Citation
Tales for village schools

Material Information

Title:
Tales for village schools amusing and instructive
Creator:
Neale, Jane K
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Camden Press ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Frederick Warne and Co.
Manufacturer:
Camden Press.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
101, [4] p., [1] leaf of plates : col. ill. ; 15 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Animals -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1873 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1873
Genre:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by Jane K. Neale.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026888844 ( ALEPH )
ALH5277 ( NOTIS )
59820736 ( OCLC )

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Full Text












Charhe and Katie,





TALES

VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

Amusing any Inustructibe

BY
JANE K. NEALE,

AUTHOR OF “WINNIE BARTON,” ETO,

LONDON:

FREDERICK WARNE AND CO.
BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN.



CAMDEN PRESS LONDON, N.W:



CONTENTS.

TALE PAGE
I, THE ENGLISH OAK TREE . 0 « « © - 1

FEE EEA 0 Canes eee
TIT RTE CMITTLE. COAL) <6 os 60s ememtce
IV. THE YOUNG GARDENER. . «© « « « + 96
vy. THE HOUSE SPIDER . . ». « «+--+ - 16

vi. THE BUTTERFLY . 5 + « « © © © « QL



TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

ie
THE ENGLISH OAK TREE.

Att was ready in the village school-room for
the usual writing-lesson, and the children
awaiting the entrance of Mrs. Ainsley to take
their places.

“ Good afternoon, dear children,” said that
lady ; “before we begin our work, I have
something to say to you.”

Upon this intimation, the children rose from
their seats with curious expectation marked in
their countenances.

“I wish to tell you, that if you will give me
a good lesson I will give you a little tale.”

“Oh!” exclaimed the little children, in
various tones of pleasure.

1



Q TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

“ Please, ma’am,” said one little girl, “ what
is it about ?”

“You shall each choose a subject.”

«“ That will be nice,’ said oue; “ but where
will you get them, ma’am?”

“J will write them for you.”

There was now a joyous shout of “ Hurrah !
hurrah !

“J have chosen the subject of the first tale,
and have brought it with me. Now, each may
tell me what he or she wishes me to write
about.”

Very various were the subjects named, as
Gardener—Baby—Coal, &c. &e.

The writing-lesson being ended, Mrs. Ainsley
began the tale-of

THE ENGLISH OAK TRE.

I am now a garden-stick, painted green, with
a white top, but I have been much bigger, and
done grander things than support flowers, as I
now do; for though you see me now with my
foot stuck in the earth, moving only as the —



THE ENGLISH OAK TREE.” 3

gardener sees fit to move me, the time has
been when I journeyed miles and miles away.
I was an acorn in my babyhood, and rejoiced
when the wind, one fine day in the autumn,
blew me down from my mother’s arm, for I
then thought I should do as I pleased. I fell
upon the green grass, and lay very comfortably,
half hidden by the slender blades, thinking I
should be very happy;.so I was, for I had
many companions around me, the sun shone
by day, and I lay in the moonlight by night—
the birds sang above me; and the grasshoppers
chirped around me. But I soon learnt my
life was not to be one of pleasure only, for one
day there came a pig, and I saw him take some
of my companions into his tremendous jaws,
and heard him crunch—crunch—munch—
munch. Oh! how much I wished myself back
again upon my mother’s arm, for I expected
he would seize me. However, I escaped the
frightful munching, and continued to lie on
the grass. I grew older, and instead of being
green, as at first, became brown, and rolled





4 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOIS.

out of my cup. The cold winter came; the
frost beat the grass over me, and dead leaves
fell upon me; the earth became soft from the
rain, and I sank into it by degrees, till I had
earth above, beneath, and around me.

_ After having been a long time in this state,

T became tired of doing nothing, and of being
shut up in the earth, where I could see nothing.
What could I do to amuse myself? Well, I
thought I would try to be a fine tree, like my
mother; so I began to push myself through
my brown case, forcing my stem upwards ‘and
my roots downwards; but I would not grow
-yery quickly, lest I should be mistaken for a
foreign oak, and I determined to be an English
one, as my mother was. Though the wind
blew upon me, and the animals rubbed against
my slender stem, I tried to keep myself straight,
and put forth my branches and leaves in the
best manner—and, asI tried to do what was
right, was very happy, drawing in nourishment
through my roots, and breathing the fresh air
through my leaves, till, from a little wee sprig,



2

THE ENGLISH OAK TREE. 5
I grew and grew till I became a very fine
tree. How I delighted in living! How proud
I was of myself !—thinking myself the finest
oak of the wood. It was a joyous life, and
I thought it would last for ever, but was mis-
taken.

When I had thus lived for many summers
and winters, becoming more and more proud
of myself as I grew larger and larger, two men
stopped near me one day, and I knew they ad.
mired me, for one said, “ Yes, it is a very fine
tree.” This increased my pride and vanity,
and I fancied I was to live.only to be admired ;
but I soon learnt otherwise. One of the men
made an ugly mark upon my noble trunk with
black-paint ; I would have struck him with one
of my large branches, but could not bend it
low enough. How I rejoiced when the rain
pelted in torrents, for I hoped it would wash
away that ugly disfiguring mark; but no,
there it remained as firm as at first, and
I was.obliged to bear it.. Now my troubles

began, for in the Autumn men came with
a



6 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

sharp knives, and stripped me of my bark.
How bitterly the wind blew upon me now!
How I mourned at the loss of my beauty,
thinking I should be left to pine away my life
unheeded and uncared for, never more to put
forth green leaves, and have the birds build
among my branches. Then came the better
thought of the use to which my bark would
be put; and when the wind blew upon my
bare trunk, or the sun scorched it, I said, cheer-
fully—

“Never mind, my bark will make excellent
leather.”

I learnt to be glad to be of use to others.
I saw men at work, and horses and dogs ail
seemed to have something to do; therefore I
said to my cousins near me—“ Why should we
be idle ?”

The next Autumn men came again, and
with hatchets chopped me and my cousins ~
down to the ground. Alas! alas! for my
vanity and pride, what was I now? A log of
wood. I was soon carried into a large yard, in



THE ENGLISH OAK TREE. 7

company with my cousins; and again I was
proud, for I was very much praised, and under-
stood that I should be sent to the shipwright’s,
while my cousins went to the cabinet-maker’s ;
and I said to myself, proudly, “ My cousin may
think it very nice to live in a smart drawing-
room, upon a soft carpet, and be polished by a
tidy housemaid; but I shall be a fine large
ship, and—who knows?—I may go into
foreign countries, and fight for my Queen. I
shall like that much better than being shut up
in a drawing-room; so I’ll be a fine ship, and
sail over the broad sea !”

Whilst I was being made into a large ship,
others of my family were being made into
boats. How proud I was over them!

“Ah!” said the boats, “you will go a long
way over the sea; but we shall not go far from
our dear home.”

“Yes,” I returned ; “ but see how small you
are, and how big I am. Besides, you are going.
to fish, Pha! how you will smell of fish, -
while I shall be kept so clean.”



8 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

“ Yes, that is all very well,” said the boats ;
“but we shall be safe, while you may get a
great cannon-ball through your side.”

“Then we will mend it again. So, hurrah!
for the Queen, and her good ship Victoria!
Good-bye to you, little fishy cousins.”

And away I went over the waves, with a merry
crew on deck, among whom was one called “Old
Ben,” whom I particularly liked; he seemed
to know everything, and I used to hear him
talk to a young lad, Philip Wright, about all he
would see on our voyage. But I learnt from
their conversation, that, instead of being, as I
had hoped, a man-of-war, I was only a merchant-
man, and my pride was much hurt by the dis-
covery. Well, it could not be helped; at any
rate, it was better than being a fishing-boat.

As we passed the curious rocks called “The
Needles,” which are off the{sle of Wight, I
heard old Ben tell young Philip how dangerous
they are, and that many a good ship had been
wrecked against them, and many brave sailors
lost.



THE ENGLISH OAK TREE. 9

“ Poor creatures ! and within sight of home,”
said the sailor boy. “I hope that will not
happen to me.”

“T hope not, my boy,” answered old Ben,
“but we must leave it in the hands of Him
who knows best; and whether near home, or
far away, we know He will be with us, when
our time comes, if we try to serve Him in life.”

We voyaged about to distant countries for
our cargoes—to Spain for fruit, to India for
rice, and to China for tea, and made several
pleasant trips in safety; but this was not
always to be the case, as I will tell you, for as
the thunder and lightning had passed over me
when I was a tree, so the storm came to me
when I formed part of a large ship.

We had been from home more than a year,
and were gladly returning, when a gale came
on as we neared the dangerous coast of Ireland.
It tore the sails to shreds. New ones were put
up, but the gale increasing, orders were given
to reef all but one small one, necessary to keep ©
the rudder in action. The carpenter made all

.



10 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

things fast below deck, and the dead-light, as
it is called, was burning in the captain’s cabin ;
thus we prepared to meet the storm. Thick,
black, heavy clouds rolled over head ; the winds
blew a hurricane; bang, bang, came the angry
waves against me, and I could not avoid creak-
ing, groaning and trembling, after every thump
of the big waves. Still, I and my companion
held together tightly, and proved ourselves to
be true English oak.

The night came on, and the wind blew
tremendously. Oh! how it whistled and roared
among the ropes. The huge waves came roll-
ing upon us as if to swallow us in anger,
foaming and roaring, as they dashed themselves
on the deck, and carried with them, as they
rolled back again, pieces of loosened wood and
empty casks. The night was pitch dark, except
when the vivid lightning flashed for an instant
from the dark clouds, and a glimpse was given
of the rocky and dangerous coast.

“This is awful, Ben,” said Philip. “Did
you ever know such a storm ?”



THE ENGLISH OAK TREE. ll

“ Searcely,” answered the old. man.

“Shall we be safe ?”

“Can’t say, boy,” answered the old sailor.
Then, after a few minutes of silence, he added,
“Philip, my boy, remember who watches over
those at sea as wellas on land. His eye is
upon us; trust in Him.”

“J will. My poor mother! Ben, I think
of her more than of myself; perhaps she is now
praying for me. I have always liked to know
that she thinks of me when she says that prayer
of our beautiful Litany—‘ That it may please
Thee to preserve all that travel by land or by
water? She will be so sorry to lose me, and I
am. so young to die.”

“The young are taken as well as the old,
Philip. We know not which may be taken
first, therefore all ought to be prepared to die.”

“But I am not good enough to die, Ben.”

“We none of us are; but we can pray to
be forgiven. You can do so, my boy; and if
you are spared, resolve to be better, God
helping you.”



12 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

Philip knelt down beside his old friend, in
earnest, heartfelt prayer. While they were
thus engaged, thinking more of their sins than
of the danger they were in, the ship struck upon
a rock with terrible force. It was soon known
she had parted; she was a wreck! The storm
still raged; the clouds hid the moon; all was
dark. The waves, sometimes as high as our
quivering mast, came roliing on, and broke in
white foam over us. The timbers gave way,
and I was separated from my companions. Old
Ben bade Philip lash himself to me, while he
clung to the mast. Night still! Gradually
the storm abated, and the morning came. The
fierce waves seemed tired of rolling, and sunk
into a heavy swell. Upon them I carried young
Philip safely. Poor boy! how tightly he clung
to me. How earnestly he prayed to be spared
for his dear mother’s sake, and that he might
be better prepared to die. He prayed for the
safety of old Ben, too.

The bright day came, and Philip was spared.
A fishing-boat had seen him, and had taken



THE ENGLISH OAK TREE. 13

him, with me, in. We both lay at the bottom
of the boat. Philip was insensible, but the
men were kindly careful of him ; they unbound
him from me, and recovered him.

Philip looked towards the spot where the
ship had been, and knew that all was over.

« All gone!” he said aloud, though speaking,
as it were, to himself.

“T fear so,” said one of the men. “ All,
poor fellows !”

«Poor old Ben !” exclaimed Philip, and he
wept bitterly for his kind old messmate. Then
he looked at me, and knew that I had carried
him upon the angry waves. “ Let me have
those planks ?” he said.

“Yes, yes, my boy,” returned the captain ;-
“they are yours. They saved your young
life.”

And Philip was glad, so was I, for I wished
_ to remain with him. And now my pride and
vanity were corrected. I who had scorned and
jeered at a fishing-boat was glad to be lying

safely at the bottom of one, although-it smelt
9

“a



14 TALES FOR VIT.LAGE SCHOOLS,

of fish, and I was very grateful to my little
cousin, who thus returned good for evil.

My voyaging was over; so was Philip’s; he
did not go to sea again, but remained at home
with his mother and became a gardener. Of
me he made sticks to support his flowers; he
cut me into various sizes, trimmed me smooth,
and painted me green, with a white top, that
he might know me from other sticks he has.

Philip is happy ; he is a good son to his old
mother, talks to her of the wonders he has
seen, of that awful shipwreck, and of poor
old Ben. He has named one of his boys after
his old friend; but I do not think he will let
little Ben go to sea. I am happy, too, in
having something to do, and grateful for the
care taken of me. Again I hear the birds
sing, and the rustling of the wind through the
leaves of a neighbouring wood, and wish my
relatives, the Oaks, may have as happy and
useful a life as my own.

“Oh! that 7s a nice story,” said Mary.



THE ENGLISH OAK TREE. 15

“Poor old Ben, he was a good man; 1 am
sorry he was drowned.”

“‘T wonder if he was washed ashore and
buried,” observed John Moore.

<< We will hope he was,” replied Mrs. Ains-
ley, restraining a smile at finding how much
her young auditors realized her tale.

‘Mary Moore,” she said, “ your tale shall
be the next; what shall it be about ?”

« About a Baby, please, ma’am.”

“A Baby! Nota very easy subject. Well,
you shall have it; but, as a Baby isa little
creature, you must not expect a very long story.
Now I will say good-bye to you all.”



16 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

Tt:
THE BABY.

Wuen the writing-day was come again, and
Mrs. Ainsley entered the school-room at the
usual time, the children looked eagerly at the
books and papers in her hand, and seeing some
of the latter tied together by a red ribbon, a
whisper of “ Yes, there it is,” passed from one
to the other.

“ You are right,” said Mrs. Ainsley ; “ I have
brought the Baby with me; but I think she
will be very good and quiet till our lesson is
over, and then we will hear what can be said
for her.”

“Won’t she speak for herself, ma’am?”
asked one of the little girls.



THE BABY. 17

“No; she is too young to talk. Now to
your places, and give me a good lesson, or I
shall take Baby home with me without telling
you anything about her, and I do not think
you would like that.”

“Oh no, ma’am! I think Baby would cry.”

“T don’t think she would,” said Mrs. Ainsley ;
“but you might, Emma.” Then, putting the
papers upon a shelf, she added, “ There, I have
put Baby into her cradle, and now begin your
writing.”

The lesson went off well, and Mrs. eS
taking the papers tied with red ribbon, began
the tale.

THE BABY.

“When may I see Baby?” inquired Mary
Moore of the kind neighbour who was acting
as nurse to her mother.

“Not to-day, Mary,” answered Mrs. Mab-
son; “ your mother must be kept very quiet ;
but to-morrow perhaps you all shall see the
dear little Baby.”

2—2



18 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

A Baby was a novelty in the Moore family ;
there had not been one for more than three
years! and though, perhaps, the father and
mother had thought five little hearty children
as many as they could comfortably provide for,
and the brothers and sisters had been quite
content at their numbers, all welcomed the
new Baby heartily, and not even the youngest
and hitherto petted little boy would consent to
part with her. All were very impatient to
see her; therefore all rejoiced when nurse
said—

“‘ Now then, one at a time shall go upstairs
with me; but all must be very quiet, walk
gently, just look at Baby, kiss mother, and
come down again.”

All did as nurse desired, and none spoke
even in a whisper till they came downstairs
again.

“What a little thing she is,” said Charlie ;
“not bigger than a doll !”

“To be sure,” said Mary, who, being the
oldest of the family, thought she knew much



THE BABY. 19

more about everything than the others did.
“To be sure she is; you were a little creature
once.”

“Not so little as she is, though,” said Charlie,
indignantly.

“Indeed you were, master Charles,” said
his eldest brother.

“J wasn’t,” returned Charlie, positively ;
then appealing to nurse asked, “ Was I, nurse ae

“Yes, Charles; quite as small as Baby,”
answered nurse, smiling.

“Well,” said the discomfited Charlie, “TI
don’t recollect it.”

“T suppose not,” said Mary, laughing; “but
I do.”

“So do I, my boy,” said the father; “and
so you all like your new Baby?”

“Oh yes! very much,” exclaimed all the
little voices.

“ She is such a pretty little creature,” said
Mary.

“Yes,” replied her father; “ Babies, like
all other young things, are pretty little crea-



20 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

tures ; and when we look at a Baby we, even
Charlie, should remember we were Babies once,
and be grateful to our mother for the care she
took of us; for if she had not nursed us
tenderly we might not havelived. This should
make us wish to take care of our mother when
she is old and helpless.”

“ So I will,” exclaimed the eldest boy, “ and
of you, too, father.”

“Thank you, my boy.”

“But,” said little Charlie, anxiously, “mother
won’t grow old yet, will she ?”

“Indeed I hope not, Charlie,” replied his
father, smiling.

“Not till lam a man,” said Charlie, “ and
then I can work for her.”

“TT think you can work for her now, my
little boy ; do you wish to do so?”

“Yes,” answered Charlie, looking earnestly
at his father.

«Then I will tell you what you can do for
her. When she is well enough to come down-



THE BABY. 21

stairs again, and bring the Baby with her, you
can rock the cradle.”

“ So I will,” exclaimed the delighted boy.

“J think, father,” said Mary, “it ought to
be my Baby.”

«Why so, Mary?” ;

“Because you’ know, father, she was born
on my birthday.”

“So she was, Mary; but do you think you
can do for her all that is necessary ?”

“T can wash, and dress, and feed her, father,”
returned Mary, confidently.

“Perhaps you can. But, Mary, there is
much more to be done for Baby besides that.
T have told you one thing we should think of
when we look at Baby; I will tell you of
another. Who gives us Baby ?”

“God,” answered Mary, reverently.

“Yes, God gave me Baby; He gave you all
to me, and He expects that I will not only
feed and clothe you, but train you im His
ways, and lead you to obey Him in all things.



22 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

Dearly as I love you all, my children, I have
fear also—fear lest I should not do all for you
that the Almighty expects of me. He has given
you to my care, and requires that I should
teach you to be good men and women, His
grace helping me. This makes me sad when
you commit a fault, and induces me to punish
you, that you may not repeat it.”

The children listened to their father very
attentively.

« Will you,” he continued, ‘remember this
when you are tempted to do wrong ?”

“ Ves, father.”

“And now, Mary, do you think you are
wise and good enough to take Baby as your
own, should I be inclined to give her up to
you?”

“No, father,” answered Mary, mn a subdued
tone. ,

“ Well, my child,” said Moore, putting his
arm round his little girl and drawing her to
him, “‘ you shall be allowed to call Baby your
baby, but you and she must remain under my



THE BABY. 23

care and teaching for many years. I must
teach you both to love and obey the Almighty.
You shall help mother to nurse Baby, and me
by setting her a good example.”

Very glad were all when the mother could
again be one of their party below stairs, and
bring Baby with her. Charlie was especially
watchful of the little one, and often made
remarks upon her.

“ Why,” he asked, “ does she sleep so much?
Why does she not look about at everything ?”

“She cannot see them yet,” answered his
mother. “I think, Mary, you can tell me.
what God created first ?”

“Tight, mother.”

“Yes; and the first thing a Baby seesis the
light. In a little time you will see Baby look
at the fire, and at the candle as it is moved
about the room; but it will be some time
before she sees anything else.”

“Well,” said James, “ that is almost as bad
as the kittens.”

“Ah! but,” said Mary, “when kittens are



24 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

born they cannot open their eyes for nine
days, while our Baby does open hers; see,
they are open now.”

“T shall be glad when she can see me,” said
Charlie. “ What nice little hands she has!
but why does she not open them ?”

“Because she cannot use them yet,” an-
swered his mother.

“ Charlie,” said John, laughing, “I think
she wants to knock you down; see how she
throws her doubled fists about ; she’ll certainly
hit you,” and John pretended to guard himself
from an expected blow, and to get out of
Baby’s reach.

“¢ She can’t hurt me, can she?” asked Charlie,
almost doubtingly, of his mother.

“No, no, Charlie, she is not thinking of you.”
Then opening one of the little hands, his
mother added, “See what a pretty hand it
is, so white, and fat, and soft outside, and so
pink inside !”

“May I kiss it?” asked the little boy ; and
upon receiving Jeave to do so, he touched it



THE BABY. 25

with his lips very gently, and said, “I love
Baby, mother.”

“T hope we all do,” returned his mother.
«* And now, Charlie, you may rock her to sleep.”

Charlie, delighted and proud, fetched his
own little wooden chair, and seating himself,
rocked the cradle very gently and steadily till
his mother told him he might leave off, as
Baby was asleep.

Baby was a great amusement to all, but
more especially to Mary and Charlie; the
former proudly and fondly calling her ‘er
Baby, while Charlie, long before she had
power to hold anything, brought her odd bits
of wood and string which formed his stock
of treasured playthings, patiently picking them
up as often as she let them fall from her weak
and uncertain grasp.

When Mrs. Moore was sufficiently recovered,
she went to church to return thanks to the
Almighty for having spared her, and not very
long after the Baby was to be taken to church
also to be baptized.

3



26 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

This was a great event to the children, and
there was some consultation as to the name to
be given her.

“ Name her Edward, mother,” said Charlie,
at which his brothers and sisters laughed
heartily.

“Why, that’s a man’s name,” exclaimed
John, “it won’t do for a girl”

“ Won’t it, mother ?”

“ Not very well, Charlie.”

“TJ should like to have it Deborah,” said
Anne, “ because old Deb Dutton is such a nice
old woman.”

“ Because she gives you lollypops some-
times,” said John. ‘ And you think to make
Baby a nice old Baby by naming her Deb;
now I think it a very ugly name.”

“Your father and I wish to name her Cathe-
rine,” said the amused mother.

“Oh yes! that will do nicely,” exclaimed
all the children. ‘It must be Catherine.”

“Ah! then you come to cats again,” said
John; “ Kitty, Kitty, miaow.”



a

THE BABY. 2%,

Charlie looked almost angry, as he fancied
his brother compared the dear little Baby to
a kitten.

Thus the name was fixed upon, the god-
father and god-mothers were provided, and
Mary gladly worked industriously upon the
little white frock Baby was to wear on the
occasion.

«My children,” said Moore, “ you have been
very busy in finding a name for Baby, but is that
all we are to think of in her baptism? We
can call her by a name without taking her
to church ; why, then, do we take her there ?”

The children did not answer.

“ Mary,” continued Moore, “think of your
catechism, and tell me what you were before
your baptism ?”

Mary considered for a few moments, then
said, “A child of wrath.”

“Yes, because born in Adam’s sin, therefore
a child of God’s wrath or anger. But when you
were baptized you received the Holy Ghost
which cleansed you from that sin; you were



28 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

then born again of the Spirit, and became—
what ?”

“A member of Christ and the child of
God,” answered Mary, in the words of the
catechism.

“Yes. What does the parson do when he
takes the Baby in his arms?”

Again Mary thought for a moment; then
said, “ He signs her with the cross.”

“Right; in token that from that moment
she is to obey our blessed Saviour in all
things. Will you think of this next Sunday
when Baby is baptized; and will you remem-
ber the same has been done to you?”

The children answered “Yes,” and Mary
said—

“Vm glad Baby will be baptized on a
Sunday.”

“For what reason, Mary?” asked her
father.

“Because it is God’s day, father.”

“You are right, my dear child; we bring
Baby to Christ on the Lord’s-day. It is also



THE BABY. g9

right that baptisms should take place in the full
congregation, that each person may be reminded
of his own. Think again of your catechism,
and tell me if Baby will promise anything ?”

“Why, Baby can’t speak!” exclaimed
Charlie.

“No; therefore we choose persons to speak
for her; these are her god-father and god-
mothers. What do they promise in her name,
Mary?”

“To renounce the devil and all his works.”

“Yes. That is, to cast away sin—to believe
in God—and to obey Him. Do you think you
can tell me why I wish Baby to be baptized
while she is so young, and cannot speak for
herself ?”

All the children were thoughtful but silent.

“ You told me that till she is baptized she is
achild of God’s anger, and I wish to make her
a child of God’s love as soon as possible after
she is born, that if the Almighty should please
to take her from me, we may be able to think
‘of her as one of those little angels who are
3—2,



30 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

- always in the brightness of heaven, and in the
presence of the Almighty.”

The children were impressed by their father’s
words, and a certain degree of seriousness was
in their thoughts and manner when they spoke
of the approaching baptism.

They were very attentive during the cere-
mony, and the kisses given to the little Chris-
tian after it, had more in them than common
worldly affection.

“God loves Catherine now,” said little
Charlie gently, as he gazed lovingly upon his
little sister on his mother’s knee.

“Yes, my dear little boy, and I pray He
may ever love her.”

The Baby grew, and though, like all other
babies, she was sometimes fretful, would be
awake on busy days when her mother wished
her to sleep, and would sometimes show undue.
favour and dislike among her brothers and
sisters, all loved and bore with her; Charlie let
her bite his finger between her swollen and
aching gums, even pies one or two white teeth



THE BABY. él

had shown their points through them, and if
the pain brought the colour into his cheeks, he
merely said—

“Oh! Baby, not quite so hard, please.”

He let her pull his hair with her little fat
fingers, entangled in his curls, without flinch-
ing or expressing any anger.

Mary and Charlie were certainly Baby’s
favourites, perhaps merely because they played
with her and nursed her oftener than the other
children did.

Then she began to run alone, and at first
Charlie was alarmed at her many falls, but
when he found she did not really hurt herself
he laughed to see her bump down, or roll like
a ball, and by laughing taught Baby to laugh
_also; he would pick her up, put her upon her
feet again, and holding out his arms, tempt her
to toddle to him, and oh! what a hug and a kiss
he gave her when she fairly reached him.

Another pleasure was when Baby began to
talk. “Mum-mum, ta-ta,” was all she could
say for along time. Charlie tried very much



82 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

to teach her to pronounce his name, but it
seemed too difficult for her, and he was at
last obliged to be content with her saying,
“ Ar,” and to guess when it was applied to him,
of course fancying it was so a hundred times
when it was not.

Catherine was little more than a year old
when she was attacked with a very severe in-
flammation on the chest, and for some days
her safety was very doubtful. All were anxious
about her, the merry laugh was hushed and the
chattering was in sad whispers. The father’s
face was grave, the mother’s pale and anxious.
Mary was of real assistance in the sick room ;
she could soothe the little moaning sufferer, and
relieve her mother of some painful watching,
when the many duties for the family called her
from beside the sick-bed. Charlie crept on
tip-toe as noiselessly as he could to look at his
“little darling,” and never failed to pray for
her recovery in the simple words his love
prompted. He narrowly watched the counte-
nance of the surgeon when he came from the



THE BABY. 33

sick-room, and once witiepernely asked, with
tearful eyes—

«Will she die ?”

“We hope not,” answered the surgeon.

“God will take her, father, if she does, for
you know she is His child. Iam so glad she
was taken to church and baptized.”

The loving father patted his boy’s curly
head, as he said—

“‘ God’s will be done!”

The child so loved was spared. More ten-
derness and love were lavished upon her than
ever; but as Catherine’s health returned, Charlie
had another sorrowful anxiety. Sorrow and
watching had worn upon his mother; she had
become very thin, pale, and weak, and poor
Charlie feared she was growing old before he
could work for her.

“ Charlie,” said Mrs. Moore, one day when
the little boy was earnestly scrutinizing his
mother’s face; “why do you look so earnestly
at me?”

“« Are you well, mother?” asked Charlie.



ok TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

«Yes, thank you, dear boy.”

Charlie still looked attentively at her for
some time, then throwing his arms round her
neck, sobbed out—

“Don’t grow old yet, mother; oh! please
don’t.”

“What do you mean, Charlie? I am not
growing old at present, dear.”

“Oh! please wait till I can work for you ;
till I am a big man !” said the distressed boy.

His mother kissed him, assuring him he
would in all probability be a man before she
should be old and helpless. So Charlie ceased
to watch her countenance, and in a few weeks
or months both mother and Baby were restored
to their usual health.

Again Charlie could lead his little pet
about the lanes and fields, filling her little
pinafore with the prettiest wild flowers, which
she too often delighted in destroying; and
Charlie would say—

“Oh! fie, Katie!’

The little rosy mouth put up to his, soon



THE BABY. 35

gained her pardon, and the fault was repeated
again and again, with no more correction than
these gentle words, and with the same forgive-
ness heartily renewed.

As Catherine grew older, Charlie was her
guide and protector to school, where he was
sometimes inattentive to his own lessons in
listening to her little voice name the great
letters pointed out to her. How anxious he
was that she should get on. He tried toteach her
in the play-hours, but she would not attend as
he wished ; in the midst of Charlie’s teaching
she would chase a butterfly, or run to gather a
flower, so Charlie was obliged to leave her
tuition to one who had more authority over
her.

Thus the Baby, whose arrival had given so
much pleasure, continued to be the pet of all,
till she was in a fair way to be spoiled; and she
would have been so, had not the good training
of the parents counteracted the injudicious in-
dulgence of the children. Catherine, with the
others, was brought up in the exercise of the



36 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

Christian virtues, and in love of Him to whom
we owe all our blessings.

Mrs. Ainsley closed her papers, and put the
red ribbon round.them.

“Thank you, ma’am,” said Mary Moore,
“that is a nice story.” ”

*“T am glad you like it, Mary.”

“Tt is all about my little sister Catherine,
and you know, ma’am, she really is my baby; she
sleeps with me, and I often wash and dress her.”

“JT am very glad you can help your mother
so much; and recollect, Mary, you must not
spoil little Catherine.”

“Yes, ma'am.”

“Please, ma’am,” said John Beckett, “ whose
story is to come next ?”

“Must I really bring another on Tuesday,
our next writing-day ?”

“Oh yes, please, ma’am,” shouted all the
children.

“Well, I will try. But do you not think it
is rather hard work for me? It takes some



THE BABY. : 37

time merely to write a story down on the paper,
and then I have to think a great deal about it.’

“Oh! but you know all about it, ma’am,”
said Emma Watson.

Mrs. Ainsley smiled, and said, “I am afraid
not; but I will not disappoint you if I can help
it; therefore I think you, Emma, shall have
the next story. What shall it be about ?”

“‘T should like it to be about a Coal, please,
ma’am,” answered Emma, much delighted.

Mrs. Ainsley looked painfully grave and
puzzled as she said, “ A coal! that cannot be
a very easy task, though a coal is such a com-
mon thing. Now, good-bye, for the presen$.”

The children rose and curtsied as Mrs.
Ainsley left the room.



38 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

II.
THE LITTLE COAL.

“Goop morning, dear children,” said Mrs.
Ainsley, as she entered the schoolroom.
«Emma, I have brought your tale.”
« About a little coal, ma’am ?” asked Emma.
“Yes, and some may wonder what a little
coal can have to say of itself; you shall hear.”

THE LITTLE COAL.

You all know that coal is dug out of the
earth, and the pits or mines from which it is
dug are very deep and dark; the entrance to
them is by a perpendicular hole, called the
shaft, through which the men descend and
ascend, and the coal is drawn up in baskets.



THE LITTLE COAL. 39

We will fancy ourselves at the bottom of one
of these deep mines, which has not yet been
worked, just in the spot where our Little Coal
lies by the side of a large lump, from which
it had been by some means broken.

“Mother,” said the Little Coal, “are you
very old?”

“ Indeed I am, child, very, very old.”
~ ©And have you always been in this dark
place, mother ?”

“ Always as you know me, my child, but
not always as I know myself; for I was some-
thing else before I was coal, and lived in a very
different place to this, but I believe I am still
very near it.”

«What do you mean by living, mother?
Don’t you live now, and don’t I live ?”

“No, child, we exist, but do not live.”

“Then what is living?” curiously inquired
the Little Coal.

“To live is to breathe the pure, clear air,
and to draw in nourishment which makes us
grow.”



40 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

“Oh! shall I ever grow as big as you,
mother ?”

“No, silly child, you will never grow, be-
cause, as I told you just now, you do not live—
only exist.”

“Well,” said the Little Coal, despondingly,
“T can’t quite understand you; but will you
tell me all about yourself when you lived? I
should so like to hear it.”

“JT will tell you all I remember,” answered
the Big Coal to the curious and listening little
bit. “ When I lived, along, long time ago, so
long that I cannot count the years, and no
Coal can say how long it is since that time, I
was a tall thing called a tree, and had branches ©
which spread about on alk sides, and I was
covered with green leaves, through which I
breathed the fresh air, which was much purer
and sweeter than that around us now.”

“That must have been very pleasant.”

“Indeed, it was very delightful. I had a
great many companions, all more or less like
myself. The world’ we lived in was very



THE LITTLE COAL _ 4l

beautiful, the blue sky so bright in the sunshine,
and the air so warm and fresh, I enjoyed
waving my branches, and shaking my leaves in
the gentle summer wind.”

“T daresay it was very delightful. Don’t
you wish to be in the beautiful world
again ?”

“J have no wish about it, for I am content
to be as I am.”

After a moment of silence the Little Coal
asked—

“Did you live long so ?”

“ Yes, a long time, and enjoyed myself very
much ; everything was so bright and beautiful ;
the gay flowers made a carpet at my feet, and
there were smaller trees and green grass.”

The Little Coal listened in amazement, but
with much attention, though all seemed so
strange that it could not understand it. Still,
as its mother seemed to think it was very de-
lightful, and to have been very happy, it
asked—

“ And can I never live so, mother?”

4—9,



42 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

“No, my child ; you were a part of me when
I lived, but will never live so again.”

“Was I!” said the Little Coal, in great
astonishment. “Why don’t I recollect it,
mother ?” ;

“ Because you were a very small part of me,
and were so entirely myself, that you had no
separate enjoyment of life, and therefore cannot
recollect it.”

“T should very much like to live so,” sighed
the Little Coal, “and see all the beautiful
things you talk of.”

The Old Coal heaved a deep sigh, as it said
sorrowfully, “ You ay perhaps, one day see
them all.”

“Oh! shall I? I am so glad,” exclaimed
the Little Coal, joyfully, and if it had -had
hands it would have clapped them in its joy.

“Silly Little Coal, be content as you are.
To see all the things I have seen will bring
you no good or happiness. Are you not happy
now?”

“Oh yes; but I should like to be happier.”



THE LITTLE COAL. 43

“That is wrong, very wrong, my child. Be
content, that is the greatest happiness. You
will never be happy anywhere, if constantly
wishing for what you have not.”

“Don’t you really wish to see all those
beautiful things again, mother?”

“No. I enjoyed them when I had them,
and I think there may be many more things I
have not seen, but I will not pine for them.
My place is here, at least for a time, and it is
my duty to be content, and patiently to await
what the future may bring.”

‘But you were very happy, mother.”

“Yes; but to see all I have seen, far from
making you happy, will, I believe, bring misery
to you.”

«That is very strange,” said the Little Coal,
again much puzzled by its mother’s words.

“My child, you must be content.”

“ Well, I will try to be so. Only ”” the
Little Coal hesitated, then in a low, sad whisper
added, “I think it must be delightful to be a
tree.”





44 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

And the Little Coal did try to be content
with its present happiness; but although it con-
quered the wish to be a tree, it could not avoid
sometimes thinking of the sun and air its
mother had talked of, wondering what they
were, and how seeing such beautiful things
could cause it misery, and it inquired of its
mother.

“ My child, I cannot explain to you why these
beautiful things should cause you pain. God
made everything beautiful and very good, and
does not wish there should be pain and misery,
and yet,1 have anassurance which I do not quite
understand, that if you should be thrown into
the way of these things, some great misfortune
will befall you. Therefore it is better for you
not to think so much of them, and to leave the
future, only seeking to fulfil your duty in the
present.”

“What is my duty, mother ?”

“To be content. And believe me, in my
life, I was not free from pain.”

< Will you tell me about it, mother ?”



THE LITTLE COAL. 45

Ves:

And the Little Coal’s mother finding it really
wished and tried to be good, told it more of
herself. How, when she was a tree, a storm
blew her down, and the water washed over her,
pressing heavily upon her, for they were deep
waters, and that the air became so hot she could
not breathe, till at last the water and heat
changed her so much, that she lost all form of
a tree, and became the Coal she then was. And
not only she, but all her companions suffered
in this manner, and formed the coal by which
they were surrounded, so that from that time
they ceased to live.

“ How very dreadful!”’ said the Little Coal.
“But you said I cannot live again, so all this
cannot happen to me.”

“No, my child, but you will have misery if
ever you see the sunshine.”

Shall 1?” inquired the Little Coal, sorrow-
fully, for it had not quite conquered all its
wishes. ‘If I see it only for a moment ?”

“Tf ever the sunshine should come to us,



46 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

be assured our happiness will soon end, and
great misery come.”

“Oh, dear! then I will try not to wish to
see it, for I should not like to be less happy
than I am.”

This quiet state, however, was not to last,
and the happiness the Little Coal was learning
to value was soon to be disturbed.

There was now, not far from them, a
dreadful noise, which made the Little Coal
tremble with alarm, and the place in which they
lay became less dark. More noise came ; first,
a deep, thumping noise; then a crashing noise,
and a rumbling, mixed with sounds which the
Little Coal could not at all understand, and
which its mother could not explain, though she
had a dim suspicion, and much feared what
might happen. More noise came, and more
light, till the Little Coal asked of its sad
mother—

“Mother, what is that beautiful thing up
there ?”



THE LITTLE COAL. 47

“The blue sky, my child,” she answered
very sorrowfully.

“ How beautiful! I could look at it for ever.
Is it what you used to see when you were a
tree?”

“Yes, my child, it is.”

“And are you not glad to see it again,
mother ?”

Then the Little Coal remembered all its
mother had said of the misery that would come
if ever it saw the sunshine, and half doubting,
it said—

“It cannot hurt us, it is up so very high.
Besides, mother, such a beautiful thing cannot
do any harm, it must be very good.”

“The blue sky 7s very good, my child,
and will do us no harm; it is all that may
follow its appearance that we may have to
fear.”

Still for a time no harm came, and the Little
Coal could quietly admire the blue sky, but the
delight which it had at first felt at it was now



48 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

changed to something like awe, as a dread of
the future came to it.

At last men came to the place, for a shaft
had been made to the bottom of the mine, and
the Little Coal put many questions to its
mother about these strange things, asking if
they were trees?

But the men were as strange to the Large
Coal as to the Little one, for there had been
none when she was a tree; but she had less of
wonder and more of thought than the Little
Coal, and she understood what the men were
doing, for she saw some of the coal near her
put into the basket and hoisted up, as it seemed,
to the blue sky.

‘Shall we go up to the beautiful blue sky,
mother ?”

“Perhaps so, my child; indeed, I fear we
shall.”

« And shall I touch the blue sky ?”

«No, my child, I think not.”

Soon the men came to them and shovelledthem
into the basket, which was drawn upward slowly.



THE LITTLE COAL. 49

«Now, mother,” said the Little Coal, sels
shall see the trees and the sunshine, shall I
not ?”

« Alas! my dear child,” said the sorrowing
mother, “you will soon wish yourself back
again in our dark home.”

But the Little Coal was unwilling to believe
this, and could not help rejoicing when they
reached the top of the shaft, and were shot out
of the basket.

«Oh! how bright! how warm!’ it ex-
claimed; but soon became silent in its wonder
at everything around it, and its mother seemed
so sorrowful it did not like to tease her with
questions; so it lay quietly, admiring more
and more the large, beautiful blue sky, and the
bright stars that came into it at night.

For a long time they lay at the mouth of
the mine. Then they were put into a truck or
waggon and carried a long way upon the railroad
through a country well planted with trees, at
which the Little Coal looked with admiration,
almost wishing to be one; and the Old Coal

5



50 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

said they were not nearly as large as she had
been; indeed she thought them so small, she
fancied they must be only flower stems, only
they had no bright gay colours on their tops,
and their leaves were very much like what hers
had been.

At last they reached London, and were
deposited in a large yard. All this time.the
wonder of the Little Coal was aroused, but the
Large Coal was too sad to make any remarks
upon the new things around her. At last the
Little Coal became frightened ; it did not like
the yard, and now seldom saw the blue sky,
while it disliked the constant noise about it.

“Mother, mother, let us go back to our
home,” it piteously cried.

“We cannot, my child.”

“Oh, why not? I don’t like to be here.
Why did I wish to leave home ?”

«* Because you were discontented, my child,
and wished for pleasures you could not under-
stand, forgetting your duty to be content in
the situation in which you were placed.”



THE LITTLE COAL 51

“Oh! I shall never be happy any more.”

“ T hope you will, my child.”

“Tow can I, mother, in this dull, dirty
place ?”

“By being of use to, and making others
happy.”

«When shall I be able to do this?”

“JT know not, my child. You must now
learn patience, and wait.”

The Little Coal again tried to be good, though
it thought of its former home with a sigh.
Soon separated from its mother, it was again
shovelled into a basket, and carried away to a
wretched house, where, in a small room lighted
by a window, the broken panes of which were
stuffed with rags and paper, there was a dark »
closet into which our Little Coal was thrown.

Here it had time to think of the past, how’
naughty it had been in being discontented, and
resolved to do all it could to help others in
future, and try to be happy, as its mother had
said. Although the closet was as dark as its
first home had been, yet it was not like it, and



52 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

the Little Coal did not for an instant imagine
it had returned to the mine. Where was it
then ? 5

Frequent moaning and childish cries reached
it, and with these sad sounds came also the
loving words of a sorrowing mother trying to
soothe her sick child, whose illness caused her
much grief.

Little by little the heap of coal near our
little friend was carried from the closet; and
as the door was opened, and sometimes left so,
the curiosity of our Little Coal was awakened
as to what was passing in the room. Upon a
small bed, not very far from the fire, lay a sick
and suffering child, and by its side sat the
anxious, grieving mother. The Little Coal
thought of its own mother, and became inter-
ested in the child. It listened in pity to its
wailing, and wished to be able to do something
to comfort it; but if the loving mother could
not alleviate the poor child’s pain, what could
the Little Coal do?

It was very sad, day and night, to hear that



THE LITTLE COAL. 53

piteous moaning, and to mark the tears on the
poor mother’s cheek. The room seemed so
desolate—a small table, two or three old chairs,
and a mattress covered by an old coloured
counterpane, was all the furniture, besides the
sick child's little bed. And hour after hour
that poor mother was alone with her moaning,
suffering child. .True, the doctor sometimes
came, but he said very little; the clergyman,
and his good lady, came, and did all they could
to comfort both mother and child; but the one
could not be relieved from pain—the sorrow of
the other could not be lightened.

It was very, very sad, and our Little Coal
forgot its own disappointments in witnessing
the distress of the inmates of that poverty-
stricken room. Soon it was taken from the
closet and put upon the fire, and then the
Little Coal was glad, for now it could do some-
thing for that poor sick child. How quickly
it put forth its cheerful blaze, and fancied it
made the pale cheek of the poor child glow!
Brightly it burned, and hugged the small, well-

5—2



e@
54 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

worn saucepan, and rejoiced greatly to hear the
broth it contained begin to simmer; that was
its work, and the child should have a hot sup-
per that night. So on and on it blazed, forget-
ful of self, and only glad to be of use to that
pale, sick child; on and on it hurned—up and
up went its gentle, steady f.ame—up and up
went its smoke, too, through the narrow
chimney, higher and higher, curling and danc-
ing in the sunshine, towards that blue sky it
had so much admired when first seen from the
dark mine. All was bright with the Little
Coal now, for it had done a kindness and was
happy. So ended the Little Coal, in—smoke.

Mrs. Ainsley closed her papers, and Emma
thanked her for the tale.

“JT did not think a Little Coal could tell so
much, ma’am.”

«And I scarcely knew what it would say
when you asked me to write about it.”

“J shall often think of it, ma’am, when I see
the fire blaze.”



THE LITTLE COAL. 55

“Think, my dear child, how wrong it is to
be discontented. John Moore, your tale shall
be the next—a Gardener, I think you said.”

“Yes, please, ma’am.”

« Ah, John, you know I atu fond of flowers,
therefore think I shall tell you a great deal
ahout them.”



56 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS. |

Iv.
THE YOUNG GARDENER.

Wuen Mrs. Ainsley came to the next writing-
lesson, John Moore anxiously looked for the
red ribbon, and his countenance brightened
when he sawit. Alas! in passing him, Mrs.
Ainsley touched his elbow, and caused a blot
upon his book; the colour rose in John’s face,
which became saddened, for a blot upon the
copy always produced punishment.

“Tam very sorry to have caused that blot,
John,” said Mrs. Ainsley, “but you shall not
suffer for it. I am the person to be punished,
and as it gives me pleasure to read these little
tales to you, I think my punishment must be



THE YOUNG GARDENER. ONG

to take my papers home again without reading
them.”

There was a general exclamation of “Oh,
no.”

“That would punish us, ma’am,” said John.

“Then you will forgive me, John?” and
being assured of a full forgiveness, Mrs. Ainsley

began the tale of

THE YOUNG GARDENER.

John Moore had often declared he would be
a gardener, and was very anxious to begin his
work, therefore he begged of his father that he
might have the little front garden for his own.

“Do you think, John, you could keep it
neat? Iam afraid we should soon have more
weeds than vegetables or flowers.”

“No, that you should not, father,” said
John, much inclined to be angry at such an in-
sinuation; “I would work so hard in it.”

“J must not have your schooling neglected,
my boy.”

“No, father, I can learn my lessons, and



58 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

work in my garden too. I will get up early
and work in it before I go to school, and at
night, and when we have a holiday.”

“When you have a holiday you will like to
be playing marbles, or some other game, with
Dick Brown.”

“No, indeed, I shall not, father.”

«Well, I'll try you, Jack.”

John jumped from the stool on which he
had been seated to eat his supper, clapped his
hands, and at that moment was as happy as any
little boy need wish to be. He had worked
very industriously in his garden for a week,
when his father said—

“ Jack, [think I must give you some garden-
tools. I! must go into the town to-morrow,
and as it will be Saturday and a holiday, you
shall go with me to buy some.”

John was immensely delighted, and said,
«Oh, thank you, father. How kind !”

“‘ Mother,” said Moore to his wife, “I think
if our young gardener produces good vegetables,



‘THE YOUNG GARDENER., 59

we may buy them of him at the fair market
price. What say you?”

Mrs. Moore readily assented to this proposal.

“Thank you, father; that will be famous.
I shall get on well so,” and John rubbed his
hands in great glee.

How glad John was to see a bright morning,
for they were to walk into the town, and return
by the carrier. He trudged off by the side of
his father, talking about many things, but most
aout his tools—which kind of hoe he would
have, and the fineness and size of the rake;
each tool was talked of, yet John was as un-
decided as ever when they entered the iron-
monger’s shop, and depended entirely on his
father’s judgment.

The tools were bought, and Moore and his
happy boy took their places in the carricr’s
cart, John carefully holding the precious tools,
and fancying every one admired them.

“You are a good boy to take care of your
father’s tools,” said one of his companions.



60 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

“They are my own,” exclaimed John, joy-
fully ; “father bought them for me. Didn’t
you, father ?”

« And what will you do with them, my little
man ?””

“Dig and rake in my garden, to be sure,”
answered John, rather proudly.

“ Have you any cauliflowers in your garden?”

“Yes, a great many.”

“Ah,” said his questioner, ‘maybe you
wont grow them so big as one I had given to
me.”

“ How big was it?” asked John, in his turn.

“Oh, so big that my missis was forced to
boil it in the copper !”

John looked astonished, and half incredulous
said, “I should like to have some as big;
what would mother say ?”

“ She would soon heat her copper,” said his
father, amused. .

They reached their village, and John carried
his tools home in joy and pride. His mother
was the first to whom he displayed them,



THE YOUNG GARDENER, 61

and her admiration delighted him; then his
brothers and sisters praised them; James ex-
amined them very closely, and taking the spade
in his hand, said—

“Why, Jack, you'll never be able to dig with
this, it is so heavy.”

“Can’t I, though,” exclaimed John, and
taking it from James, he went through the
action of digging to prove it was not too
heavy. “Isn’t it a famous spade, Jem ?”

On the Monday morning John was up early
to try his new tools; he did not consider what
was most necessary to be done, but he dug a
little, raked a little, and hoed a little, not be-
ing particular about clearing away the weeds,
and therefore did not add to the tidiness of his
garden, and when school-time came, he could
not help thinking he had been at work some
time, but had done little good to his ground ;
however, he had tried his new tools, and they
were famous ones; he would work in earnest at
noon-time.

John worked well, and his little brother

6



62 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

Charlie delighted to help him, by carrying away
the weeding basket, and occasionally weeding,
when he had learnt to know the weeds from
the plants. One unlucky day, however, Charlie,
not heeding where he was treading while he
talked to his brother, stamped very much upon
John’s bed of early radishes. John’s passion
rose the instant he perceived the mischief done,
and throwing down his spade, he ran to his little
brother and gave him a blow upon his head,
upon which Charlie screamed out, as much
frightened by the suddenness of the attack, as
pained by the blow; he went crying into the
house, and John turned sulkily to his work
again.
Moore soon came into the ae to inquire
into the matter.

“ John, why did you strike your brother ?”

“ He trod on my radishes.”

«And you dared to strike him! Could
you not have asked him to move? You have
sinned very much in giving way to passion.”

“They were my earliest radishes, and I



THE YOUNG GARDENER. 63

meant to have surprised mother soon with some
for tea,” said John in a lowand saddened tone,
for he was now sorry for what he had done.

“Tam sorry your radishes are spoiled, but
much more sorry at your passion and violence.
I must help you to correct yourself; therefore,
first beg your brother’s pardon.”

John obeyed his father, for his passion had
passed away, and he was ashamed to see the
red mark on his little brother’s cheek which
his hand had caused.

“Tam sorry I spoiled your radishes,” said
Charlie, holding up his face to be kissed by
John. ‘I won’t do so any more, and perhaps
they are not all quite spoiled.”

« Your little brother is a good example to
you, John,” said his father; “he forgives you
the blow; from your heart you must forgive
him the injury he so unconsciously did. You
know who has Cot us to forgive even
until seventy times seven.’

“Yes, father, our blessed Redeemer, and in-
deed I forgive Charlie.”



64 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

eo, And now, John, I forbid you to work in
your garden for a week.”

John looked dismayed, and Charlie taking
his hand looked ‘pleadingly at his father.

“* Father,” he said, “ I know Jack is sorry ;
T was very naughty not to look where I put
my feet; don’t punish him this time, please.”

“Tt is painful to me to punish him, Charlie,
and I do so only for his good. I cannot grant
your request, Charlie, but I hope this will be
the last time I may have to punish John.”

Poor John, with downcast looks and an
aching heart, collected his tools together and
carried them into the shed after having given a
lingering look at his garden, and sighing said,
“Tt will all be spoiled in a week.”

It was a long sad week to our young gar-
dener, who purposely avoided looking at his
garden during the time of his punishment, but
assiduously applied himself to his lessons, and
though little Charlie’s repeated efforts to make
him smile were in vain, he was obedient to his
parents and studiously kind to his brothers and



THE YOUNG GARDENER. 65

sisters. When the week was ended, he said
nothing till his father spoke.

“ Now, John, we will go to your garden.”

John went with alacrity, and when he saw
his garden in neat order and uninjured by his
absence, he smiled joyfully, and gratefully
thanked his father, for he was convinced he had
taken care of it. Then Charlie gently drew
him to the radish-bed, and said, almost in a
whisper, “ They were not all spoiled, Jack, and
I have taken care of them. May Ihelp you to
pull them ?”

John looked towards his father, but without
speaking.

“Yes, my boy, pull those that are ready for
your mother’s tea.”

Now was John again happy ; Charlie helped
him to pull the radishes, and he put them upon
the tea-table near his mother, little Charlie
looking as pleased as if they had been the pro-
duce of his own little garden, while John’s
cheek was flushed and a tear stood in his eye.

«Thank you, my dear boy,” his mother said,

6—2



66 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

holding out her hand to him; but John could
not be contented with the hand, he threw his
arms round his mother’s neck, and the hitherto
restrained tears fell plentifully down his cheeks
for a few moments; then each partook of the
radishes, declaring them to be very good, if not
the very best they had ever eaten, and John
went to bed that night a better, therefore a
happier boy.

This was the only pain the garden caused
John ; it did him much good, for he became in-
dustrious and self-denying, and he learnt to
govern his temper. ‘His great friend, Dick
Brown,was also benefited ; he had formerly been
John’s playmate, and they had spent many an
idle hour together ; now, however, it was very
different: Dick had been roused to industry,
and had begged of his father, who was Squire
Westerbury’s gardener, a piece of ground to —
cultivate, as John had done, and the boys were
now as inseparable in their work as they had
been in their play, and the gardens formed a
stronger link between them than ever the games



THE YOUNG GARDENER, 67

at marbles had. If either had fine seed it was
shared with the other, and they helped each
other in every way they could; while Brown
gave to each equally the benefit of his experi-
ence and advice.

Squire Westerbury took note of the boys’
proceedings, and, wishing to give them encour-
agement, promised a prize of a beautiful book
on gardening to him who should bring him on
a certain day the six finest and best cauli-
flowers.

“T know we shall have it, Jack,” said little
Charlie.

“Tam not at all sure of that, Charlie, but
we will try all we can.”

The cauliflowers were chosen, twelve of equal
size and thickness, and were planted in each
garden precisely at the same time, and thus the
boys started fairly in the competition. Charlie
gave his undivided attention to these particular
plants, and seemed to think any care bestowed
upon the other vegetables as so much robbed
from the important cauliflowers.



68 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

“Charlie,” said his brother, “ we must take
care of the peas and beans, or we shall have
none to eat with the bacon of that fat pig in
father’s sty.”

“But I would rather go without the peas
than that you should not have the prize.”

“You may, my good little man,” said John,
patting Charlie’s head; “but father and mo-
ther expect the peas, so we will take care of
all.”

Many were the visits the boys paid to the
gardens of each other, to watch the progress
of the cauliflowers, again and again were they
measured, and their sizes and whiteness com-
pared. Time passed, and it now wanted only
one week of the day mentioned by the squire
for his decision. That week passed, and the
important day came. It was a bright and
beautiful morning, and John and Charlie rose
early; but not earlier than their friend Dick,
for before they were quite ready to go down-
stairs, they saw him come into the garden.



THE YOUNG GARDENER. 69

< Ah! there’s Dick,” exclaimed Charlie; “‘ we
are coming, Dick,” and downstairs they ran,

“Why, Dick,” said John, “what is the
matter, is anyone at home ill ?”

“No, no, they are very well, but——” and
poor Dick seemed unable to speak.

“ Do tell me what is the matter?” said John,
very sorry to see his friend’s distress.

“My cauliflowers,” at last said Dick; “ they
are all spoiled.”

“Oh, how? They were all right last
night when we looked at them; and so
beautiful |”

“Yes, but the pig has eaten them,” said
Dick, in a sad and broken voice. He then told
them, that when he went into the garden that
morning, he saw a strange pig among his beau-
tiful cauliflowers; the three best were de-
stroyed, and the others so broken about as to
be good for nothing.

“T hope it is not our pig,” said Charlie, and
away he ran to the sty, and soon returned,



70 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

exclaiming, “all yight; I am very glad it was
not our pig.”

“T will go with you to look at them.”

They went forthwith to Dick’s garden; it
was indeed a sad scene of devastation. John
endeavoured to console his friend ; and Charlie,
taking his hand, said, in a gentle voice, with
_ tears in his eyes,

“T am very, very sorry, Dick, but glad it
was not our pig.”

The mischief could not’ be repaired, and at
noon Squire Westerbury came to Moore’s,
carrying the prize-book in his hand. He went
with Moore and John, followed of course by
Charlie, to view the cauliflowers, and expressed
pleasure at seeing such good ones.

“You have succeeded very well, John,” he
said; “these are very fine plants. Now we
will look at Dick Brown’s.”

“Tt will be of no use, sir,” said John, in a
subdued voice, and looking very sad.

“ Why so, John ?”



THE YOUNG GARDENER. 71

“ His were destroyed this morning, sir. A
pig got into the garden and ate them.”

“Then the prize must be yours, John.”

“No, sir,” replied John, “ Dick’s cauli-
flowers were as good, if not better than mine,
and but for this accident, the prize would have
been his. I cannot take the book.”

“Ts this indeed the case?’ inquired the
squire, turning to Moore.

“It is quite true, sir, that Dick’s were very
fine plants, though I do not think they were
better than John’s; however, I should like, if
you please, sir, that you should ask Brown’s
opinion of them.”

“Very well, then we will go to Brown’s.”

Accordingly they went to Brown’s and saw
poor Dick’s garden, where some _half-eaten
leaves and headless stalks told where the cauli-
flowers had been.

“Tam very sorry for your accident, my
boy,” said Mr. Westerbury, kindly; “J
hear they were very fine plants. Brown



72 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

which do you think were the finer, John’s or
your son’s ?”

“Well, sir, there was not much difference
between them, but if any, I am bound to say,
that to my thinking, John’s were rather the
best.”

“Then I abide by your opinion. The prize
is yours, John ; and let me say how very much
it pleases me to see your industry and the good
fecling between you. Continue to be good
friends. ‘Take the book, John, and I hope you
will find it useful.”

It was a beautiful book, and as the squire
put it into John’s hands, little Charlie looked
as delighted as if it had been his own, while
John, thanking the squire, said,

“Tf it is mine, please, sir, may I do as I like
with it?”

“ Certainly, my lad.”

John immediately held the book out to Dick,
saying, “ Dick, I wish you to have it, for I
think your cauliflowers were the best.”



THE YOUNG GARDENER. 73

“ Oh, no, no, John,” exclaimed Dick, “ in.
deed I can’t.”

Moore seeing the tears in Charlie’s eyes, and
the doleful countenances of the other boys,
wished to cheer them ; so, turning to his little
boy, he said, in a half whisper, “Charlie, ir
think piggy should have the prize, as he had
the finest cauliflowers.”

“Oh, father,” exclaimed Charlie, smiling,
though somewhat shocked at the idea.

John smiled also, and going to a little dis-
tance, left the book in Dick’s hand.

Charlie was, perhaps, the only one of the
party who had less pleasure than pain in the
arrangement, he so much wished his brother to
have the beautiful book, and wondered why he
had given it up. The other. boys were both
happy, though regretting the destructive act
of the pig; and it was some little time before
they could look at that part of Dick’s garden
without pain. However, they turned to work
again, and repeated competition did not de-

7



74 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

stroy their friendship, but rather tended to
cement it.

“Ts that all, ma’am?” asked a young voice
as Mrs. Ainsley closed her papers.

“Indeed it is. I hope you have liked it,
John.”

“ Very much, and thank you, ma’am.”

“TI hope you will recollect the faults our
little gardener corrected, and try to do the
same.”

John promised to do so.

“JT am sorry it is finished,” said Emma.

“Please, ma’am, whose is to be the
next?”

“J think Susan shall choose it. What
shall it be, Susan ?” j

The little girl thus appealed to could not
determine, and Mrs. Ainsley said,

“ Shall I choose for you ?”

“ Yes, please, ma’am.”

«Then I think it will be about a spider.”





THE YOUNG GARDENER. 75



“A spider!” exclaimed more than one little
voice ; “ what can a spider have to say ?”
“You shall hear,” said Mrs. Ainsley, “on
our next writing day.”

;











76 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS,

Â¥.
THE HOUSE SPIDER.

On the next writing day Susan exclaimed,
“ Have you brought the Spider, ma’am ?”

“Yes, Susan, I have him here,” said Mrs.
Ainsley, holding to view the well-known papers
tied with a red ribbon; and when the children
had arranged themselves after the lesson, she
said,—

“Now you must fancy I am a Spider.”

“ What a big one!” said John Moore, in a
laughing tone.

“Yes, a very big one. A large, brown
Spider; but you need not be afraid of me.”

THE HOUSE SPIDER.

There is a nursery rhyme about a Spider
which I have heard ; it is this,—



THE HOUSE SPIDER. V7

* Little Miss Moffet,
Sat on a toffit
Eating curds and whey ;
There came a brown spider,
And sat down beside her,
And frightened Miss Moffet away.”

I can’t tell why Miss Moffet should have run
away; she was very silly to be frightened, for
we should do her no harm, and I am not sure
we should have eaten the curds and whey, for
we don’t like such things. But some people
are so foolish as to be afraid of us, though
why I don’t know, and don’t think they.can
tell me.

Well, my name is Tegeneria, my colour is
an ash, with a band of dark spots on my back,
and though of such a quiet, sober colour, I do
not think myself ugly.

I remember I made my way out of a very
delicate and silky covering one bright and
warm day, and wondered where I could be.
Everything around me seemed so large; it
was so light and warm; I thought it must be
a very beautiful world, and I must surely be

7—2



78 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS,

very happy in it. Yet one thing pained me
much. I had no parents, at least none that I
knew, and my brothers and sisters who came
out of the silky covering at the same time with
myself ran away from me; and there I was
alone—a little young creature newly-born into
a large strange world, alone. I could see many
flies sporting about me, and thought they must
be very happy in having companions, while I
had none; and I own that at first I felt low-
spirited.

Some people think we are ugly, but I must
think they are wroug. I amnotugly. Ihave
a plump body, long, slender legs, and sharp
eyes. Another mistake I wish to correct.
Those who know nothing of my family call us
insects, which much offends my dignity. We
are not insects; we are animals, as is proved
by the more complicated form of our bodies ;
I mean we have more members and internal
organs than insects have; they have only six
legs, we have eight ; our bodies are not divided
like the wasp’s or bee’s, we have no such slender



THE HOUSE SPIDER. 79

waist; and our eyes are not like those of the
fly, who has four thousand all huddled together,
we have eight separate ones; and sometimes I
wonder the use of so many to the fly, for it
cannot see the web I make to catch it. To be
sure, the fly’s eyes are at the back of its head,
while ours are in the front. Of course these
many eyes are of use, only I am content with
my eight, and don’t wish for more. Then
again, we don’t undergo the changes that in-
sects do. Take the butterfly as an example.
First there is the egg, then the larva, or little
black worm ; the larva changes to a caterpillar,
the caterpillar to a chrysalis, and at last the
chrysalis becomes the butterfly, and very beau-
tiful it certainly is; but think of the time and
trouble necessary to go through so many
changes, and then to live only a short time
at last !

Well, after I had looked about me and
stretched my legs, I began to feel hungry.
How tempting the flies were! How I longed
to eat one! But how was I to catch him?



80 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

I must spin my web; so out of the four little
protuberances or spinnerets that are under my
body, each of which has a thousand very small
holes, I forced a thick liquid, which hardened
into threads. Twisting all these threads to-
gether, made my first web, and from the centre
of it I formed a hollow tube which led to my
home in the centre of the wall.

How beautiful my web was! I was now
very hungry, so from my chink I kept a sharp
look-out upon my web. “Oh! when would it
catch a fly?” I waited long, and with fatigue
and hunger had well-nigh fallen asleep, when
I heard a peculiar noise coming from my web;
so I peeped out, and, oh! my joy, there was a
large plump fly caught.

Well done, beautiful web! Quickly I ran
down my hollow tube or funnel, pierced my
victim, spun a little fresh silk round him lest |
he should escape, then returned to my chink to
wait till he should be dead; when assured of
this I came out again, sucked his juices, and
thus made my first meal. I would have eaten



THE HOUSE SPIDER. 81

more, but my hunger was so far satisfied that
I could wait till my next meal, so I retired to
my snug home and slept soundly.

When I awoke, of course I looked at my
web; it was all right, and I continued to
catch flies, and seldom was very hungry,
though my appetite is a very good one, in-
deed it is said that we are very voracious, that
is, eat a great deal.

I had very little trouble or work, only to
mend my web when it chanced to be broken
by the struggles of the flies to get away. How
silly I thought them to come near me. Why
did they not tell one another that I would eat
them? Ha! ha! silly little things, there
they were always dancing about upon their
wings, the great bluebottles humming their
little songs ; sometimes resting for a moment
on the window pane, then darting off again
upon a fresh dance, while I lay snug in my
corner, thinking I could eat them all. It
puzzled me, that though I ate so many there
seemed to be no fewer; where could they all



$2 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

come from? How big was the world in which
we lived? and what other creatures were there
in it besides my family and the flies? I was
soon to know another, and a cross, ill-natured
one too.

I had awakened one bright morning after a
comfortable sleep, thought of my friends the
flies, and that I should like my breakfast, when
I heard a strange noise close to my home ; it
was something between a rustling and a thump-
ing, such as I had never before heard, and I
was slightly alarmed, and when I gained
courage to look out of my chink, what a
terrible and strange creature I saw. Not at
all like myself, nor like the flies ; it was tall,
so tall that if I had stood at its feet my neck
would have ached very much in looking up at
its huge head, in which there were two such
eyes! With its paws it whisked about to the
terror of the flies as well as myself, and I soon
found the noise I had heard was occasioned by
the bristles of one of its paws being rubbed

“against the wall. I was dreadfully frightened,



THE HOUSE SPIDER. 83

and crept far into my chink, determined to be
very quiet, and in my terror forgot my break-
fast and my hunger.

After the terrible creature had rubbed its
bristles all over the room, to my great joy it
went away. Now I breathed freely, but for
some time was afraid to venture from my own
home, and waited till I saw the flies dancing
happily again ; then my hunger returned, and
I wished for a good meal, so came out of my
hole. But oh! my vexation and distress !
Where was my beautiful web? Gone=quite
gone. How was this? Had that ugly monster
taken it away? What could it want it for? Not
to catch flies, for all the flies I had ever seen
would not make a meal for such a huge crea
ture; besides, if it wished, it surely could
catch them without my web. Well, it was of
no use to fret; my web was gone, and I must
spin another before I could have my dinner.



Much valuable time is often lost in fretting
over little mishaps that can be remedied with-
out a vast deal of trouble. It is much better,



S84 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

when an accident occurs, to set to work to
remedy it, than to waste time in useless lamen- .
tations; so, instead of fretting, I set to work,
and soon spun another web, quite as beautiful
as the first, and rather larger. I soon caught
my flies—six fat, fine flies, and an excellent
meal they made me; but the last I caught
gave me a great trouble. How he fought with
me! I declare it was some little time before I
recovered from the effects of that battle, for the
creature tore off one of my legs while strug-
gling with me. It certainly was a pinch, and it
ached very much—I mean the stump did; but
T was determined to master him, and did so at
last. Then, when I had spun a quantity of
silk over him—backwards, and forwards, and
round about—lI felt I was sure of him, so only
laughed to see him struggle, till, being quite
exhausted, he could make no further resistance
to my piercing him, and after having sucked
his juices, I felt refreshed, but could not exert
myself much on account of my poor stump.

I did not grieve at losing my leg, for I knew



THE HOUSE SPIDER. 85

it would grow again; therefore I waited pa-
tiently, and while able to travel only a short
distance, I chatted with my cousin Diadema,
who lives in the garden near me ; of the sixty-
seven families of cousins belonging to me, he
is the only one with whom I have an intimate
acquaintance. He is a very fine fellow, reddish
in colour, with spots of a yellowish white on
his hack. He always sleeps under a leaf, which
I think cannot be as snug as my chink; but
he likes it, and assures me he is protected from
rain well enough. It is quite right to be con-
tented with one’s home; and I would not
change with Diadema, notwithstanding all the
fine things he says about the bright dew-
drops, sweet scent of flowers, and the nightin-
gale’s song.

I inquired of Diadema how he and some
other little cousins manage to spin their webs
from one tall tree to another—I thought it
must be so fatiguing to climb them, to say
nothing of the distance between; also how he
contrived to cross water when it came in his path.

8



86 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

“Why, I do it thus,’ he replied: ol
mount upon a twig high above the water, turn
my face to the wind, spin plenty of silk, and
the wind blows it over the water to some twig
on the other side, to which it adheres; then,
fixing my end, I can travel upon it to the other
side of the water.”

«« A very ingenious method, cousin, and cer-
tainly not a fatiguing one.”

Tn the same manner I spin and travel from
tree to tree.”

“I suppose,” I said, “it is rather pleasant
to travel about ; I never go far from home.”

“Rather pleasant! It is delightful, I can
tell you. I see a great dealin my travels—
such beautiful flowers; I am sure you would
like to travel as I do.”

“Perhaps I should; but I am not fond of
being always in the open air. Can you tell me
how our little cousins spin those fine webs
which are called gossamer, and seem to float in_
the air?”

“Just as I spin mine: they but turn their



THE HOUSE SPIDER. 87

faces to the wind, which, by a gentle puff,
carries their fine silk a long, long way behind
them, and it hangs in the air sparkling in the
suabeam.”

I was very much entertained by my chat
with Diadema; but being rather fatigued, I
bade him “ good-night,” and we retired to our
respective homes.

All has gone well with me since my leg has
grown again. I have changed my skin, and
feel as lively and well as any spider can wish.
My web is uninjured ; and, in addition to flies,
I have feasted upon two moths and a butterfly.
How very much handsomer they are than the
flies !—the butterfly especially; I admire her
wings so much that I have left them in my
web as ornaments. I wonder if the birds and
flowers that Diadema talked of are as beauti-
ful; it must be a wonderful world—so full of
beautiful things. But then, that monster
Thad almost forgotten all about her—I have



been so very happy.
Why did I mention that monster? She has



88 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

been again, and brought a companion with her
very much like herself.

“ Betty,” said her eompanion; «there’s a
cobweb in that corner.’

“So there is, I declare!” exclaimed the
monster ; “ yet how I swept yesterday! But
it shan’t be there long ;” and immediately she
destroyed my new web again.

I was very much alarmed at Betty; but I
felt safe when in my chink, and I don’t think
she has seen me yet, or I suppose she would
kill me. I heard her tell her companion,
“‘ She wished she could catch the nasty little
thing.”

I wonder what right she has to call me “a
nasty little thing?” It is very wrong to call
each other names; and Betty ought to know
better. I wish I could give her just a little
prick for sayingso. Shall I try? There she
is, very busy; Tl just run down the wall ;
if she should see me I can soon run into
some crack near. I wonder if I can spin my
web about her as I do about the flies? But



THE HOUSE SPIDER. 89

what a lot it will take to go over her! She
moves—she sees me. Quick—quick ! « Ah,
Mrs. Betty, I am safe in my chink, so you
have not caught the ‘nasty little thing.’
Take care he does not catch you; you will
give me food enough for all my life. I shall
not need to catch any more flies if I get
you.”

Poor Spider! I am afraid he made a bold
attempt to catch Betty, and was caught him-
self instead, for here his history ends.

“TJ do like that taze,”? said one of the little
girls.

“Tam glad you do. Will you think of it
when you see the gossamer ?”

“Yes, ma’am, and I can tell mother how it
is made. I should like to sce the little Spider
spin it.”

“ You must look about very carefully to find
the little creature, Susan.”

“ Did you ever see it spin, ma’am?”

“No; but I have often watched the House

—)



90 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

Spider spin its web, and am reluctant to destroy
tae)
“But it isso untidy to leave it,” said Mary.
“Yes; and if we left all the cobwebs day
after day, year after year, we should at last

be somewhat like the flies, covered by cobwebs.” |

“Please, ma’am, what will the next tale be
about ?”

“TJ have a Butterfly that wishes to tell its
tale; do you think you will like it ?”

“Oh! yes ma’am, please.”

“Very well; then it shall come with me on

Tuesday. Now, good-bye.”



THE BUTTERFLY, 91

VE
THE BUTTERFLY.

“Twas a House Spider to you, my dear
children, on our last writing day, and John
thought me a big one. To-day you must fancy
me a Butterfly.”

The children smiled, and Mrs. Ainsley, ex-
tending her arms, enveloped in her shawl, con-
tinued, “ A very big Butterfly, also, am I
not ?”

THE BUTTERFLY.

The House Spider scorned to be called an
insect. I own myself to be one, and am con-
_ tent and happy. My name is Vanessa Ata-



92 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

lanta, or Red Admiral; but I must tell you of
much before I speak of myself as a Butterfly.
I know nothing of my parents, except that my
kind mother provided for me and my brothers
and sisters as well as she could, by laying her
eggs upon the leaf of the nettle, that being the
plant we should want for food when we pushed
our way out of the eggs, through the flap at
one end, provided for the purpose. Out I
crawled, a little black worm or larva, and im-
mediately began to make a hearty meal, eating
away the leaf round the edge, but carefully
avoiding the veins; the holes I left seemed
very large to me then, but, dear me! they were
nothing compared to those I made when I be-
came a caterpillar; and this was before very
long, for I grew quickly, and from that time I
saw nothing more of my brothers and sisters.
We each took our way in the world without
grief at parting.

I was very handsome as a caterpillar. My
black skin was changed for a very smooth one,
of a dark-green colour, with a yellow line on



THE BUTTERFLY. 93

each side of my body. My body was divided
into twelve parts, and I could bend it as I
pleased. Ihad sixteen legs; six, having a claw,
were on the first three divisions of my body, the
remaining ten were upon the hinder divisions,
leaving the centre of my long body free, from
any. My hinder legs terminated in flat feet
set round with hooks, alternately long and
short.

I did not want to catch my food, as it con-
sisted of leaves and seeds of plants, so there was
no occasion for me to make a web like tha
spiders; but spinning fine silk was very
necessary to me, therefore I had one spinneret
just below my mouth, and when I wished to
crawl up a smooth surface, as of glass, I spun
my silken. thread very closely together in the
form of true lovers’ knots, as they are called, then
holding upon it by the claws of my forelegs,
aud drawing my hinder ones close up to them,
I could go up, and up, as I continued to spin.

When I was a caterpillar I ate a very great
deal; indeed I did nothing else but eat and



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EVENT '2011-10-11T21:32:53-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2011-10-11T21:31:05-04:00'
redup
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c4ccc55fa293e8cc3454b0bc140e53a9
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describe
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describe
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72a850d05c5bec7a4926c927467e45d4
918a3b0a0b47ab4f8f57817f2a7de7a2e9cf9597
'2011-10-11T21:32:48-04:00'
describe
'229507' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADITY' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
2ac2a94a62159a4df2f5debf942200fd
e6c92fcf0ec3d060546644329e10520bc2d5920c
'2011-10-11T21:31:36-04:00'
describe
'470890' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADITZ' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
7dd877cf671713ebf129085e1dd50793
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'2011-10-11T21:31:18-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'5520544' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUA' 'sip-files00001.tif'
b8f09f110463e26bad2fd46e1e6fa75a
77a73b82439eeaf857ece21cd15b550f3158d619
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUB' 'sip-files00001.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-10-11T21:33:15-04:00'
describe
'37435' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUC' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
c2efc5c8a6d510bd0ad942fddfe27bf7
4c2726950017ea5e81efd10c8d32ee5a17a08cea
'2011-10-11T21:32:56-04:00'
describe
'128952' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUD' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
0eaeec111dce9049ee3b6491d7557e0d
303591650ac62307f0d924d01d67e1c5f6d75b05
'2011-10-11T21:32:25-04:00'
describe
'281627' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUE' 'sip-files00003.QC2.jpg'
79561077489ad3919ef8e0b95d7c7297
b0edbd516e2cc87aaad9fcdb270677da288440b3
'2011-10-11T21:31:08-04:00'
describe
'238707' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUF' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
f1e898eb5b645d08912b1d694fb5170d
720f7aac42d2d57db769f0a7977a694f0f71ed19
'2011-10-11T21:32:15-04:00'
describe
'258152' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUG' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
439c01f488c5c83cf730282c4a3e5454
39dfb7a9c618638082d1767b3a3ef853d52090a6
'2011-10-11T21:33:06-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'5740144' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUH' 'sip-files00002.tif'
b74f6fa0eceb056153807d5eb680ffe5
4585a3abcc84919ad833dc0086063db145701c48
'2011-10-11T21:31:57-04:00'
describe
'175' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUI' 'sip-files00002.txt'
d5d933681adb7dea37ff0692b7894d58
8cdd594d28b9e4f1f8ab03b5981e7f18bd4c3eb4
'2011-10-11T21:31:38-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'71765' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUJ' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
bfa254611a8ca16fa2069b3decf18379
d4b20a7bc034da8bec8fd1ddaec8947739e4c8fa
'2011-10-11T21:31:17-04:00'
describe
'614552' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUK' 'sip-files00004.QC2.jpg'
82fdadacb2ecfcda650f62b3d24890a4
c6ed6bc4b6b5771f78c0d273d386ceb017a0e3fb
'2011-10-11T21:32:46-04:00'
describe
'216358' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUL' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
b72098f9bb2b6502253ec1cafb8bb236
742465cfb4076e5ff9f02347428ce5f77dd77a66
'2011-10-11T21:31:53-04:00'
describe
'131955' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUM' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
a3551cb311f6966258e45e5b2bee38be
069dba34d335bf1dc12529cb5681408ae711c78f
'2011-10-11T21:31:09-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1739852' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUN' 'sip-files00003.tif'
b14e8dd0cb2c4a84ece92e334570f1f8
1f4ccb2bea4d82f3690adb7d9ad2ddf612883c96
'2011-10-11T21:31:22-04:00'
describe
'72' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUO' 'sip-files00003.txt'
de27c263c7f0f15cd457612040701745
d67e80df1aa3043d19e8600bf02a2996c6744629
'2011-10-11T21:31:35-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'161647' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUP' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
e7ab8a700f2787dc3a59a3b1f915df80
b4cdb6643bf8961cbd1f7a6f31aced32e368da8e
'2011-10-11T21:32:21-04:00'
describe
'366226' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUQ' 'sip-files00005.QC2.jpg'
4224b3bf68c11d235488835ccd4ec122
85177d855e0204afed33943460f465a6ff078e24
'2011-10-11T21:32:31-04:00'
describe
'201835' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUR' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
ed67b479280f8c948bc541c2c4412fe8
c1a52c787025a79163a32d00616f96501531f829
describe
'433933' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUS' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
cd1cd1dcad66174f82c31d1a40d81858
d9cd8d8ae4885fac4e388304342aae58cd78a0df
'2011-10-11T21:32:09-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'4856136' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUT' 'sip-files00004.tif'
d12cc586b3281cdd27b2428bebfe8f4d
94b11100f7dcbe3b213d2e68804d7fd2adc5e63a
'2011-10-11T21:31:28-04:00'
describe
'142' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUU' 'sip-files00004.txt'
5d5d7d3a27802683f4488580370c47c5
f2cf56a7d08652373bd3cc122511e09ece42c9b1
'2011-10-11T21:32:40-04:00'
describe
'95392' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUV' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
d7e622d6be196d36a6b576833f09200d
b8d4c5c2876eab10e8cab08751753d8d154ac77e
'2011-10-11T21:32:32-04:00'
describe
'297075' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUW' 'sip-files00006.QC2.jpg'
c8deee22de148cdfaaa88451fda41881
3b5594e9aaaaec5d4942b2c211ff70aa58136355
'2011-10-11T21:31:32-04:00'
describe
'183730' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUX' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
f0275a75ccf8d4429b8add377ac0bc39
70294a74903f712c32ababf45870271d2b25f1ef
'2011-10-11T21:32:55-04:00'
describe
'197309' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUY' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
6bfb5d8b26a846a759f56b7205a4999a
9b59e32ff4c1ac35ce7bcb5f5f1904e3a06481c2
'2011-10-11T21:31:20-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1480156' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIUZ' 'sip-files00005.tif'
e3fa0a50da96f11b352c244cfa447a34
85243de1feadf5577b1280ab5fb08a300bb571af
'2011-10-11T21:32:59-04:00'
describe
'300' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVA' 'sip-files00005.txt'
879f785bc2e53e7d57df732680fea4b1
551bf3afe7641d3636070ffa079f3c7c339e4ce7
'2011-10-11T21:32:33-04:00'
describe
'68756' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVB' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
401dc3a5708ef7e3192f23f4b61bf77d
16d0554f1eeb85784c072aacd9d7e8ee06338a3b
'2011-10-11T21:32:29-04:00'
describe
'335786' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVC' 'sip-files00007.QC2.jpg'
00a7b7b4fcd68fbb92036cd83d26a4cc
8148930e8305d23a754035ade8a8f207cc9d8c26
'2011-10-11T21:31:12-04:00'
describe
'179501' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVD' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
cdd24d7c1e8d252e33c3643830379719
bf16b10c7b902ae0e71a0c31f1a2cc6d81e9524c
'2011-10-11T21:33:05-04:00'
describe
'142604' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVE' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
15220eecc312795e20a8399ceaf05524
97ca816dbc8aa49f0e877caecb401fd2718696e9
'2011-10-11T21:31:47-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1446080' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVF' 'sip-files00006.tif'
3d3344cf80e76d536e0c417d132ef7dd
bd474521acfa5829da8708231e59105241345872
describe
'91' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVG' 'sip-files00006.txt'
da015e48cba9fd04cd2cb8c77443fa73
6cf4f3085c0a8e1a231abf0037e0f848c05426f6
describe
'86186' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVH' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
46535f12e9966a4ce67dda838e6f1b49
6de82574d49204e35904d56268b877a6097a63ab
'2011-10-11T21:33:01-04:00'
describe
'417239' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVI' 'sip-files00009.QC2.jpg'
e8e30b1e17904f590068ad0050d20d55
89853d910cb212943fccd6123ba84b0b13bdc70f
describe
'184337' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVJ' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
2d41cf01d4bfc2f257f1ff6c444c686a
c6328fd2f5843062ee8f434acf2e51a30647269a
'2011-10-11T21:31:29-04:00'
describe
'171406' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVK' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
2af4b06c03e4a38024905b0592a1059e
d18e993e1c4fe96db6994b39826627d128fbcc40
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1487268' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVL' 'sip-files00007.tif'
88b83179ffb522e2e32d6b518a2b2247
c86f15fdb0661651f087a3ec7963bdec81622d36
describe
'377' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVM' 'sip-files00007.txt'
0c40f6322efcab682c5482167b22344f
965aa1ed30b3958a7ffa512d9ad98f06dc32d824
describe
'117248' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVN' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
07bde1c3d229c064ed253222a9aa9811
912f8ed9bddb72187b80d8e974f08948d70d2a4a
describe
'429738' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVO' 'sip-files00010.QC2.jpg'
218bb5ba891bc3f48be4b60f7635a1c3
66f6c373ce8c868069822e61ce089bf2d13fd98e
describe
'185461' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVP' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
053dc3a56e3def14745e63164ba1abde
ce3344566e8688faa848c71ab8ae5c2cf1f7c553
'2011-10-11T21:31:45-04:00'
describe
'243474' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVQ' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
8f066ea0286cf609a9c83bf0fbc7a8ab
da55258c0902b768ce3b2c7c613fee652854f792
'2011-10-11T21:31:46-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1495708' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVR' 'sip-files00009.tif'
b51832b4056e6f5424b9cb4c1ec202a3
bc1263a4ece9f95cdab3567dfbd87f75230845ce
'2011-10-11T21:32:08-04:00'
describe
'722' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVS' 'sip-files00009.txt'
d650ed14372e78257fc5c3305a49e486
240b21344088ef02d56017520f7e7d04b4ea0d55
'2011-10-11T21:33:02-04:00'
describe
'123065' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVT' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
34bbb51c708572133c65506a1c976643
c549832bb703933fd172837da33db757e1766a8e
'2011-10-11T21:31:44-04:00'
describe
'475362' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVU' 'sip-files00011.QC2.jpg'
a2e7babd7204b470c4be8f2737ccc1e2
8baea346385abb754470c5c854808569c44317c2
describe
'185388' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVV' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
316abde75c19d00361a00177e60dde52
7c154515751c6e181b851b54240dc6862f8f671e
'2011-10-11T21:31:50-04:00'
describe
'261211' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVW' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
ad3f354b4ba952fc287585f61405ebd5
99999d3ae0ccb4781326de41577d570aca721649
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1496396' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVX' 'sip-files00010.tif'
3ee1f3e2536300dd889f54dd4a46104d
e36334de8c49ddb92505090b9c49be39d3c5d17f
'2011-10-11T21:33:04-04:00'
describe
'881' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVY' 'sip-files00010.txt'
bc9d33414c3c390fbfcade6ebe21dbf5
5b43347f4242037ebdd418d0305cdee7d0199950
describe
'139579' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIVZ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
c3186d7e17ab1fc70cff152979a1c556
22617449f8c2359bbf77006e88f4186dfe95618f
'2011-10-11T21:31:34-04:00'
describe
'473699' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWA' 'sip-files00012.QC2.jpg'
fed7a20e94c2843febeb27e52d524843
56cbda4098a3f9d7bfca48ac0447d2bb72f71f08
describe
'188316' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWB' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
83f085910a439021e0021e3688801c27
5a858ca275b376b2c661580c1c207f68ffbd7e11
'2011-10-11T21:32:24-04:00'
describe
'307413' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWC' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
4e1e0ed67939c5c11534e89426251a8f
9e4644a888c13d0f498db39d2ff21e2ef0ec1e60
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1520704' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWD' 'sip-files00011.tif'
d348d6fee7d05bfd2d5bf4a56ac6dc23
9fe462848187834917899e025aeeda6aa7184a69
'2011-10-11T21:32:39-04:00'
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWE' 'sip-files00011.txt'
97fdc15573bc568c3302992a6cc7da5f
a9dbb73460c32a43d7b4b9830b6947a8de88aadd
'2011-10-11T21:32:00-04:00'
describe
'138238' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWF' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
4d04158852fc4216bf6e892ce972769d
a0e0ab495a5b81e367d0ccbf257e4c334d9589bd
describe
'468345' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWG' 'sip-files00013.QC2.jpg'
e9c0acbd213485f6899912773085dc92
ed991f408b34a36e38d352036d825f809d8a0899
describe
'191490' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWH' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
c0a5c5d4411179d607b019b581f7fbd6
512511dc475ab351b0633a3456ac98ca4c7225ad
'2011-10-11T21:32:04-04:00'
describe
'303668' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWI' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
4cdf101d219b35efe1c5a1aee6b39a98
ca5e083497f0198a526b8696b94ac1985d5affee
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1545772' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWJ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
9778c0b5de59f9dad83637c1d529902d
a7a3c6cde6fded2f514071ff60801fd4350399d2
'2011-10-11T21:32:42-04:00'
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWK' 'sip-files00012.txt'
4179bb169612157a49530deb957630c5
64d0ca1a57bfe81ca27627439abb243ef7b9f9d6
describe
'136584' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWL' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
cd20a5c794284c371f5265a22a947e68
c936ff6a60312bce8e6fbab27a518bc242ed4204
'2011-10-11T21:32:01-04:00'
describe
'455024' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWM' 'sip-files00014.QC2.jpg'
8bcaaf847b5ecd167db775e5df01b8b8
83b005782e04261d5d21060f309159c6f478ac68
'2011-10-11T21:32:03-04:00'
describe
'192410' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWN' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
a38fffcf4d166679e2334ce15e0283f4
a500f4b99270e28f5bd0b548587ef77704768d2e
describe
'297455' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWO' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
aee4f40c8cbb4c6292a4e6b5987a0eb3
e9de6dc2fac2cb69315c3bfd9230be5b698a568c
'2011-10-11T21:31:40-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1553712' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWP' 'sip-files00013.tif'
4e0e0c784578820ac8bdb5b796b4ccb9
855978baa1140db292528ca8799285e35c23f49e
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWQ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
96699f593ba13b2462456912f6c3d7ae
d39f61f3ee433846a85ae978db67f65b3b6113de
'2011-10-11T21:31:42-04:00'
describe
'132787' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWR' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
850f20ca46f3ed431bddf6d34812db47
5376c9e7935e487c219232d69a4397b8028cd1b5
describe
'453674' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWS' 'sip-files00015.QC2.jpg'
514c3a9714deff14de726953947d4fdd
6c85ab1e6bad1d351fc298f52dcd9fa28dc579ae
'2011-10-11T21:31:59-04:00'
describe
'199164' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWT' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
26b71856131e709b7c809955ac29e1ac
44d5c5994540a26608330b40ed939237e9790bd9
'2011-10-11T21:33:07-04:00'
describe
'281844' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWU' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
0a6ae8564292658b39174384b6904454
e24e3f4ceef3c01ba8dab097e4c4d61c22e09496
'2011-10-11T21:31:24-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1606996' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWV' 'sip-files00014.tif'
591b6183558f69abbd2048d7a5b13ff0
d8cd4d328e75b2f88d70519b15a2e848fc1754fa
'2011-10-11T21:32:47-04:00'
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWW' 'sip-files00014.txt'
b1da3205466adab66c91ca26a5cf11cb
2710c1e285aad8e583cbc0afd7d497ddd3d8fc11
describe
'131401' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWX' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
4130082c4416152fe9e121043b8a0e9e
0e0230620d701629481ca85af55355c6b2e8adce
describe
'459707' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWY' 'sip-files00016.QC2.jpg'
ad17953ca18cefb8afebffe6470506b4
1b8ef80fd4f7b1ef572d563d9f06b75852006d98
describe
'204521' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIWZ' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
c5c78842090dfae92b3eaac9a9b6e010
8c7bb12c031dea6382ba7b105b4a915d7e71babb
'2011-10-11T21:31:11-04:00'
describe
'286212' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXA' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
8c9da544a80dd3e3ee735919371ddbf2
9f28d2270fff5524aab83bdf21345df955df8797
'2011-10-11T21:32:34-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1650304' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXB' 'sip-files00015.tif'
7e0c93aadeb3966e28b3dc08350c7e0b
590f4c15321448e3f2487d4f9c9b1531801cd996
'2011-10-11T21:31:58-04:00'
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXC' 'sip-files00015.txt'
081706159e2003caf2c8c82f2ab3618b
0462726c4d55268d462f11810f12d44b053e3283
describe
'133130' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXD' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
66cce6ce8a3b8dae331473db163d3f93
2a69d61f9faedf22a39c2ad40e1f2809fb4f80ef
'2011-10-11T21:32:17-04:00'
describe
'478035' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXE' 'sip-files00017.QC2.jpg'
789d58bd9de723457873f8fe6127f119
3b922de59e3f6dc3b3f3d6978b4ef69102490bad
'2011-10-11T21:32:02-04:00'
describe
'190875' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXF' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
f59530b3f0caae7e7ff6a3bc83d78151
0f95765b958b96b8ea44544eae7a0df26537e096
'2011-10-11T21:32:36-04:00'
describe
'290214' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXG' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
25c6c9ca8f07c4c8bee6fd546cd9867d
bed23e1fb257fafc0648588398d70714547285cf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1541196' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXH' 'sip-files00016.tif'
227efd37ca59e23e8d2d51c0bbda04a0
8f913ac014207d0e48bc2d12dd053d2d3f38790d
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXI' 'sip-files00016.txt'
0d65e955fee16ed7301b5bc6948bb057
027115ad973a0b4ec7920724d311b51d8920727b
describe
'139448' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXJ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
3ee3e238c56d41db3df63dbc1d1b4476
ff91faa70a9d2bf9d2a4882ad1e45e0efdd5f27f
'2011-10-11T21:33:00-04:00'
describe
'465626' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXK' 'sip-files00018.QC2.jpg'
9507e096c5240071327e37e2f5066359
814bafd570dd222f776fc2da37f39c05a7706aa2
describe
'179408' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXL' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
f84c5f3b57c4aa5d8d3747689c8c6473
e3b6bc3922d4b6065ca0e6739512daed9eb9c651
'2011-10-11T21:32:54-04:00'
describe
'304049' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXM' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
cdd2b1485b0c8ef1e10993e66f03f992
5f52ab4f7ad4f9912f4bbd4d190198484482f01b
'2011-10-11T21:31:13-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1449196' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXN' 'sip-files00017.tif'
942c9f2b170f0e5f98042a3c1d7fd596
e5d3e6a31220d19217e0cd2ff789b05a1eb68ed1
'2011-10-11T21:32:05-04:00'
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXO' 'sip-files00017.txt'
a411b3d6d1ee61e74ce9bc519c0bf702
f36a531f58d190212721aee9495210960ab83bc1
describe
'137428' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXP' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
3d0ec869207eb588aa7bb92d493f924f
23b571843b499f7f1c96c382ad9b409158adbead
describe
'451576' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXQ' 'sip-files00019.QC2.jpg'
7290177b78dc061d19c00c410602cd7e
36b8a7cf91bcb777ba5c23927309d13280cd43e9
'2011-10-11T21:32:27-04:00'
describe
'178516' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXR' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
a7adc54ad8a8b6cbafb4d65c722335d7
84e843d02fe2ef42c8b1fe6e77720ff58f1e3eff
describe
'299946' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXS' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
0675078aecd22695ede82fdbf41aa036
86b96e55072eb4e90a4817b181bdada617c95a28
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1443624' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXT' 'sip-files00018.tif'
5cc66c1614f26aefc2a3d9010dc3dedd
313a08b8546cf3c1d3f154eaa7d5231aa5ce39f4
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXU' 'sip-files00018.txt'
1fb003e435769e90837d77c2c183f344
82840fb50a4d200934af8c28efb9c504fdb7f5b7
'2011-10-11T21:31:27-04:00'
describe
'133170' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXV' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
b2207f5e27ee765d757719ecaceddb33
cdebee281fb02012674436243402e2dee0dc440f
'2011-10-11T21:31:25-04:00'
describe
'458719' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXW' 'sip-files00020.QC2.jpg'
f02271fef7c7d0ce9595c2b558a27677
2b5f316c77efcb777a0aa211d73bdd4e41be28fd
'2011-10-11T21:31:48-04:00'
describe
'179070' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXX' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
f74b655f30154a196fe9b879426aa1ab
9d2392f920eee46e825af096a46654edc9085c8b
describe
'284830' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXY' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
740b7d683842376df729d92dfc246d89
d489cfc747c363444e88b42a66dab0ab8bcf077b
'2011-10-11T21:31:41-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1447120' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIXZ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
3f3f35b9815a8539ad87ae879401dc15
cbe66088cb86d92027394592ef724c189b66538a
describe
'1007' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYA' 'sip-files00019.txt'
4f2004826999e23961a47d82bb75671a
65902df89227b74a1183d256d8d4732db8acbdc7
describe
'134070' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYB' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
c73c4467a704558ffc0ac3c5dc5deaea
2cea430cb445c1aba5dc1e53d89dabe3a1f71bb3
describe
'427016' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYC' 'sip-files00021.QC2.jpg'
68fc28bb4f1eca1eaae733aedeb95fec
efdbf99e61c81d2a4350ebf1af05c8c712dfd5d1
'2011-10-11T21:31:26-04:00'
describe
'200747' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYD' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
d86be9cd6f12e49255a9a56d6c978e40
d1855e4957210d5b3590d22eab4f56fc86391e4f
'2011-10-11T21:31:31-04:00'
describe
'287784' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYE' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
0f0115a175672568887bc011464aa064
418ce664b6e058d363fac588f8eba7a15364346d
'2011-10-11T21:33:14-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1619948' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYF' 'sip-files00020.tif'
a288c11184b74a35388f7cf3c6e98ce8
ea78270f519d52dce30b3179df4e7917386bc436
describe
'1082' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYG' 'sip-files00020.txt'
b779ca0dceac3123594d1bdd9189544e
15ead0a4860bd06063c129ab14960a06f9825216
describe
'124382' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYH' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
95168023f053fa1d37605a3929d0766f
58bf5b5303b716c12de6fc05fc425c079651daf8
describe
'436266' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYI' 'sip-files00022.QC2.jpg'
0caf9cb601d7a87d38187c0b125bf036
8488a963809a1d156d246a933afb937cb593058c
describe
'203199' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYJ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
33a5fa0b304fd4f0fa463673962dda6c
c4c35c256efc91d4d7ac131ea966ebfe2518800d
describe
'264524' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYK' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
9d4fdda11bf35b64b17ad31f0efa451f
be93cc229d8c16764881af21c9a4e6adbe24302b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1639852' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYL' 'sip-files00021.tif'
ba32f0b2d594e48587854c0244755670
6b2cfb2dddf69addfdb37528fafecc764bfffcd8
describe
'1017' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYM' 'sip-files00021.txt'
b1157026bc8403abfed732467f78627f
695daa8a71e3b07d3477a727a9c35613ede8807f
describe
'127150' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYN' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
53395cd01ccc4adc749aa8360e01f458
37695fb1a414c7a01c0d37ac58c74ad83d8d9e0c
'2011-10-11T21:31:21-04:00'
describe
'387003' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYO' 'sip-files00023.QC2.jpg'
59bd423ee7ddeb3598851482b1970d46
7d41a06d06fe2357f95d8633215ae9240eb2a64b
'2011-10-11T21:32:38-04:00'
describe
'207981' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYP' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
2c2fdb6889eb168b28f963d3d25e6164
6f6472b46dfac86272d395e7a09c91c3cbc28c4a
describe
'267582' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYQ' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
8daa7c86b6c86000496899f0ea689152
973305afc21186ca0dff48af7e394a7701771d8e
'2011-10-11T21:33:08-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1677428' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYR' 'sip-files00022.tif'
dc90ed0c04af215e11fcd483b208795b
6753cba95b54699b2ed89b20eb8a66228be71945
describe
'1024' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYS' 'sip-files00022.txt'
a3389b311fa3f6975e8f75f4a8f7973e
714a76939b11c755320548956e14597d50461ef1
'2011-10-11T21:33:03-04:00'
describe
'107806' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYT' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
cb55784dcf5537e2db593c55c099bcc0
24b2f1a70944bc92d6829dc60d5a50eb480e7784
'2011-10-11T21:31:14-04:00'
describe
'391191' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYU' 'sip-files00024.QC2.jpg'
16d70e0be42779bab79892d82de96f3d
92db28b52ffa45a4aa469947afdf9d9c9202318f
describe
'196720' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYV' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
cb604238e6fdacb9ae81849ba5e270da
359c9a465eac8fa327f892528efebc30d53faa2b
describe
'216684' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYW' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
3096ab91562795edad6abc80fe0775ca
f45a30ac64f0e4ca97654e1a120624861fc79169
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1585868' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYX' 'sip-files00023.tif'
7d1aa0c0254a76674d439c87c589938e
4418243806911f1f85d2bc83324867a98aa02eca
describe
'622' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYY' 'sip-files00023.txt'
a4b43e1166e7c8ab3d303ce559e9f116
691193af6497ccf5507322d616e392bbf7e9c1d7
'2011-10-11T21:31:16-04:00'
describe
'108658' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIYZ' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
adc5a627c9f17713b4c433510fa7bdd4
eb8271e9ca9a24415b6613e9e5c554cdc124b913
describe
'448787' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZA' 'sip-files00025.QC2.jpg'
dbe711e3a0722ee1290dcb43fde62acf
984ea0a1588e623bbfc4407afe1c00f059505781
describe
'204215' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZB' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
3bbb40e79494b07f1749242a65bfb5e4
3fc78cfdb59c99f568cb2e003470d10ffa5bd484
'2011-10-11T21:33:11-04:00'
describe
'219965' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZC' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
bb8968b5aab69e5202a950454e2b8fc4
91e4eac9d0f73b0aa1b05a9f27c47ac9e62c4c88
'2011-10-11T21:32:43-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1646080' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZD' 'sip-files00024.tif'
7a497aa0a5b76291cb6e3feabb4f985c
4a506febde58aea6119533c240ea9e69b620cc38
describe
'678' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZE' 'sip-files00024.txt'
ed45801a104ffc96e5a918ee4e4e158d
1fe22a6dfe6fafd790628faa5bdf40ee78371440
describe
'132942' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZF' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
a299700fc959743040347546a721a846
88b808628e9f0148380a007c0f449febfe0d5b53
'2011-10-11T21:32:12-04:00'
describe
'451450' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZG' 'sip-files00026.QC2.jpg'
624d4eaf8b54488ffe2c2ffa3e1a524c
e3c2b57bc82e47ec102149ff2d263ec4792b0e82
'2011-10-11T21:32:41-04:00'
describe
'171685' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZH' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
745ac52793bf4f850cf5b07792a6e2f8
8001be32da858bd864cb633ed3a55f002afe3308
'2011-10-11T21:32:18-04:00'
describe
'283630' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZI' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
a43b85a749edcba1cff1984d4803a31f
d24659707676dae48a97544fda3bbe8dc320e23e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1387344' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZJ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
1ca67aad6c3d85d0a24992d201877c62
bc7e0cb253d8e73f79bc5198dde1023af326ae56
describe
'939' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZK' 'sip-files00025.txt'
9de4c9c7c919292194ec46613219557f
b4a025b6d0cb0bd9b87b0139f68d3ece7eaba524
describe
'132013' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZL' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
01a48d369b79ad18d03d90c025a12c51
572cb7eb21328eee44e070a29385d5f33e5e69be
describe
'424930' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZM' 'sip-files00027.QC2.jpg'
23e57524bb7358dcc210b98b1c49b8ed
39404e907ec76113321ba54207935ecb8c2ac751
describe
'195037' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZN' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
e34c90ad07753f72a9723677b715761a
3bafed9080f66c5ce86a1092120890e79039fb6b
describe
'279358' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZO' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
14d672512019bf8f0bd17e063396e3fe
21ea4ca2470c85d54e6e4c9830f397cd4db7729a
'2011-10-11T21:32:14-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1573868' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZP' 'sip-files00026.tif'
e86dff0cbf66f962fb1825c9387e0448
46475fedcff5ae4497f7a2d5e41b062f8d7768ca
'2011-10-11T21:32:52-04:00'
describe
'981' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZQ' 'sip-files00026.txt'
6e7f01cf0af87d251dbaa49badca71c5
b48f74ed38bc9a5ff24d0a7e3b4ab45d5756c47d
describe
'122874' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZR' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
7d385cdcb54bdbdc8b1ef4ff7aeb28f3
575fb09dd1acbd4acfae9a0a0983fb2e5354baee
'2011-10-11T21:31:51-04:00'
describe
'438626' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZS' 'sip-files00028.QC2.jpg'
7e63db756b5ab215e3153ade9932d7b8
b4759ccba6e5c8984baffa8703c11bfedc134eeb
describe
'191248' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZT' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
31c104dbd9d5534f64cefc4537408fb8
c61d7e72e5466a8fd4381551fba4e03858608ed9
describe
'256172' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZU' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
d721cdf678d29d319c36ea7a87a7fed6
84c3a45a8a6c6da7230797097b1d8e4b535ab1b3
'2011-10-11T21:31:23-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1543900' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZV' 'sip-files00027.tif'
e21564a1c8708d9fc2c0d8da47827f6f
de48de7054872d155161eac6c9b152e2c91624d1
describe
'877' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZW' 'sip-files00027.txt'
28194d38d32fcb1cb121791617b94fe4
d344256537574f632d51ec98d9b8fa818efe3bbf
describe
'125144' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZX' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
5e604b81ce1458db8cc4251972211a5b
bb1bf02d745e39a16f00f4c1f17949a5ac73ec36
describe
'428365' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZY' 'sip-files00029.QC2.jpg'
96a2560f3f8252fad357b65b30354eb9
ad87ddf3db60a745a3134c055e4f87cf795fb37a
'2011-10-11T21:32:13-04:00'
describe
'201085' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADIZZ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
8a48a6067cd2b8d70f7b32b898ab78b1
22824537fd69ab592ea7d12b2e042e4741e533f7
describe
'265261' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAA' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
1a25d2130adc2a943983e3295c451008
037ae9721b5e7825ef3b3c74fd95b3026891fbbc
'2011-10-11T21:33:13-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1621832' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAB' 'sip-files00028.tif'
6bf71b3bd985d55e7b5cc79d18b8b034
64b892522b3011e6397f9b0c164d7377a33b60f9
describe
'894' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAC' 'sip-files00028.txt'
1c3996433c97fb5db96f99403a7b30b9
5ba2bc32b368dbb3a7cbb491b3fefcc00e8fa17c
'2011-10-11T21:32:35-04:00'
describe
'122727' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAD' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
226052d8d95683f3c6a212b268dfef4b
e9751593cb4df75835edf43d5bed2edda73de428
'2011-10-11T21:32:30-04:00'
describe
'427136' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAE' 'sip-files00030.QC2.jpg'
602409ca6950fc6e7f14d18b58982083
a0579bebabe26d86183d77b768db26ec400d2110
describe
'201299' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAF' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
25980a42007dac545623ea1f5d661f0b
0e7d16495f4737e07ecd77219e1ecf8abf27659b
describe
'257996' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAG' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
cde688d0463849f3785298de7ada6963
1465b4e91577fde9ef5be72bb6606da1c4364550
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1623624' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAH' 'sip-files00029.tif'
2078ce832cd1ef46aeadb501b317fb22
4663f6555f7ac8c03b293bebbbbf3884ddfe794d
'2011-10-11T21:33:12-04:00'
describe
'897' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAI' 'sip-files00029.txt'
6a2cdddf20341eaa671769bf5ecc8429
5a34fe476cc0a94ac1f02e037eab8d115f2d7a3d
'2011-10-11T21:31:10-04:00'
describe
'122810' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAJ' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
3c9d0c6b3717e671d32140f1fd009fc4
13ff7d8b148d4fee23d0f036337c54b167d3e0be
describe
'448444' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAK' 'sip-files00031.QC2.jpg'
15e9dece3631c160884711a8e39958d5
3abef46ba3220fa0b9111eaad5bf716c76ce69f5
'2011-10-11T21:32:07-04:00'
describe
'211811' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAL' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
8726389fbbed1f82d15ce1b1554aed64
2d89992b2b97511503481db872054ee66e7cc55b
describe
'257931' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAM' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
8b0ea6268671f40120acea29f1415472
73b8361552e77422278a334aed2253c173fad9d9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1707440' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAN' 'sip-files00030.tif'
b35768edc48e25210947580c593e64d0
5a12fa02121ddf396192ac1f8103535f2f845939
describe
'928' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAO' 'sip-files00030.txt'
43fc671997ac6f85486b934ce35f2f74
8996048676a8d45af150a097aca414e99ed1942c
'2011-10-11T21:32:57-04:00'
describe
'127771' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAP' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
918e42b1a8c98a15f070eb40dbf06fca
4a793f3812dba26734bf0289d22202cfb63f5684
'2011-10-11T21:31:39-04:00'
describe
'453266' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAQ' 'sip-files00032.QC2.jpg'
ab30a995bb8af49bf932f678852f44d8
6bc4a38d6d61f6671a80d35ab1c681f576bd7e04
describe
'196024' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAR' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
8494705fffdc53c8257d48a54453e8a0
d881d762882e683824180468c67133c594802bed
describe
'275081' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAS' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
09d5a23bbcd4561ded31f1f9e250115a
148242ce50b82dd21ad3bfa4b852c3a7ddf3f365
'2011-10-11T21:31:55-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1581556' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAT' 'sip-files00031.tif'
ede10d7c9e4b034d6894b06a1ce334ea
5859c68dfac09dad134a39457cf10ecd73d9a9d6
describe
'979' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAU' 'sip-files00031.txt'
88775c0a1e189eebbbd12048ad7ce8ff
d169458ada0563cb919c8789489bfd760a2591ca
describe
'132245' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAV' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
97110616e041b60e31df803973823a63
cfd57e8f9ecad1ac3ad92bb8f5ba0f268841027f
describe
'439095' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAW' 'sip-files00033.QC2.jpg'
b1c80a97bca4749c6833f2c421a83d7e
98224938a150dff99971b49edb38fea1e58c5a56
'2011-10-11T21:31:15-04:00'
describe
'194114' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAX' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
f5c86640b29b13b260a56fc5eb096fae
5a5f5cac5edebdd0461327d1081a1c976eac6d83
describe
'280012' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAY' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
2c9afcddb3b0d9de7f16869fafe68077
bce6b638ffac1214cfa61ac59e02118b210cc03b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1566616' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJAZ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
05eeed115e0c99030c36072809f1e5b9
79cde1423140cf4435ca7bf0060b7a36cc11dd70
'2011-10-11T21:32:28-04:00'
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBA' 'sip-files00032.txt'
83cc21748a48f5368b8ba1dc5d455027
35d8eefa90c6b51d05947644ca1929ca194e9f0e
describe
'126583' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBB' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
b2267283840c444fc50a348bdb27a93b
bcf0401ace6209c2ca7419a9f41a2ce643bc5fa1
'2011-10-11T21:31:49-04:00'
describe
'158732' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBC' 'sip-filesUF00026966_00001.mets'
be3d84e44347edaf979a4f26e3746119
674d8cb884586a410a098c8af8a70bd5f1bd3912
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-18T20:14:18-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'1039' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBF' 'sip-files00033.txt'
946f89195657c1521e7464fe115c4e4e
e3ad4a3562c329b6c68950f38a9d9dfc45b09d76
describe
'889' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBG' 'sip-files00034.txt'
a846fa0f2d6102aee3d9d8780d51b91f
d1a65fbedda0e7a3003dfafef31a343b166bce45
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBH' 'sip-files00035.txt'
7a115a708fcc02f67596454e57d4c526
f3710c1e6a3470a83bf96e24337af38b2a51a415
'2011-10-11T21:32:26-04:00'
describe
'839' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBI' 'sip-files00036.txt'
861379f25c88a024aefef1bfdd6c4ece
d7e953758dc68aa7e3c5d0a4923c816786de6034
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBJ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
d132871502dbd1662e891f6d66f80505
2d4013cf729d0730b77a1e1f7f2fdf2b05150e51
describe
'1015' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBK' 'sip-files00038.txt'
b555db7baf5af09dc0d9d062707cc9de
74ad24836f93cf745db0d142a31ac3bc86a71c91
describe
'1036' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBL' 'sip-files00039.txt'
f453c5e148cb443cbf5904ef8c8e5604
4e0927ee77fc516f265709afe1f1a20045d701da
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBM' 'sip-files00040.txt'
d562b7a6d75d6d0310794f5bd9171563
1ec9915d76b1d81c584177641ae7f028759e0eb2
'2011-10-11T21:32:06-04:00'
describe
'932' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBN' 'sip-files00041.txt'
fb49613b94a1e6d463d1fc8bc29af926
9da59edf8c7c86f2857e1eea1314c9860407b4b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBO' 'sip-files00042.txt'
eae5e7045988ed1e8987b06a10f9f86f
d5c025a4eb8db205e6b5eb776c9e0deb495dce4a
describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBP' 'sip-files00043.txt'
2a11c1cb7c6c524d665e4727fe8ecb7f
4a86f52ee54c632889e697317092d75720fa9054
'2011-10-11T21:31:30-04:00'
describe
'868' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBQ' 'sip-files00044.txt'
574e8572ae3fdb2b13f9aacbf23d2e5e
6ded092c5a71f3127038546c73b61d0cbc23d144
describe
'799' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBR' 'sip-files00045.txt'
76a811ee8183b04f8bad4004c9544701
c7083e2f88491d60c7cbe92b3f375a60bfc86bbf
describe
'685' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBS' 'sip-files00046.txt'
864c964bb4ee476aa11f003295aa13c3
ec7ea801e241b9a65a447c57b08cf51356fe6ce1
describe
'929' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBT' 'sip-files00047.txt'
557faac65229cadde0dae07de95968ae
ea921da4ad09b2a30f940c2b8a50fbab662098cc
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBU' 'sip-files00048.txt'
0cb3aac0e9b44dffb2a72e88a55738cb
ffba4744d14c1982154e9777646e738ea3ea8947
describe
'968' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBV' 'sip-files00049.txt'
eb1bf281fe05d6c2e732d72cb3e837c5
4c449ad693332e577ce013e279ead6a49d1a5643
'2011-10-11T21:32:19-04:00'
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBW' 'sip-files00050.txt'
b6f73fe6792bbcc75ef051e6321fb3d0
67ab009e2caba8e5157d8968c217ed3fe92e5318
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBX' 'sip-files00051.txt'
521d32a500a748fd478956148295376a
b9ed4f837fc7504524d53d636cd65252231e1234
describe
'1020' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBY' 'sip-files00052.txt'
d037978d002602e12a3010a3f2c26905
0e7ccae8c3f62760f5ed5e42d59049478f1f6a6e
'2011-10-11T21:32:45-04:00'
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJBZ' 'sip-files00053.txt'
8e6ea8a785028f2e40b364c492aa4f8b
5337995c9a05896e597b793b647a269da1a7e2a3
'2011-10-11T21:31:33-04:00'
describe
'922' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCA' 'sip-files00054.txt'
0f34667b6f83b2b9df3c2a63820e38ba
6986f519f47b568809cf539a26291eeacb35588f
'2011-10-11T21:33:10-04:00'
describe
'862' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCB' 'sip-files00056.txt'
5eda2bb0f8bcddab0542abfdbd848292
8002ca06329773609aef9b163fe977ced23dc3a3
describe
'940' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCC' 'sip-files00057.txt'
0686efafd76944b98e9ff1a015f0627a
7b55b7dce64ec3f27f667f5401c883929d6de5eb
describe
'1080' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCD' 'sip-files00058.txt'
7b27470041d868027916370cdf3926e6
e936c7fb11cd058e85f751cade3c02fa78d91520
describe
'1012' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCE' 'sip-files00059.txt'
af0869a6650b73bda7aa146c140b9d4c
d745f11dfdb3dc3dd4140af932c5bed47accaeab
describe
'1008' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCF' 'sip-files00060.txt'
a06fb6b6ccaedec7b1a96da2bd9e4889
685c998b445780afe8d1697e57c965fd957986ee
describe
'1030' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCG' 'sip-files00061.txt'
69eb22254c0f7614630885a5c0bdbce2
0f308067f94702a5ad6fdc0f2b94f3e6ac55638d
'2011-10-11T21:33:09-04:00'
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCH' 'sip-files00062.txt'
c718db1c2366bb5ecc75c04496666e86
34225fa2f8efab1ac3cb65e5b0855437497d99bb
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCI' 'sip-files00063.txt'
dede44ef13712a3c3b1886019ceb992a
16497d060b542bcef5ac0e0a8c3f1d2d601a8b8d
describe
'325' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCJ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
1d388f1ef746c37cc7eb79e68be0113c
6ab0e38aba16662c677ef58269165c7d6aa1e4d9
describe
'708' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCK' 'sip-files00065.txt'
87f5dd1472e9e17badb3bb75aac09a76
6d912d89289b12179174cef1e67af352295e1029
describe
'907' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCL' 'sip-files00066.txt'
cd43cd4f9387a532c859229616385a4e
f4c136c4e3424df1a3747eb2ef8e7f53155adc26
describe
'951' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCM' 'sip-files00067.txt'
e3c049486a8524c526fdc6e14720ebed
c7d85e159591739303b888566f5bd39f9018f206
describe
'989' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCN' 'sip-files00068.txt'
b3d84b75b0654fab5d1877a669eb19b3
ac77b2853cf716da38f682b017e1978151d4295c
describe
'895' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCO' 'sip-files00069.txt'
3c68c91c58840e138be3783e8fb0b244
caae208a4c4578329e1b5f7286c50e9a2b1b0e04
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCP' 'sip-files00070.txt'
e47d20ebada59716687283739e5c4ed7
186d6631c4fed2325b45a7b67ad44abcb0ee68ff
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCQ' 'sip-files00071.txt'
da78bd627aeac7b94ce5caaff870f5f5
090f48cc5843a13a4887475149b73a748fa41f73
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCR' 'sip-files00072.txt'
ce0ff68a667482aeb212d8dc3c70cae2
ef1707bfe330c98f09e98fc98d6f5d3d3bdcb04b
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCS' 'sip-files00074.txt'
a8682a8170f98aca9726ea3656d6c6e8
75cafdf210b129d8240fc706fe203d6e985b8595
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCT' 'sip-files00075.txt'
a93211646d967f2edcd6112a845b3f78
0c56f5982327ed759690329eda5b3647536188da
describe
Invalid character
'1083' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCU' 'sip-files00076.txt'
d3d748c0e737eefd308a4a949531fe88
7ef623834ca27ee4ad9a04d3566c16f51ca7176d
'2011-10-11T21:31:52-04:00'
describe
'1002' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCV' 'sip-files00077.txt'
2e27d14a7e527349f71a23ede0849c37
aba027187fa4538105468f6a4fdf4b52195fa78e
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCW' 'sip-files00078.txt'
71f1bc82bc46c9326a8f35b154624bb4
32aff174875954bc66d342bb5a08f6607bcd42c1
describe
'948' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCX' 'sip-files00079.txt'
7060bc75978b1860cdacc1c208cdc478
9922b09e38928a6dce166cd9ff74137aff91f24c
'2011-10-11T21:31:19-04:00'
describe
'910' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCY' 'sip-files00080.txt'
8181aac992a1cf58bcafd882c9601294
d43252cdd23a1bfdf1cb60e0db897c226ad9cede
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJCZ' 'sip-files00081.txt'
87b3f395c795cd743e69018c5d83fdc6
888046b8fd9519218cf299dccb3c2b2a331394cd
'2011-10-11T21:32:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDA' 'sip-files00082.txt'
18ce3ead061932e1c378d5edeeefe5f6
751b3f0d051eb6ff69f4db6d80ff8926b615b3ca
describe
'1027' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDB' 'sip-files00083.txt'
57d92840c0007a9594c9ed98692d43b1
edadaadd0805cc9630a58e80e0c315eb064a64c0
describe
'860' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDC' 'sip-files00084.txt'
930d5851df17b8a600ca9cda5b651da8
17a83a7cc9feabcaac6ae94a45048e434b1e5920
describe
'213' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDD' 'sip-files00085.txt'
217a1ab6ff757ec04771ef962a808771
7014e152bbb002a82e4b40bdf3e5f29aa3eeef45
describe
'788' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDE' 'sip-files00086.txt'
d898046eec2e2b23959bc86c58c2b8a2
1bb44fd75beb05f24091cfc2be8c756fc07efd2f
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDF' 'sip-files00087.txt'
64be8fb6d169a2bfa6faf39825b5c28c
b33af0c2b021ea9f98150dc61d752396dfd2068d
'2011-10-11T21:32:22-04:00'
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDG' 'sip-files00088.txt'
dd0cce47369b4b04cbcd142b331d3de2
53c6311c1dcc17802aeeede91d69068fb3618b1d
describe
Invalid character
'1279' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDH' 'sip-files00089.txt'
7f447aece5083987da0827810539d5e6
f45f767ca8f0da1628167054ee6cecaa87006811
'2011-10-11T21:32:50-04:00'
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDI' 'sip-files00090.txt'
a807666fb07a34316a11845ff9bbfefd
fee238cd9b07dd190ce526644cf6620db7f88ecc
describe
Invalid character
'1138' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDJ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
27bf60164a2e695314a47cf57fc90f36
75523f7e03c432380138e1972bf1cd0de572d761
'2011-10-11T21:31:56-04:00'
describe
'1081' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDK' 'sip-files00092.txt'
8c8852b596802e96d0bfd72e291730f4
e86cede2143af2d411e7b90dc56b5bfdeeb29f64
'2011-10-11T21:31:43-04:00'
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDL' 'sip-files00093.txt'
392e88bff2f4a3efe9752c161d0bdd49
28247fd4bcee5558046200d2913cbef73cd6ac23
'2011-10-11T21:32:44-04:00'
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDM' 'sip-files00094.txt'
b426b4cd8e1a7d46733f30c069c66d2b
0a8a98f0acd10d7c391f1359cd7f38df902d3cb1
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDN' 'sip-files00095.txt'
7af096e1133d86e86e2ec04c1c4227b3
a426b3dc0ed625ddbdd4ad4d6408652df049fc9c
describe
'997' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDO' 'sip-files00096.txt'
0516a82db8399397721957c3422e73da
2145dfd884b61c2d32438495244e631fce2f4541
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDP' 'sip-files00097.txt'
6cba9a0ea3ffc1ec131ce4a514460de6
c78c0117b279dac63afb1750d29db2cdcc69c279
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDQ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
71fbf1ddab5fd8a61c85d5fe44a35a57
aac92308092bacc5d7cf39b1715f31ae0d7e3709
describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDR' 'sip-files00099.txt'
290719f2c4ff5a98554d544c90e7c581
2957f5d769d4d5859afefe7672cceb355076ede4
describe
'546' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDS' 'sip-files00100.txt'
57ff5bd435d4affd735de9aa501690a9
b63dc344288ab06491c8c74811461446350d2768
describe
'583' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDT' 'sip-files00101.txt'
52461f68d6dcb4f6b59104859a649c9b
420d13081b483d9dedc1722bf3bffc9f64657fb2
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDU' 'sip-files00102.txt'
ffb0d67636bd1a361884d1764bea10f3
cdbac81080b5bfd93acbb2332ff4539455ea0b6d
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDV' 'sip-files00103.txt'
cf9ab12ffe3938385ad890dac66bf3e1
19da1169729a8564749c90dc7e00cde38af477bb
'2011-10-11T21:32:10-04:00'
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDW' 'sip-files00104.txt'
f0b6eaacfd6a03cde0fd1cffb96378a9
384b76e31827103f9abf558ff83702751be47ea4
describe
'1089' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDX' 'sip-files00105.txt'
303c20614feb30304ffb986b9349f740
db4422bf655a958a169865318236af9b064260ec
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDY' 'sip-files00106.txt'
62cfe17218c988f0e3c5a0a723a6ecfe
a9553c365594b55868586a463a258e10f75c157e
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJDZ' 'sip-files00107.txt'
84e3656000c61fbfbb83fdbf479a4261
bd01eab006bc36f324eed38fc2e2066a79a79a24
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEA' 'sip-files00108.txt'
d0f4a1d5f306b95ef140576dd70e50b4
24db0849b23f409b7ce4cfcc67145274c9b7d74e
'2011-10-11T21:32:11-04:00'
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEB' 'sip-files00109.txt'
74d40353ebc82de0a30d2f785d9a979e
a1e9bebc84b387510bf3e857f70c22306fb66ab5
describe
'911' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEC' 'sip-files00110.txt'
38ef9be4132c6ef3cd06546fed88cf0d
388dc69960e71c49b9209755df82a4f12e4f4fe8
describe
'421' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJED' 'sip-files00111.txt'
92c61b847902d8c591a78b7658afa4b1
503c4b260970ae53f151c9a0369618d3a132a0ce
describe
'1535' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEE' 'sip-files00112.txt'
600aad8a1dac83430b072ca13c86257e
67afe7cf4c931dd2cb41ebc5bf17d72826fe363a
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEF' 'sip-files00113.txt'
8c21723c0841b3416375d1b5de699633
7eb8329901a9882dfe67a6909c908d8661551299
describe
'1461' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEG' 'sip-files00114.txt'
84372706aafd099dc98cd91c451d99c3
f5f61b39ea472ff262d107704a8000f38cd389a8
describe
Invalid character
'177' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEH' 'sip-files00115.txt'
13da83c330213f7491b2846a4ef11b49
7791c68c2cf95ab5b56c367cae1594c6f44e92c3
describe
'17' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEI' 'sip-files00117.txt'
a58fdafdbd4d52a451d06beffc900162
15d6ec8e10948e2a6564939ba764179dfa075a45
describe
'207910' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEJ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
1baf71ecf9cf4c3ae34ca921ab29f5b6
ca34a8a79c098e0fb7922106f36963bb5563c634
describe
'197150' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEK' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
23f36a5dbd54159371f0daf69193002c
842f5e2fd278667b97bf018bc79933ebb16d6b59
describe
'206376' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEL' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
e9a223bb50b50dfec3b5ad4d247b5d0b
44a9d529d83604a39dcb42d805aa9123084f84de
describe
'207286' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEM' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
312a193b8ea64eb0f994699b108358a2
678aab10c0b782d57a74e381d1d5976f9aee7c2d
describe
'204705' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEN' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
962c1242914a1f3da2f74fe3e1c6a00b
72f6aac8da6aac68e14409b5ce823dfb6837efd3
describe
'198748' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEO' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
211267ec2a309b85dde4714a05e9b3c0
43870a70940d7358141aa34a2771d1c576cbc77c
describe
'206716' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEP' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
ac57ba553de4a2f149dfdc41d8859195
37dfed86065581b7991d9e84f89a5c373d1c0ebc
describe
'203702' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEQ' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
5663122a3f3efa13c71f8f29eff3df3c
7010c9ad8019316ee347e126aa0bbf08d521f439
describe
'196220' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJER' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
38b3c33680c709d4c256165368ba9993
55e515033e987315b8c7a546fbe0a61ae054e100
describe
'204323' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJES' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
498630251685c88742eb451798225697
891bf15a585983a3dbc7fd44a6e1314351bfea69
describe
'196642' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJET' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
5be8c6aed3717c8bb91ba0939a241d59
55ddb78bba2365ddf929c21f1b9d48536db66149
describe
'198194' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEU' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
428e0ec842ec32c7fa191bfa3932facf
a7b743ef087980f43da23d148193548cb332d5f3
describe
'205082' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEV' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
8f893835f5d5ca229b7900ded8b1b982
7621621182f275771127fe40a6164864a0ec48e3
'2011-10-11T21:32:20-04:00'
describe
'208322' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEW' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
7a8767c8f4406418e325ede5ef79ffee
9ccb15ff257e20538aecf899a0d767f1ea05d6b3
describe
'205487' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEX' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
b69a33b051d8d98a586027d9818db674
fda2349c67946f1f117ece4d4e29ace1458be10c
describe
'208254' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEY' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
e6e8687f3cf24829377503fb032b7fb3
cacde6c64d80f5a09c5aa0fafc6b913be08c37f3
describe
'191740' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJEZ' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
138390dc61729058de9f528f46970112
7d846ba06219e5e96517ca21b92cf3d87ce2bbf2
describe
'208530' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFA' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
18b3c3387c36114e1be54b9b1581e6b4
0558e4ef952a572b75141c1d919c95a3f469e6f6
describe
'188607' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFB' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
6149a33dcae732a27199ccd098643992
f32bac3481f1d4b947f7ec261af4a07b953cd22b
describe
'185940' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFC' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
4859530bbfdb6a0820ded64869119f16
55768b09dfda2e8d38dfa63e31dce30031b77e18
describe
'191281' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFD' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
566824638af9ffd26ef1006921dffb9d
faebb858f4cf5727bb395d71b63605474e241c2e
describe
'187390' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFE' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
e5796c495bc04b2e169cd3f8b3cda2cd
6bfdf213d902e4936b08b7dcd556e3ee2572c691
describe
'177508' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFF' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
65543724833ce2e20f6b2ff7c187e292
b9210d69d88da70113964f86df48c5ce0acfa1fb
describe
'194610' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFG' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
2d2257e97c88c047c2230df7229589db
4d4fcb5e57d3e35723a1402c03484d2eaac687be
describe
'197660' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFH' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
377ad920a07de291e4b5da31c04c6d28
3ffa877f7321c23329b5f8e7778018bfc02f19bf
describe
'216260' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFI' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
21060bdcd9d016add23e25ec8bd33b8b
0024e7f44c6d39d9f28a2413ea4621f8f32a1f6c
describe
'207522' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFJ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
f93d8ca6f0a9292cb937ee4987bb4129
070c7822469518cfd5920db66cb76bbca6b8878e
describe
'196096' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFK' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
d2082ae52e6db2600eb5072a32be02b4
ba6841ed3c8b6058d7101650ae3206e7aae7f796
describe
'177614' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFL' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
b19edcd5b664f122ed6378862e9eff71
8d831547875ae4fbada988792b4f878964197f23
describe
'192384' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFM' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
9a8cdb1028913fa87f351f6123a7a424
42c9e3a4fb4d264957f8daf6099a72273cc58fe2
describe
'204420' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFN' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
6096515685762657d4f439ba5812911b
bc0339847d0388bbf2bf234d2d7f047b2a59da82
describe
'200954' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFO' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
c7bb64f82acc3d79916c9455682af211
ce99e375a78236c1062e6ef58512ce7229891703
describe
'192985' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFP' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
816d9271f22c92fce9f5e58c86522c2a
469a7fe5a1d051fd4002b81ea632b4c65dd3649a
describe
'181481' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFQ' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
d61dc69d414c5bbb2e9492b66da3621b
456b10ca28ba4784684502cfd757031ba7f92146
describe
'192861' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFR' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
21c49cf68d0e5b3124b36e5f07bb7332
5be1e8b9618df405286795856003a8668ed2086f
describe
'184554' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFS' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
ec2c204bf049a574c573dd4392c1e856
0e2ef944f6b48d2189a1814a84ba9a2b10946f69
describe
'202880' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFT' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
1124130434eaa8ffbfb2d0f99a3147e0
95d91ca7174f1e905b9035470a25aa1f3073aa9d
describe
'183781' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFU' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
25fa224fa6068cc93db4bec7712693b3
2664c29ef9a8a51d95f6b99785d5cf5acf686eac
describe
'210879' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFV' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
3d81016124c48a2b7f9feed23a02c833
ce31bc88275ace0f57d83bd4f43857680be372b7
describe
'200186' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFW' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
5da7236a5071cf1c86134f29b15abee8
d82e4c5d81e870faa2c95cee7ca7ed9dbb27a25a
describe
'212204' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFX' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
8e9fe853f020a0f22f43db700759990d
c92ab7b870dbee703a0ac975c03ebcd33c7e3977
describe
'205793' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFY' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
19edf758a92795e5b785ec202c882bd4
a88035003b3af9ba781b79aeb5df0f3a6ba79978
describe
'205140' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJFZ' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
2900b028c139537be469f3ac0ba00dfd
c7054af02674f30b41b6b0647e0c52482b30a0c3
describe
'210714' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGA' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
07e73430076cfbf901975b28cbb3bb48
dfff90ec3150371551146b92b9b707e036a41919
describe
'193888' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGB' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
b2074f15a36a1e137435fe0b6032bb65
df36b3c9b8583d8f59f0fbde776e474ac163a539
describe
'178970' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGC' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
8f3ee6b3492a7b8fbdd48729d11ff303
ac715259722cc448d120ff916957a1737d8baa60
describe
'183072' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGD' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
39d43384f32ae350deef5c4f3f5f9307
ea71c102bd6bf2ec9ca02e5a3bba43adaa556c41
describe
'192538' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGE' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
6eb33cb8721d5318d4fd8fc471a40ce7
18905f4ead5e4d9322a6dcf39d378f6d5557a699
describe
'213351' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGF' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
8006ebd501cb3a892d0a1e052ba908e8
ecdf7323f07442773facdb85c0a4fbcd3dc8e46b
describe
'208390' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGG' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
41471444d05440467918afbf60b3f836
9a4b10078da67817445177a1f7a7fb4e8f6dce7c
describe
'212281' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGH' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
f7c1eb6e318eede4e38fdd6313f6c355
e61eb2e0ae2c1c912120263ca3c30f2ade104dca
describe
'209939' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGI' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
572a4a4057f45e311555f6e1a70937e5
3ebd3ef416f6962c3044a23f27dd57f2904171de
describe
'217722' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGJ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
4c5a26822c634acb84b4891c09cbcca2
c3cf373362699c02cf364cdd7effab75c887322c
describe
'210599' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGK' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
07135b41d69089f3bb611e7b6845c090
97200eae693a8153e60173374df7a31b3e42f839
describe
'207050' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGL' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
39b5609996007b6bf314918dddabdd91
9d491f7948ff7654981752253a8c742aff9d3e58
'2011-10-11T21:32:58-04:00'
describe
'203419' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGM' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
804ad53dbc734974eb3cedf65c566f7a
a061d8171fca440173276c0b6fe586cae53d38ae
describe
'213942' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGN' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
2f42588f16ee60ef6ce4f7612864fc55
044d670f30885860c0f4eab4e185802132314861
describe
'191561' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGO' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
030a6ca5dfd1419164bf33641800cbe0
2dcca85c39efd2c7f1fb74c09578b725d99e7b6c
describe
'197401' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGP' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
444b479a73321ce3116d55021f6b0a9e
406b7be26e5ce738ac759893562aed51cf789771
describe
'185915' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGQ' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
88ee4d20b024117833796b688c4c3f9f
4bfd53bcc4d660e117710b57f9f9837068ee0cee
describe
'198198' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGR' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
7dc6b434ba2e22721da38319da37006b
cbab6d6e78e942088675685ba82ce14152ebe2ae
describe
'192185' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGS' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
22eee50e8991ce5bedb364a01dc87bdc
9e06ddf3b485f6e4acade0cbbf4dc9849d727982
describe
'193004' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGT' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
3b0a240bd31e88932e97b662b5668dd0
df1441a59767acf72a982be7556a9ac0d5eed589
describe
'181459' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGU' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
0156f76db2c53e7babacae19cc342ecb
4818bfd34188514d7965d3793d5b0112cdbe0982
describe
'192418' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGV' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
bb0cd4da7b022b004ab5d67f0177e6c6
4b82a0947ed2f4a37f9ac899eb3b6a2b1659e119
describe
'190409' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGW' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
f7d62ce6f9e02d60ea58b75b017716f1
7b2592427a7dcf8117395dcb77179373e3229182
describe
'205356' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGX' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
c61df02585dcb73b16085520936362b7
8d453173f777200d576a578984b805cd2628d012
describe
'197761' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGY' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
0d3342e82df73488e82f0c128489093b
674a7e44135c9afd8c43164ee03988a070dcb38c
describe
'193817' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJGZ' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
96314bc09467b2350ac1246bacff1ed7
4bf350141601010b5af25bd796a611c0d5a3bf02
describe
'191857' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHA' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
ba59eb2a4536c8402cabbfd950668efe
1093bad5e0244799eb81bada9fe52fb764368be9
describe
'199649' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHB' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
895f117c4af19c9927fc8cca783b7cfd
b369b6225675893b8b002a43f2ccd326195167cc
describe
'203682' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHC' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
002a0b237481e27f37a236119102a1d7
75d73d72f0e8f0b0296810da032de2ef0582c729
describe
'198992' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHD' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
d50bad51307ed479a4b9150a1885a3cf
5f71a148ed80f0e027ac12e31c9d2d623587c3b5
describe
'195673' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHE' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
19b42fb2fe1ee867a219f42f0c5cfaf0
1cb1da515c9775d52070113d08a4ca680b2735cd
describe
'194085' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHF' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
2a61a53acd3565bee7baeef1af4b1d5e
985114019e5f511095901f312e16960d4eece6b6
describe
'189496' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHG' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
3a5380fb9aed99853d5c78c1c8075c15
f39b21464981ad5c6c8bbe35bae91ac64d88f94d
describe
'192032' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHH' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
8bf168d43023157de85ec7a8d046e343
d120a22ba5e2f0ca55741ce43858e5665b9e141b
describe
'219794' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHI' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
810d285c3785eeea8a058963605ba65b
2dcd8e727c4d40c9d936215987faa297bb63efdb
describe
'203805' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHJ' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
9b4bd661a17ed8af0e7cd4b8ff3466e2
43f62c716caca5208fd246cba5ab235b4790cdd4
describe
'197516' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHK' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
80f7c23060d0bf8a5e63e1e2bf94fb24
ef1612a61b84f2269cc70f78dcb2d1b255467942
describe
'227237' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHL' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
d9c20d2e3a0881d8c679386adc88c8f9
b6113c6180ce69cd3b79e5398a8fe32ccce98423
describe
'232202' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHM' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
6e9f5299d42caa2d11686f8e14eb9c7d
408bd760350148871585bb6b63511a8d67e76144
describe
'32506' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHN' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
4661a725bd4bcd008c682237c2f00041
a9e51c33c378868d390b5ba306e918d5460d401b
describe
'1677492' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHO' 'sip-files00033.tif'
357509b5ad76770766c2430aed76d9cd
2701b42a846ab0b9e3166b925dbf9dc759c465f7
describe
'1590800' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHP' 'sip-files00034.tif'
465dcde44e5daccab242ae0e931da50e
32a6255fc61b2e8fe9e4faee59fb617c51ebce7b
describe
'1664652' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHQ' 'sip-files00035.tif'
14c44fcd7745c6c70479a8be7b48cc96
8752f36138b99d684ab83e5389f3ddd1c11de3b0
describe
'1671576' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHR' 'sip-files00036.tif'
8c95e223ac64624bc2e84e75ed0b3702
a7083c0b1b5eec78d4fa86dd191e0c09d9f2596b
describe
'1651468' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHS' 'sip-files00037.tif'
9c89b6a13b473163c09bae70ad801c45
c99bd7fb3b1fefd842f8766fb191d3d75e20a344
describe
'1603388' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHT' 'sip-files00038.tif'
23957ca365a0649ac1f4545583db0795
b93a9b598e40fc09a262f0172280b640f4cf3943
describe
'1668096' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHU' 'sip-files00039.tif'
d7399f3fcc291fa073660f20bf01a97d
519352fe0a021c09a2089dd4d67a5846a3d0a305
describe
'1643500' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHV' 'sip-files00040.tif'
d82e41cc2be140cd3c4338f5698e6c56
60f3eabf8ec9baa0234cc312d058845dc8cb6314
describe
'1582868' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHW' 'sip-files00041.tif'
ed6bad9e48c1c5c5584c30be02d72a99
ed5874c2ffc1cd9583a89debfc714301e3438cd6
describe
'1647860' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHX' 'sip-files00042.tif'
4e35efa5ea4d3c77be7f8dc6e0e02c62
2bfab99ca71f012b3b118a74d917ec821af0bda9
describe
'1587140' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHY' 'sip-files00043.tif'
67e2cbd4ebbfe280e3f56f1925cd305e
c926db4898b8945df154a2ad2650b36265ba2a0c
describe
'1598580' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJHZ' 'sip-files00044.tif'
7826f32832569f2aee93d28f9d52d422
522e16d8dac61b13b3271dc7409fd78a52313d0a
describe
'1652740' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIA' 'sip-files00045.tif'
b0504916c042ae6054c9c47fb5c9a854
64f1fb8cd6ac2ac0e6e61d3418e1f3ddeebd8f64
describe
'1678288' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIB' 'sip-files00046.tif'
ac1621c650d8abc3d24b9ca625018d69
f4eb9461f443fca1763261d4d505b4b8945d1a83
describe
'1657672' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIC' 'sip-files00047.tif'
b947a90c8acce9130772696bc74f6512
7c37c5a8e42f1bf2ab84b879f3bebcdcc934359c
describe
'1680208' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJID' 'sip-files00048.tif'
005cd4359bbe36fb2d73f7010cf8521b
ddecb846ce380cbb60ca9688e677a3f561aedb41
'2011-10-11T21:32:37-04:00'
describe
'1547372' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIE' 'sip-files00049.tif'
8fe9c668065643c34233520cd1e151ca
22ede0ee2f3367476b3f3217687254371d84ca9e
describe
'1681816' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIF' 'sip-files00050.tif'
e4d08df00bdc008b83dd80d069622c6a
17f00ae6033c83226497c901312e9e7ceec097c8
describe
'1522588' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIG' 'sip-files00051.tif'
35d517354d5c4c70b2932d9827003efb
4d9c0a88d35d932ab23002180254ca96db37aa07
describe
'1501200' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIH' 'sip-files00052.tif'
ed2ffefd3c89d9be0621585780f94465
4df3cdf8ece4bd4c460e7c32c1ee0f24f00e3fe5
describe
'1543852' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJII' 'sip-files00053.tif'
2084b9de3b66b138279c7ba263683be6
6c549f5e6b73ee5f71252dc34686adfb6fee5c9d
describe
'1512632' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIJ' 'sip-files00054.tif'
ee3ffd1e250e786e5f163cd06ae43fbd
7e334ccd221cfe10281ac6a5df7e9471048780af
describe
'1434060' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIK' 'sip-files00056.tif'
21e6ce2349bc567470c651b580fae3b1
7bc3cf12dc579610f3435db20c4aa1f57fde843d
describe
'1570516' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIL' 'sip-files00057.tif'
8ee62599ffc87477e215ec4c8acac7a1
56ed5bfca034333ab69f1298c99dc90753ce1ba8
describe
'1595388' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIM' 'sip-files00058.tif'
c7211c85cbc9165b864e228b8e2849d0
43a7fe607ce3b5f20ee7ed10656dfa3f71b120f9
describe
'1744468' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIN' 'sip-files00059.tif'
304129939a750c4bb1391be72028a1eb
9f7cb8a4d1c83a7c1ce56ec755cda06315951212
describe
'1674200' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIO' 'sip-files00060.tif'
bb73357f95da9b4d1605b81284b3b5a8
44d63f61a9d75c8c0a9df2ac3399793f81f0988b
describe
'1582752' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIP' 'sip-files00061.tif'
fabb4c8438c3a47299f1a9e123b95439
a5ad61541f4ce2f17e502fd573e56d83c8a213f1
'2011-10-11T21:32:16-04:00'
describe
'1435824' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIQ' 'sip-files00062.tif'
c115dba05f27ac8b1bdcdda666e2c559
4b74b03b1afaa3d219ff22761fea172a20d37b72
describe
'1553176' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIR' 'sip-files00063.tif'
b4c9687b592aa6617fed12057ca11150
d62bd03792e4ab9901207b559f51753f9bc7116b
describe
'1645776' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIS' 'sip-files00064.tif'
7fb3920211bfdec580fbdd1b416383db
19cd3260bc530daae7c4ecc93c35a1a0f9b40a41
describe
'1621128' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIT' 'sip-files00065.tif'
eea63222a108f0c8baeb35f45353f6a3
af573581790176f0f28d2bc4a8df05e4e6c8fcd7
describe
'1557608' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIU' 'sip-files00066.tif'
28ce69fc8ff8326ad7f6fde52c50567a
5e58ea5691ea25078612bfd011d852552d827ca5
describe
'1465820' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIV' 'sip-files00067.tif'
621c57b17268f8c428da8671295aa484
f6116a49f2696174cfb95f05b0245825b2ee624a
describe
'1557196' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIW' 'sip-files00068.tif'
f81703ff093692a63a5e11798709f64b
009e9d6b925434642c71b1465becce694215ba41
describe
'1490680' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIX' 'sip-files00069.tif'
ae03ed912339d1c1a83f2e9dd035fa29
48d3def4e609c868185332486b6a7ea0831fb517
describe
'1637080' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIY' 'sip-files00070.tif'
c225a005596a166c9e6db262bce7674a
e30de0905af6907063a84175b0caf7f2af1953ad
describe
'1485032' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJIZ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
717a238b9806d364fd8d4dfabf74e503
4bd1b3f24f711802f06c4ec5f8b468d99e627db3
describe
'1700540' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJA' 'sip-files00072.tif'
03a7721bff74b5c0d104672802b49ffb
2608c126237220f6565cebba35846c7ecbfbfa34
describe
'1615932' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJB' 'sip-files00074.tif'
814677b4493014752d90f9d89ec6ec4a
8e95818374c9fb012249425057de5990a0d0224e
describe
'1710876' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJC' 'sip-files00075.tif'
fbf99e2a733e9ebb2a16e9d0813021fb
dfe9c0833653b586fb1eb05718d01493a661464a
describe
'1660876' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJD' 'sip-files00076.tif'
7a8cb4a5e9b64dd2b63bbffe460f6f54
b9f6f0f19f1280a54e545e039fb5d2e3d138a1a7
describe
'1655692' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJE' 'sip-files00077.tif'
8eb434c5207e7cefcf5f0409619e163c
228c55259b23fcc2db900fab596a05196f335d91
describe
'1699664' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJF' 'sip-files00078.tif'
a68c38de295d1f86a15f4f903bf8e511
40f7078de7380fcd01805fb2443b61c0c278004b
describe
'1565156' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJG' 'sip-files00079.tif'
f07d0c5685191e70188a088fa2f35a2c
a213af1910e9d9947859eebe9379f61ab1953558
describe
'1447036' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJH' 'sip-files00080.tif'
6d59ee0a4b79a38360f33b109e8fbe9c
acfe648bfb064646262ada2f7669e303fc006a06
describe
'1478900' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJI' 'sip-files00081.tif'
e6e1ce221a0d021291ea761eac35edfb
2b16e4faf8642aa1e912b93d2ac3aa6011b5072d
describe
'1554180' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJJ' 'sip-files00082.tif'
e70d2fe40f6a2782e7fee4d2e737bc78
2726abec8b0f3ad6c261fccfa4d408fc81ecd079
describe
'1718968' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJK' 'sip-files00083.tif'
e45ee62f046e5ba7d8e638b390caaadd
0f37aeebfe6d0d5195ac80d6a75ffcad74c3be36
describe
'1679612' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJL' 'sip-files00084.tif'
8964176dc3aed4f37b8dcc2905ab6b23
b430f10172699fc41ef65a88cc4f4f1ed72f1e62
describe
'1708172' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJM' 'sip-files00085.tif'
a005ab4a046f5fcb8665a96898384fd6
d847447b0cafc1edab9b6bd5d83f79889de9ed51
describe
'1692428' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJN' 'sip-files00086.tif'
506e2f0ac0485fd790e062650e2d0ecf
701f6b24c16d1c2bf87a6d7598189405a5db6e2d
describe
'1755012' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJO' 'sip-files00087.tif'
29b911182529b0919d74bd9bca0f8a7f
51ebcb7689915341bfa9a2d9128099ed2e7befee
describe
'1698616' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJP' 'sip-files00088.tif'
73eec31c4eb71db038f29713dadb0f7a
cfccb7089f7febcc21deaa73de93a64fa3f2fc3c
describe
'1671928' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJQ' 'sip-files00089.tif'
c48b7d362ea1458091379fb309afb2b4
1adbeac94ae1aa884f55ad5575d1be724003b52e
describe
'1641016' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJR' 'sip-files00090.tif'
1851dd2b439b8accc29b7aa6da6a6927
f11c869e38f9bef52f4aee782d44cf0fb4590980
describe
'1725400' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJS' 'sip-files00091.tif'
86b97b2d98070f35e51f5eec552cfecd
d8bea619874b70bb868c32aa4475631b26f252c8
describe
'1546900' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJT' 'sip-files00092.tif'
7022b7e2905b3ef67822a2e6b150800c
70440614f18f22aa28526eedae7386b61fc488ce
describe
'1593176' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJU' 'sip-files00093.tif'
1b0213c232978688f8f9dd8997c00f1f
085c8fd41f3e7b06e2504865bebbcd5e20e812ab
describe
'1502532' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJV' 'sip-files00094.tif'
5f1ebb51e831aa1d317c34d74dfe7071
9e490cdf9b2bc69c2cf4cdece331339342ef83d1
describe
'1600292' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJW' 'sip-files00095.tif'
26493d3799c4dba955e9fb99819e17ad
1aed37b2ea38ce97d053468affc7624b328806c5
describe
'1551672' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJX' 'sip-files00096.tif'
aa3eeb482e2e600d0e5121d61adb2fc0
b278aa72197d41e432a8b7d0a84362a8f5eff1bf
describe
'1558140' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJY' 'sip-files00097.tif'
9d942d8f82343c9fe8fcb71f9b7caf09
1ef1b771e2c2d48050f0550b9e64d87c9abb03ed
describe
'1466256' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJJZ' 'sip-files00098.tif'
1269e5b9606ea4760eb42fd4db0e27a2
d08ae557b7ccc5a40b311e66a97ed7d1f78ab469
describe
'1553300' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKA' 'sip-files00099.tif'
783232537310785662513e1b473e1f57
b3ed76c18f6ee35c59e329e04b658731f4304796
'2011-10-11T21:32:23-04:00'
describe
'1536772' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKB' 'sip-files00100.tif'
48c5f48f041812e371f7345c168639ca
cc5dae280f65015e72bd2947d3ae44be9a358476
'2011-10-11T21:32:49-04:00'
describe
'1654828' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKC' 'sip-files00101.tif'
3accf5773f7b4ead2ea4da042c459014
1f4a2a55860723d8270eb8fb2d0da08c6e0314b5
describe
'1596536' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKD' 'sip-files00102.tif'
b50fc156e30d67f264659749fa504d60
562e5d6d0bd9be31c200f0cc9bfed258915a3582
describe
'1565356' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKE' 'sip-files00103.tif'
803b6184232884271be5149b86a416fc
4fd45836387a88ed131b2eaed92f507fa6950739
describe
'1549436' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKF' 'sip-files00104.tif'
90fc9976650abb5538bdefac0d0d91a5
c678cefe6037d42d1f263717f00941ef66939de3
describe
'1611392' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKG' 'sip-files00105.tif'
4ded72cce05bb5856d7e3dee397a62f2
3afb25fe469fef3b3a3fa828283052b29df175fb
describe
'1643912' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKH' 'sip-files00106.tif'
a1717987999838de0ccb7921df545367
ec1b4d03e2dcb4df3e72f6c117f18ac1b12bde5e
describe
'1606672' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKI' 'sip-files00107.tif'
d9d8c6962e440801e6403fb75495b5db
bd294cf9a146680ca22fccb52cadc4a3c73bdfce
describe
'1579856' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKJ' 'sip-files00108.tif'
0f943329cfdd355e2870a4f70b5add9a
b9ae3dfbe8c4a7484c67f56a675038f93aeed625
describe
'1567712' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKK' 'sip-files00109.tif'
591ddc64e64162aa10235aee6cd72f08
9605e911434b69a232f657cad3321d23f325e12f
describe
'1530220' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKL' 'sip-files00110.tif'
4e77bad33ba4b260d27ebb0d4d16b0a7
30a3765e07b6a6df9ae7dc15309df117c0b01f7e
describe
'1548104' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKM' 'sip-files00111.tif'
9cc6a80c624a986001c57ca6f57157d1
33bb8a7bf185f40fe501bc49a53dcf49882a6fa4
describe
'1767976' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKN' 'sip-files00112.tif'
5e66c7f299fd56bb90f72670c9acadde
af94f1522f31a4e99d82aff51ea0d929099e8a29
describe
'1644352' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKO' 'sip-files00113.tif'
88e8fa2c332e5fd2cea688f53f3f3256
25c55dcb1472c6da3d73cb237cb7b5873865397e
describe
'1593860' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKP' 'sip-files00114.tif'
6d53191c1aecca07b9162ccf4a03b6ad
f948870deef03ce189b4ef6df3af81e67fd21e0b
describe
'5465700' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKQ' 'sip-files00115.tif'
ac92f542a387c2243cc8a8ebdc5b1075
47c4e4b7bb513468990c11b784e79df24ca1cb87
describe
'5585268' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKR' 'sip-files00116.tif'
85bef3731ba8d934181292a453e59a20
09958746ee4ffb92f577f2bf0f3b83b57826375b
describe
'786832' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKS' 'sip-files00117.tif'
ce5004fdccdea9325200ead15f6c9884
f3c6c24136589be92b8b0049115eb02e59824ca3
describe
'273268' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKT' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
dc96b95fc6c5ec38bcae848108e2fc76
0729662234b8b2a0cdb70977152d3c4f4ee75ff3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'257792' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKU' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
1cff58103dd395b7d74e5988dadaa731
0f68f93a6eefb6158e43c1b70b9531ac957882d5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'264532' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKV' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
dc2ff94194c0c72b2e302ba94f730c3e
0fb419f918cd6d79a6aff5374d15367a2c43d58b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'247237' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKW' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
bb997c4205e8afd284e3ba0462d0a236
7ad5b0696d67995ed7c6407613e4b7c8b27461c4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'266669' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKX' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
488a9c38ba565c22d2761a824e9e9a64
ed285787cb0222dca9422ee7b57d8695868c1322
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'282907' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKY' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
6d3d30eabf09d99ea40ab2e781fa8c45
8cef1e154b59dd45a02744415cb96d8349a5c0b9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'269041' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJKZ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
5cf832b16b551aa3b1db6752e9da8ea6
e38691486bde926d1aba7eb72850777468bf00f4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'286233' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLA' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
c8c32f8d910655a51e7ec1e28261c9ea
664260394f8e49c1ce98d95ccddba8ffa80aac01
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'264905' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLB' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
982f962408c6f91689ef3237fe98fae7
ab7afb852a57ea726b17c92cf4aba4464dc182fd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'255891' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLC' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
aff6c911a03103429eb968f1874637fe
795b799a13b8e9202d90d0cbef5702a6a02bf053
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'281823' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLD' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
9ee5bc482c9a67307dea02040d272520
455d40c4b09aa9bf089b4fcab9b912df6f455584
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'258301' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLE' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
c8c4ecec7bb24f139538c6bdb3131e62
62b7edc68280976760de0c7d2bae06ab4c072a90
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'233467' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLF' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
614d66fd19e2f5e703537c53c7f38ead
4abc76fcd15fa4cee5059f2e12623a8e19341289
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'223340' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLG' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
8f8ddfcfc34a42e80c0d9064d93f62db
4bc6c6ab0be754b56001ea38b45eb99a4755f9cd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'258280' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLH' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
fd47624ed3f26564715ed7a0cf667101
4a30efa36bc97227e41932f2a97de1d3f9358352
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'278999' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLI' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
c2eb47fdff5b9f861e2d56842829f7b3
635f3db25e746b4ccaf56eb3725590757bb91def
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'276596' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLJ' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
b5eff5cb3740ae68b90bfe85ac0fa6a7
f5170e66f374900c85dc426b0ab7acf88bc91271
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'265813' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLK' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
10a9e91ca15acf9325f8b6cf7a647713
04d7ab81365b13e279827a8832736983367c6fde
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'278301' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLL' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
9929a2def1ce8e2fe948506446bcfbeb
9287c83098f94ae22b6ad98ec2eeec369761ee5f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'289379' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLM' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
0147203d41d50b438c1faef2df7b26ea
17cf32ceeb90a74c0b3718614a1b22977342b9f8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'290982' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLN' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
abcc8403de0795cbaf99ede632eff611
266a38c0eadae7aad1110aeb50ebea9251abd473
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'279727' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLO' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
40fe2ad972e8a57afb5984847192e5cb
af8b6fb38a650e46d68edb059779646fe5353f10
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'268684' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLP' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
ed330d23c63b9aef0c4a54cd1105f92a
dabf3a4e4d73398be7a4fce9f505d6fe83c37de7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'280409' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLQ' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
27e96bae7eca740eca429f38ee6b4f54
4c15743388708caf66cac46e7833dce24ead73c9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'284006' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLR' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
6a00daa058a252d47085fda97ee753d8
d9125090b7b03dc7ae4d6e0fe8df8fff67459a24
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'277688' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLS' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
88962de970e5989c294642a83c7fb77f
8b2b9b48348ef6c1cfca6fe04a785d4fb24590ae
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'274527' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLT' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
0a3e50e99a1ed44c123bbea55dd185af
055e02d97f5a87347f5ef2a570dbdd30144ddd26
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'285179' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLU' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
d03ca33635f99581e87b7fabec7b4644
885f29a8823460a1ca8bfb29c5faed5278f40e4e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'315942' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLV' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
7e69ec9a14a543b21ee7ebbf64d4ebff
7122d6b82349773ed68d17019a19fce60b200c54
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'289646' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLW' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
445e3620d08d0aa3bd5065f877529f49
b7c87a05b8fa97275644269123763a9c497ac99c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'174406' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLX' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
376d4a4ca022bb2639ea84d66d311296
53646f8ae216f1f9e194ed7dbd9ce8b52b4e65da
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'236241' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLY' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
77c96105ea17a9c73b379010370a28ac
8cf73fa6cec55165ec8b9ade1096a95a862d5605
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'268220' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJLZ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
ffdf499d06665d831ecad8c990f40486
45751788ffeab68a8e9031bf5672cf10092b43e4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'294938' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMA' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
c3d4606a3858a5a868140ce1bafc7d66
839c387e329ef4d3c28b782fd0b32948e3631f90
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'284596' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMB' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
e5219b16d3798eff88db5456dbeb2465
19a1b78fe6bd6345d8f46526b3686c627e512837
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'277219' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMC' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
4247931268f3cbee2c2a3a0db6b2b9ca
b96c90e1120883c30602f2cdb8661a83e56d1b46
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'279999' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMD' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
4ed6d4ff3b317ddf594e2db267e6214d
b5e96b0c937cde1e9a28bc8d5fd123106884e8a0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'304854' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJME' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
a1be4e59c82672898b00598bdbd9029d
8b98498cdcff0e99fd706461d7152eae7626aec4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'258673' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMF' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
8a5fc5c16313b0879ac3cac6cb073968
23d4186031b54f135c34d4f398ce4725405c3bf3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'275153' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMG' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
01de893c926587d3b04f937437fbacf1
7745e12400f991352df1e4c4e5b3424e24eb34d4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'273047' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMH' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
a1fd9b3a48b64b96e6f0ac6328dac42d
ce6796a0e80c3870cc8fca690194ed3dbaa02097
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'283625' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMI' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
b25a10317571a1f8dfb293adb5028d1f
eb978b4d737561ec275b2dc62fa86c210b1cc8d2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'260116' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMJ' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
4f11fb71b4ea94b7dd643f9620c84d44
3658ce48ff5e12cbca725b5603ecfdbbc2714056
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'255173' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMK' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
591a1fb16cf4bc7ddd8c41dba1d36984
e84df944413842caf543438ce9c929040de5d5f8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'244845' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJML' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
0d29cf7ef4c8a4c74b3b2f3d38e3ef26
4872b4da2fea97beb9e5d3a090bac9cc92c52289
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'263926' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMM' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
be54ee19b69a5c4194154527ef6379b0
9282af90b496316c4160e02e5584ef95af9562fe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'266890' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMN' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
d9ee14f6b260c8772f8a3e90832fc670
fba58686634a4a7749a20c20dc6d8e5fd885f043
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'259884' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMO' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
f2e07de4959f4026b58aa1e86150dd09
eda5bcc1d467174398f2e7e819e744b4219816e5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'233309' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMP' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
8408b68b3e6dc993900f99eb987bef9d
c70fdb3e71582418b0dc18db23772b9a929eacec
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'235420' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMQ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
23c07bba9bc3ba44c0f78f2d4a7552ab
1ee6adab85f5a6cf85e841930172fe0af6d14440
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'164081' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMR' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
0977b2b8d7b04d6873c9ca1a67cc6f8d
9a41d1a61065e920f8b6d25c8dba4c3dc8d77b0c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'230801' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMS' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
1afdf04e689315d26cd831cb32ed5ed5
977a15ab9454417603ceaef049f69c73b10143dd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'263483' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMT' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
c02cc1f0818bf0dfd74f5c3f666bc8af
ff4a854420e925668ae9ac780351e76ee9b77fb8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'275098' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMU' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
edba8cb9b9e6a364ede93d5c9e98f92d
7d0ef1e91229e5795f693d381845e947e5fbab33
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'287749' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMV' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
c08a9deee9889375e099cd2d5b2e4f89
9d381e11013a3129129de92112df9f1dd835a82a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'281439' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMW' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
c5bf85aa41473ec30edee3d4410831ac
7e39ade188234995f23594caf6db8e7e929d978c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'276764' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMX' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
7e3f6884b7c41bd31ec9eb5870b3f128
424ae24ba743504adaa82ae03e74fcb3854c8b24
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'287969' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMY' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
57b65da72288ed6db60cbfe2ae317302
ef7d6ba08efb0d12d1267387ea81f0c1e8808e24
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'274607' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJMZ' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
b2ad51ec249af9fd7eaa2073ccd82b7d
d82c8099314c30e63775f6af6452c19aa58236b1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'302839' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNA' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
6c38ace6c072bfd6c843a747a409ba1f
0e858248fb7bc582bf9df832c854d350cfcf3ecc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'273348' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNB' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
7f661ba5a6993b942274a89893696914
711ad7956bd3787942d54333f3b7257460eeb217
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'273544' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNC' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
264349589f2cad7123b19c4923d3607a
ccc73d4d29dbb5623f8778bcc3ec415f5fb500fa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'270380' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJND' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
9356480eca594dee2297b490629850fc
9b15a3124383ee80ed155cd6c8c3da5ed0fe0069
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'278150' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNE' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
1cadf3b00c76dbc5bed8b5267c3f7d7d
ab66cf375d21735ed7096602d72b3a4f2dbfc9f3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'245720' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNF' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
c73fe478d8414f0188bb3f814247a915
8014c968afa0d567c4538b350a5115a90b68f1a0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'207980' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNG' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
20b0dfec2a31b2937209c38cca4f069e
cac32d0dc38d952aa30d0e6b35a8568919ab6ae2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'187741' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNH' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
b46b8c75fe8f000a480d72a76e20157d
5ec20df755f8c9f6a98a7f2ce39ff7f8083ce07e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'288077' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNI' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
84df5485025ba301ee3916624da9ebc8
ed305c75305c71b46b89afab9a012e365abe1746
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'271019' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNJ' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
cae72631c076397a4a881addf3eff928
37636831081af9eef0ec6261fbabb7a095fb24f8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'293816' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNK' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
7e3aa51469ea75bcf1784cfdc7edacc5
bf89eee2dcfead58807b520b3bd2ac9537a91812
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'271878' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNL' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
08451e3c1b9637a3a9dca8544884b099
1a1399917a89e86a2a4f20da16e69534cbbdf22f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'271743' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNM' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
a1a6379ff05a37fff303a0d5251d219c
9658f141b7d7f79a218849415340bbd8529fe291
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'286365' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNN' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
7dc373f6656d59444d4d21a91b95e8ea
c9a55cfa1f8b9ad6059d7f5131c98235d33f5c24
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'285266' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNO' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
75587f4a423139b4b0bcbc2ccd101ea4
4a9b8de004ee5c88ba93d3f0edaa027723f18064
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'282798' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNP' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
fd1ad1e54881c1d179f742ff3e02bfda
c1bfe182e1eb12e517b0ba67884ef65da4de5d41
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'264238' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNQ' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
7988cf75ee8c9845b26a4404db5c17ce
a30f562261757bc8d718485446fb89a4582619ce
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'176013' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNR' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
c10001a7d93c2d58b7bf87e0b3468157
dedbf838cec301ce08a4d6795bafd301cb390edf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'280858' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNS' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
c2e84e4f05806a6dc6f0ccc0b736a767
1000078056a466561f46e8dad48fdc0e5cdfdcda
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNT' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
5dba6e992b6d29eb88db135254037bf3
baf13a91fca168b8489296d4eb60a3cd0ded5011
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'313295' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNU' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
fcc62b0b93618184598c807dcebcd0ec
b3e6a4e053ca5f6a8542a2fdee747a7942e9c77c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'203639' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNV' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
382b012635c0e7d7f3745f0953a0526c
68cd69da9e6680bb2ccdda04b5e7c51d98b152d9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'441156' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNW' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
589a3e1a8923635cbe50dd0167825037
24c015709c624b8f2d4e1f654b0f89cb07ce43cd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35794' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNX' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
86aecf2bde3a7612fb601629e6ea8b44
ef5f5ccaf686d3dec384c925deac064f6ceb4c19
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'123728' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNY' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
881cb74cc7d7c914fa05b4fe13625d26
7f31156d268f0c7a04f3365ffdf17b816a4a1f0f
describe
'422725' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJNZ' 'sip-files00034.QC2.jpg'
d3c61c11a483a79b62876a96a9d73196
f09935bac92ae2310b4143018240aa55b66cdcfb
describe
'122686' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOA' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
ec82b7c58ff13de88a4aa9621b85d65d
1f97985c50788b877e36280602a7a98de64fca9b
describe
'431928' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOB' 'sip-files00035.QC2.jpg'
3db9445f5ad5a1a4805d670b636ea138
b45e1d5bb523ea15e32b1ad7e6ce2e6db55b9c54
describe
'119149' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOC' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
2bd88a46b24a4cf886f92cd9dcc69d9e
e0c2516cc19a2c20b3df3916ab11f7c116d2c280
describe
'411163' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOD' 'sip-files00036.QC2.jpg'
1ddf2a30e8c6cbcc3be3a6e542ff085b
2ce163440d84c2604e1c88e43c9543cd0cef309c
describe
'124800' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOE' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
55caa5613a91bb81a9397106f68ccb94
4ab5b7ba38836edeb786c17247f2d52357745261
describe
'428232' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOF' 'sip-files00037.QC2.jpg'
8c91ba8e4ba26552b578501c948b6a3b
ff114a08d88d10b37c197f8e02b48b7a17d22a98
describe
'130898' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOG' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
b660354d9fddfff1e2fc2ba1cfecbbd4
6a6f66a495573274af2ce4bb16e74311af5eacc6
describe
'454608' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOH' 'sip-files00038.QC2.jpg'
4a38094552fa1cd0932d3e5be6571975
1ffb148c9ea13bafdebff3f3f324b311448f0f99
describe
'124710' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOI' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
771086a921795b6cd6aac5a99bc4696e
48f86513a4bde8e4d9de3b61a2d6591c78ec0f4c
describe
'431370' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOJ' 'sip-files00039.QC2.jpg'
e399fd5fa3f18231bbd9adbd89b8c4c5
9d927f96c866b6bf898767a31f67e6aa0546a5b5
describe
'132464' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOK' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
de4e32ccdd106f53d7474558d1cf83a7
704938d0e7eb69058836f2b21e7b9c78331346df
describe
'453185' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOL' 'sip-files00040.QC2.jpg'
12ad1d8291be898f1faea9829cbe7c7f
e93a387df8794cc0965b364c9287c04ca9034387
describe
'124901' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOM' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
4042cefb793568bf3dbe5354c7f85cb0
00435388de1fd131591a7726f1d88afcaa02c740
describe
'433181' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJON' 'sip-files00041.QC2.jpg'
200ab981b523b9a8745e157da42413e1
5453b8a8db526d96bf6fa4797c1552839c0a9f31
describe
'122592' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOO' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
b45eb6c5ca80cdf97db76c1f467b647c
1d516fbdccc89923a3c46ca329cd5e15c9118775
describe
'422749' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOP' 'sip-files00042.QC2.jpg'
c41569c1ff437375d7a0fb2633e3b147
0715f31b2ed88f1b129d39f9fa70c66c4ca9602b
describe
'130057' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOQ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
0353619343cff52f5ec6bb1c7ed5ab55
270f5c263f508a12b5e90dc00de543df14a66565
describe
'451668' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOR' 'sip-files00043.QC2.jpg'
97c9f9ff9529e7ca4cb963c206749f90
d9780b41313b84d6acd906364de15008a07d1ee8
describe
'123647' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOS' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
213a59435afe9ace3d6fa7186e9cd830
b983b09e3b8e331c395aaa6b6f94806ddd2cc6cc
describe
'427578' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOT' 'sip-files00044.QC2.jpg'
c14aa2b16e3fc61286e67d318dcea385
2a2f2aa0dd990b2d5b8398c5dcabe53a5cf3a168
describe
'111248' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOU' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
6b2c1da3217c0a4bb444c797ed3469e9
5385fe7f67b33f92cbeba39c346b91a82ad7e247
describe
'403298' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOV' 'sip-files00045.QC2.jpg'
8aaa6dc893bf23871e7a8c5df3f83bb5
c6689ec8102b41fd2732652a90390986df4d09fd
'2011-10-11T21:31:07-04:00'
describe
'108982' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOW' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
917b9a572b4743228fd554c2d072e401
b1c3608b6e6498d4a62fcfe4b71d1b7b63d5b793
describe
'395597' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOX' 'sip-files00046.QC2.jpg'
abc56241cfc48400a572c310c19bb504
2b38184187ea5e1c5d174683a769642b46215cb9
describe
'122359' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOY' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
690070223225bd9f60a9a4180fffae3c
13e6d486630f505e32f06c912b072fdb1029b2b0
describe
'427243' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJOZ' 'sip-files00047.QC2.jpg'
dd741d16713541fd0a41e2ad468c419d
aca0e82d00ef4369712bea9edb6183fea0f18d1c
describe
'128510' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPA' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
0b829c4d454eb3bdb12444497e855df8
93ec28446f753014f2b9e100c67eade3869ede97
describe
'449993' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPB' 'sip-files00048.QC2.jpg'
10cad4216e9ab5c7692c03a1c43217ff
a5d2efbacaaff99d1d35b257abcd8355f89aa10b
describe
'130833' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPC' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
b60d0a375a8cfd7ef3feceeeb0649410
fb7a435187aa3c136c61a3e092d71a7a35273670
describe
'451394' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPD' 'sip-files00049.QC2.jpg'
73656b064fb6ddf428dadc9663f2f723
9aadb9ba23b58e51c035afdc8d664cb1387cf6e7
describe
'124959' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPE' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
26e8cd2a5dfd28ce84b49da46fe35675
dfe86ee5fd669cdad0e3180ce2557f28a2ebd4a4
describe
'435150' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPF' 'sip-files00050.QC2.jpg'
c1475d579894d1504980468c721a7278
b0a69586c7d443dad9041ac205957ba61c797667
describe
'131013' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPG' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
b01cbe4ca0309424554f0b76a24e10f6
a5ed7833620898a0cf698c5f3e869d6457e9dcbb
describe
'445634' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPH' 'sip-files00051.QC2.jpg'
1a32ce51f51998f2b1babc0f11789826
74c504e76e9bd9baed51fb44a8632ac227bb5a9b
describe
'131780' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPI' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
791ae9e3325c1c889a1c84ad4d0e4691
1c032cf91e088eaa530c7759f0cf4ccafda1c026
describe
'456762' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPJ' 'sip-files00052.QC2.jpg'
27c0cf7262d32e0a58574c3be3e3035c
87613b32bcd3b8164faac1c199cdc556463fe939
describe
'134807' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPK' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
ee62b7da81c69ae30c85839ba66be8c8
11140f69e2df56b0477da7176f6f538d3ce6e569
describe
'459749' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPL' 'sip-files00053.QC2.jpg'
4ac93e55afb0da6bde9198f8a656ff1b
5d67c7685c97b9cbf66b49f76b5c858484ca10ad
describe
'131719' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPM' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
f4f270e1fe09e10b0311a82c0df53feb
0e55108b29a1b1fb7aa7da30e6a106440efa33a7
describe
'450145' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPN' 'sip-files00054.QC2.jpg'
27adb7c496a843ddc7656e72d233c46b
aa0cfbef9f0c75c2c84053d575301cc9d7306ce1
describe
'129521' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPO' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
b5c20e17f8d62e7a463035f66e4d57bd
410bbecd82d6127110e732ab9d609c5aa72a37a3
describe
'437154' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPP' 'sip-files00056.QC2.jpg'
85fa2595ecd3c964bdba45d7c8f4ae50
0019bf33da6d1c941e22792884ba91ae52f5be61
describe
'131228' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPQ' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
6108d1909364bdf712877e34cfb102b8
026d9769d9829f44058283f4dee89bf48bdbfa05
describe
'452108' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPR' 'sip-files00057.QC2.jpg'
fe33779862fad4409ff1d58d3849e2b0
800f9f7f4e3ca409ecdacb6d7dea0f1f0f71b54e
describe
'132782' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPS' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
f00bfc3af63d6e7ae055d156f098c261
f9214eba3191405154ecb6f4a6a3b0b75e9bf3cc
describe
'453792' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPT' 'sip-files00058.QC2.jpg'
fc6c7599d7663704778f7a03657a61f2
7e64e26a69602f750375a248a57ca45ab062f755
describe
'128628' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPU' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
9c380e36568bd92d2dde78b2fa0e19fd
2043549f30728e31360da33ce15beb39a36e1863
describe
'444100' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPV' 'sip-files00059.QC2.jpg'
6a4d3247369ccd41f8db9bbd5b29e8fc
74f2097050f22b83f9f46885a116e604f81c2aff
describe
'127128' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPW' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
d5323232a055e5dbfad2d02b0e3c167d
10a8e5be5d38eeb58c0433e3cca18c0ea628630d
describe
'443276' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPX' 'sip-files00060.QC2.jpg'
4e1aea54a20033c32ace394116e78bf4
c5af3f1ad6e243d2828d2cc5aaf99df3b8fe5ca7
describe
'132764' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPY' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
f543ecd4e8bee51485731a4a7739a5a4
0d02f1cc5a4373dfb430fdd3d432def454aa4555
describe
'452593' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJPZ' 'sip-files00061.QC2.jpg'
6f39ef7c85fac57dbbaf188fbeb9da65
7fec089816191e7c60e9b067ef17d8cadb193741
describe
'141763' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQA' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
ebd6258393a3f69ce1f6d4aa809dca7b
c4b62d2b5922a465f7a5381b8930db28f444eb20
describe
'483571' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQB' 'sip-files00062.QC2.jpg'
ce39c4d46b2266dddd807209193a026f
8b5f01685fd9f1594a51b3cf9070e69877c54ae0
describe
'134336' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQC' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
964a61e2aec060a74690b175f690a96b
fd53c44d9c7621f46e46645a9cb9f43ab898c907
describe
'460208' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQD' 'sip-files00063.QC2.jpg'
9c47da9679692f2e1e495510890692b9
122a822b35f8e039140c71362bcc6b69c2133459
describe
'87966' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQE' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
33a17a3d82b93aa5f175242bf5520815
dee8b16f5bdfd95f4ea6a0612620ca1cc8ed6f7b
describe
'340901' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQF' 'sip-files00064.QC2.jpg'
416794243eb96c8adb51d9ca5f4dea58
20ed8e2abdab3088920e06fea2893f8d81404c0a
describe
'113964' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQG' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
67cd46886a6bdd717f6cb5c2744b1655
89ff527bac7b0ecb89d5a0f4b3cf8e51a96b0a4b
describe
'409062' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQH' 'sip-files00065.QC2.jpg'
21addd7b7472a06a356e6e4f018553a6
e6b1e546241d02a4950a4b3feb0832fe8c3c1f39
describe
'127181' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQI' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
e760528c47bb6ba420ab9ec7717da0a3
690e12034349ea01c58957ecb8424f1d79873fd6
describe
'438382' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQJ' 'sip-files00066.QC2.jpg'
f2fc95362d683217c0f6a2eb5db31b9c
675f8cc36c56509d044921baf5b09a166e3c745c
describe
'136977' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQK' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
d44846efccfa45f3978b661ed638f13f
c5cfb52faac582d31e89b5ba0bc051fcc61803c1
describe
'465450' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQL' 'sip-files00067.QC2.jpg'
9ce08c7446e19ede1d480b6df576736b
77574db9e47c5ae3b58ccf0cc419dffefbb90d4c
describe
'131914' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQM' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
d734fed598afacb27d07abf3db99de38
2ff6af3e87b621e0a770867162d43dbc1ab9a5d5
describe
'451092' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQN' 'sip-files00068.QC2.jpg'
f7671b40f429404ad71cd25167099331
cc845db7d90ddd5c776ee472151510e0c7283bbf
describe
'131231' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQO' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
2da01b9c2e2e653632b9627324c14637
e535ebed73bbbde297b1dc02dc5875a6bd840c70
describe
'447111' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQP' 'sip-files00069.QC2.jpg'
ea3b87bdb001105431227564bdaf2b2e
77ced253a5be93a201fdd59fb554fc697e6125df
describe
'129280' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQQ' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
e9d5e51a7a9cd3a8b470e27f81e14144
76012da5c7bb0cb507cf0356582cc76d249568d6
describe
'446552' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQR' 'sip-files00070.QC2.jpg'
d5f4fd360d4d26f68c5f01984d1d3a9e
3d13aa592d47e69c537c23380eb85bb89803626d
describe
'138367' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQS' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
bf91560c60db4231abe86952b69d68bc
aa5a33865a989dfa6234d58e992d6bbe851c7990
describe
'474901' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQT' 'sip-files00071.QC2.jpg'
339871a9fb9ac71db7171c9a3b923c44
111439d12a6f84c46355297573b8df6017d1232e
describe
'125773' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQU' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
02aa17e5ba96caf8e2ddb3dcc7dd1726
050fc413574482e4c26be2c51e4c275eea8508c4
describe
'429658' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQV' 'sip-files00072.QC2.jpg'
777ab871c159baab6b37a374502039b8
6597c106c5d52f1bc13e43269b7e9dec39ed346c
describe
'128599' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQW' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
5ff6857910db7a81334a94f29eea7b6d
ec2fbb85b00aa8e02a1b2838ea33b3508e87a54c
describe
'437428' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQX' 'sip-files00074.QC2.jpg'
19f63f8cca9c117783e45134b9771058
2023c292e6ea8a188ab52f62dda3928fb9c59b04
describe
'130733' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQY' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
20016f557034be0d4cd707740fbaf536
1f3ff7fd34be69d75c61f3dab5b5007a8aa7ec5e
describe
'440604' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJQZ' 'sip-files00075.QC2.jpg'
d11026da61839c4e808345b87194ed7c
3bd5efafd0bebdbe10683e98dcf85f5ea8f0625e
describe
'131782' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRA' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
ba0e6b65c91dac2b61fb7a7d540ab9f0
3565b1dd97805cd561c93957afe4b98bdeecc648
describe
'447815' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRB' 'sip-files00076.QC2.jpg'
139a7681daa0bbb22d7e70e1d16b4bb8
a9b9a3522cb7bc10fdc9b3afe9326271ef867806
describe
'125241' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRC' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
41f78b69e96728a43a752c71ebe409f8
973073c01370a69f9f3ba4ea2d2329415f9127c9
describe
'423676' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRD' 'sip-files00077.QC2.jpg'
7a2fb33a539c9bf2ba8a8e2a1d3b3253
1fb5c3733817ca670bac14af278503a1c3062906
describe
'123722' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRE' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
f5578d20ea5d690a71700a13d86cd741
8adeb877c598a38be4860de575ccb2f5430333f3
describe
'422379' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRF' 'sip-files00078.QC2.jpg'
79859ece8417f05c83e3d1804fc2c406
cc911822a67884ad2d32ab5805a51c913e014391
describe
'119572' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRG' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
25ea6adf8a6ba491274b05c9f4fb01d7
36e93e1c407963ecbd239d4a3da590e8e364e428
describe
'405290' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRH' 'sip-files00079.QC2.jpg'
b72c343e45517c584304fa6cd5ec9e74
7bf24cc4b627a8ff4e074b02005817f8134b5af6
describe
'126484' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRI' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
6902fd2635570a225020ab4657092171
da6008a60038ffef37dfe08140288295091106bf
describe
'426923' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRJ' 'sip-files00080.QC2.jpg'
d9c1889d4bcf86b071b24b84749d5b57
fafac6f5f6371c2e7cb1d74a8c80a298f6e73be5
describe
'128147' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRK' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
d400e1a12fbaf9a9578bfeaa979602de
f619073c3af806bceaf47e6197d9197a2ef860b1
describe
'433370' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRL' 'sip-files00081.QC2.jpg'
163fed70ee6992a20ea289151caebf95
9ca4fe9660361c2950d68fdd024877ec73b2efe1
describe
'127345' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRM' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
6345f3fd9bcc19be9f787bacfd7b9b6f
c111de403993dd127062eaa12807d518b473201d
describe
'431182' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRN' 'sip-files00082.QC2.jpg'
03a2f89f3260c68c73d22bc81df8185a
71090d85629abb5152e7f0d5d5e1c2b9c7123d80
describe
'117860' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRO' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
a2dde6bdfe7e37ea605d068382796024
54b25164a45c1178e026647b749698e9243cfc5d
describe
'401846' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRP' 'sip-files00083.QC2.jpg'
490c05868c46ef344aed8e2a1a985d9c
856aced544e5f524c9197971ed77bec489ddc7ec
describe
'117268' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRQ' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
4a335068a9c0eb5186b56fb572468f5c
596677098b6193854d1092f846f2f785c48840d4
describe
'404711' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRR' 'sip-files00084.QC2.jpg'
4fd5f32023e551fa44e22b9ac1cdc04b
d868d80e9493e74ad13063cd1b444f0786411bd8
describe
'83772' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRS' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
fafd9fe522c3f7322d6d388ed96b7a38
d46a3756a74f1fa52e51b08025fc3a1dbeda810d
describe
'324120' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRT' 'sip-files00085.QC2.jpg'
f98ba621c731f1d161cf8ef064c6d364
e102f8a5ebc1518d1d23afdb19668aaaac012669
describe
'112974' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRU' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
651ffab3e0a5e894b889df2a8db4e981
9e2462b602eacfb236bd6633df40102f02acb6dc
describe
'400961' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRV' 'sip-files00086.QC2.jpg'
f38e7cfd6e8ee2851b1edde819f8a64f
61c4043d2bbf3b20faaa8fa6020b496d9b892966
describe
'125518' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRW' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
bfea30198123895f6697fb5cae0e1684
48c4027a4408b5f2111045597f99f021091c5fa3
describe
'428830' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRX' 'sip-files00087.QC2.jpg'
bb648250ca779fbd815d0f3626ba0d22
067e279a4d27ed280dea061466d08579b70241fd
describe
'132180' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRY' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
95a29c51b6345473dd34c0abfabc0397
6df000961bdc0009cd57cdc44e27ec91e2e7e8cd
describe
'445116' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJRZ' 'sip-files00088.QC2.jpg'
4f31d446323c5e1b12c082869fd93d30
791151978ca01a05e5fe211f50e72683d8cc92bc
describe
'133692' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJSA' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
3b01ea82b00b3e198a46e6e67d3fed8d
4ec226c3e226922db3f2f2f2ca058674125e592b
describe
'449835' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAASDfileF20080417_AADJSB' 'sip-files00089.QC2.jpg'
d8a9bd2b745cda37bb9d167ab70281d3
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Charhe and Katie,


TALES

VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

Amusing any Inustructibe

BY
JANE K. NEALE,

AUTHOR OF “WINNIE BARTON,” ETO,

LONDON:

FREDERICK WARNE AND CO.
BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN.
CAMDEN PRESS LONDON, N.W:
CONTENTS.

TALE PAGE
I, THE ENGLISH OAK TREE . 0 « « © - 1

FEE EEA 0 Canes eee
TIT RTE CMITTLE. COAL) <6 os 60s ememtce
IV. THE YOUNG GARDENER. . «© « « « + 96
vy. THE HOUSE SPIDER . . ». « «+--+ - 16

vi. THE BUTTERFLY . 5 + « « © © © « QL
TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

ie
THE ENGLISH OAK TREE.

Att was ready in the village school-room for
the usual writing-lesson, and the children
awaiting the entrance of Mrs. Ainsley to take
their places.

“ Good afternoon, dear children,” said that
lady ; “before we begin our work, I have
something to say to you.”

Upon this intimation, the children rose from
their seats with curious expectation marked in
their countenances.

“I wish to tell you, that if you will give me
a good lesson I will give you a little tale.”

“Oh!” exclaimed the little children, in
various tones of pleasure.

1
Q TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

“ Please, ma’am,” said one little girl, “ what
is it about ?”

“You shall each choose a subject.”

«“ That will be nice,’ said oue; “ but where
will you get them, ma’am?”

“J will write them for you.”

There was now a joyous shout of “ Hurrah !
hurrah !

“J have chosen the subject of the first tale,
and have brought it with me. Now, each may
tell me what he or she wishes me to write
about.”

Very various were the subjects named, as
Gardener—Baby—Coal, &c. &e.

The writing-lesson being ended, Mrs. Ainsley
began the tale-of

THE ENGLISH OAK TRE.

I am now a garden-stick, painted green, with
a white top, but I have been much bigger, and
done grander things than support flowers, as I
now do; for though you see me now with my
foot stuck in the earth, moving only as the —
THE ENGLISH OAK TREE.” 3

gardener sees fit to move me, the time has
been when I journeyed miles and miles away.
I was an acorn in my babyhood, and rejoiced
when the wind, one fine day in the autumn,
blew me down from my mother’s arm, for I
then thought I should do as I pleased. I fell
upon the green grass, and lay very comfortably,
half hidden by the slender blades, thinking I
should be very happy;.so I was, for I had
many companions around me, the sun shone
by day, and I lay in the moonlight by night—
the birds sang above me; and the grasshoppers
chirped around me. But I soon learnt my
life was not to be one of pleasure only, for one
day there came a pig, and I saw him take some
of my companions into his tremendous jaws,
and heard him crunch—crunch—munch—
munch. Oh! how much I wished myself back
again upon my mother’s arm, for I expected
he would seize me. However, I escaped the
frightful munching, and continued to lie on
the grass. I grew older, and instead of being
green, as at first, became brown, and rolled


4 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOIS.

out of my cup. The cold winter came; the
frost beat the grass over me, and dead leaves
fell upon me; the earth became soft from the
rain, and I sank into it by degrees, till I had
earth above, beneath, and around me.

_ After having been a long time in this state,

T became tired of doing nothing, and of being
shut up in the earth, where I could see nothing.
What could I do to amuse myself? Well, I
thought I would try to be a fine tree, like my
mother; so I began to push myself through
my brown case, forcing my stem upwards ‘and
my roots downwards; but I would not grow
-yery quickly, lest I should be mistaken for a
foreign oak, and I determined to be an English
one, as my mother was. Though the wind
blew upon me, and the animals rubbed against
my slender stem, I tried to keep myself straight,
and put forth my branches and leaves in the
best manner—and, asI tried to do what was
right, was very happy, drawing in nourishment
through my roots, and breathing the fresh air
through my leaves, till, from a little wee sprig,
2

THE ENGLISH OAK TREE. 5
I grew and grew till I became a very fine
tree. How I delighted in living! How proud
I was of myself !—thinking myself the finest
oak of the wood. It was a joyous life, and
I thought it would last for ever, but was mis-
taken.

When I had thus lived for many summers
and winters, becoming more and more proud
of myself as I grew larger and larger, two men
stopped near me one day, and I knew they ad.
mired me, for one said, “ Yes, it is a very fine
tree.” This increased my pride and vanity,
and I fancied I was to live.only to be admired ;
but I soon learnt otherwise. One of the men
made an ugly mark upon my noble trunk with
black-paint ; I would have struck him with one
of my large branches, but could not bend it
low enough. How I rejoiced when the rain
pelted in torrents, for I hoped it would wash
away that ugly disfiguring mark; but no,
there it remained as firm as at first, and
I was.obliged to bear it.. Now my troubles

began, for in the Autumn men came with
a
6 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

sharp knives, and stripped me of my bark.
How bitterly the wind blew upon me now!
How I mourned at the loss of my beauty,
thinking I should be left to pine away my life
unheeded and uncared for, never more to put
forth green leaves, and have the birds build
among my branches. Then came the better
thought of the use to which my bark would
be put; and when the wind blew upon my
bare trunk, or the sun scorched it, I said, cheer-
fully—

“Never mind, my bark will make excellent
leather.”

I learnt to be glad to be of use to others.
I saw men at work, and horses and dogs ail
seemed to have something to do; therefore I
said to my cousins near me—“ Why should we
be idle ?”

The next Autumn men came again, and
with hatchets chopped me and my cousins ~
down to the ground. Alas! alas! for my
vanity and pride, what was I now? A log of
wood. I was soon carried into a large yard, in
THE ENGLISH OAK TREE. 7

company with my cousins; and again I was
proud, for I was very much praised, and under-
stood that I should be sent to the shipwright’s,
while my cousins went to the cabinet-maker’s ;
and I said to myself, proudly, “ My cousin may
think it very nice to live in a smart drawing-
room, upon a soft carpet, and be polished by a
tidy housemaid; but I shall be a fine large
ship, and—who knows?—I may go into
foreign countries, and fight for my Queen. I
shall like that much better than being shut up
in a drawing-room; so I’ll be a fine ship, and
sail over the broad sea !”

Whilst I was being made into a large ship,
others of my family were being made into
boats. How proud I was over them!

“Ah!” said the boats, “you will go a long
way over the sea; but we shall not go far from
our dear home.”

“Yes,” I returned ; “ but see how small you
are, and how big I am. Besides, you are going.
to fish, Pha! how you will smell of fish, -
while I shall be kept so clean.”
8 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

“ Yes, that is all very well,” said the boats ;
“but we shall be safe, while you may get a
great cannon-ball through your side.”

“Then we will mend it again. So, hurrah!
for the Queen, and her good ship Victoria!
Good-bye to you, little fishy cousins.”

And away I went over the waves, with a merry
crew on deck, among whom was one called “Old
Ben,” whom I particularly liked; he seemed
to know everything, and I used to hear him
talk to a young lad, Philip Wright, about all he
would see on our voyage. But I learnt from
their conversation, that, instead of being, as I
had hoped, a man-of-war, I was only a merchant-
man, and my pride was much hurt by the dis-
covery. Well, it could not be helped; at any
rate, it was better than being a fishing-boat.

As we passed the curious rocks called “The
Needles,” which are off the{sle of Wight, I
heard old Ben tell young Philip how dangerous
they are, and that many a good ship had been
wrecked against them, and many brave sailors
lost.
THE ENGLISH OAK TREE. 9

“ Poor creatures ! and within sight of home,”
said the sailor boy. “I hope that will not
happen to me.”

“T hope not, my boy,” answered old Ben,
“but we must leave it in the hands of Him
who knows best; and whether near home, or
far away, we know He will be with us, when
our time comes, if we try to serve Him in life.”

We voyaged about to distant countries for
our cargoes—to Spain for fruit, to India for
rice, and to China for tea, and made several
pleasant trips in safety; but this was not
always to be the case, as I will tell you, for as
the thunder and lightning had passed over me
when I was a tree, so the storm came to me
when I formed part of a large ship.

We had been from home more than a year,
and were gladly returning, when a gale came
on as we neared the dangerous coast of Ireland.
It tore the sails to shreds. New ones were put
up, but the gale increasing, orders were given
to reef all but one small one, necessary to keep ©
the rudder in action. The carpenter made all

.
10 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

things fast below deck, and the dead-light, as
it is called, was burning in the captain’s cabin ;
thus we prepared to meet the storm. Thick,
black, heavy clouds rolled over head ; the winds
blew a hurricane; bang, bang, came the angry
waves against me, and I could not avoid creak-
ing, groaning and trembling, after every thump
of the big waves. Still, I and my companion
held together tightly, and proved ourselves to
be true English oak.

The night came on, and the wind blew
tremendously. Oh! how it whistled and roared
among the ropes. The huge waves came roll-
ing upon us as if to swallow us in anger,
foaming and roaring, as they dashed themselves
on the deck, and carried with them, as they
rolled back again, pieces of loosened wood and
empty casks. The night was pitch dark, except
when the vivid lightning flashed for an instant
from the dark clouds, and a glimpse was given
of the rocky and dangerous coast.

“This is awful, Ben,” said Philip. “Did
you ever know such a storm ?”
THE ENGLISH OAK TREE. ll

“ Searcely,” answered the old. man.

“Shall we be safe ?”

“Can’t say, boy,” answered the old sailor.
Then, after a few minutes of silence, he added,
“Philip, my boy, remember who watches over
those at sea as wellas on land. His eye is
upon us; trust in Him.”

“J will. My poor mother! Ben, I think
of her more than of myself; perhaps she is now
praying for me. I have always liked to know
that she thinks of me when she says that prayer
of our beautiful Litany—‘ That it may please
Thee to preserve all that travel by land or by
water? She will be so sorry to lose me, and I
am. so young to die.”

“The young are taken as well as the old,
Philip. We know not which may be taken
first, therefore all ought to be prepared to die.”

“But I am not good enough to die, Ben.”

“We none of us are; but we can pray to
be forgiven. You can do so, my boy; and if
you are spared, resolve to be better, God
helping you.”
12 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

Philip knelt down beside his old friend, in
earnest, heartfelt prayer. While they were
thus engaged, thinking more of their sins than
of the danger they were in, the ship struck upon
a rock with terrible force. It was soon known
she had parted; she was a wreck! The storm
still raged; the clouds hid the moon; all was
dark. The waves, sometimes as high as our
quivering mast, came roliing on, and broke in
white foam over us. The timbers gave way,
and I was separated from my companions. Old
Ben bade Philip lash himself to me, while he
clung to the mast. Night still! Gradually
the storm abated, and the morning came. The
fierce waves seemed tired of rolling, and sunk
into a heavy swell. Upon them I carried young
Philip safely. Poor boy! how tightly he clung
to me. How earnestly he prayed to be spared
for his dear mother’s sake, and that he might
be better prepared to die. He prayed for the
safety of old Ben, too.

The bright day came, and Philip was spared.
A fishing-boat had seen him, and had taken
THE ENGLISH OAK TREE. 13

him, with me, in. We both lay at the bottom
of the boat. Philip was insensible, but the
men were kindly careful of him ; they unbound
him from me, and recovered him.

Philip looked towards the spot where the
ship had been, and knew that all was over.

« All gone!” he said aloud, though speaking,
as it were, to himself.

“T fear so,” said one of the men. “ All,
poor fellows !”

«Poor old Ben !” exclaimed Philip, and he
wept bitterly for his kind old messmate. Then
he looked at me, and knew that I had carried
him upon the angry waves. “ Let me have
those planks ?” he said.

“Yes, yes, my boy,” returned the captain ;-
“they are yours. They saved your young
life.”

And Philip was glad, so was I, for I wished
_ to remain with him. And now my pride and
vanity were corrected. I who had scorned and
jeered at a fishing-boat was glad to be lying

safely at the bottom of one, although-it smelt
9

“a
14 TALES FOR VIT.LAGE SCHOOLS,

of fish, and I was very grateful to my little
cousin, who thus returned good for evil.

My voyaging was over; so was Philip’s; he
did not go to sea again, but remained at home
with his mother and became a gardener. Of
me he made sticks to support his flowers; he
cut me into various sizes, trimmed me smooth,
and painted me green, with a white top, that
he might know me from other sticks he has.

Philip is happy ; he is a good son to his old
mother, talks to her of the wonders he has
seen, of that awful shipwreck, and of poor
old Ben. He has named one of his boys after
his old friend; but I do not think he will let
little Ben go to sea. I am happy, too, in
having something to do, and grateful for the
care taken of me. Again I hear the birds
sing, and the rustling of the wind through the
leaves of a neighbouring wood, and wish my
relatives, the Oaks, may have as happy and
useful a life as my own.

“Oh! that 7s a nice story,” said Mary.
THE ENGLISH OAK TREE. 15

“Poor old Ben, he was a good man; 1 am
sorry he was drowned.”

“‘T wonder if he was washed ashore and
buried,” observed John Moore.

<< We will hope he was,” replied Mrs. Ains-
ley, restraining a smile at finding how much
her young auditors realized her tale.

‘Mary Moore,” she said, “ your tale shall
be the next; what shall it be about ?”

« About a Baby, please, ma’am.”

“A Baby! Nota very easy subject. Well,
you shall have it; but, as a Baby isa little
creature, you must not expect a very long story.
Now I will say good-bye to you all.”
16 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

Tt:
THE BABY.

Wuen the writing-day was come again, and
Mrs. Ainsley entered the school-room at the
usual time, the children looked eagerly at the
books and papers in her hand, and seeing some
of the latter tied together by a red ribbon, a
whisper of “ Yes, there it is,” passed from one
to the other.

“ You are right,” said Mrs. Ainsley ; “ I have
brought the Baby with me; but I think she
will be very good and quiet till our lesson is
over, and then we will hear what can be said
for her.”

“Won’t she speak for herself, ma’am?”
asked one of the little girls.
THE BABY. 17

“No; she is too young to talk. Now to
your places, and give me a good lesson, or I
shall take Baby home with me without telling
you anything about her, and I do not think
you would like that.”

“Oh no, ma’am! I think Baby would cry.”

“T don’t think she would,” said Mrs. Ainsley ;
“but you might, Emma.” Then, putting the
papers upon a shelf, she added, “ There, I have
put Baby into her cradle, and now begin your
writing.”

The lesson went off well, and Mrs. eS
taking the papers tied with red ribbon, began
the tale.

THE BABY.

“When may I see Baby?” inquired Mary
Moore of the kind neighbour who was acting
as nurse to her mother.

“Not to-day, Mary,” answered Mrs. Mab-
son; “ your mother must be kept very quiet ;
but to-morrow perhaps you all shall see the
dear little Baby.”

2—2
18 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

A Baby was a novelty in the Moore family ;
there had not been one for more than three
years! and though, perhaps, the father and
mother had thought five little hearty children
as many as they could comfortably provide for,
and the brothers and sisters had been quite
content at their numbers, all welcomed the
new Baby heartily, and not even the youngest
and hitherto petted little boy would consent to
part with her. All were very impatient to
see her; therefore all rejoiced when nurse
said—

“‘ Now then, one at a time shall go upstairs
with me; but all must be very quiet, walk
gently, just look at Baby, kiss mother, and
come down again.”

All did as nurse desired, and none spoke
even in a whisper till they came downstairs
again.

“What a little thing she is,” said Charlie ;
“not bigger than a doll !”

“To be sure,” said Mary, who, being the
oldest of the family, thought she knew much
THE BABY. 19

more about everything than the others did.
“To be sure she is; you were a little creature
once.”

“Not so little as she is, though,” said Charlie,
indignantly.

“Indeed you were, master Charles,” said
his eldest brother.

“J wasn’t,” returned Charlie, positively ;
then appealing to nurse asked, “ Was I, nurse ae

“Yes, Charles; quite as small as Baby,”
answered nurse, smiling.

“Well,” said the discomfited Charlie, “TI
don’t recollect it.”

“T suppose not,” said Mary, laughing; “but
I do.”

“So do I, my boy,” said the father; “and
so you all like your new Baby?”

“Oh yes! very much,” exclaimed all the
little voices.

“ She is such a pretty little creature,” said
Mary.

“Yes,” replied her father; “ Babies, like
all other young things, are pretty little crea-
20 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

tures ; and when we look at a Baby we, even
Charlie, should remember we were Babies once,
and be grateful to our mother for the care she
took of us; for if she had not nursed us
tenderly we might not havelived. This should
make us wish to take care of our mother when
she is old and helpless.”

“ So I will,” exclaimed the eldest boy, “ and
of you, too, father.”

“Thank you, my boy.”

“But,” said little Charlie, anxiously, “mother
won’t grow old yet, will she ?”

“Indeed I hope not, Charlie,” replied his
father, smiling.

“Not till lam a man,” said Charlie, “ and
then I can work for her.”

“TT think you can work for her now, my
little boy ; do you wish to do so?”

“Yes,” answered Charlie, looking earnestly
at his father.

«Then I will tell you what you can do for
her. When she is well enough to come down-
THE BABY. 21

stairs again, and bring the Baby with her, you
can rock the cradle.”

“ So I will,” exclaimed the delighted boy.

“J think, father,” said Mary, “it ought to
be my Baby.”

«Why so, Mary?” ;

“Because you’ know, father, she was born
on my birthday.”

“So she was, Mary; but do you think you
can do for her all that is necessary ?”

“T can wash, and dress, and feed her, father,”
returned Mary, confidently.

“Perhaps you can. But, Mary, there is
much more to be done for Baby besides that.
T have told you one thing we should think of
when we look at Baby; I will tell you of
another. Who gives us Baby ?”

“God,” answered Mary, reverently.

“Yes, God gave me Baby; He gave you all
to me, and He expects that I will not only
feed and clothe you, but train you im His
ways, and lead you to obey Him in all things.
22 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

Dearly as I love you all, my children, I have
fear also—fear lest I should not do all for you
that the Almighty expects of me. He has given
you to my care, and requires that I should
teach you to be good men and women, His
grace helping me. This makes me sad when
you commit a fault, and induces me to punish
you, that you may not repeat it.”

The children listened to their father very
attentively.

« Will you,” he continued, ‘remember this
when you are tempted to do wrong ?”

“ Ves, father.”

“And now, Mary, do you think you are
wise and good enough to take Baby as your
own, should I be inclined to give her up to
you?”

“No, father,” answered Mary, mn a subdued
tone. ,

“ Well, my child,” said Moore, putting his
arm round his little girl and drawing her to
him, “‘ you shall be allowed to call Baby your
baby, but you and she must remain under my
THE BABY. 23

care and teaching for many years. I must
teach you both to love and obey the Almighty.
You shall help mother to nurse Baby, and me
by setting her a good example.”

Very glad were all when the mother could
again be one of their party below stairs, and
bring Baby with her. Charlie was especially
watchful of the little one, and often made
remarks upon her.

“ Why,” he asked, “ does she sleep so much?
Why does she not look about at everything ?”

“She cannot see them yet,” answered his
mother. “I think, Mary, you can tell me.
what God created first ?”

“Tight, mother.”

“Yes; and the first thing a Baby seesis the
light. In a little time you will see Baby look
at the fire, and at the candle as it is moved
about the room; but it will be some time
before she sees anything else.”

“Well,” said James, “ that is almost as bad
as the kittens.”

“Ah! but,” said Mary, “when kittens are
24 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

born they cannot open their eyes for nine
days, while our Baby does open hers; see,
they are open now.”

“T shall be glad when she can see me,” said
Charlie. “ What nice little hands she has!
but why does she not open them ?”

“Because she cannot use them yet,” an-
swered his mother.

“ Charlie,” said John, laughing, “I think
she wants to knock you down; see how she
throws her doubled fists about ; she’ll certainly
hit you,” and John pretended to guard himself
from an expected blow, and to get out of
Baby’s reach.

“¢ She can’t hurt me, can she?” asked Charlie,
almost doubtingly, of his mother.

“No, no, Charlie, she is not thinking of you.”
Then opening one of the little hands, his
mother added, “See what a pretty hand it
is, so white, and fat, and soft outside, and so
pink inside !”

“May I kiss it?” asked the little boy ; and
upon receiving Jeave to do so, he touched it
THE BABY. 25

with his lips very gently, and said, “I love
Baby, mother.”

“T hope we all do,” returned his mother.
«* And now, Charlie, you may rock her to sleep.”

Charlie, delighted and proud, fetched his
own little wooden chair, and seating himself,
rocked the cradle very gently and steadily till
his mother told him he might leave off, as
Baby was asleep.

Baby was a great amusement to all, but
more especially to Mary and Charlie; the
former proudly and fondly calling her ‘er
Baby, while Charlie, long before she had
power to hold anything, brought her odd bits
of wood and string which formed his stock
of treasured playthings, patiently picking them
up as often as she let them fall from her weak
and uncertain grasp.

When Mrs. Moore was sufficiently recovered,
she went to church to return thanks to the
Almighty for having spared her, and not very
long after the Baby was to be taken to church
also to be baptized.

3
26 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

This was a great event to the children, and
there was some consultation as to the name to
be given her.

“ Name her Edward, mother,” said Charlie,
at which his brothers and sisters laughed
heartily.

“Why, that’s a man’s name,” exclaimed
John, “it won’t do for a girl”

“ Won’t it, mother ?”

“ Not very well, Charlie.”

“TJ should like to have it Deborah,” said
Anne, “ because old Deb Dutton is such a nice
old woman.”

“ Because she gives you lollypops some-
times,” said John. ‘ And you think to make
Baby a nice old Baby by naming her Deb;
now I think it a very ugly name.”

“Your father and I wish to name her Cathe-
rine,” said the amused mother.

“Oh yes! that will do nicely,” exclaimed
all the children. ‘It must be Catherine.”

“Ah! then you come to cats again,” said
John; “ Kitty, Kitty, miaow.”
a

THE BABY. 2%,

Charlie looked almost angry, as he fancied
his brother compared the dear little Baby to
a kitten.

Thus the name was fixed upon, the god-
father and god-mothers were provided, and
Mary gladly worked industriously upon the
little white frock Baby was to wear on the
occasion.

«My children,” said Moore, “ you have been
very busy in finding a name for Baby, but is that
all we are to think of in her baptism? We
can call her by a name without taking her
to church ; why, then, do we take her there ?”

The children did not answer.

“ Mary,” continued Moore, “think of your
catechism, and tell me what you were before
your baptism ?”

Mary considered for a few moments, then
said, “A child of wrath.”

“Yes, because born in Adam’s sin, therefore
a child of God’s wrath or anger. But when you
were baptized you received the Holy Ghost
which cleansed you from that sin; you were
28 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

then born again of the Spirit, and became—
what ?”

“A member of Christ and the child of
God,” answered Mary, in the words of the
catechism.

“Yes. What does the parson do when he
takes the Baby in his arms?”

Again Mary thought for a moment; then
said, “ He signs her with the cross.”

“Right; in token that from that moment
she is to obey our blessed Saviour in all
things. Will you think of this next Sunday
when Baby is baptized; and will you remem-
ber the same has been done to you?”

The children answered “Yes,” and Mary
said—

“Vm glad Baby will be baptized on a
Sunday.”

“For what reason, Mary?” asked her
father.

“Because it is God’s day, father.”

“You are right, my dear child; we bring
Baby to Christ on the Lord’s-day. It is also
THE BABY. g9

right that baptisms should take place in the full
congregation, that each person may be reminded
of his own. Think again of your catechism,
and tell me if Baby will promise anything ?”

“Why, Baby can’t speak!” exclaimed
Charlie.

“No; therefore we choose persons to speak
for her; these are her god-father and god-
mothers. What do they promise in her name,
Mary?”

“To renounce the devil and all his works.”

“Yes. That is, to cast away sin—to believe
in God—and to obey Him. Do you think you
can tell me why I wish Baby to be baptized
while she is so young, and cannot speak for
herself ?”

All the children were thoughtful but silent.

“ You told me that till she is baptized she is
achild of God’s anger, and I wish to make her
a child of God’s love as soon as possible after
she is born, that if the Almighty should please
to take her from me, we may be able to think
‘of her as one of those little angels who are
3—2,
30 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

- always in the brightness of heaven, and in the
presence of the Almighty.”

The children were impressed by their father’s
words, and a certain degree of seriousness was
in their thoughts and manner when they spoke
of the approaching baptism.

They were very attentive during the cere-
mony, and the kisses given to the little Chris-
tian after it, had more in them than common
worldly affection.

“God loves Catherine now,” said little
Charlie gently, as he gazed lovingly upon his
little sister on his mother’s knee.

“Yes, my dear little boy, and I pray He
may ever love her.”

The Baby grew, and though, like all other
babies, she was sometimes fretful, would be
awake on busy days when her mother wished
her to sleep, and would sometimes show undue.
favour and dislike among her brothers and
sisters, all loved and bore with her; Charlie let
her bite his finger between her swollen and
aching gums, even pies one or two white teeth
THE BABY. él

had shown their points through them, and if
the pain brought the colour into his cheeks, he
merely said—

“Oh! Baby, not quite so hard, please.”

He let her pull his hair with her little fat
fingers, entangled in his curls, without flinch-
ing or expressing any anger.

Mary and Charlie were certainly Baby’s
favourites, perhaps merely because they played
with her and nursed her oftener than the other
children did.

Then she began to run alone, and at first
Charlie was alarmed at her many falls, but
when he found she did not really hurt herself
he laughed to see her bump down, or roll like
a ball, and by laughing taught Baby to laugh
_also; he would pick her up, put her upon her
feet again, and holding out his arms, tempt her
to toddle to him, and oh! what a hug and a kiss
he gave her when she fairly reached him.

Another pleasure was when Baby began to
talk. “Mum-mum, ta-ta,” was all she could
say for along time. Charlie tried very much
82 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

to teach her to pronounce his name, but it
seemed too difficult for her, and he was at
last obliged to be content with her saying,
“ Ar,” and to guess when it was applied to him,
of course fancying it was so a hundred times
when it was not.

Catherine was little more than a year old
when she was attacked with a very severe in-
flammation on the chest, and for some days
her safety was very doubtful. All were anxious
about her, the merry laugh was hushed and the
chattering was in sad whispers. The father’s
face was grave, the mother’s pale and anxious.
Mary was of real assistance in the sick room ;
she could soothe the little moaning sufferer, and
relieve her mother of some painful watching,
when the many duties for the family called her
from beside the sick-bed. Charlie crept on
tip-toe as noiselessly as he could to look at his
“little darling,” and never failed to pray for
her recovery in the simple words his love
prompted. He narrowly watched the counte-
nance of the surgeon when he came from the
THE BABY. 33

sick-room, and once witiepernely asked, with
tearful eyes—

«Will she die ?”

“We hope not,” answered the surgeon.

“God will take her, father, if she does, for
you know she is His child. Iam so glad she
was taken to church and baptized.”

The loving father patted his boy’s curly
head, as he said—

“‘ God’s will be done!”

The child so loved was spared. More ten-
derness and love were lavished upon her than
ever; but as Catherine’s health returned, Charlie
had another sorrowful anxiety. Sorrow and
watching had worn upon his mother; she had
become very thin, pale, and weak, and poor
Charlie feared she was growing old before he
could work for her.

“ Charlie,” said Mrs. Moore, one day when
the little boy was earnestly scrutinizing his
mother’s face; “why do you look so earnestly
at me?”

“« Are you well, mother?” asked Charlie.
ok TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

«Yes, thank you, dear boy.”

Charlie still looked attentively at her for
some time, then throwing his arms round her
neck, sobbed out—

“Don’t grow old yet, mother; oh! please
don’t.”

“What do you mean, Charlie? I am not
growing old at present, dear.”

“Oh! please wait till I can work for you ;
till I am a big man !” said the distressed boy.

His mother kissed him, assuring him he
would in all probability be a man before she
should be old and helpless. So Charlie ceased
to watch her countenance, and in a few weeks
or months both mother and Baby were restored
to their usual health.

Again Charlie could lead his little pet
about the lanes and fields, filling her little
pinafore with the prettiest wild flowers, which
she too often delighted in destroying; and
Charlie would say—

“Oh! fie, Katie!’

The little rosy mouth put up to his, soon
THE BABY. 35

gained her pardon, and the fault was repeated
again and again, with no more correction than
these gentle words, and with the same forgive-
ness heartily renewed.

As Catherine grew older, Charlie was her
guide and protector to school, where he was
sometimes inattentive to his own lessons in
listening to her little voice name the great
letters pointed out to her. How anxious he
was that she should get on. He tried toteach her
in the play-hours, but she would not attend as
he wished ; in the midst of Charlie’s teaching
she would chase a butterfly, or run to gather a
flower, so Charlie was obliged to leave her
tuition to one who had more authority over
her.

Thus the Baby, whose arrival had given so
much pleasure, continued to be the pet of all,
till she was in a fair way to be spoiled; and she
would have been so, had not the good training
of the parents counteracted the injudicious in-
dulgence of the children. Catherine, with the
others, was brought up in the exercise of the
36 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

Christian virtues, and in love of Him to whom
we owe all our blessings.

Mrs. Ainsley closed her papers, and put the
red ribbon round.them.

“Thank you, ma’am,” said Mary Moore,
“that is a nice story.” ”

*“T am glad you like it, Mary.”

“Tt is all about my little sister Catherine,
and you know, ma’am, she really is my baby; she
sleeps with me, and I often wash and dress her.”

“JT am very glad you can help your mother
so much; and recollect, Mary, you must not
spoil little Catherine.”

“Yes, ma'am.”

“Please, ma’am,” said John Beckett, “ whose
story is to come next ?”

“Must I really bring another on Tuesday,
our next writing-day ?”

“Oh yes, please, ma’am,” shouted all the
children.

“Well, I will try. But do you not think it
is rather hard work for me? It takes some
THE BABY. : 37

time merely to write a story down on the paper,
and then I have to think a great deal about it.’

“Oh! but you know all about it, ma’am,”
said Emma Watson.

Mrs. Ainsley smiled, and said, “I am afraid
not; but I will not disappoint you if I can help
it; therefore I think you, Emma, shall have
the next story. What shall it be about ?”

“‘T should like it to be about a Coal, please,
ma’am,” answered Emma, much delighted.

Mrs. Ainsley looked painfully grave and
puzzled as she said, “ A coal! that cannot be
a very easy task, though a coal is such a com-
mon thing. Now, good-bye, for the presen$.”

The children rose and curtsied as Mrs.
Ainsley left the room.
38 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

II.
THE LITTLE COAL.

“Goop morning, dear children,” said Mrs.
Ainsley, as she entered the schoolroom.
«Emma, I have brought your tale.”
« About a little coal, ma’am ?” asked Emma.
“Yes, and some may wonder what a little
coal can have to say of itself; you shall hear.”

THE LITTLE COAL.

You all know that coal is dug out of the
earth, and the pits or mines from which it is
dug are very deep and dark; the entrance to
them is by a perpendicular hole, called the
shaft, through which the men descend and
ascend, and the coal is drawn up in baskets.
THE LITTLE COAL. 39

We will fancy ourselves at the bottom of one
of these deep mines, which has not yet been
worked, just in the spot where our Little Coal
lies by the side of a large lump, from which
it had been by some means broken.

“Mother,” said the Little Coal, “are you
very old?”

“ Indeed I am, child, very, very old.”
~ ©And have you always been in this dark
place, mother ?”

“ Always as you know me, my child, but
not always as I know myself; for I was some-
thing else before I was coal, and lived in a very
different place to this, but I believe I am still
very near it.”

«What do you mean by living, mother?
Don’t you live now, and don’t I live ?”

“No, child, we exist, but do not live.”

“Then what is living?” curiously inquired
the Little Coal.

“To live is to breathe the pure, clear air,
and to draw in nourishment which makes us
grow.”
40 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

“Oh! shall I ever grow as big as you,
mother ?”

“No, silly child, you will never grow, be-
cause, as I told you just now, you do not live—
only exist.”

“Well,” said the Little Coal, despondingly,
“T can’t quite understand you; but will you
tell me all about yourself when you lived? I
should so like to hear it.”

“JT will tell you all I remember,” answered
the Big Coal to the curious and listening little
bit. “ When I lived, along, long time ago, so
long that I cannot count the years, and no
Coal can say how long it is since that time, I
was a tall thing called a tree, and had branches ©
which spread about on alk sides, and I was
covered with green leaves, through which I
breathed the fresh air, which was much purer
and sweeter than that around us now.”

“That must have been very pleasant.”

“Indeed, it was very delightful. I had a
great many companions, all more or less like
myself. The world’ we lived in was very
THE LITTLE COAL _ 4l

beautiful, the blue sky so bright in the sunshine,
and the air so warm and fresh, I enjoyed
waving my branches, and shaking my leaves in
the gentle summer wind.”

“T daresay it was very delightful. Don’t
you wish to be in the beautiful world
again ?”

“J have no wish about it, for I am content
to be as I am.”

After a moment of silence the Little Coal
asked—

“Did you live long so ?”

“ Yes, a long time, and enjoyed myself very
much ; everything was so bright and beautiful ;
the gay flowers made a carpet at my feet, and
there were smaller trees and green grass.”

The Little Coal listened in amazement, but
with much attention, though all seemed so
strange that it could not understand it. Still,
as its mother seemed to think it was very de-
lightful, and to have been very happy, it
asked—

“ And can I never live so, mother?”

4—9,
42 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

“No, my child ; you were a part of me when
I lived, but will never live so again.”

“Was I!” said the Little Coal, in great
astonishment. “Why don’t I recollect it,
mother ?” ;

“ Because you were a very small part of me,
and were so entirely myself, that you had no
separate enjoyment of life, and therefore cannot
recollect it.”

“T should very much like to live so,” sighed
the Little Coal, “and see all the beautiful
things you talk of.”

The Old Coal heaved a deep sigh, as it said
sorrowfully, “ You ay perhaps, one day see
them all.”

“Oh! shall I? I am so glad,” exclaimed
the Little Coal, joyfully, and if it had -had
hands it would have clapped them in its joy.

“Silly Little Coal, be content as you are.
To see all the things I have seen will bring
you no good or happiness. Are you not happy
now?”

“Oh yes; but I should like to be happier.”
THE LITTLE COAL. 43

“That is wrong, very wrong, my child. Be
content, that is the greatest happiness. You
will never be happy anywhere, if constantly
wishing for what you have not.”

“Don’t you really wish to see all those
beautiful things again, mother?”

“No. I enjoyed them when I had them,
and I think there may be many more things I
have not seen, but I will not pine for them.
My place is here, at least for a time, and it is
my duty to be content, and patiently to await
what the future may bring.”

‘But you were very happy, mother.”

“Yes; but to see all I have seen, far from
making you happy, will, I believe, bring misery
to you.”

«That is very strange,” said the Little Coal,
again much puzzled by its mother’s words.

“My child, you must be content.”

“ Well, I will try to be so. Only ”” the
Little Coal hesitated, then in a low, sad whisper
added, “I think it must be delightful to be a
tree.”


44 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

And the Little Coal did try to be content
with its present happiness; but although it con-
quered the wish to be a tree, it could not avoid
sometimes thinking of the sun and air its
mother had talked of, wondering what they
were, and how seeing such beautiful things
could cause it misery, and it inquired of its
mother.

“ My child, I cannot explain to you why these
beautiful things should cause you pain. God
made everything beautiful and very good, and
does not wish there should be pain and misery,
and yet,1 have anassurance which I do not quite
understand, that if you should be thrown into
the way of these things, some great misfortune
will befall you. Therefore it is better for you
not to think so much of them, and to leave the
future, only seeking to fulfil your duty in the
present.”

“What is my duty, mother ?”

“To be content. And believe me, in my
life, I was not free from pain.”

< Will you tell me about it, mother ?”
THE LITTLE COAL. 45

Ves:

And the Little Coal’s mother finding it really
wished and tried to be good, told it more of
herself. How, when she was a tree, a storm
blew her down, and the water washed over her,
pressing heavily upon her, for they were deep
waters, and that the air became so hot she could
not breathe, till at last the water and heat
changed her so much, that she lost all form of
a tree, and became the Coal she then was. And
not only she, but all her companions suffered
in this manner, and formed the coal by which
they were surrounded, so that from that time
they ceased to live.

“ How very dreadful!”’ said the Little Coal.
“But you said I cannot live again, so all this
cannot happen to me.”

“No, my child, but you will have misery if
ever you see the sunshine.”

Shall 1?” inquired the Little Coal, sorrow-
fully, for it had not quite conquered all its
wishes. ‘If I see it only for a moment ?”

“Tf ever the sunshine should come to us,
46 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

be assured our happiness will soon end, and
great misery come.”

“Oh, dear! then I will try not to wish to
see it, for I should not like to be less happy
than I am.”

This quiet state, however, was not to last,
and the happiness the Little Coal was learning
to value was soon to be disturbed.

There was now, not far from them, a
dreadful noise, which made the Little Coal
tremble with alarm, and the place in which they
lay became less dark. More noise came ; first,
a deep, thumping noise; then a crashing noise,
and a rumbling, mixed with sounds which the
Little Coal could not at all understand, and
which its mother could not explain, though she
had a dim suspicion, and much feared what
might happen. More noise came, and more
light, till the Little Coal asked of its sad
mother—

“Mother, what is that beautiful thing up
there ?”
THE LITTLE COAL. 47

“The blue sky, my child,” she answered
very sorrowfully.

“ How beautiful! I could look at it for ever.
Is it what you used to see when you were a
tree?”

“Yes, my child, it is.”

“And are you not glad to see it again,
mother ?”

Then the Little Coal remembered all its
mother had said of the misery that would come
if ever it saw the sunshine, and half doubting,
it said—

“It cannot hurt us, it is up so very high.
Besides, mother, such a beautiful thing cannot
do any harm, it must be very good.”

“The blue sky 7s very good, my child,
and will do us no harm; it is all that may
follow its appearance that we may have to
fear.”

Still for a time no harm came, and the Little
Coal could quietly admire the blue sky, but the
delight which it had at first felt at it was now
48 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

changed to something like awe, as a dread of
the future came to it.

At last men came to the place, for a shaft
had been made to the bottom of the mine, and
the Little Coal put many questions to its
mother about these strange things, asking if
they were trees?

But the men were as strange to the Large
Coal as to the Little one, for there had been
none when she was a tree; but she had less of
wonder and more of thought than the Little
Coal, and she understood what the men were
doing, for she saw some of the coal near her
put into the basket and hoisted up, as it seemed,
to the blue sky.

‘Shall we go up to the beautiful blue sky,
mother ?”

“Perhaps so, my child; indeed, I fear we
shall.”

« And shall I touch the blue sky ?”

«No, my child, I think not.”

Soon the men came to them and shovelledthem
into the basket, which was drawn upward slowly.
THE LITTLE COAL. 49

«Now, mother,” said the Little Coal, sels
shall see the trees and the sunshine, shall I
not ?”

« Alas! my dear child,” said the sorrowing
mother, “you will soon wish yourself back
again in our dark home.”

But the Little Coal was unwilling to believe
this, and could not help rejoicing when they
reached the top of the shaft, and were shot out
of the basket.

«Oh! how bright! how warm!’ it ex-
claimed; but soon became silent in its wonder
at everything around it, and its mother seemed
so sorrowful it did not like to tease her with
questions; so it lay quietly, admiring more
and more the large, beautiful blue sky, and the
bright stars that came into it at night.

For a long time they lay at the mouth of
the mine. Then they were put into a truck or
waggon and carried a long way upon the railroad
through a country well planted with trees, at
which the Little Coal looked with admiration,
almost wishing to be one; and the Old Coal

5
50 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

said they were not nearly as large as she had
been; indeed she thought them so small, she
fancied they must be only flower stems, only
they had no bright gay colours on their tops,
and their leaves were very much like what hers
had been.

At last they reached London, and were
deposited in a large yard. All this time.the
wonder of the Little Coal was aroused, but the
Large Coal was too sad to make any remarks
upon the new things around her. At last the
Little Coal became frightened ; it did not like
the yard, and now seldom saw the blue sky,
while it disliked the constant noise about it.

“Mother, mother, let us go back to our
home,” it piteously cried.

“We cannot, my child.”

“Oh, why not? I don’t like to be here.
Why did I wish to leave home ?”

«* Because you were discontented, my child,
and wished for pleasures you could not under-
stand, forgetting your duty to be content in
the situation in which you were placed.”
THE LITTLE COAL 51

“Oh! I shall never be happy any more.”

“ T hope you will, my child.”

“Tow can I, mother, in this dull, dirty
place ?”

“By being of use to, and making others
happy.”

«When shall I be able to do this?”

“JT know not, my child. You must now
learn patience, and wait.”

The Little Coal again tried to be good, though
it thought of its former home with a sigh.
Soon separated from its mother, it was again
shovelled into a basket, and carried away to a
wretched house, where, in a small room lighted
by a window, the broken panes of which were
stuffed with rags and paper, there was a dark »
closet into which our Little Coal was thrown.

Here it had time to think of the past, how’
naughty it had been in being discontented, and
resolved to do all it could to help others in
future, and try to be happy, as its mother had
said. Although the closet was as dark as its
first home had been, yet it was not like it, and
52 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

the Little Coal did not for an instant imagine
it had returned to the mine. Where was it
then ? 5

Frequent moaning and childish cries reached
it, and with these sad sounds came also the
loving words of a sorrowing mother trying to
soothe her sick child, whose illness caused her
much grief.

Little by little the heap of coal near our
little friend was carried from the closet; and
as the door was opened, and sometimes left so,
the curiosity of our Little Coal was awakened
as to what was passing in the room. Upon a
small bed, not very far from the fire, lay a sick
and suffering child, and by its side sat the
anxious, grieving mother. The Little Coal
thought of its own mother, and became inter-
ested in the child. It listened in pity to its
wailing, and wished to be able to do something
to comfort it; but if the loving mother could
not alleviate the poor child’s pain, what could
the Little Coal do?

It was very sad, day and night, to hear that
THE LITTLE COAL. 53

piteous moaning, and to mark the tears on the
poor mother’s cheek. The room seemed so
desolate—a small table, two or three old chairs,
and a mattress covered by an old coloured
counterpane, was all the furniture, besides the
sick child's little bed. And hour after hour
that poor mother was alone with her moaning,
suffering child. .True, the doctor sometimes
came, but he said very little; the clergyman,
and his good lady, came, and did all they could
to comfort both mother and child; but the one
could not be relieved from pain—the sorrow of
the other could not be lightened.

It was very, very sad, and our Little Coal
forgot its own disappointments in witnessing
the distress of the inmates of that poverty-
stricken room. Soon it was taken from the
closet and put upon the fire, and then the
Little Coal was glad, for now it could do some-
thing for that poor sick child. How quickly
it put forth its cheerful blaze, and fancied it
made the pale cheek of the poor child glow!
Brightly it burned, and hugged the small, well-

5—2
e@
54 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

worn saucepan, and rejoiced greatly to hear the
broth it contained begin to simmer; that was
its work, and the child should have a hot sup-
per that night. So on and on it blazed, forget-
ful of self, and only glad to be of use to that
pale, sick child; on and on it hurned—up and
up went its gentle, steady f.ame—up and up
went its smoke, too, through the narrow
chimney, higher and higher, curling and danc-
ing in the sunshine, towards that blue sky it
had so much admired when first seen from the
dark mine. All was bright with the Little
Coal now, for it had done a kindness and was
happy. So ended the Little Coal, in—smoke.

Mrs. Ainsley closed her papers, and Emma
thanked her for the tale.

“JT did not think a Little Coal could tell so
much, ma’am.”

«And I scarcely knew what it would say
when you asked me to write about it.”

“J shall often think of it, ma’am, when I see
the fire blaze.”
THE LITTLE COAL. 55

“Think, my dear child, how wrong it is to
be discontented. John Moore, your tale shall
be the next—a Gardener, I think you said.”

“Yes, please, ma’am.”

« Ah, John, you know I atu fond of flowers,
therefore think I shall tell you a great deal
ahout them.”
56 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS. |

Iv.
THE YOUNG GARDENER.

Wuen Mrs. Ainsley came to the next writing-
lesson, John Moore anxiously looked for the
red ribbon, and his countenance brightened
when he sawit. Alas! in passing him, Mrs.
Ainsley touched his elbow, and caused a blot
upon his book; the colour rose in John’s face,
which became saddened, for a blot upon the
copy always produced punishment.

“Tam very sorry to have caused that blot,
John,” said Mrs. Ainsley, “but you shall not
suffer for it. I am the person to be punished,
and as it gives me pleasure to read these little
tales to you, I think my punishment must be
THE YOUNG GARDENER. ONG

to take my papers home again without reading
them.”

There was a general exclamation of “Oh,
no.”

“That would punish us, ma’am,” said John.

“Then you will forgive me, John?” and
being assured of a full forgiveness, Mrs. Ainsley

began the tale of

THE YOUNG GARDENER.

John Moore had often declared he would be
a gardener, and was very anxious to begin his
work, therefore he begged of his father that he
might have the little front garden for his own.

“Do you think, John, you could keep it
neat? Iam afraid we should soon have more
weeds than vegetables or flowers.”

“No, that you should not, father,” said
John, much inclined to be angry at such an in-
sinuation; “I would work so hard in it.”

“J must not have your schooling neglected,
my boy.”

“No, father, I can learn my lessons, and
58 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

work in my garden too. I will get up early
and work in it before I go to school, and at
night, and when we have a holiday.”

“When you have a holiday you will like to
be playing marbles, or some other game, with
Dick Brown.”

“No, indeed, I shall not, father.”

«Well, I'll try you, Jack.”

John jumped from the stool on which he
had been seated to eat his supper, clapped his
hands, and at that moment was as happy as any
little boy need wish to be. He had worked
very industriously in his garden for a week,
when his father said—

“ Jack, [think I must give you some garden-
tools. I! must go into the town to-morrow,
and as it will be Saturday and a holiday, you
shall go with me to buy some.”

John was immensely delighted, and said,
«Oh, thank you, father. How kind !”

“‘ Mother,” said Moore to his wife, “I think
if our young gardener produces good vegetables,
‘THE YOUNG GARDENER., 59

we may buy them of him at the fair market
price. What say you?”

Mrs. Moore readily assented to this proposal.

“Thank you, father; that will be famous.
I shall get on well so,” and John rubbed his
hands in great glee.

How glad John was to see a bright morning,
for they were to walk into the town, and return
by the carrier. He trudged off by the side of
his father, talking about many things, but most
aout his tools—which kind of hoe he would
have, and the fineness and size of the rake;
each tool was talked of, yet John was as un-
decided as ever when they entered the iron-
monger’s shop, and depended entirely on his
father’s judgment.

The tools were bought, and Moore and his
happy boy took their places in the carricr’s
cart, John carefully holding the precious tools,
and fancying every one admired them.

“You are a good boy to take care of your
father’s tools,” said one of his companions.
60 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

“They are my own,” exclaimed John, joy-
fully ; “father bought them for me. Didn’t
you, father ?”

« And what will you do with them, my little
man ?””

“Dig and rake in my garden, to be sure,”
answered John, rather proudly.

“ Have you any cauliflowers in your garden?”

“Yes, a great many.”

“Ah,” said his questioner, ‘maybe you
wont grow them so big as one I had given to
me.”

“ How big was it?” asked John, in his turn.

“Oh, so big that my missis was forced to
boil it in the copper !”

John looked astonished, and half incredulous
said, “I should like to have some as big;
what would mother say ?”

“ She would soon heat her copper,” said his
father, amused. .

They reached their village, and John carried
his tools home in joy and pride. His mother
was the first to whom he displayed them,
THE YOUNG GARDENER, 61

and her admiration delighted him; then his
brothers and sisters praised them; James ex-
amined them very closely, and taking the spade
in his hand, said—

“Why, Jack, you'll never be able to dig with
this, it is so heavy.”

“Can’t I, though,” exclaimed John, and
taking it from James, he went through the
action of digging to prove it was not too
heavy. “Isn’t it a famous spade, Jem ?”

On the Monday morning John was up early
to try his new tools; he did not consider what
was most necessary to be done, but he dug a
little, raked a little, and hoed a little, not be-
ing particular about clearing away the weeds,
and therefore did not add to the tidiness of his
garden, and when school-time came, he could
not help thinking he had been at work some
time, but had done little good to his ground ;
however, he had tried his new tools, and they
were famous ones; he would work in earnest at
noon-time.

John worked well, and his little brother

6
62 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

Charlie delighted to help him, by carrying away
the weeding basket, and occasionally weeding,
when he had learnt to know the weeds from
the plants. One unlucky day, however, Charlie,
not heeding where he was treading while he
talked to his brother, stamped very much upon
John’s bed of early radishes. John’s passion
rose the instant he perceived the mischief done,
and throwing down his spade, he ran to his little
brother and gave him a blow upon his head,
upon which Charlie screamed out, as much
frightened by the suddenness of the attack, as
pained by the blow; he went crying into the
house, and John turned sulkily to his work
again.
Moore soon came into the ae to inquire
into the matter.

“ John, why did you strike your brother ?”

“ He trod on my radishes.”

«And you dared to strike him! Could
you not have asked him to move? You have
sinned very much in giving way to passion.”

“They were my earliest radishes, and I
THE YOUNG GARDENER. 63

meant to have surprised mother soon with some
for tea,” said John in a lowand saddened tone,
for he was now sorry for what he had done.

“Tam sorry your radishes are spoiled, but
much more sorry at your passion and violence.
I must help you to correct yourself; therefore,
first beg your brother’s pardon.”

John obeyed his father, for his passion had
passed away, and he was ashamed to see the
red mark on his little brother’s cheek which
his hand had caused.

“Tam sorry I spoiled your radishes,” said
Charlie, holding up his face to be kissed by
John. ‘I won’t do so any more, and perhaps
they are not all quite spoiled.”

« Your little brother is a good example to
you, John,” said his father; “he forgives you
the blow; from your heart you must forgive
him the injury he so unconsciously did. You
know who has Cot us to forgive even
until seventy times seven.’

“Yes, father, our blessed Redeemer, and in-
deed I forgive Charlie.”
64 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

eo, And now, John, I forbid you to work in
your garden for a week.”

John looked dismayed, and Charlie taking
his hand looked ‘pleadingly at his father.

“* Father,” he said, “ I know Jack is sorry ;
T was very naughty not to look where I put
my feet; don’t punish him this time, please.”

“Tt is painful to me to punish him, Charlie,
and I do so only for his good. I cannot grant
your request, Charlie, but I hope this will be
the last time I may have to punish John.”

Poor John, with downcast looks and an
aching heart, collected his tools together and
carried them into the shed after having given a
lingering look at his garden, and sighing said,
“Tt will all be spoiled in a week.”

It was a long sad week to our young gar-
dener, who purposely avoided looking at his
garden during the time of his punishment, but
assiduously applied himself to his lessons, and
though little Charlie’s repeated efforts to make
him smile were in vain, he was obedient to his
parents and studiously kind to his brothers and
THE YOUNG GARDENER. 65

sisters. When the week was ended, he said
nothing till his father spoke.

“ Now, John, we will go to your garden.”

John went with alacrity, and when he saw
his garden in neat order and uninjured by his
absence, he smiled joyfully, and gratefully
thanked his father, for he was convinced he had
taken care of it. Then Charlie gently drew
him to the radish-bed, and said, almost in a
whisper, “ They were not all spoiled, Jack, and
I have taken care of them. May Ihelp you to
pull them ?”

John looked towards his father, but without
speaking.

“Yes, my boy, pull those that are ready for
your mother’s tea.”

Now was John again happy ; Charlie helped
him to pull the radishes, and he put them upon
the tea-table near his mother, little Charlie
looking as pleased as if they had been the pro-
duce of his own little garden, while John’s
cheek was flushed and a tear stood in his eye.

«Thank you, my dear boy,” his mother said,

6—2
66 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

holding out her hand to him; but John could
not be contented with the hand, he threw his
arms round his mother’s neck, and the hitherto
restrained tears fell plentifully down his cheeks
for a few moments; then each partook of the
radishes, declaring them to be very good, if not
the very best they had ever eaten, and John
went to bed that night a better, therefore a
happier boy.

This was the only pain the garden caused
John ; it did him much good, for he became in-
dustrious and self-denying, and he learnt to
govern his temper. ‘His great friend, Dick
Brown,was also benefited ; he had formerly been
John’s playmate, and they had spent many an
idle hour together ; now, however, it was very
different: Dick had been roused to industry,
and had begged of his father, who was Squire
Westerbury’s gardener, a piece of ground to —
cultivate, as John had done, and the boys were
now as inseparable in their work as they had
been in their play, and the gardens formed a
stronger link between them than ever the games
THE YOUNG GARDENER, 67

at marbles had. If either had fine seed it was
shared with the other, and they helped each
other in every way they could; while Brown
gave to each equally the benefit of his experi-
ence and advice.

Squire Westerbury took note of the boys’
proceedings, and, wishing to give them encour-
agement, promised a prize of a beautiful book
on gardening to him who should bring him on
a certain day the six finest and best cauli-
flowers.

“T know we shall have it, Jack,” said little
Charlie.

“Tam not at all sure of that, Charlie, but
we will try all we can.”

The cauliflowers were chosen, twelve of equal
size and thickness, and were planted in each
garden precisely at the same time, and thus the
boys started fairly in the competition. Charlie
gave his undivided attention to these particular
plants, and seemed to think any care bestowed
upon the other vegetables as so much robbed
from the important cauliflowers.
68 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

“Charlie,” said his brother, “ we must take
care of the peas and beans, or we shall have
none to eat with the bacon of that fat pig in
father’s sty.”

“But I would rather go without the peas
than that you should not have the prize.”

“You may, my good little man,” said John,
patting Charlie’s head; “but father and mo-
ther expect the peas, so we will take care of
all.”

Many were the visits the boys paid to the
gardens of each other, to watch the progress
of the cauliflowers, again and again were they
measured, and their sizes and whiteness com-
pared. Time passed, and it now wanted only
one week of the day mentioned by the squire
for his decision. That week passed, and the
important day came. It was a bright and
beautiful morning, and John and Charlie rose
early; but not earlier than their friend Dick,
for before they were quite ready to go down-
stairs, they saw him come into the garden.
THE YOUNG GARDENER. 69

< Ah! there’s Dick,” exclaimed Charlie; “‘ we
are coming, Dick,” and downstairs they ran,

“Why, Dick,” said John, “what is the
matter, is anyone at home ill ?”

“No, no, they are very well, but——” and
poor Dick seemed unable to speak.

“ Do tell me what is the matter?” said John,
very sorry to see his friend’s distress.

“My cauliflowers,” at last said Dick; “ they
are all spoiled.”

“Oh, how? They were all right last
night when we looked at them; and so
beautiful |”

“Yes, but the pig has eaten them,” said
Dick, in a sad and broken voice. He then told
them, that when he went into the garden that
morning, he saw a strange pig among his beau-
tiful cauliflowers; the three best were de-
stroyed, and the others so broken about as to
be good for nothing.

“T hope it is not our pig,” said Charlie, and
away he ran to the sty, and soon returned,
70 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

exclaiming, “all yight; I am very glad it was
not our pig.”

“T will go with you to look at them.”

They went forthwith to Dick’s garden; it
was indeed a sad scene of devastation. John
endeavoured to console his friend ; and Charlie,
taking his hand, said, in a gentle voice, with
_ tears in his eyes,

“T am very, very sorry, Dick, but glad it
was not our pig.”

The mischief could not’ be repaired, and at
noon Squire Westerbury came to Moore’s,
carrying the prize-book in his hand. He went
with Moore and John, followed of course by
Charlie, to view the cauliflowers, and expressed
pleasure at seeing such good ones.

“You have succeeded very well, John,” he
said; “these are very fine plants. Now we
will look at Dick Brown’s.”

“Tt will be of no use, sir,” said John, in a
subdued voice, and looking very sad.

“ Why so, John ?”
THE YOUNG GARDENER. 71

“ His were destroyed this morning, sir. A
pig got into the garden and ate them.”

“Then the prize must be yours, John.”

“No, sir,” replied John, “ Dick’s cauli-
flowers were as good, if not better than mine,
and but for this accident, the prize would have
been his. I cannot take the book.”

“Ts this indeed the case?’ inquired the
squire, turning to Moore.

“It is quite true, sir, that Dick’s were very
fine plants, though I do not think they were
better than John’s; however, I should like, if
you please, sir, that you should ask Brown’s
opinion of them.”

“Very well, then we will go to Brown’s.”

Accordingly they went to Brown’s and saw
poor Dick’s garden, where some _half-eaten
leaves and headless stalks told where the cauli-
flowers had been.

“Tam very sorry for your accident, my
boy,” said Mr. Westerbury, kindly; “J
hear they were very fine plants. Brown
72 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

which do you think were the finer, John’s or
your son’s ?”

“Well, sir, there was not much difference
between them, but if any, I am bound to say,
that to my thinking, John’s were rather the
best.”

“Then I abide by your opinion. The prize
is yours, John ; and let me say how very much
it pleases me to see your industry and the good
fecling between you. Continue to be good
friends. ‘Take the book, John, and I hope you
will find it useful.”

It was a beautiful book, and as the squire
put it into John’s hands, little Charlie looked
as delighted as if it had been his own, while
John, thanking the squire, said,

“Tf it is mine, please, sir, may I do as I like
with it?”

“ Certainly, my lad.”

John immediately held the book out to Dick,
saying, “ Dick, I wish you to have it, for I
think your cauliflowers were the best.”
THE YOUNG GARDENER. 73

“ Oh, no, no, John,” exclaimed Dick, “ in.
deed I can’t.”

Moore seeing the tears in Charlie’s eyes, and
the doleful countenances of the other boys,
wished to cheer them ; so, turning to his little
boy, he said, in a half whisper, “Charlie, ir
think piggy should have the prize, as he had
the finest cauliflowers.”

“Oh, father,” exclaimed Charlie, smiling,
though somewhat shocked at the idea.

John smiled also, and going to a little dis-
tance, left the book in Dick’s hand.

Charlie was, perhaps, the only one of the
party who had less pleasure than pain in the
arrangement, he so much wished his brother to
have the beautiful book, and wondered why he
had given it up. The other. boys were both
happy, though regretting the destructive act
of the pig; and it was some little time before
they could look at that part of Dick’s garden
without pain. However, they turned to work
again, and repeated competition did not de-

7
74 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

stroy their friendship, but rather tended to
cement it.

“Ts that all, ma’am?” asked a young voice
as Mrs. Ainsley closed her papers.

“Indeed it is. I hope you have liked it,
John.”

“ Very much, and thank you, ma’am.”

“TI hope you will recollect the faults our
little gardener corrected, and try to do the
same.”

John promised to do so.

“JT am sorry it is finished,” said Emma.

“Please, ma’am, whose is to be the
next?”

“J think Susan shall choose it. What
shall it be, Susan ?” j

The little girl thus appealed to could not
determine, and Mrs. Ainsley said,

“ Shall I choose for you ?”

“ Yes, please, ma’am.”

«Then I think it will be about a spider.”


THE YOUNG GARDENER. 75



“A spider!” exclaimed more than one little
voice ; “ what can a spider have to say ?”
“You shall hear,” said Mrs. Ainsley, “on
our next writing day.”

;








76 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS,

Â¥.
THE HOUSE SPIDER.

On the next writing day Susan exclaimed,
“ Have you brought the Spider, ma’am ?”

“Yes, Susan, I have him here,” said Mrs.
Ainsley, holding to view the well-known papers
tied with a red ribbon; and when the children
had arranged themselves after the lesson, she
said,—

“Now you must fancy I am a Spider.”

“ What a big one!” said John Moore, in a
laughing tone.

“Yes, a very big one. A large, brown
Spider; but you need not be afraid of me.”

THE HOUSE SPIDER.

There is a nursery rhyme about a Spider
which I have heard ; it is this,—
THE HOUSE SPIDER. V7

* Little Miss Moffet,
Sat on a toffit
Eating curds and whey ;
There came a brown spider,
And sat down beside her,
And frightened Miss Moffet away.”

I can’t tell why Miss Moffet should have run
away; she was very silly to be frightened, for
we should do her no harm, and I am not sure
we should have eaten the curds and whey, for
we don’t like such things. But some people
are so foolish as to be afraid of us, though
why I don’t know, and don’t think they.can
tell me.

Well, my name is Tegeneria, my colour is
an ash, with a band of dark spots on my back,
and though of such a quiet, sober colour, I do
not think myself ugly.

I remember I made my way out of a very
delicate and silky covering one bright and
warm day, and wondered where I could be.
Everything around me seemed so large; it
was so light and warm; I thought it must be
a very beautiful world, and I must surely be

7—2
78 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS,

very happy in it. Yet one thing pained me
much. I had no parents, at least none that I
knew, and my brothers and sisters who came
out of the silky covering at the same time with
myself ran away from me; and there I was
alone—a little young creature newly-born into
a large strange world, alone. I could see many
flies sporting about me, and thought they must
be very happy in having companions, while I
had none; and I own that at first I felt low-
spirited.

Some people think we are ugly, but I must
think they are wroug. I amnotugly. Ihave
a plump body, long, slender legs, and sharp
eyes. Another mistake I wish to correct.
Those who know nothing of my family call us
insects, which much offends my dignity. We
are not insects; we are animals, as is proved
by the more complicated form of our bodies ;
I mean we have more members and internal
organs than insects have; they have only six
legs, we have eight ; our bodies are not divided
like the wasp’s or bee’s, we have no such slender
THE HOUSE SPIDER. 79

waist; and our eyes are not like those of the
fly, who has four thousand all huddled together,
we have eight separate ones; and sometimes I
wonder the use of so many to the fly, for it
cannot see the web I make to catch it. To be
sure, the fly’s eyes are at the back of its head,
while ours are in the front. Of course these
many eyes are of use, only I am content with
my eight, and don’t wish for more. Then
again, we don’t undergo the changes that in-
sects do. Take the butterfly as an example.
First there is the egg, then the larva, or little
black worm ; the larva changes to a caterpillar,
the caterpillar to a chrysalis, and at last the
chrysalis becomes the butterfly, and very beau-
tiful it certainly is; but think of the time and
trouble necessary to go through so many
changes, and then to live only a short time
at last !

Well, after I had looked about me and
stretched my legs, I began to feel hungry.
How tempting the flies were! How I longed
to eat one! But how was I to catch him?
80 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

I must spin my web; so out of the four little
protuberances or spinnerets that are under my
body, each of which has a thousand very small
holes, I forced a thick liquid, which hardened
into threads. Twisting all these threads to-
gether, made my first web, and from the centre
of it I formed a hollow tube which led to my
home in the centre of the wall.

How beautiful my web was! I was now
very hungry, so from my chink I kept a sharp
look-out upon my web. “Oh! when would it
catch a fly?” I waited long, and with fatigue
and hunger had well-nigh fallen asleep, when
I heard a peculiar noise coming from my web;
so I peeped out, and, oh! my joy, there was a
large plump fly caught.

Well done, beautiful web! Quickly I ran
down my hollow tube or funnel, pierced my
victim, spun a little fresh silk round him lest |
he should escape, then returned to my chink to
wait till he should be dead; when assured of
this I came out again, sucked his juices, and
thus made my first meal. I would have eaten
THE HOUSE SPIDER. 81

more, but my hunger was so far satisfied that
I could wait till my next meal, so I retired to
my snug home and slept soundly.

When I awoke, of course I looked at my
web; it was all right, and I continued to
catch flies, and seldom was very hungry,
though my appetite is a very good one, in-
deed it is said that we are very voracious, that
is, eat a great deal.

I had very little trouble or work, only to
mend my web when it chanced to be broken
by the struggles of the flies to get away. How
silly I thought them to come near me. Why
did they not tell one another that I would eat
them? Ha! ha! silly little things, there
they were always dancing about upon their
wings, the great bluebottles humming their
little songs ; sometimes resting for a moment
on the window pane, then darting off again
upon a fresh dance, while I lay snug in my
corner, thinking I could eat them all. It
puzzled me, that though I ate so many there
seemed to be no fewer; where could they all
$2 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

come from? How big was the world in which
we lived? and what other creatures were there
in it besides my family and the flies? I was
soon to know another, and a cross, ill-natured
one too.

I had awakened one bright morning after a
comfortable sleep, thought of my friends the
flies, and that I should like my breakfast, when
I heard a strange noise close to my home ; it
was something between a rustling and a thump-
ing, such as I had never before heard, and I
was slightly alarmed, and when I gained
courage to look out of my chink, what a
terrible and strange creature I saw. Not at
all like myself, nor like the flies ; it was tall,
so tall that if I had stood at its feet my neck
would have ached very much in looking up at
its huge head, in which there were two such
eyes! With its paws it whisked about to the
terror of the flies as well as myself, and I soon
found the noise I had heard was occasioned by
the bristles of one of its paws being rubbed

“against the wall. I was dreadfully frightened,
THE HOUSE SPIDER. 83

and crept far into my chink, determined to be
very quiet, and in my terror forgot my break-
fast and my hunger.

After the terrible creature had rubbed its
bristles all over the room, to my great joy it
went away. Now I breathed freely, but for
some time was afraid to venture from my own
home, and waited till I saw the flies dancing
happily again ; then my hunger returned, and
I wished for a good meal, so came out of my
hole. But oh! my vexation and distress !
Where was my beautiful web? Gone=quite
gone. How was this? Had that ugly monster
taken it away? What could it want it for? Not
to catch flies, for all the flies I had ever seen
would not make a meal for such a huge crea
ture; besides, if it wished, it surely could
catch them without my web. Well, it was of
no use to fret; my web was gone, and I must
spin another before I could have my dinner.



Much valuable time is often lost in fretting
over little mishaps that can be remedied with-
out a vast deal of trouble. It is much better,
S84 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

when an accident occurs, to set to work to
remedy it, than to waste time in useless lamen- .
tations; so, instead of fretting, I set to work,
and soon spun another web, quite as beautiful
as the first, and rather larger. I soon caught
my flies—six fat, fine flies, and an excellent
meal they made me; but the last I caught
gave me a great trouble. How he fought with
me! I declare it was some little time before I
recovered from the effects of that battle, for the
creature tore off one of my legs while strug-
gling with me. It certainly was a pinch, and it
ached very much—I mean the stump did; but
T was determined to master him, and did so at
last. Then, when I had spun a quantity of
silk over him—backwards, and forwards, and
round about—lI felt I was sure of him, so only
laughed to see him struggle, till, being quite
exhausted, he could make no further resistance
to my piercing him, and after having sucked
his juices, I felt refreshed, but could not exert
myself much on account of my poor stump.

I did not grieve at losing my leg, for I knew
THE HOUSE SPIDER. 85

it would grow again; therefore I waited pa-
tiently, and while able to travel only a short
distance, I chatted with my cousin Diadema,
who lives in the garden near me ; of the sixty-
seven families of cousins belonging to me, he
is the only one with whom I have an intimate
acquaintance. He is a very fine fellow, reddish
in colour, with spots of a yellowish white on
his hack. He always sleeps under a leaf, which
I think cannot be as snug as my chink; but
he likes it, and assures me he is protected from
rain well enough. It is quite right to be con-
tented with one’s home; and I would not
change with Diadema, notwithstanding all the
fine things he says about the bright dew-
drops, sweet scent of flowers, and the nightin-
gale’s song.

I inquired of Diadema how he and some
other little cousins manage to spin their webs
from one tall tree to another—I thought it
must be so fatiguing to climb them, to say
nothing of the distance between; also how he
contrived to cross water when it came in his path.

8
86 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

“Why, I do it thus,’ he replied: ol
mount upon a twig high above the water, turn
my face to the wind, spin plenty of silk, and
the wind blows it over the water to some twig
on the other side, to which it adheres; then,
fixing my end, I can travel upon it to the other
side of the water.”

«« A very ingenious method, cousin, and cer-
tainly not a fatiguing one.”

Tn the same manner I spin and travel from
tree to tree.”

“I suppose,” I said, “it is rather pleasant
to travel about ; I never go far from home.”

“Rather pleasant! It is delightful, I can
tell you. I see a great dealin my travels—
such beautiful flowers; I am sure you would
like to travel as I do.”

“Perhaps I should; but I am not fond of
being always in the open air. Can you tell me
how our little cousins spin those fine webs
which are called gossamer, and seem to float in_
the air?”

“Just as I spin mine: they but turn their
THE HOUSE SPIDER. 87

faces to the wind, which, by a gentle puff,
carries their fine silk a long, long way behind
them, and it hangs in the air sparkling in the
suabeam.”

I was very much entertained by my chat
with Diadema; but being rather fatigued, I
bade him “ good-night,” and we retired to our
respective homes.

All has gone well with me since my leg has
grown again. I have changed my skin, and
feel as lively and well as any spider can wish.
My web is uninjured ; and, in addition to flies,
I have feasted upon two moths and a butterfly.
How very much handsomer they are than the
flies !—the butterfly especially; I admire her
wings so much that I have left them in my
web as ornaments. I wonder if the birds and
flowers that Diadema talked of are as beauti-
ful; it must be a wonderful world—so full of
beautiful things. But then, that monster
Thad almost forgotten all about her—I have



been so very happy.
Why did I mention that monster? She has
88 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

been again, and brought a companion with her
very much like herself.

“ Betty,” said her eompanion; «there’s a
cobweb in that corner.’

“So there is, I declare!” exclaimed the
monster ; “ yet how I swept yesterday! But
it shan’t be there long ;” and immediately she
destroyed my new web again.

I was very much alarmed at Betty; but I
felt safe when in my chink, and I don’t think
she has seen me yet, or I suppose she would
kill me. I heard her tell her companion,
“‘ She wished she could catch the nasty little
thing.”

I wonder what right she has to call me “a
nasty little thing?” It is very wrong to call
each other names; and Betty ought to know
better. I wish I could give her just a little
prick for sayingso. Shall I try? There she
is, very busy; Tl just run down the wall ;
if she should see me I can soon run into
some crack near. I wonder if I can spin my
web about her as I do about the flies? But
THE HOUSE SPIDER. 89

what a lot it will take to go over her! She
moves—she sees me. Quick—quick ! « Ah,
Mrs. Betty, I am safe in my chink, so you
have not caught the ‘nasty little thing.’
Take care he does not catch you; you will
give me food enough for all my life. I shall
not need to catch any more flies if I get
you.”

Poor Spider! I am afraid he made a bold
attempt to catch Betty, and was caught him-
self instead, for here his history ends.

“TJ do like that taze,”? said one of the little
girls.

“Tam glad you do. Will you think of it
when you see the gossamer ?”

“Yes, ma’am, and I can tell mother how it
is made. I should like to sce the little Spider
spin it.”

“ You must look about very carefully to find
the little creature, Susan.”

“ Did you ever see it spin, ma’am?”

“No; but I have often watched the House

—)
90 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

Spider spin its web, and am reluctant to destroy
tae)
“But it isso untidy to leave it,” said Mary.
“Yes; and if we left all the cobwebs day
after day, year after year, we should at last

be somewhat like the flies, covered by cobwebs.” |

“Please, ma’am, what will the next tale be
about ?”

“TJ have a Butterfly that wishes to tell its
tale; do you think you will like it ?”

“Oh! yes ma’am, please.”

“Very well; then it shall come with me on

Tuesday. Now, good-bye.”
THE BUTTERFLY, 91

VE
THE BUTTERFLY.

“Twas a House Spider to you, my dear
children, on our last writing day, and John
thought me a big one. To-day you must fancy
me a Butterfly.”

The children smiled, and Mrs. Ainsley, ex-
tending her arms, enveloped in her shawl, con-
tinued, “ A very big Butterfly, also, am I
not ?”

THE BUTTERFLY.

The House Spider scorned to be called an
insect. I own myself to be one, and am con-
_ tent and happy. My name is Vanessa Ata-
92 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

lanta, or Red Admiral; but I must tell you of
much before I speak of myself as a Butterfly.
I know nothing of my parents, except that my
kind mother provided for me and my brothers
and sisters as well as she could, by laying her
eggs upon the leaf of the nettle, that being the
plant we should want for food when we pushed
our way out of the eggs, through the flap at
one end, provided for the purpose. Out I
crawled, a little black worm or larva, and im-
mediately began to make a hearty meal, eating
away the leaf round the edge, but carefully
avoiding the veins; the holes I left seemed
very large to me then, but, dear me! they were
nothing compared to those I made when I be-
came a caterpillar; and this was before very
long, for I grew quickly, and from that time I
saw nothing more of my brothers and sisters.
We each took our way in the world without
grief at parting.

I was very handsome as a caterpillar. My
black skin was changed for a very smooth one,
of a dark-green colour, with a yellow line on
THE BUTTERFLY. 93

each side of my body. My body was divided
into twelve parts, and I could bend it as I
pleased. Ihad sixteen legs; six, having a claw,
were on the first three divisions of my body, the
remaining ten were upon the hinder divisions,
leaving the centre of my long body free, from
any. My hinder legs terminated in flat feet
set round with hooks, alternately long and
short.

I did not want to catch my food, as it con-
sisted of leaves and seeds of plants, so there was
no occasion for me to make a web like tha
spiders; but spinning fine silk was very
necessary to me, therefore I had one spinneret
just below my mouth, and when I wished to
crawl up a smooth surface, as of glass, I spun
my silken. thread very closely together in the
form of true lovers’ knots, as they are called, then
holding upon it by the claws of my forelegs,
aud drawing my hinder ones close up to them,
I could go up, and up, as I continued to spin.

When I was a caterpillar I ate a very great
deal; indeed I did nothing else but eat and
94 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

sleep. I lived in a beautiful garden, sur-
rounded by trees, under a hedge where the
nettles grew; and I heard the birds sing day
and night, wondering they were not fatigued ;
but although I liked their songs, I was very
much afraid of them ; for they came with their
sharp-pointed beaks and pounced upon my
neighbours. I saw a great many of my family
devoured by them, but had no time to fret, for
T had to take care of myself.

Well, I ate so much ‘and grew so big that
my skin became too tight, therefore I changed
it; this was by no means an agreeable opera-
tion. I felt ill for a day or two, and did not
care to eat even the nettle seeds, but felt
languid and unwilling to move; however, the
change was necessary, so I exerted myself.
I first split the old skin along my back, then
curled my body upwards, and drew my head
and hinder part of my body out of the old
skin, and appeared in bright, fresh colours ;
then I became very hungry. I determined not
to change my skin again, though I knew there

Â¥
THE BUTTERFLY. 95

were other changes I should be obliged to
undergo. How I longed to be a butterfly! To
fly about as the birds do, then I should be safe
from their beaks, for I would fly away from
them, oh! so quickly.

But I could not be a beautiful butterfly till
I had been a chrysalis, therefore I prepared for
this change when I found my food diminishing,
and there was no seed on the nettles. I chose
a snug hole, in which I could sleep away my
chrysalis life; covered the inside with my
silken thread, spinning on and on, round and
round, till there was but a very small space
left, into which I pushed my body, and by
jerking suddenly, cast off my caterpillar skin,
covering myself instead with a transparent
brown liquor, which very soon hardened and
protected my curious body; then IT went to
sleep, for five or six days, to dream of the
pleasures I should awake to as a butterfly.

Oh, how glad Iwas to awake! The sun
shone brightly on the day of my new birth,
and the birds seemed to welcome me to life by
96 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

their joyous lays. I am very, very happy now
that I am a beautiful Butterfly. Now I took
my name of Vanessa Atalanta; how proud I
was of my wings! so I am still, I assure you.
The upper side of them is deep black, and very
glossy, a broad band of bright red runs across
my first wings, beyond this band are six white
spots of different sizes and shapes, and at the
edge of the wings is a blue stripe. My second
wings have a broader band of red, in which
there are black spots, and there are besides two
half circles of blue on these wings.

The colours upon my wings are very curious ;
they are very, very small scales, and are fas-
tened by little teeth or hooks. Little children
when they catch a Butterfly, often rub off some
of these scales, and call them the dust of the
wings ; it cannot be felt, because the scales are
so exceedingly minute, that one square inch of
my wing contains more than two hundred
thousand.

How changed was my life now! When I
was a caterpillar I ate a great deal, and crawled
THE BUTTERFLY. 97

upon the ground; now I am a Butterfly, I
suck the sweet honey from the pretty flowers
by putting my long tongue into them, and a
very little satisfies me. I had so longed for
this time, always looking forward to it when a
larva and a caterpillar with impatience; and
certainly I am very happy. I flit from one
sweet flower to another in the sunshine, staying
a moment to suck the honey, then away to
another. I listen now without fear to the
birds, for I know that they will not peck at me,
so I fly about with them, only I do not fly so
high as they do, but I skim over the heads of
the gay flowers, which I scarcely saw when I
was a crawling caterpillar. What a beautiful
garden I livein! The flowers rival my wings
in their bright colours, and the grass is so
smooth and green; then I look up into the blue
sky, and see the pretty white fleecy clouds skim
along, not hiding the sun or casting shade ; and
the brilliant little stars at night that twinkle so
merrily. I wonder if all the whole world is as
beautiful as my garden home, and if everything
9
98 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

living in it is as happy asITam. Ido enjoy
my life so very much! But ah! little boy, I
know what you are going to do; you want to
catch me; thank you, I would rather you should
not. I can fly faster than you can run, and if
not, I will fly up and up, quite far out of your
reach. There, now what will you do? You
can’t jump so high. Ah! you have thrown
your cap at me, but have not caught me. How
hot and tired you are! Let me advise you to
be content in looking at me and admiring me,
without trying to catch me. I do you no harm.
It is idle cruelty to capture me, and it is very
very wrong to be cruel; besides, my life will
soon be over, so wait a little and then take me
if you will. Good boy, you take my advice;
there, sit down on the grass; I’ll be back to you
presently. Good-bye.

« Has it flown away, ma’am ?”

“Yes, it is gone; but I must add a few
words to the Butterfly’s tale. A long, long
time ago, the people who lived in Greece had
not the same true and happy religion we have,
THE BUTTERFLY. 99

but made fables of their gods and goddesses,
and being very fond of, and clever in painting
and sculpture, they made representations of
them also. Now, these people knew that the
soul of man does not die with his body, but
remains asleep for a time; so they likened it to
the Butterfly in its different states. The cater-.
pillar, crawling upon the earth, they likened to
the soul while in the body, engrossed by worldly
things; the chrysalis, which has scarcely any
life, they likened to the soul in death; then
the butterfly, bursting forth in a much more
beautiful form, and enjoying a new and happier
life, to the soul rising after death in a giorified
body, to a life far happier than can be enjoyed
in this world.

“The Greeks called the soul Psyche, and
represented it by the figure of a very beautiful
woman with coloured wings, and with a butter-
fly near her. The fable of Psyche is a very
beautiful one, but you would not quite under-
stand it, were I to tell you; however, I wish
you to remember the likeness between your
100 TALES FOR VILLAGE SCHOOIS.

souls and the butterfly, and to try, with God’s
help, to fulfil all your duties on earth so well
that you may enjoy that blessed life hereafter,
which the Almighty, in His love, grants to those
who love and obey him.”

After a few moments of silence, Mrs. Ainsley
asked the children if they liked the Buttertiy as
well as the Spider?

“Oh yes,” many cried; “the Spider was
such a pert creature, but the Butterfly seems
so gentle.” 0

“J wont catch any more,” said one little
boy; “ I shan’t like to hurt them, now.”

“T should like to find a caterpillar’s skin,”
said John. ;

«JT believe it very soon dries up,” observed
Mrs. Ainsley, “and therefore is seldom
found.”

«Please, ma’am,” asked Emma, “is this
to be the last story ?”

“Yes, Emma; and I think there must be a
little Fairy among you, for think what I have

?
THE BUTTERFLY. 101

been—an Oak Tree—a Spider—a Little Coal—
a Butterfly—what else would you have me?”

“Oh, a great many things, ma’am, if you
will write tales for us. Do, please ma’am,
write some more.”

“J wont say ‘No,’ positively ; but I must
now have a little rest. Now a double ‘ Good-
bye’—one for the day, and one for the tales.”

THE END.
Frederick Warne § Co., Publishers,



Price One Shilling each Packet.
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VICTORIA TALES AND STORIES,

PACKET OF 48 BOOKS. In Imperial 48mo, Handsome
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PACKET B. 6 Books of 32 pp. Each with Frontispiece.

PACKET ©. 4 Books of 48 pp. Each with Coloured Frontis-
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PACKET D. 4 Books of 48 pp, Each with Coloured Frontis-

iece.

PACKET E. 4 Books of 48 pp. Each with Coloured Frontis-
piece.

PACKET F. 12 Books of 16 pp. Edited by Miss Yonag,
Author of “The Heir of Redclyffe.”

PACKET G. 12 Books of 16 pp. For Sunday Reading. By
the Rev. H. C. ADAMS.
. PACKET H. 4 Books of 48 pp. Each with Coloured Frontis-
piece. Edited by the Author of “The Heir of Redclyffe.”
PACKET I. 4 Books of 48 pp. Each with Coloured Frontis-
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PACKET K. 4 Books. With Coloured Frontispiece to each.
PACKET L. 12 Books. With Illustrations. Selected and
Edited by L. VALENTINE.

PACKET M. 6 Books. With Illustrations, By CHARLOTTE
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PACKET N. 12 Books. With Illustrations. Edited by Miss
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PACKET O. 48 Books. With Ilustrations.



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WARNH’S SIXPENNY 32mo BOOKS.

Elegantly printed with new type, in modern style, cloth, gilt
edges with Coloured Frontispiece (Kronheim’s Process).



LITTLE NETTIE.

ANNIE AND Mary.

LITTLE BLACK HEN.

MAGGin’s CHRISTMAS.

MARTHA’S VISIT.

GERTRUDE AND LILY.

ALTHEA.

PRINCE IN DISGUISE.

BASKET OF FLOWERS.

ROBERT DAWSON.

BABES IN THE BASKET.

THE DAIRYMAN’S DAUGH-
TER,

JANE HUDSON.

RutH ELMER. |

PHILIP AND ARTHUR. |

BERTA AND SILVIO.

HATTY AND MARCUS.

KATE DARLEY.

CAROLINE EATON.

Timip Lucy.

Mary Burns.

LITTLE JOSEY.

RICHARD HARVEY.

HERMIT OF STENTORP.

YOUNG COTTAGER.

GIFTIE, THE CHANGELING.

CHILDREN ON THE PLAINS.

JEWISH TWINS.

RHYMES FOR THE LITTLE
ONES.

Tom WATSON,

WARNE’S BIJOU TEXT-BOOKS.



Demy 48mo, 6d. cach, cloth, red edges; 1s. each, cloth, with
rims, or calf limp, gilt edges, cut flush.

1, RILLS FROM THE RIVER
oF LIFE.

2. THE Dew oF HERMON.

3. DAILY GLEANINGS.

4, A CASKET OF PEARLS.

5. BIBLE GEMS AND BRIEF
PRAYERS.

6. Rays or LIGHtT.

*,* A FOURPENNY EDITION is also ready of all the above, in
fancy paper covers, with Plain Illustrations,



Bedford Street, Covent Garden.
Frederick Warne § Co., Publishers,



WARNE’S SIXPENNY 18mo BOOKS.
48 pages, cloth gilt, gilt edges, Coloured Frontispiece.

GENTLEMAN GEORGE; or, The Advantages of Reading.
WILLIE’S DISOBEDIENCE; or, The Cottage on the Cliff.
Tue GARDEN: An Allegory. By ©. D. BELL.

THE CHILDREN’S IsprAND. By Madame DE GENLIS.
Lost AND FOUND; or, The Adopted Daughter.

LIFE oF A BERLIN Dot. Written by Itself.

ALICE THORPEH’S PROMISE; or, A New Year’s Day.
LitTLE WILLIE; or, Patience Strong. By C. D. BELL.
JANET’s Boots. By the Author of “Finette.”

Jue LITTLE SUNBEAM; or, Lizzie’s Orange.

JULIA’S MISTAKE; or, The Fairy Valley.

THE SON OF THE PYRENEES; or, Perseverance.
EstHER STANHOPE; or, The Crowning Delight.

MARY AND NORAH; or, Queen Katherine’s School. -
SARAH WATKINS; or, Crumbs for the Birds.

ALICE; or, The Little Sentinel.

WILLIS" 8 TROUBLE; or, The Old Gig.

HucH TAYLOR; ot, The Desert Island.

TEMPTATION; or, Henry I Morland.

ST. CaDoe? s WE ELL; or, The Stolen Dog.

EDWARD'S, Prize; or, The Premium.

PHILIP AND Hite ; or, The Little Gardeners.
JOSEPH ; or, Humility before Honour.

THE SIMPLE FLOWER.

FINETTE; or, a Doll’s Fortune.

Waa. A Tale for Children.

ANNA FITZGERALD; or, The Three Half-Crowns.
WILLIE’s TRUNK; or, Mrs. Lambton’s Legacy.

<

* * A THREEPENNY EDITION is also ready of all the above, in
fancy paper covers, with Plain ERS.



Bedford Street, Conent Garden.