Citation
Old Robin and his proverb, or, "With the lowly is wisdom"

Material Information

Title:
Old Robin and his proverb, or, "With the lowly is wisdom"
Series Title:
Favourite stories for the young
Portion of title:
With the lowly is wisdom
Creator:
Brock, Henry F. Mrs.
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Edinburgh
New York
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1873
Language:
English
Physical Description:
119 p., [2] leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Proverbs -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Obedience -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Salvation -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Contentment -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1873
Genre:
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Added title page and frontispiece printed in colors.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Mrs. Henry F. Brock.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
ALG2921 ( NOTIS )
60374014 ( OCLC )
026603912 ( AlephBibNum )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
4

1
| és o
= O
Biles

|
Va

7
4









—S.sailote—

OLD ROBIN AND HIS PROVERB.

— Ses Ars tae



“Still downward goes Christ’s way :
Wilt thou, with fond endeavour
‘To scale heaven’s lofty towers,

Be vainly toiling ever?

The Saviour stoopeth low ;
He who with him would rise,
With him must downward go.

* Down, therefore, O my mind!
Unlearn thy lofty thinking ;
The light chaff mounts alone,
While solid grain is sinking.
Into the small, deep spring
The waters freely flow,
Till it breaks forth a stream; -
So thou, my soul, lie low.”
: From the German.









OLD ROBIN AND THE CHILOREN



I

ONDON,

\

\

VLSON

EDINBURGE
















OLD ROBIN AND HIS PROVERB;

OR,

“WITH THE LOWLY IS WISDOM.”

BY

Mrs. HENRY F. BROCK,

AUTHOR OF ‘THE MAN AT THE HELM,” “ BEAUTY OF TRUTH,”
ETC., ETC.

“When pride cometh, then cometh shame: but with
the lowly is wisdom.”—Proy. xi. 2.

LONDON:
T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW;
EDINBURGH ; AND NEW YORK.

1873.














G@Tontents.

——_—+4--_—_.
I. THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE, a vee see 7

Il, A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK, aes a ao wee 30
Ill. AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE,’ oe ove wee a 51
“Iv. A SAD ACCIDENT, “et vee eee ee vee 65
Vv. PAIN AND TRIAL, — we see oon a 76
VI. LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT, a ae ae see 82

VII. PALLING COUNSELS, ... oe ese see —? 102












INTHE HEAD OF THE JUST." 97

* oO * oe
BT a Hi



OLD ROBIN AND HIS PROVERB.



CHAPTER I.
THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE.

WOULDN'T give a fig for a cup of
tea without cream, Alice.”

“ That’s the Eton fashion of talk-
ing,” the sister replied, smiling as
she spoke, “but not the Eton fashion
of tea-drinking, I imagine.”

“Do not speak of matters of which you
are ignorant, Miss Alice. Do you mean to
insinuate that we Etonians, brought up on
the ancient royal foundation of Henry VI.,
ever condescend to potations of skimmed
milk? And what’s more,” added Frank,
“you can’t say as much down here, in the












8 THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE.

old hall of the Davennes.—Can she, mother?
I appeal to you. Has not Alice a pious
horror of touching anything better than
skimmed milk, as long as there are Goody
Luffs and old Robins in the parish, who can
appreciate the cream ?”

“Fie upon you, Frank!” said his sister.
“Tt would be. well for you if old Robin’s
proverb were yours.”

“Well, so it would,” said Frank; “and
so it will be, I daresay, one of these fine
days, when I am old, and wise, and
gouty.” ;

Alice shook her head at the merry boy.
“T shall get old Robin to lecture you.”

“ And may I ask who this old Robin is?”
said a voice from the opposite side of the
breakfast-table.

“ Alice will give you the necessary infor-
mation, uncle,” said Frank; “old Robin is
her beau-idéal of human octogenarian excel-
lence, in spite, wonderful to relate, of his
having neither wig, spectacles, nor gold-
«headed cane.”
~ Alice placed her hand upon her brother's
~ lips. “You are a sad boy, Frank.—I will



THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 9

tell you who old Robin is, dear uncle. He
is one of papa’s tenants, who has lived the
greater part of his life in this parish. He
is the very model of peace and contentment.
Moreover, he is a wonderfully clever old
man. He has read a great deal, thought a
great deal, and turned the reading and the
thinking to good account. He is the oracle
of the village, loved by all, for the kind
word and smile he gives to every one, and
respected by all, for his simple and unaffected
piety.”

‘“‘And the proverb, Alice,” said the squire,
—‘‘tell your uncle what the proverb is.”

“We call it the proverb,” said Alice,
“because, though he has a store of wise
maxims and sayings, there is one in par-
ticular which old Robin is always brine-
ing out, as the best advice, he says, he can
give to young and old. It is a quaint say-
ing,—

‘The sweetest sleep is the sleep on water-porridge.’”
_ “There, Harry, what do you say to it?”
said the squire.

“Well, I cannot say that I appreciate its ,

literal beauties,” said Captain Davenne,



10 THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE.

“seeing that we sailors are not supposed
to favour decoctions that ‘taste strong of the
hold ;’ but I will accept the figurative sense
of the maxim to any extent. I¢ is a short
and pithy sermon.”

“And one,” said the squire, “that the
old man has practised all his life, I should
say. J wish that all my tenants were half
as contented as he. Whether the times be
good or bad, Robin has a thankful spirit.
If his neighbours grumble, he always lec.
tures them, winding up his discourses with
his favourite proverb. And, as Alice says,
he is clever. He comes out with things
that are quite poetical,—eh! Alice? I re-
member, on one occasion, stopping my horse
to have a word with Robin, who was walk-
ing slowly along the road. It was a bitterly
cold day in the winter. He looked so blue,
and so pinched by the cold, that I could not
help saying to him, ‘ My poor fellow, I wish
it were summer-time for your sake.’ ‘Thank
you, sir,’ he replied with his ready smile,
‘but the Lord knows the time best. I once
read in a book, sir, “that in winter the
earth waits for the spring, and while she



THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 11

waits she sleeps.” Now, sir, God forbid
that I should wish to wake any of his crea-
tures from a sleep which he has given.’
‘Well, Robin,’ I said, ‘that’s a good thought.’
‘Ay, sir, the old man continued ; ‘and when
I too am taking my rest under ground, the
good Lord will waken me himself in his own
good time.’ So I rode on,” added the squire,
“and thought within myself, What are all
these broad lands, these paternal acres worth,
in comparison of that man’s simple faith in
his God ?”

“And do you remember, dear mother,”
rejoined Alice, after the short silence which
followed upon the earnest words uttered by
her father—“do you remember that day,
when you and I took shelter from a shower
in Robin’s cottage, and found him at his
frugal meal of bread and potatoes? It was
the first time that I heard his proverb.
Child as I was, I could not help telling
him that I wondered at his having no meat
for his dinner. I recollect how he smiled
and shook his head, and told me that the
simplest fare brought the best sleep, and
then he repeated the quaint old maxim.”



12 THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE,

“You make me quite anxious to see this
wonderful man,” said Captain Davenne.



SHELTER FROM THE SHOWER.

“Do come and see him, uncle,” said Alice.
“Let me take you to him this very after-
noon. Nothing I should like better than to
be your guide.”

“With all my heart, dear niece.”

“We shall be sure to find him at home,
or near home,” Alice continued. “He is
too old for regular work ; perhaps we shall



THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 13

find him in his little garden sitting among
his bees and flowers.”

The breakfast party broke up, each mem-
ber of the family going to his respective
employments for the morning. Idleness and
selfishness were no dwellers in the Hall.
The squire took his brother on a walking
expedition through the fields, first premising
that he had a long list of business to trans-
act. He did not belong to that class of
Jand-owners, which, it is to be hoped, is be-
coming more rare in the fair homes of Eng-
land, men who, in a spirit of selfish reserve,
are content to leave all personal contact
with their labourers to a paid deputy. On
the contrary, he strove, by going in and out
among them, to make them feel that he was
as much interested in their moral condition
as in the progress of their labour, and, by the
kindly word of sympathy which his manly
heart knew when and how to give, he con-
trived to win their confidence and regard.
And this the squire did, because he had
taken One for his Master, who revealed and
taught the sacredness of that tie of brother-
hood which every human being should recog-



14 THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE

nize in the face of his fellow-creature ; who
taught that reverence is due not merely to
the superiority of rank or fortune, but to that
of knowledge and goodness. He had heard
these words, “ One is your Father,” and “all
ye are brethren,” and hearing, he had obeyed.
In reward for which, he was daily reaping
that which the rich and great may have if
they will, — the hearty ow and willing
service of the working man.

The squire’s wife went to her duties in
the spirit of the matron of old, whose por-
trait the wisest of men has sketched as a
model for all the “virtuous women.” She
looked well to the ways of her household,
providing with diligent forethought for rich
and poor, for all who should need or crave the
hospitalities of the Hall. And her daughter
went, not as the daughters of fashion, to her
sofa and her novel, but to a succession of use-
ful and unselfish employments.

As soon as luncheon was over, Miss
Davenne and her uncle started on their
walk to Robin’s cottage. Alice was not
sorry that it was at some distance from the
Hall, for she liked the prospect of a long



THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 15

talk with her favourite uncle. There was
something about Captain Davenne which
attracted both old and young,—a certain
penetrating warmth, under the influence of
which even the most ungenial nature seemed
to ripen into softness and bloom. Older
than her father, Alice was accustomed to
regard him with the greatest veneration ;
and now, after some years of separation,
that he had returned to his brother’s house,
no one gave. him a warmer welcome than
his niece. She was never so happy as when
seated by his side in old home corners, or
walking with him through familiar paths,
talking freely and unreservedly to him, and
enjoying, as none could better, the com-
panionship of one whose mind was full of
aspirations after truth and goodness.

Alice stooped to gather a few violets from
the carriage-road before they left the Hall
gates. “Old Robin loves a bunch dearly,”
she said ; “he is very fond of flowers.”

“You are very kind to the old man, my
child,” said her uncle; “and you are right
to be so. It is surely a great privilege to
share in—that office which our God affirms



16 THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE.

to be his—the care of old age.” Alice looked
up. ‘Do you remember the text, Alice,
‘Even to your old age I am he, and even to
hoar hairs will I carry you. I have made
and I will bear; even I will carry and will
deliver you’ 2”

“T am sure,” said Alice, “that what I
give is nothing to what I receive. There is
‘something to me so grand in that old man’s
abiding principle of contentment.”

“You are right to use that word principle.
Weall have feelings of contentment at times;
but a fixed and deeply-rooted principle of
contentment is what God alone can give.”

“And when he does give it,” said Alice,
“how beautiful it is to behold; and how
infectious it is, too! I have often gone to
Robin’s cottage in a restless and unsatisfied
mood, and have left it in quite a different
frame of mind. Do you know,” she said,
placing her hand upon her uncle’s arm, “it
has always seemed to me that contentment
is less easy if you are rich ; why is it so?”

“Perhaps the proverb contains the an-
swer,” Captain Davenne replied, smiling.
“Tf the water-porridge be the cause of the

(402)



THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 17

sweet sleep, then I suppose it must be the
luxury of riches that robs us of rest. Cer-
tainly they multiply the sources of danger,
because, even in the Christian duty of alms-
giving, there lurks a danger of self-conscious-
ness and self-commendation. Yet after all,
my child, there is but one way for rich or
for poor ; we cannot get contentment out of
God. He must give us himself, and then
only we find rest to our souls.”

“ Robin often says that. I told him once
that I wished I was as contented and thank-
ful as he; and he replied, ‘Why not, dear
lady? God gives to all liberally. He up-
braideth not for the often asking.’ ”

“Happy old man!” said Captain Davenne.

“* He has beautiful thoughts,” Alice went
on. ‘Striking ideas, too. I told him that
I knew I was very ungrateful ever to be
discontented, placed as I was in the midst
of health, and ease, and affluence. To my
surprise, he said, ‘Nay, dear Miss Alice, do
not look to such as these for contentment.
_ The Father in heaven means you to find
pleasure in them, but not content; for you
know he often sees fit to take away all those

(402) Dy



18 THE ORACLE OF 'THE VILLAGE.

things ; but the peace and the rest he wills
should always abide. Jesus Christ, the same
yesterday, to-day, and for ever. And per-
haps,’ he added, ‘the peace is all the more
sure when the health, and the ease, and



ALICE AND HER UNCLE.

the riches are gone.’ Poor Robin; I knew
he was thinking then of his wife, who died
last year. But there he is himself, I do
think. Yes, seated yonder under those
trees at the end of the village green,—that



THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 19

is his favourite spot. Do you see him,
uncle ?”

“Yes, I do; and there is a group of chil-
dren round him—are they your school chil-
dren, Alice ?”

“Yes,” she replied ; “he is seldom to be
seen without one or two of them, he is such
a favourite with them all. From the eldest
to the youngest, they all love old Robin;
and no wonder, for he has an inexhaustible
fund of stories to suit all ages. He is the
Solomon of the village. Our schoolmaster
says that Master Robin teaches more
geography in one hour on the village green,
than he can do in a whole week with all his
school-books, spectacles, and rod.”

“He must have had good opportunities
for instruction,” said Captain Davenne.

“T have heard my father say that Robin
has had long illnesses during his life,” Alice
replied ; “and that being unable to work as
muchas others, he had spent a good deal of
his time in reading, the taste for which he
had from his earliest years.”

The children were so engrossed with their
old friend that they did not perceive the



20 THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE.

approach of Alice and her uncle. It was a
pretty scene. Artist and poet could desire
nothing better. The tree under which the
old man was seated was the veteran oak
of the village. Under its wide-spreading
branches generation after generation had
played in youth and rested in age—the child
climbing its boughs for a treasure of acorns,
and the old man resting peacefully under its



OLD ROBIN’S STICK.

shelter, wondering whether the old tree re-
membered its youth as calmly as he did. his
own. The children were of different ages.
The little ones had gathered close to the
old man—one of them was wreathing his
stick with daisies.

“The poetry of nature is nord? whispered
Alice to her uncle.

“Yes,” he replied, “in her analogies and



THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 21

her contrasts ; the fresh young grass spring-
ing up at the “foot of the old tree, and the
children’s faces pressing round the aged
man,”

The boys jumped up when they saw Miss
Davenne. Robin himself attempted to rise
from his seat, but Alice would not let him.
A bright smile overspread the old man’s
withered features ; it was like a December
sun upon a bleak landscape. Alice was
evidently a great favourite with him.

“Good afternoon, Robin; we were coming
to pay you a visit. This is my uncle, Cap-
tain Davenne. I don’t think you will re-
member him, for he has been abroad so many
years.”

Old Robin grasped the kindly offered
hand.

“T will sit down beside you, my good
friend,” said Captain Davenne. “This is an
inviting seat.”

“Yes, sir, thanks to the squire. He was.
good enough to have it put up here for the
use of the old folks.”

“You are well surrounded,” said Captain
Davenne. “TI have heard what a famous



22 THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE.

hand you are at amusing the little ones and
instructing the elder ones. It is a great
privilege, Robin, to be able to do that. An
old writer says that ‘he who makes a child
happy is a co-worker with God.’”

The old man looked kindly upon the little
group at his feet. “They are bonnie things,
sir; and I like to be with them, and see
their bright faces looking up like flowers
into the blue sky. I like to tell them of One
above who hears the cry of the young birds,
and who once said in the streets of Jeru-
salem, ‘Suffer the little children to come
unto me.”

“And these little ones love Master
Robin,” said Alice, turning to the children ;
“and they love his beautiful stories, do they
not ?”

“Yes, yes,” they replied in a chorus of
silver bells.

“Sometimes,” Robin resumed, “some-
times I am obliged to scold the little ones ;
am I not, Jeanie?” and the old man raised
his stick and gently touched a curly head.
“Shall I tell Miss Davenne,” he con-
tinued, “why it was I told you the story



THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 23

of ‘Happy Nancy’?” The little girl did
not reply.

“Why, maam,” said Jeanie’s brother,
with a merry twinkle in his blue eye, “I
will tell you how it was. Jeanie had been
saying that she wished she was a grand
lady, to ride in a carriage and wear fine
clothes; and Master Robin told her that
the finest thing was to have no wish at all,
but to be always contented. And then he
told us about ‘Happy Nancy,’ and bade
Jeanie try to be like her.”

“And Jeanie will try,” said Alice, look-
ing kindly at the blushing child.

“T think it isa pity that we have lost the
story,” said Captain Davenne, “for we are
all of us apt to be discontented. Is it one
of your own stories, Robin, or is ‘ Happy
Nancy’ a real individual ? ”

Robin gave a significant shake of the
head. “J am no great hand, sir, at making
up stories as some people do. I like best
to tell the children something I have read ;
though I can’t say I always believe what I
find in books. Don’t you think, sir, that
there is a great deal of pretence in some



24 THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE.

stories, what I call dressing up, giving them
colours that don’t belong - to them, just to
make them sound better ? 2

“Very true, Robin. I remember myself
going to one village which I had seen de-
gated as the ioveliést place in the world,
and I found nothing but a few untidy
cottages, and some pigs on the common.”

“That’s just what it is,” said Robin,
laughing. “It’s all make-believe now-a-
days, from the clever people who sit at
home and write stories, to the cunning
fellows who cheat the simple folks, as little
Jeanie’s mother was cheated last fair-time,
! boys?”

“ How was that, Robin? I never heard
of it,” said Alice.

‘Well, ma’am,” the old man replied, try-
ing to look grave, “she gave half-a-crown
for a canary bind for the gale of his pretty
coat, and another half-a-crown for a fine
cage to put him in; and the next morning
when she looked at ‘the cage, lo! the canary
bird was gone, and a little hedge-sparrow
was in his place. The little creature had
given himself a good bath, and had washed





THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 25

off his fine yellow coat. Poor Mary ! it was
too bad to be so taken in.”

The children shouted with laughter.

“Well, but to return to your ‘Happy
Nancy,” said Captain Davenne. “TI hope
she was no pretence.”

“Nay, sir, I should think not. The dis-
trict-visitor gave it to me last week. It was
printed on a fly-leaf ; but I had read it some
time ago in the Christian Treasury. I have
it in my pocket, if you would like to look at it.”

The old man took a leaf of printed paper
out of his pocket, and gave it to Captain
Davenne.

“Will one of you read it to me, boys?”
asked the captain.

“Tet Alan read it,” said Alice, while she
. took the paper from her uncle and gave it
to the eldest boy of the group, whose coun-
tenance expressed a degree of intelligence un-
common to boys of hisage. So Alan began—

HAPPY NANCY’S SECRET ; OR, CONFIDENCE
IN GOD.

There once lived in an old brown cottage
a solitary woman. She tended her little



26 THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE.

garden, and knit and spun fora living. She
was known everywhere from village to village
by the name of “Happy Nancy.” She
had no money, no family, no relatives, and
was half blind, quite lame, and very crooked.
There was no comeliness in her, and yet
there, in that homely, deformed body, the

finn po:
yy
pyr

ae Nt




HAPPY NANCY.

great God, who loves to bring strength out
of weakness, had set his royal seal.

“Well, Nancy, singing again?” would
the chance visitor say, as he stopped at her
door.

“Oh yes; I’m for ever at it.”

“T wish you'd tell me your secret, Nancy.



THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 27

You are all alone, you work hard, you have
nothing very pleasant surrounding you;
what is the reason you're so happy ?”

“Perhaps it’s because I haven’t got any-
body but God,” replied the good creature,
looking up. ‘ You see, rich folks like you
depend upon their families and their houses ;
they’ve got to be thinking of their business,
of their wives and children, and then they’re
always mighty afraid of troubles ahead. I
ain’t got anything to trouble myself about,
you see, ’cause I leave all to the Lord. J
think, well, if he can keep this great world
in such good order—the sun rolling day
after day, and the stars shining night after
night, make my garden things come up
the same season after season—he can cer-
tainly take care of such a poor simple thing
as I am; and so, you see, I leave all to the
Lord, and the Lord takes care of me.”

“Well, but Nancy, suppose that a frost
should come after your fruit trees are all
in blossom, and your little plants out ; sup-
pose—”

“ But I don’t suppose ; I never can sup-
pose ; I don’t want to suppose, except that



28 THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE.

the Lord will do everything right. That’s

what makes you people unhappy—your'e all
the time supposing. Now, why can’t you
wait till the suppose comes, as I do, and then
make the best of it.” ;

“Ah, Nancy! it’s pretty certain you'll
get to heaven, while many of us, with
all our worldly wisdom, will have to stay
out.”

“There you are at it again,” said Nancy,
shaking her head,-—“ always looking out for
some black cloud. Why, if I was you, I’d
keep the devil at arm’s length, instead of
taking him right into my heart. He'll do
you a desperate sight of mischief.”

She was right. We do take the demon
of care, of distrust, of melancholy foreboding,
of ingratitude, right into our heart. We
canker every pleasure with this gloomy fear
of coming ill. We seldom trust that bless-
ings will enter, or hail them when they °
come. We should be more childlike toward .
our heavenly Father, believe in his love,
learn to confide in his wisdom, and not in
our own; and, above all, “ wait till the sup-
pose come, and then make the best of it.”



THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 29

Depend upon it, earth would seem an Eden

if you would follow Happy Nancy’s rule,

and never give place in your bosom to
imaginary evils.

“Thank you, my boy,” said Captain
Davenne, when Alan had finished reading ;
“it is well worth hearing. We must all
try to emulate Happy Nancy, and never
suppose.”

“We must make one exception,” said
Alice ; “just one for to-day. Suppose we
hear Robin’s lesson to the elder boys; you
know, Robin, you have promised to teach
them something. They have waited very
patiently, and now you must reward them.”

“ Just as you please, ma’am,” said the old
man, “if your uncle will not be tired. Now,
then, little ones, you may run away and chase
the butterflies on the green. Only do not
hurt them, for they are God’s creatures.”

The children obeyed, and were soon far
away, merry in play. The elder boys
grouped themselves a little closer to their
old friend, who began at once.








as
nme





CHAPTER II.

A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK.




WAS going to tell them, sir, some in-
teresting facts about South Ame-
rica. They are lessons from God’s
creation, which prove how God
has thought, and planned, and con-
trived so as to give us temporal mercies and
comforts.—First of all,” Robin continued,
addressing the boys, “I must tell you that
there is a certain part of South America
where it never rains.” :

“ Never rains!” exclaimed a voice. “Ah,
I wish we had it so here; our holidays
would never be spoilt.”

“Stay a moment, Charlie,” said Alice ;
“how would the flowers grow in that little
garden you are so fond of, and what would



A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK. 31

become of the green fields and trees? You
would have no dear old oak. like this.”

The boy looked thoughtful. “Then,
ma’am, are there no fields, no trees, in that
part of South America ?”

“Yes, my lad,” said Robin, “finer and
larger than any you have seen in this coun-
try. And that is just the thing I was going
to explain to you. Rain, you know, comes
trom the clouds ; we can’t have rain without
them. Now, the reason that there are no
clouds over that part of South America is,
because there are certain winds there which
carry the clouds in such a direction, and
with such rapidity, that they are borne past
that part of the country. These winds are
called the ‘ trade-winds,’ because they be-
friend the trading people who, as the Bible
says, ‘go down to the sea in ships, and do
business in great waters. —I have often heard
my brother, who was a sailor, speak about
these winds,” Robin added, turning to Cap-
tain Davenne. “He said they could not
do without them. I don’t myself understand
much about it.”

“That is not surprising,” said the captain ;



32 A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK.

“we sailors have a better chance in such
matters, you know. It is quite true that
vessels could not cross certain seas, called
‘tropical seas,’ but for the trade-winds.
Thus it is that our merciful God provides
these winds, which are so strong that, as
you said just now, they carry the clouds
past one portion of the country in South
America. I have been in those seas myself,
Robin, and often when I have heard some
profane word from the sailors’ mouths I
have said to myself, ‘How kind, how for-
bearing is God! he pours mercies upon
thankless men.”

Old Robin shook his head. “ Don’t you
think, sir, that men would love and serve
God better if they made themselves ac-
quainted with some of his wonderful works?”

“It ought to be so,” Captain Davenne
replied, “but, alas! it is not always so.
The head and the heart but too often part
company; one may be full of knowledge,
while the other is full of enmity against God.”

“ That is true, sir,” said Robin ; “may the
good Lord have mercy upon us, and create in
us a new heart, for Jesus Christ his sake.”



A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK. 383

There was a short silence in the group,
for the old man, with his simple and reve-
rent faith, had raised his hat while he uttered
those few words of prayer.

Charlie was the first to speak. He was
impatient to know how the trees could grow
without rain. “Please, Master Robin, how
about the clouds that fly so fast ?”

“It’s a wonderful thing, as you shall
hear, my boy. There are mountains there
so very high that the clouds cannot pass
without striking them. Those trade-winds,
which, as I told you, carry the clouds past
the flat country, bear a large portion of them
against the sides of this mountain-range,
and they accumulate there in perpetual
moisture. This moisture floats off in plen-
tiful dews towards the dry plains over which
the clouds have passed, and waters the fields
with abundant dew.”

“Please, Robin,” said Alan, “ I don’t see
it quite clear. Will you be so good as to
say that over again ?”

Robin looked towards Captain Davenne.
“ You will do it better than I can, sir.”

“ Well, my boy,” said the captain, “the
3

(402)



34 A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK.

point you must notice is the wisdom of
God’s contrivance, which provides for the
different needs of all his creatures. The
trade-winds, you have heard just now, are
sent for the special benefit of the trading
vessels in the tropical seas, which otherwise
could not get on in their course. But in
order to supply this want, one part of the
land is deprived of the necessary clouds.
You see that, do you not, Alan ?”

“Yes, sir; these winds carry the clouds
so fast that they are borne past that part of
the country.”

“ Exactly so. Now observe the compen- —
sation for this loss of clouds there. The
Creator has placed those great and high
mountains, the Andes, in such a situation
as exactly suits the emergency. They run
along the edge of the land, and are a good
deal higher than the usual height of clouds.
We see the reason for this. They intercept
those passing clouds, and keep them as a
storehouse for the wants of the neighbouring
country.”

“ Oh, I see it now, sir, thank you! Then
they get very heavy dews in the place of rain?”



A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK. 35

“ Just so; and now, Alan, is it not a won-
derful proof of a Creator whose wisdom is
equal to his love ?”

“And there is another place,” said old
Robin, “where it never rains either, and
where the arrangement is different. We
must doubly admire the wisdom of God
when we see different arrangements made
in different places for producing the same
end. I¢ does not rain in Egypt, and there
are no mountains like the Andes to inter-
-cept the clouds, nor passing clouds to be
condensed, and yet we know that the crops
are plentiful in Egypt.”

~ “Yes,” said Alice, “ Egypt is called the
granary of the world.”

“Tt is the river Nile that overflows the
land, is it not?” said Alan.

“It is so,” the old man replied; “and
what we ought to notice in this fact is, how
many circumstances must combine to pro-
duce this end. First, the country must be
quite flat; next, the river must be large
enough to water so large a tract of land,
the waters must overflow at the right season.
They say that the Nile rises in the moun-



36 A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK.

tains called ‘the Mountains of the Moon,’”
Robin continued.
“That was the generally received opinion,”
“interrupted Captain Davenne, “ but recent
investigation shows that the source of the
Nile is a vast lake. The periodical rise of
the Nile is caused by the overflow of this























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































RISING OF THE NILE.

lake during the rainy season. But this
makes no difference with regard to what
you are saying, Robin. It does not signify
where the waters rise, so long as there is an
overflow of the river, and the flood covers
the plains of Egypt at the right season of



A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK. 37

the year. Thus we see that the same Hand
which arranged so wonderfully for the sup-
-ply of rain in that part of South America,
had planned similar mercies for another part
of the world, only by different means.”

“Yes, sir,” said the old man, “and yet
the wretched men who say, ‘There is no
God,’ would teach us that all these mercies
come by chance. They talk of the ‘laws of
nature, but don’t you see, Alan” (for the
boy’s eager eyes were fixed on the speaker),
“they can’t tell us how it is that the ‘laws
of nature’ which raised the Andes, did not
-raise a similar mountain on the plains of
Egypt; and if nature contrived the flat
grounds of Egypt to receive the coming
flood, why nature did not level the hills and
mountains of South America.”

“Yes, indeed,” said Captain Davenne,
“why does not inundation answer on the
coast of Chili, and dew upon the sands of
Egypt ?”

“Do tell us something more like this,
good Robin,” said Alan. “I suppose there
are other facts like these ?”

“ Yes, my boy, there are several. I could



38 A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK.

tell you about Greenland—the land, you
know, of snow and ice. No trees grow
there, and therefore no wood is to be had.
What, then, shall the Greenlanders do for .
fuel, and for making their boats, and spears,
and fishing-tackle ?”

“ Ah! what indeed?” said Charlie; “J
can’t guess at all.”

“The sailors tell us,” continued Robin,
“that they use train oil for fuel. This is
supplied to them by the whales that are
caught in great numbers near those shores.
And as for wood, we are told that certain
currents of the ocean bring large trunks and
portions of trees from other countries, and
lodge them between the islands, ready for
use when the Greenlander wants them.*—
This seems to me very wonderful, sir,” said
Robin, turning to the captain ; “these poor
creatures cannot tell where these trees are
torn from, or how they are swept away—all
they know is, that since their own islands
do not produce the trees they want, the
waves of the sea bring them to their shores.

* For these and similar illustrations, see Nelson on “ Infidelity,
its Cause and Cure.”



e

A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK, 39

Ah, sir, one longs to be a missionary, to
go to these Greenlanders and tell them that
it is a Father’s hand that sends them all
these things.”

“ Alas! Robin, God has ignorant and
thankless children in every part of his
world. How few of us care to inquire into
the wonders of God’s creation! See how
we forget the Giver all the while we are
using his gifts for our life, health, and
enjoyment. arth, air, and water are by
constant adaptations made to work together
for our good, and yet we go on in our sin
and self, living without God and without
hope in the world.”

“ That is very true, sir,” said the old man,
with a sad smile; “it’s truly wonderful
altogether.”

“T never heard anything of this before,”
said Alan, ‘and I am sure it’s well worth
remembering.”

The boy had listened to the last words
spoken by the captain with intense interest.
There was a look of earnest inquiry in his
large dark eyes, unusual in boys of his age.
In it one could recognize the early workings



40 A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK.

of an ardent spirit craving for knowledge of
the unseen world. Surely, if there be one
phase of the life in the human soul more
interesting in the eyes of angels and of God,
it is the season when thought begins to do
her work in the energy and glow of youth,
when the human first responds to the touch
of the divine, and the craving spirit goes
forth in its restless quest of God.*

“Do you remember anything more, Master
Robin ?” Alan continued ; “it is better than
all the story-books in the world.”

“That’s rightly spoken,” the old man
replied ; “ God has given us two wonderful
books of his own making, and we can read
and never tire of them. The book of nature
is one, and the blessed Bible is the other.
But mark what I say, Alan, my boy, we
shall never see clearly to read and under-
stand either of these books, unless we
_ endeavour to do God's will. We must obey
before we understand. If we do what God
_ bids us, we shall soon find that he gives us
more and more knowledge.”

* “T’homme a perdu-Dieu, et, toutefois, le malheureux ne peut

s’en passer” —Man has lost God, and yet, unhappy man! he cannot
do without God.—Bossuret.



A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK. 41

“Tt is so difficult,” said the boy, looking
up into the quiet face of the old man.

“So it is, Alan; but can we wonder at
it, when we know what suffering it cost
the blessed Saviour to bring us back to
God ?”

“T wish,” said the boy, “that Will Davis,
my cousin, could hear what you have been
saying ; he works at the factory, you know.
He is getting into strange ways, and reads
strange books—books that try to prove that
the Bible is false. I wonder what he would
say to all these wonderful things you have
been telling us. He says that everything
came by chance.”

“Poor, sinful body,” said the old man,
shaking his head sorrowfully, “he does not
see that it is far more difficult to prove that
chance can bring such wonderful contrivance
and results together.”

“You are quite right,” rejoined Captain
Davenne. “The unbeliever is the most
credulous of men. He believes things which
the Christian does not believe, and which are
far more difficult of belief. For instance, in
those facts about Greenland, let him tell us



1 42 ' A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK.

how it is that the whale happens to swim
nearest to those who most need his flesh.
If we should wish to use nothing but train
oil for fuel, we could not do so; because we
do not find whales near our coast.. Does
chance make this difference ?”

“ And the trees, sir,” said Alan, “that is
wonderful. Is it really true that they are
brought by the waves to those shores ?”

“We are told go on good authority,” the
captain replied. ‘We are informed that a
certain current of the ocean, or certain
winds, or, indeed, both united, bear along
the timber from other lands, and lodge it
between the islands, which so stand as to
make a sort of storehouse. Now, when we
notice the fact that as trees are thus borne
along the shores of France, or Spain, or
England, where they are not wanted, but
that in more frozen climes, where they are
wanted, the supply is brought, it certainly
is difficult to say, ‘There is no Designer at
work, or if there is one, that he is not a wise
and kind Father.’”

“Oh,” said Alice, claspmg her hands,
“how is it possible there can be a single



A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK. 43

infidel in the world, while men have eyes to
see and read God’s works!”

“Tt’s the heart that’s wrong, dear lady,”
said the old man; “the heart is at enmity
against God, and that is why men love
darkness rather than light, falsehood rather
than truth. They wish the Bible to be false,
and so by degrees they persuade themselves
that it is so.”

“Those words of our Lord are very clear
on this subject,” Captain Davenne rejoined,
“ “because ther deeds are evil.’ It is an
awful fact, that every act of sin brings dark-
ness into the soul, hiding the truth of God
from our minds, as well as the presence of
God from our hearts.”

“ And on the other hand, sir,” said Robin,
‘what a blessed thing it is, that by doing the
will of God we get to know what is truth.
Ah, sir, I had a good mother, she taught
me this; she was always so earnest on this
point. ‘Robin,’ she would say, ‘if once you
begin to disobey God’s plain commands, you
will soon become a sceptic and an un-
believer.’ And she was right, sir. After
her death I fell into idle company; like



44 A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK.

many young men, I began by breaking the
Sabbath, then I came to neglect my Bible,
and to give up praying; and, at last, I went
to hear free-thinkers talk, and their argu-
ments seemed to me very fine, and just to
suit me; I wished them to betrue. I could
not see the ignorance and stupidity that was
in them, because sin had darkened my mind
and defiled my heart.”

“ And what brought you out of all this,
Robin?” asked Miss Davenne.

“God was very merciful to me,” said the
old man. “He sent me a long and heavy
sickness, but it was a blessed one, for in it I
heard his voice, ‘ Return unto me, for I have
redeemed thee. And then, lady, I felt and
knew that it was true, that Jesus is a great
Saviour, and man a great sinner.” The old
man raised his eyes towards the blue heavens
above him, the calm beauty of which seemed
reflected upon his aged features.

“Ah, Robin,” said Captain Davenne,
“you have hit upon the right thing, the all-
powerful remedy for infidelity and atheism.
All the arguments in the world are as
nothing in comparison with that belief of



A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK. 45

the truth which comes from a knowledge
and a consciousness within. When the soul
feels its sorest need of a Saviour, and sees,
too, that Jesus is all that he needs, then he
does not want arguments to convince him
of the existence of God. You might as
well persuade a satisfied man that he is
hungry, as you can persuade such an one
that there is no God, no Saviour, no Holy
’ Ghost.”

There was a short silence, broken at
length by Alan, who again fixed his deep
eyes upon the old man. ‘ Were you really
once an infidel, Master Robin ?”

The old man looked very grave while he
made reply: “I am thankful to say, my
lad, that I never went so far as to say with
the fool ‘There is no God;’ but, alas! I
sinned greatly by giving heed to wretched
and ignorant men who, as Satan’s mes-
sengers, went about to teach les. My
mind was filled with unbelieving thoughts,
with doubts of God’s justice and his love,
and with foolish and absurd suggestions
against the truth of his word. Ah! those
were sad days,” continued the old man,



46 A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK,

bending his head upon his clasped hands.
“There would be little peace for me now in
remembering them, if it were not for that
blessed word, ‘The blood of Jesus Christ
cleanseth from all sin.’”

“Tt is a striking fact,” said Captain
Davenne, “that the human mind will swal-
low any amount of falsehood in arguments
against religion, which it will not do in
matters of this world. Nothing, surely,
better proves the utter departure of the
heart from God.”

“Tt is pride,” said old Robin, looking up,
‘pride that works in man rebellion and un-
belief. Ah, sir, I often think of my mother;
she had a favourite proverb—”

The old man stopped, perceiving a smile
upon Alice’s face. “Go on, Robin,” she
said, “go on; I have already told my uncle
you had a pet saying, and I am glad that
you have come out with it at last.”

“Tt is a quaint old saying, sir, but a true
one,—

‘The sweetest sleep is the sleep on water-porridge.’
My mother used to say that it held as good
for the soul as for the body; for that most of



wa

A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK. 47

us were, like Sodom, destroyed by pride and
fulness of bread.”

“That is well thought,” said Alice. “I
have never taken the proverb in that sense.
I had only applied it to your usual content-
ment in humble fare, Robin.”

“It’s a short text, lady, for a long sermon.
The blessed Lord was meek and lowly in
heart ; and it is the poor in spirit that shall
inherit his kingdom.”

“You had a great blessing, Robin, in a
good mother,” said Captain Davenne.

“A great blessing indeed, sir; there’s no
telling what a mother’s faith and prayers can
do for an erring son. I believe that it was
in answer to them that God brought me
back from the sin and misery of doubt and
perplexity. And do you know, sir, I can
remember the time when I first asked my
mother the meaning of the proverb; yes,
and the very place too. I can see the little
bed in the corner as plain as possible, though
it is such a long time ago, and the sweet
look on my mother’s face as she said to me,
‘It means that we must be happy and
thankful with whatever God gives, and not



48 A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK.

wish to have great things, or to be great
people.’ I recollect, too, her last words as
she kissed us, ‘ Love God, my children, and
then you will love all he gives, whether it









A PICTURE OF LONG AGO.

be small or great.’ Is it not strange, sir,
that I should remember all this as well as if
it had happened only yesterday? How is
it?”



A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK. 49

“One reason, I imagine,” the captain
replied, “‘is that we have gone over the
facts of our childhood so often that they
have become more fixed in our minds.
Another is, that our minds are more quiet
in old age; the hurry and work. of middle
age are.over, and our thoughts are less dis-
tracted, and are therefore able to recall past
images in their first freshness.”

“ Happy that old age,” said Alice, “that
can fill its quiet hours with such pleasant
pictures. Well, Robin, I wish that every
one was as contented and thankful as you.
I am always the better for listening to you.
But we must say good-bye now, for we shall
be wanted at home.”

“You are always very kind, lady, in bear-
ing with an old man’s long stories.”

“Tf there had been time,” Alice con-
tinued, “I should have asked you to tell
my uncle how it happened that the proverb
became so much impressed on your mind?”

“You are too good, dear lady, to make
so much of my simple story.”

“I propose,” said Captain Davenne as he
rose, “that our good friend should fix a day

(402) 4



50 A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK.

_ for telling us. I am sure we shall all be
very glad to hear it.”

The old man replied with a grateful look.
“Tf you have no objection to these young
things being present, I should like them to
hear it.”

The boys had risen from their seats on
the grass when Miss Davenne had moved,
and were now waiting eagerly for her reply.
The assent was readily given, and the day
fixed. A few more kindly words were
spoken by Captain Davenne to the old man,
and the group dispersed ; the boys bounding
across the common, the young lady and her
uncle taking the path that led to the Hall,
and old Robin, with his staff (that last friend
of feeble humanity), turning toward his
cottave.



2





CHAPTER IIT.

AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE.



JHE evening after this conversation,
old Robin sat in his little garden
‘ among his bees, his flowers, and the
parting rays of the sun which was
sinking behind the adjacent hills.
The old man was never so happy as when,
seated at his cottage door, he watched the
bright glories of the evening sky. The love of
nature is strongest at the beginning and the
end of life. The child has no care for the
morrow, but gives himself up to the wealth
that lies around him in the rich gifts of
earth, air, and sky ; and the old man returns
to the same enjoyment when the toil of life
is done, and he is waiting in the cool of the
evening for a brighter morrow in a better



52 AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE.

home. On this evening, however, Robin’s
solitude was destined to be broken. Two
figures presented themselves at the garden
gate.
“May we come in, Master Robin?”
The voice was Alan’s.



===

ALAN AND AIS COUSIN.

“Come in, my lad, and welcome,” was
the old man’s ready response.

“This is my cousin Will,” said the youth,
pointing to his companion. “Here, Will,
sit down on this bit of grass.—The fact is,
Robin,” said the lad, coming to the point at



AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE. 53

-once—‘ the fact is, I have persuaded Will
to come here for two reasons. One is that
he may hear something good from your lips,
and the next is—,” and here Alan stopped
short. His cheek became suddenly red.

“JT will tell the truth for you,” said
his cousin. “Alan is in a state of great
remorse, Master Robin, because he went
with me this morning to a lecture at the
Town Hall of Coniston, and the only way I
eould pacify him was by letting him bring
me in his turn to you, that you might
lecture me, I suppose.”

The eyes of the speaker were dark and
lustrous, but they lacked that peculiar ex-
pression which bears witness on some faces
to the joy and rest which the soul within has
found.

“What was the lecture about, my son?”
asked the old man.

“Tt was a lecture against the Bible,” Alan
replied impetuously; “against the Book you
love so much, Robin. I was a fool to be
persuaded by Will. I knew I was doing
wrong all the time, and yet I went. I am
sure that if I had known how wretched that



54 AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE.

man’s words could make me, I would never
have gone.”

Old Robin shook his head sorrowfully.
“The tree of error bears deadly fruit, Alan,
and they that will pluck and eat must be
content to suffer.—And thou, young man,”
he added, turning to Alan’s companion,
“wilt thou make thine own destruction
tenfold more sure by dragging a fellow-
creature after thee ?”

“Don’t blame him, Robin,” said Alan,
“for it was my own fault that I went.”

“The lecturer was said to be such a clever
man,” said the other, “that many of us were
tempted to go and hear him. But, indeed,
Master Robin, I will not make myself out
better than Iam. I confess to you that I
have sometimes doubted the truth of the
Bible. There are arguments against it which
I find it difficult to answer.” °

“May the good Lord forgive you,” said
the old man, “even as I had need to be
forgiven when, in the days of my youth and
folly, I gave heed to the same falsehoods.
Listen to me, my son. There are but two
reasons why men are infidels. “The first is,



AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE. 55

because they love darkness better than light;
the other is, because they are ignorant.
Yes, Will Davis, those that appear the most
learned are just the most ignorant; and,
alas! they choose to remain so. Young
man, you say that you find it difficult to
believe; but answer me this question, Do
you wish to believe ?”

“Well, Master Robin, I have really
never asked myself that question.”

“Ah!” said the old man, “if you wished
to believe you would use all your diligence
to read everything that was in favour of the
Bible ; whereas you will confess, if you are
honest, that for one argument that honours
the Word of God, you have read ten, ay,
twenty, that blasphemes it.”

Old Robin kindled as he spoke. The
radiance of the sunlight which was falling
on the faces of the young men, was as
nothing in comparison of that diviner glow
which bore witness on the aged features to
the energy of truth within.

“You may not like to hear it said you
are ignorant, my son,” he went on; “but if
you will take the trouble to examine into



56 AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE.

what scoffers say, you will find that they
are ignorant of Bible facts, Bible history,
and Bible language. Yet these are the men
who call themselves too learned to believe
in God’s Book.”

“Well, Master Robin,” said Alan, “I was
disgusted by the lecturer’s objections, and
by his unfairness too. About the Tower of
Babel, for instance, he actually said that
the Bible could not be true, because it
taught men that this tower would have been
built up to heaven, and that God came down
to prevent it, fearing lest men should find
a method of their own for getting into
heaven.”

“We ought not to be surprised at any-
thing these men assert,” Robin replied,
“for cavilling and doubting always end in
unfairness and untruth. The building of
the tower, as you know, had nothing to.
do with getting into heaven, and yet if you
had not read your Bible, this man might
have led you to believe otherwise. It is a
melancholy fact that men are everywhere
receiving and listening to every kind of
infidel objections, without making them-



AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE. 57

selves acquainted with the mass of evidence
which is on the side of truth. They seize
upon the difficulties, but do not care for any
further testimony. Why. is this? Ah!
the answer is too plain; it is because men
love darkness rather than light.”

“And only think, Robin,” said Alan
again, “that lecturer said that the Bible
was immoral in its teachings, because it
speaks of certain men as good men, when,
at the same time, it relates their having
committed the worst sins! David was his
pet example.”

“ How ignorant that man saad be,” said
Robin. “Why, if his mind had not been
perverted and madecrooked, he would see that
the Bible does not sanction or approve of
David in his sins ; it simply states those sins
as matters of fact. This is very much in
favour of the Bible. It is the only historical
book on earth which relates matters of
naked fact. No writer in that wonderful
volume ever praises the goodness of the men
he is writing about. No praise, or flattery,
is used, as there is in other books of history.
On the contrary, the sacred historians relate



58 AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE.

plainly and truthfully the sins into which
God’s people have fallen. It is impossible
they should do otherwise,” added the old
man, laying his hand impressively upon
Alan’s arm, “not only because they are the
records of truth, but because they seek to
teach us what man is when he falls away
from God. When we read of the treachery
and conceit of Peter, and of the grievous fall
of David, we see that man is never safe but
when he leans upon God. And, as the
whole teaching of the Bible points to this
truth, we cannot be surprised when God’s
Word makes it plain to us by zlustration as
well as precept.”

“There’s something in that,” said Alan’s
companion.

The old man went on. ‘David had a
fallen nature, as every one of God’s children
has, and David was a great king. With all
his wealth and all his triumphs, the surprise
is that he did not sooner fall into sin. And
when he did fall, grievous as it was, see how
great was his repentance! Could any one
have humbled himself as he did, who had
not the Spirit of God in his heart? Think



AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE. | 59

of that 51st Psalm (in which he records his
sins and his deep repentance), and remember
that king David knew that it would be sung
before his court, and before all Jerusalem ;
that it would be the memorial of his sin to
all generations. His sorrow for that sin
must have been very real to enable him to
face all.this.”

“This cannot be denied, I confess,” said
young Davis. ;

“Ah, my sons,” said old Robin very
gravely, “we would not be so ready to blame
the Bible for recording the sins of many of
God’s people, if we understood a little more
of that repentance which so filled their hearts
as to lead them to go out and weep bitterly.”

The young men were silent. The earnest-
ness of the old man’s words, together with
the seriousness of his manner, and the tone
of sorrow which seemed lovingly to bind
the whole, all made a deep impression on
their minds. The candour of youth, too,.
was still alive in their hearts, as yet un-—
destroyed by the deceits and sophistries of a
world which is at enmity with God.

“May I tell you another objection which



60 AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE.

that man made against the truth of the
Bible?” said Alan. ‘He declared it.im-
possible to believe in the resurrection of the
body, when we know that after death our
bodies dissolve and mingle with the dust or
are scattered over the earth.”

“ Stay a moment,” said old Robin, rising
from his seat. “I have a book in-doors
which has some striking words on this sub-
ject. You shall read them for yourselves.
There is light enough in the sky, so I will
fetch the book.”

The old man went into the cottage, and
soon returned with a small book in his hand.
It was a great favourite of his, to judge from
the way in which passages were marked and
underlined.

“Here is the chapter,” he said; “now
read, Alan, read it aloud.”

“God tells the righteous that their bodies,
although made out of the materials belong-
ing to their present frames of earth, will -
shine, and be very splendid (1 Cor. xv. 40-
45). God can make very durable and very
glorious things out of materials the very
opposite of firmness or of brilliancy. He



AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE. 61

has done this. Of all the substances with
which we are acquainted, we esteem diamond
the hardest and the most glittering. Char-
coal is as black and as crumbling as any
other body known to us, yet these two
bodies are the same. The learned know,

pie = i ii a! > Z = .

iid
CN













































THE BOOK.

the ploughboy does not, that the difference
between charcoal and diamond is, that the
Creator has ordered a different arrangement
of particles. The same materials are
differently placed, that is all. If any are
wishing for a body more beautiful than they



62 AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE.

now have, they may be assured that God
can, if he choose, take our present fragile,
corruptible forms of clay, and make out of
them something exceedingly glorious. ‘Jt
as sown in dishonour, tt is raised in glory.’
Out of a certain spot of earth a flower arose,
which waved in splendour; the soil from
which it grew was very black.” *

“What do you say to that?” Robin
asked of young Davis, when Alan had
finished.

“T like it very much,” said the young
man frankly. “Can you spare the book to
me for a week or so? I have a nice bit of
time for reading now in the evening. I

should not mind reading more of that book.”
«TJ will lend it you gladly,” said Robin; —
‘it’s a good thing to read on the right side.
But oh, my sons, take an old man’s advice,
‘Begin to pray.’ All the reading, all the
thinking, and all the talking will not avail,
unless you ask the Spirit of truth to help
you. Boys, the time is all too short, that
we should let the work of life go by, on the
chance of its not being true. Don’t waste

* Rev. D. Nelson, M.D.



AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE. 63

this precious time in doubt and unbelief,
but get you to your Saviour, and ask him
to teach you those words which alone can
make you a soft pillow when you lie down
to die: ‘Lord, I believe; help thou mine un-
belief.”

“We must wish you good-evening now,
Master Robin,” said Alan. “TI think I can
promise you never to go to those places
again.”

The old man was silent. His eye was
resting on the evening clouds which, with
crimson edges, lay in masses above the set-
ting sun.

“ How beautiful it is!” said Alan.

“Ay,” said the old man, “and there is
one thing more beautiful, more wonderful
still, and that is God’s good patience. We
are ready enough to use his gifts; to sow
and reap under the blessed sun in the
heavens, and be warmed and gladdened by
his rays; but we care not to seek after the
Giver himself, and we refuse to believe
in his love. Verily, his compassions fail
not.”

“Well, Master Robin,” said young Davis, —



64 AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE.

“1 would give something to have your
opinions.”

“Don’t talk of opinions,” said the old
man: “whena man talks of his ‘opinions,’
we may be sure that pride is not far off.
Nay, my lads, you must get the lowly
mind, the empty heart, if you would see
.God. He satisfieth the hungry soul. Fare-
well, my sons. Take heed to yourselves,
lest with all your books, and all your
learning, and all your opinions, you find
yourselves at the last among the proud
in heart that are sent empty away.”

The old man closed the small gate, and
walked slowly to the cottage. The young
men, silent and grave, went their way.







CHAPTER IV.
A SAD ACCIDENT.

SPHAT can be the matter?” said
the squire, who was ae at
the window of the dining-room.
“There is Frank rushing up the
garden path, evidently anxious
Bout something.”

Alice quiclly left her seat, and toned
her father at the window. “He is quite
pale,” she said, hastening to meet her
brother.

But Frank was already in the room.
“An accident, father, in the village! I
have run up to fetch a horse, for I must go
over to Coniston to fetch the doctor.”

“Who is hurt, Frank?” anxiously in-
quired Alice.

(402) 5






66 A SAD ACCIDENT.

Frank hesitated. He knew that he
should distress his sister by telling her that
it was old Robin who had met with a
serious accident.

Alice guessed his thoughts. “O Frank!”
she exclaimed, “not Robin, I hope.”

“ Don’t be alarmed, Alice; it may not be
bad after all, though I am sorry to say it is
old Robin. He has been thrown down by
a runaway horse and carriage.”

“ How did it happen, Frank?” said his
father.

“T was coming home,” Frank replied,
“across the Carr Lea, and just as I was
clearing the stile into the road, I heard the
sound of a carriage going too fast to be all
right. So I hastened on into the village,
and there, at the corner of the school-house,
I saw a group of people, and knew directly
that there was some accident. To my
horror, I saw it was old Robin; they were
just preparing to carry him to his cottage.
I did not stay to ask any questions, for I
knew that the best thing I could do was to
run and fetch the doctor.”

“That's right, my boy,” said the squire ;



A SAD ACCIDENT. 67

“and take the gig, that the doctor may come
back with you.”

“Well, father, I thought of that, and told
George to be quick and bring it round. I met
him, happily, as I cameinto the carriage road.”

“ Here it is, Frank ; make haste. If Mr.
Forman is not at home,” said the squire,
speaking through the .open window, “drive
on to Barton Chase, and bring Dr. Gordon.
He is a man,” he added, turning to his wife,
“who is always ready for a kind action.
Poor old Robin! He shall have all the
care that we can give. Cheer up, Aly!”
said the kind-hearted squire, who saw the
tears in his daughter’s eyes. ‘“ We must
hope for the best. Your old favourite has
fine health in his favour.”

“And a quiet mind,” said her mother.
“That will do more for him than all the
help that any one can give.”

“That is true,” said Captain Davenne ;
“it was only the other day that Dr. King
was saying that, in a medical point of view,
doctors knew full well the value of true re-
ligion, there being twice the chance for the
body when the mind is at peace.”



68 A SAD ACCIDENT.

“May I go to him, mother?” asked Alice.
“T could stay with him till the doctor arrives.”

“Tt would be better to wait a little, my
child, for old Robin ought surely to be kept
very quiet. He is so fond of you, that your
coming would be sure to excite him. I will
send nurse Luff to him directly; he could
not be in better hands.”

“Yes, Alice,” said the squire, “your
mother is right. The kindest thing to
Robin is to leave him quiet just now.
Wait an hour or two, and then go; and
take some grapes with you, that the old
man may have them during the night.”

Very soon after this, Alice, accompanied
by her uncle, stood at the door of old
Robin’s cottage.

“You had better go in alone, Alice,” said
Captain Davenne ; “he may not care to see
a stranger. I will wait for you on the
green, under the old tree. Do not forget
the grapes,” he added, for Alice in her
anxiety had left the basket in his hand.

Alice opened the door gently and entered
the cottage. There was no one in the little
kitchen. There was no sound but the tick



A SAD ACCIDENT. 69

of the old clock in the corner. The well-
worn Bible was on a table close to the win-
dow, and the old man’s spectacles lay upon
it. As Alice looked upon them, she said
within herself, “ Happy old man! though
your outward eye may no longer rest upon
this blessed book, you have a better portion,

AI Ih "



THE FAVOURITE SEAT.

for the eyes of your soul have been opened
whereby you can see God.”

The slight movement made by Alice’s
entrance was heard by the nurse, who came
down directly.

“ How is he now, nurse?” asked Alice.

“ He is suffering very badly, ma’am. The



70 A SAD ACCIDENT.

doctor says that it is impossible to set the
leg at present. He said he would call again
soon. It makes my heart ache to see the
good old man in pain. He is so patient
too,” she added.

“Dear old Robin!” sighed Alice.

“You will go up, won’t you, ma'am? he
has been talking of you, and wanting to see
you. Young Alan is with him. The lad
seems very fond of him; he has not left
him since the accident.”

“Do you know how it happened, nurse?”

“They say that the old man was hurt
in saving a little child in the wood from
a runaway horse. The carriage knocked
him down, and though the wheel did not
go over him, his leg was broken by the
fall.”

“It was just like him,” said Alice, “al-
ways doing good, and never sparing him-
self. But now, nurse, I will go up, for our
talking here may disturb him.”

The bed on which the old man lay was
close to the window, which was open, to
admit the soft evening air, which gently
stirred the thin gray hair that lay upon the



A SAD ACCIDENT. 71

pillow. The old man’s eyes were closed,
and Alice was grieved to notice the expres-
sion of pain that was perceptible on his face.
Alan was standing at the side of the bed,
when the lady entered. He moved away,
to allow her to take his place.

“ He is so thirsty, ma’am ; I am going to
fetch him some more water.” .

Old Robin opened his eyes, hearing these
words. He recognized Alice, and smiled.
It was a smile bright and fleeting as an
October ray. He tried to speak, but the
effort failed.

“ Here are some grapes for you, old
Robin,” said Alice,—‘‘some of papa’s early
grapes. They will assuage your thirst
better than water.”

The old man’s lips moved again. There
was a sudden expression upon his aged fea-
tures that told of a holy thought within, as
the radiant edges of an evening cloud bear
witness to the sun behind. Alice bent her
ear to the feeble voice.

“Shall the disciple be above his master?”
whispered the old man; “when uz thirsted,
they gave HIM vinegar to drink.”



72 A SAD ACCIDENT.





A KINDLY VISIT.

The sudden tears overflowed A lice’s eyes at
this proof of Christian constancy. Pain and
trial had but deepened the channel in which
- the love of the aged disciple was flowing to-
wards his crucified Lord and Saviour. The
sacred flame was burning all the brighter for
the darkened setting of the troubled hour.

Robin perceived the tears on Alice’s
cheek, and thought that she was pained to
witness his suffering.

“ Do not weep, lady,” he said; “it is well.”



A SAD ACCIDENT. — 73

“‘T know it is, dear Robin,” she said, try-
ing to smile through her tears. ‘“'The God
whom you serve constantly is able to de-
liver you from all mistrust of his love, or
impatience in your sufferings.”

“He is able,” murmured the old man,
“and he is willing.”

He closed his eyes again, while an ex-
pression of pain passed over his features.
The nurse entered the room and whispered
to Alice that the doctor had returned. As
Alice moved from her chair, the old man
put out his hand, which she took into hers,
while she stooped down to say farewell.
The feeble voice spoke again,—

“Will you say those verses you wrote in
my Bible?”

““T will,” Alice replied ; and bending over
him, she repeated, in a soft voice, the fol-
lowing words,—

“One there is above all others ;
Oh, how He loves!
His is love beyond a brother’s ;
Oh, how He loves!

“*Harthly friends may pain and grieve thee,
One day kind, the next day leave thee,
But this Friend will ne’er deceive thee ;
Oh, how He loves!”



74 A SAD ACCIDENT.

“Thank you, ma’am,” said the old man.
Alice pressed the offered hand, and gently
moving, left the room.

Ata late hour that night, Alan was stand- °
ing alone in the little garden of Robin’s cot-
tage. His affection for the old man was,
like every other part of his ardent nature,
strong and real. He had sought and ob-
tained leave to remain during the first night
of watching, and now he stood for a few
minutes in the garden before entering the
cottage. His earnest eyes were intent upon
the midnight sky. It was a lovely summer
firmament, and those bright, watching eyes
above seemed to find a response in the
solemn and radiant thoughts that filled
Alan’s young heart. “Nothing that de-
fileth,” seemed written in letters of living
light upon that glorious heaven. Then,
for the first time he seemed to realize the
full value of that faith which he now saw
was mightiest in a Christian in the hour of
trial. “ When trouble comes to you, Will
Davis,” he said, speaking his thoughts aloud,
“or to me, what shall we have to lean upon?”
He looked up at the still open casement,



A SAD ACCIDENT. 75

from whence not a sound of murmur dis-
turbed the quiet air, and the words which
the old man had spoken on that very spot,
the night before, now returned to his memory
with a force and vividness that seemed like
the waking to a new life. From out of that
earnest speech of Robin’s, three words stood
now before him in characters of fire—‘‘Begin
to pray.” There was one short form of
prayer that instantly came into his mind,
simple enough for a child, but all-sufficient
for eternity. “G'od be merciful to me a
sinner!” He breathed the words slowly,
but with the mighty energy of a new-born
faith. The soft night wind alone made re-
sponse to the sounds. But shall any man
say they were unheard in heaven? Blessed
be God, not while there is One above who,
while he “telleth the number of the stars,
gathereth together the outcast, and healeth
the broken in heart.”







CHAPTER V.

PAIN AND TRIAL.



j H REE months had passed away since
* the day of old Robin’s accident. The
summer-time was gone, but not the
summer brightness, for that seemed
to linger long and lovingly around
the autumn hours, giving a pledge and an
earnest of returning sunshine, which the old
year cherished in faith and hope that—

‘What the past hath given, the future gives as well.”

The old man was still in his room. The
doctor’s fears had been realized. As it
sometimes happens in old age, the broken
limb would not unite. There was no help
for it, old Robin would be bed-ridden for
the rest of his earthly pilgrimage. The
doctor was a kind-hearted man. He felt



PAIN AND TRIAL. 77

grieved at the old man’s prospect of help-
lessness, and expressed the greatest concern
for him. He dreaded to destroy the last
hope which Robin was one day expressing
of being able, after a time, to walk to the
favourite old oak. Great was his surprise,
however, to witness the old man’s composure
when the truth was told him. The child-
like trust which he had witnessed in Robin
during the whole course of his illness had
made a great impression on him. Dr. Gordon
was a man that feared God, and placed his
trust in a Saviour’s atoning blood ; but, from
some deficiency of early instruction, he failed
to take the full comfort that flows from an
unreserved belief in God’s fatherly love. In
his own frank and truthful manner he con-
fessed this to the old man. <“ How is it,” he
said, ‘that there is so much difference be-
tween us? I don’t believe there is any fear
in your love, while, at times, I ask myself,
Is there any love in my fear? How is it,
Robin #—don’t be afraid to preach tome. I
am sure you can teach me a great many
* things.” :

Old Robin shook his head. “There is



78 PAIN AND TRIAL.

only one Teacher, sir, and his lessons are
given for the asking.”

“That is true, Robin, but you know that
it is his will that we should be ministers of
his grace to each other. And I want you
to give me the secret of that wonderful rest
which your mind seems always to possess,
even in the midst of bodily pain. You
never seem troubled, either, by mental per-
plexities ; and oh, Robin, there are so many
of these in this weary world!”

“Sir,” said the old man, looking up with
his own meek smile into the manly and in-
genuous face of the speaker, ‘ I humbly
trust that it is the presence of the Spirit
of Christ within me, enabling me to say,
Abba, Father !”

There was a short silence ; then Dr. Gor-
don said: “The fact is, I believe that I be-
gin at the wrong end. I am always fearing
lest my repentance be not sufficient to make
God my Father, whereas you start on the
belief of his being your Father already.
That is the difference, and a very great dif-
ference it is. Your faith is hard to attain,

Robin.”



PAIN AND TRIAL. 79

“With men impossible, dear sir, for faith
is the gift of God. But oh,” the old man
continued in his earnest way, “it is only our
pride that makes it difficult! If we were
emptied of self, we should cease to wonder
at God’s way of saving us. He is too great
a God to allow a sinner any part in his work
of pardon. Do you know, sir, that Mr.
Arnot, our clergyman, was explaining this
subject to me only yesterday! He said he
believed that one reason why so many Chris-
tians began at the wrong end is, because the
ministers of God’s Word do not speak suf-
ficiently of the love of God the Father. He
said, if we read the Gospels attentively, and
especially the Gospel of St. John, we should
see how differently the Lord Jesus taught.
Do you remember, sir, the very first words
spoken by our Lord concerning his work ?
He called it his ‘ Father’s business.’”

“T never noticed that,” said Dr. Gordon ;
“they are very significant words.”

The old man continued: “It’s a blessed
truth that Jesus came to reveal the Father.
We may believe that Christ is the Way, but
it will be only half the truth if we do not



80 PAIN AND TRIAL. .

believe that he is the Way to the Father.
Ah, sir, this is the only sure road to that
repentance which is precious in the sight of
God !”

Dr. Gordon did not reply, but the words
of the old man brought with them a resist-
less conviction of their truth. “TI believe
you are right, Robin,” he said at length,
“you are right. After all, the prodigal son
did not truly repent till he remembered his
father’s love, and believed in its continuance.:
And I rather think you are right, too, when
you say that it is pride that sets us blunder-
ing at the wrong end. We think of our
feeble love to God, instead of God’s great
love in Christ tous. We look at the broken
reflection in the water, instead of at the stead-
fast sun in the heavens. By the way,” added
the doctor, as he rose to go, “talking of
pride puts me in mind of what I was going
to forget. Your friend, Miss Davenne, has
told me of a certain proverb of yours, about
which you had promised the boys a tale on
that very day of your accident, my poor
fellow. She wants me to consent to your
beig carried to the favourite oak-tree, one



PAIN AND TRIAL. 81

afternoon this week, while this fine weather
lasts. You see, she told me what the proverb
was, and how you interpreted it. Poor
Robin,” the kind doctor concluded, “you
httle thought that so much real ‘water-
porridge’ was in store for you.”

“Tt is all right, sir,” was the cheerful
reply of the old man; “a little spare diet is
necessary for us all at times, and it is whole-
some, too,” he added, smiling, “for sweet
sleep comes with it.”

“You are fond of parables, Robin.”

“Yes, sir; they are God’s way of teaching
his dull children.”

“Well, good-bye, Robin ; I suppose that -
the ‘spare diet’ means the lowly mind.”

“Yes, sir, it does, for so God giveth his
beloved sleep.”

a

(402)





CHAPTER VI.

LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT.




gy been carefully: placed on a mattress
under the oak-tree, and around him
was the same group which had
listened to his words on the evening before
his accident, with the exception of one person
—Captain Davenne—who was now absent
from the Hall.

“ Are you quite comfortable, Robin ?” in-
quired Alice ; “that is the first thing.”

“Quite, thank you, dear lady.”

“Then you must please begin,” she said,
“for some of these young listeners have only
half an hour before they return to school.”

So the old man began :—



LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT. 83

IAN

fi
Wp
i



2 UNDER THE OAK-TREE.

“It was my mother who taught me the
lesson of contentment. Bay as I was, I
could see that my father did not find the



84 LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT.

lesson easy. He was a kind father to me
and my brother (I had but one); and he
was a good husband, and loved his home.
But he was always fretting himself about
the money, and wishing that he might have
more of it, that he might do as other people
did who were more prosperous than he was.
My mother had a wonderful way of cheer-
ing him, and of bringing back a feeling of
contentment into his heart. And, bad as
times might be, she never seemed to lose
her faith in a Father in heaven. ‘The
winter I remember best was a severe one.
There was a great deal of illness in our
village, and work was very scarce. My
father used to look so grave and gloomy.
When we came from school we often found
him sitting at the table with his head buried
in his hands. One day I had got a book of
pictures, and was turning over the pages in
front of the kitchen-fire. My father was
seated in the chimney-corner, silent and
moody. My mother was clearing away from
the table the remains of our supper of bread
and potatoes, for we did not taste much
meat that winter. At last my father looked



LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT. 85

up and said, ‘It is very hard, Mary, to see
that fellow Dick’ (he was my father’s brother)
‘living like a prince, while we have nothing
but bread.’ My mother had the loaf in her
hands that minute. She stopped, and said,
‘Nothing but bread, dear husband! why,
bread is every thing. Instead of grumbling
because we have no meat, let us say, “Thank
God, who giveth bread to strengthen man’s
heart.”’—‘ That is all quite right, I know,
Mary ; but when I looked in just now at
Dick’s cottage, and saw his-little ones feast-
ing on a hot supper, while mine had only
bread and potatoes, I could hardly bear it.’
Ah,” said old Robin, shaking his head,
“how soon are evil seeds dropped into the
young mind by wrong words! I know that
while my father spoke I felt many foolish
and sinful thoughts rise in my heart. But
they were checked by the gentle voice of
my mother. She had come near my father,
and had placed her hand upon his shoulder.
She looked like his good angel. ‘Joseph,’
she said, ‘why did you go to Dick’s cottage
to-night? You promised me not to go
along with him. You know that he will



86 LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT.

only bring you into harm, for he fears not
God or man. As to his hot suppers, they
bode no good, Joseph. You know that
they will be his ruin some day. Husband,
husband, be content; the blessing of God is
better than all the feasting and all the riches
of this world.’ My father was silent a few
minutes ; while we were wondering in our
minds what my mother meant when she
said that my uncle’s hot suppers would be
his ruin. But we soon found that out, as
youshallhear. ‘ Well, Mary,’ said my father
at last, ‘you are right ; but times are really
so bad just now, I don’t see where the work
is to come from.’—‘ That is what an infidel
would say,’ my mother replied; ‘a man who
does not believe there is a God in heaven.
But you, Joseph—you who teach your little
ones to say, “Our Father which art in
heaven,”—youw should not speak so.’—‘ I
wish I was like you, Mary,’ said my father.
‘You are always contented and hopeful.
But, indeed, it is a bad winter for us all.
The work has stopped at the Hall on account
of the frost, and where I am to get a job I
don’t know. I would give something, wife,



LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT. 87

to be as quiet as you are, and believe that
it will be all right in the end. How do you
manage it?’ I remember my mother’s
beautiful smile as she made answer: ‘I ask
God, for Christ’s sake, to give me the same
trust in his love as my children have in my
love. Why don’t you do the same, Joseph?
You see that God answers my prayer ; why
should he not answer yours? Don’t you
think that the Lord Jesus meant what he
said: ‘ Whatsoever ye shall ask the Father
in my name he will do it?”’ He was
silent; but we could see that his face was
getting brighter, and that the dark cloud
was almost gone. ‘Now, Joe,’ said my
mother, ‘ will you let me read you something
which I am never tired of reading myself?’
She rose, and going to a chest of drawers,
took out a small book. She brought her
chair close to my father, and sat down to
read. There were many passages in that
book which I could see she had marked
with. a pencil line. It might be, perhaps,
in some trying hour, when things seemed to
go against her, and she needed strength and
comfort from above.”



88 LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT.

“Ah!” interrupted Alice, “that was the
book you were speaking to me about the
other day,—‘ Hymns of Faith and Hope.’”

“Yes, lady; and there was a charm in
those verses which, boy as I was, fastened
itself upon me. So much go, that, in after-



CONVERTED.

years, when I left home, I begged my
mother to give me the book. Many is the
time that I have read it since then, and
fancied that I still heard my mother’s voice
as she sat reading to my father on that even-

?

ing.



LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT. 89

“And what did your father say to it,
Robin ?” asked Alice; “do you remember?”

“Yes, ma’am, I recollect everything that
happened that evening as clear as if it was
yesterday. ‘Well, wife, he said, as my
mother closed the book, ‘you must ask God
to forgive me for doubting his love and pro-
vidence. And you, my lad,’ for I had left
my picture-book and was standing at my
mother’s knee, ‘mind you always listen to
what your mother teaches you, and be always
content and thankful.’ My mother then
rose to take us to bed. I see her standing
there, with the candle in her hand. ‘After
all, Joseph,’ she said, ‘we get one good thing
which people who have hot suppers are
obliged to do without.’ ‘What’s that, my
lass?’ said my father. ‘Why, sleep; sweet,
sound sleep,’ she replied, with that bright
smile of hers which always made me think
of the sun coming into a room; ‘depend
upon it, husband, the proverb is true :—

“The sweetest sleep is the sleep on water-porridge.”’

And now,” old Robin went on, “I am
coming to the end of my story. Something



90 LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT.

happened about a month after, which com-
pletely cured my father of his grumbling.
‘We never afterwards heard a sound of mur-
mur from his lips. You know, boys, I told
you we wondered what my mother meant
when she said that my uncle’s hot suppers
would be his ruin. It soon became clear to
us. I shall never forget that night. It was
a stormy night, dark, with wind and rain.
My brother and I were with our mother in
the kitchen, the door of which was open, so
that by-and-by, when the house-door opened,
we could see my father talking to some one
outside. We soon recognized my uncle’s
voice. We heard him say, ‘Come, Joe,
don’t be stupid. Say you'll come with me.’
How anxious our mother looked all the
while they remained talking! Presently
the door was closed again, and my father
came into the kitchen. ‘Mary,’ he said,
‘that fellow Dick is at me again. He will
have me go with him to-night.’ ‘Nay,
Joseph, she said, ‘you will not, surely.’
‘Well, Mary, I have, as they say, half a
mind to go. He says he will show me
something by which I can benefit myself



LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT. 91

and family. He kept taunting me with the
hard fare which my children had—so differ-
ent from his own way of living; and I could
not stand it.’ My mother was silent, but a
tear was slowly stealing down her cheek.
‘Come, wife, don’t take on,’ said my father
kindly. He never liked to see her cry; she
cried so seldom. ‘If I did go this once, I
would promise you never to go again.’ ‘ But
it is just this once that may ruin you, dear
Joe. It cannot be right to go with Dick,
for you know he has no fear of God; and
the Bible says, if sinners entice us, we are
not to hearken or consent. O Joseph! do
not disobey the Word of God. It is better
to starve than to grieve him who gave his
blood to save us from sin.’ My mother did
not say any more. She never talked on (as
some wives do) at her husband. Her words
were always few, but they were strong
though gentle, I can see now that this
was the secret of her influence over my
father. Well, about half an hour after,
there was a knock outside. My father went
to the door. We heard him say, ‘I am not
going with you, Dick.’ My uncle made



92 LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT.

some angry reply; we could catch the words
‘silly wife,’ ‘stupid fellow,’ and then he was
gone. My father was silent and grave the
rest of the evening, and then we all went to
bed. I remember it was a long time before













TEMPTATION,

I could get to sleep. The rain was driving
heavily against the windows, and the wind
was moaning round the house. About two
o’clock in the morning, a sudden noise roused
my brother and myself. It seemed to come



LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT. 93

from the outside door. We lay quiet, ex-
pecting to hear it again. It was repeated
two or three times. ‘ Let us wake father,’
said my brother. ‘No,’ said I; ‘let us wait.
Indeed he is awake already; don’t you hear
the window opening in his room? What
can be the matter?’ We stood at the door,
shaking in the cold, straining our ears to
catch the words that my father was speaking
to some one outside. The wind lulled at
this moment. ‘It is Aunt Bessy’s voice,’
we both exclaimed. Then we heard my
father go down-stairs, and my mother follow-
ing. Unable any longer to resist the desire
to know what was going on, we opened our
door very gently, and stole out upon the
landing. ‘ What is it, Bess?’ we heard my
father say, as he let my aunt in. A burst
of loud weeping was the only reply. ‘Has
anything happened to Dick?’ my father
asked in a hurried voice. ‘He is killed!
he is killed!’ shrieked my aunt. Oh, what
a cry of agony that was! I shall never
forget it. We trembled as we heard it.
‘Dick killed!’ said my father in a hoarse
voice ; ‘God forbid! where is he? let me go



94 LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT.

to him. But do tell us what has happened.’
We could not hear distinctly what my aunt
said, her grief was so excessive; but we
heard enough to frighten us in the few words
we caught—‘ guns,’ ‘gamekeepers,’ ‘ Bury
jail,’ and ‘ murder.’ Half dead with cold
and terror, we crept back to our beds. What
a night it was too! The rain was lashing
against the casement, and the wind seemed
to echo the wail of the broken-hearted
woman. We whispered to each other, won-
dering whether our mother would come to
us. She did come. After half an hour,
when the house was hushed again, and all
was still below, we heard her step on the
stairs. We called to her, and she came into.
our room, and sat down on a chair between
our beds. At that moment, the moon shone
out from behind the driving clouds, and we
could see how anxious my mother’s face was.
‘Mother,’ I asked, ‘what is poaching ; is it
murder?’ My mother answered, laying her
hand on my shoulder, ‘ It is self-murder, my
child ; for it sometimes costs a man his life
in this world, and, alas! in the next world
too. Do you remember,’ she went on, seeing



Full Text


xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20100201_AAAAAX' PACKAGE 'UF00026991_00001' INGEST_TIME '2010-02-01T14:32:14-05:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T18:12:07-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 300396; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-10T14:23:08-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '27' DFID 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfile0' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00130.txt'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 8d3e9ad73e4100752b5d7f537d1d3576
'SHA-1' 49389213beb327293d9177037d1a8306e435ca79
EVENT '2012-06-03T03:32:25-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2012-06-03T03:28:14-04:00'
redup
'3' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfile1' 'sip-files00131.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2012-06-03T03:31:32-04:00'
describe
'2012-06-03T03:28:16-04:00'
redup
'493133' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOUS' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
cff8bbab1a2d23e41738fb7d352d298a
d61614b6611a056418f693409aeb39c35a76ceda
'2012-06-03T03:29:26-04:00'
describe
'472356' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOUT' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
363658c62a83f7e54784ed9b955d4162
943a7608194d3d9f15ecd82ef927dab1fb6033ab
'2012-06-03T03:31:04-04:00'
describe
'220' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOUU' 'sip-files00001.pro'
1963b825f3ab3ad7a7c81b4b9377119e
797dea3e7e51dee9a46d3494e01f1193125e2010
'2012-06-03T03:29:58-04:00'
describe
'6119' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOUV' 'sip-files00089.pro'
a14dd2fbfcfd695ce218eb8189d02739
c6aebc7cf9fc4834d0079b0ebb8ef59da86f221f
'2012-06-03T03:29:10-04:00'
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOUW' 'sip-files00077.txt'
2028cfb77818e406452c841214b77de9
03a9714db693a23af1d573a2102dfb1d9c9babfd
'2012-06-03T03:29:29-04:00'
describe
'266' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOUX' 'sip-files00089.txt'
705b5956e415c5d6f4c2f3f978ac5a58
35b1c2b4559285761a6251770f98679a07eed23b
'2012-06-03T03:31:41-04:00'
describe
'167554' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOUY' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
c438e9a729b77f6c6cc0e37e9a2190e0
b1c6887ae573b007a95f199fe43b9fa4115c9229
'2012-06-03T03:28:27-04:00'
describe
'1971716' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOUZ' 'sip-files00004.tif'
42e10dd175f43d85a69314ea7b465837
7019788892cc095aae8ae31210219d2d8a50acbf
'2012-06-03T03:28:37-04:00'
describe
'49330' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVA' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
d2004c21ff67e3cd8d7fc18d2233e176
6625ddd5fb1a97f8794e33e7751a72700df426d2
'2012-06-03T03:29:43-04:00'
describe
'500182' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVB' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
fe66caf5ee617a4af95ccdef7f1e5ffd
f057de3456af3feba3f6e4e93a1e9ec32252b706
'2012-06-03T03:30:55-04:00'
describe
'247979' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVC' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
5c849ee95de3929e14167aabfbd3403e
7d402576fbe74c2f7e5f4185a7baaa200ea56d61
'2012-06-03T03:33:21-04:00'
describe
'57233' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVD' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
17c2f018dd618837e69b1b105bc46dd0
d49fe9d7686774c42fe311ca5dfd92dae4fee677
'2012-06-03T03:30:54-04:00'
describe
'27790' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVE' 'sip-files00034.pro'
8191582beb5eb6afc5b74bcb0b082d7e
7e552d16df4ce671f167efb2120e45469e742f5b
'2012-06-03T03:28:23-04:00'
describe
'1952316' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVF' 'sip-files00093.tif'
d5ebd633d60225c7a8f75704c89ad349
88ec6e718fb7486cf02dad9b6c22f765c0ba08b9
'2012-06-03T03:31:14-04:00'
describe
'55325' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVG' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
7b94bb262b5f556ba5d1aac697c458a6
bce53b618d69110ee14220659e1d3b045e1eea16
'2012-06-03T03:31:15-04:00'
describe
'16396' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVH' 'sip-files00088.pro'
cd7283f1c073c977b1add8d80ff4252f
063ca634c6175d69578206b71c5f2423bec50618
'2012-06-03T03:33:19-04:00'
describe
'1960064' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVI' 'sip-files00042.tif'
5fcf01f6e0f21c1504ad4d301f367b79
86318a6482228ff0f4c4e7f1bc82d3386ab351f5
'2012-06-03T03:32:23-04:00'
describe
'1882944' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVJ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
8bed2e1e73febd5b645dee83db057402
c2f10721db720f71d16fa9db5947de687423b802
'2012-06-03T03:28:57-04:00'
describe
'125915' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVK' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
23f0916201e37142a2b46e9e63537eed
e93ef5387972cb41b161ffb9ce6791ca6863092c
'2012-06-03T03:30:40-04:00'
describe
'176714' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVL' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
15a99f944d5d5d36274a5bf92749b310
7ed370c601c8d647e5db336d3346e4d2e2ccbc18
'2012-06-03T03:30:10-04:00'
describe
'1986192' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVM' 'sip-files00039.tif'
86b173074c6e0d84d592f1bd1414dfae
726293c92fbfbd8cafd853fbf607c84b5282b630
'2012-06-03T03:31:06-04:00'
describe
'2032248' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVN' 'sip-files00118.tif'
38a495824d470104a19c48c3931db54d
e3b314057c73e1e5f8379a012424295c521fc0fc
'2012-06-03T03:29:40-04:00'
describe
'2122108' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVO' 'sip-files00109.tif'
a6109431198a0f4edcbffb7fae1545d7
aaf67fb1d737deeb99cc530d0cfe7c6eabd96173
'2012-06-03T03:30:19-04:00'
describe
'2' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVP' 'sip-files00008.txt'
a55822426a5330c04625a41d264c190b
8f27084b6294ddbe28dbcbf98f798730e8a79289
'2012-06-03T03:33:10-04:00'
describe
'27410' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVQ' 'sip-files00116.pro'
5f3788e0648ecc7cd98ab7adc775df52
33a6f8be39e65362a04d34031644fb2945eb539f
'2012-06-03T03:32:07-04:00'
describe
'486286' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVR' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
fa1bc6ca726d0048b4bd537005f236b3
baf65df4094335e17b7f35bfcb437da154ab51e9
'2012-06-03T03:31:28-04:00'
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVS' 'sip-files00025.txt'
56bbb31a3a8fc660049abc04bf85d654
f2f41d2e8284a6aaedce0006e34fab5532314eb5
'2012-06-03T03:29:41-04:00'
describe
'173793' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVT' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
6dd08ae6fbc607820671e4d097891c80
c97069cff3a4bca4ce12005460fd906dc60eb371
'2012-06-03T03:30:45-04:00'
describe
'243168' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVU' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
c1d6fcda214a5d5aca935dfb20f9718d
f7e4c66e0b7cbf9b352b972d5ecfbdc20574b3f4
describe
'439627' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVV' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
d39e8d0b56ee39ed639341a5fa68cc2c
c40530c9f198b4fd787b908cec4912ff4ab4b1be
'2012-06-03T03:30:58-04:00'
describe
'478577' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVW' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
9e3687d661393399c0440b8ebdc7b04d
b76c219a012e0a7045a6eb3c4f031d73e253d22a
'2012-06-03T03:31:07-04:00'
describe
'1965028' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVX' 'sip-files00103.tif'
1a93f182625a7c3f9f2146e5ae29f14b
1b149a0c889f93ae4fdd86c720531861194cc42b
'2012-06-03T03:30:57-04:00'
describe
'1963824' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVY' 'sip-files00088.tif'
4839e94dead462fe625959ab5b39e0d3
d7d692277b5f693dc389ce9b5e14578cccddbcae
describe
'486192' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOVZ' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
7e2e24fdceab88ee863b6354f0c4b51b
78b9d5f3480c28d08aca0420727b3b7319a60423
'2012-06-03T03:31:33-04:00'
describe
'22493' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWA' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
1242fadf4a33989c7eb38f30d316f0bd
79347bedd27209df88fa3a95f1a39c55be361863
'2012-06-03T03:29:38-04:00'
describe
'19032' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWB' 'sip-files00108.pro'
6048051b2c87e32ac528226eb48d2a65
e61b0810174539ca4e6f5d2333904f09a9a766e5
describe
'24445' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWC' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
be5ab8916f832311211c4a5fdf71ce91
73e83ce4be0a73f3fbf985a31118db2b284c74ed
'2012-06-03T03:32:55-04:00'
describe
'27752' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWD' 'sip-files00040.pro'
0bbae67c7a6957c48ad58edacade0759
22168a6be71ef1c7d2b1da690665889e00138513
'2012-06-03T03:30:37-04:00'
describe
'12189' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWE' 'sip-files00111.pro'
d587f0ab7f98fdc39a39b412882dd3bd
5bcb8332da1fe9bab80872df808edd05cf845440
'2012-06-03T03:29:59-04:00'
describe
'245559' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWF' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
9aeecb833d1d79589526a326ba620410
98ac247b5e48725f0b73d10257b6a9632f831fa7
'2012-06-03T03:30:06-04:00'
describe
'56467' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWG' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
84d3152bd362592a8a552947d21b11ef
fae32f7a1703ccd960330dc98f73dbaf106b20e6
describe
'53466' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWH' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
36e57ae22b9aebaa6c4a5ad01defc9fc
509cba8e9524d6aa2460bb71b8240e63be6100c4
'2012-06-03T03:30:32-04:00'
describe
'153349' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWI' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
48a6ffa8f5ea54b4e3afecff2b24298a
caeb1474cd26a081821320f898901a0adacb3f0f
'2012-06-03T03:31:44-04:00'
describe
'235413' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWJ' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
0c9979a5732336e9f8b8235c1477e923
5f636cb2815832b1751b262fd8f52768a1cb3498
'2012-06-03T03:33:52-04:00'
describe
'498985' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWK' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
deb912381b0ad6964afa93a935baa35b
b8e1d34ea3cf99bd3b27cabe70f0fb1ee47b0b5c
'2012-06-03T03:28:34-04:00'
describe
'24672' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWL' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
dc02b80d2a92765bd32c98d4af16dc5d
06ea4dc442b88f32d2ccdaab7fbabbc72af4177f
'2012-06-03T03:29:35-04:00'
describe
'473945' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWM' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
b995ab027d0951188171e498e071f2aa
6e9ccee639823a0aa2753c547064e1574c64cc40
'2012-06-03T03:30:41-04:00'
describe
'55129' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWN' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
6060bc24a64b6b9a096b648035ddcb93
f4887c836e2c027e12d55ce77c8ba3e55529b59e
'2012-06-03T03:31:43-04:00'
describe
'258478' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWO' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
043817a5ef89b7d78acb2d89e7758b3f
57c4fcd0789621e4e991e75238e2e2b497cd737c
describe
'39541' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWP' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
8ad4d5104ddd49d3d1766ed099e1459d
823d406cbe618b31117237c5c074d3690519408f
describe
'256549' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWQ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
0cba8cb841ce6772d7c3f5fc86db331f
89d2eb0abc20a72584b089a02ac0b4c3ea800d15
describe
'18393' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWR' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
5007f12c1925916bc4530674b0649261
4232c2227f9baa4cb209a239875c43abe8eaaac5
'2012-06-03T03:30:35-04:00'
describe
'54887' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWS' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
3709e393b43a51ea0e480a67780817e8
d9fff1561b34bb4e5bc66c3d1400dcef8bb20eb1
'2012-06-03T03:33:54-04:00'
describe
'242388' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWT' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
787c660aa30db5f9a2e282ed6ba92e13
37242f289568c808f981510a50dceb4ef8da23dc
describe
'12487' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWU' 'sip-files00058.pro'
9756c135d22cc189e7fff0f1d88f9027
43615490d79f1e2ad2717efcba5850989e023678
'2012-06-03T03:33:50-04:00'
describe
'258431' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWV' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
7196e8bb27f35b0851a2a704c219aa1c
788f9cc49663c62247676ff224246463e035fa97
'2012-06-03T03:32:46-04:00'
describe
'489648' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWW' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
acd9960a61ef55c5c3a4f149d2e35d51
49bf09e25f4d4ac24c607ba1254829e4e50f0998
'2012-06-03T03:31:23-04:00'
describe
'491387' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWX' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
2d6a30347e65fd392bd85ee9471147a0
006fc281f0daed5924ca07d596b259c8dfdecbdb
'2012-06-03T03:32:09-04:00'
describe
'365650' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWY' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
72daeabc2d5de39065e33c1eabb69423
88a73132a2879d7ad03cb2114d56cb247275d164
'2012-06-03T03:32:44-04:00'
describe
'54636' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOWZ' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
83dda7eff98f678c7dfab4a17aafc9f8
6d1dcfecff794b0e7cf110c54f3a22d03ef627a2
'2012-06-03T03:31:38-04:00'
describe
'250689' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXA' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
b2e97e4be65ac230eac7aff7fc8788c9
9df335a1f42a45a8e22c5d1a96edfdebe4e7e99a
'2012-06-03T03:33:12-04:00'
describe
'1149' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXB' 'sip-files00097.txt'
aa9718619d2994a8a2ae64c957bfa8d0
b4ff2a096272f90132d1dcdd9285bc03dd6fc412
'2012-06-03T03:29:07-04:00'
describe
'54559' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXC' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
86b9b73d315fe4abc60e68213d193aec
d8c57db53c23da10ba77ffffc4e839d710c66807
'2012-06-03T03:29:27-04:00'
describe
'258375' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXD' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
bc10b3ae6d5bc01508c902da5d1a75fd
663362384c9beab60d48964f465c7324de35ffe5
'2012-06-03T03:33:36-04:00'
describe
'462231' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXE' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
14b8557015ca6fce4f01bfedd9715e74
09ecb57a4f45be69bac29db254a5c535da21dd5c
'2012-06-03T03:28:40-04:00'
describe
'2109832' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXF' 'sip-files00064.tif'
aff7bdfae57e9632d9e201271bd027f6
0da4c5f8d889d9dda7939c59c4b936385e4e50ca
'2012-06-03T03:29:46-04:00'
describe
'52534' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXG' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
81c033d2880090e356e7e106111d4347
aca3f4b3b14b86646c83bd7364d142d3b75b66e8
'2012-06-03T03:30:18-04:00'
describe
'29048' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXH' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
233d7fead029fec652a738b5d2319b8d
f020d7735b22cdd4ba4ee1b46ab218793bd0f713
'2012-06-03T03:30:03-04:00'
describe
'171799' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXI' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
edca58e7e0cfd172a39ffdfd2bd97c70
4d76df1aa8a38e50bb619c177349e6d4a04919af
'2012-06-03T03:32:01-04:00'
describe
'26944' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXJ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
59532ae3060b6e9e6b3d2140316beb06
03d34a559036115095608ae4cd9795b2b616bc7e
'2012-06-03T03:28:43-04:00'
describe
'1906124' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXK' 'sip-files00026.tif'
baff28c495466b55d80b8e1194aaa009
4d690b74783d4ab25b2c566a10b016190c570e2e
'2012-06-03T03:32:15-04:00'
describe
'471' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXL' 'sip-files00018.txt'
52cde62031c4bd178ec03fcad04db6f5
05ce51c9f5585f5d3fd18340c5c2b222f00dc75f
'2012-06-03T03:30:00-04:00'
describe
'15097' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXM' 'sip-files00075.pro'
d5c24c5cb5d7f59830c730aaaef99bc8
f529696563552bf282c5180b1c9715177d175be5
'2012-06-03T03:31:47-04:00'
describe
'2086892' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXN' 'sip-files00005.tif'
8832fbc88b7b3072d385a2941221ec51
f77419848d678957538c2ffb1fcb3e504c381f31
describe
'506199' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXO' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
b1e296f81c4f94b287bf73a168481533
23474c1cc9af2d4b0e762f4934426632cd602bcd
'2012-06-03T03:32:17-04:00'
describe
'485490' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXP' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
a3d79061b11b13af03b1ae5e3841ee4f
2e4f41365f23e6e724cd59493b389c75e8d6cda4
'2012-06-03T03:33:57-04:00'
describe
'1959660' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXQ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
529b3d0a79a7072455dd19d1567cbc45
09f34f3055e0ce0a5a40e2c18587a887346c4923
'2012-06-03T03:32:22-04:00'
describe
'27134' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXR' 'sip-files00118.pro'
0ec8af1cc0c6b0dd1fa17441d3d2fb03
e4c9cd7b0083e2214bcae13c27b7a5080ca7a2c2
'2012-06-03T03:29:45-04:00'
describe
'257817' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXS' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
cb76ca64d507ff71da6aa8e57447162d
59ffb6821f55acfde58ec2265fb621a1fc0d47be
'2012-06-03T03:32:19-04:00'
describe
'8233' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXT' 'sip-files00009.pro'
db47b20380db4e7979a95bfe984a0cdc
320c359401a190c5e86daef72b30914b6d9b8c35
'2012-06-03T03:30:20-04:00'
describe
'243222' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXU' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
5f01d8c098516e4fd048fe3780cfaf00
a135837ba803b8759008222683da1ccb09b834b9
'2012-06-03T03:31:17-04:00'
describe
'303694' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXV' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
cff464148cd4a1ef6375d10751aec946
5544482f7f2dc1547123fa1d4a43c7a2a2dde3de
'2012-06-03T03:34:11-04:00'
describe
'196924' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXW' 'sip-filesUF00026991_00001.xml'
05b2d5e7f2d54de045cefe4b6fded281
0ba4c97ef9b6f535e099557fa23d132e2c5ab877
'2012-06-03T03:32:05-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T14:17:27-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'513352' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOXZ' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
362dd2f685bc4cc2971a2220f594188e
80ccd191c1325efdab3648b6e3be839ecc881e13
describe
'39794' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYA' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
0c345f80310609d5b266607cd325c24f
81ed2de5f9fb7771741536ec9ac4bc791331add0
'2012-06-03T03:32:16-04:00'
describe
'67051' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYB' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
d0ac77ef01e0b96c6e852f721c866722
979fc3173cf78909fb62cc19aa1f423236e417e8
'2012-06-03T03:30:12-04:00'
describe
'570422' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYC' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
e3536b13f4051b623b57684e29c9a0c5
a7ee109ce87c3e100a43b340743a27ff34b43529
'2012-06-03T03:29:24-04:00'
describe
'457514' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYD' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
1f5d7d3765dc1cfaba466fc88c70d181
2a4fb6a7f8fb4a10e2228477050ab0b13fb7b8dc
'2012-06-03T03:34:28-04:00'
describe
'109396' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYE' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
fa74b5a2edaa89bbdbea61d54bb9b89d
9417ee6e9a58ffc0c6adb128336e06f3124934b0
'2012-06-03T03:32:14-04:00'
describe
'26605' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYF' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
392a6ace760d0e0e7996822dff191da0
cb3d4494ebe0c8b6307267b35fbb3b624c9d5da9
describe
'48030' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYG' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
73697e6b5dd261ae969cac227f710106
267e374edbe8d2b0b20885e0d6d950d6c249ff8a
describe
'21086' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYH' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
50391333b21d12356a45c887c3dd2d19
53b3a083b0bede2d58b3fd21f11e1791ce12598f
'2012-06-03T03:31:36-04:00'
describe
'412841' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYI' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
ee7bc835f75f0383d24e10528255ac21
7fd289d0173baf7adff0a07cc493b04cfb4881f7
'2012-06-03T03:34:03-04:00'
describe
'164396' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYJ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
e0c4d9a81be74bff45052b9a760bab55
4521ec9046199c02e5b362ab3053787b7d151875
'2012-06-03T03:28:48-04:00'
describe
'165643' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYK' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
b6d344b8eff4be3212e3696f360403df
4e56a91d244d55da2f51fba5e5f1de466338a382
'2012-06-03T03:30:13-04:00'
describe
'174762' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYL' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
068283c643ac544a8a4883c01a491f7a
5e9d972b81e52503202f6719d1d82edd2d041df0
'2012-06-03T03:28:47-04:00'
describe
'183050' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYM' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
08d4198a5c936a967b64c43ad9972247
5ec6c41c8533440a54d523f4c6cfce49ae2d52dc
'2012-06-03T03:29:31-04:00'
describe
'494444' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYN' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
26f08e5f4d309d4ffa67ff8caa6a724c
e992a9919ef9bb41ab2bd743072e116d900b5b2b
'2012-06-03T03:28:39-04:00'
describe
'504258' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYO' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
0308d273e3bec91fb858460680d87206
680f8a0c919efd1f25de86890a07e0bcbb66c012
describe
'510919' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYP' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
6a0191f60399e946a5297b1bb765f6ab
3238ad34fb7be17c931bb9c2b4396c7f979cc5d7
'2012-06-03T03:31:00-04:00'
describe
'494192' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYQ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
87849500c4254e4e56d4996e10e98f4e
c2054f88aa43dcbca1a888e58b8696aeb0f7f60e
'2012-06-03T03:31:59-04:00'
describe
'501213' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYR' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
44dbe50afce25904db444f7d81c9d5a7
77ae19817955ccc80e75204cc26bd681b092d775
'2012-06-03T03:28:59-04:00'
describe
'181527' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYS' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
afc99b785c48ea4c6c9f018a3b4c2b2e
09dabd6472945d63128cb74cf2aacbaa3c30f5f0
'2012-06-03T03:29:32-04:00'
describe
'480624' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYT' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
cbcc4a29be68160f44b104a4deb4a76d
653a24a1acf83f5fc3e4fd152141a4789b70eb29
'2012-06-03T03:30:14-04:00'
describe
'170613' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYU' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
2a318f5f3f8b8c1559f239ec05452772
86881659b4ecd2194712b6ce3c7608992ecb51d5
describe
'455689' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYV' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
1572693d2bad9ada5e5f15d562d0175d
e79e5f16e87df55e4e9fef2026dd3ff88cd92acd
describe
'491590' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYW' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
25da24ee569239033200f942dc4ced1c
faa21b262835f7c9f700fe8d39e5ace5a44abe60
describe
'471765' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYX' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
523323a84b088b001312d861d4961f54
7a9834747fd71a8151aaa32796f27d1d3ef4fc26
'2012-06-03T03:32:42-04:00'
describe
'459003' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYY' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
ce77ee8d9242fb4530dc5d84613d3648
4a7a8261e5053e3678537015cf97585036e7d1b0
'2012-06-03T03:29:04-04:00'
describe
'488060' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOYZ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
3c418d213c9c2db17d0d0bb957feffba
2f29e9f7d69229ced01756c4eba6dbaf1484ebf0
'2012-06-03T03:29:39-04:00'
describe
'507184' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZA' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
2f8cfc9fa26f5225ace80da3c29a0954
74e95ee08fdd3af3550bd401364e3849e40f0d3d
'2012-06-03T03:29:53-04:00'
describe
'463039' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZB' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
5a4c826df7da436274319167014a0b55
0542589d2fa5c54913af234ae4386c1ecbf544ff
describe
'486987' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZC' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
1ec91ebf14c7cd7577c917c25e2a374e
0ef9011b64b7009624398b1fa3d3fb64e53ced40
'2012-06-03T03:29:33-04:00'
describe
'495622' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZD' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
9ec4f8718a0875c9dab193f1c0b97ef7
3c2017e66ab95ef27c7ac0550e39ad62e9ffb97a
'2012-06-03T03:31:13-04:00'
describe
'505104' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZE' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
e7fcc01400da764e15d47c7ce4b058ba
fccaa192c415343f7ab4e1f8ab48e9c6a8250ee5
'2012-06-03T03:28:41-04:00'
describe
'483831' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZF' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
68895ef9fbdd9761b657df99e176cc51
c7c0321432f0ad12b7e8139b0e5d9869c7fcf78d
'2012-06-03T03:28:31-04:00'
describe
'486256' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZG' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
9bdb339065d0e2ee22c66da2a5df0c84
cd8cfd1f61526e30617f51cc77652a7b6ccb2506
'2012-06-03T03:31:55-04:00'
describe
'476260' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZH' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
fb19b1d900cbf36f05439ac43f011547
a49cfca35c8bde9aef0ffad8fd81f00e7d896901
'2012-06-03T03:29:09-04:00'
describe
'474469' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZI' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
b11d994d0a841ae714d6e907e22f360e
3e591888b37793af8e069eaa7b0f6957e5a10f80
'2012-06-03T03:31:20-04:00'
describe
'503720' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZJ' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
fa078475ce7e61950d8209275df0ec50
66d5d60c1ad4b0cd8b9f5ccee351549095d18256
'2012-06-03T03:30:48-04:00'
describe
'482086' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZK' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
c9db2f72d340797b594b08d3c2ed4502
12f3febc152f15d41f0cf2a251046efa344de0ab
'2012-06-03T03:31:09-04:00'
describe
'467755' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZL' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
2bc3a0cab9ad7a606e891172918ac5e1
d286506be3addd1c6bd3fc1387f63ad2be654adf
'2012-06-03T03:31:34-04:00'
describe
'511813' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZM' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
b2c8282f8cba959ef2b0cdca99cec54f
9ae42db66e0ef2495b88efbd4f4ea0558089e5c2
'2012-06-03T03:33:56-04:00'
describe
'484606' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZN' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
16d248c530d20555a2782fb0d6a041fe
aca90943d4b6cb39cf7afb020c92876ac9dbbdba
'2012-06-03T03:29:03-04:00'
describe
'504692' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZO' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
b9dfdb151a32531c04ff27ff51eebeaf
31a278327b973b92e914b0e08baa21a444caeefe
'2012-06-03T03:30:26-04:00'
describe
'482410' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZP' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
bdc8a74b5cbd5c74b5df033be2cd9e9a
3ee0388df1531077a0194ecd9f40e49d7803d4ef
describe
'494733' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZQ' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
77896e6627f168c8363699acaf8fdff0
5bb36924c3818f92b1b531ff201402a0b99f953b
'2012-06-03T03:32:18-04:00'
describe
'501061' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZR' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
957b5aacb769ce9033521586a7214ba5
b3b221e8fdac5589567632a7fd11b24a70f0c933
'2012-06-03T03:30:51-04:00'
describe
'477318' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZS' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
6d77c526aa0c3faeb6009e4a2f170ea8
46a49455c9d1299cf1241947262dcfbeec3eb44e
'2012-06-03T03:30:21-04:00'
describe
'490242' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZT' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
7a8b4762e9fb1a7c6d5202581dc8217b
ce1c9ed8ad66037f5067febbfd7a0c215ef79d2e
describe
'465390' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZU' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
91234634591fe7b36cd127850a9b20e0
5830e53f6fd954c35cbc28f4663fb083c1987aab
'2012-06-03T03:30:39-04:00'
describe
'495924' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZV' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
211b8578ea459423f9ae531be44ab63c
5c3ec3ee47c79cd9188085ffadbe16082aabd619
'2012-06-03T03:31:56-04:00'
describe
'427000' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZW' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
f1cd0dc9fc4cc00a5ed948c76bbc2879
b4c4c69ce6ada1e68389fc08dcd267ff3048bad8
'2012-06-03T03:31:22-04:00'
describe
'160359' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZX' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
fd4b21186ad26f3a0dd1657291f607a6
ac2dff491d19c46a37dfd3e9f29c014545387d53
'2012-06-03T03:31:49-04:00'
describe
'484518' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZY' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
dc0f8d7df27abf85355f9b0ce2dc652c
b7d34c7294380d51bc73a8eb89b314d90018a96f
describe
'159632' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAOZZ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
5056eb32b01bb85bc43322520f1db4be
334694a6a84497ba3c2307a73306a0005eecb780
'2012-06-03T03:34:24-04:00'
describe
'494619' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAA' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
98fd5db1f72bbaa049b2143da49fb99c
4f0fdf172aa5c5310a2ce15d5742147ace9286e8
'2012-06-03T03:30:24-04:00'
describe
'174567' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAB' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
db38ce24b68aeb7fb480a1dc7796e8bd
5c89ef8f8198440ee9bd596f7fef017eef711b38
'2012-06-03T03:31:48-04:00'
describe
'500109' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAC' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
ee5a4efb49330274bdf33b5b704a6ebc
70511a837fa5f9749b23fdbed639188d5e9ff1d0
describe
'492549' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAD' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
f32ac6f8ac40743bdf78b41827837759
f7e9a4a4443456173cfdef116025bdc9899f536c
'2012-06-03T03:31:51-04:00'
describe
'484680' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAE' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
62cca8f9597ae871cf0def00676f1991
d575316bbc0e575483ac58b6ddad0212a77463a1
'2012-06-03T03:32:57-04:00'
describe
'459826' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAF' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
64b57e26240f4e3e6efa44ffc070a4d1
eee1a6dd6316d136aa3ff0d59023667f425d7eaf
describe
'487226' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAG' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
baa85f44dcf83c482fedc41511749bfc
520fb030b91c17712d982a21b83752b9923088f4
'2012-06-03T03:32:31-04:00'
describe
'464356' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAH' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
067105c35a948bff37fd35448dfc9858
7a07853c356b74e73f59c104508faa8f344a6933
'2012-06-03T03:31:53-04:00'
describe
'417210' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAI' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
4a5483bf530e724a18b654fe40e5764c
f1c9c7a6b662edfad0e790344706fb823492b670
'2012-06-03T03:30:53-04:00'
describe
'477625' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAJ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
c169112c58da87c210c5a3a7fb0ed7f2
1d2505658d4185ed028b316e391242fc63ee0256
'2012-06-03T03:29:14-04:00'
describe
'487064' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAK' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
8e8b0bde7242c8fc5fc6d1dd1623c2e4
57c2c676a6dbe0f625747aa1a1d5717784f0fd7a
'2012-06-03T03:31:46-04:00'
describe
'478824' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAL' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
bc68378b27ab41d4f068f5b7dba43e61
88e71732919b424207a1117622d8f766388af6ce
describe
'459983' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAM' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
9502589cc299d001a4ac26877adc9b5f
f4f339e79acfe11a5cf5b88d1c94087639f7670d
'2012-06-03T03:28:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAN' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
03965f8ab479c93c31ab5152a04b6573
7ee6e0b172e7bb7ddb00d366ab581b32ef4ed6f1
describe
'516916' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAO' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
a7370bac999662ce44b7a450b706930f
e0e1738d640ca8ec4650b6927f8bd223b7652c00
'2012-06-03T03:30:05-04:00'
describe
'456298' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAP' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
83aa6f6dd3a599a3e832ef290dcfed2b
8d2e41ba759780f4f11ef84c92a5e80b3cab8236
'2012-06-03T03:30:07-04:00'
describe
'495351' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAQ' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
ee0a65ef8f7a9721d0118f98d68fe4aa
9d91451c519ad78169c843166050003b55ad34b9
'2012-06-03T03:31:02-04:00'
describe
'470758' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAR' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
e16899c1281a9fe539ed1c63d38878bd
acb15e5ab429d65b58926a143810968308302151
describe
'458908' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAS' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
b8302c3ae8b262f2e9cf5e7de28c6494
83a41e8af694b7f5314e139d121231e50b9b4fcf
describe
'492070' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAT' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
87d0bf1a4d3ac5d186a914959dbc4cea
f2c10ea9011367d29f05fd2a6ab59a14cae90e51
'2012-06-03T03:29:23-04:00'
describe
'487980' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAU' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
09f998ede0c2ebd270ee35256a60fd91
b073f1ac3d008031aae61ce540b96cc1eb66304e
'2012-06-03T03:31:42-04:00'
describe
'492984' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAV' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
9f5aa6e942b0ee2d4fba217f3f208b1e
e01ba6723d7e01742143f70df9ff70013c08a8af
'2012-06-03T03:33:11-04:00'
describe
'502302' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAW' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
ceab2e253c96247251597eda747c07db
2aa1f63316c96271f2ed23589c1a5b23e3c52c18
'2012-06-03T03:29:06-04:00'
describe
'412961' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAX' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
171ac1a286f52051e89950b78c967056
c3ab6bc80faa6254dd86258233a7e1623f016eb2
describe
'456097' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAY' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
da648d04595c61b76b7d1126877d13ad
f2dbd4ab90e8ff6dca032a5397ce0fe96eb69be4
describe
'556701' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPAZ' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
cb64fdd9c48142bc8fe9cbc2b9139bc5
c293a0135e9bd6b425b723b469d24306e79684d0
'2012-06-03T03:28:19-04:00'
describe
'490820' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBA' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
a9a75f58040470d0021dc1051b207e4a
9e595d4221fdce47abe8e52405a9ac413de94c8a
'2012-06-03T03:28:35-04:00'
describe
'502263' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBB' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
b427f6c59f4a481fbc593e3008cb0337
a431aefd9c36a90dd47fdd6db76f8c996b8f4e2f
describe
'493287' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBC' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
ad04f8b6ac7129310b4ac549a9eaf392
0609208759909622d1eb03405dafc93a46124c66
'2012-06-03T03:34:02-04:00'
describe
'425561' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBD' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
7e38855e82ba3c9f7948090dee9c4455
a1f707682d2d5902add2fb847db9fdf6cb56293e
describe
'439823' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBE' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
03666c62bc0ce2e0dcf8691c6acadc01
5fe8ae3c61c918b945404ade74b151071dae5495
'2012-06-03T03:30:47-04:00'
describe
'458285' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBF' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
b6342db62ade7b8cd34f010bf165a1b5
7eb9809ff1c0b8cd5a7a821ffa3dd547d97cb288
'2012-06-03T03:30:22-04:00'
describe
'483312' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBG' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
1f11ce43fa6a429c86f4aed4f3ddca19
df81f94e1511a2fe64ca9527837888cfc8f50573
describe
'490652' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBH' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
c76d308cc45cdffd3c35e3d97aeda446
df128f3f7e61f14efeca6e3a35acc386590daece
'2012-06-03T03:30:31-04:00'
describe
'483795' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBI' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
459e5cfecd30b31af4f75ed89ce35119
27badffe0c28a3c4807fd2ea70a410a1ea65434e
'2012-06-03T03:31:30-04:00'
describe
'514970' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBJ' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
7bec527dee53594044296d94c53a45f8
7ddc41abd7c677bb985c5993bb1cf0c1a10844da
'2012-06-03T03:29:08-04:00'
describe
'494117' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBK' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
e5f0d29f5b1d126c25a7d5727e8a7a73
239788ba031f26af47c58fc5b02a534fd6013b07
'2012-06-03T03:28:45-04:00'
describe
'465319' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBL' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
c250de5dae66222c022507cc086fae30
69eb9abcabd391f15664616a11962f558528dd13
describe
'391054' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBM' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
edfd46e0fa083285087e009d6bbabcaa
e080f0d37df7ec2e9955bfc76933402b0ffa8643
describe
'496769' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBN' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
a4b31524dc57a83435fb9ff64c86518a
75ebc93e92bb6601ebdea946198d2ddfc78fde34
'2012-06-03T03:30:50-04:00'
describe
'489411' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBO' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
2dc0daa92b2e58427602290997545f4b
58061e62182cad22f96d782e9d5050824a85231d
'2012-06-03T03:31:26-04:00'
describe
'496263' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBP' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
a71c14d928b66e660935372a387f270e
0fddacbc8c3130aa985620cfca4d591c30558b02
describe
'469746' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBQ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
e2612eb92a48ee37c4ff9fa3be4bff5b
de4cfc4ef0edae72d421e682a838b8f1ce9ba508
'2012-06-03T03:33:13-04:00'
describe
'468488' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBR' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
cccb66372c26d999cbfc72aa9aa0b540
8c7c34a83393a3ca8105884b8c888e5e7bf08c0c
'2012-06-03T03:29:51-04:00'
describe
'475082' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBS' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
31d0ed65a7014e121a02f5df6ef43552
f6bb7a890c3e0f436f2b8a8e25ca70b29f465660
describe
'478507' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBT' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
e6b60c09f219de9ada78b8267caf5e4e
5ef3707d099b79902d240d248bb64381caa6cdc1
'2012-06-03T03:29:56-04:00'
describe
'486806' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBU' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
c68d99db06f767ec39b2a14681edf151
e0d05edb60e07aecee26b1c67689374e75827be4
describe
'485062' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBV' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
5b8330e4f5657e1c18d0b19bf5a7941b
918e036f3f68b8b9a3b656068f3c0679a2a222bc
'2012-06-03T03:30:59-04:00'
describe
'490013' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBW' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
0ad31665fcbfa327a603384765550573
2d94fdb3be0e3e535595d9c2940873ccee41a6b0
'2012-06-03T03:33:58-04:00'
describe
'480117' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBX' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
e5d53432e73aea6cc863cb54f97e8bd6
47ea29b4154004884a14edb278acd6a99c47d8d8
describe
'481370' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBY' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
ebf83aad6388107b09458997689fc0f6
c6b565e4bf6110079d3d22d681b4831e390cf3d8
'2012-06-03T03:32:21-04:00'
describe
'485946' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPBZ' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
5ce32c3196a65aad6c62348f09c09125
0a16b189ffedea76b93bd43317a41fafc55cebad
describe
'447075' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCA' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
bbc328a49cd4abb742904892ed0b72ff
c9dd8ba97fc80cab2e1a8c8b75a33e9ebf4b80f3
'2012-06-03T03:34:04-04:00'
describe
'504644' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCB' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
4923217755c206d5211a2aaced8c72ba
5e6cb4c436cad5f6b485df4fc490769cf6f08c6c
'2012-06-03T03:33:25-04:00'
describe
'370048' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCC' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
b342f9c47d7691348919050d1f55f8d1
91bfe57e8a5b5b3db9f04f8cd1c6269c63524d6b
'2012-06-03T03:30:42-04:00'
describe
'63356' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCD' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
3b0415d0a2997f08e155b42996e879e8
320eb88c42a4c825de5f1d7cce90be687ed73e73
describe
'390043' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCE' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
ac3e976ce370c5ad9dfd7796589f58b9
5da10e024569ced391a260e2f1c5f00924db503a
'2012-06-03T03:31:52-04:00'
describe
'447213' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCF' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
1e43b1273c3989e43f79a85d07a75ab4
d378f55c386217ee1a787cd64a9559947eebac5c
'2012-06-03T03:33:47-04:00'
describe
'156002' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCG' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
762d626d2686ccfc8f05a179c40db0bf
723153bb46c85a345a710c05bc2aa6dc5dfb3364
describe
'294395' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCH' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
443d02a46d87a7999d796bd4c8bca06c
e3e4c54d50c8a01322773228893c6401ae1ee512
'2012-06-03T03:29:57-04:00'
describe
'295748' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCI' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
a0d1ed4a9c6996a00d19580106dc914c
32005f5c5d2b06b0dcc772a008249fd9b99f9256
'2012-06-03T03:31:27-04:00'
describe
'105930' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCJ' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
b31d67ba7e0d1eb8bd866ce06fb61883
cfa75b51867e26ffe31943206c4cc0b5b05040ce
'2012-06-03T03:32:58-04:00'
describe
'236409' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCK' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
1519dafe015ec0370bbb61462c669a9f
a517abaa37ddc495f9bdfb0e76b579912c33d9d1
'2012-06-03T03:33:53-04:00'
describe
'47089' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCL' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
81e4b617694604a791040ad1a66ead2f
53fec3f6260875d2ca2c7c5bdce3d1507cf278f6
describe
'264249' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCM' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
5b1e71b909889f518f81e3473625282a
24e45999ee9cf128b01283ba0c7ce2e5ae013a65
describe
'263310' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCN' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
64741fb72b7d5da360e1ac9d30e066c0
ad6db146b0bcb5a73bf290908f28a5977861a6b6
describe
'42305' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCO' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
4d071d8ac155e3799be85fd1c4d18d41
ccc8f89436c62703210790bacc9d542d2509a6d7
'2012-06-03T03:32:06-04:00'
describe
'258554' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCP' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
7101eb760cc7f37fd255751dd1b9a071
9163a0061d85721bbb9e8d9a7bbe81f599b25be7
'2012-06-03T03:29:30-04:00'
describe
'99439' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCQ' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
a7308a5a4fab80d5f906d72f979fd76d
55251107001869cdd4743b64b21635dd7d7fbc7a
'2012-06-03T03:28:28-04:00'
describe
'194080' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCR' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
f6e3a98dcc68e066cae58f2dceba1af5
0aa072bd57b1f21969c19357a258ada7beb33cf5
describe
'10301' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCS' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
84eb92f28ddb3b8e325302c7c27362c4
29fae6dd97a3d5666f47613db3cdc8a289c6a312
'2012-06-03T03:32:11-04:00'
describe
'240015' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCT' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
e4240d10bf9dbcb188c3309e8cf2cfe5
4c4423d8af945869b51aeef106779f4045f87dbb
'2012-06-03T03:31:50-04:00'
describe
'258573' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCU' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
0ae21d5e2f072a3072c01bbae195fc22
7fbb1ee8957e474b2dbd514612bdf56a80a3c62e
'2012-06-03T03:32:35-04:00'
describe
'241263' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCV' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
416014d306fda91fdaf2fc45e95b535f
6be44d57a3424b86f76f823a2fdf4adbf33ca71e
describe
'242058' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCW' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
43edc399e5a90defaed3f7e8f2aa947d
cc54c0e0266808cf44d19fee0ab7e9960a2a42d7
describe
'235920' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCX' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
46bf0abe02ffc4f0bc7bd2bdd4007562
ebd8dc0d35fa6e3b9f8711f428af2d573309ed56
describe
'243214' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCY' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
105e9c4f70fc64972b29535708584813
79482d47f69646414a36bfe2b54c870a7a71b254
describe
'242514' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPCZ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
d79ea8e6351b5a9bca239f1656fed0f5
68058cc7db46a6d5d6a4040659f1a149f023f8eb
describe
'223750' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDA' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
0411e72825979e6d8dfaad848605bdb4
3d1c9c84d21151dcf095b6a3a9c47032f4ad3a7d
'2012-06-03T03:29:49-04:00'
describe
'254995' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDB' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
7238d978b6ae4046ad724433b32f8a8b
3c0999c76e4d43d6ce27489140c69ffb8f636b30
describe
'259566' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDC' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
8d510af55e9a737575a978db5d9571ab
2abc1c22bedd728b79edced7af3656b3f79da3b1
'2012-06-03T03:28:20-04:00'
describe
'236543' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDD' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
10097a78dda32c35d42d97f1c16d4197
641e5e30476e689f67d2892761767e67fed21c97
describe
'245985' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDE' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
3773e42f09beddad87c99d91cf5bdc14
db8bb1123c934fc3889d7a3f3608df5873db1ad0
'2012-06-03T03:34:07-04:00'
describe
'243246' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDF' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
46e36c3c2154360a42e4596ac31ebc78
7347fd9cc85899a7d00704842cb6dbe4c3a74321
'2012-06-03T03:34:17-04:00'
describe
'243685' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDG' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
c9e3092a50b1020585d0472158398213
c2461ed491bb6a07bd9e796b89ac2ec7b022f81b
'2012-06-03T03:33:07-04:00'
describe
'234663' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDH' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
11767658cbe5013af6b4f5be985b2d8a
40f80166f0d373238fc070edc17ddd7e4201a23d
'2012-06-03T03:29:28-04:00'
describe
'240317' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDI' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
d43e554b2b0a8ef7f15571350a7f12aa
95fe105a578752f8362efe0e9d52565d10e56865
'2012-06-03T03:32:37-04:00'
describe
'238699' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDJ' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
d1219eea2b3b0838523dae956b0c0a73
a44b72dcfd594e98baa31d5f620e508aeb4cab48
'2012-06-03T03:31:57-04:00'
describe
'261285' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDK' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
a632e0a13d969f6b0c1a7e513a676e44
2d4082130894e706f4c034388f86a4dc5c3fee6f
'2012-06-03T03:29:48-04:00'
describe
'254055' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDL' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
dadcbd4c75028809764505f3c1fae7d4
e6d0c012e4913bfb3fe267cd2cfcdd2c3e5c67c3
'2012-06-03T03:31:16-04:00'
describe
'247764' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDM' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
e08570f4db8cfe917edccfb925ce8ebc
ece54521cfd30d7a9d032066b285a6030663532f
'2012-06-03T03:31:29-04:00'
describe
'248299' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDN' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
e339167316401a1d85b7d852c9eb3651
57d3e746dd4d1443aef9503e0e8e1c4f573f255b
describe
'244077' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDO' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
365efcf012899532c29c2e3aaa1613a5
cb714f3275c298703f6d253f60bc969b4bcc07a8
describe
'246546' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDP' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
c2fcf9bad07fd4328f004236b7d3f885
cf75cb2570588908ac96972914b9069f19932890
'2012-06-03T03:29:54-04:00'
describe
'246328' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDQ' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
427a185f2702d9e2279070f89201624b
0bba2819caa25576a8374d0e426a9b5ef84c7d8b
'2012-06-03T03:30:30-04:00'
describe
'245019' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDR' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
ee444df9beef96ff118f36815b3fa17c
e58a500143e9200ff6dcf290dbfc9c480cb1be6e
describe
'261252' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDS' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
5140b38df9dece9c7b531e13f0c20a97
a9862f65c7fe3109af30a55d0b624b4f472494cd
describe
'243078' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDT' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
67140a6daae90669c745e28fe946a022
63c188f0da703553c1d1852c9338ad57a3b85137
'2012-06-03T03:31:12-04:00'
describe
'258815' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDU' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
5d072a6c58450c80e6f10c80a5435337
2904c8d50428c3ab13a79a3ecfb7decac93ec44f
'2012-06-03T03:29:16-04:00'
describe
'245705' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDV' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
9f8daad5f5f9d854efc82078f48081aa
5814bb6e30c9fab4a1162156abe0835862d0b19c
'2012-06-03T03:31:54-04:00'
describe
'255191' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDW' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
4e00c1c22eaee03c819118891d85746a
006a83547870829e24cd12a6167682ba7e1de569
'2012-06-03T03:31:39-04:00'
describe
'240721' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDX' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
cdb04d0d06667730c2f07f455bb0f626
5d008d1c7628cd2d6ecb4f57baddb448c7e5c0a5
'2012-06-03T03:32:20-04:00'
describe
'247595' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDY' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
b7590f4acae41df287ebba96d3b3398f
6ca6a71d6ac1fc4bcccd5083f46827b3dba96343
describe
'261291' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPDZ' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
794f669bd6d87290b1736372f5d3bec8
e71ca7f5882353ba94c47bfe75266251d183206d
'2012-06-03T03:29:34-04:00'
describe
'244942' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEA' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
804eadbf4976e7ee20b2c81c9f6ff16a
682987d7936755555383f62e4382dc5089ca37a0
'2012-06-03T03:30:56-04:00'
describe
'245694' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEB' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
b94123e1e1ee34b530ec0d4d72aef3b3
8bb6430c6610aa8a360b317d0ee81401a8e04ffe
'2012-06-03T03:34:00-04:00'
describe
'243207' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEC' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
cfc06d6cd9e98d41546786c6508548bd
daccfdacc03c2e724cfcc06f0b868bb6ab1701ba
describe
'244737' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPED' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
fcc93aaf6895bf2b6df60126694ca202
a71eda971b6a1b0f9657456cb22c6e31fd132da5
'2012-06-03T03:29:05-04:00'
describe
'256952' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEE' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
ccc44bda77ad7cd8d0c0c9ed216955d6
00069a6a9ffb85790f988724fcf561ce8ba451d4
'2012-06-03T03:30:44-04:00'
describe
'268969' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEF' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
811d7ccf5956e0a7f83ea3e4c6262093
705d7d002596e7bb315d3682b9aae72e32d7fd8b
describe
'261642' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEG' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
08aa0bf20a437bb535853b442118a794
30a26c3ff83a69a220940148396f072da3decfb3
describe
'268337' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEH' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
59d46f7ba4168ea15912dba5f5d268f5
e4f917dd256df6ad8cc40b1f59de34cd7275e1de
'2012-06-03T03:29:12-04:00'
describe
'246468' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEI' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
95c9c8af1558b5a62565befd912a4326
93987e4de2d8e40d26e8c3d02f6af529c63222c3
describe
'244988' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEJ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
57837cbc3b4c6f7fbd21a3b4836e8e2c
9d21845a90b092a1eb51d874d622c6db8d68b9a4
describe
'267413' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEK' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
a3dbb35fc07eb67de963a48b6a3aeb7f
643e22051d7eeff317adda5ab81d9d2eadf2ce82
'2012-06-03T03:29:17-04:00'
describe
'261992' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEL' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
3d56459730e2ff217b686d907d32fafa
d67c9e1be0a308cb89038676a5bcff50d7834958
'2012-06-03T03:33:18-04:00'
describe
'244151' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEM' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
9dc126750c31b14662579fc3ac502af1
89e37e03d290eb6d4f542482208613043d5cb77a
'2012-06-03T03:29:42-04:00'
describe
'250612' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEN' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
728a922cc7915edf8eba8a79e169a634
f9a9924d55cbbc9be73ffe49b09918f15bf32066
'2012-06-03T03:33:31-04:00'
describe
'267727' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEO' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
d7f8eb999cac7b96b62a76ae436fce68
88177ce5e3ef3cae8214a558cc13867b12adfb64
'2012-06-03T03:29:37-04:00'
describe
'267771' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEP' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
d5d39ec84ed6538e246199c335d257a1
8bcc713da26fa42aaea1aca1f53be5a83447db53
describe
'266682' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEQ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
9ee04b17b3b681c4a90a4b9f9343b4d5
7c55ec6d42e0a7ecea50b1e3d8a7174103130821
'2012-06-03T03:31:03-04:00'
describe
'266916' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPER' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
f764cd75b1464020acfc5033df4a88ef
a48872bd4805d05e999667273243222ed4f188f5
describe
'252294' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPES' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
3fb24160a76950768d5da1e7ae4a1307
26172b3c1b7afa6469629774c8c2572d01671a75
'2012-06-03T03:31:11-04:00'
describe
'248018' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPET' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
9ed08311cd035a3d7a0c48d49cd8631e
f656b97b4a56f88cbd28ff88996c177edae1aecc
describe
'248385' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEU' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
5a3190043696dd2fbbf8dc4ab30af1b1
bf34411eb4fea926373159af1eda41fca1132052
'2012-06-03T03:32:53-04:00'
describe
'259871' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEV' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
96143a6aa8f82fa46d637da326dabc04
3ddd578df08853bd13332ad79e0ad1fea36dfbef
describe
'236455' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEW' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
bb1c35e368934c9aa552c63a1c040b0e
97c228e0ef813abe319c3cfc9e94d5915280a8c7
'2012-06-03T03:33:44-04:00'
describe
'259694' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEX' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
6a3ca00e2cc090f8b0b446b9e6418e7b
5f7a99c97914b2818aba8a24dc074557ffac1f25
'2012-06-03T03:28:56-04:00'
describe
'237352' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEY' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
80510407893ae0a24fdcda79dd645c3e
75bdd213665bdcef8dbf0afaaffa02052aa3118b
describe
'240174' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPEZ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
b07db38ff104b4469aa9bdf5b6ab905d
23abf18d5a220cf2ae5e1e62589d46878db9241f
describe
'259897' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFA' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
43e24e734988cf442874b5f7bdaee652
471ebfbf9a8e1122098179718146aa16799cb8a9
'2012-06-03T03:34:15-04:00'
describe
'240948' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFB' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
725fd01bf891eb088d26d28644ad4374
1c82adc1eb33fa681241b096133a14ecef31c9ff
describe
'259906' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFC' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
56e3221fd6a3d506c0f4b7594205f087
572bfb08ba4bc28c678305ba8bb7d9a64a6d9e4e
describe
'236674' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFD' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
03193d44b6702317b34e98638baee52b
df0b18bd5d5ff40aab69caebf7885ab1cf41f1ac
describe
'259856' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFE' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
f6f380ad82657d8841fbd6dab82cb274
36b725d645a17d8dfe99c8beb2ef35268f651606
describe
'239718' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFF' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
1ff85fbf63ad93071e77d9135a8d82ec
bc6f071a187c19a68fbfa41c8aaa09dcb53ff576
describe
'243905' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFG' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
0319334f45236846b774d5ace0c060f3
ebb89aed9f37876af88729edecedc80b3bd65c16
describe
'243870' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFH' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
1b201f648bb07157d0e933cf55daeeb9
c853ea1f706b6c7b14fb84bfb10daa49da9ec0ba
describe
'233587' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFI' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
d7707ff2adc406019db93b70c83cb1da
a064ac7e2cdae1ad4ab448c055e68908d962084b
'2012-06-03T03:30:43-04:00'
describe
'259877' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFJ' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
9f446e1a648b9d67ba81abfa18ef94bd
8d7a065903c667be93e57103d3de1a5673fa600e
describe
'242281' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFK' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
f86a45fe36388f9f428214175ae884ce
4e50125453c64e62becbeb858b15844f4d05afbc
'2012-06-03T03:31:01-04:00'
describe
'237932' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFL' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
2225436edbf3e6f2914b4defeb7c3075
3e60b3fa13489df36a7bf0f7fa78bede4a013f56
describe
'250820' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFM' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
da36d4495b939fbaa1d8929ebf76b35e
d9018e00cc34b016bb5032c88bbd33dc72e989c3
describe
'259876' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFN' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
c3f6045a888f44bcdbf8fbd4c29017b1
292bc2f964d90aab3c7f51bce711b69578cac2e5
'2012-06-03T03:28:51-04:00'
describe
'240831' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFO' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
d95be234dae8128d6fb2d679ff3511c8
48170e1f6312aee5607093da4e3f36b775b8be2e
'2012-06-03T03:33:27-04:00'
describe
'242419' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFP' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
132cf5cbe55f2522fb05bebf903bbfa0
97f121265e7dc3585d8e3222df1359a1898d99dd
describe
'228856' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFQ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
489f68e22aa680f239b57e44a2c60ab8
f73278000435d7b2241140fbc0afee060e48a5df
describe
'258135' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFR' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
293688bc772ca878609344490102eb76
4cd31458224106a09d40871a829fe7b97a6fd42d
'2012-06-03T03:30:23-04:00'
describe
'248135' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFS' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
7edceaa12d479b1379326c5cad5cadf8
dfc2b55dff3805ab808ddb55698caeda48d05fb5
describe
'257143' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFT' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
f423f38978a19197c19d342bc0ef1f2c
eb7bb844d34439156ab870619566d42263a22199
describe
'243822' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFU' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
acd720fb878113cd1976053413c77f33
78cc3a53dcc0cb2bdcc527267e75891ec80e7507
'2012-06-03T03:34:25-04:00'
describe
'264818' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFV' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
4baade0656cedcdca9f29f4d0273d9f2
305dd091cf3b6e0836c5e300a8e1f55058875249
'2012-06-03T03:32:04-04:00'
describe
'259923' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFW' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
fcbbf396a534131fb3a608f4640cfbde
40c26a951d5aaefecf2ecb7fbe01169296c7d018
describe
'252469' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFX' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
8c71c4bca054b41d36951972d291842b
4bab9aa158d31c632d77cd89109216bafe039310
describe
'263467' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFY' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
6c664c425b8fe941278a2a10803a9e78
0c461447c6168ec323aafb437cdcec99e0f993ba
'2012-06-03T03:33:06-04:00'
describe
'254800' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPFZ' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
568618bef0b930ce4d37fc3a7d5dbb3b
9f7e4fcdc1ae019494438674d3e858b6ccc4e9eb
'2012-06-03T03:29:50-04:00'
describe
'263506' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGA' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
124016be4134e01fe562f7ebb6ab82ca
112d2addf27603b053a92b09a48c5644ea800914
'2012-06-03T03:33:40-04:00'
describe
'251248' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGB' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
511eaa499ff0150483391c476c2f9305
8390b8c7b4b2db076e3d42fe39026e98ddf6ef56
'2012-06-03T03:28:38-04:00'
describe
'263543' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGC' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
e70b2a9b9011094f6db9a74a72a971d3
f301f9921eca0d5abdbb2e9deaf48f7a21255141
describe
'261814' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGD' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
082b6fc41d08ddf4a0960d682f7be976
50ac2ef2f198a5a23426be113fe69498f41cc0a5
'2012-06-03T03:33:09-04:00'
describe
'248539' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGE' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
08fada89756695802a682b4c27ddde58
6f6a5a01109f67be4c0aa42edbf0b748642d71e9
'2012-06-03T03:30:11-04:00'
describe
'246250' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGF' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
a751935da667de8223454c24f8ee23b7
649297cbc70d3d83a10ee9299455094f45901ba6
describe
'253651' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGG' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
42a213783924e10fbc7547bbd2c765c2
39888be96a87f61b4835c12b2cf6541c6dfd22c3
'2012-06-03T03:33:14-04:00'
describe
'251558' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGH' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
bdb94c1ab5cf4197424a13b2f4124de4
79a38d8281f93d7f82a207b446f679d45cf4bcc5
describe
'242917' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGI' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
734069cb768afbd0615f481e4639e8a2
b007cd5c412e914c528363300573cfaa969ff9d1
'2012-06-03T03:32:32-04:00'
describe
'252276' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGJ' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
5d82566da8f6c25bca9e8ad1aa2550be
4371e70c03290ba3b9cb1f8e299f4479795c9db8
describe
'254478' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGK' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
62313d25670fbd9a7a3288c8264eef0a
6a58843c5d290443a4c4d50e6b9f1bc61560af03
describe
'253120' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGL' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
465eef337185b37d782ca5ee65961bad
0c3ed2138c969502c4ae920165bfaf685cf7a0ab
describe
'256213' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGM' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
6cec3539114d0129508e01951c30a1c8
bdcb3be3a181ea6f5f0d15319cdb9199bdcbabed
describe
'221368' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGN' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
9b2703d656d10f0f11ebe7e23aaa3411
2450e2762ae560e856c25828b10e0dc45d929ac2
describe
'251068' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGO' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
d4744749b8da2cb420d1fc6bca5b8d79
90b45288d7a34d7b538c80293269c58d3b3a2375
'2012-06-03T03:32:34-04:00'
describe
'244253' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGP' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
06e49e9ecd9cbde44c6a6a0000642f1f
67deff0a294b6bfb096f7cf26a65d8b33797e0d2
describe
'106851' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGQ' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
da3cef563220a8653dccb578181fed08
8d778ec0d6f5b03ec95489bbd04e10c1786ff478
describe
'288215' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGR' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
46fb127776c87063ed7bd64ddaebd9c0
3b14f46a44a76b3afe05bc7dbdbf3b5d50c978fb
describe
'62730' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGS' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
d2c7eb099ba629601f10541879d4dd8e
3f21bd0f736f2cca689b01333a3bc18db4e729f6
'2012-06-03T03:30:38-04:00'
describe
'7074088' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGT' 'sip-files00001.tif'
a25175801edf2fed94e4b0e140c95417
8418dd9cf68a10b1f16dc73ae3d14dc255e7c39b
describe
'7106744' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGU' 'sip-files00002.tif'
06acb6d281e0d4a9f216183e3ffe4bd5
1aa54d6d623451764c39c83d200a7499ce866f87
describe
'2045700' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGV' 'sip-files00003.tif'
4a671b9f9dbbf673adb1330a784d1e0e
f2f6aa41671a8278f310d096da48170a7c7ab478
'2012-06-03T03:34:08-04:00'
describe
'6359268' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGW' 'sip-files00006.tif'
bebad7d16805857797c40dccdd540b95
a7553d9aaf8a9fb8884cefe954773b78e2c87191
describe
'6329776' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGX' 'sip-files00007.tif'
afc2b1ccac209669b7db1597df6eea25
6ce58e8eff32404a6488860da9a26eb41a5d9dc0
'2012-06-03T03:32:08-04:00'
describe
'2085748' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGY' 'sip-files00008.tif'
aee58fdf0c997052e7c974430be4ef6c
3e1fef197a76974917efa40b222bbeb45b529085
'2012-06-03T03:29:19-04:00'
describe
'2089024' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPGZ' 'sip-files00009.tif'
3c68f43134895adc5233c4e3e8f418ce
375316cd21f5c8a1a75a02221fef164f7eb0b9cd
'2012-06-03T03:28:49-04:00'
describe
'2049516' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHA' 'sip-files00010.tif'
b5c3cdd155303712ef79dca663506342
2088a84c0c2699df918951f3c13052789dd4a688
describe
'2086764' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHB' 'sip-files00011.tif'
6b50c03cde299799339da50fc467b62b
54603e25de01146aa617656ea1e99b5432c10553
describe
'2049436' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHC' 'sip-files00012.tif'
86ed8cb36cda530935e26e079e3fe54a
4e0f233cd944a643c3c547e665253fdef3432831
'2012-06-03T03:31:58-04:00'
describe
'2018572' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHD' 'sip-files00013.tif'
6ab12122ff966886dad1cec13c9037f0
8d10b549bf92a0fc7ed8795c34f7414e48873ea3
describe
'2090616' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHE' 'sip-files00014.tif'
5e5faa3fbab805fe8a388bb8c342d342
294afaaa39a2a209841de0ba088fdc0b80794e59
describe
'1942896' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHF' 'sip-files00015.tif'
c9b91b7913d7de9a525fe145b2a697c3
c6ac9f5cadfb98942c5e410cd79c42630686ab25
describe
'2090824' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHG' 'sip-files00016.tif'
152b15327794912e7886bd2773dea96a
2c21c88dd69f9555cb4acf1807298c14bc34d06b
describe
'1953212' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHH' 'sip-files00017.tif'
7c8a5d14629a5e2f70407097fc06060f
8d347cc168d4fe4ee54ac4df8d5420b530a04e00
'2012-06-03T03:33:22-04:00'
describe
'1949356' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHI' 'sip-files00018.tif'
45aed53f75763b7755bcd0188217273a
a77a32bf3459d48e6a16c9c8d454e071962bd86d
describe
'1900788' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHJ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
121414fd35fab360c717c1b4f06026c3
f3acb935e27ebc5f8c18501f3ad6da1a3119ff7f
describe
'1954008' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHK' 'sip-files00021.tif'
7a92f60edfd5a95bfc1c7599fbf724cc
143017cbc3711ed5a5778aac7e43080d038cbebc
'2012-06-03T03:29:25-04:00'
describe
'1804452' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHL' 'sip-files00022.tif'
e25c653ff05904eb647a1acf82a67564
a9d0568d2deae178a10a7b91e604409ad0a6808f
'2012-06-03T03:33:24-04:00'
describe
'1987216' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHM' 'sip-files00023.tif'
a52432a567c815ea1301897c563e59b6
342a0049ac49e2e940bd86603141c31a8b14e30a
'2012-06-03T03:28:55-04:00'
describe
'2052844' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHN' 'sip-files00024.tif'
82cbb0287d43c912501e1f87fd62116b
8e344c478899e38f8300605a3326cd138407cdc9
describe
'2098880' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHO' 'sip-files00025.tif'
4620ebfa594e0de3d718d3742eac0f77
226cc6d3308e4e03f1f1afe194987ffab2770b53
'2012-06-03T03:32:54-04:00'
describe
'1981948' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHP' 'sip-files00027.tif'
d16ff85c86238b90016e8ed17d844e40
03923e91f789e9755f473ece6ecc4c0bd56c0dd8
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHQ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
e9070e99b425937134b615ce2c24f5ff
5d88e3bd357a05805e8a613d0db9d2c5c870d8b2
'2012-06-03T03:31:25-04:00'
describe
'1963860' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHR' 'sip-files00029.tif'
85ed96bfb514604fc3999364f6a357c3
3b40142513dfef3718427e96e74b0a116190fc16
describe
'1890732' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHS' 'sip-files00030.tif'
d94eb8b9acac937fccd9d4e1f1f34684
9bfc8a7aa2890c10881269dbce15f14c471d1793
'2012-06-03T03:30:27-04:00'
describe
'1936140' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHT' 'sip-files00031.tif'
0dd2b54b6ccf5f2854d16c31676501b3
719e1830d654b23540b6af458490fe3073660b2d
describe
'1922908' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHU' 'sip-files00032.tif'
520391e3adcdcd97d6dff8fdda7884e1
a4d259335c8d6277e1a4c0ed9ddc4a961dbdfc66
'2012-06-03T03:32:51-04:00'
describe
'2103676' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHV' 'sip-files00033.tif'
aeb4046da58280375cccffcef4cfee3e
9f4121bef64454b4af67ba4a61d9260112f6c0e8
'2012-06-03T03:28:46-04:00'
describe
'2046268' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHW' 'sip-files00034.tif'
2c6bb79478b6adc14a13ac1afeed1c58
20be2580c71b54d49bb58f1923c66f751f52f953
'2012-06-03T03:30:33-04:00'
describe
'1995556' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHX' 'sip-files00035.tif'
46207c8774cebf9aaa13b36e670e47fa
aa13a73e9a9e3de8c4c9b4e3c796e2b8760da847
'2012-06-03T03:32:48-04:00'
describe
'1999736' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHY' 'sip-files00036.tif'
1daa04477d197cf49466675de5a04081
c5a72ae6c7919a94651ee308d3fad453ea58435f
'2012-06-03T03:29:47-04:00'
describe
'1966688' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPHZ' 'sip-files00037.tif'
72bc3f0079e30d54e62873a08ad9dfa4
04d4982873b64309a77ea6be998d6a83446fdf8b
'2012-06-03T03:30:09-04:00'
describe
'1897020' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIA' 'sip-files00038.tif'
ae29abab7adf37a01508bca18d8906cb
5d5b0d52c9bfda560ab9514ea62009659fb1a93b
'2012-06-03T03:30:16-04:00'
describe
'1984448' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIB' 'sip-files00040.tif'
532131457bf0d1933cf66824df1854cb
c7b7bc397164c3f27a7212e216b980ce72b72f9f
'2012-06-03T03:31:19-04:00'
describe
'1973760' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIC' 'sip-files00041.tif'
4388890bc1e067055ea7d452806cebee
136ca9a8f9cfdbbf01adc2a0963e6ac3ff5f8514
describe
'2103928' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPID' 'sip-files00043.tif'
c58ee00cf737a34e8b000a033b52480f
c3cdcff9c78bb83ed0d915ce6e17b61980159967
'2012-06-03T03:30:02-04:00'
describe
'1958268' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIE' 'sip-files00044.tif'
664e3038f68c18c19f1981c756b888c6
2be98cbe2bed8d22f90f1c85c8e6e063ac82dee0
'2012-06-03T03:28:21-04:00'
describe
'1952740' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIF' 'sip-files00045.tif'
6e2963bf29f8bc32041ddaacf781d35b
b28341e1dd63224418825a2c0fbf2b25171d89c7
describe
'2084496' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIG' 'sip-files00046.tif'
b56c15d778d9eec87b144b1a52854d86
2997ec3dd9464f10b1608647673870e95042d3f6
describe
'1979828' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIH' 'sip-files00047.tif'
959f645c7b467bdf5b26ef0fb1ba8784
0985053e8ad6ede0ebd6c14681ce1b22621a787a
describe
'2055708' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPII' 'sip-files00048.tif'
a11cf0011f4938f16dd974305d890d95
89897d836e059d5a73da625a8948f4d961b14a1d
describe
'1939608' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIJ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
a790f96d6f81091ccc8cd4b977e8a92d
0ed87dd874cc1c9bea819609a7add754353cd6bb
describe
'1995160' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIK' 'sip-files00050.tif'
8db5154109b15102e2dd9dad9c81f2b1
cee6c0a1ceaad52710e8377c5c31eb0cc806a701
describe
'2103792' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIL' 'sip-files00051.tif'
c2f9201a27b5b954eff84c6793f3edd4
1f10315d186ec16da5dd841603f47cabe94fa13a
describe
'1973236' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIM' 'sip-files00052.tif'
ec2ec11f4a23a04b904921844fbbc15b
8ddc6469659d354082c898e3ef360119451d0ab2
'2012-06-03T03:34:19-04:00'
describe
'1979676' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIN' 'sip-files00053.tif'
8aa532233dac78e94e836d1fa899e0eb
108c2d442364ecce8f6ce22b7ae181cbe2d54d2b
describe
'1958844' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIO' 'sip-files00054.tif'
70b42b8469a2fa67bd408e590d1491ed
015cce671edc340470e1cbfbe8536a862bbf4feb
'2012-06-03T03:28:22-04:00'
describe
'1971376' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIP' 'sip-files00055.tif'
b94fa9ed134d1c7bd7846b07224d7f61
d1ea65e81601cfdaa1b119d7c081395b8a67cf3b
'2012-06-03T03:29:55-04:00'
describe
'2067848' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIQ' 'sip-files00056.tif'
1b0b6236f75dcc887b047c9264bf03b0
b33e1447e486f37b64c5a0dbf2b6994332745760
describe
'2174076' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIR' 'sip-files00057.tif'
bb4b9ef26955696fb9d1ae12505b0825
238629b7db180ec8e036222a0587159f79818b3c
'2012-06-03T03:30:25-04:00'
describe
'2105932' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIS' 'sip-files00058.tif'
c721c1ecacdb09b698cf5e4916d8a664
0d47f2b1beb16199516cf2180069ea86f2b8d41d
'2012-06-03T03:31:35-04:00'
describe
'2168808' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIT' 'sip-files00059.tif'
face5506c73d8fae4d87e52670e11010
054e78ebfa5ca9ca218a5140c6adbd8168c5696b
'2012-06-03T03:29:36-04:00'
describe
'1985324' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIU' 'sip-files00060.tif'
8cfb3dbe9ac0889736cee78f4c918e17
944c1fce592955d7f08b9fbf31b44a69d5d56066
describe
'1973456' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIV' 'sip-files00061.tif'
9c77c383d35ba26be10049f9b5c4f902
753a296fc61240176293bc7d199403f098ab8ef9
describe
'1997228' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIW' 'sip-files00062.tif'
e006c3e5c8385bb0c2341d80e0cd2486
864e0adac9f86287bf5fe05a3304140c1991bd01
describe
'2161900' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIX' 'sip-files00063.tif'
41a1de2cb09886c0b3fabdd5c92f1c15
101a4a47105297861586a680092b78892220da8f
'2012-06-03T03:33:03-04:00'
describe
'1966800' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIY' 'sip-files00065.tif'
7cc8e67a49b4f13d210950f0fed960bb
2f2537fbddd97ab47a5cb85266d27ec41e770fd6
describe
'2018324' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPIZ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
8b96a593b8798899e6db1ab4f723c74d
6b73dc31e2506ff7e5f896ddbc128d1512ce5b1f
'2012-06-03T03:30:04-04:00'
describe
'2155284' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJA' 'sip-files00067.tif'
f8f45e6ac158c2b96fd7b04586e4c594
5f05abba2e960a92f7d97af55da31423b6e9a964
'2012-06-03T03:31:31-04:00'
describe
'2076316' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJB' 'sip-files00068.tif'
dedc8732db8a27d16754b6f21695aa9f
577a00d012459479ecbe268541f3f0f20139f260
describe
'2155624' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJC' 'sip-files00069.tif'
6c2105cc24bc0dc38999d5391b5b895a
eb7f927d1a6006c8edeb33f0932424450c64c17f
describe
'2145164' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJD' 'sip-files00070.tif'
2636c510fca06fd965b47b1df40c5997
20a453a7103fe9111a50e9cd6c0f5d9645ca7613
describe
'2148028' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJE' 'sip-files00071.tif'
b78138fa1794c0a97bac5afb45d6f872
09f7ee3354f4db33165e77330ece864cfb12196a
'2012-06-03T03:29:15-04:00'
describe
'2031480' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJF' 'sip-files00072.tif'
381ddb1e40f92b1ca3838ffe48505fe6
f15fc4414963ca7f845013bb43f6792216615b2a
describe
'1997628' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJG' 'sip-files00073.tif'
a50ba14e15769ed53c33c407d6d36d56
44b1cd1504f44ad79f3078c9e1ef4a982d3f16da
'2012-06-03T03:32:56-04:00'
describe
'2065832' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJH' 'sip-files00074.tif'
936998a37347f65456cf35a1b217ba0d
f2d398736dbdaf761c1f7e9977ce60dc677cc8ad
'2012-06-03T03:28:33-04:00'
describe
'1999648' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJI' 'sip-files00075.tif'
7958a4cdedf94f5622c4217d0976e10c
4974e03e126d68eb0c840c9316421dee76de1cc8
describe
'2092324' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJJ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
22179934f716154842b3f7a9abcae870
73fd65641b49764285d3b9591b80ed4bacc48115
describe
'1905464' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJK' 'sip-files00077.tif'
6c763a95cdb4e1bd02bae432c96ee926
cf89d876fac27dc377e1f25cb9ad0fe221165bc5
'2012-06-03T03:32:10-04:00'
describe
'2092620' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJL' 'sip-files00078.tif'
417ff996c5adf14ac0194a0798735d4e
49d27a8322f95fec5eb75f8b322af0e11ad9968c
describe
'1911816' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJM' 'sip-files00079.tif'
2391ff49123cbfb8bf0d3f3d2780cd70
d32a92d786fe6ef8d562b5562615ade0a26ebede
'2012-06-03T03:28:30-04:00'
describe
'1935796' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJN' 'sip-files00080.tif'
4ce9ec703714adb0ef65fc8794d807b1
ab4503508aee668969dbb45be57b18e4a42d5e6f
'2012-06-03T03:29:01-04:00'
describe
'2080600' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJO' 'sip-files00081.tif'
84dc718ff35c002680a3922db61c3b4a
63b081a6b37fbb4d2f771199cabcb131f7e87905
describe
'2091764' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJP' 'sip-files00082.tif'
8ec1c2c962c562aff60e0b33823aa981
b4a6984aedcd8f66598fea89a55d7b8de89df0fd
describe
'1941516' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJQ' 'sip-files00083.tif'
026d8341e4f53e2216544288098a816f
beae90134396772b9037b06e7a30c291090fda03
describe
'2092344' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJR' 'sip-files00084.tif'
651bf765a41a1c0f1c86300e9595cd48
2dd0b8d662b78199ea0b64589912f76df25a2868
describe
'1907728' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJS' 'sip-files00085.tif'
2d0d373d944cde0d8845f425a361fe90
da3bef0f6ca946be6bd5dfa0e9972bfb818cea0c
'2012-06-03T03:32:36-04:00'
describe
'2092516' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJT' 'sip-files00086.tif'
53ca489db256f14884d97ea2416ec950
9b0b8fea44c1890faeb93834141d0b3564234b9b
describe
'1929848' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJU' 'sip-files00087.tif'
cd2be7c7b2f7efcb37a731e272db08db
834f71e34d087471fd87bd37bd46dc3fc5852188
describe
'2082068' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJV' 'sip-files00089.tif'
ed4555076d9f93631fe69e2d9be17e49
1cfd8d79bdb00f2e87c5cef596f336a3a10a7e6d
describe
'1964672' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJW' 'sip-files00090.tif'
37d32e8c3a5d69116b4b3f17ffae0484
31afdedf54ffc4dffcda558c483176e82be14c40
describe
'2092560' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJX' 'sip-files00092.tif'
17b9242ec0bbd2aecd464989ab638ba8
d6ceb6a49413db5e2da0068415268d4aebae7fb9
'2012-06-03T03:34:06-04:00'
describe
'1917304' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJY' 'sip-files00094.tif'
fd6be75772a1c88574b2df6c5629c151
05e47fe769fdd897c7e895f7bbe523bd80d6e676
'2012-06-03T03:32:24-04:00'
describe
'2021124' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPJZ' 'sip-files00095.tif'
6f1c53be705a500ad62d06f2af709156
e1137de688d5f4fbd45b41cd524b96df212aa84a
describe
'2092540' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKA' 'sip-files00096.tif'
e7d5d677006c37e227c4f892e34cb57e
c5f73d2ea5f3917a0565c5e13f99a7d75b29d30d
'2012-06-03T03:32:26-04:00'
describe
'1940740' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKB' 'sip-files00097.tif'
b03321fd04fd044cdd04f6e7ab9bb5f3
2f13d77883f69f53c3923d6a74e9b97e60499fa5
'2012-06-03T03:33:04-04:00'
describe
'1952892' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKC' 'sip-files00098.tif'
b157e00dde2a2183ba26d1651a1cd865
44a2c0adc8d0ef3de2a128be3ddfe1744ba0d1b6
describe
'1845524' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKD' 'sip-files00099.tif'
052ae121c5e358730c47475182d65ff0
43dab23648d5fadb1cd8415bcaf8a3d91f8b78a1
'2012-06-03T03:34:29-04:00'
describe
'2078804' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKE' 'sip-files00100.tif'
b7a1d1636a28ab23ac8724e4b95d9135
5863b905a4a33ed3a9af4d5710f181a1b0009d17
'2012-06-03T03:30:08-04:00'
describe
'1998420' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKF' 'sip-files00101.tif'
13c5a93697c3c1da9934bac985253f19
1577deb493db1b21627aac8cfb870415cc0becfb
describe
'2071444' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKG' 'sip-files00102.tif'
57cc88791baf5a74d00dd67545c38522
23572484d44501bc40a3a587f41e8bb1154d69d3
describe
'2132000' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKH' 'sip-files00104.tif'
1f22690787ef97c15da7a697de779b04
53a41c204219c22b8937e8084bd80d72859b1404
'2012-06-03T03:34:27-04:00'
describe
'2093212' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKI' 'sip-files00105.tif'
d51bd7c5ff6fd1918000c2dcc27aa96f
51b379d616ff664097bf17eb383f21f1977cb745
'2012-06-03T03:31:05-04:00'
describe
'2033460' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKJ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
ceac1d39067cc5c49aabd869200331d6
822b46a64705e6bf7fcf6c332b5b63d902f24f8e
describe
'2119844' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKK' 'sip-files00107.tif'
21bdcd0b324691c0f747e3075b28ec81
9e05e3dcb9fd0c018a5d2856f4c9f374b85b998f
describe
'2051516' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKL' 'sip-files00108.tif'
9a48b8cfe7f3fc6e0a6a62341919453e
5f0dfab5dfc90f33cc52332884adb2cf754c6628
describe
'2023696' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKM' 'sip-files00110.tif'
23ce1cf603afce1ae7039cbd36c376a2
047d5f7999edc76915c4f5ce5809082e897b585c
'2012-06-03T03:28:29-04:00'
describe
'2122068' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKN' 'sip-files00111.tif'
6fe35b0d9c8a5e984ba1386fdcafcfc7
2950236462dd6a60d7f18ce4d68d7d38913de4a1
'2012-06-03T03:34:16-04:00'
describe
'2107784' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKO' 'sip-files00112.tif'
c31d51ddd158433702df2b98e104bc8e
038cfe7f095ecca780cdad9f5dbec76066eb22ed
describe
'2001660' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKP' 'sip-files00113.tif'
c038bf9d65130fc410de10058a7e87ac
32249f971c1af2d554ad5d06d727b2389aa2e15d
describe
'1983900' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKQ' 'sip-files00114.tif'
569f5125b858940e3dde089ac7cab5b8
75a7e665da732440e78833428223e10ccbd4946c
describe
'2042556' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKR' 'sip-files00115.tif'
3c01a73699eb63111a11950e36baa792
386e3b6d2b0b8eb565717e1c2826f671a4ee2596
'2012-06-03T03:33:08-04:00'
describe
'2025780' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKS' 'sip-files00116.tif'
e207ebda5bf7a6fd9d412b23a985ca9e
dfbd780f4f0f2a2f46148be03cac4c08dd7b8c98
'2012-06-03T03:31:10-04:00'
describe
'1957420' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKT' 'sip-files00117.tif'
56957c610d52bfe4245e8a34103a5669
b278bd07fe2bbc8455d1b8d591a46373f24c4832
'2012-06-03T03:29:22-04:00'
describe
'1958700' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKU' 'sip-files00119.tif'
717ec28cbd6d11db915211ed981a6014
3485a9814d64ea2dfdb3cbf99aacd7380670836a
'2012-06-03T03:29:11-04:00'
describe
'2049676' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKV' 'sip-files00120.tif'
b2b100a7b8fd28d8c13066b6495d3db4
a96c1a591b13fbc0ff481dcb50b5eb981bc9492d
'2012-06-03T03:28:53-04:00'
describe
'2038260' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKW' 'sip-files00121.tif'
c8d08dd30df46d916aa672f24a707d38
feb3b4145ee24a32fc03eda7986dd5f398b5b147
'2012-06-03T03:28:42-04:00'
describe
'2062760' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKX' 'sip-files00122.tif'
8c3e1e18fd02684548931954f1e678c9
3fd1006905f443c817a781fa9ac1e79d2bf7a297
describe
'1785900' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKY' 'sip-files00123.tif'
bba557f54da65f26f9fe2c58b42c3f47
745a6eb4f3960d2558850c1ad40b66d2c1e817c6
describe
'2022664' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPKZ' 'sip-files00124.tif'
55b9785106fc050af14d3c928f264143
755d44a3eab1f0bafa738bcf4463f7eff920489c
'2012-06-03T03:29:52-04:00'
describe
'1965612' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLA' 'sip-files00125.tif'
07e526aeae176faed26ccfcab8be7372
9bf7c4047b73c8222968a2f9ca696876e42bf9bc
describe
'2014008' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLB' 'sip-files00126.tif'
a9414f6b7c1422ad3a0f805d03948cf6
b54f461c1e1925fa2b3ce5e43962467bef5aa73c
describe
'6931412' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLC' 'sip-files00129.tif'
25ee23a163c9fe76682346884e995232
e8ac154efb6989c54bae0e2076d6d504682338e8
'2012-06-03T03:30:29-04:00'
describe
'7300568' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLD' 'sip-files00130.tif'
8d395e2a4de40eb5f231cbf2b1108359
3463621c2a412a8e141188b0eed2d5e754da8db5
describe
'1513296' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLE' 'sip-files00131.tif'
d7d23ac04b5d51102e8c64b7a3496656
0628767887b8f22d665dd2c01194fbef981eb7f0
describe
'1601' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLF' 'sip-files00002.pro'
a0535dfc9de9d2883a12d30893492c14
07a2be09fcbfd5b633c0624e4c99788e2b52ff15
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLG' 'sip-files00003.pro'
3c607840a9b032d17962c68cdfe1c4eb
d7d3af2fefbfe4aae4a63350ee68d048324e3e34
describe
'11773' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLH' 'sip-files00004.pro'
deb411d343a74dd29a76ae0880fee21f
6c30982ddb41e1f97e71c8daf34527dfff54ecde
describe
'2229' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLI' 'sip-files00006.pro'
73f233d7b2f1e5ed417d6e2fd7f76ac7
8c5ab98237fac419f6638c5024574e4dffcbc906
describe
'743' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLJ' 'sip-files00007.pro'
0fb28484616fbf3568e00cb358cbfe0f
da430936905daf09e64e6cc4c1909302b4b4b2aa
'2012-06-03T03:29:20-04:00'
describe
'8255' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLK' 'sip-files00011.pro'
0f87ba17104c7cff9bca7d065976f9bc
a923227e1f59ea21f38d1d2e440717b25080770b
describe
'17488' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLL' 'sip-files00013.pro'
88df9149a5059233dbd1a830c0af2014
2c6a9393a8a0d2e8d2bc6be18b9346841b8e3c29
'2012-06-03T03:34:20-04:00'
describe
'25957' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLM' 'sip-files00014.pro'
ae43d451cd1fea75b1904110f139a87b
8fbb4fe6d24eb30b55fd9450c5bb7fec89782c82
describe
'27203' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLN' 'sip-files00015.pro'
c877b6cb3f6f49e575c0c016d3dce211
0bb202853651b56afea483e75d80df87be20d762
describe
'29402' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLO' 'sip-files00016.pro'
2f6d8bd8c0b9e57073500170c61459d4
110ff1f52fb6730014d7f7fe3523c29685da0a21
describe
'28635' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLP' 'sip-files00017.pro'
e2d074ae03aedc2aec0ee4e714a375ce
128869bbdbfb8b6be046a0168d8a4a3c73ca7ea1
describe
'11437' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLQ' 'sip-files00018.pro'
b96e81a400d2d484b7e162e5f71d7012
2c0109443978134373493ab9a18ba8a5a22db1b1
describe
'29342' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLR' 'sip-files00019.pro'
7067903ef22a7cbff1d19637e01da4ef
04bca2b7535360eea20d9b92b67810b1137d61b0
describe
'29177' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLS' 'sip-files00020.pro'
b6f6003d89c63e992a20303f4e0c0df4
2dc16d5fe0ec61c532602f1b51735745398958d0
describe
'28977' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLT' 'sip-files00021.pro'
ed2ed570c56cf0022f95979951b18b2f
066c8a86f4102f5cb05d6221bcdd65241043f907
describe
'28761' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLU' 'sip-files00022.pro'
7276b90def9685bd6baa3ce6dc08a04b
c792ec3377875f595f7721d05a3ebf67e43cff75
'2012-06-03T03:31:08-04:00'
describe
'29733' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLV' 'sip-files00023.pro'
5fb7ed34c9fa5fba3529df3eb3a56c23
d0492a9eb7017aeb574343bc7ccc0f3f115c41cd
describe
'12794' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLW' 'sip-files00024.pro'
236b4753df3184848e09091579044673
7751be5918284504eee06d7c5113eeb90899c790
describe
'27428' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLX' 'sip-files00025.pro'
d77b88fbdf3e9a665b2166fb41361d67
7677b873d2de848d63c0beae92c3ee6c69c5ec41
describe
'20009' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLY' 'sip-files00026.pro'
449ca3cbb3c7f7c48de88c0d6d2afb91
ebdc203f638839ae61f7139abc6d5580743bccd9
'2012-06-03T03:31:40-04:00'
describe
'24652' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPLZ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
89963e372d8fb0a4ae7f956a66a97698
ee262119b8652c983604e659bebd14c8ec4596f3
'2012-06-03T03:28:52-04:00'
describe
'27281' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMA' 'sip-files00029.pro'
a0959a46bfa88790a07a608734129361
64f11d00d3456daf9e381ce30bf58f1f94e0c222
'2012-06-03T03:32:02-04:00'
describe
'27499' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMB' 'sip-files00030.pro'
5d543eabca11cfa66a02559dc90516ed
296b1f658aa080629d3967dd505148298184e7a0
'2012-06-03T03:34:09-04:00'
describe
'25085' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMC' 'sip-files00031.pro'
0f3933dcbed5b86bd3ff9d6ed8e3a54e
0e7a22287e63346ce837c3b80c56108aface0d9f
'2012-06-03T03:29:44-04:00'
describe
'15296' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMD' 'sip-files00032.pro'
51ec13e6bdf9b5c857f36a1702b037cf
00f0f71fcc5f5a075dbe6a120e9f8974392cf0c2
describe
'28616' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPME' 'sip-files00033.pro'
71041c223bd61b9212c815d596b0a1f5
cfe049696421b719ae8a8c8e375e3a303fa345ee
'2012-06-03T03:32:43-04:00'
describe
'24303' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMF' 'sip-files00035.pro'
3e42b8f0a4302289efb8b0f50f6fd792
4f47ff8faafb9a48888f422cffc22427e08447c6
describe
'17032' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMG' 'sip-files00036.pro'
99de1e50082629b1b91e2973089f8a57
bcb6d3c1230f8b07aa3e2f1bfc1d76faad5f6404
describe
'28379' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMH' 'sip-files00037.pro'
7a8d6106cd4ae955eff3c4b350a8928b
ad16c70703859d2fc24f7d857b6244372627276a
describe
'28306' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMI' 'sip-files00038.pro'
3cc7e1aea78f6c93d417eb9da3e382a1
668ae8d7be063bdd266ff2933f8a59d386a7b14d
describe
'28022' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMJ' 'sip-files00039.pro'
1a08bd78f3c09aa8d8c05e658a781bbe
84d86e0b31c3b8f8098bb848e2489a3948faeaf3
'2012-06-03T03:30:49-04:00'
describe
'27150' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMK' 'sip-files00041.pro'
9691720280b5a31da94d1400a5ddffb5
46a79c17d6d4797234a3c10f9d1df337551a059f
describe
'15285' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPML' 'sip-files00042.pro'
5d555a1dd188ae233fa792b4b0e978d7
60a013f608cb09c30f0fe2d10c3461a488747ae0
describe
'27837' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMM' 'sip-files00043.pro'
f8f2889f956e211b693da14ba2c9462c
9219d3ae228abda6bfe239f4d8937c8b790b7755
describe
'28260' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMN' 'sip-files00044.pro'
16e0a8d5b4181061a42d27cb29e8b8cc
381f8da955a21a562b289da7a9ab786c446e485e
describe
'26315' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMO' 'sip-files00045.pro'
3ab1ed481443473e743c7950ee072977
b0aea269ea7223833d8e33d086aa69e95b40eb79
describe
'30098' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMP' 'sip-files00046.pro'
d34b24b507734b1f684dc2e8dd9a438b
8d37886f068e4b12eebfd86b7ebb3a0eabbd8354
describe
'27495' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMQ' 'sip-files00047.pro'
4820db3a0221d9ecdbeb106250e497a3
c896507a69da72c0e42ec3e6512c297aab3ff473
describe
'28593' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMR' 'sip-files00048.pro'
19ecd2546961c923640f87b3b6d7360c
6a22dccb520a4f3a0687bab13869a76ed8652873
describe
'28248' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMS' 'sip-files00049.pro'
443245e4a03ee7f9239e0b3440b94a7e
55af7d1209b7379f1555c725c4c2dba4fa078669
describe
'28499' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMT' 'sip-files00050.pro'
dfea580e7cfd56d9f1438cd539e4be9d
521c8cfb20f84959b58c952a6290b0c4693ba420
describe
'27509' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMU' 'sip-files00051.pro'
debb699f23a92a9cbc343e2767ced886
5795dd00232e42ee9d5db24e4434b014fcffabf2
describe
'26968' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMV' 'sip-files00052.pro'
1c09b19c255d14d592414fa37f0acb3e
5ac110a0b69c66f5b73af7df93aeca7fd1fe7056
describe
'27767' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMW' 'sip-files00053.pro'
97e6e8fcf88d20accdb5ae664e7894a6
50d13973b488574669c6153e5d4c4e52264240b0
describe
'9537' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMX' 'sip-files00054.pro'
9c8aa6f56593c72ac229137acfd28f45
c317489ff2624534d83ab43541eb3103fff4f459
describe
'28332' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMY' 'sip-files00055.pro'
3b216a17774d9b367b21e812da8e0ae7
30ff4122a39fb012cf5d3593a75f5d7f45d89097
describe
'18403' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPMZ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
f8b97a4473aa070e864829c9aa44e1d3
d127668e4b543132b5da0b81d9ebdd50dc6e85cf
describe
'20318' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNA' 'sip-files00057.pro'
f78f20ef17ffd26aa1f723da31b4c2c6
d0f64ca191d475e00e81e694c96b874e9e697ced
describe
'26907' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNB' 'sip-files00059.pro'
a37a12de14edbff6d2f5711e0da41136
de02b0968fa5a591a1a39ca8541d92750d96b5db
describe
'27026' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNC' 'sip-files00060.pro'
5723b76217bfb5e3cd57bde02dbd54c8
0fb2644e4e5cb6d8df05ef9f888145a7822237d7
describe
'27518' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPND' 'sip-files00061.pro'
46288d7a7cdae83f64e21a31e5b6ffcc
df1124c36e7ea4d1bfdbcd1c61b43407db14457f
'2012-06-03T03:28:50-04:00'
describe
'27319' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNE' 'sip-files00062.pro'
7be5bbfe76a22fae5c38cced330fce3e
d7ee9905fc6075813bde4857f8bb746d40691db8
describe
'28821' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNF' 'sip-files00063.pro'
8ba3473fafb101e5b1be665c97996916
9b4f6083fc59c1aa532d22c974b60b436a153d6b
describe
'28027' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNG' 'sip-files00064.pro'
9d9a46cd1dee9c11c929ada577626e16
54e46de9eeac279b642a47c517cc805a761da191
describe
'27946' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNH' 'sip-files00065.pro'
ca93dbc83af9744dd7754dea776a795d
6d59412813c3f774bd3dbfa13afedb65f4c3bc63
describe
'27193' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNI' 'sip-files00066.pro'
cb0706bc9f66015d5f63a23ff19679f3
f80cfcc8cf97b8503ffca43e9187af4f297524e1
describe
'14350' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNJ' 'sip-files00067.pro'
54b2e000cbb2ffa4c2c4a1b76c45dd49
46574bbc20e6a7ac8034e9eea7a4e852ae94f215
'2012-06-03T03:29:21-04:00'
describe
'27650' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNK' 'sip-files00068.pro'
b01257e26b78dc19a65d94717b81977f
e0a6bec38391659fc4647f5f9d7d4fa5ac3afbe6
describe
'25154' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNL' 'sip-files00069.pro'
bd431c63848e6f9428ecc64b395f0f1c
3f1e47da506560e4d9b97eb293726ba26d775437
describe
'17432' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNM' 'sip-files00070.pro'
08e54450eae912e9e45094d256fc170e
4f3dfa6a4fdb3227455aec1d33585078153b6b8f
describe
'15307' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNN' 'sip-files00071.pro'
c2c16b5f072f58bbaa84288b2b4af8da
a48ba3edf47742f494933cc2712299be1913cd50
describe
'26449' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNO' 'sip-files00072.pro'
42a56662e1abad7e073a1793ea07d694
3a58b5ae099d6562f46f48134a7ed3e284e40294
describe
'27436' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNP' 'sip-files00073.pro'
6a85e4015aaeafe10f3da1817d3ef534
87181723b7722ad9409626df27ffadac279a5f46
'2012-06-03T03:28:25-04:00'
describe
'27430' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNQ' 'sip-files00074.pro'
fd926a24e4d28573198a6a99ed03117e
d6ea70487e9ff3496ff4a525d00a94ce36601c94
describe
'26006' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNR' 'sip-files00076.pro'
90637811ebaba98c35ec77055b2dbb2f
adb48cfaf19ad6db48b5333105d092881667edb0
'2012-06-03T03:32:59-04:00'
describe
'26032' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNS' 'sip-files00077.pro'
ae9c28f2c8c3e5f8864c53300aa68459
cfd8c31caa634c1252822fba75267bb0a3742ade
'2012-06-03T03:33:37-04:00'
describe
'13000' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNT' 'sip-files00078.pro'
dabdabe5d839dc8907057639cc32b383
85ffc8f0df24acb17ca50739f91e31fcf7cbe3e2
describe
'26002' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNU' 'sip-files00079.pro'
336918ffe1fe20c8871eab15827059f5
93d639b738d59fc9aa05f3ec9af4bc30ad23c0f1
'2012-06-03T03:33:20-04:00'
describe
'28636' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNV' 'sip-files00080.pro'
9ba0a7fd00f3f9410a5ba86ff49fa45e
6727e783f90adce2785f6f827d5c5426e65e9dbe
describe
'23868' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNW' 'sip-files00081.pro'
10c6ab75b2e0dc3fd04b8c2021e3e144
988ba88728902d50a7edc959e18e5926972b3585
describe
'19198' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNX' 'sip-files00082.pro'
977bdaf4f051b47f3d62a0b695abf5a9
99250fd3d96e5e9d1cf9dc4ca69b97adb1732a54
describe
'28802' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNY' 'sip-files00083.pro'
26a36f78da0f00bd848acf3c5f488041
f2ec2c1d77f4887746d9538d7fb090101dd203cd
describe
'27125' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPNZ' 'sip-files00084.pro'
25d478d5083bd9a6e828101a2ffe48df
b400669c587dd66cc81b32480a8016386a67ddba
describe
'29214' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOA' 'sip-files00085.pro'
ee2173435a5fa11728abff4fe1caa351
bf0ee20270a83759c40af744469103655de11ffb
describe
'28978' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOB' 'sip-files00086.pro'
378a7cb0fb0f1183ca87017de1d182b6
0f1f4dfd6e3c960ed5ba613adbc62d3181fcfba7
describe
'18111' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOC' 'sip-files00087.pro'
8f09a9dc978c1b346e033c19fedc8e5b
9a62f26c3b17e9fdbcc5c780f5b55c02f366158a
describe
'28807' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOD' 'sip-files00090.pro'
cf6115d5f8517110d5c6414882721d50
dc5cc76025c4ea0623c3d089f3cf4af2e7840572
describe
'29164' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOE' 'sip-files00091.pro'
b1c31f60b28814b9e2c5db5c6c1cbba0
c0089916d4abe9d30c9479fc9d49e7777c549f4b
describe
'29490' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOF' 'sip-files00092.pro'
201f81ec8514d04111eb11929de23f9d
7229318c8f3fd1f137707356bcb87b5c0b049412
'2012-06-03T03:31:18-04:00'
describe
'28206' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOG' 'sip-files00093.pro'
30ff7e7b75917a052a4ef1d0a5d334e1
92f5cf83ed7a5a9c16421982553ab82bbf6af3c0
describe
'13173' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOH' 'sip-files00094.pro'
c6656a1b1bc7359ddefe7ed8c3a5db71
2a5709e5de9b47cf8d079e675b08066bdc4aae4b
'2012-06-03T03:29:02-04:00'
describe
'28061' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOI' 'sip-files00095.pro'
5f94384e71ce2ed1b149572633ce86cf
c834352bbcac0cb362e7ea308a5e1f977ad9a4f1
describe
'28477' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOJ' 'sip-files00096.pro'
1bd4343422cb31b361936e10f18dc001
61cd5c3d4512fdd62dfc3f7af586f10d9ad52440
describe
'28975' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOK' 'sip-files00097.pro'
56df9699424886b28b439a5c308cd39f
446b34d4e4ae0970221500aac98af5fb9eb4f40b
describe
'12345' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOL' 'sip-files00098.pro'
6612f8caaffbcd01630f1194d0752b22
16a0ac5904aa46bdae05589cc898397723d3f33e
describe
'28997' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOM' 'sip-files00099.pro'
8cf43ae8ee8d993cbeb024e4c88f1788
a0e32cc68281ec99b35ee93c8d95c88b5a3f2e65
describe
'29293' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPON' 'sip-files00100.pro'
046a346d74d11170823b884d9f4bed0b
7022ae5a488e98613876d54de0b17ae68fd79e16
'2012-06-03T03:28:24-04:00'
describe
'15304' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOO' 'sip-files00101.pro'
3789d28fb9acf68a14f33fec4cb6abf5
8ca5f9d83675579899b4009135be188438c7fa13
describe
'29583' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOP' 'sip-files00102.pro'
22412e1442f39ed259e4bf1253309b81
d25395533bd859e93e060485716f17d62d6f5195
describe
'29950' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOQ' 'sip-files00103.pro'
321104b2cbe5052749714ab5aa55ccff
28e5291a2e180849e789c98192fc95fa813fd16b
describe
'27954' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOR' 'sip-files00104.pro'
2cb1475d12486dc3d8470d386fa830b7
e44b33b0a9c3ee22f4b46035e73bef5d1f437082
describe
'27062' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOS' 'sip-files00105.pro'
a6ee6f10c14bb3926a6b70701e7732ed
bf8f8b9f14b5ce8987e06fb7b2d78f09f62d3726
'2012-06-03T03:28:58-04:00'
describe
'26385' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOT' 'sip-files00106.pro'
517cf5ef036d56415e9d68e8b4990978
42e8b64ef9ae1796b6bf9dac231f02ca83f8b067
'2012-06-03T03:34:23-04:00'
describe
'14027' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOU' 'sip-files00107.pro'
318e134e34239976e16869f45cd4ad14
d2b404f0cde9b01c417ab52456b20efd3c860eff
describe
'27210' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOV' 'sip-files00109.pro'
36a70c93dbbc399e4f90dfbea2b97437
f17026565af2c8c76212cf8c6d424d9be505ea7f
describe
'27408' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOW' 'sip-files00110.pro'
f28f423ce72238581bac9bf5c344dc5b
4642110fc80e3ee8d6f57c23dfd59c1aebaffb67
describe
'24020' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOX' 'sip-files00112.pro'
b7fa97993145d77e510aa73d8e271e61
fd84142437a17c07bf16d987a11882c5c42df660
describe
'25677' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOY' 'sip-files00113.pro'
f52b3a83dae5568139ddd0252ec5700f
e18d9c6d08ec0719c90d5a4a9ecb1c56eeb2233a
describe
'27097' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPOZ' 'sip-files00114.pro'
9b0717c6abbd766ac83694cbd108498c
6688e2fc59b8b6dc9e903f7862b255cdc7cc4869
describe
'28312' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPA' 'sip-files00115.pro'
1f2b8fe54e0203a5b570ed8bd9a1e71e
36a2e879a4470b178ce865253ae72ef0142d308e
'2012-06-03T03:29:13-04:00'
describe
'26972' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPB' 'sip-files00117.pro'
f661dc810aaf1d42f6b45e4238ddb876
f7610f2988d4bb9d601dc98937b57c8aaa0455b7
describe
'14549' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPC' 'sip-files00119.pro'
606e653702d640242509ec90cb6d8f25
5f5205f9f95b61df4881107636f55e9ab5599bb1
describe
'27280' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPD' 'sip-files00120.pro'
dd3f5ff04f8800dd4c3d5dcb3d5cf48e
f38d71f9714f6998361a0c14c028335e2f630b54
describe
'26668' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPE' 'sip-files00121.pro'
1aa7070c737fe850dea0b2582b60c253
02045f1f787af4a116f4abc263ab5aff79167131
describe
'26220' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPF' 'sip-files00122.pro'
881263126cf0d4d87267a877fa0be9cc
7e3e9db49440c73b85da27ee31b89e6955a08172
describe
'29391' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPG' 'sip-files00123.pro'
0b34f7b4da65983abe87bdb80a8de440
3f16a0428fd5ae4f60e4a164f46cac001b885709
'2012-06-03T03:30:01-04:00'
describe
'29283' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPH' 'sip-files00124.pro'
919fe07752201cdb67c4a1721b74be19
6afb17530351dfc2b1e5e82c3efe32364d205d4b
describe
'11297' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPI' 'sip-files00125.pro'
06497109c54657313bc6f65cc27142fd
cc7a2a1279594fe2568cefe2e25fdfe933cc4124
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPJ' 'sip-files00131.pro'
0e1126fdbbd6df39e46f4467ce9b75df
2caa10b22cf350486e5e69f3c6d9aa89aff30c53
'2012-06-03T03:34:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPK' 'sip-files00001.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2012-06-03T03:32:50-04:00'
describe
'369' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPL' 'sip-files00002.txt'
290b7db3637a801a87f3d9809e572b7f
a8dc44cc8d00c3cce92aaf28d0df45ab0ee8e970
'2012-06-03T03:32:47-04:00'
describe
'108' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPM' 'sip-files00003.txt'
51ab8013bfcafcbc152b947ca1b34bca
4d85f9a9bfd6697190485cc979546d94b7e67c6c
'2012-06-03T03:32:45-04:00'
describe
'550' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPN' 'sip-files00004.txt'
e75014d8e43310a009c304a93b1dfcf6
2f1f0527a755d1bf3fe230b3af4e8395dcf1bfc0
describe
'6' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPO' 'sip-files00005.txt'
d5fe9e946f2861e765675ca39f69aba5
21e03607fbc6d9303d7d5f3e515ae2585b42a246
'2012-06-03T03:32:03-04:00'
describe
'181' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPP' 'sip-files00006.txt'
9569fee2c70c7967497057edc6a85d6c
a68f879e089703566398b678d5592165e025e96b
'2012-06-03T03:30:36-04:00'
describe
'54' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPQ' 'sip-files00007.txt'
0d5c9a0eed8c9f9f4d776245c441ea5e
c766e097c59d9067a318420b6ac4ec9f3c29a975
describe
Invalid character
'434' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPR' 'sip-files00009.txt'
a09bd1f70bc6c7969afde9d6219386cf
d8a4d4044dd680274457683c60fa2d6ea963f015
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPS' 'sip-files00010.txt'
32f8e0bb6944a6efe8b1351b72b8facc
bde71cc9b50e6357223cce13ea2b56e109cbf124
describe
'500' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPT' 'sip-files00011.txt'
1e1e086eda8865fef65d6b29e9ba8a8f
6d5512bcec97593d2db581a3ac768bba3c4fd3d4
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPU' 'sip-files00012.txt'
372e25f23b5a8ae33c7ba203412ace30
397d543883c5cb5019a0ed08acba13fcb26261c2
describe
'778' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPV' 'sip-files00013.txt'
042d6d91d589c01c44a061080562bbde
15e0a4b5a6656335e4635c0e3cdd8dc1342e440e
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPW' 'sip-files00014.txt'
21339e316027b77aff6e496cccbc4346
b931fde962e20b34b824ab85cb4178743fa2479d
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPX' 'sip-files00015.txt'
a5e638b8adcc47a42495e6af2d365301
98805c5f23034ca7b5d0cdb5190d95752b93d96f
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPY' 'sip-files00016.txt'
f1775d78bf6b34c26593459850b3a783
0d301acc7711d0543be29835b1e749055c99bb55
'2012-06-03T03:30:46-04:00'
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPPZ' 'sip-files00017.txt'
17970323b5c37af3741ae0a1965e5692
5c8f98035d38379464eeff2a85d369704f7bde37
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQA' 'sip-files00019.txt'
18fb90122e30fba81dc3b536e996982f
7b033865321cc01de3c8f885e527940dbe1c91c0
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQB' 'sip-files00020.txt'
0dc54384df4cddfd2b3417327ba3296c
d98098f9d3f0b8ff61f458081a78dcc5016966c7
describe
'1184' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQC' 'sip-files00021.txt'
7c85830796a4e46d2bbab35f7fe25954
3390ef2c45763700b7dce3a0b1abe4ef516a932e
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQD' 'sip-files00022.txt'
18b101f8dbe7f55fa8ead5c88cf3d608
4a34b95f247de7828d0f7a810bf7cc36bec512d6
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQE' 'sip-files00023.txt'
44e56527c243763675a3f91695cd4515
437034ffbcb591987c82af0428314efa8e4515b2
describe
'521' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQF' 'sip-files00024.txt'
cff1a64345451de50eeef092b306bf84
7a286e1534b3e3277b489e154e2101e2fac4ab37
describe
'837' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQG' 'sip-files00026.txt'
6a8653b824d9801e89f197dfff0f37e7
e232f512fdb85dfcf3300295ce8dc1a24e9e0ee6
'2012-06-03T03:34:21-04:00'
describe
'994' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQH' 'sip-files00027.txt'
472270721afa27215ac33a48dab95c6b
d4082339397a87d367fde1bb01583961805b3b21
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQI' 'sip-files00028.txt'
7175b57ddd1aceb1477889c90d3d2da0
8d591cac3c61f0b466b7c795c88a9e8f3f7c069c
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQJ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
d76d342628454578c3702003de77bb01
cada9a2107a4dbd09582dd780dd1867e32aca854
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQK' 'sip-files00030.txt'
f1df9e29e241dc3970b7d1ac43f44d79
b0b605510ec66eb603e3b2a637195437564fccb5
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQL' 'sip-files00031.txt'
e46435e8fc752f25d599e987c9ff3544
58329adae40e72cf3353e6c9aa96787d94988eb4
describe
'663' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQM' 'sip-files00032.txt'
cca1557a59966168e53baa3bfbadc578
e22d153a5bcfba2edcd95e63007aefc27f4f3758
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQN' 'sip-files00033.txt'
abdad6ce9c947d12a01c7d5e867254ef
71da7bc56d0430722bcf741243c8d0e9938625f0
describe
'1108' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQO' 'sip-files00034.txt'
80ddf7ab1e63fc1320c83736e594f231
4a7be14fe2bb8a9d61d1b5913cd476400a9abb4c
describe
'979' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQP' 'sip-files00035.txt'
489c5bcea77f6438cee782815e835cc5
6fb344e4b43a8cf634551ddae0bbb4496b4db8c3
'2012-06-03T03:33:46-04:00'
describe
'749' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQQ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
1a0364fb2b3d77ba17ffa9c8e0bb135e
623172db2a5625dd9f72e1099e7d5629c64ce849
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQR' 'sip-files00037.txt'
fa811977edd28c9afc305a7393f020dd
aca1d0ecaae3696fab8fc56950bea98aec2e1b6f
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQS' 'sip-files00038.txt'
68421e85d6054a5100338bc373dd14c3
1ac6bc8082dee082f3eddc2a2e5c773691f48956
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQT' 'sip-files00039.txt'
43367d0c93d6c2d86db92ce8fa4e5cfc
2ae65792b24a29d7762a68830ca691dc7e43ca76
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQU' 'sip-files00040.txt'
f0b744d651f48ea0a7bef184b6547d5d
8370e258d19a623c9c61d68b2be539718b6538ba
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQV' 'sip-files00041.txt'
07d3e7be2fdc82b84914ea3a80ba3942
1a22f837a16b9b04a842c8c34d5c7c7b072f9dbd
describe
'653' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQW' 'sip-files00042.txt'
18b519cbd7699170ea53373062371f29
f931585fd2ce54382a52ba77323845d78b572257
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQX' 'sip-files00043.txt'
ba5cb2ff83ec313d4f6767d049ac9b97
1f75668bdbfae0814cb3b0fe0e5edab557d6b429
describe
'1148' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQY' 'sip-files00044.txt'
aff78637da659f2db2280b5600a9d0e2
7178276c8548f980ce18509c6ebef76355236f85
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPQZ' 'sip-files00045.txt'
ff3415c05fae82960c787c85a25f04d0
d7c865f541d1e86980a8c85099224a5cbdf80c0f
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRA' 'sip-files00046.txt'
2fd73cb0afe082af7d753307f7f177f3
1df893d76708a76dbd9ed5aaff5c2658817219b8
'2012-06-03T03:28:54-04:00'
describe
'1120' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRB' 'sip-files00047.txt'
fd0cd45303d6e50cbd47b6f49d4d96aa
64e4c5dd3ab906b77a6251ae9128f06638457882
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRC' 'sip-files00048.txt'
d4c35bafab03ff760d204049494d5508
99138442c5adeb1f06e5d5a6a035f6c3c5378553
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRD' 'sip-files00049.txt'
02c427ee4995f255839b8171cd0a4c90
56c1cb2dbc35aa15b8b1b6aecd91ef34ecec47a3
'2012-06-03T03:30:15-04:00'
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRE' 'sip-files00050.txt'
d9e6fc9c54e0f54780857789cb85b50a
8345b6389146170fe3b8e3e244085884e884af97
'2012-06-03T03:31:24-04:00'
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRF' 'sip-files00051.txt'
be4b5e51138546de79b7f2a72e5d278b
c118ce530194e6f0a40589861cbd1562e8b9c688
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRG' 'sip-files00052.txt'
af45babc32a45c92d77fe1b5b77a9f8e
8f829f0b94036d8c2c0996cb13cc1c7d648bb8d2
'2012-06-03T03:32:33-04:00'
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRH' 'sip-files00053.txt'
402b7c8eb08d3bfef9dfd9059e8dd24c
dab755939b47cd3b6c849584a0665a0aebeffff2
describe
'441' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRI' 'sip-files00054.txt'
b3745a546b9fa05824744c7a08cbbac5
8bbfb1b5f2c9c3c1998e86eb58b8985da95716ec
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRJ' 'sip-files00055.txt'
44ebd499f540c9671b6f1c596338d1da
9bc111890809e767cfff0bfe52082ae7b0adb6fb
describe
'736' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRK' 'sip-files00056.txt'
057ddda5ec1e8c6fdcc669cd92325623
64c4ea229575af61cf60fc30706d1f918be26f1a
describe
'891' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRL' 'sip-files00057.txt'
4e7e20bb61ea1cc0cbbb7356680e248e
5f91dd01753eb06d767deb5167c6abe26f024533
describe
Invalid character
'507' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRM' 'sip-files00058.txt'
1c69bfef9bd11dd6dd871d1047772507
d4b802b1c5ce3be8666f7036420c072daf3f880d
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRN' 'sip-files00059.txt'
1fcd0016520055fabec69c4360eb05e4
d5ab857e819e99ce2dd5f50a0d07b997f691f105
describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRO' 'sip-files00060.txt'
fb1f3b56790636ca49275b487ef328d4
e80e8afef56ef28568e359eadb16afeadc4c3e3f
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRP' 'sip-files00061.txt'
f7ec84d68fa7f23bc7bc061826690218
da390ec12a4efdf791a9d6d19d1cd36ae356a0a6
describe
'1089' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRQ' 'sip-files00062.txt'
d0d00ef6f7a55532e49406d689f0bbd9
08cb33b76d74b6fa0ec14cbba5df1a12c84caffc
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRR' 'sip-files00063.txt'
cf294fdb0fffbf91d50411094f2a21e1
1532eca311b1e9bb4e683e6dc26bfb8e2a0e337a
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRS' 'sip-files00064.txt'
07c02e9fb07d24137ab5503fdbd6ee4c
3a926165432f90d462ff9cf77a4bda9cd9e275b1
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRT' 'sip-files00065.txt'
0c57a0d07d99d73541c80d228acdced9
f733456f094fb60558eb037abe04d1829d32e99e
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRU' 'sip-files00066.txt'
29b06b7dd5dc16d230b92413b6d9a9cc
fbd6e2b5849e86caa1be90c3d7ec1dd2f4e9f844
describe
'592' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRV' 'sip-files00067.txt'
0a050a68835b66c9a02540cb997798ea
34bf33e38a9055b2eb1e4879c605363a73ccc79d
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRW' 'sip-files00068.txt'
7fda0b90fe00cc3cc7bbe0b0932e8bb2
18fe50fe1ca61fd9e3896fe15b1774af43e30fd7
describe
'1022' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRX' 'sip-files00069.txt'
a9674ff5d0d1db094fd6c595e2f40854
7b52c143390ee90843e73552401ed8caf83dd870
describe
'739' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRY' 'sip-files00070.txt'
832a27240cc707849b40f186b8efe0b9
8e854d7a174a9e0b41aa9cd1a6cc9bc06c3ff749
describe
'678' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPRZ' 'sip-files00071.txt'
4fda373491a5f5dfd34636aa0b147906
124464ae97b0df2636a95ac60babba572111b375
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSA' 'sip-files00072.txt'
42c4859a84ec34fa6cf731c1bfbd3247
8c2dffc2ed164c18a56290d5e262fba6c1e50fd3
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSB' 'sip-files00073.txt'
7a9146cf99ec895cfda3ab8cbe2b2d8d
5d8fa566f78c62448f86b26589883aecccf3e544
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSC' 'sip-files00074.txt'
f3d01796360876c2bcb3c14d67b8b3d3
85d32cd344da60b366dad1e180617973224ec93a
'2012-06-03T03:33:39-04:00'
describe
'646' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSD' 'sip-files00075.txt'
404e8659d536e7a0014c510d3e00f09b
e98f3bf102ebf9d5c7dbfe215a3f32ac1e6e637d
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSE' 'sip-files00076.txt'
4e65fdab9fd4a00ab493d98652c26ecf
16b0f8d9be8b3374fbf42f70650296879f5e6fdc
describe
'536' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSF' 'sip-files00078.txt'
932a7b0eb86da71c13d72c74f9549806
a66db1eac13b60b5fd29321587c65caa700537d1
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSG' 'sip-files00079.txt'
a86c25ba34b350d4421b3b99341af1f5
907675110f2ae44adc34579c8d6ff97802e2d70e
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSH' 'sip-files00080.txt'
b83cde466e72ea5fb77eadf081b83107
dcf110d31c879fbe1aab50685bf4a411bc4f62a5
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSI' 'sip-files00081.txt'
74c59d4ca56c9cc558e214f099e4e52a
39f97f0660bf29652cb94a18189bbed734f5ecb7
describe
'851' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSJ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
61b094f1de727bb11304b447dd438083
ecbabff56763bb6cf66def7dce6435360637ce78
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSK' 'sip-files00083.txt'
861fd740d84d108fdf43ea867d031f84
5c937ba04fce03161cbf67abdbb99d8f9b66e297
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSL' 'sip-files00084.txt'
6d63da640dfa768e1f8ea9ff2aa649fd
603e2559c2045d3b39563521386913bdc44f3c8a
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSM' 'sip-files00085.txt'
a5ad859f2fe8d4a75541b42f1dbb9b9f
f63e2951d647a63bfa7837d423d2e9f426fc400d
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSN' 'sip-files00086.txt'
89bc176d7ee42fd9ef2e505bfe21af6a
27000f44c0c5090479e56382786761b9f516051a
describe
'735' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSO' 'sip-files00087.txt'
4ff0ebf9920e3281ece9f08999d1c6b4
82917141e279ccfa7bf69aa5d1caba51a9651510
describe
'724' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSP' 'sip-files00088.txt'
df5834d7216fdfb3ee2e1e1c6a84a35c
65ec2fa2237f82605fb12baed8459294c27ea78c
'2012-06-03T03:30:28-04:00'
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSQ' 'sip-files00090.txt'
b7fccd1fa39187170bdf44ae9e14ce55
acadb9a32d53d10c4783d968cf6eb51a65f2405e
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSR' 'sip-files00091.txt'
9842582eff98c21f2878697697b2e2b4
fddffe6e74eb5dd849f32e24cd15f1f56ee4ee7a
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSS' 'sip-files00092.txt'
7a3d6b12c0c10685869d0914970ea16a
d40113bee95c819ff1dbb2dd222a8258f6b27144
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPST' 'sip-files00093.txt'
18178080d7cc907c84f65e0d74628122
9883a7ab013acd82103fb9824c932ceba3b7af32
describe
'535' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSU' 'sip-files00094.txt'
6ff41f129f9bc525e2e4f7c09b2bbab7
3bd135c0d3d64cada932dcf3d34be0ee03118a46
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSV' 'sip-files00095.txt'
187691de5cce8406501dff0f50c4b108
f824aca940ffe18be7a74cd1c6607b89c10384c3
'2012-06-03T03:30:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSW' 'sip-files00096.txt'
f4dfecd47135d74fda759f5aa9966b72
ae20de5ad4d40b3efd13be45d5d2f49bd285287b
describe
'511' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSX' 'sip-files00098.txt'
0af177eb85203ed9756f4b0d0798d594
ef3a7c9f77bb6f0f97d7f95ebe3c86baa83df2b5
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSY' 'sip-files00099.txt'
902f9ab4bc63dbd310dee3e38a1980fd
8407ccce9385cc3af6520c8bd9287a347180a9b8
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPSZ' 'sip-files00100.txt'
c29e9663b641d95ff24c42166bca1bb3
6371f9f6d68f886cbbc21c4d51d3983bba43a6b6
describe
'654' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTA' 'sip-files00101.txt'
2a916d9e5326fc36e17ba32531306e48
884fb7c1fa9a74eba793290fbc5560f22825a2ea
'2012-06-03T03:34:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTB' 'sip-files00102.txt'
928a1a6e0495dc0bff1cc474a1f5ed1e
75b2262c85f410822c96e205246f921426418864
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTC' 'sip-files00103.txt'
18d5927b53aa32da7efd9bb1999d04ad
4da5765b96c502343672918165f551279a8d4944
'2012-06-03T03:28:32-04:00'
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTD' 'sip-files00104.txt'
e06798e0f46c9d665cb24a0123434496
04b641e33b866e0ca27ea17ff71344d5694aa8b5
describe
'1082' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTE' 'sip-files00105.txt'
bbc2c5d4e707b50b66c525bf45de71c5
bbdda5e925a6e170dd77ef39294ba28ada479567
'2012-06-03T03:30:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTF' 'sip-files00106.txt'
fb017d979eb4290212dd4e42ba7c04ff
681ae6baf5e8ae12366fdd5c491e176d9ac404eb
describe
'573' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTG' 'sip-files00107.txt'
2a9bf6ad7a4d566f278f01f8bed712e4
538aac62e02980212bfc04c330b1bbe1f03ef5c4
describe
'818' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTH' 'sip-files00108.txt'
d293323a3e6b7605ba6c2262a0226a2f
c134f7e8b23a8fa6d6964caa2c8a72a84c03e067
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTI' 'sip-files00109.txt'
b6d522afc23047a2d98ef8ddfa48bdbf
15534f4640b2e5bd622c8ecfdff5a6e88ed7d03b
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTJ' 'sip-files00110.txt'
ce73a955f2179729347fd2873dcbd6db
e02c6b930ec23bbe962511c78e405cb1bd023a9a
describe
'510' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTK' 'sip-files00111.txt'
c4f85aaf47f5f49f73e6e3e3bb4d53b1
2a45273e0b2ea6c2f7cd4cc6a04a9b9e23594e9e
describe
'966' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTL' 'sip-files00112.txt'
fba50ef35dbd1c98a0260a11819031a2
9f75a4ae14ce2fb9c1200453d45ddb4706256af9
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTM' 'sip-files00113.txt'
77af369ee7cb925d815104c482c94ee1
b0cb7ea27683faa36e29f18cccab9494a3f1699e
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTN' 'sip-files00114.txt'
a056491a63008f271fbdaa7168b246cb
238590abcfe1ebc7eadb3e717e1597892cfc61d3
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTO' 'sip-files00115.txt'
873cb40f43b879041076105f613770a0
4896f3289aa8e7dac36dc4188a194b63a5e847c9
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTP' 'sip-files00116.txt'
5ed5082417a5e159ab3e65fabacb3638
a5b556098afd15535e6d586fc2b3b69e9ffe08d2
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTQ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
16414bd5ff8001061303bd639001556d
90e95b1e260aa8c31c97a7df4806d1c7dd93e1e5
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTR' 'sip-files00118.txt'
93963dd4e1c8a74d6304c271476a1701
462c0af7bcaf22394ffb3d8f59f6a1e2689a5101
describe
'595' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTS' 'sip-files00119.txt'
8eb016995094097e0362091ccfdab4bc
3393d4f13831d02ffcc9cb59cb78899a1c15c511
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTT' 'sip-files00120.txt'
b41a71ac600379e60a225bad7261309b
17630d9177eb20a34562415c559d36fdc9b921b1
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTU' 'sip-files00121.txt'
0013f5ad114a568a6271427dbe8a42f9
281d255c24d5a4dbc569c13a35320cdfcb3b65ad
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTV' 'sip-files00122.txt'
38d0468abf18527a295918b9f66f88ce
e8fee1e40d674c7e523949d2e26a99188096987a
'2012-06-03T03:33:49-04:00'
describe
'1170' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTW' 'sip-files00123.txt'
e0b4f32be5d3af78cfef668b6c077c49
bfdd6575703e72bf024f6ed013e15892928c4f5b
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTX' 'sip-files00124.txt'
f4715f94462bbc1b4b2ad81be4efa623
1bb038aba645e44407efd506dbc685873c49e23c
describe
'456' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTY' 'sip-files00125.txt'
29e9fcc90957c4e90b7fa474ac91db5c
3e1502c964e6991f99b965677695e49e944b4675
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPTZ' 'sip-files00126.txt'
8d3e9ad73e4100752b5d7f537d1d3576
49389213beb327293d9177037d1a8306e435ca79
describe
'7' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUA' 'sip-files00129.txt'
5d2f4e819bb6e65e954001aa5fab3b24
b23c45bc8f902ffa4581ada717448c1b7c5f63ad
describe
'45375' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUB' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
78d153779c3ae4634296db13d72245a3
326846cd9b87ce180d933ae9f7ba375c7afd27e4
'2012-06-03T03:34:13-04:00'
describe
'148923' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUC' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
ce43425d9c1dfc5f4c16118bea345d0f
c1931479fb75177ace8e09ba0206004d732f3a40
describe
'108504' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUD' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
2df90640e9ae669c885754551c43a698
a567dd7fa057568fcf3823c766e11d2fbd0ce68a
describe
'34917' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUE' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
f902fd60a1300aa87bc69e97f42ade57
32e9014f670356f8b4e6ffd753f109f2fecbf99c
describe
'25903' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUF' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
ad3719b1aa81f874f3b40686d2480b91
d262dba62a769275d02ed219a6884e737666df5b
'2012-06-03T03:29:00-04:00'
describe
'20966' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUG' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
81afc8ae2acd207424e37d86c3583e82
d720bb7d16d4fd23df6cb659725a5233f4c0fa68
describe
'34576' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUH' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
f1f87711c5ac0e2be0be7633771eda28
b6d2a1477274be0789b2cf9637c84579e334430d
describe
'19808' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUI' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
6d75479fd9ada76c5d81cf7728849dd7
a3be26e79913687747b946b219950727b6fee129
describe
'18460' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUJ' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
42f007a1d934f7e7c205f9e4302b3457
12b0edad4cee68d981aeb8478abff9e777e0ca32
describe
'174744' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUK' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
5c146c9c8bc41b464f15358706e2bed6
eb1b740f21ad6df76acb88c3adbf6ae29679dcb1
describe
'56313' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUL' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
b7f7619e53f94409d9e8a092ccfbedeb
790474d9a144f5bff3777071bccd9ce854bee04c
'2012-06-03T03:32:41-04:00'
describe
'141954' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUM' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
12fdf5c75760816b4c4b10d0a1ede0a3
8dc12b676550ea6e00634dcbaada934a1bcf3b14
describe
'46705' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUN' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
3b87310c60145ac5dea62ba4d0a4102a
c0cc3da6aa6399170e7ced068bd5cd093476654b
describe
'19789' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUO' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
521aac25f52852a1b8a58d7d2a259f28
4426692556c39f3bd89ff7c53fce348e434a5cea
describe
'47500' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUP' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
057b45c8c825f5264977dc7edd64b726
bc6272a9c9450fb9c3c3b3e0d777fb3c0aeb95e5
describe
'28684' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUQ' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
8e1a45329de7cc9c94181b608cbd9a04
3ba2a032ec61158d78f617a1d3db892f741ed1aa
describe
'20161' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUR' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
901899e3c0ec6809a1ae551c7ab579d4
f7d8e1a91e4758dd5e811ce5873f44a6cbb7b513
describe
'18466' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUS' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
2bd88f627a5b50269fdcfe04029c98cc
2c01b107454d815c086e2e1e6e6fd8a91f1041f2
describe
'21757' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUT' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
e8d5502e75ca3652cdfaa128891f3b94
9b63ad38658a19f5e5c58c3921779ac77b735aac
describe
'18718' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUU' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
7cf4908916fe69c3ed00e3c4fb5a9be1
94e7aafbeaeac7ca3ee9269d07d44f912173e1e7
describe
'18023' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUV' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
09f3b99d3f2661ef2de62b0bc90f3b63
8a5f4a1a566701b9ea17afffd73fdf772cf611e1
describe
'145350' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUW' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
206669cb3662b55c36295b3af92df157
90c0ba8e24cd9e0a7767b38da8d0b6af3d5db1c6
describe
'47822' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUX' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
9b0da53724df5d202ac68fa85488aedf
efa172822d726098e0deca8a45b9eb842d8c9fea
describe
'70845' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUY' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
aa189cb3227e0d389ef5705c3440157e
aad2113214059881c9a03321542d318d7782edee
describe
'34761' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPUZ' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
5db9074373934dd35954705c1d9f5c0e
94b54e1cb492a12bf72df025ba9dba04eeff0f05
describe
'75119' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVA' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
eb025724b077663f941cd0fafe7021fc
26446faff250cb075e3db430ca1e9e1ff14b31d5
describe
'36193' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVB' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
0a20bc2d4bae0acd5f9911429232e0ec
f9d81e9ae4140bfaf3582058e9d342f3243a0e4f
'2012-06-03T03:33:51-04:00'
describe
'74615' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVC' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
bce451d0edf87ffab4de811bd5279cc7
3f48a512af79061e2f9985cd298f8a34a9196d48
describe
'35248' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVD' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
48ee4b71ed7795d7f142efeab3fb236d
174ed3f3cd47351f2262ff2c2923b21b7bb04735
describe
'79869' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVE' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
0b623680f87668ca39c71643a9849f38
d2c004d011670b0fed052ce0f646ccc2f047eada
describe
'36760' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVF' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
0a848ca8e4bff9c12401aaa2ce8f6539
c36b2112f8db64c06655b33f81c6f4eb9580b046
describe
'61382' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVG' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
d7d25af99eea508fbcff2ffdc6fe612e
c3150cba6945cefd59a6a5a6d71a3769b6516a00
describe
'179909' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVH' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
b965a233ec35a248014987a18ffae67d
45a10eece2d0d838e9956169e084fd15a0740144
describe
'60004' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVI' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
9c1f558c2e54403f309865ed1933fdfb
ae32ab3811315bb9f895c6a4089433ff6b60542f
describe
'179602' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVJ' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
c2d615c32b3a2d50fb89fa04876b00d7
92edcc8d4624f4467a985cfddd7af936489291ed
'2012-06-03T03:34:26-04:00'
describe
'59509' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVK' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
b26196847c8e1bde7d393ea3e684c972
b167a8a13ba021b67d7ea7907cc4bb32a8ce9db2
describe
'186898' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVL' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
e6273aa6097260b8eb69e9e23f7eb5de
62d3e72a295c221e914d92937ce730897fadd7ff
describe
'60774' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVM' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
2428fdcde96b05ed843af2416173e366
9830e4d12c167410ca0cbbff32fd7760fb66d36b
describe
'81650' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVN' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
8f7a1abda0e70469de1694bb3e1c9114
745492cce4e6dceb3ec773c8ed701f0215241af3
describe
'36676' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVO' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
1f1fd08d4b7445b9ec0c8948ee56ee08
ddaf871fffd4b7bd9b637ac383ed8acc034c3a2f
describe
'157275' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVP' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
4e92ef7f334eb6034285e05eafe24fc2
bb754e27ae64bd4d5fda6a4ccdd90322b90c339b
describe
'51715' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVQ' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
586f4b53e64b388da31860982d175e77
f20ca3eafe86134c5d9aed3a042d6b70ceea2567
describe
'72989' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVR' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
71ee630403d494eb8e688855f0705a29
8b22e27401c45742d1ece36d1478e22b46a5a2da
describe
'34819' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVS' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
edd9c8b11262c0e99d5f8d1551c1355e
bdb037823ca5e57fbebe8bc8fbcd255c2c02f8e9
describe
'161459' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVT' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
03f7b15e57654da0ad947a761b37bb56
772dc5a50996af419ac1f099f73a4daffd14e42a
describe
'54382' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVU' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
3ebe088584a8490381f19c829e25fbd1
b69a0fc6f60955a3251175e32bd7a864407d946d
describe
'164491' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVV' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
285f8382d7d9bdd237126e394b6cf8ba
a19f4f232ec57ad34757060819648e40c38d4637
'2012-06-03T03:34:05-04:00'
describe
'56483' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVW' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
d651d567dfd2c7a5bf958c41e04ff0b4
eccc931d0f54cbdc460e21c1ed0249a018ff0ecf
describe
'169376' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVX' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
b00f51352e9f532a933824c2c09b9dc2
dc74b85311af930ad1cccd6f70608459a789cd8e
describe
'57315' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVY' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
996384598b5ee41e2088676cbff321ef
afa65587eb7c661846eb0f4e2f7649ab8613d792
describe
'169415' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPVZ' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
a72cabf92208611d8e84c1f587b4dd95
6ad14fb538f261e3c339ad29cb32f76b8be3d746
describe
'57758' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWA' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
56cc2e83f9daa0dc4a99af0f07c330d7
c4a393aefcd51b28af5cec6758922fcb7a5f1c3e
describe
'162744' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWB' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
5a8a53031dc31232b0de9878c2d18ca9
3b34ef78a5d4b2961a380ccdf1100031666e1dbe
describe
'58642' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWC' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
1c7b0a6bb4de71b0a0eeececd151335d
39ab3140b5e2cd7dfd14813b89f7a18055aa4236
'2012-06-03T03:30:52-04:00'
describe
'173171' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWD' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
bde001af961e9cc6e783228b73317f9e
27698090e737b983cadd622054adff1b1a563a71
describe
'56149' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWE' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
8fe420adb1b6cda4b51817e4d29f823f
a77221552b45788774491afb1cb9dec0d0979935
describe
'166663' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWF' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
9538bc4db1aa8f751e52b7e3b21eaeb2
831bbe0bfb812bab1c7833f0b061004dd32d4137
describe
'55052' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWG' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
514c42aa7c1c10688305c19bcca425b0
f9f3c0f9824c083e0f8d3316b9581530683df669
describe
'175379' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWH' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
1f7d574ed368e0ad568673087e2a7ad4
325ef409ca51466b3047125decebc5b8998bc94e
describe
'56301' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWI' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
e8b76fd945fda679a49d555c32dc40b3
c4766ddfbf326066e017c6628738ada7e3a4615c
describe
'56429' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWJ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
3e6eabe3be51985556e9009f0f93503e
625e374224e0e5450afb6bccff301882a8ac6eeb
describe
'163671' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWK' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
a0bbd2946f2793ba53b9e3962ee7a99e
b12a670fc87277cf7ae3f69d724c4bd449d1a76d
describe
'53894' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWL' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
0a3b4d043012ffe5ef7dd445de548f0c
cb614275f92619462298334be575435a1a44255e
describe
'158669' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWM' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
42c3c640fc3c6a9581a7716b2830bfe4
360ce6979c4743ef811f42fd93570565550bed65
'2012-06-03T03:34:14-04:00'
describe
'53278' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWN' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
d8e204bc4f3a212b7630e03181e27be6
af91db2c99006e6717465d32ce4cd6cca9c097df
describe
'175745' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWO' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
b5e2f5d581d038b768b579d7260b7ed3
5398c15ff0a0caac32d72ce1a81163c7be76dc6b
describe
'58607' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWP' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
443b30e0fa611b4a656c5737a720ebc3
66f3fcac1bbda29f7e164677e6bc42d8eb9f7c9c
describe
'174332' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWQ' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
5eb2e9560fd656387f79b64a0c4f5431
6ce105e904153170ec15007c5453032197f7742c
describe
'59455' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWR' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
027bcf32d359d5797cc10632a7d194fb
75e8482e3144ceea5aa1a2de23a13ec30d472e8a
describe
'173532' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWS' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
dfcdd6946de24d23c7387dd700736bb9
259bae2a0396d461f03fb2bf831e364de644089d
describe
'56799' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWT' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
f4c2ecf8070c0fc680ec5fceae8055a6
3a6f737e4d6a61ac82140ebdbb5b3bcd1ba953b9
describe
'172692' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWU' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
14105bc49e354ec28234742c311391ff
b792dc8d7b7a74d9f68e64cbf71500afbe40e704
describe
'57037' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWV' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
0953429b880b6182868b24a1961853ad
495b7b30b03688ac1d1028e348eaf60e00e6cfee
describe
'169557' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWW' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
8f8560b01dd20f74721d64a3d57f2aac
c882ff179c1524aa718bfe11cccc567e97ad6137
describe
'58164' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWX' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
230c8545ff64801df53ffd7276ca5340
c1b4c7dcf062b6f75f9a687fe3dd1337300189f3
describe
'164915' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWY' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
443f312736be2adf214b2af5d5365159
dde261c64e4a93f78cb7b54be268f041b65d1d17
describe
'54090' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPWZ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
bbda51cd06b85b63e6c1174c039e8f8e
faf44139eb757a8dbeb9e0c1b5b5a7909eb5d827
describe
'174903' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXA' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
f5bef56d75dfab8e12c98722b9640b3d
33f67bc83099041585e1c3f8d1bb3ddf6f84146c
describe
'56382' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXB' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
c92bb64be13b91b74533703d436cefee
3ff23a06a4a5d559803d0c33764910995653122c
describe
'169992' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXC' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
f19970c836ea58929c34338c98f1215b
fa7e09284e8dadd289a79c4365bdc4dfcc78c0af
describe
'58540' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXD' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
f5612d7430678b46ba13f480f1a53ea3
721d69e22c5ffffc05118dda53463dda3ef2accb
describe
'167027' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXE' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
2796435f2989140102fa2eb5ea1df312
08c2c4f7d25571eda6d17d9d67fa7c5cc9b9306d
describe
'56133' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXF' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
eb61b19ab1e291f69af690677e4a0614
0719d2e1f669ab61a363a2049b5f3fe0f311d320
describe
'178748' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXG' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
30db1d042d46acafe46c88afebc054c5
8fae4bca9833027628b4c0a8dbffec942cf03944
describe
'57083' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXH' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
a940fb4e19ed4ba08912ab5a8e4c3d3f
320bc1e87bf67dd68d2698b2fc8639287abb00c6
'2012-06-03T03:32:49-04:00'
describe
'174671' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXI' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
ede6832a8dfb0b4659d00f8269c5ef3f
34dd9d8c34067e87914c542c1cd83a6ad433534f
describe
'58067' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXJ' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
efa1eec8977f8c5215e0213c10686140
9a93415b73f89230fc7a110747752e9449ca471e
describe
'174805' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXK' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
e8093f2f7c94fe374951b8fe71d3de0c
775501b72f940e3b43c9bc0d540c8cec9b6d05c7
describe
'57090' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXL' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
d5530983961db5a715d6d1ec93128fe0
0fea141f7dc374ab1dc7b414e7ab27cc43a73416
describe
'174923' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXM' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
4a1b01ceb55845708daa23bfb757fdb2
d389eb4c0eff9f436f3bafbc804a37c4ea735983
describe
'58998' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXN' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
86e2d3976de6e591535e4a2878735f6d
8fe92cab26a4b6be378956bbdd9464047e3048d6
describe
'173723' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXO' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
9d2d3593ca96a8dddcfec7ca77f2e45c
e788fd0683ed196e1053126afea5554e1ed90a3e
describe
'56523' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXP' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
dd8187464308d7567a187e3c14c68c0a
63e0ab391cd563f6a0bd5be75a6c75e28ac53559
describe
'173841' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXQ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
848d1ff0c914bfd391a8b6d7fe5c2287
9f1c031c311f23792bc8e01137ecf7dce5b926a5
describe
'55225' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXR' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
431118b83b316f0062ad631715bb3ad3
18953f372c0d685504f006d27128d098165c3fba
describe
'169122' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXS' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
1a16c410fa0fc4c0e0d7125922affb16
1ebf935833492c71c8693532827beee72666d83f
describe
'56234' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXT' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
9d50c75e917a2f359522acf2f0cc6588
7dbd13f7f7b7af7d54902bcc9a7f1fa3871e0862
describe
'175041' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXU' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
da0617cbe0f73351c4555a96d4e67583
c2881d4791e0a4d056705f22889f1f3146b9c094
describe
'56635' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXV' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
c8b3a93e327db4756e4350bcad7b13b0
e07e5ed35c49253ef843db3cde21caabdff752b2
describe
'153713' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXW' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
7e8d77f3c2b8bec2ebc71fdb1fd1e45c
0133fed10c4bd46bc277d3318ecba2ff156d6d36
describe
'50438' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXX' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
be02e0acb967d458bcc4fd7b34303d86
6dacba1ad3634deae338e11308853aa782d7d6ef
describe
'175609' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXY' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
b6b5f7f4719ceff6999b5093a33fea1a
908095ce6e196516b07cd0377925483e8fbe9e49
describe
'57866' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPXZ' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
da3d840d38f47c29c080381d3048438c
7300da85196202d80775073a76f7b2874c43e8e4
describe
'142913' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYA' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
73fa9c8dcf6e941441a9b0123a911eaa
03b2bdbf84dcbd09a2b38ab86127e30fa5b6bdfd
describe
'46732' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYB' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
a757846bce1a240791e97c3bbcba9576
c00befb9e59e24377a2a96791260d2a81cd4567e
describe
'65878' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYC' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
bd5bee56036c7ff1f37b58ab155cc459
d82955ccce5fc316b2d46cbd83011ee46a6579d4
describe
'32680' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYD' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
ba5b2d253e2230338f28eb209fc7e96e
8cbd35e0c42433cc114e5c394264c629a50682e6
describe
'155839' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYE' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
ceddb22ee299edcddeedb33ccda1ce4d
a2509481fd89280bd51bb53a8c4fa5275e97fe5d
describe
'50706' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYF' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
7994fa9765680e0abedfbf6d02f10e60
6bb48eff47134b02f48f1060c020b16a82918133
describe
'70472' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYG' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
91276e9a4f9713642ebc281664a4d7bb
e48d96358d9b415eb732dde58cde59c679ead679
describe
'33864' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYH' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
4a0340845012a154a295046f3a82f883
051935cbdbc7d2ae8f894b7d51a899f464125cf1
describe
'171870' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYI' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
475aec62b3535be6c3eed25ada7bdb6a
b1d79eaf5e16e216e141ebacceaf30e795be7e2a
describe
'57573' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYJ' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
9622f74ee06b9d9ed74b3c7a82f39380
4703b3fa0cb5acbe88d2cb16f7988316e4c277e5
'2012-06-03T03:33:32-04:00'
describe
'173856' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYK' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
030027db73a379c58561b0d4a03d1a5d
ac1b1c54ecc9f0171f5b1f73146fe7f2dc601525
describe
'57120' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYL' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
7f3f3c0ae5dd1b25dbe827dfa4d5df01
7465a74aaaeec76b8c61b7564e9b607bb1ff4a96
describe
'172212' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYM' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
af1689e366434fcfb4e943eb92a59423
2c3622c9d7046a02be5922b5f441273a4d2a0744
describe
'56649' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYN' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
20d9217cd1d3c9af18f320861683b03a
f215c2c3d07919f6e3ef8805db8fb5c65029cbb3
describe
'75534' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYO' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
e093cfb93a055887b7aefbe32473b79d
0d36346a2596a53e391a12e0f33e13900a86ac4d
'2012-06-03T03:31:21-04:00'
describe
'34978' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYP' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
3002ac14133fcdbd8188c4f880a42aed
e8439d52ab1d8ef8452dbdf7acf0f0c59d485b2a
describe
'171741' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYQ' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
061e09878471a42cd4ef2196a69bb530
7c8557145d75c59da40c0b64a644ac356a75798f
describe
'55920' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYR' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
8034f3989d49c92c5bd442bc6e32ad22
51e8fad1ae7f9af5dbe39d1e562df2149f47c7b8
describe
'173827' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYS' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
14508c584d99e0c2097b309b9ead522f
b731fc7fb0f72cd06f73ad5530a032e64b46b191
describe
'58690' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYT' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
dc0e531975f4b262d1c144cbdf2c8d98
c086bfbfc546933ca23e4816b19a14234ac43b66
describe
'171983' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYU' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
7fd8986502d166c3f82dfba697af1b60
4c17f2eea9a3af4e1bfb8f81c059e151b7e0bb95
describe
'55382' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYV' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
3ceb70cf9bf11213c694687d3f5afc2a
5528227d12aeb2cb0f07231e87acbc49dd977ee5
describe
'154721' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYW' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
46b7f2c33b16ada01d97cc264bcbfb3c
2d65935b38680db42b46fdc16e290e968c391652
describe
'50481' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYX' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
0b18e6bbf0f9172741cbfb18156a8182
48ac905777bee117040f9b4c1430dd69b3393684
describe
'172563' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYY' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
b4daf7319a923613768fce2aeb85b373
1cbeb3e977a29701cf5b23bdb238c7ae80708a16
describe
'160070' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPYZ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
1ad09bd8d077cc8e0110aba1d4c03394
00108466a98d3b5584364bdf6feb4c94c7507385
describe
'53076' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZA' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
300c417b2d42cb249ab6e82af13564b1
dce7a907cb9f94ce08367f9813330eeccff4262b
describe
'136924' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZB' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
37eec5a27af3f4cff29d16ffca02cb93
f7a113f051eb1e91da4af5b1d8e4bcdda7f8b019
describe
'45379' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZC' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
fa5fb9511d742dc5d75607bfb68759cc
3e6fe3b4efcc4d403ef55891741e80430b87c0f3
describe
'145155' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZD' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
b11140533fa4e80238ab688fbda842f4
66cfd5a4c6d7d4cea9a0c3cccebd95699fda7151
describe
'48124' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZE' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
2f0b58e4530be7bb20b11eaeb40b0833
5453144d3b4be9ad1e8140f9da16eb7203e6a7c0
describe
'168066' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZF' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
06f57df169c847052fd38d243b1e2d4e
436874f0a078d94863ae52a2330387f986eab8f7
describe
'53579' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZG' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
83eba2a349f3155a528c07fd998aa1a9
4f0e8dd35ae91c9cfc945ad426a16fa29adeb671
describe
'170718' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZH' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
c43e2055b845e8f7157a1a6ec514dbc6
40400ad4e20e524d0bc00542db8afcdda9550244
describe
'55586' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZI' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
0299fda747e83266df2de3749563077b
56bb36b0a98f1e96ec717df7be2b870ea618444d
describe
'165894' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZJ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
5c2aa0e909acdd21329a4cf65a0c2db1
afdc2fb3c7303ee1768fbc49297eee3dd4173ef3
describe
'160420' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZK' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
e6698feac620f540959eff4974d8092c
a820224bbe79c4348258782fa4b0b4e4cf58c581
describe
'51620' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZL' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
eb03dcf79dde2b184c58470a1beb057c
2c71e231921e17d0c11ff864c7bdf801726a8bb7
describe
'163330' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZM' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
a0b6c063400e1ceac23f69bd7375857e
9687ec33cc966311e6f067bed7a123887c31efae
describe
'170256' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZN' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
5b32378e4ab6b47e099f4a545db12ddd
f099a55d80a113a294592ca70eaf9e379163bf75
describe
'57786' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZO' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
a41887b288db957c8f7a7104f92c3c27
21e09b9f126ac5251a6891eab5bdfbc6fb80eaaa
describe
'165737' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZP' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
bf8a310e136cc1828c82654b73be5c30
c98afc52f7c9804d99df71351508a80b69ca5e82
describe
'54424' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZQ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
28d61cb7150c4e500dc6b8673c1d4bee
0fccab02ffcd3cbd8eb0fa0d9afd79bbd8683c23
describe
'164254' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZR' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
7524f4677f6e61d5bebcbea000fe83e1
559b2241faf4a8b2629940377a2ba5b4dc12e66f
describe
'54546' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZS' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
703c4dbfde896e3809549219a894abfd
a1f54e52ad199fc3484d78b3eb6cd342788954e8
describe
'172316' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZT' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
1fb4c0b462c931aeb39f39fac70c1a02
c623404191421e5d9a74e4bf0ff67a4828453775
describe
'59180' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZU' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
86ebcd680795d086768c7d07e75d0edd
2d4ba4f6ede5627736c921e63bbe745f8f7ff4b5
describe
'158695' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZV' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
3871f449830e257d1ada72b4ad371fde
72334e555fe6014f1b071aa4c32430bb88fb7aeb
describe
'52447' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZW' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
d417059c09444f951a2f0a30bf6569d2
245a9fe4cf3618885142700889eb4cc1094445f2
describe
'155284' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZX' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
8466a41e718b1d45589fa154cb5f7b8a
9c753e51a86f13281d4b2ee3c813aa9a373e8850
'2012-06-03T03:31:45-04:00'
describe
'50105' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZY' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
be2971f10466a083c6b63c6998f938f1
1a403d470b78f876cd2d772adecefb1e1d35e95d
describe
'173247' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAPZZ' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
2dee5c5dc00c681e3da985429b6c2bf8
589fd03d6f85fbe5910a0c539c429668b5e507b7
describe
'60009' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAA' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
bfa5ecb5547ec62aa43c3f62c4aa2e89
7f8f6d2028665323af01e2aa4aaeb02ff935989f
describe
'167439' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAB' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
c6f5418c2fd862c3fe9953bcea6f54a2
cede6882e5288514cc6bc0815fb11d2b613d6b02
describe
'54477' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAC' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
c9f38743ec033ff3b922c5807922b360
35af561686c8e164811355c0f41b2c7b29a5767d
describe
'175877' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAD' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
c693b79b8e0c855e0cdf23399b2aac0e
ae971eab4d7ff2d79d4ba3864497a518270c663e
describe
'59504' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAE' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
45e5064463cadd129d1786179cf7c36a
b2f799fc428f61626e127c0248f243df32966d15
describe
'172960' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAF' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
9490d7230ed361328c70f75b2ff43a0a
ce4dc7545c63419bc9fe411fa79f657a775d1678
describe
'139176' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAG' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
968f3e21d7232ee166f2c51980778721
cf18cc83657847dfc110214dd711fe442e926fe6
describe
'47288' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAH' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
e2ce629e8c8097502701cc15d01defe8
2b235ce8a829669a191d3d76de014abaa780afc6
describe
'151438' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAI' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
114ae112e86a1b8537e00095fdd8459e
f2bb7f0f0cf21a8739de10cc5ab66e88b1673d70
describe
'51988' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAJ' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
d776cd3e377d193ca9486d685f4d644d
2b1c161dcf8f1892be05432c1a814ab97aeea7bd
describe
'176777' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAK' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
da0f7dc3d7e01e520b28b7bfa9f1f4f5
c98b13e7f923c9eb7a5fd6a63445561e88bc4f1d
describe
'56755' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAL' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
f4d7253603a39e8890fafc3be9bf21eb
6c9c2027b852a4d967061536d1c42d783de237d5
describe
'180925' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAM' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
abf1e209c18ec2fae8a75498cbd81b8f
6bb0aeef9c0217f01df5595f5c05d74dcdceb951
describe
'57513' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAN' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
feb019767263e0a5d1d3fe1aaa966510
ccabadbc5383a6eeae0f7dcbedff72bc4116efbb
describe
'173948' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAO' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
3681114ecb9311557c97b1a970773ba9
8fa1870cabc27caee8c1ab94b28c72d6d6dfd454
describe
'61258' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAP' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
7b29dcefa8db57bb0193175d363dcc54
48ececa0bba01043c642ee8c99e7b1b7ebb104f0
describe
'174382' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAQ' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
e4a2b44c7ce5a479ef313b29b5f703b9
11b4d4a59ba986bf0527533a7828232d5f62b171
'2012-06-03T03:34:10-04:00'
describe
'55777' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAR' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
c3f7eb22c05ba2fcbbe45328f46013a4
1fb5aa7610dede96e0eaee72416900d16f36a760
describe
'172760' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAS' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
608d99cbebd1a16ceed30a24375a24d4
dd441ce13da6195c717648e19467caacea9fbdc0
describe
'57482' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAT' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
b7391a67dc4c7f8e26c56dede9b8287a
6729c0bf8f7b64ea15653d7c86202f59c0b697a8
describe
'149266' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAU' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
6f33f6d6125d1f6c4f6f2e39b474bb6d
e90a0ef0918fc83cefa7d6278f4b68362bec8501
'2012-06-03T03:32:00-04:00'
describe
'51652' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAV' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
f7ada72f1eb316b57e51326894426f55
d1cfbf1c20e36e20f8cb13e184a3849f6a928870
describe
'170687' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAW' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
5b0357a7ba1fe0bebb7f8416d8baa923
6b4042bf4b18de4422831b11551f26a9aeb9f626
describe
'176606' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAX' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
ebf5a2034884d759ad3bd6c517dcb70a
9ff78716bb82771aed8698d96ef9de92b783d919
describe
'56785' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAY' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
67a3ebadaca386b2c8c25ad4fbf19f54
bbcb015b7232490ad4f67bba5694db1366d75ad9
describe
'59795' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQAZ' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
7e2f653ebdbf173e832075fac697cdf0
3fc70d814dcdaaede411c4461b55bb5f83ed7f62
describe
'155642' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBA' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
59e0f6daca9962c11038e8838ce92135
724bf73926214b473a13167a4c97650227624f1c
describe
'158653' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBB' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
90311fad4a0a8caf6f20d6bb8990e515
c7e579235b8c6e96ef849f07bdb739a03d1a26b6
describe
'60785' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBC' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
dcba26e553e49feb12fe76b65ed221d1
d7bf2398d06a27ff3536eb37b9cb2700e4d7d255
describe
'172891' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBD' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
25ba39db07baefe4ece93af31fb7db54
399c9876fcf88291dc4ad886c3bf6bf8315ee4d0
describe
'55924' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBE' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
3306457335efc81d95e9285aa0e55864
6145fbc536e72cf9bb8888cff6e0f9e26a846da5
describe
'167020' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBF' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
c790242059981ca5ca624d46139c867d
759f30b4884b4233aa280061f2e8b77ea2fed681
describe
'54493' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBG' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
7c17f100ce1bb6927e9894c86579cf19
e9e1cc11ec747d232d756c8c3f2dcb4b71785e2f
describe
'169397' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBH' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
6be3673674bf87a72e1374fbc55b3a01
dffe9ec0cb727438ad0a0b39aab6f9224da4e98c
describe
'56037' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBI' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
1c22ee04e1a19a1f02341e8ff7e0308c
a40cef9c2d80bdcbe23d91141504de7c12594a96
describe
'183527' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBJ' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
9f1c2b4e6293d27223642aedd5c3e0fd
6d05b413bca53b3f66bc6ff6f381abf0e588e0ad
describe
'59098' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBK' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
030692294bece3504b72bd64fdb7391b
9330c97cd5e713c3765dd14d982db64ada10b792
'2012-06-03T03:28:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBL' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
83bcbdd1db32c3c4103599abeb460756
5afb803ca3af28e90b42f00b81ecab5cd2a3c044
describe
'55323' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBM' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
99af065af65e6676c98021a67577a4f6
68553686ab48eef56655620d4b4e0287cbd85eee
describe
'169673' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBN' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
e31ff23dd4d7d145d5cccc3570bfe54c
5f55d8ae36a58d48f826958c852f12c24da390bf
describe
'54184' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBO' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
815d2729bf7270f0c8edc112d3e969f0
e8cd6d42358ca8610ea7f115a247cce496284826
describe
'166838' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBP' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
dad9e998c87fb24fd6f67b56d41b8be0
c3da59475a51844649c3e4e421fa45eede1926a6
describe
'54828' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBQ' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
ae5fee02672a31b3f9b38e0a8d90653a
055e67fa0bdb69fc088b5616a5dc5cca730a379c
describe
'127059' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBR' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
8dc2f6d8bbcd3905a8946de267ae297d
6736fab38955d72e4a9a4dd16fa9b2d1730ccafa
'2012-06-03T03:32:13-04:00'
describe
'41784' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBS' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
d6eb638881f7529ec1551083ff171269
089e744ed0ab720b7b1ce654b1a856b5480087f7
describe
'164704' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBT' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
3be5556281172d964b40687b343d2ece
e8c0f87922fa132354d38495e9bae68de037b284
describe
'52771' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBU' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
8e708c2f749a2cd3f43c6c0a2e741be8
d109621796be4af85e82ce11620c3e8159a90964
describe
'167855' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBV' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
578af48eec6cbc7d3ee6677a28890a7a
69dc31432a70794a750836fbb091273bf468cf2f
describe
'53987' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBW' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
953303a1a738168a6482400a5eb1bf29
686aab4f7f80dcd75d9b7a421d03ab89cf5ae42f
describe
'176611' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBX' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
cdd8bca892c1327ff393320451cc71d8
0dd2f19543b419f2c9dbe92ae88499fa8e7a0992
describe
'157370' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBY' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
cb27a1b42d4f0ffac5e1cb7974c4f5ab
acc5e5ce6209a657d53a7b8ee13a1143ecf5a49a
'2012-06-03T03:33:42-04:00'
describe
'53082' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQBZ' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
77c0d82783fb6fc0806e794c6c3066f4
55aec8648ac449548f38e455be2517b666ed4c73
describe
'159431' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCA' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
c241711702c521289943802c7bbbce1d
bf4cc3fa410c90542e2f1958a764e752a9a04ebf
describe
'52458' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCB' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
6565b8e39b27f7a0c7905c94208a1135
a96ecb17f3f3dc20a529ea1db5ca8a563a79cd1c
describe
'169114' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCC' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
b8b79bf134ddf307eb7549711b39007f
d92fdb70ad69cf2a905e043f59839861ecd1a4cf
describe
'55280' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCD' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
2c78e1b02e536328294a1ccce3aee869
41be40d6902059b73db89df221c742c70f9816ba
describe
'169436' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCE' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
e440f596857b9329fd448c5f16253150
2b2d05a743e2b1013c4e88fd98a6ee9922ce869f
describe
'58092' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCF' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
5db7cab23608c32d23528c658d9beab6
f03715b36f42342af1add77bc42b0a4fb99c0d70
'2012-06-03T03:31:37-04:00'
describe
'171200' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCG' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
cb8369a58e5257d7a5e2a6c559876e81
ea8c1209c75ca9745c0dc3f1c74999c9a2519d46
describe
'54975' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCH' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
708188548680bb5ef523c770cd676137
3f677de8f1da99b1c090655c08eb2605762049c5
describe
'172342' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCI' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
19c2df707331701748af7593c2cf4036
a7aba5207172647f7ea768d684c0c549be01cf90
describe
'55699' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCJ' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
f02bcb87604b2cef578f32b8d6d6d4bb
29c51c5361c29d8344c81cb81f5151b1bb3da4e2
'2012-06-03T03:33:45-04:00'
describe
'169300' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCK' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
8ddcc6c155d53f9c91d6f858ea70b659
a01bf7fbc3f0b4812fb1d3b9e75f9de5f1fc3ca6
describe
'57349' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCL' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
cc0d95ecf0d4aabca6474c6996c3d6a0
078550c625b03de7aa64d1d3d5c707f865102cea
describe
'169288' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCM' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
edd25fd49388d27f4cc60e8b2cf049a0
68207bd7d9dbb3aacf14f1dc42b7c5e66f323de9
describe
'55771' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCN' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
e25e19442d1f26f7ecf6a84c1e6fe728
6b4b03404d7b402ffd82af8b41cb9f5cd47b627f
describe
'164086' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCO' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
ba8fa1c314c7f1e7e853e421632d78a0
7b4bc0a6eb7c53c0f128251d98a64c980fb8efb8
describe
'54370' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCP' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
9056cf410728b298925b539652e730dc
8c3d8bdda26a43e2b78d399963ecf54829417f80
describe
'170822' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCQ' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
488bd1be950cd13aaed6a90b00a7ad23
e6266e1e0b9c3569aa0c24bed42f90ca05d48526
describe
'55368' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCR' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
9a582655c5be5cd97a74bd4b26b2dfd7
02c500b79acc692244108bf929aa6134d4d07b5a
describe
'172043' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCS' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
a4899946caac6ffb65d6ba581f3579b1
6730069530c8804af77ea47f16f5ab65fabc2798
describe
'178995' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCT' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
7eb1c32df87c93ff329d1dbcfcede7d6
521d71541223f7166ab8bb23a62887aa6940205b
describe
'62759' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCU' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
589d204b673352bb0b2a5fbf034338df
746887c941a27fd8f9ad23c237e9d349c28d2116
describe
'180988' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCV' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
3da2f45f433c6803aa3a235dd41da896
cd33263b0c8cbc8f592946ba5695fd74cd1fa0cc
describe
'57134' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCW' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
0751b2010c58ec0635ddea14e57c2c3e
4a57cccd9dc5563f0e86073ce1ff143d1c4469a6
describe
'119203' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCX' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
ac802251039a63f544739e7421c82b12
ce8d03484c09763134d6561672e9ce1e1a6bfbf0
describe
'39978' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCY' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
3c36b7f7230d88e2b92b0a018b85a7f6
77c25084019394ec6a3a03e17d56cb8b3489878f
describe
'27751' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQCZ' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
4428887a25fafe1493b03f2982a29076
545b46565102f732f2d81ea949f80daa00bddc0d
describe
'14050' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQDA' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
67a9f2e0a3e816a364d1053d01bd4b78
f38b2a17549322b105b1d81335a0034667bc63fa
describe
'115675' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQDB' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
f52b0403838b4649d0f9fa304cedb882
df93e376e88e2763d7b17f06467c1fd53989ff40
describe
'38528' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQDC' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
499d2cacffacf6885e0daeafe5ae6cb2
e894e2bec27ac914bd709b2a763c6ee4f16efb38
describe
'51397' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQDD' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
07f05db020cddbabc87319f8e2955f5c
ddc2283da32d236e470e73a618d4be65c880dd0a
describe
'25545' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQDE' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
401f8d743f92dba9999897e0864447b7
96200ff6a1e7388fcd141d3e7ca71a15368f944e
describe
'56' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQDF' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
ab5eae8f8329ba1ad7dd58933a6a5f9b
9f7a3faa49b9354597d6b3c91f138088a9dcf7f6
describe
'153807' 'info:fdaE20100201_AAAAAXfileF20100201_AAAQDG' 'sip-filesUF00026991_00001.mets'
b3d81bfdfdd190dc7280c1d9326c8398
eefe7e1195a5fc585005fc00630b5c47cd0c1040
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T14:17:30-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.


4

1
| és o
= O
Biles

|
Va

7
4



—S.sailote—

OLD ROBIN AND HIS PROVERB.

— Ses Ars tae
“Still downward goes Christ’s way :
Wilt thou, with fond endeavour
‘To scale heaven’s lofty towers,

Be vainly toiling ever?

The Saviour stoopeth low ;
He who with him would rise,
With him must downward go.

* Down, therefore, O my mind!
Unlearn thy lofty thinking ;
The light chaff mounts alone,
While solid grain is sinking.
Into the small, deep spring
The waters freely flow,
Till it breaks forth a stream; -
So thou, my soul, lie low.”
: From the German.



OLD ROBIN AND THE CHILOREN
I

ONDON,

\

\

VLSON

EDINBURGE










OLD ROBIN AND HIS PROVERB;

OR,

“WITH THE LOWLY IS WISDOM.”

BY

Mrs. HENRY F. BROCK,

AUTHOR OF ‘THE MAN AT THE HELM,” “ BEAUTY OF TRUTH,”
ETC., ETC.

“When pride cometh, then cometh shame: but with
the lowly is wisdom.”—Proy. xi. 2.

LONDON:
T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW;
EDINBURGH ; AND NEW YORK.

1873.








G@Tontents.

——_—+4--_—_.
I. THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE, a vee see 7

Il, A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK, aes a ao wee 30
Ill. AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE,’ oe ove wee a 51
“Iv. A SAD ACCIDENT, “et vee eee ee vee 65
Vv. PAIN AND TRIAL, — we see oon a 76
VI. LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT, a ae ae see 82

VII. PALLING COUNSELS, ... oe ese see —? 102






INTHE HEAD OF THE JUST." 97

* oO * oe
BT a Hi



OLD ROBIN AND HIS PROVERB.



CHAPTER I.
THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE.

WOULDN'T give a fig for a cup of
tea without cream, Alice.”

“ That’s the Eton fashion of talk-
ing,” the sister replied, smiling as
she spoke, “but not the Eton fashion
of tea-drinking, I imagine.”

“Do not speak of matters of which you
are ignorant, Miss Alice. Do you mean to
insinuate that we Etonians, brought up on
the ancient royal foundation of Henry VI.,
ever condescend to potations of skimmed
milk? And what’s more,” added Frank,
“you can’t say as much down here, in the









8 THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE.

old hall of the Davennes.—Can she, mother?
I appeal to you. Has not Alice a pious
horror of touching anything better than
skimmed milk, as long as there are Goody
Luffs and old Robins in the parish, who can
appreciate the cream ?”

“Fie upon you, Frank!” said his sister.
“Tt would be. well for you if old Robin’s
proverb were yours.”

“Well, so it would,” said Frank; “and
so it will be, I daresay, one of these fine
days, when I am old, and wise, and
gouty.” ;

Alice shook her head at the merry boy.
“T shall get old Robin to lecture you.”

“ And may I ask who this old Robin is?”
said a voice from the opposite side of the
breakfast-table.

“ Alice will give you the necessary infor-
mation, uncle,” said Frank; “old Robin is
her beau-idéal of human octogenarian excel-
lence, in spite, wonderful to relate, of his
having neither wig, spectacles, nor gold-
«headed cane.”
~ Alice placed her hand upon her brother's
~ lips. “You are a sad boy, Frank.—I will
THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 9

tell you who old Robin is, dear uncle. He
is one of papa’s tenants, who has lived the
greater part of his life in this parish. He
is the very model of peace and contentment.
Moreover, he is a wonderfully clever old
man. He has read a great deal, thought a
great deal, and turned the reading and the
thinking to good account. He is the oracle
of the village, loved by all, for the kind
word and smile he gives to every one, and
respected by all, for his simple and unaffected
piety.”

‘“‘And the proverb, Alice,” said the squire,
—‘‘tell your uncle what the proverb is.”

“We call it the proverb,” said Alice,
“because, though he has a store of wise
maxims and sayings, there is one in par-
ticular which old Robin is always brine-
ing out, as the best advice, he says, he can
give to young and old. It is a quaint say-
ing,—

‘The sweetest sleep is the sleep on water-porridge.’”
_ “There, Harry, what do you say to it?”
said the squire.

“Well, I cannot say that I appreciate its ,

literal beauties,” said Captain Davenne,
10 THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE.

“seeing that we sailors are not supposed
to favour decoctions that ‘taste strong of the
hold ;’ but I will accept the figurative sense
of the maxim to any extent. I¢ is a short
and pithy sermon.”

“And one,” said the squire, “that the
old man has practised all his life, I should
say. J wish that all my tenants were half
as contented as he. Whether the times be
good or bad, Robin has a thankful spirit.
If his neighbours grumble, he always lec.
tures them, winding up his discourses with
his favourite proverb. And, as Alice says,
he is clever. He comes out with things
that are quite poetical,—eh! Alice? I re-
member, on one occasion, stopping my horse
to have a word with Robin, who was walk-
ing slowly along the road. It was a bitterly
cold day in the winter. He looked so blue,
and so pinched by the cold, that I could not
help saying to him, ‘ My poor fellow, I wish
it were summer-time for your sake.’ ‘Thank
you, sir,’ he replied with his ready smile,
‘but the Lord knows the time best. I once
read in a book, sir, “that in winter the
earth waits for the spring, and while she
THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 11

waits she sleeps.” Now, sir, God forbid
that I should wish to wake any of his crea-
tures from a sleep which he has given.’
‘Well, Robin,’ I said, ‘that’s a good thought.’
‘Ay, sir, the old man continued ; ‘and when
I too am taking my rest under ground, the
good Lord will waken me himself in his own
good time.’ So I rode on,” added the squire,
“and thought within myself, What are all
these broad lands, these paternal acres worth,
in comparison of that man’s simple faith in
his God ?”

“And do you remember, dear mother,”
rejoined Alice, after the short silence which
followed upon the earnest words uttered by
her father—“do you remember that day,
when you and I took shelter from a shower
in Robin’s cottage, and found him at his
frugal meal of bread and potatoes? It was
the first time that I heard his proverb.
Child as I was, I could not help telling
him that I wondered at his having no meat
for his dinner. I recollect how he smiled
and shook his head, and told me that the
simplest fare brought the best sleep, and
then he repeated the quaint old maxim.”
12 THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE,

“You make me quite anxious to see this
wonderful man,” said Captain Davenne.



SHELTER FROM THE SHOWER.

“Do come and see him, uncle,” said Alice.
“Let me take you to him this very after-
noon. Nothing I should like better than to
be your guide.”

“With all my heart, dear niece.”

“We shall be sure to find him at home,
or near home,” Alice continued. “He is
too old for regular work ; perhaps we shall
THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 13

find him in his little garden sitting among
his bees and flowers.”

The breakfast party broke up, each mem-
ber of the family going to his respective
employments for the morning. Idleness and
selfishness were no dwellers in the Hall.
The squire took his brother on a walking
expedition through the fields, first premising
that he had a long list of business to trans-
act. He did not belong to that class of
Jand-owners, which, it is to be hoped, is be-
coming more rare in the fair homes of Eng-
land, men who, in a spirit of selfish reserve,
are content to leave all personal contact
with their labourers to a paid deputy. On
the contrary, he strove, by going in and out
among them, to make them feel that he was
as much interested in their moral condition
as in the progress of their labour, and, by the
kindly word of sympathy which his manly
heart knew when and how to give, he con-
trived to win their confidence and regard.
And this the squire did, because he had
taken One for his Master, who revealed and
taught the sacredness of that tie of brother-
hood which every human being should recog-
14 THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE

nize in the face of his fellow-creature ; who
taught that reverence is due not merely to
the superiority of rank or fortune, but to that
of knowledge and goodness. He had heard
these words, “ One is your Father,” and “all
ye are brethren,” and hearing, he had obeyed.
In reward for which, he was daily reaping
that which the rich and great may have if
they will, — the hearty ow and willing
service of the working man.

The squire’s wife went to her duties in
the spirit of the matron of old, whose por-
trait the wisest of men has sketched as a
model for all the “virtuous women.” She
looked well to the ways of her household,
providing with diligent forethought for rich
and poor, for all who should need or crave the
hospitalities of the Hall. And her daughter
went, not as the daughters of fashion, to her
sofa and her novel, but to a succession of use-
ful and unselfish employments.

As soon as luncheon was over, Miss
Davenne and her uncle started on their
walk to Robin’s cottage. Alice was not
sorry that it was at some distance from the
Hall, for she liked the prospect of a long
THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 15

talk with her favourite uncle. There was
something about Captain Davenne which
attracted both old and young,—a certain
penetrating warmth, under the influence of
which even the most ungenial nature seemed
to ripen into softness and bloom. Older
than her father, Alice was accustomed to
regard him with the greatest veneration ;
and now, after some years of separation,
that he had returned to his brother’s house,
no one gave. him a warmer welcome than
his niece. She was never so happy as when
seated by his side in old home corners, or
walking with him through familiar paths,
talking freely and unreservedly to him, and
enjoying, as none could better, the com-
panionship of one whose mind was full of
aspirations after truth and goodness.

Alice stooped to gather a few violets from
the carriage-road before they left the Hall
gates. “Old Robin loves a bunch dearly,”
she said ; “he is very fond of flowers.”

“You are very kind to the old man, my
child,” said her uncle; “and you are right
to be so. It is surely a great privilege to
share in—that office which our God affirms
16 THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE.

to be his—the care of old age.” Alice looked
up. ‘Do you remember the text, Alice,
‘Even to your old age I am he, and even to
hoar hairs will I carry you. I have made
and I will bear; even I will carry and will
deliver you’ 2”

“T am sure,” said Alice, “that what I
give is nothing to what I receive. There is
‘something to me so grand in that old man’s
abiding principle of contentment.”

“You are right to use that word principle.
Weall have feelings of contentment at times;
but a fixed and deeply-rooted principle of
contentment is what God alone can give.”

“And when he does give it,” said Alice,
“how beautiful it is to behold; and how
infectious it is, too! I have often gone to
Robin’s cottage in a restless and unsatisfied
mood, and have left it in quite a different
frame of mind. Do you know,” she said,
placing her hand upon her uncle’s arm, “it
has always seemed to me that contentment
is less easy if you are rich ; why is it so?”

“Perhaps the proverb contains the an-
swer,” Captain Davenne replied, smiling.
“Tf the water-porridge be the cause of the

(402)
THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 17

sweet sleep, then I suppose it must be the
luxury of riches that robs us of rest. Cer-
tainly they multiply the sources of danger,
because, even in the Christian duty of alms-
giving, there lurks a danger of self-conscious-
ness and self-commendation. Yet after all,
my child, there is but one way for rich or
for poor ; we cannot get contentment out of
God. He must give us himself, and then
only we find rest to our souls.”

“ Robin often says that. I told him once
that I wished I was as contented and thank-
ful as he; and he replied, ‘Why not, dear
lady? God gives to all liberally. He up-
braideth not for the often asking.’ ”

“Happy old man!” said Captain Davenne.

“* He has beautiful thoughts,” Alice went
on. ‘Striking ideas, too. I told him that
I knew I was very ungrateful ever to be
discontented, placed as I was in the midst
of health, and ease, and affluence. To my
surprise, he said, ‘Nay, dear Miss Alice, do
not look to such as these for contentment.
_ The Father in heaven means you to find
pleasure in them, but not content; for you
know he often sees fit to take away all those

(402) Dy
18 THE ORACLE OF 'THE VILLAGE.

things ; but the peace and the rest he wills
should always abide. Jesus Christ, the same
yesterday, to-day, and for ever. And per-
haps,’ he added, ‘the peace is all the more
sure when the health, and the ease, and



ALICE AND HER UNCLE.

the riches are gone.’ Poor Robin; I knew
he was thinking then of his wife, who died
last year. But there he is himself, I do
think. Yes, seated yonder under those
trees at the end of the village green,—that
THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 19

is his favourite spot. Do you see him,
uncle ?”

“Yes, I do; and there is a group of chil-
dren round him—are they your school chil-
dren, Alice ?”

“Yes,” she replied ; “he is seldom to be
seen without one or two of them, he is such
a favourite with them all. From the eldest
to the youngest, they all love old Robin;
and no wonder, for he has an inexhaustible
fund of stories to suit all ages. He is the
Solomon of the village. Our schoolmaster
says that Master Robin teaches more
geography in one hour on the village green,
than he can do in a whole week with all his
school-books, spectacles, and rod.”

“He must have had good opportunities
for instruction,” said Captain Davenne.

“T have heard my father say that Robin
has had long illnesses during his life,” Alice
replied ; “and that being unable to work as
muchas others, he had spent a good deal of
his time in reading, the taste for which he
had from his earliest years.”

The children were so engrossed with their
old friend that they did not perceive the
20 THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE.

approach of Alice and her uncle. It was a
pretty scene. Artist and poet could desire
nothing better. The tree under which the
old man was seated was the veteran oak
of the village. Under its wide-spreading
branches generation after generation had
played in youth and rested in age—the child
climbing its boughs for a treasure of acorns,
and the old man resting peacefully under its



OLD ROBIN’S STICK.

shelter, wondering whether the old tree re-
membered its youth as calmly as he did. his
own. The children were of different ages.
The little ones had gathered close to the
old man—one of them was wreathing his
stick with daisies.

“The poetry of nature is nord? whispered
Alice to her uncle.

“Yes,” he replied, “in her analogies and
THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 21

her contrasts ; the fresh young grass spring-
ing up at the “foot of the old tree, and the
children’s faces pressing round the aged
man,”

The boys jumped up when they saw Miss
Davenne. Robin himself attempted to rise
from his seat, but Alice would not let him.
A bright smile overspread the old man’s
withered features ; it was like a December
sun upon a bleak landscape. Alice was
evidently a great favourite with him.

“Good afternoon, Robin; we were coming
to pay you a visit. This is my uncle, Cap-
tain Davenne. I don’t think you will re-
member him, for he has been abroad so many
years.”

Old Robin grasped the kindly offered
hand.

“T will sit down beside you, my good
friend,” said Captain Davenne. “This is an
inviting seat.”

“Yes, sir, thanks to the squire. He was.
good enough to have it put up here for the
use of the old folks.”

“You are well surrounded,” said Captain
Davenne. “TI have heard what a famous
22 THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE.

hand you are at amusing the little ones and
instructing the elder ones. It is a great
privilege, Robin, to be able to do that. An
old writer says that ‘he who makes a child
happy is a co-worker with God.’”

The old man looked kindly upon the little
group at his feet. “They are bonnie things,
sir; and I like to be with them, and see
their bright faces looking up like flowers
into the blue sky. I like to tell them of One
above who hears the cry of the young birds,
and who once said in the streets of Jeru-
salem, ‘Suffer the little children to come
unto me.”

“And these little ones love Master
Robin,” said Alice, turning to the children ;
“and they love his beautiful stories, do they
not ?”

“Yes, yes,” they replied in a chorus of
silver bells.

“Sometimes,” Robin resumed, “some-
times I am obliged to scold the little ones ;
am I not, Jeanie?” and the old man raised
his stick and gently touched a curly head.
“Shall I tell Miss Davenne,” he con-
tinued, “why it was I told you the story
THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 23

of ‘Happy Nancy’?” The little girl did
not reply.

“Why, maam,” said Jeanie’s brother,
with a merry twinkle in his blue eye, “I
will tell you how it was. Jeanie had been
saying that she wished she was a grand
lady, to ride in a carriage and wear fine
clothes; and Master Robin told her that
the finest thing was to have no wish at all,
but to be always contented. And then he
told us about ‘Happy Nancy,’ and bade
Jeanie try to be like her.”

“And Jeanie will try,” said Alice, look-
ing kindly at the blushing child.

“T think it isa pity that we have lost the
story,” said Captain Davenne, “for we are
all of us apt to be discontented. Is it one
of your own stories, Robin, or is ‘ Happy
Nancy’ a real individual ? ”

Robin gave a significant shake of the
head. “J am no great hand, sir, at making
up stories as some people do. I like best
to tell the children something I have read ;
though I can’t say I always believe what I
find in books. Don’t you think, sir, that
there is a great deal of pretence in some
24 THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE.

stories, what I call dressing up, giving them
colours that don’t belong - to them, just to
make them sound better ? 2

“Very true, Robin. I remember myself
going to one village which I had seen de-
gated as the ioveliést place in the world,
and I found nothing but a few untidy
cottages, and some pigs on the common.”

“That’s just what it is,” said Robin,
laughing. “It’s all make-believe now-a-
days, from the clever people who sit at
home and write stories, to the cunning
fellows who cheat the simple folks, as little
Jeanie’s mother was cheated last fair-time,
! boys?”

“ How was that, Robin? I never heard
of it,” said Alice.

‘Well, ma’am,” the old man replied, try-
ing to look grave, “she gave half-a-crown
for a canary bind for the gale of his pretty
coat, and another half-a-crown for a fine
cage to put him in; and the next morning
when she looked at ‘the cage, lo! the canary
bird was gone, and a little hedge-sparrow
was in his place. The little creature had
given himself a good bath, and had washed


THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 25

off his fine yellow coat. Poor Mary ! it was
too bad to be so taken in.”

The children shouted with laughter.

“Well, but to return to your ‘Happy
Nancy,” said Captain Davenne. “TI hope
she was no pretence.”

“Nay, sir, I should think not. The dis-
trict-visitor gave it to me last week. It was
printed on a fly-leaf ; but I had read it some
time ago in the Christian Treasury. I have
it in my pocket, if you would like to look at it.”

The old man took a leaf of printed paper
out of his pocket, and gave it to Captain
Davenne.

“Will one of you read it to me, boys?”
asked the captain.

“Tet Alan read it,” said Alice, while she
. took the paper from her uncle and gave it
to the eldest boy of the group, whose coun-
tenance expressed a degree of intelligence un-
common to boys of hisage. So Alan began—

HAPPY NANCY’S SECRET ; OR, CONFIDENCE
IN GOD.

There once lived in an old brown cottage
a solitary woman. She tended her little
26 THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE.

garden, and knit and spun fora living. She
was known everywhere from village to village
by the name of “Happy Nancy.” She
had no money, no family, no relatives, and
was half blind, quite lame, and very crooked.
There was no comeliness in her, and yet
there, in that homely, deformed body, the

finn po:
yy
pyr

ae Nt




HAPPY NANCY.

great God, who loves to bring strength out
of weakness, had set his royal seal.

“Well, Nancy, singing again?” would
the chance visitor say, as he stopped at her
door.

“Oh yes; I’m for ever at it.”

“T wish you'd tell me your secret, Nancy.
THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 27

You are all alone, you work hard, you have
nothing very pleasant surrounding you;
what is the reason you're so happy ?”

“Perhaps it’s because I haven’t got any-
body but God,” replied the good creature,
looking up. ‘ You see, rich folks like you
depend upon their families and their houses ;
they’ve got to be thinking of their business,
of their wives and children, and then they’re
always mighty afraid of troubles ahead. I
ain’t got anything to trouble myself about,
you see, ’cause I leave all to the Lord. J
think, well, if he can keep this great world
in such good order—the sun rolling day
after day, and the stars shining night after
night, make my garden things come up
the same season after season—he can cer-
tainly take care of such a poor simple thing
as I am; and so, you see, I leave all to the
Lord, and the Lord takes care of me.”

“Well, but Nancy, suppose that a frost
should come after your fruit trees are all
in blossom, and your little plants out ; sup-
pose—”

“ But I don’t suppose ; I never can sup-
pose ; I don’t want to suppose, except that
28 THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE.

the Lord will do everything right. That’s

what makes you people unhappy—your'e all
the time supposing. Now, why can’t you
wait till the suppose comes, as I do, and then
make the best of it.” ;

“Ah, Nancy! it’s pretty certain you'll
get to heaven, while many of us, with
all our worldly wisdom, will have to stay
out.”

“There you are at it again,” said Nancy,
shaking her head,-—“ always looking out for
some black cloud. Why, if I was you, I’d
keep the devil at arm’s length, instead of
taking him right into my heart. He'll do
you a desperate sight of mischief.”

She was right. We do take the demon
of care, of distrust, of melancholy foreboding,
of ingratitude, right into our heart. We
canker every pleasure with this gloomy fear
of coming ill. We seldom trust that bless-
ings will enter, or hail them when they °
come. We should be more childlike toward .
our heavenly Father, believe in his love,
learn to confide in his wisdom, and not in
our own; and, above all, “ wait till the sup-
pose come, and then make the best of it.”
THE ORACLE OF THE VILLAGE. 29

Depend upon it, earth would seem an Eden

if you would follow Happy Nancy’s rule,

and never give place in your bosom to
imaginary evils.

“Thank you, my boy,” said Captain
Davenne, when Alan had finished reading ;
“it is well worth hearing. We must all
try to emulate Happy Nancy, and never
suppose.”

“We must make one exception,” said
Alice ; “just one for to-day. Suppose we
hear Robin’s lesson to the elder boys; you
know, Robin, you have promised to teach
them something. They have waited very
patiently, and now you must reward them.”

“ Just as you please, ma’am,” said the old
man, “if your uncle will not be tired. Now,
then, little ones, you may run away and chase
the butterflies on the green. Only do not
hurt them, for they are God’s creatures.”

The children obeyed, and were soon far
away, merry in play. The elder boys
grouped themselves a little closer to their
old friend, who began at once.





as
nme





CHAPTER II.

A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK.




WAS going to tell them, sir, some in-
teresting facts about South Ame-
rica. They are lessons from God’s
creation, which prove how God
has thought, and planned, and con-
trived so as to give us temporal mercies and
comforts.—First of all,” Robin continued,
addressing the boys, “I must tell you that
there is a certain part of South America
where it never rains.” :

“ Never rains!” exclaimed a voice. “Ah,
I wish we had it so here; our holidays
would never be spoilt.”

“Stay a moment, Charlie,” said Alice ;
“how would the flowers grow in that little
garden you are so fond of, and what would
A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK. 31

become of the green fields and trees? You
would have no dear old oak. like this.”

The boy looked thoughtful. “Then,
ma’am, are there no fields, no trees, in that
part of South America ?”

“Yes, my lad,” said Robin, “finer and
larger than any you have seen in this coun-
try. And that is just the thing I was going
to explain to you. Rain, you know, comes
trom the clouds ; we can’t have rain without
them. Now, the reason that there are no
clouds over that part of South America is,
because there are certain winds there which
carry the clouds in such a direction, and
with such rapidity, that they are borne past
that part of the country. These winds are
called the ‘ trade-winds,’ because they be-
friend the trading people who, as the Bible
says, ‘go down to the sea in ships, and do
business in great waters. —I have often heard
my brother, who was a sailor, speak about
these winds,” Robin added, turning to Cap-
tain Davenne. “He said they could not
do without them. I don’t myself understand
much about it.”

“That is not surprising,” said the captain ;
32 A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK.

“we sailors have a better chance in such
matters, you know. It is quite true that
vessels could not cross certain seas, called
‘tropical seas,’ but for the trade-winds.
Thus it is that our merciful God provides
these winds, which are so strong that, as
you said just now, they carry the clouds
past one portion of the country in South
America. I have been in those seas myself,
Robin, and often when I have heard some
profane word from the sailors’ mouths I
have said to myself, ‘How kind, how for-
bearing is God! he pours mercies upon
thankless men.”

Old Robin shook his head. “ Don’t you
think, sir, that men would love and serve
God better if they made themselves ac-
quainted with some of his wonderful works?”

“It ought to be so,” Captain Davenne
replied, “but, alas! it is not always so.
The head and the heart but too often part
company; one may be full of knowledge,
while the other is full of enmity against God.”

“ That is true, sir,” said Robin ; “may the
good Lord have mercy upon us, and create in
us a new heart, for Jesus Christ his sake.”
A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK. 383

There was a short silence in the group,
for the old man, with his simple and reve-
rent faith, had raised his hat while he uttered
those few words of prayer.

Charlie was the first to speak. He was
impatient to know how the trees could grow
without rain. “Please, Master Robin, how
about the clouds that fly so fast ?”

“It’s a wonderful thing, as you shall
hear, my boy. There are mountains there
so very high that the clouds cannot pass
without striking them. Those trade-winds,
which, as I told you, carry the clouds past
the flat country, bear a large portion of them
against the sides of this mountain-range,
and they accumulate there in perpetual
moisture. This moisture floats off in plen-
tiful dews towards the dry plains over which
the clouds have passed, and waters the fields
with abundant dew.”

“Please, Robin,” said Alan, “ I don’t see
it quite clear. Will you be so good as to
say that over again ?”

Robin looked towards Captain Davenne.
“ You will do it better than I can, sir.”

“ Well, my boy,” said the captain, “the
3

(402)
34 A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK.

point you must notice is the wisdom of
God’s contrivance, which provides for the
different needs of all his creatures. The
trade-winds, you have heard just now, are
sent for the special benefit of the trading
vessels in the tropical seas, which otherwise
could not get on in their course. But in
order to supply this want, one part of the
land is deprived of the necessary clouds.
You see that, do you not, Alan ?”

“Yes, sir; these winds carry the clouds
so fast that they are borne past that part of
the country.”

“ Exactly so. Now observe the compen- —
sation for this loss of clouds there. The
Creator has placed those great and high
mountains, the Andes, in such a situation
as exactly suits the emergency. They run
along the edge of the land, and are a good
deal higher than the usual height of clouds.
We see the reason for this. They intercept
those passing clouds, and keep them as a
storehouse for the wants of the neighbouring
country.”

“ Oh, I see it now, sir, thank you! Then
they get very heavy dews in the place of rain?”
A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK. 35

“ Just so; and now, Alan, is it not a won-
derful proof of a Creator whose wisdom is
equal to his love ?”

“And there is another place,” said old
Robin, “where it never rains either, and
where the arrangement is different. We
must doubly admire the wisdom of God
when we see different arrangements made
in different places for producing the same
end. I¢ does not rain in Egypt, and there
are no mountains like the Andes to inter-
-cept the clouds, nor passing clouds to be
condensed, and yet we know that the crops
are plentiful in Egypt.”

~ “Yes,” said Alice, “ Egypt is called the
granary of the world.”

“Tt is the river Nile that overflows the
land, is it not?” said Alan.

“It is so,” the old man replied; “and
what we ought to notice in this fact is, how
many circumstances must combine to pro-
duce this end. First, the country must be
quite flat; next, the river must be large
enough to water so large a tract of land,
the waters must overflow at the right season.
They say that the Nile rises in the moun-
36 A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK.

tains called ‘the Mountains of the Moon,’”
Robin continued.
“That was the generally received opinion,”
“interrupted Captain Davenne, “ but recent
investigation shows that the source of the
Nile is a vast lake. The periodical rise of
the Nile is caused by the overflow of this























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































RISING OF THE NILE.

lake during the rainy season. But this
makes no difference with regard to what
you are saying, Robin. It does not signify
where the waters rise, so long as there is an
overflow of the river, and the flood covers
the plains of Egypt at the right season of
A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK. 37

the year. Thus we see that the same Hand
which arranged so wonderfully for the sup-
-ply of rain in that part of South America,
had planned similar mercies for another part
of the world, only by different means.”

“Yes, sir,” said the old man, “and yet
the wretched men who say, ‘There is no
God,’ would teach us that all these mercies
come by chance. They talk of the ‘laws of
nature, but don’t you see, Alan” (for the
boy’s eager eyes were fixed on the speaker),
“they can’t tell us how it is that the ‘laws
of nature’ which raised the Andes, did not
-raise a similar mountain on the plains of
Egypt; and if nature contrived the flat
grounds of Egypt to receive the coming
flood, why nature did not level the hills and
mountains of South America.”

“Yes, indeed,” said Captain Davenne,
“why does not inundation answer on the
coast of Chili, and dew upon the sands of
Egypt ?”

“Do tell us something more like this,
good Robin,” said Alan. “I suppose there
are other facts like these ?”

“ Yes, my boy, there are several. I could
38 A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK.

tell you about Greenland—the land, you
know, of snow and ice. No trees grow
there, and therefore no wood is to be had.
What, then, shall the Greenlanders do for .
fuel, and for making their boats, and spears,
and fishing-tackle ?”

“ Ah! what indeed?” said Charlie; “J
can’t guess at all.”

“The sailors tell us,” continued Robin,
“that they use train oil for fuel. This is
supplied to them by the whales that are
caught in great numbers near those shores.
And as for wood, we are told that certain
currents of the ocean bring large trunks and
portions of trees from other countries, and
lodge them between the islands, ready for
use when the Greenlander wants them.*—
This seems to me very wonderful, sir,” said
Robin, turning to the captain ; “these poor
creatures cannot tell where these trees are
torn from, or how they are swept away—all
they know is, that since their own islands
do not produce the trees they want, the
waves of the sea bring them to their shores.

* For these and similar illustrations, see Nelson on “ Infidelity,
its Cause and Cure.”
e

A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK, 39

Ah, sir, one longs to be a missionary, to
go to these Greenlanders and tell them that
it is a Father’s hand that sends them all
these things.”

“ Alas! Robin, God has ignorant and
thankless children in every part of his
world. How few of us care to inquire into
the wonders of God’s creation! See how
we forget the Giver all the while we are
using his gifts for our life, health, and
enjoyment. arth, air, and water are by
constant adaptations made to work together
for our good, and yet we go on in our sin
and self, living without God and without
hope in the world.”

“ That is very true, sir,” said the old man,
with a sad smile; “it’s truly wonderful
altogether.”

“T never heard anything of this before,”
said Alan, ‘and I am sure it’s well worth
remembering.”

The boy had listened to the last words
spoken by the captain with intense interest.
There was a look of earnest inquiry in his
large dark eyes, unusual in boys of his age.
In it one could recognize the early workings
40 A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK.

of an ardent spirit craving for knowledge of
the unseen world. Surely, if there be one
phase of the life in the human soul more
interesting in the eyes of angels and of God,
it is the season when thought begins to do
her work in the energy and glow of youth,
when the human first responds to the touch
of the divine, and the craving spirit goes
forth in its restless quest of God.*

“Do you remember anything more, Master
Robin ?” Alan continued ; “it is better than
all the story-books in the world.”

“That’s rightly spoken,” the old man
replied ; “ God has given us two wonderful
books of his own making, and we can read
and never tire of them. The book of nature
is one, and the blessed Bible is the other.
But mark what I say, Alan, my boy, we
shall never see clearly to read and under-
stand either of these books, unless we
_ endeavour to do God's will. We must obey
before we understand. If we do what God
_ bids us, we shall soon find that he gives us
more and more knowledge.”

* “T’homme a perdu-Dieu, et, toutefois, le malheureux ne peut

s’en passer” —Man has lost God, and yet, unhappy man! he cannot
do without God.—Bossuret.
A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK. 41

“Tt is so difficult,” said the boy, looking
up into the quiet face of the old man.

“So it is, Alan; but can we wonder at
it, when we know what suffering it cost
the blessed Saviour to bring us back to
God ?”

“T wish,” said the boy, “that Will Davis,
my cousin, could hear what you have been
saying ; he works at the factory, you know.
He is getting into strange ways, and reads
strange books—books that try to prove that
the Bible is false. I wonder what he would
say to all these wonderful things you have
been telling us. He says that everything
came by chance.”

“Poor, sinful body,” said the old man,
shaking his head sorrowfully, “he does not
see that it is far more difficult to prove that
chance can bring such wonderful contrivance
and results together.”

“You are quite right,” rejoined Captain
Davenne. “The unbeliever is the most
credulous of men. He believes things which
the Christian does not believe, and which are
far more difficult of belief. For instance, in
those facts about Greenland, let him tell us
1 42 ' A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK.

how it is that the whale happens to swim
nearest to those who most need his flesh.
If we should wish to use nothing but train
oil for fuel, we could not do so; because we
do not find whales near our coast.. Does
chance make this difference ?”

“ And the trees, sir,” said Alan, “that is
wonderful. Is it really true that they are
brought by the waves to those shores ?”

“We are told go on good authority,” the
captain replied. ‘We are informed that a
certain current of the ocean, or certain
winds, or, indeed, both united, bear along
the timber from other lands, and lodge it
between the islands, which so stand as to
make a sort of storehouse. Now, when we
notice the fact that as trees are thus borne
along the shores of France, or Spain, or
England, where they are not wanted, but
that in more frozen climes, where they are
wanted, the supply is brought, it certainly
is difficult to say, ‘There is no Designer at
work, or if there is one, that he is not a wise
and kind Father.’”

“Oh,” said Alice, claspmg her hands,
“how is it possible there can be a single
A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK. 43

infidel in the world, while men have eyes to
see and read God’s works!”

“Tt’s the heart that’s wrong, dear lady,”
said the old man; “the heart is at enmity
against God, and that is why men love
darkness rather than light, falsehood rather
than truth. They wish the Bible to be false,
and so by degrees they persuade themselves
that it is so.”

“Those words of our Lord are very clear
on this subject,” Captain Davenne rejoined,
“ “because ther deeds are evil.’ It is an
awful fact, that every act of sin brings dark-
ness into the soul, hiding the truth of God
from our minds, as well as the presence of
God from our hearts.”

“ And on the other hand, sir,” said Robin,
‘what a blessed thing it is, that by doing the
will of God we get to know what is truth.
Ah, sir, I had a good mother, she taught
me this; she was always so earnest on this
point. ‘Robin,’ she would say, ‘if once you
begin to disobey God’s plain commands, you
will soon become a sceptic and an un-
believer.’ And she was right, sir. After
her death I fell into idle company; like
44 A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK.

many young men, I began by breaking the
Sabbath, then I came to neglect my Bible,
and to give up praying; and, at last, I went
to hear free-thinkers talk, and their argu-
ments seemed to me very fine, and just to
suit me; I wished them to betrue. I could
not see the ignorance and stupidity that was
in them, because sin had darkened my mind
and defiled my heart.”

“ And what brought you out of all this,
Robin?” asked Miss Davenne.

“God was very merciful to me,” said the
old man. “He sent me a long and heavy
sickness, but it was a blessed one, for in it I
heard his voice, ‘ Return unto me, for I have
redeemed thee. And then, lady, I felt and
knew that it was true, that Jesus is a great
Saviour, and man a great sinner.” The old
man raised his eyes towards the blue heavens
above him, the calm beauty of which seemed
reflected upon his aged features.

“Ah, Robin,” said Captain Davenne,
“you have hit upon the right thing, the all-
powerful remedy for infidelity and atheism.
All the arguments in the world are as
nothing in comparison with that belief of
A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK. 45

the truth which comes from a knowledge
and a consciousness within. When the soul
feels its sorest need of a Saviour, and sees,
too, that Jesus is all that he needs, then he
does not want arguments to convince him
of the existence of God. You might as
well persuade a satisfied man that he is
hungry, as you can persuade such an one
that there is no God, no Saviour, no Holy
’ Ghost.”

There was a short silence, broken at
length by Alan, who again fixed his deep
eyes upon the old man. ‘ Were you really
once an infidel, Master Robin ?”

The old man looked very grave while he
made reply: “I am thankful to say, my
lad, that I never went so far as to say with
the fool ‘There is no God;’ but, alas! I
sinned greatly by giving heed to wretched
and ignorant men who, as Satan’s mes-
sengers, went about to teach les. My
mind was filled with unbelieving thoughts,
with doubts of God’s justice and his love,
and with foolish and absurd suggestions
against the truth of his word. Ah! those
were sad days,” continued the old man,
46 A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK,

bending his head upon his clasped hands.
“There would be little peace for me now in
remembering them, if it were not for that
blessed word, ‘The blood of Jesus Christ
cleanseth from all sin.’”

“Tt is a striking fact,” said Captain
Davenne, “that the human mind will swal-
low any amount of falsehood in arguments
against religion, which it will not do in
matters of this world. Nothing, surely,
better proves the utter departure of the
heart from God.”

“Tt is pride,” said old Robin, looking up,
‘pride that works in man rebellion and un-
belief. Ah, sir, I often think of my mother;
she had a favourite proverb—”

The old man stopped, perceiving a smile
upon Alice’s face. “Go on, Robin,” she
said, “go on; I have already told my uncle
you had a pet saying, and I am glad that
you have come out with it at last.”

“Tt is a quaint old saying, sir, but a true
one,—

‘The sweetest sleep is the sleep on water-porridge.’
My mother used to say that it held as good
for the soul as for the body; for that most of
wa

A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK. 47

us were, like Sodom, destroyed by pride and
fulness of bread.”

“That is well thought,” said Alice. “I
have never taken the proverb in that sense.
I had only applied it to your usual content-
ment in humble fare, Robin.”

“It’s a short text, lady, for a long sermon.
The blessed Lord was meek and lowly in
heart ; and it is the poor in spirit that shall
inherit his kingdom.”

“You had a great blessing, Robin, in a
good mother,” said Captain Davenne.

“A great blessing indeed, sir; there’s no
telling what a mother’s faith and prayers can
do for an erring son. I believe that it was
in answer to them that God brought me
back from the sin and misery of doubt and
perplexity. And do you know, sir, I can
remember the time when I first asked my
mother the meaning of the proverb; yes,
and the very place too. I can see the little
bed in the corner as plain as possible, though
it is such a long time ago, and the sweet
look on my mother’s face as she said to me,
‘It means that we must be happy and
thankful with whatever God gives, and not
48 A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK.

wish to have great things, or to be great
people.’ I recollect, too, her last words as
she kissed us, ‘ Love God, my children, and
then you will love all he gives, whether it









A PICTURE OF LONG AGO.

be small or great.’ Is it not strange, sir,
that I should remember all this as well as if
it had happened only yesterday? How is
it?”
A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK. 49

“One reason, I imagine,” the captain
replied, “‘is that we have gone over the
facts of our childhood so often that they
have become more fixed in our minds.
Another is, that our minds are more quiet
in old age; the hurry and work. of middle
age are.over, and our thoughts are less dis-
tracted, and are therefore able to recall past
images in their first freshness.”

“ Happy that old age,” said Alice, “that
can fill its quiet hours with such pleasant
pictures. Well, Robin, I wish that every
one was as contented and thankful as you.
I am always the better for listening to you.
But we must say good-bye now, for we shall
be wanted at home.”

“You are always very kind, lady, in bear-
ing with an old man’s long stories.”

“Tf there had been time,” Alice con-
tinued, “I should have asked you to tell
my uncle how it happened that the proverb
became so much impressed on your mind?”

“You are too good, dear lady, to make
so much of my simple story.”

“I propose,” said Captain Davenne as he
rose, “that our good friend should fix a day

(402) 4
50 A LEAF FROM A BIG BOOK.

_ for telling us. I am sure we shall all be
very glad to hear it.”

The old man replied with a grateful look.
“Tf you have no objection to these young
things being present, I should like them to
hear it.”

The boys had risen from their seats on
the grass when Miss Davenne had moved,
and were now waiting eagerly for her reply.
The assent was readily given, and the day
fixed. A few more kindly words were
spoken by Captain Davenne to the old man,
and the group dispersed ; the boys bounding
across the common, the young lady and her
uncle taking the path that led to the Hall,
and old Robin, with his staff (that last friend
of feeble humanity), turning toward his
cottave.



2


CHAPTER IIT.

AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE.



JHE evening after this conversation,
old Robin sat in his little garden
‘ among his bees, his flowers, and the
parting rays of the sun which was
sinking behind the adjacent hills.
The old man was never so happy as when,
seated at his cottage door, he watched the
bright glories of the evening sky. The love of
nature is strongest at the beginning and the
end of life. The child has no care for the
morrow, but gives himself up to the wealth
that lies around him in the rich gifts of
earth, air, and sky ; and the old man returns
to the same enjoyment when the toil of life
is done, and he is waiting in the cool of the
evening for a brighter morrow in a better
52 AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE.

home. On this evening, however, Robin’s
solitude was destined to be broken. Two
figures presented themselves at the garden
gate.
“May we come in, Master Robin?”
The voice was Alan’s.



===

ALAN AND AIS COUSIN.

“Come in, my lad, and welcome,” was
the old man’s ready response.

“This is my cousin Will,” said the youth,
pointing to his companion. “Here, Will,
sit down on this bit of grass.—The fact is,
Robin,” said the lad, coming to the point at
AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE. 53

-once—‘ the fact is, I have persuaded Will
to come here for two reasons. One is that
he may hear something good from your lips,
and the next is—,” and here Alan stopped
short. His cheek became suddenly red.

“JT will tell the truth for you,” said
his cousin. “Alan is in a state of great
remorse, Master Robin, because he went
with me this morning to a lecture at the
Town Hall of Coniston, and the only way I
eould pacify him was by letting him bring
me in his turn to you, that you might
lecture me, I suppose.”

The eyes of the speaker were dark and
lustrous, but they lacked that peculiar ex-
pression which bears witness on some faces
to the joy and rest which the soul within has
found.

“What was the lecture about, my son?”
asked the old man.

“Tt was a lecture against the Bible,” Alan
replied impetuously; “against the Book you
love so much, Robin. I was a fool to be
persuaded by Will. I knew I was doing
wrong all the time, and yet I went. I am
sure that if I had known how wretched that
54 AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE.

man’s words could make me, I would never
have gone.”

Old Robin shook his head sorrowfully.
“The tree of error bears deadly fruit, Alan,
and they that will pluck and eat must be
content to suffer.—And thou, young man,”
he added, turning to Alan’s companion,
“wilt thou make thine own destruction
tenfold more sure by dragging a fellow-
creature after thee ?”

“Don’t blame him, Robin,” said Alan,
“for it was my own fault that I went.”

“The lecturer was said to be such a clever
man,” said the other, “that many of us were
tempted to go and hear him. But, indeed,
Master Robin, I will not make myself out
better than Iam. I confess to you that I
have sometimes doubted the truth of the
Bible. There are arguments against it which
I find it difficult to answer.” °

“May the good Lord forgive you,” said
the old man, “even as I had need to be
forgiven when, in the days of my youth and
folly, I gave heed to the same falsehoods.
Listen to me, my son. There are but two
reasons why men are infidels. “The first is,
AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE. 55

because they love darkness better than light;
the other is, because they are ignorant.
Yes, Will Davis, those that appear the most
learned are just the most ignorant; and,
alas! they choose to remain so. Young
man, you say that you find it difficult to
believe; but answer me this question, Do
you wish to believe ?”

“Well, Master Robin, I have really
never asked myself that question.”

“Ah!” said the old man, “if you wished
to believe you would use all your diligence
to read everything that was in favour of the
Bible ; whereas you will confess, if you are
honest, that for one argument that honours
the Word of God, you have read ten, ay,
twenty, that blasphemes it.”

Old Robin kindled as he spoke. The
radiance of the sunlight which was falling
on the faces of the young men, was as
nothing in comparison of that diviner glow
which bore witness on the aged features to
the energy of truth within.

“You may not like to hear it said you
are ignorant, my son,” he went on; “but if
you will take the trouble to examine into
56 AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE.

what scoffers say, you will find that they
are ignorant of Bible facts, Bible history,
and Bible language. Yet these are the men
who call themselves too learned to believe
in God’s Book.”

“Well, Master Robin,” said Alan, “I was
disgusted by the lecturer’s objections, and
by his unfairness too. About the Tower of
Babel, for instance, he actually said that
the Bible could not be true, because it
taught men that this tower would have been
built up to heaven, and that God came down
to prevent it, fearing lest men should find
a method of their own for getting into
heaven.”

“We ought not to be surprised at any-
thing these men assert,” Robin replied,
“for cavilling and doubting always end in
unfairness and untruth. The building of
the tower, as you know, had nothing to.
do with getting into heaven, and yet if you
had not read your Bible, this man might
have led you to believe otherwise. It is a
melancholy fact that men are everywhere
receiving and listening to every kind of
infidel objections, without making them-
AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE. 57

selves acquainted with the mass of evidence
which is on the side of truth. They seize
upon the difficulties, but do not care for any
further testimony. Why. is this? Ah!
the answer is too plain; it is because men
love darkness rather than light.”

“And only think, Robin,” said Alan
again, “that lecturer said that the Bible
was immoral in its teachings, because it
speaks of certain men as good men, when,
at the same time, it relates their having
committed the worst sins! David was his
pet example.”

“ How ignorant that man saad be,” said
Robin. “Why, if his mind had not been
perverted and madecrooked, he would see that
the Bible does not sanction or approve of
David in his sins ; it simply states those sins
as matters of fact. This is very much in
favour of the Bible. It is the only historical
book on earth which relates matters of
naked fact. No writer in that wonderful
volume ever praises the goodness of the men
he is writing about. No praise, or flattery,
is used, as there is in other books of history.
On the contrary, the sacred historians relate
58 AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE.

plainly and truthfully the sins into which
God’s people have fallen. It is impossible
they should do otherwise,” added the old
man, laying his hand impressively upon
Alan’s arm, “not only because they are the
records of truth, but because they seek to
teach us what man is when he falls away
from God. When we read of the treachery
and conceit of Peter, and of the grievous fall
of David, we see that man is never safe but
when he leans upon God. And, as the
whole teaching of the Bible points to this
truth, we cannot be surprised when God’s
Word makes it plain to us by zlustration as
well as precept.”

“There’s something in that,” said Alan’s
companion.

The old man went on. ‘David had a
fallen nature, as every one of God’s children
has, and David was a great king. With all
his wealth and all his triumphs, the surprise
is that he did not sooner fall into sin. And
when he did fall, grievous as it was, see how
great was his repentance! Could any one
have humbled himself as he did, who had
not the Spirit of God in his heart? Think
AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE. | 59

of that 51st Psalm (in which he records his
sins and his deep repentance), and remember
that king David knew that it would be sung
before his court, and before all Jerusalem ;
that it would be the memorial of his sin to
all generations. His sorrow for that sin
must have been very real to enable him to
face all.this.”

“This cannot be denied, I confess,” said
young Davis. ;

“Ah, my sons,” said old Robin very
gravely, “we would not be so ready to blame
the Bible for recording the sins of many of
God’s people, if we understood a little more
of that repentance which so filled their hearts
as to lead them to go out and weep bitterly.”

The young men were silent. The earnest-
ness of the old man’s words, together with
the seriousness of his manner, and the tone
of sorrow which seemed lovingly to bind
the whole, all made a deep impression on
their minds. The candour of youth, too,.
was still alive in their hearts, as yet un-—
destroyed by the deceits and sophistries of a
world which is at enmity with God.

“May I tell you another objection which
60 AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE.

that man made against the truth of the
Bible?” said Alan. ‘He declared it.im-
possible to believe in the resurrection of the
body, when we know that after death our
bodies dissolve and mingle with the dust or
are scattered over the earth.”

“ Stay a moment,” said old Robin, rising
from his seat. “I have a book in-doors
which has some striking words on this sub-
ject. You shall read them for yourselves.
There is light enough in the sky, so I will
fetch the book.”

The old man went into the cottage, and
soon returned with a small book in his hand.
It was a great favourite of his, to judge from
the way in which passages were marked and
underlined.

“Here is the chapter,” he said; “now
read, Alan, read it aloud.”

“God tells the righteous that their bodies,
although made out of the materials belong-
ing to their present frames of earth, will -
shine, and be very splendid (1 Cor. xv. 40-
45). God can make very durable and very
glorious things out of materials the very
opposite of firmness or of brilliancy. He
AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE. 61

has done this. Of all the substances with
which we are acquainted, we esteem diamond
the hardest and the most glittering. Char-
coal is as black and as crumbling as any
other body known to us, yet these two
bodies are the same. The learned know,

pie = i ii a! > Z = .

iid
CN













































THE BOOK.

the ploughboy does not, that the difference
between charcoal and diamond is, that the
Creator has ordered a different arrangement
of particles. The same materials are
differently placed, that is all. If any are
wishing for a body more beautiful than they
62 AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE.

now have, they may be assured that God
can, if he choose, take our present fragile,
corruptible forms of clay, and make out of
them something exceedingly glorious. ‘Jt
as sown in dishonour, tt is raised in glory.’
Out of a certain spot of earth a flower arose,
which waved in splendour; the soil from
which it grew was very black.” *

“What do you say to that?” Robin
asked of young Davis, when Alan had
finished.

“T like it very much,” said the young
man frankly. “Can you spare the book to
me for a week or so? I have a nice bit of
time for reading now in the evening. I

should not mind reading more of that book.”
«TJ will lend it you gladly,” said Robin; —
‘it’s a good thing to read on the right side.
But oh, my sons, take an old man’s advice,
‘Begin to pray.’ All the reading, all the
thinking, and all the talking will not avail,
unless you ask the Spirit of truth to help
you. Boys, the time is all too short, that
we should let the work of life go by, on the
chance of its not being true. Don’t waste

* Rev. D. Nelson, M.D.
AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE. 63

this precious time in doubt and unbelief,
but get you to your Saviour, and ask him
to teach you those words which alone can
make you a soft pillow when you lie down
to die: ‘Lord, I believe; help thou mine un-
belief.”

“We must wish you good-evening now,
Master Robin,” said Alan. “TI think I can
promise you never to go to those places
again.”

The old man was silent. His eye was
resting on the evening clouds which, with
crimson edges, lay in masses above the set-
ting sun.

“ How beautiful it is!” said Alan.

“Ay,” said the old man, “and there is
one thing more beautiful, more wonderful
still, and that is God’s good patience. We
are ready enough to use his gifts; to sow
and reap under the blessed sun in the
heavens, and be warmed and gladdened by
his rays; but we care not to seek after the
Giver himself, and we refuse to believe
in his love. Verily, his compassions fail
not.”

“Well, Master Robin,” said young Davis, —
64 AN OLD MAN’S ADVICE.

“1 would give something to have your
opinions.”

“Don’t talk of opinions,” said the old
man: “whena man talks of his ‘opinions,’
we may be sure that pride is not far off.
Nay, my lads, you must get the lowly
mind, the empty heart, if you would see
.God. He satisfieth the hungry soul. Fare-
well, my sons. Take heed to yourselves,
lest with all your books, and all your
learning, and all your opinions, you find
yourselves at the last among the proud
in heart that are sent empty away.”

The old man closed the small gate, and
walked slowly to the cottage. The young
men, silent and grave, went their way.




CHAPTER IV.
A SAD ACCIDENT.

SPHAT can be the matter?” said
the squire, who was ae at
the window of the dining-room.
“There is Frank rushing up the
garden path, evidently anxious
Bout something.”

Alice quiclly left her seat, and toned
her father at the window. “He is quite
pale,” she said, hastening to meet her
brother.

But Frank was already in the room.
“An accident, father, in the village! I
have run up to fetch a horse, for I must go
over to Coniston to fetch the doctor.”

“Who is hurt, Frank?” anxiously in-
quired Alice.

(402) 5



66 A SAD ACCIDENT.

Frank hesitated. He knew that he
should distress his sister by telling her that
it was old Robin who had met with a
serious accident.

Alice guessed his thoughts. “O Frank!”
she exclaimed, “not Robin, I hope.”

“ Don’t be alarmed, Alice; it may not be
bad after all, though I am sorry to say it is
old Robin. He has been thrown down by
a runaway horse and carriage.”

“ How did it happen, Frank?” said his
father.

“T was coming home,” Frank replied,
“across the Carr Lea, and just as I was
clearing the stile into the road, I heard the
sound of a carriage going too fast to be all
right. So I hastened on into the village,
and there, at the corner of the school-house,
I saw a group of people, and knew directly
that there was some accident. To my
horror, I saw it was old Robin; they were
just preparing to carry him to his cottage.
I did not stay to ask any questions, for I
knew that the best thing I could do was to
run and fetch the doctor.”

“That's right, my boy,” said the squire ;
A SAD ACCIDENT. 67

“and take the gig, that the doctor may come
back with you.”

“Well, father, I thought of that, and told
George to be quick and bring it round. I met
him, happily, as I cameinto the carriage road.”

“ Here it is, Frank ; make haste. If Mr.
Forman is not at home,” said the squire,
speaking through the .open window, “drive
on to Barton Chase, and bring Dr. Gordon.
He is a man,” he added, turning to his wife,
“who is always ready for a kind action.
Poor old Robin! He shall have all the
care that we can give. Cheer up, Aly!”
said the kind-hearted squire, who saw the
tears in his daughter’s eyes. ‘“ We must
hope for the best. Your old favourite has
fine health in his favour.”

“And a quiet mind,” said her mother.
“That will do more for him than all the
help that any one can give.”

“That is true,” said Captain Davenne ;
“it was only the other day that Dr. King
was saying that, in a medical point of view,
doctors knew full well the value of true re-
ligion, there being twice the chance for the
body when the mind is at peace.”
68 A SAD ACCIDENT.

“May I go to him, mother?” asked Alice.
“T could stay with him till the doctor arrives.”

“Tt would be better to wait a little, my
child, for old Robin ought surely to be kept
very quiet. He is so fond of you, that your
coming would be sure to excite him. I will
send nurse Luff to him directly; he could
not be in better hands.”

“Yes, Alice,” said the squire, “your
mother is right. The kindest thing to
Robin is to leave him quiet just now.
Wait an hour or two, and then go; and
take some grapes with you, that the old
man may have them during the night.”

Very soon after this, Alice, accompanied
by her uncle, stood at the door of old
Robin’s cottage.

“You had better go in alone, Alice,” said
Captain Davenne ; “he may not care to see
a stranger. I will wait for you on the
green, under the old tree. Do not forget
the grapes,” he added, for Alice in her
anxiety had left the basket in his hand.

Alice opened the door gently and entered
the cottage. There was no one in the little
kitchen. There was no sound but the tick
A SAD ACCIDENT. 69

of the old clock in the corner. The well-
worn Bible was on a table close to the win-
dow, and the old man’s spectacles lay upon
it. As Alice looked upon them, she said
within herself, “ Happy old man! though
your outward eye may no longer rest upon
this blessed book, you have a better portion,

AI Ih "



THE FAVOURITE SEAT.

for the eyes of your soul have been opened
whereby you can see God.”

The slight movement made by Alice’s
entrance was heard by the nurse, who came
down directly.

“ How is he now, nurse?” asked Alice.

“ He is suffering very badly, ma’am. The
70 A SAD ACCIDENT.

doctor says that it is impossible to set the
leg at present. He said he would call again
soon. It makes my heart ache to see the
good old man in pain. He is so patient
too,” she added.

“Dear old Robin!” sighed Alice.

“You will go up, won’t you, ma'am? he
has been talking of you, and wanting to see
you. Young Alan is with him. The lad
seems very fond of him; he has not left
him since the accident.”

“Do you know how it happened, nurse?”

“They say that the old man was hurt
in saving a little child in the wood from
a runaway horse. The carriage knocked
him down, and though the wheel did not
go over him, his leg was broken by the
fall.”

“It was just like him,” said Alice, “al-
ways doing good, and never sparing him-
self. But now, nurse, I will go up, for our
talking here may disturb him.”

The bed on which the old man lay was
close to the window, which was open, to
admit the soft evening air, which gently
stirred the thin gray hair that lay upon the
A SAD ACCIDENT. 71

pillow. The old man’s eyes were closed,
and Alice was grieved to notice the expres-
sion of pain that was perceptible on his face.
Alan was standing at the side of the bed,
when the lady entered. He moved away,
to allow her to take his place.

“ He is so thirsty, ma’am ; I am going to
fetch him some more water.” .

Old Robin opened his eyes, hearing these
words. He recognized Alice, and smiled.
It was a smile bright and fleeting as an
October ray. He tried to speak, but the
effort failed.

“ Here are some grapes for you, old
Robin,” said Alice,—‘‘some of papa’s early
grapes. They will assuage your thirst
better than water.”

The old man’s lips moved again. There
was a sudden expression upon his aged fea-
tures that told of a holy thought within, as
the radiant edges of an evening cloud bear
witness to the sun behind. Alice bent her
ear to the feeble voice.

“Shall the disciple be above his master?”
whispered the old man; “when uz thirsted,
they gave HIM vinegar to drink.”
72 A SAD ACCIDENT.





A KINDLY VISIT.

The sudden tears overflowed A lice’s eyes at
this proof of Christian constancy. Pain and
trial had but deepened the channel in which
- the love of the aged disciple was flowing to-
wards his crucified Lord and Saviour. The
sacred flame was burning all the brighter for
the darkened setting of the troubled hour.

Robin perceived the tears on Alice’s
cheek, and thought that she was pained to
witness his suffering.

“ Do not weep, lady,” he said; “it is well.”
A SAD ACCIDENT. — 73

“‘T know it is, dear Robin,” she said, try-
ing to smile through her tears. ‘“'The God
whom you serve constantly is able to de-
liver you from all mistrust of his love, or
impatience in your sufferings.”

“He is able,” murmured the old man,
“and he is willing.”

He closed his eyes again, while an ex-
pression of pain passed over his features.
The nurse entered the room and whispered
to Alice that the doctor had returned. As
Alice moved from her chair, the old man
put out his hand, which she took into hers,
while she stooped down to say farewell.
The feeble voice spoke again,—

“Will you say those verses you wrote in
my Bible?”

““T will,” Alice replied ; and bending over
him, she repeated, in a soft voice, the fol-
lowing words,—

“One there is above all others ;
Oh, how He loves!
His is love beyond a brother’s ;
Oh, how He loves!

“*Harthly friends may pain and grieve thee,
One day kind, the next day leave thee,
But this Friend will ne’er deceive thee ;
Oh, how He loves!”
74 A SAD ACCIDENT.

“Thank you, ma’am,” said the old man.
Alice pressed the offered hand, and gently
moving, left the room.

Ata late hour that night, Alan was stand- °
ing alone in the little garden of Robin’s cot-
tage. His affection for the old man was,
like every other part of his ardent nature,
strong and real. He had sought and ob-
tained leave to remain during the first night
of watching, and now he stood for a few
minutes in the garden before entering the
cottage. His earnest eyes were intent upon
the midnight sky. It was a lovely summer
firmament, and those bright, watching eyes
above seemed to find a response in the
solemn and radiant thoughts that filled
Alan’s young heart. “Nothing that de-
fileth,” seemed written in letters of living
light upon that glorious heaven. Then,
for the first time he seemed to realize the
full value of that faith which he now saw
was mightiest in a Christian in the hour of
trial. “ When trouble comes to you, Will
Davis,” he said, speaking his thoughts aloud,
“or to me, what shall we have to lean upon?”
He looked up at the still open casement,
A SAD ACCIDENT. 75

from whence not a sound of murmur dis-
turbed the quiet air, and the words which
the old man had spoken on that very spot,
the night before, now returned to his memory
with a force and vividness that seemed like
the waking to a new life. From out of that
earnest speech of Robin’s, three words stood
now before him in characters of fire—‘‘Begin
to pray.” There was one short form of
prayer that instantly came into his mind,
simple enough for a child, but all-sufficient
for eternity. “G'od be merciful to me a
sinner!” He breathed the words slowly,
but with the mighty energy of a new-born
faith. The soft night wind alone made re-
sponse to the sounds. But shall any man
say they were unheard in heaven? Blessed
be God, not while there is One above who,
while he “telleth the number of the stars,
gathereth together the outcast, and healeth
the broken in heart.”




CHAPTER V.

PAIN AND TRIAL.



j H REE months had passed away since
* the day of old Robin’s accident. The
summer-time was gone, but not the
summer brightness, for that seemed
to linger long and lovingly around
the autumn hours, giving a pledge and an
earnest of returning sunshine, which the old
year cherished in faith and hope that—

‘What the past hath given, the future gives as well.”

The old man was still in his room. The
doctor’s fears had been realized. As it
sometimes happens in old age, the broken
limb would not unite. There was no help
for it, old Robin would be bed-ridden for
the rest of his earthly pilgrimage. The
doctor was a kind-hearted man. He felt
PAIN AND TRIAL. 77

grieved at the old man’s prospect of help-
lessness, and expressed the greatest concern
for him. He dreaded to destroy the last
hope which Robin was one day expressing
of being able, after a time, to walk to the
favourite old oak. Great was his surprise,
however, to witness the old man’s composure
when the truth was told him. The child-
like trust which he had witnessed in Robin
during the whole course of his illness had
made a great impression on him. Dr. Gordon
was a man that feared God, and placed his
trust in a Saviour’s atoning blood ; but, from
some deficiency of early instruction, he failed
to take the full comfort that flows from an
unreserved belief in God’s fatherly love. In
his own frank and truthful manner he con-
fessed this to the old man. <“ How is it,” he
said, ‘that there is so much difference be-
tween us? I don’t believe there is any fear
in your love, while, at times, I ask myself,
Is there any love in my fear? How is it,
Robin #—don’t be afraid to preach tome. I
am sure you can teach me a great many
* things.” :

Old Robin shook his head. “There is
78 PAIN AND TRIAL.

only one Teacher, sir, and his lessons are
given for the asking.”

“That is true, Robin, but you know that
it is his will that we should be ministers of
his grace to each other. And I want you
to give me the secret of that wonderful rest
which your mind seems always to possess,
even in the midst of bodily pain. You
never seem troubled, either, by mental per-
plexities ; and oh, Robin, there are so many
of these in this weary world!”

“Sir,” said the old man, looking up with
his own meek smile into the manly and in-
genuous face of the speaker, ‘ I humbly
trust that it is the presence of the Spirit
of Christ within me, enabling me to say,
Abba, Father !”

There was a short silence ; then Dr. Gor-
don said: “The fact is, I believe that I be-
gin at the wrong end. I am always fearing
lest my repentance be not sufficient to make
God my Father, whereas you start on the
belief of his being your Father already.
That is the difference, and a very great dif-
ference it is. Your faith is hard to attain,

Robin.”
PAIN AND TRIAL. 79

“With men impossible, dear sir, for faith
is the gift of God. But oh,” the old man
continued in his earnest way, “it is only our
pride that makes it difficult! If we were
emptied of self, we should cease to wonder
at God’s way of saving us. He is too great
a God to allow a sinner any part in his work
of pardon. Do you know, sir, that Mr.
Arnot, our clergyman, was explaining this
subject to me only yesterday! He said he
believed that one reason why so many Chris-
tians began at the wrong end is, because the
ministers of God’s Word do not speak suf-
ficiently of the love of God the Father. He
said, if we read the Gospels attentively, and
especially the Gospel of St. John, we should
see how differently the Lord Jesus taught.
Do you remember, sir, the very first words
spoken by our Lord concerning his work ?
He called it his ‘ Father’s business.’”

“T never noticed that,” said Dr. Gordon ;
“they are very significant words.”

The old man continued: “It’s a blessed
truth that Jesus came to reveal the Father.
We may believe that Christ is the Way, but
it will be only half the truth if we do not
80 PAIN AND TRIAL. .

believe that he is the Way to the Father.
Ah, sir, this is the only sure road to that
repentance which is precious in the sight of
God !”

Dr. Gordon did not reply, but the words
of the old man brought with them a resist-
less conviction of their truth. “TI believe
you are right, Robin,” he said at length,
“you are right. After all, the prodigal son
did not truly repent till he remembered his
father’s love, and believed in its continuance.:
And I rather think you are right, too, when
you say that it is pride that sets us blunder-
ing at the wrong end. We think of our
feeble love to God, instead of God’s great
love in Christ tous. We look at the broken
reflection in the water, instead of at the stead-
fast sun in the heavens. By the way,” added
the doctor, as he rose to go, “talking of
pride puts me in mind of what I was going
to forget. Your friend, Miss Davenne, has
told me of a certain proverb of yours, about
which you had promised the boys a tale on
that very day of your accident, my poor
fellow. She wants me to consent to your
beig carried to the favourite oak-tree, one
PAIN AND TRIAL. 81

afternoon this week, while this fine weather
lasts. You see, she told me what the proverb
was, and how you interpreted it. Poor
Robin,” the kind doctor concluded, “you
httle thought that so much real ‘water-
porridge’ was in store for you.”

“Tt is all right, sir,” was the cheerful
reply of the old man; “a little spare diet is
necessary for us all at times, and it is whole-
some, too,” he added, smiling, “for sweet
sleep comes with it.”

“You are fond of parables, Robin.”

“Yes, sir; they are God’s way of teaching
his dull children.”

“Well, good-bye, Robin ; I suppose that -
the ‘spare diet’ means the lowly mind.”

“Yes, sir, it does, for so God giveth his
beloved sleep.”

a

(402)


CHAPTER VI.

LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT.




gy been carefully: placed on a mattress
under the oak-tree, and around him
was the same group which had
listened to his words on the evening before
his accident, with the exception of one person
—Captain Davenne—who was now absent
from the Hall.

“ Are you quite comfortable, Robin ?” in-
quired Alice ; “that is the first thing.”

“Quite, thank you, dear lady.”

“Then you must please begin,” she said,
“for some of these young listeners have only
half an hour before they return to school.”

So the old man began :—
LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT. 83

IAN

fi
Wp
i



2 UNDER THE OAK-TREE.

“It was my mother who taught me the
lesson of contentment. Bay as I was, I
could see that my father did not find the
84 LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT.

lesson easy. He was a kind father to me
and my brother (I had but one); and he
was a good husband, and loved his home.
But he was always fretting himself about
the money, and wishing that he might have
more of it, that he might do as other people
did who were more prosperous than he was.
My mother had a wonderful way of cheer-
ing him, and of bringing back a feeling of
contentment into his heart. And, bad as
times might be, she never seemed to lose
her faith in a Father in heaven. ‘The
winter I remember best was a severe one.
There was a great deal of illness in our
village, and work was very scarce. My
father used to look so grave and gloomy.
When we came from school we often found
him sitting at the table with his head buried
in his hands. One day I had got a book of
pictures, and was turning over the pages in
front of the kitchen-fire. My father was
seated in the chimney-corner, silent and
moody. My mother was clearing away from
the table the remains of our supper of bread
and potatoes, for we did not taste much
meat that winter. At last my father looked
LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT. 85

up and said, ‘It is very hard, Mary, to see
that fellow Dick’ (he was my father’s brother)
‘living like a prince, while we have nothing
but bread.’ My mother had the loaf in her
hands that minute. She stopped, and said,
‘Nothing but bread, dear husband! why,
bread is every thing. Instead of grumbling
because we have no meat, let us say, “Thank
God, who giveth bread to strengthen man’s
heart.”’—‘ That is all quite right, I know,
Mary ; but when I looked in just now at
Dick’s cottage, and saw his-little ones feast-
ing on a hot supper, while mine had only
bread and potatoes, I could hardly bear it.’
Ah,” said old Robin, shaking his head,
“how soon are evil seeds dropped into the
young mind by wrong words! I know that
while my father spoke I felt many foolish
and sinful thoughts rise in my heart. But
they were checked by the gentle voice of
my mother. She had come near my father,
and had placed her hand upon his shoulder.
She looked like his good angel. ‘Joseph,’
she said, ‘why did you go to Dick’s cottage
to-night? You promised me not to go
along with him. You know that he will
86 LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT.

only bring you into harm, for he fears not
God or man. As to his hot suppers, they
bode no good, Joseph. You know that
they will be his ruin some day. Husband,
husband, be content; the blessing of God is
better than all the feasting and all the riches
of this world.’ My father was silent a few
minutes ; while we were wondering in our
minds what my mother meant when she
said that my uncle’s hot suppers would be
his ruin. But we soon found that out, as
youshallhear. ‘ Well, Mary,’ said my father
at last, ‘you are right ; but times are really
so bad just now, I don’t see where the work
is to come from.’—‘ That is what an infidel
would say,’ my mother replied; ‘a man who
does not believe there is a God in heaven.
But you, Joseph—you who teach your little
ones to say, “Our Father which art in
heaven,”—youw should not speak so.’—‘ I
wish I was like you, Mary,’ said my father.
‘You are always contented and hopeful.
But, indeed, it is a bad winter for us all.
The work has stopped at the Hall on account
of the frost, and where I am to get a job I
don’t know. I would give something, wife,
LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT. 87

to be as quiet as you are, and believe that
it will be all right in the end. How do you
manage it?’ I remember my mother’s
beautiful smile as she made answer: ‘I ask
God, for Christ’s sake, to give me the same
trust in his love as my children have in my
love. Why don’t you do the same, Joseph?
You see that God answers my prayer ; why
should he not answer yours? Don’t you
think that the Lord Jesus meant what he
said: ‘ Whatsoever ye shall ask the Father
in my name he will do it?”’ He was
silent; but we could see that his face was
getting brighter, and that the dark cloud
was almost gone. ‘Now, Joe,’ said my
mother, ‘ will you let me read you something
which I am never tired of reading myself?’
She rose, and going to a chest of drawers,
took out a small book. She brought her
chair close to my father, and sat down to
read. There were many passages in that
book which I could see she had marked
with. a pencil line. It might be, perhaps,
in some trying hour, when things seemed to
go against her, and she needed strength and
comfort from above.”
88 LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT.

“Ah!” interrupted Alice, “that was the
book you were speaking to me about the
other day,—‘ Hymns of Faith and Hope.’”

“Yes, lady; and there was a charm in
those verses which, boy as I was, fastened
itself upon me. So much go, that, in after-



CONVERTED.

years, when I left home, I begged my
mother to give me the book. Many is the
time that I have read it since then, and
fancied that I still heard my mother’s voice
as she sat reading to my father on that even-

?

ing.
LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT. 89

“And what did your father say to it,
Robin ?” asked Alice; “do you remember?”

“Yes, ma’am, I recollect everything that
happened that evening as clear as if it was
yesterday. ‘Well, wife, he said, as my
mother closed the book, ‘you must ask God
to forgive me for doubting his love and pro-
vidence. And you, my lad,’ for I had left
my picture-book and was standing at my
mother’s knee, ‘mind you always listen to
what your mother teaches you, and be always
content and thankful.’ My mother then
rose to take us to bed. I see her standing
there, with the candle in her hand. ‘After
all, Joseph,’ she said, ‘we get one good thing
which people who have hot suppers are
obliged to do without.’ ‘What’s that, my
lass?’ said my father. ‘Why, sleep; sweet,
sound sleep,’ she replied, with that bright
smile of hers which always made me think
of the sun coming into a room; ‘depend
upon it, husband, the proverb is true :—

“The sweetest sleep is the sleep on water-porridge.”’

And now,” old Robin went on, “I am
coming to the end of my story. Something
90 LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT.

happened about a month after, which com-
pletely cured my father of his grumbling.
‘We never afterwards heard a sound of mur-
mur from his lips. You know, boys, I told
you we wondered what my mother meant
when she said that my uncle’s hot suppers
would be his ruin. It soon became clear to
us. I shall never forget that night. It was
a stormy night, dark, with wind and rain.
My brother and I were with our mother in
the kitchen, the door of which was open, so
that by-and-by, when the house-door opened,
we could see my father talking to some one
outside. We soon recognized my uncle’s
voice. We heard him say, ‘Come, Joe,
don’t be stupid. Say you'll come with me.’
How anxious our mother looked all the
while they remained talking! Presently
the door was closed again, and my father
came into the kitchen. ‘Mary,’ he said,
‘that fellow Dick is at me again. He will
have me go with him to-night.’ ‘Nay,
Joseph, she said, ‘you will not, surely.’
‘Well, Mary, I have, as they say, half a
mind to go. He says he will show me
something by which I can benefit myself
LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT. 91

and family. He kept taunting me with the
hard fare which my children had—so differ-
ent from his own way of living; and I could
not stand it.’ My mother was silent, but a
tear was slowly stealing down her cheek.
‘Come, wife, don’t take on,’ said my father
kindly. He never liked to see her cry; she
cried so seldom. ‘If I did go this once, I
would promise you never to go again.’ ‘ But
it is just this once that may ruin you, dear
Joe. It cannot be right to go with Dick,
for you know he has no fear of God; and
the Bible says, if sinners entice us, we are
not to hearken or consent. O Joseph! do
not disobey the Word of God. It is better
to starve than to grieve him who gave his
blood to save us from sin.’ My mother did
not say any more. She never talked on (as
some wives do) at her husband. Her words
were always few, but they were strong
though gentle, I can see now that this
was the secret of her influence over my
father. Well, about half an hour after,
there was a knock outside. My father went
to the door. We heard him say, ‘I am not
going with you, Dick.’ My uncle made
92 LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT.

some angry reply; we could catch the words
‘silly wife,’ ‘stupid fellow,’ and then he was
gone. My father was silent and grave the
rest of the evening, and then we all went to
bed. I remember it was a long time before













TEMPTATION,

I could get to sleep. The rain was driving
heavily against the windows, and the wind
was moaning round the house. About two
o’clock in the morning, a sudden noise roused
my brother and myself. It seemed to come
LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT. 93

from the outside door. We lay quiet, ex-
pecting to hear it again. It was repeated
two or three times. ‘ Let us wake father,’
said my brother. ‘No,’ said I; ‘let us wait.
Indeed he is awake already; don’t you hear
the window opening in his room? What
can be the matter?’ We stood at the door,
shaking in the cold, straining our ears to
catch the words that my father was speaking
to some one outside. The wind lulled at
this moment. ‘It is Aunt Bessy’s voice,’
we both exclaimed. Then we heard my
father go down-stairs, and my mother follow-
ing. Unable any longer to resist the desire
to know what was going on, we opened our
door very gently, and stole out upon the
landing. ‘ What is it, Bess?’ we heard my
father say, as he let my aunt in. A burst
of loud weeping was the only reply. ‘Has
anything happened to Dick?’ my father
asked in a hurried voice. ‘He is killed!
he is killed!’ shrieked my aunt. Oh, what
a cry of agony that was! I shall never
forget it. We trembled as we heard it.
‘Dick killed!’ said my father in a hoarse
voice ; ‘God forbid! where is he? let me go
94 LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT.

to him. But do tell us what has happened.’
We could not hear distinctly what my aunt
said, her grief was so excessive; but we
heard enough to frighten us in the few words
we caught—‘ guns,’ ‘gamekeepers,’ ‘ Bury
jail,’ and ‘ murder.’ Half dead with cold
and terror, we crept back to our beds. What
a night it was too! The rain was lashing
against the casement, and the wind seemed
to echo the wail of the broken-hearted
woman. We whispered to each other, won-
dering whether our mother would come to
us. She did come. After half an hour,
when the house was hushed again, and all
was still below, we heard her step on the
stairs. We called to her, and she came into.
our room, and sat down on a chair between
our beds. At that moment, the moon shone
out from behind the driving clouds, and we
could see how anxious my mother’s face was.
‘Mother,’ I asked, ‘what is poaching ; is it
murder?’ My mother answered, laying her
hand on my shoulder, ‘ It is self-murder, my
child ; for it sometimes costs a man his life
in this world, and, alas! in the next world
too. Do you remember,’ she went on, seeing
LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT. 95

that we looked puzzled—‘ do you remember
my saying, some time ago, that your uncle’s
hot suppers would bring him into trouble ?’
‘Yes, yes,’ we said together. ‘Well,’ she
continued, ‘now the trouble is come. I will
tell you how it is. The reason why your
uncle had hot suppers while we had bread

LETT

N
N
N
S
N

NS
\



A LECLURE.

and potatoes is because he took what did
not belong to him. He took the game which
belongs to the squire at the Hall. He
brought it home, and sold it, and what he
could not sell was cooked into hot meals for
his wife and children. This is what is called
96 LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT.

poaching. Some thoughtless people say
there is a difference between stealing and
poaching, but no one who loves the truth
can think so for a moment. Suppose that
you were hungry,’ said my mother to us,
‘and that you went to Farmer Lovat’s
poultry-yard and took one of his best black
hens, which he had reared for himself, and
fed, and taken care of, what would that be ?’
‘Stealing,’ we both said. ‘ And if, instead
of going to Farmer Lovat’s, you went to the
Park, which is so large that there would not
be so much danger of being seen, and you took
away some of the squire’s hares, or pheasants,
or partridges, all of which had cost the
“squire a great deal of money to feed and
take care of, what would that be?’ ‘Steal-
ing,’ we exclaimed again. ‘Would there be
any difference between the thefts?’ ‘Not
a bit,’ we replied. ‘Think, too,’ said my
mother, ‘ what conscience has to say to these
bad men.’ It whispers to them that they
are wrong, that they are going to break
God’s commandment, Thou shalt not steal,
and so they feel afraid, and they wait till
the night comes, and the darkness hides
LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT. 97

them from the eyes of their fellow-creatures ;
forgetting that no darkness can hide us from
God.’ We were silent for a while, and then
we asked what had happened to our uncle,
whether he was really killed. ‘We hope
not,’ she answered ; ‘ your father has gone off
directly with the poor wife, in search of
tidings. All your aunt knew was that one
of the poachers had run to her house and
roused her up with the dreadful news that
her husband had been caught by the game-
keepers, that there had been a serious affray,
in which he had seen your uncle knocked
down, that the police was coming up, and
that he had made haste to be off. ‘O
mother,’ we said, ‘what a good thing it is
that father did not go with Uncle Dick.’ My
mother clasped her hands together. ‘ Let us
thank God, my children,’ she said; and, rising
from her chair, she knelt at the foot of the
bed, and told us to fold our hands in prayer,
while she thanked God for his mercy in sav-
ing our father from sin, and ourselves from
shame and sorrow. Many a time have I
remembered that prayer, dear lady,” said old
Robin, turning to Miss Davenne. “Many

(402) 7
98 LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT.

a time has it kept me strong against tempta-
tion.’”

“JT can believe that,” said Alice. ‘Ah,
there would be fewer bad sons if there were
more praying mothers. And what did your
father say to all this, Robin?”

“Our first thought,” old Robin replied,
“was whether we should see him the next
morning, and whether he would say any-
thing to us about the affair. We met him
at breakfast; he looked very grave and
serious, but his manner to us was very kind,
and kinder still to my mother. We did not
like to ask any questions ; but, as we were
leaving the house for school, my father
called us back. ‘Come here, boys,’ he said,
‘I have something to say to you. Your
mother has told you what has happened to
your uncle.’ ‘Is he dead, father?’ I asked.
‘No, my lad; thank God it’s not quite so
bad, though it’s bad enough. He was only
stunned ; but he had wounded one of the
gamekeepers badly, and so he was taken off
to Bury Jail. But what I want to say to
you, my boys, is this,—if I had not taken
heed to your mother’s counsels, I should
LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT. 99

have gone with your uncle yesternight.
See what would have come to us if I had
done so! Take a lesson—never give heed
to bad men when they try to draw you
along with them into sin. Boys, never for-
get what your mother teaches you. Be
always content, even if your lot is poor and
lowly, for a thankful heart is better than a
full table.’ We looked at our mother; the
tears stood in her eyes, though her own
bright smile was there, as she said to us
while we closed the door, ‘You see, my
sons, the proverb is true after all,—

“The sweetest sleep is the sleep on water-porridge.”’”

“Thank you, Robin,” said Miss Davenne,
when the old man had ended his tale. “I
hope you have not tired yourself by telling
us this interesting story. How well you
remember the days of your boyhood.”

“Tt is all strangely clear,” Robin replied,
“as clear as if it happened yesterday. Ah,
dear lady, I can look back to many a
struggle, in the days of my manhood, be-
tween temptation and the remembrance of
my mother’s faith.”
100 LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT.

“Well, Robin,” said Alice, ‘I am sure
your mother left her own contentment to
you as a legacy. No one could be more at
peace than you are with all things in heaven
and earth.”

“Tt was not always so,” said the old man
gravely. “It was not till I saw, and be-
lieved that Christ had died for my sins, that
I learned to trust in a Father’s love and
care.”

“ And yet,” said Alice, “there are many
Christians who believe in the forgiveness of
their sins, who cannot trust God for their
earthly life.”

“Do not say ‘cannot,’ but ‘will not,’ dear
lady,” Robin replied. “It is nothing but
pride which prevents us from taking the
great God at his word. He calls himself
‘our Father,’ in order that we may give
him the heart of a child.”

“Yes,” said Alice; “and the strongest
feature in the life of a child is that he is
never anxious for the morrow. His only
care is to remain in the presence of his par-
ent, and his only grief is when that parent
leaves him. Ah, Robin, we may well be
LESSONS OF CONTENTMENT. 101

told that except we become as little children
we cannot enter God’s kingdom. But now,”
she added, “I do not mean to let you re-
main here any longer. You may take cold ;
so now, let us all move.”

“ Happy old man!” said Alice Davenne
to-herself as she walked home, after having
seen old Robin carefully conveyed to his
cottage. “Happy, indeed! You have that
which God alone can give—the peace of a
lowly heart. You are a rich man, Robin:
all things are yours, and you are Christ’s,
and Christ is God’s.”




CHAPTER VII.

PARTING COUNSELS.

ef ¢ TWELVEMONTH had _ passed

%{ away, and the bright summer-time
had come round again. But this
year it brought a deep shadow on
AD old Robin’s path. Alice Dayenne
was about to leave the home of her child-
hood and youth as a bride. At the prospect
of parting with one who, by the daily
practice of Christian loveliness, had endeared
herself to all around, sadness filled all hearts,
from the Hall to the cottage and the village
school ; and by no one would the lowly lady
be more missed than by old Robin. For
years had Alice Davenne been his solace
and chief comfort, while Alice herself had
found a meet return for the gladness she


PARTING COUNSELS. 103

gave, in the strengthening of her own faith
under the influence of this aged Christian’s
example.

We have seen a dark and rugged fir,
around whose thick trunk a tender sapling
had entwined itself. We have noticed how
the delicate green of the early foliage lay
among the mass of dark leaves, like “sun-
shine in a cloudy place,” and we have said,
How beautiful is the energy of contrast, how
wonderful is God’s law for mutual support
and sympathy! Nature is full of these con-
trasts, and, thank God, it is human life and
human friendship. Robin felt the trial
acutely ; but as the law of Christ has power
to unlearn the law of self, so this aged
Christian was able to thank God for the
fair promise of a happy future that lay be-
fore this beloved lady, although he knew
that for himself one avenue of earthly com-
fort was now for ever closed.

The wedding bells rang out a merry peal
from the ivy-covered tower as the bridal
party moved along the small pathway of the
churchyard towards the gate, in front of
104 : PARTING COUNSELS.

which a long line of carriages was waiting,
bright with the usual tokens of wedding joy.
Only once did the young bride lift her eyes
from that narrow path so familiar to her.
She looked towards one corner of the church-
yard, where, on a couch provided for the
purpose, lay old Robin with uncovered head,
his eyes fastened upon the fair bride, and
his lips moving in words of prayer and bless-
ing.

But this was not to be the farewell. At
Alice’s request Robin was carried to the
Hall to join in the festivities of the day,
and also to afford herself an opportunity of
receiving from her old friend a few words
which should hereafter bear the indelible
impress of the parting hour.

At a late hour in the afternoon, Alice,
now Lady Ruthven, stood before him in her
travelling dress. “One more and a last
chat with you, dear old Robin,” she said ;
‘‘you must give me your blessing and a few
words of parting counsel. How much I
shall miss your advice !”

The old man was too much moved to
reply. There is an electric touch in human
PARTING COUNSELS. 105

presence which opens the flood-gates of feel-
ing and lets the bitter waters in upon the
soul. But it was only for a moment or two.
Robin was too unselfish to add his own bur-
den to that which Alice had to bear in the
moment of parting from her home.



THE LAST CHAT,

“ God will be your counsellor, dear lady,”
he replied, “and my comforter. I shall
miss you as the captive misses the light of
heaven.”

Alice sat down near the old man and
106 PARTING COUNSELS.

spoke kindly and cheerfully to him; but the
time was short, and they could only enjoy a
few words together. When Alice rose to
go, the old man said,-—

“May God bless you, and reward you for
all the kindness you have shown me. And
he will; for as you have done it to one who
is indeed the least of his children, you have
done it unto him.”

The tears fell on the lady’s cheek. “I
shall never forget you, Robin—you know
that—and if it please God, we shall meet
again.”

“As he will,” said the old man gently.
“In his hand are all the corners of the earth.
We shall not be so far from each other, dear
lady, after all, if we are still in the shelter
of his hand.”

“This shall be our comfort, dear Robin,”
said Alice. “And now, farewell. May
God be with us both!”

The old man’s voice trembled as he said,
—“The grace of the Lord Jesus be with
you.”

The lady closed the door, and Robin was
alone.
PARTING COUNSELS. 107

This was not the only farewell that day.
At a late hour in the evening, a low knock
was heard at the door of Robin’s cottage,
and the youth Alan entered.

“JT am late, I fear,” he said to the woman
that let him in.

“He is not asleep,” she replied. “You
had better go up at once.”

The old man put out his hand as Alan
came up to his bedside. “I expected you,
my son,” he said, with his ready smile. “T
heard you were going to-morrow, and I felt
sure that you would not leave without say-
ing Good-bye.”

“T should think not, indeed,” said the
young man warmly. “ But I am sorry it is
so late, for I wanted to say a great many
things to you.”

“Do not mind the hour for me,” said
Robin. “There is no need of night when
there is no work in the day. I should have
grieved-to let you go without a parting word.
You have been like a son to me, Alan.
May the Lord bless you for it.”

“Don’t talk of that, Robin; think what
you have been to me. I don’t know how I
108 PARTING COUNSELS.

am to get on without you. I feel as if ]
should be all wrong when I leave you.”

“Not so,” Robin replied. “ It is of God
that we get help and strength from our
friends ; and when he takes them away, it is
that he may prove the measure of our own
strength, whether we are leaning upon him
or not.”

“Tt will be so hard to be right, in a large
town, and at that busy factory,” said the
young man; “don’t you think so?”

“Satan has many devices,” the old man
replied. “He would always persuade us
that we should be better anywhere but
where God has placed us. No, Alan, my
boy, the foe is within, not without. If the
heart is at enmity with God, there is as
much danger in the quiet valley as in the
crowded street, in the lonely cell as the
busy factory. Nevertheless, Alan, take
heed that sinners entice you not. Go not
with men who like to cavil at God’s Word.
The companion of fools shall be destroyed.”

The colour rose in Alan’s cheek. “How
is it, Robin,” he said, “that I seem to be
more in danger that way ?”
PARTING COUNSELS. 109

“Get good out of it,” said the old man
energetically ; “get good out of it. Let it
be to you the best proof of the truth of the
Bible, and then you will have cause to bless
God that you saw the evil of your heart.
The Bible is not true, if men are not prone
to evil, and this proneness to evil is the cause
of all unbelief. Man thereby has a greater
relish for what is false than for what is true.
But oh, Alan, beware of cold, unbelieving
cavils, and doubts of God’s Word. They are
Satan’s chief tools. He is always very busy
with them ; and no marvel, for they prevent
«man from going to.God for the pardon of
his sins.”

Alan was silent. Then he spoke again.
“Persons are so different, Robin. Some
are content to eat their bread without know-
ing how the wheat grows, or how the corn is
ground; while others are always craving
after fresh knowledge. I am one of these.
I long to know something more of the un-
seen world, and of God. It is so difficult to
sit down quietly, and believe without under-
standing—without making all things square,
as I call it.”
110 PARTING COUNSELS.

The old man smiled, but with an expres-
sion of yearning interest, as he listened to
the young man’s words. They recalled to
him the days of his own youth, when he too
had struggled through the same dark waters.
“And yet, my son,” he said, “to obey is
better than sacrifice. Yes, Alan, we must
sit down before we are fed. The proud stand
afar off, while the meek shall eat and be
satisfied. But, Alan, when you are per-
plexing yourself with doubts, remember this,
the Bible is not meant to teach us what God
as in himself (how could we understand that!)
but what he is in relation to ourselves. Is not
that reasonable ?”

“Tt is a striking thought,” the young
man replied; “it will fasten itself in my
mind.”

“Yes,” continued Robin, “and as such,
the Bible makes clear to us quite enough
for our peace and comfort. We feel that
we are helpless—it tells us of a Father.
We feel that we are guilty—it tells us of a
Saviour. We feel that we are unholy—it
tells us of a Spirit to cleanse and renew.
What do we want more, my son?”
PARTING COUNSELS. 111

“ Ay, what indeed?” Alan responded in
a low but earnest voice.

The old man went on: “There is one
thing against which I would caution you.
We are all of us too apt to pity ourselves in
religious difficulties. We call ourselves un-
happy, when we should be holding ourselves
guilty. Do not pity yourself, Alan, my
son; leave that to God. Like as a father
even so he pitieth us, blessed be his name.
Where indeed should we be, if it were
otherwise? But the fact of God’s pitying
us should be just the very reason for our
not pitying ourselves. The language of our
heart should always be, ‘“ Father, I have
sinned against heaven, and before thee, and
am no more worthy to be called thy son.”

The young man looked at the small clock,
which was pointing to the hour of eleven.
“Are you sure that I do not weary you,
Robin ? it is getting late for you.”

“Quite sure,” the old man replied; “TI
like to have you with me as long as I
can.”

“And I am sure I prize your parting
counsel more than any words of mine can
112 PARTING COUNSELS.

express,” said Alan, looking affectionately
at his old friend. “Do you know, I think
that all those counsels may be summed up
in one word— lowliness.’”

“Not all, my son; there is another word
that must be joined to it, and that is dili-
gence. Yes, Alan, be diligent in seeking
God. It is true that God first seeks us,
long, long before we seek him; but it ig
equally true that unless we seek we shall
not find. There’s my Bible close to you,
Alan. Open it at the second chapter of the
Book of Proverbs, and read the first five
verses, will you ?”

The young man did so.

“ My son, if thou wilt receive my words,
and hide my commandments with thee; so
that thou incline thine ear unto wisdom, and
apply thine heart to understanding ; yea, if
thow criest after knowledge, and liftest up
thy voice for understanding ; if thou seekest
her as silver, and searchest for her as for hid
treasures; then shalt thou understand the
Jear of the Lord, and find the knowledge of
God.”

“See what man has to do,” said Robin,
PARTING COUNSELS. 113

after Alan had finished. “Mark the words
—they are strong ones. ‘ Receive,’—‘ hide,’
—‘incline the ear,—‘apply the heart,’—
‘lift up the voice,—‘ seek, and search as for
hid treasures, —then, and not till then,
mark, shalt thou understand the fear of the



r

PARTING ADVICE,

Lord, and find the knowledge of God. God
grant you this diligence, Alan.”

“Tt’s hard to get the will to do all this,”
said the young man in a low voice.

“ Hard only to our pride,” Robin replied.

“Tt is hard if we try to find it within. our-
(402) 8





Wy a

Ht


114 PARTING COUNSELS.

selves ; easy if we go straight to God, and
ask him to give it us. Now read another
passage, my son, on’ the other side of the
subject—the 77th and 78th verses of the
first chapter of St. Luke.”

Alan obeyed.

“To give knowledge of salvation unto his
people, by the remission of their sins, through
the tender mercy of our God; whereby the
day-spring from on high hath visited us.”

“You see, Alan,” said the old man,
“‘God’s mercy stands at one end, and man’s
diligence at the other. What God hath
joined together, let no man put asunder.
Yes, Alan, light comes from above, but it
comes to wake us up to work.”

“The Bible is certainly a wonderful
book,” said Alan. “Tt fits in with so many
different wants of our nature. O Robin!
I hope that I shall not fall again into those
sinful doubts and cavils. I am sure they
are a temptation from Satan.”

“And do not forget that one point, Alan,
that I have always tried to impress upon
you; I mean, that it is pride which lies at
the root of our religious difficulties.”
PARTING COUNSELS. , 115

“Your proverb will keep me in mind of
that,” said Alan, smiling. “I am sure
there is a great deal of truth in it.”

“Tt holds good for the soul more than
for the body,” said the old man. “There
are some weakly bodies that sleep the better
for better fare, but there never was a soul
yet that found health in its pride. Get a
lowly heart from God, my beloved son, get
a lowly mind. It is only when we struggle
in God’s hand that we hurt ourselves. Re-
member that, Alan, and let Patience have
her perfect work in you.”

“Now, I must go,” said Alan, rising, and
taking the hand of his old friend. “May
God bless you, Robin, for you have been
better than a father to me.”

“Ah, Alan, it will be a sore missing to
me when you are gone, and Miss Alice gone
too. But God will make up in some way.
He never takes a good thing away without
giving something better.”

“You never lose your faith in that,” said
the young man.

“Alas! my son, it is often very weak.
We are wise in matters of earth, but slow
116 PARTING COUNSELS.

in matters of heaven. When the stream is
dry we hasten to the fountain, and there get
refreshed. But when our earthly joys are
taken, we are apt to turn away from God.
Yet, blessed be God,” he continued, “that
fountain is ever full and ever flowing.”

A few minutes after, Robin was alone.
He lay with closed eyes and_ folded
hands. His lips were gently repeating
these words :—

“* Jesus Christ, the same yesterday, to-day, and for ever.’

Old Robin was alone. Alone in the
sense in which mortals speak, when all
earthly sources of comfort are removed.
But not alone in the sense of that better
fellowship which exists between a human
spirit and its God.

“* Gales from heaven, if so he will,
Sweeter melodies can wake
On the lonely mountain rill
Than the meeting waters make.
Who hath the Father and the Son,
May be left, but not alone.”

What was the secret of old Robin’s content-
ment? It was this: his soul had found its
true and destined food. This food was the
PARTING couns#is. 117

will of God, the same whereof the Lord
Jesus himself tasted ; as his own words at-
test : “I have meat to eat that ye know not of.
My meat is to do the will of him that sent
me.” What was true of the blessed Lord
in his work of salvation, is equally true ot
every soul that receives and accepts that
work, But we are long and late in learn-
ing this, for the dust of earth is more con-
genial fare than the light of heaven. God
is merciful and forbearing ; he suffers us to
eat of the meat that perishes, in order that
we may hunger again, and feel that nothing
but the bread from heaven can satisfy our
immortal souls. All learn this—only with
this difference. Some learn it in the bitter-
ness of creature disappointment. Others,
in the possession of that mysterious peace
which, like a river, flows deeper and deeper,
till it ends in the ocean of everlasting joy.
One word more. “ Blessed are the poor
in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.”
Emptied of themselves, and leaning upon
God, they alone can receive the truths ot
God’s Word. We must go and sit down in

the lowest room, if we would hear the
118 PARTING COUNSELS,

Master’s voice calling us to higher faith and
higher knowledge. The reason of this is
plain. It is with the heart that man be-
lieveth. With the pride of intellect, the
law of Christ has nothing to do. While
men are arguing, in these days, with strong
words on questions of doctrine, the poor in
spirit are feeding on those sacred truths
with the unquestioning obedience of love,
finding in them the joy and strength of
their souls. While the learned are disput-
ing on the nature of the prescription, the
broken in heart are pressing round the great
Physician, knowing that as many as touch
him shall be made perfectly whole. “The
one sort, because they enjoy not, dispute ;
the other dispute not, because they enjoy.”
Among such was old Robin. Would that
there were many more such witnesses to the
truth among those that profess and call
themselves Christians. There would be °
less infidelity in the land, for these are the
“true witnesses that deliver souls” (Prov.
xiv. 25). We may be sure that the remem-
brance of old Robin’s simple but strong
faith was of more avail to keep young Alan
PARTING COUNSELS. 119

from the dangerous toils of infidel reason-
ing, than whole. volumes of divinity from
the pen of the learned.

It is not the clear head» so much as the
“meek and quiet spirit,” that is wanted to
convince men of the reality of religion.

“ With the lowly 1s wisdom,’—the wisdom
that cometh from above—the wisdom which
is effectual to win the souls of others, and

to make their own lives legible as epistles
of Christ.








ed
AONYI




wes

a