Citation
Herman, or, The little preacher

Material Information

Title:
Herman, or, The little preacher Little threads, and The story Lizzie told
Portion of title:
Little preacher
Added title page title:
Little threads
Added title page title:
Story Lizzie told
Creator:
Prentiss, E ( Elizabeth ), 1818-1878
Crane, Walter, 1845-1915 ( Illustrator )
Evans, Edmund, 1826-1905 ( Engraver )
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
B. Pardon and Son ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London ;
Edinburgh ;
New York
Publisher:
Thomas Nelson and Sons,
Thomas Nelson and Sons
Manufacturer:
Pardon and Son
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1874
Language:
English
Physical Description:
251, [30] p., [4] leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children and death -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Teachers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Students -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Clergy -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1873 ( local )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1874 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1874
Genre:
Family stories ( local )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
General Note:
Fronispiece printed in colors; illustrations engraved by Evans after Crane.
Statement of Responsibility:
by the author of "The flower of the family," "Stepping heaven-ward, " "Susy's six birthdays, " etc., etc.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
ALH6717 ( NOTIS )
24339020 ( OCLC )
026924548 ( AlephBibNum )

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The Baldwin Library

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RmB ssi
Florida





HERMAN;

OR,

THE LITTLE PREACHER.











meRMAN;

Or, The Kittle Preacher.

LITTLE THREADS.

AND

THE STORY LIZZIE TOLD.

*
BY THE AUTHOR OF

“Tue FLOWER oF THE Famizy,” “Stepping HeaveNwarp,” “ LItTLe
Susy’s Six Birtu-Days,” BTC, ETC. .







LONDON:
THOMAS’ NELSON AND SONS,
: EDINBURGH AND NEW YORK,

1874,



i)
ru





HERMAN; OR, THE LITTLE PREACHER.

CHAPTER T.

Y a little village of the Black Forest there
sat, one Sunday afternoon, on a bench before
i] a cottage-door, two persons, engaged in con-
versation, a man and a woman. Both were tall and
well made; both ruddy and fair; and the striking
likeness they bore each other made it seem probable
that they were sisterand brother. In reality they were
mother and son.

“Tam getting on in the world vastly well without
your blessed father,” she was saying. ‘‘ People tell me
I have no sooner touched a bit of land than it begins
to bear gold.”

“T hope I have inherited that faculty,” he returned,
laughing, “ for to tell the truth, mother, I came up to-
day to invite you to my wedding.”

“Your wedding! And when did I give you leave
to take a wife, Max Steiner ?”

Max moved uneasily in his seat,





2 Herman ;

“You seem to forget that I am no longer a boy,” he
said.

“There is no danger,” she retorted, “ while you act
like one.”

Max rose to his feet. a

‘Good-bye, mother,” he said.

“Sit down, you foolish child. And when is this
famous wedding to come off?”

“Next week. Doris said—”

“Doris! What Doris?” :

“ Ah! mother, you know; the old school-master’s
Doris.”

“ And what does she bring you?” .

“ Not much besides herself and her mother.”

“Her mother! That shall never be !”

“'There’s no use arguing about it,” said Max ;'“1
can’t have one without the other.”

“Then I forbid the marriage.”

“ Mother,” said Max, “I am a full-grown man. I
am able to manage my own affairs, and mean to do it.
It is true we shall have to begin in a small way, and
if I could help it I would not have the expense or
bother of a mother-in-law in the house; but I
can’t help it.”

“Now, there is the miller’s Lore will have a dowry:
worth looking: after; take her Max, and I’ say no
more against your marrying. A mother-in-law in the
house is like a crackling thorn ; meddling and ordering
will be her only business. And you are one to be
master in your own house.”

“T rather think I am,” said Max, setting his teeth
together ; “and that is one reason why I have fixed



Or, the. Little Preacher. 3

upon Doris. She is as quiet as a little mouse, and will
oppose me in nothing.”

“‘T hate your little mice !” she cried.

‘Well, mother, there’s just where we differ. TI like
them.”

“You know very well that Doris’s mother has never
let her say that her soul was her own. She has kept
her always pinned to her side, singing hymns and
saying prayers ; otherwise she would have goneflaunting
and giggling about, like all the other girls.”

“ At any rate, you can’t deny that she is the prettiest
girl in the village,” said Max.

“ Humph !”

“ And when a man once gets to loving a girl—”

“He loves her, does he? ‘To think of that, now!
Ha! ha! And perhaps he is in love with the girl’s
mother also !”

“Well, then, if it comes to that, I do love her!”
cried Max, rising angrily from his seat. ‘I don’t pre-
tend to say prayers or to sing hymns myself, but I
should like a wife none the less for doing both, if she
took care not to do it in a canting way. And, at all
events, the thing is settled; I shall marry Doris, and
nobody else !”

He seized his cap, and with rapid strides proceeded
homeward, down the mountain-path that led to his own
village.

“Thank Heaven, one does not have to marry one’s
mother!” he said to himself. “Ishall get on better
with Doris. Two red-haired people in one house is too
much. Iam thankful she is not quick-tempered as my
mother is and as I am.”



4 flerman ;

Doris was the daughter of the school-master, and had
been brought up in great poverty and to much hard
work. Her father had taught her all he knew himself,
which, to be sure, was not much ; and had been dead some
years. Her mother had been trained in the hard school
of sorrow ; all she had left was this one child, out of a
home once full of sons and daughters, But, in reality,
she possessed a character disciplined and tempered to the
last degree of sweetness and cheerfulness ; she was rich
in faith, rich in love to God and man, rich in foretastes
of a life to come, in which there should never be felt
the sting of poverty, where even the shadow of death
could never fall.

“Dear mother,” said Doris, “I am asking a great
deal of you when I ask you to leave our native village,
and go with me to a new home.”

“ Nay, my Doris, but it is I who ask a great deal
in going there. It is true, I do not gladly leave
our dear Herr Pastor, who has taught me so much;
and our good neighbours we shall miss likewise! But
that will pass, and I shall try to make Max’s home
happy.”

“There's no doubt of that !” said Doris, smiling ; “ but
I know you always hoped to die where you have lived
so long, and I know it is going to be hard for you to
make this change. But Max says he cannot and will
not live here, so near his mother. She vexes and
frets him so.” |

The marriage took place, and Max established his
wife as comfortably as he could in the house adjoining
the little shed where he carried on his business—for he
was a carpenter. The lessons of economy, instilled



Or, the Little Preacher. 5

into him by his mother, bore their fruit in his new
home, where even the necessaries of life were dealt out
with a careful hand.

Doris entered with docility into all his wishes ; she
ordered her household discreetly, wasted nothing,
and knew no idle-moment. Her mother helped her
in all the tasks ‘suited to her strength; she was no
crackling thorn, but left Max full liberty to be master
in his own house. Though she was never gay, as
Doris was in moments of exuberant health and happi-
ness, she was so uniformly cheerful that the very sun-
shine itself hardly did so much to give light within the
house.

As for Max, he was upright and industrious ; he
wasted neither time nor money at the ale-house, and
worked early and late, indoors and out.

Twice every Sunday they all put on their holiday
clothes, locked the house door, and went to. church.
When at night Max put off these garments, he put off,
with them, all thought of religion, and gave himself up
to toil and worldly care, and making and saving. Doris
never owned, even to herself, that he had his faults ;
that he was too proud to be affectionate and demon-
strative, and that the hard race to make money was
sharpening and fevering a temper not naturally good.
She took care not to run against his peculiarities —
as far, at least, as she knew how; and, above all,
she loved him with the truc-hearted loyalty of a
faithful woman. Let anyone dare to say aught
against her Max, and this “quiet mouse” of his
had fire and passion enough in reserve to consume
the offender.



6 Herman ;

In less than a year after their marriage she had spun
linen enough to purchase a cow ; accordingly, Max went
to market in a neighbouring village to choose one for
her.

Here he met his mother stalking about as with seven-
leagued boots, buying and eee

‘“ And what are you doing here ?” cried she,

“My Doris has sent me to buy a cow,” he returned ;
“the money she has earned herself.”

“ So you are already her errand-boy! And how is
the dear mother-in-law ?”

“She is never very strong; but we get on wonder-
fully together.”

“That sounds very well, But with one’s mother
one may safely speak out. Now let’s have the truth,
Max. She meddles and makes, does she? Ah! but
did not I warn you in season ?”

“ Mother, why will you try to exasperate me every
time we meet? There is nothing to be said against
Doris’s mother.”

“And the miller’s Lore has married the baker's ©
Franz, and has gone to live near you, they say. Think,
whenever you see her, what you have lost.”

Max turned away full of disgust, and bought the
cow with a ruffled spirit.. The poor creature could not
imagine what she had done that she should be driven
to her new home with so many needless blows.

Doris came out to admire the purchase, and did not
trouble herself with the thought that all the creature
ate was to be sought for and carried to her by her
own hands. She cut grass by the wayside, and
brought home bundles of clover on her head. The



Or, the Little Preacher. 7

cow cost them nothing but this labour, and her
milk was a great comfort to them. The neighbours
whispered among themselves that Doris gave away
milk that had not been skimmed, now and then, and
wondered if Max knew of this extravagance. If Max
did not know it, it was because her right hand never
knew what was done by the left when a case of real
distress appeared.

Thus things went on, till one day there came a new
joy and a new care into the house.

“He’s a beautiful boy, dear Max,” said Doris, look-
ing fondly down upon her first-born son. “ He is such
a funny little likeness of you that I can’t help laughing
every time I look at him!”

“He has the red hair of the Steiners, and will have
their hot blood,” said Max.

“Red!” cried Doris. “Now, Max!”

“There’s a tinge of red in it, I am sure,” persisted
Max. “And a fiery young colt you will have in
him.”

“ Don’t you like him, then?” asked Doris.

“The child is well enough,” replied Max.

“T daresay you will laugh at me, Max, but I must
tell you what a strange dream I had last night. 1
thought we were in the church, and that it was beauti-
fully lighted up, and everybody had on a new holiday
suit. You had:silver buttons to your scarlet vest, and
silver buckles at the knees, and looked as you did on
our wedding-day. And when the Herr Pastor rose in
the pulpit, who should he be but our son, our little
Herman here, grown to be a man, and actually become
a clergyman !”



8 : Herman;

“A very silly dream,” returned Max. “I don’t
look much like silver buckles, nor doze that little lump
of dough look much like a parson.”

Having now said and done all that.the occasion
seemed to require, Max resumed his pipe, and ‘cut
short the interview with his first-born. Doris soon
heard, through the open window, the sound of chop-
ping and sawing.

“Ah!” she said joyfully to herself, “dear Max is
making the bench under the linden-tree that he has
promised so long. Yes, my-Herman, a nice seat for us
in summer evenings, when you and your sisters and
brothers will be playing about us. For brothers and
sisters you must have, my little man, otherwise you
will pine for lack of playfellows.”

Meanwhile Max worked steadily at the bench, and
he, too, had visions of children to come. But they
were not “playing about.” They were collecting fuel,
and cutting grass and clover; they were gathering
berries and hunting for eggs ; they were taking care of
the cattle and feeding the hens; they were making
amends, by every shift and turn, for all the money
and all the trouble they cost.

Little Herman grew up to boyhood, and the other
children followed at intervals. During his early years,
when his mother had always a baby on hand, he was
the especial charge of his grandmother. Though the
red hair rather existed in Max’s imagination, Herman
had inherited the quick, passionate temper of the
Steiners; he was morbidly sensitive, morbidly excit-
able and enthusiastic, and in his affections was a little
volcano.



Or, the Little Preacher. 9

Pride, however, made him conceal what he felt, as
much as possible ; but volcanoes will have their erup-
tions ; and there were times when he poured out his
love upon his mother and his grandmother in a way
that almost frightened them. Otherwise he was truth-
fulness personified, and conscientious to the last degree.

Max did not understand or know how to manage
him. He found him awkward with his hands, unlucky
with his footsteps, and dull with his brain. For Her-
man did nothing he was taught to do in the right way;
was continually falling down and stumbling about, and
could not learn the clock, even under the persuasive
influence of the rod. There did not seem to be much
promise that the child would ever make a successful car-
penter, and Max was dissatisfied with him accordingly.

Doris, on the other hand, loved him for the very
eagerness and enthusiasm that made him so. often get
into trouble; she was sorry for him that his temper
was so passionate, because she saw the shame and pain
it caused him. She would not believe he was dull,
but she could not give any reason for her opinion, save
that he looked as bright as other children. And she
always wound up with the mental conclusion :

“At any rate, he loves me so !”

The grandmother took advantage of his ardent tem.-
perament, and trained him to be a most religious child.
Ske talked to him about his dear Lord and Master till
he caught the glow and fervour of her affections; she
made him feel that nothing is too much to do or to
suffer for Christ Jesus our Saviour; so that if he had
lived in the days of persecution, he would have gone, a
radiant little martyr, straight to the stake.



10 Herman ;

Max’s nearest neighbour’s, the Géschens, had a son
not far from Herman’s age. He was a good-natured,
roguish fellow, and the two boys were naturally
thrown together at school—and, by the way, Max
made Herman shrink from Kurt with a. certain aver-
sion, by continually holding him up to him as the
model by which he would have him shape his life.

“ Don’t get into such a passion! Neighbour’s Kurt
never does,”

“Chop the wood faster! Neighbour’s Kurt does it
twice as fast.”

“What will you make of our Herman?” Doris one
night asked Max, when, after displaying more than
usual inaptitude for what his father wished him to do,
the boy had gone, with flushed cheeks and tearful eyes,
to bed.

“T really don’t know,” said Max, “I never saw such
a boy in my life. But of course I must teach him my
own trade.”

“ But will he ever learn it ?”

* He must learn.”

“Our Minna is very different from Herman,” said
Doris; “already she is of great use to me. And
Bernhard will perhaps be less troublesome than Her-
man.”

“As to that, he is coming on in much the “same
way.”

“People say he is so handsome,” said Doris.

The words carried Max back to the days of his
courtship and marriage, when he had regarded Doris
as such a pretty girl.

“T will own that he looks like you,” he vouchsafed.



Or, the Little Preacher. Il

“Do you know, Doris, I have been looking over my
account-book, and find things look very well? There
is Hans Godschen drinking himself to death and spend-
ing as fast as he earns. Think, now, you came near
marrying that fellow.”

“Indeed, that is not true!” cried Doris.

“ Well, he came near marrying you, then, only you
had your abiesuons. As to Herman, a carpenter he
surely shall be.”

“Tf there was anything else he could learn. easicr,”
suggested Doris.

“Yes; you would make a regular gitl of him if I
would permit,” said Max. “ But I will not permit it ;
the moment he is old enough to be of use to me, I
shall take him from school and set him to work. He
shall clean the stable—on that you may depend. He
shall cut short fodder for the cattle, morning and
night. He shall collect our fuel, and make our fires.
Yes, my BORE shall do as did their fathers before
them.”

Doris dared say no more. She went silently on
with her spinning, oppressed with anxiety, yet not
knowing what better could be done for Herman than
all his father proposed to do.

After a time she ventured to ask :

“ Shall you buy more cattle at the market to-
morrow 2”

“Why not?” returned Max.

There was no more said that night, and long before
daybreak Max was up and away.

The children studied their lessons as usual from four
o'clock till six, and then each had their own business



12 Ferman ;

to attend to. Herman must look after the cattle, and
cut short fodder for them, and put fresh water into the
drinking-trough. Little Minna helped her mother to
sweep the house, to arrange the breakfast-table, and 6
wash the dishes. She was a fair-haired, veritable little
woman, always composed and quiet, and, young as she
was, a real helper within doors and without. Bernhard
was to look after the hens and the geese and little
Adolph, and his office was one of no small life and stir.

By the time they should set off for school, every
thing was in perfect order, and Doris was ready to sit
down to spin, and the old grandmother to take her
knitting and go to her beloved seat under the linden-
tree. Herman and Minna were to knit all the way to
school, for the walk was long. Each carried a little
basket on the arm, to hold the ball of yarn, and the
slice of bread and the baked apple which were to serve
as lunch.

“Do you know, Herman,” said Minna, “that last
night, after we were in bed, the dear grandmother
wound our yarn on a bit of money? Yes, really and
truly on a silver-piece !”

“No!” said Herman, incredulously.

“Yes, really and truly. Mother was saying that our
stockings grew so slowly, and grandmother laughed,
and said that winding the yarn on a bit of money made
the stocking grow faster.”

“How could it?” asked Herman. .

“Why, don’t you see that we shall be in such a
hurry to get at our money that we shall knit day
and night?”

“Pooh! J shan’t,” said Herman. “TI hate to knit.



Or, the Little Preacher. 13

I wish I, lived in a country where only women and
girls knit the stockings.” ef

“Ts there such a country?” asked Minna.

“To be sure there is. Look here, Minna. Isn’t
this flower pretty 1”

“Yes, I suppose so,” said Minna, indifferently.

‘Here are some more, quite different. Look, this
is beautiful.”

“Don’t keep asking me to look,” said Minna. “I
am setting the heel of my stocking, and counting the
stitches.”

“How nice it is to have father gone all day
Herman.

“Tt’s very naughty to say that,” Minna felt con-
strained to say, though it obliged her to recount her
stitches.

_ Herman wondered if it was really naughty, and one
thought leading to another, he was silent until they
reached the door of the school.

!” said



CHAPTER II.

ERE the children acquitted themselves as
they usually did. Minna repéated her
lessons with perfect accuracy, word for
aad Her cool and quiet mind applied itself with-
out let or hindrance to the task before it, and all her
sums came right, and all her work was well done.
Herman, if allowed ‘to repeat his lessons in his own
words, would have done well also. But the teacher
required the exact words of the text, and it was next
to impossible to the child to commit words to memory.
He was sent back to his seat in disgrace, feeling guilty
~ and ashamed, aware that all the other children were
laughing at him, and puzzled to know how he hap-
pened to be so stupid and all the other children so
clever. When it came to the writing lesson, things
were no better. He got the ink all over his hands
and blotted every page; the teacher took him by the
shoulder, shook him soundly, and declared that he
never would learn to write. Neighbour’s Kurt pinched
him slyly, and made him start suddenly and upset his
inkstand ; another shaking from the teacher followed
speedily. Herman cried with shame and anger, and
wiped away his tears with his inky hands till he made






Herman ; or, the Little Preacher. 5

a perfect fright of himself. But he was used to being
miserable, and to getting over it; so when school was
done, and they all went scampering homeward, he
recovered his spirits, and laughed and ran and shouted
as gaily as the rest, though with less of their thought-
less light-heartedness. The sufferings of children are
as real as those of their elders; but how much more
easily they are supplanted by passing joys!

Doris was sitting under the linden-tree, with her
mother, when the boys reached home.

“Has father come?” was the first question ; and on
learning that he had not, they threw themselves and
their satchels on the ground at their mother’s feet, with
a sense of rest and comfort that the long walk and the
fatigue of school made very pleasant.

“‘ Mother,” said Herman, “I wish I had something
alive to love. I haven't anything but Minchen, and
she isn’t my own cat, but Minna’s.”

“ Am I, then, not alive?” asked Doris, laughing.

Herman jumped up and threw his arms around her
neck for answer.

* You hurt me, Herman,” she said. “Is it neces-
sary to choke people because you love thera?”

Herman ‘coloured, and darted away. It was many a
day before his mother got another such embrace.

He threw himself upon the ground again, and lay
a long time silent. The scene on which he gazed with
some latent sense of its majesty and beauty was made
up of snow-capped mountains, green valleys, pine
forests, and quaint little cottages almost hidden by the
fruit-trees with which they were encompassed. No-
thing wes wanting to its porfection but the peaceful



16 Herman ;

groups of cattle grazing on hill-side and plain, which
with us are one of the elements in every rural scene.
What would one of our cows think had happened to
her, should she suddenly find herself shut out from
the free air of heaven, to pass her life in seclusion, like
a pet bird in its cage, as do her foreign relatives ?
“Mother,” said Herman when he had recovered
from her little rebuke, “what makes people feel like
' erying when they look at mountains and such things?”

“ Asif they ever did!” returned his mother absently.

“Well, but they do, mother,” persisted Herman.

‘Then I suppose they’re homesick,” she said.

“How can they be homesick when they’re always
at home?” urged Herman.

“J can’t imagine what you are talking about,” said
Doris. “ But let me ask you one question. Have you
cut the short fodder for the cow?”

Herman started up, looking alarmed and guilty.

“Will father soon be here?” he asked anxiously.

At that moment a boy not much older than himself
appeared, leading a white calf by a cord.

“Here comes neighbour's Kurt,” said Doris. “He
has been to meet his father. They must be close at
hand. Run, Herman; get to the stable at once.”

Herman ran; but the white calf was too much for
him. He stopped to pat it, and begged the privilege
of leading it a little way.

“Tt is my own,” said Kurt. “ Bought with my own
money. Isn't it a big, strong fellow?”

“Its a beauty,” said Herman; and he knelt down
and pressed his cheek to its pure white face.

Never had the word money meant anything to him



Or, the Little Preacher. 17

before. But now it meant a beautiful, soft, live crea-
ture to feed, to caress, to love; to live in a little stable
built by his own hands! That stocking must be
_ finished, and grandmother must wind him another ball
of yarn!

He felt such delight when he saw the docile creature
follow him, that he could not find for it enough endear-
ing names.

“You are a regular bossy-calf yourself,” said Kurt,

laughing. “I should think you were talking to your
sweetheart.”
. Herman coloured, and took care to say no more.
Suddenly it flashed across his mind that he had not yet
attended to the cow. He darted off once more in the
direction of. the stable, where his father received him
with a box on the ear that would have knocked him
down, had not another on the opposite ear restored the
balance. He resented the blow, yet dared not show -
his anger. ye

“T did not mean to disobey, father,” he said ; “but I
just stopped to look at neighbow’s Kurt, who has a
white calf of his own.”

“You're a white calf yourself,” was the answer.
“ All you are fit for is to have a rope tied round your
neck, and to be led through the village for people to
look at.”

“Yes, father,” said Herman, now thoroughly hum-
bled. He felt that he must indeed be a calf who had
been called so twice within ten minutes. He fell to
cutting the fodder as fast as he could; but his eyes
were full of tears, and he cut his fingers again and
again. His father had brought home another cow, and



18 Herman ;

Doris and her mother and all the children came out to
see it. Little Adolph was made to pat the new-comer
with his fat hand, and to bid her welcome. He held
in his arms a remarkable wooden horse, which Max
had brought from the fair. It possessed a rampant tail
of an uncompromising character, and was adorned with
a hen’s feather in its head, to give it a martial air.

They were soon seated around the supper-table, where
Max appeared in unusual spirits, and had much to tell
about the sayings and doings of the fair. Lvidently
it had been a prosperous day with him, for instead of
working all the evening, he wrote in his account-book
with an air of satisfaction.

“T shall buy a bit more land to-morrow,” he said to
Doris. “Things are looking very well. We shall
have more fruit than we shall know what to do with in
the autumn, and I have arranged to exchange a part of
it for meal. And you will soon finish your fifty yards
- of linen ; and linen, in these times, is pure gold.”,

All he had in his head Max had now outspoken.
Making money and sparing money was to his mind the
chief end of man. As for his harsh ways with his
children, he never dreamed of their not being the per-
fection of good management.

Poor Herman! He who might literally have been
led by the silken thread of love and kindness, was
driven by brute force well-nigh to desperation.

“There were no cones for lighting the fire this morn-
ing,” said Doris.

“The children must bring some, then,” said Max.
“ Send them before school.”

aman and Bernhard exchanged clanees of dismay.



Or, the Little Preacher, 19

“Then may we learn our lessons to-night, father ?”
asked Herman.

“No,” said Max. “You should not have let your
mother get out of cones.”

“Tt was my fault,” said Doris ; “I did not observe
that the supply was so low.”

The boys therefore worked at toy-making, under
their father’s eye, all the evening. Their ee were
heavy, and their hands awkward, and Doris sat pain-
-fully at her wheel, listening to all that went, on, and
wondering why her children were so slow to learn,
when in many things they seemed so bright and full of
life and energy.

The next morning she whispered to the children to take
their books with them when they went to the forest.

“Once there,” said she, “gather the cones with
might and main; then sit down and study in the same
way. I cannot bear to think of you all being chas-
tised at school.”

The children set off with lght aes and under
the stimulus of the excitement of studying in such hot
haste, Herman learned his lessons well, and for once
received a gracious word from the master.

On their return from school they were all set to
gathering fruit. They had quantities of plums which
they helped their mother to spread in the sun to dry.

“Tt is almost time for the long vacation,” said Minna.
“Then we shall not have to go to school, and can help
mother so much.”

The long autumnal vacation was Herman’s special
aversion. The object of it was to give the children
of the peasantry time to help in the harvest-time,



20 Flerman ;

The lower classes had to glean in the fields of more
prosperous neighbours, with bags suspended from their
necks; and there was every variety of work to do in
preparation for the winter.

Herman was thus brought into contact with his
father almost constantly, and had ample opportunity to
display his unpractical character to the utmost extent.

“What are you idling here for?” cried Max, coming
suddenly upon the child, as with book in hand, he sat
under the linden-tree on the first day of vacation.

“JT was not idling, father; I was reading,” he
replied.

“And what's the use of reading? Does it bring
cows into the stable, or meal into the sack ?”

As Herman could not maintain that either of these
results naturally flowed from books, he remained
speechless.

The look of distress and perplexity in the boy’s face
somewhat touched his father’s heart, and he said in a
milder tone :

“Books are for the rich, not for the poor. We must
have moss collected for the cows’ bedding. Go and ask.
your mother for the bags, and set off at once.”

“Ts Bernhard to go too?” asked Herman.

“ Certainly.”

The boys set off on a brisk trot, like two young
ponies, and soon had to stop to take breath.

“Do you know what I’m going to do?” asked Her-
man. ‘I’ve got a book at the bottom of the bag, and
you shall collect the moss while I read to you.”

“But that will make us get home late, and then
what will father say ?”



Or, the Little Preacher. 21

“T suppose he'll box our ears. I don’t know how
yours are, but mine have got quite used to it.”

“ But what will you do about it when you say your
prayers to-night?”

“Well, I don’t know. Do you suppose the dear
Lord isn’t willing we should read a little bit?”

“ But father thinks we are at work, and it would be
cheating for one of us to be reading.”

“Yes, I suppose it would. So here goes!” And
Herman threw himself down, and began to scramble
up the moss and to tumble it into the bag with ner-
vous haste and energy.

‘We'll work fast, and save a little time for our
book,” said Herman. ‘“ But look here, Bernhard.
Some of this moss is so pretty. Do you suppose all
the dear Lord made it for was for old cows to sleep
on?”

“T don’t know,” said Bernhard. “If we could get
time, we might find cut in some book. But we never
shall get time.”

“Tl tell you what I read somewhere, once. There
are some large cities, not very far from here, where men
sit in their houses all day, reading. They get so that
they know almost everything. Now, if I was rich, I
could do the same. Then I should not be for ever
tumbling about, and hurting myself, and tearing and
wearing my clothes, and father wouldn’t be scolding ;
and, Bernhard, you should do the same. For next
to me, father scolds you.”

“Yes,” said Bernhard, sighing. “Take care, Her-
man !”

But the warning came too late. In the ardour of



22 Herman ;

his talk, Herman had left his work and climbed a high
rock which was covered with moss and slippery ; and
climbing with him always ended in a fall. He lay
now upon the ground, bruised and sore.

“Oh dear!” he cried. “How am I ever to get
home ?”

“Are you hurt so dreadfully?” asked Bernhard,
beginuing to cry. ;

“Tt isn’t the hurt I mind,” answered Herman,
sharply. “But don’t you see my clothes, how they
have split to pieces? You needn’t go to talking as if
I minded getting hurt, when you know all I care for is
father’s scolding so !”

But in an instant, seeing Bernhard’s colour change,
he was ashamed of having spoken so impatiently.

“T didn’t mean to say anything to plague you,” he
said; “only when I think how angry father will be,
I don’t know what I’m about.”

“Tt’s no matter,” said Bernhard. “ Perhaps mother
won't tell father.”

“She'll have to tell him. Else how am I to get
new clothes?”

Dragging their bags of moss after them, the boys
walked sadly homeward.

On seeing the plight he was in, Doris laid down the
potato she was peeling, in order to clasp her hands with
horror.

“ What will the dear father say?” she cried. “ And
it is such an unlucky moment, too, for he is just a
little out of humour. And he is so seldom out of
humour! Oh, Herman!” she added, with tears in her
eyes, “how can you give me so much trouble? Don’t



Or, the Little Preacher. 23

you know that it hurts me more to have you punished
than it would to be punished myself?”

This was a new view of things to Herman. He
rushed out to the little shed at the end of the house
where his father was at work.

“Father !” he cried, “you may do anything to me
you've a mind, only don’t let dear mother know. You
may beat me, or knock me down and kick me—I don’t
care how much it hurts—only please, father, please
don’t let mother know !”

Alas for the child born and bred among the coarse
natures nurtured in the rough wilds of the Black
Forest !

What punishment Max, in his anger, inflicted on the
generous child was never known save by the father
who dealt the blows and the boy who bore them in
silence, lest his mother should hear.

When it was all over, and Herman went back to the
house, he instinctively crept to his grandmother for
refuge. He did not think, but he felt, that she would
have more courage to bear the sight of him than his
mother could; not because she loved him less, but
because she always bore up so in times of trouble.

“Do you think I might put on my Sunday clothes i.
he whispered, stealing to her side. :

“Who tore these?”

“JT did, partly.”

« And who else ?”

“Father did, a little,” replied Herman. _

His grandmother rose and sought for the Sunday
clothes.

‘
* T know 9 hoy who has more reason at this moment



24 flerman ;

to feel unhappy than even you, dear Herman,” she
said, ‘Do you know our neighbour Gischen has just
been carried past the house, dead? And the last words
his Kurt spoke to him were angry words.”

Herman shuddered. He resolved never to speak an
angry word to anyone he loved, as long as he lived.
“Td rather father would live, and whip me,” he
said, ;

“Especially if the whipping is for your good,” said
his grandmother. “And now go out to your father,
and tell him what has happened.”

Max was greatly shocked to hear what had befallen
his neighbour. He hurried out to learn the particulars
of this sudden death, and when he came back was so
quict and subdued, that Doris ventured to tell him
that Herman must have new clothes,

For a time there was a lull in the tempest. Max
was less severe, and the children more attentive ; among
them all, incredible deeds were done by way of pre-
paration for the winter; and the long vacation, when
it came to a close, found them surrounded with many
comforts. Doris felt concerned for Babele Goschen,
for whom she had a certain friendship, growing out of
the fact that they had always been neighbours, rather
than from any point of sympathy with her.

Bibele, however, boasted that she was no sooner down
than she was upon her feet again; it was truly a sad
thing to lose one’s husband; but luckily there were
only two children to feed, and they were even now be-
ginning to spare and to earn. She came, a few weeks
affer the death of Hans, to spend the evening with
Doris. Max sat ona bench, and appeared to be asleep ;



Or, the Little Preacher. 25

his ears were open, however, though his eyes were
shut.

‘Well, neighbour,” Babele began, “have you got
quite ready for the winter? They say itis to be a very
bitter one.”

“We have yet a pig to kill and to care for,” said
Doris. “And my Herman has yet some fuel to
collect.”

“You should see my winter stores,” said Babele.
“There is no reason we should starve because the father
is not here to eat with us. He never could wish such
a piece of folly as that. I have laid in plenty of fuel ;
and of plums and other dried fruit, and of meal, we
shall have no lack. We have hay for the cattle, and
corn forthe hens and the geese. My Kurt makes me
almost forget that I have no husband; he thinks of
everything and attends to everything like aman. Next
news, he will be sitting at the tavern, and drinking his
beer on holidays as his father did before him.”

“ My Herman is a good, kind boy,” said Doris.

“My Kurt,” continued Babele, “is born with a
natural gift at a bargain. Imust tell you how he has
managed to get off potatoes and plums for a big, likely
calf. Ha! ha! He'll make his way in the world !”

“My Bernhard takes the whole care of little
Adolph,” said Doris. ‘“ When the child is with Bern-
hard, I need never give him a thought.”

“And there’s my Lizette,” pursued Babele, “she
already beats me at spinning. You must see her chest
of linen. Upon my word, whoever gets her to wife
will find her well clothed, to say the least of it. Not
to speak of the four silver spoons inherited by her from



26 Herman ;

our relative the Baumeisterin. For we have high-bred
people to our kin.”

“Yes,” said Doris, pursuing also the thread of her
discourse, “and my Minna is a discreet little maiden,
who never gives me acare. If you will believe it, sho
has to-day made a pie almost entirely with her own
hands. You shall see it with your own eyes.” And
Doris displayed a pie a foot and a half wide, filled with
plums, split open, the open side being uppermost, and
presenting an attractive aspect.

“ The question is, is the pie fit to eat?” cried neigh-
bour Godschen. “Who could believe that such a child
could make a pie one could tolerate?”

This crafty speech had its desired effect. Doris ran
for a knife and a plate, and cut the pie in eager haste,
even forgetting to look at Max to see if he were really
asleep.

The complaisant neighbour devoured a generous
portion.

“T can’t exactly say what was left out in the mak-
ing,” she said. “Spice, I think. I can tell better
after trying another piece. Nay, I believe it is the
sugar the child has forgotten. ‘Well, to oblige you I
will force down yet a third morsel, though I could not
do it for a stranger ; let me see, it is not the sugar after
all, it is actually too sweet; yes, the pie, for a beginner,
will do extremely well. The crust being tough, and
there not being enough sugar, I mean there being too
‘ much sugar, are things of no great consequence after
all. But if one really wants to see pie that is abso-
lutely a miracle, one should see my Lizette’s.”

At this juncture Max saw fit to awake, and to



Or, the Little Preacher. 27

look with displeasure at the enormous hole neighbour
Goschen had made in the pie intended for his supper.

“We shall drop in and get a taste of Lizette’s pie,”
he said dryly.

“Do, neighbour. And at the same time you shall
see our pig. "The very finest in all the Black Forest,
_ you may depend. Doris, Pll try yet another morsel

of your Minna’s pie, just to give the child a pleasure.
And if you will some day send her to my house, Lizette
shall teach her how to make one that is really eatable.”

By this time Doris was subdued to that degree that
she had no more to say about her children, and Bibele
Goschen thenceforth pursued her discourse without
interruption.

As soon as she had gone, Max was magnanimous
enough to say to Doris, while he bestowed upon her
his highest mark of friendship, namely, a good slap
upon her shoulders :

“Thank Heaven that I married you instead of that
chattering magpie.”

“ But think how much she gets out of her children,”
said Doris.

“That is true. But one can’t have everything in a
wife,” said Max, regretfully.

The vacation being over, the children went back to
school, and little Adolph was thrown now entirely on
his mother’s hands.. His grandmother was very feeble
at this time, and suffering greatly with rheumatism.
While Doris was busy with her household affairs,
therefore, Adolph.was equally busy in getting into
every conceivable kind of mischief.

On coming home from school the first day, and



28 Herman ;

inquiring for his little charge, Bernhard was informed
that Adolph had been missing for more than half an
hour.

“ He has not gone out of doors, has he, mother?”

“Oh no,” replied Doris. ‘He is safe somewhere,
and if he knew I was about to make kneepfles for
supper, I am sure he would come out from his hiding-
place.”

And sure enough, there immediately emerged from
beneath the bed a little figure on all-fours, with tangled
hair, adorned with five krtting-needles, and arms, legs,
and body involved in a maze of blue yarn.

“Tf Adolph hasn’t becu and ravelled out my stock-
ing!” cried Herman. “My very stocking that was
almost done! And Minna said grandmother wound
my ball on a piece of money! Adolph! what have
you done with the money?”

Adolph cast his eyes downward, and looked stead-
fastly at his left hand, which was doubled firmly over
the little silver piece.

At this moment Max entered. Adolph knew enough,
on seeing his father, to behave with «propriety on the
instant, and dropped the money forthwith.

“Where did the child get that money?” asked Max
with displeasure.

The children all began to explain together.

As soon as he fairly understood the case, Max tossed
the money into the grandmother's lap.

“Tt is quite enough for Doris to spoil the children,”
he said, “without getting others to help her.”

No one dared to say a word. Minna patiently dis-
entangled Adolph from his net, and wound the yarn



Or, the Little Preacher, — 29

on’a bit of paper. Herman had now all his work to do
over again, without the agreeable prospect of finding
his labour rewarded when his task was done. He felt
reckless and disgusted. All the evening he showed
that he felt so, and Max at last sent him to bed in
disgrace.

Thus everything fell back into the old way, each
successive day alienating the boy more and more from
his father,.and making Max more and more severe and
unreasonable, a

The winter was one of unusual rigour, and it was
necessary to use more fuel than ever,



CHAPTER III.



PyeqNE night after the children were in bed,
@, Max sat looking over his account-book in
ISSA] =a morose way, and at length he said :

“Tl tell you what it is, Doris, it is time that boy
left school and came to help me in my work. I have
more orders than I can fill. The Herr Pastor has
already waited for his new table three weeks, and there
are also many other persons clamouring for work that
must be done. I need help, and help I must have.”

“ He is very young to leave school,” said Doris.

“That is of no consequence. He can read and
write, and add and divide; what else is there to
learn? And, at any rate, he never would make a
scholar, for the school-master says he is a dull boy—
the very dullest in school. I wonder what I have
done that I must be the father of such a. good-for-
nothing ?”

Doris dared make no answer. To hide her tears,
she went to see if the children were well covered in
their little beds.

Herman was wide awake, and his glittering eyes
showed that he had heard what had passed.

“Oh, mother!” he whispered, throwing his arms




is





Ferman; ov, the Little Preacher. 31

about her, “ why did our dear Lord make such a good-
for-naught ?”

_ “Hush, dear Herman, I can’t talk to you now. Go
to sleep like a good boy.”

“Tam not a good boy, and I can’t get to sleep,” he
answered,

“What's all that noise when I’m casting up
accounts ?” cried Max. “Ha! I wish I had been taught
the addition table when I was a boy. There’s no great
fun in counting on one’s fingers with half a dozen
people talking, and putting you out.”

“TJ don’t think Herman has learned it yet,” said
Doris, catching eagerly at this straw. “You surely
will not take him from school until he has done so,
seeing how bad it is not to know it?”

“He shall learn it at home,” said Max; “T’ll begin
with him to-morrow. Or no, to-morrow I must go up
the mountain after fuel. Seems to me you burn a
great deal more than you need, Doris.”

“J will try to be more careful,” she said. “And
Max, won’t you let me teach Herman his tables? You
know how hard it is for him'to commit to memory,
and how he tries your patience ; and, dear Max, don’t
be angry with me, but perhaps you don’t notice how
afraid he is of you, and how many blunders he makes
because he is in such terror.”

“There’s no use in arguing with me,” replied Max.
“The: boy is the plague of my life, and always will be ;
but I cannot leave him to you to be petted and spoiled.
If anybody can beat a thing into his head, I can, and
if worst comes to worst, I will set him to watch the
geese,” :



32 Hlerman ;

“Nay, you never will degrade him to that extent!”
cried Doris.

“ Yes, a goose-boy he shall be, unless he improves !”
cried Max, “And to-morrow, at any rate, he shall not
go to school. I must have him and Bernhard help me
on the mountain to-morrow.”

“ Would you let me go in their place ?”

“¢ No,” he answered, “and twice over, noI say! It
will do for the Herr Pastor to tell me once that I let
my wife work too hard for one in her station. I don't
care to hear the same tune twice.”

There was no more to be said. And Doris could not
help feeling a little relieved, since it must be so, that
Herman was to leave school—learning his lessons was
such a painful, laborious process to him. And then if
he was so dull, as the teacher declared he was, what
was the use of trying to make him learn?

But with her true motherly instincts she felt that he
was not dull, and her heart yearned over him with
fresh love and sympathy.

Herman slept little that night, for he now felt
thoroughly degraded and heart-broken. Neither could
he force down the breakfast he needed before encounter-
ing the cold and fatigue before him. .

Doris watched for a moment in which to speak a
tender word to him.

“Don’t be cast down, dear child,” she said; “ per-
haps our dear Lord knows of something you can do
well, and when the time comes will let you know what
itis. Meanwhile try to be a good boy, and vex the dear
father as little as possible; you know he is so seldom
vexed,”



Or, the Little Preacher. Bo

“Oh! I do wish we were not so poor,” said Herman.
“Poor! who says we are poor?” cried Doris, clasp-
ing her hands in amazement, “ who says we are poor?”

“ But do rich people go out to collect fuel ?”

“ Herman !” said Doris, trying now to be severe, “is
it possible that you are a lazy boy ?”

“Tm afraid Iam,” said Herman. “ But are people
who sit all day, reading and writing, lazy?’ Because I
have read of wise men who did nothing else; and I
should like to be a wise man.”

“ Never let the dear father hear such wild words fall
from your lips!” cried Doris. “The dear father places
economy before all things.”

There was silence for a time, and Herman chopped
the fagots on which he was at work with a vague desire
to unburden himself to his mother, yet not knowing |
how.

“ As soon as I get old enough I’ll go away some-
where,” he said desperately.

Little Minna, washing the breakfast cups, would gladly
have clasped her hands at this audacious speech, but they
were too full; she therefore suppressed her emotions and
washed faithfully on,

Doris shook her head in silence, but she said to
herself :

“Tf Max drives my children away from me, I had
better die than live.”

“Come, boys, it is time to go,” said Max, hurry-
ing in.

“ Have you our dinner ready, Doris? for we shall
not be back till night.”

* Yes, here is coffee, and here are bread and potatoes.



34 Herman ;

You will roast the potatoes and warm the coffee?”
she asked.

“Yes, never fear. Bring along the cords, children.”

Doris had just time to thrust a bit of cake into
Herman’s pocket, and they were off. The village
was soon left behind them; then the little river that
traversed it was crossed on a foot-bridge, and presently
a narrow, winding path began to lead them up the
side of the mountain. They walked on in single file,
without a word, the only variety to the silent progress
being an occasional fall, the path being slippery at this
season of the year. Herman’s heart felt like lead ; it
seemed to him that even his mother was beginning to
lose sympathy with him. The thought of being taken
from school and made into a mere goose-boy tortured
him ; if possible, it seemed. worse to him now that he
was bounding up the mountain side, invigorated by the
breeze, than it did when he lay weary and discouraged
on his little bed the previous night.

Besides, the anguish then suppressed lest his father
should hear, must have vent; he lingered a little
behind the rest, then darting in among the leafless
bushes that skirted the path, he threw himself upon
the ground and burst into passionate tears and groans.

“Tm a good-for-nothing!. A good-for-nothing!” he
said to himself over and over again. And then, when
he had spent himself with crying, he looked up to the
blue sky above him, and it had for him an air of
friendliness, and there seemed to be a certain peace
in the very silence and repose of nature. He folded
his hands, and said, out of the very depths of his
heart:



Or, the Little Preacher, 35

“OQ dear Lord! can’t you help me not to be a good-
for-nothing ?”

And then he remembered that it was wrong to idle
away the time when he ought to be at work, and he
started to his feet and began to ascend the mountain
with hasty steps. As he pressed on, he wondered that
he did not overtake his father, nor hear his voice; was
it possible that he had taken the wrong path? He
stopped, and shouted with all his might, but there was
no answer, and the silence that just now seemed so
soothing appalled and oppressed him. The truth was
that, worn out by the sleepless and sorrowful night he
had passed, and relieved by the tears he had shed, the
child had actually fallen asleep for a few moments, thus
giving the others time to get out of sight and hearing.
Then, in his. haste, and only too much in accordance
with his past habits, he had chosen the wrong path,
and was every moment going further and further astray.
Unconscious of having slept, he felt sure of soon over-
taking his father, and of making up for lost time by
unusual diligence. But after a while he began to feel
some misgivings. He knew that to get lost in the
mountains was the easiest thing in the world. He
knew he should begin to suffer with hunger, and, as
night came on, with cold; but, above all, he knew
that his father would be angry—oh ! how angry ! and,
if he should perish and never be heard of more, would
perhaps feel it a mercy to be rid of him. But then his
mother! Wouldn’t she mourn for her poor lost boy?
Wouldn’t Bernhard, who loved him so, cry himself to
sleep that night? Wouldn’t even Minna, whom nothing
ever seemed to trouble, be sorry if he never came back?



36 flerman ;

He was not a timid boy, and after a few moments
of perplexity, he resolved to retrace his steps, and see
if he could not find another path. He ate half the
cake his mother had given him, as soon as he began to
feel hungry, but saved half for Bernhard.

Meanwhile Max was venting his anger at the dis-
appearance of the boy, by slashing at the trees right
and left. As fast as boughs and branches fell, Bern-
hard made them up into large bundles, and tied them
together with cords. It was hard work for such a little
fellow, but he dared not complain. Max had no doubt
that Herman was hiding somewhere to escape this
task ; Bernhard did not know what to think, but never
for one moment suspected his brother of so disgraceful
an act. As the day advanced, Max stopped his work
for a time and made a little fire, when the coffee was
warmed and the potatoes were roasted. As Bern-
hard sat dipping his bread into his coffee, he thought
anxiously of Herman, and ventured, for the first time,
to break the silence that had prevailed for so long.

“Father,” he said, ‘“‘may I go down the path a little
way, and see if I can find Herman? Perhaps he has
had a fall, and can’t get up.”

“ No,” replied Max sternly.

Bernhard dared say no more ; but he worked thence-
forth with a distracted mind, listening every few mo-
ments in hope of hearing Herman’s voice, and doing
what he had to do wearily and without heart. When,
at last, it was time to go, Max placed a bundle of fagots
upon Bernhard’s head, took a second on his own,
and the remaining ones were sent rolling and bounding
down the pathway that led homeward, They reached



Or, the Little Preacher. 37

the house just at nightfall, and everybody came out to
meet and to relieve them.

“Why, where’s Herman?” cried Doris.

Max was‘in too sullen a mood to answer.

“«Haven’t you seen him, mother?” asked Bernhard.
‘Oh, mother! then he’s lost! he’s lost!” And Bern-
hard. threw himself into her arms with a cry of anguish
that went even to his father’s heart.

“Do you mean to tell me that you have left my
Herman to perish on the mountain?” said Doris in a
hoarse voice, and confronting Max, who recoiled before
her and was still speechless.

But when he found his voice that was hoarse too.

“ Get the lantern,” he said.

Everybody was bewildered, and ran everywhere
looking for it. Max found it himself, lighted it, and
plunged out into the darkness. After a moment, hear-
ing sobs and footsteps behind him, he turned and saw
Doris and Bernhard following him.

“Go back, both of you!” he said. “The neigh-
bours will help me, but you will be in the way. Go

back, I say !”
"Tf they had withstood him, he Fond have felled
them to the earth, They went back, and Bernhard
told over and over again all there was to tell, till at
last, worn out with crying, he was made to go to bed
with the other children.

“ You must go too, mother,” said Doris.

“T cannot, dear.”

So they sat, these two, through the long hours; the
grandmother weeping silently, and with hands folded
in prayer; Doris with fevered cheeks and parched lips,



38 Flerman ;

and hands and feet of ice. There had been friction
on the wheels of her domestic life; she had had her
little cares, and vexations, and trials, but a real sorrow
she had never known. And now, in the twinkling of
an eye, this awful calamity had come upon her! Her
mind travelled back over the whole history of her
child ; she recalled all his infantine graces, all the
pretty ways of his childhood, all the intense and pas-
sionate love his boyhood had lavished on her. And
all this was gone for ever !

She walked to and fro in the room, and asked herself
if a good God could let such things be.

“Mother!” she cried at last, “I am getting be-
wildered. Tell me, is God good when He does such
terrible things to us?”

“ All my children, save you, dear, lie in God’s acre.
And your father—you know he was snatched from me
in one awful moment, when I was but young, as you
are now, my Doris. But what then? God never was
anything but good.”

Doris shook her head, and walked yet once more up
and down the room.

“You are too tired to find comfort even in Him,”
said her mother. “If you could only sleep, if but for
a moment !”

“T wish you would go to bed, mother. You know
I cannot. Tell me once more, mother, are you sure
God is good?”

Again thus solemnly adjured, the poor feeble mother
burst into tears. She held out her arms, and Doris
ran into their shelter, just as she had done when a
child.



Or, the Little Preacher. 39

“ Whatever He does, He is good,” said the mother.
“ But I believe He means to save Herman.”

“Oh, mother! He must save him! Have you told
Him so? Have you asked Him?”

“ Nay, my Doris, we may not say ‘ must’ to our dear
Lord. Surely we can trust Herman to Him?”

In her distress, Doris withdrew herself from her
mother’s arms, and went and knelt down by the side
of her bed, and tried to pray. But her tongue seemed
‘to cling to the roof of her mouth. Yet the unuttered
- prayer was heard and answered, and she rose from her
knees, comforted and cheered.

“T will make coffee for dear mother,” she said to
herself, “and have some ready for Max when he
comes. Poor Max! he must be so tired !”

She prepared the coffee, and made soup.. Yet she
dared not say to herself that either was for Herman.

These little womanly tasks beguiled her of a portion
of the weary time, and then she saw that her mother
had, at last, fallen asleep in her chair. She wrapped a
shawl carefully about her, and sitting down on the
bench by the table, laid her aching head upon it. God
gave her, as she sat there, a few moments’ sleep, though
she never knew it. How manifold are the gifts of His
opulent hand which we receive in like unconsciousness,
and for which we never thank Him !

At day-break she was startled by a footstep, and,
with a beating heart, sprang to her feet. It was Babele
Goschen, come on a visit of condolence.

“They haven’t found him?” she asked. ‘ Well, I
didn’t expect they had. Bless me, you look as if you
had a burning fever! And the dear old mother looks



40 Flerman ;

pale and tired. Ah! you should not have made her
sit up with you. You should have made her go to
bed. You remember the time my Kurt got so dread-
fully burned? I was young then, and couldn’t keep
awake, and my mother sat up with him night after
night. And she never held up her head from that
time. Weill! the old must die, and a few years more
or less can’t make much difference to them”

“Tt would make a great deal of difference to me if
I should lose my mother,” said Doris. ‘ But oh,
neighbour ! what do you think? ‘Will they find my.
Herman ?” L

“Well, as I was saying to my children, these boys
that are always wool-gathering are sure to come to
harm. Your Herman never seemed quite to have his
wits about him. Such a child needs a sound beat-
ing every night at bed-time. I cannot imagine how he
went to work to get lost. My children never get lost.
What makes yours, do you suppose ?”

“Not one of them was ever lost before,” said Doris.
“Oh, Babele ! can’t you say something to comfort me?”

“ Of course. . That’s what I came for. But it does
puzzle me to see children so different from mine.”

_“ But oh, do you think they will find him?” re-
peated Doris.

“Tt depends on where he is,” replied Babele. “If
the child keeps wandering on, he will very likely be
getting further and further away. And besides, grop-
ing about in the dark, he would be likely to get dreadful
falls. If he should fall into one of those crevices, or
down one of those deep chasms, there wouldn’t be
enough of him left to be worth bringing home, And

2



Or, the Little Preacher. 41

then again, if he does keep still, he’d perish with the
cold. Last night was bitterly cold; even our cows
were restless, and so were our pigs; and my Kurt had
to get up and pacify his white calf, it was so uneasy.
Besides, the child would soon begin to suffer with
hunger. I don’t know exactly how long it takes to
starve to death, but they say it’s an awful way to dic.
And then again—but what are you doing? You are
not listening in the least! I was going to say that
sometimes the wolves—”

Doris had risen in a frantic way, and arrayed herself
in her outer garments. She had brought forth blankets
and placed them in a ‘basket, with coffee and soup and
wine. She now proceeded to waken Minna, who still
slept profoundly.

“Keep up the fire,” she whispered, “and if the
dear father comes home, see that his breakfast is
hot.”

“Why, where are you going?” cried Babele, rising
and looking with amazement at Doris.

“Where should I go, if the mother’s heart in me
can ever beat avain after the terrible things you have
been saying?” cried Doris, turning fiercely upon her
guest. And in another moment she was gone. Babele
lifted wp her hands and slowly followed her.

“Well!” she said to herself, with a long breath,
“T never was faced by a tigress or a she-wolf, but I
rather think I know now how it would seem. And
this is what one gets for leaving one’s warm bed to
speak a word of comfort to a fellow-creature !”

She moved slowly homeward, while Doris sped
panting on her way. She was crossing the foot-bridge,



42 Herman ;

when she was confronted by Max. He looked jaded
arid dejected.

“ Where are you going, Doris?” he cried.

“To find my Herman!” she answered, trying to
pass him.

“You must not go,” he answered. “I am only
returning to seek more help, and shall conginue the
search as long as there is any hope.”

“ And how long will that be?”

Max turned away from her searching look.

“God only knows!” he said solemnly. “ But
now, Doris, go home. All that can be done, I will
cio.”

“Tl not go home,” said Doris quietly. “ Let me
pass, Max.”

“T cannot. You must go home.”

“J will not. See, Max, I never in my life disobey ed
you before, but now I must.”

He made no answer, but turned back toward the
mountain, and Doris followed him.

“Here is coffee, Max,” she said, as they reached the
path by which they were to ascend.

He shook his head and pushed onward ; then turn-
ing, he performed the first act of gallantry that had
adorned their married life, by transferring the basket -
from her head to his own. They went on in silence—
Max leading the way, Doris following—till noon-day,
when both were exhausted.

“You must take some coffee, Max,” said Doris.
“There is no use in wasting your strength by fasting.
Make a little fire and let me warm some for you. And
here is soup, too.”



Or, the Little Preacher. 43

Max threw himself wearily upon the ground and
lighted the fire.

Doris warmed the soup and made him take some,
and to please him drank some of the coffee herself.
Then they sat a moment, each trying to read some
hope and comfort in the face of the other. Suddenly
Doris uttered a cry of joy.

“He has been here !” she cried. “Look, Max, here
is a crumb of the cake I gave him yesterday. Come,
let us take courage. Call to him, Max.”

‘Max shouted, but in vain.

* “We shall find him,” said Doris, eagerly. ‘ Let us
go on; I feel fresh courage now I know that he has
been here. Oh, my Herman! If you could only
know that we are near you |”

And she lifted up her voice and called him. For an
instant there was the same awful silence as before ;
then came a faint cry, like the wail of a little child.

“Do you hear, Max?” said Doris, catching him by
the arm. ‘ Where does the sound come from?”

“ Call again,” said Max.

She called, and once more they heard the faint cry
in answer. i

Max listened as one bewildered.

“T cannot tell where the sound comes from,” he said.

“Tt comes from some place a good way off, and
below us,” said Doris. “Can it be from this crevice ?
Oh, Max! if he is there we never can get him out
alive |”

Max threw himself at full length upon the ground,
and cautiously looked over the edge. On a narrow
ledge of projecting rock he saw the child lying motion-



44 LfTerman ;

less; that he was alive seemed little short of a miracle.
He withdrew, still with caution, and blew a loud blast
upon the horn that hung at his side.

“The men will soon come to help us now,” he said
to Doris, “ a ropes I think we may be able to -
draw him up.”

“But why doesn’t he climb up ?” cried Doris.

“He must be hurt,” said Max. “I will go down
and see. As soon as the men come up with ropes,
throw the end of one of them down to me.”

“But isn’t it dangerous?” asked Doris, shuddering.

“T suppose so, And, Doris, if I make a false step,
and never come back, you will forgive me that I have
been such a surly, ill-natured fellow ?”

They clasped each other’s hands silently, and without
another word.

Doris sat down and hid her face in her hands.
Dearly as she loved Herman, she felt now that Max
was even clearer.

It seemed as if the men would never come. When
they did, one of them, a stranger to Doris, volunteered
to descend into the crevice; the others shrugged their
shoulders and did not meta

Meanwhile, Max crept carefully down, asin that
one false step would be certain destruction. But when
he at last reached Herman, and found him lying on
such a mere projection of the rock that the slightest
motion would hurl him into the depths below, he could
hardly suppress a cry of horror.

“ How are you, my poor boy ?” he asked, as soon as
he caught Herman’s eye.

“T didn’t mean to do it, father,” said Herman, “ but

4



Or, the Little Preacher. 45

‘I’ve broken my leg. Are you angry with me, father?”
he added, not knowing how to interpret the expression
of the face that was bending over him.

“Not I!” said Max. “ But, Herman, if your leg is
broken, I must have help in getting you out of this
placa, Do you think I can trust you not to move
hand or foot while I go to fetch what I want? Or
stay ; I think I can put you where you will be safer, if

_ you are willing to bear the pain.”

Max spoke with love and tenderness, and Herman
looked up at him with mute surprise.

“Oh, father !” he said, with a sigh of relief, “I don’t
mind the pain when you talk like that !”

Just then a cheerful voice was heard, and a pair of
legs came into view, speedily followed by the arms and
head of the young stranger who had offered his services
to Doris.

“T am come to help you,” he said; “is the child
hurt? Ah! yes, I see!” he added, glancing at the
pale face, so full of suppressed agony. “Keep up a
good heart, my little fellow ; we'll soon devise some
way to get you to your mother. or mothers are the
right thing when one gets hurt, aren’t they ?”

' Herman tried to smile in answer, but he was in great

pain and shivering with cold. Observing it, the young

man climbed the ascent like a squirrel, and soon re-
turned with one of the blankets. Of this they made

a sort of hammock, and under the intelligent direc-

tion of their new friend, poor Herman was at last

hoisted to the spot where his mother sat awaiting
them.
“ A little of the warm soup would refresh the poor
D



46 flerman ;

fellow,” said one of the men, glancing at the contents
of the basket.

“ Yes,” cried Doris, “and there’s coffee for all of
you. How could I forget it, when you had been
seeking my boy all night !”

She knelt down by Herman and fed him with the
soup, but he was in too much pain to speak to her.
Now that he felt himself safe, he was more conscious
of his sufferings, and longed to get home and to his
own little bed. But it was a painful journey there,
and he fainted more than once before he reached it.
Then it was long before the doctor could be found,
end when he came he found the limb so swollen, that
it was impossible to seb it at once. Thus the child’s
sufferings were prolonged ; he was exhausted, too, by
exposure and hunger, and his case, for some days, was
very serious.

And now Max came out in a way that astonished
everybody but himself, and became the most tender,
the most faithful of nurses,

His perfect health enabled him to sit night after
night by Herman’s side, when even Doris was driven
to bed by sheer exhaustion; and the tones of his
rough voice became almost womanly in their tender-
ness as he tried too soothe the child’s sufferings.

“ Don’t be so good to me, father,” said Herman, “ it
makes me cry.”

The young man who had been of such service to
them on the mountain proved to be the new school-
master, who had come to supply the place of the old
one, now too old for his position. He came every day
to see Herman, at first from mere benevolence, but



Or, the Little Preacher. 47

very soon he began to feel a peculiar interest in the
patient little fellow.

' “You bear the pain like a young hero,” he said one

day, when he was present at one of the doctor's visits.

“Tt worries mother if I cry out,” said Herman.

“ And you don’t like to worry mother? That’s a
good boy,” said the doctor.

“T ought to be good,” said Herman timidly, “ be-
cause I have not got so much sense as the other boys.”

“What other boys?” asked the school-master, with
no little surprise.

_ “ All the boys,” said Herman,

“We shall see about that,” said the school-master,
. much amused, “as soon as you get well and come back
to school. And now, suppose I read to you from a very
entertaining book I have brought with me?”

Doris could hardly believe the master would be so
. kind, and Herman was almost too much overwhelmed
by the condescension to really enjoy it. But im a few
moments he forgot his pain and everything else in the
charm of the book. His eye kindled, his face flushed,
and he felt like springing out of bed in his en-
thusiasm.

“This does not look like want of sense,” thought
the school-master, as he glanced at the child.

“It won’t do for me to read any more now,” he said,
“you are getting excited. I only wanted to make you
forget the pain the doctor had caused you. To-morrow
I will come again and read a little more.”

Herman thanked him, and lay back on his pillow,
full of new thoughts, which beguiled him of many
tiresome hours.



48 fTerman ;

The next day when the school-master came, he
said :

“Tt will not be long before the doctor will let you
employ your hands in some way, so as to pass away the
time. What do you like to do best?”

“T don’t like to tell,” said Herman, “because it is
something lazy.”

“Ah! but just tell me! I'll never tell, Come!”

Herman smiled. How different this was from the
old school-master !

“ Well,” he said, with along sigh, “ I like to read the
very best of anything. It must be because I am lazy.
But I do try to learn to saw and plane and help father,
and I do not know what makes meso clumsy. . I never
do anything well.”

“ Don’t you suppose that if some boy should break
his leg, you would know how to speak a cheering word
. tohim? Then there would be one thing you could do
well.”

“Perhaps that’s the reason our dear Lord let me
break my leg,” suggested Herman eagerly.

“ Perhaps so. At any rate, you may be sure He did .
it for some good reason.”

“ Steiner,” he said, entering the shed where Max
was at work, ‘“‘ your boy needs encouraging. I cannot
understand how it happens that he thinks so meanly of
himself.”

Max took off his cap and looked confused.

“The old school-master said he was a dull boy,” he
replied.

All this time no one had dared to ask Herman to
own how he had happened to get lost. Even his



Or, the Little Preacher. 49

mother understood him so little as to dread hearing
that he had wilfully strayed away. One day, however,
when he seemed strong enough to do so, she begged
him to tell her all about it.

Herman told his story in his usual straightforward
way, though he made as little as possible of what he
had suffered.

“Then, mother,” he said, “as soon as I found I was
not in the right path, I thought I should soon strike
into it; I called and I called to father, but no answer
came, and I kept hurrying on. Then I was hungry
and ate my cake, or at least half of it; the rest I saved
for Bernhard. It is in my pocket now; I did not
want it after I got hurt.

“ At last it began to grow dark, and I knew then that
they had gone home, and that I was left there all alone.
It seemed so dismal! I thought if I ever got home
again, I would not mind father’s not liking me; it
seemed such a nice home, with the warm fire, and the
supper, and all the faces I loved around the table!
But it kept growing darker and colder, and I tried to
find some sort of a shelter; I was so tired, mother!
When it got to be bed-time, I knew Minna and Bern-
hard were saying their prayers, and so I thought I would
say mine. So I knelt down and prayed to our dear
Lord to take care of me. After that it did not seem so
dark and lonesome, but I had to keep walking and
jumping, it was so cold. At last, the first thing I
knew, I was falling and falling—ever so far, it seemed ;
and then Iwas sure my leg was broken, it hurt so.

“ By-and-by I heard father’s voice calling ‘ Her-
man |’



50 Herman ;

“ And I was just going to answer, but I remembered
that he would be so angry with me for getting such a
fall, and I knew I couldn’t walk home, and I didn’t
think he could carry me—Oh, mother ! I knew I wasn’t
worth carrying! So I kept still, and pretty soon I
heard the sound of his steps going further and further
off. Then it seemed darker and more lonesome than —
ever, and I called ‘Father /’ with all my might. But
he had gone. And after a while I got to thinking that
if they should find me and: carry me home, the doctor
would have to cut off my leg; and then I should be
such a plague to father. He never would want a boy
with only one leg. So I thought perhaps the dear
Lord would’nt mind that so much, but would let me
go to heaven just the same, and I asked Him; but I
don’t remember what happened next, only I found the
hole I had fallen into—for I thought it was a hole—
sheltered me from the cold, and I thought God was very
good to let me fall into such a nice place.’ By-and-by
it began to grow light, and that made home seem
nearer; but then I found I was lying on such a
narrow piece of the rock that, if I had moved the very
least bit, I should have rolled off and gone down,
down, ever so far, and been dashed to pieces. Don’t
you remember what a deep place it is, mother ?”

Yes, Doris remembered only too well.

“Tt seemed so strange,” continued Herman, “ that I
should have landed on that piece of rock, instead of
going all the way down. But it seemed yet stranger
that I should have lain so still all night, instead of
rolling over and getting killed. It made me think,
just for a little while, mother, that our dear Lord did

4



Or, the Little Preacher. 51

not care if I was a good-for-naught, and made me keep
still on purpose.

“Then I heard father calling again ; but I could not
get courage to answer him, for of all the bad things I
. ever had done this was the very worst. To fall down
into such a dangerous place, and break my leg! And
I couldn’t think of any way he could get me out, unless
he came down where I was; and that would be dread-
ful. But oh, mother, when I heard your voice, I
couldn’t help crying out, and wanting to see you. And
now, only think, ’m getting well, and father seems so
kind. "Why, when he saw me down in the crevice he
cried! Yes, I saw him! He eried, mother!”

By this time Doris had to run away and cry too.
But she soon came back, and made Herman try to get
to sleep, since recalling his sufferings thus had excited
him painfully.

The next time the school-master called to see Herman,
he said to him: “Has your brother told you what a
famous scholar he is making?”

“No, Herr Lehrer,” replied Herman. “It’s just as
hard for Bernhard to learn as it is for me.”

i “That does not signify. You will remember what

- you learn all the better. If he were my boy, and I
could afford it, I would have him, by-and-by, go to the
Latin school.”

“ And after that?”

“To the University.”

« And then?”

“Why, then, he could become a clergyman, or a
" professor, or a doctor, and make himself useful.”
Herman’s colour went and came,



52 fTerman ;

“T would be a clergyman if z were he !” he cried.

“Why 2”

“So as to preach to ae about our dear Lord.”
But after a moment his eager face clouded over.
“Father would never send him to the Latin school.
He wants us to be carpenters. And we're just as
clumsy as we can be |”

The school-master smiled.

“T should like to be a clergyman myself,” he said.
“T should ae to be just like Pastor Koffel.”

“Ah! yes,” cried Herman, “my grandmother is”
always talking about him. She says he taught her all
she knows. She loves him dearly. I saw him once,
and he looked so good.”

“Yes, he is good. And without goodness all the
Latin schools and all the universities in the world -
would be of little use to him.”

After the Herr Lehrer had gone, Herman called his
grandmother, and told. her all they had been talking
about.

“Grandmother,” he said, “I long to get well and
get out again, While I lie here, and can’t do anything
but think, think, my thoughts plague me.”

“Yes,” she said, “it is very tedious to lie still so
many weeks. But what sort of thoughts are they that
trouble you?”

“T want to tell you, but I can’t.”

“Do tell me, dear Herman.”

“Well, I keep thinking of all the bad things I have
done, and the times I have got angry, and then I am
afraid our dear Lord does not love me. Do you think
He does?” ¢



Or, the Little Preacher. 53

“T know He does,” she answered. “And He will
help you not to get angry so easily if you ask Him.”

“When I can go to school, and run about, and am
busy at work, I don’t have so much time to think.”

“Perhaps that is one reason why our dear Lord has
made you lie here idle so many weeks. But instead of
thinking all the time how bad you are, it would be
better to keep thinking how good He is.”

Herman smiled with pleasure, as he always did when
he got hold of-a new idea. And then his grandmother
soothed him by singing good old hymns, such as they
used to sing in her younger days, but had left far behind
in the distance, with the good old customs, she said.
And she told him that he must never forget what a
wonderful escape he had had; but often and often ask
our dear Lord why He spared his life on that terrible
night, since surely it was to do something for Him.
And whatever it should turn out to be, she said, it
would be beautiful and blessed, because it would be for
God, and not for man. After such talks, Herman always
folded his hands as soon as he was left alone, and
prayed silently that our dear Lord would take him for
His own loving child, and teach him to do His will
with all his heart; even if it should be, after all, to
turn him into a goose-boy. At last came the joyful
day when he could be taken from his bed and placed
in a chair, and sit once more at the table with the rest.
And then came the awkward attempt to use the crutches
his father had made for him. Nobody laughed at him
now for being clumsy, only he laughed at himself, and
was afraid he never should dare to bear his weight
upon the weak leg again.



CHAPTER IV.

INE afternoon when there was no school, the

children were left to amuse themselves as

@ they chose, and as by this time they had all

learned to do whatever Herman pleased, he proposed to

play something that would not oblige him-to hobble
about with his crutches.

“Let us play school,” be said. “I will be the
teacher, and you shall be the scholars.”

“Or else we'll play ey ” said Bernhard, “and
you shall preach-a sermon.”

Herman smiled, and hesitated a moment.

‘‘T’m afraid it would be wrong,” he said.

“Oh! we won't play in fun, we'll play in earnest,”
said Bernhard, “Come, Herman, begin.”

“JT don’t look much like it,” said Herman.. “I
ought to have a gown and bands.”

“Here’s mother’s apron,” said Minna. “See, Her-
man, I’lt dress you nicely. ‘There, now you look really
like the Herr Pastor. But the congregation is very
small.”

“ Never mind,” said Herman, and after a minute’s
thought he chose for his text the words: “ Little
children, love one another.”





et |||







Heriman; or, the Little Preacher. 55

earnest. Herman forgot that he was not a real clergy-
man, and the children forgot it too; they sat and
listened to him with wonder, his words sinking into
‘their very hearts and leaving there an ever-abiding
impression. .His mother, passing the door, stopped to
look in; she listened with amazement, and went out
to. the shop to tell Max. Poor Max, who had called
his. child a good-for-naught, instinctively took off his
cap, as he stood and heard the simple, untaught
eloquence that held him as it did the children, per-
fectly transfixed. In the midst of his sermon, Herman
suddenly caught a glimpse of his father, as he stood in
the doorway ; the old habit of fear came over him, and
he stopped short.

“Go on,” said Max, advancing into the room.

“T can’t, father,” said Herman, colouring, ‘“ We
were only playing make-believe church, and I was just
making believe preach to the children.”

Max said no more, and went back to his work. But
Minna and Bernhard talked about Herman’s preaching
at school next day, till half the children were curious
to hear for themselves such wondrous little sermons.
The school-master overheard the talk, too, and the next
time he saw Herman, asked him, playfully, to preach
to him as well as to the children. Herman was con-
fused and. surprised, and hardly knew what answer to
make. But when the teacher saw Max, he received
the impression that something quite uncommon had
occurred for Max did nothing but shake his head, and
call himself a fool and an idiot, and declare that never
again in his life would he trust his own senses.

“You should hear that boy!” he cried. “TI de-



56 Lferman ;

clare to you that the words flowed out of his mouth
as water flows from a fountain. And the words had
sense in them, too! And all his life I have called
him a good-for-naught !”

The next holiday afternoon, Borin promised.
neighbour Gischen’s Kurt and Lizette that they
should have the privilege of coming to play church
at their house, for mother had’ said so, and mother
wouldn’t say so unless it was right.

Kurt shrugged his shoulders and Lizette tossed her
head ; should they really demean themselves to that
degree? Should they permit neighbour's Herman,
who never said his lessons half so well as they said
theirs, to set oe up to preach to them? Pride
said, “Don’t go.” Curiosity said, “ Why, yes, go, and
see what it is as has turned the heads of those child-
ren.” So, at last, they decided to drop in for a few
minutes, especially if after the preaching they might
play at something more amusing.

. Bernhard felt rather uneasy at what he had done.
He knew that Herman did not like Kurt or Lizette,
and thought it very likely he would refuse to preach for
their edification. In fact, Herman did, at first, declare
that he was sorry they were coming.

“They'll just go to laughing at us,” he said, “and I
always get angry when people laugh at.me.”

“You'll have to get over such ways as that,” said
Minna. “ Who ever saw the Herr Pastor angry ?”

“Ah! but I am not the Herr Pastor,” said Herman,
“and I hate to be laughed at.”

“But there won't be anything to laugh at,” said
Bernhard. ‘You preach beautifully.”



Or, the Little Preacher. 7

“Do I?” cried Herman, quite astonished. “ Then
perhaps that is the reason.our dear Lord did not let me
fall to the bottom of the crevice that night.” He became
thoughtful almost to sadness, and though he felt happy,
longed for some solitary place where he could cry
without being seen.

Kurt came in the afternoon adorned with his most
waggish air. He said he and Lizette had made up
their minds that it would be nicer to play school than
to play church. He wanted to be the teacher, and
was sure he should make a vastly better one than the
master they had now. Herman consented at once,
but Minna and Bernhard were disappointed. How-
ever, books and slates were produced, and Kurt
enacted the teacher so well that scarcely one of the
children escaped without a shaking or a blow. He
found this amusement excellent, till Lizette, getting
angry, returned the box on the ear he had just given
her with all her strength; he then became furious,
and there would have been a serious contest, had not
Adolph ran crying to his mother, and told her what
was going on. She soon stopped the affray; and,
after sitting for a time in sullen silence, Kurt and
Lizette condescended to eat an apple or two, and peace
was restored.

“ How odd one must feel, hobbling about with
crutches!” cried Kurt. “I say, Herman, lend them
to me a moment. I want to see how it feels to have
your leg broken.”

“You can’t tell by just using crutches,” said Her-
man. “ My leg is about as good as it ever was, now,
only I am afraid to bear my weight on it.”



88 Herman ;

Kurt found moving about with the crutches even
more amusing than teaching school, and spent the rest
of the afternoon in frisking around the room with
them. When he and Lizette reached home, and
Babele asked them what sort of preaching they had,
he replied :

“Pooh ! he can’t preach. He made me keep school
and eat apples, and hop round with his crutches, all
the afternoon, I knew he couldn’t preach.”

«“ And even if he could,” said Lizette, “I don’t sup-
pose he could do it any better than we could. But he
just wants to set himself up above us.”

“ Ah! but if your father were alive, you could hold
up your heads as high as they,” said Babele.

Before the snow was off the ground, Herman was
able to gg to school again.. Max said no more about
making him into a goose-boy, but made a little sledge
and drew him to school himself, not daring to trust
him to the guidance of the other children. The
school-master gave him a cordial welcome, and all the
boys and girls came out to look at him with great
curiosity.

These were the beginning of happy days for Herman.
The school-master knew how to encourage him, and at
home his father was much changed. It is true that
the force of habit made him still often rough and
severe, but Herman knew now what a big warm heart
lay hidden under the scarlet vest, and that his father
really loved him; and we can bear almost anything
from those who love us. This was one of God’s
mercies. Otherwise there would be few happy house-
holds, faulty as most human beings are.



Or, the Little Preacher. 59

Thus things went on through the winter, and spring
found Max and his household all in unusual health
and spirits. Max had had plenty of work all winter,
and in spite of the expense of Herman’s illness had
managed to lay aside as much as usual against the
rainy day. Doris had spun quantities of fine linen,
and knit an endless number of stockings. The dear
old grandmother had also been able to accomplish more
than usual ; her health was certainly better since Max
left off harassing Doris so perpetually about the children.
Little Adolph was now able to go to school with the
rest, and for many hours of every day she could sit
with her Bible before her, knitting and meditating
and reading by turns, and preparing many a future
benediction for every one of them, by silent, fervent
prayers in their behalf. How many an aged mother
fancies herself “in the way,” and longs to be gone,
whose prayers are like guardian angels in the house and
home !

It was Easter morning, and Doris let all the children
sleep a little over the usual time, while she and her
mother moved noiselessly about in the garden in a
mysterious way. Doris had lost the anxious look she
used to wear, and was now a perfect picture of a bright
and happy young wife and mother. There was no
need to hold up those short skirts of hers as she tripped
lightly over the grass still wet with the morning dew ;.
all she had to think of was the basket on her arm and
the four children for whom she was preparing a plea-
sure. The basket was filled with eggs, some pure white,
and some red and green and blue. Under every bush,
and here and there among the grass, she hid them



60 Ferman ;

away ; the grandmother did likewise, till all the eggs
were gone. ‘

And now it was time to call the children and to
remind them that the hens always laid such remarkable
Pasch eggs on this auspicious day. Instantly they
sprang from their beds, and soon were running eagerly
about the garden, gathering in the prize with laughter
and delight.

“How can the hens know it is Easter?” cried
little Adolph. “Every year they lay for us such
beautiful eggs! But they never laid such lots and
lots as they have this time.”

While they were rejoicing over their treasures, they
saw the school-master coming up the road with a
basket on his arm.

Max, who was leaning on the gate, watching the
children, took off his cap, and invited him to-come in
.to breakfast. Though Doris was-herself the daughter
of a village teacher, the thought of entertaining one at
her table threw her into a perfect flurry of pride and
pleasure. She ran hither and thither to get the best
the house afforded, made pan-cakes, brought out sour-
krout and boiled eggs. Nothing seemed to her good
enough for her guest. She would have given her right
hand for a loaf of white bread to set before him.

After breakfast was over, and the teacher had spoken
a friendly word to each child, he beckoned Max
to follow him out to the bench, beneath the linden
tree.

“Steiner,” he said, “I want to ask you what you
mean to make of your boys?”

“My father was a carpenter,” returned Max, “ and



Or, the Little Preacher. 61

so was his father before him; and I expected, till
lately, to make my boys follow in the old track.”

“But you have changed your mind ?”

“Why, no, not exactly. But since you put it into
my head that my boys were not, after all, dull, as we
used to think them ; and since I’ve heard my Herman
get up and preach off a regular sermon, all out of his
own head, I’ve been thinking whether somebody else
couldn’t make more out of them than I could. They
don’t take to the trade, either of them.”

“Could you afford to send them to the Latin
school ?”

Max rubbed his head and tried to think what to
say. Could he take all those beloved, hardly earned
savings of his, and see them spent before his face and
eyes ?

“You can’t suppose I’m a rich man,” he at last
answered, evasively. “I won't deny that I’ve a little
laid by against a rainy day; but it would cost a great
deal to undertake to make two scholars out of one
house.” \

“That is true,” replied the other; “but I think it
my duty to tell you that these boys are very remark-
able in many ways. As carpenters they may make a
living, and lead comparatively useful and happy lives,
But our dear Lord has seen fit to make them more fit
for different work.”

Max moved uneasily in his seat, as he was wont to
do when troubled.

“We never had a scholar in our family,” he said,
“T don’t know that I care to have my boys brought

up to despise their forefathers. It seems to me that
: oe &



.

62 Herman ;

the trade that was good enough fox me is good enough
for them.”

“But you say they are unusually awkward at the
business.”

“Yes, but they are slow at their books, too,”
turned Max.

“Slow and sure,” said the school-master. “ Both
the boys have peculiar minds, I will own; Herman
especially. But I do not think you would regret g giving
them an education if you can afford to do it.”

“J will think it over, Herr Lehrer,” said Max.

“Pshaw!” he said to himself when the school-
master had taken leave, “how should he know what
a pair of boys will turn out? Have not I always
known they were dull at their books? And am I to
spend all I have laid up for my old age in having their
heads filled with Latin and such trash? I was never
taught Latin, and see now, I have a house of my own,
a bit of land, cows, hens, geese, “and money laid-up
into the. bargain. To be sure, it would be a’ great
thing to see my Herman in gown and bands, and to
hear people saying: ‘That is Maa’s Herman!’ But
then the money! All my little sayings that it has
taken me years to rake and scrape together! No, a
carpenter I am, and carpenters I will have for my sons.
Ha ! it would be a pretty thing to have a pair of wise-
acres in the house, continually setting the mother and
me right !”

In this mood he equipped himself in his holiday
suit, and went, with all his household, to church. The
dream of Doris had.so far come true, that Max had
silver buttons in his vest and silver buckles at his



Or, the Little Preacher. 63

knees ; he looked comely in her eyes, as now and then
she glanced at him across the church; there seemed to
be something in his face to-day that had hitherto been
wanting there. This was really the case. New thoughts
and new feelings had been awakened in his mind, and
a mighty struggle was going on within, between love
and pride on the one hand, and avarice and the force
of habit on the other.

“ Doris,” he said, as they walked home together,
“af we choose, we may one day see our Herman stand
and preach like the Herr Pastor to-day. Only I would
have it understood that he should never preach sermons
one could not comprehend,” .

“The Herr Pastor. is a very learned man,” replied
Doris. “Very likely he understands, himself, all he
says, which must make the preaching agreeable to him,
though dull to us. But what were you saying of our
Herman?”

Max repeated to her all the school-master had said.

In the first flush of her surprise and pleasure Doris
said some foolish things, which she afterwards wished
she had not said.

“T knew it would puff you up,” said Max.

“Well, and no wonder,” cried Doris, “ after the way
people have behaved about our boys. And I knew
all along that they were not of the common sort,
You should hear Babele Géschen run on about her
children.”

“Tf the Herr Pastor was not so high and mighty,
one might ask his advice,” said Max.

“Yes, if he were but like our blessed Pastor Koffer.
Max ; why don’t you go and consult with‘him? Think



64 LfTerman ;

now—he baptized us both, when we were little, and
surely he would take interest in our affairs now.”

“But the money, Doris ! the money!” cried Max.

“What is money good for unless it is used?” she
returned. “Ob, Max! we will work day and night,
and do without this and that, but we will make scholars
of our boys. Ah! I always said they were not dulk
I knew it in my heart of hearts.”,

“ Nay,” said Max, “but you must remember that we
shall be old one of these days and not able to work by
day, much less by night. I Yay lose my health and
be disabled, and then what would become of us ?
Think, now, all we have saved and laid by with so
much care must go to those two boys. And there are
Minna and Adolph to consider.”

“Your mother has often said she should leave all
she had to Minna. And as for Adolph, never fear
for him. THe can turn his hand to anything.”

“But all my savings!” said Max. “ Everything
going out and nothing coming in. Other boys will be
earning and sparing, and taking wives and settling
down, while ours are eating—no, studying, I mean—
their heads off. And in our old age we shall be beg-
gars, Doris.”

Doris would not be convinced. She could not ima-
yine Max as ever growing old. There was his mother,
now, as erect and blooming as a young maiden, and
doing more hard work in the open air than many men.
And, at any rate, the dear Lord had made the boys:
just as they were, and it was plainly His will that
they should make uncommon men. Had not they
always abhorred and shunned rude and bad boys?



Or, the Little Preacher. 65

Had not Herman made himself unpopular in the
village by shrinking from all wild games ?

“T will go and consult with my mother,” said Max
at length. “ Herman can go with me to-morrow, when
there will be no school. People say she has more than
silver pennies laid aside. Who knows what she may
choose to do with them 4”



CHAPTER V.

CCORDINGLY they set off carly next morn-
ing, and as they walked cheerfully along,
Max was struck with the intelligent ques-

tions asked by Herman. He wondered he had not

- observed before what a thoughtful boy he was, and felt

ashamed of the rough answers he had often made to

just such questions.

As they approached The village where his mother
lived, Max felt véry much as if he had brought some
strange and rare animal for her inspection. She had
always held Herman in.supreme contempt. His sen-
sibility outraged her undemonstrative nature, and she
never could forgive him for being so much like his
mother in character. Not that she had anything to
say against Doris—not she; she thanked Heaven she
knew better than to find fault with her sons’ wives,
But Max might have married a rich wife had he
chosen; and would ead go so far as to pretend ©
that ers was rich ?

As to Herman, he stood in mortal terror of his
“bie erandmother,” as he mentally called her, to dis-
tinguish her from the “ little grandmother” at home.
He always appéared his very worst in her presence ;






Ferman, or, the Little Preacher. 67

was sure to spill his coffee on her table, and to upset
her stocking-basket, and tangle her yarn about his
unlucky legs.

“Well, Max,” she said, without stopping her spin-
ning-wheel, “so you’ve come at last.”

“Yes, mother; and here is our Herman, come also.
You have not seen him since his accident, in the
winter.”

Herman took off his cap and made his best bow.

“A pretty little sum he has cost you!” said the big
grandmother, eyeing the boy from head to foot.

“Yes, but that is now over,” said Max, rubbing his —
hands. “Go out, Herman, and amuse yourself. I
have things of consequence to speak of.”

“ Ay, and so have I,” said the mother, as Herman
withdrew. “I have -bought the forty acre lot, and
taken a man to work it.”

“The forty-acre lot !” repeated Max slowly.

“Yes, that I have, And it brings me in a penny
or two—trust me for that. And if you do not believe
me, you can take a look into my stable and see what I
have there.”

“Yes, I have no doubt of it,” said Max absently.
“ But, mother, I want to consult you about Herman.”

“Very likely. But do you know that I have four
horses in my stable, besides six oxen and seven cows?”

“ Yes, yes, it is truly wonderful,” said Max. “When
I think how my poor father left things! But, mother,
about my Herman ?”

“ You want me to take him as my cow-boy, at last?
Nay, then, but you are too late. I engaged one a week
ago,”



é8 Flerman ;

“ Hang her cow-boy, and her four horses, and her
cattle!” said Max irreverently to himself. “ We have
found out that our Herman is a most wonderful boy !”
he said to her.

“Humph!” said the mother, and began to spin
again. ‘

“ And we are thinking of making a scholar of him.”

‘“ Humph !”

“His teacher thinks we ought,” said Max, despa-
rately. ‘Do advise me, mother.”

“Then I advise you to take this bit of wool, which
T present you as a free-will offering, and fill both ears
with it, The boy is dull, I tell you. I saw it from
the outset. A scholar, indeed !” .

“T shall do what I li€e with him!” cried Max
angrily. ‘

“Of course. And what you like with your Minna ;
for not a penny.of mine shall she touch if you waste
your savings on that silly boy.”

“You shall not call him silly twice to my face,”
cried Max. “Come hither, Herman,” he called from
the door. :

Herman came panting in, and seeing the passion his
father was in, hesitated on the threshold.

“Come in, child,” said Max, “and stand upon this
chair, and let your grandmother hear you preach.”

Herman shrank into half his size. 7

“Oh, father! Don’t make me! I can't! I don’t
know what to say.”

“Say what you said before,” said Max, taking him
by the arm and making him mount into the chair.

Poor Herman stood in the chair, a piteous sight,



Or, the Little Preacher. 69

_“J don’t remember what I said before. Oh, father !
please let me get down.” ,

“Say something new, then. Come, I will have your
grandmother hear you.”

“T can’t think of anything. It came of itself before.

Oh, dear father! please let me get down !”
' His father’s displeasure and disappointment and his
grandmother's cold scorn were more than he could bear.
He covered his face with his hands, and burst into
tears.

“Then get down and be off with you,” said the
grandmother. ‘You have taken all the polish from
my chair, as usual.”

Herman flew from the room and from the house ; he
would have been glad to fly from the world.

“T see there's no use in trying to convince you
mother,” said Max. “The child was frightened, and
no wonder. But I must do him justice whether you
will or not. And I say you will hear from him one of
these days, when he will perhaps interest you as much
as your new man and your horses and your cattle do
now.”

Then regretting that he had thus spoken—for, after
all, was she not his mother ?—he said :

“T hope your man is faithful and industrious?”

“You may well hope so,” she answered.

“ And treats you with respect?”

“Tet me alone for that, thank Heaven.”

“Who is he? One of the men of the village?”

“ His name his Peter Fiichse.”

“Peter Fiichse! What, he is your hired man?
You are joking, mother.”



70 Herman 5

“Nay, I did not say I hired him. I married him
yesterday.”

Max started to his feet.

“Tt is time for me to be gone,” he cried. “Peter
Fiichse! My father’s old enemy! Oh, mother!
May God forgive you, but this is a cruel, wicked
shame !”

He took his cap and turned to go. Once he looked
sorrowfully back, hoping to see some sign of tenderness,
one look of regret on her large, cold face. He went out
into the fresh air, hardly knowing which way to take.
For the moment, darkness seemed to have fallen on the
face of the whole e@th, and everything real to have left
it for ever. He called Herman, and took him by the
hand in token of forgtveness, and walked homeward
with rapid strides,

“ After this you have but one grandmother,” he said
at last to Herman. Sk:

“Which one is it?” asked Herman. “The little
one?”

“Yes, the little one.”

As they stepped inside the door, and Doris came
joyfully to meet them, Max stretched out his arms and
held her to his breast; he knew now all she was to
him. °

“ You are all I have left, now,” he said.

“What has happened, dear Max? Your mother—”

“ Has married Peter Fiichse! Peter Fiichse with his
horses, his cattle, and his cows. Peter Fiichse who
drove my father into his grave! Oh, Doris!”

Doris was too shocked to speak.. She cried over him
a little, and then ran to get the best supper she could



Or, the Little Preacher. a1

think of. Once she stopped to kiss her mother, and to
say half laughing, half in earnest :

“Think, mother! It might have been you!”

Max ate his supper, which was none the less agrec-
able that his mother had not offered him a dinner, and
was comforted. That Herman should go to the Latin
school was now a settled thing. His mother’s opposi-
tion had done more than the urgency of Doris.

“Tf it costs me my last penny, and I have to sell the
roof from over our heads, my boys shall be put into
positions where their grandmother shall have to look
up to them, in spite of herself.”

“Dear Max,” said Doris’s mother, laying her hand
gently on his shoulder, “don’t talk thus. If you
educate the boys, let it be that they may be more
useful, and because our dear Lord seems to choose to
have it so.”

Max looked up at her kindly.

“We'll do it for all sorts of reasons,” he said;
“yours, and mine, and the dear mother’s.”

It was not. time for Herman to leave the village-
school yet, but it was thought best to tell him that he
was not to be made a carpenter, but to go to the Latin
school in the next village, and learn a great many
things that boys were not usually taught.

“And is Bernhard to go, too?” asked Herman.
“ Because the school-master said Bernhard was such a
good scholar; and he did not say I was.”

“We shall see,” replied Max.

Not a little talk went on in the village when it
became known what Max meant to do with his Herman.
Bibele Géschen especially, as their particular friend and



72 flerman s

neighbour, felt called upon to bear the whole burden of
the boy’s schooling, which she said would cost all the
money Max could make for years to come; and why
was Herman, she should like to know, to be set up.
above other boys, and have it put into his head that
he should aim to be a clergyman ?

Max, however, did not disturb himself about what
people said, but worked on with patient industry, saying
little about his plans or his boys, and every week laying
aside something toward the future. His shame and
sorrow about his mother were toning down the asperities
of his character; he saw, too, to what lengths the love
of money might carry one, since it had led her to form
this disgraceful marriage, and had hardened her heart
against her children. Thus the sacrifice he was making
in behalf of Herman had its ennobling effect, and was
elevating him above himself, Then began to arise in
his soul occasional misgivings as to the worldly life he
was leading; the noiseless influence of his wife’s mother
was doing its unconscious work.

A holiday drew Kurt and Lizette to the house
one afternoon, and of their own accord they pro-
posed to the children to play at church, and have
some preaching.

“Well, so we will,” said Herman. He threw his
mother’s red apron over the back of a chair and
placed himself on a block of wood behind it. Minna
found another apron to serve as gown. Herman had
cut wood on this block for many a year; it served very
well, however, as a pulpit, and Adolph rang the bell for
church, as soon as everything was arranged.

Minna came to her seat with her doll in her arms, when



Or, the Little Preacher. Wi

everybody cried that playthings were not allowed in
church. .

“But mothers take their babies,” urged Minna, “and
mine never cries.”

The sermon began. At first with hesitation and
shyness; but after a few moments Herman forgot
everything in his subject, and a torrent of words came
pouring out. that would have astonished even himself if
he would have stopped to think of himself. He uttered
a child’s thoughts in a child’s language, but with such
vivacity and earnestness that every word went to the
heart. Minna’s head sank lower and lower as he went
on; her doll lay forgotten upon her lap; something
within her seemed to whisper: ‘ You have always been
called a good child, and no one has found fault with you
as they have with Herman; and yet he loves our dear
Lord better than you do.” For Herman spoke from
his own experience; he had been misunderstood, and
solitary, and almost broken-hearted. He had suffered
bodily pain and mental anguish; he had prayed _to
God, and God had heard him ; and. he would have all
these children pray too.

Bernhard, lost in admiration, sat spell-bound in his
chair; he forgot that sore subject, the short sleeves of
his jacket, about which he had been fain to cry, and to
wish his arms would not grow so fast; he saw and
heard nothing but Herman, and his eager face and
glowing words.

It was curious to watch the faces of Kurt and
Lizette. They were determined not to be serious, and
not to admire, yet in spite of themselves they listened
with wonder, almost with incredulity.



74, Herman ;

“He gets it all out of some book,” Lizette whispered.
“But he-says it off beautiful. It seems.as if he really
was in earnest, but he’s only making believe.”

But now the sermon was ended, and Herman jumped
down from his block, flushed and excited. “Good-bye,”
said Kurt, “we must go now. I shouldn’t wonder if
after you'd been to the Latin school you could say
something out of your own head.”

He went home with Lizette in silence, and with un-
conscious envy in his heart.

Meanwhile another little audience had listened to
the sermon—father and mother and grandmother, with
beating hearts and fingers on their lips. As the con-
gregation within broke up, they retreated from the door
where they had been listening, and the children camo
quietly out. ,

“It’s perfectly wenden nie Max. “There never
was anything like it in my family. If that boy is dull
and stupid, I should like to see one who isn’t, that’s all.

“ Tt is very plain what he was meant for,” said Doris,
wiping some tears of pride and pleasure from her eyes.
“Mother, you must tell him. All the good things he
knows you have taught him.”

That night, after Herman was in bed, his grand-
mother went to him.

“You see now that our dear Lord knew all the time
what you were good for.”

“Am I really good for anything?” cried Herman,
starting up.

“ Of course you are. You are good at preaching.”

“Oh! that is nothing, I just say the words, that
is all,” 3



Or, the Little Preacher. 75

“But when you are a man, it will be different,
Think, now, your dear father is going to spend on you
all he had saved for his old age. One of these days
you will be a learned man, and if you are good, as well
as learned, perhaps you will be a real clergyman, and
can teach the people to love God. But the main thing
will be to love Him ycurself. ‘Without that, all the
learning in the world would be of no use.”

“Oh! I never shall be good enough to be a clergy-
man, grandmother. Think what a temper I’ve got |”

“Yes, know. But you must conquer that.”

Herman shook his head, yet pleasant thoughts were
in it, and he fell asleep and had yet. pleasanter dreams,

Meanwhile Kurt and Lizette talked not a little, at
school, about Herman and his performances, and before
long he was called, ‘‘ Herr Pastor,” and “The Little
Preacher,” all over the village.

At first he shrank from these titles, given as they
were in derision, but after a time they ceased annoying
him, under the pressure of new interests. For Max
was resolved to delay no longer placing him in the
Latin school, which, being in the next village, he could
attend every day, coming home at night.

For a few weeks Herman suffered agonies of shyness ,
in his new sphere ; his teachers would have misjudged
and overlooked him, had not rumours from his own
village reached them, which prepared them to do him
justice. His new schoolmates were disposed to laugh
at him and his clothes, and ali he did and said; this
led to some flashes of the Steiner temper, and many
tears of repentance on his part. Every night, when he
went home, he had his day’s experience to relate; his



76 Herman ;

grandmother watched him with anxiety, knowing to
what varied temptations he was now exposed ; but as
for Max and Doris, they were too proud of him to
doubt that he would turn out well.

The most trying thing he had to contend with was
the frequent meetings with his “big grandmother,” the
Latin school being in her village.

Seeing him shrink from her in terror, she took pains
to throw herself in his way, and she found it very
amusing to see the colour ‘come and go in his cheek, at
her rough salutations. She tortured him to such a
degree that oftentimes he was tempted to beg his father
to let him leave school altogether; but real love of
knowledge held him back. These encounters with her,
and with the boys who took delight in teasing him,
made the getting home at night very pleasant. There
was such a welcome awaiting him from every one, and
the old smoke-stained room looked so pleasant !

Thus a year passed away, when things began to take
another turn. Max, who had never had a pain, or
known a day’s illness, took one, day a violent cold,
neglected it, and was seized with a fever. “Week after
week passed, and he lay helpless upon his bed, broken
in body and broken in spirit, and suffering fearfully
with pain. At first he would have Herman keep on
with his school, but gradually they had to consent to
his staying at home; there were cattle to attend to,
and cows, and Doris had more than she could do to
take care of Max, while her mother, with Minna’s help,
did the rest. Herman had not forgotten, and never
could forget, what his father had done for him during
his own illness, and he now devoted his every spare



Or, the Little Preacher. 77

moment to his comfort. During the year he had grown
up tall without losing his strength; he could therefore
help to lift his father, and in many other ways make
himself useful.

. As Max became more and more feeble, he began to
look at Herman with wistful eyes, as if there was some-
thing he wanted to say to him that he had not strength
to say. Everyone observed it, but no one dared ask
what it meant. One day, however, when Herman was
alone with his father, this yearning look went so to his
heart that he was constrained to speak.

“ Dear father,” he said, “you.-want to say something
to me, and cannot. If it is about my education, don’t
give it another thought. While you are so sick, I
could not study, if I would; and if you never get well,
I will take your place, and learn to be a carpenter, and
mother ana'the children shall not suffer want.”

An expression of infinite relief spread over the face
of Max, and for a time he seemed to have done with
care, and to have nothing to do but to get well. But
it was not long before his face assumed a yet more
anxious expression, amounting, at times, to horror, so
that Doris and the children shrank from secing him.

The words of Herman, “If you should not get well,”
had suggested the question whether he was fit to die ;
and in his enfeebled state he could ill afford to grapple
with such a question, In his days of health he had
not troubled himself with such queries. He said to
himself that he did about as well as he knew how,
and far better than some of his neighbours ; that he
had never defrauded any man; and that God was mer-
ciful. And, at all events, there would be plenty of

F



78 Herman ;
. * ,
time to attend to his soul when sickness or -old age

should lay him aside from the work that now occupied
every moment. And now he had, indeed, plenty of
time—but what sort of time? He could not fix his
mind on any subject two minutes together; there was
only a vague sense of misery and fearful uncertainty.

In the midst of this illness, there came a message
from his mother, that Peter Fiichse had been kicked by
one of the horses, and lay at the point of death. They
did not trouble him with’ this news, but returned, for
answer, that Max lay, likewise, in a critical state.

Thus week after week dragged slowly on, and then
there came a slight change for the better. The pain
subsided, and Max lay, day after day, night after night,
in profound sleep. They were obliged to awaken him
to give him nourishment and restoratives ; otherwise
he would have slept away his life. The care of him
now was less painful to his friends, but not less serious ;
he needed more tender, judicious nursing than the
veriest infant.

And while he lay thus, hovering between life and

- death, another little daughter was born, and as Doris
pressed her to her heart, her faith in God was weak,
and her anguish strong within her, as she asked why
the one must be given, and the other taken?

“ Don’t ask why, dear,” her mother said, “ we never
can be happy till we stop asking why.”

“TI don’t want to be happy,” said Doris. “To
think that I am lying here, po when my Max needs
me so much !”

“The Herr Lehrer sat with int last night, and even
you, Doris, could not be more tender and kind. Her-



Or, the Little Preacher | 79

man slept well, and to-night he will be able to sit up
again. Dear child, can’t you trust Max to our Lord ?”

“No, mother, I cannot. The doctor says everything
depends-cn nursing, now ; and, oh! with all there is to
think of, some of you will forget to waken him at the
right moment. And I can’t live without’Max! Do
you hear, mother? I can’t live without him!”

“ You cannot put yourself in the place of God, my
Doris. You may watch day and night and do every-
thing the doctor directs ; but only our dear Lord can
make what you do to prosper. ‘Try, dear, not to have
any will of your own. Try, dear. I am an old
woman, and have had my sorrows, and have done
fighting against my Lord.”

Doris looked at her mother, as she spoke these words
in her gentle, tender way, which yet was so full of con-
viction, and was struck with the heavenly expression of
her countenance. She hid her face in the pillow, and
in broken fragments of prayer tried to say, “Not my
will, but Thine, O God.” But how hard it was to say
it with faith and holy courage! She was afraid, even
while the words were on her lips, that He would take
her at her word, and snatch away everything she loved
better than she loved Himself.

“Mother,” she said at last, “how came you to feel
so differently from what I do? Did it come all of
itself? When you were as young as I am now, hadn’t
_ you a will of your own?”

“Indeed I had, my Doris; and idols of my own,
also, But our dear Lord took pains with me, and bore
with me, and kept on teaching me as fast as I kept on
forgetting ; and when He found nothing else would do,



80 Hlerman ;

He used the rod; ah! yes, He used the rod. First of
all, he took away my little Herman. He was a brave
boy, and I was proud of him, and so he had to go,
Then I yan straight to my dear Lord, just as little
Adolph runs to you when you chastise him, for I was
very sorry ; and thanked Him for afflicting me.”

“ Thanked Him! Oh no, mother!”

“Nay, but what would you have of your child,
my Doris? So then, seeing how sorrowful I was,
and how I really did want to love Him more than
all else besides, He took my Kilian, my little heart's
child, the very one I could least spare. And then
— but oh, my Doris! you know it all—one child
after another came and went; it seemed as if all
they came for was to tear me in pieces in the going!
And then, last of all, hardest of all, I had to let go my
~ hold on your dear father, and let him go too.”

“But mother, while God was doing such dreadful
things to you, did you keep on loving Him ?”

“Keep on! Why, don’t you see, my Doris, that
they made me love Him more than ever? For these
were the answers to my prayers.”

“ Yes, I see. ‘ But He does not take such dreadful
ways to answer everybody’s prayers.”

“ He takes the very best way, my Doris.”

“But, mother, think how many people never have
any trouble. They never lose their children, and every-
thing goes on smoothly. Why should they have such
nice times, and you have such hard times? J don’t
see.”

The mother only smiled. But presently she said:
“T do not know, and I do not want to know; at least



Or, the Little Preacher. 8I

not now. And then as to the nice times! Ah! God
gives them to those that love Him !”

“‘ Mother, you are a wonderful woman.”

“ No, dear. But we have a wonderful Saviour.”

Doris said no more. She only clasped her hands,
and looked upward.

At that moment Herman came softly in.

“Dear father is awake,” he said, “and knows us all.
He keeps asking for you, mother.”

**Tn three days I shall be up and about,” cried Doris,
eagerly. “Go, Herman, and tell him so. Or stay, take
the baby to him, that he may know why I forsake him.”

“ No, dear,” said her mother, “ but we will tell him
you will soon be there.”

But the little one, resenting the style in which she
was overlooked, set up a shrill cry that announced to
her father that there was a new voice in the house.

He smiled as he heard it.

“ Bring the little thing to me,” he said.

But when they brought it, his eyes filled with tears,
and he said : “I am just as helpless as that feeble baby.”

Yet he grew strong faster than the baby did, and
was soon able to sit up in bed and act like himself.
And yet unlike himself, for his long illness had taught
him lessons that were to renovate his life.

“T shall be a better husband after this,” he said to
Doris, at their first joyful meeting.

“ And I shall be a better wife,” she answered.

“TJ don’t see how that can well be. But, as for
myself, I have thought too much about this world, and
too little about the next.”

“So have I,” said Doris.



82 Herman ;

“ But when I came to face death, I saw what a
mistake I had been making all my life long. Ah!
Doris, it is a great thing to die!”

“Yes,” she answered, “and so it is to ive and get
ready to die.”

After a pause, she added :

“Something very serious has happened while you
were ill. Peter Fiichse was kicked by one of his
horses, and is dead.”

“Tt may be the saving of my mother,” said Max.
“Give me the baby. What a tender, soft little thing
it is! Do you know, dear old Doris, what I want to
call this child?”

Doris changed colour. Was Max going to give the
little one his mother’s name, now that she was left so
rich ?

Max saw what she was fearing.

“You need not be afraid of that,” he said. “No, I
am going to give my child the name of the best woman
in the world. She shall have your mother’s name, and
be called Magdalena.”

This was a happy moment for Doris, but she could

not speak a word.

"Vou see, my mother could give florins, but your
mother will give prayers,” said Max.

And now came the question, how their affairs were
standing. Herman brought the account-book, and
showed his father what had been spent during his
illness, and what was yet to be paid. There was
enough to pay off every debt, and to keep them all
comfortable until Max should quite recover. But that
was all, Herman must not go back to school,



Or, the Little Preacher. 83

“Don't look so distressed, father,”, he said, at the
close of their discussion, “I have known it all along.
And I am not so awkward and clumsy as I used to be.
Yow shall see a book-case I have made for the Herr
Lehrer, while you were ill. Iam sure I can become a
carpenter, and help’ you to support the family. And
perhaps, by-and-by, we can send Bernhard to school, if
I give up going.”

All the prayers and tears that enabled Herman
thus cheerfully to renounce the life that had looked
so attractive, were sacred matters between himself
and his God.

Max returned to his shop, and Herman worked
faithfully all day long at his trade.

Babele Géschen was relieved thereby of a great care.

“T always said they were throwing away their
money,” she declared; “and now they’ve found out
that their Herman was no such wonder, after all.
Folks say he found the lessons too hard,.and was glad
to settle down to work, like other folks. It’s hard for
them, having the old grandmother to feed. What old
folks are for I can’t imagine. Why, don’t they die off
instead of the young ones ?”

The first day Max was able to go to his work, he
called his household together, and read a chapter from
the large Bible, and prayed.

“T came up, as it were, from death,” he said, “and it
is fitting I should begin a new life.”

And this came of having “ that old grandmother to
feed.”



CHUAPTER VI.

4 AX was not so strong since his illness as he
was before, and could not do so much in a

ws day. He could not help feeling troubled
that ai he made must be spent; the old habit of
pinching and saving had still much power over him.
Tt was necessary for Doris to take a maid to help her
in the household task; she was never herself after the
anxiety and fatigue of Max’s illness. And there
was this obstacle in the way of her recovering her
strength—the baby gave her no rest, day or night, but
was a marvel of wakefulness, a regular watch-dog, her
father called her, enough to frighten away all the
robbers in the world. .

Some of the old women said she was crying for
something which, if she could once have, she would for
ever after hold her peace. Various extraordinary articles
of food were accordingly administered, but none of
them proving to be the right one, the baby kept on
crying, and Doris kept on walking the room with her,
in order, if possible, to let Max sleep quietly, at least
through his first sleep. Naturally. enough, as their
cares increased, and their health and strength decreased,
both Max and Doris grew less lively and talkative.






Flerman,; or, the Little Preacher. 85

The neighbours said they were growing old, and some
said they were getting too religious.

Meanwhile there was no communication between
Max and his mother. He had not time or strength
to go to see her, and she could not take one of her six
horses from the field long enough to go to him. She
drove all before her, bought more land and more cattle,
and, the neighbours declared, grew younger and more
blooming every day. Peter Fiichse had left her houses
and land and cattle, his own vile name, and a character
much degenerated by his influence.

Every remembrance of her brought pain to Max.
He felt that it was owing to her precepts and examples
that he had grown up so avaricious and eager for gain.
Then all his harshness to his children, was not that in
imitation of the treatment he had received from her all
his life? Still, she was his mother, and had nourished
and brought him up; yet he had parted from her in
anger, and with bitter hatred in his heart.

“T can’t stand it this way much longer,” he said to
Doris. “I must go to see my mother, and try if there
can be peace between us.”

“T fear she will never forgive us the baby’s name,”
said Doris. “Dear Max, is it well to go?”

“Yes, it is well. And the sooner it is over the
better. To-morrow, being a holiday, I will go and
have done with it.”

' The next morning he put on his Sunday suit, and
set forth alone. He still looked pale, and his garments
hung loosely upon his wasted frame, and when he
reached his mother’s house, he was exhausted by the
long walk.



86 Herman ;

Kiverything looked as it did when, three years ago,
he made what he then meant should be his final visit.
His mother, not a day older, sat erect as ever at her
wheel, and scolded her maids as a pastime.

“Well,” she said, exactly as before, “so you’ve come
at last.”

“Yes, mother, I have come. You know I have been
sick, and could not come sooner.” ‘=

She just gave him a glance, and went on with her
‘spinning. Yet in that glance she saw the pale face,
the wasted figure, and the loosely fitting garments.

“Hedwig!” she cried through the open door-way.
“Hedwig, do you mean to spend the whole day in
watering that linen? And you; Marthe, can you find
nothing better to do with your hands than to roll them
in your apron?”

The frightened maids took speedy flight in confusion.

“They say the storks have brought your Doris
another daughter,” she continued in the same tone. —

“Yes,” said Max.

“« And you have doubtless given it my name, now that
I am become rich,” she cried with a boisterous laugh.

“‘No, I have not given it your name, mother,” he
answered quietly. “I call it Magdalena, after its
grandmother.”

“ Ah! she has so much to give it for its dowry!”

“T will tell you the honest truth, mother. My long
sickness has made me eupibe man.”

“So I see.”

“Nay, but listen, mother, I mean that it has put
new thoughts into my mind. It has shown me that
there are things of more value than houses and lands,”



Or, the Little Preacher. 87

He waited a moment, but there was no comment,
only the wheel flew faster than ever.

“T used to put them first,” he added at last, “but
now I put first eternal salvation for me and my house.”

“Wave you anything more to say?” she asked, and
joined a broken thread with infinite care.

“Nothing, mother. Only as you are getting old,
and sickness and death must come sooner or later—”

“Getting old!” she cried. “Ha, ha! Inever was
so young in my life. But now it is my turn to speak.

What have you done with that boy Herman?”

' “Ffe is at home, and works at his trade.”

“Works at his trade, does he? How dare you look
me in the face, Max Steiner? You think, I suppose,
that I have neither eyes nor ears. Let me tell you,
then, that I know quite well what they say of him
in the Latin school, and what they think of you for
taking him out of it. His trade, indeed! When,
with such wits as his, he might one day become Staats-
minister.”

“You do not understand the case, mother. In the
first place, my illness made it necessary to take him
- from school. In the second place, the idea of making
a great man of him has never crossed my mind.”

“Tt has crossed mine, though,” she answered
sharply.

“ At any rate, I can’t help it that I am not the man
Iwas; and that I have not now the money necessary
to educate Herman.”

“ And I suppose I have not either?” she said; and
round flew the wheel.

“You don’t mean, mother—”



88 Herman ;

“Yes, Ido mean. The fact is, I always knew that
all that ailed your Herman was having too much
sense. He inherited it from me. Oh! you needn't
smile. I know all about it, child. Do you suppose
that if I hadn’t more sense than most folks, I should
be the richest woman in the village? People may call
it luck if they choose, but I say it isn’t luck. It’s
sense. And if I had been a boy instead of a girl, and
been sent to school instead of to work in the field, I
should be one of your learned men this minute. Thank
Heaven, red hair and a fiery temper aren’t the only things
Herman has got from me; he'll make us all proud of
our name, mark my words.”

“But mother—”

“Nay, let me talk. The boys may come, I say;
there is room enough in this house that I have rebuilt,”
she added, looking grandly about her. “The Latin
school is but a stone’s throw hence, and as for the
money, ycu may thank Peter Fiichse that he has left
me a few florins, ha! ha!”

At the name of Peter Fiichse, Max reddened and
then grew pale.

“T cannot have my boys indebted to that man,” he
cried. 4
“Pshaw! Well, then, I have a few florins of my
own, it is just possible. And as I was saying, the boys
may come, but they may not go. I shall henceforth
resume the name of Steiner, and the boys shall bring
honour to it. After all, Peter was a bad, vile man; I
am not sorry to forget him. Yes, let the boys come
and divert my mind.” ;

“But, mother—”



Or, the Little Preacher. 89

“Nay, it is all settled. Latin school, university,
books, clothes ; I shall pay for all out of my own pocket.
And as to the clothes, let me tell you that your Doris will
not know her own sons when she sees them. I shall not
condemn them to go with eight or ten inches of bare
wrist grown beyond their jacket-sleeves, as she does.”

“You forget, mother, that we have been forced to be
saving. Besides, have not you boxed my ears more
than once for making an ado about just such jackets?”

“Well, let it pass. Let it pass. Ah! there is one
thing I came near forgetting to say. The boys are to
leave behind them all the canting, solemn ways your
Doris and her mother have taught them. I won't have
such things in my house. I want nothing about me
but what is cheerful and pleasant.”

“But my boys are like two young birds,” said Max.
“Why, mother, do you really imagine that religion
makes them gloomy?”

“No, I don’t fancy. I know it. Young birds indeed !
Why, your Herman, whenever I met him, when he was
here at the school, was like a solemn little owl.”

“That is because he is so afraid of you, mother.
And he is really a God-fearing boy.”

“He must be cured of that. He has sense enough
to make his way in the world if one drives the nonsense
out of him.”

“Mother!” his voice made her stop spinning and
look at him in dumb amazement. ‘Mother, my
boys shall never come to you on such terms. Sooner
than trust them to your hands, I would saw the boards
and choose the nails for their coffins: aye, and do it
with tears of joy.”



90 Flerman ;

“Very well, Have it as you like.”

“But can nothing be said, can nothing be done to
save you? Not for the sake of the boys, but for your
own sake, mother, mark what I say. Life at best is
short.”

“There, no more, no more. The thing is settled.
Go your ways and I will go mine. No child of mine
shall ever preach to me or set himself up above me.
My mind is made up, and you know, Max Steiner, that
you might as well try to move all the mountains in the
land, as to move me.”

Max did know it. He took his cap, cast upon
her a look of unspeakable sorrow, and went out. His
step as he crossed the threshold was the weary step of
an old man; she saw and heard it, and went on
spinning.

He crossed the fields, and scarcely looking upon
them, yet felt how rich they were. He saw the barns
which the men were filling with hay and with grain,
and passed them also, as if he saw them not, He was
aiming for a grove, whither in his boyhood he had
often fied from his mother’s harsh words, to gnash his
teeth, and vent the passions and hatred he dared not
show. Here he now threw himself upon his knees,
and prayed. For he wanted to be sure that he had
done right in throwing away what she had offered his
boys, and he wanted to quiet the commotion of his
spirit.

“The dear father is late to-night,” said Doris.
“ His mother has doubtless made him stay to rest him-
self. It isa pity he did not decide to pass the night
with her, and so escape your cries, my little Lena.



Or, the Little Preacher. gli

Adolph, run out now, and see if your father is in
sight.”

“Yes, mother, here he comes,” said Adolph, “and he
looks dreadfully tired.”

“Tm getting old, my Doris,” he said, smiling as he
caught her anxious look.

“T'll have supper, directly,” she said.

As they gathered about the table, Max patted
Adolph’s head.

“Father,” said the child, “I like you alos as well
as mother. You are a great deal nicer than you used
to be.”

Doris tried to hush him, but Max looked upon him
kindly, and said :

“That ig true, my little man.”

Tt was a tiresome evening to Doris. Max lay asleep
on the bench till bed-time, and she could not ask what
sort of a visit he had had. Then when he awoke, and
the other children had gone to bed, the baby woke also,
and began to cry.

“JT can’t talk when the child is crying,” said Max.
“ Besides, I am too tired to talk. ‘Let us go to sleep
now.”

“Tt is easy to say ‘ Let’s go to sleep,’ thought Doris,
“but. it is not so easily done when one has a screaming
baby in one’s arms. Well, if there was anything good
to tell, Max could not keep it to himself, Iam sure. I
did hope his mother’s hard heart would melt when she
saw how he looked, and that she would even offer to
do something for Herman. Max,” she cried, “let me
just ask one thing before you go to sleep. Did your
mother give you a dinner ?”



92 Fleriman ;

“No, I came away.”

“ But she offered you wine ?”

ce No. oa

“What a mean, stingy, wicked thing! I wonder you
did not drop dead on the way !”

“T never can help laughing when you try to get into
a passion,” said Max, rousing up. “It is so ridiculous.
You make believe in such a poor way. I wouldn’t try,
if I were you. ~ Now, what will you say when I tell
you that she offered to take both the boys off our hands
and educate them ?”

Doris replied by laying down her baby and running
to put both her arms around his neck.

“‘ Wait till you hear the rest. I refused her offer.”

“You refused? Oh, Max!”

“ Yes, I refused. She would only take them on one
condition, and that was, that they should live like a
pair of heathen. But I really am too tired to speak
another word, especially when I have to shout so as to
drown that little woman’s voice. To morrow, I'll tell
you everything ; and you will come in the end to think
I did what was best.”

Doris said no more, and after a time the baby fell
asleep, and she could snatch a few hours’ rest before
morning.

But Max must then go to his work, and defer enlight-
ening her curiosity.

When he reached the shop he found Herman already
there, whistling gaily, and engaged on a dainty bit of
carving.

“Look, father!” he cried, “I am carving. I in-
vented the pattern, and have done all this.”



Full Text

TITLE: Herman, or, The little preacher

PROJECT: JUV



Front Cover

Half Title

Frontispiece

Title Page

Herman; or, the Little Preacher. Chapter I

Chapter II

Chapter III

Chapter IV

Chapter V

Chapter VI

Chapter VII

Little Threads; or, Tangle Thread, Silver Thread, and Golden Thread.

Little Threads. Chapter I

Chapter II

Chapter III

Chapter IV

Chapter V

Chapter VI

Chapter VII

Chapter VIII

Chapter IX

Chapter X

The Story Lizzie Told.

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The Baldwin Library

University
RmB ssi
Florida


HERMAN;

OR,

THE LITTLE PREACHER.


meRMAN;

Or, The Kittle Preacher.

LITTLE THREADS.

AND

THE STORY LIZZIE TOLD.

*
BY THE AUTHOR OF

“Tue FLOWER oF THE Famizy,” “Stepping HeaveNwarp,” “ LItTLe
Susy’s Six Birtu-Days,” BTC, ETC. .







LONDON:
THOMAS’ NELSON AND SONS,
: EDINBURGH AND NEW YORK,

1874,
i)
ru


HERMAN; OR, THE LITTLE PREACHER.

CHAPTER T.

Y a little village of the Black Forest there
sat, one Sunday afternoon, on a bench before
i] a cottage-door, two persons, engaged in con-
versation, a man and a woman. Both were tall and
well made; both ruddy and fair; and the striking
likeness they bore each other made it seem probable
that they were sisterand brother. In reality they were
mother and son.

“Tam getting on in the world vastly well without
your blessed father,” she was saying. ‘‘ People tell me
I have no sooner touched a bit of land than it begins
to bear gold.”

“T hope I have inherited that faculty,” he returned,
laughing, “ for to tell the truth, mother, I came up to-
day to invite you to my wedding.”

“Your wedding! And when did I give you leave
to take a wife, Max Steiner ?”

Max moved uneasily in his seat,


2 Herman ;

“You seem to forget that I am no longer a boy,” he
said.

“There is no danger,” she retorted, “ while you act
like one.”

Max rose to his feet. a

‘Good-bye, mother,” he said.

“Sit down, you foolish child. And when is this
famous wedding to come off?”

“Next week. Doris said—”

“Doris! What Doris?” :

“ Ah! mother, you know; the old school-master’s
Doris.”

“ And what does she bring you?” .

“ Not much besides herself and her mother.”

“Her mother! That shall never be !”

“'There’s no use arguing about it,” said Max ;'“1
can’t have one without the other.”

“Then I forbid the marriage.”

“ Mother,” said Max, “I am a full-grown man. I
am able to manage my own affairs, and mean to do it.
It is true we shall have to begin in a small way, and
if I could help it I would not have the expense or
bother of a mother-in-law in the house; but I
can’t help it.”

“Now, there is the miller’s Lore will have a dowry:
worth looking: after; take her Max, and I’ say no
more against your marrying. A mother-in-law in the
house is like a crackling thorn ; meddling and ordering
will be her only business. And you are one to be
master in your own house.”

“T rather think I am,” said Max, setting his teeth
together ; “and that is one reason why I have fixed
Or, the. Little Preacher. 3

upon Doris. She is as quiet as a little mouse, and will
oppose me in nothing.”

“‘T hate your little mice !” she cried.

‘Well, mother, there’s just where we differ. TI like
them.”

“You know very well that Doris’s mother has never
let her say that her soul was her own. She has kept
her always pinned to her side, singing hymns and
saying prayers ; otherwise she would have goneflaunting
and giggling about, like all the other girls.”

“ At any rate, you can’t deny that she is the prettiest
girl in the village,” said Max.

“ Humph !”

“ And when a man once gets to loving a girl—”

“He loves her, does he? ‘To think of that, now!
Ha! ha! And perhaps he is in love with the girl’s
mother also !”

“Well, then, if it comes to that, I do love her!”
cried Max, rising angrily from his seat. ‘I don’t pre-
tend to say prayers or to sing hymns myself, but I
should like a wife none the less for doing both, if she
took care not to do it in a canting way. And, at all
events, the thing is settled; I shall marry Doris, and
nobody else !”

He seized his cap, and with rapid strides proceeded
homeward, down the mountain-path that led to his own
village.

“Thank Heaven, one does not have to marry one’s
mother!” he said to himself. “Ishall get on better
with Doris. Two red-haired people in one house is too
much. Iam thankful she is not quick-tempered as my
mother is and as I am.”
4 flerman ;

Doris was the daughter of the school-master, and had
been brought up in great poverty and to much hard
work. Her father had taught her all he knew himself,
which, to be sure, was not much ; and had been dead some
years. Her mother had been trained in the hard school
of sorrow ; all she had left was this one child, out of a
home once full of sons and daughters, But, in reality,
she possessed a character disciplined and tempered to the
last degree of sweetness and cheerfulness ; she was rich
in faith, rich in love to God and man, rich in foretastes
of a life to come, in which there should never be felt
the sting of poverty, where even the shadow of death
could never fall.

“Dear mother,” said Doris, “I am asking a great
deal of you when I ask you to leave our native village,
and go with me to a new home.”

“ Nay, my Doris, but it is I who ask a great deal
in going there. It is true, I do not gladly leave
our dear Herr Pastor, who has taught me so much;
and our good neighbours we shall miss likewise! But
that will pass, and I shall try to make Max’s home
happy.”

“There's no doubt of that !” said Doris, smiling ; “ but
I know you always hoped to die where you have lived
so long, and I know it is going to be hard for you to
make this change. But Max says he cannot and will
not live here, so near his mother. She vexes and
frets him so.” |

The marriage took place, and Max established his
wife as comfortably as he could in the house adjoining
the little shed where he carried on his business—for he
was a carpenter. The lessons of economy, instilled
Or, the Little Preacher. 5

into him by his mother, bore their fruit in his new
home, where even the necessaries of life were dealt out
with a careful hand.

Doris entered with docility into all his wishes ; she
ordered her household discreetly, wasted nothing,
and knew no idle-moment. Her mother helped her
in all the tasks ‘suited to her strength; she was no
crackling thorn, but left Max full liberty to be master
in his own house. Though she was never gay, as
Doris was in moments of exuberant health and happi-
ness, she was so uniformly cheerful that the very sun-
shine itself hardly did so much to give light within the
house.

As for Max, he was upright and industrious ; he
wasted neither time nor money at the ale-house, and
worked early and late, indoors and out.

Twice every Sunday they all put on their holiday
clothes, locked the house door, and went to. church.
When at night Max put off these garments, he put off,
with them, all thought of religion, and gave himself up
to toil and worldly care, and making and saving. Doris
never owned, even to herself, that he had his faults ;
that he was too proud to be affectionate and demon-
strative, and that the hard race to make money was
sharpening and fevering a temper not naturally good.
She took care not to run against his peculiarities —
as far, at least, as she knew how; and, above all,
she loved him with the truc-hearted loyalty of a
faithful woman. Let anyone dare to say aught
against her Max, and this “quiet mouse” of his
had fire and passion enough in reserve to consume
the offender.
6 Herman ;

In less than a year after their marriage she had spun
linen enough to purchase a cow ; accordingly, Max went
to market in a neighbouring village to choose one for
her.

Here he met his mother stalking about as with seven-
leagued boots, buying and eee

‘“ And what are you doing here ?” cried she,

“My Doris has sent me to buy a cow,” he returned ;
“the money she has earned herself.”

“ So you are already her errand-boy! And how is
the dear mother-in-law ?”

“She is never very strong; but we get on wonder-
fully together.”

“That sounds very well, But with one’s mother
one may safely speak out. Now let’s have the truth,
Max. She meddles and makes, does she? Ah! but
did not I warn you in season ?”

“ Mother, why will you try to exasperate me every
time we meet? There is nothing to be said against
Doris’s mother.”

“And the miller’s Lore has married the baker's ©
Franz, and has gone to live near you, they say. Think,
whenever you see her, what you have lost.”

Max turned away full of disgust, and bought the
cow with a ruffled spirit.. The poor creature could not
imagine what she had done that she should be driven
to her new home with so many needless blows.

Doris came out to admire the purchase, and did not
trouble herself with the thought that all the creature
ate was to be sought for and carried to her by her
own hands. She cut grass by the wayside, and
brought home bundles of clover on her head. The
Or, the Little Preacher. 7

cow cost them nothing but this labour, and her
milk was a great comfort to them. The neighbours
whispered among themselves that Doris gave away
milk that had not been skimmed, now and then, and
wondered if Max knew of this extravagance. If Max
did not know it, it was because her right hand never
knew what was done by the left when a case of real
distress appeared.

Thus things went on, till one day there came a new
joy and a new care into the house.

“He’s a beautiful boy, dear Max,” said Doris, look-
ing fondly down upon her first-born son. “ He is such
a funny little likeness of you that I can’t help laughing
every time I look at him!”

“He has the red hair of the Steiners, and will have
their hot blood,” said Max.

“Red!” cried Doris. “Now, Max!”

“There’s a tinge of red in it, I am sure,” persisted
Max. “And a fiery young colt you will have in
him.”

“ Don’t you like him, then?” asked Doris.

“The child is well enough,” replied Max.

“T daresay you will laugh at me, Max, but I must
tell you what a strange dream I had last night. 1
thought we were in the church, and that it was beauti-
fully lighted up, and everybody had on a new holiday
suit. You had:silver buttons to your scarlet vest, and
silver buckles at the knees, and looked as you did on
our wedding-day. And when the Herr Pastor rose in
the pulpit, who should he be but our son, our little
Herman here, grown to be a man, and actually become
a clergyman !”
8 : Herman;

“A very silly dream,” returned Max. “I don’t
look much like silver buckles, nor doze that little lump
of dough look much like a parson.”

Having now said and done all that.the occasion
seemed to require, Max resumed his pipe, and ‘cut
short the interview with his first-born. Doris soon
heard, through the open window, the sound of chop-
ping and sawing.

“Ah!” she said joyfully to herself, “dear Max is
making the bench under the linden-tree that he has
promised so long. Yes, my-Herman, a nice seat for us
in summer evenings, when you and your sisters and
brothers will be playing about us. For brothers and
sisters you must have, my little man, otherwise you
will pine for lack of playfellows.”

Meanwhile Max worked steadily at the bench, and
he, too, had visions of children to come. But they
were not “playing about.” They were collecting fuel,
and cutting grass and clover; they were gathering
berries and hunting for eggs ; they were taking care of
the cattle and feeding the hens; they were making
amends, by every shift and turn, for all the money
and all the trouble they cost.

Little Herman grew up to boyhood, and the other
children followed at intervals. During his early years,
when his mother had always a baby on hand, he was
the especial charge of his grandmother. Though the
red hair rather existed in Max’s imagination, Herman
had inherited the quick, passionate temper of the
Steiners; he was morbidly sensitive, morbidly excit-
able and enthusiastic, and in his affections was a little
volcano.
Or, the Little Preacher. 9

Pride, however, made him conceal what he felt, as
much as possible ; but volcanoes will have their erup-
tions ; and there were times when he poured out his
love upon his mother and his grandmother in a way
that almost frightened them. Otherwise he was truth-
fulness personified, and conscientious to the last degree.

Max did not understand or know how to manage
him. He found him awkward with his hands, unlucky
with his footsteps, and dull with his brain. For Her-
man did nothing he was taught to do in the right way;
was continually falling down and stumbling about, and
could not learn the clock, even under the persuasive
influence of the rod. There did not seem to be much
promise that the child would ever make a successful car-
penter, and Max was dissatisfied with him accordingly.

Doris, on the other hand, loved him for the very
eagerness and enthusiasm that made him so. often get
into trouble; she was sorry for him that his temper
was so passionate, because she saw the shame and pain
it caused him. She would not believe he was dull,
but she could not give any reason for her opinion, save
that he looked as bright as other children. And she
always wound up with the mental conclusion :

“At any rate, he loves me so !”

The grandmother took advantage of his ardent tem.-
perament, and trained him to be a most religious child.
Ske talked to him about his dear Lord and Master till
he caught the glow and fervour of her affections; she
made him feel that nothing is too much to do or to
suffer for Christ Jesus our Saviour; so that if he had
lived in the days of persecution, he would have gone, a
radiant little martyr, straight to the stake.
10 Herman ;

Max’s nearest neighbour’s, the Géschens, had a son
not far from Herman’s age. He was a good-natured,
roguish fellow, and the two boys were naturally
thrown together at school—and, by the way, Max
made Herman shrink from Kurt with a. certain aver-
sion, by continually holding him up to him as the
model by which he would have him shape his life.

“ Don’t get into such a passion! Neighbour’s Kurt
never does,”

“Chop the wood faster! Neighbour’s Kurt does it
twice as fast.”

“What will you make of our Herman?” Doris one
night asked Max, when, after displaying more than
usual inaptitude for what his father wished him to do,
the boy had gone, with flushed cheeks and tearful eyes,
to bed.

“T really don’t know,” said Max, “I never saw such
a boy in my life. But of course I must teach him my
own trade.”

“ But will he ever learn it ?”

* He must learn.”

“Our Minna is very different from Herman,” said
Doris; “already she is of great use to me. And
Bernhard will perhaps be less troublesome than Her-
man.”

“As to that, he is coming on in much the “same
way.”

“People say he is so handsome,” said Doris.

The words carried Max back to the days of his
courtship and marriage, when he had regarded Doris
as such a pretty girl.

“T will own that he looks like you,” he vouchsafed.
Or, the Little Preacher. Il

“Do you know, Doris, I have been looking over my
account-book, and find things look very well? There
is Hans Godschen drinking himself to death and spend-
ing as fast as he earns. Think, now, you came near
marrying that fellow.”

“Indeed, that is not true!” cried Doris.

“ Well, he came near marrying you, then, only you
had your abiesuons. As to Herman, a carpenter he
surely shall be.”

“Tf there was anything else he could learn. easicr,”
suggested Doris.

“Yes; you would make a regular gitl of him if I
would permit,” said Max. “ But I will not permit it ;
the moment he is old enough to be of use to me, I
shall take him from school and set him to work. He
shall clean the stable—on that you may depend. He
shall cut short fodder for the cattle, morning and
night. He shall collect our fuel, and make our fires.
Yes, my BORE shall do as did their fathers before
them.”

Doris dared say no more. She went silently on
with her spinning, oppressed with anxiety, yet not
knowing what better could be done for Herman than
all his father proposed to do.

After a time she ventured to ask :

“ Shall you buy more cattle at the market to-
morrow 2”

“Why not?” returned Max.

There was no more said that night, and long before
daybreak Max was up and away.

The children studied their lessons as usual from four
o'clock till six, and then each had their own business
12 Ferman ;

to attend to. Herman must look after the cattle, and
cut short fodder for them, and put fresh water into the
drinking-trough. Little Minna helped her mother to
sweep the house, to arrange the breakfast-table, and 6
wash the dishes. She was a fair-haired, veritable little
woman, always composed and quiet, and, young as she
was, a real helper within doors and without. Bernhard
was to look after the hens and the geese and little
Adolph, and his office was one of no small life and stir.

By the time they should set off for school, every
thing was in perfect order, and Doris was ready to sit
down to spin, and the old grandmother to take her
knitting and go to her beloved seat under the linden-
tree. Herman and Minna were to knit all the way to
school, for the walk was long. Each carried a little
basket on the arm, to hold the ball of yarn, and the
slice of bread and the baked apple which were to serve
as lunch.

“Do you know, Herman,” said Minna, “that last
night, after we were in bed, the dear grandmother
wound our yarn on a bit of money? Yes, really and
truly on a silver-piece !”

“No!” said Herman, incredulously.

“Yes, really and truly. Mother was saying that our
stockings grew so slowly, and grandmother laughed,
and said that winding the yarn on a bit of money made
the stocking grow faster.”

“How could it?” asked Herman. .

“Why, don’t you see that we shall be in such a
hurry to get at our money that we shall knit day
and night?”

“Pooh! J shan’t,” said Herman. “TI hate to knit.
Or, the Little Preacher. 13

I wish I, lived in a country where only women and
girls knit the stockings.” ef

“Ts there such a country?” asked Minna.

“To be sure there is. Look here, Minna. Isn’t
this flower pretty 1”

“Yes, I suppose so,” said Minna, indifferently.

‘Here are some more, quite different. Look, this
is beautiful.”

“Don’t keep asking me to look,” said Minna. “I
am setting the heel of my stocking, and counting the
stitches.”

“How nice it is to have father gone all day
Herman.

“Tt’s very naughty to say that,” Minna felt con-
strained to say, though it obliged her to recount her
stitches.

_ Herman wondered if it was really naughty, and one
thought leading to another, he was silent until they
reached the door of the school.

!” said
CHAPTER II.

ERE the children acquitted themselves as
they usually did. Minna repéated her
lessons with perfect accuracy, word for
aad Her cool and quiet mind applied itself with-
out let or hindrance to the task before it, and all her
sums came right, and all her work was well done.
Herman, if allowed ‘to repeat his lessons in his own
words, would have done well also. But the teacher
required the exact words of the text, and it was next
to impossible to the child to commit words to memory.
He was sent back to his seat in disgrace, feeling guilty
~ and ashamed, aware that all the other children were
laughing at him, and puzzled to know how he hap-
pened to be so stupid and all the other children so
clever. When it came to the writing lesson, things
were no better. He got the ink all over his hands
and blotted every page; the teacher took him by the
shoulder, shook him soundly, and declared that he
never would learn to write. Neighbour’s Kurt pinched
him slyly, and made him start suddenly and upset his
inkstand ; another shaking from the teacher followed
speedily. Herman cried with shame and anger, and
wiped away his tears with his inky hands till he made



Herman ; or, the Little Preacher. 5

a perfect fright of himself. But he was used to being
miserable, and to getting over it; so when school was
done, and they all went scampering homeward, he
recovered his spirits, and laughed and ran and shouted
as gaily as the rest, though with less of their thought-
less light-heartedness. The sufferings of children are
as real as those of their elders; but how much more
easily they are supplanted by passing joys!

Doris was sitting under the linden-tree, with her
mother, when the boys reached home.

“Has father come?” was the first question ; and on
learning that he had not, they threw themselves and
their satchels on the ground at their mother’s feet, with
a sense of rest and comfort that the long walk and the
fatigue of school made very pleasant.

“‘ Mother,” said Herman, “I wish I had something
alive to love. I haven't anything but Minchen, and
she isn’t my own cat, but Minna’s.”

“ Am I, then, not alive?” asked Doris, laughing.

Herman jumped up and threw his arms around her
neck for answer.

* You hurt me, Herman,” she said. “Is it neces-
sary to choke people because you love thera?”

Herman ‘coloured, and darted away. It was many a
day before his mother got another such embrace.

He threw himself upon the ground again, and lay
a long time silent. The scene on which he gazed with
some latent sense of its majesty and beauty was made
up of snow-capped mountains, green valleys, pine
forests, and quaint little cottages almost hidden by the
fruit-trees with which they were encompassed. No-
thing wes wanting to its porfection but the peaceful
16 Herman ;

groups of cattle grazing on hill-side and plain, which
with us are one of the elements in every rural scene.
What would one of our cows think had happened to
her, should she suddenly find herself shut out from
the free air of heaven, to pass her life in seclusion, like
a pet bird in its cage, as do her foreign relatives ?
“Mother,” said Herman when he had recovered
from her little rebuke, “what makes people feel like
' erying when they look at mountains and such things?”

“ Asif they ever did!” returned his mother absently.

“Well, but they do, mother,” persisted Herman.

‘Then I suppose they’re homesick,” she said.

“How can they be homesick when they’re always
at home?” urged Herman.

“J can’t imagine what you are talking about,” said
Doris. “ But let me ask you one question. Have you
cut the short fodder for the cow?”

Herman started up, looking alarmed and guilty.

“Will father soon be here?” he asked anxiously.

At that moment a boy not much older than himself
appeared, leading a white calf by a cord.

“Here comes neighbour's Kurt,” said Doris. “He
has been to meet his father. They must be close at
hand. Run, Herman; get to the stable at once.”

Herman ran; but the white calf was too much for
him. He stopped to pat it, and begged the privilege
of leading it a little way.

“Tt is my own,” said Kurt. “ Bought with my own
money. Isn't it a big, strong fellow?”

“Its a beauty,” said Herman; and he knelt down
and pressed his cheek to its pure white face.

Never had the word money meant anything to him
Or, the Little Preacher. 17

before. But now it meant a beautiful, soft, live crea-
ture to feed, to caress, to love; to live in a little stable
built by his own hands! That stocking must be
_ finished, and grandmother must wind him another ball
of yarn!

He felt such delight when he saw the docile creature
follow him, that he could not find for it enough endear-
ing names.

“You are a regular bossy-calf yourself,” said Kurt,

laughing. “I should think you were talking to your
sweetheart.”
. Herman coloured, and took care to say no more.
Suddenly it flashed across his mind that he had not yet
attended to the cow. He darted off once more in the
direction of. the stable, where his father received him
with a box on the ear that would have knocked him
down, had not another on the opposite ear restored the
balance. He resented the blow, yet dared not show -
his anger. ye

“T did not mean to disobey, father,” he said ; “but I
just stopped to look at neighbow’s Kurt, who has a
white calf of his own.”

“You're a white calf yourself,” was the answer.
“ All you are fit for is to have a rope tied round your
neck, and to be led through the village for people to
look at.”

“Yes, father,” said Herman, now thoroughly hum-
bled. He felt that he must indeed be a calf who had
been called so twice within ten minutes. He fell to
cutting the fodder as fast as he could; but his eyes
were full of tears, and he cut his fingers again and
again. His father had brought home another cow, and
18 Herman ;

Doris and her mother and all the children came out to
see it. Little Adolph was made to pat the new-comer
with his fat hand, and to bid her welcome. He held
in his arms a remarkable wooden horse, which Max
had brought from the fair. It possessed a rampant tail
of an uncompromising character, and was adorned with
a hen’s feather in its head, to give it a martial air.

They were soon seated around the supper-table, where
Max appeared in unusual spirits, and had much to tell
about the sayings and doings of the fair. Lvidently
it had been a prosperous day with him, for instead of
working all the evening, he wrote in his account-book
with an air of satisfaction.

“T shall buy a bit more land to-morrow,” he said to
Doris. “Things are looking very well. We shall
have more fruit than we shall know what to do with in
the autumn, and I have arranged to exchange a part of
it for meal. And you will soon finish your fifty yards
- of linen ; and linen, in these times, is pure gold.”,

All he had in his head Max had now outspoken.
Making money and sparing money was to his mind the
chief end of man. As for his harsh ways with his
children, he never dreamed of their not being the per-
fection of good management.

Poor Herman! He who might literally have been
led by the silken thread of love and kindness, was
driven by brute force well-nigh to desperation.

“There were no cones for lighting the fire this morn-
ing,” said Doris.

“The children must bring some, then,” said Max.
“ Send them before school.”

aman and Bernhard exchanged clanees of dismay.
Or, the Little Preacher, 19

“Then may we learn our lessons to-night, father ?”
asked Herman.

“No,” said Max. “You should not have let your
mother get out of cones.”

“Tt was my fault,” said Doris ; “I did not observe
that the supply was so low.”

The boys therefore worked at toy-making, under
their father’s eye, all the evening. Their ee were
heavy, and their hands awkward, and Doris sat pain-
-fully at her wheel, listening to all that went, on, and
wondering why her children were so slow to learn,
when in many things they seemed so bright and full of
life and energy.

The next morning she whispered to the children to take
their books with them when they went to the forest.

“Once there,” said she, “gather the cones with
might and main; then sit down and study in the same
way. I cannot bear to think of you all being chas-
tised at school.”

The children set off with lght aes and under
the stimulus of the excitement of studying in such hot
haste, Herman learned his lessons well, and for once
received a gracious word from the master.

On their return from school they were all set to
gathering fruit. They had quantities of plums which
they helped their mother to spread in the sun to dry.

“Tt is almost time for the long vacation,” said Minna.
“Then we shall not have to go to school, and can help
mother so much.”

The long autumnal vacation was Herman’s special
aversion. The object of it was to give the children
of the peasantry time to help in the harvest-time,
20 Flerman ;

The lower classes had to glean in the fields of more
prosperous neighbours, with bags suspended from their
necks; and there was every variety of work to do in
preparation for the winter.

Herman was thus brought into contact with his
father almost constantly, and had ample opportunity to
display his unpractical character to the utmost extent.

“What are you idling here for?” cried Max, coming
suddenly upon the child, as with book in hand, he sat
under the linden-tree on the first day of vacation.

“JT was not idling, father; I was reading,” he
replied.

“And what's the use of reading? Does it bring
cows into the stable, or meal into the sack ?”

As Herman could not maintain that either of these
results naturally flowed from books, he remained
speechless.

The look of distress and perplexity in the boy’s face
somewhat touched his father’s heart, and he said in a
milder tone :

“Books are for the rich, not for the poor. We must
have moss collected for the cows’ bedding. Go and ask.
your mother for the bags, and set off at once.”

“Ts Bernhard to go too?” asked Herman.

“ Certainly.”

The boys set off on a brisk trot, like two young
ponies, and soon had to stop to take breath.

“Do you know what I’m going to do?” asked Her-
man. ‘I’ve got a book at the bottom of the bag, and
you shall collect the moss while I read to you.”

“But that will make us get home late, and then
what will father say ?”
Or, the Little Preacher. 21

“T suppose he'll box our ears. I don’t know how
yours are, but mine have got quite used to it.”

“ But what will you do about it when you say your
prayers to-night?”

“Well, I don’t know. Do you suppose the dear
Lord isn’t willing we should read a little bit?”

“ But father thinks we are at work, and it would be
cheating for one of us to be reading.”

“Yes, I suppose it would. So here goes!” And
Herman threw himself down, and began to scramble
up the moss and to tumble it into the bag with ner-
vous haste and energy.

‘We'll work fast, and save a little time for our
book,” said Herman. ‘“ But look here, Bernhard.
Some of this moss is so pretty. Do you suppose all
the dear Lord made it for was for old cows to sleep
on?”

“T don’t know,” said Bernhard. “If we could get
time, we might find cut in some book. But we never
shall get time.”

“Tl tell you what I read somewhere, once. There
are some large cities, not very far from here, where men
sit in their houses all day, reading. They get so that
they know almost everything. Now, if I was rich, I
could do the same. Then I should not be for ever
tumbling about, and hurting myself, and tearing and
wearing my clothes, and father wouldn’t be scolding ;
and, Bernhard, you should do the same. For next
to me, father scolds you.”

“Yes,” said Bernhard, sighing. “Take care, Her-
man !”

But the warning came too late. In the ardour of
22 Herman ;

his talk, Herman had left his work and climbed a high
rock which was covered with moss and slippery ; and
climbing with him always ended in a fall. He lay
now upon the ground, bruised and sore.

“Oh dear!” he cried. “How am I ever to get
home ?”

“Are you hurt so dreadfully?” asked Bernhard,
beginuing to cry. ;

“Tt isn’t the hurt I mind,” answered Herman,
sharply. “But don’t you see my clothes, how they
have split to pieces? You needn’t go to talking as if
I minded getting hurt, when you know all I care for is
father’s scolding so !”

But in an instant, seeing Bernhard’s colour change,
he was ashamed of having spoken so impatiently.

“T didn’t mean to say anything to plague you,” he
said; “only when I think how angry father will be,
I don’t know what I’m about.”

“Tt’s no matter,” said Bernhard. “ Perhaps mother
won't tell father.”

“She'll have to tell him. Else how am I to get
new clothes?”

Dragging their bags of moss after them, the boys
walked sadly homeward.

On seeing the plight he was in, Doris laid down the
potato she was peeling, in order to clasp her hands with
horror.

“ What will the dear father say?” she cried. “ And
it is such an unlucky moment, too, for he is just a
little out of humour. And he is so seldom out of
humour! Oh, Herman!” she added, with tears in her
eyes, “how can you give me so much trouble? Don’t
Or, the Little Preacher. 23

you know that it hurts me more to have you punished
than it would to be punished myself?”

This was a new view of things to Herman. He
rushed out to the little shed at the end of the house
where his father was at work.

“Father !” he cried, “you may do anything to me
you've a mind, only don’t let dear mother know. You
may beat me, or knock me down and kick me—I don’t
care how much it hurts—only please, father, please
don’t let mother know !”

Alas for the child born and bred among the coarse
natures nurtured in the rough wilds of the Black
Forest !

What punishment Max, in his anger, inflicted on the
generous child was never known save by the father
who dealt the blows and the boy who bore them in
silence, lest his mother should hear.

When it was all over, and Herman went back to the
house, he instinctively crept to his grandmother for
refuge. He did not think, but he felt, that she would
have more courage to bear the sight of him than his
mother could; not because she loved him less, but
because she always bore up so in times of trouble.

“Do you think I might put on my Sunday clothes i.
he whispered, stealing to her side. :

“Who tore these?”

“JT did, partly.”

« And who else ?”

“Father did, a little,” replied Herman. _

His grandmother rose and sought for the Sunday
clothes.

‘
* T know 9 hoy who has more reason at this moment
24 flerman ;

to feel unhappy than even you, dear Herman,” she
said, ‘Do you know our neighbour Gischen has just
been carried past the house, dead? And the last words
his Kurt spoke to him were angry words.”

Herman shuddered. He resolved never to speak an
angry word to anyone he loved, as long as he lived.
“Td rather father would live, and whip me,” he
said, ;

“Especially if the whipping is for your good,” said
his grandmother. “And now go out to your father,
and tell him what has happened.”

Max was greatly shocked to hear what had befallen
his neighbour. He hurried out to learn the particulars
of this sudden death, and when he came back was so
quict and subdued, that Doris ventured to tell him
that Herman must have new clothes,

For a time there was a lull in the tempest. Max
was less severe, and the children more attentive ; among
them all, incredible deeds were done by way of pre-
paration for the winter; and the long vacation, when
it came to a close, found them surrounded with many
comforts. Doris felt concerned for Babele Goschen,
for whom she had a certain friendship, growing out of
the fact that they had always been neighbours, rather
than from any point of sympathy with her.

Bibele, however, boasted that she was no sooner down
than she was upon her feet again; it was truly a sad
thing to lose one’s husband; but luckily there were
only two children to feed, and they were even now be-
ginning to spare and to earn. She came, a few weeks
affer the death of Hans, to spend the evening with
Doris. Max sat ona bench, and appeared to be asleep ;
Or, the Little Preacher. 25

his ears were open, however, though his eyes were
shut.

‘Well, neighbour,” Babele began, “have you got
quite ready for the winter? They say itis to be a very
bitter one.”

“We have yet a pig to kill and to care for,” said
Doris. “And my Herman has yet some fuel to
collect.”

“You should see my winter stores,” said Babele.
“There is no reason we should starve because the father
is not here to eat with us. He never could wish such
a piece of folly as that. I have laid in plenty of fuel ;
and of plums and other dried fruit, and of meal, we
shall have no lack. We have hay for the cattle, and
corn forthe hens and the geese. My Kurt makes me
almost forget that I have no husband; he thinks of
everything and attends to everything like aman. Next
news, he will be sitting at the tavern, and drinking his
beer on holidays as his father did before him.”

“ My Herman is a good, kind boy,” said Doris.

“My Kurt,” continued Babele, “is born with a
natural gift at a bargain. Imust tell you how he has
managed to get off potatoes and plums for a big, likely
calf. Ha! ha! He'll make his way in the world !”

“My Bernhard takes the whole care of little
Adolph,” said Doris. ‘“ When the child is with Bern-
hard, I need never give him a thought.”

“And there’s my Lizette,” pursued Babele, “she
already beats me at spinning. You must see her chest
of linen. Upon my word, whoever gets her to wife
will find her well clothed, to say the least of it. Not
to speak of the four silver spoons inherited by her from
26 Herman ;

our relative the Baumeisterin. For we have high-bred
people to our kin.”

“Yes,” said Doris, pursuing also the thread of her
discourse, “and my Minna is a discreet little maiden,
who never gives me acare. If you will believe it, sho
has to-day made a pie almost entirely with her own
hands. You shall see it with your own eyes.” And
Doris displayed a pie a foot and a half wide, filled with
plums, split open, the open side being uppermost, and
presenting an attractive aspect.

“ The question is, is the pie fit to eat?” cried neigh-
bour Godschen. “Who could believe that such a child
could make a pie one could tolerate?”

This crafty speech had its desired effect. Doris ran
for a knife and a plate, and cut the pie in eager haste,
even forgetting to look at Max to see if he were really
asleep.

The complaisant neighbour devoured a generous
portion.

“T can’t exactly say what was left out in the mak-
ing,” she said. “Spice, I think. I can tell better
after trying another piece. Nay, I believe it is the
sugar the child has forgotten. ‘Well, to oblige you I
will force down yet a third morsel, though I could not
do it for a stranger ; let me see, it is not the sugar after
all, it is actually too sweet; yes, the pie, for a beginner,
will do extremely well. The crust being tough, and
there not being enough sugar, I mean there being too
‘ much sugar, are things of no great consequence after
all. But if one really wants to see pie that is abso-
lutely a miracle, one should see my Lizette’s.”

At this juncture Max saw fit to awake, and to
Or, the Little Preacher. 27

look with displeasure at the enormous hole neighbour
Goschen had made in the pie intended for his supper.

“We shall drop in and get a taste of Lizette’s pie,”
he said dryly.

“Do, neighbour. And at the same time you shall
see our pig. "The very finest in all the Black Forest,
_ you may depend. Doris, Pll try yet another morsel

of your Minna’s pie, just to give the child a pleasure.
And if you will some day send her to my house, Lizette
shall teach her how to make one that is really eatable.”

By this time Doris was subdued to that degree that
she had no more to say about her children, and Bibele
Goschen thenceforth pursued her discourse without
interruption.

As soon as she had gone, Max was magnanimous
enough to say to Doris, while he bestowed upon her
his highest mark of friendship, namely, a good slap
upon her shoulders :

“Thank Heaven that I married you instead of that
chattering magpie.”

“ But think how much she gets out of her children,”
said Doris.

“That is true. But one can’t have everything in a
wife,” said Max, regretfully.

The vacation being over, the children went back to
school, and little Adolph was thrown now entirely on
his mother’s hands.. His grandmother was very feeble
at this time, and suffering greatly with rheumatism.
While Doris was busy with her household affairs,
therefore, Adolph.was equally busy in getting into
every conceivable kind of mischief.

On coming home from school the first day, and
28 Herman ;

inquiring for his little charge, Bernhard was informed
that Adolph had been missing for more than half an
hour.

“ He has not gone out of doors, has he, mother?”

“Oh no,” replied Doris. ‘He is safe somewhere,
and if he knew I was about to make kneepfles for
supper, I am sure he would come out from his hiding-
place.”

And sure enough, there immediately emerged from
beneath the bed a little figure on all-fours, with tangled
hair, adorned with five krtting-needles, and arms, legs,
and body involved in a maze of blue yarn.

“Tf Adolph hasn’t becu and ravelled out my stock-
ing!” cried Herman. “My very stocking that was
almost done! And Minna said grandmother wound
my ball on a piece of money! Adolph! what have
you done with the money?”

Adolph cast his eyes downward, and looked stead-
fastly at his left hand, which was doubled firmly over
the little silver piece.

At this moment Max entered. Adolph knew enough,
on seeing his father, to behave with «propriety on the
instant, and dropped the money forthwith.

“Where did the child get that money?” asked Max
with displeasure.

The children all began to explain together.

As soon as he fairly understood the case, Max tossed
the money into the grandmother's lap.

“Tt is quite enough for Doris to spoil the children,”
he said, “without getting others to help her.”

No one dared to say a word. Minna patiently dis-
entangled Adolph from his net, and wound the yarn
Or, the Little Preacher, — 29

on’a bit of paper. Herman had now all his work to do
over again, without the agreeable prospect of finding
his labour rewarded when his task was done. He felt
reckless and disgusted. All the evening he showed
that he felt so, and Max at last sent him to bed in
disgrace.

Thus everything fell back into the old way, each
successive day alienating the boy more and more from
his father,.and making Max more and more severe and
unreasonable, a

The winter was one of unusual rigour, and it was
necessary to use more fuel than ever,
CHAPTER III.



PyeqNE night after the children were in bed,
@, Max sat looking over his account-book in
ISSA] =a morose way, and at length he said :

“Tl tell you what it is, Doris, it is time that boy
left school and came to help me in my work. I have
more orders than I can fill. The Herr Pastor has
already waited for his new table three weeks, and there
are also many other persons clamouring for work that
must be done. I need help, and help I must have.”

“ He is very young to leave school,” said Doris.

“That is of no consequence. He can read and
write, and add and divide; what else is there to
learn? And, at any rate, he never would make a
scholar, for the school-master says he is a dull boy—
the very dullest in school. I wonder what I have
done that I must be the father of such a. good-for-
nothing ?”

Doris dared make no answer. To hide her tears,
she went to see if the children were well covered in
their little beds.

Herman was wide awake, and his glittering eyes
showed that he had heard what had passed.

“Oh, mother!” he whispered, throwing his arms




is


Ferman; ov, the Little Preacher. 31

about her, “ why did our dear Lord make such a good-
for-naught ?”

_ “Hush, dear Herman, I can’t talk to you now. Go
to sleep like a good boy.”

“Tam not a good boy, and I can’t get to sleep,” he
answered,

“What's all that noise when I’m casting up
accounts ?” cried Max. “Ha! I wish I had been taught
the addition table when I was a boy. There’s no great
fun in counting on one’s fingers with half a dozen
people talking, and putting you out.”

“TJ don’t think Herman has learned it yet,” said
Doris, catching eagerly at this straw. “You surely
will not take him from school until he has done so,
seeing how bad it is not to know it?”

“He shall learn it at home,” said Max; “T’ll begin
with him to-morrow. Or no, to-morrow I must go up
the mountain after fuel. Seems to me you burn a
great deal more than you need, Doris.”

“J will try to be more careful,” she said. “And
Max, won’t you let me teach Herman his tables? You
know how hard it is for him'to commit to memory,
and how he tries your patience ; and, dear Max, don’t
be angry with me, but perhaps you don’t notice how
afraid he is of you, and how many blunders he makes
because he is in such terror.”

“There’s no use in arguing with me,” replied Max.
“The: boy is the plague of my life, and always will be ;
but I cannot leave him to you to be petted and spoiled.
If anybody can beat a thing into his head, I can, and
if worst comes to worst, I will set him to watch the
geese,” :
32 Hlerman ;

“Nay, you never will degrade him to that extent!”
cried Doris.

“ Yes, a goose-boy he shall be, unless he improves !”
cried Max, “And to-morrow, at any rate, he shall not
go to school. I must have him and Bernhard help me
on the mountain to-morrow.”

“ Would you let me go in their place ?”

“¢ No,” he answered, “and twice over, noI say! It
will do for the Herr Pastor to tell me once that I let
my wife work too hard for one in her station. I don't
care to hear the same tune twice.”

There was no more to be said. And Doris could not
help feeling a little relieved, since it must be so, that
Herman was to leave school—learning his lessons was
such a painful, laborious process to him. And then if
he was so dull, as the teacher declared he was, what
was the use of trying to make him learn?

But with her true motherly instincts she felt that he
was not dull, and her heart yearned over him with
fresh love and sympathy.

Herman slept little that night, for he now felt
thoroughly degraded and heart-broken. Neither could
he force down the breakfast he needed before encounter-
ing the cold and fatigue before him. .

Doris watched for a moment in which to speak a
tender word to him.

“Don’t be cast down, dear child,” she said; “ per-
haps our dear Lord knows of something you can do
well, and when the time comes will let you know what
itis. Meanwhile try to be a good boy, and vex the dear
father as little as possible; you know he is so seldom
vexed,”
Or, the Little Preacher. Bo

“Oh! I do wish we were not so poor,” said Herman.
“Poor! who says we are poor?” cried Doris, clasp-
ing her hands in amazement, “ who says we are poor?”

“ But do rich people go out to collect fuel ?”

“ Herman !” said Doris, trying now to be severe, “is
it possible that you are a lazy boy ?”

“Tm afraid Iam,” said Herman. “ But are people
who sit all day, reading and writing, lazy?’ Because I
have read of wise men who did nothing else; and I
should like to be a wise man.”

“ Never let the dear father hear such wild words fall
from your lips!” cried Doris. “The dear father places
economy before all things.”

There was silence for a time, and Herman chopped
the fagots on which he was at work with a vague desire
to unburden himself to his mother, yet not knowing |
how.

“ As soon as I get old enough I’ll go away some-
where,” he said desperately.

Little Minna, washing the breakfast cups, would gladly
have clasped her hands at this audacious speech, but they
were too full; she therefore suppressed her emotions and
washed faithfully on,

Doris shook her head in silence, but she said to
herself :

“Tf Max drives my children away from me, I had
better die than live.”

“Come, boys, it is time to go,” said Max, hurry-
ing in.

“ Have you our dinner ready, Doris? for we shall
not be back till night.”

* Yes, here is coffee, and here are bread and potatoes.
34 Herman ;

You will roast the potatoes and warm the coffee?”
she asked.

“Yes, never fear. Bring along the cords, children.”

Doris had just time to thrust a bit of cake into
Herman’s pocket, and they were off. The village
was soon left behind them; then the little river that
traversed it was crossed on a foot-bridge, and presently
a narrow, winding path began to lead them up the
side of the mountain. They walked on in single file,
without a word, the only variety to the silent progress
being an occasional fall, the path being slippery at this
season of the year. Herman’s heart felt like lead ; it
seemed to him that even his mother was beginning to
lose sympathy with him. The thought of being taken
from school and made into a mere goose-boy tortured
him ; if possible, it seemed. worse to him now that he
was bounding up the mountain side, invigorated by the
breeze, than it did when he lay weary and discouraged
on his little bed the previous night.

Besides, the anguish then suppressed lest his father
should hear, must have vent; he lingered a little
behind the rest, then darting in among the leafless
bushes that skirted the path, he threw himself upon
the ground and burst into passionate tears and groans.

“Tm a good-for-nothing!. A good-for-nothing!” he
said to himself over and over again. And then, when
he had spent himself with crying, he looked up to the
blue sky above him, and it had for him an air of
friendliness, and there seemed to be a certain peace
in the very silence and repose of nature. He folded
his hands, and said, out of the very depths of his
heart:
Or, the Little Preacher, 35

“OQ dear Lord! can’t you help me not to be a good-
for-nothing ?”

And then he remembered that it was wrong to idle
away the time when he ought to be at work, and he
started to his feet and began to ascend the mountain
with hasty steps. As he pressed on, he wondered that
he did not overtake his father, nor hear his voice; was
it possible that he had taken the wrong path? He
stopped, and shouted with all his might, but there was
no answer, and the silence that just now seemed so
soothing appalled and oppressed him. The truth was
that, worn out by the sleepless and sorrowful night he
had passed, and relieved by the tears he had shed, the
child had actually fallen asleep for a few moments, thus
giving the others time to get out of sight and hearing.
Then, in his. haste, and only too much in accordance
with his past habits, he had chosen the wrong path,
and was every moment going further and further astray.
Unconscious of having slept, he felt sure of soon over-
taking his father, and of making up for lost time by
unusual diligence. But after a while he began to feel
some misgivings. He knew that to get lost in the
mountains was the easiest thing in the world. He
knew he should begin to suffer with hunger, and, as
night came on, with cold; but, above all, he knew
that his father would be angry—oh ! how angry ! and,
if he should perish and never be heard of more, would
perhaps feel it a mercy to be rid of him. But then his
mother! Wouldn’t she mourn for her poor lost boy?
Wouldn’t Bernhard, who loved him so, cry himself to
sleep that night? Wouldn’t even Minna, whom nothing
ever seemed to trouble, be sorry if he never came back?
36 flerman ;

He was not a timid boy, and after a few moments
of perplexity, he resolved to retrace his steps, and see
if he could not find another path. He ate half the
cake his mother had given him, as soon as he began to
feel hungry, but saved half for Bernhard.

Meanwhile Max was venting his anger at the dis-
appearance of the boy, by slashing at the trees right
and left. As fast as boughs and branches fell, Bern-
hard made them up into large bundles, and tied them
together with cords. It was hard work for such a little
fellow, but he dared not complain. Max had no doubt
that Herman was hiding somewhere to escape this
task ; Bernhard did not know what to think, but never
for one moment suspected his brother of so disgraceful
an act. As the day advanced, Max stopped his work
for a time and made a little fire, when the coffee was
warmed and the potatoes were roasted. As Bern-
hard sat dipping his bread into his coffee, he thought
anxiously of Herman, and ventured, for the first time,
to break the silence that had prevailed for so long.

“Father,” he said, ‘“‘may I go down the path a little
way, and see if I can find Herman? Perhaps he has
had a fall, and can’t get up.”

“ No,” replied Max sternly.

Bernhard dared say no more ; but he worked thence-
forth with a distracted mind, listening every few mo-
ments in hope of hearing Herman’s voice, and doing
what he had to do wearily and without heart. When,
at last, it was time to go, Max placed a bundle of fagots
upon Bernhard’s head, took a second on his own,
and the remaining ones were sent rolling and bounding
down the pathway that led homeward, They reached
Or, the Little Preacher. 37

the house just at nightfall, and everybody came out to
meet and to relieve them.

“Why, where’s Herman?” cried Doris.

Max was‘in too sullen a mood to answer.

“«Haven’t you seen him, mother?” asked Bernhard.
‘Oh, mother! then he’s lost! he’s lost!” And Bern-
hard. threw himself into her arms with a cry of anguish
that went even to his father’s heart.

“Do you mean to tell me that you have left my
Herman to perish on the mountain?” said Doris in a
hoarse voice, and confronting Max, who recoiled before
her and was still speechless.

But when he found his voice that was hoarse too.

“ Get the lantern,” he said.

Everybody was bewildered, and ran everywhere
looking for it. Max found it himself, lighted it, and
plunged out into the darkness. After a moment, hear-
ing sobs and footsteps behind him, he turned and saw
Doris and Bernhard following him.

“Go back, both of you!” he said. “The neigh-
bours will help me, but you will be in the way. Go

back, I say !”
"Tf they had withstood him, he Fond have felled
them to the earth, They went back, and Bernhard
told over and over again all there was to tell, till at
last, worn out with crying, he was made to go to bed
with the other children.

“ You must go too, mother,” said Doris.

“T cannot, dear.”

So they sat, these two, through the long hours; the
grandmother weeping silently, and with hands folded
in prayer; Doris with fevered cheeks and parched lips,
38 Flerman ;

and hands and feet of ice. There had been friction
on the wheels of her domestic life; she had had her
little cares, and vexations, and trials, but a real sorrow
she had never known. And now, in the twinkling of
an eye, this awful calamity had come upon her! Her
mind travelled back over the whole history of her
child ; she recalled all his infantine graces, all the
pretty ways of his childhood, all the intense and pas-
sionate love his boyhood had lavished on her. And
all this was gone for ever !

She walked to and fro in the room, and asked herself
if a good God could let such things be.

“Mother!” she cried at last, “I am getting be-
wildered. Tell me, is God good when He does such
terrible things to us?”

“ All my children, save you, dear, lie in God’s acre.
And your father—you know he was snatched from me
in one awful moment, when I was but young, as you
are now, my Doris. But what then? God never was
anything but good.”

Doris shook her head, and walked yet once more up
and down the room.

“You are too tired to find comfort even in Him,”
said her mother. “If you could only sleep, if but for
a moment !”

“T wish you would go to bed, mother. You know
I cannot. Tell me once more, mother, are you sure
God is good?”

Again thus solemnly adjured, the poor feeble mother
burst into tears. She held out her arms, and Doris
ran into their shelter, just as she had done when a
child.
Or, the Little Preacher. 39

“ Whatever He does, He is good,” said the mother.
“ But I believe He means to save Herman.”

“Oh, mother! He must save him! Have you told
Him so? Have you asked Him?”

“ Nay, my Doris, we may not say ‘ must’ to our dear
Lord. Surely we can trust Herman to Him?”

In her distress, Doris withdrew herself from her
mother’s arms, and went and knelt down by the side
of her bed, and tried to pray. But her tongue seemed
‘to cling to the roof of her mouth. Yet the unuttered
- prayer was heard and answered, and she rose from her
knees, comforted and cheered.

“T will make coffee for dear mother,” she said to
herself, “and have some ready for Max when he
comes. Poor Max! he must be so tired !”

She prepared the coffee, and made soup.. Yet she
dared not say to herself that either was for Herman.

These little womanly tasks beguiled her of a portion
of the weary time, and then she saw that her mother
had, at last, fallen asleep in her chair. She wrapped a
shawl carefully about her, and sitting down on the
bench by the table, laid her aching head upon it. God
gave her, as she sat there, a few moments’ sleep, though
she never knew it. How manifold are the gifts of His
opulent hand which we receive in like unconsciousness,
and for which we never thank Him !

At day-break she was startled by a footstep, and,
with a beating heart, sprang to her feet. It was Babele
Goschen, come on a visit of condolence.

“They haven’t found him?” she asked. ‘ Well, I
didn’t expect they had. Bless me, you look as if you
had a burning fever! And the dear old mother looks
40 Flerman ;

pale and tired. Ah! you should not have made her
sit up with you. You should have made her go to
bed. You remember the time my Kurt got so dread-
fully burned? I was young then, and couldn’t keep
awake, and my mother sat up with him night after
night. And she never held up her head from that
time. Weill! the old must die, and a few years more
or less can’t make much difference to them”

“Tt would make a great deal of difference to me if
I should lose my mother,” said Doris. ‘ But oh,
neighbour ! what do you think? ‘Will they find my.
Herman ?” L

“Well, as I was saying to my children, these boys
that are always wool-gathering are sure to come to
harm. Your Herman never seemed quite to have his
wits about him. Such a child needs a sound beat-
ing every night at bed-time. I cannot imagine how he
went to work to get lost. My children never get lost.
What makes yours, do you suppose ?”

“Not one of them was ever lost before,” said Doris.
“Oh, Babele ! can’t you say something to comfort me?”

“ Of course. . That’s what I came for. But it does
puzzle me to see children so different from mine.”

_“ But oh, do you think they will find him?” re-
peated Doris.

“Tt depends on where he is,” replied Babele. “If
the child keeps wandering on, he will very likely be
getting further and further away. And besides, grop-
ing about in the dark, he would be likely to get dreadful
falls. If he should fall into one of those crevices, or
down one of those deep chasms, there wouldn’t be
enough of him left to be worth bringing home, And

2
Or, the Little Preacher. 41

then again, if he does keep still, he’d perish with the
cold. Last night was bitterly cold; even our cows
were restless, and so were our pigs; and my Kurt had
to get up and pacify his white calf, it was so uneasy.
Besides, the child would soon begin to suffer with
hunger. I don’t know exactly how long it takes to
starve to death, but they say it’s an awful way to dic.
And then again—but what are you doing? You are
not listening in the least! I was going to say that
sometimes the wolves—”

Doris had risen in a frantic way, and arrayed herself
in her outer garments. She had brought forth blankets
and placed them in a ‘basket, with coffee and soup and
wine. She now proceeded to waken Minna, who still
slept profoundly.

“Keep up the fire,” she whispered, “and if the
dear father comes home, see that his breakfast is
hot.”

“Why, where are you going?” cried Babele, rising
and looking with amazement at Doris.

“Where should I go, if the mother’s heart in me
can ever beat avain after the terrible things you have
been saying?” cried Doris, turning fiercely upon her
guest. And in another moment she was gone. Babele
lifted wp her hands and slowly followed her.

“Well!” she said to herself, with a long breath,
“T never was faced by a tigress or a she-wolf, but I
rather think I know now how it would seem. And
this is what one gets for leaving one’s warm bed to
speak a word of comfort to a fellow-creature !”

She moved slowly homeward, while Doris sped
panting on her way. She was crossing the foot-bridge,
42 Herman ;

when she was confronted by Max. He looked jaded
arid dejected.

“ Where are you going, Doris?” he cried.

“To find my Herman!” she answered, trying to
pass him.

“You must not go,” he answered. “I am only
returning to seek more help, and shall conginue the
search as long as there is any hope.”

“ And how long will that be?”

Max turned away from her searching look.

“God only knows!” he said solemnly. “ But
now, Doris, go home. All that can be done, I will
cio.”

“Tl not go home,” said Doris quietly. “ Let me
pass, Max.”

“T cannot. You must go home.”

“J will not. See, Max, I never in my life disobey ed
you before, but now I must.”

He made no answer, but turned back toward the
mountain, and Doris followed him.

“Here is coffee, Max,” she said, as they reached the
path by which they were to ascend.

He shook his head and pushed onward ; then turn-
ing, he performed the first act of gallantry that had
adorned their married life, by transferring the basket -
from her head to his own. They went on in silence—
Max leading the way, Doris following—till noon-day,
when both were exhausted.

“You must take some coffee, Max,” said Doris.
“There is no use in wasting your strength by fasting.
Make a little fire and let me warm some for you. And
here is soup, too.”
Or, the Little Preacher. 43

Max threw himself wearily upon the ground and
lighted the fire.

Doris warmed the soup and made him take some,
and to please him drank some of the coffee herself.
Then they sat a moment, each trying to read some
hope and comfort in the face of the other. Suddenly
Doris uttered a cry of joy.

“He has been here !” she cried. “Look, Max, here
is a crumb of the cake I gave him yesterday. Come,
let us take courage. Call to him, Max.”

‘Max shouted, but in vain.

* “We shall find him,” said Doris, eagerly. ‘ Let us
go on; I feel fresh courage now I know that he has
been here. Oh, my Herman! If you could only
know that we are near you |”

And she lifted up her voice and called him. For an
instant there was the same awful silence as before ;
then came a faint cry, like the wail of a little child.

“Do you hear, Max?” said Doris, catching him by
the arm. ‘ Where does the sound come from?”

“ Call again,” said Max.

She called, and once more they heard the faint cry
in answer. i

Max listened as one bewildered.

“T cannot tell where the sound comes from,” he said.

“Tt comes from some place a good way off, and
below us,” said Doris. “Can it be from this crevice ?
Oh, Max! if he is there we never can get him out
alive |”

Max threw himself at full length upon the ground,
and cautiously looked over the edge. On a narrow
ledge of projecting rock he saw the child lying motion-
44 LfTerman ;

less; that he was alive seemed little short of a miracle.
He withdrew, still with caution, and blew a loud blast
upon the horn that hung at his side.

“The men will soon come to help us now,” he said
to Doris, “ a ropes I think we may be able to -
draw him up.”

“But why doesn’t he climb up ?” cried Doris.

“He must be hurt,” said Max. “I will go down
and see. As soon as the men come up with ropes,
throw the end of one of them down to me.”

“But isn’t it dangerous?” asked Doris, shuddering.

“T suppose so, And, Doris, if I make a false step,
and never come back, you will forgive me that I have
been such a surly, ill-natured fellow ?”

They clasped each other’s hands silently, and without
another word.

Doris sat down and hid her face in her hands.
Dearly as she loved Herman, she felt now that Max
was even clearer.

It seemed as if the men would never come. When
they did, one of them, a stranger to Doris, volunteered
to descend into the crevice; the others shrugged their
shoulders and did not meta

Meanwhile, Max crept carefully down, asin that
one false step would be certain destruction. But when
he at last reached Herman, and found him lying on
such a mere projection of the rock that the slightest
motion would hurl him into the depths below, he could
hardly suppress a cry of horror.

“ How are you, my poor boy ?” he asked, as soon as
he caught Herman’s eye.

“T didn’t mean to do it, father,” said Herman, “ but

4
Or, the Little Preacher. 45

‘I’ve broken my leg. Are you angry with me, father?”
he added, not knowing how to interpret the expression
of the face that was bending over him.

“Not I!” said Max. “ But, Herman, if your leg is
broken, I must have help in getting you out of this
placa, Do you think I can trust you not to move
hand or foot while I go to fetch what I want? Or
stay ; I think I can put you where you will be safer, if

_ you are willing to bear the pain.”

Max spoke with love and tenderness, and Herman
looked up at him with mute surprise.

“Oh, father !” he said, with a sigh of relief, “I don’t
mind the pain when you talk like that !”

Just then a cheerful voice was heard, and a pair of
legs came into view, speedily followed by the arms and
head of the young stranger who had offered his services
to Doris.

“T am come to help you,” he said; “is the child
hurt? Ah! yes, I see!” he added, glancing at the
pale face, so full of suppressed agony. “Keep up a
good heart, my little fellow ; we'll soon devise some
way to get you to your mother. or mothers are the
right thing when one gets hurt, aren’t they ?”

' Herman tried to smile in answer, but he was in great

pain and shivering with cold. Observing it, the young

man climbed the ascent like a squirrel, and soon re-
turned with one of the blankets. Of this they made

a sort of hammock, and under the intelligent direc-

tion of their new friend, poor Herman was at last

hoisted to the spot where his mother sat awaiting
them.
“ A little of the warm soup would refresh the poor
D
46 flerman ;

fellow,” said one of the men, glancing at the contents
of the basket.

“ Yes,” cried Doris, “and there’s coffee for all of
you. How could I forget it, when you had been
seeking my boy all night !”

She knelt down by Herman and fed him with the
soup, but he was in too much pain to speak to her.
Now that he felt himself safe, he was more conscious
of his sufferings, and longed to get home and to his
own little bed. But it was a painful journey there,
and he fainted more than once before he reached it.
Then it was long before the doctor could be found,
end when he came he found the limb so swollen, that
it was impossible to seb it at once. Thus the child’s
sufferings were prolonged ; he was exhausted, too, by
exposure and hunger, and his case, for some days, was
very serious.

And now Max came out in a way that astonished
everybody but himself, and became the most tender,
the most faithful of nurses,

His perfect health enabled him to sit night after
night by Herman’s side, when even Doris was driven
to bed by sheer exhaustion; and the tones of his
rough voice became almost womanly in their tender-
ness as he tried too soothe the child’s sufferings.

“ Don’t be so good to me, father,” said Herman, “ it
makes me cry.”

The young man who had been of such service to
them on the mountain proved to be the new school-
master, who had come to supply the place of the old
one, now too old for his position. He came every day
to see Herman, at first from mere benevolence, but
Or, the Little Preacher. 47

very soon he began to feel a peculiar interest in the
patient little fellow.

' “You bear the pain like a young hero,” he said one

day, when he was present at one of the doctor's visits.

“Tt worries mother if I cry out,” said Herman.

“ And you don’t like to worry mother? That’s a
good boy,” said the doctor.

“T ought to be good,” said Herman timidly, “ be-
cause I have not got so much sense as the other boys.”

“What other boys?” asked the school-master, with
no little surprise.

_ “ All the boys,” said Herman,

“We shall see about that,” said the school-master,
. much amused, “as soon as you get well and come back
to school. And now, suppose I read to you from a very
entertaining book I have brought with me?”

Doris could hardly believe the master would be so
. kind, and Herman was almost too much overwhelmed
by the condescension to really enjoy it. But im a few
moments he forgot his pain and everything else in the
charm of the book. His eye kindled, his face flushed,
and he felt like springing out of bed in his en-
thusiasm.

“This does not look like want of sense,” thought
the school-master, as he glanced at the child.

“It won’t do for me to read any more now,” he said,
“you are getting excited. I only wanted to make you
forget the pain the doctor had caused you. To-morrow
I will come again and read a little more.”

Herman thanked him, and lay back on his pillow,
full of new thoughts, which beguiled him of many
tiresome hours.
48 fTerman ;

The next day when the school-master came, he
said :

“Tt will not be long before the doctor will let you
employ your hands in some way, so as to pass away the
time. What do you like to do best?”

“T don’t like to tell,” said Herman, “because it is
something lazy.”

“Ah! but just tell me! I'll never tell, Come!”

Herman smiled. How different this was from the
old school-master !

“ Well,” he said, with along sigh, “ I like to read the
very best of anything. It must be because I am lazy.
But I do try to learn to saw and plane and help father,
and I do not know what makes meso clumsy. . I never
do anything well.”

“ Don’t you suppose that if some boy should break
his leg, you would know how to speak a cheering word
. tohim? Then there would be one thing you could do
well.”

“Perhaps that’s the reason our dear Lord let me
break my leg,” suggested Herman eagerly.

“ Perhaps so. At any rate, you may be sure He did .
it for some good reason.”

“ Steiner,” he said, entering the shed where Max
was at work, ‘“‘ your boy needs encouraging. I cannot
understand how it happens that he thinks so meanly of
himself.”

Max took off his cap and looked confused.

“The old school-master said he was a dull boy,” he
replied.

All this time no one had dared to ask Herman to
own how he had happened to get lost. Even his
Or, the Little Preacher. 49

mother understood him so little as to dread hearing
that he had wilfully strayed away. One day, however,
when he seemed strong enough to do so, she begged
him to tell her all about it.

Herman told his story in his usual straightforward
way, though he made as little as possible of what he
had suffered.

“Then, mother,” he said, “as soon as I found I was
not in the right path, I thought I should soon strike
into it; I called and I called to father, but no answer
came, and I kept hurrying on. Then I was hungry
and ate my cake, or at least half of it; the rest I saved
for Bernhard. It is in my pocket now; I did not
want it after I got hurt.

“ At last it began to grow dark, and I knew then that
they had gone home, and that I was left there all alone.
It seemed so dismal! I thought if I ever got home
again, I would not mind father’s not liking me; it
seemed such a nice home, with the warm fire, and the
supper, and all the faces I loved around the table!
But it kept growing darker and colder, and I tried to
find some sort of a shelter; I was so tired, mother!
When it got to be bed-time, I knew Minna and Bern-
hard were saying their prayers, and so I thought I would
say mine. So I knelt down and prayed to our dear
Lord to take care of me. After that it did not seem so
dark and lonesome, but I had to keep walking and
jumping, it was so cold. At last, the first thing I
knew, I was falling and falling—ever so far, it seemed ;
and then Iwas sure my leg was broken, it hurt so.

“ By-and-by I heard father’s voice calling ‘ Her-
man |’
50 Herman ;

“ And I was just going to answer, but I remembered
that he would be so angry with me for getting such a
fall, and I knew I couldn’t walk home, and I didn’t
think he could carry me—Oh, mother ! I knew I wasn’t
worth carrying! So I kept still, and pretty soon I
heard the sound of his steps going further and further
off. Then it seemed darker and more lonesome than —
ever, and I called ‘Father /’ with all my might. But
he had gone. And after a while I got to thinking that
if they should find me and: carry me home, the doctor
would have to cut off my leg; and then I should be
such a plague to father. He never would want a boy
with only one leg. So I thought perhaps the dear
Lord would’nt mind that so much, but would let me
go to heaven just the same, and I asked Him; but I
don’t remember what happened next, only I found the
hole I had fallen into—for I thought it was a hole—
sheltered me from the cold, and I thought God was very
good to let me fall into such a nice place.’ By-and-by
it began to grow light, and that made home seem
nearer; but then I found I was lying on such a
narrow piece of the rock that, if I had moved the very
least bit, I should have rolled off and gone down,
down, ever so far, and been dashed to pieces. Don’t
you remember what a deep place it is, mother ?”

Yes, Doris remembered only too well.

“Tt seemed so strange,” continued Herman, “ that I
should have landed on that piece of rock, instead of
going all the way down. But it seemed yet stranger
that I should have lain so still all night, instead of
rolling over and getting killed. It made me think,
just for a little while, mother, that our dear Lord did

4
Or, the Little Preacher. 51

not care if I was a good-for-naught, and made me keep
still on purpose.

“Then I heard father calling again ; but I could not
get courage to answer him, for of all the bad things I
. ever had done this was the very worst. To fall down
into such a dangerous place, and break my leg! And
I couldn’t think of any way he could get me out, unless
he came down where I was; and that would be dread-
ful. But oh, mother, when I heard your voice, I
couldn’t help crying out, and wanting to see you. And
now, only think, ’m getting well, and father seems so
kind. "Why, when he saw me down in the crevice he
cried! Yes, I saw him! He eried, mother!”

By this time Doris had to run away and cry too.
But she soon came back, and made Herman try to get
to sleep, since recalling his sufferings thus had excited
him painfully.

The next time the school-master called to see Herman,
he said to him: “Has your brother told you what a
famous scholar he is making?”

“No, Herr Lehrer,” replied Herman. “It’s just as
hard for Bernhard to learn as it is for me.”

i “That does not signify. You will remember what

- you learn all the better. If he were my boy, and I
could afford it, I would have him, by-and-by, go to the
Latin school.”

“ And after that?”

“To the University.”

« And then?”

“Why, then, he could become a clergyman, or a
" professor, or a doctor, and make himself useful.”
Herman’s colour went and came,
52 fTerman ;

“T would be a clergyman if z were he !” he cried.

“Why 2”

“So as to preach to ae about our dear Lord.”
But after a moment his eager face clouded over.
“Father would never send him to the Latin school.
He wants us to be carpenters. And we're just as
clumsy as we can be |”

The school-master smiled.

“T should like to be a clergyman myself,” he said.
“T should ae to be just like Pastor Koffel.”

“Ah! yes,” cried Herman, “my grandmother is”
always talking about him. She says he taught her all
she knows. She loves him dearly. I saw him once,
and he looked so good.”

“Yes, he is good. And without goodness all the
Latin schools and all the universities in the world -
would be of little use to him.”

After the Herr Lehrer had gone, Herman called his
grandmother, and told. her all they had been talking
about.

“Grandmother,” he said, “I long to get well and
get out again, While I lie here, and can’t do anything
but think, think, my thoughts plague me.”

“Yes,” she said, “it is very tedious to lie still so
many weeks. But what sort of thoughts are they that
trouble you?”

“T want to tell you, but I can’t.”

“Do tell me, dear Herman.”

“Well, I keep thinking of all the bad things I have
done, and the times I have got angry, and then I am
afraid our dear Lord does not love me. Do you think
He does?” ¢
Or, the Little Preacher. 53

“T know He does,” she answered. “And He will
help you not to get angry so easily if you ask Him.”

“When I can go to school, and run about, and am
busy at work, I don’t have so much time to think.”

“Perhaps that is one reason why our dear Lord has
made you lie here idle so many weeks. But instead of
thinking all the time how bad you are, it would be
better to keep thinking how good He is.”

Herman smiled with pleasure, as he always did when
he got hold of-a new idea. And then his grandmother
soothed him by singing good old hymns, such as they
used to sing in her younger days, but had left far behind
in the distance, with the good old customs, she said.
And she told him that he must never forget what a
wonderful escape he had had; but often and often ask
our dear Lord why He spared his life on that terrible
night, since surely it was to do something for Him.
And whatever it should turn out to be, she said, it
would be beautiful and blessed, because it would be for
God, and not for man. After such talks, Herman always
folded his hands as soon as he was left alone, and
prayed silently that our dear Lord would take him for
His own loving child, and teach him to do His will
with all his heart; even if it should be, after all, to
turn him into a goose-boy. At last came the joyful
day when he could be taken from his bed and placed
in a chair, and sit once more at the table with the rest.
And then came the awkward attempt to use the crutches
his father had made for him. Nobody laughed at him
now for being clumsy, only he laughed at himself, and
was afraid he never should dare to bear his weight
upon the weak leg again.
CHAPTER IV.

INE afternoon when there was no school, the

children were left to amuse themselves as

@ they chose, and as by this time they had all

learned to do whatever Herman pleased, he proposed to

play something that would not oblige him-to hobble
about with his crutches.

“Let us play school,” be said. “I will be the
teacher, and you shall be the scholars.”

“Or else we'll play ey ” said Bernhard, “and
you shall preach-a sermon.”

Herman smiled, and hesitated a moment.

‘‘T’m afraid it would be wrong,” he said.

“Oh! we won't play in fun, we'll play in earnest,”
said Bernhard, “Come, Herman, begin.”

“JT don’t look much like it,” said Herman.. “I
ought to have a gown and bands.”

“Here’s mother’s apron,” said Minna. “See, Her-
man, I’lt dress you nicely. ‘There, now you look really
like the Herr Pastor. But the congregation is very
small.”

“ Never mind,” said Herman, and after a minute’s
thought he chose for his text the words: “ Little
children, love one another.”


et |||




Heriman; or, the Little Preacher. 55

earnest. Herman forgot that he was not a real clergy-
man, and the children forgot it too; they sat and
listened to him with wonder, his words sinking into
‘their very hearts and leaving there an ever-abiding
impression. .His mother, passing the door, stopped to
look in; she listened with amazement, and went out
to. the shop to tell Max. Poor Max, who had called
his. child a good-for-naught, instinctively took off his
cap, as he stood and heard the simple, untaught
eloquence that held him as it did the children, per-
fectly transfixed. In the midst of his sermon, Herman
suddenly caught a glimpse of his father, as he stood in
the doorway ; the old habit of fear came over him, and
he stopped short.

“Go on,” said Max, advancing into the room.

“T can’t, father,” said Herman, colouring, ‘“ We
were only playing make-believe church, and I was just
making believe preach to the children.”

Max said no more, and went back to his work. But
Minna and Bernhard talked about Herman’s preaching
at school next day, till half the children were curious
to hear for themselves such wondrous little sermons.
The school-master overheard the talk, too, and the next
time he saw Herman, asked him, playfully, to preach
to him as well as to the children. Herman was con-
fused and. surprised, and hardly knew what answer to
make. But when the teacher saw Max, he received
the impression that something quite uncommon had
occurred for Max did nothing but shake his head, and
call himself a fool and an idiot, and declare that never
again in his life would he trust his own senses.

“You should hear that boy!” he cried. “TI de-
56 Lferman ;

clare to you that the words flowed out of his mouth
as water flows from a fountain. And the words had
sense in them, too! And all his life I have called
him a good-for-naught !”

The next holiday afternoon, Borin promised.
neighbour Gischen’s Kurt and Lizette that they
should have the privilege of coming to play church
at their house, for mother had’ said so, and mother
wouldn’t say so unless it was right.

Kurt shrugged his shoulders and Lizette tossed her
head ; should they really demean themselves to that
degree? Should they permit neighbour's Herman,
who never said his lessons half so well as they said
theirs, to set oe up to preach to them? Pride
said, “Don’t go.” Curiosity said, “ Why, yes, go, and
see what it is as has turned the heads of those child-
ren.” So, at last, they decided to drop in for a few
minutes, especially if after the preaching they might
play at something more amusing.

. Bernhard felt rather uneasy at what he had done.
He knew that Herman did not like Kurt or Lizette,
and thought it very likely he would refuse to preach for
their edification. In fact, Herman did, at first, declare
that he was sorry they were coming.

“They'll just go to laughing at us,” he said, “and I
always get angry when people laugh at.me.”

“You'll have to get over such ways as that,” said
Minna. “ Who ever saw the Herr Pastor angry ?”

“Ah! but I am not the Herr Pastor,” said Herman,
“and I hate to be laughed at.”

“But there won't be anything to laugh at,” said
Bernhard. ‘You preach beautifully.”
Or, the Little Preacher. 7

“Do I?” cried Herman, quite astonished. “ Then
perhaps that is the reason.our dear Lord did not let me
fall to the bottom of the crevice that night.” He became
thoughtful almost to sadness, and though he felt happy,
longed for some solitary place where he could cry
without being seen.

Kurt came in the afternoon adorned with his most
waggish air. He said he and Lizette had made up
their minds that it would be nicer to play school than
to play church. He wanted to be the teacher, and
was sure he should make a vastly better one than the
master they had now. Herman consented at once,
but Minna and Bernhard were disappointed. How-
ever, books and slates were produced, and Kurt
enacted the teacher so well that scarcely one of the
children escaped without a shaking or a blow. He
found this amusement excellent, till Lizette, getting
angry, returned the box on the ear he had just given
her with all her strength; he then became furious,
and there would have been a serious contest, had not
Adolph ran crying to his mother, and told her what
was going on. She soon stopped the affray; and,
after sitting for a time in sullen silence, Kurt and
Lizette condescended to eat an apple or two, and peace
was restored.

“ How odd one must feel, hobbling about with
crutches!” cried Kurt. “I say, Herman, lend them
to me a moment. I want to see how it feels to have
your leg broken.”

“You can’t tell by just using crutches,” said Her-
man. “ My leg is about as good as it ever was, now,
only I am afraid to bear my weight on it.”
88 Herman ;

Kurt found moving about with the crutches even
more amusing than teaching school, and spent the rest
of the afternoon in frisking around the room with
them. When he and Lizette reached home, and
Babele asked them what sort of preaching they had,
he replied :

“Pooh ! he can’t preach. He made me keep school
and eat apples, and hop round with his crutches, all
the afternoon, I knew he couldn’t preach.”

«“ And even if he could,” said Lizette, “I don’t sup-
pose he could do it any better than we could. But he
just wants to set himself up above us.”

“ Ah! but if your father were alive, you could hold
up your heads as high as they,” said Babele.

Before the snow was off the ground, Herman was
able to gg to school again.. Max said no more about
making him into a goose-boy, but made a little sledge
and drew him to school himself, not daring to trust
him to the guidance of the other children. The
school-master gave him a cordial welcome, and all the
boys and girls came out to look at him with great
curiosity.

These were the beginning of happy days for Herman.
The school-master knew how to encourage him, and at
home his father was much changed. It is true that
the force of habit made him still often rough and
severe, but Herman knew now what a big warm heart
lay hidden under the scarlet vest, and that his father
really loved him; and we can bear almost anything
from those who love us. This was one of God’s
mercies. Otherwise there would be few happy house-
holds, faulty as most human beings are.
Or, the Little Preacher. 59

Thus things went on through the winter, and spring
found Max and his household all in unusual health
and spirits. Max had had plenty of work all winter,
and in spite of the expense of Herman’s illness had
managed to lay aside as much as usual against the
rainy day. Doris had spun quantities of fine linen,
and knit an endless number of stockings. The dear
old grandmother had also been able to accomplish more
than usual ; her health was certainly better since Max
left off harassing Doris so perpetually about the children.
Little Adolph was now able to go to school with the
rest, and for many hours of every day she could sit
with her Bible before her, knitting and meditating
and reading by turns, and preparing many a future
benediction for every one of them, by silent, fervent
prayers in their behalf. How many an aged mother
fancies herself “in the way,” and longs to be gone,
whose prayers are like guardian angels in the house and
home !

It was Easter morning, and Doris let all the children
sleep a little over the usual time, while she and her
mother moved noiselessly about in the garden in a
mysterious way. Doris had lost the anxious look she
used to wear, and was now a perfect picture of a bright
and happy young wife and mother. There was no
need to hold up those short skirts of hers as she tripped
lightly over the grass still wet with the morning dew ;.
all she had to think of was the basket on her arm and
the four children for whom she was preparing a plea-
sure. The basket was filled with eggs, some pure white,
and some red and green and blue. Under every bush,
and here and there among the grass, she hid them
60 Ferman ;

away ; the grandmother did likewise, till all the eggs
were gone. ‘

And now it was time to call the children and to
remind them that the hens always laid such remarkable
Pasch eggs on this auspicious day. Instantly they
sprang from their beds, and soon were running eagerly
about the garden, gathering in the prize with laughter
and delight.

“How can the hens know it is Easter?” cried
little Adolph. “Every year they lay for us such
beautiful eggs! But they never laid such lots and
lots as they have this time.”

While they were rejoicing over their treasures, they
saw the school-master coming up the road with a
basket on his arm.

Max, who was leaning on the gate, watching the
children, took off his cap, and invited him to-come in
.to breakfast. Though Doris was-herself the daughter
of a village teacher, the thought of entertaining one at
her table threw her into a perfect flurry of pride and
pleasure. She ran hither and thither to get the best
the house afforded, made pan-cakes, brought out sour-
krout and boiled eggs. Nothing seemed to her good
enough for her guest. She would have given her right
hand for a loaf of white bread to set before him.

After breakfast was over, and the teacher had spoken
a friendly word to each child, he beckoned Max
to follow him out to the bench, beneath the linden
tree.

“Steiner,” he said, “I want to ask you what you
mean to make of your boys?”

“My father was a carpenter,” returned Max, “ and
Or, the Little Preacher. 61

so was his father before him; and I expected, till
lately, to make my boys follow in the old track.”

“But you have changed your mind ?”

“Why, no, not exactly. But since you put it into
my head that my boys were not, after all, dull, as we
used to think them ; and since I’ve heard my Herman
get up and preach off a regular sermon, all out of his
own head, I’ve been thinking whether somebody else
couldn’t make more out of them than I could. They
don’t take to the trade, either of them.”

“Could you afford to send them to the Latin
school ?”

Max rubbed his head and tried to think what to
say. Could he take all those beloved, hardly earned
savings of his, and see them spent before his face and
eyes ?

“You can’t suppose I’m a rich man,” he at last
answered, evasively. “I won't deny that I’ve a little
laid by against a rainy day; but it would cost a great
deal to undertake to make two scholars out of one
house.” \

“That is true,” replied the other; “but I think it
my duty to tell you that these boys are very remark-
able in many ways. As carpenters they may make a
living, and lead comparatively useful and happy lives,
But our dear Lord has seen fit to make them more fit
for different work.”

Max moved uneasily in his seat, as he was wont to
do when troubled.

“We never had a scholar in our family,” he said,
“T don’t know that I care to have my boys brought

up to despise their forefathers. It seems to me that
: oe &
.

62 Herman ;

the trade that was good enough fox me is good enough
for them.”

“But you say they are unusually awkward at the
business.”

“Yes, but they are slow at their books, too,”
turned Max.

“Slow and sure,” said the school-master. “ Both
the boys have peculiar minds, I will own; Herman
especially. But I do not think you would regret g giving
them an education if you can afford to do it.”

“J will think it over, Herr Lehrer,” said Max.

“Pshaw!” he said to himself when the school-
master had taken leave, “how should he know what
a pair of boys will turn out? Have not I always
known they were dull at their books? And am I to
spend all I have laid up for my old age in having their
heads filled with Latin and such trash? I was never
taught Latin, and see now, I have a house of my own,
a bit of land, cows, hens, geese, “and money laid-up
into the. bargain. To be sure, it would be a’ great
thing to see my Herman in gown and bands, and to
hear people saying: ‘That is Maa’s Herman!’ But
then the money! All my little sayings that it has
taken me years to rake and scrape together! No, a
carpenter I am, and carpenters I will have for my sons.
Ha ! it would be a pretty thing to have a pair of wise-
acres in the house, continually setting the mother and
me right !”

In this mood he equipped himself in his holiday
suit, and went, with all his household, to church. The
dream of Doris had.so far come true, that Max had
silver buttons in his vest and silver buckles at his
Or, the Little Preacher. 63

knees ; he looked comely in her eyes, as now and then
she glanced at him across the church; there seemed to
be something in his face to-day that had hitherto been
wanting there. This was really the case. New thoughts
and new feelings had been awakened in his mind, and
a mighty struggle was going on within, between love
and pride on the one hand, and avarice and the force
of habit on the other.

“ Doris,” he said, as they walked home together,
“af we choose, we may one day see our Herman stand
and preach like the Herr Pastor to-day. Only I would
have it understood that he should never preach sermons
one could not comprehend,” .

“The Herr Pastor. is a very learned man,” replied
Doris. “Very likely he understands, himself, all he
says, which must make the preaching agreeable to him,
though dull to us. But what were you saying of our
Herman?”

Max repeated to her all the school-master had said.

In the first flush of her surprise and pleasure Doris
said some foolish things, which she afterwards wished
she had not said.

“T knew it would puff you up,” said Max.

“Well, and no wonder,” cried Doris, “ after the way
people have behaved about our boys. And I knew
all along that they were not of the common sort,
You should hear Babele Géschen run on about her
children.”

“Tf the Herr Pastor was not so high and mighty,
one might ask his advice,” said Max.

“Yes, if he were but like our blessed Pastor Koffer.
Max ; why don’t you go and consult with‘him? Think
64 LfTerman ;

now—he baptized us both, when we were little, and
surely he would take interest in our affairs now.”

“But the money, Doris ! the money!” cried Max.

“What is money good for unless it is used?” she
returned. “Ob, Max! we will work day and night,
and do without this and that, but we will make scholars
of our boys. Ah! I always said they were not dulk
I knew it in my heart of hearts.”,

“ Nay,” said Max, “but you must remember that we
shall be old one of these days and not able to work by
day, much less by night. I Yay lose my health and
be disabled, and then what would become of us ?
Think, now, all we have saved and laid by with so
much care must go to those two boys. And there are
Minna and Adolph to consider.”

“Your mother has often said she should leave all
she had to Minna. And as for Adolph, never fear
for him. THe can turn his hand to anything.”

“But all my savings!” said Max. “ Everything
going out and nothing coming in. Other boys will be
earning and sparing, and taking wives and settling
down, while ours are eating—no, studying, I mean—
their heads off. And in our old age we shall be beg-
gars, Doris.”

Doris would not be convinced. She could not ima-
yine Max as ever growing old. There was his mother,
now, as erect and blooming as a young maiden, and
doing more hard work in the open air than many men.
And, at any rate, the dear Lord had made the boys:
just as they were, and it was plainly His will that
they should make uncommon men. Had not they
always abhorred and shunned rude and bad boys?
Or, the Little Preacher. 65

Had not Herman made himself unpopular in the
village by shrinking from all wild games ?

“T will go and consult with my mother,” said Max
at length. “ Herman can go with me to-morrow, when
there will be no school. People say she has more than
silver pennies laid aside. Who knows what she may
choose to do with them 4”
CHAPTER V.

CCORDINGLY they set off carly next morn-
ing, and as they walked cheerfully along,
Max was struck with the intelligent ques-

tions asked by Herman. He wondered he had not

- observed before what a thoughtful boy he was, and felt

ashamed of the rough answers he had often made to

just such questions.

As they approached The village where his mother
lived, Max felt véry much as if he had brought some
strange and rare animal for her inspection. She had
always held Herman in.supreme contempt. His sen-
sibility outraged her undemonstrative nature, and she
never could forgive him for being so much like his
mother in character. Not that she had anything to
say against Doris—not she; she thanked Heaven she
knew better than to find fault with her sons’ wives,
But Max might have married a rich wife had he
chosen; and would ead go so far as to pretend ©
that ers was rich ?

As to Herman, he stood in mortal terror of his
“bie erandmother,” as he mentally called her, to dis-
tinguish her from the “ little grandmother” at home.
He always appéared his very worst in her presence ;



Ferman, or, the Little Preacher. 67

was sure to spill his coffee on her table, and to upset
her stocking-basket, and tangle her yarn about his
unlucky legs.

“Well, Max,” she said, without stopping her spin-
ning-wheel, “so you’ve come at last.”

“Yes, mother; and here is our Herman, come also.
You have not seen him since his accident, in the
winter.”

Herman took off his cap and made his best bow.

“A pretty little sum he has cost you!” said the big
grandmother, eyeing the boy from head to foot.

“Yes, but that is now over,” said Max, rubbing his —
hands. “Go out, Herman, and amuse yourself. I
have things of consequence to speak of.”

“ Ay, and so have I,” said the mother, as Herman
withdrew. “I have -bought the forty acre lot, and
taken a man to work it.”

“The forty-acre lot !” repeated Max slowly.

“Yes, that I have, And it brings me in a penny
or two—trust me for that. And if you do not believe
me, you can take a look into my stable and see what I
have there.”

“Yes, I have no doubt of it,” said Max absently.
“ But, mother, I want to consult you about Herman.”

“Very likely. But do you know that I have four
horses in my stable, besides six oxen and seven cows?”

“ Yes, yes, it is truly wonderful,” said Max. “When
I think how my poor father left things! But, mother,
about my Herman ?”

“ You want me to take him as my cow-boy, at last?
Nay, then, but you are too late. I engaged one a week
ago,”
é8 Flerman ;

“ Hang her cow-boy, and her four horses, and her
cattle!” said Max irreverently to himself. “ We have
found out that our Herman is a most wonderful boy !”
he said to her.

“Humph!” said the mother, and began to spin
again. ‘

“ And we are thinking of making a scholar of him.”

‘“ Humph !”

“His teacher thinks we ought,” said Max, despa-
rately. ‘Do advise me, mother.”

“Then I advise you to take this bit of wool, which
T present you as a free-will offering, and fill both ears
with it, The boy is dull, I tell you. I saw it from
the outset. A scholar, indeed !” .

“T shall do what I li€e with him!” cried Max
angrily. ‘

“Of course. And what you like with your Minna ;
for not a penny.of mine shall she touch if you waste
your savings on that silly boy.”

“You shall not call him silly twice to my face,”
cried Max. “Come hither, Herman,” he called from
the door. :

Herman came panting in, and seeing the passion his
father was in, hesitated on the threshold.

“Come in, child,” said Max, “and stand upon this
chair, and let your grandmother hear you preach.”

Herman shrank into half his size. 7

“Oh, father! Don’t make me! I can't! I don’t
know what to say.”

“Say what you said before,” said Max, taking him
by the arm and making him mount into the chair.

Poor Herman stood in the chair, a piteous sight,
Or, the Little Preacher. 69

_“J don’t remember what I said before. Oh, father !
please let me get down.” ,

“Say something new, then. Come, I will have your
grandmother hear you.”

“T can’t think of anything. It came of itself before.

Oh, dear father! please let me get down !”
' His father’s displeasure and disappointment and his
grandmother's cold scorn were more than he could bear.
He covered his face with his hands, and burst into
tears.

“Then get down and be off with you,” said the
grandmother. ‘You have taken all the polish from
my chair, as usual.”

Herman flew from the room and from the house ; he
would have been glad to fly from the world.

“T see there's no use in trying to convince you
mother,” said Max. “The child was frightened, and
no wonder. But I must do him justice whether you
will or not. And I say you will hear from him one of
these days, when he will perhaps interest you as much
as your new man and your horses and your cattle do
now.”

Then regretting that he had thus spoken—for, after
all, was she not his mother ?—he said :

“T hope your man is faithful and industrious?”

“You may well hope so,” she answered.

“ And treats you with respect?”

“Tet me alone for that, thank Heaven.”

“Who is he? One of the men of the village?”

“ His name his Peter Fiichse.”

“Peter Fiichse! What, he is your hired man?
You are joking, mother.”
70 Herman 5

“Nay, I did not say I hired him. I married him
yesterday.”

Max started to his feet.

“Tt is time for me to be gone,” he cried. “Peter
Fiichse! My father’s old enemy! Oh, mother!
May God forgive you, but this is a cruel, wicked
shame !”

He took his cap and turned to go. Once he looked
sorrowfully back, hoping to see some sign of tenderness,
one look of regret on her large, cold face. He went out
into the fresh air, hardly knowing which way to take.
For the moment, darkness seemed to have fallen on the
face of the whole e@th, and everything real to have left
it for ever. He called Herman, and took him by the
hand in token of forgtveness, and walked homeward
with rapid strides,

“ After this you have but one grandmother,” he said
at last to Herman. Sk:

“Which one is it?” asked Herman. “The little
one?”

“Yes, the little one.”

As they stepped inside the door, and Doris came
joyfully to meet them, Max stretched out his arms and
held her to his breast; he knew now all she was to
him. °

“ You are all I have left, now,” he said.

“What has happened, dear Max? Your mother—”

“ Has married Peter Fiichse! Peter Fiichse with his
horses, his cattle, and his cows. Peter Fiichse who
drove my father into his grave! Oh, Doris!”

Doris was too shocked to speak.. She cried over him
a little, and then ran to get the best supper she could
Or, the Little Preacher. a1

think of. Once she stopped to kiss her mother, and to
say half laughing, half in earnest :

“Think, mother! It might have been you!”

Max ate his supper, which was none the less agrec-
able that his mother had not offered him a dinner, and
was comforted. That Herman should go to the Latin
school was now a settled thing. His mother’s opposi-
tion had done more than the urgency of Doris.

“Tf it costs me my last penny, and I have to sell the
roof from over our heads, my boys shall be put into
positions where their grandmother shall have to look
up to them, in spite of herself.”

“Dear Max,” said Doris’s mother, laying her hand
gently on his shoulder, “don’t talk thus. If you
educate the boys, let it be that they may be more
useful, and because our dear Lord seems to choose to
have it so.”

Max looked up at her kindly.

“We'll do it for all sorts of reasons,” he said;
“yours, and mine, and the dear mother’s.”

It was not. time for Herman to leave the village-
school yet, but it was thought best to tell him that he
was not to be made a carpenter, but to go to the Latin
school in the next village, and learn a great many
things that boys were not usually taught.

“And is Bernhard to go, too?” asked Herman.
“ Because the school-master said Bernhard was such a
good scholar; and he did not say I was.”

“We shall see,” replied Max.

Not a little talk went on in the village when it
became known what Max meant to do with his Herman.
Bibele Géschen especially, as their particular friend and
72 flerman s

neighbour, felt called upon to bear the whole burden of
the boy’s schooling, which she said would cost all the
money Max could make for years to come; and why
was Herman, she should like to know, to be set up.
above other boys, and have it put into his head that
he should aim to be a clergyman ?

Max, however, did not disturb himself about what
people said, but worked on with patient industry, saying
little about his plans or his boys, and every week laying
aside something toward the future. His shame and
sorrow about his mother were toning down the asperities
of his character; he saw, too, to what lengths the love
of money might carry one, since it had led her to form
this disgraceful marriage, and had hardened her heart
against her children. Thus the sacrifice he was making
in behalf of Herman had its ennobling effect, and was
elevating him above himself, Then began to arise in
his soul occasional misgivings as to the worldly life he
was leading; the noiseless influence of his wife’s mother
was doing its unconscious work.

A holiday drew Kurt and Lizette to the house
one afternoon, and of their own accord they pro-
posed to the children to play at church, and have
some preaching.

“Well, so we will,” said Herman. He threw his
mother’s red apron over the back of a chair and
placed himself on a block of wood behind it. Minna
found another apron to serve as gown. Herman had
cut wood on this block for many a year; it served very
well, however, as a pulpit, and Adolph rang the bell for
church, as soon as everything was arranged.

Minna came to her seat with her doll in her arms, when
Or, the Little Preacher. Wi

everybody cried that playthings were not allowed in
church. .

“But mothers take their babies,” urged Minna, “and
mine never cries.”

The sermon began. At first with hesitation and
shyness; but after a few moments Herman forgot
everything in his subject, and a torrent of words came
pouring out. that would have astonished even himself if
he would have stopped to think of himself. He uttered
a child’s thoughts in a child’s language, but with such
vivacity and earnestness that every word went to the
heart. Minna’s head sank lower and lower as he went
on; her doll lay forgotten upon her lap; something
within her seemed to whisper: ‘ You have always been
called a good child, and no one has found fault with you
as they have with Herman; and yet he loves our dear
Lord better than you do.” For Herman spoke from
his own experience; he had been misunderstood, and
solitary, and almost broken-hearted. He had suffered
bodily pain and mental anguish; he had prayed _to
God, and God had heard him ; and. he would have all
these children pray too.

Bernhard, lost in admiration, sat spell-bound in his
chair; he forgot that sore subject, the short sleeves of
his jacket, about which he had been fain to cry, and to
wish his arms would not grow so fast; he saw and
heard nothing but Herman, and his eager face and
glowing words.

It was curious to watch the faces of Kurt and
Lizette. They were determined not to be serious, and
not to admire, yet in spite of themselves they listened
with wonder, almost with incredulity.
74, Herman ;

“He gets it all out of some book,” Lizette whispered.
“But he-says it off beautiful. It seems.as if he really
was in earnest, but he’s only making believe.”

But now the sermon was ended, and Herman jumped
down from his block, flushed and excited. “Good-bye,”
said Kurt, “we must go now. I shouldn’t wonder if
after you'd been to the Latin school you could say
something out of your own head.”

He went home with Lizette in silence, and with un-
conscious envy in his heart.

Meanwhile another little audience had listened to
the sermon—father and mother and grandmother, with
beating hearts and fingers on their lips. As the con-
gregation within broke up, they retreated from the door
where they had been listening, and the children camo
quietly out. ,

“It’s perfectly wenden nie Max. “There never
was anything like it in my family. If that boy is dull
and stupid, I should like to see one who isn’t, that’s all.

“ Tt is very plain what he was meant for,” said Doris,
wiping some tears of pride and pleasure from her eyes.
“Mother, you must tell him. All the good things he
knows you have taught him.”

That night, after Herman was in bed, his grand-
mother went to him.

“You see now that our dear Lord knew all the time
what you were good for.”

“Am I really good for anything?” cried Herman,
starting up.

“ Of course you are. You are good at preaching.”

“Oh! that is nothing, I just say the words, that
is all,” 3
Or, the Little Preacher. 75

“But when you are a man, it will be different,
Think, now, your dear father is going to spend on you
all he had saved for his old age. One of these days
you will be a learned man, and if you are good, as well
as learned, perhaps you will be a real clergyman, and
can teach the people to love God. But the main thing
will be to love Him ycurself. ‘Without that, all the
learning in the world would be of no use.”

“Oh! I never shall be good enough to be a clergy-
man, grandmother. Think what a temper I’ve got |”

“Yes, know. But you must conquer that.”

Herman shook his head, yet pleasant thoughts were
in it, and he fell asleep and had yet. pleasanter dreams,

Meanwhile Kurt and Lizette talked not a little, at
school, about Herman and his performances, and before
long he was called, ‘‘ Herr Pastor,” and “The Little
Preacher,” all over the village.

At first he shrank from these titles, given as they
were in derision, but after a time they ceased annoying
him, under the pressure of new interests. For Max
was resolved to delay no longer placing him in the
Latin school, which, being in the next village, he could
attend every day, coming home at night.

For a few weeks Herman suffered agonies of shyness ,
in his new sphere ; his teachers would have misjudged
and overlooked him, had not rumours from his own
village reached them, which prepared them to do him
justice. His new schoolmates were disposed to laugh
at him and his clothes, and ali he did and said; this
led to some flashes of the Steiner temper, and many
tears of repentance on his part. Every night, when he
went home, he had his day’s experience to relate; his
76 Herman ;

grandmother watched him with anxiety, knowing to
what varied temptations he was now exposed ; but as
for Max and Doris, they were too proud of him to
doubt that he would turn out well.

The most trying thing he had to contend with was
the frequent meetings with his “big grandmother,” the
Latin school being in her village.

Seeing him shrink from her in terror, she took pains
to throw herself in his way, and she found it very
amusing to see the colour ‘come and go in his cheek, at
her rough salutations. She tortured him to such a
degree that oftentimes he was tempted to beg his father
to let him leave school altogether; but real love of
knowledge held him back. These encounters with her,
and with the boys who took delight in teasing him,
made the getting home at night very pleasant. There
was such a welcome awaiting him from every one, and
the old smoke-stained room looked so pleasant !

Thus a year passed away, when things began to take
another turn. Max, who had never had a pain, or
known a day’s illness, took one, day a violent cold,
neglected it, and was seized with a fever. “Week after
week passed, and he lay helpless upon his bed, broken
in body and broken in spirit, and suffering fearfully
with pain. At first he would have Herman keep on
with his school, but gradually they had to consent to
his staying at home; there were cattle to attend to,
and cows, and Doris had more than she could do to
take care of Max, while her mother, with Minna’s help,
did the rest. Herman had not forgotten, and never
could forget, what his father had done for him during
his own illness, and he now devoted his every spare
Or, the Little Preacher. 77

moment to his comfort. During the year he had grown
up tall without losing his strength; he could therefore
help to lift his father, and in many other ways make
himself useful.

. As Max became more and more feeble, he began to
look at Herman with wistful eyes, as if there was some-
thing he wanted to say to him that he had not strength
to say. Everyone observed it, but no one dared ask
what it meant. One day, however, when Herman was
alone with his father, this yearning look went so to his
heart that he was constrained to speak.

“ Dear father,” he said, “you.-want to say something
to me, and cannot. If it is about my education, don’t
give it another thought. While you are so sick, I
could not study, if I would; and if you never get well,
I will take your place, and learn to be a carpenter, and
mother ana'the children shall not suffer want.”

An expression of infinite relief spread over the face
of Max, and for a time he seemed to have done with
care, and to have nothing to do but to get well. But
it was not long before his face assumed a yet more
anxious expression, amounting, at times, to horror, so
that Doris and the children shrank from secing him.

The words of Herman, “If you should not get well,”
had suggested the question whether he was fit to die ;
and in his enfeebled state he could ill afford to grapple
with such a question, In his days of health he had
not troubled himself with such queries. He said to
himself that he did about as well as he knew how,
and far better than some of his neighbours ; that he
had never defrauded any man; and that God was mer-
ciful. And, at all events, there would be plenty of

F
78 Herman ;
. * ,
time to attend to his soul when sickness or -old age

should lay him aside from the work that now occupied
every moment. And now he had, indeed, plenty of
time—but what sort of time? He could not fix his
mind on any subject two minutes together; there was
only a vague sense of misery and fearful uncertainty.

In the midst of this illness, there came a message
from his mother, that Peter Fiichse had been kicked by
one of the horses, and lay at the point of death. They
did not trouble him with’ this news, but returned, for
answer, that Max lay, likewise, in a critical state.

Thus week after week dragged slowly on, and then
there came a slight change for the better. The pain
subsided, and Max lay, day after day, night after night,
in profound sleep. They were obliged to awaken him
to give him nourishment and restoratives ; otherwise
he would have slept away his life. The care of him
now was less painful to his friends, but not less serious ;
he needed more tender, judicious nursing than the
veriest infant.

And while he lay thus, hovering between life and

- death, another little daughter was born, and as Doris
pressed her to her heart, her faith in God was weak,
and her anguish strong within her, as she asked why
the one must be given, and the other taken?

“ Don’t ask why, dear,” her mother said, “ we never
can be happy till we stop asking why.”

“TI don’t want to be happy,” said Doris. “To
think that I am lying here, po when my Max needs
me so much !”

“The Herr Lehrer sat with int last night, and even
you, Doris, could not be more tender and kind. Her-
Or, the Little Preacher | 79

man slept well, and to-night he will be able to sit up
again. Dear child, can’t you trust Max to our Lord ?”

“No, mother, I cannot. The doctor says everything
depends-cn nursing, now ; and, oh! with all there is to
think of, some of you will forget to waken him at the
right moment. And I can’t live without’Max! Do
you hear, mother? I can’t live without him!”

“ You cannot put yourself in the place of God, my
Doris. You may watch day and night and do every-
thing the doctor directs ; but only our dear Lord can
make what you do to prosper. ‘Try, dear, not to have
any will of your own. Try, dear. I am an old
woman, and have had my sorrows, and have done
fighting against my Lord.”

Doris looked at her mother, as she spoke these words
in her gentle, tender way, which yet was so full of con-
viction, and was struck with the heavenly expression of
her countenance. She hid her face in the pillow, and
in broken fragments of prayer tried to say, “Not my
will, but Thine, O God.” But how hard it was to say
it with faith and holy courage! She was afraid, even
while the words were on her lips, that He would take
her at her word, and snatch away everything she loved
better than she loved Himself.

“Mother,” she said at last, “how came you to feel
so differently from what I do? Did it come all of
itself? When you were as young as I am now, hadn’t
_ you a will of your own?”

“Indeed I had, my Doris; and idols of my own,
also, But our dear Lord took pains with me, and bore
with me, and kept on teaching me as fast as I kept on
forgetting ; and when He found nothing else would do,
80 Hlerman ;

He used the rod; ah! yes, He used the rod. First of
all, he took away my little Herman. He was a brave
boy, and I was proud of him, and so he had to go,
Then I yan straight to my dear Lord, just as little
Adolph runs to you when you chastise him, for I was
very sorry ; and thanked Him for afflicting me.”

“ Thanked Him! Oh no, mother!”

“Nay, but what would you have of your child,
my Doris? So then, seeing how sorrowful I was,
and how I really did want to love Him more than
all else besides, He took my Kilian, my little heart's
child, the very one I could least spare. And then
— but oh, my Doris! you know it all—one child
after another came and went; it seemed as if all
they came for was to tear me in pieces in the going!
And then, last of all, hardest of all, I had to let go my
~ hold on your dear father, and let him go too.”

“But mother, while God was doing such dreadful
things to you, did you keep on loving Him ?”

“Keep on! Why, don’t you see, my Doris, that
they made me love Him more than ever? For these
were the answers to my prayers.”

“ Yes, I see. ‘ But He does not take such dreadful
ways to answer everybody’s prayers.”

“ He takes the very best way, my Doris.”

“But, mother, think how many people never have
any trouble. They never lose their children, and every-
thing goes on smoothly. Why should they have such
nice times, and you have such hard times? J don’t
see.”

The mother only smiled. But presently she said:
“T do not know, and I do not want to know; at least
Or, the Little Preacher. 8I

not now. And then as to the nice times! Ah! God
gives them to those that love Him !”

“‘ Mother, you are a wonderful woman.”

“ No, dear. But we have a wonderful Saviour.”

Doris said no more. She only clasped her hands,
and looked upward.

At that moment Herman came softly in.

“Dear father is awake,” he said, “and knows us all.
He keeps asking for you, mother.”

**Tn three days I shall be up and about,” cried Doris,
eagerly. “Go, Herman, and tell him so. Or stay, take
the baby to him, that he may know why I forsake him.”

“ No, dear,” said her mother, “ but we will tell him
you will soon be there.”

But the little one, resenting the style in which she
was overlooked, set up a shrill cry that announced to
her father that there was a new voice in the house.

He smiled as he heard it.

“ Bring the little thing to me,” he said.

But when they brought it, his eyes filled with tears,
and he said : “I am just as helpless as that feeble baby.”

Yet he grew strong faster than the baby did, and
was soon able to sit up in bed and act like himself.
And yet unlike himself, for his long illness had taught
him lessons that were to renovate his life.

“T shall be a better husband after this,” he said to
Doris, at their first joyful meeting.

“ And I shall be a better wife,” she answered.

“TJ don’t see how that can well be. But, as for
myself, I have thought too much about this world, and
too little about the next.”

“So have I,” said Doris.
82 Herman ;

“ But when I came to face death, I saw what a
mistake I had been making all my life long. Ah!
Doris, it is a great thing to die!”

“Yes,” she answered, “and so it is to ive and get
ready to die.”

After a pause, she added :

“Something very serious has happened while you
were ill. Peter Fiichse was kicked by one of his
horses, and is dead.”

“Tt may be the saving of my mother,” said Max.
“Give me the baby. What a tender, soft little thing
it is! Do you know, dear old Doris, what I want to
call this child?”

Doris changed colour. Was Max going to give the
little one his mother’s name, now that she was left so
rich ?

Max saw what she was fearing.

“You need not be afraid of that,” he said. “No, I
am going to give my child the name of the best woman
in the world. She shall have your mother’s name, and
be called Magdalena.”

This was a happy moment for Doris, but she could

not speak a word.

"Vou see, my mother could give florins, but your
mother will give prayers,” said Max.

And now came the question, how their affairs were
standing. Herman brought the account-book, and
showed his father what had been spent during his
illness, and what was yet to be paid. There was
enough to pay off every debt, and to keep them all
comfortable until Max should quite recover. But that
was all, Herman must not go back to school,
Or, the Little Preacher. 83

“Don't look so distressed, father,”, he said, at the
close of their discussion, “I have known it all along.
And I am not so awkward and clumsy as I used to be.
Yow shall see a book-case I have made for the Herr
Lehrer, while you were ill. Iam sure I can become a
carpenter, and help’ you to support the family. And
perhaps, by-and-by, we can send Bernhard to school, if
I give up going.”

All the prayers and tears that enabled Herman
thus cheerfully to renounce the life that had looked
so attractive, were sacred matters between himself
and his God.

Max returned to his shop, and Herman worked
faithfully all day long at his trade.

Babele Géschen was relieved thereby of a great care.

“T always said they were throwing away their
money,” she declared; “and now they’ve found out
that their Herman was no such wonder, after all.
Folks say he found the lessons too hard,.and was glad
to settle down to work, like other folks. It’s hard for
them, having the old grandmother to feed. What old
folks are for I can’t imagine. Why, don’t they die off
instead of the young ones ?”

The first day Max was able to go to his work, he
called his household together, and read a chapter from
the large Bible, and prayed.

“T came up, as it were, from death,” he said, “and it
is fitting I should begin a new life.”

And this came of having “ that old grandmother to
feed.”
CHUAPTER VI.

4 AX was not so strong since his illness as he
was before, and could not do so much in a

ws day. He could not help feeling troubled
that ai he made must be spent; the old habit of
pinching and saving had still much power over him.
Tt was necessary for Doris to take a maid to help her
in the household task; she was never herself after the
anxiety and fatigue of Max’s illness. And there
was this obstacle in the way of her recovering her
strength—the baby gave her no rest, day or night, but
was a marvel of wakefulness, a regular watch-dog, her
father called her, enough to frighten away all the
robbers in the world. .

Some of the old women said she was crying for
something which, if she could once have, she would for
ever after hold her peace. Various extraordinary articles
of food were accordingly administered, but none of
them proving to be the right one, the baby kept on
crying, and Doris kept on walking the room with her,
in order, if possible, to let Max sleep quietly, at least
through his first sleep. Naturally. enough, as their
cares increased, and their health and strength decreased,
both Max and Doris grew less lively and talkative.



Flerman,; or, the Little Preacher. 85

The neighbours said they were growing old, and some
said they were getting too religious.

Meanwhile there was no communication between
Max and his mother. He had not time or strength
to go to see her, and she could not take one of her six
horses from the field long enough to go to him. She
drove all before her, bought more land and more cattle,
and, the neighbours declared, grew younger and more
blooming every day. Peter Fiichse had left her houses
and land and cattle, his own vile name, and a character
much degenerated by his influence.

Every remembrance of her brought pain to Max.
He felt that it was owing to her precepts and examples
that he had grown up so avaricious and eager for gain.
Then all his harshness to his children, was not that in
imitation of the treatment he had received from her all
his life? Still, she was his mother, and had nourished
and brought him up; yet he had parted from her in
anger, and with bitter hatred in his heart.

“T can’t stand it this way much longer,” he said to
Doris. “I must go to see my mother, and try if there
can be peace between us.”

“T fear she will never forgive us the baby’s name,”
said Doris. “Dear Max, is it well to go?”

“Yes, it is well. And the sooner it is over the
better. To-morrow, being a holiday, I will go and
have done with it.”

' The next morning he put on his Sunday suit, and
set forth alone. He still looked pale, and his garments
hung loosely upon his wasted frame, and when he
reached his mother’s house, he was exhausted by the
long walk.
86 Herman ;

Kiverything looked as it did when, three years ago,
he made what he then meant should be his final visit.
His mother, not a day older, sat erect as ever at her
wheel, and scolded her maids as a pastime.

“Well,” she said, exactly as before, “so you’ve come
at last.”

“Yes, mother, I have come. You know I have been
sick, and could not come sooner.” ‘=

She just gave him a glance, and went on with her
‘spinning. Yet in that glance she saw the pale face,
the wasted figure, and the loosely fitting garments.

“Hedwig!” she cried through the open door-way.
“Hedwig, do you mean to spend the whole day in
watering that linen? And you; Marthe, can you find
nothing better to do with your hands than to roll them
in your apron?”

The frightened maids took speedy flight in confusion.

“They say the storks have brought your Doris
another daughter,” she continued in the same tone. —

“Yes,” said Max.

“« And you have doubtless given it my name, now that
I am become rich,” she cried with a boisterous laugh.

“‘No, I have not given it your name, mother,” he
answered quietly. “I call it Magdalena, after its
grandmother.”

“ Ah! she has so much to give it for its dowry!”

“T will tell you the honest truth, mother. My long
sickness has made me eupibe man.”

“So I see.”

“Nay, but listen, mother, I mean that it has put
new thoughts into my mind. It has shown me that
there are things of more value than houses and lands,”
Or, the Little Preacher. 87

He waited a moment, but there was no comment,
only the wheel flew faster than ever.

“T used to put them first,” he added at last, “but
now I put first eternal salvation for me and my house.”

“Wave you anything more to say?” she asked, and
joined a broken thread with infinite care.

“Nothing, mother. Only as you are getting old,
and sickness and death must come sooner or later—”

“Getting old!” she cried. “Ha, ha! Inever was
so young in my life. But now it is my turn to speak.

What have you done with that boy Herman?”

' “Ffe is at home, and works at his trade.”

“Works at his trade, does he? How dare you look
me in the face, Max Steiner? You think, I suppose,
that I have neither eyes nor ears. Let me tell you,
then, that I know quite well what they say of him
in the Latin school, and what they think of you for
taking him out of it. His trade, indeed! When,
with such wits as his, he might one day become Staats-
minister.”

“You do not understand the case, mother. In the
first place, my illness made it necessary to take him
- from school. In the second place, the idea of making
a great man of him has never crossed my mind.”

“Tt has crossed mine, though,” she answered
sharply.

“ At any rate, I can’t help it that I am not the man
Iwas; and that I have not now the money necessary
to educate Herman.”

“ And I suppose I have not either?” she said; and
round flew the wheel.

“You don’t mean, mother—”
88 Herman ;

“Yes, Ido mean. The fact is, I always knew that
all that ailed your Herman was having too much
sense. He inherited it from me. Oh! you needn't
smile. I know all about it, child. Do you suppose
that if I hadn’t more sense than most folks, I should
be the richest woman in the village? People may call
it luck if they choose, but I say it isn’t luck. It’s
sense. And if I had been a boy instead of a girl, and
been sent to school instead of to work in the field, I
should be one of your learned men this minute. Thank
Heaven, red hair and a fiery temper aren’t the only things
Herman has got from me; he'll make us all proud of
our name, mark my words.”

“But mother—”

“Nay, let me talk. The boys may come, I say;
there is room enough in this house that I have rebuilt,”
she added, looking grandly about her. “The Latin
school is but a stone’s throw hence, and as for the
money, ycu may thank Peter Fiichse that he has left
me a few florins, ha! ha!”

At the name of Peter Fiichse, Max reddened and
then grew pale.

“T cannot have my boys indebted to that man,” he
cried. 4
“Pshaw! Well, then, I have a few florins of my
own, it is just possible. And as I was saying, the boys
may come, but they may not go. I shall henceforth
resume the name of Steiner, and the boys shall bring
honour to it. After all, Peter was a bad, vile man; I
am not sorry to forget him. Yes, let the boys come
and divert my mind.” ;

“But, mother—”
Or, the Little Preacher. 89

“Nay, it is all settled. Latin school, university,
books, clothes ; I shall pay for all out of my own pocket.
And as to the clothes, let me tell you that your Doris will
not know her own sons when she sees them. I shall not
condemn them to go with eight or ten inches of bare
wrist grown beyond their jacket-sleeves, as she does.”

“You forget, mother, that we have been forced to be
saving. Besides, have not you boxed my ears more
than once for making an ado about just such jackets?”

“Well, let it pass. Let it pass. Ah! there is one
thing I came near forgetting to say. The boys are to
leave behind them all the canting, solemn ways your
Doris and her mother have taught them. I won't have
such things in my house. I want nothing about me
but what is cheerful and pleasant.”

“But my boys are like two young birds,” said Max.
“Why, mother, do you really imagine that religion
makes them gloomy?”

“No, I don’t fancy. I know it. Young birds indeed !
Why, your Herman, whenever I met him, when he was
here at the school, was like a solemn little owl.”

“That is because he is so afraid of you, mother.
And he is really a God-fearing boy.”

“He must be cured of that. He has sense enough
to make his way in the world if one drives the nonsense
out of him.”

“Mother!” his voice made her stop spinning and
look at him in dumb amazement. ‘Mother, my
boys shall never come to you on such terms. Sooner
than trust them to your hands, I would saw the boards
and choose the nails for their coffins: aye, and do it
with tears of joy.”
90 Flerman ;

“Very well, Have it as you like.”

“But can nothing be said, can nothing be done to
save you? Not for the sake of the boys, but for your
own sake, mother, mark what I say. Life at best is
short.”

“There, no more, no more. The thing is settled.
Go your ways and I will go mine. No child of mine
shall ever preach to me or set himself up above me.
My mind is made up, and you know, Max Steiner, that
you might as well try to move all the mountains in the
land, as to move me.”

Max did know it. He took his cap, cast upon
her a look of unspeakable sorrow, and went out. His
step as he crossed the threshold was the weary step of
an old man; she saw and heard it, and went on
spinning.

He crossed the fields, and scarcely looking upon
them, yet felt how rich they were. He saw the barns
which the men were filling with hay and with grain,
and passed them also, as if he saw them not, He was
aiming for a grove, whither in his boyhood he had
often fied from his mother’s harsh words, to gnash his
teeth, and vent the passions and hatred he dared not
show. Here he now threw himself upon his knees,
and prayed. For he wanted to be sure that he had
done right in throwing away what she had offered his
boys, and he wanted to quiet the commotion of his
spirit.

“The dear father is late to-night,” said Doris.
“ His mother has doubtless made him stay to rest him-
self. It isa pity he did not decide to pass the night
with her, and so escape your cries, my little Lena.
Or, the Little Preacher. gli

Adolph, run out now, and see if your father is in
sight.”

“Yes, mother, here he comes,” said Adolph, “and he
looks dreadfully tired.”

“Tm getting old, my Doris,” he said, smiling as he
caught her anxious look.

“T'll have supper, directly,” she said.

As they gathered about the table, Max patted
Adolph’s head.

“Father,” said the child, “I like you alos as well
as mother. You are a great deal nicer than you used
to be.”

Doris tried to hush him, but Max looked upon him
kindly, and said :

“That ig true, my little man.”

Tt was a tiresome evening to Doris. Max lay asleep
on the bench till bed-time, and she could not ask what
sort of a visit he had had. Then when he awoke, and
the other children had gone to bed, the baby woke also,
and began to cry.

“JT can’t talk when the child is crying,” said Max.
“ Besides, I am too tired to talk. ‘Let us go to sleep
now.”

“Tt is easy to say ‘ Let’s go to sleep,’ thought Doris,
“but. it is not so easily done when one has a screaming
baby in one’s arms. Well, if there was anything good
to tell, Max could not keep it to himself, Iam sure. I
did hope his mother’s hard heart would melt when she
saw how he looked, and that she would even offer to
do something for Herman. Max,” she cried, “let me
just ask one thing before you go to sleep. Did your
mother give you a dinner ?”
92 Fleriman ;

“No, I came away.”

“ But she offered you wine ?”

ce No. oa

“What a mean, stingy, wicked thing! I wonder you
did not drop dead on the way !”

“T never can help laughing when you try to get into
a passion,” said Max, rousing up. “It is so ridiculous.
You make believe in such a poor way. I wouldn’t try,
if I were you. ~ Now, what will you say when I tell
you that she offered to take both the boys off our hands
and educate them ?”

Doris replied by laying down her baby and running
to put both her arms around his neck.

“‘ Wait till you hear the rest. I refused her offer.”

“You refused? Oh, Max!”

“ Yes, I refused. She would only take them on one
condition, and that was, that they should live like a
pair of heathen. But I really am too tired to speak
another word, especially when I have to shout so as to
drown that little woman’s voice. To morrow, I'll tell
you everything ; and you will come in the end to think
I did what was best.”

Doris said no more, and after a time the baby fell
asleep, and she could snatch a few hours’ rest before
morning.

But Max must then go to his work, and defer enlight-
ening her curiosity.

When he reached the shop he found Herman already
there, whistling gaily, and engaged on a dainty bit of
carving.

“Look, father!” he cried, “I am carving. I in-
vented the pattern, and have done all this.”
Or, the Little Preacher. 93

Max took the wood from -Herman’s hands, and exa-
mined the work with care.

“Tt is well done,” he said.

This was high praise from his lips, and Herman was
satisfied with it.

“JT went to see your grandmother yesterday.”

“Yes, father.”

‘And she proposed to take upon herself the whole

- expense of your education. And of Bernhard’s also.”
‘Herman turned pale, and the bit of wood fell from his
hands. —

“Tt is too good to be true!” he cried.

“ But hear the rest. You are to live with her as
long as you are in the Latin school, and promise to live
without the fear of God.”

Herman stooped to pick up his work from the floor.
It was broken.

“Do you think I can fasten this together with glue,
father?”

Max was annoyed at this evasion of the subject in
hand.

“Stick to the subject,” he said, in somewhat of his
old, hasty way.

“Oh, father! It came upon me so suddenly.
‘When you began, I was so glad and thankful! Not
but that I am contented just as I am. For I really
am. But I was so surprised that grandmother should
think of such a thing; and it seemed as if our dear
Lord really did mean I should have an education.
And then came the disappointment.”

“The disappointment?” said Max. “Do you mean

that you will not accept your grandmother’s offer ?”
G
94. fTerman ;

“ All her horses could not drag me there?” replied
Herman.

“Thank God!” said Max.

“‘ What did you tell my grandmother, dear father ?”

“ Pretty much what you have told me,” replied Max,

smiling.
' Herman went on with his work, but there was no
more whistling that day. Max looked at him now and
then with pride and pleasure.

That night little Lena thought it best to sleep and
give her parents time to discuss family affairs, Max
then gave to Doris the whole history of his visit to his
mother. ‘

“ But Herman could not have been injured by living
with his grandmother,” said Doris, “he is so decided.
and steady. And think of the good he might have
done to her!”

“T knew how you would feel,” said Max. “But if
you should ever have to stand face to face with death,
as I have done, you would see as plainly as I do, that
I have chosen well for my boys. And I am thankful
to say that Herman is satisfied with my choice.”

Doris sighed.

“ What will Bibele Géschen say, I wonder?”
thought she. “ Well, I dare say, dear ies is right.
But such a chance will never come again.” ¢

It was some relief, when she talked it over with “her
‘mother, to find that she quite justified Max.

«But Herman is growing up so tall and straight;
and to see him standing in the pulpit, with gown and
bands like our Herr Pastor, would be a sight, indeed.”

“Yet since our dear Lord will net have it so, we
Or, the Little Preacher. 95

must not fret about it,” said the grandmother. “The
time has been that we were satisfied to have the boys
become carpenters, and surely they might be in worse
business.”

“ Yes, there is Babele’s Kurt begining to idle away
his time at the ale-house,” said Doris. “Iam ashamed
to think how ungrateful I am.”

The little household now settled down. for the
winter, in peace. Minna had got through the usual
round of studies at the village school, and was now at
home, ready to help her mother in all the household
cares and labours, She had always been a staid and
quaint little damsel, and now she became everybody’s
right hand. She made the bread, and boiled the soup,
and swept the house; on Sundays she laid out upon
their beds the holiday suits and the clean linen for her
father and brothers, and at night her careful hands
restored everything to its place again. The maid could
now find leisure to help with the spinning, and another
cow was bought that butter might be made for the
market. In all the village there was not so well-
ordered or so happy a household.

Since Herman had developed a taste for carving,
Max allowed him to devote himself to it, as a business ;
it proved to be profitable and agreeable. The long
winter evenings were given him for his own use; and,
as well as he could, he kept on with his studies for the
mere love of them. The Herr Lehrer came occa-
sionally to give him a little help, but it was not much
he could give, for, though himself richly endowed by
nature, he was poor, and his education was limited.
‘He had a wife and a child, and little leisure for study.
CHAPTER VII.

EAR mother,” said Doris, as she sat in the
midst of her family one wintry night, “how
happy and contented we all are! JI am
oled now that Herman lives at home with us, instead
of being off in the world, worrying over books and for-
getting his old home. But after I heard the beautiful
sermons he preached to the children, I truly thought he
was cut out for a preacher.”

“They still call me the ‘little clergyman,’ in the
village,” said Herman, looking up with a smile. ‘“ And
Tam nearly as tall as father. But who can be at the
door this cold night ?”

He unbolted the door, and there rushed in, like a
tempest, the unexpected apparition of the “ big grand-
mother.”

“Well!” she cried, “so I’ve come at last!”

“ And you are welcome, mother,” said Max, rising.

“You are welcome,” said Doris. But she said to
herself: “ Goodness ! where are we to put her to sleep?
And what would she fancy for supper ?”

‘Meanwhile the new comer shook herself to rights,
and made everybody help her get off her things.

“T have come to stay,” cried she, “so you must get


flerman ; or, the Little Preacher. 97

me up a bed somewhere. And do you, boys, see to
my horse, this instant.”

The boys ran out pell-mell ; next to each other they
loved horses.

“Js there anything in this house to eat?” said
the big grandmother. “Ah! Doris’s mother, good
evening.”

“Thank ‘you,” said the little: grandmother, and took
upiven less room in her chair than usual.'

Minna brought out everything for supper she could
think of, and Doris, in a distracted way, ran hither and
thither, planning about the beds. The maid, who had
been sitting at her wheel fast asleep, now roused up
and rubbed her eyes, and stumbled over the cat, whose
pardon she begged, and tried to get wide enough awake
to find out where she was.

The big grandmother sat at the table, and made
havoc with everything, right and left. The younger
children never took their eyes from her the while. At
last she pushed back her chair, and burst forth with a
long, hearty, boisterous laugh.

“Well?” she cried.

Nobody answered.

“Then you haven't heard the news?”

“We do not take a paper,” said Max. “ When
there is anything new, I can read it at the
tavern.”

“Pooh,” she cried. ‘Well, I’ve taken another
man !”

There was an awkward silence. Doris thought Max
ought to say something, and Max hoped Doris
would,
98 Herman ;

“ Yes, another man. And I am going to live with
him, instead of taking him to live with me. You shall
see him presently.”

And stepping to the door, with heavy tread, she
blew a silver whistle that hung at her side.

In a few moments she ushered in her “man,” and
exhibited him with no little noisy laughter.

‘He was made for me to order,” she cried. “See!
I am no infant, but he is head and shoulders above me.
And now look in his face! Did you ever see a kinder
or a handsomer in your lives ?”

Indeed they never had. He was a man of colossal
dimensions, and there beamed from his face a perfect
flood of good humour and friendliness. His dress in-
dicated that he was one of the rich oberland farmers.
He wore a black velvet coat adorned with immense silver
buttons that almost touched each other, a scarlet vest,
fastened in the same style, and the velvet band upon
his wide hat was buckled with a silver buckle as long
as his hand.

“ Good evening,” he said, smiling upon them like
warm sunshine.

“Ha! ha! Now for the news, Max!” cried his
* mother. “Sit down, Conrad. You see, Max, my new
man will not touch with his finger the house and lands
left me by your father, neither will he look at the pro-
perty I gained through Peter Fiichse. He is a rich
man, and has more money than ten horses can draw.
So what do you think he says tome? ‘Divide your
land and your goods among your children, and come
with me, and live and die in peace.’ Ha! ha! What
do you say now, old fellow ?”
Or, the Little Preacher. 99

Max had not a word to say, but sat bewildered in his
chair ; while Doris put her apron to her eyes, and the
children sat open-mouthed, unable to understand what
was going on.

“So the house will be yours, Max,” continued his
mother, “‘and the farm and the barn, and everything
just as your father left them. The horses, and the
cattle, and the hay, and the grain, I give you also,
though Heaven knows your blessed father never owned
them. And all that came by Peter Fiichse shall go to
your brother's wife and children, since I am his only
heir, and he left no relations behind him. ‘You can
take your family to live in your father’s house and
send the children to the Latin school all the rest of
their days. Ha! ha! this is the best joke I ever
heard of !”

“A joke indeed !” said Max.

“T hope it is one you all enjoy,” said Conrad.* “ For
your mother is not really in earnest in what she says.
It is she who has the large kind heart, not I, as she
would have you believe.”

“ Hold your tongue !” cried the grandmother. ‘Do .
not believe a word he says. I fought for my property
three weeks and a day ; Conrad would have me with-
out, but not with it: he declared he would not enrich
himself with money made by other men, and at last I
had to yield. Ha! ha! And so good luck to you,
Max Steiner, and may your old age be like mine !”

“There is not a word of truth in what she says,”
repeated Conrad. ‘The whole thing was planned and
settled by her.”

“There, go back to the tavern, and sleep, if you can,
100 Herman ;

with so many falsehoods on your conscience. I declare
it is almost midnight.”

Little Lena awoke, and was astonished to see the
lights and the strangers. She smiled at the silver
buttons Conrad wore, which, compared with those of
her father, were like so many full moons. Conrad took
the child in his gigantic arms, and she nestled close to
his breast with instinctive friendliness.

“T am perfectly bewildered,” said Max, “not know-
ing whether this is not, after all, a dream.”

«Tt is a pleasant dream ; nothing more,” said Conrad.
“But when you wake up from it, you will find yourself
a rich man, as things go in this region.”

He gave them each his hand, and bade them good-
night, The children were now got off to bed, and the
big grandmother was at last conducted to hers. She
kept them awake the rest of the night, by quarrelling
with the bed, which she said made it necessary to
divide herself into two halves, and rest them by turns,
and by bursting now and then into one of her boisterous
“ha! ha’s!” ;

But she was up.in the morning at the cock-crowing,
as fresh and blooming as ever; gave each child a florix
and a good slap on the shoulders, told them they might
come to her wedding if they had anything fit to wear,
and rode off with her Conrad, with flying colours.

“Well! what do you think?” asked Max, when
quiet was once more restored to the household.

“T don’t know what to think,” said Doris. ‘“ What
do you say, dear mother?”

“JT think our dear Lord means to have the boys edu-
cated,” she answered.
Or, the Little Preacher. 101

“Then you don’t think it isall a joke? And whose
plan is it? Conrad’s, or my mother’s?” asked Max.

“T think they planned it between them. Conrad
may have put it into your mother’s head, but I think
she was quite willing to do as he wished. I always
knew your mother had a good spot in her heart, and
now that love has touched it—”

“Love!” cried Max. “Now, that is really too
absurd !”

“She loves him, and is as happy as a child. And
you may depend upon it, he will bring out all the good
there is in her.”

There was a long silence.

At last Max said :

“Then we shall all go back to live in my old home.
And you will like that, mother.”

It was the first time he had ever called her mother. -
She looked at him gratefully.

“Yes, Max, I shall like it. You cannot think how
pleasant it will be to hear Pastor Koeffel preach.”

“No, I cannot, for when I was a boy, I never pre-
tended to listen to a word. Well, Doris, little woman,
what do you say ?”

“T say, I don’t care where my home is if you all are
init,” she said. ‘But I daresay it will really seem
like going home to live in our own dear old village once
more. We shall have our old neighbours about us—-
and then, besides—you will let me give away just as
much milk as I like, won’t you, Max ?”.

Max replied by a merry laugh, and then the force of
habit drove him to his workshop, where he spent as
busy a day as usual.
102 Herman ;

It was not so easy for Doris and the children to
settle down to their work; the younger especially
went to school with their heads, for the time,
completely turned, while Herman rushed from one
task to another, in vain efforts to cool his fevered
blood.

“To think that I can go back to the Latin school !”
he said to himself. ‘And that Bernhard, who has so
much sense, can go too! It seems like something out
of a book; a fairy tale, or a fable; or else as if I had
been asleep and had a beautiful dream !”-

There was not a little commotion in the village, when
the news of Max’s good luck flew through it, growing
as it flew. Babele Godschen sighed, and said it was’
hard that a poor lonely widow, who had never held up
her head since the day of her husband’s death, couldn’t
have had a little luck of the same sort.

“T fear their heads are all turned, poor things !” she
cried. “Think now! ‘The old mother is to have a
little room quite to herself, out of the way of the noise
of the house; what with the quiet and the comfort,
she’ll live for ever, or, at any rate, live till she dies of
old age! As to Max, he was proud enough before, but
now he'll be holding his head as high as the sky. And
Doris will be worn out with care! Maids to see to,
and nobody knows how much milk to look after; and
then that cross old mother of Max’s flying back every
now and then to find fault and bite all their heads off!
And as for those boys, nothing will be good enough for
them now! Well, well! I saw Herman sitting quite
by himself, yesterday, looking melancholy enough. I
suppose it seems hard to him to have so many ups and
Or, the Little Preacher. 103

downs, and just as he had got to earning an honest
penny, sent off to school again !”

In the early spring Max and his household took
flight to their new home, which they found awaiting
them in perfect order, and where, with not much trouble,
they settled down in peace and comfort. Even the little
grandmother was thrown somewhat off her balance, when
she saw the flocks and herds to which Max had become
heir, saw his lambs and his cattle and his goods; to her
and to Doris his wealth seemed almost fabulous. They
began at oncé to form plans of usefulness in which they
promised themselves to find the greatest joy. Life
looked attractive, as their old neighbours began to flock
about them ; and then on Sundays there was the dear
old Pastor Koeffel, silvery in hair and loving in face ;
there was the Latin school waiting to welcome the
boys. Nothing seemed wanting to their felicity.

Max had now reached the very highest aim of his
ambition. He had more horses, more cattle, more land,
than any of his neighbours; people looked up to him,
and took counsel of him, and called him Herr Steiner.
With his tendencies, so much sudden prosperity might
have proved fatal to the Christian life which was be-
ginning to soften and sanctify his rugged character.
But he was no longer young, and the discipline through
which he had passed had made a great impression ;
then too, at the moment of temptation, he came under
the influence of Pastor Koeffel, a man of rare piety,
who never let his people forget that all they had
belonged to God.

It is true that the habit of sparing and saving was
not slain ina day. Max had always excused himself,
104, Flerman ;

for his want of liberality on the ground that he had so
little to give; he found it, however, as hard to part
with his money, now that he was a comparatively rich
man, as it had been all his life long. It was only now
and then, by a violent wrench upon his real nature,
that he forced open his heart and gave of his abundance
to the needy, while from Doris there flowed a constant
stream of unnoticed charity which gladdened many a
barren life.

As to her, like most women, she had but one ambi-
tion. To be a good wife and a good mother, and to be
beloved by her husband and children, was all she asked.
What she was in the old home, that she was in the
new; a busy, affectionate, cheerful little housewife,
whose voice would never be heard in the streets, but
whose memory would always live in a few faithful
hearts.

The children, however, entered upon their new life
with enthusiasm. The boys rushed hither and thither;
they made the acquaintance of every animal on the
farm ; they ploughed a little and planted a little, and
sowed a little; got in everybody's way; rode and drove
to market, and rioted in all the old haunts of their”
father’s boyhood. When Max and Doris wanted to
restrain them, their grandmother counselled that they
should have full liberty, and the result proved her
advice to be good, for after a few weeks they were all
more than satisfied to settle down at school. Herman
and Bernhard went together to the Latin school; Max
had not decided to give them both equal advantages,
but chose to see what the future should bring forth.
Herman made up by perseverance and application for
Or, the Little Preacher. 105

his natural want of readiness; it was a pleasure to see
him engaged with his studies, when all the energies of
his mind concentrated themselves on the work in hand.
What he learned he never forgot, and every now and
then a flash of real genius would reveal to his teachers
what this modest, retiring boy really was. He never
lost the desize and purpose to become a clergyman, and
taking Pastor Koeffel for his model, he fought against
the reserve and shyness which had hitherto made his
life so lonely, and mixed with the other boys, who
learned to know and to love him.

As to Minna, she was in her element, now that she
was full of housewifely cares; she took calm and serious
satisfaction in overseeing the servants, keeping the
accounts, and superintending her father’s interests
generally, The younger ones had their pet lambs and
innumerable hens and chickens; they always contrived
to have on hand some lame or feeble animal, on which
they found it expedient to lavish a wealth of love and
tenderness and a depth of sympathy which, if bestowed
on some desolate human heart, would have made it
leap for joy.

As time passed, and the elder boys proved, day by
day, how worthy they were of the education they were
receiving, people said their grandmother Steiner had
been the making of them. And in her distant home
she fondly thought and always said so herself. But
she who gave only her prayers and the sweet influence
of a holy life; whose name, so well known in heaven,
was rarely spoken on earth; who never for a moment
fancied she had aught to do with their training—she,
perhaps, will one day hear from the Master’s lips the
106 . Herman ;

«Well done, good and faithful servant!” which ushers
into the joy of our Lord.

“ Are you sure there is nothing left in the waggon !
Let me see. There is the cheese, and here is the
wheaten bread. The roll of linen is all right; yes, I
believe everything is here. You shan’t say I came
empty-handed, Max !”

“We are glad to see you, mother, however you
come,” replied Max, whose arms were full of packages
of all sorts. ‘But one would think we had a famine
in the land, to judge by the supplies you have brought
with you.” :

“Pshaw! The linen is for Herman; as to those
other things, they are for your Doris. A better
wheaten loaf she never ate; as for the cheese, the
butter, and the sauerkraut, they will astonish her ; and
well they may. People at my time of life usually sit
with folded hands, while I, thank Heaven, expect to
go on brewing and baking, mending and making, to the
last breath I draw.”

“JT dare say you will, And so you have come to
hear our Herman preach? It is very good of you,
I’m sure.”

“ Nonsense! How can you suppose I made such a
journey to hear that foolish boy? I am very angry
with him for not choosing a profession that would bring
distitiction into the family. However, as he is really
appointed to succeed Pastor Koeffel, and is going to
live in the parsonage, I concluded to bring him a roll
of linen; for I suppose your Doris has none to spare.
Ah! here she comes. How do you do, child? _And
Or, the Little Preacher. 107

how is your little mother? As strong and hearty as
Tam?”

“Mother is quite feeble,” replied Doris. “She
seldom leaves her room now; will you step in to see
her a moment ?”

“T don’t care if Ido. Well!” she shouted, as she
entered the room, and saw the little grandmother
reclining in an old-fashioned arm-chair.

“Yes, it is well,” returned the other, looking up
with a smile.

“There’s nothing left of you but your eyes. And
they are as bright as beads. So, you just sit here,
with nothing to do. Tedious enough, I dare say !”

“TJ just sit waiting,” was the answer.

“Waiting. For whom, pray ?”

Her days of embarrassment and confusion were over.
She answered, with a simple dignity that almost
overawed her gigantic querist,—“ For my Master.”

For once in her life, Max’s mother felt embarrassed,
and could think of nothing to say. She got out of the
room as quickly as she could, and in a few moments
her loud voice could be heard scolding her former
maidens, Hedwig and Marthe, who, poor things, won-
dered what they had done to deserve such treatment.
Doris lingered behind.

“ Dear mother,” she said, kissing her, “ don’t talk so.
We can’t spare you, indeed we can’t. Is there anything
we can do to make you willing to stay with us?”

“You do everything, everything, dear child. But
home looks very pleasant. And I shall go soon.”
Doris wiped her eyes more than onee, as she moved
about the house, attending to the household cares
108 Herman ;

involved in the unexpected visit of Max’s mother, with
her Conrad. z

“ Ah! how much richer is my mother, who has not
a florin in the world, than they are!” she thought. “TI
wish heaven seemed ag near to me as it does to her!
But oh! I feel bound, as with chains, to Max, to the
children, to this pleasant home !”

There was no little bustle and confusion in the house
at this time. Herman had passed throvgh his prepara-
tory. course, and was to take the place of Pastor Koef-
fel, who now slept in the churchyard among his
people, like a father with his children around him.
Bernhard had come home to spend the first Sunday of
the new pastorate, prepared to admire his brother’s
preaching as much as he had done in the days of their
boyhood. Max’s mother had come on the same errand,
say what she might to the contrary. Max and Doris
hardly knew whether they felt most pride and pleasure,
or most nervous anxiety, at the thought of seeing the
fresh and youthful face of their Herman in the pulpit,
where for so many years Pastor Koeffel had instructed
them.

“Dear mother,” said Doris, lingering behind the
rest, as they set forth for church, “you have looked
forward to this day so long, and now you cannot hear
Herman, after all. Are you very much disappointed ?”
She never forgot the sweetness and the brightness of
the smile which accompanied the reply :

“No, dear child. I have travelled beyond dis-
appointments.” ;

As she walked on by Max’s side, she revolved these
words in her mind, wondering what they signified.
_ Ov, the Little Preacher. 109

‘Mother doesn’t mean that she’s got beyond caring
for things, for she never was so interested in all that
concerns us. She grows more loving every day. I
don’t quite see what she does mean. J haven't tra-
velled beyond disappointments, at any rate; for if
Herman should make a blunder, and leave out part of
the service, or anything of that sort, I know I should
never get over it. How my heart beats! To think,
now, that my Herman, whom everybody used to cail
such a dunce, should really be Herr Pastor after all !”

“T suppose they'll be holding their heads higher
than ever, now that their Herman has actually come to
be Herr Pastor,” said Babele Goschen, as she adjusted
her Sunday cap above her withered features. . “I’ve
two minds not to go to hear him preach, after all. It’s
somebody’s duty to put him down, and keep him down,
L say.”

“T dare say he wouldn't miss us if we did stay
away,” returned Lizette. “And I mean to go, what-
ever you say. It’s nothing but envy makes you
talk so.”

“T won’t have my own children throwing my faults
in my face,” cried Babele. “It’s enough to make a
saint envious to see how things have gone on with that
boy, and all of them. And it is hard, and I don’t care
who hears me say it, to do as well by children as I’ve
done by mine, and then have them turn out as they
have. Kurt getting ready to lie down in a tippler’s
grave, like his father before him, and you so pert and
so self-willed that there’s no peace with you.”

“T hope you'll hear something in the sermon that
will be blessed to you,” returned Lizette. “If you had

i
110 Herman ;

gone to church, and brought us up as you ought, we might
have turned out more to your mind. I’m sure I wish
you had. But come, it is time to go. It’s an hourand
a half to the village, if it’s a minute. And you get
out of breath if one hurries in the least.”

Babele made no answer, and the two set forth
together for the long walk which led to the church of
Pastor Koeffel.

When they entered the church, the service had not
yet begun, and Babele had time to look about her, and
to make remarks at her leisure.

“Here come Max and Doris! Look, Lizette! ‘Doris
looks all in a flutter. There, she has dropped her
prayer-book, and now there goes her handkerchief.
Now Minna is picking them'up. I might wait till I
was grey before you'd do as much for me.”

“Do stop talking, mother,” said Lizette. ‘“ Every-
body is so still and solemn. Besides, I want to catch
the first glimpse of Herman when he comes into church.
He'll come in with an air, you may depend.”

“ There’s Max’s mother, I declare!” cried Bibele, in
such a loud whisper that Max heard the well-known
voice. He glanced at his old neighbour kindly, and
the colour rose in his face to his forehead.

“ Our dear Lord has been too good to mé!” he said
to himself, “since the days when Babele used to make
us het visits. And she looks so worn out and so
anxious. We'll have her home to dinner with us, poor
creature.”

“He needn't turn so red at the sight of me,” was
Babele’s secret thought. “Iam not going to speak to
him or his, unless they speak to me; and if they are
Or, the Little Preacher. It

ashamed of their old neighbour, why let them be
ashamed, that’s all.”

At this moment there was a little stir in the church,
and the young Pastor came in. He had developed into
a full-grown man, of his father’s height, but the slight
resemblance he had borne him in his childhood had
‘ quite disappeared. Otherwise, to the casual observer,
he looked like an ordinary, good sort of young man,
such as one sees in scores every day.

“He isn’t, handsome, that’s one comfort,” thought
Bibele. ‘And he hasn’t got much of a voice, that’s
another thing.” Her mind wandered away during the
preliminary services; she counted the buttons on Max’s
vest, estimated the cost of Minna’s red petticoat, of
which she could see a fragment, felt a little sleepy, and
was suddenly aroused by the announcement of the
text: i

“¥orI determined not to know anything among you,
save Jesus Christ, and Him crucified. And I was with
you in weakness, and in fear, and in much trembling.”

“You never spoke a truer word,” said Babele, nodding
at the young speaker, as if he could hear what she said.
“T suppose you're going to preach about yourself, and
tell what a smart man folks say you are, and what fools
we all were not to find you out sooner, Brag away!
It’s just what I’ve come to hear.”

She settled herself comfortably in her seat, gave a
glance at Lizette, and the sermon began. Curiosity
kept her awake, tired as she was with her long walk
from her own village; and, in spite of herself, the
growing eloquence and earnestness of the speaker soon
made her forget where she was, or to whom she listened.
112 Herman ;

When, at last, she bethought herself to look around her,
to see the effect of the sermon, she was almost appalled
by the solemnity of every face. Tven her giddy Lizette
sat motionless, her hands in her lap, her eyes fixed upon
the glowing face now transfigured into something more
beautiful than beauty, while tear after tear rolled down
her unconscious cheek. Doris sat leaning forward a
little; the timid delight with which she listened
at first had given way to absorbing interest in the
subject.

“ He ain’t preaching about himself, after all,” thought
Babele. “To hear him go on, one would think the
Lord Jesus was his best friend, and that he’d rather
praise Him than magnify himself. How his colour
comes and goes! It seems as if everything he said
came out of a deep well, and he wore himself out haul-
ing it up.”

“Humph! Just like him!”

This irreverent exclamation proceeded from the big
grandmother, and was heard all over the church; for
at this juncture a sweep of Herman’s sleeve brushed his
sermon from the desk, and the loose leaves went flying
about the church like so many frightened birds.

Max reddened with shame and vexation; Doris rose
from her seat, and ‘sank back again in despair. For an
instant the youthful speaker faltered, and became pale ;
but before the startled congregation had time to recover
from its surprise, or the nimblest foot to hasten to the
rescue, he went bravely, eloquently on. No longer
fettered by written words, he poured forth a flood of
eloquence which made every man, woman, and child
forget the interruption, or rejoice in it,
Or, the Little Preacher, 113

“Well, Lizette, how did you like him?” asked
Bibele, when the sermon at last came to an end.

“Do be still, mother,” was the reply, in an angry
whisper.

“You cried, at any rate,” persisted Babele.

“Tt’s no such thing !”

Max and Doris longed to talk over their new ex-
perience together in private, but they both came kindly
to Babele, to invite her to dine with them.

“I suppose you are as proud as peacocks, now,” said
she. “ And to be sure, your Herman looks very well
in gown and bands; they quite set him off. But isn’t
his preaching ee odd, and out of the common a way #
Why, I understood every word of it!”

Doris, too humble to have an opinion of her own on
the subject, looked anxious and concerned. But before
she had time to answer, Max’s mother, who had come
striding after them, burst out with—

“You're a fool, Baibele Gdschen! Of course his

preaching is out of the common way. He's got
sense enough to say things out of his own head, and
that nobody ever thought of before. Ha! that’s just
‘the difference between Herman and me, and all the
rest of you; we've got something to say, and we say
it with a vengeance. If he had preached in the
hum-drum way most young fellows do, I’d have pulled
him down from the pulpit, and pitched him into the
Neckar.”

Babele subsided in the presence of this woman, who
dared to speak of ministers as “fellows,” and who
talked of plunging the successor of the revered Pastor
Koeffel into the Neckar.
II4 flerman ;

“T meant no offence,” said she; “and I hope you'll
take none.”

“T hate apologies. But I can tell you one thing:
you never, in your life, heard such a sermon as you
heard to-day. Even I, who never shed tears, cried like.
vain, And I declare I didn’t know it was such a de-
licious thing to cry. Why, it’s next best to laugh-
ing.”

Meanwhile, Doris’s mother lay back peacefully in her
chair, the Bible from which she had been reading open
on a little table by her side. She read nothing now
save the gospel narrative concerning her Saviour, her
increasing love to Him giving to every word that fell
from His lips when He lived on earth a rare precious-
ness such as she had only known of late. Hedwig,
whose duty it was to watch over her in the absence of
the household, looked in every half hour to see that she
wanted nothing; otherwise she was left quite alone, as
-was her wish. In this sweet Sabbath stillness she
prayed silently for each member of the family, but
especially for her beloved Herman, that he might make
full proof of his ministry, and that the word he preached
this day might prove as good seed, sown in good soil,
for the glory of Jesus Christ. Then she prayed for
Max, for Doris, for Minna, Bernhard, and Adolph, each
by name, and with a strange earnestness that made her
quite unconscious of the feeble body that held her
glowing soul; then for Max’s mother and her Conrad,
that they might see the King in His beauty, as she
herself now saw Him. And it is not saying too much
of these simple prayers, that were almost wordless, that
they were heard and answered while she was yet speak-
Or, the Little Preacher. 115

ing. We cannot remind ourselves too often that no
prayer is poverty-stricken that is offered in His name
who presents our petitions for us to the Father. Her-
man, under the influence of these apparently feeble
-words, was at that moment speaking as one inspired, _
and finding his way to every heart in the congregation.
Even his big grandmother, though she would not own
it to herself, felt herself touched to the quick. She
could not help being convinced that the things of
which he spoke were real; that he had held converse
with the Christ whom he preached ; and that he valued
his own natural gifts chiefly as something to lay at
His feet.

As they all sat together at dinner, she gave him no
peace.

“To think, now, of you flinging your sermon at
the very heads of the people!” cried she. | “ You are
just as clumsy as when you were a boy.” Herman
coloured painfully. He was ashamed of himself that
he could not bear her raillery without wincing under
it ; but his whole heart had been thrown into his
sermon, and he had come down from the heights to
which he had soared to find himself a very common
mortal, vulnerable as ever ; if possible, more so.

Max, seeing his distress, came to the rescue.

“No harm was done!” he cried. “It was a fine
thing to see the boy go on preaching as well without
his sermon as with it. And the last half was the best,
after all.”

“His gestures are positively frightful,” pursued the
merciless foe. “If I hadn’t been crying, I should
have laughed at the way he flung his arms about, and
116 . Herman ;

at the grimaces he made. Once or twice I thought ho
was going to beat out his brains.”

“One is often tempted to wish it no sin to do
that,” replied Herman, who was now quite down from
the mount, and felt exceedingly flat.

“Your grandmother has an odd way of expressing
her approbation,” said Conrad, “but you must know
her el enough by this time not to mind what she
says.”
“T’m sure he will improve as he grows older,” said
Bibele Gischen, in a patronizing tone, which some-
how was more excruciating to Herman than his grand-
mother’s random shots.

“Come, mother, it’s time to go,” said Lizette, who
had sense enough to see that these words were not
making a very favourable impression.

And as they drove home in Max’s waggon she
added, crossly enough :

“JT wish you knew when to hold your tongue,
mother. The idea of Herman’s improving, when he :
is as good as an angel now! I don’t believe you
listened to the sermon. If you had you never could
have eaten such an enormous dinner.”

“ What was the dinner for, if not to eat?” was the
reply. “And with such poor pickings as I get at
home, a decent dinner is more to my mind than
your fine preaching; not that I’ve any fault to find
with that, either.”

Relieved by the departure of her guests, Doris
flew to her mother, to pour out her morning’s expe-
riences into her loving ear. But suddenly she paused
in the flow of her talk.
Or, the Little Preacher. t17

“Do you feel worse than usual, dear mother?” she
asked.

“No, dear; better than usual. I feel well in body
and well in soul. This has been a blessed day, my
Doris.”

Doris looked at the radiant yet very pallid face.

“T think I must stay and be your nurse this after-
noon,” she said. ‘TI can hear Herman instruct the .
children some other time, just as well.”

“Yes, and you will have the evening service,” said
her mother.

This tacit consent to her remaining i home alarmed
Doris even more than her mother’s unusual pallor had
done. But she talked on cheerfully, putting away the
unwelcome, vague fears that oppressed her, to be met
at some more convenient moment.

“T want to be happy to-day, of all days,” thought
she. And she did have a very happy afternoon.
Her mother seemed so like herself, and said so many
things she afterwards recalled with pleasure. She
repeated many little sayings and doings of the chil-
dren in their younger days that Doris had long since
forgotten, and now heard with curious interest. And
then she went back over all the way in which the
Lord had led her, speaking of her Master with a.
tender, personai affection, which made the heart of
Doris glow, while she said to herself, “Oh! that I
loved Him so !”

At eventide the rest of the family returned from
church, and after supper they all gathered in their
srandmother’s room to sing hymns. Max’s mother,
with her Conrad, held aloof, yet, as the sounds of
118 Herman ;

their cheerful voices reached her in her room, she felt
once more moved even to tears.

“ Bah !” she cried to Conrad, who looked at her
with surprise. “I am not crying. My eyes have
been weak all day.”

When the singing was over, each one gave their
grandmother the good-night.kiss before leaving her.
Doris lingered a little behind, with some expressions
of endearment ; then followed the rest to supper.

“Let me take her supper to grandmother to-night,”
said Herman. “It is my last chance.”

“Oh! no,” said Doris quickly, not understanding
that he referred to his own removal to the parsonage.
“ Mother has not seemed so bright and like herself for
a long time.”

Herman made no answer; he had observed and
been alarmed by his grandmother’s unusual aspect,
for he was already becoming experienced in sick-
rooms. He was hardly gone an instant, when he
returned ; one glance at his face made everybody start
from the table.

Ah! how near heaven is! How little time it takes
to get there! In one brief moment she who had so
long sat waiting for her Lord had heard His voice,
and had gone joyfully to meet Him, The smile with
which she had welcomed Him still lingered on and
illumined her face.

Doris ran and clasped the small, worn figure in her
arms.

“Oh, mother ! mother ! speak to me once more, only
once more !” she cried.

Max rushed out for the doctor, He knew it was
Or, the Little Preacher. 11g

too late, but he could not bear the sight of such
distress.

“Oh! what an ending to this happy Sunday !”
sobbed Doris, ‘Where is Herman ?” :

She instinctively turned to him for sympathy, who
was now her pastor, as well as her son.

“Tt is a beautiful ending, dear mother!” said
Herman. “This is not death; it is a translation !”
His lips quivered, however ; he had loved his grand-
mother with a peculiar affection, and after a momen-
tary struggle with himself, he burst into tears. God
knows the opportune moment at which to send sorrow
into a house, and it is His goodness and mercy that does
not suffer the cup of earthly felicity to become too full.
It was with a tempered joy, and under the holy shadow
of a real sorrow, that- Herman entered on the work
of the ministry, and settled down among the people to
whom Pastor Koeffel had so long ministered. Minna
went with him to the parsonage, to arrange his house-
hold, and helped him to make it a refuge for the
weary, and the resort of all who suffered in body
or mind.

Max and Doris devoted themselves less and less
to making money, and more and more to spending it
on those who lacked. They lived many long, useful,
happy years in the home of his childhood, and their
children and children’s children rose up to call them
blessed. Bernhard completed his studies at the uni-
versity, where he was in time chosen professor. His
grandmother Steiner took the whole credit of this
event to herself; and, as no one disputed it with her,
it continued to be to her a life-long source of glorifi-
120 =6Herman; or, the Little Preacher.

cation. Though she never tamed into a model woman,
the progress of years and the discipline of life softened
her somewhat, and before her death she said and did
some things that enabled Max to say of her, after she
was gone:

“My mother had her peculiarities. I never saw
anybody exactly like her, but I believe she died a good
woman at last.”

As for Adolph and Lena, amid the waywardness of
their youth they still wore some fragments of her
mantle whose saintly memory lingered long in her
‘native village. As time passed, they, too, learned to
reverence and to profit by the ministrations of the
‘Little Preacher,” whose self-distrust had only given
way to an invincible modesty that made both young
and old love to sit at his feet.
LIT¢ LE. PHREA DS,

OR,

TANGLE THREAD, SILVER THREAD, AND
GOLDEN THREAD.

LITTLE THREADS.

CHAPTER I.

HERE was once a very beautiful piece of
white satin, which had been woven with
! care and skill. Yet those who saw it went
away shaking their heads, saying, “ What a pity!
what a pity!” For there ran across this lovely fabric
a tangled thread ; and that one thread spoiled all.
And there was a lady who was very beautiful too.
She had always lived in a pleasant home, with kind
and loving friends about her. She had never, in her
life, known what it was to want anything she could
not have. Indeed she seemed born to be treated gently
and tenderly. People who were ignorant were not
afraid to go to see and talk with her, for they knew she
never laughed at their mistakes; and poor people liked
to go and tell her about their poverty just as if she
were poor too. And those who were sick or in trouble
wanted her to know all about their trials. For those
who went to see her with empty hands, came away not
half so poor as they went in; and the sick and the
sorrowful were comforted by her words of pity. You



124 Little Threads.

will think that this lady who was so good, who could
dress just as she pleased and ride when and where she
pleased, who had friends to love her, and friends to
admire her, must have been very happy indeed. And
so she was, for a time. Her life looked as smooth and
fair as the white satin you have just heard of. But
by-and-by there began to run across it a thread not at
all like the soft and even threads of which it was
made; here came a soiled spot; there were knots and
tangles ; as far as you could see, its beauty was gone.
How did this happen? Why, there came into the
house one day a little baby. A little, soft, tender
baby, that did not look as if it would harm anybody.
Its mother was very glad to see it. She thought her-
self almost too happy with such a treasure. The most
sunshiny, pleasant room in the house was given this
little thing for its own. All sorts of pure white gar-
ments were bought for it, and everything possible was
done to keep it well and make it happy. Before it
came its mother used to lie down to sleep at night as
sweetly as you do, little rosy child, who read this book.
But now she slept, as people say, with one eye and one
ear open! That is, she kept starting up to sce if it
were nicely covered with its soft blankets, or to listen
to its gentle breathing, to know if it were quite well.
If it happened to be restless or unwell, she would sit
up all night to take care of it, or walk with it hour
after hour when anybody but its own dear mother
would have been out of patience, or too tired to keep
awake.

And before the baby came there this lady used to
spend a good deal of time at her piano, singing and
Little Threads. 12 5

playing. She used to draw and paint and read and
write. But now she almost forgot she had any piano.
The baby’s cooing was all the music she cared for.
And she left off drawing and painting, and thought
the sweetest picture in the world was that tiny, sleep-
ing creature in its cradle. To be sure, mother and
baby together did make a very lovely picture indeed.

Perhaps you will begin to think that this lady loved
her baby too much. But no, a mother cannot do that,
unless she loves it better than God, and this little
child’s mother loved God best. She loved Him so
dearly that if He had asked her to give it back to
Him, she would have given it without a word; He
would not ask her to do it without tears.

The baby had a name of its own, but it was called
“The Baby,” and nothing else, just as if there never
had been one in the world before, and never would be
again, As it’ had nothing to do but to grow, it did
grow, but not very fast. Its mother said she liked a
tiny baby better than she did a big one. When she
showed it to her friends she always said: “It isn’t a
very large child, I know, but you see its bones are very
small, and of course that makes a difference.” And.
they would reply: “ Certainly, that makes a great dif-
ference. And it has the prettiest little round face, and
wee bits of hands and fect, there ever were |”

The day on which the nurse who took care of the
baby and its mother at first was obliged to go away,
another young woman came to fill her place. Her
name was Ruth. She was very glad to come, indeed.
For she thought it would be very nice to sit in that
bright, pleasant room, holding that pretty little baby

I
126 Little Threads.

on her lap, She thought she should never know a
eare ora trouble. But she was quite frightened when
she undertook to wash and dress the pretty little
creature, to find how it screamed. The truth is, if
there was any one thing this baby could not bear, it
was to be touched with water. What was to be done?
Let it go unwashed? Oh no, that would never do!
Its mother really trembled when she saw such a young,
feeble creature cry so. She knelt down by the side of
the nurse and with her soft hands tried to hurry
through the washing and dressing. They never knew
how they got on the little shirt, or how they fastened
the little petticoats, or which of them tied the clean,
white frock. The nurse was red and warm, and the
mother pale and tired when this great task was over.
But they both thought things would go better next
time, and Ruth said so to herself as she walked up and
down trying to quiet the child, and the mother said so
to herself as she lay all worn out on the sofa, watching
them.

Day after day passed, however, and every morning
the baby screamed. As it grew older and stronger, its
mother was less frightened when it cried, but it was
painful to hear such an uproar, and she began to dread
the hour for washing and dressing it.

‘‘ What can be the reason the baby cries so?” she
asked the nurse every morning, till at last, ‘tired of
saying, ‘Perhaps she won't cry so, next time,” poor
Ruth cried out, ‘“ Why, it’s the temper, ma’am !”

“Tis temper!” said its mother, much astonished.
“Why, I should as soon think of talking about the
temper of one of the cows in your father’s farm-yard!”
Lie Tine a

“ And you might well do that, ma’am, for cows has
tempers of their own as well as babies and other folks.
There was old White Spot, now. She couldn’t cry
and scream like this baby, but she could kick over a
pail of milk equal to anybody; and did it many a
time when she was put out.”

The baby’s mother hardly knew what to think.
The baby grew older and grew stronger, but it did
not grow better. The truth is, it had a very strong
will of its own. As long as it could have its own
way, it was good, but the moment other people wanted
their way it began to scream.

As soon as it became old enough to understand what
was said to it—and that was very soon—its mother
resolved never to give it things for which it cried.
She told Ruth so, But one day she went into the
nursery and there lay Miss Baby fast asleep on the
bed, with a china vase on each arm.

“Why, Ruth, what does this mean?” she asked.

“The baby cried so for the vases that I could do
nothing with her,” replied Ruth. “It was time for
her nap, and I did all I could to get her to sleep, but
she cried herself nearly into fits for the vases. So at
last I had to give them to her. She dropped right off
to sleep then, like a lamb.”

“ Never do so again, Ruth. You may spare yourself
a little trouble for the time by giving a child what it
cries for, But in the end you increase your trouble
tenfold, and strengthen the child in its resolution to
have its own way.”

When the baby awoke, it did not miss the vases,
which its mother had replaced on the shelf, but when
128 Little Threads.

it was ready to go to bed that night it looked at them,
and stretched out its arms towards them, saying plainly
by its gestures: “I am going to sleep with those
pretty things in my arms.”

“No, baby can’t have them,” said Ruth. “Baby
must go to sleep.”

Baby’s answer was a fearful scream, which was heard
in the dining-room where her papa and mamma were
taking tea.

“Hark!” said her papa. “I hear the baby. She
has either had a-fall, or there are a dozen pins sticking
in her.”

“No, that is not a cry of pain,” replied her mother.
“Tt is a cry of anger. And I think I know what it
means. However, I'll go up and see.”

She ran up-stairs and found poor Ruth walking up
and down with the child, looking hot and tired.

“T knew you would think I was hurting her,
ma’am,” she said. “But it’s those vases she wants.
Wouldn’t it be best to pacify her with them? She’s
hoarse with crying.”

“No, Ruth, no,” said her mamma. “I do not
wonder you are tired and almost discouraged. But we
must think of the child’s good rather than our own
present comfort.” i

She took the angry baby in her arms, and sat down
sadly in a low chair with it.

“You are sure there are no pins about its clothes ?”

“Oh yes, ma’am! I sewed on its clothes just as
you bid me.”

“Very well. Go down now to your tea.”

“T don’t like to leave you with the child crying so.”
Little Threads. 129

“T prefer you should go. She will certainly stop
erying before long.”

Ruth went slowly down-stairs.

“Two sticks ain’t crosser than that baby,” she said
to herself. “I never saw such a child. Why, every
bone in me aches like the toothache.”

“What's going on up-stairs?” asked the. cook, as
Ruth entered the kitchen.

“You might knock me down with a straw,” replied
Ruth. “I have been trying for an hour to get the
baby to sleep, and it has screamed the whole time till
I was afraid it would kill itself.”

Meanwhile the poor mother still sat sadly and
quietly in the low chair, holding the struggling child,
and praying to God to teach her how to subdue it.
She begged Him to give her patience, and to give her
gentleness and firmness. The baby’s cries began to
grow less and less noisy, and at last, ali tired out, it .
fell asleep. Its mother looked down upon it tenderly
and kissed it over and over. But her heart was full
of care and pain.

“Ah!” thought she, “ the old saying is true, ‘ Every
rose has its thorn !’”

Day after day passed on, and the baby grew from a
baby into a little child with busy hands, and active
feet, and a will of its own that seemed to grow with its
growth, and strengthen with its strength. Her father,
seeing how much anxiety and trouble she caused her
mother, began to call her “Tangle Thread” instead of
“ Baby.” By degrees everybody in the house fell into
the same habit, and instead of bearing her own sweet
name of “ Lilly,” this new name was fastened to her.
130 Little Threads.

When she was two years old she could talk. quite
plainly, and when nothing was vexing her, she was
bright and playful. Her mother tried to avoid con-
flicts with her, as much as possible. But if she once
began she did not yield. She knew that no child can
be happy that always has its own way. She knew
that God would be displeased with her if she let her
little daughter grow up self-willed and disobedient.

Early one morning Tangle Thread awoke, smiling
and cheerful. Her little crib was close by her
mamma’s bed, and she saw that neither her father nor
mother was yet awake. She sat up in bed and played
awhile with her pillow. But she was soon tired of
that, so she climbed from -her crib to the bed, and
from the bed slipped down to the floor. Pretty soon
her mother, hearing a slight noise, awoke, and starting
up, she saw Tangle Thread standing in a chair before
her father’s dressing-table, with a razor open in her

hand.
“Oh! she has a razor!” she said, jumping from the
» Jumping

bed, and hastening towards the child.

Tangle Thread instantly got down from the chair,
and ran across the room with the razor in her hand.

“Tangle Thread, stop this instant,” cried her father,
awakened by the noise. But Tangle Thread only ran
faster, and when she saw her father and mother both
running after her, she became angry.

“ Weil have it! will shave!” she cried.

“ Stop this instant !” cried her father once more.

By this time her mother had seized her hand, and
after a struggle the razor was secured. ‘Tangle Thread
burst into frantic screams, but suddenly stopped short
Little Threads. 131

when she saw that her mother’s hand was covered with
blood.

“Yes, you made your poor mamma cut her hand,”
said her father.

Tangle Thread was frightened.

“T sorry,” she said.

But in an instant she was angry with herself for
being sorry. She began to dance up and down, and
to scream out: “ No, no, not sorry.”

Her mother was used .to such scenes. Her father
had never seen her so angry.

“Why, this is dreadful!” he cried. “I never saw
such a child. If she does not learn to obey, she will
sometime cut herself to pieces or get burned up.”

“Yes, I know it,” replied her mother. “I have
tried, in every possible, way, to teach her obedience.
But nothing seems to have any effect. Not half an
hour after being punished for this offence, she will do
something else just as bad.”

“But has the child no feeling? It seems so un-
natural for a little thing of her age not to be alarmed
and pained at the sight of blood.. And your fingers are
all cut, I do believe.’ Let me see. Yes, each one of
your poor mamma’s fingers is cut and bleeding,” he
said, turning to Tangle Thread, who during this time
had not ceased to scream and stamp with all her might.
Her father’s address only made her cry more angrily
and loudly. ‘

Her mamma said to him in a low voice: “Do not
notice her. It only “irritates her yet more. She has a
great deal of feeling, and I am sure she is distressed at
the sight of my cut fingers.”
132 Little Threads.

And this was true. Tangle Thread was distressed.
But she did not know herself what was the matter
with her, and she was still angry and excited and kept
on crying. And when she once begun to cry, she was
like a horse that has begun to run, and the more he
runs the more he must run, till he gets almost wild
and quite worn out, and has to stop to take breath.
CHAPTER I.

AHEN Tangle Thread had cried till she could
cry no longer, her mamma sent for Ruth to
beibabed}! come and dress her.

Dunne breakfast, the father and mother were both
silent and thoughtful. At last her father said :

“Do not you intend to bring that child to her
senses, my dear?”

“Yes, I shall punish her by-and-by. Now, while
she is so oe she would Jet me kill her before she
would give up.”

“ But you intend to make her say she is sorry ?”

“T don’t know.”

“You don’t know, my dear? Do you mean that
you do not intend to break that child’s will?”

“T used to think I must do that, once for all,” she
replied. “I have heard great stories of conflicts be-
tween parents and children, that finished up the busi-
ness for ever. There’s Mr. Hamilton; he told me
that his little Ellen when she was about a year and a
half old, was standing near him, holding a little doll in
her hand.

“ «Tet papa see your dolly,’ said he.


134 Little Threads.

“The child put both hands behind her, and made
no answer.

“Come to me, and let me see your dolly,’ he
repeated. :

“The child refused. At last, after urging her some
time, he said : ,

“¢Then papa will have to make you do it.’ He
began by slapping her hands. She changed the doll
from hand to hand, but held it firmly. He then used
a little rod. The child grew more and more violent ;
a regular battle raged between them. He kept repeat-
ing, ‘I shall punish you, Nelly, till you show me your
dolly ;’ but she would not yield. At last she threw it
at him, angrily. Hour after hour passed before the
child would submit; but at last she gave up, and that
was their final conflict. But I have had twenty such
scenes with Tangle Thread. She yields at last, and is
as sweet and gentle and loving, for a time, as need be.
But perhaps the very next day the whole ground will
have to be fought over again.”

“Perhaps Tangle Thread would yield to me more
readily,” said her father. “As it was my razor about
which she was so obstinate, perhaps I ought to take
her in hand myself.”

So after breakfast, he took Tangle Thread into his
dressing room, and said to her :

“You have been a very naughty child; you would
not mind either papa or mamma; and you made poor
mamma cut her fingers very badly. Are not you sorry
you were so naughty ?”

Tangle Thread held down her head and was silent.

“ Answer papa. Are you sorry?”
"Little Threads. 135

No answer.

He took her little hand in his. ‘I shall slap this
little hand very hard, if you do not answer me.”

Then Tangle Thread burst out into her usual scream.

Her father: struck her hands again and again, but
she only kept on crying.

He began to wish he had not undertaken the task of
conquering such a child.

“ After all it is a mother’s work,” he said to himself.
He looked at his watch. “It is ten o’clock. I ought
to be in my office,” he said, uneasily.

“Tangle Thread, are you going to obey me, or shall
I have to punish you more severely ?”

Ten minutes passed—fifteen—Tangle Thread had no
thought of yielding.

At eleven o’clock her father sat in despair, looking
more worn out than’the angry child did; but the
battle was not yet ended.

At last her poor mother, who had sat looking on in
agony, burst into tears.

“Oh, my child!” she cried, “will you make your
' father strike you yet more?”

Then Tangle Thread’s stubborn heart seemed to
melt. She cried out:

Am sorry, papa!”

“Then run to your dear mamma, and tell her
80.”

Tangle Thread van into her mamma’s arms, who
kissed her and wept over her, but was too tired and
heart-sick to say much.

“Do you know, my little child, that your mamma
feels just so when you are naughty, and have to be
136 Little Threads.

punished? She certainly does. Then won't you try to
be good for her sake?”

Tangle Thread fell asleep in her mamma's arms.
Her papa looked at her sorrowfully.

“T am sorry I undertook to govern her,” said he.
“JT never was so tired in my life. Who would think
that that tiny frame could hold such a will!”

“T never have these conflicts with her now,” replied
her mamma. “It has been suggested to me, that when
a child refuses to obey, it is best to punish it for dis-
obedience at once, rather than enter on a contest with
it. And, on the whole, I believe it to be the proper
way.” :

“Well, good-bye, my dear; it is past twelve, and I
ought not to stay another moment. Do go and lie
down. You look quite worn out. Or shall I order
the carriage for you? Ah! your life is very different
now from what it used to be, before this strange child
dropped down upon us !”

“Tt may look hard to those who only see the wilful,
wayward ways of the child,” said her mother. “But I
love this poor little creature dearly.”

The father now kissed the pale mother and the
sleeping child, and went out. He soon forgot, in trying
to make up for his lost time, what he had been through.
God means that the work of training little children
should belong chiefly to the mother. She has no
business to call her out ; she can have no business
so important outside her own doors. It is for her to
watch every look and word and tone; to give up all
her time, if necessary, and find her happiness in seeing
her child grow up good and gentle, or her sorrow in
Little Threads. 137

seeing it continue perverse and disobedient. So Tangle
Thread’s mamma could not go out, like her papa, and
forget her troubles. There was only one place in all
the world where she could find comfort.. That was on
her knees, before God. She placed the weary little
sleeper on her own bed, and then with many tears,
gave her away more truly than ever before to Him.
She told Him all her troubles and cares, and besought
Him to look down in love on her poor little lamb, and
to take her in His arms, and carry her in His bosom,
till she should become like Himself.

Perhaps you think that God heard this prayer and
answered it at once, so that Tangle Thread awoke from
her nap quite another child, and never was naughty
again. And no doubt He did hear and answer it.
But fruit does not ripen in one day, nor in two.
Under the care of the skilful gardener it will surely
ripen, but it must have sun and rain not once or twice,
but day after day, week after week; sometimes,. even,
month after month.

Poor little Tangle Thread was only conquered for a
time. The very day after the sad affair with the razor,
she was as naughty as ever. And the next day it was
just the same. No matter what she was refused, she
always cried for it with her whole heart. No matter
how she was punished, she would do, right over again,
the very things she had been forbidden.

Ruth found it hard work to get along with her; for
when her mamma was out, she could cry as much as ~
she pleased, and tease Ruth till her patience was worn,
as she said herself, “to tatters.”

“Tf you won’t scream once to-morrow,” Ruth said to
138 Litile Threads.

her one day, “I'll ask your mamma to let you go home
with me some time. Then you can see all our cows,
and our hens and pniekens, and you can take a basket
and hunt for eggs.”

“Well!” said Tangle Thieds

But the next day she cried half a dozen times.
Once it was because her hair was cut; once because
she did not wish to go to walk. Again, because there
was rice-pudding for her dinner, and she said she hated
rice; and so on, through the day.

“ Try again to-morrow,” urged Ruth.

“ Well!” said Tangle Thread, “if you'll promise not
to wash my face, nor change my dress, nor make me
wear over-shoes when I go out; if you'll go on the
shady side of the street, and walk down to Union
Square, then I won’t cry. I shan’t have anything to
ery about.”

“But I can’t promise,” said Ruth. “I must wash
your face and change your dress ; I must put on your
over-shoes; and while this cold weather lasts, I must
walk on the sunny side of the street. Your mamma
has bidden me to do all these things; and as for
Union Square,"you know your mamma won’t let you
go there, because she is afraid you'll get run over.”

“Then I shall cry,” returned Tangle Thread. “ Of
course if you and mamma do all you can to plague me,
and won't let me do a thing I want to do, I must cry.
Or at any rate, I must fret.”

“You think if we let you alone, and you could do
just as you pleased, you would have nothing to cry or
fret about. But you'd go to destruction in the space of
half an hour. You would kill yourself eating cake and
Little Threads. 139

eandy, or you would get run over by some cart or
carriage, or you would catch your death of cold. It
frightens me to think what you would do if it wasn’t
for your poor mamma slaving herself into a consump-
tion to make you a better child. And your mamma is
such a sweet lady, too. Oh, I wish you would be a
good child !”

But Tangle Thread was much amused at the various
ways in which Ruth said she might go to destruction,
and she liked better to hear that sort of talk than talk
about being good, which was quite an old story. _

“Tell some more dreadful things I might do,” said

she.

“T’ve told enough,” said Ruth.

“You must tell me some more. Mamma says you
must do all you can to amuse me. Come, make haste!
Suggest something else!”

“Well, you might get choked to death trying to say
a big word.”

“ Now you are laughing at me, And I’ve a right to”
say ‘suggest’ if I’ve a mind. Tl tell mamma how
you laugh at me!”

Ruth answered, good-naturedly : “TI didn’t mean to
tease you, at any rate. Come, let me tell you all about
my father’s farm.”

“Youre always telling that. You've told me nine.
hundred times. I’d rather hear about something else.”

“ Then I'll tell you about the Babes in the Wood.”

“No, I don’t want to hear that, either. Tell me
about a nurse that put a baby in a carriage and made a
poor little lamb draw it all over town. And at last the
poor little lamb fell down dead.”
140 Little Threads.

“ But I don’t know that story.”

“Yes, you do, for I’ve just told it to you.”

“But if I only tell just what you've told me, you
will get angry and go to erying.”

“JT told you all I know,” said Tangle Thread. “TI
made it up myself. And you must tell me a lot more
about it.”

“But I can’t,” said Ruth. ‘TI can’t make up stories.
I never could.”

“Youre a naughty girl. I don’t like you one bit.
Tl tell mamma of you.”

“And you are a tiresome, naughty child!” Ruth
was tempted to say. But she bit her lips, and was
silent. Then Tangle Thread ran away behind the bed,
and was silent, too. Ruth knew she would sit there
and pout a long time, and then, if not noticed, scream
till attention was paid her. She got up and opened
her drawer, and took from it three little bits of candy.

“‘ Here is some candy your mamma said I might give
you,” said she. “Come, get up from the floor and
-eat if.”

Tangle Thread remained lying flat on the floor with
her face hidden in her two hands. Ruth placed the
candy near her and went back to her work. The child
pulled the candy towards her, ate it, still lying on the
floor, and at last fell asleep.

“ Was there ever such a child!” said Ruth. “If I
take her up, she'll cry and kick and scream till the
walls come down. If I leave her there, she'll get cold.
Well, I can but cover her up with a shawl and let her
alone.”
CHAPTER III.

SHALL skip over several years of Tangle
Thread’s life now, for I don’t like to write
fi -about naughty children. When she was old
enough to learn to read, her mother was glad, for she
thought. the child would be better and happier if she
could amuse herself with books. She determined to
give her four very short lessons every day, so as never
to let her get tired. So one morning she called Tangle
Thread, and taking her into her lap, she said :

“ Here is a nice little book for you, and I am going
to teach you to read. Don’t you want to learn to
read 2”

“ No,” said Tangle Thread, “I want to play.”

“Yes, you shall play very soon, But you must
learn a little bit of a lesson first. And I do not like
you to say ‘No’ when you speak to me. I wish you
to bea polite little girl, and it isn’t polite to speak so to
your mamma.”

“T don’t want to be polite,” said Tangle Thread.

Her mamma sighed a little, though she tried not to,
ind smiled as sweetly and pleasantly as ever.

“ This letter is great A,” said she. “See! one of its

ol:



142 Little Threads.

legs goes up so, and the other down so, . What did I
say its name was ?”

“T don’t know,” said Tangle Thread, in a sulky
voice.

“ A,” said her mother. “ Now say it after me—A.”

“TI don’t want to learn to read,” repeated Tangle
Thread.

“But Iam resolved you shall learn, my child,” re-
plied her mothex, “ Now say A, after me.”

Tangle Thread was silent. Her mother looked at
her watch. The time she had set apart for the lesson
was over.

“My child,” said she, “ you have disobeyed me, and
I must punish you. And at twelve o’clock I shall
give you another lesson.” ‘Then, with a heavy heart,
she punished the litile girl, and sent her back to the
nursery.

At twelve o’clock the nurse brought her home from
her usual morning walk, took off her things, brushed
her hair, and led her to her mother for the second
lesson, as she had been told to do.

Her mother received her with a loving word and a
kiss.

“ Now, can you tell me the name of the letter?” she
asked.

“TJ don’t know, and I said I didn’t know. And I
don’t want to learn to read.”

“J think you do know, Tangle Thread,’ said her
mother. “ But I will tell you once more. It is A.”

“T can’t say A,” said Tangle Thread. “And I can't
say B, either. Nor C.”

“Why, where did you learn your letters?” asked
Little Threads. 143

her mother, in great surprise. “How glad I am that
you know them !”

“They're on my blocks,” said Tangle Thread, in a
gracious voice. “ And if youll buy me a wax doll as
big as Edith May’s, I'll say some more.”

“T can’t promise to pay you for doing what I bid
you,” replied her mother. ‘You have a dozen dolls
now, and if you had one like Edith’s, you would soon
break it. But do not let us talk of that now. Let
me hear you say D.” ;

Half-crying, and with pouts and frowns, this second
lesson was finished. Tangle Thread’s mother went on
faithfully to teach her naughty child in spite-of her
behaviour. But when she called her to her lessons,
she felt very much as people do when they go up the
steps of the dentist’s house and ring his bell. Tangle
Thread never came pleasantly ; she almost always cried
before they got through the few minutes’ task; she
would not half listen to what was said, and everything
had to be repeated over and over again. Her book was
blotted with tears, and its leaves were crumpled in her
impatient hands, so that many a new one had to be
bought before the end of the year. And oh! how
many weary, weary hours this work she had looked
forward to with pleasure, cost the poor mother.
CHAPTER IV.

HERE was once a piece of coarse black stuif,
anda bright golden thread waved and rippled
through it like a sunbeam.

And there was a poor, solitary woman, who had
known little but trouble since the day she was born.
When she was only eight years old, the parent-birds
pushed her out of the nest to find home and shelter
where she could. Nobody taught her to read or to
write ; nobody cared where she went or what she did.
She wore rags for clothing, ate the coarsest food, and
not enough of that; was knocked about, scolded, and
abused. At last she was married. Her husband lived
with her till what little money she had laid up was
gone, and then ran away. After a time she heard that
he was dead.

But just before he went away, God had pity on the
joyless life of this poor woman, and He wove into it a
golden thread. In other words, he sent a little smiling,
loving child into the dark room that used to be so
lonely. ‘here wasn’t much in it besides the child.
While the mother lay in bed with the baby by her
side, the drunken husband had broken most of the
furniture to pieces with an axe, The cabinet that she


Little Threads. 145

had been so proud of was only fit to light the fire now ;
and the table and the chairs were not worth much
more. But what if the floor was covered with these
fragments—wasn’t there a live baby lying on her arm?

Little Golden Thread grew fat every minute, as
good babies are apt to do. God had provided plenty
of sweet milk for her, and nobody had to go out of the
house to buy it when the baby was hungry. It kept
coming as fast as it was wanted, just as oil kept coming
into the poor woman's cruse in the Bible. But food
for the mother did not come of its own accord, and it
was necessary for her to do something to earn money
to pay her rent with; to buy bread and potatoes and
coal and clothes. She did not know, at first, how to
manage it; for she must stay at home and take care
of her baby, and could not go out to work as she
used to do. There was a poor little seamstress who
was willing to pay half a dollar a week, if she would
let her come and sleep in her bed. And she came
every night, when her day’s labour was ended, and
crept in far over toward the wall, so as to leave room
for Golden Thread and her mother. Then in the
morning, while the child was taking its nap, the
mother would go out, with an old poker in one hand
and a tin pail in the other, to rake out bits of coal
from rich people’s ash-barrels. Her clothes were scanty,
‘and of all sorts of odd shapes, so that if you happened
to see her from your bed-room window, half buried in
your barrel of ashes, you would hardly have. been able
to tell whether that queer figure was a man’s or a
woman’s. These bits of coal helped to keep them
warm, and to cook a dinner now and then,
146 Little Threads,

Golden Thread had to lie on an old rug on the
floor, and take care of herself most of the time. Her
mother was afraid to leave her on the bed, lest she
should fall off. But the child was happy on her rug,
and she threw up her arms and hands and legs, and
played with them, or watched her mother moving
about the room, or just lay kicking and laughing and
crowing and cooing. Some of her little clothes.were
always in the wash-tub, or else hanging on a line
behind the stove, drying. This was because she had
so few things that they had to be washed every day.
But she did not know or care anything about that.
She went on enjoying herself just as much as if she
had had a houseful of clothes, and her mother would
stop now and then, look fondly down at the old rug
and the little creature on it, and say halfaloud, half to
herself, ‘Little comfort ! little blessing !” and then go
cheerily on with her work.

When Golden Thread had learned to creep and to
walk it was not so safe to go out and leave her alone, as
it had been. She would get burned or scalded, or pull
the chairs over, and hurt herself, because she did not
know any better than to get into mischief. So her
mother had to wrap her up in an old shawl, and take
her with her when she went out. Golden Thread
used to pat and kiss her as they went along with the
clothes that were to be washed or the coarse needle-
work that was to be done, And this made the way
seem short when it was long. This poor woman had
often to carry a very heavy basket on one arm with
her child on the other, and this was hard, and she
often had to stop to take breath. If Golden Thread
Little Threads. 147

had fallen asleep these sudden halts would wake her
up; then she would smile, put up her lips to be
kissed, and settle down to sleep again. And as soon
as she was strong enough to trot along by her mother’s
side she wanted to help carry the basket, or the pail,
or the bundle that was almost as big as herself, indeed
sometimes much bigger than she was. Now, of course,
she could not help at all, and yet it was very sweet to
see her try, and to watch her bright face when she
fancied herself of some use to her mother. Don’t you
remember how pleased you were when you ran to get
your papa’s boots for him? And how pleased he was,
too? You see you were like Tiotle Golden Thread when
you did that.

When Golden Thread was three years old her
mother thought she must begin to leave her at home,
and go out to work by the day. Ladies who wanted
washing done would let her come and wash for them
all day, give her plenty of good food to eat, and when
she went home at night pay her for her work. So she
asked one of her neighbours to look in now and
then to see how the child was getting along, made up
a fire that would last till her return, put bread where
Golden Thread could reach it, charged her to be a good
girl, and went away. She knew that Golden Thread
would stay where she was bidden, but she did not love
to go and leave her all alone; and she went back
twice to kiss her, and to promise to get home as early
as possible. Golden Thread did not ery or fret, when
her mother had gone, and she heard her lock the door
behind her. She ran and climbed up into a chair to
look out from the window, and watch for her to come
148 Little Threads.

home, just as she always did when her mother went out
on errands: She sat patiently and quietly a long, long
time, thinking every minute she should see her mother
turn the corner, and then hear her step coming up the
stairs. She did not know how long a day is. By-
and-by the neighbour who had promised to look after
her, came up and unlocked the door, and put in her
head. Golden Thread’s mother had given her the key
to keep while she was gone.

“Oh mother! is that you?” cried the lonely little
child, running to the door.

“ No, it’s not time for your mother to be back yet.
Suppose you go down and stay with me a bit ?”

Golden Thread was very glad to go, and for a time
she was quite happy, playing with the neighbour's
children. But by-and-by they began to quarrel, and
to pull each other's hair, and their mother boxed all
the ears in the room, even poor Golden Thread’s,
without stopping to ask who was to blame, and the
poor little thing was very glad to be taken home again
to her own room. ‘The fire had begun to get low, and
the neighbour put on more coal before she went away.
Golden Thread made believe to iron when she was left
alone, but this made her arms ache, and then she made
houses with the clothes-pins. Then dinner-time came,
and she ate her bread and drank some water, and
climbed up to watch once more for her mother. Dear
me! what a joyful sound it was to hear her come toil-
ing up the stairs! They hugged and kissed each so
many times, and it was so nice!

“Poor little soul!” said her mother, “it was lone
some while its mother was gone !”
Little Threads. 149

_ “But you've come now !” cried Golden Thread ; and
she forgot all the long hours, and was just as happy as
a little bird.

And the tired mother forgot how tired she was, and
she put on the tea-kettle and a saucepan, and began
to get the little one’s supper. She had had hers, and
now all she thought of was giving something warm to
her child, who had been so sweet and contented with
her bread and water all day.

“See,” said she, “this pretty white egg. I am
going to boil it fer you. And you shall have a drop
of milk and a bit of sugar, and a cup of tea to-night.
And mother will make you a slice of toast.” What a
feast. after a long, lonely day !

“Mother, do rich people have such nice suppers ?”
asked Golden Thread, hopping-round her, and looking
gaily on.

“Dear me! bless the child !” said her mother ; and
she laughed all to herself, and felt a good deal happier
than many rich folks put together.

So Golden Thread sat up to the table, and had her
warm supper. Her tea was make-believe tea, made of
water with a little milk in it ; but she had it in a real
tea-cup, and the egg wasn’t a make-believe egg by any
means.

“Tm going again to-morrow to the same place,” said
her mother. “And you must be a good child, and not
fret for mother.”

“No, I won’t fret one bit,” said Golden Thread.
“ And when yow’e a big gitl I'll buy you a great big
egg, and cook it for your supper.”

Do?)
“Why, I’m a big girl now,” said her mother. Then

1”
150 Little Threads.

they both laughed a good deal, and by-and-by it was
time to go to bed. When Golden Thread had fallen
asleep, her mother put on her hood and shawl, and
went out to spend the money she had earned that day.
She bought a little coal and a loaf of bread, and three
penny-worth of tea, and some meal. Some of the meal
was to be boiled next morning for the child’s break-
fast. And the coal was to keep her from freezing
through the wintry day.

“ Wait upon me as soon as you can,” she said to the
grocer of whom she bought her tea. “ For I’ve locked
my little girl up alone in the room, and I’m so afraid
of fires-when it becomes dark.”

“Tt’s a pretty risky thing to lock a child up, day or
night,” replied the grocer. ‘‘There’s no telling how
many come to their death that way, every year. You
see they get lonesome, and they fall to playing with
the fire, or with matches,”

“My little girl never does such things,” said the
woman.

“ That doesn’t prove she never will do them some
time,” persisted the grocer. ‘Children’s all just alike.
And it’s my opinion they all make a point of getting
into all the mischief they can. Don’t lock ’em up in
rooms by themselves, J say.”

“That’s my doctrine too,” said another man, who
stood by. “ Besides, it’s a piece of cruelty. Children
wasn’t made to live alone by the day.”

“T don’t know what else we poor folks are to do,”
said Golden Thread’s mother. She caught up her
basket and hastened away, to see that her child was
safe,
Little Threads. 15]

Golden Thread spent a great many such days as the
one I have told you about. How would you like to
be locked: into the room and left alone all day? Do
you think you should cry?

At last Golden Thread was old enough to go to
school, and then her long, lonely days were over. It
is hard work to learn to read, but it isn’t half so hard
as to stay by yourself all day. So Golden Thread was
very happy to stand by her teacher’s side and be taught
her letters. There were a great many children in the
school, and many of them were naughty, tiresome
children. Théy teased their teacher and made her a
deal of trouble, so that she often got quite out of
patience, and would speak sharply to them or even
shake them. She even got out of patience with our
good little Golden Thread, because she did not learn
faster, and one day she spoke quite roughly to her, and
said :

“ You are as stupid as an owl !”

The tears came into Golden Thread’s eyes, but she
looked up sweetly into her teacher’s face, and said :

“ Why, Miss Bacon, you called me an owl !”

“J did-not mean to call you so,” replied the teacher.
“You must forgive me for speaking so rudely. You
are my best child, and if all the rest were like you, I
should not lose my temper so.”

When Golden Thread’s mother came home that
night, with her limbs aching and her hands all wrinkled
and puckered with hot water, how pleased she was to
hear her dear child say :

“My teacher says I am her best child !”

Indeed the poor woman did not creep home to a
‘152 Little Threads.

dark and gloomy room in these days as she used to do
before she had any child. As she passed swiftly
through the streets she knew that Golden Thread would
have the fire burning cheerfully, the room nicely swept,
the candle lighted, and the little low chair waiting for
her. And what was more, she knew that the moment
she opened the door, she should hear the joyful cry,
“Oh! here you come, mother!” and that two arms
would be round her neck and twenty kisses on her
cheek before she had time to take off her things. Oh!
it is so pleasant to have somebody glad to see you
when you get home! Sailors on the sea think so, and
soldiers in their tents think so, and so all mothers
think who have little Golden Threads watching and
waiting for them !

“T wish I might bring home to you some of the
good things I see wasted every day,” said the mother.
“Or, that I could go without half my dinner, so that
you could have it.”

Golden Thread looked quite surprised.

“Why, mother! I have plenty to eat!” said she.
“Some children have to go a-begging, They are
worse off than I am.”

“Well, you haven’t plenty of clothes, at any rate,
I wish you had. Then you wouldn’t have to lie in
bed while I wash and dry what few old things you
have.”

Then Golden Thread laughed, and said: “ But it is
s0 nice that I’ve got some clothes, and don’t have to
lie in bed all the time. And pretty soon I shall be a
big girl, and can help you work, and we shall have
lots of clothes.”
Little Threads. 153

Yet down in the depths of little Golden Thread’s
heart there lay a good many wants and wishes, that
she never told of. There are always such wishes in
the hearts of those who are poor, or only pretty well
off. Some great agitation throws them to the surface,
and friends see them with astonishment, not dreaming
of their existence until now. Just so, all sorts of
plants are growing down in the depths of the sea.
But it needs.a great wind or storm to tear them loose
from the rocks and toss them to the surface.

Golden Thread’s mother kept on working very hard,
and by degrees she was able to get good warm clothing
for herself and her child. She bought a new chest of
drawers and some chairs and a table, and their room
looked more like a nice pleasant home than ever. But
hard work in all sorts of weather, now in freezing cold,
now in long summer days, requires a good deal of
health and strength, and this poor woman began to
lose hers. Now and then instead of going out to earn
money, she had to stay at home to rest, and then what
she had been saving had to be used up. At last, one
day, she fell from a ladder on which she was standing,
and the pail of whitewash she had been using over-
turned and poured its contents all over her. -Her eyes
were filled, and so was her mouth, and she could hardly
breathe or see. Some of the servants in the house
where she was at work helped her to get up and wipe
the whitewash from her face, but they could not cure
her eyes, which burned like fire. One of them led her
home, where she spent the night in great pain and
anxiety. In the morning Golden Thread could not
run gaily to school, as usual, She must lead her half-
154 Litile Threads.

blind mother to a dispensary. Do you know what a
dispensary is? If not, ask your mother, and she will
tell you. The poor woman was given something with
which to cool her eyes, but it did little good, and she
sat with folded hands, she who had always been so
busy! Golden Thread made the fire and got the
breakfast, and swept the room, and she said every-
thing she could think of to comfort her mother.

But the poor woman needed a great deal of comfort.
She knew that if she lost her eyes she could not work
any more to earn money for herself and her child.
They would be turned out of their pleasant little home,
and have to go to the work-house. "When she said so,
Golden Thread answered :

“ But won't they be good to us in the work-house?”

“You don’t know what you are talking about, poor
thing,” said her mother. “And I’m glad you don’t.
And to think of my being blind and not able to walk
another step !”

“But you've got me to lead you, mother,” said
Golden Thread. “It isn’t so bad as if you hadn’t any
little girl like me!”

“No, I know it isn’t. But if I am blind I never
shall see your face again.”

“But you can feel it with your hands, and that’s
most as good,” said Golden Thread. ‘And I shall
never leave you; no, not one minute. And pretty
scon I shall be able to read to you. I'll read such
beautiful stories, all about kings and soldiers and
battles and giants. There’s lots of stories in the
Bible.”

“Dear me! the child would bring a dead man to
Little Threads, 155

life!” said the mother. “And I am an ungrateful
creature not to be thinking of my mercies instead of
sitting here groaning. Why, if I had to choose which
I'd lose, this child, or my two eyes, it would come
dreadful hard, but I’d choose to keep the child.”

So many days passed, but the injured eyes were no
better, and all the neighbours came in to see the poor
woman and to give their advice. One wanted her to
try this thing and another that, and at last they told
of a woman who knew a great deal about the eye, and
would be sure to cure the worst case. Golden Thread
danced for joy when she heard this, for she believed
all she heard, like other little children. She could
hardly wait till her mother was got ready to set off to
visit this wonderful person who was to cure her eyes.
She led her carefully and tenderly along the street,
just as you would lead your little baby-sister if you
were allowed to take her out. The woman-doctor
looked at the eyes and made great promises, and in
return for her advice she took fourteen shillings from
the widow’s hard-working hands. And she took four-
teen shillings a-good many times after this, till all the’
money the poor woman had was gone. And at the
end of the visits her eyes were almost gone too.

These were hard times. The chest of drawers that
held all their treasures was sold; by-and-by the little
clock that used to tick so cheerfully went where the
chest of drawers did ; then the mother’s warm shawl was
pawned; then Golden Thread’s best frock that she
wore to Sunday-school; then other things, one after
another, till they and their room looked as forlorn as
a room could that had Golden Thread in it, and as
156 Little Threads.

Golden Thread could, while always wearing her sweet,
cheery smiles.

But winter was coming on; and winter wants many
things that summer can do without. It wants those
blankets that are at the pawnbroker’s ; those thick
shawls and petticoats, plenty of coal, plenty of warm
food.

“‘ Mother,” said Golden Thread, “if rich people
knew how poor we are, wouldn’t they give us some-
thing?”

“Yes, I dare say ; but [ never begged.”

“ But there was a lady said she would give us cold
pieces if we would come for them. Is it begging to
go”

“Why, if I ever get well, I could do something to
pay for them,” replied her mother. “You're hungry,
poor thing, I know you are. Come, Pll go with you.
But it comes hard,” she added, for her courage failed
her, and she sat down again and pressed both hands
on her eyes to keep back the tears that would have
scalded them.

“ Never mind, mother,” said Golden Thread, “I am
not very hungry. And there’s my best shoes left ;
may be we could get something for them.”

“Well, we'll try,” said her mother. They put on
their scanty shawls, and went out.

Golden Thread held her mother’s hand fast in hers,
and led her carefully along, looking on all sides to see
that she was not run over—picking out the dry places,
and every now and then speaking a word of love and
good cheer.

Walking slowly along in this way, Golden Thread
Little Threads. 157

observed a lady very richly dressed, leading by the
hand a little girl younger than herself. The child was
made on a very tiny scale. Her hands and feet were
so small that you could not help wondering at them ;
and her very red cheeks were on such a cunning little
face, that you would have said they were doll’s cheeks,
if the eyes and the mouth hadn’t such a wise and
knowing way with them. She was pulling very hard
on the hand that held hers, trying to get away. Hear
what she says, and perhaps you will know who she is:

“Tf I can’t have plum-cake and coffee, I don’t want
any party. Edith has plum-cake, and she drinks two
cups of coffee. When I ama big woman I mean to
have just what I’ve a mind.”

“Do you see that little girl across the street?”
asked her mother. “See how miserably she is dressed.
Look at her poor feet. Her shoes are so old that she
can hardly keep them on. And the poor woman she
is leading has a bandage over her eyes. -Do you think
that little girl teases for rich cake and coffee? Do you
think, if I should invite her to come to our house to
lunch, she would ery for things I did not give her?”

“She would be afraid to cry,” replied Tangle Thread,
“and I dare say she isa bad girl, and her mother is
only making believe blind. Gertrude says the streets
are full of impostors.” ‘

Tangle Thread was so pleased that she had said a
big word that her ill-humour began to give way.

“Till run and ask them if they’re impostors,” said
she; “and if they say they're not, I'll give them a
shilling,” she added, tossing up her little bit of a
head.

L
158 Little Threads.

And before her mother had time to answer she ran
towards Golden Thread, who had stopped to pull up
her shoes, that kept slipping from her feet: Many
carriages and heavy carts and stages were passing, and
the child was in the midst of them before her mother
had recovered from her surprise at her flight. A
moment more and she would have been thrown down,
and perhaps killed, But Golden Thread pulled off her
old shoes, ran quickly to the middle of the crossing,
and snatched up the little figure in her own big arms.

“Put me down, you old girl, you!” cried Tangle
Thread, frightened and angry. “Put me down, I
say ! I’ve got as many feet as you have !”

By this time her mother had reached them.

“ Thank you, little girl,” said she, looking at Golden
Thread——“ thank you with all my heart. You are a
brave child to run in among the horses and carriages
to save this foolish little thing. But is that thin shawl
warm enough, this cold day? And are not your feet
half-frozen ?”

“Oh! I don’t mind it,” said Golden Thread,
smiling, and slipping her feet into her old shoes.

“ And is this your mother?” asked the lady, look-
ing with pity at the bandaged eyes.

“ Yes, ma’am, but I lead her,” replied Golden Thread.
“She’s hurt her eyes, and can’t see so well as she
used.”

“Do you see that house on the corner?” asked the
lady. “ Well, I live there, and I wish you would come
and see me to-morrow morning. Will you let her
come?” she asked in a gentle voice, turning to Golden
Thread’s mother,
Little T hvends, 159

“The child’s hardly decent, ma’am,” said the poor
woman.

“ She looks very clean, I’m sure,” said the lady.

“Very well, if you're kind enough to think so,
ma/am,” replied the woman.

So they bid each other good-bye, and each passed on
their way, only Golden Thread and Tangle Thread
looked back at each other several times.

“What a nice, pleasant-looking little girl,” said
Tangle Thread’s mother. “And oh, my child! how
thankful we ought to be to God for saving you when
you were in such danger. How could you run across »
the street in that reckless way? You know how often
I have told you never to do it. But I won't say any
more about it. Iam too thankful that no harm has
come to you.”

“Should you cry if I should be killed?” asked
Tangle Thread. “If I had been killed, you wouldn’t
have had any little girl to tease you.”

“Oh, my darling child! how little you know how
your mother loves you. If you only could begin to
know, what a different child you would be?”

Tangle Thread’s proud little heart melted a little,
and she said in a low voice:

“T won’t tease for plum-cake and coffee again. I'll
have just what you want me to have. And I am going
to invite that little girl to my party. I don’t think
she’s an impostor.”

Her mother smiled, and would gladly have caught
her child in her arms, and covered her with kisses, as
they entered the house together. But Tangle Thread
would not have allowed herself to be caressed for

,
160 Little Threads.

making one civil speech. She was too proud for that.
So they went in together, and were both full of business
all day.

Meanwhile Golden Thread and her mother went on
to the pawnbroker’s, where they pawned the shoes.
With the money thus gained they bought a bit of
bread, and hungry as they were, ate it on the way
home.

“What do you suppose that rich lady wants me to
come there for, mother?” asked Gelden Thread.

“ T suppose she wants to give you something because
you picked up her little girl for her.”

“She must be a very nice lady, then. It only took
me a minute to snatch up the little girl.”

“Yes, but you might have got run over and killed
in that one minute. And then what would have
become of your poor old mother ?”

Golden Thread was silent. But after a while ale
said: “I don’t believe God would take away your
eyes and your little girl both at once. And if that
kind lady gives me as much as a shilling, Pl buy a
little piece of beef with it. The doctor you went to
first, said you wasn’t at all strong, and ought to eat
beef.” ;

“Much he knows where it’s to come from !” said the
mother. “ But that lady won’t give you any money,
child. How should she, not knowing but I would
take it from you and spend it in drink?” .
CHAPTER V.

]HE next morning, very early, Golden Thread
washed her face and hands, and combed

steeds} her hair, and was going to set off at once to
ae the promised visit. But her mother said:

“You must not go these three hours. The lady
won't be up this long while, and then there’s her
breakfast. It will take a good deal longer to eat it
than it takes us to eat our bit of dry bread.”

Golden Thread tried to wait in patience, but it was
ten o’clock when her mother at last let her set off.
She was taken upstairs, where her new friend sat by a
cheerful fire, with Tangle Thread by her side.

“Come in,” said the lady; “come to the fire and
warm yourself. Have you had your breakfast ?”

“Oh yes, ma’am, a good while ago,” said Golden
Thread, trying not to look round her at the beautiful
things in the room, but looking in.spite of herself.

“Tf you had your breakfast long ago, I dare say
you could eat some more by this time. Or would you
rather have something to take home so as to share it
with the rest.?”

“There isn’t anybody but mother,” said Golden
Thread.


162 Little Threads.

“ And she is almost blind, isn’t she ?”

“Her eyes were almost burnt up with whitewash,”
replied Golden Thread; “and since then-she can’t
work as she used. If she could, she wouldn’t let me
go into a lady’s house with such shoes on,” she added,
looking down at her miserable feet. ‘She says she
hopes you will excuse it.”

“To be sure, to be sure,” said the lady, drawing a
little chair to the fire. “Sit down, my child, and tell
me what is your name?”

“Mother calls me her little Golden Thread. But
that isn’t my realname. My real name is v

“ Never mind ; I am sure it isn’t so pretty as the
one by which your mother calls you. And now,
Golden Thread, do you know why I asked you to come
here to-day ?”

“No, ma’am.”

“Well, I wanted to ask you, for one thing, if you
were going to have a good many little girls come to see
you, what would you give them to eat?”

Golden Thread smiled and looked down. At last -
she said : .

“Why, if I had plenty of roasted potatoes, with
butter on them, I’d give them as many as they liked.
Roasted potatoes are very nice if you have butter with
them.”

« And nothing else ?”

“ And may be I’d give every one a piece of cake.
I mean if I had any cake. But I shouldn’t, you
know, ma’am.”

The lady looked at Tangle Thread and smiled, and
Tangle Thread smiled too, for she was thinking, as her


Little Threads. 163

mother was, of the sponge-cake, and macaroons, and
kisses, and candies, and ice-cream that had been ordered
for her party; and which she had pouted about, and
said she wouldn’t have, unless there was wedding-cake
and coffee !

“And now, Golden Thread,” said the lady, “I
should like you to tell me what of all things you want
most. For I feel very grateful to you, and it will be a
great pleasure to me to give you something.”

Golden Thread smiled, and looked thoughtfully into
the fire. * Dear me! she wanted so many things most !

Then the lady said :

“Tn this deep drawer I keep things to give away.
You would laugh if you could see what queer things I
keep in it. Toys, and books, and clothing, and shoes
and stockings.”

“Oh! is there a pair of shoes there?” cried Golden
Thread, jumping up.

“Why didn’t you say a big wax doll ?” cried Tangle
Thread. “Mamma would just as soon give you a doll
as not.”

“There are no shoes large enough for-you in the
drawer,” said the lady. “Come, what would you like
next best to shoes ?”

“Perhaps there’s stockings,” suggested the child.
“‘ Mother says warm stockings are good for chilblains.”

“Oh! there are larger things in the drawer than
stockings. Choose once more.”

“There never could be a shawl big enough for
mother ?”

The lady rose, opened the drawer, and took thence
a thick woollen shawl.
164 Little Threads.

“ Like this?” she asked.

“Oh! how nice,” cried Golden Thread. ‘“ Mother
is so cold since she got ill, But have I been begging,
oh! have I been begging ?” she cried, looking alarmed.
“ Did I ask fora shawl for mother? And I was never
thinking of a big warm shawl like that.”

“Perhaps you were thinking of a little warm one
like this,” said the lady, almost crying with pleasure
that she had found out so many of the child’s secret
wishes. “But this is just large enough for you, and
you can give the other to your mother.”

“Oh! thank you, ma’am, thank you,” cried Golden
Thread.

“ And here are more things in the drawer,” said
Tangle Thread, climbing into a chair and looking down
into it. “See, books, dolls, reticules, pictures, work-
boxes.”

“Why, how came these things here?” asked her
mother, surprised.

“T put them there my own self,” replied Tangle
Thread. ‘ They are for the little girl. And I should
like to have her take off her things and stay here and
play with me.”

“T left mother all alone, and I must go now,” said
Golden Thread.

“Stop a minute,” said the lady. “These thick
night-gowns are for you.”

“Why, I never had any night-gowns,” said Golden
Thread, with great surprise and pleasure. “ What z7dl
mother say ?”

“ And in this bundle you will find a good many
other such things.”
Little Threads. 165

“Why, I had to lie in bed while my things wera
washed! Tl go right home and show all these to
mother. What will she say 1”

The lady smiled, and Tangle Thread looked almost
as much astonished as Golden Thread. She drew near
and whispered : “ But why don’t you ask my mother
for a big doll? And some cake and candy ?”

Golden Thread was speechless. Was she the sort of
child to ask for dolls and cake and eandy, while her
mother sat half-blind, half-frozen, half-starved at home?

“Oh!” she cried, bursting into tears, “ it isn’t nice
things we want. It’s bread and meat and fire !”

Tangle Thread rushed out of the room and upstairs
to Ruth.

“Give me all my money, quick,” said she; “ there’s
a little girl downstairs that wants some bread and meat
and fire.”

“Oh! your mamma won’t let you give to beggars,”
said Ruth.

“She isn’t a beggar any more than you are !” cried
Tangle Thread, angrily. ‘And I will have my money.
Get it this instant!”

“T am not to give you things unless you ask me in a
proper way.”

“T will have my money!” said Tangle Thread ; and
she climbed up and opened the upper drawer, and began
to turn over the things there in search of her purse.

“Don’t toss over your nice clean collars in that
way,” said Ruth. ‘Your purse is not in that drawer,
and you'll not find it if you look all day.”

Tangle Thread burst into loud and angry cries. She
took out her nice collars and aprons, and threw them
166 Little Threads.

one by one to the floor, and was trampling them under
her feet when her mamma suddenly entered the room.

The happy moments she had spent with Golden
Thread were over, and she stood in the door with that
sorrowful, grieved look that was now almost always on
her face. She did not say a word, but taking the
angry child by the hand, she led her downstairs to her
own room, and seated herself opposite to her in silence.

Were you ever disappointed in your life? When
you were going into the country to spend the day, and
it began to rain just as you were all ready to set off,
how did you feel? And when you were invited toa
Christmas-tree, and had talked about nothing else for a
week, how did you behave when your mamma said you
had too bad a cold to go, and all the other children
went without you? ‘You were disappointed, and very
likely cried more or less about it. Well, Tangle
Thread’s mother was disappointed that just as her
child seemed gentler and sweeter than usual, her good-
ness lasted so. little while. You know how she felt as
she sat looking at Tangle Thread sobbing with anger.

Meanwhile Golden Thread had gone home, and one
of the maids went with her, as she was directed to do,
with a basket on her arm and some money. “With
the money she was to buy shoes and stockings, that
Golden Thread was to put right on and wear home.

“ But I’ve a pair of shoes at the pawnbroker’s,” said
Golden Thread.

“¢ Never mind, I’m to do as I’m told,” said the maid.
“Tf you ever get your other shoes back, they'll may be
do for Sundays.”

“Look at me, mother!” cried Golden Thread, run-
Little Threads. 167

ning in with her stout shoes on and making all the
noise she could. “ Lift up your bandage just a minute,
and see what I’ve got. Shoes and stockings and shawls
and night-gowns and petticoats, and the lady says she’s
coming to see you. And here are roasted potatoes
right out of the oven, and butter to eat with them!
Oh, mother! I didn’t mean to beg for them.”

The poor mother looked so bewildered and so ready
to ery, that the maid thought it best to set the basket
on the table and to slip out as quietly as she could.
As soon as she had gone, Golden Thread flew into her
mother’s arms.

“Oh! it was such a nice lady!” said she. ‘She is
coming to see you, mother, and says you must go to
her doctor and let him see your eyes. And she told
me to tell you not to be troubled, for you would not
be left to suffer when you were not fit to work.”

The poor woman shook her head. “TI cannot take
all these things,” said she. “TI never can pay for them,
and I haven’t been used to having things I didn’t
work for.”

Golden Thread stood silent, for she did not know
what to say.

“ At any rate, you'll eat some of the potatoes, won't
you, mother?” she asked. And she began taking them
from the basket. “Why, there’s a piece of roast meat
here!” she cried. “Oh, mother! it will do you so
much good! And there’s enough to last a week !”

They sat down, hungry and thankful, to this little
dinner, and then they looked at the shawls, the shoes,
and all the other treasures.

“T can’t think of keeping them,” said the poor
168 Little Threads.

woman again. “ Unless, indeed, the lady will let me
come and work for her whenever I get well.”

“The lady is very rich,” said Golden Thread, looking
down at her shoes. “ And she said herself that my
old shoes were not fit to wear.”

Her mother made no answer, but looked again and
again at the thick shawls, and at last laid everything
carefully away on the bed.

“T haven’t got down quite so low as all this comes
to,” said she. “ Begging is a trade I wasn’t brought
up to. We must not keep these things. Just as soon
as my eyes get well, I shall be able to earn what we
need.”

“May be if you'd seen the lady as long as I did,
mother, you wouldn’t mind taking presents from her.
But I'll do just as you say. You are not angry with
me, are you 2”

“ Angry with you? Bless your heart! No indeed.
If I’m angry with anybody it’s with myself for getting
that fall and spoiling my eyes.”

While this was going on in the one small room in
which Golden Thread lived, poor little Tangle Thread
sat crying before her mamma. She was crying with
anger, and when spoken to she made no answer, unless
it was by crying more loudly and by kicking against
the chair on which she sat. So at last’ her mamma rose

quietly and went away into another room. There she
threw herself down upon her knees, hid her face in her
hands and burst into tears. Then she prayed long and
earnestly to God to touch the heart of her child.
When she returned to her room Tangle Thread had
stopped crying, and looked tired. Indeed she was both

®
Little Threads. 169

tired and ashamed. She wished she hadn’t been so
angry, and that she could tell her mamma so. But it
would have been easier to have a tooth out than to tell
her secret thoughts to anybody.

“Come here, my child,” said her mother tenderly,
and holding out her hand.

Tangle Thread rose, and walked to her mother’s side.

“T am not going to say anything to you about your
behaviour,” said her mother. “Ihave said everything
I had to say, a great many times already. And I am
not going to punish you, either. I am quite tired of
that. I can hardly remember a day in your life that
I have not had to punish you in some way. But I
will tell you to-morrow what I intend to do.”

She spoke in a gentle, loving, but very sad tone,
and Tangle Thread saw that her eyes were red with
crying. She never had felt so miserable in her life.
What a pity that she did not throw herself into her
mamma’s arms, tell her how sorry she felt, and promise
to try, with God’s help, to be a better child! But
she did not say a word, and pretty soon the carriage
was ordered, and she saw her mamma drive off. She
went back to the nursery, and tried to play with her
dolls, but they did not comfort her. Then she read
a little here and there in her favourite book.

Meanwhile her mother drove from place to place,
making inquiries about Golden Thread’s mother. She
heard nothing ill of her-anywhere. Everybody said
she was a hard-working, industrious woman, So then
she drove to the house where the poor woman lived.
All the neighbours ran to the windows to look at the
carriage, and some of them directed her to the room.
170 Little Threads.

“Qh, mother! it’s the nice lady!” cried Golden
Thread, as she opened the door, on hearing her knock.

“T have come to see you on account of your eyes,”
said the lady, kindly. “I want you to tell me all
about your accident, and what has been done for your
eyes since they were injured.” P

Golden Thread’s mother was glad to tell her story to
so kind a listener, and by degrees a good many things
came. out that she did not mean to tell.

“T will take you to an oculist, if you are willing to
go,” said the lady. “Ihave the carriage at the door,
on purpose, and there is plenty of time before dark.”

The poor woman coloured, and was silent. At last
she said: “I thank you, ma’am, with all my heart. But
Iam not decent to go with a lady, like you. If you
would please to give me a bit of a note to the doctor,
my little girl could lead me to his house.”

“Jt is too far. Besides, I want to see him myself.
Your shawl will nearly cover you, and I’m sure your
dress is clean and tidy.”

“Do go, mother,” whispered Golden Thread.

“JT was going to say, ma’am, speaking of the shawl
and things, that I am grateful for them; but I can’t
think of taking them unless you will let me do some-
thing for you. I can wash and iron, and serub and
scour, and I understand whitewashing.”

“Not now, that you are nearly blind!” said the
lady.

“Why, no, ma’am, I can’t say that I can see to do
much of anything now ; but I hope to get well.”

“The first thing then is to see what the doctor
says,” replied the lady; “and I promise to give you
Little Threads. 17I

work as soon as you are able to do it, So get ready,
and we'll go at once. Put on your shawl, too, Golden
Thread,” she added, “ for of course you are to go.”

You should have seen Golden Thread’s face, as she
led her mother down the stairs, and helped her into
the carriage! Driving off in a carriage, as if they were
queens! Well, if it was a dream, what a delightful
dream it was !

The doctor said the poor eyes were in a sad state,
what with the whitewash and the quack medicine. |
But he thought they would be well in time. He spoke
kindly and cheerfully to the poor woman, who felt
as if a heavy stone had been lifted off her heart.

“ And now,” said the lady, as she set her down at
her own door, “I have one thing more to say to you.
Suppose I should be very ill several months, not able
to turn myself in bed, and needing constant care day
and night. I should be obliged to have a nurse, and I
_ Should take all her time, and strength, and patience.

Now I should pay her all she asked, and perhaps
more. But could I really pay her with money so as
not to have any reason to feel grateful to her for all she
had done and all she had suffered for me ?”

“Why, no maam, may be not,” said the poor
woman, wondering what was coming next.

“Well, if I could never repay her, then I must
always feel under obligation to her. I could, in fact,
only repay her by nursing her through just such ill-
ness. But I should not be unhappy on that account.
T love to feel obliged to people. I love to feel grateful
to God for His goodness to me, and I love to feel
erateful to kind friends for their goodness, And I
172 Little Threads

want you to love to have me do all I can for you in
this time of your trouble. Anybody can refuse a
favour, but it isn’t everybody who knows how to
accept one nobly and freely. But you must try, for
my sake, and for His sake who bids His children
to minister to each other as they would to Him.”

So saying, the lady allowed Golden Thread and her
mother to alight from the carriage, and the coachman
handed them from under his seat such a big bundle
that they could hardly get it upstairs. And when
they got there they did not know their own room.
There was such a fire burning; and the chest of
drawers had come back, and so had the table and the
chairs, and the clock. And when they opened the
big bundle there were blankets and a warm quilt, and
shoes and stockings for the mother, and flannel petti-
coats, and a woollen dress. And when she tried to put
on a pair of the stockings there was something hard in
each toe, and the hard thing proved to be money, with
which to buy coal and food and medicine.

“Are you going to send all these things back,
mother?” asked Golden Thread, anxiously, for she
had not understood the lady’s talk with her mother.

“Send them back! No, indeed! I am going to
keep them, and be grateful for them !” was the answer.

Then Golden Thread was so glad she did not know
what to do, and she threw herself down on the floor
and rolled, like a ball, across the room. And they put
away their treasures nicely in the drawers, and Golden
Thread went out and bought a candle to eat their
supper by.
CHAPTER VI.

HE next morning Tangle Thread’s mother said

to her: “I had a plan in my mind yesterday

é which I do not approve of, now that I have

had more time to think it over. Do you want to know
what it was?”

“Tf it was about me, I do,” said Tangle Thread.

“Well, I had half a mind to send you to spend a
week. with that little girl who was here yesterday.”

“ What, that little golden girl?”

“ Little Golden Thread, yes. I thought it might do
you good to see how poor people live, and to watch
that nice pleasant child at her work. But on the
whole, I cannot get courage to let you go.”

“Why not, mamma? I want to go. I am tired
of always being in this house.”

“No, I dare not trust you. You might take cold,
or get into trouble of some sort.”

It was just like Tangle Thread to begin to ery, and
to want to go because her mamma did not wish it. So
she fancied herself much abused because she could not
have her own way.

“T have to play all alone,” said she. “I never have
anyone to play with.”



M
174 Little Threads.

“ Not little Gertrude?” asked her mother.

“Gertrude gets all my toys, and she won’t play any-
thing I like. She just sits and sings to my wax doll
as if it was alive. Do let me go, mamma.”

Her mother could hardly help smiling.

At this moment her father entered the room.
He looked at Tangle Thread with displeasure, and
said : ;

“T shall really have to send you away if you behave
in this manner. You weary your mamma's life out
with such constant teasing.”

“T was just telling her that I had been thinking
of sending her to spend a week with a poor woman
I know of. But instead of being alarmed at the
prospect, she is quite vexed because I will not let
her go.”

“Ts the woman trustworthy? ‘Does she live in a
decent place?” asked the father ; ‘for I am not sure
it would not be a good thing for Tangle Thread to be
sent away among strangers.”

“JT really begin to think so,” said her mamma.

Then Tangle Thread suddenly changed her mind,
and began to think she did not want to go.

“They are not nice people,” said she, “and they
have no meat or bread or fire. I would rather stay at
home.”

“T was quite in earnest in what I said,” urged her
father. ‘A little girl who will not try to be gentle
and good, and. who, after so many years, continues so
wilful, ought not to be treated like other little girls.
If she makes her home unhappy, she ought not to stay
there.”
Little Threads. 175

So saying he took his hat and went out.

“T never saw your father so displeased,” said Tangle
Thread’s mother. “I am afraid that he will really
send you away. We know of a lady in the country
who takes little girls, and she would be quite willing
to take you.”

“JT wasn’t any naughtier than usual,” said Tangle
Thread. “I don’t see why I should be sent away just
for fretting a little bit.”

“Your father was thinking of all your anlghiy. ways
ever since you were born; and perhaps he thinks that
some one else will manage you better than your mother
can. But oh, my poor child! nobody will love you as
I do, and you will miss the love. Your heart will
ache for it day and night.”

Tangle Thread sighed. It is easy to be naughty,
but it is hard, too.

“T won't tease you any more,” said she. “It isn’t
very nice to tease people. I can do anything I have a
mind. I can be good, and I can be naughty.”

“Don’t say so, my dear. Say you can be good if
Jesus will help you; for there’s no use in trying unless
He helps you.”

. “TfI can’t be good all by myself, I don’t want to
be good at all,” said Tangle Thread. “You destroy all
my ambition.”

She was so pleased with herself for having made
this great speech, that her little tightly-packed body
almost seemed to swell with the pride it was hardly
big enough to hold. She went to the nursery lost in
thought.

“T can be good if I’ve a mind,” she said to herself,
176 Little Threads.

“T’ve a great mind to begin. Then everybody will be
so astonished. ‘They’ll say they never saw such a
sweet little girl, That’s what people say about good
children—they say they’re sweet. And I can be sweet
if ’'ve a mind.”

These thoughts were so pleasing that she laughed
aloud.

“ What are you laughing at?” asked Ruth.

Tangle Thread blushed, and started. “I wasn’t
laughing,” said she.

“Indeed you were,” said the nurse.

“I was not. Or if I was, you needn’t be asking
about it! I can laugh if I choose.”

“ She’s out of humour, and I won't say anything to
vex her,” thought Ruth. “I did provoke her yester-
day, and I wish I hadn't.”

“T’ve been looking everywhere for your purse,” said
she. ‘I was sorry that I did not help you look for it.
But I had such a toothache, I could not bear to move.
And yow'll never guess where I found it. Why, in
one of your boots, under the bed.”

“Oh! I remember now. I played that my boot
was a ship, and I put my purse on board for cargo. I
am so glad I’ve found it. Let’s go right out now, and
give some money to that little girl.”

“We must see what your mamma says, first. And
I doubt if she lets you give so much money to one
person.”

“Yes she will, She likes generous people.”

“But what will you do when all your money is
gone?”

“Oh! papa will give me plenty more.”
Little Threads. 177

“Then I don’t call it generous to give it away. You
wouldn’t do it if you were not sure he would give you
more.”

Tangle Thread was silent. But after a minute’ she
ran down to her mamma. She found her writing.

“Mamma!” said she, “mamma!”

“Do not interrupt me now ; I am busy,” said her
mother.

“But, mamma, I want—’

Her mother put her gently away.

“TJ should think you might listen,” said Tangle
Thread, reproachfully.

Her mother looked up. “I was making up the
week’s accounts,” said she, “and you have disturbed
me so, that I shall have to go all over them again. . Go
away now, and come again in half an hour.”

“ But you've stopped now, and—”

“Go, my child,” said her mother. “You must
learn to obey.”

Tangle Thread went. But it was not a sweet little
girl who ran from the room with a flushed face.

“T’ll go up into the attic and stay there till I freeze
to death,” she said to herself. ‘Then mamma will
wish she hadn’t teased me so. Oh! shell be sorry
enough when she sees me lying there cold and
dead |”

The attic was not a very agreeable place on this
wintry day. Tangle Thread soon became tired of
pouting there alone. So she concluded not to freeze,
but to starve to death; a resolution that she kept till
supper-time, when she put it off till next day.

In half an hour her mother sent for her,
178 Little Threads.

“T am at leisure now,” said she, “what were you
going to say?”

“T want to know if I can go to see that little gil,
and give her all my money 2”

“T have given her all she needs for the present,”
replied her mother. “But I am going to see them
now, and if you wish to go with me, you can run and
get ready.”

Tangle Thread hesitated. At last she went up to be
dressed, and she slipped the purse into her pocket.

They found Golden Thread and her mother quite
cheerful and happy. Their room looked clean and
pleasant; and the two children sat apart while their
mothers conversed together, and had a little chat of
their own,

“Where are your toys?” asked Tangle Thread.

“T have none,” said: Golden Thread.

“What have you done with them, then?”

“Oh! I never had any to speak of. When I was a
little girl, mother made me a rag-baby ; but I gave it
away, long ago.”

“But what do you do all day, if you have no
toys ?”

“T help mother. I wash the dishes, and I sweep
the floor; and I can knit. I knit almost a whole
stocking once.”

“Can you read? Have you any books 2”

“T can’t read very well. I have to stay at home
from school to take care of mother, now.”

“Why doesn’t sheteach you, then ?”

“Oh! she’s almost blind. Besides, she doesn’t
know how to read. herself.”
Little Threads. 179

Tangle Thread was speechless with surprise. A
grown-up woman, and not know how to read!

“Mamma knows everything,” said she, “and she
teaches me. And one of these days I shall know as
much as she does. But I am afraid she won't go to
heaven unless she gives you more money. She ought
to give you money to buy ever so many toys with.
But I’ve got some money of my own, and you shall
have it all. You must buy a large doll and a cradle.”

“But does your mamma know about it?” asked
Golden Thread, half-pleased and half-frightened.

“No, she doesn’t. It says in the Bible that you
should not let your left hand know what your right
hand does. So of course I don’t want her to know
about it.” And Tangle Thread felt very virtuous
indeed, as she put the purse into Golden Thread’s
hand. i

By this time her mamma was ready to go; and
when they were in the carriage again, she said:

“ How do you feel about spending a week with that
poor blind woman and her child? You know you could
help them to pare potatoes and wash dishes, and make
their bed, and sweep.”

“You are laughing at me, mamma,” said Tangle
Thread.

“And you may laugh at me, too, if you like,”
answered her mamma; ‘but I have another plan,
now. Golden Thread cannot go to school while her
mother is so helpless, and I have been thinking how
it would answer to let her come every day to our
house to be taught.”

“Who would teach her?”
" 180 Little Threads.

“T thought you would.”

Tangle Thread could not conceal her smile of pride
and pleasure. She sat up as straight as possible. and
said :

“J should like that dearly.”

“But you must make up your mind to find it
quite a task. At first it will be pleasant, but after
the novelty wears off you will often find it irksome.
But I want you to feel that you were not placed in
this world just to amuse yourself and have a good .
time. I want you to do some things that are tire-
some, and that require labour and patience.”

“When may I begin?”

“To-morrow or next day. I have already spoken to
the child’s mother about it.”

Tangle Thread went to bed full of ambitious schemes.
She forgot that it was not Golden Thread’s fault that
though two years older than herself she could not read
well. She forgot who had given her her own great
readiness to learn, and yet what impatience she had
always shown at her tasks.

Next morning at the appointed hour Golden Thread
made her appearance.

“My mother says I ought not to have taken this
money,” said she, placing the purse in Tangle Thread’s
hand. “She says I am to say I am very sorry I was
such a foolish child.”

Tangle Thread’s mother looked at her little daughter
with surprise.

“Did you give her your purse, after all?” she
asked.

“Yes, mamma,” replied Tangle Thread, in a firm
Little Threads. 181

voice. “The Bible says: ‘ Blessed is he that considereth
the poor.’”

“But what does it say about obedience to parents ?
Oh, Tangle Thread! what shall I do with you!”

She sank back into a chair almost ill, Golden
Thread stood looking on, surprised and troubled, and
was very glad to be told that she might run home, as
there would be no lessons that day.

On hearing her story her mother was greatly shocked.

“No wonder that lady looks so sorrowful,” said she.
“J thought she had some trouble on her mind.”

“Oh! but her little girl will never do so-again,” said
Golden Thread. “She wouldn’t like to make her
mother turn so pale again.”

“Ah!” thought the poor woman. “I’ve had a
sorrowful, hard life; and if I get well, I’ve got to go
on working just so as long as I live. But what of it?
I’ve got the best child that ever was. A child that
never crossed me in anything, nor ever spoke a rough
word to me. There isn’t anything God could have
given a poor, lonely creature like me that I should have
been half so pleased with as my little Golden Thread.
’ Why, since she came into the “world, it isn’t the same
world it was before, and I ain’t the same woman. But
I have not been so thankful asI ought. I’ve grumbled
and fretted a good deal because I was so poor. And
yet I’d rather have my little Golden Thread than all
the money and all the houses and all the good things
there are in the world !”

While these thoughts lighted up the little obscure
yoom in which the poor woman lived, Tangle Thread’s
mother sat in her beautiful house sad and sorrowful,
182 Little Threads.

What to do next for her child she knew not. But
God saw her grief and pain and heard her prayers. He
put new courage and patience into her heart. She said
to herself: “I have a very hard task to perform. I
must teach this child obedience. But I see that this
cannot be done at once. I must go on day after day,
trusting in God to lead me every step of the way. I
must pray more, I must love her more, I must be more
gentle and tender. But I must have her obedience.”

Tangle Thread stood, meanwhile, with a dark and
gloomy face, near the window. A little bird hung near
her in his cage, and she looked at him as he hopped
about picking up his seeds, and said, half-aloud :

“T wish J was a bird! Then I'd fly away—away
off where there are no houses and no people, and where
I should have nobody to plague me.”

“Poor little unhappy child!” said her mother,
“don’t you know who it is that ‘plagues’ you?”

“Everybody does!” cried Tangle Thread. “Papa
does, and you do, and Ruth does. You all seem to
think I am always naughty.”

“ Poor child !” repeated her mother, “it is you who
torment yourself, But I will not argue with you. I
will tell you once more what I have often told you. I
cannot treat you exactly as God treats me, for I ama
sinful, ignorant creature. I make mistakes, and He
never does. I get out of patience, and He does not.
I know almost nothing, and He knows everything.
But I mean to ¢ry to treat you,'as nearly as I can, as
He does me. He has had patience with me a great
many times, when I wonder He was willing to wait
for me to be penitent, He has been good to me, and
Little Threads. 183

given me many, many things. And He has never
ceased to put me under the rod since the day I gave
myself away to Him. I don’t know which to thank
Him for most, His goodness or His severity.”

Tangle Thread did not perfectly understand all this.
But she saw that her mother spoke out of the very
depths of her heart. She saw that she was more than
ever resolved to make her obedient. And what she
did not understand she felt.

She went away sorrowfully to her play-room and
locked herself in. She could not think what made
her feel so sad and unhappy. Her books and her toys
did not seem to be what she wanted.

“TJ don’t know what I do want!” she said to her-
self; and tears began to roll down her cheeks. .-

Ah ! little Tangle Thread! This is what you want.
To have Jesus touch your heart and make it sorry.
To kneel right down and tell Him how sad and desolate
you feel, and to beg Him to make you His own dear
child, and to help you to love and obey Him. And
then to run and throw yourself right into your dear
mother’s arms, hide your head in her bosom, tell her
how grieved you are for all your wilful, naughty ways,
and how you want to begin now to be like Jesus, and
to love and obey Him!

But the child had not yet learned this sweet lesson.
She could not bear to be sorry, much less to own she
was sorry.
CHAPTER VII.

S nothing more was said to Tangle Thread
about her teaching Golden Thread to read,
she saw that her mother did not mean to
give her that pleasure on account of her behaviour
about the purse. Nor was she now invited to go with
her mamma to visit poor people as she had often done.
To march into sick-rooms laden with baskets of fruit
and flowers, her little figure fairly swelling with pride,
had been one of her greatest pleasures. There were
some good and kind feelings mingled with her pride ;
she liked to see a pale face light up with joy on her
entrance, and to see how grateful fruit often was to
parched lips.

“There’s the makings of a good woman in her, bless
her heart!” said one of the poor invalids whom she
was often taken to see. This woman had lived in her
mother’s house as cook; she had heard of Tangle
Thread’s behaviour through the other servants, and
knew pretty well what she was.

About this time, Gertrude, Tangle Thread’s little
friend, came to spend the day with her.

Soon after dinner Gertrude complained. of feeling
chilly. Ruth, on hearing this, put more coal on the



Little Threads. 185

' fire and made Gertrude wear one of Tangle Thread’s
flannel sacks. ‘But in a few hours she was taken quite
sick. Tangle Thread ran quickly for her mother, who
came at once.

“She surely can have eaten nothing at dinner to
make her ill?” said she, turning to Ruth.

“No, ma'am. They had nothing but their mutton:
chops, potato and a rice pudding. No, it was tapioca
pudding to-day.”

“Her head and her hands are quite hot,” said Tangle
Thread.

“What a child you are!” said her mother, smiling.
But she looked anxiously at little Gertrude.

“Tt is snowing, and is very cold,” said she. ‘I hardly
like to send Gertrude home in such a storm. Gertrude,
darling, would you feel very badly to stay -here to-
night ?”

“JT want to go home,” said Gertrude. “I want my
own mamma to make me get well.”

“T will go for your mamma, and if she thinks it
best, she will take you home. But if she thinks it
would not be safe, then you will stay here, just to-night,
won't you?”

“Oh yes, just as mamma says,” replied Gertrude.
And she closed her eyes and fell back fast asleep in
Ruth’s arms. Tangle Thread ran for a shawl, and
covered the sleeping child carefully.

“ That’s right, dear,” said her mother.

“Thank you, that’s a good child,” said Ruth.

It was just at dusk that Gertrude’s mother came
hurrying up to the nursery. Gertrude awoke and
stretched her arms towards her dear mamma with a
186 Little Threads.

sigh of relief. Once in her arms, she expected to be
well.

“J dare not touch you yet, dear,” said her mother.
“T am all covered with snow. Wait till I can shake
it off and get dry. Where do you feel ill, darling?”

“T feel better now. My head aches a little and I
am thirsty. And I am tired a little.”

“Tt never would answer to take her home in this
storm,” said Tangle Thread’s mother. ‘She may be
quite relieved by to-morrow, and we might then take
her home safely. I will sleep with her myself, and do
everything I can for her.”

“T don’t know, I feel nervous about illness,” replied
Gertrude’s mother, looking anxiously at the child’s
glowing cheeks. “Since I lost my little Mary, I am
frightened at everything. And Gertrude is just one of
those little lovely creatures one is always expecting to
lose.”

“Can't you stay here with Gertrude?” asked Tangle
Thread, who had heard every word of this whispered
conversation.

“ Ah no—there’s the baby to nurse, and where he is
I must be. But I dare not move Gertrude to-night.
Perhaps, after all, it’s only a fit of indigestion. My
darling,” said she, now taking the child from Ruth,
“you'll do just what dear mamma wishes. I know you
will. You'll stay here to-night, and early in the morn-
ing I'll come with the carriage and take you home.
Only just to-night, dear.”

“Yes, mamma,” said Gertrude. “If you want me
to stay, I will.” r

They soon had the child undressed and in a warm
Little Threads. 187

bed. She fell asleep again, and though her sleep was
restless, she complained of nothing when she woke,
only once when she tried to take some water, she said :
“Tt hurts me when I drink; I don’t want any more
water.” Her mother, having sat by her side all the
evening, was now preparing to go honie, and did not
hear these words. Tangle Thread’s mother did.

‘Can her throat be sore?” she said to herself. “Is
it possible that scarlet fever has crossed our threshold?”
Her heart yearned over her own child. “Oh! if she
should have it and die!”

“Tf there are any alarming symptoms during the
night, I had better send for the doctor, had I not?”
she said, as Gertrude’s mother took leave.

“ Certainly, certainly.. But I hope she will have a
good night and be quite bright to-morrow.”

But the child did not have a good night. She
tossed to and fro and moaned in her sleep, and often
said :

“Tt hurts me where my throat is.”

As soon as daylight began to steal into the room,
it became plain that Gertrude was covered with an
eruption of some sort and was very ill. The doctor
was sent for her; he said at once: “ Yes, it is scarlet-
fever |”

“Can I go home to my own mamma?” asked
Gertrude.

“We'll send for your mamma to come here,” said
the doctor. And turning to Tangle Thread’s mother,
he said :

“As to your own child, you will of course see that
she does not enter this room.”
188 Little Threads.

“But may she not have already taken the disease ?
She and Gertrude were together all day yesterday.”

“T cannot say. We must use the precaution of
keeping them apart a couple of weeks at any rate. As
to little Gertrude, if she lives through it, you will have
her in this room six weeks.”

“Tf she lives through it! Is she then so ill?”

“T think her a very weak child. And you know
what scarlet-fever is. But we will do all we can. It
is not necessary to alarm her mother. She will take
the alarm when she hears what the disease is.”

Gertrude’s mother soon came in, and a glance at her
child told her the whole story.

“ Nobody need tell me what it is!” she cried, burst-
ing into tears. “It is scarlet-fever! Oh, my little
Gertrude! My sweetest, my best child! I never
thought she would live to grow up! I knew she
was too good! but I never dreamed it would come so
soon !”

“Hush!” said Tangle Thread’s mother, “she is
waking ; she will hear you. You must put on a cheer-
ful face when she sees you.”

“Qh! how can I look cheerful when my heart is
breaking ?”

‘Come into the next room till you are more com-
posed. And stay yourself on God, my dear friend.
He will not touch a hair of Gertrude’s head unless it
is best. And if it 7s best; if He does take her from
you—you will still have Him left. But do not be dis-
couraged. You are not ina state to judge fairly how
she is, You look as if-you had not slept an hour since
you left us last night.”
Little Threads. 189

“T did not close my eyes. Something kept saying,
‘ Gertrude is going just where little Mary did.’”

“ Little Mary went to a very happy place !”

“Yes, yes, I know. Butoh! she left such a great
chasm when she went away. You never lost a child.
You don’t know anything about it. This world never
has seemed the same to me since I lost my little
Mary.”

“Nor has the next world either. You have often
told me iow much nearer, how much dearer heaven
had been made to you by that affliction. And it will
. become yet nearer and ‘dearer if your precious little
Gertrude goes there too. But God will not take her
away unless it is best. Let us believe that. Let us
trust her to Him. He never makes mistakes nor
snatches away our treasures a moment too soon.”

Gertrude’s mother dried her tears. “I will trust
Him,” said she. “TI thank Him for giving me such a
friend as you to lean on in this time of trouble. But
what am I thinking of?” she cried suddenly. “Here
is your child, your only child, exposed to this fearful
disease! And I thought only of myself!”

“T must do what I have been urging you todo. I
must trust in God,” replied Tangle Thread’s mother.

Little Gertrude remained very ill many weeks. Her
precious life hung, as it were, on a thread. A little
self-will on her part, a want of docility in submitting
to painful remedies, would have broken that thread at
any moment. But she lay, with little meekly folded
hands, on her weary bed, behaving and quieting herself
like a weaned child. There was never a frown, nor an
impatient word. She let the doctor and her mother

N
190 Little Threads.

and all her friends do what was thought best to do
without in any way resisting their wishes.

Her mother never left her, save now and then to
weep in secret.

“She will not get well,” said she. “She is too
patient, too gentle, too lovely for this world.”

Everybody thought as she did. Tangle Thread’s
mother looked at this little lamb as upon one already
chosen of Christ, and precious. She had never seen
such sweet submission and docility.

“T never look at her,” she whispered to Gertrude’s
mother “without thinking of the lines:

‘Sweet to lie passive in Thy hands,
And know no will but Thine.’”

“T have learned, at last, to say those blessed words
out of the depths of my own heart,” was the answer.
“T have no longer any choice about my child. If she
is bound heavenward I will not detain her.”

Meanwhile Tangle Thread’s restless, wilful soul was
quite subdued by the silence and sadness that reigned
in the house. Nothing now would tempt her to in-
dulge in those angry screams that used to resound
through every room. She spoke in a low voice,
walked softly up and down the stairs, and seemed
quite another child. Indeed, her habit of crying
aloud with rage was now broken up once for all.

“Do you think Gertrude will get well?” she asked
Ruth, anxiously, every hour ; and Ruth always replied :
“Yes, I hope so.”

But at last she could not help saying :
Little Threads. IQl

“No, I do not. Children like her always die. It
is the cross, hateful ones that get well.”

“ Then if I am taken sick I suppose I shall get well,”
said Tangle Thread. But after a time she started up
and cried out:

“But everybody dies some time or other. Does
everybody get good, first?”

*“T don’t know. And I don’t know as I did right
to say Gertrude wouldn’t get well. The doctor says
her goodness is in her favour. She takes everything
so beautifully, you can’t think. And now they’re try-
ing to feed her up, and she has. to take brandy and
beef-tea and all sorts of things so often. And if she
was naughty, and would not take them, or if she cried
and fretted about them, then she certainly would
die.”

‘“ But beef-tea is very nice,” said Tangle Thread.

“* Nice to people that feel pretty well. But Gertrude
is so weak that she can hardly swallow. It tires her
dreadfully to take anything. Why, I heard of a little
boy who starved to death because he would not take
the nice, nourishing things he needed. His father got
down on his knees and begged him, with tears in his
eyes, to take just a little bit of wine-jelly, and he
wouldn’t. So he died. It’s a very bad thing for a
child to be self-willed when it is well. But when it is
sick it is perfectly dreadful.”

“‘T mean to be very good when I am sick,” replied
Tangle Thread. “TI feel a little sick now. I wish
you would look down my throat and see if there’s any-
thing the matter with it.”

“Oh! there’s nothing the matter with your throat,” -
192 Little Threads.

said Ruth, trying to believe what she said. “Who
told you Gertrude’s throat was sore ?”

“Why, nobody. I didn’t know it was sore. But I
know mine is. And I know my head aches.”

“Dear me! I hope youre not going to be ill!”
- cried Ruth. “I’m sure your mamma has her hands
full now. Well, well, what is to be will have to be.
Come here; sit in my lap, and lay your head on my
shoulder. Poor little thing! her head ds hot, I
declare.”

“Why, Ruth, you seem to love me!” said poor
Tangle Thread, bursting into tears,
CHAPTER VIII.

S\UTH could not help .crying a little when
Tangle Thread said that.

: “T’m sure I’ve always loved you when you
were good,” she replied. “And you have been a very
nice little girl lately. But I suppose I ought to go
and tell your mamma that you don’t feel well. Only
T hate to worry her.”

“Tf I am sick and die, then she won’t have anybody
to tease her,” said Tangle Thread. “And she'll have
plenty of time to read and to paint, and everything.”

“She'd rather have you than the time,” said Ruth.
“Tt would just break her heart if you should die.
But don’t talk that way. Youre not going to die.
You are going to get well and be the best little girl
that ever lived. And while you're sick we'll take such
good-care of you! And when you get well, I'll ask
your mamma to let me take you home with me, and
you shall drink new milk right from the cow, and
yowll grow strong and fat again.”

But Tangle Thread had fallen into a heavy sleep,
and did not hear Ruth’s cheerful words.

Ruth placed her on the bed, covered her with a
blanket, and went to tell her mother how ill she


194 Little Threads.

seemed. The doctor happened to come in at that
moment to see little Gertrude, and he went at once to
look at Tangle Thread. There was not much to say or
to do. He promised to come in again in a few hours,
and then returned to Gertrude.

Tangle Thread’s mamma was very quiet, but her
heart felt heavy indeed.

“Tf Tangle Thread ‘should be as ill as Gertrude,”
she said to Ruth, “she cannot live, she is so very
unlike Gertrude.”

Ruth made some cheering, pleasant answer, and
began to arrange things in the nursery as if she ex-
pected Tangle Thread to remain there during her ill-
ness.

“Oh! I shall have Tangle Thread in my room,”
said her mother.

“I was hoping to keep her here, ma’am,” said Ruth.
“Tl take the very best care of her. And you are worn
out now with little Gertrude’s sickness, and so many
coming and going.”

“Thank you, Ruth. You are very kind, but I feel
that I must have Tangle Thread in my own room.
You must remember she is all I have.” And then the
thought that she might now be about to lose that all,
made her eyes fill with tears, and she sat down by the
bed, and hid her face in her child’s pillow, and silently
wept and prayed.

Tangle Thread awoke and started up, looking flushed
and distressed.

“Qh! mamma! is Gertrude dead?” she cried.

“No, my darling, Gertrude seems a little better to-
day.”
Little Threads. 195

“ Then what makes you cry so?”

“Qh! Iam not erying much,” replied her mother.
“T suppose I’m pretty tired with watching Gertrude ;
and so when I heard you were sick, too, I could not
help shedding a few tears. You see mamma loves you
very much, and it grieves her to see you suffer. But
now you are going into my room to sleep with me in
my bed, and I shall take care of you day and night.
And if you will try to be patient and docile, like Ger-
trude, you will get well before long.”

“T will try,” replied Tangle Thread.

She was very glad to be undressed and to lay her
head on the cool pillow in her mamma's own bed.
She passed a weary night, and only slept in snatches.

‘When the doctor came the next day he knew, and
they all knew, that she had the fever with which
Gertrude had been so ill.

And now the fruits of her mamma’s long patience

_ showed themselves. Tangle Thread did not submit to
painful remedies as sweetly as Gertrude had done ; and
sometimes she cried, and was peevish and unreasonable.
But she had been learning lessons of obedience all her
life, and now she was humbled and subdued by greater
suffering than she had ever known. So she never abso-
lutely resisted the doctor's wishes nor her mamma’s.
She was not so ill as Gertrude had been, but she had a
long and tedious sickness, and passed many weary hours.
Her mamma seldom left her and did all she could to
make her forget her sufferings,

After a time, little Gertrude, whose room was on the
same floor, was brought in the nurse’s arms, to make
Tangle Thread a visit. The poor little creature was
196 Little Threads.

very feeble. She could not hold up her head, nor
could she amuse herself in any way.

“ ‘Why don’t you tell Gertrude stories, mamma, and
sing to her?” asked Tangle Thread.

“The poor little thing cannot hear,” replied her
mamma. “Jt makes my heart ache when I see how
little we can any of us do for her.”

“Why can’t she hear?” asked Tangle Thread in
surprise. ‘‘ She used to hear as well as I did.”

“Yes, but she has been very, very ill. And it will
be a long time before she can hear stories, if ever.”

“J will give her all my toys, then,” said Tangle
Thread. “ My Paris doll and all its clothes ; its dotted
muslin frock and its pink silk, and its gaiter boots, and
its bracelets, and its watch, and its pocket-handkerchief,
and under-sleeves, and collars.”

“ But Gertrude has a little doll already.”

“So she has—I forgot it;” and so saying, Tangle
Thread buried her face in the pillow and began to cry
pitifully. Her mamma was afraid she would make
herself very ill by crying so. She told Gertrude’s nurse
to take her away ; and then leaning over the bed, she
said gently but very firmly :

“You must stop crying, my child.”

“T can’t,” sobbed Tangle Thread, “I’m so tired!
And I don’t want Gertrude not to hear.”

“Tam sorry I let you know that,” said her mamma,
kissing her, and stroking back the hair that had fallen
over her face. “ But now stop crying, for I have two
things to say to you, and you can’t hear unless you are
quiet.” ;

Tangle Thread stopped crying and wiped her eyes.
Little Threads. 107

“You must not break your heart about little Ger-
trude,” said her mother. “The doctor hopes, and we
all hope, that by-and-by her hearing will return to her.
But if it never does, her dear Saviour, who loves her
so, and who has been with her all through her sickness,
will comfort her and make her happy. Even at the
longest, we do hot stay in this world very long. Little
Gertrude will only have to be patient a few years, and
then God will take her to heaven where she will hear
just as well as you and I. You know we mustn't be
always thinking how we are to get along with the
troubles we have in this world. We must be thinking
how sweet heaven will be when we get there.”

Tangle Thread’s face began to look a little brighter.
But after a moment she said :

“ But Gertrude’s mamma will feel so sorry !”

“Yes, she feels very sorry already. But then Ger-
trude’s mamma loves Jesus dearly. And she likes to
have Him do just what He thinks best.”

“ But what makes Him think it best to make people
deaf?” ;

“T do not know, I do not expect to. understand
everything He does. When the doctor used such’ pain-
ful remedies for your throat you did not expect to
understand why he used them. You let him do what
he pleased because you knew he was wise and kind.”

Tangle Thread smiled. After a time she said :

“What was the other thing you were going to say,
mamma?”

“T was going to say, that on the whole, you have
been very good while you were ill. I expected to have
a hard time with you. I thought you would be un-
198 Little Threads.

willing to take your medicines and to do other things
the doctor desired. But we have had some quite happy
hours together since you were moved into this room.
So you are not to be called Tangle Thread any longer.
You are to be called my little Silver Thread.”

“That's nice! that’s real nice! But oh mamma !
what has become of Golden Thread?”

“She has not been here during your illness, I believe.
I must send someone to see how they are. And, my
darling, don’t you think that before long you will
become a little Golden Thread !”

“T don’t know. I’m afraid I never shall be so good
as that,” replied Silver Thread, whose ideas on the sub-
ject had undergone a great change since the time when
she said “I can be whatever I please?”

During Gertrude’s illness and Tangle Thread’s, no-
body had bad much time to think of Golden Thread.
For four weeks Gertrude’s mother had never undressed,
and the whole house had been full of care and anxiety.
But now both children were out of danger, and Ruth
was very glad to run around as before among the poor
and the sick. She was particularly glad to be sent to
inquire after Golden Thread and her mother, for she
liked them both. And they liked her and were thank-
ful to see her pleasant face once more. At least Golden
Thread was. As to her poor mother, her eyes were
worse than ever, so that she could not use them at all,
and she looked pale and thin. She said the doctor
had told her she never would get well while she lived
in that house: there was water in the cellar, and the
whole street was damp and unwholesome. She felt
discouraged and anxious, and thought she never should

<
Little Threads. 199

be able to see again. But she still had great comfort
in her good loving child, and said the world could not
seem quite dark to her while Golden Thread was in it,
happen what might.

“Tt comes very hard on poor folks to i: ill,” said
she. “It is is many a long day since I earned a penny,
and my strength seems all gone.”

Then Ruth told her all about the two sick children
at their house ; how lovely little Gertrude had been,
and how she had lain nine days so ill that they thought
she might die at any moment. And how Tangle
Thread’s name had been changed to Silver Thread,
because she had behaved so much better during her
sickness than ever before in her life.

“You see rich folks have their troubles as well as
poor folks,” added Ruth. “ And our folks make a. good
use of theirs. It seemed as if they were as kind to the
poor and the sick as they well could be, but they’re
even kinder now. Why, when I go home and tell
how. you're getting on and what the doctor says, ’m
sure they'll be for moving you into a healthier place.”

“But rents are higher in better houses,” returned the
poor woman.

“Of course: And our notions ‘about goodness has
risen a peg or two higher,” said Ruth, laughing. “Tve
been thinking it over since I camein, and I’ve made
up my mind to let you have so much a month out of
my wages. |I get good wages and many a present
besides. If you ever get well you can pay me again,
you know.”

Ruth did not really expect this poor blind woman to
be able to repay her. She only said this to comfort
200 Litile Threads.

her. She went home quite pleased and happy: but
there she found dismal news awaiting her. Her
mother had written to say that all sorts of trouble had
come upon them. The big barn had burned down,
and one of the horses was lame, and father had the
theumatism, and some of their hest milk and butter
customers had fallen off. Poor Ruth had a good cry,
and sat up late that night writing a long, letter in reply.
She said there should be another big barn built out of
her savings; she was going to be very careful and not
waste a penny; then the horse would certainly get well
in time for the spring work, and she knew father’s
rheumatism would go off when warm weather came,
especially if he would use the liniment she was going
to send him. And as to the milk and butter, why,
if folks would’nt buy it, suppose they got somebody to
come and eat and drink it? That is, suppose they
took in one or two boarders this coming summer.
And just as she said that, a thought came into her head
that made her get up and look at herself in the glass to
see what sort of a body it was that could make such
splendidsplans.

‘‘ Mother would like the company, and she wouldn’t
have to put herself out at all for them. There’s plenty
of house-room, and plenty to eat and drink. If they
once went there they'd be likely to stay year in and
year out. And Golden Thread is a good, handy child ;
she'd soon save mother some steps. Mother would get
fond of her, I know. Let me see; what was it I pro-
mised to give them? I do believe I said I would pay
the difference in their rent, if they'd move. But, of
course, I can’t do that, and let my own father suffer.
Little Threads. 201

Well I won't worry about it. It will all come out
right in the end, I’m sure it will!”

On hearing Ruth’s account of the state in which she
had found the poor blind woman, for she was now
really quite blind, Silver Thread was full of pity.

“Do go to see her, mamma,” said she. “And do
carry lots of things to her.”

Her mamma sat silent and thoughtful, and did not
seem to hear.

“Mamma! mamma /” repeated Silver Thread, im-
patiently.

The mother was still silent.

“You won't do a thing I want you to,” said Silver
Thread, rudely.

Her mamma started. “TI was trying to think what I
could do for that poor woman,” she answered. “ And
I did not think my little Silver Thread would ever
speak to me in that way again.”

“T don’t know how I came to do it,” said Silver
Thread, sorrowfully.

Oh! how quickly these few words, this gentle tone
set everything right between them !

But Silver Thread was very feeble, and she now
began to ery bitterly.

“Don’t cry, my darling,” said her mamma. “I
ought not to expect you to cure yourself of your bad
habits at once. But now let me tell you what I have
been planning. I will go to see Dr. A. and find out
just what he thinks of this poor woman. He certainly
seemed to think he could cure her eyes when I took
her to him. But if he says he cannot, then I think a
nice, quiet home somewhere in the country would be
202 Little Threads.

better for her general health, than the best home in
the city.”

“Yes, my general ‘health is better in the country,”
said Silver Thread, wiping her eyes. “ And Golden
Thread would like to go, I know. Do please, mamma,
order the carriage and see about it now. Ruth can
come and tell me stories while you are gone.”

“T thought Ruth was not gifted in story-telling.”

“Well, it isn’t stories exactly. It’s talk. She talks
about her father’s farm, and the horses, chickens, and
such -things.”

“Her father’s farm! Why, that would be such a
very nice place for our poor blind woman! Ruth's
mother is one of the kindest creatures in the world. I
wonder if she would mind the care? I could make it
quite an object to her.”

Ruth came in now to say that the carriage was
ready, and Silver Thread was glad when she heard her
mamma, drive off in it.

“Only to think:, Ruth,” said she, “mamma has gone
to see the doctor ghout Golden Thread’s mother. She
is going to ask him if he thinks it would be good for
her general health to go into the country to live. And
she says she wonders if your mother would let her
come there, because she could make it quite an object
to her.”

“ Well! if I ever!” cried Ruth. “Ifthe very same
idea didn’t come into my head! Only I didn’t mean
to have your mother pay a penny.. I expected to

manage it somehow myself.”

“Tt will be splendid!” said Silver Thread.

They chatted on awhile, until the clock struck.
Little Threads. 203

“Tt'g time for you to take your beef-tea,” said Ruth.
“Do you mind staying alone while I run down for
it?”

“Oh! I don’t believe it is time yet,” replied Silver
Thread. “You can’t think howI hate it. I don’t
see what the doctor makes me take it for.”

“You said once that beef-tea was very nice. And
you know you must take it, whether or no.”

Silver Thread began to fret and to mutter.

“Won't let me have any peace. Keep pouring
down the beef-tea and pouring it down. Won't let
me go to sleep or anything. Say it’s four o'clock
when it-isn’t four o’clock. ‘Do all they can to plague
me.”

- She spent the time of Ruth’s absence in this state of
ill-humour, and swallowed her beef-tea with grimaces.
How many halfstarved children would have been
thankful for every drop!

Ruth quieted and soothed Silver Thread and made
all sorts of excuses for her.

“ You are weak and tired,” said she. “Perhaps I
let you talk too much. Now lie down and I'll sing to
you. Poor little Gertrude can’t hear singing or talking,
and you can. Now shut your eyes and lie still, and
perhaps you'll get a little nap, and then you'll wake up
just in time to hear what your mamma has to say.”

Silver Thread was very tired—too tired to fret
any more, She lay still and soon fell asleep, and when
she awoke her mamma had come home. .

“How have you been, my darling?” she asked,
sitting down by the bed.

“ Rather cross,” said Silver Thread.
204 Little Threads.

Her mamma smiled, not expecting just such an
answer.

“Well, let me tell you what Dr. A. says. I found
him at home and he was very glad to see me, He says
the poor creature’s eyes are past cure. She was a good
deal worn out with hard work when the accident
happened, and then she has been living in such an
unwholesome place. Otherwise he might, perhaps,
have saved her eyes.”

« And she went to a quack doctor first,” said Silver
Thread.

“Yes, that was another thing. So now, if she likes
the plan, we'll get her into the country very soon.”

“Ruth says her mother will let her come there, she
is almost sure.”

“That will be very pleasant. Ruth could go with
them and arrange everything. Ruth needs a little
change. I thought this morning she did not look
well.”

“Oh! that is because her father’s barn got burned
down, and ever so many other things happened.”

It was too late to do anything more that night. But
Silver Thread went to sleep in good spirits, with a
great deal that was pleasant to think of. She dreamed
that she saw Golden Thread running about in the
fields gathering buttercups, and as bright and happy as
a bird. She saw her drinking fresh milk, and growing
fat on it. She thought she heard her say: “Oh! how
glad I am I came here! I never want to go and live
in a big city again, as long as I live.”
CHAPTER IX.

WROM being a very unhappy child, Silver

Thread was becoming a happy one. Do
crctes] you know the reason? It was because God

has so made us, that while we spend our time in
thinking of nobody's comfort but our own, the best
things in the world fail to please us. A child may
have all the beautiful toys it wants, and a pleasant
home and the kindest friends, and yet he restless,
peevish, and uncomfortable. But when it begins to
try to be gentle and patient with everybody ; when it
speaks pleasant words and gives up its own way, then
a black cloud seems to clear away from before its eyes,
and it walks on in sunshine. Poor Silver Thread had
spent her whole life in troubling and grieving her dear

- mother, and her nurse, and all about her, but she did
not know it was that which made her often go away
by herself to be sullen and sad in secret, nor did she
now quite understand what it was that made her,
lying there so feeble on her sick-bed, have so many
hours of sweet peace.

Now if you want to understand how a good child
should conduct herself, just let us suppose your
conduct to be something like the following. You get

0



206 Little Threads.

up pleasant, and if your little sister is going to be
dressed first, you wait patiently for your turn. If your
nurse pulls your hair when she combs it, you can tell
her so, gently, and ask her to please to be more careful.
You can go downstairs smiling and pleasant, and ready
to say good morning cheerfully to everybody. If your
mamma says you are to have less breakfast than usual
because you had headache yesterday, you will not say
a word, but eat what she gives you and be thankful it
isso much. Ifshe wants you to amuse the baby while
she washes the silver or breakfast-cups, you won’t
answer, “Oh! I was just going out to play,” but will
give her a sweet smile and a sweet word: If one of the
other children gets your toy, you will not run to snatch
it away; you will say, “Please, Mary, give me my
doll,” and having always seen your good example, she
will be likely to give it up without a word. If you
are busy reading, you will lay aside your book plea-
santly when your papa asks you to run to get the
paper for him, and he will kiss you and be thankful
he has such a little girl when you come tripping back
with it. You will lie down ‘to sleep at night, peaceful
and happy, knowing that you have tried all day long to
do right and to do it in a pleasant way.

Now Silver Thread could not turn all at once into
such ways as these. LEvery now and then her old,
naughty habits would come like armed men and seem
to make her do and say things she did not want to say,
Then she would be quite provoked with herself, and
think there was no use in trying. And sometimes,
after praying to God to make her good, she felt im-
patient with Him for not making her perfect without
Little Threads. 207

giving her the trouble of trying to be so. But there’s
no use in being discouraged! It is better for a poor
naughty child that wants to do right, but finds it very
hard, to keep right on trying and trying and praying
and praying, hoping on, and hoping ever.

But perhaps you think this sort of talk is too much
like a sermon, and at any rate we had better see what
Golden Thread and her mother have to say about going
into the country. You must remember that except
her own sweet temper, Golden Thread had not much
in this world. She was not yet old enough to do any
sort of work that would help much toward the support
of her mother, and yet her head was quite full of plans
as to what she would do as soon as she grew taller and.
stronger. She thought she could go and live some-
where as little maid, and so earn a trifle; enough to
get a room in a house where the cellar was not damp,
and though it made the tears come into her eyes to
think of it, she was resolved to do so very soon. Her
mother knew it would have to come to that sooner or
later, but it almost broke her heart to think of being
left alone and blind, without her bright Golden
Thread’s cheery words and ways. Ruth’s visits com-
forted them both for atime, but then the poor mother
grew sad again.

“Tf we are going to live on charity,” said she, “we
may ag well go to the workhouse first as last. And I
don’t see much chance of our living on anything else.”

“But if we could get along a little while longer,
mother, just till I grow a bit taller, I could get a place,
and then you wouldn’t have to live on charity.”

- Tt will be many a long year before you could earn
208 Little Threads.

money. Nobody would give you more than your
board and clothes.”

“ But that would bea good deal. And I would try
to do everything I could to please them. Don’t cry,
dear mother.”

“T can’t help crying. When I think that ever
since I was eight years old I’ve earned my own bread
and no thanks to anybody, and now I’m helpless-and
have to demean myself to be a beggar !”

“Why, mother! Are you a beggar?” cried Golden
Thread. :

“Tt’s just the same. I eat other people’s bread, and
wear other people’s clothes, and use other people’s
money. And I can’t do a thing for them that feed
and clothe me.”

“Can't you pray for them, mother? Praying’s
something.”

The poor woman was silent. What little praying
she had ever done in her life had been for herself, in
her misery, and for her child.

“ Such prayers as mine wouldn’t do them any good,”
she said at last.

“Well, may be they'll do a little bit of good,” urged
Golden Threid. “I pray for that kind lady every
night. And for that little girl, too. My teacher said
we ought to pray for everybody that is kind to us.”

“ What do you say 2”

“T say, ‘Our Father who art in heaven !”

“ What, the Lord’s Prayer? I don’t call that pray-
ing for the lady, or the little girl, either.”

“Tsn’t it?” said Golden Thread, greatly disappointed
and puzzled. “Why, I meant it, all the same. I
Little Threads. 209

don’t know anything else to say, and so whenever I
think of them, and how good the lady was, I say ‘ Our
Father.’ May be He knows what I mean.”

The poor woman sighed. “Ah! my child knows
more than I do, and is better, too,” thought she. “I’ve
never taught her anything good, and now she’s teaching
me. Im afraid I ain’t just what I ought to be; but I
don’t know. I never wronged anybody in my life, nor
told a lie, nor took a pin’that wasn’t mine. But I
can’t say what’s wanting in nie.”

“Do you think, Ruth, that this poor blind woman
and her child would give your mother too much
trouble?” asked Silver Thread’s mamma. “You know
I owe them a heavy debt of gratitude, and I am
resolved to place them in some pleasant country place
where the child can learn to do such kinds of work
as she is capable of, and where the mother can rest.”

““T think my mother would be very glad to take
them, ma’am,” replied Ruth. “Golden Thread is such
a nice, pleasant child, and her mother is so grateful
and humble.”

“TY don't know about the humility,” said Silver
Thread’s mother, smiling a little. “But I think well
of her, and the child has fairly won my heart.”

“The only trouble is, to get the poor creature to
consent to go at your expense, ma’am. It almost kills
her to live on charity.”

“Did Elijah live on charity when the ravens fed
him ?” asked Silver Thread in her wise little way. “I
shouldn't think it was charity, I should think it was
God,” she added, “ Besides, Golden Thread saved my
210 Litile Threads.

life, and mamma would want to give her lots of things
for that, Oh! you needn’t laugh, Ruth. She reaily
did save my life! There were all the stages and carts
and carriages going up and down, and I might have
been run over. And she risked her life for me.”

“Yes, yes,” said her mother. “TI do really owe
them far more than I can ever repay. But this is
nothing to the debt I owe my heavenly Father, and He
intends that those of His children to whom he has
given money shall use it for Him. I am only thankful
that He has thrown this poor woman in my way. And
now how very nice it will be, if we can put her under
your mother’s care. Do write to her by this evening’s
mail, and see what she will say. Or stay—suppose you
run down and see her and talk with her about it.
You can take the seven o’clock train to-morrow morn-
ing, and come back by the early train the day after.
Then if we decide to send Golden Thread and her
mother, you can go with them and stay a few days
until they feel at home.”

Ruth felt very grateful for this proposal, and at
twelve o’clock next day she ate dinner with her father
and mother, to their no small delight. Everything was

easily arranged. There was a room aA could be
spared as well as not.

“And you say she is a nice child 2” said Ruth’s
mother. “Talways did say a little girl round the house
was a nuisance I couldn’t and wouldn’t bear; but then
some little girls ain’t like all little girls.”

“This one is the nicest child I ever saw,” returned
Ruth. “ And you'll teach her your own ways, mother,
won't you? She is not to be brought up a fine lady,
Little Threads. 2il

that I was to make sure of, but to be an industrious
girl, able to do all sorts of work. Why, she'll save
you some steps, now, mother.”

“She won't save as many as she'll make,” replied
the mother, whose opinion of “little girls” was not
flattering. “But you may depend I'll do my best for
her and her poor mother too.” e

Ruth went back to town quite rélieved of all
anxiety.

“Oh mamma !” cried Silver Thread eagerly, “let me
tell Golden Thread she is to go to the country. She
will be so glad! Mayn’t I tell her?”

“T don’t know, darling. Iam not quite sure that
Golden Thread ought to be exposed to take the fever
by coming here. On the whole, I do not think it
would be safe.”

“Tt’s too bad !” cried Silver Thread.

“Ts anything God does ‘too bad’?” asked her
mother, gently. “You know it was He who sent you
sickness, and it is He who makes it unsafe for children
to come to see you.”

“TJ didn’t think,” said Silver Thread. “But I
should like so much to tell Golden Thread.”

“Very likely you would be disappointed, if you
could see and tell her. She knows nothing about the
country, and cannot go into ecstasies at the thought of
living in it. I will tell you all she does say when I
come home, for I am going now to see them. Perhaps
they will prefer to stay in town. In that case, of
course, I cannot force them to leave it.”

At first it did seem as if leaving the noisy, dirty,
unwholesome city was going to be a trial instead of a
212 Little Threads.

blessing. The poor woman was so feeble that the
thought of exerting herself to make any change, made
her begin to ery. Then Golden Thread cried too, and
things looked forlorn. ip

“Tt’s so hard to go among strangers,” said the woman.
“ And to live on charity! If I could do anything to
pay my way, it would be so different! But I never
lived on charity till now.”

One needs patience with poor people as well as with
little children. Silver Thread’s mother had to try hard
not to lose hers, now.

“While you were well and strong,” said she, “it
was quite right for you to work and not to accept
charity. But now God has laid His hand on you and
set you aside from labour of any kind. And seeing
you so helpless, He has sent me to do for you what you
can’t do for yourself.”

“T never thought as God had anything to do with
it, It was the whitewash and the bad doctoring and
the damp room and all, that broke me down. I don’t
mean any harm. I am a poor, ignorant creature and
can’t reason things out very well. But the workhouse
is good enough for such as we are, and we'd better go
there, if we must go anywhere.”

“Golden Thread, did you ever see any pretty white
hens?” asked the lady. ‘Ruth says her mother’s hens
are all pure white, every one of them. And they have
cows, too; I don’t know how many, and when she was
a little girl she used to drive them home from pasture
every evening. You would like to feed the hens and
chickens, I’m sure, And you can’t think how sweet
and still it is in the country. Very soon the spring
Litile Threads, 213

will open, then the fields will be grecn and covered
with flowers ; the birds will begin to sing and to build
their nests, and everything will be bright and beautiful.
Then asthe summer comes on, you will go out to pick
berries in the fields and woods. And you will be learn-
ing all sorts of things. You will learn to milk and to
hunt for eggs, and by-and-by to make butter and
cheese.”

Golden Thread smiled. She began to think the
country must be nice, after all. To make butter and
cheese! Why, that must be better than living in
the city! But then she did not want to do anything
mother didn’t, and mother kept crying! .

“My little daughter wanted very much to break
this good news to you,” added the lady, smiling. “ But
I thought it very likely it wouldn’t seem good news at
first, It is not necessary to decide what you will do at
once. You can think it over, and pray it over, and by-
and-by, you will see just what is best to do.”

‘Shall we say anything besides ‘Our Father’?”
asked Golden Thread. ‘I don’t know any prayer but
that, and I don’t think mother does.”

“T would say that, and I would besides, tell God
just how troubled and perplexed you feel. Tell Him
you do not know whether to stay here or go into the
country. Ask Him to make you do whatever is best
and will please Him most.”. She spoke to the child,
but she hoped the mother would lay her words to heart.

“Now good-bye,” she added, rising to go. “Don’t
feel troubled and unhappy. You will see your way out
of this strait, I have no doubt.” She shook hands
with them both, and took leave,
CHAPTER &.

IN hearing the result of her mamma's visit,
Silver Thread was quite vexed with Golden
Thread and her mother.

“They are not nice people at all,” said she. ‘“ They
are ungrateful. I hope you never will give them any-
thing again, mamma.”

“ Tt is fortunate that the affairs of this world are not
in the hands of ignorant little children,” replied her
mamma, smiling. “So you would have me turn my back
upon them because they do not jump at my offer?”

“ That’s what they deserve.”

“ But what do you and I deserve? Suppose God
should give us exactly what we deserve ; what would
He give us, do you think? Oh! my darling! what a
mercy it is that He does not! And we must try to be
long-suffering and patient, as He is, and not be harsh
‘with our fellow-creatures.”

Silver Thread was silent. She was glad when Ruth
came in to see the colour rush into her cheeks when
told that the poor woman did not entirely fancy the
idea of going to live in the country.

“Tt’s only too good for such as her to be offered the

9

privilege of going to live with such as my mother !” she


Little Threads. 215

said, quickly. “TI begin to see now that you were right,
ma’am, in saying she was as proud as she could be.”

“T am not aware that I said that, Ruth. You
forget yourself. I barely suggested that she had less
humility than you fancied; and that rather to prepare
you for the disappointment I thought might await you.
As to pride, we all have it in one shape or other.”

“Tt’s a very ugly shape when it makes a body so
stuck up,” said Ruth, who rarely lost her temper, but
when she did, hardly knew where to look for it.

“T never saw it in any shape but an ugly one,” was
the answer. “It is certainly very unpleasant to see
people too proud to receive favours. But it is also
unpleasant to see people too proud of their own virtues
to make allowances for the faults of others.”

Ruth coloured.

“T do not mean to be severe with you, Ruth. We
are none of us guiltless in this respect. And do not
feel irritated about this matter. ‘The next time you
see that poor woman, she will, as likely as not, have
changed her mind.”

Tt turned out to be exactly so.

“ Mother,” said Golden Thread, “is it nice in the
country ?”

“Folks say itis. I’ve always thought it must be lone-
some. Now here you see the carriages going up and
down and crowds of people stirring about, and every-
body so wide awake.”

“ But you can’t see them now, mother.”

“No, that’s true enough. And the noise in my cars
does tire me some days. May be, too, you'd take a
notion to the country yourself.”
216 Little Threads.

“T should if you did,” replied Golden Thread.

The next day, Ruth, a little ashamed of her anger,
asked leave to go and carry Golden Thread a few fresh
eggs which she had brought for her from the farm.

The child and her mother were delighted. A breeze
from the farm-house seemed to come invitingly to
meet them. That unknown land, “the country,” did
not seem so strange since it sent those white eggs.

“Don’t you think your mother will wish we hadn't
come, after she’s had us a little while!” asked the
woman. ‘For we shall be a sight of trouble.”

“No, you won't,” answered Ruth. “Golden Thread
can take all the care of you, lead you about, and all
that, and by degrees you will grow stronger and can
help more than you'll hinder. And Golden Thread
will wash dishes and set the table, and feed the hens
and chickens. There’s my little block that I used to
stand on when I wasn’t high enough to reach up to the
sink ; there’s my piece of tin on it now that I nailed
on one end of it.”

“ What was the tin for!” asked Golden Thread.

“Why, my block was going to split, and I nailed on
a bit of tin to keep it together.”

“Tsn’t it lonesome in the country?” asked the poor
woman, a little timidly.

“J don’t think it’s lonesome anywhere where my
mother is,” said Ruth. “ But then she ain’t your mother,
and I ought not to expect you to feel as if she was.”

“How nice it must be to hunt for eggs!” cried
Golden Thread. ‘And you said we should have as
much milk as we wanted! It doesn’t seem as if there
was as much milk in the world as that |”
Little Threads. 2

They all laughed, and Golden Thread’s mother began
to think how pleasant it would be for the child to
leave that dirty street and breathe the pure country air.
She began to wonder how she had happened to think so
much of herself and so little of that good patient child
whom she had never yet heard speak one unkind word.

“ Oh, Ruth ! if your mother will let us, we'll go!” said
she, “and we'll try to be as little trouble as we can.”

Ruth went away well satisfied with this sudden
change. It was then agreed that on the first of May
she should take them to their new home. Meanwhile,
dear little Gertrude was’ slowly regaining her strength,
and she and Silver Thread spent many happy hours
together with their dolls and other toys.

Silver Thread began to feel as if she had a sweet
little sister of her own, and when she at last heard
that Gertrude was going home, she nearly made herself
ill again with crying. Poor little Gertrude could not
guess what this terrible distress was about, for they
could not make her understand that she was going
away. But she tried to comfort Silver Thread with
kisses and caresses, and after she had gone everybody
tried to divert the poor broken-hearted child. Her
mamma was very gentle and tender with her, and
talked to her about Jesus, who never has to go away
and leave us, happen what will. And she let her
spend the money in her little purse in buying some
things for Golden Thread’s journey. Silver Thread
felt very grateful for this favour because this was the
very money about which she had been so naughty.
She made up her mind how she would have it spent,
and Ruth went out to get the things; which were odd
218 Little Threads.

enough, you may depend. First, there was a basket
to put eggs in, if she should be so happy as to find
any eggs. Next there was a small tin cup which she
was to fill with milk, and drink, as soon as she had
learned how to milk all herself. . Thirdly, there was a
sun-bonnet which Golden Thread was to wear always
except on Sundays. Fourthly, a penny churn, with
which to make butter. Fifthly, some beans and peas,
which were to be planted in whatever little corner might
be allowed her for a garden. Last of all, two buns, lest
she should be hungry on the journey. These things
being all-spread out on her bed, she looked at them
with great satisfaction, and couldn’t help wishing she
was going on a journey too. Golden Thread and her
mother needed a good many other things, which were
supplied them, and at last they set off, with Ruth, in
pretty good spirits. Indeed Golden Thread would
have been as gay as a lark if her mother had not
looked go pale and tired, and very soon her amusement
and astonishment at everything she saw on the road,
quite amused and astonished the poor woman herself, and
inade her giad that her child could be so free from care.

Ruth felt quite proud when she at last ushered its
new guests into the neat and cheerful farm-house, and
saw how they enjoyed her mother’s bread and butter, and
how her mother enjoyed being kind and friendly to them.

Ruth stayed at home four days. She showed Golden
Thread how to do what work she was able to do, and
set up a blue yarn stocking for her mother to knit, so
that she might not be unhappy from idleness. When
she went back to town, she left them in good spirits,
and quite weaned from the city, which they thought
Little Threads. 219

they should never want to see again. The day after
she left was Sunday, and the farmer brought a waggon
to the door with two seats, and took them all to church.
It was many a year since the blind woman had been to
the house of God. She used to think Sunday was only
fit to rest in, especially for poor folks who worked hard
all the week. But now she could not make that ex-
-cuse, for she was resting all the week, not working.
Nor could she say her clothes were not decent, for they
were as neat and tidy as clothes could be. So she and
Golden Thread sat together in the farmer’s big, square
pew, and had a truly blessed Sunday there. After
church Ruth’s father made Golden Thread stand by
his side and learn the First Commandment, and spell
out a few verses in his big Bible, just as he used to do
years before with Ruth herself. Indeed he soon began
to treat the child as if she were his own little Golden
Thread, and to love her dearly; and he and his wife
kept saying how nice it-was to have such a cheerful,
pleasant little thing about the house. This did her
mother as much good as the country air and country
food did. She began to feel that they were not a
burden, and to recover her health and spirits. Every
pleasant day she sat, with her knitting, before the door
of the house, looking as peaceful and happy as if she
had never known a care. Yes, happier and more
peaceful, for God had blessed to her the troubles she
had passed through, and had taught her to love Him-
self. By degrees she left off complaining that she
never expected to live on charity, and grew humble and
thankful, and willing to live just as God would have
her, And aftera time she stopped talking about the loss
220 Little Threads.

of her eyes, and only kept saying how happy she was, in
having such a home, and such friends, and such a child.

This made everybody kind to her, and Ruth’s mother,
as she bustled about her work, often looked with envy
at the pale, placid face, and said to herself :

“I’m afraid she’s on the way to a great deal better
place than this! But it is a pleasure to do what little
one can for her, and to try to make her last days her
best days. And if she’s going to heaven, I’m glad she
took us in her way !”

About two months after Golden Thread’s entrance
into her new home, she and Silver Thread had the
pleasure of meeting again. The doctor wished Silver
Thread to travel about a little this summer, and try
change of air, because she did not grow very strong, or
recover her rosy cheeks. So, for one thing they all came
to this pretty little village, and when Silver Thread
came out to the farm, Golden Thread led her about,
and showed her allits wonders, and they played together
in the hay, and fed the chickens to their heart’s content.

Silver Thread liked being at the farm better than
she did staying at the village, when she had no play-
‘mate. Her mamma allowed Ruth to take her home to
spend a week there, thinking that she would spend
more time out of doors, and gain strength faster. ‘This
was a very pleasant week to both the children, and
théy were sorry when Saturday came, and it was time
for Silver Thread to go back.

“T’ve a good mind not to go,” she said to Ruth. “TI
like to stay here, and I think this place agrees with me
very well, indeed. Why can’t you go to the village
and tell mainma I want to stay another week ?”

Little Threads. ~ 221

“T should not dare to go without you,” replied Ruth.
“Tf your mamma should not choose to have you stay,
it would then be too late to take you home to-night. I
would go if I were you, and perhaps she will let you
come back next Monday.” :

“ But I want to be here on Sunday. Golden Thread
says it is such fun to ride to church in a waggon, and I
never rode in a waggon.”

“ But I am to drive you home in the waggon as soon
as we have done supper.”

Silver Thread became sullen and silent.

“J don’t want to stay where I am not wanted,” she
said at last.

“We do want you,” cried Ruth. ‘“ Weall want you.
But how dare I disobey yourmamma? Come! be good.
And I dare say she will let you spend another week.”

Silver Thread’s old bad habits were too strong for
her. She began to cry in a very disagreeable way,
kicking her chair with her feet, and rocking back and
forth as if in great distress. Nobody could do any-
thing with her. Golden Thread was frightened, and
wat and hid in the hay-mow. Supper was ready,
put neither of the children ate any. Golden Thread
was too unhappy, and Silver Thread was too angry.
Ruth’s father brought the waggon to the door, lifted
the crying child into it, and they drove away. Ruth
was thankful to get off; she was ashamed to have her
father and mother see such behaviour. By degrees
Silver Thread stopped crying. Then she began to feel
wofully ashamed. What had she been doing? What
must they all think? And what would God do with
such a child? Ruth drove on in silence. She had

P
222 Little Threads.

felt much vexed with Silver Thread, but she now
began to pity her.

“Poor thing!” thought she, “she’s got a hard time
before her with that temper of hers. She’s the very
oddest child I ever saw. You never can tell one
minute what humour she will be in the next.”

After a time, touched by Silver Thread’s tearful
face, and something unusual in its expression, she said :

“ Never mind, it’s all over now. You needn't be
afraid I shall tell your mamma of you.”

“T ghall tell her myself,” was the answer ; and then
they drove on without another word, till they reached
the house where Silver Thread’s mamma was boarding.
Ruth was to go home with the waggon, and after lift-
ing the child out she hastened away, not caring to see
the meeting between them.

“Here is your old Tangle Thread come back,” said
the poor little girl, as her mother ran joyfully to meet
her. “I’m nof Silver Thread any more. I am worse
than a heathen. I’m perfectly dreadful.”

“Why, my dear child, what can you mean?” cried
her mother. ‘What dreadful thing have you been
doing? Don’t go off and sit by yourself in that way.
Come, sit in your own mamma’s lap and tell me all
about it. Don’t you know how dearly I love you, and
how lonely I have been without you?” She took the
child in her lap and. soothed her tenderly. After a
time Silver Thread told the whole story.

“But, my dear little girl, do you expect to become
quite good all at once, like a flash of lightning ?”

“JT don’t know. I know I’m old Tangle Thread,
only worse.”
Little Threads. 223

Her mamma could not help smiling. “Old Tangle
Thread, as you call her,” she answered, “has gone
away for ever. She has left some of her bad habits
behind her, it is true, and they will be often trying to
you and to me. Why, ‘old Tangle Thread’ was not
only naughty, but she never tried to be good. This
little Silver Thread does try; and that very hard.
Tangle Thread never would own she did wrong. She
always disputed about it, and was angry when told of
her faults. Silver Thread has faults, and often is
impatient and angry, and likes to have her own way.
But she is sorry when she does wrong and often tells
me so, with tears. Above all, my little Silver Thread
really loves Jesus, and prays to Him to make her like
Himself, and He will.”

Silver Thread’s little thin hand crept softly into her
mother’s, and her face grew less sorrowful. “It makes
me love Jesus to hear mamma talk as if I loved Him,”
she said to herself. “TI believe I dolove Him. I am
sorry I have been in such a passion, Oh! I wish I
hadn’t! I wish I hadn’t!”

I shall not tell you anything more now about Tangle
Thread and Golden Thread.

But I want, before I bid you good-bye, to ask you a
question. Are you the little thread in your mother’s
life that spoils it, or are you the little thread that
makes it bright and beautiful? Perhaps you say, “I
am not so good as Golden Thread, but I am not, half
so bad as Tangle Thread.” And I dare say you are
right. Little children are not often exactly like these.
But on the whole, which are you most like? You
224 Little Threads.

don’t know. Then I beg you to watch yourself one
day, and see. And if you find that you are really
trying to be good, that you are sorry, and say that
youare sorry, when you do wrong; if you sometimes
climb into your mamma’s lap, and kiss her, and -
promise to do all you can to please her, then you may
safely say to yourself, “I am my dear mother’s little
Silver or her little Golden Thread. I love her and she
loves me, and she wouldn't give me away or sell me for
all the treasures in the world.” .

But if you find that you like to have your own way
a great deal better than you like your mamma to have
hers; if you pout and cry when you cannot do as you
please ; if you never own that you are in the wrong,
and are sorry for it; never, in short, try with all your.
might to be docile and gentle, then your name is
Tangle Thread, Tangle Thread, and you may depend
you cost your mamma many sorrowful hours and many
tears. And the best thing you can do is to go away
by yourself and pray to Jesus to make you see how
naughty you are, and to make you humble and sorry.
Then the old and soiled thread that can be seen’ in
your mother’s life will disappear, and in its place there
will come first a silver, and by-and-by, with time and
patience, and God’s loving help, a sparkling and
beautiful golden one. And do you know of anything
in this world you should rather be than somebody’s
Golden Thread? specially the Golden Thread of
your dear mamma who has loved you so many years,
who has prayed for you so many times, and who longs
so to see you gentle and docile like Him of whom it
was said, “ Behold the Lamb of God !”







THE STORY LIZZIE TOLD,

CHAPTER I.

6c

SN’T it lonely lying here all day with
nothing going on?”
“Qh no, maam! So many things have
happened to me, you can’t think. If it isn’t too bold
for a poor girl like me to tell it over to a lady like
you, I could begin to tell it now. You would like to
hear all about it ¢ ;
“Well, the first thing that happened to me was
mother’s giving me the baby to hold. I was just
turned of four, and my sister Jenny was going on
two, and the baby was just a baby, not any years old.
“ You're four years old; and I’m going to trust the baby
to you.’
“Tt was the first thing that happened to me. It
made me feel grown up. I thought I was.a woman,
sure.
“ After that I nursed the baby, and kept him from
putting things into his mouth, and hushed him when



226 Lizete’s Story.

he cried, and got him to sleep. He kept growing and
growing ; ‘and when he was down on the floor, crawl-
ing into everything, another one came, And mother
trusted me more than ever, and I washed and dressed
both of them.

“ Did I ever get time to play about?

“Oh no, ma’am. For as fast as one baby got to
crawling another kept coming ; and mother said I was
the oldest, and play was for little children and little
dogs and cats, but not for big girls like me. When I
was ten years old, we had six of them besides me.”

“ Six little dogs and cats?” ;

“Oh no, ma'am ; six little children that had been
babies.

“And then the next thing happened. One day,
when I was carrying Jim upstairs—he’d been crying
to be took out of doors, and I’d been taking him out,
and he’d seen a monkey with a little red cap on: well,
my two legs just slipped out from under me, and I
tumbled right into the room and bumped his forehead,
dreadful. . 5

“¢You bad child,’ says mother, and took him away,
and put water on his forehead and kissed him.

“T lay there on the floor; if you would be pleased
to look, ma’am, you'd see the very place.

“And says I, ‘I couldn’t help it, mother. It was
my two legs as went right out, and I can’t get up.’

“ Mother she looked scared like, but one of the
neighbours was there, and says she,—

“<¢Tet her be; she’s only shamming. I know these
girls |”

“So mother let me be, and I lay flat on the floor, as
Lizzte’s Story. 227

still as a mouse, till father came home and nearly tum-
bled over me.

“¢ Hallo !’ says he, ‘whatever is the matter now ?’

“¢She’s been a-lying there doing nothing these two
hours,’ says mother, ‘and Mrs. Jones, she says she’s
shamming.’

“<¢Mrs. Jones,’ says father, ‘there’s the door; and I
rather think it’s wide enough for you to get out at, but
the next time you want to get in you'll find its grown
narrow.’

“So Mrs. Jones she went away very red in the face,
and father he picked me up and set me up on end.

“¢Now, little woman, whatever is it ails you?’
says he.

“ so long. My legs have got so shaky that it seemed as
if there wasn’t any bones in ’em. And the pains in
my back have took me bad between times.’

“Father didn’t say another word, and he didn’t eat
any supper, and after he’d lighted his pipe, he just sat
thinking. Mother didn’t say anything either. She
undressed me and put me to bed; and then such a
thing happened! I don’t want to talk much about it.
It chokes me in the throat if Ido. You wouldn’t
hardly believe it, ma'am, I’d been a big girl so long,
but she reached over where I lay close to the wall to
make room for the rest, and she kissed me! Oh, how
T hoped my two legs would get well, so that she needn’t
have a sick child to take care of! But they didn’t, and
I got weaker every day, till I felt like a great long piece
of thread dangling about. So father took me in his
arms to the doctor's.
228 Lizeie’s Story,

“T felt so ashamed when the neighbours all came
out and looked at me, and saw Mrs. Jones a-laughing
quite hard !

“But the doctor did not laugh at all when father
carried me in and showed him my legs.

“<¢ Yes, they’re a couple of pipe-stems, and no more,’
says he. And then he began to punch me all up and
down my back, and in some places hurt me dreadful.

“¢ Well, my little woman,’ says he, ‘what have you
been doing all your life now 2’

“ «Nursing the children, sir,’ says I.

“¢T thought so,’ says he. ‘ Hating bad food, breath-
ing bad air, and doing the work of a grown person.
Have you any friends in the country you could send
her to, my man !’

“No siz,’ says father; ‘ not one.’

“¢There’s little else to be done for her,’ says the
doctor. ‘Plenty of good air, good food, and entire
rest, might arrest the progress of disease.

“¢ What kind of food, sir?’ says father.

“¢ Beef and mutton, beef and mutton,’ says the
doctor.

“Father shut his teeth together hard.

“ needs in that line,’ says the doctor, and he wrote some-
thing en a piece of paper.

“‘<¢ There, take that to the street and number I have
written here, show it to.some of the people there, and
youll get beef tea, and other things of the sort. Keep
up her strength and spirits, and she may come round
yet.’

“TJ believe it was a big kitchen father was to go to,
Lizste’s Story. 22

where nice things are cooked for poor people when
they’re sick.

“But as we were coming away the doctor says,
‘Mind, my man, green fields and fresh milk in the
country are worth all the beef teas in the world for a
case like this.’

“When we got home and mother asked ‘what the
doctor said, father wouldn’t answer at first. At last
says he,—He wants her to swallow down some fine
lady’s diamond necklace.’

“Mercy on us!’ says mother, and she dropped into
a chair with the dish-cloth in her hand.

. “Father went away to his work, and mother kept
groaning about the diamond necklace.

“«How’s it to be got,’ says she, ‘and how could
swallowing it down bring the bones into your legs, I
should like to know?’

“¢The doctor says it ain’t my legs as ails me,’ says I.
‘It’s the spine of my back.’

“¢Them doctors, they thinks they know everything,’
says mother. ‘Didn’t-you say as it was your two legs
as went out from under you? And them diamonds,
they do worry me so!’

“TJ lay still, and thought, and thought. When the
spine of your back aches the worst, you get so sharp!

“ And says I at last—‘I know what father meant.
The doctor wanted me to be took off into the country,
to drink milk and smell the green grass; and that
would cost money, ever and everso much money. For
it’s too far for father to carry me, and I should have
to ride in something.’

«<« But it’s the diamonds as worries me,’ says mother ;
230 Ligste’s Story.

and I couldn’t get ’em out of her head, and the children
they all plagued her, and I wasn’t there to help, and
she looked ready to drop. I got away down into the
bed and cried to think how drove she was.

“ And then I brightened up and called the children
to me, and told them stories out of my head about
things father had told me of. I putin green meadows,
and nice, quiet churchyards, where ivy grew all the
year round, and there were pretty little graves for the
good children to go to sleep in. And I says, ‘ Let’s
make believe that some day, a lady with a gold ring
on her finger and a gold watch hanging round her neck,
will come and take us all into the country and give us
strawberries to eat.’

“¢ Mother, how does strawberries grow ?’ says I.

“ «Why, on bushes, child!’ says she. ‘How else
should they grow?’

“When father came home he laughed at that, and
asked her if she supposed potatoes grew on trees ?

“Why shouldn’t they?’ says she. ‘And, anyhow,
how should I know? Was I ever out of London in my
life 2”

“Tt kept the children quiet to hear me talk, ma’am,
only the little ones believed every word, and they’re
always looking for the lady to come and fetch them
away.

“The next thing that happened was father’s bringing
home to me a picture of the country, all green and blue ;
splendid. You can see it nailed up there, opposite my
bed.

“ But you don’t seem surprised, ma’am. Doesn't it
look like the country? Did you say you wanted to
Liggie’s Story. 231

take it down and put up a better one? Oh, please,
ma’am, I love it so dearly !

“Té took me a good while to get over having such a
splendid present. I lay and looked at it all day, and
when it was dark and I shut my eyes, I could sce it
just the same. And it made me tell the children more
stories, and then they didn’t hang on to mother so.

“T wondered what poor little children did who had
something the matter with the spine of their backs, but
never had anything happen to pass away the time.
And I wished I could lend them my picture a week at
a time, turn about and turn about.

“T hadn't got used to having it, and was lying so
peaceful and happy thinking bout it, when father
came in one night as mother was just a-going to un-
dress me, and he got a sight of my back when she
was rubbing it.

“ He bursted right out crying, loud, and then mother
bursted out, and all the children cried, and I bit my
lips and held my hands together, and at last I bursted
out, too, For I knew then that my father and mother
had got a hunchback for their oldest child. At last
father stopped short off. And then mother and the
children stopped, and I hushed up pretty quick,

“<¢Pegey,’ says father, ‘go and tell that woman
Jones to come here.’

“ we set ourselves up above the common, and she laughs
at us.’

“ 10 go.

“ Mis. Jones came quick,
232 Ligste’s Story.

“¢Took here,’ says father; ‘look at this child’s back,
and put it alongside of the day you said she was
making believe sick. Well, have you seen it? Maybe
the day’ll come when you'd like to eat them words of
yours,’

“Mrs. Jones she felt bad, and I felt bad, and I
called her to me, and says L—‘ Don’t lay it up against
father, and I'll give you my beautiful new picture, full
of green trees, and blue sky, and cows and sheep.

“What, that little flared-up thing on the wall?’
says she ; ‘thank you, I rather think you can keep it,
and welcome, for all me.’

“You see there was always something going on that
passed away the time.

“Father used to talk to us about his young sister
Rose, who was at service in a gentleman’s family, ten
miles from London.

“She got a holiday soon after this, and came to see
us. She told me more about what the country was
like than ever father had, and all about the young ladies
she took care of, and their toys and books.

“You couldn’t believe ma’am, how it passed away
the time to hear her talk.

“And then she asked me if I liked to read, and
what books I had got.

“Then I had to tell her that I had never been to
school, and didn’t know how to read.

“¢ Poor little soul!’ says she, and put on her bonnet
and went and bought a book, out of her own savings,
and wrote my name in it, and taught me great A, and
little a, that very day. And she took me in her arms
and hugged me, and said,—-‘ Oh, that I could carry this
Lizgie’s Story. 23 3

poor lamb home with me, and give her what my young
ladies waste every day of their lives !’

“Please, ma’am, did ever anybody hug you and say
such nice things?

“ After that, my father taught me all my letters, and,
all of a sudden, I could read!

“Tt was a big book that my aunt gave me. She
said she got it because it would last me so long, and
amuse me till I got another. It was called the
‘Pilgrim’s Progress,’ and was full of beautiful stories
and pictures. I could tell it all to you if it wouldn’t
tire you, ma’am.

“Oh, you've got one, too? How nice! Have you
got any other books? But mother looked in just now,
and coughed twice. She thinks I qm talking too much.

“You're not tired, ma’am ?

“TJ read my book, and read it, and as soon as I got
to the end I began it again ; and I showed the pictures
to the children, and on Sundays I read out of it to
father and mother. Father is tender like, and the tears
would keep rolling down his cheeks when-I read the
prettiest parts, and one day he said,—‘TU tell you
what itis, Lizzie: I’ve a good mind to go on a pilgrim-
age myself.’

“T felt awful bad when he said that, for I wanted to
go, too; but how could I, with the bones gone out of
my two legs?

“ Father sat quiet, thinking and thinking. At last
he got up all of a spring like, and put on his hat and
went out.

“«¢ Where's father gone to now ?’ says mother. ‘ Not
to any of them gin-shops, I hope.’
234 Lizete’s Story.

“¢No!’ says I, ‘he’s gone on a pilgrimage, I do
expect.’

“Mother laughed, and said that wasn’t so bad as
them gin-shops, any way.

“But I felt bad and lonesome, and as if he’d gone
and left me behind. And I couldn’t get to sleep for
thinking about it, till I heard his step on the stairs.
He wouldn’t tell where he’d been to, and we all went
to sleep. But the next day he said he’d been to hear
the preaching at a big church.

“¢T was lifted away up to the third heaven,’ says he,
‘and I sang hymns, too.’

« don’t know how to sing. Better own it and done with
it. You was a-singing songs at the gin-shops.

“ «That I wasn’t, then, says father; ‘I was at
Westminster Abbey, where they bury the grand folks,
and the hymns hung all round the walls, printed in
letters as big as the top of my thumb, Come, if you
don’t believe it, go with me next Sunday night and
see for yourself.’

“ Abbey indeed ! with a bonnet and shawl like mine !’

“ goes to hear it,’ says father.

“¢ And ain't you a-going on a pilgrimage, after all?”
says I,

“<¢ Veg, my lass, I am,’ says he, ‘I'll learn all about
it at the preaching, you see,’

“ After he'd gone off to his work, mother says,—
‘Tl go with him next time, you may depend. Some-
thing’s coming over him,’
Lizeie's Story. 235

“The day but one after that father come home all
eager like, and, says he,—<‘ Lizzie, child, mightn’t it
amuse you if you had a flower a-growing in the
window there? Tor the men talked at their work to-
day about a “Society for the Promotion of Window
Gardening among the Poor,” and they say there’s just
been a flower-show, and prizes given to them as raised
the handsomest ones. Wray’s girl, Betsy, got a prize
of six shillings for hers.’

“*You don’t say so !’ says mother.

“<¢ Yes,’ says father; ‘and what’s more, I’ve got a
beautiful rare plant for Lizzie here: poor soul, it will
be company for her these long days !’

“« What makes you say “poor soul,” father?’ says
I, ‘when I’ve got a picture, and a “ Pilgrim’s Progress,”
and a plant a-growing ?” ‘

“¢Pshaw !’ says father, ‘whatever ails my eyes to
water so easy? See, here’s the little wee thing.’

“T almost screamed when I saw it, I was so glad.
It was a-setting out in a little flower-pot, and its leaves
was all green.

“Which of you two is the biggest fool, I wonder?’
says mother. ‘There! now you've slopped water all
over the bed-clothes and everything !’

‘I was only giving my plant a little drink,’ says I.

“T called watering it giving it a drink, I was so
silly.

“<¢Of course, I’m the biggest fool,’ says father, and
he laughed real pleased like.

“<«Everything runs to societies nowadays,’ says
mother, ‘I wish they’d offer prizes to them as has
the most children and the handsomest ones. I'd go in
236 Ligste’s Story.

for it, that I would! It ain’t gentlemen’s children as
gets all the good looks.’

“¢ No, nor the sense, either,’ says father.

“<¢There ain’t many young ones as sets alone the
day they’re four months old,’ says mother. ‘See
here! This one beats all our babies. And what did
I pay for him at ‘the shops? La, nothing at all, bless
you; and so he ain’t fit to fetch a prize.’

“¢T didn’t pay anything for Lizzie’s plant, if that’s
what vexes you,’ says father. ‘Hicks gave it to me.
He said he got it from his wife’s second cousin, whose
half-brother was nephew to one of the gardeners at
Osborne, and that it’s something costly and precious.’

“¢Next news youll say you dug it up in Paradise,’
says mother.

“ name that’s wrote on this paper: or, no you can’t read
writing. Perhaps I can’

“ So after a deal of time, and spelling of it over, and
scratching his head, he read it out, so :—

“¢ Calendula officinalis.’

“¢That sounds splendid!’ says I, and was sorry
when it grew dark, because I could not watch it and
see it grow. Father said the next exhibition would
be on June the 19th, 1868, and he was sure it would
be a big, strong plant by that time, thick with leaves
and flowers.

“ And if you'll believe it, ma’am, after a while it did
have a little mite of a leaf, and it grew up tall and
leaned one side, and then grew some more and leaned
the other side.

“Oh, it was-such company for me, and I loved it
Ligzie's Story. 237

so! Even mother, with all she had to do, got to
watching it.

“So it went on all winter long, and in the spring
a little bud came, and it took father and me a week
to get over that. By-and-by, you could see little
streaks of orange colour in the bud, and we talked
about that, and were afraid the flower wouldn’t bloom
out for the tight day, and then we were afraid it
would bloom too soon. Somebody told father to cut.a
little ring out of stiff paper and put it on to keep it
back ; he said they always did so with choice flowers.
Then I laughed and said I was a choice flower too,
for something had kept me back from growing into a
big giz.

“Then father said it was good to hear me laugh,
and that I was a choice flower, ring or no ring. That's
just father’s way, please, ma’am.,

“Oh, how pretty my flowér looked the day before
the show! I was sure it would get the prize, for there
couldn’t possibly be a flower so beautiful as mine.
Father carried it on his way to his work, and promised
to bring it back, prize and all at night.

“But I can’t tell the rest now, ma’am. Something’s
a squeezing and a crowding at my heart, and I feel
faint-like. Its nothing to be scared about. I’m often
took so.

“There! it’s all gone now. But you say I musn’t
talk any more? You say that you'll come again to
hear the rest? Thank you, ma’am.”

“T’m sorry I frightened you so, ma’am. I wasn’t
scared myself. It was only one of my turns. Mother
Q
238 Ligste’s Story.

says she expects I’ll go off in one of em sometime, but
we don’t tell father that. And I hope I shall live to
go on a pilgrimage, first.

“Did my flower take the prize?

“T'll tell you all about it, ma’am. After father went
away with it in the morning, I thought what a long
day it would be before he would bring it back at night.
But I told stories to the children, and that kept them
out from under mother’s fect, and I read my ‘ Pilgrim’s
Progress,’ and had a good time ; but I was glad when I
heard father’s step on the stairs, and to see my dear good
little flower, safe and sound.

“Don't take on my lass,’ says father, but the
handsome flowers elbowed yours away off into a
corner, and it’s my belief that nobody so much as
looked at it.’

“¢That must be the reason it did not get the prize,’
says I. ‘I’m glad it ought to have got it anyhow.’

“And then I said it was late, and time to go to
sleep, and I lay down and cried under the quilt ; but
not aloud; that would have plagued father. My poor
little flower! Nobody had looked at it! Nobody had
told how pretty it was! And it was such a good little
‘ thing, to grow here in our crowded room, when other
plants were having such a nice time out 0’ doors!

“ But after I had cried a pretty long time about it, I
fell asleep, and dreamed a beautiful dream. I thought
I was as well and strong as ever, and that I carried my
flower to the Exhibition myself, and stood a little way
pack to see what the people would say to it. There
was a great crowd, and somebody said there were lords
and ladies mixed all up among us poor folks. But all
Lisgte's Story. 239

I looked at was my flower. There it stood, up in a
corner, all by itself; but nobody noticed it, nobody
said a word about it, except Mrs. Jones; and I heard
her laugh and say, ‘Do look at that mean, scraggling
little atom of a marigold of Lizzie Gray’s! The idea of
bringing it here, among all these splendid flowers !’

“ She passed on, and a gentleman and a lady stopped
to look at it.

“¢QOh, look at this poor, little, half-starved mari-
gold!’ said the lady. ‘What a pathetic story of its
own it tells. Fancy how the child’s heart will ache,
when it goes home and tells her it has not won a prize
after all! Tuck something down into the pot, dear ;
she will find it to-morrow; and what a surprise and
what a joy that will be to her!’

“She was such a lovely lady to“look at, with a face
that went right down into your heart! And her
husband said, ‘ Yes, darling, I have.’

“Then all the people who had brought plants, had
tea and bread and butter, in a tent, and there was a
band that played sweet music; and the children
tumbled about in the green grass. But I did not want
any tea, or any bread and butter, and I had heard that
sweet lady’s voice, and it was music that nobody else
heard. So I took my little flower-pot in my arms, and .
went home with it; and it kept growing heavier and
heavier, just as Jim used to the last days I nursed
him, and I could hardly get up the stairs; and when
I did, my two legs went from under me, and I fell
right into the room.

“The fright woke me up, and then I knew it was all
a dream, for it wasn’t bedtime, and mother sat at work
240 Ligete's Story.

by the light of the candle, and father sat by her, cut-
ting a bit of stick. So there wasn’t any sweet lady,
and there wasn’t any kind gentleman, after all! The
tears began to come again, and I could hardly help
crying out aloud. But I heard mother say—

“ thing. She dropped off to sleep like a lamb as soon as
you got home.’

“YT hope she did,’ says father. ‘For I never had
my heart so broke but once before.’ .

“¢ And when was that?’ says mother.

“*Tt was the night I got a look at her poor back,’
says father. ‘You'd better let me know it when
it was a-coming on, and not let me find it out all
of a sudden. Why, when I went to my work next
day, the streets and the houses, and the people were
there just the same, and the carriages rattling along
just as usual; and yet they weren’t the same streets,
nor the same houses, nor the same people. Everything
was altered to my eyes, and altered to my ears. My
trouble had struck in, and there wasn’t no cure for it,
Sometimes I think it’s your fault with letting the poor
thing carry the children about ; and sometimes I think
it’s a judgment upon us for living like two heathen, as
we always have.’

“‘¢ As to that,’ says mother, ‘I did the best I could
by the child. Bringing up a family of young ones is a
trade, and I never learnt it. I was a slip of a girl, and
was set to the business with nobody to show me how
to go to work, and without any tools. I wasn’t
brought up myself; I footed it up; and how should
I know our Lizzie was getting beat out? She never
- Ligete’s Story. 241

said she was tired, and never said her back ached; and
I was so drove from morning till night, that I did not
notice how pale she was getting. I tell you what it is,
Joe. A man has his day’s work, and there’s the end
of it. He can go to the beer-shops and gin-shops, and
sit and warm the inside of him every evening, and then
lie down to sleep all night, and wake up strong and
hearty. But his woman’s work goes on, and she’s up
and down of nights, and she lays and thinks what's to
feed them all next day, and her head isn’t empty
enough to sleep on.’

“<« Wife,’ says father, ‘don’t mention beer-shops and
gin-shops in the room where that child lays asleep.’

“T thought, though, I ought not to let them believe
that I was asleep, and I tried to speak, but I couldn’t
for the tears. Did you ever have a lovely dream,
ma’am, and wake up and find it was a dream?

“ husband goes and spends his time, and wastes his
money,’ says mother, a little short.

“¢My trouble’s struck in,l tell you,’ says father.
‘And it’s got in so deep that even the drop of drink
can’t reach it. I’ve done drinking, wife.’

“¢Then have you took the pledge?’ says mother.

“ «My pledge is a-lying there on that bed,’ says father.
‘T never drank to hurt me, nor to hurt you nor the
young ones. I’ve always been a decent, sober, hard-
working man.’

“So you have,’ says mother. ‘And you're no
heathen, either. You needn’t call yourself names, Joe.’

““< Maybe you've forgot it,’ says father, slowly, ‘ but
I haven’t, for I was brought up to know better; we
242 Lizeie’s Story.

pawned the Good Book, and that’s why I said we were
heathens.’

“T rose right up when I heard that. For I remem-
bered what a big book it was, and how much reading
it had in it.

“¢Why, Lizzie, have you woke up?’ says mother.
‘There, lie down, and go to sleep again. It’s nigh
apon ten o’clock.’

“¢ But you were talking about a book,’ I said.

“ leg, when he couldn’t go to his work; dear me, P’d
forgot all about it. I’ve got the ticket now.’

“ «Please God we'll have it back again,’ says father,
‘and Lizzie there shall read to us out of it every night.’

“Then they blew out the candle, and I lay and
thought about my pretty lady in my dream, and the
room seemed almost light. And the next thing I
knew it was morning, and everybody was getting up.

“That night when father came home, he brought
the man with him that gave him my plant. The man
kept his hat on, and when he looked at me, he said
‘ Halloo !’ and no more!

“Then father reached him the flower-pot, and when
he saw that, he took it in one hand, and held it off as
far as he could, and burst out a-laughing; and he
laughed so hard that he fell back into a chair, and the
tears rolled down his cheeks. He kept trying to say
something, but every time he tried, he laughed harder
than ever. Father looked bewildered at first, but then
he began to laugh too, and then mother and all the
rest of us set in, till we made the room shake, Oh,
how tired I was; but I couldn’t stop.
Ligeie’s Story. 243

“At last he got out what he had to say, and it was
just this, and no more :—

“« Why, it’s nothing but a marigold,’ and then he
went off again.

“At last he sobered down, and says he, ‘If I don’t
pitch into Bob Higgins, my name isn’t Hicks. He told
me it was such a rare and costly plant, with such a high
and mighty name of it’s own, that I thought your lass
there was sure to win the prize. Never mind, my girl;
we'll do better by you next year, and now let me tell
you how to manage this plant. You've let it run up
too tall, and it looks like a sickly girl that’s got no life
in her. When this blossom falls off, pinch it here, so,
and pinch it there, so, and it will throw out more
leaves, and bear more flowers in the end; and if it
don’t get prizes, it will help pass away the time, won't
ib

“T said ‘Oh, yes,’ and thanked him, and he went

“away; and I was holding the flower-pot while father
showed him out, and one of the children brought me a
little stick, and said I was to put it away down into the
earth, and tie my plant to it, because it kept falling
over, and looking as if it would faint away. It was
the stick father had been working at the night before,
and it wouldn’t go down into the earth ; but when I
pushed it hard, it broke short off.

“¢There’s a stone in the way,’ says father, coming
up to the bed, ‘and you must dig it up.’

“ And it’s the truth I’m telling, and I wouldn’t tell
a lie for all the world ; I dug up the stone, and it wasn’t
a stone ; but it was something bright, and shiny, and
yellow.
244 Lizgie’s Story.

“ And says I, ‘Oh, my pretty lady did it! My
pretty lady !’ and then I turned faint-like, and father
threw water in my face, and mother fanned me’ with
her apron: and when that didn’t bring me to, they
slapped my hands hard. The children thought they
slapped me because I was naughty, and they came and
stared at me; glad some, and sorry some.

“ At last I got over it.

“So somebody had loved my poor little flower, and
thought it was pretty, and told it so as well as she
could. And my flower had come and told me, and I
don’t know which of us was the gladdest.

“And I told my dream to father and mother and
the children, and father said I had seen a vision, and
that it was no man or woman had sent It to me.

“ After I had done telling them all about it, and
every one had handled my yellow thing, and at last
given it to me to hold, I felt as if there must be Some-
body else to tell how happy I was, or I should burst.
Did you ever feel so, ma’am ?

“‘ Whenever I woke up in the night, I felt under the
pillow to see if It was safe ; and then I wanted to show
It once more, but it was all dark and still, and I
couldn’t think who the Somebody was.

“The next day was Sunday, and father dressed him-
self in his clean clothes : and after dinner made mother
put on hers and the children’s, and says he, ‘Now,
Lizzie shall read to us all ;’ and he whipped out a book
from under his coat, and it was the pawned book come
home again. There was a mark in it, and he said,
“Read there, Lizzie. My old mother read there every
Sunday.’
Lizgie's Story. 245

“ And I read the twenty-third Psalm ; father holding
the book, it was so heavy.

“Tt sounded beautiful.

“¢ Father,’ says I, ‘who wrote the Bible’

“
“<*Mr, John Bunyan wrote my “ Pilgrim’s Progress,”
says I. ‘It says so on the first page. Maybe he
wrote the Bible, too. I don’t much believe God did.’

«¢Why not? says father.

“<¢Why, God wouldn’t say “the Lord is my Shep-
herd.” J should think that it was a man said that.
Or else some poor, sick girl.’

“T looked at the Psalm again, and it said, over the
top, ‘A Psalm of David.’

“T read it out loud.

“ «Who was David, father?’

“¢ He was a—he was a—well, it’s all mixed up in
my head together ; he was a man that got into a den
of lions, or else he was a man that didn’t, I don’t quite
remember,’ says he.

“ «Maybe it will tell, somewhere in the Bible,’ says
I. ‘Do shepherds love their sheep, father?’

“¢Of course they do. Folks always love the things
they take care of.’

“* Does God ?

“<¢Well, now, the questions you put upon one,
child. I oughter bea parson, to answer the half of
7em.’

“ He was going to put the Bible away, but I had just
caught sight of a verse, and read these words, ‘God so
loved the world, that He gave,’ I hadn’t time to see what
He gave, but I knew it was something out of the com-
246 Liggte’s Story.

mon. ‘Oh, father, just let me see what it was God gave
because He loved us so.’

“¢ Loved the world, you mean?”

“¢Tsn’t that us?’

“* How should He love us, I want to know?’ says
father, quite put out like. ‘Though, to be sure, He
may love you, poor child. I dare say He does.’

“¢Then, would He like me to show It to Him?’
says I.

“ Father didn’t hear me, I suppose, for he got up and
went out,

“ And I said to myself, ‘I know now who the Some-
body was that I wanted to show It to.’

“ And I held It out on my hand, where He could
see It plain ; and I said, softly, ‘ Please ! This is mine !
Are you glad ?’

“ And I thought I heard Him say, ‘ Yes, I am.’ But
when I asked mother if she heard anything, she said
she didn’t. :

“ And then I thought it wasn’t likely He’d say any-
thing to a poor girl like me.

“ But the room seemed brimful of Him.

“Oh, I did wish the Bible wasn’t so big and heavy,
so that I could hold it myself, and read it all day
long !

“Did you say, ma'am, that I should have a little
Bible that wasn’t big and heavy? ‘Two Bibles in one
house? That wouldn't be right. Perhaps father will
give his to Mrs. Jones, and get good friends with her
again,

“Tn the evening father said he was going to the
preaching, and mother must put the children to bed,
Lizeie’s Story. 247

_and gotoo. She never said a word about her old bonnet
and shawl, but put them all to bed, except the baby,
and took him with her.

“TI was wide awake when they got home, and father |
told me a little about the preaching. He said it was
all about Jesus, who loved poor folks so, that He
came down from heaven, and lived among ’em; and
that they loved Him so that they would hardly give
Him time to éat, but went everywhere He went ; and
He fed the hungry ones, and cured the sick ones,
and was just like their Brother; and if they did
bad things, He forgave them four hundred and ninety
times !

“<«Then, father, you'll forgive Mrs. Jones just one
time, won't you ?’ says I.

«¢T will, to please you,’ says he.

“Tell her about the hymns,’ says mother.

“<¢T can't,’ says father: ‘Next Sunday night, as
Im a living man, P’ll wrap her up in your shawl, and
take her to hear for herself. It'll be next best to getting
to heaven.

“«Then your back’ll be broke next,’ says mother.
‘Aint it enough that you have to go two miles out of
your way every time you go for her beef-tea and things ?
Must you go and kill yourself a Sundays?’

“T didn’t say a word.

“Vd got so used to having things happen to me,
that if two angels had come in and said, ‘You can’t
go on a pilgrimage, and so we've come to carry you,’
I shouldn’t have been surprised. So I held It tight in
my hand, and went fast asleep.

“When Sunday came round, father began again
248 Ligzie’s Story.

about the preaching. If I’d aknown how far off it
was, IJ never would have let him carry me. It’s a
wonder it didn’t kill him.

“How good the air felt blowing in my face, when
we got out into the street! And when I looked up
into the dark night, all the stars looked down at me,
and I thought they winked, and whispered to éach
other, and said—

“See that poor girl going to the preaching. When
she was well, she hadn’t time to go; but now she’s
nothing else to do. She couldn’t go when the bones
was in her legs ; and now they’re gone, she can.’

“When we first got into that grand place, I was
scared, and thought they would drive us poor folks
out. But when I looked round, most everybody was
poor, too. ,

“ At last I saw some of them get down on their
knees, and some shut their eyes, and some took off
their hats and held them over their faces. Father
couldn’t, because he had me in his arms; and so I
took it off, and held it for him.

“<¢What’s it for?’ says I. ‘Hush!’ says father,
‘the parson’s praying.’

“When I showed It to God, the room seemed full
of Him. But then it’s a small room. The church
is a million and a billion times as big, isn’t it, ma’am ?
But when the minister prayed, that big church seemed
just as full as it could hold. Then, all of a sudden,
they burst out a singing. Father showed me the card,
with the large letters on it, and says he, ‘Sing, Lizzie,
sing!
Ligete’s Story, 249

“And so I did. It was the first time in my life,
The hymn said—

‘ Jesus, lover of my soul,
Let me to Thy bosom fly.’

and I whispered to father, ‘Is Jesus God?’ ‘Yes,
yes,’ says he. ‘Sing, Lizzie, sing.’

“ But I couldn't.

“The hymn made me forget all about my picture
of the country, and my ‘Pilgrim’s Progress,’ and It,
and set mé upon thinking that my father and mother
had got a hunchback for their oldest child, that had
lost the bones out of her legs, and got ’em a-growing
out in a lump between her shoulders; and how it
broke father’s heart, and how it made mother work
_so hard; and I pitied them so, and I pitied myself
go, and the people sang out so strong and hearty—

‘Leave, oh-leave me not alone,
Still support and comfort me!’

but I could only whisper it out, and maybe God didn’t
hear it, the rest sang so loud.
. “You say you are sure He did? Then I am sure
a lady like you ought to know, and so I'll think so too.
“ After the praying and the singing came the preach-
ing. I heard every word. And you did, too, ma’am,
go I needn't tell about that. You say you want to
hear how much I remember? Oh, I remember it all!
Tt was a beautiful story. It told how sorry Jesus was
for us when we did wrong, bad things, and how glad
He was when we were good and happy. It said we
must tell Him all our troubles and all our joys, and
feel sure that He knew just how to pity us, because
250 Lizste’s Story.

He had been a poor man three and thirty years, on
purpose to see how it seemed.

“ And it said we might go and tell Him everything.
I was so glad then that I had showed It to Him!

“And when it was time to go honte, and I was
beginning to feel awful about poor father’s carrying
me all that long, long way, you came and spoke to us,
ma’am, and said you would take us in your carriage !
To think of your letting a girl, with such a looking
back, get into your carriage like a lady !

“But it has always been so! Something happening
always !

“T was so tired after mother put me to bed that
night, that I couldn’t get to sleep for a good while.
So I lay, and thought over all the hymns, and all
the prayers, and all the preaching. I did not know
what prayers were, before. But I know now that
it’s saying things to God. And I thought I would
say something to Him; and I said, ‘Please, did You
see me sitting alongside of a real lady in a carriage,
with It in my hand? Did you hear her say she would
often take me to hear the preaching? And oh, please,
have You looked at my back, and felt sorry for father
and mother, that they’ve got such a child?’

_ “My praying did not sound like the minister’s
praying; but then a poor girl ought not to set herself
up to talk to God like a parson.

“And now you say, ma'am that you had a little
Lizzie once, that lives in heaven now, and that you
love all sick Lizzies, for her sake? And that you
are going to give me some of her books, and all the
nourishing food she would eat if she lived down here!
Lissie's Story, 251

Then father won't have to go two miles for my beef-
tea, and I shall grow stronger; and may be the bones
in my two legs will come back again (though the
doctor does say it’s not my legs), and I can get so as
to help mother once more.

“But I hope there won’t anything else happen to
me, for my head is quite turned now, and I can’t think
what makes me have such good times, when there are
so many other people lying sick and sorrowful, and
wishing the days and the nights wasn’t so long, I’m
sorry I’ve made you cry, ma’am, off and on; and I
suppose it’s because my name is Lizzie, and Til be
more careful next time; and, please ma’am, don’t give
me all the things you said you would, but find some
other poor girl, that hasn’t got any ‘Pilgrim’s Progress,’
nor any pictures, and that never saw two folks a-
crying over her marigold, and giving It to her, and
that never heard any singing, and praying, and preach-
ing, and that nobody ever told she might dare to tell
things to God. Father says there’s plenty of them, up
and down, lonesome, and tired, and hungry, and
“may be it will keep you so busy looking after them,
and speaking such sweet words as you’ve spoke to
me, that the next thing you'll know, the time will
all be slipped away, and you'll see the shining ones
coming to take you where your little Lizzie is.

“ Being a poor girl, and ignorant, I can’t quite make
it out how some folks gets to heaven one way, and
some another. The ways it tells, in my ‘ Pilgrim’s
Progress,’ is to go on a great long journey, till you
come to a river; and when you've got across that,
youre right at the door of the city, and all your
252 Ligate’s Story,

troubles is over. But cripples, like me, can’t go ona
pilgrimage, and I spoke to God about that; says I,
‘Please how is a girl like me to get there?’ And it
came into my mind, ‘Why, Lizzie, little babies, as
die when they’re babies, don’t go on a pilgrimage, but
they get to heaven all the same. Angels comes down
and fetches them may be.’

“And may be they fetches up the lame girls, or
helps them along. I should like to have one show
me the way, if he didn’t mind; and another go
behind -me, and cover my back with his wings ; and
T’d go in on tiptoe, and sit away up against the wall,
where nobody could see me; and I'd sing, softly, with
the rest.

“You say you think they'll come for me, before long ?
Thank you, maam. But don’t tell father. And if
you ever come here and find I’ve gone, tell him, please,
that TI be sitting near the door, watching for him ;
he'll know me from all the rest, because they’ll be
walking about.

“And now I humbly ask your pardon for talking
so much, ma’am, and won’t speak another word.”

_
PARDON AND SON, PRINTERS, PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON.
ELECTED bist
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?__DarLy TELEGRAPH,

















































































































































































The Bird. By Jules Michelet, Author of ‘‘ History of
France,” &e. Illustrated by Two Hundred and Ten Exquisite
Engravings by G1AcoMELLI. Imperial 8vo, full gilt side and gilt
edges. Price 10s. 6d.

The Desert World. From the French of Arthur Man-
cin. ‘Translated, Edited, and Enlarged by the Translator of
“The Bird,” by Michelet. With One Hundred and Sixty Tlus-
trations by W. FREEMAN, FouLquinR, and YAN’DARGENT. Im-
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Earth and Sea. From the French of Louis Figuier.
Translated, Edited, and Enlarged by W. H. Davenport ADAMS.
Illustrated with Two Hundred and Fifty Engravings by FREE-
MAN, GIACOMELLI, Yan’Darcent, Prior, Fourquirr, Rov,
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in cloth and gold. Price 10s. 6d.

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MARY HOWITT’S

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Birds and Flowers, and Other Country Things. By
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The World at Home: Pictures and Scenes from Far-

off Lands. By Mary and Evizasera Kirsy. With upwards of
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Companion Volume to “ The World at Home.”

The Sea and its Wonders. By Mary and Elizabeth
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Beautiful Birds in Far-off Lands: Their Haunts and
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FIRST SHRIENS.

Contents :—The Lion—The Tiger—The Leopard—The Jaguar
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SECOND SERIES.

Contents:—The Elephant—The Camel—The Giraffe—The
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T. NELSON AND SONS, LONDON, EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK.
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FAuthor of “ Ahe SSpanish Ksrothers.”



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Under the Southern Cross: A Tale of the New World.

Crown 8vo, cloth. Price 6s. 6d.

The Spanish Brothers. A Tale of the Sixteenth

Century. Crown 8vo, cloth extra. Price 6s. 6d.

No Cross No Crown; or, The Dark Year of Dundee.
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Pride and his Prisoners. With Forty Engravings.

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Hebrew Heroes. With Thirty Engravings.

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RUINED CITIES OF BIBLE LANDS.
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The Valley of the Nile: Its Tombs, Temples, and
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Home Amid the Snow; or, Warm Hearts in Cold

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Things in the Forest. By Mary and Elizabeth Kirby.
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The Children on the Plains. A Story of Travel and
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Truth is Always Best; or, ‘‘A Fault Confessed is
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Lessons on the Life of Christ for the Little Ones at
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Little Lily’s Travels. With Coloured Frontispiece and
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Bible Stories for Little Children. By M. Jones.
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ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE INDUSTRIES, TOOLS, AND IMPLEMENTS
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Fach illustrated with Numerous Woodcuts, and an Illum. Frontispiece.
18mo, cloth, with Illuminated Side. Price 9d.

1. WHO WAS THE FIRST ARCHITHOT?
2. WHO WAS THE FIRST PAPER-MAKER?
8. WHO WERE THE FIRST MINERS ?

4. WHO WERE THE FIRST BUILDERS ?
5. WHO WERE THE FIRST WEAVERS?

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By Aunt Susan. Illus-

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By Aunt Susan. Illus-

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Rambles of a Rat. Illustrated. Gilt edges.
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War and Peace. A Tale of the Retreat from Cabul. Tllustrated.
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The Sunday Chaplet. Illustrated.
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Flora; or, Self-Deception. Illustrated. Gilt edges.
Whispering Unseen. Mlustrated.
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On the Way; or, Places Passed by Pilgrims. Illustrated.

The City of Nocross, and its Famous Physician.
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Cyril Ashley. A Tale.

Claudia.
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Idols in the Heart. A Tale. Illustrated.

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Wings and Stings; or, Lessons on Insect Life. Illustrated.
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The Land and the Book; or, Biblical Illustrations
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NEW WORK ON PALESTINE.

In the Holy Land. By the Rev. Andrew Thomson, D.D.,
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Bashan’s Giant Cities and Syria’s Holy Places. By
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Light from the Catacombs. A Story of the Early
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Pathways and Abiding Places of Our Lord. Illus-

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The Rivers and Lakes of the Bible. By the late
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Bible Notes by the Wayside: Gathered during a Tour
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THE JORDAN AND ITS VALLEY,

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The Fall of Jerusalem; and the Roman Conquest of
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Eastern Manners and Customs. By the late Rev. W.

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Jerusalem: Pictorial and Descriptive. By the late
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WONDERS OF CREATION.—Volcanoes and their
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NATURE'S WONDERS.—Pictures of Remarkable
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WONDERS OF THE VEGETABLE WORLD. With
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SCENES OF WONDER IN MANY LANDS. Being
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WONDERS OF NATURE IN SKY AND AIR.
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J&yome

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\y/

Home: A Book for the Family. By the late Rev.
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School-Boy Heroes : The Story of Maurice Gray and
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Success in Life: What it is, and how Attained. A
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‘* Above Rubies; or, Memorials of Christian Gentle-
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The Early Choice. A Book for Daughters. By the
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Youthful Diligence and Future Greatness. By the
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a i 2 a

























































Muy

THE QUEEN OF THE ADRIATIC;
OR, VENICE PAST AND PRESENT.

BY W. H. DAVENPORT ADAMS.
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Temples, Tombs, and Monuments of Ancient Greece
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The Land of the Nile: An Historical and Descriptive
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CA







TTT TTT





THE BURIED CITIES OF CAMPANIA;

Or, Pompeii and Herculaneum: Their History, their
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BY W. H. DAVENPORT ADAMS.
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Enterprise Beyond the Seas; or, The Planting of our
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Merchant Enterprise; or, Commerce and its History
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Triumphs of Invention and Discovery. By Jd. H.
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LIGHTHOUSES AND LIGHTSHIPS:

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BY W. H. DAVENPORT ADAMS.
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Earthquakes and Volcanoes: Their History, Pheno-
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Life in the Primeval World. Founded on Meunier’s
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On the Banks of the Amazon: A Boy’s Journal of
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In the Eastern Seas; or, The Regions of the Bird of
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Old Jack: A Sea Tale. With Sixty Engravings,
Crown 8vo, cloth extra. Price 5s.

My First Voyage to Southern Seas. With Forty-two

Engravings. Crown 8vo, cloth extra. Price 5s.

T. NELSON AND SONS, LONDON, EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK.


Pictorial Wertbrary of Hearabvel and Ldbenture.

EXTRA FOOLSCAP, CLOTH. COPIOUSLY ILLUSTRATED.









DOCTOR KANE, THE ARCTIC HERO.

A NARRATIVE OF HIS ADVENTURES AND EXPLORATIONS IN THE
POLAR REGIONS.
By M. Jonrs. With Coloured Frontispiece and Vignette, and
Thirty-five Engravings on Wood. Price 2s.

Quadrupeds: What They Are, and Where Found. A
Book of Zoology for Boys. By Caprain Mayne Rep. With
Coloured Frontispiece and Vignette, and Nineteen Page-Engrav-
ings on Wood. Price 2s.

The Young Crusoe; or, A Boy’s Adventures on a
Desolate Island. By Mrs. Horitanp. With Coloured Frontis-
piece and Vignette, and Fourteen Engravings. Foolscap 8vo,
cloth extra. Price 2s. 6d.

Robert and Harold; or, The Young Marooners. A
Tale of Adventure on the Coast of Florida. By F. R. Gounpinc.
With Six Tinted Plates. Post 8vo, cloth extra, illuminated side.
Price 2s. 6d.



T. NELSON AND SONS, LONDON, EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK.
Books of Maravel and EL dventure
FOR BOYS.
BY R. M. BALLANTYNE.



MAINT On THH OCHAN.
A BOOK ABOUT BOATS AND SHIPS.

WITH EIGHT TINTED PLATES, AND UPWARDS OF ONE HUNDRED
AND TWENTY WOODCUTS.

Post 8vo, cloth extra. Price 3s. 6d.

The Young Fur-Traders: A Tale of the Far North.
With Illustrations. Post 8vo, cloth. Price 3s.

Ungava: A Tale of Esquimaux Land. With Illustra-

tions. Post 8vo, cloth. Price 3s.

The Coral Island: A Tale of the Pacific. With Illus-

trations. Post 8vo. cloth. Price 3s.

Martin Rattler; or, A Boy’s Adventures in the Forests
of Brazil. With Illustrations. Post 8vo, cloth. Price 3s.

The Dog Crusoe and his Master: A Tale of the
Western Prairies. With Illustrations. Post 8vo, cloth. Price 3s.

The Gorilla-Hunters: A Tale of Western Africa.
With Illustrations. Post 8vo, cloth. Price 3s.

The World of Ice; or, Adventures in the Polar
Regions. With Engravings. Post 8vo, cloth. Price 3s.

T. NELSON AND SONS, LONDON, EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK.
Pictorial Wertbrary of Herabel and Ldbventure,

PRICE TWO SHILLINGS EACH.

Extra Foolscap, Cloth. Copiously Illustrated.



REST;
OR, PICTURES OF LIFE AND SCENERY IN THE WILDS OF CANADA.

BY MRS. TRAILL, AUTHOR OF ‘‘ THE CANADIAN CRUSOES,” ETC.



With Coloured Frontispiece and Vignette, and Twenty-two
Engravings on Wood,

Pictures of Travel in Far-off Lands. A Companion
to the Study of Geography.—CunrraL America. With Fifty
Engravings.

Pictures of Travel in Far-off Lands.—South America.
With Fifty Engravings.

Round the World. A Story of Travel Compiled from
the Narrative of Ida Pfeiffer. By D. Murray Smiru. With
Tinted Frontispiece and Vignette, and Thirty-five Engravings on
Wood.

1. NELSON AND SONS, LONDON, EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK.

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'2012-05-25T17:06:43-04:00'
describe
'446373' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABESL' 'sip-files00255.QC2.jpg'
0b959c1be1e4a4d655e76fb7601afd6a
6dff3c8ffb5b6800e9d5808842982661dedbb8c4
'2012-05-25T17:10:17-04:00'
describe
'289061' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABESM' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
6ffc5ad0dbbb60d78366c15cc15186f7
e24f8d6f5fa847f9d93ae5aadbb2e51f4d399e36
'2012-05-25T17:07:27-04:00'
describe
'37492' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABESN' 'sip-files00224.pro'
1e6363db68c8258a81e42fb7421b74bf
462eda2bc5e05f1065c0778a9183116a18d3c677
'2012-05-25T17:08:15-04:00'
describe
'285811' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABESO' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
cedfe5461dbb5c44bea0970dbec81f77
e0e4c04494c5e5ee624753503f8bacf56e69cccf
'2012-05-25T17:13:21-04:00'
describe
'451696' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABESP' 'sip-files00162.QC2.jpg'
9d49cd213f910686538a4bf3b2612dea
814234a38a4b68737586e7aa655ab042570aadff
'2012-05-25T17:08:30-04:00'
describe
'419901' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABESQ' 'sip-files00056.QC2.jpg'
9a4fa6b4dbacc2e600c40a43dc367c61
91da67fd230d4ed35b75d1707a63c097fa2e7c03
'2012-05-25T17:15:44-04:00'
describe
'147487' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABESR' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
53785e416eda7dbffa7e2db761075a32
ac4051ed94ec82491d5981fb49c90c8355ce4ae3
'2012-05-25T17:15:59-04:00'
describe
'52764' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABESS' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
6fac17290e68e1ec6eb0f0069fcd2a43
a972e527fb8699ad1a15000e4f9f582aeca60934
'2012-05-25T17:09:24-04:00'
describe
'2361572' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEST' 'sip-files00109.tif'
9a5190165c83d0aeeed562e2df946b7d
dd9d53d8e28fde349d322c13f7f753a6693aaf36
'2012-05-25T17:05:58-04:00'
describe
'2358720' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABESU' 'sip-files00190.tif'
3a154650d8c82833412c69b02fac92e4
8e1fa260ede1ca10293c431ae776d070d80870fc
'2012-05-25T17:05:02-04:00'
describe
'288764' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABESV' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
031e2993f80473d500214b2247fc41f2
25253e616767b2180364f6a34dcb7f1894096a14
'2012-05-25T17:15:06-04:00'
describe
'2362600' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABESW' 'sip-files00204.tif'
974b5b0591f0247e60964aacca003f2a
b9bd2706e678b8bb7359e2369dc7a9c2065a431e
'2012-05-25T17:07:55-04:00'
describe
'2242256' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABESX' 'sip-files00265.tif'
959860f5bce9cc98ef9f81f72598fbba
9308d419152beb47584264ba16c14fa44f47ad7b
'2012-05-25T17:11:07-04:00'
describe
'427164' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABESY' 'sip-files00041.QC2.jpg'
276cbfe9557754fcfa1682fb20656c1b
6b3ef1026a4c724bbddeb53cb91c87c8ca3f72ad
'2012-05-25T17:16:50-04:00'
describe
'854' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABESZ' 'sip-files00271.txt'
b60322144bc2f7754f97343887958e7e
390cf6eea8b2c223e63d4fa2996fc70d772028ff
'2012-05-25T17:04:09-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'296616' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETA' 'sip-files00284.jp2'
85bc157b377ee584f7deef5ad13eb0ac
b6e141f4f9ce68cd32282f71b7ed354d0503f982
'2012-05-25T17:10:38-04:00'
describe
'483543' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETB' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
4e2207efde2b763fe9e805efa3bbfb42
2022ea69bb3b6bbd40f94ef8c92c0adb410b9d2c
'2012-05-25T17:11:55-04:00'
describe
'169' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETC' 'sip-files00008.txt'
6908fc066a53b446e3ff410d85fc0e5b
e2b223c73fe5b3ee0fecd76c8744846a3424fd60
'2012-05-25T17:13:14-04:00'
describe
'2284892' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETD' 'sip-files00140.tif'
60ac416ee044bd8a396321ddab933449
e2d5d9cc1c755588b713405dcc2fbf7baa404fc9
'2012-05-25T17:10:41-04:00'
describe
'36980' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETE' 'sip-files00116.pro'
8929ce9391e0d3ea2989933f6041b17f
f08d4f43b48e33ae3f52f9fbead022478f14c38d
'2012-05-25T17:09:51-04:00'
describe
'460987' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETF' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
f4d0b729eebf07f801eb8671810068cd
f618c4a850afcdc381fdc5f4aa0c64cb25a31c65
'2012-05-25T17:12:06-04:00'
describe
'1566' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETG' 'sip-files00025.txt'
39b2aa8dae98892897658df8f1402338
6e92383ada3e28c916f29b90212e9aac120f8ba0
'2012-05-25T17:16:42-04:00'
describe
'159567' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETH' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
f0c7903c6d32ba2a968ce84af8ae7ec2
df7fe9d782a51734f926f7a6e9cdf31e762b14c3
'2012-05-25T17:10:34-04:00'
describe
'436093' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETI' 'sip-files00092.QC2.jpg'
c68aebb357d4d672b0bf6d97587f581e
f1b7bafd60e3105a5b19c3de98e8b95e49636e23
describe
'435023' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETJ' 'sip-files00109.QC2.jpg'
d47a09067e4d397b51a26e4e532ee6ac
ba43c01c74004b726d120f5a2cff60c72016cc16
'2012-05-25T17:17:33-04:00'
describe
'284601' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETK' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
51575378f5d57ee630da0be7ceafb588
ad1921f1217e72b8fe94ab5a769778524c1359bd
'2012-05-25T17:09:54-04:00'
describe
'472079' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETL' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
d3be22a41300e2aed23d1b923334d51d
af97d07b863d2fbff763884772aa3f4111709349
'2012-05-25T17:04:19-04:00'
describe
'491500' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETM' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
07d813c37dc70f0ec747048f7bfa9a07
666668906f3a473594826c16cd7e1c8f2913f74a
'2012-05-25T17:11:16-04:00'
describe
'40602' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETN' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
de1165fcbae484399813e26486635c5d
5e5188ccf2411b46eec52ea72112de7955c8c718
'2012-05-25T17:04:11-04:00'
describe
'25330' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETO' 'sip-files00182.pro'
ec3a00bdcb2e4368dd998e35e305fe25
6d6804d37e28c3869f70a5c9d5c5fb477bbaacc2
'2012-05-25T17:18:04-04:00'
describe
'36350' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETP' 'sip-files00242.pro'
652974b62c03dab142b338652b715b66
bed0114af0411cd8e9f06b317fd543f395232c3e
'2012-05-25T17:11:17-04:00'
describe
'484263' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETQ' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
5b52dce88fc236dd53a937efa54b5cdb
bf6dafe51199d337289f9edf55fe14855fd249ce
'2012-05-25T17:10:42-04:00'
describe
'2354368' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETR' 'sip-files00286.tif'
01adbbe5f0bb9499da41d38813c33eaa
258d9a065612df4cad884ce3015c03395a188385
'2012-05-25T17:15:04-04:00'
describe
'49055' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETS' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
ad551753d591d8aa82b629e5796caf7a
6212ce8e52181bc24518883789b9d3d5c1eb8fb8
'2012-05-25T17:14:55-04:00'
describe
'2336516' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETT' 'sip-files00103.tif'
a677637abdd3d5f0968ec07aa55507a0
2877ddb0ba6d8538f5b7766514ec6c0ed3deef78
'2012-05-25T17:13:26-04:00'
describe
'1465' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETU' 'sip-files00172.txt'
c1ac4d7eabac399d624a32a737209471
8c323f701ce1e6b10e2f9608bc5068854d2c9ac3
'2012-05-25T17:05:27-04:00'
describe
'2419068' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETV' 'sip-files00088.tif'
ce242ad44bd78b4cfc42b08dbcbde8f1
303b284ca9ccec29edbaa95f1d1e264afbc0f197
'2012-05-25T17:15:35-04:00'
describe
'477302' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETW' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
d6e7af0d912206e8f838313e591da9cd
566cad2381ada93022d5f5ab50de87863c6c495a
'2012-05-25T17:14:32-04:00'
describe
'25922' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETX' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
5256371432c8693a8db8cc80f0bb5d7d
ef68e7957334bfbd3e0fc43432df38ccbd754d3b
'2012-05-25T17:09:04-04:00'
describe
'445114' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETY' 'sip-files00211.QC2.jpg'
f7bfcc74183cbf3f5864a0ad672d9e3d
130348f2151553e9fed1337fcbd909f80f7ea456
'2012-05-25T17:17:53-04:00'
describe
'48937' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABETZ' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
b7a4e25cb48f3f76e3a1aa5566807f92
de123b34b47678010a0c50d424c9b38825f0eee1
'2012-05-25T17:09:17-04:00'
describe
'35660' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUA' 'sip-files00239.pro'
634bba2c07816ee5fb5944889f1c23fd
8ab3a9eaef295506249eef8a598ecaf75871f205
'2012-05-25T17:08:29-04:00'
describe
'1616' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUB' 'sip-files00147.txt'
00ab6c8c1faff56c082ac72c099c325b
36bd1d0744a5a62628fdc963f585f02cd3421cb5
'2012-05-25T17:07:57-04:00'
describe
'551403' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUC' 'sip-files00293.jpg'
1111c5064926f884187b03e6d22d196f
5594a06623d6b9e1692426378c1b6c4d8b1aba9a
'2012-05-25T17:08:18-04:00'
describe
'43048' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUD' 'sip-files00164.pro'
b4287ae3df027a36340bd05f487453dc
491ab622969f25a04a0736cf4fe9af0decbde0b9
'2012-05-25T17:12:04-04:00'
describe
'38817' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUE' 'sip-files00108.pro'
8864354917c331d20f300b3c4955a932
54598c3be43167d6fe7718b4f25dea1a303274b0
'2012-05-25T17:10:07-04:00'
describe
'491630' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUF' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
6192ec30ac53fcf621b38f07a65eccfb
88d3f665d7678ffbb6f4069eb3afc1c3db8fb3c0
'2012-05-25T17:10:36-04:00'
describe
'168781' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUG' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
48da74787779ff647f2ad9459dfeb316
50ef71c158877a888575a5b5cc0997a78f06dbbf
'2012-05-25T17:14:47-04:00'
describe
'162942' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUH' 'sip-files00295.QC.jpg'
4494c360eb614139249b5ee5a5f3b22c
e0b8773efdbc823f1b8fd18cd658cb2eabcf385a
'2012-05-25T17:07:36-04:00'
describe
'169112' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUI' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
a5ed975863fe18af3cd29c1efb73a257
ce4d301b8570b62f2729a9616cf8735634eca91a
'2012-05-25T17:12:54-04:00'
describe
'39850' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUJ' 'sip-files00012.pro'
26ecd64a0c310640d50940ee8d78755e
fb7357f994f0f747adeb514eb1e96226ef3fce65
'2012-05-25T17:05:07-04:00'
describe
'447144' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUK' 'sip-files00159.QC2.jpg'
a8910e64d4672938be97984f01209e40
6b1e03dbbbd2a66f64b1e2b5a2fea1c4e7f13714
'2012-05-25T17:08:50-04:00'
describe
'501196' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUL' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
d14505e5e8562349d9482daa37cae872
e31a746362755eff99a79c167b442faae3f79a2c
'2012-05-25T17:16:46-04:00'
describe
'417777' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUM' 'sip-files00186.QC2.jpg'
8d30f6a8849dc41e22ff502fb6d6cdc1
19a25689c3cb1dc8ea026cbfd17c9e4deaa19b0e
'2012-05-25T17:16:21-04:00'
describe
'51065' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUN' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
35229b07f104a6ea3bce275680dfaf81
88075e0da5786c7c552735a2dffd3cbf0f2e83a8
'2012-05-25T17:14:29-04:00'
describe
'37423' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUO' 'sip-files00040.pro'
4a0dd80a31d8e8f9d28b0968d8fdd53b
dc0dc26e13eb28cf3ec91d38a23e4272e2e6dccb
'2012-05-25T17:18:27-04:00'
describe
'1506' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUP' 'sip-files00276.txt'
82a5552d7991830b054a597bd9f8383d
88f2aee2a8ec295fab709fd784fd1b261f7c0b4a
'2012-05-25T17:15:27-04:00'
describe
'308797' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUQ' 'sip-files00007.QC2.jpg'
11d39c8561752de7f8903ba87757849e
256029fe475577ad37ee5c6d881f81c2cff8239c
'2012-05-25T17:18:00-04:00'
describe
'36478' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUR' 'sip-files00174.pro'
b9fe7c510a392967ab25f957f4302dc9
3bc222d7570123d27e435c5dc4c5c0020e01ca63
'2012-05-25T17:12:01-04:00'
describe
'1490' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUS' 'sip-files00210.txt'
894dc7e2d34d7e045b7eff63028d6a8e
0d33b8211e16c2ef95cfd913006ef523cb7ab417
'2012-05-25T17:13:12-04:00'
describe
'1762' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUT' 'sip-files00215.txt'
3545728114b801cb99ad610223f47f58
c887c5dbbd260839057ad4ad4ed670acb301053d
describe
'36886' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUU' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
919d89a71c20ed67ad78b962f14978e8
1f8e17cee3c0b1a5f15ecaf14589f61c5dc1ba13
describe
'433542' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUV' 'sip-files00091.QC2.jpg'
87419f44623633b934ccb9b4fd50fc35
819b2cac7259152635b6df0cdec6db4a31fec5d7
'2012-05-25T17:18:24-04:00'
describe
'41485' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUW' 'sip-files00111.pro'
b44fe2972826246baec387dfb28ceb17
bd6f8ed02f76e72e3f7d60b80bd02c8de30868b0
'2012-05-25T17:17:34-04:00'
describe
'291026' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUX' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
1868f917016e222a36c15357f98ff101
25b647f3f89333c7aae5b682ff37ae9d6795c0c2
'2012-05-25T17:17:22-04:00'
describe
'289713' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUY' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
129ac6e19438776643e90b810ca151bf
254368c2a104e3eba56a26ffae8ce0b8af46b427
'2012-05-25T17:13:02-04:00'
describe
'292290' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEUZ' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
33b7d0d3e06c7d1a99c47e330b6e76c1
cd842dcec765dc377896a9fc2fdbde9ff15f58fa
'2012-05-25T17:12:28-04:00'
describe
'159069' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVA' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
7e6fbb23bed9f535db8314a355313a51
12c831e27e4fd069e65c341117688a0f9ac2ecac
describe
'48503' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVB' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
0bbce12d49e7a4e0fbc77c54ba4b4144
9c10477bdfab5510de22753962409b7cebdd81a1
'2012-05-25T17:15:58-04:00'
describe
'444159' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVC' 'sip-files00088.QC2.jpg'
b3e5534c5e471008f044e0ee9e4e08ba
1b7c4f68e55ad08f42c5b497a54e7eaca0c7793c
'2012-05-25T17:11:53-04:00'
describe
'32685' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVD' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
4c6dbcfca7572a0c8caccabb07c1fdad
107472c5e561c828449c75777546f2505c6d0cf6
'2012-05-25T17:12:19-04:00'
describe
'164718' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVE' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
ca27ba41c2a77d500a7f7ae0d3810733
51ce46a47142e999dbffe007c680919ee4a9c2f4
'2012-05-25T17:04:25-04:00'
describe
'287392' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVF' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
71edff151b35e829ec107176327550da
8030692ed38521b770753001f357de32e6e09ca6
'2012-05-25T17:13:48-04:00'
describe
'494218' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVG' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
e701902239b6fa4d649e81ce83b76513
7d71413495ee3d180f3e9ef05d08d0023944e353
'2012-05-25T17:14:02-04:00'
describe
'219' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVH' 'sip-files00235.txt'
6382bea08a240e3d216b7c52e4f97a11
a2bcc19855c42b43dd74b8069b30fbeacfc6efff
'2012-05-25T17:05:37-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'110756' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVI' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
ef57e967cada95fa048850dbebfce47d
783a02944d558d5eaff13027a6cf467dc78669b0
'2012-05-25T17:16:20-04:00'
describe
'42350' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVJ' 'sip-files00134.pro'
48176d312772e56c399d3f1029207e92
50a38c93bd6f797f0e81eb13506e81ff8a254282
'2012-05-25T17:13:19-04:00'
describe
'283006' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVK' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
96f6be05a33c3e053daf8e582b5e7193
98aaace109f7fa66f029eda9d34ac88a9ea0c461
'2012-05-25T17:07:54-04:00'
describe
'355923' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVL' 'sip-files00298.jpg'
ed926abb5fb3ccc30235aedc2d2f153a
54cf553e21416b5bcb5afa6d1429a2b31fd74505
'2012-05-25T17:11:04-04:00'
describe
'485441' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVM' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
43aa25db3ccbc34d1258d38570f1e992
d261dad76e4d8e3118f157bcd98042967aba7b49
'2012-05-25T17:06:02-04:00'
describe
'352543' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVN' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
9bf9f4a57345bd08f970c6f95d5d7045
fb858b3c12fe90537d9ee7e56a5ee2db20e36cd2
'2012-05-25T17:17:39-04:00'
describe
'50467' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVO' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
0e42d945f4ebcb10eb4d9364a8f4e3aa
957204974caae394da86c259ac9200a65b4809c3
'2012-05-25T17:10:02-04:00'
describe
'1789' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVP' 'sip-files00229.txt'
05750515274cc4a1fd2449be2c6b6eb6
30de79130543a58614a96c1ae9f29761e2df4bf6
'2012-05-25T17:13:20-04:00'
describe
'435074' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVQ' 'sip-files00260.QC2.jpg'
152ba756ef7544fc2f74fe04ad2f8f1e
7232f945c58b2fc1001cf26ac1ffeb56261b83f0
'2012-05-25T17:16:59-04:00'
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVR' 'sip-files00192.txt'
cf2ea2fc5400ea99ef2afdab13b6641d
4b04217caff85e1c759d64aabfc28a812027963e
'2012-05-25T17:08:23-04:00'
describe
'290810' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVS' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
03994193d1a81e41d852b9b85d09c95e
56048d25f5a19bd551f3724ce987b440455e5a92
'2012-05-25T17:18:18-04:00'
describe
'2334412' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVT' 'sip-files00178.tif'
328b3d5612ad372d4b2bf091b1a08408
546101e1505a69247a34d3a2148a903d3d1c645e
'2012-05-25T17:12:32-04:00'
describe
'476674' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVU' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
6ef91b25f0441e8e3058ecd1ae3ff0aa
5366808697964c443ca82aea2e0e2feecfa617f1
'2012-05-25T17:13:42-04:00'
describe
'53586' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVV' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
8935b772fa1e21db04ec579e17412f19
887d408eb0d1ec75f6ae329fefe1fc540e4eacdb
'2012-05-25T17:15:01-04:00'
describe
'27200' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVW' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
ae28ff90d6fd35346fafdbcd1a468a81
7a4cb81cb84e923531a49c995ebfa7c4f272f79d
describe
'285270' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVX' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
c0c03984bad23b73cac3fc09f9d56613
22c57aab3b2d0a0f91231505a5302c253a9bf889
'2012-05-25T17:11:59-04:00'
describe
'26560' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVY' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
41b42a20f5ca1a0b2e6f503ef36e6a3d
375b4662c4a1ab3471d88fbba6dd4958f3edc38b
'2012-05-25T17:04:15-04:00'
describe
'446675' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEVZ' 'sip-files00181.QC2.jpg'
6baade240482bb50a5725501de6e93e4
de3320bae485978675fc3e95483c8637472f7ba1
'2012-05-25T17:11:35-04:00'
describe
'51777' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWA' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
ad0739ffaa040b9b5387f4c3c262cad0
3b94f0e44434d0c1774313b919bcfa8ec3050081
describe
'157592' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWB' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
de879d781da2da2d42ccde3ad533df45
be03705a505bcd327fa791ca936178a070d7cef4
'2012-05-25T17:15:33-04:00'
describe
'287845' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWC' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
0d2c941cd8bf48d5acf85419b27f6e95
329084fe9c8155b54e7b0da47d3e39d40248b5f9
'2012-05-25T17:15:47-04:00'
describe
'286697' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWD' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
01063bf2e2003d26017df0d4a5925a89
efc330732a162060f754e12d209af155e8f2f1e0
'2012-05-25T17:10:04-04:00'
describe
'35033' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWE' 'sip-files00165.pro'
9303ebb005328b2e8c5c98504244fd21
773889eb82980515ef62b70dc5af783164e21ab0
describe
'472549' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWF' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
fcff8bb408916c0b1e2fa551339be36b
57993f6a5abe2bbc2ef36352e5bcfa9b5fcfdf1e
'2012-05-25T17:14:59-04:00'
describe
'522855' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWG' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
0c993adc1371e8acc6f87a65ac0523fd
af4049714a0f8360b69277225056ab55afc834f3
'2012-05-25T17:12:11-04:00'
describe
'2375436' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWH' 'sip-files00153.tif'
d58509dbe54ecd385f67710d9e3cbb51
220d947280a4bfe358fb1026db4b73e4cc66daf6
describe
'281604' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWI' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
4eae5119acc1706718b659c6182b54fd
255726b816546cd1b9cce6044aa345d150f2c2db
'2012-05-25T17:07:25-04:00'
describe
'427050' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWJ' 'sip-files00174.QC2.jpg'
dadf123fb5980b70ac6896a1799535ad
b6e89cd590f426b81be5bbe0a574e7f2ec25fa89
'2012-05-25T17:13:09-04:00'
describe
'42137' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWK' 'sip-files00058.pro'
85dc1005fbccd6944723a7fd91499e5f
af50e7a5429002b3e37bf8c84685f894081a4a60
'2012-05-25T17:07:39-04:00'
describe
'294602' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWL' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
c47565cb1d488cc16c38e0d8316f0513
31f183e57be452545d2ea28760b39140021185b6
'2012-05-25T17:16:17-04:00'
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWM' 'sip-files00274.txt'
f05250a0e98f8a66da77e3cdbeb4d6fa
6fb228075cb7776e538c9c8b3feb320e4e891c00
'2012-05-25T17:04:56-04:00'
describe
'516922' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWN' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
534552ea562040bf279883e22f56e3c7
bb7f333ed8d42c4db09523d7e0b07259130db821
'2012-05-25T17:18:01-04:00'
describe
'1723' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWO' 'sip-files00209.txt'
4ccd3df75f4fb6cfaceecb9798e93437
7834bc57a7bb18cbad0dfefb4449421e64ff5f53
'2012-05-25T17:16:29-04:00'
describe
'288036' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWP' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
ef49ce5fcc0c2741107f335b4906c73b
70446b72e2ef3543e8dc4188aaac7d352fbeed20
'2012-05-25T17:04:35-04:00'
describe
'158528' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWQ' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
e1fe77ee4dc95e42eaa5c8992fd75ac5
33825abd671fd73a029cdb807a7cf9cddc06c1ea
describe
'473214' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWR' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
a4953d0917ef1927f236e27d64fbb3fa
6e6d82aae97e95c8c774c4938c9bf38da39452f7
'2012-05-25T17:04:50-04:00'
describe
'1040' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWS' 'sip-files00230.pro'
758d86c26ba9d449d8e0a22d34a5062e
40afd28d6e3cddeb3cd19359e7383f2d755d2d9a
'2012-05-25T17:12:27-04:00'
describe
'499706' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWT' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
93e252e0006406d1be467b5de89dca9d
25110537a052c87109426e43773d4e18d8e5ed36
'2012-05-25T17:07:01-04:00'
describe
'2261712' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWU' 'sip-files00239.tif'
e86f60dffc55f1d35f6f540cfb9f7fa5
30b4ad1c615e422de5ae6b1ee9188981cc953ad3
'2012-05-25T17:12:14-04:00'
describe
'511851' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWV' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
efc30a32bac94c4332ea6f8f44962068
48c872d01af82a3d4d6a81f5c9b83534536a019e
'2012-05-25T17:10:09-04:00'
describe
'451103' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWW' 'sip-files00200.QC2.jpg'
95c48a8b765836aa122670cedf8186e5
ebcd865c1b6d2c5814f9ff1939f403a4622cb814
'2012-05-25T17:13:58-04:00'
describe
'548718' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWX' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
93c161a9afa55a65e30f101375044796
c7d0d7b1660305f748dbd97af3c04ab6e817e137
'2012-05-25T17:10:39-04:00'
describe
'437872' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWY' 'sip-files00143.QC2.jpg'
17a4568b01a46cc7df640b19359b27c9
1b6301ae55cf5dff991ce3b90f59b92a9adf3902
'2012-05-25T17:04:51-04:00'
describe
'353464' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEWZ' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
debed05f9255f3c40e98049a0bc43d68
7056a8bad689f45091344edf174188fc531ed4d6
'2012-05-25T17:07:44-04:00'
describe
'517553' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXA' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
09d647af6d7b907e0b85fd5912a8f5ec
2acb8dc7da248486871a6a553f8f63dbcc007871
'2012-05-25T17:16:45-04:00'
describe
'51034' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXB' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
16eba82c1fb403531b0e32610d6a5798
64cf30abeb690df96d8187f6e7c4eeb5ced5c7d5
'2012-05-25T17:08:33-04:00'
describe
'293355' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXC' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
71298dee20088809985f185927ad7b00
5cc7438c0b5c40d225124f8c14763a30585f020a
'2012-05-25T17:17:16-04:00'
describe
'50566' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXD' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
021dafcb8b2226106a2822eb9163ef2b
f0f0c06504cbf8e61bc87faacb32b6341a37d53a
'2012-05-25T17:17:29-04:00'
describe
'293742' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXE' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
3ab99469aaab7f5d6a4582a4fad7c9ab
a8b5dcaaa7350349bad3062e46dda004b69bc001
'2012-05-25T17:11:29-04:00'
describe
'1512' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXF' 'sip-files00097.txt'
079219ecfe81963009170655eb6772a3
2b078dcc3727c2e38ecc7603a8dfa86b0c3359c5
'2012-05-25T17:12:29-04:00'
describe
'52042' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXG' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
8597ac746fd4b4bb0181d8e055ba5103
870a60daed1ac7ebe748ab22d186752cc16e13e2
describe
'297832' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXH' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
f0ad1992cc8628e1dcc05493d4bf29ab
4a62e882caa3ab76cdf1c3dab62fec12dc78bc0a
'2012-05-25T17:05:12-04:00'
describe
'2321128' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXI' 'sip-files00277.tif'
73cc1a227949acf9a43648965969246c
47d974b3d120097873396fce21e342e05591577c
'2012-05-25T17:08:52-04:00'
describe
'1752' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXJ' 'sip-files00154.txt'
1358a86cb1e3388bc08617e38fcb7548
50595ca5179570059f43cac9f74630db0fa255c5
'2012-05-25T17:16:05-04:00'
describe
'456054' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXK' 'sip-files00180.QC2.jpg'
96342f7c993fe4d190d521f361ab4335
6a21196b16c8bf63c7285fb802da9a8e68d25bce
'2012-05-25T17:17:17-04:00'
describe
'39402' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXL' 'sip-files00255.pro'
3e317b4ae21933a738061349286cd7f2
76a13f09a95014dd3ba8788aa77acb24cacee02b
'2012-05-25T17:11:20-04:00'
describe
'178365' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXM' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
fec54d7f983a6fa2771acbec5c1a0239
259e6a51bab184130671063c7ec15dad8cb82b01
'2012-05-25T17:12:37-04:00'
describe
'484203' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXN' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
0e9a9a460d36d9b7484b86fbd8a73ae6
e99dd808958a65d63d44c30c82a0d111f76986b7
'2012-05-25T17:12:40-04:00'
describe
'2359900' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXO' 'sip-files00064.tif'
96bbc805e9626529366a9e20ff9fb3ef
70b70484acfbad082be1d271fedc614c4e80a87c
'2012-05-25T17:04:36-04:00'
describe
'55730' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXP' 'sip-files00291thm.jpg'
a65993e466ebb33fc87d08f6c8a49961
78206d3701a9f4438703f1ce8c54279597ea8df9
'2012-05-25T17:10:51-04:00'
describe
'42026' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXQ' 'sip-files00209.pro'
8ad4efb17dac9485d4b1a9b8996acec5
4752a7c6255e53c1ed697ad993a5220c710fe685
'2012-05-25T17:18:23-04:00'
describe
'1691' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXR' 'sip-files00219.txt'
0809ca9e7fc8cf0df5b15d48fcd61ba7
3aa6055cec388dc6e7263af1c4f4704e7f7e57ae
'2012-05-25T17:17:09-04:00'
describe
'49756' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXS' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
34883be1a22493d72ead1d55875d0914
d021fc8a2e859869e1025a47debfc31307c58b87
describe
'461152' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXT' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
c83b538d75b5c03371ef6c212df76c05
1b436ee7fcecad6dffb2b17d804d697768927727
'2012-05-25T17:05:42-04:00'
describe
'466163' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXU' 'sip-files00267.QC2.jpg'
8eea120f3d46d9e6fb502320fce0ca50
57d37516e30152524cdfae150b155db9757c31af
'2012-05-25T17:04:07-04:00'
describe
'490665' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXV' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
f424430d72459470553892939bab876f
60169ebe6c822f2489ff5227c8aae18e5cc0cf7b
'2012-05-25T17:11:50-04:00'
describe
'158272' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXW' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
1ba22da5074c089b7f690303ce8a43a8
5537819c1b0c3e8969218059642a93d3b63ec5b2
'2012-05-25T17:04:34-04:00'
describe
'163199' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXX' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
cdc7be41e94edf8ab8e8c100df028c47
7fd31b27dd130eaaf562a23c74dff6626f39d902
'2012-05-25T17:10:06-04:00'
describe
'159055' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXY' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
7841cadb67df2708fa51f95ed3e03f87
1b1286088dae380a48c2235df9bb8e7393a161eb
'2012-05-25T17:15:21-04:00'
describe
'2223820' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEXZ' 'sip-files00251.tif'
00215dead7a721c75c1483bbb907ae2e
5a708bee45cd293c0bacb0d01481c63878d171da
describe
'287906' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYA' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
91667d33a5554b23fb5e97d0a0fb10e9
30aa9f490ecac39b58407cc62a47cb4ccd38aab7
'2012-05-25T17:15:09-04:00'
describe
'35897' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYB' 'sip-files00028.pro'
e1792097fc031956f1f7f24a4f703b21
ea0211cb294412009d79f249455dbba577585ab7
'2012-05-25T17:05:29-04:00'
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYC' 'sip-files00132.txt'
52effd9d1d7a99c9515544a026833279
423768f4223cf60b6b179c14a84f609b39a672fe
'2012-05-25T17:04:53-04:00'
describe
'497860' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYD' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
35577ffc27c63465676447ae0f1912d4
f5cdece93cbf5227071621869d0e97d9b0ec1e68
'2012-05-25T17:07:20-04:00'
describe
'2340324' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYE' 'sip-files00246.tif'
98dd4bf589f0675d5c70a22130d015d2
aa6cc38b817515ee3fa0161838dfa73705234996
'2012-05-25T17:13:33-04:00'
describe
'527505' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYF' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
fc34fb2f581cb229b86e01123c2d0671
7e26bf5af8b39e53fc330bcfbaa8b1213cee6e11
'2012-05-25T17:05:30-04:00'
describe
'37341' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYG' 'sip-files00126.pro'
8f98bbc181f8efe805f43b074e216816
44e82b5176dfd7e04c4600665ccd7f62bc85f532
'2012-05-25T17:10:54-04:00'
describe
'512921' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYH' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
f2fff46ac2bdeb11e15f9dc3004d716e
6f194ccc6521e7ad4756970d870c6364e4ef9b8a
'2012-05-25T17:15:16-04:00'
describe
'1751' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYI' 'sip-files00198.txt'
4f93511493a5acf24cd476d001605158
ec8847d17a3e90a451e406d90a9e94e81c58cce0
'2012-05-25T17:12:48-04:00'
describe
'2390424' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYJ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
fecce2c463c2368b7fb7a79c3f642275
809ccc842f1bc56f418c9b83352603165367868a
'2012-05-25T17:05:39-04:00'
describe
'295328' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYK' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
def21833d9deed03de0da64a5acbdd39
4d6c4a244894cd158aa5036dc5062bad76819a56
'2012-05-25T17:04:01-04:00'
describe
'154' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYL' 'sip-files00230.txt'
0a76db911a65564dca4b29b5fbef6b64
0b5444928e04aed61fe6c392aea31781f3f5efbf
'2012-05-25T17:14:35-04:00'
describe
'158669' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYM' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
fd3f6e232503c4a3d0241ab58dc2092f
615173b8419b304a436fb898801e2ba45a9f5c71
describe
'2341620' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYN' 'sip-files00179.tif'
71a552a2343eee7734718b6b8c92007d
9b8319c17567feeb5965da464f9e2359380f8add
'2012-05-25T17:11:52-04:00'
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYO' 'sip-files00018.txt'
417814c9f93a1ca1f969782947b2bf1f
041bf8cceb002872fa0880e79532ffeb7e4a3318
'2012-05-25T17:04:48-04:00'
describe
'484246' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYP' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
567f57bf91ecd41f1f28a90bb2bb840e
319ea3f62cebc5c7199c0fc70076717fa7424d03
'2012-05-25T17:13:50-04:00'
describe
'35438' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYQ' 'sip-files00199.pro'
4a2066ec4770188d558c24fa11b85f56
b95064a915afdac9ad2394e59b407c5fed53d890
describe
'164760' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYR' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
baf9abef1c2b18875bb25e4b983c9d12
d467f33ab7336669a8a9339b0e9962f836eccd28
'2012-05-25T17:06:42-04:00'
describe
'27616' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYS' 'sip-files00075.pro'
ddd5a814906cde6d4c4a1d8acf0bc14f
bb5109d174ffae4dc2e71a543f5c14ab406a1382
'2012-05-25T17:18:35-04:00'
describe
'289573' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYT' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
302550abe6b9cf3603a38038175a1268
f5ce778ebc0b4660cc924d6fd73439443e71bc2c
'2012-05-25T17:04:08-04:00'
describe
'40197' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYU' 'sip-files00190.pro'
270fe140ce27505934c8449ed821356b
364244e4a9d4ad551fa8a39243c1f2cf661f444b
describe
'439503' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYV' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
3e73ead30759a99bf0a44dff7c3af5de
a1789821004d5ffb328943bcdcde50e909866be3
'2012-05-25T17:16:28-04:00'
describe
'2396892' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYW' 'sip-files00169.tif'
086e711138deac638e56a4864ae45d67
da7ffba4faad6e2de0708c7df93d8f1330e3e791
'2012-05-25T17:14:03-04:00'
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYX' 'sip-files00142.txt'
e19277221a41eb0897ad716379249db5
91ce49950e4762cb169434af2499e7f6cd33221b
'2012-05-25T17:16:18-04:00'
describe
'36334' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYY' 'sip-files00244.pro'
b33090857e0f08ad0fb6d2fd4d818c20
b7176fcd824bacd00c14a9b097f3fe2aba513522
'2012-05-25T17:17:52-04:00'
describe
'2285612' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEYZ' 'sip-files00253.tif'
f76f67a1157ca083e7f06bcb3329872b
66e711c884da4d470aad9615406c1746be379438
'2012-05-25T17:13:52-04:00'
describe
'425100' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZA' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
c9f56f32d402855bcf3253152480d840
cb8bf7c6f460df602ef38f6b71bfbbf80b5c99c9
describe
'287123' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZB' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
359869439ae5ce499a940ee879423c42
1c77688ed2fb5c1eb3146ec7b936562832f7a058
'2012-05-25T17:11:00-04:00'
describe
'295710' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZC' 'sip-files00074.QC2.jpg'
5110a7a9d8d5416323c159c4618ef77e
5745e6ae6cb58b72f996578eaad8fc40e2b65601
describe
'452263' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZD' 'sip-files00044.QC2.jpg'
3539a53e5981f41b447fc028f17f815b
35d3cef06a0c18e2648cebfe32d8829672978517
'2012-05-25T17:10:48-04:00'
describe
'2388820' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZE' 'sip-files00020.tif'
4d99541ce44f7f8c3304ea589585d6e8
2ec5e6c8ceadeff5e07d27f73d9f39b04d31750f
'2012-05-25T17:13:15-04:00'
describe
'447314' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZF' 'sip-files00042.QC2.jpg'
c2f40b89a10e239d2debd08c49ec5005
e170e9b064e299aca51a805188e6c0b35a622ac3
describe
'157493' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZG' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
05aa3664d1cc24809c1749a50d61c272
f066995aa8aa1c6187d924f39a3c2ad12ad79cde
'2012-05-25T17:11:46-04:00'
describe
'163785' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZH' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
b68c7428a100c8592b5d62dce6298607
7b019605abe1d0ec5240249e88492eb537438317
describe
'56864' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZI' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
41ed3f57ed54f3fdf61c26bf08522123
330621edb8044cbfa5d07f662213f49e42fcb086
'2012-05-25T17:12:52-04:00'
describe
'285041' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZJ' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
18e020728a94d6dd847c707297108695
0a2155f4f96c12e33e242b654ad285119d6e4c7d
'2012-05-25T17:17:14-04:00'
describe
'40762' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZK' 'sip-files00118.pro'
04ef58580cc4a0ee3cbdd2df88144dc6
a78b85c80b39abadd5e8d766cff40091306ddeea
describe
'297701' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZL' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
11f0f94db62f5529c3d603bad1e2e1dd
391d5b887b6ecb5f031ed95e01773a58fe76b376
'2012-05-25T17:17:07-04:00'
describe
'21113' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZM' 'sip-files00009.pro'
e7d615d84a0b19402b0022104a709d00
739e87c6b40b5f92d5072fa51e252d3de7601376
'2012-05-25T17:07:00-04:00'
describe
'274653' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZN' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
7b09a9c932ffb72ea90bfd8685b96b91
745a53e27d164ba1037010e8195c111cad249ba6
'2012-05-25T17:12:59-04:00'
describe
'18552' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZO' 'sip-files00280.pro'
e1b02a8bf2dd3a765c4c665d7d14e88b
92d167f720de9182fe10eea7ec46b8752d8e7a94
'2012-05-25T17:14:09-04:00'
describe
'2369232' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZP' 'sip-files00192.tif'
45046bb12e139bd5acc04d87fa7b6cb8
068ecfead6cc2399bcdd00823bc1cec67e048eee
describe
'286098' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZQ' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
30c088901310c5c15aef11f79f5bbd01
7c69bce8d4edd0ecf6e64a4935af89f5d62cac72
'2012-05-25T17:04:22-04:00'
describe
'580068' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZR' 'sip-files00286.jpg'
d656dd63a16cc1eeeefcef8fb9db11a1
ac51193eede144d4f6d8f31fc1f51932f5e4d4a0
describe
'159935' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZS' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
4ff82fc78d9bd5bb9976990c314d3aa7
6e247149c555a7a4dea8a61ab8932e4f3e2cad78
'2012-05-25T17:16:24-04:00'
describe
'284483' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZT' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
736f80cf116d4caf4c699206b99afb53
e5bb21d4b2cf28e3b37a1ca29d979cb9e0528990
describe
'53393' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZU' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
577cc3d7b36ae7e4daf6d1a17aedcbbc
47b2298f7d9369033653de83bfb1fbe6d959dc21
'2012-05-25T17:04:23-04:00'
describe
'291425' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZV' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
65405564fe19be9bef93bca272f7e273
18bd0d110e386a78edada2f5169c8ae5f9deeae8
describe
'2272016' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZW' 'sip-files00213.tif'
d3b85f04e5c942fa992dd010e7956eb0
af16c021d5fa1ef5899f39d00b2ed839b6c5c07b
'2012-05-25T17:06:32-04:00'
describe
'45147' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZX' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
37ac6ddea223999a2a69c9e03ec1c7c5
f5fa863738dab4a1c74ee37504d498d6ba7fcf86
'2012-05-25T17:05:43-04:00'
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZY' 'sip-files00185.txt'
d5f4173ffa94cc49c1ea631b33a75649
279c1de76ccf9adc9b0641f802ce1f44d486979f
'2012-05-25T17:09:21-04:00'
describe
'1504' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABEZZ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
6e991abd2784ba093ff6ebcb96a4c42f
75341e4b06d1565ef3065956835c44684fa7fbf9
'2012-05-25T17:06:57-04:00'
describe
'2287572' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAA' 'sip-files00028.tif'
88a4f9ba78f839e621cc1f362efe9163
068a8448b4aa734032fa88e3c210281c43bd19da
'2012-05-25T17:17:47-04:00'
describe
'293319' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAB' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
53d1bebe113fb8d8ebadb5956af17f83
f42181e48561d9401546f1dab4b2d84f12165d55
'2012-05-25T17:10:00-04:00'
describe
'163272' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAC' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
0d7081df1aeb24a0a1389eee838f8ba0
21f200eb31eca3d5db7f0d1fe347e733c633c7d3
'2012-05-25T17:08:55-04:00'
describe
'285939' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAD' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
258d32f71687455edc61b9ad83429b06
4e6b464f7275bdc059b0dc2808c31986d5708711
'2012-05-25T17:16:27-04:00'
describe
'461555' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAE' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
11d374c186b3112477af624091eff551
71dbe25fd44368f54aa362b286e9a59b6a4a1b06
describe
'288435' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAF' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
9bfb684966370bb7992907ad9f923100
fabfd66b167f98f47e8f5816f34ab867c9488b7c
'2012-05-25T17:04:28-04:00'
describe
'156776' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAG' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
8ed534f8654763ff0b018b2001daddec
db91083a2942ffb1b57d4e48ac2c5b22c1cc7857
describe
'1569' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAH' 'sip-files00040.txt'
09a4ef6e2f5e10b24d1d6f591f8c9c16
76dc60d494376c6b2d553eab13a76cdf097da6fe
'2012-05-25T17:09:47-04:00'
describe
'155058' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAI' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
3f7eba07319e6c9c60413928851a5241
4d65efa3851d2cdbdbed8d4e31c6495c0418b52f
'2012-05-25T17:06:19-04:00'
describe
'279352' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAJ' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
a0c6c3943fc817100ff2bd0cf5cad96f
114ebdf1ec217f263eaca12baa00996f6eb5b241
describe
'517932' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAK' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
2c846dc5e40038acdba2c31285765900
a0588a6561c22c85f2a586d9de950049879e35f9
describe
'447622' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAL' 'sip-files00103.QC2.jpg'
0981942a4e1a42394bc6925368bcc00a
9e0f7677939811a9b6ac95531b3a26325f8cfbbb
describe
'44309' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAM' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
43f7112110517016066c943c87776029
64de99a89c3245ab960e5e0602c9b948828d459d
'2012-05-25T17:16:03-04:00'
describe
'2342644' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAN' 'sip-files00056.tif'
d843806e466af446901fa3b826959345
79e10119b21118b25038ffc2826c03983d48c9c0
'2012-05-25T17:10:14-04:00'
describe
'40828' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAO' 'sip-files00178.pro'
f2445b9825057c0aba8b80cc8c01bf76
545c8d1b8dab667f0c9b63f0f911a7759c6ed29d
'2012-05-25T17:09:15-04:00'
describe
'2302460' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAP' 'sip-files00233.tif'
9127086f1d1cdec146381f4cdb26c928
611a95c049ca2847ac01da8af9d2a13e77e36826
'2012-05-25T17:06:53-04:00'
describe
'8101064' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAQ' 'sip-files00002.tif'
69ec8fedc7936c510e6a10941f5c3196
0b67be4b52b1dd9c40ae6953815d6597cd35a399
'2012-05-25T17:16:53-04:00'
describe
'496130' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAR' 'sip-filesUF00027889_00001.xml'
cfb915c010ef7c4f54d64023aa04f4f5
78ee3b2831ec9a24631484c7c03e14f5855bb013
'2012-05-25T17:18:20-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-07T04:09:44-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'656098' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAU' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
edafbbc7e888223957ab20fb119fd317
85cad85b042181159c74d59261e1608df27313e0
'2012-05-25T17:08:56-04:00'
describe
'287836' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAV' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
b55618cc3948c372fe4a0ee08a9907ce
1ccfa66f44d937c1b307707bce3b44ee38e928c9
'2012-05-25T17:10:46-04:00'
describe
'262665' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAW' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
f87efe65755d3e756282db9abac4b9c6
64c1611e095026adc79fe8683ea84eb3fecef291
'2012-05-25T17:12:47-04:00'
describe
'610599' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAX' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
fbbfc6d193e7258c5c04847d2bfefb38
d3a0cdcfb8d4455d67b96d97f91a6b91fd887604
'2012-05-25T17:11:51-04:00'
describe
'329339' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAY' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
5501a3e874c2bb2c046598a70381a92e
ce9742c7cfe54a94539d9ddc7b8815fac5c3ec17
'2012-05-25T17:17:23-04:00'
describe
'412962' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFAZ' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
bedf69a87da408f13fd72013151ee159
7c4454e0c9bdf7c3c67117e7e8b96c6c36d5fc5c
'2012-05-25T17:18:12-04:00'
describe
'460799' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBA' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
5c81616a5adc452d23dd276238f694d0
bf75b490a786f20decc20265113c1892087f9c40
'2012-05-25T17:18:33-04:00'
describe
'486013' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBB' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
02d5899f16dc7e58265c9e3f011222a1
fa31f696a243ca637e176192419add773e7f5b24
describe
'514683' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBC' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
5cf9928a37d1d9fb114b3a0c8b01b96f
7df8e43de158177a21fe47cf53135545f81a3e63
describe
'497315' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBD' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
f388919f70dc6175dca2f39eed46938a
68df929defa189b99e690add0477cbedd88845f1
'2012-05-25T17:04:49-04:00'
describe
'476736' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBE' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
b50dee16bd5cc3092032fa5948043b1e
caf27121ed8bc91d01518c1f2cc1e43d18d5fe34
describe
'497007' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBF' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
7c70db04c5483b55aca9c91e6536b7de
2724b299587c520191721b0e6b1f09a62a206ffe
'2012-05-25T17:06:24-04:00'
describe
'501212' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBG' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
1a5495819185902bd70c2c8e896bf70d
e3fe9e5575625c29af0b263bd0450775f7ffac1a
describe
'535562' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBH' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
84d54a013049a412d7c41a8668b946fb
742e1bff76d7a9709e975806401ee77d44223243
'2012-05-25T17:13:59-04:00'
describe
'473661' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBI' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
408748be3e8e33f999fe27e70da16001
333d1b03631d5e78d151284c46f4d87953020531
'2012-05-25T17:09:30-04:00'
describe
'490618' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBJ' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
4cc4a92b70ae724f111b616d1e3c8d54
6f5d61b22b7a4ef5486dd0f46f891a76d4d26564
'2012-05-25T17:11:42-04:00'
describe
'492492' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBK' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
1735f3c9d0903c58d440f36d2f7d05ff
a4f837eceed92724dd665f4e14592912dbe8b832
'2012-05-25T17:09:57-04:00'
describe
'380745' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBL' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
f9be4de5c93e2d703141406c44e0ab2c
2f3bce20f50beda0976afd545ebdec93d7100803
describe
'444531' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBM' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
cc87dafe2663a00a5beb0ad4d5231d13
5ef72826a9a7cee3bd9673df22844e98bc29882d
'2012-05-25T17:09:13-04:00'
describe
'515006' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBN' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
e73c4883adab1f75f2d5d17b96b8751a
6f3b8bba729e994204e29616cfd549d4fb78ac0a
describe
'508405' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBO' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
d7b9fdad5f4e3949375e1b82267e382c
b8826334bb39abff280fca7154223d55f818bab9
describe
'489481' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBP' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
31c00930feebc3bf354ce8511f278465
ee75e9f8c9c7d9ec51a0fe858c1b765aa163e055
'2012-05-25T17:05:40-04:00'
describe
'505121' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBQ' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
59b6dafde9cc4e16a984019b4bd4fe47
44f2ba2b11b5f9d083f5ae0f14687821fac7bf06
'2012-05-25T17:07:58-04:00'
describe
'475081' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBR' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
a50134ac4282cddc3aa9619c361f5a38
7305b723207d005e57dbc42683146b2f8d725bd6
'2012-05-25T17:08:41-04:00'
describe
'465309' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBS' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
6f324d67d7bdbfd1c9e0efeedba4f5ea
61c064296d2a2146481efecd0e0fc5bdc66ef8d0
'2012-05-25T17:11:47-04:00'
describe
'500744' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBT' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
5ef4a7697a9cfca295b3abd2c031d523
8d3b76fb633a87701f16c5f0f1e4933b4fda2472
'2012-05-25T17:13:31-04:00'
describe
'498533' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBU' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
634d00f40e7f09c12a2899e36bb5fae2
bd6b0b9013b7e047b2c0dd9a29fe8b0914937375
'2012-05-25T17:04:26-04:00'
describe
'495664' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBV' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
18332483b82ecdec91f5fd89fc300b56
fc9cadaa967e5ba58df1e0f7d226551e2b4682b2
'2012-05-25T17:18:21-04:00'
describe
'490977' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBW' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
be582801e305bafcbdec96acdb9e05fd
6266e18fca33f9509b9d09cd09c894658fc0085b
'2012-05-25T17:09:55-04:00'
describe
'355649' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBX' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
164fe9be6c0b665ac4700f7ecd44edcf
127a5f7ec885c2634055438ff1b9009672e812b0
'2012-05-25T17:17:27-04:00'
describe
'445840' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBY' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
442e1a1b5cf72aadf9278338faab77d4
3884f7e1920b964356695ab0cf97b79772dcfca2
'2012-05-25T17:04:33-04:00'
describe
'498426' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFBZ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
359c7827b47bb98d2af2f85f7a5aac02
5190148e6f74101c1dc51aa51b2a2aeb3a6abf07
'2012-05-25T17:10:47-04:00'
describe
'490819' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCA' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
fa065d16529228153ecf73e870e0b05f
8aa671971aabfed8c555c7da26be39d34a0cdeed
'2012-05-25T17:11:10-04:00'
describe
'473759' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCB' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
d1fe2a987a37609d5af1e8692adf94d3
4e7e104b86da301dd64806b2254686b42aeadca2
describe
'494009' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCC' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
2f7012731a4b87dd2dec3beb1f143aa9
359ebea18752430bde0b7e9b889067ed06f19ee6
'2012-05-25T17:13:27-04:00'
describe
'518518' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCD' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
a50519adda3207c7732c2e0b23bc174a
1b46b3c52fcdfac8a86c06535972ae395ca3e7c3
'2012-05-25T17:06:26-04:00'
describe
'494580' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCE' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
9adc2e13338b2b1c5655849266840fab
892741ec03d27925a1b3b0f5c7eced745fe0c234
'2012-05-25T17:10:59-04:00'
describe
'486858' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCF' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
b9a3a84a1d38dc64b32d82d15f57d03e
a11b48d79d1ecf9320d0f36bd7f4ea33a85002a9
'2012-05-25T17:15:10-04:00'
describe
'484649' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCG' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
6a797a754a8e5e399c616f7529fad36c
95024a7c0c3c26f0b2781a0cd0bd87464a7fa4f1
'2012-05-25T17:18:29-04:00'
describe
'497166' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCH' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
5ae3601eb231a68e8e3d74e5c9287f50
8aff3ecd7b380afeb330cd553007dca4b0f7bacc
describe
'494533' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCI' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
7703e91e298359560ef1b9b32cc42397
4abb3019666d7a268822ed76a693276410ce6208
'2012-05-25T17:14:42-04:00'
describe
'506421' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCJ' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
b14e5a8af135e3e958d31fadda15434d
d8da122c2d05c4a83d5a74eec7ae4b2cc2a0490c
'2012-05-25T17:10:11-04:00'
describe
'467569' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCK' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
36b91ffa686434b300ef9d43255bc326
32e97e4cb232a65776a6faa5deb075b43c50dc73
describe
'493671' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCL' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
6eb6717275670cb338696e8b1ea8d75a
9c8e5e43be2b697050b6d240f33a8fbf2b8c8f7e
describe
'481168' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCM' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
00cacc097e30ef992b4bfd82256cf289
0adeab3bdaa63cc96d7a7f6cff227fec693ccd29
describe
'507371' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCN' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
266b138f1e5753a5f938421384374e50
e8aab6f483cfb8ca10962a34ae29607e60cb2a87
'2012-05-25T17:15:12-04:00'
describe
'498008' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCO' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
062a874794588b65aab820db91dda7e7
612473746b18e972bd1a83b519332fc027c4b54e
'2012-05-25T17:12:46-04:00'
describe
'497904' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCP' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
2579726f9e6e6615d4859da13c150cfc
11f4557f197b4521a27ffe1d86100a0b7c10bcfd
'2012-05-25T17:15:37-04:00'
describe
'467894' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCQ' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
585899bfb8a79181e6b0d7aa08159686
847bc6b8ef165318d6371406a7032e2327e54ede
'2012-05-25T17:06:47-04:00'
describe
'508693' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCR' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
8acdf1981c5bbe9e4eb44773710c7b70
842a51a2f7642c510011269b5c292cb3e83ed8b7
describe
'533824' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCS' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
2aa8bdbcfbaf3b21b952120f7eb8a16a
48b7208fe240a897e3a469de42e635a796a1878a
describe
'482824' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCT' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
662d27613ffea079afc5317dcf4a7b18
97759042c811c4658b59541bf4bfe83978774e9a
describe
'522545' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCU' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
482b4b0567841445a9f466e25e514453
fb75a1b344ddc1cdf3acd18114a4d78ccb4f23d6
'2012-05-25T17:15:26-04:00'
describe
'593514' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCV' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
e6b81949f8f796ddef8b57ab89ef478b
9996b49e29f17c5a0cf6d817c6a3831510fea651
'2012-05-25T17:12:18-04:00'
describe
'510654' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCW' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
4324d3e3e841b4a991013508a90e500e
b1ba27f4d944147dd60d1aea11f682fd6bb4dd51
'2012-05-25T17:10:08-04:00'
describe
'500968' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCX' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
03d24e5af0a90a15bf67589bc1443fa2
16f910e59c1c299de606746e19ea6ce3027d1521
describe
'499921' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCY' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
2b5dd1655ca5120fc86405f2c9acad8a
91bebbb248373febb0bff1630c7f6d89c3306cb5
'2012-05-25T17:15:05-04:00'
describe
'504214' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFCZ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
239779f94698e6fcee5dcf889f5e6e8a
d3658a0c3cd38433ed94d00ff827564377b2759e
describe
'521535' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDA' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
2f8f340f342023b05afb54ce5be89e0a
d4c8ed395eda583763702486e7eb87566905a801
'2012-05-25T17:12:55-04:00'
describe
'490334' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDB' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
c8c689d4f4517b47b9d0853287a21f48
f45f71c463072b78392770820f64cc2b11a05581
'2012-05-25T17:17:30-04:00'
describe
'499567' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDC' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
66a231c7c39dcc1caddf1d61922de16f
54e53d80558163e079d7b6dfb852b62687710075
'2012-05-25T17:18:07-04:00'
describe
'504336' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDD' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
518ac52a8af8e68aa317682222d90734
e94c68e90443775b5466495d32e30912c2566af4
'2012-05-25T17:16:44-04:00'
describe
'494109' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDE' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
b34dc8267590c38f93f04e77440f533d
623c987ed7fbc286fd43901c6fe6ff6983ed1562
'2012-05-25T17:11:45-04:00'
describe
'318372' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDF' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
47656ff9299a215c009e7606c650adcc
c60bc4b3b52c6673f0306704f59fce6e73b5d89e
'2012-05-25T17:06:06-04:00'
describe
'442099' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDG' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
bc51488e70b4205e23f8a5afaddfde3e
f1bce27c63942a946d995f38c686e7b9e3f2673a
describe
'463226' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDH' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
10311a853168e6d4ab5021997c0b23f6
7086baa69c51628d60543972b1414d9e23c107a0
'2012-05-25T17:13:56-04:00'
describe
'473254' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDI' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
837889a45b629ca708c8a787209c37e7
ffc0f6d0dbe4d3e2d27c2683c1036a38199e4304
describe
'472558' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDJ' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
3fe7b2b08b49663d62974e1033010c1c
ea04ad3d5e689fa69f5c087e6698161d2e4b8079
'2012-05-25T17:05:05-04:00'
describe
'496041' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDK' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
66643d1426624a1ca5e6f1d934594909
14fb4609ceb1556fcfad7a069b8485e41767a367
describe
'515798' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDL' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
287db4ee4dfffcae6959c6dbcc33578e
3cf96027dc4b521debea3361c7fcce133a2e1d78
describe
'485581' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDM' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
38c88a58f5a510257c48c8ba957ae6ae
c74938c2ba3c50f9d1b4faed014687a326e5c73b
'2012-05-25T17:13:32-04:00'
describe
'480729' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDN' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
c145cae60e343b58056217e2105242fb
a93dff33f6e43c637efa0091c005501a967fa3ac
'2012-05-25T17:10:55-04:00'
describe
'507438' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDO' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
783ac25411a206d312687167d2488283
656a5c95f63db5330fcccc2b7803db9de3a8c3af
'2012-05-25T17:09:03-04:00'
describe
'509079' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDP' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
e0e49dc900954bb7ba5cfe2b5b38e738
766e9ccb4b88f5e473c14132a5699faae6037d0e
'2012-05-25T17:15:54-04:00'
describe
'495838' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDQ' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
ce6786444b54faf10f712d98a5b21ee0
9dcd4a63ab600c31c5023839a846c04625266a3e
'2012-05-25T17:08:44-04:00'
describe
'483620' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDR' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
93ef46c1b82eccfeb557eff278e88dc5
b117305b1483d8330e4bbaea7e9e9ad3d0335d61
'2012-05-25T17:14:17-04:00'
describe
'499819' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDS' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
7182e8e918804d1c3b0cb84e8266e9a9
cfdf2e0561b489a1da4d988670a6199acb6cb0e2
'2012-05-25T17:10:19-04:00'
describe
'492088' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDT' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
4d4ad993222bdd13e92c1508a002a620
db4ae24ac1b2ff423b6a29aef5dd7085673f2400
'2012-05-25T17:14:26-04:00'
describe
'479216' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDU' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
93ab22cf5a85528f58e77b45ae300a7c
2a66ef9c96ae5ef21852141c06a5f8825c43f488
'2012-05-25T17:15:11-04:00'
describe
'480311' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDV' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
8045e5669e5057c60983379137da8765
4e0543464fe129bbca4fd93516a0a7f27c54389d
describe
'431523' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDW' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
6c0dc35b89ea9a518a844be8bfdb67e1
38e463737a64bbba38d423b66ef639670e768af2
'2012-05-25T17:18:22-04:00'
describe
'504799' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDX' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
4dfbde79b8239839898315e57c4b6d90
bdd8f1ac6216b0125dd26cd9474a6c62aa0a03e3
'2012-05-25T17:09:41-04:00'
describe
'489216' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDY' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
f31cf62138373d20cdfe62c7fbff2e1b
625ad62baf8e83f5690aecb48265eef5713edfb5
'2012-05-25T17:10:12-04:00'
describe
'493021' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFDZ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
6d6c658b9748591cebc3664953a2a91d
cd36b74088d3bd931f1269482760012f978c0283
describe
'461211' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEA' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
0ebb45f96b188855f3ae90de37d7505c
97b1dd31bcbbd605259c482df5b369e24abd4fe2
'2012-05-25T17:10:28-04:00'
describe
'458920' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEB' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
39cb0c60823d74b460aec64d1bf35781
d7ec2806073b8d95ea497cd3bb1571993d3348d5
'2012-05-25T17:08:59-04:00'
describe
'470500' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEC' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
01a16a9705d9b32f18e661d09c540ccb
78b2acad2a11c7029a34e25b3919130f8b2b49be
'2012-05-25T17:05:11-04:00'
describe
'497147' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFED' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
2515686eb063547c0bc63a46882128b4
fbfae7ec491f2f514b3c83093f6858ef60d1b1f2
describe
'528925' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEE' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
7ac3b93d252773d0550e7b8a9362d1f5
aa480b66068413cab721db3859873a24f58aee7e
'2012-05-25T17:09:31-04:00'
describe
'472735' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEF' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
0d76018e8a8abf9aad42a1e644ef5767
63e414329469cdf3b88acf41ca2746a9d0c36e86
'2012-05-25T17:11:41-04:00'
describe
'495839' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEG' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
e64be6312adc65db70c96aea29407d1e
500f35b23951cd9d6d0feccb343597d22737bd7e
describe
'497348' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEH' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
bd2e3654ecd9c85fac5a9fe78125ba8b
d4a1fd750fd2547d192685dcd0ed57706d78d731
'2012-05-25T17:04:21-04:00'
describe
'490179' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEI' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
feef3cdfa02c62ea281344a57ab63106
e41d74a237588f882404c9fac32b3f6505c72d0d
describe
'467757' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEJ' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
9d5fbb00d600a18258c50596d78c49e8
091c65aab9b0bcda47682bec4bdbf8c8b1929846
'2012-05-25T17:15:56-04:00'
describe
'515265' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEK' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
835d5ac716d43af5b89547d9fdd8e681
2927484e2d769d2a78a37ddfdd69ce1cfe3ff7f6
'2012-05-25T17:03:52-04:00'
describe
'530351' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEL' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
92685a9386da47aeeccd9d51664924cb
75b45c7d69fff2f4025f3f8e5353f5ea206d4260
'2012-05-25T17:12:49-04:00'
describe
'489554' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEM' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
977f8f08ed847900820f841e6aaaf031
15ceb620163063e3d90409f16f36c36f0c030e51
'2012-05-25T17:16:49-04:00'
describe
'513413' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEN' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
14d7fa210ef6819ebbffd77170b9620e
9f076e761cc0e9d86a0379c7bd4f8d4a617c38a0
'2012-05-25T17:15:45-04:00'
describe
'489248' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEO' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
41a60840524c4fc80d3840ff2684c113
9d8db9d60a08e42e2f780cfc757659c60b41cc37
describe
'484002' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEP' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
cc188349e5fb58cfee661b5db206c5aa
d0242fd0d7ffc0f3421a40d18e6f39bda3189ee5
'2012-05-25T17:03:55-04:00'
describe
'495300' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEQ' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
d3bd500b77df50ecb0d5650f58f50f19
fe8270291d3e3d10898bb39db3e8ea5ea4075615
'2012-05-25T17:04:06-04:00'
describe
'488930' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFER' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
a0d724137e8871f4c11305ebcbd4fa02
4edf262fafa76cbd078375dd46af95380abab5be
'2012-05-25T17:13:11-04:00'
describe
'510903' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFES' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
7de934342dd6956b5fe10a51ed9df574
e1985a92aab7cd2a7eb7e470431506d0adfb6308
'2012-05-25T17:18:32-04:00'
describe
'513319' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFET' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
ffc8bf7f5a036aab70a00f304c2f972a
0831efa8c290509bf06ae54acb27527147caac03
'2012-05-25T17:07:15-04:00'
describe
'496815' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEU' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
0cf909df16bf352306f34dc8d9518ef9
6355818524ade98e3f074085242b1a96877557de
describe
'501950' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEV' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
3dfa4a04cdf198d2ea32473567717c0c
b64b87ab023db718537d10eb2fd0ff0d619f3bf3
'2012-05-25T17:13:45-04:00'
describe
'470799' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEW' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
b85e8e05d3e9cc58e0b8c2b9e243ef78
17169ca6afd064a1c5e44619ec279b92baee185c
'2012-05-25T17:15:19-04:00'
describe
'480885' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEX' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
4566af43467448954b365053a942a8bb
cf0b9c67ae7ab53331fb26393e29ec8e8cc3feaa
'2012-05-25T17:18:10-04:00'
describe
'479672' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEY' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
5e93a72fbb7293ef7b61d756e712d829
fd1b572672acceb82accd9f069f42980491256b7
'2012-05-25T17:09:27-04:00'
describe
'493152' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFEZ' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
8bc40432576971a4266b420ec28f1ac4
fa04a44137dd0207d38c98e55506b3a62c8a535f
'2012-05-25T17:14:22-04:00'
describe
'378114' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFA' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
94fa1fd63aa5f13ad1c77c55da4b973d
9a142e07279a74d7d2329517718e5f173c7ff835
describe
'272426' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFB' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
d862047754649c28d34f0d91130a1e7a
7284e322b519a077ab527ee968a73f1ec7a80dd9
'2012-05-25T17:08:43-04:00'
describe
'261561' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFC' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
5e7a5352e2fd8a117ced4aa36c623c32
54a0a837144f7cb746bc4915026101415d22828e
'2012-05-25T17:04:02-04:00'
describe
'430724' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFD' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
df8e528dd25f8f625b78308b3e8b92f0
7b5bf15c5a1acec2f681674b423b15dde1a43f29
describe
'500413' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFE' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
6f865bcb191620d555d1ad6a4071b39e
9cc621b34d4557a98546cc18a01fce63a9b04c65
'2012-05-25T17:17:44-04:00'
describe
'499922' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFF' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
de9a3079f1152615c85ffcf041089080
a3c304a35546d74d7678ce426f8e89a473098f01
'2012-05-25T17:17:10-04:00'
describe
'508046' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFG' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
f2b2ffacf8712adeb5df3696174f0043
c1cb08f05d032c440e3704797fa4a1aaf5e43c46
'2012-05-25T17:08:13-04:00'
describe
'498158' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFH' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
5c7e1c96de67420ab8dd594efa0e605e
a2435d14afad540deec776aa2182189b6b6d33b2
'2012-05-25T17:11:34-04:00'
describe
'463105' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFI' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
d6595aa52395163bb4089611162af3ae
816d8e4a1b93a5b2a226a34130909a6f748a2777
'2012-05-25T17:16:48-04:00'
describe
'485816' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFJ' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
81fa1ed03d4466a7ce9382f3ab0bce1a
066db8887128c1b19c07609963fd0d0627fe99c3
'2012-05-25T17:15:34-04:00'
describe
'508039' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFK' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
cd548756c12f8a861ab8d5908752d978
dd91c8d7baee67d1474b12bd9a070ac932febeeb
'2012-05-25T17:07:19-04:00'
describe
'488043' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFL' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
6da04efd47af47f35e66940216252237
d4dc36569c406732ca30e8c4f7ca98bc75ddb738
'2012-05-25T17:16:56-04:00'
describe
'322914' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFM' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
0a29b06131dca5bcc5fa8dc3d6f41c7f
d13e4da9bd683364ec0929be5e2479f807fa69e0
describe
'400562' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFN' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
b707100850a812155693b37c86439ea9
afdba7d481354d785329199a06f6528fc1c80d0d
'2012-05-25T17:07:56-04:00'
describe
'470516' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFO' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
bea8bc0f34079f48984376b13cc847c3
629d2c59657fbbee3df04a55dc44e08d61327879
'2012-05-25T17:13:30-04:00'
describe
'497228' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFP' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
322cc00b5041a65109b5e37acabaa380
a7f52806967ef45f7986c3101ff7d64c6bdcd4cb
'2012-05-25T17:15:38-04:00'
describe
'496839' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFQ' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
98fc204526037e8046bc0f3ddab8f6eb
b77955a2990070e98b4385173cbeb8f830d04c05
'2012-05-25T17:12:20-04:00'
describe
'487789' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFR' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
27f2d7f140c20f249f91bcaea94d1418
e968689cc05234b0cb1c755fa6e812a3d3f9f40d
'2012-05-25T17:04:39-04:00'
describe
'468397' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFS' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
d8f7fddca14e0d9aa9af2546f66f0386
f086094a949a1c84217ae6b84e77934e69f4de66
'2012-05-25T17:03:59-04:00'
describe
'431263' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFT' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
cc2603c7c43679fb727b0e333259446a
641dbefd16e4ba74c94b56af6c4cfc8abb4c4c1d
'2012-05-25T17:12:21-04:00'
describe
'461187' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFU' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
94a56735b6f6a90c407d1591ad9dfc6a
f0b5115c49897b4a4595d65b1c18b511355f055f
'2012-05-25T17:03:45-04:00'
describe
'456350' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFV' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
0476eeecb789f2f0c00c5c7cd8372c55
26ee0b7cdcd725fbca5473227aa44cc950595254
describe
'436961' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFW' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
46534f1930474ec8af2445aef1bd1daa
14f700bcde53f61c61a82c64e864ff351d066e40
'2012-05-25T17:11:05-04:00'
describe
'515498' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFX' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
8afc53ef45809bac4cdefa6b3b119d6a
992000adb72717e5a4506c7e26ac55f1671285f5
describe
'516726' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFY' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
b667b5f04c2159a368e0d2786fb4abae
2b634dc316303acf3dee2ac9b8915ac7ec897695
'2012-05-25T17:16:06-04:00'
describe
'502234' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFFZ' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
c135aed2c8c23799d6c190362c1be07a
927eeabb22b546bd7c8cdf2cb816d8019c3ad833
'2012-05-25T17:08:40-04:00'
describe
'476792' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGA' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
642c6981bd9464b0763c2af995e95f54
1f9bc36d6641a261f1ea4b64faaa034196b511a3
'2012-05-25T17:04:43-04:00'
describe
'499792' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGB' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
d23ac0d63806cbbb21d049ab849e8e76
ee081150be6d30191b833bca263c9f3c5d18e258
'2012-05-25T17:06:07-04:00'
describe
'485493' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGC' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
c4ef5c2b85ca3212f4ddc98cd4f0c9b4
2abb0de696113854f1b7e69bd4b83751d7fb5ee2
describe
'491311' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGD' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
d4f866f1104fbb9ae07f97274881b7d1
32e944eac348aa436103fb9b98b1629fab5f77d3
'2012-05-25T17:05:49-04:00'
describe
'515859' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGE' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
b5161919d77c009a1c4801ad2c0c7e2b
552878f6e3e402a09ac244a550989b5f623d7b78
'2012-05-25T17:07:35-04:00'
describe
'501227' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGF' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
540493b899ddda9b49fd0cba8ae90e8e
a26ded57fe8649f3752706070c117bab8d5f98ec
'2012-05-25T17:17:36-04:00'
describe
'510209' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGG' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
984aa109037a7e7ad49ce8774f2287aa
1e533e3b353f61a3d928979a8ad376ea3453ca26
'2012-05-25T17:11:06-04:00'
describe
'474873' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGH' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
2c9b65a889f0cd5b4d4fe2507fbdfd0c
0fb804d7d9f7e2fd108cc86ca7103e7b554be8ad
'2012-05-25T17:07:17-04:00'
describe
'506720' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGI' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
3859a2bbbe6985ea55483fe01ed10be0
f3ff7d051727cfb370108df15f692b7ff3c2bf06
'2012-05-25T17:09:53-04:00'
describe
'506333' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGJ' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
1e69b0924f16f798ff0bb0abe0318336
656cf25a3b344170b34fc22a578fdab9b85c1e00
'2012-05-25T17:06:44-04:00'
describe
'493799' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGK' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
11f50feb8b4b1b251a3c2054f2ea48d8
937e6298fe603be0ab4b7af9f033b43e1da5eeae
'2012-05-25T17:08:31-04:00'
describe
'454418' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGL' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
9693ea8fccef254b30481a46b5f7106d
010bf7452031c3bf8fa4878db8641b4e2274cac1
'2012-05-25T17:16:00-04:00'
describe
'424902' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGM' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
52a8d9da8c370468737a5516edff1281
af4ea7547a7375a8b421bd3d4f7a98ed641041d3
'2012-05-25T17:17:50-04:00'
describe
'473645' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGN' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
d1f5a8c701769aa06fbeeb4c25441920
6a71e7e2600cb943878516a7fa4e933cb0a75367
'2012-05-25T17:14:15-04:00'
describe
'480096' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGO' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
1d454f54b9df3a4f41b62abcb1dc9c31
bca11839e7e8310c70243f99a660d6f6e15a4232
'2012-05-25T17:15:02-04:00'
describe
'461906' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGP' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
e8250450cba34039ab7432312c57e5a1
7ea0c353646684adffc6d5335a69c66a12cb5925
'2012-05-25T17:09:05-04:00'
describe
'472625' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGQ' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
e3ed709319ec9a592202631dd98c4e16
fde128ba3ee69a2b26b54ed4abe7f91d2fd9e19f
'2012-05-25T17:09:23-04:00'
describe
'517465' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGR' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
6d309ccd423ad2a6684bb14f1b54430b
65dc803dad1f13ddebafa7192a5f1e535344acef
'2012-05-25T17:12:15-04:00'
describe
'506860' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGS' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
0698f9f5351ef304ea82bf7a15ae0a9d
ddd7f0b6204c2201bd76b4ae55cc4160a4661843
'2012-05-25T17:17:42-04:00'
describe
'493786' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGT' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
4ef26748c9168359896a5432a555d6e7
45dfcf4c0de82e4b1b7d98e76cac7cc56949de04
'2012-05-25T17:10:03-04:00'
describe
'512120' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGU' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
c72b5fecee1e017b83dbd5c8a2556a47
3bec1867707a9770e9f0a7c2f445b0ae300ea30d
'2012-05-25T17:05:19-04:00'
describe
'507192' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGV' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
660e99c0adfbdab01e2be22a43ed208b
280903bf87dd7de37afa067e29d581865fbdf172
describe
'507934' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGW' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
6e0bbe387ec872578bc3b3cda3a6c594
969c7e7a409baca80d939d142b4d16fa8c04fa60
'2012-05-25T17:15:14-04:00'
describe
'491181' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGX' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
aa757607b1f5b0f36b7d8efa9644fa4b
85e091194608ceaadeae4641262b573aeaab826d
'2012-05-25T17:04:13-04:00'
describe
'414832' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGY' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
e2e8b2506dbb03f53648ea2abcf959ae
d7e50752aee5ec247c1cf0bd29b7a1655eaf29b3
describe
'474686' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFGZ' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
b86b4111f05b99c7edb0819017f19d4b
9bd37c4912c37918e38a4c210e3f307b7c9f2e5a
describe
'477234' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHA' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
86395753cd5aafa388eff45448a302a8
1786cb3d1a81304e6a8e003d06e1834fe69ac30a
'2012-05-25T17:03:48-04:00'
describe
'460578' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHB' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
25c9b2e1e89d9745f70d3ffdeedd6540
601a2de8e2bd332f0fa3bfb87067e6d73f0f695b
'2012-05-25T17:04:00-04:00'
describe
'460934' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHC' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
b4643b3798ee2ed91f16bc7d23197553
ae59066ac45e31a516f57c3bd68218f3a5221563
describe
'467248' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHD' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
5c30472132f8742d14d4b34a9de325da
9ee109b50ec285c4b72100f37b14fd6623e58501
'2012-05-25T17:06:20-04:00'
describe
'493444' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHE' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
ba5c102f456b2112013cd3378092ab85
d7603aa1dcfe9f8dd67290c4f086246549782b32
describe
'474085' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHF' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
8f9b663ce7e97abd9acf20a651fe79e7
6932be04eaa9914e86ea5744888233a9e2cab9c2
describe
'493912' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHG' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
c89d6fabfbbd2e4a46c9cb35aa9fda0b
be014563ab76ae5a5e8293d52b6cc1505c0e4bbd
describe
'503648' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHH' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
6bf9a6d926576e3a7c241a81929fb2c8
be5f114d6fa7007580f9f561efc88d2efdb12c92
describe
'444047' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHI' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
cc67638be8a2f51a3d36e26dfb1023d9
af537c3db7b72803115f93434514e0ea675f1d07
'2012-05-25T17:10:01-04:00'
describe
'482444' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHJ' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
0f6d5c8ea69af28eb75e8627641dc2e0
3eeba520b39b30e2ca15c5a47cf79ea5851d30a8
'2012-05-25T17:17:01-04:00'
describe
'461368' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHK' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
a580c0f2e1d67e66fc00d62544f63d92
d9ef4e89bea87431a0534c4f17b08f89271de99b
'2012-05-25T17:06:25-04:00'
describe
'484165' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHL' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
11653626548d8c81a0de35ee396237ff
a9a2fce0cd2d975bc817696c85bd0d7e1f24ef16
'2012-05-25T17:15:52-04:00'
describe
'499140' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHM' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
ca4ab5e6a0d365f1075bddcf366a8d56
47264e321b0e4cae0347a8ab184c4acea907b56b
'2012-05-25T17:18:19-04:00'
describe
'488290' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHN' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
7f117ac039f78c6884d6f270daf1adbe
099d8b690538b3a63f14a968c768c6cc73c2d516
'2012-05-25T17:08:57-04:00'
describe
'432935' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHO' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
3a311c74862a869defa5b214cc662f44
590ed56ce3d14256d55ecd2862e82c507aec2dfa
'2012-05-25T17:17:40-04:00'
describe
'479691' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHP' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
bf2cc721fe376be1b5f04427d67837ca
35d0e5265ef219c064b300bf818912fab3950a72
'2012-05-25T17:04:46-04:00'
describe
'502096' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHQ' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
5512765f9e20e5d8ec408a1380abbcc0
08b7c66e5601f0a638db6944157c84e5d22eb3ab
'2012-05-25T17:15:17-04:00'
describe
'501544' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHR' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
d65358fcbad4bb4abe1bfaa90f440c2c
49a8d17d2d226a3c20e385b3e08d719a8a13d699
'2012-05-25T17:03:47-04:00'
describe
'540333' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHS' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
d11dd0a0a9ccb888d474e827fe740145
69d0497fb7a56d4c3ee216d90cd82ad69a1306a3
'2012-05-25T17:14:01-04:00'
describe
'503153' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHT' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
21a2d0139b6dfd99f0c52b16bafbaf92
6e51149f7a5111d75cf1cc83ccd21e7a0d0c0fd6
'2012-05-25T17:15:36-04:00'
describe
'464136' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHU' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
03ed9ab63fa0ca39f42be02365e8b74c
5aaa3db469f88423689c9c71af5cb563f65164c0
'2012-05-25T17:11:25-04:00'
describe
'490538' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHV' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
8f3de3e25e45c8dddecbb0315d725b99
1d894060f35220491cfc43331074f7186a65fa0d
'2012-05-25T17:14:25-04:00'
describe
'488886' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHW' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
fc3293a5f18a3f3bce1330e4ddc1d673
a73a86895ba672f6c08beabc0c6b8c60115cde03
'2012-05-25T17:06:39-04:00'
describe
'473746' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHX' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
62b335194a2b42a918688f479f8192fe
7d775b9f9ae989107ba96d453cfc0079d3b3d744
'2012-05-25T17:09:58-04:00'
describe
'443779' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHY' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
ad592f14cb58eb7e353d69e5d3810faa
004c01a905dd6ab8efecc28fe8b25ca4fa1a5d79
'2012-05-25T17:05:36-04:00'
describe
'528202' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFHZ' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
814de6d4a759ba8b0c39dbd626f946e7
de6a38d7db551ee1e6cecaf2cf0369e80e5c4b29
'2012-05-25T17:10:13-04:00'
describe
'519294' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIA' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
106fb9ecf972c254f28c1c6527bf8441
7200d1c1a5c586732b6b67189bc863b9d2eea68e
'2012-05-25T17:07:09-04:00'
describe
'464858' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIB' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
bcbc1161366df0821a969bb8a388c9a0
038b4341826dd1e5ac224330d59a4417cd187d3d
describe
'483449' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIC' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
ff5238b5b4fe7328c49c26431cfe8b10
b018dd41af37ff6178a116afabca654c2a6aae00
'2012-05-25T17:05:01-04:00'
describe
'483248' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFID' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
8f7b1dbe156188b9d9b587fca576ff66
39bfcf6e74414908e0c66f19a97a7bc142cee93b
'2012-05-25T17:08:25-04:00'
describe
'432379' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIE' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
6bfcc1d6399243d7d02d77a0f000ff08
7256a2dbfc6b8a7490b0673684198091aa1955c7
'2012-05-25T17:07:49-04:00'
describe
'493623' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIF' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
a1177caabf67b0dc95a291fd0575e0e5
cae99f2d90546505c4c1712fadd75c1f8588c973
'2012-05-25T17:07:28-04:00'
describe
'497748' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIG' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
6bce74904295675ed3baa52adcce3a17
86c75783ceca2fafe03d0f8d1ac716a0e4fc64d9
'2012-05-25T17:08:45-04:00'
describe
'540214' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIH' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
31fa37f498276941c7e4f175f3814341
c8b2fa116c9b284a670ce4b0c02f0b43e2ff072e
describe
'504082' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFII' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
b2c34e8fea7cb89441ae6f7cba014e6d
116798e7e281b17f63c5d4ac6ba1d032b4996192
describe
'631728' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIJ' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
a9bf23b294926387ae64fa0194b9f06d
dda9cf48540f812dede05586d0e70f37cfd25907
describe
'515168' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIK' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
56510a2d52ccec62989b84c1e69693cb
ee0d63b85b9a7e9b4481af7bde7050868378a9fc
'2012-05-25T17:10:30-04:00'
describe
'516037' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIL' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
cef807ec556e6ab7ebb9a7b12f02b33b
b1552fdf8b912b2a45f28f62cdbd394563b1bcb4
'2012-05-25T17:06:12-04:00'
describe
'600316' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIM' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
a76711f4b8db8c74ad4afa469f4613dc
562d5496612599acec384ddff998fcf8efc27133
'2012-05-25T17:05:51-04:00'
describe
'408375' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIN' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
b6841f4fba2e537dca745fcefb33857d
f03b7a6f760588ad3c39df4cf3a42ba08780b6bb
'2012-05-25T17:11:11-04:00'
describe
'475108' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIO' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
8a7d935fbc444e1218664654e2b3dad8
44adadfa35ef1f2267300e3ad0892111e532abeb
'2012-05-25T17:09:14-04:00'
describe
'488014' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIP' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
a1c81e213b9b15be85c0df34ae8492d7
a3f393a14b15dd8a76f91b5c8da3eb8289fbbc94
'2012-05-25T17:07:43-04:00'
describe
'487917' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIQ' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
19f351846efe041f26192f442a55b945
9bcd7697b83ed2474bb32ec6b11078c5d4129ff9
describe
'500959' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIR' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
38231d4b05974ef3728154d94f7ada7a
c18e9e8f9a4647ac79c655dd7b95a0d16dfa22a3
'2012-05-25T17:09:44-04:00'
describe
'490972' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIS' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
e84e7db176111f0b4c597753367a923b
b965c4d9e4153ba58fa7462c6ce85b26e9814290
'2012-05-25T17:10:23-04:00'
describe
'491839' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIT' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
5b375ab81a7b7cddf36745e92c5779cc
d348447a4690592076f9e53d334136d6af145c90
describe
'482089' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIU' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
534488b057db9cb0e125c659e529f9c1
dcb3541ee21498df610d42a01182bbd0d642f277
'2012-05-25T17:12:17-04:00'
describe
'495926' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIV' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
406675a770d9d2f66b6ab5662386d560
7aeddc2ae2fba33b2454117eeddbf4b512655f18
'2012-05-25T17:07:07-04:00'
describe
'492745' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIW' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
f09ade3d9f2be55c794e24a262605f6d
606cc1082c4dcc8b10944536c37aace94620d2a0
describe
'496299' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIX' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
1af3d1cce3e6e7e70352bcbcb57cd8ed
f61b984fc4b54eb6d0e4984e54f145cfcd0eede5
'2012-05-25T17:13:44-04:00'
describe
'518071' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIY' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
a587b21fc02aa4c886da3e83a7df3594
faf380f9a608fa34c04d47dbda5d5894ca44de58
'2012-05-25T17:08:37-04:00'
describe
'515392' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFIZ' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
c0cd662d7e9a6c121589f067db62bf66
cefdc3a36c3da05e91e7c9e5ac75832dbbf1dde5
'2012-05-25T17:16:14-04:00'
describe
'490598' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJA' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
44e6a86ad10362793aec1ea68615ac3c
733be27bd9979c1784da605a520bc58e6d0fa7fc
'2012-05-25T17:11:32-04:00'
describe
'507840' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJB' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
9a12dd6d6141a58ff690d6ef1991d937
48fdc0bee3d6fc4faf9409968607ed834809f4b5
'2012-05-25T17:10:05-04:00'
describe
'491612' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJC' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
8368edcadc37e0c7045f903138a24d2d
a1f9d56f80a25cf28811dbbe7430916433645891
describe
'503216' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJD' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
bd26c961f3131bbe64977db3f9ec314b
c57c4adec8f7265811e9b5fcc20e5e835345dc37
'2012-05-25T17:08:24-04:00'
describe
'461672' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJE' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
8fc20b0d5547e713d7b38426525a4167
a37836267783a2ca021e9c04139a3fc5d5055646
'2012-05-25T17:09:26-04:00'
describe
'483840' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJF' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
df73f9d47dcfbc1a91970ce2d9b16096
b677d433bc6f096113dda59da29234a6a9ea693d
'2012-05-25T17:18:28-04:00'
describe
'472796' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJG' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
621274616c0614b9421b9a9d0f54f431
1014aad0adbb1219afc5b988591a19c637fbf751
describe
'480627' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJH' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
f696f2c1b845e8152cdf4059cb072d66
96f8fc59c2b1612a6613954dc4834cbf5be34b63
describe
'443704' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJI' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
cb99d1be5b64f9e7adabfc1c9d29bb51
92e3f0d6457c0f6c7014041d2e0f5dd40b171421
'2012-05-25T17:08:39-04:00'
describe
'286372' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJJ' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
3a285a111f25c364504609200b0ee4fd
25b84e50f6e4d049c1bf09d624196dbe2efd272b
describe
'257040' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJK' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
dc21924a60cbe62b29ea370b26ec6593
d00d5ccafbf84c634f1fa24d72d7f19769caf4d0
'2012-05-25T17:05:48-04:00'
describe
'545207' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJL' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
467f2800f160f03a12b3edba20a81942
e1a66d4479019f5fc705a5fd0a1bfc7c95b5376b
'2012-05-25T17:14:27-04:00'
describe
'534125' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJM' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
257cca0a7a86966089f331eac670c3ce
26b26883efae01f6cf7c19b1bc2912e609689dca
describe
'490030' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJN' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
964a4f9a5bca0e605aadb846f66a74fe
8d40a1ac31cee382686371d58959c664c86e3a43
'2012-05-25T17:03:54-04:00'
describe
'480048' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJO' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
09a1faeee4735914771358c2030f4445
7a81f1bd86ece1da3725a78a23969de5a80fbed0
'2012-05-25T17:05:10-04:00'
describe
'564783' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJP' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
2c2ad6ff7c9c2a5e59dcc0d4c1f58c55
69244f42f16e6c8ef753f467eda83417822ea052
'2012-05-25T17:12:38-04:00'
describe
'562060' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJQ' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
a601c6c450520d1daa552b3ba9190365
a0ab5420580dca6af9ec5f6630110f948d649dee
'2012-05-25T17:09:38-04:00'
describe
'519239' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJR' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
42b6f353679dc0d00937bf609da5e443
59effe81f60a623bd80d680f03c1c1f3f106eb3a
describe
'522990' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJS' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
ecabf934baf3090239900a1631f815b9
a4dda13524553364645309674cd2d2b81f73393f
'2012-05-25T17:09:11-04:00'
describe
'523923' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJT' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
d9b6dc8d753e3d20b452d5e13ad37d7b
95af5844966c67bf211e4829cf13928885a4c369
'2012-05-25T17:13:57-04:00'
describe
'508513' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJU' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
00cfb5e77d225e7609ab918653b1e468
cc4f757f7979e1b465cb91aae5277b39604698dd
describe
'504926' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJV' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
4e1a82f89809502d2bbba511e0b358d6
78a6d827f1fee1271eba60374d0741913f35b986
'2012-05-25T17:12:09-04:00'
describe
'550016' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJW' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
6758e48e3e750fff6c3643d83823bf20
190d5dbc32b01878218efef32957d963178e1b2a
'2012-05-25T17:16:30-04:00'
describe
'586157' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJX' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
52c61ead88780f2c4da87dc93950cb1f
696f2bcf96cea4860ce15025df04af3af9e3ecb3
'2012-05-25T17:17:08-04:00'
describe
'599326' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJY' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
2a2bb94d73033b9ae2a10fea7a4fe210
fc6e136eaeae0d464ec699c76042f96aae2d37bf
describe
'538127' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFJZ' 'sip-files00282.jpg'
e4d7fc100d32984dd94ec04573070134
149f58496804ca3786d50424c81f9cebf7e97294
describe
'552113' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKA' 'sip-files00283.jpg'
9474af9799930739c01754c1ff4bdae1
c205a7f41b7b373fac4ad8175e9898fb9f3ab283
describe
'566592' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKB' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
2a9fec0a85629ca77ec467ccd5191240
bdff65988b9edbef4df8bd544428aabfe5e9b095
describe
'533286' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKC' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
96ede4ecefe945d81ee284ed365fba34
8508a8b9a8788ca4fba60e618583cb7c142b7155
'2012-05-25T17:06:37-04:00'
describe
'528254' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKD' 'sip-files00288.jpg'
57b8e8ea7a28ae243782d989da40cf5c
9346723aee4b32e8c3f11011653e4181dff012c4
'2012-05-25T17:04:18-04:00'
describe
'547075' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKE' 'sip-files00289.jpg'
01680b6fefa12e6f21384cac7e5f0c16
344e50fefff3c47b713d4406f204926f49a479ec
describe
'543071' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKF' 'sip-files00290.jpg'
18fa1ca4f5e510a3047bf7457fa6627c
247cf4aa89a2605199e212af7a457d83bd866b1b
'2012-05-25T17:17:18-04:00'
describe
'557793' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKG' 'sip-files00291.jpg'
567a9d9fca10e7f9ffa1a37d09415a18
86d4aeaa2565df2948df16b69bc9b4f5861d2f2a
describe
'564255' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKH' 'sip-files00292.jpg'
374a4e3175e5fed5ee7a9a7dcfda4e99
ba8a14d37071b53499f8ba9b359808121775b9b4
'2012-05-25T17:18:44-04:00'
describe
'507916' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKI' 'sip-files00294.jpg'
016073c07f86937427f1103a20ba0e43
ec602b34d460315dd58474f96ed0cf46695d9a94
describe
'524736' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKJ' 'sip-files00295.jpg'
a9a22a3f1ec5293f7d8b92a846b90d2f
703b429a5e02131a917d71e8d352779d33996ae7
describe
'554023' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKK' 'sip-files00299.jpg'
d27be6d23a40d812bcd9c76d191bff82
c6b1b7fdea7a758a579f0899a61a61f41c8ad684
describe
'214078' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKL' 'sip-files00300.jpg'
8f9a2e9c504d2903d47ac3f186d4d3c0
0ffbddf219332d18413b3326697287e37bc28a10
describe
'324864' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKM' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
404ee8e69e2a153b7ec5712be7a192f7
43cf9fb4164fdbba3baf968f5c14799664928de1
'2012-05-25T17:15:50-04:00'
describe
'337172' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKN' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
13bdbc8a0a356269a7dd3007162e5755
69a57cca5cb935adce7047aae5af70c3a02dc891
'2012-05-25T17:17:21-04:00'
describe
'286051' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKO' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
8859e36968a43b8c49f76ebd440459ca
f74902fdc8c04555dfcde668c7b3c6a856cabc9a
'2012-05-25T17:09:00-04:00'
describe
'267026' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKP' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
b619055e75af57838e6047e9ebfe51c2
6df69ba8ab5a2479707727df5457d023a1cd76c0
'2012-05-25T17:18:25-04:00'
describe
'290081' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKQ' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
d233207a7805dd605fbef6434e7a1b92
a811ed1062df03071a4725a053cb5ce1f422f49a
describe
'278905' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKR' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
b1baccd4242c2d9bc547d857e209aff7
c8ca86a503154f6e1331540aefb7e9b21e40ed3d
'2012-05-25T17:13:29-04:00'
describe
'288494' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKS' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
69727e4af234e8a80d3e454aebfe254a
7e813610c9136960de3f2ea147fba81d1f91a46b
'2012-05-25T17:08:17-04:00'
describe
'286118' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKT' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
0d8fceb3c42bbfb2db66e6d52ed69aab
81f79593407c2ca3ccbb5a3c27bfeceab4126468
'2012-05-25T17:12:13-04:00'
describe
'291530' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKU' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
186c41b98e468acdb78954ea0dc1ae8f
cffe7f8f31270bdc8498140a0c889c1322302ab4
'2012-05-25T17:16:37-04:00'
describe
'285316' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKV' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
766dc21e4476d773f3452e26b702b2a5
aa7ab894f1657422f857828b1c403a82ca43d983
describe
'283572' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKW' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
11f0a509d1315de4e957d48d25d24aeb
cc3f2edf79f7d054422d2b108a819ff4b1f10ed0
'2012-05-25T17:07:52-04:00'
describe
'292694' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKX' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
ce0635d8b53385d1476a1a4e1db55582
068df33065f65899061c12bd166803d030e54496
'2012-05-25T17:14:24-04:00'
describe
'288388' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKY' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
006909e5b45d4f30d5e2c35585f4641b
b62d4fa98571b631359d391ba36bc5942d6a6e50
'2012-05-25T17:12:33-04:00'
describe
'294582' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFKZ' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
4b986b711ede40b2759d8bbe24fda44c
1bb04d7b89ecfc58d76e1d795fbd48f4b75aff1b
describe
'275264' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLA' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
73fd827347aa2360f5fa22fde0afde47
4db9f13a96a6b5574efbf81b518fd7a58e866adb
'2012-05-25T17:18:31-04:00'
describe
'291985' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLB' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
ed1e28831ba76c6418f35c4437ca3ddf
2b0bc56d77c7391bcaa03f9f6af6ac54f06e1c8f
'2012-05-25T17:04:41-04:00'
describe
'297014' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLC' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
02d4997c49a8419401f36dc4fe9bcd9c
c936c851deb0c214934a967c5678cf7ceff0c148
'2012-05-25T17:07:22-04:00'
describe
'289215' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLD' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
cffbcb6864e472e834b5947b9023d715
e411ccd11310fb55d27b85ce511a675a37644d8a
'2012-05-25T17:05:13-04:00'
describe
'306208' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLE' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
39f03b63c2cf9d559ee3aa1aa5f7a9c4
491a94d64a7bc6808160ed0afec9cb516a2b500b
'2012-05-25T17:14:46-04:00'
describe
'294724' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLF' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
9c0949a02ed1a5226c1778a0724abf08
2b809d3353bdb1d2afeaf35559dfea1b23afcaa3
describe
'292112' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLG' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
20b279487fbd75d058f93fe8d1bc63b1
3fb828c1d6e76a66ce7eeabad53e8578efe72de5
'2012-05-25T17:11:14-04:00'
describe
'297242' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLH' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
9deb234387226dca29cd8df9d0e257d6
39b28e50b50de3d17901f37024be0e8e0578288f
describe
'283303' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLI' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
29e805d1a34b0d147eaece933df27e93
a5afa2d8e12ddf17eec952342691743986e376a2
'2012-05-25T17:10:26-04:00'
describe
'284272' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLJ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
4094ad6810d3934e9e1b7dfd6a4ecada
9677b3fcf3bcd522f5a4f90c16c7e5c1b207359e
'2012-05-25T17:12:56-04:00'
describe
'288649' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLK' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
a2e0fc5d5290e5a057d956ee02fa5eb4
7bb4ab9e6d057861090fb71da4f2670c60953637
describe
'295360' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLL' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
056a3fd2b6511263c6d58fbcfd9f7d44
d2ce317f93109f721536a1e755f9537ef5a4ab82
'2012-05-25T17:12:02-04:00'
describe
'295297' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLM' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
fc76b567105b9e3f9a189470f9c99dbb
f2e70f44f8f4d601aef3e0390ef8b89b1de2518d
'2012-05-25T17:06:33-04:00'
describe
'298505' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLN' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
1e9caff0e851aaafbd257376fe26aaf1
d1a5bac1d84e72d175576a181f847a172e9ba90e
'2012-05-25T17:07:05-04:00'
describe
'277777' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLO' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
c70a67cb47ff4b08a27b47b03c956041
6f10c992d57141381a3c914c2798ff3acd42d19d
'2012-05-25T17:17:11-04:00'
describe
'290482' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLP' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
1de91988fe1eac9132db29022e70119c
9774d7f1d5a23d61afe4c8915aba70d66a0fa302
'2012-05-25T17:04:37-04:00'
describe
'298954' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLQ' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
7a939ed46d241fa5c3c2c315e684f01f
2fb833ddb2f7ae5e13f7cfdc748e18080b0183a7
describe
'290036' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLR' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
90cee5f7ff08dd62013efc973634246e
86832403208a7ce92a50b36a5d09c8637a69634f
'2012-05-25T17:05:50-04:00'
describe
'290955' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLS' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
443793d94f34987f4af94a7b88b702cf
028a01f572c07ca0ad7c8192a763650e90c028d0
describe
'288592' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLT' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
fdbe3e64036a3a2e4df5fd390e56b183
635dd846142b7b773ac60e3964bb68545e3f6caa
'2012-05-25T17:06:50-04:00'
describe
'289071' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLU' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
498a97c4aaa450c8bfed5b0bd364b136
54fa466aa61eea5f9002de795c1f37cbb1b685d2
describe
'281106' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLV' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
e13de92de373f71ba702dc18bece6d6e
3eb7a2d2b21bbfaacc5512fb04e729b1cf70eaea
'2012-05-25T17:14:11-04:00'
describe
'287311' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLW' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
c1a7902ebad25c7bcf2c513efbd15995
84e8a3ab94952df9b1b0b236ed52cf03b2b56ac7
'2012-05-25T17:12:51-04:00'
describe
'286149' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLX' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
7fe84b75b18d38a86ec75cace686e978
89db292327b217b4d577db3206c1ef4959da51b5
'2012-05-25T17:05:08-04:00'
describe
'284595' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLY' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
27cc72ad2f55a80d8e01df0c3dc4a19d
ffc4921322546517a231ceb2c906857606ef29db
'2012-05-25T17:14:33-04:00'
describe
'285653' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFLZ' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
3da3cb6a3fd5d33b7df87bd805d617ea
1c30c9c22e4d04c1a9f5a9a7e068dce1cec397d6
describe
'290280' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMA' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
60f33f3e9ef5c324fc332e4ce6bfe7fb
cd21da559347e9cb16e239d8833cefa921f6820b
describe
'291279' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMB' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
3df9807042a91977c303d7d429d7d3ee
ad7ba2a8dced675d33667cb02572f1e1da5f96b1
'2012-05-25T17:04:29-04:00'
describe
'297107' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMC' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
b7fdedf52357a2b6da6ac5850a4f8fbc
18ffa6546f204e22a093f00c30cfe685c4b2e749
describe
'280516' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMD' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
7207dd2b8a579e546c29dd876ca35660
80ded24b16e40d30a9e1d5d08f71615eb1e73c38
'2012-05-25T17:04:12-04:00'
describe
'291894' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFME' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
3a0556589f80d2ef566dedbf1e364a50
3ce1b9729ef0714aaf961669777e397dcfb3ed49
describe
'282853' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMF' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
67a6f941744705576c76f2357b42034d
039db16c427d40fd9c7555dd6c71479af570b6dc
'2012-05-25T17:15:51-04:00'
describe
'293620' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMG' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
c20827f435d205b7946ba4a6c444b389
b3259bdde65d344494bfbd67f5668096c1e67b3d
'2012-05-25T17:15:32-04:00'
describe
'291197' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMH' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
372c25495809a2a354e0d8613b06cf69
e8ca62a3838808c7d5f2baf5c818c2aaa0f38c64
'2012-05-25T17:12:07-04:00'
describe
'288778' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMI' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
2344e7ee0cc7bfc31d54077394deea2c
d4d749086483cb78d3db12675446449b36c68aa3
'2012-05-25T17:13:47-04:00'
describe
'292568' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMJ' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
a251f66faf085683b76a6ca33bbb9908
41efc5f2f2a662b0b8fe1ebb98bfb1743cd3208c
'2012-05-25T17:17:35-04:00'
describe
'294373' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMK' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
3d38a70fb94fcfc04d31c2a2f398931f
74cc3e26fde87758727b968a07965e60654a91ba
'2012-05-25T17:10:21-04:00'
describe
'292980' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFML' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
eaadb58e1e26d8625024016f040b4e71
84572541efa2e58242c5a1c125a27f8883843369
'2012-05-25T17:12:16-04:00'
describe
'287586' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMM' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
1986ac8f3b07a0481d91a03c8cd29251
30f8c3a5f7eaed57025024fc95e95114a8b6c5a6
'2012-05-25T17:09:40-04:00'
describe
'297000' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMN' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
e9f13d014365c608c642ce7c6635c3a3
8b8ccb6e0ee4b595fbc306be66ab7ed343b4125d
describe
'298337' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMO' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
27236b8f470cba912f4afcaf5c11b026
e7a0e4f3ec1d2eb3d45a60cf5e4fbc1a19de7502
describe
'297146' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMP' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
efa354ab989aa14e6b9606937e8fedee
29692ce4dcc3cac0754137235bfde42c644d101f
'2012-05-25T17:17:03-04:00'
describe
'291884' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMQ' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
04f21e0eb81ed51ac936f14578c1e639
36c6b4d307533d14c28817a6b5328fc19942dab4
'2012-05-25T17:17:04-04:00'
describe
'278050' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMR' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
a76dac032a4f56ac706214ae2549d04f
5bbfa220a1670e1beacd755d90c60e5985461db5
'2012-05-25T17:13:41-04:00'
describe
'290380' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMS' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
ea1ccb9d46b167ff79d784f8dbe8ca5f
5016dad266a85cb7fd0d0aa2788faf586bb5c809
'2012-05-25T17:11:43-04:00'
describe
'293668' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMT' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
9059074ae4f821a3627750d6b4fa0725
097648be263067eb67db048e0f0f2354b4c5c6a1
'2012-05-25T17:11:09-04:00'
describe
'291093' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMU' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
947a7be12192357bd9169715a08376a7
d91835cfa0d5ba7860908a6363aa9c0ae70daa05
'2012-05-25T17:07:14-04:00'
describe
'297271' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMV' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
02bf31c1fbec71b1e708aad7e21de39d
65aafcbbaf99dba70c32538d73f3919983228545
describe
'298746' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMW' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
15ca1e520de66296432284923ad8679c
0c93688cbb97a4f3da67852a16f80de92a5560c6
describe
'292411' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMX' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
bca24bff1b2ee19caa95af53e37ce54d
6975f91d819b986b7b96b5333c9ddf0232b5d063
'2012-05-25T17:06:13-04:00'
describe
'301980' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMY' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
6460433a7b303650bab734527d3ede8f
6545a0e941d35791129aab4fd8fad48c41c4957d
'2012-05-25T17:18:09-04:00'
describe
'294793' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFMZ' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
07b1f38ccf46c2d4402897ac62b9fae2
a76a3b1cc48a3e2140647e491b1a77032e3f5094
'2012-05-25T17:11:03-04:00'
describe
'290398' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNA' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
e6f3da208f8d723311fbe9600e8d4c23
b6d4111df1ba883d694f6376b1198fe80c6dfa89
describe
'297993' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNB' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
d100c76521b7881188e46725bf42b1a5
1bee7c4765635adaec8712bd3240507be4d595ad
describe
'288562' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNC' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
de6a341bba86faef9eb1bc6361520500
ae4b37826db84cceebaa301a93a786992e870926
describe
'297654' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFND' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
b72bbddb185d9fb2a3b0dae51fcc1fbd
2a0ccce901daeda2d78a5a220be99ef5711ec5a9
describe
'285856' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNE' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
2ad61d9fba97daab0ff8c2372a0dd78a
744cb85bc15d397a1a6cc2913c04da3aa4311d07
'2012-05-25T17:09:12-04:00'
describe
'294990' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNF' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
1f1a9217dcba04fd2e842e51b41578c4
d392a72664887d0cc2cd4e23944e05aa9632d6f4
'2012-05-25T17:14:37-04:00'
describe
'294976' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNG' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
570cd799362e1919418cd8cd755b43e6
f0406dd95c7b763db9cfea99f572c1260de2afc3
describe
'310025' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNH' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
62405c91bec17b76b190c50d9e04a644
a80fc9f73477fc38470f337c70c8e8b7c159fdc7
describe
'300829' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNI' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
fc99b34045b38ce8192c74e13a65577c
5e5b423ed7a58312e3df2e39df9946ff8d29b607
describe
'285557' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNJ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
9b84af3fa6a21800b3e2d5057476ca96
e763f5ad1ab6686c53c20158a49466643c5d1ef7
'2012-05-25T17:10:56-04:00'
describe
'289916' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNK' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
bd6afcf212a2e16969a5be1584ce2301
0bd0e4769f10eadebd238788465c81c04725b2f4
'2012-05-25T17:18:34-04:00'
describe
'285469' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNL' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
1dadf61ca20645d158bca28995a08638
d6a91fd9ae919e1b2d47b57214f7792045b475c9
'2012-05-25T17:14:12-04:00'
describe
'295228' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNM' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
bf7fa527ce28f805585e954cfab001bc
3c8e9ff469b4d7e78c0dbfd01911a2291de30cf5
'2012-05-25T17:10:20-04:00'
describe
'289564' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNN' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
70aff805e330523aa30802c730369e13
e57a3b4833038789ea8e359523f4ca4cb7ba73c1
'2012-05-25T17:17:24-04:00'
describe
'297791' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNO' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
d453629777850ec74c6658770283766e
9b301fc10ae70f5ac700bfab5fdea258b777469b
'2012-05-25T17:07:16-04:00'
describe
'284506' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNP' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
2a650bbde2506217d83723be176c4acb
737a80d39d93d32189ecc4a43a032a5eccc6c362
'2012-05-25T17:18:11-04:00'
describe
'299023' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNQ' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
ec876c19acfde79617aaabfae86851e2
50867a59ca52a1104e9eed55a70eaf0dfbcdebfc
describe
'298530' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNR' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
d3acf3429da6c0bd7f288bf0d5b5b8a4
76c970bf05d4017a5e502defa43270777a689669
'2012-05-25T17:08:02-04:00'
describe
'289788' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNS' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
6db61157260fcb1d7092a42765cb0123
0695a0032bda3b7fb140ff5294573b5f54939f70
'2012-05-25T17:08:28-04:00'
describe
'300588' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNT' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
4e40e115f899f2542dc40e09befda609
ce56642e19cd5b5094a133ee877ca7efdc33d16c
'2012-05-25T17:14:06-04:00'
describe
'298302' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNU' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
abe6d437c468b5f99854cad034fca12a
962fa80a40eae7747f448dde0fa217e3968a45c1
describe
'288906' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNV' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
4cb3e2c237452c4922b9f8f094f01c77
3ff539b2cd5e5aaaeba2d86cad2aa6dda4a4fa72
'2012-05-25T17:09:33-04:00'
describe
'290478' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNW' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
15c293350958b7b221bafeb3877adfbb
14fbeec9fd5e390a13a6cb3daf739b3e636e9eca
'2012-05-25T17:11:22-04:00'
describe
'283206' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNX' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
4873d4f334ad1edfc949ace1367f236d
c51b7b95b09183c6f308c28d09aacc7732fbd39b
describe
'298004' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNY' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
47f4c6f728ba96c795cadf3cff4c19c3
72b777f974f4b7513d489e7da989b57790838b59
'2012-05-25T17:10:33-04:00'
describe
'284479' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFNZ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
1709ed8cc5c9d6ca366fe8eab49b7254
be872b312a338695036da9c756174aca36a29ee2
'2012-05-25T17:11:30-04:00'
describe
'283448' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOA' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
c77252897d605494fbced384bc8101a2
51f14afaff23f46a18c198d4195097524443adb1
describe
'288548' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOB' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
392b38994edd94c725922e9f90d980c1
4a6139ecef8cc2278ce33622a3d52c4c378a5c68
describe
'293592' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOC' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
a2604e5331d7d41756f7a5e45eb6a811
16cd91dd9589a8aaff24f4bf48d2c68a5f0c610d
describe
'287417' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOD' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
66a5440b20e30d7c1bf990550e131933
14aade945df9333d383b570f8e7366d0d7f17d7b
describe
'286054' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOE' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
91248a0199e05fe408746bb6a216b3ff
204f904d18eb8bdcf343867cae281ec2654efd6a
describe
'284500' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOF' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
0cc48de7361cd50cb69476e6380203d5
93d996266145ac61674ff47bc822e8b0f4a06131
'2012-05-25T17:03:42-04:00'
describe
'295225' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOG' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
6a0b02595d89d218d404f8324aa37990
a997fd2751666748ff988966d765f2df854d6323
'2012-05-25T17:05:38-04:00'
describe
'290631' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOH' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
3fc937b156243d257a225e8d6360f8f7
3c84a881b294092ffa7dfc271acd00bdd5de8067
describe
'286328' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOI' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
80c217e68ead0c73bddb83f4f96b8e1f
5b4b695a0907c9153f5de2ff55b58cd5f3365163
describe
'289877' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOJ' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
eaea2d1e2e4380e9c0eac140eb0cd0fb
45d51feffe0238822b9cde377fb25d348648e3b4
describe
'295389' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOK' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
b35a1bcb3f06c01c39cae7528667d2f1
66e3a59523a81657d2bb17fdd635e51572cd743f
'2012-05-25T17:12:08-04:00'
describe
'290501' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOL' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
318f7866953409ce1623ebb8147a7d3c
b9d01761f71fc449bdaf81b400064f819de67a08
describe
'290908' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOM' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
7f102f2d56a30ec9885ab0072f1e2b03
3385f0f1458910050e895641b746b51cdb3c2610
'2012-05-25T17:05:53-04:00'
describe
'280455' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFON' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
b1165a9b00828f257832604d133d17d2
8dd3134ea3319a27e4f1a0568750e55f8c41cba2
'2012-05-25T17:04:31-04:00'
describe
'293024' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOO' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
c04b0be200a7705c992863e523e87931
39edc2841a01b84af60b8a484fcbf63745115f75
describe
'281763' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOP' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
0f48ef709d7ebbef34ea02a21a1f1b2d
d02cc5ea4608b4a38b51750c85ea0ea912c5d956
'2012-05-25T17:09:50-04:00'
describe
'279340' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOQ' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
d940059c171786208df3ccb6b63039e7
6f9a42f84efbef822f36d998160fd0faf6fcbfee
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOR' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
abb3d6be5710f77c0ff984e4a5a8b090
42a33f28ab831c57cfdefd69aa31e61adf5f2fa5
describe
'285972' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOS' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
8ddb96634ecfe00acce433778c645585
c0ba64b4d97e367587f41f21dd24b5f7ccba61b5
'2012-05-25T17:15:57-04:00'
describe
'291927' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOT' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
81a744bc0522a96fa2719394e1fc5970
ecc0ca0f17e394959808ee2f38d3a77cf72f0ff3
'2012-05-25T17:16:41-04:00'
describe
'280870' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOU' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
c031ee16c3b4c8bb790bf52d9969062f
64a532e84d1f51d24d26b7d214005caefbd77520
'2012-05-25T17:06:18-04:00'
describe
'294355' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOV' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
ddd9b55021db4881f56dd373bcec8d4d
4698491191c31c7f30e07e85b2cdd302d8e026bb
'2012-05-25T17:17:45-04:00'
describe
'287799' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOW' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
0ade7bcf0ef5bcdc183459d9d2416e16
d31585a8207bf5cf18d0427c8ec8d27af132faab
'2012-05-25T17:07:45-04:00'
describe
'292971' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOX' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
a6177b2ee123538ca96db3ae68f9ed25
10ebcdb7e1a6504a619133e016fed2acf652ef1f
describe
'292422' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOY' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
5b56a6022401500e09fa7ab24cb3ff27
5d635378cc6304bc8de0793dff3f5f19ab7cc369
'2012-05-25T17:05:24-04:00'
describe
'298523' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFOZ' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
6f1ddffb39c07ae6ea76c2fb72d9ddce
a06de64229720201c002c72e4c64456c426e4bc1
'2012-05-25T17:15:08-04:00'
describe
'288502' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPA' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
5049c44d1ce2cd1dfbbc86696344c1a2
90ee6b1c63fbdb20bfc7fe3918f2f367ccb47695
describe
'296564' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPB' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
76ce1f6f28d6bd73ea4710ba02a1d23c
c337436dea86cca8fa18578151d1b5b52eb3ebe2
describe
'276204' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPC' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
6747302a781f130034686917fb048750
1b27230949d52702901ad77725553e0c34852809
'2012-05-25T17:18:16-04:00'
describe
'284056' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPD' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
6027d412135f52cb22fa0179e30aa213
af7bec4cf4c58a734afc9f0bc415c752728fa73d
describe
'287119' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPE' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
baa07cd655b2669ec2c6b78c0e4d1159
dcf9f73ef34a9bc175fce1490d785202684ab735
describe
'293029' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPF' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
39c55779bb5a120f3b3a97596b97c5e2
21efb45a531002e764b3c7edcf2d8c0ee43763e9
'2012-05-25T17:03:44-04:00'
describe
'291812' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPG' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
cfa9e7f93ddf45f803477f4fc2a0b047
723bbbc211e2a2681e571be010c4cb5ed6cab726
'2012-05-25T17:04:04-04:00'
describe
'276684' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPH' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
8268ca4c5ddcee0003a17988667f4487
d6ac041dc35f925f96b88f624fd166cde428d3ed
describe
'290707' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPI' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
d9496c5c0a7016bf3cc8c651e95de172
9af8b081246a4a384d55a99f98676d75f7a70637
'2012-05-25T17:04:44-04:00'
describe
'290598' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPJ' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
2854df5715cc38ce6e118dcb2af50e03
49aa634129881f61adbcb04f1aa2a570ece7ab82
describe
'286057' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPK' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
133a955d29e6e7396e871ac6d1f1aa24
ebc75b4d05e1ea4e7a5de29cb1a1c441dd0b973a
'2012-05-25T17:16:13-04:00'
describe
'295625' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPL' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
c1ea803ab375b485335755ca58aaf776
3abf1654ff46e6037062b5069b1c2d5e37576e33
'2012-05-25T17:17:57-04:00'
describe
'288238' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPM' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
f0d56cddd0b203f18df17a9f9930da8c
395483bf52a05ac0a46ab538df2ceacc5cd34ce5
'2012-05-25T17:10:50-04:00'
describe
'292395' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPN' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
ea80c06d489aee83e0f54d56f3db71d3
8ed085ebb76b9a4468e761953723093b82876ecf
describe
'295421' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPO' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
8b3f4722e43ffe372a0a0cc128ec3c9b
e906593e97fc31ee431cc6939df75fed501c3a10
describe
'297692' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPP' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
29f0a37db5928ee4a1279bf933fb61e9
2f553a1b62dd052d38a9caaae2ea959a161b6131
'2012-05-25T17:04:24-04:00'
describe
'297267' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPQ' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
4a865d413924aa390eb6d67332114bce
94326129d6bec6120a80d5b5a69ad95483dc090a
'2012-05-25T17:08:46-04:00'
describe
'296235' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPR' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
140b1d7e1434b9885b8a0162bcecc4d8
b6eabd8514d890f24c711b61d8de6f1ce9c8a450
describe
'296665' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPS' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
b24b9c9939191b5e32103802b39e69d4
8c70956bd1f37b2a07b6459e8ed8c2687c9b4342
'2012-05-25T17:14:39-04:00'
describe
'297491' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPT' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
eeddc3daef3e4a8f279d90bd7649465e
18626346eaf4271bb74fa7764138dc320751ea98
'2012-05-25T17:07:21-04:00'
describe
'303929' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPU' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
1cb4e056d82a73562a2953aa4eba3912
cec0f894b1a0de503883d600643db003105cd795
'2012-05-25T17:06:45-04:00'
describe
'294206' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPV' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
ddbf97af653a38d0331f58326abeb3e0
7bc5b969cd07b636a4714565a663acf0ce59dba8
'2012-05-25T17:18:46-04:00'
describe
'299012' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPW' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
350ac3f016f6498c0ef2643b3af62256
3768c4b4a76766911bb03dc8234c6e4a5b56a224
describe
'290149' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPX' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
1842462d3a443fb652ea76afbe18c6bd
326d080f9394d16cc733eb8fa9983913fa135d2a
'2012-05-25T17:18:06-04:00'
describe
'289332' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPY' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
6722877879eadc956ee0d4569b82a520
0e831cbb357f96a513ae5f33f0aa960db63ce20e
'2012-05-25T17:17:41-04:00'
describe
'294594' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFPZ' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
9d58fc1f5d2eceeb3a9ed207598312d6
9873fbd5f0087f0d2adad0660795fe55b51079bd
'2012-05-25T17:08:10-04:00'
describe
'298115' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQA' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
6fa8dc77e4fd06cdde216973861d7fef
efaafd2f16caf57d17832f3918ea15ba95c2721d
describe
'293223' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQB' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
313f936531dc0ddc13e8448172ab42e4
166ffc3240be03a9f8c2f6a809d19cda28c29662
describe
'285214' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQC' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
54696fd970eb413dbe137a49aada168c
63f5ee1f0d6f7117ae7b6f5a2fd14c9cf6f83f2e
describe
'299134' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQD' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
b1cfd5d179b97f4687b43b3b4c8e4bdf
1898ec4be9d987554e31ce5f1666774c37c537cf
'2012-05-25T17:08:07-04:00'
describe
'294468' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQE' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
4797fb2aa57710a375b087b2ea1424a4
c69d88350bbe3130787e2f26c647fcef9a6a79e1
describe
'290853' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQF' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
7c173f4c28cc14b261d61719b33f7e85
c33a6c2382aa98fcd03a8f1afaf1f69c6f6097e2
describe
'288738' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQG' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
e27230144019d56941147e593d316973
cabc86ffecc3f481430d25cd87b6cd047971e340
'2012-05-25T17:04:05-04:00'
describe
'292907' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQH' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
6cd2d86eacf40f29433fbdbf1b61f13c
3e3f0931c91e71e652a5c75daf084ca44885f0fe
'2012-05-25T17:05:17-04:00'
describe
'290239' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQI' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
b6faaf69e24df88dfc5e4fe90ce10e80
330b842cb47190a33e3490756fba2b105367ae06
'2012-05-25T17:08:14-04:00'
describe
'291099' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQJ' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
4e3931275cc5ef3bf225203bf5c7f465
9cd5d4f8f864c9ab76d77c89aa6fef44b31601ed
'2012-05-25T17:11:18-04:00'
describe
'289407' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQK' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
a52c9000210b226b1c9f54c97f0ce749
9a15c8ecc970e24dfb3da9b1c8f39b3ee126008e
describe
'293150' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQL' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
2b6e38e701b36fc42a3675f286fe14d5
42fe9f7e410dd8f4d7ea7fc9d9a719913a9c94c9
'2012-05-25T17:09:36-04:00'
describe
'289335' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQM' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
c9ae2b8b78e18f82ae8cdd643dfab148
4a2256ea5366212a569f89b0eadd6bf4de885d73
describe
'281943' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQN' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
c4d011c5736bbafc9abcbe87a5563ec9
1124878c32626163f26c02c4612db593ba8ee4b9
'2012-05-25T17:10:29-04:00'
describe
'294078' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQO' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
f17ee60666616b75a8eb0be5b54eb2b4
906333131466c0f5307395966dbe35fdf118a7ca
'2012-05-25T17:13:00-04:00'
describe
'296625' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQP' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
1109c18d49d0da8b5ffb62022d82602a
9c3764822981daac280d3171873fe306fc84f0fe
'2012-05-25T17:18:41-04:00'
describe
'285496' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQQ' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
2e6ddc27992b34a04689e786ad91649f
6ed0c844b5ee3be481e896ce2e80710e43601d87
describe
'293824' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQR' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
205ad2be94de099a9bd2226d2b157cb7
a5049220319fd3a3aff888267020f8583bc80aa2
'2012-05-25T17:11:26-04:00'
describe
'293255' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQS' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
a3e15d9cc59369abc37540e78e501020
1ad327bdb9d22140562758b6c3238f93292c904b
'2012-05-25T17:13:07-04:00'
describe
'292101' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQT' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
0aa66858f554783901dc8af6b3cda4c7
90b0bfb3747e9bc6dc73c9906ae36b690c7317fd
'2012-05-25T17:06:23-04:00'
describe
'294635' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQU' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
671c594ce417db8bcdf3643ff5513524
45143548c9b34c65958646cd41cd2490fbb17149
describe
'293149' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQV' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
6a2efbb9ebd5631671f98cac3aa0ce41
f88d9444646c8e043b0b746da618fe9c4e9c58bb
describe
'295334' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQW' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
b425363eb3020ae701de7fce313f7a9f
3e6b931e7b01ded6c6df828714bbb0ea1352bfc3
'2012-05-25T17:06:35-04:00'
describe
'291024' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQX' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
d52250879c630624ce826f96dc1e8a6b
5d38ecc6a93853774b5986d45357bfb0f9a99bbf
describe
'291893' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQY' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
80c117de3fe2c05b81120433a3ffa8b4
1ec3a425b5278a13521ec0c0a4a42895ad653302
'2012-05-25T17:14:52-04:00'
describe
'294856' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFQZ' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
f799e9f1cda8b781591c63b83ca22c0a
5ec0803dcaa8f3bb6d834ddf5533f4a5f8a44145
describe
'292709' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRA' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
f61776202688d0e8415c433dd2f121c1
d5b4ddd5416c079fce51484b51693a04f00342f1
describe
'269627' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRB' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
26d9ad017492579e70eac0408c6180f1
42f1d65f4f4d052ac9843cb41d0e1df17a5a7c6d
describe
'282703' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRC' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
eb938d20aa2d33d6a91a84dc05d684f5
d1e486bc40fc406aa7b69f6f7d64ab2870b339ba
describe
'278616' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRD' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
b14f614caea4072078828d630a3a75cd
42868c6543492a0c1b635b752d045849c7b0a5ac
'2012-05-25T17:16:57-04:00'
describe
'287552' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRE' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
2fee91ecbaa8f983b35936166e177124
f203a565ee20ba0eb3fd7b2baf1dcd521c305753
describe
'289302' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRF' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
406c5712962f2704df4430462eab8956
d854dca0bd14a139ce5db4d713b364703e9e7976
describe
'293673' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRG' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
5015fa2652dbe80b5d7796be9c3bee05
f7813a9e766359b2457519db76cbdae0979846d1
'2012-05-25T17:09:28-04:00'
describe
'284359' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRH' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
3776fbba2a1d243322bb734e5e2ff368
2c547f713634c344ebefadede90fd40423b2301f
describe
'286072' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRI' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
2077f28771a88a0e1c3207f0263ae609
665200ba356c8439710efb65c2bc1163ce2d716e
'2012-05-25T17:13:25-04:00'
describe
'282342' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRJ' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
6989865019aac75eb5285d5ff819a522
5a3a76ef79aeed19377f828b07110e50a1b80648
'2012-05-25T17:08:51-04:00'
describe
'289666' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRK' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
9b29ae1782048c898aa1d90d9435ea89
da6c225fb539538b58dcf4b5b89c968c41deec49
'2012-05-25T17:09:59-04:00'
describe
'280240' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRL' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
2cbc61b15f7079d27cc2abd1bb3a20a0
d10f58380a3cbf0840cf1e958cf00a04654bf897
describe
'289924' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRM' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
d5c82d58cc541862a834fb8e0bcb1336
48100edc604efe3cc59976d02011a7c645b6f40e
describe
'286527' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRN' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
68ac584c068a42e51af533771f4ca3dd
25a361048a8610a9f875310667498247c677fa87
describe
'283721' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRO' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
2a4957b57cdcf49561593054a95b71f4
d1df51bf914b7cc01dd2701b4a8ad8238b57c979
describe
'282426' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRP' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
9e104fbc8c92d0eec98284cc9f40172d
f758e4ebabd652223fdeed5fe3149734013195f3
describe
'289665' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRQ' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
b8ec9a6311d115296a5c7cece742c8f4
53db54052bf7684bb5d251731d498964b3704f96
describe
'292168' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRR' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
3bfd29bb75e0057f2ca0c0a0dc88ee6c
3b35ccb72b0a9203e2a2817d856bceeb3c2f2761
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRS' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
58b27e33a288b2df3039594d92dc5318
d2ed53104e98d6c491f872eda9f024edc1b3f25e
'2012-05-25T17:05:21-04:00'
describe
'280769' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRT' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
36bc23050c13028e3b6f0891f57b4cde
853b60cbdd46bca9202b46492863b68fb4515dc7
'2012-05-25T17:16:01-04:00'
describe
'290993' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRU' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
26da6f66606ba848ca94215f415a22f5
4ceccd339dcb3d9865b5e52df73e041ac0bed5b6
'2012-05-25T17:11:21-04:00'
describe
'286617' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRV' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
4567ff018b8c101f6f623208af9412db
cd8436e79402b9c8cfdfcee4602033de45f3c981
describe
'291384' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRW' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
ca5b1b9a7696a1b8fc076ec40f7aa436
0d390a0ac895ffcae243fc6585be12ee66938472
describe
'293701' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRX' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
d630415ab92a24ef8bf71bcfb61ffa8f
908e71b8c5d937e15fc7643008b8003074d569c9
'2012-05-25T17:17:48-04:00'
describe
'288837' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRY' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
4378b21fab9392041c5e3a172636a4f1
8aeaeb6cde3596f1bd6d033c68163ceb8147b547
describe
'284032' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFRZ' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
1d6650d14a231858e8d734706db92460
d9622f6ca42db3a97dfc61d9a0af94677998f039
'2012-05-25T17:10:10-04:00'
describe
'289221' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSA' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
2e16c52fcfb3ae6f17dd26f03ce393b3
e7caa1767974343d644eb74b9a5024b9dacdee6d
describe
'285313' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSB' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
b46f227c0b911108a81d6fd210e70a1b
188d31f9695517b00c6d2d5811755fef7469644f
'2012-05-25T17:17:37-04:00'
describe
'286851' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSC' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
44dcb1e34d4828ef27de313eb9897ef6
57f6ce9667e926efce55cc4f2a45e05a1cb35fe9
'2012-05-25T17:13:37-04:00'
describe
'293819' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSD' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
e79d27c4c02707ce00ba0664acdb0c30
f4d835689efe93138c3e39686dad5112b7176732
'2012-05-25T17:14:43-04:00'
describe
'283741' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSE' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
a87036fa1776a26686ff83f80368ce52
e991c4174eee0ef434a0e168ccce650029068302
describe
'280780' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSF' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
146e8c3d0b6ffd4503f02d2a5ad44a7a
80eaa7d7ebd90c513353ffb24bf823d1f27dca94
'2012-05-25T17:11:48-04:00'
describe
'284954' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSG' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
ac2c2b09f2ebe633b0872e0fa0b19508
a38a1566a6544d822dfc047ed10d58da8f381686
'2012-05-25T17:08:03-04:00'
describe
'286083' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSH' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
2ba75a224078ada6608b2374a9c73674
029d6c2e7b9d05c00e053b41ba61c10c0ffd2b91
'2012-05-25T17:11:40-04:00'
describe
'274759' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSI' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
00e0c7379cf0c4e706f771ecd01d7359
3e8a908700166f07c47ef75b841eb556005fca56
describe
'289570' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSJ' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
869d8677695f5f76a6ce8542f8c49702
8e7416f84798b40ea4e1b65a8a3009aaa7fe394a
describe
'288498' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSK' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
07e7b61adbc7a218df3350f203ab24e5
a3837ff3b382dc90871c9bcd879d8c39c86a39da
describe
'286553' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSL' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
2eae945601012b5ea08b6c98ad1fe50d
a40f939e342aa471ec5597b80f8b8928535f35b2
'2012-05-25T17:06:55-04:00'
describe
'281098' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSM' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
837c04e1699167730cf89e4e4b2c5e8c
266a4f3a3e754b67dfc33ac25bafe66d452cde09
'2012-05-25T17:05:23-04:00'
describe
'283954' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSN' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
91eac6d2cd2e9d9e9f8885cd18088544
0ba4649151ac7f8d02d3b24222b281aee88c15a9
describe
'287622' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSO' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
9a1cc16a8b07ed3c9ab6f135bdfc3e83
e9108c1a721e31996731b0b085c6241968741d93
'2012-05-25T17:05:46-04:00'
describe
'292160' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSP' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
95433d2854598c4e243c974082646b6a
5c125855e5b76dfc689f7dae11d3225b3ff7fe96
describe
'283475' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSQ' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
fad04667cfd81814501f471a467973b3
e403178d6b03328a9a619510574fcc906d695b54
'2012-05-25T17:03:57-04:00'
describe
'284181' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSR' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
433f8c2b5b52b97127fda4085ec4e1b9
d97463b61516410a45d593f149f95d8656d33d76
describe
'290913' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSS' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
d4ae4c700d16dc3ec34a9065d756be58
1e25ff1ccded7f53d873834bed6201d183ad97ac
describe
'289857' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFST' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
3e05513b0269b59f1d01bf19e62d4662
94530c7c80fba6b645b47cd8b62691050dacd97f
'2012-05-25T17:10:57-04:00'
describe
'284948' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSU' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
371c7352cfc4e8fa37938b6dce89d45a
7e4553944281ee516ef10c139a1381db582267b7
'2012-05-25T17:13:18-04:00'
describe
'289538' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSV' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
8866dc59822dd316c9cbb4652dc5673b
dc2bce53c175e803fcc6cb74b1e4fcc7766a52f4
describe
'276326' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSW' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
6c8b4a056623e49e2fb22145925377e6
ddd0900a08dd6e3d1ed96dc6b5a7ac9f7ab37199
'2012-05-25T17:14:45-04:00'
describe
'287803' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSX' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
58bc6b6177390093dd1cb83ed6a7e195
d3fadc880d69460d3dcda4818ab75f185ea78f21
describe
'284153' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSY' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
41022ef60547ce5814ac61d225da7169
a203bea8c03b860b3c6af12b73cc5e0ade10e37a
'2012-05-25T17:16:12-04:00'
describe
'292698' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFSZ' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
36e42e7d242dbc299670096b4a4bcf79
3c644c6da387b88e13e9bfe4dc7764f6eed7abf0
describe
'297113' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTA' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
28a29a42b732a2feb4ef88806eb1e064
a8e611942ec261a7362b7667a7d7568d452d57b2
'2012-05-25T17:18:13-04:00'
describe
'295234' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTB' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
cffb279841f7592e73760fc6053eb251
14f21f2648e31e4b0d9b5d7a326bad260130d3d6
'2012-05-25T17:13:08-04:00'
describe
'295223' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTC' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
1df430e8325d22b050f0503fd90a1779
6fb39f4f7848ae0f764623e85234caef63247798
describe
'275711' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTD' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
3bec60eca4730f2a3170454cdb113d84
e90537a488159e3031cdb1f976a20f3804da2f39
describe
'287263' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTE' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
e1059ce3895d584249260cd05a002bcd
c01af017b3497d39ee3812c4ce614b545ce55309
'2012-05-25T17:11:02-04:00'
describe
'279051' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTF' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
791b769303caa548191f3f3c68094372
04fe9c65fa6993c6ee9b47a16e97521a9e0d5a64
describe
'292777' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTG' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
171128fd9ff54cec42f2c1696728b79d
017869ce011b3ecbd20b106317657d503c9abdd8
'2012-05-25T17:12:36-04:00'
describe
'288102' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTH' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
eac085a17cdb65bff46fe5915cd0e5e3
2443657136412b9b617478bc59b1a5ab32248ea0
'2012-05-25T17:09:35-04:00'
describe
'288150' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTI' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
357c21f9a59b55a2a73c804d1d3b4f02
8d9c9d8b06b243a2893e923af82fd3db4c38dd73
'2012-05-25T17:18:14-04:00'
describe
'278933' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTJ' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
5d5ce2cb3079d3d0b17f3749aa50e86c
b24a78befd4adb404dff2f2279eb276a0acb6a34
describe
'292317' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTK' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
545704cd9bc7c5d062e9fc7a7cee4913
169c9c2cdddc650ebc559e3683b72194ff569fac
'2012-05-25T17:17:28-04:00'
describe
'286259' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTL' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
edb2991a7abacdc0bf14d242c205a80e
9efbf9350a9defdad88cd78135b432c0514964a4
describe
'291869' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTM' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
2468b732d76a3c2a8eb67466618c5e18
3ba30cfa10527a3de911afc4cfc6f06b549f281c
describe
'275649' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTN' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
399d7d9f8f7c4789f7d47ea150a65a65
68fe3158cb90cb3229dd9e1df4faef4358817981
'2012-05-25T17:15:03-04:00'
describe
'287390' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTO' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
67b48a861ee2e6c2e9d080bea9adbcdf
8cde2ab75608e6f4177de31e0b8d5756ec3f53bb
describe
'292966' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTP' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
e3b15a5f7619994b67d81ad57e2aed3b
1b4530e88fd9b32557a4a8abaa8d7684b3997eb2
'2012-05-25T17:11:33-04:00'
describe
'282788' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTQ' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
a758db584448cf27db272fc6dfce1555
453931cbb0d1ba20b08fa8d5c493b75c411a5278
describe
'292196' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTR' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
82d2a34cb7fc3dd0f5d0f6e1738af711
68aed9c44c564e707b07b068804041affe219910
'2012-05-25T17:07:42-04:00'
describe
'289258' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTS' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
3539ec8c068b3b2ed466334156acbf95
556d7c65b63ce96380a91da106f925a5a4753e7b
describe
'281508' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTT' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
3a534d2812f0dd0c12245105c427f67e
81e1b5c46f52b8b6b45266ec2ddf7c68fcab4b76
'2012-05-25T17:12:24-04:00'
describe
'288446' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTU' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
2c12d463e884fd3d970cc6b28276b2b0
77513e706bb8c4a54b5f079d4543ce54ccc5209d
'2012-05-25T17:11:58-04:00'
describe
'293238' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTV' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
3acba4bf8673700eb8e2a07f23a71857
b3ebcd06d34a3cd3b59783e7cf9cf7a94ddfaacc
'2012-05-25T17:18:47-04:00'
describe
'295626' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTW' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
366eab0704b339b2c7bbf8a445dceb25
8327d2d0815d26262d6a5baafe48eb30ed5c944f
'2012-05-25T17:06:38-04:00'
describe
'291219' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTX' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
1d3a1b14c53c4a74518003a855a6d636
3833e1267c4b9397c9f2c00ccca51c83d24468ed
'2012-05-25T17:14:40-04:00'
describe
'294190' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTY' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
35ae66c2d266f059e9b27f031d6a6b95
a22fa077b1cdf7fc24fa98ffc585e68da2ff7af4
describe
'292927' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFTZ' 'sip-files00282.jp2'
70b96af5f4d6b1769411f96cc1169129
cc2fc6af1f628151679d1de53318a8cfdd29fef3
'2012-05-25T17:04:45-04:00'
describe
'297883' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUA' 'sip-files00283.jp2'
5bdf49fde0b5d2acd3a8b2664f48fb8c
4bd89e210dac8b90910ced5ed7090ef7d4742ad4
describe
'291475' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUB' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
6b9268efa9821c21b57ceeffd817e364
92d7468d966df13be753ac99aed8e31155287b03
describe
'292611' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUC' 'sip-files00286.jp2'
00730c33f860e99c80616cff4b6126b8
162feb4b422f51f8acc5e5c51573d0da55ccb15c
describe
'290112' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUD' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
4185d09ede625edf709b1e3d6447566b
df821eb75e3c7fd066160aefd1bfc9fd31de0795
'2012-05-25T17:08:34-04:00'
describe
'291148' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUE' 'sip-files00288.jp2'
d6ca1b11aec8ce5aff27119d8071624f
ab005b6a5d2316429e15d4101c1356e2b801ed54
describe
'288513' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUF' 'sip-files00289.jp2'
da0d0ec76bbb57b2e5f3bec0f66bdf72
99f8b22ba111793980d619565dfe049da5563d54
'2012-05-25T17:09:06-04:00'
describe
'295363' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUG' 'sip-files00290.jp2'
a3fae95dec49257f86cba3408c63915b
185db63835097bf366956d78efcf93de4038b81f
'2012-05-25T17:08:58-04:00'
describe
'286800' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUH' 'sip-files00291.jp2'
68fc5d9e648e290d1ac45a3b07b12ba3
55a0a93e4feecb52ce4e18162cd1e8e3c2977db8
describe
'296860' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUI' 'sip-files00292.jp2'
a39c8a9f245d1b3a22fd1352cd6d9ca4
eee297b08d7e686a2298a59422eef3999158e204
'2012-05-25T17:13:28-04:00'
describe
'289943' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUJ' 'sip-files00293.jp2'
d890e16a076172f86c2f3f5f8e112236
d1341b96b09bf42bbd2644e71d7ea42ad3a9b8d0
'2012-05-25T17:06:09-04:00'
describe
'284620' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUK' 'sip-files00294.jp2'
9f36ba91cd69d40f2f45da8176bb85ad
7ec6f1f31d7d9df6dc69c9e5e7a5126d1ceb806e
'2012-05-25T17:04:52-04:00'
describe
'285845' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUL' 'sip-files00295.jp2'
824078c9a3104c1708f06398251d84b2
99158b750248e5528a3a85a2dbb761d05841f21d
'2012-05-25T17:06:34-04:00'
describe
'340141' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUM' 'sip-files00298.jp2'
d0173e9d3977b711ba64716d3aae776c
e730c5ff1ce5d05d1beddc820902749d29cbba79
describe
'345333' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUN' 'sip-files00299.jp2'
6f66ddd5aa59e0d25dab1f620d11763a
c38c41f713de98ceeb02db756454d7a766f3e36b
describe
'98777' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUO' 'sip-files00300.jp2'
ebf4150d049c2abc24477cae740f337f
dd762afc76f2a37bbd592efd07eace8e17890e02
describe
'7810580' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUP' 'sip-files00001.tif'
066974607dca5e6a8aa6c212d7dab87b
06c464b4391c31043579d02c97d1cb4c8a047e40
describe
'2298188' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUQ' 'sip-files00003.tif'
bac7fdd2f8459e9ebe756a3cacb47d35
f9ef8a27683c3e4b5e6e17ec0048b5d118ef6d91
describe
'6973972' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUR' 'sip-files00006.tif'
b5cbbbe57c99fc7679e1a4ff0725ddbc
b4e8f60f2014dd8bba67a9256886bf2163ef236a
describe
'2241972' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUS' 'sip-files00007.tif'
d7d1f0964ee3a8e9ec407360b785f09d
4e4a0a944530feef66eff908d868fad48aa97a42
'2012-05-25T17:06:31-04:00'
describe
'2316632' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUT' 'sip-files00008.tif'
abe29f9199ffe4b66762b15f3f4c50d7
4d35e1e9fd5aaa9278f6b8114c3c23a0459e9b70
describe
'2300224' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUU' 'sip-files00009.tif'
9115edcb38c10d30e51aa58f2201e514
6ab8bd5f82f4003d0d6fea1e12fce2133873183e
'2012-05-25T17:08:00-04:00'
describe
'2344912' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUV' 'sip-files00010.tif'
3d5b566148ad1c1a458f7e1e3f0e99f2
48f6941309b8a7c45796f2b1df995bc46e646f38
'2012-05-25T17:09:56-04:00'
describe
'2294924' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUW' 'sip-files00011.tif'
c9b0da096afe5e7612de5412a835fc0e
c83b332ef255cc2d7f173ca1b918494cc4b50d0b
describe
'2281948' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUX' 'sip-files00012.tif'
86e42b14e80e8bf945aa756dfccfc4cf
82483bd890a6e288fff167aac028b33e39785f8e
'2012-05-25T17:14:38-04:00'
describe
'2363368' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUY' 'sip-files00013.tif'
3d9bd584e3f21db68d60409e16657d15
ea103b246da11e2b9de2f642a657a202a224566b
describe
'2338904' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFUZ' 'sip-files00014.tif'
9f853de9f0feb489ab5eb59b3492851d
bbeaa2db1dd0c7ec95166376b303948c8f0c86bd
describe
'2354832' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVA' 'sip-files00015.tif'
b7cc31b1a4c37aa14e881b387378e107
03d0dc5bd763c563abe49238f7183db12f239481
describe
'2320396' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVB' 'sip-files00016.tif'
c1addf6088cffc152d1130196b76d18c
871edd9c3e53879a6478979ef727aa2832f8aea9
describe
'2369332' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVC' 'sip-files00017.tif'
22555f97975c7f24635414ad3abd9b90
574c416719a1edfd4e9f520c2409422cf603a295
describe
'2214588' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVD' 'sip-files00018.tif'
588fc71d33cb1b008bd6a93919001e4d
d2c87426f79f3645db261ef8ad9a9a912e1f3497
'2012-05-25T17:14:10-04:00'
describe
'2348268' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVE' 'sip-files00019.tif'
acc9ecefef6d95c9e8c6d5aa1864dfa4
caca7cc2587252611b0d9cfccd05c2f1bad521b5
describe
'2325912' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVF' 'sip-files00021.tif'
6d44ad8be7b11108dbd52517b35a8524
34a7c845b035f90f79332c928609bbb73082c207
'2012-05-25T17:10:18-04:00'
describe
'2461696' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVG' 'sip-files00022.tif'
ee2d7e0599fd8a7946dbc26e5cbf4ab8
9ab115d173836efc4529966f14a1b16012f575a4
describe
'2340656' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVH' 'sip-files00023.tif'
b8be344ffbf294fbc42b0cddeae90b8b
f46f1b9283bce4281c48ac208cb966ef1638ebc2
'2012-05-25T17:14:07-04:00'
describe
'2370536' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVI' 'sip-files00024.tif'
ed975eb8df83039c8df9c5cc199c5602
3fa655fde10d511705593a39fa0dc3f4f1c8cce0
'2012-05-25T17:10:53-04:00'
describe
'2350208' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVJ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
e842ae35da5f6bb16f5e0763eb4aee28
c8992445ce52d6afd795059c7f9158dfced606f7
'2012-05-25T17:15:13-04:00'
describe
'2278988' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVK' 'sip-files00027.tif'
a73b39a2028410762eb32e283248df1e
f7b3b21dd6fb726cf8974fb02915423c5c9ce4a7
'2012-05-25T17:04:55-04:00'
describe
'2321652' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVL' 'sip-files00029.tif'
e9b443ad55b9e738f33996fd91dd236f
82bdca650ee48f4ccbbec77ad5c5dae9d59534e0
describe
'2375468' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVM' 'sip-files00030.tif'
153d5a01da30da835f982ebaf5097443
e9b86d3e6347feff8cef89b8e9239134a9c424c4
'2012-05-25T17:06:46-04:00'
describe
'2374412' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVN' 'sip-files00031.tif'
03016c715500a865990f4d971e9206dc
b003cf4bc994fa0090e706e10d09f3b7a51a7d65
describe
'2401420' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVO' 'sip-files00032.tif'
8b16250b8bed282cf08c9ce8b106a7c1
8ac720e3d34379eafdf3621afcbebcd171493ee2
'2012-05-25T17:06:40-04:00'
describe
'2235576' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVP' 'sip-files00033.tif'
29fd2c1570a998607009a1a384d63514
ebb8357c46524db64c50bdcf66976f505490f8ad
'2012-05-25T17:14:34-04:00'
describe
'2336852' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVQ' 'sip-files00034.tif'
abc0d8083ec0e4b7786c637f569e36d3
def6f90812538d48c26ba4b483f6fd5da7e4f079
'2012-05-25T17:15:42-04:00'
describe
'2404524' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVR' 'sip-files00035.tif'
031a2cc0dfee28a28fe8ab85f4936347
feb05fdc7be8308852fd6f9c15064594691daee1
describe
'2333684' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVS' 'sip-files00036.tif'
08f17f36e7f32cd76349a4c1d32af238
e61fc683f5c0981168bb95c9a2ea17a9c175f0dd
describe
'2338944' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVT' 'sip-files00037.tif'
24e51969a05dadd1fda5f3e53e41bd34
f8e5477899bf21c4a810d154eb2d6c8514653992
describe
'2310852' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVU' 'sip-files00038.tif'
5c6f6ac4f75c112ec6e9a4f663a614ff
8469f8b71df4212d3fdc8b2d0372609786835268
'2012-05-25T17:17:46-04:00'
describe
'2325572' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVV' 'sip-files00040.tif'
558da5c7a901d83118e7540e132c3cb3
3394205239d5c4cb332abfe53272a4debfec70c0
'2012-05-25T17:17:58-04:00'
describe
'2261796' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVW' 'sip-files00041.tif'
aff810887c0f3375c8a18f7e74b6b8cf
d9677446660c9237ed596606090ae5818ec21bee
'2012-05-25T17:06:58-04:00'
describe
'2311772' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVX' 'sip-files00043.tif'
b09bc8faf41e0f1464e6d29f4633f25a
a00cdc3495a1b751770c731b6fe6789dc462926b
'2012-05-25T17:11:19-04:00'
describe
'2302340' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVY' 'sip-files00044.tif'
9a2764f3f15f40fe4d8158fbf40c7417
5683f0c9c4df15a64f6b82e3ffb9bf959fdbd6a0
'2012-05-25T17:08:19-04:00'
describe
'2315716' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFVZ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
ca1d08b3df13ecd6eb4caf24d18a675e
5f6b5198a73db21b93566c7e41e5f555ac741862
'2012-05-25T17:14:57-04:00'
describe
'2289276' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWA' 'sip-files00046.tif'
43ef434ed92be0114f8e91c15f344a85
810face4d5069b5940073c27b7e23f468a4d8c9f
'2012-05-25T17:17:20-04:00'
describe
'2299004' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWB' 'sip-files00047.tif'
a2cb7f87b037f1c95413afa65c996643
9964d82d9802318e73863022a704eedb26637698
'2012-05-25T17:17:02-04:00'
describe
'2335680' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWC' 'sip-files00048.tif'
0b560cb3c2759a033f03dbdf95e6c127
c4f441d82f6207e7721daf3c2f7d0458a1eba621
'2012-05-25T17:06:51-04:00'
describe
'2343756' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWD' 'sip-files00049.tif'
4888a8c0ccb1261f24b2d2ab469def2c
1f0a0ccdc433434fc40c5821c882ca37282ed78e
'2012-05-25T17:13:10-04:00'
describe
'2389560' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWE' 'sip-files00050.tif'
fac2e77a35a096f33771837060393113
9f66e5793b2b8e85bce29a87196d20d989f1b4f3
describe
'2344120' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWF' 'sip-files00051.tif'
21f72c404801e45c8372ef46a04daf52
e88193198cc5de1a25c02562d53a52e08bc9dbe9
describe
'2256672' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWG' 'sip-files00052.tif'
f0180c95c9922664f54c7f7f5e725c33
1cfb6248ccbf64f6995145a3d51febdcab846752
'2012-05-25T17:17:19-04:00'
describe
'2348452' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWH' 'sip-files00053.tif'
46444487536b94a79d2701e72b6a56a8
c511e3281c0894c28cbbfc507e30a7116aa15819
'2012-05-25T17:09:42-04:00'
describe
'2275592' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWI' 'sip-files00054.tif'
c8acc59237a1585f8570f9ff580731fe
ccbc5a7e370d2cd39cd265e7fde33702f2ec8c29
describe
'2362624' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWJ' 'sip-files00055.tif'
18a2a6baebe571d9fc895c57dbc1f33a
5bbcd4bd5def62a36090a9067d07d56b7f085da6
'2012-05-25T17:14:13-04:00'
describe
'2323072' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWK' 'sip-files00057.tif'
59182f0b898cadd2ddf59cbd8d77ed2f
08f385ee9221980d83bc8e1074f11a405338a85d
describe
'2353732' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWL' 'sip-files00058.tif'
350058b28519c4841407814963e87908
2c9913a2ccdc17d59e459cfc0dee691470b6169e
describe
'2367140' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWM' 'sip-files00059.tif'
0343d4bac33a776b48e2d3cee2d1322b
7e9cff128dd66363708515d1b44bbbdcfae25508
'2012-05-25T17:16:31-04:00'
describe
'2356648' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWN' 'sip-files00060.tif'
2b8bacf8964a2776e78de1f59f1d649c
b40a347df821e9908e7852fac8cad288c0c5b50b
describe
'2313400' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWO' 'sip-files00061.tif'
4840beb2401495fb1d12a50240beaad9
afd790d879c156a0b73b042732b6eae8eba3833f
describe
'2289452' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWP' 'sip-files00062.tif'
19cf59e861c8cce423745d9bd601876f
9c20a004a2cf9d8a781e8d18677edaff4f53ec6a
'2012-05-25T17:04:30-04:00'
describe
'7140248' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWQ' 'sip-files00063.tif'
58067cec0c89a0220d7a298b86845292
6205956c74709ea04b288b6ad74320e64c4e30fb
'2012-05-25T17:11:15-04:00'
describe
'2399772' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWR' 'sip-files00065.tif'
5d93c4145c701029ddee0dbacd702165
4863d399b860ebbd4c066f8e05d5d90b14a6359d
describe
'2390192' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWS' 'sip-files00066.tif'
8e4d2724c0a5748fe94b54b69cc32174
4d0aa81deace1e4fff2ad2364982b6fb8ebc4d57
'2012-05-25T17:13:49-04:00'
describe
'2348060' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWT' 'sip-files00067.tif'
be19bc0f182d2053253274a9ff988b56
0eb7b41cf9eddfd4409703b83d3d2abffb250c7f
describe
'2394896' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWU' 'sip-files00068.tif'
529655578d2a5fac8a2854fa3946ce97
668012e9217a0a83ce43c51b3d03cbbdbd3a5623
describe
'2237176' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWV' 'sip-files00069.tif'
a0d01bf8289ce330920eebb45aaf9c9e
8643a1c22309952f89a7db1bc1854ac53a9d9ab8
'2012-05-25T17:09:48-04:00'
describe
'2336200' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWW' 'sip-files00070.tif'
db81bc2ee042b8d9f9a05d26e0d0b767
a27b36d955c299b63aea047233f322a054e0db5c
describe
'2362924' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWX' 'sip-files00071.tif'
7cd514dd09e57649fc9296f8a100901a
b734306ba7a8c22cf00bf159c77fb16260707223
describe
'2341704' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWY' 'sip-files00072.tif'
69ffbfcc111fc500c3107cf911072d10
f1faed016d470bf384a9cea4ba5d1665af5f1904
'2012-05-25T17:06:01-04:00'
describe
'2390864' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFWZ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
f6856281151be3da4f54d379839a15eb
c9f7bbb9b1ae422446645ef56d013ca3a6f9bd97
describe
'2292800' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXA' 'sip-files00074.tif'
3a7dfa89f9a462a307e69803e24d19af
ceec74af17f829ace421ad3b74fae3d32753f949
'2012-05-25T17:05:14-04:00'
describe
'2402324' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXB' 'sip-files00075.tif'
1bfa7ebe6e7cb8fb90bacd0a588af101
b820a370b5675492b8caf43b7dc310486bf4cf91
'2012-05-25T17:14:30-04:00'
describe
'2352180' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXC' 'sip-files00076.tif'
96d3c9227a65c620275ecff8d1e12107
23d1d43f02d4185aad94b9da8169b8f7d759078f
describe
'2428740' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXD' 'sip-files00077.tif'
80248ca1eb5b20ae7b01390e9a14b397
045900f9cec369732fc05e274692aecf76edca1c
'2012-05-25T17:03:51-04:00'
describe
'2370904' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXE' 'sip-files00078.tif'
38fabccda92cdc4e0ba3299b932c13f7
5796c5d00c81ad63296853d46a6eaf15da3e79b2
describe
'2335644' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXF' 'sip-files00079.tif'
2b14bbafa5703dcdb7b452fc5c91dea8
81859af075a3c0847a7d86272f6d10d88d1f691d
'2012-05-25T17:06:05-04:00'
describe
'2396740' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXG' 'sip-files00080.tif'
c375fb3b94545494b5cd6e8ce2d350aa
0a7c640aecf0f2382d2efccaf003243c2a26ab2e
'2012-05-25T17:17:32-04:00'
describe
'2369292' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXH' 'sip-files00081.tif'
62a2eacf315f9950d787815fda4d6a56
405faf8905a2e4603ddb343f054b6c55a7c9770e
describe
'2321016' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXI' 'sip-files00082.tif'
695c36048c872c675b7b4a3531a36029
e240caa48af434a253675ae2cf55472baad44dbf
'2012-05-25T17:15:18-04:00'
describe
'2393680' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXJ' 'sip-files00083.tif'
91c50e8b663eae149b5d6a982b755f30
332d5c8886441cb899c7326e7c4632203083a6b1
'2012-05-25T17:14:31-04:00'
describe
'2299716' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXK' 'sip-files00084.tif'
dea4045a76822b348cf12ece0c95acea
74078f25d71800235475e7e08d5e847bdcb30c64
describe
'2373128' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXL' 'sip-files00085.tif'
7e3b84d6229039a63278c8d3f6430536
baa4adef9e5f14096c4a1d6ef3740429c038d0df
describe
'2372936' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXM' 'sip-files00086.tif'
5c42b3a65edc24dbb3bcaec4de5a941b
8004799e2adbc66ade1393330310b68a06360c0e
'2012-05-25T17:13:38-04:00'
describe
'2492736' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXN' 'sip-files00087.tif'
9585feedf3f466723d2b4e318257ea47
ccc076e17962cf76c1bc1949f5d032f66e39ed78
'2012-05-25T17:17:56-04:00'
describe
'2395688' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXO' 'sip-files00089.tif'
c4d9509c865d5b5b4deccd44abf69321
3812b0673164c8b5ecb599642dbda8a64991249a
'2012-05-25T17:14:58-04:00'
describe
'2297420' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXP' 'sip-files00090.tif'
cf344343582913662246b6d934d9a7bf
932042c24039f46e48cd72699bb3c9fee0aa8bf3
describe
'2296052' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXQ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
03870a3d3275b6af92241f450a6e4d76
a0f8cc9c8d3d8083ec6a40a592de7c3caf855c24
'2012-05-25T17:08:11-04:00'
describe
'2329348' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXR' 'sip-files00094.tif'
53aaf335bfe42750b23f3d9804b50fe5
5e409c27edec4e188520731c63454d8452b6ec8a
describe
'2394456' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXS' 'sip-files00095.tif'
b5c87b5d63b05cf7ae2ef347ca89a3e7
1c2e6eecbf12ae00709543985df12742c614c5d6
'2012-05-25T17:09:43-04:00'
describe
'2288340' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXT' 'sip-files00096.tif'
bce135c5f057bcb1af3e8985ce54eef6
a03b4cb9977e6bbb50ce8d05e6870d00f9f878f0
'2012-05-25T17:16:26-04:00'
describe
'2404484' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXU' 'sip-files00097.tif'
fbe7c8175664031e552ed4db08abf21a
a3830507263726fe4610bb3309bf460a1dcede9e
'2012-05-25T17:14:23-04:00'
describe
'2401860' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXV' 'sip-files00098.tif'
c43bd12a894057efcff30e93f6c0b460
837eb079e70472d81877d5bca562787b0c8b7f81
describe
'2331048' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXW' 'sip-files00099.tif'
dc6d2e92d7e6e3d12c104a782ef448b9
d94fffd31dd91d69736295deebcfcc531351fcd4
'2012-05-25T17:10:43-04:00'
describe
'2416972' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXX' 'sip-files00100.tif'
fbb65d0a9a79f2bfe97f638fc07ff7bc
3b4a356dbff11cf7847b87e5ba10e9e9f6955311
describe
'2398820' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXY' 'sip-files00101.tif'
48ea5872e6b7c5c3e499107e5b9521be
84abc04e5cdb6520dc131c1784c7158b5e6383fb
'2012-05-25T17:17:05-04:00'
describe
'2323768' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFXZ' 'sip-files00102.tif'
fadf64b56518f2b87f474829779af954
e476f53ab5fc255185764ccc0736ef7d9302cd2b
describe
'2278520' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYA' 'sip-files00104.tif'
1632872b3be90515225a75f181ce39b0
3ee040ee2ac1a29d1505eddb5ed439fca45d3298
describe
'2396736' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYB' 'sip-files00105.tif'
4839a3160e3a28888b2e8944be1a6467
b3b4464335822be2ccd4a73113085609899465c8
describe
'2288416' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYC' 'sip-files00106.tif'
dd8fc5b4c7eb732de0332266877e8e8f
3e3c9d6031e50cf57daa5f7facb10320b4b6829a
'2012-05-25T17:08:06-04:00'
describe
'2280272' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYD' 'sip-files00107.tif'
b48f6fe62c2bb158472d23e602d8bd73
9f5d454625a8efc8ce2399739fb585b364dbd87f
'2012-05-25T17:08:27-04:00'
describe
'2321304' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYE' 'sip-files00108.tif'
0fb7bbc807c841a5dbf959b669f9924c
1da49831951da0a8db7e923e6a9edb2294dea770
'2012-05-25T17:08:49-04:00'
describe
'2311780' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYF' 'sip-files00110.tif'
294319145177bf029ef26705b85ee9fe
7789db2ef9fc78a6bf263fb9eeabd65eb53b8a5f
describe
'2302328' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYG' 'sip-files00111.tif'
8c372ed0ba9827a76e72dce15fc7c537
e9cdb048555bc8d8b83704acaee36c5ac67b4722
'2012-05-25T17:13:05-04:00'
describe
'2288888' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYH' 'sip-files00112.tif'
44cde1b5821963727c4362f377dfd9cc
4ae1e9d4e50557e3c8de5f61198a9e376d72baf9
'2012-05-25T17:15:30-04:00'
describe
'2374428' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYI' 'sip-files00113.tif'
25e84e7d11a0cc8b856f93107eb79707
e209427e5061501e6437aa410fac8bbe4c3fdd45
describe
'2337476' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYJ' 'sip-files00114.tif'
8bc4c1ef85e3a5e07f53b32504de9cb7
5879ec4176e9f4dfa664b725c06e5bab17735e03
'2012-05-25T17:16:09-04:00'
describe
'2303712' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYK' 'sip-files00115.tif'
6bf0259a3c5271eafbb4e350cd22e86b
949f5cd8fe4b49640de80aaf009e56f0cf8005e8
'2012-05-25T17:11:56-04:00'
describe
'2332296' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYL' 'sip-files00116.tif'
0bc3e7972a4644d677e6182313841c64
ac755ebe03a83077feb7fe4f2d6f9ffdcd96cf23
describe
'2376192' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYM' 'sip-files00117.tif'
e18a878257c2634dfc674f66043d2d1d
44496c5392b3701fa94d5e265a3c55180d366a91
describe
'2289380' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYN' 'sip-files00119.tif'
0b68738a0ec7ff1d0d5f3bc23b8de0d4
a23e08dcc316c27d666c9e064affdd09af90345f
'2012-05-25T17:15:24-04:00'
describe
'2340444' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYO' 'sip-files00120.tif'
c3edb7bcf76f622368b1bd74e03773f9
511cc54349fec99633e667e885be1ec01a61dd70
'2012-05-25T17:09:18-04:00'
describe
'2289612' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYP' 'sip-files00121.tif'
2f1a8041f7b00560c6c3c14aab0a7242
ad58da141b4e92c8dd7c23d3ca56e57b979a7d42
describe
'2256392' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYQ' 'sip-files00122.tif'
7aebe4c644340256f0da75b59e641c19
0397b050541afb1c4ba68628b45ea1111d8c5ac9
'2012-05-25T17:15:48-04:00'
describe
'2356712' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYR' 'sip-files00123.tif'
bd1f9f06678b3d8864b10dc7595a6fda
5da996a83ba9929b28fad8b24711434481758782
'2012-05-25T17:07:53-04:00'
describe
'2266800' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYS' 'sip-files00124.tif'
56de6595ca8aa03bf9fcccf3a996acab
68b368056f0b7c26e613cdb97ffe2fcf52abf206
describe
'2247244' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYT' 'sip-files00125.tif'
c4f94a441dcf413d8f16486f3e05fb9c
03a98ca89a355890e6ac96c3f3d4cf7718203b3b
'2012-05-25T17:16:10-04:00'
describe
'2303512' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYU' 'sip-files00126.tif'
6d8d82c03ef307af0e531656b0acaa5e
67d297c776d9c95a1991a1f356ad0257de7ffb59
'2012-05-25T17:13:34-04:00'
describe
'2309664' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYV' 'sip-files00128.tif'
0cb117d2e1f8cd0e9e056df12ed3a753
487efa69a28c56682767d563d17093617390bf3f
'2012-05-25T17:09:39-04:00'
describe
'2346676' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYW' 'sip-files00129.tif'
953baff871060ae533fea5793cffc8c9
24d589ff927c15ce45a46441fed440a7ce61f2d6
'2012-05-25T17:17:13-04:00'
describe
'2297812' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYX' 'sip-files00130.tif'
0f4ff9e4bd144ff32b9f7e9c042930be
e7c40125aeb360ca2e02c9f7496d47241d8f1d78
'2012-05-25T17:18:30-04:00'
describe
'2255556' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYY' 'sip-files00131.tif'
f1fa2c27f69583955a3e285b5155bb2f
1ec9673f930b0e16f7551c1e072720bc7b5ea8a6
describe
'2366424' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFYZ' 'sip-files00132.tif'
ef04c758f0ba333f670c5c0fbfe9764b
560645d236a169b3316a1f27d12b95112f6d85a4
describe
'2315564' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZA' 'sip-files00133.tif'
f42d5d1a4ff8dae9fb0b6fd14ea5d794
98a8e88ae31e06a11d2dfbb3a2ec90c20c091677
describe
'2356748' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZB' 'sip-files00134.tif'
7ee3ed6c0116c888a38a5633a75c041b
cb5abaf79145e28b3130de728d23c9d5bc0a57bf
'2012-05-25T17:16:47-04:00'
describe
'2352668' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZC' 'sip-files00135.tif'
91d2daed77fdeacee53c2392f166d6cc
fdb2fc5d84a063dcc3d1f305088c25ea0d652152
describe
'2400576' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZD' 'sip-files00136.tif'
ed3528299d68e7490f9cb81e9cbf4d65
0626d4a4df323f57efdad078401c2be724e152af
describe
'2320748' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZE' 'sip-files00137.tif'
24049d0c4066a251e8c53412f991be32
e0831aa15e40d164d2f5d757d5a3a6a8ae11850b
describe
'2384848' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZF' 'sip-files00138.tif'
361929aa83c61523e76762d05024d007
2d0dd54980c4c162adb2567113fd1958b74e8818
'2012-05-25T17:07:23-04:00'
describe
'2222064' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZG' 'sip-files00139.tif'
1b695284a68231f15a0b230298fbf0da
66a19a0b3535404839039edccd4c1b7d24b967b8
'2012-05-25T17:13:39-04:00'
describe
'2308468' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZH' 'sip-files00141.tif'
217dfbb4fcca50b58dfd43d3f0fc48ec
77fc8d20bbec81ffb345efda76aceb2d80a6efaf
describe
'2357144' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZI' 'sip-files00142.tif'
a1a4384f7556a285552110c124fe4c8f
d16e680e84a3ca0a200b432baf39c0ed80acbb37
describe
'2247392' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZJ' 'sip-files00143.tif'
163ddfbefceaa2c0bad059bbafc7d158
974881105c033284c8f0852a1bd7ddb453bf300f
'2012-05-25T17:16:43-04:00'
describe
'2347016' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZK' 'sip-files00144.tif'
a9b4f7eedd6337fd1f48b7d091c7a2eb
0344c2138072fb467318a08f21556f5385225851
'2012-05-25T17:04:16-04:00'
describe
'2225880' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZL' 'sip-files00145.tif'
ec4ad6bb287b594fc4b0e900c3fd4e12
eea26af9b6ea0a522e674abb330ba92446b5a63d
'2012-05-25T17:11:57-04:00'
describe
'2338212' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZM' 'sip-files00146.tif'
d65bebcc56b5cab786a54f28601fa06f
f787c1ee778bcd8b30e5cbb74d7cb0151aaf9028
describe
'2324760' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZN' 'sip-files00148.tif'
0bf8ef3ea1c30d76a9c8275afd8254a2
63570dcd4dee30ae2ae4dc87624a93d5accfdc5c
'2012-05-25T17:06:03-04:00'
describe
'2300712' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZO' 'sip-files00149.tif'
57f957c2dad1aa0d3801bf44ad256ea0
8381e056507238c26bac539dd7846b33287c1488
'2012-05-25T17:06:28-04:00'
describe
'2376572' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZP' 'sip-files00150.tif'
c6d20e7178389b3282ac4bd43b338140
f2c8e0e0f6bc24e0aad735734277dc1899ba091d
'2012-05-25T17:05:16-04:00'
describe
'2318932' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZQ' 'sip-files00151.tif'
cd03635245e86614f177f4de81c718c8
1b6ba748263871a7451ac401df12e4c956110e85
'2012-05-25T17:17:06-04:00'
describe
'2351060' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZR' 'sip-files00152.tif'
af341b50ff985b9572d9b8334187b84c
db0672e735eb1f764b16a561e59ad97a75ae27cd
'2012-05-25T17:14:00-04:00'
describe
'2394620' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZS' 'sip-files00154.tif'
4d3d83e4386529573076d06fb5fe8528
aae74e9beb6058ac82eda42a7d5edb05cb73f575
'2012-05-25T17:07:08-04:00'
describe
'2330740' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZT' 'sip-files00155.tif'
4dd203b1416d1756942e53724ea111d8
0766cf5846122029b83f554205359b976a7cf616
'2012-05-25T17:12:57-04:00'
describe
'2391576' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZU' 'sip-files00156.tif'
e4396fb8d40e20abdfd94689f4826f82
1e23efd58a41a741078ab667e0a4001880d5547d
describe
'2382848' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZV' 'sip-files00157.tif'
99fb2098e928de11d19a549d8c355608
eabe055df6a295454b6e42f7a21e979104507634
describe
'2385616' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZW' 'sip-files00158.tif'
d03e6a3abcade2302066a2e7e7665680
dba194784d08988b675f0316c8e852a34c810135
describe
'2392436' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZX' 'sip-files00159.tif'
d66a2714bcf9eda2ee6557e9188f5f50
03fc4a800ace3cb4fc76825f5c23067182dd8c45
'2012-05-25T17:13:23-04:00'
describe
'2444148' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZY' 'sip-files00160.tif'
02d98f2f8150e4258ed7a310237bc2e0
74a0bcf385375290bc20c45eb73e4ab6c3b0434e
'2012-05-25T17:08:38-04:00'
describe
'2350584' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABFZZ' 'sip-files00161.tif'
ca2ae86b07536a59f232a6b52137d37c
1ee5020ff0bc8d785c82adf6f7a37995a0aac365
describe
'2366124' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAA' 'sip-files00162.tif'
edafb2aef466192a9abd2522b784642d
bbc42adc4930c0d8260001db46c57daa0176e7c7
describe
'2359804' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAB' 'sip-files00163.tif'
9baa3ba0284964c1feb0427e275be67a
a82daf6d8dd8234dcd5d7b74ffa0c62aa2907e7d
describe
'2404948' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAC' 'sip-files00164.tif'
78ae345da004f5e7eae756fc36ed07b8
5d8c1295dbdb5e2facddc643d0b4437fac2c30b7
describe
'2334288' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAD' 'sip-files00165.tif'
b90c28fa4940178f07c541ac6175b44f
8d1e2391cb11969550fac5205037fb0aaa5926bc
'2012-05-25T17:09:45-04:00'
describe
'2327196' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAE' 'sip-files00166.tif'
a9f6746941372c9db2649d868083a7f7
4041129eb334d5fe801c96dbb8f89dc78ec8bb67
'2012-05-25T17:06:27-04:00'
describe
'2370084' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAF' 'sip-files00167.tif'
c4d32d56d5f7b8c3fde8081902e55698
84897af1dd75dfcc7c79e759b299782973fff1cb
'2012-05-25T17:15:43-04:00'
describe
'2375540' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAG' 'sip-files00168.tif'
78ea2602417ace3bea56f941de64c57e
afa3c6f3ad9076e8a3ef8c6e626f5adff233d3f3
describe
'2357404' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAH' 'sip-files00170.tif'
23c778f1053f29a8f2732572d4ab27a9
32635b90edb626a76d8d8307f342e006b850c513
describe
'2294224' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAI' 'sip-files00171.tif'
43bd5de7a5cecc33504dc1bbd3b51c62
7f70d03404b9d731500fe980dfa69ab7b546c57a
describe
'2405436' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAJ' 'sip-files00172.tif'
c185e63d968b3c291babd00ec7954cb7
46a2be917f1ab07308ff68bb2544b5fffd76faf3
'2012-05-25T17:14:21-04:00'
describe
'2322536' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAK' 'sip-files00173.tif'
c94e136fa4a24d3c69a2aec26bf49a2a
a8f55f3f90e41b5c0184e9f755efa0cdb4fe7005
describe
'2368236' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAL' 'sip-files00174.tif'
b4dd7b9b129e8a25cda27c780465173b
28a21ee6270cc0553b1fac2f3bbfd1d3b483c1ce
'2012-05-25T17:17:15-04:00'
describe
'2339600' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAM' 'sip-files00175.tif'
ed0a3257ab8fd99ef392abaf7e71ac19
3f2b8ef6101a8c6b73bb85dfe7010194daffee9e
describe
'2323272' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAN' 'sip-files00176.tif'
77f991abb29b8958fd73ca7e7c0d96c1
e4dba26ae9b0cb014d9f571642a0d3075f0bfacf
'2012-05-25T17:16:25-04:00'
describe
'2355752' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAO' 'sip-files00177.tif'
3aa99c382429ba43454787aa0441d440
80cb3082a0db5aa3726e5cab21993a64ad5d6dba
describe
'2328572' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAP' 'sip-files00180.tif'
28ca258fc4bbbe8de62c8fdc506e2488
05ddc771195bfc888af42eb5122a3fb57d1a6ba1
'2012-05-25T17:13:40-04:00'
describe
'2357656' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAQ' 'sip-files00181.tif'
e70590a11b496dd7f698c1a3b3357430
4f46b643b4f89f402ee6e660b4fd9e30231b14db
'2012-05-25T17:08:08-04:00'
describe
'2326636' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAR' 'sip-files00182.tif'
13b02e3b329821a860ac81b37bca901b
0f0ae503b0350f63c32367954003384dabc5d1dd
describe
'2298984' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAS' 'sip-files00183.tif'
54001fd84f01c65112fc9d8283565df3
1983f016c08541c8902a99bc8062509ec6e4fd50
'2012-05-25T17:14:04-04:00'
describe
'2268084' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAT' 'sip-files00184.tif'
929ee20e1614e5fe883324619584388e
1abebbf0e1d5b497dcc4437cc6cf0434a7007d33
'2012-05-25T17:10:32-04:00'
describe
'2365380' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAU' 'sip-files00185.tif'
eb13f9540ad7745d766d2c677772c135
2ce9bf6f98303054dbb1383a30164d71f8c3d0ec
'2012-05-25T17:10:15-04:00'
describe
'2385484' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAV' 'sip-files00186.tif'
6a04cb589c4845367a2d468233646490
1f67e31d1699bd52de5451d5c17222b5ee486517
describe
'2296288' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAW' 'sip-files00187.tif'
879a68b9e74debff2cec90a202d5c091
b0c6eaa887229336d2937ea7a9c27c1e1d9388bf
'2012-05-25T17:05:35-04:00'
describe
'2363188' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAX' 'sip-files00188.tif'
a6dcd5080365eff823ea5cbc65500e43
a5714fedf3780d592ab306b7383aa51062d7a483
'2012-05-25T17:07:31-04:00'
describe
'2300200' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAY' 'sip-files00189.tif'
22fe820f1e021e5ed159b2fd9074c76d
c014de5a9a10cfe41c378ee7037a9261d60b4e68
describe
'2349648' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGAZ' 'sip-files00191.tif'
dc7206d76380145469ab54830933a4fe
5df1fa882f55e18591a87cf6b78b70bf50309862
'2012-05-25T17:15:53-04:00'
describe
'2356736' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBA' 'sip-files00193.tif'
80af08fbc00711d1ce6f4c2b0049dd8d
9f1b50f0b68b5961dd0f3bfe0f6a9b756145b914
'2012-05-25T17:17:43-04:00'
describe
'2375760' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBB' 'sip-files00194.tif'
8f2c7e901376ea2fcc538b93e8a6089c
dd631ecb8310ae511d1b7db1fe468216b233bb5b
describe
'2340616' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBC' 'sip-files00195.tif'
8ae2555a85dd83b6f40ecd16bb048751
7d4a575c9ed5c932b93a51eba110ff3c85ce9f4e
describe
'2347464' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBD' 'sip-files00196.tif'
f35dee7f2c54fa675f6c8adfeb8e427b
208dca0bdf4db7b55234ca5071c3defc5888a6cf
describe
'2371288' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBE' 'sip-files00197.tif'
3716a8a09825180df5553e05cdc47f45
05ab0b0b322b34d94915ce901ed5ccbcf4cfcdc6
describe
'2354988' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBF' 'sip-files00198.tif'
a272ba85a16be6f517f747bec295f75e
054e0bf3301c08e6746f554a25bbb44f5de4864a
describe
'2170344' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBG' 'sip-files00199.tif'
d303a8192fb9f5f86cfbafafc9d25f77
f14c26da59cba733b16967a0357760f749b4d75c
'2012-05-25T17:15:39-04:00'
describe
'2274624' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBH' 'sip-files00200.tif'
0e1dd841332168c629877bac8650ad6f
2a143cd9a0ef809c87375df71d5d9966f8d030c9
describe
'2239412' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBI' 'sip-files00201.tif'
d98ebad883db16b6f051fec550d72b26
371722cb6e7ddf5f4d061c6088e4728da0dad3d8
'2012-05-25T17:07:33-04:00'
describe
'2313252' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBJ' 'sip-files00202.tif'
8a6515a03a8a777279953bb774972151
b8d947d71f26010f3789d86da8ece389cf514cfc
'2012-05-25T17:04:14-04:00'
describe
'2327288' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBK' 'sip-files00203.tif'
810582304373f53ed8c70bf64ee2634c
fb04067885ab0dfc2007b26c142048c2cca5ddaa
'2012-05-25T17:08:54-04:00'
describe
'2288060' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBL' 'sip-files00205.tif'
70ba3338dac75e29f45d3c6070820d48
1a3674bf014e04353b0391d63937a0635b43d4bd
'2012-05-25T17:14:05-04:00'
describe
'2301268' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBM' 'sip-files00206.tif'
a190f3ebf8d894bb6fad00085df633f1
439ac76ebab8531cc31779ef6a227d9a11ffe59a
'2012-05-25T17:10:31-04:00'
describe
'2272384' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBN' 'sip-files00207.tif'
b0770bfeccd5d33ec15b90c939c0a00c
b6c8468d66bceadb6af387193bfc832807147a33
describe
'2330748' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBO' 'sip-files00208.tif'
74f2c062dbd043992d9cb1bd8d609172
28856e34aa288827d26abf1fb642c31baf8516f4
'2012-05-25T17:14:36-04:00'
describe
'2254404' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBP' 'sip-files00209.tif'
0e58105449e8877e8ac793f3d8560652
309edb4782ed2e0e474aebdb6419cc2531f052a1
'2012-05-25T17:06:10-04:00'
describe
'2332016' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBQ' 'sip-files00210.tif'
08152d05cc2441cd5c4e735d7621a7fc
d7adc7d662fca6c38bfa34c15cdaf56a0d5f99ae
'2012-05-25T17:08:21-04:00'
describe
'2305496' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBR' 'sip-files00211.tif'
018e445ff6da4e8cd9cc031e13d6d85e
2178d27e52b8b0579c66cf84be3662f2abc95028
describe
'2282528' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBS' 'sip-files00212.tif'
25355120a4ad8b0cead34648facf9fda
0be119ad9076aa48a29abe233580f67f953e4f30
'2012-05-25T17:16:33-04:00'
describe
'2329572' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBT' 'sip-files00214.tif'
cb70407723290493b64cc9b5a67f2d87
5de057f136ba5b799b6cc035f01c3975a42a3942
describe
'2350220' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBU' 'sip-files00215.tif'
5cc591124e202cd4af746564f5a040ba
49cdd2031232ea5625aa7bfa768a2bbfa7ffa304
describe
'2329792' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBV' 'sip-files00216.tif'
7b461d74255c69a34bfa54299871bc16
d361777bf90de8118ded0aa67e1a34b911746a10
describe
'2258592' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBW' 'sip-files00217.tif'
52d19debf23218643faa85b4b7d06222
a0b53ff96342afac4dd8390e8bb4856835cdcb0d
describe
'2341476' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBX' 'sip-files00218.tif'
84c1eca222af98d8269a31ae23bbc5b6
07452fd2e93a0f0267eedfd740f0158c98f60fe1
'2012-05-25T17:12:41-04:00'
describe
'2305776' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBY' 'sip-files00219.tif'
80da4a181564c5b7c14f4bdb4e73a6fa
050b42fc0fb8b7f4fdf32bb98e31cb6c262ab544
describe
'2343508' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGBZ' 'sip-files00220.tif'
bdf0c9f984d928697e43ffb2cfb43343
5d40714e22c71d22b33fdf2db1a65e617912bdb9
describe
'2316084' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCA' 'sip-files00221.tif'
222301bfe608790184c591d69ef6bfbf
677f9f8a45887f85028ac567b540f6c3166dfd87
'2012-05-25T17:09:22-04:00'
describe
'2265408' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCB' 'sip-files00222.tif'
158f48c8a6bf06f919efa669e557ae7a
f07043560508a9b1138b62d0f101fd957d830bc2
describe
'2361564' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCC' 'sip-files00223.tif'
19f3bd681756d035a97beb0a5fa6500a
2b92b6808871d48b1dd565c5fa516c2160d8af5f
'2012-05-25T17:12:43-04:00'
describe
'2323144' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCD' 'sip-files00224.tif'
d1a6f05fe4d10cc236766313bf794200
2470d072ff20758973b7043e65c8f51d04cd027e
describe
'2284824' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCE' 'sip-files00225.tif'
0697503d705a6c4634b0761542bbba4c
4c7a138affddca8d6732057a891d234536bf02d3
'2012-05-25T17:14:51-04:00'
describe
'2326844' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCF' 'sip-files00226.tif'
367c69fa84275c7bcf85fe8937e49f6a
24dae635882997e19bdcd4254dfb4b52aa080fc3
'2012-05-25T17:07:13-04:00'
describe
'2295724' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCG' 'sip-files00227.tif'
592f3c6619beb36df591c18048f0b20d
e99e81aa80e08e2937780816729cb0182bcc4097
'2012-05-25T17:16:08-04:00'
describe
'2307392' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCH' 'sip-files00228.tif'
8a0b10f70c14fdd70df4942ba0e17b6a
68fcb997eee611ed38b1ed478bce9cd683aecd36
describe
'2363244' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCI' 'sip-files00229.tif'
bda4c68b39efea574c9e9905d04740ff
996642012c7d1bd7d46cef531fc5c3223dc2c432
describe
'6822500' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCJ' 'sip-files00230.tif'
f2062dddb4596c641a5e5acb3aaa0f04
d7b1de3696bfed72041adf9e25eb459604a69ae3
describe
'2259372' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCK' 'sip-files00231.tif'
a144dc2eab786b79ea6efc2e4e83f4e7
629701b48cff7a6dd2170bb155e8ffaedd1cec9b
describe
'2292740' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCL' 'sip-files00232.tif'
b2edfa04c46640ee87e15fcdfe063b9c
7a765d60e0e864edcf36cacd270f38a218dc67c8
'2012-05-25T17:07:46-04:00'
describe
'2211744' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCM' 'sip-files00234.tif'
0998f8bacb52c67d9dec7cba8c092397
31d4ce31ca797d1fa61539494c423fa0902aa995
'2012-05-25T17:10:35-04:00'
describe
'6960804' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCN' 'sip-files00235.tif'
bc70d7230222f5ab36eb0c0d2d812f20
2a55482f20d0ef8515b656628e4cb5d2b8c673ef
describe
'2319120' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCO' 'sip-files00236.tif'
a30a22affbf29adde6f7d52aa7f3b4ac
05e08e97adbb94e74821ec9dfdba45a3a1eea406
'2012-05-25T17:17:51-04:00'
describe
'2305820' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCP' 'sip-files00237.tif'
42b2861cc8ff1ffd7c1b5064f7d9f32a
02b06f13ccfaa112763cbcdcb90aedf646817355
describe
'2316928' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCQ' 'sip-files00238.tif'
49518e9456a93d33a56a0cdb1a82c8a4
2bcc8d27c8cef8a1098a197e9b5877c4fa430ad2
describe
'2284108' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCR' 'sip-files00240.tif'
53d5299f878fa31434fed9fabc03f09c
917f9bcc4911bbdb449d9ebd44455aeec502336a
'2012-05-25T17:17:59-04:00'
describe
'2313416' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCS' 'sip-files00241.tif'
736b3e17d2b8bcfad7879f999d956c39
a6eb2816e4614988623620f9917c24d7228b61f5
'2012-05-25T17:16:22-04:00'
describe
'2293176' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCT' 'sip-files00242.tif'
98946999420ef11612407c5ce75d5aa0
27b01bd8f95dd04d3245bfe3de3206e56eb9ebb3
'2012-05-25T17:04:20-04:00'
describe
'2349988' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCU' 'sip-files00243.tif'
4f969962c48f4396e17759079fc384a8
f0b462548eb1ac223915a443699bc3556b59c796
describe
'2280304' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCV' 'sip-files00244.tif'
cd40c533df595f15f49094dac92bc67e
fce39d9b3a3ec5704d0a4c26303e73b09654cfa9
describe
'2286408' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCW' 'sip-files00245.tif'
8ea9e1f86005057e978887f2907c7127
fba750299b9083e6a413c90522574b9fdee05979
describe
'2292448' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCX' 'sip-files00248.tif'
eca3e74eeaea54a5bf06974ede36272f
126bedd9df93c9b2109329f935ae1d116f004b42
describe
'2328988' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCY' 'sip-files00249.tif'
ba76b5ad1253b70392215d82d5c9d84b
205e734a8e89bdb5b3789129e527780d0aebe2d6
'2012-05-25T17:12:45-04:00'
describe
'2307096' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGCZ' 'sip-files00250.tif'
683bc963547b6905d43eb7a482720064
d85ea2e0857f5a788f96095f519db86441d84b61
'2012-05-25T17:09:02-04:00'
describe
'2315804' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDA' 'sip-files00252.tif'
dea68914b71fd0994a69ae1264d76b52
e00401f44c6664350a88ad1ba9ad66f12fe24516
'2012-05-25T17:10:40-04:00'
describe
'2354284' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDB' 'sip-files00254.tif'
86f7c5a08b58925280030a26472f3b88
5f506728812a89d6fed99c68e296e8562971fb25
describe
'2389480' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDC' 'sip-files00255.tif'
02d4d9d0a7bf9aa0c247909f3c62338f
e54330f19a91d7c3f9dfce5182d9a592b5b6b395
describe
'2375024' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDD' 'sip-files00256.tif'
424aa50a0b688ed685f9b5fdccb78e8f
c7dcf61b02b651e23834fd1328f21f3677727b2c
'2012-05-25T17:12:03-04:00'
describe
'2328744' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDE' 'sip-files00257.tif'
404de33bae428cd313a8e87a8ce005e1
822cbc0293d6357d1d8a813d97d559feb64e880e
describe
'2374300' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDF' 'sip-files00258.tif'
8d4953da5efc5d67dddc5304149e360e
ca900094bec55f4ba2b8fb2565e5a641a35c041b
describe
'2310588' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDG' 'sip-files00260.tif'
726913f1ced1efe18179cba2f3c72445
387bb8022f3fa3f90785b17e565449d1d70a6e2c
describe
'2244980' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDH' 'sip-files00261.tif'
9a74a96bb0febceaeddb4bf343c3faaf
620f8f32a1ac4d2cd116639ed0a1a9e0a6921aa6
describe
'2355012' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDI' 'sip-files00262.tif'
2699b2d9e12cd143801a2dee7da22869
2ff8cb5a357c9c96ff71daa8c0c7eb97b4a44a1e
'2012-05-25T17:14:44-04:00'
describe
'2316388' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDJ' 'sip-files00263.tif'
8215d489b7bf450f57f349b1320e5787
aacdc98f823b8d6bdca7690b90794b9c5eb018c7
'2012-05-25T17:14:50-04:00'
describe
'2315440' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDK' 'sip-files00264.tif'
b275720e620c172a4813215adb3e9311
516d58df07b36ea84e8ee55349a2cb0264aaa4e5
'2012-05-25T17:08:35-04:00'
describe
'2351796' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDL' 'sip-files00266.tif'
bea2a850d849f49c8f4eee6a1f222c1d
1fdff25356223380b20f1733211e284943ad5e18
'2012-05-25T17:18:15-04:00'
describe
'2304012' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDM' 'sip-files00267.tif'
9500906ac5c937de31edc5d147e1dec1
1ce020604ceb9b9581a35043d17ca80516fcd86d
'2012-05-25T17:16:11-04:00'
describe
'2348020' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDN' 'sip-files00268.tif'
fdb0b906067a6c5519ec04ccd7a1938d
1f7b814374d605630da477b28e41159342ba0e0d
describe
'2218096' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDO' 'sip-files00269.tif'
279bfccc9840268b7ef235572460245f
1a796390845c36f8f8eb924057ec327248772776
describe
'2312616' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDP' 'sip-files00270.tif'
f7c5d4a4494cd7b04eeb3a41d72a2e95
bba28c716d6ae444a00e5f05b397f5e9796cc0e3
describe
'2357584' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDQ' 'sip-files00271.tif'
f9b7afa0f0f442da69404a485d3dfc30
3f38fab0050a0b86e95511303aff2836d5df5b82
describe
'2321164' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDR' 'sip-files00272.tif'
18130740ee1def70a078a53d09cea85c
e5107971e44c1358ac6275d15d76d8e669972192
'2012-05-25T17:06:56-04:00'
describe
'2351284' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDS' 'sip-files00274.tif'
c6d82e848b9a3f9f528b9b25f6960845
8c178fb994463a6543f8b6e010df94e83472bd78
describe
'2326740' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDT' 'sip-files00275.tif'
16927b22966b8c61ba5aa0933841d903
526168630b543b4b524f6650dd26a1b9e144dfac
describe
'2264520' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDU' 'sip-files00276.tif'
1254f5f565887922d7ba33529c575b12
31d5ab797882dfa0503014f2b7e1c0d3afc944e3
describe
'2359572' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDV' 'sip-files00278.tif'
065e3c47ed2ff960dd877d6771385b6c
3130b2c5f469a6d9a83847b774b93279eef46556
'2012-05-25T17:06:22-04:00'
describe
'2377756' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDW' 'sip-files00279.tif'
384524465712de561a3e7b008eed717d
e1dd126f39d68c3367b7a282aa3528cdbc649842
describe
'2342656' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDX' 'sip-files00280.tif'
c3614d488092c8418b4d439c6ae8a50c
6e2f427a2b8293b406e96d6d8a3fc2b7a4c9e46a
describe
'2368216' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDY' 'sip-files00281.tif'
ae3c03835830436160197fe2a8e1b89c
20fb792cb4233f381f8f4637390ac19b418e6a95
describe
'2357288' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGDZ' 'sip-files00282.tif'
28c349e18887dae47351fb256e07d950
f704f2dd5ea727973b922ff7ee1766c3139a44b5
'2012-05-25T17:06:36-04:00'
describe
'2388272' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEA' 'sip-files00284.tif'
5ad9e1e1354d95736b6373b0656fda6d
b05f941e28932e53943968b654e7793e48ce4a84
describe
'2344812' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEB' 'sip-files00285.tif'
40fe2e94c7f6d7fe4ae34c8466026203
0f0347e3f7431c5fc8fde72078e856e979393977
'2012-05-25T17:12:39-04:00'
describe
'2334384' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEC' 'sip-files00287.tif'
afa11d05f16ef452f87e994ac853a0b1
27904b3f757e5c99e8054326d50d336dade819c4
describe
'2342312' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGED' 'sip-files00288.tif'
cfe474517fc6a40bf01af1da51d8ee5b
03e670e76363e1ef96898cc328eb1ba7bf217221
describe
'2322528' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEE' 'sip-files00289.tif'
7b214e850dfa32533084ad8d89c3fd89
758a267e6db66be9be2711def93dcbe03df95f01
describe
'2376604' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEF' 'sip-files00290.tif'
d35fcc259449d6c25cffd299954d8a71
ad397c892c525f7ace162c8483222dbfdb7eec7f
'2012-05-25T17:17:26-04:00'
describe
'2307684' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEG' 'sip-files00291.tif'
5f2e636694dbb1348678bef2c7a8eedf
2aac9c3c5e80dbcc321c156a07c558bdd787e14f
'2012-05-25T17:04:17-04:00'
describe
'2390612' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEH' 'sip-files00292.tif'
d90b90d8b92c066da73753c4962f33bd
406e42f104bf398aaa7a659b1ffa2105c18b9e5d
describe
'2333368' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEI' 'sip-files00293.tif'
3d700fba445777e91dd68b6e35b51173
3143606c4bab347657fa73fac8d55862218815c3
describe
'2289776' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEJ' 'sip-files00294.tif'
9cba9fb5b61090ee75a6f465cc68c8d3
d6b020f1f6f2797beba6d6761501890081b4f60f
describe
'2300416' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEK' 'sip-files00295.tif'
526c99e908a930842a591c90aff547e3
69949b06118ae5a97ea97328e3627cdc6f12e9a9
describe
'8176632' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEL' 'sip-files00298.tif'
df4eac72e71eb56a40b4065057c6d11a
23e91360e322c678e5ded5585dd965c5a7e14759
'2012-05-25T17:04:40-04:00'
describe
'8295760' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEM' 'sip-files00299.tif'
83169a5b6d33fa92c829986c0e86e6be
fa2ce33a8294fee72c8513e281ef65163a1e2237
'2012-05-25T17:09:16-04:00'
describe
'2383352' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEN' 'sip-files00300.tif'
b1f6bdef1e48241ce963eab0d1c2ab2e
62cb2341551d6ce42e12b7db915046940b4d5393
describe
'906' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEO' 'sip-files00002.pro'
c45a8a68bf6954f67ecada82628ff394
3f7989b94236a4efa277b39557acc8e82a89948f
'2012-05-25T17:08:32-04:00'
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEP' 'sip-files00003.pro'
0e499803d608843757bdd87d58b2d275
ff994af9c9b20bc2b790a7900780c269f20c65e3
describe
'209' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEQ' 'sip-files00004.pro'
86b3cb6cd4fab280c369fe942e4ee154
18bb063645e940a6f2a635986e38d55f9afc2ea4
'2012-05-25T17:06:41-04:00'
describe
'2592' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGER' 'sip-files00006.pro'
6724250da0a18d77fed4ce331f8ae0ee
f777dc73b59c14984a55dd22ae844042e82c2226
describe
'6613' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGES' 'sip-files00007.pro'
3253d7127daadc306d31efab94dbbc08
4c566822b8a1c5dabf43ef052f2e8af883d82705
describe
'305' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGET' 'sip-files00008.pro'
f94ed475ee039745fe5dac6755ef9a60
eb79150ce4943c64be2782fba44c1ac97e1864e4
describe
'31984' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEU' 'sip-files00010.pro'
e6538a745cd665d4cb9397bcd6101b34
56c3446620b0406fee1a0a29e230ec51f9b33043
describe
'35577' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEV' 'sip-files00011.pro'
d3302cc3d256cc8826e177cf84d01b74
870d0d1a2f05e10fa92a8ce8e6ff824169751c45
describe
'39504' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEW' 'sip-files00013.pro'
bdf8654dc25ef2ffaf35f8a16bf95f09
b50e4be976ae4507c38aa93dc29c425de8658075
describe
'36596' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEX' 'sip-files00014.pro'
fd74dd0aa9d6f738eb2b8e892a66fbec
9b75090c3317a480b05001596a95e7e2bae98d85
'2012-05-25T17:13:17-04:00'
describe
'37101' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEY' 'sip-files00015.pro'
0e38637accc01b99d7b2953f9872ccf9
2dabfcec567f41a83b084c7c78458d7a4171da66
describe
'38926' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGEZ' 'sip-files00016.pro'
8de296a14e74ed7c175b27e0decf27a7
1991f292f0585282fadffae72aa91494af6722e8
describe
'42506' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFA' 'sip-files00017.pro'
ac8a6987f3bad39abd767aa518badb34
c1917817738065aaf4d23e7175e86a0ea360b445
describe
'32716' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFB' 'sip-files00018.pro'
ec1d091535738f128f07ecffe8950afe
f7e5a102d213f09197f64ac1fafb0c2e6c8e4215
'2012-05-25T17:16:35-04:00'
describe
'35098' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFC' 'sip-files00019.pro'
75025b71b019ba91f948b87d312bb297
d5bd148e99a44ed823f3031e123c058c5bc76d87
describe
'38659' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFD' 'sip-files00020.pro'
acde92884988a5a1216f12ab73766891
14d8a301ea60cc9a389ecdcbf4e9a771ff5f681a
'2012-05-25T17:04:42-04:00'
describe
'19278' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFE' 'sip-files00021.pro'
1b092144ee8612847b097e5b8c1f4829
a5b7745b86141e2993ec3e203174297a9d052068
describe
'30073' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFF' 'sip-files00022.pro'
f3b751a9cab7b29e70fa4d216746826d
f728b5670cb2a2de655094a20ed2c02b04e7118f
describe
'40548' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFG' 'sip-files00023.pro'
3adc49fcce1297d602abb4c30616fa2b
7bb8362d04ae81bf4b58715c10eb9ad81cbe559d
'2012-05-25T17:09:37-04:00'
describe
'39137' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFH' 'sip-files00024.pro'
1ee9d2903d9cdf776595ba88004e28ea
d54e45d263dfe507c4845da2bc2c027d4976d9c3
'2012-05-25T17:17:49-04:00'
describe
'37253' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFI' 'sip-files00025.pro'
ccbccfb85ec23889a1ac59381f160a4a
9696ab2ca194ea9cf244c8adbc9d119e4f3262fa
describe
'38680' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFJ' 'sip-files00026.pro'
0af743b7a9d6b2d2124409918b4bf6f7
2e9db72eda99b9e706e36986216b3f2572271a85
describe
'37469' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFK' 'sip-files00027.pro'
9726635fcb181097768bb22f0e8d6d9b
8b2affe7db17184ba34713cb931fb7667887fd40
describe
'36043' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFL' 'sip-files00029.pro'
0d695efd058888d0317c95c6dd915741
96cd168c5f747df49aeec0395075f095d8388d18
'2012-05-25T17:12:42-04:00'
describe
'34681' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFM' 'sip-files00030.pro'
9127ba63d6432f69277e39d883ab5e1a
4cb9f40f12ee09a8b30b22c08a0ceabd80c284c5
describe
'34814' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFN' 'sip-files00031.pro'
5105bc87eb655192bf9848cf3b4ddc22
80e5c5e802ba92eceb5e9060eaca2a066bfe779e
describe
'39897' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFO' 'sip-files00032.pro'
3df1abbf9a19aaace0b42153be8f302f
abbe1e7c6785b35a80fe5f8b26ae4fb957ba4dec
describe
'38988' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFP' 'sip-files00033.pro'
d6ebf133ebd6b8a3b25c4924f8748407
5d1ff5f61c2922edd33ff51b03dc5d3889e2a02d
describe
'37144' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFQ' 'sip-files00035.pro'
3b596decc182f0fbc1c5027ed91885e2
c78ab83b1fb51d6790de8da7d88ea7e613da8954
describe
'36573' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFR' 'sip-files00036.pro'
1bda76b325ddaf9ac1394b658540a156
799492318f7e29e305c55a5abf46f4f2fd6db49b
describe
'14156' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFS' 'sip-files00037.pro'
0f39d34f335caa599bc53a26e02736b9
a00d390d13bb1226f0faa80718b186f93d0a03d3
'2012-05-25T17:14:18-04:00'
describe
'27110' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFT' 'sip-files00038.pro'
744df160a0bb932fa4ae65db86694aa8
b6f250a0120ab5841369aad472ffbc33ca292bf9
describe
'37172' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFU' 'sip-files00039.pro'
62ab9189070630ee9b406aea100750ea
2c5d4bfdd38b1ec2adf5f4d87dc40a22b8548d52
describe
'35276' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFV' 'sip-files00041.pro'
875b85d2423b7fe933d055a7d8b1fb24
a8dbcc36c209cb78694c296bc1b21278632c24eb
'2012-05-25T17:12:44-04:00'
describe
'40575' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFW' 'sip-files00042.pro'
2f75f93e76d1da642970db41766986c9
a3fb3243d243367d2924e96d9c9c574032eaa803
describe
'42502' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFX' 'sip-files00043.pro'
0f76de3796704accfc39e339c559500d
174a3f000d5860f825f2d9af733d1ea03b8f5b3b
describe
'41247' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFY' 'sip-files00044.pro'
0d01c7fdf9eb09815762e677a03ffcd7
3dd68faad1b70f66502e35ff6d4aa1cbccd6a757
describe
'36472' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGFZ' 'sip-files00045.pro'
4759ea8e51789603353441ed69d96879
4a02c33badbe478da426fc497cab766baeb0d9fb
'2012-05-25T17:03:53-04:00'
describe
'36111' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGA' 'sip-files00046.pro'
6eb97edc6573d1a5447c51821b07a57d
f93097ee69e2a336afa52eeee95cdfa7759f3b28
'2012-05-25T17:08:20-04:00'
describe
'40108' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGB' 'sip-files00047.pro'
62f9e2a531e483d6a2ab2f5083c7c08b
7015e8a6a4bf18fb2987f196f3ce0222ed3c4e72
describe
'39598' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGC' 'sip-files00048.pro'
562fe2bf410652f296178c713feb8153
44823ac7756fee82349e99a4dfc42792a8b81502
describe
'38951' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGD' 'sip-files00049.pro'
0fdb1f4525f47a1975aece6f64737256
5b72148d6c362ec1e38f8038108853d4bb1b630f
describe
'32891' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGE' 'sip-files00050.pro'
1d02813bbb9a1ec9763fd8e1c3af1c7e
c0bd60f61e31327d8d8379a8cdb833f956d19ddf
describe
'35459' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGF' 'sip-files00051.pro'
33466d423e178f769bc5e087ee7a6aea
b748140dcd85b4e65fec1088276afd31453ed3ea
'2012-05-25T17:06:08-04:00'
describe
'36830' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGG' 'sip-files00052.pro'
1e0b107696ee4576dea6d1f3f0d5fa8d
76fd09111da9fa54d8ded73b4f66509e77c6b862
describe
'39095' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGH' 'sip-files00053.pro'
83a986053e516a6fd48c61b3a7c2b89c
9ddf6c39eb9cd27710367adc113f78afc9f616fa
describe
'37935' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGI' 'sip-files00054.pro'
b89e108ed82b050afae54001b5278184
c1868261b479dc54729f2a600132db0beaddc75c
describe
'37251' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGJ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
e362322009d1dc2fa354d65ebab8da73
976f541296237579e4e33b308307c7d45cdf5d2f
describe
'33691' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGK' 'sip-files00056.pro'
75d31e1d66f3a7e607951df44af78172
5cf2308e4335f8d4c396ce58208286c1bbc7cf1b
describe
'39812' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGL' 'sip-files00057.pro'
d766a80736ee0b8c3409fc7387b30a39
f59794ef79b71b43f827727090a78fdfe908fa75
'2012-05-25T17:12:35-04:00'
describe
'36076' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGM' 'sip-files00059.pro'
948ab903f248e82c03b96e65575de394
f386c218beb2e069c1fd02436dacb22693331eea
describe
'33605' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGN' 'sip-files00060.pro'
bdb0a19ee75662eecd3a44d968875e46
c2cdfa48b4791853f2dc6e8e657a1d7671d73546
describe
'41968' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGO' 'sip-files00061.pro'
3cfc13920ad50cf3f858bbe0bd69b42c
6aea3c4eb351139ca5c6bc00b5067133e20840b5
describe
'26252' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGP' 'sip-files00062.pro'
3d0ccc026f982bf07732149a798f9fc3
611b6847af4c8daf7389481815999b0a2e4d4111
'2012-05-25T17:15:23-04:00'
describe
'2557' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGQ' 'sip-files00063.pro'
2881d15d6c45cc651712deb5da91fa3c
94ed487ca0ad80480785852a91249a6a6c71a506
'2012-05-25T17:13:43-04:00'
describe
'41714' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGR' 'sip-files00064.pro'
9922130063f0395518e9abb775b8b6e5
dfbe5e4cb62eddb9a4d604e9830dc1dc5c9db8c1
describe
'39389' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGS' 'sip-files00065.pro'
c60b7fedfaefc4feadc727e41f27a28a
1ea52cd45794d25483119c2b8101415f605eb692
'2012-05-25T17:16:55-04:00'
describe
'39287' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGT' 'sip-files00066.pro'
3b5b8ef7f2064176705d9b9306b7c731
140ab8e7ca75b5773539fb9bb6045714a37994c5
describe
'38935' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGU' 'sip-files00067.pro'
8c4731f2c7db8e09748cdf6f2b23ee62
c4a8918b1f0cf8cec7f81557aad5bb00e5fdcc4d
describe
'42191' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGV' 'sip-files00068.pro'
c3e89a659b5b868279ec26686f424550
fc97a9d372f2d7f4934faceee99296c791fc3faa
describe
'37052' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGW' 'sip-files00069.pro'
740af374b72903ca67f5d1b700d5d425
78871c90800f457f986f0d3b7c87f5af4662ace0
describe
'36588' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGX' 'sip-files00070.pro'
1cd675503b79d4715e332b71cad69cda
26de2ecdd60a0840d732c075bf833a6dec0501e0
describe
'37833' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGY' 'sip-files00071.pro'
db8c2b6fc5cb12064ee58dc45983084f
cb2087d5bec4fd45ef12a0aaab68798e760fc44c
'2012-05-25T17:14:14-04:00'
describe
'37658' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGGZ' 'sip-files00072.pro'
4e3af6628fff0cc969646277e2097eed
2c63914e5726968b0259dc163f17213aa8827149
'2012-05-25T17:11:13-04:00'
describe
'39238' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHA' 'sip-files00073.pro'
1d4d23e541e44b5288cd8c6c5cd4dae5
840371f9c05b59100913e12b988f630559650806
'2012-05-25T17:05:41-04:00'
describe
'8983' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHB' 'sip-files00074.pro'
d62d67d4db621702b580df8204146727
d4c12059fadb49d40a2f9a86d4ab2624435d210e
'2012-05-25T17:18:38-04:00'
describe
'35856' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHC' 'sip-files00076.pro'
0eefff62f9b72ead3fea66c3dccab986
86a8376b4ec787651aa7e65066c2a9246395bc6f
describe
'33484' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHD' 'sip-files00077.pro'
29566df70eb350f2b5753dbe7c0b6052
c47889eb2a131730d680ab892e509bb4bf0a2e60
describe
'34438' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHE' 'sip-files00078.pro'
b8e7397e841e7863299306755539c722
5a6071e3014ebc0c457eaadcdb067a2d655216db
'2012-05-25T17:17:55-04:00'
describe
'34913' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHF' 'sip-files00079.pro'
9a110437ba9b0065bd2224cab738f17b
8eb1d9d599da82cb0330c48e20503d3d35ec7613
describe
'38500' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHG' 'sip-files00080.pro'
443a97377801f340f2f9fdc01d03e9ab
5fd8a2f53d1241aded96825c8e7b7b19c7a719f6
describe
'41280' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHH' 'sip-files00081.pro'
e73a1674bc7e5056119a44d6f9e32eee
e28d58627233c19615d7ae576946b9fbd9ff2f29
describe
'38908' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHI' 'sip-files00082.pro'
541094ee1670ab00bae0224e4db8a1f1
fbeac9ae48dcc3f43cbca5b3f22a55defb872412
describe
'36790' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHJ' 'sip-files00083.pro'
102add617ced10d3ec849db04c1dee47
b9e69c2602c2a4f4b7691dc301fb7d0ffca45ecd
describe
'41716' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHK' 'sip-files00084.pro'
b54985af185fbf21e98e5f4653883944
d962926eec8244ad6bbc243ea59c888c9b601ec1
'2012-05-25T17:13:22-04:00'
describe
'41706' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHL' 'sip-files00085.pro'
7455e768fa15f3712755dee736ca28b4
9a4ebf86cf9142407ea57161d4b068096e7d7b86
'2012-05-25T17:13:24-04:00'
describe
'42153' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHM' 'sip-files00086.pro'
03a718c643434eb2738df2d4bd2f59c1
f8ce67d25d3b987653e13ecda5512eef44827648
'2012-05-25T17:07:03-04:00'
describe
'40616' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHN' 'sip-files00087.pro'
59e84b79d8d25c35fd85178ea99abefe
c8d092ea185d07ee0fc357fa5aceb12aa8bf1cb6
'2012-05-25T17:14:49-04:00'
describe
'36998' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHO' 'sip-files00090.pro'
c120d4a09da7d48cfa2acec51e373df8
6f9c11ffb0da8a497bfae5b6190652bbc141514b
describe
'34269' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHP' 'sip-files00091.pro'
f4f1935f82c22766712bef20a14a091a
94ec430d1ad352c5da37d26496cc938b9b0233b5
describe
'34995' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHQ' 'sip-files00092.pro'
2850d07b4ce1aa21db21076fc6a4cd4e
ca28d002a15c1c215279eb298c102ca50dcfdee1
describe
'29845' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHR' 'sip-files00093.pro'
25ecc39b610345fc61504229a1047466
d960f69dee18758127775952c26e6c49ef1fa29e
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHS' 'sip-files00094.pro'
13aba9ddad3c6587fb02b8d468c238bb
a70824d627fadf40361f5e1adf388db91b1748af
'2012-05-25T17:09:49-04:00'
describe
'36129' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHT' 'sip-files00095.pro'
157cb7effa9dda0e16482db9901ed56d
6cb43d2ca5ee24397b3e40ba085361c96a6c6261
describe
'36627' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHU' 'sip-files00096.pro'
fb1c0bde682e19dc85b646feccad280e
0c8e92c1e3001ebb04dd36d2f4dce648b971e5a9
describe
'36403' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHV' 'sip-files00097.pro'
b30a8df19e5b7f75d431daf9c5992c07
6178924056b2d270e16f1362b2639482ccdabe67
describe
'39532' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHW' 'sip-files00098.pro'
13c8012fcf13249948aa83184f9b0ae4
fdb81afa77f7168d0b6e14278228955f9cb0dcad
describe
'37612' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHX' 'sip-files00099.pro'
3865b34e7b9184bdf4d95f4c048105b5
cfe2a5159d0318ccf0c9655b44c8cef88faafa10
'2012-05-25T17:09:34-04:00'
describe
'34477' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHY' 'sip-files00100.pro'
3ed81c700f9ef73eb9794ac3f36b7be8
62040793d5c295606355715ca4b61c61546bd810
'2012-05-25T17:09:08-04:00'
describe
'34347' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGHZ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
e36729409d2b53f85fc3aaeb0c7bb6dd
26cac8475fede65c1ec3904cb23f0edc778c80ad
describe
'32488' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIA' 'sip-files00102.pro'
4a4c2eeb2f725908892518fec3d8c37a
3aaf4cc5b639879011ace6d85dde5103740425eb
describe
'35296' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIB' 'sip-files00103.pro'
280a56b7b8c5f4fdbb26be4427378360
fc37da00f03a994c47575c645f21ba75d0ea1d45
describe
'41075' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIC' 'sip-files00104.pro'
7759969901ea86907bfb24c2313c237a
2584a7cd25de26ce502dd09731cf3b38a72e0257
describe
'27385' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGID' 'sip-files00105.pro'
40b4d53225e76dfaf199929c2adcc8a5
304c57e3420f16268fcf2af96c670751c1364296
describe
'32675' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIE' 'sip-files00106.pro'
e7154871714a0715a320fc847cb1fda5
866ced7f71fb0d812696c29c14b9fa9fd0f746be
describe
'38298' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIF' 'sip-files00107.pro'
e3765aa75f97e2c14a2f3861770a3314
cc669d1cb63dd899516f4d114ba0874b06350be6
describe
'38829' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIG' 'sip-files00109.pro'
d5e8e8695c91fba05926e2c8d74e4df5
c8870c4d84fbdf5a6fe8d4166a0ab97ef9ed2d7e
'2012-05-25T17:10:37-04:00'
describe
'35651' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIH' 'sip-files00110.pro'
ff33ad37e33011bce6600db5bd756bf4
04b2b560c538408921ac11fbd92dc2dd86a439ed
'2012-05-25T17:07:26-04:00'
describe
'42158' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGII' 'sip-files00112.pro'
50ab69182306e83e8c3de9b5865847b0
6d15f5f2bc1294d8a91579fc3d1313d32cd22041
'2012-05-25T17:07:37-04:00'
describe
'41094' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIJ' 'sip-files00113.pro'
40e607a96452f3752fc566af64efa652
e42514d8934a7e70ca488ffba85ab0016e1e8570
describe
'42010' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIK' 'sip-files00114.pro'
cf128e3282e660ba4cb7ea1690985180
95735607f7fa21940653800dc118d770a38fccec
describe
'36719' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIL' 'sip-files00115.pro'
91d8424dd8e5fe5fe8ef6956e19b229f
c9c14af4f717a4b6c3935fe2c4a25b19802b0746
describe
'39031' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIM' 'sip-files00117.pro'
534fb5d233db25a3ec3aec69b29513d0
07d6913918c144c526600d9a3b828aa9469b138d
describe
'39373' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIN' 'sip-files00119.pro'
0e4268de587ebbfb189545d9e013e8f1
d4df24191f7ec8518a92651ae1c99dfe13a0f10e
describe
'40910' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIO' 'sip-files00120.pro'
77e70e5d44c70ef21a9d6bb3cfb64ee7
25e4634d86abc550d2ad8f800c05e3da62308238
'2012-05-25T17:05:18-04:00'
describe
'40626' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIP' 'sip-files00121.pro'
0c0813ae0075a7b72f02590d7a88496b
6767330693a7a97a6a0050943474024684874d23
'2012-05-25T17:12:50-04:00'
describe
'37540' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIQ' 'sip-files00122.pro'
95394ee1ad1f6843d12477005f56304d
8a8e463910479bf57b0f3a82939e1e92ca127748
describe
'41377' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIR' 'sip-files00123.pro'
f7292fc954ab0ad57dd579157da09919
e2a796fad603f5175b4c05203c48a074bddb8fb6
describe
'39332' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIS' 'sip-files00124.pro'
e03120fbf8cf37e918462510a7fdda95
fdcf9c75c1cc668e90b8edf4b11d68a4c96e9434
describe
'35494' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIT' 'sip-files00125.pro'
1d573849315df22f859b018cd59508ef
ec44775be46b7a7e1cbf856ea689fbd659861922
'2012-05-25T17:18:36-04:00'
describe
'35420' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIU' 'sip-files00127.pro'
e557643c2d763986fd59d0b70ed02da0
61a67714d319b0868b41f70e69300ed831e8418e
'2012-05-25T17:07:29-04:00'
describe
'39833' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIV' 'sip-files00128.pro'
c1780f540728c2e425761e7eb458b7ee
6adc7499555d9bf9eb8612758a59670f4a6d5be9
'2012-05-25T17:18:02-04:00'
describe
'19633' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIW' 'sip-files00129.pro'
65afab533a6494956f8decf41f23be94
b72eff4dfeb6a27ede20917af2fc28d5b7c7033d
describe
'2006' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIX' 'sip-files00130.pro'
68d965be66eed754227d779be827438a
d9f1f1af407a5706b4d321d414b3fbec02069eff
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIY' 'sip-files00131.pro'
c9067eff2e714c7d320031c7043205f4
df7bd5efe076d1f77d92e1e5c9011effbc10987c
describe
'26248' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGIZ' 'sip-files00132.pro'
8d2551e14e9c32e4d37c7d3da8eabd45
2854a16895bebc7b5d22cd75de41f4da686eeb63
'2012-05-25T17:15:20-04:00'
describe
'42410' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJA' 'sip-files00133.pro'
f9daac71188ed92e04e597b690413eb9
162321f2b8e687d3190921842841887296f335e3
'2012-05-25T17:07:47-04:00'
describe
'41345' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJB' 'sip-files00135.pro'
146c71ffe8f5e851b79a2b7e9fc6b0dc
7cd5c6dd22881e34d519149a006460e1861e33cf
describe
'39107' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJC' 'sip-files00136.pro'
07e0fe8aa8c73a5bfe1debfa7438573e
72aca53595ba4008c868a3769f31066d00ee2cf4
describe
'38531' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJD' 'sip-files00138.pro'
c883bce4ecd4ed24964b121cc0339f3a
554fce8689f6827b9a40a14594c21352138669a1
describe
'40361' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJE' 'sip-files00139.pro'
40be47f9a41fe8c025ad8169b3ca4b91
2399b69e3f2fc85efef583241f87dacae72b908c
describe
'35949' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJF' 'sip-files00140.pro'
67636bc1a8e1868511205b0cc60b5f8a
e3defaf64b64029bad220d37d927ebf97afc919a
describe
'9885' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJG' 'sip-files00141.pro'
38ec688b345cabc5ffdf41c4696e775a
53632467e2ca1ac6f575e9368faea2f7468c6701
describe
'23724' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJH' 'sip-files00142.pro'
042bc7a2db3997e2e71cdada07019a4c
27ce70c18edf1c75bcb958f017f1531274ebeba9
describe
'36173' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJI' 'sip-files00143.pro'
8fad8935b7aa32fd4bf6421388421ed2
3b888ae635fa42f768493d49ebfd37865a07c68c
describe
'32478' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJJ' 'sip-files00144.pro'
e6e0675c1e3005822caa45cb3b0f7398
49a30ccc564b6a9f23d036d42483e44df57a2655
describe
'39501' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJK' 'sip-files00145.pro'
a0178e4c73264349ebdc7a00070a90b6
43c80dcbc26d24f04dbd1ac124b9eef4e3daed7a
'2012-05-25T17:07:24-04:00'
describe
'40881' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJL' 'sip-files00146.pro'
92317415b5f00af5d9f13d4516da0769
b28bbe86dd474e43f235826aac2bc3a28083103a
describe
'38635' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJM' 'sip-files00147.pro'
5b5db4c27908d0d8e7ae13f45f4c92f1
7ab8e6e9b45eb5317a7ec137fab3be8515626e38
describe
'35776' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJN' 'sip-files00148.pro'
4be2e8e7d3e08d2071185333e022d449
6ae7cf00f0b671338d23daa60ae7321cda3e02bd
'2012-05-25T17:11:28-04:00'
describe
'35082' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJO' 'sip-files00149.pro'
5424ba9399ccef0e695e625427fa4188
78e5d4c03fd9758e7afeb27982206daf57752e65
describe
'26404' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJP' 'sip-files00150.pro'
eca9443384fdc30c48b0f8ce1618f6d8
e3d18cf996535588f6f2fec23f73827e626cb21d
describe
'32735' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJQ' 'sip-files00151.pro'
c36893acfe80ef9200c4ca9ffa79c6ac
63e2273fc3d8582750b93ee30ae74b6a4456e6c7
describe
'31260' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJR' 'sip-files00152.pro'
6aa0b6d5141ea0b7ef57e6c1405eca86
346ec757e74f74002df503d798e4f995b8e74044
describe
'28606' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJS' 'sip-files00153.pro'
02143d033d2a098c6105f1b56b473835
3f0832d6d290caab07aaa7807380e9b83d651d81
describe
'42223' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJT' 'sip-files00154.pro'
a1edffde512e8d8d35448a5125cf3e52
394edf6270e5f7951d5af53c8b54f556bc93e14f
'2012-05-25T17:05:54-04:00'
describe
'41780' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJU' 'sip-files00155.pro'
4438289311ea63ded83ba86ae65f10ec
518f89ef33c8f33d34d2e782bae843a4acfce2c8
describe
'41665' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJV' 'sip-files00156.pro'
b96debb723f202133330ef2b3253fb1e
d16f99fb3e1a2f9b316a15fbf4d9a78bc517ba33
describe
'40310' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJW' 'sip-files00157.pro'
53fd23733b8d42d17e5b51b343f81a14
738e9976cfcc76a49b1e582b4d3f9c78f186c9f3
describe
'36838' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJX' 'sip-files00158.pro'
ccbf63a8c6faac3c2b502fe1df404250
2cd2c091de05cb99095d1b3302ca22212b5292da
'2012-05-25T17:12:05-04:00'
describe
'37978' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJY' 'sip-files00159.pro'
fa5b0ddc7b5988559cdd00a5cf78b745
c694f3bd2ee5ce91aeb36c8001fe4eb8be6750ea
describe
'38486' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGJZ' 'sip-files00160.pro'
a01d67a1b17bf8b30f361517e33374dd
47a4720fa9dec6de6a7ea09963b79a3874743f7e
'2012-05-25T17:12:34-04:00'
describe
'42796' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKA' 'sip-files00162.pro'
ae355cd87b78cbcbbf260079ef4c581b
8e2f53c09dce19781c14f203a00f8ff8c6565c02
describe
'37815' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKB' 'sip-files00163.pro'
0cd33baee2161fb5f3b9d3faf8bf84f9
128bc76f953767de767dbf9bc7ef2b9c8112f99e
describe
'40350' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKC' 'sip-files00166.pro'
1d581cd0c147f558b2298aa7411fd171
b13dd0ede7f801677a2f908fc088d6939a28ea76
describe
'38678' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKD' 'sip-files00167.pro'
13e0d5eceb6c75f6fdbb3094ea58c518
c048ded254d0707727daf7fe46f701837a5e319d
describe
'37038' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKE' 'sip-files00168.pro'
c20aca948767f9ddadd4eb64f5179494
234f7a07132bffef527fe1989809da17d6080221
'2012-05-25T17:15:07-04:00'
describe
'31945' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKF' 'sip-files00169.pro'
9e7968b380aec19452724568cab77d68
e69fb761e722fe9b657fcd032a66d941878c3445
describe
'26906' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKG' 'sip-files00170.pro'
c37dfe4ee819839214b1c75c92e3b7f1
e76b6cb0efd699d5089db1f0f67b43e87669b1a3
describe
'34030' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKH' 'sip-files00171.pro'
81a5c5528eb502b3033291ade5aa57bc
0b5f54a309b8f9f792b78a16e241790f60864e64
describe
'34610' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKI' 'sip-files00172.pro'
95b952899e38c1cbb0bc0ff05d105b13
5210329272241190fa80f32d143e33664dda3d2a
describe
'33750' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKJ' 'sip-files00173.pro'
eb1ae786797c74741dd3b66ed4b28864
0e80f7767df67cc45d7fccc06b0ae9a5abb82d52
'2012-05-25T17:17:00-04:00'
describe
'40809' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKK' 'sip-files00175.pro'
c57cee27c9285b83b4ff2ab3188b7c7a
e7538bba4f1185794fe6d874344d810535e20ade
describe
'38806' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKL' 'sip-files00176.pro'
4057ae93fbbf795000bf401dcbc47779
11a151129d2ea0ed2acb513a3243c12b6488b128
describe
'39160' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKM' 'sip-files00179.pro'
c719fc521bbc650045a05e52d08b26cd
8446d5ea2ce256dd617f05abd07cc8e000aafc52
describe
'40876' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKN' 'sip-files00180.pro'
26cf0b929fc47f360c8d5f81c3d765d1
6618cb2baef5456710af797e372508316f422921
'2012-05-25T17:06:14-04:00'
describe
'39348' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKO' 'sip-files00181.pro'
256c2b7e1dfa3cedb633768b9da9008a
11886b5636df0a1df10794c3e9dba96f03fca246
describe
'35466' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKP' 'sip-files00183.pro'
16b339fd7b6509e5aebc97ef02643fd0
44cbbcffbef56a61cbd934b95fd9e4c0ac272acd
'2012-05-25T17:03:58-04:00'
describe
'36116' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKQ' 'sip-files00184.pro'
34daff0be44352c6dc09756969600976
96e0d248003a7eb0521ea48726c3e055baf38375
'2012-05-25T17:17:12-04:00'
describe
'34097' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKR' 'sip-files00185.pro'
d73f16d3ec1f445a35550b9dcfbb4211
04e735e8875ae60aa90e7b1ebd9664bcf57781a9
describe
'33936' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKS' 'sip-files00186.pro'
f3bab432f86a315340dce7d3918f8bd6
2da923c91602b3e7a151c0dd178cc8ddfd8d3f73
describe
'32934' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKT' 'sip-files00187.pro'
d971b644196391c59118396aef44d350
c10c8b7965cf8fc67ab1ca501bb788aa7708defe
describe
'35860' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKU' 'sip-files00188.pro'
18ec9dc128cff9c48f6872fc0fbe60cb
a5b27208fd44171bd2b208297e26accfa12740fe
describe
'33972' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKV' 'sip-files00189.pro'
2ea70555bb868bb06e487d712cb132ba
8fd851b6c5f3e1fad74c7136282c0d352fe641c6
'2012-05-25T17:07:12-04:00'
describe
'41156' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKW' 'sip-files00191.pro'
3cb3235112e798f661e0abd641b57761
418aca334d41db0f2af91fe5672da373e87d1c48
describe
'33827' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKX' 'sip-files00192.pro'
85a8ff528c14a0e98e5fe600bfb73535
e29b7c3cfe2d30f571cf30add05e4b7d5197b136
'2012-05-25T17:07:34-04:00'
describe
'28024' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKY' 'sip-files00193.pro'
53ecf54e8183bf2325f22e7265ce7740
59f72a771e9ef022286b8b866a26c765746e02cb
describe
'35569' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGKZ' 'sip-files00194.pro'
86e9c69af897af93a572580359f640a9
732a9a07fcac3b236e3d3ecb7668f8ef2ce8fcb9
describe
'37140' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLA' 'sip-files00195.pro'
7607325fd57a65a116283a80df898008
78b3ebde508d73894ad3cb43ffdb524fdf6d280c
describe
'35833' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLB' 'sip-files00196.pro'
2030f216ed88eb805cc31d38fcf30e3a
b3d7920a217bca2069bbd04bd1a40ad93255daa6
describe
'38047' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLC' 'sip-files00197.pro'
fe56dabd9ef6b07e2303da2eca13483a
1fd375d9db3b8ac5c45e331888d81ff451dbfc3d
describe
'40624' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLD' 'sip-files00198.pro'
d44b07d240f4cde5e9c7cfdce63ab973
27437c4edbf3a007bf28dd2d3fb2c7e0500f38bb
describe
'38525' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLE' 'sip-files00200.pro'
a7ab37df89ccbf5f76ce6b5bf31e41db
d03f69ed4667a603042b466c269e60ede96abb63
describe
'13763' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLF' 'sip-files00201.pro'
efde7ee768f9e898217704337955617d
07b1c778e4d34d4738a9f93827b0014e2b1dcdf7
describe
'27633' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLG' 'sip-files00202.pro'
77efb5c0ec8c0414aeffa358ff9d0c5a
ab50825afef78d6262235dda603ad1a920883e85
describe
'34274' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLH' 'sip-files00203.pro'
433ae6bf5b9677897f35f6a22c623c0e
1f6b14c35de4a07215cfecafa68015dddcdd9e03
describe
'40401' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLI' 'sip-files00204.pro'
680ab2de9f9dd96324e1ecfe231bd0dd
afbc0a94884486076b421be3c48dfa93847eaa06
'2012-05-25T17:07:48-04:00'
describe
'38199' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLJ' 'sip-files00205.pro'
3320257096374e8be06903930dc24635
027bbb984d588d8a226549d6228f31dcc25eba47
describe
'38543' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLK' 'sip-files00206.pro'
a01df95fc44a2c2df3f12f5a647fc6ee
881c9fa04204e03d0caff4637792d4fc8c570042
describe
'43732' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLL' 'sip-files00207.pro'
3181edd0ba473301ee36b26b359eef35
dc4e5d7bc87fe908edce1b63f1bfa771f1e1145f
describe
'38808' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLM' 'sip-files00208.pro'
bb2c07941b204c1ed4de4fa379d2eeca
9031e531efa601778eb9133141cedc5fe66e110e
'2012-05-25T17:06:11-04:00'
describe
'34727' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLN' 'sip-files00210.pro'
a763f78aecdf38a48d9e9663694bbaf6
5e6473d6e3eba160009c02fbc8d5b47b8d6cee45
'2012-05-25T17:05:25-04:00'
describe
'38515' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLO' 'sip-files00211.pro'
c3676a0409811bd24a5da9f4b6fb3b38
ca6bdc508cdcc39ccc551c83a2623e6f6460d3b3
'2012-05-25T17:03:50-04:00'
describe
'36269' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLP' 'sip-files00212.pro'
a758b9503a4caa462b4497df7be947fa
d4900af471fbd56e01b7e1933dbf7b08e54edd1e
describe
'34229' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLQ' 'sip-files00213.pro'
5ce28577b0630000fbc86be8e6b631fc
0acaac8127db0ee2491096a1c1549f31ce45856a
describe
'28691' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLR' 'sip-files00214.pro'
0f4b6cc79e850aa1ce62127a74da0591
7b0a39dddd83efd2d9125a5140189a8852da842c
'2012-05-25T17:07:04-04:00'
describe
'43008' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLS' 'sip-files00215.pro'
75cc3257a5e03975a270449031a9a04c
8f5ef07d3d6b68e7389a6646c99155de77a4a33a
describe
'41845' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLT' 'sip-files00216.pro'
35904f4a23782b0c51378b153a9151bf
803e039dab34996609e78800223dbebba791a266
describe
'38290' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLU' 'sip-files00218.pro'
3a91847fb042831994a04122b707285f
6c3bc85965e8c7018a42798cf4380a870dfe0655
describe
'41082' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLV' 'sip-files00219.pro'
6cc099e211262698ba401b3f529fc04a
96569053f04e1d9aef4db921ae469b943531eb05
describe
'37121' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLW' 'sip-files00220.pro'
a92b9c2f7aabbb5c2ce97182d10e8b39
0d72b950b460cee956394756a3d8e0f642a73673
'2012-05-25T17:08:36-04:00'
describe
'39122' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLX' 'sip-files00221.pro'
05278951d406eee57df0debb3215cd40
7c6a38d435bd5f86ce6da4343f8a0acf9d47a39a
describe
'39785' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLY' 'sip-files00222.pro'
0ce2275422a11da4f75655145351fbc0
006003b3abd291bf3eac43e0905b5dcd516a2bc7
describe
'27228' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGLZ' 'sip-files00223.pro'
8203f47378b00056084511da67123aec
91bdb320aebc7704a85cc5086c131ae545a255d1
describe
'39770' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMA' 'sip-files00225.pro'
b364b72703345d4b3571e8aa4784b4ab
e6dac859c11939ae7ede84e3e7138d08e511c5f0
describe
'42632' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMB' 'sip-files00226.pro'
0c09631f23acf32e6116143f1f1ef0c5
749b64b01b330d9c00d45a5b80757d25801f7d21
describe
'43103' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMC' 'sip-files00227.pro'
ce7e697d1fd39408d478d4bb885300f4
db4262c2a805fb6cda373d0630725e1c64fbf9af
describe
'43323' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMD' 'sip-files00228.pro'
637a5c4c9c509e413d77ab91076677c4
93cd2093fdb37232b94737d0d7c9df3702d2c4cb
describe
'42149' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGME' 'sip-files00229.pro'
b3c069ec7bb981307b3c1b550015234f
2b3f8ddf2fd861bd46cb553120b98d92d9568c28
'2012-05-25T17:13:51-04:00'
describe
'38777' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMF' 'sip-files00231.pro'
11786abc640a7c0277fcc5e9117c509a
24e92914866c20c9460081f2e84a60ff9d6527f9
describe
'38748' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMG' 'sip-files00232.pro'
5b0976d7da70826e54bb4e25f1c65b55
706d09762d3aacee7023708144201c84c512d656
describe
'39560' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMH' 'sip-files00233.pro'
52dc26877c52c4c348d71d73f59bda3e
affc8cd348e8f306163662ad414eaaf63ca0c49b
describe
'41489' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMI' 'sip-files00234.pro'
6f113f041ae1767fe3cb93b1ed0524f8
98357407f08a48a47e5fef72d09315623ddcac29
describe
'1865' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMJ' 'sip-files00235.pro'
69c189e274f74e84d22495a28cf5b4bf
dde4d4a6e3d4c91750ff2145bd90019d905c1f8f
describe
'21345' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMK' 'sip-files00236.pro'
59b627751f353d17cecd77659f3260c6
47874059c116e6db346632591fc6d7f75632c98c
describe
'36247' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGML' 'sip-files00237.pro'
d65d5458ca3e87c6e9d8065ed05605cc
771642b2c46194953fd02d09fd7a9885b143b649
'2012-05-25T17:03:46-04:00'
describe
'38095' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMM' 'sip-files00238.pro'
1a4ba696193267c6dabb20f9feaaef3f
9c0ee06124a4faedd3fedc5034c556c4ac4a0631
describe
'36158' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMN' 'sip-files00240.pro'
7b2c036843907c6a24797b90e3848b39
cc52524ed153a54af45c1cf4511ef3a74b44a649
describe
'37542' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMO' 'sip-files00241.pro'
29b862e359a5de2a0be0ec8d4277c77c
b5cdf9972780ffc2f00141c57c118c5e495a7cbc
describe
'37576' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMP' 'sip-files00243.pro'
1e677895616d141faa9f990bd7ef75d0
760d2b51085b7c37bb120e40c427808e900ffecc
describe
'35811' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMQ' 'sip-files00245.pro'
caab82275551a91b1ccec605cc70d8b2
db75247f1644572266f9db90cb179d78f0ade8af
'2012-05-25T17:11:38-04:00'
describe
'37998' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMR' 'sip-files00246.pro'
385b8cad3a26aefe1a87a8dbb6c2e5cf
bd1f50012e605ab7b6bf4ed69296b1c5a1c4e6e1
'2012-05-25T17:16:39-04:00'
describe
'37853' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMS' 'sip-files00247.pro'
95f738e80ab468e1cca672419944d9b9
273bbc984d4731bec825c05bef7e0ee79468ef9a
'2012-05-25T17:17:54-04:00'
describe
'37023' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMT' 'sip-files00248.pro'
afae4d3275bef7492b22d42b9ac47e96
9627b19c9222beddb67bedaf383f5032022ae7a5
'2012-05-25T17:13:06-04:00'
describe
'41223' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMU' 'sip-files00249.pro'
6336cf0b7477e71329e00d242d5225ff
3070eaafd4ccc785a1828ba2d62ff7fd8429197c
describe
'40495' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMV' 'sip-files00250.pro'
4ea6d11f52229b89f4095c83299bda9d
4a448538a309f795ddb5f2ad75e30596e5ea1a52
describe
'40398' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMW' 'sip-files00251.pro'
7a952b1e8f829486f86c24bbad0bb50f
ca829d3e5f4ebfb4848cec66d48acffa4de67859
describe
'40430' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMX' 'sip-files00252.pro'
b5296bcb582faeb748afd96161a60c3f
6e7b17513fca1776004d3e4d3b2229b7130695cc
describe
'38536' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMY' 'sip-files00253.pro'
a7274e3d4537e56bd31880bcf2792bfd
dbacab50b9f21da3e9f42e2b6013d2c7ed3a7c60
describe
'39196' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGMZ' 'sip-files00254.pro'
59c59f9a9f57cd7b6ef5eacc285cf752
759c6a86bc6318726354f57dfdac57b3132c3c24
describe
'33678' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNA' 'sip-files00256.pro'
776137ea6cd1dae0be9b7d4a253d572a
6be1040fe8fe93d955fe9ed810e85ed8ecc81dc6
'2012-05-25T17:06:15-04:00'
describe
'32925' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNB' 'sip-files00257.pro'
7fba541acec3d083b6501d7d894487cb
39c60876c29fdc077c779ce9c5c368d721eb07ec
'2012-05-25T17:05:59-04:00'
describe
'36680' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNC' 'sip-files00258.pro'
e8e87c92bbd6c320467cb7b685a10e9e
dce87f3481bb060d8add9c587323333e8dbd109b
'2012-05-25T17:08:53-04:00'
describe
'35974' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGND' 'sip-files00259.pro'
e3cf46ba6023e8db4f09ee9f50b7afc0
84bd03362f8e40fd8b74d72aeec1cbbc544656fe
describe
'36049' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNE' 'sip-files00260.pro'
fa415b4393d6d8012fbef79ff7b64d3b
0995de941cdfe0a48430e89eadce101ec8f09961
describe
'39668' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNF' 'sip-files00261.pro'
817891138270973b0718ac775e8c9b3d
9b7277b70126f4fc4953dd458027ddba48f57ae3
describe
'41864' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNG' 'sip-files00262.pro'
28d756302e086032c59b5156957f32d6
c9c0f5687ad728dfb3c98497f00db8d83568ebb5
describe
'28201' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNH' 'sip-files00263.pro'
059e3379fb30ae01e4f92896854bc07e
3c8ec365e0c26b0bcc97a99ae7a3ae71c0e233ec
describe
'5225' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNI' 'sip-files00264.pro'
708aa06c52a5693683bb1412d9d1fb9b
9fe8007f175c410576855f5d5c92294a006e9d43
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNJ' 'sip-files00265.pro'
05fef6b5cb9ba58909cb2e650b9ae121
a8284871aa4c60e6067c3b22cb0592f940f95039
describe
'26913' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNK' 'sip-files00266.pro'
7507afff2dc6a3af61c86dcfcde5f277
c6fc063e7f16eead4312216de4acd49c23d3f3da
describe
'28931' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNL' 'sip-files00267.pro'
01a84cee27a4055f4f2aed3b92714976
e65a969e46a9b00d2b25714335317abc06b58b98
'2012-05-25T17:07:30-04:00'
describe
'22973' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNM' 'sip-files00268.pro'
976c9dfe03d7ffb50b21e88a8e68a488
a54eb28a96f0d1bdd1b40cbb30bb5f2e4c7807a3
describe
'21878' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNN' 'sip-files00269.pro'
4233ad827c7634a9d6dffb1e0072f269
852401fa955531513bf0090feacebdae5c358ae9
describe
'16902' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNO' 'sip-files00270.pro'
3c9972761d7496096ac6a973949d627b
a0ad8dd9f146ff6aa66d860a9b41588d8b87ab38
describe
'17998' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNP' 'sip-files00271.pro'
c9c4a9de96b49bc162a03f1448a65671
42afe19f880a3d774e5b2fd750f7d74bf6256070
describe
'19511' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNQ' 'sip-files00272.pro'
b1e1442f9d7ca655e10429871ec612f0
64d884bb2017b8e7488675aae7d09916145d7a92
describe
'29033' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNR' 'sip-files00273.pro'
69edb5a7fef4361a0a000c15d568d8fb
d73ba61b54bb9ca8bf0b65e99e740b44a54acb1b
describe
'27119' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNS' 'sip-files00274.pro'
ac189b627bc641836ff2f7a1708905a9
313d643182f987d270be437354e6c306b5a6a7e1
'2012-05-25T17:13:35-04:00'
describe
'18539' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNT' 'sip-files00275.pro'
4ed3167915b608184502920cbcc2d012
6e65e0f2ee8c854fbda04915224855a517bce6a6
describe
'32625' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNU' 'sip-files00276.pro'
10ca7f17830b46a6de03331d989f0db0
75531dd2a8854cf9e59196f3e61cd851d61c619e
describe
'38162' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNV' 'sip-files00277.pro'
cf0973fd3bd73500d84186b806743893
6c91019f5b75ccef2ad9358789aaa58c8cce7265
describe
'15359' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNW' 'sip-files00278.pro'
4505d32081646690ade307449a688cfb
85830499cfa01ba828590a41b59502e696c8e14b
describe
'19440' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNX' 'sip-files00279.pro'
9e40687668221b529c9b69f64f38efcb
83b29d4f6cf381c278b3c5fc21ebb17f787d08cd
describe
'23247' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNY' 'sip-files00281.pro'
1e537eadf68e2078e28497292168fb3c
0c89c4f9686bf076e015001fd0ec391f46d91dc2
describe
'29761' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGNZ' 'sip-files00282.pro'
bd0e38589ac3d8143f660cedcc44ab05
a2378674e4a4c67e5935f77193ece318eddbb2f8
describe
'27360' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOA' 'sip-files00283.pro'
6a97241cca3d11a3d75bc9b39f5d3a98
21b74947deaff5ef5b74ade9eeee51f3cbf0a9d0
describe
'26491' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOB' 'sip-files00284.pro'
ede8119241e4844041e4653b0797dfff
6427ae0c86c05750d6ece1396c59ee326f0a4a1f
'2012-05-25T17:12:31-04:00'
describe
'22347' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOC' 'sip-files00285.pro'
f0d69e521d19647dd9bda7679d032fca
baa4ed3ef8cca94ee68d3f07025144cacb0cf4bb
describe
'23793' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOD' 'sip-files00286.pro'
63b69e3393ee93e94098394c0325423b
96bd06575d7085aabd49f1fceab67f7096ad57b7
describe
'44535' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOE' 'sip-files00287.pro'
292080f7a41457e8251706d3fc0122fa
84ac092e932c58dbe2251bfbc2abc4003875139e
describe
'27702' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOF' 'sip-files00288.pro'
70929db539229577e8e71ad06036c0f3
d804ff1d4450b6a24980a508d3bf5ef769817869
'2012-05-25T17:07:02-04:00'
describe
'21046' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOG' 'sip-files00289.pro'
e99667d34360b9628c954cfae9048ade
af8cecd607b1448407b8ebf179560c0efb30ea23
describe
'19760' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOH' 'sip-files00290.pro'
199e8dedb50b9588654e62996221f244
f68e6c114d7194776633026070c8a62735c38d5c
describe
'17134' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOI' 'sip-files00291.pro'
fc40feac9c6617016e8ef185fe457afd
ab18a0506023e5626e18f524582d1785934c5e04
'2012-05-25T17:17:31-04:00'
describe
'23465' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOJ' 'sip-files00292.pro'
1625551e149acbc32495b7de0fe914b6
2a6ac56c4af83744527ecaf25e17517109b7d9dc
'2012-05-25T17:11:12-04:00'
describe
'28476' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOK' 'sip-files00293.pro'
a6d54c7da7bfb3d6855e3039c1538f2a
cbb82a7aa23ec7bfa9d0851a75c2195b5ee4e846
describe
'26136' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOL' 'sip-files00294.pro'
c9ef9223b9af1704cf05350fc9e012bf
eb64e16fa75c9ec16a160d537b119af588beeee0
describe
'19756' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOM' 'sip-files00295.pro'
e449b34fe905083e0dfe4367e502e650
8a9fe5cc38b473332bfa95f4832e39419c1f13fa
describe
'535' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGON' 'sip-files00298.pro'
f9de013ee490e6a0d202e833c6dfd5e3
8034c68411d431fa758c5cfa0ceeaceb7e42d96a
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOO' 'sip-files00299.pro'
e9128f40eb4b131e6f882c21429af4e7
67cc050eb1482bf9c992acd131a6542bf3d17be6
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOP' 'sip-files00300.pro'
39921c00543496737be1894ce168f7c0
c5b4c005951328b6a8ca4cef4ae7e9481181e00b
describe
'29' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOQ' 'sip-files00001.txt'
46b8ac11180836a6d5671902b5122b37
4ecea253ebcd7e10a3f95baf67fc4688a5a9f728
describe
'91' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOR' 'sip-files00002.txt'
33ff458afdea5b8b243fd21f1194b882
e093b608878e1a7c71ec86d50e1a804270837574
'2012-05-25T17:04:27-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'99' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOS' 'sip-files00003.txt'
777eb5473452154ca7673d29de3ef60f
bef151d0b7f4a3e08d88852bb39e449e5c1e7818
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOT' 'sip-files00004.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'276' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOU' 'sip-files00006.txt'
97dc64b38e86f24a930d7e6628f20c32
cd1bfdec59fbb68920940e1864392d1cd7869fa0
describe
Invalid character
'420' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOV' 'sip-files00007.txt'
6901dd3ac6ff8a1e41b01618082c1e4a
4cc6fad4c5ae21a29b334a5898d5e123a13eed52
describe
'949' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOW' 'sip-files00009.txt'
9556aba13cdc04e25ffdc28acc7b5fe6
77c21a2db570c7ed2e27d6de56b090ffed6e5547
describe
'1344' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOX' 'sip-files00010.txt'
de91a010b1d516d9ea1565bca581929b
fb3fd7871c56d58b3ff0f468ed2418a8fc96c9fb
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOY' 'sip-files00011.txt'
edac6290083d801618e79b69d13fba67
70c26f1bebd009e6b6790d959608858aa133c29f
'2012-05-25T17:15:41-04:00'
describe
'1656' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGOZ' 'sip-files00012.txt'
a877a3862ac6739f0ebb69e06467168d
2f87c25532b359eaf5004d9f07a0b52b9a1d9472
describe
'1650' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPA' 'sip-files00013.txt'
993092bc71f83a1e71d610c636967aa9
253c1c8ce8aecb54cd254b6a5598816e104af86e
describe
'1529' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPB' 'sip-files00014.txt'
95e8af1bf3ac27840726170368c72648
8932c40122a061e0a9413ad05926f16b27f77ad8
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPC' 'sip-files00015.txt'
c36e64295d4e7663298d46699e5f0e36
0abb27362a6acdc08da2ea2c5165f401379bc379
describe
'1623' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPD' 'sip-files00016.txt'
5e3f00c9f55b3fc0f6c196366cfd129c
4b08223e38b1e6d17a3e6b653271ff563ad9d851
describe
'1772' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPE' 'sip-files00017.txt'
428cbdf98e6ec1122f3ab5da8b7d2593
d696504bee2c7764bd2c93a3b63d5f5e4d58bfaa
describe
'1486' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPF' 'sip-files00019.txt'
e7a524dfc69d9a6a5fac881372b8e6bf
7956616b06b03188c0d4255120d5b077ad78501f
describe
'1600' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPG' 'sip-files00020.txt'
ff018273e3ba3d95438b84f5052001d0
3af811ac185c8290e2ec6440d73e70da6c6391f2
describe
'877' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPH' 'sip-files00021.txt'
d78890bcac2c45374fb12932d3194b30
a4534f02636e7a65fcc92ed27bc5f5de9b777492
'2012-05-25T17:16:52-04:00'
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPI' 'sip-files00022.txt'
20f1b1e9b147cf3468b481267971331f
7c356b12974eafca2e3a475e1bef73c1c848262a
describe
'1694' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPJ' 'sip-files00023.txt'
ca08b4016266edff657f556c939df16c
21d68804d7ae11a9b83ebdabe1f3c0b664976fb5
describe
'1627' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPK' 'sip-files00024.txt'
444164169285f0c5d0b0f23ded76042f
de26e0b46d077ec1d9fff3aa6e53e9604abc6ead
describe
'1610' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPL' 'sip-files00026.txt'
4bf9a58f1fa2791f0a62201de497ef67
617302ba5e2194fdd895c0918b92aa1d95be0147
describe
'1590' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPM' 'sip-files00027.txt'
87169d334335f15ea896d6dbfb0c6953
473b80f8d31016b83d9c9b81d9d0d40f074ab1c1
describe
'1510' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPN' 'sip-files00028.txt'
f28d4f18898859208b213c3ee40d32b9
c1340493bebc21e869a0d009d4504f874408ff89
describe
'1521' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPO' 'sip-files00029.txt'
196633b6efc218cd77be3048c580f04d
562990880e1554976987eabbc74f150b00d00684
'2012-05-25T17:09:10-04:00'
describe
'1449' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPP' 'sip-files00030.txt'
37d351eb17a12b150b5cd4545ae7df98
9ea5e8fa6d364e8e8aaa9309209164e8e9815d2a
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPQ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
633e49951cc921e78e219e98097253fb
9ede3c5c3e36ddc7d978fe3d2c72240b635464d9
'2012-05-25T17:16:32-04:00'
describe
'1651' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPR' 'sip-files00032.txt'
8d0ec2488f28769d18a534f83dec01f0
7d5aafe3bd1c0e81f6f55249f9812f2a643f51a7
'2012-05-25T17:15:40-04:00'
describe
'1642' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPS' 'sip-files00033.txt'
a1669d1215cb6170ba7e48ef002e5c20
5f9b7e65b32d5b8a513777c54f1acd2dd06fc6c2
describe
'1686' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPT' 'sip-files00034.txt'
df5f739425935a877f9f4b63def53a04
fb697f32d056aa370d7624bb973f6c24c79b6bca
describe
'1555' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPU' 'sip-files00035.txt'
d504ea90e7c440ef35cea71a3f533be8
e28700a2e7758f5c0093acc9aaea4703ad53f87a
describe
'1537' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPV' 'sip-files00036.txt'
021e9c285404bfb12ab53bc086be15f5
821218c122ea4a6dc36c82de8a3a7255eb1cf338
describe
'608' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPW' 'sip-files00037.txt'
6b7c0adc3fc66a252580b92b7ac78723
29161f1522490ae604ae7230ef64b40e99ac15c8
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPX' 'sip-files00038.txt'
644708baad32ee4fb6be60c5bdb0a4ac
216f8fe8d084bbfc00d3ea7e8a5b1a1cb94f7bac
describe
'1565' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPY' 'sip-files00039.txt'
8eb8369c0bc0c2cfcbec870df8e6e34d
61bee8500029e09031ecbed021285a1b1d81b306
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGPZ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
8dede23884f21249ee18a1d78faf3101
85d229c75dcbb604c65a61e0ce278db50d4dcf0c
'2012-05-25T17:14:08-04:00'
describe
'1684' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQA' 'sip-files00042.txt'
6b4ddf3f75e60201650fee05e10b41dc
652064d0d132a06bc2527d4120c241d1e29c39eb
'2012-05-25T17:06:16-04:00'
describe
'1768' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQB' 'sip-files00043.txt'
780f519672934723698d13744ecfc24b
9ea6989fae4c96b365d7d106bc45039917b4d3dd
describe
'1706' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQC' 'sip-files00044.txt'
18d46d259ef3b31b9b1e58c35604aa26
f4fcca799b0c2686f2bba6850e15f703e0d448a0
'2012-05-25T17:09:07-04:00'
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQD' 'sip-files00045.txt'
40ba13b4b9f627820fcc878a235bccee
49eabd9c510176f8d42097cb025ed1aeaac85892
describe
'1498' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQE' 'sip-files00046.txt'
8154ed6bb3ac9b888f3a5fb4f5bc9fa1
df4f91143f8ef09b455597fc527beb0d79c25f45
'2012-05-25T17:07:40-04:00'
describe
'1703' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQF' 'sip-files00047.txt'
be5f295c672dfcb67a9efae01c570b4f
dc100cc4d538db27fba7dcbb06f088603d30fcc8
describe
'1625' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQG' 'sip-files00048.txt'
cef63d9b60be882596fd919e58d233cf
b5dd6842534cc1c3d7407b4beeccc633ffd1bc7e
describe
'1653' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQH' 'sip-files00049.txt'
51890426db3526bb7fba08e3b6a59554
e54625ca7567020f1afc5d26b91b3d28c01b843f
'2012-05-25T17:17:38-04:00'
describe
'1386' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQI' 'sip-files00050.txt'
9ec4b3d96d3630ba96d5e6265d08662a
c173ba0f7020e7fbc31fb0c495578106842f2288
describe
'1545' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQJ' 'sip-files00052.txt'
aa6766471feed4a5ea92b16ef9fb6428
955fda5a065487d12a5edd5619c7d57b29221004
describe
'1682' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQK' 'sip-files00053.txt'
837ac546b284ac5b1f20d0a5869fdbb9
b59d11f8d5d884370f379c23b3465a85a32a57c4
'2012-05-25T17:14:41-04:00'
describe
'1575' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQL' 'sip-files00054.txt'
e506364836a9be9ab973fe678c093369
8bc154a35f4ec12a9b8f2e4ed88f10f6860ec08a
describe
'1572' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQM' 'sip-files00055.txt'
1e09e5634aff76c886e94dd2e04221d5
ff4dcc060e83b9aefea328965d460eef9879b753
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQN' 'sip-files00056.txt'
d6079990c3daf59c034f26f5782603cb
1fdb2f60951083076f5fd702a13bb54454e69d60
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQO' 'sip-files00057.txt'
a10ac9061598a8adb9d7f2af0939842e
05ba6eecaa05faa03c60e144f4652efecde00a48
describe
'1731' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQP' 'sip-files00058.txt'
49e7b0f6c052291eebe0b70dd51d1723
29e0dd5581795d2816df6c594d66d3708646a58b
'2012-05-25T17:18:17-04:00'
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQQ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
4087d18d4367bfba5bb067ca52f80916
b49da1c8c09922da1722c5d063fcfe87eeca4fe5
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQR' 'sip-files00060.txt'
6792db249bf8b6283784f0b3bbedb950
fdeb23536f0224f5d48cd06dba6564b4afaf395c
describe
'1747' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQS' 'sip-files00061.txt'
bbaf87e964090a103e44828334a4b39c
75d3e2ee1daf1fbe1f5995cc3bff7ca1d6378ce3
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQT' 'sip-files00062.txt'
f553e67e1109e67613e1ac066c94bacd
a7bd69698b28ddcf13c3323fe221832b2a76961b
describe
'340' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQU' 'sip-files00063.txt'
b58512fedf7f2873947272511ecb419a
95ee43ada67fb4e2e06e390476c2524463c588c5
'2012-05-25T17:18:05-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1759' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQV' 'sip-files00064.txt'
db7cb7545bd3d7e9bdbe2b62edb478ea
038c3fbd9412e8784f93d8298d76b2fff0393ee7
describe
'1633' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQW' 'sip-files00065.txt'
fd1220a1f0468674522807803ee06d2e
f459fdbf32ad4f9caf7d17d3d2c629398137bcaa
describe
'1640' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQX' 'sip-files00066.txt'
2e92c367e13bba1054e4bcab4546a670
28afbb7902287d2ade5ae5d36b1f1014f8b01d1e
'2012-05-25T17:05:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQY' 'sip-files00067.txt'
20db0bc2f256bae529b8065675c24b74
1c4e3052db74d07d916c638dd905c094cb9a46e1
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGQZ' 'sip-files00068.txt'
e6ff16562dcb07b5f7764e56fc085a86
a0aec8ff8d2b0ba8378786ba9b3071cdd0619026
describe
'1559' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRA' 'sip-files00069.txt'
1b6aad59f7fdf5bbcb0cc336e36b6c53
e0f32bfe031ae77619a267838d0e92a31d0b89a3
'2012-05-25T17:10:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRB' 'sip-files00070.txt'
a1545e15c9363e482903a3c1bcaa844a
9d48b8a973bdb29d5d0a75896d321e4446319d4d
describe
'1652' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRC' 'sip-files00071.txt'
f9454aa1afbb92d65abb6ab6b7e7c696
6ad112956997bb332547ca678a9b0487a8060781
describe
'1593' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRD' 'sip-files00072.txt'
1fd3983d661425ee7607bf69eb88cba6
e03e7022fc2c8061f2299dbd00438ab420aaff75
'2012-05-25T17:12:12-04:00'
describe
'1638' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRE' 'sip-files00073.txt'
5682a8d925b59c9b575a04b0272ed809
8acb67ff8bb68cab846bbb8d05600a66c78cfe74
describe
'393' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRF' 'sip-files00074.txt'
1b6a75748a58c28534f76006c78e0ce4
37c266d75c7685fc145eec038081eb365416df70
'2012-05-25T17:14:19-04:00'
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRG' 'sip-files00075.txt'
200ce1a36444e6f4c8c77351f9ca5b80
f6bc6560e993c42a18a74ef124910b32c95bb3a3
describe
'1505' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRH' 'sip-files00076.txt'
8dea6b8ccc38df82ff2dc4c915d63468
772ba04865ec642385f630509c4043cd9226583e
'2012-05-25T17:15:55-04:00'
describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRI' 'sip-files00078.txt'
e437c91ea2f6433859e176cf33fe743f
0117be3fc1a9aafda60b37b92f5dff7f13ca89a6
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRJ' 'sip-files00079.txt'
abb0e2ee4f988f578682702cd6cdfe9e
ceddb800f58081760dea1b1226787c4c781f4033
describe
'1618' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRK' 'sip-files00080.txt'
cc5501cdc3c79958dfc2a60f7ee1493f
0c6a32bbd27bac5ba24784f2c6e040e15a9332e5
describe
'1709' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRL' 'sip-files00081.txt'
9e3783496b9ad39e757c9032956b431e
f0dc9513dc1d76d600bd9ebe2128e9545d0fb5c4
describe
'1646' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRM' 'sip-files00082.txt'
21112964fa328d3876fc596a16592f77
6e08af3177fc10ff4185da581a8b6a292cef7991
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRN' 'sip-files00083.txt'
c9ebc78adde805f6be672ef6c0760b02
98d8f4fa0d2e2bb0578688503f3990073c521e7e
describe
'1750' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRO' 'sip-files00084.txt'
6ed88c9406962dad7924c853bd4ee36f
395127e267632579f6e7bc46452fe3ee78169511
'2012-05-25T17:12:53-04:00'
describe
'1712' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRP' 'sip-files00085.txt'
98b295b49241ab8fce8bcf77b537f33f
0298b4f440f9dea55eedfe4052b434ba60d6af24
describe
'1803' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRQ' 'sip-files00086.txt'
48b0f9b5f8d1dab3ec4111d9c7a18dbe
611ad2ae9c4cedfe6a34dc61e2e83737d5f1673e
'2012-05-25T17:11:54-04:00'
describe
'1679' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRR' 'sip-files00087.txt'
202b46b8912ff149f4cc3553a89660c0
52d524b4b8a1d629f480442e49316eb5f0c24ba8
'2012-05-25T17:05:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRS' 'sip-files00088.txt'
bf645e04e4faaddc308d126673b80849
45d194dffd0af75c73c2315f53b7b183d0895514
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRT' 'sip-files00090.txt'
9570cc2459112b611f457f953bfa10c0
ad217abc12eceacfd9a2499e9146392db3468901
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRU' 'sip-files00091.txt'
b4b22d526ba4fc7102165dedf1a63721
74155b37dea3f92c5531a3158a55603c56a7424c
'2012-05-25T17:08:16-04:00'
describe
'1472' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRV' 'sip-files00092.txt'
2c74634d329484ea5226d1e9c778543e
b90428853d0dd5a17131fde1e694a272e530e66b
'2012-05-25T17:11:36-04:00'
describe
'1277' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRW' 'sip-files00093.txt'
72d12cbc29ac9f1824e0cc3193e62a18
2d1d3e747a0afffdb85e7936d4fc1bb2f998911d
describe
'1649' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRX' 'sip-files00094.txt'
7084d3621322dc4a3856c45e18911b30
f1bd69cb7b6e9a3615f519f7be80938ff6a248f9
describe
'1509' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRY' 'sip-files00095.txt'
57e16d34d874655fd0ba80d388080835
7bdf6ce0ba8c2f99fe94d41c8280f3725fec1ece
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGRZ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
c73ccd8ed1fc21c58c18ceeb70b5d597
a08552d4f2e2ae77af6972a4293dcca36cfdff98
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSA' 'sip-files00098.txt'
210af45174af14c1a02396d425ea904e
b8ae88935c42a7a2680e4b37267914a2a57066c8
'2012-05-25T17:12:25-04:00'
describe
'1561' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSB' 'sip-files00099.txt'
9d41c27ba10ff93bf2a656bf60185c4d
01ca60714277e31ba7e3316cf0f95268b9cc0ddc
'2012-05-25T17:11:39-04:00'
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSC' 'sip-files00100.txt'
c6cba11dfff20066ff2755e5251676d5
09c8b32919116313a5152d4e25a4bbcf9b07f987
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSD' 'sip-files00101.txt'
7fcbf097306fa0b4a56cce52cbdda8f8
d2633c3e75fd76e13ca345fa600f4800c3047e2e
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSE' 'sip-files00102.txt'
63db3a16e0a8e6a711d139b9e99eafa1
36c392716f0b9f6ea7d2609db06aae377e76f92a
describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSF' 'sip-files00103.txt'
d1caa70bcf77796cc3d69fd59bacfd4d
b5359477f7737a1094e87b135eb22e883ca670b2
describe
'1717' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSG' 'sip-files00104.txt'
05f9a7f7cad6bfa95544be49e9068c81
4ac91a0b97c22643cfd3cffc9fc98c4ba83c54fd
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSH' 'sip-files00105.txt'
9f2970f78c05fbf1366782155eee252d
46e6c8c208de5fc4c215bdfc4e8b91e455d01015
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSI' 'sip-files00106.txt'
79b9eec75db1000f58854be3532ad342
c754d5a7f7744c451cc93ce6aeb55459452b42c0
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSJ' 'sip-files00107.txt'
ec2c44b1c25e42dd97a394a0a3ad2c83
f8348a5b08969e94c7acfb23334b48f1ce37d8ac
describe
'1637' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSK' 'sip-files00108.txt'
1eabae4081d52ebd32390c4740ef418c
06c07ac070b3e555cf2b5edff0c2a73b5f5d3880
'2012-05-25T17:11:24-04:00'
describe
'1620' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSL' 'sip-files00109.txt'
3d412ff13c6f6cd70912de5896323cdd
f9e90fd638f9e3581372e1781a4e1f87cb6e3ead
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSM' 'sip-files00110.txt'
f0cbebff2329399dc9798fd457594d82
2ab9729b1635fe29d658c930c5ba8dc2acc54080
'2012-05-25T17:05:20-04:00'
describe
'1713' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSN' 'sip-files00111.txt'
1aacf76b9532d8e9330eadc8fb689425
ba01f1452ee9fb8f9f08661684a84a1c4ff0733e
describe
'1744' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSO' 'sip-files00112.txt'
fe774498bbc9835791b00d8d835e745e
242692d2e3dfd4ebe037e2837fc1c5739ca9f84a
describe
'1690' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSP' 'sip-files00113.txt'
777fb6952f5ac8d6eadbb2d3063252bb
90feec445206f9ba8e54b394ea44decab0e0393a
describe
'1742' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSQ' 'sip-files00114.txt'
a2ca54dd5c31071e78ae4399bf11dea8
40aff7c16e42977a143f0f071f52fbbbef2d1cb5
describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSR' 'sip-files00115.txt'
8ecd4ed310f9cb8dff5b8caf00551dc8
494a3a70189354dbcbc990e96481e95ddd932c94
'2012-05-25T17:06:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSS' 'sip-files00116.txt'
f38ae8ae7b4785c4256f16cce40269df
dae37a7756d0a9a82e394539039a4943c877a045
describe
'1609' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGST' 'sip-files00117.txt'
e463dee876eed707856a0926df9659cb
a6d2aa4facaa112ca83a76266d469fa34aaeed99
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSU' 'sip-files00118.txt'
3a6678ae3d907c73adbd3303ce27c304
08e4380095fa0dd915c7481d58cb844525647ba1
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSV' 'sip-files00119.txt'
cbc56b465ffb1092cbe941a2c33b2fc7
7f7344a7f9c1feb28e682b7b77b90d9f113a6240
describe
'1698' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSW' 'sip-files00120.txt'
5c25bc868a8087139bc10aa7e08090f8
48866376143be252e88ce839663100e711f4dc80
describe
'1685' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSX' 'sip-files00121.txt'
4731aa9a2a4fac12fc906f415b81d61a
4f99d7fdd659bdef6dd535cd7466ee5b3b1fd78d
describe
'1578' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSY' 'sip-files00122.txt'
cefba0f937e24a6cbc65b6f20d391602
889d9f4bbd03a8a24918b0905eceaa7b656a9474
'2012-05-25T17:18:39-04:00'
describe
'1727' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGSZ' 'sip-files00123.txt'
774584777d275a228dcc3e2247442094
0c0da62bae228819e3c64e14300e687372199624
describe
'1658' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTA' 'sip-files00124.txt'
4824d6e0fbc23e908cce0dd326c3986e
5d253e034ab8731e8cef866c30395c1b6e8a77c4
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTB' 'sip-files00125.txt'
bb7baee6a03a385a719943cc01103853
0f10c5065262b78d8a4a840c87d5029ee7d4ed86
'2012-05-25T17:04:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTC' 'sip-files00126.txt'
db51fa17d358d787b878d6bff414ad64
0ea5bcf42b9e72f41767d9c208cfc75fc8049bda
'2012-05-25T17:10:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTD' 'sip-files00127.txt'
09d194c3b657fa3d5cce7454d9912858
fbc5f38f7b7f610d0db033c008c28ffb5d345383
describe
'1663' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTE' 'sip-files00128.txt'
c525bae3ed45c0fe6b18ea55c83f3771
3924e4eb02997b3bf37a0d43e224ba0df1142bfb
'2012-05-25T17:10:52-04:00'
describe
'812' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTF' 'sip-files00129.txt'
7a15892461821359c7a7e199a2feb7e0
caee657420322304cca800b235435062c3ff5d56
'2012-05-25T17:04:54-04:00'
describe
'149' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTG' 'sip-files00130.txt'
6c643c0c54c1c817fe807c742bed666d
1d10a329c95008be11a79a59c55adb2a47c1a19b
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTH' 'sip-files00133.txt'
65b0235f799f61b02f8c5e1626367481
1cbd14455e3a2a47eb36621b6a62c58de55c8fb8
describe
'1815' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTI' 'sip-files00134.txt'
ac0d2e5882396f613b1c3c749a93f5b3
97b9c5bf467358d20dfc93a4c98af3c65c08ff31
describe
'1705' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTJ' 'sip-files00135.txt'
f0bc165be0c1046816f4ce4d0fe63b7a
3066120ba688778cd10cb93996ea739fd134775d
describe
'1641' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTK' 'sip-files00136.txt'
45af62fc2cec31f64d5fc18f8431ffb2
87b5921425786c50bf2fe54dd249ca57101d4090
'2012-05-25T17:06:49-04:00'
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTL' 'sip-files00137.txt'
c9110d86d4037e871aebb919cd9d7711
d0532a3f007701de4010e5029510ddba9d461cc5
describe
'1629' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTM' 'sip-files00138.txt'
2e1597fe9bc62644f57889b6ef409564
f0072c29f586bf716c8afb01db87d372cee2e706
describe
'1676' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTN' 'sip-files00139.txt'
cfdc7815382eb0d3db05800e41df620e
a235e98a6932db8df7a7ff1ac59603e457848606
describe
'1526' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTO' 'sip-files00140.txt'
2843fa21cd292c38e79715dd76aa8989
2bec7a8c6daa4d43782f4be2a7b28044f650e9aa
describe
'418' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTP' 'sip-files00141.txt'
751444eca5046b1ef6fef4d83b0f384d
91a131803e944f9e7e1745804a225d2a7af9cab0
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTQ' 'sip-files00143.txt'
bf6d28258aea806d58b546e9949f3d04
293a2269521bbe6c9bb8c0cdd2794ea0de4e47ce
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTR' 'sip-files00144.txt'
2166dc2b9a3a0463fccc641b61ff6646
5a9b7279247cca47a3e7757cbf706d93a9fcee74
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTS' 'sip-files00145.txt'
fc31f978332da27b7b2cc4a2ca5e5e47
0076a81f8c6ba8d1bd374cba91e0583f01519d38
describe
'1722' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTT' 'sip-files00146.txt'
5810bb5c7e058f333dcff1945675bc1e
8686c6777027b3da89b24fc832a3a09d10ac465c
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTU' 'sip-files00148.txt'
2a97f759b4fae6cb0ca1c3ac46f3922b
13f6179c01e09a4eea6af64a7bd2434953caf597
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTV' 'sip-files00149.txt'
d3827574d6bbfe7510212b6d622aef95
bfba09c175b2467cfc33493e76e01503e6f3a465
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTW' 'sip-files00150.txt'
085c85577115f9afa3d8ab79aa388b7e
5a3557e04442532f49e999399b9ad4249a73f6f7
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTX' 'sip-files00151.txt'
415b500d2e94ef25c1354b88fe6c82fb
c761ab6d3fd20581d6e53f99040c456508ee40d1
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTY' 'sip-files00152.txt'
7104e31c61459e5825647d91180858ee
3940a2cb6be02d6105cdf4095307f93d3889db63
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGTZ' 'sip-files00153.txt'
38366669fd292c4a75ff6c8a10f74470
e15bcbcb73ce5c3e7408a3161ec3ddb429929770
describe
'1714' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUA' 'sip-files00155.txt'
397425c33d75ff7dc160376bf5ac0774
37a689ae7d9159bfaedfb3d24d62a6f08dbef521
describe
'1726' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUB' 'sip-files00156.txt'
1684a815e912896636f0939fbc68d310
d7b7d9850a9a63ccc1ffc091be952d7994b978db
describe
'1661' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUC' 'sip-files00157.txt'
4cb8e97f10f9fb1d33305177618a0825
9c5122f8565ffd2ea29ba26f76db19332c822974
'2012-05-25T17:06:17-04:00'
describe
'1564' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUD' 'sip-files00158.txt'
2439819d05fc8a411b57d602d9e3c1c6
b49e771b7e6a8312edfb546cd1c2dbce792dc331
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUE' 'sip-files00159.txt'
7b27c0ac9d3a4f122a8e52c479a2442f
533f45590c245361f65c8a220421a35b2a7f0401
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUF' 'sip-files00160.txt'
f1c7dbaaa3a045181afd3afc480d546b
6c1c4264bb51be58e4414bf6fdc33f36e03ce80e
describe
'1574' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUG' 'sip-files00161.txt'
0d6de7119fd0b75dd937a602f4a4ab87
ba0de9de45fa28346b939ff2c4b6a71a7b6f312f
describe
'1791' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUH' 'sip-files00162.txt'
6b78a23da5bec8682f98cab00ca2f2ee
42700cf597370ae53dda281d6ec65127d2b658bb
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUI' 'sip-files00163.txt'
3a4b0919940d80100c2833374dcc2171
8ae6e11010a53e2188ebd0fac684a7247a0126c9
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUJ' 'sip-files00164.txt'
814761fb0b472689ff33c38204d097d8
1637285c4f5ade4bbbe03e3d37447b2646937fd7
describe
'1457' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUK' 'sip-files00165.txt'
93a72b248c1aaa5b10ef76e815bd5c77
64b6d868dd6eec6cd28eae06ab8f84e3240fa485
describe
'1797' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUL' 'sip-files00166.txt'
f0eb7582dff4dbf47caa6024309ee9e1
cb7e86d50be8b89c35a479aa20412deaab16d98e
describe
'1608' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUM' 'sip-files00167.txt'
d91372b1bd06e97bb6ad307db62ef8a8
4c39f66583dcb1cb80d6b3ad61280e341a94b60e
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUN' 'sip-files00168.txt'
696c7050d3886e446dae784e79b16a71
cc378c9243e57a13ea3a5382a40d324ce4246d7d
'2012-05-25T17:16:40-04:00'
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUO' 'sip-files00169.txt'
34199d487d5fd3b7628ab58ff91e39be
5f760fe396c2e821dbebc0e6b2d6017033e9c237
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUP' 'sip-files00170.txt'
396e63aade983f1290fb25b15164b870
2603a31521c8a564b968e09352781865c77e21a1
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUQ' 'sip-files00171.txt'
5b9745ddb1fca6a1b3e5ea09e5468319
1a309224d41f0d7bcf61aed276a53779218ccebf
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUR' 'sip-files00173.txt'
b276e6abb60b86e9d4b1a0c62b181ead
bd6075a4514480c71ef49c1a03d065523587b9a9
'2012-05-25T17:17:25-04:00'
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUS' 'sip-files00174.txt'
d1ac422c3b28409142264d749bd822fc
59651687e156ab87ef685b426cdab710b561e67f
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUT' 'sip-files00176.txt'
8a58d80813e941786b464e191bb7246e
718e2473e3c418bb0b8aeb82ce72facef31a5089
describe
'1611' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUU' 'sip-files00177.txt'
118a582d7654edb507796ec118a07fa6
dd6c8d7808df1335721b1f0f4971cfeb29ad03e9
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUV' 'sip-files00178.txt'
282335ec5441cd30268fb75a2cce6f40
f0b56e446b2537f6534850f89bf0113faceaf3b0
describe
'1636' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUW' 'sip-files00179.txt'
4e0a9add53372d3588ca584408814276
b95e1bdc6e4188fa08a88e8102542970043f811b
describe
'1735' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUX' 'sip-files00180.txt'
5b00921bc31279669a8b35c52828ac66
f7fb6c9c9b7e81c275338f03b8ebbdaf66081d99
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUY' 'sip-files00181.txt'
59922f8fea9ed9a9ffcdbefb12f1bc31
0299359ff46fd4f3c7230fb56c79fc5075be9669
'2012-05-25T17:12:00-04:00'
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGUZ' 'sip-files00182.txt'
7e2c7a10174dc0347a29eb267564fa44
d2595c4a614e42ad333ec3c5254a4358b30da3fa
'2012-05-25T17:15:46-04:00'
describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVA' 'sip-files00183.txt'
31a406f6635734b4396a47c557d24b7d
0a223f369ec7950bbd76f0eb139d3b61481bc354
describe
'1531' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVB' 'sip-files00184.txt'
36e5788c4e52351d2d9831431d99df30
c5f831d053812beece9b07808af1f82f53c95439
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVC' 'sip-files00186.txt'
82f55a143e08a6bfe4a8d3147b3c91ce
8504445f07fb9ae68f0638d2dbbb82ebd285423c
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVD' 'sip-files00187.txt'
a50c12675861e79d76277601008931e6
3f2f74720399c735e54a91c8972b988075ee35e3
describe
'1524' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVE' 'sip-files00188.txt'
ef0571c34a4d9ce88087e65b3772fc3a
8e09b9504b3a710f758d9d7c79a236b5cdd7f1fa
describe
'1425' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVF' 'sip-files00189.txt'
69a9c6280e507b2fe0317ede4c626071
bc409b0ba93e12b44fafacfb08465ef672cab5d7
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVG' 'sip-files00190.txt'
55a3cc0cace4ada7c48805b7d5742601
26b7d96da7ead03f39b6969955d4b8d3a972b7d3
describe
'1700' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVH' 'sip-files00191.txt'
0f300f7af992aeb2da7afd74c7e13159
1fcb5327ad7f006e74531bffb31409698ad0df8b
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVI' 'sip-files00193.txt'
e3793ddcfb62706d54bf1d40100b81d3
5741f37e375b0aecd30882e6fc350cd31ab8274a
describe
'1518' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVJ' 'sip-files00194.txt'
370bb0b910eef5b01ab6e54951c11972
a100159a8cd0ed2d0e5b180dd4ad2eadad412d01
describe
'1544' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVK' 'sip-files00195.txt'
f39b7cf5722468e266a5b71ed2dd474f
650785d367f65b570341381dcea40968eb804681
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVL' 'sip-files00196.txt'
fa45b129e51f05fe06ea73985fa8dea1
a66f212cae2c6ceb9432cc8ebc7209a9437ff015
describe
'1581' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVM' 'sip-files00197.txt'
9c345ac07809e52eff0793961367739f
24de19b98338d2a985b75e5b5feeaa3e80151766
describe
'1500' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVN' 'sip-files00199.txt'
eb91efb42031a843ec48867fac6a4a41
b05fb3885280a528f015d16e74adf055d067ba6f
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVO' 'sip-files00200.txt'
59f3f6de553a32616b62f106385834d6
1c0c53f5bebc38a6650202e42b4998912eeeb411
describe
'583' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVP' 'sip-files00201.txt'
44425cb6ca73bfcdb6a7c9dbfad5c183
b74889de61b2b14d20990d3a447908cd5f200095
describe
'1199' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVQ' 'sip-files00202.txt'
e05ff12b409d2c9ec724949745600d56
600389ab6cf34f8352709b66e10c0a166a575c78
describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVR' 'sip-files00203.txt'
ae13e8e59d27ce518d19658d8b417d41
df21c98724bb93ea0ae062b8758cd54c0a6d6166
describe
'1688' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVS' 'sip-files00204.txt'
84d8d8accc35ef8c8bd22b4eb811c9e8
83f986cf7cb591efda0415c33c2c527019e326d8
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVT' 'sip-files00205.txt'
4cddd35812695df7595c346f8699d734
85ac709faebfd0b645cfd1043cd6e97518974001
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVU' 'sip-files00206.txt'
89c901270db3a2c15d5736ad8971d7a9
3856bf5d8f4293ade77600238341e7b464faab38
'2012-05-25T17:14:54-04:00'
describe
'1782' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVV' 'sip-files00207.txt'
9f080f8b41676d05572b51361e8cb54e
5424620eb967e884cc7891105f102aae5654b99b
describe
'1632' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVW' 'sip-files00208.txt'
a042340823e960cb1e64442c3ea829a0
392644809405cc02ce7fe8cba66676f91d49650a
describe
'1550' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVX' 'sip-files00211.txt'
94632d7478632313c5852c8d347a8c97
df4dbda54f28dcdbeff31a9b2d5d8759beaad898
describe
'1539' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVY' 'sip-files00212.txt'
6f46d7287177abee4a4066e884eb6f42
f1f5dbc6491172b9ca00cbe92a57bb8bb28cbcc7
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGVZ' 'sip-files00213.txt'
8aa823cfe756b8a275da463bbd29136e
a5ab5498e8c0d4367c5d71e4f8c724180fb83fbd
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWA' 'sip-files00214.txt'
98dfc7b220a7f118a17418e73f68f31e
1b7d4f462415906e8d3d2ec3ea10584c6b155029
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWB' 'sip-files00216.txt'
41eb8c02fd578fc3d0ae65b8b46977cb
f1123d3154038c640f0ddeb99171b131dab68160
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWC' 'sip-files00217.txt'
bffc1266322561af352f6e1ed676c92a
165c1b48b8ec476206cb8fef16d9f6b6bc7f28fb
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWD' 'sip-files00218.txt'
22900ff52f42ce742cf84f68be5eb2bd
56f75b443960ea5a79c446e8ee1d6c7df17867f6
describe
'1584' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWE' 'sip-files00220.txt'
0d4660712acc8454f3beb17dc570e01c
f9f055f8780dd6c8934592aef8a740a2735a4067
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWF' 'sip-files00221.txt'
2bdf0bd3da2b25c02253de24a4e44a55
742964f43b3f34f8aae4b0fcb7bb6808bfc2d3a2
describe
'1672' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWG' 'sip-files00222.txt'
aa2d5fa2a4e8d43a376adfd3d58bb91c
fe6f12f069ff2934428fe7510002b7ddba3c1d4d
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWH' 'sip-files00223.txt'
d052e7f493b809d54812c12f5b0dde6f
0ea8b8b2e3ef6d87fa2ba63854ecf19a33caa8b3
'2012-05-25T17:06:54-04:00'
describe
'1595' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWI' 'sip-files00224.txt'
7f07fc1a7cf53b65d8d6ed0755a84bba
53feb820a411cdfffd33663bfa101f837e06c89a
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWJ' 'sip-files00225.txt'
972edf1cdd1f48b347ede294d0a35531
b7c65519279b0ab68419121b3e4a59170d6215c8
'2012-05-25T17:11:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWK' 'sip-files00226.txt'
15fbaca86d8f5015e1db3fb57394af2f
b2df4f2925baa822d7b3c1de562aa88bc39e7479
describe
'1769' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWL' 'sip-files00227.txt'
de135bfc5a4cb0580bdc5120ba50dc5b
9f8d16cd320012a1ffd6840b7e9bf5edc350db12
describe
'1804' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWM' 'sip-files00228.txt'
cdd38ee4fa50c7072395f7c4e074f6ee
d5b450643ad61daad1b2a382f43dfca3bbc367a1
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWN' 'sip-files00231.txt'
ed75d86ab921d7b3aa03f38019f33aca
d5b0a42201b0afa6adcb715cea9f0d7693884d0b
describe
'1605' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWO' 'sip-files00232.txt'
f16070cca68f5a46cb6bdd47d27ba1e1
b0b31f6da8b4408f9000cfc9f04a643ba282d606
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWP' 'sip-files00234.txt'
0eaff8ed1c7641e198fe8cae9de9a498
f8d13facb99859a900c739f5df91945ca443abba
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWQ' 'sip-files00236.txt'
099381770305a79c87ee547295f1ab4e
9625c525c9fd636df1f26c6946172025bdf62036
describe
'1601' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWR' 'sip-files00238.txt'
6f61303c3cc92d03338b846401d9b589
2cf74b977c6c9ff34fe0d883ce5522578434567b
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWS' 'sip-files00239.txt'
f359b1746178ee5a83e230b8923c006a
e27ef054d6df635ec1d0bc8cdcb36ed851127b6f
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWT' 'sip-files00240.txt'
ffa1d48022d47d569de18ef7ca557603
4b2fd2b8a8ee755841107fdb77b666f5838894d6
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWU' 'sip-files00241.txt'
d6eb9147e2b3b985b818ecc850efaaa8
8268cdd3c92624d5ef3109e056c519ead75c7119
'2012-05-25T17:10:22-04:00'
describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWV' 'sip-files00242.txt'
051afb61cac9e79d59e20de810aac739
5da8cc4fbdc1268660bd7d4abae00b94a9c3f2d8
describe
'1558' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWW' 'sip-files00243.txt'
9d40b9426e6d0596d6013514d822240b
48af1f98e6fa3b5393bf0a8e5cb380066b99059d
describe
'1551' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWX' 'sip-files00244.txt'
71e5b1f4ba863ab565bcb6174f57098c
c57379ba491741038c30a3120626cc0a77f185cd
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWY' 'sip-files00245.txt'
10b7ba2d08eb793c46175c89b459c3ac
3a1e7d29da5eade0802aa8b80d8856d640819b1a
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGWZ' 'sip-files00246.txt'
3e3e7a1ed664db9577d763d6c9167998
aef958d5d1c006ddc8ee2f3830fb3555e05cc2ba
describe
'1588' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXA' 'sip-files00247.txt'
612aaa769232acd6dcafc2f4054847a9
ac578b08ebc5d2e34179b37d5ef4bbbd22125ead
'2012-05-25T17:06:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXB' 'sip-files00248.txt'
491f1db1847825190d0a65c7e13729fc
1ea93b08b17ef86158e2b8a9375dbd6a445b6929
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXC' 'sip-files00249.txt'
0d2fec4045766cbb5000a1c82fe2146a
0c73df49b701be8253ca4d5c80472163ac505456
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXD' 'sip-files00250.txt'
85021d3f0a086e190055befa79e21f0d
2fa680e3666aad5f503ca291aa6881f8307b86bb
describe
'1695' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXE' 'sip-files00251.txt'
e5777263dd5091e520aa9219819b46ff
1590ad5bfd821657c086106b8d436d34ac7ee0b6
describe
'1710' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXF' 'sip-files00252.txt'
bb96e5d2e17dce76620433b14b9192a6
144aab7cf6d2e7b39701fa34a7be0b88e65ea40b
describe
'1602' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXG' 'sip-files00253.txt'
9fc43f1bf29cb6340374ac038fd3ab7c
4c53a87ecb402934f6ed9242c1787496b916f128
describe
'1673' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXH' 'sip-files00254.txt'
420e3046ca836651c9ca9e96913267ef
6183318f35e2c5ef68898a581ed695aa79c6fe27
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXI' 'sip-files00255.txt'
6ac9e412f053b81909ed316aaccbd576
26e468ca2a33a030d6832852ec824cb9623f2fc1
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXJ' 'sip-files00256.txt'
bb8803f6c6b540d1756f823465023dd8
9327256c1d4711053fb9ea19f1e293c9e0943d04
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXK' 'sip-files00257.txt'
a8d86f8d77bc0ff4814235bdfe99668e
c4d2bc1782671720fbace0fcd1cbdee151a4c049
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXL' 'sip-files00258.txt'
3b029e01b346902cdb6d17d4a354ade1
e93be28f399b36f0b5b32afbfcfac34ea4217a5e
describe
'1502' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXM' 'sip-files00259.txt'
6a53fb707990bb93711b05603eb1b7b9
1f46cf788ec0b22df26f875994e0fa2749d07fff
describe
'1568' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXN' 'sip-files00260.txt'
f6e6ffe1438776d9abdc00d2c5de5d2a
5646474ba6a01deb1db94e8a2b754fd9261e7e60
'2012-05-25T17:05:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXO' 'sip-files00261.txt'
8aebd649fa3c43388f88faf84d91efa8
23ad51c3cd27423c666a7a39ea80cb543e9f6eb3
describe
'1743' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXP' 'sip-files00262.txt'
c679339c0a1f2b4d96b68f1c72955dc6
ca54204d253d6e892ed70fd4087ab8ee83e864c1
'2012-05-25T17:14:56-04:00'
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXQ' 'sip-files00263.txt'
de7ab7cba764f0b5498fc20c9f413c2e
44c9fbc24206f521985a350ce277f85532a0cf69
describe
'306' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXR' 'sip-files00264.txt'
a299e59f7c838c5cd70be92194482d1d
80dc116afdca2f90554d354d91f5f27482a0e4e5
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXS' 'sip-files00266.txt'
36e4625c430d2267c8b2af8a2e054c68
a359c8daeca2a7f0b4dc7f186e5f9ddef18f3938
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXT' 'sip-files00267.txt'
b23060d7a52aae2e4d8ac5baaa162798
c9deb3ecd6ae807070eeb894fa2551f0665a161b
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXU' 'sip-files00268.txt'
f30479d7e70297cd4e9b505416ef1f57
0cbfc95ec16d3ecd54fa6343d69fa9dad5289713
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXV' 'sip-files00269.txt'
49dd7011ca8624515b82896a1d498a97
1b34088f81943d8148f7eb5736a629b455f28e26
describe
'804' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXW' 'sip-files00270.txt'
03d56585f3b0a71e9d4e024985fa85ab
9c288ebd691eeebe14c8bbb1346e1e8ae2c1c61c
describe
'920' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXX' 'sip-files00272.txt'
c850fd2d8146c46f090c3c5d09dacc89
9082338cca59ce03776347c4b5f33e1609eeb311
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXY' 'sip-files00273.txt'
243ed239b7a4791564d6ab9fad3c0761
021e48a667a0a87b4f6ad2901f28e1c6d7f3680a
describe
'902' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGXZ' 'sip-files00275.txt'
f9b17e707400a0f44f3cb27ea36f3f3e
1f2e30604872ab8f409ae884422e1bdcf68ebf0e
'2012-05-25T17:05:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYA' 'sip-files00277.txt'
f4bb82e757230cfb918dac0a2703fe90
848f6416f67dfdfd4e3ea97aee528509c33acf4f
describe
'942' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYB' 'sip-files00278.txt'
8bb5a1d69dd00c6cfc00bc6eac4a96db
cfc06f68a03d2bbedc0ce491ecaab1923bc23dff
describe
'917' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYC' 'sip-files00279.txt'
8511a382abd22c3d89b5ce175651ec64
23a84a09ef66265d58e47c85fd93d28919fdf65d
describe
'892' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYD' 'sip-files00280.txt'
c5a7e33518ceb4d94a4456825e3ef61b
ea64b9d57b43623d7f0b6dbe90933fd18e4dfecd
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYE' 'sip-files00281.txt'
803678a752a9f7ecf854653b64db8cfa
d690918623eff92b374916240af7f6bb64f2e987
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYF' 'sip-files00282.txt'
54229a95fb1ac0b0a44310b589e8302e
4d187ffd232a1e733322c187445895fa5d35f438
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYG' 'sip-files00283.txt'
9b586d2c5e8401ac73ab7c1e49a68811
d4c76b04f88c5d68e22129c99bd4edaafcf7422e
describe
'1170' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYH' 'sip-files00284.txt'
cb18a81e4e93166dedca8fef6662bdc6
fb1ad11213ad82f60b0572bb3ed6a0e327c03057
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYI' 'sip-files00285.txt'
6fefdbbf50e7ba4e17c53892827bd699
1274825e01b961e5fefb1ca215cd60562e3f1c72
describe
Invalid character
'1093' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYJ' 'sip-files00286.txt'
c1de5e1b045bb32eafd7f2a74ae441f9
2b8e10eb9a99a77051b75f9bde693287a7d97153
describe
'1949' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYK' 'sip-files00287.txt'
e705a97888e8d4dfde0044a99884fbc6
25e1acc896607b1624bb08007231461e9950b776
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYL' 'sip-files00288.txt'
b471b5d4d17145ea2e2c930f8ab1bb1e
363db954e1a47cdeaa66027d90df943cb9ce69dd
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYM' 'sip-files00289.txt'
6df10b9084d91fa6eca5248d22c8239e
112cf732d0fb75a6217c5a9ef0c6ee540c95f34d
describe
'983' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYN' 'sip-files00290.txt'
a7a889e4a26aa578855aab530dc0ddc9
46cfe91c202d93d0588c84713e7666868bcade55
describe
'836' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYO' 'sip-files00291.txt'
c6f04b15df67b2680b7f76370f14beac
c64b92b1b81ba65db7dc43d7a5596793bed75d2c
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYP' 'sip-files00292.txt'
dafb51c6b2217a5023970fec51b533ba
19c3f87a2140619941e4fc688fa6fcb8177f21ae
'2012-05-25T17:15:22-04:00'
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYQ' 'sip-files00293.txt'
db364f19f3776ee63e32c5dd5fa37345
27a0cfcb2804527e9fd7cd6f7084dd6c5b008686
describe
Invalid character
'1227' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYR' 'sip-files00294.txt'
e0a1ea7d39cf304bf946cf245e0b26b1
3c6d855629adcc359cbb69b8772554326f44ec85
describe
'975' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYS' 'sip-files00295.txt'
8a6ac197485a9188a11584138d865c34
22f93b741299e03e327a373d1ea82d946c73ca97
describe
'33' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYT' 'sip-files00298.txt'
0e545a903e2f21658716f82413bb4cbb
3e2a95f5277fe106630233b03813fe692019b1b1
describe
'53011' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYU' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
22af69da739b0f1d1cd5aa83c8e120c4
96000486d326f0e6502090de6b15acc7bd65f64b
describe
'182540' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYV' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
e4fbcce1d067ee319c40d94acccd4eac
161464becb2dae9170c4bfbcf266d1043997bd4a
describe
'102878' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYW' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
9d4756cad2c6af231698cdec656105a0
651ca88d72ec9ba89bead1dccd39ff28118ecd43
describe
'318453' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYX' 'sip-files00002.QC2.jpg'
4dc2737840b3205d97359856b893fa7b
6e6d40b2366f0c0607d33f5e5bda3b0a304db669
describe
'33571' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYY' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
c7f5eae7a45e7f94529d9a9e827c8212
44e13a270f54097f1879cdbd86547d0c7d79f5bc
describe
'84877' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGYZ' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
db735affca0810d7a62b071a87c8e424
4d87924136f19d5c80a78c84b6d3bce40bb8d0b4
describe
'269774' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZA' 'sip-files00003.QC2.jpg'
2cdd8175c3fdec0c445cdfc31fb4a339
55ee1a467b98d5818d1b1392ef044e37333d0796
'2012-05-25T17:16:04-04:00'
describe
'28783' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZB' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
0365f62a276abf64baed7c7e27d87341
a2986a55384ffbf0b8b52978260dac18f5f5f78a
describe
'76067' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZC' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
9aa1cfe44cdc59c345e1d43719f5fe50
232371c4eea447afe549c38392436752db36590d
describe
'235036' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZD' 'sip-files00004.QC2.jpg'
1ea5b788f9582dba53f8e54e5b438d68
e18fb1c236ebb4b710d27809992f22caf4dd6081
describe
'184134' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZE' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
0871da64df69158e3c5fad6647c00291
6babc9ec889d20810b06a34abdb7c3ae1eb5c635
describe
'566513' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZF' 'sip-files00006.QC2.jpg'
f152ab33dd5a415608fb2ca4ef86df0b
0afc3a547363ba22868e597f6f975e97f784cd35
'2012-05-25T17:08:47-04:00'
describe
'59443' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZG' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
c8640b8f3fdef5e0cbbbc534d4370454
3db0e4f8498a44f7bdfcb37d1a65c345e206507d
describe
'103687' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZH' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
4a79a4de7d0790f0af810e40fb4fad8d
55058dd6a73cd554a9a334409d6c33507a567f9a
describe
'38552' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZI' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
59a2618e83c0ce6b1a425a278c826c13
bd4f0acd92c45676b6e5ecf5fdddfa501785df41
'2012-05-25T17:13:55-04:00'
describe
'81241' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZJ' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
39c7282bafea1470d2226cf0d0737170
881fb0ffd772cddffdc2c2918bca64f20f7d533a
describe
'257191' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZK' 'sip-files00008.QC2.jpg'
a041e8d90f369f9f9ad11f8033cf64fe
084a38fc8557691cecab85ad97f37fa6b89a3e42
describe
'130954' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZL' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
1546ae9d424d0231c28412aeab777f7d
5c7f0744269483950ae61a886c5da44ebb79b51c
'2012-05-25T17:15:31-04:00'
describe
'381638' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZM' 'sip-files00009.QC2.jpg'
b797c7562c5f9ea2bae140c8cd3a1489
50564ce674912c5d59eed5013b15ede98ceaf73a
describe
'41897' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZN' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
27362a8a9c6a3ed2360465dc062ea4a0
5b38b2cdd2da52c6058779d4876a525af08d96b3
describe
'148332' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZO' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
284716dc060d24ed64f37cc0f60792c6
5ec97157798df2d68991a3ea8df338bfd0ca4320
describe
'422304' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZP' 'sip-files00010.QC2.jpg'
a8d4c703938f21f06a1b6c784d1be559
2ea5143660a82c7bd1af4b395fa35255319fa5b7
describe
'48931' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZQ' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
1f03d8191a15b15896088103a66550b7
903bede3436a54ad75467fe4c24e3c9c97776760
describe
'439873' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZR' 'sip-files00011.QC2.jpg'
8b43325c27b31947bba307e91db97235
cd76719690f9862b5efd8a80d474714151df8a8b
describe
'51888' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZS' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
31483b1823b00ff213b00993b05bb2fe
be3f63bee1db9c27039671c280c4f62ef33ee9af
'2012-05-25T17:07:11-04:00'
describe
'171906' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZT' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
3006a03c26e2b26943272e789679f649
94c3dc3c4c9db2c5041165e6cdda194c6d8068ce
'2012-05-25T17:12:23-04:00'
describe
'461042' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZU' 'sip-files00012.QC2.jpg'
b6fa7a0fe6c27e397ec95426ebca3361
51fa741627b4d7ed1099f14daccbfc8da0ef6fd4
describe
'52391' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZV' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
de2d8a20439c64f148cae8785367f562
f31e099046fd72efda13ea23a49f8cd343fd13c3
describe
'161783' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZW' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
3379161bbf0c2fd4133471dd071b38d6
377a17780946e624950c4bba7c06d727ce78dc34
describe
'443119' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZX' 'sip-files00013.QC2.jpg'
2eeca5e1b042b052d45b1e83fd9c8aaf
088a6dfcf33ec6b38f17c0bd4c7f10e25fc29d0f
describe
'49788' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZY' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
6f540734a2a532c2b652e1260e872465
1bf80aa15b3e92aefe20aec5ea7377b1db48a800
'2012-05-25T17:05:47-04:00'
describe
'156956' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABGZZ' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
24c69e1980cad7ebe6e5c9bb698d41cc
a0542d9714f32a34ad15c5196804b0ffd62f02d3
describe
'436194' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAA' 'sip-files00014.QC2.jpg'
8ece0ff1d1699c0381f118d9f8dbf703
b25395fe068ac010ebd4a54783188731ff686b55
describe
'49539' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAB' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
093791ee24b07c36276852b24779e100
07f4dc258b941b0f49834a59ce1ffdcaaba5d0a4
describe
'162507' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAC' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
40bc787eee388c30485965ce2455e317
56a557b42cc50d3765825f164a388653b8670e9c
'2012-05-25T17:16:34-04:00'
describe
'447183' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAD' 'sip-files00015.QC2.jpg'
39b0d8b98c9620a1db7e5e897030e795
2217e9eb67eca0181c9c060d59c3d1728ba81e40
describe
'49926' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAE' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
d7286d77bd3d8dd993a641f83cb6757d
d5fe136b8c4706f9daf369e15395212cfdf72047
describe
'164305' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAF' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
8a5d1f8926a10715b05399befe9856f1
046dae647de08dcae5e565f7fa2492c15513bc35
describe
'450572' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAG' 'sip-files00016.QC2.jpg'
f962de3add15fe02717e4bd762175967
0f74886f6675162afb7d85f1b3decd798a70b823
'2012-05-25T17:08:48-04:00'
describe
'51589' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAH' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
64153093e07cdf674dd20a7e8e94b406
7af413c352e15f53e80b6874d8cc07237035009a
describe
'174983' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAI' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
8604ef92718069eb615109ee34cea733
05629c4d91960842c3b375bdf36bb1d039cf3962
describe
'467440' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAJ' 'sip-files00017.QC2.jpg'
4b51ba751a832f066618c15d3b6b407e
9ac9576aea38cb6ceb06b0849319820b138704fe
describe
'51814' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAK' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
17f02949eb4c3b36aca107e06761b890
2c5f58f1b33a6b59cce85717659ec5b5be33eecd
'2012-05-25T17:06:21-04:00'
describe
'431115' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAL' 'sip-files00018.QC2.jpg'
dac05156df32d161e5502e854f1f7f74
c7784512327a1ce457f734db39adf255a5fbdccb
describe
'438626' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAM' 'sip-files00019.QC2.jpg'
e2d6a3d466aecfa0674d38939c39d3b1
de7b8571ac9c319848ae34400475820fb0536acd
describe
'51386' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAN' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
6a43d17fea902f389e64e5280f7faa17
415a806546f5b65ad0145da38806a9783c5e70df
describe
'160426' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAO' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
bf3ae6a59bbe786925dba415f7738804
6a55638ad9b85d955e49c7222d12ada1b5ef9f1d
describe
'446321' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAP' 'sip-files00020.QC2.jpg'
01689350d1dd9ae31a8ea79e3a8ea4a0
d771f0b6f4dfd8e0a4a86714fc387287d9d68670
describe
'50416' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAQ' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
16b1e493a1b8b2a36f3c5818e805893d
38ba13bd809f3429234dced4224ef14241fadc59
describe
'120901' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAR' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
f3aacfc777e31b8dc751e4bf0ca9ea8a
b3261f1e9d3e048df8800c714bbdefc1cb5343bc
describe
'356428' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAS' 'sip-files00021.QC2.jpg'
ad19b854de93be86da79ed9845ea2248
85f5710781235d02cafbae03b92407411acc7921
describe
'40724' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAT' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
633231a66a3fd00280ee5eb32e84c619
90c022a9c06a1f96840df50cd57126816a0b15c3
describe
'141913' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAU' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
f6cd1645fedfc9c6240a8b78ad55a599
6427e9190903b3625bf4652aa99b47bfdd210c38
describe
'403739' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAV' 'sip-files00022.QC2.jpg'
fd25c4a3aa917824ebf09a108d4cc481
0538cc31b44106c96dc2cc2f0a0f2a4d5b1bdfa8
describe
'43859' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAW' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
dd968ef8c85edf1573d24362567a2a76
ade6c6f239d5e45ff623a1da6c6f8d5fc8c3d839
describe
'167218' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAX' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
eceefbd04df7d257f5c27b6f9a20c3b0
54e5dfe46ea1fa0ff399b770cf16905087264dd2
'2012-05-25T17:05:09-04:00'
describe
'464879' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAY' 'sip-files00023.QC2.jpg'
4b813dd102281c5920008a9b19b66198
5a02fc393e2059e52267b161f9437e8f9b2a6111
describe
'52130' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHAZ' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
4e303af7ea19bac9ec8035e843600567
74ffb109a88c0dd6a3c847ea011e21af2e3c5477
describe
'165036' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBA' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
00b59be9b618ce7c058a62a24d6a297e
1c1f373b7f1fefeacb062e919fd04bfc83a24d86
describe
'449459' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBB' 'sip-files00024.QC2.jpg'
9cbfd476e4dc2b5f8a70a91546573c11
717530112642149649824944f42c653868a69289
'2012-05-25T17:05:56-04:00'
describe
'51234' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBC' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
89b341ea24095bf2d107f669e049d2ec
89fe1afc1a0fb2d5a1e8599a60482a252f5008b0
describe
'161273' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBD' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
5e1f225399e6a168d033a24c662a1570
1057598abf87a044559439fc989b3689d81a10a8
'2012-05-25T17:05:31-04:00'
describe
'435859' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBE' 'sip-files00025.QC2.jpg'
faae81bb1125019c3cbc27e3c95c0fdf
48c8284880ab3c9ae0faf9781c3dac86c8363be2
describe
'52536' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBF' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
c0ba2156169d005d8167fc00a7b379f8
e039b5649abc944022c4afc887e1f0f67edd4f2a
describe
'160339' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBG' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
1c342b33ae7a40f18122e1b8fda52cb7
ed5766d074e38c22ef3113e269f7edddc6a78087
describe
'453281' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBH' 'sip-files00026.QC2.jpg'
2e908aa9bee0780701d45057b7833c1f
f552d5c782b750d4fd18f03974cfcd1141914dbe
describe
'49495' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBI' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
5bb96b7bb83412d7fc0f53ca425cc77a
5e59cf44bbffc8f2192c4ccd7efc61344d291e2b
'2012-05-25T17:03:43-04:00'
describe
'156039' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBJ' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
39ae207a72cbd2ed80249dc86ae857cf
0928b22975cfacea7f325c78c0e7f5067a2ee722
describe
'438865' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBK' 'sip-files00027.QC2.jpg'
66cdbb094b50b8705dc31852cfaf1332
519e8a4d0be474bfb118fd3fe2501e7ba187a5f4
describe
'52517' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBL' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
09ec677c24c0cfe0d847f2f6339b2a74
c0360bf65d34b5a40c71d656fb1727aa4e2f62b7
describe
'155341' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBM' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
2686da89918e5867ddf6639dbdc039ac
1548c0234f67d2148b63270553bef2f0df7b137e
describe
'432528' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBN' 'sip-files00028.QC2.jpg'
de259d54b50f8710fcccfe19238b92d5
9b8e19909ace1004e927e844f910a5477fb637b6
describe
'49900' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBO' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
20ac590fa72b6e0f6210038838935c30
0e05298b935f013fd18bb835b259cc17151a7793
describe
'155739' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBP' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
a08efb1aedd186b994a574ebf7781a8e
b97f9350d65c95ae520c00c871f91a1732e7475a
describe
'425982' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBQ' 'sip-files00029.QC2.jpg'
e10eb176405628555a83d24d52817adf
b229b368ee93265d1e6cc427e046846ef317ce90
describe
'51882' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBR' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
94051cac21a5d6b54d76576d01723633
debd2866b193d2318c3faa268d0098eddbde9073
describe
'150396' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBS' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
c6e1668fba2606e68a2fa45b9da746d4
a7751320c7377cda1fd23c1bd829d04144ef8b1d
describe
'420810' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBT' 'sip-files00030.QC2.jpg'
a96560715d171da7ca3b20db743622f0
5571248c128ec84207435e6386fe811b0250392b
describe
'50759' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBU' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
8eb543950fbfe258ccd78dfe9a41f8b9
38b827f5cc427c89c437ac1836f4ce21f566b7a3
describe
'153255' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBV' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
0f370b727c14a30359586fec101fe462
3c6c4b146a9c329cf97704d33fa5bfe964186bf7
describe
'422650' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBW' 'sip-files00031.QC2.jpg'
fd44ecf4e56203a34b391443ca1ddbba
712628c109c9d2e955052e9a85b9fb23dc8999f4
describe
'49197' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBX' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
3516a932df3e09f4a43599ea0b432e93
27f043e71e2d0f1d772b296eaffdb5fe041daf5a
describe
'164632' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBY' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
16fa6f10d5e9a4805d338b6a9f783292
98b7b44cbbd871924b4471b9a3994d1c8cc4cee1
describe
'444762' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHBZ' 'sip-files00032.QC2.jpg'
d947a6dc136b66c591513764d60627a6
b3b598eaa6d85fd3c83fd47d86efa65e3c4427eb
describe
'50712' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHCA' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
73cee3ff710bdeb192287f5b2c6b47b4
d060fd6b529eebe147cbe6d5e371268eed3e96ac
describe
'166028' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHCB' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
37daf1acc51d62f24ec01cf6d432bad2
e2f3bc175241cf3e056610dc8ed522e5e9a3d068
describe
'446226' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHCC' 'sip-files00033.QC2.jpg'
bbbff1a59b6a2e540d2b8fdd42288a36
c576f3a424edb3a72f1e80ba0ab8684dde881d0d
describe
'52736' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHCD' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
8ba35cf0985aa1fc6118ba6981a4c848
e495f64cf2664c917125a68736941916662daf7f
describe
'453588' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHCE' 'sip-files00034.QC2.jpg'
080b07a65bd65ea7331e975b3e9b047f
761f7dc55dff96ff0e7d54b9b5b42d2f6c077a35
describe
'52950' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHCF' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
e3eeb13b65d5d6c13fdc92b6ca3737e4
df18995176cf99bd4a109ce479c609381de94397
'2012-05-25T17:16:19-04:00'
describe
'160123' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHCG' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
3a47d87aaa3537f6aa5dc48873147841
002d58c369378178f0e26315f1223c007443d9d7
describe
'444751' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHCH' 'sip-files00035.QC2.jpg'
92d96b206de0e7832d643a80c80d0d96
b4b91062b97e33a1ee8962eb6fd95901f407cef9
describe
'50488' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHCI' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
c85bbb618192720d743f1c1d4ebebe64
c456939073e6f3d84ee6485b1106e8cf04b3a0db
'2012-05-25T17:07:41-04:00'
describe
'160975' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHCJ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
a0869c2a44ce0082e37f22c3b2e60ffc
500efd90698bd977649ffd8a318623f987a1d569
describe
'440408' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHCK' 'sip-files00036.QC2.jpg'
b4f4b1b901417135a7c4e9a1ed1cf346
e56bd2de83edc40f108f32f75424c3f6d68bd08e
describe
'51680' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHCL' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
deb15e49bfbdbcc1982c7b69f9cda192
4ceb078bb05cac037bcad37e47bff2e8a5bf9ccf
describe
'110488' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHCM' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
caaf231bd0a5fc0eead92dc82ec1228b
942330030c2de36531906e73f456433a179911b8
describe
'331959' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHCN' 'sip-files00037.QC2.jpg'
6d6e4a7a2a2e4edd28227d5ef9fe92ad
946459cd1959aa6de519b8b08e20eb5b46b0a59d
describe
'36150' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHCO' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
05a1938c59f2e6ddcb93b725bca258f9
b533c784127b27461d55e047ff409c624c4b55a0
describe
'143508' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHCP' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
de2c290e47ac723e50931d838ea0d45f
64ebe707bb3f615ca2003fc95ac6dc9df9b542f1
'2012-05-25T17:08:05-04:00'
describe
'407964' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHCQ' 'sip-files00038.QC2.jpg'
678bb01fad571a752f3b620e6aa44a35
18df35a83194f3000a7782a2fa2103b18cf882f9
describe
'163239' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHCR' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
62e722c7fe3ce22e43c101ed6a5acb69
cc9c4640fc33b712a9e9af0c7ebec3a2b88f5a90
describe
'445594' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHCS' 'sip-files00039.QC2.jpg'
6e74eee07e4bb54edd7b1775b680ec2e
2fb1e73b503b0638c4e65e55c61340426d8ba8c9
'2012-05-25T17:05:33-04:00'
describe
'51255' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHCT' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
2b08674888318ab8a8381a250e02d866
e25491ea063e033ec3431618422ae36e3759658b
describe
'160517' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20100203_AABHCU' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
9dc01bd204bf6b411e52798b30f61b75
1f74a5df2f6523cca741592ed05550a3b627b796
describe
'439069' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACCfileF20