Citation
May's garden and where the flowers went

Material Information

Title:
May's garden and where the flowers went :a tale
Creator:
D. Appleton and Company ( Publisher )
Simmons & Botten
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
D. Appleton and Co.
Manufacturer:
Simmons & Botten
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
196 p., [8] leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Flowers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Gardening -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children and death -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1873 ( local )
Baldwin -- 1873
Genre:
Hand-colored illustrations ( local )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrations are hand-colored.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
with eight illustrations.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026872452 ( ALEPH )
ALH4562 ( NOTIS )
59820808 ( OCLC )

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Full Text




The Baldwin Library

Rm Bux











cs



MAY’S GARDEN,

AND WHERE THE FLOWERS WENT.

WITH EIGHT ILLUSTRATIONS.

NEW YORK:
D. APPLETON AND CO., BROADWAY.
1873.



II.

Ill.

IV.

VI.

VII.

VIII.

CONTENTS.

PAGE
THE CROOUS. uo cececccee ence centre eee eee eee nee ne erie nn enn nes 1
THE FURZE ooo cee teen nee nee ener eee 23
THE RED QUA ORING ioe. coh ee stan tate eorusceess psasens 43
THE HEHART’S-EASE 0.0 ccc eee nes 59
THE BLUE-BELLS 00.0. ctee eee erence ee 83
TVET ROSH oe. edness csc vee vas cetenns cocnte teteecetinaasmstloncieeieta 107
HOR) = Gs BAINUIM ES, oo foes ccc cess oes concen samt cnensmeresetieas 141
DEER OARINADTON: = cece Sites ccsciaseutiecnmtsseesmeccaeetsst 169



MAY’S GARDEN.

CHAPTER I.
THE CROCUS.

“T vainx that piece, from the wall along to this rose
tree, would be the best to have, May.”

“ No, ’m sure mamma would not like me to have
that, but this large bed would be just the thing ; and,
oh, Annie, perhaps mamma would give me the pink
may tree as well, for it is just at the corner.”

“Well, you are greedy; as if mamma would
indeed! Why she wouldn’t have a bit of pink may
for herself.”

“Oh yes, she would, of course. I should give her
some as often as she wanted it; there would be plenty

for everybody.”
1



2 MAY’S GARDEN.

“Would there? Iknow what it would be. You
would want to see what the tree looked like when it
was all in bloom, and then, when the may was begin-
ning to fade, you would give us each a little tiny bit,
and expect us to be so much obliged to you.”

“Annie, how unkind you are! I’m sure I often
give you things, and then you say that I just dole
bits out.”

“Oh yes, dear, you’re very kind, really I mean it ;
but last year, you would not let me have one Guelder
rose, until you had seen how they looked all out at
once, and then my rose was getting faded when I did
get it at last.”

“Yes, but I shouldn’t do it again; besides, the
may tree is so big. Fancy keeping that till it was all
out |”

“T think you’d better have this piece! Why you’d
get a piece of wall.”

“A piece of wall. Really, Annie, I’m not so fond
of ‘wall’ as all that. What good would ‘wall’ do,
all covered over with ivy. I couldn’t grow anything
upon it.”

“Oh dear me, what an old fidget you are,” said
Annie, laughing, “I can’t please you. Ask for that
piece ne” “2 rabbits then, and I shall be able to



THE CROCUS. 3

cheer you up when I am feeding the pretties, and you
are standing wishing the weeds would pull themselves
up.”

Oh, I couldn’t have that piece! I should have
all my flowers eaten up by your tiresome pretties, I
know, in no time. No, I likethe bit near the may-tree
best. Just think, Annie, of all the things I should get
in free if I had that, and in those other pieces I should
have to buy nearly everything.”

«Yes, I wasn’t thinking of that.”

« You'd have thought of it though, if you were go-
ing to buy the flowers.”

“Oh yes, of course I should; and I can tell you,
I’m oppressed with a tremendous weight of care, for
I’m afraid my pretties will eat up all their food before
papa gives me my next week’s money. What shall I
do? oh what shall I do? I wish I could squeeze
out some tears.”

‘Oh, nonsense! Do let us go in and ask mamma
for my new piece, or all my courage will go.”

“Very well, but mind you tell mamma that ’m
going to be your gardener.”

‘“ Of course, dear, that will be half the fun? Will
it be ‘yes’ or ‘no;’ guess.”

293

““T’ll guess ‘yes.



A : MAY'S GARDEN.

“Then I'll guess ‘no,’ and then perhaps it will be
€ yes.’ 3?

“Mamma,” said May, “ might I have a new
garden? I don’t like my old one; it won't grow
things properly, and I want to have a lot of flowers.”

“Yes, you may have another piece if you will take
care of it, but you know you told me weeding made
your back ache.”

“Yes, it does, but Annie will be my gardener, and
she will take up the weeds and rake, and you said
before that Smith might dig for me.”

«Then how will it be your garden, dear, if Annie
and Smith do all the work ?”

“Oh, because I am going to buy all the flowers ;
Annie wants her pocket-money for her rabbits, all but
what she gives away. She is not going to buy any-
thing for the new garden.”

“T sce; very well, you can have a fresh piece. I
suppose you want me to come and choose it now ?”

“Yes, please; I’ve been thinking of what I should
like.”

“Well, what is it?”

“That large bed, with—please, mamma, don’t say
no—with the pink may at the corner!”

“Oh,” laughed Mrs. Aston, “I see there has been



THE CROCUS. oO

_a regular plot about it. Well, you may have the bed,
but as for the may, I must think about that. I shall
often want some of it myself.”

“Oh yes, mamma, of course you must have it
whenever you want it. I only want to be able to call
it mine.”

“ And suppose I give it to you, what are you
going to do with it, and with all your flowers ?”

“T shall make nosegays for you, mamma, and for
ourselves, and nurse. Then I shall be able to give
papa a rosebud for his button-hole sometimes, when I
have a nice one.”

“Yes, dear, you can do all this occasionally, but I
have a little plan which I think would be very nice for
you. Suppose you take flowers to some poor people
sometimes? You see, the townspeople haven’t got
gardens—at least, only a few of them ; and they would
value a little present of flowers, and as I want you to
take an interest in the poor about you, it would be a
nice way of beginning.”

“Yes, it would, I should like that. Then may I
have the may tree, mamma ?”

“ Yes, on condition’that papa and I have what we
want. Then you might give little bouquets of flowers
to your friends sometimes. You see, you will have a



6 MAY’S GARDEN.

good many already planted. Let me see, there are
four rose bushes, the furze bush—that will. soon look
glorious—the blue-bells—why, how did they come
into this bed ? ”

“T asked Smith to put them here in the autumn,
out of my old garden, because I’m so fond of them,
and I meant to ask you for this bed.”

“You sly-boots! Suppose I hadn’t given it to
you?”

“Then I should have got Smith to move them
next autumn to my garden; but I thought you would
give it to me, mamma.”

«Well, I should advise you in future to make sure
of a gift before you use it.”

“Yes, I will next time. Smith didn’t like moving
the blue-bells, he called them rubbish; wasn’t it
rude, mamma ? ”

«There was no need to say it certainly, but it was
a gardener’s idea, I suppose. You see, he had not
your happy associations with them. If he had had a
splendid day in the woods, with tea made in a kettle
and boiled under three sticks, and no end of jam and
bread, he might have managed to get up a particular
affection for blue-bells, especially if the root had been
presented by a very dear friend.”



THE CROCUS. 7

“Oh, mamma,” laughed Annie, “ how funny you
are! and fancy calling Archie Campbell May’s dear
friend.”

‘‘ Well, I think he is. Isn’t he, May?”

“Oh, I like him, and so do you, mamma. You
said he was a very nice boy.”

“So he is; and now I think it would be a good
plan for you both to go and have tea with nurse.
You have not been lately, and a little walk will do you
good.”

The two children were soon on their way to see
their old nurse, who lived by herself in a pretty little
cottage, with a small garden, about half a mile from
the town. She was only forty years of age, but she
had fallen and hurt her back when Annie was three
years old, so that she was quite unable to keep her
place.

Mr. Aston had been very kind to her, and allowed
her to live in this cottage rent free; he also gave her
five shillings a week. Tis, with what she earned by
lace-work, when she was feeling better between the
attacks, enabled her to live comfortably. Mrs. Aston
was also very kind, often sending her little delicacies,
and keeping her well supplied with clothes. She was
very grateful for all this kindness, and she repaid it



8 MAY’S GARDEN.

with the utmost devotion. She was very fond of the
children, particularly of Annie, whom she had nursed
from a baby, and they fully returned her affection,
and had a great respect for her, for she was a truly
Christian woman.

To have tea with nurse was a great treat, only
there was a little fear whether she would be well
enough to have them.

“We are come to have tea if you can have us,
nurse,” said May.

“Oh_yes, missy, I’m right glad to see you both.”

“* Let us have coffee, please,” said Annie, “tea is
so nasty.”

“ Hear the child! You won’t think it nasty when
you’re my age, my dear, but you shall have your way.”

“We have a great piece of news for you, nurse.
Mamma has given me a new garden, with the pink
may tree as well, and Annie is going to be my
gardener.”

“Dearie me! I’ve not heard such a piece of news
for some time. I wonder how the garden will be
kept?”

“Tn the most perfect order,”

said Annie; ‘I saw
you laugh, nursey.”
“Annie does pull up weeds beautifully, quite by



THE CROCUS. 9

the roots; and you know how well she raked last
year.”

“Yes, she is a remarkably clever little woman
when she takes pains ; and you are going to try, eh?”

“Of course, Jam. You're not kind, nursey, to
tease me.”

“You will try your best then, and I shall not
tease. But talking of your garden reminds me of the
pot of crocus bulbs you gave to little Tom Evans last
November. Do you remember, missy?”

“Yes, how is he, nurse?”

“He’s dead and buried, poor lamb! He died
before the crocus came up. You know he said he
should watch for them coming, and the leaves began
to come, and then he died. He bloomed himself in
paradise before they bloomed on earth.”

“Oh! I’m so sorry he’s dead,” said May. “TI did
so hope he’d get better. Did the crocuses come up?”

“Yes, his mother showed them to me, looking
so bright and beautiful. Now, I think it would be
nice for you both to go and see her after tea, on your
way home. She’d be that pleased, and it might com-
fort her a bit.”

“T’m afraid she’d cry all the time,” said Annie,
“and we shouldn’t know what to say.”



10 MAY’S GARDEN.

“Oh yes, we shall,” said May, ‘“‘we can tell her
how sorry we are for her.”

“Why, nurse, little Tom was as well as I am last
year at this time. I remember him running about and
playing. He was so funny.”

“ Yes, and it was all through that wicked lad, Joe
Jenkins, that he got so hurt.”

“Do tell us about it,” said Annie, “ how did it
happen? We weren’t told about that.”

«His mother never told anybody before him;
he did not like to think of it; he wanted to for-
give and forget; but it was in this way :— He
was coming home from school with several boys, and
two of them began to fight, and one of the boys
was much stronger than the other, and got him
down, and was stamping upon him, and treating
him in a shocking way. Little Tom could not bear
this, and he called on the other boys to stop it;
but they were afraid of this great fellow, and they
wouldn’t try. Then Tom ran up to try and help the
boy who was down. Well, he was a strong little
fellow, and he did manage to help him; but the
other one was so angry, that he turned upon
Tom, and gave him a dreadful blow on his back,

which sent him flying against some large stones,



THE CROCUS. 11

and his head was so hurt that he was never well
again.”

“Oh, what a wicked boy!” said May. ‘ Was
he put in prison ?”

“No; he ran away to sea, and he has not been
heard of since.’

““T hope he was drowned then, I do,” said Annie,
with scarlet cheeks and angry eyes.

“Oh, you must not say that, dear. Think how
dreadful it would have been if he had died in his
sins.”

“Yes, nurse; but he ought to have been
punished.”

«Yes, he ought, and he has been. He ran away
from home, as I told you, but it was not because he
wanted to go, but because he was frightened when
he knew how dreadfully little Tom was hurt; and if
he is alive, he must have had a wretched life.”

‘Nurse, was little Tom a good boy before he
was ill ?””

“Yes, missy, that was why he was so angry
_ about the fighting. He would never fight, except to
help another boy who was getting the worst of it.
He loved the Lord Jesus when he was well and
strong, and he had been trying to follow Him since



12 MAY'S GARDEN.

he was four years old. So just think! for five years
before he died he had been a little soldier of the cross.”

“Five years, nurse! Oh, there is his mother
standing at the door.”

“How do you do, Mrs. Bretherton ?” said nurse.
“T’ye brought my young ladies to see you.”

“I’m very glad, indeed. Come in and sit down.
I’ve just been out for some bits of green for my old
man’s tea.”

“Oh, I’m afraid we’ve come at an awkward
time.”

““No; he won’t be home till eight. He’s work-
ing at Squire Clifton’s, and it takes him an hour to
get home; and he is doing a bit of overtime as well.”

“Well, the young ladies must be home by six, so
we shall not delay you.”

“ Oh dear, no; come into the front kitchen. Ill
just put these in water to keep fresh till I can wash
’em. Well, ’m right glad to see you all. Tve not
forgotten it was these ’ere two young ladies who
brought my poor boy his pot of crocuses. Eh, how
he did watch and watch ’em, poor dear! and when
the leaves got up a bit, he waited and waited for the
flowers; but the weather was so cold, they didn’t
come up. At last he says to me, ‘ Mother, I shall be







THE CROCUS, 13

in heaven when them crocuses are a-flowering; and
when you sees em, mother, just think of me a bright
angel, bonnier than them flowers will be. They’ll
fade and die, mother, but I shall live for ever.’ Yes,
and it’s that keeps me up when I gets down-hearted,
and I feel asif I couldn’t look up. I sees them bright
things, and I thinks he’ll never fade, and he’s bonnier
_ and brighter than them. He’ll live for ever.”

The tears stood in the poor mother’s eyes, but
she kept quite calm, only though she seemed to be
looking at the crocuses, her eyes had a far-off look, as
if she were gazing beyond them.

The children thought they had never seen any
flowers so bright, for they were just fully out and the
sun was shining upon them.

“TJ shall always keep them flowers,” said the
mother rousing herself, “all but one. Vlllet you have
one, missy, if you like.”

May turned a pair of longing eyes to nurse, she did
not know whether she ought to ask for it.

Nurse said, ‘“‘ Well, if you can really spare one,
Mrs. Bretherton, missy would like one to plant in her
new garden next year. She is going to have a new
garden, and I know she would like to have one of
little Tom’s flowers.”



14 MAY’S GARDEN.

“ Oh yes, I should indeed,” said May. “Am I to
have it now then,” she whispered to nurse.

“No, my dear, I can’t spare it now. I must keep
them all for the present,” said Mrs. Bretherton, over-
hearing May’s request.

So it was settled that May was to have the bulb
before winter. Then they all took their departure,
leaving Mrs. Bretherton much happier for their visit.

“I should like to be as good as little Tom,
nurse,” said Annie, when they were out of sight of the
cottage.

“My pet must pray to the Lord Jesus to make her
good,” said nurse. ‘ Why, little Tom did that, dear,
he was not good of himself. He prayed for a new,
clean heart, and then when God had given him one, he
strove to live like a little soldier, and he died so
happily.”

“Tsn’t it nice to think he’s brighter than the
crocuses?” said May. ‘I shall always think of little
Tom when I see one. Won’t you, Annie?”

«Yes, I think I shall.”

The next day there was a great piece of news, for
Mrs. Aston told the children that their aunts and

cousins were coming.



THE CROCUS. 15

“ Oh, how delightful, mamma!” said Annie, as she
jumped about the room with delight. “Oh, May,
won't it be fun? Fancy, three cousins! quite new
. ones too, that we’ve hardly heard of.”

“Yes, two boys and a girl,” said Mrs. Aston.
“Let me see, Kitty will be your age, May, or perhaps
a little older.”

“Ts she ten, mamma?” said May. “ Oh, I wish she
wasn’t ten, because she’ll be grander than me.”

“My dear May, what nonsense! There is no-
thing grand in Kitty being a few months older than
you are.”

May could not help thinking ten was grand.

“How old are the boys, mamma? I hope they
are little ; I don’t like big boys.”

“The eldest is twelve, and the youngest seven.”

“Then the little boy will be just as old as I am,”
said Annie. “I’m glad some one will be little as well
as me!”

« How is it we’ve not seen them before, mamma? ”
said May.

“ Because they have lived in Canada, and as your
aunt is a Canadian, I have never seen her; but she is”
very sad, for she has never got over your uncle’s death,

some years ago now, so you must try to show her that,



16 MAY’S GARDEN.

although you are only little girls, you know how to
show sympathy.”

“Yes, we will try, mamma,” said May.

* What are the boys’ names, mamma?” said Annie.

“ Frank and Herbert.”

“ How funny it will be to have boys to play with,”
said May. “TI shall feel so shy.”

A day or two afterwards, the aunt and cousins
arrived, and when the front door bell rang, Mrs.
Aston called to the children to come and mect them 3
but they were much too shy, and dared not venture
downstairs until Mrs. Aston called them again; and
then they came slowly down, looking asif they thought
they were going to mect some wild beasts.

Their aunt and Kitty returned their timid kisses very
warmly ; but Frank was not going to kiss girls, nor be
kissed by them, so he held out his hand as far as
he could, and would not allow them to get near him.
They shrank away looking hot and shy, and left their
mother to show their cousins to their rooms.

“Oh, May! isn’t he proud?” said Annie, as soon
as they were gone.

“T shan’t like him, I know, and what a big boy
he is! I wish he hadn’t come.”

“‘So do I,” said May. “But I like the look of



THE CROCUS. ae

Kitty, only I’m rather frightened, she looked so tall.
How tall they all are! Why, Herbert is taller than
me, and he is only seven.”

“Oh dear! how stiff it will be,” said Annie.
“We shall have no more happiness till they’re all
gone.”

But after tea it was found that there was some
happiness left in the world, for Herbert asked Annie
if she had a rocking-horse, and when he found she
had one, he proposed that they should have a ride
together. This pleased Annie wonderfully, although
she had secret fears about keeping on with such a
partner. Then May shyly made advances to Kitty,
which she received with favour, so that the misery and
unhappiness of cousins seemed vanishing into thin air.

After the cousins had stayed a few days, Mrs.
Aston proposed that, as it was unusually warm for the
time of year, they should venture on a picnic to Bexley
Common.

Now the very mention of Bexley Common almost
drove May and Annie wild with excitement, for the
delights of that lovely part of the country were such
as to bring the most happy remembrances to both
children. Their joy made Kitty and Herbert almost

as full of excitement as they were; only Frank stood
2



18 MAY’S GARDEN,

aloof, as if he thought himself quite above picnics of
every kind.

It was arranged that they were to have the large
waggonette, which would carry them, and the hampers
as well. Nurse was to go with them, and they were all
to be allowed to help with dinner and tea, as this was
a great part of the fun. Frank looked very gloomy,
until a bright idea struck him.

“Ts there a pond on the common?” he asked
May.

«Yes, there is,”’ said May, hoping to please him,
‘with such a lot of fish in it.”

“That’s all right,” said Frank, as if he thought
there was no doubt he would catch plenty.

« Are there donkeys?” asked Herbert. ‘‘'They
are so jolly.”

‘No, there are some ponies,” said Annie, ‘ but
mamma won’t let us ride upon them. ‘They have no
saddles or bridles, and they are not tame.”

“Tame!” said Frank, scornfully, “you might be
talking of tigers; I mean to try them whether they
are tame or not.”

«But mamma would not let us,” said Annie.

«Oh, never mind mamma,” said Frank ; “if you

don’t peach she’ll know nothing about it.”



THE CROCUS. 19

May and Annie stood horror-struck at such words,
and Kitty looked ashamed of her brother; but he
walked carelessly away, whistling a tune. May stood
considering for a little while, when she said to Kitty,
“ Do you love Frank ?”

“Not just this minute,” said Kitty; “but I
love him sometimes. He’s not always cross, you
know.”

“ Well, I don’t think I could love him at all, if
he were my brother, he’s so disagreeable.”

“Mamma says we ought to love everybody,” said
Annie, looking very wise.

“Do you love Frank ?” said May.

«“ N—o,” said Annie, laughing, feeling that she
was caught; “but I ought to.”

“Oh yes, I know I ought to,” said May; “but
the puzzle is how to begin.”

“Missy,” called nurse, ‘‘it’s time for you all to
get ready.”

There was a general scamper immediately, and
the deep question of how we are to love those who
don’t love us was for the time forgotten. I cannot
tell you the delights of the drive to Bexley; the
trees looked so lovely in ther light green foliage,
aud there was such a delicious scent, and such a



20 MAY’S GARDEN,

fresh breeze, which blew about the hats and ribbons,
and altogether such pretty sights and sounds, that
the children were almost beside themselves. Even
Frank lost some of his gloominess, and condescended
to laugh.

When at last Bexley was reached, there was a
great consultation as to what should be done first.
Frank said he should go and fish, and Herbert
begged to go with him. So they went off, to the no
small relief of the girls, except Annie, who was sorry
to lose Herbert.

Then a great unpacking commenced—just nurse
and the girls; for Mrs. Aston and Mrs. Edmunds
went into the wood, to sit quietly until dinner
was ready. But when the contents of the hampers
were turned out, it was found that there was no
bread! Cook had actually forgotten that very neces-
sary article. Annie said she could make her dinner
of tart very well. But nurse said mamma and aunt
could not, if she could, and there was not enough
tart for everybody’s dinner. Then May suggested
that they should all go in different directions, and
get bread from the farmhouses. But nurse again
bjected, as the farmhouses were, most of them, miles

away, and, in fact, there was no house near but the



THE CROCUS. al

little inn where the horses were put up, and here
nurse feared there was very little bread. May and
Kitty ran off to see what could be got, and they
soon returned with a quantity of oat-cake, but only
one loaf. So the loaf was put aside for mamma and
aunt, and the children decided that it would be fun
eating oat-cake with meat, and that it would be
delicious for tea, with plenty of butter.

Dinner passed off very merrily, and was all the
greater fun, because there was so little bread; and
after dinner Annie declared that they were going to
have the most delightful afternoon they had ever had
on Bexley Common.

“How do you know that?” said Mrs. Aston.
“Tt is not right to speak as if we could do anything
without God’s permission.”

“I mean, I hope we shall have a very nice time,
mamma.”

** Wouldn’t it be good fun to gather lots of flowers
and make wreaths ?” said May.

“T don’t think you’ll find lots of flowers, missy,”
said nurse. ‘I’ve only seen a few primroses. You
mustn’t think that summer’s come, although it is so

warm.”

“Let us go after the boys, and watch them fish,”



22 MAY'S GARDEN.

said Annie, “and then we'll have some games, and
then we’ll make tea, and light the fire, and have such
fun, and go home in the dark, and have supper, and
never go to bed!”

“ Annie, Annie,” said Mrs. Aston, reprovingly.
But Annie was flying away as fast as she could.



CHAPTER II.

THE FURZE.

“* Mama, I should like to go and see old Peggy, this
afternoon,” said May, “‘ when I’ve learnt my lessons.
The other day, when she came, she thought my furze
bush so beautiful—‘ bonnie,’ she called it—and when
T told her that a furze bush had been the means of
saving my life, she wanted to know all about it, for
she’s been away, and she had not heard about my
having been run away with.”

“Very well, dear, you may go if you feel strong
enough, and Emma can take you, as she is going
that way, and then she can call for you on her return.”

So in the afternoon May went to see Peggy Cooper,
an old woman who had worked for Mrs. Aston, now
and then, as charwoman. She was such a cheerful
old body, that the children were really fond of her.

May was a special favourite, because she was rather



24 MAY’S GARDEN.

like (or at least Peggy fancied she was) a child Peggy
had lost.

“1m o’er glad to see ye, missy,’ was the greeting
May received, “and I’ve been a-thinking and a-think-
ing about that run-away ye’ve had. Nae wonder ye
look so puir and white, my bonnie. Come, sit ye
down and tell me all about it.”

*‘But where shall I put this furze?” said May.
“ve brought you enough for the table, and the
mantel-shelf, and the top of the drawers.”

“Well, I never! I was so took up with you, as
I didn’t notice the yellow stuff. It is bonnie, real
bonnie. I shall be as grand as th’ Queen. Here’s
mugs, but I maun hae a glass for th’ table. There,
they do look fine! But I want to know all about the
run-away, so now we’s settled, we’ll hae it out.”

“After you had gone to see your son, mamma
said we might have a picnic to Bexley Common. It
was so warm, and just like summer, and our cousins
went with us. You know they came before you went:
away.”

“Yes, I remember.”

* Well, Frank was a very naughty boy then, and
he wanted to ride on one of the rough ponies that a
man had on the Common. They had no saddles, and



THE FURZE. 25

only rope for bridles, but Frank rode one, and kept on
very well ; and then, although he knew mamma did not
wish us to ride, he persuaded me and Kitty to get on
two of the ponies. It was very wrong of us, for we
knew mamma and aunt did not wish it.

“Well, just at first it was very nice, and we kept
on so well. Then Frank frightened my pony, and it
flew away, oh, at such a dreadful pace! I was so-
frightened, and it seemed as if all the wicked things
I had ever done came into my mind. I held on with
all my might, and I tried to pray, but it seemed as if
God would not hear me, and it took all my strength
to hold on, so that I felt as if I could not think—only
things came into my head that I had done wrong. It
was so dreadful, and then I saw an old man coming
along, and I screamed to him to stop the pony, and he
tried, but I think it knocked him down, and we only
seemed to go all the faster. Then we came right into
the middle of a lot of geese, and I thought I must
come off, and then they would peck at me, but I
stuck on, though I’m sure the pony trod on some of
them, for they made such a fearful noise. Then we
flew on and on, and I remembered a great pond there
was, and I thought, suppose the pony should go right
into it, and I should be drowned, and it seemed so



26 MAY’S GARDEN.

horrible, that mamma thinks it must have made me
faint, and all of a sudden I felt I was going, and I
remembered no more until I found myself in a little
cottage, and a woman and girl with me. I was so
frightened at first, and I couldn’t think where I was,
but I felt so glad to find I wasn’t dead, for I thought
I should be killed when I felt myself tumbling off the
horse.

“But oh, Peggy, it was so wonderful. I was
thrown on to a furze bush, and the doctor told mamma
that it most likely saved my life, because it bent
under my weight. I shall always like furze now, and
I’m so glad I’ve got some in my garden.”

“Tt was a mercy that ye fell so well; but ye maun
hae got pricked wi’ the furze.”

“Oh yes, I did. Just look at my neck and arms ;
the marks show now; and the spikes had run into my
dress, so that Mrs. Jones said she had some trouble in
getting me free.”

‘‘ How was it she found ye?”

“ Her little boy, Jim, was playing, and he saw me
thrown, and ran in to his mother, and said a girl in
white had come off her horse on to the bush. He
said I was in white, though it was only a light
dress.”



THE FURZE. OM,

“ Dearie me! ye might hae had all your bones
broke.””

“Yes, Pegey, I’m so glad that I’m all right, that
is that ’ve no bones broken. Just suppose I’d been
hurt, and died like little Tom.”

“Yes, indeed! ye musn’t be a-disobeying of your
mamma, missy. But I want to know how they all
got at ye.”

“Oh, mamma, and auntie, and nurse, and all of
them came in the waggonette. They got a man to
trace the pony’s footsteps, and they inquired for me
at the very house where I was. Mamma and nurse
were so frightened when they saw me; they said I
looked so ill, and I did not come round for some time
after they came in, for just before they arrived I had
fainted again.”

“T should think Master Frank must have been
mighty frightened.”

“Yes, I believe he was; but, do you know, he has
not said anything to me yet about it. He hasn’t even
said he was sorry. But I think he is, for he is never
unkind now.”

“T should think not. But go on, I want to know
how long ye stayed in the country.”

“Twas there more than a week before I could be



28 MAY’S GARDEN.

moved, and then I was brought home; they were all
so kind to me, but mamma was so sorry I had dis-
obeyed her.”

«Yes, missy, ye maun never do that ag’in.”

“No, Peggy, I hope not. We had such a nice
talk about it last night. Mamma was so kind, and
she has quite forgiven me; I told her how very, very
sorry I was. I had told her before, but I explained it
all to her, and she loves the furze as much as
I do, and she says I must always have it in my
garden.”

“ Ay, ye must, my dear. I allers thought it was
a bonny thing, but now I’ll think it bonnier than ever.
Some folks says it’s common, but it’s ’cause they’re
common, it strikes me! ”

““Mamma says, too, that when we get used to
things we don’t think them half so beautiful, but it
hasn’t been so with the furze, as I never thought it so
pretty before. And, oh, Peggy! I wanted to tell
you that there was a poor cripple at this cottage.
Such a funny little thing. She used to sit by me
for such a time, and only talk when she thought I
should like it. I got so fond of her, and I am sure
she loves me very much. Mamma is going to try and
get her into a hospital for children, where she thinks






THE FURZE. 29

she might get much better, and learn to do some-
thing.”

“Tt’s right kind on yourmamma, I’m sure; I hope
she’ll get good on’t.”

“Yes, I hope she will; and, oh, Peggy, she was so
kind to Annie. What do you think she did? Annie
told me she was crying away, and feeling very miser-
able, and Jane came up to her witha great brown mug
of milk in one hand, and a piece of tart on a plate
in the other. Such a great piece! and she wanted
Annie to have it all, to comfort her. Annie said
she couldn’t help laughing, it looked so funny, and
there was such a lot of it, but, however, she eat it
all up, and drank the milk, never thinking that
she was eating up all Jane’s supper! for actually,
she found out afterwards, that Jane went to bed
without anything at all, for she had given up all her
mother had got for her, to try and make Annie stop
crying. Wasn’t it kind? Nurse found it out and
told us about it.”

“‘ She’s a kind-hearted lassie, I’s nae doubt, missy.
She wadna’ like parting with ye? ”’

“No, she cried so, that mamma’s promised she
shall come and see us before she goes to the hospital.

Her mother came over last week and told us she was



30 MAY’S GARDEN.

always talking about it, and that she even dreamed
about it at night. Isn’t it funny?”

“Nay, ye little think what small things gives
pleasure to poor folks, as haven’t much to get pleasure
from.”’

“Here’s Emma, so I must say good-bye now,
Peggy, for mamma said I must not stay very long,
and she told me to tell you that she was going to send
you some more liniment for your rheumatism.”

“T’m sure Ill be very thankful, and tell your
mamma, with my duty, that I feels better for going to
my son’s, and that he was very kind; tell her that I
only got back on Wednesday. I wanted to tell her
t’other day, when I saw your furze, but she were out.”

Not long after this, Mrs. Edmunds said they must
really leave in a few days, for she had already stayed
some time longer than she had meant to do.

This piece of news seemed to make a wonderful
difference to Frank; neither of the other children
liked the thoughts of going, but Frank seemed more
gloomy than ever. May couldn’t help noticing this,
and it struck her that, perhaps, after all, Frank was
sorry that he had to go, so as she happened to be in
the garden alone with him, she said—



THE FURZE. 31

*‘Oh, Frank, I’m sorry you’re all going so soon,
I wish you could have stayed a little longer.’

Frank opened his eyes very wide, and said—

“T thought you hated me, you don’t mean you'd
like me to stay! ”

“Yes, I should,” said May, ‘ because you’ve not
been unkind since my accident, and I think you’re
sorry about it, and you don’t seem happy.”

“No, I’m not,” said Frank, “I’m a brute, I know,
but if you'll forgive me J’ll be your friend, I will.
But I frightened your pony on purpose, though I did
not want to hurt you, only to get you into a scrape;
because I heard you say I was so disagreeable, if I
was your brother you couldn’t love me, and I thought
I'd be revenged.”

«Oh, I didn’t mean you to hear that; and, besides,
I’m sure I could love you now.”

“Then we'll be friends,” said Frank, “I wish we
had been before, for I like you.”

“ There’s Kitty coming, please don’t tell her,” and ~
then he moved away to another part of the garden.

May kept the secret of her friendship with Frank,
although she longed to tell some one, particularly her
mamma, because she wanted her to think better of

- him; but though she tried to persuade Frank to let



32 MAY’S GARDEN.

her say something, he would not consent to it, but
said he would make all straight before he went.

May was obliged to be satisfied with this, and
also with the odd sort of friendship Frank showed
her; for, before his brother and sister he took no
more notice of her than he had done formerly; but
when they were alone they had some long talks.

One day he said to her, ‘ It’s no use trying to be
good with such a horrid temper as ’ve got. I’m sure
I’m meant to be bad.”

“Tm sure you’re not,” said May. “ Mamma says
were all born sinful, but then we can be made new
and clean, if we come to the Lord Jesus. I’m sure
He could make you different, if you would ask Him.”

“JT couldn’t be made good, that’s certain,” said
Frank.

“Oh yes, you could, if you would pray.”

“T never pray,” said Frank; “the fellows would
laugh, and 1 should have cold water thrown over me,
and all sorts of things done to me,if I did. I couldn’t
pray at school, and I should think it sneaking to
pray at home, and not at school.’’

«Yes, it would be; but, then, couldn’t you begin
here? and then, if you asked God, He would give

you strength to pray at school.”



THE FURZE. 33

“TI might try; but it would be awful at -school.
You have no idea.”

“ But couldn’t you get aunt to send you to another
school ? ”

“Tam going to another. I’m going to Eton. I
couldn’t go all the way to Canada to school; but
then I know it will be just as bad, or worse, at Hton,
because I know fellows who have been there.”

“ How dreadful! But aunt wouldn’t let you go,
if she knew, would she?”

“Oh yes; she’d only langh, and say other boys
had to do it. But she docsn’t know what it’s like.”

* But ll get mamma to tell her.”

“Oh no. VIl try your plan; it might do. I
suppose people who’ve been burnt to death had some
help. Dll try it on. Ill begin to-day, and V’ll write
to you when I’m at school, if you won’t show the
letter.”

“No, I won’t show it, if you’ll not put anything
in mamma wouldn’t lke, because we have to show
them unless they are from some one who is careful.”

“She won’t think I’m careful, I know; but I
don’t mind aunt seeing: the letter, if she won’t tell
anybody.”

“T’m sure she won’t, if you don’t put anything

3



34 MAY’S GARDEN.

wrong in it. Except if they treat you very badly,
Frank, she would think she ought to tell aunt.”

“Oh, I shan’t tell you if they do. I shall only
tell you how I get on about praying.”

* But I shall want to know.”

“No, I shan’t tell you till the holidays, so don’t
bother me. Let’s go and look at the rabbits.”

May saw Annie and Herbert were coming, and so
she knew it was no use trying to talk any more.

Frank didn’t give her another opportunity of a
talk. He seemed very sorry to go, in his way, and
he said ‘‘ Good-bye” quite affectionately ; but he said
no more, and it was quite two months before May
heard from him.

Soon after the aunt and cousins had gone, Mrs.
Aston got an order for little Jane to go to the hos-
pital. She was to be there in a week from the time
the order was received, so Mrs. Aston said she must
come and spend a day or two with the children before
she went. Mrs. Aston sent the pony carriage for
her, and when she drove up 4o the door, May and
Annie ran out to welcome her.

She looked as if she didn’t know whether to
laugh or to cry, and she seemed to have lost all her
courage. The children took her upstairs, and showed



THE FURZE. 35

her the little room near theirs which she was to have.
The poor child seemed quite overwhelmed, so Mrs.
Aston took her into the nursery (which was now used
as a play-room), and made her lie down on the sofa
and rest. Then, after a time, May and Annie went
and sat with her, and got her to talk.

“Do you feel very poorly ?” said Annie.

“No, I only feels tired a bit; but it all seems so
grand and strange like, I don’t think I can stop.”

“Oh yes, you must,” said May. ‘We're not
grand. What have you been doing since I left ?”

“Knitting, and helping mother a bit. Jim’s
gone to schvol again. I’m so glad; I want him to
be a scholard.”

«“ What’s a scholard ?” said Annie.

“Why, don’t you know? I thought you knew
everything.”

“Oh no,” laughed Annie; “I wish I did, and
then I should have no lessons.”

“‘T suppose a scholard means a school-boy,”’ said
May.

“Yes,” said Jane, “ one as learns—gets learning,
you know.’

May saw Annie was laughing, so she gave her a
reproving look, for she didn’t want Jane to see.



36 MAY’S GARDEN.

“Shall you like going to the hospital?” said
Annic, looking as grave as a judge.

“T shall like to be taught; but I can’t bear the
thought of them doctors. I’m afraid they will hurt
80.”

“ Nurse told me she didn’t think they would hurt
at all. She said she had a little cousin there once,
who wasn’t well, like you, and they did not hurt him
at all, and he came out so much better.”

“Oh, how nice!” said Jane. “I shouldn’t care
for anything if I were well, but I can’t bear to see
mother working and working so hard; and I can’t
help her a bit, except by knitting, and it fetches so
little.”

“Do you think you could come and see my rab-
bit?” said Annie; “they are so pretty.”

“ Yos, if yowll give me my crutches. Thank you,
miss.”

«Well, I never seed such pretty things,” said
Jane; “but what a lot they must cat?”

“They do,” said Annie. “It takes nearly all my
pocket money, and they cat a quantity of grass,
besides.”

« Wow much money do you get?” said Jane.

* T have a shilling a weck.”



THE FURZE. 37

“ A shilling a week! Whatalot! Don’t it seem
wrong to give it all to the rabbits ?”

““T don’t spend it all on the rabbits,” said Annie,
“but I don’t think it’s wrong at all; they must be
fed.”

Yes, but poor folks is starving,’ said Jane,
“and mother says it’s wicked to keep a cat, because
it eats so much.” |

“Well, we have three,” said May, “two in the
house, and one in the stables, and I don’t think
mamma would let us have them if it was wicked.”

“We haven’t got a lot of food like you have; I
’spose that’s it,” said Jane. “It will be nice always
to have enough, and mother ’ll have enough too
now.”

“Are you hungry now?” said Annie. “It’s just
tea-time. Do come in.”

“Tam a bit hungry, but I’m not in a hurry.”

_ €T have often been so cross, because tea was not
ready the minute I wanted it,” said May.

Jane smiled. “Poor folks gets used to being
hungry sometimes,” she said. ‘But you haven’t to
get used to anything.”

“T’m not used to being run away with,” said May,
smiling.



38 MAY’S GARDEN.

“No, but I mean other things. Aren’t you happy
all day when you're well?”

“No, indeed, I’m not; I have my lessons to do,
and they are very hard sometimes, and always tire-
some. I think I should often be nearly quite happy
if it was not for them.”

“How queer,” said Jane, “I should like to do
lessons all day.”

“Have you ever done lessons all day?” said -
Annie,

“© No, I haven’t.”

‘Then don’t want to,” said Annie; “you'd soon
be tired of it. - When I’m at lessons I think of my
pretty rabbits, and there are two long lines of spelling
to be learnt before I can get to them, or some history,
er something. Oh, it’s horrid!”

« But what a queer lady you’d be when you grew
up, if you didn’t know how to read,” said Jane. “ If I
were a lady wouldn’t I learn !”

«That’s right, Jane,” said Mrs. Aston, who had
overheard Jane’s remark, “ teach them to value their
privileges.”

«Oh, mamma, we were only talking about lessons
,

being tiresome—making us unhappy, I mean,” said

May, “because Jane thought I had no troubles.”



THE FURZE. 39

“Tf you have no worse ones than lessons, my
dear, you will do very well.”

“ But, mamma, you said one day, that lessons
were a real trouble to children, and that we ought to
do our duty about them as if they were grown-up
troubles.”

“1 used words to that effect, May, and I meant it,
and I also meant that if, when you were grown up,
you had no worse troubles than lessons are to you
now, you would not have very serious trials.”

“Being hungry is much worse than lessons,
mamma, isn’t it??? said Annie, “and Jane has some-
times not had enough to eat.”

“Yes, it is much worse, but I hope Jane won’t
suffer from that any more,” said Mrs. Aston, looking
at her kindly.

Jane coloured up. ‘‘Oh, ma’am,” she said, “I
didn’t mind the hunger so much as the pain; besides,
I’ve not often been real hungry; it’s been more faint
like.”

“T hope you will get stronger and better at the
hospital,” said Mrs. Aston, cheerfully, “and as to the
little talk we have had, I want you all to remember
that God sends troubles to rich and poor, and He
knows all we feel about them. He gives us what He



40 MAY’S GARDEN.

thinks best, and we must try and get all the good out
of them we can. Now go in to tea, and take care of
Jane.”

“ Mayn’t I come with you while you dress for
dinner, mamma?” said Annie, wistfully, lingering
behind.

“No, darling, go and have your tea with May and
Jane, and I will come and see you in bed.”

An hour or two after tea, Jane was helped to bed
by the children’s maid; and when she laid herself
down in the soft bed, she felt as if she were in fairy-
land.

Then she heard Mrs. Aston speaking to the chil-
dren in the next room, and to her great joy she
came in to her too.

‘* How are you, Jane?” said Mrs. Aston gently.

But there was no answer, only a heavy sob, and
two large tears trickling down Jane’s white cheeks.

“Why, what is the matter?” said Mrs. Aston,
looking surprised.

**Oh, ma’am, you are so kind, and it is so beauti-
ful here, and I don’t want to go to the hospital.”

* But you must go to try and get well, and then
you could help your mother. You want to be a help
to her, don’t you?”





THE FURZE. 41

“Oh yes, ma’am, but I wish we could come and
be your servants.”

“Well, you must go and try to get well before
you could be a servant, andl then some day you may
be one.”

“Here, ma’am?”’ said Jane with brightening eyes.

«Yes, perhaps here, but that must not be thought
of now. J do want you to think of the good Shep-
herd, Jane, who carries the lambs in his bosom. You
know who I mean, don’t you?”

“« Yes, ma’am, the Saviour.”’

“Yes, I want you to be one of his lambs, trying to
follow Him always. He will make you one if you ask
Him, and He will love you more than anybody else.
He does that now, and it will be good for you to
think of this when you are at the hospital.’’

“Yes, ma’am.”

“ Good night, Jane. I hope you will sleep well.”

“Good night, ma’am, I’ll not forget,” said Jane.

And she did not. The next day her mother came
to take her to the hospital, and she was quite sur-
prised at her brightness. She could hardly believe

she’ was the same child who had left her the day
"before.
But Jane felt she could not tell any one that she



42 MAY’S GARDEN,

wished to love and follow the good Shepherd. She
had often heard of Him and read about Him, when she
was well enough to go to the Sunday-school, but she
had never wished to follow Him before. Now that
this wish had entered her heart, her fear and dread of
the hospital seemed almost to go, and she said good-
bye to Mrs. Aston and the children quite cheerfully. .

In fact, everything seemed brighter for little Jane,
for she never forgot that some day she might per-
haps live with Mrs. Aston, and attend to the young
ladies; then she would save such lots of money for
mother, and buy Jim no end of new tops; quite for-
getting that when she was a woman, Jim would be a

man, with desires above new tops.



CHAPTER III.

THE RED THORN.

“We haven’t been for such a time to see Aunt Sarah
and Aunt Martha, mamma,” said Annie, one fine
morning. ‘Don’t you think we might go and see
them to-day, and perhaps they would ask us to tea ?”’
“Which do you want to do? See Aunt Sarah
and Aunt Martha, or have tea ?”
a Both, mamma.”
“Well, if I were Aunt Sarah, I should prefer that
you came to see me without any tea in the matter.”
“Oh, I shall like to see them without tea, but I
enjoy myself a great deal more with it.”
«That's one way of getting out of it. Well, ’m
going to drive to Wrexall this afternoon, so I will
drop you both at Elm House, and we will ask the old
-ladies if they can keep you to tea, and then I will
send for you in the evening. It will be Aunt Martha’s



44 MAY’S GARDEN.

birthday to-morrow, May. I think it would be a
good thing if you were to take her some pink may.
She always likes to have some for her birthday.”

“Qh yes. I’m so glad you thought of it, mamma ;
she will be so pleased.”

These old ladies were two Miss Ansteds, whose
fathers and grandfathers for many generations had
lived in Woodchester. They had been great travellers
in many lands, for they were very well off; but for
the last eight years they had been living quietly in
their native town, in the old family house. It was
such an old-fashioned place, with numbers of windows
looking on the street, and a large walled garden
behind. Everything about the place seemed old—
even the servants matched the furniture, having a
faded, dried-up appearance about them, which made
them look very quaint and odd. The garden, though
as old-fashioned as the rest of the place, was very
bright and beautiful, but only with old fashioned
flowers; not one new specimen was allowed, for Aunt
Sarah was thoroughly of the old school, and, though
she loved young people, she disliked all new improve-
ments and all new notions.

You will, perhaps, wonder how it was that May
and Annie were so fond of going there; but when



THE RED THORN. 45

you hear all the delights in store for them, you will
wish you could have gone there too.

First of all came the old ladics themselves; they
were so very kind and loving that they won the con-
fidence and affection of everybody, but especially of
children, who were allowed to roam about the old
rooms and passages, and to play, to their hearts’
content, with old-world toys upstairs in the nursery of
long ago. Then even the kitchens were allowed to
be explored; and though the cook looked as if she
had come out of a band-box, she could laugh, and
allow all sorts of liberties with her beautifully-kept
kitchens and cupboards ; and the treasures to be found
in the latter were almost beyond comprehension. ‘Then
there was the garden, where grew no end of straw-
berries, apples, pears, plums, gooseberries, currants ;
and, last, but not least, were the delightful stories
Aunt Sarah told. It really seemed as if the time
would never come when she had no more to tell.
You will not wonder now, I think, that May and
Annie were very fond of going to see the old ladies,
and especially of staying to tea. So, when Mrs.
Aston’s ‘carriage stopped at the door, there were
two beating hearts, hoping for an invitation; and
when the old butler brought out word that his



46 MAY’S GARDEN.

mistresses would be very glad if the young ladies
would stay, there were two very bright faces, and two
happy little people, with a very large bunch of may,
got out of the carriage and walked into the house.

“And how are you, missy?” said the butler; for
he was quite a friend of the family, and always had a
little chat on his own account.

“Tam nearly quite well, thank you,”

said May.

“She has been run away with, and might have
been killed,” said Annie. “She was thrown on some
furze, or the doctor said she would have been killed
most likely.”

“Yes, I heard,” said Henly. “Well, missy, you
won’t be going against orders on them wild things
again, I should think. Tm right glad you were
caught on the furze. Why, you ought always to wear
a bit in your button-hole.”

* Button-hole, Henly! I don’t wear a coat.”

“But youve got button-holes, missy; leastways
my missis has, for I see her making ’em.”

The children laughed, and Annie took his hand
while he led them through the hall, and then down a
long passage to a bright morning room, where sat
the two old ladies, quite close to one another, hold-
ing hands. Aunt Sarah was very handsome, and





RED-THORN



THE RED THORN. 47

looked lively ; but Aunt Martha was blind, and she
had a sweet, sad face, which, one could sce, had
known deep sorrow.

When the childrea appeared with the large bunch
of red thorn, the old ladies quickly unclasped their
hands, and Aunt Sarah rose to kiss them, and then
they went up to Aunt Martha, and gently kissed
her.

“We have brought you some pink may, out of
my new garden, for Aunt Martha’s birthday,” said
May.

“That is very good of you,’ said Aunt Martha.
“T always used to have a wreath of it on my birthday,
when I was young, but I never wore it after Edward
died—no, I couldn’t after that. But I always like some
in the room, dears; not too much though, for it has a
strong scent.”

“Come, and I will show you where our old red
thorn tree used to be,” said Aunt Sarah, as she step-
ped out into the garden. “I never told you we used
to have one. This is the old stump of it, you see it is all
covered with ivy now, that you can hardly tell what it
is, but it was once part of a beautiful tree, and when
we were children, our brother used to climb up into it,

and get such pretty pieces of may, and, as Aunt



48 MAY’S GARDEN,

Martha told you, he always made her a wreath on her
birthday.”

“Didn’t he make you a wreath too on yours,
Aunt Sarah?” said Annie.

“No, I didn’t care for wreaths. I was a very
different child from Aunt Martha, She was always
sweet and amiable, but I prided myself on trying to
be grown up before my time.”

“You were not always good?” said Annie wonder-
ingly.

“No, indeed,” said Aunt Sarah.

“JT wish you would tell us about it,” said Annie,
thinking it would be refreshing to hear of any one so
good as aunt having been naughty.

Aunt Sarah smiled, and then, turning to May,
said, “I hear you have been running away, May.”

“T did not mean to run away, but it was very
wrong to get on the pony’s back.”

“Tam glad you confess at once you were wrong,
and I hope it will teach you a lesson to obey your
mother in future.”

May coloured and the tears came into her eyes.

“Oh, Aunt Sarah, I shouldn’t think of getting on
a pony’s back again without mamma’s leave.”

“No dear, perhaps not, but you might think of



THE RED THORN. 49

disobeying her in some other way, and I want this
lesson you have had to affect your future life, and to
be a warning to you. Annie wants me to tell you
both about when I was a naughty girl, so after tea I
will tell you a story about myself and my brother.”

May did not like the idea of the story, she thought
it might refer to her fault rather toomuch; but Annie,
not having an uneasy conscience, wished very much to
hear Aunt Sarah’s tale » so as soon as tea was over she
asked for it.

Aunt Martha laughed. “Oh, Annie!” she said,
“Tm afraid you’re too fond of tales. Don’t you’
think it would be better for Aunt Sarah to read out
some history ?”

“No, thank you,” said Annie, “I want Aunt
Sarah to begin this very minute.”

“Then I must make haste,’ said Aunt Sarah.
“Once upon a time—-—”

“ But do tell how old you were first,” said May.

“T was thirteen, and Aunt Martha was eleven, and
my brother sixteen. Now I shall have to begin
again.”

“JT bee your pardon, Aunt Sarah,” said May,
“ but I did so want to know how old you were.”

“Tt’s very easy to begin again. Once upon a time
4



50 MAY’S GARDEN.

we lived in Russia, as you have heard me say before,
with our father, who was a physician. Our mother died
when we were very little girls, much younger than you
are, and we had only one brother, and we were very
foud of him, he was such a kind, noble-hearted youth.”

“ He was a dear, dear boy,” said Aunt Martha.

“ Well, as I said, we were very fond of him, and
he was very fond of us, and he was our father’s
favourite. At first we lived in St. Petersburg, but
after a time the nobleman, to whom our father was
physician, moved to his estate in the country, and we
went with him, and had a pretty house in his grounds.

“Now before I go on, Annie, you tell me what
kind of climate they have in Russia. Is it hot, or
cold, or temperate like ours ?”

“Very cold, freezing,” said Annic, quite pleased
that it was such an easy question.

«Yes, it is very cold, indeed, and so we found it,
I can tell you. We had to have double windows,
and stoves always lighted, and the people dress
in fur, and do all they can to keep out the cold.
Well, our father bought a new sledge—you both know
what that is—and I was very anxious to try it; I
thought it would be so delightful. I asked my father

to allow me to go out in it, and for Edward to drive



THE RED THORN. 51

it, but he would not allow it, and he said he should be
very angry if we attempted it. So I gave up the idea
then, but I felt very cross about it in my heart, though
I did not show it outwardly. My father did not know
-that he had such a naughty girl, or he would have
locked me in my room, and I wish he had. Don’t
you, Martha?”

“Yes, yes, dear, for your own sake I wish he had.”

“Yes, you hear even Aunt Martha wishes he had.
But he did not, and one day he went out and said
he should not be back until the next day, and all
of a sudden the wicked thought came into my mind
that I would persuade Edward to take me out in the
new sledge. So I went to Edward, and said I wished
he would take me out for a little drive in the sledge ;
but he said he did not think our father would like it,
but he did not know, nor did Martha, that our father
had quite forbidden it.

“So I gaid, ‘Oh, it will not matter going a little
way in the park. We cannot take any harm.’

“So Hdward consented, thinking we could not
get lost if we kept within the park. He forgot that
the snow was so very deep that a low wall on one side
was completely covered, and that therefore we should

“not know when we were in the park or not. But I



D2 MAY’S GARDEN.

knew this, only I thought I should be sure to know
when to stop, and I did not fear any danger, so that I
had my way and my pleasure.

“So we started. We both wrapped up well in
warm furs, and off we went at a great pace, flying -
along! I thought it was delightful, and I enjoyed it
so much, and Edward was so pleased at my excite-
ment, that he forgot when it was time to turn, and I
did not remind him. At last, he said he thought
we must make our way back, or Martha would be
nervous.”

“Yes, yes, dear boy,” interrupted Aunt Martha,
“he was always so thoughtful for me, and so were
you, Sarah, my dear, though you do not say so.”

“T was not then, Martha, for I did not like return-
ing; but I gave into Edward, and back we went, as we
thought, but it was anything but going back, for we had
got far away from the park, and we were only getting
farther and farther away, and nearer and nearer to the
dreadful woods, where the wolves make their home.

« As we went on and on, I thought we were a long
time getting home, and I said to Edward, ‘It seems
to take a long time to get back again;’ and then the
horrible thought struck me, that we had perhaps wan-
dered beyond the park, and I almost screamed, ‘Oh,



THE RED THORN. 53

Edward, we must have been beyond the park. Do
you think we are on the right track ?’

*“* Don’t be frightened, Sarah,’ he said, ‘but I
have been suspecting for some time that we must have
lost our way; but be brave and trust in God, you
know we are in his hands.’

“¢But oh, Edward,’ I said in anguish, ‘I have
disobeyed papa, for he said I was not to go out in the
sledge, but I wanted so to come, that I would not tell
you, and now, oh, Edward! suppose we are frozen to
death, I shall have killed you and myself too!’ and then
I sobbed and felt as if I was undone and lost for ever!

“ Poor Edward! he was in great distress, I could
tell, although he did not say a word at first. Then in
a low steadfast voice, he said, ‘Pray, Sarah, pray for
forgiveness. You know he that confesseth and for-
saketh his sin shall have mercy. We must both try
and keep up our strength, and use all our endeavours to
reach home.’

«T cried to Edward to pray, I felt too wicked; and
so in a low voice he asked for pardon and guidance,
and with his prayer the cloud of sin and misery was
lifted a little, so that I could help to think what we
had better do; but oh! my heart was heavy as lead,
Tt could not tell you what I felt.



54 MAY’S GARDEN.

“Fdward looked all round to see which way to turn,
and then he chose what he thought would be the
most likely road to lead home. On and on we went,
but we seemed to get no nearer, and soon we saw we
were approaching a pine forest.

“Now, I must tell you, my dears, that the pine
forests in Russia extend for miles and miles; and as
the wolves live in and about them, it is very dangerous
to go near them, unless you are well protected,
especially at night, when they DEO about and often
hunt in great packs.

“ Hdward well knew our danger, better than I did,
for he had travelled with our father in the winter,
when they had seen something of these creatures.
Suddenly, we heard a howling noise in the distance, at
which I was terrified, and the horse pricked up his
ears, and flew along, in his fright nearly upsetting us.
Edward did not speak, but when I cricd ont, he said,
‘Keep quiet, dear, and pray. You know that verse,
“God is our refuge and strength, a very present
help in trouble.” ’

“T knew that God was his refuge, but would He be
mine? I felt I must ask Him to be, there was no
other hope or help; and soI prayed really and truly, as

Thad never prayed before, and my great and heavy sin’



THE RED THORN. 55

seemed to roll away. It did roll away, my dears, to the
foot of Christ’s cross, and that terrible hour was made
to me the beginning of a new life.

* But though I was not in such dreadful fear about
my soul, I was terrified, and so was Edward, at our
fearful danger. On and on we flew, and on and on
came the wolves, and we felt they were gaining upon
us. Hdward urged on the poor frightened horse, who
was quite aware of the peril he was in, and I felt as if
I must push the sledge along as I pressed forward
with my feet against the front part of it. Still on
we flew, and on came the wolves, till in the twilight I
could see them, like a dusky cloud, getting nearer and
nearer,”

“Did they catch you?” asked Annie, breathlessly.

“No, they did not catch me, dear, or I should not
have been here, nor did they catch my brother.”

“Who did they catch then?” said May.

«Wait a moment, I shall soon have finished.
Just as we felt ourselves on the point of being
devoured, Edward saw a light, and he immediately
urged and cheered on the brave horse, who, though
almost spent, exerted all his remaining strength, and
reached the door of a wood hut, just im time for us to

get inside. But our poor noble horse was devoured



56 MAY’S GARDEN.

by the wolves; we tried to get him loose from the
sledge, and then we could have got him into the hut,
but there was not time.

“ Hdward burst into tears, and cried like a child, he
was so grieved for the noble creature, and then, when
he was calmer, he made me knecl down with him, and
we gave thanks for our deliverance. When we rose,
we noticed the old man who had opened the door for
us was the only person there, and we found he had
been busy getting us hot brandy-and-water, which
revived and refreshed us; but Edward seemed much
more overcome than I was; he was always a very deli-
cate boy, and before morning he was in a high fever.”

“Oh, what did you do?” said May. ‘“ Weren’t
you frightened ?”

«T was, indeed. I thought, ‘Suppose Edward
should die, and all through my disobedience’ I
entreated the old man to fetch my father, but he dared
not venture out, because of the wolves. I think I should
have gone mad if my father had not arrived the
next day, but he had traced us, and came to our
assistance.

“He did not say a word to me, although he knew
that all this trouble was through my fault. I think he saw
that I had suffered terribly. We had to nurse Edward in



THE RED THORN. 57

the hut, for he could not be moved, and by the time
he was getting better, the winter had gone, and we
were able to return home safely. Then, one evening,
I crept up to my father, and confessed all my wicked-
ness. He was very tender and loving, but very grave,
and I shall never forget how he showed me that in
disobeying him I had broken God’s commandment.

“But the most dreadful thing was that Edward
never got strong again. We came back here before
the winter came on, and in a year he died. Aunt
Martha had one more birthday first, and though he
was too ill to pluck the pink may, he made her the
wreath, and put it on for her, and we all sat together
in this room, and listened to the birds, and enjoyed
the scent of the flowers. Edward was so gentle and
sweet to me, and he made me promise that I would
not reproach myself any more for my disobedience
and the consequences. He said my sin was forgiven,
and I must live as one forgiven. Then he said he did
not think he should have lived to be a man anyhow,
for he knew before the fever, that he was not at all
strong, and of course, he said, I had not meant to
injure him.”

“Oh no,” said Aunt Martha, “your Aunt Sarah

nearly killed herself with nursing him, and she was,



58 MAY’S GARDEN.

and is, one of the most loving sisters that ever were
born.”

“Come, come, Martha,” said Aunt Sarah, ‘you
are always making me out better than Tam. Well,
to finish, dears. I have told you this long tale to

show you that we can never know the -evil con-_

sequences that may follow one sin. So when you are
tempted to disobey, pray for strength to resist.”

“JT should have thought you wouldw’t like pink
may, Aunt Martha,” said Annie.

“Should you, dear? You would not have looked
at it again, eh ?”’

“No; it’s all so miserable.”

“ T ought to be the one not to like the pink may,” ~

said Aunt Sarah, “but I love it, because it reminds
me of my brother and his sweetness, and Aunt Martha
loves it for the same reagon.. We often talk of our
brother, although it’s all these years since we lost him.
It is beautiful to think of those who have gone before,
and who have reached the haven where we long to be.”

The children left soon after this conversation, and
as they passed the old parish churchyard, they noticed,
for the first time, that there was a red thorn tree

growing near Edward Ansted’s grave.

: ae



CHAPTER IV.
THE HEART’S-EASK.

Mav’s garden was looking very pretty, and the chil-
dren were quite delighted with the flowers, they
looked so gay and bright.

“T gee that something wants doing to it,’ said
Annie; “and if it were my garden, I should give
orders to my gardener to do it.”

“Oh, would you!” laughed May. ‘ Well, I must
walk round and see. Oh, those two great weeds!
how ever did they grow up so quickly? Pm afraid
you are a very carcless gardener, Annie. You must
take them up directly, and rake the whole garden
over.”

“'That’s just what I wanted,” said Annie. “Ido
_like raking so.”

“Oh, how beautiful these heart’s-ease are, Annie!
Do look !”



60 MAY’S GARDEN.

«They are just ready for cutting. Who shall we
take them to?”

“Couldn’t we take them to old Mrs. Morris?
She would be so pleased, and we could make them so
pretty with some green,” said Annie, throwing away
her rake.

- “No, I am going to cut them and do them up.
You are the gardener.”

“Oh, I was forgetting that you are the mistress.
I beg your pardon, ma’am.”

The garden was then left to be raked im the
evening, and May and Annie went in to ask Mrs.
Aston if they might go and see Mrs. Morris, and
take her some flowers. She gave them leave, and so
they started at once.

Mrs. Morris was a sweet-looking old woman, who
lived in a pretty little cottage with her grandson.
She had brought him up, and he was very fond of
her and very kind to her; but, as he was out all day,
she was rather lonely, and therefore pleased to have
visitors, especially young people, for she said they
almost made her feel young again. Her grandson
used every bit of the garden for vegetables, so that
the old lady had no room for flowers, except a few

she kept in pots, and the pretty creepers on the house.



THE HEARYT’S-EASE. 61

She was, therefore, very pleased to have a few to put
on her table with her Bible and spectacles. May and
Annie had taken ber flowers before, but this was the
- first time they had taken them out of May’s new
garden.

“We have brought you some heart’s-ease, Mrs.
Morris,” said May, as she entered the neat kitchen
where Mrs. Morris was sitting.

“Some heart’s-ease, my dears! Well, ’m sure
you could bring me nothing better.”

“Oh, Mrs. Morris,” said Annie, “there are lots
of things, and lots of flowers even, better than heart’s-
ease ; but we are glad you like them, for they are out
of May’s new garden, and I do the work for her.”

“Do you, my dear? Well, to be sure! You are
not very ol to do the work; but I daresay missy
sees you don’t do too much.”

“No, Mrs. Morris, I don’t think she will kill her-
self; but [ want to know why you like heart’s-ease
better than other flowers.”

“No, my dear, I didn’t mean I liked heart’s-ease
better than other flowers; but heart’s ease—that is, a
peaceful, contented heart—is one of God’s best gifts.
And you said, ‘I have brought you some heart’s-ease,’

and I said, ‘ You could bring me nothing better,’ ”



62 MAY’S GARDEN.

“Oh, I see,” said May. “Well, I hope you wil
have heart’s-ease in your heart, ag well ag on your
table.”

“Thank you, my dear; that is very pretty of you.
It’s a blessed thing to have peace within, and God’s
beautiful flowers outside; but when I was a girl I did
not care much about cither.”

“Didwt you?” said Annie. ‘ What were you like
when you were ee Did you ee wear that .
great white cap.”

“No, my dear, that I didn’t, though in those
days, young girls did wear caps, real caps, when they
went out to service and when tkey were married.
Those were good old days, my dear, in many MEW
though folks do think these times so grand.”

*‘T wish you would tell us about those times,” said
May, “‘ when you were a little girl.”

« Wouldn’t it be nice, Annie, if Mrs. Morris would
tell us what she used to do?”

“Oh yes, it would; but might we get some peas
first, and then we could shell them while you talk to
us?” said Annie, turning to Mrs. Morris.

“Yes, dearie, you may get some peas from the
second row at the other end of the garden; and you,
missy, will get down that large brown basin, won’t



THE HEART’S-EASE. 63

you, dear? It’s curious how fond one gets of one’s
chair, when one grows old. Itscems so hard to move.
Hey day! I used to be as active as anybody.”

“Mamma says she will be very thankful if she is
as well and strong as you are at eighty. I heard her
say so to nurse one day.”

“Well, my dear, I hope she will be much better
than I am. Now, here comes little missy, with her
frock full of peas. Oh dearieme! what will mamma
say if that pretty frock ‘is spoilt ? Come here, my
dear, and let me wipe it for you. Young ladies
always wore pinnies when I was a girl. It’s one of
them new-fangled notions to go about and spoil your
nice new frocks.”

“Oh no,’ said May, “these are our garden
frocks; we run about in these, and mamma doesn’t
mind.”

“Oh well, ‘garden frocks’ are new-fangled too,
so you are new-fangled anyhow, missy,” said Mrs.
Morris, with a twinkle in her eye. ‘Now, my
dears, I must see if I can remember something about
when I was a little girl Dve told you a good deal,
and I shall get used up some of these fine days, and
have no more to tell, and then I wonder if the little

missies will and come and see the old woman.”



64 MAY’S GARDEN.

“Oh, yes! you know we shall,” said both chil-
dren in a breath. ‘‘ Why, we often go and see
nurse, and she is too poorly to talk to us at all some-
times.”

“ Well, now, my dears, if you’ll sit quiet for a bit,
Tl tell you ‘ about when I was a little girl,’ as Miss
Annie calls it. When you brought them heart’s-
ease to me, it took me back seventy-one years. Just
think on that. Why, missy, you think you will be
getting old at twenty; don’t you?”

“Oh yes. Why, I think I shall be very big at
twelve. I can’t fancy what twenty is like,” said
May.

“Can’t you? Then you can’t fancy what nearly
four times twenty is; so I had better go on with my
tale at once. You've heard me tell of Miss Lucy,
sometimes, but I never told you how it was that I
knew her so well, and that we were so fond of one
another. It was in this way, my dears. She was ~
what is called my foster-sister. My mother was her
nurse, and brought her up from a little, such a little
baby. Her mother at the Hall was very ill when
she was born, and she had to go away soon after
into foreign parts. So my mother took Miss Lucy
home with her to nurse; and as Madam did not





THE HEART’S-EASE. 65

return again till Miss Lucy was seven years old, we
had a long time together, and we were just like sisters.”

“How was it that Lucy’s mamma was so long
away ?”’ said May.

“ Because she was so very delicate, that the doc-
tors wouldn’t let her come to England.”

“ Please go on,” said Annie, rather impatient
about the interruption.

“‘T was mother’s only child, so that when we heard
that Madam was going to return to the Hall, and that
she would want Miss Lucy back, we were both very sad.
Mother was very fond of Madam—but then she was
very fond of Miss Lucy, too—and she felt how lonely I
should be without my playfellow; but she had always
looked forward to this time. She knew she could not
keep Miss Lucy always, for she was a lady born, and
she must be brought up like one. She therefore made
up her mind to part, and she tried to make me.see
that it was all for the best; but, dearie me, children,
I was as sore about it as one of you would be if the
other was going to be taken away to some grand
place right out of sight. I screamed, and put myself
into a dreadful passion when mother first told me of
it; and when that had worked off I was dull and
miserable whenever the dreadful thought came over me

5



66 MAY’S GARDEN.

that my dear dear Lucy must go away. Miss Lucy, too,
could not bear the thoughts of parting, and she seemed
quite frightened at the notion of the big house, and of
all the brothers and sisters she would have to see.”

“Where were all her brothers and sisters all this
time, Mrs. Morris?” said Annie.

“Oh, the elder ones were with the Squire and
Madam, and the younger ones were at school; but
now all the family was coming home, so that Miss
Lucy would have to make many new friends at once.
Well do I remember the last day we had together,
and our last walk. We went out into the-fields, hand-
in-hand, feeling very dull and listless. Then, after a
little while, Miss Lucy began to try and comfort me,
by telling me what beautiful things she would give me.
She said I should have half of all her new toys, and
that she would ask her mamma to let me come and
see her, and that she might come and see me. Then
she said, ‘When we are grown up we will live in a
pretty little house together all the rest of our lives.’
I could not get the comfort out of this Miss Lucy
seemed to do, for she was much more hopeful than I
was; but still it pleased me that she was going to
ask to come to see me, and so we began gathering

our last nosegay of wild flowers. Now, mother often



THE HEART’S-EASE. 67

made us each a wreath of the flowers we had gathered,
and then she would tell us their names, and what
they meant; for mother was a noticeable woman, and
avery good scholar. That day we took home a good
many wild violets and heart’s-ease among the other
flowers; and when we saw mother in the little
parlour, we asked her to make us each a wreath to
wear before we parted. Mother noticed my dull, sad
face, and she made me a wreath of violets and heart’s-
ease. It all comes to me as if it was the other
day. She said, ‘This is for thee, my girl, and I
hope thou wilt have a contented mind, for that
is what heart’s-ease means; and I hope thou
wilt not forget to be as humble as these violets,
which hang their heads so low.’ Then, as she saw
me nearly crying, she kissed me, and sent me to
fetch the butter in, for she was going to have her
dish of tea when we had our bread-and-milk. When
I got back again, Miss Lucy had her wreath on, and
I was just going to ask her what it meant, when we
heard the sound of carriage-wheels, and soon we saw
a grand coach drive up to the door. Mother ran up-
stairs to get her best cap, and we stood quite still,
feeling that the time had come when we must part.

“* Mother soon opened the door, and then a beauti-



68 MAY’S GARDEN.

ful lady came into the parlour, and after looking at us
for a moment, she said, ‘This must be my darling,’
and she clasped Miss Lucy to her heart, and covered
her with kisses.

“Oh, my dears, I cannot tell you what. I felt, I
could have torn her to pieces, I was so angry to think
she was going to take away my dear dear Lucy and leave
me quite alone. After she had talked to Miss Lucy,
and to my mother about her, for some little time, she
turned, and saw my angry, jealous eyes watching her.
I think she instantly guessed my feelings, for she held
out her hand to me, and said to mother, ‘ Is this your
only one, nurse, and the foster-sister of my Lucy ?
Come here, dear,’ she said to me; ‘you would like
to know Lucy’s mother, and I want to know you.’

“Then mother took my hand, and led me to
Madam, saying my heart was very sore at parting
from Miss Lucy, and she had been telling me I ought
to be humble and contented, or my wreath would not
become me. I burst into tears at this, and said I could
not part with Lucy. I would not say ‘ Miss Lucy,’ as
mother had told me I must, now that she was going
to live at ‘the Hall,’ but I went on saying I could not
let her go, it was wicked to take her away. Miss

Lucy cried in company, and there was quite an upset.



THE HEART’S-BASE. 69

Mother was so vexed, that she was going to take me
out of the room, but Madam would not let her. She
took my hands, and then lifted me on her knees, and
after soothing me a little, she said, oh, so sweetly (she
was such a sweet lady, my dears), ‘ Little Susie is not
contented or happy. Is she, dear?’

““*No, I said, with a sob, ‘I love her,’ and I
pointed to Lucy, who was standing by with a litle
sad face.

“T remember now, though it’s all these years
- since, seeing the tears start into Madam’s eyes, and
she said, ‘Well, I will tell you what you shall do.
You shall come to the Hall with Lucy, and stay with
her: for a while, and see how you like it. What do
you say to that? Will you come?’

“T felt rather frightened, but without waiting a
minute I said I would. I thought anything would be
better than parting with Lucy. Mother said it was.
too great an honour, and it would not do, but I could
see she was mighty pleased, and Madam would not
hear a word against it. We were then both sent out
of the room, and when we were called in again we
were told we were both to go to the Hall in the
morning. I was quite a different child after this, and
Miss Lucy was as pleased as I was. Still I could not



70 MAY’S GARDEN.

help feeling afraid of all the grand people at the Hall,
and I did not know whether I should behave properly,
and I had all sorts of fears. But then Miss Lucy felt
afraid too, for it was almost as bad for her as for me,
except that mother had always talked to her about
how she would have to behave, and what she would
have to do when Madam came back. The next
morning we both went to the Hall, and were received
by Madam only, for the Squire was not coming for
a few days. Madam was very kind, and kissed me,
and of course Miss Lucy was covered with kisses, but
I have chiefly got to tell you my own experience, so
that I put myself first. Madam took us up to the
schoolroom herself, where three little girls and one
boy were having their lessons. J daresay you would
like to know their names. Miss Amelia was the
eldest, she was thirteen ; then there was Miss Theresa,
eleven; Miss Margaret, ten; and Master George,
nine. They all rose when their mother entered, and
they kissed Miss Lucy very warmly when she told them
that she was their little sister. Then she explained
who I was, and that I had come to stay with Miss
Lucy, and she wished them to be kindtome. They
all looked rather strangely at me, but when Madam
told the young ladies to give mea kiss, they did so



THE HEART’S-EASE. 71

immediately. Then, to my great relief, we were taken
to the nursery, and I felt as if I could breathe again
when I was alone with my dear Miss Lucy. We both
felt very strange, and I think Miss Lucy was very
glad to have a companion, and I know she was
very glad to have me with her, for she loved me
very dearly. We had a private talk about the young
ladies, and we both agreed they were not very nice.
I quite disliked them, and so I was quite pleased that
Miss Lucy did not care for them. I got on pretty
well the first day, for we had our meals alone with the
nurse, and during the rest of the day we were a great
deal with Madam. But the next day we had our
dinner in the schoolroom with the young ladies, their
governess, and Master George. I saw them titter
round the table before we began, but soon there were
roars of laughter, when I was caught putting my knife
to my mouth. Poor Miss Lucy then came in for it, be-
cause she bit her bread. We both coloured,and felt very
much confused ; but Miss King, the governess, reproved
their rudeness, and then she told us we must not put our
knives to our mouths, and that we must break our bread.

“Now we knew we ought not to do either of these
things, for mother had been nurse with Madam, and
knew something about proper behaviour, and she had



72 MAY’S GARDEN.

told ug not to do these things; but then every day we
saw father do it, and even mother too, sometimes, so
we had got into the way of following their example.

“You see, my dears, people are always more
inclined to practise what you do, than what you say.
I remember I did not eat half enough at dinner, for
I felt so afraid of being laughed at again, and I often
saw four pairs of merry eyes watching for what would
come next. Then I made another slip in always call-
ing the governess ‘ Miss.’ I kept saying it at every
sentence, and they were so amused, and said Miss
King had never been so much ‘ missed’ in her life.”

“Didn’t you and Lucy go to school,” said Annie.

“T used to go sometimes, but Miss Lucy was too
delicate. The doctors said she wasn’t to get any
learning until she was stronger. Besides, we
shouldn’t have learnt much about manners at my
school. Miss Lucy would have had to go right away
from mother, both for fine manners and good learn-
ing, but Madam thought most about her health.

« But though they made such fun, I don’t want you
to think they were quite unkind, my dears. No, ina
grand patronizing sort of way they were often good to
me; but, of course, it was not the place for such as

me, and child as I was, I began to find it out more and



THE HEART’S-EASE. 73

more. Madam’s orders were that I was to be treated as
Miss Lucy’s companion and friend, but the servants and
everybody knew I was only the gamekeeper’s daughter,
and they made me feel it, just as people in this world,
my dears, know well enough how to make anybody
uncomfortable. The Squire did not come home until
I had been there a few days ; but the day he returned,
orders were sent up that we were all to go down and
see him, and have some dessert.

“Of course, Susan will not go down,’ said Miss
Amelia, haughtily; ‘ papa does not care to see her.’

«Yes, migs,’ said the nurse, ‘ the orders are that
she is to go down with you.’

“ ¢ Really, it’s very strange that mamma can allow
that child to be with us,’ said Miss Amelia.

“T heard all this, and I determined not to go
down; but nurse would not hear of it; I was taken
down and sent in with the rest, and oh, how awkward
I felt! When the Squire had kissed them all, he
turned to me, and said in his jolly sort of way—

«« Well, Susie, how do you like playing the lady ?
Come here, my lassie, let’s have a look at ye?’

“©¢ No, don’t trouble her,’ said Madam kindly, ‘ she
is very shy. Go and sit by Lucy,’ she said, turning
such genile eyes upon me and smiling sweetly.



74, MAY’S GARDEN.

“Twas nearly crying with vexation and wounded
pride, but Madam’s kindness comforted me, and Mist
Lucy was so good, putting her hand into mine, as she
had been used to do at the cottage. There were
many good things for dessert, but I was so afraid of
making a mistake, and not eating them properly, that
I wisely took only a piece of cake, and that I managed to
get through without being laughed at, although to this
day, I remember the great temptation I had to pick
out the currants, as I did at home.

«Then another day, they had some friends come
_ to see them; and there was a little girl about Miss
Lucy’s age, who took a great fancy to her, and wanted
to be her friend. She was a pretty, taking child,
and Miss Lucy was greatly taken with her; and
although I know she did not wish to make me un-
happy, she did wish to play with her new friend. So
she brought me one of her new toys to comfort me; and
then she went to play in another part of the room, ag
this child wanted to see her doll’s house. She soon
came back to me, and wanted me to come and play
with them, but I was too jealous and angry to think
of it. She coaxed and pleaded with me to come, and
at last I went, but the game did not go off very well,
and we all felt uncomfortable, and did not at all mind



THE HEART’S-EASE. 75

when we were called to have our bread and milk,
which we knew meant bed, for which we began to
prepare as soon as the meal was over.

Miss Lucy got on much better than I did,
although she really did not know much more;
she was naturally a quick child, and she seemed to
guess what it was right to do. She did not suffer
from awkwardness in the way I did, and then she had
so much love shown her, and her sisters gave her
every help, often telling her privately what to do, but
taking good care not to let me hear them.

‘But the great trouble, which made me feel how
thoroughly I was out of place, was this: Madam had
invited many of the neighbouring gentry’s children
to a party, and I had a pretty frock made by nurse
for it. Iwas very proud and vain of my finery, and
I showed it. I gave myself such airs, shook myself _
about, and pretended to be so very grand, that the
young ladies got quite angry; and when some of
their friends asked who I was, they said I was only
a vulgar child, whom their mother had asked to stay ;
but Master George went further still, and, without
any more ado, said, ‘She’s only our gamekeeper’s
lass; she’s got to look after Lucy, that’s all. I heard

nurse say so.’





76 MAY’S GARDEN.

“You may think, my dears, how they all stared ;
and when they did begin to play again, not one of
them would have anything to do with me; even Miss
Lucy seemed shy, and did not come to me in the
sweet way she used to do. I felt very wretched, and,
after trying to appear as if I did not care for a little
while, I slipped out of the room, and down the stairs,
and out of the door towards mother’s cottage, for
there I felt I should be welcome, and I longed to
cry out all my troubles in her arms.

“Mother looked quite frightened when she saw
me in my fine frock running in with angry tears
streaming down my face. She was busy, but she
quickly wiped her hands and took me on her lap,
while she tried to get out of me what my trouble was.

“¢ Oh, mother, mother,’ I said, ‘I hate ’em all, I
do; yes, and Lucy too. I’ll never go again—no, never,
mother! they’re so proud and unkind;’ and I went
on sobbing, and here and there telling mother how it
was I had run away.

“ Father came in while mother was soothing me.

« « Well, what’s up now?’ he said, when he saw
me. ‘She be fine, to be sure! Well, Betsy, what’s
the upshot on’t ?”

““¢Qh, she’s run away,’ said mother, with hot



THE HEART’S-EASE. 77

cheeks; ‘they’ve been unkind, and she’s come home.
I’m glad on’t; I'll not have her set upon. I can’t
think how it is. I’m sure Madam don’t know.’

“Then she told father what I had told her; and
he was angry, too, and said he should speak to the
Squire, for he knew he would not like it.

“‘ However, Madam sent for mother up to the
Hall, and told her the truth ; but she said she had
feared, from the first day, that her plan to break the
separation to me had not been a good one. Still,
she went on to say, it had perhaps effected her pur-
pose to some extent, although she was very grieved
that it had been done in such a manner. She told
mother that she had taken pains to have me treated
well, but she could not help other people showing
their dislike to what she had done, and then my own
conduct had led to the last unkindness. Mother quite
agreed that it was best that I should keep at home
with her; only she pleaded thet we might see Miss
Lucy sometimes at our cottage, and she hoped that
Madam would still hononr us with her friendship and
favour.

“The dear lady never thought of withdrawing it.
She said she wished us always to feel as sisters, and

to be as sisters as much as our different positions





78 MAY’S GARDEN.

would allow; and she said she should never forget
mother’s kindness to Miss Lucy (no more she ever
did) ; and she finished up with saying she should call
to see me, and bring Miss Lucy with her.

“ Mother came home, looking .quite pleased and
happy. She did not chide me then for not telling
her that my own conduct had brought on the worst
unkindness. She merely told me that Madam was
very nice about me, and that she was coming to
see me, and going to bring Miss Lucy with her.
I didn’t feel as if I wanted to see Miss Lucy. I felt
as if I quite disliked everybody at the Hall. I only
wanted to sit close by mother, and feel that I had
one true friend in the world. Mother did not mind
that I should want to be with her. She teased me
about being mammy-sick all of a sudden, but she
dearly loved it, I know. As for myself, I felt as if
home was beautiful after the coldness and ridicule
which I had endured at the Hall.

“The next day Madam arrived with Miss Lucy.
Mother took me into the room with her; and when
Miss Lucy saw me, she came shyly forward and
kissed me. Her first kiss was very timid, but all of a
sudden she flung her arms round my neck, and said,
‘I do love you, Susie, very much, and I’m so sorry I



THE HEART’S-EASE. 79

was not very kind the day you ran away.’ I was
quite taken with her again, and returned her kisses
warmly. Then Madam told us to run away and play,
for she should leave Miss Lucy for the rest of the
day, and come for her in the evening. So we scam-
pered off to the fields and woods, and forgot our
troubles, and were just two happy butterflies again.
It’s curious how well I remember those days, my
dears, and many and many a thing that’s happened
later on I’ve quite clean forgot. Well, we had a
happy, merry day, and in the evening Madam came
to fetch Miss Lucy home. She said she wanted to
speak to me first, so I had to go in all alone to see
her. I felt so frightened, for I thought she was
going to scold me; but I soon found out I was mis-
taken, for she had such a sweet smile on her face, and
she held out her hand and took me to her, and gave
me a kiss. Then I saw she had some heart’s-ease
and violets in her hand, and she said to me—

«* Do you remember, Susie, that you had a wreath
of violets and heart’s-ease on when I first came, and
that your mother had told you, if you wanted to he
like your wreath, you must have a contented mind
and a humble heart ??

« Yes, ma’am,’ I said, feeling very guilty.



80 MAY’S GARDEN.

«“¢Well? she said, ‘you can understand now
that you are more happy here with your mother
than anywhere else; and you will not lose your
friend, for Miss Lucy will come to see you, and
I think she will always remember her foster-
sister, so that you must not fear that she will forget
you. Now, I say all this because I want you to feel
that God knows best, and it is his will that you are
Susie Smith, and not Lucy’s very own sister; and
I want you to pray that you may have a contented
mind and a new and humble heart, so that you may
be like the Lord Jesus Christ, who loved you and
bought you. Then when you wear a wreath of these
pretty flowers, you may hope that you are like them.’

. Then she went on to say that she hoped I should
bloom a beautiful flower one day in God’s own
garden; and though I did not quite understand her
then, mother explained it all to me afterwards; and
I often used to think of what she had said, and pray
that I might be like the heart’s-ease and violets, and
that I might be one of God’s own flowers. This was
how it was, my dears, that your heart’s-ease reminded
me of what had happened so many years ago, and I
have told you this long story as well as I remember it.
Though I daresay I have not told it to you just as it



THE HEART’S-EASE, 81

should be, still it’s pretty near; for, as I said before,
it’s curious how well I remember those times when I
was a child, long ago.”

“* But do tell us how you parted from Miss Lucy,”
said May, “and what became of her.”

“Oh, we parted very good friends, and she
often used to come and see me. I never went to
the Hall again, except for an hour or so—I had
had enough of that—not, at least, until Miss Lucy
was grown up; then she married, and she wanted
me to be her maid, so I went to pack up for her,
and then we went to foreign parts, and we were
travelling up and down, until Miss Lucy—I mean
Lady Hamlyn, as she was then—until she died.
But you must not ask me any more, my dears. I
cannot talk of that, except just to tell you she died
very happy, and I hope my time is not far off, but
Tm willing to wait the Lord’s time, for He knows
best.”

The children sat quite still for a minute, looking at
Mrs. Morris, and then Annie said, “I can’t fancy you
a little girl, Mrs. Morris; you look as if you had
always sat in that chair; it seems so funny to think
you could run about.”

“JT daresay it does, my dear,” said Mrs. Morris,
6



82 MAY’S GARDEN.

laughing, “but I did, I can assure you, and quite as
quick as you do, I can tell you.”

“Yes, I’m sure you would not tell a story,” said
Annie.

«We are very much obliged to you, Mrs. Morris,”
said May. “It has been a very pretty tale ; perhaps
you will tell us another, next time we come.”

«* Well, I shall see, my dear, whether I can think
of one. You see, I shall get used up, as I told you
before, and then I shall have nothing to say.”

“Oh yes, you will! What shall we do with the
peas, please ?”

“You can put them on the shelf, and if you look
in that blue basin, you will see some apples; you can
each have two, and then I think you must go home,
or mamma will be afraid you are lost.”



CHAPTER V.

THE BLUE-BELLS.

Mrs. Aston called the children to her one day, and
said that she was going up to London for a fortnight,
and so she had asked nurse to come and stay with
them while she was away. She said she hoped they
would be very good and obedient, and as they would
not have any lessons, she wished them to be out in the
open air as much as possible.

“Oh, that is nice!” said Annie, giving a few
jumps; “not that you are going away, mamma dear,
but that we shall have no lessons, and that we are to
be out in the air. Isn’t it beautiful, May? ”

“Y-e-s,” said May, “I shall like the holiday, but
do you think you will come back safely, mamma?”

“T hope so, my child. At all events, I shall be
quite as safe as if I were at home.”

“ Yes, mamma, but it does not seem as safe to be

going in the train as it is to be at home.”



*
84 MAY’S GARDEN.

“My May must learn to trust,” said Mrs. Aston,
kissing her. ‘Don’t you remember the verse you
learnt the other night, ‘ He shall not suffer thy foot to
be moved; He that keepeth thee will not slumber?’ ”

“Yes, mamma, I will trust you away, and I shall
be very pleased to have nurse here. I felt afraid,
because of that railway accident papa was talking
about.”

Mrs. Aston left the day after this conversation,
and nurse came.

There was a great talk as to what was to be done
while mamma was away; various plans were thought
of. May’s garden, of course, was to be put into the
most perfect order; so she called the little gardener,
who was playing in an undignified way with the
kitten, and suggested that the weeds should be taken
up and the whole garden neatly raked.

Annie immediately undertook the work, while May
looked to see what flowers she could spare for giving
away.

Nurse came up while the children were busy, and
when she found that May was counting her treasures,
she told her of a poor child in the town, who, she
thought, would be very glad to be visited and to have

some flowers.



THE BLUE-BELLS. 85

“Oh yes, I shall like to take her some,” said
May. “In what street does she live? and what is the
matter with her? ”

“She lives in Friar Street, and has such a poor
home. She has a spinal complaint, and is always
obliged to lie down, but she is so sweet and patient,
and so industrious when she is feeling a little better.”

“ Poor thing!” said Annie, who had stopped to
listen. ‘Hag she a mother, and father, and brothers,
and sisters, nursey ? ”

“No, darling, not so many relations as that. She
has a widowed mother, and a little brother called
Bill, that is all. She is so fond of her mother, and
so kind to her little brother, and he is such a tiresome
ehild, too.”

“Oh, it would be nice to go and see her, wouldn’t
it, Annie? When shall we go, nurse?”

“ You had better wait for a few days, for she was
very poorly when I saw her last, and it takes a little
while for the attacks to wear off.”

“‘ Suppose we go on Friday,” said May.

“Very well, I will take you, and then I shall leave
you to stay and talk to her while I go and do some
shopping. Now I should like to see what you will
take her.”





86 MAY’S GARDEN.

“There is a tiny rosebud on that tree,” said May,
“but it is only a monthly rose; then there is still
some red thorn left.”

“Oh, you must not take that, dear,’’ said nurse,
“it would give too strong a scent. What else have
you? Oh, this is very ye ! Why, it is a blue-bell,
that would be very nice.’

“Yes,” said May, “and I see a few other things
that will be out by Friday, so with some pretty green,
it would look nice. We shall soon have our standard
roses out, and the geraniums too, and then the garden
will look pretty. Won’t it, nurse?”

“Yes, it will indeed.”

When Friday came, the children made up a pretty
nosegay, chiefly of blue-bells, monthly roses, and
pretty pieces of green, and they started with nurse for
the street in which the sick child lived.

“ Wasn’t it a good thing we kept our blue-bells,
nursey?” said Annie. “I am so glad we did not
throw them away, or May could not have made such a
pretty nosegay.”

“Tt was avery good thing you keptit, dear ; yousee
‘no waste, no want,’ is true of flowers as well as food.”

«It’s nicer about flowers than food,” said Annie,
“because I don’t like eating up my fat, nor my crusts



THE BLUE-BELLS. 87

when the jam is all gone; and flowers haven’t to be
eaten up—you just water them and they keep all right
until they die.”

They were not long in reaching Friar Street, and
then the children felt rather shy when they really came
to the house.

Mrs. Martin, the mother of the sick child, only
rented two rooms, and into the first nurse took the
children.

“ve brought the young ladies to see Naomi,”
said nurse, “and they’ve brought her some flowers, for
I told them how fond she was of them.”

“Tm very much obliged, ’m sure. Sit down,
please. Ill go and tell her you’ve come; she’s been
a-looking out every day since you said you’d tell the
young ladies about her.”

“Oh, nurse, what shall we say?” said May, getting
alarmed. “I can’t think of anything.”

“Oh, don’t trouble about that, missy, say you’ve
brought her some flowers, and that you’re very sorry
she’s ill.”

«And what am I to say, nursey?” said Annie.
“ Please tell me something too.”

«You can say the same, and you can tell her about
your rabbits.”



88 MAY’S GARDEN.

“Oh yes, so I can,” said Annie, brightening up;
and then Mrs. Martin came in and said that Naomi
was quite ready for the young ladies. Nurse took
them in; but as the room was darkened they could
not see well at first; then, as they looked more closely,
they saw a very pale, thin girl, lying on her back on a
small wooden bedstead. May went up to her, and
gave her the flowers, saying she was very sorry she
was so ill; then Annie said the same; and after nurse
had spoken, she thought they would get on better
alone, so she left them.

‘Naomi lay quite still for a few minutes looking at
the flowers, turning them round and round and smell-
ing them ; then she said—

**T do like flowers. Would you put them in water
for me, miss? I be so much obliged to you for them.”

May asked what she should put them in. And
Naomi pointed to an old mug, which May filled half
full of water, and then put in the flowers.

“Please, both on you, sit down,” said Naomi, “if
you don’t mind staying a bit.”

“Oh no,” said May, “we’ve come to stay while
nurse does her shopping.”

“ That’s kind,” said Naomi. “ Might I ask how
old the little ’un is ?”’



THE BLUE-BELLS. 89

Annie nearly burst out laughing, but May managed
to get out that she was seven years old.

“Thank ye, and how old be you? ”

“Tam nine,” said May. ‘“ How old are you?”

“Kleven, miss ; I was just as old as you are when
I fell down stairs and hurt myself so bad, and I’ve lain
here ever since.”

« How tired you must be,” said May.

«Well, I gets very tired sometimes when I am
much by myself. Sometimes mother goes out charing,
and then she just gets a neighbour to come in now and
agen, and it do seem a long time, and lonely like;
but ’m that fond of flowers that when I get them,
they seem to make a bit of company.”

“Tm so glad we brought you some,” said May.
“We will bring you some more. We shall be having
some beautiful roses out soon ; but my garden has not
a great many flowers in it, and so I could not gather
you very nice ones to-day.”

“Oh, these be beautiful !’’ said Naomi. ‘Then the
garden isn’t little missy’s too? ”

No,” said Annie, “itis May’s garden, and I am
her gardener. I keep rabbits instead; I have such
beauties.”

“ Have you, miss? I had a rabbit when I was



90 MAY’S GARDEN.

well, but after I was took ill, mother said she hadn’t
time to see to it, so she sold it, and bought me that
there little book with the money. It’s such a pretty
tale, I read it over and over.”

“Do you like reading?” said May.

“That I do; I should be dull if it wasn’t for read-
ing when I’m a bit better. I used to have such a nice
teacher to come and see me, but she’s left, and now
V’ve no one. I used to go to the Sunday-school one
time, and it was just after the treat that I fell and
hurt myself. It was the only whole day I was ever in
the country, and it was nice. I could almost cry when
I look at them blue-bells, for I got such a lot of them
that day!”

“ Where did you go for the treat?” said May.

“We went to the fields near Bexley Woods. Bill
and I both went, and my friend, Betsy Green, from
t’other side of the street. We went in great vans, and
a teacher went in each van with the scholars. My
teacher sat next me, and told me such a pretty tale
when the others didn’t make too much noise.”

Mrs. Martin came in just as Naomi finished this
sentence, to say that nurse had come back again, as
she was afraid there was a storm coming on, and she

wanted the young ladies to get home. At first Naomi



THE BLUE-BELLS. 91

looked so disappointed, that May said she would ask
nurse to let them come on Monday to see her again,
and then they would bring some more flowers, par-
ticularly blue-bells.

Naomi quite brightened up at this and said, “It
would be nice if it wasn’t troubling.”

“Oh no,” said May, “we shall like it.”

Annie asked if she might bring one of her baby
rabbits ?

“ Just hear her!” said Mrs. Martin, laughing ;
“ o? course you may if you'll take it home again, but
my poor lass ain’t well enough to look after it.”

Annie said she would take it back, and then after
saying “ Good-bye,” the children went, and Naomi
was left alone.

Oh, who can tell the longing, yearning desire that
came over the poor girl for green fields and country
life! She had just spent one whole day in the country
two years ago, and she had never forgotten it. It had
been to her a heavenly pleasure ; the beautiful flowers,
the birds, the trees, and streams, had quite entranced
her, and now she seemed cut off from all these
delights.

The tears came into her eyes and dropped quietly
down, and then there came into her mind a text her



Full Text

The Baldwin Library

Rm Bux





cs
MAY’S GARDEN,

AND WHERE THE FLOWERS WENT.

WITH EIGHT ILLUSTRATIONS.

NEW YORK:
D. APPLETON AND CO., BROADWAY.
1873.
II.

Ill.

IV.

VI.

VII.

VIII.

CONTENTS.

PAGE
THE CROOUS. uo cececccee ence centre eee eee eee nee ne erie nn enn nes 1
THE FURZE ooo cee teen nee nee ener eee 23
THE RED QUA ORING ioe. coh ee stan tate eorusceess psasens 43
THE HEHART’S-EASE 0.0 ccc eee nes 59
THE BLUE-BELLS 00.0. ctee eee erence ee 83
TVET ROSH oe. edness csc vee vas cetenns cocnte teteecetinaasmstloncieeieta 107
HOR) = Gs BAINUIM ES, oo foes ccc cess oes concen samt cnensmeresetieas 141
DEER OARINADTON: = cece Sites ccsciaseutiecnmtsseesmeccaeetsst 169
MAY’S GARDEN.

CHAPTER I.
THE CROCUS.

“T vainx that piece, from the wall along to this rose
tree, would be the best to have, May.”

“ No, ’m sure mamma would not like me to have
that, but this large bed would be just the thing ; and,
oh, Annie, perhaps mamma would give me the pink
may tree as well, for it is just at the corner.”

“Well, you are greedy; as if mamma would
indeed! Why she wouldn’t have a bit of pink may
for herself.”

“Oh yes, she would, of course. I should give her
some as often as she wanted it; there would be plenty

for everybody.”
1
2 MAY’S GARDEN.

“Would there? Iknow what it would be. You
would want to see what the tree looked like when it
was all in bloom, and then, when the may was begin-
ning to fade, you would give us each a little tiny bit,
and expect us to be so much obliged to you.”

“Annie, how unkind you are! I’m sure I often
give you things, and then you say that I just dole
bits out.”

“Oh yes, dear, you’re very kind, really I mean it ;
but last year, you would not let me have one Guelder
rose, until you had seen how they looked all out at
once, and then my rose was getting faded when I did
get it at last.”

“Yes, but I shouldn’t do it again; besides, the
may tree is so big. Fancy keeping that till it was all
out |”

“T think you’d better have this piece! Why you’d
get a piece of wall.”

“A piece of wall. Really, Annie, I’m not so fond
of ‘wall’ as all that. What good would ‘wall’ do,
all covered over with ivy. I couldn’t grow anything
upon it.”

“Oh dear me, what an old fidget you are,” said
Annie, laughing, “I can’t please you. Ask for that
piece ne” “2 rabbits then, and I shall be able to
THE CROCUS. 3

cheer you up when I am feeding the pretties, and you
are standing wishing the weeds would pull themselves
up.”

Oh, I couldn’t have that piece! I should have
all my flowers eaten up by your tiresome pretties, I
know, in no time. No, I likethe bit near the may-tree
best. Just think, Annie, of all the things I should get
in free if I had that, and in those other pieces I should
have to buy nearly everything.”

«Yes, I wasn’t thinking of that.”

« You'd have thought of it though, if you were go-
ing to buy the flowers.”

“Oh yes, of course I should; and I can tell you,
I’m oppressed with a tremendous weight of care, for
I’m afraid my pretties will eat up all their food before
papa gives me my next week’s money. What shall I
do? oh what shall I do? I wish I could squeeze
out some tears.”

‘Oh, nonsense! Do let us go in and ask mamma
for my new piece, or all my courage will go.”

“Very well, but mind you tell mamma that ’m
going to be your gardener.”

‘“ Of course, dear, that will be half the fun? Will
it be ‘yes’ or ‘no;’ guess.”

293

““T’ll guess ‘yes.
A : MAY'S GARDEN.

“Then I'll guess ‘no,’ and then perhaps it will be
€ yes.’ 3?

“Mamma,” said May, “ might I have a new
garden? I don’t like my old one; it won't grow
things properly, and I want to have a lot of flowers.”

“Yes, you may have another piece if you will take
care of it, but you know you told me weeding made
your back ache.”

“Yes, it does, but Annie will be my gardener, and
she will take up the weeds and rake, and you said
before that Smith might dig for me.”

«Then how will it be your garden, dear, if Annie
and Smith do all the work ?”

“Oh, because I am going to buy all the flowers ;
Annie wants her pocket-money for her rabbits, all but
what she gives away. She is not going to buy any-
thing for the new garden.”

“T sce; very well, you can have a fresh piece. I
suppose you want me to come and choose it now ?”

“Yes, please; I’ve been thinking of what I should
like.”

“Well, what is it?”

“That large bed, with—please, mamma, don’t say
no—with the pink may at the corner!”

“Oh,” laughed Mrs. Aston, “I see there has been
THE CROCUS. oO

_a regular plot about it. Well, you may have the bed,
but as for the may, I must think about that. I shall
often want some of it myself.”

“Oh yes, mamma, of course you must have it
whenever you want it. I only want to be able to call
it mine.”

“ And suppose I give it to you, what are you
going to do with it, and with all your flowers ?”

“T shall make nosegays for you, mamma, and for
ourselves, and nurse. Then I shall be able to give
papa a rosebud for his button-hole sometimes, when I
have a nice one.”

“Yes, dear, you can do all this occasionally, but I
have a little plan which I think would be very nice for
you. Suppose you take flowers to some poor people
sometimes? You see, the townspeople haven’t got
gardens—at least, only a few of them ; and they would
value a little present of flowers, and as I want you to
take an interest in the poor about you, it would be a
nice way of beginning.”

“Yes, it would, I should like that. Then may I
have the may tree, mamma ?”

“ Yes, on condition’that papa and I have what we
want. Then you might give little bouquets of flowers
to your friends sometimes. You see, you will have a
6 MAY’S GARDEN.

good many already planted. Let me see, there are
four rose bushes, the furze bush—that will. soon look
glorious—the blue-bells—why, how did they come
into this bed ? ”

“T asked Smith to put them here in the autumn,
out of my old garden, because I’m so fond of them,
and I meant to ask you for this bed.”

“You sly-boots! Suppose I hadn’t given it to
you?”

“Then I should have got Smith to move them
next autumn to my garden; but I thought you would
give it to me, mamma.”

«Well, I should advise you in future to make sure
of a gift before you use it.”

“Yes, I will next time. Smith didn’t like moving
the blue-bells, he called them rubbish; wasn’t it
rude, mamma ? ”

«There was no need to say it certainly, but it was
a gardener’s idea, I suppose. You see, he had not
your happy associations with them. If he had had a
splendid day in the woods, with tea made in a kettle
and boiled under three sticks, and no end of jam and
bread, he might have managed to get up a particular
affection for blue-bells, especially if the root had been
presented by a very dear friend.”
THE CROCUS. 7

“Oh, mamma,” laughed Annie, “ how funny you
are! and fancy calling Archie Campbell May’s dear
friend.”

‘‘ Well, I think he is. Isn’t he, May?”

“Oh, I like him, and so do you, mamma. You
said he was a very nice boy.”

“So he is; and now I think it would be a good
plan for you both to go and have tea with nurse.
You have not been lately, and a little walk will do you
good.”

The two children were soon on their way to see
their old nurse, who lived by herself in a pretty little
cottage, with a small garden, about half a mile from
the town. She was only forty years of age, but she
had fallen and hurt her back when Annie was three
years old, so that she was quite unable to keep her
place.

Mr. Aston had been very kind to her, and allowed
her to live in this cottage rent free; he also gave her
five shillings a week. Tis, with what she earned by
lace-work, when she was feeling better between the
attacks, enabled her to live comfortably. Mrs. Aston
was also very kind, often sending her little delicacies,
and keeping her well supplied with clothes. She was
very grateful for all this kindness, and she repaid it
8 MAY’S GARDEN.

with the utmost devotion. She was very fond of the
children, particularly of Annie, whom she had nursed
from a baby, and they fully returned her affection,
and had a great respect for her, for she was a truly
Christian woman.

To have tea with nurse was a great treat, only
there was a little fear whether she would be well
enough to have them.

“We are come to have tea if you can have us,
nurse,” said May.

“Oh_yes, missy, I’m right glad to see you both.”

“* Let us have coffee, please,” said Annie, “tea is
so nasty.”

“ Hear the child! You won’t think it nasty when
you’re my age, my dear, but you shall have your way.”

“We have a great piece of news for you, nurse.
Mamma has given me a new garden, with the pink
may tree as well, and Annie is going to be my
gardener.”

“Dearie me! I’ve not heard such a piece of news
for some time. I wonder how the garden will be
kept?”

“Tn the most perfect order,”

said Annie; ‘I saw
you laugh, nursey.”
“Annie does pull up weeds beautifully, quite by
THE CROCUS. 9

the roots; and you know how well she raked last
year.”

“Yes, she is a remarkably clever little woman
when she takes pains ; and you are going to try, eh?”

“Of course, Jam. You're not kind, nursey, to
tease me.”

“You will try your best then, and I shall not
tease. But talking of your garden reminds me of the
pot of crocus bulbs you gave to little Tom Evans last
November. Do you remember, missy?”

“Yes, how is he, nurse?”

“He’s dead and buried, poor lamb! He died
before the crocus came up. You know he said he
should watch for them coming, and the leaves began
to come, and then he died. He bloomed himself in
paradise before they bloomed on earth.”

“Oh! I’m so sorry he’s dead,” said May. “TI did
so hope he’d get better. Did the crocuses come up?”

“Yes, his mother showed them to me, looking
so bright and beautiful. Now, I think it would be
nice for you both to go and see her after tea, on your
way home. She’d be that pleased, and it might com-
fort her a bit.”

“T’m afraid she’d cry all the time,” said Annie,
“and we shouldn’t know what to say.”
10 MAY’S GARDEN.

“Oh yes, we shall,” said May, ‘“‘we can tell her
how sorry we are for her.”

“Why, nurse, little Tom was as well as I am last
year at this time. I remember him running about and
playing. He was so funny.”

“ Yes, and it was all through that wicked lad, Joe
Jenkins, that he got so hurt.”

“Do tell us about it,” said Annie, “ how did it
happen? We weren’t told about that.”

«His mother never told anybody before him;
he did not like to think of it; he wanted to for-
give and forget; but it was in this way :— He
was coming home from school with several boys, and
two of them began to fight, and one of the boys
was much stronger than the other, and got him
down, and was stamping upon him, and treating
him in a shocking way. Little Tom could not bear
this, and he called on the other boys to stop it;
but they were afraid of this great fellow, and they
wouldn’t try. Then Tom ran up to try and help the
boy who was down. Well, he was a strong little
fellow, and he did manage to help him; but the
other one was so angry, that he turned upon
Tom, and gave him a dreadful blow on his back,

which sent him flying against some large stones,
THE CROCUS. 11

and his head was so hurt that he was never well
again.”

“Oh, what a wicked boy!” said May. ‘ Was
he put in prison ?”

“No; he ran away to sea, and he has not been
heard of since.’

““T hope he was drowned then, I do,” said Annie,
with scarlet cheeks and angry eyes.

“Oh, you must not say that, dear. Think how
dreadful it would have been if he had died in his
sins.”

“Yes, nurse; but he ought to have been
punished.”

«Yes, he ought, and he has been. He ran away
from home, as I told you, but it was not because he
wanted to go, but because he was frightened when
he knew how dreadfully little Tom was hurt; and if
he is alive, he must have had a wretched life.”

‘Nurse, was little Tom a good boy before he
was ill ?””

“Yes, missy, that was why he was so angry
_ about the fighting. He would never fight, except to
help another boy who was getting the worst of it.
He loved the Lord Jesus when he was well and
strong, and he had been trying to follow Him since
12 MAY'S GARDEN.

he was four years old. So just think! for five years
before he died he had been a little soldier of the cross.”

“Five years, nurse! Oh, there is his mother
standing at the door.”

“How do you do, Mrs. Bretherton ?” said nurse.
“T’ye brought my young ladies to see you.”

“I’m very glad, indeed. Come in and sit down.
I’ve just been out for some bits of green for my old
man’s tea.”

“Oh, I’m afraid we’ve come at an awkward
time.”

““No; he won’t be home till eight. He’s work-
ing at Squire Clifton’s, and it takes him an hour to
get home; and he is doing a bit of overtime as well.”

“Well, the young ladies must be home by six, so
we shall not delay you.”

“ Oh dear, no; come into the front kitchen. Ill
just put these in water to keep fresh till I can wash
’em. Well, ’m right glad to see you all. Tve not
forgotten it was these ’ere two young ladies who
brought my poor boy his pot of crocuses. Eh, how
he did watch and watch ’em, poor dear! and when
the leaves got up a bit, he waited and waited for the
flowers; but the weather was so cold, they didn’t
come up. At last he says to me, ‘ Mother, I shall be

THE CROCUS, 13

in heaven when them crocuses are a-flowering; and
when you sees em, mother, just think of me a bright
angel, bonnier than them flowers will be. They’ll
fade and die, mother, but I shall live for ever.’ Yes,
and it’s that keeps me up when I gets down-hearted,
and I feel asif I couldn’t look up. I sees them bright
things, and I thinks he’ll never fade, and he’s bonnier
_ and brighter than them. He’ll live for ever.”

The tears stood in the poor mother’s eyes, but
she kept quite calm, only though she seemed to be
looking at the crocuses, her eyes had a far-off look, as
if she were gazing beyond them.

The children thought they had never seen any
flowers so bright, for they were just fully out and the
sun was shining upon them.

“TJ shall always keep them flowers,” said the
mother rousing herself, “all but one. Vlllet you have
one, missy, if you like.”

May turned a pair of longing eyes to nurse, she did
not know whether she ought to ask for it.

Nurse said, ‘“‘ Well, if you can really spare one,
Mrs. Bretherton, missy would like one to plant in her
new garden next year. She is going to have a new
garden, and I know she would like to have one of
little Tom’s flowers.”
14 MAY’S GARDEN.

“ Oh yes, I should indeed,” said May. “Am I to
have it now then,” she whispered to nurse.

“No, my dear, I can’t spare it now. I must keep
them all for the present,” said Mrs. Bretherton, over-
hearing May’s request.

So it was settled that May was to have the bulb
before winter. Then they all took their departure,
leaving Mrs. Bretherton much happier for their visit.

“I should like to be as good as little Tom,
nurse,” said Annie, when they were out of sight of the
cottage.

“My pet must pray to the Lord Jesus to make her
good,” said nurse. ‘ Why, little Tom did that, dear,
he was not good of himself. He prayed for a new,
clean heart, and then when God had given him one, he
strove to live like a little soldier, and he died so
happily.”

“Tsn’t it nice to think he’s brighter than the
crocuses?” said May. ‘I shall always think of little
Tom when I see one. Won’t you, Annie?”

«Yes, I think I shall.”

The next day there was a great piece of news, for
Mrs. Aston told the children that their aunts and

cousins were coming.
THE CROCUS. 15

“ Oh, how delightful, mamma!” said Annie, as she
jumped about the room with delight. “Oh, May,
won't it be fun? Fancy, three cousins! quite new
. ones too, that we’ve hardly heard of.”

“Yes, two boys and a girl,” said Mrs. Aston.
“Let me see, Kitty will be your age, May, or perhaps
a little older.”

“Ts she ten, mamma?” said May. “ Oh, I wish she
wasn’t ten, because she’ll be grander than me.”

“My dear May, what nonsense! There is no-
thing grand in Kitty being a few months older than
you are.”

May could not help thinking ten was grand.

“How old are the boys, mamma? I hope they
are little ; I don’t like big boys.”

“The eldest is twelve, and the youngest seven.”

“Then the little boy will be just as old as I am,”
said Annie. “I’m glad some one will be little as well
as me!”

« How is it we’ve not seen them before, mamma? ”
said May.

“ Because they have lived in Canada, and as your
aunt is a Canadian, I have never seen her; but she is”
very sad, for she has never got over your uncle’s death,

some years ago now, so you must try to show her that,
16 MAY’S GARDEN.

although you are only little girls, you know how to
show sympathy.”

“Yes, we will try, mamma,” said May.

* What are the boys’ names, mamma?” said Annie.

“ Frank and Herbert.”

“ How funny it will be to have boys to play with,”
said May. “TI shall feel so shy.”

A day or two afterwards, the aunt and cousins
arrived, and when the front door bell rang, Mrs.
Aston called to the children to come and mect them 3
but they were much too shy, and dared not venture
downstairs until Mrs. Aston called them again; and
then they came slowly down, looking asif they thought
they were going to mect some wild beasts.

Their aunt and Kitty returned their timid kisses very
warmly ; but Frank was not going to kiss girls, nor be
kissed by them, so he held out his hand as far as
he could, and would not allow them to get near him.
They shrank away looking hot and shy, and left their
mother to show their cousins to their rooms.

“Oh, May! isn’t he proud?” said Annie, as soon
as they were gone.

“T shan’t like him, I know, and what a big boy
he is! I wish he hadn’t come.”

“‘So do I,” said May. “But I like the look of
THE CROCUS. ae

Kitty, only I’m rather frightened, she looked so tall.
How tall they all are! Why, Herbert is taller than
me, and he is only seven.”

“Oh dear! how stiff it will be,” said Annie.
“We shall have no more happiness till they’re all
gone.”

But after tea it was found that there was some
happiness left in the world, for Herbert asked Annie
if she had a rocking-horse, and when he found she
had one, he proposed that they should have a ride
together. This pleased Annie wonderfully, although
she had secret fears about keeping on with such a
partner. Then May shyly made advances to Kitty,
which she received with favour, so that the misery and
unhappiness of cousins seemed vanishing into thin air.

After the cousins had stayed a few days, Mrs.
Aston proposed that, as it was unusually warm for the
time of year, they should venture on a picnic to Bexley
Common.

Now the very mention of Bexley Common almost
drove May and Annie wild with excitement, for the
delights of that lovely part of the country were such
as to bring the most happy remembrances to both
children. Their joy made Kitty and Herbert almost

as full of excitement as they were; only Frank stood
2
18 MAY’S GARDEN,

aloof, as if he thought himself quite above picnics of
every kind.

It was arranged that they were to have the large
waggonette, which would carry them, and the hampers
as well. Nurse was to go with them, and they were all
to be allowed to help with dinner and tea, as this was
a great part of the fun. Frank looked very gloomy,
until a bright idea struck him.

“Ts there a pond on the common?” he asked
May.

«Yes, there is,”’ said May, hoping to please him,
‘with such a lot of fish in it.”

“That’s all right,” said Frank, as if he thought
there was no doubt he would catch plenty.

« Are there donkeys?” asked Herbert. ‘‘'They
are so jolly.”

‘No, there are some ponies,” said Annie, ‘ but
mamma won’t let us ride upon them. ‘They have no
saddles or bridles, and they are not tame.”

“Tame!” said Frank, scornfully, “you might be
talking of tigers; I mean to try them whether they
are tame or not.”

«But mamma would not let us,” said Annie.

«Oh, never mind mamma,” said Frank ; “if you

don’t peach she’ll know nothing about it.”
THE CROCUS. 19

May and Annie stood horror-struck at such words,
and Kitty looked ashamed of her brother; but he
walked carelessly away, whistling a tune. May stood
considering for a little while, when she said to Kitty,
“ Do you love Frank ?”

“Not just this minute,” said Kitty; “but I
love him sometimes. He’s not always cross, you
know.”

“ Well, I don’t think I could love him at all, if
he were my brother, he’s so disagreeable.”

“Mamma says we ought to love everybody,” said
Annie, looking very wise.

“Do you love Frank ?” said May.

«“ N—o,” said Annie, laughing, feeling that she
was caught; “but I ought to.”

“Oh yes, I know I ought to,” said May; “but
the puzzle is how to begin.”

“Missy,” called nurse, ‘‘it’s time for you all to
get ready.”

There was a general scamper immediately, and
the deep question of how we are to love those who
don’t love us was for the time forgotten. I cannot
tell you the delights of the drive to Bexley; the
trees looked so lovely in ther light green foliage,
aud there was such a delicious scent, and such a
20 MAY’S GARDEN,

fresh breeze, which blew about the hats and ribbons,
and altogether such pretty sights and sounds, that
the children were almost beside themselves. Even
Frank lost some of his gloominess, and condescended
to laugh.

When at last Bexley was reached, there was a
great consultation as to what should be done first.
Frank said he should go and fish, and Herbert
begged to go with him. So they went off, to the no
small relief of the girls, except Annie, who was sorry
to lose Herbert.

Then a great unpacking commenced—just nurse
and the girls; for Mrs. Aston and Mrs. Edmunds
went into the wood, to sit quietly until dinner
was ready. But when the contents of the hampers
were turned out, it was found that there was no
bread! Cook had actually forgotten that very neces-
sary article. Annie said she could make her dinner
of tart very well. But nurse said mamma and aunt
could not, if she could, and there was not enough
tart for everybody’s dinner. Then May suggested
that they should all go in different directions, and
get bread from the farmhouses. But nurse again
bjected, as the farmhouses were, most of them, miles

away, and, in fact, there was no house near but the
THE CROCUS. al

little inn where the horses were put up, and here
nurse feared there was very little bread. May and
Kitty ran off to see what could be got, and they
soon returned with a quantity of oat-cake, but only
one loaf. So the loaf was put aside for mamma and
aunt, and the children decided that it would be fun
eating oat-cake with meat, and that it would be
delicious for tea, with plenty of butter.

Dinner passed off very merrily, and was all the
greater fun, because there was so little bread; and
after dinner Annie declared that they were going to
have the most delightful afternoon they had ever had
on Bexley Common.

“How do you know that?” said Mrs. Aston.
“Tt is not right to speak as if we could do anything
without God’s permission.”

“I mean, I hope we shall have a very nice time,
mamma.”

** Wouldn’t it be good fun to gather lots of flowers
and make wreaths ?” said May.

“T don’t think you’ll find lots of flowers, missy,”
said nurse. ‘I’ve only seen a few primroses. You
mustn’t think that summer’s come, although it is so

warm.”

“Let us go after the boys, and watch them fish,”
22 MAY'S GARDEN.

said Annie, “and then we'll have some games, and
then we’ll make tea, and light the fire, and have such
fun, and go home in the dark, and have supper, and
never go to bed!”

“ Annie, Annie,” said Mrs. Aston, reprovingly.
But Annie was flying away as fast as she could.
CHAPTER II.

THE FURZE.

“* Mama, I should like to go and see old Peggy, this
afternoon,” said May, “‘ when I’ve learnt my lessons.
The other day, when she came, she thought my furze
bush so beautiful—‘ bonnie,’ she called it—and when
T told her that a furze bush had been the means of
saving my life, she wanted to know all about it, for
she’s been away, and she had not heard about my
having been run away with.”

“Very well, dear, you may go if you feel strong
enough, and Emma can take you, as she is going
that way, and then she can call for you on her return.”

So in the afternoon May went to see Peggy Cooper,
an old woman who had worked for Mrs. Aston, now
and then, as charwoman. She was such a cheerful
old body, that the children were really fond of her.

May was a special favourite, because she was rather
24 MAY’S GARDEN.

like (or at least Peggy fancied she was) a child Peggy
had lost.

“1m o’er glad to see ye, missy,’ was the greeting
May received, “and I’ve been a-thinking and a-think-
ing about that run-away ye’ve had. Nae wonder ye
look so puir and white, my bonnie. Come, sit ye
down and tell me all about it.”

*‘But where shall I put this furze?” said May.
“ve brought you enough for the table, and the
mantel-shelf, and the top of the drawers.”

“Well, I never! I was so took up with you, as
I didn’t notice the yellow stuff. It is bonnie, real
bonnie. I shall be as grand as th’ Queen. Here’s
mugs, but I maun hae a glass for th’ table. There,
they do look fine! But I want to know all about the
run-away, so now we’s settled, we’ll hae it out.”

“After you had gone to see your son, mamma
said we might have a picnic to Bexley Common. It
was so warm, and just like summer, and our cousins
went with us. You know they came before you went:
away.”

“Yes, I remember.”

* Well, Frank was a very naughty boy then, and
he wanted to ride on one of the rough ponies that a
man had on the Common. They had no saddles, and
THE FURZE. 25

only rope for bridles, but Frank rode one, and kept on
very well ; and then, although he knew mamma did not
wish us to ride, he persuaded me and Kitty to get on
two of the ponies. It was very wrong of us, for we
knew mamma and aunt did not wish it.

“Well, just at first it was very nice, and we kept
on so well. Then Frank frightened my pony, and it
flew away, oh, at such a dreadful pace! I was so-
frightened, and it seemed as if all the wicked things
I had ever done came into my mind. I held on with
all my might, and I tried to pray, but it seemed as if
God would not hear me, and it took all my strength
to hold on, so that I felt as if I could not think—only
things came into my head that I had done wrong. It
was so dreadful, and then I saw an old man coming
along, and I screamed to him to stop the pony, and he
tried, but I think it knocked him down, and we only
seemed to go all the faster. Then we came right into
the middle of a lot of geese, and I thought I must
come off, and then they would peck at me, but I
stuck on, though I’m sure the pony trod on some of
them, for they made such a fearful noise. Then we
flew on and on, and I remembered a great pond there
was, and I thought, suppose the pony should go right
into it, and I should be drowned, and it seemed so
26 MAY’S GARDEN.

horrible, that mamma thinks it must have made me
faint, and all of a sudden I felt I was going, and I
remembered no more until I found myself in a little
cottage, and a woman and girl with me. I was so
frightened at first, and I couldn’t think where I was,
but I felt so glad to find I wasn’t dead, for I thought
I should be killed when I felt myself tumbling off the
horse.

“But oh, Peggy, it was so wonderful. I was
thrown on to a furze bush, and the doctor told mamma
that it most likely saved my life, because it bent
under my weight. I shall always like furze now, and
I’m so glad I’ve got some in my garden.”

“Tt was a mercy that ye fell so well; but ye maun
hae got pricked wi’ the furze.”

“Oh yes, I did. Just look at my neck and arms ;
the marks show now; and the spikes had run into my
dress, so that Mrs. Jones said she had some trouble in
getting me free.”

‘‘ How was it she found ye?”

“ Her little boy, Jim, was playing, and he saw me
thrown, and ran in to his mother, and said a girl in
white had come off her horse on to the bush. He
said I was in white, though it was only a light
dress.”
THE FURZE. OM,

“ Dearie me! ye might hae had all your bones
broke.””

“Yes, Pegey, I’m so glad that I’m all right, that
is that ’ve no bones broken. Just suppose I’d been
hurt, and died like little Tom.”

“Yes, indeed! ye musn’t be a-disobeying of your
mamma, missy. But I want to know how they all
got at ye.”

“Oh, mamma, and auntie, and nurse, and all of
them came in the waggonette. They got a man to
trace the pony’s footsteps, and they inquired for me
at the very house where I was. Mamma and nurse
were so frightened when they saw me; they said I
looked so ill, and I did not come round for some time
after they came in, for just before they arrived I had
fainted again.”

“T should think Master Frank must have been
mighty frightened.”

“Yes, I believe he was; but, do you know, he has
not said anything to me yet about it. He hasn’t even
said he was sorry. But I think he is, for he is never
unkind now.”

“T should think not. But go on, I want to know
how long ye stayed in the country.”

“Twas there more than a week before I could be
28 MAY’S GARDEN.

moved, and then I was brought home; they were all
so kind to me, but mamma was so sorry I had dis-
obeyed her.”

«Yes, missy, ye maun never do that ag’in.”

“No, Peggy, I hope not. We had such a nice
talk about it last night. Mamma was so kind, and
she has quite forgiven me; I told her how very, very
sorry I was. I had told her before, but I explained it
all to her, and she loves the furze as much as
I do, and she says I must always have it in my
garden.”

“ Ay, ye must, my dear. I allers thought it was
a bonny thing, but now I’ll think it bonnier than ever.
Some folks says it’s common, but it’s ’cause they’re
common, it strikes me! ”

““Mamma says, too, that when we get used to
things we don’t think them half so beautiful, but it
hasn’t been so with the furze, as I never thought it so
pretty before. And, oh, Peggy! I wanted to tell
you that there was a poor cripple at this cottage.
Such a funny little thing. She used to sit by me
for such a time, and only talk when she thought I
should like it. I got so fond of her, and I am sure
she loves me very much. Mamma is going to try and
get her into a hospital for children, where she thinks
THE FURZE. 29

she might get much better, and learn to do some-
thing.”

“Tt’s right kind on yourmamma, I’m sure; I hope
she’ll get good on’t.”

“Yes, I hope she will; and, oh, Peggy, she was so
kind to Annie. What do you think she did? Annie
told me she was crying away, and feeling very miser-
able, and Jane came up to her witha great brown mug
of milk in one hand, and a piece of tart on a plate
in the other. Such a great piece! and she wanted
Annie to have it all, to comfort her. Annie said
she couldn’t help laughing, it looked so funny, and
there was such a lot of it, but, however, she eat it
all up, and drank the milk, never thinking that
she was eating up all Jane’s supper! for actually,
she found out afterwards, that Jane went to bed
without anything at all, for she had given up all her
mother had got for her, to try and make Annie stop
crying. Wasn’t it kind? Nurse found it out and
told us about it.”

“‘ She’s a kind-hearted lassie, I’s nae doubt, missy.
She wadna’ like parting with ye? ”’

“No, she cried so, that mamma’s promised she
shall come and see us before she goes to the hospital.

Her mother came over last week and told us she was
30 MAY’S GARDEN.

always talking about it, and that she even dreamed
about it at night. Isn’t it funny?”

“Nay, ye little think what small things gives
pleasure to poor folks, as haven’t much to get pleasure
from.”’

“Here’s Emma, so I must say good-bye now,
Peggy, for mamma said I must not stay very long,
and she told me to tell you that she was going to send
you some more liniment for your rheumatism.”

“T’m sure Ill be very thankful, and tell your
mamma, with my duty, that I feels better for going to
my son’s, and that he was very kind; tell her that I
only got back on Wednesday. I wanted to tell her
t’other day, when I saw your furze, but she were out.”

Not long after this, Mrs. Edmunds said they must
really leave in a few days, for she had already stayed
some time longer than she had meant to do.

This piece of news seemed to make a wonderful
difference to Frank; neither of the other children
liked the thoughts of going, but Frank seemed more
gloomy than ever. May couldn’t help noticing this,
and it struck her that, perhaps, after all, Frank was
sorry that he had to go, so as she happened to be in
the garden alone with him, she said—
THE FURZE. 31

*‘Oh, Frank, I’m sorry you’re all going so soon,
I wish you could have stayed a little longer.’

Frank opened his eyes very wide, and said—

“T thought you hated me, you don’t mean you'd
like me to stay! ”

“Yes, I should,” said May, ‘ because you’ve not
been unkind since my accident, and I think you’re
sorry about it, and you don’t seem happy.”

“No, I’m not,” said Frank, “I’m a brute, I know,
but if you'll forgive me J’ll be your friend, I will.
But I frightened your pony on purpose, though I did
not want to hurt you, only to get you into a scrape;
because I heard you say I was so disagreeable, if I
was your brother you couldn’t love me, and I thought
I'd be revenged.”

«Oh, I didn’t mean you to hear that; and, besides,
I’m sure I could love you now.”

“Then we'll be friends,” said Frank, “I wish we
had been before, for I like you.”

“ There’s Kitty coming, please don’t tell her,” and ~
then he moved away to another part of the garden.

May kept the secret of her friendship with Frank,
although she longed to tell some one, particularly her
mamma, because she wanted her to think better of

- him; but though she tried to persuade Frank to let
32 MAY’S GARDEN.

her say something, he would not consent to it, but
said he would make all straight before he went.

May was obliged to be satisfied with this, and
also with the odd sort of friendship Frank showed
her; for, before his brother and sister he took no
more notice of her than he had done formerly; but
when they were alone they had some long talks.

One day he said to her, ‘ It’s no use trying to be
good with such a horrid temper as ’ve got. I’m sure
I’m meant to be bad.”

“Tm sure you’re not,” said May. “ Mamma says
were all born sinful, but then we can be made new
and clean, if we come to the Lord Jesus. I’m sure
He could make you different, if you would ask Him.”

“JT couldn’t be made good, that’s certain,” said
Frank.

“Oh yes, you could, if you would pray.”

“T never pray,” said Frank; “the fellows would
laugh, and 1 should have cold water thrown over me,
and all sorts of things done to me,if I did. I couldn’t
pray at school, and I should think it sneaking to
pray at home, and not at school.’’

«Yes, it would be; but, then, couldn’t you begin
here? and then, if you asked God, He would give

you strength to pray at school.”
THE FURZE. 33

“TI might try; but it would be awful at -school.
You have no idea.”

“ But couldn’t you get aunt to send you to another
school ? ”

“Tam going to another. I’m going to Eton. I
couldn’t go all the way to Canada to school; but
then I know it will be just as bad, or worse, at Hton,
because I know fellows who have been there.”

“ How dreadful! But aunt wouldn’t let you go,
if she knew, would she?”

“Oh yes; she’d only langh, and say other boys
had to do it. But she docsn’t know what it’s like.”

* But ll get mamma to tell her.”

“Oh no. VIl try your plan; it might do. I
suppose people who’ve been burnt to death had some
help. Dll try it on. Ill begin to-day, and V’ll write
to you when I’m at school, if you won’t show the
letter.”

“No, I won’t show it, if you’ll not put anything
in mamma wouldn’t lke, because we have to show
them unless they are from some one who is careful.”

“She won’t think I’m careful, I know; but I
don’t mind aunt seeing: the letter, if she won’t tell
anybody.”

“T’m sure she won’t, if you don’t put anything

3
34 MAY’S GARDEN.

wrong in it. Except if they treat you very badly,
Frank, she would think she ought to tell aunt.”

“Oh, I shan’t tell you if they do. I shall only
tell you how I get on about praying.”

* But I shall want to know.”

“No, I shan’t tell you till the holidays, so don’t
bother me. Let’s go and look at the rabbits.”

May saw Annie and Herbert were coming, and so
she knew it was no use trying to talk any more.

Frank didn’t give her another opportunity of a
talk. He seemed very sorry to go, in his way, and
he said ‘‘ Good-bye” quite affectionately ; but he said
no more, and it was quite two months before May
heard from him.

Soon after the aunt and cousins had gone, Mrs.
Aston got an order for little Jane to go to the hos-
pital. She was to be there in a week from the time
the order was received, so Mrs. Aston said she must
come and spend a day or two with the children before
she went. Mrs. Aston sent the pony carriage for
her, and when she drove up 4o the door, May and
Annie ran out to welcome her.

She looked as if she didn’t know whether to
laugh or to cry, and she seemed to have lost all her
courage. The children took her upstairs, and showed
THE FURZE. 35

her the little room near theirs which she was to have.
The poor child seemed quite overwhelmed, so Mrs.
Aston took her into the nursery (which was now used
as a play-room), and made her lie down on the sofa
and rest. Then, after a time, May and Annie went
and sat with her, and got her to talk.

“Do you feel very poorly ?” said Annie.

“No, I only feels tired a bit; but it all seems so
grand and strange like, I don’t think I can stop.”

“Oh yes, you must,” said May. ‘We're not
grand. What have you been doing since I left ?”

“Knitting, and helping mother a bit. Jim’s
gone to schvol again. I’m so glad; I want him to
be a scholard.”

«“ What’s a scholard ?” said Annie.

“Why, don’t you know? I thought you knew
everything.”

“Oh no,” laughed Annie; “I wish I did, and
then I should have no lessons.”

“‘T suppose a scholard means a school-boy,”’ said
May.

“Yes,” said Jane, “ one as learns—gets learning,
you know.’

May saw Annie was laughing, so she gave her a
reproving look, for she didn’t want Jane to see.
36 MAY’S GARDEN.

“Shall you like going to the hospital?” said
Annic, looking as grave as a judge.

“T shall like to be taught; but I can’t bear the
thought of them doctors. I’m afraid they will hurt
80.”

“ Nurse told me she didn’t think they would hurt
at all. She said she had a little cousin there once,
who wasn’t well, like you, and they did not hurt him
at all, and he came out so much better.”

“Oh, how nice!” said Jane. “I shouldn’t care
for anything if I were well, but I can’t bear to see
mother working and working so hard; and I can’t
help her a bit, except by knitting, and it fetches so
little.”

“Do you think you could come and see my rab-
bit?” said Annie; “they are so pretty.”

“ Yos, if yowll give me my crutches. Thank you,
miss.”

«Well, I never seed such pretty things,” said
Jane; “but what a lot they must cat?”

“They do,” said Annie. “It takes nearly all my
pocket money, and they cat a quantity of grass,
besides.”

« Wow much money do you get?” said Jane.

* T have a shilling a weck.”
THE FURZE. 37

“ A shilling a week! Whatalot! Don’t it seem
wrong to give it all to the rabbits ?”

““T don’t spend it all on the rabbits,” said Annie,
“but I don’t think it’s wrong at all; they must be
fed.”

Yes, but poor folks is starving,’ said Jane,
“and mother says it’s wicked to keep a cat, because
it eats so much.” |

“Well, we have three,” said May, “two in the
house, and one in the stables, and I don’t think
mamma would let us have them if it was wicked.”

“We haven’t got a lot of food like you have; I
’spose that’s it,” said Jane. “It will be nice always
to have enough, and mother ’ll have enough too
now.”

“Are you hungry now?” said Annie. “It’s just
tea-time. Do come in.”

“Tam a bit hungry, but I’m not in a hurry.”

_ €T have often been so cross, because tea was not
ready the minute I wanted it,” said May.

Jane smiled. “Poor folks gets used to being
hungry sometimes,” she said. ‘But you haven’t to
get used to anything.”

“T’m not used to being run away with,” said May,
smiling.
38 MAY’S GARDEN.

“No, but I mean other things. Aren’t you happy
all day when you're well?”

“No, indeed, I’m not; I have my lessons to do,
and they are very hard sometimes, and always tire-
some. I think I should often be nearly quite happy
if it was not for them.”

“How queer,” said Jane, “I should like to do
lessons all day.”

“Have you ever done lessons all day?” said -
Annie,

“© No, I haven’t.”

‘Then don’t want to,” said Annie; “you'd soon
be tired of it. - When I’m at lessons I think of my
pretty rabbits, and there are two long lines of spelling
to be learnt before I can get to them, or some history,
er something. Oh, it’s horrid!”

« But what a queer lady you’d be when you grew
up, if you didn’t know how to read,” said Jane. “ If I
were a lady wouldn’t I learn !”

«That’s right, Jane,” said Mrs. Aston, who had
overheard Jane’s remark, “ teach them to value their
privileges.”

«Oh, mamma, we were only talking about lessons
,

being tiresome—making us unhappy, I mean,” said

May, “because Jane thought I had no troubles.”
THE FURZE. 39

“Tf you have no worse ones than lessons, my
dear, you will do very well.”

“ But, mamma, you said one day, that lessons
were a real trouble to children, and that we ought to
do our duty about them as if they were grown-up
troubles.”

“1 used words to that effect, May, and I meant it,
and I also meant that if, when you were grown up,
you had no worse troubles than lessons are to you
now, you would not have very serious trials.”

“Being hungry is much worse than lessons,
mamma, isn’t it??? said Annie, “and Jane has some-
times not had enough to eat.”

“Yes, it is much worse, but I hope Jane won’t
suffer from that any more,” said Mrs. Aston, looking
at her kindly.

Jane coloured up. ‘‘Oh, ma’am,” she said, “I
didn’t mind the hunger so much as the pain; besides,
I’ve not often been real hungry; it’s been more faint
like.”

“T hope you will get stronger and better at the
hospital,” said Mrs. Aston, cheerfully, “and as to the
little talk we have had, I want you all to remember
that God sends troubles to rich and poor, and He
knows all we feel about them. He gives us what He
40 MAY’S GARDEN.

thinks best, and we must try and get all the good out
of them we can. Now go in to tea, and take care of
Jane.”

“ Mayn’t I come with you while you dress for
dinner, mamma?” said Annie, wistfully, lingering
behind.

“No, darling, go and have your tea with May and
Jane, and I will come and see you in bed.”

An hour or two after tea, Jane was helped to bed
by the children’s maid; and when she laid herself
down in the soft bed, she felt as if she were in fairy-
land.

Then she heard Mrs. Aston speaking to the chil-
dren in the next room, and to her great joy she
came in to her too.

‘* How are you, Jane?” said Mrs. Aston gently.

But there was no answer, only a heavy sob, and
two large tears trickling down Jane’s white cheeks.

“Why, what is the matter?” said Mrs. Aston,
looking surprised.

**Oh, ma’am, you are so kind, and it is so beauti-
ful here, and I don’t want to go to the hospital.”

* But you must go to try and get well, and then
you could help your mother. You want to be a help
to her, don’t you?”


THE FURZE. 41

“Oh yes, ma’am, but I wish we could come and
be your servants.”

“Well, you must go and try to get well before
you could be a servant, andl then some day you may
be one.”

“Here, ma’am?”’ said Jane with brightening eyes.

«Yes, perhaps here, but that must not be thought
of now. J do want you to think of the good Shep-
herd, Jane, who carries the lambs in his bosom. You
know who I mean, don’t you?”

“« Yes, ma’am, the Saviour.”’

“Yes, I want you to be one of his lambs, trying to
follow Him always. He will make you one if you ask
Him, and He will love you more than anybody else.
He does that now, and it will be good for you to
think of this when you are at the hospital.’’

“Yes, ma’am.”

“ Good night, Jane. I hope you will sleep well.”

“Good night, ma’am, I’ll not forget,” said Jane.

And she did not. The next day her mother came
to take her to the hospital, and she was quite sur-
prised at her brightness. She could hardly believe

she’ was the same child who had left her the day
"before.
But Jane felt she could not tell any one that she
42 MAY’S GARDEN,

wished to love and follow the good Shepherd. She
had often heard of Him and read about Him, when she
was well enough to go to the Sunday-school, but she
had never wished to follow Him before. Now that
this wish had entered her heart, her fear and dread of
the hospital seemed almost to go, and she said good-
bye to Mrs. Aston and the children quite cheerfully. .

In fact, everything seemed brighter for little Jane,
for she never forgot that some day she might per-
haps live with Mrs. Aston, and attend to the young
ladies; then she would save such lots of money for
mother, and buy Jim no end of new tops; quite for-
getting that when she was a woman, Jim would be a

man, with desires above new tops.
CHAPTER III.

THE RED THORN.

“We haven’t been for such a time to see Aunt Sarah
and Aunt Martha, mamma,” said Annie, one fine
morning. ‘Don’t you think we might go and see
them to-day, and perhaps they would ask us to tea ?”’
“Which do you want to do? See Aunt Sarah
and Aunt Martha, or have tea ?”
a Both, mamma.”
“Well, if I were Aunt Sarah, I should prefer that
you came to see me without any tea in the matter.”
“Oh, I shall like to see them without tea, but I
enjoy myself a great deal more with it.”
«That's one way of getting out of it. Well, ’m
going to drive to Wrexall this afternoon, so I will
drop you both at Elm House, and we will ask the old
-ladies if they can keep you to tea, and then I will
send for you in the evening. It will be Aunt Martha’s
44 MAY’S GARDEN.

birthday to-morrow, May. I think it would be a
good thing if you were to take her some pink may.
She always likes to have some for her birthday.”

“Qh yes. I’m so glad you thought of it, mamma ;
she will be so pleased.”

These old ladies were two Miss Ansteds, whose
fathers and grandfathers for many generations had
lived in Woodchester. They had been great travellers
in many lands, for they were very well off; but for
the last eight years they had been living quietly in
their native town, in the old family house. It was
such an old-fashioned place, with numbers of windows
looking on the street, and a large walled garden
behind. Everything about the place seemed old—
even the servants matched the furniture, having a
faded, dried-up appearance about them, which made
them look very quaint and odd. The garden, though
as old-fashioned as the rest of the place, was very
bright and beautiful, but only with old fashioned
flowers; not one new specimen was allowed, for Aunt
Sarah was thoroughly of the old school, and, though
she loved young people, she disliked all new improve-
ments and all new notions.

You will, perhaps, wonder how it was that May
and Annie were so fond of going there; but when
THE RED THORN. 45

you hear all the delights in store for them, you will
wish you could have gone there too.

First of all came the old ladics themselves; they
were so very kind and loving that they won the con-
fidence and affection of everybody, but especially of
children, who were allowed to roam about the old
rooms and passages, and to play, to their hearts’
content, with old-world toys upstairs in the nursery of
long ago. Then even the kitchens were allowed to
be explored; and though the cook looked as if she
had come out of a band-box, she could laugh, and
allow all sorts of liberties with her beautifully-kept
kitchens and cupboards ; and the treasures to be found
in the latter were almost beyond comprehension. ‘Then
there was the garden, where grew no end of straw-
berries, apples, pears, plums, gooseberries, currants ;
and, last, but not least, were the delightful stories
Aunt Sarah told. It really seemed as if the time
would never come when she had no more to tell.
You will not wonder now, I think, that May and
Annie were very fond of going to see the old ladies,
and especially of staying to tea. So, when Mrs.
Aston’s ‘carriage stopped at the door, there were
two beating hearts, hoping for an invitation; and
when the old butler brought out word that his
46 MAY’S GARDEN.

mistresses would be very glad if the young ladies
would stay, there were two very bright faces, and two
happy little people, with a very large bunch of may,
got out of the carriage and walked into the house.

“And how are you, missy?” said the butler; for
he was quite a friend of the family, and always had a
little chat on his own account.

“Tam nearly quite well, thank you,”

said May.

“She has been run away with, and might have
been killed,” said Annie. “She was thrown on some
furze, or the doctor said she would have been killed
most likely.”

“Yes, I heard,” said Henly. “Well, missy, you
won’t be going against orders on them wild things
again, I should think. Tm right glad you were
caught on the furze. Why, you ought always to wear
a bit in your button-hole.”

* Button-hole, Henly! I don’t wear a coat.”

“But youve got button-holes, missy; leastways
my missis has, for I see her making ’em.”

The children laughed, and Annie took his hand
while he led them through the hall, and then down a
long passage to a bright morning room, where sat
the two old ladies, quite close to one another, hold-
ing hands. Aunt Sarah was very handsome, and


RED-THORN
THE RED THORN. 47

looked lively ; but Aunt Martha was blind, and she
had a sweet, sad face, which, one could sce, had
known deep sorrow.

When the childrea appeared with the large bunch
of red thorn, the old ladies quickly unclasped their
hands, and Aunt Sarah rose to kiss them, and then
they went up to Aunt Martha, and gently kissed
her.

“We have brought you some pink may, out of
my new garden, for Aunt Martha’s birthday,” said
May.

“That is very good of you,’ said Aunt Martha.
“T always used to have a wreath of it on my birthday,
when I was young, but I never wore it after Edward
died—no, I couldn’t after that. But I always like some
in the room, dears; not too much though, for it has a
strong scent.”

“Come, and I will show you where our old red
thorn tree used to be,” said Aunt Sarah, as she step-
ped out into the garden. “I never told you we used
to have one. This is the old stump of it, you see it is all
covered with ivy now, that you can hardly tell what it
is, but it was once part of a beautiful tree, and when
we were children, our brother used to climb up into it,

and get such pretty pieces of may, and, as Aunt
48 MAY’S GARDEN,

Martha told you, he always made her a wreath on her
birthday.”

“Didn’t he make you a wreath too on yours,
Aunt Sarah?” said Annie.

“No, I didn’t care for wreaths. I was a very
different child from Aunt Martha, She was always
sweet and amiable, but I prided myself on trying to
be grown up before my time.”

“You were not always good?” said Annie wonder-
ingly.

“No, indeed,” said Aunt Sarah.

“JT wish you would tell us about it,” said Annie,
thinking it would be refreshing to hear of any one so
good as aunt having been naughty.

Aunt Sarah smiled, and then, turning to May,
said, “I hear you have been running away, May.”

“T did not mean to run away, but it was very
wrong to get on the pony’s back.”

“Tam glad you confess at once you were wrong,
and I hope it will teach you a lesson to obey your
mother in future.”

May coloured and the tears came into her eyes.

“Oh, Aunt Sarah, I shouldn’t think of getting on
a pony’s back again without mamma’s leave.”

“No dear, perhaps not, but you might think of
THE RED THORN. 49

disobeying her in some other way, and I want this
lesson you have had to affect your future life, and to
be a warning to you. Annie wants me to tell you
both about when I was a naughty girl, so after tea I
will tell you a story about myself and my brother.”

May did not like the idea of the story, she thought
it might refer to her fault rather toomuch; but Annie,
not having an uneasy conscience, wished very much to
hear Aunt Sarah’s tale » so as soon as tea was over she
asked for it.

Aunt Martha laughed. “Oh, Annie!” she said,
“Tm afraid you’re too fond of tales. Don’t you’
think it would be better for Aunt Sarah to read out
some history ?”

“No, thank you,” said Annie, “I want Aunt
Sarah to begin this very minute.”

“Then I must make haste,’ said Aunt Sarah.
“Once upon a time—-—”

“ But do tell how old you were first,” said May.

“T was thirteen, and Aunt Martha was eleven, and
my brother sixteen. Now I shall have to begin
again.”

“JT bee your pardon, Aunt Sarah,” said May,
“ but I did so want to know how old you were.”

“Tt’s very easy to begin again. Once upon a time
4
50 MAY’S GARDEN.

we lived in Russia, as you have heard me say before,
with our father, who was a physician. Our mother died
when we were very little girls, much younger than you
are, and we had only one brother, and we were very
foud of him, he was such a kind, noble-hearted youth.”

“ He was a dear, dear boy,” said Aunt Martha.

“ Well, as I said, we were very fond of him, and
he was very fond of us, and he was our father’s
favourite. At first we lived in St. Petersburg, but
after a time the nobleman, to whom our father was
physician, moved to his estate in the country, and we
went with him, and had a pretty house in his grounds.

“Now before I go on, Annie, you tell me what
kind of climate they have in Russia. Is it hot, or
cold, or temperate like ours ?”

“Very cold, freezing,” said Annic, quite pleased
that it was such an easy question.

«Yes, it is very cold, indeed, and so we found it,
I can tell you. We had to have double windows,
and stoves always lighted, and the people dress
in fur, and do all they can to keep out the cold.
Well, our father bought a new sledge—you both know
what that is—and I was very anxious to try it; I
thought it would be so delightful. I asked my father

to allow me to go out in it, and for Edward to drive
THE RED THORN. 51

it, but he would not allow it, and he said he should be
very angry if we attempted it. So I gave up the idea
then, but I felt very cross about it in my heart, though
I did not show it outwardly. My father did not know
-that he had such a naughty girl, or he would have
locked me in my room, and I wish he had. Don’t
you, Martha?”

“Yes, yes, dear, for your own sake I wish he had.”

“Yes, you hear even Aunt Martha wishes he had.
But he did not, and one day he went out and said
he should not be back until the next day, and all
of a sudden the wicked thought came into my mind
that I would persuade Edward to take me out in the
new sledge. So I went to Edward, and said I wished
he would take me out for a little drive in the sledge ;
but he said he did not think our father would like it,
but he did not know, nor did Martha, that our father
had quite forbidden it.

“So I gaid, ‘Oh, it will not matter going a little
way in the park. We cannot take any harm.’

“So Hdward consented, thinking we could not
get lost if we kept within the park. He forgot that
the snow was so very deep that a low wall on one side
was completely covered, and that therefore we should

“not know when we were in the park or not. But I
D2 MAY’S GARDEN.

knew this, only I thought I should be sure to know
when to stop, and I did not fear any danger, so that I
had my way and my pleasure.

“So we started. We both wrapped up well in
warm furs, and off we went at a great pace, flying -
along! I thought it was delightful, and I enjoyed it
so much, and Edward was so pleased at my excite-
ment, that he forgot when it was time to turn, and I
did not remind him. At last, he said he thought
we must make our way back, or Martha would be
nervous.”

“Yes, yes, dear boy,” interrupted Aunt Martha,
“he was always so thoughtful for me, and so were
you, Sarah, my dear, though you do not say so.”

“T was not then, Martha, for I did not like return-
ing; but I gave into Edward, and back we went, as we
thought, but it was anything but going back, for we had
got far away from the park, and we were only getting
farther and farther away, and nearer and nearer to the
dreadful woods, where the wolves make their home.

« As we went on and on, I thought we were a long
time getting home, and I said to Edward, ‘It seems
to take a long time to get back again;’ and then the
horrible thought struck me, that we had perhaps wan-
dered beyond the park, and I almost screamed, ‘Oh,
THE RED THORN. 53

Edward, we must have been beyond the park. Do
you think we are on the right track ?’

*“* Don’t be frightened, Sarah,’ he said, ‘but I
have been suspecting for some time that we must have
lost our way; but be brave and trust in God, you
know we are in his hands.’

“¢But oh, Edward,’ I said in anguish, ‘I have
disobeyed papa, for he said I was not to go out in the
sledge, but I wanted so to come, that I would not tell
you, and now, oh, Edward! suppose we are frozen to
death, I shall have killed you and myself too!’ and then
I sobbed and felt as if I was undone and lost for ever!

“ Poor Edward! he was in great distress, I could
tell, although he did not say a word at first. Then in
a low steadfast voice, he said, ‘Pray, Sarah, pray for
forgiveness. You know he that confesseth and for-
saketh his sin shall have mercy. We must both try
and keep up our strength, and use all our endeavours to
reach home.’

«T cried to Edward to pray, I felt too wicked; and
so in a low voice he asked for pardon and guidance,
and with his prayer the cloud of sin and misery was
lifted a little, so that I could help to think what we
had better do; but oh! my heart was heavy as lead,
Tt could not tell you what I felt.
54 MAY’S GARDEN.

“Fdward looked all round to see which way to turn,
and then he chose what he thought would be the
most likely road to lead home. On and on we went,
but we seemed to get no nearer, and soon we saw we
were approaching a pine forest.

“Now, I must tell you, my dears, that the pine
forests in Russia extend for miles and miles; and as
the wolves live in and about them, it is very dangerous
to go near them, unless you are well protected,
especially at night, when they DEO about and often
hunt in great packs.

“ Hdward well knew our danger, better than I did,
for he had travelled with our father in the winter,
when they had seen something of these creatures.
Suddenly, we heard a howling noise in the distance, at
which I was terrified, and the horse pricked up his
ears, and flew along, in his fright nearly upsetting us.
Edward did not speak, but when I cricd ont, he said,
‘Keep quiet, dear, and pray. You know that verse,
“God is our refuge and strength, a very present
help in trouble.” ’

“T knew that God was his refuge, but would He be
mine? I felt I must ask Him to be, there was no
other hope or help; and soI prayed really and truly, as

Thad never prayed before, and my great and heavy sin’
THE RED THORN. 55

seemed to roll away. It did roll away, my dears, to the
foot of Christ’s cross, and that terrible hour was made
to me the beginning of a new life.

* But though I was not in such dreadful fear about
my soul, I was terrified, and so was Edward, at our
fearful danger. On and on we flew, and on and on
came the wolves, and we felt they were gaining upon
us. Hdward urged on the poor frightened horse, who
was quite aware of the peril he was in, and I felt as if
I must push the sledge along as I pressed forward
with my feet against the front part of it. Still on
we flew, and on came the wolves, till in the twilight I
could see them, like a dusky cloud, getting nearer and
nearer,”

“Did they catch you?” asked Annie, breathlessly.

“No, they did not catch me, dear, or I should not
have been here, nor did they catch my brother.”

“Who did they catch then?” said May.

«Wait a moment, I shall soon have finished.
Just as we felt ourselves on the point of being
devoured, Edward saw a light, and he immediately
urged and cheered on the brave horse, who, though
almost spent, exerted all his remaining strength, and
reached the door of a wood hut, just im time for us to

get inside. But our poor noble horse was devoured
56 MAY’S GARDEN.

by the wolves; we tried to get him loose from the
sledge, and then we could have got him into the hut,
but there was not time.

“ Hdward burst into tears, and cried like a child, he
was so grieved for the noble creature, and then, when
he was calmer, he made me knecl down with him, and
we gave thanks for our deliverance. When we rose,
we noticed the old man who had opened the door for
us was the only person there, and we found he had
been busy getting us hot brandy-and-water, which
revived and refreshed us; but Edward seemed much
more overcome than I was; he was always a very deli-
cate boy, and before morning he was in a high fever.”

“Oh, what did you do?” said May. ‘“ Weren’t
you frightened ?”

«T was, indeed. I thought, ‘Suppose Edward
should die, and all through my disobedience’ I
entreated the old man to fetch my father, but he dared
not venture out, because of the wolves. I think I should
have gone mad if my father had not arrived the
next day, but he had traced us, and came to our
assistance.

“He did not say a word to me, although he knew
that all this trouble was through my fault. I think he saw
that I had suffered terribly. We had to nurse Edward in
THE RED THORN. 57

the hut, for he could not be moved, and by the time
he was getting better, the winter had gone, and we
were able to return home safely. Then, one evening,
I crept up to my father, and confessed all my wicked-
ness. He was very tender and loving, but very grave,
and I shall never forget how he showed me that in
disobeying him I had broken God’s commandment.

“But the most dreadful thing was that Edward
never got strong again. We came back here before
the winter came on, and in a year he died. Aunt
Martha had one more birthday first, and though he
was too ill to pluck the pink may, he made her the
wreath, and put it on for her, and we all sat together
in this room, and listened to the birds, and enjoyed
the scent of the flowers. Edward was so gentle and
sweet to me, and he made me promise that I would
not reproach myself any more for my disobedience
and the consequences. He said my sin was forgiven,
and I must live as one forgiven. Then he said he did
not think he should have lived to be a man anyhow,
for he knew before the fever, that he was not at all
strong, and of course, he said, I had not meant to
injure him.”

“Oh no,” said Aunt Martha, “your Aunt Sarah

nearly killed herself with nursing him, and she was,
58 MAY’S GARDEN.

and is, one of the most loving sisters that ever were
born.”

“Come, come, Martha,” said Aunt Sarah, ‘you
are always making me out better than Tam. Well,
to finish, dears. I have told you this long tale to

show you that we can never know the -evil con-_

sequences that may follow one sin. So when you are
tempted to disobey, pray for strength to resist.”

“JT should have thought you wouldw’t like pink
may, Aunt Martha,” said Annie.

“Should you, dear? You would not have looked
at it again, eh ?”’

“No; it’s all so miserable.”

“ T ought to be the one not to like the pink may,” ~

said Aunt Sarah, “but I love it, because it reminds
me of my brother and his sweetness, and Aunt Martha
loves it for the same reagon.. We often talk of our
brother, although it’s all these years since we lost him.
It is beautiful to think of those who have gone before,
and who have reached the haven where we long to be.”

The children left soon after this conversation, and
as they passed the old parish churchyard, they noticed,
for the first time, that there was a red thorn tree

growing near Edward Ansted’s grave.

: ae
CHAPTER IV.
THE HEART’S-EASK.

Mav’s garden was looking very pretty, and the chil-
dren were quite delighted with the flowers, they
looked so gay and bright.

“T gee that something wants doing to it,’ said
Annie; “and if it were my garden, I should give
orders to my gardener to do it.”

“Oh, would you!” laughed May. ‘ Well, I must
walk round and see. Oh, those two great weeds!
how ever did they grow up so quickly? Pm afraid
you are a very carcless gardener, Annie. You must
take them up directly, and rake the whole garden
over.”

“'That’s just what I wanted,” said Annie. “Ido
_like raking so.”

“Oh, how beautiful these heart’s-ease are, Annie!
Do look !”
60 MAY’S GARDEN.

«They are just ready for cutting. Who shall we
take them to?”

“Couldn’t we take them to old Mrs. Morris?
She would be so pleased, and we could make them so
pretty with some green,” said Annie, throwing away
her rake.

- “No, I am going to cut them and do them up.
You are the gardener.”

“Oh, I was forgetting that you are the mistress.
I beg your pardon, ma’am.”

The garden was then left to be raked im the
evening, and May and Annie went in to ask Mrs.
Aston if they might go and see Mrs. Morris, and
take her some flowers. She gave them leave, and so
they started at once.

Mrs. Morris was a sweet-looking old woman, who
lived in a pretty little cottage with her grandson.
She had brought him up, and he was very fond of
her and very kind to her; but, as he was out all day,
she was rather lonely, and therefore pleased to have
visitors, especially young people, for she said they
almost made her feel young again. Her grandson
used every bit of the garden for vegetables, so that
the old lady had no room for flowers, except a few

she kept in pots, and the pretty creepers on the house.
THE HEARYT’S-EASE. 61

She was, therefore, very pleased to have a few to put
on her table with her Bible and spectacles. May and
Annie had taken ber flowers before, but this was the
- first time they had taken them out of May’s new
garden.

“We have brought you some heart’s-ease, Mrs.
Morris,” said May, as she entered the neat kitchen
where Mrs. Morris was sitting.

“Some heart’s-ease, my dears! Well, ’m sure
you could bring me nothing better.”

“Oh, Mrs. Morris,” said Annie, “there are lots
of things, and lots of flowers even, better than heart’s-
ease ; but we are glad you like them, for they are out
of May’s new garden, and I do the work for her.”

“Do you, my dear? Well, to be sure! You are
not very ol to do the work; but I daresay missy
sees you don’t do too much.”

“No, Mrs. Morris, I don’t think she will kill her-
self; but [ want to know why you like heart’s-ease
better than other flowers.”

“No, my dear, I didn’t mean I liked heart’s-ease
better than other flowers; but heart’s ease—that is, a
peaceful, contented heart—is one of God’s best gifts.
And you said, ‘I have brought you some heart’s-ease,’

and I said, ‘ You could bring me nothing better,’ ”
62 MAY’S GARDEN.

“Oh, I see,” said May. “Well, I hope you wil
have heart’s-ease in your heart, ag well ag on your
table.”

“Thank you, my dear; that is very pretty of you.
It’s a blessed thing to have peace within, and God’s
beautiful flowers outside; but when I was a girl I did
not care much about cither.”

“Didwt you?” said Annie. ‘ What were you like
when you were ee Did you ee wear that .
great white cap.”

“No, my dear, that I didn’t, though in those
days, young girls did wear caps, real caps, when they
went out to service and when tkey were married.
Those were good old days, my dear, in many MEW
though folks do think these times so grand.”

*‘T wish you would tell us about those times,” said
May, “‘ when you were a little girl.”

« Wouldn’t it be nice, Annie, if Mrs. Morris would
tell us what she used to do?”

“Oh yes, it would; but might we get some peas
first, and then we could shell them while you talk to
us?” said Annie, turning to Mrs. Morris.

“Yes, dearie, you may get some peas from the
second row at the other end of the garden; and you,
missy, will get down that large brown basin, won’t
THE HEART’S-EASE. 63

you, dear? It’s curious how fond one gets of one’s
chair, when one grows old. Itscems so hard to move.
Hey day! I used to be as active as anybody.”

“Mamma says she will be very thankful if she is
as well and strong as you are at eighty. I heard her
say so to nurse one day.”

“Well, my dear, I hope she will be much better
than I am. Now, here comes little missy, with her
frock full of peas. Oh dearieme! what will mamma
say if that pretty frock ‘is spoilt ? Come here, my
dear, and let me wipe it for you. Young ladies
always wore pinnies when I was a girl. It’s one of
them new-fangled notions to go about and spoil your
nice new frocks.”

“Oh no,’ said May, “these are our garden
frocks; we run about in these, and mamma doesn’t
mind.”

“Oh well, ‘garden frocks’ are new-fangled too,
so you are new-fangled anyhow, missy,” said Mrs.
Morris, with a twinkle in her eye. ‘Now, my
dears, I must see if I can remember something about
when I was a little girl Dve told you a good deal,
and I shall get used up some of these fine days, and
have no more to tell, and then I wonder if the little

missies will and come and see the old woman.”
64 MAY’S GARDEN.

“Oh, yes! you know we shall,” said both chil-
dren in a breath. ‘‘ Why, we often go and see
nurse, and she is too poorly to talk to us at all some-
times.”

“ Well, now, my dears, if you’ll sit quiet for a bit,
Tl tell you ‘ about when I was a little girl,’ as Miss
Annie calls it. When you brought them heart’s-
ease to me, it took me back seventy-one years. Just
think on that. Why, missy, you think you will be
getting old at twenty; don’t you?”

“Oh yes. Why, I think I shall be very big at
twelve. I can’t fancy what twenty is like,” said
May.

“Can’t you? Then you can’t fancy what nearly
four times twenty is; so I had better go on with my
tale at once. You've heard me tell of Miss Lucy,
sometimes, but I never told you how it was that I
knew her so well, and that we were so fond of one
another. It was in this way, my dears. She was ~
what is called my foster-sister. My mother was her
nurse, and brought her up from a little, such a little
baby. Her mother at the Hall was very ill when
she was born, and she had to go away soon after
into foreign parts. So my mother took Miss Lucy
home with her to nurse; and as Madam did not


THE HEART’S-EASE. 65

return again till Miss Lucy was seven years old, we
had a long time together, and we were just like sisters.”

“How was it that Lucy’s mamma was so long
away ?”’ said May.

“ Because she was so very delicate, that the doc-
tors wouldn’t let her come to England.”

“ Please go on,” said Annie, rather impatient
about the interruption.

“‘T was mother’s only child, so that when we heard
that Madam was going to return to the Hall, and that
she would want Miss Lucy back, we were both very sad.
Mother was very fond of Madam—but then she was
very fond of Miss Lucy, too—and she felt how lonely I
should be without my playfellow; but she had always
looked forward to this time. She knew she could not
keep Miss Lucy always, for she was a lady born, and
she must be brought up like one. She therefore made
up her mind to part, and she tried to make me.see
that it was all for the best; but, dearie me, children,
I was as sore about it as one of you would be if the
other was going to be taken away to some grand
place right out of sight. I screamed, and put myself
into a dreadful passion when mother first told me of
it; and when that had worked off I was dull and
miserable whenever the dreadful thought came over me

5
66 MAY’S GARDEN.

that my dear dear Lucy must go away. Miss Lucy, too,
could not bear the thoughts of parting, and she seemed
quite frightened at the notion of the big house, and of
all the brothers and sisters she would have to see.”

“Where were all her brothers and sisters all this
time, Mrs. Morris?” said Annie.

“Oh, the elder ones were with the Squire and
Madam, and the younger ones were at school; but
now all the family was coming home, so that Miss
Lucy would have to make many new friends at once.
Well do I remember the last day we had together,
and our last walk. We went out into the-fields, hand-
in-hand, feeling very dull and listless. Then, after a
little while, Miss Lucy began to try and comfort me,
by telling me what beautiful things she would give me.
She said I should have half of all her new toys, and
that she would ask her mamma to let me come and
see her, and that she might come and see me. Then
she said, ‘When we are grown up we will live in a
pretty little house together all the rest of our lives.’
I could not get the comfort out of this Miss Lucy
seemed to do, for she was much more hopeful than I
was; but still it pleased me that she was going to
ask to come to see me, and so we began gathering

our last nosegay of wild flowers. Now, mother often
THE HEART’S-EASE. 67

made us each a wreath of the flowers we had gathered,
and then she would tell us their names, and what
they meant; for mother was a noticeable woman, and
avery good scholar. That day we took home a good
many wild violets and heart’s-ease among the other
flowers; and when we saw mother in the little
parlour, we asked her to make us each a wreath to
wear before we parted. Mother noticed my dull, sad
face, and she made me a wreath of violets and heart’s-
ease. It all comes to me as if it was the other
day. She said, ‘This is for thee, my girl, and I
hope thou wilt have a contented mind, for that
is what heart’s-ease means; and I hope thou
wilt not forget to be as humble as these violets,
which hang their heads so low.’ Then, as she saw
me nearly crying, she kissed me, and sent me to
fetch the butter in, for she was going to have her
dish of tea when we had our bread-and-milk. When
I got back again, Miss Lucy had her wreath on, and
I was just going to ask her what it meant, when we
heard the sound of carriage-wheels, and soon we saw
a grand coach drive up to the door. Mother ran up-
stairs to get her best cap, and we stood quite still,
feeling that the time had come when we must part.

“* Mother soon opened the door, and then a beauti-
68 MAY’S GARDEN.

ful lady came into the parlour, and after looking at us
for a moment, she said, ‘This must be my darling,’
and she clasped Miss Lucy to her heart, and covered
her with kisses.

“Oh, my dears, I cannot tell you what. I felt, I
could have torn her to pieces, I was so angry to think
she was going to take away my dear dear Lucy and leave
me quite alone. After she had talked to Miss Lucy,
and to my mother about her, for some little time, she
turned, and saw my angry, jealous eyes watching her.
I think she instantly guessed my feelings, for she held
out her hand to me, and said to mother, ‘ Is this your
only one, nurse, and the foster-sister of my Lucy ?
Come here, dear,’ she said to me; ‘you would like
to know Lucy’s mother, and I want to know you.’

“Then mother took my hand, and led me to
Madam, saying my heart was very sore at parting
from Miss Lucy, and she had been telling me I ought
to be humble and contented, or my wreath would not
become me. I burst into tears at this, and said I could
not part with Lucy. I would not say ‘ Miss Lucy,’ as
mother had told me I must, now that she was going
to live at ‘the Hall,’ but I went on saying I could not
let her go, it was wicked to take her away. Miss

Lucy cried in company, and there was quite an upset.
THE HEART’S-BASE. 69

Mother was so vexed, that she was going to take me
out of the room, but Madam would not let her. She
took my hands, and then lifted me on her knees, and
after soothing me a little, she said, oh, so sweetly (she
was such a sweet lady, my dears), ‘ Little Susie is not
contented or happy. Is she, dear?’

““*No, I said, with a sob, ‘I love her,’ and I
pointed to Lucy, who was standing by with a litle
sad face.

“T remember now, though it’s all these years
- since, seeing the tears start into Madam’s eyes, and
she said, ‘Well, I will tell you what you shall do.
You shall come to the Hall with Lucy, and stay with
her: for a while, and see how you like it. What do
you say to that? Will you come?’

“T felt rather frightened, but without waiting a
minute I said I would. I thought anything would be
better than parting with Lucy. Mother said it was.
too great an honour, and it would not do, but I could
see she was mighty pleased, and Madam would not
hear a word against it. We were then both sent out
of the room, and when we were called in again we
were told we were both to go to the Hall in the
morning. I was quite a different child after this, and
Miss Lucy was as pleased as I was. Still I could not
70 MAY’S GARDEN.

help feeling afraid of all the grand people at the Hall,
and I did not know whether I should behave properly,
and I had all sorts of fears. But then Miss Lucy felt
afraid too, for it was almost as bad for her as for me,
except that mother had always talked to her about
how she would have to behave, and what she would
have to do when Madam came back. The next
morning we both went to the Hall, and were received
by Madam only, for the Squire was not coming for
a few days. Madam was very kind, and kissed me,
and of course Miss Lucy was covered with kisses, but
I have chiefly got to tell you my own experience, so
that I put myself first. Madam took us up to the
schoolroom herself, where three little girls and one
boy were having their lessons. J daresay you would
like to know their names. Miss Amelia was the
eldest, she was thirteen ; then there was Miss Theresa,
eleven; Miss Margaret, ten; and Master George,
nine. They all rose when their mother entered, and
they kissed Miss Lucy very warmly when she told them
that she was their little sister. Then she explained
who I was, and that I had come to stay with Miss
Lucy, and she wished them to be kindtome. They
all looked rather strangely at me, but when Madam
told the young ladies to give mea kiss, they did so
THE HEART’S-EASE. 71

immediately. Then, to my great relief, we were taken
to the nursery, and I felt as if I could breathe again
when I was alone with my dear Miss Lucy. We both
felt very strange, and I think Miss Lucy was very
glad to have a companion, and I know she was
very glad to have me with her, for she loved me
very dearly. We had a private talk about the young
ladies, and we both agreed they were not very nice.
I quite disliked them, and so I was quite pleased that
Miss Lucy did not care for them. I got on pretty
well the first day, for we had our meals alone with the
nurse, and during the rest of the day we were a great
deal with Madam. But the next day we had our
dinner in the schoolroom with the young ladies, their
governess, and Master George. I saw them titter
round the table before we began, but soon there were
roars of laughter, when I was caught putting my knife
to my mouth. Poor Miss Lucy then came in for it, be-
cause she bit her bread. We both coloured,and felt very
much confused ; but Miss King, the governess, reproved
their rudeness, and then she told us we must not put our
knives to our mouths, and that we must break our bread.

“Now we knew we ought not to do either of these
things, for mother had been nurse with Madam, and
knew something about proper behaviour, and she had
72 MAY’S GARDEN.

told ug not to do these things; but then every day we
saw father do it, and even mother too, sometimes, so
we had got into the way of following their example.

“You see, my dears, people are always more
inclined to practise what you do, than what you say.
I remember I did not eat half enough at dinner, for
I felt so afraid of being laughed at again, and I often
saw four pairs of merry eyes watching for what would
come next. Then I made another slip in always call-
ing the governess ‘ Miss.’ I kept saying it at every
sentence, and they were so amused, and said Miss
King had never been so much ‘ missed’ in her life.”

“Didn’t you and Lucy go to school,” said Annie.

“T used to go sometimes, but Miss Lucy was too
delicate. The doctors said she wasn’t to get any
learning until she was stronger. Besides, we
shouldn’t have learnt much about manners at my
school. Miss Lucy would have had to go right away
from mother, both for fine manners and good learn-
ing, but Madam thought most about her health.

« But though they made such fun, I don’t want you
to think they were quite unkind, my dears. No, ina
grand patronizing sort of way they were often good to
me; but, of course, it was not the place for such as

me, and child as I was, I began to find it out more and
THE HEART’S-EASE. 73

more. Madam’s orders were that I was to be treated as
Miss Lucy’s companion and friend, but the servants and
everybody knew I was only the gamekeeper’s daughter,
and they made me feel it, just as people in this world,
my dears, know well enough how to make anybody
uncomfortable. The Squire did not come home until
I had been there a few days ; but the day he returned,
orders were sent up that we were all to go down and
see him, and have some dessert.

“Of course, Susan will not go down,’ said Miss
Amelia, haughtily; ‘ papa does not care to see her.’

«Yes, migs,’ said the nurse, ‘ the orders are that
she is to go down with you.’

“ ¢ Really, it’s very strange that mamma can allow
that child to be with us,’ said Miss Amelia.

“T heard all this, and I determined not to go
down; but nurse would not hear of it; I was taken
down and sent in with the rest, and oh, how awkward
I felt! When the Squire had kissed them all, he
turned to me, and said in his jolly sort of way—

«« Well, Susie, how do you like playing the lady ?
Come here, my lassie, let’s have a look at ye?’

“©¢ No, don’t trouble her,’ said Madam kindly, ‘ she
is very shy. Go and sit by Lucy,’ she said, turning
such genile eyes upon me and smiling sweetly.
74, MAY’S GARDEN.

“Twas nearly crying with vexation and wounded
pride, but Madam’s kindness comforted me, and Mist
Lucy was so good, putting her hand into mine, as she
had been used to do at the cottage. There were
many good things for dessert, but I was so afraid of
making a mistake, and not eating them properly, that
I wisely took only a piece of cake, and that I managed to
get through without being laughed at, although to this
day, I remember the great temptation I had to pick
out the currants, as I did at home.

«Then another day, they had some friends come
_ to see them; and there was a little girl about Miss
Lucy’s age, who took a great fancy to her, and wanted
to be her friend. She was a pretty, taking child,
and Miss Lucy was greatly taken with her; and
although I know she did not wish to make me un-
happy, she did wish to play with her new friend. So
she brought me one of her new toys to comfort me; and
then she went to play in another part of the room, ag
this child wanted to see her doll’s house. She soon
came back to me, and wanted me to come and play
with them, but I was too jealous and angry to think
of it. She coaxed and pleaded with me to come, and
at last I went, but the game did not go off very well,
and we all felt uncomfortable, and did not at all mind
THE HEART’S-EASE. 75

when we were called to have our bread and milk,
which we knew meant bed, for which we began to
prepare as soon as the meal was over.

Miss Lucy got on much better than I did,
although she really did not know much more;
she was naturally a quick child, and she seemed to
guess what it was right to do. She did not suffer
from awkwardness in the way I did, and then she had
so much love shown her, and her sisters gave her
every help, often telling her privately what to do, but
taking good care not to let me hear them.

‘But the great trouble, which made me feel how
thoroughly I was out of place, was this: Madam had
invited many of the neighbouring gentry’s children
to a party, and I had a pretty frock made by nurse
for it. Iwas very proud and vain of my finery, and
I showed it. I gave myself such airs, shook myself _
about, and pretended to be so very grand, that the
young ladies got quite angry; and when some of
their friends asked who I was, they said I was only
a vulgar child, whom their mother had asked to stay ;
but Master George went further still, and, without
any more ado, said, ‘She’s only our gamekeeper’s
lass; she’s got to look after Lucy, that’s all. I heard

nurse say so.’


76 MAY’S GARDEN.

“You may think, my dears, how they all stared ;
and when they did begin to play again, not one of
them would have anything to do with me; even Miss
Lucy seemed shy, and did not come to me in the
sweet way she used to do. I felt very wretched, and,
after trying to appear as if I did not care for a little
while, I slipped out of the room, and down the stairs,
and out of the door towards mother’s cottage, for
there I felt I should be welcome, and I longed to
cry out all my troubles in her arms.

“Mother looked quite frightened when she saw
me in my fine frock running in with angry tears
streaming down my face. She was busy, but she
quickly wiped her hands and took me on her lap,
while she tried to get out of me what my trouble was.

“¢ Oh, mother, mother,’ I said, ‘I hate ’em all, I
do; yes, and Lucy too. I’ll never go again—no, never,
mother! they’re so proud and unkind;’ and I went
on sobbing, and here and there telling mother how it
was I had run away.

“ Father came in while mother was soothing me.

« « Well, what’s up now?’ he said, when he saw
me. ‘She be fine, to be sure! Well, Betsy, what’s
the upshot on’t ?”

““¢Qh, she’s run away,’ said mother, with hot
THE HEART’S-EASE. 77

cheeks; ‘they’ve been unkind, and she’s come home.
I’m glad on’t; I'll not have her set upon. I can’t
think how it is. I’m sure Madam don’t know.’

“Then she told father what I had told her; and
he was angry, too, and said he should speak to the
Squire, for he knew he would not like it.

“‘ However, Madam sent for mother up to the
Hall, and told her the truth ; but she said she had
feared, from the first day, that her plan to break the
separation to me had not been a good one. Still,
she went on to say, it had perhaps effected her pur-
pose to some extent, although she was very grieved
that it had been done in such a manner. She told
mother that she had taken pains to have me treated
well, but she could not help other people showing
their dislike to what she had done, and then my own
conduct had led to the last unkindness. Mother quite
agreed that it was best that I should keep at home
with her; only she pleaded thet we might see Miss
Lucy sometimes at our cottage, and she hoped that
Madam would still hononr us with her friendship and
favour.

“The dear lady never thought of withdrawing it.
She said she wished us always to feel as sisters, and

to be as sisters as much as our different positions


78 MAY’S GARDEN.

would allow; and she said she should never forget
mother’s kindness to Miss Lucy (no more she ever
did) ; and she finished up with saying she should call
to see me, and bring Miss Lucy with her.

“ Mother came home, looking .quite pleased and
happy. She did not chide me then for not telling
her that my own conduct had brought on the worst
unkindness. She merely told me that Madam was
very nice about me, and that she was coming to
see me, and going to bring Miss Lucy with her.
I didn’t feel as if I wanted to see Miss Lucy. I felt
as if I quite disliked everybody at the Hall. I only
wanted to sit close by mother, and feel that I had
one true friend in the world. Mother did not mind
that I should want to be with her. She teased me
about being mammy-sick all of a sudden, but she
dearly loved it, I know. As for myself, I felt as if
home was beautiful after the coldness and ridicule
which I had endured at the Hall.

“The next day Madam arrived with Miss Lucy.
Mother took me into the room with her; and when
Miss Lucy saw me, she came shyly forward and
kissed me. Her first kiss was very timid, but all of a
sudden she flung her arms round my neck, and said,
‘I do love you, Susie, very much, and I’m so sorry I
THE HEART’S-EASE. 79

was not very kind the day you ran away.’ I was
quite taken with her again, and returned her kisses
warmly. Then Madam told us to run away and play,
for she should leave Miss Lucy for the rest of the
day, and come for her in the evening. So we scam-
pered off to the fields and woods, and forgot our
troubles, and were just two happy butterflies again.
It’s curious how well I remember those days, my
dears, and many and many a thing that’s happened
later on I’ve quite clean forgot. Well, we had a
happy, merry day, and in the evening Madam came
to fetch Miss Lucy home. She said she wanted to
speak to me first, so I had to go in all alone to see
her. I felt so frightened, for I thought she was
going to scold me; but I soon found out I was mis-
taken, for she had such a sweet smile on her face, and
she held out her hand and took me to her, and gave
me a kiss. Then I saw she had some heart’s-ease
and violets in her hand, and she said to me—

«* Do you remember, Susie, that you had a wreath
of violets and heart’s-ease on when I first came, and
that your mother had told you, if you wanted to he
like your wreath, you must have a contented mind
and a humble heart ??

« Yes, ma’am,’ I said, feeling very guilty.
80 MAY’S GARDEN.

«“¢Well? she said, ‘you can understand now
that you are more happy here with your mother
than anywhere else; and you will not lose your
friend, for Miss Lucy will come to see you, and
I think she will always remember her foster-
sister, so that you must not fear that she will forget
you. Now, I say all this because I want you to feel
that God knows best, and it is his will that you are
Susie Smith, and not Lucy’s very own sister; and
I want you to pray that you may have a contented
mind and a new and humble heart, so that you may
be like the Lord Jesus Christ, who loved you and
bought you. Then when you wear a wreath of these
pretty flowers, you may hope that you are like them.’

. Then she went on to say that she hoped I should
bloom a beautiful flower one day in God’s own
garden; and though I did not quite understand her
then, mother explained it all to me afterwards; and
I often used to think of what she had said, and pray
that I might be like the heart’s-ease and violets, and
that I might be one of God’s own flowers. This was
how it was, my dears, that your heart’s-ease reminded
me of what had happened so many years ago, and I
have told you this long story as well as I remember it.
Though I daresay I have not told it to you just as it
THE HEART’S-EASE, 81

should be, still it’s pretty near; for, as I said before,
it’s curious how well I remember those times when I
was a child, long ago.”

“* But do tell us how you parted from Miss Lucy,”
said May, “and what became of her.”

“Oh, we parted very good friends, and she
often used to come and see me. I never went to
the Hall again, except for an hour or so—I had
had enough of that—not, at least, until Miss Lucy
was grown up; then she married, and she wanted
me to be her maid, so I went to pack up for her,
and then we went to foreign parts, and we were
travelling up and down, until Miss Lucy—I mean
Lady Hamlyn, as she was then—until she died.
But you must not ask me any more, my dears. I
cannot talk of that, except just to tell you she died
very happy, and I hope my time is not far off, but
Tm willing to wait the Lord’s time, for He knows
best.”

The children sat quite still for a minute, looking at
Mrs. Morris, and then Annie said, “I can’t fancy you
a little girl, Mrs. Morris; you look as if you had
always sat in that chair; it seems so funny to think
you could run about.”

“JT daresay it does, my dear,” said Mrs. Morris,
6
82 MAY’S GARDEN.

laughing, “but I did, I can assure you, and quite as
quick as you do, I can tell you.”

“Yes, I’m sure you would not tell a story,” said
Annie.

«We are very much obliged to you, Mrs. Morris,”
said May. “It has been a very pretty tale ; perhaps
you will tell us another, next time we come.”

«* Well, I shall see, my dear, whether I can think
of one. You see, I shall get used up, as I told you
before, and then I shall have nothing to say.”

“Oh yes, you will! What shall we do with the
peas, please ?”

“You can put them on the shelf, and if you look
in that blue basin, you will see some apples; you can
each have two, and then I think you must go home,
or mamma will be afraid you are lost.”
CHAPTER V.

THE BLUE-BELLS.

Mrs. Aston called the children to her one day, and
said that she was going up to London for a fortnight,
and so she had asked nurse to come and stay with
them while she was away. She said she hoped they
would be very good and obedient, and as they would
not have any lessons, she wished them to be out in the
open air as much as possible.

“Oh, that is nice!” said Annie, giving a few
jumps; “not that you are going away, mamma dear,
but that we shall have no lessons, and that we are to
be out in the air. Isn’t it beautiful, May? ”

“Y-e-s,” said May, “I shall like the holiday, but
do you think you will come back safely, mamma?”

“T hope so, my child. At all events, I shall be
quite as safe as if I were at home.”

“ Yes, mamma, but it does not seem as safe to be

going in the train as it is to be at home.”
*
84 MAY’S GARDEN.

“My May must learn to trust,” said Mrs. Aston,
kissing her. ‘Don’t you remember the verse you
learnt the other night, ‘ He shall not suffer thy foot to
be moved; He that keepeth thee will not slumber?’ ”

“Yes, mamma, I will trust you away, and I shall
be very pleased to have nurse here. I felt afraid,
because of that railway accident papa was talking
about.”

Mrs. Aston left the day after this conversation,
and nurse came.

There was a great talk as to what was to be done
while mamma was away; various plans were thought
of. May’s garden, of course, was to be put into the
most perfect order; so she called the little gardener,
who was playing in an undignified way with the
kitten, and suggested that the weeds should be taken
up and the whole garden neatly raked.

Annie immediately undertook the work, while May
looked to see what flowers she could spare for giving
away.

Nurse came up while the children were busy, and
when she found that May was counting her treasures,
she told her of a poor child in the town, who, she
thought, would be very glad to be visited and to have

some flowers.
THE BLUE-BELLS. 85

“Oh yes, I shall like to take her some,” said
May. “In what street does she live? and what is the
matter with her? ”

“She lives in Friar Street, and has such a poor
home. She has a spinal complaint, and is always
obliged to lie down, but she is so sweet and patient,
and so industrious when she is feeling a little better.”

“ Poor thing!” said Annie, who had stopped to
listen. ‘Hag she a mother, and father, and brothers,
and sisters, nursey ? ”

“No, darling, not so many relations as that. She
has a widowed mother, and a little brother called
Bill, that is all. She is so fond of her mother, and
so kind to her little brother, and he is such a tiresome
ehild, too.”

“Oh, it would be nice to go and see her, wouldn’t
it, Annie? When shall we go, nurse?”

“ You had better wait for a few days, for she was
very poorly when I saw her last, and it takes a little
while for the attacks to wear off.”

“‘ Suppose we go on Friday,” said May.

“Very well, I will take you, and then I shall leave
you to stay and talk to her while I go and do some
shopping. Now I should like to see what you will
take her.”


86 MAY’S GARDEN.

“There is a tiny rosebud on that tree,” said May,
“but it is only a monthly rose; then there is still
some red thorn left.”

“Oh, you must not take that, dear,’’ said nurse,
“it would give too strong a scent. What else have
you? Oh, this is very ye ! Why, it is a blue-bell,
that would be very nice.’

“Yes,” said May, “and I see a few other things
that will be out by Friday, so with some pretty green,
it would look nice. We shall soon have our standard
roses out, and the geraniums too, and then the garden
will look pretty. Won’t it, nurse?”

“Yes, it will indeed.”

When Friday came, the children made up a pretty
nosegay, chiefly of blue-bells, monthly roses, and
pretty pieces of green, and they started with nurse for
the street in which the sick child lived.

“ Wasn’t it a good thing we kept our blue-bells,
nursey?” said Annie. “I am so glad we did not
throw them away, or May could not have made such a
pretty nosegay.”

“Tt was avery good thing you keptit, dear ; yousee
‘no waste, no want,’ is true of flowers as well as food.”

«It’s nicer about flowers than food,” said Annie,
“because I don’t like eating up my fat, nor my crusts
THE BLUE-BELLS. 87

when the jam is all gone; and flowers haven’t to be
eaten up—you just water them and they keep all right
until they die.”

They were not long in reaching Friar Street, and
then the children felt rather shy when they really came
to the house.

Mrs. Martin, the mother of the sick child, only
rented two rooms, and into the first nurse took the
children.

“ve brought the young ladies to see Naomi,”
said nurse, “and they’ve brought her some flowers, for
I told them how fond she was of them.”

“Tm very much obliged, ’m sure. Sit down,
please. Ill go and tell her you’ve come; she’s been
a-looking out every day since you said you’d tell the
young ladies about her.”

“Oh, nurse, what shall we say?” said May, getting
alarmed. “I can’t think of anything.”

“Oh, don’t trouble about that, missy, say you’ve
brought her some flowers, and that you’re very sorry
she’s ill.”

«And what am I to say, nursey?” said Annie.
“ Please tell me something too.”

«You can say the same, and you can tell her about
your rabbits.”
88 MAY’S GARDEN.

“Oh yes, so I can,” said Annie, brightening up;
and then Mrs. Martin came in and said that Naomi
was quite ready for the young ladies. Nurse took
them in; but as the room was darkened they could
not see well at first; then, as they looked more closely,
they saw a very pale, thin girl, lying on her back on a
small wooden bedstead. May went up to her, and
gave her the flowers, saying she was very sorry she
was so ill; then Annie said the same; and after nurse
had spoken, she thought they would get on better
alone, so she left them.

‘Naomi lay quite still for a few minutes looking at
the flowers, turning them round and round and smell-
ing them ; then she said—

**T do like flowers. Would you put them in water
for me, miss? I be so much obliged to you for them.”

May asked what she should put them in. And
Naomi pointed to an old mug, which May filled half
full of water, and then put in the flowers.

“Please, both on you, sit down,” said Naomi, “if
you don’t mind staying a bit.”

“Oh no,” said May, “we’ve come to stay while
nurse does her shopping.”

“ That’s kind,” said Naomi. “ Might I ask how
old the little ’un is ?”’
THE BLUE-BELLS. 89

Annie nearly burst out laughing, but May managed
to get out that she was seven years old.

“Thank ye, and how old be you? ”

“Tam nine,” said May. ‘“ How old are you?”

“Kleven, miss ; I was just as old as you are when
I fell down stairs and hurt myself so bad, and I’ve lain
here ever since.”

« How tired you must be,” said May.

«Well, I gets very tired sometimes when I am
much by myself. Sometimes mother goes out charing,
and then she just gets a neighbour to come in now and
agen, and it do seem a long time, and lonely like;
but ’m that fond of flowers that when I get them,
they seem to make a bit of company.”

“Tm so glad we brought you some,” said May.
“We will bring you some more. We shall be having
some beautiful roses out soon ; but my garden has not
a great many flowers in it, and so I could not gather
you very nice ones to-day.”

“Oh, these be beautiful !’’ said Naomi. ‘Then the
garden isn’t little missy’s too? ”

No,” said Annie, “itis May’s garden, and I am
her gardener. I keep rabbits instead; I have such
beauties.”

“ Have you, miss? I had a rabbit when I was
90 MAY’S GARDEN.

well, but after I was took ill, mother said she hadn’t
time to see to it, so she sold it, and bought me that
there little book with the money. It’s such a pretty
tale, I read it over and over.”

“Do you like reading?” said May.

“That I do; I should be dull if it wasn’t for read-
ing when I’m a bit better. I used to have such a nice
teacher to come and see me, but she’s left, and now
V’ve no one. I used to go to the Sunday-school one
time, and it was just after the treat that I fell and
hurt myself. It was the only whole day I was ever in
the country, and it was nice. I could almost cry when
I look at them blue-bells, for I got such a lot of them
that day!”

“ Where did you go for the treat?” said May.

“We went to the fields near Bexley Woods. Bill
and I both went, and my friend, Betsy Green, from
t’other side of the street. We went in great vans, and
a teacher went in each van with the scholars. My
teacher sat next me, and told me such a pretty tale
when the others didn’t make too much noise.”

Mrs. Martin came in just as Naomi finished this
sentence, to say that nurse had come back again, as
she was afraid there was a storm coming on, and she

wanted the young ladies to get home. At first Naomi
THE BLUE-BELLS. 91

looked so disappointed, that May said she would ask
nurse to let them come on Monday to see her again,
and then they would bring some more flowers, par-
ticularly blue-bells.

Naomi quite brightened up at this and said, “It
would be nice if it wasn’t troubling.”

“Oh no,” said May, “we shall like it.”

Annie asked if she might bring one of her baby
rabbits ?

“ Just hear her!” said Mrs. Martin, laughing ;
“ o? course you may if you'll take it home again, but
my poor lass ain’t well enough to look after it.”

Annie said she would take it back, and then after
saying “ Good-bye,” the children went, and Naomi
was left alone.

Oh, who can tell the longing, yearning desire that
came over the poor girl for green fields and country
life! She had just spent one whole day in the country
two years ago, and she had never forgotten it. It had
been to her a heavenly pleasure ; the beautiful flowers,
the birds, the trees, and streams, had quite entranced
her, and now she seemed cut off from all these
delights.

The tears came into her eyes and dropped quietly
down, and then there came into her mind a text her
92 MAY’S GARDEN.

teacher had taught her, ‘“ There are pleasures at thy
right hand for evermore ;” and as she thought of the
joys prepared for those who love God, a calm came

over her, and she was soon sleeping a quiet happy
sleep.

May and Annie were very full “of their new friend.
They felt how sad it was to be lying there without
being able to get up and run about, and then she had
so few comforts too. So various little things were
thought of to make their visit on Monday a happy
surprise.

Cook was to make some jelly, and the children
denied themselves their Sunday cake at tea, in order
that it might be taken uncut to Naomi. ‘ben May
had knitted herself a little shawl, to wear when the
days were too cool for the garden frock alone, and
this she asked nurse’s leave to present, as she had
something else (not nearly so pretty though) that she
could wear. Nurse consented, feeling that it was
really a self-denial on May’s part to give it, as it was
the first large piece of knitting she had done.

Annie chose one of her books to give; she told
nurse it was the ‘‘ most grown up one” she could find.
In fact, nurse had to forbid anything more being
taken this time. She reminded them that they would


THE BLUE-BELLS. 93

pay other visits, and that there were other poor girls
and boys who wanted help.

How pleased the children were when Monday came
at last! It was so delightful to think of the pleasure
they hoped to give, and they both longed to make
poor Naomi’s life brighter. Mrs. Martin was out
when they reached the house, but they got the key
from a neighbour, and nurse took the children in.

Naomi was delighted to see them, and as one by
one the gifts were shown her, she seemed almost
overwhelmed. But nurse began talking about other
things, and made May arrange the fresh nosegay
of blue-bells and roses, so that Naomi had time to
recover herself.

Annie proposed that she should have some of the
jelly at once ; this was considered a very good idea, so
a plate and spoon were procured, and Naomi seemed
quite refreshed after she had taken some. Annie’s
baby rabbit was very much admired; it seemed so
funny to see him on the bed; he gave such odd jumps,
and once he came right down upon the jelly! Nurse
thought that both the children would be too much
for Naomi, so she proposed that Annie should come
with her while she went to do some errands, and that
May should stay quietly with Naomi.
94 MAY’S GARDEN.

Annie was quite willing to go, now that she had
given her present, shown her rabbit, and seen Naomi ;
for to tell the truth, it was very hard work for her to
sit still for long, and she could not run about in
Naomi’s room.

As soon as the two girls were left alone, Naomi
said, “I’ve had such a happy time since you were
here. I should so like to tell you about it, if you
don’t mind.”

“Oh no; I should like it,” said May. “ Please do
tell me.”

“Well, you remember that you put them blue-
bells and roses in the mug on the washstand, and
they were just where I could see ’em as I lay here.”

“Yes,” answered May.

« After you were gone, I felt a bit tired, just nicely, .
not much you know, and I went to sleep and dreamt ;
oh, such a pretty dream! Tve been thinking it over
and over, so that I could tell it to you just as it
happened.”

«T should so like to hear it,” said May. What
was it about?”

«Well, I dreamt about that day I told you we had in
the country two years ago. I thought we were all as
busy as bees, picking blue-bells and primroses ; there
THE BLUE-BELLS. 95

were such a lot of us, and I could hear all the talking
and laughing quite plain. It seemed just like real, all
of it. At first there was a great noise, but after a bit
there didn’t seem so many of us, and I began walking
away to another part, where there were more blue-bells,
though I’d such a lot then, that I had to carry them
in my pinny. As soon as I got to them, I began pick-
ing more, and then I wandered on and on, till I found
T was all alone; but I didn’t seem to mind, on I went,
and the sun shone and the grass looked so green, and
the birds sang—oh so beautiful it was! I felt so
happy, and it seemed so wonderful like to feel so glad.
T couldn’t help thinking how queer it was; but still
though it was queer, it was that nice, I couldn’t tell
you how beautiful it was.

« After a good while, the sun seemed going down,
and it soon began to get dark, but I felt asif I must
go on; and such a queer dreadful kind of feeling came
over me, as if there was nothing but mist and dark-
ness, and yet I must go through it. So I went on
and on, and at last I saw a star come out, then another
and another, till there were getting quite a many, and
the mist and darkness seemed going, and I didn’t
seem in it any longer, but on my bed; and then all
the stars seemed to join together, like a crown, and
96 MAY’S GARDEN,

to come into the room, and when I opened my eyes
in astonishment, there were your blue-bells, with the
moon shining full upon them, and somehow the stars
and blue-bells all seemed mixed up together, and I
thought that blue-bells must be stars, and stars blue-
bells.”

“ Tow very strange!” said May.

“Yes, wasn’t it? and I can’t tell you how happy
I felt, just as if all the dull unhappy time had gone,
and as if I was going always to be glad. I shall
always think now that blue-bells are stars, and that
they make a crown, and it will make me think of that
crown ‘that fadeth not away,’ that teacher used to
tell me of.

“T felt so happy that I lay quite still for a bit,
and then I called mother, for I began to feel so
hungry I didn’t know what to do. Then she
comes and tells me T’d been sleeping ever since
she’d been in, and when I awoke it was quite dark,
and one o’clock in the morning. Mother was so
pleased, for I hadn’t had such a beautiful sleep for
I don’t know how long before—not since I’d had
the fall.”

“T’m so glad,” said May. ‘Do you think the
blue-bells made you sleep ? ”


UE-BELL

BI
THE BLUE-BELLS. 97

“Well, I don’t know as it was them alone, I
felt so glad like, to think I’d got some friends again,
and that you was a-coming to-day, and then I
was mighty pleased with them blue-bells too, they
looked so pretty, and made me think of the country.
It was all of it together, mother thought, and so
do I.”

“JT wish you could go out,” said May, “I should
think you could in a carriage, or something you could
lie down in.”

“The doctor says ’m not to move for another
year; he told mother that after that I might be able
to be got out, but not before. I shouldn’t mind so
much if you could come pretty often, but it’s rude of
me to ask it.”

“Oh no, I should like to come,” said May, “and it
would be so nice for you to see mamma when she
comes back, she is so kind.”

“‘T wonder if she’s like my teacher. She was a
real lady too, only she wasn’t old.”

“ Oh, mamma isn’t old—not very oldI mean. She
hasn’t got grey hair yet, and she doesn’t wear a cap,
like aunt. She’s not really old because she can run.
Now, Mrs. Morris, an old woman we know, can’t run

upstairs.”
7
98 MAY’S GARDEN.

“Oh no, she’s not old then; why, mother says
she’s not, though she tells folks, ‘she’s not
young.”

Nurse and Annie now came in to fetch May.
Nurse was afraid Naomi was tired, but she said
she was not. She seemed so sorry that May was
obliged to go, that nurse said she should come again
soon.

So after Mrs. Aston’s return, May was very anxious
to go and see Naomi again, and to interest her
mamma in her case; and Mrs. Aston was quite
pleased to see her little daughter show so much
feeling, and take such a deep interest in the poor
sick child. .

She therefore allowed May to visit her again
very soon, and gave her some beautiful fruit to take,
and promised to go and see her in a few days.
Annie thought she should like to go too, so Emma
took the children, who were both delighted at the
thoughts of the pleasure they were going to give
Naomi.

As soon as they had asked her how she was,
May put the basket of fruit on the table, near the
bed, and Naomi seemed as if she couldn’t believe her
eyes.
THE BLUE-BELLS. 99

“Them’s not for me, surely?” she said, looking
eagerly at May.

** Yes, they are,” said Annie laughing, not able to
contain herself, and wishing to be the first to com-
municate the good news.

“Ay, surely, but they’re too good for such as
me,” said Naomi, as tears of pleasure and excitement
came into her eyes.

“No, mamma hopes you will enjoy them very
much, and she is coming to see you herself in a
few days,” said May.

“She is a kind lady! it just seemsas if everything
nice was coming to-day, for I’ve heard from my
teacher, such a long letter, and I want you to read it,
please, miss. Mother has been reading it, but she’s
not a very good scholar, and she can’t make out all
the hard words.”

May sat down and took the letter, feeling very
grand in being considered such a much better scholar
than Naomi’s mother.

Naomi had raised herself a little, so that she could
watch May better while she read, and so get the whole
effect of the valued letter. May began :—

“Dear Naomi,—I trust you are feeling better
and stronger than when I left you. I have very
100 MAY’S GARDEN.

often prayed for you, and asked God to make you well
again; and we know, dear child, that He can and will
do this if it is best.

“T am afraid you must have thought I had for-
gotten you, but indeed I have not. I have very often
thought of you, and wished I could see you again,
but this cannot be just yet, though I hope it will not
be a very long time before we meet. You will be
very much surprised at something I am going to tell
you. Can youguess? Try, before you read any more.
When you send me a letter, which I hope you will do
through your mother, you must tell me if you guessed
rightly. The secret is this, I am married ; so that I
am no longer Miss Mackenzie, but Mrs. Bogue. Can
you fancy me? I assure you Iam just the same per-
son, just as fond of Naomi, and as much interested in
her as I was at dear Woodchester.

“JT daresay you would like to know who my
husband is, so I will tell you; he is a chaplain to
a regiment of soldiers, that is, he reads prayers and
preaches to them on Sunday, and looks after them
during the week, as a clergyman looks after his
people in England.

“* Now I think you would feel interested if I told
you something about India, and something about a
THE BLUE-BELLS. 101

school there is near us, where many native children
are taught about the Bible, and learn to grow up use-
ful men and women. First, then, about India. It is
a very hot country, so hot, that we have to have great
fans, called Punkahs, in the rooms to keep up a
current of air, so that we have to live ina wind. The
sun has such power as soon as ever it rises, that it
would be dangerous to be out without some protec-
tion, even when it only seems to have just risen. It is
impossible to do anything in the middle of the day
but sleep, or keep quite still, so that we have to get
up very early indeed, so as to secure the cooler hours
for work. We are obliged to have a great many
servants, because they will only each do one thirg.
Fancy people in England having one servant to clean
the boots, another to make the beds, another to brush
your clothes, and so on.

“Then I am sure you would be dreadfully
frightened if you saw one of the deadly serpents
here, called cobras. They get into the houses some-
times, and I know one gentleman who told me what a
narrow escape he had. He said he was in his bed-
room, and he saw something hanging over the door,
and at first he did not think of what it was, but soon
he saw that it was a cobra just getting ready to
102 MAY’S GARDEN.

dart at him ; -you may think he quickly called his ser-
vant, who gave it a great blow which disabled it, and
then it was quickly killed. Then the servants thought
it was such a wonderful escape that they offered a
sacrifice to their gods. Iam afraid we do not always
remember to praise our true God when we are
delivered from danger, as these poor heathen praised
and thanked their false gods.

“ And now for the school where these poor heathen
children are taught. I shall only tell you something
about the girls, or my letter will be so long that you
will forget the beginning before you reach the end.
There are thirty girls in the school; from little tiny .
things of two and three, to thirteen and fourteen, and
even older than this. But I must tell you that girls
of thirteen and fourteen are treated as women in India,
and fourteen is considered quite old to be married.
Doesn’t it seem funny? Fancy your friend Betsy
Green being old enough to be married when she is
only twelve !

“There is one child whom I have adopted, and who
is called ‘Naomi.’ Can you guess who she is named
after? But though she is named after a Sunday
scholar of mine, she does not take her place in my
heart. Still, it is pleasant to think I have a ‘ Naomi’
THE BLUE-BELLS. 103

near me, and I sometimes look at her dusky face,
and try to imagine a likeness to an English girl of
the same name!

* Well, Naomi the dusky is actually going to be
married, and she has been betrothed some months.
She is going to marry a catechist, who is a very good
young man. She is also, I trust, a true Christian,
but is inexperienced and too young for the position she
will occupy. She has a sister who is blind, and who
is not yet a Christian. It is very sad to see her, and
she is not at all happy, for she lives with an aunt
who is not kind to her. She sometimes comes to see

. Naomi, who tried to teach her about God. She
always listens very attentively, and we hope that what
she hears may be blest to her, but she will find it
hard work to profess the faith, for her aunt is very
much opposed to Christianity.

* You ought to be very thankful that you have no
one to keep you back from striving to follow the Saviour.
Just think how trying it is for this young girl (she is
only ten) to even think about the effort of becoming a
Christian. I hope you will pray for her, dear Naomi.

“Now I have written you quite a long letter, and
I shall expect one in return. I enclose you stamps
for the postage, so that you will have no excuse.
104 MAY’S GARDEN.

Please remember me very kindly to your mother, and
believe me to remain with love, Your affectionate
teacher. - © Huren Bogus.

“P.S. Since I finished my letter to you, I have
heard that the poor blind child I told you about has
been so cruelly treated by her aunt, that she has run
away to the school for protection, and as she is very
much hurt, the magistrate has been applied to, and he
has given Miss Warner, the governess, power to keep
her. It seems the woman with whom she lived was
not really her aunt, and she has no parents. I hear
she wants to be a Christian; if she becomes one, I will
tell you about it in my next letter. Good-bye, once

more, dear child.”’

“Tsn’t it a nice letter ?”’ said Naomi, with tears
in her eyes; ‘“‘and I was afraid she had forgotten
me quite.”

‘Tt is a very kind letter, and to think it has come
all the way from India, miles and miles off!”

«Yes, all across the sea, isn’t it, miss?”

“It has to come over some sea; but one day,
when mamma was giving us our geography lesson,
she told us that people, and letters, too, I suppose,
came over the land a great deal, because if you go
THE BLUE-BELLS. 105

a particular way, you can get there without much
sea.”

“T do hope that blind girl will come over to our
religion. Don’t you, miss? I shall pray for her as
teacher asked me. Will you?”

“ Yes, I will.”

“So will I,” said Annie. “Tm glad I’m not a
heathen.”

“There’s Emma calling us,” said May, ‘we
must go.”

«Oh, I’m go sorry,” said Naomi, ‘‘ but mother will
be in soon, so never mind.”

“Tm afraid we can’t stay,” said May, “but
mamma is coming to see you in a few days.” ,

“Then would she write for me to teacher ? ”’

“ Yes, I think she would. T’ll ask her,” said May.

The children then said “ good-bye” to the sick
child, who watched them out of the room with yearn-
ing eyes, and then she hugged her letter to her, feel-
ing that could not go away.

Mrs. Aston came to see her in a day or two, and
wrote the letter, as Naomi said, “ right beautiful,” and
when it was fairly off, she began to wonder how soon
she should get an answer. The children often came

to see her, bringing her flowers and little delicacies ;
106 MAY’S GARDEN.

and after a time she began to get quite well and
strong again. But she never forgot the lessons she
had learnt on her sick bed, and she often thanked
God for the hours of darkness and weariness, for she
felt they had been the means of drawing her nearer to
Him.
CHAPTER VI.
THE ROSE.

“T can’t bear that old man! He is so ugly, and so
cross and disagreeable, I’m sure nobody could like
him if they tried ever so much,” said Annie to May
one day, after they had passed the Alms-houses in a
street near their home. :

“‘T suppose we ought to love him,” said May.

“ Love him!” screamed Annie, in perfect horror.
“You might as well love a tiger! He looked as if
he could eat me up just now, as we passed.”

* He does look cross, and no mistake; but I won-
der whether anything would make him kind? Sup-
pose we give him a rose for his coat? He couldn’t
eat us up, however cross he might be.”

“ Don’t ask me!” said Annie. ‘I’d as soon hand
a rose to a roaring lion as to that cross old fellow.
Do it yourself, if you like, and Ill peep round the
108 MAY’S GARDEN.

corner with Emma; and if he knocks you down, we’ll
come and pick you up.”

“Thank you!” said May. “I’m sure you're
very kind. Oh, never mind him. We’ll give one to
some one else.”

“There!” said Annie. ‘“ You say, ‘Never mind
him,’ when you think you will have to give it your-
self.”

“ You are so sharp, Annie. I didn’t think you’d
mind it ag much as I should.”

“Just as if I like being knocked down any more
than you do,” said Annie, laughing.

But, however, the next day, before they went for
their afternoon walk, May saw that Annie had got one
of her very best roses in her hand.

“Whatever have you got that for?” said May,
not quite liking Annie having gathered it without her
permission.

* Don’t look cross. I’m going to have a try at the
old man. I thought we could run down the street in
front of Emma, and then I could offer it to him
quickly as I passed.”

“ But suppose he’s not at his door ?” ‘

“Then I shan’t goin. But he is there generally
at this time.”




ROSE

A
THE ROSE. 109

So, with beating hearts, the children started with
Emma; and, as they neared the Alms-houses, Annie’s
heart almost failed her when she saw the old soldier
at his door. But she didn’t want to be bafiled, and
so she tried to feel as courageous as possible.

The children began running, and, as they reached
the old man, they slackened their pace, and Annie
smilingly offered the rose.

To the surprise of the children—for May lingered
to see the result—the rose was received quite gra-
ciously, with a sort of grunt, but also with an unmis-
takable smile.

“Thank you, missy,” he said. “Is it for the
button-hole ?”

“Yes; or to put on your little table while you
have your tea.”

“Well, I never ’eard the loike!” said the old
man, with a series of low grunts which were meant
for laughter. ‘Th’ old chaps would laugh to see me
with a rose on th’ table. I shouldn’t mind th’ mantel-
shelf.”

“Oh! please put it where you like,” said Annie,
looking very sedate, but feeling very merry.

“Ay, ay; that’s the place, missy. There it is.
Pll just get a drop o’ water to ’er. Now she do look
110 MAY’S GARDEN.

fine,’ he said, turning to the children, who had ven-
tured almost within the lion’s den.

“Yes, it’s a beautiful rose,” said May. “I hope
it will live a long time.”

“Ay, ay,” said Old Peter (for that was the
name he went by); “it ’ll live fast enough. But
you’d better come and see that I takes care on ’er.”

“Yes, we will,” said Annie, venturing a few steps
into the room. “‘ What a nice, clean little room you’ve
got,” she said, timidly, almost afraid whether tho old
lion would not turn upon her.

But, no; he gave a comical look as he saw her
frightened peep at him, and said—

“Tt’s a beautiful parlour, missy, and it ’Il be proud
to see you. Just try my chair. There, ain’t it com-
fortable ?”’

Annie found herself actually sitting in Old Peter’s
chair !

It certainly was very comfortable, and she leant
back her head, and shut her eyes, as if she was going
to have a nap.

Old Peter watched her with a face full of the
most intense amusement, and with such tenderness,
that no one would have thought of calling him any-
thing but the best-tempered man they knew.
THE ROSE. 111

Annie quickly opened her eyes. She had certainly
no intention of sleeping in the den ; and, as she looked
up to the old man, she saw his face perfectly beaming
upon her.

“T like your chair. It is very comfortable,” she
said, smiling.

*You’s welcome, and I’ll be glad to see you at
any time. I’m fond of little folks, in my way.”

By this time, Emma was quite tired of waiting ; so
she appeared at the door, and told the children they
must come.

Old Peter’s face changed as soon as he saw her,
and the old gloomy look came back again; but he
smiled to the children as they bade him good-bye ;
and, as Annie turned to have a last peep, she saw
him sitting down in his chair with evident satisfaction,
and the rose was in his hand.

“T like him so much,” said Annie. “Don’t you,
May?”

“Yes; I think he must be kind, really, in his
heart.”

“ He didn’t look kind at me, that’s certain,” said
Emma: “and I don’t think your mamma would like
you to go a-visiting of such as he.”

“Oh yes; ’m sure mamma would,” said Annie.
112 MAY’S GARDEN.

“She likes us going to see poor people. Besides, he
only looked cross at you; he was very good to us,
wasn’t he, May?”

“Yes, he was; but I think he could soon get cross,
if we did anything he didn’t like.”

“T should like to go and see him again on Wed-
nesday,” said Annie.

When they reached home, they told Mrs. Aston
about their visit, and she was quite pleased to think
they had made acquaintance with the old soldier; and
she was willing that they should go and see him again
goon.

So, when Wednesday came, May and Annie ran
off, and went to pay a second visit to their new friend.

This time they went alone, as the Alms-houses
were very near home, and they had told their mamma
that Old Peter did not seem to like Emma. To their
dismay, his door was shut, and they almost felt afraid
to knock ; but after looking at it for some time, as if
they thought two pairs of eyes staring hard could open
it, Annie ventured to give a timid knock.

There was a dreadful growl, and the door was
flung open in an angry way; but, as soon as Old Peter
saw who his visitors were, his face relaxed into a

smile, and he seemed quite another man.
THE ROSE. 113

Nevertheless, he peered out to see if the objec-
tionable Emma was there; but, when he saw the
children were quite alone, he rubbed his hands in
high glee.

“There, now ; that’s what I calls civility, to come
and see me without that great gawky crittur with you.
Now, missy,”’ he said, turning to May, “take that
cheer; and you, little un, take this un. “Iwas ‘the
same as my Sarah Anne allers sat in, and she were
fond on’t.””

«Who was Sarah Anne?” said Annie.

“My darter, as died th’ year I got this ’ere place.
On course she died, ’cause I wanted her particular ;
and I wur that fond on’er, it cut me in two, as you
may say, when she went. Howsoever, tain’t no good
a-thinking on’t.”

“Was she grown up?” said May.

“No, no—grown up, missy! Why, she wur no
bigger than th’ little un there—beg pardon, little
missy, I means. She were properly my grand-darter,
but she allers seemed like my own, and of course she
went. Everything and everybody as I likes goes to
Ameriky, or dies, or gets killed, or summat. It’s
enough to try anybody’s temper, and it’s allers been
that way with me. Like a comrade, he’s killed; like

8
114 MAY’S GARDEN.

another, he must get away somewhere or other, not
near me. It’s all the same—allers has been, and allers
will be. Little folks is best, that’s why I likes you.”

““T am so sorry you lose everybody,” said May.
*‘T don’t know what I should do if I did. Yes, though
—I think I should do something.” Then May stopped,
colouring, for she didn’t like to bring it out.

‘What would you do, then, missy? You look
very wise.”

May coloured more and more, and then she said, in
a low voice, ‘‘ Mamma says we ought to pray when we
are in trouble,”

Old Peter made no answer; but as there was a
knock at the door, he hobbled there very quickly and
opened it. There was a woman there with a basket of
pins and needles, tapes and cotton, and she asked Old
Peter to buy.

“No!” he roared. “Get you gone! Who wants
such as you, a-selling and a-messing with your bits 0’
things? No, I say, can’t you ’ear!” and he slammed
the door in her face.

Both May and Annie looked shocked and uncom-
fortable, particularly as the old man went rating on to
himself. He seemed quite upset, and May’s only
thought was, how they could get away.
THE ROSE. 115

But as soon as he saw May was getting up, he said,
“What! are you a-going so soon? Can’t you stay
and keep an old man company a bit? I ain’t out with
you; but people as comes a-bothering. a-pushing, and
a-screeching, provokes me that bad, if ’'d only both
my legs I’d kick ’em to t’other end of the street.”

Annie burst out laughing, though May looked quite
shocked. Old Peter laughed too.

“Wouldn’t it be fun, little missy, eh? You'd like
to see me do it, eh ?”

“‘ No, indeed, I shouldn’t,” said Annie; “I should
be so frightened of you! I don’t like you when you’re
cross.”

« You’re a queer un, and no mistake! Wull, I
ain’t angered with you—I likes your coming, and I
wish you’d come often, and I’ll not blow up th’ old
women. ’Hre’s some gingerbread, now, right good.
I wish you'd both on you have a bit.”

Annie couldn’t refuse, it looked so very nice; and
May ventured on a piece, though she longed to get
away, and thought she’d never come again. As they
were eating it, the old man said, “I’ve lots and lots I
could tell you about th’ wars I’ve been in: such tales
ag you would like, I know. If you’ll come in on an

arternoon now and agen, [’ll tell you lots. What
116 MAY’S GARDEN.

do you say to that, missy?” he said, turning to
Annie.

«Oh, I should like it very much, if mamma would
let us come,”’ said Annie.

“Tell ’er it’ll be a charity,’ said Old Peter—‘a
raal one, too. I’m not as rough asI look. I only
gets out o’ sorts now and agen; folks do bother me so
a-coming and a-coming for ever to th’ door.”

“ But we must come to the door, too,” said May,
looking amused.

“Yes, yes; but I'll know your knock now. You
needn’t fear, and I’ll get the beautifullest story for you
next time. When ’ll you come again?”

May felt mollified; nevertheless, she wasn’t quite
prepared to say when they would come again, but
Annie saved her the trouble, for she said, ‘“ Saturday
is a whole holiday, so we will ask mamma if we may
come in the afternoon for a bit; but you won’t be
cross, will you ?” she said, coaxingly.

“No, no; certain not, little missy. You are that
like my Sarah Anne, I never see’d the like on’t.”

«Will you tell us more about Sarah Anne,” said
May, ‘‘when we come on Saturday? I should like
that better than the wars.”

“Oh, May!” said Annie, looking very much dis-
THE ROSE. 117

appointed, “I shouldn’t; not but what I should like
to hear about Sarah Anne,” she said, afraid the old
man might think her unkind; ‘‘but I do want to
hear about the battles, and the soldiers, and every-
thing.”

«Well, well, ll please you both. You shall hear
about my poor Sarah Anne, and Ill tell you lots
about the wars, where I lost my leg.”

The children thanked him and left, longing to get
home and tell their mamma their wonderful experience.

«Oh mamma,” said Annie, rushing into the room,
“Old Peter has been so cross, not with us, but with a
woman who came round selling things; he did go on
so, and then, when he found we didn’t like it, he made
out he wouldn’t be so cross to us, but he says every-
thing has gone against him, and he has lost his grand-
child, Sarah Anne, and he seems to have been so
fond of her.”

«Poor old. man!” said Mrs. Aston, “ his troubles
have tried his temper instead of leading him to God;
but perhaps we may be able to comfort him a little.”

“‘We said we would go on Saturday afternoon if
you would let us, mamma,” said May, “ he is going to
tell about Sarah Anne, and about his battles.”

“Yes, I do wish Herbert was here,” said Annie,
118 MAY’S GARDEN.

“because he says he is going to be a soldier, and
he would be so interested to hear about real
battles.”

“Well, dear, your cousins are coming for part of
their holidays most likely, and then you will be able
to take Herbert to see Old Peter.”

“ Oh, that will be delightful,” said Annie, frisking
round and round her mamma, “I shall tell Old Peter
he must teach Herbert how to be a soldier.”

“He would not find it easy without a leg, my
dear.”

“But he could tell him what to do, mamma, and
that would be something.”

On the Saturday, the children paid their promised
visit to Old Peter, who had his door open all ready to
receive them. His room was beautifully clean, and
both the roses were carefully put in a tumbler on
the mantel shelf. There was a plate of ginger-bread
on the table, and some plates and tumblers.

“How do you do, little missies,” he said, with
beaming eyes (but with a face like a piece of leather
drawn into thick folds for smiles), I’m pleased to see
you, and I’ve got some ginger-bread and ginger-beer
to match, you know) for you to keep yourselves awake
(while I tell my stories.”
THE ROSE. 119

“How kind of you!” said May, seating herself
sedately in the chair prepared for her.

Annie looked brimful of happiness. ‘Do you
know,” she said, “I have a cousin who wants to be a _
soldier, and he is coming here for part of his holidays,
and I want you to teach him, please, will you?”

“Well, I'll talk to him, but it will not be much
good if he’s no bigger than you, little missy.”

“Oh yes, it will, for he’ll be a man some day, and
he’s quite made up his mind to be a soldier.”

Old Peter roared with laughter. “What do you
think I made up my mind to be when I were seven,
missy ?”

“T don’t know,” said Annie, “ what was it?”

« A cobbler! that’s what I thought was one of the
best trades going, to mend up lots of boots and shoes
seemed fine to me, but ’ere’s me, with a leg took off,
and been a-soldiering all my life.”

“ But Herbert doesn’t want to be a cobbler,” said
Annie, puzzled to see the drift of the old man’s talk.

“No, but he wants to be a soldier at seven, and
I wanted to be a cobbler at seven, and he may be
no more a soldier than I’ve been a cobbler, eh,
missy ?”

“T don’t think he’ll change his mind,” said Annie,
120 MAY’S GARDEN.

“‘we play at nothing else but soldiers when he’s here,
he’s the officer and I’m the men.”

“It?s as good as a play, it is,” said Old Peter
laughing ; “ but howsoever, if we’re to have tales about
the war, I think we’d better have some of this ’ere
ginger-bread and ginger-beer. What do you say,
missy ?”’ he said, turning to May.

«* Tt would be very nice,” said May. So Old Peter
handed round the ginger-bread and opened some
ginger-beer, but when it came to the point, he did not
wish to be fortified himself with the same refreshments.
He said, on being pressed by his young lady visitors,
that he thought a glass of beer without the ginger
would suit him better when the stories were over.

“ Notas [takes more than my couple of pints a day
ever, and only that when I’s got extra duty, you know.
V’s not a drinking chap, never was, and hope I never
will be ; howsoever, talking do make a fellow dry,
special when talking ain’t one’s trade. Now, if I'd
been one of them preaching chaps, ’'d a-talked and
a-talked and never given in till as I could talk no
longer, and no extra beer would I ha’ took for that,
but it’s different when it ain’t your trade, and talking’s
only occasional.”

May managed to keep a grave face during this long
THE ROSE. 121

speech, but only by turning her back as much as
possible on Annie, and eating small bits of ginger-
bread very quickly, so as to keep down her inclination
to laugh; but Annie, after repeated little bursts, which
she managed to smother down for a time, at last fairly
choked and caused quite a scene.

May turned white with fear, and began thumping
Annie’s back, for she had heard that it was a good
thing. This made the old man so angry, that he gave
May a knock with his crutch, which so horrified Annie
(who had only got a crumb in her throat), that the
crumb went down and she was well directly. May
felt very indignant, although it was only a very slight
knock the old man gave her.

As soon as Annie was better, Old Peter sat down
in his chair, and seemed as if he could hardly breathe ;
he pointed to the door, and gasped “ Open it.” The
children quickly obeyed him, and he soon revived.

“ Whatever made you go a-choking and a-frighten-
ing me in that way, missy?” he said, turning re-
proachful eyes on Annie.

“T got a crumb in my throat,” said Annie, “I felt
ag if I could hardly breathe.”

«Well, I’m glad it’s gone down. I begs your
pardon, big missy, for using th’ crutch, but it did rile
122 MAY’S GARDEN.

me to see you a-beating of your sister there; I spose
you thought it ’ud help ’er; maybe you didn’t mean
to hurt ’er, eh ? ”

“Ohno!” said May, “I’ve been told it is a good
thing to do, but I don’t know, I’m sure.”

“Then we’re friends again,” said the old man,
“ain't we? Ididn’t mean to *urt you, missy, any more
than to keep you from a-beating of your sister.”

Annie laughed. “May never beats me,” she
said, “and we’re all friends again. Aren’t we,
May?”

“Oh yes,” said May, getting mollified. ‘ Are you
better?” she said, turning to the old man.

«All right, missy, thank you, it’s only for a
minute or so I feels so queer, and only sin’ my
Sarah Anne died as I comes on like that.”

«Will you let us hear about Sarah Anne,” said
May, “ for we can’t stay much longer.”

“Well, I gived you my word, and J’ll keep it, if
you wish, but I gived my word about th’ battles to
th’ little missy, and if you can’t stay long, I can’t tell
you both, which shall it be? It seems to me as if
Sarah Anne was more a Sunday tale. I allers thinks
on ’er most o’ Sundays; if you could come then, I:
could tell you about ’er, and about th’ battles to-day.”
THE ROSE. 123

JT don’t think mamma would like us to come on
Sundays,” said May, “ but I’ll ask her.”

“Then you will have th’ battles to-day ?”

“Yes, please,” said May.

“ Well now, little missy, I’ll begin by saying, never
you a marry of a red coat, when you’s grown up ; it’s
nothing but misery and misery, the lots o’ miserable
widders I’ve seed, to be sure! Soldiering’s all grand
enough when you’ve to go parading about like a lot a
new pins; but when it comes to mean being dirty,
and hungry, and your clothes hanging on you as if
you was pegs in a wall, and what there is a-patched
and a-darned till you don’t know hardly whether you’re
a red-coat or not—I tell you, missy, it’s very different
to marching toa band, a-playing of beautiful toons and
having lots o’ lassies looking and admiring, and a-
thinking how grand you are.”

“‘ Didn’t you like being a soldier, then?” said May.

“ Aye, aye, missy,” said the old man with brighten-
ing eyes. “Td go again to-morrow and ‘list if I'd
my poor leg back, and if they’d take me; but that’s
different to being a soldier’s wife ; and I don’t want little
missy to grow up with th’ notion that’s a good thing.
No, my wife just died from th’ worry, worry, worry as
she had about me, for she wur very fond of me, tho’ I


124 MAY’S GARDEN.

says it as shouldn’t, and I made ’er a good husband,
tho’ that’s between us and th’ wall, as you may say.
Yes, she wur a good wife to me, but sickly and of a
pining disposition, she was allers wanting cheering
up. I used to say to ’er, ‘ Cheer up, old woman,’ and
she says to me, she says, ‘ That’s right, George, let’s
cheer up,’ but then she’d soon get down agen, so
that it was a continual cheering of ’er up, and
when she died it near broke my heart to think I
shouldn’t have nobody to cheer up no more. But
howsoever, little missy wants to ’ear about soldiering.
Well, I ’ardly know where to begin. I wur a sergeant
when I went to the Crimea, and I came back a
sergeant-major, which wur no disgrace, an course.
Did ye ’ear about th’ battles?”

‘No, I wasn’t born,” said Annie, “I should be
nearly grown up if I had been.”

“How stoopid of me,” said Old Peter, “ why it
only seems like t’other day; but, an course, it’s
seventeen year ago, now. Well, I wur not at th’ first
battle, I wur ill. It did cut me up to think I wurn’t
there ; but, howsoever, I wur at Inkermann, and that
were stiff work. We’d more men agen us than we knew
how to getrid on. Jest as you thought you’d got ’em
back a bit, on they comes agen, like a lot o’ wild
THE ROSE. 125

beasts as they was and nothing better, a-spiking of our
men when they was down. Wull, we never turns our
backs on ’em. No, no, up they comes, and we’s at
7em agen and agen till we were near spent, and
comrades were getting knocked down on all sides.
Curious I didn’t get touched, just a bit .o? my coat-
tail off wur all as came nigh me. But it’s not for
babies such as you to hear all the horrible things as
happens in battle; I never told my Sarah Anne, and
I don’t think it’s fit for you. Howsoever we won the
day; them French chaps came in a-trotting like a lot
a ponies, almost a-skipping they was, and they did
good service and no mistake, and I’s not one as
grudges ’em th’ praise on’t, not as we hadn’t th’ hard
work first, for we had to keep them Roosian critters
back as best we could.” ‘

Here Old Peter stopped to take breath, and imme-
diately May took advantage of the opportunity to
remonstrate with him on calling her and her sister
babies.

“ You needn’t mind telling us about the war,” she
said, “because we are not babies. Why, I’m nearly
ten and Annie will be eight next month.”

“You are not babies, eh? Well, well, be jest

what you likes in your own ’pinion, you ain’t much.
126 MAY’S GARDEN.

more nor babies to me, who’m turned over of seventy-
five; howsoever, little folks likes to be grow’d up,
and old uns often wants to be young again; there’s
no a-satisfying of nobody in this ’ere world, ’m
thinking.”

“Please do go on about the war,” said Annie,
“T do so want to know about it because I’ve got to
write to Herbert, and he’ll be so disappointed if he
doesn’t have a long letter.”

“ Now, little missy, you take an old man’s advice
and don’t you be a-palavering of Master Herbert about
th’ war, as if it wur grand and foine. He’d soon wish
hissel’? back with his mamma, I can tell you, with a
day of the ’sperience some of our young officers had ;
not but what they was brave enough, jest doing as th’
men did, and bearing up like brave men as they was ;
but war ain’t the thing for a little chap o’ seven to
think on; and I’s tell you no more, ’cept as I got my
leg took from me at jest a skirmish and nothing more;
and I wur riled to think as it didn’t get took off at a
bigger affair ; howsoever, it couldn’t be helped.”

“Didn’t it hurt dreadfully ?” said Annie, looking
horrified.

“Yes, pretty considerable, I warrant you, missy ;
Master Herbert wouldn’t a liked it. But I got took
THE ROSE. 127

off to the ship after a bit, but I wurn’t o’ any more use ;
so, thinks I to mysel’, I’ll jest go home to my Sarah
Anne, and we’ll have a quiet time for a bit. But,
howsoever, I said I’d tell you about ’er of a Sunday if
you could come, so I’ll stop now. I suppose you’d
better go home to your mamma, eh ?”

“Yes, we had better say good-bye now,” said
May; “and we’ll come in and tell you when we can
come to hear about Sarah Anne.”

“We are so much obliged to you for the ginger-
bread and ginger-beer,” said Annie, ‘‘ and I’m so sorry
I made you ill with choking.” ar

“Well, well, that’s no matter; but do be care-
ful, little un; t’ain’t comfortable to choke, you
knows.” :

“ No, indeed it isn’t,” said Annie, laughing.

When the children reached home they were in a
great state of excitement about the fun they had had
with Old Peter, for his curious way of talking amused
them so much that they had often hardly known how
to keep from bursting out loud with laughter.

Mrs. Aston was quite amused with their hot
faces, and she was glad to hear that they had got on
so well with the old man.

“But, mamma,” said May, “I don’t know
128 MAY’S GARDEN.

what you will say, for he wants us to go some
Sunday to hear about his grandchild, Sarah Anne.
He was so fond of her, and she died, and he is
going to tell us about her, only he wants to do it on
Sunday. May we go some Sunday afternoon after
church ?”

“T will think about it, my dear. I like the old
man’s idea of wanting to tell you about her on Sun-
day ; but I will consult papa first to see whether he
would mind.”

Mrs. Aston asked Mr. Aston if he objected to the
visit being paid on Sunday, and as she found he did
not she allowed the children to go and tell old Peter
that they would come some Sunday very soon to hear
about Sarah Anne.

The old man seemed quite pleased to think he was
going to have his little visitors on a Sunday. Then
he asked them to stop a while as he had thought of
some interesting bits to tell them from his campaign-
ing experience.

The children had not long to stay, but they could
not resist the temptation of a few tit bits.

“T ain’t got no ginger-bread nor ginger-beer to- .
day,’”’ said Old Peter, “ for I didn’t know as how you

would come; howsoever, I ’ave thought o’ summat as
THE ROSE. 129

I thinks was uncommon fun, though at th’ time 1 wur
near driven wild. |

«“Wull, to go to th’ p’int at once, ’twas in th’
Crimea as there was th’ most awful gales o’ wind as
ever I seed in all th’ days o’ my life. No, I never
anywheres saw the like. Wall, th’ wind roared like
that.”

Then Old Peter gave a roar, which made the
children jump up with fright.

“T wur only showing you as how it wur,” he said,
with an amused twinkle in his eye; “you needn’t be
jumping up.”

‘Please don’t show us any more,” said May, “it’s
dreadful.”

«Eh, it wur, I can tell you. Wull, th’ wind blew
and th’ rain came down,and I could ’ear it in my
tent. Thinks I to mysel’, th’ tent ll soon be down,
and th’ pole snaps, and down the wet canvas comes,
a-smothering me a’most. Wuill, I creeps out as well
as I could, and then I secs th’ tent carried up by th’
wind; and I looks agen, and there’s a big table with
four legs a-careering about up in the wind, and not
only that but a couple o’ cheers a-careering for com-
pany. It wur odd. Wull, thinks I, Pll keep out o’
their way anyhow; so I goes a-careering too; but as

9
180 MAY’S GARDEN.

soon as I gets free of the table there’s the cheer jest
a-going to seat itself a-top o’? my head. Fortunate
for me th’ table soon tired o’ such freaks, and with a
great bang comes down and breaks ’er legs, but th’
cheers thinks they’ll enjoy theirselves, and if they
comes down a bit they rises aloft agen, till at last I
wur right glad when they wur all to bits, and then
legs and pieces didn’t seem so bad to come a-
tumbling about. How would you ha’ liked that, little
missy?”

“Not at all; but we needn’t fear having winds
like that in England, need we?” said Annic, rather
alarmed.

“T never seed the like afore or since as them
winds, so I don’t think you need feel afraid,” said Old
Peter, with his withered-up smile and low grunting:
laugh.

The children laughed heartily with the old man,
and he seemed as pleased as they did.

“Tt’s allers rare fun to tell one’s ’sperience,” he
said, “ when it’s comic, and *twas a good thing as a
fellow could turn his ill-luck into a laugh. Don’t you
think that they was my table and cheers. No, no;
they comed out 0’ two different officers’ tents nigh th’
place where I wur. Th’ table wur out o’ my colonel’
THE ROSE. 181

tent, and when, after th’ storm, I told him th’ skittish
way in which she’d behaved, he roared and seemed
nigh killed with laughing, and I ’eard him a-telling a
lot o’ t’other officers, and it made ’em a bit o’ fun all
round. Th’ colonel wur a raal gentleman from th’ sole
o’ his feet to crown 0’ his head; I never seed him any-
thing else, tho’ he’s been dressed a’most in patch-
work often and often, but whatever figure he’d ha’
made, I’d allers ha’ saluted him. I should ha’ known
him if he’d been up this ’ere chimney, I should. He
says to me one ‘day, laughing, ‘Ah, Sam,’ he says,
‘there’s no taking you in, you’s too sharp by half.’
And I wur sharp arter him, I real loved him, I did. I
used to follow him about when I could, all unbeknown
though generally, and I saved him from many a rub.
T raal can enter into th’ feeling o’ dogs as follows their
masters, I never sees one but I thinks that’s loike me
a-follering of th’ colonel; and when they gets a kind
word, or a bit of a stroke, I allers knows how pleased
they are, as I was when the colonel spoke. Of course
he didn’t stroke me—”

But here Old Peter stopped, for the children were
shaking with laughter. The idea of Old Peter being
stroked seemed too ridiculous. They were all enjoy-
ing themselves with the fun, and making the litile
1382 . MAY’S GARDEN,

house ring again, when loud knocking was heard at
the door; and when Old Peter opened it, there was
Emma come for the children, for they had stayed so
long that Mrs. Aston had sent for them.

Old Peter’s face quite changed; he did not get
into a temper, but he looked daggers at Hmma, and
only relaxed to say good-bye to the children, and to
ask if they’d come next Sunday to hear about Sarah
Anne.

They said they would try to come next Sunday in
the afternoon. So they left the old man feeling very
gloomy and miserable without his two little friends.

When they reached home, they told their mamma
what fun they had been having with Old Peter. She
was very much amused, and said she should go and
see him herself before Sungay.

The next day May was looking at her garden,
which did not seem so neat as it ought to have been,
so she called Annic to have a consultation about it.

‘‘Now I think those roses want a great deal of

attention,”

said Annie. “It strikes me, ma’am, that
you ought to wash the insects off them. I saw Smith
squirting away, and I think you had better do the
same.”

«Then will you get the rake while I wash the
THE ROSE. 133

rose trees ?’’ said May, looking very dull at the dis-
agreeable business she had to do.

“What a face!” said Annie. “You look as if
you were going to be whipped. I'll do the rose trees
for you, if you'll rake.”

“Oh, thank you,” said May, brightening up.

So Annie ran and asked Smith for the syringe,
and he brought her a pail of water, and she began
squirting the water on the rose trees.

Soon May gave a jump as if she had been shot.

“How dare you wet me in that way?” she said,
for Annie couldn’t resist the temptation of giving her
a little shower. Annie laughed, but as she saw May
was really angry, she went and helped her wipe her-
self, and then she ran and brought her a clean holland
garden frock, for she dare not let Emma know what
she had done.

May was really a good-tempered child, so she did
not scold any more, but ran into the arbour ; and there
the frock was changed, and the wet one was hung up,
and the children had great fun over the state of mind
Emma would be in when she found out that she had
lost one of the frocks.

Then the raking and squirting recommenced,

but Annie took care not to give May another
134 MAY’S GARDEN.

shower, though the temptation was very strong some-
times.

At last the garden really looked very tidy, and
Annie got the rose trees to look much cleaner, although
she was rather in despair when, having got one of
them particularly clean, she saw a whole procession
of green-flies walking up the stem again. You may
be sure they never reached the top, but it seemed
almost impossible to kill all the rest.

“ Really, May, it’s quite hard work cleaning your
roses; I think you ought to give me one of the very
best on Sunday to give to Old Peter, to reward me.”

“Very well, you shall chose which you like best,”
said May.

So on Sunday afternoon they got their mamma’s
leave to pay Old Peter a visit, and then they went
into the garden, and Annie had her choice of the
roses. She chose a very pretty pink bud, and May
took a white rose, and then they started for the alms-
houses.

Old Peter seem to be expecting them, although the
door was not open. The room looked particularly neat,
and the chairs were all arranged in a circle; the kettle
was singing away on the hob, and the tea-things were

set out on the table, with three cups and saucers, and
THE ROSE. 135

some beautifully cut bread-and-butter, and preserve,
and gingerbread—in fact quite a feast. The children
looked at one another in surprised pleasure, and Old
Peter’s eyes beamed again with delight.

“T thought as how we ought to be ’appy of a
Sunday, little missies, so I ups yester arternoon and
invests in summat as I thought you’d like. It’s all of
the best, you can tell your mammie. I’d not give you
anything as wasn’t of the first quality. No, not I.
Did you know your mammie came to see me th’ other
day, eh ? ”

“No,” said the children in a breath. ‘ Mamma
never told us she’d been.”

“Well, we had a discussion. She wants me to go
to th’? church, and I don’t want to go; as I said,
religion’s not in my line; howsoever, she’s that hke
my colonel’s missus, as I can’t refuse ’er, so next
Sunday I goes, but I’ve never been sin’ I left a-
soldiering, so as how I'll sit it out is more than I
knows on.”

“But you can read, can’t you?” said Annie.

“Aye, aye, missy, I can read; I ain’t a bad
scholard, although I never read a word till I wur five-
and-twenty, and then I were teached by a gentleman.

Oh yes, missy, I can read, though it’s more nor I can
1386 MAY’S GARDEN.

say I’ll find the place in the book ; howsoever, I can
ear th’ gentleman as talks, that’s one thing.”

«Tl find your places all ready for you,” said May,
“if you'll let me have your prayer-book before next
Sunday.”

‘Kh, well, I’ve no objections—~u fact, Vil be
obliged to you, for when a fellow gets past seventy,
his eyes ain’t so good as when he wur young.”

“Very well,” said May looking very bright. “T’ll
find all the places for you, and put markers in.”

“Thank you, missy. Wull, what do you say toa
cup o’ tea, fore I begins a-telling you of my poor
Sarah Anne?”

“Tt will be very nice,” said May.

So the old man poured out the tea and handed
round the eatables, during which he kept up a discur-
sive sort of talk, but when the little meal was finished,
he buttoned up his coat right up to the chin, and put
his boots on, and then he began :—

“T wur married when I wur thirty year of age, to
my wife as I tells you on, ’er as wanted cheering up.
Well, she wur an oncommon good wife, and I never
found no fault on ’er, but ’er want o’ cheering up,
which were a bit trying sometimes; howsoever, as I
said afore, I got that used to it, that when she died I
Q

THE ROSE. 137

missed ’er terrible, ’cause I’d nobody to cheer, for my
Sarah Anne were left a baby, and I didn’t take to ’er
when she wur a very little un; I mean th’ mother of
Sarah Anne you’ve heard me speak on. Wull, she
growed up and I wur very fond of her, and she married
and lived several years, and died, and soon arter her
husband died, and they left me their little girl, Sarah
Anne, as was my grandchild, to take care on.

“ Now this wur not long afore th’ war in th’ Crimea
broke out, so you may think when I found I should
have to leave ’er I wur in a takin’; howsoever, there
wur nothing for it, but to get a woman as would look
arter ’er. So “fore I went on shipboard, I set all
straight for the lassie, and I left ’er with a sore heart.
I see ’er now in ’er bit of black frock, and her white
apron and little cloak, all a-shouting at me as I went
off, though I couldn’t ’ear a word on’t.

“She wur a pretty little thing, white and fat, with
light ’air and blue eyes, a handsome little lass as ever
you see’d, though I say it as shouldn’t.

* Wull, th’ day or two arter I got to England, and
afore she’d quite got used to me without my leg, she
took ill. Th’ doctor said it wur fever, but it were a
low sort, so as she was sensible all the first part of ’er
illness, and a good deal arter that.
138 MAY’S GARDEN.

“ Wull, wull, she did behave pretty and no mis-
take. She soon got used to me without my leg, and
she wur that fond of having me to nurse ’er. Dearie
me, my specs wants wiping, jest excuse me stopping
a bit whiles I gets the mist off ’em, it will gather
sometimes; thur, thur, now where had I got to, please,
little missies ? ””

“You got to where Sarah Anne liked having you
with her,” said May.

“Oh, ech! Wull, she wur so patient, and when she
wanted a drink, she’d say to me, ‘ Grandfather, would
you please give me a sup?’ So pretty, wasn’t it?
and she’d put ’er arms round me and hug and hug, only
feeble, but it wur nice, and she’d talk of ’er books as
she’d had at the Sunday-school, and she’d pray beau-
tifully, and for me too, though I know’d it wur no
good, ’cause I weren’t worth ’em; still I liked to ’ear
er,”

Here Old Peter’s spectacles became so very misty
that they took a long time to get wiped, so Annie
said, ‘Mamma says we may pray for everybody, so
why did you think it was no good Sarah Anne pray-
ing for you?”

« Wull, wull,” said Old Peter, “perhaps it wur of
good, only I’ve not found it out yet.”
THE ROSE. 139

“But you haven’t been to church to try and get
good,” said Annie again.

“No, it’s my own fault,” said Old Peter; “ how-
soever, Sarah Anne wur religious and no mistake, and
though I’in not I weren’t sorry as she wur. She died
the beautifullest death, all bright and happy, a-ask-
ing me to foller ’er. Yes, P’ll go to the church next
Sunday—I’ll go, or I’ll never get to ’er, I s’pose.”

“Oh, do go,” said May, who was nearly crying,
“Mamma says we can’t go to heaven unless we love
the Lord Jesus, and so I want you to love Him, please.”

* Aye, aye, missy, I’ll pray—I will; your mamma
said I must, and please God I will this ’ere night.
Wull, wull, it’s queer how things comes round. I
never thought as how I should ever pray, but how-
soever, Ill try.”

There was a slight knock at the door, and nurse
came quietly in. Old Peter didn’t seem to mind her at
all, but he asked her civilly to take a chair. She did so,
and the old man did not say a word for a few minutes.
Then, as nurse rose, and told the children they must
come home, he rose and said “Good-bye” very
gently and silently.

Except for a short visit to take the prayer-book
the children did not see Old Peter for nearly a fort-
140 MAY’S GARDEN.

night, for Naomi had sent urgent messages, asking
the children to come and see her, as they had not been
so frequently since they had known Old Peter.

When they went to visit him again, they were
very pleased to see, on a little side table, a large old
Bible, which Old Peter showed them, and told them
he had rummaged it out of an old chest, and he meant
to use it. Then he showed them the pink bud and
white rose, acting as markers to two chapters which
Mrs. Aston had found for him to read.

They were very much pleased to see what a good
use their roses were put to, and they were still more
pleased when Old Peter told them he always meant to
keep them in his Bible.
CHAPTER VII.
THE GERANIUM.

“‘ TuEm’s the best, missy, but you get more of these
for a penny.”

*“You’re sure they are not poison?” said Annie,
hesitating whether it would be safe to make a
purchase.

“Pison! Well, I never heard the like! and do
ye think I’d pison your mother’s child ?”

“ N—o,” said Annie, not quite understanding who
her mother’s child was, but comprehending that the
pedlar-woman was indignant that she should fear her
sweets might be poison.

“Vl have a pennyworth of the best, please,” said
Annie.

“Very well, my dear, and T’ll eat one to show ye
there’s no pison in thim.”

“Thank you,” said Annie greatly relieved. “May
142 MAY’S GARDEN.

always eats some of my sweets before I do, and then
I’m sure they are all right.”

The pedlar laughed so heartily, she nearly choked
herself. Annie stood amazed, and really fearing the
woman had gone out of her mind.

“Don’t ye looked scared,” said the woman, “ but
to think ye’d git your sister pisoned afore yoursel’ near
killed me, it did.”

Annie looked quite shocked; she had never had
such a thought, for she never really thought there was
poison in the sweets she bought, but she was very
nervous about it, and May was not.

“Oh, I don’t want to poison May,” said Annie
colouring. ‘‘She’s not frightened and I am. She
does not a bit mind tasting for me.”

« Never mind, missy, it’s always as well to know
your bread’s buttered on the right side. Could ye
p’int the way to Lawyer Gammon’s place ? ”

«Vl show you,” said Annie, tying the strings of
her garden hat.

So she started with the pedlar up a lane at the
back of the garden, but all of a sudden a dreadful fear
came into her mind, and she flew away as fast as her
legs could carry her.

The pedlar stood amazed, and thought the child
THE GERANIUM. 143

must be in fun, so she walked on leisurely, smiling to
herself at the quick way in which Annie got over the
ground. After runuing for some time, Annie ventured
to look round and to her surprise and relief no one
was near. The truth was, she took it into her head
that perhaps the pedlar was going to steal her, and so
without stopping to consider whether it was likely or
not, she ran away.

But she didn’t like being alone much more
than she liked being in dangerous company, so she
turned into another road, knowing it would lead her
home, when she came face to face with the pedlar and
Smith.

“ Oh, Smith, I’m so glad to see you,” said Annie,
nearly crying with the relief it was to feel safe again.

“Whatever has took you, missy, to run away,” he
said ; “here’s Mrs. O’Brien were afeared you might lose
yourself, and I met her, and she asked me to help look
for you.”

Annie felt very much ashamed. She could not tell
the pedlar that she was afraid of being stolen, and she
did not know what to say, so she wisely said nothing
but that she was sorry she had frightened them.
Then turning to Smith she said, ‘“‘ Please take me

home to mamma,’’
144 MAY’S GARDEN.

So the pedlar bid her ‘“ Good-bye,” thinking what
an odd child she was, and when she was alone with
Smith she told him her fear.

He laughed heartily, and told her he had known
Mrs. O’Brien for several years, and she was a respect- —
able, hard-working woman.

“Why, missy,” he said, your mamma has been a-
visiting of her in the Infirmary, where she’s been for
a burn as she got, and she’s took sucha fancy to missis
as she likes a-coming about th’ place, and she told me ;
as how she’d tasted the sweeties for you.”

Annie turned crimson, for she didn’t want her
peculiar ideas about the fear of poison in sweets to be
spread abroad.

“Please don’t tell about that, Smith,” she said
pleadingly, “I can’t help being afraid of poison.”

“ Never you need fear of me a-telling, missy,” said
the gardener good-naturedly. “ ll be mum.”

«Thank you,” said Annie, greatly relieved.

It was at a small door at the farther end of the
garden that Annie had made her purchase, and as
they came near it, they saw May peeping out with a
very anxious face, for she couldn’t think where Annie
had got to, and she had been all over the house and
garden looking for her. She looked quite relieved
THE GERANIUM. 145

when she saw her with Smith, and she ran to meet
them.

“Where have you been, Annie?” she said, “ I’ve
been looking for you everywhere, and I got so
frightened.”

Smith answered, “ She got scared, missy, so you’d
better take her in to missis and let her rest.”

As soon as Smith had gone, Annie told May about
her fear, and she laughed so much that Annie forgot
her annoyance and her fright, and joined in the
merriment.

Mrs. Aston was out when Annie returned, but as
soon as she came in, Annie told her about buying the
sweets and running away from the pedlar.

“Tt must teach you, my dear, not to buy sweets at
the door; you ought to have known I should not like
it. You were very fortunate in having Mrs. O’Brien
to deal with. Suppose some gipsy woman had given
you something to stupify you, and had carried you off
with her.”

Annie turned white with the bare idea of such a
thing.

“©Oh, mamma,” she said, ‘I shouldn’t have gone
stupid for a long time, and I should have kicked.”

“People can be made ‘stupid,’ as you call it,
io
146 MAY’S GARDEN.

very quickly, and then my pet couldn’t have
kicked.”

“Vl never go to that garden door again,” said
Annie. ‘ Couldn’t we have it locked, mamma?”’

““No, my dear; there is no danger if you keep in
the garden. And now about Mrs. O’Brien. She is a
nice, respectable sort of woman, and I think we must
try and look after her a little.”

“‘ Where does she live, mamma?” said May.

“She has a room in the same house that Mrs.
Andrews live in, who keeps the little school near to
Wright the baker’s.”

“Oh yes, I know the house,” said May. “We
could go and see her sometimes, and you would like
us to take her some flowers; wouldn’t you, mamma ? ”

‘Yes, when she is at home, but she goes round
with her basket, and although she generally returns
at night, she is often late, so that we must try and
find out when she will be in.”

So one day when May had been sitting with
Naomi, nurse called for her by arrangement, to take
her to see Mrs. O’Brien, for it was one of the days she
was more at home.

«© And who’d belave it?” said Mrs. O’Brien, when
she found out who had come to see her. “It’s glad I
THE GERANIUM. 147

am to see ye, and any o’ your mother’s children are
welcome to my heart and to my home. For a swater
lady nor your mother niver stepped in shoes, my
dear—no, never stepped in shoes.”

“ Annie’s coming to see you next time,” said May.
“You know my little sister Annie, don’t you?”

“T knows ’er well, but she’s not se much hittler
nor you, missy, my dear.” ,

“No,” said May, “ but she’s two years younger.”

’ € And to be sure that’s a long difference, my dear.
Two years is two years all the world over, it is. Id
make the most of it, my dear. And may I make so
bold as to ax why th’ little missy didn’t honour me
with the sight of her swate face the day?”

May didn’t know what to say, nor where to look.
Nurse had merely left her at the door, so there was no
refuge in her; and the truth was that Annie was so
afraid of Mrs. O’Brien asking her why she had run
away, that she would not come, hoping that after a
little while her flight would be forgotten. .

« And don’t ye know ? or maybe ye don’t want to
tell,” said Mrs. O’Brien, noticing May’s confusion.

“T know, but I don’t want to tell, please,” said
May, wishing she was far away from Mrs. O’Brien’s

room.
148 MAY’S GARDEN.

«And Vl not be th’ body to ax yer, though an
shure I should like to know ; I was swate and kind to
her, and gave ’er measure above all she could ax, but
Vl say no more, though maybe she didn’t like the
looks of an owd woman such as me, who’s gone foot-
ing it round and round to get her bread, many and
many a year, och! many a weary year.”

May hardly knew whether she was to answer or not,
but she said, “ Oh, Annie likes you very much, and
she will come with me next time;” for May thought to
herself, she would not let her off on any account ; it
was so very uncomfortable, and then Annie had
promised to come. When Mrs. O’Brien heard that
Annie liked her, it seemed quite to soothe her, and
she did not say any more about the “younds she’d
gone many a weary year.”

May asked her if she was fond of flowers, and if
she would like some out of her garden.

“Och, my darlint, and I should be plased. The
pretty critturs flowers is! PH put thim on th’
mantel-shelf in th’ best o? my pots; to be sure I will.
Flowers is mighty genteel, and it’s gentlefolks as gits
them on their tables, I knows. And’twas your mother,
dear lady, as brought thim to the ’Firmary ; and says
she to me, says she, ‘ I’ve brought ye some flowers and
THE GERANIUM. 149

‘some fruit, Mrs. O’Brien, which I ’ope ’ill plase ye.’
And says I, a-bowing low to th’ sheet—for I were in
‘bed—says I, ‘I’m your humble servant, an’ kiss your
feet I wud if twas not in bed were.’ An’ she laughs
80 swate, an’ looks so fine and so gintle. Och, dearie
me, it’s no use a-talking, but I'd walk my feet off to
save her a pin prick, I would, my dear.”

May liked to hear her mamma praised in this way,
although she could not quite understand it all.

“T am glad you like mamma,” she said; “ Annie
and I love her very, very much. She is so kind, and
never cross except when we are naughty, and then
she says she’s not cross, but grieved; only it seems
like what we call cross, but it isn’t really, for I’ve
noticed other children’s mammas are angry with them
often after they have asked forgiveness ; but mamma
is just as kind and loving as ever when we’re humble
and sorry for what we’ve done wrong.”

««That’s just it,’ says I to th’ nurse as tended me ;
I says, ‘ That’s a lady swate as new butter, and softer
nor oil—swate oil too.’ And she says to me, ‘ It’s
true, Mrs. O’Brien,’ she says, ‘a more beautifuller,
nor more kinder nor charitabler lady never breathed.
I knows ’er ’fore you did,’ she says to me, ‘ for she’s
a-visited ’ere, and a-brought of fruit and flowers, and
150 MAY’S GARDEN.

sint hares and birdies, and I dun know what, for th’
sick. I likes her bettermost of all th’ ladies as comes
ere,’ she says ; ‘an’ a good many comes as is well to
be spoke of, but Mrs. Aston, I says, is number one
wid me.’ And says I to her, ‘ She’s double number
one wid me.’ ”’

* But that would be number two, Mrs. O’Brien,’
said May, looking very sly ; “ twice one makes two,
you know.”

“Och, the darlint! ye have me there,” and Mrs.
O’Brien’s sides shook again with laughter. ‘“ Och!
aw that ’Il stand me in a joke for all my rounds and
rounds, it will; for I says ‘ always ’ave a joke ready, it
makes folks buy,’ an’ now that’s a raal un. Why,
missy, ye ought to ha’ been born in th’ old country, ye’s
too clever by ’alf for English, ye are. Begs yer pardon,
though, I was a-forgetting as yer mother’s an English-
woman. Well, she ought to ha’ been Irish, says I.”

May had no desire to be an Irish girl, particularly
with such a refined specimen of Irish womanhood
before her! but she was too much of a little lady to
say so, for her mamma always taught her that a real
lady ought to hurt people’s feelings as little as possible,
and to be as courteous and kind to a poor woman as

she would be to a rich one..
THE GERANIUM. 151

So May merely smiled, and as nurse conveniently
appeared at the room-door for her at that moment, it
saved her from having to answer.

“Tt is time for you to come home, now, missy,”
said nurse.

“Och, an’ I’m sorrer to part wid ye,’’ said Mrs.
O’Brien; ‘“won’t ye take a chair, ma’am,” she said
to nurse, “and stay a bit longer wid ’er ?”’

“No, we must go, thank you,” said nurse; “ but
I’m sure that Miss Aston will come to see you again.”

“Oh yes,” said May, “and V’H bring my sister
next time.”

“Do plase, missy, and tell ’er as I’ve got some
beautifaller sweeties than afore, and: I’ll taste thim all
for ’er.”

Nurse and May both went away laughing, for they
knew Annie wouldn’t be at all pleased that Mrs.
©’Brien remembered her nervousness about poison.

When May gave Annie Mrs. O’Brien’s message,
she was horrified.

“Tsn’t she ever going to forget I told her about
you tasting the sweets for me? I don’t care to go
and see her.”

“Tm sure she won’t say it if you ask her nob,’
said May, “because she is very kind, and oh so
152 MAY’S GARDEN.

funny! You really must hear her talk about
mamma,”

‘Qh, if she’s very funny I shall like it; she was
very queer the other day, it was that made me think
she might carry me away.

“Well, she is queer, but she’s Irish, you know,
and they are funny sometimes—at least mamma says
so; but mamma likes her very much.”

In about a week’s time Mrs. O’Brien came to the
house, hoping to catch a glimpse of her dear Mrs.
Aston, but she was out, so then she asked if she could
speak to the young ladies; and as they were in the
garden, she was taken to see them there.

The children were very busy putting the garden
tidy. Annie was squirting water over the rose-trees,
and May was cutting off the dead flowers all about her
garden.

Annie, hearing a sound of footsteps, looked up and
saw limma conducting Mrs. O’Brien towards them,
with her well-remembered basket. Her heart first
almost stood still, and then beat pit-a-pat, pit-a-pat in
such a way, that the syringe dropped from her hands,
and she felt inclined to take to her heels again.

“ May,” she gasped, “look who’s coming. Oh,
help me; what shall I do?”
THE GERANIUM. 1538

“May looked up in alarm, thinking Annie must be
ill; but she soon knew-the cause of her fright, as she
caught sight of Mrs. O’Brien.

She had just time to say, “It will be all right,”
when Emma said that Mrs. O’Brien wanted to see
them so much, that she had brought her into the
garden.
““T begs yer pardon, missy, but I couldn’t pass the
house widout a-trying to see your mother, and Emma

says she to me, ‘ Missis is out, but the young
ladies is in the garden.’ So says I, ‘If ye plase
Pll spake to thim,’ and she says, ‘ Do, Mrs. O’Brien,’ so
civil; so I comes, and ’opes I’m not inducing of myself.”

May looked puzzled, for she couldn’t think what
“inducing” meant; she did not guess that Mrs.
O’Brien wished to say “intruding,” but could not
quite manage it.

However, May said, “Mamma would have liked
to have seen you, and she wishes us to bring you
some flowers to-morrow; but perhaps you would like
them now, I have some very pretty ones.”

“No, no, my dear,” said Mrs. O’Brien, “it’s not
‘for flowers I’m come, but for your own swate selves,
as is flowers as purty as ever grew in the most
‘splendidest garden as ever I see’d, and gardens more
154, MAY’S GARDEN.

beautifuller ye couldn’t see if ye went for rounds and
rounds of many more of miles nor I’ve been.”

Annie couldn’t stand such talk, she dare not look
at May, but ran away to laugh comfortably and to
get a rabbit to show Mrs. O’Brien, which she hoped
would keep her from thinking of sweets, and of her
having run away from her in the lane.

“7 niver see’d running the like o’ that,”’ said Mrs.
O’Brien ; “really ye wouldn’t think as legs could go
so quick. Ye should ha’ seed her that day as she
went to show me Lawyer Gammon’s house.”

“Oh, here she comes with two beautiful rabbits,”
said May, to take away Mrs. O’Brien’s attention from
the subject of running.

«Them is pretty critters as ever I see,” said Mrs.
O’Brien, ‘‘and they’re as fond of ye! Oh, dearie me,
they’re a-nibbling of your pinny, miss.”

«They won’t hurt, they never do anything wrong.
Do you, my prettiest”? said Annie, stooping to kiss -
her rabbits.

“Now you must look at my garden, Mrs. O’Brien,”
said May; ‘“‘haven’t I got a lot of geraniums and
roses out?”

“Ye have, my darlint; shure and shouldn’t I be

plased with a few for some children I knows as lives


1

GERANIUM.
THE GERANIUM. 155 -

without a bit of a flower from one year’s end to
t’other, ’cept a bit of a daisy or dandelion.”

“J shall be very glad for you to have some for
them,” said May, and she plucked a pretty bunch of
geraniums and roses, and mixed some green up with
them tastefully, and then she ran in and found a little
piece of pink ribbon, with which she tied them up and
gave them to Mrs. O’Brien.

“They’ll be raal plased, missy, the poor little
critturs! and they’re so clane, and behaves thim-
selves more like the raal gintlefolks, as ye be your-
selves, than children as lives in but one room, my
dear.””

“ Poor things !’? said Annie. ‘‘ How many are there
of them ?”

«“ The mother and six children, and a handful it is
says I every time as I sees thim a-playing there ; and
they does it so clane, a-niver making of mud-pies and
spiling their pinnies. No, no, when they’re clane
they keeps clane for a bit ; and when they’re dirty, and
it ain’t often, they don’t get grimed in as t’other
children do.”

“Do they ever get cakes or sweeties ?”” said Annie.

“Niver a bit,’cept as I gives thim now and agen,

missy.”
156 MAY’S GARDEN,

“Poor things!” said Annie, “how dreadful it
must be. T’ve got two pennies and a halfpenny, will
you give them some sweeties, pleasé, from me? How
many will all that money buy ?”

“ All of it won’t only buy each o’ thim a ha’porth,
my dear, ’cept th’ baby as cannot ate swates at all,
at all. And it’s fortunate, my dear, for it can’t be
jealous of t’other five.”

“Then please give the flowers from May and the
sweets from me ; and when shall we hear about them?”

“ Hear the darlint ! and ye’d like me to fly on thim
telegraps to tell ye, I belave! Tl be back in two
days, and thin J’ll be plased and proud to see ye both ;
aw’ I’ll tell ye about the poor starved little children,
and anything more as ye’ll ax me, my dears.”

“Very well, Mrs. O’Brien, we’ll ask mamma if we :
may come on Friday; but if it should be wet would
you come here?”

“Tl see, if ’ve a leg to stand on, my dear. I
may come if it don’t pour cats and dogs. Good-bye,
my little ladies; and remimber me with riverent duty
to your swate dear mother.”

When the old pedlar had gone, the children were
surprised and delighted by Emma bringing them
each a letter. May’s was from Kitty, and Anniec’s
THE GERANIUM. 157

from Herbert; they had been enclosed in one from
their aunt to their mamma.

May could read writing well, so she was soon
enjoying herself; but Annie, after vainly trying to
make out Herbert’s large, round hand, gave a deep
“sigh to attract May’s attention.

It was quite successful, for May looked up, and
seeing her trouble, she put her own letter aside to
read Herbert’s to her.

It was full of joy at the thought of meeting in one
month’s time, when they would play at being soldiers
every day.

Alas! soldiering had lost its charms for Annie
since she had known Old Peter. It would be too
dreadful for Herbert to lose a leg, and to get as ugly
and old as he was. She tried to fancy him, as May
was reading, with a wooden leg and withered face ; but
somehow it was very difficult to make Herbert’s little
round fat body, and merry fair face, like Old Peter.

When May had finished, Annie thanked her, and
then said:

“May, do you think Herbert ever could be like
Old Peter? It seems to me that he never could be
so ugly; for though I like Old Peter very much, you
know, I think he’s dreadfully ugly.”
158 MAY’S GARDEN.

“He might lose a leg if he were a soldier, but 1
don’t think his face could ever be as withered up ;
but then he might get killed altogether, you know.”

“Yes, he might. I wish Herbert would play at
something else.”

“Perhaps he will, if you ask him,” said May.
“What do you think Kitty says, that Frank has got
on so well at school, and he is ceming here with her
when she comes. I’m so glad.”

“Tm not,” said Annie. “ He’s so cross. I don’t
like him at all.”

“Oh, but Ido!” said May. “I wonder——

* Well, go on; what do you wonder at?”

“Never mind, dear. I’m not to tell.”

“There, that’s just it—such secrets, as Herbert
said. JI don’t like secrets. Tl have one with Her-

a

bert,’ said Annie.

“Very well, I don’t mind if you do,” said May.
“T don’t have one because I wish it.”

This appeased Annie a little. She thought it was
all that horrid Frank; and then as Mrs. Aston was
seen coming down the garden, both the children ran
to meet her.

When Friday came it was a lovely day, and
so leave- was obtained to pay Mrs. O’Brien a
THE GERANIUM. 159

visit. Emma took the children and left them with
her.

“It’s plased Iam to see ye, my dears,” she said,
“and it’s plased and delighted as thim little ’uns
were wid the flowers and the swates, as ye sint them,
and they says to me, ‘ Mrs. O’Brien,’ they says, ‘ plase
tell the young ladies as we’s oncommon obliged for the
swates and the flowers; and plase curtsey for us to
the ladies, as mother says you ought.’ So I’ve five
curtseys to make, and here’s they are.”

Bob, bob, bob, bob, bob, goes Mrs. O’Brien.

The children were so amused, that Mrs. O’Brien
had to wait a while before she could finish her story ;
then she went on—

“When I got to their room door, I knocks, and
two little v’ices says to me, ‘ Come in ;’ and in I goes,
and there on the floor was the baby lying on some
rags with the rest of the little ones, and the two
biggest was watching of thim all. So I shows thim
the flowers, all as quiet as could be, and up gits the
big ’un; and she says, I know a gintleman as ’ud
buy thim all; for one day I see’d him buy some of a
girl as sells flowers.

“« Very well,’ says I, ‘rin, my dear, and sell them,’

for thinks I, niver much of food ’as gone down that
160 MAY’S GARDEN.

bit o’ throat. I sits there and shows all through my
basket to t’other child; but I gived her no swates,
only a bun as I’d got; for thinks I, no swates shall
they have but little missy’s.

“ But I waited and waited, and she didn’t come ; and
I was jist a-thinking I must be going, when in she comes
a-blowing and a-rinning, and seemed near frantic with
joy, and she throws down half-a-crown on to the floor.

« «A gintleman threw it me for the flowers, he
said they were so beautiful got up,’ she said. ‘Oh,
what will it buy? I wish mother would come.in. I
knew their mother would like them to have something
good; so up I gets, and rins and buys thim each a
mutton pie, and some tarts; not as I spent much of
the half-crown, for I knows the woman at the shop,
and I tells her about thim poor little dears, as hadn’t
- tasted tart or mate I don’t know when ; and says she
to me, ‘ Mrs. O’Brien, ll give you the tarts for the
little things, for I’ve known you this many a year,
and I feels for thim as gets no swates, and it’s a favour
to yourself, as I would be so doing. So I rins, reglar
rins in, and they all comes round, and didn’t they eat
and enjoy thimselves; and then I gave thim little
missy’s goodies, and they were as smiling and con-

tinted as ye niver see’d, nobody more.”
THE GERANIUM. 161

“Poor little things,” said Annie, ‘I wish they
could come here, and have plenty to eat.”

“Yes, I wishes as your dear mamma could ha’ see’d
them, I’m shure her tinder heart would ha’ felt for thim ;
and I’ve been thinking as I’ll bring the two biggest to
see your mamma the next time as I goes my rounds.”

“Oh, do,” said Annie; ‘‘I should so like to see
them.”

«But where could they sleep?” said May ; “they
couldn’t go back the same night.”

“No, my dear; there would be plenty of room for
thim with me, and I should like for your mamma to
see thim, such little swate critturs as they are.”

Emma appeared at the door, and said the young
ladies must make haste, for she thought there was a
storm coming. Annie didn’t need to be hurried
when she heard that news. She was in such haste to
get home, that she had hardly time to take some
sweets that Mrs. O’Brien offered, and then she
wanted to run all the way. But Emma said she wasn’t
as young as she used to be, and she couldn’t run
much. So Annie was obliged to be satisfied with urging
her on with all the entreaties she could think of.

Happily, home was reached before the storm
broke, and then the children went into the arenes

1
162 MAY’S GARDEN.

room to their mamma, and when the storm had
abated they told her about the poor children who
had been so long without meat, and who were so
delighted with the sweets and tarts.

Mrs. Aston was very much pleased with both
her children ; for it made her glad to think they were
really wishing to share others’ troubles and sorrows.

«Would you like to have these two little children
here for the afternoon, and give them some tea?” said
Mrs. Aston.

‘© Oh, it would be delightful,” said Annie. ‘ Poor
little things! I should so like to see them have a
good tea,”’

A few days afterwards, Mrs. O’Brien brought the
two eldest little girls—such clean-looking children,
with fair hair and white little faces. May and Annie
felt rather shy with them at first, for Mrs. O’Brien
went away when she had talked to her dear lady, as
she called Mrs. Aston. ;

“What is your name?” said May to the eldest,
who was about eight years old.

“My name is Grace, and my sister’s is Maggie.
We takes care of the children, us two does. Mother
said she couldn’t spare us for long, because of my
baby and Maggie’s children.”
THE GERANIUM. 163.

‘Well, you will only be away for one night,”’ said
Annie; “so won’t you play while you can? Do
come and see my rabbits.”

Grace and Maggie brightened up at the thought
of rabbits.

“T once saw a rabbit in a cellar,” said Maggie,
“but it was brown, and not near so pretty as these.”

“No, I don’t like brown rabbits,” said Annie ;
‘black and white are my favourites.”

«© What a lot of money they’d bring !” said Grace ;
‘why, it would buy lots of things, what you’d get
for these ’ere, ’cause they’re such very grand ones.”

“Yes; but I wouldn’t sell them for anything,”
said Annie. “I never think of such a thing.”

“No, like as not,”’ said Grace, remembering that
Annie was rich, and she was very poor.

“Please may we see where the flowers came
from ?’’ Grace continued, after a pause.

So May took her, to see her own little garden.

Grace stood still, and did not say anything aloud ;
but May saw she was busy counting. At last she said,
“What lots of bunches of flowers, like as you sent to
me, could be made out of these! and if they only
fetched threepence apiece, what a sum it would
be!”
164 MAY’S GARDEN.

“ Well, I -couldn’t spare all my flowers,” said
May, colouring, “but you shall have some bunches to
take back with you to-morrow.”

“Oh, miss, ’m so sorry; I didn’t mean to ask
for them.”” said Grace, looking very hot and uncom-
fortable. ‘It’s only as I never sees anything but I
thinks to myself, what would it fetch ? for we go so
often without food, that I gets in the way of reckon-
ing up what things would buy. Mother has so often
to send me round the corner, you know, and then I
wonders what Ill get.”

«Where is round the corner?” said May.

“Why, some people call it Uncle Sam’s, but it’s
really the pawn-shop. Mother can’t bear me going, or
going herself; but she says, ‘What are we to do
when we’s got no food ?? ”

“Do you sell your things, then?’ said May,
puzzled as to what a pawn-shop could mean, for she
mixed it up in her mind with prawns; and yet she
was sure Grace meant selling things.

“Well, it isn’t selling, exactly; it’s borrowing
money—that is, you take a frock, and the man as is
in the shop gives you a few shillings, and you never
get it back again, except you take a ticket, and pay a

‘ lot more money than you got for it; so, as mother
THE GERANIUM. 165

says, it’s a losing game; and it’s only when she has
had no cleaning all the week that she does it.”

“ What a dreadful place it must be!”’ said May.
“T’m sure I shall be very pleased for you to have all
my geraniums. Ill pick you a lot to-morrow, and
ll ask mamma if you may have a large basket to
carry them in. IJ’ll make them all up into pretty
nosegays for you. I know Annie will help me.”

“ But oh, miss,” said Grace, “ mother will say I
asked for them, and she will never let us ask for any-
thing except from God, and we often ask Him when
we have nothing more to pawn.”

“* But don’t you pray every day ?” said May.

“Yes, we always say our prayers, but I mean we pray
hard when there’s no food and nothing to pawn; and
mother says she’s often noticed as we gets help then.”

“Vm sure mamma would say you ought to pray

a”

hard every day,” said May. ‘‘ But as to the flowers,
you didn’t ask for them, you know; I heard you
counting, and I thought you would like them.”

““T should like them very much,” said Grace ;
“and oh, if I could only see the gentleman as gave
me half-a-crown.”

May was so full of her idea about the flowers,

she hardly knew how she should wait till the next day.
166 MAY’S GARDEN.

“T shall so want to know if you sell them all,” she
said: “ you will tell Mrs. O’Brien exactly what you
get for them, won’t you ?”’

«Oh yes, miss,” said Grace, with demure but great
happiness. ‘I'll tell her every ha’porth I get by
them.” \

Then the flowers were forgotten for a whilein some
games, but the poor little children couldn’t stand much
exertion, they were too weak, although Mrs. Aston had
thoughtfully ordered them some bread and meat and
milk as soon as they came.

They enjoyed their tea very much; the sweet cake
with currants was so very good.

After tea May quietly slipped away to tell her
mamma about the flowers. Mrs. Aston thought her
plan of making nosegays a very good one, but she
said she must not strip her garden.

Fortunately for Grace, May’s garden was very full
of flowers, particularly of variegated and _ scarlet
geraniums, so that there was a prospect of a nice
basketful to sell.

The next morning May and Annie were up be-
times, in fact they awoke about four in the morning,
only Emma, who slept in the next room, was so cross

when she saw two white little figures entreating to be
THE GERANIUM. 167

allowed to get up, that they dare not stir again until
six, when the sound of their talking and laughing pre-
vented Emma from getting any more sleep, and so
she got up, and let them do the same.

There were twelve lovely little nosegays made up
by breakfast-time, packed in a large basket with moss,
which was made wet to keep the flowers fresh.

Grace and Maggie were delighted with them when
they arrived in Mrs. O’Brien’s donkey cart. As for
Mrs. O’Brien, she nearly went into hysterics over
them; the result of her admiration was that all the
flowers were sold to her customers before they had a
chance of reaching the town where Grace and Maggie
lived. The children were very sorry that their mother
couldn’t see the nosegays, but who can tell their
happiness when they counted out four shillings to
her as the result of the sale.

“We sold them at threepence a bunch,” said
Grace; ‘but one lady gave a shilling, when Mrs.
O’Brien explained how we got them, and told as how
the young ladies had made them up.”

“Now, Mrs. Turner,” said Mrs. O’Brien to their
mother, “you take the advice of a woman as knows
what’s she’s about. My swate lady says to me, ‘ Mrs.
O’Brien, I should like Grace to go to school, and I
168 MAY’S GARDEN.

shall be plased to pay for her,’ says she, ‘ but what’s to
be done with the baby ?’”

“Says I, ‘ That’s a puzzler, my lady,’ says I; but
I considers, and then I says, ‘What do you say to
Maggie going to school till baby’s on his feet—he’ll
not be long—and then Grace can go.’ ”

«Yes, Mrs. O’Brien,’ she says to me, ‘that’s the
plan. Then plase tell Mrs. Turner I’ll pay for Maggie
until Grace can go to school, and by that time,’ she
says, ‘I hopes Mrs. Turner will be able to pay for
Maggie; for,’ says she, ‘T’ll write to some ladies at
Harbury, and see if I can get her full employment.’
Now, Mrs. Turner, if you’re a sinsible woman, as I
takes you for, ye’ll take the advice of my swate lady,
and Maggie will go to the school.’

*T shall be very glad, and I’m sure it’s very kind
of the lady,” said Mrs. Turner, her sad, pale face light-
ing up with hope.

So you can fancy how happy May and Annie were
when they heard Mrs. O’ Brien’s account of the Turners,
and that all the flowers had been sold. And when they
heard that the four shillings would buy Grace a new
frock, they both ran to see if there were geraniums
enough left to sell which would buy Maggie one too.
CHAPTER VIII.

THE CARNATION.

‘‘Ou, what a love! Annie, do come here, there’s such
a sweet little thing peeping in at the gate. Look
at her, the darling! Do let us go and speak to
her?”

“Let us call her in,” said Annie, “you know
mamma doesn’t like us going to the door.”

“Vl go and fetch her in. Little girl,” said May,
“would you like to come into the garden and look at
the flowers?”

But there was no answer, only two shy blue eyes,
and a finger more vigorously sucked.

May put out her hand and said, “Do come in,
dear, what is your name ? ”

But there was again no sound, and the little figure
moved off. May thought it was no use trying to get

her in, so she moved away; but just as she had nearly
170 MAY’S GARDEN,

reached her garden she caught sight of a little blue
frock actually within the garden door.

She ran back, but away ran the little figure,
and by the time she had got to the door she was quite
out of sight.

“ Tt’s no use,” said May, “she’s too shy; but what
a little love she is, and she was so prettily dressed too.”

“Perhaps we could coax her in with one of my
rabbits the next time we see her. J have never seen
her before ; have you, May?”

The next day the children were in the garden
again, and Smith was busy wheeling in gravel, when
the little blue dress appeared again, and Annie caught
sight of the owner’s little face peeping in at the
door.

She didn’t call the child or move towards her, but
she nodded and smiled, and then went on with her
squirting operations. After a short time she took
another sly peep, and she saw the little blue girl
had ventured in a little further; but as soon as she
saw Annie looking she began to retreat towards the
door. So Annie began her squirting again, and after
a while, without looking towards the garden-door, she
went off to her rabbits, and got out one of the tiniest
and prettiest and walked quietly down to the door.
THE CARNATION. iv

She kept very quiet, as May was busy in another part
of the garden, and she thought it would be such a
triumph if she could lure the little child in all by
herself.

But as she got near to the door she could not see
her, and when she asked Smith if she had gone, he
said there was no one about. It was very disappoint-
ing, and Annie was just going to carry her rabbit
back again when she heard a very tiny sigh, and
turning round she saw the little blue girl trying to
hide behind a tree, but she was quite in the garden,
and Annie felt she had caught her at last.

“Isn’t it a pretty rabbit ?” she said to her, making
the little thing run a little way. It looked so funny
that little Miss Blue gave a wee laugh, and then feel-
ing frightened at her own small voice, the finger went
up to her mouth, and she seemed as if she were going
to be a rabbit and run too.

But Annie took up the rabbit, and stroked it, and
then held it close to Miss Blue Frock, and she couldn’t
resist the temptation to give it a little fairy stroke ;
then she seemed to think it. so nice, that she gave -
another and then another, till she laughed with
delight ; and Annie put it into her pinafore, and she
nearly toppled over with it, for though it was very
172 MAY’S GARDEN.

small, she was very small too, and so she found it
rather heavy. Then she popped down, just where she
was, and made the rabbit comfortable; and, without
saying a word, she seemed as contented as if she had
sat there always.

Annie was so amused, that she longed to attract
May’s attention, but she was afraid of frightening
the little maid after all the trouble she had taken to
overcome her shyness.

“TI does ove bunnies,” said the little thing. “I
tink dey is so pitty, and you ove bunnies too?”

“Yes, I do. Tve lots up at the other end of the
garden. Will you come and see them, dear?”

“No, please.”

«Whatis your name, dear?” said Annie.

“ Rosie.”

“What a pretty name! I should like you to see
my sister, dear, she ig in the garden. Will you wait
while I call her?”

“No, please,” said Rosie, looking as if even bunny
must be disturbed if she had to make any more new
friends.

“Well, I won’t call her; sit still, please. Where
do you live ?”

A little nod of the head was all Annie got.
THK CARNATION. 173

“Where is that?” nodding her head in the same
way Rosie had done.

“ please may I take bunny.”

“ T couldn’t spare it, dear,” said Annie ; “ besides,
it must be fed, you know.”

At this bad news the little lip went down, and
two big tears began to flow. Annie didn’t know
what to do. She as heartily wished May would come,
as she had hoped she would keep away when she
didn’t want her.

“ Don’t cry, Rosie,” said Annie, tenderly, stooping
to kiss her.

But she got one of Rosie’s fat little fists stuck in
her eye.

“Oh!” said Annie, “ you mustn’t do that, Rosie.’’
And when she got her eye completely open again, she
saw no tears on Rosie’s face, but angry hot eyes.
She nearly laughed, though she felt rather cross, for
Rosie’s face looked so funny; it was so fat and
babyish, and yet her eyes looked so determined.

“Tt isn’t kind to poke in that way,” said Annie;
“you might have put my eye out, and I’m sure I’ve
been very kind to you.”

*“No, you want my bunny.”
174 MAY’S GARDEN.

“Tt?s mine,’ said Annie, really getting quite
alarmed, and afraid that her rabbit would be taken
before her eyes by this bit ofa child.

“You gave it to me, and I’s going to take it to
Toppy.”

“No, I didn’t give it to you, dear; I only lent it
to you to nurse. I must have my rabbit ;” and Annie
gently tried to get hold of it, trying to protect her
eyes with the other hand in case of another poke.
But this time Rosie tried a new plan. She held the
rabbit tight, and screamed with all her might. This
nearly electrified Annie, and May came flying, think-
ing Annie really had got into the hands of gipsies
this time.

You can imagine how astonished she was to see
the “little love ” sitting on the grass screaming, with
Annie’s poor rabbit held tightly in her little fat
hands.

Annie quickly explained how it was she came to
be in such an uncomfortable position.

“Oh, you mustn’t cry,” said May. “ Perhaps
some day Annie will give you a rabbit; but that
mustn’t be taken from its mother, dear. You shall
come to see it every day; so don’t cry;” and May
stroked her hair, and talked kindly, without trying
THE CARNATION. 175

to get hold of the rabbit, though Annie was nearly
crying to see the poor little thing so unmercifully
squeezed.

So, after a while, the screams abated, and then all
of a sudden Rosie, after giving bunny an extra
squeeze, threw it right in Annie’s face, and then
jumped up and ran away, before the children had
recovered their astonishment.

They went to the door, but no one could be seen,
and they could hardly believe Rosie could have got
away so quickly.

“JT couldn’t have believed it,” said Annie. ‘“‘ Such
a little quiet thing, and so shy! I’d such trouble
to get friends with her; and then she turns out a
regular little black pussy. My poor, poor pretty !
I wonder it’s alive. I never will let her touch one of
my pretties again.”

«* How queer it is,” said May. ‘I should like to
go and tell mamma about her.”

“T wonder who she is,” said Annie. ‘“ Perhaps
mamma may know.”

So, when the children went in, they told their
mamma about Rosie, and asked her if she had any

idea where she lived.

“‘T think she may belong to the new baker at the
176 MAY’S GARDEN.

end of the lane. Poor little dear! it is sad to think
of her getting into such a temper. I think I must
try and find her out.”

“Oh, do, mamma,” said May. “She is such a
pretty little thing ; and I fancy she must be nice, too,
although she was very passionate.”

Mrs. Aston was passing the baker’s, a day or two
afterwards, so she went in and asked if he had a
little girl called Rosie.

“Oh yes, ma’am,” he said; “she is our only
child, and a great pet; but what makes you ask,
ma’am, if I may make so bold?”

“She came and played with one of my children,
and she became very fond of a rabbit of hers, and
seemed very much grieved to part with it.”

“That accounts for it,’ said the baker. ‘She
ran home, the other day, looking very hot, and we
could sce she had been crying; but she couldn’t tell
us why, until, as her mother was putting her to bed,
she said she couldn’t say her prayers, she’d been so
naughty; and when her mother asked her why, she
told her some story about a bunny, and pushing at a
little girl’s eye, and her mother couldn’t make it out.
But she told her to ask to be forgiven, and then she
went to bed happier ; but ever since she has wanted
THE CARNATION. 177

to see the little girl whose eye she poked at; and we
didn’t know who it was.”

“T should like to see her, if you have no objec-
tion,” said Mrs. Aston.

“We shall be best pleased, ma’am. Will you
walk upstairs ?”

Mrs. Aston was then taken to the parlour, where
Mrs. Wheeler, the mother of little Rosie, was sitting,
sewing, and Rosie was on the rug playing with her
dog Toppy.

“ This lady has come to see Rosie,” said the bake
to his wife.

“How do you do?” said Mrs. Aston. “I have
found out that it was your little Rosie who took such
a fancy to my little daughter’s rabbit.”

“Oh, ma’am,”? said Mrs. Wheeler, “I am afraid
she did more than that; for Rosie has told me she
poked some little girl’s eye.”

“Well, she has not damaged it,” said Mrs. Aston,
“and I hear she is sorry about it.”

“ Come here, Rosie,” said her mother; “this is
the mamma of the young lady you tried to hurt.”

Rosie’s eyes filled with tears. ‘I’s so sorry,”
she said. “ Will the little girl fordive me ?”’

“Oh yes,” said Mrs. Aston, drawing Rosie to her

i: 12
178 MAY’S GARDEN.

and kissing her, “and I think she will do more than
that. I think she will give Rosie a bunny next
year, when she is older and able to take care
of it.”

“Oh, tank you. How long will next year be,
mammie,” she said, turning to her mother.

“Not very long, darling; and then what a rich
little girl you will be.”

“You had better come and sce the rabbits this
afternoon. Would you like to come ?”

“No, please,” said Rosie.

“Why not? Are you afraid of the little girl
being angry ?”

« Yes, ma’am.”

“Oh, but I’m sure she won’t. I will tell you what I
will do. I will send her with her sister to fetch you,
and you will see how kind she will be.”

«Tank you; and may I see the f’owers, too,
please ?”

“Oh yes, of course.”

Mrs. Aston then said good-bye, and left; and in
the afternoon May and Annie came to fetch the “little
love.”

As soon as she saw Annie she ran to her and said,
“‘T’s so sorry ; please fordive Rosie.”
THE CARNATION. ~ 179

Annie was delighted. She soon got plenty of
kisses, and when she reached the garden they decided
that May should have her first and Annie afterwards ;
so May took her to her garden and showed her the
flowers, and Rosie was so taken with some bright
carnations that she asked for one.

May plucked one for her, and put it in her hair;
but as she couldn’t see that, she had another for her
hand, but she stuck her little nose into it so vigorously
that it soon looked shabby and untidy, and then she
wanted another. Having found by experience that
flowers did not stand such very determined smelling,
Rosie kept the second better.

May had cut her geraniums and roses ‘so much
for Grace and Maggie, that the only bright flowers
she had in her garden were carnations; so, as Rosie
would have nothing else, they gradually got round
to the rabbits. :

Here Rosie’s excitement became so intense, that
the carnation dropped from her hand, and as it fell
very near the wire of the rabbit-house, one of the old
ones was just on the point of tugging it in, when Rosie
saw the danger and set up such a cry of distress that
the thief flew away in a fright, and hid itself at the

other end of the hutch. The carnation was rescued,
180 MAY’S GARDEN.

but little Rosie would still sob, so that May felt very
uncomfortable.

* Let us goand get another flower, dear,” she said.

So another carnation was got, and then Rosie
wanted to go and see the naughty bunnies again.

May called Annie to show the pets, and she safely
held the flower, so that there were no more cries,
except small ones of delight as the little bunnies were
seen, especially the beauty of all, which Rosie had
nursed on her last visit.

“ Oh how pitty !’”? said Rosie; “ will you give me
that bunny in one year, please ?”

“Yes,” said Annie ; © you shall have it, but I think
you will like a baby bunny best, and this won’t be a
baby then.”

“ May I have a baby bunny just like it, please ?”

«Yes, if I have one, and if I haven’t got one just
like it, you shall have one of the prettiest I’ve got, if
you will be kind to it.”’

“Oh yes,” said Rosie. ‘‘I wish I might have all
the baby bunnies, too.”

“* No, dear,” said May, ‘‘ Annie can only spare one.”

Rosie looked sad, but she soon brightened up.

“T love you now,” she said to Annie; “and you
too,” turning to May, “ but I love Toppy best.”


RNATION

CA
THE CARNATION. 181

Annie couldn’t help laughing, for her mamma had
told her who Toppy was.

“Why do you laugh?” said Rosie, beginning to
suck her finger.

“‘ Because you love your doggie best.”

“T’ve known it longest,” said Rosie.

The chiidren laughed again, but they were obliged
to stop quickly, for Rosie’s lip dropped.

*« Never mind, dear,” said Annie; “ will you try to
catch me if I run away ?”

“Yes,” said Rosie, but then she looked at her
carnation, and said, “ No, t’ank you, I’m afraid it will
spoil my f’ower.”

“T will take care of your flower,” said May.

Rosie looked at it, half gave it, and then took it
back.

«No, t’ank you, I’d like to take it to mammie.”

“Do you want to go home, then?” said May.

“ Please, t’?ank you,”’ said Rosie.

So May and Annie took her home, and she gave
them each a very pretty kiss, and said, ‘‘T’ank you,”
again.

“ She is a little dear,” said Annie, as they entered
the garden.

“ Yes,” said May, “ but so queer; she’s so babyish
182 MAY’S GARDEN.

and yet so grown up in her ways. I’m sure after she
wanted to go we couldn’t have got her to stay if we
had tried ever so much.”

Nothing more was seen of Rosie for a few days,
although the children got Smith to leave the door on the
latch sometimes when they were in the garden. But
atlast Mrs. Wheeler came up to the house to say that
little Rosie was very poorly, and she wanted to see
the young ladies.

So May and Annie went back with her, May first
running into the garden to get a carnation.

As they were going, Mrs. Wheeler told them that
she couldn’t ask them to stay long, as little Rosie
seemed so weak, she felt anxious about her; but she
was very much obliged te them for coming.

She led them upstairs to a very clean little bed-
room, and there in a tiny bed lay httle Rosie. The
children were quite struck by the change in her, she
looked so ill. Toppy was on the bed, and one little
hand, no longer fat, was holding the dog’s ear.

“‘Tiss Rosie, please,” she said, when she saw
them.

So they kissed her, and asked her how she
was.

“Oh, I’s soon be better. How’s bunny t”
THE CARNATION. 183

“Very well,” said Annie, “he’s been playing
about a great deal.”

“Tm sorry I was naughty about bunny when I
came to see you the first day.”

“Oh, never mind,” said Annie.

** Mammie says the Lord Jesus doesn’t like naughty
tempers. I so sorry,” and the tears began running
down the little cheeks.

“Please don’t cry,” said Annie, nearly crying
herself; and then, suddenly feeling very generous,
she said, ‘Would you like to have bunny now,
Rosie? Because I shall be very glad to bring him if
you like.”

The tears immediately stopped, and little Rosie’s
face beamed with delight.

‘Oh, mammie,” she gasped, “‘ may I have it ?”

«Yes, darling, if the young lady can spare it.”

“Oh yes,” said Annie, feeling quite happy in
giving so much pleasure. “Shall I fetch it now?”

“« Please,”’

said Rosie; then, as her eyes caught
sight of the carnation May had brought her, she said,
‘Oh, mammie, another f’ower! please put it with the
others.”

Then for the first time May saw the two faded

carnations in a glass near Rosie’s bed.
184 MAY’S GARDEN.

“Oh, do throw those away,” she said, “and I
will fetch some more while Annie gets the rabbit.”

Then they went for the rabbit and flowers. As
soon as they got outside, Annie’s heart began to
fail her.

“Do you think she will squeeze it very much, May,
and will it be fed properly ?”

“Oh yes, I think it will have food enough. You
could bring it some; and then, the other day, she
did not squeeze it until she was afraid of your taking
ib away.”

So Annie got the little rabbit, and May her car-
nations, and they went back to Rosie. She was
delighted with the rabbit, and stuck it right under
Toppy’s nose. He didn’t at all like it, and began
to growl, but when Rosie tapped him and told him to
be good, he left off, though he kept one eye open to
watch the intruder.

Rosie would smell all the carnations before she
put them into the glass to have some water put to
them, but she was satisfied with a little smell at
each.

Then she was so tired with her excitement
and her exertions that she lay down with one
little hand on Bunny, and one on Toppy, and went
THE CARNATION. 185

to sleep. So the children very quietly left the
room, and went home and told their mamma all about
Rosie.

The next morning Mrs. Aston went herself to
inquire, and she came back looking very sad.

“Rosie is very ill, dears, I think we ought to pray
for her.”

So Mrs. Aston and the children prayed for Rosie,
but God knew it was best for her to go and live with
Him. In the afternoon May and Annie were sent for,
as Rosie wanted to see them.

This time Toppy and Bunny were not even in the
reom, only May’s carnations. Poor little Rosie looked
very ill.

“ Mammie thinks I’m going to live with the Lord
Jesus,”’ she said, “so I don’t want Bunny, please ; and
will you have Toppy too?” looking at Annie.

Annie burst into tears, but May struggled to
answer, “ Yes, she will have them, and take care of
them for you.”

“The flowers I’ll teep,” said Rosie. “ Please tiss
Rosie, she’s s’eepy and wants to go to heaven.”

May and Annie kissed her, but they could not speak.
Mrs. Aston then came into the room and led the
children out. She took them home, and then returned
186 MAY’S GARDEN.

herself to Mrs. Wheeler, as she thought she might be
a comfort to her.

The next morning Mrs. Aston came to see the
children before they were up, and she told them that
dear little Rosie had died late the night before. They
were so sorry, and when Mrs. Aston told them that
Toppy and the rabbit were to be sent over for Annie,
there was another burst of tears.

“Oh, mamma,” said Annie, “I do so wish I had
let Rosie have the rabbit when she wanted it, but I
thought she would hurt it, and it wouldn’t get fed.”

“You were right not to give it to her then,
dear, for of course you didn’t know how it would be
treated. Poor little Rosie was so sorry that she
got into such a temper; her mother said for more
than a year she believed she had loved her Saviour, and
she always said she loved Him best, and nothing made
her so sorry as to be told she had grieved Him when
she had given way to passion.”

“ Dear little thing,” said Annie. “Oh, I wish she
hadn’t died.”

‘She is much better off, my love. She seems
to have been such a lovable little thing; but her
mother says she has always been very passionate,
but much less so since she understood about the
THE CARNATION. 187

Lord Jesus. Just before she went to sleep for the
last time she said, ‘I know Jesus is coming to fetch
Rosie soon. I’s so glad. Rosie will always be good
then, mammie.’

“Then her mother kissed her, and as she saw
her mother crying, she said, ‘ Don’t cry, mammie,
Rosie will be a bright little angel, won’t she?’

««¢ Yes, my darling,’ said her mother.

“ mammie,’ she said, and she never woke again in this
world.”

“‘T wish I was as good,” said May.

“Pray to have the same faith, my darling,” said
Mrs. Aston, “and then you will be like her.”

Little Rosie was buried in the pretty churchyard
that the children loved, and May and Annie threw
flowers on the tiny little coffin after it was lowered
into the grave.

They were nearly all carnations and white roses,
and when the little grave was made, three of May’s
best carnations were planted on the top of it.

The children’ never passed through the church-
yard without looking at Rosie’s grave, and they
never saw a carnation without thinking of their lost
little friend.
CHAPTER IX.
CONCLUSION.

“Ou, I know something delicious, beautiful, delight-
ful!’ said Annie, and then she took a flying leap
over a corner of May’s garden and ran away.

May followed. ‘“ Now, Annie, don’t tease; what is
it you know? Do tell me, please.”

“IT know something,”’ echoed Annie’s voice from
the other end of the garden.

“T shail go in and ask mamma,” said May.

“Mamma is out, and Emma is busy, and as cross
as two sticks, You’d better ask me, ma’am. What
will you give me if I tell you directly ?”

“A kiss,” said May laughing.

“Oh, I don’t care for kisses,” said Annie. “I can
geta kiss any day. What will you give?”

“A piece of geranium.”

“No, indeed.”
CONCLUSION. 189

“ Well, a rose. I won’t give more; thereare only
two left.”

“Tl take that, ma’am. Now listen, we are
going to the sea-side ! ””

“Oh, that is delightful! When are we going?”

“Tn a fortnight, and the cousins are going with us, -
-but they’ll come here for a week first.”

“I’m so glad they’ll be with us,” said May, “it
will be such fun.”

Next week the cousins arrived. ‘ Hurrah! here
we are again,” said Frank. ‘ How do you do, aunt?
how do you do, everybody.”

May could hardly believe her ears. Was this the
gloomy stiff Frank she had known before?

«Well, May,” he said, when he saw her watching
him. ‘* How are you, old girl? I hope you are not
going to lecture me because I haven’t written,-eh ? ”

“ Oh no,” said May, “ but I can’t believe you’re the
same.”

“ Kitty will soon tell you I am, for she’s had no
peace of her life since ’ve been back.”

“ Yes, I have,” said Kitty ; and then, as Frank ran
off, she said confidentially to May, ‘“He’s so nice
now, May; a great tease but such fun, and never
gloomy as he used to be. Oh, look at those two.”
190 MAY’S GARDEN.

“ Those two,” were Herbert and Annie, forgetful
of all the world besides, walking off with their arms
round one another’s wajsts to see the rabbits and tell
their secrets. : a

“ How funny,” said May. “I expect Annie will
tell him he’s not to be a soldier.”

“Why not? ”’ said Kitty.

“Oh, because we’ve got to know an old man who’s
been a soldier and lost his leg, and he’s frightened
Annie about soldiering, so I think we shall see no
more games of that kind.”

“T think old soldiers are great fun sometimes,”
said Kitty ; “we know an officer who tells delightful
stories.”

“‘ But this man’s not an officer ; he’s much greater
fan, because he talks so oddly. We go to see him at
least once a fortnight, and mamma reads to him once a
week. He’s so fond of mamma, and she’s got him to
go to church and read his Bible. He was so bad-
tempered when we knew him first—not to us, but to
other people—and now he’s much quieter. He’s so
fond of Annie, she runs in oftener than I do, and he
keeps a store of gingerbread for her, so I expect
she will take Herbert there a great deal.”

Was he one of the people “ you took flowers to?”
CONCLUSION. 191

“Yes, Annie gave him a rose, that’s how we got
to know him. We like him best of all the grown-up
people we go to, except Aunt Sarah and Aunt Martha,
and of course they’re ladies, and it’s different going to
them.”

“Yes, I hope they will ask us.all to go there
before we go to the sea; it must be such fun.”

“T daresay they will, they’re so kind. Oh, I must
go, there’s Frank raking my garden. Will you come
down, dear, as soon as you are ready ?”

. © Yes,” said Kitty, “you’d better go and have a
confab.”

May ran off and came to Frank out of breath.
“Oh, Frank, do be careful,’ said May, remembering
that he was more vigorous than patient in garden
work.

*T thought I should bring you,” said Frank
laughing. ‘I remembered you always liked to see
what the rake was doing to your valuable property.
What a time you’ve been.” 2

“Tve been talking to Kitty; I longed to come,
but I couldn’t get away. How have you got
on?”

“Oh, famously. It’s a jolly school, and the fellows
are very nice—at least some of them. I tried that on
192 MAY’S GARDEN.

and stuck to it, and I think it has made me a brighter
chap.”

“Oh,” said May, “you mean praying. Oh, I’m so
glad; ”’ and the tears came into her eyes, and dropped
on to her frock, for she dare not get out her pocket-
handkerchief, lest Frank should see.

He saw fast enough, and loved her for it, but he
didn’t think it manly to show it, so he went on raking,
and said, “Your garden’s splendid. What lots of
money you must have spent on it.”

“ve spent a good deal, but Smith’s given me
things sometimes that mamma didn’t want, and they
have helped to fill up.”

“That geranium’s a splendid fellow, did you buy
a Ig P

“No, Mrs. Morris, an old woman we know, gave it
to me. We take her flowers sometimes, and some one
gave her this geranium, and she thought it too good
for herself, she said, and she would make me have it.”

“A convenient sort of body; pity but what they’d
sent her some more. You might have got a nice
stock.”

“ Ah, I shouidn’t have taken them, because she’s
so fond of flowers! I’m going to take her a bunch
before we go away.”
CONCLUSION. 193

In fact, May and Annie had a great deal to do—
before they left forthe sea. What with their friends
high and low, and their visitors, and May’s garden to
put to rights, and Annie’s rabbits to arrange for, their
hands were quite full. All the friends were to have
flowers before they went, so the days were portioned
out, that time might be had for everybody.

Naomi was one of the first to be visited. She
looked very sad when she heard her little friends were
going away, but when May promised her a letter she
brightened up wonderfully. May left her a very
pretty nosegay, which Naomi said she should try to
keep alive until she came back, and if it wouldn’t keep,
she should press some of the flowers in a book.

“Tm so thankful ’m so much better, miss; the
doctor says, with God’s blessing, I'll be up and out
next summer.”

“Then you must come and see my rabbits,” said
Annie.

“Yes, miss, I hope so. I should be pleased.
Have you heard how Jane is, miss?”? said Naomi,
turning to May.

“Oh, much better; I had a letter from her a
fortnight ago, and she said she could walk without

crutches, and that she was getting quite fat. She’s
, 13
» 194 MAY’S GARDEN.

looking forward to the time when she will be our maid.
Mamma has told her that she may in a few years, if she
is strong enough, and she is already looking forward
to it. The doctor at the hospital has written to
mamma about her, and he says he thinks she will be
able to do light work.”

“Tf I get quite well I should like to come
too, miss. Couldn’t I have a place with your
mamma ? ”

«“T daresay you could; I will ask mamma, she is
very fond of you, I know.”

When the children went to say good-bye to
Old Peter he was almost inclined to be cross, not with
them, but with the door which would creak, and the
chimney which would smoke ; or, at least, he was so
out of sorts at the idea of losing his visitors, that he
fancied they did, and that everything was going
wrong.

“How long be you going for, missy?” he said to
May.

“We are going for two months, and our cousins
are going to stay a month with us.”

“That's a weary timefor an old man; howsoever, I
hopes you’ll come safe back agen. You’ll come and

see me often when you gets back, eh? ’Cause I likes
CONCLUSION. 195

you without the flowers, though they’re pretty critturs
certain.”

“Oh yes,” said May and Annie in a breath, “ we'll
come. And, perhaps,”
a little letter.”

“Eh! do, missy, and I'll have it framed and put
over the mantel-shelf, eh ? ”’

“J shan’t send it then. No, you must promise to

said Annie, “I shall send you

put it away in a drawer.”

“Well, Pll do it; then you'll write, eh?”

“Yes,” said Annie, “but you mustn’t show it to
anybody.”

So the children said good-bye to Old Peter,
and left him standing at the door with his crutch,
watching them. They gave him a nod as they
turned the corner, and then they went to Mrs.
Morris.

She looked as calm and sweet as usual, and May
told her there was no doubt she had got heart’s ease
now, however much she might have wanted it when
she was a little girl.

“You always look 80 happy, Mrs. Morris,” she
said, “I wish I always felt as happy as you look.”

«The storms of life have passed over my head,
dear child, and now I’m like an old ship in dock, only
196 MAY’S GARDEN.

fit to be moored, and made a refuge in sickness and
trouble for others whom I may be allowed to comfort.”

“ Nurse says you are the most comforting friend
she’s got.”

Mrs. Morris smiled. ‘‘ How is she, missy ? I hope
she’ll be coming to see me soon.”

* Oh yes, she was going to bring us to-day instead
of Emma, but she’s so busy helping mamma. She’s
going away with us. She’s been much better lately,
and mamma thinks the sea air may set her up for the
winter.”

«“ Well, here’s Emma coming for you, so I must
bid you good-bye. Ask nurse to try and see me before
she goes, and give my duty to your dear mamma.”

“Yes, thank you. I know nurse means to come
and see you,” said May.

The children did not forget Rosie’s grave. They
went there the day before they left with a wreath of
flowers, and Smith had orders to put in crocuses and
snowdrops, ready for the winter.

Their affectionate remembrance of little Rosie
soothed her mother, and the flowers they strewed on
the little grave were often watered with her tears.

Simmons & Botten, Printers, 4a, Shoe Lane, E.C.
Adh (ag {y
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'2011-12-16T21:37:00-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3052756' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIEZ' 'sip-files00005.tif'
26ac06c5ba6c5fb98e2ea28e1d9041c9
7ad9a988a66a7ef8ca69a5aff7e228580414f640
'2011-12-16T21:33:08-05:00'
describe
'236' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFA' 'sip-files00005.txt'
4097f0a550697eae9798adf697e46af2
86e1840b8123a83ab63f802484655df90799b04f
'2011-12-16T21:31:11-05:00'
describe
'58903' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFB' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
f63584646ff6917bf934618d9c8be8ad
fc3009be85128270f6a3717463ac3aa7deef19e7
'2011-12-16T21:33:22-05:00'
describe
'262756' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFC' 'sip-files00007.QC2.jpg'
8762dae72cc9110d94c2c3564fe69412
895fb4154d57d5863b914342df510dc03f4a71ff
'2011-12-16T21:29:35-05:00'
describe
'367819' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFD' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
ab0eb849a2935bd2679793c5635ca061
764cd3799062d715682fabe069e48571998c7434
'2011-12-16T21:30:24-05:00'
describe
'95932' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFE' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
4e770913fe20e3fc2d2cdad3e5fe01ea
11aa1d7eb0b2c1cbe3753f6eaada5b5d7cb55eeb
'2011-12-16T21:31:55-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2952080' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFF' 'sip-files00006.tif'
75defe04eb5aa92dc449c2237f5c2adc
ba73944a372e42e4dbbc4b0b3e27beb94b9193f9
'2011-12-16T21:29:42-05:00'
describe
'747' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFG' 'sip-files00006.txt'
ae92da73785c7254be5192642f9be0e7
341c6fb0ad6f3dc9d25753126a6ac06229d0008c
'2011-12-16T21:32:15-05:00'
describe
'72991' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFH' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
bdb4339a696ab6b3ca11f1abeed14276
2c687f8895ccdf713449720ff9419bf984e94bb0
'2011-12-16T21:36:11-05:00'
describe
'313149' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFI' 'sip-files00008.QC2.jpg'
5678d29dfe98d14f1062e5a962347233
6853322e52cad2538e6d1d630360f204a71fa11f
describe
'375555' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFJ' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
1edde56ce1c555e66823272a2187c656
11ac492624cd046a462aa6b959d090caadf0f944
'2011-12-16T21:35:48-05:00'
describe
'130415' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFK' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
5773ca8f57190ae6be27960fb657370a
d3723df0dad41bae262f03b95c672f2090485b7d
'2011-12-16T21:32:06-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3016764' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFL' 'sip-files00007.tif'
96634fb92a123a452cdf2153e8e67d88
be8f359257c9eddac996fbb66a4ba2bd9dd1c559
'2011-12-16T21:33:21-05:00'
describe
'707' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFM' 'sip-files00007.txt'
58627a29574f219836f464463ff19285
ac15299ee10e20a4cb2d3864b9cd7f18f79f33e0
'2011-12-16T21:33:51-05:00'
describe
'91048' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFN' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
bbbd22bc973087c788986b45c36d8d9d
5e6c243af92ae78f161e1d0a65550de5e8cd27b2
describe
'314777' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFO' 'sip-files00009.QC2.jpg'
0bda676ceeac0d8b5d9455c3f2b66cd0
5cef2d8a15158f0960af7ac5a395e46aa7b90862
'2011-12-16T21:34:30-05:00'
describe
'366213' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFP' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
ca7fc1f4c6680a81b8f9618b85372330
b3a9cbf4bdd617990bf44edb6a4b504a89cdf05b
'2011-12-16T21:33:46-05:00'
describe
'180742' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFQ' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
9a4d0d5c921483de794ae066e29ca155
7816423decdd0d3a1b8654b10f8b04f40536fa6f
'2011-12-16T21:30:11-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2942444' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFR' 'sip-files00008.tif'
704e6076b2394d82baee4b5e2721ab1c
5143f3fc68fedb79dd6db8e6413b9b1c8beb46cc
'2011-12-16T21:35:29-05:00'
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFS' 'sip-files00008.txt'
2fc00430f68b10e560b03c85cb3d9dcb
f1598e7956aad435943658908ce352c06cf8e134
'2011-12-16T21:34:23-05:00'
describe
'91503' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFT' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
394f927483b1f17e2cb7bf7d2adffedf
cc693235dd3ba43b26dc3ef6b5771950642638cb
'2011-12-16T21:36:15-05:00'
describe
'313281' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFU' 'sip-files00010.QC2.jpg'
58d68975703b7cd6e365b1dd96516ba4
ce507e6a88e9a76faa95c1c77b3aece3b6dc578f
'2011-12-16T21:31:06-05:00'
describe
'370351' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFV' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
9b50b529bf1a7571b0a6d0c250f6e8b7
9be2694705a5f54d91ec415bb8c52fe4589b2073
'2011-12-16T21:32:45-05:00'
describe
'178430' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFW' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
ce601baf1310c51e2101a41afc5a4508
d565003541bb440c1fbecb00b60492f7bcdc45f0
'2011-12-16T21:30:49-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2974748' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFX' 'sip-files00009.tif'
d681833b5b1a7a43e6c570cde946de3a
42895b0146e790fa34f0833723f5324120d4f1c2
'2011-12-16T21:34:13-05:00'
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFY' 'sip-files00009.txt'
43f1c840c550ba7be267aa4fda291a8e
33731f37809912db4f9e1c8265def5e76ec91e5b
'2011-12-16T21:33:17-05:00'
describe
'90806' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIFZ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
e73849955fe21a884d88d9c7faa82861
89ed381a4558106a6a871a16f43b559ab21617c9
'2011-12-16T21:32:46-05:00'
describe
'324746' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGA' 'sip-files00011.QC2.jpg'
2b58f8306dfbb5f7d8dc2d2659a9c3d3
c28b3ab2981a3a684460c54b52daf27516a0cadd
'2011-12-16T21:30:50-05:00'
describe
'378458' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGB' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
b4b6668e49837ca8b9bf3d4a9b053a20
f2795b72e4ef08ef59038c85d31b1fe2c8cd2ade
'2011-12-16T21:32:56-05:00'
describe
'179827' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGC' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
1ffdb078d5ea7a545643442be2e3b3f4
623a33ed46dc8b43ea8f7c2814a47ab8556335de
'2011-12-16T21:35:38-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3040532' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGD' 'sip-files00010.tif'
00f4919c0fb4c76b13d9974074aa545b
f38dd87982712cc38af3fb158478e4c2ace6d0b6
'2011-12-16T21:32:47-05:00'
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGE' 'sip-files00010.txt'
143ae4c5710d0612351cda1f83d963b0
c575d5a7df155296e22ed668f62eab0de1f1a5bd
'2011-12-16T21:36:08-05:00'
describe
'97778' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGF' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
a2c67422b27a63e76933d6ce63154123
87ca153acb8f2776f7fa07bca3297ee59fe039af
'2011-12-16T21:31:46-05:00'
describe
'322420' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGG' 'sip-files00012.QC2.jpg'
65bdde2152f878f94a0d87eb0aae1d5b
6aca7606e340b8de22f2b75563ab677c6cec4640
'2011-12-16T21:31:03-05:00'
describe
'366232' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGH' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
705cca4432672527dcb5d20419574ee1
acb53b60fb8ae87655995a06601d5b684c4fb612
'2011-12-16T21:31:52-05:00'
describe
'189939' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGI' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
14cf10613832860cae2e38f75b318237
cb8ac78f767b3e49f124e86e70f30f210b8a04e8
'2011-12-16T21:31:41-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2942640' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGJ' 'sip-files00011.tif'
67603d96245011e95de410c8287316a4
81f66218c9437b6b57c9e85b913c1373b0a48cb2
'2011-12-16T21:35:11-05:00'
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGK' 'sip-files00011.txt'
cbd26065d814861c383b1c48026c98e1
2604e1765009a14926dc6025d4c1037f559a0e8d
describe
'95492' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGL' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
702e733c1aa04d7be1cf7617ab471e98
cf638e2860b6c35d75f0da93d47d047e298dd624
'2011-12-16T21:33:02-05:00'
describe
'325354' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGM' 'sip-files00013.QC2.jpg'
8801bd94f42edf9314df3e594e7b580d
3fd31f3702958175b9da2647f9ce81a2f6154be6
'2011-12-16T21:34:12-05:00'
describe
'371385' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGN' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
8c11dced1daf158b77aac255aa06bf7e
c87bedc7350d8f05b99a723aa09fae41d0d426f1
'2011-12-16T21:35:18-05:00'
describe
'183847' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGO' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
6e1cc1b3d8973ffe503319467746a6ae
232900a6bf56910a9973fcb1c71cb3b8507ab74a
'2011-12-16T21:29:37-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2982996' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGP' 'sip-files00012.tif'
85f30efa5c887a452fc345d2eaa56fa3
166995e3834cb623b02f88a35ff32449af7b5022
'2011-12-16T21:32:08-05:00'
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGQ' 'sip-files00012.txt'
c00c397506f869433cfb32fcff7f25a1
a31ba7f5e5f922502d1ab010cddd9e57c47475b9
'2011-12-16T21:33:25-05:00'
describe
'96631' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGR' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
4223732c89ffd018441d8475a9af4dea
e04e67c9648319a7df86a7ef77c31f094cf0fd2a
'2011-12-16T21:30:27-05:00'
describe
'307706' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGS' 'sip-files00014.QC2.jpg'
1f02d478719c5f0bc01044fb1a43e83c
f33bcd6c3af57759384cdd2b7865226b9a381d26
'2011-12-16T21:30:59-05:00'
describe
'372138' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGT' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
a5be97e6d67bc2fc2643bc72a36d9ed2
494012ed7c5d0bae9ae1cfcbe6476030ce26de75
'2011-12-16T21:33:58-05:00'
describe
'188354' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGU' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
68d068e634bf15c50648f1354046b56c
406d31586e120c787a19ca4f1dd220f5f10369e9
'2011-12-16T21:34:00-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2989452' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGV' 'sip-files00013.tif'
78ba2a4dbf0afe03ec349357b3ffff28
7afe7746a723874f28c278adaa9a4d22e7dd2a0a
'2011-12-16T21:35:44-05:00'
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGW' 'sip-files00013.txt'
ca4ef862f364008517e0afaddcab8cc5
3c1a0dd0d0248c07087ea81e0ec111ff37873237
'2011-12-16T21:33:50-05:00'
describe
'92577' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGX' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
05ac81cd0082417c89becf4a00106e0c
75fa554d13cd0d932eec928cc9e427d5bee67638
'2011-12-16T21:31:30-05:00'
describe
'319650' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGY' 'sip-files00015.QC2.jpg'
9e954fcbc9f07bfe8dbaa4d73747eeb0
5e77d509cc5f7569688bbd535f442656778c93cb
'2011-12-16T21:32:55-05:00'
describe
'376204' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIGZ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
7a1a460743411ae6ba756db941dd0cef
ccaf66e27cedd06334bf44bba2e35b79e3b47a19
'2011-12-16T21:35:36-05:00'
describe
'175754' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHA' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
8b08ceaf395b76ca72eb358f69dab622
180518649a0fa87464e281b961be1dafeb5aff8e
'2011-12-16T21:32:37-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3021948' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHB' 'sip-files00014.tif'
947b2eaae693f82faf81df4200ee29eb
a71e11af655358066cb694ad34dcbd871d17335e
'2011-12-16T21:34:55-05:00'
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHC' 'sip-files00014.txt'
8a9b9429677890005ea5d31b6ca88b66
00680ead76b61f493c67cf0f215aab7bd223776e
describe
'92852' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHD' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
c00b0e42f322017ea0c7db0d7d06d360
10b16973aa6e13e2cb21595550609394f8ce231a
'2011-12-16T21:34:46-05:00'
describe
'320826' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHE' 'sip-files00016.QC2.jpg'
e6393fe3946c430d7cc61c3827e6d9fb
7d4f8f7ff475a88aecc6fa3f44d271cb7e5e89a8
'2011-12-16T21:36:51-05:00'
describe
'378191' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHF' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
1a74c49e6e5df387bb7fe2ce6f82bc53
7f69845bf1e7af10a01ecefedaee441c75bd8fc0
'2011-12-16T21:34:15-05:00'
describe
'184589' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHG' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
f91da18ae46ef70a0e5106416e12770a
cf8e8b5440d9d2ff0c69a53367307d20609979e5
'2011-12-16T21:35:59-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3037776' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHH' 'sip-files00015.tif'
62ec4793bcb81a8961f0225e3b25200e
9e29f8795351aaf6964dc3dfaaf28197c315d4a1
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHI' 'sip-files00015.txt'
da3457a4131b9884c87072edc245a1cf
c1c388638cab063a0029831fe27d565cd4410534
'2011-12-16T21:30:41-05:00'
describe
'96926' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHJ' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
365794da4983d421b0d7547f8339af83
7ca1a3dd47d9db0c64b435db1eecd15b0cb4db5b
'2011-12-16T21:31:09-05:00'
describe
'303305' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHK' 'sip-files00017.QC2.jpg'
f6d0d7ea7b79a464eac0dc2fe578724f
646dfd9d89f7b792f7ed22b04e5d4c020873e0c2
'2011-12-16T21:36:45-05:00'
describe
'381720' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHL' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
d12587a3799729fddc6dcce5daeb91e4
6c26a832f5a6f1b5473f2980e2502df30b88d6a4
'2011-12-16T21:36:12-05:00'
describe
'186666' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHM' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
c41742fc336168021b6f3096598659db
853e61717557ecd722a1c2306a73e04a3a0d573b
'2011-12-16T21:36:52-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3066048' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHN' 'sip-files00016.tif'
f9e48a4863d82f1c6e24cc2ff0d8981e
ceff188f6c91f797d83860bad6351c4ef472eef3
'2011-12-16T21:31:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHO' 'sip-files00016.txt'
0d07d05d413ef822a92addd7e51c2ca2
6206eb301f931efed1584be6788275cb5305afd3
'2011-12-16T21:31:53-05:00'
describe
'89154' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHP' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
410b2ca78e789eaff1f5efcd5f0a39bb
cd6e025fe841c2e4f139b370b454cbf60e23d3ac
'2011-12-16T21:35:42-05:00'
describe
'319536' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHQ' 'sip-files00018.QC2.jpg'
ed60d93109b58eb8a55530feed3c80a9
d95646692ad6bdaa0e06eab37bbd256ad75a4c22
'2011-12-16T21:33:18-05:00'
describe
'371781' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHR' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
43eece3b2cfb65df2de6e5ffb55c36ed
c1ec5ffca3b663ab0461434b975294062d9e2e42
'2011-12-16T21:34:45-05:00'
describe
'170716' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHS' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
bfb5bf26123fd81f78c05c2569f2abc5
13855894d86bc46d8edbc0edb052c5afa6514277
'2011-12-16T21:30:31-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2986800' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHT' 'sip-files00017.tif'
6fa0e8743213cdced21b41298d55e775
c1ea73e84c91ee809a8264669a7c1fb2cd32b0ff
'2011-12-16T21:33:13-05:00'
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHU' 'sip-files00017.txt'
a2de0e47f8ef0b4d1e973034accd4cb4
c83f01d75901f24ddff889932ac916fecf1fca99
describe
'93587' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHV' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
e22923f025cbe51cbb3563d3a3397bd9
148537a47e610a0d62dc0509110d493c1479c11e
'2011-12-16T21:30:33-05:00'
describe
'196138' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHW' 'sip-files00019.QC2.jpg'
0935e4437506e9f427d084b33f1446d0
da20e86d04acc42454ff19600666dec4c2494575
'2011-12-16T21:31:04-05:00'
describe
'379998' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHX' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
7c4630bb35f3988e333406979ad0652b
4e403efe6ffd58276fe883111586028c6e9debc4
'2011-12-16T21:31:19-05:00'
describe
'185559' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHY' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
e07dc679afeaa86b9150bd37cb98e614
763a75a13c3e01c7e053411003d271451613f602
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3052312' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIHZ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
b566acd67e7543773a59e8e18d6b5548
4cc3d8d58c0eacc229051059b578640e1e742c08
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIA' 'sip-files00018.txt'
1586dadbdc6d0a082ee6a380d36440f4
b074d7147a08e1b52d44e5f3f81a042d35a38976
'2011-12-16T21:33:19-05:00'
describe
'48065' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIB' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
4980c57e5fce380d0b9e97e2603c4100
c47ebe3e276e294f331d9224d1d724cb2c8534bb
'2011-12-16T21:35:45-05:00'
describe
'331425' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIC' 'sip-files00020.QC2.jpg'
8c09a25cb2193fca1caab6b2a9b57ad3
8d921296805b848fe38de88c0f3df187c6a90d28
'2011-12-16T21:30:35-05:00'
describe
'371120' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIID' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
3be742d9802614a87bb79dbcc9e2819c
6f919fe1649f079862e1021c19d19442004f4496
'2011-12-16T21:30:29-05:00'
describe
'75379' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIE' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
4aa7c8df665d6e35641c962d7c7b747e
dd6b5680b7f971ccfd6c87c4db90c40bf2361c59
'2011-12-16T21:32:12-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'8913972' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIF' 'sip-files00019.tif'
68a9e82a1686427c5b6848a273ef2a7f
d4695a52dc7d436c3139a73590504d20fb98b40b
'2011-12-16T21:29:55-05:00'
describe
'25' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIG' 'sip-files00019.txt'
508afa9b95bfca2059a122de34518298
4d6cbf7cca49eb2f81c5f1a01efde181485291fa
'2011-12-16T21:30:15-05:00'
describe
'97803' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIH' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
3831580b7d47bbcbdc664962520fe425
86454bc007821a94bcfc6b3cce72f296c8021447
'2011-12-16T21:32:40-05:00'
describe
'317159' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIII' 'sip-files00021.QC2.jpg'
046671c68930c12770238bcdec571cc8
7b8b753f6e0cd745562b9388f91d0d38e1ec3e86
'2011-12-16T21:32:27-05:00'
describe
'373609' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIJ' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
d7737815ba18e836bbbfc03d8fc16249
21597c0972ae66d50f7057573872cea21959546e
describe
'194377' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIK' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
f12de00cfeaf39df2721d281f75e7975
012253f676939b748f8ad4bbc2119fd092747880
'2011-12-16T21:32:00-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3001124' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIL' 'sip-files00020.tif'
2eb90b5ddfb46af14cbb943df222c650
7a1a7f232b38632c0504d8c461f6d98b7addb8e5
'2011-12-16T21:34:05-05:00'
describe
'1292' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIM' 'sip-files00020.txt'
ddbf7a031f7af96d48b8ba63b3604f5f
786635764699712df9b4e7dbbc3d320152c654af
'2011-12-16T21:34:57-05:00'
describe
'91876' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIN' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
16839c00c8291d1e55e93bd34fb7aa5d
4a34c642bad35cb47e357df6219fdf341015a89a
'2011-12-16T21:30:54-05:00'
describe
'324857' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIO' 'sip-files00022.QC2.jpg'
be065092b83b4d93a49553cecbacf6bb
093f3b32ea4cadd699518334737b02c9cec230ac
'2011-12-16T21:30:23-05:00'
describe
'372143' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIP' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
f74dce805ae83f1d516e54cd7228c4d0
1e1b1ecef148d100eccb16d321d02585e7a574cd
'2011-12-16T21:32:44-05:00'
describe
'177776' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIQ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
df1f30b931d9d313d47cc03582d85df2
690d7cba73ebc9eda610843b9dd44a198e97e477
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2989000' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIR' 'sip-files00021.tif'
db2d939839916f2f094510276063c398
59d1320fd77fe1f8eb208e8fb52848ae37ce9eb7
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIS' 'sip-files00021.txt'
f0dc51dd6e3d84c86dac7ef172990bae
9a885ae896147d84687b757a181bfcbbe8b6d0c4
'2011-12-16T21:30:43-05:00'
describe
'96011' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIT' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
971e24af5d6da19e6c403887b899edd0
7de09dab41063be7d089952f615b20dfb5e9b7a3
'2011-12-16T21:33:09-05:00'
describe
'95638' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIU' 'sip-files00022a.QC.jpg'
8bedb060ea5c56d859f2b949acf7aa1a
dd3416681daa389b23126003be9cbc1b8cfb79a3
describe
'361419' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIV' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
db82d92fed63a727459e60618ca6fb47
9955c842e692703d2f05138918d64795c37fb97b
'2011-12-16T21:31:47-05:00'
describe
'187228' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIW' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
274d3781eee8d2356088bee50c316e7c
659457f9036a9650644dd0fccae5ce4251147445
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2903636' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIX' 'sip-files00022.tif'
a5d0b0f87ba3a5a6bad548fb6cfe67ba
6e311f4b840f840c365d1510635b3d74cc1ef802
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIY' 'sip-files00022.txt'
e27af121972e7242fed2669b6ca2054b
f68721a06c56d44f80a8f3476538308ff1791671
'2011-12-16T21:30:07-05:00'
describe
'289969' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIIZ' 'sip-filesUF00026977_00001.mets'
88f1ac1d3ac97d352e577b3b10294e48
7ae746c942eccb307f805bf554e5c96bc9ec0971
'2011-12-16T21:35:19-05:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-18T00:21:02-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'1235' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJC' 'sip-files00022a.txt'
2b8fd126fb5d02da394709aa660e5c02
47d052fa33d3e58124e20590b59d7a10b6af5168
'2011-12-16T21:36:49-05:00'
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJD' 'sip-files00022b.txt'
4837c2530f24bf75b2e6dce695507239
a6f81bac04127b0542a4072dbc4fa340b1c049b3
'2011-12-16T21:31:08-05:00'
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJE' 'sip-files00023.txt'
8cb775fdaa7699d8bb0c4422af3f0c88
f6e1f6c761b30c1902a78b686948e0f3420185b7
'2011-12-16T21:30:40-05:00'
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJF' 'sip-files00024.txt'
985b5bd39dd1ff52959e9721c556703e
57f1f9fda75164a06295526e4b6b7cc05b1c7504
'2011-12-16T21:37:01-05:00'
describe
'1272' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJG' 'sip-files00025.txt'
2f087c38915218a1aa2fe204b6447166
4f5a9cca989ee56dd5e969152ce99ceb8665058c
'2011-12-16T21:36:41-05:00'
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJH' 'sip-files00026.txt'
197d259c4c655647b9376f0d295f3e0d
457facf018a41fef6bcc1bd1fcba15f3a9129d84
'2011-12-16T21:33:16-05:00'
describe
'330' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJI' 'sip-files00027.txt'
f806bb285a6bc82bd6477fd622014f65
07a404679411297c860db78ce0e5b3b254b54999
'2011-12-16T21:36:25-05:00'
describe
'913' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJJ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
b7504b245e432b0cf6d4558526561d78
a86a75dee7098870f52d352544de6418188fc51f
'2011-12-16T21:31:33-05:00'
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJK' 'sip-files00029.txt'
03ff830853b8a3850113c2793d24fede
25a3bd0928b5e0f3f1adec1c7aa2df6f0f24828d
'2011-12-16T21:34:07-05:00'
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJL' 'sip-files00030.txt'
c7da4ac4d752808db5647dc32042593b
d72212671f06ef9f76b825489e2538a32f0ef6e3
'2011-12-16T21:30:26-05:00'
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJM' 'sip-files00031.txt'
d7a5ad32e436a6859ef0e1505f511bde
d0c45a017549e360664a18496f218f1981e7ebe2
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJN' 'sip-files00032.txt'
eab321d6de568358c8eb25a1c32e7500
792ea5ef2377d2a250ee2599815f5a3dc4108b1b
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJO' 'sip-files00033.txt'
a9eaf92685a8c67ddb4afe92f12674c8
d02daa406c06d2b68fdbb6daf6122d5f948eb301
describe
'87' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJP' 'sip-files00034.txt'
3a2f0c319db5ff88e2560cabfe56360c
125f6f8b671a3e0caf2dc04d5350457ea8c43f36
'2011-12-16T21:36:14-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1264' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJQ' 'sip-files00035.txt'
073c2d4c4505ebf4db988170b056b21d
8998110e5692c1aa0e6238bece2d31d5ff512eb1
'2011-12-16T21:34:09-05:00'
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJR' 'sip-files00036.txt'
b833f7b7aa8cbe234b18860dae3aa526
7476f005112804d467bad5d7e3c8da653c1fb43d
'2011-12-16T21:35:57-05:00'
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJS' 'sip-files00037.txt'
b4688f0a26ece9bdc0bcb3a2d75cd920
ab2662f5015cb6d5b40283fe8bf2f52d1575a35d
'2011-12-16T21:34:28-05:00'
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJT' 'sip-files00038.txt'
c90c668353d3eb42b1721b2ee6a20cd3
7f33085d992fcce6a30ed6c40d7a0bfe7d0b9ffc
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJU' 'sip-files00039.txt'
c520e7d4a50350465154a2106b8fa671
3676f7fc9397f58e6a577f525f606382264cfcd9
'2011-12-16T21:30:57-05:00'
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJV' 'sip-files00040.txt'
c8dafa292a7071c42291119dd7d30d95
188ce48a6a5043eeb0fd0e454092e2e9a8a7fdcd
'2011-12-16T21:31:42-05:00'
describe
'1142' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJW' 'sip-files00041.txt'
f4ea8eb8c8a30b891e488876562203b1
63a46cc4f86c57fae150c65a4ef4d362ec86381c
'2011-12-16T21:34:53-05:00'
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJX' 'sip-files00042.txt'
0e9b65484bb5dd8c7841e18b21291350
46e0e62b98749e044fdf7ffbf203e020bbcd20ea
describe
'1127' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJY' 'sip-files00043.txt'
720852b947ed7b4c46abf0b5ee78062d
7db9092e5b0c0f59056cc1d25389e414cbc906c7
'2011-12-16T21:34:56-05:00'
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIJZ' 'sip-files00044.txt'
6f9b475dbc55da9dd3ddb4a6374c8a52
f560a7ea0be72db2139a8acfc78f042bae069e06
'2011-12-16T21:32:32-05:00'
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKA' 'sip-files00045.txt'
33a95e18b1656c8cc50429118b9d6dd8
b5c1b2d522daf0a43c32c5be63172ca1c911eab0
'2011-12-16T21:29:59-05:00'
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKB' 'sip-files00046.txt'
074fef086127bf1ae134ca64eb476766
ac595c29fd1f444fb91d5b814456c47a1d217dff
'2011-12-16T21:31:02-05:00'
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKC' 'sip-files00047.txt'
20c920ebced88a6a5963298d15fb0c31
be1a5366b3bd476a87bde8025d3e42af7ea97c7c
'2011-12-16T21:33:28-05:00'
describe
'771' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKD' 'sip-files00048.txt'
d6bf16d9221dec64b58a21e0574fd075
d72840ea57910fdd52ff95e344e3292cecbc3b18
describe
'877' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKE' 'sip-files00049.txt'
dcc4830f3505b413d064653221de1c65
fa56be9b972a280bfb3f8fc3cf1293aca2bc6db6
'2011-12-16T21:34:22-05:00'
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKF' 'sip-files00050.txt'
1e852cf8079f499d15f3da38674f54fe
23a854ef04f37f90c18d1714a098adf880d1755f
'2011-12-16T21:34:48-05:00'
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKG' 'sip-files00051.txt'
449d06caae7c24f9c747c8df4963ed3b
e691124bbc6998368cdb36c056f5f25996623d74
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKH' 'sip-files00052.txt'
45b39fb136602814692d7a859b3e3160
3bb54eb94ca927fb8e1ade1af48a096148bd8a06
'2011-12-16T21:31:20-05:00'
describe
'103' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKI' 'sip-files00053.txt'
2cdda9b6182d107b65c90d0d4bd0a3f1
1abd400aa0f1f24d792479a50ba1458499a18523
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKJ' 'sip-files00054.txt'
5c87d45897f97bc83a603dcdf51aeedc
921b48c2c229e86f4deb096943d28a5411e33fc4
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKK' 'sip-files00055.txt'
17c57578c2629c4f72f9ace3f55f5385
f960024f1a3b07b3d95193e136fd16407ca01e48
'2011-12-16T21:36:50-05:00'
describe
'1251' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKL' 'sip-files00056.txt'
12119bc9e91a6193263de21c50b535d9
1a45514620923491bb32cebd66feab46df22279b
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKM' 'sip-files00057.txt'
bbeed286c33d1e9d38e72b6ab762b627
5a2dfcbf48534db35250754b409f27473b09939e
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKN' 'sip-files00058.txt'
b518921a0868a1a56e4452b19cedb0f3
1764caeb22312571c6196fa1b64db8ba047cb634
'2011-12-16T21:33:30-05:00'
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKO' 'sip-files00059.txt'
3e5ffe0669aa792b7d9e35b9081e7800
400a970cdcb8b53ecc4d941a62eff00f24a1a220
'2011-12-16T21:32:02-05:00'
describe
'1318' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKP' 'sip-files00060.txt'
07080e49a350a3bfb5a6f10f3a8d0e77
9dfedadcc5459a2ca302a661e99b2ee8d4ff6567
'2011-12-16T21:35:26-05:00'
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKQ' 'sip-files00061.txt'
d3f4a57ef2986512d99ebb9fcf039a2d
57ccf0c0185e124e4dca5d8491bb82b6d452b1d0
'2011-12-16T21:36:18-05:00'
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKR' 'sip-files00062.txt'
49d684ba141d97f37b9253a8e35d1f58
d63ec933cffb822a1938e1cc500beb4439e47d92
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKS' 'sip-files00063.txt'
11a83d9da073dd6c9e0d1bd10dae297b
c6bd5df7b1b6c9584a575e4b217f1daf88acf524
'2011-12-16T21:36:48-05:00'
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKT' 'sip-files00064.txt'
40d2a88b2247861c0333ebbc4572dfe7
8ea4600105dabc079f419de7c5c1df9a33956cb0
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKU' 'sip-files00065.txt'
465859ba8938acadec6572401d1e8ef3
e77f59bb30075d9807355f4f1601e8473f14c6ea
'2011-12-16T21:36:05-05:00'
describe
'782' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKV' 'sip-files00066.txt'
8e24302c01500c0f1cb6ac75da090a0a
498e7483255ccc687792239a9a957dfd4cfe7a54
'2011-12-16T21:31:24-05:00'
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKW' 'sip-files00067.txt'
8d68e23a74cc0c7fd7585dfc934d8662
5abd0f7e6211e5f045cede0d8be1c3f51b77bb95
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKX' 'sip-files00068.txt'
fac008093c901158ca5a4303cd5f7f59
5ca0aa990927dc941f2583b90ba74561a9963830
'2011-12-16T21:29:39-05:00'
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKY' 'sip-files00069.txt'
6a8a930bc20674426f9f2edebfa926fc
57c3515a74f0b6c94510aa0ddf79063465c6ad4d
'2011-12-16T21:33:57-05:00'
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIKZ' 'sip-files00070.txt'
eda57633420d51f2756714f258ede76d
3645cba9bde4ccec07ffe688f2e4d2f0bd078b6e
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILA' 'sip-files00071.txt'
711b96dca236eb76802062537d4cf6d9
d6eb684f59b5c594bb7e3ac1c85d43fcb4901550
'2011-12-16T21:35:12-05:00'
describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILB' 'sip-files00072.txt'
4a11f7181b058572676526464b2fb843
67ce804c5f4fad64f5a840200052b22e2438cb9f
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILC' 'sip-files00073.txt'
aa0b80e98d999f622559bad7771dd2c9
9c2dfd665ac393d35992c7e764956f7ef5d2e726
'2011-12-16T21:35:35-05:00'
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILD' 'sip-files00074.txt'
a7a541afa6e34d56c631642eeef9b6e7
39613b5352626c5775d879e342b4c90b92b1cc5a
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILE' 'sip-files00075.txt'
4a8ae7e733a950d6578e121d79d75066
2be3377f5d2c8806a252fd6416b376d1769854ab
'2011-12-16T21:31:17-05:00'
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILF' 'sip-files00076.txt'
c38e84fccb323c250b1ac1097ea59ee4
a93df7c36e55dd5f2e09eab35481db7da74d7505
'2011-12-16T21:35:21-05:00'
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILG' 'sip-files00077.txt'
4c3739e7bcb80fa4d3905a8d02c8fc2c
375419761f4e31ea613db8b499f73239b01fb427
'2011-12-16T21:36:42-05:00'
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILH' 'sip-files00078.txt'
8409c5894b9b09fd2cfd5f5bb217f3da
329f5f2348ddfd31f4f676e43a9c754acdd6350b
'2011-12-16T21:33:32-05:00'
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILI' 'sip-files00079.txt'
491695747e096a13047d18d48322397c
55012645eb9d52e768bb004a3d8032fb12b04899
'2011-12-16T21:31:28-05:00'
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILJ' 'sip-files00080.txt'
8aa489bbbf4ef5807869aeb9e1ee4a70
effc3c002ac0de09970bea262492941461ddff2a
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILK' 'sip-files00081.txt'
0acdf02befb383eb488ae305127ac2f2
4b731ad8348bd197b6b392b45da7fb696aef7465
'2011-12-16T21:29:41-05:00'
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILL' 'sip-files00082.txt'
4a160c6ea475c5bc2db72545dbdcb5cd
e49b40f5dffdfa28a2cc93b229a7d63f07cc89bc
'2011-12-16T21:36:36-05:00'
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILM' 'sip-files00083.txt'
a3c110f17f305d0e52a6381491945f3d
099fbcd28e3ebb4b4711d7f6eda4e818fd12b32b
'2011-12-16T21:31:07-05:00'
describe
'1323' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILN' 'sip-files00084.txt'
9f23349710010339e7113f658635b3a3
eb99e61eb6c5d0a10470419e6d8338090526bc04
'2011-12-16T21:33:15-05:00'
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILO' 'sip-files00085.txt'
f8e182fec45316e425731f63d4074cc7
f588310f6268a76f43f44d55100e6082c49fa9cd
'2011-12-16T21:32:41-05:00'
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILP' 'sip-files00086.txt'
a57abb0e739a744d9b77bba0de902537
b4776ac28e2d72515d5eac7a013ee4f41732db09
'2011-12-16T21:29:44-05:00'
describe
'1344' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILQ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
fb9087358190e7139fdeb888afbb9cd0
4a4c93a4ddb3dde7ede919796ab9e3e7fde3aed0
'2011-12-16T21:35:43-05:00'
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILR' 'sip-files00088.txt'
2a8db2f2029db4f913408cc33fbebe70
84c5588cdd4070be8f3812642f50c36b77275c45
'2011-12-16T21:29:43-05:00'
describe
'784' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILS' 'sip-files00089.txt'
6d74b84a932773396c8a38955f7bf43f
e1469dc3fdd7c437309591550c06f5a738650365
'2011-12-16T21:30:46-05:00'
describe
'940' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILT' 'sip-files00090.txt'
2d1965fe9c28dfb3ab5fd596a0f9bfc5
5a3047b2e8b77d80559365a285aa6f621d604dca
'2011-12-16T21:34:50-05:00'
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILU' 'sip-files00091.txt'
60662aac12f56b5b286051ea331ebe0a
b9a8d3c8c8da7e35d9703f6bb7ab020c571abbd7
'2011-12-16T21:33:53-05:00'
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILV' 'sip-files00092.txt'
ab943012354d20d0178824fdf978d581
7bfac1c0b4b272c2188abb91f9ad91c0e1435ac2
'2011-12-16T21:30:34-05:00'
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILW' 'sip-files00093.txt'
c348c9d8392f45548a4f3fe579648c68
cdfac2755788ca9f726088560c2c235d93e39503
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILX' 'sip-files00094.txt'
d83555e0c4cabad1dac552e60e55b19f
2c6c6f6aa6e1247aa73935cbff0acff3cb0ea697
'2011-12-16T21:30:58-05:00'
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILY' 'sip-files00095.txt'
65079f13756c21add01e22594d708a45
09183017fdfb491e1bdc093d5680bb0ca0f913ea
'2011-12-16T21:32:21-05:00'
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAILZ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
7b5b13c454195a79c152bf67a34a4126
0e7a186e50a330d78f243c63f08ed91d5da8aff1
'2011-12-16T21:31:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMA' 'sip-files00097.txt'
1bdf3e6aa16ee3e6f460d9ac5b780687
c21fcbceb06a7d2f6de2dc347e6ab5c4b0361af1
'2011-12-16T21:33:54-05:00'
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMB' 'sip-files00098.txt'
bf3e8d37852a2e7a98c259b410e8dc8c
9f0035c658f7577b183eddeaa384280a51fc105b
'2011-12-16T21:31:40-05:00'
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMC' 'sip-files00099.txt'
21d20b171a1fa434cf94a675dd70dc1f
1ebbbd3068008970493c5ef3d05eff94c2b1ba73
'2011-12-16T21:30:45-05:00'
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMD' 'sip-files00100.txt'
f5211644fbbaeb566c62a77980bfe6e9
5939d9786553d1067913db07af21f81a5c557835
'2011-12-16T21:35:14-05:00'
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIME' 'sip-files00101.txt'
dc8ccc4ff9dfdc22c70b315884e54a49
af787da1e2f47802f92d610087db4b65d6c709a3
'2011-12-16T21:36:57-05:00'
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMF' 'sip-files00102.txt'
7605fbd81c87faf3897f17af4d8be3d0
6a51eb380a94e180a2515f4be6ac88a5e808f8ae
'2011-12-16T21:31:00-05:00'
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMG' 'sip-files00103.txt'
3a8e20ffa73669069b7d67517c8cbe4a
eb35fb56589106d04577984aba43f17eacbbe742
describe
'37' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMH' 'sip-files00104.txt'
0389f955037211e0ce4aa18646c51c01
8c6e2f71d25db19e78b2e0e52a51ecb223c318f9
'2011-12-16T21:36:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMI' 'sip-files00105.txt'
234797a0efdac662193980df5bd15224
72292324d9d0ed6643fe25b82325cdb71d393c61
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMJ' 'sip-files00106.txt'
4cd37a6a8ea0b80979e27fca64c1b2fa
ebee5a9e513a43c96f69fca4cf3d1aa31082463c
'2011-12-16T21:30:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMK' 'sip-files00107.txt'
a93fe853fc44d2946a7de65b2316c734
37a9b1680df69ee9ca6c8e9da07f9c13db2030bf
'2011-12-16T21:35:10-05:00'
describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIML' 'sip-files00108.txt'
2cdb2c082682fe79a94f7569b84c7899
b7d5df2bcd459a2b6a94efe999c6c59b7d25a132
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMM' 'sip-files00109.txt'
94e2e084d75425c300ecbd3d03a2194d
0b21eba89e9878c70a0fa757c7dad2c0ef7613a9
'2011-12-16T21:30:55-05:00'
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMN' 'sip-files00110.txt'
93d8920c304436b35de9e9e3ae886b5e
5e56fb70ba332d19d01542f7a6b43955e820caeb
'2011-12-16T21:35:50-05:00'
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMO' 'sip-files00111.txt'
e788faac04fd796f455ac2e40fe02970
273688cca1007d6ab04551251ddde7273a77bf06
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMP' 'sip-files00112.txt'
63efb232ed1019ab7c0d2fd5fb1dabdc
829482d84c0fcebe52c7b02806c0a29bfde5e8c6
'2011-12-16T21:33:27-05:00'
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMQ' 'sip-files00113.txt'
6461d725bc5195a0ccafd6895940e273
697c4a435e0a7b1580c777b15e2ec7668d567d2b
'2011-12-16T21:35:30-05:00'
describe
'319' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMR' 'sip-files00114.txt'
e03a6d0b95c9de042cd5f994f7b68a63
1cd7566cf25d6adfd188e88491e6f6ddf0f21225
describe
'884' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMS' 'sip-files00115.txt'
35923c22d14927c125cfde55d2b4e393
e31f419e6ba5672a63ef9eeced15a4209a78a6ad
'2011-12-16T21:36:46-05:00'
describe
'1074' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMT' 'sip-files00116.txt'
81f075d0ce702ebac5174c408e126f7c
706c494adfad0424ffd159a1be7698128000509c
'2011-12-16T21:30:39-05:00'
describe
'54' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMU' 'sip-files00117.txt'
f19ce2e58e93cfbaf27b3aa32de4dbf3
eb69942440d159d348ed94952ad088d9bfcbc934
'2011-12-16T21:31:27-05:00'
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMV' 'sip-files00118.txt'
590ac24df612582c18916fb4224ffbe0
32b1b8f513bd9d1f2a55028bba623f34b9a82d91
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMW' 'sip-files00119.txt'
44ed7b199d231fe3f47a7ac71ad3f3a0
33bdebeb145395d7af9e7f613a45a8dc1523405b
'2011-12-16T21:35:07-05:00'
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMX' 'sip-files00120.txt'
9bb9b4a2ae5fc49ba143e52d7f3a4f37
397fc294c0360a102ae9557acd09cc87a3a646b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMY' 'sip-files00121.txt'
a6e6289a851810050ec66635d30f9023
358517f3dce0adfa115b756d1d48208a82610648
'2011-12-16T21:36:09-05:00'
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIMZ' 'sip-files00122.txt'
ac5b8553ed8163df24802ffa07116b4b
3e408c1c08a6d849f630f2934a956609e777d3ff
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINA' 'sip-files00123.txt'
8359209dc781a1598ca4423f30a613b0
3e86cbfe5de96895bfd2f5a9a7308fe52f9d2638
'2011-12-16T21:32:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINB' 'sip-files00124.txt'
1cf93bac7feb29477f49b49465a5d60f
d9274c437501e7966f7a7f531b27893792b3e71a
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINC' 'sip-files00125.txt'
acbc189cd6e88182703535069ee9fb1e
c66e8a06ab84b81f957e55421ba977891f808be1
'2011-12-16T21:36:58-05:00'
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIND' 'sip-files00126.txt'
4f24fcf3b8ee1146965a61b1b096199f
c8955cb905007ea6e87b8061c9b1cc6b590918f4
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINE' 'sip-files00127.txt'
68a87e333aac3c0783d8986c6d7e5c1a
114edb1f623d4175f364d2ef9daa17ebc16b4a7a
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINF' 'sip-files00128.txt'
b6b580e599d825602c041c471e5cf6ec
f0429d5ed6ace3801f16be809637b4abe6c680b4
'2011-12-16T21:30:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAING' 'sip-files00129.txt'
902ed5b1ff47104df821d66690d2888a
bd29545085d1676b8f42e77d8e6e7d517e0cd5ea
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINH' 'sip-files00130.txt'
ef6a5bcfe8d6099760280d996f570aac
eec653726947acaaaca6d574fdcf5fc14172217d
'2011-12-16T21:34:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINI' 'sip-files00131.txt'
7d13ecd9c1f2ebe6e8015598e42e755b
1ac6db2f50cf0e14866c946d134d2d4352eca8b4
describe
'1366' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINJ' 'sip-files00132.txt'
f30d93405e691017e5e6e82e75a3b788
21b9f16fedd13b1c73382f04941b4b12276ee329
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINK' 'sip-files00133.txt'
d6a5a88d7af2e3d82359c03055d53cf3
4dfc0bb77c1b2ec4748cacfbfe61838258ab0c91
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINL' 'sip-files00134.txt'
3d766b9da0c47a3bdef5b1364b823be7
b5dfbb54c3927457446578b1bea65d636d41dd14
'2011-12-16T21:34:29-05:00'
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINM' 'sip-files00135.txt'
54e766f061da50e248f1a9e8feddc3f8
fbf75d26cfe5b9b84bd2a408cd155586855f2f9c
'2011-12-16T21:32:31-05:00'
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINN' 'sip-files00136.txt'
ff6f67a060b9d4c69ff9d1078c718501
d8de845e60e3e0be67ff603185b95fa49a76c8d0
'2011-12-16T21:33:05-05:00'
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINO' 'sip-files00137.txt'
ff9ab4571127f09c686094eedb7f6067
ce69642cce15550ad3f2bc12e6afe5e0cfb9ceb4
'2011-12-16T21:34:10-05:00'
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINP' 'sip-files00138.txt'
43b6367395ff16d0a57e56ea2d48a707
23904d0b1f7f05c346795852ffe1bdcc3218919a
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINQ' 'sip-files00139.txt'
f5a1f22298038cbb250dca9e7d2fd7c5
03c2ba3688fe48131abfdd46129dea92c23fb7fc
'2011-12-16T21:35:05-05:00'
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINR' 'sip-files00140.txt'
6afd9c78322352158091120e27a2e7ea
de488bc4d09da4b93a4b6bac81d9ed54befc72f3
'2011-12-16T21:33:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINS' 'sip-files00141.txt'
82f465c4355be3394ac5871aaed9c2a4
2ba85bc71791cbe7f5a0ea00a38b88c5ba1ff0a4
'2011-12-16T21:36:30-05:00'
describe
'1246' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINT' 'sip-files00142.txt'
9f5d97f0087eddbee4bfa1cb1c6a3869
d2fb5106fd94d56a350a751c01716bcc8e80dcbd
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINU' 'sip-files00143.txt'
6f3a307c7783bde003a84ef2196f54da
f34461c65981166f8a2aff9971b1df182a3012c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINV' 'sip-files00144.txt'
7f747b8626a7b69692db25248a801c40
948a1040a8421d9e3a2d93b0429d7bb4802354fc
'2011-12-16T21:35:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINW' 'sip-files00145.txt'
3d983196f7b6f42532b32fc2ff5ffccb
cbc35f5fe03ad15aa7752d25fe43d35aff375a24
'2011-12-16T21:33:55-05:00'
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINX' 'sip-files00146.txt'
a916db76895948851b3c003a39d400f0
7d2e9d0d39c56aa206e6bd524f4d8fdc1d4c3415
'2011-12-16T21:33:56-05:00'
describe
'1218' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINY' 'sip-files00147.txt'
204d52fa4a7b1b6be529090840360353
e8db22d8f06866e7d76430d557dfbc2dec9b266a
'2011-12-16T21:30:06-05:00'
describe
'1321' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAINZ' 'sip-files00148.txt'
82554e6fb813a135b24fab709148dbea
682a7511f8c8fdcf1faa9554ce9303caa85cf8a8
'2011-12-16T21:35:02-05:00'
describe
'741' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOA' 'sip-files00149.txt'
bdca9c0596612a14c642f0a4379cbb54
c1901367162cf771effb8a5be30a15374154e770
describe
'754' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOB' 'sip-files00150.txt'
8de2a03526ff197ad600a25f201201a7
2106a31cbc70feede8a5c50afc4e2bf3c76bd139
'2011-12-16T21:32:36-05:00'
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOC' 'sip-files00151.txt'
3d43ffb9f331f6bcdda0c76b34dfd200
a384ad310c5eccdd49b3b7c2a13fdab2b63fd207
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOD' 'sip-files00152.txt'
0d4954ff62ddef1d79228a28975980c2
b0393885bd7ad5a2d8958d98648470e6edfeea78
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOE' 'sip-files00153.txt'
ea3b92bbb679b3642fddf64730d22e4b
aa0b561579fd6248a36226e0ac69955492ece605
'2011-12-16T21:35:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOF' 'sip-files00154.txt'
d241524252ce2fa11c5adc5f105d89b0
33f9e8a60f2e20fc33ae68e4dca5ec168b0857bc
'2011-12-16T21:32:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOG' 'sip-files00155.txt'
09c33b35bf436b73344a82aad4b32965
972cc4fe0aa35ba85937ea3697990dabc4c6c834
'2011-12-16T21:34:21-05:00'
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOH' 'sip-files00156.txt'
d213696f12852e8105744a90342b18f6
463ce4fa0d13b9249b3b7455e0188e488fda7cbd
'2011-12-16T21:31:18-05:00'
describe
'1319' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOI' 'sip-files00157.txt'
281acbfd94037d5862643fac03e56b0c
23d5de2fbca8f31b12d70c6d2ed436cbfa532d1a
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOJ' 'sip-files00158.txt'
9ed585634e645bea1e580357a6bd4b16
9e5f99f630c9b9848bfeb4f7f58668fe44a1a38c
'2011-12-16T21:36:20-05:00'
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOK' 'sip-files00159.txt'
e6e5e7516ccb53bce63f285e387c8ac4
fa670cdfe4f5d8643bed78507db1d7e0a17f2180
'2011-12-16T21:34:41-05:00'
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOL' 'sip-files00160.txt'
1363c63526ca79c82de4e22ada24e3ad
9c243fa60966e9490b3d1865cc6aa7eb2fe69028
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOM' 'sip-files00161.txt'
4ef99ef8d06c44bde32016c92c996bbc
839ace24efa0eff0ca0dd248f15c86c655cbdf11
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAION' 'sip-files00162.txt'
3caa0a2953fa3b8752c6cdbd910f2acc
751c6495e0aa53a8a37529c1ee5d8997de149f25
'2011-12-16T21:32:42-05:00'
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOO' 'sip-files00163.txt'
c318c1d3f2dac911fe40c283f149bde0
92e486c8029a463eda6a97794f426fae54475fb1
'2011-12-16T21:30:22-05:00'
describe
'42' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOP' 'sip-files00164.txt'
72d62ac3f3461613ff7ea05e5a62d9bf
5ce04a18ec1b734a0511a0d60ff1c655d9619e22
'2011-12-16T21:37:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOQ' 'sip-files00165.txt'
76cabe3b47514fe5a8877a0332cf1f2b
4b409cf89f89d6fa8fcbcc95f60b46cc5efb1371
'2011-12-16T21:32:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOR' 'sip-files00166.txt'
dca0546e657a0fceded3986d8b805f27
2adf337b883d2038b5c45a882bc6cb596a2e2fde
'2011-12-16T21:35:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOS' 'sip-files00167.txt'
89eff6a2069eea5cf07cbb3ba1fa4de1
34e81fd642fef01933556f65c76b67b8fd739522
'2011-12-16T21:33:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOT' 'sip-files00168.txt'
9bb77b544a2c40db08f3f2c375c5d19b
47196ca0efa2415a4a8ad1f2eb3fbc7c487c9dd2
'2011-12-16T21:31:25-05:00'
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOU' 'sip-files00169.txt'
9c28441988998feb0932bcf342a4909a
a8e9188fc5ef1535da4da017665e1b64cf6302bb
'2011-12-16T21:36:55-05:00'
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOV' 'sip-files00170.txt'
83562bde1ef184f13ca7cf85b4323370
2c62fbe178077cc82f777edaa27ecdf47aca6cec
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOW' 'sip-files00171.txt'
ac95c51495f4b5fe938f156061cce811
217a1eab787690acbcce702380e9cde9e857abb2
'2011-12-16T21:34:27-05:00'
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOX' 'sip-files00172.txt'
a88f9539a656f53b358c14ef490db8c7
1633bb3040eec53ee16dba85e85ca2e9dde0efc5
'2011-12-16T21:31:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOY' 'sip-files00173.txt'
4f23b339f1bd22771c12de4c7d684622
5f04a00852a37f4791ba599872abf36fb10865b8
'2011-12-16T21:35:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIOZ' 'sip-files00174.txt'
a49cd833e6841a274484904e2411bfcc
67920cfcba98cb8b441cee27fba050878f4de020
'2011-12-16T21:36:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPA' 'sip-files00175.txt'
98332bb1dc1288f145422a6f26f80f93
c4bc561a2b652d88e967e194c69279d35c5697c2
'2011-12-16T21:34:35-05:00'
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPB' 'sip-files00176.txt'
49aa29487d733aa84745f5bf59037376
b781aaeedb78a7013546721a24caf46be72dbf5b
'2011-12-16T21:35:51-05:00'
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPC' 'sip-files00177.txt'
7430dd973ac67fb9ec425245eb1fcf83
b609ce3e548feb2dd096cf8ad823823a2be40280
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPD' 'sip-files00178.txt'
f66fa8344147b73aa965965afabf1c67
536f1a55fc76789127615791aa9737d7c62c20c3
'2011-12-16T21:30:16-05:00'
describe
'811' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPE' 'sip-files00179.txt'
d610e7b7614eb50305539d23434b8d9e
4fd898a422e457715fb97fa3dd57db409fe8ba30
'2011-12-16T21:30:03-05:00'
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPF' 'sip-files00180.txt'
a20ddcf143a11062349334045bd0176f
7c6c5bf24cac82d9047a0c91696907f4986b37a6
'2011-12-16T21:29:45-05:00'
describe
'1341' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPG' 'sip-files00181.txt'
05fa28cb564e48137e49bf4bb822ed70
2d1a953c928e0c70a4a0b92529ce2252d8b649f3
'2011-12-16T21:36:47-05:00'
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPH' 'sip-files00182.txt'
3fc18a08c945400a3f90a33298e7903a
5b30d571cfef810c17873aace194460774df7dfe
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPI' 'sip-files00183.txt'
386f0fd5ecc44efa315659f0a0768de1
79c75c3204add17d472222db585285f5a0c16eec
'2011-12-16T21:30:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPJ' 'sip-files00184.txt'
5cecd9b804043fb409819e646b0d23d8
244f44eb18d320ba7e8e407b6e1431f60f59d7a4
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPK' 'sip-files00185.txt'
84baf5a0baa2027118bbbe462e566110
dc769920949e99dc5b8e9a2c27b129b8289c6638
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPL' 'sip-files00186.txt'
34a3572aa53d646afd20d853c14d2676
1fd73ade9e8b87be15abb4dff13665ba75fc7d4e
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPM' 'sip-files00187.txt'
81872adafdaabe6d06399b05472c5220
f06db48f4f90833fcfd62c99aa2ce92ecff098f0
'2011-12-16T21:37:07-05:00'
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPN' 'sip-files00188.txt'
6991b9802d139f9a0d559ab3f33cc089
02bbad5fc187dba1323fce7334b75320d22f1682
'2011-12-16T21:35:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPO' 'sip-files00189.txt'
09acdd7dca028dd9b0df76d4a4acf38c
fd1a46828c53d8db161d97867f768628c49a9945
'2011-12-16T21:29:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPP' 'sip-files00190.txt'
aeea7030dabe9a7452c27be4e1b45e08
ace648f46d2f9fbc7ffb10eeb69044b04d434a0a
describe
'32' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPQ' 'sip-files00191.txt'
0dbc1e9e13bea6139361d9e8b586e922
add0b2c0ca958dddf60c6372c037c59bfca8302a
describe
Invalid character
'1080' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPR' 'sip-files00192.txt'
838921070b5ef82856429a7d78b6c0d0
7f1c9f2b5ee1656b3ffe31103266d0f2f9f409cd
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPS' 'sip-files00193.txt'
55ae4a872d0a92c4805ffaf976584696
292b486e9ca7b336533776cb4742dc83f08c2ecb
'2011-12-16T21:34:59-05:00'
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPT' 'sip-files00194.txt'
3c1c396131ba9d4945136b6b842e9b06
13e24e229435d32e9d38025ec3f643b43884ddd0
'2011-12-16T21:35:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPU' 'sip-files00195.txt'
af1be9bbbdeacc476a15b7f71751345e
c69f4a2cc17ea5dd214d20f03f2d26ade0a6ac55
'2011-12-16T21:29:52-05:00'
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPV' 'sip-files00196.txt'
95a86a8d58dda5a98fda25b315284745
81da2dc1c312e23406d2125863bd96c0d8af822d
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPW' 'sip-files00197.txt'
ad093dacd99e63d1dbe4cd08e57f98d8
6ebf5c332c01ccbbf94176ccade8094063ac7968
'2011-12-16T21:33:29-05:00'
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPX' 'sip-files00198.txt'
cf014901ee17ea89de2171854577f8da
024b6985b8377d7b487c7e038613a5b6efed30a2
describe
'789' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPY' 'sip-files00199.txt'
b5417848efc33da00c46ea60dc9f66dd
22cf23d773a3cb55ff06a6905e09784600f5e412
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIPZ' 'sip-files00200.txt'
aabcf0ff6330a51170281b63c2e3680c
2be231a20d6c9892671b0b0ae34c92611a4f82a6
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQA' 'sip-files00201.txt'
1cb0d54acbf7d686fb4a2bce8c42b2d8
7030667aed815d967128f079c73c43857483d35c
'2011-12-16T21:35:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQB' 'sip-files00202.txt'
bcf87f79dfd8eb5c66df88c76f04a73e
0b0d0ab3d99e3fcef81599e854f94bf5a5e0c0c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQC' 'sip-files00203.txt'
f3d65aba8c7fbc20bcd96779cae1e360
ce2bd5b054722a8377359c942fdbf954285c0029
'2011-12-16T21:31:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQD' 'sip-files00204.txt'
3dca8cb8631e77eec365591c4863b79f
24cb818f250c34d11ada9d4bd1c00013e7c017da
'2011-12-16T21:31:54-05:00'
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQE' 'sip-files00205.txt'
581f870110058e1c5ead265f5c273976
45d16b1324bd3af25d3f1ff0f4b025794b01b394
'2011-12-16T21:29:53-05:00'
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQF' 'sip-files00206.txt'
ebe7e411fee3e1863f7f5955ccf7656a
a866b2f6f5f99743e0a415fadeb066f9ce876234
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQG' 'sip-files00207.txt'
7f422ca8a892be0fd6c78239b803e19f
e9d0cd8704d65152879a6e5d5ad34df9ffd0b250
describe
'47' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQH' 'sip-files00208.txt'
73d7520e025d56c646d0a83862572c48
5eac3c8296ea1a63fe4a710ec91112f1b6781f9f
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQI' 'sip-files00209.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'78' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQJ' 'sip-files00210.txt'
4123811337f2060ef8a95bdc7cc55076
8bfc5e9fa7f674969e315715964724e0597c2e73
'2011-12-16T21:29:31-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'375834' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQK' 'sip-files00022a.jp2'
941e505f4cd2b63e63f2460f3623c090
15bb715bb9465a536e08b1f3f581c5ba98f462d8
describe
'353077' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQL' 'sip-files00022b.jp2'
ad59190382b24d37fb05d01089a37166
5665eb299bc8e423327986b09c7e423cccab3df1
'2011-12-16T21:36:40-05:00'
describe
'374055' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQM' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
73cdda4292156f146aac4c86f28d4d61
37e089a8420f5a642a34850c171eb815579080b1
'2011-12-16T21:36:19-05:00'
describe
'377059' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQN' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
cf7598c0e2ed94290896d4bb1f33a78a
1d91692c0ca23cf5f065e96f2ea03d0c91f321fd
'2011-12-16T21:32:13-05:00'
describe
'385480' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQO' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
a12582465d000c70f3e2f9290b3935fd
52850065e128d848d34cffe486d1b12990066d42
describe
'389366' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQP' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
9bd3c44334b74e6f6574d830596ed078
91b7a302a50e5065caf6d1eb01c83993c919e169
describe
'389853' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQQ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
c5ab8deaad8b67f1aab1d7ef71f6aaeb
8dcc23f7ae1b4ab1b15fc7945fd698b08d8d7145
'2011-12-16T21:30:21-05:00'
describe
'385070' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQR' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
24f33a274fb5be4b13801eb7084448eb
1b6dacc3a6ea1bf42bb2221a4930ba70014e6abb
describe
'385258' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQS' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
cc52e8a69e5ff99ad44435482b58a314
8df8ed471b9be86b9a555ed8cc870bcf707268ae
describe
'396644' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQT' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
9c22bad694fbe820dc6b6c4e9c6b46ef
8399085091239f14f46ee9a0e924c1921ebbc9c1
'2011-12-16T21:31:23-05:00'
describe
'401922' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQU' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
9e9f1d346d467dc5e606d467922e6e64
a09040b65c1b590a53f2ab700ee445a9854458f1
describe
'399247' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQV' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
f7bcfee8f766e95a53a0befda1ba54ae
0d648d3332f15de8f269fa4b24ef3f49ac434638
'2011-12-16T21:29:58-05:00'
describe
'380304' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQW' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
7e5fcc34e60184c2f796ec1958c89526
ab48a049c6b29b3e959702454e2bb21b64d5cee7
'2011-12-16T21:35:32-05:00'
describe
'403924' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQX' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
d6f4c177c0611c20c09194ddb30cf3d7
5cbb45fcfa3d34de023ea2625ceb3b2ee088a523
'2011-12-16T21:35:55-05:00'
describe
'397694' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQY' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
21417aba575196f7b4ea618b2d79f0c0
df6995cc8ddf9a822264633be3f0658f66c24209
'2011-12-16T21:29:57-05:00'
describe
'388087' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIQZ' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
0fe1285b6d4841502a5215df31e68c44
942f0f287cb77aade629a1a5b7a83dbb160a073c
'2011-12-16T21:34:52-05:00'
describe
'396188' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRA' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
8daedd804bdd4fbfe3d97a070d2ef0c8
33c46b293b0eed24c3f37c8d0f7bef9f8284fc4c
describe
'385102' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRB' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
ec2d7f933a9c0846dfe2d1ff412d29d0
8956a38dcfc0200453f5d9f91590694d71800e90
describe
'388929' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRC' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
25e9afd2d93d06bf54afb7eeb19dbca7
07d4fafc335bff5c55487cf7c932489beb2359aa
'2011-12-16T21:34:14-05:00'
describe
'383822' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRD' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
579fcbf69069125cd51ab7596456ffc4
3762fddcb297440408c5875bcd7f125818fd079c
describe
'383150' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRE' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
d27a128fdd2ec46b1d493da96916c249
4065d47a435b87d6d198ad5f039826bee50fca8f
'2011-12-16T21:31:43-05:00'
describe
'384411' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRF' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
f34d8d64b4479b88a6c87c65bfe930d2
f15117228c3f1772c702619da2c1c04eaef8ad63
'2011-12-16T21:34:03-05:00'
describe
'377851' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRG' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
03dde0117028c8ead01512ed7e2d64e9
38420479542a4bdac5c05861dc284a4ac3d489b1
describe
'379421' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRH' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
5354ca4be4982d1ff5c12fbb17916f1f
9ecd7666ff2c7740aa9e879e2dec7553829d0fdf
'2011-12-16T21:34:16-05:00'
describe
'387748' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRI' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
c5aba0f84d23526ff0a8b1368ccdad3c
fdaa4a65dc725c359b68835eb482e11602aaeb81
describe
'373877' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRJ' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
4981f6e63b149874c17071d84d43fe19
9cf70780403b507b0ae24bc40260eb311633b190
describe
'399427' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRK' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
e8ac927c7bbc7e1af9ddaadc9101e508
a7edbf2acd7f0584a71ecd6382cba94b64cf0995
'2011-12-16T21:30:37-05:00'
describe
'378957' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRL' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
01eea1fa5c1d71231d8262e36ed9f5c4
1e1bc1b657dc3e58004141d8d9b922d3881c4183
'2011-12-16T21:30:12-05:00'
describe
'384898' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRM' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
fb7781de4651a89b20c22dbb1453d62f
5c1f8b6da3de4da69a1edd17f3e33560e054493b
'2011-12-16T21:32:18-05:00'
describe
'396433' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRN' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
691d58889793072ec5a559d375c139f0
e0e1bb42d85341b7bb7a462994315fed640fec1c
'2011-12-16T21:33:07-05:00'
describe
'396663' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRO' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
386db01b7cfc8ab274bbc743495ff856
784375fbd61962911436641077ac609b3297d264
'2011-12-16T21:33:01-05:00'
describe
'395265' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRP' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
04a4742d2691bc8c3e0749f8a9389465
a5b32313eb20fec3b6a14e00fd1cf6829aecc9c8
describe
'377736' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRQ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
204d7069a489e1f0b7c1d4d78d424469
7b433a95e0e5311d66dc862b22b0de40668f09a8
'2011-12-16T21:32:07-05:00'
describe
'380661' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRR' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
be4ef1997bb10e2409599473a5525f15
039c177ab11dfbdf65e00f49dbe03ff42a9602c7
'2011-12-16T21:31:13-05:00'
describe
'376116' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRS' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
b59c95cfb318e03668de414c1c9db4ed
26afe4fda5d43c0333e4b1b9524f94c80d08ed89
describe
'383550' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRT' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
2048c6c6a447d28010c6de1bec0071c1
9cbc088d4ad09efddcc049a2392ae893dfbc61f2
'2011-12-16T21:35:13-05:00'
describe
'387012' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRU' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
88639ebb57237a755115a644c7ac2bf6
0e6da7c247ffa2615459cfbcae03249e9a795108
'2011-12-16T21:32:17-05:00'
describe
'378864' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRV' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
6fb3bab6f883b8ad0f085a86f5a43685
eac8c6cacb013f36f861918aff3c870c08b8b791
'2011-12-16T21:35:49-05:00'
describe
'378653' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRW' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
da22499292600fa0b497e97874a1754f
fd829a0baa875cb0ded6cf5e66e126512783dc00
'2011-12-16T21:33:59-05:00'
describe
'382560' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRX' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
1f47208f55e2d92b164eed29d2a5ba14
7d27ef1dbaf5a2587ac7a8e0a71400d2b896ce51
describe
'377279' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRY' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
50ed6d5d78d1b9acb24fbba6eff15b4e
6b80b476f1c5408706268db500ad5422037ee413
'2011-12-16T21:34:19-05:00'
describe
'385984' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIRZ' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
c841362dae48accc9bc0cec062110ed3
f8c4fa134a4de16a5cdc1b190b81bfb5e1252a1e
'2011-12-16T21:33:03-05:00'
describe
'372539' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISA' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
ccf98c8651b30b12760efcfd081200c8
c0fd04f0ad2bb4de84ac6bab1efde4b028220389
'2011-12-16T21:31:22-05:00'
describe
'386704' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISB' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
ed1b0a7b8c12233768efe09e8c0442f5
1a3c51660b5429ba7e8b69ecd8d0e9ad7a28275e
describe
'377842' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISC' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
2a45f1a79ce1a98df949e87ffcd3d110
5855b8c39953cc292eb7b869e9e98e0c7aa1ec5b
'2011-12-16T21:32:14-05:00'
describe
'377830' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISD' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
bd3548e01101d08b3cce135ca40670ed
b954710b2b7f5741e85bbaa20b3ba2dfe0a47327
'2011-12-16T21:34:20-05:00'
describe
'371937' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISE' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
48889e05e8fbffe7fd588124413c6090
35a17d31e4ed8838fd850100bde71df02efb13ad
'2011-12-16T21:29:30-05:00'
describe
'389803' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISF' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
2fdd40238d45c1cf64921992ab064bf1
b9826089cf3bde96f2733ed1008b9aecbfa978d6
'2011-12-16T21:32:04-05:00'
describe
'380922' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISG' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
a8295a9cef2265a7151699e2ad2d7c1b
fb8b44cbfe75ea6b0d3ba601b83c388c43abd077
describe
'390345' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISH' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
b0a35a9db0b152dac2667681252d11e5
23bb0bdcd3f687192ced07a3d97585e9fefc2b49
'2011-12-16T21:31:50-05:00'
describe
'391323' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISI' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
e6c06e9221fdb9706897bfa6be280e59
d58ac7e667c8a47595917cdcb5cce2666ec7784b
describe
'391058' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISJ' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
05ba97b4986734629f2c0f16e33f0057
295846ace133cfb8d04eb481b4ee880048da2acb
describe
'381442' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISK' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
9f64e46bf3403f72e87af426c59a26f9
6fc04b65654d74a99b02009b16085aee84cf9a7e
'2011-12-16T21:35:46-05:00'
describe
'390172' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISL' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
3405125ad39229c56073a6d881f126ba
4c72f8d5b291b6b306568c915b562393d0cad10b
describe
'386267' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISM' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
1da771108d1a7949cba2f89812c8f0e9
a5baf9e50243b07045f70fa979ab3744db369b0d
'2011-12-16T21:31:44-05:00'
describe
'383744' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISN' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
745d1dc0f53587d40a7e6c78c4a6f6be
d4ecf20fa2024e996a0ee76854b1fcc093b12114
'2011-12-16T21:33:44-05:00'
describe
'386150' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISO' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
5269c1edc5fa1d069ef91b6c759764dc
cf020ee5d084d12e0518091036460fd582344b3a
describe
'399681' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISP' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
f60200c7abc6e8bb70ffe92cdb443e8d
a6f824ebf3e981c7afbb833ebc87a2770e86070f
'2011-12-16T21:35:28-05:00'
describe
'392333' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISQ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
aaeae6d4150634cfbeafb9f831409cc1
23348f594958d87351d95923c4554812d57482f4
describe
'399328' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISR' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
f9b726d16acb16f40299aa6bfb603c1b
84aa190a421fa19eaeb682792fb42bf8468da677
describe
'383253' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISS' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
1535080637a6d40ed61625b8066c5c19
933c8cb3d86e651efd6bbfdc78e96b32c3f4f657
'2011-12-16T21:35:22-05:00'
describe
'397163' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIST' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
ff17b2d99c26472c94670ce2fdea6d2d
088152b0984ee4361e9de4fc8ab0fdea4064d5b9
'2011-12-16T21:33:20-05:00'
describe
'392800' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISU' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
3ddf151f2d56b40230c14a2b0fbe152f
5af6a1e335a1aa05464014c17f458aee96be19cf
'2011-12-16T21:34:11-05:00'
describe
'398074' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISV' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
a1ecb9409a1c2092b26c4a5e48292131
a583045354e501368a4e817f99e7b89833b17bc7
'2011-12-16T21:34:43-05:00'
describe
'400651' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISW' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
36981d69bf0faeda7154ca3de704697d
4186304952d20374bee60a66784f1d4291474bcc
'2011-12-16T21:36:13-05:00'
describe
'394045' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISX' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
c5f0e948ac0961512b58120c29b6fda5
6689bb8c6a2c1e2862852d727e7d8857dea1391c
'2011-12-16T21:32:43-05:00'
describe
'389616' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISY' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
d5e53ed60ac765239034cbd2d17b9741
1032f37178010d6e240f1cc7291a92b4b5925a89
'2011-12-16T21:29:36-05:00'
describe
'386077' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAISZ' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
f4dd208ecc4f3ba3062b084ac375a634
47be2e1362640793abd0dd673f32c629860aa5ee
'2011-12-16T21:32:59-05:00'
describe
'377700' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITA' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
9020ff4c48f6fd4cbe0f8d629051d406
294999dc86a21ea981a4ae1e1b1a61d262724a9b
describe
'387959' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITB' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
a95ef9c1d10e16672f2e49e939142204
46f6e4c04e1c6e880bb6998d6a580253d52256b4
describe
'396238' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITC' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
de4c00d68848bffa77f5a02ea43dc43a
7a4a40438d63a797303c254210b7299f694787c6
describe
'396459' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITD' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
4b9346948478071c83f2ec9ea7dde6df
2770240143f34da996eb51f6ce3853ca04096f74
describe
'391494' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITE' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
cebced53596340589fa881f9f2d85088
1add2cbfc177682ffd975ee6cd1febb4421d7dbd
'2011-12-16T21:30:48-05:00'
describe
'393874' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITF' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
31b39d961e7dcd844e79ac3620ea7f77
7e5704e7cd83e08b2417d784dc851ff7c5b5ddd0
describe
'396172' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITG' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
947954bdc6cd4dcc20e964d7ff5d4e98
5d374da7554f0a5616abf3144a98fc1a55b277ca
describe
'403744' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITH' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
4b4d14e295f7e5fcc941bfa170b97dcd
8edce235f7747c7ffad85753bd9e95ed95c67177
'2011-12-16T21:36:39-05:00'
describe
'405676' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITI' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
209150e5a84a8f64baade9656b839580
6198e38d0ba363360c64ac50644bac435bc4a81a
'2011-12-16T21:32:35-05:00'
describe
'399010' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITJ' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
e243ff63bde32b8b5b9d157df1d22636
c267b161ef0ebb29d2762d36cab9bed4c8232fda
describe
'402034' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITK' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
4fadebab08886bcc7735d3719dd2d18b
720d5fd39e4de2f83260899ce8454eeee993ee5e
describe
'395030' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITL' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
14ecf7aec4fb5e931983f0bd8630026f
ea8d410c452a641c23787ec89adf06effc661b62
describe
'388061' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITM' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
de8da0814983076a5457a7cd606af9aa
976df8a7f9f9a6107f8521f14b5fa499034ae45f
'2011-12-16T21:36:02-05:00'
describe
'388314' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITN' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
9970ed8d205187243ec3ec69d275a428
14f18427b3c88a5309be866cbd42a81841a8c1ef
'2011-12-16T21:36:34-05:00'
describe
'375341' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITO' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
ce8944ad0aafa91db8771c6ff325d155
2991190af17908345fe87d09a4cc5d62fe12ed6d
'2011-12-16T21:35:58-05:00'
describe
'377930' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITP' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
e69b808a68a07d9a2f6c4b8b61f465ea
c19877a337953aabdf03e46e98cf0dd7da6b37e7
describe
'379874' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITQ' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
e3388e1259cf9b6ceabad418b94afd03
f968107884e0343dd96e2ea270c5da7064473c0b
describe
'381532' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITR' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
f3f5cfaaa5aaaa66764a24ea3fec9fdc
7a4e312c34024fbc07a294fbccabd2206f1138f3
'2011-12-16T21:36:32-05:00'
describe
'391291' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITS' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
115e5efd2ae02c47a3dc69824c122e2a
edeca88a28198eaa1ddd9c7c7bc0e8c5970f684f
describe
'364954' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITT' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
1ec5d6fcae8033f34ae1c8639613e956
7c18a94f0025eb87db5313c3c328999e27afa9db
describe
'388722' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITU' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
696bcfa612ddb30c6a928bf9b6bebb03
870bb81bcc5d5e65ab00a3b28dd356ecaee4363c
describe
'370524' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITV' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
819d956fa1dae5ba3e51311689bea1d4
48ab991d2d2da10e1ea0f74adc9de3936013a77d
'2011-12-16T21:29:34-05:00'
describe
'376791' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITW' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
e2eeed945b86003280f5b6b5c45a49ee
3b316b59843a7c6011de598ea48c7b12f9f89dc3
'2011-12-16T21:32:49-05:00'
describe
'377301' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITX' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
b49a998691b6d6285597bac5919b2ffe
7a258f6e6d0db00da557cc1d2a665a204fca57a0
'2011-12-16T21:32:26-05:00'
describe
'380621' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITY' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
2eb155456ecee18e9f66f5692c581ad7
ed732f034e07587aafe1841d0365057b7dc5de98
describe
'377171' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAITZ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
20092130247c02cb447df7662c7b2b79
3d0535ccf86076f165a646adf59aa9534cdfe814
'2011-12-16T21:30:08-05:00'
describe
'392580' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUA' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
3e03881ffcff17a689835088f47d8609
6f50a43fd22e9969492b7fd51d077a20f33b3aa3
describe
'373028' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUB' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
3e388ce8992fef32547254dff7419fe9
b4b7edb3c5d9535fe2bd5105d86722d029d0df9e
'2011-12-16T21:33:00-05:00'
describe
'393508' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUC' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
080e1acef77c14b477352a8e579b5e9e
f70eca17cf01b2e5e91aa28f022213f89d2ff195
describe
'392555' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUD' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
24dcf1f7b32e9cba5477f90889508e29
75923890cc34a99526a7221d73a4f7fcd5d07115
'2011-12-16T21:31:21-05:00'
describe
'388037' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUE' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
c1858dd95508792bc056a4d1dc5e68ac
48335f96e8855967b8542ccefff89d7f1a95b060
describe
'377209' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUF' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
b84d3238f5cc3aa04737c08d31e0fb47
8179af2fccd59cdf32cdb634d574c29206c9fe6a
'2011-12-16T21:35:56-05:00'
describe
'370903' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUG' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
3a94547223dafc395ed1e0eb0d71fd87
48daa3612432462e16c3d6a7e22a784f344b98ff
describe
'379838' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUH' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
8eecfcc5c40598fe2016e61d57a654d5
2a6bdfd0e36eaec0d49f336b6e064a5cd0c69012
describe
'386147' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUI' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
e5871d57d76ad7fd06cc96690b27a64a
006791c1158abfb0ccb81d530c0332c19ce262a6
'2011-12-16T21:29:40-05:00'
describe
'390781' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUJ' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
b6c4234ba74c4add79a15640f871c76a
d8437180758607af8ffe43c86794f910cbb90ffe
describe
'375307' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUK' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
574aa4c72ab57458427cda4ccc818d73
41059aa4ad00b048c57036efb0884d8eff92d752
'2011-12-16T21:36:23-05:00'
describe
'376136' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUL' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
d4e31638130532db23c0d9ae7b8d5a41
47ba874179afebeb4da3828b2b532767de9a8a0b
'2011-12-16T21:35:01-05:00'
describe
'382575' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUM' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
65654377162698b690a7f6fc0b0be2a9
5d378a00ced7afa8bc255b627420866023216eb3
'2011-12-16T21:33:14-05:00'
describe
'389683' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUN' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
9dff8cb37ac5362a84e6551ae311bb76
3666be5acc660b04aa5875c5c8530669e1476913
describe
'388434' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUO' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
ff61e2531700aba3a6ee993f41377c0f
9ddd514e5641a66f90f841e2f93da791330bf8ce
'2011-12-16T21:35:47-05:00'
describe
'394113' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUP' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
a0854e679c5ff9833210fe7c8d6533cb
75c7516132c6a482a32610c5fc5ee375cc3c1484
'2011-12-16T21:33:41-05:00'
describe
'387971' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUQ' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
47ee27b7f7448cf29f61350ffe384d49
04ca3845933f71aa7ae283309b5ed99ffd2243ac
describe
'388595' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUR' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
5a41d5d4731e3b5585d44a17e8d030b4
3004b245712cd60fb81765d27d8953a6eb53fc9a
'2011-12-16T21:29:38-05:00'
describe
'389546' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUS' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
a8637cb1b2fda02beafcbc0b07785a5b
edb38fb2ffbf01311a3128fafbdc0940c9cb7565
describe
'385368' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUT' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
c4d5fdfe4e08213c9cf25bdb8b94c905
ec2f85ce5328208b60d02a09f0314e793bcf1b9d
describe
'385605' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUU' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
a9f77231aaedaddca36b814aca95b993
bc3378f2156b3dd811261cf475a712092668eda0
describe
'389980' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUV' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
042d814fd918e2794f2c55a6514b9b09
7482009a3f4492e92aa2c1b207d8ed6282c644dc
describe
'387238' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUW' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
1cc750ad7388f49b3e13d3c24c1ba5ec
8ab2074c95ccc4823e822aac59c561a8b68557c2
describe
'380308' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUX' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
27a2f735b02dd8c8096567ced7dde388
12a0baa7dea46db7ae75ad4514a46f441fc857e0
describe
'385226' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUY' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
7bfdfe78573666500cf5e62039d753c3
25e5c9b0fd7f6ae413ab290d4fb0a7731761d539
'2011-12-16T21:33:35-05:00'
describe
'382853' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIUZ' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
ea002683a1bc49e769eaa245ac3395f7
406d1ed89858fa33cc39444d229d2d934712e13e
'2011-12-16T21:29:50-05:00'
describe
'383904' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVA' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
a138e1e1e2d56af4496ed927712070f1
345c54ea17b0e0b99a47a61bd2660aeb5cd2a4fe
describe
'391408' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVB' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
4ebacb2787c3658b643b914f696456cd
79bd9ea7fe2be8304f0e2dd4b6c06200d4a66298
'2011-12-16T21:34:47-05:00'
describe
'383576' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVC' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
c1a96960dadc093434dc709758369bfb
665fe0e211cbbca993f8bbb0b8856595b4ff2432
'2011-12-16T21:32:10-05:00'
describe
'374999' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVD' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
b91a53365c45b6ad721e26504c79897e
72098615f1b66ee15111cd773d50d56b2edf30db
describe
'370818' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVE' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
ec5fc43e846f845b48f1c56f664b8a29
a61ad55ca6ad9900677d52b1a21fbdb2c32f48d3
describe
'370765' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVF' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
96e266438ade4c64d1f5ffd452945c05
03a9f731399d307960948d46ef714d6ab607cdc5
describe
'373968' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVG' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
f96e22bdc1bf19e95b3c05f481d4214d
1e244612ce4b90cc42cf961dceb34383c2014417
describe
'388490' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVH' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
0243e2dc0b8d84b81782b1dfd27b72c2
656f07a40c6e2ac073dfcba74af9d0c3e5553f3f
describe
'379725' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVI' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
59fb71fbde1656b5c14b64bd8f86e101
5fdd78643c91186d4752c43a3d55e9642ed73942
describe
'395070' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVJ' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
538a3cc864bd2e827e317caea7381a1b
98669abaa4dc498207eade2b6c822c118a7f2dff
describe
'385279' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVK' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
a7406531f87b60d611577c1adf64c499
3bfa32ca16ed12c10b0603dcfe42be80e137a738
'2011-12-16T21:36:38-05:00'
describe
'395730' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVL' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
60a0132843240c70e6de02ba071e2486
6c6ee43245f9076538c07c5fca8978b3300de956
'2011-12-16T21:35:20-05:00'
describe
'386266' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVM' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
ed75501d2297680ac26a1415c84bc530
cc87871ee55b1064a30d108d834d79b43fe69eac
describe
'388941' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVN' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
393f2d40c48078200cf7e4cd85769fc4
d84dd5156d1f40ee04328068a93b55409cd5d96e
describe
'390831' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVO' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
5e963bd6135fe42a1f7ab686517441e6
b8e6e54f8b516dd4d8e0735170ad794518cbc87b
describe
'379666' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVP' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
f699bdb0c197cd0af424d98acce8861a
ff66397612bbf153614f717a33b9953ed614bcaf
'2011-12-16T21:31:48-05:00'
describe
'393807' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVQ' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
397d9556177c0df054b5f47efd267bc0
642863ba595796511d6309190add4de9861936ae
'2011-12-16T21:30:30-05:00'
describe
'392574' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVR' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
913eb753943ef878405e5724803d4521
d2f17e53ccbdb55632fd417ee340d0a6d6159e7b
describe
'378081' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVS' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
dd275411c848fce211fab2ad5bc540e0
bcac019609b5075ecbed6d5e5a0869c5ff2b5963
describe
'382670' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVT' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
5e998d9396cdeaccbb2f8082547554a1
269671b46b92e4fab78f5e7893de1ad38347a4c5
'2011-12-16T21:36:53-05:00'
describe
'383527' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVU' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
06e0be5c9b6144d0f6abda138db8c753
456a215e4f3231d604a71fde7593af6f71358378
'2011-12-16T21:35:16-05:00'
describe
'402013' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVV' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
92f91e8e6abd1e888cb1412e572314bd
5f5a446ca270209f939c73679526b271cc298840
describe
'380603' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVW' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
2a1a623fb4241a9491e7ce8c71bdfbe4
b0b5b5a57498c3721389d5b06051378492c44270
describe
'380324' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVX' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
7a4646bc03292143c09e1e16da0bc08f
4a5a4d1a3abe0c11e646069c2c9fa1b42615b897
describe
'382967' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVY' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
dcba2abc6a06eda6e377f776acf8be1e
b0b680c1e4e09692a862fc8b09468675a4747436
describe
'398300' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIVZ' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
b8a43a804541deb1aa62b81ffaadcf24
c8c6ff120ec9039b5bf7d10c8848559da40e19cc
'2011-12-16T21:29:26-05:00'
describe
'401668' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWA' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
84a38704834d9e7315a16827676b9c17
d2e1d720f472eaaa8f923f2e2bcc87e109aa44d2
'2011-12-16T21:34:34-05:00'
describe
'399717' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWB' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
18221a8203d2cdc6ef666b3ef53b5c4d
41165c4b7a864497b21dc40e13c105d36ed63305
describe
'390439' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWC' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
5d3cae0fe4480c26c3c2fee66b308b47
b28f7d167806e51213284c6550e763da080b0cbf
describe
'382095' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWD' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
5c3865342b7c0bb568cf8fcd64890187
53344df3063b8d041603fb47e29a5d4815a2563f
describe
'379833' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWE' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
8e7d24446ec1b278391672ef6ce4c9c0
e39af0b526df4189c8c6fc488e5666d0123b9729
'2011-12-16T21:32:19-05:00'
describe
'390442' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWF' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
df63cb30116af497164e774fca0a4ffe
db05173f0ea3b16fb9b050123466dcbebc3f69a8
'2011-12-16T21:33:42-05:00'
describe
'401623' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWG' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
f5e707ec74271a498896c9b81d480ff1
2dc509a80f2cbf5ff1f9f7b14a83bc831340bcce
describe
'402419' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWH' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
5b88a908f5cdea7dea45e47aa52d0d69
79fb9145c9f31f0f3363d9bc594889e37aa187d2
describe
'399513' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWI' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
08e1d6e5d91e831717131a14c420ce9b
360e2fac7210739a28f7b21f8ed8dd94c01ba082
'2011-12-16T21:31:59-05:00'
describe
'397540' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWJ' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
ab64f05dc72adb0dc25d987f8f2a1746
fc1ea1b5404c044b585dbb2b3f8d9eb91ed4547c
'2011-12-16T21:32:39-05:00'
describe
'401061' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWK' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
8105cfd2196d0e9d84ed883703ca0c34
965d89591745cdc7fd4a73aecf52aeaf8c81d8bb
describe
'391607' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWL' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
d72d8495749c4a6573a7fc9515a58002
92a31fdd84acde8ae09c1630b4561645892e0302
'2011-12-16T21:32:54-05:00'
describe
'402031' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWM' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
488a7cc43b8e2b4f044635006ad77d7b
a7941a3ea2eea3cf7bd4d9d1455fa4ea495b6535
describe
'404963' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWN' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
c8da76d6e077f2229fb0026c4132f01b
af682fab3618a4d4afeb89f67272e72bc367c025
'2011-12-16T21:33:49-05:00'
describe
'394290' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWO' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
f581497b3e828618b1e7f2e9df626f2e
c56eb1a694990591c672c940219a24c7f6df3d75
describe
'406335' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWP' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
a993a9336519d1a23865e736474e114f
cbbacf4beb40783ee3eab0996c3d55e79b7f3cbb
describe
'397587' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWQ' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
3a297181efb40345cfc33f0159bd663c
e5fbd872eaa399218e4e13edeb4ee80ec2431d4c
describe
'401228' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWR' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
68d1179b1096b48ec2c305ca04595c4f
cbf503167f85c21d70b9e154e24b77bf8c9c7bd3
'2011-12-16T21:36:56-05:00'
describe
'382788' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWS' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
ca4dd99ae42aa6f09688fbb0ce76b71e
3cf7bdb92830b86339826773b3e27c4c49493aef
describe
'399510' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWT' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
90cdebf680e3feb592ba652e215509a4
49f5f5254c7baf79ba0a70d1b75d5741d0ce78b6
'2011-12-16T21:29:54-05:00'
describe
'392124' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWU' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
7b02cae7326f0cdebe4037f3432a9f67
efa20ebac5172950ec3bac2d97058d23160ab7a7
describe
'393246' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWV' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
20a2026e284564b28025d84536ab2510
ae01981a0c825d99f405f5421e19433f81dd03f3
'2011-12-16T21:30:01-05:00'
describe
'393957' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWW' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
a5f1df399c948e1d210037cf46b156c3
f36203f529b46e6197f56374dd277f35a17994e8
describe
'401529' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWX' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
c6f809a92b017322c8455dc810ea2b2f
cfdda743fa6b3199e2e34d98f820324504c3ad6b
describe
'380199' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWY' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
932ae4bcd1ed359cda56e9228a9ecb25
b0dba77484a624936ff18aa30a734fc0bbc5157d
describe
'395148' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIWZ' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
b7ee91ddc2c46729f5c751b61f11c764
1425168d02de26cb449340410d357de0295ada72
describe
'391695' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXA' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
3fc57c1f252ff8a52ab5224155fd3845
5208ac7b1dc1e031d686e20d3d2f1439a46fe893
describe
'381421' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXB' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
196ddcb7595b50e2f56b0de951c28ba7
fa4bf3d08be050f174650735bb100b532d4b6d76
describe
'386655' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXC' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
ea1e02e8f0b4dd4cb63980996fb5b0b7
a86b0bbcb2cd16de1f2b385f328edabf6fc890ed
describe
'396147' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXD' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
a2ecb2dd2638f9694d0ff12cebd5059e
48396031e965d3d02d33b6bca4dc8c2452c9cffb
describe
'400372' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXE' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
16c13c7a593fab63aead74d2643356d9
9e8153a81721b47a56c441f497f2262d64a2d922
describe
'382674' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXF' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
5fc02ccc3cb5d8c681e44f7e07a4fdce
7e2aa665abe2ea9881fcc149e254d64cde24e07c
describe
'395556' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXG' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
8ecae1dd0a4669d6bfd6a22f476da1e1
4bf8a92f4507754aace3cd6d709a7b76b758650c
'2011-12-16T21:29:27-05:00'
describe
'399548' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXH' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
e463ff5e88dd30d0c4cafac392d9d62e
e1c2d65ce00e20840c8c5bb2c54dc499715b56d4
'2011-12-16T21:31:14-05:00'
describe
'390792' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXI' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
6ca30429eced75b0d4fed130c1fac405
a36c2683f0777cae4c0586d4e694748b2a795ad6
describe
'394182' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXJ' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
8fb2b4ce65bcc4ca8986763e17d34188
ab159fd6e8f83f0363c8ded515673ad58132a9e5
'2011-12-16T21:34:58-05:00'
describe
'390176' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXK' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
63a307e513df35486933d6eb3f51aa84
9385964fcfa51e59be27d928024cb002da3e97fd
describe
'379428' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXL' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
2044daecf2edf85e8d770bde444528e9
22aea630481b811a7228e55f49eccd935e70fb36
describe
'382972' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXM' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
9775cb64d4bf7a84d2d76391c81d4555
84dd5afeefee129315ec1d7207661efe79764673
describe
'394734' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXN' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
b1d500d974f0b63e494c3bb12fc89ea8
fb74a4bc4221c0391e6c160ead0158d0dcda8c05
describe
'390447' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXO' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
5670f314db0fde9f2e73ad66f244b718
714c260d25359bacf91a2adb3d8070b717b8c526
'2011-12-16T21:35:17-05:00'
describe
'426938' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXP' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
5d14384406eac8dfca48053bf3bdeaaf
8498d73aa3dd536d2d61adee98bec85e9a9e6671
'2011-12-16T21:36:22-05:00'
describe
'427367' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXQ' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
562f7b7771c7035c86a6f13182dc4bc6
51fd020264b8f53e627145cd467d5b2636019664
'2011-12-16T21:34:04-05:00'
describe
'101861' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXR' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
732f21d4004446adb4183ca9a62be663
1a4c829442bbf67b7f44ba1a94cbe476fc36af8f
describe
'3018436' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXS' 'sip-files00022a.tif'
56ac836fa0836f61d592bae3c77b10f8
04a344598efceb73da96e0c0c6576148b45f0c95
describe
'2838232' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXT' 'sip-files00022b.tif'
09e1d1168f10a213e709da9dcab60494
b169c66255113ab024a56cb380904af03bba5676
describe
'3004608' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXU' 'sip-files00023.tif'
4c9b487d254fdaa434ac98a2c466d0c2
291a9cf57d314fe800474ca1f51b9d2baefb0413
'2011-12-16T21:31:57-05:00'
describe
'3028940' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXV' 'sip-files00024.tif'
fbb7815a1c8187f8a9541f8dedf2d6b2
14d9dd8625873f0eecf3a97ee20a614c712de665
describe
'3096080' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXW' 'sip-files00025.tif'
c4bec045b1a7b9f09b5ab503bd347e95
f8d3d801db82d2aa9073d42ff7cbd95493600356
'2011-12-16T21:32:38-05:00'
describe
'3127296' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXX' 'sip-files00026.tif'
e53afd36d12e2962966617a3dc6b7cb2
9418396c547545d15cff4d856d4af09e8cde5978
describe
'3128280' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXY' 'sip-files00027.tif'
d1ddc735e0d32b1a50707fde8835ac84
0d5d176786585e7b0d099abd4a23c8b160ab7b37
'2011-12-16T21:33:26-05:00'
describe
'3091432' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIXZ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
c48fd62dcaf1981eb9a90b96329dd961
81b0d8a86136b1e7aa8ba883999f23ca93d64a18
describe
'3094288' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYA' 'sip-files00029.tif'
94abc3dc5b38404e25a13de8e5faf8cb
5d88f3f14c5cb6206db3fa5da3dab0740b280845
describe
'3185864' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYB' 'sip-files00030.tif'
0ec856e6c9a2243286034d40ed04221c
aace81c6dc151a079d4c45e813b0e3c66e5104fc
describe
'3227892' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYC' 'sip-files00031.tif'
32618cb1dff273ee26d8431c3d70cf66
15ac77ef6d44fe87e000f2455d9ec66b192534c5
describe
'3206560' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYD' 'sip-files00032.tif'
51317ef048ecf7e23754217986111872
4c9fc3347fe9ce83f413a97b8777ad112305eb19
'2011-12-16T21:36:31-05:00'
describe
'3055332' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYE' 'sip-files00033.tif'
3a20b275bbb147dfc2e1f36e207d13f1
0e71e77c69c7f9befcdb921d9501468295fb4bda
'2011-12-16T21:35:09-05:00'
describe
'9701680' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYF' 'sip-files00034.tif'
a1ccea657228127b1d820c020153bb34
30f5994a3093564b34e64db5dea847d5184204ce
'2011-12-16T21:37:04-05:00'
describe
'3194036' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYG' 'sip-files00035.tif'
1e2c0447d56f617f32fcb74e442333da
8946edd5aed8988ccd310789b6daf18d35530dc4
'2011-12-16T21:34:26-05:00'
describe
'3117196' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYH' 'sip-files00036.tif'
40951c765c47cd83babb37053385799b
aa7f87266da854865cadf6a6229f890dfb5253c6
describe
'3182288' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYI' 'sip-files00037.tif'
5897a8246d6baf7a51f98d358203a401
ae9918cbeac470c87206a5207715dd093ceaf79b
'2011-12-16T21:34:54-05:00'
describe
'3093084' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYJ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
459c159612986561a4678d24a39765bd
2ec959255068de67ec2e0f6955c4bd666a503b12
describe
'3123380' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYK' 'sip-files00039.tif'
7aa70c4e9a2c66d72deba92295a291e1
cb6c28c65385aa78e1fcb2cf72f33f180b9f44ed
describe
'3082692' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYL' 'sip-files00040.tif'
9b50aee3c83875001c3e3d5943d04932
2ff0afd5f33d8c8c6304f2ebdfbb53c2ecf44ee5
describe
'3077108' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYM' 'sip-files00041.tif'
22530e4166079e9f0a11904cdfe3feea
bd3d946fa91ab7d14cbaa1ccceff9d591be502fe
describe
'3086428' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYN' 'sip-files00042.tif'
725c0bbad2ca910c156b4f04381d8880
21cd7c15d9eb18d6d59178f582bcab72e0abf9a8
'2011-12-16T21:35:39-05:00'
describe
'3034584' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYO' 'sip-files00043.tif'
7f52227016ee6175f12e5efc2003513c
2244fb1cb37fe6b435fa563b25b792673a555e0e
describe
'3047496' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYP' 'sip-files00044.tif'
fea7c9e8d6579c3bd6cfec8f5717d745
21d270d0a0814d21339f85394c0ed38f6af0cc12
describe
'3114108' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYQ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
69f2e6fc3ee030c8b513f1043f36e46e
8c48163c9dc31ab40a9a885398acf1aa6850c33d
'2011-12-16T21:37:02-05:00'
describe
'3004596' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYR' 'sip-files00046.tif'
21f9c3b171592ff9cb4fadcd51833060
5fef5c2f10f571f5e061d5b7b80c89fdf1117f5a
describe
'3207180' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYS' 'sip-files00047.tif'
28e075ea69c2106e2409c9b9a2116269
45ccb0661b454f120efd6611e3c4cd79120afe92
'2011-12-16T21:36:03-05:00'
describe
'3042352' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYT' 'sip-files00048.tif'
d160778d4c89b10650c500185b1a1427
4da76231dede7bea8fa1628663740cb9e0e2fb1b
'2011-12-16T21:34:25-05:00'
describe
'3089772' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYU' 'sip-files00049.tif'
721f35e23a6dbd4f0b43a278933a00d5
dfb18d7a063544a3afe6f6cb8dd64946e005094b
'2011-12-16T21:36:28-05:00'
describe
'3183512' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYV' 'sip-files00050.tif'
dab2e9a64e5a0ede23622ab7716bbb8e
b1ed53b026a757e5729e931c75a9c9e1d9f58f67
describe
'3185872' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYW' 'sip-files00051.tif'
266ee6299c4be26c7e837b001034d2b0
dbe7573f6b70877614e561b594b6a5c5c65bde21
describe
'3174428' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYX' 'sip-files00052.tif'
dadc76d5bcbefc3af1ffbd4f9495d373
2425f0003f94664bc4d253bbfdb28db2d39be17f
'2011-12-16T21:30:00-05:00'
describe
'9074264' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYY' 'sip-files00053.tif'
60cb37050868562ae4169f7ee8345781
c13d5fbd8ff50b8e29f24648127646ac6f504397
'2011-12-16T21:32:16-05:00'
describe
'3057544' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIYZ' 'sip-files00054.tif'
1f86d71aee8468ab00a2b5715705a083
3ef33d340718d9ea6b854531cacec8005b090c27
describe
'3020900' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZA' 'sip-files00055.tif'
00c717fa16e3048c6a93948c61ecbf71
4e5384493b64e158270a1987ebbfe1de2ad10f5e
'2011-12-16T21:31:32-05:00'
describe
'3081116' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZB' 'sip-files00056.tif'
af5538ee515cf61324465f2115fd127e
8139a2602e6415efa02778c43927c0a0dd254f71
describe
'3107984' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZC' 'sip-files00057.tif'
db8219c020962c66a08126f0111f835c
d176ecb561908f0afc0ebe27ef6cbe8a7bbd0008
'2011-12-16T21:36:59-05:00'
describe
'3042600' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZD' 'sip-files00058.tif'
38d85335086d2e8a56853154c4a58eea
d4453aab89ea11ad1b7036bb36b15cf6084b132e
describe
'3041852' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZE' 'sip-files00059.tif'
efb192debe0726f78718cb009de5be78
6ffc3435bd26f60fa7186daaf66f23a8b00ffa9d
describe
'3073680' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZF' 'sip-files00060.tif'
82f4d70d3e0b704a676eb5bc70e546bc
92e280ada6fa3a699fcfeda545857943c18afcd8
describe
'3029776' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZG' 'sip-files00061.tif'
8d77a096c0dfbf1f25f01c99a525772a
7ef2e63263c3063b9c198a7b6cd536a87b54434a
describe
'3100896' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZH' 'sip-files00062.tif'
0e28800c03c0b007721d12d376c7c618
5d3cc65daacd6231c4193a2941342ccc0a7f9c4a
describe
'2992568' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZI' 'sip-files00063.tif'
ce921f93fd5385ccfb12320d7de6e736
74bee1246cdb71588ad6cf2b45676ca2f6b41a55
describe
'3105796' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZJ' 'sip-files00064.tif'
e8c29f8211fae74b88c6656083503dd3
aa4218f20322cb3ad04eb9a822f534f7a1511b18
describe
'3034860' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZK' 'sip-files00065.tif'
809f7228c945deca6b8b12184e15c092
e8a49706cb829b1bc0446e30b8bd2eb5efb42d06
'2011-12-16T21:32:01-05:00'
describe
'3033128' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZL' 'sip-files00066.tif'
7ecb06891fe8e4bdc57cf00202833a59
5076146c97e4e80d3ee23e71dd258b94ddab3cb2
describe
'2987856' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZM' 'sip-files00067.tif'
6593da884b81b35c85a3f900ee2c0aa4
6ea891e8b64ea2d81f4e76e40ed2e8784ec794fc
describe
'3130456' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZN' 'sip-files00068.tif'
0d57bc25794dd810c5cbe8e220827560
9d6c48f93a18999b0737f2815a415f69974d39ab
'2011-12-16T21:32:50-05:00'
describe
'3059640' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZO' 'sip-files00069.tif'
14bd751d6a866102da6e59c97830cd5b
270088c75ef3dd9bef8fa48753a1bb282bc53162
describe
'3134852' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZP' 'sip-files00070.tif'
571e747a882f216540c8706a636c35dd
f633a878aa72d17ee485adba1ce92f16946d5301
'2011-12-16T21:29:32-05:00'
describe
'3142844' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZQ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
ba8decba935b03dc3e7fcca1189a222f
a3bd57adfe992893c8ed658b3885aa469f7738cf
describe
'3141500' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZR' 'sip-files00072.tif'
e1b5e6f5534e87c6a213ec0e239cffd5
865d9c78b2808b1c38088ff2879ab70805df4481
describe
'3064256' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZS' 'sip-files00073.tif'
b3f6740269dee4365144b962ff3654dd
879822f0f8cf88b0df23bbf30037d5a87eacff39
describe
'3134012' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZT' 'sip-files00074.tif'
063f1a0a50e1c45c12753c730c5fe71f
2260477ec6644d640fcb4c1f0038fdc4f877586d
'2011-12-16T21:32:48-05:00'
describe
'3102940' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZU' 'sip-files00075.tif'
0bb68ea0743ca003f9a2a5426411f76e
cd7b3d917dcd84720e50ad32b9497a2799370858
'2011-12-16T21:35:37-05:00'
describe
'3082812' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZV' 'sip-files00076.tif'
7a03d69167dda2f990660287c5b8007f
087f9a27f34bc323420bbed4ced97fa16edfb3d3
'2011-12-16T21:36:07-05:00'
describe
'3101944' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZW' 'sip-files00077.tif'
2d41aa5382a91caab0c71c71bc42fd79
6f6b9b982a06725566152df56fc3de9c041fd8f0
describe
'3211476' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZX' 'sip-files00078.tif'
bc94df527b411f880c8b5b7219824de4
a55f86e1dfa3af9d5abddd8f96e62d05e48c17da
describe
'3151352' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZY' 'sip-files00079.tif'
1d50172731ca674d12bbd176e41fcf87
aaa2f1a273cb6795f561f64006bb551374b22165
'2011-12-16T21:32:20-05:00'
describe
'3207260' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAIZZ' 'sip-files00080.tif'
73ff4d24c332dfbb6d9634117a4e3b90
890b5960adbd3b4383a45734147ebc15b292cccc
describe
'3079348' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAA' 'sip-files00081.tif'
0d74158241bed2606158b5ecb2088e19
8cdfadff5dea51ebe4da5f7c27488f34142e375f
'2011-12-16T21:31:38-05:00'
describe
'3189524' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAB' 'sip-files00082.tif'
f2e01913c319a5822ff53c53eac466d5
fe5d09a49270e6b0381daee0aa5279d061aca36b
describe
'3154904' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAC' 'sip-files00083.tif'
8e90987d3393415f74b14f4d23af21ba
748f733dc7959f70ce6ff73a21336234a1cacb0c
describe
'3197192' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAD' 'sip-files00084.tif'
bcbd997879711c17402906b301483d5c
022979045a67e8342dcb9655f41146fd141f3c90
'2011-12-16T21:34:02-05:00'
describe
'3218340' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAE' 'sip-files00085.tif'
f6d988d7636e507bcd3e11f658b0bdd8
0d838fb9185e6a37a5de89f39ebb89f6806a50f6
'2011-12-16T21:32:24-05:00'
describe
'3165188' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAF' 'sip-files00086.tif'
ef244425e7527430de3cc3c2d7134bf1
6901a30366eb47b321b86da31080e6365fdc14b5
describe
'3129680' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAG' 'sip-files00087.tif'
90bee2f0e31c543427443f651d702cde
91768c3e03c591937f6eae0266544909a08c8219
describe
'3101052' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAH' 'sip-files00088.tif'
6c5710da1e0eee725bc573b90c0bc2eb
c7e8493d1727f292db5198794493a49ff4bf1fb4
'2011-12-16T21:31:10-05:00'
describe
'3032528' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAI' 'sip-files00089.tif'
6d643038a46b1489b80a385af4f70f42
0c26795fc4aa8056c3ef2082fc4f08960b044d76
'2011-12-16T21:35:52-05:00'
describe
'3114796' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAJ' 'sip-files00090.tif'
790a7c3bfb5b8fa4111ce1ee7c640182
2ed666c29600b795dac70fe8fb6a11c7009ef780
describe
'3181932' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAK' 'sip-files00091.tif'
47e575fc52029a530cb179562a493867
fa47b147527dcb64ac17adf87361245a1b87e99c
'2011-12-16T21:30:19-05:00'
describe
'3183968' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAL' 'sip-files00092.tif'
5c97d018482ed42de551a5c969346a52
6ca2745f890c0b9db7f782226ee4eed964a4df73
describe
'3144540' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAM' 'sip-files00093.tif'
b1e92cab379591f42bf9e26671f8833f
2230b9b812025a7ecf67bf590e15639e87ebcb86
describe
'3163144' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAN' 'sip-files00094.tif'
7abda4222289ad8c1c5af25545166fde
2e651da1faa395196e181bb3d4df62af0e4f6a43
describe
'3181892' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAO' 'sip-files00095.tif'
fbe57cdd6c43b6fdf6893528997567bf
4656cf39cde4ce98b97d1d64c230bf5bb14ba1ae
'2011-12-16T21:29:46-05:00'
describe
'3242832' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAP' 'sip-files00096.tif'
66d0072fd242c3a805406f312cb2e73f
6e9d29215dba621f5b13331d062f8546a889d2ec
describe
'3257956' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAQ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
0a28dd38e88d965a4ace600c2f076fdd
d62f8c15cd1d1827bdab15b6b6e809f839958dd3
describe
'3204384' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAR' 'sip-files00098.tif'
399932332402b711af4945c88f1a2740
d228f172ef2fea6a33d24d9209c94ea5c9876be3
'2011-12-16T21:32:33-05:00'
describe
'3229036' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAS' 'sip-files00099.tif'
d9b54d08898d0627842ef7f04220896d
9b36695886e9a6b39bc0c849f82392959c4fe673
describe
'3172504' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAT' 'sip-files00100.tif'
0e4dae433dd8e2de9587a0a3159434ee
b52496a5dc82b834add12b01308c7b03b4ca8484
describe
'3117304' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAU' 'sip-files00101.tif'
af08f02a5bf346cac6a4db74ba954c49
c580e08cd31dd00daa694af7675b154f958f74a8
describe
'3119596' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAV' 'sip-files00102.tif'
07bf5a2de5bc970c007b778e1add0ea0
ad79d286906f79f71e590f3b8c8a1d2d1796a2f4
'2011-12-16T21:30:09-05:00'
describe
'3015368' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAW' 'sip-files00103.tif'
bcea1ec642b35d393dd5e0679f39f471
3528e3bdce6deb1c7d87d09f1593c60cacf4bbf3
'2011-12-16T21:29:56-05:00'
describe
'9079256' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAX' 'sip-files00104.tif'
7210a0ee58e10cf4ac0b89502d573847
5d80dda98a3e7101557ad756f66907887e3ba116
'2011-12-16T21:36:01-05:00'
describe
'3051548' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAY' 'sip-files00105.tif'
355dcbfefcb375234a54ee66c9c05fca
ed76935167cbf3efb473498e1eee4e6c8845a68b
describe
'3064260' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJAZ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
e6fc36a50ac87ae9fe35466a748e1bd2
94ade67197e53ce3554c9c37099abf7804ce4abf
describe
'3142532' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBA' 'sip-files00107.tif'
bd50cbb67ee66666f9a95fac5943788e
f534cebe29b190e9fcd6a5fd7ef8cacee56b5202
describe
'2932032' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBB' 'sip-files00108.tif'
af05b28cec418d05de72d5af649a2a88
ea8a9b21783fedcbf4d58e410a4112c67cc6f3fb
describe
'3122112' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBC' 'sip-files00109.tif'
8dadd469902073ba2691dd6d8bcf5ab4
e564f6cabcf7fce89648f1e326d87758c0220c2f
'2011-12-16T21:30:05-05:00'
describe
'2976976' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBD' 'sip-files00110.tif'
2c9976f6cafc83ce8abce678d9279fd8
69e3b9c4b71559ac7cad849ac73f9e49311cb5c9
'2011-12-16T21:34:42-05:00'
describe
'3026756' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBE' 'sip-files00111.tif'
c0899978e4fdacfd212084027cd5f23f
81470b7d7f555666e6e9187a91e0280435a50bb3
'2011-12-16T21:30:38-05:00'
describe
'3030560' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBF' 'sip-files00112.tif'
3a8cf49af672e4636937e1cf8ce1fd9b
966290f9e4b95d12dce3e61a3244af0ba7eccb18
describe
'3057028' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBG' 'sip-files00113.tif'
9361f9e9a7c2a933552545a450d9d04b
fdf99fc73ebfc8b4a3c80a768d67e11e1de1f82b
'2011-12-16T21:36:43-05:00'
describe
'3026868' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBH' 'sip-files00114.tif'
d10fbd7ce53f4bccc2f1e95505081391
7e3a07847acfd43bb3dcdd7ab68c2109ceb0889c
'2011-12-16T21:30:42-05:00'
describe
'3153328' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBI' 'sip-files00115.tif'
179daf430e24e866a3ef1c263ebbe57c
3c7e8d1964499c71f6800dbbc468fe2e97f204d9
'2011-12-16T21:30:56-05:00'
describe
'2996764' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBJ' 'sip-files00116.tif'
d147f9b632174d90cb98f8469763a571
860578b60af392a1efe5d16e242069996a12a49a
describe
'9453576' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBK' 'sip-files00117.tif'
8a861976f1564ad67dc25fd06ef98f6a
f5630e3de6f478abe4550b4c516ff412c3667c54
'2011-12-16T21:30:18-05:00'
describe
'3152964' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBL' 'sip-files00118.tif'
3f724f79f25f72d689bc76bd816fd777
4d3717bfebfb4dd1c560a7ee78f27c95d2e2046e
describe
'3116948' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBM' 'sip-files00119.tif'
10e93ceb809ada80671c659b483f0a36
6009a009fd785603b754e169eb1a3ea8d4130a90
describe
'3029840' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBN' 'sip-files00120.tif'
ea4e3d58261b18647c576746d5df5975
14a624b5de8b0ec9f67b9b32b92cfdb558b40f1f
describe
'2980348' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBO' 'sip-files00121.tif'
3083c639ed925ae8783b19ea25a0ad77
07c1d1f0e788dc53a24aa15214d3fb585faed3f6
'2011-12-16T21:32:23-05:00'
describe
'3050772' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBP' 'sip-files00122.tif'
acadc24153b8860ad5e43abdeacd52ae
d152f1b62412acc569903299541317915a869838
describe
'3101644' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBQ' 'sip-files00123.tif'
c573d83c3b8e781079ff39fc380566a2
cf6d00797513d1e0ccbc3117e279a7e285204b8d
describe
'3138444' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBR' 'sip-files00124.tif'
85855d4a932f299a8ed8ae104f27e495
6bf6f195fd69d05eeecd3be3732ef6b31c304cdd
describe
'3014292' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBS' 'sip-files00125.tif'
5d5ffe3729165d49d93ce75853c40392
ccdc17851b11db89006e75a53414f123cff4fc15
describe
'3021748' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBT' 'sip-files00126.tif'
d7b5133d31048f862dfba234db718330
a3c0fc69fa748289a05f31ef8b41dc7016c77524
describe
'3072848' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBU' 'sip-files00127.tif'
f10bc42b07dfb6bac0feaec30c6965a1
6429ae1015009135311f87c5c7e472a08a4a00e5
describe
'3130036' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBV' 'sip-files00128.tif'
36090accd96b638d4ce0471da7f94f40
3d0256738d6f8b0e12c056801514cabb4d64fbd3
describe
'3119960' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBW' 'sip-files00129.tif'
b9a225e07fa8e3d57a16d66d23e7a2a4
bddf4c1d3c82877c98563b5ef76400a27b8b514a
'2011-12-16T21:33:04-05:00'
describe
'3165372' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBX' 'sip-files00130.tif'
17aa315e36ae8c20727de911e7f97953
4f1166ddd6a3484bcbaaf7f6f76f3495b47967f6
describe
'3116028' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBY' 'sip-files00131.tif'
b30a6b426f0b82e94535bf711c018094
2ab8253262137a409cd43f58d10d8903ae873929
describe
'3121512' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJBZ' 'sip-files00132.tif'
04c06e92c98cf2a1df875e9262e30904
9d43620d867a7de233313cbf5dc83642bf8d1eeb
describe
'3128740' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCA' 'sip-files00133.tif'
1b7d863939b242051b852a6adbbdd4f7
999fd465107b9972b4d3119308a356bcfe0f0021
describe
'3094956' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCB' 'sip-files00134.tif'
0b9c95872807fbde816292be44d27d8b
344be7c852160c925abccde44f75175380dc7546
describe
'3096964' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCC' 'sip-files00135.tif'
0a3ae171953f056e17f350fd67d1843a
590b39e6f47adaff97306f1938b12c2481b65a3e
'2011-12-16T21:33:43-05:00'
describe
'3131964' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCD' 'sip-files00136.tif'
f20eec1aa395030517eb32a404a45533
8ffe0d06d8522bdc1abe541826dcb9ffb6bdca4c
'2011-12-16T21:37:06-05:00'
describe
'3109964' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCE' 'sip-files00137.tif'
9655a4f27afaaa93319fe8d409349d29
de2d9cce335b6eb28f955423b7191de4707b9c7e
describe
'3054608' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCF' 'sip-files00138.tif'
2e817636f1b1345620d31b82080ee8c5
ec42b933791d48bdd4a22d24027f8955498f15c1
describe
'3094136' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCG' 'sip-files00139.tif'
8e2c6d90b2d2d8bc306abb47a0eed679
02b4f3b425a5b8759edcfbac97f620ea44e98411
describe
'3075092' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCH' 'sip-files00140.tif'
302276e0996a361de991c7afdb4cef7d
d280a7821db4e4b3c9bceb4bde533d42810cfb9d
describe
'3083276' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCI' 'sip-files00141.tif'
3352bdd98574eea653ea900394596f04
e31a628da97c75b068e3ac246f6493aed9854624
describe
'3143492' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCJ' 'sip-files00142.tif'
b0ef2682610096f3da25f7cb3f469b21
6d995dda6841e8bf9a52829b7f515f90e7b358e6
describe
'3081580' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCK' 'sip-files00143.tif'
5e242197b493660c78e2c45a2448c5a8
441c32c400a4b9335f146431b1476a437a1f9d59
'2011-12-16T21:36:06-05:00'
describe
'3012280' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCL' 'sip-files00144.tif'
1110a943211ccebdba84ce57ab2a356b
0af92734b321d2b813a5bfa5e9470375a786f5b2
describe
'2978704' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCM' 'sip-files00145.tif'
e2ac2a3ef54a5c20fda8002f2dc0df1a
c84cedec51e4a3e0d41f174e2bde388093c45cbd
'2011-12-16T21:35:31-05:00'
describe
'2978560' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCN' 'sip-files00146.tif'
c1747fe7b588d6f52a2849200815b215
e2c79bd3eef77d7ce340a12ba7d3b8151a6e7864
'2011-12-16T21:36:00-05:00'
describe
'3004484' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCO' 'sip-files00147.tif'
6b886f6270e5ee30afddc71680d28031
ff447df13d69b184d6f4121099788762542fb369
'2011-12-16T21:34:33-05:00'
describe
'3120016' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCP' 'sip-files00148.tif'
74d3da30b48c31a6312308c7f1b7637d
5072132e224b61c7d1d5b99d5e5b34a3ed63ee0c
describe
'3049356' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCQ' 'sip-files00149.tif'
87a2072ad8103d711c164634a877411a
c334944c796f164a0b3e53e5350b5663c77d9c46
'2011-12-16T21:30:47-05:00'
describe
'3171992' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCR' 'sip-files00150.tif'
980513813baeed889dc5ffc07ac42f59
0ae638e4ead3d82a1044684eb9e398f8f4345d76
'2011-12-16T21:31:58-05:00'
describe
'3094272' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCS' 'sip-files00151.tif'
2bbb22b76e3803f854e162f5d676adc5
c5e62c3a87a192c00548c2638f075b33190827f2
describe
'3178188' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCT' 'sip-files00152.tif'
f2addccb9519dcb9ae5a7c23bb58e766
82533cd4a962305a084a9eb0a2bbd084925c4574
describe
'3102160' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCU' 'sip-files00153.tif'
cb1f0717652a80c2047b8054a57b4ffb
d66ce79fb3e6414a41ac16f9ae83cd44c0f4204e
describe
'3123832' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCV' 'sip-files00154.tif'
22fc481ca918b71f1cac9e2e4247b3db
5eac27e841ccf05a7995e600acdb1ee7c72a3969
describe
'3139008' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCW' 'sip-files00155.tif'
7cac3cd18b4d0b36e37486fcb882032f
b2c9256f5d8ca6566b00f4e6eaa6c7165295dee1
describe
'3049440' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCX' 'sip-files00156.tif'
1f359338713feb9a0a46be5b078fe463
460e5fc4eee5709c19e126d2d33343865b2fa431
'2011-12-16T21:31:49-05:00'
describe
'3163064' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCY' 'sip-files00157.tif'
6b28e96a81e004f014e3c7546ed88651
4f20bad81619f8f3ba0c9bb9efc6a5fbae56ab46
describe
'3153216' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJCZ' 'sip-files00158.tif'
f9a646c01b272cbf53bdc9d294f32e45
a714570a866490bfaac40cc4c871d25d30cbf0a8
describe
'3037592' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDA' 'sip-files00159.tif'
e8553fc8828c2a72323ce5a60c32717f
03c5e090987cd3407525405dc759ed28cf65fdf4
describe
'3073772' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDB' 'sip-files00160.tif'
6bfe279ac45fe89044ca74878ed52e78
d20f90555d8b191c37d268bd7233033803d4df90
describe
'3080524' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDC' 'sip-files00161.tif'
a90179a1413da1aac8746007329c6bcb
38189fac95e90a850c36a7e0dcf339076a0c3599
'2011-12-16T21:34:40-05:00'
describe
'3228008' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDD' 'sip-files00162.tif'
1840e8ab8a68e989c8974b2d69551d26
315275a3f53e0475fe4c7a44f103c75420828f32
'2011-12-16T21:32:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDE' 'sip-files00163.tif'
7b0e638ae90adca150897fa7017af374
ae3a93b07332a74b4137e482097a13ad25a3dd46
describe
'9137312' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDF' 'sip-files00164.tif'
905d57573631a26368b613360426b69d
220a713be4c4d38c77fc30429b2e7590e6a59ac3
describe
'3075828' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDG' 'sip-files00165.tif'
6b89baf5eb1147f6fe8116d63f92b1f0
74e5875aead6db14d6b083ca816bc6fe4d14692e
describe
'3199268' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDH' 'sip-files00166.tif'
2c729b893436ddc42bd693b7d08d14a1
503de8bfc4d0aa0c25829dfbb43a03c4e6763b21
'2011-12-16T21:33:11-05:00'
describe
'3226000' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDI' 'sip-files00167.tif'
64fd299674b0f467435ed46f2144a74f
6a49d0dff9c37206a3cd0dfbfe516fe01d2a1280
describe
'3210144' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDJ' 'sip-files00168.tif'
49deddb541afbc8e00d717152312e0e2
7e30ebe4564f4717e59f25840687850eb6ac24a4
'2011-12-16T21:33:12-05:00'
describe
'3135536' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDK' 'sip-files00169.tif'
967d2022df66c1a2f424c89d2e57163c
9b782a0a449be61dc11616dde840adb0a9774e50
'2011-12-16T21:35:27-05:00'
describe
'3069168' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDL' 'sip-files00170.tif'
7ed23d245a30075304808a8895bea42d
e5092b3230562d98019f6752fda27a1b51d528af
'2011-12-16T21:29:47-05:00'
describe
'3051000' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDM' 'sip-files00171.tif'
416af95d0dfe142373a6955296180489
277fc2107ddc065d661c1748ee6db2303dd12e3f
describe
'3135940' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDN' 'sip-files00172.tif'
d94670c47851dfea0ae16c66e03598da
73d2f10ed8eefe6ea4b29b7f2a5079336998433f
'2011-12-16T21:30:14-05:00'
describe
'3225148' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDO' 'sip-files00173.tif'
6cd05f32cd671613f457913f06b8e1c4
906b611add142afb46a93c460eba42d2c588714e
'2011-12-16T21:32:34-05:00'
describe
'3231416' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDP' 'sip-files00174.tif'
ed411a125ad655a5703e17593bd43136
4919ae02d115fce8183cc636c25b38eb8c062980
describe
'3208468' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDQ' 'sip-files00175.tif'
6fda83e7915bf7f379e56e33d3564012
3fc133bc8cc1949c3ec42bdbbe6e363e42e6da8c
describe
'3192400' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDR' 'sip-files00176.tif'
765f7d298b632f8a54868c0827a0d8b2
567f69667a5c18b2813ae430a44df56e8152a50f
describe
'3220804' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDS' 'sip-files00177.tif'
7acd85571689ca727eac76f7d603f20a
83f4b67b13dc2e39e7b56abbd34ed67c734b45dc
describe
'3145812' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDT' 'sip-files00178.tif'
d9d2478ec4c90f577dfb377a702dd7fe
226efd2c532ae006507d761083b924242276ffe8
'2011-12-16T21:32:11-05:00'
describe
'3227832' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDU' 'sip-files00179.tif'
1eaf8e90dcec1137414bab8bed89b847
9423a0949903b58097e68e8d86c052fd70b1600b
describe
'3252272' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDV' 'sip-files00180.tif'
9e53c883dc0565bd065a522cafc6eab9
0fa415c94dfee1d7bd137eaa0d569dce01547d76
describe
'3167076' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDW' 'sip-files00181.tif'
65187401060dc65be5399b9dc8b56d1e
a87faa436e62aaec79f6eb2d4f6657f3142e358f
'2011-12-16T21:29:29-05:00'
describe
'3262724' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDX' 'sip-files00182.tif'
881e4f733bc65156e3c520f984a63bda
e8b2147f5710e14b8a045081abdeeb77a49b8e60
describe
'3192820' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDY' 'sip-files00183.tif'
e0fa02296cf67cc180e5ab7ea08e5408
60d0279673f704367ace50ee26d900fc84925267
'2011-12-16T21:32:09-05:00'
describe
'3222240' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJDZ' 'sip-files00184.tif'
e673fa1564491b9aba6202518215e162
9da09a5bca56f7651ac9916e6289cc6a361e32c4
describe
'3074424' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEA' 'sip-files00185.tif'
d1359f122ada7334c6f15aafb6bf977a
36731ddeea742615da4f30d554adfec49ae2d839
'2011-12-16T21:29:33-05:00'
describe
'3208340' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEB' 'sip-files00186.tif'
80f0ed3891c1326166f30e04b4f9fa32
87132dcd73b17b31f225c86276d2cc9314174f53
describe
'3149420' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEC' 'sip-files00187.tif'
906b17e45802cb9097f57e9912ed5eaf
4f144701879b92909d043beca16d59246c5c1353
describe
'3158032' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJED' 'sip-files00188.tif'
c265a02ad3e05b49bdc33372c8367698
f4037a9872c5f5268531c75e68b8f99e47ed6e73
describe
'3164248' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEE' 'sip-files00189.tif'
8cdd353179b90c619ccc4cac4c7fd6ef
909d2e87866b18214a05d1b28826bac6e185aff0
'2011-12-16T21:33:31-05:00'
describe
'3224632' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEF' 'sip-files00190.tif'
60a6c0c136b07a87eac804924ff504e5
d2aeec3cfc452fe0122687f817a85bd5810f3e25
describe
'9137660' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEG' 'sip-files00191.tif'
3ed3d1d7a9471ff4f00dc6af14352762
91eb18f6cb04fa6a34b0b9f0587a3bf932b0e1b7
describe
'3173552' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEH' 'sip-files00192.tif'
fc18868b2337675e64e6b28f90880031
887d10b643c8bef63dfd87b7d7c061dc2ecad28c
describe
'3145840' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEI' 'sip-files00193.tif'
ab595187f8192b85f1efb7cad4f38bcb
c89235958e6c4c16746d8fab9b7e1589db614c82
describe
'3064040' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEJ' 'sip-files00194.tif'
5eca91b2e1dacb53cb13ce75288c9eee
7f8c1bc68d6cf0f406d1aedb6353d2306db5e50a
describe
'3105860' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEK' 'sip-files00195.tif'
7bc77d2a7b610e4339d0724d10ddc924
f8bb5d94dd5d8b371e9c2b737a97768133dc38fd
describe
'3181660' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEL' 'sip-files00196.tif'
5b20dd1b68b2adf45e12a860686fc709
7c8235452cc4156148259b6a9b4fdb79cb7b9f43
describe
'3215692' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEM' 'sip-files00197.tif'
e9a5371c9f0a16f1d86d860eba2e9d9c
81c0e2446a6a932dbd168e260632ba624733fa2e
describe
'3073488' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEN' 'sip-files00198.tif'
1e3432befa83444b33c27da442dcc3e9
d5603f2dd10cb6e6a1cb3be8341af743ad7a2a7a
describe
'3176968' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEO' 'sip-files00199.tif'
f6c30d1e062cefac0651fa9ec02850ed
4efe9781eeafe2f2b4f536c1e41fd0a92eb4abd5
describe
'3209172' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEP' 'sip-files00200.tif'
18e0d59d4ac6baf10d4e9e124dfb6cf1
50a4b50e7bad1b84ac3f3a1b2cb58b6f8d1cb1aa
describe
'3138776' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEQ' 'sip-files00201.tif'
e055a72183a9d9881778a9aae2ca8a88
4cd24445097711b705d0549d7e0533a033a9b557
describe
'3167248' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJER' 'sip-files00202.tif'
03cab821b2a9b1460bee05dc6f7f5935
e89349c57c8c92b0df398c8c7775b34e076fff4c
describe
'3133828' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJES' 'sip-files00203.tif'
84e10cd78ee8c356fc5f1e3905c2ea32
9def7192d967603b96d1cb865bd399f64343b3b2
'2011-12-16T21:35:15-05:00'
describe
'3047380' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJET' 'sip-files00204.tif'
ae3e2a92331eb78c854b3ac146b0c5bc
575a5b0e4ff90c99c380c81b3f7936590ec4f89f
'2011-12-16T21:34:39-05:00'
describe
'3076128' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEU' 'sip-files00205.tif'
d403648db67f6f1f4aaf1f46ae3b8e59
fdd6a5de4e9c5a7b68e22cfb995287e49fd00c4d
describe
'3169576' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEV' 'sip-files00206.tif'
6d5682b524d788a139401e9165e6b52d
41fb7607a715598a569dfda77308f06c173a587b
describe
'3136152' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEW' 'sip-files00207.tif'
630b9a18193db9f734c84ecd0575e9f9
55afd561e403f0ba6d3e413852030af224ef1ed0
describe
'10254344' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEX' 'sip-files00208.tif'
26b45db2d9bc65e3c0dc566786d96df5
0671ec647f81b492f582d9a547ea359be16a8591
'2011-12-16T21:34:01-05:00'
describe
'10267008' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEY' 'sip-files00209.tif'
720b99085b6c1b76bce6a6e0cc4e508d
79891d22361a287eb95559103e143a9679edf422
describe
'2451072' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJEZ' 'sip-files00210.tif'
18569d5c98c9bd439ba24d0fdf0375e7
ac95709be0ad830999736876f62fa3f91cda7f56
describe
'193282' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFA' 'sip-files00022a.jpg'
df190e9a6df40c48752a845e8cf81996
a0bf59ffee6e6b9be6ffa81197c1dea57aa190c5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'218293' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFB' 'sip-files00022b.jpg'
709b379dcef36ee3bb4ca296711b2a3d
417cac0ca0efda19c329481ffbac0860b2eac770
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'173035' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFC' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
7221300150569df837be7a4a92c21f98
43e220670b92f312e14370e5ab372020080438a8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'171670' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFD' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
a26d5a7b2fedee33a5a41b384d00ce02
9469ce437136b6a34e60bdd0e8f3dfd1f63516bf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'186492' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFE' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
913378b0150435141d7e4ce815a7acda
e01d4eea165a55ff432f62d6d87b3b2234a75737
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'173665' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFF' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
f2c54c0ff60eb8f239a4ba689b6048cc
b045b378cd646c4513d5e5fcbee614d3cc2e558c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'86814' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFG' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
b9dacd426a43a020cba266bb1eba9188
edd4db35725fa90d7a63724184276e47d50c1d55
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'144526' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFH' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
f52cd522b05a727210700471f1ff818a
754c3325da798a558e2dbb9b8b21d218deb9d952
'2011-12-16T21:34:32-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'178017' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFI' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
4cda82b2f763bf20a83fd0cd822bcdff
f70652fbe50e2b2382a73eabca5c964e01430161
'2011-12-16T21:34:49-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'190921' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFJ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
196cf0114cd8e4a8b4d62db42ba4952b
300674211b85ef64bdfd86eaf2cfd574cc9e1c9f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'170366' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFK' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
8b4ed5124291004b27a56ecc7ac129b8
86ca0ea76ecf5175d8767231af08b50b2a4f1648
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'166414' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFL' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
a647434745bf808a37d85a01fc1c94b8
c315a8ab40c0124e75f29b7a8a798082e143b089
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'186148' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFM' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
4e5a56b33fdd0345aa8aab4ee7e2eab7
1ea3916357879148a416e9ad9d3632a5d8c475e8
'2011-12-16T21:29:48-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81801' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFN' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
54728a4c5233f51ab85783353f740206
3b3c174cbc998ca6435f2bcfc0b187b347f15b5b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'180479' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFO' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
73403ffca4dceefc4b2234fdec97653b
b312263f033dcbada91d1dcd9254473e4411b3fa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'180625' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFP' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
d01cc5ab7284a5c7e2eddaa27928ff10
90512087ef85d713e1b5aa0c3fd5b3e31a2b85fe
'2011-12-16T21:34:17-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'178095' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFQ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
dd3f7f0fc111b2ceb99a8051b4a588fd
6609579302bb71c8940ed2d49e69605a096b6ee3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'179255' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFR' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
2127c89aaa42a2917ca3a135596bacee
6d6d85e262eb2ef15d1bbd6a1c9d370bf0186855
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'163764' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFS' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
1076d0ae8e4bf91b0f16d2d6a14fc53f
29e58d4712217f70c8bfb542f24a101ae4c36220
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'181480' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFT' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
7dd12feecda2be567f821e88285d6eb6
8db75bf6cff12227f972a249a6a1e4cae9854d99
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'164489' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFU' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
cf763d7f8c047d18bb5a81a97327c826
e162d332fdc309c8079ad74ad65fc0a79c626d33
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'144038' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFV' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
f2febaa7473e2cd64bd8cdab1bcb5d23
a01ff137c83e8fd4e3926574ebd240f2f6277516
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'163991' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFW' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
4fd6734c246436860f5744101a2ad549
75f981e88d4ea54d58372afd5182132d47b41ff7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'165175' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFX' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
67370d7cbf09ac1027dc3e5b84ec6d0a
bff978acd6745865c4a766dfa2e8a20c243fec19
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'168066' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFY' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
46b0787d9b7eba35017ca7026c678d3a
415323788f6ce772e827bf1d347d507edc283eb0
'2011-12-16T21:31:35-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'174232' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJFZ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
3c4e4af8f0acdcb99e7740f255bc6a52
344ff295b4b6a9fe3f03ca57f36addbc8dd9fab3
'2011-12-16T21:36:27-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'165618' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGA' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
83315d50c5ed03e47d48ecda33a23963
fe345f6c2e6c61550af5613db5d709662b48bc4f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'129579' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGB' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
f99dd24c7692cf23509dd52d9db243a7
248f014264c58e192c22d6bdfc6993e6c86bb228
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'135108' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGC' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
44a398c24c41ce705275769483266393
e272326d0670e972a52b4014f064751660d53235
'2011-12-16T21:32:03-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'182661' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGD' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
76b5152dd2cbbca910be1b104bec7f81
72d9ddd5e62921f502f6085fd25d8fdf0796443e
'2011-12-16T21:35:24-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'183436' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGE' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
5f484150fd686a440c0957209e77f959
bbf34f678516a8fda03f6c03b9a0d0b987384e6e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'177242' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGF' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
bb8bfcf8291dc85ba82ff94dee6694cf
4e3d1e8403c5eb6ecf1d56da3b935d2fc72a5a04
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'86978' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGG' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
faf20e33f512ef4a2c91ec3a490b3091
551444c6973205dba60027a80b9b61c288ba5e35
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'172566' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGH' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
16354e8714bb0dddf3601aff7e5347c3
c67c8aabf447221b7f8ddcb85f5b5d1fb5e9f463
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'170636' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGI' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
eb73144b99413b411359ffd46f21a97d
2ba2bc22288aecc717b9ac86e5ce2f9d15e723d0
'2011-12-16T21:36:10-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'169775' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGJ' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
1304889c9530180e8444e4376395147c
2e172f63ade12e70d168fbe30ff6039c7747710c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'185272' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGK' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
c21722d0ccd4dfb17b85865fb725dca3
fa79c600a423bf2239c467d61220a7843a1b1f9c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'176665' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGL' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
4e12c893e05f1d97f3c1ce64de5d7ab1
5e93372a88afd9d585cc68501faa478baa2fffef
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'186225' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGM' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
58a15747f5619dc29e1889ae142388ba
2f90c8f894e836d8054523d35635277fc1b48f3a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'178987' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGN' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
589f4baad7a0ef9b09d38cedce48df43
25f338c252b49e05ca15fc5831946fa7a55acf88
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'189373' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGO' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
c7ddf231ac1d1cf9e75681bb961e1076
3619de37ad63fdcedf0164d21b273c2cf5aa6049
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'184777' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGP' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
b452cb65c3cec27d8249558d303c4f98
ed7b352fc4e3ec5b59431f9e48e95830bd69907a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'185833' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGQ' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
e89c6a164ef3270d27cd17ce746f712e
f495af3affb4a3671e2a4b593a069dda457b9355
'2011-12-16T21:31:12-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'184625' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGR' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
699ff72f4a654fb765b3da795c6832b2
4563f2fc730d27fbbe6ed4cae7ba08e9fb700435
'2011-12-16T21:35:25-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'181654' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGS' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
998ad8408fd1d894c915c2d3ee5ea52f
f900169d9cfb64304a6d94ef51c93f2e4eeea147
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'124359' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGT' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
11170729c7bec74ef5d1df8ea8dc7f83
7880840194e180b2abf0eceba37b45842a8f3555
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'175363' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGU' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
3d750e14eea72586624379426185d0aa
186e12cb11535d0b4a2c9a9cc248f7e7e9363699
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'177884' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGV' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
8d70e34517688c92ebbc0f4bd77ca41d
b37e55b2e8b04c6cfe03d953408e93f4d6d79865
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'178214' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGW' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
fedb73955105b90d81f83b01514a8449
c43f69195ae0d2195425c02efae4ce76f4194bf0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'170756' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGX' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
fe7d9ab22d46beaee21e533298a4d118
3adc62ab57b6933c46bca471b805c6ebc917dd30
'2011-12-16T21:31:31-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'176970' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGY' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
3ebe2611077fe5aecde44bad27ea7569
71081e5c80209db9bf3718769d4c6c6f91b0a8f7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'191974' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJGZ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
5a1587d8efd87c6bf176793ba1875b93
743089dc9c785d76cd54545f6fe3f06088e5adeb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'197941' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHA' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
863027ebdbed5032b4c7b1fc8ede6fdd
d8857d017bccb4b326738df2cd578e0c3c2e9c16
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'188786' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHB' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
0b1b89428acdc806b49633d43637106e
5aae7f1a44a945f476ab80b2feb4463a7cd9b18e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'198322' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHC' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
c799ca0b7992dc3b6d7a0060804c0595
75cb1cecdca5dda971c513020d1b68e207c12ce5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'191070' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHD' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
d4d8a97a060630a6457ff2bd775d572c
99b33537d34f62086c73014f5c5852aaabf7501d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'198758' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHE' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
70b693601e22c2e6ac2eed05ecc8a7a7
c177dead02de4f523561342e947ca9aa392a5241
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'193424' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHF' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
435ac8807b9be6de953a515faff9c852
9aad540498b565828559a3f4a48d39da122cda5d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'197460' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHG' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
310b3a7ed29098a97178aa77b1d588b6
9d662c8084678ec3efa0857347fda91c6f386016
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'189474' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHH' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
fd52f9fab0827e29679492e88e3e62f3
04f4aca0df09b340f2014da1e1240761ac4a113a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'196412' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHI' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
dd97f9fdc9e6bb28179ee7db0e63acd5
b25fa646cb78c62a58a4586809239d11f9743470
'2011-12-16T21:31:37-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'184333' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHJ' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
c9582c7b16d8eed6f50feff3305badc5
77ef9b71154c2bd901d2a3ffb520ea978c410568
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'185087' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHK' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
daf6719595fe25458560d160c4ab41f6
e8e88e19af5ab6f14965f2650f18b1ba71ef5db8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'191952' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHL' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
b44051245dd8f06d4e84b2d9b6467647
21e692104b8ed000d2dfc0f4763d29fdff63e799
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'186292' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHM' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
16d899e9c9bc37ba38080a594169fbda
60666fc9a520854f62d30fc397820269a933eecc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'187321' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHN' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
74e52604129b766ebb06611e7c602f16
5116ed2426c6676e8ceedfe032180653d2f3de5b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'195395' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHO' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
642c0e7a1f4d147281035a2dcc107457
7bdac6009bcd9abd850b48c469cbdf50fa8b28e2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'178265' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHP' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
3fe040a77954b5cb39016e6ab357c82d
ea35aeadb609df9abd2686e42acc372e9f432ec1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'134602' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHQ' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
3e738b49f7f67811f51a51d6ee56caa6
8155714bf7a41301bec3e66fe8ba440c1aed6e81
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'146114' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHR' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
7d2ad2366a8e2a39c00bdbfeb56e870e
80ef041f1721e9642efd1ef47a259b5e95373521
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'171989' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHS' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
7ffb71e81eea2bd6e5adb25f613d2467
64fb6e7c02f83dd51c920a47045b812435fd1182
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'172126' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHT' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
fe9f1c32cdaf6ea022d919c34a256919
e10e4c0ec304611ac4ecd252c087dfdb83555b63
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'183254' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHU' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
b1a8df19b7bc1752ab9fea8a6134a469
04ae8d4fd072420616943f56f82b8dfb349c213c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'166204' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHV' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
b7cb84f538ee356645f423adbbaaf887
b93d79acd49ed080948ff2a5a1f4a5f9c74a1839
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'176523' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHW' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
0ae90391121b631888b59dbbbb5b0e02
a14c06c1ed37146fe1a6768687ac613ce6c21a9b
'2011-12-16T21:32:29-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'169043' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHX' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
a0b0961374a1261123db337fa500d714
d8da358b11731096eee61cdb925e12989564a447
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'172689' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHY' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
8742d0832ebc7c3fa0cfcb542575c3f5
ea54ff5494a574dda9eafabf2ed543213a67cf96
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'172756' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJHZ' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
985b4302a98c65dd90f57befad4e06fa
d841e82406cda514d34f2ce7e84fc73856cd18ff
'2011-12-16T21:33:33-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'183023' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIA' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
dd5603c4f76bb1d40b4994209e294fdf
02c73cfa36370d3f5912e09078a28f1edc3312a6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'186840' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIB' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
dd9467cc2cbfdb165605e52c0c8cd13d
0dcb39e764843916fe9a1bffe7e6b7df20fef362
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'174802' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIC' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
9bed2714c15e40be9607f2ba70145af1
b7fac466532bbdec214b97da5b0b5c0b25c63ac3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'199404' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJID' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
8d4717b1a0e3ee0c84561a6728364329
1507ecf58755a6363bc88cb13f2f29245de281f0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'175527' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIE' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
ef4e94ef330daba1afef0eff37fa7cd6
399a7cd30de8b9fbdc9732083ae260e67adeaf9d
'2011-12-16T21:30:20-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80102' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIF' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
fcad8f794eb3f728fa91601888e9a1e1
b8e3e698d9ce9e8674b0cc6c4e364d1ba1097bc5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'169242' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIG' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
cecfd09f957f55c0e58bc2af72693a35
ca855fbf24af8f467af66052b9597e0bf5c48bac
'2011-12-16T21:30:04-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'172481' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIH' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
0ea253156f96f2fc7f3b4c72ad6dee72
09471b4286e430510973c58a48f6bf9a2abd2267
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'172996' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJII' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
1e4b7924fa0cede65321ca22c216fee5
12e3aff9507457143c35f3b14d052b4283a3d198
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'200409' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIJ' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
0d3ce14e650294e958e34436c20877c1
0c2ef4b9d705c25918e73befa7aa98700e1357f3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'188186' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIK' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
788787d0ca3a379564d646d0f34bef02
9981bb6e0e66805e93a654aa7062aaa96f0f3745
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'203157' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIL' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
6d5d1fc9e78130a30599a7255eff2f43
64370e2c0da0b95b3e41fa1d69b1a8b635c401f7
'2011-12-16T21:31:34-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'199492' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIM' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
3e12ddf818fbca13b20ee154d135cda6
802ed9a710abd7a71ec56b05b5fda3e134f97cf5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'179606' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIN' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
4e5a8cc78e5cc2e9406117d7d18dbb0a
cb19d110287c32c219beb90948f28b0f85e04d88
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'164952' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIO' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
141d5f9f8c3c3bccaf13cfbdd37923cb
2b5a5c935e78838e5f6bbbf3bdced4508849a09c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'85148' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIP' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
1e96b891a47eed51d72dfb991c72a85a
0608d3037b4956a0bf2590d9ac893798efdcae51
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'141552' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIQ' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
5194693ee224ce20c6d89bec03488678
d3916d52738c8fc47d93d07283115df46706edcd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'167995' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIR' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
5a738839daf9144a2117f9a8dcbe7abc
86493896a988a9e1378a4e91366fbd1692f567d6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74606' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIS' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
fcbbbfa4f1953230872a4b1eaf9d5f18
f7a235a6e1b16f2b45469537cfbd939e73523b00
'2011-12-16T21:34:38-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'173642' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIT' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
ebc39439b84c8d977ddb5b852263093e
c5db56508f5cb26bfe6c0f43cc3e1e5bd4b64d1b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'174963' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIU' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
ce5fba202f8beac31b8a6b243ba03e47
391c9e0036676aecbc71443c4eb6e6bf5d83e8fd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'174873' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIV' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
bc7d742fc977ee7a1e6f7f748c73f4a0
c07d577e70cc3c03e392be88889364678b96e0c5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'186442' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIW' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
d02cd42e89e326e0912aab1324cf684f
8b8ead7d2c3d1b12af31ac5d5c433007d4b3ca21
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'175804' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIX' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
6f03bf28ac217dbdcde9ec4f74e377c4
6233e1e245bc42f5ed44b45f6d601d805dff7618
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'178271' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIY' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
34b9f14eec95d97976da0eb00b76eb02
30499653c531826288e55efe9d559ae20ae03c51
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'181684' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJIZ' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
c6b46845d95143f3423eaa53c7156dcf
20c9344bd74dba5ad1e91081f728fc3672d1607d
'2011-12-16T21:34:36-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'177085' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJA' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
f14f110e3cb022625a1b10c9a8bc91be
0b20e31378b4066bba0188bbf0ca475a6edac05b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'190586' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJB' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
3129ebe5846fe97216a400acda902166
75dbb01f4ed13f7bb5e9c884e74c72eec4bd143d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'174603' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJC' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
d30c98b2feac9fde6782232afac961d5
1949a74fc064c89c6793c48dd532b63dd2bf71b3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'177750' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJD' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
cb642a7eb304a6cea66683036818021c
3beeb5042eb8e623861ce6f41c592fdcc1521689
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'192282' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJE' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
a72dfa24c5e3475b0fee607ac96d8f25
c57f77452d57e16ef114107ea5a2b1751daa609c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'187004' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJF' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
83b2ed5604f36f7ce0cd8ecb4d967a01
d47d5124d87be8d989c7fb93604913a78655b099
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'181697' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJG' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
bc8fc890df7ca03ba0dec69f07b3e37e
7de552a4314f0742bf7294cc304d61d890f2d07e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'190388' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJH' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
f3e8cdb9cd69a6e42065f79916602577
03a3a1b006a39e1ed73651a022acc5cdb5b3ab4b
'2011-12-16T21:33:52-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'192610' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJI' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
012b93f584e2bc6af7dfc0fefc622c66
9e67fe085bc541f6ab4cfae1be7e007616909ca0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'184089' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJJ' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
04a5594bf0f03d1803f0d9d47b9999e9
425143df8b3aa802309808be25c0e86b59596ee5
'2011-12-16T21:30:32-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'183670' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJK' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
98ec4cf4255e536a4ba79082cd9ec3f2
f46592577595b24edc5f2a8e14c5599189aeeb41
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'175871' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJL' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
67c0bc0d66abad1cffe058757722e536
2dc5afb87adf0f95ef548647bec16d541e5c88b4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'179247' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJM' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
7cac6d30cc1a18a51fa7c0507a11b78b
f0171e501d73551df8a5e4ffaf06858d7cae8d71
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJN' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
0dd59d24ba5f3729b0709a4731347725
c7b8f21384cdf674ef0b7bcd0973320d644acf85
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'180949' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJO' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
de6670076f9a9218a181e141846c8e27
06841034274ad461bdf055ab714a370a6e6140da
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'196971' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJP' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
3474e5026ff83981211f1b343ac159a8
cf6df99cdff9a20c039c31bb6c021760f22cd4c4
'2011-12-16T21:33:38-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'184239' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJQ' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
e27845eca1dbed31feab5b918802facf
e3930098d1293809a6add8221f2135bd3251ac1b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'180303' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJR' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
21835f7e2276f8739c5cf443bca5c3cb
a8a33beb81cb30e765921df09bdf50734a5f9f6b
'2011-12-16T21:30:25-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'183758' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJS' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
e5e777734e91a157c1932fd2538e8049
e8abd17395487cf1ba76c54d840a1683ed1ed44a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'182384' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJT' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
a11026c92b4da9465347b56f555e2946
6557993b83957ddfe791b5f42c93e4da1afa7b48
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'194138' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJU' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
8a6357f31ee73bff2b7989625f10790d
61560d28c164925559c8a9f1cc655ee48ad66f5d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'198990' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJV' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
3c4b8eef1661a9d47b5a9456a0073099
d147b96440ab6a1ec81d7ea3dd61139f366f9344
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'183773' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJW' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
452e713fbfceb5a921604dba0b49064c
4a295a5474b8bd97ada612b0368ebe607830cf61
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'183963' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJX' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
378777cc45a45983d091ab9069e53d90
c40091f23804f11acf2aaa1d63d35e63b604d786
'2011-12-16T21:29:49-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'131058' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJY' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
109a77b133cba59eb84e99bf822007b1
5e66fa36e62945052d699fc87387fef6f97a417f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'122993' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJJZ' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
7e67e0af2ac86d39139d6f61763d52a7
9caa467115230e1326683e9d19d63e7e00ef03a7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'177001' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKA' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
f95728f543a3d0790db9860dd60f505a
6d632d4cdf6bd5e4ac0d6adad15e643b7648c1aa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'177576' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKB' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
83999fd2877a956e22575f9c12dbfd5f
a0db749e9a07f6c1cd9bf7295a70baaaacc7437c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'186695' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKC' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
c58c3248a6e0d661e75cea90143deb80
f0155b3fc0a6e49229ea79fef96684baaf2d7e52
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'169417' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKD' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
5340eecac1afa758ec8f292a89764812
7f466bb5f48867ce82ec684c0307007e99d1c919
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'176697' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKE' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
a148d67a45d896f347d75d8542e63021
6c0fd317ad056c46d76492aa2624dffe6d5130a1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'180526' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKF' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
7de9f7f7097b9198bef422bf36b1185e
6ce5a7ad1b594f02d6670d2133704bad58842640
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'191180' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKG' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
febfe7ccc7fa77960ae38de3e9e76a65
1ff058d05eba98134747b9d4a30c916b3de479e2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'189494' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKH' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
8c77592e6b6fa2eb1507672d221582bf
6617dc35a23be3936ce22e3859a5c3bdcc01f590
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'187556' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKI' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
87ff190d0cd25351f4dd2d55fae6244f
87495fafc2efdb2f57f642d25e2c6e03584331a0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'170381' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKJ' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
9cbef7e54aac8cf7c0f9c2c2505e5673
5361f5d4982af8159461b4b7c0224388dd85dfdf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'180447' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKK' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
200cf51d6abdd410072349297997a88d
cdbffb13604e2b52570204125a99036cc4eab19d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'177962' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKL' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
54a8651e4de6d23abc5f4d83f355cf20
280fda9d88767b37bdfb6755c32351125374e635
'2011-12-16T21:37:03-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'183814' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKM' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
1f1d27c6f7cc1bb36876f19c05b90e49
6559ea6a5f2b275381ef3a071e53c5fe890eeb26
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'90949' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKN' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
d0f2b5012aa30e28a99d44d7e43a334e
6b6b0a85c8c0ec12f82399715f6f00489d02661d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'176408' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKO' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
376b79e93c36ec0a50cf2ff206177172
b29cb784b1fdd7717997e95d9093eaf71946d6b2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'177253' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKP' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
54910c19c572e973418b537085a8ad51
65a6db9e9a350711b7106f3b399c54d0dac723c3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'174369' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKQ' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
0947e4166698042d51e79e863e925e4a
66fd97d087c19db05992f4531e6f025b6ad3497e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'163728' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKR' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
1e0afb017e70372725577a47c119ef60
16155ba3fd23739ad6e5f94f46ee333868320a11
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'176887' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKS' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
c8a88898fa6eaa264fb8d138f8a11dd9
8876a044cfee3390add97d523c0eda2c53c589d5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'194513' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKT' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
e5aa31f7dfbc7ae40c633c5014605ca0
200483da8e541c34d7d72cfd4f1f5bb17700c429
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'188417' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKU' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
6f2eb246c78bdf5ba11b0deb7444675e
75fef0e7b0a03d8a2f3ef71e7ad7c68ef725c9da
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'171950' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKV' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
bb6a78dd9dd11bb7a0fcb419aee32d52
52c638ba01c0066f3a7305d6c1d65391ffa553e5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'172498' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKW' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
fc0cedecac37a899b5df111b8e1b0a67
5bdbf1843e9a07fc01ca6083dd4d4ae48fe996c7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'176472' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKX' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
2f223af9327941ca7bd036895583c02c
b24bdc273ca0e373812f0cae72d2deefc109820c
'2011-12-16T21:30:36-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'180644' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKY' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
a555b6a38d8c5f4dc3845cae343ae031
289a74aad0c49b04946fb34ff594c22bd146902c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'169258' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJKZ' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
7a6b739838e1959986d0fe156f361b03
42b2a61f6a357a1a3d140cfecb361adc0f3edf03
'2011-12-16T21:32:05-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'185868' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLA' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
f7c25c35e383bcfbcbe34d9e7751ae6d
5bd963ba8624e3f64f1b1f9fd36f75d8f8a5e487
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'181127' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLB' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
7fc7fc8e80138880c88b73befd704ba2
99bc3d1debc86f530bb61effa3d075efc80d5760
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'125487' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLC' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
b30333d12af7c9673ed3f4270706ae19
e910c798e633f32b70f513b27bdac69d8f510152
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'176489' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLD' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
2949b8597e5b5da4b5e14fc4e64005bb
9185b2155018f4ce475e149767fbece2f3be6f7d
'2011-12-16T21:34:08-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'184442' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLE' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
fb81e71d233f6141c79ab9ee2a629c1f
4f28ec276054978644dad86140c25746a08a1bce
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'156751' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLF' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
d8efb87db793cdfee4ac71b9b0fe7684
05da544c804e56c7abb8b8fe746081da9b0ea66f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'165460' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLG' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
21f4eee7141296689a97315f4dfb1f4b
2add5473f6631657340fcb7d650648a0f7966f5c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'173254' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLH' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
3e5b4853ff3e31bb445a53cd071dce06
49c33c0c330aea264b5017e8e7ad394235b87c02
'2011-12-16T21:36:35-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'177525' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLI' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
764947aa4b1c0fc5787c78a32cba0c0b
184680faaaf92b3d9bb8e0dac35e79bf143405a3
'2011-12-16T21:34:51-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'180452' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLJ' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
ddeaa048f6dd660895b5cfd82261e6a3
f2fce3c4513cacf88297cbf5f87063135537eaa3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'172065' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLK' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
be260895e4201e64a5d80f8e4963dcdb
9869e2d346d006af8772233c3708e8691fe8d0bc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'155273' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLL' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
d23f805a8fe716f3933409f78bb36cf3
4f2a748e50ada2deb808b1192ec2914ea07a3def
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'182330' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLM' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
d9c2365261b0047e61249222fdeda092
7f5c0c11251c912827265e10cf4f316cf3b57e3a
'2011-12-16T21:30:02-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'169077' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLN' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
2344a71af3010addc10fd01a2ca84fa4
b0b534113f46c05dadc4e38ebed1b6086f76a89d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'94072' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLO' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
97e113fd8a886a7c234ec04605beefa1
ca9aacd2e6c692cdf1583ecfa4a6274ef2d65de0
'2011-12-16T21:31:39-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'164252' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLP' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
464d220438960e88085c3d11e2afdf33
ea19407857f42aac8d3e7979ad694f602232ebb4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'176497' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLQ' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
d62aaca4f296f758a0233e8e60218bf1
3711fece427382d9b2d03df236d0dc6a902ca18a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'176048' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLR' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
4aed6fd7a9e905aee548cf4d2642e5a9
9854630480c8e9adf225eaf08d9ea989702bd6b1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'180097' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLS' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
4af7a23a6337f78091247c7da3a45390
83e184670fb2bcb1ecba324ac20fd1152c2e5be3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'174498' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLT' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
98d8474bee3e58793012385002259062
73eefd874607d5e1c8374d2477bec6495275644e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'177192' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLU' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
a4f310f9fdcadb0db61ba346ff51ace7
4a4d491c638421901502144a44dc8501229dcac4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'172392' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLV' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
603df1bb3a95adea5be247671759819b
7dd968705bd3a4c61488b3eba6bd228a4510da89
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'126913' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLW' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
57c3c8a78c76fef3b679774ff318d27c
807e5de39a5a90dd3c86523053476223a71cdd42
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'168857' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLX' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
70f6560a59b286210d92a0a081a4720c
1427a425d7ba0acff864814247f96b567e54aa22
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'173897' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLY' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
c1fbfcf6d1f15f47d91607459dfbb2dd
3b08c6aa08b87b9050e347bb68ae83e744e8221c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'169969' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJLZ' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
79ee58a9be747ecd0b11c6171c0bf966
d9e3b98a2ab4ebf323340baa7af326d0bcff755b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'173986' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMA' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
fed2d060d998c2eb3e41e6c70ae68e0d
09d7cd8a5ee74a67b35ce82d24f216f6b3ca5e71
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'185575' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMB' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
da09e2891b713ebef6252dc5a23d63ca
5527b283f3c54fd945d4107824fb7c13e9ecb64a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'175140' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMC' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
07033ada3f98ea2454c92b9d07fcab40
8ca6e57006a79627fc503a50e38777adf71d9e10
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'164949' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMD' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
483a4086ec415f95ab3346217a814b4b
aa6747794683a58f1bc36ae450f6660c679daf8e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'201505' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJME' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
337bc4cf729a69717a3a0fd129c10291
71284fc90c886792d38997c3a35ab35a9b6b2055
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'120877' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMF' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
e28a094a4c3186b880a3ed950f2fee5c
ced9cb01791034172e19b76499730a65904362d3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'310167' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMG' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
a0bda9ddc004d13bfaad8a61e4bb1d50
c31b0c60306f59c25468158dc40f143d843fcfd3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'109228' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMH' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
dab1aed085b9aeef3ce800ea36f2f16b
d5589d63404b29f9b7c70faa462c9121b6d73840
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'344031' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMI' 'sip-files00022a.QC2.jpg'
f544fc918d10c58e557bbaab1fb2c1a6
a5bf263b0ffd69bd33c210cd9603c398cc636d14
describe
'103186' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMJ' 'sip-files00022b.QC.jpg'
0e1efcd152822aba66ba0fe2ca01e220
3e501b2ffd0051ec3c98cb4371f09a7c0b78255b
describe
'368210' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMK' 'sip-files00022b.QC2.jpg'
a6d2cbae5e5bdcb8527f9f80be49cc2b
7aadee55d61f897d428bec02b52a55eac7d5793f
describe
'88861' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJML' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
d8e11786d0b337281a98f8129f083fec
5c806d5f7acb27cfc3c8648781a66cf263302762
describe
'305763' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMM' 'sip-files00023.QC2.jpg'
700121d9cf2f4c9d37f886392ddeb4ee
f41e8ee560ccfa9485816bc6451ba4454b7f656d
describe
'89821' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMN' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
63db7459d4ba451b456ba3cad426c904
7a7a9568a205be7aaa8404f99e6294bb974677ae
describe
'301096' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMO' 'sip-files00024.QC2.jpg'
f4581631216addc84111fde2b076cd37
f77f46bcb20d6c7b0c08451b820b6d4024885ec7
describe
'92704' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMP' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
a18697345b35212a02ef95ec2282eda9
326f930497a9118bc7fc52973006e43d417dad8c
describe
'318100' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMQ' 'sip-files00025.QC2.jpg'
f35a7d69864fd850e55e633000da3a27
f741caabc98f3418ca25c1e2d0a0646e032248a8
describe
'88986' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMR' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
935e490624532e32919ec50bd970de4f
364a22a4044b3927cd2d959a69cef0d9cb24b235
describe
'303843' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMS' 'sip-files00026.QC2.jpg'
64739f230ee1fd3f94f19ce9af37dac0
b30cdfdd89f69a3fdddc5c863543d171e798f3d4
describe
'52970' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMT' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
30d3b019d10289292b0ef21a49abc890
eee77da314bb64441d58a14f6f0c0c85a586afd0
describe
'202932' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMU' 'sip-files00027.QC2.jpg'
2422b11627d2f77d6e700f7da4e73027
1182bd34b32a5caef1bb23ff49c5fc2401b649e7
'2011-12-16T21:36:33-05:00'
describe
'76471' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMV' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
538275b013971a200025d6a46f1bd335
8f7b8e737868e84c7f5bf1621289745ef6d84876
describe
'270111' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMW' 'sip-files00028.QC2.jpg'
34fa7ce99702aa6230ef9ff13f03291a
dbf5d60fb436c3a406082a9ff40206cff264b367
describe
'88476' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMX' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
5e75a7c625e4b0ffb7a13d2812b8ac6f
3560cfc1d7963171845fe04c024efecffdb6f6dd
describe
'307535' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMY' 'sip-files00029.QC2.jpg'
a3efa79809045af0dc535f1e9fbaafe0
27cb158ce77edd860c5299c74257227d77857106
describe
'93096' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJMZ' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
3d9d089900ad37c3972354a9661c2224
b789a62a1492e390f30b188d7874d28f93dd718b
describe
'318690' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNA' 'sip-files00030.QC2.jpg'
fffff78b6b6dea337bdf9c750d3c7df6
f304df322ed38cfe6599f5a1efda22d35644eb83
describe
'86243' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNB' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
5b4d9459b7e847537d3c28a27e951817
2eae764a58cba3e5d6598f761c5c83d282b01401
'2011-12-16T21:29:28-05:00'
describe
'295035' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNC' 'sip-files00031.QC2.jpg'
cb95986c7eb8d062a89edde2c7487b2a
45bf9699cf797f5ded8466f6041d2c4ff7fbacde
describe
'86210' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJND' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
41081271503e9fe3a025158c306bbbd1
326659789c51e9e63ef9dd662b2ebf941b032a30
describe
'292265' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNE' 'sip-files00032.QC2.jpg'
2e9aa5c84795dabd782daedde5b1a69b
7d61fca5dae93ae1e9f071581526a1ba562e1bf7
describe
'95428' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNF' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
0b83863a7ec295075f2a2313249c8285
3ec089d18b544b6e8206990b613799769f6dd34a
describe
'318774' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNG' 'sip-files00033.QC2.jpg'
c22239c90e61f8d448af5030159b8bf8
f1da1c444a1e0041b290cd136d874c1b73737724
describe
'50633' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNH' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
0899f0e95c34b8627fb19506e4d233cb
24c9fa27cf2e263627518cbd8626723b8bfda609
describe
'197722' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNI' 'sip-files00034.QC2.jpg'
d34505af0a416027d380e412a11fe673
0e2deb6aa0354c3acdf98fb9f949177b0de4644b
describe
'91189' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNJ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
30388376e8b35616465678a2aa8ea2d2
fe5eb68329304ee0e6e1a1200be48d71304723de
describe
'311140' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNK' 'sip-files00035.QC2.jpg'
57b0bc202ebc5f35f485d4d7a82c0dd5
b2af6c6553d373f0d3308e35bd04bf859ccd7c9d
describe
'90222' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNL' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
8543b5ab8cfdc3fb4e4965bb5a987fc0
d3761e1ed22f48e9ffb4a96ca60622a69e499c5e
describe
'308150' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNM' 'sip-files00036.QC2.jpg'
e8d9e4f8786f7c2a7ad6bae50557e7a7
88f0a5a6600a0c5f1226f886e58bf23dfa6c1354
describe
'88866' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNN' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
de11daf3d8c07aebac6d200e6d3888de
96c0ea5b31be6a78998989de267c1a028f433860
describe
'307124' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNO' 'sip-files00037.QC2.jpg'
584833b8ce07b45b2c91e4ec94cfc99b
a6ac02530ec0892646450375c22a8b7b33ecf77c
'2011-12-16T21:35:03-05:00'
describe
'90934' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNP' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
6282a12c7941a197cf3a23483fdb1f35
7f7879db7c6f2a814ee5ed976dc57a6bb61289f9
'2011-12-16T21:30:28-05:00'
describe
'312092' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNQ' 'sip-files00038.QC2.jpg'
d31388fa45534197c364b8894a13a83d
115197488aecaad0951b77c415dcfe94b5dc2cdc
describe
'84705' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNR' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
f5e47fa52feb480837f89d58cd399fcf
01c1b8b6de0e20c2b14e57f9e1c0ec5dc1c7f863
describe
'292862' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNS' 'sip-files00039.QC2.jpg'
eefd1a934c4b8405cd6ba9b675d6dfa0
0da8713257686c8b0fd2d31483f0a855fe0cebae
'2011-12-16T21:30:10-05:00'
describe
'91202' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNT' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
5246e57ad9cf5e3788703d9fb46e4522
01fd57b907c0e355aeb8145e6fbe2ca1578fb66d
describe
'309925' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNU' 'sip-files00040.QC2.jpg'
aedc336913642db1ce2cea418d9c9fbb
3adfd0183eb1e18fc72deb349ed14b04f869e633
describe
'85487' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNV' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
65df015b4ab3381b7ddeca2baa02e846
506ea29b2a4487d6d5e8c59f6f2dfae82d1b90df
describe
'292669' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNW' 'sip-files00041.QC2.jpg'
3590dabce89151a802e50cdb647e40fc
72a4f902165c9f6f5c7a61dc8c5bd02362872067
describe
'71586' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNX' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
b667a8ad23f502dcca92a271e269fc83
c44eeb4c6071446aa8fa6fe619b78cdbc00facda
describe
'224892' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNY' 'sip-files00042.QC2.jpg'
fa308ab927ca0c29d2f1579374f710d5
e8f9b6923105ea0a89d5ac2a72a3fb19cac6ed9b
describe
'87075' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJNZ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
fb52e7c2efb2d5647322145e7772abf0
1f35aeab5e43ff035ce01f5e4a70adc59ddd04c6
describe
'293620' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOA' 'sip-files00043.QC2.jpg'
1da65dc52785ab6f1a05a1b1beaa0773
9cb33d077783bc4295967e5d032e152c44b29728
describe
'85376' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOB' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
1a7081d2876e54dbdf639f599bcd3841
d5e9dd5006ec10937a0cc8a6d0d964169d4beb65
describe
'293143' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOC' 'sip-files00044.QC2.jpg'
0f211c133853b51ca3426baa17327376
d22f9c6e25092d272495899eea3a9770a07232b3
describe
'86189' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOD' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
4fd7fcf4eface0ecf8571468ef5e432c
fe607fa4b09af9d873ae47444dd621529c241f43
'2011-12-16T21:34:06-05:00'
describe
'295914' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOE' 'sip-files00045.QC2.jpg'
5d6b12a742d16e18138a8dbc9b5c572c
c1ac4a0fcfe68d39899cab3e802dae689195ca65
describe
'90212' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOF' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
2c85d908a060cc77f1926b33a857d1ee
fb2f2a40b408a3b48b7b2a9cafacc4e4f316bbe9
describe
'307998' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOG' 'sip-files00046.QC2.jpg'
8fadf70aba1e6b3660df6b900b95495f
92094716f3414042964930de58d94a99de522534
describe
'85937' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOH' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
f7a690c79632799e26aad6195f256128
01c479c9ffe4f300a6880b2a8447ae520b81e7e3
describe
'295484' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOI' 'sip-files00047.QC2.jpg'
83188ca809a9558ffae4d1f89ed549d5
d455423db62f49145d34fbefdd0569b9fbc98bf7
describe
'70164' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOJ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
633a4a1c322b8e29cc7f86f550f83421
d56fa3726a6cdf5fb93c6f4f1535699c97b0f12d
describe
'250751' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOK' 'sip-files00048.QC2.jpg'
70c49c5fdd26c0749372b1c487ab1db2
89510fb0b2174b514c9fbbf18758f60138226e00
describe
'73328' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOL' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
c08c7b39f8b035e0c529ba71e14a60fd
99a50f1a5d482543a4ffdd1e8a302ba0485d99ad
describe
'258362' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOM' 'sip-files00049.QC2.jpg'
d44f849152f16b2e313668fe47829f95
c0f1170b7628ab1424d393405764f0a6cfac507e
describe
'91460' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJON' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
b38b9f2aa1ac903c291ae8d4c85d0a4e
7716434350fc94156b0113c6f4f77c46dbb7cd97
describe
'315067' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOO' 'sip-files00050.QC2.jpg'
d8d8d8ec01917ac803cd177f4ca54864
09fb10afa4dac882a8fe5c256a8406d89f9f1353
describe
'92453' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOP' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
9a7d30e11ae8c61a62de87bf3a5910e6
d08790246f6fbd03212ed3647b2fa3c7b71a6e33
describe
'313690' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOQ' 'sip-files00051.QC2.jpg'
838cf18ae3382c761a34c28449574d9f
7ba2defdc044cfd7b59cabf8d611f882729c545c
describe
'89002' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOR' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
3fa845f1131cb97fea18028a3b699279
615582ab211c4f63300a7d9000e63646830629f7
describe
'305314' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOS' 'sip-files00052.QC2.jpg'
ede8c09a8ab46993e9d2c719e7a4e963
db2191d2d603a3660ac1dff4601b12ba69aff114
describe
'55061' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOT' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
9991a75746dc89e26af68a9952a92785
bfe4bbade5290b4c7311314f229171d8a1e7020f
describe
'217400' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOU' 'sip-files00053.QC2.jpg'
ff41cbd1df2a6134c9adfa7ad561510a
44a92a8dee5df91b3c273bdd5de15a19b8a0eeb7
describe
'88585' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOV' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
83cd9d7585f7067d09b203cb64563117
185a0405a5eac2cfa56d7e21646803c009b40a99
describe
'297147' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOW' 'sip-files00054.QC2.jpg'
7fbdd1351359f3854bbc6306b3af5bf5
69f6ec21903f9fa9f6099d5e242469cccb77f6f2
describe
'88264' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOX' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
38e29125b8362d5cfb64fd4183d957f0
89399b6c5141c42015e85d9c80436a15f88feceb
describe
'305293' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOY' 'sip-files00055.QC2.jpg'
d6d5192e3d2340e0cb7a690fafe7d5f2
98b970daf9b22d39d4b59e2ad1d3b24e608cfce6
describe
'87215' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJOZ' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
89c7d581ba5f71d3d0f00469ac9cf67d
613ce669ebe03a11aaef8febd41b25d4ca22d88f
describe
'293731' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPA' 'sip-files00056.QC2.jpg'
1a5a1ffaf63a23a12aadc4f5f782fec4
53dff07ca1364b980ec08c004a596c8c020eeeff
describe
'92751' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPB' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
7254f164be97e2ffeb0068ef17b3ab35
4f78c67df568f5a19e294a33362e983143c146ed
describe
'318719' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPC' 'sip-files00057.QC2.jpg'
9ca5e1c8c293ca527077a4eb40526072
2cc723e5f6065a8d2b4386f94bf849f75ca46b60
describe
'90008' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPD' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
cbb4cc83768106756badbd60c33702c4
87a34eec17566dd1546aab2814039cea126e3f70
'2011-12-16T21:33:39-05:00'
describe
'310899' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPE' 'sip-files00058.QC2.jpg'
f5aa309a33f7d172b987baa2cabf2cda
4a1f9c0345d3d37481795dd1f1e06f20060bc50d
describe
'91520' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPF' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
966b1a7a7d9bd623c62301307ea1954e
9838338c15c1a336a3d1bb70142c1c4d5f77d489
describe
'314209' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPG' 'sip-files00059.QC2.jpg'
1c2e84eb8f72055b5023c31858a124a0
9c7c90e16fe873fbae95ab27aaaa499a7351b7b9
describe
'90228' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPH' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
0c23aa33bfea245a347f304d99bf2a9a
0c0344823cfd29306864d3d31bd9235e363d49f0
describe
'306671' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPI' 'sip-files00060.QC2.jpg'
d44e885ef44c20df691114b6bd39007c
f7187eea3cb007dc7f707efdb39a4088be6d61b8
describe
'95707' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPJ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
110b9f4e6362450969fed1365e49b95f
af2ca4e095f7efd338b4c78859498f9cfd6a37d4
describe
'332173' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPK' 'sip-files00061.QC2.jpg'
13cb98a167ed0fd9f1dec48e5d746961
e7f1fa6b80ba5f6fc3f315d60e73fcf2fa055c3c
describe
'92429' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPL' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
50947a06e1ec2ca0d847f869bf14867c
abf2c5aac2027e07d80058b313df16382a0a497b
describe
'314975' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPM' 'sip-files00062.QC2.jpg'
7a93ec76689234cb1f8426474d176779
12704a22153fe9496deba8c023e4ad3da7c0c394
describe
'92809' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPN' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
561cf1ea5921d204cb312f1c75daf3b5
7474642924b7a49bd677e4b7e5f94c91032dce3c
describe
'314535' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPO' 'sip-files00063.QC2.jpg'
196e364f87e353e093aac03ae563cedb
a5ba1f40176c817f15f3ff538b4b90f07e173c6f
describe
'91266' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPP' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
7f06197378754bec69b9743800251a26
cd0c57e1da5d91561af7ffc338a2b0601c6cfe14
describe
'313773' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPQ' 'sip-files00064.QC2.jpg'
df7a4b620951a0c4e297ada652f221fb
8c6d8cb8d56261d03d8241598a04a44db3f7c209
describe
'92063' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPR' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
512a2af8bd81266c2b52498bb424d362
2f25262f1acd4230eca7d2e5c7ad3b7e34a954b1
describe
'314144' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPS' 'sip-files00065.QC2.jpg'
e86a57ca8d715a35ff55c4668301374a
43dc3445c649a58c3a6db5e2c560686eb6f5a128
describe
'70502' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPT' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
acc5674049c3baef4f5fc622e0ecd934
a836f3fead2edf2e261392102eee12eabae99d30
describe
'249797' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPU' 'sip-files00066.QC2.jpg'
b875f9f229cd6731a699b71a880738a7
624af879c9b5ff3e6c43f5c759362c661fb43457
describe
'88757' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPV' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
52d8bf1e79aa6d3d1f949c2ad1023ba3
347c5b821b8b8fd9081d812308a5209ab581a9cb
'2011-12-16T21:35:23-05:00'
describe
'304535' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPW' 'sip-files00067.QC2.jpg'
873ab37112e6f300354f460657a5d9c9
03279d489af9a3ca9603f9aa2228c007c707bf35
describe
'89827' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPX' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
1476d54624874772591f74390e56a733
e3c769386b6c813da1b757d04313213fbc4ea683
describe
'305363' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPY' 'sip-files00068.QC2.jpg'
097729858c8f3a832a7c6260067c2c51
96d5f160ac314fcba08e80f3da0ece95a066e921
describe
'90437' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJPZ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
4c685021a884f53f1f5d378475580b01
086b0e083377219ba0d2a463947f7784f0df9768
describe
'308222' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQA' 'sip-files00069.QC2.jpg'
a6b7c67f7b51c89dc52d91af5e87c019
a4fc89fa66bbcab8582462560ab54960d3a60945
describe
'88249' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQB' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
ab46f7c7f0b939aaaae2d46e8a7d3982
89d8ab7b777b6f8c274eca4e7b26779e6a3572fb
describe
'304603' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQC' 'sip-files00070.QC2.jpg'
0f2c58bf48ae50e06ae27cf073134449
14fbbf6a9b160d3601b1d4c6692ccf3a9631ebff
describe
'91666' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQD' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
d6076fa662c56b98794fb04073173f16
314ed0cc5cc60b9fa4f8a8f691a9ce3ed4002259
describe
'306490' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQE' 'sip-files00071.QC2.jpg'
d0680f56c9992b0c5f0d64e26e9d5827
2abf52569d96fc314d348f1c44e2b40d00a73ffa
describe
'94946' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQF' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
d0ade0c468ad1d7ce1967ff7f3de8955
56abbfc163dc360268edd4048cd3615fb2a8dbe7
describe
'322769' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQG' 'sip-files00072.QC2.jpg'
10e36dc42523069033f0256beafd1dd8
f03009140bacdb402236ac0e5a0127184a5960d5
describe
'97623' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQH' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
31944d8a57e0e42b356dfec2573bc3f9
c27ca4f96b8f8f5df96c4f6f27d197e0ee76082a
describe
'328980' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQI' 'sip-files00073.QC2.jpg'
c8132498ebb28352401fa4f302037c2d
854deae66573ded0d8588431fdb406aa6a98eb06
describe
'93992' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQJ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
a13b2daa23967004d73846dbe9812668
49536adf6454627bc329bc740a9294f59b2cefaa
describe
'313760' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQK' 'sip-files00074.QC2.jpg'
5a110b52ad8c450ce5d5ebe39142103a
314b22a7a126264104e8a9b1ca42d943eed4388c
describe
'98753' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQL' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
8539129e5445440cdf24fc9e5df36faa
c7bca08b7ebcb1963ae1d12cac8f5e7555223f5d
describe
'329046' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQM' 'sip-files00075.QC2.jpg'
b516f3129e8afb3d59dc3d17971e09a9
65742c736073161b3b72762d1b74ab75f0586d20
describe
'94644' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQN' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
24ebd7c2fe2a326303846b36fb0468bb
7fb68bba5c42dff5581d2af61942accc627f7657
describe
'318837' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQO' 'sip-files00076.QC2.jpg'
901f52be2db28795d90973e79f6f0545
f39521311a9e8da624bfd04d18d0e67a8ad41c76
describe
'97585' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQP' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
f2d81799f5fd19f8d09fb0e26ae3712c
9837394d9ca54fa197ce6f90e5c4c3c0a461032d
describe
'327191' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQQ' 'sip-files00077.QC2.jpg'
6c5b6dae1ed8ee43e20b1d5921b8b01b
ad4e58f2495f4c9d400a8259ff66e2891eb12afa
describe
'94289' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQR' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
4a9e09de61006619a22006d1f59a9761
2667e7150a265d7a077575f71356f3c4330b133b
describe
'320462' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQS' 'sip-files00078.QC2.jpg'
4cd0067b920a955052008f0fd4eb80dc
3f7dc482ada33002f5a908f215189b9d25705110
describe
'95965' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQT' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
3190e9d1a52a66c4266c588b98b7f2f9
77483ed78039dfed394e65d49bbad5ed7df9a292
'2011-12-16T21:37:08-05:00'
describe
'325678' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQU' 'sip-files00079.QC2.jpg'
c5e0fdef1cb32e2a84b632b582837707
3846f51ee0866dad99e6465256a0fb67c4359393
describe
'92465' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQV' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
d916db13292128e86529561131e41309
683b645424295d86894067bc33d62a728f71f3af
describe
'317042' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQW' 'sip-files00080.QC2.jpg'
7ec0b0d7108077c140580ef171fb8b8e
a76b0f3c178f6edd5b25e7b582236c3d4ca4f6c0
describe
'95257' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQX' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
d9871d1a4356ab8406c78fbfc7376865
338157d14dc06b82d84c671cf1062c894e556b16
describe
'322486' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQY' 'sip-files00081.QC2.jpg'
4532d5e173a52f240af1b47541290bc3
f53329c8ac442b8424232cc93cd7e5f47ce9f075
'2011-12-16T21:31:26-05:00'
describe
'91499' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJQZ' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
2f96c67b1ef09596d98974f2ca0d6e93
f635284efe4a371d10cb2aefa5d9cb4df668326f
describe
'311039' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRA' 'sip-files00082.QC2.jpg'
f5679d7102009d3943b6bf4af9441e1e
4d5abba2aee45600e9104b2fde6827138e2a4001
describe
'93721' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRB' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
e41b065d6843b7ccb307e33d5ed47c5c
258a4cf8b9a08617afaffcbf6f5b394889270849
describe
'313655' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRC' 'sip-files00083.QC2.jpg'
d49cd0aa0640f1d15b75875096a640d7
13912028e7ef14e9a220a3d8dca0c5a81bef7b6b
describe
'93733' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRD' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
27bc7b1c529419056d6c2b75208b7355
fe8281ccd9acf599525facc5bbb03a2da03c3e1f
describe
'322088' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRE' 'sip-files00084.QC2.jpg'
8ee2f0a10b23686ac3220d4d9d9e8488
fb039ec713f39beff913b00d475705cbd111608b
'2011-12-16T21:36:24-05:00'
describe
'92742' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRF' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
bb88f7391a59173332141b4ff2d49cd5
b3fcf8d398478b0ae833a41e497d2c895a0ff41f
'2011-12-16T21:32:28-05:00'
describe
'313270' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRG' 'sip-files00085.QC2.jpg'
19ed1df6fea24abae93fa9e07ee6010f
dbba60683a6bc589c01f7cfcd4d2e2dbe9f7785b
describe
'91545' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRH' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
6715c6bcb084b713fb360b65fa97365c
92fd3dc024621ca495bc0495277097f31733d505
describe
'314478' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRI' 'sip-files00086.QC2.jpg'
c03a3cc7366c437961a1796e8882498c
b2641f11b8b76426b6a00afd6659a39ca6bb76cb
describe
'96153' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRJ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
53a424eb55ee4cc3cafa7927873ca958
b82682c411e16d7a1138dc35b81f58a971682c4a
describe
'322434' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRK' 'sip-files00087.QC2.jpg'
33a24113e82d8bd5fcc07d271557fa6a
264a8e411181a6f1ed2d011d14d1029896393af6
describe
'90916' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRL' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
d76ee4d0ab1867115d3197dc81f9815d
a98dc2cc5776ef2363f3b6d6b9afbdaa3f068704
describe
'304834' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRM' 'sip-files00088.QC2.jpg'
58af6676b0fdc5593c38f4136f89afde
a659b41fe6fee1bd895e1674f0844c18c1af05e0
describe
'73462' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRN' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
183d917995cfa17cd36a919970942f4b
d8679b9002360169ef3e29795a9d81634587e8df
'2011-12-16T21:33:45-05:00'
describe
'258261' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRO' 'sip-files00089.QC2.jpg'
a22736dc79c685f5345a9707be95d52b
67e4444ee47271f4d5c900a574054a7f6c27b52e
describe
'76402' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRP' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
01dd53710ff212f332c1b9a3474444fb
1d44340e7af39e119898d8036f17dae3a1f45a09
describe
'268080' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRQ' 'sip-files00090.QC2.jpg'
eb6c431ab9147c730542fbd98ec6f047
b2aa664e86fa77023472e4515e138e207ebcb566
describe
'85987' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRR' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
b30bb33b88a845294cb40726d1d0fbe4
3b4d6d7ee201cee188aeb539bb5128d5c14e1ff8
describe
'296804' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRS' 'sip-files00091.QC2.jpg'
92bff24f1dfc1deaf2fa32a09491ed59
62288b4309fc5c04a94a2c92b3398914fd2b5a2e
describe
'86771' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRT' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
a68a02d12eb14a3a07f4269308475b64
af63f94f77522b035852754c859a8d1bce4d15ee
describe
'297367' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRU' 'sip-files00092.QC2.jpg'
bdb7852a450bd9403ea8e8d519bdf24d
da56725b37c7ab5be4692783b2745f43a24fb841
describe
'90734' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRV' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
afd30cc3a10888bb12cf03e77d37888d
84acb2b79e7a153cc5bb5ec4d1880bd775df219c
describe
'312139' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRW' 'sip-files00093.QC2.jpg'
846f4aca994086bbee23a5e103d58f57
b754148ab30bb466b1bd35d51950554ed0a36e5e
describe
'84622' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRX' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
2552e212a60d2b61a4064aa630ff38fb
d977018054cfe895a4cf694aea9fbab2420fda38
describe
'291567' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRY' 'sip-files00094.QC2.jpg'
ca20b4ad74dffc66d012be8197c3384e
fec479f22b8801eeb1c9acafee4bb44fd3c04903
describe
'88104' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJRZ' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
825e9056208298046747ba3f7fc30f6a
942fe5ee191158751a5f3fd7249d28a5cca2cbc1
describe
'302259' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSA' 'sip-files00095.QC2.jpg'
8ea16de2d3143ee54a2d41b09a17e018
8a0b6ce7ae766a5ede25fc4f65f0abeba2a03623
describe
'85595' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSB' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
905bd89b183d3c9c61aacac01d932ade
6810a4daaba88841d68a1327f7fb8fdab135371e
describe
'293385' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSC' 'sip-files00096.QC2.jpg'
cf1c172e1b697d5a5e8d2ee15880039e
af7615f7948da6160426fe5f8fa0a4d633ec48df
describe
'89408' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSD' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
d99fdb055afb92d1cbf83dde62190af1
7a1bf01c2c63a3eb9268a1d57b2019364dd15809
describe
'297932' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSE' 'sip-files00097.QC2.jpg'
9b20a64095b1374643ec8167a1dc5db9
8057e2e017968738163e999936d9ee6053f9c406
describe
'87218' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSF' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
3f51e797ffa0b44c3fa1a4a797e17a03
14c243ad553c8c5bfefeaa0b93e5f21dd79d69e4
describe
'298206' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSG' 'sip-files00098.QC2.jpg'
96267d242555610f8e033544e1bc2d0a
de35d277b62a55522c86b62bc85e3d56e7cfa4e8
describe
'91984' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSH' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
80f10e88792086985c72acdfb0089573
5e5e0f1f0b9cb88462361aef4f2954434f84ed2e
describe
'310426' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSI' 'sip-files00099.QC2.jpg'
cb635d739653beee3a167f6ab83d1d2a
2f4f06e0263d35b6c46dd0df4c22d80138f01bf3
describe
'92045' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSJ' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
c4dda95ac4c6a4329b878f128bf9801d
9eaca6569856ddc82b70603b53f9affd493256d3
describe
'313782' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSK' 'sip-files00100.QC2.jpg'
be1bb060117a90506778de323631ddf2
682d9ee057934c51decebda15f860eb67ddeefba
describe
'88518' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSL' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
a792ae72d1296c4a04a78a36b31083e4
3dc9498c523d12b8cc6ef555005c22de941506b4
describe
'302309' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSM' 'sip-files00101.QC2.jpg'
b3aa621ffc3d403624424117fbbbfcdf
b9696bd3532a9baf4d3021b272038001c4560aae
describe
'95425' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSN' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
dbb2c6203e61f1fc533d67a8330868e4
a91ffa784328ba21526ecdcea77d8cb4cc049b27
describe
'327506' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSO' 'sip-files00102.QC2.jpg'
a42d02778c5945fcfbbfca6967da666b
cd6d63d5890b893a2a3c3e51b9ca0b9706df1719
describe
'87770' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSP' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
5421ff568b23a65096a2ce0fed706586
1073980e0087c6268521796a0b6f4d29be7a13c9
describe
'300747' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSQ' 'sip-files00103.QC2.jpg'
484ea0ec5d6206df3e69b40e715e57ff
f0dfafe44ac7ddcb0f525b5f8e311ca1e4ec8d7e
describe
'51653' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSR' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
2184697a201069a7b6d34ed9f9ed4e2c
f97bff78c2ceb78c73f3a0ef9823f4ac9fd972d8
describe
'204857' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSS' 'sip-files00104.QC2.jpg'
9761931cc63245610395b293bf8e9ae9
0fdce6b36bc2e166c9f724e2cb69f73f74e8bc3f
describe
'85760' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJST' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
9e52295c3d8c925717dc7e07ece3460d
d86682810f96ac2cc1e10cb8f500002e5377e91e
describe
'290057' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSU' 'sip-files00105.QC2.jpg'
a430a098e02d93a1efdb0f5e5350d6aa
9a2298dd0564efa412547b762c4304134c7d37ef
describe
'90098' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSV' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
9b656b8ad8271a53b41ab17b2fa80f27
d36da9d0c33d1150aee96e90f51f13efea77b8d0
describe
'300669' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSW' 'sip-files00106.QC2.jpg'
be9133f9fb2f9df46a7226f6d849d180
1ec2c44ba83cbce5dce5ee3e758c0206b1d040d5
describe
'86719' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSX' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
fbeba38a0bc74a90851c1eed24479e25
4f5f84b912b306c4bd65b9cc039b157f43bb57f2
describe
'298362' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSY' 'sip-files00107.QC2.jpg'
28440d11f65bca4ffaead2bf1166c458
0c6cdc13b9cf9536cd7c7d175177dd8c4bc5fea1
describe
'97513' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJSZ' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
3d5d32a5c9996ab89ada08a27f5ffb4f
86920b548f5c0f0cf70d980b5919c4a993631e04
describe
'333510' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTA' 'sip-files00108.QC2.jpg'
ec683166b9bffbda4b44be6f52b38f30
172466f183e018cd46625f36fbeb8c5687d17b89
describe
'91896' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTB' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
62d9eeacea4827fb2d3a8e9d26efaacd
449674494db4abce0aaba5d2511701834ba96dcd
describe
'311937' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTC' 'sip-files00109.QC2.jpg'
0f1840ae964079b55da7ebeb4b4548f2
2d0070ccb1247d914fc77110f7efdaf869241bde
describe
'97873' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTD' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
6d995a79443b8002f5453fb6d3562fa5
efc4165d1e436b5c1653a7ab507b3bcb7aca81ff
describe
'333856' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTE' 'sip-files00110.QC2.jpg'
af54c4dcb2bf521e2767ebee93948ad7
7a4152983f00a6f29b3fbaed692840aff77691dd
describe
'97606' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTF' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
1a76fcfdb8f2df88f8aad68a57297b62
91c2c24e92a90c64d48c16bae533a806bcd3be17
describe
'330237' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTG' 'sip-files00111.QC2.jpg'
2be26d99bf08318575adb65fef52fc1d
dd008c68ffa7c24a759c2641431d46a46bcd0ea9
describe
'90353' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTH' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
3cc5925a37f72faeab880217fbcdc8c4
965a95cf4a9e2721c682e8c8d40af188a5bd5a48
describe
'308074' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTI' 'sip-files00112.QC2.jpg'
aba30a9592393bda4de0ad9fbb919c4a
9f9bc93fa49420e5cc3d1902d561b118e68035b9
describe
'85432' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTJ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
6f0ea71b24c6fc9d8898eda3b49a872c
4e28983a1a952331ea079ae9f7353b18ce073911
'2011-12-16T21:34:18-05:00'
describe
'288137' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTK' 'sip-files00113.QC2.jpg'
e31337664182b3783f6f34f36730ae19
25920d4dc3f37d7a898ed17b92b9d138ce2f3467
describe
'51554' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTL' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
d3ec1032f97cfa3e1d173b78726f1065
7429cdee6919d77070cb1ef331c11f16619673fc
describe
'197841' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTM' 'sip-files00114.QC2.jpg'
8e265a4c3af141e282201c3eefab960f
9c75c75c8092efcb8601cf6c02c4f90566f82027
describe
'75002' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTN' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
71252bef8e992da8e09050a4b8f6dd4d
24d09fbc739493ae3502a276c068b13551704074
describe
'265195' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTO' 'sip-files00115.QC2.jpg'
0f3774ee1c3a7c6edf9af78775fcfd42
0278ddad04676cab139c58510aa3d98681631b33
describe
'87330' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTP' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
6129677771d4f868724a740a05601a85
a84b69c40e4ddcb01a59f13d4389941572fb57a9
describe
'293016' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTQ' 'sip-files00116.QC2.jpg'
97fcfed8dcb8ce12fa61b1418011cf41
a66b5f82f49d86ad31357c921fef8bfc788a1fa1
describe
'49097' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTR' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
4493fe82cf7afe1ae52469eecc77accf
45a37fc7911cdbce29074decd92e8190795ea99a
describe
'196612' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTS' 'sip-files00117.QC2.jpg'
a533ea554077465b0bcea1ea0cd1ef53
20791630cc3f5e205742497b2709c4ade778021b
describe
'86992' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTT' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
9ebd126c0bb4247c16c9fd5e2960b236
689d5a5c048f7875a8f241f7efd6cba5798a0980
describe
'298328' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTU' 'sip-files00118.QC2.jpg'
127b1789589d3db644bae6a5ce053401
9f89c10a7442a7c853802c89a7b92aaf8ce878eb
describe
'88219' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTV' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
213a2526d4bf498959a82cf52ff9bf5a
1cd4272c7904ade3bada1f3fbe2b357e81424db7
describe
'302253' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTW' 'sip-files00119.QC2.jpg'
967012365811c5f1251aed19785cc8c4
6714bf34e91d626fa2d196851006bfa176dac9eb
describe
'90789' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTX' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
4305d115b8b6b67fb2ded4a87f241dea
e3277dcfcc187932bb12872725ea1ee93c6c25ca
describe
'304440' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTY' 'sip-files00120.QC2.jpg'
a491be2064ad5fcf3004a2b44d03cea4
9b9d6bd6b8065822563ccb2d90e7ab08da7851fd
describe
'92752' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJTZ' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
e82e551a49ec4369109f878c18791bd5
07a189ed87c3c9c066e4d943605838d39b113846
describe
'311782' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUA' 'sip-files00121.QC2.jpg'
6c1fc41b01d3b6a276c60deacbc92981
befe1826cad20b4c99b64203ef4b4b50735d7ea1
describe
'90543' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUB' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
b071802806de8a2b8defdcc2147edac8
9a194ce115a777579df33de36e6efb79848661c5
describe
'305514' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUC' 'sip-files00122.QC2.jpg'
88062bc1e1229cd3b6f7b1283e480d2f
0de32bc6bcd9a000de621ab88cfa04960a1a9534
describe
'90876' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUD' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
3b23e2bf0fac72b7b6c3c68fad732ed3
0346b20b77d7323a12527262b02b9ba66ea32a5e
describe
'306629' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUE' 'sip-files00123.QC2.jpg'
27325b326883b4d61ea12f36a2f3bb20
e9cf0dfa5924b44213dbf7e7f2d07c4508fcb8d3
describe
'90867' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUF' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
d9d365109bc4adc887a98b8bf6500a02
d2d36b6c2291d2953a4d3a3a23ecbf7a3650c078
describe
'309189' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUG' 'sip-files00124.QC2.jpg'
36932df622d4e56af39133caff756163
f5b66772f35b1af99c48ed9f3ca5afe0f6772bf3
describe
'89293' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUH' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
0c052d125222e831a7d53bca3f12de1b
ee48474172105cff603f251348ec06de300c20ec
describe
'309084' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUI' 'sip-files00125.QC2.jpg'
e298774bbf61bdc436fb0af780bf5853
06e7a28f34bf660f8d77e8b419377b6579d24073
describe
'95294' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUJ' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
9ca5068ba65390a42b99d832dff55c01
285e80fa25f21d0907bff5f6aaaec2e3e9171cfb
describe
'317790' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUK' 'sip-files00126.QC2.jpg'
56dbfe29afe959364de76b09b868b04a
58be546d68293569564ecc673a7b6cca23546a43
describe
'89398' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUL' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
19c9be47b09427104cfe24091f9d7b3e
f5446e5dc0d2ebb78f480604d9edd6c4675e483e
describe
'299725' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUM' 'sip-files00127.QC2.jpg'
ffe850b80fc1bd6b2ef5f83fedc9c80c
b4dab04ee8b1143020d86caa363ec3ccfe8806d8
describe
'89260' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUN' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
a23f0e2121548172c0cfffbaf4841277
50765c8e13d055d7c351dddbc25e7269180dcee5
describe
'304633' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUO' 'sip-files00128.QC2.jpg'
995664211b4c0fdf6562a87ddf2d66ab
ae44bc443a96540abeeaed7fbb73a25581273213
describe
'94145' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUP' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
515a5d5ceca0b15a6ff46300c99f2a2e
bd34323a2e526108df36f3d489f9edbe0cce470f
describe
'322527' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUQ' 'sip-files00129.QC2.jpg'
d419274c7fceabaa721fbfc14dc2d42e
1738ad8f53cb7b722ff3f3b6c8accce5750c7bd4
describe
'91485' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUR' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
ca479936afc69dc21082b3de08228062
ca293f71b2714566bc0e937ff85a5dbcd80826d1
describe
'315798' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUS' 'sip-files00130.QC2.jpg'
7a964cdaae0ef5db572607e7134906da
42d2541b4fdf03ab8e9838a67b683c2e1a942131
describe
'90393' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUT' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
82fb905481928a41f4f59f5af9b0f0f8
5b91c1759889d18d221aead0ab46ba5cf7254a54
describe
'311629' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUU' 'sip-files00131.QC2.jpg'
15cfe85c49ee6089eea3551b290a4ac4
80dac42ca0baee72f732767d489a931f81e3cf12
describe
'93071' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUV' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
ed5b5fc87de585b40832c255c208117e
286fa3eb158762946262a26790abb1c4720af9fe
describe
'320026' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUW' 'sip-files00132.QC2.jpg'
0fbf40d0b7186f43f0cd2c2187f6b622
976c6e477aa5ee663671e79ca76474157842b33b
describe
'95480' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUX' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
46fe2776ffd6e4bb584cb4c326bc4707
65f09b42f1cf952b319aca78721fe36a35541eff
describe
'324739' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUY' 'sip-files00133.QC2.jpg'
c0792dfff2dbad1897203b038b65650a
656ee9de75ca37ab93450fb61de02c0843f48a5b
describe
'92788' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJUZ' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
11d47592c007e348908c58d6c9aab9c0
3bda6ca3c1dcd1ea3c1a8f6c46b724ea97ced9bc
describe
'312684' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVA' 'sip-files00134.QC2.jpg'
47945ff5f2e52437bba29d00d692e3bf
84c15f0c5038c77e7c87d895ddbf450453c1fd44
describe
'91875' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVB' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
b29c4e6aac96e23e242047b17c3d7a4e
cc320dbc597ff692b0e35432903b9ac52d276869
describe
'313137' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVC' 'sip-files00135.QC2.jpg'
bcf2f55be7210cdfd76931e4bcf8624d
08d87532c4f503f52c5c206c0c4fa8fc5655a34f
describe
'89902' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVD' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
547a9aa5383121a5adeac71b13e1d7e3
dcdfabe1af6a82021e3799e17e13b4a1ca58e1bb
'2011-12-16T21:35:06-05:00'
describe
'303514' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVE' 'sip-files00136.QC2.jpg'
ae7361cfa8cf786660b79df6886ceeeb
5206e56dfd457b49f1cc22bb496a513d25fce3d8
describe
'92241' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVF' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
7852b767a4f05f0b5a7dfabad0a22ccd
e6e4863ad81bad3727e2205c21f48d6345a62854
describe
'311298' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVG' 'sip-files00137.QC2.jpg'
4bf9034374ee07cb34423a50f4e5132f
acf03a12c89d8e69190c31cbbc11f89c4b0e8498
describe
'90832' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVH' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
b6d1395566639f3ef25604385dfd116c
abed596800587db72c986917e8d7d5aea99cdcd7
describe
'306447' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVI' 'sip-files00138.QC2.jpg'
9d322efec088e108f21343efc22d75c1
3519b5870ca4093c9847e054c57a95ece41f46e2
describe
'92527' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVJ' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
9b47161a2a89ba5f1aabd18be48b9ab0
f055205b80fd87029b780699b1d5ad007faf5853
describe
'310111' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVK' 'sip-files00139.QC2.jpg'
ee21c2088f5e7d70d9d8ade6f0cabe4b
566ab00aa4847a40b25d5e3c2cac7e381c17ebcc
describe
'95233' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVL' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
2a7dc9b003a75c4c4f86094a2b6efafc
b901b7829c41f589249b8726c0f832bda27c3c60
describe
'327696' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVM' 'sip-files00140.QC2.jpg'
208b612cb0974dd676b0b87863db99a6
59880418bdbfc644e4c279dcae83cc9261bfa466
describe
'91751' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVN' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
1023be4be4dc396ab4740cb2ab00ffab
32614791c1676efa87eb84e54f089fd36ad185e5
describe
'318535' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVO' 'sip-files00141.QC2.jpg'
b9725b3f3acc530faa4f80410358a9e9
49031bc7fb485fa73ed2246e5ca4b9f7332c36a1
describe
'89308' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVP' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
0c906d7d33be0a01febf4ce1fbb234e5
42d5dceac7ef6ee8cadbdf1fee2048714c7f47c7
describe
'308649' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVQ' 'sip-files00142.QC2.jpg'
d266c7779c9c25bc81ad48a3a4521708
c37db1bbbcbf8f85da921b4b9955194553a444a5
describe
'92234' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVR' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
17bc27802ad355bdcba654162cc0597e
349018704fbd0618545379ade5cf2afd307d91e0
describe
'312816' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVS' 'sip-files00143.QC2.jpg'
132df641b4dba686bf7adf56d43b4c0f
0e50ed9126cb5a1045d0e194a8db359c01491d7e
describe
'92747' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVT' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
8abe2e4b46511cbabf2f9f7ad3d6675e
9457f87d921e25153f7930ac2f98ebee0d0b5b37
describe
'311839' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVU' 'sip-files00144.QC2.jpg'
f5bb49bccd7adb39adb2b04e9a517fb0
ad7474f39fd4b36ed9b3d92e44ecfb2b3ce4e953
describe
'97038' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVV' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
fe6a9673917e7e337e70286e92118d31
9238897072ef3db15d452d6134c54dd72e97a409
describe
'328428' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVW' 'sip-files00145.QC2.jpg'
b571424dfce832b507237a474686851f
3327401a4c6449a4f48c2e344276c424a5a209b2
describe
'96106' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVX' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
54e216988a3b4f1d7be6f182b4760c52
c2635f7f4b44155a60ab323a2f8058a0a4d973e6
describe
'327749' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVY' 'sip-files00146.QC2.jpg'
0a544639ffee519329d1b78eccd1405a
88827afe3c278a8d01e6a81f40c88ae1ddcd2d24
describe
'92512' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJVZ' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
a6f113e183d89a8c893d6da9bc4bdc9b
7fe71ff19e548b9071288ed45ec89d2bbdca7837
describe
'312698' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWA' 'sip-files00147.QC2.jpg'
d8b8370c792492e12c86e7f01f264f60
ce71cd52fa36e9fa7def13d403499bcd85daf70a
describe
'92125' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWB' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
5f8d8fed6d3cc7e7610f533423f42fa1
e66d9864a925134a35437fee56db5f129f1cc2ed
describe
'312882' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWC' 'sip-files00148.QC2.jpg'
a440352c8e945fe32c275c2be1f6125d
4a68ce329760c1a5503449ceb44eeafafc1cad1a
describe
'70767' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWD' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
3bf157e9c1dcb9056055eb8173ef2390
8f1a32dd7987a2d57dd6ded40de1d76af92add79
describe
'256571' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWE' 'sip-files00149.QC2.jpg'
259c0a6004114346483bad92dca297f6
fb5fd972034aee43989458db092f693c1d4e48e2
describe
'68594' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWF' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
46e05416066f30624117da72279df162
83e01e3c4785943c64a8496fb5e1722117b2c924
describe
'243745' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWG' 'sip-files00150.QC2.jpg'
2c00b29d54c44acdb69575f1471d08d8
08c49d8e5e40540fa2ccac59879f6106ef049d72
describe
'90313' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWH' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
ee5b4ebe42710c084b5ed148363cb905
dd294453fd43ca86f41f89b2da641b1641df8e5c
describe
'305696' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWI' 'sip-files00151.QC2.jpg'
6a3855174cf4468a9dcf24e6018d9145
9d526516f7eca3d0e06af49e59516ca1eb796de0
describe
'89565' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWJ' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
2601e961381856d502d8d6b00a834d28
613b4c8d6fcaa97784a412401f8f47e11e8b5fbd
describe
'306912' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWK' 'sip-files00152.QC2.jpg'
6a0e01b9a96a1b5ff013dbfd1a29679a
8474aff34ae1144a889b5475553b82ed62c4624f
describe
'94069' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWL' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
942d4e955b940bd420883c11690f60ad
e84433458ea220f0bf2ac1e20b910612d98445a6
describe
'319237' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWM' 'sip-files00153.QC2.jpg'
386429e5969242d837dcf4bd4736d9d7
dfaf297b4961c91f776026963a717d22b8a636f0
describe
'86688' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWN' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
601286c014ab435adaf7271427462213
e660fbb49607885513cafd6790177a2e3d13839e
describe
'296341' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWO' 'sip-files00154.QC2.jpg'
9555299dc3881f9149a55620c9bf59fd
7262dc11e9250f6aab26d606e3b5af9470e40a3f
describe
'89367' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWP' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
98ec56be3d7849fa7a37deb7ea8c948a
6bd6b6db32cd48d1e9a8cdd16a7289eec1f8f208
describe
'308184' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWQ' 'sip-files00155.QC2.jpg'
5723d7974366a1bfc40c69d8269a22b5
4f7b7bbfb5992a909ea60d86a9580b3e61700d66
describe
'90189' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWR' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
c5c1f039f0e417d868a3c64e48e23399
4153a5e56868d8d96f323fa68d74136625b247aa
describe
'307361' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWS' 'sip-files00156.QC2.jpg'
0feb5522816933b0fd37e813023343b1
1e7579aed7facae84f3730cd96b41ea6af77000a
'2011-12-16T21:36:37-05:00'
describe
'95083' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWT' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
0fcc9d337f8c0248b662e2d9aadd1ac4
3edca10160d61e204abf7afcf550b6a0aff5b5a0
describe
'322368' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWU' 'sip-files00157.QC2.jpg'
bac23b40a9279afac319301ed2e41b76
6149ee970fd061b54401613e11c8c2b060d137b5
describe
'92343' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWV' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
b4327b0dbe5e12bbe5e60ec471af638c
bc57a494fc05349a6813f1cb24dc058bf7acde03
describe
'314687' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWW' 'sip-files00158.QC2.jpg'
5f62a237ced06c0248b886422e611781
a6cfcb877ab6d7b83a6de74bb4cf115412fc489e
describe
'92517' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWX' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
23b2b1ce88b0946f9de346309b2d16f0
5cae7732f092b76130603232bcf3929dfe26e2b0
describe
'315560' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWY' 'sip-files00159.QC2.jpg'
b89c73a5b449ef3fe7d74acc56b84510
8592781409c470fdd40d5960412dd2038642f971
describe
'88990' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJWZ' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
ad6cc9287a6deb38190979375c4423c9
2bd72323e5a3969aa7d74e2a82d6b554e2b21824
describe
'297857' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXA' 'sip-files00160.QC2.jpg'
d53c9f496406c058dd43b5ae9a38e879
44c62d817a981ca1a9a2df6af281299946287b99
describe
'89487' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXB' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
2be2c6865a43a3cbe6c219e1265d6dd5
864ca0c41a03167eccd43a446bee22828e93b277
describe
'312846' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXC' 'sip-files00161.QC2.jpg'
64d5eebcba9974e3a74828dd9ed3e69f
7f24570206032cfaed4e41d63a41d6258f7c8e71
describe
'88793' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXD' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
e93308e7a7edecd43cdf68741491eb7a
a14bf0024ab4e85ed8f88d115dc567946385953d
describe
'304495' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXE' 'sip-files00162.QC2.jpg'
ffbe99a9961df1c58bbf7f15ec6a5783
81cf6b653cb80d58b4e4075540166cba883214c7
describe
'91708' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXF' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
358f39e25baa990b7bcbec53a6a2544e
8f89f585de8ab1f306cf79e1c3316dd6f73ed832
describe
'313686' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXG' 'sip-files00163.QC2.jpg'
26a319b8d8ae1f7240515b01ebf0c0e8
6ba6e37d5b0b120b2a19e7d319a214d897156dca
describe
'58851' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXH' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
9a36c6b1fde8a7b78b9c41886aedae5b
332cf24317df37535e56e427d1462c4a584841a0
describe
'236892' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXI' 'sip-files00164.QC2.jpg'
326b35afa6a8aa154f773ab09567bdfa
73d7b60a96b3bd1e0f98eee89ddf80091e5669d3
describe
'89018' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXJ' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
28f88517f700b34e845a26af1b35c8b1
5610235a27c7aafc4e73fe6fa79448447bfd6d35
describe
'307105' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXK' 'sip-files00165.QC2.jpg'
fa4d948ab699f16890675ec6406ecc1a
dfbbdd341c0cd22d933ca1197f282df25fd0f2b3
describe
'89003' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXL' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
4c316736579a6a932d6070b768cccdd3
7b8546be1c3af15f7b0c131c831fccd1952f6bd0
describe
'304347' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXM' 'sip-files00166.QC2.jpg'
9008665f0c74a9f95a79da8caf95d3f7
0038e6ffcfc3956b4555c33ec35a1217758d4b47
describe
'87090' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXN' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
36b5ed989f976ee0d7d0ad43aa16d941
d0619918deaf358725cc13433e825f8847efe149
describe
'300800' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXO' 'sip-files00167.QC2.jpg'
a4f3a16df9399e01e9f317f3199e4b8f
1d31e6dfbbf506989a4976c8476a11c8449fb8a4
describe
'85476' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXP' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
e786336d83b4b059e781443d12c5e3c9
77a91bb8ba9f636c05127a6c4496721280ab08c3
describe
'288027' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXQ' 'sip-files00168.QC2.jpg'
f84447c04fac2af47c3ccfc35b60f19d
2d493d64f84e2edfddbac85c53749e14ea13aeaf
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXR' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
56d0bab5ce9869326800690880593f97
8e0a5350b22542b24b01322a41efee076054ec7c
describe
'302659' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXS' 'sip-files00169.QC2.jpg'
2ab532cb396a4412a0dbdab6581489aa
dfb9963f99b8c3582a2be25506a398ba520eaa0f
describe
'96339' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXT' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
e2915042c2eb0718d3460dd8cf38fd91
68923794768c3854536c958061d98801271215f2
describe
'323694' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXU' 'sip-files00170.QC2.jpg'
78b72cdf01416d4882d9e399c435836f
fc27766b8b8999130267c5143fabec2c2ff85a58
describe
'92827' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXV' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
0fe32a3c602dc0a80c25c91c5e56c0bb
2b2df95bce2c597b9acb59561b426cf51b8620c0
describe
'318817' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXW' 'sip-files00171.QC2.jpg'
31686ac7f0f9ac505944d5b95d4ec1f5
242d78e0d46a559434360b8c71ee558f349d0714
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXX' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
912f9c814968fe61aef0c682145e835e
07e6708c39e2b593b51820223f8a1f71b2c617c8
describe
'295869' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXY' 'sip-files00172.QC2.jpg'
1866f340452d8a67e1d209bfbbc7cc59
913431d6819d1f5db965bb76b1f7c8d948583d16
describe
'88272' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJXZ' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
f0fd26377755f5e264c2767e960f01e4
17d9501faa3848371d4fb0b00827660fc0fe55e4
describe
'299686' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYA' 'sip-files00173.QC2.jpg'
301bd9af4a8c4e7355294e25c539fd85
30456ee2eedb38a45bde8d2ca1a3b0d2cd5cb361
describe
'89854' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYB' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
30970d439988654b31db4c5be392a49c
251d612e64a04c2649dd17ff862aaaad2faa75f6
describe
'305635' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYC' 'sip-files00174.QC2.jpg'
54f9d68d6be0869b9da7aa30acd3da01
8b362adcfc896979a52b8381ec70547a4d85d953
describe
'90451' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYD' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
9949bb65b1a876fa8e2a35acd4b13683
8303f405a002478433a58283bc901d0f42c1cf23
describe
'309759' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYE' 'sip-files00175.QC2.jpg'
7547c88d8435c7660e23a66ca576dd0e
08212a12f7e99a00183c55de21d9752d1b06238c
describe
'86403' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYF' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
a538926d16fa67cf39b5498762ab2a7d
f0873146c96c1833c572f619962d55aeb9da6902
describe
'294082' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYG' 'sip-files00176.QC2.jpg'
a33926fe076a98c5c63dcde192c80222
393cad46b54f6c3533ecefdb6904f716ad87b60c
describe
'91072' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYH' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
2e4b9c4a3e15373bfebbe1c5fcf45c89
56d9a5d2adf3ea4cc7239fa68d9c00df837c8586
describe
'314073' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYI' 'sip-files00177.QC2.jpg'
2582391d7b6780ad49139b110b1b0e92
0582a6468b388c0579f06735cf3bbf655fd4c341
describe
'89369' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYJ' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
3c98e40d2688afbe10be9a0ada39fa62
7c6c10b77c504e7b23dae7cda145629a836b3dc3
describe
'305328' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYK' 'sip-files00178.QC2.jpg'
666e7dc5aade6a451b843aa6c81c2640
4cfda8883608ee632324e376a6d83c6b990f2e7b
describe
'70555' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYL' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
1ed65deb790085768706ecbdfd679b41
e970783404b69582faaf3aedbef7da0afda789af
describe
'245003' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYM' 'sip-files00179.QC2.jpg'
352f6cb377f968757d5841968d64243b
10ae3abc80f5913139258c4229d6a7967899a7b7
describe
'87914' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYN' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
f76caf4a262e99099e06a31195aafd41
0575244ef4d744b8f6e58a8ec987b6a5c717f319
describe
'300826' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYO' 'sip-files00180.QC2.jpg'
696f617c7c3e984efd1eddfccc2cf416
4c40445233274a413c0933504f4d3e01ab007657
describe
'91109' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYP' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
6588f82aac95b28ca400d409940a6321
119eb77a47234726fc9a161187612826bcabc26c
describe
'310788' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYQ' 'sip-files00181.QC2.jpg'
81d13acc1056b20c19637d292b00f9df
edb0736cb073a260e27e4c7aa8f5e45b1f28dd31
describe
'83143' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYR' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
46d1f2a2d522494d33ebeb8e7171f676
9de0982dcd7dbc229b13190d364835a2b5433da2
describe
'281492' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYS' 'sip-files00182.QC2.jpg'
5bac9ca6b945d85cc816a26bae500f89
101970137cc7955954ca4df15e19a145ffba9812
describe
'86544' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYT' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
fc9c1333237148e848148f889c12537e
b9447302dd1e06b86084d2ce35294c8c2df1d470
describe
'292299' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYU' 'sip-files00183.QC2.jpg'
c4c9cd8b14e27d63981f8e463e47aae5
410eb91320dfe4825e7318a56b0555829b13b020
describe
'86930' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYV' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
e0379c3e9721506a6d3bf0c49b0b56a1
e313a3edba335c2d0feed0236392c5ea8f6e6466
describe
'296652' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYW' 'sip-files00184.QC2.jpg'
3516638d49fea18c0cfcd80f3ccb09df
7e838a1de366f830394e0af935061f2973f53a57
describe
'90917' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYX' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
42727e284c40caef47846aa80d3c47bb
2bb88eac22d2d8daf6b0eb51e998e792a93818f4
describe
'307751' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYY' 'sip-files00185.QC2.jpg'
b0d5d94fac1d1c171617dbac3a83e560
ea13e06092eaced129201a786503c9e0688bf766
describe
'90463' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJYZ' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
2066a3989d49670b858124b93759dbd4
123b68a626169d522903bb2b6d7f8761920188da
describe
'309651' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZA' 'sip-files00186.QC2.jpg'
9d4ab2d0bd4546a215c850317624c75a
9b7815be5a42a5f828835bac71148fb5c158cf79
describe
'87071' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZB' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
5aaf633b444ddb57aa96f08cfbee5508
afbacdec2530544b7cc43f56656cc1b47416e282
describe
'297989' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZC' 'sip-files00187.QC2.jpg'
88aaaf3e1c76d9f0981e47be3d8e2550
7153cebbf36d8dfe0ebe9e895eaeab20b85f4f01
describe
'81065' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZD' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
d0b8009b08c7bc1c44c8b34fe70dc198
7f71abdc801150dec9a7ccc182ca76dc275bd557
describe
'277410' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZE' 'sip-files00188.QC2.jpg'
1e3776a781c6ab1d284e67914265434b
e2654a71491d0b2e537cf4dd8c00d9fcbe9f028e
describe
'89267' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZF' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
f7d0c80cb45e8e3dd4f3385817807f51
a838c5876de30e3db4f2b3f938ba34cedad76079
describe
'306091' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZG' 'sip-files00189.QC2.jpg'
64c266024a91cac2deb283c254f43dde
324dbfb802dd13aacc62cd6c3a3845df56b10e36
describe
'84499' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZH' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
2f6af5c5fb4932ef236bf00433524427
33b5644a02a89bad1234fe4e082539f4190b6f5e
describe
'291646' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZI' 'sip-files00190.QC2.jpg'
3d900aad6fb0580fcb5e59be41a6f104
7fa0a740ccf32a3324f7466f5bfb574d414012d6
describe
'58528' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZJ' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
f2fb574aae41b5f5e9dc6e5af233480c
fec64e1a795fefa8dd99d54c06dc12d5cc0b769e
describe
'237581' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZK' 'sip-files00191.QC2.jpg'
dbf4be5c96621e0c8679750c7115d88a
d10df4cf6d611e14c093c6a7e406d2185a6d9e46
describe
'84425' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZL' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
2547a2c524ae651a62003c3e78c8d31a
a836f733f4d0116a659aa737ea2be2326ef69cb3
describe
'287248' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZM' 'sip-files00192.QC2.jpg'
7456d86449fbc9524559e99ef699105b
b8e6bc512343ea4c3b684022fa605c4b1bb43551
describe
'87678' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZN' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
5951235edc89a4fca84236f95d1f5243
3d384a3d8e1a2d38f3d6e7c945cbe576d7bb70dc
describe
'303589' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZO' 'sip-files00193.QC2.jpg'
4b21a73327812e5b0653728053ef4416
a8a90d07fa2cdd798c36cc7e9f00a1f4a6c54c42
describe
'89597' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZP' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
e427004d26744b046a76e664291632ff
9a7432cbab54b8b7b61fbbe4a5b438f265c2aa7a
describe
'302355' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZQ' 'sip-files00194.QC2.jpg'
74e23560ca3d3544fe6f73e9d2d87758
07a50b0c17f9f90da00909ddf73e43a3ac794094
describe
'90901' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZR' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
a2322660ff9e2bc83a27541badeb2641
b98809da753b8431ec8ce122d20bc90eff73cfc4
describe
'308962' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZS' 'sip-files00195.QC2.jpg'
80a88ab24f734966913c86360bb26683
bd7c6e2e01847a9bff62109cab5c5f55f78fc110
'2011-12-16T21:33:34-05:00'
describe
'88542' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZT' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
cd6b06a889719bb84532a9449f862307
ecc1a704acfcd6f49cf50a43a5e2f364c97cf193
describe
'299341' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZU' 'sip-files00196.QC2.jpg'
b5b3a600026322a10a21cf3a3c981494
36b82e8a64c2e4cda2e833a0875a3bf7227efe75
describe
'87716' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZV' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
f757608022ceb88c4826219a080833df
648952c97e0b48887ecb5577477701b082d75a1c
describe
'301671' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZW' 'sip-files00197.QC2.jpg'
eb8c31dfd2d26e9235b6a2f47ed375bc
f599b2ffb9b67604f12de3d2a89dbe6ed66eaded
describe
'87520' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZX' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
88a6303f9233aed71dc8b0b4a474901e
274e4a3c63e1b56c7bd4e517f72bc6d50256b39b
describe
'298119' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZY' 'sip-files00198.QC2.jpg'
d7f89a4a09fb6ace2225505d07a27a3d
1a82b77240fb52e82d9dd42e728d77fa317ae6fe
describe
'69282' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAJZZ' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
5c0321d14e3449339a9f0ce2057ff319
2bbc347467f8ab98aaa719e4e5f1429f3d6b6afd
describe
'247068' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAA' 'sip-files00199.QC2.jpg'
51cff2035cd6db752e4df080235b46fc
679f514f29a078446eafeac0fd60d2510e27b76e
describe
'86288' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAB' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
1f57edc5cce747e130f967f510ff4223
9005d2e5807e756e9f112a1fb0a3b5bae99670e9
describe
'294424' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAC' 'sip-files00200.QC2.jpg'
3041c57cbd280abe1877358a263b628c
ef1fa9da229738981769cd13a04f98d672d78b6a
describe
'85973' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAD' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
ac5ed1507521942f8e2f0d889c512b0b
a85e78a799f9dd5ab977b849bdf395cca36d6829
describe
'295557' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAE' 'sip-files00201.QC2.jpg'
864218da8c13374af323daa260a6f48b
13cc2152af92e4726ccc5466f746e80802275450
describe
'88409' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAF' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
46ff5ccf58c03931c0a82d3650774e72
8d3127d4eedf60ea6d37241e2dc1221dc1b8dea5
describe
'296468' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAG' 'sip-files00202.QC2.jpg'
858006010aefe41b0ef6618abfdbebac
072521805e2feeb74ecaf4d48386d060e3ebce23
describe
'87269' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAH' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
cd85fa4800206f58f76077cfbebb0b7d
0a38f3ec7f964b04fb12e88ba485b68eb03b79ba
describe
'299916' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAI' 'sip-files00203.QC2.jpg'
8527ee359594fa679480008223ba1665
0f247bcd578cd6be4bbbe6d936b1e71a9159d13d
describe
'91962' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAJ' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
2c42ff3ca1746c2e03c8562453aca3c0
f5dc1fb5deffd793b892459bfe71b431193bd627
describe
'313348' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAK' 'sip-files00204.QC2.jpg'
244678e4be5cc1342ae0650da762d200
e6b91db662ef2eb6e5b100329c5a85a1f3178597
describe
'89027' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAL' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
7cd6018fbf50f6d903cc4a2f02b80ac6
302499feb2eabee85f4717764eaf4cf04df41dca
describe
'302902' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAM' 'sip-files00205.QC2.jpg'
77d6cf15c370ca1008f9384319249bf7
e73d63b36b8a6b191ab7101ad1e1c178684d8d72
describe
'85424' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAN' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
3d793634c3e237a394e5ce58b6fd77ce
904984b6aa82c4974b7bc6b93d4ed4e18c5509d5
describe
'292699' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAO' 'sip-files00206.QC2.jpg'
eb5a258ec2bd60c7333ff87846b07db4
e409693c2e57a1e3d8ae2299eb8400192cedf648
describe
'98217' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAP' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
5608dc958ba2f4e1a1c111a4ef490d3e
fa1440706ca1ed9e6289ccb00b77958b24e840ce
describe
'349054' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAQ' 'sip-files00207.QC2.jpg'
bbeb04c5ca5b4572f6d5562ec49cb879
143af79226a0f349a4a58ce891746648e59f3df3
describe
'72132' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAR' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
f0efdd2ff31adfac44494a69dc648a65
bcf029dbf7f2eb55ddf54a85dfb28330e0ff493b
describe
'295766' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAS' 'sip-files00208.QC2.jpg'
8c16f97e6afb1585cf04300ca56a3b53
8338b6cef5d0409d909334749ad3a4da14c865fa
describe
'101681' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAT' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
8e1503c136f5ac9f92420a07d70b7b53
1232cc9fa0479fa249e1f73de8f650e7892a7f60
describe
'468846' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAU' 'sip-files00209.QC2.jpg'
f5eb71e52674beaf15fe3426351257ca
b30e96fcfc337aa6aaa60b19724c1c5a74b38757
describe
'41190' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAV' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
17118b38623ad522d688e96a3424e1fe
76dbdbb60d28b99fa38cb57202aebbfb4c002a3c
describe
'155236' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAW' 'sip-files00210.QC2.jpg'
739bed7f3fc540d178f122d55fe92c2b
b01f288a7e65857bdbc715eb793b64bffd6d2238
describe
'394362' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAX' 'sip-filesUF00026977_00001.xml'
3499fe732eb4114828a1faeed5b949bc
4573f176cb3b9d2ac27ee083c9a87b4e97d21bfd
describe
'2013-12-18T00:21:05-05:00'
xml resolution
'56' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEJfileF20080603_AAAKAY' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
be6d8af02489096a391fe53d247f1267
c94ffaf32a2c6d9c099190a38e240383ad13ece5
describe