Citation
The word-picture fable book, or, Old Æsop in a new dress

Material Information

Title:
The word-picture fable book, or, Old Æsop in a new dress
Portion of title:
Old Æsop in a new dress
Creator:
William
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London ;
Edinburgh ;
New York
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
83 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fables -- 1872 ( rbgenr )
Rebuses -- 1872 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1872
Genre:
Fables ( rbgenr )
rebuses ( aat )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Signatures: 1², 2-10⁴, 11².
General Note:
Preface signed by Uncle William, dated June 1870.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
024192357 ( ALEPH )
AHN5066 ( NOTIS )
08998943 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




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The Baldwin Library

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iful book in a beautiful dress,
th Pictures and Words for you to guess

A beaut

Wi











THE

WORD-PICTURE FABLE BOOK;

OR,

OLD ASOP IN A NEW DRESS.



LONDON:
fT. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW;

EDINBURGH; AND ‘NEW YORK.



1872.























PREFACE,

um uum

My Dear Cuinpren,
I hope you will like this little Fable Book I have prepared for you, and
will find much to amuse, and something to instruct, in its pretty pages.

You know what a Fable is? A kind of short story, in which animals are
generally introduced, and which is made to convey a truth worth remembering
in a lively and agreeable manner.

The following Fables are not new ones ; they are Old Favourites, but they
have New Faces—that is, I have rewritten them in language which, I think,
you will easily understand. ne :

And in order to puzzle you a little, and to entertain you while puzzling you,
I have made the printer insert a little picture here and there instead of a word,
so that you must guess the word from studying the picture.

I think you will not find it very difficult to do this; but in case you should
sometimes be unable to hit upon the right word, I have printed a Key at the end
of the book, in which the Fables are given without illustrations. You must
mind, though, that you are not to look at the Key until you have first done your
utmost to make out the meaning of the picture.

And now, my dear children, I commend. this little book to your careful
reading, and hope you will profit by it, and that you will all of you endeavour to
act up to its lessons, and from good boys and girls, with God’s blessing, become,
in due time, good men and women.

Your affectionate friend,

Unote WILLIAM.
June 1870. ae







Â¥

evra Sainte pelt AE renege ne





om







10.
11.
12.
13.
14,

16.
17.
18,
19.
20.
21,
22.

[aE SO
. THE DOG AND HIS SHADOW, ese ose eve eee

. THE FISHERMAN AND THE FISH, ... ove eee ove eve
. THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE, re ove an

. THE BEAR AND THE OWL, ... oes eee eee ae

. EVERYBODY FOR HIMSELF, ... ove zee eos eee

. THE WOLF AND THE LAMB.,... oe ove ose

. THE CROW AND THE PITCHER, a po sae eee to
. THE MISTRESS AND HER SERVANTS,

. LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP,

THE COUNTRY MOUSE AND THE TOWN MOUSE, ...

THE FOX AND THE GRAPES,

THE ADDER AND THE COUNTRYMAN, ss ose ey eos
THE JACKDAW AND THE BIRDS,

THE BOY AND THE NETTLE, ne eee eee eve ove

. THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS,

WHAT WE HAVE IS OFTEN BETTER THAN WHAT WE WANT, ...
THE MOUSE AND THE LION,

THE THIEF AND THE MASTIFF,

THE DISCONTENTED DONKEY,

THE WICKED ARE NEVER GRATEFUL,

ONE GOOD TURN DESERVES ANOTHER,

TAKE WARNING BY OTHERS’ MISFORTUNES,

KEY TO THE FABLES,

19
21
24
26
28
31
36
388
41
44
46

59
62
64
67
69

71









ee ae ee)

WHAT THE EYE SEES NOT THE HEART RUES NOT.

GOOD MAXIMS ARE ALWAYS IN SEASON.



THE WORD-PICTURE FABLE BOOK.



lL—THE DOG AND HIS SHADOW.





he saw, as he thought, another dog in the

water, which also carried a piece of meat.



THE COVETOUS MAN IS HIS OWN TORMENTOR.



2



CATCH NOT AT THE SHADOW AND LOSE THE SUBSTANCE.









MUCH IS WANTING WHERE MUCH IS DESIRES.

GREED OFTEN BEGUILES WIT.



10 THE DOG AND HIS SHADOW.



Then he barked loudly, and attempted

to seize the prize. In doing so, he let



go his own piece, which fell into the

and sank. So _ the = fool-





NEVER QUIT CERTAINTY FOR HOPE.

MUCH WOULD HAVE MORE, AND LOSE ALL.

po











NEVER GIVE UP A CERTAINTY FOR AN UNCERTAINTY.







ENVY AND COVETOUSNESS ARE NEVER SATISFIED.



THE DOG AND HIS SHADOW. ll



It is wise to be content with what we
have. Greedy people always injure them-

selves. “A n the hand,”



\\ SOR AY
\ Wey .
WS

says a good old proverb, “is worth two in

the >.” We should learn to



other persons.

GREED IS ENVY’S ELDER BROTHER.



THERE IS MANY A SLIP BETWEEN THE CUP AND THE LIP.











UNDERTAKE NOTHING BEYOND YOUR POWERS.

DO NOT COUNT YOUR FISH TILL YOU GET THEM.











12 THE FISHERMAN AND THE FISH.





2.—THE FISHERMAN AND THE FISH.

||

began



to play, in the belief that the fish, on

hearing his beautiful tunes, would jump on

shore. He played, and played very well,

ee



THINKING IS FAR FROM KNOWING.



WHEN WISE MEN PLAY THE FOOL, THEY DO IT WITH A VENGEANCE.











A LITTLE WIT WILL SERVE A FORTUNATE MAN.

WHERE THERE IS A WILL THERE IS A WAY.









THE FISHERMAN AND THE FISH. 13



but no fish came; neither}



nor 4



will never do,” said he; “I must try some

other way of catching my fish, or I shall



starve.” So he got into his



took his

and soon found his net quite full. Then

~

DILIGENCE IS THE MOTHER OF GOOD FORTUNE.





HE WHO WOULD CATCH FISH MUST NOT MIND GETTING WET.











LUCK DEPENDS ON A WILLING HEART AND SINEWY MUSCLE.



ALL IS FISH THAT COMES IN HIS NET.







14 THE FISHERMAN AND THE FISH.





“If you would not dance when I played,

your dancing now won’t save you from the



.’—There are always two wavs of
_ 5

doing a thing; let us take care to choose

the right one.



IT IS GOOD TO BEGIN WELL, BUT BETTER TO END WELL.



MOST THINGS HAVE TWO HANDLES; AND A WISE MAN TAKES HOLD OF THE BEST,















; A WAGER IS A FOOL’S ARGUMENT.

THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE.

15



8. THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE.



race they chose the

TO SAY LITTLE, AND PERFORM MUCH, IS NOBLE.

SLOW AND SURE OFTEN WIN THE RACE.



THE RACE IS NOT ALWAYS TO THE SWIFT.















THE SLEEPING FOX CATCHES NO POULTRY.

TIME STAYS NOT THE FOOL’S LEISURE.







16 THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE.



Away went the hare, and soon left the

tortoise far behind. Then she thought to

herself she would take a rest, and squat-

before she awoke. The fox declared him

s



THERE IS LUCK IN LEISURE,



— seals aed

HE THAT RUNS FAST WILL NOT RUN LONG.

a tet





LET THEM LAUGH WHO WIN.



THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE. 17



Most haste



is sometimes worst speed. If we rest at
the wrong time, we must expect to lose by

our idleness. In the race of life we must

EACH USEFUL IN THEIR SPHERE—’TWAS SO ORDAINED.

» must



keep steadily onward.



| JUDGE NOT OF MEN AND THINGS AT FIRST SIGHT.
eS SIA SR re SRR kN matt see a eal

3

A SPUR IN THE HEAD IS WORTH TWO IN THE HEEL.









FALSE FRIENDS ARE WORSE THAN OPEN ENEMIES,

CRAFT BRINGETH NOTHING HOME,





18 THE BEAR AND THE OWL.





4.—THE BEAR -AND THE OWL.



was boasting in the
hearing of an owl, that he was very
partial to man, never ill-treating him when

he was dead. “I should believe in your



shoh
RX

friendship,” said the “% , “if you did

not devour him when alive.”



THE UNKNOWN ARE BETTER THAN ILL KNOWN.





NEVER SPEAK TO DECEIVE, NOR LISTEN TO BETRAY.











QUESTIONS OF MOMENT REQUIRE DELIBERATE ANSWERS.

THREATENED FOLKS LIVE LONG.







EVERYBODY FOR HIMSELF. 19



6:-EVERYBODY FOR FIMSELF.

Once upon a time a governor of a certain

had reason to fear it would

os

be besieged by the enemy; and therefore he

called a council to see how it could best be











DELAYS ARE DANGEROUS.

X

HAVE NOT THY CLOAK TO MAKE WHEN IT BEGINS TO RAIN.







PROVIDE FOR THE WORST, THE BEST WILL SAVE ITSELF.





KNOWLEDGE IS BETTER THAN HOUSE OR LAND.

20 EVERYBODY FOR HIMSELF.



brick.”—“ Not at all, ” exclaimed animble and

industrious ; “TI am sure that



timber is a pets nae ”__ Wou are both

wrong,” sharply remarked a -



“for there is nothing like aor em
Every man thinks his own trade or pro-

fession the best, and undervalues every other.





EVERY ONE FOR HIMSELF, AND GOD FOR US ALL.

OF ALL THE CRAFTS, TO BE AN HONEST MAN IS THE MASTER CRAFT.











HE WHO SOWS THORNS CAN NEVER REAP GRAPES,





MALICE SELDOM WANTS A MARK TO SHOOT AT



THE WOLF AND THE LAMB.

21





6.—THE WOLF AND

THE LAMB.



One very hot day a





chanced to come down
mW s







ais.

to the

Â¥

same

The wolf,

lamb some distance below him.

wishing to quarrel, accused the meek and







AN EVIL MIND, AN EVIL MEANING,



THE STONE THAT LIES NOT IN YOUR WAY NEED NOT OFFEND YOU.

















ILL-WILL IS EVER PLENTIFUL OF ILL WORDS.







WRANGLERS NEVER WANT WORDS.





22 THE WOLF AND THE LAMB.



innocent lamb of seeking to disturb the

water in the ~<







“But how
me : : :

can that be,” said the lamb, “since the

water runs down from you to me?” “That

may be so,” said the grim and_ surly




, “but this time last year you

Se 2
= Se

called me ul names.” “ What! I2?—I was

Mad







A CLEAR CONSCIENCE FEARS NO ACCUSATION.

ILL-WILL NEVER SPEAKS WELL, OR DOES WELL.









A FEW VICES WILL OBSCURE MANY VIRTUES.





ONE UNKIND WORD GENERATES OTHERS.





THE WOLF AND THE LAMB. 23





not even born.” Then the



saying, “If it was not you, it was your



mother, the



the same.”

REBEL NOT AGAINST THE DICTATES OF REASON.



The wicked man never wants an excuse

for doing harm to the innocent.



MALICE DRINKETH ITS OWN POISON.







NECESSITY IS THE MOTHER OF INVENTION.





24 THE CROW AND THE PITCHER.



(.-FHE CROW: AND ‘THE - PIF CHER.
‘

Once on a time, a thirsty
had the good fortune to fall in “with a
pitcher of water. But when he would have

drunk, he found the water so low down that

TO BELIEVE A BUSINESS POSSIBLE, IS THE WAY TO MAKE IT SO.

he could not reach it. He tried to overturn

(Pitas

the but it was too heavy for



NEVER GIVE UP AT A DIFFICULTY.







CONSTANT APPLICATIONS OVERCOME THE GREATEST DIFFICULTIES.











NOTHING IS SO DIFFICULT BUT WE MAY OVERCOME BY PERSEVERANCE

FEW THINGS ARE IMPOSSIBLE TO SKILL AND INDUSTRY.









THE CROW AND THE PITCHER. 25



him. Then he picked up some large
stones, and these he cast one by one into
, until the water rose up
to the brim, and he was able to quench his
thirst.—This is a lesson for boys and girls,
as good as they can find in any
“ Persevere and conquer every difficulty.”

PERSEVERE AGAINST DISCOURAGEMENT.
4







DIFFICULTIES, TO BE SURMOUNTED, MUST BE MET WITH ENERGY









THE PLANS OF THE WICKED ARE NOT ALWAYS SUCCESSFUL.

A GOOD SERVANT MAKES A GOOD MASTER.





26 THE MISTRESS AND HER SERVANTS.



8. —THE MISTRESS AND HER SERA NTS:

There was a young <3



had several servants, and sie was m ascustonibd

to ba them up every morning when the

\ crew. The lazy girls, angry



at bene roused so early, killed the cock, in

the hope that they might get an hour or

RISE EARLY AND ECONOMISE YOUR TIME.



THE WILES OF THE WICKED ARE OFTEN RUINOUS TO THEMSELVES.











SERVE WELL, IF YOU WOULD BE WELL SERVED. ‘ |
moe

THE MISTRESS AND HER SERVANTS. 27



two's s caine rE BICeD and be left longer i in their

“|. But their young mistress











Beinted to three.—People who dov wrong to

NEVER DO EVIL, TO THINK GOOD MAY COME OF IT.



A GOOD SERVANT DISPUTETH NOT HIS MASTER’S COMMAND.

save themselves trouble, often bring a far



greater misfortune upon their heads.





HE THAT RISES LATE NEVER DOES A GOOD DAY’S WORK.









THE FOLLY OF ONE MAN IS THE FORTUNE OF ANOTHER.



NEVER WADE IN UNKNOWN WATERS.



28 LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP.





9.-LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP.



again. After a while there came to the



drank, he asked of Mister Fox whether the

water was good and plentiful. “Oh, yes,





SUDDEN TRUST BRINGS SUDDEN REPENTANCE.

HE THAT WILL NOT LOOK BEFORE HIM, WILL HAVE TO LOOK BEHIND HIM.











LOOK TWICE ERE YOU DETERMINE ONCE.









IF YOU TRUST BEFORE YOU TRY, YOU MAY REPENT BEFORE YOU DIE.

LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP. 29





my friend,” cried he; “you never before saw

water so good or so abundant! I came

oe
_

upon his stout = A », immediately

jumped out. Then said the former: “ What!





CALCULATE WELL BEFORE YOU RESOLVE,

CONFIDE NOT IN HIM WHO HAS ONCE DECEIVED ‘VOU:













SOME DO FIRST, THINK AFTERWARDS, AND REPENT FOR EVER.



PROCURE NOT FRIENDS IN HASTE.



30 LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP.





will you leave me here alone? How shall

I get up again?” “That is your business,”



ee
et yet ate
————_—_=_- hs



Greedy people often overreach them-

selves. Be content with what you have.







PRESENCE OF MIND IS NECESSARY AT ALL TIMES.

VENTURE UPON NOTHING TILL YOU HAVE WELL CONSIDERED THE END.











BETTER A LITTLE FIRE TO WARM YOU THAN A BIG FIRE TO BURN YOU.

A CONTENTED MIND IS A CONTINUAL FEAST.





THE COUNTRY MOUSE AND THE TOWN MOUSE. 31



10.-THE COUNTRY MOUSE AND THE TOWN MOUSE.



A country 4 ~, who had a
friend in a distant town, invited him to pay
him a visit. The town mouse did so, and
on his arrival received a hearty welcome.
But he soon found that the fare was coarse

and scanty; a -or two, a few







UNFADING JOYS ARE NOT OF THIS WORLD. .





CONTENTMENT IS ONLY TO BE FOUND WITHIN OURSELVES,













CONTENT IS THE TRUE PHILOSOPHER'S STONE.

QUIET AND CONTENT IN A COTTAGE IS BETTER THAN LUXURY AND STRIFE IN A PALACE.







82 THE COUNTRY MOUSE AND THE TOWN MOUSE.





pease, a little rice, and now and then a

small quantity of grain, with occasionally



So he grew tired of his visit, and said to his

friend, “ How can you spend your life in this



miserable : », , where the farmer

and his wife don’t allow you proper food,





BETTER LONG SOMETHING THAN SOON NOTHING.



THE GREATEST WEALTH IS CONTENTMENT WITH LITTLE.











CREDIT NOT HIM WHOSE TONGUE SPEAKETH WONDERS.

CONTENTMENT TO THE MIND IS A LIGHT TO THE EYE.











THE COUNTRY MOUSE AND THE TOWN MOUSE. 33 |

nor enough of it? Come up to town with
me, and see how I live.” The two friends

went, and at night the town mouse took the

AWS
‘

\
4

aN







country mouse into a splendid |] amu, S\(e ,

.

whose shelves were loaded with dainties.
Here was a fine cheese, there a x
full of delicious milk; in fact, the country

PLEASURES OVER-PURCHASED ARE REAL TORMENTS,





RIOTOUS LIVES CAN NEVER KNOW THE PLEASURES OF TEMPERANCE.





5











A CONTENTED MIND ENJOYS THE SWEETEST REST,

A FAT KITCHEN MAKES A LEAN WILL.









34 THE COUNTRY MOUSE AND THE TOWN MOUSE.



mouse was quite bewildered, and scarcely





knew what to taste first. {

But, lo and behold! the

came in, while the two friends were enjoying

themselves, and discovering them at work,
\

she began to beat them with a



and calling a couple of cats, pursued them







BETTER BE BLITHE WITH LITTLE, THAN SAD WITH NOTHING.

PRAISE NOTHING BUT WHAT YOU KNOW TO BE WORTHY OF PRAISE.















SINCE NOWE ENJOY ALI.

BLESSINGS, BE CONTENT WITH YOUR FEW.





CONTENT CAN ONLY BE PURCHASED BY A VIRTUOUS LIFE.

THE COUNTRY MOUSE AND THE TOWN MOUSE. 35



with so much vigour, that it was with great
difficulty they made their escape.
As soon as things were quiet again, the

country whispered to his



Serene

friend, “ Good-bye! ’m off! You are wel-
come to your fine dishes and anxiety; for my

part, Pd rather have plain food and peace.”

DEPEND NOT ON FORTUNE, BUT CONDUCT.



THAT WHICH WE MAY LIVE WITHOUT WE NEED NOT MUCH COVET











YOU CAN’T SEE GREEN CHEESE BUT YOUR TEETH MUST WATER.

FIRST DESERVE, AND THEN DESIRE.







36 THE FOX AND THE GRAPES.



Il.—THE FOX AND THE GRAPES.

It was vintage time, and the grapes

were ripe.


mail
H



Unfortunately he found they hung beyond







ENVY IS A SELF-EXECUTIONER.

WISE MEN CARE NOT FOR WHAT THEY CANNOT HAVE,











WHAT WE CANNOT POSSESS WE OFTEN PRETEND TO BE NOT WORTH HAVING.



———

WALK SWIFTLY FROM TEMPTATION; IT MAY OVERTAKE YOU.









THE FOX AND THE GRAPES. 37

his reach; and after many fruitless trials,

ne te crept back through the



=. ad 7
hedge, grumbling, and saying, “ Well, after

all, who would care to eat a lot of sour

grapes !”—What we cannot get, we pretend



to despise. The g- which is

not ours, never keeps time:







**SOUR GRAPES,” AS THE FOX SAID WHEN HE COULD NOT REACH THEM.

GET GOOD SENSE, AND YOU WILL NOT REPINE AT THE WANT OF GOOD LUCK.



BEFORE YOU MAKE A FRIEND, EAT A PECK OF SALT WITH HIM.





A DOUBTFUL FRIEND IS EVER TO BE AVOIDED.





38 THE ADDER AND THE COUNTRYMAN,





12.-THE ADDER AND THE COUNTRYMAN.

One winter day, when the pure white

snow lay thick on the ground, and the leaves



Being a man of tender heart, he put the crea-





IT IS NOT WISE TO WAKE A SLEEPING LION.

DOUBT, IN ORDER THAT YOU MAY BELIEVE THE TRUTH.













KINDNESS IS LOST UPON AN UNGRATEFUL MAN.

RETURN KINDNESS WITH CHEERFULNESS,







THE ADDER AND THE COUNTRYMAN, 39





ture in his bosom, and carried it home, where

he laid it before the , in the




hope of reviving it. fat no sooner did it
feel the warmth, and recover its strength,

than it turned round on the peasant’s



see “ff () ets

“Ho, ho!” an the peasant, amazed; “is

WHEN INGRATITUDE IS PUNISHED, NO ONE WEEPS.

INGRATITUDE DRIES UP THE FOUNTAIN OF ALL GOODNESS.





RATHER DISTRUST TOO SOON THAN BE DECEIVED TOO LATE.

KINDNESS SHOULD BEGET KINDNESS,—REPAY IT NOT WITH EVIL.





40 THE ADDER AND THE COUNTRYMAN.





this the way you repay me for my kindness ?

Will you return evil for good? If so, you



blow killed it.—If we turn round on those

who do us a kindness, we must expect to be

punished for our ingratitude.



TURN NOT ON THE HAND THAT SUCCOURS YOU.





NO MAN IS WISE AT ALL TIMES, NOR KNOWING IN ALL THINGS,







PRIDE THAT DINES ON VANITY, SUPS ON CONTEMPT.





BORROWED GARMENTS NEVER FIT WELL





THE JACKDAW AND THE BIRDS. 41



I3.-THE JACKDAW AND THE BIRDS.

A vain and empty-headed jackdaw went

strutting about a garden decked in a lot




left his old friends,

ae a

and forced himself into the company of a

PRETENDERS SHOULD BE PUT TO THE TEST.
6



MANY ARE DECEIVED BY THEIR OWN VAIN OPINIONS.









VANITY IS SURE TO MEET WITH ITS DUE PUNISHMENT.

SEEK YOUR COMPANIONS AMONG YOUR EQUALS.





42 THE JACKDAW AND THE BIRDS.







splendid” 4

. At first he got along
very well, but after a short time the peacock
found out that he was only a pretender, and

stripping him of the s that were



not his own, drove him away. The wretched

bird, perfectly humbled and _ crest-fallen,

then went back to his former friends, the







VANITY RENDERS BEAUTY CONTEMPTIBLE.



CLIMB NOT TOO HIGH, LEST THE FALL BE THE GREATER.













HE WHO THINKS MUCH OF HIS APPEARANCE IS DESPISED BY ALL WHO KNOW HIM.





PRIDE MAKES ENEMIES OF FRIENDS.

THE JACKDAW AND THE BIRDS 43





TORY

but hey, offended at his ae ad at the
contempt he had shown for their society,
bade him go about his business.

It is foolish to make ourselves out what

we are not; and only the ignorant and silly

will scorn their old friends.





PRIDE JIS THE EFFECT OF SELF-IGNORANCE.





DANGEROUS THINGS ATTEND AT THE HEELS OF PRIDE AND AMBITION.







THE SMALLEST PARTICLE OF KNOWLEDGE IS WORTH REMEMBERING.



A KNOWLEDGE OF LITTLE THINGS IS OFTEN VALUABLE.







44 THE BOY AND THE NETTLE.



who was playing






about in a meadow ventured to touch a
iy

, and was stung by it. He ran
home to his mother with all speed, complain-

ing that he had scarcely touched it, and yet

the nasty thing had made his fingers burn.





GIVE ME, NEXT GOOD, AN UNDERSTANDING.

EXPERIENCE KEEPS A DEAR SCHOOL,—FOOLS WILL LEARN IN NO OTHER.













IGNORANCE IS THE PARENT OF MANY TROUBLES.





IF YOU DO NOT LISTEN TO REASON, SHE WILL RAP YOUR KNUCKLES.





THE BOY AND THE NETTLE. 45



“ Just so, my son,” said she; “but had you
grasped it boldly, it would not have hurt you;

timid people alwaysruninto more trouble than



do the brave. If you see a

Waid

and want to jump across it, do so without fear

and hesitation, and you will leap safely to the
other side. If you hesitate, you are lost!”

VALOUR IS BUT LITTLE WITHOUT DISCRETION.





BE BRAVE FOR RIGHT, AND THOU WILT NOT BE OVERTHROWN.











THE SIMPLE BELIEVETH EVERY WORD: BUT THE PRUDENT MAN LOOKETH TO HIS GOING.

TRIFLES LEAD TO SERIOUS MATTERS.











46 THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS.



I5.—-THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS.

A miller and his son were driving an



to market in a neighbour-

ing town to sell him. They had gone but

a little way when they met some rude




who cried out, “ Look at those

two simpletons! They are toiling along on









GIVE YOUR FRIEND COUNSEL WITH CAUTION.

BE READY TO HEAR, CAREFUL TO CONTRIVE, AND SLOW TO ADVISE.

















IF WISDOM IS SOUGHT FOR, IT MAY ALWAYS BE FOUND.





WHATEVER AN ASS MAY DO, PEOPLE WILL NOT GIVE HIM HONOUR.



THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS. 47



foot, when they might much more waseny ride

upon their donkey.”



made his son mount the ass’s ke and
walked along by his side, very well con-
tented.

Shortly afterwards ey came up to a

noisy group of | , who, the



a







HE HAD NEED RISE BETIMES THAT WOULD PLEASE EVERYBODY.





THERE’S NO FOOL LIKE AN OLD FOOL.











UNKIND EXPRESSIONS WOUND SENSITIVE MINDS.

MEDDLE NOT WITH THAT WHICH CONCERNS YOU NOT.







48 THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS.







moment they caught sight of the father

walking and the son riding, exclaimed,

“What an idle boy! Look at the young

rascal! He is fine and comfortable on his

, while his poor old father



On hearing this the miller made his son



REPROOF NEVER DOES A WISE MAN HARM.





EVILS BROUGHT UPON OURSELVES ARE THE MOST DIFFICULT TO BEAR.









LABOURING TO PLEASE FOOLS IS SERVILE EMPLOYMENT.







BELIEVE NOT ALL YOU HEAR, AND TELL NOT ALL YOU BELIEVE.

THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS. 49

on the back of the ass.

A couple of men were sitting under an old



, and seeing the old man rid-

dismount, and placed himself in his stead
ing and the boy walking, one of them

A RIGHTEOUS MAN REGARDETH THE LIFE OF HIS BEAST.

shouted, “Get off, you lazy fellow! How

can you expect your son to walk as fast as





QUICK BELIEVERS NEED BROAD SHOULDERS. |





7





A GRAIN OF PRUDENCE IS WORTH A POUND OF CRAFT.



50 THE OLD MAN AND UOIS ASS.



you can ride! Get off, or at least take

your boy up behind you.”



anxious to please everybody, amimedrately

did so, and thinking that now he must be in



the right, trotted merrily away.



But passing the of the

NEITHER DESPISE NOR OPPOSE WHAT YOU DO NOT UNDERSTAND.



squire’s orchard, they found the squire stand-



_GREDULOUS MEN ARE THE PREY OF CRAFTY ONES.



DO NOT JUDGE THE FEELINGS OF OTHERS BY YOURSELF.



GOOD-NATURE IS A GREAT MISFORTUNE IF IT WANT PRUDENCE.





MISFORTUNES ARE THE DISCIPLINE OF HUMANITY.



THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS. 51

ing there, and he, when he saw the donkey
hobbling along beneath his double burden,
began to scold the miller and his son, and

Jestingly exclaimed, “Why, you can much















SS

he can carry heavy fellows like you.”

ES ee eer
Tea SUS

No sooner said than done. “I am sure,”

MISFORTUNES SELDOM COME ALONE.

REFORM THOSE THINGS IN YOURSELF THAT YOU BLAME IN OTHERS.







a a a a ey Bi he a
hess fen asses se es opmental sien as

BY OTHERS’ FAULTS WISE MEN CORRECT THEIR OWN.

UNBOUGHT EXPERIENCE IS SELDOM WORTH MUCH.



52 THE OLD MAN AND GIS ASS.

said the miller, “I wish to please you all;”

and tying the ass’s legs together, he strung



him on a stout




he himself took, while his son took the

other, and thus they carried the donkey as

se i

far as the ®% which made the










a 1h es

approach to the town.

MISFORTUNES MAKE US WISE.

& , one end of which

EXPERIENCE TEACHES FOOLS, AND FOOLS WILL LEARN NO OTHER WAY.



THE REMEDY OF TO-MORROW IS TOO LATE FOR THE EVIL OF TO-DAY.





GOOD ADVICE IS OFTEN MORE VALUABLE THAN GOLD.



THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS. 53

Here the townsmen began to laugh and
jeer at the unusual sight of a donkey being
carried to market; and the ass, frightened
by the noise, kicked off the cord that bound

him, and in his agitation fell over the bridge

into the . The water was



IS. - =

very deep, and the poor animal immediately





AFTER CROSSES AND LOSSES, MEN GROW HUMBLER AND WISER.

AS YOU MAKE YOUR BED, SO YOU MUST LIE ON IT.













| HE IS UNFORTUNATE WHO CANNOT BEAR MISFORTUNE.
r

54 THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS.






§ ‘ir
io) after tying to

Tio
please everybody had pleased nobody, but



lost his ass, time, and trouble into the bargain.

Let us listen to the advice of the wise and

prudent, and act upon it; but if we follow

LAMENT NOT THE LOSS OF THAT YOU CANNOT RETRIEVE.

everybody’s counsel, we shall not please

IF BY LOSING ANYTHING WE GAIN WISDOM, WE ARE GAINERS BY THE LOSS.

anybody, and shall injure ourselves.



ADD NOT TROUBLE TO THE GRIEF-WORN HEART. |










QUENCH ALL IMMODERATE DESIRES. |
WHAT WE HAVE IS OFTEN BETTER THAN WHAT WE WANT. 55



IS: WHAT WE HAVE 16:.OFTEN. BETTER
THAN WHAT WE WANT.



Once upon a time, the

eo

after living for ages in the wide marshes,



uncontrolled by any superior power, grew

discontented with their lot, and croaked out a

BETTER TO BEAR THE ILLS WE HAYE, THAN FLY TO THOSE WE KNOW NOT OF.
CREATE NOT IMAGINARY WANTS, LEST YOU FAIL TO SATISFY THEM.











TAKE CARE YOU RAISE NO MORE SPIRITS THAN YOU GAN CONIURE DOWN.



WE INCREASE OUR WEALTH BY LESSENING OUR DESIRES.

WHAT WE HAVE IS OFTEN BETTER THAN WHAT WE WANT.





be better off than they were; but, weary of

their croaking, he threw them down a log
into the water, and bade them be satisfied.

At first they regarded the log with fear, but



mee es ==.

around it, and after awhile actually got

HAPPY IS HE WHO LIMITS HIS WANTS TO HIS NECESSITIES.







EVERY SITUATION IN LIFE HAS ITS COMFORTS FOR THOSE WHO CHOOSE TO ENJOY THEM.







THE REMEDY IS SOMETIMES WORSE THAN THE DISEASE.

CHANGES ARE NOT ALWAYS BENEFICIAL.

HE THAT ALWAYS COMPLAINS IS NEVER PITIED.

WHAT WE HAVE IS OFTEN BETTER THAN WHAT WE WANT. 57



upon it. “This is a sorry king,” said they;

“he can’t govern us, for he is without life.

Pray, O Jupiter, give us another!” This

time Jupiter grew angry, and, to punish

y
as):

their discontent, sent them a

who immediately began to eat them up as fast

bs

ashe could. The:- 14S now com-





8

THERE IS A REMEDY FOR EVERYTHING, COULD WE BUT FIND IT.









CONTRACT YOUR DESIRES, IF YOU WISH FOR INDEPENDENCE.

LITTLE SINS COMMONLY LEAD TO GREAT EVILS.



58 WHAT WE HAVE IS OFTEN BETTER THAN WHAT WE WANT.





plained that instead of a



a ‘ A

, J fi SS 4

{ Hi . ar
hia S |
|

{ ii
| |

Q

had got a tyrant; but Jupiter neeeneth to

listen to them, and said they must put up

with the consequences of their own folly.
Don’t change your condition, dni you

are sure it is for the better. “A rolling

stone,” says the proverb, “ gathers no moss.”





THE THORN IS OFTEN PLUCKED FOR THE ROSE.

IN ATTEMPTING TO AVOID A LESSER, WE MAY FALL INTO A GREATER EVIL.





KINDNESS, LIKE GRAIN, INCREASES BY SOWING.



A NOBLE MIND SCORNS MEAN ACTIONS.



THE MOUSE AND THE LION. 59









I7.-THE MOUSE AND THE LION.

The king of beasts was sleeping in his den,



indignant animal was about to kill the tiny

creature ; but the latter implored his mercy,







A KIND ACTION IS NEVER THROWN AWAY.

DO UNTO OTHERS AS YOU WOULD THAT OTHERS SHOULD DO UNTO YOU.











DO GOOD TO YOUR ENEMY, THAT HE MAY BECOME YOUR FRIEND.

STRENGTH IS NOT ALWAYS A MATCH FOR CUNNING.





60 THE MOUSE AND THE LION.



and promised not to offend again. So his
grim majesty permitted him to take his leave.
Some time afterwards, the lion happened

to be captured by a company of hunters, who



A FRIEND IS NEVER KNOWN TILL NEEDED.



DO ALL THE GOOD YOU CAN,—MAKE LITTLE NOISE ABOUT IT.







EVERY MAN BOWS TO THE BUSH HE GETS SHELTER FROM.





THE NOBLE MIND HAS NO RESENTMENTS.



through the knot, and set the



THE MOUSE AND THE LION. 61



who straightway set to work at the cords, bit



free. After thanking his humble friend, the

lion retired with all speed to the shelter of

{ Hr.




, remarking, that even

y

in this world a good action seldom fails to

meet with a due reward.







ONE NEVER LOSES BY DOING A GOOD TURN.

A REAL FRIEND IS DISCOVERED IN A TRYING CASE.

















NEVER BE BRIBED TO DO A WRONG.



ie THE THIEF AND THE MASTIFF.

I8.—THE THIEF AND THE MASTIFF.



A thief, no wanted to rob a gentleman’s



and endeavoured to bribe him into silence



by throwing oe a a none, “ Ho, ho,” said

the honest _ “T did not like

KNAVERY MAY SERVE A TURN, BUT HONESTY IS BEST IN THE END.



your Aieaaace a at He first, but now that





OBTAIN NOT FRIENDSHIP BY GIFTS, BUT BY GRACES.





A KNAVE DISCOVERED IS THE GREATEST FOOL.













WHATEVER IS BECOMING, IS HONEST; AND WHATEVER IS HONEST, IS BECOMING.

IF SINNERS ENTICE THEE, CONSENT THOU NOT.



THE THIEF AND THE MASTIFF. 63

See



you try to bribe me, I am sure you are





Fraud. He who once listens to the voice

of the tempter is certain in the end to go



A GUILTY CONSCIENCE NEEDS NO ACCUSER; HONESTY NEEDS NO MARK.

astray, and be lost.





ALL ARE NOT THIEVES THAT DOGS BARK AT.







HE THAT SEEKS TROUBLE, IT WERE A PITY HE SHOULD MISS IT.



HASTY RESOLUTIONS SELDOM SPEED WELL.

64 THE DISCONTENTED DONKEY.

I9.-THE DISCONTENTED DONKEY.

had been for years in



the service of a gardener, who employed him

to carry to market his stock of vegetables;







THE LOAD THAT IS CHEERFULLY BORNE BECOMES PLEASANT.

RASH JUDGMENT MAKETH HASTE TO REPENTANCE.





| CHANGE SELDOM, FOR CHANGES ARE INCONVENIENT.



DON’T CHANGE YOUR BUSINESS EVERY TIME YOU FEEL DISAPPOINTED.





THE DISCONTENTED DONKEY. 65 |

Growing weary of his





work, he asked Jupiter for another master.

Jupiter does not like the discontented, and
sii SV el

so he placed him under a



The burdens he had now to carry were



heavier than any his former master had

placed on his back, and again he complained



HE IS WELL WORTHY OF SORROW THAT BUYS IT.

A CONTENTED MIND ENJOYS THE SWEETEST REST.



9







‘TIS FOLLY TO FRET WHEN GRIEF’S NO COMFORT

66 THE DISCONTENTED DONKEY.





to Jupiter, who, this time, made him over to



self compelled to turn the brickmaker’s wheel.



‘* Alas,” said he, “what a fool I was not to



be content with my first lot! I see that he

IN GOOD FORTUNE, BE MODERATE; IN BAD, PRUDENT.
A POOR MAN MAY CHANGE HIS MASTER, BUT NOT HIS CONDITION.



who is constantly changing, is sure to change

for the worse!”



|

HE WHO WANTS CONTENT CAN’T FIND AN EASY CHAIR. |









HE LOSETH HIS THANKS WHO PROMISETH AND DELAYETH.

BE SLOW TO PROMISE, AND QUICK TO PERFORM.

THE WICKED ARE NEVER GRATEFUL. 67



swallowed a bone, which stuck in his throat,

and caused him terrible pain. He went up
\ Wt





and down the 4 , asking every

AN iN,
i

animal to relieve him, but all were afraid.

At length, by the promise of a splendid







ALL ARE NOT FRIENDS THAT SPEAK US FAIR.

HE THAT GETS FORGETS, AND HE THAT WANTS THINKS ON.









TO PROMISE, AND GIVE NOTHING, IS COMFORT FOR A FOOL.



TRUE GRATITUDE IS SHOWN IN DEEDS.



68 THE WICKED ARE NEVER GRATEFUL.





wolf’s throat, she drew forth the bone. Then

she claimed her reward. “Reward!” cried




the — ; “and is it not enough

that, having put your head into a wolf’s jaws,

you have been allowed to take it out again?”



PROMISES ARE TOO OFTEN LIKE PIE-CRUST,_MADE TO BE BROKEN.



RATIFY PROMISES WITH PERFORMANCES,







NOUGHT SO SMALL BUT MAY GOOD CONTAIN.



GOOD ACTS BRING US JOYS,—BAD ACTS BRING US WOE.



—

ONE GOOD TURN DESERVES ANOTHER. 69



2l1.—ONE GOOD TURN DESERVES ANOTHER.



who saw the mishap, plucked a leaf from a

tree, and dropped it in the water. The

ant, mounting upon it, got safely ashore.





A FRIEND IN NEED IS A FRIEND INDEED,





GRATITUDE IS A PROPERTY OF WHICH NO ONE CAN ROB THE POSSESSOR.









GRATITUDE PRESERVES OLD FRIENDSHIPS, AND BEGETS NEW.



LOSE NO OPPORTUNITY OF DOING A GOOD ACTION.



70 ONE GOOD TURN DESERVES ANOTHER.

At this very time a



his net, with the view of catching the poor
dove; but the ant, perceiving his objeet, bit
his heel, and the man in his alarm let fall

-e Thedove then saw how



great a danger she had escaped, and thank-
ing the ant, flew away.

A REAL FRIEND IS DISCOVERED IN A TRYING CASE.



WRITE INJURIES IN DUST, BUT KINDNESSES IN MARBLE.





LEARN BY THE VICES OF OTHERS HOW DETESTABLE YOUR OWN ARE,





WHEN THY NEIGHBOUR’S HOUSE IS ON FIRE, BEWARE OF THINE OWN.







TAKE WARNING BY OTHERS’ MISFORTUNES. 71



22.-TAKE WARNING BY OTHERS’ MISFORTUNES.

The errors and misfortunes of other people
will always be regarded by the prudent as

lessons for their own instruction.






Once upon a time, the

y).
g °
fees

=F

with an ass and a fox, and proposed that

they should go out hunting together. They





BETTER TO BE ALONE THAN IN BAD COMPANY.





LET THE SHIPWRECKS OF OTHERS BE YOUR SEA-MARKS.















HE THAT HAS MUCH, WOULD ALWAYS HAVE MORE.



WHEN FORTUNE SMILES, SHE OFTEN DESIGNS THE MOST MISCHIEF.



| 72 TAKE WARNING BY OTHERS’ MISFORTUNES.

captured a very considerable amount of

booty, and the chase being over, retired to a

that it might be divided



oe Py)
= eo
“ay Y

among them. The lion requested the ass to
undertake the task of division, and he, care-

fully separating the spoil into three equal

portions, requested his companions to take |

FEAR IS ONE PART OF PRUDENCE.



SERVE A GREAT MAN, AND YOU WILL KNOW WHAT SORROW IS.









THE BEST GO FIRST; THE BAD REMAIN TO MEND.

AVOID CONTENTION WITH THE STRONG.





TAKE WARNING BY OTHERS’ MISFORTUNES. 73

their choice. But the lion declared the divi-



SS SS B

an

divide the whole between me and yourself.”
The fox immediately handed over the spoil

to the lion, keeping back only a very small

CHEATING PLAY NEVER THRIVES.
10 ae



NEVER ACT THE TYRANT TO THOSE WEAKER THAN YOURSELF.







THOUGH WE MAY TREAT OTHERS ILL, WE DO NOT LIKE TO BE TREATED SO.



PRECEPTS MAY LEAD, BUT EXAMPLES DRAW.







74 TAKE WARNING BY OTHERS’ MISFORTUNES.



portion. “ Ha, ha,” said the king of beasts,

“IT see you understand how to act fairly.”

IT IS ALLOWABLE TO DERIVE INSTRUCTION EVEN FROM AN ENEMY.









LET US TURN OVER A NEW LEAF. Z |









A GOOD WORD, FOR A BAD ONE, IS WORTH MUCH, AND COSTS LITTLE.

KIND WORDS AWAKEN KIND ECHOES.







KEY TO THE FABLES.

The italicised words represent the Pictures in the foreyoing Fables,





1.—_THE DOG AND HIS SHADOW.

THERE was once a dog, which being very
hungry had carried off a leg of mutton. But
crossing a bridge he saw, as he thought,
another dog in the water, which also carried
a piece of meat. Then he barked loudly,
and attempted to seize the prize. In doing
so, he let go his own piece, which fell into the
stream and sank. So the foolish dog found
he had been grasping at a shadow; as man
himself too often does.

It is wise to be content with what we
have. Greedy people always injure them-
selves. “A bird in the hand,” says a good
old proverb, “is worth two in the bush.”



We should learn to be satisfied with our lot,
and not to envy other persons.

2.—THE FISHERMAN AND THE FISH.

A fisherman, who was very proud of his
musical skill, sat himself down by the sea-
side with his flute, and began to play, in the
belief that the fish, on hearing his beautiful
tunes, would jump on shore.
and played very well, but no fish came;
neither salmon, nor mackerel, nor any other.
“This will never do,” said he; “I must try
some other way of catching my fish, or I
So-he got into his boat, took
his net, rowed out to sea, and soon found his
net quite full. Then he drew it on board,
and the fish began to jump and leap; but he
only said, “If you would not dance when I
played, your dancing now won’t save you
from the pan.”—There are always two ways
of doing a thing; let us take care to choose
the right one.

shall starve.”

3._THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE.

A hare, once upon a time, laughed at the
slow gait of a tortoise, and offered to bet a
very considerable sum of money that she
would run a mile in far less time. As judge
of the race they chose the fo.

He played,





USE SOFT WORDS AND MILD ARGUMENTS.

REPROVE MILDLY, AND CORRECT WITH CAUTION.









WISELY AND SLOWLY: THEY STUMBLE WHO RUN FAST.



HE WHO SWIMS IN SIN WILL SINK IN SORROW.



76 KEY TO THE FABLES.





se 2 SES SWaSON |

Away went the hare, and soon left the
tortoise far behind. Then she thought to
herself she would take a rest, and squatting
under a tree she fell asleep. Meantime, up
came the tortoise, passed the sleeping hare,
and reached the post before she awoke. The
fox declared him winner of the pwrse.—Most
haste is sometimes worst speed. If we rest
at the wrong time, we must expect to lose
by our idleness. In the race of life we must
not fall behind, or halt by the wayside; but
if we would win the crown, must keep

steadily onward.

4.—THE BEAR AND THE OWL,

A bear was boasting in the hearing of an
owl, that he was very partial to man, ever
ill-treating him when he was dead. “I
should believe in your friendship,” said the
owl, “if you did not devour him when
alive.”

5.—EVERYBODY FOR HIMSELF.

ONCE upon a time a governor of a certain
castle had reason to fear it would be besieged





by the enemy; and therefore he called a
council to see how it could best be fortified.
“For my part,” said a bricklayer, “I think
you cannot do better than use brick.” —* Not
at all,” exclaimed a nimble and industrious
“T am sure that timber is a
better material."—“ You are both wrong,”

carpenter ;

sharply remarked a currier; “for there is
nothing like leather !”

Every man thinks his own trade or pro-
fession the best, and undervalues every other.



6.—THE WOLF AND THE LAMB.

ONE very hot day a wolf and a lamb chanced
to come down to the same stream to drink ;
the wolf on the higher ground, and the lamb
some distance below him. The wolf, wish-
ing to quarrel, accused the meek and innocent
lamb of seeking to disturb the water in the
stream. “But how can that be,” said the
lamb, “since the water runs down from you
tome?” “That may be so,” said the grim
and surly wolf, “but this time last year you
called me ill names.” “What! I?—I was
not even born.” Then the wolf fell into a
passion, and seized the lamb, saying, “If it
was not you, it was your mother, the sheep,
which is all the same.”

A LIE HAS NO LEGS, BUT SCANDAL HAS WINGS.



IT COSTS MORE TO REVENGE INJURIES THAN TO BEAR THEM.







WE NEVER KNOW THE WORTH OF WATER TILL THE WELL IS DRY.



GOOD FORESIGHT FURTHERS THE WORK.

KEY TO THE FABLES. 77

The wicked man never wants an excuse
for doing harm to the innocent.





be left longer in their bed. But their young

| mistress saw through their scheme, and

always afterwards made them rise when the
clock pointed to three—People who do wrong
to save themselves trouble, often bring a far
greater misfortune upon their heads.







7.-THE CROW AND THE PITCHER.

ONCE on a time, a thirsty crow had the
good fortune to fall in with a pitcher of
water. But when he would have drunk, he
found the water so low down that he could
not reach it. He tried to overturn the
pitcher, but it was too heavy for him. Then
he picked up some large stones, and these
he cast one by one into the pitcher, until
the water rose up to the brim, and he was
able to quench his thirst—This is a lesson
for boys and girls, as good as they can find
in any book: “Persevere and conquer every

difficulty.”

8.—THE MISTRESS AND HER SERVANTS.

THERE was a young lady who had several
servants, and she was accustomed to call
them up every morning when the cock crew.
The lazy girls, angry at being roused so
early, killed the cock, in the hope that they



might get an hour or two’s extra sleep, and







9.-LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP.

A Fox had fallen into a well, and was at a
loss for some means of getting out again.
After a while there came to the place an old
goat; but before he drank, he asked of
Mister Fox whether the water was good and
plentiful. “Oh yes, my friend,” cried he;
“you never before saw water so good or so
I came down here on purpose to

The goat immediately jumped

abundant !
drink of it.”

in; and the sly old Reynard, springing upon

his stout horns, immediately jumped out.
Then said the former: “What! will you
leave me here alone? How shall I get up
again?” “That is your business,” replied
the fox; “you should have looked before
you leaped.” And away he went over the

nearest gate.





NONE CEASE TO RISE, BUT THOSE WHO CEASE TO CLIMB.

KEEP GOOD MEN COMPANY AND YOU WILL BE ONE OF THEM.

a







PATIENCE AND TIME RUN THROUGH THE LONGEST DAY.

STUDY TO BE WORTHY

OF YOUR PARENTS.





78 KEY TO THE FABLES.

Greedy people often overreach themselves.
Be content with what you have.

10.—THE COUNTRY MOUSE AND THE
TOWN MOUSE.

A COUNTRY mouse, who had a friend in a
distant town, invited him to pay him a visit.
The town mouse did so, and on his arrival
received a hearty welcome.
found that the fare was coarse and scanty ;
a nut or two, a few pease, a little rice, and
now and then a small quantity of grain, with
occasionally a crumb or two of mouldy
bread. So he grew tired of his visit, and

But he soon

said to his friend, “ How can you spend your
life in this miserable barn, where the farmer
and his wife don’t allow you proper food,
nor enough of it? Come up to town with
me, and see how I live.” The two friends
went, and at night the town mouse took the
country mouse into a splendid larder, whose
shelves were loaded with dainties. Here
was a fine cheese, there a pan full of delicious
milk; in fact, the country mouse was quite
bewildered, and scarcely knew what to taste
first.

But, lo and behold! the servant came in
while the two friends were enjoying them-
selves, and discovering them at work, she
began to beat them with a broom; and call-
ing a couple of cats, pursued them with so

_ much vigour, that it was with great diffi-

culty they made their escape.

As soon as things were quiet again, the
country mouse whispered to his friend,
“Good-bye! I’m off! You are welcome to
your fine dishes and anxiety; for my part,
I'd rather have plain food and peace.”





11—THE FOX AND THE GRAPES.

It was vintage time, and the grapes were
ripe. A sly old fox stole into a vineyard,
where his quick eyes discovered some fine
fruit just above his head; and he jumped up
to seize the grapes. Unfortunately he found

they hung beyond his reach; and after many

‘fruitless trials, the fow crept back through

the hedge, grumbling, and saying, “ Well,
after all, who would care to eat a lot of sour
grapes !”—What we cannot get, we pretend
to despise’ The watch which is not ours,
never keeps time. —










a Bee,

12,-[THE ADDER AND THE COUNTRYMAN.
ONE winter day, when the pure white snow
lay thick on the ground, and the leaves were
all gone from the trees, a peasant found under
the hedge an adder, lying frozen and nearly

THE PATH OF VIRTUE IS THE PATH OF PEACE.



PASSION IS A FEVER THAT LEAVES US WEAKER THAN IT FINDS US.











IF WE SUBDUE NOT OUR PASSIONS, OUR PASSIONS WILL SUBDUE US.



HE WHO WOULD REAP WELL MUST SOW WELL.

KEY TO THE FABLES. 79

dead. Being a man of tender heart, he put
the creature in his bosom, and carried it
home, where he laid it before the jive, in the
hope of reviving it. But no sooner did it
feel the warmth, and recover its strength,
than it turned round on the peasant’s chil-
dren, and tried to sting them.

“Ho, ho!” said the peasant, amazed; “is
this the way you repay me for my kindness ?
Will you return evil for good? If so, you
must die.” And with his stick he knocked
the adder on the head, and with one blow
killed it—If we turn round on those who do
us a kindness, we must expect to be punished
for our ingratitude.



Paterra

13.-THE JACKDAW AND THE BIRDS.

A VAIN and empty-headed jackdaw went
strutting about a garden decked in a lot of
peacocks’ feathers which he had picked up.
Thinking himself very handsome, the jack-
daw left his old friends, and forced himself into
the company of a splendid peacock. At first
he got along very well, but after a short time
the peacock found out that he was only a
pretender, and stripping him of the feathers

+

S | other side.



| had made his fingers burn.
| son,’



that. were not his own, drove him away.
The wretched bird, perfectly humbled and
crest-fallen, then went back to his former
friends, the raven and the crow; but they,
offended at his pride, and at the contempt
he had shown for their society, bade him go
about his business.

It is foolish to make ourselves out what
we are not; and only the ignorant and silly
will scorn their old friends.

14.-THE BOY AND THE NETTLE.

A LITTLE boy who was playing about in a
meadow ventured to touch a nettle, and was
stung by it. He ran home to his mother
with all speed, complaining that he had
scarcely touched it, and yet the nasty thing
“Just so, my
said she; “but had you grasped it
boldly, it would not have hurt you; timid
people always run into more trouble than do
the brave.

>

If you see a stream, and want
to jump across it, do so without fear and
hesitation, and you will leap safely to the
If you hesitate, you are lost!”

15.—_THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS,

A MILLER and his son were driving an ass
to market in a neighbouring town to sell
him. They had gone but a little way when
they met some rude boys, who cried out,
“Look at those two simpletons! They are
toiling along on foot, when they might much
more wisely ride upon their donkey.” Then
the miller made his son mount the ass’s
back, and walked along by his side, very
well contented.

THE HOPE IS SURE WHICH HAS ITS FOUNDATION IN VIRTUE.

DEFER NOT TILL THE EVENING WHAT THE MORNING MAY ACCOMPLISH.











FLY PLEASURE AND IT WILL FOLLOW THEE.—LOOK BACK AND IMPROVE.



GOOD MANNERS IS THE ART OF MAKING PEOPLE EASY.



80 KEY TO THE FABLES.

Shortly afterwards they came up to a
noisy group of girls, who, the moment they
caught sight of the father walking and the
son riding, exclaimed, “ What an idle boy!
Look at the young rascal! He is fine and
comfortable on his donkey, while his poor
old father can scarcely drag along his weary
feet.” On hearing this the miller made his
son dismount, and placed himself in his
stead on the back of the ass.

A couple of men were sitting under an
old tree, and seeing the old man riding and
the boy walking, one of them shouted, “ Get
off, you lazy fellow! How can you expect
your son to walk as fast as you can ride!
Get off, or at least take your boy up behind
you.” The mlier, anxious to please every-
body, immediately did so, and thinking that
now he must be in the right, trotted merrily
away.

But passing the gate of the squire’s
orchard, they found the squire standing
there; and he, when he saw the donkey



hobbling along beneath his double burden,
began to scold the miller and his son, and
jestingly exclaimed, “Why, you can much
better carry the poor donkey than he can
carry heavy fellows like you.”

No sooner said than done. “I am sure,”

said the miller, “I wish to please you all;”



DERIDE NOT ANY MAN’S INFIRMITIES.

and tying the ass’s legs together, he strung
him on a stout pole, one end of which he
himself took, while his son took the other,
and sthus they carried the donkey as far as
the bridge which made the approach to the
town.

Here the townsmen began to laugh and
jeer at the unusual sight of a donkey being
carried to market; and the ass, frightened
by the noise, kicked off the cord that bound
him, and in his agitation fell over the bridge
into the water. The water was very deep,
and the poor animal immediately sank; so
that the miller after trying to please every-
body had pleased nobody, but lost his ass,
time, and trouble into the bargain.

Let us listen to the advice of the wise and
prudent, and act upon it; but if we follow
everybody’s counsel, we shall not please any-
body, and shall injure ourselves.

16.—WHAT WE HAVE IS OFTEN BETTER
THAN WHAT WE WANT.

ONCE upon a time, the frogs, after living for
ages in the wide marshes, uncontrolled by
any superior power, grew discontented with
their lot, and croaked out a petition to
Jupiter to give them a king. Jupiter knew
very well that they could not be better off

than they were ; but, weary of their croak-

ing, he threw them down a log into the
water, and bade them be satisfied. At first
they regarded the log with fear, but finding
that it did not move or speak, they crept
out of the rushes, hopped around it, and after
awhile actually got upon it. “This is a sorry
king,” said they; “he can’t govern us, for
he is without life. Pray, O Jupiter, give us
another!” This time Jupiter grew angry,





IT IS LESS PAINFUL TO LEARN IN YOUTH THAN TO BE IGNORANT IN AGE.









THE GREATEST TREASURES ARE STORED IN THE SMALLEST COMPASS.





IF THERE WERE NO CLOUDS WE WOULD NOT ENJOY THE SUN.

KEY TO THE FABLES. 81



and, to punish their discontent, sent them a
stork, who immediately began to eat them
up as fast as he could. The frogs now com-
plained that instead of a king they had got
a tyrant; but Jupiter refused to listen to
them, and said they must put up with the
consequences of their own folly.



Don’t change your condition, unless you
are sure it is for the better. “A rolling
stone,” says the proverb, “gathers no moss,”

17.—THE MOUSE AND THE LION.

THE king of beasts was sleeping in his den,
when he was aroused by a little mouse, who,
in his ignorance of where he was, ran over
the nose of the ion. The indignant animal
was about to kill the tiny creature; but the
latter implored his mercy, and promised not
to offend again. So his grim majesty per-
mitted him to take his leave.

Some time afterwards, the lion happened
to be captured by a company of hunters,
who bound him tightly with ropes, intending
to kill him on the morrow. In this condi-
tion he was found by the little mouse, who
straightway set to work at the cords, bit
through the knot, and set the lion free.
After thanking his humble friend, the lion









retired with all speed to the shelter of the
forest, remarking, that even in this world a
good action seldom fails to meet with a due
reward.

18.-THE THIEF AND THE MASTIFF.

A THIEF, who wanted to rob a gentleman’s
house, found a dog in the garden, and
endeavoured to bribe him into silence by
throwing him a bone. “Ho, ho,” said the



honest mastiff, “I did not like your appear-
ance at the first, but now that you try to
bribe me, I am sure you are a knave. Be
off, or I will rouse the watchman,’”—This is
the way in which Honesty will always meet

NOT HE THAT HAS LITTLE, BUT HE THAT DESIRES MUCH, IS POOR.





A GOOD NAME KEEPS ITS LUSTRE IN THE DARK.

11

¢









TAKE HEED OF AN OX BEFORE, AN ASS BEHIND, AND A KNAVE ON ALL SIDES.



CONFESSION OF A FAULT MAKES HALF AMENDS FOR IT,

82 KEY TO THE FABLES.



the advances of Fraud. He who once listens
to the voice of the tempter is certain in the

end to go astray, and be lost.

19.-THE DISCONTENTED DONKEY.

A donkey had been for years in the service
of a gardener, who employed him to carry to
market his stock of vegetables; now a basket
of nice fresh cabbages, and now a hamper of
potatoes; at one time a load of apples, and
at another a load of pears.
of his work, he asked Jupiter for another

Growing weary

master, Jupiter does not like the discon-
tented, and so he placed him under a potter.
The burdens he had now to carry were
heavier than his former master had placed
on his back, and again he complained to
Jupiter, who, this time, made him over to
a brickmaker, and the silly ass found him-
self compelled to turn the brickmaker’s
wheel. “Alas,” said he, “what a fool I was
not to be content with my first lot! I see
that he who is constantly changing, is sure

10?

to change for the worse !



20.-THE WICKED ARE NEVER
GRATEFUL.

A wolf, while taking his dinner, swallowed
a bone, which stuck in his throat, and caused

him terrible pain. He went up and down



the wood, asking every animal to relieve
him; but all were afraid. At length, by the
promise of a splendid reward, a crane was
induced to try her skill; and thrusting her
neck down the wolf’s throat, she drew forth
the bone. Then she claimed her reward.
“Reward!” cried the wolf; “and is it not
enough that, having put your head into a
wolf’s jaws, you have been allowed to take
it out again ?”

21.—ONE GOOD TURN DESERVES
ANOTHER,

Two ants were drinking at the side of a
pond. One fell in, and was on the point of
being drowned, when a dove, who saw the
mishap, plucked a leaf from a tree, and
dropped it in the water. The ant, mounting
upon it, got safely ashore. At this very
time a fowler spread his net, with the view
of catching the poor dove; but the ant,
perceiving his object, bit his heel, and the
man in his alarm let fall the net. The dove
then saw how great a danger she had
escaped, and thanking the ant, flew away.

22.-TAKE WARNING BY OTHERS’
MISFORTUNES.

THE errors and misfortunes of other people
will always be regarded by the prudent as
lessons for their own instruction.

Once upon a time, the lion met with an
ass and a fox, and proposed that they should
go out hunting together. They captured a
very considerable amount of booty, and the
chase being over, retired to a grotto that it
might be divided among them. The lion

.





THERE’S NO JOY WITHOUT ALLOY,—NO ROSE WITHOUT A THORN.

IF EVERY ONE WOULD MEND ONE, ALL WOULD BE AMENDED.











THINE ACTIONS SERVE THE TURN;

NEITHER PRAISE NOR DISPRAISE THYSELF,

JUDICIOUS MAXIMS OUGHT TO BE KEPT IN VIEW.





KEY TO THE FABLES. 83

requested the ass to undertake the task of | the whole between me and yourself.” The

division; and he, carefully separating the
spoil into three equal portions, requested his
companions to take their choice. But the
lion declared the division unfair, sprang upon
the ass, and tore him to pieces. “ Now,”
said he to the fow, “be good enough to divide

fox immediately handed over the spoil to
the lion, keeping back only a very small
portion. “Ha, ha,” said the king of beasts,
“T see you understand how to act fairly.”
“Yes,” replied the fox; “I was taught a
lesson by the fate of the ass.”



ALL’S WELL THAT BEGINS AND ENDS WELL.



' AND DON’T BE ALL YOUR DAYS TROTTING ON A CABBAGE-LEAF.









i)





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THE

WORD-PICTURE FABLE BOOK;

OR,

OLD ASOP IN A NEW DRESS.



LONDON:
fT. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW;

EDINBURGH; AND ‘NEW YORK.



1872.

















PREFACE,

um uum

My Dear Cuinpren,
I hope you will like this little Fable Book I have prepared for you, and
will find much to amuse, and something to instruct, in its pretty pages.

You know what a Fable is? A kind of short story, in which animals are
generally introduced, and which is made to convey a truth worth remembering
in a lively and agreeable manner.

The following Fables are not new ones ; they are Old Favourites, but they
have New Faces—that is, I have rewritten them in language which, I think,
you will easily understand. ne :

And in order to puzzle you a little, and to entertain you while puzzling you,
I have made the printer insert a little picture here and there instead of a word,
so that you must guess the word from studying the picture.

I think you will not find it very difficult to do this; but in case you should
sometimes be unable to hit upon the right word, I have printed a Key at the end
of the book, in which the Fables are given without illustrations. You must
mind, though, that you are not to look at the Key until you have first done your
utmost to make out the meaning of the picture.

And now, my dear children, I commend. this little book to your careful
reading, and hope you will profit by it, and that you will all of you endeavour to
act up to its lessons, and from good boys and girls, with God’s blessing, become,
in due time, good men and women.

Your affectionate friend,

Unote WILLIAM.
June 1870. ae




Â¥

evra Sainte pelt AE renege ne


om







10.
11.
12.
13.
14,

16.
17.
18,
19.
20.
21,
22.

[aE SO
. THE DOG AND HIS SHADOW, ese ose eve eee

. THE FISHERMAN AND THE FISH, ... ove eee ove eve
. THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE, re ove an

. THE BEAR AND THE OWL, ... oes eee eee ae

. EVERYBODY FOR HIMSELF, ... ove zee eos eee

. THE WOLF AND THE LAMB.,... oe ove ose

. THE CROW AND THE PITCHER, a po sae eee to
. THE MISTRESS AND HER SERVANTS,

. LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP,

THE COUNTRY MOUSE AND THE TOWN MOUSE, ...

THE FOX AND THE GRAPES,

THE ADDER AND THE COUNTRYMAN, ss ose ey eos
THE JACKDAW AND THE BIRDS,

THE BOY AND THE NETTLE, ne eee eee eve ove

. THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS,

WHAT WE HAVE IS OFTEN BETTER THAN WHAT WE WANT, ...
THE MOUSE AND THE LION,

THE THIEF AND THE MASTIFF,

THE DISCONTENTED DONKEY,

THE WICKED ARE NEVER GRATEFUL,

ONE GOOD TURN DESERVES ANOTHER,

TAKE WARNING BY OTHERS’ MISFORTUNES,

KEY TO THE FABLES,

19
21
24
26
28
31
36
388
41
44
46

59
62
64
67
69

71






ee ae ee)

WHAT THE EYE SEES NOT THE HEART RUES NOT.

GOOD MAXIMS ARE ALWAYS IN SEASON.



THE WORD-PICTURE FABLE BOOK.



lL—THE DOG AND HIS SHADOW.





he saw, as he thought, another dog in the

water, which also carried a piece of meat.



THE COVETOUS MAN IS HIS OWN TORMENTOR.



2



CATCH NOT AT THE SHADOW AND LOSE THE SUBSTANCE.






MUCH IS WANTING WHERE MUCH IS DESIRES.

GREED OFTEN BEGUILES WIT.



10 THE DOG AND HIS SHADOW.



Then he barked loudly, and attempted

to seize the prize. In doing so, he let



go his own piece, which fell into the

and sank. So _ the = fool-





NEVER QUIT CERTAINTY FOR HOPE.

MUCH WOULD HAVE MORE, AND LOSE ALL.

po








NEVER GIVE UP A CERTAINTY FOR AN UNCERTAINTY.







ENVY AND COVETOUSNESS ARE NEVER SATISFIED.



THE DOG AND HIS SHADOW. ll



It is wise to be content with what we
have. Greedy people always injure them-

selves. “A n the hand,”



\\ SOR AY
\ Wey .
WS

says a good old proverb, “is worth two in

the >.” We should learn to



other persons.

GREED IS ENVY’S ELDER BROTHER.



THERE IS MANY A SLIP BETWEEN THE CUP AND THE LIP.








UNDERTAKE NOTHING BEYOND YOUR POWERS.

DO NOT COUNT YOUR FISH TILL YOU GET THEM.











12 THE FISHERMAN AND THE FISH.





2.—THE FISHERMAN AND THE FISH.

||

began



to play, in the belief that the fish, on

hearing his beautiful tunes, would jump on

shore. He played, and played very well,

ee



THINKING IS FAR FROM KNOWING.



WHEN WISE MEN PLAY THE FOOL, THEY DO IT WITH A VENGEANCE.








A LITTLE WIT WILL SERVE A FORTUNATE MAN.

WHERE THERE IS A WILL THERE IS A WAY.









THE FISHERMAN AND THE FISH. 13



but no fish came; neither}



nor 4



will never do,” said he; “I must try some

other way of catching my fish, or I shall



starve.” So he got into his



took his

and soon found his net quite full. Then

~

DILIGENCE IS THE MOTHER OF GOOD FORTUNE.





HE WHO WOULD CATCH FISH MUST NOT MIND GETTING WET.








LUCK DEPENDS ON A WILLING HEART AND SINEWY MUSCLE.



ALL IS FISH THAT COMES IN HIS NET.







14 THE FISHERMAN AND THE FISH.





“If you would not dance when I played,

your dancing now won’t save you from the



.’—There are always two wavs of
_ 5

doing a thing; let us take care to choose

the right one.



IT IS GOOD TO BEGIN WELL, BUT BETTER TO END WELL.



MOST THINGS HAVE TWO HANDLES; AND A WISE MAN TAKES HOLD OF THE BEST,












; A WAGER IS A FOOL’S ARGUMENT.

THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE.

15



8. THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE.



race they chose the

TO SAY LITTLE, AND PERFORM MUCH, IS NOBLE.

SLOW AND SURE OFTEN WIN THE RACE.



THE RACE IS NOT ALWAYS TO THE SWIFT.












THE SLEEPING FOX CATCHES NO POULTRY.

TIME STAYS NOT THE FOOL’S LEISURE.







16 THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE.



Away went the hare, and soon left the

tortoise far behind. Then she thought to

herself she would take a rest, and squat-

before she awoke. The fox declared him

s



THERE IS LUCK IN LEISURE,



— seals aed

HE THAT RUNS FAST WILL NOT RUN LONG.

a tet


LET THEM LAUGH WHO WIN.



THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE. 17



Most haste



is sometimes worst speed. If we rest at
the wrong time, we must expect to lose by

our idleness. In the race of life we must

EACH USEFUL IN THEIR SPHERE—’TWAS SO ORDAINED.

» must



keep steadily onward.



| JUDGE NOT OF MEN AND THINGS AT FIRST SIGHT.
eS SIA SR re SRR kN matt see a eal

3

A SPUR IN THE HEAD IS WORTH TWO IN THE HEEL.






FALSE FRIENDS ARE WORSE THAN OPEN ENEMIES,

CRAFT BRINGETH NOTHING HOME,





18 THE BEAR AND THE OWL.





4.—THE BEAR -AND THE OWL.



was boasting in the
hearing of an owl, that he was very
partial to man, never ill-treating him when

he was dead. “I should believe in your



shoh
RX

friendship,” said the “% , “if you did

not devour him when alive.”



THE UNKNOWN ARE BETTER THAN ILL KNOWN.





NEVER SPEAK TO DECEIVE, NOR LISTEN TO BETRAY.








QUESTIONS OF MOMENT REQUIRE DELIBERATE ANSWERS.

THREATENED FOLKS LIVE LONG.







EVERYBODY FOR HIMSELF. 19



6:-EVERYBODY FOR FIMSELF.

Once upon a time a governor of a certain

had reason to fear it would

os

be besieged by the enemy; and therefore he

called a council to see how it could best be











DELAYS ARE DANGEROUS.

X

HAVE NOT THY CLOAK TO MAKE WHEN IT BEGINS TO RAIN.




PROVIDE FOR THE WORST, THE BEST WILL SAVE ITSELF.





KNOWLEDGE IS BETTER THAN HOUSE OR LAND.

20 EVERYBODY FOR HIMSELF.



brick.”—“ Not at all, ” exclaimed animble and

industrious ; “TI am sure that



timber is a pets nae ”__ Wou are both

wrong,” sharply remarked a -



“for there is nothing like aor em
Every man thinks his own trade or pro-

fession the best, and undervalues every other.





EVERY ONE FOR HIMSELF, AND GOD FOR US ALL.

OF ALL THE CRAFTS, TO BE AN HONEST MAN IS THE MASTER CRAFT.








HE WHO SOWS THORNS CAN NEVER REAP GRAPES,





MALICE SELDOM WANTS A MARK TO SHOOT AT



THE WOLF AND THE LAMB.

21





6.—THE WOLF AND

THE LAMB.



One very hot day a





chanced to come down
mW s







ais.

to the

Â¥

same

The wolf,

lamb some distance below him.

wishing to quarrel, accused the meek and







AN EVIL MIND, AN EVIL MEANING,



THE STONE THAT LIES NOT IN YOUR WAY NEED NOT OFFEND YOU.














ILL-WILL IS EVER PLENTIFUL OF ILL WORDS.







WRANGLERS NEVER WANT WORDS.





22 THE WOLF AND THE LAMB.



innocent lamb of seeking to disturb the

water in the ~<







“But how
me : : :

can that be,” said the lamb, “since the

water runs down from you to me?” “That

may be so,” said the grim and_ surly




, “but this time last year you

Se 2
= Se

called me ul names.” “ What! I2?—I was

Mad







A CLEAR CONSCIENCE FEARS NO ACCUSATION.

ILL-WILL NEVER SPEAKS WELL, OR DOES WELL.






A FEW VICES WILL OBSCURE MANY VIRTUES.





ONE UNKIND WORD GENERATES OTHERS.





THE WOLF AND THE LAMB. 23





not even born.” Then the



saying, “If it was not you, it was your



mother, the



the same.”

REBEL NOT AGAINST THE DICTATES OF REASON.



The wicked man never wants an excuse

for doing harm to the innocent.



MALICE DRINKETH ITS OWN POISON.




NECESSITY IS THE MOTHER OF INVENTION.





24 THE CROW AND THE PITCHER.



(.-FHE CROW: AND ‘THE - PIF CHER.
‘

Once on a time, a thirsty
had the good fortune to fall in “with a
pitcher of water. But when he would have

drunk, he found the water so low down that

TO BELIEVE A BUSINESS POSSIBLE, IS THE WAY TO MAKE IT SO.

he could not reach it. He tried to overturn

(Pitas

the but it was too heavy for



NEVER GIVE UP AT A DIFFICULTY.







CONSTANT APPLICATIONS OVERCOME THE GREATEST DIFFICULTIES.








NOTHING IS SO DIFFICULT BUT WE MAY OVERCOME BY PERSEVERANCE

FEW THINGS ARE IMPOSSIBLE TO SKILL AND INDUSTRY.









THE CROW AND THE PITCHER. 25



him. Then he picked up some large
stones, and these he cast one by one into
, until the water rose up
to the brim, and he was able to quench his
thirst.—This is a lesson for boys and girls,
as good as they can find in any
“ Persevere and conquer every difficulty.”

PERSEVERE AGAINST DISCOURAGEMENT.
4







DIFFICULTIES, TO BE SURMOUNTED, MUST BE MET WITH ENERGY






THE PLANS OF THE WICKED ARE NOT ALWAYS SUCCESSFUL.

A GOOD SERVANT MAKES A GOOD MASTER.





26 THE MISTRESS AND HER SERVANTS.



8. —THE MISTRESS AND HER SERA NTS:

There was a young <3



had several servants, and sie was m ascustonibd

to ba them up every morning when the

\ crew. The lazy girls, angry



at bene roused so early, killed the cock, in

the hope that they might get an hour or

RISE EARLY AND ECONOMISE YOUR TIME.



THE WILES OF THE WICKED ARE OFTEN RUINOUS TO THEMSELVES.








SERVE WELL, IF YOU WOULD BE WELL SERVED. ‘ |
moe

THE MISTRESS AND HER SERVANTS. 27



two's s caine rE BICeD and be left longer i in their

“|. But their young mistress











Beinted to three.—People who dov wrong to

NEVER DO EVIL, TO THINK GOOD MAY COME OF IT.



A GOOD SERVANT DISPUTETH NOT HIS MASTER’S COMMAND.

save themselves trouble, often bring a far



greater misfortune upon their heads.





HE THAT RISES LATE NEVER DOES A GOOD DAY’S WORK.






THE FOLLY OF ONE MAN IS THE FORTUNE OF ANOTHER.



NEVER WADE IN UNKNOWN WATERS.



28 LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP.





9.-LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP.



again. After a while there came to the



drank, he asked of Mister Fox whether the

water was good and plentiful. “Oh, yes,





SUDDEN TRUST BRINGS SUDDEN REPENTANCE.

HE THAT WILL NOT LOOK BEFORE HIM, WILL HAVE TO LOOK BEHIND HIM.








LOOK TWICE ERE YOU DETERMINE ONCE.









IF YOU TRUST BEFORE YOU TRY, YOU MAY REPENT BEFORE YOU DIE.

LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP. 29





my friend,” cried he; “you never before saw

water so good or so abundant! I came

oe
_

upon his stout = A », immediately

jumped out. Then said the former: “ What!





CALCULATE WELL BEFORE YOU RESOLVE,

CONFIDE NOT IN HIM WHO HAS ONCE DECEIVED ‘VOU:










SOME DO FIRST, THINK AFTERWARDS, AND REPENT FOR EVER.



PROCURE NOT FRIENDS IN HASTE.



30 LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP.





will you leave me here alone? How shall

I get up again?” “That is your business,”



ee
et yet ate
————_—_=_- hs



Greedy people often overreach them-

selves. Be content with what you have.







PRESENCE OF MIND IS NECESSARY AT ALL TIMES.

VENTURE UPON NOTHING TILL YOU HAVE WELL CONSIDERED THE END.








BETTER A LITTLE FIRE TO WARM YOU THAN A BIG FIRE TO BURN YOU.

A CONTENTED MIND IS A CONTINUAL FEAST.





THE COUNTRY MOUSE AND THE TOWN MOUSE. 31



10.-THE COUNTRY MOUSE AND THE TOWN MOUSE.



A country 4 ~, who had a
friend in a distant town, invited him to pay
him a visit. The town mouse did so, and
on his arrival received a hearty welcome.
But he soon found that the fare was coarse

and scanty; a -or two, a few







UNFADING JOYS ARE NOT OF THIS WORLD. .





CONTENTMENT IS ONLY TO BE FOUND WITHIN OURSELVES,










CONTENT IS THE TRUE PHILOSOPHER'S STONE.

QUIET AND CONTENT IN A COTTAGE IS BETTER THAN LUXURY AND STRIFE IN A PALACE.







82 THE COUNTRY MOUSE AND THE TOWN MOUSE.





pease, a little rice, and now and then a

small quantity of grain, with occasionally



So he grew tired of his visit, and said to his

friend, “ How can you spend your life in this



miserable : », , where the farmer

and his wife don’t allow you proper food,





BETTER LONG SOMETHING THAN SOON NOTHING.



THE GREATEST WEALTH IS CONTENTMENT WITH LITTLE.








CREDIT NOT HIM WHOSE TONGUE SPEAKETH WONDERS.

CONTENTMENT TO THE MIND IS A LIGHT TO THE EYE.











THE COUNTRY MOUSE AND THE TOWN MOUSE. 33 |

nor enough of it? Come up to town with
me, and see how I live.” The two friends

went, and at night the town mouse took the

AWS
‘

\
4

aN







country mouse into a splendid |] amu, S\(e ,

.

whose shelves were loaded with dainties.
Here was a fine cheese, there a x
full of delicious milk; in fact, the country

PLEASURES OVER-PURCHASED ARE REAL TORMENTS,





RIOTOUS LIVES CAN NEVER KNOW THE PLEASURES OF TEMPERANCE.





5








A CONTENTED MIND ENJOYS THE SWEETEST REST,

A FAT KITCHEN MAKES A LEAN WILL.









34 THE COUNTRY MOUSE AND THE TOWN MOUSE.



mouse was quite bewildered, and scarcely





knew what to taste first. {

But, lo and behold! the

came in, while the two friends were enjoying

themselves, and discovering them at work,
\

she began to beat them with a



and calling a couple of cats, pursued them







BETTER BE BLITHE WITH LITTLE, THAN SAD WITH NOTHING.

PRAISE NOTHING BUT WHAT YOU KNOW TO BE WORTHY OF PRAISE.












SINCE NOWE ENJOY ALI.

BLESSINGS, BE CONTENT WITH YOUR FEW.





CONTENT CAN ONLY BE PURCHASED BY A VIRTUOUS LIFE.

THE COUNTRY MOUSE AND THE TOWN MOUSE. 35



with so much vigour, that it was with great
difficulty they made their escape.
As soon as things were quiet again, the

country whispered to his



Serene

friend, “ Good-bye! ’m off! You are wel-
come to your fine dishes and anxiety; for my

part, Pd rather have plain food and peace.”

DEPEND NOT ON FORTUNE, BUT CONDUCT.



THAT WHICH WE MAY LIVE WITHOUT WE NEED NOT MUCH COVET








YOU CAN’T SEE GREEN CHEESE BUT YOUR TEETH MUST WATER.

FIRST DESERVE, AND THEN DESIRE.







36 THE FOX AND THE GRAPES.



Il.—THE FOX AND THE GRAPES.

It was vintage time, and the grapes

were ripe.


mail
H



Unfortunately he found they hung beyond







ENVY IS A SELF-EXECUTIONER.

WISE MEN CARE NOT FOR WHAT THEY CANNOT HAVE,








WHAT WE CANNOT POSSESS WE OFTEN PRETEND TO BE NOT WORTH HAVING.



———

WALK SWIFTLY FROM TEMPTATION; IT MAY OVERTAKE YOU.









THE FOX AND THE GRAPES. 37

his reach; and after many fruitless trials,

ne te crept back through the



=. ad 7
hedge, grumbling, and saying, “ Well, after

all, who would care to eat a lot of sour

grapes !”—What we cannot get, we pretend



to despise. The g- which is

not ours, never keeps time:







**SOUR GRAPES,” AS THE FOX SAID WHEN HE COULD NOT REACH THEM.

GET GOOD SENSE, AND YOU WILL NOT REPINE AT THE WANT OF GOOD LUCK.
BEFORE YOU MAKE A FRIEND, EAT A PECK OF SALT WITH HIM.





A DOUBTFUL FRIEND IS EVER TO BE AVOIDED.





38 THE ADDER AND THE COUNTRYMAN,





12.-THE ADDER AND THE COUNTRYMAN.

One winter day, when the pure white

snow lay thick on the ground, and the leaves



Being a man of tender heart, he put the crea-





IT IS NOT WISE TO WAKE A SLEEPING LION.

DOUBT, IN ORDER THAT YOU MAY BELIEVE THE TRUTH.










KINDNESS IS LOST UPON AN UNGRATEFUL MAN.

RETURN KINDNESS WITH CHEERFULNESS,







THE ADDER AND THE COUNTRYMAN, 39





ture in his bosom, and carried it home, where

he laid it before the , in the




hope of reviving it. fat no sooner did it
feel the warmth, and recover its strength,

than it turned round on the peasant’s



see “ff () ets

“Ho, ho!” an the peasant, amazed; “is

WHEN INGRATITUDE IS PUNISHED, NO ONE WEEPS.

INGRATITUDE DRIES UP THE FOUNTAIN OF ALL GOODNESS.


RATHER DISTRUST TOO SOON THAN BE DECEIVED TOO LATE.

KINDNESS SHOULD BEGET KINDNESS,—REPAY IT NOT WITH EVIL.





40 THE ADDER AND THE COUNTRYMAN.





this the way you repay me for my kindness ?

Will you return evil for good? If so, you



blow killed it.—If we turn round on those

who do us a kindness, we must expect to be

punished for our ingratitude.



TURN NOT ON THE HAND THAT SUCCOURS YOU.





NO MAN IS WISE AT ALL TIMES, NOR KNOWING IN ALL THINGS,




PRIDE THAT DINES ON VANITY, SUPS ON CONTEMPT.





BORROWED GARMENTS NEVER FIT WELL





THE JACKDAW AND THE BIRDS. 41



I3.-THE JACKDAW AND THE BIRDS.

A vain and empty-headed jackdaw went

strutting about a garden decked in a lot




left his old friends,

ae a

and forced himself into the company of a

PRETENDERS SHOULD BE PUT TO THE TEST.
6



MANY ARE DECEIVED BY THEIR OWN VAIN OPINIONS.






VANITY IS SURE TO MEET WITH ITS DUE PUNISHMENT.

SEEK YOUR COMPANIONS AMONG YOUR EQUALS.





42 THE JACKDAW AND THE BIRDS.







splendid” 4

. At first he got along
very well, but after a short time the peacock
found out that he was only a pretender, and

stripping him of the s that were



not his own, drove him away. The wretched

bird, perfectly humbled and _ crest-fallen,

then went back to his former friends, the







VANITY RENDERS BEAUTY CONTEMPTIBLE.



CLIMB NOT TOO HIGH, LEST THE FALL BE THE GREATER.










HE WHO THINKS MUCH OF HIS APPEARANCE IS DESPISED BY ALL WHO KNOW HIM.





PRIDE MAKES ENEMIES OF FRIENDS.

THE JACKDAW AND THE BIRDS 43





TORY

but hey, offended at his ae ad at the
contempt he had shown for their society,
bade him go about his business.

It is foolish to make ourselves out what

we are not; and only the ignorant and silly

will scorn their old friends.





PRIDE JIS THE EFFECT OF SELF-IGNORANCE.





DANGEROUS THINGS ATTEND AT THE HEELS OF PRIDE AND AMBITION.




THE SMALLEST PARTICLE OF KNOWLEDGE IS WORTH REMEMBERING.



A KNOWLEDGE OF LITTLE THINGS IS OFTEN VALUABLE.







44 THE BOY AND THE NETTLE.



who was playing






about in a meadow ventured to touch a
iy

, and was stung by it. He ran
home to his mother with all speed, complain-

ing that he had scarcely touched it, and yet

the nasty thing had made his fingers burn.





GIVE ME, NEXT GOOD, AN UNDERSTANDING.

EXPERIENCE KEEPS A DEAR SCHOOL,—FOOLS WILL LEARN IN NO OTHER.










IGNORANCE IS THE PARENT OF MANY TROUBLES.





IF YOU DO NOT LISTEN TO REASON, SHE WILL RAP YOUR KNUCKLES.





THE BOY AND THE NETTLE. 45



“ Just so, my son,” said she; “but had you
grasped it boldly, it would not have hurt you;

timid people alwaysruninto more trouble than



do the brave. If you see a

Waid

and want to jump across it, do so without fear

and hesitation, and you will leap safely to the
other side. If you hesitate, you are lost!”

VALOUR IS BUT LITTLE WITHOUT DISCRETION.





BE BRAVE FOR RIGHT, AND THOU WILT NOT BE OVERTHROWN.








THE SIMPLE BELIEVETH EVERY WORD: BUT THE PRUDENT MAN LOOKETH TO HIS GOING.

TRIFLES LEAD TO SERIOUS MATTERS.











46 THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS.



I5.—-THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS.

A miller and his son were driving an



to market in a neighbour-

ing town to sell him. They had gone but

a little way when they met some rude




who cried out, “ Look at those

two simpletons! They are toiling along on









GIVE YOUR FRIEND COUNSEL WITH CAUTION.

BE READY TO HEAR, CAREFUL TO CONTRIVE, AND SLOW TO ADVISE.














IF WISDOM IS SOUGHT FOR, IT MAY ALWAYS BE FOUND.





WHATEVER AN ASS MAY DO, PEOPLE WILL NOT GIVE HIM HONOUR.



THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS. 47



foot, when they might much more waseny ride

upon their donkey.”



made his son mount the ass’s ke and
walked along by his side, very well con-
tented.

Shortly afterwards ey came up to a

noisy group of | , who, the



a







HE HAD NEED RISE BETIMES THAT WOULD PLEASE EVERYBODY.





THERE’S NO FOOL LIKE AN OLD FOOL.








UNKIND EXPRESSIONS WOUND SENSITIVE MINDS.

MEDDLE NOT WITH THAT WHICH CONCERNS YOU NOT.







48 THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS.







moment they caught sight of the father

walking and the son riding, exclaimed,

“What an idle boy! Look at the young

rascal! He is fine and comfortable on his

, while his poor old father



On hearing this the miller made his son



REPROOF NEVER DOES A WISE MAN HARM.





EVILS BROUGHT UPON OURSELVES ARE THE MOST DIFFICULT TO BEAR.






LABOURING TO PLEASE FOOLS IS SERVILE EMPLOYMENT.







BELIEVE NOT ALL YOU HEAR, AND TELL NOT ALL YOU BELIEVE.

THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS. 49

on the back of the ass.

A couple of men were sitting under an old



, and seeing the old man rid-

dismount, and placed himself in his stead
ing and the boy walking, one of them

A RIGHTEOUS MAN REGARDETH THE LIFE OF HIS BEAST.

shouted, “Get off, you lazy fellow! How

can you expect your son to walk as fast as





QUICK BELIEVERS NEED BROAD SHOULDERS. |





7


A GRAIN OF PRUDENCE IS WORTH A POUND OF CRAFT.



50 THE OLD MAN AND UOIS ASS.



you can ride! Get off, or at least take

your boy up behind you.”



anxious to please everybody, amimedrately

did so, and thinking that now he must be in



the right, trotted merrily away.



But passing the of the

NEITHER DESPISE NOR OPPOSE WHAT YOU DO NOT UNDERSTAND.



squire’s orchard, they found the squire stand-



_GREDULOUS MEN ARE THE PREY OF CRAFTY ONES.



DO NOT JUDGE THE FEELINGS OF OTHERS BY YOURSELF.
GOOD-NATURE IS A GREAT MISFORTUNE IF IT WANT PRUDENCE.





MISFORTUNES ARE THE DISCIPLINE OF HUMANITY.



THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS. 51

ing there, and he, when he saw the donkey
hobbling along beneath his double burden,
began to scold the miller and his son, and

Jestingly exclaimed, “Why, you can much















SS

he can carry heavy fellows like you.”

ES ee eer
Tea SUS

No sooner said than done. “I am sure,”

MISFORTUNES SELDOM COME ALONE.

REFORM THOSE THINGS IN YOURSELF THAT YOU BLAME IN OTHERS.




a a a a ey Bi he a
hess fen asses se es opmental sien as

BY OTHERS’ FAULTS WISE MEN CORRECT THEIR OWN.

UNBOUGHT EXPERIENCE IS SELDOM WORTH MUCH.



52 THE OLD MAN AND GIS ASS.

said the miller, “I wish to please you all;”

and tying the ass’s legs together, he strung



him on a stout




he himself took, while his son took the

other, and thus they carried the donkey as

se i

far as the ®% which made the










a 1h es

approach to the town.

MISFORTUNES MAKE US WISE.

& , one end of which

EXPERIENCE TEACHES FOOLS, AND FOOLS WILL LEARN NO OTHER WAY.
THE REMEDY OF TO-MORROW IS TOO LATE FOR THE EVIL OF TO-DAY.





GOOD ADVICE IS OFTEN MORE VALUABLE THAN GOLD.



THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS. 53

Here the townsmen began to laugh and
jeer at the unusual sight of a donkey being
carried to market; and the ass, frightened
by the noise, kicked off the cord that bound

him, and in his agitation fell over the bridge

into the . The water was



IS. - =

very deep, and the poor animal immediately





AFTER CROSSES AND LOSSES, MEN GROW HUMBLER AND WISER.

AS YOU MAKE YOUR BED, SO YOU MUST LIE ON IT.










| HE IS UNFORTUNATE WHO CANNOT BEAR MISFORTUNE.
r

54 THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS.






§ ‘ir
io) after tying to

Tio
please everybody had pleased nobody, but



lost his ass, time, and trouble into the bargain.

Let us listen to the advice of the wise and

prudent, and act upon it; but if we follow

LAMENT NOT THE LOSS OF THAT YOU CANNOT RETRIEVE.

everybody’s counsel, we shall not please

IF BY LOSING ANYTHING WE GAIN WISDOM, WE ARE GAINERS BY THE LOSS.

anybody, and shall injure ourselves.



ADD NOT TROUBLE TO THE GRIEF-WORN HEART. |







QUENCH ALL IMMODERATE DESIRES. |
WHAT WE HAVE IS OFTEN BETTER THAN WHAT WE WANT. 55



IS: WHAT WE HAVE 16:.OFTEN. BETTER
THAN WHAT WE WANT.



Once upon a time, the

eo

after living for ages in the wide marshes,



uncontrolled by any superior power, grew

discontented with their lot, and croaked out a

BETTER TO BEAR THE ILLS WE HAYE, THAN FLY TO THOSE WE KNOW NOT OF.
CREATE NOT IMAGINARY WANTS, LEST YOU FAIL TO SATISFY THEM.








TAKE CARE YOU RAISE NO MORE SPIRITS THAN YOU GAN CONIURE DOWN.



WE INCREASE OUR WEALTH BY LESSENING OUR DESIRES.

WHAT WE HAVE IS OFTEN BETTER THAN WHAT WE WANT.





be better off than they were; but, weary of

their croaking, he threw them down a log
into the water, and bade them be satisfied.

At first they regarded the log with fear, but



mee es ==.

around it, and after awhile actually got

HAPPY IS HE WHO LIMITS HIS WANTS TO HIS NECESSITIES.







EVERY SITUATION IN LIFE HAS ITS COMFORTS FOR THOSE WHO CHOOSE TO ENJOY THEM.




THE REMEDY IS SOMETIMES WORSE THAN THE DISEASE.

CHANGES ARE NOT ALWAYS BENEFICIAL.

HE THAT ALWAYS COMPLAINS IS NEVER PITIED.

WHAT WE HAVE IS OFTEN BETTER THAN WHAT WE WANT. 57



upon it. “This is a sorry king,” said they;

“he can’t govern us, for he is without life.

Pray, O Jupiter, give us another!” This

time Jupiter grew angry, and, to punish

y
as):

their discontent, sent them a

who immediately began to eat them up as fast

bs

ashe could. The:- 14S now com-





8

THERE IS A REMEDY FOR EVERYTHING, COULD WE BUT FIND IT.






CONTRACT YOUR DESIRES, IF YOU WISH FOR INDEPENDENCE.

LITTLE SINS COMMONLY LEAD TO GREAT EVILS.



58 WHAT WE HAVE IS OFTEN BETTER THAN WHAT WE WANT.





plained that instead of a



a ‘ A

, J fi SS 4

{ Hi . ar
hia S |
|

{ ii
| |

Q

had got a tyrant; but Jupiter neeeneth to

listen to them, and said they must put up

with the consequences of their own folly.
Don’t change your condition, dni you

are sure it is for the better. “A rolling

stone,” says the proverb, “ gathers no moss.”





THE THORN IS OFTEN PLUCKED FOR THE ROSE.

IN ATTEMPTING TO AVOID A LESSER, WE MAY FALL INTO A GREATER EVIL.


KINDNESS, LIKE GRAIN, INCREASES BY SOWING.



A NOBLE MIND SCORNS MEAN ACTIONS.



THE MOUSE AND THE LION. 59









I7.-THE MOUSE AND THE LION.

The king of beasts was sleeping in his den,



indignant animal was about to kill the tiny

creature ; but the latter implored his mercy,







A KIND ACTION IS NEVER THROWN AWAY.

DO UNTO OTHERS AS YOU WOULD THAT OTHERS SHOULD DO UNTO YOU.








DO GOOD TO YOUR ENEMY, THAT HE MAY BECOME YOUR FRIEND.

STRENGTH IS NOT ALWAYS A MATCH FOR CUNNING.





60 THE MOUSE AND THE LION.



and promised not to offend again. So his
grim majesty permitted him to take his leave.
Some time afterwards, the lion happened

to be captured by a company of hunters, who



A FRIEND IS NEVER KNOWN TILL NEEDED.



DO ALL THE GOOD YOU CAN,—MAKE LITTLE NOISE ABOUT IT.




EVERY MAN BOWS TO THE BUSH HE GETS SHELTER FROM.





THE NOBLE MIND HAS NO RESENTMENTS.



through the knot, and set the



THE MOUSE AND THE LION. 61



who straightway set to work at the cords, bit



free. After thanking his humble friend, the

lion retired with all speed to the shelter of

{ Hr.




, remarking, that even

y

in this world a good action seldom fails to

meet with a due reward.







ONE NEVER LOSES BY DOING A GOOD TURN.

A REAL FRIEND IS DISCOVERED IN A TRYING CASE.














NEVER BE BRIBED TO DO A WRONG.



ie THE THIEF AND THE MASTIFF.

I8.—THE THIEF AND THE MASTIFF.



A thief, no wanted to rob a gentleman’s



and endeavoured to bribe him into silence



by throwing oe a a none, “ Ho, ho,” said

the honest _ “T did not like

KNAVERY MAY SERVE A TURN, BUT HONESTY IS BEST IN THE END.



your Aieaaace a at He first, but now that





OBTAIN NOT FRIENDSHIP BY GIFTS, BUT BY GRACES.





A KNAVE DISCOVERED IS THE GREATEST FOOL.










WHATEVER IS BECOMING, IS HONEST; AND WHATEVER IS HONEST, IS BECOMING.

IF SINNERS ENTICE THEE, CONSENT THOU NOT.



THE THIEF AND THE MASTIFF. 63

See



you try to bribe me, I am sure you are





Fraud. He who once listens to the voice

of the tempter is certain in the end to go



A GUILTY CONSCIENCE NEEDS NO ACCUSER; HONESTY NEEDS NO MARK.

astray, and be lost.





ALL ARE NOT THIEVES THAT DOGS BARK AT.




HE THAT SEEKS TROUBLE, IT WERE A PITY HE SHOULD MISS IT.



HASTY RESOLUTIONS SELDOM SPEED WELL.

64 THE DISCONTENTED DONKEY.

I9.-THE DISCONTENTED DONKEY.

had been for years in



the service of a gardener, who employed him

to carry to market his stock of vegetables;







THE LOAD THAT IS CHEERFULLY BORNE BECOMES PLEASANT.

RASH JUDGMENT MAKETH HASTE TO REPENTANCE.


| CHANGE SELDOM, FOR CHANGES ARE INCONVENIENT.



DON’T CHANGE YOUR BUSINESS EVERY TIME YOU FEEL DISAPPOINTED.





THE DISCONTENTED DONKEY. 65 |

Growing weary of his





work, he asked Jupiter for another master.

Jupiter does not like the discontented, and
sii SV el

so he placed him under a



The burdens he had now to carry were



heavier than any his former master had

placed on his back, and again he complained



HE IS WELL WORTHY OF SORROW THAT BUYS IT.

A CONTENTED MIND ENJOYS THE SWEETEST REST.



9




‘TIS FOLLY TO FRET WHEN GRIEF’S NO COMFORT

66 THE DISCONTENTED DONKEY.





to Jupiter, who, this time, made him over to



self compelled to turn the brickmaker’s wheel.



‘* Alas,” said he, “what a fool I was not to



be content with my first lot! I see that he

IN GOOD FORTUNE, BE MODERATE; IN BAD, PRUDENT.
A POOR MAN MAY CHANGE HIS MASTER, BUT NOT HIS CONDITION.



who is constantly changing, is sure to change

for the worse!”



|

HE WHO WANTS CONTENT CAN’T FIND AN EASY CHAIR. |






HE LOSETH HIS THANKS WHO PROMISETH AND DELAYETH.

BE SLOW TO PROMISE, AND QUICK TO PERFORM.

THE WICKED ARE NEVER GRATEFUL. 67



swallowed a bone, which stuck in his throat,

and caused him terrible pain. He went up
\ Wt





and down the 4 , asking every

AN iN,
i

animal to relieve him, but all were afraid.

At length, by the promise of a splendid







ALL ARE NOT FRIENDS THAT SPEAK US FAIR.

HE THAT GETS FORGETS, AND HE THAT WANTS THINKS ON.






TO PROMISE, AND GIVE NOTHING, IS COMFORT FOR A FOOL.



TRUE GRATITUDE IS SHOWN IN DEEDS.



68 THE WICKED ARE NEVER GRATEFUL.





wolf’s throat, she drew forth the bone. Then

she claimed her reward. “Reward!” cried




the — ; “and is it not enough

that, having put your head into a wolf’s jaws,

you have been allowed to take it out again?”



PROMISES ARE TOO OFTEN LIKE PIE-CRUST,_MADE TO BE BROKEN.



RATIFY PROMISES WITH PERFORMANCES,




NOUGHT SO SMALL BUT MAY GOOD CONTAIN.



GOOD ACTS BRING US JOYS,—BAD ACTS BRING US WOE.



—

ONE GOOD TURN DESERVES ANOTHER. 69



2l1.—ONE GOOD TURN DESERVES ANOTHER.



who saw the mishap, plucked a leaf from a

tree, and dropped it in the water. The

ant, mounting upon it, got safely ashore.





A FRIEND IN NEED IS A FRIEND INDEED,





GRATITUDE IS A PROPERTY OF WHICH NO ONE CAN ROB THE POSSESSOR.






GRATITUDE PRESERVES OLD FRIENDSHIPS, AND BEGETS NEW.



LOSE NO OPPORTUNITY OF DOING A GOOD ACTION.



70 ONE GOOD TURN DESERVES ANOTHER.

At this very time a



his net, with the view of catching the poor
dove; but the ant, perceiving his objeet, bit
his heel, and the man in his alarm let fall

-e Thedove then saw how



great a danger she had escaped, and thank-
ing the ant, flew away.

A REAL FRIEND IS DISCOVERED IN A TRYING CASE.



WRITE INJURIES IN DUST, BUT KINDNESSES IN MARBLE.


LEARN BY THE VICES OF OTHERS HOW DETESTABLE YOUR OWN ARE,





WHEN THY NEIGHBOUR’S HOUSE IS ON FIRE, BEWARE OF THINE OWN.







TAKE WARNING BY OTHERS’ MISFORTUNES. 71



22.-TAKE WARNING BY OTHERS’ MISFORTUNES.

The errors and misfortunes of other people
will always be regarded by the prudent as

lessons for their own instruction.






Once upon a time, the

y).
g °
fees

=F

with an ass and a fox, and proposed that

they should go out hunting together. They





BETTER TO BE ALONE THAN IN BAD COMPANY.





LET THE SHIPWRECKS OF OTHERS BE YOUR SEA-MARKS.












HE THAT HAS MUCH, WOULD ALWAYS HAVE MORE.



WHEN FORTUNE SMILES, SHE OFTEN DESIGNS THE MOST MISCHIEF.



| 72 TAKE WARNING BY OTHERS’ MISFORTUNES.

captured a very considerable amount of

booty, and the chase being over, retired to a

that it might be divided



oe Py)
= eo
“ay Y

among them. The lion requested the ass to
undertake the task of division, and he, care-

fully separating the spoil into three equal

portions, requested his companions to take |

FEAR IS ONE PART OF PRUDENCE.



SERVE A GREAT MAN, AND YOU WILL KNOW WHAT SORROW IS.






THE BEST GO FIRST; THE BAD REMAIN TO MEND.

AVOID CONTENTION WITH THE STRONG.





TAKE WARNING BY OTHERS’ MISFORTUNES. 73

their choice. But the lion declared the divi-



SS SS B

an

divide the whole between me and yourself.”
The fox immediately handed over the spoil

to the lion, keeping back only a very small

CHEATING PLAY NEVER THRIVES.
10 ae



NEVER ACT THE TYRANT TO THOSE WEAKER THAN YOURSELF.




THOUGH WE MAY TREAT OTHERS ILL, WE DO NOT LIKE TO BE TREATED SO.



PRECEPTS MAY LEAD, BUT EXAMPLES DRAW.







74 TAKE WARNING BY OTHERS’ MISFORTUNES.



portion. “ Ha, ha,” said the king of beasts,

“IT see you understand how to act fairly.”

IT IS ALLOWABLE TO DERIVE INSTRUCTION EVEN FROM AN ENEMY.









LET US TURN OVER A NEW LEAF. Z |






A GOOD WORD, FOR A BAD ONE, IS WORTH MUCH, AND COSTS LITTLE.

KIND WORDS AWAKEN KIND ECHOES.







KEY TO THE FABLES.

The italicised words represent the Pictures in the foreyoing Fables,





1.—_THE DOG AND HIS SHADOW.

THERE was once a dog, which being very
hungry had carried off a leg of mutton. But
crossing a bridge he saw, as he thought,
another dog in the water, which also carried
a piece of meat. Then he barked loudly,
and attempted to seize the prize. In doing
so, he let go his own piece, which fell into the
stream and sank. So the foolish dog found
he had been grasping at a shadow; as man
himself too often does.

It is wise to be content with what we
have. Greedy people always injure them-
selves. “A bird in the hand,” says a good
old proverb, “is worth two in the bush.”



We should learn to be satisfied with our lot,
and not to envy other persons.

2.—THE FISHERMAN AND THE FISH.

A fisherman, who was very proud of his
musical skill, sat himself down by the sea-
side with his flute, and began to play, in the
belief that the fish, on hearing his beautiful
tunes, would jump on shore.
and played very well, but no fish came;
neither salmon, nor mackerel, nor any other.
“This will never do,” said he; “I must try
some other way of catching my fish, or I
So-he got into his boat, took
his net, rowed out to sea, and soon found his
net quite full. Then he drew it on board,
and the fish began to jump and leap; but he
only said, “If you would not dance when I
played, your dancing now won’t save you
from the pan.”—There are always two ways
of doing a thing; let us take care to choose
the right one.

shall starve.”

3._THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE.

A hare, once upon a time, laughed at the
slow gait of a tortoise, and offered to bet a
very considerable sum of money that she
would run a mile in far less time. As judge
of the race they chose the fo.

He played,





USE SOFT WORDS AND MILD ARGUMENTS.

REPROVE MILDLY, AND CORRECT WITH CAUTION.






WISELY AND SLOWLY: THEY STUMBLE WHO RUN FAST.



HE WHO SWIMS IN SIN WILL SINK IN SORROW.



76 KEY TO THE FABLES.





se 2 SES SWaSON |

Away went the hare, and soon left the
tortoise far behind. Then she thought to
herself she would take a rest, and squatting
under a tree she fell asleep. Meantime, up
came the tortoise, passed the sleeping hare,
and reached the post before she awoke. The
fox declared him winner of the pwrse.—Most
haste is sometimes worst speed. If we rest
at the wrong time, we must expect to lose
by our idleness. In the race of life we must
not fall behind, or halt by the wayside; but
if we would win the crown, must keep

steadily onward.

4.—THE BEAR AND THE OWL,

A bear was boasting in the hearing of an
owl, that he was very partial to man, ever
ill-treating him when he was dead. “I
should believe in your friendship,” said the
owl, “if you did not devour him when
alive.”

5.—EVERYBODY FOR HIMSELF.

ONCE upon a time a governor of a certain
castle had reason to fear it would be besieged





by the enemy; and therefore he called a
council to see how it could best be fortified.
“For my part,” said a bricklayer, “I think
you cannot do better than use brick.” —* Not
at all,” exclaimed a nimble and industrious
“T am sure that timber is a
better material."—“ You are both wrong,”

carpenter ;

sharply remarked a currier; “for there is
nothing like leather !”

Every man thinks his own trade or pro-
fession the best, and undervalues every other.



6.—THE WOLF AND THE LAMB.

ONE very hot day a wolf and a lamb chanced
to come down to the same stream to drink ;
the wolf on the higher ground, and the lamb
some distance below him. The wolf, wish-
ing to quarrel, accused the meek and innocent
lamb of seeking to disturb the water in the
stream. “But how can that be,” said the
lamb, “since the water runs down from you
tome?” “That may be so,” said the grim
and surly wolf, “but this time last year you
called me ill names.” “What! I?—I was
not even born.” Then the wolf fell into a
passion, and seized the lamb, saying, “If it
was not you, it was your mother, the sheep,
which is all the same.”

A LIE HAS NO LEGS, BUT SCANDAL HAS WINGS.



IT COSTS MORE TO REVENGE INJURIES THAN TO BEAR THEM.




WE NEVER KNOW THE WORTH OF WATER TILL THE WELL IS DRY.



GOOD FORESIGHT FURTHERS THE WORK.

KEY TO THE FABLES. 77

The wicked man never wants an excuse
for doing harm to the innocent.





be left longer in their bed. But their young

| mistress saw through their scheme, and

always afterwards made them rise when the
clock pointed to three—People who do wrong
to save themselves trouble, often bring a far
greater misfortune upon their heads.







7.-THE CROW AND THE PITCHER.

ONCE on a time, a thirsty crow had the
good fortune to fall in with a pitcher of
water. But when he would have drunk, he
found the water so low down that he could
not reach it. He tried to overturn the
pitcher, but it was too heavy for him. Then
he picked up some large stones, and these
he cast one by one into the pitcher, until
the water rose up to the brim, and he was
able to quench his thirst—This is a lesson
for boys and girls, as good as they can find
in any book: “Persevere and conquer every

difficulty.”

8.—THE MISTRESS AND HER SERVANTS.

THERE was a young lady who had several
servants, and she was accustomed to call
them up every morning when the cock crew.
The lazy girls, angry at being roused so
early, killed the cock, in the hope that they



might get an hour or two’s extra sleep, and







9.-LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP.

A Fox had fallen into a well, and was at a
loss for some means of getting out again.
After a while there came to the place an old
goat; but before he drank, he asked of
Mister Fox whether the water was good and
plentiful. “Oh yes, my friend,” cried he;
“you never before saw water so good or so
I came down here on purpose to

The goat immediately jumped

abundant !
drink of it.”

in; and the sly old Reynard, springing upon

his stout horns, immediately jumped out.
Then said the former: “What! will you
leave me here alone? How shall I get up
again?” “That is your business,” replied
the fox; “you should have looked before
you leaped.” And away he went over the

nearest gate.





NONE CEASE TO RISE, BUT THOSE WHO CEASE TO CLIMB.

KEEP GOOD MEN COMPANY AND YOU WILL BE ONE OF THEM.

a




PATIENCE AND TIME RUN THROUGH THE LONGEST DAY.

STUDY TO BE WORTHY

OF YOUR PARENTS.





78 KEY TO THE FABLES.

Greedy people often overreach themselves.
Be content with what you have.

10.—THE COUNTRY MOUSE AND THE
TOWN MOUSE.

A COUNTRY mouse, who had a friend in a
distant town, invited him to pay him a visit.
The town mouse did so, and on his arrival
received a hearty welcome.
found that the fare was coarse and scanty ;
a nut or two, a few pease, a little rice, and
now and then a small quantity of grain, with
occasionally a crumb or two of mouldy
bread. So he grew tired of his visit, and

But he soon

said to his friend, “ How can you spend your
life in this miserable barn, where the farmer
and his wife don’t allow you proper food,
nor enough of it? Come up to town with
me, and see how I live.” The two friends
went, and at night the town mouse took the
country mouse into a splendid larder, whose
shelves were loaded with dainties. Here
was a fine cheese, there a pan full of delicious
milk; in fact, the country mouse was quite
bewildered, and scarcely knew what to taste
first.

But, lo and behold! the servant came in
while the two friends were enjoying them-
selves, and discovering them at work, she
began to beat them with a broom; and call-
ing a couple of cats, pursued them with so

_ much vigour, that it was with great diffi-

culty they made their escape.

As soon as things were quiet again, the
country mouse whispered to his friend,
“Good-bye! I’m off! You are welcome to
your fine dishes and anxiety; for my part,
I'd rather have plain food and peace.”





11—THE FOX AND THE GRAPES.

It was vintage time, and the grapes were
ripe. A sly old fox stole into a vineyard,
where his quick eyes discovered some fine
fruit just above his head; and he jumped up
to seize the grapes. Unfortunately he found

they hung beyond his reach; and after many

‘fruitless trials, the fow crept back through

the hedge, grumbling, and saying, “ Well,
after all, who would care to eat a lot of sour
grapes !”—What we cannot get, we pretend
to despise’ The watch which is not ours,
never keeps time. —










a Bee,

12,-[THE ADDER AND THE COUNTRYMAN.
ONE winter day, when the pure white snow
lay thick on the ground, and the leaves were
all gone from the trees, a peasant found under
the hedge an adder, lying frozen and nearly

THE PATH OF VIRTUE IS THE PATH OF PEACE.



PASSION IS A FEVER THAT LEAVES US WEAKER THAN IT FINDS US.








IF WE SUBDUE NOT OUR PASSIONS, OUR PASSIONS WILL SUBDUE US.



HE WHO WOULD REAP WELL MUST SOW WELL.

KEY TO THE FABLES. 79

dead. Being a man of tender heart, he put
the creature in his bosom, and carried it
home, where he laid it before the jive, in the
hope of reviving it. But no sooner did it
feel the warmth, and recover its strength,
than it turned round on the peasant’s chil-
dren, and tried to sting them.

“Ho, ho!” said the peasant, amazed; “is
this the way you repay me for my kindness ?
Will you return evil for good? If so, you
must die.” And with his stick he knocked
the adder on the head, and with one blow
killed it—If we turn round on those who do
us a kindness, we must expect to be punished
for our ingratitude.



Paterra

13.-THE JACKDAW AND THE BIRDS.

A VAIN and empty-headed jackdaw went
strutting about a garden decked in a lot of
peacocks’ feathers which he had picked up.
Thinking himself very handsome, the jack-
daw left his old friends, and forced himself into
the company of a splendid peacock. At first
he got along very well, but after a short time
the peacock found out that he was only a
pretender, and stripping him of the feathers

+

S | other side.



| had made his fingers burn.
| son,’



that. were not his own, drove him away.
The wretched bird, perfectly humbled and
crest-fallen, then went back to his former
friends, the raven and the crow; but they,
offended at his pride, and at the contempt
he had shown for their society, bade him go
about his business.

It is foolish to make ourselves out what
we are not; and only the ignorant and silly
will scorn their old friends.

14.-THE BOY AND THE NETTLE.

A LITTLE boy who was playing about in a
meadow ventured to touch a nettle, and was
stung by it. He ran home to his mother
with all speed, complaining that he had
scarcely touched it, and yet the nasty thing
“Just so, my
said she; “but had you grasped it
boldly, it would not have hurt you; timid
people always run into more trouble than do
the brave.

>

If you see a stream, and want
to jump across it, do so without fear and
hesitation, and you will leap safely to the
If you hesitate, you are lost!”

15.—_THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS,

A MILLER and his son were driving an ass
to market in a neighbouring town to sell
him. They had gone but a little way when
they met some rude boys, who cried out,
“Look at those two simpletons! They are
toiling along on foot, when they might much
more wisely ride upon their donkey.” Then
the miller made his son mount the ass’s
back, and walked along by his side, very
well contented.

THE HOPE IS SURE WHICH HAS ITS FOUNDATION IN VIRTUE.

DEFER NOT TILL THE EVENING WHAT THE MORNING MAY ACCOMPLISH.








FLY PLEASURE AND IT WILL FOLLOW THEE.—LOOK BACK AND IMPROVE.



GOOD MANNERS IS THE ART OF MAKING PEOPLE EASY.



80 KEY TO THE FABLES.

Shortly afterwards they came up to a
noisy group of girls, who, the moment they
caught sight of the father walking and the
son riding, exclaimed, “ What an idle boy!
Look at the young rascal! He is fine and
comfortable on his donkey, while his poor
old father can scarcely drag along his weary
feet.” On hearing this the miller made his
son dismount, and placed himself in his
stead on the back of the ass.

A couple of men were sitting under an
old tree, and seeing the old man riding and
the boy walking, one of them shouted, “ Get
off, you lazy fellow! How can you expect
your son to walk as fast as you can ride!
Get off, or at least take your boy up behind
you.” The mlier, anxious to please every-
body, immediately did so, and thinking that
now he must be in the right, trotted merrily
away.

But passing the gate of the squire’s
orchard, they found the squire standing
there; and he, when he saw the donkey



hobbling along beneath his double burden,
began to scold the miller and his son, and
jestingly exclaimed, “Why, you can much
better carry the poor donkey than he can
carry heavy fellows like you.”

No sooner said than done. “I am sure,”

said the miller, “I wish to please you all;”



DERIDE NOT ANY MAN’S INFIRMITIES.

and tying the ass’s legs together, he strung
him on a stout pole, one end of which he
himself took, while his son took the other,
and sthus they carried the donkey as far as
the bridge which made the approach to the
town.

Here the townsmen began to laugh and
jeer at the unusual sight of a donkey being
carried to market; and the ass, frightened
by the noise, kicked off the cord that bound
him, and in his agitation fell over the bridge
into the water. The water was very deep,
and the poor animal immediately sank; so
that the miller after trying to please every-
body had pleased nobody, but lost his ass,
time, and trouble into the bargain.

Let us listen to the advice of the wise and
prudent, and act upon it; but if we follow
everybody’s counsel, we shall not please any-
body, and shall injure ourselves.

16.—WHAT WE HAVE IS OFTEN BETTER
THAN WHAT WE WANT.

ONCE upon a time, the frogs, after living for
ages in the wide marshes, uncontrolled by
any superior power, grew discontented with
their lot, and croaked out a petition to
Jupiter to give them a king. Jupiter knew
very well that they could not be better off

than they were ; but, weary of their croak-

ing, he threw them down a log into the
water, and bade them be satisfied. At first
they regarded the log with fear, but finding
that it did not move or speak, they crept
out of the rushes, hopped around it, and after
awhile actually got upon it. “This is a sorry
king,” said they; “he can’t govern us, for
he is without life. Pray, O Jupiter, give us
another!” This time Jupiter grew angry,





IT IS LESS PAINFUL TO LEARN IN YOUTH THAN TO BE IGNORANT IN AGE.






THE GREATEST TREASURES ARE STORED IN THE SMALLEST COMPASS.





IF THERE WERE NO CLOUDS WE WOULD NOT ENJOY THE SUN.

KEY TO THE FABLES. 81



and, to punish their discontent, sent them a
stork, who immediately began to eat them
up as fast as he could. The frogs now com-
plained that instead of a king they had got
a tyrant; but Jupiter refused to listen to
them, and said they must put up with the
consequences of their own folly.



Don’t change your condition, unless you
are sure it is for the better. “A rolling
stone,” says the proverb, “gathers no moss,”

17.—THE MOUSE AND THE LION.

THE king of beasts was sleeping in his den,
when he was aroused by a little mouse, who,
in his ignorance of where he was, ran over
the nose of the ion. The indignant animal
was about to kill the tiny creature; but the
latter implored his mercy, and promised not
to offend again. So his grim majesty per-
mitted him to take his leave.

Some time afterwards, the lion happened
to be captured by a company of hunters,
who bound him tightly with ropes, intending
to kill him on the morrow. In this condi-
tion he was found by the little mouse, who
straightway set to work at the cords, bit
through the knot, and set the lion free.
After thanking his humble friend, the lion









retired with all speed to the shelter of the
forest, remarking, that even in this world a
good action seldom fails to meet with a due
reward.

18.-THE THIEF AND THE MASTIFF.

A THIEF, who wanted to rob a gentleman’s
house, found a dog in the garden, and
endeavoured to bribe him into silence by
throwing him a bone. “Ho, ho,” said the



honest mastiff, “I did not like your appear-
ance at the first, but now that you try to
bribe me, I am sure you are a knave. Be
off, or I will rouse the watchman,’”—This is
the way in which Honesty will always meet

NOT HE THAT HAS LITTLE, BUT HE THAT DESIRES MUCH, IS POOR.





A GOOD NAME KEEPS ITS LUSTRE IN THE DARK.

11

¢






TAKE HEED OF AN OX BEFORE, AN ASS BEHIND, AND A KNAVE ON ALL SIDES.



CONFESSION OF A FAULT MAKES HALF AMENDS FOR IT,

82 KEY TO THE FABLES.



the advances of Fraud. He who once listens
to the voice of the tempter is certain in the

end to go astray, and be lost.

19.-THE DISCONTENTED DONKEY.

A donkey had been for years in the service
of a gardener, who employed him to carry to
market his stock of vegetables; now a basket
of nice fresh cabbages, and now a hamper of
potatoes; at one time a load of apples, and
at another a load of pears.
of his work, he asked Jupiter for another

Growing weary

master, Jupiter does not like the discon-
tented, and so he placed him under a potter.
The burdens he had now to carry were
heavier than his former master had placed
on his back, and again he complained to
Jupiter, who, this time, made him over to
a brickmaker, and the silly ass found him-
self compelled to turn the brickmaker’s
wheel. “Alas,” said he, “what a fool I was
not to be content with my first lot! I see
that he who is constantly changing, is sure

10?

to change for the worse !



20.-THE WICKED ARE NEVER
GRATEFUL.

A wolf, while taking his dinner, swallowed
a bone, which stuck in his throat, and caused

him terrible pain. He went up and down



the wood, asking every animal to relieve
him; but all were afraid. At length, by the
promise of a splendid reward, a crane was
induced to try her skill; and thrusting her
neck down the wolf’s throat, she drew forth
the bone. Then she claimed her reward.
“Reward!” cried the wolf; “and is it not
enough that, having put your head into a
wolf’s jaws, you have been allowed to take
it out again ?”

21.—ONE GOOD TURN DESERVES
ANOTHER,

Two ants were drinking at the side of a
pond. One fell in, and was on the point of
being drowned, when a dove, who saw the
mishap, plucked a leaf from a tree, and
dropped it in the water. The ant, mounting
upon it, got safely ashore. At this very
time a fowler spread his net, with the view
of catching the poor dove; but the ant,
perceiving his object, bit his heel, and the
man in his alarm let fall the net. The dove
then saw how great a danger she had
escaped, and thanking the ant, flew away.

22.-TAKE WARNING BY OTHERS’
MISFORTUNES.

THE errors and misfortunes of other people
will always be regarded by the prudent as
lessons for their own instruction.

Once upon a time, the lion met with an
ass and a fox, and proposed that they should
go out hunting together. They captured a
very considerable amount of booty, and the
chase being over, retired to a grotto that it
might be divided among them. The lion

.





THERE’S NO JOY WITHOUT ALLOY,—NO ROSE WITHOUT A THORN.

IF EVERY ONE WOULD MEND ONE, ALL WOULD BE AMENDED.








THINE ACTIONS SERVE THE TURN;

NEITHER PRAISE NOR DISPRAISE THYSELF,

JUDICIOUS MAXIMS OUGHT TO BE KEPT IN VIEW.





KEY TO THE FABLES. 83

requested the ass to undertake the task of | the whole between me and yourself.” The

division; and he, carefully separating the
spoil into three equal portions, requested his
companions to take their choice. But the
lion declared the division unfair, sprang upon
the ass, and tore him to pieces. “ Now,”
said he to the fow, “be good enough to divide

fox immediately handed over the spoil to
the lion, keeping back only a very small
portion. “Ha, ha,” said the king of beasts,
“T see you understand how to act fairly.”
“Yes,” replied the fox; “I was taught a
lesson by the fate of the ass.”



ALL’S WELL THAT BEGINS AND ENDS WELL.



' AND DON’T BE ALL YOUR DAYS TROTTING ON A CABBAGE-LEAF.






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