Citation
Little Katie

Material Information

Title:
Little Katie : a fairy story
Creator:
Bruce, Charles ( Author, Primary )
Nimmo, William Philip, 1831-1883 ( Publisher )
M'Farlane and Erskine ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
Edinburgh
Publisher:
William P. Nimmo
Manufacturer:
M'Farlane and Erskine
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
98 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 15 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children and death -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Grief -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Students -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Loneliness -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Prisoners -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Charity -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fairies -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Baldwin -- 1873 ( local )
Genre:
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by Charles Bruce.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026607635 ( ALEPH )
ALG3067 ( NOTIS )
59820754 ( OCLC )

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LIDighE KA Dam,

GA Fiuiry Story.

BY
CHARLES BRUCE,

AUTHOR OF THE ‘‘STORY OF A MOSS ROSE,” ETC., ETC,

EDINBURGH:
WILLIAM PB NIMMO.

1873.



EDINBURGH :
PRINTED BY M‘FARLANE AND ERSKINE,
(late Schenck & M‘Farlane,)
ST JAMES’ SQUARE,



TO

KATIE HAMILTON,

THIS LITTLE STORY IS DEDICATED,
WITH KIND LOVE,
AND THE HOPE THAT HER YOUNG LIFE WIL&
BLOSSOM OUT INTO TRUE BEAUTY
AND LOVELINESS,
BY

The Author.



CONTENTS.

PAGE
CHAPTER I.

ALONE, : 9 ; : . e 7
CHAPTER II.

THE FAIRY, : . 7 ee
CHAPTER III.

THE PRISONER, , . . ° 5
CHAPTER IV.

LITTLE ORPHANS, . : e > « 26
CHAPTER V.

worK! wWoRK! woRK! . : 5 >» ol

CHAPTER VI.
ONLY TIRED, ° ° . ° » 86



6 CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VII.
KATIE’S VISITORS, . ‘ .

CHAPTER VIII.
A ROSE, ; 5 .

CHAPTER IX.

A DAISY’S MISSION, 8 .
CHAPTER X.
THE QUEEN FAIRY AGAIN, e

CHAPTER XI.
AND LAST, « , 4 0



e)

@:

PAGE

45

54

67

. 84

99





LITTLE KATIE:

A FAIRY STORY.

CHAPTER I.
ALONE.

OW strangely sound the voices of

children heard in the fields at twi-

waged) Jioht, as half-frightened, they call
to their play-fellows, whom the increasing
darkness almost hides from their sight. It
was thus the voice of little Katie sounded,
as, standing beneath the wide-spreading
branches of a giant old oak, and half fright-
ened at finding herself alone, she shouted to
her school-fellows, who but a moment before
were playing at her side, but whom she now
saw ina distant part of the field; not clothed





8 LONELY LITTLE ONES.

in their old familiar aspects and shapes, but
gliding about like shadows, grim and por-
tentous, while the faint echo of their laughter
just reached her ear. No answering voice,
however, responded to her repeated cries, and
when the last dimly-discerned form had en-
tirely vanished from her sight, looking timidly
and fearfully round, Katie began to cry.

You must not think scornfully of Katie
because tears wetted her checks; she was
but a child, numbering only eight years in
age, and even those few years had been far
from happy ones; indeed her brief life had
been a very sad and lonely one—she knew
few of the joys of childhood, and although
she possessed a whole fund of laughter and
merriment in her little nature, yet circum-
stances had frowned so severely on the dear
child, that they had chilled them and forbade
them to flow; and as yet she had found no
human creature, whose beautiful human love
could set the streams free to cheer the sor-
rowful little heart.

It is very saddening to think that there
are many such lonely little lives; yet, let us
hope, that in every instance the good God



THE ANGELS WHISPER. 9

sees and knows of each one, and has a won-
derful store of happiness laid up for them for
a future day. Although this thought may
be vague and meaningless to my young
readers, yet it is very comforting to men
and women with tender hearts who feel
powerless to heal the sorrows of childhood.
Katie had no mother, and her father was a
cold, hard, and stern man, who cherished no
love for his little motherless girl. The recol-
lection of her mother was, however, still fresh
in Katie’s memory ; in sleep she still saw her;
those tender loving,eyes which had watched
her so often and so fondly when on earth,
came again to her in her dreams; and those
who sometimes passed through her room in
the night hours, and stayed for a moment to
gaze upon her, would remark a most happy
smile upon her thin face; then they would
murmur to each other, as they stepped
silently away, “an angel is whispering to her
in her sleep!”—for it is a beautiful fancy
with some people, that when children smile
in their sleep, bright angels are visiting them.
When morning dawned, and her eyes
opened to the light of day, the spell was



10 WHISPERS OF EVIL.

broken, the vision faded away; so night was
ever a happy time for Katie, and she felt
sorry it was not always night.

Katie inherited much of her mother’s sen-
sitive nature; hence, when God had taken
her mother up into His beautiful home, and
she lost the warm clasp of loving arms, and
the soft tones of her tender voice, she wan-
dered lonely and sad about her father’s
house, unloved and uncared for by any.
Every week her little cheeks grew thinner
and paler, and the servants began to whisper
among themselves, “She will surely die!”
Whether the import of these whispers reached
the father’s ears, or whether he wearied of
seeing his lonely little daughter—whose
silent presence must have been a constant
reproach—is not known, but he suddenly
determined to send her to school; and to
school Katie was accordingly sent.

Being, however, so much accustomed to
solitude, Katie could not feel herself at home
among so many girls; she shrunk timidly
from the approaches which many of them
made towards acquaintanceship; the more
boisterous among them she carefully avoided,



QUEER WAYS. 11

and she could not prevent herself from ner-
vously starting if spoken to by any of the
teachers. All these several traits in her cha-
racter were not comprehended; her teachers
thought her dull and stupid, and her school-
mates strange, very strange. Thus it came
to pass that Katie found herself as much
alone at school as she had been at home. In
all the sports and. pastimes indulged in by
her school-companions, in the lovely green
fields, she would sit apart and watch, or
would ramble away by herself and gather
flowers, which was ever an unfailing source
of delight; perhaps the lovely flowers spoke
to her and answered to her unuttered thoughts
and wants.

It was on one of these occasions she found
herself left behind, with the darkness rapidly
gathering over and around her, her cries un-
heeded by her school-fellows, and then, like
most children, having a dread of darkness,
she began to cry. The flowers she had
gathered had fallen from her hand, and lay
unheeded by her side, as she gat herself
down, absorbed in grief, with her little hands
spread over her face.





CHAPTER IL.

THE FAIRY.

FTER allowing her tears to flow un-
restrainedly for several minutes,
Katie withdrew her hands from
before her face to note once more the increas-
ing darkness, and to glance fearfully up at
the leaves of the tree, beneath which she sat,
which to her terrified little soul, appeared to
be talking and murmuring to one another,
and glancing down at her, as if they wondered
why she should sit beneath their shadow; it
was while in the act of withdrawing her gaze
from the chattering leaves, her eyes fell upon
the flowers she had gathered, and she fancied
that one of the blue-bells appeared much
agitated and disturbed, as flowers sometimes
do whev sme active little bees are busy at






4

THE BELLE OF THE BLUE-BELL. 13

work gathering honey; yes, the blue-bell
certainly moved, and Katie felt sure it was
much too late for a bee to be at work, and
she could not determine what caused the
flower’s evident agitation; her surprise and
wonder checked the current of her grief, and
with the exception of one or two little sobs,
which unconsciously to herself she could not
stifle, she remained perfectly still, watching
the blue-bell’s motions.

The cup of the pretty flower continued
shaking for several moments as though con-
vulsed by some internal cause, but suddenly
subsided into stillness as there sprung from
its depths, to the very feet of the wondering
Katie, a tiny little creature, which she at
first took for a grasshopper, but soon dis-
covered to be a lovely Fairy, who was clothed
in a mantle of green, and had on a dress, the
colour and substance of rose-leaf; her hair
was of the very finest gossamer, and of a
brilliant gold colour; while her eyes were as
bright as the stars when they first appear in
the sky, or rather like dew-drops when the
early morning sun shines upon them, only

not so large as dew-drops are. In her hand
B



14 SPIRITUAL VISION.

she carried a wand which seemed to have
been taken from the bell of a lily; while
from her shoulders spread a pair of wings, like
unto those of the butterfly, only more delicate.

You may be sure Katie’s wonder increased
as she recognised this little creature to be a
fairy; she had never seen one before, but
had read about them, and thought of them
very frequently, as good and benevolent little
creatures, who had lived in the green fields,
and woods, and green lanes of merry England
a long, long while ago; so long ago, that she
had never heard of one person who had ever
seen any; and, like other people, who were
wiser than she was, had thought them all
dead, or at least gone away to some happier
country than England.

She did not know that it is only the pure
in heart who have the power to see fairies,
and that rarely after childhood is this purity
sufficiently retained to enable men and women
toseethem. The world scatters so much dust
on the heart and in the eyes, that we cannot
see clearly, till the angel of death comes and
blows it all away again, and restores to us
our lost purity and sight.



SILVERY SPEECH. 15

No sooner had the Fairy released herself
from her temporary abode, and adjusted her
dress and mantle, and spread out her wings,
than she mounted herself on Katie’s knee,
and smiled at her so bewitchingly, that Katie
instantly desired to take her in her hand,
and nestle her in her bosom; but with a
wave of her wand the Fairy, who appeared
to discern what was passing in Katie’s mind,
cried quickly, “ No, no, you must not touch
me, or at least not yet.”

What a sweet silvery voice the lovely little
creature had!—not loud or shrill, but soft,
clear, and silvery; every word she uttered
was instantly heard. She continued—

“So, Miss Katie, I have you in my power
at last. I’ve been trying for many weeks,
and have only sueceeded to-night; I sent all
my subjects to lure your school-fellows away
home, so that you might be left behind, and
my exertions have been so great, that I am
quite overcome with fatigue.”

And seating herself, her little arms drop-
ped by her side, and her little bosom heaved,
and she panted, as human creatures do
when wearied with great labour; but she



16 “JUST ONE KISS!’

was only pretending, for Fairies never know
what it is to be tired; and seeing the look of
concern steal over Katie’s face, all semblance
of fatigue quickly vanished, and she smiled
as bewitchingly as before, and Katie again
felt the desire to take her to her bosom, but
was restrained by the Fairy’s resolute “No,
no.”

“Just one kiss,” pleaded Katie.

“Well, only a very gentle one.”

And very gentle Katie was as she took
the little creature up in her hand and softly
kissed her.

“And now,” said the Fairy, as she again
stood on Katie’s knee, “do you know who I
am? and why I have so laboured to get you
into my power ?”

“No, but I feel you must be very good,
and also that you do not mean to do me any
harm.” Katie spoke quite confidently.

“Did you ever think there were such tiny
creatures as myself in this great world ?”

“No, but I have often, oh! very often,
dreamed about you; but I never mention
what I dream to anybody; I did so once, but
Miss Smith, one of our teachers, said, ‘ Stuff



THH FAIRY QUEEN, 17

and nonsense! the child’s stomach is out of
order.’ ”

“Ah! you must not mind what Miss
Smith says, she only thinks about eating, and
how much she can eat, and never dreams.”

“ But tell me who you are,” said Katie.

“T am the Queen of a number of Fairies,
and we devote our time to the service of
lonely little children, whose lives are very sad,
and who have no friends to care for them and
love them in this hard world. We cannot
do anything for them in the daytime, but at
night we climb up on their pillows and whis-
per in their ears, and then they dream about
beautiful places, where children are happy all
_ day long, and never weep or feel lonely; and
they dream, too, of those who once loved
them, but who have died and left them.”

“Then, it is you,” said Katie, “that makes
my mother come to me every night and speak
to me, and love me, and kiss me, as she used
to do before they took her away and hid her
in the dark ground ?”

«Yes, I have taken you under my special
protection, and every night I pay you a
special visit.”



18 THE OAK-OPENING.

“Oh! you darling,” cried Katie, “I must
give you another kiss.”

The Fairy permitted Katie to have another
kiss, and then said, “Come with me, and I
will show you my domains, where I am ab-
solute Queen ;” and dismounting from Katie’s
knee, she tripped lightly over the grass, or I
should rather say, she stepped from blade to
blade, round to the other side of the oak,
beneath which they had held their conversa-
tion; and there, to Katie’s increased wonder-
ment, appeared at the roots of the tree a
large opening, which she never recollected
to have seen before, although she had passed
and repassed it many times.

As she entered the opening there stretched
before her bewildered gaze, a long and beau-
tiful tract of country of the most lovely de-
scription, and filled with trees and flowers of
the most delicious perfume and colour. There
were flowers of all varieties, very many of
which Katie had never seen before; and
what was most strange, although Katie did
not think so, was to see the flowers of differ-
ent seasons, all blooming and growing side
by side—the snowdrop, crocus, violet, rose,



FAIRYLAND. 19

lily, heart’s-ease, and many others were in
the choicest and rarest condition, sparkling
with dew-drops; not a single weed or nettle
was to be seen, while the rose trees were
without thorns; and in the green leaves of
the trees sat birds who sang sweeter than
Katie had ever heard birds sing before; a
gentle and refreshing breeze fanned the cheek.
and a clear, yet soft light revealed all the
beauties of this lovely place; and the light
proceeded from stars, larger and more pure
and lustrous than any which shone upon
earth; and amid it all could be heard the
murmuring of brooks and waterfalls.

Katie drew a long breath as she thought,
« Ah, how I should like to live here!”

“Perhaps you may, one day,” said the
Fairy, who knew all her thoughts.

“ And is this Fairyland?” inquired Katie,
as she stooped down to smell a rose, and then
glanced upward to watch a bird in a tree just
over her head; “and are these real flowers ?
and is that a live bird? and is it always as
beautiful as this ?”

“ Yes, yes, yes, my flowers never fade, and
my birds never die; they live forever!”



20 BLOSSOMS OF PARADISE.

“Forever!” dreamily echoed Katie, look-
ing up at the stars.

“Yes, forever!” repeated the Fairy.

“ And where do you get all these lovely
flowers from ?” inquired Katie.

“These are all the souls of little children,
whose lives were lonely and sad; my subjects
wait round them till they die, and then they
bring their spirits here, and plant them, and
they directly spring up into these lovely
flowers.”

This answer did not seem to surprise Katie,
but it made her withold her hand from pluck-
ing a lily, while she said, “I always thought
flowers must be alive, because they seemed
so to enjoy being flowers; and they used to
whisper many things to me as I gathered
them; but when I once asked Miss Smith if
they were, she said I must be crazy to ask
such a question, yet still I thought they
were.”

“Yes,” said the Fairy, “all these were once
little children.”

There was a few moments’ silence as they
threaded their way in and out among the
lovely flowers, Katie holding her frock closely



EXPRESSING SURPRISE. 21

round her, lest she should brush one in pass-
ing; and when the Fairy again looked up
into her child companion’s face, she saw that
her eyes were filled with tears, and she said
with some surprise, “ Why do you cry ?”

“Because,” replied Katie, “I am sad in
thinking how many lonely and unhappy
children there have been, and still are in the
world.”

“Well, now,” said the Fairy, as she held
her head on one side reflectively, “you do
surprise me; does not the mere fact of your
knowing there are other children whose lives
are as lonely as your own, make you feel
happier ?”

“Oh! no,” replied Katie, “I was happy
in thinking that although I was very wretched
and sad, that perhaps I was the only one,
and that all other children were as happy
and gay as the summer days.”

“We live and learn,” sighed the Fairy, in
a musing tone; then added, with her usual
sprightly vivacity, “but come, time is pass-
ing, and I want you to see that there are
others even worse off than yourself;—this

2)

way!





CHAPTER III.

THE PRISONER.

RIPPING forward, the Fairy preceded

Katie into a little arbour or summer-
# house, entirely composed of rose
leaves, with the exception of the window,
which, although somewhat resembling glass,
was more clear and transparent. On entering,
the Fairy touched the window with her wand,
and then bade Katie look through.

Katie did so; and she saw the low and
narrow stone cell of a prison, through the
iron bars of which streamed, in a flood of
silver glory, the light of the moon, revealing
to her gaze the tiny form of a ragged boy
~erouching in one corner, who had evidently
been trying to obtain sleep, but was apparently
too cold to receive so great a consolation, for





THE CRIME OF POVERTY. 23

his half-naked limbs shivered, as he looked
fixedly up at the moonbeams with a rapt and
awe-struck gaze. Katie, following the direc-
tion of his look, saw a wonderful vision of
beautiful angels who were beckoning to the
boy, and smiling upon him sweetly. It was
this vision which made his gaze so rapt. The
boy stretched forth his arms as though eager
to answer the angels’ silent call; but at that
moment a cloud passed over the face of the
moon, and the beautiful vision was blotted
out; and as the cell became dark, a low plain-
tive cry or wail of sorrow smote upon Katie’s
ear. Turning her eyes brimful of tears to the
Fairy Queen, she exclaimed—

“Oh, why is he there ?”

“Because,” replied the Fairy, “he had no
home, and was very poor, and very hungry,
and very cold; and you must know that in
England it is considered a crime to be either
poor, or homeless, or hungry ; he was all three,
and so they sent him to prison. I did all
I could to save him, but was just a few
minutes too late. It happened in this wise:—
he had been crouching in door-ways all day
for shelter from the bitter cold wind, and the



24 BREAD OF AFFLICTION.

hail and snow, but had been driven away
from every place by those big creatures you
call policemen ; so when night came and the
cold increased, and the wind rose higher and —
sharper, he crept into an empty shutter-box,
if possibly he might obtain a little warmth,
and there he fell asleep. One of my subjects
heard him, and immediately hastened and
informed me of his loneliness ; I putan extra
leaf over my shoulders, and set out to see who
he was; but the wind was high, and caught
my extra wrapper so strongly that it retarded
my progress, and when I did arrive at the
shutter-box, I found a policeman, who had
been attracted by the noise he made, in the
act of hauling him out and marching him off
to prison; and one of those hard men you
call magistrates, because the boy was a little
boy, and was so guilty as to be without a
home, said he must go to prison for four
weeks, and work all day, and sleep in the
cell in which you saw him every night. How-
ever, I don’t think he will remain there so
long; for the angels want him, and every
night they beckon to him, and he will soon
go to them, and forget all his hunger and cold.”



KATIE GRIEVES. 25

As I have said, Katie had a sensitive heart,
and this little recital of the Fairy made it
very sad, and she wished she had the power
to make all children happy. Wiping the
tears from her eyes, she again looked through
the window,







CHAPTER IV.

LITTLE ORPHANS.

HE scene had changed, and instead of
a prison cell, she sawa poor wretched
room, evidently an attic, as on one
side the ceiling, broken through in several
places, sloped down almost to the floor;
the walls had no pictures hung upon them,
but were black with smoke and dirt; the
room itself was entirely bare of furniture—
there were no chairs and no table; the fire-
place was rusty, and without a fire; while
through the half-opened door of a cupboard,
no food could be seen on its shelves.

In one corner of this miserable room, lying
on some coarse sacks, were two children very
scantily clothed, and bearing on their little
thin cheeks the traces of tears; they were






ROUGH SIDE OF LIFE. 27

very young, not more than five years old,
but were all in all to each other, and clung to
and loved each other with that unselfish but
tenacious affection which orphan children
sometimes exhibit. Life had shown to them
only its rough and cruel side ; they were quite
alone in the world; their father had gone
away, they knew not whither, and their
mother had been dead and buried for more
than a week; a broker, by the landlord’s
direction, had taken away all their pieces of
furniture; a kind neighbour had given them
the sacks on which they were lying, while
the landlord reluctantly permitted them to
remain in the room until it was let. The
kind neighbour who had given them the sacks
sometimes gave them a little food, but very
seldom, as she had a large family of her own
for which to provide; but for three days this
good woman had not been near. them, as she
was out at work.

The little girl, for they were boy and girl,
had once or twice left her brother asleep, and
crept down the stairs into the street to beg
some food for him; for he had said on each
occasion, and even once or twice in his sleep,



28 A LOVING PAIR.

“Sissie, hungry! Sissie, hungry!” Once she
was successful; a man who was carrying a
loaf had broken off and given her the top.
That day the two children had made a most
splendid feast, and in spite of the cold, had
even laughed over their meal of dry bread,
and would sometimes stop, even with their
mouths full, and hug each other; but usually
the little girl returned from these expeditions
as empty-handed as she went, and with an
increased look of care, and age, and want in
the blue eyes and pale face.

This day they had had nothing to eat, and
the weather was extremely cold, so they lay
on their coarse sacks, and nestled close to
each other for warmth, the sister clasping
her arms lovingly round her brother, and the
brother his round his sister; so they lay all
day, sometimes crying with hunger and cold,
and sometimes so happy as to fall into a brief
sleep.

When Katie saw them they were awake,
and looking up through a rent in the roof at
the blue sky, which was deepening into even-
ing twilight, and the little boy was saying—

“Sissie, what be Love ?”



HOME WITH LOVE. 29

“Something very good.”

“Will it make I warm ?”

“Oh, so warm!”

« And will it give I bread ?”

“ Lots !”

“T not cry any more, if Love come !”

“One day it will come to Arty.”

“Where be it 2?”

“T do not know.”

“Be it up there, Sissie 2?” and he pointed to
the little rift of blue sky.

“ Perhaps.”

“T like to go up.”

« Arty shall, one day.”

“They lay quite still for a little time; a
strange expression was stealing over each
face. Presently the little boy exclaimed—

“Look, Sissie, look! love see us!” and he
pointed to a star which was peeping into
their room. The sister did not answer, and
the boy stretching out his hands to the star,
cried, “I come! Arty come! Sissie come,
Love!” After which his arms dropped by his
side, and all was still, The angels had car-
ried them away to where Love lives, to warm
them and to feed them.



30 PUT TO SILENCE.

Katie sobbed convulsively now, and said
to the Fairy, “ Do not show me any more; I
shall never think myself lonely again, and
murmur because no one loves me.”

But the Fairy replied, “Look once more.”

And Katie looked,









CHAPTER V.

WoRK! worK! work!

HE scene had again changed. It was
an early winter’s morning, the snow
was falling fast, and the large
feathery flakes had been falling all night, for
it lay deep on the side paths, and in the
roads of a large manufacturing town. There
was a loud clamour of bells in the air; and
out from the door-ways of poor wretched
houses, into the narrow lanes and streets,
issued troops of little children of all ages.
But amid them all there was none of the joy-
ousness, and fun, and frolic of childhood;
there was no playful snow-balling, and no
merry shouts of laughter. Silently they hur-
ried along in the cold and the snow, looking
like troops of ghosts. A strange look of






32 CAREWORN CHILDHOOD.

weariness gleamed out from the eyes and
face of each one, as though they had been
up all night, and had had no sleep.

Some appeared to be lame, and dragged
their limbs painfully along in the deep snow;
some were, bent as though with age; and
some put their hands up to their head, as
though a great pain were there which nothing
could ease; and many of the little frames
were racked with a distressing cough, which
told fearfully of some insidious and deadly
disease which was making rapid progress.
Not in one of the many hundreds who hur-
ried along could be seen a single gleam of
childhood; age and care had stamped their
seal upon the face and form of each, long
before happier children had left their nur-
series.

Katie watched them as they all entered
large monster-looking buildings, from whence
soon issued the noise and clang and clamour
of machinery, the fierce bellowing and roar-
ing of steam, as though hundreds of demons
were rejoicing over the little victims who had
‘been entrapped into their power, and were
creating as much noise and uproar as possible



MOLOCH. 33

that their cries might not be heard. Katie
saw into the monster buildings, and could
see the children, who never had had any
childhood, toiling, toiling, toiling all day
Jong; and as the hours crept on, the look of
weariness and age deepened and became more
intensified.

When the clamour of bells again re-
sounded through the air, and the demons
stopped their roaring and bellowing, the
children trooped out and returned slowly
home; and when they arrived there, some
were too weary to eat, but instead, lay down
on the floor, and instantly fell asleep; some
dropped off with their basins of porridge in
their hands, some crouched down by the fire,
and stared dreamily into the live coals,
Katie noticed that over the faces of some
who lay asleep a smile of pleasure flitted, as
though some lovely vision had appeared, and
carried the sleepers away into Fairyland ; but
the smile seemed so out of place on the
wearied and worn little faces, that it was
painful to behold. But Katie was pleased to
see that some of those who had fallen asleep
never woke again. Good angels had taken



34 FAIRY FROLIC.

them away where there was to be no more
work,

Resolutely turning her face away, Katie
said to the Fairy Queen, “Show me no more,
you have made me very sad; all I have seen
has sunk deep into my heart. I never knew
there was so much sorrow and sadness in the
world. JI thought mine was the worst; now
I know that there are others who suffer more
than I have ever done; forgive me, dear
Fairy, I will never murmur again.”

“Nay,” said the Fairy, tripping lightly out
from the arbour of rose-leaves, “come into
my garden and smell the flowers, and forget
all your sadness.”

And they went into the lovely garden, and
they played among the flowers, chasing each
other in and out among them, and merry
peals of laughter and merriment were soon
heard. But in the midst of it all, while Katie
was hunting for the Fairy Queen, who had
hidden herself in a tulip, she heard her name
loudly called, and a shout of many voices;
and instantly the garden all vanished from
her sight, and she found herself standing be-
neath the oak-tree, with the stars looking



DISENCHANTED. 35

down upon her, and her teachers and some
of the elder scholars surrounding her.

“Oh! where is the lovely garden, and the
Fairy Queen ?” cried Katie, moving round to
the other side of the oak; but no opening
was there, and instead of the pleasant tones
of the Fairy Queen, she heard Miss Smith’s
coarse and decided voice, saying, “There, I
told you she was crazy! Come along home,
you have been here quite long enough;”
and seizing her by the hand she hurried her
back to school regardless of her tears and
cries, while her schoolfellows followed won-
deringly behind.

Katie had not been missed till the time it
was usual for the younger scholars to be put
to bed, when a hue and cry was raised, and
many went back to search for her, and found
her where she was last seen. They said she
had fallen asleep; Katie would never believe-
that, but invariably said she had been to
Fairyland.





CHAPTER VI.

ONLY TIRED.

"HE next morning Katie was too un-
well to leave her bed; there was a
lassitude and weariness which had
crept over her limbs during the night, and
sapped up all their strength. The doctor
was called, but he could not account for it,
although he put on a wise look, and said,
“ She will be well in a few days. Keep her
quiet.” But the few days passed over, and
‘Katie was not better; on the contrary, more
indisposed. She suffered no pain, but surely
as the days passed, so surely did each one
leave her weaker than it had found her. &A
very serene and peaceful look had stolen over
her little face, which gradually grew thinner
and thinner.






INVALID AND NURSE. 37

Her schoolmistress inquired if there was
anybody she would like to have sit by her,
and whether she would like her bed moved
to another room ; and Katie had the bed re-
-moved to aroom and put close to the window
from whence she could see the oak-tree; and
thought she should like Nellie, one of her
school-fellows, to sit by her. And Nellie,
who was very quiet, came and sat by the bed
day after day, with Katie’s hand in hers;
and she heard all about the visit to Fairyland,
the wonderful sights which were there seen,
and speculated with the little invalid, as to
what the fairies were doing while she was
lying there, whether they ever thought of her
now that she never ran in the fields, and
whether they felt the hot sun in summer, and
the cold frost and wind in winter; and Katie
told her all about her mamma, and how she
still saw her in her dreams, and had even
heard her whisper, “ Courage, my darling! I
am always watching you, and one day we
shall be with each other again.”

The bright summer days glided on, the
beautiful flowers bloomed and faded, and the

fruit iv orchards began to ripen fast, and yet
D



38 ONLY TIRED.

Katie did not seem to grow better; on the
contrary, she grew weaker, and felt more
wearied and tired. Her school companions
came in to see her every day, and spoke
kindly and affectionately to her, some even.
brought her little bunches of flowers, many
were sorry that they had neglected to show
her kindness when she was with them in the
school and playground.

On each visit they paid, she would plant
her little elbow on the pillow, and lean her
head in her hand, and answer their greetings
with a pleasant smile, and say in answer to
their inquiries, “Thank you, I am very well
—there is nothing the matter with me, only
I am so tired; to-morrow, perhaps, I shall
not feel so.” Then they would kiss her, and
go away; some with tears in their eyes,
which Katie observing, would turn to Nellie
and say, “Why do they cry? Iam not ill,
am I?”

“ Only tired, darling,’ Nellie would reply,
furtively wiping a tear from her own check.

“Only tired, that’s all,” Katie would
dreamily murmur, and then lie quite still
looking up into the blue summer sky, while



WRITING TO SISTER. 39

the merry shouts and laughter of her school-
fellows at play, would be faintly borne in at
the open window.

“Are you writing a letter, Nellic, dear 2?”
inquired Katie one day, as she watched her
friend’s pen travel quickly over the paper.

“ Yes, dear, I am writing to my sister.”

“Ah!” sighed Katie, “it must be very
nice to have a sister; I sometimes wish I
had one.”

“JT will always bea sister to you. Darling,
don’t ery.”

“Tam not crying, Nellie, dear, I was only
thinking how lonely it was not to have a
single relative in the world.”

“Don’t think of such sad things, Katie, think
only of things that are bright and beautiful.”

“Oh! but Icannot, Nellie. The sad things
come without my asking them.”

“You must drive them away by something
bright.”

“ And what are you saying in your letter,
Nellie?” inquired Katie, after a few minutes’
silence.

“JT am writing about you, darling,” was
the reply, with a bright smile.



40 “SEND MY LOVE.”

«But your sister does not know me, dear,”
advanced Katie.

“Oh! yes, she does, for I have mentioned
you before, and she is so concerned about
you, that she begs to hear all about my dear
friend, Katie.”

“How kind,” said Katie, with a bright
light in her eyes; “is your sister like you,
Nellie ?”

“She is much better than I am, and much
wiser, and is so kind and gentle in all her
ways, that everybody loves her,” said Nellie,
softly and lovingly.

How beautiful it is for one sister to praise
another, to see the other through a halo of
love and loving memories, to always carry
her image in the heart surrounded by warm
and loving thoughts, and to recognise in her
a better and wiser being, to whom she can
look for sympathy and love in trouble and
sorrow.

“Send my love to your kind sister, Nellie,
and tell her I long very much to know her.”

“Yes, darling, I will, and I am sure it will
please her very much indeed,” said Nellie, as
her pen travelled rapidly over the paper.



VERY MUCH PUZZLED, 41

The doctor came every day to see Katie ;
but, as before remarked, he did not know
what to think of her; he was puzzled, very
much puzzled, but like a great many other
people when they do not understand a thing,
he continued to look wise, and shook his
head, and knitted his brows in a very know-
ing manner; every morning he felt her pulse,
and looked at her tongue, and talked very
grandly and learnedly about the “ Nervous
System,” the “Prostration of the Nerves,”
and so on; yet, with it all, his little patient
did not improve, and this so irritated him,
that he began to grow cross.

“Come, come,” he would say, as he knocked
his walking stick on the floor of the room in
a very energetic manner; “come, come, not
up yet; this will never do; do you intend
lying in bed all your life, young lady ?”

“ Not if I can possibly help it, doctor,” re-
plied Katie, wistfully.

“ Well, then, how is it you are not running
about at play ?” said the doctor, with an-
other energetic knock.

“ Because I can’t; don’t be cross, doctor !”
replied Katie, with a smile.



42 THE DOCTOR HAS IT,

“Dear me,” said the doctor to himself, as
he blew his nose loudly; “dear me, what can
I do for her? I never saw suchacase. I
believe if I gave her all the physic in my
surgery, bottles and all, she would not be a
whit better. A most extraordinary case
this !—most extraordinary indeed! Let me
think, let me think ;” and the doctor walked
backwards and forwards in the little chamber,
with his walking-stick under his arm, and
one finger raised to his forehead in a very
profound and impressive manner.

After a few turns up and down the room,
he suddenly clapped his hands together, ex-
claiming—“ I have it! I have it! Young
lady,” he continued, standing at the foot of the
bed, you must take a dose or two of joy, a dose
or two of happiness,a dose or two of pleasure!”

“Dear me!” cried the schoolmistress, who
had entered the room, “ wherever can I find
a chemist who has such articles ?

“Nevertheless, madam,” said the doctor,
emphatically, “those are the tonics she re-
quires; they will brace her up, they will
drive out that weariness from her limbs ;—in
short, they will restore her to health.”



NOVEL REGIMEN, 43

“But you surprise me, doctor,” answered
the schoolmistress ; “how am I to procure
such tonics? What would you recom-
mend ?”

“Dish her up a relative or two,” said the
doctor, drawing on his gloves.

“A relative! Dish up! Good gracious,
doctor, how you talk,” cried the astonished
schoolmistress, with uplifted hands, and wide
open eyes.

“Yes, madam, I repeat it,” said the doctor,
seizing his hat; “Dish her up a relative or
two; not one with a heart as hard as a flint,
anda nature as narrow and sharp as the edge
of a carving knife, but one with a large heart,
a heart overflowing, gushing with love, affec-
tion, and tenderness. It is my belief, madam,
that all these kind of illnesses which afflict
young creatures like her, are caused because
they are starved for want of love and human
compassion. If people would not bottle up
their love, or lock it up in a box, and throw
away the key, there would be less of misery
among the tender ones of the earth. Look out
of that window madam,” continued the doctor,
pointing with his stick,—look out of that



44. VISITORS ANNOUNCED.

window, I say,—is the earth starved by its
Maker? No! See, it is flooded with beauty,
and literally covered with the evidences of
its Creators overflowing love. Why, then,
should you deprive those for whom the earth
was made of love? Dish her up a relative,
madam,—dish her up a relative!” and the
energetic doctor stumped vigorously out of
the room, leaving the schoolmistress perfectly
petrified with surprise; and it was not till
the doctor had left the house, and was seen
striding across the garden, that she recovered
herself sufficiently enough to ejaculate—

“Bless my heart, doctor, she has not a
relative in the world!”

But at that very moment the servant ap-
peared at the door, saying—“ If you please,
ma’am, visitors for Miss Kate Merton !”







CHAPTER VII.

KATIE’S VISITORS.

“][SITORS for Miss Kate Merton!

oy “Some one the doctor must have
fall sent to be dished up, I think,

Nellie,” whispered Katie, “ or else the servant

must have made a mistake, for I have no

one who would care to visit me.”

“ Perhaps, dear,” said Nellie, with a smile,
“perhaps your good little fairy has been put-
ting it into some one’s heart to visit you.”

«But no one knows I am hear, Nellie,”
said Katie.

«“ Are you aware who your visitors are,
Miss Kate?” inquired the governess, who
had but just recovered from the combined
shocks the doctor’s prescription and the
announcement had given her.





46 SO NICH TO BE LOVED.

“T can’t think who it can be, miss, un-
less ie

“Unless what, child 2”

“Unless it is papa. But I don’t think it
can be him,” said Katie, shaking her head.

“Why not, child? What can be more
natural? I wrote and informed him of your
illness,” said the governess, as she left the
room, and ran hastily downstairs.

Katie did not at all anticipate it was her
papa; she would have been only too glad,
and her little heart beat quickly at the
thought—if he had come to love her, but she
had never known a caress, a kind word, or a
loving smile to be bestowed upon her by him.
No, it could not be her papa.

“I hope, darling,” said Nellic, with a
bright smile, “that it is some one who will
love you at first sight, for it is so nice to
be loved.”

“YT think it must be, Nellie,’ said Katie
quietly ; “but till you loved me a little, I
never knew what it was after dear mamma
left me.”

“Darling, I do not love you a little, but
ever so much,” said Nellie.





FOOTSTEPS ON THE STAIL. 47

“ How much, Nellie,” asked Katie.

“So much, darling, and some over,” re-
plied Nellie, putting both arms round Katie’s
neck, kissing her little mouth, and laying her
face beside hers on the pillow.

How sweetly pretty they looked, with their
hair mingling, their cheeks touching, and
nestling lovingly together. What a beauti-
ful thing is human love, what pleasure it
gives, what happiness it bestows, how bright
it makes everything appear! My dear young
readers, if you are blessed by being sur-
rounded by those who love you, thank the
good God for it; and the best way you can
thank Him is by showering love on others,
especially those whose lives are dark because
they have it not.

“T hear footsteps on the stairs,’ said
Nellie, raising her head from the pillow,
and unclasping her hands from Katie’s
neck,

“Who can it be,” whispered Katie, wonder-
ingly.

The schoolmistress was the first to appear,
and she was saying to some one following
behind—* This way, sir, if you please—this



48 KATIE AND THE STRANGER.

?

way.” And immediately afterwards a gentle-
man was in the room.

At the first glance Katie knew it was not
her papa, yet the face seemed familiar; she
fancied she had seen it before, especially the
eyes, but where, she could not imagine. It
was, however, a very kind face, full of
strength, character, and thoughtful tender-
ness.

“This is the little lady, sir,’ said the
schoolmistress, pointing to Katie; and then
beckoning to Nellie to follow, she left the
room, and Katie and the stranger were alone
together.

The stranger advanced to the beside, and
kneeling down that his face might be on a
level with that of the little invalid’s, he took
one of her wee frail hands in one of his own,
—where it nestled very confidently—and
then gazed at her with a face so full of pity-
ing love and tenderness, that Katie felt half
inclined to hold up her mouth for a kiss.

“Can you guess who I am, Katie?” said
the stranger in gentle tones.

“No, sir; and yet I somehow fancy I have
seen you before, but I am not sure,”



A REVELATION 49

“Did you ever hear your dear lost mamma
speak of some one named Harold ?”

“No, sir, I do not recollect; but I was so
young when she died,” said Katie wonder-
inely.

“What! did she never speak of a brother
who loved her dearly ?”

“Oh! yes,” said Katie, with a bright smile;
“he went across the seas.”

“Well 2?” said the stranger, with a meaning
look.

A sudden light broke on Katie’s mind, and
she exclaimed—

“ Are you my dear mamma’s brother 2?”

“Yes,” said the stranger.

“Oh!” cried Katie excitedly, “you must
be, for you have dear mamma’s eyes, and
dear mamma’s smile. And will you love
me? Will you be very kind to mé 2”

“TJ will, indeed, my darling child, for my
dead sister’s sake and for your own,” and he
folded her to his breast in a most loving
embrace.

“ And will you take me away, and let me
live with you, and love you, so that I may

not be lonely any more ?”
E



50 LOVING RELATIVES.

“T have come on purpose, dear child. You
shall be my own little girl, and no one shall
part us.”

“Oh! how happy I shall be. Why, uncle,
I already feel stronger !”

“But I have another happiness for you;
some one else to love you, and whom you
are to love.”

“Oh! uncle dear, I shall be too happy,”
murmured Katie.

Her uncle left the room, and in a few
minutes returned, hand in hand with a most
beautiful lady, to whom Katie immediately
held out her arms, and was soon crying and
laughing with her face buried in her bosom.

“Oh, oh! how happy I am, my heart will
burst. And will you really be my mamma ?
and when may I go home with you? Oh!I
shall love you,” cried Katie.

A consultation was held with the school-
mistress—who sent for the doctor—as to
whether Katie could be removed. When
the doctor came, he gave it as his opinion
that no bad results would follow if she were
taken away at once; nay, he said, it would
make her a new creature. So in a very brief



DISHED UP. ot

time Katie had bidden farewell to her school-
fellows, who were sorry to see her go, espe-
cially Nellie, who had grown to love her very
dearly. Her newly-found aunt seemed to
know Nellie, for she kissed her as an old
acquaintance.

“How did you find me out, dear auntie ?”
inquired Katie, as she lay in the railway
carriage, while being whirled to her new
home.

“We heard through your friend Nellie’s
sister, of a poor, little, lonely girl, lying ill at
school, with no one to care for her, and we
were so sad, and yet interested, that we in-
quired whom she was; and when we heard
her name, your uncle said, ‘Can it be my
dear sister’s child?? And he hunted up
your papa, and found it really was so; and
your papa gave him permission to carry you
away from school to live with us. And now,
darling, you must soon get strong and well,
for we shall love you as if you were our own
child.”

Katie’s new home was a marvel of beauty.
It stood in the centre of a large garden,
which was filled with flowers, where the



52 IMPROVING.

bees gathered honey all the day. Katie had
a prettily-furnished bedroom all to herself,
where the sweet perfume from the flowers
came in at the open window; and in the
parlour a soft little couch was placed for her
sole use, while her. uncle bought her a small
bath-chair, in which to be wheeled about the
garden, and he himself would wheel her,
while her aunt walked by its side with one
of Katie’s hands clasped in hers. Katie
already began to look brighter, and she
fancied herself stronger, and thought she
should soon be able to run about again.
Meanwhile, many were the long and pleasant
chats she had with her kind uncle, who told
her stories of his life over the seas in far
away lands.

One afternoon she lay in her bath- ener
with her uncle seated on one side, and her
aunt on the other, who was busy doing some
needle-work.

“Uncle,” said Katie, “you once told me
that nothing really beautiful, or worth hav-
ing, could be got without toil and suffering.”

«Yes, I did, dear.”

“Well, will you tell me how it was you



A PROMISED STORY. 53:

toiled for dear auntie; for is she not beauti-
ful and worth having ?”

“Yes, indeed, Katie,” said her uncle with
fervour, while a blush spread over her aunt’s
face.

“ How did you win her, then, uncle ?”

“Well, if you listen, I will tell you a story,
and then you will know.”

“Hold my hand, uncle dear; there, now,
begin !”









CHAPTER VIII.

A ROSE,

7, noontide, one very hot summer day,
the sun darted down a fierce ray
on a dirty puddle of water in a
narrow street of a large manufacturing town.

“ puddle, as it felt the hot beam, ‘this is
growing past all endurance; I am almost
exhausted.’

“«Murmur not, whispered the sunbeam,
‘I am but refining you; you are nothing
better now than so much black filthy water,
a thirsty dog even would refuse to drink you
in your present condition; I wish to make
you pure, and to give you the power of im-
parting life, and not, as now, breathe out
disease and death.’






PURIFIED BY SUFFERING. 55

“<«Your intentions may be very good,’ re-
plied the puddle, ‘but the process! the pro-
cess is most painful; cannot you adopt
some more pleasant method in accomplishing
your wishes 2”

“‘No, friend? said the beam, ‘purity
cannot be attained but through suffering ;
that is the law, I assure you.’

“« All very well, I dare say, said the
puddle, ‘but I know nothing of law; I
only know what I feel; and this I know,
that when the moon kisses me her kiss
is soft and cool, not fierce and fiery like
yours.’

“No doubt there is a difference, replied
the beam; ‘but you should recollect, that I
eive health and strength and beauty—the
moon withdraws it,

«Well, well, that may be, said the puddle
impatiently, ‘but I know which is most
agreeable. I am quite content to remain
what I am, I have no desire to become
better, so I must request you to shift your-
self, and vex me no more.’

“ I have performed my mission, and in spite of



56 TRANSMUTATION.

your complaints, made you purer, and given
you new life.’

“So the sun continued to shine and to
dart down his fierce rays, until, by degrees,
the puddle was carried high up into the air,
where it floated like a faint white cloud, and
in that state continued wandering about
until the sun sank to rest, and night stretched
her dark curtain softly and silently over the
sky; then the stars came out one by one,
looking brightly down on the earth, lighting
little children to bed, and travellers on their
way; and the sailor, keeping his solitary
watch at sea as his vessel ploughed through
the water, looked up at them and thought of
the dear ones left at home, and wondered if
they were thinking of him.

“One little star hovered over a garden and
saw arose beginning to die, and wishing to
save it, said to the cloud, ‘ There is a dying
rose down in that garden just under you;
will you preserve its life ?’

«<«Willingly,’ said the cloud, ‘but how am
I to reach down so far? the distance is so
great, I dare not drop or I should lose myself.’

“<*T will assist you,’ said the star; and



SWEETS TO THE SWEET, 57

darting a ray into the very centre of the
cloud, it carried down, depositing in the
rose a dew-drop.

«Ah! how refreshing!’ said the rose,
drawing a long breath; ‘I thought I was
dying, but now I feel strong again.’

“ And it drank up the dew, and opened its
leaves a little wider, so that when the sun
awoke and flushed all the sky, and crowned
the distant hills with light, it held up its
head proudly, for it was the most beautiful
one in the garden.

“When the sun had travelled more than
one-half his journey, a sweet girl of seventeen
tripped lightly into the garden, and when she
saw the flower she exclaimed, ‘Oh! what a
lovely rose ;’ and burying her delicate nose
in the leaves, closed her eyes and inhaled the
perfume luxuriously.

««T will wear this to-night ;’ and picking
it, she held her head first on the one side,
then on the other, that she might examine
its beauties the better. A faint flush stole
into her cheeks, a sweet smile played over
her face, and in her eyes, as she whispered,
as though to herself alone, ‘He once said I



58 THE COUSINS.

was like a rose; ah! but he leaves to-night,
—the smile died away, and a tear-drop fell
on the rose.

“*Not so refreshing as the dew,’ murmured.
the flower, ‘but far more precious,’

“Tn a very large old-fashioned room of a
country house there were assembled a num-
ber of individuals, all related the one to the
other: there were fathers, mothers, brothers,
sisters, uncles, aunts, and cousins; they had
come from far and near, and had gathered
together to spend a pleasant evening, and
bid one of their number farewell, who was
going to a far distant land to seek—what so
many seek and never find—a fortune; and
this was the last time perhaps he would sce
so great a number of his friends. His name
was Lionel, and he moved about among them
all with a hopeful and resolute smile upon
his face, albeit his heart ached some-
what.

“Although there were so many who claimed
his attention, he had eyes for only one out of
the bevy of fair cousins who were assembled,
and she was the sweet girl of seventeen, who
wore no ornament save a rose placed in the



HAND IN HAND. 59

bosom of her simple white dress. And in-
deed she required no jewels, for nature had
been so bountiful as to lavish her treasures
upon her, and make her so beautiful that all
ornament appeared unnecessary. Her eyes
were a lovely soft brown, veiled with long
black lashes, and over-arched by black eye-
brows; her cheeks were as delicately white
as the pearl, her form rounded and graceful
as that of the fawn, while her hair was as
bright, and of the same colour, as a horse
chestnut when fresh from the pod. No
marvel Lionel had eyes for her alone.

“Later on in the evening, Lionel and this
fair young creature strolled out into the gar-
den. The stars seemed to shine brighter as
they saw them walking side by side, while
the soft winds whispered, ‘ How lovely, let us
blow upon them gently.’ Hand in hand they
walked in silence until Lionel said brokenly
and abruptly —

“ shall see you for years—may I take hope
with me, cousin dear 2’

“She made -no reply, but taking the rose
from her dress she pressed it to her lips, at



60 LOVERS’ VOWS.

the same time stealing a glance at her cousin’s
face from beneath her downcast and half-
veiled eyes.

“Give me that rose, dearest, entreated
Lionel, ‘it has touched your lips, and if you
give it me I shall feel you give me hope with
it, and I want it; it will impart courage, and
give me strength to win wealth and fame to
lay at your feet.’

“*TVionel,” said the young girl softly,
tremblingly, yet firmly—‘ Lionel, I will ever
remain true to you; if that is the hope you
want, take it, for I know you are brave and
true-hearted, and I do not care so much for
you winning wealth and fame, so long as
you are brave and noble, and do what is
right,’

“She gave him the rose, and looked into
his eyes with such a bright light in her own,
that it seemed as though two beautiful angels,
named Hope and Trust, darted down into his
heart, and made it their abiding-place.

“«This will aid me in doing right—I will
never part from it, said Lionel.

“Brighter shone the stars, softer blew the
winds, and the flowers looked up inquiringly,



THE TEMPTER AT WORK. 61

as they heard and saw the parting of these
two young creatures.

“Mine is an enviable lot, said the rose,
as it felt its leaves plucked asunder and
placed one by one in a little gold locket—‘J
am. to help a man to keep in the straight path,
and though I die, I will retain my fragrance’

“Gallantly the stout ship sailed across the
seas, and firmly Lionel trod the deck, while
his spirit looked forward to the new world
where he was to fight the battle of life, and
he resolved to fight it bravely, that the dear
one at home might hear his name mentioned
with pride.

« But if ever youth thinks to strive man-
fully and bravely to do what is right in the
world, there are always lions and ravenous
beasts in the way, or evil spirits to lure him
down to destruction.

«<«Will you take a quiet glass with me ?’
said one, ‘the day is hot, and a few glasses
will do you no harm.’ The drink looked
enticing, and Lionel was thirsty.

“Come, said the tempter, ‘I pledge the

dear ones at home.’
F



62 ASSAILED ANEW.

“ Lionel stretched out his hand to take the
offered glass, when a locket fell from his open
vest. ‘No,’ he said, firmly, withdrawing his
hand and turning away.

“* Afraid’ laughed a mocking voice.

“* Afraid echoed the wind.

“« Brave!’ whispered the imprisoned rose-
leaves.

«<« Will you take a turn with these ?’ said
another, rattling the dice box in his hand—
‘just a few throws for a small sum, it will
while away the time; come, you are no longer
a boy.’

“*No, said Lionel, with his hand on the
locket as it rested on his bosom, ‘no, I have
resolved never to play.’

“*Coward!’ cried a sneering voice.

“*Coward!” echoed the waves, as they
beat against the vessel.

“¢ Brave!’ whispered the imprisoned rose-
leaves.

“«Try him again, we must not lose him, he
has money and brains,’ muttered the evil spirit.

“Onward sailed the good ship, bravely
ploughing through the waters, until she
reached the land of promise,

.



TRIUMPHANT RESISTANCE. 63

“«Money, money, I have came here to
gain heaps,’ said Lionel, as he strolled about
the strange city.

- “*T will show you how to win it speedily,
whispered one in his ear, ‘look, see how easy
my plan is!’

“Ves, yes, I see, said Lionel, ‘but your
plan will not do for me, it will soil my fingers,
and stain my soul, and burden my conscience ;
besides it will bring others to ruin, and may
be break many hearts; no, I will work hon-
estly for my money, and try to injure no one.’

“«Coward!’ shouted a voice.

«« Brave !’ murmured the imprisoned rose-
leaves.

“How could I dare think of her with
guilt on my soul?’ said Lionel, as he pressed
the locket to his lips.

««She is worth all the money in the
world,’ said the rose leaves.

“«True, replied Lionel, ‘and must be won
bravely and honestly.’

“Time rolled on, and Lionel toiled man-
fully with hands and brain, and began to
heap up riches; yet still he found time to
minister to the wants of others; he relieved



64 SOMEBODY COMING.

distress, comforted those in sorrow, spoke
consolation to the broken-hearted, and
pleaded for the erring. Thus blessings fell
around his path, and upon his heart, as dew
upon thirsty flowers.

“Not only am I doing my duty, but I am
winning her!’ said Lionel.

“<«True,” murmured the imprisoned rose-
leaves, ‘good actions springing from pure
motives are never wasted: work on, the re-
ward is close at hand.’

“Time rolled on. The sweet girl of seven-
teen had changed into graceful womanhood ;
but her heart had not changed, it was whole,
and true, and pure. The roses had budded,
and bloomed, and faded many times when
she once tripped along the garden walks, her
form more graceful, her brown hair cluster-
ing in massy waves, and her soft brown eyes
filled with a light like that seen in the
twilight skies.

“«He is coming home!’ she whispered,
looking up at the evening star.

“«Tam lighting him on his way,’ replied
the star, looking brightly down.

“The shadows deepened, the winds



FAITHFUL LOVE REWARDED. 65

breathed softly, the flowers folded themselves
for the night, and the birds hushed their
singing, as she glanced timidly and shyly up
into the bronzed features and earnest eyes of
the manly form before her. The eyes full of
earnest love gazed down into the sweet face.

“<«T have returned, dearest, and my heart
is as truly yours as it was when we parted
long years since; see, 1 have your rose still,
and he showed her the locket.

“*T have been true to you, Lionel,’ she
whispered softly, while two tear-drops, which
had their source in joy and happiness, stole
into her eyes.

“Then, dearest, we will never more be
parted, but be happy forever, said Lionel,
kissing away the tears.

«Yes, happy ! whispered the stars.

“* Happy !’ echoed the wind.

“*Happy! murmured the dreaming
flowers.

“<«Fappy !’ sighed the imprisoned rose-
leaves.”

When the story was ended, Katie ex-
claimed—“ Ah, uncle, you were Lionel!”



66 THE RIDDLE IS READ.

“Yes, dear, but not half so good as I ave
made him out to be.”

“We think differently, do we not, Katie ?”
gaid her aunt with a smile,







CHAPTER IX,

A DAISY’S MISSION.

ATIE told her kind aunt and uncle
all about her visit to Fairyland, and
they increased the pleasurable re-
coliections of that memorable evening by
their earnest sympathy with what she saw.
They were too wise to laugh at her and say
she was crazy, as Miss Smith had done.
True wisdom sometimes consists in genuine
sympathy. They both affirmed that there
must be many fairies in the world if people
could but see them.

“But I have only seen a fairy once,” said
Katie,

“ And should you like to see the little lady
again ?” inquired her uncle.

“JT should indeed, uncle dear.”





$8 HOUSEHOLD FAIRIES.

“Well, darling, I believe you will see her
again if you really wish it; they pay a visit
to everybody once in their lives, and if those
they visit treat them kindly, obey their
counsel, and follow their instructions, they
will visit them again and again.”

“Tam so glad to hear that, uncle; I was
afraid they had most of them left England.”

“No, dear, they have not all disappeared ;
they reside in every city street, in every
town, and country village; but some people
are too much in a hurry to see them, others
make too much noise, and then when those
who do see them say they have done s0,
they laugh and turn it all to ridicule.”

“What a pity,” said Katie, with a sigh.

“Yes, darling, it is, for I believe every
house may have one or more fairy.”

“Has your house one, uncle ?”

“Yes, I am rejoiced to say it has,” replied
her uncle.

“ And what does it do for you ?”

«Why, it whispers kind thoughts to my
heart and to your auntie’s. If Iam cross and
feel inclined to say unkind and cruel words
—for words can be very cruel—it comes and



KATIE THINKS. 69

taps at my heart, and says, ‘ think how kind
so and so has always been to you, how,
when you were sick, you were so kindly and
affectionately tended ;’ and then the fairy
takes away all the cruel words, and puts
loving ones in their place, and smoothes out
the wrinkles from my brow, and impresses a
smile there instead.”

“ And what is your fairy’s name, uncle ?”

“T think we call her Love, do we not,
dear ?”

“Yes,” replied Katie’s aunt, with a very
bright smile, and such an affectionate light
in her eyes, that Katie almost believed there
was a fairy of the same name looking out of
each.

There was silence for a few minutes.
Katie was thinking how strange it was that
a fairy should have such a name as Love, a
something, she thought, which always resided
in good and kind people’s hearts.

Katie did not know that there are a large
family of fairies which have names that are
like emotions and qualities which dwell in
the heart and mind of men and women, and
boys and girls. For instance, there is Fairy



70 THE WILL AND THE WAY.

Good-thought, Fairy Kindintention, Fairy
Unselfish, Fairy Hopeful, and many, many
more, with similar names, all of which will pay
visits to little girls if they will but invite them,
and treat them kindly when they come.

“ After all, uncle,” said Katie, breaking
silence, “I think more of what my queen
fairy showed me than of the fairy herself.
All those scenes where little children suffered
so, and they no older than I am. Do you
think, uncle, there are many little, poor little
children like those ?”

“T am afraid there are, my dear,’ said her
uncle sadly, “many more than we have any
conception of.”

“Oh! how much I should like to make
some of them happy,” said Katie, clasping
her hands ; “but I am so little, I can do no-
thing,” and tears gathered in her eyes.

“No, darling, not too little,” said her
uncle, kissing her, “if you only have the
desire, the way will surely follow. Even a
little daisy can do good, much more a little
human, loving heart ?”

“A daisy, uncle! how can that be? It
neither moves nor speaks.”



THE DAISY’S SOLILOQUY. 71

“Tf you will listen, I will tell you what a
daisy once did; there is nothing, dear child,
in this world, but what can be turned into
usefulness.”

Having said which, Katie’s uncle drew his
chair nearer to her couch, and commenced—

“*Now, this is what I call pleasant and
comfortable,’ said a daisy, one early summer
morning, as the wind carried a leaf down
from an elm tree, and covered without touch-
ing it. ‘This is what I call delightful: I
have quenched my thirst by drinking all the
dew which fell on me during the night, and
am quite refreshed, and now that this friendly
leaf has been kind enough to shield me from
the burning sun, I have a cool and shady
bower where I can sit and think all day long,
watch my neighbours, and, when so disposed,
converse with them. The sun is very cheer-
ful the first thing in the morning, when its
warm beams kiss me slantwise, but at mid-
day, when it pours down all its fire on my
unprotected head, I find it too much, more
indeed, than a wee, tiny flower like myself
can endure; but, thanks to this good leaf, I
am safe for the day.’



72 FLIOWER-LORE.

“Having thus given expression to her
feelings, the daisy settled herself to her own
satisfaction on her couch of green grass, and
looked forward to a day of quiet contempla-
tion, varied, if so inclined, by social inter-
course,

“This was a modest, sensitive daisy ; when
the sun saluted her on first rising, she blushed
a beautiful bright crimson, which appeared
so becoming, that mother Nature determined
it should always remain.

“But, alas! for the daisy’s day of antici-
pated enjoyment; she reckoned without once
thinking of two very wise sayings flowers
whisper among themselves: first, ‘ That we
do not grow solely for our own pleasure, and
second, ‘Be not sure of repose, a little hand
may pluck you, a rude foot may crush you,
and a big mouth eat you.’

“On the other side of the hedge, outside
of the meadow where the daisy bloomed,
stood a farm-house, the owner of which, and
his family, were so uncultivated as to rise
with the sun, and to go to bed with the same ;
they were not sufficiently refined to turn the
night into day, and the day into night, like



UNCULTURED AGRICULTURISTS. 73

unto the dwellers in great cities ; they were
so vulgar as to think that the day was meant
for work, and the night for sleep. They
were evidently behind the age.

“On this particular morning, the farmer
having set his men to work, seen the cows
milked, and the horses and pigs fed, walked
across the fields to see how his crops were
progressing, thinking they would be all the
better for a little rain, and not quite so much
sun,—for, as a rule, farmers are never satis-
fied with the weather, it is either too dry ot
too wet, too much sun or not enough, never
quite the thing—having done all this, the
farmer thought he had earned his breakfast,
orif he did not think so, he went home to
get it, which amounts to the same thing.
As he seated himself at the table; and cut a
thick slice of fat boiled bacon and a delicious
piece of home-made bread, he said to his wife :

«Well, dame, this be a fine day ; what say
you to adrive to see brother Jem at the jail ?
He promised to take us over if we chose to
go, and I have a fancy to see what the inside
of a prison is like; something different to a

meadow I take it: ar’t’ agreeable !’
G



74 PROPOSING A JAUNT.

«“¢Yes, John, replied the wife, ‘I’m will-
ing, and we'll take our Annie; she seems a
bit low, and the ride will do her good.’

««Then, wife,’ said the honest farmer, ‘ do,
you pack up a basket of victuals; and you
may as well pick a few flowers, they'll look
cheerful-like inside such a place.’

“Now, the farmer's youngest daughter,
Annie, hearing she was to ride with her
father and mother to visit her uncle and the
poor men shut up in prison, thought she would
gather some flowers likewise ; so, scrambling
down from her high chair, she toddled out of
the room into the garden, and creeping
through a hole in the hedge, she made her
way into the meadow, close to where the
daisy was seated under her leaf awning ; who,
at the moment Annie made her appearance,
was indulging in a wise chat with her next-
door neighbour, who had overheard her soli- *
loquy regarding the manner in which she
intended spending the day.

“«You know, friend,’ said this neighbour,
‘we are not sent into this world to make
ourselves comfortable, but to be of some

?

use,



RAETORICAL FLOWERS. 75

“«T can’t say I exactly see the force of
your observation,’ replied the first daisy ;
‘will you oblige by making it a little clearer,
and explain how I am to make myself useful,
when I find it impossible to move myself
from this place ?’

“* We are all intended for some wise pur
pose,’ replied the second daisy, sententiously ;
‘and will that wise purpose be fulfilled in
you, if you are dissatisfied with your lot, and
not with yourself? I overheard you mur-
mur at being exposed to the fierce rays of the
sun ; doubtless it is a fiery trial we have to
endure, but fiery trials bring out hidden
virtues, and those burning beams of which
you complain help to make us as beautiful
as we are; you will lose all your loveliness
if you remain under your bower,’

“But I see no reason why I should wish
for beauty,’ said the first daisy.

“<* Apart from the pleasure the fact of
your being beautiful would convey to your-
self, you have to consider how it will please
others, what delight it will impart to those
creatures so superior to ourselves, called
men; I have even heard that our quiet un-



76 TRANSPORTED,

obtrusive beauty has been sung by poets,
who have written poems and songs in our
praise. I heard one once beginning with—

** Wee modest, crimson-tipped flower.”

« «Yes, that’s all very well,’ replied the
first daisy ; ‘but I see no use in living as
you say I should, if at last I am to be eaten
by a cow or a sheep.’

“<«Provided we live well, and think and
act rightly, said the second daisy, ‘it does
not much matter what death we die; it is
not so much how we die, as how we live;
but who knows, your lot may be more for-
tunate than to go to help to make food for
man; your mission may be higher,’

“Just as the wise daisy uttered these
words, the farmer’s little daughter stooped
down and plucked them both, adding them
to a whole heap she held in her hand,
mingled with buttercups. Children prefer
these simple wild flowers to the rarest of
those that grow in gardens and conserva-
tories.

“The farmer and his wife were soon
seated in their light-cart, the one holding



AND IN PRISON. Ue

the reins and whip, while the other carried
a huge nosegay and a basket, from which
peeped the neck of a stone bottle. Little
Annie was packed in behind, her fat dimpled
hand still tightly clasping her buttercups
and. daisies.

““Dear me,’ gasped our friend the first
daisy, as she rode along, ‘ dear me, I shall be
stifled to death if this continues much longer ;
I really cannot bear it.

“Tt is foolish and weak to say you can-
not bear what it is your fate to bear; learn
the lesson of endurance, my friend,’ said the
second daisy, calmly. The other made no
reply, and in due time they left the cart, and
were transported, in a railway carriage, to a
large city, through the streets of which they
went, wondering whether the people they
met ever saw a wild-flower before.

“<«Sad, sad,’ murmured the second daisy,
‘no country ever comes here. What wretched-
ness! How impure the air!’

“ Presently they arrived at the iron gates of
the grim stone prison, and trembled with fear
as they saw them open, and heard them clash
to behind them.



78 SEEING THE JAIL,

“ ‘who ever can draw breath in such a fearful
place 2’

“The honest farmer and his wife, and Annie,
were kindly welcomed by their relative, who
was one of the warders of the prison. After
a little friendly chat and mutual inquiries
concerning friends, the warder took them
yound the men’s portion of the jail; and
much the farmer stared, and his wife, and
little Annie, as they peeped into the various
cells, and saw the prisoners.

“«T should like, said the farmer, ‘to give
them all a run in my fields, like I do the pigs.
How can they bear living here? Why, wife,
I should die!’

“Ay, John, so should I; I can’t sniff a
green field here.’

“ After being shown the dark cells, and the
different modes of punishment for refractory
prisoners, they were handed over to a female
warder, who took them round to examine the
women’s department.

“««This is more sad still, John,’ said the
farmer’s wife; ‘what must their mothers
think !—poor dears! They were all like our



A BAD ’UN. 79

Annie here, and the good creature wiped a
tear from her cheek, while her husband blew
his nose loudly, but said not a word, only
drew Annie a little closer to him as though
he would shield her from all future harm.

“« them into one, ‘is occupied by as pretty a
young woman as you could wish to see, but
she’s a,regular bad ’un, her heart’s as hard as
stone; she is that wicked that nothing will
ever do her good. The chaplain visits her
every day, but she only makes fun of him,
See, here! this is the fourth Testament he
has left for her, but she tears them all up,
and swears like as I never heard anybody
before, and I’ve heard a good many, I reckon ;
and yet she is only nineteen years of age.
She is undergoing punishment now, but will
be here again to-night.”

“© John,’ said the farmer’s wife, ‘I must be
off; I can’t bear any more of this. I’msure I
shall cry ; and my heart aches as it never did
when our Susan died. Come, Annie dear,’
and taking her little daughter up in her arms,
the good woman strode out of the cell, her
husband following.



80 LEFT BEHIND.

“They bade their brother farewell, and left
the prison, and hastened home, thinking that
if they lived a hundred years they should
never wish to see the inside of a jail again.

“When the farmer’s wife lifted little Annie
into her arms, the child dropped one of her
daisies, which fell on the stone floor of the
cell, and was left behind, the very identical
one whose anticipated day of enjoyment had
been so speedily brought to a close.

“*Dear, dear, how this fall has hurt me.
I tremble all over; how hard the floor is,
and how cold. I’m sure I shall die, and
and with no kind friend to hear my last
words. What a hard fate is mine! I won-
der what my wise neighbour would think if
she were in such plight. If we are made
perfect through suffering, ’m sure I ought
to be perfect, for never surely has any fellow-
daisy suffered as I have; yet, I don’t think
I should mind if it was for some good pur-
pose.’ Muttering thus the daisy lay quite
still, waiting for the end.

“As the day was drawing to a close, and
the light was growing dim in the silent cell,
& young woman was ushered in by the matron



THE CONVICT. 81

of the prison. She wore the coarse plain
prison dress, and her hair was cut short, but
it must have been very beautiful, for what
little there was left, shone like bright gold ;
her eyes were large and very blue, and her
face would have been lovely but for its fierce
and hardened expression, which told the
story of so much sin and crime which had
never been repented, and had only assisted
in making the heart harder and more averse
to good. The good chaplain despaired of
ever being able to touch it; all his prayers,
his exhortations, and grief, appeared of no
avail. ‘Nothing can do her any good,’ he
muttered, as he last left her cell, with her
mocking laugh ringing in his ears. ‘ But
what is man’s extremity, is God’s oppor-
tunity.

“ See her now, how restlessly she paces up
and down her narrow place of confinement,
more like a wild untamed creature of the
forest than a human being. But what is that
which suddenly arrests her footsteps, making
her gaze with surprise on one spot of the
stone floor? ‘How came that here?’ she
murmurs, as stooping down she picked up



82 CONTRITION.

the daisy which had fallen from little Annie’s
chubby hand.

“Watch how carefully she handles it, and
how gently she lays it on the palm of her
left hand. How softly shekisses it! What
is it that simple flower is whispering in her
ear? See! she is kneeling at the side of her
rough bed, her face works convulsively, and
tears are gushing from her eyes. Oh!
mystery of mysteries, that a tiny flower, a
little daisy, should have the power to find
the one crevice in that heart, so hardened by
sin and crime, penetrating to the fountain of
repentance and tears, and making the guilty
creature feel the depth of the degradation to
which she has fallen.

“As the hot drops fell upon the dying
daisy, she looked up to the sorrow-stricken
face; and did the daisy speak, or was it
some other voice that whispered in the for-
lorn woman’s heart—‘I bloomed in such a
- field as you played in when you were a child,
and before your soul was stained with sin,
when your mother loved you, and you had
not broken her heart and hurried her into
her grave by your conduct. Ah! how much



THE PRODIGALS RETURN. 83

you have to answer for! Weep on, weep on;
tears of repentance soften the heart, and help
to wash away its dark stains !’

“When the chaplain paid his customary
visit, he found her still kneeling and weep-
ing. She motioned him to read, and he read
the touching and hopeful history of the
woman who washed the good Saviour’s feet
with her tears and wiped them with her hair.
He then knelt beside the repentant woman,
and poured out his heart in prayer on her be-
half, to the good God who is willing to receive
all repentant prodigals.

“As the chaplain left the cell, he mur-
mured, ‘Alittle daisy! Truly, My thoughts
are not as your thoughts, nor your ways as
my ways, saith the Lord.”







CHAPTER X.

THE QUEEN FAIRY AGAIN.

HE beauty of summer was fast fading
away ; the flowers faded, withered,
and died; the defacing fingers of
autumn began to touch the leaves on the
trees, turning them sear and brown; and
high winds began to blow them from the
branches and whirl them about in the air, and
then let them fall in field and garden, on the
highway, and on the waters of rivulets and
rivers. Rooks became noisy in making pre-
parations for their journey to their winter
home.

To the great joy of her kind uncle and
aunt, Katie began to gain strength ; a little
of the lassitude left her small, fragile limbs ;
new life seemed to infuse itself into them ;






MUSING. 85

and with new life new strength. She had
taken some of the old doctor’s prescription.
She could walk about the room for a few
minutes at a time, much to her own delight,
for she said to herself, “I want to get strong
again, for I have a purpose now for which to
live ; uncle says everybody—boy or girl, man
or woman—should have some purpose, and
mine is to make others happy, for there are
so many unhappy in this great world.”

It was a chilly autumn evening when
Katie thus spoke within her heart. Her
aunt and uncle had gone out on a visit, and
Katie was alone in the parlour. The cur-
tains were drawn before the window, but the
wind blew up against it, as if it wanted to
get into the room. A green log was burning
in the grate, from which the sap bubbled and
hissed quite musically.

Katie’s couch had been wheeled close to
the fire. She had been testing her renewed
strength, by walking several times up and
down the room, and now she was resting,
reclining on the couch, with her head propped
upon her hand, and her eyes dreamily gazing
into the bright sparkling flames.

H



86 HERE WH ARE AGAIN!

While thus lying and gazing, the fire, she
knew not how, seemed suddenly to resolve
itself into one bright, dazzling halo, and was
a fire no longer; and in the centre of the
halo appeared a fairy—certainly a fairy, it
was so very small.

Katie sat up and rubbed her eyes to make
sure they did not deceive her. Yes, there it
stood! it was no delusion of the sight! it
was a real living fairy! and, moreover, her
friend the Queen.

The Queen sprang from her halo of glory,
and jumped on to the pillow of Katie’s
couch. Katie saw she was clad in warmer
garments than those she wore when they
were first acquainted. She had a little fur
of moss round her tiny throat, and her
mantle was lined with the same material;
while her dress was composed of a dark, thick
kind of stuff, which Katie thought was manu-
factured from holly leaves, but she was not
quite sure.

“Tam come to pay you another visit,” said
the Fairy, as she seated herself on the pillow,

“You are very welcome, dear!” said
Katie.



A WELCOME GUEST. 87

“Are you sure lam welcome?” said the
Fairy, looking into Katie’s eyes (she saw a
bright reflection of her own image there),
“because we fairies do not like to visit where
we are not welcome.”

“Quite, quite welcome,” murmured the
delighted Katie, gently kissing the bright
little Queen. ,

“T am very glad,” said the Fairy. “ While
I am here, I will lay aside my mantle, or
I shall not feel its warmth when I go out
into the cold.”

The Fairy Queen took off her mantle, and
carefully folding it, laid it on one side; then
she looked so lovingly into Katie’s eyes that
Katie was compelled to kiss her again.

“How is your garden? Are there more
flowers than when I visited it?” inquired Katie.

“They increase every day, Katie,” replied
the Queen.

“Do so many children die, then?” said
Katie sadly.

“Die, dear! You must not say ‘die.’ They
only bloom into new life and happy life when
they pass away from home and friends.”

“But they leave their home; and kind



88 ONLY CHANGED.

fathers and mothers miss them, and cry for
them,” said Katie.

“Yes, dear; but still the children are not
dead, they only pass away to new life, new
beauty, and great happiness.”

Katie could not understand; she won-
dered whether it was a kind of realisation of
some verses her aunt had once read to her,
after they had been speaking upon the same
subject. She inquired of the Fairy and re-
peated the verses to her—

When little children droop and die,
And mothers’ eyes rain tears,

The little forms beyond the sky
Are guarded safe from fears.

The love which merely budded here,
A wee frail tendril fair,

A blossom, yet so sweetly dear,
Will bloom in beauty there.

Shielded so safe from every breath
Of chill, and cold, and frost,
Transplanted from this house of death,
They live, and are not lost.

«Yes, dear, your aunt and I mean the
same thing, only we put it in a different way,”
said the Fairy.





PHANTASMA. 89

“But I thought children helped to make
_ the world better,” said Katie.

“So they do,’ replied the Fairy.

“But how can that be, when they pass
away ?” questioned Katie.

« Because the children pass away to a new
and purer life,” said the Fairy; and when
they enter into that life, the hearts of men
and women turn towards it, and unseen cords
draw them to it.”

“JT don’t understand,” said Katie, with a
sigh.

“Then I will show you,” said the Fairy ;
and taking her wand, which lay by her side,
she waved it in the air.

And instantly there appeared before Katie's
astonished eyes, a bedroom, containing a tiny
bed, on which lay the still form of a little
child. Its eyes were closed, the face looked
very white, and the lips quite colourless. It
lay so still that Katie murmured “It is
dead !”

By the bedside kneeled a man and woman,
whose hands were clasped together, and
whose eyes were wet with tears. Suddenly,
Katie saw them hush their sobs, and raise



90 INVISIBLE TIES.

their eyes with a look of beaming love
Following the direction of their glance, she
saw a little child, clothed in white raiment,
and surrounded by a bright pure light. Its
face was radiant with happiness, and its
little arms were stretched out to the kneel-
ing man and woman. Katie noticed that the
child surrounded with light was the same,—
yet so changed,—as that lying on the bed;
and she, moreover, saw that fine—almost in-
visible—threads went up from the heart of the
man and woman, and were held in the hand
of the child, who seemed to be pulling them.

“T understand now,” said Katie, as the
vision faded away.

“So you see,” said the Fairy, replacing her
wand, “that children do not die, they are
only removed to a happier place.”

“T will never forget,” said Katie.

“But there are many children who will
not be removed, but will continue here; and
many of them are very sad and unhappy,
and I want all who have happy homes to
try and do a little to banish the misery of
those who have none. Every little boy and
every little girl can do something; if they



EXIT FAIRY. 91

will really try, many good fairies, my sub-
jects, will cluster round them and help them ;
let them only try. You have a happy home
now, Miss Katie,” continued the Fairy Queen,
* will you not try and do something ?”

“ Dear Fairy,” said Katie, “it has become
a settled purpose with me to do something
like what you urge; when I am able to run
about again, I mean to begin; now I can
only send out good wishes.”

“Good wishes are something,” said the
Fairy ; “every one that is breathed out into
the world helps to make it better; but good
words and good actions are more effectual.”

“TJ mean to try hard, Fairy dear,” said Katie.

“You are sure to succeed,” said the Fairy ;
“every one who tries does; meanwhile, I
must now bid you farewell, I have other
visits to pay.”

The Fairy resumed her mantle, and kissing
Katie on the lips, she vanished from her
sight, singing—

A Fairy I roam
In a world so sad,
Delighting to make
Hearts happy and glad ;



92 ENTER AUNTIE.

To banish sharp pain,
Give comfort and peace,

And joys of all childhood
To largely increase.

I enter all hearts,

And lead them to think
Of others who dwell

On misery’s brink ;

Of children whose lives
Have hunger for food,
And tears for all gladness,

And evil for good.

As the last lingering echoes of the Queen
Fairy’s song died away, Katie felt a hand
laid upon her shoulder, and looking up she
saw her aunt’s bright face and smiling eyes
—eyes that were always filled with the light
of love when they rested upon her.

“Why, auntie dear, when did you come
into the room; I never heard you?” said
Katie, with surprise.

“T have but this moment entered, darling,”
replied her aunt, bending down to kiss the
soft cheek.

“Did you see anything strange when you
entered, auntie dear ?”

“Nothing stranger than a wee, little girl



KATIE’S MYSTERY. 93

lying on a couch by a warm cheerful fire,
either asleep or dreaming.”

“ Not asleep, auntie,” said Katie, positively.

“Well then, dreaming.”

“TJ am not sure even of that, auntie.”

“ Not asleep, and yet not dreaming !”

“No; I have had a visitor while you and
uncle have been away.”

“A visitor! And who is there round
about here that knows my darling?” said
her aunt.

Katie’s face flushed, and her eyes sparkled
with fun, as she saw her kind aunt’s be-
wilderment and surprise.

“What is this I hear about a visitor 2?”
inquired the husband, who entered at the
very moment his wife exclaimed, “A visi-
tor !”

“Why, here is our Katie declaring she has
entertained a visitor while we have been
away.”

“T think, auntie, she entertained me, and
not I entertained her,” said Katie.

“Come, wife, let us sit down and hear all
about this mysterious visitor,” said Katie’s
uncle, handing his wife to a chair.



94 THE MYSTERY REVEALED.

“ What should you say, uncle,” commenced
Katie, “if I were to tell you I had received
another visit from my dear little Fairy
Queen ?”

“Say, darling,” replied her uncle, “ why, I
should say I am extremely sorry I was not
here to see such a darling creature.”

“Well, uncle, the Fairy has really been
here again !”

“And what did she find to say to my
Katie 2?”

“Oh! many things! I cannot remember
them all.”

“Was she glad to see you so much better?”
inquired her aunt.

“Yes, indeed she was, auntie; and she
hoped I would try, when I got really strong,
* to do a little good in this great world. She
seemed to think that there was a great deal
that even I could accomplish if I would only
try heartily.”

“There is indeed, darling,” said her uncle,
taking one of her little hands in his.

“But, uncle, whenever I think about it,
there seems so much that is wrong, that a little
thing like I am cannot even dare to touch it.”



POWER OF LOVE. 95

“Remember, Katie dear,” said her aunt,
what your uncle said about the little daisy.

** A daisy by the shadow that it casts
Protects the lingering dew-drop from the sun,”

Yes, auntie dear, I remember, and some-
times I resolve that nothing shall prevent
me from trying; but when I think of what
my kind Fairy showed me of the sorrow, and
misery, and pain there is, I grow faint-
hearted; besides, I am so poor.”

“My darling, it does not require riches; a
kind word, a loving glance, a tender caress,
a sympathising tone, can do more good than
many gold sovereigns or crisp bank notes,
Ab me! little hands and hearts and voices
have a wonderful power.”

“ Yes, yes,” murmured Katie’s aunt in an
absent tone of voice, as though she was think-
ing of little hands, which had once been active
and warm, but were now still and cold for ever.

“My dear,” said her husband gently, “ have
you sufficient courage to sing our little song.”

“T think I have, dear, although I have not
sung it for a long, long time.”

“TI know, darling, but I should like our



96 AUNTIE’S SONG.

new child to hear it; perhaps it will do more
than please her.”

The wife rose from her chair, and seated
herself at the piano, and after a few preli-
minary chords, commenced singing, in low,
soft tones, the following very simple song:

It needs not wealth to gladden hearts,
Bring smiles to careworn faces ;
The tender clasp of loving arms,
And childhood’s sweetest graces,
Have magic charms
No wealth can give,
To bid the sad
Heart breathe and live.

Dark clouds of care so often fall
On lives in town or city,
No charm can make the sun break through
Like childhood’s tones of pity ;
For magic charms,
In childhood’s voice,
Bid weary lives
Rejoice! Rejoice!

Ah! me, some lives go all astray
With passion’s baneful leading ;
‘What power can bring the wand’rers
Like childhood’s gentle pleading?

Dwells magic charms,
Few can resist,

In childhood’s face
And childhood’s lisp.



ALL GONE! 97

The lamps had not yet been lit, but in the
dusky twilight of the fire, as the song ended,
Katie saw her aunt’s head droop over the
key-board of the piano, while she felt her
uncle’s hand, which held hers in its grasp,
tremble, and noticed he shaded his eyes with
the other. The silence was only broken by
the hissing of the sap in the burning wood.
Katie wondered for a moment, and then
thought that the song she had just heard
must have set in vibration some painful
chord in the heart of her kind uncle and
aunt. Nestling closer she whispered—

“What is it, uncle dear? Did you ever
hear the voice and feel the caress about
which auntie has sung ?”

“ Once, darling,” replied her uncle in a low
voice.

“ All gone, uncle dear ?”

“Yes, buried in the deep, deep sea, but
alive in our hearts forever and ever.”

The fire burned merrily, and huge shadows
danced on the wall and ceiling, as Katie
relapsed into silence, but in her heart she was
saying —“TI will try and be to my kind

uncle and auntie all that their darling would
I



Full Text


vs vicDaatd. bye satel tiesrcheceall




The Baldwin Library







LIDighE KA Dam,

GA Fiuiry Story.

BY
CHARLES BRUCE,

AUTHOR OF THE ‘‘STORY OF A MOSS ROSE,” ETC., ETC,

EDINBURGH:
WILLIAM PB NIMMO.

1873.
EDINBURGH :
PRINTED BY M‘FARLANE AND ERSKINE,
(late Schenck & M‘Farlane,)
ST JAMES’ SQUARE,
TO

KATIE HAMILTON,

THIS LITTLE STORY IS DEDICATED,
WITH KIND LOVE,
AND THE HOPE THAT HER YOUNG LIFE WIL&
BLOSSOM OUT INTO TRUE BEAUTY
AND LOVELINESS,
BY

The Author.
CONTENTS.

PAGE
CHAPTER I.

ALONE, : 9 ; : . e 7
CHAPTER II.

THE FAIRY, : . 7 ee
CHAPTER III.

THE PRISONER, , . . ° 5
CHAPTER IV.

LITTLE ORPHANS, . : e > « 26
CHAPTER V.

worK! wWoRK! woRK! . : 5 >» ol

CHAPTER VI.
ONLY TIRED, ° ° . ° » 86
6 CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VII.
KATIE’S VISITORS, . ‘ .

CHAPTER VIII.
A ROSE, ; 5 .

CHAPTER IX.

A DAISY’S MISSION, 8 .
CHAPTER X.
THE QUEEN FAIRY AGAIN, e

CHAPTER XI.
AND LAST, « , 4 0



e)

@:

PAGE

45

54

67

. 84

99


LITTLE KATIE:

A FAIRY STORY.

CHAPTER I.
ALONE.

OW strangely sound the voices of

children heard in the fields at twi-

waged) Jioht, as half-frightened, they call
to their play-fellows, whom the increasing
darkness almost hides from their sight. It
was thus the voice of little Katie sounded,
as, standing beneath the wide-spreading
branches of a giant old oak, and half fright-
ened at finding herself alone, she shouted to
her school-fellows, who but a moment before
were playing at her side, but whom she now
saw ina distant part of the field; not clothed


8 LONELY LITTLE ONES.

in their old familiar aspects and shapes, but
gliding about like shadows, grim and por-
tentous, while the faint echo of their laughter
just reached her ear. No answering voice,
however, responded to her repeated cries, and
when the last dimly-discerned form had en-
tirely vanished from her sight, looking timidly
and fearfully round, Katie began to cry.

You must not think scornfully of Katie
because tears wetted her checks; she was
but a child, numbering only eight years in
age, and even those few years had been far
from happy ones; indeed her brief life had
been a very sad and lonely one—she knew
few of the joys of childhood, and although
she possessed a whole fund of laughter and
merriment in her little nature, yet circum-
stances had frowned so severely on the dear
child, that they had chilled them and forbade
them to flow; and as yet she had found no
human creature, whose beautiful human love
could set the streams free to cheer the sor-
rowful little heart.

It is very saddening to think that there
are many such lonely little lives; yet, let us
hope, that in every instance the good God
THE ANGELS WHISPER. 9

sees and knows of each one, and has a won-
derful store of happiness laid up for them for
a future day. Although this thought may
be vague and meaningless to my young
readers, yet it is very comforting to men
and women with tender hearts who feel
powerless to heal the sorrows of childhood.
Katie had no mother, and her father was a
cold, hard, and stern man, who cherished no
love for his little motherless girl. The recol-
lection of her mother was, however, still fresh
in Katie’s memory ; in sleep she still saw her;
those tender loving,eyes which had watched
her so often and so fondly when on earth,
came again to her in her dreams; and those
who sometimes passed through her room in
the night hours, and stayed for a moment to
gaze upon her, would remark a most happy
smile upon her thin face; then they would
murmur to each other, as they stepped
silently away, “an angel is whispering to her
in her sleep!”—for it is a beautiful fancy
with some people, that when children smile
in their sleep, bright angels are visiting them.
When morning dawned, and her eyes
opened to the light of day, the spell was
10 WHISPERS OF EVIL.

broken, the vision faded away; so night was
ever a happy time for Katie, and she felt
sorry it was not always night.

Katie inherited much of her mother’s sen-
sitive nature; hence, when God had taken
her mother up into His beautiful home, and
she lost the warm clasp of loving arms, and
the soft tones of her tender voice, she wan-
dered lonely and sad about her father’s
house, unloved and uncared for by any.
Every week her little cheeks grew thinner
and paler, and the servants began to whisper
among themselves, “She will surely die!”
Whether the import of these whispers reached
the father’s ears, or whether he wearied of
seeing his lonely little daughter—whose
silent presence must have been a constant
reproach—is not known, but he suddenly
determined to send her to school; and to
school Katie was accordingly sent.

Being, however, so much accustomed to
solitude, Katie could not feel herself at home
among so many girls; she shrunk timidly
from the approaches which many of them
made towards acquaintanceship; the more
boisterous among them she carefully avoided,
QUEER WAYS. 11

and she could not prevent herself from ner-
vously starting if spoken to by any of the
teachers. All these several traits in her cha-
racter were not comprehended; her teachers
thought her dull and stupid, and her school-
mates strange, very strange. Thus it came
to pass that Katie found herself as much
alone at school as she had been at home. In
all the sports and. pastimes indulged in by
her school-companions, in the lovely green
fields, she would sit apart and watch, or
would ramble away by herself and gather
flowers, which was ever an unfailing source
of delight; perhaps the lovely flowers spoke
to her and answered to her unuttered thoughts
and wants.

It was on one of these occasions she found
herself left behind, with the darkness rapidly
gathering over and around her, her cries un-
heeded by her school-fellows, and then, like
most children, having a dread of darkness,
she began to cry. The flowers she had
gathered had fallen from her hand, and lay
unheeded by her side, as she gat herself
down, absorbed in grief, with her little hands
spread over her face.


CHAPTER IL.

THE FAIRY.

FTER allowing her tears to flow un-
restrainedly for several minutes,
Katie withdrew her hands from
before her face to note once more the increas-
ing darkness, and to glance fearfully up at
the leaves of the tree, beneath which she sat,
which to her terrified little soul, appeared to
be talking and murmuring to one another,
and glancing down at her, as if they wondered
why she should sit beneath their shadow; it
was while in the act of withdrawing her gaze
from the chattering leaves, her eyes fell upon
the flowers she had gathered, and she fancied
that one of the blue-bells appeared much
agitated and disturbed, as flowers sometimes
do whev sme active little bees are busy at



4

THE BELLE OF THE BLUE-BELL. 13

work gathering honey; yes, the blue-bell
certainly moved, and Katie felt sure it was
much too late for a bee to be at work, and
she could not determine what caused the
flower’s evident agitation; her surprise and
wonder checked the current of her grief, and
with the exception of one or two little sobs,
which unconsciously to herself she could not
stifle, she remained perfectly still, watching
the blue-bell’s motions.

The cup of the pretty flower continued
shaking for several moments as though con-
vulsed by some internal cause, but suddenly
subsided into stillness as there sprung from
its depths, to the very feet of the wondering
Katie, a tiny little creature, which she at
first took for a grasshopper, but soon dis-
covered to be a lovely Fairy, who was clothed
in a mantle of green, and had on a dress, the
colour and substance of rose-leaf; her hair
was of the very finest gossamer, and of a
brilliant gold colour; while her eyes were as
bright as the stars when they first appear in
the sky, or rather like dew-drops when the
early morning sun shines upon them, only

not so large as dew-drops are. In her hand
B
14 SPIRITUAL VISION.

she carried a wand which seemed to have
been taken from the bell of a lily; while
from her shoulders spread a pair of wings, like
unto those of the butterfly, only more delicate.

You may be sure Katie’s wonder increased
as she recognised this little creature to be a
fairy; she had never seen one before, but
had read about them, and thought of them
very frequently, as good and benevolent little
creatures, who had lived in the green fields,
and woods, and green lanes of merry England
a long, long while ago; so long ago, that she
had never heard of one person who had ever
seen any; and, like other people, who were
wiser than she was, had thought them all
dead, or at least gone away to some happier
country than England.

She did not know that it is only the pure
in heart who have the power to see fairies,
and that rarely after childhood is this purity
sufficiently retained to enable men and women
toseethem. The world scatters so much dust
on the heart and in the eyes, that we cannot
see clearly, till the angel of death comes and
blows it all away again, and restores to us
our lost purity and sight.
SILVERY SPEECH. 15

No sooner had the Fairy released herself
from her temporary abode, and adjusted her
dress and mantle, and spread out her wings,
than she mounted herself on Katie’s knee,
and smiled at her so bewitchingly, that Katie
instantly desired to take her in her hand,
and nestle her in her bosom; but with a
wave of her wand the Fairy, who appeared
to discern what was passing in Katie’s mind,
cried quickly, “ No, no, you must not touch
me, or at least not yet.”

What a sweet silvery voice the lovely little
creature had!—not loud or shrill, but soft,
clear, and silvery; every word she uttered
was instantly heard. She continued—

“So, Miss Katie, I have you in my power
at last. I’ve been trying for many weeks,
and have only sueceeded to-night; I sent all
my subjects to lure your school-fellows away
home, so that you might be left behind, and
my exertions have been so great, that I am
quite overcome with fatigue.”

And seating herself, her little arms drop-
ped by her side, and her little bosom heaved,
and she panted, as human creatures do
when wearied with great labour; but she
16 “JUST ONE KISS!’

was only pretending, for Fairies never know
what it is to be tired; and seeing the look of
concern steal over Katie’s face, all semblance
of fatigue quickly vanished, and she smiled
as bewitchingly as before, and Katie again
felt the desire to take her to her bosom, but
was restrained by the Fairy’s resolute “No,
no.”

“Just one kiss,” pleaded Katie.

“Well, only a very gentle one.”

And very gentle Katie was as she took
the little creature up in her hand and softly
kissed her.

“And now,” said the Fairy, as she again
stood on Katie’s knee, “do you know who I
am? and why I have so laboured to get you
into my power ?”

“No, but I feel you must be very good,
and also that you do not mean to do me any
harm.” Katie spoke quite confidently.

“Did you ever think there were such tiny
creatures as myself in this great world ?”

“No, but I have often, oh! very often,
dreamed about you; but I never mention
what I dream to anybody; I did so once, but
Miss Smith, one of our teachers, said, ‘ Stuff
THH FAIRY QUEEN, 17

and nonsense! the child’s stomach is out of
order.’ ”

“Ah! you must not mind what Miss
Smith says, she only thinks about eating, and
how much she can eat, and never dreams.”

“ But tell me who you are,” said Katie.

“T am the Queen of a number of Fairies,
and we devote our time to the service of
lonely little children, whose lives are very sad,
and who have no friends to care for them and
love them in this hard world. We cannot
do anything for them in the daytime, but at
night we climb up on their pillows and whis-
per in their ears, and then they dream about
beautiful places, where children are happy all
_ day long, and never weep or feel lonely; and
they dream, too, of those who once loved
them, but who have died and left them.”

“Then, it is you,” said Katie, “that makes
my mother come to me every night and speak
to me, and love me, and kiss me, as she used
to do before they took her away and hid her
in the dark ground ?”

«Yes, I have taken you under my special
protection, and every night I pay you a
special visit.”
18 THE OAK-OPENING.

“Oh! you darling,” cried Katie, “I must
give you another kiss.”

The Fairy permitted Katie to have another
kiss, and then said, “Come with me, and I
will show you my domains, where I am ab-
solute Queen ;” and dismounting from Katie’s
knee, she tripped lightly over the grass, or I
should rather say, she stepped from blade to
blade, round to the other side of the oak,
beneath which they had held their conversa-
tion; and there, to Katie’s increased wonder-
ment, appeared at the roots of the tree a
large opening, which she never recollected
to have seen before, although she had passed
and repassed it many times.

As she entered the opening there stretched
before her bewildered gaze, a long and beau-
tiful tract of country of the most lovely de-
scription, and filled with trees and flowers of
the most delicious perfume and colour. There
were flowers of all varieties, very many of
which Katie had never seen before; and
what was most strange, although Katie did
not think so, was to see the flowers of differ-
ent seasons, all blooming and growing side
by side—the snowdrop, crocus, violet, rose,
FAIRYLAND. 19

lily, heart’s-ease, and many others were in
the choicest and rarest condition, sparkling
with dew-drops; not a single weed or nettle
was to be seen, while the rose trees were
without thorns; and in the green leaves of
the trees sat birds who sang sweeter than
Katie had ever heard birds sing before; a
gentle and refreshing breeze fanned the cheek.
and a clear, yet soft light revealed all the
beauties of this lovely place; and the light
proceeded from stars, larger and more pure
and lustrous than any which shone upon
earth; and amid it all could be heard the
murmuring of brooks and waterfalls.

Katie drew a long breath as she thought,
« Ah, how I should like to live here!”

“Perhaps you may, one day,” said the
Fairy, who knew all her thoughts.

“ And is this Fairyland?” inquired Katie,
as she stooped down to smell a rose, and then
glanced upward to watch a bird in a tree just
over her head; “and are these real flowers ?
and is that a live bird? and is it always as
beautiful as this ?”

“ Yes, yes, yes, my flowers never fade, and
my birds never die; they live forever!”
20 BLOSSOMS OF PARADISE.

“Forever!” dreamily echoed Katie, look-
ing up at the stars.

“Yes, forever!” repeated the Fairy.

“ And where do you get all these lovely
flowers from ?” inquired Katie.

“These are all the souls of little children,
whose lives were lonely and sad; my subjects
wait round them till they die, and then they
bring their spirits here, and plant them, and
they directly spring up into these lovely
flowers.”

This answer did not seem to surprise Katie,
but it made her withold her hand from pluck-
ing a lily, while she said, “I always thought
flowers must be alive, because they seemed
so to enjoy being flowers; and they used to
whisper many things to me as I gathered
them; but when I once asked Miss Smith if
they were, she said I must be crazy to ask
such a question, yet still I thought they
were.”

“Yes,” said the Fairy, “all these were once
little children.”

There was a few moments’ silence as they
threaded their way in and out among the
lovely flowers, Katie holding her frock closely
EXPRESSING SURPRISE. 21

round her, lest she should brush one in pass-
ing; and when the Fairy again looked up
into her child companion’s face, she saw that
her eyes were filled with tears, and she said
with some surprise, “ Why do you cry ?”

“Because,” replied Katie, “I am sad in
thinking how many lonely and unhappy
children there have been, and still are in the
world.”

“Well, now,” said the Fairy, as she held
her head on one side reflectively, “you do
surprise me; does not the mere fact of your
knowing there are other children whose lives
are as lonely as your own, make you feel
happier ?”

“Oh! no,” replied Katie, “I was happy
in thinking that although I was very wretched
and sad, that perhaps I was the only one,
and that all other children were as happy
and gay as the summer days.”

“We live and learn,” sighed the Fairy, in
a musing tone; then added, with her usual
sprightly vivacity, “but come, time is pass-
ing, and I want you to see that there are
others even worse off than yourself;—this

2)

way!


CHAPTER III.

THE PRISONER.

RIPPING forward, the Fairy preceded

Katie into a little arbour or summer-
# house, entirely composed of rose
leaves, with the exception of the window,
which, although somewhat resembling glass,
was more clear and transparent. On entering,
the Fairy touched the window with her wand,
and then bade Katie look through.

Katie did so; and she saw the low and
narrow stone cell of a prison, through the
iron bars of which streamed, in a flood of
silver glory, the light of the moon, revealing
to her gaze the tiny form of a ragged boy
~erouching in one corner, who had evidently
been trying to obtain sleep, but was apparently
too cold to receive so great a consolation, for


THE CRIME OF POVERTY. 23

his half-naked limbs shivered, as he looked
fixedly up at the moonbeams with a rapt and
awe-struck gaze. Katie, following the direc-
tion of his look, saw a wonderful vision of
beautiful angels who were beckoning to the
boy, and smiling upon him sweetly. It was
this vision which made his gaze so rapt. The
boy stretched forth his arms as though eager
to answer the angels’ silent call; but at that
moment a cloud passed over the face of the
moon, and the beautiful vision was blotted
out; and as the cell became dark, a low plain-
tive cry or wail of sorrow smote upon Katie’s
ear. Turning her eyes brimful of tears to the
Fairy Queen, she exclaimed—

“Oh, why is he there ?”

“Because,” replied the Fairy, “he had no
home, and was very poor, and very hungry,
and very cold; and you must know that in
England it is considered a crime to be either
poor, or homeless, or hungry ; he was all three,
and so they sent him to prison. I did all
I could to save him, but was just a few
minutes too late. It happened in this wise:—
he had been crouching in door-ways all day
for shelter from the bitter cold wind, and the
24 BREAD OF AFFLICTION.

hail and snow, but had been driven away
from every place by those big creatures you
call policemen ; so when night came and the
cold increased, and the wind rose higher and —
sharper, he crept into an empty shutter-box,
if possibly he might obtain a little warmth,
and there he fell asleep. One of my subjects
heard him, and immediately hastened and
informed me of his loneliness ; I putan extra
leaf over my shoulders, and set out to see who
he was; but the wind was high, and caught
my extra wrapper so strongly that it retarded
my progress, and when I did arrive at the
shutter-box, I found a policeman, who had
been attracted by the noise he made, in the
act of hauling him out and marching him off
to prison; and one of those hard men you
call magistrates, because the boy was a little
boy, and was so guilty as to be without a
home, said he must go to prison for four
weeks, and work all day, and sleep in the
cell in which you saw him every night. How-
ever, I don’t think he will remain there so
long; for the angels want him, and every
night they beckon to him, and he will soon
go to them, and forget all his hunger and cold.”
KATIE GRIEVES. 25

As I have said, Katie had a sensitive heart,
and this little recital of the Fairy made it
very sad, and she wished she had the power
to make all children happy. Wiping the
tears from her eyes, she again looked through
the window,




CHAPTER IV.

LITTLE ORPHANS.

HE scene had changed, and instead of
a prison cell, she sawa poor wretched
room, evidently an attic, as on one
side the ceiling, broken through in several
places, sloped down almost to the floor;
the walls had no pictures hung upon them,
but were black with smoke and dirt; the
room itself was entirely bare of furniture—
there were no chairs and no table; the fire-
place was rusty, and without a fire; while
through the half-opened door of a cupboard,
no food could be seen on its shelves.

In one corner of this miserable room, lying
on some coarse sacks, were two children very
scantily clothed, and bearing on their little
thin cheeks the traces of tears; they were



ROUGH SIDE OF LIFE. 27

very young, not more than five years old,
but were all in all to each other, and clung to
and loved each other with that unselfish but
tenacious affection which orphan children
sometimes exhibit. Life had shown to them
only its rough and cruel side ; they were quite
alone in the world; their father had gone
away, they knew not whither, and their
mother had been dead and buried for more
than a week; a broker, by the landlord’s
direction, had taken away all their pieces of
furniture; a kind neighbour had given them
the sacks on which they were lying, while
the landlord reluctantly permitted them to
remain in the room until it was let. The
kind neighbour who had given them the sacks
sometimes gave them a little food, but very
seldom, as she had a large family of her own
for which to provide; but for three days this
good woman had not been near. them, as she
was out at work.

The little girl, for they were boy and girl,
had once or twice left her brother asleep, and
crept down the stairs into the street to beg
some food for him; for he had said on each
occasion, and even once or twice in his sleep,
28 A LOVING PAIR.

“Sissie, hungry! Sissie, hungry!” Once she
was successful; a man who was carrying a
loaf had broken off and given her the top.
That day the two children had made a most
splendid feast, and in spite of the cold, had
even laughed over their meal of dry bread,
and would sometimes stop, even with their
mouths full, and hug each other; but usually
the little girl returned from these expeditions
as empty-handed as she went, and with an
increased look of care, and age, and want in
the blue eyes and pale face.

This day they had had nothing to eat, and
the weather was extremely cold, so they lay
on their coarse sacks, and nestled close to
each other for warmth, the sister clasping
her arms lovingly round her brother, and the
brother his round his sister; so they lay all
day, sometimes crying with hunger and cold,
and sometimes so happy as to fall into a brief
sleep.

When Katie saw them they were awake,
and looking up through a rent in the roof at
the blue sky, which was deepening into even-
ing twilight, and the little boy was saying—

“Sissie, what be Love ?”
HOME WITH LOVE. 29

“Something very good.”

“Will it make I warm ?”

“Oh, so warm!”

« And will it give I bread ?”

“ Lots !”

“T not cry any more, if Love come !”

“One day it will come to Arty.”

“Where be it 2?”

“T do not know.”

“Be it up there, Sissie 2?” and he pointed to
the little rift of blue sky.

“ Perhaps.”

“T like to go up.”

« Arty shall, one day.”

“They lay quite still for a little time; a
strange expression was stealing over each
face. Presently the little boy exclaimed—

“Look, Sissie, look! love see us!” and he
pointed to a star which was peeping into
their room. The sister did not answer, and
the boy stretching out his hands to the star,
cried, “I come! Arty come! Sissie come,
Love!” After which his arms dropped by his
side, and all was still, The angels had car-
ried them away to where Love lives, to warm
them and to feed them.
30 PUT TO SILENCE.

Katie sobbed convulsively now, and said
to the Fairy, “ Do not show me any more; I
shall never think myself lonely again, and
murmur because no one loves me.”

But the Fairy replied, “Look once more.”

And Katie looked,






CHAPTER V.

WoRK! worK! work!

HE scene had again changed. It was
an early winter’s morning, the snow
was falling fast, and the large
feathery flakes had been falling all night, for
it lay deep on the side paths, and in the
roads of a large manufacturing town. There
was a loud clamour of bells in the air; and
out from the door-ways of poor wretched
houses, into the narrow lanes and streets,
issued troops of little children of all ages.
But amid them all there was none of the joy-
ousness, and fun, and frolic of childhood;
there was no playful snow-balling, and no
merry shouts of laughter. Silently they hur-
ried along in the cold and the snow, looking
like troops of ghosts. A strange look of



32 CAREWORN CHILDHOOD.

weariness gleamed out from the eyes and
face of each one, as though they had been
up all night, and had had no sleep.

Some appeared to be lame, and dragged
their limbs painfully along in the deep snow;
some were, bent as though with age; and
some put their hands up to their head, as
though a great pain were there which nothing
could ease; and many of the little frames
were racked with a distressing cough, which
told fearfully of some insidious and deadly
disease which was making rapid progress.
Not in one of the many hundreds who hur-
ried along could be seen a single gleam of
childhood; age and care had stamped their
seal upon the face and form of each, long
before happier children had left their nur-
series.

Katie watched them as they all entered
large monster-looking buildings, from whence
soon issued the noise and clang and clamour
of machinery, the fierce bellowing and roar-
ing of steam, as though hundreds of demons
were rejoicing over the little victims who had
‘been entrapped into their power, and were
creating as much noise and uproar as possible
MOLOCH. 33

that their cries might not be heard. Katie
saw into the monster buildings, and could
see the children, who never had had any
childhood, toiling, toiling, toiling all day
Jong; and as the hours crept on, the look of
weariness and age deepened and became more
intensified.

When the clamour of bells again re-
sounded through the air, and the demons
stopped their roaring and bellowing, the
children trooped out and returned slowly
home; and when they arrived there, some
were too weary to eat, but instead, lay down
on the floor, and instantly fell asleep; some
dropped off with their basins of porridge in
their hands, some crouched down by the fire,
and stared dreamily into the live coals,
Katie noticed that over the faces of some
who lay asleep a smile of pleasure flitted, as
though some lovely vision had appeared, and
carried the sleepers away into Fairyland ; but
the smile seemed so out of place on the
wearied and worn little faces, that it was
painful to behold. But Katie was pleased to
see that some of those who had fallen asleep
never woke again. Good angels had taken
34 FAIRY FROLIC.

them away where there was to be no more
work,

Resolutely turning her face away, Katie
said to the Fairy Queen, “Show me no more,
you have made me very sad; all I have seen
has sunk deep into my heart. I never knew
there was so much sorrow and sadness in the
world. JI thought mine was the worst; now
I know that there are others who suffer more
than I have ever done; forgive me, dear
Fairy, I will never murmur again.”

“Nay,” said the Fairy, tripping lightly out
from the arbour of rose-leaves, “come into
my garden and smell the flowers, and forget
all your sadness.”

And they went into the lovely garden, and
they played among the flowers, chasing each
other in and out among them, and merry
peals of laughter and merriment were soon
heard. But in the midst of it all, while Katie
was hunting for the Fairy Queen, who had
hidden herself in a tulip, she heard her name
loudly called, and a shout of many voices;
and instantly the garden all vanished from
her sight, and she found herself standing be-
neath the oak-tree, with the stars looking
DISENCHANTED. 35

down upon her, and her teachers and some
of the elder scholars surrounding her.

“Oh! where is the lovely garden, and the
Fairy Queen ?” cried Katie, moving round to
the other side of the oak; but no opening
was there, and instead of the pleasant tones
of the Fairy Queen, she heard Miss Smith’s
coarse and decided voice, saying, “There, I
told you she was crazy! Come along home,
you have been here quite long enough;”
and seizing her by the hand she hurried her
back to school regardless of her tears and
cries, while her schoolfellows followed won-
deringly behind.

Katie had not been missed till the time it
was usual for the younger scholars to be put
to bed, when a hue and cry was raised, and
many went back to search for her, and found
her where she was last seen. They said she
had fallen asleep; Katie would never believe-
that, but invariably said she had been to
Fairyland.


CHAPTER VI.

ONLY TIRED.

"HE next morning Katie was too un-
well to leave her bed; there was a
lassitude and weariness which had
crept over her limbs during the night, and
sapped up all their strength. The doctor
was called, but he could not account for it,
although he put on a wise look, and said,
“ She will be well in a few days. Keep her
quiet.” But the few days passed over, and
‘Katie was not better; on the contrary, more
indisposed. She suffered no pain, but surely
as the days passed, so surely did each one
leave her weaker than it had found her. &A
very serene and peaceful look had stolen over
her little face, which gradually grew thinner
and thinner.



INVALID AND NURSE. 37

Her schoolmistress inquired if there was
anybody she would like to have sit by her,
and whether she would like her bed moved
to another room ; and Katie had the bed re-
-moved to aroom and put close to the window
from whence she could see the oak-tree; and
thought she should like Nellie, one of her
school-fellows, to sit by her. And Nellie,
who was very quiet, came and sat by the bed
day after day, with Katie’s hand in hers;
and she heard all about the visit to Fairyland,
the wonderful sights which were there seen,
and speculated with the little invalid, as to
what the fairies were doing while she was
lying there, whether they ever thought of her
now that she never ran in the fields, and
whether they felt the hot sun in summer, and
the cold frost and wind in winter; and Katie
told her all about her mamma, and how she
still saw her in her dreams, and had even
heard her whisper, “ Courage, my darling! I
am always watching you, and one day we
shall be with each other again.”

The bright summer days glided on, the
beautiful flowers bloomed and faded, and the

fruit iv orchards began to ripen fast, and yet
D
38 ONLY TIRED.

Katie did not seem to grow better; on the
contrary, she grew weaker, and felt more
wearied and tired. Her school companions
came in to see her every day, and spoke
kindly and affectionately to her, some even.
brought her little bunches of flowers, many
were sorry that they had neglected to show
her kindness when she was with them in the
school and playground.

On each visit they paid, she would plant
her little elbow on the pillow, and lean her
head in her hand, and answer their greetings
with a pleasant smile, and say in answer to
their inquiries, “Thank you, I am very well
—there is nothing the matter with me, only
I am so tired; to-morrow, perhaps, I shall
not feel so.” Then they would kiss her, and
go away; some with tears in their eyes,
which Katie observing, would turn to Nellie
and say, “Why do they cry? Iam not ill,
am I?”

“ Only tired, darling,’ Nellie would reply,
furtively wiping a tear from her own check.

“Only tired, that’s all,” Katie would
dreamily murmur, and then lie quite still
looking up into the blue summer sky, while
WRITING TO SISTER. 39

the merry shouts and laughter of her school-
fellows at play, would be faintly borne in at
the open window.

“Are you writing a letter, Nellic, dear 2?”
inquired Katie one day, as she watched her
friend’s pen travel quickly over the paper.

“ Yes, dear, I am writing to my sister.”

“Ah!” sighed Katie, “it must be very
nice to have a sister; I sometimes wish I
had one.”

“JT will always bea sister to you. Darling,
don’t ery.”

“Tam not crying, Nellie, dear, I was only
thinking how lonely it was not to have a
single relative in the world.”

“Don’t think of such sad things, Katie, think
only of things that are bright and beautiful.”

“Oh! but Icannot, Nellie. The sad things
come without my asking them.”

“You must drive them away by something
bright.”

“ And what are you saying in your letter,
Nellie?” inquired Katie, after a few minutes’
silence.

“JT am writing about you, darling,” was
the reply, with a bright smile.
40 “SEND MY LOVE.”

«But your sister does not know me, dear,”
advanced Katie.

“Oh! yes, she does, for I have mentioned
you before, and she is so concerned about
you, that she begs to hear all about my dear
friend, Katie.”

“How kind,” said Katie, with a bright
light in her eyes; “is your sister like you,
Nellie ?”

“She is much better than I am, and much
wiser, and is so kind and gentle in all her
ways, that everybody loves her,” said Nellie,
softly and lovingly.

How beautiful it is for one sister to praise
another, to see the other through a halo of
love and loving memories, to always carry
her image in the heart surrounded by warm
and loving thoughts, and to recognise in her
a better and wiser being, to whom she can
look for sympathy and love in trouble and
sorrow.

“Send my love to your kind sister, Nellie,
and tell her I long very much to know her.”

“Yes, darling, I will, and I am sure it will
please her very much indeed,” said Nellie, as
her pen travelled rapidly over the paper.
VERY MUCH PUZZLED, 41

The doctor came every day to see Katie ;
but, as before remarked, he did not know
what to think of her; he was puzzled, very
much puzzled, but like a great many other
people when they do not understand a thing,
he continued to look wise, and shook his
head, and knitted his brows in a very know-
ing manner; every morning he felt her pulse,
and looked at her tongue, and talked very
grandly and learnedly about the “ Nervous
System,” the “Prostration of the Nerves,”
and so on; yet, with it all, his little patient
did not improve, and this so irritated him,
that he began to grow cross.

“Come, come,” he would say, as he knocked
his walking stick on the floor of the room in
a very energetic manner; “come, come, not
up yet; this will never do; do you intend
lying in bed all your life, young lady ?”

“ Not if I can possibly help it, doctor,” re-
plied Katie, wistfully.

“ Well, then, how is it you are not running
about at play ?” said the doctor, with an-
other energetic knock.

“ Because I can’t; don’t be cross, doctor !”
replied Katie, with a smile.
42 THE DOCTOR HAS IT,

“Dear me,” said the doctor to himself, as
he blew his nose loudly; “dear me, what can
I do for her? I never saw suchacase. I
believe if I gave her all the physic in my
surgery, bottles and all, she would not be a
whit better. A most extraordinary case
this !—most extraordinary indeed! Let me
think, let me think ;” and the doctor walked
backwards and forwards in the little chamber,
with his walking-stick under his arm, and
one finger raised to his forehead in a very
profound and impressive manner.

After a few turns up and down the room,
he suddenly clapped his hands together, ex-
claiming—“ I have it! I have it! Young
lady,” he continued, standing at the foot of the
bed, you must take a dose or two of joy, a dose
or two of happiness,a dose or two of pleasure!”

“Dear me!” cried the schoolmistress, who
had entered the room, “ wherever can I find
a chemist who has such articles ?

“Nevertheless, madam,” said the doctor,
emphatically, “those are the tonics she re-
quires; they will brace her up, they will
drive out that weariness from her limbs ;—in
short, they will restore her to health.”
NOVEL REGIMEN, 43

“But you surprise me, doctor,” answered
the schoolmistress ; “how am I to procure
such tonics? What would you recom-
mend ?”

“Dish her up a relative or two,” said the
doctor, drawing on his gloves.

“A relative! Dish up! Good gracious,
doctor, how you talk,” cried the astonished
schoolmistress, with uplifted hands, and wide
open eyes.

“Yes, madam, I repeat it,” said the doctor,
seizing his hat; “Dish her up a relative or
two; not one with a heart as hard as a flint,
anda nature as narrow and sharp as the edge
of a carving knife, but one with a large heart,
a heart overflowing, gushing with love, affec-
tion, and tenderness. It is my belief, madam,
that all these kind of illnesses which afflict
young creatures like her, are caused because
they are starved for want of love and human
compassion. If people would not bottle up
their love, or lock it up in a box, and throw
away the key, there would be less of misery
among the tender ones of the earth. Look out
of that window madam,” continued the doctor,
pointing with his stick,—look out of that
44. VISITORS ANNOUNCED.

window, I say,—is the earth starved by its
Maker? No! See, it is flooded with beauty,
and literally covered with the evidences of
its Creators overflowing love. Why, then,
should you deprive those for whom the earth
was made of love? Dish her up a relative,
madam,—dish her up a relative!” and the
energetic doctor stumped vigorously out of
the room, leaving the schoolmistress perfectly
petrified with surprise; and it was not till
the doctor had left the house, and was seen
striding across the garden, that she recovered
herself sufficiently enough to ejaculate—

“Bless my heart, doctor, she has not a
relative in the world!”

But at that very moment the servant ap-
peared at the door, saying—“ If you please,
ma’am, visitors for Miss Kate Merton !”




CHAPTER VII.

KATIE’S VISITORS.

“][SITORS for Miss Kate Merton!

oy “Some one the doctor must have
fall sent to be dished up, I think,

Nellie,” whispered Katie, “ or else the servant

must have made a mistake, for I have no

one who would care to visit me.”

“ Perhaps, dear,” said Nellie, with a smile,
“perhaps your good little fairy has been put-
ting it into some one’s heart to visit you.”

«But no one knows I am hear, Nellie,”
said Katie.

«“ Are you aware who your visitors are,
Miss Kate?” inquired the governess, who
had but just recovered from the combined
shocks the doctor’s prescription and the
announcement had given her.


46 SO NICH TO BE LOVED.

“T can’t think who it can be, miss, un-
less ie

“Unless what, child 2”

“Unless it is papa. But I don’t think it
can be him,” said Katie, shaking her head.

“Why not, child? What can be more
natural? I wrote and informed him of your
illness,” said the governess, as she left the
room, and ran hastily downstairs.

Katie did not at all anticipate it was her
papa; she would have been only too glad,
and her little heart beat quickly at the
thought—if he had come to love her, but she
had never known a caress, a kind word, or a
loving smile to be bestowed upon her by him.
No, it could not be her papa.

“I hope, darling,” said Nellic, with a
bright smile, “that it is some one who will
love you at first sight, for it is so nice to
be loved.”

“YT think it must be, Nellie,’ said Katie
quietly ; “but till you loved me a little, I
never knew what it was after dear mamma
left me.”

“Darling, I do not love you a little, but
ever so much,” said Nellie.


FOOTSTEPS ON THE STAIL. 47

“ How much, Nellie,” asked Katie.

“So much, darling, and some over,” re-
plied Nellie, putting both arms round Katie’s
neck, kissing her little mouth, and laying her
face beside hers on the pillow.

How sweetly pretty they looked, with their
hair mingling, their cheeks touching, and
nestling lovingly together. What a beauti-
ful thing is human love, what pleasure it
gives, what happiness it bestows, how bright
it makes everything appear! My dear young
readers, if you are blessed by being sur-
rounded by those who love you, thank the
good God for it; and the best way you can
thank Him is by showering love on others,
especially those whose lives are dark because
they have it not.

“T hear footsteps on the stairs,’ said
Nellie, raising her head from the pillow,
and unclasping her hands from Katie’s
neck,

“Who can it be,” whispered Katie, wonder-
ingly.

The schoolmistress was the first to appear,
and she was saying to some one following
behind—* This way, sir, if you please—this
48 KATIE AND THE STRANGER.

?

way.” And immediately afterwards a gentle-
man was in the room.

At the first glance Katie knew it was not
her papa, yet the face seemed familiar; she
fancied she had seen it before, especially the
eyes, but where, she could not imagine. It
was, however, a very kind face, full of
strength, character, and thoughtful tender-
ness.

“This is the little lady, sir,’ said the
schoolmistress, pointing to Katie; and then
beckoning to Nellie to follow, she left the
room, and Katie and the stranger were alone
together.

The stranger advanced to the beside, and
kneeling down that his face might be on a
level with that of the little invalid’s, he took
one of her wee frail hands in one of his own,
—where it nestled very confidently—and
then gazed at her with a face so full of pity-
ing love and tenderness, that Katie felt half
inclined to hold up her mouth for a kiss.

“Can you guess who I am, Katie?” said
the stranger in gentle tones.

“No, sir; and yet I somehow fancy I have
seen you before, but I am not sure,”
A REVELATION 49

“Did you ever hear your dear lost mamma
speak of some one named Harold ?”

“No, sir, I do not recollect; but I was so
young when she died,” said Katie wonder-
inely.

“What! did she never speak of a brother
who loved her dearly ?”

“Oh! yes,” said Katie, with a bright smile;
“he went across the seas.”

“Well 2?” said the stranger, with a meaning
look.

A sudden light broke on Katie’s mind, and
she exclaimed—

“ Are you my dear mamma’s brother 2?”

“Yes,” said the stranger.

“Oh!” cried Katie excitedly, “you must
be, for you have dear mamma’s eyes, and
dear mamma’s smile. And will you love
me? Will you be very kind to mé 2”

“TJ will, indeed, my darling child, for my
dead sister’s sake and for your own,” and he
folded her to his breast in a most loving
embrace.

“ And will you take me away, and let me
live with you, and love you, so that I may

not be lonely any more ?”
E
50 LOVING RELATIVES.

“T have come on purpose, dear child. You
shall be my own little girl, and no one shall
part us.”

“Oh! how happy I shall be. Why, uncle,
I already feel stronger !”

“But I have another happiness for you;
some one else to love you, and whom you
are to love.”

“Oh! uncle dear, I shall be too happy,”
murmured Katie.

Her uncle left the room, and in a few
minutes returned, hand in hand with a most
beautiful lady, to whom Katie immediately
held out her arms, and was soon crying and
laughing with her face buried in her bosom.

“Oh, oh! how happy I am, my heart will
burst. And will you really be my mamma ?
and when may I go home with you? Oh!I
shall love you,” cried Katie.

A consultation was held with the school-
mistress—who sent for the doctor—as to
whether Katie could be removed. When
the doctor came, he gave it as his opinion
that no bad results would follow if she were
taken away at once; nay, he said, it would
make her a new creature. So in a very brief
DISHED UP. ot

time Katie had bidden farewell to her school-
fellows, who were sorry to see her go, espe-
cially Nellie, who had grown to love her very
dearly. Her newly-found aunt seemed to
know Nellie, for she kissed her as an old
acquaintance.

“How did you find me out, dear auntie ?”
inquired Katie, as she lay in the railway
carriage, while being whirled to her new
home.

“We heard through your friend Nellie’s
sister, of a poor, little, lonely girl, lying ill at
school, with no one to care for her, and we
were so sad, and yet interested, that we in-
quired whom she was; and when we heard
her name, your uncle said, ‘Can it be my
dear sister’s child?? And he hunted up
your papa, and found it really was so; and
your papa gave him permission to carry you
away from school to live with us. And now,
darling, you must soon get strong and well,
for we shall love you as if you were our own
child.”

Katie’s new home was a marvel of beauty.
It stood in the centre of a large garden,
which was filled with flowers, where the
52 IMPROVING.

bees gathered honey all the day. Katie had
a prettily-furnished bedroom all to herself,
where the sweet perfume from the flowers
came in at the open window; and in the
parlour a soft little couch was placed for her
sole use, while her. uncle bought her a small
bath-chair, in which to be wheeled about the
garden, and he himself would wheel her,
while her aunt walked by its side with one
of Katie’s hands clasped in hers. Katie
already began to look brighter, and she
fancied herself stronger, and thought she
should soon be able to run about again.
Meanwhile, many were the long and pleasant
chats she had with her kind uncle, who told
her stories of his life over the seas in far
away lands.

One afternoon she lay in her bath- ener
with her uncle seated on one side, and her
aunt on the other, who was busy doing some
needle-work.

“Uncle,” said Katie, “you once told me
that nothing really beautiful, or worth hav-
ing, could be got without toil and suffering.”

«Yes, I did, dear.”

“Well, will you tell me how it was you
A PROMISED STORY. 53:

toiled for dear auntie; for is she not beauti-
ful and worth having ?”

“Yes, indeed, Katie,” said her uncle with
fervour, while a blush spread over her aunt’s
face.

“ How did you win her, then, uncle ?”

“Well, if you listen, I will tell you a story,
and then you will know.”

“Hold my hand, uncle dear; there, now,
begin !”






CHAPTER VIII.

A ROSE,

7, noontide, one very hot summer day,
the sun darted down a fierce ray
on a dirty puddle of water in a
narrow street of a large manufacturing town.

“ puddle, as it felt the hot beam, ‘this is
growing past all endurance; I am almost
exhausted.’

“«Murmur not, whispered the sunbeam,
‘I am but refining you; you are nothing
better now than so much black filthy water,
a thirsty dog even would refuse to drink you
in your present condition; I wish to make
you pure, and to give you the power of im-
parting life, and not, as now, breathe out
disease and death.’



PURIFIED BY SUFFERING. 55

“<«Your intentions may be very good,’ re-
plied the puddle, ‘but the process! the pro-
cess is most painful; cannot you adopt
some more pleasant method in accomplishing
your wishes 2”

“‘No, friend? said the beam, ‘purity
cannot be attained but through suffering ;
that is the law, I assure you.’

“« All very well, I dare say, said the
puddle, ‘but I know nothing of law; I
only know what I feel; and this I know,
that when the moon kisses me her kiss
is soft and cool, not fierce and fiery like
yours.’

“No doubt there is a difference, replied
the beam; ‘but you should recollect, that I
eive health and strength and beauty—the
moon withdraws it,

«Well, well, that may be, said the puddle
impatiently, ‘but I know which is most
agreeable. I am quite content to remain
what I am, I have no desire to become
better, so I must request you to shift your-
self, and vex me no more.’

“ I have performed my mission, and in spite of
56 TRANSMUTATION.

your complaints, made you purer, and given
you new life.’

“So the sun continued to shine and to
dart down his fierce rays, until, by degrees,
the puddle was carried high up into the air,
where it floated like a faint white cloud, and
in that state continued wandering about
until the sun sank to rest, and night stretched
her dark curtain softly and silently over the
sky; then the stars came out one by one,
looking brightly down on the earth, lighting
little children to bed, and travellers on their
way; and the sailor, keeping his solitary
watch at sea as his vessel ploughed through
the water, looked up at them and thought of
the dear ones left at home, and wondered if
they were thinking of him.

“One little star hovered over a garden and
saw arose beginning to die, and wishing to
save it, said to the cloud, ‘ There is a dying
rose down in that garden just under you;
will you preserve its life ?’

«<«Willingly,’ said the cloud, ‘but how am
I to reach down so far? the distance is so
great, I dare not drop or I should lose myself.’

“<*T will assist you,’ said the star; and
SWEETS TO THE SWEET, 57

darting a ray into the very centre of the
cloud, it carried down, depositing in the
rose a dew-drop.

«Ah! how refreshing!’ said the rose,
drawing a long breath; ‘I thought I was
dying, but now I feel strong again.’

“ And it drank up the dew, and opened its
leaves a little wider, so that when the sun
awoke and flushed all the sky, and crowned
the distant hills with light, it held up its
head proudly, for it was the most beautiful
one in the garden.

“When the sun had travelled more than
one-half his journey, a sweet girl of seventeen
tripped lightly into the garden, and when she
saw the flower she exclaimed, ‘Oh! what a
lovely rose ;’ and burying her delicate nose
in the leaves, closed her eyes and inhaled the
perfume luxuriously.

««T will wear this to-night ;’ and picking
it, she held her head first on the one side,
then on the other, that she might examine
its beauties the better. A faint flush stole
into her cheeks, a sweet smile played over
her face, and in her eyes, as she whispered,
as though to herself alone, ‘He once said I
58 THE COUSINS.

was like a rose; ah! but he leaves to-night,
—the smile died away, and a tear-drop fell
on the rose.

“*Not so refreshing as the dew,’ murmured.
the flower, ‘but far more precious,’

“Tn a very large old-fashioned room of a
country house there were assembled a num-
ber of individuals, all related the one to the
other: there were fathers, mothers, brothers,
sisters, uncles, aunts, and cousins; they had
come from far and near, and had gathered
together to spend a pleasant evening, and
bid one of their number farewell, who was
going to a far distant land to seek—what so
many seek and never find—a fortune; and
this was the last time perhaps he would sce
so great a number of his friends. His name
was Lionel, and he moved about among them
all with a hopeful and resolute smile upon
his face, albeit his heart ached some-
what.

“Although there were so many who claimed
his attention, he had eyes for only one out of
the bevy of fair cousins who were assembled,
and she was the sweet girl of seventeen, who
wore no ornament save a rose placed in the
HAND IN HAND. 59

bosom of her simple white dress. And in-
deed she required no jewels, for nature had
been so bountiful as to lavish her treasures
upon her, and make her so beautiful that all
ornament appeared unnecessary. Her eyes
were a lovely soft brown, veiled with long
black lashes, and over-arched by black eye-
brows; her cheeks were as delicately white
as the pearl, her form rounded and graceful
as that of the fawn, while her hair was as
bright, and of the same colour, as a horse
chestnut when fresh from the pod. No
marvel Lionel had eyes for her alone.

“Later on in the evening, Lionel and this
fair young creature strolled out into the gar-
den. The stars seemed to shine brighter as
they saw them walking side by side, while
the soft winds whispered, ‘ How lovely, let us
blow upon them gently.’ Hand in hand they
walked in silence until Lionel said brokenly
and abruptly —

“ shall see you for years—may I take hope
with me, cousin dear 2’

“She made -no reply, but taking the rose
from her dress she pressed it to her lips, at
60 LOVERS’ VOWS.

the same time stealing a glance at her cousin’s
face from beneath her downcast and half-
veiled eyes.

“Give me that rose, dearest, entreated
Lionel, ‘it has touched your lips, and if you
give it me I shall feel you give me hope with
it, and I want it; it will impart courage, and
give me strength to win wealth and fame to
lay at your feet.’

“*TVionel,” said the young girl softly,
tremblingly, yet firmly—‘ Lionel, I will ever
remain true to you; if that is the hope you
want, take it, for I know you are brave and
true-hearted, and I do not care so much for
you winning wealth and fame, so long as
you are brave and noble, and do what is
right,’

“She gave him the rose, and looked into
his eyes with such a bright light in her own,
that it seemed as though two beautiful angels,
named Hope and Trust, darted down into his
heart, and made it their abiding-place.

“«This will aid me in doing right—I will
never part from it, said Lionel.

“Brighter shone the stars, softer blew the
winds, and the flowers looked up inquiringly,
THE TEMPTER AT WORK. 61

as they heard and saw the parting of these
two young creatures.

“Mine is an enviable lot, said the rose,
as it felt its leaves plucked asunder and
placed one by one in a little gold locket—‘J
am. to help a man to keep in the straight path,
and though I die, I will retain my fragrance’

“Gallantly the stout ship sailed across the
seas, and firmly Lionel trod the deck, while
his spirit looked forward to the new world
where he was to fight the battle of life, and
he resolved to fight it bravely, that the dear
one at home might hear his name mentioned
with pride.

« But if ever youth thinks to strive man-
fully and bravely to do what is right in the
world, there are always lions and ravenous
beasts in the way, or evil spirits to lure him
down to destruction.

«<«Will you take a quiet glass with me ?’
said one, ‘the day is hot, and a few glasses
will do you no harm.’ The drink looked
enticing, and Lionel was thirsty.

“Come, said the tempter, ‘I pledge the

dear ones at home.’
F
62 ASSAILED ANEW.

“ Lionel stretched out his hand to take the
offered glass, when a locket fell from his open
vest. ‘No,’ he said, firmly, withdrawing his
hand and turning away.

“* Afraid’ laughed a mocking voice.

“* Afraid echoed the wind.

“« Brave!’ whispered the imprisoned rose-
leaves.

«<« Will you take a turn with these ?’ said
another, rattling the dice box in his hand—
‘just a few throws for a small sum, it will
while away the time; come, you are no longer
a boy.’

“*No, said Lionel, with his hand on the
locket as it rested on his bosom, ‘no, I have
resolved never to play.’

“*Coward!’ cried a sneering voice.

“*Coward!” echoed the waves, as they
beat against the vessel.

“¢ Brave!’ whispered the imprisoned rose-
leaves.

“«Try him again, we must not lose him, he
has money and brains,’ muttered the evil spirit.

“Onward sailed the good ship, bravely
ploughing through the waters, until she
reached the land of promise,

.
TRIUMPHANT RESISTANCE. 63

“«Money, money, I have came here to
gain heaps,’ said Lionel, as he strolled about
the strange city.

- “*T will show you how to win it speedily,
whispered one in his ear, ‘look, see how easy
my plan is!’

“Ves, yes, I see, said Lionel, ‘but your
plan will not do for me, it will soil my fingers,
and stain my soul, and burden my conscience ;
besides it will bring others to ruin, and may
be break many hearts; no, I will work hon-
estly for my money, and try to injure no one.’

“«Coward!’ shouted a voice.

«« Brave !’ murmured the imprisoned rose-
leaves.

“How could I dare think of her with
guilt on my soul?’ said Lionel, as he pressed
the locket to his lips.

««She is worth all the money in the
world,’ said the rose leaves.

“«True, replied Lionel, ‘and must be won
bravely and honestly.’

“Time rolled on, and Lionel toiled man-
fully with hands and brain, and began to
heap up riches; yet still he found time to
minister to the wants of others; he relieved
64 SOMEBODY COMING.

distress, comforted those in sorrow, spoke
consolation to the broken-hearted, and
pleaded for the erring. Thus blessings fell
around his path, and upon his heart, as dew
upon thirsty flowers.

“Not only am I doing my duty, but I am
winning her!’ said Lionel.

“<«True,” murmured the imprisoned rose-
leaves, ‘good actions springing from pure
motives are never wasted: work on, the re-
ward is close at hand.’

“Time rolled on. The sweet girl of seven-
teen had changed into graceful womanhood ;
but her heart had not changed, it was whole,
and true, and pure. The roses had budded,
and bloomed, and faded many times when
she once tripped along the garden walks, her
form more graceful, her brown hair cluster-
ing in massy waves, and her soft brown eyes
filled with a light like that seen in the
twilight skies.

“«He is coming home!’ she whispered,
looking up at the evening star.

“«Tam lighting him on his way,’ replied
the star, looking brightly down.

“The shadows deepened, the winds
FAITHFUL LOVE REWARDED. 65

breathed softly, the flowers folded themselves
for the night, and the birds hushed their
singing, as she glanced timidly and shyly up
into the bronzed features and earnest eyes of
the manly form before her. The eyes full of
earnest love gazed down into the sweet face.

“<«T have returned, dearest, and my heart
is as truly yours as it was when we parted
long years since; see, 1 have your rose still,
and he showed her the locket.

“*T have been true to you, Lionel,’ she
whispered softly, while two tear-drops, which
had their source in joy and happiness, stole
into her eyes.

“Then, dearest, we will never more be
parted, but be happy forever, said Lionel,
kissing away the tears.

«Yes, happy ! whispered the stars.

“* Happy !’ echoed the wind.

“*Happy! murmured the dreaming
flowers.

“<«Fappy !’ sighed the imprisoned rose-
leaves.”

When the story was ended, Katie ex-
claimed—“ Ah, uncle, you were Lionel!”
66 THE RIDDLE IS READ.

“Yes, dear, but not half so good as I ave
made him out to be.”

“We think differently, do we not, Katie ?”
gaid her aunt with a smile,




CHAPTER IX,

A DAISY’S MISSION.

ATIE told her kind aunt and uncle
all about her visit to Fairyland, and
they increased the pleasurable re-
coliections of that memorable evening by
their earnest sympathy with what she saw.
They were too wise to laugh at her and say
she was crazy, as Miss Smith had done.
True wisdom sometimes consists in genuine
sympathy. They both affirmed that there
must be many fairies in the world if people
could but see them.

“But I have only seen a fairy once,” said
Katie,

“ And should you like to see the little lady
again ?” inquired her uncle.

“JT should indeed, uncle dear.”


$8 HOUSEHOLD FAIRIES.

“Well, darling, I believe you will see her
again if you really wish it; they pay a visit
to everybody once in their lives, and if those
they visit treat them kindly, obey their
counsel, and follow their instructions, they
will visit them again and again.”

“Tam so glad to hear that, uncle; I was
afraid they had most of them left England.”

“No, dear, they have not all disappeared ;
they reside in every city street, in every
town, and country village; but some people
are too much in a hurry to see them, others
make too much noise, and then when those
who do see them say they have done s0,
they laugh and turn it all to ridicule.”

“What a pity,” said Katie, with a sigh.

“Yes, darling, it is, for I believe every
house may have one or more fairy.”

“Has your house one, uncle ?”

“Yes, I am rejoiced to say it has,” replied
her uncle.

“ And what does it do for you ?”

«Why, it whispers kind thoughts to my
heart and to your auntie’s. If Iam cross and
feel inclined to say unkind and cruel words
—for words can be very cruel—it comes and
KATIE THINKS. 69

taps at my heart, and says, ‘ think how kind
so and so has always been to you, how,
when you were sick, you were so kindly and
affectionately tended ;’ and then the fairy
takes away all the cruel words, and puts
loving ones in their place, and smoothes out
the wrinkles from my brow, and impresses a
smile there instead.”

“ And what is your fairy’s name, uncle ?”

“T think we call her Love, do we not,
dear ?”

“Yes,” replied Katie’s aunt, with a very
bright smile, and such an affectionate light
in her eyes, that Katie almost believed there
was a fairy of the same name looking out of
each.

There was silence for a few minutes.
Katie was thinking how strange it was that
a fairy should have such a name as Love, a
something, she thought, which always resided
in good and kind people’s hearts.

Katie did not know that there are a large
family of fairies which have names that are
like emotions and qualities which dwell in
the heart and mind of men and women, and
boys and girls. For instance, there is Fairy
70 THE WILL AND THE WAY.

Good-thought, Fairy Kindintention, Fairy
Unselfish, Fairy Hopeful, and many, many
more, with similar names, all of which will pay
visits to little girls if they will but invite them,
and treat them kindly when they come.

“ After all, uncle,” said Katie, breaking
silence, “I think more of what my queen
fairy showed me than of the fairy herself.
All those scenes where little children suffered
so, and they no older than I am. Do you
think, uncle, there are many little, poor little
children like those ?”

“T am afraid there are, my dear,’ said her
uncle sadly, “many more than we have any
conception of.”

“Oh! how much I should like to make
some of them happy,” said Katie, clasping
her hands ; “but I am so little, I can do no-
thing,” and tears gathered in her eyes.

“No, darling, not too little,” said her
uncle, kissing her, “if you only have the
desire, the way will surely follow. Even a
little daisy can do good, much more a little
human, loving heart ?”

“A daisy, uncle! how can that be? It
neither moves nor speaks.”
THE DAISY’S SOLILOQUY. 71

“Tf you will listen, I will tell you what a
daisy once did; there is nothing, dear child,
in this world, but what can be turned into
usefulness.”

Having said which, Katie’s uncle drew his
chair nearer to her couch, and commenced—

“*Now, this is what I call pleasant and
comfortable,’ said a daisy, one early summer
morning, as the wind carried a leaf down
from an elm tree, and covered without touch-
ing it. ‘This is what I call delightful: I
have quenched my thirst by drinking all the
dew which fell on me during the night, and
am quite refreshed, and now that this friendly
leaf has been kind enough to shield me from
the burning sun, I have a cool and shady
bower where I can sit and think all day long,
watch my neighbours, and, when so disposed,
converse with them. The sun is very cheer-
ful the first thing in the morning, when its
warm beams kiss me slantwise, but at mid-
day, when it pours down all its fire on my
unprotected head, I find it too much, more
indeed, than a wee, tiny flower like myself
can endure; but, thanks to this good leaf, I
am safe for the day.’
72 FLIOWER-LORE.

“Having thus given expression to her
feelings, the daisy settled herself to her own
satisfaction on her couch of green grass, and
looked forward to a day of quiet contempla-
tion, varied, if so inclined, by social inter-
course,

“This was a modest, sensitive daisy ; when
the sun saluted her on first rising, she blushed
a beautiful bright crimson, which appeared
so becoming, that mother Nature determined
it should always remain.

“But, alas! for the daisy’s day of antici-
pated enjoyment; she reckoned without once
thinking of two very wise sayings flowers
whisper among themselves: first, ‘ That we
do not grow solely for our own pleasure, and
second, ‘Be not sure of repose, a little hand
may pluck you, a rude foot may crush you,
and a big mouth eat you.’

“On the other side of the hedge, outside
of the meadow where the daisy bloomed,
stood a farm-house, the owner of which, and
his family, were so uncultivated as to rise
with the sun, and to go to bed with the same ;
they were not sufficiently refined to turn the
night into day, and the day into night, like
UNCULTURED AGRICULTURISTS. 73

unto the dwellers in great cities ; they were
so vulgar as to think that the day was meant
for work, and the night for sleep. They
were evidently behind the age.

“On this particular morning, the farmer
having set his men to work, seen the cows
milked, and the horses and pigs fed, walked
across the fields to see how his crops were
progressing, thinking they would be all the
better for a little rain, and not quite so much
sun,—for, as a rule, farmers are never satis-
fied with the weather, it is either too dry ot
too wet, too much sun or not enough, never
quite the thing—having done all this, the
farmer thought he had earned his breakfast,
orif he did not think so, he went home to
get it, which amounts to the same thing.
As he seated himself at the table; and cut a
thick slice of fat boiled bacon and a delicious
piece of home-made bread, he said to his wife :

«Well, dame, this be a fine day ; what say
you to adrive to see brother Jem at the jail ?
He promised to take us over if we chose to
go, and I have a fancy to see what the inside
of a prison is like; something different to a

meadow I take it: ar’t’ agreeable !’
G
74 PROPOSING A JAUNT.

«“¢Yes, John, replied the wife, ‘I’m will-
ing, and we'll take our Annie; she seems a
bit low, and the ride will do her good.’

««Then, wife,’ said the honest farmer, ‘ do,
you pack up a basket of victuals; and you
may as well pick a few flowers, they'll look
cheerful-like inside such a place.’

“Now, the farmer's youngest daughter,
Annie, hearing she was to ride with her
father and mother to visit her uncle and the
poor men shut up in prison, thought she would
gather some flowers likewise ; so, scrambling
down from her high chair, she toddled out of
the room into the garden, and creeping
through a hole in the hedge, she made her
way into the meadow, close to where the
daisy was seated under her leaf awning ; who,
at the moment Annie made her appearance,
was indulging in a wise chat with her next-
door neighbour, who had overheard her soli- *
loquy regarding the manner in which she
intended spending the day.

“«You know, friend,’ said this neighbour,
‘we are not sent into this world to make
ourselves comfortable, but to be of some

?

use,
RAETORICAL FLOWERS. 75

“«T can’t say I exactly see the force of
your observation,’ replied the first daisy ;
‘will you oblige by making it a little clearer,
and explain how I am to make myself useful,
when I find it impossible to move myself
from this place ?’

“* We are all intended for some wise pur
pose,’ replied the second daisy, sententiously ;
‘and will that wise purpose be fulfilled in
you, if you are dissatisfied with your lot, and
not with yourself? I overheard you mur-
mur at being exposed to the fierce rays of the
sun ; doubtless it is a fiery trial we have to
endure, but fiery trials bring out hidden
virtues, and those burning beams of which
you complain help to make us as beautiful
as we are; you will lose all your loveliness
if you remain under your bower,’

“But I see no reason why I should wish
for beauty,’ said the first daisy.

“<* Apart from the pleasure the fact of
your being beautiful would convey to your-
self, you have to consider how it will please
others, what delight it will impart to those
creatures so superior to ourselves, called
men; I have even heard that our quiet un-
76 TRANSPORTED,

obtrusive beauty has been sung by poets,
who have written poems and songs in our
praise. I heard one once beginning with—

** Wee modest, crimson-tipped flower.”

« «Yes, that’s all very well,’ replied the
first daisy ; ‘but I see no use in living as
you say I should, if at last I am to be eaten
by a cow or a sheep.’

“<«Provided we live well, and think and
act rightly, said the second daisy, ‘it does
not much matter what death we die; it is
not so much how we die, as how we live;
but who knows, your lot may be more for-
tunate than to go to help to make food for
man; your mission may be higher,’

“Just as the wise daisy uttered these
words, the farmer’s little daughter stooped
down and plucked them both, adding them
to a whole heap she held in her hand,
mingled with buttercups. Children prefer
these simple wild flowers to the rarest of
those that grow in gardens and conserva-
tories.

“The farmer and his wife were soon
seated in their light-cart, the one holding
AND IN PRISON. Ue

the reins and whip, while the other carried
a huge nosegay and a basket, from which
peeped the neck of a stone bottle. Little
Annie was packed in behind, her fat dimpled
hand still tightly clasping her buttercups
and. daisies.

““Dear me,’ gasped our friend the first
daisy, as she rode along, ‘ dear me, I shall be
stifled to death if this continues much longer ;
I really cannot bear it.

“Tt is foolish and weak to say you can-
not bear what it is your fate to bear; learn
the lesson of endurance, my friend,’ said the
second daisy, calmly. The other made no
reply, and in due time they left the cart, and
were transported, in a railway carriage, to a
large city, through the streets of which they
went, wondering whether the people they
met ever saw a wild-flower before.

“<«Sad, sad,’ murmured the second daisy,
‘no country ever comes here. What wretched-
ness! How impure the air!’

“ Presently they arrived at the iron gates of
the grim stone prison, and trembled with fear
as they saw them open, and heard them clash
to behind them.
78 SEEING THE JAIL,

“ ‘who ever can draw breath in such a fearful
place 2’

“The honest farmer and his wife, and Annie,
were kindly welcomed by their relative, who
was one of the warders of the prison. After
a little friendly chat and mutual inquiries
concerning friends, the warder took them
yound the men’s portion of the jail; and
much the farmer stared, and his wife, and
little Annie, as they peeped into the various
cells, and saw the prisoners.

“«T should like, said the farmer, ‘to give
them all a run in my fields, like I do the pigs.
How can they bear living here? Why, wife,
I should die!’

“Ay, John, so should I; I can’t sniff a
green field here.’

“ After being shown the dark cells, and the
different modes of punishment for refractory
prisoners, they were handed over to a female
warder, who took them round to examine the
women’s department.

“««This is more sad still, John,’ said the
farmer’s wife; ‘what must their mothers
think !—poor dears! They were all like our
A BAD ’UN. 79

Annie here, and the good creature wiped a
tear from her cheek, while her husband blew
his nose loudly, but said not a word, only
drew Annie a little closer to him as though
he would shield her from all future harm.

“« them into one, ‘is occupied by as pretty a
young woman as you could wish to see, but
she’s a,regular bad ’un, her heart’s as hard as
stone; she is that wicked that nothing will
ever do her good. The chaplain visits her
every day, but she only makes fun of him,
See, here! this is the fourth Testament he
has left for her, but she tears them all up,
and swears like as I never heard anybody
before, and I’ve heard a good many, I reckon ;
and yet she is only nineteen years of age.
She is undergoing punishment now, but will
be here again to-night.”

“© John,’ said the farmer’s wife, ‘I must be
off; I can’t bear any more of this. I’msure I
shall cry ; and my heart aches as it never did
when our Susan died. Come, Annie dear,’
and taking her little daughter up in her arms,
the good woman strode out of the cell, her
husband following.
80 LEFT BEHIND.

“They bade their brother farewell, and left
the prison, and hastened home, thinking that
if they lived a hundred years they should
never wish to see the inside of a jail again.

“When the farmer’s wife lifted little Annie
into her arms, the child dropped one of her
daisies, which fell on the stone floor of the
cell, and was left behind, the very identical
one whose anticipated day of enjoyment had
been so speedily brought to a close.

“*Dear, dear, how this fall has hurt me.
I tremble all over; how hard the floor is,
and how cold. I’m sure I shall die, and
and with no kind friend to hear my last
words. What a hard fate is mine! I won-
der what my wise neighbour would think if
she were in such plight. If we are made
perfect through suffering, ’m sure I ought
to be perfect, for never surely has any fellow-
daisy suffered as I have; yet, I don’t think
I should mind if it was for some good pur-
pose.’ Muttering thus the daisy lay quite
still, waiting for the end.

“As the day was drawing to a close, and
the light was growing dim in the silent cell,
& young woman was ushered in by the matron
THE CONVICT. 81

of the prison. She wore the coarse plain
prison dress, and her hair was cut short, but
it must have been very beautiful, for what
little there was left, shone like bright gold ;
her eyes were large and very blue, and her
face would have been lovely but for its fierce
and hardened expression, which told the
story of so much sin and crime which had
never been repented, and had only assisted
in making the heart harder and more averse
to good. The good chaplain despaired of
ever being able to touch it; all his prayers,
his exhortations, and grief, appeared of no
avail. ‘Nothing can do her any good,’ he
muttered, as he last left her cell, with her
mocking laugh ringing in his ears. ‘ But
what is man’s extremity, is God’s oppor-
tunity.

“ See her now, how restlessly she paces up
and down her narrow place of confinement,
more like a wild untamed creature of the
forest than a human being. But what is that
which suddenly arrests her footsteps, making
her gaze with surprise on one spot of the
stone floor? ‘How came that here?’ she
murmurs, as stooping down she picked up
82 CONTRITION.

the daisy which had fallen from little Annie’s
chubby hand.

“Watch how carefully she handles it, and
how gently she lays it on the palm of her
left hand. How softly shekisses it! What
is it that simple flower is whispering in her
ear? See! she is kneeling at the side of her
rough bed, her face works convulsively, and
tears are gushing from her eyes. Oh!
mystery of mysteries, that a tiny flower, a
little daisy, should have the power to find
the one crevice in that heart, so hardened by
sin and crime, penetrating to the fountain of
repentance and tears, and making the guilty
creature feel the depth of the degradation to
which she has fallen.

“As the hot drops fell upon the dying
daisy, she looked up to the sorrow-stricken
face; and did the daisy speak, or was it
some other voice that whispered in the for-
lorn woman’s heart—‘I bloomed in such a
- field as you played in when you were a child,
and before your soul was stained with sin,
when your mother loved you, and you had
not broken her heart and hurried her into
her grave by your conduct. Ah! how much
THE PRODIGALS RETURN. 83

you have to answer for! Weep on, weep on;
tears of repentance soften the heart, and help
to wash away its dark stains !’

“When the chaplain paid his customary
visit, he found her still kneeling and weep-
ing. She motioned him to read, and he read
the touching and hopeful history of the
woman who washed the good Saviour’s feet
with her tears and wiped them with her hair.
He then knelt beside the repentant woman,
and poured out his heart in prayer on her be-
half, to the good God who is willing to receive
all repentant prodigals.

“As the chaplain left the cell, he mur-
mured, ‘Alittle daisy! Truly, My thoughts
are not as your thoughts, nor your ways as
my ways, saith the Lord.”




CHAPTER X.

THE QUEEN FAIRY AGAIN.

HE beauty of summer was fast fading
away ; the flowers faded, withered,
and died; the defacing fingers of
autumn began to touch the leaves on the
trees, turning them sear and brown; and
high winds began to blow them from the
branches and whirl them about in the air, and
then let them fall in field and garden, on the
highway, and on the waters of rivulets and
rivers. Rooks became noisy in making pre-
parations for their journey to their winter
home.

To the great joy of her kind uncle and
aunt, Katie began to gain strength ; a little
of the lassitude left her small, fragile limbs ;
new life seemed to infuse itself into them ;



MUSING. 85

and with new life new strength. She had
taken some of the old doctor’s prescription.
She could walk about the room for a few
minutes at a time, much to her own delight,
for she said to herself, “I want to get strong
again, for I have a purpose now for which to
live ; uncle says everybody—boy or girl, man
or woman—should have some purpose, and
mine is to make others happy, for there are
so many unhappy in this great world.”

It was a chilly autumn evening when
Katie thus spoke within her heart. Her
aunt and uncle had gone out on a visit, and
Katie was alone in the parlour. The cur-
tains were drawn before the window, but the
wind blew up against it, as if it wanted to
get into the room. A green log was burning
in the grate, from which the sap bubbled and
hissed quite musically.

Katie’s couch had been wheeled close to
the fire. She had been testing her renewed
strength, by walking several times up and
down the room, and now she was resting,
reclining on the couch, with her head propped
upon her hand, and her eyes dreamily gazing
into the bright sparkling flames.

H
86 HERE WH ARE AGAIN!

While thus lying and gazing, the fire, she
knew not how, seemed suddenly to resolve
itself into one bright, dazzling halo, and was
a fire no longer; and in the centre of the
halo appeared a fairy—certainly a fairy, it
was so very small.

Katie sat up and rubbed her eyes to make
sure they did not deceive her. Yes, there it
stood! it was no delusion of the sight! it
was a real living fairy! and, moreover, her
friend the Queen.

The Queen sprang from her halo of glory,
and jumped on to the pillow of Katie’s
couch. Katie saw she was clad in warmer
garments than those she wore when they
were first acquainted. She had a little fur
of moss round her tiny throat, and her
mantle was lined with the same material;
while her dress was composed of a dark, thick
kind of stuff, which Katie thought was manu-
factured from holly leaves, but she was not
quite sure.

“Tam come to pay you another visit,” said
the Fairy, as she seated herself on the pillow,

“You are very welcome, dear!” said
Katie.
A WELCOME GUEST. 87

“Are you sure lam welcome?” said the
Fairy, looking into Katie’s eyes (she saw a
bright reflection of her own image there),
“because we fairies do not like to visit where
we are not welcome.”

“Quite, quite welcome,” murmured the
delighted Katie, gently kissing the bright
little Queen. ,

“T am very glad,” said the Fairy. “ While
I am here, I will lay aside my mantle, or
I shall not feel its warmth when I go out
into the cold.”

The Fairy Queen took off her mantle, and
carefully folding it, laid it on one side; then
she looked so lovingly into Katie’s eyes that
Katie was compelled to kiss her again.

“How is your garden? Are there more
flowers than when I visited it?” inquired Katie.

“They increase every day, Katie,” replied
the Queen.

“Do so many children die, then?” said
Katie sadly.

“Die, dear! You must not say ‘die.’ They
only bloom into new life and happy life when
they pass away from home and friends.”

“But they leave their home; and kind
88 ONLY CHANGED.

fathers and mothers miss them, and cry for
them,” said Katie.

“Yes, dear; but still the children are not
dead, they only pass away to new life, new
beauty, and great happiness.”

Katie could not understand; she won-
dered whether it was a kind of realisation of
some verses her aunt had once read to her,
after they had been speaking upon the same
subject. She inquired of the Fairy and re-
peated the verses to her—

When little children droop and die,
And mothers’ eyes rain tears,

The little forms beyond the sky
Are guarded safe from fears.

The love which merely budded here,
A wee frail tendril fair,

A blossom, yet so sweetly dear,
Will bloom in beauty there.

Shielded so safe from every breath
Of chill, and cold, and frost,
Transplanted from this house of death,
They live, and are not lost.

«Yes, dear, your aunt and I mean the
same thing, only we put it in a different way,”
said the Fairy.


PHANTASMA. 89

“But I thought children helped to make
_ the world better,” said Katie.

“So they do,’ replied the Fairy.

“But how can that be, when they pass
away ?” questioned Katie.

« Because the children pass away to a new
and purer life,” said the Fairy; and when
they enter into that life, the hearts of men
and women turn towards it, and unseen cords
draw them to it.”

“JT don’t understand,” said Katie, with a
sigh.

“Then I will show you,” said the Fairy ;
and taking her wand, which lay by her side,
she waved it in the air.

And instantly there appeared before Katie's
astonished eyes, a bedroom, containing a tiny
bed, on which lay the still form of a little
child. Its eyes were closed, the face looked
very white, and the lips quite colourless. It
lay so still that Katie murmured “It is
dead !”

By the bedside kneeled a man and woman,
whose hands were clasped together, and
whose eyes were wet with tears. Suddenly,
Katie saw them hush their sobs, and raise
90 INVISIBLE TIES.

their eyes with a look of beaming love
Following the direction of their glance, she
saw a little child, clothed in white raiment,
and surrounded by a bright pure light. Its
face was radiant with happiness, and its
little arms were stretched out to the kneel-
ing man and woman. Katie noticed that the
child surrounded with light was the same,—
yet so changed,—as that lying on the bed;
and she, moreover, saw that fine—almost in-
visible—threads went up from the heart of the
man and woman, and were held in the hand
of the child, who seemed to be pulling them.

“T understand now,” said Katie, as the
vision faded away.

“So you see,” said the Fairy, replacing her
wand, “that children do not die, they are
only removed to a happier place.”

“T will never forget,” said Katie.

“But there are many children who will
not be removed, but will continue here; and
many of them are very sad and unhappy,
and I want all who have happy homes to
try and do a little to banish the misery of
those who have none. Every little boy and
every little girl can do something; if they
EXIT FAIRY. 91

will really try, many good fairies, my sub-
jects, will cluster round them and help them ;
let them only try. You have a happy home
now, Miss Katie,” continued the Fairy Queen,
* will you not try and do something ?”

“ Dear Fairy,” said Katie, “it has become
a settled purpose with me to do something
like what you urge; when I am able to run
about again, I mean to begin; now I can
only send out good wishes.”

“Good wishes are something,” said the
Fairy ; “every one that is breathed out into
the world helps to make it better; but good
words and good actions are more effectual.”

“TJ mean to try hard, Fairy dear,” said Katie.

“You are sure to succeed,” said the Fairy ;
“every one who tries does; meanwhile, I
must now bid you farewell, I have other
visits to pay.”

The Fairy resumed her mantle, and kissing
Katie on the lips, she vanished from her
sight, singing—

A Fairy I roam
In a world so sad,
Delighting to make
Hearts happy and glad ;
92 ENTER AUNTIE.

To banish sharp pain,
Give comfort and peace,

And joys of all childhood
To largely increase.

I enter all hearts,

And lead them to think
Of others who dwell

On misery’s brink ;

Of children whose lives
Have hunger for food,
And tears for all gladness,

And evil for good.

As the last lingering echoes of the Queen
Fairy’s song died away, Katie felt a hand
laid upon her shoulder, and looking up she
saw her aunt’s bright face and smiling eyes
—eyes that were always filled with the light
of love when they rested upon her.

“Why, auntie dear, when did you come
into the room; I never heard you?” said
Katie, with surprise.

“T have but this moment entered, darling,”
replied her aunt, bending down to kiss the
soft cheek.

“Did you see anything strange when you
entered, auntie dear ?”

“Nothing stranger than a wee, little girl
KATIE’S MYSTERY. 93

lying on a couch by a warm cheerful fire,
either asleep or dreaming.”

“ Not asleep, auntie,” said Katie, positively.

“Well then, dreaming.”

“TJ am not sure even of that, auntie.”

“ Not asleep, and yet not dreaming !”

“No; I have had a visitor while you and
uncle have been away.”

“A visitor! And who is there round
about here that knows my darling?” said
her aunt.

Katie’s face flushed, and her eyes sparkled
with fun, as she saw her kind aunt’s be-
wilderment and surprise.

“What is this I hear about a visitor 2?”
inquired the husband, who entered at the
very moment his wife exclaimed, “A visi-
tor !”

“Why, here is our Katie declaring she has
entertained a visitor while we have been
away.”

“T think, auntie, she entertained me, and
not I entertained her,” said Katie.

“Come, wife, let us sit down and hear all
about this mysterious visitor,” said Katie’s
uncle, handing his wife to a chair.
94 THE MYSTERY REVEALED.

“ What should you say, uncle,” commenced
Katie, “if I were to tell you I had received
another visit from my dear little Fairy
Queen ?”

“Say, darling,” replied her uncle, “ why, I
should say I am extremely sorry I was not
here to see such a darling creature.”

“Well, uncle, the Fairy has really been
here again !”

“And what did she find to say to my
Katie 2?”

“Oh! many things! I cannot remember
them all.”

“Was she glad to see you so much better?”
inquired her aunt.

“Yes, indeed she was, auntie; and she
hoped I would try, when I got really strong,
* to do a little good in this great world. She
seemed to think that there was a great deal
that even I could accomplish if I would only
try heartily.”

“There is indeed, darling,” said her uncle,
taking one of her little hands in his.

“But, uncle, whenever I think about it,
there seems so much that is wrong, that a little
thing like I am cannot even dare to touch it.”
POWER OF LOVE. 95

“Remember, Katie dear,” said her aunt,
what your uncle said about the little daisy.

** A daisy by the shadow that it casts
Protects the lingering dew-drop from the sun,”

Yes, auntie dear, I remember, and some-
times I resolve that nothing shall prevent
me from trying; but when I think of what
my kind Fairy showed me of the sorrow, and
misery, and pain there is, I grow faint-
hearted; besides, I am so poor.”

“My darling, it does not require riches; a
kind word, a loving glance, a tender caress,
a sympathising tone, can do more good than
many gold sovereigns or crisp bank notes,
Ab me! little hands and hearts and voices
have a wonderful power.”

“ Yes, yes,” murmured Katie’s aunt in an
absent tone of voice, as though she was think-
ing of little hands, which had once been active
and warm, but were now still and cold for ever.

“My dear,” said her husband gently, “ have
you sufficient courage to sing our little song.”

“T think I have, dear, although I have not
sung it for a long, long time.”

“TI know, darling, but I should like our
96 AUNTIE’S SONG.

new child to hear it; perhaps it will do more
than please her.”

The wife rose from her chair, and seated
herself at the piano, and after a few preli-
minary chords, commenced singing, in low,
soft tones, the following very simple song:

It needs not wealth to gladden hearts,
Bring smiles to careworn faces ;
The tender clasp of loving arms,
And childhood’s sweetest graces,
Have magic charms
No wealth can give,
To bid the sad
Heart breathe and live.

Dark clouds of care so often fall
On lives in town or city,
No charm can make the sun break through
Like childhood’s tones of pity ;
For magic charms,
In childhood’s voice,
Bid weary lives
Rejoice! Rejoice!

Ah! me, some lives go all astray
With passion’s baneful leading ;
‘What power can bring the wand’rers
Like childhood’s gentle pleading?

Dwells magic charms,
Few can resist,

In childhood’s face
And childhood’s lisp.
ALL GONE! 97

The lamps had not yet been lit, but in the
dusky twilight of the fire, as the song ended,
Katie saw her aunt’s head droop over the
key-board of the piano, while she felt her
uncle’s hand, which held hers in its grasp,
tremble, and noticed he shaded his eyes with
the other. The silence was only broken by
the hissing of the sap in the burning wood.
Katie wondered for a moment, and then
thought that the song she had just heard
must have set in vibration some painful
chord in the heart of her kind uncle and
aunt. Nestling closer she whispered—

“What is it, uncle dear? Did you ever
hear the voice and feel the caress about
which auntie has sung ?”

“ Once, darling,” replied her uncle in a low
voice.

“ All gone, uncle dear ?”

“Yes, buried in the deep, deep sea, but
alive in our hearts forever and ever.”

The fire burned merrily, and huge shadows
danced on the wall and ceiling, as Katie
relapsed into silence, but in her heart she was
saying —“TI will try and be to my kind

uncle and auntie all that their darling would
I
98 A BRAVE RESOLVE.

have been. I know I am small—a very tiny,
little girl, and not very brave and strong, but
still I can do something if I try; the Fairy
said I could; and the kind, good God will
put it into my heart what to do, and how to
doit if Task him. The kind, good God loves
all people I know, but I wonder how it is
that every one has something to make them
sad; perhaps it is what the Queen Fairy
meant when she showed me the picture in
which were the threads which drew people’s
hearts upward.”




CHAPTER XI.

AND LAST.

HE autumn days passed quickly away,
the fruit was gathered in from or-
chard and garden, and the harvest
from the field, while giant stacks of wood
made their appearance in back yards ready
for winter use. Flowers were dead, and the
trees were stripped of all their leaves, so
that their branches stuck out like bare
skeleton arms, through which the autumn
winds sounded very shrill and melan-
choly.

Winter, with its frost and snow and ice,
followed after autumn ; the murmur of brooks
ceased, the flow of the deep river was no
more discernible—they were locked in hard,
rigid bands of ice; snow fell, covering the



100 THE REVOLVING YEAR.

earth with a mantle of white. All that was
beautiful in nature seemed dead.

But spring, beautiful bright spring, returned,
and the earth awoke as if from sleep, and
shook off its stillness; the sun came out with
power, and snow and ice disappeared as if by
magic; the brooks began to murmur and
prattle, and the rivers to flow; the trees
clothed themselves in their beautiful spring
dress of green; flowers made gardens lovely,
and fruit trees budded into pink and white
blossoms; birds came back again, making
the woods to thrill with music, and the
voices of children were once more heard in
the fields.

Spring is the resurrection of nature from
death, and is typical of that higher resurrec-
tion of which we read in the grand old Guide
Book of Life.

During the autumn and winter months,
Katie was almost a prisoner by the warm
cheerful fireside—the doctor said she must
be shielded from the icy cold north winds;
but sometimes her kind uncle would wrap
her up in a goodly number of warm shawls,
and place her in her bath-chair, and take her
MAGIC MEDICINES. 101

out for an hour or two to watch the skaters.
dart hither and thither over the hard ice;
and sometimes he would fasten on his own
skates, and pushing the chair, send her skim-
ming over the slippery surface, delighted and
exhilarated with the swiftness of the motion,
and the novelty of the scene.

Loved, and cherished, and fondled—as I
wish every child could be—no wonder little
Katie’s face grew bright and cheerful; and,
instead of being pale and thin, became beau-
tifully rounded and tinted with colour.

Love and happiness are magic medicines
which cure many diseases that have their
root in the heart, gives light to the eye, and
beauty to the cheek. Some people carry a
whole heart full of this wonderful medicine,
and dispense it freely about wherever they
go, banishing gloom and discontent, as the
sun dispels darkness and cold.

Children may do this as well as men and
women. The little fairies which dwell in
the head and heart of each boy and girl, will
show how it can be done. And what a won-
derful blessing it is to be able to do this

Katie’s health and strength were progress«
102 RETURN TO SCHOOL.

ing all through the long winter months, but
when spring came a vigorous impulse of life
seemed to dart through her little frame, so
that she was soon able to discard her bath-
chair, and use her own little feet. It was a
bright day in her life when she first discovered
she could walk without the aid of her uncle’s
strong arm. By the end of spring she had
quite recovered from her indisposition, and
needed no more doctor’s prescriptions. She
was like a fairy in her kind uncle’s and aunt’s
household; the love they had showered upon
her returned to them again wonderfully in-
creased. It is always so; love expended is
never lost, but returns with a seven-fold
increase.

Katie went back again to school, but not
as when she first made her appearance there
a pale, lonely, and friendless little creature,
but on the contrary cheerful, happy, and
contented. Her school-fellows welcomed her
with pleasure, the more demonstrative hugged
her in their arms, and bestowed kisses with-
out number upon her. Now she became a
partner in their various games, and shared in
their pursuits of pleasure and work. She
THE DOCTORS PEE. 103

never became as boisterous as many of her
companions were, but was always noticeable
for a certain quiet thoughtfulness of conduct,
and an utter disregard of self where the hap-
piness or welfare of others were concerned.
Nellie was especially delighted to welcome
her back again, and in all the school Katie
felt there was no one whom she should love
so well,

But the doctor must not be forgotten—the
wise doctor whose original prescription so
amazed the schoolmistress. THe rubbed his
hands, and flourished his stick vehemently,
when he first saw Katie after her return ; he
even went so far as to kiss her on each cheek
—an action he had never been known to do
before—yes, and said afterwards that her
cheek was like the leaf of a damask rose.

“So, young lady,” he said, pretending to
poke her with his stick; “so, young lady,
you followed out my directions, and took the
medicines I ordered? Don’t tell me you did
not! I know you have! Ha! ha! that’s
the sort of stuff to take; here is a patient
that has done credit to my skill; I really
think I must be a very wise man. What
104 A WONDERFUL HORSE.

are you laughing at, you saucy little puss ?”
And away the wise old doctor went, shoul-
dering his stick as a soldier shoulders his
gun.

But this was not the end of the eccentric
doctor. He invited his former patient to
partake of a friendly cup of tea with him at
his own residence, and on the appointed day
drove over to the school in his pony chaise
to fetch her. A most happy evening Katie
spent with the old bachelor doctor, who
showed her all manner of strange and curious
things, which he kept in his study and sur-
gery—in glass bottles—and others which
hung pendant from the smoke-coloured
ceiling; he played a game of hide-and-seek
with her in his parlour and drawing-room ;
told her all sorts of laughable stories about a
wonderful horse which he rode, and which
he once took into a woman’s cottage to give
it some medicine, when it had the misfortune
to be taken ill on the road. When it was
time to return to school he drove her back
again, depositing her safely on the door
steps, placing a large parcel in her hands as
he said good-bye, which, when Katie opened,
UNDER THE OLD OAK. 105

to her intense surprise, she found contained
an immense negro doll, with a black face and
black woolly hair.

Katie did not forget the old oak tree, be-
neath whose shadow she first saw the Fairy
Queen. During the bright spring and summer
months, when the careful schoolmistress per-
mitted her scholars to play in the fields,
Katie would separate herself from her com-
panions and retire to seat herself beneath the
wide-spreading branches; there she would
remain until the call was given to return
home, but no longer as a lonely little girl
whose life was full of sadness and tears.
Everything had changed; she looked out
upon the world with different eyes; the
erass had a lovelier green; the sky a deeper
blue; the sunbeams were brighter, while
the soft summer breezes seemed full of
mystic voices—voices full of love and ten-
derness.

Nellie was sometimes her companion be-
neath the old tree, where, with arms clapsed
round each other’s waist, or lovingly thrown
over each other’s shoulder—as girls will—
they would sit and talk about absent friends,
106 DAY-DREAMS.

and sometimes of the mystic and unknown
future which stretched out before them, and
of the happy life they intended to lead, and
the good they hoped to do. So they sat and
(reamed. The future was all rose-tinted,
asthe sun sometimes leaves the evening sky.
Katie never again saw the Fairy Queen.
Haunt the old oak as she might, her eyes
were never again gladdened with the lovely
vision. She sometimes fancied she heard
her silvery voice issuing from some bluebell
or foxglove in notes of song; but when she
examined the flower no fairy was there. It
might have been fancy only, but one evening,
just as twilight was deepening the purple of
the sky, flowers shutting themselves up for
the night, and birds hushing themselves in
their nests, Katie thought she heard the little
Queen sing the following simple song :

A Fairy I am,

The wide world I roam,
To make of each heart

A sweet blessed home ;
And if it receive me

And welcome me there,
Tl fill it with fancies

All lovely and rare.
INVISIBLE THOUGH NEAR. 107

All thoughts that are pure,
Unselfish, and bright,
Shall flourish as flowers
In sweet summer light ;
«And send out their magic,
To banish all fears,
Bring sunlight to eyes
So dim with sad tears.

Lut best I delight
Dear childhood to bless,
To fill its pure heart,
With sweet happiness ;
To chase all its sorrows
To dark underground,
And bid dearest love,
Encircle them round.

“Tt is very much like the one she sung
when she last bade me farewell,” said Katie
to herself, while hunting about the root of
the old tree to find where the little singer
was hiding.

“T am always near you, but you will not
see me any more,” said a silvery little voice,
as Katie gave over her search.

Good fairies, good angels, always surround
children ; they attend upon their footsteps,
and are ever ready to charm away their
sorrow and distress, and surround them with
108 ROUND MOTHERS KNEE.

love and happiness ; they have various names,
have these fairies, but they all belong to one
family. Let my young readers try and think
of a few of their names.

Katie is not a little girl now—she has
erown up into a lovely woman; but she has
never forgotten her little Queen Fairy. She
carries light and love into many dark places,
and many hearts are full of gratitude and
devotion for her. She does good to both
men and women, but her greatest delight
consists in hunting out lonely and unhappy
children, whom she treasures with all a
mother’s care and love.

She has children of her own now, has
Katie; and oftentimes, in the twilight of
beautiful summer evenings, or the “ gloam-
ing” of winter time, she gathers them round
her, and tells over again the story of the
Queen Fairy’s visit to the lonely little girl

‘beneath the oak tree.

M'Farlane & Erskine, Printers, Edinburgh