Citation
Frank Martin, or, A schoolboy's trials and victories

Material Information

Title:
Frank Martin, or, A schoolboy's trials and victories a tale for the young
Added title page title:
A schoolboy's trials and victories
Added title page title:
A schoolboy's trials and triumphs
Creator:
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London (Paternoster Row) ;
New York
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
143 p., <2> leaves of plates : ill. ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Boys -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Honesty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1872 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1872
Genre:
Juvenile literature ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title: Frank Martin, or, A school-boy's trials and triumphs.
General Note:
Imprint also notes publisher's location in Edinburgh.
General Note:
Added engraved t.p.--"Frank Martin, the story of a country boy."
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
023787657 ( ALEPH )
23865773 ( OCLC )
AHM2089 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text
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TRIALS FANDS TRIUMPHS:












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T.NELSON AND SONS
LONDON, EDINBURGH AND NEW YORK















FRANK MARTIN;

OR,

A SCHOOLBOY’S TRIALS AND VICTORIES.

A Gale for the Doung.





LONDON:

T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW;
/ EDINBURGH ; AND NEW YORK.





1872,
[Soke ANG SO





Chapter
I.

IL.

III.

IV.

VI.

VIL

VIII







Frank’s Schooling begins,

Short Steps into great Troubles,

In which Prizes are won and lost,

Work in earnest,

In which appears a mysterious Messenger,
Frank goes ‘ owl-hunting” with Mr. Stock,
The Truth, and nothing but the Truth,

Which proves Honesty is the best Policy,










CHAPTER I.

FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS.

“Duty, like a strict preceptor,
Sometimes frowns, or seems to frown;
Choose her thistle for thy sceptre,
While thy brow youth’s roses crown.”
WORDSWORTH.









: Z SE = = rg
Cu: es Oh INKS



CHAPTER I.

FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS.



3 SYNE ; two; three; four.

“There, I told you it was four
o'clock, Eliza ; and you said the long
hand would be pointing downwards
if twas time to go—as if I couldn’t
tell the clock yet!”

But Eliza was convinced, not because Mary
Ann had whispered it, but because the clock
had spoken, and she thought that she could
trust her ears.

As it turned out, however, both were wrong.
Eliza was wrong, certainly ; but as she was
but five years old, we will excuse her mistake.
The clock was most to blame, for it deceived
not only Mary Ann, but the whole school.

“Sit still, children,” said the mistress, “ the
clock is ten minutes toc fast.”

But for a schoolroom clock to go wrong



10 FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS.

is very sad. When I was at school, we did
not mind its being too slow, for then playtime
came before we expected it; but when it
went too fast, under pretence of keeping time
at all, it was cruel.

The mistress’s announcement fell on the
hopes of her little scholars as a wet blanket
falls on fire. Ten minutes more school,
and a disappointment, was hard for them to
bear.

It was a trial to others besides Frank
Martin; but however deeply they felt it, they
did not show it as he did. For a weary time
he had been sitting up on a form, holding on
with his hands, gazing straight before him,
and scarcely daring to dangle his legs, lest he
should incur the mistress’s rebuke. At last
he saw, out of the corner of his eyes, that
his sister had pulled down his woollen com-
forter from the peg, and he knew what that
meant. But when she turned round and
hung it up again, it was too much. His
fingers began to twitch, and his mouth to
work, and suddenly he set up a prolonged and
doleful ery.

“Why, Frank, what is the matter ?” said the



FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS. il

mistress, no less startled than the rest of the
school.

“Please, I think he wants to go,” said
Martha, his sister.

“Well then, you two can leave at once,”
said the mistress, seeing no other means of
stopping the commotion. So down came the
comforter again, and the hat and the bonnet,
and they were out in the lane in no time.

The next day Frank thought he would set
up another mournful lamentation when he
began to get tired of sitting still; but school
was only half over, and his plan did not
answer. He was sent to stand in the corner
by himself instead, which was another trial for
him.

Being just four years and a half old, school
at that age was dull work. I think his
mother sent him there to keep him out of
mischief for the chief reason, and to teach him
to be quiet. And a very good thing to learn,
too!

I know numbers of children who couldn’t
sit for five minutes together, without talking,
or fidgeting, or picking their clothes to pieces,
if you asked them, or even if you gave them



12 FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS.

something. But if you have a little brother
or sister, who goes to an infant school, and is
about the same age as Frank Martin was when
this story begins, and any one asks what such
a little thing goes to school for, you can say,
“To learn to sit still!”

Can you sit still while you read this
chapter? Try! and don’t laugh, or make any
noise, except by turning over the leaves.

Frank Martin’s father worked for Mr. Stock.
at Cowleas farm, and went with the horses.
Jack, his eldest brother, was an ox-boy, and
went with the oxen; and Sam, the next, was
a donkey-boy, and went with the donkeys.
Then came Martha, the only girl in the family;
and Frank was the youngest.

The Martins had worked on Cowleas farm
before Mr. Stock’s family came to live there,
and that was some time ago—many years, I
might say; and so they were well known, and,
what was more, they were respected. For if
Frank’s father had not been a sober, trust-
worthy, intelligent man, he would not have

- been Mr. Stock’s head carter. He had some-

times as many as thirty horses under his
charge, and some of them were very valuable,



FRANK'S SCHOOLING BEGINS. 13
and he prided himself on their appearance.
Indeed, it was commonly said that Mr. Stock’s
teams were the finest in the neighbourhood ;
and people used to stop and look at them, as
they went in and out of the county town on
the market days, gayly dressed with plaited
manes and tails. :

Sam, the second boy, accompanied his
father at such times, and though he was tired
enough when he reached home, he liked going
far better than staying with his donkeys,
They gave him, he complained, such a deal of
trouble ; he had often to look after five or six
of them by himself, and old Michael, who was
donkey-master-general, was strict and cross,
and never allowed the boys to play or idle
their time, though he did not do much work
himself, Sam used to say.

Part of Cowleas farm Jay on the steep hill-
side of the downs near the sea, and there the
donkeys and their panniers were very useful,
as the sure-footed animals could easily go
where no cart or waggon could travel; and
they were employed in various ways—in carry-
ing away the couch-grass to a heap after the
women had picked it, or in gathering in the



14 FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS.

turnips and mangold, and often in bringing
up the sea-weed from the shore for manure for
the land.

Jack, Frank’s eldest brother, who was
mostly with the oxen—except in harvest, or
other busy times, when an extra hand was
wanted—was old enough to have lads under
him, and could already plough a furrow
with the best of them.

Now you can fancy what an unbounded
pleasure it was to little Frank, after school
was over, to take his sister’s hand, and ramble
down the hill from their cottage, past the
little church, and wait for his father’s return
with the horses. And then he would watch
the long string of them, as they passed in
their jingling harness; and sometimes he
would be taken up for a ride; or the two
little ones would peep in through the doors of
the ox-barton, and see the great creatures, with
their beautiful eyes and long horns, panting
and lowing, and snuffing the sweet hay, whilst
their necks were being freed from the heavy
yoke and they sauntered to their stalls.

And when the children had wandered up as
far as the blacksmith’s shop on the other side



FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS. 18

of the hill, to see if anything was being done
there, it was time to go back to tea,

One reason why they liked the blacksmith’s,
besides the attraction of the red-hot iron, and
the ding-dong of the hammer, and the glow-
ing and scattering sparks, and the puffing
bellows, was because there the oxen were shod.
And that was a sight they would not lose for
anything, though it used to make them rather
timid, and their hearts beat fast when they
saw the huge creature lying swung on its back,
with its feet strapped tightly, grunting and
moaning as if its end was come.

“Well, if I was an ox,” Martha used to say,
“JT would stand like a horse to be shod, and
not be turned up and down that way.”

“You couldn’t,’ was the usual remark from
another looker-on; whereupon a_ discussion
would arise, into the particulars of which we
will not enter.

Well, on fine afternoons, when there was
nothing else to be seen, or no game on foot
with the others, this was Martha and Frank’s
usual walk, but they did not see an ox shod
every day. But at different times of the year—
for instance at sheep-shearing, or hay-harvest,



16 FRANK'S SCHOOLING BEGINS.

or reaping, or leasing, or threshing in the great
barn—there was much to be done, and you
may be sure the children did not throw away
their opportunities of seeing the fun, whatever
it was.

Now, before Frank had been many weeks
at school he began to rebel.

It was of no use, as he found, to try to get
away before the clock struck four, for the
nature of Mrs. Sharp the school-mistress was
too much like her name. So it entered into
his little head one bright morning, that he
would not go to school at all that day; and
when Martha was ready to start, Master Frank
was nowhere to be found.

She called him again and again, and looked
here and there for him, and at last went in to
her mother, and said that if she waited any
longer, she herself would be late. So Mrs.
Martin bade her set off, and she would bring
Frank when she found him.

But find him she could not. She asked
her neighbours, but no one had seen the truant,
and she began to be uneasy at the loss of her
child. She ran down to the pond, for Frank

was fond of watching the circles in the water
(144)



FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS, 17

which the trout made when they jumped ; but
a man working there had seen nothing of him.
She sent to the farm-yards and stables, and
spent an hour in running about, asking ques-
tions of every one she met, and at last made
up her mind that he had been stolen by a
gipsy party who had passed through the
village that morning.

In a sad state, she posted off to ask her
husband’s advice, who was at work some dis-
tance off with his horses. But while she
was gone, little Luke Collins went in to his
mother, who lived next door to the Martins,
and said, “Mother, I know where Frank
Martin is!”

“Where is he, then?” said his mother.

“ He’s in along with old Rover,’ said the
child.

“What?” cried Mrs. Collins, running out
and looking into Rover’s barrel; and sure
enough, there, at the further end, lay the
truant, curled up, on most excellent and com-
fortable terms with his host.

Old Rover was a sheep-dog, now long past
work, who had done good service for Collins
the shepherd in his time, and he was much

(144) 2



18 FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS.

gratified at the condescension of his visitor in
making himself so much at home in his barrel,
and would have resented Mrs. Collins’ inter-
ference with the arrangement had he dared.

“You naughty boy,” said Mrs. Collins,
“come out directly ; your mother has been
looking for you these two hours and more!
Come out at once !”

But Frank did not stir.

“ Come out this minute. Do you hear what
I say?”

He heard very well, but chose to remain
where he was, and Rover wagged his tail, and
looked happiness itself. Mrs, Collins next
threatened a whipping, but Frank preferred
the barrel.

There was quite a crowd collected by this
time, and many could not understand it at all,
and asked, “ What is it?” “Who is she talk-
ing to?” “ What is in there?” whilst the rest
were very much amused and interested, and
awaited the result.

But now Mrs. Collins changed her tone, and
began to try coaxing. “Come out, then,” said
she; “there’s a good boy, and mother ’ll give
you something, I dare say.”



FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS. 19

But Frank was not to be tempted by any
such vague promises.

“Look here, Franky dear,’ said Mrs. Col-
lins, searching for something, “here’s a pretty
thing I’ve got in my pocket;” but as she only
produced a thimble and a piece of wax, the
children and the neighbours burst out into a
laugh, so that plan also failed of its pur-
pose.

At last Mrs. Collins’ stock of patience was

at an end, and down she went on her hands
and knees. ‘“ You bad little piece of disobedi-
ence!” cried she, “if I don’t get in and pull
you out myself!” thereupon she put her head
into the barrel and tried to get hold of Frank’s
frock, to have him out by main force, whilst
old Rover danced on her back with excite-
ment.
* Unfortunately the barrel was too long and
narrow, and the sturdy little fellow held on so
tight, that moving him by this means was out
of the question. When, however, he saw Mrs.
Collins’ head and shoulders appear he begaa to
cry out lustily, but on finding that his position
was so safe and strong, he became as silent as
before.



20 FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS.

And now, seeing the crowd collected, Mr.
Stock rode up to ask what was the matter,
just when Mrs, Collins was backing out of the
barrel, and having laughed very heartily at
the position of things, rode off to tell Mrs..
Martin that her child was found. .

But before she reached home Richard Duke
had knocked away the pegs that kept it down,
and had taken the barrel up in his strong
arms, and the culprit had been rolled out on
to the ground without ceremony, amid the
jokes and laughter of the lookers on; and
though Mrs. Martin could not resist joining in
the general amusement, she was grieved that
her son’s bad behaviour was the cause.

Frank’s father did not come home in the
middle of the day, having taken his dinner
with him to the field; but in the evenin he
lifted the little fellow on his knee and a
“What I am going to tell you, my lad, it
won't do Jack and Sam any harm to hear.”
So they both listened, like good sons, as they
were.

“Would that you, boys,” said their father,
“could always mind that God in heaven (and
the old man pointed upwards) looks to us to



FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS. 2)

do, first, our duty towards him. Then, we have
to do our duty towards one another ; and last,
towards ourselves. Admiral Nelson, at the
Battle of Trafalgar, gave his signal, ‘ England
expects every man to do his duty,’ and that
was not to be done by running away. No;
my lads, never shirk your duty, whatever it is
—if it’s hard work, never mind, do it as best
you can. Nelson gave up his life in doing
his. This little fellow ran away from his duty
to-day. Never play truant again, my lad.
Be a brave boy, and ask Ged for Christ’s sake
to help you to do your duty, and afterwards
youll be ten times happier than if you had
left it undone. Duty sometimes seems to be
a hard mistress, but choose her to serve while
yau are young, and she will stand your friend,
aygend a firm friend, too. And now, little
’un, let me hear no more of your hiding away
from school, and make haste and get your
supper, and off to bed; but first say your
prayers, and ask forgiveness for your disobedi-
ence, and pray that God will give you his Holy
Spirit, and a new heart within; for without his
help we can do nothing right.” And _ this
Frank did at his mother’s knee.



22 FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS.

After that he heard no more at home of his
adventure, except as a joke; but his school-
fellows did not forget it, you may be sure.

Neither did he himself forget it for a long,
long time ; and he never played truant again
all the while he was at school.







CHAPTER II.

SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES.

“Oh, what a tangled web we weave,
When first we practise to deceive.”
Sir W. Scort.











CHAPTER IL

SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES.



(HAT Frank was a cunning little fellow,
we saw in the last chapter. The
affair of the barrel, no great matter
in itself, affords an insight into
his disposition. And the following
practice of his while yet a child, shows a love
of adventure and self-dependence.

He used to try to persuade Martha, and if
she would not come he would go up alone, to
the top of the high hill on the downs, and there
he would sit and watch for a carriage to pass,
whereupon he would run by the side down the
long steep road which led to the village, and
put on and take off the drag, and open the
gates on the bridge, and so gain some half-
pence very likely for his trouble. But the
difficulty then was to decide how it was to
be spent—lI mean in what kind of lollypop. If



26 SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES.

he got a penny only, he spent it; but if more
than a penny his mother put the rest away in
a box to keep for him.

Martha was fond of peppermints, and he
liked liquorice, and the discussions as to which
was the best of the two were wordy and long,
and generally ended in half of the one and
half of the other. And on Sundays, sometimes,
he got a penny for holding the gates open
when people were going to church.

But on one occasion, having had a penny
given them, the children were led by a com-
panion, unknown of course to their father and
mother, to buy sweets on the Lord’s day at an
old woman’s, who kept her shutters up but let
the children in by a back way.

They hesitated a good deal before they
would do this, which they both well knew
was wrong.

But, “ nonsense,” said Susy Sparrow ; “ who'll
know?” and “ where’s the harm? Come along
in,’ said-she, “ Mrs. Brown will let you have
some in a minute;” and so they were tempted,
and gave way in the trial.

They entered, looking very much ashamed
of themselves, and Mrs. Brown on her part was



SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES. 27

surprised to see “the Martins’ children ” there,
but she very soon let them have what they
asked for, and put the penny into her pocket,
saying they were good children, and gave
Frank a bull's eye over. But, as they were
going out, she added, “I only do it as a
favour, you know, my dears, but make haste
and eat ’em before you get home. And you
needn’t say anything about it, you know.” ©

For she said to herself, “How Mrs. Martin’
would go on if she knew! And there’s Miss
Margaret, goodness me! I hope these children
won't go saying I keeps the shop open 0’
Sundays, or I shall be in for it from Miss
Margaret.”

Ah ! when we do wrong how we dread being
found out! There were in this little matter
of a pennyworth of sweets four individuals
who feared to be found out. Their conscience
made cowards of them all. But was it fear
of man or of God that troubled them most?
Alas! I am afraid that neither Susy Sparrow
nor Mrs. Brown had any fear at all of God
before their eyes. But little Frank said to his
sister before they joined Susy Sparrow, who
was waiting for them,—



28 SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES.

“ Martha, will God be very angry?”

And Martha answered sharply to hide her
own. feelings,—

“Don’t be a silly boy; it’s only a penny,
just for once.”

And the words seemed to soothe them both
as they were spoken ; for that “only just for
once” is the easy excuse which Satan prompts
to quiet the pricking conscience at the first be-
ginnings of evil, and the laughter and light
talk of Susy Sparrow did the rest, so the chil-
dren soon nearly forgot all about it, and the
liquorice and peppermint tasted nicer, they
thought, than ever it did before.

But it was time for afternoon Sunday school,
and, as they had the sweeties in their pockets,
they could not keep their fingers off them, but
every now. and then popped one into their
mouths, when they thought “teacher” was not
looking; and when their turn came to read,
there was a good deal of mouthing and mum-
bling, and a great deal of inattention and losing
of their places, neither did they know their
verse nor their hymn when they were called
on to say them.

Now, among its other prominent qualities,



SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES. 29

peppermint diffuses a defined aromatic odour,
acceptable to some, offensive to others, but
perfectly recognizable by all, as the reader
may be aware. And Frank and Martha were
aware of it too, and so cunning were they as
to agree to put off their indulgence in the
choice white lozenges, and pungent, many-
coloured drops, and only to eat their liquorice
during the presence of the young lady, their
mistress, as fearing detection and punishment.

But when school-time was nearly over,
Martha, who had finished her share of the
liquorice, could not resist the temptation of
trying one of her favourite peppermints, and,
under cover of stooping to the floor, popped
one into her mouth.

“One of you is eating peppermint,” said
Miss Margaret, without raising her eyes from
her book. “Please not to eat anything now,
especially peppermint, which makes my head
ache;” and soon after she glanced round the
class.

Martha coloured deeply, and was doubly
sorry, for she loved the young lady, who came
over the hills, in all weathers, from a long dis-
tance to teach them.

e



30 SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES.

But it so happened that, when Miss Mar-
garet looked round the class, she caught Master
Frank in the very act of withdrawing from his
mouth, as children will, the delicious lump
which had so much occupied the attention re-
quired for his lessons, and therefore, after
school, she said, “ Ah, here is the little fellow
who is so fond of peppermint that he must
eat it even in class,”

“ Please, Miss Margaret,” said Frank, fool-
ishly for his own interests, “it wasn’t me.”

“What! hadn’t you your mouth full of
peppermint, Frank?”

“No, Miss Margaret :”

“ But you had something in your mouth !”

No answer.

“Ah,” said his mistress, “I am afraid you
were trying to make me believe by your
manner, that you were not eating anything.
Be straightforward, Frank, in the smallest
matter. Never try to deceive any one by act
or by word.”

“Please, “twas liquorice,” said Frank at
last.

“Then who, I wonder, was eating that
other nasty stuff?”



SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES. 31

“Tt was me,” said Martha humbly.

“So you two, brother and sister, are the
offenders! Well, I shall ask your mother not
to give you your sweeties just before schoo!
another day. I want to speak to her now.”

So saying, Miss Margaret jumped over the
stile by the school, and went towards Mrs.
Martin's cottage.

“Oh, dear, dear!” said Martha, hanging
behind; “whatever shall we do? What will
mother say? I do wish we'd never bought
fem! It’s all that Susy a-telling of us to go
to Mrs. Brown’s! and there goes Miss Mar-
garet in to speak to mother! Oh, dear,
dear !”

Ah! yes, children, “be sure our sin will
find us out!” It will find us out in our own
consciences, if it be not found out before the
world.

“Twas you bought em,” said Frank, trying
to excuse himself.

“There now,” returned Martha, “’twas no
more I than you! You knew ’twas wrong,
as well as I did, of a Sunday. Oh, I wish I
had something to say to mother!”

“Won't father be angry!” said Frank



32 SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES,

“? Twas all that Susy. We shouldn’t have
had ’em but for her.”

“Yes, I’m sure it was her fault; I shall
tell mother so. She asked us to go in and
buy ’em to-day. I shouldn’t have thought——”

“ Here’s mother,” said Frank.

“ Make haste,” cried Mrs. Martin; “I want
you.” }

“You must say, twas Susy,” said Martha
to Frank, as they hastened on to the cottage
door. :

“Where did you get the peppermints you
were eating in school, then?” asked their
mother at once.

The children together mumbled something
about Susy Sparrow.

“Did Susy Sparrow gie ’em to you?”

“Please, mother, she had some,” said
Martha.

“ Well, and so she had,” was her excuse to
Frank, after Miss Margaret had gone, and
they were alone together. “It wasn’t a lie
to say she had some, for I gave her some
before school.”

But this paltry evasion did not relieve the
weight on her conscience in the least.



SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES. 33

“Mother’s sure to ask her,” said Frank.

“Then, Pll tell her, too, to say she had
some, and then mother’ll think she gave ’em
to us.”

Little steps, very easy, one after another,
just suited to little feet and little limbs. So
short that one more can make no difference at
all, and one leads to the next so fast. Having
taken it, you must take another. But turn,
and look how far down you are! How near
the deep, dark, bottom seems! How hard
the getting up again! What toil! what
labour, to get up the steps that seemed so
easy to go down! So one little fault leads
to another, and then how hard it is to rise
again once more !

Little children had best avoid those down-
ward steps, for they are narrow, dangerous,
slippery steps, and a fall may prove fatal.
See how one yielding to temptation led
Martha and Frank to another. First they
broke the Fourth Commandment, then they
misbehaved in school. They deceived their
teacher, and then their mother, and now have
caused another child to tell a lie to screen

themselves.
(144° 3



34 SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES.

But Satan is a bad pay-master. How they
suffered, those two little ones! And they did
not confess their fault, and ask God to forgive
them, which was the right and only way of
relief.

Though, at first, tne weight of all this sin
seemed too heavy for them to bear, and they
were so silent under it that their father asked
whether they were not unwell, and what was
the matter with them; yet, before long, it
wore off and they were nearly as cheerful as
ever. Now and then, indeed, they talked
about it to one another; but it was not a
pleasant subject.

“We can’t tell now,’
as they were in the road, going down to the
bridge, “and it doesn’t matter.”

“But we'll never do it again,” said Frank.

Just then, Miss Margaret on horseback

2

said Martha, one day,

cantered through the village and up the hill,
and a white-haired old gentleman rode by her
side, who, as they passed the children at a
slower pace, said,—‘ Ah! there is my little
friend, to whom I gave a penny on Sunday
for holding open the gate.”

“Did yon?” said Miss Margaret, who had



Qe

SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES. 35

not forgotten the occurrence of last Sunday,
and was not quite satisfied then with the
children’s behaviour, and, stopping her horse,
she asked Frank what he did with the penny
the gentleman gave him last Sunday.

Frank hung down his head, and could not
answer.

“What did he do with it, Martha? Can-
not you say?”

“No, miss,’ said she, looking very guilty
too.

Frank then burst into sobs, and Martha
followed his example.

“Uncle,” said Miss Margaret, “I can get
nothing from these children. Would you
mind turning back with me to the village? |
wish to ask a question.”

So back they rode, whilst Martha sobbed
out in a fresh burst of tears, “She’s going to
ask Mrs. Brown !”

“Let’s hide,” said Frank.

Martha was right ; and in answer to Miss
Margaret’s questions, Mrs. Brown said,—

“Well, miss, I don’t open my little window
of Sundays, of course not. But I was just.
a-sitting, and reading of a tract, as I always



36 SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES.

do of a Sunday—and a beautiful tract it was.
—one you lent, miss; and they little things
came in and asked me for some peppermints
—which they be very nice—and I said, ‘Oh!
you know, my dears, I never sells of a Sun-
day, because it’s wrong, and a breaking of the
command. But, there, they seemed to long
so, that I gied ’°em a few. Though I’m a
poor woman, I’m fond of the childer’; but
I’ve a hard living to get, miss, I can assure

2”?

ye.
“Mrs. Brown, said Miss Margaret, “I’ve

a reason for asking; did they not give you a
penny in return for what you gave them?”

“Miss, I never sell of a Sunday, let it be
whoever might, or ever so—”

But here the gray-haired old gentleman
broke in,—

“Be so good as to answer Miss Margaret's
question. Did you take a penny of those
children last Sunday, or did you not?”

He was an old general officer, an uncle of
Miss Margaret’s, and. he spoke in a tone not
to be trifled with.

“Well, sir, I ask your pardon; they did
put a penny on the table, as well as I can



SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES. 37

remember; but ’twas against my wish, sir.
If you'll believe me, miss, it was, I can assure
you.”

“Oh, woman,” said the old gentleman,
“why not tell the truth at once, and not add
prevarication to your sin of causing Christ’s
little ones to offend. Your years should have
taught you better things. For a few chil-
dren’s pence, you put a great occasion of fall-
ing in their way, and you tempt them to sin!

“For shame! for shame! Go in and ask
God to work a change by his Spirit in your
heart, where it is greatly needed, before it is
too late; and may your own sin, and the evil
you have caused in others, be forgiven you.
Nay, I will hear no attempt at excuse. There
can be no worthy one. Come, Margaret.”

“Did you know of this bad practice of
hers?” asked he, as they rode away.

“Indeed, yes,” was the answer; “that is, I
suspected it. And I fear it has been a great
hindrance to any work for good among the
little ones of the place. J think that, now
she has had a lesson from you, she will not
forget. But I want to go to that cottage,”
added Miss Margaret, pointing with her whip



38 SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES.

across some fields to a dwelling at a little dis.
tance off

' So she went and spoke with Susy Sparrow,
and then with Mrs. Martin; and when Martha
and Frank came home, and their father heard
it all, it was a sad household that night—very
different from what it generally was; and
both Martha and Frank began thus to learn,
by early and valuable experience, that “the
way of transgressors is hard.”

This chapter began by saying that Frank
was what people call a “sharp lad,” and
doubtless he had his wits about him as he
grew in years and in stature.

But had he not had the blessing of a good
father and mother, and the advantage of going
to a good school in the week, and of teaching
on Sundays, when he was young, there is no
doubt but that he would have proved any-
thing but a credit to his family and parish
when he grew up. And in spite of these
advantages, old self within, and Satan our
enemy, and bad companions, often laid snares,
into which he fell, and only the grace of God
ib was that raised him again. His battle,
dear reader, was yours and mine! We,



SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES. 39

too, have entered into the fight to stand or
fall,

Are you standing firm, in Christ’s strength,
under his banner, and warring in his Spirit;
or are you against him, in the black ranks of
the Evil One, who must yield at last? What
are your words, your actions, your thoughts ?
Look to it, I pray you, for “no man can serve
two masters.”

“Oh, vise thou then, and strive, my soul,
‘To reach the beatific goal!
Thy every nerve and sinew strain,
The crown of glory to obtain!”











CHAPTER III.

iN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST.

\

“Sinful thoughts of pride and passion,
Greedy wishes, selfish care,
In our human hearts lie hidden,
Ready to awaken there.

“411 the wrong way will seem pleasant
Still the right way will seem hard;
All our life we shall be tempted -—
We must ever be on guard.”








CHAPTER III.

IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST.

ENRANK MARTIN’S parents were wise





1) school as long as they could possibly
afford to do so, for both of them
knew the value of a good education,
ana they tried to do the best for their child-
ren’s welfare.

They knew that when he once went to
work, there would not be then much time for
reading and improving himself; so they judged,
at least from his brothers’ example. They
used to come home so tired after their day’s
labour, that they were glad to have their sup-
per and go to bed, and get as much rest as
they could before they were roused, almost at
daylight, the next morning.

Frank was able to read well and write
nicely, and do his sums to his master’s satisfac-



44 IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST.

tion, and had gained a good deal’of useful and
valuable knowledge before he received the
prize to which every scholar was entitled when
leaving the school with credit.

That which Frank obtained after his last
examination at school was a book upon British
Flowering Plants, with coloured pictures. It
was a book which he thought himself most
fortunate to possess ; and indeed it was a very
beautiful prize.

It had been chosen expressly for him, the
master said, after some words of praise for the
good progress he had made of late in his les-
sons, and his general behaviour in school; and
“in losing Frank Martin,” he added, “I lose one
of my best scholars ; and though I should have,
liked to have had him longer with me, yet I
believe that, for his age, he is well prepared
to enter upon the trials of life——as well prepared,
that is,as a boy can be bya sound Christian edu-
cation and training such as I have endeavoured
to give him. And now it chiefly depends upon
himself, with the assisting grace of God’s Spirit,
which is always granted to those who ask for
it faithfully. I would just add these few
words, the advice of a wiser teacher than I am,



IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST. 45

before I shake hands with you, Frank, and bid
you good-bye on leaving the school :

“ «Trust in the Lord with all thine heart ;
and lean not unto thine own understanding.’

“<«TIn all thy ways acknowledge Him, and
He shall direct thy paths.’

“« Be not wise in thine own eyes: fear the
Lord, and depart from evil.’ ”

And then his kind good master shook Frank
by the hand, and wished him many good
wishes for the future, and God’s. blessing
wherever he went, and in all he undertook
that was right and honourable in the state of
life in which he was placed by the providence
of God.

And then Miss Margaret, having said how
pleased she was to hear such a good report,
put the book into Frank’s hand with the
words,—‘“I know that you are fond of flowers;
and as I hear you intend to be a gardener, it
will not only be interesting, but useful, I hope.”

Yes; Frank had got a place in Mr. Stock’s
garden: he was to be an assistant there, and
to make himself generally useful besides; and
his parents were very much gratified that
Mr. Stock had chosen their Frank, as ne would



46 IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST.

not only be able to learn gardening, but a
great many other things. It was a capital
situation, they thought, for so young a lad, and
a good recommendation also in future, if he
kept it for some time.

But how did Miss Margaret know that he
was fond of flowers? She had found it out in
this way. Among the many good deeds which
she had done for the village, of which any one
thereabouts could give an account, and because
of which she was heartily loved by all, both
young and old, she had established a cottage-
garden show for vegetables, fruit, and flowers,
which was held every summer in a spacious
tent in the park. That show-day was a
holiday for all the parish—for every one at
least who could possibly be spared—and there
was a band of music, and cricket and football
for the young men and boys; and a stroll round
the beautiful pleasure-grounds and gardens,
and a tea in the evening, for the elder folk.

I ought to tell you that Miss Margaret was
the daughter of the owner of the large estate,
a great part of which Mr. Stock farmed, and
that was why she interested herself so much
in the welfare of the people, and why they



IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST. 47

knew her so well, and honoured her so
highly.

But her gentle Christian life and her kind
and charitable heart would have made her be-
loved wherever she was, even though she had
not been the heiress of so many broad acres.
She was like a little queen among her people,
and they esteemed her for her own sake.

Well, at the cottage-garden show there was
a prize offered for the best nosegay of wild-
flowers, and a large one for the best collection
of wild-flowers, laid out with their names on
paper, to be competed for by children of the
village school only.

When the show was first set on foot, and
the bills were printed and sent round to the
cottagers, it was stated that a prize would be
given “for the best bouquet of wild-flowers ;”
and what do you think one brought to the
tent on the morning of exhibition, but a clean
new bucket, garlanded with wreaths, and the
handle highly ornamented and decorated with
all the bright blossoms the fields could produce

This caused many a hearty laugh ; but the
next year the schoolmaster wrote noseyay
instead, a good old English word which every



48 IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST.

one could understand, instead of the fine
French one, which had no business on the
bills of an English cottage-garden show.

But the year before he left school, Frank
had made up his mind that he would try his
best to carry off the wild-flower prizes. He
took a deal of trouble about his nosegay ; he
set it up again and again, and time after time
he took it down and kept adding fresh flowers
and changing others, until the colours and the
arrangement suited his taste. And he was
not unrewarded for the care and the pains
that he had taken, for he gained the first
prize.

As to the dried collection of wild-flowers
named, he and Martha worked at it hard all
the year previously, and sent it in as their
ioint production; and it obtained an extra
prize for its excellence. But it was more of
Martha’s prize than Frank’s, as he himself
acknowledged, though his name was sent in
with hers.

He helped to find the flowers, and re- -
membered some of their names; but Martha’s
careful, skilful fingers spread them out, as her
mistress had shown her, on the paper, and she



IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST. 49

had written the names underneath each one;
and to her Miss Margaret handed the unex-
pected reward, with a warm word or two of
praise, at her diligence, and neatness, and care.

But Frank was most of all anxious about a
fuchsia, with which le boped to take the prize
for window plants.

It was a cutting which his mother had
raised, but which Frank had taken under his
care, and had been nursing most tenderly and
training with all his skill for the show. And
certainly he had managed it remarkably well.
When the day came, the plant was covered
with a profusion of blossom; and success
seemed certain.

It had hitherto been standing on the win-
dow-ledge of the cottage at home, and every
passer-by could not but stop to admire it.
With great pride Frank carried it to the tent,
and placed it beside his nosegay.

“ What a beautiful fuchsia,” somebody said ;
“it won’t get the prize, though !”

Frank’s heart leaped into his mouth. What
did they mean? Surely no one had a finer



fuchsia than his—he thought it impossible.
Although it was against the rules, he walked

(144) 4



50 IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST.

quickly up the tent among the fruits, and
vegetables, and flowers, which lay in wild
disorder, awaiting arrangement on the tables ;
and, true enough, in a corner of the tent there
stood a fuchsia, with which his own could not
for a moment be compared.

It was trained on wire in the shape of a
cone—a perfect sheet of bloom on every side,
or rather all round the plant. Hach separate
blossom, tvo, was finer than his; of more
brilliant colour and contrast, and in newer and
later fashion.

He glanced at the name on the card—
“ Joseph Harris.”

Frank set his teeth together, and, pale with
disappointment and rage, took up his fuchsia,
and carrying it outside the tent, and behind
the trunk of a large elm-tree that overshadowed
the spot, dashed it to the ground. And then
he leaned against the trunk of the tree, and
looked at what he had done.

“T don’t care,” he said; ‘I don’t care one
bit!” and he breathed some wicked, angry
words against Joe Harris.

“T wish it had been his fuchsia,” he said
at last. “Not that I care for the prize ;



IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST. 51

I wouldn't have it if they gave it to
me,”

And so on. He kept uttering strings of
foolish, wicked thoughts that came into his
mind—things that he did not mean, and words
that he would have shuddered to use at any
other time—for the devil was in his heart
then. He had given place to the spirit of
evil by the indulgence of his passion; and
now he was, as it were, out of his right mind.

Frank was not a passionate fellow in general.
He could at most times curb his temper and
rule his spirit. But the evil was lurking in
him. It was there, although it did not
always come to the surface, and show itself in
such an ugly form as now it did. Ay, and
this is the case with us all!

To have our fond hopes dashed to the
ground—our dearest wishes thwarted—-the
work, and labour, and care of many anxious
hours, and the pleasant dreams of reward, aud
success, and praise suddenly destroyed and
dispelled—would be a very severe and painful
trial, dear reader, for you and for me. Our
enemies within us and without are not dead.
The corruption of the old self is not vet purged



52 IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST.

away, and the new man wholly raised up in
us; for even St. Paul was forced to exclaim,
in bitterness of spirit, “ When I would do
good, evil is present with me.”

Ah! what need have we of fervent and
constant prayer for the converting, renewing,
and strengthening grace of God’s Holy Spirit!

The good work had been begun in Frank’s
heart, but he was surprised into sin; and “let
him that thinketh he standeth take heed lest
he fall.”

But soon Frank began to see how wrong
and how foolish he had been; and _ bitter
mental punishment quickly followed. He
looked at the ruin of his favourite plant with
different eyes, and the sight brought him to
himself.

“Ah! what have I been saying! How I
have sinned! God forgive me! I didn’t
think that ever I should let such words pass
my lips again! Why, I am as bad as the
worst of them! And what a piece of folly to
pitch the flower down this way !”

And then, leaning against the tree, his tears
burst forth. And——ay, but the punishment
was a bitter one!



IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST. §3

Shame, remorse, the sense of his lost time
and pains, and, not least, penitence and sorrow
for having so lost the command of his angry
passion, and having given Satan the vic-
tory: all this seemed nigh to overwhelm
him.
“Oh! what have I done! what have I
done!” he sobbed; and certainly, in that
moment, at least, he thought but very little of
hinself.

Now when, afterwards, Frank called to
mind the events of this show day, yes, years
afterwards



for he was not careless or forgetful
of the experience he gained of the truth of
that Bible proverb, “ He that trusteth in his
own heart is a fool”—he ever counted it as
one of the greatest providences of his life, or
one of the greatest signs of God’s goodness
towards himself, that he was enabled to get
the better of his passion, and to recover his
self-possession when he did.

And you will think so, too, reader, when I
tell you that all the while poor Frank was
sobbing and leaning with his head upon his
arm against the trunk of the elm-tree, there
stood Joe Harris before him, hardly concealing



54 IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST.

his laughter and exultation at what he took
to be Frank’s accident to his fuchsia.

Had Frank but seen him a minute or two
-before, with his pointed finger and mocking
face, and who knows what his heated and un-
curbed passion might not have led him to do!

« Ah,” he used to say, when in after-life he
would repeat the story —‘“ah, I do not consider
it a small thing, I think it a crowning mercy!
for there was, I shudder to say it, there was
« heavy mallet which the men had used to
knock in the pegs of the tent lying ready to
my hand, as if Satan had placed it there; and
if I could destroy my favourite flower in my
madness, who knows but that I might not
have lifted my hand against him whom I then
hated with all my soul (may God forgive me!)
and who found me out and gibed at me in the
moment of my weakness and distress !”

As it was, God being merciful to him,
Frank quickly recovered himself, and spoke
not a word. He lifted up his plant, and
pressed the earth together around the roots,
and placing it in the largest fragment of the
pot, laid it over his arm, and quickly walked
off, with no other feelings than those of dis-



IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST. 55

tress and shame at his own sinfulness and
folly.

After such a sharp battle as this, of the
evil against the good, of old self against new
self, of Satan against Christ, in the soul of
one of Christ’s soldiers serving in the war-
fare of this trial state, you might think he
would be left at peace for a breathing space.

But not so. Our soul’s enemies are never-
wearying ; they are ceaseless in their attacks
upon our peace: and often when the Christian
soldier is weakest and most faint-hearted, or
is careless and off his guard, or, rejoicing in a
victory, is confident in his own strength, the
trial again presents itself in a more dangerous
form, and the struggle is renewed wherein he
must either stand or fall.

Perhaps you may guess what poor Frank’s
trial now was.

It was to avoid telling a lie as to how the
mishap came about.

He bore the broken plant home in his arms
in a very sad and downcast spirit, and in-
stantly his mother caught sight of him, of
course she exclaimed,—

“Why, Frank, what has happened to the



56 IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST.

fuchsia ?”——and, of course, Martha ran out and
overwhelmed him with questions; and how
easy it would have been to have said, “I let
it fall and broke it.” Then he would have
had sympathy and kind words, and sorrow
for the accident ; and he would not only have
got over the difficulty easily, but pleasantly,
in which he found himself, when he came to
explain how his beautiful flower was so de-
plorably ruined.

It was a difficult thing to say, “I threw
the fuchsia down in a rage because Joe Harris
had a better one !”

Ah, yes! it is hard to speak the truth, very
often, especially when it tells against our-
selves. However, Frank did not yield to the
temptation.

For a long time he was silent, and at last
he said, “ Well, mother, you cannot be more
sorry than I am! I can’t say it was an
accident, for it wasn’t. But Joe Harris has a
fuchsia at the show, and it’s a better one than
mine, and I got angry and threw it down.
There ! that’s the truth. I’ve been a foolish
chap, and now I’m sorry for it, and let’s say
no more about it.”



IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST. 57

And his mother and Martha did say no
more about it, though they were very sorry
too. But by-and-by they made themselves
ready, and all three set out for the show.
And at the end of one of the tables stood
Joe’s fuchsia, but no prize-card on it. Why,
how was this? It was by far the best flower
exhibited by a cottager, and yet it had not the
prize.

“If you please, sir,” asked Frank of one of
the judges, “ how is it that fuchsia does not
take the prize for window-plants?”

“Oh,” said he, “that is no window-plant,
If you were anything of a gardener, you
would know that plants always turn towards
light; but this is equally good all round. Be-
sides,” added he, “1 have reasons for knowing
that this fuchsia was bought of a florist a day
or twoago. No one in our parish has trained
this plant, and this prize has been withheld
for this year, as no bond fide window-plant
has been exhibited worthy of it.”

So
would have taken the prize after all,

without any doubt, Frank’s fuchsia

?









CHAPTER IV.

WORK IN EARNEST.

“ He toils at een, he toils at morn,
His work is never through ;
A coming life o' weary toil
Ts ever in his view;
But on he trudges, keeping aye
A stout heart to the brae,
And proud to be an honest man
Until his dying dsy.”
R. Nico.











CHAPTER IV.

WORK IN EARNEST.




30 Frank went to Mr. Stock’s, and was
set to work in the garden. And
very glad was old Ralph Churchill to
have a boy under him. He had been

gardener and sexton as long as most
people could remember, and though he was
getting rather past his work, Mr. Stock would
not turn him away, but gave him extra
help.

Ralph had been a hard-working man in his
time, and if now he was somewhat slow and
deliberate in his actions, his breath was short
and his joints were stiff, and he used often to
be saying, “I don’t feel so young as I did
years agone.”’ But he was sharp enough upon
Frank, and would not allow him to idle.

“ Holloa, you there !” he would say, “what
are you at, cheating the master! He pays.



62 WORK IN EARNEST.

you for work, don’t he, and not for making a
scare-crow of yourself!”

And then Frank would set to again, find-
ing it more trying to his good resolutions of
industry and perseverance than he had ex-
pected.

Indeed, he used to look upon it in the light
of a holiday, when old Ralph was occupied by
his other duties in the church-yard, as he
used to take it a little easier then.

But he would recall to mind what his father
had said once when he was laughing at old
Ralph. “He’s quite right: the master has
bought your time and the labour of your
hands; and if you don’t give him his due, but
waste your time and shirk your work, you
cheat your master. Put yourself in the
master’s place, and see how youd like to have
your money thrown away.”

“Ay,” added his mother, “he should do
it to the Lord, and not to please man
only.”

And so Frank and old Ralph did not often
fall out, and Ralph used to say “he was a
pretty good boy ; though,” of course he added,
“T have known better.”



WORK IN EARNEST. 65

Now, one autumn afternoon Frank was
busily digging potatoes, throwing the bad
ones in a heap, and wheeling off the others to
a shed, and hoping to get the piece finished
before old Ralph came back, when he was
startled by hearing a voice behind him:
“Well, if you ain’t working like a nigger !”

It was Bob the stable-boy leaning over the
top of the wall. “TI heard the bell going,”
said he, “and as I knew youd be lonely, I’ve
come to keep you company a bit.”

“ But master’ll be out in a minute,” said
Frank,

“ He’s just rode off or I shouldn’t be here,”
was the reply: which was very true; for if
ever there was an eye-servant, Bob Partridge
was one.

He sat down on the wall and pulled out
some twine out of one pocket, and putting
his hand carefully into another, took out a
young white ferret, to the collar of which he
tied the twine, and let it run about over him
and along the wall for his amusement.

“Well, I wouldn’t be in your shoes,” said
he, “ to be drove about by old Ralph! What's
the good of sweating so; let's go and put the



64 WORK IN EARNEST.

ferret into the rick, and see him work the
rats.”

“No,” said Frank, “I want to finish this
job right away.”

“What’s the odds when ’tis finished? I
say, pitch us up one of those apples, they are
nice ones, they are.”

“How do you know ?” said Frank, who
had missed some from the tree, but thought
his master had gathered them.

“ How do I know?” said Bob laughing; “ by
the taste, to be sure. How should I know
else, you ninny 2”

“You don’t mean that you've been at
7em?” said Frank, who stopped digging
for the first time, and stared with oper
face.

“Why, dear me, what now? Gape your
mouth a little wider! And suppose I have
been at ’em, masterll only think ‘twas
you took ’em. He hain’t a-missed ‘em yet,
then ?”

Frank went on with his work, but his
mind was more busy than his hands. He
saw in a minute what Bob meant, that his
master would suspect the new comer ; and if



WORK IN EARNEST. 65

he told the truth, he thought, there was sure
to be trouble that way, and he might not be
believed into the bargain.

“T say, can’t ye just pitch us an applet
one more or less aint nothing. I’m most
afraid to ask’ for a peach, as I’m pretty sure
they’re counted, and I happen to know one or
two are short already, and it might be un-
pleasant for you, my lad, as they’re fond of
’em in the house, I’m told. But the bell is
stopped.”

He stood upon the wall to see whether
Ralph was coming back, when a brick gave
way, and down he slipped into the garden,

“Ah! there goes the bell again. Well, as
you were uncivil enough not to invite me, I
must help myself,” and so saying he picked
an apple, which he put into his pocket.

“Look here,” he said, “you’re new and
raw, you know. Master don’t mind us help-
ing ourselves. Now you've got some rabbits
at home, so I'll leave the corn-bin open, after
Adam has fed the horses, and you can just
fill your pockets, or I don’t mind a small bag,
only you must put it in the hedge and fetch
it after dark, dy’e see ?”—but then espying

(144) 5



66 WORK IN EARNEST.

Sally the maid, off he went to idle and romp
with her.

But this pilfering and dishonesty, which
Bob seemed to make so light of, was new and
strange to Frank, and to say the truth, his
whole soul seemed to recoil from it with
abhorrence. He remembered being punished
some time ago for dipping his fingers into his
mother’s treacle, and again for breaking off the
sweet corners of the new loaves; but he had
no idea that servants ever could do as Bob
did. Ah, those were happy days when we
were innocent of the wickedness we now are
aware of, and which, alas, we hasted to learn.
How little has that gross knowledge added to
our peace of mind ?



nay, rather, of how much
has it deprived us ¢

We are not as we once were. The root of
original sin has forced up rank, fast-growing,
suckers, which have drawn away much
strength, if they have not endangered our
spiritual life. Cut them down, root them out
of the soil of the heart, even though it bea
toilsome and painful task.

Christ said, “It is profitable” (or expedient)
“for thee that one of thy members should



WORK IN EARNEST. 6?

perish, and not that thy whole body should
be cast into hell” Pray God to create a new
heart and renew a right spirit within, that
the body of sin may be destroyed, that we
may live no longer to ourselves, but to him
who died for our sins, and rose again for our
justification. :

Beyond a lecture which Ralph administered
upon the evil of picking and stealing, the
former of which expressions Ralph interpreted
solely with reference to garden fruit, Frank
heard nothing further relating to Bob’s depre-
dations ; indeed, he was led to believe that
Ralph’s lecture was only intended as a warn-
ing for his own guidance in future with the
fruit before his eyes, for Ralph believed that,
with boys in general, seeing and tasting is one
and the same thing.

But from that time Frank used to have his
suspicions, which however he kept to himself,
concerning a certain covered basket which
Sally would pass into Bob’s hands in the
evening sometimes, and which he would carry
to his home; and Frank, as much as_ he pos-
sibly could, tried to avoid his company. When
he was at Sunday school he had learnt the



68 WORK IN EAKNEST

first psalm by heart ; and Miss Margaret had
explained the first verse to him in such a
forcible and descriptive manner that he never
forgot it. He used to say it over to himself
sometimes, and not unfrequently the whole
psalm, for it seemed to comfort, and strengthen,
and do him good.

But Bob was not long in Mr. Stock’s service.
His master very soon had a suspicion that his
character was none of the best ; and he was by
no means satisfied by the way in which his
work was done: yet Bob was clever enough so
to deceive Mr. Stock’s sharp eye, that he did
not know things were so bad as they were. .

But this is how he came to be dismissed at
a day’s notice; and you may be sure it wasa
warning to Frank, and a lesson that he minded
more than twenty pieces of advice from old
Ralph, or his father even.

“Frank,” said Mr. Stock one day, coming
into the garden where he was at work, “you
must leave what you are about, and go home
and get your dinner, and then help Bob to carry
a set of harness into town to the saddler’s ;
and I have told Bob that there is something
to be brought home from Mr. Drench’s, the



WORK IN EARNEST. 69

veterinary surgeon ; now mind you don’t loiter,
but be back as quick as you can, for I want
the medicine at once.”

So Frank got his dinner, and set out with
Bob and the harness to walk about four miles
and a half to the neighbouring town.

It was certainly a hot autumn afternoon, |
but they could have been well back by five |
o’clock, whereas Frank made his appearance
alone, about eight! for before the two had
got far on their road, Bob laid down his share
of their burden by the hedge, and telling Frank
to mind it till he came back, jumped over and
made his way to a wood at some little distance
off, where he remained some time; and when
at length he returned, he had a companion
with him, and both appeared in the best of
spirits. The newcomer, who was a young
man older than Bob, was smoking a short pipe,
and over his arm were slung some rabbit
nets, and at his heels a lurcher dog followed,
and the pockets of his ragged coat seemed
heavy and laden.

Frank took a dislike to this ill-conditioned
acquaintance of Bob’s the moment he set his
eyes on him; and when he heard him speak.



70 WORK IN EARNEST.

his judgment was confirmed, for without an
oath he seemed scarcely able to open his
mouth.

The three then proceeded on the road
towards the town, while Frank did not add
much to the conversation. Indced, the chief
part of it he did not understand, as it seemed,
by the mocking laugh they raised, when he
asked why they should choose the night for
an “owl-hunt,” about which they were speak-
ing.

By-and-by, on nearing the town, Bob and
his companion stopped at a public-house, while
Frank sat outside; and when Bob came out,
he was more merry than ever. However,
they left the harness at the saddlev’s, and got
the two bottles of medicine at the veterinary
surgeon’s ; and then Bob said he had another
errand to do. So Frank followed him through
street after street, and down a narrow alley,
and into a yard, where was a big fierce dog,
which flew out at them, but which shrunk
back into its kennel when it heard Bob’s
voice, as if it knew him. And then a door
was opened, and Bob was hailed by his name,
and told to come up stairs, while Frank was



WORK IN EARNEST. 7)

left sitting in a room below, with the bottles
of medicine in his hands. And there he sat
long enough to remember every article in the
room; whilst from above, such noisy language
reached his ears as he never heard before, and
he hoped he might never hear again.

It was a mason’s abode, apparently, in which
he found himself, for trowels, and brushes, and
a bucket were in a corner; whilst a_bull-
terrier lay near, eyeing him very suspiciously,
and a gun, and nets, and wires, and a large
cage of rats, seemed to show that the mason
had sporting tastes.

Frank did not know what time it was, but
saw it was getting late; and though anxious
to get home, dared not stir for fear of the bull-
terrier, who pricked up his ears whenever he
made a movement; and then he remembered
the savage brute in the yard.

By-and-by Bob made his appearance, but
with a flushed face and unsteady step, and,
throwing a shilling to Frank, cried, “ Ha!
ha! have ye had asleep? There’s my name-
sake for ye; but mind ye say nought where
yeve bin to,” he added, in a lower key, while
the man offered him to drink out of a case



72 WORK IN EARNEST.

bottle. Frank said he didn’t want to drink;
but Bob grew so angry, that he put the bottle
to his lips. It was like liquid fire, and he
quickly withdrew it, to the drunken amuse-
ment of Bob and his friend.

By the time they reached the street the
sun was nearly set, and Frank said, “ We
ought to have been home by now.”

“ What do I care,” was the answer. “I’m
going to make a night of it. Look here!”
And he pulled out a handful of silver, some of
which he scattered in the road.

Frank now began to see that his duty was
to get home as soon as possible with the
bottles of medicine, and leave Bob to his own
devices; but he could not manage to slip
away till Bob entered the public-house once
more to find his friend.

And then Frank hurried home, and told
Myr. Stock all about it, where he had been,
and what he had done; and from that day
Bob ceased to be Mr. Stock’s stable-boy, as
you may suppose, and Frank had heard and
seen more of the wickedness that is in the
world than ever he had before in his life.

And that night he prayed, and his mother



WORK IN EARNEST. 73

prayed with him, that he might be kept from
it, although his lot seemed cast in the midst
of evil, and that Christ, who died for sinners,
would pardon those who were given up to it,
and change their hearts, and lead them to
better ways before it was too late.

Events which shortly happened explained
to Frank much that was a mystery to him
that day, and they are detailed in the next
chapter.











CHAPTER V.

{N WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER.

“Ah! well do I wot the perils and snares
Of this bad world and its lust ;
Temptations and sorrows, vexations and cares,
Grow with the young heart’s wheat like tares,
And worry it down to the dust.

“Yet better, I know, if the spirit will pray
When trouble is near at hand;
If the heart pleads hard for grace to obey,
Brother, no sin shall lure thee astray ;
By faith thou still shalt stand.

** For heaven bends over to help and to bless,
With all a Redeemer’s power,
The spirit that strives, when evils oppress,
Its God to serve, and its Lord to confess,
In dark temptation’s hour.

“Thou, then, fair brother, go cheerily forth,
And manfully do your best,
In all sincerity’s warmth and worth
Go forth—be pure, be happy on earth,
And so evermore be blest.”











CHAPTER V.

IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER.



{HE immediate result of Bob’s dismissal
was, that Frank had to do double
“ work; but then, at the same time,
his wages were increased, and so he
did not mind it, especially as it
showed his master had confidence in him, and
was pleased at his efforts to do his duty.

And how tired he was when he got home
in the evenings, sometimes not till late! He
often would fall asleep over his supper, and
used to try all sorts of plans to keep in mind
what he was doing when he asked God to
pardon his offences of the day past, for Jesus
Christ’s sake, and to bless him, and his father
and mother, and brothers and sisters, and
while he repeated our Lord’s prayer before he
tumbled into bed. And when his father
ealled him in the early gray light of the morn-



78 IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER.

ing, he seemed to have been but a minute or
two asleep; but he soon was ready for his
cup of tea; and then his father asked God’s
blessing on the day thus begun, and the
family separated, each one to his appointed
labour.

Not much time was there, then, for reading
or writing, or learning anything from a book ;
indeed, he scarcely saw one except on Sundays,
and then he was so sleepy and tired, he could
not read much. Besides, what with going to
church and attending to his horses, and a
better dinner than usual, Sunday soon passed
away, and on Monday morning to work again.

And yet, how he rejoiced when Saturday
evening came; for besides that Sunday was a
day of rest, be loved it as the Lord’s day, the
best of all the seven: for then he heard of the
kindness and love of God our Saviour towards’
man; he “heard of heaven, and learned the
way ;” the soothing tidings of the gospel of
peace and God’s good will then cheered and
comforted him; and holy and solemn words
of advice and warning became as a light to
his feet and a lamp to his path.

And when he began to encounter the troubles



IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER. 79

and trials of man’s life here, he felt that he
needed assistance, and a stronger arm than any
of flesh and blood to hold up his goings in the
right paths; he wanted guidance and comfort
above that which man could give; and, hap-
pily, he knew where to seek for and obtain it.

And Sunday, therefore, when he could ap-
proach the mercy-seat, in quiet moments of
meditation, and in the congregation of the
faithful, was a glad and happy day to hin.
And then, too, he would look back on the
past, and ask God, for his Saviow’s sake, to
pardon all that was amiss; and he would go
forth to meet the future with a manly heart,
in the strength that Christ can give.

His mother liked this hymn which they
used to sing, and Frank liked it too, and would
say afterwards, “That’s true, that is!” and
at the end :—

2

would add an “ Amen’

“Sad and weary were our way,
Fainting oft beneath our load,
But for thee, thou blessed day—
Resting-place on life's rough road:
Here flow forth the streams of grace;
Strengthened hence we run our race

“Soon, too soon, the sweet repose
Of this day of God will ceese;



80 IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER.

Soon this glimpse of heaven will close;
Vanish soon the hours of peace:

Soon return the toil, the strife,

All the weariness of life.

* But the rest which yet remains
For thy people, Lord, above,
Knows nor change, nor fears, nor pains—-
Endless as their Saviour’s love:
Oh! may every Sabbath here
Bring us to that rest more near.”

Now one Monday morning Frank was sent
for, as Mr. Stock wished to speak with him
in the house; and great was his wonder when
he saw “the general,” and another gentleman,
and Enoch the gamekeeper there. Still higher
did his astonishment rise, when Mr. Stock
ordered him to repeat his account of his doings
in the town on the day when he carried the
harness thither with Bob Partridge.

Frank, having made his bow of course, told
all that occurred to the very best of his
memory; and on being asked if he thought he
should know Bob’s friend again on seeing him,
he answered, “ Yes; he would know him any-
where.” “And the man in the house, who
seemed to be a mason?” But Frank was not
sure, yet thought he would know him again if
he were dressed the same. Having described



IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER. 81

the appearance of both these persons as well as
he was able, Mr. Stock told him to leave the
room, but to stay in the garden or stables
until further orders, and on no account to men-
tion a word of what had passed to any one.

“What did master want ye for there?”
asked old Ralph, directly Frank got back to
the garden.

“ Well, he wanted to speak to me,’
Frank.

“ Eh, lad! and what did he say?”

Frank was not going to disobey his master,
but he was afraid of offending Ralph, and a
lie was out of the question.

“ He’s coming out to speak in a minute,”

D

said

he said.

“ What did Enoch want in there with him,
I wonder; did ye hear?” next asked the old
man.

“No, I didn’t,” said Frank shortly. “There's
that setter-pup among the chickens again, I
do believe.’ And off he went, as the wisest
mode of getting out of his difficulty.

Soon afterwards Mr. Stock came into the
garden, and asked Ralph where Frank
was.

144) 6



82 IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER.

“Did you speak to me, sir?” said Ralph,
pretending not to hear.

“Why, your hearing is worse than usual,
I think,” said Mr. Stock. “ Where is Frank?’
he shouted.

“ Wouldn’t I do instead, sir?” said the old
man.

“Go, then, and open the gate for ‘the
general?” And Mr, Stock walked away,
leaving Ralph grumbling to himself in high
disgust at the order; and very sour was his
face when “the general” said, “ Why, Ralph,
you're as nimble as a boy.”

He was terribly afraid “the general” would
have thrown him a halfpenny, when, I think,
he would have died of vexation, for numbers
of people were about, and they laughed as it
was. But it served him right, did it not?

Mr. Stock found Frank in the yard, and
said, “ Again I must caution you, my boy,
to say nothing to anybody about what I am
now going to tell you, or even to talk of what
you did in town that day with Bub Partridge.
Do you understand me ?”

“ Yes, sir,” said Frank ; “but I have already
told my father and mother about that day.”



IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER. 83

“Well,” said Mr. Stock, “say no more to
any one even at home, as it might be re-
peated. And what I now tell you, must be
kept a secret also. I have good reason to
suspect that Bob Partridge and his friend
whom you saw, and the man in the house
that looked like a mason, are members of a
gang of poachers, if nothing worse, that has
been disturbing this neighbourhood all this
autumn, and we shall require your assistance
in detecting them. Do you understand ?”

“ Yes, sir,” said Frank. “I saw a number
of nets and wires, as I told you; but Bob
spoke of owl-hunting.”

“Did he?” asked Mr. Stock; “ and what
did he say about it ?”

“Well, sir, they both said they had had a
good hunt one night, and they hoped to have
a better in a week or so.”

“Did you hear where 2”

“J think I heard ’em say Cowleas Copse;
but their talk was so strange I did not under-
stand it.”

“And you don’t remember anything else,
nor know what they meant by owls?”

“No, sir.”



84 IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER.

“They meant pheasants,” said Mr. Stock.
“ And now you run home and tell your mother
that I find it more convenient for you to
sleep in the house and have your meals here,
and so she need not expect you home to-night.
Bring your clothes and all that you want, and
say no more to any one.”

So Frank ran home and told his mother,
who was much pleased at his getting his board
at Mr. Stock’s ; and he quickly put his clothes
in a bundle and returned.

“ Some evening, Frank,” said Mr. Stock to
him, “we will go out together and try and
catch a sight of the owl-hunters ?”

So Frank was all excitement in expecta-
tion of some fun. A week passed away, and
Frank heard no more of the matter, and in a
fortnight he had nearly forgotten all about it,
so much was he busied in bustling about his
work. But the worst of it was, that Frank
began to think a great deal of himself.

Being a sharp, handy lad, he was called
here and there; and filling the position of
under-gardener and stable-lad, which he prided
himself on, and earning good wages for his
age, and entrusted with such a secret about



IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER. 85

the poachers, he was puffed up with self-im-
portance, and fancied there never was such a
fellow as he. And of course his fellow-servants
laughed, and played off on him all manner of
tricks, and not unfrequently he brought him-
self into trouble by his forwardness.

For instance, he was told one day to get
Adam the groom, to harness a pony into a
basket-carriage belonging to a visitor at Mr.
Stock’s ; but Frank must needs think he him-
self could do it as well as Adam, who had
taken the pony out, and therefore knew how
to put it in again. And the consequence was,
that at the first hill the carriage followed too
fast on the pony’s heels, and the pony ran
away, and broke the shafts and the harness to
pieces, and kicked the ladies out, who, very
fortunately, were more frightened than hurt.

At another time he would pull about a
rabbit-gin that Adam had told him not to
touch, and it caught his fingers, and made
them sore for many a day.

But the greatest joke against him was his
adventure in the beer cellar. Mr. Stock sent
him in to order the cook to fill a can with
cider for some labourers ; but Frank, not find-



86 IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER.

ing her in the kitchen, thought, “Oh, I can
do it as well as she!” So he opened the
cellar door, which was in a distant passage of
the old rambling house, and, without lighting
a candle, went down the steps, felt his way to
the cider barrel, and soon filled the can, but
could not stop the tap! He turned it this
way and that, but still the cider poured out
upon the stones, and he was in despair. What
should he do? He clapped his hand on the
mouth of the tap and hallooed with all his
might. Leave the cellar he dared not; for
he knew, in the first place, he had no business
there, and the barrel would empty itself in no
time. So all he could do was to keep his
hand tight to the tap’s mouth and shout. And
shout he did; but to no purpose. No one
heard him; and for three long hours Master
Frank paid the penalty for his self-assurance
in the dark, among the black beetles in the
cold cellar, with his hand stuffed against the
cider-tap, till his arm ached as if it would
fall off !

When the maid at last heard the deplorable
wailing which issued from the darkness below,
she was too frightened to go down alone to



IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER, 87

poor Frank’s rescue. But she called a fellow-
servant, and Adam the groom ; and the three,
having armed themselves with a broomstick,
the kitchen poker, and Mr. Stock’s life-pre-
server, with a lighted candle in the other hand,
formed a procession down the cellar stairs—
the cook, with the poker, heading it, and
Adam, with the life-preserver, bringing up the
rear—only to find our hero, very crestfallen
and miserable, with the palm of his hand still
glued fast to the cider-tap. But when the
cook set him free, after a hearty laugh at the
discovery, by two turns of her wrist, the con-
ceit was well out of him, and the joke was not
forgotten for a long time.

And besides all this, he had to bear many
a sneer, and many a jest was made at his
expense, because he was what the other ser-
vants scoflingly termed “religious.” He was
called “Saint Martin,” “Parson Frank,’ and
many other such nicknames, which are not
worth repeating, but sometimes at the moment
they are very hard to bear.

But Frank in this way, as in others, was
inclined to be a little “set up.” He thought
more of himself than he ought to think, for he



88 IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER.

considered himself better than others. He
needed some friendly discipline and chastening ;
he had to be taught how foolish and frail he
was, and to learn that while he was nothing,
Christ was everything. That necessary dis-
cipline came to him in due time. He had his
share of the trials of life, and they brought
him to himself, and by the grace of God they
were made his means of leading him nearer
to the cross of Christ as a humble suppliant,
even as a little child. His self-sufficiency and
self-pride was brought low ; “the world’s rude
furnace ” refined and purified his blood; and
he learned to say, with hearty sincerity and
thankfulness of spirit, “ By the grace of God
I am what I am!”

One evening he was in the stable late, and
by the light of a lantern was busily at work
bedding down a horse which Mr. Stock had
just brought in from a drive of some distance,
and was hissing away and thinking that Adam
himself, the crack groom of all the stables -
round, could not do it in better style, when he
suddenly became aware of a figure beside him,
which made him start and turn pale, and the
horses stopped feeding and turned their heads



IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER. 8&9

to look uneasily at the intruder. Frank was
no coward, and he had many a time laughed
with contempt at the superstitious stories that
were told in that country-side, and had volun-
teered to prove their absurdity over and over
again; but now his blood ran chill, and he felt
a tingling about the roots of his hair as he
rubbed his eyes, and stepped back a step or
two, while Tom, the stable cat, arched its back
and swelled its tail to double its natural size,
and fairly bolted up the ladder into the loft.
As Frank afterwards described it to Mr.
Stock, the figure was a foot or two higher than
a man, and was all in white, with a long ann,
and it spoke in a low hollow voice, and said,—
“Frank Martin, beware! beware! I am
come to warn thee, that if thou tell to any
mortal creature anything whatever, good or
bad, about the persons to whom that good
fellow Robert Partridge spoke, on the day thou
and he went to town; or if thou tell about or
show the house into which thou entered with
that honest fellow Bob Partridge, thou shalt
suffer horribly, yea, horribly !”—&c. &e. And
then came a vivid and blasphemous description
of what would, without fail, happen to him if



90 IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER.

he breathed a syllable against the stainless
character of that “honest and good fellow
Robert Partridge,” or those equally good and
honest fellows his companions; and the solemn
oration being ended, the long arm knocked
down the lantern, and the figure vanished with
a streak of blue and white light and a strong
smell of sulphur.

But Frank said to Mr. Stock afterwards,
“J thought what was up when I heard tell
about Bob Partridge, but I can’t deny but that
it scared me at first !”

“ Did the dogs bark?” asked Mr. Stock.

“No, sir, they didn’t, but the horses were
nigh mad.”

“Then it was Bob Partridge himself,” said
Mr. Stock; “the dogs knew him, of course.
He put a white smock over his head, on the
top of a broom most likely, and kept one arm
clear for striking down the light, and he rubbed
a box of matches along the wall as he went
out,”

“Yes, that was it, sir,’ said Frank. “ But
it knocked me all of a heap like, coming so
sudden, and I don’t call it a fair thing to
frighten a fellow in that fashion! It’s just



IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER. 91

one of Bob’s tricks; but he must have thought
me a bigger fool than IT am to be taken in
that way !”

“And what did you do when the light was
out?” asked Mr. Stock.

“Well, sir, I waited a minute, and just
quieted the mare a bit, and then I lighted it
again and looked about me, and came right
in to you.”

“Well, you're a brave, sensible lad, Frank.
There’s always some nonsense at the bottom
of these things. Indeed, it is worse than
nonsense, it is exceedingly wrong to frighten
others; for sometimes very sad and serious
results have followed some such trick as this.
If those that play them had their deserts,
instead of frightening anyone, they should get
a good sound thrashing, and it would serve
them right. I'll go out with you and lock
the stable up, and if I see that scamp Bob
anywhere, I won’t let him off very easily.”

But Bob was far enough away by the time
Mr. Stock went out.

“Say nothing about it, Frank,” said his
master. “It will only set people asking
questions, and we shall have the laugh on our



92 IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER.

side by-and-by. But you are a good, brave
boy. Do nothing wrong, Frank, nothing to
be ashamed of, and then you need be afraid of
nothing !”

But Frank would not have minded being
frightened over and over again, if he could in
this way gain such high praise from his master,
for Mr. Stock seldom commended any one that
did not most thoroughly deserve it. And
before Frank went to bed, he looked out the
27th Psalm and read it: “The Lord is my
light and my salvation, whom shall I fear?
The Lord is the strength of my life, of whom
shall I be afraid?” And the last verse, espe-
cially, gave him such true comfort that he soon
composed his excited nerves, and laid him
“down in peace ” and slept, being well assured
that it was the Lord only that made him
“ dwell in safety.”







CHAPTER VI.

FRANK GOES “OWL-HUNTING” WITH MR. STOCK.



o———-

** Lord, uphold me day by day;
Shed a light upon my way};
Guide me through perplexing snares;
Care for me in all my cares,

‘All I ask for is, enough;
Only, when the way is rough,
Let thy rod and staff impart
Strength and courage to my heart.

“Should thy wisdom, Lord, decree
Trials long and sharp for me,
Pain or sorrow, care or shame,
Father, glorify thy name.

“ Let me neither faint nor fear,
Feeling still that thou art near,
In the course my Saviour trod,
Tending still to thee, my God."
JOSTAH CONDER











CHAPTER VI.

FRANK GOES “OWL-HUNTING” WITH MR. STOCK.

(NICARCELY a week had passed since the
4f attempt in the stable to frighten Frank
into holding his tongue, when the




\Faffair took place which he had been
long expecting.

It was nearly the middle of the night, and
he had been some time in bed and asleep,
when Mr. Stock woke him up with a shake,
saying, ‘‘ Make haste, and put on your clothes,
and bring your boots down in your hand; the
poachers are at it in the copse.”

Frank started up and rubbed his eyes, with
a very confused notion as to where he was
and who was speaking, and what it was that
was “at it in the copse.” He began to think
at once of two young bulls that he had seen
fighting a few days before, and said, ‘“ They
must have a’ broke out again, then !”



96 FRANK GOES “ OWL-HUNTING ” WITH MR. STOCK.

“Yes,” said Mr. Stock; “the keepers are
watching; but I want you to see if you know
any of them should they get away.”

“Why don’t keeper drive ’em home ?” said
Frank, still rubbing his eyes.

“There—jump up at once,” said Mr. Stock,
giving him another shake, “and make haste
about it,” and putting down the candle he
left the room.

But he waited and waited, and Frank did
not come. “ Why, what is the boy about?”
said he, going up again to hasten him, but
there was poor sleepy Frank, with his head
where his heels ought to be, as sound as ever.

“Dear me, what a boy for sleeping! come,
come ; get up, get up,” said Mr. Stock, shaking
him so as to rouse him thoroughly.

“What! be ’em at it again?” murmured
Frank ; “ why don’t keeper drive them home?”

“T want you to get up and see if you know
them,” said Mr. Stock ; ‘so bundle on your
clothes. Come!”

“Tsaw ’em t’other day a tearing of the’selves
to pieces, sir,” added Frank, when for the first
time he understood who spoke to him.

“Who did you see fighting, Frank ?”



FRANK GOES “ OWL-HUNTING” WITIL MR. STOCK. 97

“They two plaguy bulls, sir. Jem said as
how—”

“Nonsense, you sleepyhead! It’s the
poachers! you've been dreaming! that’s right
—get on—get on!”

“Poachers !” said Frank, wide awake now,
and he hurried on his things with excitement,
and, trembling a little, he followed Mr. Stock
down the stairs.

The moon was nearly at the full, but fast-
sailing clouds from over the sea hid her every
now and then from view, and made gray
darkness where, before, all was in cold white
light. Not a breath of wind was passing
over that part of the earth’s surface where
Cowleas farm lay, however roughly it was
blowing in the regions above, when Mr. Stock
and Frank stepped out into the damp night
air.

The mist was lying on the meadows by the
stream, and when they got on to the hill and
looked behind them, the cottages -and farm-
buildings were quite hidden by it; and the
valley seemed to be the course of a mighty
river, which nearly surrounded the island on
which they stood.

(4) 7



98 FRANK GOES “OWL-HUNTING” WITH MR. STOCR.

But such fancies as these did not long
occupy Frank’s mind, for they were drawing
‘near the head of the copse which lay on the
slope of the other side of the hill, and ex-
tended for some distance, out of their sight
indeed, in the foggy moonlight. They had
been walking up on the dark side of the
hedge, and now that they came to a gate, Mr.
Stock stopped until a cloud passed over the
moon, and then he stepped across quickly
that they might not be noticed from below.
He listened, but not a sound reached their
ears, except the tinkling of the sheep-bells on
the hills, and now and then the distant hoot |
of the white owl as he beat along the hedge-
rows after his prey. There lay the copse still
and motionless before them, and Frank took
leave to whisper to his master, that in his
opinion the alarm was a false one, and that
the poachers were in bed.

There were the rabbits out feeding and
chasing one another in hundreds, and now and
then a hare would scud across the open ;—but,
hark! a squealing cry, as if an animal were
wounded, or in pain, or caught’ in a snare.
The rabbits sit wp and prick their ears, and



Full Text


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T.NELSON AND SONS
LONDON, EDINBURGH AND NEW YORK












FRANK MARTIN;

OR,

A SCHOOLBOY’S TRIALS AND VICTORIES.

A Gale for the Doung.





LONDON:

T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW;
/ EDINBURGH ; AND NEW YORK.





1872,
[Soke ANG SO


Chapter
I.

IL.

III.

IV.

VI.

VIL

VIII







Frank’s Schooling begins,

Short Steps into great Troubles,

In which Prizes are won and lost,

Work in earnest,

In which appears a mysterious Messenger,
Frank goes ‘ owl-hunting” with Mr. Stock,
The Truth, and nothing but the Truth,

Which proves Honesty is the best Policy,




CHAPTER I.

FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS.

“Duty, like a strict preceptor,
Sometimes frowns, or seems to frown;
Choose her thistle for thy sceptre,
While thy brow youth’s roses crown.”
WORDSWORTH.






: Z SE = = rg
Cu: es Oh INKS



CHAPTER I.

FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS.



3 SYNE ; two; three; four.

“There, I told you it was four
o'clock, Eliza ; and you said the long
hand would be pointing downwards
if twas time to go—as if I couldn’t
tell the clock yet!”

But Eliza was convinced, not because Mary
Ann had whispered it, but because the clock
had spoken, and she thought that she could
trust her ears.

As it turned out, however, both were wrong.
Eliza was wrong, certainly ; but as she was
but five years old, we will excuse her mistake.
The clock was most to blame, for it deceived
not only Mary Ann, but the whole school.

“Sit still, children,” said the mistress, “ the
clock is ten minutes toc fast.”

But for a schoolroom clock to go wrong
10 FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS.

is very sad. When I was at school, we did
not mind its being too slow, for then playtime
came before we expected it; but when it
went too fast, under pretence of keeping time
at all, it was cruel.

The mistress’s announcement fell on the
hopes of her little scholars as a wet blanket
falls on fire. Ten minutes more school,
and a disappointment, was hard for them to
bear.

It was a trial to others besides Frank
Martin; but however deeply they felt it, they
did not show it as he did. For a weary time
he had been sitting up on a form, holding on
with his hands, gazing straight before him,
and scarcely daring to dangle his legs, lest he
should incur the mistress’s rebuke. At last
he saw, out of the corner of his eyes, that
his sister had pulled down his woollen com-
forter from the peg, and he knew what that
meant. But when she turned round and
hung it up again, it was too much. His
fingers began to twitch, and his mouth to
work, and suddenly he set up a prolonged and
doleful ery.

“Why, Frank, what is the matter ?” said the
FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS. il

mistress, no less startled than the rest of the
school.

“Please, I think he wants to go,” said
Martha, his sister.

“Well then, you two can leave at once,”
said the mistress, seeing no other means of
stopping the commotion. So down came the
comforter again, and the hat and the bonnet,
and they were out in the lane in no time.

The next day Frank thought he would set
up another mournful lamentation when he
began to get tired of sitting still; but school
was only half over, and his plan did not
answer. He was sent to stand in the corner
by himself instead, which was another trial for
him.

Being just four years and a half old, school
at that age was dull work. I think his
mother sent him there to keep him out of
mischief for the chief reason, and to teach him
to be quiet. And a very good thing to learn,
too!

I know numbers of children who couldn’t
sit for five minutes together, without talking,
or fidgeting, or picking their clothes to pieces,
if you asked them, or even if you gave them
12 FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS.

something. But if you have a little brother
or sister, who goes to an infant school, and is
about the same age as Frank Martin was when
this story begins, and any one asks what such
a little thing goes to school for, you can say,
“To learn to sit still!”

Can you sit still while you read this
chapter? Try! and don’t laugh, or make any
noise, except by turning over the leaves.

Frank Martin’s father worked for Mr. Stock.
at Cowleas farm, and went with the horses.
Jack, his eldest brother, was an ox-boy, and
went with the oxen; and Sam, the next, was
a donkey-boy, and went with the donkeys.
Then came Martha, the only girl in the family;
and Frank was the youngest.

The Martins had worked on Cowleas farm
before Mr. Stock’s family came to live there,
and that was some time ago—many years, I
might say; and so they were well known, and,
what was more, they were respected. For if
Frank’s father had not been a sober, trust-
worthy, intelligent man, he would not have

- been Mr. Stock’s head carter. He had some-

times as many as thirty horses under his
charge, and some of them were very valuable,
FRANK'S SCHOOLING BEGINS. 13
and he prided himself on their appearance.
Indeed, it was commonly said that Mr. Stock’s
teams were the finest in the neighbourhood ;
and people used to stop and look at them, as
they went in and out of the county town on
the market days, gayly dressed with plaited
manes and tails. :

Sam, the second boy, accompanied his
father at such times, and though he was tired
enough when he reached home, he liked going
far better than staying with his donkeys,
They gave him, he complained, such a deal of
trouble ; he had often to look after five or six
of them by himself, and old Michael, who was
donkey-master-general, was strict and cross,
and never allowed the boys to play or idle
their time, though he did not do much work
himself, Sam used to say.

Part of Cowleas farm Jay on the steep hill-
side of the downs near the sea, and there the
donkeys and their panniers were very useful,
as the sure-footed animals could easily go
where no cart or waggon could travel; and
they were employed in various ways—in carry-
ing away the couch-grass to a heap after the
women had picked it, or in gathering in the
14 FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS.

turnips and mangold, and often in bringing
up the sea-weed from the shore for manure for
the land.

Jack, Frank’s eldest brother, who was
mostly with the oxen—except in harvest, or
other busy times, when an extra hand was
wanted—was old enough to have lads under
him, and could already plough a furrow
with the best of them.

Now you can fancy what an unbounded
pleasure it was to little Frank, after school
was over, to take his sister’s hand, and ramble
down the hill from their cottage, past the
little church, and wait for his father’s return
with the horses. And then he would watch
the long string of them, as they passed in
their jingling harness; and sometimes he
would be taken up for a ride; or the two
little ones would peep in through the doors of
the ox-barton, and see the great creatures, with
their beautiful eyes and long horns, panting
and lowing, and snuffing the sweet hay, whilst
their necks were being freed from the heavy
yoke and they sauntered to their stalls.

And when the children had wandered up as
far as the blacksmith’s shop on the other side
FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS. 18

of the hill, to see if anything was being done
there, it was time to go back to tea,

One reason why they liked the blacksmith’s,
besides the attraction of the red-hot iron, and
the ding-dong of the hammer, and the glow-
ing and scattering sparks, and the puffing
bellows, was because there the oxen were shod.
And that was a sight they would not lose for
anything, though it used to make them rather
timid, and their hearts beat fast when they
saw the huge creature lying swung on its back,
with its feet strapped tightly, grunting and
moaning as if its end was come.

“Well, if I was an ox,” Martha used to say,
“JT would stand like a horse to be shod, and
not be turned up and down that way.”

“You couldn’t,’ was the usual remark from
another looker-on; whereupon a_ discussion
would arise, into the particulars of which we
will not enter.

Well, on fine afternoons, when there was
nothing else to be seen, or no game on foot
with the others, this was Martha and Frank’s
usual walk, but they did not see an ox shod
every day. But at different times of the year—
for instance at sheep-shearing, or hay-harvest,
16 FRANK'S SCHOOLING BEGINS.

or reaping, or leasing, or threshing in the great
barn—there was much to be done, and you
may be sure the children did not throw away
their opportunities of seeing the fun, whatever
it was.

Now, before Frank had been many weeks
at school he began to rebel.

It was of no use, as he found, to try to get
away before the clock struck four, for the
nature of Mrs. Sharp the school-mistress was
too much like her name. So it entered into
his little head one bright morning, that he
would not go to school at all that day; and
when Martha was ready to start, Master Frank
was nowhere to be found.

She called him again and again, and looked
here and there for him, and at last went in to
her mother, and said that if she waited any
longer, she herself would be late. So Mrs.
Martin bade her set off, and she would bring
Frank when she found him.

But find him she could not. She asked
her neighbours, but no one had seen the truant,
and she began to be uneasy at the loss of her
child. She ran down to the pond, for Frank

was fond of watching the circles in the water
(144)
FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS, 17

which the trout made when they jumped ; but
a man working there had seen nothing of him.
She sent to the farm-yards and stables, and
spent an hour in running about, asking ques-
tions of every one she met, and at last made
up her mind that he had been stolen by a
gipsy party who had passed through the
village that morning.

In a sad state, she posted off to ask her
husband’s advice, who was at work some dis-
tance off with his horses. But while she
was gone, little Luke Collins went in to his
mother, who lived next door to the Martins,
and said, “Mother, I know where Frank
Martin is!”

“Where is he, then?” said his mother.

“ He’s in along with old Rover,’ said the
child.

“What?” cried Mrs. Collins, running out
and looking into Rover’s barrel; and sure
enough, there, at the further end, lay the
truant, curled up, on most excellent and com-
fortable terms with his host.

Old Rover was a sheep-dog, now long past
work, who had done good service for Collins
the shepherd in his time, and he was much

(144) 2
18 FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS.

gratified at the condescension of his visitor in
making himself so much at home in his barrel,
and would have resented Mrs. Collins’ inter-
ference with the arrangement had he dared.

“You naughty boy,” said Mrs. Collins,
“come out directly ; your mother has been
looking for you these two hours and more!
Come out at once !”

But Frank did not stir.

“ Come out this minute. Do you hear what
I say?”

He heard very well, but chose to remain
where he was, and Rover wagged his tail, and
looked happiness itself. Mrs, Collins next
threatened a whipping, but Frank preferred
the barrel.

There was quite a crowd collected by this
time, and many could not understand it at all,
and asked, “ What is it?” “Who is she talk-
ing to?” “ What is in there?” whilst the rest
were very much amused and interested, and
awaited the result.

But now Mrs. Collins changed her tone, and
began to try coaxing. “Come out, then,” said
she; “there’s a good boy, and mother ’ll give
you something, I dare say.”
FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS. 19

But Frank was not to be tempted by any
such vague promises.

“Look here, Franky dear,’ said Mrs. Col-
lins, searching for something, “here’s a pretty
thing I’ve got in my pocket;” but as she only
produced a thimble and a piece of wax, the
children and the neighbours burst out into a
laugh, so that plan also failed of its pur-
pose.

At last Mrs. Collins’ stock of patience was

at an end, and down she went on her hands
and knees. ‘“ You bad little piece of disobedi-
ence!” cried she, “if I don’t get in and pull
you out myself!” thereupon she put her head
into the barrel and tried to get hold of Frank’s
frock, to have him out by main force, whilst
old Rover danced on her back with excite-
ment.
* Unfortunately the barrel was too long and
narrow, and the sturdy little fellow held on so
tight, that moving him by this means was out
of the question. When, however, he saw Mrs.
Collins’ head and shoulders appear he begaa to
cry out lustily, but on finding that his position
was so safe and strong, he became as silent as
before.
20 FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS.

And now, seeing the crowd collected, Mr.
Stock rode up to ask what was the matter,
just when Mrs, Collins was backing out of the
barrel, and having laughed very heartily at
the position of things, rode off to tell Mrs..
Martin that her child was found. .

But before she reached home Richard Duke
had knocked away the pegs that kept it down,
and had taken the barrel up in his strong
arms, and the culprit had been rolled out on
to the ground without ceremony, amid the
jokes and laughter of the lookers on; and
though Mrs. Martin could not resist joining in
the general amusement, she was grieved that
her son’s bad behaviour was the cause.

Frank’s father did not come home in the
middle of the day, having taken his dinner
with him to the field; but in the evenin he
lifted the little fellow on his knee and a
“What I am going to tell you, my lad, it
won't do Jack and Sam any harm to hear.”
So they both listened, like good sons, as they
were.

“Would that you, boys,” said their father,
“could always mind that God in heaven (and
the old man pointed upwards) looks to us to
FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS. 2)

do, first, our duty towards him. Then, we have
to do our duty towards one another ; and last,
towards ourselves. Admiral Nelson, at the
Battle of Trafalgar, gave his signal, ‘ England
expects every man to do his duty,’ and that
was not to be done by running away. No;
my lads, never shirk your duty, whatever it is
—if it’s hard work, never mind, do it as best
you can. Nelson gave up his life in doing
his. This little fellow ran away from his duty
to-day. Never play truant again, my lad.
Be a brave boy, and ask Ged for Christ’s sake
to help you to do your duty, and afterwards
youll be ten times happier than if you had
left it undone. Duty sometimes seems to be
a hard mistress, but choose her to serve while
yau are young, and she will stand your friend,
aygend a firm friend, too. And now, little
’un, let me hear no more of your hiding away
from school, and make haste and get your
supper, and off to bed; but first say your
prayers, and ask forgiveness for your disobedi-
ence, and pray that God will give you his Holy
Spirit, and a new heart within; for without his
help we can do nothing right.” And _ this
Frank did at his mother’s knee.
22 FRANK’S SCHOOLING BEGINS.

After that he heard no more at home of his
adventure, except as a joke; but his school-
fellows did not forget it, you may be sure.

Neither did he himself forget it for a long,
long time ; and he never played truant again
all the while he was at school.




CHAPTER II.

SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES.

“Oh, what a tangled web we weave,
When first we practise to deceive.”
Sir W. Scort.





CHAPTER IL

SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES.



(HAT Frank was a cunning little fellow,
we saw in the last chapter. The
affair of the barrel, no great matter
in itself, affords an insight into
his disposition. And the following
practice of his while yet a child, shows a love
of adventure and self-dependence.

He used to try to persuade Martha, and if
she would not come he would go up alone, to
the top of the high hill on the downs, and there
he would sit and watch for a carriage to pass,
whereupon he would run by the side down the
long steep road which led to the village, and
put on and take off the drag, and open the
gates on the bridge, and so gain some half-
pence very likely for his trouble. But the
difficulty then was to decide how it was to
be spent—lI mean in what kind of lollypop. If
26 SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES.

he got a penny only, he spent it; but if more
than a penny his mother put the rest away in
a box to keep for him.

Martha was fond of peppermints, and he
liked liquorice, and the discussions as to which
was the best of the two were wordy and long,
and generally ended in half of the one and
half of the other. And on Sundays, sometimes,
he got a penny for holding the gates open
when people were going to church.

But on one occasion, having had a penny
given them, the children were led by a com-
panion, unknown of course to their father and
mother, to buy sweets on the Lord’s day at an
old woman’s, who kept her shutters up but let
the children in by a back way.

They hesitated a good deal before they
would do this, which they both well knew
was wrong.

But, “ nonsense,” said Susy Sparrow ; “ who'll
know?” and “ where’s the harm? Come along
in,’ said-she, “ Mrs. Brown will let you have
some in a minute;” and so they were tempted,
and gave way in the trial.

They entered, looking very much ashamed
of themselves, and Mrs. Brown on her part was
SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES. 27

surprised to see “the Martins’ children ” there,
but she very soon let them have what they
asked for, and put the penny into her pocket,
saying they were good children, and gave
Frank a bull's eye over. But, as they were
going out, she added, “I only do it as a
favour, you know, my dears, but make haste
and eat ’em before you get home. And you
needn’t say anything about it, you know.” ©

For she said to herself, “How Mrs. Martin’
would go on if she knew! And there’s Miss
Margaret, goodness me! I hope these children
won't go saying I keeps the shop open 0’
Sundays, or I shall be in for it from Miss
Margaret.”

Ah ! when we do wrong how we dread being
found out! There were in this little matter
of a pennyworth of sweets four individuals
who feared to be found out. Their conscience
made cowards of them all. But was it fear
of man or of God that troubled them most?
Alas! I am afraid that neither Susy Sparrow
nor Mrs. Brown had any fear at all of God
before their eyes. But little Frank said to his
sister before they joined Susy Sparrow, who
was waiting for them,—
28 SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES.

“ Martha, will God be very angry?”

And Martha answered sharply to hide her
own. feelings,—

“Don’t be a silly boy; it’s only a penny,
just for once.”

And the words seemed to soothe them both
as they were spoken ; for that “only just for
once” is the easy excuse which Satan prompts
to quiet the pricking conscience at the first be-
ginnings of evil, and the laughter and light
talk of Susy Sparrow did the rest, so the chil-
dren soon nearly forgot all about it, and the
liquorice and peppermint tasted nicer, they
thought, than ever it did before.

But it was time for afternoon Sunday school,
and, as they had the sweeties in their pockets,
they could not keep their fingers off them, but
every now. and then popped one into their
mouths, when they thought “teacher” was not
looking; and when their turn came to read,
there was a good deal of mouthing and mum-
bling, and a great deal of inattention and losing
of their places, neither did they know their
verse nor their hymn when they were called
on to say them.

Now, among its other prominent qualities,
SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES. 29

peppermint diffuses a defined aromatic odour,
acceptable to some, offensive to others, but
perfectly recognizable by all, as the reader
may be aware. And Frank and Martha were
aware of it too, and so cunning were they as
to agree to put off their indulgence in the
choice white lozenges, and pungent, many-
coloured drops, and only to eat their liquorice
during the presence of the young lady, their
mistress, as fearing detection and punishment.

But when school-time was nearly over,
Martha, who had finished her share of the
liquorice, could not resist the temptation of
trying one of her favourite peppermints, and,
under cover of stooping to the floor, popped
one into her mouth.

“One of you is eating peppermint,” said
Miss Margaret, without raising her eyes from
her book. “Please not to eat anything now,
especially peppermint, which makes my head
ache;” and soon after she glanced round the
class.

Martha coloured deeply, and was doubly
sorry, for she loved the young lady, who came
over the hills, in all weathers, from a long dis-
tance to teach them.

e
30 SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES.

But it so happened that, when Miss Mar-
garet looked round the class, she caught Master
Frank in the very act of withdrawing from his
mouth, as children will, the delicious lump
which had so much occupied the attention re-
quired for his lessons, and therefore, after
school, she said, “ Ah, here is the little fellow
who is so fond of peppermint that he must
eat it even in class,”

“ Please, Miss Margaret,” said Frank, fool-
ishly for his own interests, “it wasn’t me.”

“What! hadn’t you your mouth full of
peppermint, Frank?”

“No, Miss Margaret :”

“ But you had something in your mouth !”

No answer.

“Ah,” said his mistress, “I am afraid you
were trying to make me believe by your
manner, that you were not eating anything.
Be straightforward, Frank, in the smallest
matter. Never try to deceive any one by act
or by word.”

“Please, “twas liquorice,” said Frank at
last.

“Then who, I wonder, was eating that
other nasty stuff?”
SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES. 31

“Tt was me,” said Martha humbly.

“So you two, brother and sister, are the
offenders! Well, I shall ask your mother not
to give you your sweeties just before schoo!
another day. I want to speak to her now.”

So saying, Miss Margaret jumped over the
stile by the school, and went towards Mrs.
Martin's cottage.

“Oh, dear, dear!” said Martha, hanging
behind; “whatever shall we do? What will
mother say? I do wish we'd never bought
fem! It’s all that Susy a-telling of us to go
to Mrs. Brown’s! and there goes Miss Mar-
garet in to speak to mother! Oh, dear,
dear !”

Ah! yes, children, “be sure our sin will
find us out!” It will find us out in our own
consciences, if it be not found out before the
world.

“Twas you bought em,” said Frank, trying
to excuse himself.

“There now,” returned Martha, “’twas no
more I than you! You knew ’twas wrong,
as well as I did, of a Sunday. Oh, I wish I
had something to say to mother!”

“Won't father be angry!” said Frank
32 SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES,

“? Twas all that Susy. We shouldn’t have
had ’em but for her.”

“Yes, I’m sure it was her fault; I shall
tell mother so. She asked us to go in and
buy ’em to-day. I shouldn’t have thought——”

“ Here’s mother,” said Frank.

“ Make haste,” cried Mrs. Martin; “I want
you.” }

“You must say, twas Susy,” said Martha
to Frank, as they hastened on to the cottage
door. :

“Where did you get the peppermints you
were eating in school, then?” asked their
mother at once.

The children together mumbled something
about Susy Sparrow.

“Did Susy Sparrow gie ’em to you?”

“Please, mother, she had some,” said
Martha.

“ Well, and so she had,” was her excuse to
Frank, after Miss Margaret had gone, and
they were alone together. “It wasn’t a lie
to say she had some, for I gave her some
before school.”

But this paltry evasion did not relieve the
weight on her conscience in the least.
SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES. 33

“Mother’s sure to ask her,” said Frank.

“Then, Pll tell her, too, to say she had
some, and then mother’ll think she gave ’em
to us.”

Little steps, very easy, one after another,
just suited to little feet and little limbs. So
short that one more can make no difference at
all, and one leads to the next so fast. Having
taken it, you must take another. But turn,
and look how far down you are! How near
the deep, dark, bottom seems! How hard
the getting up again! What toil! what
labour, to get up the steps that seemed so
easy to go down! So one little fault leads
to another, and then how hard it is to rise
again once more !

Little children had best avoid those down-
ward steps, for they are narrow, dangerous,
slippery steps, and a fall may prove fatal.
See how one yielding to temptation led
Martha and Frank to another. First they
broke the Fourth Commandment, then they
misbehaved in school. They deceived their
teacher, and then their mother, and now have
caused another child to tell a lie to screen

themselves.
(144° 3
34 SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES.

But Satan is a bad pay-master. How they
suffered, those two little ones! And they did
not confess their fault, and ask God to forgive
them, which was the right and only way of
relief.

Though, at first, tne weight of all this sin
seemed too heavy for them to bear, and they
were so silent under it that their father asked
whether they were not unwell, and what was
the matter with them; yet, before long, it
wore off and they were nearly as cheerful as
ever. Now and then, indeed, they talked
about it to one another; but it was not a
pleasant subject.

“We can’t tell now,’
as they were in the road, going down to the
bridge, “and it doesn’t matter.”

“But we'll never do it again,” said Frank.

Just then, Miss Margaret on horseback

2

said Martha, one day,

cantered through the village and up the hill,
and a white-haired old gentleman rode by her
side, who, as they passed the children at a
slower pace, said,—‘ Ah! there is my little
friend, to whom I gave a penny on Sunday
for holding open the gate.”

“Did yon?” said Miss Margaret, who had
Qe

SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES. 35

not forgotten the occurrence of last Sunday,
and was not quite satisfied then with the
children’s behaviour, and, stopping her horse,
she asked Frank what he did with the penny
the gentleman gave him last Sunday.

Frank hung down his head, and could not
answer.

“What did he do with it, Martha? Can-
not you say?”

“No, miss,’ said she, looking very guilty
too.

Frank then burst into sobs, and Martha
followed his example.

“Uncle,” said Miss Margaret, “I can get
nothing from these children. Would you
mind turning back with me to the village? |
wish to ask a question.”

So back they rode, whilst Martha sobbed
out in a fresh burst of tears, “She’s going to
ask Mrs. Brown !”

“Let’s hide,” said Frank.

Martha was right ; and in answer to Miss
Margaret’s questions, Mrs. Brown said,—

“Well, miss, I don’t open my little window
of Sundays, of course not. But I was just.
a-sitting, and reading of a tract, as I always
36 SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES.

do of a Sunday—and a beautiful tract it was.
—one you lent, miss; and they little things
came in and asked me for some peppermints
—which they be very nice—and I said, ‘Oh!
you know, my dears, I never sells of a Sun-
day, because it’s wrong, and a breaking of the
command. But, there, they seemed to long
so, that I gied ’°em a few. Though I’m a
poor woman, I’m fond of the childer’; but
I’ve a hard living to get, miss, I can assure

2”?

ye.
“Mrs. Brown, said Miss Margaret, “I’ve

a reason for asking; did they not give you a
penny in return for what you gave them?”

“Miss, I never sell of a Sunday, let it be
whoever might, or ever so—”

But here the gray-haired old gentleman
broke in,—

“Be so good as to answer Miss Margaret's
question. Did you take a penny of those
children last Sunday, or did you not?”

He was an old general officer, an uncle of
Miss Margaret’s, and. he spoke in a tone not
to be trifled with.

“Well, sir, I ask your pardon; they did
put a penny on the table, as well as I can
SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES. 37

remember; but ’twas against my wish, sir.
If you'll believe me, miss, it was, I can assure
you.”

“Oh, woman,” said the old gentleman,
“why not tell the truth at once, and not add
prevarication to your sin of causing Christ’s
little ones to offend. Your years should have
taught you better things. For a few chil-
dren’s pence, you put a great occasion of fall-
ing in their way, and you tempt them to sin!

“For shame! for shame! Go in and ask
God to work a change by his Spirit in your
heart, where it is greatly needed, before it is
too late; and may your own sin, and the evil
you have caused in others, be forgiven you.
Nay, I will hear no attempt at excuse. There
can be no worthy one. Come, Margaret.”

“Did you know of this bad practice of
hers?” asked he, as they rode away.

“Indeed, yes,” was the answer; “that is, I
suspected it. And I fear it has been a great
hindrance to any work for good among the
little ones of the place. J think that, now
she has had a lesson from you, she will not
forget. But I want to go to that cottage,”
added Miss Margaret, pointing with her whip
38 SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES.

across some fields to a dwelling at a little dis.
tance off

' So she went and spoke with Susy Sparrow,
and then with Mrs. Martin; and when Martha
and Frank came home, and their father heard
it all, it was a sad household that night—very
different from what it generally was; and
both Martha and Frank began thus to learn,
by early and valuable experience, that “the
way of transgressors is hard.”

This chapter began by saying that Frank
was what people call a “sharp lad,” and
doubtless he had his wits about him as he
grew in years and in stature.

But had he not had the blessing of a good
father and mother, and the advantage of going
to a good school in the week, and of teaching
on Sundays, when he was young, there is no
doubt but that he would have proved any-
thing but a credit to his family and parish
when he grew up. And in spite of these
advantages, old self within, and Satan our
enemy, and bad companions, often laid snares,
into which he fell, and only the grace of God
ib was that raised him again. His battle,
dear reader, was yours and mine! We,
SHORT STEPS INTO GREAT TROUBLES. 39

too, have entered into the fight to stand or
fall,

Are you standing firm, in Christ’s strength,
under his banner, and warring in his Spirit;
or are you against him, in the black ranks of
the Evil One, who must yield at last? What
are your words, your actions, your thoughts ?
Look to it, I pray you, for “no man can serve
two masters.”

“Oh, vise thou then, and strive, my soul,
‘To reach the beatific goal!
Thy every nerve and sinew strain,
The crown of glory to obtain!”





CHAPTER III.

iN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST.

\

“Sinful thoughts of pride and passion,
Greedy wishes, selfish care,
In our human hearts lie hidden,
Ready to awaken there.

“411 the wrong way will seem pleasant
Still the right way will seem hard;
All our life we shall be tempted -—
We must ever be on guard.”


CHAPTER III.

IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST.

ENRANK MARTIN’S parents were wise





1) school as long as they could possibly
afford to do so, for both of them
knew the value of a good education,
ana they tried to do the best for their child-
ren’s welfare.

They knew that when he once went to
work, there would not be then much time for
reading and improving himself; so they judged,
at least from his brothers’ example. They
used to come home so tired after their day’s
labour, that they were glad to have their sup-
per and go to bed, and get as much rest as
they could before they were roused, almost at
daylight, the next morning.

Frank was able to read well and write
nicely, and do his sums to his master’s satisfac-
44 IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST.

tion, and had gained a good deal’of useful and
valuable knowledge before he received the
prize to which every scholar was entitled when
leaving the school with credit.

That which Frank obtained after his last
examination at school was a book upon British
Flowering Plants, with coloured pictures. It
was a book which he thought himself most
fortunate to possess ; and indeed it was a very
beautiful prize.

It had been chosen expressly for him, the
master said, after some words of praise for the
good progress he had made of late in his les-
sons, and his general behaviour in school; and
“in losing Frank Martin,” he added, “I lose one
of my best scholars ; and though I should have,
liked to have had him longer with me, yet I
believe that, for his age, he is well prepared
to enter upon the trials of life——as well prepared,
that is,as a boy can be bya sound Christian edu-
cation and training such as I have endeavoured
to give him. And now it chiefly depends upon
himself, with the assisting grace of God’s Spirit,
which is always granted to those who ask for
it faithfully. I would just add these few
words, the advice of a wiser teacher than I am,
IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST. 45

before I shake hands with you, Frank, and bid
you good-bye on leaving the school :

“ «Trust in the Lord with all thine heart ;
and lean not unto thine own understanding.’

“<«TIn all thy ways acknowledge Him, and
He shall direct thy paths.’

“« Be not wise in thine own eyes: fear the
Lord, and depart from evil.’ ”

And then his kind good master shook Frank
by the hand, and wished him many good
wishes for the future, and God’s. blessing
wherever he went, and in all he undertook
that was right and honourable in the state of
life in which he was placed by the providence
of God.

And then Miss Margaret, having said how
pleased she was to hear such a good report,
put the book into Frank’s hand with the
words,—‘“I know that you are fond of flowers;
and as I hear you intend to be a gardener, it
will not only be interesting, but useful, I hope.”

Yes; Frank had got a place in Mr. Stock’s
garden: he was to be an assistant there, and
to make himself generally useful besides; and
his parents were very much gratified that
Mr. Stock had chosen their Frank, as ne would
46 IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST.

not only be able to learn gardening, but a
great many other things. It was a capital
situation, they thought, for so young a lad, and
a good recommendation also in future, if he
kept it for some time.

But how did Miss Margaret know that he
was fond of flowers? She had found it out in
this way. Among the many good deeds which
she had done for the village, of which any one
thereabouts could give an account, and because
of which she was heartily loved by all, both
young and old, she had established a cottage-
garden show for vegetables, fruit, and flowers,
which was held every summer in a spacious
tent in the park. That show-day was a
holiday for all the parish—for every one at
least who could possibly be spared—and there
was a band of music, and cricket and football
for the young men and boys; and a stroll round
the beautiful pleasure-grounds and gardens,
and a tea in the evening, for the elder folk.

I ought to tell you that Miss Margaret was
the daughter of the owner of the large estate,
a great part of which Mr. Stock farmed, and
that was why she interested herself so much
in the welfare of the people, and why they
IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST. 47

knew her so well, and honoured her so
highly.

But her gentle Christian life and her kind
and charitable heart would have made her be-
loved wherever she was, even though she had
not been the heiress of so many broad acres.
She was like a little queen among her people,
and they esteemed her for her own sake.

Well, at the cottage-garden show there was
a prize offered for the best nosegay of wild-
flowers, and a large one for the best collection
of wild-flowers, laid out with their names on
paper, to be competed for by children of the
village school only.

When the show was first set on foot, and
the bills were printed and sent round to the
cottagers, it was stated that a prize would be
given “for the best bouquet of wild-flowers ;”
and what do you think one brought to the
tent on the morning of exhibition, but a clean
new bucket, garlanded with wreaths, and the
handle highly ornamented and decorated with
all the bright blossoms the fields could produce

This caused many a hearty laugh ; but the
next year the schoolmaster wrote noseyay
instead, a good old English word which every
48 IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST.

one could understand, instead of the fine
French one, which had no business on the
bills of an English cottage-garden show.

But the year before he left school, Frank
had made up his mind that he would try his
best to carry off the wild-flower prizes. He
took a deal of trouble about his nosegay ; he
set it up again and again, and time after time
he took it down and kept adding fresh flowers
and changing others, until the colours and the
arrangement suited his taste. And he was
not unrewarded for the care and the pains
that he had taken, for he gained the first
prize.

As to the dried collection of wild-flowers
named, he and Martha worked at it hard all
the year previously, and sent it in as their
ioint production; and it obtained an extra
prize for its excellence. But it was more of
Martha’s prize than Frank’s, as he himself
acknowledged, though his name was sent in
with hers.

He helped to find the flowers, and re- -
membered some of their names; but Martha’s
careful, skilful fingers spread them out, as her
mistress had shown her, on the paper, and she
IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST. 49

had written the names underneath each one;
and to her Miss Margaret handed the unex-
pected reward, with a warm word or two of
praise, at her diligence, and neatness, and care.

But Frank was most of all anxious about a
fuchsia, with which le boped to take the prize
for window plants.

It was a cutting which his mother had
raised, but which Frank had taken under his
care, and had been nursing most tenderly and
training with all his skill for the show. And
certainly he had managed it remarkably well.
When the day came, the plant was covered
with a profusion of blossom; and success
seemed certain.

It had hitherto been standing on the win-
dow-ledge of the cottage at home, and every
passer-by could not but stop to admire it.
With great pride Frank carried it to the tent,
and placed it beside his nosegay.

“ What a beautiful fuchsia,” somebody said ;
“it won’t get the prize, though !”

Frank’s heart leaped into his mouth. What
did they mean? Surely no one had a finer



fuchsia than his—he thought it impossible.
Although it was against the rules, he walked

(144) 4
50 IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST.

quickly up the tent among the fruits, and
vegetables, and flowers, which lay in wild
disorder, awaiting arrangement on the tables ;
and, true enough, in a corner of the tent there
stood a fuchsia, with which his own could not
for a moment be compared.

It was trained on wire in the shape of a
cone—a perfect sheet of bloom on every side,
or rather all round the plant. Hach separate
blossom, tvo, was finer than his; of more
brilliant colour and contrast, and in newer and
later fashion.

He glanced at the name on the card—
“ Joseph Harris.”

Frank set his teeth together, and, pale with
disappointment and rage, took up his fuchsia,
and carrying it outside the tent, and behind
the trunk of a large elm-tree that overshadowed
the spot, dashed it to the ground. And then
he leaned against the trunk of the tree, and
looked at what he had done.

“T don’t care,” he said; ‘I don’t care one
bit!” and he breathed some wicked, angry
words against Joe Harris.

“T wish it had been his fuchsia,” he said
at last. “Not that I care for the prize ;
IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST. 51

I wouldn't have it if they gave it to
me,”

And so on. He kept uttering strings of
foolish, wicked thoughts that came into his
mind—things that he did not mean, and words
that he would have shuddered to use at any
other time—for the devil was in his heart
then. He had given place to the spirit of
evil by the indulgence of his passion; and
now he was, as it were, out of his right mind.

Frank was not a passionate fellow in general.
He could at most times curb his temper and
rule his spirit. But the evil was lurking in
him. It was there, although it did not
always come to the surface, and show itself in
such an ugly form as now it did. Ay, and
this is the case with us all!

To have our fond hopes dashed to the
ground—our dearest wishes thwarted—-the
work, and labour, and care of many anxious
hours, and the pleasant dreams of reward, aud
success, and praise suddenly destroyed and
dispelled—would be a very severe and painful
trial, dear reader, for you and for me. Our
enemies within us and without are not dead.
The corruption of the old self is not vet purged
52 IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST.

away, and the new man wholly raised up in
us; for even St. Paul was forced to exclaim,
in bitterness of spirit, “ When I would do
good, evil is present with me.”

Ah! what need have we of fervent and
constant prayer for the converting, renewing,
and strengthening grace of God’s Holy Spirit!

The good work had been begun in Frank’s
heart, but he was surprised into sin; and “let
him that thinketh he standeth take heed lest
he fall.”

But soon Frank began to see how wrong
and how foolish he had been; and _ bitter
mental punishment quickly followed. He
looked at the ruin of his favourite plant with
different eyes, and the sight brought him to
himself.

“Ah! what have I been saying! How I
have sinned! God forgive me! I didn’t
think that ever I should let such words pass
my lips again! Why, I am as bad as the
worst of them! And what a piece of folly to
pitch the flower down this way !”

And then, leaning against the tree, his tears
burst forth. And——ay, but the punishment
was a bitter one!
IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST. §3

Shame, remorse, the sense of his lost time
and pains, and, not least, penitence and sorrow
for having so lost the command of his angry
passion, and having given Satan the vic-
tory: all this seemed nigh to overwhelm
him.
“Oh! what have I done! what have I
done!” he sobbed; and certainly, in that
moment, at least, he thought but very little of
hinself.

Now when, afterwards, Frank called to
mind the events of this show day, yes, years
afterwards



for he was not careless or forgetful
of the experience he gained of the truth of
that Bible proverb, “ He that trusteth in his
own heart is a fool”—he ever counted it as
one of the greatest providences of his life, or
one of the greatest signs of God’s goodness
towards himself, that he was enabled to get
the better of his passion, and to recover his
self-possession when he did.

And you will think so, too, reader, when I
tell you that all the while poor Frank was
sobbing and leaning with his head upon his
arm against the trunk of the elm-tree, there
stood Joe Harris before him, hardly concealing
54 IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST.

his laughter and exultation at what he took
to be Frank’s accident to his fuchsia.

Had Frank but seen him a minute or two
-before, with his pointed finger and mocking
face, and who knows what his heated and un-
curbed passion might not have led him to do!

« Ah,” he used to say, when in after-life he
would repeat the story —‘“ah, I do not consider
it a small thing, I think it a crowning mercy!
for there was, I shudder to say it, there was
« heavy mallet which the men had used to
knock in the pegs of the tent lying ready to
my hand, as if Satan had placed it there; and
if I could destroy my favourite flower in my
madness, who knows but that I might not
have lifted my hand against him whom I then
hated with all my soul (may God forgive me!)
and who found me out and gibed at me in the
moment of my weakness and distress !”

As it was, God being merciful to him,
Frank quickly recovered himself, and spoke
not a word. He lifted up his plant, and
pressed the earth together around the roots,
and placing it in the largest fragment of the
pot, laid it over his arm, and quickly walked
off, with no other feelings than those of dis-
IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST. 55

tress and shame at his own sinfulness and
folly.

After such a sharp battle as this, of the
evil against the good, of old self against new
self, of Satan against Christ, in the soul of
one of Christ’s soldiers serving in the war-
fare of this trial state, you might think he
would be left at peace for a breathing space.

But not so. Our soul’s enemies are never-
wearying ; they are ceaseless in their attacks
upon our peace: and often when the Christian
soldier is weakest and most faint-hearted, or
is careless and off his guard, or, rejoicing in a
victory, is confident in his own strength, the
trial again presents itself in a more dangerous
form, and the struggle is renewed wherein he
must either stand or fall.

Perhaps you may guess what poor Frank’s
trial now was.

It was to avoid telling a lie as to how the
mishap came about.

He bore the broken plant home in his arms
in a very sad and downcast spirit, and in-
stantly his mother caught sight of him, of
course she exclaimed,—

“Why, Frank, what has happened to the
56 IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST.

fuchsia ?”——and, of course, Martha ran out and
overwhelmed him with questions; and how
easy it would have been to have said, “I let
it fall and broke it.” Then he would have
had sympathy and kind words, and sorrow
for the accident ; and he would not only have
got over the difficulty easily, but pleasantly,
in which he found himself, when he came to
explain how his beautiful flower was so de-
plorably ruined.

It was a difficult thing to say, “I threw
the fuchsia down in a rage because Joe Harris
had a better one !”

Ah, yes! it is hard to speak the truth, very
often, especially when it tells against our-
selves. However, Frank did not yield to the
temptation.

For a long time he was silent, and at last
he said, “ Well, mother, you cannot be more
sorry than I am! I can’t say it was an
accident, for it wasn’t. But Joe Harris has a
fuchsia at the show, and it’s a better one than
mine, and I got angry and threw it down.
There ! that’s the truth. I’ve been a foolish
chap, and now I’m sorry for it, and let’s say
no more about it.”
IN WHICH PRIZES ARE WON AND LOST. 57

And his mother and Martha did say no
more about it, though they were very sorry
too. But by-and-by they made themselves
ready, and all three set out for the show.
And at the end of one of the tables stood
Joe’s fuchsia, but no prize-card on it. Why,
how was this? It was by far the best flower
exhibited by a cottager, and yet it had not the
prize.

“If you please, sir,” asked Frank of one of
the judges, “ how is it that fuchsia does not
take the prize for window-plants?”

“Oh,” said he, “that is no window-plant,
If you were anything of a gardener, you
would know that plants always turn towards
light; but this is equally good all round. Be-
sides,” added he, “1 have reasons for knowing
that this fuchsia was bought of a florist a day
or twoago. No one in our parish has trained
this plant, and this prize has been withheld
for this year, as no bond fide window-plant
has been exhibited worthy of it.”

So
would have taken the prize after all,

without any doubt, Frank’s fuchsia

?



CHAPTER IV.

WORK IN EARNEST.

“ He toils at een, he toils at morn,
His work is never through ;
A coming life o' weary toil
Ts ever in his view;
But on he trudges, keeping aye
A stout heart to the brae,
And proud to be an honest man
Until his dying dsy.”
R. Nico.





CHAPTER IV.

WORK IN EARNEST.




30 Frank went to Mr. Stock’s, and was
set to work in the garden. And
very glad was old Ralph Churchill to
have a boy under him. He had been

gardener and sexton as long as most
people could remember, and though he was
getting rather past his work, Mr. Stock would
not turn him away, but gave him extra
help.

Ralph had been a hard-working man in his
time, and if now he was somewhat slow and
deliberate in his actions, his breath was short
and his joints were stiff, and he used often to
be saying, “I don’t feel so young as I did
years agone.”’ But he was sharp enough upon
Frank, and would not allow him to idle.

“ Holloa, you there !” he would say, “what
are you at, cheating the master! He pays.
62 WORK IN EARNEST.

you for work, don’t he, and not for making a
scare-crow of yourself!”

And then Frank would set to again, find-
ing it more trying to his good resolutions of
industry and perseverance than he had ex-
pected.

Indeed, he used to look upon it in the light
of a holiday, when old Ralph was occupied by
his other duties in the church-yard, as he
used to take it a little easier then.

But he would recall to mind what his father
had said once when he was laughing at old
Ralph. “He’s quite right: the master has
bought your time and the labour of your
hands; and if you don’t give him his due, but
waste your time and shirk your work, you
cheat your master. Put yourself in the
master’s place, and see how youd like to have
your money thrown away.”

“Ay,” added his mother, “he should do
it to the Lord, and not to please man
only.”

And so Frank and old Ralph did not often
fall out, and Ralph used to say “he was a
pretty good boy ; though,” of course he added,
“T have known better.”
WORK IN EARNEST. 65

Now, one autumn afternoon Frank was
busily digging potatoes, throwing the bad
ones in a heap, and wheeling off the others to
a shed, and hoping to get the piece finished
before old Ralph came back, when he was
startled by hearing a voice behind him:
“Well, if you ain’t working like a nigger !”

It was Bob the stable-boy leaning over the
top of the wall. “TI heard the bell going,”
said he, “and as I knew youd be lonely, I’ve
come to keep you company a bit.”

“ But master’ll be out in a minute,” said
Frank,

“ He’s just rode off or I shouldn’t be here,”
was the reply: which was very true; for if
ever there was an eye-servant, Bob Partridge
was one.

He sat down on the wall and pulled out
some twine out of one pocket, and putting
his hand carefully into another, took out a
young white ferret, to the collar of which he
tied the twine, and let it run about over him
and along the wall for his amusement.

“Well, I wouldn’t be in your shoes,” said
he, “ to be drove about by old Ralph! What's
the good of sweating so; let's go and put the
64 WORK IN EARNEST.

ferret into the rick, and see him work the
rats.”

“No,” said Frank, “I want to finish this
job right away.”

“What’s the odds when ’tis finished? I
say, pitch us up one of those apples, they are
nice ones, they are.”

“How do you know ?” said Frank, who
had missed some from the tree, but thought
his master had gathered them.

“ How do I know?” said Bob laughing; “ by
the taste, to be sure. How should I know
else, you ninny 2”

“You don’t mean that you've been at
7em?” said Frank, who stopped digging
for the first time, and stared with oper
face.

“Why, dear me, what now? Gape your
mouth a little wider! And suppose I have
been at ’em, masterll only think ‘twas
you took ’em. He hain’t a-missed ‘em yet,
then ?”

Frank went on with his work, but his
mind was more busy than his hands. He
saw in a minute what Bob meant, that his
master would suspect the new comer ; and if
WORK IN EARNEST. 65

he told the truth, he thought, there was sure
to be trouble that way, and he might not be
believed into the bargain.

“T say, can’t ye just pitch us an applet
one more or less aint nothing. I’m most
afraid to ask’ for a peach, as I’m pretty sure
they’re counted, and I happen to know one or
two are short already, and it might be un-
pleasant for you, my lad, as they’re fond of
’em in the house, I’m told. But the bell is
stopped.”

He stood upon the wall to see whether
Ralph was coming back, when a brick gave
way, and down he slipped into the garden,

“Ah! there goes the bell again. Well, as
you were uncivil enough not to invite me, I
must help myself,” and so saying he picked
an apple, which he put into his pocket.

“Look here,” he said, “you’re new and
raw, you know. Master don’t mind us help-
ing ourselves. Now you've got some rabbits
at home, so I'll leave the corn-bin open, after
Adam has fed the horses, and you can just
fill your pockets, or I don’t mind a small bag,
only you must put it in the hedge and fetch
it after dark, dy’e see ?”—but then espying

(144) 5
66 WORK IN EARNEST.

Sally the maid, off he went to idle and romp
with her.

But this pilfering and dishonesty, which
Bob seemed to make so light of, was new and
strange to Frank, and to say the truth, his
whole soul seemed to recoil from it with
abhorrence. He remembered being punished
some time ago for dipping his fingers into his
mother’s treacle, and again for breaking off the
sweet corners of the new loaves; but he had
no idea that servants ever could do as Bob
did. Ah, those were happy days when we
were innocent of the wickedness we now are
aware of, and which, alas, we hasted to learn.
How little has that gross knowledge added to
our peace of mind ?



nay, rather, of how much
has it deprived us ¢

We are not as we once were. The root of
original sin has forced up rank, fast-growing,
suckers, which have drawn away much
strength, if they have not endangered our
spiritual life. Cut them down, root them out
of the soil of the heart, even though it bea
toilsome and painful task.

Christ said, “It is profitable” (or expedient)
“for thee that one of thy members should
WORK IN EARNEST. 6?

perish, and not that thy whole body should
be cast into hell” Pray God to create a new
heart and renew a right spirit within, that
the body of sin may be destroyed, that we
may live no longer to ourselves, but to him
who died for our sins, and rose again for our
justification. :

Beyond a lecture which Ralph administered
upon the evil of picking and stealing, the
former of which expressions Ralph interpreted
solely with reference to garden fruit, Frank
heard nothing further relating to Bob’s depre-
dations ; indeed, he was led to believe that
Ralph’s lecture was only intended as a warn-
ing for his own guidance in future with the
fruit before his eyes, for Ralph believed that,
with boys in general, seeing and tasting is one
and the same thing.

But from that time Frank used to have his
suspicions, which however he kept to himself,
concerning a certain covered basket which
Sally would pass into Bob’s hands in the
evening sometimes, and which he would carry
to his home; and Frank, as much as_ he pos-
sibly could, tried to avoid his company. When
he was at Sunday school he had learnt the
68 WORK IN EAKNEST

first psalm by heart ; and Miss Margaret had
explained the first verse to him in such a
forcible and descriptive manner that he never
forgot it. He used to say it over to himself
sometimes, and not unfrequently the whole
psalm, for it seemed to comfort, and strengthen,
and do him good.

But Bob was not long in Mr. Stock’s service.
His master very soon had a suspicion that his
character was none of the best ; and he was by
no means satisfied by the way in which his
work was done: yet Bob was clever enough so
to deceive Mr. Stock’s sharp eye, that he did
not know things were so bad as they were. .

But this is how he came to be dismissed at
a day’s notice; and you may be sure it wasa
warning to Frank, and a lesson that he minded
more than twenty pieces of advice from old
Ralph, or his father even.

“Frank,” said Mr. Stock one day, coming
into the garden where he was at work, “you
must leave what you are about, and go home
and get your dinner, and then help Bob to carry
a set of harness into town to the saddler’s ;
and I have told Bob that there is something
to be brought home from Mr. Drench’s, the
WORK IN EARNEST. 69

veterinary surgeon ; now mind you don’t loiter,
but be back as quick as you can, for I want
the medicine at once.”

So Frank got his dinner, and set out with
Bob and the harness to walk about four miles
and a half to the neighbouring town.

It was certainly a hot autumn afternoon, |
but they could have been well back by five |
o’clock, whereas Frank made his appearance
alone, about eight! for before the two had
got far on their road, Bob laid down his share
of their burden by the hedge, and telling Frank
to mind it till he came back, jumped over and
made his way to a wood at some little distance
off, where he remained some time; and when
at length he returned, he had a companion
with him, and both appeared in the best of
spirits. The newcomer, who was a young
man older than Bob, was smoking a short pipe,
and over his arm were slung some rabbit
nets, and at his heels a lurcher dog followed,
and the pockets of his ragged coat seemed
heavy and laden.

Frank took a dislike to this ill-conditioned
acquaintance of Bob’s the moment he set his
eyes on him; and when he heard him speak.
70 WORK IN EARNEST.

his judgment was confirmed, for without an
oath he seemed scarcely able to open his
mouth.

The three then proceeded on the road
towards the town, while Frank did not add
much to the conversation. Indced, the chief
part of it he did not understand, as it seemed,
by the mocking laugh they raised, when he
asked why they should choose the night for
an “owl-hunt,” about which they were speak-
ing.

By-and-by, on nearing the town, Bob and
his companion stopped at a public-house, while
Frank sat outside; and when Bob came out,
he was more merry than ever. However,
they left the harness at the saddlev’s, and got
the two bottles of medicine at the veterinary
surgeon’s ; and then Bob said he had another
errand to do. So Frank followed him through
street after street, and down a narrow alley,
and into a yard, where was a big fierce dog,
which flew out at them, but which shrunk
back into its kennel when it heard Bob’s
voice, as if it knew him. And then a door
was opened, and Bob was hailed by his name,
and told to come up stairs, while Frank was
WORK IN EARNEST. 7)

left sitting in a room below, with the bottles
of medicine in his hands. And there he sat
long enough to remember every article in the
room; whilst from above, such noisy language
reached his ears as he never heard before, and
he hoped he might never hear again.

It was a mason’s abode, apparently, in which
he found himself, for trowels, and brushes, and
a bucket were in a corner; whilst a_bull-
terrier lay near, eyeing him very suspiciously,
and a gun, and nets, and wires, and a large
cage of rats, seemed to show that the mason
had sporting tastes.

Frank did not know what time it was, but
saw it was getting late; and though anxious
to get home, dared not stir for fear of the bull-
terrier, who pricked up his ears whenever he
made a movement; and then he remembered
the savage brute in the yard.

By-and-by Bob made his appearance, but
with a flushed face and unsteady step, and,
throwing a shilling to Frank, cried, “ Ha!
ha! have ye had asleep? There’s my name-
sake for ye; but mind ye say nought where
yeve bin to,” he added, in a lower key, while
the man offered him to drink out of a case
72 WORK IN EARNEST.

bottle. Frank said he didn’t want to drink;
but Bob grew so angry, that he put the bottle
to his lips. It was like liquid fire, and he
quickly withdrew it, to the drunken amuse-
ment of Bob and his friend.

By the time they reached the street the
sun was nearly set, and Frank said, “ We
ought to have been home by now.”

“ What do I care,” was the answer. “I’m
going to make a night of it. Look here!”
And he pulled out a handful of silver, some of
which he scattered in the road.

Frank now began to see that his duty was
to get home as soon as possible with the
bottles of medicine, and leave Bob to his own
devices; but he could not manage to slip
away till Bob entered the public-house once
more to find his friend.

And then Frank hurried home, and told
Myr. Stock all about it, where he had been,
and what he had done; and from that day
Bob ceased to be Mr. Stock’s stable-boy, as
you may suppose, and Frank had heard and
seen more of the wickedness that is in the
world than ever he had before in his life.

And that night he prayed, and his mother
WORK IN EARNEST. 73

prayed with him, that he might be kept from
it, although his lot seemed cast in the midst
of evil, and that Christ, who died for sinners,
would pardon those who were given up to it,
and change their hearts, and lead them to
better ways before it was too late.

Events which shortly happened explained
to Frank much that was a mystery to him
that day, and they are detailed in the next
chapter.





CHAPTER V.

{N WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER.

“Ah! well do I wot the perils and snares
Of this bad world and its lust ;
Temptations and sorrows, vexations and cares,
Grow with the young heart’s wheat like tares,
And worry it down to the dust.

“Yet better, I know, if the spirit will pray
When trouble is near at hand;
If the heart pleads hard for grace to obey,
Brother, no sin shall lure thee astray ;
By faith thou still shalt stand.

** For heaven bends over to help and to bless,
With all a Redeemer’s power,
The spirit that strives, when evils oppress,
Its God to serve, and its Lord to confess,
In dark temptation’s hour.

“Thou, then, fair brother, go cheerily forth,
And manfully do your best,
In all sincerity’s warmth and worth
Go forth—be pure, be happy on earth,
And so evermore be blest.”





CHAPTER V.

IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER.



{HE immediate result of Bob’s dismissal
was, that Frank had to do double
“ work; but then, at the same time,
his wages were increased, and so he
did not mind it, especially as it
showed his master had confidence in him, and
was pleased at his efforts to do his duty.

And how tired he was when he got home
in the evenings, sometimes not till late! He
often would fall asleep over his supper, and
used to try all sorts of plans to keep in mind
what he was doing when he asked God to
pardon his offences of the day past, for Jesus
Christ’s sake, and to bless him, and his father
and mother, and brothers and sisters, and
while he repeated our Lord’s prayer before he
tumbled into bed. And when his father
ealled him in the early gray light of the morn-
78 IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER.

ing, he seemed to have been but a minute or
two asleep; but he soon was ready for his
cup of tea; and then his father asked God’s
blessing on the day thus begun, and the
family separated, each one to his appointed
labour.

Not much time was there, then, for reading
or writing, or learning anything from a book ;
indeed, he scarcely saw one except on Sundays,
and then he was so sleepy and tired, he could
not read much. Besides, what with going to
church and attending to his horses, and a
better dinner than usual, Sunday soon passed
away, and on Monday morning to work again.

And yet, how he rejoiced when Saturday
evening came; for besides that Sunday was a
day of rest, be loved it as the Lord’s day, the
best of all the seven: for then he heard of the
kindness and love of God our Saviour towards’
man; he “heard of heaven, and learned the
way ;” the soothing tidings of the gospel of
peace and God’s good will then cheered and
comforted him; and holy and solemn words
of advice and warning became as a light to
his feet and a lamp to his path.

And when he began to encounter the troubles
IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER. 79

and trials of man’s life here, he felt that he
needed assistance, and a stronger arm than any
of flesh and blood to hold up his goings in the
right paths; he wanted guidance and comfort
above that which man could give; and, hap-
pily, he knew where to seek for and obtain it.

And Sunday, therefore, when he could ap-
proach the mercy-seat, in quiet moments of
meditation, and in the congregation of the
faithful, was a glad and happy day to hin.
And then, too, he would look back on the
past, and ask God, for his Saviow’s sake, to
pardon all that was amiss; and he would go
forth to meet the future with a manly heart,
in the strength that Christ can give.

His mother liked this hymn which they
used to sing, and Frank liked it too, and would
say afterwards, “That’s true, that is!” and
at the end :—

2

would add an “ Amen’

“Sad and weary were our way,
Fainting oft beneath our load,
But for thee, thou blessed day—
Resting-place on life's rough road:
Here flow forth the streams of grace;
Strengthened hence we run our race

“Soon, too soon, the sweet repose
Of this day of God will ceese;
80 IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER.

Soon this glimpse of heaven will close;
Vanish soon the hours of peace:

Soon return the toil, the strife,

All the weariness of life.

* But the rest which yet remains
For thy people, Lord, above,
Knows nor change, nor fears, nor pains—-
Endless as their Saviour’s love:
Oh! may every Sabbath here
Bring us to that rest more near.”

Now one Monday morning Frank was sent
for, as Mr. Stock wished to speak with him
in the house; and great was his wonder when
he saw “the general,” and another gentleman,
and Enoch the gamekeeper there. Still higher
did his astonishment rise, when Mr. Stock
ordered him to repeat his account of his doings
in the town on the day when he carried the
harness thither with Bob Partridge.

Frank, having made his bow of course, told
all that occurred to the very best of his
memory; and on being asked if he thought he
should know Bob’s friend again on seeing him,
he answered, “ Yes; he would know him any-
where.” “And the man in the house, who
seemed to be a mason?” But Frank was not
sure, yet thought he would know him again if
he were dressed the same. Having described
IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER. 81

the appearance of both these persons as well as
he was able, Mr. Stock told him to leave the
room, but to stay in the garden or stables
until further orders, and on no account to men-
tion a word of what had passed to any one.

“What did master want ye for there?”
asked old Ralph, directly Frank got back to
the garden.

“ Well, he wanted to speak to me,’
Frank.

“ Eh, lad! and what did he say?”

Frank was not going to disobey his master,
but he was afraid of offending Ralph, and a
lie was out of the question.

“ He’s coming out to speak in a minute,”

D

said

he said.

“ What did Enoch want in there with him,
I wonder; did ye hear?” next asked the old
man.

“No, I didn’t,” said Frank shortly. “There's
that setter-pup among the chickens again, I
do believe.’ And off he went, as the wisest
mode of getting out of his difficulty.

Soon afterwards Mr. Stock came into the
garden, and asked Ralph where Frank
was.

144) 6
82 IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER.

“Did you speak to me, sir?” said Ralph,
pretending not to hear.

“Why, your hearing is worse than usual,
I think,” said Mr. Stock. “ Where is Frank?’
he shouted.

“ Wouldn’t I do instead, sir?” said the old
man.

“Go, then, and open the gate for ‘the
general?” And Mr, Stock walked away,
leaving Ralph grumbling to himself in high
disgust at the order; and very sour was his
face when “the general” said, “ Why, Ralph,
you're as nimble as a boy.”

He was terribly afraid “the general” would
have thrown him a halfpenny, when, I think,
he would have died of vexation, for numbers
of people were about, and they laughed as it
was. But it served him right, did it not?

Mr. Stock found Frank in the yard, and
said, “ Again I must caution you, my boy,
to say nothing to anybody about what I am
now going to tell you, or even to talk of what
you did in town that day with Bub Partridge.
Do you understand me ?”

“ Yes, sir,” said Frank ; “but I have already
told my father and mother about that day.”
IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER. 83

“Well,” said Mr. Stock, “say no more to
any one even at home, as it might be re-
peated. And what I now tell you, must be
kept a secret also. I have good reason to
suspect that Bob Partridge and his friend
whom you saw, and the man in the house
that looked like a mason, are members of a
gang of poachers, if nothing worse, that has
been disturbing this neighbourhood all this
autumn, and we shall require your assistance
in detecting them. Do you understand ?”

“ Yes, sir,” said Frank. “I saw a number
of nets and wires, as I told you; but Bob
spoke of owl-hunting.”

“Did he?” asked Mr. Stock; “ and what
did he say about it ?”

“Well, sir, they both said they had had a
good hunt one night, and they hoped to have
a better in a week or so.”

“Did you hear where 2”

“J think I heard ’em say Cowleas Copse;
but their talk was so strange I did not under-
stand it.”

“And you don’t remember anything else,
nor know what they meant by owls?”

“No, sir.”
84 IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER.

“They meant pheasants,” said Mr. Stock.
“ And now you run home and tell your mother
that I find it more convenient for you to
sleep in the house and have your meals here,
and so she need not expect you home to-night.
Bring your clothes and all that you want, and
say no more to any one.”

So Frank ran home and told his mother,
who was much pleased at his getting his board
at Mr. Stock’s ; and he quickly put his clothes
in a bundle and returned.

“ Some evening, Frank,” said Mr. Stock to
him, “we will go out together and try and
catch a sight of the owl-hunters ?”

So Frank was all excitement in expecta-
tion of some fun. A week passed away, and
Frank heard no more of the matter, and in a
fortnight he had nearly forgotten all about it,
so much was he busied in bustling about his
work. But the worst of it was, that Frank
began to think a great deal of himself.

Being a sharp, handy lad, he was called
here and there; and filling the position of
under-gardener and stable-lad, which he prided
himself on, and earning good wages for his
age, and entrusted with such a secret about
IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER. 85

the poachers, he was puffed up with self-im-
portance, and fancied there never was such a
fellow as he. And of course his fellow-servants
laughed, and played off on him all manner of
tricks, and not unfrequently he brought him-
self into trouble by his forwardness.

For instance, he was told one day to get
Adam the groom, to harness a pony into a
basket-carriage belonging to a visitor at Mr.
Stock’s ; but Frank must needs think he him-
self could do it as well as Adam, who had
taken the pony out, and therefore knew how
to put it in again. And the consequence was,
that at the first hill the carriage followed too
fast on the pony’s heels, and the pony ran
away, and broke the shafts and the harness to
pieces, and kicked the ladies out, who, very
fortunately, were more frightened than hurt.

At another time he would pull about a
rabbit-gin that Adam had told him not to
touch, and it caught his fingers, and made
them sore for many a day.

But the greatest joke against him was his
adventure in the beer cellar. Mr. Stock sent
him in to order the cook to fill a can with
cider for some labourers ; but Frank, not find-
86 IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER.

ing her in the kitchen, thought, “Oh, I can
do it as well as she!” So he opened the
cellar door, which was in a distant passage of
the old rambling house, and, without lighting
a candle, went down the steps, felt his way to
the cider barrel, and soon filled the can, but
could not stop the tap! He turned it this
way and that, but still the cider poured out
upon the stones, and he was in despair. What
should he do? He clapped his hand on the
mouth of the tap and hallooed with all his
might. Leave the cellar he dared not; for
he knew, in the first place, he had no business
there, and the barrel would empty itself in no
time. So all he could do was to keep his
hand tight to the tap’s mouth and shout. And
shout he did; but to no purpose. No one
heard him; and for three long hours Master
Frank paid the penalty for his self-assurance
in the dark, among the black beetles in the
cold cellar, with his hand stuffed against the
cider-tap, till his arm ached as if it would
fall off !

When the maid at last heard the deplorable
wailing which issued from the darkness below,
she was too frightened to go down alone to
IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER, 87

poor Frank’s rescue. But she called a fellow-
servant, and Adam the groom ; and the three,
having armed themselves with a broomstick,
the kitchen poker, and Mr. Stock’s life-pre-
server, with a lighted candle in the other hand,
formed a procession down the cellar stairs—
the cook, with the poker, heading it, and
Adam, with the life-preserver, bringing up the
rear—only to find our hero, very crestfallen
and miserable, with the palm of his hand still
glued fast to the cider-tap. But when the
cook set him free, after a hearty laugh at the
discovery, by two turns of her wrist, the con-
ceit was well out of him, and the joke was not
forgotten for a long time.

And besides all this, he had to bear many
a sneer, and many a jest was made at his
expense, because he was what the other ser-
vants scoflingly termed “religious.” He was
called “Saint Martin,” “Parson Frank,’ and
many other such nicknames, which are not
worth repeating, but sometimes at the moment
they are very hard to bear.

But Frank in this way, as in others, was
inclined to be a little “set up.” He thought
more of himself than he ought to think, for he
88 IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER.

considered himself better than others. He
needed some friendly discipline and chastening ;
he had to be taught how foolish and frail he
was, and to learn that while he was nothing,
Christ was everything. That necessary dis-
cipline came to him in due time. He had his
share of the trials of life, and they brought
him to himself, and by the grace of God they
were made his means of leading him nearer
to the cross of Christ as a humble suppliant,
even as a little child. His self-sufficiency and
self-pride was brought low ; “the world’s rude
furnace ” refined and purified his blood; and
he learned to say, with hearty sincerity and
thankfulness of spirit, “ By the grace of God
I am what I am!”

One evening he was in the stable late, and
by the light of a lantern was busily at work
bedding down a horse which Mr. Stock had
just brought in from a drive of some distance,
and was hissing away and thinking that Adam
himself, the crack groom of all the stables -
round, could not do it in better style, when he
suddenly became aware of a figure beside him,
which made him start and turn pale, and the
horses stopped feeding and turned their heads
IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER. 8&9

to look uneasily at the intruder. Frank was
no coward, and he had many a time laughed
with contempt at the superstitious stories that
were told in that country-side, and had volun-
teered to prove their absurdity over and over
again; but now his blood ran chill, and he felt
a tingling about the roots of his hair as he
rubbed his eyes, and stepped back a step or
two, while Tom, the stable cat, arched its back
and swelled its tail to double its natural size,
and fairly bolted up the ladder into the loft.
As Frank afterwards described it to Mr.
Stock, the figure was a foot or two higher than
a man, and was all in white, with a long ann,
and it spoke in a low hollow voice, and said,—
“Frank Martin, beware! beware! I am
come to warn thee, that if thou tell to any
mortal creature anything whatever, good or
bad, about the persons to whom that good
fellow Robert Partridge spoke, on the day thou
and he went to town; or if thou tell about or
show the house into which thou entered with
that honest fellow Bob Partridge, thou shalt
suffer horribly, yea, horribly !”—&c. &e. And
then came a vivid and blasphemous description
of what would, without fail, happen to him if
90 IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER.

he breathed a syllable against the stainless
character of that “honest and good fellow
Robert Partridge,” or those equally good and
honest fellows his companions; and the solemn
oration being ended, the long arm knocked
down the lantern, and the figure vanished with
a streak of blue and white light and a strong
smell of sulphur.

But Frank said to Mr. Stock afterwards,
“J thought what was up when I heard tell
about Bob Partridge, but I can’t deny but that
it scared me at first !”

“ Did the dogs bark?” asked Mr. Stock.

“No, sir, they didn’t, but the horses were
nigh mad.”

“Then it was Bob Partridge himself,” said
Mr. Stock; “the dogs knew him, of course.
He put a white smock over his head, on the
top of a broom most likely, and kept one arm
clear for striking down the light, and he rubbed
a box of matches along the wall as he went
out,”

“Yes, that was it, sir,’ said Frank. “ But
it knocked me all of a heap like, coming so
sudden, and I don’t call it a fair thing to
frighten a fellow in that fashion! It’s just
IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER. 91

one of Bob’s tricks; but he must have thought
me a bigger fool than IT am to be taken in
that way !”

“And what did you do when the light was
out?” asked Mr. Stock.

“Well, sir, I waited a minute, and just
quieted the mare a bit, and then I lighted it
again and looked about me, and came right
in to you.”

“Well, you're a brave, sensible lad, Frank.
There’s always some nonsense at the bottom
of these things. Indeed, it is worse than
nonsense, it is exceedingly wrong to frighten
others; for sometimes very sad and serious
results have followed some such trick as this.
If those that play them had their deserts,
instead of frightening anyone, they should get
a good sound thrashing, and it would serve
them right. I'll go out with you and lock
the stable up, and if I see that scamp Bob
anywhere, I won’t let him off very easily.”

But Bob was far enough away by the time
Mr. Stock went out.

“Say nothing about it, Frank,” said his
master. “It will only set people asking
questions, and we shall have the laugh on our
92 IN WHICH APPEARS A MYSTERIOUS MESSENGER.

side by-and-by. But you are a good, brave
boy. Do nothing wrong, Frank, nothing to
be ashamed of, and then you need be afraid of
nothing !”

But Frank would not have minded being
frightened over and over again, if he could in
this way gain such high praise from his master,
for Mr. Stock seldom commended any one that
did not most thoroughly deserve it. And
before Frank went to bed, he looked out the
27th Psalm and read it: “The Lord is my
light and my salvation, whom shall I fear?
The Lord is the strength of my life, of whom
shall I be afraid?” And the last verse, espe-
cially, gave him such true comfort that he soon
composed his excited nerves, and laid him
“down in peace ” and slept, being well assured
that it was the Lord only that made him
“ dwell in safety.”




CHAPTER VI.

FRANK GOES “OWL-HUNTING” WITH MR. STOCK.



o———-

** Lord, uphold me day by day;
Shed a light upon my way};
Guide me through perplexing snares;
Care for me in all my cares,

‘All I ask for is, enough;
Only, when the way is rough,
Let thy rod and staff impart
Strength and courage to my heart.

“Should thy wisdom, Lord, decree
Trials long and sharp for me,
Pain or sorrow, care or shame,
Father, glorify thy name.

“ Let me neither faint nor fear,
Feeling still that thou art near,
In the course my Saviour trod,
Tending still to thee, my God."
JOSTAH CONDER





CHAPTER VI.

FRANK GOES “OWL-HUNTING” WITH MR. STOCK.

(NICARCELY a week had passed since the
4f attempt in the stable to frighten Frank
into holding his tongue, when the




\Faffair took place which he had been
long expecting.

It was nearly the middle of the night, and
he had been some time in bed and asleep,
when Mr. Stock woke him up with a shake,
saying, ‘‘ Make haste, and put on your clothes,
and bring your boots down in your hand; the
poachers are at it in the copse.”

Frank started up and rubbed his eyes, with
a very confused notion as to where he was
and who was speaking, and what it was that
was “at it in the copse.” He began to think
at once of two young bulls that he had seen
fighting a few days before, and said, ‘“ They
must have a’ broke out again, then !”
96 FRANK GOES “ OWL-HUNTING ” WITH MR. STOCK.

“Yes,” said Mr. Stock; “the keepers are
watching; but I want you to see if you know
any of them should they get away.”

“Why don’t keeper drive ’em home ?” said
Frank, still rubbing his eyes.

“There—jump up at once,” said Mr. Stock,
giving him another shake, “and make haste
about it,” and putting down the candle he
left the room.

But he waited and waited, and Frank did
not come. “ Why, what is the boy about?”
said he, going up again to hasten him, but
there was poor sleepy Frank, with his head
where his heels ought to be, as sound as ever.

“Dear me, what a boy for sleeping! come,
come ; get up, get up,” said Mr. Stock, shaking
him so as to rouse him thoroughly.

“What! be ’em at it again?” murmured
Frank ; “ why don’t keeper drive them home?”

“T want you to get up and see if you know
them,” said Mr. Stock ; ‘so bundle on your
clothes. Come!”

“Tsaw ’em t’other day a tearing of the’selves
to pieces, sir,” added Frank, when for the first
time he understood who spoke to him.

“Who did you see fighting, Frank ?”
FRANK GOES “ OWL-HUNTING” WITIL MR. STOCK. 97

“They two plaguy bulls, sir. Jem said as
how—”

“Nonsense, you sleepyhead! It’s the
poachers! you've been dreaming! that’s right
—get on—get on!”

“Poachers !” said Frank, wide awake now,
and he hurried on his things with excitement,
and, trembling a little, he followed Mr. Stock
down the stairs.

The moon was nearly at the full, but fast-
sailing clouds from over the sea hid her every
now and then from view, and made gray
darkness where, before, all was in cold white
light. Not a breath of wind was passing
over that part of the earth’s surface where
Cowleas farm lay, however roughly it was
blowing in the regions above, when Mr. Stock
and Frank stepped out into the damp night
air.

The mist was lying on the meadows by the
stream, and when they got on to the hill and
looked behind them, the cottages -and farm-
buildings were quite hidden by it; and the
valley seemed to be the course of a mighty
river, which nearly surrounded the island on
which they stood.

(4) 7
98 FRANK GOES “OWL-HUNTING” WITH MR. STOCR.

But such fancies as these did not long
occupy Frank’s mind, for they were drawing
‘near the head of the copse which lay on the
slope of the other side of the hill, and ex-
tended for some distance, out of their sight
indeed, in the foggy moonlight. They had
been walking up on the dark side of the
hedge, and now that they came to a gate, Mr.
Stock stopped until a cloud passed over the
moon, and then he stepped across quickly
that they might not be noticed from below.
He listened, but not a sound reached their
ears, except the tinkling of the sheep-bells on
the hills, and now and then the distant hoot |
of the white owl as he beat along the hedge-
rows after his prey. There lay the copse still
and motionless before them, and Frank took
leave to whisper to his master, that in his
opinion the alarm was a false one, and that
the poachers were in bed.

There were the rabbits out feeding and
chasing one another in hundreds, and now and
then a hare would scud across the open ;—but,
hark! a squealing cry, as if an animal were
wounded, or in pain, or caught’ in a snare.
The rabbits sit wp and prick their ears, and
FRANK GOES “ OWL-HUNTING” WITH MR. STOCK. 99

Mr. Stock says, under his breath: “Ah, they
are at work down there safe enough!”

“What was that, sir,” whispered Frank,
rather frightened.

“That was a hare in a wire,” said Mr.
Stock. “Now, you stay here and don’t let
yourself be seen, but keep your eyes open and
watch. You can see two sides of the cover
from this point, and if any of them leave this
part of it, they will most likely make for this
gate; but no one will see you if you keep
close and quiet.”

Mr. Stock was going to leave him, when
Frank asked how long he should stay there?

“Until I come,” was the answer, and in
another minute, Frank, with his heart thump-
ing fast and loud against his side, as it seemed,
was left alone in his hiding-place, watching as
quiet as a mouse for the next strange event
that was to happen.

A long time he waited and watched, and
the rabbits still played, and the barn owl
hooted, and the sheep-bells tinkled, and he
began to get cold, and damp, and tired of the
same position, and again he thought to himself:
“there’s nobody in the copse, and it was a
100 FRANK GOES “ OWL-HUNTING” WITH MR. STOCK.

rabbit hunted by a stoat that squealed just
now.”

But then, again, the same painful cry came
from a distant part of the copse, and Frank's
heart began beating as before, when he
noticed further signs of disturbance below.
A wood-pigeon every now and then rose from
the trees, and sometimes two or three together,
and now a pheasant left the cover for a cop-
pice near, and now another, and, ah! the
report of a gun!

The rabbits quickly made their way into
shelter, and the pigeons rose in numbers, and
pheasants too, as three or four guns were fired
in quick succession, and a crashing noise heard
as of men breaking through the wood. Frank
could see some distance down one of the
drives; and watching that spot very closely,
he caught sight of a man stepping into it out
of the wood, and at the same moment a
pheasant rose, which he shot. But no sooner
had he fired his gun, than two men ran down
the drive in pursuit of him. At the same
moment five others jumped over the fence into
the field, and made for Frank’s gate. They
came leisurely up the hill, and had guns, and
FRANK GOES “ OWL-HUNTING” WITH Mk. STOCK. 101

nets, and bags with them. They talked
loudly, and before they came close enough for
Frank to see their faces, he had recognised
Bob Partridge’s friend by his voice.

How Frank’s heart was beating now!
They stopped at the gate, and their bags
seemed to be full and heavy to carry.
“There’s only three of ’em,” Frank heard
them say; but their words were too bad to
repeat. They appeared to be waiting for
another, and to be very careless as to whether
the keepers came near them or not. Frank
saw Bob’s friend now very plainly, but the
others he did not know.

He was lying as still as he possibly could,
and he had just heard an_ exclamation:
“There’s four! ’tis Mr. Stock himself; we're
only five ;” and the men began to move off
quickly. Frank turned his head to see who
was coming; Mr. Stock, the two keepers, and
another man were running fast up the hill .
towards the gate; Frank had time to see that.
But at the same moment, to his terror, he
discovered a few yards from him, that savage
and powerful dog which he feared so much in
the mason’s court in the town on the day of
102 FRANK GOES “ OWL-HUNTING ” WITH MR. STOOK.

his memorable visit with Bob Partridge. It
began to growl and to show his teeth, and
before poor Frank had time to raise his arm
to defend himself, the beast was upon him.
He screamed for help, but Mr. Stock’s party
was still some distance off, and the hill was
steep.

It is best not to try to describe the horrible
scene too closely. The dog had been trained
to assist and defend its master in a fight, and
this, added to its ferocious nature, made it a
most formidable assailant, against whose attack
Frank was powerless.

In a moment he was thrown violently to
the ground, with the jaws of the fierce animal
at his throat. He was conscious of a fall and
a sharp shock of pain—of hearing the dog’s
snarling growl—of seeing its white teeth and
glaring eyes flash, as he rolled out into the
moonlight, and he knew nothing more of what
happened to him until he found himself in bed
in his room at Cowleas.

“ He was only in a faint, poor little fellow,”
said a kind woman’s voice by his bedside.
“Bide still, Frank; there’s a brave boy;
doctor’ll be here in a minute, and set ye all to
FRANK GOES “OWL-HUNTING” WITH MR. STOCK. 103

rights; mother’s coming presently, so you
bide still.”

Frank, feeling very uncomfortable about
the throat, which was his first sensation on
“coming to”—as cook termed it—tried to
hift his hand, but, oh! such a sharp pain
again in his arm, that he cried out loudly.

“That nasty dog has a-broke your arm,
my dear,’ said cook; “but doctor’s coming
soon to bandage it, and it will be nice and
comfortable then—but you must bide still—
that nasty dog! I’m glad master shot it.”

Cook’s was a soothing notion of the surgical
operation needed for setting a compound frac-
ture of the arm, for poor Frank’s hurt was no
less—and that was not all. The dog had
torn and bitten him badly; but, doubtless, the
fall which broke his arm, by God’s merciful
providence, had saved his life. He had been
hiding behind a knot of furze which grew on
a mound close under the hedge on the very
brow of the steepest part of the ridge, and the
dog’s spring had rolled them both over the
edge, giving Frank a heavy fall with his arm
bent under him. The dog, too, had to run
some distance downwards, and before it could
104 FRANK GOES “ OWL-HUNTING” WITH MR. STOCK.

return to the second attack, Mr. Stock arrived
breathless on the spot, and put an end to its
life with the keeper’s gun.

To lift Frank up tenderly, and to carry
him down to Cowleas, was but the work of a
short time, and Mr. Stock was sorely grieved
that such a sad mishap should have befallen
the little fellow, whom he had thought so
safely hidden out of all harm’s way.

It was the broad light of morning when
the doctor came to set Frank’s arm. He took
it up and tried it, and oh! what a cry the
poor little fellow gave. “Ah, my wounded
hero,” said the doctor, “there is not much the
matter otherwise, if you can holloa like that,
and we will soon set the arm in the way of
mending, I hope.”

But Frank had to bear much acute pain,
and he was very glad when he saw the doctor's
back, and his arm was tightly bound up and
laid in splints. His neck, too, where the
savage dog had bitten him, was painful and
sore; but how thankful he was that it was no
worse. And when he was left alone, after
that he had heard Mr. Stock’s account of the
occurrence, he lifted up his heart in glad
FRANK GOES “ OWL-HUNTING” WITH MR. STOCK. 105

praise to the Almighty, who had been so
gracious to him. In the course of the day his
mother read to him the 115th and 116th
psalms,

“Read another, mother,” said he; and she
read the two next following psalms, and
Frank repeated the last verse after her: “O
give thanks unto the Lord, for he is good; for
his mercy endureth for ever.”

Frank had plenty of visitors in his sick-
room, and cook sent many away, for she said:
“Tm not a-going to have the house turned
into a Van Humbug’s show !”

Mr. Stock, also, soon took the opportunity
of asking him if he was able to identify either
of the men whom he saw that night, and his
master also told him that the police were on
their track, and doubtless they soon would
be taken, and then his evidence would be
necessary in the court of justice, so that he
must make haste and get well enough to go
out.

But though all possible care was taken of
him, and he was nursed very kindly in. Mr.
Stock’s house—for all of whose goodness Frank
was very grateful—yet he did not make a very
106 FRANK GOES “ OWL-HUNTING” WITH MR. STOOK.

fast recovery. The shock had been a severe
one, and the pain his arm gave him, with the
change from an active out-of-door life to this
lying in bed or just crawling out in the
garden, and being able to do nothing, whilst
every one else was busy, affected his spirits.
Poor Frank was not a bit like himself, and it
was melancholy to see him sitting on a bench
with his arm in a sling, and his pale thin

?

face, or just walking down to “ father’s” and
having a chat with Martha, who did her very
best to amuse her brother, and give him com-
fort by her cheerful talk.

Of course it was not long before Miss Mar-
garet came to see “ Frank, the hero,” with her
usual kindness. She read and talked cheer-
fully to him, but was much grieved to see him
thus cast down, and she pressed him to tell
her why it was that his spirits were so low
and melancholy.

“Did his arm hurt him very continually ?
Did he feel very weak and ill?”

“No, miss;” he said, “I am weak to be
sure, and my arm is painful, but I can’t bear
being useless, and I seem to fret about it.
And, perhaps, I shall never be able to work
FRANK GOES “ OWL-HUNTING” WITH MR. STOCK. 107

again, and then I shall be a burden all my
life!”

“Oh!” said Miss Margaret, “be patient
Frank. You cannot expect a broken arm to
be well in a day, and by-and-by I hope it will
be as strong as ever; so the doctor says, at all
events, and he knows best.”

“ But, miss,” said Frank, “don’t you think
it’s rather hard that I should have to bear all
this; I haven’t been so bad as to need it—
have I?”

“Be sure, Frank,” was the answer, “if you
had your deserts, or I either, we should not
be spared for a single moment, but we should
be sent to a place of punishment at once. If
you only think how we each have forgotten
God, and broken his laws and rebelled against
him in thought, word, and deed, no one can
say that they do not merit the anger of God’s
justice. Think of your evil heart—the sin of
your thoughts—the pride of self—the iniquity
that clings even to your prayers and your
most holy actions, and you will not speak of
your not being ‘so bad,’ but of how ‘bad you
are.”

“Yes, miss,” said Frank, for his eyes began

oH
108 FRANK GOES “ OWL-HUNTING” WITH MR. STOCK

to be opened to it; “I don’t see that I’m
much better than others, after all.”

“Well, then,” said Miss Margaret, “see the
way of escape God in his loving-kindness has
provided for us. He has sent his own dear
Son into the world, that he might suffer for
us in our flesh, and God has ‘ laid on Him the
iniquity of us all’ He bore the curse of sin
for you, and for me, and for all ; and whosoever
believeth in him shall receive remission of sins.
He now calls sinners to repentance, and says,
‘Come unto me, and I will give you rest unto
your souls.’ ”

“ But, miss,” said Frank, “if Christ has
borne all for us, and if we cannot do anything
to deserve God’s favour, or atone for our sins
of ourselves, as I. believe—for Christ has said,
‘No man cometh unto the Father but by me’—
why do we suffer pain and trouble here?”

“Tt is to bring us to ourselves, Frank, to
show us when we are wrong. It is God’s best
gift very often ; it is his discipline to teach us
for our good, just as a father punishes his
child to make him mend his ways.”

“What, then, ought this to teach me, Miss
Margaret ?” asked Frank very humbly.
FRANK GOEs “ OWL-HUNTING” WITH MR. STOCK. i109

“Nay,” said his instructor, “that you surely



must know best. Pray to God—ask him.
Each heart knows its own bitterness. Was
it thinking too much of yourself, though,
Frank, do you think?” added she, moving
to go.

“ Ah, miss,” said Frank, blushing up quite
red, “I think it was to teach me that very
same; you've hit it, I believe. Well, with
God’s Spirit helping me, I’ll remember the
lesson T’ve learnt to-day !”

“ And the lesson your pain is teaching you,
Frank,” said Miss Margaret, as she bade the
lad good-bye, with best wishes for his speedy
recovery.

But in the evening Frank received a note
by the hands of a messenger from the Hall,
to Mr. Stock’s. It was an envelope enclosing
a paper on which was written the lines which
end this chapter.

They were in Miss Margaret’s own hand-
writing, and were written, as Frank rightly
guessed, for his own especial welfare. How he
considered himself honoured by Miss Margaret’s
kindness, and how he prized them, need not
be told :—
110 FRANK GOES “ OWL-HUNTING” WITH MR. STOCK,

* Cheer up, faint heart, no trouble lasts for ever;
*Tis but the chast'ning of our Father's hand:
Shun not his smart, but trust him; sorrow never
Crosses the border of the promised land.

“Tis for thy good; God's child must bear reproving
Ere he may see his Father face to face;
Old Self must die, the guilt-stain needs removing,
The hard heart melting by the Saviour's grace.

“Oh, why cast down! E’en now the sunbeam brightly
Displays God's colours in the cloud o’erpast.
Hope thou in him! Take his correction rightly,
And sure his love will lead thee home at last.”




CHAPTER VII.

THE TRUTH, AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH,

““No distance breaks the tie of blood—

Brothers are brothers evermore;

Nor wrong, nor wrath of deadliest mood,
That magic may o’erpower :

Oft, ere the common source be known,

The kindred drops will claim their own,

And throbbing pulses silently

Move heart towards heart by sympathy.

“So is it with true Christian hearts;
Their mutual share in Jesus’ blood
An everlasting bond imparts
Of holiest brotherhood :
Oh, might we all our lineage prove,
Give and forgive, do good and love,
By soft endearments in kind strife
Lightening the load of daily life!"
KEBLE.





CHAPTER VII.

THE TRUTH, AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH.

ee UE day Frank was walking slowly



dix along a bridle-path on his way to a
* field not far off, where a steam thresh-
ing-machine was puffing away, and
keeping three or four men busily em-
ployed in cramming the yellow sheaves down
the capacious throat that never was satisfied ;
for he thought, If I can’t do anything, ] may
as well look on.

It was one of the few last warm bright
days, when sunny autumn seems to linger
before giving place entirely to the cold Novem-
ber fogs. The swallows had taken their noisy
leave, and all the birds seemed to be gather-
ing together in flocks) The different families
of partridges upon the hills, lamenting and
calling for their absent members, packed to-
gether, to make, as it were, common cause

(144) 8
114. THE TRUTH, AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH.

against the sportsman. The field-sparrows,
fat and saucy after their good living in the
corn-fields, sat in innumerable numbers on the
hedge-rows, and chattered incessantly. The
starlings almost darkened the air in their
flights, and the whirr of their wings would
make the traveller stop and look up as they
crossed overhead, The pretty little long-tailed
blue tits chirped merrily as they followed one
another from tree to tree and bush to bush,
light-hearted and busy. A number of plovers
rose from a fallow near, and cried “ pee-wit,”
their somewhat mournful cry; while their
white wings glistened in the sun, and they
moved off, high in the air, with their lapping
flight.

The blackberries were gone, but there were
still plenty of sloes and hips and haws on
the hedges; but the berries on the yew in
the church-yard were most tempting to the
thrushes and blackbirds of the neighbourhood.
Such an abundance of -wild-fruits was there,
that Frank thought it was surely going to be
a very sharp winter, and that God had provided
food to keep his birds alive. And then some-
thing that was said in the sermon at the
THE TRUTH, AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH. 115

harvest-thanksgiving came into his mind,
God is a bountiful giver, thought he He
gives more than we desire or deserve. He
never holds his hand, and says, “ Enough;”
but he gives to all “ liberally, and upbraideth
not.” Like as when Christ fed the five thou-
sand people, he made more bread than they
could eat ; so what abundant crops he grants
to men, if they do but act according to his
Jaws in working industriously, in keeping down
weeds, in preparing the ground, and sowing
good seed at the right time! If the crop
fails, it is some mistake of ours; it is not
God’s will, unless it is sent as a punishment.
Even then, he has said that seed-time and
harvest shall never fail; and it never will.
What immense quantities he gives !—the
apples, the plums, and the blackberries, the
nuts, the winter food for all his creatures—for
the birds, the mice, the squirrels, and many
insects, as well as for man—teaching us to
provide for the future, and not to live in and
care for the present only. And so he leads us
on to think of laying up treasure in heaven for
the life to come.

Some such thoughts as these passed through
116 THE TRUTH, AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH.

Frank’s mind as he leant over a gate on that
bright autumn morning. They were frag:
ments that he had picked up and kept, and
now put into this kind of shape. Don’t
think, reader, that whenever he was alone he
had such grave meditations, though they were
very pleasant to him. No; his mind was
generally full of common things of this life’s
business and cares, if not of foolish or wrong
fancies. Thank God when any such a lad,
whether he be prince or farmer’s boy, has
thoughts above this gross world of eating,
drinking, sleeping, working, play, in which so
many of us altogether live! The things of
sense and time, relating to the body and its
poor concerns, occupy us very often from
morning to night! Never a thought of the
spiritual life, which we should live by the
faith of the Son of God, who loved us and
gave himself for us !

Alas! there are those who make this life of
the ‘body upon earth their whole and only
concern, from the morning to the evening of
their existence; and then comes upon them the
darkness of night indeed! But take heed,
and call to mind the apostle’s exhortation :
THE TRUTH, AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH. 117

“Set your affection on things above, not on
things on the earth. For ye are dead, and
your life is hid with Christ in God. When
Christ who is our life shall appear, then shall
ye also appear with him in glory.” God
grant it, for the Saviour’s sake, to you, my
reader, and to me!

Frank’s attention was now fully occupied
by a robin, that sat on the bough of a beech-
tree not far off, some of the leaves of which
were as brilliant in colour as the breast of the
little bird that sat and sang among them.
His throat trilled and shook with the effort
of his tuneful voice; and when he stopped,
another answered him from a branch of a
thorn in the opposite hedge.

“They, at all events, are singing their
praises to the Giver of all good,” thought
Frank.

But, alas! in another minute the one flew
across and attacked the other with every sign
of rage and violence. The two pretty birds
ruffled up their feathers, and pecked at each
other, and sprang up to get the advantage,
like a pair of fighting-cocks ; and Frank’s eyes
were opened wide at the sight.
118 THE TRUTH, AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH.

It might have taught him how the curse
of sin has fallen upon and marred God’s fair
creation, and that though his own heart might
at that moment seem right with God, yet the
root of corruption is still there, until changed
by the renewing and life-giving influence of
his Holy Spirit.

It is a sad sight to see evil passions shown,
whether it be by a pair of robin redbreasts,
or by the young child that lies so calmly and
sweetly, like an angel, as some say, in its
mother’s arms. Ah! sin is an ugly thing,
take what view we will of it We can only
find true beauty in purity, truth, and love.

Frank was gazing at the quarrelsome robins
with such rapt attention and interest, that
he did not hear a footstep behind him; and
so weak was he, that he was somewhat startled
when a voice said, “ Hulloa, Frank! you're
just the fellow I want to see. How be ye
getting on 2?”

It was Joe Harris, who had laughed at
Frank when he broke his fuchsia on the show
day.

Now, if Frank had an enemy in the village,
it was Joe Harris, he thought. He had not
THE TRUTH, AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH. 119

forgotten the circumstance in the park; and,
besides that, Joe often laughed and sneered at
“pious Frank ;” so that he could not bring
himself to like the fellow; and he was just
about to return a rude answer—‘“ None the
better for seeing you,” was on his lips—when
he thought of the two robins. “TI shall be
no better than one of them, that have no
understanding, if I don’t be civil when he
is’ Not quite right, Frank, yet? To be
civil only when others are civil to us, is
not Christ’s rule But He said, ‘“ Love
your enemies, bless them that curse you, do
good to them that hate you, and pray for
them which despitefully use you and persecute
you; that ye may be the children of your
Father which is in heaven: for he maketh his
sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and
sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust.
For if ye love them which love you, what
reward have ye?” Our Father in heaven is
kind to the unthankful. He gives more than
we deserve. Christ loved us when we loved
not Him. Let us Christians, then, as St. Peter
exhorts us, see that we love one another witha
pure heart fervently.
120) THE TRUTH, AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH.

Well, Frank gave Joe a civil answer, thanks
‘to the lesson the fighting robins taught him.

“T’ve been wanting to come across ye,”
said Joe. ‘ How’s your arm ?”

“ Better, thank you. The doctor is going
to strip it by-and-by, and see how it is get-
ting on.”

“Ah!” said Joe, “it was a bad job that
night, all round. They’ve took ’em; so I
hear.”

“Have they ?” exclaimed Frank. “ Who
have they taken ?”

“Some four or five; so they say. Young
Larkyns and Bob Partridge they’ve got safe
enough. The keepers can swear to Bob, but
to none of the rest, except that mason chap
who owned the dog. You are going to say
nothing about it, of course ?”

“T must speak the truth,” said Frank.

“The truth be hanged!” said Joe. “ Look
here: if you will only hold your tongue, these
poor fellows will get off. You won't split
upon ’em to be sure, will you?”

“T aint.going to tell any lies,” said Frank.

“Of course not! who wants you to tell
lies? there’s plenty of ways for you just to stop
THE TRUTH, AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH. 121

short of saying all you know, isn’t there?
Now, youre a good-tempered chap, how
would you like to be fined or sent to jail, just
for a bit of a lark, yourself? Here’s some-
thing I’ve got in my pocket, somebody told
me to put into your hand; and I said, oh, I
knew Frank Martin wasn’t the fellow to
make himself a sneak. So just you take
that, that'll make it all right.”

“What is it?” asked Frank.

“Oh, never mind, you look at it by-and-by,
and then it will be all straight. I knew you
were a good fellow, Frank. I must be off,
or master’ll be looking after me.”

So saying, Joe walked away, leaving Frank
tearing open the parcel as well as he could
with his teeth and his one sound hand; but
he had no sooner caught sight of the con-
tents, than he set up holloaing after Joe with
all his might.

“Tf you don’t come back,” cried he at last,
“Tl pitch it down in the path and leave it
there.”

And hearing that, Joe turned _ back.
* What’s the matter?” said he.

ae)

“The matter!” exclaimed Frank; “what
122 THE TRUTH, AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH.

do you take me for, then, if you think I’m to
be bought and sold this way? Here’s your
money. I’ll not touch a farthing of it; and
I shall just speak the plain truth when I’m
asked, neither more nor less: and that’s all
you've got by playing off such dirty tricks
upon me.”

“Don’t be a donkey,” said Joe; “just take
the money and say nothing about it; no one'll
know.”

Frank threw the packet down on the
ground, and, fairly turning his back on his
tempter, walked away, while Joe burst out in
a passion into a volley of horrible oaths and
threats, which he vowed should be executed
on poor Frank’s person if he dared speak a
word against anybody or anything at any
time whatever.

“You know you'd get such a licking that
you would not hold up your head for a week, if
I could use my arm,” said Frank; “and as I
can’t give it you now, I’ll get Sam to do it
for me next chance, only he’s too much your
own size; and if I tell him the reason he'll
beautify your pretty face, so that your mother
won’t know you.”
THE TRUTH, AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH. 123

And so the boys got quarrelling after all,
and if they did not come to blows, it was the
next thing to it, in spite of the broken arm.

Some one might say perhaps, “And no
wonder, it was enough to provoke any one!”

Ay, but to what? Not to “paying him
out,” surely? when St. Paul has said, “ Dearly
beloved, avenge not yourselves, but rather give
place unto wrath: for it is written, Vengeance
ismine; I will repay, saith the Lord ;”—rather
to the exercise of the spirit that was in Christ,
“Forbearing one another and forgiving one
another, if any man have a quarrel against any:
even as Christ forgave you, so also do ye.”

The news, however, was true which Joe
had told Frank; for, on his return, Mr. Stock
said, “I shall want you to go with me into
the town to-morrow to give your evidence, for
the police have got those men.”

Frank hesitated in his mind as to whether
he ought to tell his master of his meeting
with Joe Harris; but he decided he would not.
“Tt only concerns myself, as I see,” he thought;
“and it is of no use to go telling tales which
may bring others into trouble, unless it is my
duty.”
124 THE TRUTH, AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH.

That evening his father spoke to him, and
said, “So you have to go before the court
to-morrow, Frank !”

“Yes, father,” said he; “and it isn’t a job
I like at all.”

“Well, we aint here to please ourselves.
Do you mind what I told you that time you
got into Rover's barrel, ‘stead of going to
school 2”

“Yes, father, I mind,” said Frank, laugh-
ing; “you told us Admiral Nelson’s signal.”

“Was that all?”

“You said, we had first to do our duty to
God, then to man, and then to ourselves.”

“ Ay, that’s it. Never mind likes or dis-
likes. Duty is the word. And what are you
going to say to-morrow, Frank ?”

“The truth, father,” said he, looking up
into his father’s face.

“ All right, my lad; stick to that, and you
won't go far wrong. And you can come in,
in the evening, if you’ve a mind to, and tell
your mother and me how you got on, and
all about it.”

So Frank went to bed, and had as much
sleep as his wounded arm would let him; but
THE TRUTH, AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH. 125

that, with his excitement and nervousness
about the morrow, made him very restless
and troubled; and when the morning came,
there he was, down stairs and ready, almost
as soon as it was light.





WHICH

CHAPTER VIII.

PROVES HONESTY IS THE BEST POLICY.

“ Courage, brother! do not stumble,
Though thy path is dark as night;
There's a star to guide the humble—
‘Trust in God, and do the right !*

“Let the road be rough and dreary,
And its end far out of sight,
Foot it bravely! strong or weary—
‘Trust in God, and do the right!’

“Simple rule and safest guiding,
Inward peace and inward might,
Star upon our path abiding—
Trust in God, and do the right!"

**Some will hate thee, some will love thee;
Some will flatter, some will slight:
Cease from man, and look above thee—
‘Trust in God, and do the right!’”
Rev. N. Macieop





CHAPTER VIII.

WHICH PROVES HONESTY IS THE BEST POLICY.

TEAIRANK found the morning go very
<<) slowly until 10 o'clock, at which
“Y hour Mr. Stock had ordered his gig
F to be ready, and they were to start





together. The master, who had been
giving directions to his men, was detained
rather late, and old Firefly was made to step
out to make up for lost time. That, however,
old Firefly was quite capable of doing, and
rattled away up hill and down dale, while
Frank sat shy and silent by his master’s side.

The town was soon reached, and the gig
put up at an inn not far from the court house,
near, which, here and there, stood a policeman,
and Frank saw that a number of people, men
and women, were gathered about the doors,
as being interested in the business going on
within.

(144) 9
130 WHICH PROVES HONESTY IS THE BEST POLICY.

As Mr. Stock and Frank were entering,
some one near said, “ That ’ere boy is one of
the witnesses against ’em;” and then some
mutterings followed not of a very compli-
mentary nature, while some pretty general
hissing showed the feeling in that quarter, at
all events.

Frank then began to feel very uncomfort-
able, and his face grew red and his ears
burned ; but Mr. Stock looked down kindly
and bade him keep his heart up; and as he
knew he was doing his duty, though it was
very unpleasant, he did not much care about
what others thought of him. And, besides,
he had a support to lean upon, which never
failed ; his feet were on a rock, that he could
stand firm: for though he did not say so in so
many words, yet the thought which gave him
confidence was the same as David’s when he
was in trouble, who exclaimed, “In God
have I put my trust; I will not fear what
man can do unto me.” Z

Frank was put into a room by himself, and
told to wait until he was wanted. And wait
he did, until by-and-by he began to think
they must have mistaken him for a poacher,
WHICH PROVES HONESTY IS THE BEST POLICY. 131

and have sentenced him to a term of solitary
confinement !

It was, indeed, a dreary waiting-room—very
much like a prison cell he fancied; for there
was nothing in it but two wooden chairs, a
table, and a roll of matting in the corner. He
could only see out of the window by mounting
on one of the chairs, so high up was it; and
when he had summoned courage enough to
peep through its bars, the dead blank of the
brick wall of the next house only, was the not
very cheerful prospect.

“T believe they have all gone away and
forgotten me,” was his reflection ; and he was
on the point of opening the door, or at all
events of trying the handle, to see if he were
really locked in or not, when he heard steps
on the stone passage, and a policeman made
his appearance, who ushered him into the-
presence of the court.

Although unprepared for this sudden sum-
mons, and rather frightened, he glanced
around, and seeing “the General” there,
whom he knew so well, gained presence of
mind enough to answer thus to the first ques-
tion asked him, if he understood the nature of
132 WHICH PROVES HONESTY IS THE BEST POLICY.

an oath: “It binds me before God and man
to speak the truth.”

His reply seemed to please the gentlemen
present, and he was next desired to describe
his visit to the mason’s with Bob Partridge.

This he did very clearly, but just as he was
examined about the events of the night-watch
by Cowleas Copse, his eye caught the face of
Joe Harris, who was exactly opposite on the
other side, and was making signs to him
across the court.

This drew away his attention, and confused
him so much, that instead of answering the
question put, he began to hesitate and look
down ; and he would have got himself into a
good deal of trouble had not one of the
lawyers present fortunately caught sight of
what was going on, and remarked that a
person opposite was evidently trying to intimi-
date the witness. Thus, unexpectedly, the
tables were turned upon Joe Harris, who
made a bolt for the door directly he heard
what the lawyer said ; but was there stopped
and captured, and brought back by a police-
man, very sulky and crest-fallen.

Thereupon, after Frank’s account of hia
WHICH PROVES HONESTY IS THE BEST POLICY. 133

adventure with the poachers, and the attack
made upon him by the mason’s fierce dog,
which he gave satisfactorily, an examination
ensued, which began thus :—

“Do you know this person who was
making signs ?”

“When did you see him last ?”

And so, by degrees, Frank was made to tell
all about his meeting with Joe Harris on the
day before, and how he had offered him money
as a bribe not to speak the whole truth.

Frank was very sorry, but he was obliged
to answer when asked ; and the questions were
so cleverly put, that he could not hide any-
thing had he tried to do so, except by telling
lies, and that he could never do—-and besides,
now he was on his oath.

But before he left the witness-box, Frank
had great praise for the manly, straight-for-
ward way in which he had given his evidence,
and for his conduct all through the affair,
which had been exceedingly creditable to him ;
and so he was sent off to his dreary waiting-
room with very different feelings than when
he occupied it before.

‘Neither did the time seem long before Mr.
134 WHICH PROVES HONESTY IS THE BEST POLICY.

Stock came for him, saying it was all over,
and that he was now going to order the gig
for the homeward ride.

“Please, sir,’ said Frank eagerly, “ what
did they do to Joe Harris?”

“Oh,” said Mr. Stock laughing, “he got the
good scolding which he richly deserved—that
is all. But he is a marked fellow, as being a
companion of bad characters. Let it be a
lesson to you, Frank, to keep from bad com-
pany. Better avoid the infection than risk
being tainted by the poison. Prevention is
better than a cure; and besides, as Master
Joe was told in court, it is very easy to get a
stain upon one’s character which years will
hardly remove.”

“ But, sir,” said Frank, “are all the others
sent to prison ?”

“The mason is sent to hard labour, for he
is an old offender,” answered Mr. Stock ; “ and
a good thing too, to keep him out of mischief
for a time, for he has led many a young fellow
astray. Larkyns and Bob Partridge were
fined by the magistrates, and locked up in
default of payment; and I hope it will be a
lesson to them, as they are yet young. I don’t
WHICH PROVES HONESTY IS THE BEST POLICY. 135

know when we have had such a bad set of
fellows in our quiet parts at Cowleas. But
here we are at the inn,’——for they had left the
court by another way to avoid the crowd.

“T have another errand though,” said Mr.
Stock, “which I can do whilst the ostler gets
the gig ready, as I have not to go far.”

“Shall I come, sir,’ asked Frank.

“Well, you can come, if you like,” was the
answer ; and Mr. Stock went across the road
into a watchmaker’s shop. “I want to buy a
good, useful silver watch,” said he to the
shopman



“one that you can warrant ; not
an expensive watch with a showy outside
case, and lots of jewels; but a good, sound,
strong, English watch. I want it for a lad,
in fact, who would not know how to take care
of a delicate article; a lad about the size of
this fellow here,” added he, as he looked at
one the man handed to him.

“ Ah,” thought Frank, “he wants it to give
to his nephew, Master Lewis; he is just my
size.”

“T wonder whether boys like a watch in a
hunting-case or not,” said Mr. Stock; “what
should you say?” added he smilingly to
136 WHICH PROVES HONESTY IS THE BEST POLICY.

Frank, who was looking on with much in-
terest.

“Ym sure I don’t know, sir,” said Frank,
“but that looks a beauty.”

“Handsome is that handsome does, in
watches, I think,” said his master; ‘well,
what is the price of this?”

“Three guineas, sir,” said the man.

“Three guineas! Ah, I wished to get a
vit of silver chain besides for that sum!”

“Well, sir,” said the watchmaker, “ you
shall have this bit of chain and the watch for
three guineas ready money.”

And so the bargain was struck, the money
paid, the watch and chain wrapped up in
cotton wool and put into a cardboard box and
placed in Mr. Stock’s pocket, and very soon
old Firefly was spinning along the road home
again, once more.

That evening, when the Martins were
sitting round the table in their cottage at
supper—the whole family, for Frank was there,
the hero of the day, and Martha was sitting
by his side, and helping him when, with his one
hand, he got into difficulties—a knock was
heard at the door.
WHICH PROVES HONESTY IS THE BEST POLICY. 137

“Jump up, Martha,’ said Mrs. Martin,
“and see who it is.”

Martha opened the door and curtsied, for it
was Mr. Stock,

“Ym sorry to disturb you,” said he, as they
all rose, “but I won’t keep you long from
your supper.”

“Take a seat, sir,” said Mrs. Martin.

“No, I thank you, my business will not
take long to transact. It is this,—I saw ‘the
General’ to-day in town, Martin, after the trial,
and he told me that young Spades over at the
Hall was going to leave, having the offer of a
head place, and therefore that the under-gar-
dener’s place would shortly be vacant ; and he
begged me to offer it to Frank, if I would
consent to part with him.”

“Qh, sir!” cried Frank.

“ Well,” continued Mr. Stock, “I cannot
say that I like to lose him, but at the same
time I will not of course stand in the way of
his getting on; and, as you know, such a
situation as that at the Hall is not to be had
every day ; in fact, not to mention the pay
and position, to put a lad under such a man
as Mr. Orchid is to make him for life, if he
138 WHICH PROVES HONESTY IS THE BEST POLICY.

chooses to be steady and industrious. So I
told ‘the General’ my opinion of your son
Frank ; and though I thought it very kind of
him to make the offer, yet I believed that
your son would try his best to do his duty
there, as he has done it with me—that is, if
you, his parents, agree to accept ‘the Gen-
eral’s’ offer: what do you say to it?”

“Well sir, I am sure,” said Martin, “God
is very good to us. The boy isa good boy, I
believe, but I most doubt if he could fill such
a place as that. Could ye, Frank ?”

“Td do my best, father,” said Frank.

“ Well,” said Mr. Stock, “one can’t do more,
and as the offer is made, you see, am I to say
that you accept it ?”

“Well sir,” said Martin, “as you say, the
offer is made, and Frank ’]l try to do his best,
I’m sure: mother, and me, and the lad, are
very grateful for it, and we return you our
best thanks for your kindness,”

“Nay,” said Mr. Stock, “thank Miss
Margaret, for I expect she’s at the bottom of
it all—not me. And so I may tell ‘the
General’ that you don’t refuse, and I must
look out for another boy to help old Ralph.
WHICH PROVES HONESTY IS THE BEST POLICY. 139

So that matter is settled; and now I havea
little commission on my own account. Iam
sorry you are going to leave my service,
Frank. You have had a good many trials
since you entered it, and you have borne them
well; you have had your temptations, more
than some lads of your age, perhaps; and, in
the main, you have stood firm. I believe,
my boy, you knew to whom to go for help—
to One above: is not that your secret? I
have watched you narrowly, and have taken
note of a good many things, and I cannot
doubt but that, if you go on as you have
begun, you will not only rise in your calling,
but you will be an honour and comfort to
your family and your friends, and will prove
yourself what now-a-days is much to be
desired in your class of life, and at your age—
an open and fearless and good soldier of Jesus
Christ. Shake hands, Frank: I wish you
every kind of prosperity in the new position
which you have gained for yourself; and keep
this as a present from me. It will remind
you of our adventure on the hill, perhaps, if
nothing more. Good evening, Mr. Martin,



good-bye,’—and before Frank could say a
140 WHICH PROVES HONESTY IS THE BEST POLICY.

word of thanks, much less open the parcel,
Mr. Stock was gone.

“ Let me, Frank,’ said Martha, as all the
young ones crowded round to see what the
present could be. Martha cut the string, and
took out of the brown paper which covered
it, a cardboard box, and poor Frank turned
quite pale, and went over to the fire-place and
Jeant his head on his arm.

“ A watch! a silver watch !”

“What!” cried Mrs. Martin, “a watch ?”

“Let me see,” said the father.

Yes it was, the very watch! and Mr. Stock
had been buying it for Frank all the time!

“Where is Frank? What are you doing
there ? look here—’tis a watch.”

But when they pulled him round, to show it,
the tears were running fast down his cheeks.

“I know,” he said; “master bought it in
town, and I was with him, and I never
thought; and it cost three guineas, it did.’
I’m sure I don’t deserve it; I can’t think
what everybody’s so kind for;” and he sobbed
aloud.

“Catch me crying if anybody gave me a
watch,” said Sam.
WHICH PROVES HONESTY IS THE BEST POLICY. 14]

“It’s because he broke his arm,” said Jack.
“Td rather not have a watch, and have my
two arms sound and strong, if you please.”

No, they were not a bit jealous. It was
the way of that family to be good-tempered
and unselfish ; and as Jack said afterwards,
‘“‘He’s a good plucked ’un, Frank is, and he’s
deserved it.”

Martha’s great delight was in putting the
watch into Frank’s waistcoat pocket and pull-
ing the chain through his button-hole, ana
every now and then turning round with a low
eourtesy, and saying, “I beg your pardon, sir,
but could you tell me the time ?”

“Think of our Frank being under-gardener
at the Hall,” said his mother ; “why, it seems
but a week or two since he toddled about in
petticoats,”

“Ay,” said his father, “so long as they
grow up in wisdom as in stature, and in

favour with God and man, they can’t grow
too fast for me; and get out and earn their
bread, so as to be able to help their old
parents, perhaps, when they can’t help them-
selves.”

“That we will, father,’ said the children ;
142 WHICH PROVES HONESTY IS THE BEST POLICY.

“so long as we have health and strength to
get it, you shan’t want for nothing.”

“Nor mother, neither,” said Frank.

“ Of course not,” said Martha; “Tl take care
of that.”

And so they chatted away with light
merry hearts, ay, and thankful hearts, too,
for they did not forget God the giver.

“Martha, get me the hymn-book,” said her
father. She did so, and having found the
place, Frank was told to read out, and the
rest to listen.

** When all thy mercies, O my God!
My rising soul surveys,
Transported with the view, I’m lost
In wonder, love, and praise.

“ Unnumbered comforts to my soul
Thy tender care bestowed,
Before my infant heart conceived
From whence these comforts flowed.

‘‘When in the slippery paths of youth
With heedless steps I ran,
Thine arm, unseen, conveyed me safe,
And led me up to man:

“Through hidden dangers, toils, and deatha,
It gently clear’d my way ;
And through the pleasing snares of vice,
More to be feared than they.
WHICH PROVES HONESTY IS THE BEST POLICY. 143

‘Ten thousand thousand precious gifts
My daily thanks employ ;
Nor is the least a cheerful heart,
That tastes these gifts with joy.

“Through every period of my life
Thy goodness I'll pursue;
And after death, in distant worlds,
The glorious theme renew.

“Through all eternity to thee
A joyful song I'll raise;
But oh, eternity’s too short
To utter all thy praise.

“Amen,” said Frank when he had done
reading, and they all said “ Amen.”

When his arm was fit for work again,
Frank went to the Hall as under-gardener.
And there he stayed waiting until Mr. Orchid
should think fit to retire, when Frank was to
be promoted to fill his place, which would be
before long, as everybody said.

Cele =e
frie x >






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'2011-10-12T00:42:31-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfile2' 'sip-files00045.txt
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-10-12T00:43:33-04:00'
describe
'2011-10-12T00:42:14-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfile3' 'sip-files00061.txt
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-10-12T00:43:12-04:00'
describe
'2011-10-12T00:42:16-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfile4' 'sip-files00063.txt
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-10-12T00:44:18-04:00'
describe
'2011-10-12T00:42:17-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfile5' 'sip-files00077.txt
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'2011-10-12T00:42:19-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfile6' 'sip-files00079.txt
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'2011-10-12T00:42:21-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfile7' 'sip-files00097.txt
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-10-12T00:45:13-04:00'
describe
'2011-10-12T00:42:22-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfile8' 'sip-files00115.txt
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-10-12T00:45:25-04:00'
describe
'2011-10-12T00:42:24-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfile9' 'sip-files00129.txt
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'2011-10-12T00:42:26-04:00'
redup
'289872' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVLP' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
d79daee89fb3e72e4b84a12a16690cd0
61c90e9fd9314e9521a03ca539fc34d2d167963e
'2011-10-12T00:44:54-04:00'
describe
'387059' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVLQ' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
1597a67852d480fafbbdae63f88cffc9
eae722d4e012675f39c2f32dd02a5fde2c010873
'2011-10-12T00:44:28-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1410' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVLR' 'sip-files00001.pro'
d3a805e88cde0184815b3907d62fd8a6
4a4f4b593c507e0f8b813121c1789e2d1c73724e
'2011-10-12T00:45:11-04:00'
describe
'96063' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVLS' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
f8ceeb85f44f3d7f3a7c7a517d200239
0b9dcd129fe37383a35be7c0fc9f78094c40de67
'2011-10-12T00:44:27-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'6963864' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVLT' 'sip-files00001.tif'
1e9133439f17b5f88faa68bbd537729a
f61bf26a94134aa3896cb6b5c889df4de41ddf91
'2011-10-12T00:45:27-04:00'
describe
'113' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVLU' 'sip-files00001.txt'
3c17caa5f3b1912bee6261d15651540c
0d10bb3f2463ae4d051d0630e3513ee11645b136
'2011-10-12T00:43:22-04:00'
describe
'29432' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVLV' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
553b6648c8d5b2a47ecdbce50805b34d
93dd20006f36b66770ed4ec7dd5b19063753d246
'2011-10-12T00:43:56-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'288077' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVLW' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
67e87740ec6ef9a56fb912650ca6ef6d
e9eed24f312e24e63bf384fe6b1422de9c997135
'2011-10-12T00:44:13-04:00'
describe
'156817' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVLX' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
0fa83878b96925bb72463fd5e6faf230
dd853824c0f07f88fa607a6edcf3639fa87f7b03
'2011-10-12T00:44:25-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'48539' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVLY' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
18c1d53254c751f8e263d7f6a5ee3b46
accd9ceef96e8ffaced3c84cb701b5a6c74bfb93
'2011-10-12T00:44:29-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'6920000' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVLZ' 'sip-files00002.tif'
cfffdbc90769aa43420122ec83001191
b3c93901db5bc00ea28530a82a72710bce004129
'2011-10-12T00:44:22-04:00'
describe
'196' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMA' 'sip-files00002.txt'
868af2e6f3b30f09628eceaf36e23f18
6d99e60d374a7450d826ee809e46ebe3eb1aba9e
'2011-10-12T00:44:14-04:00'
describe
'269005' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMB' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
a58487921be679e07b96d859c7093fad
9f0b586e4501729ec5242911624b7a9618a6a600
'2011-10-12T00:44:05-04:00'
describe
'92719' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMC' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
e9a03bacdcd9c81a49be409cd2b50613
1b94d56781fe9238d88235ce73bcd03608ef9adb
'2011-10-12T00:43:06-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35592' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMD' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
d539901a3515d0ff6541561d3c159bfc
c27bc0b70ecf34496f66e3ae79a0085584a06206
'2011-10-12T00:45:01-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2163872' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVME' 'sip-files00003.tif'
6ed9f105e16d2d5fff6a74a429c0a01f
a626019df217eb7291c4f285c6ed12b174304f99
'2011-10-12T00:42:48-04:00'
describe
'105' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMF' 'sip-files00003.txt'
aa381ac5a81b020964007150f84731b1
67b5997353ca65cb02441cd1d2e0005ab1a81a21
'2011-10-12T00:43:50-04:00'
describe
'256528' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMG' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
59d85451692f4f20196995f976c9c9f0
a89fe766e8eb053e12502cd1eca28a3b3abb60a6
'2011-10-12T00:42:37-04:00'
describe
'63176' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMH' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
bc7a6bd07faf50f4d40015aff346f2d1
0e6a8410e1702902f5cf18df5d7f339f4d8b00fd
'2011-10-12T00:43:30-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1094' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMI' 'sip-files00004.pro'
577020ccde43c95c83afc4cfcbb6c23d
11998b73a60417799c3f9902643e4eb8c1d79852
'2011-10-12T00:43:24-04:00'
describe
'23408' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMJ' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
29a703be83666d8d2ba2bddbd3ef7bbb
1112927634cbd262dd8b7dc15751d6a9c0bf1961
'2011-10-12T00:42:52-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2061360' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMK' 'sip-files00004.tif'
d7ca02bb70a079acd75fe14b4fef94da
de1eee4ce2ba615cc5081ec3e5c71a6b2747b8d3
'2011-10-12T00:45:04-04:00'
describe
'89' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVML' 'sip-files00004.txt'
d5e99ecf95b7449b893f693da00c95da
def133540d1d5b073f2d9ddf1319a6d744d23047
'2011-10-12T00:43:21-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'256501' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMM' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
c0677aeb6422050cf915ecb0259a32ac
35add06d2c3591b368b261850b4269ff9a140942
'2011-10-12T00:44:49-04:00'
describe
'347926' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMN' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
97a951e675a2b9e69523985bfd27e573
c598bd6185b72f799a3dd65b462675922a096303
'2011-10-12T00:43:45-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2041' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMO' 'sip-files00005.pro'
9375bd5ac17ae1e6ba801e7e65785b2e
bd3c6bd8f5775b29ad02d873d155174e29f4766a
describe
'104612' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMP' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
f05d51690ecdb40789f829089ceaa162
1d8463a1236ee5d04dfc95357a040feb9e184009
'2011-10-12T00:43:25-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'6171184' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMQ' 'sip-files00005.tif'
8e94a7c5cccc7827c4892646395eff9b
7c042621e60685367a2552f6a9d804708db73291
'2011-10-12T00:44:43-04:00'
describe
'109' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMR' 'sip-files00005.txt'
d90b6d63044a1668418cdf89897aad28
0d5b43c62f62027bb2595c74d233d30c4a04cb17
'2011-10-12T00:43:13-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'258654' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMS' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
4abd393b3f0653210e9b87fe0ab81cfb
b7c02eed6965c88c8e207ed4c01b1fc5fca95bad
describe
'281502' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMT' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
1b1f2dc5ca54ee48ec44d4fb0d44e5f3
9115a6d724beec5d197d03717385fae5e94363a1
'2011-10-12T00:44:16-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2057' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMU' 'sip-files00006.pro'
42248e1d2a2009daf05f8cbdfd20938b
6034981a88a80484b01937d7dd953fc2ce7d6aae
'2011-10-12T00:42:56-04:00'
describe
'89335' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMV' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
3b9667af2b8c8a2b31241436ba118313
bd3a4ceb40280566aafa316a5fcc5487e830a5f9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'6218528' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMW' 'sip-files00006.tif'
6b2ab951f7f9dfd3c4935229ffe3a52f
1cf276d703c1d6b54875e787c0330f8859af77f3
'2011-10-12T00:44:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMX' 'sip-files00006.txt'
fda05a51966b209cfe91b6d2f7cb2521
412ac645a3f4cc7646bf532278599d43c4f61c54
'2011-10-12T00:43:26-04:00'
describe
'248749' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMY' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
d63ea223b9d51536f7d3141d2cb33960
2d7068187e4d3c31cf763d332c84303e4c529a7c
describe
'145389' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVMZ' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
c3d5c45b70df546774de23e395c10977
315d6153708baab58a6835fdd677c936717339ae
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'4324' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNA' 'sip-files00007.pro'
949ad8dfb7ac7680d7f25e4cda690920
f1b1d6e9a0f20dc37c05c59d25e25adfeb66dbd6
describe
'52990' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNB' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
389be2ad558458605d15bd630e4e56a6
539eff184bc93053e6dbbd29ff5ea0777f23fad9
'2011-10-12T00:44:50-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2001096' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNC' 'sip-files00007.tif'
f410190a9868f0590ea4899c8f15e7da
a2fe4642632c7a670c6453bc2f1d2f20573dee84
'2011-10-12T00:45:16-04:00'
describe
'311' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVND' 'sip-files00007.txt'
2e3ad2c590149ffe49b6689cd50c80c7
4ea4326acd9204286728d862681a73a39cf8e0d4
'2011-10-12T00:43:07-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'266409' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNE' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
cf9d176fc9bb4eda0444d8dfb9626a88
2f227696342aecaf0ba044eaa833c769b6e30841
describe
'114718' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNF' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
9c18071dee5078d39c54a3baf8cf5050
4af729995324fd74139cbbf2c57179902b0281de
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'10306' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNG' 'sip-files00009.pro'
ec5a2656361c36b5294b4dd0497cd8a2
af4abdadc6a9828de06e356633817b66e7bd8ff1
describe
'42450' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNH' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
cf244b89b225a5289156055b830cc54c
d2a7525be149d73026ee734bf088b6f0f18500a4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2143172' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNI' 'sip-files00009.tif'
70f0809ecc97fbd75f217499590771ea
54855cb1ddf6042e7e5596e2fad768dc1994a6b6
'2011-10-12T00:43:31-04:00'
describe
'528' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNJ' 'sip-files00009.txt'
9519c12f4e340f3dc590ed51bf023d74
ed136acd5bc9c1274cd26a5c859a9bd3ca9a1e72
describe
Invalid character
'244607' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNK' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
a8b0b102edc732727074dfc247c64394
db50ae991a515763fb9e03885bfd05a2372c35ef
'2011-10-12T00:43:00-04:00'
describe
'48186' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNL' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
a006a80419a7166ce0db5d342924aa15
d22d299724290401235efcae5ba874100a9579b4
'2011-10-12T00:44:33-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'17783' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNM' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
f143817730ee1897ab2cba4b83fbcee7
66a86c9e2335020a2b6f7a3d0805673ede0176a1
'2011-10-12T00:43:52-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1966564' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNN' 'sip-files00010.tif'
e2341e49be9b5ca0a8f14720553f529a
a4b97d458b2c666c118fa2fb76248677221d2275
'2011-10-12T00:42:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNO' 'sip-files00010.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'261426' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNP' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
a46d453f6d9ac201984aacf94c0670a9
d189a6fde075189b437b2c473eb43ab9728c04ae
'2011-10-12T00:43:27-04:00'
describe
'85623' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNQ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
1e9c55f9260392c14aa2145bcbb846ac
c87a7805916aae758c2b3668afa7ec2c913fcd39
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'5382' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNR' 'sip-files00011.pro'
1b1ed6e1a8e2367862beeb61582281f2
634bd25414fec96e9b32673bbe989b6217e6dd28
'2011-10-12T00:43:11-04:00'
describe
'33200' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNS' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
ab9835a933cf2a8400cae508671d440c
6565e5910ada7bafed2f14c75a3b07f7ae7877b6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2103336' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNT' 'sip-files00011.tif'
5f66bd1cce9b4e8d7f615ecec8fa1572
de0efac78a3a92f74800574677e417c055c8b37c
'2011-10-12T00:43:40-04:00'
describe
'345' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNU' 'sip-files00011.txt'
c88cccd2c0f8f471cc65aa3231991b80
c1ba78c16758f3c0c6146ef38a12d8b059050ea6
describe
'258000' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNV' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
4516b36ab895b51089439b5d6c570fed
afcf5dcdda1983df3f4a996d0361e2954f1f7bc4
'2011-10-12T00:43:29-04:00'
describe
'208993' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNW' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
bd0ccc82ab980d163c340f67f98e92f9
fedb4d5d5ffdf891a6c41414d1b19d4b4ab1cdcb
'2011-10-12T00:45:23-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'18394' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNX' 'sip-files00012.pro'
fadf9b0dd8f6a23b1d0a85a1b30c9de0
fc69f2319835cffbcb69c8a2f9cd0319ab19f8b0
'2011-10-12T00:42:54-04:00'
describe
'77797' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNY' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
07c470973c9b12c36ac617addff6fe67
a8cb4b129abd418fcd018ab3a9808135b709d587
'2011-10-12T00:44:41-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2076412' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVNZ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
29f3942c5c5fcf01dd7fc33de64a0203
88969475ecae35cea4333ff9d946bd28014562c7
'2011-10-12T00:42:46-04:00'
describe
'869' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOA' 'sip-files00012.txt'
ed904445a5c608c67e5ba22b9b14bcee
6521afeb792e9ef4a7f758e116cf3ff9fad44342
'2011-10-12T00:42:38-04:00'
describe
'258052' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOB' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
02c0d91f38f7a85c19ed076726d94595
165f922c51ece8a75783abfc84eb48a38b6b5fa6
describe
'219979' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOC' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
5087d10a8c818f2bee647cfa605fe209
550dbb01ff7f94ef4cd96784cf45e4c2fc78bbac
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28156' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOD' 'sip-files00013.pro'
4fd975fa705b3350e698b5663257f73d
b1b621353b71e24bec44ab26f141c6a72aa0bff1
describe
'86362' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOE' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
d475b8a1deb3a49a2e40398083a28078
907d95b82c9a62ecc3a04e384bfd14bcccb63622
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2077472' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOF' 'sip-files00013.tif'
b8c910531624173d148b0d9836ec9bc5
e345eda6bdb6eb4173bd1712a1dfbd1332e84390
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOG' 'sip-files00013.txt'
ec465e8eda963c52b7dc96638933be79
b90d3c8fec605774bd8ec81c26a34f54ad6f42e3
'2011-10-12T00:43:09-04:00'
describe
'256308' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOH' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
495ad9200dfe0eecc48ba517c953fefb
b5fc60f91a9af6daf4b1372b11c92ea2bfd01727
'2011-10-12T00:44:58-04:00'
describe
'221593' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOI' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
2922a8960d309dc246a2267dd4c45ee6
882345c6d9a3a30dc5c524b3c72b85de2a1e27c0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26941' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOJ' 'sip-files00014.pro'
f490ad923a4cffb342c7b5db13af6406
fa8308d09c3c4b45d310ebc8e8c006d060fdd7f0
'2011-10-12T00:45:29-04:00'
describe
'84130' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOK' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
a8de0bdab7c4ce9837c950c52ee2a186
0ed5e3620cf49ef219945b8b7e78661a5aa56ce6
'2011-10-12T00:43:39-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2063016' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOL' 'sip-files00014.tif'
1d7b871be1926ff83b797a7a7b9271ee
bfdc01d563e0ad7ce5555fc4d172bd41f5f8049b
describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOM' 'sip-files00014.txt'
cf867eec8227d1d3baf10b30e4767514
e011fe36fdb5c2d5fccca36b15c1cab6b1494c8b
describe
'258430' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVON' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
5fc39e6e0ccf95ac7529e8f3e424080f
cc61f9ebd2049b517cec1b35d45387e1a6ed065e
'2011-10-12T00:42:44-04:00'
describe
'237098' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOO' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
60945f370620fcef42180df7784a5cef
87166dffb5eea3155764f72a7ffd76d1bd8e9808
'2011-10-12T00:44:38-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29780' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOP' 'sip-files00015.pro'
7505fdeb48e0259de1736c2f73cf32d1
44034f4b44b584f8afb6093171c3ca3437ded021
'2011-10-12T00:42:34-04:00'
describe
'92315' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOQ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
4c4fea36206794dbb355a6ce59f5a8c4
52c4d025f56770ee3be98bb9261858fc2bc00d26
'2011-10-12T00:43:43-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2080608' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOR' 'sip-files00015.tif'
7ef53997489f7d89cc3d5bb31752dd9f
c6f4814f4b543acac86ec6b1a9a839586b5b7f7e
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOS' 'sip-files00015.txt'
b62e7da06b7965147366ecf3aa25a642
cbd3c57b65770beb443cfbd5c82f57a7b6f8727e
'2011-10-12T00:42:53-04:00'
describe
'258405' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOT' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
6960a84c16bf222ba28adb516cce2bc3
474d06368f958072a5cbc17719690f1cba33329b
describe
'238709' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOU' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
c62db3ee364ae67fe524df29ffdd5d5e
47584a0fee6126fb63cefae2d0ab2820d064f5e6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29497' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOV' 'sip-files00016.pro'
3eff1a10b33223788036d2c89f58b726
814c89ea780632747f7ec31d5e52af41e7380af1
describe
'90180' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOW' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
44c9d54e076864771a34bf2dbed1f334
eaaa1f984bde13b31c3472dfe2185c30b4b49698
'2011-10-12T00:43:54-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2079976' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOX' 'sip-files00016.tif'
2933e5fdc3b7e9eaa74088401c0f0c95
7d2da6f9858d31bdd43e81e2c5fadee096dca548
'2011-10-12T00:43:51-04:00'
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOY' 'sip-files00016.txt'
88d164218fe4609a649695388e52ff27
0d4cfe6d8da257d8ad4517e94c839a7bd20e398f
'2011-10-12T00:45:05-04:00'
describe
'257764' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVOZ' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
f531879a5f0501e61788cade7cdde55d
ae844df211fbd188b123f4ba18c7e15049af4585
describe
'235124' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPA' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
f4b790a6c478f1f6da917943d10e34e6
88419890937b2c0ca5dfa933bfef05bd166111c8
'2011-10-12T00:45:33-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28997' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPB' 'sip-files00017.pro'
5a13237e9ab9890b34de245d473ad060
efdb0a14f1092fb2d5744697247cdb6e1bc05c25
describe
'91220' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPC' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
c0e46a6fd2c59dd509f3b16cdb8a28d3
ceeccadc8acf3f9cc3e3696a9fe5917dac24f362
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2074836' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPD' 'sip-files00017.tif'
1540ea96689ff0eee0010c397b11fbc6
19e245eedaaec254bf27a3a6261332a22954eac2
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPE' 'sip-files00017.txt'
0a89fcfddf75fdf4810a7a07502eba6c
d3e5a7e5bac5ee3876c3f6f54b59896b006968f0
describe
'257678' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPF' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
6c1c65fbc05c9a526f73ba1c3d2e4859
a0c7a462a3b74b2b546befc3a6c862e2161fc4a4
'2011-10-12T00:45:26-04:00'
describe
'236773' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPG' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
2ee0aad15eb5aac70ed434135312eec5
1a42f285b24865369da2a0f2c1229a2c854f0274
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28556' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPH' 'sip-files00018.pro'
82fb72a05538d99b66f7157826493f5b
4c1e11ebf0a95f8634e668caaf40fe851fbff2ba
describe
'92414' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPI' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
abd69a58f2059d262103d1dc92a91138
459fdd3c315f787c3582e034868a2afe17487edd
'2011-10-12T00:44:37-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2074356' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPJ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
8742c471409434913f9618a17358317d
60a24ab3c98862bd5bb08381e85c36247faa4006
'2011-10-12T00:42:51-04:00'
describe
'1200' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPK' 'sip-files00018.txt'
0b416704fe13ea3d7b6bcefc024c5b51
70b2deed20667e004ee8d7cc14856d2079736e28
describe
'256209' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPL' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
705806ebff4c8c46ff888939f7784284
6ba003235040580adae4b842515babc401c18928
'2011-10-12T00:43:46-04:00'
describe
'231994' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPM' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
19be57bd6f95e7b3fad49836785719c3
609b29b6b1828774c5b17bd7e2bb4ae5bbe1955e
'2011-10-12T00:44:52-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28853' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPN' 'sip-files00019.pro'
86dc7b69eab491e6fe28f54f51e8a958
0b5d1fcebe9ab8b00958205a452b84ef754d3d9a
describe
'89836' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPO' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
6e545a6babad59a7c8c66e590339acc1
8274cc70184fcf453c385972c5890e990f9985f1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2062752' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPP' 'sip-files00019.tif'
cab92c1b58e9b082bb7641fec5c6438b
c6ffc1db34bebb4cdfb1022a8901b2377f445508
'2011-10-12T00:44:11-04:00'
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPQ' 'sip-files00019.txt'
0032ff760796d5255080bea076c6a8f3
e715e87251d7088d7aed5db3438aef5543fea108
'2011-10-12T00:42:55-04:00'
describe
'254880' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPR' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
c4865dc2ac2abddeff772194fea51ab3
3f8bd37efe13e81dec297cbaedab0a0ce65f102f
describe
'224078' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPS' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
7c433f37d63d175c9761128157d927ce
982c4cdc6ae8e9af8d4f3e62416187f345a93b87
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27426' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPT' 'sip-files00020.pro'
73c2c39bb4fbf93211b9757bce09d86f
4bb67c9f02c16718f3083f5a3593b74d1d4f0c17
'2011-10-12T00:45:08-04:00'
describe
'86844' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPU' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
b534b99c141a652f8c75546df1b9af34
04796c082337669a96a8cc555dfe4a2a5ef841b0
'2011-10-12T00:45:28-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2051968' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPV' 'sip-files00020.tif'
2bc5f4e52f6cc00282a014ef6e7c778a
a47ddec6cde1f1e50b0acfdfb13de26ccde4e08d
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPW' 'sip-files00020.txt'
d5279201708ab6e109ce7bfc63d516c2
cbbbf724d59e2971e49213d4046be2d56e0befc0
'2011-10-12T00:44:55-04:00'
describe
'249336' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPX' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
956a3ce2f150d7d46b7536e21e3ddf89
232ca30f25f6a1a042145580af62cb86eb0c96dd
describe
'211928' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPY' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
d2844b9ba409a89075b990e281dcd4f5
9c029c7433975783e296863d307409c8a627d96f
'2011-10-12T00:44:26-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26670' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVPZ' 'sip-files00021.pro'
b83c792696e5fec9655a4b2288ae7a0a
eaeb5b9fe7f882fe2f76c6719ee376716674abe2
describe
'81766' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQA' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
c37744e29de9b443d5ae21c0f017f238
1334097acd0feb88397e444a00c965efc68b525d
'2011-10-12T00:42:49-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2007480' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQB' 'sip-files00021.tif'
ffca1673933a7535f1c40d931a06b549
f992bbc588c2bb86a61710415120c6b801fe6c93
describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQC' 'sip-files00021.txt'
7453b8ab93ad68924526902216246ac6
f4b3f5ccc85f9d9c889f638d38d5190e32700d8b
describe
'266531' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQD' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
6c89130303d88f3bf3762d496e4dd9db
685de4d559f8222fb4cf575e149ef7c7ae3352e3
'2011-10-12T00:44:09-04:00'
describe
'212338' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQE' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
c5d883a8d50a2dc4657124da6d2c8d73
6b2738ce414970d8a945fa7b78e5d4ecea83bc5c
'2011-10-12T00:43:44-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27765' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQF' 'sip-files00022.pro'
f915a95ecd156e193c6f4068797066fa
106a8173911d0b5a44fdccf708c889ac6fbcb457
describe
'82054' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQG' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
e5f631f158e293807dd16fda84dd0f4f
1e217816a83ac6c7fd0435af546d2ee25cda64e8
'2011-10-12T00:45:22-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2145004' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQH' 'sip-files00022.tif'
62f4a5a6b189b971f9f5dd9411a110ed
e63a135b0bab7c07f16dc209ff3b3fd7554848b5
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQI' 'sip-files00022.txt'
5662ab35067a2c7ae69dc96ae6838b57
80e46c4cc988ab28cdc4dd293def4c171d22faec
describe
'261691' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQJ' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
a22d5c0f50d1aaa47f9ae1d581c1d91a
6c6362bf196ba8628c73d10b5a9f5aa6f450480c
describe
'231757' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQK' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
91b4c935bf2c37c87196e8dd91e2da98
4cbcdaa481063f331379ad502781e304fc154599
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28979' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQL' 'sip-files00023.pro'
8c8327ac180f5bafa29e08297005c5d1
8017c1cf1ffa1eb55837625d5e758fc5b1a3d7d2
describe
'89673' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQM' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
2bd3bb5f0ce5e53babe305b47a19d8ad
4903fcd11e7d47e4905ea0599a029de68f073572
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2106024' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQN' 'sip-files00023.tif'
666eb54c331d3c7a6c2f42c8f6d18153
46872c8ec97de8c02d6c4c0e8bfe75b6886ad141
'2011-10-12T00:45:10-04:00'
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQO' 'sip-files00023.txt'
8382b6ebb63b1be869648af8637e6833
c7dea9bc319b0b38415aa5bdec8c7f1561f16e29
'2011-10-12T00:44:17-04:00'
describe
'266400' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQP' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
fdde5318efbe011a91a2ab3c9ece1ddf
d9f92b598dc026ba499334bb424f4aa2daa733d0
describe
'233137' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQQ' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
97b256fcd3d4453fb43616fa4d28dcde
4add437fc2044569c5e4164e250d6328a7b76a6e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30705' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQR' 'sip-files00024.pro'
531900739a0dfccf6ff27ff9fc9a0cdb
b3fb8cf9560d99290b7ace687c241ac41409f250
'2011-10-12T00:44:31-04:00'
describe
'89747' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQS' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
70ce1b7a65a8d51e2f6f86defcccf9f3
ed96cbeefffceb609d7ab0aebdb20f60d5122791
'2011-10-12T00:42:43-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2143896' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQT' 'sip-files00024.tif'
e8411952534fcb22f2f6432f9324894a
9926f92794720a34775782b4bcaf5f7dd32cebb7
'2011-10-12T00:44:45-04:00'
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQU' 'sip-files00024.txt'
2123524473777e33380217a6f92aa1c7
38a65a1bff203bcd857b9643d9db295175012878
describe
'258598' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQV' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
ca60f60623421b71c065e09ec0f31cd4
fd0e10846f61d39ca9525143c8702361c88baa9f
'2011-10-12T00:43:02-04:00'
describe
'106632' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQW' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
bf95ef789d19a8484c31983807986f14
e17d0910ac73e8be8cd749efb39d255d3553b2d0
'2011-10-12T00:43:38-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7518' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQX' 'sip-files00025.pro'
445aff486ed2bb16fc16a1e31bebd00d
c324016881f3563ec7cadd74bbe8905e69f9b61d
describe
'41340' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQY' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
e48f66a20937732fe9fb77cfe1df8d18
b0d1081b62dba21b18a0b1f0b1c18b564f8b91d1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2078528' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVQZ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
585376c841c012a218f8664e658aea6d
8bca657ed8a0a8ef555f99af65c2cf492af6c746
'2011-10-12T00:43:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRA' 'sip-files00025.txt'
6fb34a111ed3523cbe9e89d0df5ebeb7
5811ee07ac4d01e9fed2c07083bd94527baed2b9
describe
'257956' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRB' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
dcd4687acd4aa2bfec171f5433a2cabc
b6224c47441c5f4274cdbe9d76a533e268f9c47f
describe
'83720' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRC' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
af49a23b00d2e028185d2d6d0ea23282
e01ddb7110d84a372379fa7796a69b1364aec24a
'2011-10-12T00:43:08-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3669' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRD' 'sip-files00026.pro'
871af3abff427b270f688d881ebee762
7e81d8e0310d0c90562229659a1acb9ab584e62c
describe
'31313' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRE' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
193dac14c0c62b553d335eda8c645c65
7118c2af517f4e29cdeeedd922cff24bf690caef
'2011-10-12T00:45:30-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2074096' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRF' 'sip-files00026.tif'
08064d0bb4817d109007ac45dabf8498
df4cc0eb0a2eca22cd03fc6fbc2531bff1a3fc0a
'2011-10-12T00:43:04-04:00'
describe
'263' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRG' 'sip-files00026.txt'
4c8dd448877c08e4bf9526167b32d968
a3eda3bea7b1c8f9986b8cdd62ad3ac92590f172
describe
'243483' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRH' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
c57cfe2ca07768a5a0f1e114ec8013e8
ce8703b33b7b9edc1259a6c65b868ab47ea2885e
describe
'48975' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRI' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
d64d0ca805029beab5830fc93d7df5c1
eee45249c1b1b6f01c2ce65c82d74f0ce2accc0a
'2011-10-12T00:43:14-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'17907' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRJ' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
e69cbb0b34eacfddaea5bd4c91b9afd3
90bac7a22e85b984b20d7980825676c1b322ccd7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1956244' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRK' 'sip-files00027.tif'
6194daa47f3b67db0ce48105998ba0eb
da4e8212f6030adda6585d1a3979536048296093
'2011-10-12T00:44:01-04:00'
describe
'264792' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRL' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
6425f80082302729b4f3c86386105b15
3a7fa8a58a77d6243034333f93167f6f164c83e2
'2011-10-12T00:44:02-04:00'
describe
'220881' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRM' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
24951345b6d4d69306e4b968df8a25e4
a2229a8f642d969a1c9154b569a7bb17f2e12a7c
'2011-10-12T00:42:45-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'21690' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRN' 'sip-files00028.pro'
1ae84c66b25ef7d517b70b6df25d6e52
f2ca5a901409f6fb80df9df38a332baf25e8e2fc
describe
'83195' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRO' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
7bd2bf2706ba6bbaed9da56896973d27
892a168a910b9314213e662eb471273ebdc9a3d7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2131412' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRP' 'sip-files00028.tif'
a96e4f04ec093f48d92f5581d13ca3ce
e14608cf7bbf7fa3f389bdbb677b37733f3f8c1e
'2011-10-12T00:45:15-04:00'
describe
'927' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRQ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
ca63827665a77938324a04490253ed0a
5924036a4c6b765ff98f5682759b6e930a78289a
describe
'263029' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRR' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
23aa09fe3a27b890811eca35578c1da1
8d0b09591eaf253363cb94aeb9d387ff735c19c8
describe
'220045' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRS' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
ac2dc35746263f4f03df1f0bdee3c14a
9c3cf4c0af621ca00529c1eb7943d24c38023f31
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28383' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRT' 'sip-files00029.pro'
e230757e022af3457a5e94323711e896
30679ec56f9c975cfe98ce0a15f1d87ddd34b43e
describe
'86053' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRU' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
65f5e47a5d00c1acb99c00ef395bbf3e
44eb6a5a54bc1188377252c386c995a004943f9f
'2011-10-12T00:43:18-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2117524' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRV' 'sip-files00029.tif'
ab724eaa5000d864851586f4c25b6037
ba1338755236ce8e76f87276ecbec656dfec3df7
'2011-10-12T00:45:09-04:00'
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRW' 'sip-files00029.txt'
56c322071493e414cc7ae9af184958f4
73f26b6f91c34ab44f5da45351c8283461eef175
describe
'261116' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRX' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
ebdefb97f1323912031723bd2ae466cd
6dd35bf6a1f30be60144cc6b4e10646f52acf238
describe
'226310' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRY' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
9268e212729df0b0aa47b1c93ee4783a
4acfae1b92d6192e270313a6381224204568b8a2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28951' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVRZ' 'sip-files00030.pro'
5a498c06a341a86d8aa012fa056cf8e2
642f4a25f370209aff0001b6a995c365aee96153
describe
'86169' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSA' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
4a832376b3615cb4a6c748f14f2a9be0
59d07e2ccd4baf1122ca91c8d08f38370192251c
'2011-10-12T00:43:37-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2101952' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSB' 'sip-files00030.tif'
7e5053338c5f7a5411ba9a1e4f3145d3
8373abef9043310aea0b078d40456bf1db3482d3
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSC' 'sip-files00030.txt'
64e54daece0ac60673a40501bdda0376
028e0f7eabc80fe0689b6ad69ec249273fab9e10
describe
'261797' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSD' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
16a0c48de8dedbe68f0ff50618d48b79
28db3249d1fc3fdd9b6c5e75767ee7c6864ed175
'2011-10-12T00:42:58-04:00'
describe
'225082' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSE' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
d4f8c423bcb94f01fd689970e83e1717
e1be408f03282d1f98a1b6ca57fafebb7b4c440f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28611' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSF' 'sip-files00031.pro'
fbfed0792f311a103fcab6cb14b9a39f
cbdcebcdee4cce976cce2290bab5fd06b1cfed15
'2011-10-12T00:43:05-04:00'
describe
'86719' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSG' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
6a34b5486a1a75ca56349914ccb92d74
8623beca5ac6bf553ec10472ee0b311b5057f189
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2106936' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSH' 'sip-files00031.tif'
d9ff70da1cde44d81e8b33892dec0f64
e645e3b3fdd5c426ea5ece70d0dd4dd2b36f2f96
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSI' 'sip-files00031.txt'
ea93f84b5367d2ebbae266cf7b5c5978
04cfe11a7b8693081498de41efc28db2d0e78657
'2011-10-12T00:42:36-04:00'
describe
'264208' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSJ' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
e1e451ca2c7286f1e0a8e482f846279c
d18310b058c7c8467550803073b1e3a742a4a4a4
describe
'216382' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSK' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
de76e5ba63dc3669e80be6956f838213
22774bc95017402f1c2f0e67eaf3244091b9f4d2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28740' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSL' 'sip-files00032.pro'
2c6daf67acbf8d7b58a952aeb73f4e3a
bae5308de606bacbbdd08dc7de6ddda1b8d926ce
describe
'82979' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSM' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
ebd2a139e99ab8f735995177e0173744
514759fab0dd56d959359549f83448fdcb81cc3f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2126372' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSN' 'sip-files00032.tif'
cd8f660a2cfd6ca73d7721c670a4f5f0
b6bfdc20bfa18976bc19bbb6b5824aa8c19bc19e
'2011-10-12T00:44:04-04:00'
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSO' 'sip-files00032.txt'
0b579f9ad5cb707c6643780af9d2765e
5ba2b8b3a2ef6226e34092791086a053a9e5af11
'2011-10-12T00:44:48-04:00'
describe
'264209' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSP' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
4653bbc1f6740e00c3821b7d1e0d69ca
e381160edff603c61849d96799718efee6d14c58
describe
'198413' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSQ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
ec73d54907a4eef5de298003818f6c7a
d2e690b0888272e08f5d6f030d8a396f07d7f439
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25657' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSR' 'sip-files00033.pro'
351b97bc35a2f5cd61eb71e071f596ea
26b07735413fe1c39ae8f94d96d07b9186d10648
describe
'78053' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSS' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
658b33659570d1169c079b99f3aee634
25d047ee5e87063c2f101693049944aa37205b86
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2125824' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVST' 'sip-files00033.tif'
aade89b467334a827ef2e537f6e02104
fdee1e8a5eb3545158e2eb3e41e2918540945a04
'2011-10-12T00:45:06-04:00'
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSU' 'sip-files00033.txt'
c759cb8085be014a832e94cd7c5207a9
7c2d824552df1cf3bc1395689280538f7c139c27
describe
'264300' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSV' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
ca4c3fa4305fcd482422bd18962f4b7f
62fa715a5b8c20919a37316f79d4520d6e910e5d
describe
'203458' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSW' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
32a41b33e0aee47a8f326a80eb07a218
aeea9aeaad7337f9e66a525274aa5b4c101c38b5
'2011-10-12T00:44:34-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26370' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSX' 'sip-files00034.pro'
da2ff1b5780ec48251a1682c110f41d4
c5041d6daa9a402aac6c122ebcd8e42c4daff6fb
describe
'80751' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSY' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
486643e3e3cd98b5ef71bebbd86c3f24
a21996855c1c3795ea32b44380911a0c8afeb505
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2127020' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVSZ' 'sip-files00034.tif'
a46b92eb20dc53376c985bc7733b872f
525cf3db12fb5f0e0866cea9b6d9df1211521569
'2011-10-12T00:42:41-04:00'
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTA' 'sip-files00034.txt'
eed26060fbeb6ac15bdae7101ebe64d3
21b07ec70567db62132cde52405956a2e676f116
describe
'261031' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTB' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
8ed4c414044eff0ea58f0062346e99ce
2a079edd36cac6d52eea98e8460d0cf53bd7d17b
describe
'193057' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTC' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
606ef48dc33e115688591dd8a67f31e7
381d94db9c655205cc1d0177dc36131c82b584d8
'2011-10-12T00:44:40-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23919' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTD' 'sip-files00035.pro'
961d3a836fc4a7e1870f26d5f8675976
d3435f396ad544f966b61947c4f0ccda39d438ef
describe
'76828' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTE' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
94614fcabcf9991bca424c9e9237d661
6dd66b728f36c7f0331c5fcd33fe361e01265266
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2100416' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTF' 'sip-files00035.tif'
a00d5045565a02d9e216ac0e120661b8
ae4b96769175f4321c6972bda0e22b7ceaee499c
describe
'978' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTG' 'sip-files00035.txt'
d34c047ab6554a07de5bd941f6480731
4376d62e6910996ce1b14c67f9e948233c4088d6
describe
'262661' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTH' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
1ae76195c98697c480689bb6534f98d5
90a6a71eb21b8c33967ec58c68de645812c138bb
'2011-10-12T00:44:23-04:00'
describe
'221796' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTI' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
34821bf3cd971eb5d8e067c7382eaea6
78718e709e8a8d513ecc93bb109282739eb4d7f5
'2011-10-12T00:43:23-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28247' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTJ' 'sip-files00036.pro'
642eca755067e4e6a0694b60490c3689
fdac97aa54da9f470c8dc12ab6cb3c128a7ef9fe
'2011-10-12T00:43:15-04:00'
describe
'86927' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTK' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
40350e2821b83efedaf76539fa4f0cf4
69a637e8b4c653270e41e3c2ceecbea4136e2932
'2011-10-12T00:45:12-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2113960' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTL' 'sip-files00036.tif'
3e857c09cf5d3d579dd37494b60f4316
4f6bc6a2bb60ba1fd5f7d62dc0628f90ead6340a
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTM' 'sip-files00036.txt'
8be95a6e9a49d63d73e83ec3aaf80b90
12d74bf5c92541fb977c9c9e52eff20199e6f204
describe
'262686' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTN' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
a0f91a975a65050b27380d66f4b9d561
ca5e31f14a2404ca6e5abd5b50235ae417fd3c6c
'2011-10-12T00:44:56-04:00'
describe
'221904' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTO' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
bed0c985c6ec569814c25b9779a841f1
11f4ceeec1ddf60b6d3c9fcf0fa2aaf80639b5fd
'2011-10-12T00:45:00-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28342' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTP' 'sip-files00037.pro'
4a3bd5a3af3c04298414ad5849ce505f
1cb5108c9e51099d6c9b38c434230ab21f1444c4
'2011-10-12T00:43:17-04:00'
describe
'85943' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTQ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
b0ec5452ec4a06cbf7cb0a8e67d235e3
62e9aa5a07ce75a472ff3e7092d1f98b2bb89407
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2114324' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTR' 'sip-files00037.tif'
c443f0f2ebef9193c1648eb2a9b23f5f
715a0b18e97e1b89a776882f7296fb2855da99d4
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTS' 'sip-files00037.txt'
5298cbe712e2a27e760ea15386d5f285
acc6a2d6ce2facef1dc966cadbfec75e63d01aae
'2011-10-12T00:44:46-04:00'
describe
'263852' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTT' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
09755034ea88c724a4e8acfdc086e5d7
28c1b65780441897e34ca958d6edcab85404d633
'2011-10-12T00:45:18-04:00'
describe
'201767' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTU' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
437f189cab0135065a2e312a03c553bc
5874959106853b5b63222c85856005c7600910da
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25109' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTV' 'sip-files00038.pro'
c3646d9be77c74c46d13832730aef326
d018527de339d9784125d9bba7ede8257dbf91f9
'2011-10-12T00:45:34-04:00'
describe
'79893' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTW' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
5bbd9c7bf9bb34b56aae46852faf8fbc
43d5a2a1bcaca3531cad8fb503f3ee2c1eb92056
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2123680' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTX' 'sip-files00038.tif'
204e476fd0713e416e7628982deb9d9a
990e472d33397e5f90719eb9dc500ba91645b3d6
describe
'1034' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTY' 'sip-files00038.txt'
9e3f7f93cfe47dc4df185bf1c902a03b
1069c87da4cb55aaf706b9f54fc6d774ad6eca5b
describe
'263099' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVTZ' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
1bff502a40fadee72fe41cf1378a11fe
d14cc1655ba81891c230da3f33491632991820fb
describe
'218516' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUA' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
cbb27477f4adfc50edf56231fe4f134f
2a5dd8f75970f900fa0ec4d99cff608a20a54064
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27172' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUB' 'sip-files00039.pro'
d8d3e01578b3ae618f96a187aa2f81a0
237c2a80a56a2a640fcf8f5adfdd1c755ab13c1d
describe
'86372' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUC' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
2569f43c72ce9d0edd5bdb5c43793686
b2cdbf176805af86975595f3bda3c4ac94cb826c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2117608' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUD' 'sip-files00039.tif'
d29f7740b344dc3649b06d019d0f23f4
fb31919fafeeb1a5b1b79a88ff099b986685924b
'2011-10-12T00:44:30-04:00'
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUE' 'sip-files00039.txt'
9bc5d769705613911c338c856dbf7006
a60b60d7a7e55c2fa357161d0345b4c6cbdf2171
describe
'261080' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUF' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
5612783c88b526fcaebfdf97989a7106
4a81fe5d2c3485b2f44dddf766d4da8c54b198e7
describe
'234477' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUG' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
63d51d9416d26dbc7dd53a34a8b385cf
4c5b0ac49544d44fa1a1eb8fe3d5ce36d1fb257c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29467' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUH' 'sip-files00040.pro'
1fcaed8b7f3741e00cb944e8d762ea23
d82c2e7889f2606f46573df9a50b2d70aa9b170a
describe
'91665' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUI' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
5a43accf3a9cbf7492ae9ea50de815db
18cb5292d00dadc3dbf24ec72b348a8b6ba053d6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2102068' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUJ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
513218b055d0c64d103dd26cd5d7003c
44adead76397e11daf49d3f39965d07ad49d30e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUK' 'sip-files00040.txt'
3ec3b4302aa0598ce50b98679a2fd9f9
f291df567f58266b6891bbf26bc625baf582560b
describe
'261284' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUL' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
39a70827beb6353e0ac926d782117d23
66b4dc1041da7386e0a72bf51dba0fa547ec94d8
describe
'235201' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUM' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
09c031924ff9b7494d13a73cd96a7563
68e0ee4642e6fa0c6b16459ec172baca4070418c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28908' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUN' 'sip-files00041.pro'
c4f520cc3b03ad461a7345cefee186d6
e70ab4254deedaa240c811af7f033b639e0f177c
describe
'88995' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUO' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
23428ea65eba2c5b28febd145d5e41c8
0e63bcbefa1b61d63748b750a5ebc4d79eff0930
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2103516' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUP' 'sip-files00041.tif'
0ac1b06e1aaf952f6553ebdc5cd87787
d6214b0b0c29d0dad7cdd3a4d20a873809317d5c
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUQ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
2d9d478df0be79e9c5c67ba9c6483de8
1cd1bf5d4aaf72d5b1375ed8445cc5ef2baa1df3
describe
'263690' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUR' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
f9ec7abb23cf6e63148cfe01710c4cc0
2363f4b0094c567766abf2e65a6a1f9009d2cd81
describe
'130139' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUS' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
9d12df1f4968236f8b95c730aaab2897
c7ef20a250fe5bbee0389a95386c2dc8f7151eff
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'13943' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUT' 'sip-files00042.pro'
521552fe6b2e5750ba46f29d5171a7c0
e8b5284c50b58f374f4ba255d0d1cfc0626ee260
describe
'49293' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUU' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
262430b4f5a3a4908022fdcad6fb4e59
bfc7155964e9af046164f020070140042da8ca13
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2120464' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUV' 'sip-files00042.tif'
5ed84b204006e9ed8e3e307a9ffabfe1
ed56279f21a95ea1e91a35a84541cfe6f078c3a9
describe
'686' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUW' 'sip-files00042.txt'
a6d6c20888631a4c523098e57ea97760
79defa4dd3d558c89019f8d5e0217bd97c4d50e7
describe
'254414' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUX' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
ca6095f4dcd69f650a38671f6361b089
399ad24af4fa3c2b56361fd4d252bd4dcc809e91
describe
'50910' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUY' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
02a027e8b061b5756805aa636a596d9c
c1a480549188f104e502ed69b935201cce288cd8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'18801' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVUZ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
e9b20746b3709f70c0d1812e71187301
b3ab6d2602a8c2cea92e95d5be7b38a18faeea1f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2045404' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVA' 'sip-files00043.tif'
d4650e90561914c5c7807cfa583bca69
2d1ebd8fcb54753dfbcf368f4f7006a1d693f8e2
describe
'255777' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVB' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
3cad817a9e4c77fe86f6f47a7b1af136
b177e2d115985415bdb8b8e62b878048a34c8e22
describe
'82627' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVC' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
7fce7c1f52300930e2ae64306446dd71
767ff397de93a3a8f711fad8d5a53a8cb17816e9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'8165' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVD' 'sip-files00044.pro'
b5786fb66e0bb08e9c80a0e7335f9ad2
23da7a795237a9a33e42fc8150abe1e6291b2caf
describe
'34281' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVE' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
64b7a56e1df270f8667216b03076fcdb
4ae5048607313ad24f0e8c1bc118e96521d2b525
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2111264' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVF' 'sip-files00044.tif'
4002d0eed394e13a228782c9c42fefc2
5ad5a3ae1dbb7386cc00cb6392028ce971f96170
'2011-10-12T00:43:36-04:00'
describe
'504' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVG' 'sip-files00044.txt'
b4342913291b104d1e26a8df0606a482
9bdc5ee7c1e216f420393a1bd02b560b48a82b9d
'2011-10-12T00:44:42-04:00'
describe
'1686' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVH' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
b325b609ec0fa9c412b1b47845f4f31d
16f781a3b7baf698269d9c2bfdfe98838ddc587f
describe
'19285' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVI' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
491de3d472d96b425e926dec792f4f91
756a809c89a68b2a38d8b23625774003d013d7eb
'2011-10-12T00:45:19-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'12678' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVJ' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
2285c818b60b1146df7997f3d4fb437b
0ea317393d105d650df31eb66921bb53e489ec6c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1940076' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVK' 'sip-files00045.tif'
e8503e1a932ec463cf2745f10592236e
c64bd77fb3a50adce99d655bc66f81442a1a7761
describe
'260370' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVL' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
5e9a7504ada1720d857adc64eb7991bf
a5a3708ee7fe0ff64c0d592dbd9e3ca72926c5ef
describe
'219891' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVM' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
cf1ff49b7a07d64f33d2ec5e0c90d3a6
a78ba5cab336d0b0cfc600414390a2b7540e9011
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'21387' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVN' 'sip-files00046.pro'
510a8d71dfd30f23d8b83e609592bc7b
220031a5b027cb35c2f5d287292e0571216f6823
describe
'79888' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVO' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
cf57b6ac00c34eb582b93c4dbaa2063d
6209818b0a1b12b6d2cc291d3f091ff572e01ef2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2095388' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVP' 'sip-files00046.tif'
3a1ceb4015cb960457045eaa0f7fb46b
1d6d692ea284946f59e12c9f4a9994f26b8bdaec
'2011-10-12T00:43:42-04:00'
describe
'916' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVQ' 'sip-files00046.txt'
12ea8945b614673706fd49089b0bb269
eee05058df344041d5b9bc164e08839f80292065
describe
'252642' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVR' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
a2efccbb4305d7e6fe70a6bb9de7d97b
05dad935e3a74edeb4835f39415985515e52cc37
'2011-10-12T00:43:57-04:00'
describe
'248516' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVS' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
324270b7c4d296753bce74ce66e32d0c
748ad68b4bc232f28dcfb0324ebe54d20c185af2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'31208' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVT' 'sip-files00047.pro'
4a492544196b3dd671a6ae95886d5aad
c72fc8f1270461fb2d1cb8a4bfae9f83c16d5924
describe
'99445' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVU' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
82620896784e46d967fa1666fee87c0f
767eb7e25c70709f29c38984b0f58f0884a78ef3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2034836' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVV' 'sip-files00047.tif'
2caaafce04f752d0e68c95c249f65f26
5a95a7b8bb834a7eb566144c51dbf0593714075d
'2011-10-12T00:44:10-04:00'
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVW' 'sip-files00047.txt'
8cf2702d8fe74e58d3537d4118c827dc
9b7c16228057aced6b5ff5c5138d7e62cff7ba7c
describe
'264189' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVX' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
527222f2e830416a4b797ce6f4881120
bd988609e441589322bfff8051495e19bbbf1394
describe
'226286' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVY' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
2717e02a985495db28070710e37a69ff
eb1b402a3fdc829210c331a3de35c9f0e68c924d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28634' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVVZ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
ead253564814ee563d359ccd2b72fd94
36b707bbc21b1ecc9f90aeafe7c2239f4d3622df
describe
'87052' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWA' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
634e110db57fc42c9b5d78c5c4060557
c678cd895e5b8ce513df8af231e8a341815c2272
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2126640' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWB' 'sip-files00048.tif'
68aa9432d1f0e9b2ab2dfe830d5ecbcd
06e10c362e04f6cb8c159fe65f496e913a0cc0b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWC' 'sip-files00048.txt'
e2b190a5b856c4d4585e1215c026379f
b5e24ca171271e124c5f270bd19799f2c938ee6d
describe
'261507' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWD' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
45298c7a85c8148c355e255f15865551
2b8554e9c178d93b9f45eb12bed569f4f86f2769
describe
'237495' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWE' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
ce8405a98dc12f269f71528f039060f8
df957fbb074aa9f7772efe162b9b48c642a28cbb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30663' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWF' 'sip-files00049.pro'
05a10a0a59a5b8305fa6bbda276bb81f
d5900d2a75284a36769e4ff8093d729c84a94e77
describe
'91032' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWG' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
923c3474d37ed74e7925b28a44bc15dc
ac91d4f1ef89bdd6ca98bb8c27c99c7f827d7ece
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2104592' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWH' 'sip-files00049.tif'
81e3b502ee3d4f3114ee9f2096e437ee
1bbf4b06738dcf2a3e4b929ed25e2c5de25a34be
'2011-10-12T00:43:47-04:00'
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWI' 'sip-files00049.txt'
4ad138fce4777fa1cd5b80d3d37a87a2
87f0d322faa33515f05ef4d348a9f20f006c65c5
'2011-10-12T00:43:49-04:00'
describe
'265370' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWJ' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
8931eb2b415cb8284a91575c1e4a61ee
8ca4b3666831e2c6a68107ebed47eaee836642cc
describe
'223588' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWK' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
1b7aecdd81aad808ffc3e06197b9f7c8
93af30ebb76752319f9ba7219128e5a9eda888b0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWL' 'sip-files00050.pro'
c6312e2b0e84cc56a8f852b852d37160
23026d51433f47865f1cee5fcef924480d5eb4ad
describe
'85402' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWM' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
f7e98bb35f1d2d7247ff876396e0df74
2a9c1abe7e699cb3492ab31dfd7e1a8f784b7998
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2135596' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWN' 'sip-files00050.tif'
dbabe62c5282bedf9ca981efa1ac517a
a4aa5d352d96f52ec1443a46eee2b3fe1fd3dbc8
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWO' 'sip-files00050.txt'
7c105cf0f96c971f3bf93f1cc04606ee
6099a545ea20ad1849a9f653cb0998186bc9968c
describe
'261076' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWP' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
57e9d1fccbcdf2ebdfd1d1b724773c96
e24326e8c99fce91ad8d67f08501f98be2ba6646
describe
'226084' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWQ' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
7f8750d3188da7a6c76eff4cb5d43cee
0191323839cfd6b22179b31e429bc5752b20bd9e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28898' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWR' 'sip-files00051.pro'
0d0d9cc621db8f9137c0c64bbebe3cb3
17af5d811883069b190429a46adee93ea644d706
describe
'89082' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWS' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
8874969946cb5c99e3728db04abaf1f2
bf744c5f3ff95cd3ed1aba154662f70c03ff907e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2101516' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWT' 'sip-files00051.tif'
ab160059db75dbb9aa389d098aa95ef6
aa43b6b570ada7744fba589a4317f2f58fb0eb67
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWU' 'sip-files00051.txt'
df9de2a64418d0b99e56638b9033a629
32d488b7ac2700b89ad29653960b35bc7c1ce774
describe
'265340' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWV' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
07f44fb0920c5dcff389b33cdeb4182b
a41e0e84d931e131f2e2f46a3eeb9f072001d2e7
describe
'223316' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWW' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
067903f95580c3ad4eb98aa0ed2b7e0e
c574d87e6f985d757cb4c3be2dff1508af4e1a6b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29077' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWX' 'sip-files00052.pro'
07f44fffdd793fdfba1ac27c924868b8
93b00af46d6d2aa7fbb6c6ae89e135a03b4ab043
describe
'86783' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWY' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
a469963221c66cd4ebd515788ac8b6f2
227a3203049edd19ff51198c43af360b7983f9cf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2135524' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVWZ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
3744950440ada6d1ceec7093f5e51401
31ba59c87a888c3e0d20140bcb7c1d2bc8e1dcee
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXA' 'sip-files00052.txt'
4778905b5986f78366aad5978e5ddb84
30e7bcb5fa7ee7876f8748c1055eeffec98a6263
describe
'261225' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXB' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
ceca7d775113e539a58a1d1fb4779fb4
9adea282b6a644cb64d2851b3673eae77a0836ff
describe
'212000' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXC' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
dea11cf7e45d2517b28f382a6acb7ff2
fcf51698ef3c3691ab2d38149ab7a0bc591192f7
'2011-10-12T00:45:24-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28300' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXD' 'sip-files00053.pro'
f98b71d0264ce3a08bf5b3becd01070a
da25e25ac2cfac68b7ca10c43cd270cbb38fd279
describe
'83078' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXE' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
635137ed755c816f2daa12cccfff21a8
d1501bd98acfd19b8455056aec1ce188834c9e63
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2102244' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXF' 'sip-files00053.tif'
c0e5e83a71057387c4f3485096a2c263
710f537641dbf726f3b16cd11ffa0dc331978d15
'2011-10-12T00:43:19-04:00'
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXG' 'sip-files00053.txt'
0a38e6221c65fac602c1875cbff0ceb6
d20dfd01072b25390d2f8fb063ccd1eb587c3c3d
describe
'265880' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXH' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
afa34bc0bd326a0ebfdd0e623ba2978e
b5dbd8da5d0c841686d1cb9edeb49802f62ba52f
'2011-10-12T00:43:41-04:00'
describe
'214792' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXI' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
b123c2aeffd0eb4407d8bc2077e3f5dd
2e11f1b4deb7546b1e10970c31fafaeded7390b7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28889' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXJ' 'sip-files00054.pro'
1ec206322d39c97ff1bf46de3bd341a2
c016d3c70421c5c05b3d0f738ccf8cef20348974
describe
'83746' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXK' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
59cb05404ee9a9a0f24ee1789e7d036e
b6ca50b8bdda41583c301a5607ae30f1332f0f6c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2139652' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXL' 'sip-files00054.tif'
d250be428e1482a14eec5bc36647728c
81857e8275afcba6ce744546b96d5267f903bce5
'2011-10-12T00:44:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXM' 'sip-files00054.txt'
f9c299afc7fc3b23e743b33cfb301b00
da082aa5a4ceee1bdc3529cb8f97d67ced2e8172
describe
'262265' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXN' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
b35f20437c0d73f193f65f93034f5315
758440133c012f7f2010e0cc1ee421fbbc9fd48f
describe
'209101' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXO' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
548cdec68004679b41286f7a119dd008
4488b4ca9e631ede933e4a7ed20fc786de620d32
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27375' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXP' 'sip-files00055.pro'
0b65bea47d747f7d84d4e2121603aafa
daf99d0e66a3a0775295ea99cd9f6e525c4f45bb
describe
'83998' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXQ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
a70848869b0e2ea0fb2b894f02c8ec93
3eaac35c6c45232b011972f5c8c228595161860f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2111332' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXR' 'sip-files00055.tif'
7f6aaff95638029cd7004890d839a843
cf7f129b524e33dd756e28d239c7fca2c198ed91
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXS' 'sip-files00055.txt'
6f4338d13b390fa3d2c86444a5c938b9
e84cd2ea4c30cf1eb594ccff27375bf7ff927a52
describe
'265835' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXT' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
9754884f509b0bd58580ad580bd3bb1d
fb36f4797a4798b66be997d9562c80b7f501fef1
describe
'220831' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXU' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
0392edc848ac1473493b0f82c1f81704
55e0fdf6a9ec0d3063cafd0a0c55d4affffde1b0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28352' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXV' 'sip-files00056.pro'
b7ff4f37c2506372d415385377ae1826
d815044cfefef24b02ea6d08a1f9dd34de1d0f2d
describe
'86104' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXW' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
3c4d2646235c907b9996877a248111c6
c0095f2e87216a87adc3fb9086d0c959127fb2ec
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2139800' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXX' 'sip-files00056.tif'
74eb22269485563ba0de2dec269546cb
3fb4a99cef0fe8d9ccb1b32f0d769d6e609fe77e
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXY' 'sip-files00056.txt'
db369983cdb02f3863c18d23f35149d1
28a59f68b67dddfcb08aaa00cd67247311ed1444
describe
'257875' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVXZ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
579e7050cabf9957a519c5ea9389cb15
a176381668dd0685c4237012af4a0c6d34c84632
describe
'241510' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYA' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
7e972258f144fadb2755b50168006996
9070b7b660caa5b3f52cb46ae5bdd2c78e691794
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30760' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYB' 'sip-files00057.pro'
55eb30648664d063dc1eb0ae474df856
6da32525225348c6f5a09a73dd4a8ac79a1fb9f8
describe
'92690' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYC' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
33944cdb9cf67d38c007b8eb3df85b06
8a43d0af497fd476922da1e7917e9fa3e53935d3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2075840' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYD' 'sip-files00057.tif'
8a4ad30e3bc117d486a4d4c342931d94
0bd08a915ba0106fe666e1ac947d346a851f7da3
'2011-10-12T00:44:47-04:00'
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYE' 'sip-files00057.txt'
e53fe3a5a7b7ac7021b2212c0e7f19cd
c2b408c1470338df630f174bcce98e0b06b9d9ee
describe
'260048' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYF' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
928f17d50342656123ba7d07ae8244d2
319cb42570f1f3a3fd4eeafc172e036ff4ee51cd
'2011-10-12T00:45:20-04:00'
describe
'217814' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYG' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
9b913859a61e7ab01fdfbadff69b9339
472592b15dea4d28cbeaa83cdfe350c0143cb1d4
'2011-10-12T00:43:58-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27641' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYH' 'sip-files00058.pro'
157a7ce05267798d72d31703bd91ff92
fb8cd8703d6834b0b2bfb85fa8f086f201b4b094
describe
'85637' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYI' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
6fd05686ce0a9d2b755835ab73fded0b
ede055fe14709987cba67159370e4638783d023b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2093460' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYJ' 'sip-files00058.tif'
1ee72309c74f5bfe593df74648bc6827
4397fd598fd93ede9a8e4b7c64b3d005237d4f3a
'2011-10-12T00:45:31-04:00'
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYK' 'sip-files00058.txt'
a743008ab01525b5b24e708948247859
165e57b38c412655aea5a022c3a6021e7109e02c
describe
'263870' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYL' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
6b926cfef83006b78691a85dbe9f14e5
7264cf72e0d8bd7bd3b0701ecc3a5490a390efa0
describe
'218533' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYM' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
ba1282793258d0790041771d2c50785b
176c1f0600a55303b10d7056407a257c2862249e
'2011-10-12T00:44:20-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28151' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYN' 'sip-files00059.pro'
4579c39d62121140bbe807d7fd271db2
e421b8700311d17d97c30f2fb466ede3b273655f
describe
'87931' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYO' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
cc7c3c8d4b954934bd37df194a6472d6
825a3bf9d0c695db035253f6169359a1020299aa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2123944' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYP' 'sip-files00059.tif'
a2bf69fb7c44e066d0461a2b7464d0b1
8f195b82ea8147df9016e12f5ad7077eab349634
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYQ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
5eb9b2d4bae6312825f53c0d56fe3ec3
bd6597dfe2606d8ca953215c5a26d99df5a0cc68
describe
'261436' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYR' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
6619a51dba55f41c3861b9e698d4e269
3cfde03a327ad22251699753c3ccc54d141c4afa
describe
'212128' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYS' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
66996c879e6ddb9395bcb1bcc0c20212
5e36de697478088b37bb72276144b0bd0b8613c4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25824' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYT' 'sip-files00060.pro'
95af79c993c48d0201a36c1678d7f475
44fa476c7248e5de403776ffd1ebe9064a48c7e8
describe
'84844' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYU' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
98216d39745971a12323485ce328f4c1
c6028991d5752a5745d1ebf7b85e4d5b17f0680d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2104544' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYV' 'sip-files00060.tif'
e93d73d536a34c292c04b528133dc15b
5ffff7fd3618d8134fa6115e460706d1889e65de
describe
'1078' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYW' 'sip-files00060.txt'
7272fbc25835bc3b6c00412ad28512dc
76b63ed38461a637d5ad2ee9f0de0178ec28950b
describe
'261995' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYX' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
03e4cdfe96829da0167a86b930035f99
0fd3a4ce86bbe582a1dac27cde41674e03f266fd
describe
'53615' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYY' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
20fc8e2369c85e2941205a218e8afd8e
421b5ac12834b47d982b21812f23da359bb8a4a1
'2011-10-12T00:43:32-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'19340' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVYZ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
29976c045913661043ee8661c42fa0ae
38adb7c1ab7c903638a858ae15cbe7104194cc34
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2103828' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZA' 'sip-files00061.tif'
2a1a313f8d3605244e5cff11495ea9ea
72b494da52fd9314ac92dc683ad04aafcdc96680
describe
'259514' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZB' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
a506fc9b7a273c53316ea779ae6cd151
e7afa38574531ac5b7094dc1575f54f526d46e8d
describe
'95982' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZC' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
cfbffe71c12fe4b96eff802151d242e1
3b440590f07ac6249bf6fe8b650118fe42068802
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7693' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZD' 'sip-files00062.pro'
7449ae90a33bec8e662f82d66a544599
c78525cf365c6aad4223f58ed0c72b998b176096
describe
'34319' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZE' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
692fea74a1901cd3b349578924fb2fcb
93b22ca930518e971770a0954fe7b604bd069acb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2086816' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZF' 'sip-files00062.tif'
adfa9be72dd7bfdb71bd28f7834de5b8
3572b2d1f7b2b4b22d41842fe096d5a0b3a0edfd
'2011-10-12T00:43:16-04:00'
describe
'445' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZG' 'sip-files00062.txt'
bcb130e2018742fab6f7f50e3c2861f1
463d49b432b4b5423643293dd0bd73f94cc9aa30
'2011-10-12T00:45:14-04:00'
describe
'262649' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZH' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
2719d22cce07cdf32faf51baff8145a8
dcb53d010a0492b79c3497395349d0ed6b698aac
describe
'50450' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZI' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
c1e4559a912586638785efe67208f4ae
d76fe975f2df521b56630ef432125f09f1ae6fde
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'18563' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZJ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
b0b4228755a9cccd1d995fafcacfc14e
7fe0c189113e205df1618684f7b599a65e4283a3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2111140' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZK' 'sip-files00063.tif'
a46e6ea3083dd97bc6b9e8b190d2a930
9d9dff40a8c1ad96c8e33d482e785f58fd9bea0b
'2011-10-12T00:43:10-04:00'
describe
'264749' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZL' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
be73420f6828aa0a26ef109907fea4f6
4c8c8bef703b5670e993236c5a28dc130bbbee4e
describe
'209357' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZM' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
023b717dcb6e4c94af2618994c7e7eaf
03e7af4b1290a1b2562464f058fd7c9e6fb224ae
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'19692' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZN' 'sip-files00064.pro'
92444573d2ac3b62cd65bf7d023ee527
4e30106395cc2eee7911cbc2ef5a8d455e8030c4
describe
'78274' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZO' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
90d18868dd5ad059170f3d026f15512c
a8fa61c46d9ee87193ec5b46680054cd2401dd08
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2130268' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZP' 'sip-files00064.tif'
b19695c355d8537ef5e0d7ca5b5ad7a3
7d35ee6606d4160f13de4f33f8dc5a730d801c4e
'2011-10-12T00:44:36-04:00'
describe
'834' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZQ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
019c309c71937c8f54f112472d1ac3d6
c5c530e78818f9529fe9a92432b07403018e3de0
describe
'261442' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZR' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
e67db9f43e809f433026b5bdf4bd328e
b5fe14889f396e38041ed5345dfeed98bc487f52
describe
'204887' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZS' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
9792637e2eb386c71ef2dbbc06016aff
4d64d408530754ad009464983fb23d08865ad725
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26315' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZT' 'sip-files00065.pro'
678e83f5ebd3fe204ae69b8830d1ee8a
bb8243fc28c987607163f57830aab061f9ffb191
describe
'80473' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZU' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
336b7786780440294f533fd35e9f54fe
a364acf4d864c1e14733927bb121cc652b2b2419
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2104560' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZV' 'sip-files00065.tif'
17dca4742c81bb9006ab147ffc20e002
d431de1263ce7f679ce7ee226cebeb570611ebae
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZW' 'sip-files00065.txt'
6910fcbfbd65beffb91845fc012f7792
99d4e36e939e2b78f96c14a8f68138dec5003a50
describe
'263506' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZX' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
e3adb565246eecabe3cca15b13f81c2a
17fb3e2f9201d848e28acae3331c49ab66aaea82
describe
'211566' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZY' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
641afff6139b0e58e25ed55238120025
eaa276478d1a305abcf6791483b4226f62f85ccd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27884' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABVZZ' 'sip-files00066.pro'
c69ccf3b77ac83d285de93d3ea6181f6
e9b60dd687b0e38cd57be7a0cc1d84fe083c89bc
describe
'82175' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAA' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
35a6b439cf12dcf0f2696300d054ccbc
95c95ec633a6b4171217298075c0c2cf97b4e634
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2120428' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAB' 'sip-files00066.tif'
24d1aa521019154280bd77ddd4ce0ece
ffc0b198d9defa48527954439700acdfdbcf1e8b
describe
'1120' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAC' 'sip-files00066.txt'
2056ca55ed306ae971e8de7acde9ef9f
3a5990711167ad80147bf5633a46e36ef4dec90d
'2011-10-12T00:43:48-04:00'
describe
'263122' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAD' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
6ebd703997338ff56779b97bf0f053f1
520ae9bf5983e5588487d485b81816374d61444e
'2011-10-12T00:44:59-04:00'
describe
'190726' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAE' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
d00da86573e63543bcd5e6288f6cbf18
b3158aeb66a7b9ff16e3008f8491bbc0a4e8c820
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23135' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAF' 'sip-files00067.pro'
7a9e5b69fa7632101a34465b0e7dd1d7
2caa459f9306d57be28f3a92ad4007c08831bc8b
describe
'75549' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAG' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
6e8292c9c9df8ebb1e6904e493263784
1bc75e31c5b489141d7b209849112ef9825a1f01
'2011-10-12T00:44:51-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2117204' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAH' 'sip-files00067.tif'
cbe226eb184f2cb322d197843a12a0a7
dfd5f1b5d4985dc566fe30635c9b8b18096b5955
describe
'981' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAI' 'sip-files00067.txt'
4603d0e81f784b68073f3f9e8cefa49a
efcd0a05c406677f878dab283ed37c2923707595
describe
'265347' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAJ' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
84159b30c0dac160b9962144519da6f3
bb4d5c837621d8da7552ee73b5e5b33151652199
describe
'211582' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAK' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
4a79e4ff2bb1a54f36dbc84be99eeb9d
484d144159784586126721ee497e41e6849c3764
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28671' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAL' 'sip-files00068.pro'
f9081a9301b6a5f18c374d93c0317f95
d6867e8088677d37a231b9e2aabffff3916dd81f
'2011-10-12T00:45:02-04:00'
describe
'84426' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAM' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
4c9f44439b8f150d2667babe48d8526f
c7fa1f4be5e06abed8399d6b7de872d6a74c3dd6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2135856' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAN' 'sip-files00068.tif'
37c51fd0b6aaaf20c14c88b0a8fde72c
19f320f5c070e27bcc88e1ec92f6f252407df75a
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAO' 'sip-files00068.txt'
5fa5f8ea0871875ea2ecd040f34f8587
ec0d3f94ef45f814942b0aa183d5443829b60d19
describe
'258627' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAP' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
c20970c5cdf790464f5104ffa2bb44a8
684cd29c31f47acb0922608662e1b3aae5dbeeed
describe
'212245' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAQ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
a20bfcca066e5bcf433983e705934cb4
4f08738aaed41f1f5bc872f4078ea907b75e65cb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28632' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAR' 'sip-files00069.pro'
76db569eb733e8dd19b79630af70c666
b56589973a58e0a2c26dbc1acf46bc947c771b0f
describe
'84259' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAS' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
ea9391680b6016867a179aab8b30e6b9
57dbe2bd192aff1d68d02ef9fd7bc585f9919b4d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2081652' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAT' 'sip-files00069.tif'
7479eb68d5acc1ead931f1983a71e5d8
f9c42eaa29c8a86b391011a1c611abcbdc4a86c2
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAU' 'sip-files00069.txt'
735fe8458017890f100bbb6319b04d7e
93edd77aa7619851d8520bc3e08aa83b9df773f3
describe
'264096' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAV' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
5383e3a7b68c55ddcc31e89109f91f72
0deb6a8074db6746477658ec95b8b678c48e2b45
'2011-10-12T00:43:20-04:00'
describe
'215919' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAW' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
8dab3eb37b2eb6f8d639e4d06b02cdba
d658c9cc2ab47d75b60b2b4c0a234e89426f1d30
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29189' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAX' 'sip-files00070.pro'
534406c529f942e272195e0d44e1ef8f
2e845fc1914d816bcf384f965783d175fdfa38b3
describe
'83782' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAY' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
3d6a98a1e4451eac5ae5a1fe07d60523
098eb353ddab3f00b43bdd1397ca1eb6f89a307d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2125900' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWAZ' 'sip-files00070.tif'
c060cf2e037b01909cd57c19e9785211
c749b98b9b4d2984bc2f4caff2e61e2ff1af5f3c
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBA' 'sip-files00070.txt'
ec3c6548240775cc35b1640d191ccf63
b67de48110c38969a6be38a72cccd44e07636dda
describe
'262954' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBB' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
065d92b1cb5309b5d2c44787cc29bb6a
ea96253ce4ea6eea74bd50916e1afa904bdfb06d
describe
'219859' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBC' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
5bbafda7a28b0d07d95b51f61afbbe4e
be42fdebe96e5e12abf6c289ceb9dc68cdc48718
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29485' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBD' 'sip-files00071.pro'
4e2c844c34aaa3d9db8bf08f403d4898
a74f54846025f152c77f9ecff56760619443d83a
describe
'86696' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBE' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
31c44166d7285ec09012fa1aed2d8254
90459f366231d1fb6846073c7200f9976630024a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2116084' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBF' 'sip-files00071.tif'
6228e2af06629348a39039d36b23aeb6
5dd6ad6145b59bc9a573128d9daeedd0a530530c
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBG' 'sip-files00071.txt'
88745815a21a1cef22028cc0e5c710b1
a9f5274253c527059dc7927e4f0d06c8ecb6ff1e
describe
'267446' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBH' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
5e61397fd7a3e8047ddb02414993965f
8b7a1cc898627edd4ea4595e79c7624b1b504621
describe
'216443' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBI' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
e43d833eb53c24cd59b138f82b5069a3
60c604224e238c621300bf7aac8e289da058e7fd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29096' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBJ' 'sip-files00072.pro'
f2a54c57ef1c86b7b06741c3efd77f26
a9e2280d973749fabc00bc9724dbef9fcccebf5c
describe
'84742' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBK' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
5ecbe927a1502d7958e4c8c194fcb00b
62f7a10e4331bf39743c548fbb4c17178c1728d7
'2011-10-12T00:42:39-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2152248' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBL' 'sip-files00072.tif'
62c9c7b38ba64c033ae09add9cb67b74
099b3da9664f9d9b6ba98b715c9bcbf70a6d0674
'2011-10-12T00:44:00-04:00'
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBM' 'sip-files00072.txt'
b26ee6a4879d074d2bf15d2bcc718d38
de0d9fbba8c1294c98aae8d4bcb20b29a4bc1106
describe
'265599' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBN' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
60108934bbb6585bb7714d57a0a2f1c6
d29f40ffca0005663f6b6de87d291347e2a46a18
describe
'207894' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBO' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
7a322aade4089438afa94401f2e74e5c
a10e96f3c2fe8f912c3153337b55750d0af26209
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28117' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBP' 'sip-files00073.pro'
a7f28dbf4db22a129fa5a25c7b0af157
56ed5efbec2db15660fc978d140a1eda8dcd6e85
describe
'82850' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBQ' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
2cfc5dc0d2402e4f148a8e6f1c2b6a1b
bbfc18cee80de9985550eebec2e288cc56dbf168
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2137252' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBR' 'sip-files00073.tif'
96fa5ea993e1d1cc37fb8822e9b10cfa
3ab52bf0d18b45f8cc41dc9e2f3fb652e7b9eca5
'2011-10-12T00:44:15-04:00'
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBS' 'sip-files00073.txt'
2c61af9d6569b4f4849a081fe4f32894
29b67af5837a739506d85bb438e15cd1e7f4083e
'2011-10-12T00:44:08-04:00'
describe
'265127' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBT' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
4d1b869b80a1f0c5864ff3619580ba19
de8e3e79014016bfb9d23e009b3cf6130ea36e44
describe
'214822' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBU' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
70e5d1650c089c372c01e8d94b25a23b
a785593357a0d67f2863795ca8bc8a67e2ce27b1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28495' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBV' 'sip-files00074.pro'
55e62b3cceb40a44d9efa4fa5cd7df94
947dd05b4869b0f73ef6fea3dd2716573c4c3a1c
describe
'85620' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBW' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
0d64b8b98926d388ec7407ac998f15fa
d750c4c20a675d33821983169a65ccf36aeef112
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2133752' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBX' 'sip-files00074.tif'
79188c57958bd42d57c2812f42a2f52d
1100cdc5624d914f5b1ce12abe203d32ece13c99
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBY' 'sip-files00074.txt'
5a09b4c0d9fb9506e33cfac54c37f65f
5c413c7ef9c17c82212e5456bd7772d570406789
describe
'263879' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWBZ' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
2c2e970d014903894810432a629b2ef3
ab54f49de414b57a0bea3b02433cd3ceb740e1ad
describe
'211813' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCA' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
3137797a74988065ee051881e4763708
b1436707b32cdeba32cd9ec5797a3b0089491d6f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28082' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCB' 'sip-files00075.pro'
704b30ac265292a50db0f4140a5c4301
3ca244dd730c6fe9f0e0d9e61fc98f23b25133e4
describe
'84306' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCC' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
6f32621ac759cd7fe78740f30fdaec56
57cf00da5bf4714ec9867f7be3e30f1ac8aedb50
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2123596' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCD' 'sip-files00075.tif'
851483a977f61059e29bd9042efbb766
6a54dc2a89c9312c47e9e69e60b5a068cfdd3c8f
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCE' 'sip-files00075.txt'
7a43230d4d7273c7931486aa50f62fa7
56dc4294e5b8e77af4ffd6ad0566b38cb59898f5
describe
'266608' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCF' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
6f7a250b568374201b411a257f326822
6ce4ff4903cc84e7df25c9e624f8ff853d35e840
describe
'116835' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCG' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
e6bf95ab39a9ee1a269d1ffe40ac878c
2ea98109fca8747bde23ce39e436e777c3bd3f3b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'11629' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCH' 'sip-files00076.pro'
46fb2ba3fa82f6696acf522f175e8044
ae8646253629411a7825248e26b9489ee2f4d4bf
describe
'46148' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCI' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
dad2fc0294d137c21a534a49d37b4f86
64d78e771ed292a95cbbcc5ee4a5fe50c6fff155
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2143204' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCJ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
46cd2335b43cf5cd66f46db094500d83
3dc85c5ec02d713738caebd80bd0ad5ffcaa9462
describe
'519' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCK' 'sip-files00076.txt'
439df9578efdef6666703c6fbea66ba2
cf3135d8e0f7fbb01c5baa8aa69df705b6602924
describe
Invalid character
'258012' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCL' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
fb3664a0c7b65516b9e90d9ce4279f04
ad818a0d5b3091324c4e8fc04aa8ea0416573d22
describe
'40314' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCM' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
8c7cfdcefef5888d6b3fc331ea2c9b20
63586b667970508f9f3aa35a12c40ba07c069319
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'16364' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCN' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
e60dbd0f36df2f518bd0a3e573089a6b
b4ce1d0a8660e31fdf6968de43d1f672b45aaf63
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2072280' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCO' 'sip-files00077.tif'
b1d31d9e206bf3f3031b4b0ee68508a9
c20f192fc44a8134b75cd73cb9fbd512ba1ae08f
describe
'262842' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCP' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
85c9d3de99d6d46688da57320ae6e981
15b7beecf99a85317627b5026ea2f319552a02d2
describe
'133635' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCQ' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
03266fc775cdbdba6351b24141e5caef
127544449bac9e9440b3e791dcb64e5b18c41d6b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'20734' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCR' 'sip-files00078.pro'
f9ecdc3ca67924f0948fab31b4321cfa
ef7524b59fca3508498999a723524ffaa7fff109
describe
'48890' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCS' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
8aec570118548dd216693cc118a9f45c
bb898156af5a8ce22ce105d40f6a1f361d620b74
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2115056' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCT' 'sip-files00078.tif'
9ceeadc4e2b1feb7f4670b12a5b03331
b4f905a18fc37b456309c7e98f0a357a45f02bbf
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCU' 'sip-files00078.txt'
605517166d7a68447894ca314a8da3c1
306dd8191092303ef9c864601210bb0f22550712
describe
'255802' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCV' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
4af59b907ec5a3a5481441ce6a0db15b
0e61646c7d40dc3c22875b83025fbc9036b8b352
describe
'43071' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCW' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
c5893556373d91d3372da6c28a6b5fa0
5918e2394542c0a26123d2ce2562951301925f34
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'16743' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCX' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
da86065e74391cfd02f6633d52b029d9
e5aad73c286361d6b1b448fc6915cce5ca25a86f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2054668' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCY' 'sip-files00079.tif'
74e642391acd90d3c27aab51b744a5aa
9bd758f1ad3d63a07928d1a5dc5223bbcde6cf5a
'2011-10-12T00:42:35-04:00'
describe
'261744' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWCZ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
eec4d2a9e8e0e8d3589df1ce0c15cc51
83bfed7b6c3bf8e67147c4ab782afd0716e18e3b
describe
'217540' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDA' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
10631a5f3f2892577f51bed48c8a58b6
95dc64efab639fe1316bd6d2bb791fa157f038cd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'21792' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDB' 'sip-files00080.pro'
4706a49523633a2ced91b5e76fd50731
47ac5ecc2f1b1279ca6156761e52b55f55663f19
describe
'83053' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDC' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
fd253c15b2ee7fe64058f8fd7f9da9a4
c753cc849a1ebd7073907a2bb1f81fbedc3f1007
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2106580' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDD' 'sip-files00080.tif'
5d4797e5d5d0c968cdab8f9e73aa70f7
9f698216d7abeef100e29f6cb351b7ea0746f513
describe
'949' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDE' 'sip-files00080.txt'
913d98a88520cab7fcfbba97799d3d81
c35a2c2d4b39de0cdda4cf0cdeccf358bd4d62ed
describe
'265556' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDF' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
30bd2d2fc194cb88606c9ad3b12c8f76
9a7715a143255703db42dd7a900d681943d080bb
describe
'222100' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDG' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
9aa62b5eb51ec8950e956da6a99079e8
b87386cbddaf3f3ceb2ff91313049cf360f464b9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29697' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDH' 'sip-files00081.pro'
e0b7a96dcfd1b73e93d7c53a89af67cc
05adcf1a288efd90f9304ccf4a4fc45f8009ee44
describe
'85627' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDI' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
30ce9547698614f50e0c53bca1900d52
ee817f15463388d0355619055903c609550d0b57
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2137224' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDJ' 'sip-files00081.tif'
f1a9d310e73718b3ebbd9e6997b68725
28edb0c5669cd16e8642b7f099fc72c9ba1b9def
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDK' 'sip-files00081.txt'
12fb7046c5b3f216ee017a160213b850
a76ddea6504584112eeb7385b6f07e8eb5d2e8a3
describe
'259741' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDL' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
f972f0616e2a05641ccf8b5440eded28
f9cf2c33473c4cfd365de932ea3ea999ec247eac
describe
'199007' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDM' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
4248dba39c1ce2bbd14471bbbc46a647
6f921e72152ef2ac1069bad22ac6de017f3dc8f7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29482' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDN' 'sip-files00082.pro'
88740f0544404eb5b5889e16b91bab95
fb915c04b5e27312b6b9bd869464d9be80ec09dc
describe
'76571' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDO' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
26c0d8445ce67aa5b48c665e8423a340
c825a4aa787835d299724aaacc7621a557c1ef1e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2090140' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDP' 'sip-files00082.tif'
1cebb0196f88ea07a6cc6888e8a16932
1132226d3b3d22ebf872c6879a37d27f95d8d916
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDQ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
d09c79550c7ec08f753e6ff063791a21
c848831abb9aad51fc51cc13eea2ec6bca7c7815
describe
'256950' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDR' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
5d939c1ad1a25701cebb97d32b69df68
47d788649b0e57d033808940fbd7d949328cda84
describe
'204772' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDS' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
71daa605ad0d100abbb3ec238ba27fd3
d24119dfffda3c25308fd2a1681ed98377859212
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29714' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDT' 'sip-files00083.pro'
2b16ffc238ded746b1b647cf91d4732c
be9d20d46f398ce41901f3be09f3ef54b0b60e31
describe
'77500' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDU' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
8295a47c20e10ba797d69a20fcdc387f
0176c7460f2cea78729fcb4cc8b26ab631ea0b89
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2067456' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDV' 'sip-files00083.tif'
e229cedffda2ad2e8fffe60e748aa4c2
a59b6ea9d3633d4912a30816894356b07cc36118
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDW' 'sip-files00083.txt'
dfadfc1060c2ec5c55e6b9fe603dcfbf
a1cd5d19bf8014105f8b1167fc7f7c7d64ef052f
describe
'262915' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDX' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
fb87554a2817f31f94e62fb55722dcff
3a14c01af7baa1482c58aeb1c973c67de1e01ee6
describe
'199068' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDY' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
da77ac1f03eb8daf48b002aad52da8f9
96d062308050e324869f5ed68a174bd8315c973c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25066' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWDZ' 'sip-files00084.pro'
1d274bb333106dbc2ead706b513cd709
5c27f9f82ab28c133a3ce519dca910d6ce82dcea
describe
'79885' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEA' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
7bd039a8203490c5db11846d3f2040a0
254e6939de0e45d40a7cecdd38dec9206d69d11a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2115980' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEB' 'sip-files00084.tif'
101379fd99fe002a401e2445717c33f5
84ebed1b33ce2eea684a6f1c676c47ea28da4d4f
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEC' 'sip-files00084.txt'
55bb02801e3041749058ab7bce61d667
eb3d81d35c3d83ed5fe2c7a2a4ddd3962097315b
describe
'265569' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWED' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
bf405db8f2eadf1c7e1dd026e96cf656
3f7c63410cd690faa5656ec4493a3319417a2c6e
describe
'206157' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEE' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
edd5eac8ef3b357318daf9e5b50d11de
d913417b8abfaff060042ad6f7a8654a83636c3d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27098' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEF' 'sip-files00085.pro'
ffe5b1e45d85d92be991815b0ad6738d
c935881fa1f5655f3634d1abe91c11eb042e064c
describe
'82987' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEG' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
48fb981941cb84cd7365de6360d6017b
e52e565a01052f64fb035b61b1d4106c2b41e12c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2137120' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEH' 'sip-files00085.tif'
156084176d97b329658f8d2401604252
cb33526da8e5b2c0637d1f9f602997def6863b31
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEI' 'sip-files00085.txt'
4783402845227bd304857ab223f14e80
778a103873a5004dac9caf3a6b2ebc4e822e7856
describe
'265991' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEJ' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
b882c749bfb1b56c9efb3dd1ef064f6f
012e856264651f22ee11e2d5ef189c64463be4b3
describe
'193769' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEK' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
eda1a6cdbafa0443559cdb49d1424d60
612f40ec438ceb4595b8c9077b43306df8f87c5b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26071' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEL' 'sip-files00086.pro'
c9a3b7e10a5bb95023c9a723d1537173
75bc8986b8b343c0b9ab5dd9f277db213af848a9
describe
'77566' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEM' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
54ac26df7d190fb5bfb7c99de5dd9977
fe480783d73fe7ed1d96289485751da420c73473
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2141136' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEN' 'sip-files00086.tif'
8a5b2cd8348c7b1ad949b5698ecdfcda
ed5ffc947ff8f766cc56c4910d7ee5e38c27b2df
describe
'1060' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEO' 'sip-files00086.txt'
37eb7a891eb14c165fa1e3fe23474172
ea0140614749b11d9e4ae7bba8e941fe174a2ccb
describe
'263396' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEP' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
ee9c2c727bb42227df305bd3dd558245
abd44b5ce4bab566cdb7201eb8ef9486ee8293ed
describe
'228822' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEQ' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
538cfcb29c486f06e9ebba8adc4a4b2f
9432d83ba736e3badd217998d4ea8d35c51748ba
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29544' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWER' 'sip-files00087.pro'
5e78655ca905b5d922dca47e86bdc8c0
138e19b021f6109d615eb6353ae4edc7da8786fd
describe
'90466' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWES' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
2d6166bc6393ba6b8ab8bf61958c5c58
b0d7558a0579910c5445c631f2f97158fe0ce26b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2119888' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWET' 'sip-files00087.tif'
3561fcd87cdc756d42735b9108ca81e6
26fca555ca4603639aa2a5f766ee3b18df9ca3bc
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEU' 'sip-files00087.txt'
913ca2683799f90ae8ae9e4729099356
7e6acdffde1bae6759ac210d5b5eef2055e52209
describe
'265336' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEV' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
a646201fd3e4effe08f8cb3ff518bf36
37adaf19ddaff02a49b95849192f2fd69b67002c
describe
'230458' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEW' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
03b5d66033627fa836bc3c70355af05b
e662ebfbf8907ca841121619229b1f0384acd6c8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30474' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEX' 'sip-files00088.pro'
ede664e62e65783e654d11edced23fdd
b6cd516edc8662c6a0c3438355e78be387e687b3
describe
'90018' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEY' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
74746865c737962627ae3a3d9849fe8a
abaf92922973e9f791cde2cb554fd22e524d476c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2136068' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWEZ' 'sip-files00088.tif'
58847a671fc96f0c521f06eaaf7ff542
ce3f1e574d742d4d37f9eacf1de43692988b925e
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFA' 'sip-files00088.txt'
1dac6e29624df9da6f754f518d420885
d8b024f8e14b31fc6055525413f4aa835c46642d
describe
'263340' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFB' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
ba50b73aba354ff80ae34af172007d67
681a10a3e2e2bd83626cee70ac188c84bf564c17
describe
'231494' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFC' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
19bc155a863ab43e6840f1ba3fe7ba7e
641f5e5484e7a83374a412562590b49f54fe10e6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30391' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFD' 'sip-files00089.pro'
f5dcee6a36c50fc161b43219e257cf4a
037bcd729f71f132bf5b7f4b4ac2002a88ed70e8
describe
'91799' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFE' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
3688c6b9a6f81a3da46b36387d1c49c3
548e09e864182d62142c8ec0f47e123184d4a367
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2119884' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFF' 'sip-files00089.tif'
234be10bed7f5b4bb977245c24a19c70
40457135da8df534b0a06952cbd5f9cdfd95c2db
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFG' 'sip-files00089.txt'
abe8bb912ae8858cdbbb7676df1d4a3d
c316fe006cb89a440b3e0460aa224cabcf14e2d7
describe
'258804' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFH' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
b439989626ccca9811a02d607d8b5522
a5f0cbfeb64c9b7f201e6e2f5b784c4ecb49d235
describe
'227562' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFI' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
60cee72fe255100461439e106a684478
01bf3b253a3515c87ccd17552e24cf5d1a91d5a9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30388' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFJ' 'sip-files00090.pro'
6b1cd75d92b4b75b61a62a5dfdf7a589
cd60ce5f8990b337c033a49cc1cbbc7f8cccd47b
describe
'88413' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFK' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
ed54ef31f0f2e3977c7d3baf780f8299
b1ebdd2d95989289fe2ca0a6abafac83b3eb0a0f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2083536' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFL' 'sip-files00090.tif'
06ce3d403c112de44ddd2e4d8289f09a
ac197ae607e9fdf007100cc0e8ee5ec497899f03
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFM' 'sip-files00090.txt'
2212503985138f796f98761f2bdee29c
c2728c2a55d80c215e3a9e92505375d700af40f8
describe
'254396' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFN' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
aff2b0e56d690cb08d557ba2a7be49bd
57ba7c59656c25e7675db525bcad9d2bd98b198b
describe
'238044' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFO' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
52a44f81d4f1f3d662d8091d19fdc5f0
971117f5a5b2ed1b26a9b1bbf6098c3abc00ff82
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30947' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFP' 'sip-files00091.pro'
7e4e6fc11bf39213ebbb57473ea5f5f6
3dbcfa04e0ee472686a57a97e9c5f24ebcaf4ba5
describe
'93253' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFQ' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
38faa4024c75d0733521ba3593999031
c9923b8b719fa2c6ae9d64fe8c238f5fb8f1a4b3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2048280' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFR' 'sip-files00091.tif'
10fe8e15bd83407b21fd7b9c9998c2f3
5d9da581b33b340859f7e87c1c5ff318dc9e7bda
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFS' 'sip-files00091.txt'
e9c476d8ee11dae8cc83d768f2e2f639
0c11307e8d999019cbb23e03a723bf7485d5bcc4
describe
'263356' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFT' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
408d6ba16372f6f84857c1e3f0e0ca0e
39681d0ac3ceda3a2eb8d3f0a9a5dd2df69047fa
describe
'237195' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFU' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
301b8451c0d83100a89a7cc9ef58db15
913389348b7d44c7124f5f948b42865f66f8d98d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'31822' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFV' 'sip-files00092.pro'
977a203cba6e2c304e3f9e00278255fe
cd43bd7e01fb43baca76a393b5237a8f04f099ec
describe
'92185' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFW' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
fd4fb6922ec2d9cae99c9faac229d341
6728819c966221c731ac90415c683e86cc7722f3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2119928' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFX' 'sip-files00092.tif'
758aab787ca26e608b40c6f168c1ded2
8c6e9397e88877cd2cbc4c3ec9d85e8a3750f3a1
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFY' 'sip-files00092.txt'
57756b521141a16a27d3eb54d6308b9e
710b32dd40887f8ba4aa486948c914f73fe57767
describe
'263057' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWFZ' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
8dd18070267e5f73386eb3199a4afacc
b40b799b929d6cdefb81a76fc359b5e7cc9bf919
describe
'217622' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGA' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
69ce0138a3aadfb68e144554e462d4a4
aaf67feeff2a1d4e6f81f429f83ded638294d996
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28037' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGB' 'sip-files00093.pro'
a6ad4c7fc46ded8eec28fc31b9bf0b9a
9d75e08a9020b55a55795eb22570ec188f3374f5
describe
'86233' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGC' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
adcc95559711fcb0d3fa5eab8ae8fbb0
21b716333d76b9625b9f85cecefcebdc259fb17c
'2011-10-12T00:42:50-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2117356' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGD' 'sip-files00093.tif'
2b7284c71405931e1bd3109f923e7136
e9f238d829348e243f6cc13329fc98617f5b2b3d
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGE' 'sip-files00093.txt'
a1ea441e732b1bd306d114da8e09bf25
5790845a25a1e54f67a7dff943525e926f727956
describe
'263367' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGF' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
e42b07a80c3c44a08d6dae15cd54de35
d38da0d13a01b577e0680c7e8312964918b84859
describe
'217044' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGG' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
00889df1d21e74ea9a6c7e0858957e53
9a4380971ac999714bebf0ec891a3dcf733d90af
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27736' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGH' 'sip-files00094.pro'
9ea6d1472d718384d2a81ad88194d3e2
7e5a434bf409fe4cc729b87e6e2b0c9d490afe20
describe
'87547' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGI' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
f2a6953046f45a9e2856bed3d9aa9d53
a12ccead78cdc0e99e721cfc603c6915b79df6ad
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2119924' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGJ' 'sip-files00094.tif'
2463857fff4cae16e216de49c972e3d7
82f3ce5c6287fe74231e81a0619ef7654b5cca88
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGK' 'sip-files00094.txt'
ffcef6365cb7dc0842a9da6122d76d4e
2b865eb20c6d623fcd025af4d3cca12973b69ca9
describe
'257149' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGL' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
45c71efc4d451b52f5d365dbecd2d6a9
35b4f0d83ec5ad954a7e163ad638b904ff054730
describe
'187740' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGM' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
85bcc40c916dc32f804f1eb2b4b8b0a1
078d49d71cfb2f8f67702cdd0c8d0b974fbb1b51
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'21646' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGN' 'sip-files00095.pro'
fdad2ead5e1d3d20e41cebe2d1478be2
a1806852139422a237d0b10d499bc80eebf7ac09
describe
'73142' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGO' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
62fe78a15c9e95aef5232537db9e7a99
f7d83dfb82e4189c7eefb43c0dc1fb487f44fb0a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2069084' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGP' 'sip-files00095.tif'
0391f0982c912707aff271d508576ee5
4ee9a0b95296c56987d01e34b19aaed38be4152c
describe
'887' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGQ' 'sip-files00095.txt'
df06fa15f8ee90834c1da66d9c04ea40
182cf5e26c6dfba728e14e01a0b39c8d07e1237e
'2011-10-12T00:43:55-04:00'
describe
'264206' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGR' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
06d9f7bf7d72d62bee6bb352cb53d833
451422950e240577b847505f0b290701bfadf872
describe
'110622' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGS' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
92aac3d589d0127ca970bff433f8ac2f
2c52400e2df7f34f0f90331f822015f270908d3b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'14796' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGT' 'sip-files00096.pro'
3d565e79f198d07d2d86cb6d5818b8f4
5df598ef27c6b6dec4efa5d3f788e836fd8730fb
describe
'41092' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGU' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
88c58315b3ab4a45b343f26eb86e2ec5
d1b63736a480737373b86428491aaccb487b61c0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2123580' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGV' 'sip-files00096.tif'
1183a9bea4b538bb9c7e1dba69a52031
94c4f3bf7006f48cd3dc5f5eca31c13562a70149
describe
'943' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGW' 'sip-files00096.txt'
633c92616d6849298dcb50e25be282c9
f4eca46306f8dee5d30481972c861368adc9443b
describe
'260579' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGX' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
60fc1808dfcb08a59266829eb5e47e2c
e5da2586cae00ef1a5e6e8d15aa870761523d68f
describe
'41307' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGY' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
fde75bc36bd7a73b91dbd6e93a3dbd6f
1608f222a8f18b0ce6044b9183095b71717458eb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'16913' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWGZ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
1cfd97a72bd4f6e2c11b45bb47bf79b2
105642ce50f1c4f83fbaacaecfa99c71f97a1a99
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2093100' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHA' 'sip-files00097.tif'
c80e147dcccb06544e7b17049d51c381
30453356bd3b8141f43613d8abf2fecf6bc6d5b0
describe
'262949' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHB' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
08c76ade14b7262414dec08a17c482de
8d27b88b52a483d3d3283ad51368a31b1129a869
describe
'206389' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHC' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
d866b134f3935f71830b7e57591bcf8a
b41bc66757a1c0cde5c180324a62c916dc69c0f7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'20252' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHD' 'sip-files00098.pro'
c0730e60e59f3ec049cbbddb21517f5f
4197abb0d016cc121c1da87fa2cb37b853051bed
describe
'80011' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHE' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
d4baf204992f51cccc1e92ece83f92c4
46fcaa394875640a4d04676c7e49009b5add4519
'2011-10-12T00:45:21-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2116368' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHF' 'sip-files00098.tif'
2701fdf8bb82128397f40cebbf0689dd
6b5770d54235ce8bd413c446a1d04f6c384a913a
describe
'853' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHG' 'sip-files00098.txt'
5a87b02681d2ce70861a8ea90347b1a1
e56f449cd4a5c136d7eee57c8cb6c313a9713bfb
describe
'266876' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHH' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
0c8ef429b7454e1e4e05777b2ea42937
93af6ab74bfebe3696450a66045632b8e07ad8e7
describe
'221136' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHI' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
44f7da2e36d918ad4e7a2ab92f677999
66e5c34f2ee91fffdd2626deec12d9103f79e85a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28087' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHJ' 'sip-files00099.pro'
3761a74febdadd594520c5676ca738ad
98c1bfea4f727e81f7a915002aaddb8d89ea5e04
describe
'85015' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHK' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
5c7aa0ed3effd2055b763dd772bfa65c
844fea564dc535ff428e79a477b362bbc30b657e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2147840' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHL' 'sip-files00099.tif'
7b52466e736fe10b24707ffc79b8098e
4457f3bc1db6e9d70d526c8f0bf81d5c451f57c7
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHM' 'sip-files00099.txt'
b2502e5f462b9a021831fea8def3cafa
a2f7c101f36e0f775bf8f4b3a965aac3555b3722
describe
'252125' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHN' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
7c99b2fa75575b9c3bd9b3e7ec3de2d9
dcf12fef76f9b4754b136a02b4b22373192cd99a
describe
'209818' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHO' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
48e9637a8a29165cf641057841e35b58
4137f4ef4ac1012813551888236052a871b3d3d1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26852' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHP' 'sip-files00100.pro'
95d386b43a1a42c64924d23fad440cb5
8ddbc0aaca8316505f9549b0c1e825a779a095f0
describe
'82080' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHQ' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
593ac2032513395238e82c8c8dc6125b
91ad92bb4461d6da82e3e370b470446753becbfe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2030692' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHR' 'sip-files00100.tif'
bf2cb28ec8309b491174e5d9be930181
fe130287b2827334d9f1a8fd6c458817e79784c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHS' 'sip-files00100.txt'
dede8dd5a245f7a79c7af2b481b05333
d524c07f1080bdfe82c581e9aa7949f3c3a55c53
describe
'267238' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHT' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
047de04c2c23898e59409bca107d75c0
560dbccf1fd55bb662da8fb083e6126bc211617e
describe
'219624' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHU' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
cef7e852148d7b518d1a07df79ac78d8
10f10aae7d338b0b79890b4132d7910e082445dc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30400' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHV' 'sip-files00101.pro'
9b71db7f4a47970992853856fcb0a00c
676eac88497cb527102e471b13da7c711d87234f
describe
'87238' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHW' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
4633b720b13573a566271782e8b8b679
c7615de1aa4650f348b34f4953d2ed59535871f3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2150432' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHX' 'sip-files00101.tif'
fa50fde4009f98967912e215ca0c8fd5
0a5f96c7c109af5533724242f1e76aa83190895b
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHY' 'sip-files00101.txt'
646c44271902214959869fb2c63414b1
08134b97a638b7435a7ef616b7c10e09f2e5676b
describe
'268669' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWHZ' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
05da824967a2bf9322d959ad4e69c49c
f693d9f832a35239d4689b8c8b6b314a0cce7c90
describe
'208497' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIA' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
9c0286405d0b3de6a883416928ffc1b4
1363f91d2a8e7dfa480c0624e22a368554fe3a31
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28580' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIB' 'sip-files00102.pro'
1f7642b85ebda8e41afca29d4bc924e0
1b94f7e531f3fe4fff7a131216063179424e8094
describe
'82075' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIC' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
b4a1b5ecea3d135e66f58a6493ff0a39
8089c4729b6f94cdd8c074cd021114ea924d6574
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2161980' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWID' 'sip-files00102.tif'
4045e33058b9dafa83868296481dc10d
e24d5107ac10141d6070d8bc16bd1e5fe0a7f166
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIE' 'sip-files00102.txt'
432f70d3fb4536bd3bd0b97c3573aac4
6f43d1bcc2d8e5cdb24bda868fd0ee5c1fac9ac3
describe
'262588' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIF' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
4ec45501b39629b86b11f44bcd40936d
05b5399eba6689296aa40b990239991ab8ad5422
describe
'218109' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIG' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
b6bf5b2dc574637ca137b399d3fede62
e79f06743a732c1fce9cce494ef5696044d9e7e8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29424' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIH' 'sip-files00103.pro'
1920a526bfc9446cf8408184d24798fd
4e3172f3e0a768c3512c4332b0861736c6e36dc0
describe
'84307' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWII' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
b7b10cb0a8f2537fdd47b32f2415ac4c
dff01ed949f653f47c9f7f625776e5df9d0bf1e6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2113460' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIJ' 'sip-files00103.tif'
bd2e91e16c7a82aa0e43c761b8926108
7c2b9cb9d378c23f5fdd6e6590c6f5953b811a97
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIK' 'sip-files00103.txt'
6c9bf0726a8d013a32a74f023a47d364
55adf6e1445095234e1e05fb27bb1a07fe4c40a5
describe
'243080' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIL' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
33517635f34e84dd7ac0ec60a749bb44
24ceac4b40ea40888265a94d74d0f3164b31a807
describe
'234576' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIM' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
4806644bbaddd9b933386322506a5743
1111f84f726fe034c079ce1fc46d746f566e7e89
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29548' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIN' 'sip-files00104.pro'
a3e745e8e39feae8bd96c9dd41640789
2f59e86903fb6a5ce7e892c290c6cc772f7b9ac0
describe
'99667' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIO' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
583069af2374a1e329a56d37c21352ad
ad3e0eb7e8ffd4beed58a709a2ab0919c9093e89
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1957708' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIP' 'sip-files00104.tif'
03c9021fa7c1546fcdf919b92902425a
425a4add5f5c3384628ce0be790e652444189953
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIQ' 'sip-files00104.txt'
4c7ee7149330248ee05e1832b000bdc3
2705ce2fda6fcc8e46938dd113abd3127281b774
describe
'253232' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIR' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
642074c424417586a8e42ca112f4afbb
4bd8ba2e08574f8c82746fc812d71c57cba31e0b
describe
'220720' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIS' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
0cddea72b495d2f87a6852777187dc45
0abaa7806d6ee0846cc5f4e59cf5206d3947a225
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29598' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIT' 'sip-files00105.pro'
1d99633ae475cedaae1160ca7427d479
de754d2d4016648c6b560f992f8868ce931a6b93
'2011-10-12T00:42:42-04:00'
describe
'86933' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIU' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
23af4eec17795e46c9edd5b53900e85e
b24e16b0d1a912998c1c58dd3dfd118977ced7cc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2038672' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIV' 'sip-files00105.tif'
ed2d967f90458fd6f7f169e1b6cef9f6
1c4e1ad2884cba51146e9ddc057101445e18a3cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIW' 'sip-files00105.txt'
8c644da5c38f3fae9458c229a904bfd4
a23a17d30b228b062d42ef5a7b618d458a42b49f
'2011-10-12T00:43:34-04:00'
describe
'246975' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIX' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
72b6306242cb5fcb6a02344ac581503b
f5d4ac6fb2fd7a0dcf079de9e27d4b66cb49ce72
describe
'234888' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIY' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
5bf1c1443e586dd6dc0b01e018ce5b9c
3ae9670bb4c4e905b3d4bd318c4f7a414e699270
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29712' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWIZ' 'sip-files00106.pro'
78c99b60e79a7d14e2ae5817b3513a5f
cefbca8b8841d6232442b3107b182a6f0080f6a6
describe
'91658' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJA' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
c106c1cf7aa2c0fa5908c645a653098a
327b03d559a822b1e95d6311db08fa7a78341ea4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1988928' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJB' 'sip-files00106.tif'
ee593f3798777cd701810f84ff17571b
ecf12d16d1929126cfb8965d1ec0810ac7571a49
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJC' 'sip-files00106.txt'
d83a6c79df3d69b09231bab5bffe6655
40d960b827461fcf360297bd0aae7fa1b9267875
describe
'252915' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJD' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
6e3bb75f2b12e33faaad9b3be5a99a52
134e17913a6a2ce3c742588bc005ca54c6f260f9
describe
'225919' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJE' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
cc7acab9d14f205a073c6e2b5b64a8a9
3f5d0b6e4da96d04e720cd0be717e51210c78301
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29418' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJF' 'sip-files00107.pro'
b4b1925b94ad92463a659ced621d1f60
0a7c0cd3fde1df8abc5ae8881d4259967523123c
describe
'89615' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJG' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
7fc2382905cb632c22acf98c2e5e3172
beb0f0e80f6128ece662ba2429c6d68beddee61f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2036296' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJH' 'sip-files00107.tif'
971360491cf36ce8727416004bc63e6c
f869a21cab0bff3e38a7f5b14aa9e011a4b5bdda
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJI' 'sip-files00107.txt'
ac0ccb26a7c19dab29024814d4e8d1f3
277c7e82a89952c16f5dca4364e042ceb6cae81f
describe
'267103' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJJ' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
eb860924240b540777766920b6c05895
067d33797b8557f1cf64ed3c0d20d4644ccd93c9
describe
'209115' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJK' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
1fa6886093d15c1ca5c97832f61cb8de
bae71ec8245fb87d9a5c1256590d35e1bb34e935
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28059' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJL' 'sip-files00108.pro'
1ee74b21435d8c238f5feb874118b2bb
aca32acddee534ca3f9b41f00a4e2c0248abe681
describe
'83854' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJM' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
40849762ad36904c0f0f5da080c7f827
eb35be4525ea7ebf35ff2fccf60ce5709cb41754
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2149288' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJN' 'sip-files00108.tif'
3a52bf3bddb3e1fde606924ff97cf39d
8c53bb9819c471a19da507df55199e945d4c82b0
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJO' 'sip-files00108.txt'
12e34b3331c1eef6d8b34f4f34c405bc
7994ed21b13587654b65580f59cf97acbf361456
describe
'245886' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJP' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
9d15a1b07f05a227cc32150518441f85
e0fe5e3d7bde53b0e3228beb7e13e7f5e0e22fd7
describe
'230104' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJQ' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
44bc8ac8d6084297823a474053264ffd
5dd87c48e6b892d9f53d2c8246e4860521f1b9ee
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29516' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJR' 'sip-files00109.pro'
c3363950bddcf51fab234aabcf4e8628
803c29680adf514c5d5dcea110fcef76786936dd
describe
'89716' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJS' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
0cdbc3c137ef6102905f0caf7a5acfc2
f9f84251dad951b645b3e5a85c08a4f8652a1adb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1980924' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJT' 'sip-files00109.tif'
12e409ae406689b33d9f06c37a708a8f
8c0b875271da499aba62e0c7b81cc04e4a2ee429
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJU' 'sip-files00109.txt'
23bbc17c1e01e8ac7cb7558218e56a4e
fdc8a5f161e6da694d0e84318a13d3b2523c0337
describe
'261706' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJV' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
9822512f660e3df3e5fdf796e66772d8
4c1c114f9305254b9acf2a1c218bcfaad298ca5e
describe
'207636' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJW' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
cb908d56dc4d0863101b0aff63d2eae3
f348534f59d9ae6f74aaad42904e1121cd139fb8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28137' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJX' 'sip-files00110.pro'
28bc5bae3e4e297e7db354cf0fcb4bf1
742ba726c63361030a920832c3d75bb6834c53f4
describe
'82780' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJY' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
e12210805276e9026c397cd7e064f442
309cae01c4e22bbeadceb3b59146cbce045dcd82
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2106604' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWJZ' 'sip-files00110.tif'
55482d8457b26856f44d90a657141507
6d8af26df7a647d365afac02d444149c65557471
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKA' 'sip-files00110.txt'
90156a8b073d691fc4227b9f68cad548
be6d3faa4c2756e70757cd52909e5043f1212d9d
describe
'256908' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKB' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
80112ba813bcaa1a140bc8591f300f6f
1fd1840bbc9425c32f6d99358bdf3cb84dfaf6ac
describe
'216880' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKC' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
3c4ea244df611f5ac2e40b21b4a49cd5
35f3e9300bf91034587b8158dac47fcf625bf075
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29285' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKD' 'sip-files00111.pro'
18b4ba325fe468dd7e6153a2886973df
d71fc8da4271db2bd5b4fe0f79b24d02b787681e
describe
'84894' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKE' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
26d135da65277d64d994b229383f4f2f
0daa796a72958bc2a8b6a368b77246c916530b27
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2067984' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKF' 'sip-files00111.tif'
0d0153aa4a6580ae6cce7eaae84d6ba6
c1e27906dbc2c4859dadcecc2e49f8270af779b4
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKG' 'sip-files00111.txt'
94c9f544bee181aad9b8c8fe40ad7bf5
2abdcad2c8cfa773e99bd145ab0d3b49aaceaabd
describe
'258902' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKH' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
df8f3ff9076a4718067eb9a76a2df866
cf85caf0d2485bd4e82513be5728766fb1b98399
describe
'202976' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKI' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
411d06508eda9c6a6afa0d61381aa69a
1fc5c952891a2dccb4d91e531fa4eec7926c0ee4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26896' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKJ' 'sip-files00112.pro'
35a9619475c1ee48e26d0cbd3f6bac27
b7a5b72e906ade9efb36bcbc3db87cd7c3ac3695
describe
'79735' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKK' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
b68710af83a3a4b8d81c91b9d747233d
d1764df2fcaf2b346305bc640cd6fe6a831981bb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2083416' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKL' 'sip-files00112.tif'
8332e366e970a51241f30736e5de83c2
7db76f5346af0c048f48c522b3b4f88045aabcc6
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKM' 'sip-files00112.txt'
44c960a7fa928a8ad6d06439369ea947
e0fa4d9e94f83498f1683f5ae0fa05e94edaf84f
describe
Invalid character
'260934' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKN' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
c135e1eb4cfaa7059b12c7ea44dff756
8640b2fbd6c04d2e178219090e2c08cd848b0196
describe
'105445' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKO' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
5a1f4cd130d97e41facfa5d14882bb81
687851fa66a38c7e26a59652473bab0d28c3276e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'15448' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKP' 'sip-files00113.pro'
c818b196c0c26d94b1dc4e09421cd336
93d702c90bf123b08b4e25bffdace6f1b998a3ec
describe
'37666' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKQ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
9c7a264cea9db181478dec9ba3d47230
98471c28c10b7087308afde8c6d89d898ea61d2d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2096940' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKR' 'sip-files00113.tif'
2c4ac89e8956c4d686315fdd5fb72764
052b515716e06d59856ccbe2387fa02de874b5d3
describe
'784' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKS' 'sip-files00113.txt'
9d1e292b3b7b3e689ab2e4c9890a3b9b
b2685423729fda601e6ba612016d5cf830e16cb5
describe
'259780' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKT' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
7ae811825af30c16ea1741077b5af61e
b74e5d648fd887c9d41faee7d293b018721d950c
describe
'114471' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKU' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
2e02bf827ecbe97e35794697c31a7d1b
0cab7e89c0522d45081f3303cf69414af35744d8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'15923' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKV' 'sip-files00114.pro'
d28d4f34ba2471f509cca69b36b24514
643469f3950234364ee858e71cfc971d82ac1425
describe
'42557' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKW' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
23fdab96e2993bd0130cd95d62ff48aa
44b6fff325d7f80bd347538e4ccc9842d356621c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2088424' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKX' 'sip-files00114.tif'
572cc7ce8a1d3126ee6e23c45c8e1789
d56d011c5797a92c6ac8cfd2cb462472dabcb878
describe
'882' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKY' 'sip-files00114.txt'
d1c26b9cddb64967b6e6e893b82f271d
c063c7c3bc322314b2b1be31c67cb45f8813036f
describe
'257684' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWKZ' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
263345d31a5f7cc9cd966f2e3b5da244
1cf8811bbc903e6a283bc1b6aea9007ef44182ac
describe
'52455' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLA' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
d5acb81534ab55536b5112fb8716b72f
f0a4014807a188f5e7649cb26977203c097e01a3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'19100' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLB' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
41490325bc8e2148db81d393af5ad270
48a3a096a7003bfc7235f3edc7c99ec5e4f66c62
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2073104' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLC' 'sip-files00115.tif'
596301aa5a055aef94254b106cfc6ddb
cd5e95c8a369cfc6605549f1973c9cafccee687d
describe
'257483' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLD' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
08a93c61ede196181936b3b99379b97e
abd7edfad6657fcc9aedc904826c0af404324e1a
describe
'219336' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLE' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
5e8c73ba4a016d4225f6ca54c54ab8eb
69a6e8ee2ab60dab3cb1db9de8cad4deee477787
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'20751' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLF' 'sip-files00116.pro'
c67f16253dca298118c042b0d13f6248
6cb6c468a666d10e74c6cd414bdab61f609ea296
describe
'81793' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLG' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
14b08327461527b8eabc0abe5eadd0a9
0fc972351ed4a1bbb79046f815a0ced1a6e0482c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2072200' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLH' 'sip-files00116.tif'
0d4b30e2f168a3b09c81f9b6a6071ca1
3521c0ddaaaa5cfe498a7e4da5c6b9567962e891
describe
'906' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLI' 'sip-files00116.txt'
9215f871582a9fdd6d8944fd94d02bec
44181a174b984993156851344160aeb018a712e8
describe
'258700' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLJ' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
ab40ed763b70a1db35f4e0bf37004613
de7e4981572f41a9609e9e803852a9aba610e070
describe
'232227' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLK' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
e074050015dd3df1142906d5577e67c1
cfd37e1bfa32b63df67b8f03b85a24c64bf65f85
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30324' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLL' 'sip-files00117.pro'
0796b6b7fcb1dd981c8853736d60e476
6fb6552f6bba2ebf27a6c837c174e525a05c884d
describe
'90699' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLM' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
4d6e6f7779da50a05daa3bd2e4de03d9
31c1a90384aefce74b8ce32e5cb08d0a24f4a7b8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2082404' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLN' 'sip-files00117.tif'
55566fa6fce9d36df0bb3d61c8635834
78aaa69aa998aabef579f40a7ace4018188de40a
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLO' 'sip-files00117.txt'
831a595c14c13e0197eb9526c6e9cb98
4b828924cae5c99b45f464041293e0a700dc9f1e
describe
'266258' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLP' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
6785aa993336bb7f1459e5d5e74b0213
5a9811027675ebef88d0973a8a50be994c144266
describe
'228235' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLQ' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
884f338eccdb8ef581189059a13e324a
507759e3bf5698d56c0fb4259cc12729b3bee388
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30431' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLR' 'sip-files00118.pro'
0c0a77f82a7199490d9b477fd6869fd2
5c9e21167aaa98eddb50f2654bc7cd709efc3187
describe
'88691' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLS' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
eadc8f61698251a3d7adc7f0cc68c34f
c07d27f9c12a2894bb87062c8268038cb8b67186
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2142952' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLT' 'sip-files00118.tif'
788212a5ebfd0784fbd75c5882f28337
aaab688a547e7b58b39ef9395d8df7287ea4a50d
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLU' 'sip-files00118.txt'
19dec76bfe7f575627a49fb01a4db860
c6d6e55680ed27e74974b433396efa4a68720d3e
describe
'261785' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLV' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
0e08a1a228dffbccc9c16199a39227f3
b0a9f774c729cf34453b668c52c95f1273a8e7e5
describe
'222289' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLW' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
8571faa484e987875d3a47cf2929fa4a
458364b29089a71e555f0afca069694b4e0b12f1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29774' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLX' 'sip-files00119.pro'
be9b622e74f2e0897f884bfbf3267a74
af79ba58daba7d24c175487d11d41bad78c1f33b
describe
'86652' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLY' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
6a6e8728babf0d6a204d50b17f70870c
e4cabe5336adeb352421012a68d89b6a21d12863
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2106880' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWLZ' 'sip-files00119.tif'
6417fbe2f40969db1b31fc9edb3536b0
e02a43193607f3aceeedc243ce72ab12c663eed8
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMA' 'sip-files00119.txt'
05a156dbc2bf1567f163fe4ecb2cfce3
a93a93b4b5bca8b4e5d194db05d92f04138766f3
describe
'246806' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMB' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
aa85e474bb177ecd111aba03edf21686
86f2c0112670c0c0bbcae3519d4be301b0886100
describe
'223402' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMC' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
21c760236297f2a436e58c3955b4c129
6ddf5ec7656479657760cd1ad702abeacc273d0c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28468' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMD' 'sip-files00120.pro'
e24727dc492033b9ef151dd4e54caeea
2f86b2f14598da996fe61f104750c1e22daabdc4
describe
'86379' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWME' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
b31ae74977a4d67a5c9501f81d31c13e
bd4fdfb971f08ec1f3eedb77701ebead68558ff9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1987380' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMF' 'sip-files00120.tif'
36ae9c59cee389036cc48bf411463630
b832be47679aea6720b3cb0b506355c714093bcc
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMG' 'sip-files00120.txt'
22dbb9b2108562c1e4a99db3b5fe1d59
cf6a0e06c825007dcc26ff11d6fb704204da8e72
describe
'248124' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMH' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
d49a5e62ba6c7ae33c9b6d63a5110ed7
8e086a3f4f466fb8644bda0292bc4f7099f6ae7a
describe
'223771' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMI' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
fd5d487f2768d2030dec6319a70303a4
138cc3762907d1440f4896abe6417de4399ae89e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28265' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMJ' 'sip-files00121.pro'
c107b12c2c0c855944b032dba2aa5141
4cb897c4972ae5b07e4640677b08da360eef77f2
describe
'88837' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMK' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
811b6538facc6d3184c3e08da94eb08c
eeb7f9fa7c8a9d70da233b8eac5c98aeb82147f3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1998424' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWML' 'sip-files00121.tif'
e42319fc9763715d5bc336a574851521
765d22ed415c3b0c6d8c099e17bee7c0e647b5da
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMM' 'sip-files00121.txt'
87f451b8b3ab1d3684bbf0cd23244122
51a3d59b2ce24f73f8dfc07e18ee9dc43998af2e
describe
'254959' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMN' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
82e61c9321765cad97985d6e15354aa6
ab8d99c15950a6b12fcca97fff1b73e9bdef222d
describe
'234896' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMO' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
c4b19344ddd24f001f94f906ade7b3be
ffc84cfe17d47831baaa1a947e794fd9d11a4299
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29965' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMP' 'sip-files00122.pro'
fec090516a4411d7be846ba15b80cfae
e1b5cba2483549fb74d18857ce8420779dbb0ef4
describe
'93100' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMQ' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
8f89c89e3fc260ffd82a2dbf17700b77
7b8aba8d979871a918f7b34ac37fc57d88549098
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2053028' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMR' 'sip-files00122.tif'
80f1154bd34e8f9e7a2b377f4bfbdef9
3b72bf63046175de78667a7224fdc16253019f27
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMS' 'sip-files00122.txt'
aff008bf77e129e46d913564c7c84451
aff8dc59b336ac72d46dd9b11cd57747e441f293
describe
'261624' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMT' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
663735d8dfbe5824d647dd6e3a22bbe8
ca72839b9af1d46e3c6acf3eb5f1de82d522ff89
describe
'204855' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMU' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
4c11f36257a6cc78df36cbb2697e7720
3541783e78a2f57845695522caa82e2231625abe
'2011-10-12T00:43:35-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26500' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMV' 'sip-files00123.pro'
9ba1204e2a720ee44da0eed1765a215b
53da93ad39005cc8826cfe2446f9f1a1d3894ac1
describe
'81097' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMW' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
eaa8565af338ea92e40432b367d75b66
da572834797eb247a515243e919918c6063884ee
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2105916' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMX' 'sip-files00123.tif'
28648e9546bf4caeac1afd2c45eb55f0
2f16164b47854b5158f06fc88bb489ed646d8b1e
describe
'1089' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMY' 'sip-files00123.txt'
c9dbce2b3fbb1b9e6ab99c6bfd3e7d81
46414e0bffbe0cf4c1ec5f270a7e7efde1b0ab0a
describe
'265407' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWMZ' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
c7a2257794f0e7cc1bac39b93ddbb6df
45c63dc2f6a20def528cce2f5527d6a1aee9f7b2
describe
'206959' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNA' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
032a537c58fc2d7435f19f91019e0e2e
0bae4e83e0d7c4616caf3a002e9dbeee9e047ff1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27492' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNB' 'sip-files00124.pro'
7cef4d73bb6da1d66488cc8b95002cc4
30ddd6f29a2c0d2242d4c26b3ca2b5e181479d71
describe
'82460' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNC' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
fb6fd5e13bb2b5a361da5bfc3a285958
2a17e790ce7a87e27c309acc22d0592da1de5073
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2136140' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWND' 'sip-files00124.tif'
f6c80fb145866749e5f49a26442ab2a0
42b5daf65cacc31e035f1bf1c8690f3f8f5572d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNE' 'sip-files00124.txt'
07905126d02d1fd2388bd50f01ca5b08
4bffb5d0d97d277f154b78316808cb0cc289c40f
describe
'264468' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNF' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
3082eb9945dc08ee1fa4d0cf94028421
ad83fc75583c5829e5527d431326861e8ef57277
describe
'213418' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNG' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
11bdbb221daf0b53930107b18688787b
40531a08a7d4a9f2a3c8a4dd5e1da177584a3f7d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27469' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNH' 'sip-files00125.pro'
6e928290a66c31aa4c91fc2d45297776
3a860df5ba0154a23378554bb25b31bcc6ddd2bd
describe
'85385' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNI' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
3c2fe34c0274db89ec41cd4442871081
585ffba8e1bedef21b0a6a17a1573d77cd149cd0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2128404' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNJ' 'sip-files00125.tif'
f3735c4dda5100d946848225bded24c4
27a87aef197f17cbd98269c726ceaace419c8456
'2011-10-12T00:43:01-04:00'
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNK' 'sip-files00125.txt'
15c131f928f4317a510306cac369a764
fbec3e3d2a26ce55278d49d62bfb9e58bc00bba6
describe
'255308' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNL' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
fef47c125641d8801b1c9de1d28eb58e
e7854b424ad3105d4581802fd85ffe47173fa924
describe
'232216' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNM' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
7f24de74d2d6c96707ac97e67e85fe76
60c148f7081b027a7de24e9bb6a7b3c7c2e97e22
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30022' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNN' 'sip-files00126.pro'
9ad1f650f4565f3029a8f5d654dcb60e
24ed249ddfda5545edd8ff9f7c8ff8160d47142f
describe
'89801' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNO' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
076e1d181824ce8b611072d86315dff6
0b973b338018817c988e43ef3097ffad0fb5dc69
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2055184' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNP' 'sip-files00126.tif'
fd55aeec2338fa803eba0bc081562fb2
5cb7bf1360bfb0cc9d58d39fbacf522482cffeef
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNQ' 'sip-files00126.txt'
cdb31c861cfa6de24d0eeb5641a50617
25dbe184ef175c5de71e2982d01f402c3acd0bcc
describe
'258129' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNR' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
efff70124bf1320b15b26e14b41bf26d
c61b69946d0a74071fe211c99a6de6e092d3b083
describe
'197634' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNS' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
1bb6fedcbaf8fab73be3716029858d4d
2ead9d2c2a350d7624683381224508c47a5b1b2d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25491' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNT' 'sip-files00127.pro'
c0f707918d24ed9f89242c07c50bccac
f4248c754039e687a4a4c898aae4850639d10367
describe
'78435' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNU' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
9afe85374958ce2cf4a9d39a5fdf7fc8
1ebb3f3e6f98f1adc6d5b6d2f6d03c95d1463b51
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2077476' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNV' 'sip-files00127.tif'
b09f2532136f444770a8b66f621da892
5f355013c8326bc456ca27d53610a366ca3330fd
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNW' 'sip-files00127.txt'
cb89268cfa2d7649b537cc2478cbefd2
eec8600a57db84289d753687078dcb601ab377ba
describe
'262046' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNX' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
6892935b5bcea417d56f92c633ab801f
9e071f2fd7d83339819c398692ae6b99ec99cd76
describe
'100546' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNY' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
b908201e5fa410ceb71d575f26a87e58
6a08dec50f448e05c7c34da3a07b6d1d13ff98bc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'6049' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWNZ' 'sip-files00128.pro'
7b941611eb98290d5602875573dfbdfe
fe6796960eeed577bd786547d0a984afd62368ca
describe
'36979' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOA' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
4a6d345fe1d6f2c98db1dd6fb8b46f3d
6da13a1353a4cfff82faa01ebc7016c35ec90909
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2105688' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOB' 'sip-files00128.tif'
d78415f04e67624741e83fa5258c3868
4379a9c1281c1bb529901698d9188a79ee4ee37f
describe
'252' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOC' 'sip-files00128.txt'
30700e91b5131a48fb0b2139288b9bf0
731adb5d0039698718926451f6688d1c3fcdd5f1
describe
'262377' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOD' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
d75d81a2f354ddbe3cc13a580c33c9d5
95897191ae9a0cacb367a00b31d0bf1b41197008
describe
'51111' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOE' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
2aa00c68ea023b0a4cd349e88427db07
faabba66f305294803b0ebc261877eaa3928e460
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'18649' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOF' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
7c3e47bebac4b2b5769179867c1f6efd
bb470e2f34aebc96067fc31c2858164dcaf87f87
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2107000' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOG' 'sip-files00129.tif'
7932009dc952b41f97716cdf4ce6e897
594cd258a350f916269610c3a1d8fc73ccc93d09
describe
'260756' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOH' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
dfc2689657d7fbbedc982705104db180
4e00f2349979a121f48bf05bdcea8c6489d27838
describe
'122798' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOI' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
4ac750951594005003323523b74a015e
818f3dfbe66393d42192c4ff66926ab5ac12bc96
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'17047' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOJ' 'sip-files00130.pro'
c108e49956921b96c85cda9d9fd38b9a
e23067744d259fa47fce8db334403f658b3f4bdc
'2011-10-12T00:44:44-04:00'
describe
'43784' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOK' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
6a2e8ab3ea58b28e256de0480d2f3117
a42c9841a7080b83a420248dcd296adac96ef1d8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2096240' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOL' 'sip-files00130.tif'
58106d39c6e17e9480f8f0d6b65a705c
936721a431ae46ab4c7374eef316d26abbcb158b
describe
'999' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOM' 'sip-files00130.txt'
3074fd531d0c2acd6799f8f1449dfb29
98788fde49cfcb8510e0d41275e0824fe8b5b184
describe
'260448' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWON' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
3bdfa41488bcab334a42f05a82f223ab
7c86a74ef0e4b1d494d138f84ce4a0be68f71280
describe
'52793' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOO' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
64fdf3462bc44ad3a2fc4ef95634bcbe
737dd2051012afd2860562578dd1169a27ccc056
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'19213' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOP' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
95a11bd8559d5bfe6fe05cd822ebc99a
8dbb6ef5a18c1f10edc796f5a5cd0e7bf3a70d62
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2091848' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOQ' 'sip-files00131.tif'
027c8330ca6880288e3a667fd9297789
33d22cc22a4bb1bd7a430e44641c1a95d27121fe
describe
'260854' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOR' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
047cc7e30fa1e0c4e134cc2417dc7dd9
95b6c785c46118c46f46fd550c02c0b8460e7590
describe
'215353' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOS' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
2049043e54772d49a79aecbafaa733e7
6278a8ba9eefbfd6d9a7589e3e7da086a169b92b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'19876' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOT' 'sip-files00132.pro'
849fd97d0245a5b4df2f59e566841267
b5851fa7ed6f9930601215cacc54d754577b90e7
describe
'80802' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOU' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
3f80cfe5932dc1054749963761504b52
d222aa5ef43823cf81dcbe3bd0d2f666c5fec192
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2099616' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOV' 'sip-files00132.tif'
26d47de689c3eb49bc88fcf4bd7de1c8
cee5cb79ac0ef2c398bdb353b186ce9482825836
describe
'897' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOW' 'sip-files00132.txt'
fd96145dda4fbc0de137e31d29019cec
cbe9261762d41edce9905887b8731dcaf776f5be
describe
'265493' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOX' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
61ada78e71d177b6297cf99fcb037d3d
404668eb8800a8c798f1d28cf38e2fef721c4e48
describe
'223253' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOY' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
9de769412aed9447ed785bef76b2014b
b89611e7a50817f72707abad2e32c5ddb2f0c8db
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28840' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWOZ' 'sip-files00133.pro'
792486b807032f8667e960a86ce67977
a779090d6816bba119bf11de6fb6de7d3866a4c9
describe
'87820' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPA' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
5d76f87763545f0c463d8ecd6fba236d
09437d6001eb0a46b550e53e642caea75b755e3a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2136928' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPB' 'sip-files00133.tif'
cefbacd9ee54a201d7a1c08e4866538f
120ee0cd9b5f017f08fa5163cc78840fe7436a25
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPC' 'sip-files00133.txt'
3dad478812d6b440c5b94f790a0de5c9
5486a9ed0a15a2c15ce85491b28eaede7db01524
describe
'263220' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPD' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
c42ddb1130eb938054104546dff16718
0c9986279650d97fe3cc2ae1b0075c146f7d8d4a
describe
'223583' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPE' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
a3cbca71a4f984f44817c6f8d25e2aea
2302a97adfdba3968ee615f80d8f3cec3d6cc1a1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29046' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPF' 'sip-files00134.pro'
2b24409fa898aa8e7213668ed5822c32
7587ec57fd4e0e803b60c5050331d56a5f871854
describe
'86239' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPG' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
3bc3a9c7c529f072262178c3463da98a
c5ca526d7ddbdb97865d12a8df77f791f885d9c9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2118684' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPH' 'sip-files00134.tif'
ba8793338faa2a834044139de8fa6e47
a662441384908ac7753eb8eea3566f82b905d8be
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPI' 'sip-files00134.txt'
134992a2f45bd5e155f105f0081b97ff
283172d1f025b8b4bee8af56b43ed48d1657f335
describe
'267900' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPJ' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
51a158aadec8d7be167fad5273448271
6ef8168ffd14ca74e440afc3ccf11cba15ef8a0e
describe
'218316' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPK' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
3a001a95f7fb74f2ece99995373c72e2
2efc2270ea5d29c0d90837d1543974117e326480
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27998' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPL' 'sip-files00135.pro'
1ead8a1d5577e40773361477da52045f
6b73e44df6d919f9ff21e46f02e996aa7258e315
describe
'86378' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPM' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
9873bb0bd98a5bbce4a397bad4afd5d1
efb864dd63d57be6f495fb976d5102248e159469
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2155856' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPN' 'sip-files00135.tif'
2fd3be01cdf2f12230670903ff524731
da0f7b78945791b5f930b654f95638f013da16bf
'2011-10-12T00:44:03-04:00'
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPO' 'sip-files00135.txt'
7d106477d86c197e699cd85021bfe37b
350916d6d20311e9f19de7610c0a38ef83fffcec
describe
'266929' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPP' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
1955999ab4c30a2c82e8c3a4b7d99deb
44251db9688d26881b571cd3decd299371fef06c
describe
'213761' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPQ' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
71f091569f2b5d51ad73b2d9feb88314
853aa2050bdbcebb15226169922553ebc0053fae
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28354' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPR' 'sip-files00136.pro'
ac190e9b285b40b87e73123dc5ea657b
261299f3fa1f280db4f7e41339fe10b8d3e2f1de
describe
'83974' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPS' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
1c5eb75df9bc36b672975511d8a8b455
8b4d8c270fba2d0881ffb51dcab142a3999d3417
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2148272' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPT' 'sip-files00136.tif'
debb2d37d4e7d90de480e5c20e70bd55
f3bdfde9b024c8624b4f92baa00bc3b21a120e46
describe
'1148' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPU' 'sip-files00136.txt'
fc1a5015ed44cf61093ad78c7bd7a963
023ac3a284a460d2b1283766c69e89d1d0424d6c
describe
'267315' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPV' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
ea0a4d5d082319e13375e82cf38047e1
c69c89f0d56a86d1c744ad38105b6f8e3270cd30
describe
'215280' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPW' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
360fbc244414910db6812ef9b82fbbc9
7043a4cfc597f4042547c614f460cf6e72efb1a6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28783' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPX' 'sip-files00137.pro'
f62eaa23d5c54916653b47bf96658ebe
4e1ea50e38d012608dafd7d0c5db7a0a4d56ec06
describe
'84661' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPY' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
051ad361e057964d602ce4c6eefa5959
48eaef1052167ea64cb7eff4c5dd73885e0b9bbe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2151684' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWPZ' 'sip-files00137.tif'
91f19cc091a445ad373586733ba4420f
4bafc7231a68fac17104dfe9503b29e1966fb5b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQA' 'sip-files00137.txt'
3aac17642fd569984f8d56ea2f656e15
6eced2200020a33cf64072ae2f33839b2ff5be21
describe
'264979' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQB' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
3968fe53713767eb6814036e7b52e825
d6187a26feeba1c19903e3f4fb71de63cd47ce6f
describe
'219368' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQC' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
0655e47d9193fc148331f1d3341fd41c
97b8d8cce5c1c5f9fc4122aac11078b8a7be4ffe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28874' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQD' 'sip-files00138.pro'
3b6626e21aabb6a62ca70f361aa126d1
5e9622da55f03a96739f78123e8d2b701e469e6b
describe
'86519' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQE' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
45baa5815409d7044177564ddc8622e2
68f32bc1fdb8b1f7389cd4f5490f42eff1e62d3e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2132384' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQF' 'sip-files00138.tif'
6af090e312bc70ad51456dd784bf1acc
e70f7193eea57d246f8cf414a84e44d86106ce97
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQG' 'sip-files00138.txt'
4660c2763edf32ba5d70bc62e46c77da
b10cdf8fcf26892908daf12cdf648b34b983de49
describe
'268797' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQH' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
441920667fdf60c66737a43b69e5571b
f89dcc3f045fc33c8584792a8701ea53f31dc36d
describe
'203223' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQI' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
45bf87f4583ae61b6d7b6cd3fda1c771
f03890552553ad068ffe432df7a52433782fc677
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQJ' 'sip-files00139.pro'
eaccaf26e58f85476bc096d853ab23ea
54f009ed3173c37f4c7b5596e57d9b0cae619a5a
describe
'78867' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQK' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
4ede8a62035b3f868e7312accb056a38
ede1e79e61a44ebb82b4202a31ba3c72540ea24f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2163020' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQL' 'sip-files00139.tif'
1faf5fb93a0180ea61638cd9abae0f4d
ca231c8b688b8c12f36af898b08d119d96d16a5b
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQM' 'sip-files00139.txt'
0329bcbea625caaeac26dadfe1d55e97
07fa75c8a3cfbe2e5b07235704062e63c097261b
describe
'244883' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQN' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
66503559e3ecd56de0f5b31e037c9267
5eebcb60da39dabb077972063a352630a7d1299a
describe
'219664' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQO' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
d6fb975d0dc5cb76c9525caa9251bef6
43df291a0436921f5338dc5013d6a0e18fcc7dcd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27252' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQP' 'sip-files00140.pro'
65f48cade175508fa4ea32ee7b31713d
77805f722cc051f325d5637b3ce06aa627b3ec7a
describe
'89949' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQQ' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
6c2198fe8451e88229977865baf860b9
f33cafcd158bb83d1c68add36da05deb7a84ca72
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1971912' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQR' 'sip-files00140.tif'
795f82deb759ed03c306d3d2d1ababf8
21bb2046087964a35495b19ce4cc338999bd6201
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQS' 'sip-files00140.txt'
46a96ccc1c4ef477787c92374848bcfe
fe8e1d2fc818efa32d66343296dffb0f2c7ffec6
describe
'265018' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQT' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
be5bc7a35b62dc27ed4cfaeb58164ab5
6920d23ea5c022964012d5d04bbe7d500388a2fd
describe
'222674' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQU' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
ec68231612f4082bae428d4e8315b9e7
ed519c94d6a7edc92af70b0eeab7ee167ce07fb9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29682' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQV' 'sip-files00141.pro'
3be8e7b13212786b75afaaced6e13d3a
6a0011c546055dc00ebc7b44a16171f2f39d83ac
describe
'88352' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQW' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
64cd699c57e2bc3eb93bd1bb31a88a82
e6be636022c3f389686d91b8894ba21f4b53681f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2133256' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQX' 'sip-files00141.tif'
132da61c45ca8ee4e686732a9dc2c470
a94f81015fe70ed3ddcfa0518049172b928293f2
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQY' 'sip-files00141.txt'
36689f702ab6cff8ec93f92ea23fd545
80e5b0cf912548062ce5e900c7f24a43959f9d70
describe
'259229' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWQZ' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
321c08b24f7c7f6b02ac08d1735366ba
8c91107f39aadfbd41540a662d0437b64098a955
describe
'238559' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRA' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
667d899f9f8174a5fbfd3956fb562fbe
5399a355c64871945f0183dbe504f8c5e606b9d7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30169' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRB' 'sip-files00142.pro'
f2a56afcdb9c398e5bf9d51344594bb3
5cb291a5c7ecaf4ffc649dd37acb4db17049166a
describe
'94537' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRC' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
c806e44fa6b5c834de5ea37da622b470
fde13e5c34ceb368746aac88dd155d92ce07cc46
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2087792' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRD' 'sip-files00142.tif'
84df5f86c673a7b6c461c055d0d7c2b4
830a7976f3e10d07e05c07d9b5a7891ef47d47bb
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRE' 'sip-files00142.txt'
33c9d49a1d0c0e2aeb15ba7ece002e1d
9a3777ec05c904049e70f471835c4a5880931757
describe
'243582' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRF' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
6e92b507e256036ecaa1c6fd5264cb41
a09dc53470714457257031878a0f4f60e9949720
describe
'214952' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRG' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
6e10f12a714f412d4f017f597dfd5828
4c895172aaa41d1ec47c319ab3f251095b5f6df5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25701' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRH' 'sip-files00143.pro'
1523bc455771bfe2681a28d8ad87078c
3e992e8f1bba78ade5d7df7ab9c9aa51c07b4793
describe
'88549' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRI' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
46946dbaf9b867d78ecb5a0c087a0f3a
57478a1a7e9e57ee5ecdfcd6ccd55cafc598e26f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1961196' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRJ' 'sip-files00143.tif'
d6ea7217f78b90e587dc3bbe9a6bbd68
e22eae4ddd7a652571bd6214ac214b743efde070
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRK' 'sip-files00143.txt'
e84c68ad91ec4046a8caa593f6928f87
f81f4a33802103d6fbdf8185a9ff8bf970c8be7d
describe
'262085' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRL' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
7b696d7991a3c77890b61d405bb948d6
bdc6208b56546ed50de27909168be849f97806dc
describe
'214722' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRM' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
bae568de41d35a7a133a0c456ee566a7
fe14d0da8d0642a51eb4ca083d5625c4e6416159
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27878' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRN' 'sip-files00144.pro'
9336ece7d4d2e693d23c0af99777827d
3c8f54bafc33433c5524150862354a333d8a1d5d
describe
'86307' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRO' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
16f8ad31717a9208b21c47bf0f5ab308
9792212e25ba55c6aa50083310e5c919281aea00
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2109748' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRP' 'sip-files00144.tif'
23a79cee5928afbc7eb52c96e110be6f
4682290e0651f8f1e67eda20ae08f1a7f3a0e229
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRQ' 'sip-files00144.txt'
d41dfa391d0ca2bf0e143a1e5757ab5a
26d5d94fac152e494dc793581594ae8e950d38af
describe
'266552' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRR' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
299e210464f68a4004a838bade7cf9a4
01c40ef5ecbeaf8faf890b6f60832601ccb24bc4
describe
'165627' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRS' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
0d91ea496919efeee5ddbbb6fe0acf9b
3df531b29acc9a32e5f259d5ba62ff0040986601
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25924' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRT' 'sip-files00145.pro'
0d86094293625cc343e002baaebad635
9968816e04658574eba2b0a1eeaf7ab1b66633b7
describe
'62035' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRU' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
4e0e8107941bbb637fbfe1eaf36e0ab2
5de8f88086d7bf72bd56f99f643f160cf3584bfd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2143852' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRV' 'sip-files00145.tif'
e5c199f8a707f32aff0cc9289204136d
8e3025d70395303b8f375d15b49290afdfe740de
describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRW' 'sip-files00145.txt'
4e800c728fe765d5f9d551d6f771f837
7b0864d15feaf1051545d040cad117ba7d75b7cd
describe
'262258' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRX' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
a769e5be100f585a73ba16ce05423ba4
d201c3d4b799a92d2df38a7bff7fa070a4eb364a
describe
'147019' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRY' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
aa45ff59540ea24ef0c60e5b10f02d92
99aab05986ec018a8e55402cbcd9242bb710001e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'18878' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWRZ' 'sip-files00146.pro'
bd259b46bd113454616e4f3d0617dc96
17a8bb997f4f9c2ca3c15818356d4dd5fa82bc3a
describe
'56457' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWSA' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
c0088ccc989201204d1898f19ee95083
4113b4f53c23b2ec26b4c1c2e2113f3bccf8c155
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2108976' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWSB' 'sip-files00146.tif'
9127bef0af84aff2bb3f9679fe42dd96
7b9fa26b64e7c82c48c3f3b6d14e469e6eba9f23
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWSC' 'sip-files00146.txt'
326364076f72b784fcf414ecd4b28dce
b5d4e00e64f29afaf4e35130ecba2a9851e7cd61
describe
'288580' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWSD' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
34652e74d0b27338ccfe5f1f74a06be1
4b03139dcd55a13ec369e193f335bf10a122a4cb
describe
'148709' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWSE' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
ff37bc10256ee905fa0a65f36f34d449
310f1d4177a05afd04693c8e187aff741926db03
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'44932' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWSF' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
56f511c074724ce34ab880776fd13dfc
8a1eef8a0d2ee434c1634b6ee0707e7d3910c0c8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'6932292' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWSG' 'sip-files00147.tif'
950e7a47538feb3d796fa638a062b797
a62c573dce14af7eb00bc982fd700b17909b00a8
describe
'10' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWSH' 'sip-files00147.txt'
325f96e13a840160188ec69c4cfb9234
20e488ba8968a76240d13e2c7efb31c7fdbcfd2c
describe
'299078' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWSI' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
cc695b4201c829a81533fef2e6c6e95d
de9861d9a9b068d135d89d32acaff91515cdac98
describe
'372956' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWSJ' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
3f8f51152dfd256e2e3fa45162204957
a119701fccb2a86d06b5cb092985ad8a83652f6b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'85908' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWSK' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
c60bfffe9dd2d09bc12d2ca81a7ae108
4b8e3fcddc017e52e8d664a1c15166b20166fd2f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7184300' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWSL' 'sip-files00148.tif'
91b7292075d8e862ce9e4b2ec193823b
c56d31481802f0bddce55c1e81d46dca1589bee8
describe
'68182' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWSM' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
9ab54111e978bbe4ccbb0d286c56797d
64c5196ab9b45e1beb81cb77c14049c420bd81ac
describe
'110807' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWSN' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
a342e1b054f3090bbfec851fb74b0a9d
3d5396bf0b4e022e0e58b2cb55df402e82dfce5a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'209' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWSO' 'sip-files00149.pro'
f9fba397de1e44f08f66fdb0d910d3a3
b0971cde0b880d1b18163471e108c43d34c3af67
describe
'36587' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWSP' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
a5bee2c0f4637986f4df677aa2eaba86
f7003024d2b46bd62ac611168b0c05b6ca8e01ed
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1641452' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWSQ' 'sip-files00149.tif'
957fb53679acc715406ec1c8c9eb2130
6754620ffec9806361d8e653806d40277c7789c9
describe
'128' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWSR' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
61fbaa75690892df641a51b66e8cb82b
677a2927b67614351784541be8b5ec3562b21efd
describe
'244005' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWSS' 'sip-filesUF00026652_00001.mets'
8bfe3aee00d2c05609eacd17b6176cda
6dd8b300f571c39d7b63fc417b280f4d7e08e4c6
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-18T19:44:53-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'279521' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAOHfileF20080417_AABWSV' 'sip-filesUF00026652_00001.xml'
2d16e5ed01c63fb69fec7c2fb940f16e
81a45b89d234d0836540e1e3452e7d3240115992
describe
'2013-12-18T19:44:50-05:00'
xml resolution