Citation
Aunt Charlotte's stories of Bible history for the little ones

Material Information

Title:
Aunt Charlotte's stories of Bible history for the little ones
Portion of title:
Stories of Bible history for the little ones
Added title page title:
Aunt Charlotte's Bible history
Creator:
Yonge, Charlotte Mary, 1823-1901
Marcus Ward & Co
Royal Ulster Works
Place of Publication:
London
Belfast
Publisher:
Marcus Ward & Co.
Royal Ulster Works
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
302, 24 p., [2] leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Bible stories -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1875 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1875
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Northern Ireland -- Belfast
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Added title page and frontispiece are printed in colors.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue precedes and follows text.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by Charlotte M. Yonge.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027030540 ( aleph )
ALJ0713 ( notis )
60551857 ( oclc )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

UF00027870_00001.pdf

UF00027870_00001.txt

00006.txt

00265.txt

00199.txt

00206.txt

00026.txt

00047.txt

00080.txt

00288.txt

00058.txt

00339.txt

00105.txt

00060.txt

00054.txt

00092.txt

00282.txt

00233.txt

00280.txt

00051.txt

00269.txt

00177.txt

00231.txt

00263.txt

00252.txt

00055.txt

00061.txt

00320.txt

00153.txt

00162.txt

00137.txt

00205.txt

00253.txt

00296.txt

00183.txt

00067.txt

00142.txt

00181.txt

00237.txt

00037.txt

00326.txt

00290.txt

00262.txt

00033.txt

00215.txt

00100.txt

00224.txt

00291.txt

00096.txt

00145.txt

00308.txt

00108.txt

00316.txt

00338.txt

00333.txt

00174.txt

00317.txt

00062.txt

00002.txt

00112.txt

00146.txt

00243.txt

00076.txt

00057.txt

00293.txt

00148.txt

00182.txt

00158.txt

00087.txt

00066.txt

00186.txt

00073.txt

00075.txt

00267.txt

00279.txt

00194.txt

00127.txt

00235.txt

00027.txt

00063.txt

00315.txt

00270.txt

00114.txt

00221.txt

00091.txt

00071.txt

00120.txt

00059.txt

00223.txt

00136.txt

00259.txt

00284.txt

00150.txt

00303.txt

00330.txt

00042.txt

00201.txt

00156.txt

00125.txt

00023.txt

00167.txt

00039.txt

00218.txt

00122.txt

00258.txt

00163.txt

00255.txt

00256.txt

00133.txt

00210.txt

00072.txt

00081.txt

00020.txt

00318.txt

00274.txt

00038.txt

00322.txt

00268.txt

00309.txt

00213.txt

00250.txt

00188.txt

00179.txt

00193.txt

00151.txt

00327.txt

00101.txt

00011.txt

00238.txt

00277.txt

00190.txt

00285.txt

00160.txt

00034.txt

00083.txt

00311.txt

00157.txt

00143.txt

00024.txt

00110.txt

00093.txt

00117.txt

00247.txt

00234.txt

00152.txt

00310.txt

00184.txt

00022.txt

00204.txt

00119.txt

00189.txt

00168.txt

00328.txt

00111.txt

00154.txt

00248.txt

00207.txt

00019.txt

00289.txt

00203.txt

00251.txt

00126.txt

00135.txt

00283.txt

00172.txt

00191.txt

00170.txt

00220.txt

00246.txt

00169.txt

00299.txt

00070.txt

00032.txt

00337.txt

00138.txt

00068.txt

00241.txt

00323.txt

00294.txt

00107.txt

00217.txt

00128.txt

00140.txt

00212.txt

00064.txt

00008.txt

00035.txt

00095.txt

00200.txt

00264.txt

00271.txt

00090.txt

00196.txt

00312.txt

00016.txt

00222.txt

00116.txt

00118.txt

00005.txt

00103.txt

00304.txt

00208.txt

00166.txt

00301.txt

00197.txt

00017.txt

00139.txt

00178.txt

00097.txt

00321.txt

00050.txt

00121.txt

UF00027870_00001_pdf.txt

00085.txt

00195.txt

00018.txt

00227.txt

00307.txt

00098.txt

00209.txt

00113.txt

00052.txt

00144.txt

00084.txt

00069.txt

00245.txt

00134.txt

00239.txt

00088.txt

00187.txt

00240.txt

00292.txt

00286.txt

00287.txt

00029.txt

00257.txt

00175.txt

00226.txt

00272.txt

00074.txt

00254.txt

00249.txt

00132.txt

00077.txt

00300.txt

00219.txt

00041.txt

00236.txt

00053.txt

00164.txt

00198.txt

00229.txt

00332.txt

00104.txt

00185.txt

00115.txt

00078.txt

00149.txt

00141.txt

00324.txt

00131.txt

00021.txt

00028.txt

00216.txt

00275.txt

00331.txt

00031.txt

00009.txt

00230.txt

00276.txt

00295.txt

00281.txt

00046.txt

00329.txt

00298.txt

00278.txt

00266.txt

00147.txt

00297.txt

00044.txt

00013.txt

00228.txt

00319.txt

00001.txt

00109.txt

00225.txt

00099.txt

00102.txt

00180.txt

00040.txt

00129.txt

00313.txt

00094.txt

00159.txt

00302.txt

00014.txt

00086.txt

00242.txt

00232.txt

00305.txt

00130.txt

00049.txt

00079.txt

00048.txt

00165.txt

00306.txt

00211.txt

00123.txt

00334.txt

00065.txt

00261.txt

00106.txt

00214.txt

00015.txt

00314.txt

00056.txt

00192.txt

00045.txt

00161.txt

00171.txt

00176.txt

00173.txt

00202.txt

00030.txt

00325.txt

00244.txt

00089.txt

00082.txt

00155.txt

00273.txt

00036.txt

00124.txt

00260.txt

00043.txt

00025.txt


Full Text












AUNT CHARLOTTE’S

BIreLeE Wiest ory





FUST PUBLISHED

BY THE sav Eb Ase

Aniform with “ Stories of Wible Wistory ”’

UNT CHARLOTTE’S Stories of English History for

the Little Ones. In Fifty easy Chapters, with a Frontispiece in Colors by H.

Stacy MARKS, A.R.A.; a Half-page Picture to each Chapter, and an Illuminated

Title-page. New Edition, with Questions. Square Octavo, Cloth Extra, Bevelled
Boards, Gilt Edges. Price 6/-

UNT CHARLOTTE’S Stories of French History for

the Little Ones. In Forty-eight easy Chapters, with a Frontispiece in Colors
by H. Stacy Marks, A.R.A. ; Illustrations, and an Illuminated Title-page. Square
Octavo, Cloth Extra, Bevelled Boards, Gilt Edges. Price 6/-~





CHRIST BLESSING LITTLE CHILDREN.



Oa & hor é
Qn SS | ea es SS SSS SSS

AUNT CHARLOTTE |

PX] STORIES OF _



Charlotte M. Yonée.
SD Author of The Heir of Kedelpfe, Ke.
j ROI

ee



MARCUS WARD & CO, LONDON & BELFAST.



PSS
o AA











AUNT CHARLOTTE'’S

STORIES OF

BIBLE HISTORY

POR THE, Lit ILE ONS.

BY
CHARLOTTE M. YONGE,

AutHOR OF ‘‘THE HEIR OF REDCLYFFE,” ‘‘STORIES OF ENGLISH History,’ &C.



London :

MARCUS WARD & CO., CHANDOS STREET, W.C.;
AnD ROYAL ULSTER WORKS, BELFAST.
M.DCCC.LXXV.











PREFACE.



HESE Readings give the outlines of the
Scripture narrative to very young children.
The first half of them will be found, if
begun on Septuagesima Sunday, to follow the course
of the First Lessons for Sundays, so that the three



short Readings can be gone through with children
each Sunday; but they can be read as a consecutive
history. In the Gospels, it was of course impossible
to adapt the story to the Sunday Lessons, and it has
therefore not been attempted. It is hoped, however,
that this may serve as a useful introduction to Scrip-
ture history, and give children a better understanding
of the connection of the Lessons they hear at
Church.
CHARLOTTE M. YONGE.

Nov. 8rd, 187 4.









CONT ENT S:

PAGE
The Making of the World : i . . TL
How Sin began and the Flood came ‘ 5 : 17
The Rainbow : é ; : 5 3 : 28
Abraham and Lot . _ : ; ‘ A ; 29
Jacob’s Journey . 7 : fi “ ‘ . - 35
Joseph in Egypt ; d : : : é : 4!
Joseph’s Brothers : : é : : . 2 AZ.
The Call of Moses. 4 : ° . . 53
The Plagues of Egypt . e i . . - - 59
The Passover 4 i. $ 3 5 ‘ 5 64
The Gainsaying of Korah ‘ 3 i é 3869
Israel in the Wilderness : . . é 3 : 74
Balaam and Balak ‘ . 3 ; i ° - 79
The Giving of the Law é 3 ‘ 3 3 - 85,90
The Death of Moses ; 5 is c ° . - 95
The Holy Spirit of Love 3 y i . 6 a 99
The Glory of God : : 3 7 6 . . 105
Israel in Battle ‘ . c . ° s . Ill
The Judges of Israel : ‘ : . : : . 116
Samuel . ‘ ; . 6 : . c 121
King Saul : 3 : é : . . 127
The Reign of Saul. I . : é : . 132
King David reigning : ; A : ‘ s - 139
Preparing forthe Temple. d ‘ . : . 144
Solomon in his Glory. 3 i ‘ . 148
Solomon’s Fall : . 5 rs . a A 152
The Kingdom of Israel . 5 ‘ : ‘ 3 - 156

Elijah and Ahab ‘ . j : : zi A 162





vili Contents.

Elijah and Elisha

Elisha’s Miracles . s : E .
The Ruin of Ahab’s House a : .
Hezekiah and Josiah . : 5 d .
Jehoiakim’s Cruelty : . . °

Jeremiah’s Prophecies

The Taking of Jerusalem

The Fall of Jerusalem . .
The Jews at Babylon .

Daniel at Babylon

The Return from Babylon

Troubles of the Jews .

The Coming of the Lord

The Childhood of our Lord .

The Preparation for the Ministry
The Calling of the Disciples.

The Ministry : é 5
Wonders of our Lord’s Working.
Going up to Jerusalem

The Evening of the Betrayal

The Trial and Condemnation . 5

The Crucifixion

The Resurrection ‘

The Ascension : 3 ,

The Waiting-time ‘ ‘ : ‘











LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



PAGE
The Garden of Eden. ‘3 : : : =P UIT
Adam and Eve expelled from Bien . . . . 17
Noah receiving the Dove into the Ark . 3 3 Re n28
Abraham offering Isaac : , 5 i 3 : 29
Isaac blessing Jacob ‘i s : 3 e : oth
Joseph’s Coat shown to Jacob . . 2 : 4 41
Joseph embracing his Father. . . s : - 47
The Burning Bush . 3 3 . ‘ 3 sy 53
Death of the First-born . ‘ - . iy . - 59
Eating the Passover . é : is : . : 64
Aaron’s Rod 3 : ‘i : F : . 69
Moses striking the Rock > 3 a : 3 8 74
The Brazen Serpent . ; . : ; 3 949
Gathering Manna. ‘ 3 t , 85
Moses speaking the Book of pete j : : - 90
Moses viewing the Promised Land . 2 . , , 95
Offering First Fruits : 6 : 5 : - 99
Abraham and the three Holy Ones : : 5 § 105
Passing over Jordan : : : ; , P . III
Gideon’s Fleece 7 ‘ 5 : i : fy 116
Samuel and Eli . . A 5 ‘ A = pil
Samuel anointing Saul 3 : 6 ‘ : A 127
David and Goliath : : . . . el32,
Absalom caught in the Tree 5 ‘ : : 5 139
David buying the Threshing-floor $ S 3 ‘ - 144
Solomon’s Judgment . : 3 : ‘ 148
The Queen of Sheba’s Visit a Splumon 3 ¢ eali52)

The Disobedient Prophet . : : : ‘ ; 156









x Lust of Illustrations.

PAGE



Elijah on Mount Sinai . . : 5 ‘ . 162
Ascent of Elijah é , p : : 168
Naaman at Elisha’s door 5 5 : . . - 173
Jezebel at the Window : : . 179
Hezekiah spreading Sennacherib’s etic: Before the Lord FE . 184
The Feast of Tabernacles . r i E : z 190
Offering Wine to the Rechabites r A 5 - . 193
Reading the Roll to Jehoiachin 6 é : ; ; 199
Jews driven away captive : ; ; 5 3 - 205
Daniel refusing the Dainties . , : , - 211
The Handwriting on the Wall . : hg He . 216
Daniel in the Lion’s Den. 5 4 a : : 223
Esther before King Ahasuerus ; : . ; . 230
The Annunciation . ; ‘ , 3 . 3 236
The Nativity : 3 . 3 ? . 241
Jesus with the Doctors in ae Deuinle i . 3 . 246
Miracle of the Loaves and Fishes 5 5 . : . 251
Raising the Widow’s Son. gj : . ; : 256
The Transfiguration : < . 261
Jesus’ Triumphal Entry into yetesden : : 3 . 266
Jesus blessing little Children. 7 ; a - 271
Jesus before Pilate. : . : j : é 276
The Crucifixion . ‘A . : . . 283
Jesus appears to Mary Magen 5 5 ° ; ; 288
Jesus ascends into Heaven . - ; . . - 293













THE GAKDEN OF EDEN,



First Sunday—Septuagesima,

THE MAKING OF THE WORLD.
FIRST READING.
“Tn the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.”—Gev. 1. 1.
O-DAY we are told how God made this earth that we
live on. Sunday is the earth’s birthday, for on the first
day of the week the Creation began.
The world was all one mass—dark, empty, and shapeless—

till God made the light by His Word, and said that the light
was good. Without light we could not live: even the very











12 first Sunday—Septuagesima.



trees and flowers would die. When we have been in the dark
how glad we are to see light come back, even if it be only one
grey line beginning in the sky! This shows how blessed is
this gift. It was good, too, that we should have quiet dark
night for rest and stillness.

The second great change enclosed the earth in an outer
ball of air, which we call the sky or firmament. That is the
deep blue into which we look up and up. The water rises up
from the earth and makes the clouds that take such strange
shapes, sometimes dark and full of rain to water the earth,
sometimes shining white, or pink and golden with morning or
evening light.

The third great change was, that water filled the deep
hollows of the earth, while the hills rose up dry above them,
with rivers and streams running down their slopes into the
deep seas below. God did not leave the land bare and stony:
He clothed it with green fresh plants and herbs, with leaves
and flowers, and trees to give us their fruit or their wood, and
filled even the sea with plants formed to live under water.

Next, God allowed the rays of the sun to gladden the earth,
and let it see the moon lighted up by the sun, as well as the
stars far beyond our firmament. We count the months by the
changes in the moon; and our earth’s journey round the sun
marks our years and seasons. We all rejoice in a bright
sunny day, though the sun is too bright and glorious for us to
bear to gaze at him; and how lovely the moon looks, either
as a young crescent, or a beautiful full moon!

The waters began to be full of live things, that swam, or







The Making of the World. 13

crept, or flew: fishes, and birds, and insects. By that time
this world was nearly as we see it, and a beautiful home for us
to live in. Then God made the four-footed beasts—sheep
and cows, horses, dogs, cats, elephants, lions—all that we use
or admire ; and, last of all, when He had made this earth a
happy, healthy place, He planted the Garden of Eden, and
put in it the first man and woman, the best of all that He had
made; for though their bodies were of dust, like those of
the beasts, yet their souls came from the Breath of God.
They could think, speak, pray, and heed what is unseen as
well as what is seen.

There are many many lessons to be learnt from this wonder-
ful story. Let us try to take home one of them. Let us ask our
Father that the ground below, the light above, the sky and
sea, the sun and moon, the trees and flowers, the birds and
beasts, and His holy day of rest, may remind us that they
came from Him, and that we may be very thankful to Him
for having given us such good things.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who made the world? 2. Which Commandment tells you about
God’s making the world? 3. What is there in the sky that God made?
4. What is there on the earth? 5. What do you see round you that He
made? 6, Can we make birds, or beasts, or flowers? 7. Or could we
make them live? 8. Who makes them and us live? 9. Where does all
our food come from? 10. Who gave us corn? 11. What must we ask
God to do for us? 12. What must we thank Him for? 13. Do not you
think it would be pleasant to whisper to yourself, when you see a pretty
flower, or a beautiful sky, or when the sun shines bright and warm,
“Thank God for being so good to me”?











14 first Sunday—Septuagesima.

SECOND READING.
“ And the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed

into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.”
—Genests, ii. 7.

N the Bible God tells us that He made the world, and

everything in it: land and water, and grass, flowers and
trees, insects, birds and beasts, and last of all He made the
first man and woman. The man was made by God out of the
dust of the ground, and then God breathed into his nostrils
the breath of life, and gave him a living soul. And the
woman was made by God out of the man’s side. They
were called Adam and Eve, and they were to be the first
father and mother of everyone who was to be born into the
world.

The good God gave them a beautiful home. It was a gar-
den, with a clear river of water flowing through it, and all
kinds of delicious fruit-trees and beautiful flowers growing in
it. Nothing could hurt or vex them there. They did not
know what pain was, they were never tired, and all they had
to do was to dress the garden and to keep it. They had no
faults, and never did wrong; and God Himself came near to
talk with them.

That was the way they lived, always good and always
happy, whilst they obeyed what God had told them. In the
midst of the garden grew two trees: one was the Tree of Life,
and the other was the Tree of the Knowledge of good and
evil. God told them that if they ate the fruit of this Tree of
Knowledge they would die. We do not know what those









The Making of the World. 15

trees were like, but sometime or other I hope we shall see the
Tree of Life, for it is growing in heaven, close by the river
that flows by the Throne of God; and when we see it, and
taste of it, we shall live for ever, and be happier even than
Adam and Eve were. We shall never be as happy as they
were while we are living in this world; but if we will try to
obey God, and live holy lives, He will take us to heaven, and
that will be still better than the Garden of Eden.

QUESTIONS.

1. What did God make? 2. Whom did He make? 3. What was the
man made of? 4. What was the woman made of? 5. What did God
breathe into them? 6. What did He give them? 7. Why were they
better than the beasts? 8. What was the man’s name? 9. What was
the woman’s name? io. Of whom were they the father and mother?
11. Where did they live? 12. What had they to do there? 13. What
grew there? 14. What were the two chief trees that grew there? 15.
Which were they not to touch? 16. Where is the Tree of Life now?
17. When do we hope to see it? 18. What is a still happier place than
the Garden of Eden ?

THIRD READING.

“Hitherto shalt thou come, but no further: and here shall thy proud
waves be stayed.”—-¥od, xxxviii. 11.

HAT glorious and wonderful things God has made! Did

you ever see the sea? There it is—a great vast space,

all water, looking green near us, but blue further off—always
heaving up and down. The waves rise, and then ripple along,
and burst with a white edge of bubbles of foam. And, if you







cc —_-

16 first Sunday—Septuagesina.

live near the sea, you know how, at certain times in the day,
one wave after another begins to break a little higher on the
beach ; eight waves seem to run up the same distance, then
the ninth comes much further, then eight more come like that,
then another. A great space that had been left dry gets
covered up with water again, and where you were walking just
now is quite deep water. What is this called? The tide.
Well, what will the tide do in proper time? Will it come
rolling in over the beach, sand, pebbles, and rocks, and wash
us all away and drown us all, and cover up the land? No;
presently each will turn. Each wave will be a little less high
than the last, till it will have gone back again and left the
beach uncovered as before. Why does the tide do this? It
is because God so wonderfully contrived this earth and sea,
that the waters should rise and go back. He made the sand
the bound of the sea, and said, “ Hitherto shalt thou come,
but no further: and here shall thy proud waves be stayed.”
So, you know, we sing in the Psalm every Sunday—

“The sea is His, and He made it :
And His hands prepared the dry land.”

QUESTIONS.

1. Which day was the sea and land made? 2. What curious thing
does the sea do every day? 3. What do you call the coming in and going
back of the sea? 4. Why does the tide always stop in its proper place?
5. What did God make the bound of the sea? 6. What did He say to
it? 7. What verse praises God for making the sea?





















ADAM AND EVE EXPELLED FROM EDEN.



Second Sunday.— Seragesima.

HOW SIN BEGAN AND THE FLOOD CAME.
FIRST READING.
“The serpent beguiled me, and I did eat.”—Gen. iii. 13.

AST Sunday you heard how God made the world, and
put a man and woman to live init. The man was named
Adam ; the woman was named Eve. God gave them a beau-
tiful garden to live in, full of trees and flowers; and they had
no pain, no trouble, nothing to vex them. Only one thing
God told them: there was one tree whose fruit they must not











18 Second Sunday—Sexagesima.



eat. They might eat the fruit of all the other trees, but not
of that one. As long as they obeyed, all was well and happy
with them ; but if they ate it they would die. But a bad spirit
came and took the shape of the serpent, and talked to Eve.
He told her a wicked lie—he told her that to eat the fruit
would make her wise, and would not make her die. And Eve
listened, and did eat. And she gave Adam, and he also ate ;
and so they took the bad spirit for their master instead of the
good God. Then God was angry with them, and put them
out of the garden, and let them be weak and sickly, and die
at last. It is a sad thing for them and for us. For if they
had been good and obeyed God, and not the bad spirit, it
would have been easy to us to be good, and we should not
have had the devil tempting us to do wrong: we should have
never known pain or sorrow. But God pitied Adam and
Eve, and us too; and he promised them that the Seed—
that is, the Son—of the woman should bruise the serpent’s
head, and set them and their children free. Our Blessed Lord
Jesus Christ, the Son of God and of the Virgin Mary, set us
free when He died on the cross and rose again; and now we
belong to Him, and not to the bad spirit. Only we must try
and ask Him to help us not to do what is wrong, as Eve did,
or we shall not keep free from the power of the enemy.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was the first man? 2. Who was the first woman? 3. Where
did God put them? 4. What was the one thing they might not do? 5.
What was to happen if they ate of that fruit? 6. Who came and spoke
to Eve? 7. What shape did the bad spirit take? 8. What did he tell













aa
flow Sin Began and the Flood Came. 19



Eve? 9. What did she do? 10, Whom did she make her master? 11.
What was done to punish her? 12. What sad things did the bad spirit
bring on her? 13. Who came to set us free from the bad spirit ?



SECOND READING.

“And, behold, I, even I, do bring a flood of waters upon the earth.”—
Genesis vi. 17.
HE Lesson this morning told the sad history of how
Adam and Eve did the very thing that God forbade ; so
that He drove them out of the Garden of Eden, and sin and
death came into the world.

After that they had children. Some were good, but not so
good as Adam and Eve had been at first; and some were
bad. And as time went on the bad ones grew worse, and the
good ones were tempted, and many of them grew wicked too.
And so all the world was getting wicked, and God saw
nothing but evil when He looked down on it. And He said
that He would destroy these wicked people, and wash away
the evil from the earth by a great flood. But there was one
good man, whose name was Noah; and God said He would
save him. He bade Noah build an Ark. It was to bea
great ship, all made of wood, and it took a great many years
to build; and all that time people laughed at Noah, for they
would not believe that anything was going to happen. Noah
made the Ark, and stored it with food. And God sent him a
pair of all sorts of animals that were in the world, and he put
them into pens in the Ark. Then Noah and his wife, and his











20 Second Sunday—Sexagesima.

three sons, Shem, Ham, and Japhet, and their wives, went
into the Ark, and God shut them in.

Then it began to rain. It rained for forty days and forty
nights without stopping, and the rivers came out of their
banks, and the sea came upon the land, and the ground was
covered up. Even the tops of the highest hills were hidden,
and everybody and every creature was drowned—all but Noah
and those that were with him. There was the Ark all the
time, floating quite safe on the water. The storm could not
upset it nor the sea get into it, for God took care of it and all
that was in it.

The reason Noah was saved was because, first, he tried to
be good, and not do like the bad people round him; and
next, because he believed what God said to him, and went on
making the Ark, even when he saw no danger. If we wish
God to save us, then we must take care that we do just what
we are told—not what seems pleasant now, but what is really
right.

QUESTIONS.

1. Do you know why Adam and Eve were driven out of the happy gar-
den? 2. How did people go on after that? 3. How had sin come into
the world? 4. What did God say He must do to the world? 5. Why?
6. Who was to be saved? 7. What was Noah to make? 8. What was
the Ark like? 9. What were put into it? 10, Why were two of all crea-
tures put into the Ark? 11. What men and women were in it? 12. What
were the names of Noah’s sons? 13. What happened when Noah was in
the Ark? 14. How long did it rain? 15. What was covered up? 16.

What became of all the people? 17. Who were safe? 18. Where was
the Ark? 19. Who took care of the Ark? 20. Why was Noah saved?





flow Sin Began and the Flood Came. 21



THIRD READING.
“So Noah knew that the waters were abated from off the earth.”—
Genesis viii. 2.
T must have been a sad sight for Noah and his wife and
their sons, as the rain went on and on, and the water

grew deeper and deeper, and everybody and everything was
drowned. Then came a time when nothing was to be seen
but water. Wherever they looked all was sky and water ; but
it had done raining, the sky was blue again, the sun shone by
day, the stars by night, and they must have been very glad.
And still the water got lower, till the Ark did not float about,
but stopped, resting on a peak of a mountain, a very high
mountain, and a few bare tops of other hills began to peep
out. By-and-by, Noah opened the window of the Ark and let
out a raven. Fle never saw the raven again, for a raven eats
dead things, and there were so many dead bodies floating
about that it got plenty of food, and never came back to the
Ark that had saved it. He waited a week, and then he let
out a dove. Now doves like trees to sit and nestle in, and
they eat grains and seeds; so the poor dove found no place
to rest in, and flew back to the Ark; and Noah took her
back, and kept her a week, then let her fly again. She flew
away, but still she came back to the Ark, and this time she
brought in her beak a sprig of olive branch.

It was the first green thing that Noah had seen for a year!
Noah’s children have loved the olive leaf everywhere, and cal-
led it the sign of peace and good news ever since.

For now Noah knew that the waters had gone down, and

nt a ee ee







22 Second Sunday—Seragesima.



that trees must be able to put forth leaves again. Once more,
after another week, he let out the dove, and she did not come
back, for she had found a tree where she could make her
home, and seeds to eat; and then Noah knew the sad time of
the flood—a whole year—was over, and the earth had been
washed from all her stains.



QUESTIONS.

1. What was the Flood? 2. What was the Ark? 3. Who was in it?
4. What had Noah with him in the Ark? 5. What became of everyone
else? 6. Why? 7. Why was Noah saved? 8. How long did the Flood
last? 9. What birds did Noah send out of the Ark? 10, Which came
back? 11. Why did not the raven come back? 12. What did the dove
bring? 13. What was Noah sure of then? 14. What had the earth
been washed from?







ea ro













Zi oe

PE

nf

CILULE:







NOAH RECEIVING THE DOVE INTO THE ARK.—PAGE 21.

Chird Sunday.—Quinguagesima.

THE RAINBOW.
FIRST READING.

“T do set my Bow in the Cloud.” —Genesis ix. 13.

HE sin that came into the world when Eve listened to
the tempter had grown as men multiplied and made each
other worse. The wicked people had been drowned in the
Flood, and Noah, his sons and their wives, had alone been
saved in the Ark. After a whole year of being shut up there,
watching the earth, first drowned and then coming out of the









24. Third Sunday—Quinguagesima.



water, they had just come out on the fresh green earth, with
all the animals saved with them, when God spoke to them.

Then God made a promise to Noah. It was that no flood
of water shall ever drown all the world again, but spring,
summer, autumn, and winter, day and night, will go on to the
end of the world, when it shall be burnt up by fire, not
drowned by water. That Noah, and all of us after him, might
feel sure that God in His mercy will go on preserving us, and
giving us days and nights, seed-time and harvest, He gave us
something to look at asa sign of His promise. He so ordered
the rays of light, that when they shine upon drops of water in
the air they cause beautiful colours, making part of a circle,
so as to form a bow. So when the sun shines on a cloud,
as it rains, the fair bright rainbow is seen, as a pledge to us of
God’s merciful care and love to us. There is a rainbow round
about the Throne of God in Heaven ; and the lovely rainbows
that we see when the sun shines out, and the showers drift
away, are to put us in mind that we are safe under His care,
in right of His promise to Noah and his three sons, of whom
the whole earth was overspread. We are the children of his
son Japhet, and all that was then said to him belongs to us
also. We should recollect it, and put our trust in Him, and
be thankful when we see the beautiful soft arch that the
Hands of the Almighty have bended, looking out of the
midst of the dark watery cloud.

QUESTIONS.

1. What beautiful sight do we sometimes see after a shower? 2. What
is a rainbow like? 3. Who put the rainbow in the cloud? 4. Who Was





The Rainbow. 25

the man to whom God showed the rainbow? 5. What promise did God
make Noah? 6. What had God just done to the wicked people? 7.
Whom had he saved? 8. What did He say should always go on? 9.
What did God put in the sky to show that He will not send ancther
Flood? 10. What are we to think of when we see a rainbow? 11. Who
takes care of us? 12. Where is there a rainbow in Heaven above?

SECOND READING.
“Tn thee shall all families of the earth be blessed.” —Geneszs xii. 3.

HEN Noah’s grandchildren and great-grandchildren

came to be more and more, and the world was being
filled with people again, they still were not all good, and the
longer time went on the worse they grew.

At last God called to a very good man, whose name was
Abram, and told him that if he would come away from his
home toa land God would show him, then God would bless
him and lead him, and by-and-by give the land to his children,
and that their children after them should be more in number
than the grains of sand on the sea-shore, or than the stars in
the sky: and that in his seed—that was, in a Son of his—all
the nations of the earth should be blessed.

It was strange to hear all this about Abram’s children, for
he was growing an old man, and he and his wife Sarai had no
child at all. But he believed in God. He knew that God is
Almighty, and can do whatever He will; so he only did just
as God told him, and went away from his home, where God
told him. He was obliged to take all his cattle with him—
quantities of cows, and goats, and sheep, and camels, and







26 Third Sunday—Quinquagesima.



asses ; and he had servants to drive them. When they came
to a piece of grass and a fresh spring of water, there they
would stop. They had no houses—only tents, which were
great curtains woven of goat’s hair and fastened up with
poles, so that they could be set up or taken down, and carried
about. All his life Abram lived in a tent, instead of staying
at home in a city, and being at his ease.

By-and-by he came to a beautiful country.. There were
high cool hills rising up, and green valleys between, full of
grass for the sheep and cattle; and the wide sea spread out
far away towards the sunset, all blue and glorious. God told
him to look at the land, for that was the place which his
children should have for their own; but in the meantime
Abram had not one bit of it, and was a stranger there; and
he had no child either.

But still he was quite sure that God spoke truth ; and that
somehow, though he did not know how, it would come about
that his children should have the land, and that in One all the
nations of the earth should be blessed. That was faith.

QUESTIONS,

1. What good man do you hear of to-day? 2. What did God tell
Abram to do? 3. What did God promise? 4. Who were to have the
land? 5. Why was it strange to hear of his children? 6. But did he
believe it would come true? 7. Why did he believe it? 8. How did he
show that he believed? 9. Where did he go? ro. What had he with him?
11. What did he live in? 12. What is a tent like? 13. What sort of place
did he come to? 14. Who were to have this land? 15. How many were
his children to be? 16. Did he believe this? 17. What is believing called?







The Rainbow. 27

THIRD READING.

“Let there be no strife, I pray thee, between thee and me.”—Gex. xiii. 8.

WO men were travelling together. They were an uncle
and nephew. The uncle’s name was Abram, the nephew’s
was Lot. They had come from home, because God had told
Abram to come away from his own home to the land that
God would give his children. Abram believed, and did as
God bade him; and Lot, the son of his dead brother, went
with him. They did not go alone. Each of them had great
flocks of cows, and sheep, and camels, and asses, and goats,
and numbers of servants to take care of them. They would
fix their black tents, made of camels’ hair, in any place where
they saw a spring of water and good green grass for their
cattle; and there they would stay till all the grass was eaten
up, and then take up their tents and move to another place.
Just now they had got to a bare stony place, where the sun.
shone hotly, and there was not much green; but Abram had
built up an altar with the great stones, and prayed there.
Abram and Lot loved one another, and were at peace; but
when their servants drove out their flocks to get food and
water there were apt to be quarrels. If Abram’s men found
a green grassy valley, they would not let Lot’s cattle into it;
and if Lot’s came to a well, they would not let Abram’s flocks
drink ; and so on. They were always quarrelling and making
complaints to their masters. At last Abram saw that they
would make Lot quarrel with him. So he said it would be
wiser to part; Lot should go one way and he another—any







28 Third Sunday—Quinquagesima.



way there should be no strife. And he even told Lot to
choose which way he would go. So Lot looked, and saw to.
the East a pleasant green valley, with fields of corn and mea-
dows, and a fine river running into a clear lake, and five fine
towns on the bank. He liked it better than the bare stony
hills where Abram was; and he never thought whether the
people were good or not, but he took the first choice, and
went to live there. So Abram gave up. He had the right to
choose first, but he would not use it. He let his nephew
choose. For he hated quarrels, and knew they were wicked ;
and he knew how to stop them, because he would yield up the
best. That is the way to make peace and please God.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who had called Abram? 2. Who went with him? 3. What was Lot
to Abram? 4. Why did they go? 5. What had God promised? 6, What
had they with them? 7. Who quarrelled? 8. About what did the servants
quarrel? 9. Did Abram and Lot quarrel? 10, How did Abram prevent
a quarrel? 11. Who was to choose first? 12, Who might have chosen
first? 13. Why did not Abram choose first? 14. Ought you to be in
haste to take the first choice? 15. What should you try to hinder? 16.
And if you keep yourself back, and don’t say “It’s mine,” and “TI must,”
shall you not be likely to keep from quarrels ?

























ABRAHAM OFFERING ISAAC.



Fourth Suday—~first m Lent.

ABRAHAM AND LOT.
FIRST READING.
“ Escape for thy life ; look not behind thee.”—Geneszs xix. 17.

HERE was a beautiful valley, with steep hills shutting it
in on all sides, and a clear swift river running through
the midst and spreading into a lake. There were fine fields
and rich grass, where sheep, cows, and goats could feed, and
the shepherds shelter themselves under the palm trees ; and
on the bank of the river were five cities, with strong walls













30 Fourth Sunday—Ffirst in Lent.

round them, and full of rich people, who bought and sold and
made merry with the good things they possessed. There was
one man living among them who was good, and was grieved
by the wicked ways of the men round him, who only laughed
at him if he tried to tell them of better things. One evening
two strangers came into the city where he lived, and he was
the only person who would take them in, and shelter them
from the wicked people in the street.

Those strangers told him the place was to be destroyed,
with all that were in it, because it was so wicked! Though
the fields looked so quiet, the walls so strong, and the sun
had gone down as usual, all would be ruined in a few hours’
time! Then the strangers took hold of him, and his wife
and daughters, and led them almost by force away from
their home in the dawn of morning, bidding them escape for
their lives to the mountain, and not look back. They were
frightened, and begged not to have to go so far as the wild
mountain. Might they not go to the little city near at hand?
And their wish was granted. Just as the sun had risen they
entered the little city for which they had begged ; and as soon
as they were safe the four towns, that had seemed so strong
and firm, were all burning with fire and brimstone; and all
the sinners who had mocked at warning were soon lying dead
under God’s awful anger! Four alone had been led out of the
city by the strangers, but even of these only three came into
the city of refuge. The wife did not heed the warning not to
linger nor look back, the deadly storm overtook her, and she
remained rooted to the spot—a pillar of salt!









Abraham and Lot. 31



The names of those cities were Sodom and Gomorrah, and
the one good man who was saved by the mercy of God was
named Lot. And now a strange gloomy lake called the
Dead Sea covers that valley with its heavy waters, and the
bare rocky hills, crusted with salt, show that the curse of God
is on the place.

Let us try to carry home one thought from this terrible his-
tory. This world will one day be burnt up like those cities,
and its looking safe and prosperous now does not make it safe.
But God sends messengers to lead us out of it. If we attend to
them, and follow their advice, we shall through all our lives be
getting out of danger, and going on toa safe home in heaven;
but if we care only for pleasant things here, it is like looking
back, and our souls will perish with what they love. That is
why our Saviour bade us “ Remember Lot’s wife.’ We should
remember her when we are tempted to think it hard to give
up anything pleasant, because we are told that it is wrong, and
may put us in danger of God’s anger.

QUESTIONS.

1, What was the name of the place I told you of to-day? 2. What was
the name of the man? 3. What kind of place was Sodom? 4. Who was
the only good man there? 5. Who came to Lot? 6. What did he do for
the strangers? 7. What did the strangers tell Lot? 8. Why was Lot to
come out of Sodom? 9. Why was Sodom to be destroyed? 10, Where
did Lot go? 11. Who looked back? 12. What became of her? 13. What
did God do to Sodom? 14. What sort of place is it now? 15. What will
be burnt up some day? 16. If we are not good, what will become of us?
17. But what have we to teach us to be good? 18. And how must we try
to come out, like Lot?









Bo Fourth Sunday—Ffirst in Lent.



SECOND READING.
“ Now I know that thou fearest God, seeing thou hast not withheld thy
son, thine only son from Me.”—Geves?s xxii. 12.
Y-AND-BY Abraham had a son—one only son, whose
name was Isaac. All the promises God had made were
to be for Isaac’s children after him: and Abraham loved God,
and hoped all the more.

But then God called Abraham to do a strange and terrible
thing. He was to go and take his dear son Isaac to the top
of a hill, and there to offer him up to God as if he had been a
calf or a lamb. Of course, in general, to do such a thing
would be shockingly wicked ; but Abraham knew that when
God commanded a thing, it must be right to do as he was
bidden, however dreadful it was to him.

So they set out together. Abraham took the knife, and a
vessel with fire in it? and Isaac carried the wood with which
the sacrifice was to be burnt. On the way Isaac said, “ My
father, behold the fire and the wood: but where is the lamb
for a burnt offering?” And Abraham answered, “My son,
God will provide Himself a lamb for a burnt offering.”

Isaac soon knew he was to be the lamb, for his father put
the wood in order, and bound his limbs, and took the knife.
And Isaac did not complain or struggle. He was ready, like
his father, to do the will of God. But just as Abraham had
the knife ready to slay his son, an angel called to him out of
Heaven: “Lay not thine hand upon the lad, neither do thou
anything unto him: for now I know that thou fearest God, see-
ing thou hast not withheld thy son, thine only son from Me.”







Abraham and Lot. 33



Then Abraham unbound his son, and was as glad as if
Isaac had really risen from the dead. And he saw a ram
caught in the thicket by its horns; so he took that, and of-
fered it up instead of Isaac. Thus God really provided a
lamb for a burnt offering.

And He blessed Abraham more and more, and promised
again that his children should have the land, and that in his
Seed should all the nations of the earth be blessed. That
Seed was our blessed LORD JESUS CHRIST, who, you know,
was reaily given by His Heavenly Father to die, and then came
back from the dead, that all people might be saved by Him.

QUESTIONS.

1. What was the name of Abraham’s son? 2. What had God promised
Abraham? 3. What had Abraham done at God’s command? 4. What
was he now to do? 5. Whom did he obey? 6. Where was he to go? 7.
Who went with him? 8. What did Isaac ask? 9. What did Abraham
answer? 10. Who seemed likely to be the lamb? 11. What was Abra-
ham just going to do? 12, Who called him? 13. What did the angel
tellhim? 14. Why was God pleased with him? 15. What blessing did
God give him? 16, Who was to be his Seed in whom all families should
be blessed ?

THIRD READING.
“JT am a stranger and a sojourner with you.”—Geweszs xxiii. 4.
BRAHAM and his wife Sarah had lived together many
years; but at last Sarah died, and Abraham wanted to
bury her. You know in all the country he had not one morsel
| of ground of his own; he was a stranger there, but he knew











34 Fourth Sunday—First in Lent.



it would all belong to his children by-and-by. But he wanted
to make sure of the one bit where his wife should lie. So he
went to the prince to whom Hebron belonged, and begged to
buy a field with trees in it, and a rock where there was a deep
cave that was called Machpelah. The prince said he would
give it; but Abraham could not feel sure that it would be
always safe till he had bought it. So he weighed out the price.
It was not in little bits of money like ours, but lumps of silver
all the same weight, and each with a mark stamped on it—
four hundred of them. Then the cave was given to Abraham,
and he had his good true wife Sarah buried there, rolled in
linen with spices. He was buried there afterwards himself,
and so was his son Isaac, and Isaac’s son after him, in the
cave of Machpelah.

That cave has been kept sacred ever since. There is a
building over it now, and no stranger is allowed to go into it ;
but deep down there is a golden grating, and far within lie
these holy men and women of old. Their bodies are waiting
to rise again at the Last Day, and then I hope we shall see
them and know them.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Abraham’s wife? 2. Where did Sarah die? 3. What did
Abraham want to do? 4. Had he any ground? 5. So what was he
obliged to do? 6. Of whom did he buy the place? 7. What was it called?
8. What is a cave? 9. What did he pay? 10, What was Abraham’s

money? 11. Who were buried there afterwards? 12. How is the place
marked now? 13. When will Sarah’s body leave the grave in the cave of
Machpelah? 14. What do you say you believe in? (In the eleventh
Article of the Creed.) 15. What is Resurrection ?









ISAAC BLESSING JACOB.



Fifth Sunday—Second m ent.

FACOB’S FOURNE Y.
FIRST READING.
“ Bless me, even me also, O my father.” —Geneszs xxvii. 34.

OD had called Abraham from his home, and promised to
give his children the land of Canaan, and that in his Seed
all the nations of the earth should be blessed. This was re-
newing to Abraham the great promise of the Seed of the
woman that had been made to Eve; and Abraham believed,
and was glad. But though his children were to have the land,





36 fifth Sunday—Second in Lent.



none of it was his; and he went up and down in it a stranger,
living in his tent, without house or home, only trusting in faith
to God’s promise to his children. His son Isaac lived like
him, with no home, but looking on in faith to what God pro-
mised, Isaac had two sons; and as Esau was the eldest, he
had the first right to these promises. But Esau did not care
enough about them; he did not seem to get anything by
them, and he liked what he could get at once better than
what was a long way off. He had no faith, One day he came
home half dead with hunger, and saw his brother Jacob mak-
ing soup over the fire. He said he would give all these rights
for a meal of the soup; for if he died of hunger, what good
would his birth-right do him? So for a mess of pottage he
sold his right to the land of Canaan, and to be the forefather
of our Saviour.

A time was to come when he would be sorry for what he
had done. His father was old and blind, and thought he was
going to die; so he bade Esau, whom he loved the best, bring
home some meat and make a solemn feast—which was the
way then of giving a blessing. _Esau went, and in time brought
home the meat to his father ; but when he came in, Isaac cried
out, and trembled! His brother Jacob had come in his stead,
and Isaac had taken him for Esau, and given to him the bles-
sing that gave the right to the promised land, and to all God’s
promises !

Then Esau cried out with an exceeding bitter cry, and
asked if his father had but one blessing! Isaac was grieved
for him, and blest him with all his heart; but there was no














Facol’s Fourney. a7





changing back, no taking away what Jacob had won and Esau
had lost.

Esau did not know what he was doing when he took the
pottage at once, rather than wait patiently for the glorious in-
heritance that was to come. This was the reason that he was
allowed to be so cruelly disappointed. This is a warning to
us. We have the inheritance of the kingdom of heaven pro-
mised to us; but we are tempted not to care about it when
we want something here in this world, whether play, or dress,
or anything that seems a great deal to us now. But if we
trifle away our right to these great promises that God made
us at our baptism, there will come a time of bitter grief, when
it is too late. And when we are dead, it will be too late to
change! Therefore, now while we are alive, we must have
faith, and show it by taking care that the things we like here
on earth do not make us lose the better things in heaven.

QUESTIONS.

r. What were the names of Isaac’s two sons? 2. What had God pro-
mised Isaac? 3. Which son had the first right to the promise? 4. But
which cared about it most? 5. What did Esau want? 6. So what did he
give up for the sake of the soup? 7. Could he get it back again? 8. What
are you an heir of? 9. How could we lose the inheritance of the king-
dom of heaven? 10. Shall we be able to change after we are dead? 11.
Then what must we care about most? 12. Why could not Esau get his
father’s blessing? 13. What did he like better than waiting for what he
could not see? 14. Can we see heaven? 15. But when we get there, will
it not be better than anything we can see here?







38 fifth Sunday—Second tn Lent.



SECOND READING.
“This is none other but the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven.”
—Genesis Xxvill. 17.
OU know that Isaac, Abraham’s son, had two sons, whose
names were Esau and Jacob. Now Jacob had grieved
Esau by gaining God’s great promise, for which Esau did not
care till he had lost it. And Esau was so angry with him,
that he had to go out away from his father’s home, all alone.
But Jacob knew he was not alone, for God was with him. He
went on till night came. Then he was in a dismal stony place,
with no house or shelter near—only big stones, and here and
there a thistle. He said his prayers, and then he lay down,
with a stone for his pillow and the sky over him. But in the
night he saw a wonder. There was a ladder reaching from
earth to heaven, and God’s angels were going up and down,
and the Lord Himself stood at the top of the ladder. And
He told Jacob that He was going to give his children all the
land he saw—North, South, East, and West; and that He

would take care of him, and be with him wherever he went, -

and in time bring him safe home.

Jacob woke, and found it was a dream, but he knew it was
true, and that God had really spoken to him; and though he
was glad he was afraid, and he said, “ How dreadful is this
place! this is none other but the house of God, and this is the
gate of heaven.” And that he might always know the place,
he put one of the great stones upright, and he took some of
the sweet olive oil he had brought to eat on his journey, and
poured it on the stone, as the only thing he could do to show









Facols Fourney. 39

honour to God. Then he made a solemn holy vow, that if
God would take care of him on his way, and give him food to
eat and clothes to wear, he would make a gift to God all his
life of the tenth part of all he had. Good people like to do
like Jacob, and give God their tenth. And if we only had our
eyes opened to see, like his, we should see God’s angels com-
ing up and down with blessings for us, for we go to the house
of God and gate of heaven whenever we go to church. Let
us recollect how awful Jacob felt it to be so near to God.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Jacob? 2. Who was Isaac? 3. Who was Esau? 4. Why
-was Jacob obliged to go away? 5. What was the promise? 6. What kind
of place had he to sleepin? 7. What was his pillow? 8. But what did
he see? 9. Who went up and down? 10, Who stood at the top? 11.
What did God promise him? 12. What did Jacob say of the place? 13.
How did he mark it? 14. What did he pour on the stone? 15. What
vow did he make? 16. What are our houses of God? 17. Who come up
and down tous? 18, What do the angels bring us? 19. How much did
Jacob promise to give to God? 20, What does God do for us?

THIRD READING.

“ As a prince hast thou prevailed.”—Geneszs xxxii. 28.

T was a long journey that Jacob had had to take, but God
took care of him, and brought him safe to the home where
his mother had come from. He lived there, and took care of
his uncle’s sheep and cattle, till he had earned a great many
for his own; and he had married there, and had a great many









40 fifth Sunday—Second in Lent.



sons. But after a time God commanded him to go home to
the land of Canaan. He was afraid, because he thought his
brother Esau might still be angry with him; but, in spite of
his fear, he did as God bade him. When he came near the
river Jordan, which flows on the East side. of the land of
Canaan, he prayed to God to guard him, and once more God
_let him see the angels who were going with him to protect
him. He was glad, but he was still very careful. He chose
out a present of cows, and goats, and camels, and sheep, and
asses, for Esau, and sent it on to meet him; and then he sent
on the other cattle he wanted to keep for himself; then his
children ; and last of all, in the safest place, his dear young
son Joseph.

Esau came to meet him, but not in anger. The two bro-
thers met, and fell on one another’s neck and kissed one
another, and were friends. So God had kept His promise to
take care of Jacob; and Jacob kept his promise, for he set up
an altar at Bethel, where he had seen the angels before, and
praised and blessed God.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Jacob? 2. Why had he left home? 3. With whom did he
go to live? 4. What did he earn there? 5. Why did he go back? 6.
Why was he afraid? 7. But what comforted him? 8. Of whom do God’s
angels take care? 9. What did he give Esau? 10. How did he put his
family in order? 11. Who went last? 12, How did Esau meet him? 13.
What was the quarrel between them? 14. But was Esau angry? 15.
How did Jacob show he was thankful ?























JOSEPH'S COAT SHOWN TO JACOB.



Sisth Sanday.—Ohird in Tent.



FOSEPH IN EGYPT.
FIRST READING.
“ His brethren envied him.”—Geveszs xxxvii. I1.

TOLD you how Jacob went away from home, and how
God promised to take care of him. He did take care of
him: He led him to his uncle, and with him Jacob lived many
years, and then came back with flocks of sheep and goats,
camels and cows. And he had twelve sons. The best of all
his sons was named Joseph. Jacob loved him very much, and











42 Sixth Sunday— Third in Lent.

gave him a striped dress of many colours, such as the son
wears in those countries who is to be the heir. But his bro-
thers hated and envied him, and could not speak peaceably to
him. One day, when Joseph was seventeen years old, ten of
the brothers were out with their sheep, and Jacob desired
Joseph to go and see what they were about. He would not
tell his father how unkind they were to him, but he went ; and
as they saw him coming some of them were so wicked as to
say that they would kill him, and never let him go home.
Reuben, who was the eldest brother, tried to hinder them; but
when he saw he could not stop them, he said the best way
would be, not to kill him, but to let him down into a dry well
just by. There they meant to let him starve to death; and
they let him down without any pity for him. Reuben meant
to come by-and-by and take Joseph out of the pit and save
him; but there was another brother, named Judah, who did
not want to have him killed, and who saw a great party of
men, with camels and asses laden with goods, going on a jour-
ney. He knew they were merchants, going to sell and buy in
Egypt, and he advised the other brothers to persuade them to
buy Joseph: for in those days men and women used to be
bought and sold, and were called slaves. So Joseph was
drawn up out of the pit; and when the merchants saw what
a fine young man he was, they paid the price for him and
carried him off, away from his father and all he had ever
known or cared for before. The cruel brothers kept his
coloured dress; and they killed a kid and stained it in the
blood, and then carried it to their father, telling him they had







Foseph in Egypt. 43



found it. Jacob thought some wild beast had met Joseph and
killed him, and eaten him, and he mourned and wept. His
sons pretended to comfort him; but not one of them would
tell him that Joseph was not dead.

QUESTIONS.

1. Whose son was Jacob? 2. How many sons haa Jacob? 3. What
did he set them to do? 4. Which did he love best? 5. What did he give
Joseph? 6. Where did he send Joseph? 7. What did the brothers want
todo? 8. Who wished to save him? 9. So what did Reuben persuade
them todo? 10. What did Reuben mean to do? 11. But who came by?
12. What did the brothers do with Joseph? 13. Who persuaded them to
sell him? 14. What are people called who are bought and sold? 15.
What was done with his coat? 16. What did Jacob think?

SECOND READING.
“The Lord made all he did to prosper in his hand.”—Geveszs xxxix. 3.

O we see Joseph a slave. A slave is a servant who belongs
to his master, as his cows and horses do; he gets no
wages, and cannot go away, but is bought and sold like cattle.
Think of poor Joseph. He was used to live as the son of a
great rich prince, wearing a dress of many bright colours, with
many servants, and no one to obey but his kind fond father ;
and living in a beautiful land, all hill and valley, where he
used to feed his father’s flocks. But now he was a slave ina
strange land, with people speaking a language he did not
know, and no one to care for him or say a good word to him,
shut up in a house in a town, far away from his dear hills.
Still he had one comfort, and the best of all—God was with







44 Sixth Sunday—Third en Lent.

him. He could still pray to God, and do his duty. And he
did his work well, for God helped him, and everything he did
was made to prosper in his hand. Then he was trusted. His
master knew that he always took care of everything, as if it
was his own, and left all to him, quite sure that it would be
safe. But his wicked mistress made up a story that he had
behaved ill, and he was put in prison for what he had not
done. This sounds hard, but it was God’s own way of bring-
ing good to pass, and making Joseph come at last to honour.
Very soon he was loved and trusted in his prison; and all he
did the Lord made it to prosper.

Think about this. Try when you have anything to do—a
lesson or a bit of work—to ask God to make it prosper. Then
if you try your best He will help, and it will be sure to turn
out well.

Then try to deserve to be trusted. That is a great thing.
If you always recollect that God sees you, you will do the
same when no one is with you as if all the world were watch-
ing; and that is the way to be true and just in all your deal-
ings. If you are only good when you are looked at, you are
not like Joseph, but are only doing service outwardly. You
must try to live that your parents may

“Out of sight
Know all is right,
One law for darkness and for light.”

QUESTIONS.

x. Whose son was Joseph? 2. How many brothers had Joseph? 3.
What had they done to him? 4, Why had Joseph’s brothers sold him?





Joseph in Egypt. 45



5. What is a slave? 6. How did Joseph behave as a slave? 7. Who
comforted him? 8. How did he take care of his master’s things? 9.
Who made up a story against him? so. What was done to him? 11. But
who was with him still? 12. Did he always stay in prison? 13. And
what did people think of him, wherever he was? 14. What is the way to
be like Joseph? 15. If you are trusted to carry a message, how should
you do it? 16. Who always sees you? 17. Then, even if no one is by, |
how should you behave ?
|

THIRD READING.
“To not interpretations belong to God ?”—Gez. xl. 8.

HE young son of Jacob, Joseph, had, you know, been sold

by his cruel brothers, and made a slave of; and then a
wicked falsehood was told about him, and he was put into
prison. But wherever Joseph was he tried to do his duty, and
so God blessed him ; and the keeper of the prison soon found
out how different he was from the others, and let him help.
I suppose he helped to carry them their food and wait upon
them ; and he often could say a few kind good words to them.
One day two grand people came in as prisoners. One was
the chief of all the bakers, who made bread for king Pharaoh ;
and the other was the chief of all his cup-bearers, who carried
him his wine. Some wrong thing had happened, and they
were both suspected of having had something to do with it, so
they had been sent to prison. One morning Joseph saw them
both looking more sad than usual; and when he asked what
was the matter, they said each had a dream, and they wanted
to know what it meant; for the Egyptians used to think a







46 Sixth Sunday— Third in Lent.

great deal of dreams, and there were men among them who
pretended to explain them. Most dreams have no meaning,
but these had, and God put it into Joseph’s heart to under-
stand them. The cup-bearer had dreamt that he saw a vine,
and that it had three bunches of grapes, and that he was
squeezing the juice into the king’s cup as he used to do.
Joseph said this meant that in three days the cup-bearer
should really hand Pharaoh the cup again; and Joseph beg-
ged that when he was free, he would tell the king about him-
self, and get him set free. Then the baker told his dream—
that he had three baskets full of pastry and bread ready for
Pharaoh, but that the birds came down and ate them up.
Joseph was obliged to tell him that this meant that he would
be hanged, and that the vultures and ravens would eat his
flesh. So it happened. Pharaoh looked into the matter in
three days’ time; he caused the baker to be hung, and the
cup-bearer to come back to his old place. But the cup-bearer
was ungrateful, and forgot all about Joseph in his prison,
trusting to him.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Joseph? 2. Where was he? 3. How came he to be in
Egypt? 4. Where had he been put? 5. Had he done anything wrong?
6. Who trusted him? 7. What had he to do? 8. Who came into the
prison? 9. What was the cup-bearer’s dream? 10. What was the baker’s
dream? 11. What did Joseph say the cup-bearer’s dream meant? 12.
What did the baker’s dream mean? 13. What happened? 14. What
had Joseph asked of the cup-bearer? 15. Did he remember?























ais:

“INNS

Sy re pire % f x

eros a





o_o SOS

q re
ty vr



wi

JOSEPH EMBRACING HIS FATHER.



Sebenth Sumday— Fourth m Lent.

FOSEPH’S BROTHERS.
FIRST READING.

“‘ We are verily guilty concerning our brother.”—Genesés xlii. 21.

oH did not always stay in prison, for God gave him
wisdom to tell the king of Egypt that his dreams had
meant that there were going to be first seven years of very
fine harvests, and then seven years would come of no harvests
at all. So the king took him out of prison, and made him a
great lord ; and he set to work to buy the corn that was over









48 Seventh Sunday—Fourth in Lent.



and above what people wanted to eat in the years of plenty,
that he might store it up against the years when the corn
would not grow.

So when the bad harvest began, Joseph had plenty of corn,
and he sold it for the king to all who wanted it. The famine
was not only in Egypt, but in all the countries round; and
by-and-by Joseph saw, among the people that came to buy,
ten of his own brothers—the same who had sold him for a
slave. He knew them, for they still looked like shepherds ;
but they did not know him, for he had grown from a youth to
a man, and was dressed like an Egyptian lord; and he would
not seem to know them, though he wanted much to know
what had become of his old father and his little brother Ben-
jamin. He made as if he thought they were enemies, come to
see if Egypt could be conquered when it was so bare of food.

Then they told him who they were ; that they were all one
man’s sons, and that one brother they had lost; the other
was left with his father, who could not bear to part with him.
Joseph would not seem to believe this, and said he must keep
one of them in prison, while he sent the rest back to fetch
their youngest brother, or else he could not believe them.
Then, when fear and trouble came on them, they began to
think how ill they had used their lost brother Joseph; and
they said to each other, “ We are verily guilty concerning our
brother.” Joseph heard them, and could hardly bear it; but
still he kept to his plan. He kept Simeon a prisoner, that he
might be sure of the others coming back, and sent them home
to fetch Benjamin. But he would not have any of the money

&







Foseph’s Brothers. 49



they had brought for the corn, and made his steward put it
all back into the mouth of their sacks,

When they found this out as they went home, they were
much afraid; and when they came home, their father was
more afraid still. After the way they had used Joseph, he
thought they had killed Simeon, and wanted to kill Benjamin.
They spoke truth now, but he could not believe them ; and he
said he could not send Benjamin, for if mischief should befall
the lad, “then shall ye bring down my gray hairs with sorrow

to the grave.”
QUESTIONS.

1. Where was Joseph? 2. Why was he in prison? 3. What did God
make him able to tell the king? 4. How many years was there to be
much corn? 5. What was to be done with the corn? 6. Who managed
the buying it? 7. When was the corn wanted? 8. Who came to buy
corn? 9, Who did not come? 10, Why did not Joseph’s brothers know
him? 11. What did he make believe to think? 12. Whom did he tell
them to fetch? 13. What did he give back to them? 14. What did their
father say about Benjamin’s going? 15. Why was he afraid to trust them
with Benjamin? 16, What is the way to be believed ?

SECOND READING.
“God Almighty give you mercy before the man.”—Genests xliii. 14.
ghty give y y 4

OSEPH’S brothers were soon obliged to go again and buy
more corn in Egypt. Joseph had said they must bring the
young brother they had told him of, or he should not believe
their story; and when they said Benjamin must go, their father
Jacob was greatly grieved, and showed how little he could
trust them now, after the way they had behaved to Joseph.







50 Seventh Sunday—Fourth in Lent.

He would not have let Benjamin go at all if Judah had not
promised to take the greatest care of him; and Judah could
be trusted.

The story is so beautiful, and so easy to understand in the
Bible, that I hardly like to tell it in my own words. Only
think of Joseph’s heart being so full when he saw his own
dear youngest brother, that he could not stay with him for
his tears, and went away to weep in his chamber! And yet
he still tried the brothers. He wanted to see if they still were
envious of the one their father loved best; so he made his
steward hide his cup in Benjamin’s sack of corn, and then go
after them, and pretend to think they had stolen it.

The sons of Jacob were no thieves, and they said the
steward might search their sacks. They took them down
and looked, and there was the cup in Benjamin’s sack!

They were all shocked; and the steward said that Benjamin
must go back and be punished.

How pleased they would have been long ago if such a mis-
fortune had happened to Joseph! But now their hearts were
changed, and they were shocked and grieved.

QUESTIONS.

1. What had Joseph’s brothers done to him? 2. What trouble did you
hear last Sunday he was in? 3. But how did he behave? 4. And what
had he come to be? 5. What had he stored up? 6. Who came to buy
corn? 7. How many brothers came? 8. Which did not come? 9. Why
did not Benjamin come? to. Did the brothers know Joseph? 11. What
did he tell them to do? 12. When he saw Benjamin, where did he go?

13. What did Joseph tell his steward to do? 14. What did Joseph want
to see? 15. How did the brothers behave this time?







Foseph’s Brothers.



THIRD READING.
“God did send me before you to preserve life.” Genesis xlv. 5.

LL the eleven sons of Jacob turned back in grief, and
fear, and dismay, when Benjamin, the youngest brother,
whom Judah had promised to bring safely back to their
father, was found to have the silver cup of the lord of the
land in his sack. How it came there they could not guess,
but they knew that their father’s heart would break if they
came home and left Benjamin to be a slave.

So they all came to the lord of the land; and Judah
stood up before the strange, stern, princely man, and told
him how much their old father loved this youngest son, and
he would be sure to die if the lad did not come home safe.
And then Judah begged to stay and be a slave in Egypt,
instead of his brother Benjamin, for he said if mischief
befel the lad his father would die, and that he could not
bear to see.

But when Judah so spake, the lord of the land sent all the
lookers-on away, and wept aloud, and said that he was their
own brother Joseph, whom they had sold so long ago. He
would not let them be afraid ; he embraced them all and wept
for joy, and asked for his father. Then he told them not to
grieve for what had gone before; for God had turned it all to
good, and made him be the means of saving all their lives, by
storing up the corn in Egypt.

And now they were to go home, and tell Jacob, their father,
that Joseph was still alive, and was a great and powerful man ;
and they were to fetch old Jacob, their father, and their wives







52 Seventh Sunday—Fourth in Lent.



and their children, and all they had, and come to live with
Joseph in Egypt, where he would take care of them.

That was the way Joseph forgot all the ill his brothers
had done to him, and forgave them, and loved them with
all his heart. When the brothers came home, their father
Jacob could scarcely believe such good news; but at last
he said, “Joseph my son is yet alive, I will go to see him
before I die.”

And he came down to Egypt, and Joseph met him and fell
on his neck and kissed him; and then there was joy indeed,
joy as if Joseph had come back from the dead.

So Jacob lived all the rest of his life in Egypt, and was
happy with his son Joseph. God had given him another
name, Israel, and his sons, and their sons after them, were
always called the children of Israel.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Benjamin? 2. What was found in Benjamin’s sack? 3.
Who put it there? 4. What was going to be done to Benjamin? 5.
Who spoke for him? 6. What did Judah ask? 7. Who did the lord of
the land turn out to be? 8. How came Joseph to be in Egypt? 9. Why
had his brothers not known him sooner? 10. How did he treat them?
11. Whom did he send for? 12. What did Jacob say? 13. Where did
Jacob go to live? 14. Why was it very kind in Joseph to help his bro-
thers? 15. Did he give back to them the harm they had done to him?
16. How could we do like Joseph?













THE BURNING BUSH.



Gighth Sud —filth m ent.

THE CALL OF MOSES,
FIRST READING.
“T have surely seen the affliction of My people.”—Z-xodus iii. 7.

OU heard how Joseph brought his father and brothers and
their children to live in Egypt. Their children’s children
went on living there for many years, till they had come to be
a great people, and were called the children of Israel; but
then the King of Egypt grew cruel to them. He made them
work very hard to make bricks and build towns for him ; and





54 Liighth Sunday—Fifth in Lent.



what was still worse, he ordered that whenever a little boy
was born to the children of Israel, he should be thrown into
the river and drowned.

One mother hid her little baby for three months, and when
she could not hide him any longer, she put him into a little
cradle of bulrushes covered over with pitch, to keep the water
out, and let the cradle float on the river, leaving the little
boy’s sister to watch him. Presently a lady, no other than
the daughter of the cruel king, came down to bathe in the
river. She saw the little cradle, and had it brought to her.
The little baby was crying, and the lady pitied him and took
him home, to bring up for her own child. She wanted a nurse
for him, and his sister fetched his own mother, and she be-
came his nurse.

His name was Moses, and we hear about him in the Lesson
to-day. He was not living with the king’s daughter now.
The king had grown angry with him because he cared for his
own people, and he had had to flee away and keep sheep in
the wilderness.

And there he saw a great wonder. He saw a flame of fire
in a bush, and yet the bush was not burnt. And God’s voice
spoke to him out of the fire that did not burn, and told him
that the troubles of His people, the children of Israel, were
to come to an end. God would save them from the cruel
Egyptians ; and Moses himself was to go and lead them out,
and bring them to the good land that God had promised that
Abraham’s children should have for their own. Moses was to
go and tell the King of Egypt that it was God’s will that they







The Call of Moses. 55



should go. Moses was afraid at first, but God promised to
help him: and next Sunday you will hear what happened.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Moses? 2. Where was he put when he was a baby? 3.
Why was he put on the river? 4. Who had said the little boys were to
be drowned? 5. Whose babies were they that were to be drowned? 6.
What other cruel things did the King of Egypt do to the children of
Israel? 7. Who were called the children of Israel? 8. What became of
Moses in his bulrush cradle? 9. Who brought him up? 10. Did he stay
with the king’s daughter? 11. Whom did he care for? 12. What wonder
did Moses see? 13. Who spoke to him? 14. What was God going to
do for His people? 15. What land would He give them? 16. Who had
the first promise that his children should have the good land ?

SECOND READING.
“ And Pharaoh said, Who is the Lord ?”—E-xodus v. 2.

OSES and his brother Aaron went and told Pharaoh

God’s message, that the people of Israel were to go away
and worship Him. But Pharaoh said, “ Who is the Lord, that
I should obey His voice to let Israel go? I know not the
Lord, neither will I let Israel go.” And he was more cruel to
the children of Israel; he made them work harder and harder,
and had them beaten if they did not do all the work that was
set them. They had to make bricks of clay mixed with straw;
and, to punish them, Pharaoh said that they should have no
straw given to them for their work, but that they must find it
for themselves; and yet he required of them just as many
bricks as they had had to make before. Then they cried out













56 Exghth Sunday—Ffifth in Lent.





and were angry, and fancied Moses had brought all this trou-
ble on them, by asking for them to go. They were very mis-
erable, and said they wished they had never listened to Moses,
for he had only made them worse off instead of better.

Aaron was a better speaker than Moses, and God had said
he should help him, and that, when God told Moses anything,
Aaron should speak it to the people. So the two brothers stood
telling the Israelites to bear it a little longer, and then it would
be all well and over, and they would get away from making
the bricks in Egypt to the beautiful country. They could not
remember it themselves, but some of their fathers’ grand-
fathers had been little boys when they came, and could tell
them that it was a country not all flat, with only one river in
it, like Egypt, but full of steep hills and green valleys, with
bright streams running along in them, and thick woods on
some of the slopes, and others laid out in gardens and vine-
yards. There were so many cows in the pastures, and in the
wild rocks and hollow trees so many bees’ nests, that it was
called a land flowing with milk and honey.

Should not the Israelites have liked to hear of such a place
as this? But no, they were too dull to care. They thought
more of whether they should get a leek or a melon to eat at
supper, than of all the lovely land far away. Do you know,
people are very like that when they care for zow more than
for dy-ana-by. If we want just what pleases us to-day, instead
of caring for what will be good for us as we grow older, we
are just like the Israelites, who would not attend to Moses or
to God.







The Call of Moses. 57



QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Pharaoh? 2. Who were the children of Israel? 3. Who
had been sent to call them? 4. What did Pharaoh say to Moses? 5.
How did he use the Israelites? 6. What would he not give them? 7.
Who was Moses’ brother? 8. What was Aaron to do for Moses? 9.
Who spoke to Moses? 10. Who told the people what God said to Moses?
11. What kind of place did God promise? 12. What did Moses say it
flowed with? 13. Why? 14. Did the Israelites care? 15. Why not? 16.
When are we like them? 17. Which should we care for most, zow or
by-ana-by ?



THIRD READING.
“T will redeem you with a stretched out arm.”—Zxodus vi. 6.

eae Israelites were very unhappy, for Pharaoh was very
cruel to them, and they thought it all Moses’ fault. But
Moses told them that they would be saved, and that God was
going to show them His power, so that they might always re-
member what He had done for them, and how He punished
Pharaoh, who would not obey Him.

Then God made His power to be known; so that Pharaoh
and the children of Israel might both learn who is the great
Lord of heaven and earth, who must be obeyed. First, Moses
stretched out his rod, and all the water in the river turned
into blood. For seven days it was all one red dreadful stream
of blood ; and when Moses held out his rod again it turned
back into pure water. But Pharaoh did not mind, and would
not let the people go. Then God sent a multitude of frogs,
that came into all the houses and bed-rooms, and on the













58 Eighth Sunday—Fifth in Lent.

tables and everywhere. Pharaoh could not bear to have these
creatures everywhere, and said if the frogs would but go away
he would let the children of Israel go. Moses prayed to God,
and all the frogs died; but Pharaoh only hardened his heart
again, and would not let the people go. Next, God sent lice,
disgusting unclean creatures, most horrible to the Egyptians,
who could not bear anything dirty; but Pharaoh did not care.
Then came swarms of flies, buzzing, stinging, and tormenting ;
and Pharaoh said he would allow the Israelites to go, so the
flies were taken away ; but no sooner were they gone than he
went back again to his obstinacy, and would not let the peo-
ple go. He was trying to fight against God, and so came
these terrible miseries on him. If people will not do better
after being punished, worse and worse is sure to come on them.

QUESTIONS.

1. How did God punish Pharaoh? 2. What four plagues have I told
you of to-day? 3. Why did these dreadful things happen? 4. Did
Pharaoh care for them? 5. Why did he not mind them? 6, What hap-
pens to those who do not mind being punished ?

























DEATH OF THE FIRST-BORN.



Hint} Sunday—Paln Sunday.

LHE PLAGOULS {OR E.G MCE TL.
FIRST READING.

“There is none like Me in all the earth.”"—Z-vodus ix. 14.

OU remember that when God spoke to Moses out of the
burning bush, it was to tell him that he should lead the
children of Israel away from the people in Egypt, who were
so unkind to them.
But Pharaoh, the King of Egypt, said that they should not
go; he could not spare them, and he did not care for God’s







60 Ninth Sunday—Palm Sunday.



message to him. Then God punished Pharaoh that he might
let them go. Ten times God punished him, and you hear
about three of the punishments to-day. First, how the sheep
and cows, that the Egyptians worshipped like gods, fell sick
and died, but still Pharaoh did not care; then how the people
all had sores and boils that made them very ill, but still
Pharaoh did not care; and then how there was a terrible
storm, thunder and lightning, and rain and hail—such big
hailstones as killed the men and cattle that were out in the
fields, and lightning that struck them, and wind that broke
every tree in the field. No wonder that Pharaoh was fright-
ened, and begged that the storm might cease, and said that
then he would let the Israelites go. So Moses prayed to God,
and the thunder left off, there was no more hail, and it was
all still again. But when the thunder was over Pharaoh grew
wicked again, and left off caring, and said the Israelites should
not go. And thus God went on being angry with him, till at
last he came to a terrible end.

I am afraid some children are a little like Pharaoh when
they get sulky, and say “I won't,” and if they are punished,
still they won’t—they think nobody shall force them, and they
make themselves hard that they may not do what they are
told. It is very sad, for this hardness is very wrong, and you
see how angry God was with this king for being obstinate.
Pray to God to help you not to harden your heart, but to
teach you to obey. And do not forget and do the same thing
again when the punishment is over, or it will have done you
no good, and you will have to be punished worse next time.





The Plagues of Egypt. 61



QUESTIONS.

1. What did God desire Pharaoh to do? 2. Who spoke God’s words
to Pharaoh? 3. But what did Pharaoh say? 4. Who was Pharaoh? 5.
Who was Moses? 6. What was done to Pharaoh? 7. Did he mind? 8.
Tell me the three plagues we hear of to-day. 9. How many plagues were
there in all? 10. What happened in the thunder-storm? 11. What did
Pharaoh say when he was frightened? 12. So what left off? 13. But did
he let the people go? 14. What fault in some children is the same as
Pharaoh’s? 15. What ought they to do? 16, Who can help them to
fight with their obstinate temper? 17. But how must they get God’s help?

SECOND READING.

“The Lord hardened Pharaoh’s heart, so that he would not let the children
of Israel go.” Exodus x. 20.

oe troubles are sure to come when people have not
taken warning by what was sent them before. Pharaoh
had not minded seven dreadful plagues, so now God sent
another. He sent locusts. These were creatures like great
grasshoppers. They came in swarms and clouds, and ate up
every green leaf and blade of grass, and made all the earth
brown and the trees dry sticks, so that there was nothing left
for man or beast to eat. Then Pharaoh gave way a little, and
said he would let the men go, but that their wives and child-
ren must stay; and he would not hear a word more, but had
Moses and Aaron driven out from before him.
Then God bade Moses to hold up his hand to Heaven.
And darkness came on. It was dark all day—and with









62 Ninth Sunday—Palm Sunday.

“darkness that might be felt ;” not like night, but such black
darkness that no fire or candle could give light, and no one
dared to move about; but the Egyptians lay still in their
places, full of horror and terror, for three whole days. But
all the time it was light among the Israelites—the sun rose
and set as usual; and thus God showed that they were His
people.

Then Pharaoh said that he would let them go—men, women,
and children, only he must keep all their cattle; and when
Moses, speaking God’s words, said that the cattle must go too,
and not a hoof be left behind, Pharaoh made his heart hard
again, and drove out Moses, saying the people should not go,
and that Moses should never see his face again.

And Moses said, “Thou hast spoken well, I will see thy
face again no more.”

So ended the last hope for Pharaoh. He was never to have
another chance of bending his will and doing as God told
him. Oh, let us take care not to be like him!

QUESTIONS.

1. How many plagues of Egypt were there? 2. Tell me which had hap-
pened. 3. What are the two plagues in this lesson? 4, What are locusts?
5. What harm do locusts do? 6. Who did Pharaoh say might go? 7.
Whom would he not let go? 8. What plague came then? 9. What made
the darkness so horrible? 10. How long did it last? 411. Who were not
in the dark? 12. What did Pharaoh say then? 13. What did he want
to keep back? 14. And how did he then change? 15. What did he say
to Moses? 16. How did Moses answer?









The Plagues of Egypt. 63



THIRD READING.
“He smote all the first-born in Egypt.”—Psadm Ixxviii. 51.

FTER the nine sad plagues that had come upon the

Egyptians—the blood for water, the frogs, the lice, the
flies, the cattle plague, the boils, the hail, the locusts, the
darkness—there was to be still one plague more, the last and
worst. That would make the Egyptians let the people of
Israel go, so they must be ready.

There should be a terrible night. God’s holy angel would
pass over the whole land of Egypt that night, and in each
house of the Egyptians he would slay the eldest son of the
family. No one would be spared: Pharaoh’s eldest son, the
young prince, and the very poorest person’s son. They had
killed the little Israelite babies, so God would punish them by
killing their children. None of the Israelites should lose their
children; only there was one thing for them to do. They
were that night to sup on a lamb, and, with some of the blood
of the lamb, they were to make a mark on the door-post.
Where that mark was the angel would pass over and do no
one any hurt; but the people would be blest and set free, be-
cause they believed God, and did as He bade them.

QUESTIONS.

1. How many plagues of Egypt were there? 2. Say them over. 3.
What were they all for? 4. Who would not let them go? 5. What was
the last plague? 6. Who were to die? 7. Why did the Egyptians deserve
to lose their children? 8. Who would slay them? 9. Whom would the
angel spare? 10, How were the Israelites to mark their houses? 11.
With what blood? 12. What were they to do with the lamb?















EATING THE PASSOVER.



Centh Sundw—Easter Day.

THE PASSOVER.
FIRST READING.

“There was not a house in which there was not one dead.”—E-xvodus xii. 30.

HIS is our own gladdest Sunday in all the year, and we

read of the Israelites being glad too—glad upon the very
Sunday that answered to this, thousands of years ago. On
this Sunday, of all those thousands of years, there has been
joy and gladness and thanking God. And why? It was be-
cause all the troubles in Egypt were over, and God brought
the Israelites out safe. There was one thing they had to do



The Passover. 65



first, though; Moses bade them do it, as God commanded
him. Every family was to take a lamb, and it was to be killed
and roasted whole in the evening, and some of its blood was
to be marked upon the door-post of the house, and then all
the family were to stand round the table, all ready dressed for
a journey, and eat it as fast as they could, late at night.

And while all the families, fathers and mothers and child-
ren, stood up eating the lamb in this strange way, there came
a great shout and cry. God had sent His angel to punish the
cruel Egyptians; and every house where there was no mark
of blood on the door-post had some one dead in it, and that
dead person was the eldest or first-born son. There was a
great cry, for there was death everywhere, from the son of
Pharaoh who sat on his throne down to the child of the
poorest slave; and even the first-born of cattle died too, be-
cause the Egyptians used to worship them; but wherever there
was the blood on the door-post the angel passed over, and the
eldest son was safe. Then cruel King Pharaoh was sorry
and afraid at last, and said that the people who brought such
trouble on him should go where they liked.

QUESTIONS.

1. Why are we glad to-day? 2. Why were the Israelites glad to-day?
3. Where were the Israelites living? 4. What hard work had they to do?
5. Who said they should come out? 6. Who would not let them go? 7.
What did God tell the Israelites to eat? 8. How were they to be dressed
while they ate it? 9. What were they to do with the blood? 10. Who
was going to pass over the land that night? 11. What did the angel do
where he did not see any blood on the door-post? 12. Who were fright-
ened then? 13. What did the Egyptians wish then?







66 Tenth Sunday—Easter Day.



SECOND READING.
“Tt is the sacrifice of the Lord’s passover.”—E-roduts xii. 27.

HEN the King of Egypt said the Israelites might go

they were all up and dressed, quite ready and only wait-
ing, and off they set. No more making of bricks, no more
slaving for the Egyptians, no more drowning of babies! They
were free! and God was going to lead them to the beautiful
country that long ago He had said He would give them.

And so, to put them in mind how they were saved from the
Egyptians, God bade them on the same day in each year to
kill a lamb and roast it, and put the blood on the door-post,
and eat the lamb all standing round the table, dressed as if
they were going for a journey, that they might never forget
how God had made them free. This was called the Passover,
because the angel passed over the houses where the blood was
marked over the door. And God came in a pillar of cloud to
show them the way they should go.

Our blessed Lord was crucified when He had come to the
Feast of the Passover many years after. You know He was
like a lamb, He was so pure and gentle; and His Blood saves
us, as that lamb’s blood did the Israelites, and sets us free
from the power of the devil. So we still keep the feast of
being set free, on this happy Easter Sunday, when we recol-
lect that Christ was slain for our sins, but that He rose again
from the dead, and liveth for evermore.



QUESTIONS.
1. What did Pharaoh say that the Israelites might do? 2. What made
him let them go at last? 3. Who were set free? 4. What were the







The Passover. 67



Israelites to do every year? 5. What was this eating the lamb called?
6. Why was it called the Passover? 7. Why were the Israelites glad?
8. Who set us free? 9. What did our Lord do as on this day? 1o. In
what is He like a lamb? 11. So what did we say in the Easter Anthem
to-day? 12. How did God lead them?

THIRD READING.

“The children of Israel shall go on dry ground through. the midst of the
sea.”— Exodus xiv. 16.
LL the Egyptians were weeping over their dead first-born
sons, and the Israelites were set free, and going gladly
out and away from their hard masters.

But Pharaoh’s hard heart turned again, and he got all his
chariots and horsemen together, and went after the children
of Israel to drive them back to Egypt. And when he came
in sight of them, there they were all upon the shore of the
sea called the Red Sea. They could not go on, for the sea
was straight before them; they could not go back, for the
Egyptians were behind. They were sore afraid. But God
spoke to Moses, and told him not to fear. They had only to
stand still and see how God would save them.

And God Himself showed that He was with them, for the
pillar of cloud went behind them, instead of before, and made
it dark to the Egyptians, but gave light by night to the
Israelites: so the Egyptians could not get near them all
night.

Then God bade Moses stretch out his rod over the sea.
And then there was a great wonder. The waves of the sea







68 Tenth Sunday—Easter Day.

parted, and stood up on each side in a heap, and in between
there was a wide open space, where the children of Israel
might walk safely dry-shod, through the very midst of the
sea. Through it they went, men, women, and children,
through the depths of the sea, with the waves standing still
on each side of them.

Pharaoh saw that they were all gone over. He chose to
follow after them. But when his host was full in the midst,
the sea returned to its strength again and came down on the
Egyptians, and every one of them was drowned—“ they sank
like lead in the mighty waters”—-and the Israelites were freed
from their enemies, quite away from all their trouble and all
their slavery ; and they sang hymns of joy to God, who had
set them free.

And we read about their being set free, because this is the
great Easter Day when we give thanks to our Blessed Lord
for having set us free.

QUESTIONS.

1. What last plague had come on Egypt? 2. Who had set off to leave
Egypt? 3. But what did Pharaoh do? 4. What was before the Israelites?
5. What was behind? 6. Where did the pillar of cloud go? 7. How
were the Egyptians cut off from them? 8. What wonder did God work?
g. Where did the Israelites go over? 10. Who came after them? 11.
What became of the Egyptians? 12. Who were free? 13. Who had
made them free?







(hi i

ni





AARON'S ROD,



Elebenth Sunday —First wfter Caster.

THE GAINSAYING OF KORAH.
FIRST READING.
“The Lord will show who are His, and who is holy.”—Nusmbers xvi. 5.

HERE is a sad history in the Lesson to-day. When the
Israelites came out of Egypt they had a long journey to

go, through a dreary, lonely wilderness. Moses and his bro-
ther Aaron led them; and God took care of them, and fed
them, and kept them safe. But there were some wicked men,
named Dathan and Abiram, who were tired of the wilderness,







70 Eleventh Sunday—first after Easter.



and were angry at having Moses for their leader and master,
though God had made him lead them, and had done so much
for them. They said they were as good as Moses, and that
he should not be their prince. They did not care for God
having spoken by him.

Their end was so very dreadful that I can hardly tell it to
you. God would not let them rise up against His servant
Moses ; and when they would not listen nor repent He made
the earth open under their feet, and they went down alive,
and were swallowed up in the pit before the eyes of all the
other Israelites; and so they died the most terrible death
anyone ever died. It was because they set themselves up
against Moses, whom God had placed over them, that He was
so angry with them.

Remember God has set people over us: there are our
fathers and mothers, and our clergymen and teachers ; and it
is our duty to obey them, as He tells us in the Fifth Com-
mandment. If we are proud and saucy it is very wrong of us.
It is not likely that we should be so dreadfully punished in
this life as Dathan and Abiram were ; but their horrible death
should make us remember that God is very angry with those
that will not try to obey those that have the rule over them,
and set themselves up to be bold and proud, and to say they
do not care.

QUESTIONS.

1, What is the Fifth Commandment? 2. What is the explanation of it
in the Duty to our Neighbour? 3. Who was set over the Israelites by
God? 4. Where had he brought them from? 5. Where was he leading







The Gainsaying of Korah. I



them to? 6. How should they have behaved to him? 7. What bad men
were there among them? 8. Whom did they not care for? 9. What did
they say? 10. Why was it very wicked of Dathan and Abiram not to
obey Moses? 11. What terrible end did they come to? 12. Why was
God angry with Dathan and Abiram? 13. What makes Him angry?
14. Whom did you say He had set over you? 15. Then how must you
behave to your parents and clergyman and teachers ?

SECOND READING.
“ And seek ye the priesthood also ?”—NMumbers xvi. 10.

HEN God gave the Commandments upon Mount Sinai,
He chose that Aaron, Moses’ brother, and his sons
should be His priests. A priest had to offer up the sacrifices
to God, and to burn incense to Him. Incense is made of
dried plants and gums that have a sweet smell when they are
burnt. The priests had brazen urns with holes at the top, and
chains to hold them by, and when the smoke of the incense
went up it was just as our prayers rise up to God in heaven.
There were other people called Levites, who had to take care
of the holy things that were used in God’s service, but only
the priests might offer sacrifices or incense.

Now one of these Levites, named Korah, wanted to do
more. He was angry, and said everybody was holy, and that
Aaron took too much on himself. Now it was not Aaron
who made himself priest, but God had made him so. There-
fore it was wrong in Korah; but there were two hundred and
fifty men whom he persuaded to come and get censers, and
offer incense to the Lord as if they had been priests. But







a
72 Ltleventh Sunday—First after Easter.



because they did it in pride and self-will God was angry with
them, and His fire burst out and scorched them all to death!
It was only the men themselves that died, not their wives or
children; and Korah’s family after him were better than he
was, and used to sing God’s praises in the Psalms.

But they always recollected that no one who was not a
priest might offer sacrifice or burn incense before God.

QUESTIONS.

1. What had a priest to do? 2. What was a sacrifice? 3. What was
incense? 4. What was it burnt in? 5. Who only might offer sacrifice
and incense? 6. Who was the right priest? 7. How came Aaron to be
priest? 8. Who wanted to offer incense? 9. What did Korah say? Io.
How many came with him? 131. What did they try to do? 12. What
happened to the two hundred and fifty? 13. Why were they punished ?
14. What became of Korah’s children? 15. Who are our priests? 16.
How were they made priests? 17. What may they alone do?

TEZRD READING.

“The rod of Aaron for the house of Levi was budded, and brought forth
buds, and bloomed blossoms, and yielded almonds.”—Numéers xvii. 8.
HE high-priest, whom God chose, had to offer sacrifices
to Him. That was, the priest slew a lamb, or a goat, or
a bullock, by the altar, and gave it to God. It was to show
that the Son of God would come and die to take away sin.
Now He has come and died, we have left off killing creatures
in sacrifice, and only make remembrance over again of His

sacrifice in the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper.
The high-priest used to wear a beautiful dress. He hada





The Gainsaying of Korah. 73

mitre on his head, with a gold plate on it, and the words,
“Holiness unto the Lord;” and he had a blue, red, and white
robe, embroidered with gold, and round the hem little gold
bells and pomegranates. He had a curious scarf called an
ephod, and a beautiful breast-plate made of twelve precious
stones, each with the name of one of the twelve tribes of
Israel engraven on it.

God said He would show who should be His priest. So He
bade Moses desire the chief man in each tribe to bring him a
dry rod or staff, and lay them up all night in the Holy Place.
The one whose rod began to grow as if it was still on the
tree should be the high-priest. When the twelve men went
to look in the morning, eleven rods were dry sticks still, but
one had put out green leaves and pink buds, and white blush-
ing flowers, like almond blossoms. It was Aaron’s rod; and
this was the way God let the children of Israel know that
Aaron and his sons, and grandsons after him, were always to
be priests.

QUESTIONS.

1. What was a priest? 2. What had he to do? 3. What was a sacri-
fice? 4. How was it offered? 5. What creatures were killed? 6. Where
were they put? 7. What was this to make the children of Israel think of?
8. Why don’t we kill sacrifices now? 9. Who has been sacrificed? Io,
What did the high-priest wear on his head? 11. What colour was his
dress? 12. How was it edged? 13. What was on his breast? 14. What
did God say He would show? 15. What were twelve men to bring? 16.
Where were the rods put? 17. What was to show who should be priest ?
18. What were the eleven rods like in the morning? 19. But how did one
look? 20, Whose was it? 21. What, then, was Aaron to be?















MOSES STRIKING THE ROCK.



Cloelfth Sunday.—Second after Easter.

ISRAEL IN THE WILDERNESS.
FIRST READING.
“Ye shall not tempt the Lord your God.”—Dewz. vi. 16.

TOLD you what sort of place a desert is, and how full it
is of stones, and rocks, and sand, and with no water in it.
Do you remember how thirsty Ishmael was in a desert, and
how God heard the voice of the lad, and sent an angel to lead

his mother to a well of water?
When the Israelites had come out of the land of Egypt,









Lsvael in the Wilderness. 75



they were in a terrible wilderness. Mount Sinai stood up in
the midst, and all round were great rocks of red and black
marble, all dry and parched with the hot sun shining on them.
The Israelites grew very hot and sadly thirsty, but they did
not pray as Ishmael had done. They grew angry, and said,
“Ts the Lord among us or no?” Do you not think they de-
served that God should show whether He was among them
by punishing them for grumbling? That was the way they
tempted God. But He was so good and merciful that He
pitied them; and He bade Moses to take His rod, and go to
the bare, dry rock, and strike it. And when Moses struck the
rock, God made a beautiful, fresh, clear spring of water come
pouring out of it, so that all the people, and all their cows,
and sheep, and asses, and camels, could drink and be re-
freshed. Was not that a great wonder? and was not God
very kind to them, though they were not good? But you see
God was near to help them all the time, and it was very sad
that they grumbled instead of praying. Do not be like them.
If a thing is hard to bear, don’t murmur and grumble about
it, but pray, and then you will get help. Either the vexing
thing will go away, or you will leave off minding it.

QUESTIONS.

1. Where had the Israelites come from? 2. Who was leading them?
3. What kind of place did they get into? 4. What is a desert like? 5.
What was the mountain in the midst of the desert? 6, What cannot be
found in the desert? 7. Who was the lad that was thirsty there before?
8. What did Ishmael do when he was thirsty? 9. But what did the
Israelites do? 10, What did they say? 11. What would have served
them right? 12. But did God punish them? 13. What did He tell Moses









76 Twelfth Sunday—Second after Easter.



to take? 14. What did Moses strike? 15. What came out of the rock?
16. Who made the water come out of the rock? 17. Was it not very good
of God to give them water? 18. What ought they to have done? 19.
What should you do when a thing is hard? 20. Is it not very naughty to
grumble ?

SECOND READING.
“As Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the
Son of man be lifted up.”—ohz iii. 14.
NE great fault of the Israelites was that they had no
patience. The moment they saw anything troublesome
or difficult, they began to cry out, and say they could not get
on, and it was very hard on them. Now it is very wrong ever
to say God is very hard upon us, for we may be sure He is
doing what is best for us. There was one stony, hot, steep
part of the journey still to come, and when the Israelites saw
it they forgot how often God had helped them, and cried out,
and lamented, and complained of Him and of Moses.

So again they were punished, for the little shining snakes
that live there came in numbers, darting at them and biting
them, so that the bite burnt like fire, and they died. Then
they cried out to God and were sorry, and He told Moses of
a wonderful way to cure them. Moses was to melt up some
brass and make a great serpent, like the little ones that bit
them, and set it up on a pole. Then if anyone who was
bitten would come at once and look up at the brazen serpent,
his bite would get well, and he would not die of it.

This was a miracle—a wonder. And it was to teach the
Israelites something, and us too. For you know our Blessed









Israel in the Wilderness. aa



Lord hung on the cross, as the serpent hung on the pole ; and
when our souls are in danger of dying of sin, we must think
of Him, and look to Him in faith, and He will save us from
being punished for our sin, and keep our souls from dying.

QUESTIONS.

1. What sort of place had the Israelites to go over? 2. How did they
like it? 3. What did they do? 4. Why ought they not to have cried out ?
5. Who had been taking care of them? 6. So how did God punish them?
7. What happened when the serpents bit them? 8. What were they sorry
for? 9. So what was Moses to make? Io. Where did he put the brazen
serpent? 11. What were they to do if they were bit? 12, What cured
them? 13. Who hung upon the cross? 14. What does He cure our
souls of ?

THIRD READING.

“He humbled thee, and suffered thee to hunger, and fed thee with manna,

which thou knewest not.”—Deuz. viii. 3.

HIS morning you heard how God gave the children of
Israel water to drink in the wilderness. Now you shall
hear what He gave them to eat. The ground was all hard
stones. There was grass which the cows and sheep could eat,
and there were a few trees with long sharp thorns, but no
fruit on them, and no corn to make bread ; and soon the peo-
ple were very hungry, and began to cry out that they did not
know what would become of them.

But God was not going to forget them. When they rose up
in the morning, the fresh dew lay on the grass, and all about
in the dew were little white things that tasted like wafers
made with honey. This was called manna, and God had sent







78 Twelfth Sunday—Second after Easter.



it from heaven for them to eat. Every morning on week
days there it was, and they had all to come out and pick it
up. But they must get up early to gather it, for when the
sun was hot it would melt away. And they could not keep
it—it grew bad and was not fit to use the next day; but there
was always just enough for everybody to have all they wanted.
There was only one day in each week that more came down,
and that was the day before the Sabbath-day, which they had
instead of Sunday. Then each one could get twice as much
as could be eaten in one day, and it did not spoil so fast. For
on the Sabbath-day God would have them rest, and so no
manna was to be found anywhere, so that they might learn to
keep the Fourth Commandment—Remember the Sabbath-
day to keep it holy. All the time they stayed in the wilder-
ness, the sweet white manna lay on the grass in the morning
for them to pick it up—twice as much on the sixth day of the
week, and on the Sabbath-day none at all. Was not that
very good of God ?

QUESTIONS.

1. Where were the Israelites? 2. What had they to drink in the wilder-
ness? 3. What else did they want? 4. Why could they not get bread?
5. What did God give them instead? 6. What was the manna like? 7.
Where did it lie? 8. When was the manna on the grass? 9. Who were
to eat it? 10. Who sent it? 11. What became of it in hot sunshine? 12.
Would it keep? 13. What was the day when it could be kept? 14. How
much came down the day before the Sabbath? 15. What might not be
done on the Sabbath? 16. What is the Fourth Commandment? 17. So
why did they get twice as much manna the day before? 18. When did
no manna come? 19. What day have we instead of the Sabbath?











THE BRAZEN SERPENT.—PAGE 79.



Thirteenth Sunday —Chicd after Guster.

BALAAM AND BALAK.
FIRST READING.
“ Thou shalt not curse the people : for they are blessed.” Numbers xxii. 12.

HERE was a prophet called Balaam. A prophet means

a man to whom God made His will known, and who was
thus much wiser than other men. This prophet one day saw
some rich great men come to his house. They brought him
a message, that a king named Balak wanted him to come with
them, and would give him great rewards for coming. Balaam







80 Thirteenth Sunday—Third after Easter.



said he must wait for one night, and God would make known
to him what he was to do. And at night God told him he
was not to go; for what Balak wanted of him was to curse
the children of Israel, and God would not have them cursed.
So Balaam said he must not go, and the messengers went
away.

But Balak sent more princes, still grander men, with larger
presents, to fetch Balaam. He answered, “If Balak would
give me his house full of silver and gold, I cannot go beyond
the word of the Lord my God, to do less or more.” But he had
not left off wishing. He begged the messengers to stay, and
see if God would give him leave to go. And this time God did
say he might go, but that he should not say anything about
the Israelites but what God put in his mouth. Balaam knew
that God was not pleased with him; but he wanted Balak’s
rewards, and he set off in the morning, riding on his ass.

Presently the ass was frightened, and turned out of the road
into the field. Balaam was angry at this, and beat the ass.
But again the ass turned aside in a narrow walled path, and
squeezed Balaam’s foot against the wall. He beat her again.
Presently, in a very narrow road, the poor ass fell quite down
for fear; and Balaam was very angry, and beat her harder.
Then God worked a wonder. He made the dumb ass to
speak, and ask why he was so cruel to her. He answered that
he only wished for a sword to kill her. The ass asked if she
had ever been like this before. He said, No. And then, full
before him, he saw God’s holy angel with a sword in his hand.
And he fell down on his face. The poor ass had seen the









Balaam and Balak. SI

angel all the time; but Balaam could not see him till God
made him able. And now he was afraid, and would have
gone back; but the angel said he must go on now, though he
would only be able to speak the words which God put in his
mouth. Think if, sometimes when you have been told you
must not do something, you fret and teaze to do it—is not
that like Balaam? And perhaps you teaze till some one
gives you leave to do as you wish. Then you get quite cross
with eagerness, and are unkind to all that hinders you; and,
after all, you do not find that any good comes of getting your
own way.
QUESTIONS.

1. What is a prophet? 2. Who sent for Balaam? 3. What did God
tell Balaam? 4. But what did Balaam wish? 5. How did he get leave
to go at last? 6. But who stood in his way? 7. Who saw the angel at
first? 8. What did Balaam do to the ass? 9. What wonder did God
work? 10. What did the ass say? 11. Whom did Balaam see? 12.
What did the angel tell him? 13. What had he been allowed to have?
14. Does good come of having our own way ?



SECOND READING.

“There shall come a Star out of Jacob, and a Sceptre shall rise out of
Israel.” —Numébers xxiv. 17.

HERE was a king named Balak, whose land the Israelites

were to pass through. They promised not to do any

harm to him or his people, if they might go quietly through ;

but he was afraid and angry, and wanted to have them cursed,

hoping to bring God’s anger on them. That was a very wicked



ns _}









82 Thirteenth Sunday— Third after Easter.

and foolish notion of King Balak’s ; and God would not let it
bring harm upon His people. They had not deserved to have
His anger called down on them, and so He would not be
angry with them. And when Balak’s friend Balaam tried to
speak curses, God turned them all to blessings ; and, instead of
saying they should come to a terrible end, he could only say
how happy and well off they should be, with God to take care
of them, and be their King. He even went on to say that a
Star should come out of Jacob, and a Sceptre should rise out
of Israel—and that meant that our Saviour should be born
among them. He is called a Star, because He came to give
us light ; and you know a star showed the way to the place
where He was born. And a sceptre is the rod a king carries
in his hand. So when He was called the Sceptre, it meant
that He should be a King.

Only think how angry Balak was, when Balaam could not
curse, but only blessed. I wish he had been afraid, and seen
it was not God’s will that he should hurt the Israelites ; but
instead of that, he went on in his wickedness, and was miser-
ably killed at last ; for God took care of His people, and
would let no one do them any harm.

Now, recollect, bad words and bad wishes do harm to the
person that speaks them, not to those they are meant for. If
a bad boy came and abused a steady one for going to church,
or saying his prayers, it would be very bad for himself; but if
the good boy kept on quietly, nothing that the other could say
would hurt him one bit. God would take care of him as surely
as He took care of the Israelites.









Balaam and Balak. 83



QUESTIONS.

1. What did Balak want? 2. Why did he want the Israelites to be
cursed? 3. Whom did he set to curse the Israelites? 4. But what did
Balaam do instead? 5. Why could he not curse them? 6. Who would
not let him curse them? 7. Who was to be born among them? 8. What
did Balaam call our Saviour? 9. Why was He like a star? 10. Why was
He like a sceptre? 11. Could Balak hurt the Israelites? 12. Why not?
13. Whom do bad words hurt? 14. Ought we tomind them? 15. If any-
one teazes you when you try to be good, must you leave off ?

THIRD READING.
“ The people did eat, and bowed down to their gods.”—Numbers xxv. 2.

OU heard how Balaam went to Balak ; and how God made
him bless the children of Israel when he wanted to curse
them. But even this did not make Balaam good. He wanted
Balak to give him a reward ; and so he told him that though
no harm could happen to the people of Israel while they were
good and worshipped their God, yet if he could make them do
something wicked, and turn away from their God, then God
would be sure to punish them.

So these two wicked men sent a number of women to invite
the Israelites to hold a great feast with them, in honour of
their idol Baal Peor. Many were so foolish and wicked as to
be led away ; and they had a great feasting and revelling, and
all kinds of bad pleasures that these heathen women said were
to do praise to this horrible false god. Then, though Balak
might have cursed for ever without hurting them, they had





84 Thirteenth Sunday—Third after Easter.

done themselves the harm. God sent a deadly sickness, and
in one day twenty-four thousand people died.

But Phinehas, Aaron’s grandson, did as Moses commanded
him. He first put to death the wickedest of the people who
had joined themselves to Baal Peor ; and then he prayed—and
all the people prayed and wept too. So God forgave them,
and the plague ceased.

Afterwards Phinehas led the Israelite fighting men to punish
the wicked Balak and his people; and Balaam was killed in
fighting with them. All the wicked women who had tempted
the Israelites away from God were put to death too. So
Balaam’s evil counsel ended in all sorts of misery. It is very
sad to think of him, for he knew so well what was good, and
yet did what was so very bad. But remember this, nobody
could hurt God’s people till they did wrong, and then they
hurt themselves, and God punished them,

QUESTIONS.

1. What did Balak want todo? 2. How had Balak tried to hurt the
children of Israel? 3. Why could not Balaam curse them? 4. What
did Balaam think would be the way to hurt them? 5. Whom did he send
to them? 6. Whom did the women persuade them to worship? 7. What
did God send to punish them? 8. How was the plague stopped? 9. How
was Balaam punished? 10. Why was Balaam greatly to be blamed? 11.
When could not Balaam hurt the Israelites? 12. When could he hurt
them? 13. For who took care of them when they were good ?











GATHERING MANNA (PAGE 77).

1+ = + __

Hourteenth Sunday.—Fourth after Caster.







THE GIVING OF THE LAW.
FIRST READING.
“Thou heardest His words out of the midst of the fire.”—Deut. iv. 36.

HEN the children of Israel had come out of Egypt, God

had told Moses to lead them to the foot of Mount Sinai.

This was a high steep rocky mountain in the wilderness. And
God told Moses to set bounds round the mountain, so that
nobody should come and touch it; and the people were to
pray, and wait round it for the holy and awful thing that was





86 Fourteenth Sunday—Fourth after Easter.



to happen. Then there came on the hill-top a deep dark
cloud, and the mountain was altogether on a smoke, and it
shook and quaked, and there were lightnings and thunders
and voices, and the sound of a trumpet loud and louder, so
that all the people trembled. Then out of that cloud there
came a voice speaking to them—a voice that they all could
hear, and that made them afraid. For it was the voice of
God. And God spoke out of the cloud, and gave the Ten
Commandments. They were the very same Ten Command-
ments you say in the Catechism, and see written up in church,
God had come in this terrible and awful manner to speak
them, that all Israel might hear and fear, and take care not to
break them. Afterwards God gave these Ten Commandments
to Moses, written upon two tables—or pieces of stone—written
by God Himself. That was the way the Ten Commandments
were given—by God’s own voice speaking to men, out of the
cloud, amid thunders and lightnings, and the sound of the
trumpet, dreadful to hear. And God means us all to obey the
Commandments, just as much as He meant the Israelites to
obey them. They are His words, and must be kept; and
if we ask Him in our prayers He will give us help and strength
to obey them, so that we may fulfil the promise that was made
at our baptism, that we should keep God’s Holy Will and
Commandments, and walk in the same unto our lives’ end.

QUESTIONS.

1. Where had the children of Israel come from? 2. Who was leading
them? 3. Where did God tell Moses to take them? 4. What wonderful
sight did they see on Mount Sinai? 5. What did they hear? 6. Who





The Giving of the Law. 87

spoke out of the cloud? 7. What did God speak? 8. How many Com-
mandments? 9. Tell me the first of them. 10. On what did God write
them? 11. To whom did He give them? 12. When do you say them?
13. When did you promise to keep them? 14. What is keeping the Com-
mandments? 15. Howcan you be helped to do as they tell you? 16.
How must you ask for God’s help?

SECOND READING.

“ The Lord talked with you face to face in the mount out of the midst of
the fire.”—Deuteronomy v. 4.
HEN the lightning and thunder and the loud voice of the
trumpet came forth from the cloud on Mount Sinai, and
God had spoken the Ten Commandments, He called to Moses
to come up and speak with Him in the cloud. How wonder-
ful it must have been! Moses was the only man that ever
spoke so near to God.

God gave him two blocks of stone written with the Ten
Commandments, written with God’s own Finger. Then God
told him to make a chest to keep them in. It was to be made
of wood, with gold all over it ; and two figures of cherubims
were to be one on each side. This chest was to be called the
Ark of the Covenant. And it was to be put into a square
room, inside a tent, that was to be made with curtains, and
carried about with the Israelites. It was to be called the
Tabernacle. And this was to be a very holy place. The
children of Israel would say their prayers in front of the
Tabernacle ; but they were not to go into the place where the
Ark was, because they were sinful, and God is holy. That









88 Fourteenth Sunday—Fourth after Easter.

place was to be called the Holy of Holies, and no one might
go near it but the Priests whom God chose, and set apart to
lead His worship. The first High Priest was to be Moses’
brother Aaron ; and he was to wear a beautiful dress when he
ministered before God—a high cap with “Holiness to the
Lord” on it, a long embroidered robe, edged with gold bells
and pomegranates, and a blue scarf crossed over his breast ;
and in the middle a breast-plate, made of twelve precious
stones, each carved with the name of one of the twelve tribes
of Israel, so that he might have them on his heart as he prayed
to God. All this and much more God told Moses while he

was on the mount.
QUESTIONS.

1. What was given on Mount Sinai? 2. Who spoke the Commandments ?
3. To whom did God give them? 4. What were they written on? 5.
Who wrote them? 6. Where were they to be kept? 7. What was the
chest like? 8. What was the chest called? 9. Where was Moses to put
the chest? 10. What was the room called? 11. Who might go near the
Holy of Holies? 12. Who was the first High Priest? 13. Who was
Aaron? 14, What was Aaron to wear? 15. Why might not the people
come near ?

THIRD READING.
“ Know therefore that the Lord thy God, He is God.”—Deut. vii. 9.

YHEN Moses went up into the awful cloud upon Mount
Sinai, he stayed there forty days.

But all the Israelites below were impatient. They could not

think what had become of Moses; and though they had so

lately heard God’s own Voice speaking to them, they would not







Ra



The Giving of the Law. 89
wait as they had been told to do. They cried out that they
wanted something instead of Moses, whom they had lost. So
they took all their gold ear-rings and melted them, and made
an image of a golden calf. And then these foolish wicked
people began to feast and dance, and worship this golden idol.

Moses was coming down Mount Sinai with the two Tables of
the Commandments in his hands. And first he heard a shout-
ing and singing; then he saw the people leaping and dancing,
and the great golden idol standing in the midst. Then he was
sure it was of no use to bring them the Commandments if they
minded them no better. So he took the two tables of stone,
and threw them out of his hand, and broke them to pieces.

Then he went down, and severely punished the worst of the
Israelites for having disobeyed the commandment. And he
broke the golden calf to pieces, and ground it to powder.

Then he went and prayed to God to forgive the people.
God did forgive them, and let Moses bring two fresh tables of
stone to be written with the Ten Commandments. But the
first that they had lost were the tables God had given, and
they could never have them back again!

QUESTIONS.

1. Where was Moses gone? 2. What was God going to give him? 3.
Who were left below? 4. What did the Israelites want? 5. What did
they take off? 6. What did they make of their ear-rings? 7. What is the
Second Commandment? 8. How did they break the Second Command-
ment? 9. What did Moses do to the Tables of the Law? 10, Why did
he throw them down? 11. What did he do with the golden calf? ra.
Where did he go then? 13. What did he do for the Israelites ?













MOSES SPEAKING THE BOOK OF DEUTERONOMY.

fifteenth Sundiay.—Fitth after Gaster.

THE GIVING OF THE LAW.
FIRST READING.

“JT prayed therefore unto the Lord, and said, O Lord God, destroy not

Thy people and Thine inheritance.”—Dewtz. ix. 26.
AST Sunday you heard how sadly the people of Isracl
sinned by making the golden calf, while Moses was up in

the mountain, and how he punished them.

Then he said he would go and pray to God to forgive them,
and try them again. So up he went over the rough rocks of
Mount Sinai, and into the cloud again, where he had spoken









The Giving of the Law. gl
with God before. And he prayed with all his might that God
would not cast off His people, though they had been so
wicked, but would give them again the Commandments on
their tables of stone. And God listened to Moses, and pro-
mised to give them the Commandments again. Then Moses
made a great request: he said to God, “I pray Thee, show
me Thy glory.” But God said, “ Thou canst not see My Face,
for there shall no man see Me and live.” But Moses was to
come up the mountain the next day, and bring with him two
blocks of stone, and then God would let him see as much of
His glory as he could bear.

On the next day Moses went up the mountain again, and
took with him the two tables of stone. And the Lord came
down in the cloud; and Moses was in the cleft of the rock,
where he could see a small part of the glory, and hear the
Lord’s Voice proclaim before him, “The Lord, The Lord God,
merciful and gracious, long-suffering, and abundant in good-
ness and truth.” Then indeed Moses bowed his head and
worshipped. No man ever came so close to God as Moses,
with whom God spoke face to face, as a man speaketh to his
friend.

Moses stayed forty days and forty nights up in the moun-
tain. And God again wrote the Commandments upon the
two tables of stone, and granted the Israelites to try again to
keep them. When Moses came down from being in converse
with God, the glory was still about his face. It was all shin-
ing like the sun, and was so bright that.the Israelites could
not fix their eyes on it; and he was obliged to put a veil over

Per













92 fifteenth Sunday—fifth after Easter.

his face, because they could not bear to look at it. Was ever
living man so favoured, and brought into such glory?

QUESTIONS.

1. What wicked thing had the Israelites done? 2. Who prayed for
their forgiveness? 3. Where did Moses go to pray for their forgiveness ?
4. Who forgave them? 5. What did Moses venture to ask God to show
him? 6, But what can no one do? 7. Where was Moses placed? 8.
What passed by? 9. What voice did he hear? 10, How was Moses
more honoured than any man? 11. How long did he stay in the moun-
tain? 12. What did God give him again? 13. How did his face look
when he came down? 14. What did he do to hide his face? 15. How
came his face to be so glorious?

SECOND READING.
“Ye shall walk after the Lord your God, and fear Him.”—Devwdz. xiii. 4.

HEN the Israelites came into the good land where they

were going, they were to be very careful not to learn to
worship idols. For idols were no gods at all—only wood and
stone—and could not hear them pray, nor give them what they
wanted. Besides, the people round them had very frightful
ways of trying to please their false gods. They had one
called Moloch, made of brass, and they used to offer poor
little children up in sacrifice to him, and make a noise with
drums and trumpets, that no one might hear their cries.
There was another god called Baal, to whom they set up
great images, and feasted in his honour; and a goddess, whom
they called the queen of heaven, or Ashtoreth. Women used
to offer cakes to her, and dance in honour of her, for they
thought she sent the moon to shine on them.

= es atl



oe nnn ee en

The Giving of the Law. 93



Now, the Israelites were not to worship any of these false
gods. They were to remember how they heard the Only True
God speaking to them out of the cloud upon the mountain,
and telling them, “I am the Lord thy God: thou shalt have
no other gods but Me.” And God told them that if they |
would worship Him and serve Him, all should go well with |
them, and they should be happy and blessed. But if they
went after these false idols, all would go ill with them, and
there would be only sorrow and misery.

QUESTIONS.

1. Say the First Commandment. 2. Say the Second. 3. What three
idols did the people of the country worship? 4. What did they do in
honour of Moloch? 5. What did they do in honour of Baal? 6. What

‘did they call Ashtoreth? 7. What did they think she sent them? 8.
Who made the moon? 9. What would happen if the children of Israel
worshipped God? 10, What would happen if they worshipped idols ?





THIRD READING.

“Tt is a people that do err in their heart, and they have not known My
ways.”—Psalm xcv. 10.
FTER the Commandments were given the Israelites went
on their journey. The Ark, or chest, where the Com-
mandments on their two tables of stone were kept, was car-
ried before them; and God still showed that He was with
them, for He made a pillar of cloud by day and of fire by
night go along with them, and rest on it.
When they came near the land of Canaan, twelve men were











94 Fifteenth Sunday—Ffifth after Easter.

sent on to see it. They came back, bringing such a great
bunch of grapes that two had to carry it between them on a
pole! But they said that the land was full of strong citiés,
and very strong men, and they should never be able to win it,
but would all be killed. Only two men, Joshua and Caleb,
recollected that there could be no fear, for God had promised
to save them and bring them in. The others all cried, and
said they would go back to Egypt, and threw stones at Moses
and Aaron when they wanted to quiet them.

Then God showed His glory, and would have cut them all
off in a moment if Moses had not prayed for them. But He
said none of those who had said they would not go into the
good land should go. They were to stay forty years longer
in the dismal wilderness, till all the grown-up men, except
Joshua and Caleb, should be dead, and their children be
grown up in their stead. Then their children, who had
learned to trust God and do as He bade, should be the ones
to go in and live in the promised land.

QUESTIONS.

1. How did the Israelites know which way to go in the wilderness? 2.
What was the ark? 3. What was in it? 4. How did God show them
His Presence? 5. Whom did Moses send to look at the land? 6. What
did these men bring back? 7. But what did they say of the country? 8.
Who were afraid? 9. Why was it wrong to be afraid? 10, Who only
were not afraid? 11. What were the people ready todo? 12. How were
they to be punished? 13. How long were they to stay in the wilderness ?
14. Who would die? 15. Who would grow up to goin? 16. Who were
the two good brave men? 17. What was promised to Joshua and Caleb?















MOSES VIEWING TIE PROMISED LAND.

Sizteenth Sunda —After Ascension.

THE DEATH OF MOSES.
FIRST READING.
“They angered Him also at the waters of strife.’—Psalm cvi. 32.

Boe all the forty years in the wilderness, the children
of Israel were quite close to their home in the promised
land. There was only the river Jordan between them and
the hills and valleys there. But Moses was not to go with
them. Once when the people were crying out for more water,
and God told him to command the stream to come out of the









96 Stxcteenth Sunday—A fler Ascension.



rock, Moses was so hot with anger that he did not attend.
He said, “Hear now, ye rebels; must we fetch you water out of
this rock?” And he struck the rock with his rod, instead of
speaking to it. The water came out as it had done before ;
but Moses had been so hasty that he had not thought how to
obey God exactly, and so he was not to be allowed to lead
the people in as a great warrior, lest he should fail again.
God was not angry with him, but had forgiven him; only he
had his punishment because he had done wrong.

Joshua was to lead the people, instead of Moses. So before
Moses was taken away, he called Joshua and all the chief men
of each tribe, and put them in mind of all that God had done
for them, and warned them very solemnly, that if they broke
their promise and did not keep the Commandments, God would
punish them—first a little, and then more and more, and would
even cast them out of the good land at last. For, mind, God
always keeps His promises; and as surely as He gives the
good all that is best for them, so surely He will punish those
who turn from Him.

QUESTIONS.

1. Where were the Israelites? 2. How long had their journey lasted?
3. Where were they going? 4. What lay between them and the land of
Canaan? 5. Who had led them? 6. But what one thing had Moses
done? 7. What was he not to do? 8. Who was to lead them in? 9.
What did Moses tell the Israelites they must be careful to do? 10. What
had they promised to keep? 11. What would happen if they broke the
promise? 12. What would happen if they kept the promise? 13. What
promises have we made?







The Death of Moses.



SECOND READING.


















“So Moses the servant of the Lord died.”—Deuteronomy xxxiv. 5.

T was not God’s will that Moses should lead the Israelites
into the promised land, but he was to die on the east
side of the river Jordan; and so he would have his rest above
instead of in the land of promise. But first God told him he
might see the land. So he went up into a very high hill:
and there God made him able to see all the home of his
people—the snowy hill of Hermon, and Mount Lebanon
where the cedar trees grow, and the hills and valleys where
Abraham had wandered and Isaac and Jacob had lived, and
which he had hoped for all his life; and green fields, and
corn-fields, and vineyards, on to the great blue sea stretching
out to the westward. That was where his people were to
live; but there was a better home for Moses. Nobody saw
him any more after he went up into the mountain. There
he died, and the Lord buried him, and no one knows of
his grave—only the children of Israel wept and mourned
for him.

QUESTIONS.

1. Where had the Israelites come? 2. Who had led them? 3. But
where was Moses not to go? 4. But what did God allow him to see? 5.
Where was he to go? 6. What did God show him there? 7. What kind
of place was it? 8. Where had he brought the people from? 9. Who
was to lead them in? 10, What was to happen to Moses? 11. Did any
one ever see him again? 12. What does no one know? 13. Why do we
think so much of Moses? 14. Where did he speak with God? 15. Was
he not the greatest man of all in the Old Testament ?





Full Text








AUNT CHARLOTTE’S

BIreLeE Wiest ory


FUST PUBLISHED

BY THE sav Eb Ase

Aniform with “ Stories of Wible Wistory ”’

UNT CHARLOTTE’S Stories of English History for

the Little Ones. In Fifty easy Chapters, with a Frontispiece in Colors by H.

Stacy MARKS, A.R.A.; a Half-page Picture to each Chapter, and an Illuminated

Title-page. New Edition, with Questions. Square Octavo, Cloth Extra, Bevelled
Boards, Gilt Edges. Price 6/-

UNT CHARLOTTE’S Stories of French History for

the Little Ones. In Forty-eight easy Chapters, with a Frontispiece in Colors
by H. Stacy Marks, A.R.A. ; Illustrations, and an Illuminated Title-page. Square
Octavo, Cloth Extra, Bevelled Boards, Gilt Edges. Price 6/-~


CHRIST BLESSING LITTLE CHILDREN.
Oa & hor é
Qn SS | ea es SS SSS SSS

AUNT CHARLOTTE |

PX] STORIES OF _



Charlotte M. Yonée.
SD Author of The Heir of Kedelpfe, Ke.
j ROI

ee



MARCUS WARD & CO, LONDON & BELFAST.



PSS
o AA








AUNT CHARLOTTE'’S

STORIES OF

BIBLE HISTORY

POR THE, Lit ILE ONS.

BY
CHARLOTTE M. YONGE,

AutHOR OF ‘‘THE HEIR OF REDCLYFFE,” ‘‘STORIES OF ENGLISH History,’ &C.



London :

MARCUS WARD & CO., CHANDOS STREET, W.C.;
AnD ROYAL ULSTER WORKS, BELFAST.
M.DCCC.LXXV.








PREFACE.



HESE Readings give the outlines of the
Scripture narrative to very young children.
The first half of them will be found, if
begun on Septuagesima Sunday, to follow the course
of the First Lessons for Sundays, so that the three



short Readings can be gone through with children
each Sunday; but they can be read as a consecutive
history. In the Gospels, it was of course impossible
to adapt the story to the Sunday Lessons, and it has
therefore not been attempted. It is hoped, however,
that this may serve as a useful introduction to Scrip-
ture history, and give children a better understanding
of the connection of the Lessons they hear at
Church.
CHARLOTTE M. YONGE.

Nov. 8rd, 187 4.



CONT ENT S:

PAGE
The Making of the World : i . . TL
How Sin began and the Flood came ‘ 5 : 17
The Rainbow : é ; : 5 3 : 28
Abraham and Lot . _ : ; ‘ A ; 29
Jacob’s Journey . 7 : fi “ ‘ . - 35
Joseph in Egypt ; d : : : é : 4!
Joseph’s Brothers : : é : : . 2 AZ.
The Call of Moses. 4 : ° . . 53
The Plagues of Egypt . e i . . - - 59
The Passover 4 i. $ 3 5 ‘ 5 64
The Gainsaying of Korah ‘ 3 i é 3869
Israel in the Wilderness : . . é 3 : 74
Balaam and Balak ‘ . 3 ; i ° - 79
The Giving of the Law é 3 ‘ 3 3 - 85,90
The Death of Moses ; 5 is c ° . - 95
The Holy Spirit of Love 3 y i . 6 a 99
The Glory of God : : 3 7 6 . . 105
Israel in Battle ‘ . c . ° s . Ill
The Judges of Israel : ‘ : . : : . 116
Samuel . ‘ ; . 6 : . c 121
King Saul : 3 : é : . . 127
The Reign of Saul. I . : é : . 132
King David reigning : ; A : ‘ s - 139
Preparing forthe Temple. d ‘ . : . 144
Solomon in his Glory. 3 i ‘ . 148
Solomon’s Fall : . 5 rs . a A 152
The Kingdom of Israel . 5 ‘ : ‘ 3 - 156

Elijah and Ahab ‘ . j : : zi A 162


vili Contents.

Elijah and Elisha

Elisha’s Miracles . s : E .
The Ruin of Ahab’s House a : .
Hezekiah and Josiah . : 5 d .
Jehoiakim’s Cruelty : . . °

Jeremiah’s Prophecies

The Taking of Jerusalem

The Fall of Jerusalem . .
The Jews at Babylon .

Daniel at Babylon

The Return from Babylon

Troubles of the Jews .

The Coming of the Lord

The Childhood of our Lord .

The Preparation for the Ministry
The Calling of the Disciples.

The Ministry : é 5
Wonders of our Lord’s Working.
Going up to Jerusalem

The Evening of the Betrayal

The Trial and Condemnation . 5

The Crucifixion

The Resurrection ‘

The Ascension : 3 ,

The Waiting-time ‘ ‘ : ‘








LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



PAGE
The Garden of Eden. ‘3 : : : =P UIT
Adam and Eve expelled from Bien . . . . 17
Noah receiving the Dove into the Ark . 3 3 Re n28
Abraham offering Isaac : , 5 i 3 : 29
Isaac blessing Jacob ‘i s : 3 e : oth
Joseph’s Coat shown to Jacob . . 2 : 4 41
Joseph embracing his Father. . . s : - 47
The Burning Bush . 3 3 . ‘ 3 sy 53
Death of the First-born . ‘ - . iy . - 59
Eating the Passover . é : is : . : 64
Aaron’s Rod 3 : ‘i : F : . 69
Moses striking the Rock > 3 a : 3 8 74
The Brazen Serpent . ; . : ; 3 949
Gathering Manna. ‘ 3 t , 85
Moses speaking the Book of pete j : : - 90
Moses viewing the Promised Land . 2 . , , 95
Offering First Fruits : 6 : 5 : - 99
Abraham and the three Holy Ones : : 5 § 105
Passing over Jordan : : : ; , P . III
Gideon’s Fleece 7 ‘ 5 : i : fy 116
Samuel and Eli . . A 5 ‘ A = pil
Samuel anointing Saul 3 : 6 ‘ : A 127
David and Goliath : : . . . el32,
Absalom caught in the Tree 5 ‘ : : 5 139
David buying the Threshing-floor $ S 3 ‘ - 144
Solomon’s Judgment . : 3 : ‘ 148
The Queen of Sheba’s Visit a Splumon 3 ¢ eali52)

The Disobedient Prophet . : : : ‘ ; 156






x Lust of Illustrations.

PAGE



Elijah on Mount Sinai . . : 5 ‘ . 162
Ascent of Elijah é , p : : 168
Naaman at Elisha’s door 5 5 : . . - 173
Jezebel at the Window : : . 179
Hezekiah spreading Sennacherib’s etic: Before the Lord FE . 184
The Feast of Tabernacles . r i E : z 190
Offering Wine to the Rechabites r A 5 - . 193
Reading the Roll to Jehoiachin 6 é : ; ; 199
Jews driven away captive : ; ; 5 3 - 205
Daniel refusing the Dainties . , : , - 211
The Handwriting on the Wall . : hg He . 216
Daniel in the Lion’s Den. 5 4 a : : 223
Esther before King Ahasuerus ; : . ; . 230
The Annunciation . ; ‘ , 3 . 3 236
The Nativity : 3 . 3 ? . 241
Jesus with the Doctors in ae Deuinle i . 3 . 246
Miracle of the Loaves and Fishes 5 5 . : . 251
Raising the Widow’s Son. gj : . ; : 256
The Transfiguration : < . 261
Jesus’ Triumphal Entry into yetesden : : 3 . 266
Jesus blessing little Children. 7 ; a - 271
Jesus before Pilate. : . : j : é 276
The Crucifixion . ‘A . : . . 283
Jesus appears to Mary Magen 5 5 ° ; ; 288
Jesus ascends into Heaven . - ; . . - 293










THE GAKDEN OF EDEN,



First Sunday—Septuagesima,

THE MAKING OF THE WORLD.
FIRST READING.
“Tn the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.”—Gev. 1. 1.
O-DAY we are told how God made this earth that we
live on. Sunday is the earth’s birthday, for on the first
day of the week the Creation began.
The world was all one mass—dark, empty, and shapeless—

till God made the light by His Word, and said that the light
was good. Without light we could not live: even the very








12 first Sunday—Septuagesima.



trees and flowers would die. When we have been in the dark
how glad we are to see light come back, even if it be only one
grey line beginning in the sky! This shows how blessed is
this gift. It was good, too, that we should have quiet dark
night for rest and stillness.

The second great change enclosed the earth in an outer
ball of air, which we call the sky or firmament. That is the
deep blue into which we look up and up. The water rises up
from the earth and makes the clouds that take such strange
shapes, sometimes dark and full of rain to water the earth,
sometimes shining white, or pink and golden with morning or
evening light.

The third great change was, that water filled the deep
hollows of the earth, while the hills rose up dry above them,
with rivers and streams running down their slopes into the
deep seas below. God did not leave the land bare and stony:
He clothed it with green fresh plants and herbs, with leaves
and flowers, and trees to give us their fruit or their wood, and
filled even the sea with plants formed to live under water.

Next, God allowed the rays of the sun to gladden the earth,
and let it see the moon lighted up by the sun, as well as the
stars far beyond our firmament. We count the months by the
changes in the moon; and our earth’s journey round the sun
marks our years and seasons. We all rejoice in a bright
sunny day, though the sun is too bright and glorious for us to
bear to gaze at him; and how lovely the moon looks, either
as a young crescent, or a beautiful full moon!

The waters began to be full of live things, that swam, or




The Making of the World. 13

crept, or flew: fishes, and birds, and insects. By that time
this world was nearly as we see it, and a beautiful home for us
to live in. Then God made the four-footed beasts—sheep
and cows, horses, dogs, cats, elephants, lions—all that we use
or admire ; and, last of all, when He had made this earth a
happy, healthy place, He planted the Garden of Eden, and
put in it the first man and woman, the best of all that He had
made; for though their bodies were of dust, like those of
the beasts, yet their souls came from the Breath of God.
They could think, speak, pray, and heed what is unseen as
well as what is seen.

There are many many lessons to be learnt from this wonder-
ful story. Let us try to take home one of them. Let us ask our
Father that the ground below, the light above, the sky and
sea, the sun and moon, the trees and flowers, the birds and
beasts, and His holy day of rest, may remind us that they
came from Him, and that we may be very thankful to Him
for having given us such good things.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who made the world? 2. Which Commandment tells you about
God’s making the world? 3. What is there in the sky that God made?
4. What is there on the earth? 5. What do you see round you that He
made? 6, Can we make birds, or beasts, or flowers? 7. Or could we
make them live? 8. Who makes them and us live? 9. Where does all
our food come from? 10. Who gave us corn? 11. What must we ask
God to do for us? 12. What must we thank Him for? 13. Do not you
think it would be pleasant to whisper to yourself, when you see a pretty
flower, or a beautiful sky, or when the sun shines bright and warm,
“Thank God for being so good to me”?








14 first Sunday—Septuagesima.

SECOND READING.
“ And the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed

into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.”
—Genests, ii. 7.

N the Bible God tells us that He made the world, and

everything in it: land and water, and grass, flowers and
trees, insects, birds and beasts, and last of all He made the
first man and woman. The man was made by God out of the
dust of the ground, and then God breathed into his nostrils
the breath of life, and gave him a living soul. And the
woman was made by God out of the man’s side. They
were called Adam and Eve, and they were to be the first
father and mother of everyone who was to be born into the
world.

The good God gave them a beautiful home. It was a gar-
den, with a clear river of water flowing through it, and all
kinds of delicious fruit-trees and beautiful flowers growing in
it. Nothing could hurt or vex them there. They did not
know what pain was, they were never tired, and all they had
to do was to dress the garden and to keep it. They had no
faults, and never did wrong; and God Himself came near to
talk with them.

That was the way they lived, always good and always
happy, whilst they obeyed what God had told them. In the
midst of the garden grew two trees: one was the Tree of Life,
and the other was the Tree of the Knowledge of good and
evil. God told them that if they ate the fruit of this Tree of
Knowledge they would die. We do not know what those






The Making of the World. 15

trees were like, but sometime or other I hope we shall see the
Tree of Life, for it is growing in heaven, close by the river
that flows by the Throne of God; and when we see it, and
taste of it, we shall live for ever, and be happier even than
Adam and Eve were. We shall never be as happy as they
were while we are living in this world; but if we will try to
obey God, and live holy lives, He will take us to heaven, and
that will be still better than the Garden of Eden.

QUESTIONS.

1. What did God make? 2. Whom did He make? 3. What was the
man made of? 4. What was the woman made of? 5. What did God
breathe into them? 6. What did He give them? 7. Why were they
better than the beasts? 8. What was the man’s name? 9. What was
the woman’s name? io. Of whom were they the father and mother?
11. Where did they live? 12. What had they to do there? 13. What
grew there? 14. What were the two chief trees that grew there? 15.
Which were they not to touch? 16. Where is the Tree of Life now?
17. When do we hope to see it? 18. What is a still happier place than
the Garden of Eden ?

THIRD READING.

“Hitherto shalt thou come, but no further: and here shall thy proud
waves be stayed.”—-¥od, xxxviii. 11.

HAT glorious and wonderful things God has made! Did

you ever see the sea? There it is—a great vast space,

all water, looking green near us, but blue further off—always
heaving up and down. The waves rise, and then ripple along,
and burst with a white edge of bubbles of foam. And, if you




cc —_-

16 first Sunday—Septuagesina.

live near the sea, you know how, at certain times in the day,
one wave after another begins to break a little higher on the
beach ; eight waves seem to run up the same distance, then
the ninth comes much further, then eight more come like that,
then another. A great space that had been left dry gets
covered up with water again, and where you were walking just
now is quite deep water. What is this called? The tide.
Well, what will the tide do in proper time? Will it come
rolling in over the beach, sand, pebbles, and rocks, and wash
us all away and drown us all, and cover up the land? No;
presently each will turn. Each wave will be a little less high
than the last, till it will have gone back again and left the
beach uncovered as before. Why does the tide do this? It
is because God so wonderfully contrived this earth and sea,
that the waters should rise and go back. He made the sand
the bound of the sea, and said, “ Hitherto shalt thou come,
but no further: and here shall thy proud waves be stayed.”
So, you know, we sing in the Psalm every Sunday—

“The sea is His, and He made it :
And His hands prepared the dry land.”

QUESTIONS.

1. Which day was the sea and land made? 2. What curious thing
does the sea do every day? 3. What do you call the coming in and going
back of the sea? 4. Why does the tide always stop in its proper place?
5. What did God make the bound of the sea? 6. What did He say to
it? 7. What verse praises God for making the sea?


















ADAM AND EVE EXPELLED FROM EDEN.



Second Sunday.— Seragesima.

HOW SIN BEGAN AND THE FLOOD CAME.
FIRST READING.
“The serpent beguiled me, and I did eat.”—Gen. iii. 13.

AST Sunday you heard how God made the world, and
put a man and woman to live init. The man was named
Adam ; the woman was named Eve. God gave them a beau-
tiful garden to live in, full of trees and flowers; and they had
no pain, no trouble, nothing to vex them. Only one thing
God told them: there was one tree whose fruit they must not








18 Second Sunday—Sexagesima.



eat. They might eat the fruit of all the other trees, but not
of that one. As long as they obeyed, all was well and happy
with them ; but if they ate it they would die. But a bad spirit
came and took the shape of the serpent, and talked to Eve.
He told her a wicked lie—he told her that to eat the fruit
would make her wise, and would not make her die. And Eve
listened, and did eat. And she gave Adam, and he also ate ;
and so they took the bad spirit for their master instead of the
good God. Then God was angry with them, and put them
out of the garden, and let them be weak and sickly, and die
at last. It is a sad thing for them and for us. For if they
had been good and obeyed God, and not the bad spirit, it
would have been easy to us to be good, and we should not
have had the devil tempting us to do wrong: we should have
never known pain or sorrow. But God pitied Adam and
Eve, and us too; and he promised them that the Seed—
that is, the Son—of the woman should bruise the serpent’s
head, and set them and their children free. Our Blessed Lord
Jesus Christ, the Son of God and of the Virgin Mary, set us
free when He died on the cross and rose again; and now we
belong to Him, and not to the bad spirit. Only we must try
and ask Him to help us not to do what is wrong, as Eve did,
or we shall not keep free from the power of the enemy.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was the first man? 2. Who was the first woman? 3. Where
did God put them? 4. What was the one thing they might not do? 5.
What was to happen if they ate of that fruit? 6. Who came and spoke
to Eve? 7. What shape did the bad spirit take? 8. What did he tell










aa
flow Sin Began and the Flood Came. 19



Eve? 9. What did she do? 10, Whom did she make her master? 11.
What was done to punish her? 12. What sad things did the bad spirit
bring on her? 13. Who came to set us free from the bad spirit ?



SECOND READING.

“And, behold, I, even I, do bring a flood of waters upon the earth.”—
Genesis vi. 17.
HE Lesson this morning told the sad history of how
Adam and Eve did the very thing that God forbade ; so
that He drove them out of the Garden of Eden, and sin and
death came into the world.

After that they had children. Some were good, but not so
good as Adam and Eve had been at first; and some were
bad. And as time went on the bad ones grew worse, and the
good ones were tempted, and many of them grew wicked too.
And so all the world was getting wicked, and God saw
nothing but evil when He looked down on it. And He said
that He would destroy these wicked people, and wash away
the evil from the earth by a great flood. But there was one
good man, whose name was Noah; and God said He would
save him. He bade Noah build an Ark. It was to bea
great ship, all made of wood, and it took a great many years
to build; and all that time people laughed at Noah, for they
would not believe that anything was going to happen. Noah
made the Ark, and stored it with food. And God sent him a
pair of all sorts of animals that were in the world, and he put
them into pens in the Ark. Then Noah and his wife, and his








20 Second Sunday—Sexagesima.

three sons, Shem, Ham, and Japhet, and their wives, went
into the Ark, and God shut them in.

Then it began to rain. It rained for forty days and forty
nights without stopping, and the rivers came out of their
banks, and the sea came upon the land, and the ground was
covered up. Even the tops of the highest hills were hidden,
and everybody and every creature was drowned—all but Noah
and those that were with him. There was the Ark all the
time, floating quite safe on the water. The storm could not
upset it nor the sea get into it, for God took care of it and all
that was in it.

The reason Noah was saved was because, first, he tried to
be good, and not do like the bad people round him; and
next, because he believed what God said to him, and went on
making the Ark, even when he saw no danger. If we wish
God to save us, then we must take care that we do just what
we are told—not what seems pleasant now, but what is really
right.

QUESTIONS.

1. Do you know why Adam and Eve were driven out of the happy gar-
den? 2. How did people go on after that? 3. How had sin come into
the world? 4. What did God say He must do to the world? 5. Why?
6. Who was to be saved? 7. What was Noah to make? 8. What was
the Ark like? 9. What were put into it? 10, Why were two of all crea-
tures put into the Ark? 11. What men and women were in it? 12. What
were the names of Noah’s sons? 13. What happened when Noah was in
the Ark? 14. How long did it rain? 15. What was covered up? 16.

What became of all the people? 17. Who were safe? 18. Where was
the Ark? 19. Who took care of the Ark? 20. Why was Noah saved?


flow Sin Began and the Flood Came. 21



THIRD READING.
“So Noah knew that the waters were abated from off the earth.”—
Genesis viii. 2.
T must have been a sad sight for Noah and his wife and
their sons, as the rain went on and on, and the water

grew deeper and deeper, and everybody and everything was
drowned. Then came a time when nothing was to be seen
but water. Wherever they looked all was sky and water ; but
it had done raining, the sky was blue again, the sun shone by
day, the stars by night, and they must have been very glad.
And still the water got lower, till the Ark did not float about,
but stopped, resting on a peak of a mountain, a very high
mountain, and a few bare tops of other hills began to peep
out. By-and-by, Noah opened the window of the Ark and let
out a raven. Fle never saw the raven again, for a raven eats
dead things, and there were so many dead bodies floating
about that it got plenty of food, and never came back to the
Ark that had saved it. He waited a week, and then he let
out a dove. Now doves like trees to sit and nestle in, and
they eat grains and seeds; so the poor dove found no place
to rest in, and flew back to the Ark; and Noah took her
back, and kept her a week, then let her fly again. She flew
away, but still she came back to the Ark, and this time she
brought in her beak a sprig of olive branch.

It was the first green thing that Noah had seen for a year!
Noah’s children have loved the olive leaf everywhere, and cal-
led it the sign of peace and good news ever since.

For now Noah knew that the waters had gone down, and

nt a ee ee




22 Second Sunday—Seragesima.



that trees must be able to put forth leaves again. Once more,
after another week, he let out the dove, and she did not come
back, for she had found a tree where she could make her
home, and seeds to eat; and then Noah knew the sad time of
the flood—a whole year—was over, and the earth had been
washed from all her stains.



QUESTIONS.

1. What was the Flood? 2. What was the Ark? 3. Who was in it?
4. What had Noah with him in the Ark? 5. What became of everyone
else? 6. Why? 7. Why was Noah saved? 8. How long did the Flood
last? 9. What birds did Noah send out of the Ark? 10, Which came
back? 11. Why did not the raven come back? 12. What did the dove
bring? 13. What was Noah sure of then? 14. What had the earth
been washed from?







ea ro










Zi oe

PE

nf

CILULE:







NOAH RECEIVING THE DOVE INTO THE ARK.—PAGE 21.

Chird Sunday.—Quinguagesima.

THE RAINBOW.
FIRST READING.

“T do set my Bow in the Cloud.” —Genesis ix. 13.

HE sin that came into the world when Eve listened to
the tempter had grown as men multiplied and made each
other worse. The wicked people had been drowned in the
Flood, and Noah, his sons and their wives, had alone been
saved in the Ark. After a whole year of being shut up there,
watching the earth, first drowned and then coming out of the






24. Third Sunday—Quinguagesima.



water, they had just come out on the fresh green earth, with
all the animals saved with them, when God spoke to them.

Then God made a promise to Noah. It was that no flood
of water shall ever drown all the world again, but spring,
summer, autumn, and winter, day and night, will go on to the
end of the world, when it shall be burnt up by fire, not
drowned by water. That Noah, and all of us after him, might
feel sure that God in His mercy will go on preserving us, and
giving us days and nights, seed-time and harvest, He gave us
something to look at asa sign of His promise. He so ordered
the rays of light, that when they shine upon drops of water in
the air they cause beautiful colours, making part of a circle,
so as to form a bow. So when the sun shines on a cloud,
as it rains, the fair bright rainbow is seen, as a pledge to us of
God’s merciful care and love to us. There is a rainbow round
about the Throne of God in Heaven ; and the lovely rainbows
that we see when the sun shines out, and the showers drift
away, are to put us in mind that we are safe under His care,
in right of His promise to Noah and his three sons, of whom
the whole earth was overspread. We are the children of his
son Japhet, and all that was then said to him belongs to us
also. We should recollect it, and put our trust in Him, and
be thankful when we see the beautiful soft arch that the
Hands of the Almighty have bended, looking out of the
midst of the dark watery cloud.

QUESTIONS.

1. What beautiful sight do we sometimes see after a shower? 2. What
is a rainbow like? 3. Who put the rainbow in the cloud? 4. Who Was


The Rainbow. 25

the man to whom God showed the rainbow? 5. What promise did God
make Noah? 6. What had God just done to the wicked people? 7.
Whom had he saved? 8. What did He say should always go on? 9.
What did God put in the sky to show that He will not send ancther
Flood? 10. What are we to think of when we see a rainbow? 11. Who
takes care of us? 12. Where is there a rainbow in Heaven above?

SECOND READING.
“Tn thee shall all families of the earth be blessed.” —Geneszs xii. 3.

HEN Noah’s grandchildren and great-grandchildren

came to be more and more, and the world was being
filled with people again, they still were not all good, and the
longer time went on the worse they grew.

At last God called to a very good man, whose name was
Abram, and told him that if he would come away from his
home toa land God would show him, then God would bless
him and lead him, and by-and-by give the land to his children,
and that their children after them should be more in number
than the grains of sand on the sea-shore, or than the stars in
the sky: and that in his seed—that was, in a Son of his—all
the nations of the earth should be blessed.

It was strange to hear all this about Abram’s children, for
he was growing an old man, and he and his wife Sarai had no
child at all. But he believed in God. He knew that God is
Almighty, and can do whatever He will; so he only did just
as God told him, and went away from his home, where God
told him. He was obliged to take all his cattle with him—
quantities of cows, and goats, and sheep, and camels, and




26 Third Sunday—Quinquagesima.



asses ; and he had servants to drive them. When they came
to a piece of grass and a fresh spring of water, there they
would stop. They had no houses—only tents, which were
great curtains woven of goat’s hair and fastened up with
poles, so that they could be set up or taken down, and carried
about. All his life Abram lived in a tent, instead of staying
at home in a city, and being at his ease.

By-and-by he came to a beautiful country.. There were
high cool hills rising up, and green valleys between, full of
grass for the sheep and cattle; and the wide sea spread out
far away towards the sunset, all blue and glorious. God told
him to look at the land, for that was the place which his
children should have for their own; but in the meantime
Abram had not one bit of it, and was a stranger there; and
he had no child either.

But still he was quite sure that God spoke truth ; and that
somehow, though he did not know how, it would come about
that his children should have the land, and that in One all the
nations of the earth should be blessed. That was faith.

QUESTIONS,

1. What good man do you hear of to-day? 2. What did God tell
Abram to do? 3. What did God promise? 4. Who were to have the
land? 5. Why was it strange to hear of his children? 6. But did he
believe it would come true? 7. Why did he believe it? 8. How did he
show that he believed? 9. Where did he go? ro. What had he with him?
11. What did he live in? 12. What is a tent like? 13. What sort of place
did he come to? 14. Who were to have this land? 15. How many were
his children to be? 16. Did he believe this? 17. What is believing called?




The Rainbow. 27

THIRD READING.

“Let there be no strife, I pray thee, between thee and me.”—Gex. xiii. 8.

WO men were travelling together. They were an uncle
and nephew. The uncle’s name was Abram, the nephew’s
was Lot. They had come from home, because God had told
Abram to come away from his own home to the land that
God would give his children. Abram believed, and did as
God bade him; and Lot, the son of his dead brother, went
with him. They did not go alone. Each of them had great
flocks of cows, and sheep, and camels, and asses, and goats,
and numbers of servants to take care of them. They would
fix their black tents, made of camels’ hair, in any place where
they saw a spring of water and good green grass for their
cattle; and there they would stay till all the grass was eaten
up, and then take up their tents and move to another place.
Just now they had got to a bare stony place, where the sun.
shone hotly, and there was not much green; but Abram had
built up an altar with the great stones, and prayed there.
Abram and Lot loved one another, and were at peace; but
when their servants drove out their flocks to get food and
water there were apt to be quarrels. If Abram’s men found
a green grassy valley, they would not let Lot’s cattle into it;
and if Lot’s came to a well, they would not let Abram’s flocks
drink ; and so on. They were always quarrelling and making
complaints to their masters. At last Abram saw that they
would make Lot quarrel with him. So he said it would be
wiser to part; Lot should go one way and he another—any




28 Third Sunday—Quinquagesima.



way there should be no strife. And he even told Lot to
choose which way he would go. So Lot looked, and saw to.
the East a pleasant green valley, with fields of corn and mea-
dows, and a fine river running into a clear lake, and five fine
towns on the bank. He liked it better than the bare stony
hills where Abram was; and he never thought whether the
people were good or not, but he took the first choice, and
went to live there. So Abram gave up. He had the right to
choose first, but he would not use it. He let his nephew
choose. For he hated quarrels, and knew they were wicked ;
and he knew how to stop them, because he would yield up the
best. That is the way to make peace and please God.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who had called Abram? 2. Who went with him? 3. What was Lot
to Abram? 4. Why did they go? 5. What had God promised? 6, What
had they with them? 7. Who quarrelled? 8. About what did the servants
quarrel? 9. Did Abram and Lot quarrel? 10, How did Abram prevent
a quarrel? 11. Who was to choose first? 12, Who might have chosen
first? 13. Why did not Abram choose first? 14. Ought you to be in
haste to take the first choice? 15. What should you try to hinder? 16.
And if you keep yourself back, and don’t say “It’s mine,” and “TI must,”
shall you not be likely to keep from quarrels ?






















ABRAHAM OFFERING ISAAC.



Fourth Suday—~first m Lent.

ABRAHAM AND LOT.
FIRST READING.
“ Escape for thy life ; look not behind thee.”—Geneszs xix. 17.

HERE was a beautiful valley, with steep hills shutting it
in on all sides, and a clear swift river running through
the midst and spreading into a lake. There were fine fields
and rich grass, where sheep, cows, and goats could feed, and
the shepherds shelter themselves under the palm trees ; and
on the bank of the river were five cities, with strong walls










30 Fourth Sunday—Ffirst in Lent.

round them, and full of rich people, who bought and sold and
made merry with the good things they possessed. There was
one man living among them who was good, and was grieved
by the wicked ways of the men round him, who only laughed
at him if he tried to tell them of better things. One evening
two strangers came into the city where he lived, and he was
the only person who would take them in, and shelter them
from the wicked people in the street.

Those strangers told him the place was to be destroyed,
with all that were in it, because it was so wicked! Though
the fields looked so quiet, the walls so strong, and the sun
had gone down as usual, all would be ruined in a few hours’
time! Then the strangers took hold of him, and his wife
and daughters, and led them almost by force away from
their home in the dawn of morning, bidding them escape for
their lives to the mountain, and not look back. They were
frightened, and begged not to have to go so far as the wild
mountain. Might they not go to the little city near at hand?
And their wish was granted. Just as the sun had risen they
entered the little city for which they had begged ; and as soon
as they were safe the four towns, that had seemed so strong
and firm, were all burning with fire and brimstone; and all
the sinners who had mocked at warning were soon lying dead
under God’s awful anger! Four alone had been led out of the
city by the strangers, but even of these only three came into
the city of refuge. The wife did not heed the warning not to
linger nor look back, the deadly storm overtook her, and she
remained rooted to the spot—a pillar of salt!






Abraham and Lot. 31



The names of those cities were Sodom and Gomorrah, and
the one good man who was saved by the mercy of God was
named Lot. And now a strange gloomy lake called the
Dead Sea covers that valley with its heavy waters, and the
bare rocky hills, crusted with salt, show that the curse of God
is on the place.

Let us try to carry home one thought from this terrible his-
tory. This world will one day be burnt up like those cities,
and its looking safe and prosperous now does not make it safe.
But God sends messengers to lead us out of it. If we attend to
them, and follow their advice, we shall through all our lives be
getting out of danger, and going on toa safe home in heaven;
but if we care only for pleasant things here, it is like looking
back, and our souls will perish with what they love. That is
why our Saviour bade us “ Remember Lot’s wife.’ We should
remember her when we are tempted to think it hard to give
up anything pleasant, because we are told that it is wrong, and
may put us in danger of God’s anger.

QUESTIONS.

1, What was the name of the place I told you of to-day? 2. What was
the name of the man? 3. What kind of place was Sodom? 4. Who was
the only good man there? 5. Who came to Lot? 6. What did he do for
the strangers? 7. What did the strangers tell Lot? 8. Why was Lot to
come out of Sodom? 9. Why was Sodom to be destroyed? 10, Where
did Lot go? 11. Who looked back? 12. What became of her? 13. What
did God do to Sodom? 14. What sort of place is it now? 15. What will
be burnt up some day? 16. If we are not good, what will become of us?
17. But what have we to teach us to be good? 18. And how must we try
to come out, like Lot?






Bo Fourth Sunday—Ffirst in Lent.



SECOND READING.
“ Now I know that thou fearest God, seeing thou hast not withheld thy
son, thine only son from Me.”—Geves?s xxii. 12.
Y-AND-BY Abraham had a son—one only son, whose
name was Isaac. All the promises God had made were
to be for Isaac’s children after him: and Abraham loved God,
and hoped all the more.

But then God called Abraham to do a strange and terrible
thing. He was to go and take his dear son Isaac to the top
of a hill, and there to offer him up to God as if he had been a
calf or a lamb. Of course, in general, to do such a thing
would be shockingly wicked ; but Abraham knew that when
God commanded a thing, it must be right to do as he was
bidden, however dreadful it was to him.

So they set out together. Abraham took the knife, and a
vessel with fire in it? and Isaac carried the wood with which
the sacrifice was to be burnt. On the way Isaac said, “ My
father, behold the fire and the wood: but where is the lamb
for a burnt offering?” And Abraham answered, “My son,
God will provide Himself a lamb for a burnt offering.”

Isaac soon knew he was to be the lamb, for his father put
the wood in order, and bound his limbs, and took the knife.
And Isaac did not complain or struggle. He was ready, like
his father, to do the will of God. But just as Abraham had
the knife ready to slay his son, an angel called to him out of
Heaven: “Lay not thine hand upon the lad, neither do thou
anything unto him: for now I know that thou fearest God, see-
ing thou hast not withheld thy son, thine only son from Me.”




Abraham and Lot. 33



Then Abraham unbound his son, and was as glad as if
Isaac had really risen from the dead. And he saw a ram
caught in the thicket by its horns; so he took that, and of-
fered it up instead of Isaac. Thus God really provided a
lamb for a burnt offering.

And He blessed Abraham more and more, and promised
again that his children should have the land, and that in his
Seed should all the nations of the earth be blessed. That
Seed was our blessed LORD JESUS CHRIST, who, you know,
was reaily given by His Heavenly Father to die, and then came
back from the dead, that all people might be saved by Him.

QUESTIONS.

1. What was the name of Abraham’s son? 2. What had God promised
Abraham? 3. What had Abraham done at God’s command? 4. What
was he now to do? 5. Whom did he obey? 6. Where was he to go? 7.
Who went with him? 8. What did Isaac ask? 9. What did Abraham
answer? 10. Who seemed likely to be the lamb? 11. What was Abra-
ham just going to do? 12, Who called him? 13. What did the angel
tellhim? 14. Why was God pleased with him? 15. What blessing did
God give him? 16, Who was to be his Seed in whom all families should
be blessed ?

THIRD READING.
“JT am a stranger and a sojourner with you.”—Geweszs xxiii. 4.
BRAHAM and his wife Sarah had lived together many
years; but at last Sarah died, and Abraham wanted to
bury her. You know in all the country he had not one morsel
| of ground of his own; he was a stranger there, but he knew








34 Fourth Sunday—First in Lent.



it would all belong to his children by-and-by. But he wanted
to make sure of the one bit where his wife should lie. So he
went to the prince to whom Hebron belonged, and begged to
buy a field with trees in it, and a rock where there was a deep
cave that was called Machpelah. The prince said he would
give it; but Abraham could not feel sure that it would be
always safe till he had bought it. So he weighed out the price.
It was not in little bits of money like ours, but lumps of silver
all the same weight, and each with a mark stamped on it—
four hundred of them. Then the cave was given to Abraham,
and he had his good true wife Sarah buried there, rolled in
linen with spices. He was buried there afterwards himself,
and so was his son Isaac, and Isaac’s son after him, in the
cave of Machpelah.

That cave has been kept sacred ever since. There is a
building over it now, and no stranger is allowed to go into it ;
but deep down there is a golden grating, and far within lie
these holy men and women of old. Their bodies are waiting
to rise again at the Last Day, and then I hope we shall see
them and know them.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Abraham’s wife? 2. Where did Sarah die? 3. What did
Abraham want to do? 4. Had he any ground? 5. So what was he
obliged to do? 6. Of whom did he buy the place? 7. What was it called?
8. What is a cave? 9. What did he pay? 10, What was Abraham’s

money? 11. Who were buried there afterwards? 12. How is the place
marked now? 13. When will Sarah’s body leave the grave in the cave of
Machpelah? 14. What do you say you believe in? (In the eleventh
Article of the Creed.) 15. What is Resurrection ?






ISAAC BLESSING JACOB.



Fifth Sunday—Second m ent.

FACOB’S FOURNE Y.
FIRST READING.
“ Bless me, even me also, O my father.” —Geneszs xxvii. 34.

OD had called Abraham from his home, and promised to
give his children the land of Canaan, and that in his Seed
all the nations of the earth should be blessed. This was re-
newing to Abraham the great promise of the Seed of the
woman that had been made to Eve; and Abraham believed,
and was glad. But though his children were to have the land,


36 fifth Sunday—Second in Lent.



none of it was his; and he went up and down in it a stranger,
living in his tent, without house or home, only trusting in faith
to God’s promise to his children. His son Isaac lived like
him, with no home, but looking on in faith to what God pro-
mised, Isaac had two sons; and as Esau was the eldest, he
had the first right to these promises. But Esau did not care
enough about them; he did not seem to get anything by
them, and he liked what he could get at once better than
what was a long way off. He had no faith, One day he came
home half dead with hunger, and saw his brother Jacob mak-
ing soup over the fire. He said he would give all these rights
for a meal of the soup; for if he died of hunger, what good
would his birth-right do him? So for a mess of pottage he
sold his right to the land of Canaan, and to be the forefather
of our Saviour.

A time was to come when he would be sorry for what he
had done. His father was old and blind, and thought he was
going to die; so he bade Esau, whom he loved the best, bring
home some meat and make a solemn feast—which was the
way then of giving a blessing. _Esau went, and in time brought
home the meat to his father ; but when he came in, Isaac cried
out, and trembled! His brother Jacob had come in his stead,
and Isaac had taken him for Esau, and given to him the bles-
sing that gave the right to the promised land, and to all God’s
promises !

Then Esau cried out with an exceeding bitter cry, and
asked if his father had but one blessing! Isaac was grieved
for him, and blest him with all his heart; but there was no











Facol’s Fourney. a7





changing back, no taking away what Jacob had won and Esau
had lost.

Esau did not know what he was doing when he took the
pottage at once, rather than wait patiently for the glorious in-
heritance that was to come. This was the reason that he was
allowed to be so cruelly disappointed. This is a warning to
us. We have the inheritance of the kingdom of heaven pro-
mised to us; but we are tempted not to care about it when
we want something here in this world, whether play, or dress,
or anything that seems a great deal to us now. But if we
trifle away our right to these great promises that God made
us at our baptism, there will come a time of bitter grief, when
it is too late. And when we are dead, it will be too late to
change! Therefore, now while we are alive, we must have
faith, and show it by taking care that the things we like here
on earth do not make us lose the better things in heaven.

QUESTIONS.

r. What were the names of Isaac’s two sons? 2. What had God pro-
mised Isaac? 3. Which son had the first right to the promise? 4. But
which cared about it most? 5. What did Esau want? 6. So what did he
give up for the sake of the soup? 7. Could he get it back again? 8. What
are you an heir of? 9. How could we lose the inheritance of the king-
dom of heaven? 10. Shall we be able to change after we are dead? 11.
Then what must we care about most? 12. Why could not Esau get his
father’s blessing? 13. What did he like better than waiting for what he
could not see? 14. Can we see heaven? 15. But when we get there, will
it not be better than anything we can see here?




38 fifth Sunday—Second tn Lent.



SECOND READING.
“This is none other but the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven.”
—Genesis Xxvill. 17.
OU know that Isaac, Abraham’s son, had two sons, whose
names were Esau and Jacob. Now Jacob had grieved
Esau by gaining God’s great promise, for which Esau did not
care till he had lost it. And Esau was so angry with him,
that he had to go out away from his father’s home, all alone.
But Jacob knew he was not alone, for God was with him. He
went on till night came. Then he was in a dismal stony place,
with no house or shelter near—only big stones, and here and
there a thistle. He said his prayers, and then he lay down,
with a stone for his pillow and the sky over him. But in the
night he saw a wonder. There was a ladder reaching from
earth to heaven, and God’s angels were going up and down,
and the Lord Himself stood at the top of the ladder. And
He told Jacob that He was going to give his children all the
land he saw—North, South, East, and West; and that He

would take care of him, and be with him wherever he went, -

and in time bring him safe home.

Jacob woke, and found it was a dream, but he knew it was
true, and that God had really spoken to him; and though he
was glad he was afraid, and he said, “ How dreadful is this
place! this is none other but the house of God, and this is the
gate of heaven.” And that he might always know the place,
he put one of the great stones upright, and he took some of
the sweet olive oil he had brought to eat on his journey, and
poured it on the stone, as the only thing he could do to show






Facols Fourney. 39

honour to God. Then he made a solemn holy vow, that if
God would take care of him on his way, and give him food to
eat and clothes to wear, he would make a gift to God all his
life of the tenth part of all he had. Good people like to do
like Jacob, and give God their tenth. And if we only had our
eyes opened to see, like his, we should see God’s angels com-
ing up and down with blessings for us, for we go to the house
of God and gate of heaven whenever we go to church. Let
us recollect how awful Jacob felt it to be so near to God.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Jacob? 2. Who was Isaac? 3. Who was Esau? 4. Why
-was Jacob obliged to go away? 5. What was the promise? 6. What kind
of place had he to sleepin? 7. What was his pillow? 8. But what did
he see? 9. Who went up and down? 10, Who stood at the top? 11.
What did God promise him? 12. What did Jacob say of the place? 13.
How did he mark it? 14. What did he pour on the stone? 15. What
vow did he make? 16. What are our houses of God? 17. Who come up
and down tous? 18, What do the angels bring us? 19. How much did
Jacob promise to give to God? 20, What does God do for us?

THIRD READING.

“ As a prince hast thou prevailed.”—Geneszs xxxii. 28.

T was a long journey that Jacob had had to take, but God
took care of him, and brought him safe to the home where
his mother had come from. He lived there, and took care of
his uncle’s sheep and cattle, till he had earned a great many
for his own; and he had married there, and had a great many






40 fifth Sunday—Second in Lent.



sons. But after a time God commanded him to go home to
the land of Canaan. He was afraid, because he thought his
brother Esau might still be angry with him; but, in spite of
his fear, he did as God bade him. When he came near the
river Jordan, which flows on the East side. of the land of
Canaan, he prayed to God to guard him, and once more God
_let him see the angels who were going with him to protect
him. He was glad, but he was still very careful. He chose
out a present of cows, and goats, and camels, and sheep, and
asses, for Esau, and sent it on to meet him; and then he sent
on the other cattle he wanted to keep for himself; then his
children ; and last of all, in the safest place, his dear young
son Joseph.

Esau came to meet him, but not in anger. The two bro-
thers met, and fell on one another’s neck and kissed one
another, and were friends. So God had kept His promise to
take care of Jacob; and Jacob kept his promise, for he set up
an altar at Bethel, where he had seen the angels before, and
praised and blessed God.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Jacob? 2. Why had he left home? 3. With whom did he
go to live? 4. What did he earn there? 5. Why did he go back? 6.
Why was he afraid? 7. But what comforted him? 8. Of whom do God’s
angels take care? 9. What did he give Esau? 10. How did he put his
family in order? 11. Who went last? 12, How did Esau meet him? 13.
What was the quarrel between them? 14. But was Esau angry? 15.
How did Jacob show he was thankful ?




















JOSEPH'S COAT SHOWN TO JACOB.



Sisth Sanday.—Ohird in Tent.



FOSEPH IN EGYPT.
FIRST READING.
“ His brethren envied him.”—Geveszs xxxvii. I1.

TOLD you how Jacob went away from home, and how
God promised to take care of him. He did take care of
him: He led him to his uncle, and with him Jacob lived many
years, and then came back with flocks of sheep and goats,
camels and cows. And he had twelve sons. The best of all
his sons was named Joseph. Jacob loved him very much, and








42 Sixth Sunday— Third in Lent.

gave him a striped dress of many colours, such as the son
wears in those countries who is to be the heir. But his bro-
thers hated and envied him, and could not speak peaceably to
him. One day, when Joseph was seventeen years old, ten of
the brothers were out with their sheep, and Jacob desired
Joseph to go and see what they were about. He would not
tell his father how unkind they were to him, but he went ; and
as they saw him coming some of them were so wicked as to
say that they would kill him, and never let him go home.
Reuben, who was the eldest brother, tried to hinder them; but
when he saw he could not stop them, he said the best way
would be, not to kill him, but to let him down into a dry well
just by. There they meant to let him starve to death; and
they let him down without any pity for him. Reuben meant
to come by-and-by and take Joseph out of the pit and save
him; but there was another brother, named Judah, who did
not want to have him killed, and who saw a great party of
men, with camels and asses laden with goods, going on a jour-
ney. He knew they were merchants, going to sell and buy in
Egypt, and he advised the other brothers to persuade them to
buy Joseph: for in those days men and women used to be
bought and sold, and were called slaves. So Joseph was
drawn up out of the pit; and when the merchants saw what
a fine young man he was, they paid the price for him and
carried him off, away from his father and all he had ever
known or cared for before. The cruel brothers kept his
coloured dress; and they killed a kid and stained it in the
blood, and then carried it to their father, telling him they had




Foseph in Egypt. 43



found it. Jacob thought some wild beast had met Joseph and
killed him, and eaten him, and he mourned and wept. His
sons pretended to comfort him; but not one of them would
tell him that Joseph was not dead.

QUESTIONS.

1. Whose son was Jacob? 2. How many sons haa Jacob? 3. What
did he set them to do? 4. Which did he love best? 5. What did he give
Joseph? 6. Where did he send Joseph? 7. What did the brothers want
todo? 8. Who wished to save him? 9. So what did Reuben persuade
them todo? 10. What did Reuben mean to do? 11. But who came by?
12. What did the brothers do with Joseph? 13. Who persuaded them to
sell him? 14. What are people called who are bought and sold? 15.
What was done with his coat? 16. What did Jacob think?

SECOND READING.
“The Lord made all he did to prosper in his hand.”—Geveszs xxxix. 3.

O we see Joseph a slave. A slave is a servant who belongs
to his master, as his cows and horses do; he gets no
wages, and cannot go away, but is bought and sold like cattle.
Think of poor Joseph. He was used to live as the son of a
great rich prince, wearing a dress of many bright colours, with
many servants, and no one to obey but his kind fond father ;
and living in a beautiful land, all hill and valley, where he
used to feed his father’s flocks. But now he was a slave ina
strange land, with people speaking a language he did not
know, and no one to care for him or say a good word to him,
shut up in a house in a town, far away from his dear hills.
Still he had one comfort, and the best of all—God was with




44 Sixth Sunday—Third en Lent.

him. He could still pray to God, and do his duty. And he
did his work well, for God helped him, and everything he did
was made to prosper in his hand. Then he was trusted. His
master knew that he always took care of everything, as if it
was his own, and left all to him, quite sure that it would be
safe. But his wicked mistress made up a story that he had
behaved ill, and he was put in prison for what he had not
done. This sounds hard, but it was God’s own way of bring-
ing good to pass, and making Joseph come at last to honour.
Very soon he was loved and trusted in his prison; and all he
did the Lord made it to prosper.

Think about this. Try when you have anything to do—a
lesson or a bit of work—to ask God to make it prosper. Then
if you try your best He will help, and it will be sure to turn
out well.

Then try to deserve to be trusted. That is a great thing.
If you always recollect that God sees you, you will do the
same when no one is with you as if all the world were watch-
ing; and that is the way to be true and just in all your deal-
ings. If you are only good when you are looked at, you are
not like Joseph, but are only doing service outwardly. You
must try to live that your parents may

“Out of sight
Know all is right,
One law for darkness and for light.”

QUESTIONS.

x. Whose son was Joseph? 2. How many brothers had Joseph? 3.
What had they done to him? 4, Why had Joseph’s brothers sold him?


Joseph in Egypt. 45



5. What is a slave? 6. How did Joseph behave as a slave? 7. Who
comforted him? 8. How did he take care of his master’s things? 9.
Who made up a story against him? so. What was done to him? 11. But
who was with him still? 12. Did he always stay in prison? 13. And
what did people think of him, wherever he was? 14. What is the way to
be like Joseph? 15. If you are trusted to carry a message, how should
you do it? 16. Who always sees you? 17. Then, even if no one is by, |
how should you behave ?
|

THIRD READING.
“To not interpretations belong to God ?”—Gez. xl. 8.

HE young son of Jacob, Joseph, had, you know, been sold

by his cruel brothers, and made a slave of; and then a
wicked falsehood was told about him, and he was put into
prison. But wherever Joseph was he tried to do his duty, and
so God blessed him ; and the keeper of the prison soon found
out how different he was from the others, and let him help.
I suppose he helped to carry them their food and wait upon
them ; and he often could say a few kind good words to them.
One day two grand people came in as prisoners. One was
the chief of all the bakers, who made bread for king Pharaoh ;
and the other was the chief of all his cup-bearers, who carried
him his wine. Some wrong thing had happened, and they
were both suspected of having had something to do with it, so
they had been sent to prison. One morning Joseph saw them
both looking more sad than usual; and when he asked what
was the matter, they said each had a dream, and they wanted
to know what it meant; for the Egyptians used to think a




46 Sixth Sunday— Third in Lent.

great deal of dreams, and there were men among them who
pretended to explain them. Most dreams have no meaning,
but these had, and God put it into Joseph’s heart to under-
stand them. The cup-bearer had dreamt that he saw a vine,
and that it had three bunches of grapes, and that he was
squeezing the juice into the king’s cup as he used to do.
Joseph said this meant that in three days the cup-bearer
should really hand Pharaoh the cup again; and Joseph beg-
ged that when he was free, he would tell the king about him-
self, and get him set free. Then the baker told his dream—
that he had three baskets full of pastry and bread ready for
Pharaoh, but that the birds came down and ate them up.
Joseph was obliged to tell him that this meant that he would
be hanged, and that the vultures and ravens would eat his
flesh. So it happened. Pharaoh looked into the matter in
three days’ time; he caused the baker to be hung, and the
cup-bearer to come back to his old place. But the cup-bearer
was ungrateful, and forgot all about Joseph in his prison,
trusting to him.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Joseph? 2. Where was he? 3. How came he to be in
Egypt? 4. Where had he been put? 5. Had he done anything wrong?
6. Who trusted him? 7. What had he to do? 8. Who came into the
prison? 9. What was the cup-bearer’s dream? 10. What was the baker’s
dream? 11. What did Joseph say the cup-bearer’s dream meant? 12.
What did the baker’s dream mean? 13. What happened? 14. What
had Joseph asked of the cup-bearer? 15. Did he remember?




















ais:

“INNS

Sy re pire % f x

eros a





o_o SOS

q re
ty vr



wi

JOSEPH EMBRACING HIS FATHER.



Sebenth Sumday— Fourth m Lent.

FOSEPH’S BROTHERS.
FIRST READING.

“‘ We are verily guilty concerning our brother.”—Genesés xlii. 21.

oH did not always stay in prison, for God gave him
wisdom to tell the king of Egypt that his dreams had
meant that there were going to be first seven years of very
fine harvests, and then seven years would come of no harvests
at all. So the king took him out of prison, and made him a
great lord ; and he set to work to buy the corn that was over






48 Seventh Sunday—Fourth in Lent.



and above what people wanted to eat in the years of plenty,
that he might store it up against the years when the corn
would not grow.

So when the bad harvest began, Joseph had plenty of corn,
and he sold it for the king to all who wanted it. The famine
was not only in Egypt, but in all the countries round; and
by-and-by Joseph saw, among the people that came to buy,
ten of his own brothers—the same who had sold him for a
slave. He knew them, for they still looked like shepherds ;
but they did not know him, for he had grown from a youth to
a man, and was dressed like an Egyptian lord; and he would
not seem to know them, though he wanted much to know
what had become of his old father and his little brother Ben-
jamin. He made as if he thought they were enemies, come to
see if Egypt could be conquered when it was so bare of food.

Then they told him who they were ; that they were all one
man’s sons, and that one brother they had lost; the other
was left with his father, who could not bear to part with him.
Joseph would not seem to believe this, and said he must keep
one of them in prison, while he sent the rest back to fetch
their youngest brother, or else he could not believe them.
Then, when fear and trouble came on them, they began to
think how ill they had used their lost brother Joseph; and
they said to each other, “ We are verily guilty concerning our
brother.” Joseph heard them, and could hardly bear it; but
still he kept to his plan. He kept Simeon a prisoner, that he
might be sure of the others coming back, and sent them home
to fetch Benjamin. But he would not have any of the money

&




Foseph’s Brothers. 49



they had brought for the corn, and made his steward put it
all back into the mouth of their sacks,

When they found this out as they went home, they were
much afraid; and when they came home, their father was
more afraid still. After the way they had used Joseph, he
thought they had killed Simeon, and wanted to kill Benjamin.
They spoke truth now, but he could not believe them ; and he
said he could not send Benjamin, for if mischief should befall
the lad, “then shall ye bring down my gray hairs with sorrow

to the grave.”
QUESTIONS.

1. Where was Joseph? 2. Why was he in prison? 3. What did God
make him able to tell the king? 4. How many years was there to be
much corn? 5. What was to be done with the corn? 6. Who managed
the buying it? 7. When was the corn wanted? 8. Who came to buy
corn? 9, Who did not come? 10, Why did not Joseph’s brothers know
him? 11. What did he make believe to think? 12. Whom did he tell
them to fetch? 13. What did he give back to them? 14. What did their
father say about Benjamin’s going? 15. Why was he afraid to trust them
with Benjamin? 16, What is the way to be believed ?

SECOND READING.
“God Almighty give you mercy before the man.”—Genests xliii. 14.
ghty give y y 4

OSEPH’S brothers were soon obliged to go again and buy
more corn in Egypt. Joseph had said they must bring the
young brother they had told him of, or he should not believe
their story; and when they said Benjamin must go, their father
Jacob was greatly grieved, and showed how little he could
trust them now, after the way they had behaved to Joseph.




50 Seventh Sunday—Fourth in Lent.

He would not have let Benjamin go at all if Judah had not
promised to take the greatest care of him; and Judah could
be trusted.

The story is so beautiful, and so easy to understand in the
Bible, that I hardly like to tell it in my own words. Only
think of Joseph’s heart being so full when he saw his own
dear youngest brother, that he could not stay with him for
his tears, and went away to weep in his chamber! And yet
he still tried the brothers. He wanted to see if they still were
envious of the one their father loved best; so he made his
steward hide his cup in Benjamin’s sack of corn, and then go
after them, and pretend to think they had stolen it.

The sons of Jacob were no thieves, and they said the
steward might search their sacks. They took them down
and looked, and there was the cup in Benjamin’s sack!

They were all shocked; and the steward said that Benjamin
must go back and be punished.

How pleased they would have been long ago if such a mis-
fortune had happened to Joseph! But now their hearts were
changed, and they were shocked and grieved.

QUESTIONS.

1. What had Joseph’s brothers done to him? 2. What trouble did you
hear last Sunday he was in? 3. But how did he behave? 4. And what
had he come to be? 5. What had he stored up? 6. Who came to buy
corn? 7. How many brothers came? 8. Which did not come? 9. Why
did not Benjamin come? to. Did the brothers know Joseph? 11. What
did he tell them to do? 12. When he saw Benjamin, where did he go?

13. What did Joseph tell his steward to do? 14. What did Joseph want
to see? 15. How did the brothers behave this time?




Foseph’s Brothers.



THIRD READING.
“God did send me before you to preserve life.” Genesis xlv. 5.

LL the eleven sons of Jacob turned back in grief, and
fear, and dismay, when Benjamin, the youngest brother,
whom Judah had promised to bring safely back to their
father, was found to have the silver cup of the lord of the
land in his sack. How it came there they could not guess,
but they knew that their father’s heart would break if they
came home and left Benjamin to be a slave.

So they all came to the lord of the land; and Judah
stood up before the strange, stern, princely man, and told
him how much their old father loved this youngest son, and
he would be sure to die if the lad did not come home safe.
And then Judah begged to stay and be a slave in Egypt,
instead of his brother Benjamin, for he said if mischief
befel the lad his father would die, and that he could not
bear to see.

But when Judah so spake, the lord of the land sent all the
lookers-on away, and wept aloud, and said that he was their
own brother Joseph, whom they had sold so long ago. He
would not let them be afraid ; he embraced them all and wept
for joy, and asked for his father. Then he told them not to
grieve for what had gone before; for God had turned it all to
good, and made him be the means of saving all their lives, by
storing up the corn in Egypt.

And now they were to go home, and tell Jacob, their father,
that Joseph was still alive, and was a great and powerful man ;
and they were to fetch old Jacob, their father, and their wives




52 Seventh Sunday—Fourth in Lent.



and their children, and all they had, and come to live with
Joseph in Egypt, where he would take care of them.

That was the way Joseph forgot all the ill his brothers
had done to him, and forgave them, and loved them with
all his heart. When the brothers came home, their father
Jacob could scarcely believe such good news; but at last
he said, “Joseph my son is yet alive, I will go to see him
before I die.”

And he came down to Egypt, and Joseph met him and fell
on his neck and kissed him; and then there was joy indeed,
joy as if Joseph had come back from the dead.

So Jacob lived all the rest of his life in Egypt, and was
happy with his son Joseph. God had given him another
name, Israel, and his sons, and their sons after them, were
always called the children of Israel.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Benjamin? 2. What was found in Benjamin’s sack? 3.
Who put it there? 4. What was going to be done to Benjamin? 5.
Who spoke for him? 6. What did Judah ask? 7. Who did the lord of
the land turn out to be? 8. How came Joseph to be in Egypt? 9. Why
had his brothers not known him sooner? 10. How did he treat them?
11. Whom did he send for? 12. What did Jacob say? 13. Where did
Jacob go to live? 14. Why was it very kind in Joseph to help his bro-
thers? 15. Did he give back to them the harm they had done to him?
16. How could we do like Joseph?










THE BURNING BUSH.



Gighth Sud —filth m ent.

THE CALL OF MOSES,
FIRST READING.
“T have surely seen the affliction of My people.”—Z-xodus iii. 7.

OU heard how Joseph brought his father and brothers and
their children to live in Egypt. Their children’s children
went on living there for many years, till they had come to be
a great people, and were called the children of Israel; but
then the King of Egypt grew cruel to them. He made them
work very hard to make bricks and build towns for him ; and


54 Liighth Sunday—Fifth in Lent.



what was still worse, he ordered that whenever a little boy
was born to the children of Israel, he should be thrown into
the river and drowned.

One mother hid her little baby for three months, and when
she could not hide him any longer, she put him into a little
cradle of bulrushes covered over with pitch, to keep the water
out, and let the cradle float on the river, leaving the little
boy’s sister to watch him. Presently a lady, no other than
the daughter of the cruel king, came down to bathe in the
river. She saw the little cradle, and had it brought to her.
The little baby was crying, and the lady pitied him and took
him home, to bring up for her own child. She wanted a nurse
for him, and his sister fetched his own mother, and she be-
came his nurse.

His name was Moses, and we hear about him in the Lesson
to-day. He was not living with the king’s daughter now.
The king had grown angry with him because he cared for his
own people, and he had had to flee away and keep sheep in
the wilderness.

And there he saw a great wonder. He saw a flame of fire
in a bush, and yet the bush was not burnt. And God’s voice
spoke to him out of the fire that did not burn, and told him
that the troubles of His people, the children of Israel, were
to come to an end. God would save them from the cruel
Egyptians ; and Moses himself was to go and lead them out,
and bring them to the good land that God had promised that
Abraham’s children should have for their own. Moses was to
go and tell the King of Egypt that it was God’s will that they




The Call of Moses. 55



should go. Moses was afraid at first, but God promised to
help him: and next Sunday you will hear what happened.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Moses? 2. Where was he put when he was a baby? 3.
Why was he put on the river? 4. Who had said the little boys were to
be drowned? 5. Whose babies were they that were to be drowned? 6.
What other cruel things did the King of Egypt do to the children of
Israel? 7. Who were called the children of Israel? 8. What became of
Moses in his bulrush cradle? 9. Who brought him up? 10. Did he stay
with the king’s daughter? 11. Whom did he care for? 12. What wonder
did Moses see? 13. Who spoke to him? 14. What was God going to
do for His people? 15. What land would He give them? 16. Who had
the first promise that his children should have the good land ?

SECOND READING.
“ And Pharaoh said, Who is the Lord ?”—E-xodus v. 2.

OSES and his brother Aaron went and told Pharaoh

God’s message, that the people of Israel were to go away
and worship Him. But Pharaoh said, “ Who is the Lord, that
I should obey His voice to let Israel go? I know not the
Lord, neither will I let Israel go.” And he was more cruel to
the children of Israel; he made them work harder and harder,
and had them beaten if they did not do all the work that was
set them. They had to make bricks of clay mixed with straw;
and, to punish them, Pharaoh said that they should have no
straw given to them for their work, but that they must find it
for themselves; and yet he required of them just as many
bricks as they had had to make before. Then they cried out










56 Exghth Sunday—Ffifth in Lent.





and were angry, and fancied Moses had brought all this trou-
ble on them, by asking for them to go. They were very mis-
erable, and said they wished they had never listened to Moses,
for he had only made them worse off instead of better.

Aaron was a better speaker than Moses, and God had said
he should help him, and that, when God told Moses anything,
Aaron should speak it to the people. So the two brothers stood
telling the Israelites to bear it a little longer, and then it would
be all well and over, and they would get away from making
the bricks in Egypt to the beautiful country. They could not
remember it themselves, but some of their fathers’ grand-
fathers had been little boys when they came, and could tell
them that it was a country not all flat, with only one river in
it, like Egypt, but full of steep hills and green valleys, with
bright streams running along in them, and thick woods on
some of the slopes, and others laid out in gardens and vine-
yards. There were so many cows in the pastures, and in the
wild rocks and hollow trees so many bees’ nests, that it was
called a land flowing with milk and honey.

Should not the Israelites have liked to hear of such a place
as this? But no, they were too dull to care. They thought
more of whether they should get a leek or a melon to eat at
supper, than of all the lovely land far away. Do you know,
people are very like that when they care for zow more than
for dy-ana-by. If we want just what pleases us to-day, instead
of caring for what will be good for us as we grow older, we
are just like the Israelites, who would not attend to Moses or
to God.




The Call of Moses. 57



QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Pharaoh? 2. Who were the children of Israel? 3. Who
had been sent to call them? 4. What did Pharaoh say to Moses? 5.
How did he use the Israelites? 6. What would he not give them? 7.
Who was Moses’ brother? 8. What was Aaron to do for Moses? 9.
Who spoke to Moses? 10. Who told the people what God said to Moses?
11. What kind of place did God promise? 12. What did Moses say it
flowed with? 13. Why? 14. Did the Israelites care? 15. Why not? 16.
When are we like them? 17. Which should we care for most, zow or
by-ana-by ?



THIRD READING.
“T will redeem you with a stretched out arm.”—Zxodus vi. 6.

eae Israelites were very unhappy, for Pharaoh was very
cruel to them, and they thought it all Moses’ fault. But
Moses told them that they would be saved, and that God was
going to show them His power, so that they might always re-
member what He had done for them, and how He punished
Pharaoh, who would not obey Him.

Then God made His power to be known; so that Pharaoh
and the children of Israel might both learn who is the great
Lord of heaven and earth, who must be obeyed. First, Moses
stretched out his rod, and all the water in the river turned
into blood. For seven days it was all one red dreadful stream
of blood ; and when Moses held out his rod again it turned
back into pure water. But Pharaoh did not mind, and would
not let the people go. Then God sent a multitude of frogs,
that came into all the houses and bed-rooms, and on the










58 Eighth Sunday—Fifth in Lent.

tables and everywhere. Pharaoh could not bear to have these
creatures everywhere, and said if the frogs would but go away
he would let the children of Israel go. Moses prayed to God,
and all the frogs died; but Pharaoh only hardened his heart
again, and would not let the people go. Next, God sent lice,
disgusting unclean creatures, most horrible to the Egyptians,
who could not bear anything dirty; but Pharaoh did not care.
Then came swarms of flies, buzzing, stinging, and tormenting ;
and Pharaoh said he would allow the Israelites to go, so the
flies were taken away ; but no sooner were they gone than he
went back again to his obstinacy, and would not let the peo-
ple go. He was trying to fight against God, and so came
these terrible miseries on him. If people will not do better
after being punished, worse and worse is sure to come on them.

QUESTIONS.

1. How did God punish Pharaoh? 2. What four plagues have I told
you of to-day? 3. Why did these dreadful things happen? 4. Did
Pharaoh care for them? 5. Why did he not mind them? 6, What hap-
pens to those who do not mind being punished ?






















DEATH OF THE FIRST-BORN.



Hint} Sunday—Paln Sunday.

LHE PLAGOULS {OR E.G MCE TL.
FIRST READING.

“There is none like Me in all the earth.”"—Z-vodus ix. 14.

OU remember that when God spoke to Moses out of the
burning bush, it was to tell him that he should lead the
children of Israel away from the people in Egypt, who were
so unkind to them.
But Pharaoh, the King of Egypt, said that they should not
go; he could not spare them, and he did not care for God’s




60 Ninth Sunday—Palm Sunday.



message to him. Then God punished Pharaoh that he might
let them go. Ten times God punished him, and you hear
about three of the punishments to-day. First, how the sheep
and cows, that the Egyptians worshipped like gods, fell sick
and died, but still Pharaoh did not care; then how the people
all had sores and boils that made them very ill, but still
Pharaoh did not care; and then how there was a terrible
storm, thunder and lightning, and rain and hail—such big
hailstones as killed the men and cattle that were out in the
fields, and lightning that struck them, and wind that broke
every tree in the field. No wonder that Pharaoh was fright-
ened, and begged that the storm might cease, and said that
then he would let the Israelites go. So Moses prayed to God,
and the thunder left off, there was no more hail, and it was
all still again. But when the thunder was over Pharaoh grew
wicked again, and left off caring, and said the Israelites should
not go. And thus God went on being angry with him, till at
last he came to a terrible end.

I am afraid some children are a little like Pharaoh when
they get sulky, and say “I won't,” and if they are punished,
still they won’t—they think nobody shall force them, and they
make themselves hard that they may not do what they are
told. It is very sad, for this hardness is very wrong, and you
see how angry God was with this king for being obstinate.
Pray to God to help you not to harden your heart, but to
teach you to obey. And do not forget and do the same thing
again when the punishment is over, or it will have done you
no good, and you will have to be punished worse next time.


The Plagues of Egypt. 61



QUESTIONS.

1. What did God desire Pharaoh to do? 2. Who spoke God’s words
to Pharaoh? 3. But what did Pharaoh say? 4. Who was Pharaoh? 5.
Who was Moses? 6. What was done to Pharaoh? 7. Did he mind? 8.
Tell me the three plagues we hear of to-day. 9. How many plagues were
there in all? 10. What happened in the thunder-storm? 11. What did
Pharaoh say when he was frightened? 12. So what left off? 13. But did
he let the people go? 14. What fault in some children is the same as
Pharaoh’s? 15. What ought they to do? 16, Who can help them to
fight with their obstinate temper? 17. But how must they get God’s help?

SECOND READING.

“The Lord hardened Pharaoh’s heart, so that he would not let the children
of Israel go.” Exodus x. 20.

oe troubles are sure to come when people have not
taken warning by what was sent them before. Pharaoh
had not minded seven dreadful plagues, so now God sent
another. He sent locusts. These were creatures like great
grasshoppers. They came in swarms and clouds, and ate up
every green leaf and blade of grass, and made all the earth
brown and the trees dry sticks, so that there was nothing left
for man or beast to eat. Then Pharaoh gave way a little, and
said he would let the men go, but that their wives and child-
ren must stay; and he would not hear a word more, but had
Moses and Aaron driven out from before him.
Then God bade Moses to hold up his hand to Heaven.
And darkness came on. It was dark all day—and with






62 Ninth Sunday—Palm Sunday.

“darkness that might be felt ;” not like night, but such black
darkness that no fire or candle could give light, and no one
dared to move about; but the Egyptians lay still in their
places, full of horror and terror, for three whole days. But
all the time it was light among the Israelites—the sun rose
and set as usual; and thus God showed that they were His
people.

Then Pharaoh said that he would let them go—men, women,
and children, only he must keep all their cattle; and when
Moses, speaking God’s words, said that the cattle must go too,
and not a hoof be left behind, Pharaoh made his heart hard
again, and drove out Moses, saying the people should not go,
and that Moses should never see his face again.

And Moses said, “Thou hast spoken well, I will see thy
face again no more.”

So ended the last hope for Pharaoh. He was never to have
another chance of bending his will and doing as God told
him. Oh, let us take care not to be like him!

QUESTIONS.

1. How many plagues of Egypt were there? 2. Tell me which had hap-
pened. 3. What are the two plagues in this lesson? 4, What are locusts?
5. What harm do locusts do? 6. Who did Pharaoh say might go? 7.
Whom would he not let go? 8. What plague came then? 9. What made
the darkness so horrible? 10. How long did it last? 411. Who were not
in the dark? 12. What did Pharaoh say then? 13. What did he want
to keep back? 14. And how did he then change? 15. What did he say
to Moses? 16. How did Moses answer?






The Plagues of Egypt. 63



THIRD READING.
“He smote all the first-born in Egypt.”—Psadm Ixxviii. 51.

FTER the nine sad plagues that had come upon the

Egyptians—the blood for water, the frogs, the lice, the
flies, the cattle plague, the boils, the hail, the locusts, the
darkness—there was to be still one plague more, the last and
worst. That would make the Egyptians let the people of
Israel go, so they must be ready.

There should be a terrible night. God’s holy angel would
pass over the whole land of Egypt that night, and in each
house of the Egyptians he would slay the eldest son of the
family. No one would be spared: Pharaoh’s eldest son, the
young prince, and the very poorest person’s son. They had
killed the little Israelite babies, so God would punish them by
killing their children. None of the Israelites should lose their
children; only there was one thing for them to do. They
were that night to sup on a lamb, and, with some of the blood
of the lamb, they were to make a mark on the door-post.
Where that mark was the angel would pass over and do no
one any hurt; but the people would be blest and set free, be-
cause they believed God, and did as He bade them.

QUESTIONS.

1. How many plagues of Egypt were there? 2. Say them over. 3.
What were they all for? 4. Who would not let them go? 5. What was
the last plague? 6. Who were to die? 7. Why did the Egyptians deserve
to lose their children? 8. Who would slay them? 9. Whom would the
angel spare? 10, How were the Israelites to mark their houses? 11.
With what blood? 12. What were they to do with the lamb?












EATING THE PASSOVER.



Centh Sundw—Easter Day.

THE PASSOVER.
FIRST READING.

“There was not a house in which there was not one dead.”—E-xvodus xii. 30.

HIS is our own gladdest Sunday in all the year, and we

read of the Israelites being glad too—glad upon the very
Sunday that answered to this, thousands of years ago. On
this Sunday, of all those thousands of years, there has been
joy and gladness and thanking God. And why? It was be-
cause all the troubles in Egypt were over, and God brought
the Israelites out safe. There was one thing they had to do
The Passover. 65



first, though; Moses bade them do it, as God commanded
him. Every family was to take a lamb, and it was to be killed
and roasted whole in the evening, and some of its blood was
to be marked upon the door-post of the house, and then all
the family were to stand round the table, all ready dressed for
a journey, and eat it as fast as they could, late at night.

And while all the families, fathers and mothers and child-
ren, stood up eating the lamb in this strange way, there came
a great shout and cry. God had sent His angel to punish the
cruel Egyptians; and every house where there was no mark
of blood on the door-post had some one dead in it, and that
dead person was the eldest or first-born son. There was a
great cry, for there was death everywhere, from the son of
Pharaoh who sat on his throne down to the child of the
poorest slave; and even the first-born of cattle died too, be-
cause the Egyptians used to worship them; but wherever there
was the blood on the door-post the angel passed over, and the
eldest son was safe. Then cruel King Pharaoh was sorry
and afraid at last, and said that the people who brought such
trouble on him should go where they liked.

QUESTIONS.

1. Why are we glad to-day? 2. Why were the Israelites glad to-day?
3. Where were the Israelites living? 4. What hard work had they to do?
5. Who said they should come out? 6. Who would not let them go? 7.
What did God tell the Israelites to eat? 8. How were they to be dressed
while they ate it? 9. What were they to do with the blood? 10. Who
was going to pass over the land that night? 11. What did the angel do
where he did not see any blood on the door-post? 12. Who were fright-
ened then? 13. What did the Egyptians wish then?




66 Tenth Sunday—Easter Day.



SECOND READING.
“Tt is the sacrifice of the Lord’s passover.”—E-roduts xii. 27.

HEN the King of Egypt said the Israelites might go

they were all up and dressed, quite ready and only wait-
ing, and off they set. No more making of bricks, no more
slaving for the Egyptians, no more drowning of babies! They
were free! and God was going to lead them to the beautiful
country that long ago He had said He would give them.

And so, to put them in mind how they were saved from the
Egyptians, God bade them on the same day in each year to
kill a lamb and roast it, and put the blood on the door-post,
and eat the lamb all standing round the table, dressed as if
they were going for a journey, that they might never forget
how God had made them free. This was called the Passover,
because the angel passed over the houses where the blood was
marked over the door. And God came in a pillar of cloud to
show them the way they should go.

Our blessed Lord was crucified when He had come to the
Feast of the Passover many years after. You know He was
like a lamb, He was so pure and gentle; and His Blood saves
us, as that lamb’s blood did the Israelites, and sets us free
from the power of the devil. So we still keep the feast of
being set free, on this happy Easter Sunday, when we recol-
lect that Christ was slain for our sins, but that He rose again
from the dead, and liveth for evermore.



QUESTIONS.
1. What did Pharaoh say that the Israelites might do? 2. What made
him let them go at last? 3. Who were set free? 4. What were the




The Passover. 67



Israelites to do every year? 5. What was this eating the lamb called?
6. Why was it called the Passover? 7. Why were the Israelites glad?
8. Who set us free? 9. What did our Lord do as on this day? 1o. In
what is He like a lamb? 11. So what did we say in the Easter Anthem
to-day? 12. How did God lead them?

THIRD READING.

“The children of Israel shall go on dry ground through. the midst of the
sea.”— Exodus xiv. 16.
LL the Egyptians were weeping over their dead first-born
sons, and the Israelites were set free, and going gladly
out and away from their hard masters.

But Pharaoh’s hard heart turned again, and he got all his
chariots and horsemen together, and went after the children
of Israel to drive them back to Egypt. And when he came
in sight of them, there they were all upon the shore of the
sea called the Red Sea. They could not go on, for the sea
was straight before them; they could not go back, for the
Egyptians were behind. They were sore afraid. But God
spoke to Moses, and told him not to fear. They had only to
stand still and see how God would save them.

And God Himself showed that He was with them, for the
pillar of cloud went behind them, instead of before, and made
it dark to the Egyptians, but gave light by night to the
Israelites: so the Egyptians could not get near them all
night.

Then God bade Moses stretch out his rod over the sea.
And then there was a great wonder. The waves of the sea




68 Tenth Sunday—Easter Day.

parted, and stood up on each side in a heap, and in between
there was a wide open space, where the children of Israel
might walk safely dry-shod, through the very midst of the
sea. Through it they went, men, women, and children,
through the depths of the sea, with the waves standing still
on each side of them.

Pharaoh saw that they were all gone over. He chose to
follow after them. But when his host was full in the midst,
the sea returned to its strength again and came down on the
Egyptians, and every one of them was drowned—“ they sank
like lead in the mighty waters”—-and the Israelites were freed
from their enemies, quite away from all their trouble and all
their slavery ; and they sang hymns of joy to God, who had
set them free.

And we read about their being set free, because this is the
great Easter Day when we give thanks to our Blessed Lord
for having set us free.

QUESTIONS.

1. What last plague had come on Egypt? 2. Who had set off to leave
Egypt? 3. But what did Pharaoh do? 4. What was before the Israelites?
5. What was behind? 6. Where did the pillar of cloud go? 7. How
were the Egyptians cut off from them? 8. What wonder did God work?
g. Where did the Israelites go over? 10. Who came after them? 11.
What became of the Egyptians? 12. Who were free? 13. Who had
made them free?




(hi i

ni





AARON'S ROD,



Elebenth Sunday —First wfter Caster.

THE GAINSAYING OF KORAH.
FIRST READING.
“The Lord will show who are His, and who is holy.”—Nusmbers xvi. 5.

HERE is a sad history in the Lesson to-day. When the
Israelites came out of Egypt they had a long journey to

go, through a dreary, lonely wilderness. Moses and his bro-
ther Aaron led them; and God took care of them, and fed
them, and kept them safe. But there were some wicked men,
named Dathan and Abiram, who were tired of the wilderness,




70 Eleventh Sunday—first after Easter.



and were angry at having Moses for their leader and master,
though God had made him lead them, and had done so much
for them. They said they were as good as Moses, and that
he should not be their prince. They did not care for God
having spoken by him.

Their end was so very dreadful that I can hardly tell it to
you. God would not let them rise up against His servant
Moses ; and when they would not listen nor repent He made
the earth open under their feet, and they went down alive,
and were swallowed up in the pit before the eyes of all the
other Israelites; and so they died the most terrible death
anyone ever died. It was because they set themselves up
against Moses, whom God had placed over them, that He was
so angry with them.

Remember God has set people over us: there are our
fathers and mothers, and our clergymen and teachers ; and it
is our duty to obey them, as He tells us in the Fifth Com-
mandment. If we are proud and saucy it is very wrong of us.
It is not likely that we should be so dreadfully punished in
this life as Dathan and Abiram were ; but their horrible death
should make us remember that God is very angry with those
that will not try to obey those that have the rule over them,
and set themselves up to be bold and proud, and to say they
do not care.

QUESTIONS.

1, What is the Fifth Commandment? 2. What is the explanation of it
in the Duty to our Neighbour? 3. Who was set over the Israelites by
God? 4. Where had he brought them from? 5. Where was he leading




The Gainsaying of Korah. I



them to? 6. How should they have behaved to him? 7. What bad men
were there among them? 8. Whom did they not care for? 9. What did
they say? 10. Why was it very wicked of Dathan and Abiram not to
obey Moses? 11. What terrible end did they come to? 12. Why was
God angry with Dathan and Abiram? 13. What makes Him angry?
14. Whom did you say He had set over you? 15. Then how must you
behave to your parents and clergyman and teachers ?

SECOND READING.
“ And seek ye the priesthood also ?”—NMumbers xvi. 10.

HEN God gave the Commandments upon Mount Sinai,
He chose that Aaron, Moses’ brother, and his sons
should be His priests. A priest had to offer up the sacrifices
to God, and to burn incense to Him. Incense is made of
dried plants and gums that have a sweet smell when they are
burnt. The priests had brazen urns with holes at the top, and
chains to hold them by, and when the smoke of the incense
went up it was just as our prayers rise up to God in heaven.
There were other people called Levites, who had to take care
of the holy things that were used in God’s service, but only
the priests might offer sacrifices or incense.

Now one of these Levites, named Korah, wanted to do
more. He was angry, and said everybody was holy, and that
Aaron took too much on himself. Now it was not Aaron
who made himself priest, but God had made him so. There-
fore it was wrong in Korah; but there were two hundred and
fifty men whom he persuaded to come and get censers, and
offer incense to the Lord as if they had been priests. But




a
72 Ltleventh Sunday—First after Easter.



because they did it in pride and self-will God was angry with
them, and His fire burst out and scorched them all to death!
It was only the men themselves that died, not their wives or
children; and Korah’s family after him were better than he
was, and used to sing God’s praises in the Psalms.

But they always recollected that no one who was not a
priest might offer sacrifice or burn incense before God.

QUESTIONS.

1. What had a priest to do? 2. What was a sacrifice? 3. What was
incense? 4. What was it burnt in? 5. Who only might offer sacrifice
and incense? 6. Who was the right priest? 7. How came Aaron to be
priest? 8. Who wanted to offer incense? 9. What did Korah say? Io.
How many came with him? 131. What did they try to do? 12. What
happened to the two hundred and fifty? 13. Why were they punished ?
14. What became of Korah’s children? 15. Who are our priests? 16.
How were they made priests? 17. What may they alone do?

TEZRD READING.

“The rod of Aaron for the house of Levi was budded, and brought forth
buds, and bloomed blossoms, and yielded almonds.”—Numéers xvii. 8.
HE high-priest, whom God chose, had to offer sacrifices
to Him. That was, the priest slew a lamb, or a goat, or
a bullock, by the altar, and gave it to God. It was to show
that the Son of God would come and die to take away sin.
Now He has come and died, we have left off killing creatures
in sacrifice, and only make remembrance over again of His

sacrifice in the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper.
The high-priest used to wear a beautiful dress. He hada


The Gainsaying of Korah. 73

mitre on his head, with a gold plate on it, and the words,
“Holiness unto the Lord;” and he had a blue, red, and white
robe, embroidered with gold, and round the hem little gold
bells and pomegranates. He had a curious scarf called an
ephod, and a beautiful breast-plate made of twelve precious
stones, each with the name of one of the twelve tribes of
Israel engraven on it.

God said He would show who should be His priest. So He
bade Moses desire the chief man in each tribe to bring him a
dry rod or staff, and lay them up all night in the Holy Place.
The one whose rod began to grow as if it was still on the
tree should be the high-priest. When the twelve men went
to look in the morning, eleven rods were dry sticks still, but
one had put out green leaves and pink buds, and white blush-
ing flowers, like almond blossoms. It was Aaron’s rod; and
this was the way God let the children of Israel know that
Aaron and his sons, and grandsons after him, were always to
be priests.

QUESTIONS.

1. What was a priest? 2. What had he to do? 3. What was a sacri-
fice? 4. How was it offered? 5. What creatures were killed? 6. Where
were they put? 7. What was this to make the children of Israel think of?
8. Why don’t we kill sacrifices now? 9. Who has been sacrificed? Io,
What did the high-priest wear on his head? 11. What colour was his
dress? 12. How was it edged? 13. What was on his breast? 14. What
did God say He would show? 15. What were twelve men to bring? 16.
Where were the rods put? 17. What was to show who should be priest ?
18. What were the eleven rods like in the morning? 19. But how did one
look? 20, Whose was it? 21. What, then, was Aaron to be?












MOSES STRIKING THE ROCK.



Cloelfth Sunday.—Second after Easter.

ISRAEL IN THE WILDERNESS.
FIRST READING.
“Ye shall not tempt the Lord your God.”—Dewz. vi. 16.

TOLD you what sort of place a desert is, and how full it
is of stones, and rocks, and sand, and with no water in it.
Do you remember how thirsty Ishmael was in a desert, and
how God heard the voice of the lad, and sent an angel to lead

his mother to a well of water?
When the Israelites had come out of the land of Egypt,






Lsvael in the Wilderness. 75



they were in a terrible wilderness. Mount Sinai stood up in
the midst, and all round were great rocks of red and black
marble, all dry and parched with the hot sun shining on them.
The Israelites grew very hot and sadly thirsty, but they did
not pray as Ishmael had done. They grew angry, and said,
“Ts the Lord among us or no?” Do you not think they de-
served that God should show whether He was among them
by punishing them for grumbling? That was the way they
tempted God. But He was so good and merciful that He
pitied them; and He bade Moses to take His rod, and go to
the bare, dry rock, and strike it. And when Moses struck the
rock, God made a beautiful, fresh, clear spring of water come
pouring out of it, so that all the people, and all their cows,
and sheep, and asses, and camels, could drink and be re-
freshed. Was not that a great wonder? and was not God
very kind to them, though they were not good? But you see
God was near to help them all the time, and it was very sad
that they grumbled instead of praying. Do not be like them.
If a thing is hard to bear, don’t murmur and grumble about
it, but pray, and then you will get help. Either the vexing
thing will go away, or you will leave off minding it.

QUESTIONS.

1. Where had the Israelites come from? 2. Who was leading them?
3. What kind of place did they get into? 4. What is a desert like? 5.
What was the mountain in the midst of the desert? 6, What cannot be
found in the desert? 7. Who was the lad that was thirsty there before?
8. What did Ishmael do when he was thirsty? 9. But what did the
Israelites do? 10, What did they say? 11. What would have served
them right? 12. But did God punish them? 13. What did He tell Moses






76 Twelfth Sunday—Second after Easter.



to take? 14. What did Moses strike? 15. What came out of the rock?
16. Who made the water come out of the rock? 17. Was it not very good
of God to give them water? 18. What ought they to have done? 19.
What should you do when a thing is hard? 20. Is it not very naughty to
grumble ?

SECOND READING.
“As Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the
Son of man be lifted up.”—ohz iii. 14.
NE great fault of the Israelites was that they had no
patience. The moment they saw anything troublesome
or difficult, they began to cry out, and say they could not get
on, and it was very hard on them. Now it is very wrong ever
to say God is very hard upon us, for we may be sure He is
doing what is best for us. There was one stony, hot, steep
part of the journey still to come, and when the Israelites saw
it they forgot how often God had helped them, and cried out,
and lamented, and complained of Him and of Moses.

So again they were punished, for the little shining snakes
that live there came in numbers, darting at them and biting
them, so that the bite burnt like fire, and they died. Then
they cried out to God and were sorry, and He told Moses of
a wonderful way to cure them. Moses was to melt up some
brass and make a great serpent, like the little ones that bit
them, and set it up on a pole. Then if anyone who was
bitten would come at once and look up at the brazen serpent,
his bite would get well, and he would not die of it.

This was a miracle—a wonder. And it was to teach the
Israelites something, and us too. For you know our Blessed






Israel in the Wilderness. aa



Lord hung on the cross, as the serpent hung on the pole ; and
when our souls are in danger of dying of sin, we must think
of Him, and look to Him in faith, and He will save us from
being punished for our sin, and keep our souls from dying.

QUESTIONS.

1. What sort of place had the Israelites to go over? 2. How did they
like it? 3. What did they do? 4. Why ought they not to have cried out ?
5. Who had been taking care of them? 6. So how did God punish them?
7. What happened when the serpents bit them? 8. What were they sorry
for? 9. So what was Moses to make? Io. Where did he put the brazen
serpent? 11. What were they to do if they were bit? 12, What cured
them? 13. Who hung upon the cross? 14. What does He cure our
souls of ?

THIRD READING.

“He humbled thee, and suffered thee to hunger, and fed thee with manna,

which thou knewest not.”—Deuz. viii. 3.

HIS morning you heard how God gave the children of
Israel water to drink in the wilderness. Now you shall
hear what He gave them to eat. The ground was all hard
stones. There was grass which the cows and sheep could eat,
and there were a few trees with long sharp thorns, but no
fruit on them, and no corn to make bread ; and soon the peo-
ple were very hungry, and began to cry out that they did not
know what would become of them.

But God was not going to forget them. When they rose up
in the morning, the fresh dew lay on the grass, and all about
in the dew were little white things that tasted like wafers
made with honey. This was called manna, and God had sent




78 Twelfth Sunday—Second after Easter.



it from heaven for them to eat. Every morning on week
days there it was, and they had all to come out and pick it
up. But they must get up early to gather it, for when the
sun was hot it would melt away. And they could not keep
it—it grew bad and was not fit to use the next day; but there
was always just enough for everybody to have all they wanted.
There was only one day in each week that more came down,
and that was the day before the Sabbath-day, which they had
instead of Sunday. Then each one could get twice as much
as could be eaten in one day, and it did not spoil so fast. For
on the Sabbath-day God would have them rest, and so no
manna was to be found anywhere, so that they might learn to
keep the Fourth Commandment—Remember the Sabbath-
day to keep it holy. All the time they stayed in the wilder-
ness, the sweet white manna lay on the grass in the morning
for them to pick it up—twice as much on the sixth day of the
week, and on the Sabbath-day none at all. Was not that
very good of God ?

QUESTIONS.

1. Where were the Israelites? 2. What had they to drink in the wilder-
ness? 3. What else did they want? 4. Why could they not get bread?
5. What did God give them instead? 6. What was the manna like? 7.
Where did it lie? 8. When was the manna on the grass? 9. Who were
to eat it? 10. Who sent it? 11. What became of it in hot sunshine? 12.
Would it keep? 13. What was the day when it could be kept? 14. How
much came down the day before the Sabbath? 15. What might not be
done on the Sabbath? 16. What is the Fourth Commandment? 17. So
why did they get twice as much manna the day before? 18. When did
no manna come? 19. What day have we instead of the Sabbath?








THE BRAZEN SERPENT.—PAGE 79.



Thirteenth Sunday —Chicd after Guster.

BALAAM AND BALAK.
FIRST READING.
“ Thou shalt not curse the people : for they are blessed.” Numbers xxii. 12.

HERE was a prophet called Balaam. A prophet means

a man to whom God made His will known, and who was
thus much wiser than other men. This prophet one day saw
some rich great men come to his house. They brought him
a message, that a king named Balak wanted him to come with
them, and would give him great rewards for coming. Balaam




80 Thirteenth Sunday—Third after Easter.



said he must wait for one night, and God would make known
to him what he was to do. And at night God told him he
was not to go; for what Balak wanted of him was to curse
the children of Israel, and God would not have them cursed.
So Balaam said he must not go, and the messengers went
away.

But Balak sent more princes, still grander men, with larger
presents, to fetch Balaam. He answered, “If Balak would
give me his house full of silver and gold, I cannot go beyond
the word of the Lord my God, to do less or more.” But he had
not left off wishing. He begged the messengers to stay, and
see if God would give him leave to go. And this time God did
say he might go, but that he should not say anything about
the Israelites but what God put in his mouth. Balaam knew
that God was not pleased with him; but he wanted Balak’s
rewards, and he set off in the morning, riding on his ass.

Presently the ass was frightened, and turned out of the road
into the field. Balaam was angry at this, and beat the ass.
But again the ass turned aside in a narrow walled path, and
squeezed Balaam’s foot against the wall. He beat her again.
Presently, in a very narrow road, the poor ass fell quite down
for fear; and Balaam was very angry, and beat her harder.
Then God worked a wonder. He made the dumb ass to
speak, and ask why he was so cruel to her. He answered that
he only wished for a sword to kill her. The ass asked if she
had ever been like this before. He said, No. And then, full
before him, he saw God’s holy angel with a sword in his hand.
And he fell down on his face. The poor ass had seen the






Balaam and Balak. SI

angel all the time; but Balaam could not see him till God
made him able. And now he was afraid, and would have
gone back; but the angel said he must go on now, though he
would only be able to speak the words which God put in his
mouth. Think if, sometimes when you have been told you
must not do something, you fret and teaze to do it—is not
that like Balaam? And perhaps you teaze till some one
gives you leave to do as you wish. Then you get quite cross
with eagerness, and are unkind to all that hinders you; and,
after all, you do not find that any good comes of getting your
own way.
QUESTIONS.

1. What is a prophet? 2. Who sent for Balaam? 3. What did God
tell Balaam? 4. But what did Balaam wish? 5. How did he get leave
to go at last? 6. But who stood in his way? 7. Who saw the angel at
first? 8. What did Balaam do to the ass? 9. What wonder did God
work? 10. What did the ass say? 11. Whom did Balaam see? 12.
What did the angel tell him? 13. What had he been allowed to have?
14. Does good come of having our own way ?



SECOND READING.

“There shall come a Star out of Jacob, and a Sceptre shall rise out of
Israel.” —Numébers xxiv. 17.

HERE was a king named Balak, whose land the Israelites

were to pass through. They promised not to do any

harm to him or his people, if they might go quietly through ;

but he was afraid and angry, and wanted to have them cursed,

hoping to bring God’s anger on them. That was a very wicked



ns _}






82 Thirteenth Sunday— Third after Easter.

and foolish notion of King Balak’s ; and God would not let it
bring harm upon His people. They had not deserved to have
His anger called down on them, and so He would not be
angry with them. And when Balak’s friend Balaam tried to
speak curses, God turned them all to blessings ; and, instead of
saying they should come to a terrible end, he could only say
how happy and well off they should be, with God to take care
of them, and be their King. He even went on to say that a
Star should come out of Jacob, and a Sceptre should rise out
of Israel—and that meant that our Saviour should be born
among them. He is called a Star, because He came to give
us light ; and you know a star showed the way to the place
where He was born. And a sceptre is the rod a king carries
in his hand. So when He was called the Sceptre, it meant
that He should be a King.

Only think how angry Balak was, when Balaam could not
curse, but only blessed. I wish he had been afraid, and seen
it was not God’s will that he should hurt the Israelites ; but
instead of that, he went on in his wickedness, and was miser-
ably killed at last ; for God took care of His people, and
would let no one do them any harm.

Now, recollect, bad words and bad wishes do harm to the
person that speaks them, not to those they are meant for. If
a bad boy came and abused a steady one for going to church,
or saying his prayers, it would be very bad for himself; but if
the good boy kept on quietly, nothing that the other could say
would hurt him one bit. God would take care of him as surely
as He took care of the Israelites.






Balaam and Balak. 83



QUESTIONS.

1. What did Balak want? 2. Why did he want the Israelites to be
cursed? 3. Whom did he set to curse the Israelites? 4. But what did
Balaam do instead? 5. Why could he not curse them? 6. Who would
not let him curse them? 7. Who was to be born among them? 8. What
did Balaam call our Saviour? 9. Why was He like a star? 10. Why was
He like a sceptre? 11. Could Balak hurt the Israelites? 12. Why not?
13. Whom do bad words hurt? 14. Ought we tomind them? 15. If any-
one teazes you when you try to be good, must you leave off ?

THIRD READING.
“ The people did eat, and bowed down to their gods.”—Numbers xxv. 2.

OU heard how Balaam went to Balak ; and how God made
him bless the children of Israel when he wanted to curse
them. But even this did not make Balaam good. He wanted
Balak to give him a reward ; and so he told him that though
no harm could happen to the people of Israel while they were
good and worshipped their God, yet if he could make them do
something wicked, and turn away from their God, then God
would be sure to punish them.

So these two wicked men sent a number of women to invite
the Israelites to hold a great feast with them, in honour of
their idol Baal Peor. Many were so foolish and wicked as to
be led away ; and they had a great feasting and revelling, and
all kinds of bad pleasures that these heathen women said were
to do praise to this horrible false god. Then, though Balak
might have cursed for ever without hurting them, they had


84 Thirteenth Sunday—Third after Easter.

done themselves the harm. God sent a deadly sickness, and
in one day twenty-four thousand people died.

But Phinehas, Aaron’s grandson, did as Moses commanded
him. He first put to death the wickedest of the people who
had joined themselves to Baal Peor ; and then he prayed—and
all the people prayed and wept too. So God forgave them,
and the plague ceased.

Afterwards Phinehas led the Israelite fighting men to punish
the wicked Balak and his people; and Balaam was killed in
fighting with them. All the wicked women who had tempted
the Israelites away from God were put to death too. So
Balaam’s evil counsel ended in all sorts of misery. It is very
sad to think of him, for he knew so well what was good, and
yet did what was so very bad. But remember this, nobody
could hurt God’s people till they did wrong, and then they
hurt themselves, and God punished them,

QUESTIONS.

1. What did Balak want todo? 2. How had Balak tried to hurt the
children of Israel? 3. Why could not Balaam curse them? 4. What
did Balaam think would be the way to hurt them? 5. Whom did he send
to them? 6. Whom did the women persuade them to worship? 7. What
did God send to punish them? 8. How was the plague stopped? 9. How
was Balaam punished? 10. Why was Balaam greatly to be blamed? 11.
When could not Balaam hurt the Israelites? 12. When could he hurt
them? 13. For who took care of them when they were good ?








GATHERING MANNA (PAGE 77).

1+ = + __

Hourteenth Sunday.—Fourth after Caster.







THE GIVING OF THE LAW.
FIRST READING.
“Thou heardest His words out of the midst of the fire.”—Deut. iv. 36.

HEN the children of Israel had come out of Egypt, God

had told Moses to lead them to the foot of Mount Sinai.

This was a high steep rocky mountain in the wilderness. And
God told Moses to set bounds round the mountain, so that
nobody should come and touch it; and the people were to
pray, and wait round it for the holy and awful thing that was


86 Fourteenth Sunday—Fourth after Easter.



to happen. Then there came on the hill-top a deep dark
cloud, and the mountain was altogether on a smoke, and it
shook and quaked, and there were lightnings and thunders
and voices, and the sound of a trumpet loud and louder, so
that all the people trembled. Then out of that cloud there
came a voice speaking to them—a voice that they all could
hear, and that made them afraid. For it was the voice of
God. And God spoke out of the cloud, and gave the Ten
Commandments. They were the very same Ten Command-
ments you say in the Catechism, and see written up in church,
God had come in this terrible and awful manner to speak
them, that all Israel might hear and fear, and take care not to
break them. Afterwards God gave these Ten Commandments
to Moses, written upon two tables—or pieces of stone—written
by God Himself. That was the way the Ten Commandments
were given—by God’s own voice speaking to men, out of the
cloud, amid thunders and lightnings, and the sound of the
trumpet, dreadful to hear. And God means us all to obey the
Commandments, just as much as He meant the Israelites to
obey them. They are His words, and must be kept; and
if we ask Him in our prayers He will give us help and strength
to obey them, so that we may fulfil the promise that was made
at our baptism, that we should keep God’s Holy Will and
Commandments, and walk in the same unto our lives’ end.

QUESTIONS.

1. Where had the children of Israel come from? 2. Who was leading
them? 3. Where did God tell Moses to take them? 4. What wonderful
sight did they see on Mount Sinai? 5. What did they hear? 6. Who


The Giving of the Law. 87

spoke out of the cloud? 7. What did God speak? 8. How many Com-
mandments? 9. Tell me the first of them. 10. On what did God write
them? 11. To whom did He give them? 12. When do you say them?
13. When did you promise to keep them? 14. What is keeping the Com-
mandments? 15. Howcan you be helped to do as they tell you? 16.
How must you ask for God’s help?

SECOND READING.

“ The Lord talked with you face to face in the mount out of the midst of
the fire.”—Deuteronomy v. 4.
HEN the lightning and thunder and the loud voice of the
trumpet came forth from the cloud on Mount Sinai, and
God had spoken the Ten Commandments, He called to Moses
to come up and speak with Him in the cloud. How wonder-
ful it must have been! Moses was the only man that ever
spoke so near to God.

God gave him two blocks of stone written with the Ten
Commandments, written with God’s own Finger. Then God
told him to make a chest to keep them in. It was to be made
of wood, with gold all over it ; and two figures of cherubims
were to be one on each side. This chest was to be called the
Ark of the Covenant. And it was to be put into a square
room, inside a tent, that was to be made with curtains, and
carried about with the Israelites. It was to be called the
Tabernacle. And this was to be a very holy place. The
children of Israel would say their prayers in front of the
Tabernacle ; but they were not to go into the place where the
Ark was, because they were sinful, and God is holy. That






88 Fourteenth Sunday—Fourth after Easter.

place was to be called the Holy of Holies, and no one might
go near it but the Priests whom God chose, and set apart to
lead His worship. The first High Priest was to be Moses’
brother Aaron ; and he was to wear a beautiful dress when he
ministered before God—a high cap with “Holiness to the
Lord” on it, a long embroidered robe, edged with gold bells
and pomegranates, and a blue scarf crossed over his breast ;
and in the middle a breast-plate, made of twelve precious
stones, each carved with the name of one of the twelve tribes
of Israel, so that he might have them on his heart as he prayed
to God. All this and much more God told Moses while he

was on the mount.
QUESTIONS.

1. What was given on Mount Sinai? 2. Who spoke the Commandments ?
3. To whom did God give them? 4. What were they written on? 5.
Who wrote them? 6. Where were they to be kept? 7. What was the
chest like? 8. What was the chest called? 9. Where was Moses to put
the chest? 10. What was the room called? 11. Who might go near the
Holy of Holies? 12. Who was the first High Priest? 13. Who was
Aaron? 14, What was Aaron to wear? 15. Why might not the people
come near ?

THIRD READING.
“ Know therefore that the Lord thy God, He is God.”—Deut. vii. 9.

YHEN Moses went up into the awful cloud upon Mount
Sinai, he stayed there forty days.

But all the Israelites below were impatient. They could not

think what had become of Moses; and though they had so

lately heard God’s own Voice speaking to them, they would not




Ra



The Giving of the Law. 89
wait as they had been told to do. They cried out that they
wanted something instead of Moses, whom they had lost. So
they took all their gold ear-rings and melted them, and made
an image of a golden calf. And then these foolish wicked
people began to feast and dance, and worship this golden idol.

Moses was coming down Mount Sinai with the two Tables of
the Commandments in his hands. And first he heard a shout-
ing and singing; then he saw the people leaping and dancing,
and the great golden idol standing in the midst. Then he was
sure it was of no use to bring them the Commandments if they
minded them no better. So he took the two tables of stone,
and threw them out of his hand, and broke them to pieces.

Then he went down, and severely punished the worst of the
Israelites for having disobeyed the commandment. And he
broke the golden calf to pieces, and ground it to powder.

Then he went and prayed to God to forgive the people.
God did forgive them, and let Moses bring two fresh tables of
stone to be written with the Ten Commandments. But the
first that they had lost were the tables God had given, and
they could never have them back again!

QUESTIONS.

1. Where was Moses gone? 2. What was God going to give him? 3.
Who were left below? 4. What did the Israelites want? 5. What did
they take off? 6. What did they make of their ear-rings? 7. What is the
Second Commandment? 8. How did they break the Second Command-
ment? 9. What did Moses do to the Tables of the Law? 10, Why did
he throw them down? 11. What did he do with the golden calf? ra.
Where did he go then? 13. What did he do for the Israelites ?










MOSES SPEAKING THE BOOK OF DEUTERONOMY.

fifteenth Sundiay.—Fitth after Gaster.

THE GIVING OF THE LAW.
FIRST READING.

“JT prayed therefore unto the Lord, and said, O Lord God, destroy not

Thy people and Thine inheritance.”—Dewtz. ix. 26.
AST Sunday you heard how sadly the people of Isracl
sinned by making the golden calf, while Moses was up in

the mountain, and how he punished them.

Then he said he would go and pray to God to forgive them,
and try them again. So up he went over the rough rocks of
Mount Sinai, and into the cloud again, where he had spoken






The Giving of the Law. gl
with God before. And he prayed with all his might that God
would not cast off His people, though they had been so
wicked, but would give them again the Commandments on
their tables of stone. And God listened to Moses, and pro-
mised to give them the Commandments again. Then Moses
made a great request: he said to God, “I pray Thee, show
me Thy glory.” But God said, “ Thou canst not see My Face,
for there shall no man see Me and live.” But Moses was to
come up the mountain the next day, and bring with him two
blocks of stone, and then God would let him see as much of
His glory as he could bear.

On the next day Moses went up the mountain again, and
took with him the two tables of stone. And the Lord came
down in the cloud; and Moses was in the cleft of the rock,
where he could see a small part of the glory, and hear the
Lord’s Voice proclaim before him, “The Lord, The Lord God,
merciful and gracious, long-suffering, and abundant in good-
ness and truth.” Then indeed Moses bowed his head and
worshipped. No man ever came so close to God as Moses,
with whom God spoke face to face, as a man speaketh to his
friend.

Moses stayed forty days and forty nights up in the moun-
tain. And God again wrote the Commandments upon the
two tables of stone, and granted the Israelites to try again to
keep them. When Moses came down from being in converse
with God, the glory was still about his face. It was all shin-
ing like the sun, and was so bright that.the Israelites could
not fix their eyes on it; and he was obliged to put a veil over

Per










92 fifteenth Sunday—fifth after Easter.

his face, because they could not bear to look at it. Was ever
living man so favoured, and brought into such glory?

QUESTIONS.

1. What wicked thing had the Israelites done? 2. Who prayed for
their forgiveness? 3. Where did Moses go to pray for their forgiveness ?
4. Who forgave them? 5. What did Moses venture to ask God to show
him? 6, But what can no one do? 7. Where was Moses placed? 8.
What passed by? 9. What voice did he hear? 10, How was Moses
more honoured than any man? 11. How long did he stay in the moun-
tain? 12. What did God give him again? 13. How did his face look
when he came down? 14. What did he do to hide his face? 15. How
came his face to be so glorious?

SECOND READING.
“Ye shall walk after the Lord your God, and fear Him.”—Devwdz. xiii. 4.

HEN the Israelites came into the good land where they

were going, they were to be very careful not to learn to
worship idols. For idols were no gods at all—only wood and
stone—and could not hear them pray, nor give them what they
wanted. Besides, the people round them had very frightful
ways of trying to please their false gods. They had one
called Moloch, made of brass, and they used to offer poor
little children up in sacrifice to him, and make a noise with
drums and trumpets, that no one might hear their cries.
There was another god called Baal, to whom they set up
great images, and feasted in his honour; and a goddess, whom
they called the queen of heaven, or Ashtoreth. Women used
to offer cakes to her, and dance in honour of her, for they
thought she sent the moon to shine on them.

= es atl
oe nnn ee en

The Giving of the Law. 93



Now, the Israelites were not to worship any of these false
gods. They were to remember how they heard the Only True
God speaking to them out of the cloud upon the mountain,
and telling them, “I am the Lord thy God: thou shalt have
no other gods but Me.” And God told them that if they |
would worship Him and serve Him, all should go well with |
them, and they should be happy and blessed. But if they
went after these false idols, all would go ill with them, and
there would be only sorrow and misery.

QUESTIONS.

1. Say the First Commandment. 2. Say the Second. 3. What three
idols did the people of the country worship? 4. What did they do in
honour of Moloch? 5. What did they do in honour of Baal? 6. What

‘did they call Ashtoreth? 7. What did they think she sent them? 8.
Who made the moon? 9. What would happen if the children of Israel
worshipped God? 10, What would happen if they worshipped idols ?





THIRD READING.

“Tt is a people that do err in their heart, and they have not known My
ways.”—Psalm xcv. 10.
FTER the Commandments were given the Israelites went
on their journey. The Ark, or chest, where the Com-
mandments on their two tables of stone were kept, was car-
ried before them; and God still showed that He was with
them, for He made a pillar of cloud by day and of fire by
night go along with them, and rest on it.
When they came near the land of Canaan, twelve men were








94 Fifteenth Sunday—Ffifth after Easter.

sent on to see it. They came back, bringing such a great
bunch of grapes that two had to carry it between them on a
pole! But they said that the land was full of strong citiés,
and very strong men, and they should never be able to win it,
but would all be killed. Only two men, Joshua and Caleb,
recollected that there could be no fear, for God had promised
to save them and bring them in. The others all cried, and
said they would go back to Egypt, and threw stones at Moses
and Aaron when they wanted to quiet them.

Then God showed His glory, and would have cut them all
off in a moment if Moses had not prayed for them. But He
said none of those who had said they would not go into the
good land should go. They were to stay forty years longer
in the dismal wilderness, till all the grown-up men, except
Joshua and Caleb, should be dead, and their children be
grown up in their stead. Then their children, who had
learned to trust God and do as He bade, should be the ones
to go in and live in the promised land.

QUESTIONS.

1. How did the Israelites know which way to go in the wilderness? 2.
What was the ark? 3. What was in it? 4. How did God show them
His Presence? 5. Whom did Moses send to look at the land? 6. What
did these men bring back? 7. But what did they say of the country? 8.
Who were afraid? 9. Why was it wrong to be afraid? 10, Who only
were not afraid? 11. What were the people ready todo? 12. How were
they to be punished? 13. How long were they to stay in the wilderness ?
14. Who would die? 15. Who would grow up to goin? 16. Who were
the two good brave men? 17. What was promised to Joshua and Caleb?












MOSES VIEWING TIE PROMISED LAND.

Sizteenth Sunda —After Ascension.

THE DEATH OF MOSES.
FIRST READING.
“They angered Him also at the waters of strife.’—Psalm cvi. 32.

Boe all the forty years in the wilderness, the children
of Israel were quite close to their home in the promised
land. There was only the river Jordan between them and
the hills and valleys there. But Moses was not to go with
them. Once when the people were crying out for more water,
and God told him to command the stream to come out of the






96 Stxcteenth Sunday—A fler Ascension.



rock, Moses was so hot with anger that he did not attend.
He said, “Hear now, ye rebels; must we fetch you water out of
this rock?” And he struck the rock with his rod, instead of
speaking to it. The water came out as it had done before ;
but Moses had been so hasty that he had not thought how to
obey God exactly, and so he was not to be allowed to lead
the people in as a great warrior, lest he should fail again.
God was not angry with him, but had forgiven him; only he
had his punishment because he had done wrong.

Joshua was to lead the people, instead of Moses. So before
Moses was taken away, he called Joshua and all the chief men
of each tribe, and put them in mind of all that God had done
for them, and warned them very solemnly, that if they broke
their promise and did not keep the Commandments, God would
punish them—first a little, and then more and more, and would
even cast them out of the good land at last. For, mind, God
always keeps His promises; and as surely as He gives the
good all that is best for them, so surely He will punish those
who turn from Him.

QUESTIONS.

1. Where were the Israelites? 2. How long had their journey lasted?
3. Where were they going? 4. What lay between them and the land of
Canaan? 5. Who had led them? 6. But what one thing had Moses
done? 7. What was he not to do? 8. Who was to lead them in? 9.
What did Moses tell the Israelites they must be careful to do? 10. What
had they promised to keep? 11. What would happen if they broke the
promise? 12. What would happen if they kept the promise? 13. What
promises have we made?




The Death of Moses.



SECOND READING.


















“So Moses the servant of the Lord died.”—Deuteronomy xxxiv. 5.

T was not God’s will that Moses should lead the Israelites
into the promised land, but he was to die on the east
side of the river Jordan; and so he would have his rest above
instead of in the land of promise. But first God told him he
might see the land. So he went up into a very high hill:
and there God made him able to see all the home of his
people—the snowy hill of Hermon, and Mount Lebanon
where the cedar trees grow, and the hills and valleys where
Abraham had wandered and Isaac and Jacob had lived, and
which he had hoped for all his life; and green fields, and
corn-fields, and vineyards, on to the great blue sea stretching
out to the westward. That was where his people were to
live; but there was a better home for Moses. Nobody saw
him any more after he went up into the mountain. There
he died, and the Lord buried him, and no one knows of
his grave—only the children of Israel wept and mourned
for him.

QUESTIONS.

1. Where had the Israelites come? 2. Who had led them? 3. But
where was Moses not to go? 4. But what did God allow him to see? 5.
Where was he to go? 6. What did God show him there? 7. What kind
of place was it? 8. Where had he brought the people from? 9. Who
was to lead them in? 10, What was to happen to Moses? 11. Did any
one ever see him again? 12. What does no one know? 13. Why do we
think so much of Moses? 14. Where did he speak with God? 15. Was
he not the greatest man of all in the Old Testament ?




98 Szxteenth Sunday—A fler Ascension.



THIRD READING.
“Be strong and of a good courage.”—Foshua i. 6.

FTER Moses had gone out of sight on the mountain, God
Himself told Joshua that Moses was dead, and that he
must lead the children of Israel into the good land God had
promised them. Moses had laid his hands on Joshua’s head,
and God’s Holy Spirit had come to help him to see what was
right, and to lead the people. He must be strong and brave,
and do all that God commanded, and then he would be quite
sure to be able to drive away all the strange people out of the
land, and to make a home for the people in the land that
Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, had loved so well.
All the people promised they would do as Joshua bade
them. So he was their captain instead of Moses,

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was the old leader of the children of Israel? 2. Where had
Moses led them from? 3. Where were they going? 4. Where did Moses
go? 5. What became of Moses on the mountain? 6. Whom did God
make captain instead of Moses? 7. What did God tell Joshua? 8. What
did God promise him? 9. What is the way to be helped by God? 10,
What were the Israelites to be helped to do? 11. Who were to be driven
away? 12. Why did the children of Israel wish to live in the land of
Canaan? 13. What had God promised Abraham? 14. And does not
God always keep His promises ?

SOLOS?












OFFERING FIRST FRUITS,



Seventeenth Sunday —sabit Sunday.”

THE HOLY SPIRIT OF LOVE.
FIRST READING.

“Thou shalt rejoice before the Lord thy God, thou, and thy son, and thy
daughter, and thy man-servant, and thy maid-servant.”—Dewt. xvi. 11.
OD is very good tous. He wishes us all to be very happy.

It is only for doing wrong that troubles come, and then
they are to make us good and happier at last. This is one of
our glad happy days. It is Whit Sunday, the day that God
the Holy Ghost came down from Heaven, to come into little

* When reading these Lessons as a narrative (not by the Sundays), this and the following
Sunday can be omitted.






100 Seventeenth Sunday—Whit Sunday.



children’s hearts when they are baptized, and help us all to
be good. But you have been hearing about the children of
Israel; and you will like to hear how they used to be glad, as
on this day, and rejoice, when they had come to the beautiful
land of Canaan that God gave them.

They were not glad about God the Holy Ghost coming, for
they knew nothing about that, it had not happened then. But
they were glad of their harvest time. It is not harvest yet
with us, but the land of Canaan is so much hotter than Eng-
land that the corn gets ripe much sooner. And on this very
day, the two first loaves of bread, that were made of the corn
that was freshly reaped, were brought to the priest and were
offered up to God, and He was thanked for them. And then
everybody ate their feast, and gave thanks, men and women
and children, and all their friends; and if there were any poor
people, widows and fatherless children, those that were better
off sent some of their good things to them, that they might
feast too. So it was a glad day—all feasting and singing and
giving God thanks, because He made the corn to grow up in
the furrows, and sent rain to swell it, and sun to ripen it, and
gave men strength to cut it down and store it up, and then
grind it, and make loaves and bake them. God gives us seed
to sow and bread to eat still; and He has given us much bet-
ter blessings too. So we rejoice and are glad. We go to
church, and deck the church with boughs and flowers, to show
how glad and thankful we are. And we often have a feast to
eat at home too. Mind you thank God, and remember that
He gave it to you. And if you know of some poor person—




The Holy Spirit of Love. 101



some old man or woman, or poor little child, that can hardly
get enough to eat, perhaps you could help them to feast too.
Perhaps you have a penny or a sixpence of your own. That
would help them. Or, maybe, if you tried to save a little bit
of your own dinner, or your cake, if your mother would let
you. Would not that be a nice way of keeping God’s feast?

QUESTIONS.

1. Why are we glad to-day? 2. What used the children of Israel to be
glad about? 3. What is harvest? 4. Is our harvest ready yet? 5. Why
did they have it so soon? 6. Why did they thank God for the harvest ?
7. What had God done to the harvest? 8. What did they offer to Him?
9. What did they do then? 10. Who feasted? 11. What did they do that
the poor people might feast too? 12. How do we keep our feast? 13.
What is done to make the church look beautiful? 14. Why should we be
even more glad than the children of Israel were? 15. Is there anyone too
poor to make a feast? 16. How could anyone of us help them?

SECOND READING.
“ And a little child shall lead them.”—Jsazah xi. 6.

ID you ever see any wild beasts? The grand, noble lion,

with the heavy yellow mane, and the large strong arms
with velvet paws; and the graceful leopard, his yellow soft
fur spotted with dark rosettes, his long tail waving like a
kitten’s with play, and his face so lively and engaging. Did
you not think it was a pity that these beautiful creatures
were so fierce and savage that you could not go near to
stroke and fondle them? Do you know why it is that they
are savage and dangerous to us? It was because, when




102 Seventeenth Sunday— Whit Sunday.

Adam and Eve sinned, death and woe and pain came into
the world, and these creatures began to prey upon the gentle
harmless animals round them.

But listen to the Lesson this evening. “The wolf also shall
dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the
kid ; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together ;
and a little child shall lead them. And the cow and the bear
shall feed ; their young ones shall lie down together: and the
lion shall eat straw like the ox. And the sucking child shall
play on the hole of the asp, and the weaned child shall put his
hand on the cockatrice’ den. They shall not hurt nor destroy
in all My Holy Mountain: for the earth shall be full of the
knowledge of the Lord, as the waters cover the sea.”

The fatling means a young bullock ; the asp and cockatrice
are poisonous serpents, very beautiful and shining to look at,
but with deadly venom in their teeth. But here, in these
beautiful verses, they are tame and gentle, and the child, and
the lamb, and the kid, and all harmless playful things, are
happy and safe with what used to be so fierce and dreadful.

We cannot be quite sure whether God here promises us that
real lions, bears, leopards, and serpents, shall grow gentle and
tame, so that little children can play with them. But what
we know He promises is, that God the Holy Ghost, who came
down to us from Heaven on a Whit Sunday long ago, can
make people’s fierce natures gentle. Men who, left to them-
selves, would have been as terrible as lions, are made by Him
strong to take care of us and bold to do right; people who
might have been mischievous as leopards grow active to do




The Holy Spirit of Love. 103



good and help others ; surly sullen ones, like bears, are helped
to fight with their fierce tempers, and grow gentle and kind;
and so quiet innocent people can be happy and safe with
them. And who is the little Child who shall lead them? It
is the little Child who was born at Bethlehem. He has put
away their sins, and following Him makes them leave off their
rude bad natures; and it is the Holy Spirit that makes them
able to do it.
QUESTIONS.

1. Why are there fierce creatures in the world? 2. What does the
chapter say about these creatures? 3. What kind of people are like
beasts of prey? 4. But who has come to make people good? 5. What
kind of people would be like lions? 6, But how does the Holy Spirit
make them use their strength and power? 7. What should active lively
people use their spirit for? 8. What beasts are cross people like? 9.
But how should they try to be changed? 10, What fault makes one like
a serpent? 11. But what must we learn to do? 12. Who is the little
Child who has set us a pattern? 13. Who came to-day to help us to
follow that pattern ?



THIRD READING.

“Then will I sprinkle clean water upon you, and ye shall be clean.”—
Ezekiel xxxvi. 25.

(5°? the Holy Ghost came from Heaven to-day? He came
then so that people could see, in bright lights that sat on
the Apostles’ heads. But He does not come so now. We
cannot see Him. But when the water is sprinkled on a baby’s
face at its baptism, and the priest says, “I baptize thee, in
the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy
Ghost,” then God the Holy Ghost comes and lives in the soul










104 Seventeenth Sunday—Whit Sunday.



of that little child. And what for? He tells us. To make
a new heart and a new spirit in us. To take away the heart
of stone, and make a heart of flesh. Now what does a stone
feel like? Is it not hard and cold? So cold, that if you
warm it ever so much it gets cold again directly. So hard,
that you can do nothing to it, except by hammering it so hard
as to break it, and even then it does not feel. You could not
fondle a stone image of a kitten, as you can play with the
kitten. It does not feel, and it does not care. Now hearts
get like a stone sometimes. They will not love, and they will
not feel; they are cold and hard. Sullen sulky ways are
stoniness in our hearts. But the Blessed Spirit has come to
take the stony coldness away, and make the heart all soft and
warm—full of love and full of feeling. He will help you not
to say “I don’t care.” He will help you to care, and to love
God, and to be loved, instead of being like a hard cold stone,
that has to be broken because it has no feeling. Ask Him to
help you and He will.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who came down from Heaven to-day? 2. How was His coming
seen? 3. Whom does He come to now? 4. When does He come? 5.
What is done to the babies? 6. What is said to them? 7. What does
He come for? 8. What does a stone feel like? 9. Can you keep it warm?
to. Can you make it feel? 11. Will it love you? 12. When are people’s
hearts like stone? 13. Who can take away a heart of stone? 14. What
kind of heart can He give instead? 15. What is the difference between
stone and flesh? 16. Which is the right sort of heart to have? 17.
Which sort of heart are you getting when you “don’t care”? 18, What
should you care for? 19. Who will help you to care for what is good?


















ABRAHAM AND THE THREE HOLY ONES.



Gighteenth Sundiy—Crinity Sunday.

THE GLORY OF GOD.
FIRST READING.
“ Holy, holy, holy, is the Lord God of hosts.” —Jsazah vi. 3.

E know very little about the glory that is in Heaven.
But a very few times God has made good men’s eyes
able to see His brightness, that they may tell us a little about
it. When the Prophet Isaiah was going to have a message
given him to the people of Israel, he was allowed to sce a
throne—and on it the Lord, the King of Heaven and Earth,




106 Eighteenth Sunday—Trinity Sunday.



was sitting; and above, with their wings arching over, were
the Seraphim. The Seraphim are glorious angels, with six
wings; and they cry out the song of praise, “Holy, holy,
holy, is the Lord of hosts; the whole earth is full of His
glory.” Holy, holy, holy; that is because there are Three
Persons in One God—God the Father, God the Son, and God
the Holy Ghost. There is One God, but He is Three in One.
We cannot understand how this is yet; but the holy angels
understand it, and they praise God in this way, and so do we.
There were two more holy men who saw the like great sight ;
and one of them heard the song again, “ Holy, holy, holy,
Lord God Almighty.” He heard it begun by four wonderful
beings called Cherubim, who are round the throne in heaven;
and when they began, all the angels and saints in heaven
join into that song of praise. Yes, and the saints on earth,
too. Everyone, old or young, that has learned to praise God,
helps to sing that song.

Do you know when we sing it? It is when we sing or say,
“To Thee Cherubim and Seraphim continually do cry, Holy,
holy, holy, Lord God of Sabaoth.” Sabaoth means hosts—
great numbers—because God is Lord of whole armies of
angels, and multitudes of saints, and of all the numbers of
men and creatures in the earth, ay—and of the stars.

When we begin that hymn, let us try to recollect that the
Lord is on His great bright throne, and that we are helping
the great song that the Cherubim and Seraphim begin, and
the angels and saints go on with, and all the Church in
heaven and earth sing with them.




The Glory of God. 107



QUESTIONS.



1. Who are the Seraphim? 2. Whose throne are they about? 3. Who
has seen them? 4. What do they sing? 5. Why do they say “Holy” three
times? 6. What is the meaning of Sabaoth? 7. What are hosts? 8. Tell
me what God is Lord of. 9. When do we help to sing this hymn? 10,
Whom are we praising? 11. Who begin the song? 12. Who go on with it ?

SECOND READING.

“ And the Lord appeared unto him.”—Genes¢s xviii. 1.

O-DAY we go back to a bit of Abraham’s history. You

remember who Abraham was. He was the father of all

the children of Israel—the good man whom God called out

of his own country, and told that his children should have all
the land of Canaan, when as yet he had no child.

This chapter tells how three Holy Ones came to Abraham
one evening, when he was sitting in his tent door in the cool
of the day, and how the Lord told him that the son he had
so long looked for should be born at last. That son, you re-
member, was Isaac, whom Abraham was ready to offer up in
sacrifice at God’s command. Isaac was the father of Jacob;
and Jacob, whose name was also Israel, had the twelve sons
who were the fathers of the twelve tribes of Israel.

After the Lord had promised Abraham that Isaac should
soon be born, He went on to say that the people in the cities
in Sodom and Gomorrah had grown so wicked that He must
punish them. Then Abraham thought of his nephew, Lot,
who was living in Sodom; and he prayed that God would




108 Lighteenth Sunday— Trinity Sunday.



spare the city, if there were even only fifty good men in it.
God said He would have mercy on the city if there were fifty.
Then Abraham said, Would He not spare it if there were forty-
five; then again if there were forty, or thirty, or twenty, or
even ten good people in it?) And the good and merciful God
promised that, if there were only ten good people in the city,
He would spare all the others for their sakes.

It is sad to remember that there were not even those ten
good people; and that nobody could be saved but Lot and
his two daughters. But only think how merciful and slow to
punish God is, and of how much use it is to pray to Him,
since He listened to Abraham, and was so very near sparing
Sodom, because Abraham prayed for it! And if there had
been only ten good people in it, the fire and brimstone would
not have come down on Sodom. So everyone who tries to be
good is helping to keep God’s anger away from the place
where he lives. The real way of being safe is to try to be as
holy and good as we can.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Abraham? 2. What had been promised him? 3. Who
came to him? 4. What promise did the Lord make him? 5. Who was
that son? 6. Who was Isaac’s son? 7. How many were Jacob’s sons?
8. What were their children called? 9. What did you last hear about the
Israelites? 10. After Abraham had been promised a son, what did God
say He must do to Sodom? 11. Why? 12. Who prayed for Sodom? 13,
What did Abraham beg for? 14. Were there ten good people in Sodom ?
15. Who were the only people that were saved? 16. What became of
Sodom? 17. Where was Lot? 18. What is the way to be safe?




The Glory of God. 109



THIRD READING.

“God saw every thing that He had made, and behold it was very good.”
—Genesis i. 31.
HIS is the same chapter over again that we read at the
beginning of the history. It tells us how God made the
world—the bright light first, then the blue sky, then the land
and sea, and all green things; then the sun, moon, and stars,
then the birds and fishes, and then the beasts and man. It is
a beautiful and wonderful story, and we may well read it over
and over. We read it to-day because it tells about the glory
of God. It is summer now, and all these good things are in
full beauty. Look up. There is the sky over our heads, with
bright white or soft grey clouds to shade us and send us rains,
God made it beautiful. And look round. There are hills and
fields and trees all green and fresh; and here are flowers ;
look how fair and sweet they are. If you pull one to bits,
each piece is perfect; and yet no one could put it together
again. And no colour, no shape is like theirs: even the most
plain and common of them is better than what any living
man could make. And God made them all.

Yes, and He made the birds that are flying about and sing-
ing so sweetly. He taught the cuckoo and the swallow and
the nightingale when to come; and He made them able to
build those wonderful nests, so woven together that not the
wisest man could make one like them. And most wonderful
of all that He made, He made us, ourselves. He gave us our
eyes, with their soft lids and the lashes that fringe them and
keep out all that could hurt—eyes to see and delight in these


110 Eighteenth Sunday—Trinity Sunday.



lovely things. And He gave us these quick, clever hands,
that touch and move so easily; and feet to run about with,
and lips and tongue to talk with, and a heart and soul to be
happy with and enjoy it all. And the very best thing you
can do to-day with that happy heart and tongue of yours, is
to thank the great God who made it all so beautiful, and who
saw “every thing that He had made, and behold it was very
good.”
QUESTIONS.

1. Who made the world? 2. What did God put into the world? 3.
Can anyone make things like what God has made? 4. Could we make
real flowers? 5. And though they are so small, are they not perfectly
made? 6. Who made the birds? 7. What did God teach the birds to
make? 8. Could we build nests like theirs? 9. What good things has
God given us? 10. How has He taken care of our eyes? 11. What has
He made our fingers able to do? 12. What has He given us a tongue
for? 13. What should you do with your tongue? 14. Why should you
thank God? 15. What did He say of all that He had made?






PASSING OVER JORDAN,



Aineteenth Sunday —ZFirst after Trinity.

ISRAEL IN BATTLE.
FIRST READING.

“Ye go over Jordan, and dwell in the land which the Lord your God
giveth you.”—Deuz. xii. 10.



FTER the children of Israel had been forty years living in
the wilderness, God led them into the beautiful land He
had promised them. But before they could come in they had
to get across a river—a deep river, with rocks on each side,
and a stony bottom to it, and the water running very fast
indeed. The name of the river was Jordan, There was no








112 N¢neteenth Sunday—First after Trinity.



bridge to go over, and no boat to row them across; and not
only all the strong men, but all the women and little children,
had to get over it!

But nobody need be afraid when God is helping him. God
told them what to do. The priests, who were like clergymen
to them, were to take the ark—that is, the chest where the
two tables of the Ten Commandments were kept—and were
to walk down into the river, without being afraid. And they
were brave men ; they believed what God told them, and went
down into the swift stream in no fear of being drowned. And
behold, as soon as their feet touched the water it stopped flow-
ing, and stood still. No more water came down, and all the
hosts of the children of Israel went straight over the bottom of
the river with dry feet. The priests stood up in the middle all
the time the others were going over, and when everyone was
safe on the other side they came after them; and by-and-by
the river came rushing down again in its own place, for it was
God who had commanded it to stop short, and make a dry
place for His people to pass over. And so they came into the
land of Canaan that He had promised them so long.

QUESTIONS.

1. How long did the children of Israel stay in the wilderness? 2.
Where were they going? 3. What had they to eat? 4. What had they
to drink? 5. What had God given them on Mount Sinai? 6. What were
the Ten Commandments written on? 7. Where were the two stones put ?
8. Who carried this ark? 9. What had the Israelites to go over? 1o.
What was the name of the river? 11. How do we cross rivers? 12. But
had they a bridge or a boat? 13. Who was taking care of them? 14. What






Israel in Battle. Hie



did God tell the priests todo? 15. Were the priests afraid to go into the
river? 16, Why not? 17. What happened when the priests’ feet touched
the water? 18. Who made the water stop running? 19. Who went over?
20, Where did they come to? 21. Who had promised them the land?

SECOND READING.
“ By faith the walls of Jericho fell down.” —Hebrews xi. 30.

FTER the Israelites had come into the land of Canaan,
there was a strong walled city before them, and its name
was Jericho. They could not go any further till they had
taken the city. But God was going to show that He fought
for them. So He told them not to fight, but that every day,
for a whole week, the priests should take the Ark of the
Covenant on their shoulders and walk round the outside of
the walls of the town. Seven priests were to go in front,
blowing on trumpets made of rams’ horns; but nobody else
was to make any noise. So they did one day, and nothing
happened. Joshua bade them do it the next day. Perhaps
some of the Israelites wondered and were impatient, but they
had to go on the next day still; and after that the Ark was
carried round once every day for a whole week.

On the seventh day, Joshua told the priests that God would
have them go round not once but seven times. And so they
did; and then, at last, on the seventh day, Joshua said,
“Shout.” The whole of the people shouted, and the priests
blew their trumpets, and then—oh, great wonder !—the walls
of Jericho fell down flat, and the people went in and took the
city. So the Lord fought for Israel.





H




114. Neneteenth Sunday—First after Trinity.



QUESTIONS.

1. Where were the Israelites now? 2. Who was their leader? 3. What
city were they come to? 4. What did they want to do? 5. Were they to
fight? 6, But what was to be carried round? 7. What was the Ark? 8.
What was in it? 9. Who carried the Ark? 10. Who went in front of
them? 11. How many days did they go on? 12. How many times did
they carry the Ark round at first? 13. How often on the seventh day?
14. What were the priests todo? 15. What were the people todo? 16.
What happened then? 17. Who had conquered Jericho? 18. What was
God giving the Israelites ?

THIRD READING.
“As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord.”—Foshua xxiv. 15,

HIS morning you heard how God gave the children of
Israel victory over Jericho. After that He gave them
more victories. None of the heathen people could stand
before them. They took their towns, and drove the heathen
out, and had the fields and gardens and houses for their own.
Then Joshua was to divide the land among them, and fix

what cities each tribe should have for its own.

All the chief men of each tribe came to him, and the Lord
taught him how to fix the places for them to dwell in. The
children of the good Joseph had the very best lot of all, as his
father Jacob had wished. It was just in the middle of the
country, and was full of beautiful corn land. Two tribes and
a-half lived on the other side of the river Jordan, on the edge
of the desert, but where there was fine grass for their cattle.
And the tribe of Judah had a very hilly, rocky part of the
country ; but they loved it, because it was where Abraham
had lived and now lay buried. And all up the hills they




Israel in Battle. “et 5

planted vines, where fine large grapes grew; and in the valleys
were plenty of corn-fields. All over the country, people had
each man his own house, with his vine and his fig-tree to
shelter it, and olive-trees in his garden, and a field to grow
corn in, and hill-sides near, where he might keep his cows,
goats, and sheep. And the rocks and the hollow trees were
full of wild bees’ nests ; so that indeed they found it, as Moses
had told them, a land of corn and wine—a land that flowed
with milk and honey; and they were very glad to be there,
and to rest after their long wandering in the wilderness.
After they had had a quiet rest, their first sorrow came. It
was that their brave leader Joshua had grown old, and felt him-
self near his death. So he called all the chief men together,
and told them over again how much God had done for them ;
and that if they would serve Him and keep His Command-
ments, all would go well with them. “As for me and my
house,” he said, “we will serve the Lord.” And all the people
promised too. They said they would serve the Lord, and would
not go after other gods, but would keep His Commandments.

QUESTIONS.

1. Where were the children of Israel now? 2. Who had promised the
land to them? 3. Who was leading them? 4. Whom did they drive out?
5. Who had the country then? 6. How was it settled where they were to
live? 7. Who had the best part? 8. What had Joseph done that was
good? 9. Who went beyond the Jordan? 10. What part did Judah have?
11, What grows there? 12. What choice plants grew in the land? 13.
What sort of place had they been told it would be? 14. Who was grown
old? 15. What did Joshua tell the Israelites? 16, What was the way
for them to be happy?












GIDEON'S FLEECE,



Cluenticth Sunday—Second after Grimty.

THE FUDGES OF ISRAEL.
FIRST READING.
“ The journey that thou takest shall not be for thine honour.” —Fudges iv. 19.
HEN the Israelites had come to live in the beautiful
land that God had promised them, they ought to have
loved and served Him, and thanked Him for all His good-

ness. But no! They liked worshipping false gods ; and they
made idols to pray to, cut out of wood and stone; and they

learnt wicked ways.




The Fudges of Israel. 117



Then God was angry with them; and He punished them
by sending cruel nations to conquer them, to burn their
houses, to steal their children, and drive away their cattle.
Then they would be sorry, and pray to God again; and He
had pity, and sent some brave man to defend them. To-day
we hear how sadly they were used by a fierce man named
Sisera, who had nine hundred war chariots of iron to go into
battle with. His people used to shoot at the Israelites at the
wells when they came to draw water; and nobody dared to
go along the high-roads, but only through the paths, for fear

of being killed.
QUESTIONS.

1. How ought the Israelites to have behaved? 2. What had God given
them? 3. Whom should they have worshipped? 4. But what did they
worship? 5. How did God punish them? 6. What was the name of the
cruel man who ill-used them? 7. How many chariots had Sisera?

SECOND READING.
“The Lord shall sell Sisera into the hand of a woman.”—Fudges iv. 9.

T last God spake to a good brave woman named Deborah,
and told her to send for a man named Barak, who should
lead the Israelites to fight with Sisera. She sent for Barak,
and told him what God had said. But Barak was afraid to
go alone. He said he must have Deborah with him. He
ought to have known that, if God sent him, he was sure to be
safe and to succeed.
Deborah told him that since he wished it she would go
with him, but that the journey should not be to his honour,








118 Twentieth. Sunday—Second after Trinity.



for the Lord would sell Sisera into the hand of a woman.
And it turned out as Deborah said. Barak won a great
battle, and drove the enemies away, so that they did not hurt
the children of Israel again for forty years. But he did not
meet with Sisera in the battle, nor get the honour of killing
him. Sisera fled out of the battle, and was killed after all by:
a woman, whose name was Jael. Barak lost all the honour,
because he would not do just as he was told, but was afraid
without Deborah, just as if God could not help him better
than Deborah could.

This morning’s lesson told how Deborah and Barak con-
quered the cruel Sisera.° This evening’s lesson is the song
that Deborah made to thank God for having given her the
victory, and saved His people.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was the holy woman that God raised up? 2. For whom did
Deborah call? 3. What was Barak todo? 4. Who did Barak say must
come with him? 5. Why was this wrong of Barak? 6. What happened
in the fight? 7. Did Barak kill Sisera? 8. Who did kill Sisera? 9. Why
was not Barak allowed to kill Sisera? 10. Whom ought he to have
trusted to? 11. Who will always help us if we are not afraid to do as we
are told?

THIRD READING.

“They chose new gods ; then was war in the gates.” Fudges v. 8.

HE Israelites never kept long from sinning and setting

up idols ; and, by-and-by, God let a set of robbers, called
Midianites, come in and burn their crops and houses, drive
away their cattle, and steal their children for slaves.


The Fudges of Lsrael. 119



Then the Israelites were sorry, and prayed to God to save
them. And God had pity on them, and sent His angel toa
man named Gideon, to tell him that He was to fight for the
Israelites.

A great many men came to Gideon; but the Israelites
were to be shown that it was as easy for God to save them
with few men as with many. So He bade Gideon send home
all but three hundred men. And Gideon believed, and sent
them home, and kept only the three hundred.

Then at night he took these men, and gave them each a
trumpet, and an earthen pitcher, with a lamp inside the
pitcher, so that the light could not be seen. He took a hun-
dred with him, and sent the other two hundreds another way,
creeping quietly along till they came to the place where the
Midianites had set up their tents, and were all lying asleep
among the cattle they had stolen. There they lay, and never
heard Gideon and his men coming till they were close to the
camp, the three parties on three sides. Then, all of a sudden,
everyone of the Israelites broke his pitcher and let his lamp
shine, and blew his trumpet, and shouted, “The sword of the
Lord and of Gideon!”

The Midianites were wakened out of their sleep to see
the lamps on three sides of them in the dark, and hear
the trumpets and the cries. They were very much fright-
ened, and quite wild with fear. They all began to beat
down-one another, for they did not know friends from
enemies. A great many were killed, and the rest fled away,
leaving all that they had stolen behind them. And so God










120 Twentieth Sunday—Second after Trinity.



delivered the Israelites from the Midianites by the hand of
Gideon, and gave them peace again as long as they would
serve the Lord.

QUESTIONS.

1. What made the Israelites meet with troubles? 2. Whom ought they
to have worshipped? 3. But whom did they worship? 4. What happened
then? 5. Who were the next people that ill-used them? 6. What did
they do when they were punished? 7. Whom did God send to save
them? 8. How many men was Gideon to have with him? 9g. What did
all the men carry? 10. Where did they go? 11. Into how many parties
were they divided? 12. What did the Midianites hear? 13. What did
they see? 14. What did they begin to do? 15. What became of those
that were not killed? 16. Who had made Gideon able to beat them with
so few men?




SAMUEL AND ELI.

Chuenty-frst Sunday—Ohud after Trinity.

SAMUEL.
FIRST READING.



“Samuel ministered before the Lord, being a child.”—1 Sam. ii. 18.

JYYVHERE was a very good woman named Hannah, and she

grieved because she had no children. Whenever she came
with her husband to God’s holy place, she used to kneel, and
pray with all her heart to God that He would let her have a
son; and she promised that if she had one, she would lend
him to the Lord all the days of his life. At last God granted
122 Twenty-first Sunday—Third after Trinity.

her prayer, and gave. her a little son, and she named him
Samuel. She was very glad when he was born, and she thanked
God, and sang a hymn of praise for her dear little child. But
she had promised to lend him to the Lord all his life ; and she
kept her promise. As soon as little Samuel was old enough
to be without her, she took him to the holy place, that was
instead of a church, and gave him to wait upon the Lord. He
lived with the High Priest, whose name was Eli, and was
taught by him.

Eli was a very old man, and his sons used to behave very
badly ; but Samuel was always good and obedient to him,
and used to wait upon him, and help him when he served
God in the holy place. Samuel wore a little white linen
dress like the priests ; and when his mother came to see him,
she used to bring him a little coat. She had five more child-
ren afterwards, three sons and two daughters. If you listen
in the afternoon, you will hear how God spoke to Samuel
whilst he was still a little boy ; and I am sure you like to think
of the little child in his white dress, ministering before God in
His beautiful holy place. But only think. You can be like
Samuel. Your father and mother lent you to God for all your
life. when they took you to the font, and made you God’s
child ; and though you live at home, you go to church, and
can serve God there, if you kneel and stand and sit quietly at
the proper times, mind the prayers, and repeat the Amens,
and the verses you know, in their right places. And if you
are obedient, and try to be good, God will love you as He
loved Samuel.




Samuel, 123



QUESTIONS.

1. What was the name of the woman we hear of to-day? 2. What did
she wish for? 3. What did she do to obtain her wish? 4. What did God
give her? 5. What was her son’s name? 6. What did she promise? 7.
Where did Hannah bring her little son? 8. Who took care of Samuel?
g. Who was Eli? 10. How did Samuel behave? 11. What did Samuel
wear? 12. What had Samuel to do? 13. When were you lent to God?
14. Whose child are you? 15. How can you be like Samuel when you go
to church? 16. How can you be like him at home? 17. Who will bless
you if you try to be good? 18. What kind of children does God love?

SECOND READING.
“Speak, Lord ; for Thy servant heareth.”—-1 Sam. iii. 9.

OU heard this morning that Hannah brought her little son
Samuel, to be brought up in the holy place by the High
Priest Eli.

Samuel was very good and holy, and God blessed him and
loved him. One night, when everyone was gone to bed, but
the lamp in the holy place was not yet gone out, Samuel heard
a voice calling to him, “Samuel!” He sprang up at once, for
he thought that Eli had called him, and he ran.to Eli and
said, “ Here I am, for thou didst call me.” But Eli answered,
“T called not, my son; lie down again;” and Samuel went
back to his bed.

Then.again came the voice calling to him, “Samuel!” and
again he thought it was Eli’s call. He was not lazy, or fretful
at being roused out of his sleep, but he ran at once to Eli,
and again said, “Here I am, for thou didst call me.” But






124 Twenty-first Sunday—Third after Trinity.



Eli sent him back to his bed again ; and there again he heard
the call, “Samuel!”

Patiently he once more rose and came to the old man, but
this time Eli knew that it must have been no other than God's
own voice speaking to the child. So he bade Samuel go back,
and next time he heard the voice, to say, “Speak, Lord ; for
Thy servant heareth.”

And so Samuel did. Again his name was called, and he
made answer, “Speak ; for Thy servant heareth.”

And God spoke to him in the still night, and told him to
give Eli a fresh warning of the sad things that were coming
on him and on his sons. Samuel was forced to tell Eli all in
the morning, sad and mournful as it was. He was afraid and
grieved to have such things to say, but he told the truth, and
Eli was too good a man to be angry with him, and only said,
“It is the Lord: let Him do what seemeth Him good.”

And, after that, God often made His will known to Samuel,
and blessed him, and all Israel knew that Samuel was God’s
own prophet. Think of the great honour and blessing of
having God so often speaking to him! But we have that
blessing too. God is nearer to a little Christian child than He
was to Samuel; for the Holy Spirit speaks in a Christian
child’s heart, and tells him to be good and dutiful, and to
think of God, and say his prayers with all his heart. And
that is better than even being a prophet like Samuel. Only
we must take great care to attend to that voice; or it will
leave off, and then we shall get worse and worse, like those
bad sons of poor old Eli.








Samuel. 125



QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Samuel? 2. Where was he brought up? 3. What did his
mother bring him every year? 4. Who was the High Priest? 5. What
did Samuel hear? 6. Who did he think was calling? 7. What did he
do? 8. What did Eli say? 9. How often did this happen? 10, Was
Samuel cross at being called so often? 11. Who was he honouring? 12.
What did Eli perceive at last? 13. What did he tell Samuel to answer ?
14. What did he hear again? 15. Howdidhe answer? 16. What did the
voice tell him? 17. Whose voice speaks to us? 18. How does the Holy
Spirit speak tous? 19. What must we take care to do?

THIRD READING.
* The Ark of God is taken.”—Samuel iv. 17.

OD helped the Israelites again and again, but they would
not leave off their wickedness, and at last He punished
them still more. There came up a nation to make war upon
them, fiercer than any before, called the Philistines. Then the
Israelites fancied that if they took the Ark of the Covenant
out into the battle with them they would get the victory, as
they had done when Joshua conquered the land. But God
had never bidden them take the Ark. He had commanded
that it should stay in its place at Shiloh. They did not heed
this, but took it out into the camp, and all the people shouted
for joy when it was brought, with the two priests, Hophni and
Phinehas, Eli’s sons, to take care of it. When the Philistines
heard the shout, they said that the gods of Israel were come,
and that they must fight all the more bravely. And they did.
God would not help His people because of their self-will, so He

|


126 Twentyirst Sunday—Third after Trinity.



let them be beaten by the Philistines, and Hophni and
Phinehas were killed, and the holy Ark of God was taken by
these heathens. And when poor old Eli, the High Priest,
heard the sad news, he was so much shocked, that he fell down
backwards and broke his neck and died.

God still shewed His power, for when the Philistines put the
Ark into the temple of one of their false gods the idol fell
down and was broken; and wherever it was taken the people
fell sick, till at last they sent it back to the Israelites: but it
never came back to Shiloh. It was hidden in a lonely house
in the woods; and the Philistines were strong and the Israelites
were very weak and miserable, because they had been so very
disobedient.

QUESTIONS.

1. What people came to fight with the Israelites? 2. Why did God let
any one hurt the Israelites? 3. What did the Israelites think would help
them to fight? 4. What was in the Ark of the Covenant ? 5. Where was
it kept? 6. Ought they to have taken it? 7. Why not? 8. Why did they
take it? 9. Did it give them the victory? 10, Why not? 11. Who were
killed? 12. Who was the father of Hophni and Phinehas? 13. What
happened to Eli when he heard the Ark was taken? 14. Why did God
allow it to be taken? 15. Did it come back again? 16, Why did not the
Philistines keep it? 17. What happened to their idol? 18. What hap-
pened to themselves? 19. Where had it been before? 20. Did it ever
come back to Shiloh? 21. Where was it kept ?

CD














SAMUEL ANOINTING SAUL.



Choenty-second Sunday—Fourth after Crimity.

KING SAUL.
FIRST READING.
“ Behold, the Lord hath set a king over you.”—1 Sam. xii. 13.

HERE was a young man named Saul, who was very tall
and strong. His father kept a number of asses; for, in

the land of Israel, people rode on asses instead of horses. One
day all the asses were lost, and Saul and one of the servants
went out to look for them. They went a long long way, and
never found the asses; and at night they came to a city, and








128 Twenty-second Sunday—Fourth afler Trinity.



there they found Samuel. Samuel was an old man now, and
grey-headed; and he ruled over Israel, and everyone honoured
and loved him, because he was so good and just. Saul was
very much surprised when the great and good Samuel met
him, and led him into the house, and put him in the chief
place, and gave him a choice piece of meat that had been set
apart for him. Saul could not think how Samuel knew any-
thing about him. And he was still more surprised the next
morning, for then Samuel came out of the city with him, and
sent the servant on before. Then Samuel took some oil, and
poured it on Saul’s head, which was what was called anoint-
ing, and told him that God had chosen him to be king over
all the people of Israel. Was not this wonderful news for
him? And you see, God had led him to Samuel to be made
king, though he so little guessed what was going to happen
when he set out to look for the asses. And God still makes
everything happen, even the least thing ; it is all for our good,
even though we do not quite see why.

So Saul was the first King of Israel ; but he was only to be
prosperous as long as he would take care to obey God.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was the first King of Israel? 2. Did Saul expect to be a king ?
3. What did he set out from home to do? 4. Where did he come? 5.
Who was in the city? 6, What did you hear about Samuel last Sunday?
7. What age was Samuel now? 8. What did he give Saul? 9. What sur-
prised Saul? 10. What did Samuel do to him the next day? 11. What
is anointing? 12. What was he tobe? 13. But what must he do if he
would get on well?








King Saul. 129



SECOND READING.

“There is no restraint to the Lord to save by many or by few.”—
I Sam. xiv. 6.
AUL was the first king of Israel. But just at first, when
he was appointed king, the people were in great distress;
for their enemies the Philistines had overrun the whole land,
and held all the strong places, and were very hard to the
Israelites. They would not even let a smith live among the
Israelites, that they might not be able to have swords or spears
made to use in fighting ; and the Israelites had to go into the
Philistines’ country to get their axes and ploughshares made,
and to sharpen the goads, or long sticks tipped with iron that
they drove the oxen with.

Nobody had a sword or spear but Saul and his good son
Jonathan ; all the rest of the people had nothing better to
fight with than axes and mattocks and goads, and they were
very much frightened, and came trembling after their new king.

But Jonathan trusted in God, and he and one young man
set out creeping along a rugged steep path to see what the
enemy were about, and by-and-by they came below the high
rocky hill where the Philistines were encamped.

One of the Philistines looked out and said, “ Behold, the
Hebrews come forth out of the holes where they had hid them-
selves ;” and he called out to Jonathan, “ Come up to us, and
we will show you a thing.”

Now, Jonathan knew, as he said to his friend, that the Lord
can save as easily by few men as by many, so he was not
afraid; and he and the other young man climbed up on their

I




130 Twenty-second Sunday—Fourth after Trinity.





hands and knees till they came out among all the Philistine
soldiers. Then they began to fight at once, and the Philistines
were so surprised at these two men beginning to fight with
them, that they most likely thought all the others were behind,
and they began to run away.

The people in Saul’s camp heard all the noise, and went out
to look, and saw the Philistines running away, so they went
after them, and killed many, and drove them out of the land,
and got free of them once more.

So God blessed and helped the good Jonathan, because he
trusted in Him; and Saul became a great king.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was the first king of Israel? 2. Who made Saul king? 3. Who
was Saul’s son? 4. Who were the enemies of the Israelites? 5. Why
would not the Philistines let the Israelites have any smiths? 6. What is
asmith? 7. What tools does a smith make? 8. How did the Israelites
get their iron tools? 9. Who were the only ones that had swords and
spears? 10, Why were the people afraid? 11. Who crept out to see the
Philistines? 12. What did Jonathan know that God could do? 13.
Where did he climb up? 14. What happened? 15. What became of the
Philistines? 16. Who became king ?

THIRD READING.
“TIntreat me not to leave thee.”—Auth i. 16.
NE fine summer day, a good man named Boaz went out
into his corn-fields where his reapers were cutting down
the wheat. “The Lord be with you,” he said. “ The Lord
bless thee,” they answered. Then he saw a young woman






King Saul. Iga

gleaning, whom he had never seen before. He asked who she
was. He heard that her name was Ruth, and she was a
stranger and a widow. Then why had she come there?
Because she could not bear to leave her husband’s mother,
Naomi, alone in her old age. She knew that if she kept with
Naomi she must be poor and forlorn, and away from all her
friends ; but she loved her mother-in-law so much, that she
said, “Intreat me not to leave thee, or to return from follow-
ing after thee: . . . where thou lodgest, I will lodge:
thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God: where
thou diest, will I die, and there will I be buried.”

When Boaz knew that Ruth was poor and a stranger, he
told his reapers to drop some handfuls of corn in her way ;
and he told Ruth to keep among his young maidens, so that
nobody might be rude to her, and that she might rest and eat
among them when they rested in the heat of the day.

Ruth carried home plenty of corn to her mother-in-law.
And soon it was found out that Boaz was their nearest friend ;
and he married Ruth, and Naomi lived with them ; and Ruth
was no longer poor and a stranger, but was happy as a wife
and mother in her beautiful home.

QUESTIONS.

1. What was the name of the mother of whom we hear to-day? 2. Whose
mother was she? 3. But who was good to her? 4. What did Ruth do for
Naomi? 5. Where did she goto glean? 6. Who sawher? 7. What did Boaz
bid his men do? 8. How did Boaz speak to his men? 9. How did they
answer? 10. How was he kind to Ruth? 11. What did she find out?
12. Whom did Ruth marry? 13. What became of Naomi? 14. Why was
Ruth sohappy? 15. Whom does God bless?
















DAVID AND GOLIATH.



Choenty-thirs Sunday.— Fitth after Crmty.

THE REIGN OF SAUL.
FIRST READING.

“ Because thou hast rejected the word of the Lord, He hath also rejected

thee from being king.”—1 Sam. xv. 23.
AST Sunday you heard how God chose Saul to be king
of Israel, and promised to help him if he would obey in

all that God commanded him.

Now, there were some cruel robbers that lived in the moun-
tains, and used to fall upon peaceful people, and kill them ;
and take their cows and sheep and camels and asses, and gold








The Reign of Saul. 133



and silver, and all they had. So God sent a message by
Samuel to Saul and his brave men, to destroy these cruel
people; but God said that none of all their prey and riches,
that had been gained by such wicked ways, was to be kept by
His people; it was all to be made away with; they were to
have none of it for themselves.

They won the battle, and killed the robbers, as they were
sure to do when God helped them; but then when they saw
such fine cattle and choice things, they would not obey
God, but went and took it all for themselves. They left
only the poor and mean that they did not care for, and
helped themselves to all they liked. And then, when Samuel
came to meet them, Saul made as if he had done just what
he was told, and said, “I have obeyed the voice of the
Lord.” But Samuel said, “What meaneth then this bleating
of the sheep in mine ears, and the lowing of the oxen which
J hear?”

Saul wanted to make excuses ; but it was not the first time
he had been disobedient ; and he was only frightened, he was
not really sorry; so Samuel was obliged to tell him, “ Because
thou hast rejected the word of the Lord, He hath also rejected
thee from being king.”

Saul would not do as he was told, and so God punished
him. Remember that. Your parents and teachers, or nurses,
give you orders; and you have to mind them exactly—not
only to do what you like, and miss out the rest. Saul did
what he liked when he fought the robbers, but he would not
obey when he took the spoil. Then God was angry with him.








134 Twenty-third Sunday—Fifth after Trinity.

Do not you be like him; but obey when you do not like, as
well as when you do like.

QUESTIONS.

1. What is the Fifth Commandment? 2. What must we always do?
3. Who did we hear of to-day who did not do as he was told? 4, What
was Saul told todo? 5. Whotold him? 6. Who was Samuel? 7. Who
was Saul? 8. What was Saul told not to do? 9. How far did he obey?
10. In what did he disobey? 11. Why was it wrong of Saul to keep the
robbers’ cattle and sheep? 12. What did he say when Samuel came?
13. Was this true? 14. What did Samuel hear that showed that this
was false? 15. Whom had Saul disobeyed? 16. How was Saul to be
punished? 17, Why was Saul not to keep the kingdom?

SECOND READING.

“Y have found David my servant; with my holy oil have I anointed
him.”—Psalm |xxxix. 20.

HE hills that lie above Bethlehem have green slopes where
the sheep feed. There, one day, a flock was feeding, and

a boy with blue eyes and shining hair watched them, and
perhaps sung as he watched. He was the youngest of eight
brothers, and all the rest had gone down to a great feast ; for
Samuel, the great Prophet, was come to visit their father.
But the youngest must stay out with the sheep. No one
would want him. But see—a messenger is coming up the
hill. He calls—David is wanted.. The Prophet has called for
him. So the boy is obedient, and rises up, to run down the
hill at his father’s call. Perhaps he stopped to wash his face


The Reign of Saut. 135



in the clear well of Bethlehem before he went up to the place
of the feast, the same place where Boaz had brought his bride
Ruth, for Jesse, David’s father, was Ruth’s grandson.

There stood the Prophet, with his long white hair flowing
down; and as soon as young David came in, he stepped for-
ward with a horn in his hand, and sweet-smelling oil of olives
mixed with incense was flowing upon David’s golden hair.
He was the Anointed of the Lord. In time to come he would
be king, but he must wait long and patiently first.

Yes. Each of his seven brothers had passed before Samuel
—tall goodly men—but God had spoken to Samuel, and for-
bidden him to choose them; for Samuel could only see their
fine handsome faces and figures, but God looked at their hearts,
and knew they were proud men, who would soon have been
as fierce and headstrong as Saul himself. So he had sent
Samuel to choose the youngest and least thought-of of all
Jesse’s sons, and anoint him to be king of Israel. Yes; and
above all, to be the forefather of our Blessed Lord Jesus Christ.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was sent to Bethlehem? 2. Who used to live at Bethlehem?
3. What was Samuel to do? 4. Whose son was he to anoint? 5. What
does anointing mean? 6. What was anointing to mark him for? 7. How
many sons had Jesse? 8. How many came to the feast? 9. Which did
not come? 10. Where was David? 11. Were his brothers anointed ?
12. Why not? 13. Who saw their hearts? 14. Who was sent for? 15.
What did Samuel do? 16. Why was Saul to be punished? 17. Why was
David chosen? 18. Was he to begin to reign at once? 19. How was he
to wait?




136 Twenty-third Sunday—Fifth after Trinity.



THIRD READING.

“T come to thee in the name of the Lord of hosts, the God of the armies
of Israel.” —1 Sam. xvii. 45.
HOUGH King Saul had beaten the Philistines, still
they used to come back again and try to conquer the
Israelites.

Once they came with an army, and Saul had an army too.
The Israelites were on one hill and the Philistines on another
hill, and there was a valley between. Then out in front of the
Philistines’ camp came a giant named Goliath; for there really
were giants then, and Goliath had three brothers as tall as
himself.

Goliath was nearly twice as tall as any man we ever saw,
and he had a helmet on his head, and armour on his breast,
and an enormous spear, and a shield, and a man carried a
shield before him. He stood out, and called to know if any:
Israelite would fight with him. Then if Goliath conquered
the Israelite, the Philistines should be lords over the Israelites;
but if an Israelite conquered Goliath, then the Israelites should
be lords over the Philistines.

But nobody felt bold or strong enough to go out to fight
with this great man; and day after day he came and walked
up and down, and laughed the Israelites to scorn for not dar-
ing to come out, they who called themselves the servants of
God.

At last a young shepherd boy came to the camp. He had
three brothers among Saul’s soldiers, and his father had sent
him to take them some loaves of bread, and see how they








The Reign of Saul. eee

were. The shepherd boy’s name was David. When he came
he saw the proud Goliath walking up and down boasting
against the Israelites ; he asked the soldiers about him, and
was so eager that at last they brought him to the king ; and
Saul asked him how it was that he, who was only a youth,
could dare to think of fighting with a man of war like
Goliath.

David answered that when he was keeping his flocks a lion
and a bear had come and tried to take away a lamb. And
God had made him strong to kill both the lion and the bear,
and saved him from danger; and he trusted that in like
manner God would help him if he fought with the giant.

So Saul wanted to dress David in his own armour, but it
was too large for him, and he would not use it. All he did
was to choose five smooth stones out of the brook, and put
them into his shepherd’s bag. And he took his sling, a long
strip of leather, the ends of which he used to hold in his hand
to throw stones farther with, when he wanted to drive beasts
away from his flock. And with only his sling and his stone
he went out to meet the giant.

Goliath was fierce and angry when he saw such a boy, and
he thought it was only laughing at him to send no better
warrior to fight with him. But David said, “ Thou comest to
me with a sword and with a spear and with a shield: but I
come to thee in the name of the Lord of hosts, . . . whom
thou hast defied.”

Then David took one of his stones and slung it out of his
sling. It struck the very middle of the giant’s forchead, and






—
138 Twenty-third Sunday—Fifth after Trintty.



went deep in, and down fell Goliath. All his great strength
was of no use to him, and David ran and stood upon him, and
drew out his great sword from his side, and cut off his head.

All the other Philistines fled away, and David gave thanks
to God for his great victory.

By-and-by David came to be king instead of Saul ; and he
loved God, and trusted in Him so faithfully that God Himself
called him a man after His own heart.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who were the enemies of the Israelites? 2. Who was the giant ?
3. What isa giant? 4. What did Goliath wear? 5. What did he call the
Israelites to do? 6. Who was the only one that would come out to fight ?
7. What was David? 8. Why was not Davidafraid? 9. What had David
killed before? 10. What did David take with him? 31. What wasa
sling? 12. What did David say? 13. Who helped David? 14. How
‘did David attack Goliath? 15. What happened to Goliath? 16, What
did David do to him then? 17. What became of the other Philistines?
18. What did David come to be? . 19. What did God call David? 20.
Why did God love David?


















KING DAVID REIGNING.
FIRST READING.

“ How are the mighty fallen !”—2 Saznzel i. 19.

HE last thing that has to be told about Saul is very sad.
You know he would not do as God bade him, but chose
to go his own way. Then God forsook him, and left him to
grow worse and worse. Then his enemies, the Philistines,
came up against him, and his army came together on the hills
to meet them. But God was not with Saul, so his men could






140 Lwenty-fourth Sunday—Sixth after Trinity.



not fight, and he was beaten back step by step up into his
own hills, close to his home; and there, when he found he
could go no further, and that the Philistines would soon be
upon him, he did the saddest thing of all—he threw himself
on his own sword, that they might not take him alive. He
did not quite kill himself; and when a young robber came
by, trying to get garments and weapons from the dead bodies,
the unhappy king begged for a death-blow as he lay. The
robber gave him the last stroke, and then took the crown
from his helmet, and his bracelets, and brought them to
David, to show that he was dead. The robber thought he
should have a reward, but David put him to death for having
dared to strike the king: and David grieved and mourned for
Saul, who had been a great and noble king once. But he had
come to this miserable end because he would have his own
way and will.

Then, when Saul was killed, David was anointed to be
king ; and he was a very good man, and served God with all
his heart. So God blessed him, and made him great and
powerful.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Saul? 2. What was Saul’s fault? 3. Who came out to
fight against Saul? 4. Where was he driven? 5. Who came after him?
6. What dreadful thing did he do? 7. Who killed him entirely? 8. What
did the robber take? 9. To whom did he carry Saul’s crown? 10. What
did David do to him? 11. Why? 12. Who was to be king now? 13.
Why did Saul come to such an end? 14. Whose way should he have
followed? 15. Can anyone go on well who is self-willed? 16. Who was
king after Saul?








King David Reigning. 141

SECOND READING.
“T shall go to him, but he shall not return to me.”—2 Samuel xii. 23.

ING David had a little son, a baby, whom he loved very
much; and this child fell sick. While it was sick King
David grieved for it, and prayed that it might be made well.
But it was not God’s will to make the little boy well, and he
died. And then David was patient, and knew it was God’s will;
and he said, “I shall go to him, but he shall not return to me.”
For David meant that one day he should die, and then his
soul would go to be with his little son’s soul in the happy
place of rest; and by-and-by their bodies will rise again out
of their graves, and be joined to their souls again, and live for
ever and ever. King David used to sing the Psalms to praise
God ; indeed, he first made most of them ; and in one he says,
“My flesh also shall rest in hope.” That was, the hope that
he should rise again from the dead, and always live in God’s
holy home in heaven. Heaven is the happy place where we
all hope to meet and live by-and-by, and that is the comfort
that good Christians have when death takes away friends

whom they love. QUESTIONS.

1. What was David’s sorrow? 2. What did he do when his little boy
was ill? 3. Did the little boy get better? 4. What became of him? 5.
How did David bear his death? 6. What did he say? 7. Where did he
hope to go to his little son? 8, When would his soul go to his child’s
soul? 9g. When will their bodies rise? 10. What does David say of his
flesh? 11. What is his flesh? 12. What hope does he rest in? 13,
When will our flesh rest? 14. What do we hope todo? 15. Where in
the Belief do you say we hope to rise from the dead? 16, What people
will be happy then? 17. What are David’s songs called?





De








142 Twenty-fourth Sunday—Sixth after Trinity.

THIRD READING.
“O my son Absalom, O Absalom, my son, my son !”—2 Sam. xix. 4.

OOD King David had more sons besides the little one

who died. One was named Absalom. He was a very
fine, handsome young man, and had most beautiful hair; but
he was fierce and proud, and wanted to be king.

And when David was old, this wicked Absalom gathered
men together, and drove his father away, that he might be
king instead. Good King David had to go away, weeping
and barefoot, down the steep rocky pass, for fear of his
wicked son; and cruel men called him names, and threw
stones at him as he went, while Absalom was made to reign
in his father’s palace, and did all he pleased there. But God
will not let wicked men prosper; and all David’s faithful old
soldiers came together to help him. They had a great battle
with Absalom and his men; and Absalom was beaten, and
fled away on a mule.

But when he came into a wood, his thick hair was caught
in an oak tree, and he could not get it loose; and his mule
went away, and left him still with his hair caught in the tree.

Now, though Absalom had been so wicked, his father loved
him still, and had begged all his men to take care not to
hurt the young man Absalom. So when one of the men saw
Absalom caught by the hair in a tree he would not hurt him,
and only went and told Absalom’s cousin, Joab, who was the
captain of David’s army.

Joab had no pity; he thought Absalom richly deserved to




King David Reigning. 143

die, and he was afraid the king would pardon him; so he
went at once, with three darts in his hand, and killed Absalom
as he hung in the tree.

King David was grieved to the heart. No words can say
how sad he was to think that his son had died in his sin, and
never asked his pardon. He wept, and cried aloud, “O my
son Absalom, my son, my son Absalom! would God I had
died for thee, O Absalom, my son, my son!” It was not like
his grief for the innocent little baby he had lost before; for
Absalom had been a bad man, and for that there is no
comfort.

And when all the people came joyfully to bring King
David home to his palace, to be king again, still his heart
mourned for his son Absalom.

QUESTIONS.

1, What is the Fifth Commandment? 2. Do you hear of anyone to-day
who broke the Fifth Commandment? 3. How did Absalom break it? 4.
Who was Absalom’s father? 5. How had David to go away? 6. What
did cruel men do? 7. Who came to help David? 8. What did he charge
them? 9. Who won the battle? 10. What happened to Absalom? 11.
Who saw him there? 12. Whom did the man tell? 13. Why did Joab
kill Absalom? 14. Did Absalom deserve it? 15. How did his father
behave? 16. What did he cry out? 17. Why was he more sorry than for
his baby son? 18. What is sadder than even dying? 19. How should
you behave to your parents?




















DAVID BUYING THE THRESHING-FLOOR.



Choenty-ffth Sunday.—Sebenth after Crinity.

PREPARING FOR THE TEMPLE.
FIRST READING.

y
“Nay; but I will surely buy it of thee at a price.” —2 Sam. xxiv. 24.

YHEN David was king his people did wrong again; and
there came a plague upon them, so that a great number

of them died all through the land of Israel.
David and his priests, and all the good men, fasted and
prayed, and entreated that God would turn His anger away.
And while they were praying, David saw the Destroying






Preparing for the Temple. 145



Angel standing with his drawn sword over Jerusalem; but
the plague had not begun there. Then David prayed the
more; and God made known to him that he must offer up a
sacrifice on the threshing-floor of Ornan, just by Jerusalem,
and then the plague should be stopped.

A threshing-floor was a flat rocky place on the top of a hill,
where the sheaves of corn were laid out, and oxen drew
boards, with the under side covered with spikes, to knock the
grain out of the ears. Ornan’s threshing-floor was upon
Mount Moriah, where Isaac had been so nearly sacrificed.
He was threshing wheat on it when David came and desired
to buy it for the sacrifice. Ornan was a good man, and said
he would give the whole place to the king. But David said,
“T will not offer unto my God of that which doth cost me
nothing.” So he bought the place of Ornan, the oxen, and
the threshing tools; and the sacrifice was made to show that
death must be for sin. Then God pardoned Israel, and the
plague was stopped. We should remember that our offerings
to God are only worthy if they cost us something. He does
not want the things themselves, but He does value the love
that gives them.

QUESTIONS.

1. What is a threshing-floor? 2. Whose threshing-floor have we heard

of? 3. Where was it? 4. What had happened on Mount Moriah? 5.

Whose son was Isaac? 6. Was he sacrificed? 7. Why not? 8. What

town was near? 9. Who bought the threshing-floor? 10. Why? 11.

What is a plague? 12. Why was the plague sent? 13. What did David

see? 14. What was he bidden todo? 15. What did Ornan want to do?
i 16. What did David say? 17. So what ought we to give to God?





K






= ay

146 Zwenty-fifth Sunday—Seventh after Trinity.



SECOND READING.
“ His seed also will I make to endure for ever.”—Psa/m Ixxxix. 29.

OU know the two Tables of the Commandments were kept
in the Ark of the Covenant ; and when the Israelites were

going about in the wilderness, they had a beautiful tent to
keep it in. But now they had come into the Land of Promise,
and had no more journeys to make, David wished to build a
house, or temple, where the Ark might be kept, and to make |
it beautiful for the glory of God. But the Lord had sent a
prophet to tell David that he must not himself build a house
for God, because he had been a man of war, and had fought,
and shed much blood; but that his son Solomon should be a
man of rest, and should build the Temple for the Lord.

David did not repine. He thanked God for giving him the
hope that his son should do this great work ; and all the rest
of his life he was busy getting together gold and silver, brass
and iron, and beautiful cedar wood, all for the Temple of his
God. It was to be built on Mount Moriah, on the threshing-
floor he had bought of Ornan, just by the city of Jerusalem,
which David had conquered from the Jebusites, and made the
capital of his kingdom.

QUESTIONS.

1. What was kept in the Ark of the Covenant? 2. Where was the Ark
kept at first? 3. What did David want to build? 4. Why was not David
allowed to build a temple? 5. Did he fret and grieve at being forbidden?
6. Who was to build the Temple? 7. What did David get ready? 8.
Where was the Temple to be? 9g. When had he bought it of Ornan?




Preparing for the Temple. 147



THIRD READING.
“All things come of Thee, and of Thine own have we given Thee.”—
1 Chronicles xxix. 14.
AVID had grown to be a very old man, near to his death;
but, before he died, he called all the princes of his people
together at Jerusalem, and asked them all to bring offerings
to help to build a beautiful house, to be a Temple to the
Lord their God. So all the people brought what precious
things they could, to add to what the king had prepared ; and
a great quantity was ready—all willingly offered.

Then good King David stood up and made his offering.
“All things come of Thee,” he said, “and of Thine own have
we given Thee.” And He thanked and blessed the Lord God,
who had been with him all his life; and he blessed his people
Israel, and showed them his son Solomon, who was to reign
after him; and he gave Solomon a charge to build the Temple
of the Lord, and bade them all serve the Lord with all their
might. And the crown was set on Solomon’s head, and he was
king; and David died at a good old age. He was the shepherd
boy who came to be a king, and who first sung so many of the
beautiful Psalms that are still our best words for praising God.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was David? 2. Who was his son? 3. What was Solomon to
do? 4. What had David got ready for Solomon? 5. What did he ask
his princes to bring? 6. What did they bring? 7. What for? 8. When
did David meet all his people? 9. Who was to be king? 10. Why was
David glad? 11. What did he say to God? 12. Whose are all things ?
13. What charge did David give? 14. What had David been before he
was king? 15. What did David write? 16. What are the Psalms?






NFA
oe



SOLOMON’S JUDGMENT.



Choenty-sixth Suuday—Eighth after Crmitn.

SOLOMON IN HIS GLORY.
FIRST READING.
“ Thine, O Lord, is the greatness, and the power, and the glory, and the
victory, and the majesty.”——-1 Chrox, xxix. II.
HE last thing holy King David did was to have his son,
young Solomon, anointed to reign, and then to show him

to the people, and charge them to help him build the Temple —

for the Lord God. For he said Solomon was still very young,
and the work was very great; so he begged the people of
the tribes to bring their offerings; and so they did. They




ota mre





Solomon in his Glory. 149



brought gold, silver, brass, iron, and beautiful stones, or the
wood of oaks and cedars, according to what they had or could
give; and when David saw it he was very happy and glad,
and offered it up to God, and prayed that God would give
unto his son Solomon a perfect heart, that he might serve
God and keep His laws.

Then there was a great feast all round Mount Sion, all the
people eating, and drinking, and rejoicing, and praising God,
who had given them rest from all their enemies.

QUESTIONS.

i. What did David ask of his people? 2. What did they bring him?
3. What were all these things for? 4. Who was to build the Temple?
5. Why was not David himself allowed to build it? 6. Yet what did he
get together for it? 7. Why was he happy? 8. What did he ask of God?
9. What great rejoicing was there? 10. Why was everything happy now
with the nation?

SECOND READING.

“Give me now wisdom and knowledge.”—2 Chron. i. 10.

HEN King David died, Solomon was still almost a boy.

But God spake to him in a dream by night, and said,
“Ask what I shall give thee.” Then Solomon said he was
but young, and knew not how to rule over this great people
that God had given him; and therefore he prayed, above all,
that God would give him a wise and understanding heart.
And God was pleased with Solomon’s choice, and said that
because he had cared for wisdom most, and had not asked for
riches, or long life, or to put down his enemies, that therefore,






150 Twenty-sixth Sunday—Eighth after Trinity.



besides wisdom, God would give him all the rest—riches, and
honour, and length of life—and he should be wiser, and
greater, and richer, than any king ever was before him, or
should be after him. All this was because he had cared so
much to have a wise and understanding heart to know good
and evil. That was first with him, and so God gave him all
the rest. So it will be with all who seek first of all to be good.
God does not make us wise all at once like Solomon, but if
we care about it, He will help us to get wise by little and
little if we really try, and then He will bless all we do.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Solomon? 2. Whose son was he? 3. What was he king of?
4. How old was he when he began to be king? 5. What did God say to
him at night? 6. What did Solomon wish for most? 7. What did God
give him besides? 8. Why did God give him all these things when he
did not ask for them? 9. What should we care about most? 10. What
will God do for us if we care most about goodness? 11. How will He help
us to get wise? 12. But what must we do ourselves ?

THIRD READING.
“The wisdom of God was in him, to do judgment.”—1 K7zugzs iii. 28.

ERE is a story to show how wise and clever King

Solomon was. One day when he was sitting on his
throne two women came to him: one with a live baby, the
other with a dead one, both boys, and just of the same age.
They said they had been living alone together in the same
house, each with her little baby, till one night one of the
| women rolled over her child in her sleep and stifled it, so that




Solomon in his Glory. 151

she found it was dead. But each woman said it was not her
baby but the other’s that was dead, and that the mother of
the dead one had put the little corpse down by the other
sleeping woman, and taken her living child out of her bosom
to herself. How was it to be known which was right ?—for
nobody out of the house knew the two little ones apart, and
each of the women declared that she was the mother of the
live child, not of the dead. So they came to the king to judge
between them.

And what plan could Solomon take to find out the truth?
He sent for the executioner, with a sword, and said that as
the women could not agree, both the children should be cut
in two, and each woman should have the two halves. One
woman was content to have it so, but the other only cried out
in grief and dread, “O my lord, give her the living child, and
in no wise slay it.” Then Solomon saw in a moment which
was full of mother’s love, and which was full of hatred and
jealousy ; so he said, “Give er the living child, and in no
wise slay it: she is the mother thereof.” And so the true
loving mother had her child safe and well, and the other was
disappointed in her spite.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Solomon? 2. Who came before him? 3. What had hap-
pened to one baby? 4. What did both the women say? 5. What had
Solomon to decide? 6. What did he command? 7. Did he really mean
to kill the child? 8. But what did he want to find out? 9. What did one
woman say? 10. What did the other woman say? 11. Which was the
real mother? 12. What did Solomon command? 13. Would not the
loving mother rather give the child away than have it killed?














THE QUEEN OF SHEBA'S VISIT TO SOLOMON.



Ctuenty-sebenth Sunday—Ainth after Grinity.

SOLOMON’S FALL.
FIRST READING.

“ All the earth sought to Solomon, to hear his wisdom, which God had

put in his heart.”—1 A7zzgs x. 24.

ING Solomon was the greatest king in wisdom and riches

who ever lived. He had an ivory throne with golden
lions standing on the steps, and a beautiful house lined with
sweet cedar-wood. He sent ships which brought home gold
and silver, and apes and peacocks; and it was said that gold
was as common as silver generally is, and silver as common






Solomon's Fall. 153



as stones! All people honoured him, and the Queen of Sheba
came from her far-off country to see him, because of the fame
of his greatness. And when she saw him she was quite over-
come, and said that all she had heard was not half so grand
and glorious as what she saw. Very happy, she said, were
the people who stood round him and heard the words of his
wisdom.

We have the words of his wisdom in the Book of Proverbs
in the Bible, for his wisdom came from God. And though we
shall never see his purple robes or his gold and silver, do you
know what our blessed Saviour said ?—“ Consider the lilies of
the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin:
and yet I say unto you, that even Solomon in all his glory was
not arrayed like one of these.”

The least little flower, if you look well into it, is more beau-
tiful than anything King Solomon ever wore, for God made
it; and he could only put things together that were made
already.

QUESTIONS.

1. Why was Solomon so rich? 2. Whose son was he? 3. What had
he built? 4. When he had built the House of God what did he build ?
5. What sort of throne had he? 6. What were on the steps? 7. Who
came to see him? 8. What did she say of him? 9. Where have we got
his wisdom? 10. What do we call it? 11. What did our blessed Saviour
say about him? 12. What have we got which are more beautiful than
Solomon’s robes? 13, Why are flowers more beautiful than Solomon’s
robes.

cca ene eee




154 Zwenty-seventh Sunday—Ninth after Trinity.

SECOND READING.

“Then will I visit their transgression with the rod, and their iniquity with
stripes.”—Psalm Ixxxix. 32.

T is very sad to say that as Solomon grew old he left off

being good. He married a great many wives, and brought
them from the heathen nations round; and he did not teach
them to worship the true God, but let them worship each in
her own way. So, out in his gardens, one lady had her idol
to the moon, and another had hers to the dreadful idol
Milcom, and so on; and though Solomon knew so much bet-
ter, even he was persuaded to come and pay honour to these
idols, just to please these women—he, the son of David, whom
God had blessed so much.

And what the king did the people were sure to do. So God
spake to Solomon, and told him that since he had fallen away
from the right way, he must be punished, and that ten out of
the twelve tribes would be taken away and not belong to his
kingdom. It was not to happen in his own time, but in his
son’s time; but it must have been very sad to him to know

. that his beautiful kingdom and great power were to be so les-

sened, and that his son Rehoboam was a very foolish young
man, who would spoil everything. But he was not to lose all,
only part, for the sake of the holy King David, to whom God
had promised that his throne should last for ever.

QUESTIONS.
1. What wrong did Solomon do? 2. Where did his wives come from?
3. What did they want to worship? 4. Did Solomon let them? 5. What
did he do himself? 6. Why was this wrong? 7. What is the First Com-




Solomon's Fall. 155

mandment? 8, What did God tell Solomon? 9. How was he to be
punished? 10. How many tribes were to be lost? 11. How many were
to be kept? 12, Why were any to be left? 13. What had God promised
David? 14. In whose time was the trouble to come? 15. What was the
name of Solomon’s son? 16, What sort of person was he?

THIRD READING.
“T will take the kingdom out of his son’s hand.”—1 Kings xi. 35.

HERE was a strong brave man of the tribe of Ephraim,

named Jeroboam, and God sent his prophet to speak to
him. Jeroboam had a new mantle on, and the prophet took
it and tore it into twelve pieces, and gave Jeroboam ten of
them. Then the prophet said this was to show how God was
going to tear away ten tribes from Rehoboam, the grandson
of David, and give them to Jeroboam, because Solomon was
bringing idols in to be worshipped. And he told Jeroboam
that all should go well with him, and he would be a great
king, and his sons after him, if he would go on serving the
Lord, and the Lord only, and would keep from idols.

QUESTIONS.

1, What was to be taken from Solomon’s son? 2. What was the name
of Solomon’s son? 3. Who was to have the tribes? 4. Who told Jero-
boam so? 5. What sign did the prophet give? 6. What was torn? 7.
Of how many tribes would Rehoboam be king? 8. Of how many would
Jeroboam be king? 9. Why were any taken from Rehoboam? 10. Why
were any left? 11. What does the Second Commandment say? 12. How
long would Jeroboam go on well?
















THE DISOBEDIENT PROPHET.



Choenty-eighth Sunday.—Centh after Crimty.

THE KINGDOM OF ISRAEL.
FIRST READING.
“This thing became a sin.”—1 K7zngs xii. 30.

OLOMON’S son was named Rehoboam. He was foolish
and hasty; and when his father’s wise old men gave him
good advice he would not listen to them, but only cared for
his young friends, who were as foolish as himself. So when
the Israelites came to him to ask him not to be hard upon
them, and make them bring him so much corn and so many








The Kingdom of Israel. wy



sheep, the old men told him to answer them kindly and
gently, but the young men said he had better be fierce and
sharp. So he followed the young men’s advice, and made a
very unkind answer. This made them all so angry that they
said they would not have him for their king any longer; but
they took Jeroboam, a brave strong man of the tribe of
Ephraim, and made him their king. Only two tribes still
held steady to Rehoboam. These were the tribes of Judah
and Benjamin. God left him these, because of the promise
that King David's sons should go on sitting on his throne.
But ten of the tribes had made Jeroboam their king; so that
now there were two kingdoms—a large one called Israel, and
a small one called Judah. This was because Solomon had let
his heart turn away from God, and had not taken pains to
keep his people holy, but had cared more for riches, and
power, and glory. But Jeroboam did not take pains to serve
God. He set up two calves, made of gold, for the Israelites
to worship, instead of going to the Temple.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Solomon? 2. Who was his son? 3. Whom did Rehoboam
like best? 4. What did his people ask? 5. What did the old men
advise? 6. What did the young men advise? 7. Whose advice did he
take? 8. What answer did he give? 9. What did the Israelites do? ro.
Whom did they make their king? 11. How many kingdoms were there?
12. How many tribes made up Israel? 13. How many made up Judah?
14. Who was king of Judah? 15. Who was king of Israel? 16. Why did
not Rehoboam lose all? 17. What had God promised David? 18. Why
did Rehoboam lose any? 19. What foolish answer did he make? 20,
What idols did he set up?

serene ernie ners resent nre




|



158 TZwenty-cighth Sunday—Tenth after Trinity.



SECOND READING.
“T may not return with thee, nor go in with thee.”—1 Kzngs xiii. 16.

T is a sad story that you hear to-day. There was a man

who was called a prophet, because God spoke to him, and
used to send him to declare His will to the people.

Once God called this prophet, and told him to go to a place
named Bethel, where the wicked king of Israel, Jeroboam,
had set up a golden idol in the shape of a calf, and was
teaching the people to pray to it, instead of going to the
Temple at Jerusalem to worship. He was to tell the king of
his sin, and how his idol should be overthrown and destroyed;
and when he had done this, he was to come home at once, by
a different way, and neither eat bread nor drink water, but
come quickly back.

The prophet went to Bethel, and he spoke God’s words to
the king boldly; and when the king put out his hand to strike
him God struck the hand, so that Jeroboam could not draw
it back till the prophet prayed for him. Then Jeroboam felt
God’s power, and wanted the prophet to come to his palace
with him. But the prophet said no; for God had commanded
him to go home at once, without eating or drinking in that
wicked place. So he set off.

He had so far done well; but before he had gone all the
way he grew tired, and he sat down under an oak. It wasa
great pity that he delayed, for there was a bad man coming
after him with a lie upon his lips. This man told the prophet
that God had said he was to come back and eat and drink;
and I am grieved to say the prophet listened, and turned




The Kingdom of Israel. 159

back. He ought to have known that God would have told
him Himself if he was to go back; but he did not think—he
did what pleased himself, not what pleased God ; and he went
back to feast with this stranger. But God’s anger came upon
him. When he went back in the evening, a lion came out of
the wood and killed him. The lion did not kill the ass he
rode upon, nor tear the body, and the ass did not run away
from the lion; but the lion and ass both stood by the dead
prophet till—who do you think found him? The very man
who had tempted him to do wrong! Must not that have been
a terrible sight ?

QUESTIONS.

1. What had God told the prophet todo? 2. What had He told him
not todo? 3, What was the first wrong thing the prophet did? 4. What
harm came of his lingering? 5. How did he disobey? 6. What was his
sad end? 7. Who found him lying dead? 8. What were standing by
him? 9. Why did he come to this sad death? 10. How did he fall in
the way of the wicked man? 11. What is the way to fall in with bad
people? 12. Then how should you always go on messages, or to school ?
13. Is it enough to mind only half what you are told?

THIRD READING.

“The barrel of meal shall not waste, neither shall the cruse of oil fail, un-

til the day that the Lord sendeth rain upon the earth”—1 Kings xvii. 14.

T is very sad to say, but the Israelites went on getting more

fond of idols, and would not worship God. They grew so

wicked that at last He punished them, to teach them who
sent the rain and did them good.








160 Twenty-crghth Sunday—Tenth after Trinity.

He would not let it rain for three whole years. No rain by
day, no dew by night! The corn would not grow, the grass
dried up, and all the streams were nothing but stones; so that
there was nothing to eat or to drink, and everyone was in sad
distress.

There was one good man, a prophet, called Elijah, and God
took care of him. He sent him to a lonely place, by the side
of a little mountain stream, where there still was water to
drink; and every morning and evening there came two ravens,
who were sent by God, to bring him bread and flesh. That
was a great miracle, or wonder, which God worked to feed
His prophet.

In time the brook dried up, and then God sent Elijah
to a town called Zarephath. There Elijah saw a poor
woman gathering sticks, and he asked her to give him a
bit of something to eat. But the poor widow woman
said she had nothing for herself and her son but a hand-
ful of meal and a little oil, and she was going to make a
cake of it, and bake it with a fire of her sticks; and that
was the last she could get, so they must die of hunger after
they had finished.

But Elijah still told her to make him a little cake first, for
he said, “ Thus saith the Lord God of Israel, The barrel of
meal shall not waste, neither shall the cruse of oil fail, until
the day that the Lord sendeth rain upon the earth.”

And the woman believed him, and gave him a bit of her
last cake. And it was as he said. There was always meal
and oil enough to feed them day by day: the widow, and her




The Kingdom of Israel. 161



son, and the prophet, went on living on the meal every day,
for God fed them.

At last the child fell sick and died ; and his mother grieved
for him. But Elijah laid the child on his bed, and prayed to
God to have mercy on the widow: and God had mercy. The
little child’s soul came back, and he was alive again; and
Elijah gave him to his mother.

Are not these three great wonders of God’s goodness? God
does not let us see miracles now, as He did in those times,
because we are taught to believe in Him without them. But
He still takes care of us. He takes care that if we trust to
Him, and pray to Him, we shall have our food every day.
And if we are ready to give what we want ourselves away to
one who needs it, He will make it up to us, and take care of
us all the more. And though no one is brought to life now
who has died, yet God often gives us back our friends when
they have been very ill; and we know that we shall all rise up
from the dead and live with God for ever, at a greater call

than Elijah’s. d
QUESTIONS.

1. What is a miracle? 2. How many miracles have you been hearing
of? 3. For whom were they worked? 4. Who worked them? 5. What
were the three miracles? 6, Why was it a miracle that the ravens fed
Elijah? 7. Why did the ravens bring Elijah the food instead of eating it
themselves? 8. What was the next miracle? 9. How came the widow
always to have enough? 10, How did she show that she was worthy to
have a wonder worked for her? 11. Why was God pleased with her? 12.
What more did God do for her son? 13. Who prayed for him? 14. How
could you try to be like the good widow? 15. What is the way to be
helped? 16. What do you ask God to give you every day?
















ELIJAH ON MOUNT SINAI.



Choenty-ninth Sunday—Elebenth after Crinity.

ELIFAH AND AHAB.
FIRST READING.
“The Lord, He is the God ; the Lord, He is the God.”—1 Kings xviii. 39.

OU heard last Sunday how sadly the Israelites were behav-
ing when they prayed to a golden calf. They had a still
worse idol afterwards. His name was Baal; and they wanted
to worship him instead of the true God. To-day there is a beau-
tiful chapter that I hardly like to put into my own poor words.
Listen to it well in church, and you will hear how wonderful it is.




Eljah and Ahab, 163



There were four hundred prophets, as they called them-
selves, who worshipped Baal, and only one real prophet who
worshipped the Lord God. This prophet was named Elijah.
He called all the people to a high mountain, and said they
should see who was the true God. He said he would build
one altar, and that the four hundred prophets should build
another; they should each offer a sacrifice, and each should
pray to his god, and the God that sent fire to burn the sacri-
fice would be the true God.

The prophets of Baal tried first. They built their altar and
put wood on it, and killed a bullock and cut it up, and they
prayed to their god Baal to send fire down. But he was no
god—he was nothing at all; and though they cried and
shouted, and leaped about, and even cut their own flesh in
their rage, not a spark of fire came.

Then Elijah made his sacrifice. And he did a strange thing ;
for he had water poured all over it, till all the wood was
streaming wet—and you know water always puts out fire—so
how was it ever to be burnt? He even made a trench round,
and filled that with water too. Then he knelt down, and
prayed that the Lord God in heaven would show His power,
and make the people know that no one else was God. And
down from heaven came the fire! It was not stopped by the
water! No, it dried that up in a moment, and burnt the
wood, and consumed the sacrifice! And all the Israelites fell
on their faces, and cried out, “The Lord, He is the God; the
Lord, He is the God!” For only the Lord God is Almighty,

and can do wonders.






164 Twenty-ninth Sunday—Eleventh after Trinity.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who is the prophet we read of to-day? 2. What wicked thing were
the Israelites doing? 3. What is the First Commandment? 4. What
was the name of the false god? 5. How many prophets were there for
Baal? 6. Who only spoke up for the true God? 7. What did Elijah say
they would try? 8. How would they know which was the real God? 9.
What happened when Baal’s people prayed to him? 10. Why did not
Baal send them any fire? 11. What did Elijah do to his sacrifice? 12.
Whom did he pray to? 13. What came down from heaven? 14. What
became of all the water Elijah had poured out? 15. Why did not the
water stop the fire? 16. What did all the people cry out? 17. What
word in the Belief means that God can do everything?

SECOND READING.
“A still small voice.,—1 Kémgs xix. 12.
FTER the Israelites had called out, “The Lord, He is the
God!” and owned that Baal was nothing but an idol,
God had mercy on them, and sent them rain again ; and their
famine was over.

But King Ahab’s wife, whose name was Jezebel, was a
heathen woman, and she would worship Baal, and did not
choose to believe in the true God. And she was very angry
with Elijah, and sent men out everywhere to put him to death.
Elijah was obliged to flee far away for fear of her; and he
went out into the wilderness, and sat down under a juniper
tree; and there he was so sad, to think that all he had done
was of no use, that he requested for himself that he might die,
for he could do no more good with these wicked people.

Then he went to sleep; and when he woke an angel was



nw


Elyah and Ahad. 165



by him, with a cake baken on the coals, and a cruse of water;
and the angel bade him rise and eat, for the journey was too
great for him.

It was a great journey, for he was to go all the way to the
Mount of God, where God had spoken to Moses. And there
he stood in a cave; and a voice came and asked, “ What doest
thou here, Elijah?” Then he told how the Israelites had for-
saken their God, and killed the prophets, and “I, even I only,
am left,’ he said; “and they seek my life to take it away.”
Then God showed him His wonders.

First a great strong wind came rushing by—but the Lord
was not in the wind. Then there was an earthquake, that
broke the rocks in pieces—but the Lord was not in the earth-
quake. And after the earthquake a fire—but the Lord was
not in the fire. And after the fire, a still small Voice.

Then Elijah wrapped his face in his mantle, and stood in
the entrance of the cave, to hear what God would say to him.
And God told him he was not all alone, as he thought ; for
there were many good men still left who had never bowed the
knee to Baal, nor deserted the God of their fathers. And God
sent him back to return to his work among the people of
Israel, and not to think that there was no hope because he
could not see it; nor to think he was left alone because he
had no friends near him that he could see.

QUESTIONS.
1. How long was there no rain in the land of Israel? 2. Why was there
no rain? 3. Who told the Israelites of their wickedness? 4. What won-
der showed who was the real God? 5. What did the Israelites cry out?



———}




166 Twenty-ninth Sunday—Eleventh after Trinity.



6. Who was the Israelite king? 7. Who was Ahab’s wicked wife? 8.
What did she want to do to Elijah? 9. Where did Elijah flee to? ro,
Who came to feed him? 11. Where did he go? 13. What had been
given on the Mount of God? 13. What was said to Elijah? 14. Why
was Elijah so sad? 15. What wonders passed before him? 16. What
came last? 17. Who spoke in that Voice? 18. What is the voice by
which God speaks to us? 19. What did God tell Elijah? 20, Was
Elijah really all alone? 21. Are we ever alone? 22. Who is our Father?
23. Who are our brethren?

THIRD READING.

“He laid him down upon his bed, and turned away his face, and would
eat no bread.”—1 Kings xxi. 4.

OU learn in the Catechism to say, “Thou shalt not covet.”
Coveting means wishing very much for what we ought
not to have; and God tells us not to covet, because all faults
begin in bad wishes. Now you shall hear what shocking sin
one wish led to.

King Ahab had a grand garden, and he wanted to make it
bigger ; but the next piece of ground belonged to a poor man
named Naboth. Ahab asked Naboth to sell him his ground ;
but Naboth said it had come to him from his father, and must
go to his son, and he could not sell it. Then Ahab coveted,
and lay on his bed and would not eat—caring for nothing but
the bit of ground he could not get.

Now Ahab had a cruel, wicked wife ; and when she saw her
husband grieving about Naboth’s ground she was determined
to get it for him. So she had two very bad men set on to say
that poor Naboth had been wicked, and must be put to death.








Elyah and Ahad. 167



They bore false witness against him, and broke the Ninth
Commandment when they did so; and then, worst of all, this
poor innocent man was really put to death for the crime he
had never done—and that was murder, which breaks the
Sixth Commandment. Then Jezebel called Ahab, and told
him he might go and take possession of the ground that he
wanted: there was nobody to hinder him. But he never had
any pleasure in it. When he went to it, there stood God’s
great Prophet Elijah, ready to meet him. And Elijah told
him how very angry God was with him and with Jezebel, and
that they should be terribly punished for their cruel behaviour
to this innocent man. Then Ahab was sorry, and wept and
grieved for the cruel thing that had been done; but all his
sorrow could not bring Naboth back to life again. And oh!
how grieved he must have been that he had not kept his
wishes in order !—for almost all our faults begin in a wish.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who is the king we hear of to-day? 2. Who is the bad queen? 3.
Who is the poor man? 4. What did Ahab want? 5. Why would not
Naboth let Ahab have the ground? 6. How did Ahab behave when he
could not get the ground? 7. Who said he should have it? 8. How did
Jezebel get Naboth put to death? 9. Who met Ahab? 10. What did
Elijah tell him? 11. What had Ahab done wrong? 12. What Command-
ment tells you not to covet? 13. What is coveting? 14. What Com-
mandment tells us not to tell untrue things of other people? 15. Say the
Ninth Commandment. 16. What Commandment was broken by putting
Naboth to death? 17. How many Commandments were broken? 18.
And what first made all this harm happen? 19. If you wish for what you
must not have, ought you to go on thinking about it?










ASCENT OF ELIJAH.



Thirtieth Sunday.— Ctuelfth after Crimty.

ELIFAH AND ELISHA.
FIRST READING.
“A certain man drew a bow at a venture.”—1 Kings xxii. 34.
HEN Ahab had let Naboth be stoned that he might get
his vineyard, the Prophet Elijah said that Ahab would
be greatly punished, and that where the dogs licked up
Naboth’s blood there they would lick up Ahab’s; and that

cruel Jezebel should be eaten up by dogs, so that no one
could say, This is Jezebel.




Lljah and Elisha. 169



Some time after, Ahab went out to fight a battle. He was
afraid, because his conscience troubled him, and he thought
he should be safer if he did not go out to fight dressed like a
king, for he knew the enemies would all come and try to kill
him if they saw him in his robes. But he dressed only like a
common captain, and thought they would take no notice, and
he would be safe. He forgot that if the enemy did not know
him God knew him, and that God could see it was Ahab just
as well in his common dress as in his robes and crown.

So a man drew his bow, not shooting at anybody in parti-
cular ; but God’s will guided the arrow, and it wounded Ahab
so badly that he desired to be taken out of the battle, and he
died before he could be carried home. His chariot was full
of his blood, and his servants washed it in the place where
Naboth had been stoned to death; and the wild hungry dogs
came and licked up the blood, just as they had licked up
Naboth’s blood. So you see no hiding could get away from
God.

QUESTIONS.

1. What did God say was to happen to Ahab? 2. What was to happen
to Jezebel? 3. What did Ahab go out todo? 4. How did he dress him-
self? 5. Why did not Ahab dress like a king? 6. From whom did he
want to hide? 7. But who knew him all the time? 8. How was he
wounded? 9. Did the man mean to hit Ahab? 10. How came Ahab to
be hit? rz. What was done with him? 12. Where was his chariot
washed? 13. What licked up his blood? 14. Who had said the dogs
should lick his blood? 15. Why? 16, Why did Ahab let Naboth be
killed? 17. Who was angry with Ahab? 18. Can we hide from God’s
anger?




| 170 06 Thirtieth Sunday— Twelfth after Trinity.



SECOND READING.

“ My father, my father, the chariot of Israel, and the horsemen thereof.”—

2 Kings ii. 12.

HE time had come when God was about to call away His

great Prophet Elijah. And it was not as other men are
taken from this earth, by dying and being buried, while their
souls go away to the God who gave them. No; Elijah went
out and visited all the schools, where young men and boys
were being trained to sing God’s praise; and Elisha, who was
his scholar and his friend, went with him. When they came
to the bank of the river Jordan, Elijah took his mantle and
rolled it up, and struck the waters of the stream with it, and
they parted, and left a way for Elijah and Elisha to go over
dry-footed. Then Elijah said, “Ask what I shall do for thee,
before I be taken away from thee.” And Elisha said, “I pray
thee, let a double portion of thy Spirit be upon me.”

And while they were talking together, there came a great
wonder from heaven: a chariot and horses, all bright and
glowing like fire; and Elijah was parted from his friend, and
went up into heaven upon a whirlwind. Elisha stood watching,
crying out, “My father, my father, the chariot of Israel, and
the horsemen thereof ;” as if he knew not what he said. And
Elijah, as he went up, threw down his mantle; and Elisha took
it up and went his way, much wondering, and full of awe.

And when he came to the river Jordan, he took the mantle,
rolled up, and smote the waters, and they parted again, so
that he went through with dry feet. And when the young
men in the school of the prophets met him, they saw in his




Lilyah and Elisha. 171



face and manner that the same Spirit which had been on
Elijah was on him, and they bowed themselves before him.
Only one other man was ever taken up to heaven without
dying, and he was Enoch, who lived before the Flood. Our
blessed Lord ascended into Heaven; but He went up, He
was not taken, and it was after He had died and risen again.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Elijah? 2. Who was his friend? 3. Where did they go
together? 4. How did they get across the river? 5. What did Elisha
ask? 6, What appeared to them? 7. What happened to Elijah? 8.
What did he let fall? 9. Who was to be prophet in his stead? 10, What
did Elisha cry out? 11. What did he do with Elijah’s mantle? 12. What
other man was taken up like this? 13. When did Enoch live? 14. Who
only ascended into heaven ?

THIRD READING.
“Tt is well."—2 Kings iv. 26.

s(LISHA was the prophet for Israel instead of Elijah.
Now there was a good woman who saw him go by, and
she said she would make a little room for him by the wall of
her house, and put in a bed, and a table, and a stool, and a
lamp, so that he could go and rest there whenever he pleased.
And when Elisha saw it he was pleased, and told her that if
she wished for anything very much he would pray God to
give it to her. She answered that she dwelt among her own
people, and wanted for nothing. But she had no child; and
Elisha prayed for her, and God blessed her for her kindness
to His servant, and by-and-by she had a son.






172 Thirtieth Sunday—Twelfth after Trinity.



But when he had grown into a boy, he went into the fields
with his father to see the harvest, and the heat of the sun struck
on his head so that he cried out, “My head, my head!” And
his father said, “Carry him to his mother.” But she could do
him no good; he sat on her knees till noon, and then died.

She did not stop to weep; she had her ass saddled, and
rode away to seek for the man of God. And by-and-by she
met him on the way, and she knelt down before him and held
him by his feet. Then he knew how it was, and he bade his
servant Gehazi take his staff, and hasten on, and never rest
till he had laid it on the child’s face. Gehazi did so, but there
was no voice nor any answer. So he went back and met his
master, and said, “The child is not awaked.”

Then Elisha came in, and found the child lying dead on his
own bed. Then he stretched himself on the boy, and prayed
to God that the soul might come back to the little one. And
at last God granted the prayer, and the child’s flesh grew
warm; and Elisha prayed again, and the child sneezed seven
times as his breath came back, and he opened his eyes! Then
the mother was called, and the child was given back to her ;
and she bowed herself to the ground, and gave thanks to God
and His prophet.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was prophet instead of Elijah? 2. What had become of Elijah?
3. Who made a room for Elisha? 4. What did she put in it? 5. What
joy did God give to her? 6, What great grief? 7. What caused the boy’s
death? 8, What did his mother do? 9. What order did Elisha give?
10. Could Gehazi do anything? 11. What did Elisha do? 12. How did
God show His mercy? 13. How did the mother thank God?
















NAAMAN AT ELISHA’S DOOR.



Chirty-tirst Sunday —Chirteenth after Crinity.

ELISHA’S MIRACLES.
FIRST READING.
“Wash, and be clean.”—2 K7ngs v. 13.

HERE was a poor little girl who was stolen away from
her own home in Israel by Syrian soldiers, and carried
far from her mother and friends, to be a slave. It must have
been very sad and lonely ; but God lets nothing happen but
for good, and so this poor little captive maid did great good.
Her master was named Naaman. He was the captain of the




174 Thirty-jirst Sunday—Thirteenth after Trinity.

army—brave and strong; but he fell ill of a disease that no
doctor could cure, and which would go on getting worse till
he would die of it. The little maid was sorry for him; and
though she was all alone in a heathen land, she had not for-
gotten about God and His prophets, and she told her mistress
that at home, in Israel, there was a prophet who could cure
her master by God’s power.

So Naaman set out in his chariot, and came to the pro-
phet’s door. He thought the prophet would come out, and
strike his hand over the place, and cure him directly—all the
more because he was such a great man. But, instead of that,
the prophet sent out word to him that he was to wash seven
times in the River Jordan, and he would be well. This made
Naaman very angry. He thought the bathing in Jordan
would do no good, and that the prophet made light of him;
and he turned and went away in a rage. Then his servants
persuaded him. They said, “My father, if the prophet had
bid thee do some great thing, wouldest thou not have done it?
how much rather then, when he saith to thee, Wash, and be
clean?” Naaman was wise enough to listen to them. He did
go and wash in the River Jordan, as the prophet bade him ;
and God gave the water the power to make him quite well
again. Then he came back and thanked the prophet, and
said he would never pray to any god again but to the One
true God, who had healed him.

So you see the little maid did great good to her master,
both to his body and his soul, because she was good, and re-
membered her God, even when she was far away from home.






Elishas Miracles. 175

QUESTIONS.

1. Who is the great captain we hear of to-day? 2. What was the mat-
ter with him? 3. Whom did Naaman go to to cure him? 4. From whom
did he hear about the prophet? 5. How came the little maid into
Naaman’s house? 6. Who made the prophet able to cure people? 7.
Had Naaman been brought up to worship God? 8. What did he expect
the prophet to do to him? 9. What did the prophet tell him to do? to.
Why did he not like this? 11. Who persuaded him to try? 12. What
did they say he would have been ready todo? 13. Don’t we sometimes
wish to do something grand, rather than just what we are told? 14. But
what have we got todo? 15. What came of Naaman doing as he was
told? 16, To whom did Naaman say he should always pray?

SECOND READING.
“They that be with us are more than they that be with them.”—2 Kings
vi. 16,
HE great enemies of the kings of Israel were the Syrians,
who lived at Damascus; but whenever the Syrians made
a plan to come and fight with the Israelites, God made it
known to the Prophet Elisha; and he told King Joram, so
that the Israelite soldiers were always ready beforehand to
fight with the Syrians. The king of Syria began to think one
of his own men must tell Joram; but they said it was the
Prophet Elisha who told the king of Israel what was said in
the most secret chamber of the king of Syria. Then the
Syrians sent an army of men to take Elisha at Dothan, and
kill him.
They came by night, and when Elisha’s servant looked out
in the morning, he saw horses and chariots all round the






176 Thirty-jirst Sunday— Thirteenth after Trinity.



place. He was afraid, and cried out “Alas, my master!
how shall we do?” But Elisha said to him, “Fear not: for
they that be with us are more than they that be with
them.” And he prayed that the young man’s eyes might be
opened that he might see: and so they were—to see the
whole mountain round about full of chariots of fire and
horses of fire; many, many more than the Syrians had, and
all come to take care of Elisha.

And God made the Syrians unable to see that Elisha was
before them, and he led them all the way to Samaria, and
put them before King Joram as his prisoners. Joram wanted
to put them to death, but Elisha would not let him, and they
were all sent safe home, and did not come back as enemies
for a long time. And we know that, though we cannot see
them, God’s angels are still in great armies encamped all
round about those who fear Him, to deliver them.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who were the enemies of the kings of Israel? 2. Who always told
the plans of the Syrians? 3. How did Elisha know? 4. What did the
king of Syria want to do? 5. When did his army come? 6. Who was
frightened? 7. What did Elisha say? 8. Who were those who were with
them? 9. Who are always round about those who fear God? 10, Why
then need we never be afraid? 11. What happened to these Syrians?
12. But were they killed? 13. Why not?


Etlisha's Muractes. 177

THIRD READING.
“This day is a day of good tidings.”—2 K7zgs vil. 9.

F King Joram had been good he would have had no

troubles; but he would let his mother Jezebel worship her
false gods, so God sent the Syrians against him again. And
they came all round Samaria, and shut it in so close that no-
body could get out; and all the food was eaten up, so that
even such food as a donkey’s head was so dear that hardly
anybody could buy it, and everyone was getting starved.
Joram was so angry, that he said at last, in his wickedness,
he would cut off Elisha’s head the next day.

But Elisha said quietly that to-morrow there would be
quantities of food in the city, so that it would cost almost
nothing. One of the king’s lords laughed, and said, “If the
Lord should make windows in heaven, might such a thing
be?” “Thou shalt see it with thine eyes,” said Elisha, “but
shalt not eat thereof.”

Now, that night the Lord made the Syrians hear a great
noise, as if an army was coming up to help the Israelites.
And they were so frightened, that they all fled away in the
night, and left all their tents standing, and their armour in
them, and their stores of food.

In the early morning, three poor leprous men, who could
not get any food in Samaria, crept down to see if the Syrians
would give them anything, or they thought if the Syrians
should kill them, that would be better than being starved.
But when they came to the camp there was nobody there—

a
M


178 Thirty-first Sunday—Thirteenth after Trinity.





no soldiers, no horses, only tents full of rich dresses, and fine
armour, and, best of all, plenty of food. The hungry lepers
went ana ate, and then they thought they ought to go and
tell the people in the town that all the Syrians were gone.

So the king sent out to see, two men upon lean, starved
horses. They found it was all true, and everybody went rush-
ing out to get food. The king sent the lord who had laughed
at Elisha, to stand in the gate to keep order; but the people
were so very hungry that they did not mind him, and he was
knocked down and trodden upon, and trampled to death: and
so it came to pass that he saw the plenty, but did not eat of
it, because he had mocked at the word of the Lord.














QUESTIONS.



1. Who was king in Israel? 2. Who was prophet? 3. What was the
chief town in Israel? 4. Who tried to take it? 5. What was the sad dis-
tress in Samaria? 6. What had they to eat? 7. Whose fault was it? 8.
But whom did Joram want to punish? 9. What did Elisha promise? to,
Who laughed at him? 11. What did Elisha say? 12. What happened
in the night? 13. What became of the Syrians? 14. Who found it out?
15. What did the lepers see? 16. Whom did they tell? 17. What did all
the people do? 18. What became of the man who laughed at Elisha?
19. What is it that makes God angry?












Chirty-second Sunday.—Fourteenth after Grimity.

THE RUIN OF AHAB’S HOUSE.
FIRST READING.
“What hast thou to do with peace?” —2 Kings ix. 18.

HE Sunday before last you heard how King Ahab was
killed in battle, though he had fancied that he could hide
from God. His wife, Queen Jezebel, was left; and she had
always been worse than he was, and she had brought up her
son Joram to be very wicked too. When Joram had reigned
as king for twelve years, God told His Prophet Elijah to send






180 Thirty-second Sunday—Fourteenth after Trinity.



a young man to anoint a captain called Jehu to be king in-
stead of Joram. So the young man took some oil, and went
to the town where Jehu was, and said, “I have an errand
to thee, O captain.” Then he poured the oil on Jehu’s
head, and told him that God made him king of Israel.

The other captains were glad to make Jehu king, and they
made him sit on the top of a flight of steps, and blew with
their trumpets, and shouted, “Jehu is king.” Then they all
set out to conquer King Joram.

Joram had his chariot made ready, and went out in it to
meet Jehu; but, as soon as they came in sight of one another
Jehu shot an arrow, and it struck Joram, so that he sank
down in his chariot and died.

Then Jehu went on into the town; and Jezebel thought she
would still try to make friends with the people; so, instead of
mourning for her son, she painted her face, and put on a
head-dress, and looked out at a window. Jehu said, “ Who is
on my side? who?” And some of the servants looked out.
He said, “ Throw her down.” So the servants threw Jezebel
out of the window, and her blood sprinkled on Jehu’s horses.
But he went on, and went into the palace, and was made king,
and had a feast. Then he sent out, and said that he would
have Jezebel properly buried, for she was a king’s daughter.
However, when his men went out to look for her, they found
that the wild dogs that ran about the streets had eaten up
every bit of her, so that there was nothing left of her but her
skull and her feet, and the palms of her hands.

You remember that God’s prophet, Elijah, had told Ahab






The Ruin of Ahal’s House. 181

that the dogs should eat Jezebel, because she was so cruel.
She worshipped idols, and killed God’s prophets, and had
poor Naboth put to death that Ahab might have his vineyard.
So God punished her. People need not hope that God will
not punish what they have done wrong, for He will be quite
sure to punish unless they are very sorry, and pray to Him to
pardon them for Jesus Christ’s sake.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Ahab? 2. Who was Jezebel? 3. What wicked things had
they done? 4. What had the prophet told them? 5. What had become
of Ahab? 6. Who was king after Ahab? 7. How long was Joram king?
8. Whom did God choose to punish Jezebel and Joram? 9. Who was
sent to tell Jehu? 10. What is anointing? 11. Who did you hear of
before who was anointed? 12. What did the other captains do to Jehu?
13. Who came out to meet him? 14. What did Jehu do to Joram? 15.
What did Jezebel do? 16. What became of Jezebel? 17. What was left
of Jezebel? 18. Why did she come to such a shocking end? 19. What
does God do to sinners? 20. Does He always punish them at once?
21. But does He forget? 22. What must be done if we would not be
punished ?

SECOND READING,
“Jehu destroyed Baal out of Israel.”—2 Kings x. 28.

HEN that fierce soldier, Jehu, was made king, the men of
Israel cut off the heads of all Ahab’s sons and grandsons,
and made them up into two heaps at the city gates; and all
the people who worshipped Baal were shut up in his temple,
and every one of them killed. It is very sad and terrible ; but






182 Thirty-second Sunday—Four teenth after Trinity.



God had commanded that people who prayed to idols should
not live, because they taught the rest of the Israelites to be
wicked too. When we hear about it, we must recollect that
it is a fearful thing to turn away from serving God, and that
He is sure to punish those who will not worship Him.

You are not likely to pray to an idol; but I hope you do
say your prayers night and morning, and mind them as you
say them. Not saying our prayers, and not going to church,
is turning away from God; and it would be very sad and un-
grateful to do that, for God has done much more for us than
He did for the Israelites, and we know more about Him than
they did.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who came to punish them? 2. What was done with the heads of
the princes? 3. What was done to the worshippers of Baal? 4. Why
were they put to death? 5. What Commandment did these worshippers
of Baal break? 6. What is the First Commandment? 7. Whom must
we worship? 8. When do we worship Him? 9. Must we go without say-
ing our prayers ?

THIRD READING.
“The arrow of the Lord’s deliverance.”—2 Kings xiii. 17.

LISHA grew to be a very old man, and when at last he
fell sick and was near his death, the king of Israel, whose
name was Joash, came and kept by his bed-side.
Elisha said, “Open the window eastward;” and he opened
it. Then Elisha said, “Shoot;” and Joash took his bow and
shot an arrow. And Elisha said, “The arrow of the Lord’s


The Ruin of Ahab’s House. 183



deliverance.” Then he said, “Take the arrows; smite upon
the ground.”

Joash struck three times on the ground, but he did not go
on striking, for he did not think enough of God and His
prophet to understand that if he obeyed Elisha God would
bless him. So Elisha told him, if he had struck many times,
he would have had a great many victories over the Syrians,
but as he had only struck three times, he would only have
three victories. For it is when people begin by obeying in
little things that God gives them a great deal.

Then the great Prophet Elisha died, and was buried ; and
Joash beat the Syrians three times, but no more, because he
had not believed and obeyed.

QUESTIONS,

1. Who was dying? 2. Who came to see Elisha? 3. What did Elisha
tell Joash to do? 4. What did he call the arrow? 5. What did he bid
Joash do then? 6. How many times did Joash strike the ground? 7.
What ought he to have done? 8. Why did he not? 9. What did Elisha
promise him? 10. Why did not he have more victories? 11. If we want
to do great things, how must we do little things ?


















HEZEKIAH SPREADING SENNACHERIB’S LETTER BEFORE THE LORD.



Chirty-thirs Sunday.— Fitteenth after Grmty.

HEZEKIAH AND FOSIAH.
FIRST READING.
“He did that which was right in the sight of the Lord.”—2 Kéngs xviii. 3.

OU have heard of many bad kings. There is a good king
to tell you of at last—good King Hezekiah. He cared
for nothing so much as to please God. He would not have
any idols, but he cleared them all away, and had the holy
Temple all set to rights, and made beautiful as God had com-
manded; and he had all the services at the Temple at the








Hezekiah and Fostah. 185



right times, and used to go and pray there himself constantly.
And he did all he could to make his people good too.

But there came a great danger. There was a king of
Assyria named Sennacherib, who had quantities of soldiers
and horses and chariots, and he used to conquer towns, and
carry all the people in them away to live far from home. He
thought he would seize Hezekiah and his people in this way,
and he did come and do much harm all over the country. He
did not come at once to Jerusalem ; but he sent three boasting
men, with an army, to stand outside the walls, and call out to
the people inside, that Sennacherib was coming to conquer
them and carry them away, and that they need not believe
their king Hezekiah when he said that God would help them,
for no god had ever yet saved a country from Sennacherib.

Hezekiah’s people were terribly afraid. Some wanted him
to get help from the king of Egypt; but Hezekiah knew that
God had forbidden him to have anything to do with the
Egyptians. He knew that God could help him, and that the
way to be helped was to do just what God told him. So,
though Sennacherib had so many men, and he had so few,
and the Egyptians had plenty of soldiers and horses, he made
sure that God could save him much better than any Egyptian
of them all.

Next Sunday morning you will hear what happened.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who is the good king we hear of to-day? 2. What did he clear
away? 3. What commandment did he keep? 4. Where did he go and
pray? 5. Who was his enemy? 6. What message did Sennacherib send
186 Therty-third Sunday—Fifteenth after Trinity.



to the people of Jerusalem? 7. Where did the people want Hezekiah to
send for help? 8. Why would not Hezekiah send for help from Egypt?
g. To whom did he trust?

SECOND READING.

“Thou art the God, even Thou alone, of all the kingdoms of the earth:
Thou hast made heaven and earth.”—Jsazah xxxvii. 16.
Y EZEKIAH was king of Jerusalem. He was very good, and
always served God and prayed to Him. Buta great fierce
king named Sennacherib brought an army into his land, and
ruined all his towns and villages except Jerusalem, and shut
up Hezekiah in his town, so that his people could not dare to
come out. And Sennacherib wrote a letter to tell Hezekiah
that it was no use to hope to escape, he was coming to take
away the Jews and ruin Jerusalem ; and this wicked man even
said that Hezekiah need not think that his God would save
him, for no nation had ever yet been saved by its gods, so the
God of Hezekiah could not help him.

In his great distress Hezekiah went up to the Temple, and
told God all his trouble. And he said, “Thou art the God,
even Thou alone, of all the kingdoms of the earth: Thou hast
made heaven and earth.” He said he knew the gods of those
nations could not save them, for they were no gods, only wood
and stone; but he trusted that God would save him and his
people, though they were far too weak to defend themselves
against this terrible king and his people.

God heard the good king’s prayer, and sent him a promise


Flezekiah and Fosiah 187



that his enemy should not even come before Jerusalem, nor
shoot one arrow at it. And God kept His word. The fierce
soldiers of Sennacherib all lay down to sleep one night, but
they never woke up again. God sent His angel, with a deadly
blast, and all the army that wanted to destroy His people died
in one single night. It was because they and their king had
fancied God could not save His people, that they died. And
it was because Hezekiah prayed to the Lord and tried to be
good and holy, that no one could hurt him. -Now try to do
like Hezekiah. If you are vexed, or if you are afraid, tell God
all about it, and ask Him to help you. And He will be quite
sure to hear and help you, if you will only speak to Him and
tell Him what is in your heart.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Hezekiah? 2. What kind ofking washe? 3. Who wanted
to hurt him? 4. What did Sennacherib mean to do? 5. What had he
done to other cities? 6. What very wicked thing did Sennacherib say?
7. Where did Hezekiah go in his distress? 8. To whom did he pray. 9.
Why did he say the other cities had not been saved by their gods? Io.
What commandment tells us not to have gods of wood and stone? II.
What did Hezekiah ask God todo? 12, What did God promise? 13.
And what happened to the soldiers of Sennacherib? 14. Who slew
them? 15. Why were these people slain? 16. Why was Hezekiah safe?
17. What did he do that he might be saved? 18. Howcan you do like
Hezekiah? 19. What may you tell God about? 20. What will He be
sure to hear? 21. And if you pray to Him, what will He do for you?






188 Thirty-third Sunday—Fifteenth after Trinity,

THIRD READING.

“Like unto him was there no king before him, that turned to the Lord
with all his heart, and with all his soul, and with all his might.”—
2 Kings xxiii. 25.
HERE is one more good king to tell you about, whose
name was Josiah. He was great-grandson to good King
Hezekiah. The two kings who had come between Josiah’s
grandfather and father, had both been very bad men. His
grandfather repented when he fell into trouble, and God forgave
him; but his father never repented, and died in his wickedness
when Josiah was only eight years old. But Josiah was very
different. He made his people break down their idols, and clear
out the Temple of the unholy things they had brought in, and
worship God rightly once more. While they were cleaning out
the Temple, they found a book that nobody knew—the Book of
the Law of Moses—that is, the first five books in the Bible. All
the time of these two bad kings nobody had minded it, or read
it ; it had been lost, and everyone had forgotten all about it.

When Josiah knew what it was, and that it was the Law that
God had spoken to Moses, he made the priests read it to him
and all his people. They were very much frightened when
they heard it; for they found they were doing all the very
things that God had said He would punish them for, and turn
them out of their good land.

So Josiah sent to a holy prophetess to ask her whether, if
they left off their sins, and were very sorry, and prayed with
all their might, God would still forgive them. But God told
her to answer that the people had done so wrong, and grown



SS


SS eee a
Hezekiah and Fostah. 189

so wicked, that now their punishment must come; but that,
as Josiah’s heart was tender, and he loved God, it should not
happen in his time, and that he should be quietly buried with
his fathers. And, after years of goodness, Josiah was killed in
a battle, and all his people mourned over him.

But they had not been really good, they only pretended, just
to please him, and went back to their wicked ways, in spite of
all the pains he had taken with them; and his own sons were
as bad as the rest. So the punishment was obliged to come.

What I wish you to mind to-day is how these people lost
their Book of the Law for want of attending to it. If you
have not got a Bible of your own, I dare say you soon will
have one. And then, pray, do not do like these people of
Israel. Do not let it lie by till you forget to look at it, and
forget what is in it, and then forget even where it is. If you
do, you will grow as bad as these people were, and God will
be forced to punish you as He was forced to punish them.





QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Josiah? 2. How many kings were there between him and
Hezekiah? 3. What sort of kings were they? 4. What kind of person
was Josiah? 5. How old was he when he began to reign? 6. What did
he have cleaned out? 7. What did they find there? 8. Who gave the
Law? 9. What was to happen if it was not kept? 10. How had it been
lost? 11. What did Josiah cause the priests to do? 12. Why was he
frightened? 13. What did he ask? 14. What did God promise him?
15. But why did the people deserve to be punished? 16. What did they
do as soon as Josiah was dead? 17. What came of forgetting their
Bibles? 18. Ought we to forget our Bibles? 19. If we never read them,
can we be good? 20, And if we are not good, what must be done to us ?


ay

TRA
it

RRERRRE Ss
ay

a

—

ede
eras

ae
was

CCL LOL OD Rp rp ot

7

A
i.

VO eT,













































THE FEAST OF TABERNACLES.— PAGE 234.



Chirty-fourth Somday—Sieteenth alter Crimity.

QO



FEHOIAKIM’S CRUELTY.
FIRST READING.

“T spake unto thee in thy prosperity ; but thou saidst, I will not hear.”—

Fer. xxii. 21.

OSIAH was the last good king. In his time God called

Jeremiah, when he was only a young boy about twelve
years old, to be His prophet ; and all the time Josiah reigned
Jeremiah was teaching the people God’s will, while Josiah was
doing all he could to help them to do right and serve the
Lord.








Fehoiakim’s Cruelty. IQI



But the Jews did not heed either the king or the prophet—
they only longed after their idols. Even Josiah’s own sons
would not be good, after they had been brought up by such a
holy father ; but no sooner was he killed in battle, than they
went back to all the bad ways that he had put an end to.

The eldest son, Jehoahaz, only reigned three months. Then
God let the King of Egypt take him away; and the Prophet
Jeremiah says that it was far sadder for him to go away a
captive, and never see his home again, than for good Josiah
to be in his grave, loved and wept for by all. For though
God had let Josiah die so early, it was in mercy. The people
had grown so wicked that they must be punished, and so he
was taken away from the evil to come. His next son was
king after his brother Jehoahaz.

The next brother was king instead. His name was
Jehoiakim. One would have hoped he would have taken
warning by his brother’s troubles, and served God better.
But no! He did not care to attend to poor people. He
thought he should be safe in a fine house. He sent for large
stones, and had great beams of cedar tree for the roofs, and
painted the walls of his great rooms with scarlet. But he paid
no wages to his workmen, and was cruel to everybody, and
had innocent people killed if they made him angry with them.

Only there was one man who was not afraid of this King
Jehoiakim. It was God’s prophet Jeremiah. He told the
king how little good his fine house would do; and what was
more, he said that when he died nobody would be sorry for
him. They had wept for his father with a great weeping and






192 Thirty-fourth Sunday—Sixteenth after Trinity.



many tears; but when the cruel Jehoiakim died nobody would
lament. Nobody would say, “Ah, lord!” or, “ Ah, his glory!”
but they would care for him no more than if he was an ass
who was being buried.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was the good king you heard of last Sunday evening? 2. What
kind of sons had he? 3. What became of the first? 4. What was he
never to do? 5. What was the name of the second? 6. What did
Jehoiakim want to build? 7. What were the walls of? 8. How was it
roofed? 9. How was it painted? 10. But what did he not pay? 11.
How did he treat the people? 12. Who could have made him quite safe?
13. But how must he have lived if he wanted God to take care of him?
14. If God did not take care of him, would his fine house do him any good ?
15. Who told him it would do him no good? 16. What had everyone
done when Josiah died? 17. Why did they weep for Josiah? 18. But
would they care when Jehoiakim died. 19. Why would nobody care for
Jehoiakim ?

Nore. —The two other Lectionary Lessons for this day are from Nehemiah. If it be desired

to read the ‘‘story” on them, it is to be found on the 41st Sunday, but it was omitted here to
prevent chronological confusion.








See

22



OFFERING WINE TO THE RECHABITES,



Chirty-ftth Sunday —Sobenteenth after Crinity.

FEREMIAH’S PROPHECIES.
FIRST READING.

“ He reserveth to us the appointed weeks of the harvest.”—Fer. v. 24.

HE chapter to-day is one where God is putting us in mind,

by His Prophet Jeremiah, whom he sent to speak to the

wicked kings, that we ought to remember Him and be thank-
fulto Him. Two of His great mercies are spoken of here.

If you go and stand on the sea-shore, you see the great wide

sea of waters heaving and moving all over. Then along wave










194 Thirty-ifth Sunday—Seventeenth after Trinity.



comes rising up ; it runs on and on, and rises high, falls over in
white foam, and breaks on the sand with a rush. Then
another rolling wave comes after it, and another, and another,
each a little higher than the last. They hide the ground ; and
if you stood still at the edge of the first, they would soon carry
you off. Stone is hidden after stone, rock after rock, and you
would think all the land would get covered at last. No, there
is no fear of that. In six hours’ time, the waves leave off
coming farther and farther ; but each leaves a little bit more
ground uncovered, till they have gone quite back to where
they were before, and the beach lies fresh and shining in the
wet. People call this the tide, and know it always does so; it
comes up and goes back at its set times, because God fixed a
line for that fierce sea, and said to it, “ Hitherto shalt thou go,
and no farther; and here shall thy proud waves be stayed.”
And if the waves dash and roar ever so loud, still they never
can get beyond the bound God fixed for them.

There is the wonder of the sea! Now look at the wonder
of the land. All over the country, the corn stands up tall and
brown ; or else it has been cut, and is piled up in shocks; or
the waggons are carrying it safe home! Perhaps you have
been gleaning in the fields, and have brought home your lap
full of corn. How did we get the corn that is to make us
bread? It was because, when the farmer sowed his grain, God
sent rain to make it grow, and caused the sun to shine, so as
to draw up the stalk, and swell the grain in the ear; and now
He hath “reserved to us the appointed weeks of the harvest.”
He has given us the glad harvest-time to store up our wheat,








Jeremiah’s Prophecies. 195



to make bread for all the year. Let us thank Him, and never
forget who gives us bread, nor to say our prayer for daily
bread.

QUESTIONS.

1. What do the waves of the sea do every day? 2. What do people
call the coming up of the sea? 3. Need we fear its coming too far? 4.
Why cannot the waves come too far? 5. What did God say to the sea?
6. Who made the sea? 7. Can you tell me a verse you say or sing at
church about the sea being His? 8. What is it that God gives us every
day to eat? 9. What is bread made of? 10. Where does corn grow?
11. Who makes the corn grow? 12. What does God send to make the
corn grow? 13. What do we call the gathering in of our corn? 14, Who
takes care we shall have a harvest? 15. How should we ask God for
our food? 16. How should we thank Him for our food?

SECOND READING.
“Yet they were not afraid.” er. xxxvi. 24.

OU heard what a bad, cruel king Jehoiakim was. Still

there was a hope that he and his people would take warn-
ing, when he heard that God would punish his sin ; so Jeremiah
the Prophet had all his prophecies written out on a roll of
parchment, and his friend Baruch went to the Temple, and
read to the people that if they would not worship God and
serve Him faithfully, He would cause them all to be taken
away prisoners to a strange land.

Baruch stood reading the parchment; and the people
listened to him, and some of them began to grow afraid. But
then came some of the king’s great people, and when they
heard it they thought it would make the king angry. They










196 Thirtyifth S unday—Seventeenth after Trinity.



forgot that God's anger signified much more than the king’s
anger. They did not want Jeremiah or Baruch to be punished,
but they were afraid to let the reading go on. So they told
Baruch to go away and hide himself and Jeremiah carefully,
and then they took the prophecies to shew them to the king.

The king was sitting by the fire warming himself, for it was
in the winter. He listened for a little while; but when he
found that the parchment was about his sins and God’s anger,
he took out a knife and cut the whole into bits, and burnt it
in the fire. Was he so foolish as to think that burning the
prophecy would prevent it from coming to pass? If so, he
made a great mistake ; for God desired Jeremiah to have it all
written over again, and more too; for the punishment was to
be worse now than it would have been before—much worse
than if Jehoiakim had listened, and left off his bad ways, and
prayed to God.

In a very short time the enemy all came round Jerusalem,
and everyone was shut up in the city, and could not get out,
and food was very scarce ; and Jehoiakim was taken and put
in chains; and thus he died, and nobody grieved for him.
His young son, Jehoiachin, was called king for a little while,
but only for a very little while ; for the king of Babylon broke
into the city, and made him prisoner, and took him away to
be shut up far from home. And as to the dead body of
Jehoiakim himself, nobody had time to give him a burial ; so
it was thrown out at the gates as if he had been a dead ass
instead of a king of Judah.

So you see God’s words through Jeremiah all came true,




Feremiah’s Prophecies. 197





though Jehoiakim would not heed them. He only made it
worse by not listening.
QUESTIONS.

1. Who was the king? 2. Who was the prophet? 3. What had
Jeremiah said about Jehoiakim? 4. Where did God tell him to have it
written? 5. Who was to read it? 6. To whom did Baruch read? 7.
Where did the great people take the roll of parchment? 8. What did the
king do to it? 9. Whose words did he throw away? 10. Why would
not he listen? 11. Did he hinder the harm from coming? 12. What
happened to him? 13. How was he buried? 14. How should he have
tried to prevent the harm from coming? 15. How should you behave if
you have fault found with you?

THIRD READING.

“Thus have we obeyed the voice of Jonadab the son of Rechab our father

in all that he hath charged us.”—Fer. xxxv. 8.

OD is pleased with those who obey what their parents tell

them. To-day we hear about a family, whose father gave
them an order that sounds strange to us. They were never
to live in stone or brick houses, but always to have tents ; they
were not to have corn-fields or vineyards, but only flocks of
sheep, and herds of cows and goats; and they were never to
taste wine or strong drink, but only water and milk. It was
quite a long time after the old father, who gave these orders,
had died, that the Prophet Jeremiah was told to try whether
they still minded him. He was told to set pots of wine and
cups before them, and to ask them to drink. But they all
answered steadily, that their father had bidden them never to
touch wine, nor have fields, nor build houses ; and they were




198 Thirty-fifth Sunday—Seventeenth after Trinity.



resolved that they would obey him. Then God was pleased
with them, and gave a blessing to them by the mouth of His
prophet. He said that there should never be an end to their
tribe, because they were so obedient. And so it has been.

These Rechabites, as they are called, lived two thousand
four hundred years ago; and their children and descendants
have gone on like them ever since—living in tents, keeping
sheep, and drinking no wine, and obeying the voice of
their father, who lived so long ago. They have lasted so long,
because God blessed their obedience.

Now, sometimes a little child goes out alone, and some
friend offers it something nice that it knows its mother would
not like it to have. Or some person asks a little boy to come
into a beer-shop, and drink a drop, when perhaps his father
had told him not. Recollect, then, that if you are steady in
minding what you are told, as those good Rechabites were,
then God will be pleased with you, and own you for His good
child, and give you His blessing.

QUESTIONS.

1. What is the Fifth Commandment? 2. Who are the people we hear
of to-day who honoured their father? 3. Who was their father? 4. What
had he told them? 5. Where were they to live? 6. What were they not
to drink? 7. Who tried if they would obey? 8. What did Jeremiah offer
the Rechabites? 9. What did they answer? 10. What blessing did God
give them? 11. How have they gone on ever since? 12. Why'’was God
pleased with them? 13. What can you do to please God? 14. If you
are out of sight of your father and mother, what must you still do? 15.
If any of you are asked to do what your mother would not like, how must
you behave? 16. Who is pleased if you are obedient ?


















READING THE ROLL TO JEHOIACHIN.



Chirty-sixth Sunday —Cighteenth after Grimty.

THE TAKING OF FERUSALEM.
FIRST READING.

“ Behold, I am against you, saith the Lord God.”—Ezekiel xiii. 8.

HEN King Jehoiakim was dead, and his son Jehoiachin
carried away to Babylon, another king began to reign,
named Zedekiah. He was Jehoiachin’s uncle; he was
Jehoiakim’s brother ; and he was son to good Josiah. The
king of Babylon said that Zedekiah should reign as long as
he would be obedient to him, and pay some money every year,






200 Thirty-sixth Sunday-Eighteenth after Trinity.

so as to show that he owned the king of Babylon for his
master. And God spake through His prophet Jeremiah, and
said that if Zedekiah would obey the king of Babylon, the
people should be left in peace, only they must be patient under
their punishment.

But Zedekiah was more like his bad brother than his good
father. He listened to people who pretended to be prophets,
though God had never spoken by them. They told him to set
up for himself against the king of Babylon, and that all the
beautiful things that had been taken out of the Temple should
come back again. And when Jeremiah told them that it
would not be so, and that if they rebelled against the Baby-
lonians it would be worse for them, and the king would be put
to death, they were so wicked as to let the holy prophet down
into a pit, with mud and mire at the bottom ; and there he lay
sunk in the mire, and with no food to eat, nor water to drink.

At last a black man, one of the king’s slaves, came and told
the king that the prophet would soon be dead if he stayed
there. Then Zedekiah was shocked, and he told the black to
get Jeremiah safe out of the pit. So they threw him down
soft rags, and told him to put them under his arms, that the
ropes might not hurt him when they drew him up. So
Jeremiah came out of the horrible pit, and had some food ;
and the king sent to see him in secret. Then he told the
king that it was God’s will that he should bear to be under
the Babylonian power, and that he must not make war ; for
that if he did, he would come to great misery, and die blind
and a prisoner.






The Taking of Ferusalem. 201



Zedekiah was not angry, as his brother had been, but all he
had to say for himself was that he was afraid of his people.
He was more afraid of them than of God, and he would not
do what he knew to be right. So he told the black man to
keep Jeremiah safe, and take care he had food every day ; but
be begged Jeremiah not to say one word to these wicked men
about the conversation they had had together.

Was it not a foolish thing to be so afraid of men, when God
could have taken care of him? He would have been quite
safe if he had only been bold enough to do as God told him!
Mind, that if ever idle children should want you to be as
naughty as they are, and tease you till you feel afraid to stand
out against them, the only way to be safe is to do as God tells
you. Zedekiah, who was afraid to do right, was quite as much
punished as Jehoiakim, who was bold to do wrong.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was king after Jehoiakim? 2. What did the king of Babylon
promise? 3. What did God say? 4. By whom did God speak? 5. To
whom did Zedekiah listen instead? 6. What did he do to Jeremiah? 7.
What kind of place was the pit? 8. Who had pity on Jeremiah? 9.
How was Jeremiah taken out of the pit? 10, What did he tell the king?
11. Why did not Zedekiah mind him? 12. Why was it very foolish of
Zedekiah to be afraid of the people?






202 Thirty-sixth Sunday—Eighteenth after Trinity.
| SECOND READING.

“There was written therein lamentations, and mourning, and woe.”—
Lzekiel ii, 10.
HIS is a sad text; but when people are wicked, sadness
must always follow.

You heard how kind God had been to the Israelites, and
how much He had done for them; how He gave them their
beautiful land, and their city of Jerusalem, and blessed them
whenever they were good. And if they sinned, He sent
punishment, that they might learn to do better; and when
they were sorry He forgave them, and made them happy again.
But they would not keep to what He told them; they would
worship idols, and grow worse and worse, till at last God said
that there could be only “lamentation, and mourning, and
woe,” for the trouble they had brought on themselves.

God sent a great army under the king of Babylon, and
Jerusalem was given up tothem. The fierce soldiers came in,
and burnt the houses, and robbed the Temple; and as to the
young king, Jehoiachin, they took him and his mother, and all
his chief lords and priests, and carried them away to Babylon,
where he was a long time in prison.

The chapter to-day was written by a holy prophet, whose
name was Ezekiel, and who was taken away to Babylon at
the same time as the young king. God came and spoke to
Ezekiel, that he might go on warning the people, that if they
did not repent now that they were punished, He would be
obliged to go on punishing them still.

Think about that. You know if you have done wrong and








The Taking of Ferusalem. 203



been punished, it is that you may mind another time, and not
do the same over again. If you are obstinate or careless, and
go back to the old fault, then you will have to suffer more and
more; and there can be nothing but “lamentation and mourn-

ing and woe.”
QUESTIONS.

1. Who is the prophet whose chapter is read to-day? 2. Where did
Ezekiel live? 3. Who took him to Babylon? 4. Who was taken there at
the same time? 5. How old was king Jehoiachin? 6. What was his
home? 7. Why were he and his people taken away from Jerusalem? 8.
What had been their sin? 9. How had God tried to make them better?
10. Had they attended? 11. What must come of sin? 12. What is the
use of being punished? 13. What will happen if we do not leave off the
fault when we are punished ?

THIRD READING.
“ And ye shall be comforted.” Ezekiel xiv. 22.

HE prophet Ezekiel had many sad things to tell the Jews;

but he had some comfortable ones. They had been very
wicked, and God took them away from their dear home at
Jerusalem, and let it be burnt with fire; and put them to live
far away in astrange land at Babylon. But He told them that
if they would leave off their sins, and turn back to Him, and
not worship idols any more, then He would forgive them, and
bring them home again. To-day the Lesson says that they
must really be sorry in earnest, not only pretend to be sorry.
If they said they would worship God, and were caring for their
idols in their hearts all the time, then He must go on being
angry, and punishing them ; but if they were really sorry, and




204 Thirty-sixth Sunday—Eighteenth after Trinity. |

|

really prayed to Him, then when they had been punished
enough, they should be comforted.

They should not always stay in Babylon, in the dull flat
land, with the streams of water flowing lazily through it; but
they should see their own dear hills and fields again, and live
in their homes once more. That would be such gladness, that
it would make up for all the sorrow. All that was wanted
was, that they should be really sorry, and leave off all the bad
things they had done, and repent from the bottom of their
hearts.

Now when we have done wrong, and are punished, it is to
make us sorry, that we may do so no more. Little children
are punished by their friends; grown-up people are punished
by God sending troubles. Then we must be sorry, not only
for the punishment, but the fault, and really try with all our
hearts not to do it again. If we only say we are sorry, and
then run back to our old ways, something worse will come
of it. No, we must be sorry in earnest, and then God will
forgive us, for His dear Son Jesus Christ’s sake.

QUESTIONS.

1. What was happening to Jerusalem? 2. What was done to the
houses? 3. What was done to the people? 4. Where had they to live?
5. Where did they wish to be? 6. Why were they taken to Babylon? 7,
What wicked thing had they done? 8. But what hope had they? 9,
What must they do to be forgiven? 10. Where should they go back again
to? 11. Whyare people punished? 12. What is the way to be forgiven?
13. Howare children punished? 14. How are grown-up people punished?
15. What should we do if we are punished? 16. Will it do to go back to
the fault ?














JEWS DRIVEN AWAY CAPTIVE.



Chirty-sebenth Sanday —Aineteonth after Grimity.

THE FALL OF FERUSALEM.
FIRST READING.

“Repent, and turn yourselves from all your transgressions.” Ezekiel
XVII. 30.

ERY sad things were going on among the Jews. A great

many of them were carried away out of their beautiful

hilly land of Canaan, to live among the flat wet marshes round

Babylon, and only a few were left with their king Zedekiah at
Jerusalem.

Jeremiah was speaking God’s words to the people at Jeru-










206 Thirty-seventh Sunday—Nineteenth after Trinity.



salem ; Ezekiel was speaking God’s words to the people who
were captives by the river side. They both said the same
thing—that the only way to be peaceful, and not to suffer
worse and worse, would be to repent and leave off their sins
that had displeased God, and pray to Him to spare them, and
then to bear patiently the punishment that had begun. But
this was just what Zedekiah and his people would not do.
They misused Jeremiah for giving them such advice, and they
would not own the king of Babylon for their master; and
instead of believing God’s true prophets, they listened to the
false ones, who said, that in a very little while the captives
would come back again, and all would be well.

Then Ezekiel took a tile, a great flat piece of pottery, and
he drew on it the walls and towers of the city of Jerusalem,
and made little tents and banks round it, and he lay down by
it on his side, and watched it. And he weighed out for him-
self a very little bad bread to eat. Then, when the people
came to ask him why he did this, he said that it was to show
them how it would be with their own Jerusalem far away. The
Babylonians would come round it, and set up their tents, and
make banks of earth to keep the people in, and shoot stones
and arrows, and climb the walls. Inside there would be no
better food than Ezekiel was eating—no, nor so good—and
everyone would be starving, and dying of thirst. Then the
enemy would break in, and carry all the chief of them away
to Babylon, and keep them prisoners there—till the whole
people had come to repent of their sins, and had turned to the
Lord with all their hearts.










The Fall of Ferusalem. 207



For God has no pleasure in man’s being punished. He only
punishes that we may turn away from our sin and do right,
and be saved at last. If only these Jews would have listened
to Ezekiel and Jeremiah, and repented, they would have been
spared ; but instead of that, they went on growing worse and
worse, till they had to have seventy long years of punishment
before they could be forgiven.

We must take care when we are punished that we are sorry,
and not obstinate and hard, or we shall have to be punished
more and more.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who were the two prophets? 2. Where did Jeremiah prophesy ?
3. Where did Ezekiel prophesy? 4. What did they both tell the people?
5. Would the people mind them? 6. What did King Jehoiakim do to
Jeremiah’s prophecies? 7. What did King Zedekiah do to Jeremiah?
8. What did Ezekiel take? 9. What did he draw on the tile? 10. What
did he put round the tile? 11. Where did he lie? 12, What did he eat ?
13. What was the tile to stand for? 14. Who were coming round
Jerusalem? 15. What would they set up? 16. What food would the
people have? 17. What would become of them? 18. Why? 19. What
ought they to have done?

SECOND READING.
“ Woe to the bloody city.” Ezekiel xxiv. 6.
O Jerusalem had been taken, and pulled down, and burnt ;
and King Zedekiah was dead, and all his sons, and most
of the great people had been carried away to Babylon. Only
the poorer people were left, that they might plough and sow,












208 Thirty-seventh Sunday—Nineteenth after Trinity.



and gather the corn and the grapes, and keep the land from
getting waste and full of weeds. The Prophet Jeremiah was
left among them. There is one book in the Bible called the
Book of Lamentation, for it is the sad verses that he made to
mourn over the beautiful city and the glorious Temple, all
burnt with fire because the people had been so sinful.

Still Jeremiah told the people that were left, that if they
would be patient and obey the king of Babylon, that after the
seventy years of punishment the troubles should be over, and
their friends should come back, and the Temple be built up
again. But still, after all that had happened, these wilful
Jews would have their own way. They said they were afraid
of the king of Babylon there, and must go to Egypt to be
safe; just as if they were not safer where God told them to
stay, than they could be anywhere else. So off they went,
and they carried Jeremiah by force with them, whether he
would or no.

But almost as soon as Jeremiah came there, God told him
to take some great stones and put them into the clay of the
brick kiln near Pharaoh’s house, and say that upon those very
stones the king of Babylon himself would set up his tent in a
few years’ time.

And so it was. The Babylonians raised a great army, and
came marching into Egypt, and there they burnt and de-
stroyed, and killed and made slaves of the people they found
there. Then these foolish Jews saw that if they had only
stayed quietly at home the king of Babylon would have done
them no harm. But now they had run away just where he




The Fall of Ferusalem. 209

was coming, and would hurt them most. That came of not
trusting God’s Word, but trying to run away from Him ; for
truly nothing is so foolish as to try to hide from God.

QUESTIONS.

1. What had been done to Jerusalem? 2. Where were all the chief
people gone? 3. Who were left? 4. Where did Jeremiah stay? 5.
What sad book did Jeremiah write? 6. Why was he sorry? 7, What
did he tell the Jews that were left? 8. Where did they want to go?
9. Why was it wrong to go to Egypt? 10. Why did they choose to go to
Egypt? 11. What did God tell Jeremiah? 12. Where was the king of
Babylon to set his throne? 13. Where would they have been safest ?
14. Why?

THIRD READING.
“TJ will cause you to pass under the rod.”—Ezehiel xx. 37.

OD told His prophet Ezekiel to put the Israelites in mind

of all that He had done for them, and how ungrateful
they had been—always worshipping idols, and turning away
from Him, though He had brought them out of the land of
Egypt, and led them through the wilderness, and given them
the beautiful land of Canaan. But they would not serve Him
there, so punishment had come. Some of the Israelites were
captives already in the land of the king of Babylon. Ezekiel
was one of them; and just four years after he spoke this
prophecy, Nebuchadnezzar, the king of Babylon, came up
against Jerusalem, and took it once more, and made King
Zedekiah prisoner as he was trying to flee away. Zedekiah’s




210 Thirty-seventh Sunday—Nineteenth after Trinity.

sons were put to death before his eyes; and after that his
eyes were put out, and he was carried in chains to Babylon,
and there slain. Beautiful Jerusalem was set on fire, the walls
were thrown down, and all the gold and silver in the Temple
was carried off to Babylon; and the Jews themselves were
made to go there too, and live as prisoners there. This was
the way God punished them to make them sorry for their
sins ; and still He gave them hope that when seventy years
were over, they should come back, and build up their city ;
and after that they would always remember their old fault,
and never turn to worship false gods again. So God was
merciful even in His anger, and sent their sorrow to make
them know Him and serve Him better.

QUESTIONS.

1. Where had God led the Israelites from? 2. What beautiful place
had He given them? 3. What were they to do for Him? 4. Did they
serve Him? 5. What did they worship? 6. How did He punish them ?
7. What young king had they lost already? 8. Who was the king that
came up against Jerusalem? 9. What did Nebuchadnezzar do to Jeru-
salem? 10. Who was the king Nebuchadnezzar took? 11. What was done
to King Zedekiah? 12. What was done to the city? 13. What was done
to the people. 14. Were they ever to come back again? 15. How soon
were they to come back? 16, What did they learn by their troubles ?






























DANIEL REFUSING THE DAINTIES,



Chirty-cighth Sunday—Coenticth after Trinity.

THE FEWS AT BABYLON.
FIRST READING.

“ By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we

remembered Zion.”—Psalm cxxxvii. I.
HEN the Jews came to Babylon, some were made to live
in the city, where they worked at trades, and kept shops.
Others lived in the country and worked in the fields. These
were not like the fields at home. The goodly land at home
was full of hills and valleys, with sloping pastures for the
flocks, and vineyards on the sides of the hills; but the land






212 Thirty-cighth Sunday-Twentieth after Trinity.



round Babylon was quite flat, with broad rivers flowing slowly
and lazily through the meadows, with weeping willows upon
their banks.

While Jerusalem-was being besieged, Ezekiel, at Babylon,
drew the picture of the town on a tile, and shut it in with a
wall, and lay watching it, and weighing out a little bit of
bad bread for himself to eat every day, that the other Jews
who were with him might know what was going on among
their brethren at Jerusalem, as God told him. And in a vision
he saw the angels come and mark in their foreheads all that
were good, that they might not be hurt in the siege; while the
bad would die by sword, and hunger, and sickness. So it is
still, God saves His own good ones. The angels know and
mark them, when all the rest are given up to God’s terrible

ame et- QUESTIONS.

1. What sort of place was Babylon? 2. Was it like the land of Israel?
3. Who was the prophet there? 4. What did he do while the siege of
Jerusalem was going on? 5. Where did he draw it? 6. What did he
eat? 7. Who were eating bread like that? 8. Whosaw him? 9. What
did he see an angel doing? 10, Who were marked? 11. What became
of those who were marked? 12. What became of those who had no
mark? 13. Who will always be safe? 14. How are you marked?

SECOND READING.

“ Son of man, can these bones live ?”—Ezekiel xxxvii. 3.

HE great prophet Ezekiel was shewn by God how the
Jews should be brought back after all their troubles. The
Jord made him have a sort of dream, when he saw a whole




The Fews at Babylon. ong

valley spread over with dry bones, and the Lord said, “Son
of man, can these bones live?” And Ezekiel said, “ Lord,
Thou knowest.” Then the Lord bade Ezekiel sing ; and as
he sung there was a shaking, and the bones came together
again and joined in their right places ; and as he sung on, the
flesh came back on them ; and then the Lord bade him call
to the winds of heaven, and they came and filled them with
breath again, and they rose up and lived.

Just so God said the kingdom of Judah was dead and
scattered, but He would breathe on it, and wake it, and join
it together again, like the dead bones rising to life.

And just so, we know, when all our bodies are dead, and
our bones lie in the grave, the call of the Lord’s voice will
wake them up, and we shall rise on our feet, and His breath
will come to us, and we shall stand before Him an exceeding
great army. For that is the resurrection of the body which
we look for.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was the prophet? 2. What had happened to the kingdom of
Judah? 3. Who had conquered it? 4. Why had Nebuchadnezzar con-
quered it? 5. What did God shew Ezekiel? 6. How did the bones look?
7. What did God bid Ezekiel do? 8. What happened? 9. What came
back to the bones? 10, What was dry and dead like the bones? 11. But
what did God promise to do? 12. When did the Jewish people come to
life? 13. What will become of us by-and-by? 14. What will be done
with our bodies? 15. When will they wake? 16. What will wake them ?
17. What will be joined together? 18. Will they die any more? 19. For
what do we believe in ?


214 Thirty-cighth Sunday—Twentieth after Trinity.
|







THIRD READING.
“God gave them knowledge and skill.”—Danzel i. 17.

MONG the Jews who were carried away to Babylon there
were some little boys, young princes of the king’s family,
who had been brought up in the palace of the house of David.
They could not have been more than twelve years old when
they were thus taken from their homes.

The king of Babylon, Nebuchadnezzar, thought he should
like to have them to wait on him. So he desired the steward
of his palace to have them taken into his care, to be taught
both to wait on the king, and to know all the learning of
Babylon.

Slaves instead of princes. That was sad enough, but what
grieved these boys most of all was that the dinners that were
sent to them all came from the king’s own table, and they
knew that all the meat there came from creatures that had
been offered up to idols. Now there was one boy, whose name
was Daniel, who knew that it was very wrong for any Jew to
eat meats that had been offered to idols. Some of the boys
said they did not care, and some said they were very sorry,
but they could not help it. Yes, Daniel said, they could
help it if they would leave off eating meat and drinking
wine, and only have beans and water. Then three more
of the boys said they would stand by Daniel, and have only
the beans and water rather than break God’s holy Law.
Their proper names were Hananiah, Azariah, and Mishael,
but the king had changed all the boys’ names, and he called
them Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego.






The Fews at Babylon. 215



So Daniel asked their master, Melzar, to give them none of
the rich wine and fine dainties, but only water and pulse—that
is, beans.

But Melzar said they would grow thin and weak on such
poor food, and then the king would be angry with him.

“Only try us for just ten days,’ Daniel said.

And God so blessed the food, that at the end of ten days,
Daniel, Hananiah, Azariah, and Mishael, were fairer and
fatter than all their cousins and friends who had been eating
the king’s dainties.

And Melzar had found that none were so true and honest
and obedient and painstaking, so he trusted them very much ;
and they grew wise and learned, and still loved and feared
their God, though they were slaves so far away from home.

Now remember how they began. It was by giving up the
things they liked when they found it was wrong to have them.
When you are tempted to be greedy, would it not be a good
thing to recollect Daniel and the other boys eating beans and

drinking water?
QUESTIONS.

1. Who were the boys carried to Babylon? 2. What were their proper
names? 3. What did the king callthem? 4. What was the name of the
king of Babylon? 5. How did he desire these boys to be brought up?
6. What had they been at home? 7. What were they to eat? 8. Why
did they not like to eat these meats? 9. What did Daniel beg for?
10, Who joined with him? 11. Who was their master? 12. What did
Melzar say? 13. How long was it to be tried? 14. How did Daniel and
his friends look? 15. Why was this? 16. Why did God bless them?
17. How did they behave? 18. What was the beginning of all their
holiness? 19. What ought we to keep in order?










THE HANDWRITING ON THE WALL.



Chirty-ninth Sunday —Ctoenty-frst after Grimtp.

DANIEL AT BABYLON.
FIRST READING.
“Our God whom we serve is able to deliver us from the burning fiery
furnace.”—Dantel/ iii. 17.
OU remember that the Jews had been so wicked, that God
had let them be conquered by their enemies, and taken
quite away from home to the great city of Babylon.
The king of Babylon worshipped idols; and he set up a
great golden idol, much higher than this room, and com-
manded that as soon as his music played, everyone should fall






Daniel at Babylon. 217

down and worship the image; or if anyone would not, that
person should be thrown into a burning fiery furnace. A
furnace is like a very large oven, or like a brick-kiln—a sort
of house quite full of fire—for burning and baking bricks, or
melting iron, or anything else that requires to be made very
hot. Many people were afraid of such a horrible punishment
as being thrown into the furnace; and when they heard the
music, they made haste to bow down before the great golden
image. But the Jews knew that they must not worship idols ;
so what could they do? I only know what three of them did.
They were three yourig men, named Shadrach, Meshach, and
Abed-nego, who were brought up before the king, because they
would not bow down before his great image. The king asked
them how it.was; and told them fiercely that if they would
not worship his golden image, they must be thrown into the
fire. But they stood up boldly, and said, “Our God whom
we serve is able to deliver us from the burning fiery furnace,
and He will deliver us out of thine hand, O King! But if not,
be it known unto thee, O King, that we will not serve thy

oS)
gods, nor worship the golden image which thou hast set up.”



The king was very angry at this brave answer. He had the
furnace made seven times hotter than usual; and Shadrach,
Meshach, and Abed-nego were thrown into it, tied hand and
foot; and the flame was so hot, that it burnt the men that
threw them in.

Presently, the king gave a loud cry. For in the midst of
the fire were the men, not tied, but free, and walking in the
burning heat, as if they were in cool spring air! And there












218 Thirty-ninth Sunday—Twenty-jirst after Trinity.

was another with them, whose form was as the Son of God.
Then he called them, and the three came out. There was no
smell of fire about them, and not a hair of their heads was
singed ; they had not felt the heat at all; but that Holy One
had taken care of them, and kept them safe in the midst of
the fire. Then the king of Babylon knew how wrong he had
been; and he sent forth a command, that no one should ever
speak a word against the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and
Abed-nego, who had saved them in the burning fiery furnace.

QUESTIONS.

1. Where were the Jews living? 2. How came the Jews to be at
Babylon? 3. What did the king of Babylon want everyone to worship?
4. Who would not worship the golden image? 5. Why would not
Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego worship the image? 6. What is the
Second Commandment? 7. What was done to them for not worshipping
the image? 8. Whatisafurnace? 9. Howhot was it made? 10. What
did the king see in the fire? 11. Who was with them? 12. Were they
hurt? 13. Why did not the fire burn Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego?
14. Who took care of them in the fire?

SECOND READING.
“Those that walk in pride He is able to abase.”—Dawiel iv. 37.

REAT Nebuchadnezzar, the king of Babylon, had a
strange dream. He thought he saw a great tree with
spreading branches and fine leaves, making a sweet shelter,
where all the creatures came and stood, and the birds nestled








Daniel at Babylon. 219

in the boughs ; but while he was admiring it there came a holy
one down from heaven, and said the tree was to be cut down,
and only the stump left in the tender grass of the field, and
that it should be bound with iron, and wet with the dew of
heaven till seven years had passed over it.

When Nebuchadnezzar woke he was troubled, and was sure
the dream had a meaning, and he sent for the prophet Daniel
to tell him what it was. Daniel was so sorry, that at first he
could hardly bear to speak ; but at last he told the king that
it was himself, Nebuchadnezzar, that the tree meant. He was
great and mighty, and countries and people were shadowed
over by his power ; but soon he would have a fall—he would
lose his senses, and his man’s heart would be like a beast’s
heart, and he would be driven out of his palace, and he would
eat grass like an ox, and his body would be wet with the dew
of heaven, and his hair would be long like eagles’ feathers, and
his nails like eagles’ claws, till seven years had passed by; and
then he would recover his senses, and know and understand
again, and he would come back to his kingdom again. Then
he would know and own that the Lord of Heaven is the true
God.

Nebuchadnezzar was shocked at first, but soon he forgot all
about the dream, and felt himself so wise and strong and
brave, that nothing could hurt him. He was walking one day
in his palace, a most beautiful one, and looking out on the
grand city with the river running through it, with all the
bridges and the hundred brazen gates; and his heart was
lifted up with pride, and he said, “Is not this great Babylon



|




220 Thirty-ninth Sunday—-Twenty-jirst after Trinity,



that I have builded?” That very moment there came a voice
from heaven that said the time was come!

And a strange madness came on the king, his brave clever
spirit became as senseless as a beast’s; and he only wanted to
graze in the field like the cattle. So they drove him out of
the palace, and put a band of iron round him, and let him eat
grass like an ox, and his hair grew long and shaggy, and his
nails like eagles’ claws, just as Daniel had said.

So seven years passed away; and at the end of them he
came to his senses again, God gave back his man’s heart and
his reason, and he went back to his palace, and sat on his
throne again. And one of the first things he did was to have
a letter written to his people, telling them all this story, and
bidding them do honour to the God of Daniel, who putteth
down and setteth up.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Nebuchadnezzar? 2. Who was Daniel? 3. How came
Daniel to be at Babylon? 4. What did the king see in his dream?
5. What happened to the tree? 6, What did the king want to know? 7.
Whom did he send for? 8. Whom did Daniel say the tree meant? 9.
What was to happen to the king? ro. How long was he to be in this
state? 11. What beautiful place had Nebuchadnezzar built? 12. What
did he say about it? 13. What happened that moment? 14. What did
this poor king want to be? 15. What did he eat? 16. What was his
hair like? 17. What were his nails like? 18. How long did he go on
like that? 19. What did God restoreto him? 20. What was the first thing
he did? 21. What did he tell the people? 22. Had not he lost all his
pride? 23. What should we not boast of?






Daniel at Babylon. 22%

THIRD READING.
“God hath numbered thy kingdom, and finished it.”—Danzel v. 26.

FTER Nebuchadnezzar, some troublesome times began at

Babylon ; but at last his grandson Belshazzar was reign-

ing. He was a foolish, self-pleasing young man; and his

enemies, the great nation of Medes and Persians, came to

make war on him, but still he did not care for anything but
his amusement.

He thought Babylon so strong that they could never break
in; and he gave a great feast to all his lords, with fine meats
and wines, and he had all the gold and silver bowls, and the
golden candlestick that had been brought out of the Temple
of God at Jerusalem, on the tables, while he and his friends
were drinking and singing and shouting.

All on a sudden a stillness came over them, and their eyes
opened wide with fright. For just over the candlestick there
was seen a man’s hand. There was no body, only the hand;
and the finger went along writing on the wall, tracing out
letters.

There were four words, but no one could read them or tell
what they meant.

The king was terribly frightened. His knees knocked
together, and he shook all over, and he called for some one to
tell him what this writing could be. Nobody could guess ; but
at last the queen, his mother, came and put him in mind how
Daniel had been able to explain his fathers’s dreams. So
Daniel was sent for, and he at once read the writing. He






222 Thirty-ninth Sunday—Twenty-first after Trinity.



told them Belshazzar was found wanting. His kingdom was
going to be taken from him, and given to the Medes and
Persians.

And even then, all the time the Babylonians were feasting
and not watching the enemy, Cyrus, the clever king of the
Persians, was making his men dig ditches, into which he
turned all the water of the great river that ran through the
city ; and that very night all his army came in, walking up
the dry bed of the stream. No one saw them till they were
in the city; and that very night Belshazzar was slain.

QUESTIONS.

x. Who was king of Babylon. 2. Who made war on Belshazzar? 3.
What was all he cared for? 4. What feast did he make? 5. What were
brought out? 6. What frightened him? 7. What was the hand doing?
8. What could no one understand? 9. Who spoke up? 10. Who was
sent for? 411. What did Daniel say it meant? 12. What happened that
night? 13. How did the Persians get in? 14. Who was king of the
Persians? 15. Why did Belshazzar come to such a sad end.












L = “To FS

DANIEL IN THE LION'S DEN.



HFortieth Sunday—Ctoentp-second after Grunity.

THE RETURN FROM BABYLON.
FIRST READING.
“The Lord is in His holy Temple : let all the earth keep silence before
Him.”—fad, ii. 20.
HE Jews had gone back to their old city of Jerusalem, but
they found it looking very sad and ruinous. The walls
were broken down, and the pleasant houses were heaps of
ruins, and grass and brambles had come up in the courts, and
there were heaps of stone blackened with the fire and smoke
that had burnt down the city.




224 Fortieth Sunday— Twenty-second after Trinity,



The first thing they did was to clear the place where God’s
holy Temple used to stand, and to build it up again. But
they were not rich and powerful like King Solomon, who built
the first Temple; they had no gold and silver, and the new
Temple they built was very small and poor compared with the
old one. There were old men among them who remembered
the first Temple as it used to be, and they wept aloud as they
saw how different the new one was; but there were young
men who were very glad to have a Temple at all, and they
shouted for joy ; so there was a mixed sound of weeping for
sorrow and of crying out with joy. Then God sent His
Prophet Haggai to tell the old men not to be afraid, for the
glory of this latter House should be greater than that of the
former. The way this should be was that our Blessed Lord
Himself would come to the new Temple, as a little Babe at
first and afterwards as a grown Man; and when He was there,
the honour and glory of the Temple would be greater than
ever it was before. Now there is no one Temple: but God’s
Houses are Churches, and we have them everywhere to pray
to Him in, and meet Him there though we cannot see Him.
Let us take care to worship Him there very humbly and
reverently.

QUESTIONS.

1. Where did the Jews return to? 2. What state was their city in? 3.
What had they to do to their city? 4. What did they first buildup? 5.
What sort of a Temple did they build? 6, Why was the new Temple not
so fine as the old one? 7. What did the old people do? 8. What did
the young people do? 9. How did God comfort the old people? Io.




The Return from Babylon. 225



Who would come to the new Temple? 11. Is there a Temple now? 12.
What have we instead? 13. How should we behave in church ?

SECOND READING.

“What doth the Lord require of thee, but to do justice, and to love
mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God ?”—J/zcah vi. 8.

HE name of the leader of the Jews, when they came home
from Babylon to their own country, was Zerubabel.
Zerubabel was their prince. He was of David’s family, and
he would have been king if the Jews had been allowed to have
kings ; but he was contented to go back without the crown
and throne and sceptre that his fathers had had before him,
and to live humbly in obedience to the king of Babylon.
That which Zerubabel cared to have was a little spot of
ground among the mountains. It was the village of Bethlehem,
the place from which David had been called away long ago,
from feeding his father’s sheep, to come and be king of Israel.
Why should Zerubabel care for that little piece of ground
more than for Solomon’s palace, that was so glorious? One
reason was, that the Prophet Micah had said, “But thou,
Bethlehem-Ephratah, though thou be little among the thou-
sands of Judah, yet out of thee shall He come forth unto Me
that is to be Ruler in Israel ; whose goings have been from
everlasting.” And faithful men understood that this meant
that the Saviour of the world should be born at Bethlehem, and
that He would be among Zerubabel’s children’s children. That
was why Zerubabel cared so much for the poor little ruined



Â¥






226 fortieth Sunday— Twenty-second after Trinity.



village, and took care to make a home of it again, though now
there were only a hundred and twenty-three people to come
back to live in it. God was pleased with Zerubabel’s faith, and
blessed him because he had not despised the day of small
things.

God said that to Zerubabel a mountain should become a
plain—that is, that what seemed most difficult should grow
easy, and that Zerubabel should be the man who should build
up the Temple again—God’s own House, that was lying in
ruins. That was the great honour this good man had, because
he believed in God’s promise with all his heart, and went so
bravely and steadily to work upon a little, when he could not
do a great deal. For to him that is faithful in a little shall
much be given.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Zerubabel? 2. Where were the Jews coming back from?
3. What had Zerubabel’s fathers been? 4. Why was not Zerubabel a king?
5. Who was the father of the kings of the Jews? 6. What had David
been before he was a king? 7. Where did he keep his sheep? 8. What
was the place Zerubabel cared to have again? 9. Why did Zerubabel care
for Bethlehem? 10. Who was to be born there? 11. Who had said so?
12. What did Zerubabel believe? 13. How many people went back to
Bethlehem? 14. Did Zerubabel despise it for being small? 15. What
did he think of? 16. Why did God bless him? 17. What did God say
he should build up? 18. What did God say difficulties should be to him?
19. Do not things we have to do sometimes seem like great mountains to
get over? 20. But who can make them easy tous? 21. Only what must
we do ourselves? 22, And what is the way to do great things well? 23.
What must we never despise ?






The Return from Babylon. 227



THIRD READING.

“Thy God whom thou servest continually, He will deliver thee.”’—
Dan. vi. 16.

HERE was another king of Babylon, and his name was
Darius. It was the strange, foolish way of his people to
treat him as if he was a sort of a god, and more than man;
and one day his people came to him and begged him to make
a law that for thirty whole days nobody should say their
prayers to any god, or ask anything of any man, except of
Darius the king ; or if they did, they should be thrown to the
lions, to be eaten up.

Darius thought this was all to do him honour, so he made
the law that thus it should be. Now when a law had once
been made by the king of that people, it could not be changed.
So nobody was to say their prayers to anyone but the king for
all that time.

But by-and-by the king’s people came and told him that
there was one old man who did not attend to his law, but that
they had watched him in his own room, and there he said his
prayers three times a-day, just as if the king had made no law
at all.

The king was very sorry when he heard who it was, for
this man who would not leave off saying his prayers was the
man he trusted most in all the kingdom. It was Daniel,
one of the captive Jews, son or brother to one of the last kings
of Jerusalem. He had been taken to Babylon when he was
a very little boy, and now he was quite an old man, but he






228 fortieth Sunday—Twenty-second after Trinity.



had never ceased praying to the great God of Heaven, and
he was not going to leave off now. He was a prophet of
the Lord, and very wise, and he was one of the king’s very
best advisers, so Darius was greatly grieved when he was
accused.

But Darius could not help himself; the law that had once
been made could not be broken, and these spiteful people
declared that Daniel must be thrown to the lions. All day
long the king tried to get his wise good counsellor saved from
this dreadful fate, but he could not succeed; and at evening
Daniel’s enemies came to take him and throw him to the lions
in their den.

Still, though Darius was a heathen himself, he had one
hope; and when he saw his friend led away, he said, “Thy
God whom thou servest continually, He will deliver thee.”

So they took Daniel, and put him into a pit among the
lions, and they fastened up the door and left him there; and
the king was so sorry, that he could not sleep all night for
grieving for the good, wise, brave man who was thrown to the
lions because he would not leave off praying to God, and feared
God more than man.

And when daylight came they all went to the den. The
enemies hoped to find that Daniel was eaten up, but the king
cried out in a lamentable voice, “O Daniel, servant of the
living God, is thy God, whom thou servest continually, able
to deliver thee from the lions ?”

And Daniel’s own voice came cheerfully back, and told the
king that his God had sent His angel, who had shut the lions






The Return from Babylon. 229



mouths, so that they could not hurt him, and had kept him
safe all night.

And the king was very glad, and commanded them to take
Daniel out of the pit, and to put the spiteful men in instead ;
and the lions were so hungry that they brake all their bones
in pieces before ever they came to the bottom of the den.

Only think what Daniel was willing to bear rather than not
say his prayers! And it was because he prayed that God
saved him. God’s power shut the lions’ mouths, because
Daniel had been more afraid to leave off praying than even to
be torn to pieces. How glad we should be that we can say°
our prayers safe and unhurt ; and how careful we should be
never to miss them out of idleness, if Daniel would not miss
them out of fear.

QUESTIONS.

1. Where were the Jews living? 2. Who was king of Babylon? 3.
What law was Darius persuaded to make? 4. Who was to be prayed to?
5. What was to be done to anybody who said prayers to any but Darius ?
6. Who did go on saying his prayers? 7. Who was Daniel? 8. What
was done to Daniel? 9. Did the lions hurt Daniel? 10. Why was
Daniel kept safe in the den? 11. Whom did Daniel fear most, God or

men? 12. When should we say our prayers? 13. Can anyone hurt us if
God takes care of us?

eee








ESTHER BEFORE KING AHASUERUS.

ee

Forty-trst Sunday— Choentp-thind after Crimtty.

TROUBLES OF THE FEWS.
FIRST READING.

“Surely in vain the net is spread in the sight of any bird.”—Pvov. i. 17.

HERE was a gentle Jewish girl, named Esther, who had

been left an orphan very young, and was brought up by

her kind relation, Mordecai, who was one of the Jews who had
not gone back to Jerusalem, but still lived in Persia.

One day there came a messenger from the king, to carry

away poor Esther from home. The king wanted all the




Troubles of the Fews. 231





maidens in his land to be brought together, that he might
choose the most beautiful of them all for his queen, and the
others would be kept for slaves. All the other maidens
dressed themselves up, and painted themselves to try to look
beautiful ; but Esther did not ask for any ornaments, she only |
put on what she was ordered to wear. Yet she looked so_ |
much the most lovely of all, in her modest quietness, that the |
king chose her and married her, and set the crown on her
head, and made her his queen. But she had a sad life, though
she was queen. She was always shut up, and could not see
her kind friend Mordecai, and she could not even go to her
husband without his leave, or she would have been put to
death.

Her kinsman, Mordecai, used to sit in the palace gate every
day, to hear news of her. Now, there was a very bad man
named Haman, who used to pass by every day ; and Mordecai
never would bow to him, because he was one of the people
whom God had forbidden the Jews to have any concern with.
Haman grew so angry at last that he resolved not only to get
Mordecai killed, but all the Jews besides. So he went to the
king, and told him a false story about the Jews, and persuaded
him to give orders that their enemies in all the lands round
Jerusalem, and everywhere else, should fall on them on a set
day, and put them to death.

And the king was so foolish and so cruel as to consent to
seal the letters, saying that all the Jews were to be killed on
one day. But Mordecai heard about this cruel plot, and he
sent secret word to Esther that she must try to save her

nae ee ee




232 Forty-first Sunday— Twenty-third after Trinity.



people, by telling the king that he had been deceived by
Haman.

Poor Esther was much afraid. She knew that if she went
to the king without leave, she would be put to death; but she
thought it was better for her to run the risk, than to let all the
Jews perish. So she dressed herself beautifully, as the king
liked best to see her; and she went to his court almost
fainting with fear. But when he saw her, he touched her with
his golden sceptre. Then she knew he would not put her to
death ; and when he asked why she had come, and what she
wanted, she said she wished to ask him to a banquet of wine
in her chamber,

And when he came there, she was able to tell him of the
cruel plan for killing all her people, and how falsely Haman
had spoken. The king was very angry when he understood
it all; and wicked Haman was hung upon the very gallows he
had meant for Mordecai. And so the Jews were saved by the
good queen, who was not afraid to risk her life for her people.

QUESTIONS.

1. Where were some of the Jews living? 2. What was the name of
the Jew girl? 3. What was the name of her kinsman? 4. How did the
king choose his wife? 5. Who was the most beautiful woman? 6. Where
did Mordecai sit? 7. To whom would not Mordecai bow? 8. What did
Haman want todo? 9. Who consented? 10, Why was it dangerous for
Esther to go and speak to the king? 11. What did the king do when he
saw her? 12, What did holding out the sceptre mean? 13. What did
she ask him? 14. What did she tell him? 15. What was done to
Haman? 16. How were the Jews saved ?




Troubles of the Fews. 233

SECOND READING.

“Thy servants think upon her stones, and it pitieth them to see her in
the dust.”—Ps. cii. 14.

HERE was a good Jew named Nehemiah, whom the King

of Persia had made his cup-bearer. One day one of the
Jews came from Jerusalem, and told Nehemiah how sad all
was at their home, the city that once had been so beautiful.
There was a little bit of the Temple built up, but all the streets
were heaps of ruins, and only a house or two here and there
built up; and the robber tribes round were always breaking
in and doing mischief.

Nehemiah wept, and prayed to God for his people ; and
when he went in to wait on the king and queen, he still looked
so sad, that they asked him what was the matter. Then he
told them that he had just heard that his dear home, where
his fathers’ tombs were, was lying waste, and that the cruel
enemies were always doing harm ; and he begged the king to
let him go home and try to help them.

So the king gave him leave, but set him a time to come
back; and Nehemiah went all the long way to Jerusalem. It
was quite as bad as he had heard. The houses were all down,
only here and there one standing ; and when he went out on
his ass at night to view the ruins, there was a heap of stones
where a gate should be, and a hole where a wall should be.

So Nehemiah stirred up all the Jews, and they set to work
to build the wall to keep out the robbers. Then the enemies
laughed at them, and said a fox could break down all they
built; and when they went on, people used to come and








34 Lorty-jirst Sunday— Twenty-third after Trinity,



attack them, so that they had to work with swords ready to
fight, and always on the watch to come to help if they heard
a trumpet blown. But they kept on, and the wall was built,
and the gates set up; and they were safe once more from
enemies coming in among them.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who was Nehemiah? 2. What made him sad? 3. Who were living
at Jerusalem? 4. What had happened to it? 5. What did Nenemiah
do when he heard this sad news? 6. How did God begin to grant his
prayer? 7. What did the king ask him? 8. What did he tell the king?
g. Where did he go? 10. What did he find there? 11. Why did they
want a wall? 12, What did he set the Jews to do? 13. How did they
build? 14. Who tormented them? 15. But what was finished at last ?

THIRD READING.
“The joy of the Lord is your strength.” —Prov. iii. 17.

OOD Nehemiah built up the wall of Jerusalem ; and his
friend Ezra did all he could to teach the Jews to keep the
Law of God rightly. It was Ezra who gathered together the
five books of Moses, and collected the writings of the prophets,
and wrote out the history of the kings, and put nearly all the
Old Testament in order as we have it now. And Ezra and
Nehemiah took care to teach the people to keep the Sabbath
again, as the Fourth Commandment had taught them.
Nehemiah used to have the gates of the city shut up, that no
stranger might bring any burthen in, and that no one might
come in to sell or buy on God’s holy day.
And then they kept the Feast of the Tabernacles. It was








Go
Ct

Troubles of the Fews. 2



a most beautiful feast. All the people went and cut down
great boughs of myrtle, olive, pine, and citron, and willow
trees, and built up arbours with them, where they lived for
seven whole days, to put them in mind of how their fathers
had lived in tents when they came out of Egypt.

Andon the great day of the feast, every Jew went up to the
Temple with a green bough in his arm, and stood in the court,
and all the priests came out on the steps with palm-branches,
and with silver trumpets. Then the trumpets were sounded,
and everybody waved their branches for joy. And the priests
began a beautiful rejoicing psalm, and at its most joyful verses
the people waved their palms again. At night all the court of
the Temple was lighted up with great lamps, to put the people
in mind that the Lord is our light. How beautiful it must
have been, and how happy all the people were to have come
back from worshipping idols, and being punished in a strange
land, to praise their own true God once more, who blessed and
made them happy.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who were the two good men who governed the Jews? 2. What did
Ezra collect together? 3. Who taught good men how to write the Bible ?
4. What parts of the Bible did Ezra put together? 5. What command-
ment were Ezra and Nehemiah careful about? 6. How did they keep
people from breaking the Fourth Commandment? 7. What great feast
did they keep? 8. What did the people cut down? 9. What did they
build themselves? 10, How long did they live in arbours? 11. What
was it to remind them of? 12. What did they take to the Temple? 13.
Where didthe priests stand? 14. What was sung? 15. What did the people
do? 16, When did God bless His people? 17. What made them happy ?












THE ANNUNCIATION.



Forty-second Sunday.—Choenty-fourth after Grinity.

THE COMING OF THE LORD,
FIRST READING.

“ The fulness of the time was come.”—Gead. iv. 14.

JYVHERE was a long time after the Jews came home during
which we do not know much about them. Only they
had quite left off worshipping idols, and stood out bravely
when a bad king wanted to make them do so.
But they were not good in other ways. They quarrelled
among themselves a great deal. One set, who were called




The Coming of the Lord. 235



Pharisees, were very proud and hard-hearted ; and another
set, who were called the Sadducees, would not believe or obey
any of the Bible that was written after the time of Moses—
none of the Prophets nor of the Psalms.

These two sets quarrelled so much that they allowed a fierce
strange nation to come in and make themselves their masters.
These were the Romans, whose city was Rome, in Italy.
They were fierce soldiers, and wanted to make the world all
their own.

One of their generals, whose name was Pompey, was so
daring that he forced his way into the Holy of Holies, where
no one was allowed to go but the High Priest once a-year.
He was disappointed to find nothing there, only an empty
chamber, without any image or likeness ; and the Jews were
much grieved and distressed. It was always said that nothing
ever went well with Pompey afterwards,

QUESTIONS.

1. What sin had the Jews left off? 2. But were they grown good?
3. Who were the two parties? 4. What was amiss with the Pharisees ?
5. What would not the Sadducees believe? 6. What came of their
quarrels? 7. What sort of people were the Romans? 8. Where was
their home? 9. What did they want to conquer? 10. Where did their
general make his way? 11. What was the Holy of Holies? 12. What
did he find there? 13. Why was there no image there? 14. What
commandment forbids the worshipping any image? 15. Who alone was
allowed to go into the holy place? 16. How often? 17. What was said
of Pompey after he broke in?






238 Forty-second Sunday— Twenty-fourth after Trinity,



SECOND READING.

“ He shall be great, and shall be called the Son of the Highest.”—
Luke i, 32.

JYVHE Romans set up a strange king over the Jews. His

name was Herod, and he was an Edomite—that is, a
descendant of Jacob’s brother Esau. He believed in the true
God, and began to make the Temple much more beautiful
than it had been since it had been built up after the Jews
came back from Babylon. But he was a very wicked and
cruel man, who killed his own wife, and made everybody
afraid of him ; and the Jews were very unhappy under him.

They had one hope, and that was, that it was just about the
time when God had promised to send a Holy One into the
world to save them and set them free ; and they thought He
would be a great, mighty king, like David, who would conquer
Herod, and drive away the Romans, and have a crown and
throne brighter than Solomon’s.

And just then an angel was sent from God to the little town
of Nazareth, where there lived a young maiden, quite a poor
woman, but most good and holy, a descendant of the great
King David. The angel told her that she was highly favoured,
for she was to be the mother of the Son of the Highest, for
the Holy One who was to be born of her should be the Son of
God ; and when He was born, she was to call His name
Jesus, which means the Lord our Saviour, because He should
save His people from their sins; and Mary said, “ Behold
the handmaid of the Lord; be it unto me according to thy
word.”






The Coming of the Lord. 239



QUESTIONS.

1. Whom did the Romans make king of the Jews? 2. What nation
did Herod belong to? 3. Who was the forefather of the Edomites? 4.
Whose son was Esau. 5. What sort of man was Herod? 6. What-did
he do to please the Jews? 7. But how did hetreat them? 8. Whom did
he put to death? 9. What were the Jews hoping for? 10. Who had
promised that Holy One? 11. What did the Jews think He would be?
12. Who came to say He was coming at last? 13. To whom was the
angel sent? 14. What was her name? 15. Where did she live? 16.
What did the angel tell her? 17. Who would be born of her? 18.
Whose Son would He be? 19. What was she to call Him? 20. What
does JESUS mean? 21. What did she answer ?

THIRD READING.

“ Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward
men.”—Luke ii. 14.
HE blessed Virgin Mary lived at Nazareth; but it was
God’s will that the holy Son of God should be born at
Bethlehem, the little town where David used to live and keep
his sheep. The Romans sent out orders that everyone should
go to their proper home to have their names set down, and
pay a piece of money. So the Virgin Mary had to go, witha
good man named Joseph, a carpenter, who was to be her
husband. Such a number of people had come there that there
was no room for them in the inn, and they had to go to a
stable—a cavern underground—where the oxen and asses
were.
And it was there that the Holy Child of Mary, the Son of
God, was born, in the stable where the cattle were. The












240 Lorty-second Sunday— Twenty-fourth after Trinity.



blessed mother wrapped Him in baby-clothes, and laid Him
in the manger, among the hay and straw.

None of the people in the inn knew or cared ; but there
were shepherds on the hill, keeping watch over their flocks by
night. The angels came down to them, and told them that to
them was born that day, in the city of David, a Saviour,
which is Christ the LORD, and that He was a Babe lying in a
manger.

As soon as the angel had said that, many other angels, who
were very glad that poor men below should be saved, all began
to sing, “Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace,
good-will toward men.”

So the angels and the shepherds kept the Saviour’s birthday,
and we keep it upon Christmas-day.

QUESTIONS.

1. What was David’s town? 2. But where did the blessed Virgin
Mary live? 3. How came she to go to Bethlehem? 4. Where had she
torest? 5. Why could she not goto the inn? 6. Who was born in the
stable? 7. Where was He laid? 8. Who were told of it? 9. Who told
the shepherds? 10. What did the angels sing? 11. Why were they glad?
12. Why are we glad? 13. What is the birthday of our Lord ?








THE NATIVITY.





HForty-third Sunday.
THE CHILDHOOD OF OUR LORD.
FIRST READING.

“We have seen His star in the east, and are come to worship Him.”—
Matt. ii. 2.

HE shepherds were not the only people who came to see
the blessed Lord Jesus when He was a little Infant. Far
away in the East, God showed a bright, beautiful star to some
wise men, and taught their hearts that it was the sign that the
great King was born.
They set out on their journey to Judea, to see and honour






242 cae forty-third Sunday.



Him ; and when they came, they asked, “Where is He that is
born King of the Jews, for we have seen His star in the East,
and are come to worship Him.” This made Herod afraid, for
he thought this must be a king who would take his kingdom
from him. He made the learned men among the Jews look
out in the prophecies where Christ should be born. They
found it was to be at Bethlehem, and he told the wise men so,
and desired them to let him know when they found the King,
that he might come and worship Him too; but he did not
really mean to worship Him, but to kill Him.

However, God Himself showed these wise men where to find
our blessed Lord, for the same star that they had seen in the
East came out again, and went before them, and came and
stood over where the young Child was. And though they saw
a little Baby, and a poor mother holding Him in her arms,
they knew He was Lord and King; and they worshipped
Him, and offered Him the gifts they had brought. There was
gold, and there was frankincense, which means the sweet-
smelling, costly powder that was burnt in the Temple; and
myrrh, which is a precious gum which comes out of trees, and
is used to preserve and keep things good.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who came to see our Lord? 2. Where did they come from? 3.
What had they seen? 4. What did they ask? 5. Whom did they ask?
6. What did Herod say? 7. Did he want to worship? 8. What did he
wanttodo? 9. Howdid the wise men find the way? 10. Whom did they
see? 11. What did they offer Him? 12. What werethe gifts? 13. What
is frankincense? 14. Whatis myrrh? 15. Why did they worship Him?






The Childhood of our Lord. 243



SECOND READING.
“ Arise, and take the young child and His mother.”—JZatz. ii. 13.

EROD was afraid that the new-born King of the Jews
would take away his kingdom. So he meant to kill Him
as soon as he could find out from the wise men where He was,
But the wise men never came back to tell him, for God spoke
to them in a dream, and warned them to go back to their own
country another way. And God also spoke to Joseph the
carpenter, the blessed Virgin Mary’s husband, and told him
to take the young Child and His mother, and flee into the
land of Egypt, and stay there till they should be told to come
back, for Herod was seeking the young Child to destroy Him.
Joseph obeyed, and the whole family fled into Egypt, and lived
there for some years.

When Herod found the wise men did not come, he was very
angry ; and to make sure of killing Him who was to be King
of the Jews, he was so cruel and wicked as to cause all the
babies in Bethlehem, of two years old and under, to be put to
death. We call them the Holy Innocents, because they were
the first who died for Jesus Christ’s sake. It seemed very sad
then, but they have been happy and glorious ever since in
heaven, and always will be. But God had taken care of Him,
and He was safe in Egypt ; and there they staid till our Lord
‘was about three years old, and then the wicked King Herod
died.

QUESTIONS.

1. What did Herod want todo? 2. Why could he not find our blessed

‘Lord? 3. Who warned the wise men? 4. Whom did Herod murder?






244 Forty-third Sunday.



5. What do we call those Babes of Bethlehem? 6, But whom did he not
find? 7. For where was our Lord? 8. Who had taken Him there? 9.
Who was Joseph? 10. How did Joseph know He was to go to Egypt ?

THIRD READING,

“ Jesus increased in wisdom and stature, and in favour with God and
man.”—Luke ii. 52.

HEN Herod died, Joseph brought our blessed Lord and

His mother back from Egypt, and went to live at
Nazareth. We do not know any more about Him till He was
twelve years old, and then He went up with Joseph and His
mother to Jerusalem to keep the Feast of the Passover. That
great feast the Jews always kept in remembrance of the night
when God delivered them out of their troubles in Egypt.
When the time came for going home, the blessed Mary and
Joseph could not find the Child Jesus. They thought at first
that He was among the other boys of the company who had
come up from Nazareth, and they went on a day’s journey;
but when He did not come back to them in the evening, they
turned back to Jerusalem to seek Him. They looked for
Him during three days all round the city, and found Him at
last in the Temple, among the boys who came to be taught
by the learned men there. Everybody who listened was
astonished at His understanding and His answers ; but when
His mother came to call Him, He went home with her
directly ; and He obeyed her and Joseph in everything, and
helped and worked for them, though He was really their God



ee I
The Childhood of our Lord. 245



and King. That was to teach us all how good children should
behave at home to their fathers and mothers, for Joseph was
like a father to Him, though His real Father is God. And
as He grew older He lived on with them, and worked as a
carpenter with them till He was thirty years old. So, you
see, He knows just what it is to be one of us, and a poor
hard-working man. For God from heaven came to be one of
us men, and just like us.

QUESTIONS.

x. When did our blessed Lord come back from Egypt? 2. Where did
He go and live? 3. How old was He when we hear about Him again ?
4. Where did He gothen? 5. What feast did they goto? 6, What was
the Passover to put people in mind of? 7. What happened when it was
time to go home? 8. How long was He lost? 9. Where was He found?
to. What was He doing there? 11. What was everyone surprised at?
12. What did He do when He was called? 13. How can you do like
Him when you are called from what you like? 14. How did He always
behave to His mother and Joseph? 15. How can you try to be like Him?

Wo oy ro








JESUS WITH THE DOCTORS IN THE TEMPLE.—PAGE 244.



Horty-fourth Sunday.

THE PREPARATION FOR THE MINISTRY.
FIRST READING.

“ Repent ye: for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.”—Afai?z. iii. 2.

HE blessed Lord Jesus lived at Nazareth, and worked

there as a carpenter until He was thirty years old, so that

He has felt how we live here, and knows what our feelings
and ways are by trying them.

When it was nearly time for Him to begin to set up His

kingdom, a holy man was sent to make ready for Him. This

aa






The Preparation for the Mintstry. OAT



man’s name was John, and he lived out in the rocky and
bushy country on the bank of the river Jordan, dressed in a
coarse garment woven of camel’s hair, and living on the locusts
and wild honey he found there. He stood there telling every-
one who came that the kingdom of God was going to begin,
and that those who wished to belong to it must repent and
give up their sins. All who would feel and own their sins he
took down to the river and bathed and washed them, to show
how some day they would have their souls washed, just as their
bodies were washed now. This washing was called baptising,
and ne is always called John the Baptist ; but he always told
the people that there was One coming who was greater than
he was, and that this Holy One would baptise them with the
Holy Ghost and with fire.

QUESTIONS.

1. How long did our blessed Lord live at Nazareth? 2. What did He
do there? 3. Who was sent to prepare His way? 4. Where did John
live? 5. What did he wear? 6. What did he eat? 7. What are locusts?
8. What did he tell the people? 9. What were they to be sorry for? Io.
What is repenting? 11. What did he do to those who repented? 12. In
what river did he wash them? 13. What was this washing called? 14.
What was he called? 15. Who did he say was coming? 16. How would
that One baptise them?






248 fortyfourth Sunday.



SECOND READING.
“This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.”—Mat?z. iii. 17.

NE day, as John was baptising, Jesus came to him, and
desired to be baptised. His mother and John’s mother
were cousins, and John knew He had never done one wrong
thing in all His life, and had nothing to repent of. So he
said, “I have need to be baptised of Thee, and comest Thou
to me?” Then JESUS answered, “Suffer it to be so now, for
thus it becometh us to fulfil all righteousness.”

Then John baptised Him ; and as they were coming up out
of the water, the heaven above was opened, and there came
God the Holy Ghost, taking a shape like a dove, and rested
upon the Head of JESUS, and there was God the Father’s
voice speaking out of heaven, and saying, “This is My
Beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.”

Then John the Baptist knew that Jesus was the Son of God,
and the great King whose way he had been sent to prepare.

And this was the beginning of baptism, or christening, as
we call it. We are all baptised into the name of the Father,
the Son, and the Holy Ghost, and made to belong to Jesus
Christ.

QUESTIONS.

1, Who was John the Baptist? 2. Where did he baptise? 3. Who
came to him to be baptised? 4. What relation was the blessed Virgin
to his mother? 5. What did he say? 6. Why did he say so? 7. What
was the answer? 8. What happened after the baptism? 9. Who came
down from heaven? 10. Who spoke from heaven? 11. What did God
the Father’s voice say? 12. What did John know then? 13. Whose
Son is Jesus? 14. How had John been preparing His way?






The Preparation for the Ministry. 249



THIRD READING.
“Thou shalt not tempt the Lord thy God.”—JZaitt. iv. 7.

UR Lord Jesus had come into the world to conquer the
Devil, to whom Eve had given power over it when she
ate the fruit.

So He went up into a lonely place in the wilderness, that
He might meet the Devil, and stand up against all the
temptations that had led Eve astray. He was there forty
days, with nothing to eat; and the Devil came and said, “If
Thou be the Son of God, command that these stones be made
bread.” But He would not do it at Satan’s word ; and so as
Eve fell by eating, He stood by resisting hunger. Then the
Devil showed Him all the kingdoms of the world, and the
glory of them, in one moment of time, and said, “All these
things will I give Thee, if Thou wilt fall down and worship
me.” But though Eve had been tempted by seeing the beauty
of the fruit, our Lord was not led astray by all the glory and
beauty of this world. So He conquered again. Then He
stood with Satan on the top of a high wall, with a precipice
below ; and Satan tempted Him to cast Himself down, so that
the angels should come round and bear Him up, and all might
see He was the Son of God. It was just as Satan had told
Eve, that she would be like a God if she ate the fruit ; and
He said, “It is written, Thou shalt not tempt the Lord thy
God.”

Satan left Him then for a time, and the angels came and
waited on Him. That was the beginning of His victory over
Satan and sin. And every one of us must fight our battle

[eae ee = ~






250 Forty-fourth Sunday.



too. Whenever we are inclined to be naughty, Satan is
tempting us, but we must try to be strong and drive him

away ; and our Lord Jesus will help us if we only try, and will
drive him away.

QUESTIONS.

1. What had our Lord come into the world for? 2. When had Satan
become master of the world? 3. Where did our Lord go? 4. What was
the first temptation? 5. Why would not He make the stones into bread?
6. What was the second temptation? 7. What did Satan want Him to
do? 8. What was the third temptation? 9. Who would have come
round Him? 1o. Would He let them show that He was God? 11. What
did He say to Satan? 12. What did Satan do? 13. Who came to wait
on our Lord? 14. Who had been conquered ?
















MIRACLE OF THE LOAVES AND FISHES.—PAGE 258.



Horty-ftth Sunday.

THE CALLING OF THE DISCIPLES.
FIRST READING.
“ Behold the Lamb of God.”—¥ohn i. 36.

OW that John the Baptist knew that JESUS was indeed
the Son of God, whom he had been sent to proclaim, he
began to point Him out, saying, “Behold the Lamb of God,
which taketh away the sin of the world.” There were two poor
fishermen, who had come out to listen to John, who heard,
and who went to JESUS and asked, “ Master, where dwellest








252 horty-fifth Sunday
Thou?” He said, “Come and see.” Their names were
Andrew and another John. They stayed all one night with
Him, and saw and felt that He was so great and holy that no
one else could be the Christ who had been promised to come
and save the world; and John was always the nearest and
best loved of all to Him.

Andrew went and told his own brother Simon, whom our
Lord named Peter, which means a rock; and they brought
two more of their friends to see Him, whose names were
Philip and Nathanael. When JESUS saw Nathanael coming,
He said, “ Behold an Israelite indeed, in whom is no guile!”
Nathanael asked how He could know him. Our Lord
answered, “ Before that Philip called thee, when thou wast
under the fig tree, I saw thee.” Then Nathanael said, “ Thou
art the Son of God; Thou art the King of Israel.” For he
had been alone under the fig tree, and nobody who was not
God could have seen or known he was there ; and our Lord
said that because he believed, he should see greater things
than these.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who had been sent to proclaim our Lord? 2, What did John the
Baptist say of Him? 3. Who were the two first who listened? 4. What
was their trade? 5. Who was the best loved of all? 6, Whom did Andrew
fetch? 7. What name was given to Simon? 8. What does Peter mean ?
g. What friends did they tell of our Lord? 10, What did our Lord say
of Nathanael? 11. What does “without guile” mean? 12. What did
Nathanael ask? 13. Why was he surprised? 14. What did our Lord
say? 15. What was his answer? 16. How did he know that Jesus was
God? 17. Where can God see?

Sane spunea steep sinter




The Calling of the Disciples. Ee



SECOND READING.
“Thou hast kept the good wine until now.”—¥ohz ii. to.

ERSONS who loved to learn of a Master were called his
disciples. So John and his brother James, Andrew and
Simon Peter, Philip and his friend Nathanael, were all called
our Lord’s disciples. They were all invited to a wedding at
Cana, the village in the hills where Nathanael lived ; and the
blessed Virgin Mary, our Lord’s mother, was there too. But
the bride and bridegroom were poor people, and in the midst
of the feast it turned out that there was not wine enough.
The blessed Virgin said, in a low voice, to her Son, “They
have no wine.”

Now, there were six great jars standing by, and JESUS told
the servants to fill them with water. So they filled them up
to the brim ; and then He told the servants to draw out some
of what they had poured in, and carry it to the chief person
there.

As soon as this man had tasted it, he found it was such
good wine that he said to the bridegroom that most people
began their feasts with their best wine, but that here the best
had been kept for the last. This was the first wonderful thing
our Lord did on earth, and it made His disciples know that
He was God, for no one else could have done such a wonder.
We call these wonders miracles. Our Lord worked many
more while He was on earth, and most of them were cures to
the blind, or the lame, or the sick. He made them well
directly by His power and love.



|
|
|


254 forty-fifth Sunday.


























QUESTIONS.

1. What are disciples? 2. Who were the first disciples? 3. What
feast did they go to? 4. Where was the feast? 5. What was wanting at
the feast? 6. What did our Lord’s mother say? 7. What did He tell the
servants todo? 8. How many waterpots were there? 9. What did the
water become? 10. To whom was it carried? 11. What was said of it?
12. How came it to be wine? 13. What is such a wonder called? 14,
Why could our Lord do miracles? 15. What did they show?

THIRD READING.

“JT will make you fishers of men.”—JZait, iv. 19.

TOLD you Andrew and Peter and John were fishermen.
They used to go fishing at night in boats, on the blue
lake of Galilee, shut in between the high mountains. One
night, they had been out in two boats, trying hard to catch
fish, but none would come to their nets. In the morning,
they saw JESUS standing on the bank, with a great crowd
of people round Him, come to see and hear His teach-
ing. He called to Simon Peter to come and take Him
into his boat, so that He could teach the people from thence
without being crowded. When He had done speaking, He
told Andrew and Peter to go out into the deeper water, and
let down their nets. They said, “ Master, we have toiled all
the night, and have taken nothing: nevertheless at Thy word
I will let down the net.” And instantly the net was so full of
fishes, that Andrew and Peter could not draw it up without
the help of John and his brother James, who was with him in


The Calling of the Disciples. 255

his boat ; and both boats were quite full of fish, and ready
to sink with the weight! When the boats came to land, our
Lord told the four disciples that they were to come with
Him, for He would make them fishers of men, for they were
to draw disciples to Him, instead of catching fish, They
believed Him, and left all they had to follow Him, and they
were always with Him—His dear friends who followed Him
everywhere, and stored up His holy words in their hearts.

QUESTIONS.

1. What was the trade of the disciples? 2. Where did they fish? 3.
How did they fish? 4. Whocametothem? 5. What did He bid them
do? 6, What had they been doing all night? 7. But what did they now
let down? 8. What did they find in their nets? 9. What were filled ?
10. How came the fish there? 11. What did our Lord call them to do?
12. What were they to be? 13. What did they leave? 14. Who were
these four ?










RAISING THE WIDOW’S SON.—PAGE 261,



Horty-steth Sundag.

THE MINISTRY.
FIRST READING.
“ He went about doing good.”—Acts x. 38.

IMON PETER had a house at Capernaum, which is one
of the towns that stand upon the shore of the Lake of
Galilee. There our Lord cured the mother of Peter’s wife of
a bad fever by His mighty power in one moment, and there
He generally lived when He was in those parts ; but He never
stayed long there, for He went about doing good. In every




The Mintstry. 257

town or village that he came to, He used to go and teach in
the synagogue. A synagogue was a place where the Jews
who lived too far from Jerusalem to go to the Temple every
Sabbath-day used to meet, and hear the Old Testament read
and explained to them, and pray together. Our Lord used
to teach in the synagogues, and draw out all the meaning of
the Law; and when He came out, all the sick people who
were near, and all the blind and deaf and dumb people, were
brought to Him, and He cured them all by only just touching
them, or even only by bidding their disease to go away. For
He was God as well as man, and could do all things. Or He
would sit on the mountain side, and all the people would
come round Him, and He would teach them. There is one
beautiful discourse of His, called the Sermon on the Mount,
which I hope you will soon know well. And in it He taught
His disciples the prayer we all say, and call the Lord’s Prayer,
and which we love the best of all prayers.

QUESTIONS.

1..In whose house did our blessed Lord Jesus live? 2. Where was
Capernaum? 3. What had He done for Simon Peters wife’s mother ?
4. Where did He teach? 5. What is a synagogue? 6. When did the
Jews go there? 7. What did they do in the synagogue? 8. What did
our Lord explain? 9. Whom did He cure? 10, Where did He some-
times teach? 11. What is one great discourse of His called? 12. What
prayer did He give His disciples? 13. How does it begin? 14. When
do we say it ?






258 forty-sixth Sunday.



SECOND READING.

‘““T have compassion on the multitude.”—Matz, xv. 32.

UR Lord Jesus chose out twelve of His disciples to be

always with Him, and to teach and work with Him. All

the six you have heard of before were among them, and there

was another called Matthew, who had been a rich man, but

left all his riches to follow our Lord. These twelve were
called apostles.

I told you that the Jews were in two parties, called Pharisees
and Sadducees, and they used to quarrel and have many bad
ways. When they found that Jesus blamed them, they were
very angry; and when He was called the Holy One whom
God promised, they said that the Christ would be a great
king, and that He was only pretending. But all the poor
heard Him gladly ; and when He was driven out of the towns,
they came after Him into the hills and open places, and wen
everywhere they could to hear Him.

One day, evening was coming on, and all these people had
been with Him all day, and had nothing to eat. He said to
Philip, “ Whence shall we buy bread, that these may eat?
Philip came from a village just below, but he did not know
what to do. Andrew said there was a little boy there, who
had brought five loaves and two small fishes ; but what would
they be among so many? Indeed, the loaves were not like
ours—only thin barley cakes. But our Lord said, “ Make the
men sit down.” So they all sat on the grass; and He gave
thanks, and began to give out to the apostles the bread and
the fish, and they never came to an end, but there was enough








The Ministry. 259



for all the five thousand; and when they had all done, He
told the apostles to gather up the remains, that nothing might
be lost. And there was enough to fill twelve great baskets.

QUESTIONS.

1. How many disciples did our Lord choose? 2. What were they to be
called? 3. What were the names of the first six? 4. Who was the rich
man? 5. Who hated our Lord? 6. Why? 7. Why did they think He
could not be Christ? 8. Where was He driven from? 9. Where did He
go? 10. Who came after Him? 11. What was all He had to feed them
with? 12. Who brought the five loaves and two fishes? 13. Where did
they sit? 14. What did our Lord do first? 15. Who gave out the food :
16. How much was left? 17. How many had eaten?

THIRD READING.
“ Be of good cheer ; it is I ; be not afraid.”—Matz. xiv. 27.

HE people whom JESUS had fed wanted to make Him a

king, but He would not be an earthly king; so He told
the apostles to row away across the lake, while He went up
alone into the hills to pray to His Father, where the people
could not find Him. _

It was a rough night. The wind came down from the hills,
and tossed the lake up in great waves ; and the apostles rowed
with all their might, but they made little way. But when the
night was far on, they saw a Figure coming to them, walking
on the waves. They were frightened, and cried out. Then
the Figure said, “It is 1; be not afraid!” and they knew it
was their Master, and were glad. And Peter said, “ Lord, if




260 forty-sixth Sunday.



it be Thou, bid me come unto Thee on the water.” So he
came out of the boat, and as long as he trusted in His Master,
he could walk ; but when he saw the wind boisterous, he was
afraid, and cried out, and then he began to sink. He called
out, and Jesus put forth His hand and held him up, saying,
“O thou of little faith, wherefore didst thou doubt?” Then
they were both taken into the boat, and the wind ceased, and
the lake was calm and still.

QUESTIONS.

1. What did the people want to do? 2. Why did they want to make
Jesus a king? 3. What did He do to get out of their way? 4. Where
did He bid the disciples go? 5. What sort of night was it? 6. What
happened to the apostles? 7. How did our Lord come to them? 8.
What did they do when they saw Him first? 9. How did they know
Him? 10. Who came out to Him on the water? 11. When was St.
Peter safe? 12. When did he begin to sink? 13. What did our Lord
say to Him? 14. What happened as soon as they were in the boat ?














THE TRANSFIGURATION,



HForty-sebenth Sunday.

WONDERS OF OUR LORD'S WORKING.
FIRST READING.
“Young man, I say unto thee, Arise.” —Lzke vii. 14.

O one can think how good and kind our blessed Lord
Jesus was. Once, when He was going with His disciples

into a village called Nain, He met a funeral coming out.
People are not carried to the grave in their coffins in the East ;
but they are laid on a sort of bed called a bier, with all their
best clothes on, and a wreath of flowers round the head. The






262 Forty-seventh Sunday.



person who was now to be buried was quite a young man, and
he was the only son of his mother, and she was a widow. And
when the Lord saw it, He had pity on the poor woman, and
He said to her, “ Weep not.” Then He came and touched the
bier, and the bearers stood still. Then He said, “ Young man,
I say unto thee, Arise.” And he that was dead sat up and
began to speak; and our Lord gave him back alive to his
mother.

QUESTIONS.

1. What was our Lord always doing? 2. What village was He going
into? 3. What did He meet? 4. Who was going to be buried? 5. Had
his mother any more sons? 6. And what was she? 7. How are people
carried to their graves in the East? 8. Who had pity on the mother? 9.
What did He say to her? 10. What did He do? 11. What did He say
to the dead man? 12. What did the dead man do at once? 13. To
whom was he given back? 14. How came JESUS to be able to work such
miracles? 15. Was not He most kind and loving so to do?

SECOND READING.
“ His face did shine as the sun.”—Maite. xvii. 2.

NLY once all the time He was in this world did our Lord
Jesus let His apostles see any of His glory, and then it
was only the three who believed in Him best, and whom He
kept the most with Him.
One night, He took Peter and James and John out toa
mountain with Him, as He was wont to do when He was








Wonders of our Lord’s Working. 263



going apart to pray. They went to sleep; but when they
woke, they saw Him in bright light and glory. His face was
shining like the sun, and His clothes were as white as the
light; and there were two talking with Him, Moses and
Elias. And they were talking of how He was come to die at
Jerusalem. The three were afraid, but they were happy too ;
and Peter said, “ Master, it is good for us to be here: and let
us make three tabernacles; one for Thee, one for Moses, and
one for Elias;” for, indeed, he hardly knew what he was
saying.

And even as He spoke, a bright cloud came and hid
the wonderful sight from them, and then they found that
no one was with them but their Master, Jesus, looking
as usual; and He bade them tell no one about what
they had seen, until the Son of man should be risen again
from the dead.

They knew that their Lord was the Son of man ; but they
could not think what He could mean by rising again from the
dead.

This wonderful showing forth of His glory is called the
Transfiguration.

QUESTIONS.

1. What was the Transfiguration? 2. Who were allowed to see it? 3,
Where did it happen? 4. What was our Lord’s face like? 5. What
were His clothes like? 6. Who came and talked to Him? 7. Who was
Moses? 8. Who was Elias? 9. Do you remember what had become of
Elias? ro. What were Moses and Elias talking about with Him? 11.
What were the three apostles doing at first? 12. What did Peter say






264 forty-seventh Sunday.



when he woke? 13. What happened then? 14. Who was left with them?
15. What did He forbid them todo? 16, When might they speak of it ?
17. What could not they understand ?



THIRD READING.

“ Suffer the little children to come unto me.”—Mark x. 14.

FTER His Transfiguration, our Lord Jesus often told His
apostles that He was going to be taken by the chief
priests at Jerusalem, and that He should be ill-used, and
beaten, and spit upon, and put to death on a cross; and that
the third day He should rise again. But they never could
understand how this would be, for they had never heard of
rising from the dead; and they were so sure that He was
Christ, and that Christ would be a great King, that they
never understood or believed that He was to die. And
sometimes they even disputed among themselves who would
be first and greatest in His kingdom. When they did this,
our Lord called a little child, and took him, and set him in
the midst, and said that the greatest in His kingdom would
be the most like that little child ; for only those who are ready
to be last here can be high up there.

The Lord loved little children. Once, when the mothers
were bringing their babies for Him to touch, the disciples
wanted to keep them away; but He said, “ Suffer the little
children to come unto me, and forbid them not, for of such is
the kingdom of heaven.” ,

And then He took the little ones up in His arms, and put




Wonders of our Lord’s Working. 265



His hands on them, and blessed them. And just so He
embraces and blesses the little children we bring to Him in
church, though we cannot see Him now; and He is always
glad to hear them pray.

QUESTIONS.

1. What was the Transfiguration? 2. What did our Lord say would
happen to them? 3. Why would not the disciples believe it? 4. What
did they dispute about? 5. Whom did our Lord call? 6. What did He
tell them? 7. What is the way to be high in the kingdom of heaven ?
8. Who were brought to Him? 9. Who wanted to stop them? 10. What
did they say? 11. What did He do? 12. When are little children
brought to Him? 13. What does He still do for them?












JESUS’ TRIUMPHAL ENTRY INTO JERUSALEM.



HForty-cighth Sunday.

GOING UP TO FERUSALEM.
FIRST READING.

“ Have mercy on us, O Lord, thou son of David.”—AMatzt. xx. 30.

OR three years our blessed Lord went about doing good
and teaching, generally in Galilee, in the towns or on the
hills, where the people came out to hear Him; and at the
feasts, when people ought to worship at Jerusalem, He used to
go up and speak to them in the outer court of the Temple.
But there was a wicked high priest named Caiaphas, who






Gong up to Ferusalem. 267

had been set up by the Romans, and he and the Pharisees and
Sadducees all hated JESUS, because He found fault with their
evil ways, and they would not believe He was the Christ, but
wanted to put Him to death. So whenever He came to
Jerusalem it was more dangerous ; and then they stirred up
the chief men of Galilee, so that He could not be in the town,
but had to wander on the hills. Once, when a man wanted to
follow Him, He said, “ Foxes have holes, and the birds of the
air have nests ; but the Son of man hath not where to lay His
head.”

And at last, when His time was come, He set His face to
go to Jerusalem to keep the Passover, though He knew that
He would be taken and put to death there, and so be the real
Passover. As He was going, two blind men, who sat by the
roadside begging, called out, “ Have mercy on us, O Lord,
thou son of David!” And He stood still and cured them
both.

QUESTIONS.

1. How long did our blessed Lord teach? 2. Where did He teach?
3. When did He go to Jerusalem? 4. What did He go to Jerusalem for?
5. Where did He teach? 6. Who hated Him? 7. Who was Caiaphas?
8. Why did they hate Him? 9. Where did they drive Him? 10. What
did He say about having no home? 11. When did He set His face to go
to Jerusalem? 12. What feast was He going to keep? 13. What did He
know would happen to Him? 14. Whom did He cure as He was going?
15. What did the blind men cry out ?






268 forty-cighth Sunday.

SECOND READING.
“ Hosanna to the son of David.”—Matt. xxi. 9.

T was only the great rich wicked men that hated our Lord.
The common people heard Him gladly, and only wanted
Him to begin to be king. And they really thought the time
was come when He came up to Jerusalem. Just before He
came in, He sent two of His disciples to fetch a young ass on
which no one had ever sat, and on it He rode down Mount
Olivet.

Now, there was an old prophecy which said to Jerusalem,
“Behold, thy King cometh unto thee, meek, and sitting upon an
ass.” People remembered this, and began to receive Him like
a king ; they spread their mantles on the ground before Him,
and others cut down branches from the trees and strewed
them in the way ; and the people before and behind, especially
the children, cried out with all their might, “ Hosanna to the
son of David: Blessed is He that cometh in the name of
the Lord ; Hosanna in the highest. Hosanna means, “save
now.”

The Pharisees were very angry, and bade Him stop them ;
but He answered with the verse of a Psalm, “Yea, have ye
never read, Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings hast
Thou ordained strength ?”

But as He looked at beautiful Jerusalem, He wept over the
city, for He knew that sad and dreadful punishments were
coming on it; and yet the people would not listen to Him,
and be sorry, and so be saved.






Going up to Ferusatem. 269

QUESTIONS.

1. Who loved our Lord? 2. What did they want Him todo? 3. What
made them think His reign was coming? 4. How did He come into
Jerusalem? 5. What was the old prophecy? 6. What did people do in
His honour? 7. What did they cry? 8. What does “ Hosanna” mean?
g. Who were angry? 10. What did He say? 11. But why was He
grieving? 12. What made Him sorry for the city? 13. How were the
people bringing sad punishment on themselves?

THIRD READING.
“ My house shall be called the house of prayer.” —Matz. xxi. 13.

HE first thing our blessed Lord did at Jerusalem was to

go into the Temple; and there, in the courts, He found
people keeping shop, selling the lambs that were wanted for
the Passover, and doves for other services, and changing the
coin that strangers brought for Jewish money.

This was very disrespectful to God, and He was angry. He
had driven them all out once, and they had come back, and
now they were doing it again. So He drove them all out, and
told them His Father’s house was a house of prayer, but they
had made it a den of thieves.

No one dared to answer Him, and all that day and the next
He stood in the Temple, teaching the people, and showing the
wickedness of the chief priests and Pharisees. It seemed as if
all the people of Jerusalem were ready to follow Him, and as
if He might begin His reign directly ; but this was not what
He came for, and, as He well knew, the Pharisees were




270 forty-erghth Sunday.

planning against Him. They wanted to get Him to say
something that they could say was against the Law, so they
asked Him many hard questions, but His great wisdom put
them all to silence, and made them ashamed ; but they were
so hard and wicked that they only hated Him the more.

QUESTIONS.

1. Where did our Lord go? 2. What were the Jews doing there? 3:
Why was this wrong? 4. What did He do to them? 5. Had He done
this before? 6. What did He tell them? 7. Who was His Father? 8,
What was His Father’s house? 9. What are our houses of prayer? Io.
How must we behave in them? 11. Who were planning against Him?
12. But who followed Him gladly? 13. What did they want Him
to be?














JESUS BLESSING LITTLE CHILDREN.—PAGE 264.



Horty-ninth Sunda.

THE EVENING OF THE BETRAYAL.
FIRST READING,

“ JESUS knew that His hour was come.”—-Fohn xiii. 1.

Re chief priests grew more fierce and bitter when they
saw how all men listened to the Lord Jesus. They could
do nothing to Him by day, because the people would have
risen up to defend Him; so they tried how to find Him alone
and at night, to take Him secretly. Now, one of the twelve
apostles, named Judas Iscariot, was too fond of money, and


















used to take for himself what was trusted to him to take care
of. So he went on from bad to worse, till at last he did the
dreadful thing of promising the chief priests that he would
show them to some lonely place, where they could take his
Lord and Master prisoner ; and then they were to pay him
for this wickedness with thirty pieces of silver. Judas settled
all this, and then he went back to our Lord and the other
eleven apostles just as usual, thinking they did not know; but
our Lord did know very well. But He bade the apostles get
ready the supper that was eaten the night before the Passover,
in a large upper room that was lent to them for it, and there
He sat down to eat with them.

QUESTIONS.

1. What feast was being kept at Jerusalem? 2. Why were the priests
and Pharisees angry? 3. What did they want todo? 4. Why did they
not take Him in the Temple? 5. Where did they want to take Him?
6. Who said he would show them the way? 7. What did they promise
to Judas Iscariot? 8. Who was he? 9g.. Then how came he to be so
wicked ? 10, Where did our Lord go to eat His Last Supper? 11. Who
were eating it with Him?



SECOND READING.
“This do in remembrance of me.”—Lwke xxii. 19.

es our Lord and His apostles were eating the Supper
together, He was very sorrowful, and said, “One of you
shall betray me.” The apostles were grieved, and each said,



272 Forty-ninth Sunday. :


The Evening of the Betrayal. 25:3

“Lord, is it 1?” And He said, “He that dippeth his hand
with me in the dish, the same shall betray me.” And then, as
the custom was, He dipped His piece of bread in the dish in
the middle of the table, and gave it to Judas. Then the
wicked man presently got up and went away.

And as they were still in the upper room, our Lord took
bread and broke it, and gave a piece to each of His apostles,
and said, “ Take, eat: this is My Body, which is broken for
you: this do in remembrance of me.” And He took a Cup
of wine, and said, “ This Cup is the new testament in My
Blood: This do, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of
me.”

And that was the beginning of what we call the Holy
Sacrament of the Lord’s Supper, “ For as often as ye do eat of
this Bread, and drink this Cup, ye do show the Lord’s death
till He come.”

QUESTIONS,

1. Who were eating together? 2. When was it? 3. Why was our
Lord sorrowful? 4. What did He say one of them would do? 5. What
did they all ask? 6. Who did He say it would be? 7. What did He dip
then? 8. To whom did He give it? 9. Who went away? 10. What
holy Sacrament did He appoint? 11. What did He take? 12, What
did He say of the bread? 13. What did He then take? 14. What did
He say of the wine? 15. What is the outward sign of the Lord’s Supper ?
16. What is the inward grace? 17. What does it show forth?

Hite


274 Forty-ninth Sunday.

THIRD READING.



* Not as I will, but as Thou wilt.,—Ma?t. xxvi. 39.

HEN the Supper was over, and night was coming on, our
Lord went out with His disciples to a garden, full of
olive trees, called Gethsemane, where He often used to pray.
He told them again on the way that they would soon all be
afraid, and leave Him ; but Peter could not think so, and said
boldly that if everybody fell from Him, he never would. But
JEesuS answered, “Verily, I say unto thee, that this night,
before the cock crow, thou shalt deny me thrice.”

Then He went on to the garden, taking only Peter, James,
and John into it with Him, and telling them to watch while
He went apart to pray. They were heavy and sorrowful, and
could not keep awake ; but while He was praying, He was
in the greatest trouble and grief that ever anyone felt. He
knelt and prayed in an agony, till His sweat was as great
drops of blood falling down to the ground. For He was
feeling the sorrow for all the sin of all the world—the sorrow
that belongs to you and me. The disciples heard Him say,
“O my Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me:
nevertheless, not as I will, but as Thou wilt.” He came to
them more than once, and called them, as if He longed for
them to comfort Him; but still they fell asleep again, though
He said, “What, could ye not watch with me onehour? The
spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak.”




The Evening of the Betrayal. 275



QUESTIONS.

1. Where did our Lord gothen? 2. What was the garden full of? 3.
What did He say the apostles would all do? 4. Who thought he never
could leave Him? 5. What did our Lord tell Peter? 6. Whom did He
take into the garden? 7. What were they to do? 8, What great grief
did He suffer? 9. Why did He suffer such agony? 10. What did He
pray? 11. What could not the disciples do? 12. What did He say at
last? 13. What was their flesh? 14. Was He angry? 15. But was He
not much grieved that they did not comfort Him?










JESUS BEFORE PILATE,

Hitteth Sunday.

THE TRIAL AND CONDEMNATION.
FIRST READING.
“ Betrayest thou the Son of man with a kiss ?”—Lwke xxii. 48.
UST as our Lord had wakened His three apostles for the
last time, there came a tread of soldiers, and lanterns
gleamed through the olive trees. For Judas Iscariot, the
traitor, knew that his Master was apt to go to the olive
garden to pray at night, and he was leading them, and he
said to them, “ Whomsoever I shall kiss, that same is He:




The Trial and Condemnation. 277






























hold Him fast.” And he came up first to JESUS, and said,

“Hail, master; and kissed Him.” All our Lord said was,
“Judas, betrayest thou the Son of man with a kiss ?”

' Peter tried to defend Him, and drew a sword and cut off
the ear of one of the servants; but our Lord bade him put
the sword back into the sheath ; and then, in His great love,
our blessed Lord touched the ear, and cured it in an instant,
and begged that all the disciples might be allowed to go their
way. Indeed, they were so much afraid that they all forsook
Him and fled away, except John and Peter, who both followed
to see what would be done with Him.

The soldiers dragged our blessed Lord to the house of the
high priest, Caiaphas, where his enemies tried to make out
some charge to bring against Him ; but as He was good and
holy, and had no sin at all, they could accuse Him of nothing.
And when they asked Him questions, He answered them not a
word, for He knew that it was only to accuse Him.

While He stood at the upper end of the hall, John, who
knew one of the servants, had come in to the lower end, and
had brought in Peter with him. The chill of the morning had
come on, and the servants lighted a fire on the pavement,
where Peter stood and warmed himself. One of the maids
there looked at him, and asked if he did not belong to Jesus
of Nazareth. Peter was afraid, and said, “I know not what
thou sayest.” But then another maid said, “ This fellow was
also with Jesus of Nazareth.” Peter grew more afraid, and
went on declaring he did not know such a person; but
presently another servant said, “Did not I see thee in the
278 fiftieth Sunday.



garden with Him?” Again Peter's fear of being punished for
wounding the man in the garden led him further astray, for
he began to curse and swear, and say, “I know not the man.”
Just then the cock crew, and the Lord turned round and
looked upon Peter.

That look went to his heart. He went out and wept
bitterly ; and whenever he thought of his sin, he wept.

QUESTIONS.

1. Where was our Lord? 2. What time was it? 3. Whom had He
taken with Him? 4. Who came up in the night? 5. Who was leading
them? 6. How did Judas show which was our Lord? 7. What was he
wicked enough to say? 8. How did our Lord answer? 9. How did Peter
try to save Him? 10, What blow did he strike? 11. What command
did our Lord give Peter? 12. What did He do for the wounded man?
13. What care did He take for His disciples? 14. Who only followed
Him? 15. Where was our Lord taken? 16. What did the chief priests try
to find? 17. Why could they find nothing to accuse Him of? 18, What
had He said Peter would do? 19. What had Peter then said? 20, Yet
what did He do? 21. What made him deny? 22. What did he answer?
23. What brought his better mind back? 24. What sound? 25. What
look? 26. What did he do when he thought of his sin ?

SECOND READING.

“He is brought as a lamb to the slaughter.” —Jsazah liii. 7.
S.

S soon as it was light, all the chief men of the Jews met in
the council chamber in the Temple, and had our Lord
brought before them. But no one could prove that He had
broken the law; and whenever a story was brought against




The Trial and Condemnation. 279



Him, it turned out not to be true. At last the high priest
stood up and commanded Him to say whether He were the
Christ or not. He answered, “Thou hast said: nevertheless,
I say unto you, hereafter shall ye see the Son of man sitting
on the right hand of power, and coming in the clouds of
heaven.” At this answer, Caiaphas and all the other enemies
made a great outcry, as if they were very much shocked, at
His speaking of Himself as the great Judge of all—namely, as
God. They all cried, “He is guilty of death;” and they
began to beat Him and strike Him; and they blindfolded
Him, and struck Him on the face, and bade Him say whose
blow it was. And all the time He stood gentle and patient,
and said not one word of complaint or anger.

Since the reign of the great wicked Herod, the Romans
had not allowed the Jews to put anybody to death without
their leave ; so the chief priests were obliged to take JESUS
before the Roman governor, Pontius Pilate. But it was not
possible to find anything that a Roman would think He
deserved to be put to death for. When the chief priests said
that “by our law He ought to die, because He made Himself
the Son of God,” Pilate only feared to do anything against
Him ; for he saw that there was no fault in JESUS, but that
the chief priests were spiteful, and hated Him.

Then the chief priests said that He called Himself King of
the Jews. This made Pilate more anxious, for to set up to be
an earthly king would have been rebelling against the
Romans ; but still he wanted to let JESUS go, because he saw
that He was innocent; yet he did not like to offend the








280 Fiuftieth Sunday.



priests, who might have accused him to the Emperor of Rome. .
Pilate saw what was just; but he was afraid, and cared for
himself more than for his duty.

QUESTIONS.

1. Where did the chief priests meet? 2. Who was brought there before
them? 3. What did they intend todo? 4. But could they find any fault
in Him? 5. So what did the chief priest ask Him? 6. What did He
say? 7. What did they all cry out? 8. How did they begin to treat
Him? 9. How did He bear it all? 10. How can we try to be like Him?
11, What were not the Jews allowed to do? 12. Who had the power over
them? 13. Before whom did the chief priests take our Lord? 14. Who
was Pilate? 15. What did Pilate think of the chargesagainst Him? 16.
But why did not Pilate set Him free? 17. Why was he afraid of His being
called King of the Jews ?

THIRD READING.

“Ye denied the Holy One and the Just, and desired a murderer to be
granted unto you.”—A cfs iii. 14.
ILATE thought he had found a way of saving the Lord
Jesus without offending the Romans. It was the custom
that at the feast of the Passover he should set some prisoner
free, whomsoever the Jews asked for. And he thought, as the
people loved our Lord, that they would ask for Him.

But there was a robber and murderer in prison named
Barabbas, and the enemies of our Lord went about among the
people, stirring them up to ask for him to be set free ; so that
the poor, foolish people all broke out with a great, shout to
ask that this murderer Barabbas might be set free.




The Trial and Condemnation. 281



Pilate asked them what he was to do with Jesus, and then
there was a great roar from all the people, “ Crucify Him!
crucify Him !”

Now, crucifying was a very horrible and painful punishment,
that had never been allowed among the Jews, but was chiefly
used by the Romans themselves for slaves and for robbers ; so
that their savage cry was for JESUS to have the punishment
that belonged to Barabbas.

Pilate’s soldiers were very cruel, and they laughed at a
poor man being called a king; so when they had beaten
the blessed JESUS till He was bleeding all over, they took one
of their old red soldiers’ cloaks and threw it over Him; and
they platted a crown of sharp thorns, and forced it upon His
head ; and they put a reed in his right hand, instead of a
sceptre ; and they bowed their knees, mocking Him by pre-
tending to do Him honour.

He never spoke one word of anger all this time ; and when
Pilate saw His meek, brave, patient face, pale and faint with
pain, and streaming with blood, he thought the people would
pity Him; so he led him out once more to the top of the steps
of the judgment hall, and said, “Behold the man!” But the
people were too mad to have any pity or feeling, and they
only cried louder and louder still, “ Crucify Him! crucify
Him!” Pilate was not brave enough to go against them all,
even to save an innocent man; so all he did was to take water
and wash his hands before them all, to show that he was
clear of wishing it, and he said, “I am innocent of the blood
of this just person.” But the chief priests made the dreadful






282 fiftieth Sunday.

answer, “His blood be on us, and on our children!” meaning
that they would take the guilt and punishment.

QUESTIONS.

1. What plan had Pilate for saving our Lord? 2. Whom did he always
set free at the feast? 3. Whom did he wish to set free? 4. But whom
did the chief priests make them ask for? 5. Who was Barabbas? 6.
What did they all cry out? 7. What kind of punishment was crucifying ?
8. To whom would it naturally have belonged? 9. But who was going to
bear the worst of punishments? 10. How did the soldiers treat our Lord?
11. Why did they mock Him? 12, What did they put on His head? 13.
What did they dress Him in? 14, What did they putin His hand? 15.
What did Pilate hope to do? 16. What did hesay? 17. What was the
cry in answer? 18, What ought Pilate to have done? 19. Why did he
not? 20. What did he do instead? 21. Why did he wash his hands?
22. What did he say? 23. What did the chief priests answer? 24. What
did they mean ?




















THE CRUCIFIXION.



Filty-first Sundap.

THE CRUCIFIXION.
FIRST READING.
“ They pierced my hands and my feet.”—Ps. xxii. 16.

HEN the judgment was over, Pilate gave up our Lord to
the four soldiers who were to crucify Him. His cross,
a heavy beam of wood, with another fastened across it, was
laid on His shoulders, that He might carry it to the place
where He was to suffer—a place named Calvary, outside the
walls of Jerusalem. He was so weak and worn out after the






284 Lifty-first Sunday.



long sad night, the being taken from one judge to another, and
the beating and tormenting, that He could hardly walk under
it; and the soldiers met a man coming out of the country
whom they forced to carry it after Jesus.

When they came to Calvary, the soldiers made the blessed
Jesus lie down on the beam of wood, and they stretched His
arms out on the cross-beam, and drove a large nail through
each of the palms of His hands into the wood, and another
nail through His feet ; and then they lifted up the cross, with
Him upon it, and planted it in the ground, that He might
hang there till He should die. And all He said while they
were thus nailing Him were the words, “ Father, forgive them ;
for they know not what they do!” That was the great pain
He bore to save us!

QUESTIONS.

1. Where was our Lord to be crucified? 2. Who led Him there? 3.
Where was it? 4. What had Heto carry? 5. But who had to be called
to help him? 6. Why was He so worn out? 7. What had they done to
Him? 8 What was the cross? 9. How was He fastened to it? to,
What was done to it then? 11. What prayer did He make? 12. For
whom was He praying? 13. For whom was He dying?

SECOND READING.
“Jesus of Nazareth the King of the Jews.” ohn xix. 19,
VER the head of the blessed Lord on the cross was a
tablet, with the words, “JESUS OF NAZARETH THE KING
OF THE JEwWS;” and on each side of Him was another cross,

d
with a robber upon it.


The Crucifixion. 285



There He hung patiently, while the chief priests and
Pharisees passed by, mocking and laughing at His pain, and
crying out, “ He saved others; Himself He cannot save. If
He be the King of Israel, let Him now come down from the
cross, and we will believe Him.” . Even the robbers at first
joined in the cry; but by-and-by one of them began to fecl
that He who was so patient and so great in all that agony
must truly be the Son of God; and he rebuked his fellow, and
said, “ Lord, remember me when Thou comest into Thy king-
dom!” And the Lord answered, “ To-day shalt thou be with
me in paradise !”

His holy mother had come to stand by the foot of His
cross, and with her, her sister and some other women, and
His beloved apostle John. The Lord looked down at her, and
said, “Woman, behold thy son!” and He looked at St. John,
and said, “ Behold thy mother!” And John took the blessed
Virgin home with Him, and was always like a son to her
afterwards.

At noon-day, a dreadful darkness came over all the earth,
and it lasted for three whole hours, as if the very sun mourned
for Him who made it. Just at three o’clock, the blessed Lord
said, “I thirst ;” and as one of the soldiers was touching His
lips with a sponge full of vinegar, He gave a great sad cry,
“My God, my God, why hast Thou forsaken me!” Then
presently he added, “It is finished! Father, into Thy hands
I commend my spirit!” . And He cried with a loud cry ; and
so He, who was God and man in one, died for us men, and for
our salvation.




286 Fifty-first Sunday.



QUESTIONS.

1. What was set up over our Lord’s head? 2. Who were crucified on
each side? 3. How did the robbers behave at first? 4. How did one
change? 5. What did he say? 6. How did our Lord answer? 7. Who
were standing by His cross? 8, What did He say to His mother? 9.
What did He say to John? 10. What did John do for her? 11. What
came over the earth? 12. How long did the darkness last? 13. What
did our Lord cry out? 14. How did a soldier try to quench His thirst ?
15. What was His sad cry? 16. What did He say at last? 17. What
was finished? 18. To whom did He commend His soul? 19. Why did
He die? 20. Should not we thank Him very much for dying for us?

THIRD READING.
“ And rested the sabbath day.”—Lwke xxiii. 56.

HERE were some good people even among the chief of
the Jews ; and two of these, named Nicodemus and Joseph
of Arimathea, went to Pontius Pilate, and asked him to let
them bury the body of Jesus. People generally were much
longer in dying on the cross, so Pilate sent to see if He was
dead. To make sure, one of the soldiers pierced His side with
a spear, and out came blood and water together. The robbers
were still alive, so the soldiers broke their legs, that they
might die sooner; and so the repenting one soon went to our
Lord in Paradise.

Then Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathea took the holy
body down from the cross, quite dead. Now, close by, Joseph
had a garden, and in it was a cave which he meant to be
buried in, but where no one had yet been laid. They carried








The Crucifixion. 287



our Lord’s body there ; and the good women who followed
Him, Mary Magdalene and the rest, wrapped it up in linen
cloths and sweet spices. They wanted to do more for it; but
it was getting late on Good Friday evening, and the Sabbath
or seventh day was counted from sunset, and then they could
do no manner of work. So they had to wait till the Sabbath
should be over ; and Joseph rolled a great rock to close up the
door, and they went away in their grief.

And then came a guard of soldiers, whom the chief priests
had sent to watch the stone, for fear, as they told Pilate, that
the disciples should steal the body away in the night. So
they put seals, to make sure that no one should move the
stone ; and the soldiers were set to watch.

QUESTIONS.

1. Who asked for our Lord’s body? 2. What did Pilate want to know?
3. How did they make sure that our Lord was dead? 4. What was done
to the robbers? 5. Where did Nicodemus and Joseph take the body?
6. To whom did the cave belong? 7. Who were there too? 8. How did
they wrap the body? 9. What did they put with it? 10, Why did they
not do any more? 11. What day was it? 12. What was the next day?
13. What is the Fourth Commandment? 14. When did the Sabbath
begin? 15. How did Joseph close up the cave? 16, Who watched
outside? 17. Who sent the soldiers? 18, Why?














JESUS APPEARS TO MARY MAGDALENE.





Hitty-second Sunday.

THE RESURRECTION.
FIRST READING.
“ Now is Christ risen from the dead.”—1 Cov. xvi. 20.

HE holy women waited all the Sabbath day in sorrow ;

and our Lord Jesus lay in His grave. But, on the night
after, He rose up from His grave, and came forth again, for
He is alive for evermore. There was a great earthquake, and
an angel came from heaven, and rolled away the stone from
the door of the cave, and sat upon it; and for fear of him the
keepers did shake, and were as dead men.






The Resurrection. 289



Very early in the morning, Mary Magdalene and the other
women came with the sweet spices they had prepared. They
wondered who would roll away the stone for them ; but when
they came nearer, they saw that it was taken away; and when
they went in, they saw that the body of the Lord was gone.
They feared at first that someone had taken it away; but
behold, two men stood by them in shining garments, who
said, “ Why seek ye the living among the dead? He is not
here, but is risen, as He said. Come, see the place where the
Lord lay.”

And as the women went in great wonder to tell the disciples,
they saw JESUS Himself, the same whom they had seen and
touched quite dead the day before yesterday, standing before
them, speaking kindly to them. So they held Him by the
feet, and worshipped Him. For never was there such won-
derful joy and gladness in all the world.

QUESTIONS.

1. What happened all the Sabbath? 2. What happened the night
after? 3. Who rose again? 4, Who came down from heaven? 5. What
happened to the soldiers? 6. Who were the first at the grave in the
morning? 7. What did they bring? 8. What did they wonder about ?
g. What did they find? 10. Who stood by them? 11. What did the
angels say? 12. Who was living? 13. Whom did they goto tell? 14.
Who met them? 15. How did they show their joy? 16. Why were they
so very glad? 17, What day was it ?

Gare >




| 290 Fifty-second Sunday.



SECOND READING.
The Lord is risen.” Luke xxiv. 34.

T was the first day of the week that our Lord rose from the

dead, and we call that day the Lord’s day, and have kept

it holy ever since, instead of the seventh. But on that first

day it seemed too wonderful. The apostles had never under-

stood when their Lord spoke of dying and rising again ; and

though the women said they had seen Him, they were afraid
to trust their word, and thought it a mistake.

Later in the day, two of the disciples were walking to
Emmaus, a little village near Jerusalem, when a stranger came
and joined them. He asked why they were sad, and what
they were talking of. They told Him it was of Jesus of
Nazareth, who had been a great prophet, and they had hoped
would have redeemed Israel ; but now He had been put to
death the day before yesterday, yet that some of the women
said that they had seen a vision of angels which said that He
was alive.

Then the stranger began to show them, as they had never
seen before, that all the Old Testament meant that when the
Christ came, the Seed of the woman, He was to suffer, and
save the world before His kingdom and glory could begin ;
and their minds understood, for they were opened to see and
know the Scripture, so that they were sure that Jesus was
the Christ.

So they came to Emmaus, and went into a house; and the
stranger made as if He would have gone farther, but they




The Resurrection. 291



pressed Him to come in. He sat down with them, and took
bread and blessed and broke it; and then their eyes were
opened, and they knew it was Jesus Himself! And as they
knew Him, He vanished out of their sight. And they said to
one another, “Did not our heart burn within us, while He
talked with us by the way ?”

QUESTIONS.

1. What day did our Lord rise? 2. What is it called? 3. Which day
do we keep holy? 4. Who could not believe yet? 5. Where were two
disciples going? 6. Who came and walked with them? 7. Who was it
really? 8, Did they know Him? 9. What did He ask them? 10. What
did He explain to them? 11. How did they know Him at last? 12,
What great joy had they? 13. How did they lose sight of Him ?



THIRD READING.
“ Peace be unto you.”—Luke xxiv. 36.

N the evening, the ten apostles were all together in the
upper room, with the doors close shut, for fear of the
Jews. There were only ten, for Thomas was not there ; the
wretched Judas had hung himself in his grief and despair.
The two disciples came back from Emmaus, and told how they
had seen JESUS ; and while they were telling about it, though
the door was not opened, they found Jesus Himself standing
in the midst, and they heard His voice say, “ Peace be unto
you.”
They were afraid at first ; but again He said, “ Why are ye
troubled? and why do thoughts arise in your hearts? Behold




292 fifty-second Sunday.



My hands and My feet, that it is I Myself: handle Me, and

e; for a spirit hath not flesh and bones, as ye see Me have.”
Then He showed them that there were the marks of the nails
in His hands and feet, and the spear-wound in His side ; so
that it was His own real body that had come again from the
dead.

And while they could not believe for joy, and wondered,
He said, “Have ye here any meat?” And they gave Him a
piece of broiled fish and a honeycomb; and He ate with
them, to make them quite sure it was Himself.

And He explained all to them, and showed them how He
really is the Christ the Son of God; and told them that, as
His Father had sent Him, so He would send them to teach
all nations how He had died and risen again to save men from
their sins.

QUESTIONS.

1. Where were the ten met? 2. Why were there only ten? 3. Who
were away? 4. What had become of Judas? 5. Who had come home?
6. Who stood in the midst? 7. What did He say? 8. What did He
show? 9. What did He eat before them? 10, Why did He do this?
11. Whom were they to tell about it ?

SO

CARS

A






JESUS ASCENDS INTO HEAVEN.



Hifty-third Sundap.

THE ASCENSION.
FIRST READING.
“Blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed.” —Fohz xx. 29.

UR blessed Lord Jesus did not stay with His apostles as
He did before His death and rising. They did not see
Him after that first day for a whole week; and they could
not make Thomas, who had not been there when He came,
believe that it was true that any man could come again from
the grave. He said He should never believe that it was the






294 fifty-third Sunday.



Lord Himself, unless he could put his fingers into the prints
of the nails, and his hand into the wound in the side.

The next Sunday evening, Thomas and the other ten were
all in the upper room together, when Jesus came and stood in
the midst, and said to Thomas, “ Reach hither thy finger, and
behold My hands; and reach hither thy hand, and thrust it
into My side: and be not faithless, but believing.”

Then Thomas knew Him indeed, and could only say, “My
Lord and my God.”

And the Lord answered, “ Thomas, because thou hast seen
me, thou hast believed: blessed are they that have not seen,
and yet have believed.” And that is the blessing for all of us,
who have not lived when our blessed Lord was on earth. We
have not seen Him, but we must believe in Him; and that
faith is the beginning of all goodness.

QUESTIONS.

1. What had happened on Easter-day? 2. Who saw our Lord then?
3. Who had not seen Him? 4. What could not Thomas believe? 5.
What did he say? 6. What prints did he mean? 7. When did our Lord
come again? 8. Where were the apostles? 9. Who was there this time?
10. What did our Lord say to Him? 11. What did Thomas answer?
12. What did our Lord then say? 13. Why had Thomas believed? 14.
But who are blessed? 15. Have we seen our Lord? 16. But what must
we do? 17. What is believing called? 18. What begins with faith ?

Oi

cl




|
|
L



The Ascension. 295



SECOND READING.
“Feed my lambs.”—Fohn xxi. 15.

UR Lord told His apostles to go into Galilee; and there

some of them went out fishing on the lake, as they used
to do; but they fished all night, and caught nothing. In the
dawn of morning, they saw One standing on the bank, and
He said, “ Children, have ye any meat?” They said, “No.”
Then He said, “Cast the net on the right side of the ship.”
And directly the net was full of a hundred and fifty-three
fishes, all large and good, and it did not break! Then John
knew who it was, and said to Peter, “It is the Lord.” And Peter
was so glad, that he sprang out of the boat, and came hurrying
through the water to His Master’s feet.

And JESUS said, ‘Come and dine ;” and the disciples found
a fire ready lighted on the bank, with the broiled fish and
bread ; and they ate with Him again, and felt His care after
their long, weary, hungry night.

When they had eaten, the Lord said, “Simon, son of Jonas,
lovest thou me more than these ?”

“Yea, Lord, Thou knowest that I love Thee,” Peter
answered.

“Feed my sheep,” our Lord said. Then again He asked,
Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me?” “ Yea, Lord, Thou
knowest that I love Thee,” said Peter. “Feed my lambs,” He
said ; and again He asked, “Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou
me.” Then Peter was grieved, and said, “ Lord, Thou knowest
all things ; Thou knowest that I love Thee.”








296 fifty-third Sunday.



And again Jesus said, “ Feed my sheep.” Peter knew that
our Lord is the Good Shepherd, and that His sheep and lambs
are the people and the children of His flock, the Church ; and
that He was to show his love for His Master by taking care of
them.

QUESTIONS.

1. Where did our Lord come to His disciples again? 2. What were
they doing? 3. What time did He come? 4. How did they know Him?
5. Had He ever done anything like this before? 6. Who knew Him first ?
7. Who sprang to Him first? 8. What did He give them toeat? 9.
What question did He ask Peter three times? 10. What had Peter once
done three times? 11. What did Peter answer now? 12. What did our
Lord three times bid him do? 13. Who is the good Shepherd? 14. Who
are His sheep? 15. Who are His lambs ?

THIRD READING.

“This same JESUS, which is taken up from you into heaven, shall so come.
in like manner as ye have seen Him go into heaven.”—Acds i. 11.

OR forty days our Lord came in ways like what I have

told you to see and teach His disciples. Once, five
hundred of them saw Him together; but He never came to
the wicked, unbelieving Jews again.

But when the feast of weeks was near, the disciples went
back to keep it at Jerusalem. There our Lord came to them
again, and He led the eleven apostles out with Him to the
Mount of Olives. He taught them, and charged them much ;
and He gave them a great command, “Go ye therefore, and


The Ascension. 20%

teach all nations, baptising them in the name of the Father,
and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: teaching them to
observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and,
lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world.”
And then He bade them stay at Jerusalem until they should
be endued with power from on high. And while He talked
with them, He was parted from them, and went rising up into
heaven, going higher and higher, till a cloud received Him out
of their sight.

While they still looked up after Him, two angels stood by
them, and said, “ Ye men of Galilee, why stand ye gazing up
into heaven? this same JESUS, which is taken up from you
into heaven, shall so come in like manner as ye have seen
Him go into heaven.”

And so it was that our blessed Lord Jesus ascended up to
His throne in heaven again, after He had been born, and lived,
and died to save us. And there He is in heaven, now
watching over us, and laying all our prayers before His Father
in heaven, and getting ready our home there for each of us.

QUESTIONS.

1. How long did our Lord stay below? 2. Where did the disciples go?
3. Where did He take them with Him? 4. What was the great charge
He gave them? 5. Whom were they to teach? 6. What were they to do
to those whom they taught? 7. In whose name were they to baptise
them? 8. What were they to teach them? 9. Who would always be
with them? 10. What happened while He was speaking? 11. Where
did He rise? 12. Who came to tell them where He was gone? 13. What
do we call the day? 14. When will He come again?










Sitty-fourth Sundap.

THE WAITING-TIME.
FIRST READING.
“T will pray the Father, and he shall give you another Comforter, that he
may abide with you for ever.”—fohn xiv. 16.
UR Lord had told the apostles that though He was going
to heaven, He would send them another Comforter, who
would be with them for ever, and in whom He Himself should
be present with them—even God the Holy Ghost, who is One
with God the Father and God the Son.

Ten days after He had ascended up to heaven, on the great
day of the feast of weeks (or, as we call it, Whitsunday), as
the disciples were together in one place at Jerusalem, they
heard a sound like the noise of a rushing mighty wind, and it
filled all the house; and there came flames like tongues
divided in the midst, and sat on the head of each disciple—not
burning, but shining. And wonderful knowledge came to all
of them—they understood all they could not understand




The Warting-time. 299

before ; and they could speak all sorts of different languages,
without ever having learnt them. These wonders were to
show them that God the Holy Ghost had come down from
heaven to be with them, and to dwell in them, and help them,
and make them strong for ever and ever.

QUESTIONS.

1. Whom had our Lord promised to send His apostles? 2. Who is
that Comforter? 3. Who is with us when God the Holy Ghost is with
us? 4. How long after our Lord’s Ascension did He come? 5. What
feast was it? 6. What do we call the day? 7. Where were the disciples?
8. How did they know when God the Holy Ghost came down? 9. What
did they hear? 10, What did they see? 11. What were they made able
todo? 12. What could they understand? 13. How long will He stay ?

SECOND READING.
“ Abide in me.”—Fohn xv. 4.

HE Lord God the Holy Ghost goes on coming and being
with us still. He does not show us when He comes now,
because it is more blessed to believe than to see; but we know
He does come to each of us when we are baptised, to help us
and make us good.

The reason He made the apostles able to speak all those
languages, was that they were to go and teach all the nations
round the Gospel—that is to say, the good news that Christ
was come, and had died for the sins of everyone, and risen
again. They did go and teach ; and all who chose to believe
and belong to Christ’s kingdom were baptised. Then each of



=


300 Fifty-fourth Sunday.



us receives the Presence of the Holy Ghost, to help us to be
good, and to keep God’s holy law, the Ten Commandments,
that He gave on Mount Sinai. More and more of that good
help of the Holy Spirit is given to everyone who comes, as
our Lord bade, to take and eat and drink of the bread and
wine, by which we partake of the Body and Blood of Christ ;
and He gives all that we ask to us if we pray to Him. For
we belong to those nations that the apostles were commanded
to teach and baptise, and bring into the fold ; and we belong
to Jesus Christ just as much as His own first disciples did.
We are called Christians, after His name; and all the time we
live here, He takes care of us; and if we serve Him, He takes
our souls to be with Him in Paradise, when death parts them
from our bodies.

QUESTIONS.

1, Who stays with us still? 2. When does He come tous? 3. What
does He come to us for? 4. Why did He teach the apostles to speak
languages? 5. What were they to teach the nations? 6. What does
Gospel mean? 7. What is the good news? 8. Who belong to His king-
dom? 9. What have we todo? 10, What are His laws? 11. Who will
help us to keep them? 12. How can we get the help of the Holy Spirit ?
13. What will God give us if we ask Him? 14. What are we called after
Christ’s name? 15. What does He do for us while we live? 16. What
will He do for us when we die ?

eo






The Wazrting-time. 301

THIRD READING.

“We, according to His promise, look for new heavens and a new earth.”

2 Pet, iil. 13.

HE Lord Jesus Christ is coming again. We do not know

when it will be; but, sometime or other, He will send His
angel to blow a trumpet; and all that are in their graves
shall hear His voice, and their souls will come back to their
bodies ; and we shall all be alive again; and if we have been
good and holy, we shall be caught up to meet the Lord Jesus
in the air. For then He will come, with all His holy angels,
and will sit on a great white throne; and all that have
ever lived will be called before Him, and judged for all the
things they have done, and the words they have said. And
then those that have gone on doing wrong, and never being
sorry, and never caring for the Lord Jesus, but have made
Satan their master, will be given to Satan, to be in misery in
hell-fire for ever.

But those who have tried to do their best, and held fast to
our Lord Jesus, and prayed Him to wash them clean in His
blood, will be taken home for His sake. And they will have
the happiest and most blessed home that ever can be in
heaven. There will be all brightness, and no more pain, nor
grief, nor sorrow; and the Lord shall wipe off all tears from
all eyes ; and there shall be gladness and joy for ever and ever.

The old earth will be burnt up; but there will be new
heavens, and a new earth, all beautiful, with nothing that will
hurt or spoil or fade, but all lovely and peaceful.






302 Lifty-fourth Sunday.



And then there will be the great joy of singing the praise of
God, who made us, and saved us, and helps us to be good, for
ever and ever.

Holy, holy, holy, Lord God Almighty, which was, and is,
and is tocome! Alleluia!

QUESTIONS.

1. When will our Lord come again? 2. What will He come for? 3.
How will the dead be waked? 4. Who will be caught up to meet Him ?
5. What will He sit on? 6. Who will come before Him? 7. What will
everybody be tried for? 8. Who will be punished? 9. Who will be
saved? 10, What will become of the old world? 11. What will the new
home be? 12. What sort of place will it be? 13. Why will it be so
happy?






( URN



Marcus Ward & Co., Printers, Royal Ulster Works, Belfast.








SONDON-ChANDOSSTS
ORDO Chal DOSST STRANDS ROYAL ULSTER WORKS BELFAST

4 llustrnted & Educational ddlorks

©)



PUBLISHED BY

MARCUS WARD & CO,
LONDON AND BELFAST.

JUST PUBLISHED.

PICTURESQUE SCOTTISH SCENERY.—

Quarto, Cloth, Gold and Black, Bevelled Boards. Price 7/6

ENGLISH LAKE SCENERY.—

Quarto, Cloth, Gold and Black, Bevelled Boards. Price 7/6

VIEWS IN NORTH WALES.—

Quarto, Cloth, Gold and Black, Bevelled Boards. Price 7/6

The above form three sets of exqutstte Chromo fac-similes of Original Draw-
ings, by T. L. ROWBOTHAM, Meméer of the Society of Painters in Water-
Colours. With Archeological, Historical, Poetical, & Descriptive Notes,
compiled by the Rev. W. J. LOFTIE, B.A., F.S.A.


2 List of New Illustrated Works



PUCK AND BLOSSOM: A Fairy Tale.—

By RosA MULHOLLAND, Author of ‘The Little Flower.Seekers,”
“‘Eldergowan,” &c. Six Illustrations, in Gold and Colours. Small Quario,
Cloth Extra, Bevelled Boards. Price 5/~

[ELCOMB MANOR: A Family Chronicle.—

By F. SCARLETT POTTER. Six Illustrations, in Gold and Colours.
Small Quarto, Cloth Extra, Bevelled Boards. Price 5/-

A GRUISE IN THE ACORN.—

By ALICE JERROLD. Six Illustrations, in Gold and Colours. Smatl
Quarto, Cloth Extra, Bevelled Boards. Price 5/-

JHE SHIP OF ICE: A Strange Story of the

POLAR SEAS.—By S. WHITCHURCH SADLER, R.N., Author of
‘*Marshall Vavasour,” ‘The African Cruiser,” &c. Six Full Page Illus-
trations, Coloured Frontispiece, and Illuminated Title-page. Post Octavo,
Cloth, Gold and Black. Price 3/6

QHRONICLES OF COSY NOOK: A Book of Stories

FOR BOYS AND G/RLS.—By Mrs. S.C. HALL. With Six Full
Page Illustrations, Coloured Frontispiece, and Illuminated Title-page.
Post Octavo, Cloth, Gold and Black. Price 3/6

(POUNTRY MAIDENS: A Story of the Present

DAY.—By M. BRAMSTONE, Author of ‘‘The Panelled House,” &c.
With Six Full Page Illustrations, Coloured Frontispiece, and Illuminated
Title-page. Post Octavo, Cloth, Gold and Black, Price 3/6

CHRISTMAS AT ANNESLEY; or, How the

GRAHAMS SPENT THEIR HOLIDAYS.—By M. E. SHIPLEY.
With Five Full Page Illustrations, Coloured Frontispiece, and Illuminated
Title-page. Small Octavo, Cloth, Gold and Black. Price 2/6

[URNASIDE COTTAGE.—

By MARY SENIOR CLARK, Author of ‘‘ Lost Legends of the Nursery
Rhymes.” With Five Full Page Illustrations, Coloured Frontispiece, and
Illuminated Title-page. Small Octavo, Cloth, Gold and Black. Price 2/6

[HE FAIRY SPINNER.—

By MIRANDA HILL. With Five Full Page Illustrations, Coloured
Frontispiece, and Illuminated Title-page. Small Octavo, Cloth, Gold and
Black. Price 2/6



London: 67, 68, Chandos Street, Strand;
Published by Marcus Ward & Co. 3



POLLiE AND JACK; A Small Story for Small

PEOPLE.—By ALICE HEPBURN. With Five Full Page Illustrations,
Coloured Frontispiece, and Illuminated Title-page. Small Octavo, Cloth,
Gold and Black. Price 2/6

JHE TWIN BROTHERS OF ELFVEDALE ; A Story

OF NORWEGIAN PEASANT LIFE FIFTY YEARS AGO.—
By Cuas. H. Epen, Author of ‘‘My Wife and I in Queensland,” ‘‘The
Dominion of Canada,” &c. Four Coloured Illustrations, Cloth Extra.
Price 2/-

QUR GAMES; A Story for Children.—
een HAMILTON. Five Coloured Illustrations. Cloth Illuminated.
FLLA’S LOCKET, and What it Brought Her.—

By G. E. DARTNELL, Five Coloured Illustrations. Cloth Mlumi-
nated. Price 2/-

KATIE SUMMERS; A Little Tale for Little

READERS.—By Mrs. CHARLES HALL. Five Coloured Illustrations.
Cloth Illuminated. Price 1/6

POses WITH AND WITHOUT THORNS.—-

By EsTHER FAITHFULL FLEET. Five Coloured Illustrations. Cloth
Illuminated. Price 1/6

[LITTLE ADA’S JEWELS.—

By FANNY LevieN. Five Coloured Hlustrations. Cloth Illuminated.
Price 1/6
JHE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT; A New Building
ON THE OLD FOUNDATION. Set forth in Twelve Full Page
Drawings in Colours, in the ancient style. Large Quarto, Clorh Extra.
Price 5/-

MARCUS WARD'S FUNNY-PICTURE-STORIES.
JHE TWINS; Which was Which ? or Who was

WHO? AND OTHER TALES. By DAvpy-JOuN. Price 1/-

[NQUISITIVE PETER, and Other Tales.—

By Dappy Jonn. Price 1/-



And Royal Ulster Works, Belfast.
List of Illustrated Works



ILLUSTRATED HISTORIES FOR YOUNG CHILDREN.

A

of ‘‘The Heir of Redclyffe,” &c.

UNT CHARLOTTE’S Stories of English History
fOR THE LITTLE ONES.—By CHARLOTTE M. YONGE, Author
In Fifty easy Chapters, with a Frontis-

piece in Colours by H. Stacy Marks, A.R.A.; a Half Page Picture to

each Chapter, and an luminated Title-page.
Square Octavo, Cloth xtra, Bevelled Boards, Gilt Edges.

New Edition, with Questions.
Price 6/—

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

“ Aunt Charlotte's Stories of Eng-
lish History for the Little Ones, by
Charlotte M. Yonge. This highly
esteemed authoress has undertaken
to write histories of various countries
for children, and the English History
is the first of the series. We accord
her the title of ‘The Children’s His-
torian,’ for the stories of the rise and
progress of Britain are told in a very
lucid manner, and the language em-
ployed is so simple that a child of the
tenderest years will be perfectly able
to comprehend all that the writer
wishes to convey. The work is
adorned with numerous illustrations,
and there is a beautiful full-page
coloured drawing as a frontispiece ;
while the title-page is a lovely piece
of art in illuminated printing.”—
Ldinburgh Courant.

“Ts meant for children who are
scarcely yet out of the nursery. It
is beautifully got up, the stories are
well told, the type is large, the illus-
trations many, and altogether it is an
excellent and useful little gift-book.”
— Scotsman.



‘The style is simple, and will in-
terest and amuse the little students
whose first steps itis meant to guide.”
—Northern Whig.

‘“Any boy or girl who fails to ad-
mire Miss Yonge's Storées of English
ffistory, must, indeed, be hard to
please.” —LBookseller.

“It is an attempt to teach history
on a method of projection, as it were,
and by this means of inducing chil-
dren to become familiar, first of all,
with the names and eras of the several
monarchs. The book is written in a
light, entertaining style, so as not to
be readily distinguishable by those
for whom it is designed from more
seductive and less truthful narratives.
The illustrations are numerous, and
suited to gratify the pictorial tastes
of children.” —Morning Post.

‘The authoress of ‘The Heir of
Redclyffé’ has written a very good
child’s book—just such a story as a
kind, intelligent nurse might tell her
little charge. ‘There are here and
there passages which parents of par-
ticular opinions might think as well
omitied, for if they say nothing they
seem to give to understand. But we
must not forget the extreme difficulty
which besets the writer at every sen-
tence of such a work, and for our
part we think Miss Yonge has been,
upon the whole, as neutral between
all elements and episodes as it is pos-
sible to be. ‘The book is handsomely
illustrated, and is, beyond question,
written in a style most attractive for
children.”—Dudlin Freeman's Four-
nal,



‘“The style is simple, and the facts
selected are such as would most in-
terest a boy or girl.” —G/ode,



London: 67, 68, Chandos Street, Strand;


Published by Marcus Ward & Co. 5



OPINIONS OF THE PRESS—Continued.

“Told in such a pleasant and in-
teresting fashion, that the young can-
not fail to receive instruction without
almost being aware of it. ‘There are
many well executed engravings which
will catch young eyes, and admirably
assist the understanding of the text.
A beautifully coloured frontispiece,
“After the Battle of Crecy,’ from a
water-colour drawing by Mr. H. 8.
Marks, A.R.A., executed in the style
for which this firm is now famous,
will considerably enhance the volume
in the eyes of those for whom it is
intended—if they will not almost
prize it for this illustration and the
title-page alone. ‘The latter is quite
a marvel of workmanship.” — Czv¢l
Service Gazette.

‘“The narrative is exceedingly sim-
ple, and is quite within juvenile com-
prehension.” —Zcho.

‘Tt is, as its title indicates, a book
for the very young, simple in lan-
guage, and otherwise written to the
comprehension of those for whom it
is intended. Why should we not
have a History of Ireland of this
class?” —-Belfast Morning News.

‘‘Miss Yonge's abilities are un-
questionable, her power of narrative
exceptional. . The volume is
creditable to the publishers, as all
their publications are, and the illus-
trations are numerous and sometimes
forcible.” —Manchester Guardian.

“This work is well written for
children, being ina simple easy style.
Its facts are, so far as we have ex-
amined them, perfectly correct, and
in this respect it compares favourably
with many nursery histories. It is
well illustrated, and very handsomely
bound.""—J/rish Times.

‘Written in a manner at once so
simple and attractive that it cannot,
we believe, fail to call forth the live-
liest attention of the most youthful
listener." — Belfast News-Letter.

‘A book intended for very little
children. It deals in a simple narra-
tive style with many leading facts,
and is, on the whole, fairly written.
The stories range from the invasion
of Julius Caesar down to our own day,
everything being given in due chro-
nological order.” — Lloyds’ Weekly
London News.



JUST PUBLISHED—BY THE SAME AUTHOR.

AUNT CHARLOTTE’S Stories of French History

LOR THE LITTLE ONES.



In Forty-eight easy Chapters, with

a Frontispiece in Colours by H. Stacy Marks, A.R.A.; Twelve Full

Page Illustrations, and an Illuminated Title-page.

AUNT

Price 6/-

CHARLOTTE’S Stories of Bible History

FOR THE LITTLE ONES.—Three Readings and One Picture for
each Sunday in the Year, with an Illuminated Title-page and Frontispiece

in Colours. Price 6/-



And Royal Ulster Works, Belfast.
6

List of Lllustrated Works

[HE GARLAND OF THE YEAR; or, The Months:
THEIR POETRY AND FLOWERS .—Giving an Account of each
Month, with carefully chosen Poetical Selections, descriptive of the Seasons

and their Flowers, taken chiefly from the Standard British Poets.

Printed

in Black and Red, with Twelve IlNuminated Full Page Floral Designs

in Gold and Colours.

Small Octavo, Bevelled Boards, Cloth Elegant, Gilt

Edges, Price 5/-; Morocco Elegant, 10/6
OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

1nisisanice little volume, nicely
‘got up,’ and a good gift for a boy
or girl of finer taste than usual. The
text consists of well-chosen pieces of
English verse, by various authors,
such as Drayton, Wither, Words-
worth, Charlotte Smith, Spenser, and
others. The selection is creditable to
the compiler’s taste, and comprises
many gems, all of which are rich,
while some of them are rare.”—
Atheneum.

«Twelve beautiful illuminated chro-
mographs of the typical flowers of
each month. The poetical selections
are judicious, and distinguished for
their brevity and point.”—Staxdard.

“A pretty little volume.”— Daily
News.

“(A small but exquisitely printed
volume. It is illustrated by litho-
graphs of the typical flowers of each
month, on a golden back-ground,
and enclosing illuminated verses in
old English type. In taste and effec-
tiveness, this little volume will hold
its own with even any French work
of the class.” —Architect.

‘“The editor deserves great credit
for the pains he has taken to render
his descriptions interesting and in-
structive.” —Jrish Times.

““A very pretty little volume, most
tastefully bound. Is compiled
with considerable literary judgment.
The drawing and colouring of the
floral illustrations are admirable.”"—
Northern Whig.

“*A very elegant little volume, con-
taining twelve chromo-lithographs of
flowers, one for each month, upon a
ground of gold, with a verse of suit-
able poetry inscribed in illuminated
text, on the same ground. With each
month’s floral emblem, the editor
has connected a brief notice of the
month’s natural and social history,
and a few passages selected from
the best English poets."—/élustrated
London News.

‘Contains some brief but interest-
ing and instructive descriptions of
the months, together with selections
of appropriate poems from the best
authors. An eligible gift-book or
birth-day present.” —Morning Post.

‘Far above the average pictures in
Christmas books. The designs are
most graceful, and the colouring ex-
quisite.’”—Glude.

‘““A bijou Christmas book of a
choice kind, suitable for girls of al-
most any age. It is beautifully
printed. . . . Great credit is due
both to the editor and artist for such
a delicate bit of bookmaking.’’—
Manchester Guardian.

“We turned over the volume to
see which portrayal of floral beauty
was worthy of note, and finding we
could not fix on any one, we say—
‘all are best.’ — The Irish Echo.

“Tt is a perfect little gem, and ad-
mirably adapted as a gift-book for
this, and, indeed, for any festive
season.” —Belfast News-Letter.



London: 67, 68, Chandos Street, Strand;
Published by Marcus Ward & Co. 7

KATTY LESTER: A Book for Girls.—

By Mrs. GEorGr CuppLes. With Twelve Chromographs of Animals,

after HARRISON WEIR.
Price 5/-

Foolscap Quarto, Cloth Extra, Bevelled Boards,

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

“Its young readers will hardly
know which to admire most—the
beautiful pictures of dogs, ducks,
pigeons, chickens, and half the do-
mestic animal creation, or the pretty
stories told by Uncle Peter about
them to his little niece during her
stay in his country home.”— Dazly
News.

“Harrison Weir's illustrations are
excellent, and some of the pictures
of animal life, such as ‘Dog saving
Charlie's life,’ are almost as beautiful
as water-colours.”—£ cho.

‘A book for girls, by Mrs. George
Cupples, who has judged her readers
well, and whose text is illustrated by
the excellent chromo-lithographs in
imitation of water-colours by Mr.
Harrison Weir.” —Standard.

‘« A very pleasantly-told little story
for children, illustrated, or rather,
perhaps, we should say accompanied
by numerous charming sketches in
colour, from the facile pencil of Mr.
Harrison Weir. A very pretty
story, not troubling itself about plot,
but relating little every-day incidents
of child life, just in the way in which
ehildren like to have them related.”
—The Hour.

‘‘A capital book for girls. . .
The tone of the book is fresh and
wholesome. ‘The illustrations are
very fine chromographs, after: Harri-
son Weir.” —Glode.

‘Is deserving of high commenda-
tion for its artistic beauty.” —Figaro.

“There are twelve chromographs
of animals, after Harrison Weir, and
they are without doubt perfect gems.”
—LEdinburgh Courant.



And Royal Ulster Works, Belfasi.

“Itis a pretty story of country life ;
but its chief charm will, no doubt, be
the twelve chromo-lithographs by Mr.
Harrison Weir, which serve as illus-
trations. They are very finely done.”
—Scotsman.

“An interesting story for girls.
The chromo-lithographs, after Har-
rison Weir, are, several of them at
least, worthy of good frames, and to
be hung up in a drawing-room.”—
The City Press.

‘‘A pleasant and sensible story of
life in an English rural home, sur-
rounded by the familiar objects of the
country—sheep and cattle, horses and
dogs, birds and bees and butterflies,
trees, grass, corn, and wild flowers,
not to speak of the red deer of Ix-
moor."-—/ilustrated London News.

““A charming gift-book for chil-
dren. Nothing more acceptable than
the farm-yard and domestic scenes
Mr. Weir has added to Mrs. Cupples’
pretty story.” —Lookseller.

“Contains chromograplis, mostly
of animals. They are cleverly and
agreeably sketched. The text con-
sists of sensibly- written, rational
stories, which develope one from the
other in a simple way, with a running
narrative to connect them.”—A then-
Cum.

“The stories are interesting, but
they are far exceeded in value by the
numerous chromograph illustrations
of animals by Mr. Harrison Weir,”
—WManchester Guardian.

“A delightful collection of stories
for little girls, adorned with a dozen
capital chromographs, after Harrison
Weir.” — Times.


8

List of Illustrated Works



[HE LITTLE FLOWER-SEEKERS; or, The Adven-

LURES OF TROT & DAISY IN A WONDERFUL GARDEN

BY MOONLIGHT,—By RosA MULHOLLAND.
graphs of Flowers, after various Artists.

Bevelled Boards. Price 5/-

With Twelve Chromo-
Foolscap Quarto, Cloth Extra

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

‘‘A pretty story. The book will
charm many a girl and boy. The
chromographic illustrations are com-
posed of capital pictures of flowers,
brilliantly and richly coloured after
nature, and executed with a large
amount of skill and taste. In them-
selves, and as works of art, these pic-
tures are a great deal better than the
gaudy and coarse designs of figures
which we so often see in gift-books.”
—Atheneum.

“These illustrations are among
the very best of an unusually prolific
period.” —Morning Post.

“In the child-world of literature,
few events of equal importance to the
publication of this volume have oc-
curred since ‘Alice in Wonderland’
saw the white rabbit pull its watch
out of its waistcoat pocket.” —Dudlin
Evening Post.

“A dainty and delightful book.
The text, of course, is mainly a struc-
ture on which to hang pictures, and
very beautiful the pictures are. . .
Reproduced with a closeness to the
originals simply astonishing.” —Zan-
chester Guardian.

‘A littlke gem of a book, with a
number of very prettily told stories
and a series of really exquisite chro-
mographic pictures of flowers, beau-
tifully drawn and reproduced with
extraordinary fidelity. One of the
most graceful efforts of the season.”
The Hour.

“Contains some of the finest
coloured plates of flowers ever pub-
lished, and the story is in itself telling
and fresh." —Standard.

“Another most attractive book.
The stories told by the flowers are
fanciful and pretty ; but the illustra-
tions of the flowers are better still.
This, at least, will be the judgment
of grown-up people ; but we should
not be surprised if the little ones, for
whom these tales are written, will pre-
fer them to the chromographs, bright-
looking as they are. A prettier book
for young children we have not seen
for a long while.” —Pall Mall Gazette.

“A charming volume.” — Daily
News.

“The Little Flower-Seehers tells
the adventures which befel Trot and
Daisy in a wonderful moonlit garden,
among talking apples, hyacinths and
honeysuckles, which find a tongue on
Midsummer Eve. The coloured pic-
tures are very good indeed.” — 7 zmes.

‘“Whilst juveniles will be pleased
with the adventures of Trot and Daisy
in their wonderful garden by moon-
light, they can scarcely fail to be
charmed with the very choice chro-
mographs of flowers with which the
book is furnished.” — The City Press.

“This is undoubtedly a charming
work.” —Edinburgh Courant.

‘“The book is charmingly written,
a strong suppressed element of poetry
runs through it, it has the delicate
wildness of a child’s dream, and is
altogether one of the most fascinating
contributions to the juvenile literature
of the season." —Freeman's Fournal.

“‘This charming story cannot fail
to please our little ones. It is ex-
quisitely illustrated with chromo-
graphs.’ —Belfast News-Letter.



London; 67, 68 Chandos Street, Strand;
Published by Marcus Ward & Co. 9

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS—Continued.

“‘The illustrations are singularly
beautiful, and have high artistic ex-
cellence, Indeed, together with the
stories, they make up a volume which
it would be difficult to overpraise.”—
Scotsman,

““The chromographs are exquisite
in grouping and colour. . These
stories are the gems of the book, even
pictorially they are rich in pure
imagination, and overflowing with
poetic thought.” —/résh J/onthly.

[HE CHILDREN’S VOYAGE; or, a Trip in the

WATER FAIRY.—By Mrs. GEORGE CUPPLES.

With Twelve

Chromographs of Ships, Boats, and Sea Views, after EDWARD DUNCAN,

Foolscap Quarto, Cloth Extra, Bevelled Boards.

Price 5/-

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

“The voyage is to Scotland, the
‘Water Fairy’ is a yacht, and the
passengers consist of the children of
two families, with nurse, governess,
one papa, &c., all bent upon seeking
health and enjoyment in a pleasant
sea trip. Mrs. Cupples unites—as
she is bound to do on such an occa-
sion, for is there not a governess on
board ?— instruction with entertain-
ment ; and Mr. Grogan, the skipper,
a jolly, good-hearted tar, is her prin-
cipal mouth-piece. Miss Dalby, the
governess, does her duty also; and
those who have been in the habit of
sailing or steaming from the Thames
to Granton, will be amused to find
how much is made out of the voyage.
Mrs. Cupples deserves to be congra-
tulated on a success, and so assuredly
does the artist.”--Pall Mall Gazette.

‘«This pretty little volume is em-
bellished with chromographs, a novel
form of illustration.” —Daily News.

“Tt is illustrated with excellent
chromographs, from originals in
water-colours by Mr. Edward Dun-
can.” —Adorning Post.

‘* The Children's Voyage contains
some excellent coloured lithographs
of marine views, after Mr. E. Duncan,
and the story is well adapted to the
comprehension of children.’~-S¢az-
dard.

‘Mrs. Cupples has not, as one
might fancy from the title, carried
her little friends away into the realms
of the supernatural, but has taken
them for a safe and pleasant voyage
in their papa’s sailing-yacht, from the
Thames to the port of Edinburgh.
The artist who has in this instance
made drawings for the chromo-litho-
grapher is Mr. Idward Duncan, an
esteemed member of the Society of
Painters in Water-colours.”—//lus-
trated London News.

“«T’ine chromographs also illustrate
The Children’s Voyage. “Yhe scenes
visited by the ‘Water Fairy’ will
abide in the memory of every young
reader. Next to joining the merry
group in their trip is the pleasure of
following their adventures in this
charming volume.” —G/ode.

‘‘It is sure to become acceptable
with all youths nautically inclined,
giving, as it does, a graphic descrip-
tion of a yachting expedition in which
Frank and Cicely were delighted par-
ticipators, discovering in this, their
first sea voyage, many of the hidden
treasures of the deep, witnessing novel
sights hitherto unknown to them, and
also becoming, for the first time,
fully aware of the dangers to which
sailors are exposed." —Belfast News-
Letter.



And Royal Ulster Works, Belfast.
Io

List of Illustrated Works



[OM: The History of a very Little Boy.

By H. RUTHERFURD RUSSELL,
Coloured Frontispiece and Illuminated Title-page.

Gold and Black. Price 2/6.

With Five Full Page Illustrations,
Small octavo, Cloth,

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

‘*Almost as good, in its way, as
Mr. Carroll's ‘Alice in Wonderland,’
though it has less of humorous fancy.
Parents and lovers of childhood will
like it much, as the childish reader is
sure to do.”—J/llustrated London
News.

“‘Shows how a child may, by the
precept and example of an excellent
mother, learn to become good, from
the birthday of the Child Jesus.”—
Adorning Post.

“In every way certain to give satis-
faction to the happy juvenile who
may have the good luck to receive it
as a present.”—-WVorthern Whig.

‘Ts sure to become a favourite with
all good little boys who may be for-
tunate enough to secure it as a
Christmas or New Year's gift. The
story is pleasingly told, and contains
many useful lessons.” —Vews-Letter.

“Tts tendency is quite unexcep-
tionable.” —Standard.

‘‘Told in large print and easy
words, which alone must make it de-
lightful reading for the little ones,
even were Tom’s adventures less
amusing than they are.” — Dazly
News.

‘‘A very good story for boys.”—
Globe.

[JODA’S BIRTHDAY: The faithful Record of all

THAT BEFEL A LITTLE GIRL ON A LONG, EVENTFUL
DAY.—By Epwin J. Evtis. With Five Full Page Ilustrations, Coloured

Frontispiece and Illuminated Title-page.

Black. Price 2/6.

Small octavo, Cloth, Gold and

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

“The book purports to be ‘the
faithful record of all that befel a little
girl on a long eventful day,’ and it is
what it professes to be. Perhaps
some people may think that within
such narrow limits not much is pos-
sible. They have only to read this
little volume to come to a different
conclusion. The story is throughout
interesting, and the book in that re-
spect as pleasant a one as could be
given to any little girl.” —Scotsman.

‘“A most suitable book for girls,
and one that will delight the little
misses immensely. The frontispiece
in colours is really very pretty.”—
Edinburgh Courant,





‘Deals a good deal with childish
adventures in the fields, childish
sports with animals, and childish ex-
periences and utterances in drawing-
rooms and daisy dells. This book is
handsomely illustrated.” — Freeman's
Fournal,

‘* Will be found interesting to those
who wish to enjoy a portion of second
childhood without its senility.’’—
Morning Post.

‘A very nice little volume, exactly
adapted for a gift-book.””-—Worthern
Whig.

“A charming book.’-Daily News.

“The story is told in a pleasing
style.”— The City Press.



London: 67, 68, Chandos Street, Strand;
Published by Marcus Ward & Co. 11



[HE MARKHAMS OF OLLERTON : A Tale of the
CIVIL WAR, 1642-1647. By ELIZABETH GLAISTER. With Five
Full Page Illustrations, Coloured Frontispiece and Illuminated Title-page.
Small octavo, Cloth, Gold and Black. Price 2/6.
OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

‘A tale of the civil war, and abounds
with thrilling incidents of that event-
ful period. It appears to be composed
by a close adherent to historical fact,
and will compare favourably with
some of the many sombre pages which
Sir Walter Scott has indited respect-
ing the same period.” —Morning Post

‘‘A most readable little volume,
comprising in a well-told tale an his-
torical sketch of the period indicated,
written in an interesting and instruc-
tive manner, and suitably illustrated.”
—Belfast News-Letter.

‘A very interesting story, told in
a most interesting way. The coloured
illustrations are above the average,”
—Edinburgh Courant.

‘A well-written story of the civil
war, from 1642 to 1647." —Scotsman.

““The story of Charles I. is one
that never loses its charm, and when
so pleasantly and colloquially told,
and embellished by such pretty and
characteristic pictures as we have
here, it will be sure to find a large
and appreciative audience.”—Dazly
News.

‘‘A capitally-written story of the
great civil war, founded on a well-
developed plot, told in spirited lan-
guage, full of incident, and preserv-
ing to the close that historical se-
quence which is so indispensable and
so infrequent a quality in narratives
professing to illustrate notable events.
The illustrations, too, are excellent.”
—Freeman's Fournal,

“‘Has many scenes that will touck
boyish sympathies,” —G/ode.

JUST PUBLISHED.

FLDERGOWAN ; or, Twelve Months of my Life,

AND OTHER TALES.—By RoSA MULHOLLAND,

With Five Full

Page Illustrations, Coloured Frontispiece, and Illuminated Title-page.
Small octavo, Cloth, Gold and Black. Price 2/6
OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

“One of the pleasantest little books
we have met with for some time; it
does not aspire to the dignity of a
novel, but in truth there is more in it
than in nine-tenths of the more pre-
tentious works in three volumes. It
is charmingly illustrated, as might
have been expected from the pub-
lishers’ name.""—J//lustrated Review.

“The leading story in this prettily
got up little book possesses merits of
such an uncommon order, that it will
be found all too brief. It isa perfect

little gem in its way, far exceeding in
worth most of the three-volume novels
which are published now-a-days. The
illustrations are well executed, and
Messrs. Marcus Ward & Co. have
turned the little volume out most
ereditably.”—Czv¢l Service Gazette.

‘The book is very well got up, and
the title-page is a refreshing bit of
art.” —Jreland's Eye.

‘‘A fine volume for girls. Its in-
fluences are on the right side,”—
Edinburgh Courant.



And Roval Ulster Works, Belfast.
List of Popular Works

NEW EDITION—ILLUSTRATED.

A VERY YOUNG COUPLE.—

By the Author of ‘‘ Mrs. Jerningham’s Tournal,” ‘‘ The Runaway,” &c.

With Six Full Page Engravings.

Crown Octavo, Cloth Extra.

Price 6/-

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS,

“Readers of this bright and spark-
ling story will forgive Mr. and Mrs.
Clare all their shortcomings, in the
way of housekeeping, on account of
the good nature of the former and the
devotion of the latter. We do
not exaggerate in the least, when we
say that this is the most charming
novelette of the season.” —Czvzl Ser-
vice Gazette.

“Though the story is slender, it has
some capital sketching, and abounds
in the characteristic humour and ob-
servation of life which distinguish the
writings of this author and her gifted
sister. We shall not so far wrong
the author as to tell how Fred's ab-
sence was cleared up and the very
young couple came together again,
older and wiser. But we may recom-
mend the story as delightful reading,
and also the binding, paper, and
printing of the book as most credit-
able to its popular and enterprising
publishers.” —/dlustrated Review.

‘* Affords some excellent sketches
of private life in pursuit of comfort
under difficulties. The first evening
of a newly-married pair, in rather
economical lodgings, is happily ren-
dered.” —Morning Post.

“The history of a young husband
and wife, who begin life in a small
lodging in a country town—he as a
bank clerk, and she as a childish little
housekeeper. . . . The story is
well and clearly told.” —Dazly News.

‘‘A simple story of true love, told
with much grace and naiveté.

One of the most readable and attrac-
tive tales of the season.”—Sunday
Times.

‘A very lively and pleasant little
tale, vivid in its interest, and the har-
rowing part of it not too prolonged
for endurance, nor too artfully shaded
to leave a loophole for the entrance
of a beam of hope. The talks be-
tween the very young couple before
the crisis of the story, and the con-
duct of the young wife after it, are
both given with true spirit, and the
pathetic part carries the reader's
heart with it. Moreover, the
lively rattle of the story is not better
painted for us than the tension of its
deeper interest and the happy exulta-
tion of its close.” —Spectator.

‘“The young wife relates her own
distress so touchingly that she quite
wins our sympathy.” —A theneum.

‘«Many readers will welcome this
author once more, her ‘Journal’ hav-
ing left pleasant impressions on the
memory. ‘The story of the mistakes
of inexperienced housekeepers is by
no means new, but it is here told
with much freshness and_vivacity.
The wife takes the reader into her
confidence, and most will sympathise
with her thoroughly, except when she
is too exacting in requiring her hus-
band to spend every spare moment
in her society. Trouble overtakes
them, and their whole horizon be-
comes dark for a time, only to
brighten, however, into a new dawn.”
—Globe.

‘“To those of our readers contem-
plating matrimony at too early an
age, we would suggest the perusal of
this every-day story, which bears all
the traces of being true to the life.”
—Belfast News-Letter.



London: 67, 68, Chandos Street, Strand;
Published by Marcus Ward & Co. %3 .



/LLUMINA TING: A Practical Treatise on the Art.

By Marcus Warp, Illuminator to the Queen.

Examples of the styles prevailing

With Twenty-Six

at different periods, from the sixth cen-

tury to the present time; Chromographed in Facsimile and in Outline.

Foolscap Quarto, Cloth Extra, Bevelled Boards, Gilt Idges.

in Morocco Extra, 10/6

Price 5/-, or,

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

“The examples of illumination
given to illustrate the text confer
upon the book itself no slight artistic
value. The treatise, with its acces-
saries, reflect much credit upon its
author." —Morning Post.

“Full of precise suggestions on
the best form of pens and brushes,
the preparation of the material, the
mixing and laying on of colours, &c.,
all which subjects are treated with
great minuteness, such as could only
come from an expert. ‘The illustra-
tions are taken from good examples
of the French, German, Italian, and
Celtic Schools. ‘The coloured pages
are quite equal in style to those in
more expensive works. This
is a very creditable and remarkably
cheap little book.” —-Architect.

‘An essentially useful book to
draughtsmen.”—/%garo.

“A most valuable work.
burgh Courant.

“The educated eye, with or with-
out any intention of learning to prac-
tise this exquisite art, may derive a
great deal of refined pleasure from
Mr. Ward’s book on the subject.””—
Illustrated London News.

“Of all the volumes that we have

seen, none equals this as a compact
and cheap book of instructions.
Of these twenty-four plates there is
not one that is not worthy of admira-
tion as in itself a work of art.”--
Standard.

‘‘Admirably adapted for the use of
all beginners in this lately revived and
beautiful art.’ See News-Letter.

"_ Fdin-

‘It is a complete history of the
subject, and abounds with illustra-
tions of the styles prevailing at dif-
ferent periods, and the letterpress is
full of interest. The writer is an en-
thusiast in his art, and a very beau-
tiful art it is—one, too, which may
be followed with success by many
persons of artistic taste, whose abili-
ties would not enable them to take
rank among ordinary painters.” —
Morning Advertiser.

‘These specimens are exceedingly
beautiful in design as well as colour-
ing. The instructions to students are
not only technically well written but
have a literary interest in connection
with the subject of illumination.”
Freeman's Fournal.

“That Mr. Marcus Ward is a
master of the art this volume, like
others he has issued during the pre-
sent season, sufficiently proves. 3
A most tempting topic to the author,
the student, and the reviewer, but
which must lead us no further at this
moment than to the renewed ex-
pression of our admiration for Mr.
Ward's excellent manual.”—dZax-
chester Guardian.

“The volume, whether as regards
its literary or artistic qualities, is en-
titled to high praise. The practical
instructions are concise and clear.”
—City Press.

‘A very uscful little treatise, the
merit of which is in no small degree
enhanced by the excellent illustrations
with which it is thickly studded.” —
The Hour.





And Roa Ulster ee Re Hast
14 List of Illustrated Works

New Book of Design in Colours, for Decorators, Designers,
Manufacturers, and Amateurs.

ANTS: Their Natural Growth & Ornamental

TREATMENT.—By F. EpwarD HuLME, F.L.S., F.S.A., of Marl-
borough College, Author of ‘Plant Form.” Large Imperial Quarto, Cloth
Extra, Bevelled Boards. Price 21/- sn

This important work consists of Forty-four Plates, printed in Colours,
in facsimile of original Drawings made by the Author. It shows how the
common Plants and Flowers of the Field may be used to produce endless
variety of inventive form, for all manner of decorative purposes. The Plates
are accompanied by a careful ‘Treatise on the whole subject.



HULME’S Freehand Ornament.—60 Examples,

for the use of Drawing Classes. Adopted by the Department of Science
and Art. By F. Ek. Hunn, F.L.S., F.S.A., Marlborough College. Imperial
8vo. Price 5/-, or, mounted on Millboard, Cloth-bound Edges, ro/—

“To the Student of Drawing this book _ turer of textile fabrics of every description
is a mine of well-drawn examples . . . in which patterns are employed, and to
Cannot fail to be useful to the decorative many others whom it is not needful to
sculptor, the bookbinder, the manufac- point out.”—Art Fournal.



HANDSOME GIFT BOOKS FOR YOUNG FOLKS.
Ma4rcus Warns Fapanese Puture Book.—

28 large Pictures of ALADDIN, ABOU HASSAN, ALI BABA, and SIND-
BAD ; designed in the true Eastern spirit, and Printed in Japanese Colours ;
the Stories done into English Rhyme. Imperial qto., Cloth Extra, Price 5/—





Ma4kcis Warn's Fable Picture Book.—
24 large Pictures of ANIMALS AND THEIR MASTERS, drawn in

Colours, in the Medieval manner—exemplifying the Fables of A“sop; with
the Fables in easy words. Imperial 4to, Cloth Extra, Price 5/—



Marcus Ward's Golden Picture Book of

FAIRY TALES.—24 Full Page Pictures, comprising CINDERELLA,
Tour Fair ONE WITH THE GOLDEN Locks, THE MARQUIs OF CARABAS,
and Tue Hinp or THE FoREST—the Stories Versified and set to Music.
imperial 4to., Cloth Extra. Price 5/-



[VIARCUS WaARD’S Golden Picture Book of

LAYS AND LEGENDS.—24 large Pictures, comprising LADY
OUNCEBELLE & LORD LOVELLE, KING ALFRED & OTHERE, POCAHONTAS,
and THE SLEEPING BrEAUTY OR THE ENCHANTED PALACE—the Stories
Versified and set to Music. Imperial 4to., Cloth Extra. Price 5/-







London: 67, 08, Chandos Street, Strand;
Published by Marcus Ward & Co. 15

[MARCUS WARD’S Royal Illuminated Legends.

New Edition—Six Pictures in each—Fight Books. Each Story or
Legend is illustrated with a set of brilliant Pictures, designed in the quaint
spirit of Medizeval times, and printed in Colours and Gold. The Stories
are related in Antient Ballad form, with appropriate Music, arranged in an
easy style, for Voice and Pianoforte, suited to little folks or great folks, and
minstrels of all degrees. Price One Shilling each; or, mounted on Linen,
Two Shillings each. May also be had in z vols., Cloth Extra, price 5/— each.

PON H

. Cinderella and the Little Glass Slipper.

. The Fair One with the Golden Locks.

. Lady Ouncebelle and Lord Lovelle.

The Sleeping Beauty; or, The Enchanted Palace (with Tennyson’s

Words, by the permission of Messrs. Strahan & Co.).

an

King Alfred and Othere (with Longfellow’s Words, by permission of Messrs.

Osgood & Co., for the United States).

ono

. The Marquis of Carabas; or, Puss in Boots.
. Pochahontas; or, La Belle Sauvage.
. The Hind of the Forest; or, The Enchanted Princess.

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

“'We drew attention, a few days
since, to the wonderful improvement
upon the old picture-books noticeable
in some of the publications then un-
der review. ‘There are some now be-
fore us, however, which put these
quite out of court. Marcus Ward's
Golden and fable Picture Books as
far surpass any of those before no-
ticed as they were in advance of the
old daubs of our own childish days.
The Golden Picture Book is a most
gorgeous volume." — 7 he Hour.

““We have to welcome a new edi-
tion of the lovely /Z/uminated Legends
which made such a sensation last
year, as well they might, for who ever
saw such an approach to illumination
in gold and colours, for such a trifling
amount as the cost of these really ex-
quisite productions." —Standard.

“The drawing and colouring are
very good,’"—Sfectator.

“The legends told in good ring-
ing rhymes, set to easy pretty tunes.”
— Bookseller.

‘‘Many of the pictures are really
beautiful—clear, firmly outlined, and
decidedly characteristic. In the story
of ‘The Sleeping Beauty,’ the awake-
ing both of the princess and the other
inmates of the palace is rendered
with genuine humour.”—G/ode.

‘* Beautifully illustrated books, and
gorgeous in gold and bright colours.”
—Publishers Circular.

‘““The illustrations of Lays and
Legends, with their golden back-
grounds, are quite dazzling. Among
children’s books, Messrs. Wards’
series hold the highest place.” —
Architect. ‘

‘* Of the manner in which these are
executed it is hardly possible to speak
too highly. Nothing like them has
ever been brought under our notice
by any other publisher. The Royal
Illuminated Legends, printed in the
most gorgeous colours on a gold





ground, have certainly not been
equalled in our experience.’’—North-
ern Whig.



And Royal Ulster Works, Belfast.
16 List of Illustrated Works

NEW PICTURE BOOKS FOR YOUNG FOLKS.
MARCUS WARD’S Japanese Picture Stories.

Tales told in brilliant Pictures, conceived in the true Eastern spirit,
and with all the forcible drawing and effective colouring of the Japanese, by
native talent ; with New Version of the Stories in English Rhyme. Each
book has Seven large Pictures (one double page), mounted in Japanese
Screen, or Panorama fashion. Price One Shilling each, on Paper; or,
mounted on Linen, Two Shillings each.

1. Aladdin; or, The Wonderful Lamp.
2. Abou Hassan; or, Caliph for a Day.
3. Ali Baba; or, The Forty Thieves.

4. Sindbad; or, Seven Strange Voyages.

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

“Astonishingly good. It was a
very funny notion in itself to take the
Arabic stories of Aladdin and Abou
Hassan and Ali Baba and Sindbad,
and give them to an artist imbued
with the fashionable Japanese feeling
to produce in picture shape; but the
way in which the idea has been car-
ried out is still funnier. The print-
ing and colouring are perfection, and
the humour of the drawing is always
extremely fine.” —Standard.

“Brilliant pictures and narratives
in the true [astern spirit.
possessing much comic merit and
humour, ye suited to the tastes of
"Morning Post.
ys a higl ly. original idea,
carried out with spirit and | ingenuity.
It is enough to make one wish to be
a child again, to look at the pictures,
so gorgeous, dazzling, and splendid
they are." —Zcho.

“Tf all these illustrations are by
Marcus Ward, all we have to say is
that he should be president of the
Children’s Royal Academy, when
they have one.” —Buzlder.

“Many of the designs are not
without spirit, especially those which
illustrate ‘Sindbad.’ the publi-
cation is creditable to Messrs. Ward.”
Atheneum.





“The pictures, which are brilliantly
coloured, are as quaint as possible,
and often clever and amusing. The
characters appear in the guise of
Japanese—certainly very odd Japan-
ese, but not likely to be less popular
with children for their eccentricity.
Nothing could be more comical than
the dignified advance of Aladdin to
the palace to claim the princess,”—
Globe.

‘The illustrations are capitally
done, following, as the title-page may
fairly claim, the quaint Eastern spirit
with remarkable fidelity, and result-
ing in a series of pictures grotesquely
comie and brilliantly gay.” — The
Hour.

“‘A marvel of cheapness and at-
tractiveness.”—/’igaro.

‘‘A selection of Japanese drawings,
excellently re-produced on English
paper, and accompanied by some
spirited verses on Aladdin, Haroun
al Raschid, Ali Baba, and other
favourite subjects.” —Daily News.

“One of the most admirable ex-
amples of humorous design and satis-
factory execution that we have ever
examined. The artist has caught
the salient characteristics of Japanese
illustration with really wonderful abil-
ity.” —Northern Whig.



London: 67, 68, Chandos Street, Strand;
Published by Marcus Ward & Co. 17

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS—Continued.

‘« Aiaddin, Ali Baba, Sindbad, and
other old friends, are turned into
Japanese heroes, and their adventures
represented in brilliantly - coloured
pictures in the style of Japanese art.
Children cannot fail to be charmed
with the clear outlines and bright un-
shaded colouring.’—Guardian,

‘The pictures, whether or not
literally the work of ‘native talent,’
are ‘drawn in the true Eastern spirit;’
and, as all things Japanese are now
the fashion, should be certainly popu-
lar.” — Spectator.

‘*One of the most mirth-provoking
volumes we have seen for many a
day. The poetical descriptions
of these old-world but ever fresh
legends are excellently well done, but
the pictures are inimitable for fun and
graphic power.” — The /rish Echo.

‘‘Grand coloured pictures, the
drawing and colouring of which give
an agreeable freshness to these fami-
liar subjects. Altogether out of the
common way are these picture stories,
and they will be liked accordingly.”
—The City Press.

“Full of humour. Of the Eastern
figure drawing and composition, the
characteristics are well caught.” —
Architect.

‘The pictures are mounted in Ja-
panese screen, or panorama fashion,
and must prove very charming to
children.” —Edinburgh Courant.

‘They are admirably done in
sheets, which fold map-like. If the
youngsters cannot get genuine amuse-
ment out of them they must be diffi-
cult to please.” — Scotsman.

“The colouring is brilliant as the
eye can endure. ‘hey are clever and
very laughable.” —J//ustrated London
News.

“In the forcible drawing and re-
splendent colours of the Orientals
themselves.” —Bookseller.

And Royal Ulster Works, Belfast.

‘«The artist who illustrated A/lad-
din has studied Japanese art to some
effect. He has succeeded in turning
out a clever and brilliant series of
pictures, which even the Mikado
would regard with approval.” —/7uz.

“Without undertaking to say that
there is much of the true Eastern
spirit to be found in these pictures,
yet we will allow that they are bril-
liant enough, and afford an agreeable
change from the true Western spirit,
which has for years been set forth in
the illustrations of these stories.”—
Saturday Review.

‘“These are good books : pleasant
to examine and also to read, irs
An original and agreeable book of
coloured prints, perhaps the only veri-
table novelty of the season.”—Art
Journal,

“Taking ‘Sindbad’ as a represen-
tative specimen, we may call atten-
tion to the peculiar fitness of the
Japanese style of illustration em-
ployed. It suits the story, and we
are agreeably surprised to find how
cleverly the artist has avoided any-
thing like the stiff formality which is
generally associated with Chinese and
other Eastern work.” — Manchester
Guardian.

“We have decidedly seen nothing
to exceed the series of Fapanese Pic-
ture Stortes, in which the immortal
legends of the ‘Arabian Nights,’ and
other Oriental romances, are pre-
sented in poetico-illustrated form.
The chief characteristic of the series
is their thorough fun.” — Freeman's
Journal,

“Full of fun as they are, and re-
viving for us the ‘ Arabian Nights’'—
in their most pleasant guise—many
a hearty ring from joyous family cir-
cles will be given out.” — Morning
News.


18

List a Lllustvated Works

Arcus WARD’S Pishuhe Fis from ion,

Pictures of Animals and their Masters, suggested by the time-honoured
Parables of A°sop, drawn in the Medizeval manner, and with all its effective

colouring.
children.

With New Version of the Fables in easy words for young
In Four Books—Price One Shilling each ; or, mounted on Linen,

Two Shillings each. May also be had in x vol., Cloth Extra, Price 5/-

1. The Wolf and the Lamb, and other Fables, including—Town and
Country Mouse—Boy who cried ‘‘ Wolf!”—Ass in Lion’s Skin—
Huntsman and Old Hound—Man and Bundle of Sticks.

2. The Hare and Tortoise, and other Fables, including—Monkey and Cats
—Boys and Frogs—Goose with Golden Eggs—Bear and Bees—The

Conceited Stag.

3. The Jackdaw and Peacock, and other Fables, including—Basket of
Eggs—Dog and Shadow—Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing—The Two Pots

—Eagle and Jackdaw.

4. The Dog in the Manger, and other Fables, including—Mouse and Lion
—Countryman and Snake—Sun and Wind—Fox and Stork—The

Trumpeter.

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

‘«The colouring is broad and mas-
sive, but with a remarkable absence
of the crudeness which is commonly
noticeable in subjects thus handled.
Many of the sketches, too, display a
large amount of artistic skill in the
drawing and grouping, whilst the ex-
pression thrown into the faces and
attitudes of many of the animals is
exceedingly striking. Mr. Friswell,
too, has done his work well.”—TZkhe
Hour.

‘‘The pictures aptly render the in-
tended expression, and are such as
would elicit the praise of A’sop him-
self, were he still in the flesh.”—
Morning Post.

‘The pictures are carefully, if not
finely, drawn, and that is a rare merit
in such works.” —A theneum.

**Such a shilling’s worth is not
often seen, even in these days of
cheap and excellent books for chil-
dren.” — Standard.

‘Carefully executed, and display
the power of seizing on quaint ele-
ments and rendering them amusing
a few broad touches.” —Gloéde.

“ Parents could not give their little
ones a better present, and one which
will be more appreciated, than this
enchanting volume.” — Edinburgh
Courant.

‘*Leave nothing to be desired in
respect to the illustrations, which
are boldly and effectively drawn.”—
Stationer.

‘Besides their mechanical execu-
tion, there is real fancy and master-
ful artistic conception displayed in
them.” —Freeman's Fournal,

‘*Messrs Ward are to be warmly
thanked by the young and those who
are in search of good gift-books for
the young.”—A7t Fournal.

‘“The poet has done well, and has
contributed a substantial share of the
attractions of this capital fable-book
for children. It is very handsomely
bound.”—Manchester Guardian,

“The expression thrown into the
countenances of the various animals
would be worthy of the lamented
Landseer himself.”—Jrish Echo.

“Singularly good—full of fun and
cleverness.” —Budlder.

London: 67, 68, Chatados Street, Strand;


Published by Marcus Ward & Co. %9

SUITABLE FOR SCHOOL PRIZES,

ERE FOSTER’S Complete Course of Drawing.

Handy Voiumes of Drawing Copies on a good scale, in a free manner,
with Blank Paper to Draw on, and SIMPLE AND PRACTICAL LEssoNns, for
Teaching or Self-instruction. In Paper Wrappers, 1/6 each; or, in Cloth
Extra, 2/6 each. The following is a list of the volumes (each complete
in itself) :—

1. ELEMENTARY DRAWING. | 6. ANIMALS (2nd Series). By

2, LANDSCAPE & TREES. By! Harrison Weir.
J. Needham. | zg. FREEHAND ORNAMENT.
3. ANIMALS (1st Series). By Har- | By F. E. Hulme, &c.
rison Weir. 8. FLOWERS (Outline). By F. E.
4. PRACTICAL GEOMETRY. By Hulme, W. H. Fitch, &c.
John Mangnall, 9. HUMAN FIGURE.
5. MECHANICAL DRAWING. |10. MARINE. By John Callow,
By John Mangnall. | Edward Duncan, &c.

11%. ORNAMENT AND FIGURE (Shaded).

ERE FOSTER’S Complete Course of Water-
COLOUR PAINTING.— Handy Volumes; each containing Twelve

Chromograph Facsimiles of Original Water-Colour Studies, by eminent

Artists, and SIMPLE & PRACTICAL INSTRUCTIONS for copying each Plate.

In Paper Wrappers, at 1/6 and 2/--each; or, in Cloth Extra, 3/— each.

The following is a list of the volumes (each complete in itself) :—

1. FLOWERS. By Hulme, Cole-|4. ANIMALS. By Harrison Weir.

man, French, &c. 1/6 and 3/- 2/- and 3/-

2. LANDSCAPE (Introductory). By| 5. MARINE. By Edward Duncan.
John Callow. 1/6 and 3/- 2/- and 3/-

3. LANDSCAPE (Advanced). By|6. FLOWERS (end Series). By
John Callow. 1/6 and 3/- i Fitch, Hulme, &c. 2/- and 3/—

7. ILLUMINATING. By Marcus Ward, Illuminator to the Queen. 2/-
(For larger Work on Illuminating, see page 12 of List).

Specially prepared for Vere Foster's Drawing Books. Warranted to
work well and rub out readily.

Price ONE PENNY Each. | Price TWOPENCE Each.
In Four Degrees—Superior Quality. In Five Degrees-—Best Quality,
HB, B, BB, and H.—Adapted for the HB, for General Work; B, for Shading,
Vere Foster Penny Drawing Books. | &c.; BB, for Deep Shading; F, for Light
The best pencil it is possible to procure ; Sketching and Outlining; H, for Sharp
at the price. | Outlining and Mechanical.

And Royal Ulster Works, Belfast.
20

List of Educational Works



ERE FOSTER’S Drawing Books.—

On a New and Popular System, by the first Artists of the day, contain-

ing both Copies and Paper to draw upon.

The Series embraces every

branch of Drawing, and has been approved and adopted by the Depart-

ment of Science and Art.

POPULAR EDITION, ONE PENNY EACH;

A—Elementary.

B—Familiar Objects—Simple.

C 1, 2—Familiar Objects—Advanced.
D 1, 2—Leaves and Simple Flowers.
E 1, 2,3—Wild Flowers.
G—Garden Flowers.

I rto6—Frechand.

J 1. 2,3—Trees.

K 1, 2, 3, 4—Landscape.

M 1, 2, 3,4—Marine

O x1—Domestic Animals.

O 2—Families of Animals,

BEST EDITION, THREEPENCE EACH.

O 3—British Song Birds.

O 4—British Wild Animals.

O 5—The Horse—Elememtary.
O 6—The Horse—Various Breeds.
O 7—Dogs.

O 8—Cattle.

O g—Australian Animals.

O 1o—Various Animals.

Q rto6—The Human Figure.
R 1, 2, 3—Practical Geometry.
T 1 to 6—Mechanical.
Z—Blank Exercise Book.



VERE FOSTER’S Water-Colour Drawing Books.

Chromo-Lithographed Facsimile Drawings by eminent Artists.

ELEMENTARY NOS.—THREEPENCE EAQH. :

Wild Flowers—By various Artists. In
Three Books—F'1, F 2, F 3,
Garden Flowers—-By various Artists. In

Three Books—H 1, H 2, H 3.
Landscape—By J. Callow.
L 1, 2, 3,{4, 5,6—Introductory Lessons
in Monochrome (Sepia).
L 7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12—Elementary Les-
sons in Colours, in the various stages
of Simple Landscape.

ADVANCED NOS.—SIXPENCE EACH.

Animals—By Harrison Weir. In Four
Books—Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4.
Marine—By Edward Duncan. In Four

Books—Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4.

Flowers (Second Series)—By various
Artists. In Four Books—Nos.
2, 3) 4

Tluminating—By Marcus Ward, Ilumi-
nator to the Queen. In Four Books
—Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4.

I,



/é RE FOSTER’S Larger Series of Drawing

COP/ES.—I\mperial Quarto.
ANIMALS—By Harrison Weir.

Price 2/6 each Part.
Six Parts of Four Plates each

LANDSCAPE & TREES—By Needham. Six Parts of Four Plates each.



London: 67, 68, Chandos Street, Strand;
Published by Marcus Ward & Co. 21



/ERE FOSTER’S Writing Copy Books.—
Adopted by the Commissioners of National Education in Treland,
and all the Principal Schools in Great Britain and the Colonies. ‘The
Cheapest and best Copy Books ever published. Annual Circulation over
Three Millions.
POPULAR EDITION, ONE PENNY EACH; BEST EDITION, TWOPENGE EACH
1. Strokes, Easy Letters, Short Words. g. Sentences, Finishing Hand.
2. Long Letters, Short Words, Figures, | 10. Plain and Ornamental Lettering.

3. Capitals. tr. Exercise Book, Wide Ruling, with

34. Sentences in Bold Round Hand. Margins.

4, 44, 5, 6, 7, 8. Sentences, small by de-|12. Exercise Book, Narrow Ruling in
grees. | Squares.

N.B.—An ENLARGED EDITION, Printed on a Superior Quality of
Paper, large 4to size, is also issued in the Nos. 4, 5, 6, and 7 of the above
list for the special use of High-class and Private Schools. Price 6d. each.

SPECIMENS OF THE SERIES OF WRITING AND Drawina Books
Post FREE FOR Price in STAMPS.

/ERE FOSTER’S Copy Book Protector & Blotter.

For use with either Writing or Drawing Books. Price One Penny each.
ADVANTAGES—-/” Writing.—The Copy Book is kept clean, outside and
inside, and may be closed at any time without the risk of blotting. Jz
Drawing.—By placing one of the blotting leaves under the drawing paper
a pleasant yielding surface for the pencil is obtained, whilst the opposite page
is covered by the other blotting leaf, and kept clean and free from rubbing.

ERE FOSTER’S Water-Colour Blocks.—

Specially prepared for Vere Foster's Water-Colour Drawing Books,
and for Sketching from Nature. Composed of a number of sheets of Draw-
ing Paper, ready strained for the Pupil to begin painting.

No, 1, Threepence, 64}x4} ins. | No. 2, Sixpence, 9x6} ins.

|/riting Charts for Class Teaching.—

A pair of Charts, showing the shapes and proportions of letters
adopted in Vere Foster’s Copy Books. Size, 25x20 inches. Price, in
Sheets, 1/- per pair; mounted on Millboard, 1/6

JERE FOSTER’S Hat Ink Well.—

Suitable for Schools Price One Shilling per dozen.









And Royal Ulster Works, Belfast.
22 Published by Marcus Ward & Co.



MA RCUS WA RD’S Concise Diaries for the

POCKET, Published Annually. Lightest—Neatest—Handiest-—Best.
These Diaries meet the universal objection to all other Pocket Diaries—
their cumbrousness and unnecessary weight in the pocket. They are beau-
tifally printed in Blue and Gold, on a light, hard, Metallic Paper, and

“combine the following advantages :-— ra
1. Maximum of Writing Space. | 4. Equal Space for Sunday.
2. Minimum of Weight. 5. Daily Engagement Record.
3. Useless Matter omitted. 6. The Writing is Indelible.

The Concise DIARIES are made both in ‘‘ Upright” and ‘‘ Oblong”
form, and in Three Sizes of each form.

Leading Features of the Four Part System (the Copy-
right Novelty of the Concise Series). Only one Part (Three Months) need
be carried in the pocket at once. Extra pages are given for ‘‘Cash Account”
and ‘‘Memoranda Forward,” to be transferred, according to date, when
changing to the following Part. Covers are made to take Two Parts, so
that Part II., commencing April, may be carried in same Cover as Part L.,
towards end of March, for making prospective entries. When March is
ended, the Cover can be lightened of Part I., and so on; the abrupt break
between Old and New Year is thus overcome. A blank Memo. Book can
be carried under second elastic in Cover, in place of Second Part of Diary,
thus rendering an additional pocket book unnecessary, All so called
“Useful Information,” which few read, is excluded. The weight in pocket
is thus reduced to oxe-fourth that of Pocket Diaries of similar superficial
size, while the ordinary writing space is almost doubled.

Advantages of the Oblong Series. —The Oblong form
of Diary, originated by MARcus WaRD & Co. in 1671, has become ex-
tremely popular. The Oblong Concise Diary, containing the year complete,
is the most convenient Complete Form Diary published. It is also made in
the Four Part Style. The Single Part, in its limp Cover, forms scarcely
any appreciable thickness in the pocket, and is, therefore, especially com-
mendabie to many.

Upright Patterns, in Four Parts (issued with Part I. in
the Cover, and Parts II., III., 1V., ina Packet), ‘These are made in Three
Sizes, No. 1, 314 x2% ins.; No. 2, 444 x25 ins.; No. 3, 5x3 ms. They
are sold in strong useful Covers, and also in handsome Pocket Books of
Russia, Morocco, or Velvet, and with Elastic Band, or MAkcUSs WARD &
Co.'s Patent Sliding Bolt ese at maces to suit all eevee

London: anne 68. Rais Sb, Str pep
Published by Marcus aS a coe 23

CONCISE DIARIES— Continued,

Upright Patterns in One Book.—These are made in

the same sizes as above, and are sold at the same prices.

Oblong Patterns in Four Parts (issued with Part I. in

the Cover, and Parts II., III., IV., in a Packet).
5,42 ins.; No. 6, 436 x 2% ins.

Sizes, No. 4, 3% x3 ins.; No.

These are made in ‘Three™
They

are sold in strong loose Covers, to last for several years, and also in best
Russia or Morocco Covers, with Elastic Band, or MARCUS WARD & Co.'s

Patent Sliding Bolt Lock.

Oblong Patterns in One Book.—These are made in the

same sizes as above.

They are sold in French Morocco Bindings, Gilt
Edges, and Elastic Band, as low as One Shilling each.

They are made

also in best Morocco, or Russia loose Covers, vo last several years.

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

‘By a capital arrangement, the
maximum amount of writing space is
secured in these handy little books,
with the minimum amount of weight,
by the simple expedient of changing
the Diary every quarter, instead of
only once a year.” —Duwily Telegraph.

“The Concise Diaries are singu-
larly good in the four-part arrange-
ment, and the finish of the leather-
work leaves nothing to be desired,
whilst a new patent bolt lock, which
cannot readily be put out of order,
stamps the present issue as the most
complete series yet published.” —
Standard.

“The Diary pages are furnished
separately in quarterly parts,
and are much smaller and handier
than they would otherwise be. It is
a very good plan.”— Pall Mail
Gazette.

“legant and tasteful little poc-
ket books, with moveable diaries,
divided into quarterly parts so as to
save room. We have never scen
anything better—if so good—of the
kind.” —Fuz.

‘The Concise Diaries ave as con-
venient in form as they are beautiful
in appearance.’’—Globe.

“Like everything published by
this firm, the Cozcise Diary is hand-
some and handy. The Diary itself
being divided into four parts, the
well got-up Russia leather case, in
which it is enclosed, makes the book
much more eligible for the pocket
than the majority of so-called pocket
diaries.” — Sportsman.

“The Diary is in arrangement
perfect for keeping a cash account,
memoranda, and engagements, be-
sides containing a deal of useful in-
formation. It is bound in a strong
Russia pocket book, making alto-
gether as good a present as one
would wish to give or receive on
New-Year's Day.” —/our.

‘*Conspicuous for the taste dis-
played in their manufacture.’’—J forn-
eng Post.

“The idea is so simple, that the
wonder is that nobody thought of it
before.” —Dazly News.

s Ps Royal Ulster Works, Belfast.
24 Ts ae Meads Ward & 7 CO.

MARCUS WARD & CO.’S
NEWSPAPER CUTTINGS SCRAP-BOOK.—

A Ready Reference Receptacle for Scraps, from our daily sources of
knowledge, the Newspapers ; with an Alphabetical Index, and Spaces for
Marginal Notes.

“When found, make a note of.’--CAPTAIN CUTTLE.



The Newspaper Cuttings Scrap-Book has been intro
duced by MAkcus WARD & Co. to supply a want equally felt in house.
hold, office, or counting-house, as well as in the library of the literary man,
or in the chambers of the lawyer.

‘There are few readers of Newspapers who do not daily meet with para
graphs, notices, or advertisements, which they would gladly cut out and
retain, but, not having any convenient means of preserving them, they are
passed over and lost; or, even if cut out, are so carefully put away that
they cannot be found when wanted for reference.

By the use of the NewspAPER CUTTINGS ScRAP Book all such incon-
veniences are prevented, as the cuttings can be readily fixed in order, and,
by means of the Index, may be referred to in a moment; thus forming a
volume of permanent interest and usefulness.

LIST OF SIZES, BINDINGS, AND PRICES.



















No. DESCRIPTION. Pages Size, in Inches. | Price.
6021 | ‘ancy Cloth, Lettered on Side oe +++} IOO 73% by: oe A
6031 Do. do. too | 934 by 11} -
6or2 | Do. Extra Gilt, Lettered on Side...| 120 7% by oe 3/3
6010 | Do. do. do. el EEO | 9% by 1134 4/6
6o1r | Half Roan, Lettered on Back «| 200| 944 by 1134) 5/6
6041 | Half Turkey Morocco, Lettered on Side 1. 100 | 7% by 9%) 3/6
6042 Do. do. do. al 200| 8% by 10/4, 5,6
6008 | [lalf French Morocco, Lettered on Be |

\ Superior Quality Paper... |150| 9% by 113%] 7/6
6009 | Half Levant Morocco Extra, Lettered on

| Back, Superior Quality Paper... «= 150] 9% by 113{| 10/6
6013 | Half Roan, Lettered on Back, Superior | | |

| Quality Paper Nee -.| 200 TO by 1s 9/-
6014 | Half Levant Morocco Extra, Lettered on

| Back, Superior Quality Paper aes | 200 iro by 15 15/-



London and Belfast. t &

en

eSTe teats
noe
od es

ae