Citation
Work for all and other tales

Material Information

Title:
Work for all and other tales Work for all, or, Patty Grumbler and her grandchild, The sister guardian, Brave Bessie, or, the Epiphany lesson
Added title page title:
Work for all, or, Patty Grumbler and her grandchild
Added title page title:
Sister guardian
Added title page title:
Brave Bessie, or, the Epiphany lesson
Creator:
C. E. B
Thomas, William Luson, 1830-1900 ( Engraver )
Evans, Edmund, 1826-1905 ( Engraver )
Seeley Jackson & Halliday ( Publisher )
John Childs and Son ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Seeley, Jackson, & Halliday
Manufacturer:
John Childs and Son
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Edition:
6th ed.
Physical Description:
[4], 215 p., [3] leaves of plates : ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Girls -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Wealth -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1872 ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1872 ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1872
Genre:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrations engraved by W. Thomas and E. Evans.
General Note:
Baldwin Library copy contains prize plate printed in colors.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by C.E.B.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026598030 ( ALEPH )
ALG2686 ( NOTIS )
58844073 ( OCLC )

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THE ,
SALVATION -ARMY

JUNIOR - SOLDIERS

For: GOOD - CONDUCT
DILIGENCE *** AND
REGULAR: ATE

OBTAINING .. le _. MARKS
OUT OFA POSSIBLE. "GA

“ BE THOU AN EXAMPLE”








WORK FOR ALL,

AND OTHER TALES.

















































































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WORK FOR ALL.



WORK FOR ALL,

AND OTHER TALES.

WORK FOR ALL, OR PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD.
THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

BRAVE BESSIE, OR THE EPIPHANY LESSON.

BY C. EH. B.,

AUTHOR OF “AMY'S WATCHWORD,” ETC.

SIXTH EDITION.

SEELEY, JACKSON, AND HALLIDAY, 54, FLEET STREET,
LONDON. MDCCCLXXII.



JOUN CHILDS AND SON, PRINTERS.



PREFACE.

Tue following tales have been written at the request
of a friend of the author, who has much at heart the wel-
fare of young girls in the lower ranks of life.

Their purport is to show that wealth and position
are not requisite accompaniments to usefulness. The
cottager’s daughter may, by her energy and sympathy,
cheer the path and lighten the sorrows of others as
effectually as though she occupied a loftier sphere. And
all may rest assured that whether their lot in life be high
or low, rich or poor, God has placed within their reach,

according to their power of action, abundant

© Work ror ALL.”



CONTENTS.

PAGE
WORK FOR ALL, OR PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER
GRANDCHILD. we See 7 we 1
THE SISTER GUARDIAN .., see es vce BF

BRAVE BESSIE, OR THE EPIPHANY LESSON .. 191



WORK FOR ALL,

OR

PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD.

© Honour to those whose words and deeds
Thus help us in our daily needs,
And by their overflow,
Raise us from what is low.”—LONGFELLOW.







CHAPTER I.

Ove bright clear evening in January, a troop of neatly-
dressed girls, between the ages of ten and fifteen, might
be seen proceeding to St Mark’s Vicarage, in the town
of Hanbury, their animated countenances showing that
something of unusual interest was expected.

They were received by Miss Merton, the Vicar’s sister,
who had invited her Sunday school class to the then
novel amusement of a Christmas tree. Another well-
known and pleasant face also greeted them on their en-
trance. Mrs Phebe Edmonds, as she was called, though
a person not much above their own rank, was one uni-
versally looked up to and beloved by the young people;
and as she was the constant dispenser of the Vicar’s
charity, and a valuable assistant to him in many ways,
they were not surprised to see she had been invited by
Miss Merton to aid her on the present occasion. By her
they were conducted to a well-lighted apartment, where a
substantial tea was being prepared, after which the won-
ders of the tree were exhibited, and, unlike anticipated

1 *



4 WORK FOR ALL, OR

marvels in general, the reality exceeded expectation.
But when its gifts were distributed to the delighted
gazers, and, though apparently without any previous ar-
rangement, proved to be precisely what each girl most
wanted, it seemed to*them little short of magic! For in-
stance, Ellen Durnford had often longed for a workbox,
having never yet risen to a higher state of things than a
neatly made print bag. To her surprise and pleasure one
completely furnished was placed in her hand. Fanny Tur-
ton’s prayer-book was minus several leaves, and one side
of the cover. Had a shopful been placed at her disposal,
she would have chosen the very one of which she sud-
denly found herself the possessor! Rachel Fenn’s hat,
though never allowed to be in holes, had been mended so
often that the straw could scarcely be persuaded to meet
. together in some places. It looked sadly shabby on its
peg in the school-room every day by the side of those of
some of the girls whose parents were better off. Poor
Fanny had more than once heard very disparaging re-
marks upon it, which she had felt to be unkind because
it was no fault of hers. She had little thought what that
beautiful tree would provide for her! Nothing less than
a new well-made brown straw bonnet with a good ribbon of
the same colour; and as Miss Merton tied it on her head,
Phebe Edmonds placed on her shoulders a warm woollen
cape that had been pinned as a parcel inside the crown.
It would have been worth while to have watched the
child’s countenance for a minute or two, so full was it of



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 5

joy and surprise—but there was no time, for the coloured
tapers were rapidly getting lower, and the tree had still
much to bestow. Not only had every girl an appropriate
present for herself, but round the foot of the tree lay a
number of packets which proved to be tea and sugar.
These Miss Merton distributed amongst the young people
that they might each one have the pleasure of giving it
themselves to any poor neighbour they chose, and she
trusted by so doing she might enable some at least
amongst them to remember others in the midst of their
own pleasure, and to lead them to enter into the spirit
of our Saou: 8 words, “Tt is more blessed to give than
to receive.’

- That the poor need not consider this saying to ane
ouly to the rich none felt more truly than Phebe Hd-
monds, who for years had been accustomed to save some-
thing for others out of her scanty means. As she escorted
the young folks to their own homes that night, she was
glad to see how greatly some of them appeared to prize the
pleasure of having it in their power to bestow the little
gifts which Miss Merton’s kindness had provided, upon
neighbours who were yet poorer than themselves. Even
little Rachel Fenn spoke with a delight that seemed to
exceed what she had felt on becoming possessed of her
new hat and cape, of going next morning to an old woman
who lived near them and surprising her with the tea and
sugar; for she said she knew she never had anything but
tea-leaves to make her tea from, and no sugar at all.



6 WORK FOR ALL, OR

The cheerful party gradually diminished as one girl after
another arrived at her own home, till at length only Mary
’ Grey and Mrs Phebe were left together, for their houses
lay at some little distance. Mary had been very quiet since
they left the Vicarage, but now that she found herself
alone with her kind friend, for Phebe had known her from
a little child, she unburdened her mind of its thoughts.

“Don’t you think, Mrs Phebe, it must be very pleasant
to be a lady?”

“T dare say it is, Mary; I never thought much about
it.”

“T have been wishing I was one ever since we left
Miss Merton.”

“Then you have been wishing rather a silly thing,
Mary dear. I should never have expected to find that
you were a discontented girl, with your comfortable home
and kind parents; you ought to feel yourself well off as
God has placed you.”

« And so I do, indeed,” exclaimed Mary; “it was not
that, but I thought if I were a lady how much good I
might do, just like Miss Merton.”

“Oh, that is a very different thing. J was afraid
it was the large house and the servants, and those sort of
things, you were longing for. But, my dear girl, I think
it is not necessary for you to be a lady in order to do good
to others.”

“Don’t you think so?” replied Mary, doubtfully ;
then remembering how full of usefulness Mrs Phebe was,



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 7

who was not a lady herself, she added, “ at all events I
must be grown up first, and it seems a long time to wait,
for I am not quite fifteen yet.”

* But I don’t think you need wait till you are grown
up, any more than you need be a lady, Mary. If you are
really and truly desirous to be of use to others, depend
upon it you may find ways and means, young and humble
in station though you are.”

Mary looked incredulously at her friend, and the
moonlight was bright enough to let her see it.

“Yes, Mary, I am sure I am right,” she said, replying
to that look ; ‘‘ another day we will have some more talk
about it.””

They were approaching Mary’s cottage, and Phebe
was about to bid her good-night, when Mary said, “Do
you think, Mrs Phebe, you could show me something to
do? Ishould be so glad.”

“T cannot all at once mention any particular thing,
Mary, but I will think about it. Do you suppose your
mother could spare you to come and drink tea with me
some evening soon ?”

“Yes, I am quite sure she will,” exclaimed Mary.
«When shall I come?”

“To-morrow night I must be busy,” said Phebe,
“but on Thursday I shall be very glad to see you at five
o’clock. Bring your thimble with you, and you can help
me with some flannel petticoats Miss Merton has asked
me to make for a poor family. Good-night.”



8 WORK FOR ALL, OR

“ Good-night, Mrs Phebe, and thank you; I will be
sure to come;” and Maryan merrily up the little slip of
garden that lay in front of their house.

Their voices had been heard at the gate, and the door
was opened even before she could tap at it: Mrs Phebe
might well speak of Mary Grey’s home as a comfortable
one. Few girls of her station were more blessed in this
respect, or had kinder and wiser parents.

Her father was a carpenter in constant work ; Mrs
Grey was a clean, notable woman, who made her husband’s
house what every wife should endeavour to have it,—a
bright and peaceful place of repose and enjoyment after
the day’s toil.

They had but two children,—Mary and a little girl of
three years old. The former had been sent to both day
and Sunday schools at an early age, and the religious and
moral training she received there had been carefully en-
forced at home. Would that this were oftener the case
with parents! Such promising characters as the open-
ing one of Mary Grey seemed likely to form into, would
doubtless be less rare than they are!

She had much to tell her father and mother of what
they had seen, and of Mr and Miss. Merton’s kindness
and liberality. The beauty and wonders of the Christmas
tree lost nothing by her lively description of it, and as an
earnest of the truth of her almost fairy-like tale she had
her treasures to produce.

Her own present had been a small green leather case,



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 9

containing every convenience for writing, which Miss
Merton had purposely contrived should fall to Mary’s
share, because the written answers she expected to certain
questions every week were always so neatly executed by
her. When this had been duly ‘examined, the disposal of
the tea and sugar was discussed.

“ Don’t you think, mother, I had better take it to old
Patty Reed? She is as poor as anybody we know, though
she is so cross and disagreeable.”

“Do, Mary ; it will be a real treat to her, poor old
soul. I passed her house to-day and heard her scold-
ing Lizzie terribly. I am afraid the child leads a wretched
life with the old woman, and that it is hardening her into
a rude, self-willed girl; her manners get worse and worse,
I think, and she is never fit to be seen, with her hair
about her ears and her torn frock.”

“Tt’s a pity she doesn’t go to school, mother ; she
would be obliged to mend her clothes there.”

“Yes ; Mr Merton has long wished she could, I know,
but her grandmother won’t hear of it; she says she can’t
spare her, and indeed I don’t see how the old woman could
be left alone so long together, for she gets very infirm.”

“Come, wife !. come, Mary!” here interrupted John
Grey, “you are forgetting how late it is!” So saying,
he opened the Bible, and the evening closed with the
family prayer, which Mary had never seen missed one
night in her parents’ house since she had been old enough
to be allowed to join in it.



10 WORK FOR ALL, OR

CHAPTER II.

Mary Grey hastened over her breakfast the next
morning, that she might have time to run to Patty Reed
(or Patty Grumbler as she was oftener called) with the
tea and sugar before she went to school. Well did the
old woman deserve the name she had acquired. Nothing
ever seemed to go right with her. It had been so all her
life. She had never learnt the habit of looking at the
bright side of anything when young, and now she was
old it was ten times worse. She was always fancying
people were deceiving her, and that her lot was more to
be pitied than any of her neighbours’. Very few of them
ever cared to go and see one who did nothing but growl
and complain directly they entered ; and consequently it

was one of her grievances that she was left so entirely to
" the company of her grandchild Lizzie, who had lived with
her ever since the death of her parents some years before,
and who certainly was as unfavourable a specimen of
bringing up as could be seen anywhere. Sharp and
clever she was to an unusual degree, but the only use
these qualities had been to her hitherto was to enable her
to trick and outwit her grandmother when it suited her
purpose to do so. She did not bear a very good charac.



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 11

ter either for truth or honesty. Although no one could
exactly say why they would not trust Lizzie, there was a
universal feeling it would be safer not to do so. Her un-
tidy appearance, for not even on Sunday was she ever fit
to be seen, was sadly against her making friends amongst
the more respectable neighbours; and children of her
own age avoided rather than sought her, she was so mis-
chievous in her ways that they were sure to get into
trouble if they played together. In fact, Lizzie Reed was
in the really pitiable situation of one whom no one cared
for, and consequently who cared for no one. Her grand-
mother’s infirmitics had prevented her ever going to
school, and even church was a place almost unknown to
her. Yet there was much that was in reality good in this
poor neglected girl. Circumstances had been sadly
against the better parts of her character coming to light,
and each year seemed to bury them down deeper in the
hard and stubborn soil that was forming over them; but
that there was gold amongst the dross was subsequently
proved.

When Mary Grey reached Patty’s cottage she found
it a wretched contrast to the clean, well-ordered home
she had just left. Patty was not down, but Lizzie was on
her knees before the fire-place, setting light to an untidy,
ill-made collection of sticks and cinders. As she blew
the fresh-lighted fuel into a flame with her mouth, the
clouds of dust that she disturbed from the only partially
cleared grate found a refuge amongst her hair, which hung



12 WORK FOR ALL, OR

in disorder over her shoulders. Her frock was put on
hind-part before, for the convenience of being able to fasten
it herself ; but those useful little articles, the hooks, having
for the most part disappeared, she had supplied their
place with pins. The room was exactly as it had been
left the night before, looking thoroughly uncomfortable,
and as though it would take a week’s work to make it
decently clean and neat.

Lizzie’s astonishment on seeing Mary at that early
hour was expressed in her countenance, but the latter
was the first to speak.

“Good morning, Lizzie, I hope your grandmother is
well.”

“No, she’s not, she says; but what do you want?”

“ve brought her some tea and sugar that Miss Mer-
ton told me last night I might give to any one I pleased,
and I thought she would be glad of it.”

“ That she will,” replied Lizzie, rising from her knees
for the first trme, and shaking back her hair from her eyes ;
“ how droll of you to think of bringing it here.”

“Can’t you get your fire to light ?” said Mary, seeing
the last spark in the grate vanishing, and secretly feeling
a benevolent interest in the kettle boiling that morning,
for she thought a cup of good tea would surprise and
please even Patty Grumbler.

“No; I’ve been ever so long over it already, it’s a
nasty bothersome grate that never will light, do what
one will.”



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 13

“You have not cleared out the ashes from underneath,
and the sticks are all laid far apart,” said Mary. “I don’t
think it can very well light. Mother has always shown
me that I must let plenty of air come in at the bottom,
and you see that is quite choked up.”

Lizzie looked as if she were doubtful as to the truth
of this theory, so Mary, asking her if she might show her
what she meant, took the poker, and clearing out a space
(somewhat to the detriment of her nice stuff dress), laid
the sticks on the top in the scientific manner well known
to clever housewives, and a few pieces of coal on the top
of them from an old box standing in the chimney corner ;
then striking a match, the result was quickly one that
surprised Lizzie into a broad grin and an exclamation of
“La! it won’t do so for me.”

Mary laughed. “It will if you will do as much for it,
Lizzie. Now if you take away the ashes it will look quite
comfortable ; shall I fill the kettle for you?”

“Tt’s too dirty for you to carry to the pump ; T’ll do
it,” said Lizzie, and seizing the ROony article in question,
she rushed out of the door.

At this moment old Patty’s voice was heard from the
room overhead, asking who was there.

“Tt is me, Mary Grey,” said Mary; “I have brought
you a little present.”

‘What is it, child? Bring it up here, don’t give it
to Lizzie.”

Mary took up the tea and sugar and timidly ascended



14 WORK FOR ALL, OR

the wooden ladder leading up to the only other room. It
was rather more tidy than the one below, though very
poorly furnished.

Old Patty lay in bed with her head covered up with a
half shawl to protect it from the draught that came from
the room underneath. Mary explained about her pre-
sent ; the old woman held out her hand for it, and in-
stantly opened the tea at one end to examine it both by
sight and smell.

“Tea, do you call it?” she said, “it seems more like
dust, but I suppose anything’s good enough for me, Miss
Merton thinks.”

“Miss Merton did not know it was for you,” said
Mary rather indignantly, “ it was I settled to bring it to
you, for I thought you would like it.”

“Aye, catch Miss Merton thinking of an old lone
body like me! I might starve and she wouldn’t mind.”

“‘ Miss Merton would let nobody starve if she knew,”
said Mary, “she is good and kind to everybody ; but I
must go now, or I shall be late at school. Shall I take
the tea down and tell Lizzie to make you a cup? the ket-
tle will soon boil, I think.”

“No, that it won’t. Lizzie’s always an hour get-
ting the fire to light, she can’t do nothing like other
girls.”

Mary was not sorry to leave Patty and her complaints.
As she reached the bottom of the ladder the old woman



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 15

called to Lizzie in an angry voice to make haste, and not
go on dawdling another hour. “What should I do if that
were my home, and Patty Grumbler my mother,” thought
Mary as she hastened to school. ‘ No wonder people have
given her that name. Poor Lizzie! how I pity her!”

CHAPTER III.

Mary did not forget her invitation for Thursday even-
ing, which gave her mother almost as much pleasure as
herself, for she knew that her child could gain only good
from the society of such a woman as her she was
going to. She had not very far to walk. Mrs Phebe
lived in lodgings. They were small but extremely com-
fortable. The arrangement of everything showed order
and good taste. She had been housekeeper for many
years to a former vicar of the parish, who had left her a
small annuity at his death, which, with what she easily
earned by her needle, enabled her to live in tolerable
comfort, as well as assist some of her poorer neighbours
a little. But her sympathy with their troubles, the inter-
est with which she entered into all that concerned them,



16 ’ WORK FOR ALL, OR

and her soothing gentle way in a sick room, was what
they most prized, and gave her greater influence over
them than she could ever have acquired by mere money,
had she had it to bestow.

Her late master had left her various articles of furni-
ture, which gave her sitting-room rather a superior air
to what it otherwise would have had. A sofa and easy-
chair were luxuries Mrs Phebe would not have aspired
to; but as having once been her beloved master’s, were
highly valued by her. The crimson moreen curtains
which had belonged to his study gave a warm and cheer-
ful appearance to her little apartment. True, they were
a good deal faded, and her landlady had more than once
suggested that dyeing would make them just like new
again. But for that very reason she did not have
them done. She liked them best in their old colour,
and as she had always remembered them. They were
drawn when Mary arrived. A bright fire burnt in
the grate, before which Mrs Phebe’s tabby cat sat
bolt upright, purring and nodding at intervals, but
not yielding to the luxury of rolling herself round into a
sound sleep till she had had her usual saucerful of
milk from her mistress. The tea-things were on the
table, and as Mrs Phebe was not above keeping her own
things well polished, the little brass kettle and metal tea-
pot shone as they never would have shone if left to the
woman of the house, clean and tidy body though she was
in her way. The small white loaf and pat of butter had



PATTY GRUMBLERB AND HER GRANDCHILD. 17

a delicious appearance, and as Mary sat on the edge of
the easy-chair in which her hostess placed her, with the
shy feelings natural to the first half-hour—she thought
that even Miss Merton’s room could not be more com-
fortable. But good kind Mrs Phebe was not one tu be
shy with long, and before tea was half over her young
_ visitor was chattering with her usual ease.

“Now for the flannel petticoats, my dear,” said Mrs
Phebe when tea was removed, producing from under the
sofa a work-basket well filled with garments of different
kinds in various stages of progress. “I am anxious
to get these finished, the weather is so cold, and the
woman for whom Miss Merton intends them is very deli-
cate.”

‘ Mary’s fingers set to work with the alacrity of one
well skilled for her age in the use of her needle. Mrs
Phebe’s quick eye saw this in an instant.

«You are accustomed to sew, I see.”

“Yes, I mend all my own things, and make a good
many of them. Mother likes me to do them myself.”

“Your mother is quite right. Now since she has
taught you to be so handy in this way, do you not think
you might work a little for the very poor sometimes?
You were wishing to be useful somehow to others, and
this would be just a thing you could do.”

“T should like to very much,” said Mary, her eyes
brightening with the thought; “if you will let me help

you, I will get as much done as I can every evening.”
2



18 WORK FOR ALL, OR

«That would be giving more time to it than you could
properly afford, I think, my dear, for your mother must
have plenty for you to do with your own and your little
sister’s things. But I dare say for one, or even two evenings
she could spare your time, and if so, you will be surprised
how much you will get through if you go on regularly. I
have a quantity of print and calico in that drawer, which
Miss Merton is going to give away—she has asked me to
get them made intofrocks and under-garments. I can easily

_find people who will make them for pay—but perhaps you
would like to give your time and your labour?”

«* And who are to have the clothes? ” inquired Mary.

‘Those who Miss Merton considers most want them,”
said Mrs Phebe. ‘If you know any one in real need
whom you would like to work for, I am sure she will
gladly let you dispose of what you make yourself.”

“T was thinking of Lizzie Reed,” replied Mary. “She
seems scarcely to havea tidy thing belonging to her.
Yesterday morning I took Miss Merton’s tea and sugar
to her grandmother, and really Lizzie’s frock seemed all
to pieces.”

*‘ Unfortunately Lizzie has never been taught to mend
her things, and make the most of them. I am often
sorry for that girl. They are very poor, and I think a
new frock and one or two under-garments would be in-
deed well bestowed there.”

«And I will make them,” said Mary, “for I do not
think Lizzie could do them. Perhaps if she for once saw



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 19

herself neatly dressed she might try to keep so afterwards.

I really do think she is very much to be pitied ; her grand-
mother is always scolding her, and she has never been to
school, and has no one to teach her how to do anything.
I tried to show her how mother taught me to light a fire
yesterday morning, and she seemed quite surprised that
done in that way it would burn up directly.”

Mrs Phebe laid down her work, and took off her
spectacles. She had a way of doing this when she was
going to say anything very earnestly. ‘Now, Mary,”
she said, “here is some work for you which may be
more lasting even than the frocks. There is that poor
Lizzie not much younger than yourself, has lost both father
and mother, and has for years had no one to look after
her but her old grandmother, who spoils her temper and
- makes her life miserable by her grumbling and discon-
tent. She has had no opportunities of learning to read and
write like other girls, and as Patty won’t part with her
even to go to church, she has none of the religious advan-
tages they have constantly. What a different lot to yours,
Mary! Itseems to meas if I might answer the question you
put to me the other night, ‘ Do you think you could show
me something to do?’ by saying, ‘See whether you
cannot show your gratitude to God for all His good-
ness to you, by trying to improve this poor neglected
orphan.’ ”

“T wish I could,” said Mary, the tears starting to her
eyes. “I do feel very sorry for her. I am afraid though

Q*



20 WORK FOR ALL, OR

my mother will not like me to see much of her, she is so
particular who I go with.”

“And so she ought to be, Mary; but it is one
thing to associate with a girl like Lizzie as a companion,
and another to visit her sometimes in order to try
and teach her such things as she has had no means of
learning. Your mother is a sensible and good wo-
man, and will see this, I am sure. But talk to her
about it, for she is your best friend, and will help you
to judge how far you can be of service to the poor
child.”

Much more conversation passed, the good effects of
which did not cease with the hour. When Mary parted
from her kind friend, she thought how much she should
like to resemble one so excellent, and that at least she
might try to follow her example in looking out for op-
portunities of usefulness, however small.

CHAPTER IV.

Mrs Grey cordially entered into Mrs Phebe’s and
Mary’s plan with respect to Lizzie Reed, though she
doubted whether much could be accomplished, owing to



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 21

“her living so constantly as she did in the presence of her
grandmother, who, though apparently caring little for
her, could not bear to have her absent for long together.
“T must try and please old Patty herself first, I think,
mother,” said Mary ; “I feel almost afraid of her though,
she is so cross.”

“You must put up with that and many other dis-
agreeables, I dare say, if you really try to teach Lizzie
anything, but you will be all the more glad if in the
end you succeed. I am afraid Lizzie herself is a rude,
troublesome sort of girl; whenever I have spoken to her,
she only turns away, or stares at me. But I don’t wish
to discourage you, Mary. Girls can manage girls per-
haps better than grown people.”

**T have been thinking, mother, that if I make her a
frock the first thing and take it to her, it will show her
that I wish to be kind, so I will set to work directly, as
Mrs Phebe has given me the print for it. I think
Lizzie-is pretty much my size, though I am older than
she is.” :

So Mary set vigorously to work, and with her mother’s
assistance cut out and made a dark lilac print dress; the
thoughts of the pleasure it would give Lizzie stimulating —
her fingérs to a pace that soon brought her labours to
a conclusion. Armed with it, she proceeded a second
time to Patty’s cottage, but as it was the after-
noon, she had no hope of finding the old woman



22 WORK FOR ALL, OR

in bed as before, which, considering the dislike she
could not help feeling for her, would have been rather
a relief.

She found her seated in the chimney corner in a low
rush-bottomed chair, watching Lizzie, who was employed
in ironing some clothes at a table on the opposite side of
the room.

“Good afternoon, Patty,” said Marys; “T wanted to
speak to Lizzie, if she is not too busy.”

* Busy! she’s never busy, she’s an idle slaty and
that’s what she is. Look at them clothes, washed last
Tuesday, and not ironed yet!”

Lizzie looked sullen and made no reply, but said to
Mary,—

‘‘There’s a chair yonder, if you like to sit down.”

There was enough civilization in this speech to en-
courage Mary to say,—

“Tf you have a great deal to iron, perhaps you would
let me help you a little ; I am not in a hurry.”

Lizzie put down her iron, and turned round with an
astonished stare.

“Do you mean you'll care to help me?”

«Yes, indeed I will, gladly; it is Saturday, so there
is no. school, and mother told me I might stay a little
while.”

So saying, she rose, and taking an iron she saw heat-
ing, began to assist her with such good-will, that Lizzie
exclaimed,—



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 23

“T can’t think why you’re so good-natured like all of
a sudden.”

Mary laughed, and said, ‘‘ Because I want to be good-
natured to somebody, and I wish it to be you.”

Lizzie’s stare was more astonished than before as she
replied,—

“Now yow’re making game of me. Nobody never
cares nothing for me.”

Mary was touched by these words, and still more by
the tone of voice in which they were said, and replied,—

“Yes, I care for you, Lizzie; and I have been making
a frock for you myself—look here!” and she unfolded it
before her.

. Well now, but if you ain’t kind!” exclaimed Lizzy;
“look here, grandmother, Mary has made this for me her-
self, isn’t it a beauty ! ”

“Tt’s more than you deserve,” said Patty; “is it a
good print?” she added, holding out her hand for the
dress.

“Miss Merton bought the stuff,’ replied Mary.
“
Patty’s inspection of its quality seemed to be satisfac-
tory, seeing she laid it down without finding fault. Mary
would have liked to talk more to Lizzie, but felt it impos-
sible whilst her grandmother sat listening and watching,
so they ironed in silence for a little while, and had nearly
finished when Patty growled out that Lizzie was to make
haste and fetch in some things that were wanted from the



24 WORK FOR ALL, OR

shop. Mary was glad to have the opportunity of accom-
panying her that they might talk as they went along. So
when the last article was folded, Lizzie took up a basket,
and asked for money to make her purchases. This was
given with a suspicion and grudging, that made Patty
appear more than ever unamiable to Mary. She counted
out the half-pence for. each thing, as though she ex-
pected Lizzie to cheat her. The girl seemed to take it as
a matter of course, and Mary’s pity for her grew strong..
She could not help expressing something of the sort
when they left the house.

Lizzie did not seem to pity herself however in this re-
spect, for she only replied,—

“Granny thinks she’s as deep as I am, but she’s not;
I can trick her in the price of the butter, I know where
to get it cheaper than she said.”

“ But,” said Mary, “shall you not give her the difference
it makes in the money ?”

“ Now you don’t think I’m such a goose as that! No,
T’ll spend it on sucks, it’ll only be a penny ! ”

“T wish you wouldn’t, Lizzie, that’s stealing after a
way ; it’s your granny’s penny, not yours.”

‘But granny won’t be any the poorer, and I’ll get the
sucks,”

“ Indeed it’s wrong, Lizzie, though you try to persuade
yourself it isn’t. Mother would explain to you what I
mean.”

“I don’t want no explaining to, I know what you



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 25

mean, but I dare say you often get pennies given you
and I never get one.”

Mary felt how true this was, and as if it must seem
hard in her to blame Lizzie. Yet here was an oppor-
tunity of trying to turn her from doing wrong which she
must not suffer to escape.

She pondered an instant, and then a thought struck
her.

“ Lizzie,” she said, “if you will not trick your grand-
mother, you shall still ne your Peeye for I have one in
my pocket I will give you.”

«What were you going to do with it?”

sf Perhaps I ponies have bought Ewcots) but I would
rather give it to you.”

“No, I won’t have it,” replied Lizzie, “thank you though
kindly.” And she returned the penny with so determined
an air that Mary saw it was in vain to pressit. Seeing
she looked disappointed, Lizzie added,—

«T won’t take granny’s penny though.”

“That’s right, Lizzie; I’m sure you’ll feel more com-
fortable when you tell her how you’ve spent the
money.”

No I shan’t; she wouldn’t find me out, I’ve done it
lots of times ; but I won’t now because you don’t like me
to.”

Mary felt that this was not quite the best reason she
could have given, but it seemed the highest Lizzie could
rise to at present.



26 WORK FOR ALL, OR

“Can you read or write?” was her next question.

“No, how should I? I never had any schooling.”

** Should you like to learn? ”

“ Yes, well enough, but granny won’t ever let me go
to school, I know.”

“Would she let me teach you? I should like to, and
would come to your house to give you a lesson as often
as I could, every Saturday I have plenty of time ; and
we might do some writing too.”

Lizzie looked so really pleased at the idea, that Mary
was sufficiently encouraged, though her only exclamation
was,—

“Ta! will you really now ?”

A good deal more talk followed, and before they
parted, it was settled that Mary should give her first
lesson the following Tuesday on her way from school in
the afternoon. Mary went home and told her mother
what she had undertaken, and Lizzie proceeded to make
her purchases, nor was there one half-penny not honestly
accounted for to her grandmother of what she had given
her to lay out.



' PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 27

CHAPTER V.

Ir is only those who have tried it that can have any
idea of the pleasure there is in beginning to live for
others. Although Mary Grey was by no means what is
called a selfish girl, she had hitherto been simply indus-
trious at school and obedient at home, helping her
mother in whatever she was bidden. Such is the history
of many a well-principled girl, and as far as it goes it is
good and encouraging. But as year succeeds year in
early youth, and young people begin to feel that child-
hood is being left behind, it is well they should remem-
ber that our Saviour’s injunction, “ Love thy neighbour as
thyself,” applies to the age at which they have arrived as
well as to an older one. Riches and influence are not
necessary to carry it out. There is probably no respect-
able girl of Mary Grey’s class, who, if she were to con-
sider what it is in her power to effect towards the welfare
of others of her own age, would not be surprised to find
how largely she might contribute to their comfort or im-
provement. They who have once felt the blessedness of
having their minds directed to this point and have tried
to act upon it (and we know some who have, even in
childhood), will not need to be urged on. But unfortun-



28 WORK FOR ALL, OR

ately it is a matter little thought of in general, or is re-
garded as not coming within the range of youthful duties.
Tt is in the hope of arousing the attention of our readers
to. the subject that we record the simple yet earnest efforts
of Mary Grey to benefit the ignorant and despised Lizzie,
- hoping that they may consider the results in her case as
sufficiently encouraging to induce them to “go and do
likewise.”

Mary soon found that the task she had set herself was
in some respects a difficult and trying one. Lizzie,
though a quick clever girl, had lived in such untu-
tored habits both of mind and body, that she either
could not or would not apply steadily to the drudgery of
learning. She was desirous of possessing the power of
reading and writing, but hated the trouble necessary for
its acquisition. Then again, old Patty, though she ac-
quiesced in the plan, hindered it to a most provoking
degree, by vociferating from her chimney corner to Lizzie
about things that had no connection with what she was
about; thus distracting the attention of both teacher and
pupil whilst the lesson was going on. Once or twice
Mary was almost tempted to give up in despair, but the
alacrity with which she saw the proposal would be se-
conded by Lizzie, who persevered chiefly because she
wished to please Mary, recalled her to the recollection
of what her mother had said,—‘ That there would be
many disagreeables in her way, but she would be all the
more glad if she succeeded in the end.” So she returned



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 29

to the charge again and again, and at length succeeded
in making her repeat and write the alphabet correctly.
From that time matters began to improve. Lizzie was so
charmed at the sight of her own letters (albeit they were
none of the most elegant) that every spare moment found
her, pen or pencil in hand, forming them on anything that
fell in her way. Then came the spelling of her own
name, which she soon accomplished with a facility that
surprised Mary, till she discovered that the walls, table,
and even the chairs, were covered with “ Ivzzies”’ of every
possible size and dimensions. The step from this feat to
the reading and writing words and putting them together
was rapid in comparison to what the commencement of
the affair had been, and Lizzie’s interest was now as fully
aroused as her teacher could desire.

Almost imperceptibly too, at first, but very decidedly
as time went on, the girl’s dress changed to a less slatternly
appearance. Her hair was rarely seen hanging over her
face on the days on which she expected Mary to give her a
lesson, and her frock was neatly hooked straight down
instead of pinned over in any zig-zag direction that suited
the convenience of the moment. Little white collars
now generally gave a finished neat appearance to the
dark print dress round the throat. It was a sign of the
times that the red-framed looking-glass had been brought
from up-stairs and hung over the bench in the back
kitchen where Lizzie’s ablutions were usually performed.
Not a sign, be it understood, that she was growing vain,



30 WORK FOR ALL, OR

for no human being could have been freer from that weak-
ness than herself,—but the virtue of cleanliness was be-
‘ginning to assume an importance in her eyes to which it
had hitherto been a stranger. The same gradual yet
visible improvement went on in the state of the cottage.
Lizzie had learnt to light a fire easily now, and as
Mary sometimes peeped in on her way to school in the
morning, and was sure to give a glance at the grate
as she said “good morning,” Lizzie did not like her to
find it untidy and choked up with the ashes of the day
before. She was beginning to love her too dearly not to
try and please her. She felt this all the more because
Mary never tried to speak to her with any authority, or
reprove her for what she wanted to see different. But
she told: her how her mother did things, and how com-
fortable their house was in consequence, till she persuaded
her to try and make theirs the same; so Lizzie com-
menced the attempt by way of pleasing Mary, and ended
by effecting it to satisfy herself.

Another trial in Mary’s way was the observations
made by her companions on her notice of Lizzie. They
were astonished that she should be so often at her house,
devoting to her the best part of her Saturday afternoons,
and some of them did not hesitate to remark on what
they called her low taste. When she explained that she
was teaching her to read and write and work better,
there was a good deal of laughing at her expense, and



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 3l

hints thrown out that she wanted to set herself up as
somebody, and to lord it over Lizzie. There was one
girl in particular, Sarah Dallas by name, who tried to
persuade the other girls that Mary’s love of power and
rule was the motive that actuated her to take such pains
with her. She had her own reasons for disliking Mary Grey.
Sarah was idle and careless to a degree that often brought
upon her the reproof of the schoolmistress, and on one
occasion she had been detected bringing a story book to
read on the sly in class, when only the week before this
breach of the rules had been most severely commented
upon by Mr Merton himself, to whom complaint had been
made that some of the elder girls were in the habit of
thus offending. It was then intimated that any one again
doing so would not be allowed to go to Miss Merton’s
Christmas tree, which was being anticipated with great
anxiety. Notwithstanding what had been said, Sarah Dal-
las soon after was seen by her neighbours in the working
school with a book hidden under the large-sized piece of
work she was engaged upon, which she was contriving to
read whilst the mistress believed she was engaged only
with her needle. No notice was taken by the other girls
till Mrs Jeffrey was called away; then several expressed
their disapprobation, and none more earnestly than Mary
Grey, who entreated her to put it aside. Sarah refused,
saying there was no occasion, for she could both work and
read at the same time, and that she was not afraid of Mrs



32 - WORK FOR ALL, OR

Jeffrey seeing the book, so cleverly as she contrived to
hide it. Mary replied to this speech of the ill-principled
girl rather indignantly, and Sarah was answering with
anger, when Mrs Jeffrey entered and insisted on knowing
what was the cause of the talking and of Sarah Dallas’s
angry looks. None of the older girls would reply, but
on Mrs Jeffrey appealing to one of the younger children
the truth came out. Mrs Jeffrey found the book in
Sarah’s lap, and she was at once struck off from the list
of those who were to go to Miss Merton’s tree. Instead
of seeing how entirely the blame was her own, she ac-
cused Mary Grey of being the cause, as having caused
her detection by her “ preaching.’ Mary was very un-
happy, and went herself secretly to Miss Merton and
begged her to overlook the matter. But Mrs Jeffrey
‘would not second her request; Sarah was too trouble-
some and deceitful a girl to make it wise to do so, and
thus the affair ended, as far as Sarah’s punishment was
concerned. But from that time she began a sort of petty
persecution towards Mary, never letting an occasion slip
of representing her as considering herself better than
others, laying down the law, &c. Mary’s natural character
was so entirely the opposite of this that it did her no harm
with her companions ; but Sarah saw that she shrunk from
ridicule, and was delighted to have found a way of annoy-
ing her. She had a few partisans of her own class, and
from these the words ‘‘ Mary the preacher,” “Mary the
fault-finder,” &c., would reach her ears when saying her



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 33

lessons to Miss Merton on Sunday, who had no idea
why the colour should so suddenly rush over her face,
and her words be stammered in repeating what she
evidently knew. It may readily be imagined how gladly
Sarah would seize on the circumstance of Mary’s exerting
herself for Lizzie’s good, and twist it into a case of love
of power and domineering, and in proportion as her
gentle spirit winced. under the spiteful remarks and inu-
endoes that Sarah threw out, the latter delighted in re-
peating them.

Had Mary Grey’s desire in what she was doing been
praise from others, she would, with her sensitive dis-
position, scarcely have stood proof against these annoy-
ances, and Lizzie would have been gradually left again to
herself, her ignorance, and her cross grandmother. But,
almost unconsciously, a higher motive was at work. The
wish to do something for others had been aroused in her
heart ; and He, without whom we cannot even think a
good thought, was leading her on to know something of
that true charity which beareth all things, hopeth all
things, endureth all things. So Mary persevered with
Lizzie, and bore Sarah’s unkindness with meekness.

Then there was the brighter side of the picture. If
there was shade, there was sunshine also. Lizzie’s na-
tural disposition was most affectionate. Under a rough
exterior lay a heart which required but the touch of kind-
ness to show that it had stores of love and gratitude
ready to be called forth by circumstances. Mary’s interest

3



34 WORK FOR ALL, OR

in her aroused these qualities with a force and warmth that
grew stronger and stronger as time went on. Even grumb-
ling Patty began to look on her with complacency, and to
associate her with the increased comfort that had arisen in
the cottage since she had first tried to improve Lizzie in
the art of tidiness and method. Not only was there a
bright little fire every morning when she came down, but
the kettle was generally boiling, and the tea-cups set
ready for breakfast. ‘The room was no longer left till the
middle of the day to be swept, and then only done because
a scolding from her granny obliged Lizzie to obey. The
table and dresser were subject to sundry scrubbings utterly
unknown to them before, and their complexions were be-.
coming as fair under the new system as nature originally
intended them to be. There was a sad dearth in the cot-
tage of conveniences, such as shelves, pegs, &c. But the
. landlord, a sullen, cross-grained man, obstinately refused
to put them up. So Lizzie’s shawl and bonnet were still
doomed to be. thrown on the first vacant spot, and the
saucepans and other such articles, though not very numer-
ous, were too many for the only place intended for them.
They had to put up with their old quarters on the floor,
to the detriment of Lizzie’s dresses, which showed sooty
saucepan and kettle marks much more easily than form-
erly, seeing that they were now regularly washed every
week instead of just as it might happen. Lizzie was less
perplexed than Mary how to manage, saying, “ they must
just go on as before, there was no help for it.” But



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 385

Mary resolved there should be help, and going to her
father with the difficulty, coaxed him into coming one
evening after working hours and putting up a long deal
shelf in the little back kitchen, and a row of pegs in the
sitting-room. He did not get many thanks from Patty,
who, though secretly pleased, was too much of an habitual
grumbler not to complain that the hammering made her
head ache, and that she didn’t believe Lizzie would ever
use them, except Mary was by to see she did. Lizzie’s
awkward but honest gratitude however pleased him, and
- made him look round to see what else his tools might
effect for her comfort. After various small repairs, he
walked home with his daughter, and gladdened her heart
by expressing an interest in poor Lizzie, and promising
to make a little book-case, which she should give her for
a present on her next birthday; Lizzie’s attainments in
the reading line promising to become such before long as
to make a place for books desirable.

Another and a more serious subject lay on Mary’s
mind respecting her protégée; and this was that she
was seldom or never able to go to church, old Patty’s
infirmities making it undesirable she should be left long
alone. After much thought, she settled on a plan for al-
lowing her to go every Sunday afternoon if her parents
would consent to it. She had always been in the habit
of attending three times herself, after morning and after-
noon school, and again in the evening with her parents.
She ouent she might contrive for Lizzie to go in the

3*



36 WORK FOR ALL, OR

afternoon by undertaking to sit with old Patty, who was
not likely to make any difficulty now she had become so
accustomed to Mary’s presence, she being a decided
favourite with her. Her parents made no objection, and
were pleased with the idea of Lizzie’s being enabled to
attend divine worship regularly, but Mary hoped to ar-
range more than this. She wished her to have the
privilege of Miss Merton’s Sunday afternoon instructions
to her class, which she had for so many years enjoyed.
She confided her wishes to Mrs Phebe. That good
woman was watching Lizzie’s progress in civilization and
education with great interest, and was ever ready to en-
courage Mary with her advice. She at once entered into
her plan.

I will speak to Miss Merton about it, my dear,” she
said, “I am sure of her consent to Lizzie taking your
place in her class in the afternoon.”

Mr and Miss Merton were so much pleased and in-
terested in what Mrs Phebe told them about Mary and
her pupil, that they sent for her and expressed their ap-
probation, and it was settled that Lizzie should have the
offer of going to school before church.

“T am sorry to lose you, Mary,” said Miss Merton,
‘but I consider that the hour will be as profitably spent
by you in enabling Lizzie to partake of the instruction
which has long been yours. The injunction ‘ Freely ye have
received, freely give,’ applies to this case as much as if it



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 37

were money you had to bestow, and will be as favourably
regarded by God as alms rendered by those to whom He
has given riches. If, as I believe is the case, you are
denying yourself a pleasure for Christ’s sake, of you it
may be said you are obeying His command to ‘ give alms
of such things as ye have.’ ”

Mary’s heart beat high at these words, but not because
she was elated with praise, and thought she was doing
great things. Never had she felt more conscious of her
own weakness and unworthiness than as she walked away
from the Vicarage. She feared Miss Merton thought far
higher of her than she deserved, and the tears rose to
her eyes as she remembered how great had been the
struggle of her mind before she had brought herself
to give up her treasured hour with Miss Merton and
spend it in listening to cross old Patty’s grumblings.
“God loveth a cheerful giver,” said she to herself, and
Miss Merton and mother and Mrs Phebe all think I am
one. They cannot see my heart and know as He does
that I thought about this long ago, but would not pro-
pose it because it was disagreeable to me ; Lizzie has lost
several services and hours of Miss Merton’s instructions
through my selfishness.

Her face looked so grave when she arrived at home
that her mother 'scarcely expected to hear Miss Merton
_had consented to the wished-for arrangement. When,
however, her daughter came out of her little bedroom to



38 WORK FOR ALL, OB

tea not a trace of the slight cloud was visible. She had
confessed her short-comings to Him who could bear with
and pardon them, and Who would accept her offering,
small and humble though it was, and made in much
weakness and imperfection.

CHAPTER VI.

Lizzie was well pleased with the proposal: that she
should go to church every Sunday afternoon, and was
grateful to Mary for arranging it. But her countenance
fell at the idea of the school.

“T should like to go,” she said, “but I am so ignor-
ant, and have such poor clothes. The other girls will
only laugh at me. No, Mary, thank you kindly, but I
think I’d rather not.”

“Never mind being ignorant, Lizzie. Miss Merton
knows it, and won’t ask you questions; she will only tell
you things, and talk to you with the rest, so kindly.
Then about the clothes, Mrs Phebe and'I have settled all
that. Mother and I are making you another dress, a
nice dark blue merino one, and it is to have a large cape of
the same, lined with flannel, which you can take in or out



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 39

according to the weather. Miss Merton gave us the
stuff. Then you are to have a new straw bonnet with
some dark blue ribbon on it. Mother wishes to get you
that, and as your granny bought you a new pair of boots
lately, you will be quite as well dressed as any girl there,
so you need not fear being laughed at.”

Lizzie’s face had brightened up wonderfully as Mary’s
speech proceeded. “I’m sure] can’t say thanks enough,”
she said. ‘TI tell you what, Mary, if there was just any-
thing I could do for you I’d be happy, but I feel all chok-
ing with your kindness ;” and Lizzie burst into tears of
pure heart-felt gratitude, sobbing out, “ There’s nothing
I can do but love you!”

Mary felt almost inclined to. cry too, but she said
cheerfully, “Indeed, Lizzie, you are making me very
happy by taking so much pains about everything. I don’t
know what I should do without you, it is so pleasant to
see you getting on with your reading and writing.”

Patty made no objection to Mary supplying Lizzie’s
place with her on a Sunday afternoon, so it was settled
she was to go to school the following Sunday, and as she
still shrunk from the first appearance there, Mary per-
suaded her mother to go on that one occasion to Patty

‘whilst she accompanied her, Lizzie declaring that after
this she should be willing to go by herself.

No mother’s anxiety on her daughter’s first appear-
ance in public could have been greater than was Mary
Grey’s over Lizzie Reed on the occasion of her taking



40 WORK FOR ALL, OR

her place amongst the girls in Miss Merton’s class. She
was quite aware she would be eyed with curiosity by all,
and disdain by some, and she was resolved that she
should appear perfectly neat and properly dressed for her
station. The dark blue dress was finished on Saturday,
and the bonnet trimmed with its curtain and band of
ribbon by Mary’s own hands. Out of. her pocket-
money she had saved enough to purchase a pair of
gloves, as she knew the absence of them would cause
remarks, and poor Lizzie had never in her life had a pair
on her hands.

She and her mother went to Patty’s house after their
early dinner on Sunday, the latter to remain there whilst
the girls went to school. Lizzie was ready, looking so
nice in her new dress and bonnet that a stranger would
scarcely have recognized the modest tidy-looking young
person with her well-brushed hair braided under her
simple bonnet-cap, to be the same Lizzie who used to be
so often seen with it streaming behind her, and her dress
matching the hair in its arrangement.

The gloves however were a trouble to her. “ Must
I wear them, Mary ?” she asked, as they walked along.
«They make my fingers tingle; I can’t bear them; do let
me pull them off;” and Lizzie gave a tug at her left glove
with her right hand.

To Mary’s relief, who had had the trouble of getting
them on, the glove refused to yield to the pull, though by
no means a gentle one.



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 4]

“No, don’t take them off, Lizzie, try and bear it,
you'll soon get used to them ; all the other girls will have
them on, and I want you to be like the rest.”

“Tl wear them,” said poor Lizzie, with a sigh, and
evidently feeling that for the present she had taken leave
of her old comfortable fingers for a set of entirely new
and disagreeable ones; “J’d do more than that to please
you, Mary.”

“Yes, be sure and please preaching Mary,” said a
girl at that moment pushing past, who had overheard the
last words, and Sarah Dallas ran on in front with a com-
panion, looking back however, and saying loud enough
for them to hear,—

“‘ Mary’s in her glory now, with her pupil by her side.
Shan’t we have fine airs to-day ?”

“What is that she’s saying?” asked Lizzie, in utter
ignorance of her meaning, yet seeing by Mary’s hcight-
ened colour that it was something unpleasant connected
w.th her.

“ Nothing of any consequence,” replied Mary ; “ Sarah
often says rather disagreeable things, but it is no use to
mind them. We must come on quick, Lizzie, or school
will have begun,” and they walked on at a pace that
prevented any further remarks about Sarah Dallas.

Miss Merton received Lizzie with extreme kindness.
She saw she was feeling shy and awkward, and that
she was aware every eye was fixed on her with a stare of
curiosity. She placed her between herself and Mary,



42 WORK FOR ALL, OR

and at once called the girls’ attention from her by com-
mencing work. It was her habit to read aloud to them
of an afternoon, explaining and commenting as she pro-
ceeded ; Lizzie had therefore only to sit and listen like
the rest, or if questions were asked, Miss Merton took
care to put them in such a way that she should see no an-
swer was expected of her. When school was over, she
kept Mary and Lizzie back for a few minutes, and spoke
with great kindness to the latter, saying she hoped to see
her regularly, and that if she went on as she was doing
at present, she should find she had a friend in her as well
as in Mary. ate.

From this Sunday began a second and new era in
Lizzie’s history. Her attendance at the afternoon school
was punctual and regular, and her attention to Miss
Merton’s teaching so great that the lady was much grati-
fied. Without seeming to do it on Lizzie’s account,
she so managed her instructions to the class in general,
from the first Sunday of her coming, as to carry them
through a course of simple Scripture teaching such as
most of them knew, but none could be the worse for hear-
ing again. This soon brought Lizzie, who was particularly
quick, to be more on a par with the others, and before
many weeks were over, if a question were put to the girls
generally, none.was more likely to answer correctly than
Lizzie Reed. The extreme disadvantages under which she
had been brought up, and the pains Mary was taking
with her, gave hera great interest in both Mr and Miss -



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 43

Merton’s eyes. This was noticed by Sarah Dallas, whose
inattention made her by no means a favourite ; indeed
such had been her conduct on several occasions, that she
had run great risk of being dismissed from the school.
Although Sarah cared little how she stood with her elders,
her dislike to Mary made that feeling extend to lizzie,
and she could not endure to see the notice that was taken
of her. As Mary never was with her when she came to
school, she had not the satisfaction of throwing out the
insulting speeches which she knew so greatly discom-
posed her. But she did not hesitate to try and annoy
her second-hand by attacking Lizzie in various ways. For
instance, she drew the attention of some of the girls to
her dress, and then after admiring the colour, asked her
who had given it to her? Then turning to her bonnet,
made the same inquiry, and said she was thankful she
was not obliged to go trying to please people in order to
get presents so as to be fit to be seen. Her unkind re-
marks had however little effect on Lizzie, so long as they
were only thrown at her. Straightforward herself, she
scarcely could understand hints and inuendoes.

But at last, Sarah showed her dislike so openly one
day that Lizzie’s indignation was fairly aroused.

It happened that the two girls had entered a shop to
purchase such things as are to be found at small de-
pots. There were a great many customers, and they
had to wait fora time. Others came in, for it was Satur-
day, always a busy day at such places, and Lizzie was



4A, WORK FOR ALL, OB

gradually obliged to stand further and further in, till she
was almost behind the counter. A woman from the
country had been buying some tea and sugar, for which
she laid down half-a-crown as payment. A moment after
she remembered something else she wanted, and was
about to add the money for it to the rest, when it was
found the half-crown had vanished! In vain the counter
was searched, and the floor likewise, though it could
scarcely have fallen without the noise having been heard.
The woman kept declaring she was certain she had laid it
down, and the man who served her said he had cer-
tainly seen her do so. The affair was unpleasant and
mysterious. The woman was unwilling to pay a second
time, the shopman not disposed to let her go away without
doing so. His wife, who was in another part of the shop,
came forward. Sarah Dallas, to whom she was well known,
whispered a few words in her ear which caused her to
look towards Lizzie, who was standing close to the end of
the counter where the half-crown had been laid. What-
ever the whisper was, it had been heard by others, for
she suddenly seemed the object of general attention.
And the wife, going behind the counter, said something
in a low voice to her husband, which caused him, also, to
glance suspiciously at her.

“TI say, Lizzie Reed,” said he, ‘‘ why have you taken
into your head to stand so uncommon close to the
counter? That’s the place for them as takes money, I’m
thinking, not for them as gives it.”



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 45

Lizzie did not detect the double meaning implied in
these words, and replied simply,—

“I was pushed up here when I came in, there were
so many behind me.”

“T suppose then you saw the half-crown put down?”

“Yes I did,” replied she, “it was placed by this
piece of cheese.”

His wife now came forward, saying,—

“If you. know so well where it was, perhaps you can
tell us where it is now.”

“T know no more than you do,” exclaimed Lizzie,
who began to see by the looks around her that she was
suspected, and the blood rushed indignantly to her face.
“Who says I have taken it? is it you, Sarah Dallas ?”
she added, for she saw her nodding and making mysteri-
ous grimaces to the shopwoman.

Sarah laughed aloud. “ past makes you suppose I
lay it on you?” she replied; “is it because you know
you can’t deceive me with your new. ways as you do some
others ?”

“I deceive no one,” said Lizzie passionately. ‘And
I am sure you are trying to make them think I have
stolen the money only because you don’t like me. I
should like to be searched,” she said eagerly to the shop-
man. “I brought only fifteen-pence into the shop, and
now that you think I have taken the half-crown, I want
it to be seen whether I have it about me.”

There was a pause for an instant, and then the coun-



46 WORK FOR ALL, OR

trywoman said, “She would much rather lose the half-
crown than have any more said, for she didn’t believe
the girl had touched it. Perhaps it would turn up, and
in the mean time there was another.”

But Lizzie was resolute. “If it is not found,” she
said, “ Sarah will tell every one that I am a thief;. I want
it to be seen Iam not.”

At this moment the shopman, who was obliged to
serve an impatient customer with some cheese, placed
the slice he had just cut off in the scales. As he did so
there was a metallic sound, and on lifting it up to
examine the cause, with a sudden suspicion of how the
case stood, he found the half-crown had stuck to the
bottom of the cheese, which was soft and decayed, thus
proving he must have himself placed it heavily down
upon it. As it adhered to the bottom it was not seen in
the search that had been made by lifting things from the
counter. :

The tide was instantly turned against Sarah, and in
favour of Lizzie. The shopman-and his wife at once
expressed their regret that she had been suspected, and
the latter said it was Sarah Dallas’ fault, who had whis-
pered to her that she had seen Lizzie leaning with her
arm on the counter in a very strange manner, the
moment after the half-crown had disappeared. A cry
. of Shame! shame! arose from those around, and one
loquacious dame did not hesitate to give Sarah not only
a severe scolding for trying. to ruin the character of an



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 47

innocent girl, but a pretty sharp push as she pressed
by her to get out of the place that was getting too un-
comfortable to remain in. Lizzie became the heroine
of the moment, especially with the countrywoman, who
had been indignant from the first at her having been ~
suspected. She waited for her outside the door, and they
walked together as far as their roads lay the same way.
Her kindness a little soothed poor Lizzie, who had felt
deeply the cruelty of Sarah Dalle, and longed to tell
Mary what had occurred.

Patty had the usual complaints ready when she returned
at her having been too long away, and there was so much
to do before going to bed, she had not time to dwell on the
scene in the shop, but that she had an enemy in Sarah she
was now assured ; nor, if she had searched into her heart,
would she have found that her own feelings towards her
were either amiable or forgiving. Poor Lizzie had yet
much to-learn of the sinfulness of her own heart, and
she lay down that night, having repeated the words
of. the Lord@’s prayer certainly, but without feeling that
she had forgiven, or wished to forgive, them that had
trespassed against her.



43 WORK FOR ALL, OR

CHAPTER VII.

Ir happened that Mrs Phebe’s landlady was in the
shop when the half-crown was lost, and she had con-
sequently been witness to the whole affair, and had related
it to Mrs Phebe when she returned home. Vexed for
the pain Lizzie had been put to, and angry with Sarah
for her disgraceful endeavour to injure her, she thought
it right to mention it to Miss Merton the next day, who
was extremely shocked, and sending for Sarah, spoke to
her with more severity than she had ever done before,
constantly as she had had occasion to reprove her. She
found the girl was sullen and dogged, giving no sign
whatever of contrition, nor did she do so after Miss
Merton had represented to her how great was the sin
she had committed, in trying to fix a charge of theft
on an innocent person. She at length said that, till she
was really sorry for her fault, and had told not only her-
self but Lizzie that she was so, she should not allow her
to come to her class, and desired her to take her place >
ina much lower one. This was a great mortification to
Sarah, but her countenance as she left was more ex-
pressive of temper than sorrow.

Lizzie was astonished when she passed up the school-



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 49

room in the afternoon to her own place to see Sarah
removed to the other end. She had no idea that Miss
Merton had heard of what had occurred, and when that:
lady on her arrival informed the girls that misconduct on
the part of Sarah Dallas had obliged her to remove her
from her class till such time as she was contrite and
grieved for her fault, Lizzie had no suspicion that she
herself was so closely connected with her disgrace. Her
inward feelings on hearing of it were known only to her-
self and God who searcheth the heart. But perhaps there
was something in her countenance which made Miss
Merton choose for her lesson that afternoon the example
set us by our blessed Saviour in His forgiveness to His
enemies, and she exhorted all present to search their
hearts and see whether, if they had been injured in any
way, they could bless them that persecuted them, and
pray for them that despitefully used them. She was
more earnest than usual, and Lizzie’s attention was
completely riveted. She had never before thought on
this subject ; it was a new light opening upon her that
she was to love her enemies. How could she love Sarah
Dallas? How pray for her who had been so cruel? Yet
had not Miss Merton just been describing how Christ
had prayed for His murderers even when in all the agonies
of the death to which they were putting Him; and how
much smaller had been the offence Sarah had committed
against her! Lizzie was quick in her perceptions, and
4



50 WORK FOR ALL, OR

she could catch something of the exquisite beauty and
grandeur of the Divine love of which Miss Merton had
been speaking in glowing language. Perhaps a faint ray
of it illumined her own heart as the first class filed down
the room, for no look of exultation was on her countenance,
nor did ske even raise her eyes as she passed close to
where Sarah stood, thinking it might be painful to her
to be noticed.

From that. time Sarah studiously avoided Lizzie; no-
thing seemed further from her thoughts than to tell her
she was sorry for her unkindness, and it was a bad sign
that before the following Sunday she had persuaded her
parents to let her give up going to the Sunday school at
all. Lizzie’s character continued steadily to improve
under the valuable instructions she received from Miss
Merton and the good influence of Mary Grey’s friendship.
Even Patty, though she still found fault with her inces-
santly, owned she wasn’t like the same girl as before
she knew Mary. The old-woman was not only far more
comfortable than formerly, owing to Lizzie’s greater
thought for her, but she was less discontented with
everybody and everything. Mary used to spend her
Sunday afternoons with her in reading the Bible aloud,
and such simple tracts as Mr Merton thought suitable.
At first she seemed indifferent, and unable to acquire the
habit of listening, but by degrees her attention was
aroused, and she would lean forward as Mary sat on a low
stool by her side with her shrivelled skinny hand over



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 51

her ear, that she might catch the words more distinctly,
sometimes stopping her to ask for some passage that she
could not quite follow, to be repeated. Lizzie also was
now able to read to her, and the last hour of most even-
ings was spent in this way. Mr Merton made them a
present of a large Bible, which Patty valued greatly; at
first because of its appearance on the little book-case
which Mary had given to Lizzie, and afterwards from the
real pleasure it gave her to hear it read.

About a year and half after Mary Grey had begun
to be interested in Lizzie, Mr Merton announced that
the Bishop of the diocese was going to hold a Confirma-
tion, and requested such young people as were of a
proper age to send in their names to him. Mary was
now more than 16 years of age and Lizzie about 10
months younger. Their names were both amongst the
candidates, but that of Sarah, who was as old as Mary,
was not on the list.

“Sarah Dallas is of an age to be confirmed,” said the
Vicar to his sister, “ but she has not entered her name.”

“Tam not surprised,” replied Miss Merton. “ That
girl has baffled all my efforts to do her good, and since
she has given up the school I have of course lost what
little influence I had over her, which however I fear con-
sisted only in her dread of losing any pleasure that might
be going forward. She has never forgiven me for dis-
missing her my class till she should acknowledge her un-
kind conduct to Lizzie Reed.”

4*



52 WORK FOR ALL, OR

“Do you suppose,” said Mr Merton, “that she still
feels her old dislike to Lizzie?”

“Yes, I am afraid she does, from what Mary Grey
told me the other day. She says she does not show it
openly because they are seldom thrown together, but that
she will never lose the opportunity of being disagreeable ~
to both her and Lizzie if it comes in her way.”

“Perhaps the preparation for Confirmation may be
the very means of arousing better feelings in her heart.
Unfortunately her parents are such as will not second
one’s own efforts for her good. They rarely come to
church themselves, or insist on their daughter doing so.”

A: day or two after this conversation, Mr Merton
called at Sarah’s cottage, and as he happened to find the
girl alone he at once spoke to her on the subject of the
Confirmation.

She replied rather pertly that she supposed of course
she had better do as others did.

Mr Merton was not satisfied with her manner, and re-
solving to have some private talk with her before he re-
ceived her with the other candidates, he requested her to
call at the Vicarage on the following evening, at seven
o’clock.

Sarah looked as if she would rather avoid the inter-
view, but, not daring to refuse, promised to go, and Mr
Merton took his leave.

From her he passed on till he came to Patty Reed’s
little cottage. It was a strange contrast to what he once



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 53

remembered it when going his pastoral rounds. Clean
and orderly now as any he ever entered, he looked about
with approbation, and said to Lizzie, who was busily em-
ployed with her crochet needle when he came in,—

_ Why, Lizzie, this is not like the same house I used to
see once on a time; you have learned to be as tidy as
Mary Grey, I think.”

Lizzie coloured with pleasure as she replied,

“Tt was all Mary Grey’s doing, sir; she taught me
everything.”

“She is a good girl, Lizzie, and you have cause to be
grateful to her, and to God who put it into her heart to
take such pains with you. Where is your grandmother ?”

“ She is in bed, sir, very poorly indeed.”

«© Will she like me to go up to her? ”

“T am sure she will, sir; she begins to like to be
spoken to, and to hear the Bible read now, since Mary
Grey took to reading to her every Sunday.”

“ Now you are alone, Lizzie, I want to say a few words
to you on a subject that in the prospect of your Confirma-
tion becomes of great importance. You know that that
sacred rite should be followed by a participation in the
sacrament of the Lord’s Supper, on which subject I shall _
hope to have much conversation with you hereafter; but
one thing I wish to be sure of, namely, that there is no ill
will in your heart towards Sarah Dallas, who I am aware
once tried to injure you.”

Lizzie crimsoned. She thought Mr Merton must



54 WORK FOR ALL, OR

have penetrated into the most secret corners of her
heart. Sarah had aroused angry feelings on that evening
long ago, the sin of indulging which had on the following
day been put before her so forcibly by Miss Merton.
She had struggled with them then, and often since, but
little vexations at different times from Sarah had produced
them again. True they did not often meet except in the
street, but many a scornful look and taunting word she
had had to endure. She could not hide from herself that,
notwithstanding her resolution not to be angry, there
lurked a feeling of resentment within her which ought
not to be there, and when Mr Merton put the unexpected
question, whether she felt any ill will, she was conscious
that she could not truthfully reply in the negative.
Mr Merton did not press her further. But he talked
as his sister had formerly done on this subject, and
showed how she might make this very trouble, for such
she confessed it was, a means of honouring God by trying
to imitate the example of His Blessed Son in His forgive-
ness to His persecutors. His words were not lost on
Lizzie. Whilst he was up-stairs with her grandmother,
she searched deeper into her feelings than she had yet
done. The scrutiny showed her how uncharitable they
were towards Sarah, and she had been too carefully
taught latterly not to know where to turn for help to
struggle against them. Nor did she seek it in vain.
Sarah went to the Vicarage at the appointed hour,
and Mr Merton, after a few remarks on the subject of



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 55

Confirmation, led the subject to that on which he wished
to prove her, namely, her feelings towards Lizzie Reed.
He told her how pained he and his sister had been by her
refusal to confess her fault some months before, which
had obliged Miss Merton to send her from her class.
“And then, Sarah,” he added, “your anger and pride
of heart made you even leave the school rather than ac-
knowledge you had done wrong. Nor is that all, I much
fear that although you may not again have dared openly
to show your dislike to Lizzie, you have suffered it to
rankle in your heart, and perhaps let her see it in
other ways.”

Sarah remembered her many looks and hints at Lizzie
as she had found opportunity, and her conscience at once
led her to rush to the conclusion that she had been telling
Mr Merton about her, for she had seen him go in the di-
rection of her cottage when he left her the day before.
Her anger rose, her heart hardened towards her more
than ever, and she replied sullenly,

“T do not. like Lizzie Reed, and I don’t care if she
knows it. I suppose she has been telling tales of me?”

“No, Sarah, Lizzie has told me nothing. She never
even mentioned your unkind conduct to her in the shop,
T heard of it from entirely another source. It is yourself
alone who have given me cause to suppose your feelings
towards her are not such as they should be.”

Sarah pouted, and muttered loud enough to be heard
that Lizzie was getting quite a proud upstart since she



56 WORK FOR ALL, OR

had been made so much of,—then added more boldly, for
Sarah was not deficient in pertness,

‘Lizzie Reed is nothing to me, sir, and I don’t want
to have anything to do with her.”

“But it is my duty to tell you, Sarah,” replied Mr
Merton, “ that in one sense you have a great deal to do
with her. She is one to whom you have shown unkind-
ness, and when your fault was pointed out to you you re-
fused to acknowledge it. Now although months have
passed since then, you still remain unrepentant, and with
your heart full of resentment towards one who has in no
way injured you. _In this state of mind, how could I pre-
sent you to the Bishop as fit for Confirmation, and how
could I afterwards admit you to the Holy Communion?
No, Sarah! you must be led if possible to see your fault,
and to humble yourself before God, asking Him to soften
your heart and bring you into a different state of mind
towards Lizzie. His grace alone can effect this, but His
grace is all-sufficient for the purpose, and will be given to
you if you seek it with a real desire to obtain it. Come
to me at this hour next Thursday, and we will talk to-
gether again on the subject.”

Sarah left Mr Merton with an air that gave him little
hope his words had taken any good effect. She went
home and complained bitterly to her parents that Lizzie
Reed had done all in her power to set Mr Merton
against her, in order that she might stand well with
him herself. That he had been telling her she was



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 57

not fit to be confirmed because she couldn’t like an ill-
mannered low sort of girl, who, till Mary Grey took it
into her head to set her up, wasn’t fit to be seen with
any decent person. For her part she didn’t care about
being confirmed. If it were necessary to be so very good,
why she didn’t profess to anything of the sort, and would
leave it to such girls as Mary and Lizzie, who perhaps found
it worth their while to try to seem better than others.

Her mother was wrong and imprudent enough to
take her daughter’s part, and consider she had been ill-
used. The result was, that instead of following Mr
Merton’s advice, and asking to be brought into a better
frame of mind, Sarah told him on the following Thurs-
day when she went to the Vicarage, that she had quite
made up her mind not to be confirmed, and that her
parents did not wish it either. ~

“Nor can I wish it in your present hardened state,
Sarah; but have you thought what is to become of you
if you continue thus? Have you considered that you
are throwing away privileges which may never again
be offered? If you turn away from the blessings that
might be yours, you are provoking God to remove you
perhaps beyond the reach of them. Remember that
the same cause which prevents you from being fit to be
confirmed, or to presume to approach the table of the
Lord, unfits you also for death, and who can say, however
young they may be, that they are sure of life?”

Sarah’s look in reply was one of such pert confidence,



58 WORK FOR ALL, OR

that it might be supposed she felt sufficiently sure on the
subject as faras she herself was concerned. Finding he
could do no more with her at present, Mr Merton sent
her away, trusting that God might lead her to repentance
in His own good time.

CHAPTER VIII.

Tr is pleasant to turn from Sarah Dallas to Mary Grey
and- Lizzie, whose preparation for the approaching rite
was a happy period to both. Mr Merton was quite satis-
fied by subsequent conversations with Lizzie that she was
struggling with any resentment she might feel towards
Sarah, though he was not aware how completely, as the
weeks passed on and her mind became more and more
under the good influence of his teaching, she succeeded,
by God’s blessing, in eradicating what had lurked in her
mind against her. Her great desire now was to try and
make Sarah feel more kindly towards her, and she saw with
pain that, on the contrary, she appeared more disposed
to dislike her than ever. Of what had passed between
her and Mr Merton, and of the reason why she was not



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 59

amongst the candidates for Confirmation, she was quite
ignorant. How to conciliate her she knew not, for she
was aware that she would probably meet with a repulse
if she were to speak to her. At length a circumstance
occurred which suggested the idea of offering her a little
present which she hoped might be acceptable.

The art of crochet had been for some time much
practised in the school, and Miss Merton was often in
‘ the habit of lending the girls patterns for collars; and
also of disposing of their work for them amongst her
frieuds for a higher price than they could get in the
shops. Sarah, having now left the school altogether,
had no longer this advantage. Mary had taught Lizzie to
crochet, and she took to it with such a remarkable degree
of skill, that she soon excelled many who had learnt for
years. Miss Merton having called on her one day and
seen some of her work, not only offered to sell it for her,
but to lend her a collar to copy, which she thought she
was capable of executing, though it was somewhat ela-
borate. She charged her to be very careful and
keep it as clean as possible. Lizzie’s skilful fingers set
to work, and she was busily engaged when a girl
named Letty Vernon came in, and after admiring it,
exclaimed,

“Why this is the very collar that Sarah Dallas was
copying when she left school! She has always wanted to
go on with it.”



60 WORK FOR ALL, OR

“‘T am sure Miss Merton would lend it to her,” said
Lizzie, “ she is so good-natured. I shall soon have finished
with it.”’

“ But I know she wouldn’t ask her for the world,”
said Letty; “Miss Merton isn’t pleased with her.”

An hour or two after, Letty appeared again.

“ Lizzie,” said she, “will you let me take that collar
away for a little time? You shall have it back quite
safe.”

“Indeed, Letty,” replied Lizzie, “I mustn’t, Miss
Merton told me to be so very careful of it, and I don’t
think she would be pleased if I let any one have it with-
out her leave. Jam very sorry, but you shall have mine
to copy from directly I have finished it.”

“Tt is not for myself, but for Sarah Dallas,”
said Letty; “she asked me to come and try to bor-
row it.”

Lizzie felt really vexed to be obliged to deny Sarah
the first request she had ever made her, but she was
quite sure she had no right to lend what was not her
own, and was firm in her refusal. Letty, who was a great
friend of Sarah’s, was annoyed, and showed it by saying,
“Sarah said she knew you would not oblige her in
anything!” and she left the house.

Lizzie pondered for some time as she sat working;
she could not bear things to be left so, for she feared
Sarah would mistake her motive for refusing. Suddenly
a thought struck her. ‘I will finish my collar and ask



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 61

her to accept it from me,” she said to herself. ‘ She
will see then that I bear no ill-will towards her.” Tho
idea was pleasant, and her fingers quickened their pace, so
that the collar was soon completed. She felt rather
timid at the thoughts of taking it to Sarah, being doubt-
ful how it would be received. Not liking to go to her
house, she folded it in paper and put it in her pocket,
intending to- watch for an opportunity of giving it.
That very afternoon as she was on her way to the Vic-
arage to take back the pattern collar, she saw Sarah
approaching ; she hastily drew forth her own as she sup-
posed, and stopping said, to the surprise of the girl, who
was passing her with her usual disdainful air, “ Sarah,
_ will you speak to me an instant? I was very sorry I
could not, send you Miss Merton’s collar the other day
when Letty Vernon asked for it.”

“T might have known you would not do anything
good-natured for me,” interrupted Sarah. “I was very
silly to let her go to you about it.”

“Indeed my only reason was, because Miss Merton
said so much to me about being very careful of it, and not
letting it get dirty ; she seemed to value it so.”

“And why should I have hurt or dirtied it more
than you, pray? I dare say I am quite as careful as you,
although Miss Merton doesn’t like me as well, thanks to
your tales about me.”

“Oh, Sarah,” exclaimed Lizzie, indignantly, “I have
never said one word about you to Miss Merton; how can



62 WORK FOR ALL, OR

you say such a thing!” and anger was beginning to rise
up fast and to whisper to her not to offer the collar.

But a better feeling rose also and struggled with it.

“T wish you would be friends with me, Sarah,” she
said. “‘ Look, I have finished the collar, and though it
is not nearly so well done as the copy, it is exactly like
it, and I want to know whether you will accept it from
me for yourself.”

She unpinned the paper at one end as she spoke, and
drew it out, but finding it was the wrong one, took out
the other and held it to her.

Mingled astonishment and shame for a moment were
visible in Sarah’s countenance, that one she had tried to
injure should treat her so generously. But pride quickly
overpowered every other feeling, and she replied,

“Since I cannot have Miss Merton’s to copy for myself
Ido not want the collar at all. I am not going to be
beholden to you for a present.”

Again Lizzie managed to struggle with her wounded
feelings, and answered,

“Then if you will not accept it as a present, will you
let me lend it you as a pattern ?”

“No,” replied the other, “if I may not have Miss
Merton’s, I don’t care for the other. You have it there,
why not let me take it for a day or two?”

“Because I am sure it would not be right,” said
Lizzie. “Tam going with it to the Vicarage now.”



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 63

“I suppose you are afraid of losing favour with Miss
Merton,” replied Sarah, “as a tidy careful girl, such as
you think yourself now,” and she laughed scornfully.

A scuffle between some rude boys, who ran up against
them, here separated the girls, and ended the conversa-
tion. Lizzie put her rejected collar into her pocket
again

It is to be hoped that the tears Sarah’s unkindness
produced were shed more in sorrow than anger. When
she reached the Vicarage, she stood an instant outside
the door to take out Miss Merton’s collar, and arrange it *
neatly in the paper before giving it in charge to the
servant. What was her dismay to find only her own.
The empty piece of paper belonging to the other was
there, but not the collar! She shook out her pocket,
examined the folds of her dress, all to no purpose. It
was gone! Her distress may be imagined. She hastily
retraced her steps, but although not a crowded street,
it was scarcely likely she would find it if dropped. She
knew it was safe when she showed it in mistake for
the other to Sarah, and .she remembered, as she
thought, distinctly putting them both back in her
pocket when the boys came rushing up against them.
Sarah had walked off instantly one way as she went
the other, so she could know nothing about it. She
turned into one or two shops and told her trouble. They
advised her to have a paper written, describing it, and



64 WORK FOR ALL, OR

offered to place it in their windows. Poor Lizzie
walked away feeling quite bewildered with her sorrow.
How careless Miss Merton would think her! It was
such a handsome collar too, far more so than most of
those she was in the habit of lending the girls. She felt
she could scarcely presume to offer her own in its place,
for it was not so well done, and it might appear like a
liberty in her to do so. She had not courage to go back
at once to the Vicarage, but walked sadly to Mary Grey’s
cottage arid mentioned her trouble. Mary urged her to
lose no time in telling Miss Merton ; so she went, and with
much distress explained to that lady the misfortune she
had met with. Miss Merton, though of course vexed, saw
that poor Lizzie felt far more about it than she did, and
told her not to trouble herself further. She, however,
questioned her closely as to the manner in which it had
probably been lost, and in so doing the whole story of
her having wished to give Sarah her own collar was
drawn from her. Miss Merton was more pleased at this
than concerned for her collar, but her bad opinion of Sarah
was unavoidably increased. At Lizzie’s entreaty she
wrote one or two notices that it had been dropped, offer-
ing a small reward to any one who should bring it to
the shop in which the paper was placed. As she gave
these to Lizzie she said,—

“You do not think it at all likely that Sarah knows
anything about it? she did not take the collars into her
hand, did she?”



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 65

“No, ma’am, she never touched them. She cannot
possibly have had anything to do with it. I can only
suppose I dropped it when some boys ran up rudely and
parted us. They were fighting and scuffling together, so
it might have fallen under their feet, without my seeing
it.”

The papers were put into the shop windows, but no-
thing more was heard of the missing article.

CHAPTER IX.

Asout a week after the loss of the collar, old Patty
was taken seriously ill, and a very few days showed that
her end was approaching. Lizzie was indefatigable in
her attendance upon her. Cross as her granny had al--
ways been, she felt in the prospect of losing her, that
she was her only relative, and when she was gone,
she would be left alone in the world. All her scoldings
and her grumblings were forgotten now, and she hung
over her pillow with a yearning towards her she had
never felt before.

Mrs Grey and Mary helped her to nurse Patty day
and night. The poor old body showed that real affection

v



66 WORK FOR ALL, OR

existed in her heart towards her grandchild, by her
anxiety as to what would become of her. She had been
servant in her youth and middle age to a lady to whom
she had been faithful, and who had left her an annuity suf-
ficient to keep her in tolerable comfort. On this she had
subsisted ; but it would of course cease at her death, and
Lizzie be left entirely dependent on charity or her own
exertions, Patty’s penuriousness had been almost pro-
verbial. Many had been provoked with her for denying
herself and her grand-daughter almost the common ne-
cessaries of life when it was known she could afford
them.

But how often are motives mistaken! And under
an unpleasant surface how much good is sometimes
hidden! So thought Mrs Grey, when one night as she
was sitting up with the old woman, who was drawing
near her end, she asked her to put her hand under her
pillow and take thence a small bag. On opening it
at her request, she found within money to the amount
of £23, which she said she had in the course of years
saved for Lizzie against the time when she would be
left entirely an orphan. ‘It was all I could do for
her,” said the old woman ; “I never allowed myself any-
thing I could go without, or she would have been penni-
less at my death.” She then asked Mrs Grey if she and
her daughter would continue to befriend her. She spoke
gratefully of the comfort Mary’s Sunday afternoon read-
_ing had been to her, and thanked Mr Merton for his



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 67

visits in a way that greatly touched him. He had a good
hope that a ray of Divine light illumined the soul of the
poor creature in her last days, great as was the darkness
into which it had to penetrate !

And so old Patty passed away, and Lizzie was left
alone, feeling how gladly she would now listen to the dis-
contented words and oft-repeated. scoldings, which had
become a mere matter of habit, but were hushed for ever
in the grave at last !

“What is to become of that poor child Lizzie?” said
Mrs Grey to her husband after supper the night succeed-
ing Patty’s death. ‘‘ My heart aches to think how lonely
she is in the world, for however cross her granny used to
be to her sometimes, still she was her grandmother, and
after all there’s nothing like kin. That the old woman
loved her in her own way she showed by pinching herself
to save for her. I suppose the girl must go to service at
once, for she should not touch her little store of money if
it can be helped.”

“John Grey was leaning back in his three-cornered
arm-chair, smoking, as his wife spoke. He gave whiff
after whiff, and seemed as though he had not heard
a word, but was looking with a sleepy gaze at a
bit of soft coal lying between the bars, which every
now and then, being filled with a super-abundant
quantity of gas, emitted a jet of bright blue flame,
then as suddenly withdrew it and looked dark and —

black as before. His wife spoke again. “Poor Lizzie!”
5*



68 WORK FOR ALL, OR

she said; “what a thing it would be, John, if our Mary
were to be left as she is! Supposing she were, I wonder
whether any one would be kind to her, and give her a
home for a time?”

John puffed on; the coal continued to send forth its
little bright blazes; and he seemed more absorbed in
contemplating it than ever. Mrs Grey, nevertheless, felt
pretty sure that her 18 years’ experience of her good man’s
character was sufficient to tell her he did not see that coal
at all, but was thinking of just what she had been trying
to draw his mind to. She was mistaken this time, how-
ever, for John was looking at the coal, and thinking of it
too.

“Wife,” he began at last, “do you see that bit of
coal? how it flames out every instant, and how dark and
black it looks between whiles ! ”

“Yes, I see it,” replied Mrs Grey in a slightly dis-
appointed tone of ee “‘T wasn’t thinking of it though,
but of poor Lizze.”

«And I was thinking of Lizzie and the eal too,”
said John, giving a final puff, and laying down his pipe on
the hearth. “I was thinking, wife, how that there bit of
coal is going on just like my heart. You would lke to
take Lizzie Reed into our house for a time, and mother
her till something can be found for her, and you want me
to propose it, and to feel that it is only doing what we
should wish done for our own child if she were left in the
same way. I saw all that whilst you were speaking, and



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 69

my heart was going on just like that coal—one moment
blazing up warm towards Lizzie, and resolving she should
come here, and the next it turned cold and dark, and
thought it wouldn’t be pleasant always to have another
person with us, making the home seem not our own.
Then came the blaze again, then the dark, till my heart
and the coal seemed having a race together. But Pve
won, wife. My light is burning steady now, and please
God won’t go out again. What’s the use of reading the
Bible every night if one can’t do as it bids one when the
right time comes? We have enough for ourselves, and
for an orphan too, for a time at least, so let her come here
and be welcome, and her money be put into the sayings’
bank at once for future need.”

“There! that’s just like yourself, John,” said Mrs”
Grey, and her eyes glistened with tears, called forth, not
by her interest in Lizzie at that moment, but by the
honest pride she felt in her warm-hearted, simple-minded
husband. “Our Mary will be glad to have the girl here
now the Confirmation’s coming on,” continued she.
«They both seem taking after good ways.”

“Tt has done our Mary a deal of good I’m thinking,
wife, looking after Lizzie so much as she has done for a
long time ; and she keeps steady to her like.”

“Indeed, John,” replied Mrs Grey, “I think it’s im-
proved Mary almost as much as Lizzie in a way. She
used to be a bit giddy and thoughtless, forgetting things
I told her to do; but since she has tried to put Lizzie in



70 WORK FOR ALL, OR

the way of managing well, it’s wonderful how she has
begun herself to think, and be orderly in her ways. Liz-
zie’s an affectionate-hearted girl, she’s quite got about my
heart as well as Mary’s.”

So after the funeral Lizzie went home to John Grey’s
house, where she was to share Mary’s little room, and
assist her in her domestic duties. It seemed as if she
could never be doing enough to show her gratitude for
their kindness, and from the moment she came to them
she was so on the watch to render every service in her
power, that Mrs Grey laughingly declared, “if this went
on, she and Mary might as well turn into fine ladies at
once.” Harly as the latter was in the habit of rising, she
found the morning after Lizzie’s arrival that she had been
earlier still; the kitchen fire being made, and the room
swept and dusted, before she could make her appear-
ance. Mary still continued her attendance at school,
so there were abundant opportunities for Lizzie to be
useful to Mrs Grey, both in household affairs and in
taking charge of her little girl, who was not in good
health, and required care.

The thoughts of both girls were now chiefly turned
towards the time of Confirmation, which was close at
hand. Many young voices dn that day repeated the
words by which they declared they took upon them-
selves the vows of their baptism. By some they
were uttered in carelessness, and with hearts more en-
grossed by the novelty of the scene around them than



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 1
by their own solemn part in it. Others there were who
endeavoured to fix their thoughts on what the Bishop was
saying, prayerfully seeking the realities of the blessing
he pronounced upon them. Amongst this last number
we may venture to include Mary Grey and Lizzie Reed.

The following Sunday the celebration of the Lord’s
Supper was to take place. John Grey and his wife had
for many years been communicants, and they started
for church in good time, followed by the two girls. As
they passed down a street which led to the railway
station, they saw a number of people hastening in that
direction.

“There is a cheap excursion to Fisherton to-day,”
said John, in answer to his wife’s inquiry as to the
reason, “and this is about the time fixed for starting.
What a pity that so many are turning their backs on
public worship, and going probably to profane the Lord’s
day.”

As he spoke, a party came running up, expressing
their fears lest they should be late. Amongst them,
dressed in a manner very unbecoming her station, and
talking and laughing loud, was Sarah Dallas.

“Oh! father!” exclaimed Mary, “see there is Sarah
Dallas going with the rest; how grieved Miss Merton
would be after all the pains she used to take with her.”

She came up at this moment, and was passing by
without appearing to see them, when John Grey, who was
a plain outspoken man, stopped and said—



72 WORK FOR ALL, OR

““ Why, Sarah my lass, surely you are not going off to
Fisherton on Sunday! Have you forgotten all you learnt
in the Sunday school already ?” -

The rest of her. party, except one, had hurried on.
John Grey and his wife had often shown Sarah kindness
formerly when as a little girl she used sometimes to go to
their house and play with Mary, and an involuntary feel-
ing of respect made her stand still as he spoke. She
coloured, and seemed ashamed for an instant, but her
companion came to her relief by saying, “Come along,
Sarah, or they will go without us,” and hurried her off.
She, being only too glad to escape any further remon-
strance from John, ran as fast as she could go, and was
just in time to get into her place as the train started.

How differently were the next few hours spent by the
‘several girls. Sarah in the midst of a set of young
people who made open game of the church-going family
they had met, and passed the time as they sat in the
railway carriage in singing unholy and coarse songs; for
the party she was with, was one which hesitated not to
make fun of the most sacred subjects. Sarah was quizzed
about what John Grey had said to her, his words having
been repeated for the edification of the rest by the com-
panion who had remained behind with her. They pro-
duced a roar of laughter, in which Sarah joined, ‘at first
uneasily, but before long she was as merry as the rest,
and even amused them by relating the history of her re-



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 73

fusing to be confirmed, and was rewarded by hearing
herself called a girl of spirit for not having been managed
by Mr Merton. Yet this conversation brought to her mind
what she would gladly have forgotten at that moment ;
viz., Mr Merton’s warning, “Remember, Sarah, that the
same cause which prevents you from being fit to be con-
firmed, or to presume to approach the table of the Lord,
unfits you also for death; and who can say, however
young they may be, that they are sure of life?” Often
had those words haunted Sarah, and now they rose up
before her at a time when the reproaches of her con-
science made them less welcome than ever. She could
not quite recover her former spirits, and was glad when
the arrival of the train at Fisherton changed the scene, and
drew the attention of her companions to other subjects.

And where were Mary and Lizzie at this hour?

Conscious of their own weakness and sinfulness, tremb-
ling at the deep solemnity of the holy rite they were ad-
mitted to, yet clinging to a strength superior to their
own, and trusting to that love they were about to com-
memorate, they approached the table ofthe Lord, and
received from the hands of Mr Merton the sacred
food, which taken in faith and thankfulness would pre-
serve their souls unto everlasting life.



74 WORK FOR ALL, OR

CHAPTER X.,

Ir was a quiet and happy little party in John Grey’s
cottage that sat reading round the table on the even-
ing after Mary and Lizzie’s first communion. Their
book was the “Pilgrim’s Progress,” which next to the
Bible was John’s delight, and every Sunday Mary read
_ it aloud to her parents.

“It’s a wonderful book,” said John ag she closed it at
nine o’clock, the hour for their family prayer. “The
more one reads it, the more it seems to grow like one’s
own history. You don’t know what I mean by that, girls,
yet; you are only just setting out on your journey, and
have most of your battles to come. I ama good way on,
and have had some hard ones to fight, just as Christian
had, and shall have harder yet, may be, before I’ve done
with the enemy. You’ve got them before you, as I said ;
but mark you,” said John, folding his arms and look-
ing at them with his honest face lighted up with earn-
estness, “you have this day buckled on armour, which,
if you keep it bright and fit for use, will serve you in
good stead in many a pitched battle with Satan, and be
sure to bring you off victorious at last.”

At this moment they were surprised by a tap at the



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 75
door, and on Mary running to open it there stood Mrs
Phebe Edmonds! Though always a welcome visitor, her
appearance excited considerable astonishment at present.
She came in, but declined to sit down.

*‘T have brought sad news,” she said, “ which will
greatly shock you all. A dreadful accident has happened
to an excursion train returning from Fisherton, and great
numbers are killed or injured. Sarah Dallas was one of
the passengers, and has been brought home dreadfully
hurt. I am going to see if I can be of any use, for I
hear her mother is in fits, and the neighbours are crowd-
ing in, no one knowing what to do. I called here to see
if you would come with me,” she added to Mrs Grey, “ for
I knew how clever you are as a nurse.”

A general groan of horror broke from her hearers.
Mary Grey was obliged to cling to her father’s arm for
support, and Lizzie’s deadly pale face spoke her feelings.

“Poor girl! poor girl!” said John Grey after a mo-
ment’s silence. ‘May God in mercy give her time for
repentance before He takes her away! Get ready, wife,
you may be a comfort to her body and mind.”

Mrs Grey was already pinning on her shawl.

“Don’t sit up late,’ she said, “perhaps I may be
kept all night.”

“J will walk with you,” said J ati. “and learn some
more particulars. We shall none of us sleep, ’m think-
ing, till we know more.”

They set out, and Mary and Lizzie, putting fresh fuel



76 WORK FOR ALL, OR

on the fire, crouched together in front of it in the shiver-
ing terrified state of nerves which so often follows a sud-
den shock of horror given at night. Neither of them
spoke much to the other, the subject seemed too dreadful
for discussion, with all its attendant circumstances; but
thoughts crowded one after another on their minds, and
many an ejaculatory prayer was silently uttered for poor
Sarah.

It was an hour before John Grey returned. He. had
not been able, he said, to learn any particulars concern-
ing the accident that could be relied upon. Some said
one thing, some another as to the cause. It seemed,
however, that the excursion train had left Fisherton much
behind its time, and owing, it was supposed, to careless-
ness respecting the signals, a regular train had run into
it when it was passing through the tunnel close to Han-
bury station. The amount of injury done was terrible.
Many had been taken to the infirmary. Sarah Dallas
was carried home by her own entreaty.

“ And did you hear any particulars about her, father ? ”
asked Mary.

“T went to the cottage door with your mother and
Mrs Phebe,” said he. “There seemed much confusion,
and as if there were no one to take a lead. I could hear
Mrs Dallas’ screams as the door opened. Some women
were trying to quiet her. The doctor was not come when
I first got there; but he arrived in about a quarter
of an hour, and I waited outside to see if I could be



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 7?

of any use. It was some time before he came out, and
then I ventured to step forward and ask what he thought
of Sarah. It was Dr Kennedy, so he knew me at once,
and said that he considered it a serious case. There is severe
internal injury he thinks, besides the leg being badly hurt
and several ribs broken. He was going to return with
another doctor as soon as possible. He said he was very
glad to find your mother and Mrs Phebe there, and that
he hoped they would remain a few hours to see how she
went on. I came home then, for I could do no good by
staying. You had better not sit up longer, girls, your
mother won’t be home to-night, depend upon it.”

They went to bed after commending poor Sarah to
the tender mercy of God, but sleep was almost un-
known to any of them. It was about eight o’clock
the next morning when Mrs Grey returned, looking pale
and fatigued with her night’s nursing. In answer to their
anxious inquiries about Sarah she replied,—

“She is ina terrible state, both mind and body. It
has been a dreadful time. I have sometimes sat up nurs-
ing for three or four nights together and have felt less
fatigued than now. Her pain is such she cannot lie still
an instant, yet every move she makes causes increase of
it somewhere. The doctors say if she were of a more
placid easy temperament there might be a little hope, but
that her state of mind is enough to produce fever in itself.
Poor soul! she keeps asking if there is any chance of her
life, whether no one can save her from dying. Mrs Phebe



78 WORK FOR ALL, OR

tried to turn her mind to think of Christ, and of His will-
ingness to save her soul.if she would turn to Him—but
she kept saying in reply, ‘Oh! save my life! make me
live! and then see whether I will not do quite differently
to what I have done.’ Another time she exclaimed,
‘Oh! that I had been confirmed! Mr Merton told me
if I were not. fit for that, neither was I fit to die. I kept
thinking of his words as I lay in the dark tunnel in that
dreadful agony ; but I could have borne the pain; it was
my thoughts were the worst part, the dread of dying
there all in the dark with no one to speak to. I tried to
pray but I could not; no words would come; oh! Mrs
Phebe! Mrs Grey! what shall I do?’ That’s how she
kept running on till six o’clock, when she fell into a sort
of sleep... Mrs Phebe went home for an hour or so, and
then came back to let me off, for her mother is not fit for
anything.”

“Oh! mother,” exclaimed Mary, bursting into tears,
“what can be done to comfort poor Sarah? may I run
and fetch Mr Merton to her?”

*T went round by the Vicarage. Mr Merton was out,
he is going from one to another of the poor sufferers, but
Miss Merton said he would be sure and see Sarah, for
he had heard about her being hurt.”

Mrs Grey did not remain long at home, for she knew
how her services were required in the sick room. When
she went back she found the doctors had been again, and
that they intended taking off the: wounded leg in the



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 79

course of the day, as its appearance was becoming sus-
picious. Mrs Phebe said Mr Merton was with her.

“ [hope he may soothe her, poor thing,” she remarked,
“for she is in a dreadful way about her leg coming off.
She has taken into her head she shall die whilst they are
doing it, and her mother makes her worse by her way of
going on—one moment wringing her hands and saying she
is going to lose her, and the next telling her she knows
she will get well, and that there is ro fear, so that Sarah
does not know what to believe. I was quite glad when I
persuaded her to go and lie down a bit.”

At this moment the door of the room where Sarah lay
was opened, and Mr Merton came out.

“‘That poor young creature wants to see Lizzie Reed,
Mrs Grey,” said he ; “she has something on her mind which
she must confess, and ask her forgiveness for, before she can
have a moment’s peace. She should be brought immedi-
ately, for it is possible her time may be short, especially
as the operation must in this case be a dangerous one.”

“T will go and fetch her,” said Mrs Grey, hastily
tying on her bonnet and leaving the cottage.

Mr Merton waited only to say a few words to Mrs
Phebe about Sarah, and then left, saying he would return
and see her again in the course of the day.

Mrs Grey soon returned with Lizzie. She left her in
the outer room whilst she went softly in to tell the suffer-
ing girl of her arrival, but reappeared almost instantly
and beckoned. Lizzie trembled all over, she dreaded



80 WORK FOR ALL, OR

seeing Sarah, though she longed to try and comfort her.
The room was partly darkened, and the bed curtains were
.drawn on the side next the door, so that she had a mo-
ment’s time to recover herself. Mrs Grey was standing
at the foot of the bed, Mrs Phebe was seated near with an
open Bible in her hand. Mrs Grey led Lizzie round to
the side where Sarah lay.

Very awful was the change that had taken place in the
face of the bright blooming girl she had met only the morn-
ing before! White as the pillow on which ‘it lay, except
where several bruises and cuts disfigured the skin, and
expressing vividly the terrors of a disturbed mind, the
face of Sarah Dallas could scarcely be recognized. She’
was burning with fever, and longing to toss about in
hopes of a moment’s relief, yet not daring to move because
of the fresh torture she would create for herself in doing
so. A more melancholy picture than that which she
presented cannot be conceived. But great as was the
agony of her body, it was trifling compared to what she
was undergoing in her mind. She did not perceive Lizzie
at first, but exclaimed to Mrs Phebe, who was reading
such passages of Scripture as she thought would soothe
and comfort her,—

“T can’t listen, I can only keep on thinking! think-
ing! oh! Mrs Phebe, ask the doctors to try and save me.
If I could but get well again and go to Miss Merton’s
class, and be confirmed! But I never shall now. I shall



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 81

die, I know I shall.”” Sobs and moans accompanied the
words.

“‘ Hereis Lizzie Reed, Sarah,” said Mrs Phebe gently,

“you wished to see her.”

Sarah looked up eagerly,.as, drawing close to her,
Lizzie said a few kind affectionate words.

“So you have come to. me, Lizzie Reed,” she said ; “I
want to speak to you alone.”

Mrs Phebe and Mrs Grey immediately quitted the
room, and the girls were left together.

“Can you forgive me ? ” she began again, “ I have been
so unkind to you.”

“‘Indeed, dear Sarah,” said Lizzie, kneeling down
by her, “I have nothing to forgive, do not talk so.”

“T have a great deal to tell you, Lizzie, but my head
is so bad I scarcely know where to begin. Do you re-
member that collar of Miss Merton’s I wanted to copy?
and how we spoke in the street about it? You lost it,
did you not, that day ?”

“
“Yes,” said Sarah, “you did, and I picked it up when
the boys were pushing each other. You had walked on;
I felt too proud to run after you with it, and then suddenly
the thought came into my head that I would hide it
away, that Miss Merton might think you careless. I[
tried to persuade myself I should serve you right for not

letting me have.the collar. Sol brought it home and
6



82 WORK FOR ALL, OR

put it out of sight far back in a drawer, and there it lies
now. I saw the papers that were put in the shop win-
dows, and I knew how vexed you must be at having
lost it. -Now, Lizzie, I have told you all, can you forgive
me?”

“Indeed I do, Sarah, with my whole heart, and I am
quite sure Miss Merton will, so do not think any more
about it. I am very sorry for you, and Mary Grey is
also, she asked me to tell you so.”

Sarah gavea groan of anguish. “Oh, that I were like
Mary Grey,” she exclaimed. “ I always disliked her because
I thought her religious, and trying to be good, and I
laughed at you both yesterday because you were on your
way to church when we were going to Fisherton. It
seems all so terrible now that I am about to die!”

* But perhaps you will get better, Sarah, and then you
will go to church, and be sorry for having done wrong.”

“No, I shall die, J knew I shall,” sobbed Sarah. “Oh!
it is so dreadful! They are going to take off my leg too,
and perhaps I shall not live through it. Lizzie, promise
that you will pray for me that I may not die, and ask
Mary Grey to do so also.”

Lizzie had just promised, when Mrs Phebe came in
and said Sarah must be quiet now, and gave her a com-
posing draught. Lizzie went home and related her af-
fecting interview with Sarah to Mary.

An hour or two later the doctors came to perform the
operation. Her terror was extreme ; not so much of the



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 83

pain, as lest she should die whilst it was’ going on. It
pleased God however to grant her yet a little space for
repentance. After the removal of the limb she became
somewhat easier in body, but not in mind. Her dread of
death seemed to absorb all her thoughts.

Mrs Phebe was unremitting in her efforts to lead her
to throw herself on the refuge of the cross of Christ,
and Mr Merton saw her constantly. Many were the
prayers put up for her by Mary and Lizzie, as well as by
John Grey in their family worship, that she might find the
peace she so sorely needed. And at last Sarah prayed
for herself. Broken-hearted and humbled to the dust, she
cried with her whole soul, “Lord, save me, I perish.” By
degrees a ray of comfort broke in upon her, which was
followed by others as she began to be able to comprehend
in some measure that for such sinners as herself Christ had
died. It was hoped at first that her youth and good consti-
tution would enable her to struggle through the terrible
suffering she was enduring, but about a week after her
leg was taken off, the medical men saw that it could not
be. Poor Sarah’s hours were numbered !

Mary Grey and Lizzie went often to see her by her
own request. Miss Merton spent some time with her
daily, and Mr Merton was indefatigable in his efforts to
prepare her for that end which all saw approaching. Life
ebbed slowly, and latterly without the racking pain that
had at first made her almost unable to collect her

thoughts.
§ *



84. WORK FOR ALL, OR

A great change took place in her on Sunday, exactly
a fortnight after the accident, and on the evening of that
day she breathed her last, having lain in an unconscious
state for some hours previously.

And so ended the sad history, as far as this life j is con-
cerned, of one who turned aside from privileges of which
she found the value too late, and who forgot that in the
midst of life we are in death! Let us hope that her re-
pentance was accepted by Him whose mercy knows no
bounds.

CHAPTER XI.

Tazzte remained with her kind friends for half a year
after Sarah’s death, and then she became anxious to be
no longer a burden to them, for although she was able by
her skill in crochet-work to make sufficient money to pay
for her clothing, she .could not do more, and John Grey
positively refused to touch a penny of the small store left
her by her grandmother. When his neighbours ex-
pressed their astonishment at his keeping her so long, he
used to reply,

“T have not missed’ the little she has had; on the
contrary, work has appeared to be more abundant since



PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 88

she came to us, and instead of feeling poorer we have
seemed to be richer. God has given me enough for the
wants of myself and my family, and: something over be-
sides for the orphan girl who has been led to us for a
time.”

Lizzie spoke to Miss Merton at last, and respectfully
asked her if she would aid her in getting into service.
It happened that the girl who assisted the cook at the
Vicarage was at this time going to leave, and Miss Mer-
ton was so pleased with all she had seen.of Lizzie as well
as by Mrs Grey’s report of her, that she offered to put
her into the vacant place. Nothing could have been
more desirable for her in all ways, and it was settled
that she should go to her new home in a fortnight. We
must not follow her thither further than to inform our
readers that Miss Merton never regretted having received
her into her family. Her anxiety to please and her na-
tural cleverness made her gradually become a favourite
with mistress and servants. In the course of a few
years she was promoted to the post of cook, and was soon
regarded as their most valued and trusty domestic by
both master and mistress. Her marriage with a respect-
able farmer alone removed her from their service. She
and Mary Grey used often to meet. Lizzie’s love and
gratitude to her kind friends seemed to increase rather
than diminish as years went on. Mary Grey became a
schoolmistress, after having served her time as pupil-
teacher, and when she obtained a situation at some dis-



86 WORK FOR ALL.

tance from her parents, they used to say they felt the
separation from her less than they should have done, had
they not had Lizzie at the Vicarage, who was almost as a
second daughter to them. Mary also became comfort-
ably settled in life in course of time.

Mrs Phebe still lives. The red moreen curtains are
more faded than ever. The tabby cat has been dead for
many years, and her place on the hearth-rug is supplied
by one of her descendants. The large work-basket is no
longer filled with work to be done for the poor, for Mrs
Phebe’s eye-sight will admit of nothing but knitting stock-
ings now. She is old and feeble, calmly waiting her dis-
missal from a world where her great happiness has been
to try and soften sorrow by her sympathy, and to lead
others to know the happiness of doing some good in their
generation, whether the capability placed in their power
be great or small. She is never lonely in her old age.
There are many to watch over one who has so long cared
for others, and foremost amongst these may be found
our old acquaintances, Mary and Lizzie. The latter lives
at no great distance from her, and the former, when
she pays her yearly visit to her parents, never lets an
hour elapse.after her arrival, before going to see this old
and valuable friend of her youth.



THE SISTER GUARDIAN.





















































































































































































































































































































































THE SISTER-GUARDIAN.



CHAPTER I.

Azovut forty miles south of London, in a well-wooded
part of the country, lies a town which was formerly of
little importance, but has greatly increased in size since
the erection of a paper-mill on the banks of the river
Win, which in this part winds its way between eteen and
‘picturesque banks.

At first the inhabitants of Windale were rather indig-
nant at the erection of an unsightly building by their
beautiful stream, but before long they found that the
town was likely to be a gainer by it. The prejudice
which the lower classes had seemed to feel against the
idea of working in the mill, began to give way when they
found families from other neighbourhoods coming to settle
there, attracted by the high wages and the excellent ar-
rangements made by its respectable owner.

Gradually rows of small houses sprang up on the banks
of the river near the mill, which was situated about a mile
and a half from the town. Then was felt the necessity of
anew church and means of instruction for the multitudes of



90 THE SISTER GUARDIAN,

young people who were employed in the business. Fresh
shops were opened, and thus business went on gradually
increasing, till the once humble town of Windale grew
into a place of some pretension.

One fine morning in June there was an arrival of a
cart-load of furniture at the door of a small house which
stood in a row near the mill. It was followed almost im-
mediately by a light conveyance, driven by a farmer-like
sort of man, who handed from it a delicate-looking widow
of middle age and a girl of about fifteen. A boy, two
years younger, had leaped out the instant the vehicle
stopped, and was ina moment employed in taking as rapid
a survey of the cottage as could be obtained by peeping
into the lower windows.

A few women came out of the adjoining doors to look
at the new comers, but for the most part the neighbour-
hood seemed deserted; for almost all, excepting those
who had infants or very young children, were at the mill.

“ This is the house, Mrs May,” said the man who had
driven, “I hope it will suit you, it was the only one to be
had.”

“T have no doubt it will do very well,” said the
widow cheerfully. She took care that neither William
Hemings nor her children should hear the sigh that arose
as she compared the formal town-built cottage before her
with the pleasant creeper-covered lodge in which she had
long lived.

“Tt will seem a bit gloomy at first, I fear,” said Hem-’



THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 91

ings, “but one gets used to everything. Now for the
key ; they said it would be left next door. You ought to
find the house all well-cleaned down as I gave orders,
and if so we shall soon get the furniture lifted in.”

The woman in the adjoining cottage now came out with
the key, and told them that the house was scoured from top
to bottom ; and she volunteered her aid in taking in the
furniture and getting things straight. Towards evening,
when William Hemings returned home, he was able to in-
form his wife he had left them getting tolerably tidy.

But we must tell our readers something about Mrs
May and her children, and the circumstances which had
brought them to seek work at Windale Mill.

The early life of Mary Welton, afterwards Mary May,
was passed in different circumstances to those in which
we introduce her.

Her father had been a respectable clerk in a lawyer’s
office, but her mother died, and this was the commence-
ment of misfortunes which seemed to follow him from that
time, and when Mary was about sixteen years old she was
glad to take a situation as under lady’s-maid in a gentle-
man’s family in the country. Her steady upright conduct
soon won for her the respect of her master and mistress,
and in their house she first learnt those lessons of practi-
cal piety with which in after days she strove to impress
the hearts of her children.

In process of time she took the position of nurse in
the family, and remained as such for about ten years,



92 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

when she married Stephen May, the head-gardener, with
the entire approbation of her master and mistress, who
settled them in the entrance lodge to the hall. Here
passed fifteen years of peaceful life, clouded only by the
loss of two infants.

When her eldest child Mary was about thirteen years
old, the family at the hall was broken up by the death of
its master, Mr Wynn. He left Mrs May an annuity of
£10 a year as a mark of his esteem for her. Soon after, it
was arranged that the place should be let, and Mrs Wynn
and her daughters take up their abode on the Continent
for some years whilst the only son was being educated in
England.

A tenant was soon found, who was glad to engage
Stephen May to continue in his post as gardener, and
reside in the lodge as formerly.

The loss of the family to whom she was so attached was
a heavy trial to Mrs May, but a greater was in store for her.

About a year later, Stephen May fell from a high
ladder, and was so severely injured in the head that he
died in the course of a few days, leaving his wife and
children to maintain themselves as best they could.

Of course it was necessary to quit the lodge, and that
without much loss of time, for a new gardener had to be
appointed. Her £10 annuity, though a great help, would
not go far towards supporting them, and the widow’s health
was too delicate to endure much hardship or labour.

Tt was in this dilemma that her daughter Mary, who,



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'15672' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALOS' 'sip-files00007.pro'
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8139badf5095f2499ca633d0ed8e5d0de40e21c3
'2011-09-25T16:06:49-04:00'
describe
'53311' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALOT' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
d832e2a1328e870b585a642a269e413c
de9c884e0ad516b42fc99914fa4b59a233e89ce1
'2011-09-25T16:13:14-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2809204' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALOU' 'sip-files00007.tif'
9dffdf4beff31b4cdc93188204ef8d76
2f550df530d1ba5fef8515ad6242482b90918871
'2011-09-25T16:04:48-04:00'
describe
'707' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALOV' 'sip-files00007.txt'
24398bf19d772e877681b5862e7f6550
1214f6fc9672640a7e5161d2ee7b5201f1873dc8
'2011-09-25T16:10:37-04:00'
describe
'349856' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALOW' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
0003b629cbe10f2168ec9e172840005f
7e37aa006bc0195e72ae8dfd960dba29aab7d22f
'2011-09-25T16:09:45-04:00'
describe
'93417' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALOX' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
e3dc3046545e937fedec146efddeb634
4b766d321a37a7d913c439c2f49c741488c85c51
'2011-09-25T16:05:54-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'5397' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALOY' 'sip-files00008.pro'
679967a7769c9d8e3d95f826fbf37d3e
8fed376bda071509a6b20a0b2e654ce5b5f99b56
'2011-09-25T16:10:07-04:00'
describe
'30676' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALOZ' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
fba09291fcadd163b7ea2eb09b97192f
e99ba3d7e0745b21f4de4ce48211ab0e791fc40d
'2011-09-25T16:13:16-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2807764' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPA' 'sip-files00008.tif'
de491f0569df62a21c7fdfab4758c9c1
149466bc23cda316132fa72df25f26e1a552cb78
describe
'338' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPB' 'sip-files00008.txt'
c10b7aebb9382d6cf48740b69c0f9206
da49bf6c53b7816cf42507e5d00d1ba1994d88ce
'2011-09-25T16:12:00-04:00'
describe
'321537' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPC' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
650b12592e2c6ddc35a4e0f98929a798
d57f313e2096a9b59047aa4496a6a8847c368673
describe
'121759' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPD' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
9351b862575b364bedc4f9e2dd3c2d0d
5fa0e9bcfd147e6b8f9c7dd973c0dd2649452736
'2011-09-25T16:07:57-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'5223' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPE' 'sip-files00009.pro'
d74c9c94a258ec6d23725d7dd27be1c7
cb1093b625af6ebac78397cfd694abddd3c10af6
'2011-09-25T16:05:23-04:00'
describe
'35864' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPF' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
20abc2266a6829cfe607b0c78eaa8077
f0c80f2b857d5a809087ad7f029f3bc6939d6fe4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2581028' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPG' 'sip-files00009.tif'
4e63e4dd9fcd80e948fea387c2f35c7d
7e74d98ef4d9ef61ba414c1cdf213d02f0f7d5f1
'2011-09-25T16:05:42-04:00'
describe
'309' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPH' 'sip-files00009.txt'
b51224277d045b3c2ea2e1a68bc68608
4ec83e5aa9294f307c5d7632434f9747c664df5b
'2011-09-25T16:05:25-04:00'
describe
'349440' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPI' 'sip-files00009a.jp2'
f14c8af61db9a66ea83efe3f6be70ed8
d09cd844f7423621b01f9beee69e1600a7676649
'2011-09-25T16:08:41-04:00'
describe
'60284' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPJ' 'sip-files00009a.jpg'
7f20752f33ab9aa15486c370fbf3db26
40825a5ec8112371889d98106343bae212c01690
'2011-09-25T16:07:36-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'19484' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPK' 'sip-files00009a.QC.jpg'
f842c082de29c94b1ebd86a12e9a8323
7b96f6b63736586908e7573c1393628985e4ea65
'2011-09-25T16:06:54-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2807120' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPL' 'sip-files00009a.tif'
0d6d548975dbf46c4ef1b345f3069833
f9b5f902da03ba0ff55839a3596ff746733c1e6c
'2011-09-25T16:05:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPM' 'sip-files00009a.txt'
81051bcc2cf1bedf378224b0a93e2877
ba8ab5a0280b953aa97435ff8946cbcbb2755a27
'2011-09-25T16:05:56-04:00'
describe
No printable characters
No printable characters
No printable characters
'349674' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPN' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
d99cda1bfb011636e35afb3fb105e54b
ffc7248732cb95f4c2b806bc0385b7c0912e0d70
'2011-09-25T16:05:51-04:00'
describe
'188539' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPO' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
e6a4275c39b32dcac044f60d0e71f58e
3fb552d0a39a6fe7e312e52d7ae65f6469667400
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27536' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPP' 'sip-files00010.pro'
b3b2bd470a870e75161fd406251a52b2
ae7ebd176dde691fbce535f9f47d5ac9e43a3bf9
'2011-09-25T16:04:45-04:00'
describe
'66283' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPQ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
fb865fb4ac1bb7f9b12b02f38fb93621
f2c1e58d2344f8e6b45b2eeee578034b3f27643b
'2011-09-25T16:06:04-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2810304' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPR' 'sip-files00010.tif'
3b099287739e39c79208b87a788e6f58
99e761fd70c85e47c11652f5e37f04e08de3c693
'2011-09-25T16:13:02-04:00'
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPS' 'sip-files00010.txt'
27139174cdd5fecfa09e31ad03bc71cf
115637bb14b20049957d992662a28653f28a1e07
'2011-09-25T16:06:51-04:00'
describe
'331579' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPT' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
2b67d85d21f9f9f9f865ce8d24f7d1c5
fd2d2e0a8e71d617b142c2532a644e7e38eefeb6
'2011-09-25T16:05:04-04:00'
describe
'265658' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPU' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
285ca9ebe4d504dd9e8e39c30d1c09a6
2b80206d24da6d630fb431667fd1cdf57132b9c6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'41509' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPV' 'sip-files00011.pro'
7fb7ceff347d2b1db613f3f5d665ff45
24f5d9fe30c6e4e572cef320d5f3d0ce08fb8a73
'2011-09-25T16:12:55-04:00'
describe
'91039' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPW' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
7976497fb1b9034b918e98298ecfbd1a
96f44a126a0b2fe0ee47497d1170526415486c68
'2011-09-25T16:08:31-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2665928' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPX' 'sip-files00011.tif'
53542a806d81e28b87a019a4d49f5f44
fb958ea30949ceccfdc4e619f5e706d417d8c937
'2011-09-25T16:10:08-04:00'
describe
'1633' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPY' 'sip-files00011.txt'
62afcaf890b754732586a9968f199947
b1308507d874a404af16eafd8e58f3f2746eb7e7
'2011-09-25T16:05:37-04:00'
describe
'332656' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALPZ' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
1aa2f31fe938d963beca9ce0a4f6e026
7735e958d109aa4691568696db0c4233851a40a7
'2011-09-25T16:13:18-04:00'
describe
'270681' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQA' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
b7c72c22c312c8a3f74aa1d188817539
e7263c9e8a4e2e9228f666aa10182ee91df39cf9
'2011-09-25T16:08:02-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40085' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQB' 'sip-files00012.pro'
5a0aeca29fda80d9a0acc617ad99d15f
3310476dda0913024310c4b3eebb58fa7d092b24
'2011-09-25T16:09:47-04:00'
describe
'90454' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQC' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
5e59e43274510b147edb9d4702413840
b19b51f02dad63ba6cf6be68be63c816a3443d8d
'2011-09-25T16:12:56-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2675064' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQD' 'sip-files00012.tif'
9aba06ceb15d423ce5f4752bf211518e
3b13209c1cb83f7e4c8d6e296e35de9f82e5a805
'2011-09-25T16:09:29-04:00'
describe
'1588' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQE' 'sip-files00012.txt'
a50b0fdc653c83915909b57e647910cb
33220a941d383a89ae6dbf6b8dec89a124ed9ad0
'2011-09-25T16:05:15-04:00'
describe
'331404' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQF' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
d06b803b6463f02823ded24c9da5f3e5
c3f0f8d3f7306565f8a1d593d3d7da865c9ad0ca
'2011-09-25T16:06:18-04:00'
describe
'219310' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQG' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
7933b99b0d1285eaa42491f164498e58
cab5a1d72289f69fc7d6792c229cac6ad1c15c28
'2011-09-25T16:04:52-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35005' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQH' 'sip-files00013.pro'
8043a0ea8eb82b6bd8afbbc9d25d3d68
4f0d82224aac2cfb08eea08eab79cbf6c17cbb30
'2011-09-25T16:10:44-04:00'
describe
'80244' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQI' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
e0a1175bb6ac9803ea9cb05f9f0d4b6d
9c7b34b063284ec8e55e55b40bb916afb82cadf0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2664176' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQJ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
9b3f9630357a6e7e61f891f9405f95df
930484ca84ff8307d37983d5eaa6bbe13bef401e
'2011-09-25T16:08:53-04:00'
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQK' 'sip-files00013.txt'
8f139b5ae5ec608beb9e3b87a478a2f6
f81854baaccd16d3a0dd5076afec405118c96757
'2011-09-25T16:07:28-04:00'
describe
'333827' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQL' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
1cff6fe4329957929c811d11542cdfb0
ce1cdfe58946ffdd6b8bb2564b265a76d8f913cd
'2011-09-25T16:05:28-04:00'
describe
'232278' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQM' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
b1474d481296136d676d74273575f5cd
1132a1786719ffdad6ef15ebd5e5d9457e92e5e7
'2011-09-25T16:11:44-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35017' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQN' 'sip-files00014.pro'
c608ca3ce0cbdea7c59039acb036ed4c
a6ae009197af4c9863e3bc2fb7079f0ebd151dc2
'2011-09-25T16:06:06-04:00'
describe
'83213' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQO' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
99a5784287f28bf89f2239f14ea820a9
111d919292558bf893e4095c4b263195ad97ad76
'2011-09-25T16:09:11-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2683536' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQP' 'sip-files00014.tif'
b6a1d9953ab6d9d10797dd0f6032a54d
b004e454ed7cb35ea6936eede6d40f5108ce80a4
'2011-09-25T16:06:46-04:00'
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQQ' 'sip-files00014.txt'
feeb85cc7f3b6059e90a2500ae7d5223
04f409f3aa7846b1b966ac9494ce340349a93815
'2011-09-25T16:08:27-04:00'
describe
'350444' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQR' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
f21c57ac2330cecd61dc3cb4f4d1f7ff
9a376fa04d74591d8e7674d81998fc90394044f6
'2011-09-25T16:06:55-04:00'
describe
'259019' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQS' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
3f361b17922e7a28cfcea189b4caa6f5
f6516952e1f91767b92ee17f78eb646980a6d62e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36952' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQT' 'sip-files00015.pro'
073c6da36bc4db6aca5055387445ed3b
67c5016d3054cc7481a6ac4e3e140af17e38fdec
'2011-09-25T16:09:55-04:00'
describe
'84973' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQU' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
cea93a41997ccf2c2802ac816a05c716
afded8905f63b2d7ea9159048c884778c4364d10
'2011-09-25T16:12:51-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2816772' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQV' 'sip-files00015.tif'
12b82ad897a3b67a4ba194d9e4768259
a696551872c56ae9529ee64403284823c7d1830f
'2011-09-25T16:07:10-04:00'
describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQW' 'sip-files00015.txt'
f09f7233a42d4414bcb6cb02efbaf259
69743e6b3f109b913202f5f979d80142d8180b66
'2011-09-25T16:08:34-04:00'
describe
'326303' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQX' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
67ff065539ec628e9f850080c7509d84
ad091a92e818f44212ed1f1a174e3ff719eca915
'2011-09-25T16:08:45-04:00'
describe
'271803' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQY' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
d5dbf01487c75441bbee25237f505801
fa533766960d8e12331c1373d508b54370a8148a
'2011-09-25T16:11:20-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38935' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALQZ' 'sip-files00016.pro'
c8c766b7537f2b352f2292a542ba311d
e183efd2596d192bf4ee5fc79d52b9a95103c795
'2011-09-25T16:08:10-04:00'
describe
'92157' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRA' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
8311ce280d5510f5e572a2f4b5f43da9
0b0381f3be7139ed161db891fd8aa45627e09557
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2624140' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRB' 'sip-files00016.tif'
ef1f344d566be6ade68b284bf7fbcbd6
d197c158dfc65698de9ba90fef986f3c368e6666
'2011-09-25T16:08:40-04:00'
describe
'1549' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRC' 'sip-files00016.txt'
f01bcd40afc35fb2797b4f29bc051e99
9a376f8a3bbb08fce0b5029393c1a8ce9b2e45ed
'2011-09-25T16:07:12-04:00'
describe
'350474' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRD' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
0ba3d615ffff9a566d6da3cfffb92da2
a8324ef4906b94d7c420f8e476be8c29cf77c864
'2011-09-25T16:13:17-04:00'
describe
'204610' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRE' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
b13b85b7db3c46f36881b829c33e185e
08594a664205c95436b7f2197b03ede1ef588e25
'2011-09-25T16:09:52-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'32477' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRF' 'sip-files00017.pro'
900529922bc5abfd105a80278774b96d
0870b016475481a21717a705ea7961232e9681da
'2011-09-25T16:09:40-04:00'
describe
'72971' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRG' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
100e8421935524e2d6a4685ba4981a81
ba718d1263a35a0a4d007be70771e508b4606872
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2815828' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRH' 'sip-files00017.tif'
1cece820e05428d0f32debeb5c5a76ef
ea79d053776ae5a7cd080cc7c2e8c13620692571
'2011-09-25T16:05:52-04:00'
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRI' 'sip-files00017.txt'
e424d43459a4707ed559de35d7359663
9f45ce48d29ea340cf58d695cc7f395a1f3511d5
'2011-09-25T16:07:25-04:00'
describe
'349805' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRJ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
b6580fcf34629d11d06d5cee46d5411d
63fb8d031ab31c988f26860a61c78e22018500d4
describe
'245307' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRK' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
c36fe835ba0db0adf0480b060d7ed2a3
25ad3ad85a19b18edd7cd0703b6c498d884e3da7
'2011-09-25T16:11:10-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40508' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRL' 'sip-files00018.pro'
5d3b7cd72f5b5c8f719afbff389d18b7
d55a20570fb38f5765b5f575d685a39852bb0e03
'2011-09-25T16:11:33-04:00'
describe
'86933' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRM' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
bf978f7907ee1b9c5bba754700351a5f
4e4c9cea61a5b61b2a5f09804af4b91aee57d861
'2011-09-25T16:05:50-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2812008' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRN' 'sip-files00018.tif'
56a81af0797920643a67b7c3add92181
58d36b25e531a9dec39afc742f632f341fe18ce4
'2011-09-25T16:09:53-04:00'
describe
'1596' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRO' 'sip-files00018.txt'
4de19d7dfeb2bcb5a4af888f799e17be
d89b53a6b918ead9971493b2f7fd793638890796
'2011-09-25T16:04:54-04:00'
describe
'350490' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRP' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
231fb31c097a593487ed3a0c4d55c119
aaeca3bc3b2c125e254b33d59d80814faf964351
'2011-09-25T16:05:05-04:00'
describe
'239131' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRQ' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
f0b76dba6916c10751795815590b4616
c4a67bea31db411ff11403a84c1d82ac2b62e577
'2011-09-25T16:08:15-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36100' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRR' 'sip-files00019.pro'
e68fc46e4348aff5e940c72a64a5122c
e430abf0aa3f29954852ce9d935649e9a20da79c
'2011-09-25T16:12:49-04:00'
describe
'78664' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRS' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
7a65ea91cacfa02f66db4107130f07fb
2c36946f92e8ed6502e79c6fe9777c094e37b6f3
'2011-09-25T16:11:28-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2816288' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRT' 'sip-files00019.tif'
1dc6466134ace2015a4483ddcf5ec916
1e299fe7d6b3482590e7577d90da989bb1c30e4a
'2011-09-25T16:06:47-04:00'
describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRU' 'sip-files00019.txt'
c223b98565c7e289e220760d8496b56d
04c2dfc3852e39d8963ff9348bfaaaa2e3dde16e
'2011-09-25T16:06:53-04:00'
describe
'349821' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRV' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
8ffc1173658d43c39d8a5778d82bd4ed
21ad52d4db632607a72de370f2b514fcd024db0f
describe
'243839' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRW' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
014abbf0738db9a30245d37bb3dd03ec
d83b686549e4df653dc9b4ce594998c4f2b5790d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37435' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRX' 'sip-files00020.pro'
840494e70b31e7ec398bdcdd1a628670
b4ea41c99a9ec7efddbe1f2007a8a82a08f912b2
'2011-09-25T16:12:25-04:00'
describe
'83335' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRY' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
eda65ba9191d0bfb6d81a0a050bef0d5
0cd78c914bbb28d8ff7ec9b951c03ce00907e587
'2011-09-25T16:05:22-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2811724' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALRZ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
1b20d796a3aff02570666860551e0010
ab934d54a71834040ac10c26711cbd929c47a7a2
'2011-09-25T16:11:31-04:00'
describe
'1499' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSA' 'sip-files00020.txt'
4a214db71017b59e1663fae151c19110
6cffadaa86da1b94dbaa726337386c8a23b93603
'2011-09-25T16:10:11-04:00'
describe
'350494' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSB' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
9e274f221f1d641db3c80ff70ca97486
8df31fb11cf22415901b23e5ee986cdde4070f8c
'2011-09-25T16:07:07-04:00'
describe
'208452' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSC' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
d23a4958bbfd5c952e25ee9325f54096
febc7cf7a012e130efaa77dfd82c1b1bfd023bcb
'2011-09-25T16:06:17-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'33816' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSD' 'sip-files00021.pro'
f29294adb2c840c3e2e64d8957253bd5
2640a0b4af861f33a95ca014afa470a3365cf0d1
'2011-09-25T16:08:21-04:00'
describe
'74696' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSE' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
90f7db741305d43e8265e9da78e5a863
853ccc7d420b0bb309872fc69a743c2ca35e1163
'2011-09-25T16:11:12-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2816332' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSF' 'sip-files00021.tif'
ce7445b647a0e16274ad048be5108fe6
509269cdb2a57b76675d23ca7a5e3f1994777217
'2011-09-25T16:05:36-04:00'
describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSG' 'sip-files00021.txt'
b1f6fe3dc9a0cb2feddfee426939db4a
86adccae227ca9ed52a8538b3ed52791da594e1a
describe
'349829' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSH' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
e5ae69a3e511a69ad00e23273dba53da
d4ed524803cb0567a839e8cfaf294db3be9e44af
describe
'202485' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSI' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
7c9090e3caca5c750a562b1ef1d5f0fb
e2067aea106a61aba195d2cdd05723de522a444b
'2011-09-25T16:05:49-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28658' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSJ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
f2e2a61ef0df839b3c307c9bd52a5968
b4e5f5e24230ecfc1451ebd67a186c5d4a53af67
'2011-09-25T16:08:48-04:00'
describe
'71937' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSK' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
90606331b14cdf6898210cbb43b4eaaa
1862e6852ad5605f631f071dffb50b0f933cc1c4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2810976' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSL' 'sip-files00022.tif'
942b6310502e5132bbb9008cb255ffc3
0d1d177638c7baebcfd167f10b10f946d32899b0
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSM' 'sip-files00022.txt'
9874896dd2e0f9297439d4978ad1c50d
d2bd5ac21a42efc06c733f089ff24d494aadb683
'2011-09-25T16:10:15-04:00'
describe
'330895' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSN' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
a9879f144f1bdedfffb211b008e839d1
5b63d2d0385bb15f6ef9db029d81d20b049a915d
describe
'260713' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSO' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
b3958ad6b6f909ea2194bcd41efbd6c1
1cf89786492a867cdefdd1d663b0335917dd800e
'2011-09-25T16:07:32-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39279' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSP' 'sip-files00023.pro'
3a35bcb24c9316736eb89be1a1e8b931
ada6fc3678c8ad2fcc4ccea340f25d78f6c83ebe
'2011-09-25T16:13:01-04:00'
describe
'90250' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSQ' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
d499fe6946ccb90cf5a09d19e4693062
b246de31b2b78a556d5d4676b680df0a5e2ed579
'2011-09-25T16:08:56-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2660320' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSR' 'sip-files00023.tif'
357b0ffbe66d94784094895bf1a2c03a
9e1ab09cb58d61b0117292d4b84d30f92dcd72fa
'2011-09-25T16:07:41-04:00'
describe
'1545' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSS' 'sip-files00023.txt'
f81cf1ed532a4636b858da27beef3f75
94bcc39cfaf9cb695007a9e0c27b360e7fbd0ccc
describe
'349645' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALST' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
4d3c73df68696daaf6dffa0e7f8a96be
df5186dc88a632d2408575fc0f88e2c7c8bf500f
'2011-09-25T16:05:44-04:00'
describe
'245169' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSU' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
929630f6495ed563079dd4cd87739876
032640d4a00956fbd536995299803797befa2b0e
'2011-09-25T16:12:21-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37728' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSV' 'sip-files00024.pro'
4fca7092a1fff8b0776b7644e83b72c1
e2238eb1720235334bb7086792ecf9bb68789b36
'2011-09-25T16:04:50-04:00'
describe
'84155' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSW' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
5b6803b6f4004d167e0bf1ccf192a014
78d9cf7f8a7f6919b6871cfb54d0962a2370e663
'2011-09-25T16:10:51-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2811828' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSX' 'sip-files00024.tif'
2e4aa8b19e554099d9b39eb735720a5c
bfa3ea3d0c368c5867e5760524e2af9578b1de7b
'2011-09-25T16:08:11-04:00'
describe
'1503' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSY' 'sip-files00024.txt'
828cc3ff278513aad284bdf53353c121
d283395027d5279c2ccdd4b4466a5aa46c146a75
describe
'335773' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALSZ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
e94707c9d4fe18ccea0acdf1447cacc4
9db77d27675d27dcabd516294b0283c46d318dce
'2011-09-25T16:10:43-04:00'
describe
'238594' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTA' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
d2aee9528707af97d077555006d6bf85
39c720f4ab145c1558ffa7bc47f806506ab87ce6
'2011-09-25T16:07:33-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38307' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTB' 'sip-files00025.pro'
c148865501b2e1ffeac85a2bd3fc88bd
83ef51f188dbd8936d89ae6ff25d2a1832b0809e
'2011-09-25T16:09:07-04:00'
describe
'85487' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTC' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
61031b4ea3dd1246b1d9a6902830537c
93820338943c28fe1a44bea2ea3890e8f439099e
'2011-09-25T16:12:54-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2699204' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTD' 'sip-files00025.tif'
ffdff51d5568cce0793daa4d63fbed49
a586b04b558d4527925e01ffc517937c0a7f9a61
'2011-09-25T16:08:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTE' 'sip-files00025.txt'
0aecb48290aabf475f05b4d6166cfea7
990a4aa61f6a7be921cc7b1fc413e4da7878758f
'2011-09-25T16:13:08-04:00'
describe
'349772' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTF' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
76f597aca8b120913b99c17efde68135
af9c39d4150ccdc3cf8d954208dd155fb5529471
'2011-09-25T16:10:00-04:00'
describe
'248149' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTG' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
74a7e7e7b762ccefe6896a290d1ce917
a6a0c6f498a6861d1889aad4f3c9650885ffdd3c
'2011-09-25T16:11:50-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40415' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTH' 'sip-files00026.pro'
1eb91ecfe03206a4be83be87e196f7ac
169bf4cf06d65f225c0be3d1509525b610a8e19f
'2011-09-25T16:12:29-04:00'
describe
'87729' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTI' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
400fd72dbd8bdde3936b668df3b5f484
f403f9bde5631c8c85f00c66397d48c118c2a0bf
'2011-09-25T16:04:49-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTJ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
a763ed7cde088497dd032b011f4a42e8
32d6cf1edd72ed56397c8f0f1070594d9cdbbaf7
'2011-09-25T16:11:16-04:00'
describe
'1630' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTK' 'sip-files00026.txt'
fad804d6de50b9d8866812d7915e1423
db673a7d93eb903b5b38ece1a10243421fa9f201
'2011-09-25T16:12:02-04:00'
describe
'350456' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTL' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
760e4351db944dad4aea976f887bc568
1f61d5227c05d0281692f64b1f698023f0ffd08f
describe
'195880' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTM' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
b4b606e1449ff4eefa2854a2a4c57e73
5958ad401b7aa08f16582cff4cc7b7c5796f1899
'2011-09-25T16:09:41-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25794' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTN' 'sip-files00027.pro'
0a1d9f43c0f5b948395a42cb34319461
b4cb7fd013c80b540a94cb85032c2dd63d7621a5
'2011-09-25T16:07:48-04:00'
describe
'68154' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTO' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
c674edabca6a36d79af9c5f69b9f2d6f
20a22be266113974bf2f9dc9fcb7519a3f8fd673
'2011-09-25T16:08:37-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2815580' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTP' 'sip-files00027.tif'
460ca052dca7d1d1464cbaad25908386
e84331a1b432c0fbc6eddcc12858c7b987fc0123
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTQ' 'sip-files00027.txt'
3733d42316326acdb11e57b847f26b50
f09008693a4a9e43caef3fb9f4f1821034ec0786
'2011-09-25T16:05:19-04:00'
describe
'331535' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTR' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
1881aea29fd3d67900395d1732ca36b5
97dc043fc1c208e316eb1f055f6e4201206b30bf
'2011-09-25T16:05:34-04:00'
describe
'251810' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTS' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
4f2f9402223089a84baf99660976355f
0ec62ffa6530295fa362bd5345f7c071965a7401
'2011-09-25T16:13:05-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35859' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTT' 'sip-files00028.pro'
d6c169561fbbec37c29a024c0e84fa32
2a1f9380d8fc529f1d00a3af2ef990449b8ea4be
describe
'88486' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTU' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
4cae371b21b7a9b793a454ea1a309cae
f6273c0abcf1486e1c2fbef1d72c2124c5ab7ab1
'2011-09-25T16:08:35-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2665724' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTV' 'sip-files00028.tif'
a96621e6b78e33660a4ee0fc8ebe6309
86c93e7f47fb929261889e4b84aec3698464e039
'2011-09-25T16:08:59-04:00'
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTW' 'sip-files00028.txt'
74910d2d311d72fd23fa883f2bd959ed
f5e7443ed30bfbd636d6395e20df20ce921b23ae
'2011-09-25T16:11:56-04:00'
describe
'350480' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTX' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
19d7236be99d0204494e4d4db4984024
4f69802dd768de707d65b00ebd68253c961efc1b
'2011-09-25T16:07:18-04:00'
describe
'199306' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTY' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
797244c75824da89de2e540eeaf1a355
98cedb1cafc7d2e4c74c375e78c373cae9df6efc
'2011-09-25T16:13:10-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29973' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALTZ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
66105ad02abea2234be497c56fcb83ea
d7b7735116ea3841d6ac87b8f0b9c818d04e3f00
'2011-09-25T16:05:13-04:00'
describe
'73154' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUA' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
ad4677ce22b0cbd9af6a3ebe45c9c154
a38a478ee7799961084fcac39b91a485eaec4807
'2011-09-25T16:06:29-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2816640' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUB' 'sip-files00029.tif'
1422baa9d35946054e3a19f01299e227
0755cd53de37a44603db7f72f468aeb80bcbd402
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUC' 'sip-files00029.txt'
60e7f2cf7512c9511652046a3fcad425
2e9326068f09a3a98f47602174626fd2b6e2a795
'2011-09-25T16:09:02-04:00'
describe
'349855' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUD' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
556715b6d57f7b47684cc15969b9881f
0682856c34684589e0f76ecd8df7b9f38602ca5f
'2011-09-25T16:11:47-04:00'
describe
'222189' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUE' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
a8aa09449cfd3e515b8a44b61f1e8436
b61c4ba20d7efbbaae405fce304f825ce9fd08e5
'2011-09-25T16:04:51-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34959' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUF' 'sip-files00030.pro'
20f05c2deffc8d22d2ce2ef8fb20476f
2e2c388d183fe25739d234f1124b15fcf79c0daf
'2011-09-25T16:06:02-04:00'
describe
'77922' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUG' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
abbcb758a407b3dd8e7c24d1e9022a22
ddb58972b72a1c3e9999d9185cefbe0ec3036f01
'2011-09-25T16:09:21-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2811556' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUH' 'sip-files00030.tif'
b0d645ee0cb8654b0bc5220d40975908
28de024f53588e90fcb63ffe3a2521b6700882f2
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUI' 'sip-files00030.txt'
870539955a10bb83f4368455a9a6e001
de0f98db06582a155142bab2e59587f29f768fba
'2011-09-25T16:12:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUJ' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
0cd470036ebca18d33ac66ac5d234505
ece40e59cfee1979c1b7ddc9627864360b9e768a
'2011-09-25T16:12:38-04:00'
describe
'227884' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUK' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
f8d7d01c01e688e77dcd5f37a3f089dd
22ca7dc87c31399ba87d7f91165f89b17190b81e
'2011-09-25T16:09:13-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34744' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUL' 'sip-files00031.pro'
0731a715b09a5b1de3f36d07ff4ad7ae
fd8d14f4dbdf39331e7106dfa674f327e54275c2
describe
'80073' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUM' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
e3e7f806a0ec30b1f051d7f1be7e3c9b
aeb9c19e65213142a648c081aca9114e75aefd14
'2011-09-25T16:06:27-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2816808' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUN' 'sip-files00031.tif'
5b37c91b3dda2aadd508572e0f31f3ab
e087b4139ddbd49304523b8919f0f9ea2cd05f0d
describe
'1406' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUO' 'sip-files00031.txt'
7e55e34ba3b8abaea85324eee3428df9
2b522fe2a1be857dd9cf824d37a1a9246163de8e
'2011-09-25T16:07:47-04:00'
describe
'349846' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUP' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
a69e4e4293d2ad23174e92e059a8a940
a5e2bedbd662b32d6883175bee3e31140f695152
'2011-09-25T16:11:35-04:00'
describe
'221818' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUQ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
a4a33b87ee8fc132de26ad0d944f1644
13ebdac96b6881780467d7d4e034d31a5cd4c00b
'2011-09-25T16:12:53-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'31955' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUR' 'sip-files00032.pro'
b42e8c6d85164850baa94e468acfde4a
f38c662a9cd091027c45460328bcdf28bd32f683
'2011-09-25T16:09:44-04:00'
describe
'79497' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUS' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
e9419359ffdd37e63836d66e1965605a
f011cb381e1524d38aa23079605a927949b148db
'2011-09-25T16:05:48-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2811744' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUT' 'sip-files00032.tif'
ec6cd8efb4ba1ac7e28e098acef14506
77fc7aca1a549e9963e3bf7b66411d0b4a117e81
'2011-09-25T16:08:32-04:00'
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUU' 'sip-files00032.txt'
49460135db6dc3845a8d663ea270bcb5
45fb727d68597773c9ed882076aae737a15a9e5b
'2011-09-25T16:06:19-04:00'
describe
'350285' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUV' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
46b25947fed2126cef96548fb575f1e7
ad676e9d43ef0cf9b5b7353e192de769efdce05d
describe
'174557' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUW' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
f04744ff11535b20fcb9c02e3da352bf
5462ff6cfe5bb8c48fd5ff2e7e2d259b39c64bd2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25113' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUX' 'sip-files00033.pro'
e4427b657aa2d1429e63bd7c8f67060c
dc64fe2c2e899040347e2c7199f6b45e26e6471a
'2011-09-25T16:08:18-04:00'
describe
'63926' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUY' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
03da66ae17145e2bbc627221f4512fd4
2e5e44b906b8c05ba975ca7ecc69c620d2651116
'2011-09-25T16:09:23-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2815360' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALUZ' 'sip-files00033.tif'
c7c3f77d9c2cb5c5a0013bafa93eaff2
5158528624a07010f16b7a45e8295dcfd02a9135
'2011-09-25T16:09:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVA' 'sip-files00033.txt'
854f2ebce068ac7aa1dd84450475b949
f0d99cde5c1c1cbdd9507854e3fa3e21bb11ffa7
'2011-09-25T16:04:46-04:00'
describe
'349824' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVB' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
e939cc8a9f5f5ca662a232a142dbd99e
de0f9084e9203668f69aef197f42e933c2c1898d
describe
'215647' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVC' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
179497a97d335a1544b8ee9db950f112
6e41e4ddbd8c804b60beccffba95b07df6495027
'2011-09-25T16:10:28-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'33367' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVD' 'sip-files00034.pro'
18c22780bce3e8b85e5920b7cc084d91
37e734e0ee7b949125c44049337c91e777345779
'2011-09-25T16:05:47-04:00'
describe
'74875' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVE' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
0d7b53b48679c084b0e2d6f7ee3ee632
f4d34e874e477a7078d4ef9fa16bcf7d3de625bf
'2011-09-25T16:10:31-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2811044' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVF' 'sip-files00034.tif'
564c21ee6d6f3c206244a2576a8e6261
531b08d641fd007c210d98cee2f5497e65e81675
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVG' 'sip-files00034.txt'
cd69d2a2df005e173daf687d29f2a90e
86fe56153885653407c7206008ac9289d45dcbd8
'2011-09-25T16:11:13-04:00'
describe
'355075' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVH' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
9b787bcd05febb4c5baf4b5001eb812b
e5848f65d6c212a9d449ecc3d67601d82ace7d86
'2011-09-25T16:12:52-04:00'
describe
'243206' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVI' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
a8fe44e34a641604c1255759d839a192
15a1648cafd4cfa56d8890b17340864eebd04b08
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40335' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVJ' 'sip-files00035.pro'
889f2759f7f77b3e9b96802221400a75
c38302ddbd9143c5c5601da80ee3fc33054b34c5
'2011-09-25T16:12:43-04:00'
describe
'84638' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVK' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
768ea342b23eb0d7c64f2b8bb87b3ade
612d838df0844fc5b2d873371a007cacdd0ac670
'2011-09-25T16:10:49-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2854124' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVL' 'sip-files00035.tif'
94e1b783832fb2c160298c71e8bccac5
eb736048c2f81ca46929586b685635c8c604a563
describe
'1576' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVM' 'sip-files00035.txt'
dd90fe5e756807fe1bb7f8bbfbbf588c
53788ad4ddf81e3b88b723d2f7399b27a336f661
'2011-09-25T16:09:56-04:00'
describe
'349802' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVN' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
c80739a9e1a71fde3ec70f1c1d22062e
412022b7ffa8ce87a55b88cd59f5bef6e6f737a3
describe
'258464' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVO' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
ef2ac11e1ddf0ef53a5c0e8169166f31
e0d285083ca979cafc10c682f96057c1b89d492a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'41621' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVP' 'sip-files00036.pro'
f5388a77ec7df372e9e423c9681b2ea5
0d910b8b01e37a19d7af3579a46c9c2fef9e8305
'2011-09-25T16:06:00-04:00'
describe
'88682' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVQ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
3231bbb354457b6261af8aa4b3bd4b4f
d37ca2854b2590a4d318d979cf6f899f61da8829
'2011-09-25T16:11:32-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2812136' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVR' 'sip-files00036.tif'
d910afb814c40970883f9c23e5f2a111
5b0f3f2ef1fb2729bd2d98a8e7aaea01e436f806
'2011-09-25T16:13:07-04:00'
describe
'1636' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVS' 'sip-files00036.txt'
c4921f68796eaa451e82b76c41d2d0b2
a23544ee476e1b24606f0f61b1fcd209692cc2fc
'2011-09-25T16:07:54-04:00'
describe
'350495' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVT' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
17276490e1be3fa8ea01cec38aaed904
40be9a50363f83ef03877268727d4dadf05dbba9
'2011-09-25T16:12:14-04:00'
describe
'226853' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVU' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
f72e2a1b398360b38cc0ac62341f7db0
b421640acb0afa059fb42befe5a2747edd56c3c4
'2011-09-25T16:13:06-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39048' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVV' 'sip-files00037.pro'
d63cc1a234e2d0ffc6438ab9fb3caa86
9174b63dc6f0bb7069b3956a8ffc4cd64e6d05a7
describe
'80663' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVW' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
91ca0801698ba674ebda1baf2c08d8e1
e325dd0856625e9d65af49fdea3fccf07f243ff4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2816480' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVX' 'sip-files00037.tif'
ed4c5c73d1cac6a1b28540f4b091fa03
e16c11266927d0181df60e89ab5222f3094c0034
'2011-09-25T16:11:24-04:00'
describe
'1537' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVY' 'sip-files00037.txt'
9aca68b18a5cf11ce90ddbe97f41da0a
c555ca05e9bcedb1ea73f084b0fa8d19cc84867f
'2011-09-25T16:06:33-04:00'
describe
'333666' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALVZ' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
305a4475c2ee0f79d968a7110922bebd
7f2b747fdfb7810581a0de2aea90c3abe868da5a
'2011-09-25T16:12:50-04:00'
describe
'255948' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWA' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
ae67e7cbc29ad39fc621eac580258725
feb46db6a67ec893c459c13449b9656bc19887e9
'2011-09-25T16:07:38-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40256' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWB' 'sip-files00038.pro'
595e81c1f9f83cea35648ea5bed4a1c1
716ab98054136d503bb2ab3d952037e7afe69fa9
'2011-09-25T16:11:17-04:00'
describe
'89648' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWC' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
239b400a513d37445787772562865e95
68bae3d604dd29fd01dc1867dd655e4ad1326121
'2011-09-25T16:08:28-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2683096' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWD' 'sip-files00038.tif'
a7fac0e6028364a3f52617a1b6566a9a
d781d12636a8e9879f14cbc4180bac3d60f6c6f8
'2011-09-25T16:08:23-04:00'
describe
'1587' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWE' 'sip-files00038.txt'
2b7924eab6fbd5105b2adf063f3b412f
6e1452bf621f2da69708a26a17f658ba1c141f1f
'2011-09-25T16:12:28-04:00'
describe
'330368' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWF' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
56c931a06889c7a7cc094a156f613957
8905eef218de006472d86af5becb2e490aa2fbfe
describe
'260254' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWG' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
5fdf2c190414138520116cd1622de0d8
b77fa9a923c10d48f3b10ee82761bb670360b034
'2011-09-25T16:08:20-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'41402' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWH' 'sip-files00039.pro'
fd0af846bd23ab5f34efa1c6023de673
7422ac195877d18e142e2617d198e87e128d3901
describe
'91953' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWI' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
a3963615122f7cfed0aa887412a91c4a
e00a3d8cf219614b5ce187624e6e23d31ef6fef3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2656216' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWJ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
10a0c8f22635d50a2dfb963e1b2ece41
e7d727d7266d3e323a671b93a25156ae4b8806f7
'2011-09-25T16:11:38-04:00'
describe
'1627' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWK' 'sip-files00039.txt'
d92750936241d32720c0f94bb5da5f28
c5780004837c24bcffa4cfe022b2e2fa3e0f7628
'2011-09-25T16:07:59-04:00'
describe
'349791' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWL' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
fa630e64c01b4feb5fa5a472573eaa51
dc18efc34250413c9419103a6d666728fd7ad95d
'2011-09-25T16:12:10-04:00'
describe
'247846' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWM' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
d058fcf3e918a79232a051b968a8a482
fa07fc1a9cc2f90b544c44e6bfdbbc09198273e8
'2011-09-25T16:08:47-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40034' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWN' 'sip-files00040.pro'
0909a5be8fbacfa35dadc49071b3062e
1f1bbdeb86b12ec438198a131cb6821df6b4f30e
'2011-09-25T16:12:35-04:00'
describe
'87174' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWO' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
a5d695399f48563d0bda6f6a684fda25
f5a0f5975899019920d1138729be9a077e0a7416
'2011-09-25T16:12:59-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2811952' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWP' 'sip-files00040.tif'
a02387926857ea8739859e651edbf5ac
1f38d08b6e829c23e76d8ee1ebd9e5a848db7a34
'2011-09-25T16:09:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWQ' 'sip-files00040.txt'
48157a09198c9874cfb6e70f446d5345
b65021d997487c11e0ba1a8baa6cf94b5ea40de5
'2011-09-25T16:09:15-04:00'
describe
'331917' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWR' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
994b75b146c56cd8ae9a7abb3e24310e
772b69d506402d8707e3b02953c20615425d6ccc
describe
'258416' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWS' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
0908ba794f02d206132a49a69e9535f1
ea71f31005fe00d453908364fd70b4fd245af9ed
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'42140' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWT' 'sip-files00041.pro'
9360e0702fcaf22cd8570b7a63f9dc16
1029ce69503d539aaaf1748492eb8357e843a9b6
'2011-09-25T16:05:30-04:00'
describe
'89737' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWU' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
ce6def4ef686787fcbbe1df9496087ce
8a8e79dfc43129f8f907de2bf14ac525135a9c47
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2668252' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWV' 'sip-files00041.tif'
d4fe09caeb83ef37b180478546f00daa
36bfad7a6c027246184d31e3fbfdc5e990561316
describe
'1650' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWW' 'sip-files00041.txt'
881a490b38cf0ed54c62a3833a7c84a9
4ea5d83aa2adbec08992624b500edf8f68877ca5
'2011-09-25T16:10:06-04:00'
describe
'335206' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWX' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
e9d1dda86976fbb8701ea5fc3c6213bf
39057d7653805da7a252f981045f97c1a90b6e40
'2011-09-25T16:06:42-04:00'
describe
'271345' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWY' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
0590ab1a202a02c2b3628b3845f85d11
167595a9ab4b02655fcbec1ed568c58e2c2eebec
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39456' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALWZ' 'sip-files00042.pro'
e2a455fd469d9b3f73135a93e18bf908
0e0d1266d6299ba54046c86bea9178992f7eef16
'2011-09-25T16:05:55-04:00'
describe
'92648' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXA' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
da76d56f42ed744daaf4374819a6f6af
38eada581c3ccf993cc06dec3372d1ff9ea75251
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2695216' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXB' 'sip-files00042.tif'
bf8a2c75dbf342eb157a73aa580d7215
ea478720c3a8506bfdc81568c1274883c533871c
describe
'1613' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXC' 'sip-files00042.txt'
11daef787d7f8e061b3133d822aac00c
7cfd2f9cefa336348d7ccded32682f73675589ad
'2011-09-25T16:11:53-04:00'
describe
'326000' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXD' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
4df591073a9c1e46325e60d18bfe1ea9
1cb0cda1fe28dfa4dd58ada3ee68207caaa33629
'2011-09-25T16:07:02-04:00'
describe
'236780' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXE' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
93a7d5aa7747818be027dc7ec3842b22
646f2ee2cbe899c8552849fb065c55e322dedac5
'2011-09-25T16:06:03-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36033' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXF' 'sip-files00043.pro'
88854b1d82da7c8a62df208e1bf60dad
4fd581dc82de135d022483a49e070c429dbe1e0a
describe
'84338' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXG' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
72207c453cafdd7bc17779518e3c52ff
ae2badacc912ee88236f4d2ca43c5f9eeb82824f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2621124' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXH' 'sip-files00043.tif'
4c4faf21efc3f0490aa57e39a0d7f867
15b98d605d245119ca07dc99b93c73bff056c405
'2011-09-25T16:09:58-04:00'
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXI' 'sip-files00043.txt'
8c832344a434c6dec3b25f1a36f468a3
3d516a8cb9ac8aadcc3d9ea26057ac6334eeffaf
describe
'349817' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXJ' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
c4117fe8a265c32f262b2443a7d034ac
ce232e464d126a613dd9d45ebc8e9733bf79a1ea
'2011-09-25T16:09:54-04:00'
describe
'240408' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXK' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
af33cdc97339d06836f3b2ce5c7798b6
2d9c94b088c97efcd0c611d96705c0ad7d7dd1a0
'2011-09-25T16:07:30-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37957' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXL' 'sip-files00044.pro'
eb3c2e11cb35eeb3304e8624fac1786f
8401e2d1e35191b0a722699cacf0fbbf63fa0188
'2011-09-25T16:13:12-04:00'
describe
'84116' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXM' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
b869044634e49f1c93f5d44ec6a01f01
24bd3fea3ce94a4c12245c556213f4e97614b617
'2011-09-25T16:07:06-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2811708' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXN' 'sip-files00044.tif'
3eda41156bda2820706a323cd87c86c3
618fe54477c248fc7a04e5546c2f3ddd441f4742
'2011-09-25T16:05:11-04:00'
describe
'1493' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXO' 'sip-files00044.txt'
94d3476c9338b2de038e7cede575863c
2ab55370fcd288d347726d105ea02329cfcf67ee
'2011-09-25T16:07:43-04:00'
describe
'331633' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXP' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
a87d699c0dff18969473ffef0b6db3a3
3e7f7c8ffa4fc4a678d94dc33c639689026cef06
describe
'197550' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXQ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
ee0be67cee2ab166ca9606259562c6df
7e82f5f06d3ceb5a7b07ebc0bb7a7580f269d52f
'2011-09-25T16:06:56-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27285' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXR' 'sip-files00045.pro'
2f3fb097030c2c4684cdc8603ae909db
339d443c465c0c6b60855dd5d913e4b366e34852
describe
'69703' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXS' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
d5790b8f9eb5aab3b88d0eea2efac123
cdf6a06f3147a6a724d98b34fe40d72e873df622
'2011-09-25T16:09:48-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2665120' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXT' 'sip-files00045.tif'
c1b9616068a5fd3054a0e47d65d076ae
bba16ff33bf88a87f72e066d1a3345d2b940cbdf
'2011-09-25T16:06:28-04:00'
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXU' 'sip-files00045.txt'
75f93ecaeea372227bbc304fbc722a8c
6499460d26a697a0975f5eb6f318574725d7819c
describe
'333735' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXV' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
d9e7c5673787a5048b5bb50921987eb4
30dba637916632036788d0ac80d05a01eee5a3ce
'2011-09-25T16:11:30-04:00'
describe
'257113' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXW' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
317ee2d443573796def23c4c17bd259d
4c9e317d9e0cfafe12c64bbcaf25372d75693327
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39769' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXX' 'sip-files00046.pro'
04f65bf3dcfa5c164da9e09050b57701
18d9199c6fa32042e8279970370d66850a91a328
'2011-09-25T16:09:50-04:00'
describe
'87352' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXY' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
f1358906b0100ddc4f0fe0459400757c
cc7cad5d9bc2c7ef70f59747365c0adde93348e1
'2011-09-25T16:08:36-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2683172' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALXZ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
1c14d8033116aa851168651ce7d98108
f1f3c819a8e2e88d36fe06792a7d1a35c0b8fe35
'2011-09-25T16:09:18-04:00'
describe
'1574' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYA' 'sip-files00046.txt'
28b750d8e514c9375c3332d28158ae5e
1c3b5e0b707c3b5afdd867ae9bf4fbcd3a28a787
describe
'333879' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYB' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
96c825768ebb6d70a433e2f45fba7083
26fecaa3069a6732d5e54f55da96b6a16e3a977f
'2011-09-25T16:09:32-04:00'
describe
'233637' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYC' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
7ece775e3d930058c76c936c248fa94e
f6d132954195c94342a30dae440d21a4d8ba6e00
'2011-09-25T16:11:07-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36288' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYD' 'sip-files00047.pro'
db0a192bae79858fc126b33419a1cadc
8332e9c10036c792d67884e3a3d81c74bb87b867
describe
'83371' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYE' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
c2b5138ba53f028b07dc2bd2059487ef
68432c1ae406ea28f6a4e0b4afbf99f4899723e1
'2011-09-25T16:11:36-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2684200' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYF' 'sip-files00047.tif'
c1901bb68d01685fa9b1dd357fb396de
d2a5931dca671c86f74fa55593dd14bf451e6110
'2011-09-25T16:10:29-04:00'
describe
'1500' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYG' 'sip-files00047.txt'
951ef5052a1ee561e4f288e44e201880
63ef143ff2c83b753f95bfc143c0fa4f4c7a173f
describe
'349814' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYH' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
b44c1c4f1b63ffd2308a6e948d7720d1
265b0c50f7b454109191afd73dd17a333238ece4
'2011-09-25T16:10:05-04:00'
describe
'234094' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYI' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
eb647be4f7180c346aa1f1316e38e6b3
c37bfa3ac862eb0117c36d717cf4a5555d4301ad
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYJ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
9ab1cc05d54c99633f0f94f41b38f2d3
857def06c6d830debdeb768fbb80d5b7c66af632
'2011-09-25T16:09:30-04:00'
describe
'81637' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYK' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
1e8ac104b935eeb279f2cc0bd759bc8e
7fc51542ee9730c4383e6f4d0c0f058a43e7fc29
'2011-09-25T16:07:45-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2811712' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYL' 'sip-files00048.tif'
35821b9a81b5765a1ab074bbe0270482
2ecee5fd5cf358b80da0084341c21a49dc4c516f
describe
'1470' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYM' 'sip-files00048.txt'
2d690f844a56b1245cae123c223c7d03
d879b1a23d839dc1093c32a6e14877c63e5f1f1f
'2011-09-25T16:10:09-04:00'
describe
'350383' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYN' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
ba7e6909677775d924c2d62dad0d8a4c
7e0beb4ab2881986e8482eb5ba3a65453302114b
describe
'243309' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYO' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
9b8e679d63687a5a48d6df728b5ec2cb
6eb8c58ab8c9de349eef2fceb4ac956d3b93b722
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38878' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYP' 'sip-files00049.pro'
5a38943fbc0cf458834b2ed48780c3a0
7d4ff8ee9f4075266e2ddd5fee35e9028def1adf
describe
'84108' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYQ' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
2187fcaa5bb67b2fb599de122d3ce43a
96d3872bb6eeeb32d7112ebdb4db210e7e963749
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2816716' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYR' 'sip-files00049.tif'
03346157eedb7fe842977cc1cbfc04dd
0f6c6f8943d0f921921c3a19e3abdc058be2d352
describe
'1590' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYS' 'sip-files00049.txt'
9d5f33c53d07384ab94575e70b91293f
66e98076b575ed1cd396bbc02e1c9d170afcf4f3
describe
'349843' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYT' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
31a221f9786ab0d83da43a9029aa0860
9e5a8cacba18b33cf7dd3bb63a6321df02f7540b
'2011-09-25T16:07:27-04:00'
describe
'257778' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYU' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
98f4c1c253406c6050410502804ec827
957c7f3946d0955e19ed8ab168b6d3ebed5b70e5
'2011-09-25T16:07:01-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'41101' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYV' 'sip-files00050.pro'
f9935d6142f2596e872ac024b0c0766f
b73e96582f3b5cbb058f22181da0005ae8d37402
describe
'89361' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYW' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
8a530453265044d3a5c6fcedb98f1f65
54886b9d3ead0f1a71aaead02baa36b7047d8a5a
'2011-09-25T16:06:23-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2812232' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYX' 'sip-files00050.tif'
e88566cd1d6c0967c29853948159c00c
c773e08f71b7494b2850e01a7d24247743a28a89
'2011-09-25T16:09:38-04:00'
describe
'1621' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYY' 'sip-files00050.txt'
f7d78cbe9defaec98ac8c014471c7c1e
d5f4a1cfb49bd0076da4b314a40b5ce5cb7ee9f9
describe
'350416' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALYZ' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
21ffd6987c05a19e79d0c83d47bea6f2
f647e2ccacad2dd902c075f9bc59799d74ca4470
'2011-09-25T16:08:26-04:00'
describe
'229370' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZA' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
21efe68854e835f4090d1b084e77e79b
5ecc4beb195701936a252c713bac1fca7c79ac07
'2011-09-25T16:11:02-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38274' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZB' 'sip-files00051.pro'
c81e59c82c875961f708c4067a93b912
541e4ef748167a2c9c82afd86cde2d4e07e0a938
'2011-09-25T16:06:41-04:00'
describe
'81524' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZC' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
ed001ec3754664e774ef3219ab1ffbb9
63cbb9a1371ceb85b119152ecdcd0cf05540e881
'2011-09-25T16:09:34-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2816668' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZD' 'sip-files00051.tif'
2acac5d9335b73677fb3ce4ebe3ec9c7
ff669e0bdd2e27d496139959ea11a62e5d556378
'2011-09-25T16:11:40-04:00'
describe
'1568' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZE' 'sip-files00051.txt'
9de92a8687ab413f75c32979db3f2f00
35ac435033e5b9cf6e47e566701a2a258d5cb47a
'2011-09-25T16:10:18-04:00'
describe
'349832' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZF' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
c35c0c70b005bae4e8bd22ee3bf9f17d
958b4da54a9bf61072458e315173cbd0a9243b91
'2011-09-25T16:12:42-04:00'
describe
'225375' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZG' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
befe78f61bd4a473a132b58a7f4eb9a0
916fdc2b73eff72c55d2beb5c41f0b1defeccf47
'2011-09-25T16:08:33-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34452' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZH' 'sip-files00052.pro'
b4b447b0eee76a1ffed243af3d88f6ca
09794f47a3084508d3fa89026a0baaf06dae8d6a
'2011-09-25T16:06:11-04:00'
describe
'82420' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZI' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
98346656b1fbfc49187bde7d9b5eaea1
c649eb002b14973387c04f98b3772f3f2051a5d6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2811872' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZJ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
e67f1e137390028e32f337376d11709d
c6077dc98d67c09c879f0e892e2ea511495791d3
'2011-09-25T16:12:13-04:00'
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZK' 'sip-files00052.txt'
dbf60ccab412c079019759c8da77bbbc
4ec10ae3287212f59975945f52f9ea1cebebea5f
describe
'333265' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZL' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
371e60c0ac5a292c2ed3aadf58b7e949
8a33b861f47ae4bb791ca901216af5798109b29f
describe
'241855' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZM' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
4ccb13fb41eb44742dfe925b7d2714ca
e3c1103bb329698d1a32342a65e7052827270d98
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37786' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZN' 'sip-files00053.pro'
b78fb3fa46164f8cdca26153f4f7078f
e9c7b29784e5da5339a96f4a22a2c3a217b7ed33
'2011-09-25T16:09:01-04:00'
describe
'85666' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZO' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
265c4cc824eee9705ed84dbdd0b75ca2
f08a9abaf06002ea504c9c7ca5ed2166e9aa6ff5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2679032' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZP' 'sip-files00053.tif'
2bb1c3b715f64dea3a05b2dfc3d31564
e48e671257103190a25d66d83a644563aea10a3f
'2011-09-25T16:09:42-04:00'
describe
'1494' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZQ' 'sip-files00053.txt'
56756b419c1b85d782b44f91662d0a90
0ff66029be1f7869e6c7b69d239263e0fa6d1959
'2011-09-25T16:05:43-04:00'
describe
'349730' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZR' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
2dece045f8185b69152ecf6f8449cb87
9eb0ccabf43235b35499c213c38c6d3bb2abc341
describe
'224061' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZS' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
452ce5752f15ddd63024d97d800ddf5a
79e6abb8040f6512b64b8e204d3a84d419b1f5f4
'2011-09-25T16:09:31-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'31268' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZT' 'sip-files00054.pro'
97b902f9b45f0c78f5a9869bf21b8be3
253972a40b29eb033ed719ae01e825ba4381b840
'2011-09-25T16:12:47-04:00'
describe
'76090' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZU' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
817150ba75a69687f21eb538e5388c11
63e2b405087ce773d73baf2e20b2576b25ef5332
'2011-09-25T16:12:26-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2811084' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZV' 'sip-files00054.tif'
76d804a71d4869fcfbd3060d50b6fae8
f8247fc25f44038fd1f7b4adec3cc81aa3a9020d
'2011-09-25T16:07:31-04:00'
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZW' 'sip-files00054.txt'
a6a567912f6897fed10ba77e79751ff3
c3117461034cafcb8a33e1e193f8a29d9144c5cf
describe
'324833' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZX' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
f6b99b7f18cf04d2c5d867c8edf0bdfd
937c9a2cd51dd16d62cf5da4f2a407173b55e3ab
'2011-09-25T16:06:08-04:00'
describe
'212060' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZY' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
4b745b0f33410d969ae91d704e1e3e1e
b7fe129422bbb98ddfdb5a7e4278f48c7aa39d4d
'2011-09-25T16:09:49-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'31754' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAALZZ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
4df76659a9e3f1f6f6c6396200a15095
55c0239011edb9dd82b3b31e37ef407b0c9f7d34
'2011-09-25T16:04:55-04:00'
describe
'76282' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAA' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
3817ed3117e0f2251e30922a9aa97b58
bc42a2b612100130c46e598a823a39adea3b7b90
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2610992' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAB' 'sip-files00055.tif'
f32753631aa4cbcd5d84a6695b5746d6
67580b93a815e8ed3cbf24341b3e723ccdb1f652
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAC' 'sip-files00055.txt'
e107e1b9be90b10afe4a87be17b0c3c2
8e3a44a0f7caeec3bef0f8e98ee99a3568d2e4ff
describe
'335707' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAD' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
450a0b17807f04261b0be915e025d06d
4c0141e8eef4e9dcc9cdd46a8d8d4b8bd746dac6
describe
'256920' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAE' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
631251c079115e18417fdc553e566176
bd8e2f4812b2edc6e0f88fea3a7d95a9b2147bfb
'2011-09-25T16:10:56-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39199' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAF' 'sip-files00056.pro'
76192ae9e71a7278a531edb97890812f
4cb9ef1e7c1c54e5a17419d9c5c3d83cfc8d2bd3
describe
'89360' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAG' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
25960c0e0589faa9de212bb8becd33f6
d446b33886af67a332e9481a0cf0bc525d1dee28
'2011-09-25T16:08:17-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2699332' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAH' 'sip-files00056.tif'
16549a2011b60b5b641d609f8a654a5c
c233240056eaef1859948dab8dc2b50cd7eb51a0
'2011-09-25T16:10:17-04:00'
describe
'1542' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAI' 'sip-files00056.txt'
d6650364e2498f1134cdfb1f473b1422
98008bcd4e79ebb29e3f8a7532ad41971bfa4b45
'2011-09-25T16:07:19-04:00'
describe
'333690' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAJ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
0a31353c1c06bb421d344c3793fe95d5
ffeec967e296bf7a1d802b5e2baaea209f34a0fb
describe
'239823' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAK' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
ab8497ff6741f704572e6cadcac631b6
75adbb85031eb1975dee7e2dec72c0fb7f614f8b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39944' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAL' 'sip-files00057.pro'
8b76f178c6fc120117a865b4b7593ec4
a94ce64da6293175503a12511b403a28fd0608a1
describe
'85940' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAM' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
4ad7fa142e6703f953e9a4f38d10ae98
979005467808a381de9d909dd16905d9360b336e
'2011-09-25T16:09:14-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2682108' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAN' 'sip-files00057.tif'
333a69c3d7f33bc10a288c6d50f20848
c4eb87b95921d5711f518048839b0ce34a849ac9
'2011-09-25T16:10:42-04:00'
describe
'1565' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAO' 'sip-files00057.txt'
8069317e9c29acb373819dab4c7e27cb
60ffcda85650533d1a2cece266943ab6571d753b
'2011-09-25T16:10:33-04:00'
describe
'340376' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAP' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
5047d86b52d1308b1ebc48f716276d1c
de214f8d3a521c3df19da3ead80d727536979d12
'2011-09-25T16:06:39-04:00'
describe
'241849' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAQ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
8f5208054d739ab238e0f2fb3df6a9a1
24c458afee8fc195bbcab9762f55fcd58720c787
'2011-09-25T16:13:00-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39096' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAR' 'sip-files00058.pro'
e16ff405d12175408ce781c76ededb28
1a09942296bf059043168ad6809088997eaf0ac7
describe
'85644' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAS' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
307f87f3a9754a16e0ee11b5fa8f51ed
904c0b181045f5325a30357510031b0e94dc41eb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2736140' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAT' 'sip-files00058.tif'
3774d819a60e9d6ac4899c75b84cbb96
98f7093ee17e9bee2ede4da3c07829e807c35b49
'2011-09-25T16:12:12-04:00'
describe
'1557' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAU' 'sip-files00058.txt'
7ad2c793f9fac2e4d781b762fb2417b4
444160b81cc1dbe37dbf4b733d8c369afe7aca82
'2011-09-25T16:10:58-04:00'
describe
'343061' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAV' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
1916fc2fbf1d55ab2f7c3ded83935094
69d59dbc1ff034bed8d0334e8ea176b262d44621
'2011-09-25T16:07:16-04:00'
describe
'232475' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAW' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
e3b9e0c6986cdf37b7c423373454d0ac
47bdabdf7d4b6659b0e302c807a2fa29c29f2f2a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35164' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAX' 'sip-files00059.pro'
2833c31c570fde44a20093c4192d66ce
97d3ce53b5365dacdc38204594c42bf937a2dfa0
'2011-09-25T16:07:24-04:00'
describe
'83613' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAY' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
1ade69792ed22b39d5075ce1c392a6d6
eb721358eaf681092e6cc153e582d3e51e928dab
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2757824' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMAZ' 'sip-files00059.tif'
9e6b6bf80012fc65ff1ebbbc2fdd581b
71fc9b957c47abc743326ef50b95f6f1d2f3fdc1
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBA' 'sip-files00059.txt'
49806c9194c009eb5f6f6c3750902a16
4c94b1d00829c4016a25255a681b588acde86331
describe
'339099' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBB' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
d1ab1d8b9c98263fc5281ae91705f8b8
5393e631c6d64a3e9814eb0fd2cc44f4f998a208
describe
'246981' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBC' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
04d52220b3301c4efa429541f24398cb
d6393438ecc9b287f860d7ee409d1fe9e7d22ccb
'2011-09-25T16:05:10-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37038' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBD' 'sip-files00060.pro'
d1d0d52b671b0a7f85ac3559309f99d9
4c88175590abdb3ab2ac8c0e195c6c180058fa21
'2011-09-25T16:08:38-04:00'
describe
'86785' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBE' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
c5a1b43180dbeef89b110a13d8defbce
b91b0f1a6526506cb89dab4c441bb7dc09b669ca
'2011-09-25T16:11:37-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2726116' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBF' 'sip-files00060.tif'
6fdb3911672e386dbb3cd934f7e12514
890888020ec07f8ca3d4cbcb8354ccf7eedb15ef
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBG' 'sip-files00060.txt'
6ba985a3999d91bb8e6aa3b5068b7b58
82d35652736ee9b8b291fe4ad648b5e1ed5ae1c5
'2011-09-25T16:05:39-04:00'
describe
'336906' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBH' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
c85f37757b964fa5ad794755306b89a2
f108eb41349088661428edc8f057a591c62666d7
'2011-09-25T16:08:00-04:00'
describe
'242186' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBI' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
fc812eb54cf04a81f7c0cf636a1b670c
2e81cb3a407928832e96cdcf687951afdfa48106
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40701' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBJ' 'sip-files00061.pro'
16557705f2ef6f0f561371695b2aec36
a72797ae7dd77986c811946cab8769b5e605108e
describe
'86581' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBK' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
f4348c8f2c3320373090428dc543d21d
ad2610a5aa577fd1740967356e9a341c0fcad25b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2707908' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBL' 'sip-files00061.tif'
826a5106d881fcac11a51bb5287082ab
f8601e38b8e42802fbce69f67df0b2d39ade1a63
describe
'1605' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBM' 'sip-files00061.txt'
e1939aba9e16d8b37460abc2d9933fab
824f41a905de5267004fb303883ffa47c4b24a3b
describe
'349818' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBN' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
87f72946945a1586c28322a7611cf3d7
9220afb1553a2ed15f99cb7660004efff8685245
'2011-09-25T16:10:24-04:00'
describe
'236185' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBO' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
dc015b13448f652fe730e02fdc6a4754
bbc8a536986d503c2499b29cb9b56eb482655b93
'2011-09-25T16:12:58-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39437' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBP' 'sip-files00062.pro'
da03f95d9779e06b3530d96999e9ec20
6f220a66977a80c89b121a7db21349929bbea0c3
'2011-09-25T16:07:00-04:00'
describe
'82657' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBQ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
c57a7f81654b6bca3d9ede38ca578e6e
4939073a7b89f2ee719aff7c27f5bbc64345f89d
'2011-09-25T16:06:59-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2811652' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBR' 'sip-files00062.tif'
b35aeadea36895d6cd2e14835546704a
5b779312b69c23f2de1db4939117aa0aaeb33cb4
'2011-09-25T16:08:06-04:00'
describe
'1559' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBS' 'sip-files00062.txt'
9e587181d84430f4e9dc4058add46c2a
836718ca0840f92f256acc41a11b590bfc87cffd
describe
'336856' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBT' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
8c50061a185b57197883a547c57a5adf
332c4bf69bd6617e6d67039162e35fad2bfa7ad2
'2011-09-25T16:06:05-04:00'
describe
'240981' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBU' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
960fc00324d4efea2928fda379397610
0e60a8ab2a9c65f3615400a0f3d4f5adf111af79
'2011-09-25T16:10:22-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39299' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBV' 'sip-files00063.pro'
648a7388886bb82feba3e7e7f03019dc
db2634199f508341c6dcabd4380429e9a26dc294
'2011-09-25T16:10:16-04:00'
describe
'87039' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBW' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
890e83e7a8cbb655b5a0168eb5960557
642c08276d95c9f5ab9fdb4de1ad6c0ab6ff60ee
'2011-09-25T16:11:39-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2708360' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBX' 'sip-files00063.tif'
cb3b700da152adf29ac469723ff3d8e7
25aae94d2bba37ce17a64ebd97bb085186fdbcb4
'2011-09-25T16:05:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBY' 'sip-files00063.txt'
1a88c500673db29ef917955bb2f3435b
0171da6d40d2df8bba038262f4fabc93a467aea4
'2011-09-25T16:07:42-04:00'
describe
'344870' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMBZ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
c404c270a95ad4a7a90a43cbd30efc45
0024cee89852511e45e954fd1ed86e3bea77fe4d
'2011-09-25T16:10:04-04:00'
describe
'251939' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCA' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
b638b5482ea49b15153b5cad53233ea5
6881a8dc3b672f38b260e809a9ab522c237b68ae
'2011-09-25T16:09:17-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39848' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCB' 'sip-files00064.pro'
255270a34c55533d1ffe630d793e349e
b55cf09cef792b131104c88220a1c5f4f3360085
describe
'89202' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCC' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
efd2faf2d23767ad50fb184b92aa843b
4c8649d6fd2e0da50dddbae1d518af4bf867ccb4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2772476' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCD' 'sip-files00064.tif'
7f5ea36886b3249d7bfb2afbcf272f4b
7f2c8004dc0b550b47356b256bd8b5eb916194b5
'2011-09-25T16:06:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCE' 'sip-files00064.txt'
ad9c6132322bd2fa61cda0f908234e44
9923468875c4a128f16d01f25d090398c759808f
'2011-09-25T16:11:08-04:00'
describe
'336924' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCF' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
e30589717d9009bfe99d5d733241e10a
8eda26ec1762ebd747697764be55661dc69b0ec2
'2011-09-25T16:12:48-04:00'
describe
'182502' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCG' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
fc86c86af813fde51efcb94c49a79de6
02435a6055d2d95d167a41f78c6be54333bd352d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26813' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCH' 'sip-files00065.pro'
dda2761c782cb7fd9564476c8acb5dc5
afaaf4e81e1f6dbfe37c09cb52b0d660d985d41d
describe
'68122' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCI' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
0d56b2d67f9ad187ee87957800658694
9d3f7d95517baeaef5ccd311532819332b21d792
'2011-09-25T16:05:01-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2706856' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCJ' 'sip-files00065.tif'
41e72e1e6e65961a9275b3c722557547
a4fece59a1c1e5ed7596e640a4c0ded28a99e112
'2011-09-25T16:05:00-04:00'
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCK' 'sip-files00065.txt'
7d36a493787959719d6bca41f0faa686
55976b4e65eb171f9b95d782eb79034a32bdd9b2
describe
'340104' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCL' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
a09b4709b458da6ede05ef9aa95668cc
550f9e30d8114ebe4af34f42c22c862476e75981
'2011-09-25T16:07:40-04:00'
describe
'227138' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCM' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
883a9c29ac1c9a0cc39709c0c45fc069
bc1ee10f357e964ee66f9ab5d4d60f77fe365d1c
'2011-09-25T16:05:40-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36877' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCN' 'sip-files00066.pro'
59ce3c2f504bbb525c86ce15c62cf48c
ac7344ac0c09f64c111e74f45efef2237cf2e192
describe
'82828' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCO' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
10beea69f9584f111b5166434a736ba1
eaba26912c3a908bc19d8d369e55c2ba9b67a268
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2734444' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCP' 'sip-files00066.tif'
aee7ae350d9e4533d70b0bd018c41361
54eac4dd4a9a507246637a7323ab12909794844c
'2011-09-25T16:07:51-04:00'
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCQ' 'sip-files00066.txt'
c2278e4b04fb3d5a1031cc7dab075921
efe2ff2ef4caac64669a2a93d329fb5fc3bf8e90
'2011-09-25T16:08:58-04:00'
describe
'336894' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCR' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
2960d41bb9653a903a7c71d1b60d55c9
5bc654bb3eb4460a64d46ded5fed3c9561dee1fb
describe
'226345' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCS' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
41ac006e11f24e496f6795b64b733a42
b3e080ebe7cf62398cee0e18cc60da7113b216d0
'2011-09-25T16:10:02-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34376' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCT' 'sip-files00067.pro'
600b60fa52b7f048f8d250074a5cdef6
644c6ba53cd0737e51563ced4aacc7e560491837
'2011-09-25T16:06:32-04:00'
describe
'82387' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCU' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
58f56002c4b3de79021c60bcdd5861eb
3f477cf12565226e2a37ebabf74ac2329b16e671
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2707960' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCV' 'sip-files00067.tif'
4c490ab73fa53a2836bf0887dd9e2aa6
8b61624a5147ef2ca61dd68850f44d9deac210d9
'2011-09-25T16:07:23-04:00'
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCW' 'sip-files00067.txt'
67c199e116802b9c7e605955d7d62e98
824e425c403cc4fb86ae293e021b30744f234c8a
describe
'341150' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCX' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
bd7155a27a67ab90c90b551da4dbc0d7
0e3b3d49e60a01e53324abd2cd9939d1460a8ce9
'2011-09-25T16:06:35-04:00'
describe
'245138' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCY' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
c1b637bff02e7e0bcee4a717b09e8917
0f52c5c6decb729da23e53b5f845c3f6f80f99df
'2011-09-25T16:08:43-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38855' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMCZ' 'sip-files00068.pro'
e3868343cdd6b78898edafde7487086a
5b9a2d345502c44c9ab14159541eac4b0167ff5d
'2011-09-25T16:06:21-04:00'
describe
'86429' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDA' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
6db540734a430039a509e233ca983287
6928026eee91c60c9c3eed1446c9472f1a1d8b4a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2742812' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDB' 'sip-files00068.tif'
d45e46057ebc60a4156d6a23b3a8e587
4280e2be7922bf94ea9a2bb282f44f716557ec40
describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDC' 'sip-files00068.txt'
a51191ee516397e9f49d2be05f7285f8
b623e94ce45d840e20202b80798940b9cccd438e
describe
'336916' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDD' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
cb9de2c9e01331fe195164f2029cb9e6
249d61caa069181154d828d35c3b6f23c92c884d
describe
'209922' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDE' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
72d2dfe6e5ff4fac400f657edf70b148
0acc23482d19fd128354363360b207e66ee5d125
'2011-09-25T16:10:57-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'33731' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDF' 'sip-files00069.pro'
e37390f6d7ad21d31cdcd9beb940b9c7
05ddb02069090d639fab5fce72372ad29edaf699
describe
'76525' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDG' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
0ddef905b4b862383fd24621f8a80ce6
ca84caa79fd297a2969c2dad54fdd6d5741c7b54
'2011-09-25T16:06:58-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2707540' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDH' 'sip-files00069.tif'
1d6ed349ddbf856431713b9339144cf4
3a04b9838b892c38b153b431323949b919dd4421
'2011-09-25T16:06:10-04:00'
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDI' 'sip-files00069.txt'
3031d1c9ba418fb8c7800b33a64ca435
f423fed6f11af3edc84192b1e025ac60a8abb51c
'2011-09-25T16:10:59-04:00'
describe
'349857' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDJ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
f64aaff96360832b0c78e07d05129c4b
a88cf211485868177fdb0f41f693613a7905ba55
describe
'225477' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDK' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
115294da754977d9c5efc6dbff0b4dda
095e77692d027f95071c7ff3bd0f073ac2194d11
'2011-09-25T16:11:34-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37385' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDL' 'sip-files00070.pro'
c0a8e633d30ef9531690824338a8ba69
456e56594850b124270a39f9cfd5fc17280950a8
describe
'81856' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDM' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
701c677c557584c34dd04f8655ce43b8
d4b3c8b4f6ae4f888cba9a5856b673e8d383e9fe
'2011-09-25T16:06:36-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2811804' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDN' 'sip-files00070.tif'
1cd304a268f2dabefcfdaf32ee57fe28
c5ac80a32b081df3883d5edd5101582771921df5
'2011-09-25T16:12:44-04:00'
describe
'1486' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDO' 'sip-files00070.txt'
dbc5dfedaac639fa0ed5a003284ae15c
d06cd58edff87abbd1c810007fe57953419f7e5f
describe
'336887' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDP' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
437dd876acda303662fa295181de2e13
a8747db53f2d388f560712075e9a3303db32c199
'2011-09-25T16:12:03-04:00'
describe
'239009' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDQ' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
07ae504056be7595579987aae4ce2ae8
d341a04d6909d8fbd69c98a1c470b46d4048a923
'2011-09-25T16:12:16-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39519' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDR' 'sip-files00071.pro'
fee22441c0bd3161bc2676757fb53662
754ea5fef4880810bbd0c34f3c8bdbb75f160429
describe
'86200' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDS' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
08ccb375a7bac12eb17ada5f50a6b0cf
d1c238d8c9115426e0c2b3ad714c9b066b2422e0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2708016' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDT' 'sip-files00071.tif'
b995a50ad73041ade92e32330fd4415c
3a02038dba8860353d3074a95607d3bb909fdd96
'2011-09-25T16:07:35-04:00'
describe
'1562' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDU' 'sip-files00071.txt'
8bf66c255efe1057dc8f2a46b554b44c
617cba9c5fed6f45a0a72e9cb911e190de2c63bc
'2011-09-25T16:06:45-04:00'
describe
'349830' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDV' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
7cfd4b39515c9f427a354dadfeb99b13
8fd7fec8855cbfa8aab4ac416c5b50d878b69b90
describe
'186228' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDW' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
7c5c15bdde02b5ac29f6ffd8ed78aabf
ac48fdd5ea0e0fd91280d4365668f11d88a517d5
'2011-09-25T16:12:30-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26280' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDX' 'sip-files00072.pro'
a15f18a5613d0ce75647618eb2a840fb
ee493f76b6c2c00e749283a70c3c8765e18c48c1
'2011-09-25T16:11:58-04:00'
describe
'67847' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDY' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
323f265b31095a4586b532e1eed2817f
77668698af4ed3633d2fcc5f36ec28b7a5dd4ad6
'2011-09-25T16:07:13-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2810708' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMDZ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
596f587a5733e3fe059432e7eeb69a6c
d66175846c4469136ed03f068204ff3623d9fc15
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEA' 'sip-files00072.txt'
610ad8fbe621926496e4a021582ce1d0
3eb7d880711e2f191867d6f3af63e189eac9208e
describe
'336922' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEB' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
019df2c159b342bdf18f6df2dbada8bc
1c5fc6d06466cc87838de9b2bed72d470276b1be
describe
'232328' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEC' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
7fe44d2e46e73d9fa7b1596bf217bcac
161c234e1a5678f559533286b6c6c0a7ade9629b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37428' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMED' 'sip-files00073.pro'
f9ea13e51171cdbcb3fb3e6726245ec4
e2551f5cebba9dc8fac6e1bc3787d80e4083e881
'2011-09-25T16:08:16-04:00'
describe
'84632' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEE' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
058badef9c0942b4fece2fe7dcde35fe
08b1d771edb1642e704748cbc1242019a220229d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2707864' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEF' 'sip-files00073.tif'
0d8f6feb0368a83e45f80f2fa4345e59
740c796e33c39201627500fa3875b9916a8e7e95
'2011-09-25T16:11:01-04:00'
describe
'1534' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEG' 'sip-files00073.txt'
ed429bcce340e914c1e7d07884bcc53a
191cfe7234b917f4bb4a4c26eb14ea68a1acc9e7
describe
'331254' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEH' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
51fc82e8cdfc9701ca00400729a18ece
32808c76abe4af1d8168d7234d7b7726e801a48a
'2011-09-25T16:06:13-04:00'
describe
'236556' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEI' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
415153805923c36f559e658ce112ec16
7ad20710f25ce371cdb19f0e5411919ead88b542
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38777' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEJ' 'sip-files00074.pro'
a158443bb0c82d6845eb53d41be88136
778588aa1a5d963cd574e5dbd7cbe721dded78a7
'2011-09-25T16:08:04-04:00'
describe
'86491' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEK' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
02cbe2f8b58c164f5f536d932e3fbdb1
ba3cf35034a21bbf9d9afc97d77061f0017c62fe
'2011-09-25T16:11:06-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2663144' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEL' 'sip-files00074.tif'
6e6dabac8b31ebd9702d49862907f0b2
8a788a27e8c7f49c5a2b89bd973c87ad48d6a6a9
'2011-09-25T16:05:41-04:00'
describe
'1563' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEM' 'sip-files00074.txt'
72f2d1ea8b0393f6f0d2f85c7f30df6a
f8bbe7bb670bb3806ef135dd2ee92a353d677467
describe
'336923' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEN' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
ab6d5f4b180d41979b0e874b82dd5536
78c248711f35b68825137aea3609c1c4cbf05fc7
describe
'234143' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEO' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
a46a5b911062315bae8a618cc983f34f
079bf27cee7fc122bfa2450b408b6b2515482e67
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38124' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEP' 'sip-files00075.pro'
2556357e7fb7e9726815ef8844d185f7
deb9c7f46794f0a8534ddc5f100654ad13a0d252
describe
'83157' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEQ' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
1ada3ac5bbdc35aba64e7311035561f0
47d3949685143d7056899df93e1eb2c3a39b1820
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2707968' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMER' 'sip-files00075.tif'
c3ad59611ca04401998da15169090400
e55d3d188438937defa6fe83bf886800aa8b410f
'2011-09-25T16:13:15-04:00'
describe
'1531' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMES' 'sip-files00075.txt'
b64de77dfa6f2496049dcbf2a8eb06f7
35e46ea08a20b5eb8acc769688312896c56d574c
'2011-09-25T16:12:34-04:00'
describe
'349775' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMET' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
89ef8615fa4491c564ea93f4efbeb036
3a15b9e16a9a4500d99654f28bfb0ecafa700514
describe
'244855' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEU' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
48b49152afdcdb78c3698386a3e5549f
f01bd71cfe53e46f8c19aa602c44818320455f14
'2011-09-25T16:10:38-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40090' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEV' 'sip-files00076.pro'
a078ec3b04e3945ad0e1b0adb2b97d08
9aa3e7ae9d01430e5ec5464cdf7b872763460c56
describe
'84613' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEW' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
cfb3b2c4e8f6e6a0c77f04d31c72ee79
2000d863ad40b3ffcb5ccb7bdd92ff0faf6fb772
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2811624' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEX' 'sip-files00076.tif'
67116d784b1763a74e5bcc52015ceb91
5af39311f10644b0b46c92ea2043f1b79cf1ae8c
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEY' 'sip-files00076.txt'
36607c96d8813c03e1a0eee554d335ae
af911458b868664780daee14acef81fe793b036b
describe
'336821' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMEZ' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
b31168873fd08b20e9cd0d0aaef5d5f4
647e0ce8f5fa93744da148a012ad62978c4884f0
'2011-09-25T16:10:19-04:00'
describe
'228830' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFA' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
ee3436764f06cd4bd505c21a0b2ff906
4e5ea5d3748d6c27d65598bf5ded4c1d640de66c
'2011-09-25T16:05:46-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37639' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFB' 'sip-files00077.pro'
b183f68f0b6b6f2b99448771f7a153df
e3fae41fe040a166b6ffb880152f3207dffbab95
'2011-09-25T16:06:44-04:00'
describe
'85047' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFC' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
ffead81d3a51e76d67051e65e9aa9dd7
b19dc19218e98b76709b35045ee5b1e29678e7c4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2708228' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFD' 'sip-files00077.tif'
f148d48ee129138435bf46581cfa1e11
b2d1a29adcfc0140c63aa298b8a850e4e4ea59ff
'2011-09-25T16:07:05-04:00'
describe
'1553' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFE' 'sip-files00077.txt'
a9a03925da729eadf6987e97caceb0d2
4705aab9df7d9fff7f890d31fdc9e137d66d3df9
'2011-09-25T16:08:55-04:00'
describe
'331442' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFF' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
d05ffd126216ffb577b72c3c059e25ba
3852d8f10697e1ea410e3fc3d410903273994343
describe
'234513' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFG' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
a60fc6759a2576dcc14d5122e01c972b
8fbc5d56e85041a7a08c1c85a0089d2a2a7853ba
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37213' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFH' 'sip-files00078.pro'
255fcd4aa76ea1674ac69d4da242eb9d
a1ffb59b929c854a8395ed4c8e0252883284e6e9
'2011-09-25T16:07:11-04:00'
describe
'85008' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFI' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
40e5bc5a657dd76a7092b8579d11d921
bb78f4525cfdc0ab8091cf216dd7ce9ffb56f575
'2011-09-25T16:10:23-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2664676' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFJ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
bb0b5280309b331fde9a8d412ed0c9d8
5a7437fdbf27dfc874be5a1fe02095f629d03dbd
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFK' 'sip-files00078.txt'
ee421aa10c4ad256aa27b54674669da7
5b8afddee7bfe59b182afc377dafc3be2b561dc1
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFL' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
2b36b2a4018a709c036bd7b898782c55
ddbacb809be90c9b2e91945b7ccbf5dd49e36763
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFM' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
b1b24fd4d585890608ffad4caa35f3de
5b5833a5a55081354a43be406dbde7a881aa4053
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37476' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFN' 'sip-files00079.pro'
01832795854a043f608935eea0f31d03
6935437bb6a186d90fba710bc99b99cfdc7a3736
describe
'85515' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFO' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
a1f53f6149e906280449dd39cd0eb3ba
0952ea4273ca4193ae76bd0cd9c6e29e2b8c1b27
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2707964' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFP' 'sip-files00079.tif'
07c7e63b09f6f8f4b916a8c5dee9d084
7b5bc4aa9e5e1890940cca7d9cae6b0b4b5c67f1
'2011-09-25T16:09:19-04:00'
describe
'1551' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFQ' 'sip-files00079.txt'
1be71ba9e9c26bcd62c3afbe46289607
6740b4d1db881709edf89b0b0cc6869cd2049bbf
'2011-09-25T16:09:05-04:00'
describe
'330828' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFR' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
e078c581e9c040f8d870fa866cd727b8
16325a6c4774dcefdab5a9f29501a4777b2f03bf
'2011-09-25T16:05:09-04:00'
describe
'227674' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFS' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
5d127590e59d06a0dbe677c61459e339
534ddd454fa8720c88f73054804729e291c2145a
'2011-09-25T16:11:41-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34869' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFT' 'sip-files00080.pro'
d8151cac3b38bb3bd6db1ef23695656e
b9d3dabe2e4bc65f50c2ca538feb8e2ce047da8d
'2011-09-25T16:07:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFU' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
0c499a90840335d6676823931232e090
faac2eff43b23ebf0a9dc959d2d54238a9fee888
'2011-09-25T16:05:29-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2659100' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFV' 'sip-files00080.tif'
e16306b9c83e60490538ec400b3e6145
5781abf317b8be89643cb4abfd2569cd9a711c30
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFW' 'sip-files00080.txt'
a253ee7ac6f7c4d5573f586a4cd00f5d
9ab499b8b5fdafb775ab2bce4eca4a0ff7cf7972
'2011-09-25T16:06:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFX' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
2701a247f0d3103b463d85c0fcb705dc
efe6544bf3a9ce8774c26c50e84967e0c802052f
describe
'197595' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFY' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
6706c76baa847b82378af8a55349ab79
fa3a6516ef2f80361a8818073a49e0a4fd812418
'2011-09-25T16:08:52-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'31211' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMFZ' 'sip-files00081.pro'
d6795975d184d7a88319f873d6a4b964
adc404afe9804930a0c78c22c225ec35275c05de
describe
'73059' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGA' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
807b354c53400a5c6ae9fe8306c5fab6
32730d1b9f59b0ac923ba5ea7a834ba4dfdf2ef7
'2011-09-25T16:11:21-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2707372' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGB' 'sip-files00081.tif'
ec823a1439170a1cae2c30fbef86995e
b40616b2314b506f9085ade639c677feb6c32162
describe
'1277' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGC' 'sip-files00081.txt'
2718b23f21cbd81d4946385c4de4cd3d
03125e9302d98308011a8e5f2c70f45029457128
'2011-09-25T16:09:00-04:00'
describe
'329713' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGD' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
82220af71451179c327747a4344f344c
e964f745bf2d63ae94dff32c6e133049aa87730d
'2011-09-25T16:12:40-04:00'
describe
'235454' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGE' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
93bab7df01a3cd1dc745cc6263fc467e
2f7a0bcfe5b884c9891b24ad9f13abcdddf870e2
'2011-09-25T16:06:48-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37746' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGF' 'sip-files00082.pro'
01478c63dce7bc2f72b5b57a35d9711c
edc94f32c477e22a0a4ed8b82e6fb1390cb30bcf
'2011-09-25T16:12:46-04:00'
describe
'85516' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGG' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
85abb303f7c1bfb71d748aed5eeeb53a
ffc03c0dd21441928dda919f0dee9b7dbb2d9050
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2651160' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGH' 'sip-files00082.tif'
6c1eb885da82470769498b6181cd9b2e
288fa1afc014619d70f89a3b4551be29ef3a4aaa
describe
'1505' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGI' 'sip-files00082.txt'
a6b585da328353eccb596434e65ad58c
823f473b8430d42285b3d28d6ce83acb99aecd68
describe
'336870' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGJ' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
7fbaa82a417081bf97c76f525ca682fb
ec304ecf8b215235fe725810ce8b992d29151c9e
'2011-09-25T16:08:30-04:00'
describe
'236093' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGK' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
5d19af58ba685f390adb3447c45a77d3
5b78ccb6693234aa93e363f6b7851fc513cf5897
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38375' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGL' 'sip-files00083.pro'
3b119f39a6d5f46f58b71688e5082b26
f00581edc77c9939e5b04e06ebf16cb3c90989c9
'2011-09-25T16:11:26-04:00'
describe
'84505' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGM' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
5cb44dbc9903817a3e30ebf5ac00f1d8
454e24ed319f947b8767a82ec5dea7a31207b2d7
'2011-09-25T16:08:13-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2708048' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGN' 'sip-files00083.tif'
fc72d52087a3b096021e5e8fc398d8d1
7e0d279fe9e64cd5b67c7a86b2fea1e0d25903c9
describe
'1539' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGO' 'sip-files00083.txt'
1c6cf1598e7cd14c1fdd881cbaec7969
f2752eb5e0cc8fac5759d4525accec14902e9c34
'2011-09-25T16:06:15-04:00'
describe
'338190' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGP' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
4950ef0466f7c626bb07fcb0c609f397
0dcbce8e4fee6b01a1a9439f2d3201a6335f7b24
describe
'257667' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGQ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
adcd3fca457f0b02bdd673e5a3e19669
aec0e17ba75209c20c64ea2cb01e0d092cf3ea2a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40736' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGR' 'sip-files00084.pro'
683e42d31fee2ff808de8009e5f96c12
280c07ec0e5a884698221efd0733be85c8a3ac14
describe
'89417' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGS' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
f58476d8082722e6829739ca9dcd824c
dcad9bd53187f17652bafc8cb45980dbd36ef350
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2718688' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGT' 'sip-files00084.tif'
74464f277e1cc17ff707eb79877f316d
24c3c09568d4176c2ef5fd63351ddac686cd7ae4
'2011-09-25T16:09:43-04:00'
describe
'1617' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGU' 'sip-files00084.txt'
9bc5c499d5228a41d8cd5d56ef458e2c
bc9b0b29ede67bda07c833f8406cc1da7bb7d615
describe
'336880' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGV' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
af2cd39c1caa6a4e5d7b9e2ddf0b9271
c5310ae5438d051566d082bd7e532daa6ac27d9c
'2011-09-25T16:11:19-04:00'
describe
'227559' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGW' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
2b753399019665bb8a4d4ba82a0cceb1
3f67b9950b59b5438682949cbf6f5fb4ceba2c86
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38905' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGX' 'sip-files00085.pro'
f85940ebc53e029b1d4f29fe09e11847
bb7cc85f1b465eae6d0b38bf11c1487ad1c77a04
'2011-09-25T16:04:53-04:00'
describe
'83904' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGY' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
61bec6f5bbc80e4ad2a97ca3792a05b7
af98c2c3d8cb3c4e68194cfdda5f99f9a1aac4a4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2708148' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMGZ' 'sip-files00085.tif'
36aa0953e263550fe7d8d22319ceb4b5
17c316d08f88d60826d9871a9c87cdfa99342425
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHA' 'sip-files00085.txt'
b339316839d282ed576cb0bc1025e0fa
fcaca59493978d787d010db4b661626c9574bbc2
'2011-09-25T16:12:41-04:00'
describe
'338168' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHB' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
797bf93fed2f6267efafc12ba14eda33
8b41bb82f45105c1fc92f9fcc77a8fc6c5156ccd
'2011-09-25T16:10:14-04:00'
describe
'245438' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHC' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
2a6ce794d3e6a10cd0bc204ff26089cf
ec0829ddcfb31b41795e20a0820657cbf9f8132f
'2011-09-25T16:09:22-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39928' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHD' 'sip-files00086.pro'
3956fea4f5260a73a9817614596c5e36
34d3eac3d493f10a5beed30dd7a9d8d7d8c25c9f
describe
'86965' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHE' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
b171b67f9f40c18dd542f1867fe7299a
b2a6ba92dad462c4660bee75b83e79c81d78b22e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2718700' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHF' 'sip-files00086.tif'
877b6a0ef16a1c388af49f74cffefd8b
6d421d264d32afdccb955a40e8a28dc53700e81c
describe
'1589' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHG' 'sip-files00086.txt'
6a1dad5bec4083e295b245abeaf6d6a8
e6d9402b1caf4562a23163f2614719aa8e0d1f1c
'2011-09-25T16:10:13-04:00'
describe
'336908' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHH' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
ab6e29dbc09a4998af8791c00b38f800
b5e5e0e5fe3acddc68e83004ff81a6e9f623e515
'2011-09-25T16:10:30-04:00'
describe
'237135' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHI' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
0015ae387b8b62f592a3235e4fbd1b88
0352308c3cf60c1be1f4a4253d7a036a016d074a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36948' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHJ' 'sip-files00087.pro'
e6c196863ec061b5bed5ce7fe6bf4aed
835f2b138926ecac72a1ec17446cea3569c705e0
describe
'85412' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHK' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
fdcaf3619f009422223d0ab8f831b020
a39fc407ceda5173937f44458a7eb59b76550883
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHL' 'sip-files00087.tif'
11d2f7ee43ee67931c4428a4ec712b61
95f26965a689b195feabf227db6b5717f698b6db
describe
'1521' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHM' 'sip-files00087.txt'
8be5397e0817237f33f5604f265b4cdf
c5f3055c9a8f9e9189fc8e9696e8ce83632851f1
describe
'332121' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHN' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
7982df4230f0a644e2feb7037a9ed69b
23a078a7c5413ba33a208da939e7eb114f5d92f2
'2011-09-25T16:06:52-04:00'
describe
'225743' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHO' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
b651fa25f4f964452e1cb7e1d13698eb
81001e5a0aca3e0855c17a2c8c437af832922a48
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'33973' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHP' 'sip-files00088.pro'
a9ee9e4a7796babe17f2c2b3528b2b4e
57fba9bd0acf0623f9587df3d762a3687c4f98c0
describe
'80257' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHQ' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
ae36d551c681225d1ca942975353be24
ae5456d03b0f3ae76e71503130f3895b7f0e03b1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2670344' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHR' 'sip-files00088.tif'
378fe2641b214fb4ed68ae04a9ad46a1
9d18b91ba6b19c68dac4e047fa2883cae3c78079
'2011-09-25T16:11:55-04:00'
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHS' 'sip-files00088.txt'
a6a7816fc5af9c5bcb60c789966273b8
913bd5ded46577ce2ac786de02f14dac1c9ac7ce
'2011-09-25T16:07:04-04:00'
describe
'318890' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHT' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
9d3d77a75bc861380094b87caa96f381
daaed385046f3d19523c166789f0b00fea52f9a9
'2011-09-25T16:12:27-04:00'
describe
'235482' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHU' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
a2a5e99ff5179106a62d036d839dfda3
c2f7a07b1f33bb9166fb37a0b146563018bc7861
'2011-09-25T16:09:39-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36272' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHV' 'sip-files00089.pro'
3b6fd829741375627f47d08bdaa069cc
35cebf38bc37233eea943ebc4fdbef9f8b8f2b53
describe
'89249' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHW' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
68e19b050396c4c85fc20837b4e80cce
958dad96edd0af6f0adcba4d5ae3980953d6788c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2565080' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHX' 'sip-files00089.tif'
992858d4b382a71b637e15d60ec95864
9fd857e44319af2cef4da93022a160ae8d96e31c
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHY' 'sip-files00089.txt'
4dd60419eab7cb6afc778b2096f78db5
71391616bbbbfb0e3262176c2d558cdbeb749add
'2011-09-25T16:07:26-04:00'
describe
'349852' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMHZ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
90135aed2ec176c13b6752fafab65cdb
5174d7d60d51676dcbb9d69afb40fb77574aa1dc
describe
'238762' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIA' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
cf70d7088a33006a651fb864db84a23c
a378eea6d277b2336f8b0d1c4a98c11df4d26ebf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39696' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIB' 'sip-files00090.pro'
38cca5af7da1809e350dd34175f33266
dddcb7b830d2b29c83c2ce3d63195eae5beca653
'2011-09-25T16:09:28-04:00'
describe
'84133' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIC' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
7ca9f2134441f943a60b38e664ca3de8
71b5c8c0bf36fc1b919cc9945c88619a69a513bb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMID' 'sip-files00090.tif'
89859605f3db15a68b85f783564c295c
72d760c5adf862f6aa8e699c20476b0766204274
describe
'1579' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIE' 'sip-files00090.txt'
2260c11b897c76f2aa9041e459baac2a
8170dd7300377601a47de585a7d38eb891e6937b
describe
'336903' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIF' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
d226ceff9f70e107ffb2cd38f4ff14ff
3b4b0669686796e4ae639c65314ac3c73a9c11e4
describe
'197896' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIG' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
205fe111e3285b2e47eba875065445bd
ee7f656b25fa13536e1e1cebe4e6c700f2547bf5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28721' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIH' 'sip-files00091.pro'
6139f33e0ecc39a0bf290c983b854660
dc48f79eb491257987fb1ff2ce6d585414e5a245
'2011-09-25T16:07:50-04:00'
describe
'69837' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMII' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
a675219843e47819a70f799b1080ec15
936db2dd35f8bc67626db96aa89e3e46e4722151
'2011-09-25T16:07:55-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2707120' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIJ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
a66b35fc81e6b0f1c1aceac098ffe06f
84f32b77edab3cf9f9e6c12ba81ef2a5db97f1e2
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIK' 'sip-files00091.txt'
9a0100db4c15b842ba922b15442039be
fc13c6457c1a71c1834206f264fdffb112f21a2d
describe
'349815' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIL' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
4ca997834f0cc63b392a03043692854c
2d2f1c026ddc2cbb8625f259d55051591b5865ac
describe
'246497' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIM' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
c8e217b1e2ece2821e0ef0e47deaf299
ed49322567e20a0c95c40a2c6381ed8a54bd5176
'2011-09-25T16:10:12-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40038' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIN' 'sip-files00092.pro'
3a1d029f3fce7514c4d6604a52210cfb
79847e322e0f0d61db9771d2d77155025ff95b64
describe
'85909' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIO' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
9e0f99c562d68449f637efb47520fd38
7684142a14c45271289b8db14a89578896cba8b7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2811520' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIP' 'sip-files00092.tif'
ba14f611d31f4455cd2345ade0a60d8c
1e149f14aa2f21770ac2bcbe03e612f77d494666
'2011-09-25T16:06:12-04:00'
describe
'1569' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIQ' 'sip-files00092.txt'
31a9a904e827c083f19993936a6e4386
338dbe45228acaf6a443e4ad08537fed35c8e972
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIR' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
be2866f4aec19d69a5ab2469a2b42629
47a2c5e7a9d3a1f8f7659ac3d9a3bdcdac12dba6
'2011-09-25T16:06:37-04:00'
describe
'207780' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIS' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
f73f2d6d9e0155c87a9d4359d59d29d3
f814e5e1bdc50592deb17da1218a89c8f25a0f5f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34418' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIT' 'sip-files00093.pro'
11895f2d280942797c206694f0508b74
5133c1596a08dfae456f362bc6de911515e0d080
'2011-09-25T16:05:32-04:00'
describe
'75809' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIU' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
1abc8e48c9775e2ce10f069b8d44b296
9b8f2dff675a24bedf356876681f56238633e512
'2011-09-25T16:07:53-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2707444' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIV' 'sip-files00093.tif'
d3b4b1f761d6f9b6dbd0f67376f519de
5955186c3478f02cbeca5645ebcf55332216f3e8
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIW' 'sip-files00093.txt'
55ad12e978ced9ce9e9479f9b9f586cf
fec3ba3c63e1d89d2f647924a054afe66d1454bb
'2011-09-25T16:08:07-04:00'
describe
'349813' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIX' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
3de72e5274f92fcce38809d1b503721c
4cb4ee3f7e67d4db1507a76a8520479e5c3ac55d
'2011-09-25T16:11:25-04:00'
describe
'66877' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIY' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
d0174f3490e8f80ed663ae8b268c9eab
ad1c6e4a6363dba86f4ad764e305c95e348f09d4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'782' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMIZ' 'sip-files00094.pro'
8aba1b31659f2fb04c536a9f6273d29f
ca20047afd87018c3f7316071ed6236e9fd0c91d
describe
'23554' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJA' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
b38cb0384ec8a0d96fc21d20a9160025
33feae7801991f4a1743523e70d0649a2179d10a
'2011-09-25T16:07:09-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2806952' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJB' 'sip-files00094.tif'
6e8dd8bf547c267e3876fd98a43ef86e
dc810adea5c856879136b6e360fd7cfff7acb4ad
describe
'59' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJC' 'sip-files00094.txt'
ab35c992fde80c8a54ad856856e664c5
c9b8e255409e6a08a0d974c77c172d6a5aca65ac
describe
'341295' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJD' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
05c51f61a953075b5463e0a9c9111a38
a9de0146b77f5bd6cd2d527dfcc74baa7bfcf277
describe
'217743' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJE' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
2eed5f07a08ad79bb8c9af9ccc48e03e
dc40536243c0889a021b76bfaabffc57ac6718f1
'2011-09-25T16:10:27-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3955' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJF' 'sip-files00095.pro'
7e6127b761fe8d0ff16023ea3b665ebe
c511c03096261905a03f12316acd4f75be31fe82
describe
'64833' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJG' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
9ad768ce7b7229cfa54fee334caf5016
45bb385d904f6a30cc9bba54273fccc94a61bcf8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2742464' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJH' 'sip-files00095.tif'
1352b3ef688c36e140503b3079b9d22e
d75dec75390d4ca790186008a1b69d9f9a8643fa
describe
'249' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJI' 'sip-files00095.txt'
9542aa822348098694da7729e839ff0e
6a35070d85b218b9a4606ef751dbd723fc501327
describe
'334886' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJJ' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
59ba56043b2b9a097eeb2ef787d29c75
29f5205984bc6132f8724a1e54f44f18f3863886
'2011-09-25T16:13:11-04:00'
describe
'191667' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJK' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
c2b9d6ad088a23665af41d856eeb4f7c
63ad602a3be7808cc010b09a8ed3db09a5787b56
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26980' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJL' 'sip-files00096.pro'
39d1873a755f8a3f1dfcf3656616dbcf
264c4e13048b0a582fd8830675e31b6d51bcf6d3
'2011-09-25T16:08:12-04:00'
describe
'67057' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJM' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
3a126fbfc945f2299d79788e349692e0
a82d3d853143f6707daca558a543a5161035155f
'2011-09-25T16:07:29-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2691240' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJN' 'sip-files00096.tif'
dc07fe5419da21371ee7ebfceaa21fe1
95072dc48f8b6f1a016bedeea5dafd7d87065dfa
'2011-09-25T16:09:26-04:00'
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJO' 'sip-files00096.txt'
fadca5e353245adf25bdb94752bcd7a6
394300c66980322397e46a2af5ed54df02be430f
describe
'341277' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJP' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
ebec58cdd2621d6f98d6ce7a1011502a
773dd99341a6a74b05dcbbaada7189d05a619f79
'2011-09-25T16:09:12-04:00'
describe
'223905' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJQ' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
a52571cde4b90de5f576c6ede1d1ec93
de40aabdae0b076ba9a8e608b9005e95c1d90c2f
'2011-09-25T16:05:33-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37507' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJR' 'sip-files00097.pro'
f8c464afe1f36854cca4992172052e85
ea37aae2b1db2de3b18e19099bae9e965dfe9cb2
describe
'81512' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJS' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
5bcf1bb6a611155a2d8dfb6585f68569
bbfd7357e6a6082cb3fe3491c163eca9e9d5ad50
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2743424' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJT' 'sip-files00097.tif'
4c76141baae7fc231b2eb7dfad01bc81
936a8633448e93c589854aafd8a5baee6cebe700
'2011-09-25T16:05:18-04:00'
describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJU' 'sip-files00097.txt'
1bfdde7804f9d92617137ca8b9b569f7
8878afe8f186c6f5752164d9cf4ccd7d08580f9c
'2011-09-25T16:08:46-04:00'
describe
'340140' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJV' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
94a4b4fdfab6681c7578b9b326b9d9de
8f25dd14828dd9766b7d5c242393e574e74ad26d
'2011-09-25T16:12:15-04:00'
describe
'241048' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJW' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
a35d7a3e2b7caadf88c9f9d786cd74e1
22bad2052554d7fd171bffec0f4dcd9153b8682d
'2011-09-25T16:08:49-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37690' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJX' 'sip-files00098.pro'
473c818210fbeb7235752eb941e79807
892c8025f00ba8356b4b5f32be0a8a0a80d52094
describe
'85761' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJY' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
8b23402deb45879535a174fe7973e1ea
f0d6373874c24f844de9480b290400b2c98b7868
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2734536' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMJZ' 'sip-files00098.tif'
284b33f6190fdfbec6ef98f5f45e08e8
750c8928f8114a93eae2ade9cbac5be728dd0a44
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKA' 'sip-files00098.txt'
2667a1bad642d5433a3c3e8a0102f7b6
0c2a508ef9fbe218b2609591da139e10e8a350d3
describe
'341344' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKB' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
9e0e7cc30ea08f359aceaeb6a57d2644
eb60ba77c81a39746b139163555a6c9f64be7a2b
describe
'235763' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKC' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
74b988285398a87f5a2af532dda30ece
1fb3f5ed6e06ff175d2847d358dd11716d605ba1
'2011-09-25T16:07:34-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38344' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKD' 'sip-files00099.pro'
2ed5922fea7a9313ac72e2f89ab0ff78
3237207758011982d9f97b89044ada44e059a338
describe
'82114' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKE' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
a12303af7fa18b0404fde3eb8a12f940
f1447df4f22e83e7f3c61afddda168fd679935fe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2743268' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKF' 'sip-files00099.tif'
a17a42c3ef63d2292c5e27a72c4ffa4a
31bed5ec7fc05608b4eea875d6e3e647ce3e814b
'2011-09-25T16:08:54-04:00'
describe
'1519' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKG' 'sip-files00099.txt'
2c1924cc50ba0e5c4bc8fda79a76bdd9
eed71a101ab2c39f21b860c3f855caf9c3f67fc5
describe
'339188' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKH' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
99b7963419cebeef9dc962efe38d80b1
ff29c078470b7f4e7741d1aae09086257390436d
describe
'246705' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKI' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
5334d88938e08a305d58a24ccbbfb4eb
71bd66028d447af331f51e5d5bfa5fc2c3382b0f
'2011-09-25T16:11:43-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKJ' 'sip-files00100.pro'
fda5e99f2a9d1e5e1b6ba604819edb0a
ff31056898b22ba04097ed9a9145f74cf42a5c3e
describe
'87181' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKK' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
ff798ec3257df5adee23f8e3df363eb5
eb6c34cad0db07411b3153b2d9eaea502530e9bd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2726308' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKL' 'sip-files00100.tif'
b00305b21a4f8ff35c28cf0204b06885
919890cc8121fa129a626682155e1ed385de6578
'2011-09-25T16:12:19-04:00'
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKM' 'sip-files00100.txt'
39bededfddff4c6ac32c00945cd29ada
13bb1921bc2785ed28ac0eb840c7edafe96f754c
describe
'321188' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKN' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
acc6599a4ab2493952deabced2f76202
27966a4c4ad57fd6307c4586eaa2be9346d3d2f8
describe
'223169' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKO' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
ca7c76eb9f026d79b156940e4484d49b
1d9d5ddc9b3ecf8de434e62b5bd6a61d1002d3bd
'2011-09-25T16:06:07-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35224' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKP' 'sip-files00101.pro'
fd8b23dbe2d94cf66d9590c7389eb8e0
3381d31bbdcfc8b62b1f6313211dc8461712ba60
describe
'80951' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKQ' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
5663451d16d40c61bce29f23680445f0
d077e950afcaaf04d7fae09c0aec1ffa30f7d523
'2011-09-25T16:08:39-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2582000' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKR' 'sip-files00101.tif'
f0e8b664c7b56189e194e26d703b66b8
1f6b14fee238a1926a85484f332471c74889713d
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKS' 'sip-files00101.txt'
1a236bd93bc41611f34a4d7c6fbf6e9a
0815d3e38ac601359d85ad4d83bdaea32aad12b6
describe
'322674' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKT' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
51cc78545ad6e3d2d00ebd74e31f3e35
ed09eafaed2dcfb7112c30c0d4c50619e53dc899
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKU' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
c3f1f16340d1f697703ef93c036e4cb8
691920209667fad64214e55e300011a15d2d4aa3
'2011-09-25T16:10:20-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36738' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKV' 'sip-files00102.pro'
7c17a31725351bfa0e82010b51c2ea07
cc8b9d75243f81cf598ea888462330bb60e53285
describe
'88321' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKW' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
0a1f6b810c917eb0fe4aee24b2dbefe2
d6472290d208a5b0091d85b7257cffdc941cd3c8
'2011-09-25T16:12:31-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2595560' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKX' 'sip-files00102.tif'
d33d65e77616ad51e7b9a7af128de82c
f9ccda595cba53bf4bd5412e0cccc5e723a1f612
'2011-09-25T16:09:35-04:00'
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKY' 'sip-files00102.txt'
a49f38f6c982fbfe09627f3c3dc11718
054262df3bff693cd2718727af618c4f588fa67b
'2011-09-25T16:11:29-04:00'
describe
'341366' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMKZ' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
649d90438dd3cad92dd86af7899cd623
f7e585e3741c363923258dc5f1813724a8fb97d0
describe
'239500' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLA' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
e6b705f31c31950d3f6e0d17e4992593
8712e202a1f8227aad051bc0146c1dff9736cd52
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39425' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLB' 'sip-files00103.pro'
57be09f556f32622ddc89fc667ac8f59
14b16bdbf5603ffe98d0737efe9c0c7af053bc43
describe
'83777' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLC' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
54a3d3f01552df1fe3405ea24efd9813
22bf0290f9050319bfc96ce3ee3d2c03a5e38afb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2743388' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLD' 'sip-files00103.tif'
1edab0fdf9b0e1fa0e7675a865e96b34
e67e7bd895b5f70b59bf8002c41787549ae6fe2a
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLE' 'sip-files00103.txt'
281192411ab6ffee6429352112bf4d43
ce421667286fa268160726e1f57f104e3122eb62
'2011-09-25T16:06:16-04:00'
describe
'327442' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLF' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
c729b2e145885260a916475932c101db
73a9933d8f092039cb2ff9990dfc378577dba93e
describe
'258545' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLG' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
e9817ce58940fa1fb48ae9407e615165
d289620f592c8a683e76e65ec1a2833a8aff317d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38760' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLH' 'sip-files00104.pro'
8ea20610d633cb3ff2330e9950c6530d
d5629fd30cb02aef7b59d06eea26ac351f1fddfa
'2011-09-25T16:09:16-04:00'
describe
'90251' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLI' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
ccea128189be225c25b6f46295e3344a
d13d67ae7d26bc3074861782021b0c1c0eb992f9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2633740' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLJ' 'sip-files00104.tif'
b27acc4d75df967f1630f46ef60c0e73
976d1313ee63f62ae651f3a3f8198e8ffc9c4073
describe
'1584' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLK' 'sip-files00104.txt'
74d0b19517dc7e175100b1882a780e2a
150988c3b0d53b8e7650edbe6dd4ec70b0d3ed3a
describe
'317296' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLL' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
4910d2c3e9a23cb625821258913f726c
f787553aa405132c12a3fae1f1bb3155ba756dc5
describe
'224671' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLM' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
e7226eed264c6345938cc07c305e48ae
cb412659ec779f2aeca0e2b883aa306a43cbcea1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35301' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLN' 'sip-files00105.pro'
2837f040b9174d21d26916962f67df19
db0bd7ee54ac59cff752d2b69499e78476350ba9
describe
'82523' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLO' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
deac4e3df463721a2749ecf129488eb1
254b94cb59583ce69661ec1d778a42278da07bd5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2550916' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLP' 'sip-files00105.tif'
56677ec2fc748f564cd538acd4d0f330
9ecd48ae6de27b79c8ff41c6e3442fa4da8529fb
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLQ' 'sip-files00105.txt'
3a8ae7152e7c1e9465e7748be0d519af
3077ea6b304198dbd292bcd3e1ad6d8ffd7cb656
describe
'324910' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLR' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
f6a13a676cb2f73fc0dd5ea615830112
487d3ddc1442263b241896c80aa7776825c79878
describe
'240464' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLS' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
a27dd2ddb47e60ba21e3dcb5733c453a
352b1f087ebb6490ee6381f9e03f18192ea17ce9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36187' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLT' 'sip-files00106.pro'
9fc95532a1d989411cab01144a6a5bb3
7a25c7ce792a65d2d6a640cc6ee6810b37a8cc7b
describe
'87704' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLU' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
f225c7aa00a0883749909d2ade7a5c3a
07059a767c4341be05b1fd27af3e08f808df489c
'2011-09-25T16:12:01-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2612188' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLV' 'sip-files00106.tif'
67e87206ca65eee5983a4786a2503fce
70b7a804c1d382da79ef1e98adc1b671b5b2f6e9
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLW' 'sip-files00106.txt'
3bc2bb816ab42755ad05b900161e0f87
6856b8fb11b05464ce2b66398933bd513d211aa4
'2011-09-25T16:10:35-04:00'
describe
'341319' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLX' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
24386394d369f8907acf2bc7fbd39e51
6907ad7bd1901cb798423ec2ba37ac770870b1ea
describe
'225312' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLY' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
4c288e6f73ce4c76e52494647ced3d73
211bd99b83d5b6752a0522238a82f752a95651c0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35835' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMLZ' 'sip-files00107.pro'
2308f5ffb1974045fe0734f2f84ad3df
2c70675e73153be3c8ac03ef9e4b00dade19eb88
describe
'78908' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMA' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
90c5b546ab73184cbf26a0374a94af58
58ea9d1353ce83f61da4412becb54293da237f78
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2742884' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMB' 'sip-files00107.tif'
970641bf84d7507c5d8fd50272ea039c
f3e36d46785f1f448d804aa33079ed309b2db181
describe
'1420' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMC' 'sip-files00107.txt'
ad5ab7d6c2e5d8bb1cfef84620647446
d421be5b9f242fa715b6e07681a5281780289df7
'2011-09-25T16:11:05-04:00'
describe
'324331' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMD' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
5df617d4121ee7bad13bf27c1b846ee9
3de5d85ed585d6696c0728f6288cb069bce93809
describe
'248190' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMME' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
a180066060f135f810844d6096e49355
4623de3ed7fac153a82eafcaee7feff857acacd7
'2011-09-25T16:07:46-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMF' 'sip-files00108.pro'
344c3be998408fc637a406def6c4b61a
96118e52a34e20cb2c9b2539f629baadae3c2353
'2011-09-25T16:10:52-04:00'
describe
'85327' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMG' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
df5335afb4ab955dea2d03d62c3952a7
9e7e7ef60115c45731459800424ab967b42fe204
'2011-09-25T16:05:03-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2607332' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMH' 'sip-files00108.tif'
800e46243a6c14caa39dcd3e0989ed08
9e7686698805f158684d873ca63b5d07adc4ebb2
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMI' 'sip-files00108.txt'
8456fa25ee71dda5b93b5ca890d5441c
fbb24742b00524d54885e3142aba3315e45ab9ae
describe
'341352' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMJ' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
46dfae8f803170ae818cca543abdc06e
33ec8c0e2715922879cee6e3ece3315b676b1632
describe
'219444' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMK' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
b83a6ba5c3c76296a8861d70b9f7b4a5
5e9c4749b5c5936b57dfa8a176f84bd89fc7b031
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34533' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMML' 'sip-files00109.pro'
a5be01d906a375b55e3c346820b77e18
039e621d7e3387db90e3a94068a757e2617163ec
'2011-09-25T16:10:26-04:00'
describe
'79106' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMM' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
342e5a34c0e9a5107b5d179f07727fa3
a176583b4bc456415b54ee8209c46dc4776f27ff
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2743036' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMN' 'sip-files00109.tif'
1107d7357cfde40bdfa21aed06bd4bdf
9188391cb3e09861131de5c4a536710d76eb85e9
'2011-09-25T16:07:39-04:00'
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMO' 'sip-files00109.txt'
fb97967b406390b4ec396822e724d7b2
53da2638e2ee7ec652a4b9ac3255b45c3e751df1
'2011-09-25T16:07:21-04:00'
describe
'324606' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMP' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
97ad9dfd74b7e589836e5c0ad884e67f
5a342a70e1f048fee0e1235cda3a02868d45abfd
describe
'199639' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMQ' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
f80eba6e96234625bdb25b1a660b6ec6
e57aae1d61abeb556f40f7af759a00df84b6ee00
'2011-09-25T16:05:08-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27633' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMR' 'sip-files00110.pro'
945b46a9e4119a6815ba6a2615c39395
8a9085e09bc00b722ebec6b1b652ee0e3ded61fa
describe
'71009' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMS' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
7e5d9912b7efb525760743d4d1aa194d
b52789ea316c582d08e54c5e959518deefdd62ae
'2011-09-25T16:10:50-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2609460' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMT' 'sip-files00110.tif'
3c69ff827dad2779425e9796783c9c4f
3b29ab61d1ecbc8e57db754ad21b50f059a49d47
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMU' 'sip-files00110.txt'
8165a38530f4f63e4888566cdedb34ec
2228bd977900e7f9b28025e0a644f0d282d99dbf
describe
'341285' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMV' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
a3d8e6c3a179392890a0bfe0eef1b8c6
a69478d2d069cefc518e97ba1fa5438c9ed3e20b
describe
'230125' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMW' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
4dcbc90e4adc6e194db6c4a488719309
09aa1c451d4dd9f4babb5b3e5724b33f50b45e8e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36681' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMX' 'sip-files00111.pro'
680a07a250eb6a89b18dbb761acb6278
0c011a9fc3b9ef75b5b5e3f6ead6ed905720bc28
describe
'79730' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMY' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
26d69e53e647f04fa48e949cf986eadb
447eb2934d28c46fbb1434c2fcf66ca3a6758af7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2743132' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMMZ' 'sip-files00111.tif'
39067b8fa8f665bc0a88767a9fca80f6
bebdd9c0f193266179b44672690fff3edef42210
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNA' 'sip-files00111.txt'
c36cee5645d6e52e69b805ec69bf2bb4
20ba817840b44b5a7555f2dc4aab422ba83cbf59
'2011-09-25T16:06:50-04:00'
describe
'325812' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNB' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
fe3a3faaa1264420467479a6331ff5fe
4980fe8cf625f317e023ff42931a60e08b2c452b
describe
'241033' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNC' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
27949131f8cb4117e6f5146ed85db83d
1021156e00715a6d5f637246bd9780d0b4baf3b3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36683' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMND' 'sip-files00112.pro'
6293818fba85803428924ea9083c9a3a
5d1bd1353b9189589c7fc54a0cbf34fb4e4d8b0d
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNE' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
8e4b19e5cdac19649c13062c2c1579c5
511e0978a45271910a46bc883ade3cad41cfc3ad
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2619760' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNF' 'sip-files00112.tif'
3b2a55ddd5605ae246ec2c64a64c5156
a4cd3d7e9645267d016ae2742e695c4b68e1049b
'2011-09-25T16:08:24-04:00'
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNG' 'sip-files00112.txt'
8d52b4338ebe203f6395bee950e0613b
a362aca8b4d3c9349cdcbf4d40349fbdd6164c47
'2011-09-25T16:06:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNH' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
25b4d2650adb6e7547d0fdf953e25840
6d2d58b419021e82dcdfa867b0ee60cd65201e79
'2011-09-25T16:11:14-04:00'
describe
'218705' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNI' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
66613280c8f26ca98ebee222db64891b
1922f0766c5a2c68ccf6b5e0e609c11ca65d4175
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35190' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNJ' 'sip-files00113.pro'
a2148109a1d04270144ec689bfa94a8c
465f6e5310bd6cde93d612191b69aab7b3d46d85
'2011-09-25T16:09:59-04:00'
describe
'78840' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNK' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
fbfeee874fe594ffc8cfb3db36301017
57d7ea016985098cfd00d3d8a2422b016fcc37cb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2743368' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNL' 'sip-files00113.tif'
4a034bae51a08f9c878760f9daa5a5f6
6c40a085b744df3d6bbf441e62e56a1605bfe02c
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNM' 'sip-files00113.txt'
e212ce7e70dfdc1cfd09d634f8f5c99b
173ae021a832425876266ef01c0b01c68a97557b
'2011-09-25T16:08:51-04:00'
describe
'322743' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNN' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
a8985c142e0850c75ba63e91374fadf5
8eb744565622378c6c03c198c8aa680cc1aafedf
'2011-09-25T16:05:20-04:00'
describe
'239220' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNO' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
181edba378cc990e3ab2e933f1d6b788
78a852e1794f3748981e7099f46866063ddfe5d6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36193' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNP' 'sip-files00114.pro'
45005cb9d59ea368e65e5b7b71b2ebab
4f9f97b679dbab635a841c49fb0db6ae2e520c97
describe
'86240' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNQ' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
2acb520395f918d9ab800cc520773602
70c059c1853dd2973f6e5bf80e8be458222ad568
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2594840' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNR' 'sip-files00114.tif'
ff04df6ee8f1742a724328acdfc8ba99
ceeaf2d9ca0b41d4422b44567d5b92cd008c8fb6
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNS' 'sip-files00114.txt'
a8d5da0970a31dee37b0e7d1d5ef92ea
973ea8ae6bfa3c506828a1bf38dc62586f618a34
describe
'320677' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNT' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
0ee341b4c7698873982fabad4b2cc31e
ae718bb2c9e41f941f206783151646390a7d5cfc
describe
'264937' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNU' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
6f69ab20c9114ebbaf412befff80f369
e48e557af95e406748cf8742cdd003f70dcc1e64
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'41988' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNV' 'sip-files00115.pro'
86e03dc964df3e83153e81a399481834
f3fdf9b02cf6cac7c6b3346206b3075e96613806
'2011-09-25T16:05:24-04:00'
describe
'90265' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNW' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
e05545e52fb0efbd2adda7a80a583006
d87b9d68bdac648f47c852f4fac738ad3f66eb30
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2578856' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNX' 'sip-files00115.tif'
fb1ee76b6f9e2a15e60f39d142221395
cc6a029b7f8a07b2f3e113ec038d75629ea6f38b
describe
'1644' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNY' 'sip-files00115.txt'
68895e0bd39a4e741181b542fb973ff5
f8ebb588615342f44b9c19c192b340ba57e51b98
'2011-09-25T16:12:23-04:00'
describe
'339196' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMNZ' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
4f5fbc48d5f1ee6760fe022c94f0e302
e7fe5477157ee0ec6807f0dec6b07e7dbe8ea752
'2011-09-25T16:09:46-04:00'
describe
'246997' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOA' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
2018dec76c520d76cc9edb1a52d4309e
7bad5e028cfb69f90270cf6bb64bebf7512426a3
'2011-09-25T16:09:10-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38676' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOB' 'sip-files00116.pro'
af95e730a6dae8af1e95448967502a0b
41f73105585c99173f51f94955dc36f14115aff1
describe
'85212' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOC' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
36507fedcdbf96e92fe33905db084623
e6ab2914d362466f67320e90d334d2946852e4b2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2726136' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOD' 'sip-files00116.tif'
606b0054c430ce520e3bc5bbf7dbb453
af61b5ccc46b303a28dcb22dd0a04c1eda783e01
'2011-09-25T16:11:49-04:00'
describe
'1538' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOE' 'sip-files00116.txt'
f98b2cf7f892ebb570b809bdb54d5601
1f3fb36879b6479c4af1a00566c8f56a823e96a2
describe
'341360' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOF' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
c41cb78cfffc116279aa0ab210814810
729178c466f596bb0522ff04597f4c1e22249a15
'2011-09-25T16:12:17-04:00'
describe
'232567' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOG' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
5b42316ce10d7221d113cbdc71551cf6
40bc5d5b36e456c4f9bbb458b2fa44f43bdb30c8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39273' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOH' 'sip-files00117.pro'
d527ea3cdae5a79d0cd06469c93f733a
e656d7d8a2fbda7628aa6fc5e681751963ed6d8c
describe
'82651' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOI' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
ec3ae2313d895f10831ed6459fea5223
08ecd2a6dd758532a82f6b5349b0ee4855b3af37
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2743584' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOJ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
59a223e5a4a820d64db7fc4ea8bed37d
c995aa42b8db28a443caf245f1fdc9cd6a936c2b
describe
'1571' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOK' 'sip-files00117.txt'
91c83e43364787f39fa44b4b87551cd8
dbab0bf59113c1768bf8871f134d127d0a387d0f
describe
'339065' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOL' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
29a87441a3caeaa0e2099ead58f6d4b8
733ab7837e9258cd78ec6f2275e8dfb29c1550a0
'2011-09-25T16:13:19-04:00'
describe
'239815' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOM' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
8ebcd5b5dae47101b38e0335ec01cb6d
1ccfa974935d54c9a8aa5b4b7080ccd7e0acd79c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38926' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMON' 'sip-files00118.pro'
98d6c7dd3ab530d35ee5e698c2513699
7957aca9c34d4b42e4a81f7df7cc1aa7abce7e57
describe
'86468' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOO' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
8235a897c18d87d758dbb795f97b52ce
48a10d60bf09184c61132b5d4dd974f8d3e39aa2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2726180' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOP' 'sip-files00118.tif'
170dbe36643b63be30b31e055f50cf0c
178e424903381ea10fe5d52079052a64d622eaeb
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOQ' 'sip-files00118.txt'
ce0bc89320f95c9cfa2ec7070b3a50b4
79623b5a756449f15280ff8dcaafb2094484edd6
'2011-09-25T16:05:12-04:00'
describe
'341364' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOR' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
8bfab2a16fffe939ad7be5e0c21659ad
ca6192803398cfbe25ae6ebc41b54727ae70c00e
describe
'214257' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOS' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
b9a0cb1879e72abd17f5ff13239987b0
00e4e73173d39dc8cc3bbb4cd218697216261bb8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'32374' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOT' 'sip-files00119.pro'
60cb7890dbf98a55f833a5c743059e5f
aaf0dc5c0dbceab3d3d609599486b1504dbe8192
describe
'73835' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOU' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
bfb4f1d898cc46cd6a4f2164d50f5148
de5b01993ea326ad8810697753bc0e4c418de9f0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2742616' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOV' 'sip-files00119.tif'
b2289e5717bede41cdeb6a1c6cecdc17
65bf4c13a58825e5c649ddb25016d07818c75104
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOW' 'sip-files00119.txt'
c83e35e8772a3f386916cdca3dd60d51
cc0724791a5229b7bdab0e44e82fe1bb621ab0a8
'2011-09-25T16:12:24-04:00'
describe
'349746' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOX' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
99eacae7779ae76e9142ef6eb9fccf96
e27ac48ddb681f305fc390dbfbd643458d383a55
'2011-09-25T16:10:45-04:00'
describe
'211309' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOY' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
4cd76566b1f06604a136ed4954dc6004
6a14b5c092b394f83b828111e9e4b0dbe6b0f96c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'31277' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMOZ' 'sip-files00120.pro'
833115e6cf98ee1b3c243de6d3b0aa84
321888633f5428f1fad2db4bd1fc0556615429c8
'2011-09-25T16:11:03-04:00'
describe
'72025' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPA' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
80f44328a590795a53a2aabd98575d75
8b85b72b642669d9e101facd6619485db7ed36a4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2810880' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPB' 'sip-files00120.tif'
08cb12cc2cf2625f976b2e13df34d321
70b9d97d7d1e6c3008383799b14ff0e07d26ad83
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPC' 'sip-files00120.txt'
e1660bc17de484768c910e6729ab6328
29d4658800cea6dae56eaa1969830cfac1ddafbd
describe
'341359' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPD' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
d4e0b86b7e3c4f232334198a950808b1
da9747e93662e2d829e899f87a08b847c34bfe12
describe
'222626' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPE' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
75114b0863c2564e4140efa85b7e3574
96840375a8f84be19237822c6095a766d139b03a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35903' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPF' 'sip-files00121.pro'
0e45a1c393a102cee3549c0fc795e09f
5cec6df5df6d0c6ad71596441b974db20dc54a1b
'2011-09-25T16:10:10-04:00'
describe
'80445' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPG' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
9cc363bca77e9513487a07c969fbec7d
c087e143085f00470d07de242b749bfcf9cbf2df
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPH' 'sip-files00121.tif'
847e3c1bc1d6a04b315e5fea4682ceb1
9fcdf79892d4bf5155d9c72394c3fcb57567f8af
describe
'1422' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPI' 'sip-files00121.txt'
a20208d78f63df0053dec361419c7d58
9f68632975bbdbe7a86f979d2f2dbb1c18a42464
describe
'333702' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPJ' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
f612bfee820c935a637a43483b44ad6f
b95b8d93174ff13f2d71c53d8e612c740325f987
'2011-09-25T16:04:57-04:00'
describe
'228522' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPK' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
522d521892a35005cacf616675b11229
46991c4b9108f22398cd3970da8a96284cfae3b8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34562' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPL' 'sip-files00122.pro'
fbcab7716a4f4d09a9f6c1fbad9154e6
327828ca6cb1912f5544c8e83c58dee668f51949
describe
'83427' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPM' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
839c44e1dbadcd053e7c0cfad2cc8990
f3eeb9e6f5e927255ec099d923d4d568c75b1d9e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2682732' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPN' 'sip-files00122.tif'
324ec706bb877ba0d9c05280607d737b
6af24242cec948353c8e70841583138025d73f68
'2011-09-25T16:06:34-04:00'
describe
'1426' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPO' 'sip-files00122.txt'
dcfd68a63fc1466933f6b3cadbb536e2
e9b9157f9414f148c5b9470ba13a85cc3a9b5a5b
'2011-09-25T16:05:02-04:00'
describe
'341288' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPP' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
9a5e25c76222114ffbabf61624f4bdcd
0bd4aacdaf3186671afa654f6b4b5d1cb962ae8e
describe
'221851' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPQ' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
a252f0104b6017e12188b0b336530839
ee8a37b0cbf8bf0028cf8729512a2d992cbf6de9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34300' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPR' 'sip-files00123.pro'
3519ed39072d01800d57be6d94a62bac
fa8b602d866633591f55f35b9ba799471d7933c6
'2011-09-25T16:08:57-04:00'
describe
'78455' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPS' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
1c4a0536d43ec1979659e2fe818b7787
0a1a304a56e49bf3a066052f9664fabc7f8b0583
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2743012' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPT' 'sip-files00123.tif'
457b8f0fc1612b373a984cc4d5f2a24b
d016acd0cde5b88475ce6da376fe7997ae56a4b9
'2011-09-25T16:08:44-04:00'
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPU' 'sip-files00123.txt'
2f265f8acb3cf3750340da58dd7be9a1
68dc02dc8faf327859a654bfa051171848b261a0
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPV' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
758fc3e63114fe531f1a206d05bc4ac9
21c595e9ed15ff23ede16afffe87aca85cf59611
'2011-09-25T16:09:25-04:00'
describe
'224097' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPW' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
398db8d78d6d33678ede5c825597115e
03416655d6441095280c812bf441ed08fcb7caac
'2011-09-25T16:09:33-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34544' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPX' 'sip-files00124.pro'
d51c180aa00aa0de76cd36a115ececdf
35caee584231bd579cbdb57a1607c601657b67b1
describe
'77981' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPY' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
b896f6d80331f9bb7c217998a07b088c
baa501fdb5422364363a4cf494340cea19675dcb
'2011-09-25T16:12:04-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2811256' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMPZ' 'sip-files00124.tif'
cdd27c65fc1374f21102ce7451f4fc0d
8d600755f236e809a590b79d356970f9126551b0
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQA' 'sip-files00124.txt'
886a1684fc026847dc3b0eb8af0765a1
2fd419b6e76d7755234bf1a916a7f07a53643d31
describe
'341353' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQB' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
854bb12cfbf503243e4e58d63ce52cce
0f03988d4e9d922f5b004c14e7a291a68a32d8d3
describe
'223575' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQC' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
4e44cbd0db41678ee8bfcd55188b7f2b
8460e89196d0f4bc0d37c84ab7e89ede41f2ebd3
'2011-09-25T16:11:45-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37151' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQD' 'sip-files00125.pro'
d472496bd9ad05b386f6435b04ebec5f
401708c0fa9837e5da5a54ee078aeeaeef4e7ddd
describe
'81289' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQE' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
f94d2569ac10545a66ed3cde214c79b6
fbaaf7adb44e574baeabb15f656ed94c16b99771
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2743628' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQF' 'sip-files00125.tif'
36352e33a9fd067c345a24d09f1d0c2e
389d50cecb0f707331d6d4f9cf689ce09ab51d18
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQG' 'sip-files00125.txt'
bc28b9e61c04822d47d54bc4fcf2f6c2
c82c97da6c40a684228d0654fdf8a9bf0e4a15db
describe
'322759' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQH' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
99f350fa470a5e622fec95c4f1fcb9cf
812eda5f3786a69932661002aef0ebb5fc7df3ac
'2011-09-25T16:12:32-04:00'
describe
'244924' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQI' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
521cfc4e734e3f7c2252aac8fd41680f
f12523c87cca928f74678edaf8d98b9e23943bb4
'2011-09-25T16:11:54-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38318' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQJ' 'sip-files00126.pro'
a95e1bffa3d8d9c5365ddb3d3faa21d5
b94ebb918d68cbfbca325f91f0ed731c2f55696f
describe
'88039' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQK' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
035cffa281bd14ff2e0bac18e6e0e720
766b9fed159d82c1852789f897b48422c2023ecb
'2011-09-25T16:12:20-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2595308' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQL' 'sip-files00126.tif'
20267d1dc82f6a09ac328bdb7a5ce1d2
26567bf904a31c5530dbee6e4d6f686fc5a1b839
describe
'1517' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQM' 'sip-files00126.txt'
189a5b196d0c44dc73da434c797112cc
b14e184c667b30f31339698ba4424165d9133ff1
describe
'316289' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQN' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
c4151c03401df5853373c4ec67bf9c49
5d737edf658c3a53613ec2dc8bfd8a91edf8177a
describe
'246362' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQO' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
d273603326373119da910eec5301f3d2
7a32076203131819f58ee0cf0b448d179ae6f118
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37208' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQP' 'sip-files00127.pro'
fad60faabacb5c46850d1ed99ee5a93e
315a936b200a3446ff8f9d13dcebba424e31f5db
describe
'90246' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQQ' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
4cec3cf624d31fec449a7e948c45125c
412f0b26ee778f4ca231688da0fa4874463e8e43
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2543892' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQR' 'sip-files00127.tif'
fac85fa673c71ef2bce35b32c0dcae07
0bf959d16a04b0f23d15e131f00c2bdee6e585a3
'2011-09-25T16:13:13-04:00'
describe
'1526' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQS' 'sip-files00127.txt'
6e99295af05e3b8ccc185abc733c2f66
d079cc7444a848b91b846c2c35b5289725cc7ac6
'2011-09-25T16:08:03-04:00'
describe
'349835' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQT' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
b42372bf29b87a7b2616428c19d159a6
ec463a31b2ec48a37a92018c40691a26a9ccff49
describe
'239478' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQU' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
717b9f2fecb852bc076270fa1b9eea13
99a9ac608d8e962c02e80a3251838777f69894f6
'2011-09-25T16:10:41-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37826' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQV' 'sip-files00128.pro'
c9e786ee02d678d00103a453fb3b4d98
d873680b3bb6b788285a554e81b0cb504bc86065
describe
'82408' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQW' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
574f25cfb994f80f6610d349322e9ddf
5f34e815cf19f8f721ce412dcd98f3b06653e647
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2811336' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQX' 'sip-files00128.tif'
11108d0fb97d4a6c0bf222b01b16a409
bb3a6b1fb141e2e03785c38bdf1d2f42089c587e
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQY' 'sip-files00128.txt'
672e9aec951a90a86a10ad2cf3191356
511eb25350ce403db73fcaeff45911908e14fa04
describe
'341263' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMQZ' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
ca07f24f506a0a30dfdc1f341330d9e6
1ea5ab056a3a4aa15dde2513c2053cedeee6a01c
describe
'229329' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRA' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
f0eeaad5a816f42e1f4803aa1c13e7b5
1651a926960922361af153a92d8adb3e96cd7b29
'2011-09-25T16:04:59-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36822' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRB' 'sip-files00129.pro'
6e865da9482871f30bee9776aefc0b57
fc5422abebb321491a240aef4247e744bcff91d5
describe
'83733' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRC' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
10e0dae6c056d672a52a5150b18e2184
433279a22dbd410313211defc9d860548691b84d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2743740' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRD' 'sip-files00129.tif'
54445d5a32d7d5882233c86e17e5073a
053e501dfd4db39ce109fe899ef9e288d52d5a46
describe
'1543' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRE' 'sip-files00129.txt'
8c330df7703e8dc809e725bcc8cd6d2d
a7ecd4dee3146edec588f5dcb49a54e2d09a616b
describe
'329900' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRF' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
d3e70cf4718ab04f2957af60b878de96
22c83e547c882f2a42261b8e196d3abbc7a20c5d
describe
'234957' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRG' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
2a37be794ffacf745ef8b98e8a0381d7
61e792bc2922f18132b89d53f894b122fb29cde1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36718' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRH' 'sip-files00130.pro'
68ec6b598a5d93a3185e89225eae1edc
a045067687cb6d1e3e6450e0056ec1f941c69cd6
describe
'84303' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRI' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
923bbe0819ce4585acaa30c42057e42a
5f850681bc1bf62caf848249ecf025d9d7de616a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2651804' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRJ' 'sip-files00130.tif'
46225752aed3e7c0cfe3aa65b4a80db3
591334b35947011f5e44fbb4a8b15a006a059109
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRK' 'sip-files00130.txt'
035c108611c3bad3ae9d67464f28ad34
54e7a1a94da0e2723af78cb46742e131b8e89df3
describe
'341326' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRL' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
824f472b648c7aa39dec137e068b74bf
a8e9a2a1b189ddb892af887296637a4b648c8ee0
describe
'240334' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRM' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
3a0dead26bce56cdfa95d73d72da383f
c71c0ae31a656917b0748bdc7138b50c66e02f0e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38026' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRN' 'sip-files00131.pro'
f944bbec5b5ac53a7eb804865ac213a2
c3b9a05bb9d444b9b727c3b6f09bc9897c4ea851
describe
'82636' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRO' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
2e76505eb06f5f064b74092995dd4189
4bfdd717c0236cd9788602fbfe194eac01651a67
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2743304' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRP' 'sip-files00131.tif'
8d50d601048bdbdc254e067067f561a1
a9ef9a839ab411e4c0a5a2408f48f6683c3edd68
describe
'1498' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRQ' 'sip-files00131.txt'
1dea8620fed81dd66dfdeeef40028b79
790497594b35ec859c914f21797473e34ab61c5a
describe
'349827' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRR' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
d40ea5dc41923a6d2ff463348311f137
790b7c0d44ae4a817ad09cd5fc02918d5bfb39c1
describe
'229151' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRS' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
56f12fff8b1fa7364aa3603f30480231
2556935dc8544d4aa5684e3ab190c7015b3dbea5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35673' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRT' 'sip-files00132.pro'
a3976ce19ea8b8a04f32cd9ebb1887fa
b8a6ae18f70e3090b42850764ca9414de973b3f4
'2011-09-25T16:08:42-04:00'
describe
'79164' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRU' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
27f7b66215410234cb94496ae406fc0a
8076a1dce2e0dc260d830fc253ef46c5da7d377e
'2011-09-25T16:10:25-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2811572' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRV' 'sip-files00132.tif'
588d6f059d98eaa2e342d34787f36ff9
ab463caa4c14f2bcb19401d35e9322e083872664
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRW' 'sip-files00132.txt'
fdce9c8a5e7fd8418120228bb2f58edf
4bc6a0dd0fe8f0c872033f4129739a3c2484c685
describe
'341335' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRX' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
d95120d4279b827c9fa90d71fe22a4ed
5a03f10b0754baf3d17165e267f8cd32514df0ce
describe
'228235' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRY' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
97b6a996fbc5749ad9d6b5301393adc4
965aabbcdb37550c13b270a6c0cf30e7c0a94330
'2011-09-25T16:13:09-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37597' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMRZ' 'sip-files00133.pro'
4c844c21d3930ef004178866c38f3d98
fac4662d0fb5c530a7defa5582d3e5d4d59c3e01
'2011-09-25T16:11:51-04:00'
describe
'82450' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSA' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
5ab3571ece4dd83e4008e0df70f3bcc4
7fcff1515f084115903277d6a21ddf09f1d0e47c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2743528' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSB' 'sip-files00133.tif'
9e161677566258ede2956cd09da01ee8
9ff8c021bdc72ba6e3de15800c1781efc3b3f20d
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSC' 'sip-files00133.txt'
f74c8363e0568123ab397c85d9320125
4a67935e64ec1cb316df23857fcd78a6d4028af1
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSD' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
07367b139190118a22812b4e49d8be7d
8ea2017a3caa344ed00cfe28e124400957645099
describe
'228793' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSE' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
5dacf82669c28fee9014e0c66b9269a0
065113b60a882c14f98d97e03bd19f4cabf6073b
'2011-09-25T16:07:20-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37784' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSF' 'sip-files00134.pro'
0ca835ced75c825c2fa0270911ddc303
45cedf64ac719cb6c668a53e8850448ce3f7efe0
'2011-09-25T16:05:07-04:00'
describe
'83438' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSG' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
78a8204c2feae33294936921d644df28
9de30228a22207b723541e8fbf9b272049d6eabf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2811852' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSH' 'sip-files00134.tif'
a6c317992adf78072f2c77406700ef3b
452d5a2b21b013e4cf791244e8983a109ae12528
describe
'1502' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSI' 'sip-files00134.txt'
4d7ab60400a577845279e51efa5e4b09
cde854fd76ce70f4ddb9ce0e01da13f4db024ca8
describe
'341254' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSJ' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
9c20e77cd660f2ff655631944469b7ba
def21e79fbf73bc975a75647346837ae7e57bd71
'2011-09-25T16:09:27-04:00'
describe
'190484' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSK' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
3cf105326f83ba68ae0ef62b59b58d1e
ca271c36b9fc8137d6f53f2629d160ce6f6d0ea7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26861' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSL' 'sip-files00135.pro'
02d0a60b132f51ff1f18dd9b147d28be
ca92742d16041de9ab322480a43e0d1e4cb745c4
'2011-09-25T16:06:40-04:00'
describe
'66928' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSM' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
127a7b08741da764221bb38538407f49
19d2d953eb77b568257587aff6d3b74334b10baa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2742252' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSN' 'sip-files00135.tif'
589b1afc327b0a163e01c60b43ef7bb8
6e4ee5c66b86584ecb39c7c869701c8693467c73
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSO' 'sip-files00135.txt'
62de9861d112a32c9b8960030a470ff9
c6149777e96bd206205b46000e81660a900d0b7d
'2011-09-25T16:05:17-04:00'
describe
'331459' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSP' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
1998f278ee154397c70e44d25e1cec71
0a320918dd1ad224892e8fec08bfc317bbbfa8b1
describe
'256169' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSQ' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
e2c3219046cb9f6b47598316e342431b
5f025eae222fd8112fdc506b4650af048834aafe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39357' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSR' 'sip-files00136.pro'
5b41f2488e184e16eb027f3aabcfea9a
2646729e293128bf27c2b0cfa62eb08f744e69b0
describe
'88505' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSS' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
00e3a9714d47baf4f9c5038571557855
a61c736b04a7093fae288c0212cb7a11ee69649a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2665096' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMST' 'sip-files00136.tif'
a7b90e1bbb0b6cb82e5ffd5082c4bf85
8a6b7c7852b0356cf24d1eca8ffd9f3e50bfca54
describe
'1591' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSU' 'sip-files00136.txt'
541e8444a2bd08b62958aee79d27f3b7
8bac728d9966a06b716ce0a5a15acd14973d10d3
describe
'341365' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSV' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
1bbff8f895a2f67da4d79f5f701c5dde
89e5d7de48cd9d31f6c5ed84cec60713acba8646
'2011-09-25T16:09:57-04:00'
describe
'216771' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSW' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
b6d7b1f54212bef66858e32bfa3434ef
84f74d04d35e2fda1dd2c5cdc43ee066848e7a39
'2011-09-25T16:11:57-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'33856' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSX' 'sip-files00137.pro'
25929b6f9ea2c2fe188c2860cc75f86c
d3f549f792f20a4a63d9708be19eb6b8d1c17f1b
describe
'80272' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSY' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
47bde8562f8ef1d3b9eb3380c4e1ac3e
05d5238c3cac52b69bbdbbdb7f3a82e15e93f2aa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2743380' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMSZ' 'sip-files00137.tif'
bfad9a68bf51a1a11c939ece2eabea6b
1b151f049057fe574535fc4c404f0dcac81d7f4e
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTA' 'sip-files00137.txt'
65241cf71494c7bef8f9c1102f8fdbf2
3eb1c8bc31188b0428ddda804f0cbf584a5a0838
describe
'327426' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTB' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
e2c0c616059cd721a17a8a3db25dcecd
fe14779b9114cf37e1bcb22e808045e4ee7cfe40
describe
'243060' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTC' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
0c9a86e865fe6add8b297d36ff2cbd15
4d269688b3b80f34a4f4842e46c969da63007a9b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38783' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTD' 'sip-files00138.pro'
7b7327e9d837c39570a7d4dbb344858e
a71ac797801c78293453ee17bd21a26951eda001
'2011-09-25T16:09:37-04:00'
describe
'88420' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTE' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
cc5f4dfec8923fed48555b98e8c5dcdf
14ed226c941a85bf37a0cd4b8bbfdfba0966bc44
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2632460' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTF' 'sip-files00138.tif'
3a2246d6b090ddf315033565dc24c593
8960982b68744cfcffb8d093e3bc36d98067b894
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTG' 'sip-files00138.txt'
d1fc68b062171c582518c427ac2f3da6
9374c2b54c376c95816c77c167aa59658ed84df0
'2011-09-25T16:06:30-04:00'
describe
'341341' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTH' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
1623ad6964f4d2c45e29752f1f7d8ae9
1c377d1defdfe4041531319ca130bafbc47bc71f
describe
'241285' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTI' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
c4343a4e0c943f32392adafbc71a049b
c3f6fb157e121637f7ee9e11f2a71d17be483396
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38182' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTJ' 'sip-files00139.pro'
b88156477d78f7af0368792fac717fcb
028cac8f6cbf4b0c493de94b7b9290126f9f3754
describe
'84308' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTK' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
3d9ad508446b94c33983aab0bc0bd26d
28754f3f223cc74e7cf772d6a7e711136dbe6808
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2743600' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTL' 'sip-files00139.tif'
c3f2444ac448717fc6b3f39258553210
061c2639f566666d205691880672ae575e09f040
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTM' 'sip-files00139.txt'
ad4d4a3a31f1d3ab9f1e0aa4b7b2a3be
91f1b18ac2da0b00165747785171a718a02ae4d7
'2011-09-25T16:12:45-04:00'
describe
'324243' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTN' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
f1630bcebfa8621f32b982fb09eeb322
3ad76844fc5a2986f2746f93ec60a276519fdaa5
describe
'257743' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTO' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
e3e2979eed2b9b25dfc18e8fd4c84dec
0c20308a2d5f4c695236fc4a1f515d32f6a6c282
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37466' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTP' 'sip-files00140.pro'
f0a8050b947281cdb5b94abddf648a2c
aa149d703904b794261237b428ff977e4a33520c
'2011-09-25T16:11:00-04:00'
describe
'90592' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTQ' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
e26f10ba05417b9ca4ebba8c0968a431
2badb9d8147d38d4fcf44f0817db5f601e008284
'2011-09-25T16:11:15-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2608012' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTR' 'sip-files00140.tif'
25c833ca8649f42e47af59dcab986bec
e1ecaa4b661f04b9147d8b2133131e684e6d9526
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTS' 'sip-files00140.txt'
f3aa1ea8047da303dd68ce0732bf8ae5
6e03bfa98188b528b6f06a7bf1a48a07a7eee082
describe
'312633' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTT' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
c2dbd6ff516437ff870385cbd1271cff
a8eaf95163ac541744bbfaceeaef2094c65717b7
describe
'220815' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTU' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
d9003ec82ff808f501ac3df8b11c70ef
642c2ff051eb87d83607ad4614829300a01b47df
'2011-09-25T16:08:08-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'33013' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTV' 'sip-files00141.pro'
4d1b0e89d163cce2bdc734f2dbef1bf7
b6a423c2770daaffa9f46f574dce740b198cee21
describe
'84256' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTW' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
6c94bb8029cab853c867db26d87a7936
dceacf36812c2b23b4f93a7c38a2ca8a5aa6040a
'2011-09-25T16:11:22-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2514236' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTX' 'sip-files00141.tif'
1a7ef31e7ad250a8d2169ed620f0bb1e
fb718f194aae52e219388e305f66e0a3e953296b
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTY' 'sip-files00141.txt'
5ca169077f50d4743d666ac488079ef0
a3959d06cc43106d05265c1d8b0bd50c7fdd95e7
describe
'315147' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMTZ' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
e97ff3b74b634f4fee5323d653a51f36
c7b2068e6437fc8e71e54dca5afbd28ec45e88f8
describe
'203356' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUA' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
165cc34affa5be447f86d319fdc1a548
e490060fbd65cd50a9a7be36969610dae76ddff7
'2011-09-25T16:06:57-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28775' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUB' 'sip-files00142.pro'
1dd9ab0b110b509b270c7788c0297218
6759786f9ce2d2451210331be75143430f4b3634
describe
'73091' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUC' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
ce0d311495f295074651f31e38e4762e
83e2eaba939e0c3803080215cecfc72834eadfae
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2533732' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUD' 'sip-files00142.tif'
e9633aceb351d663157bcca2b0538bdb
5c48497def2fa0832e1f6aa29319c62a536c77b7
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUE' 'sip-files00142.txt'
17f0918962b4c5fca28a033febc63855
1aea6cd66c1d44755824108cd82c6dc32381a912
describe
'313133' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUF' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
c7a544df5d185be2fff76af823fb5049
9519ae7394fe6b6f0207c82bfd31b6cf06afbc28
describe
'246003' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUG' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
b8bb3d34903a857fa1f7b3a9a0059a98
95e7bf0042ab30774560761f405edb2bfea68ea7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34586' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUH' 'sip-files00143.pro'
47f864cac41adc6ddba68bb1a1fba7f9
99cbfb81f592c67dd57ebce647978d0ca16a41af
describe
'87624' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUI' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
84ee033ee517f28f487da2089d19330e
cfddb8add657391a9f02ff2d0be78d960b88b22d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2517880' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUJ' 'sip-files00143.tif'
dbc8143519adf6ef23bc1bfaaad3a752
286e3fefcffdce2db093bcdc36ea0b2505848e5b
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUK' 'sip-files00143.txt'
2bb60a240cd23bcf27d6d2264dafbc0b
35dd56b84501da26c31630296e32ed9155c89791
describe
'349812' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUL' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
e211ccd2fb5b4ddc8b07e4d60b1511e5
687b9577f9c6c09d499600c23dd4f30cab354a80
describe
'241111' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUM' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
ce4087c57f8c25e4c24345c5adb3d2d7
5dffeff31fee0b067331cc91a80c1036f89961ba
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37749' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUN' 'sip-files00144.pro'
92ec71fd3f6cee59490956503bffb67b
8f12a40ab196ea4d728ec5c8d15efd4ee22a0bd1
describe
'83771' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUO' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
13a4bef9654fca8895da5f658aac3616
f2c8bab930dc697f6c579c420d7f8513eb92fd67
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2811676' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUP' 'sip-files00144.tif'
89def3ba942ea2c01f79ef4eecddd549
b2a199f8428359f41184b2f694cd366aabe457ba
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUQ' 'sip-files00144.txt'
e78a64d2b4c67204cb29a49d178ff12f
d84cd3e6811673f428f2982ea6f7f9c536c777d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUR' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
dd989040368dd33f1503c4dd6188ab98
534fff439eb584e5421cee34a499a62a0d1dbc13
describe
'229144' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUS' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
acb8eb66c801a279f5b9febeb8b211b1
8e287d5c03a2caeb2babb61a3fff0ee7785f9185
'2011-09-25T16:08:19-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37287' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUT' 'sip-files00145.pro'
0604d572626f2cc8dfd64306eafa0084
526ce1c89aa78c7b85376975dcdc9b3c277705a3
describe
'83829' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUU' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
4ffcb52ebbf4dcff04c96b0b0a8b0d34
282b289c1ecc84a2748323bff175e6681625b157
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2743792' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUV' 'sip-files00145.tif'
534def47bc7c4b4356f1cb8d90531a42
7195abd7d5e8ee6bc4019e1fac929d54196ffc3e
'2011-09-25T16:11:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUW' 'sip-files00145.txt'
c88e56226147cfd2274e40b9ac595199
f86aaf302ee7cd391c6a8160a4d32b2f83717925
'2011-09-25T16:08:09-04:00'
describe
'326284' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUX' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
4a110d49c3a0ed3a426dbb9f0949e57a
800869c87614c5eeaf3aad7cde5dbfbd9f3e689c
describe
'219698' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUY' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
9fa16cbe3a118e2de9848548338d7d93
54a81fdaab72e270bb3bcba61d578ba20cf84e56
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'33626' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMUZ' 'sip-files00146.pro'
cc983e7ba9903c04b656be68444e50ab
baab12282fbc0a3455297ffbfcdba423e61a9125
describe
'80890' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVA' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
3d87605091e24c730cd063dab19e150a
4f0b677264f4a8d653e6a961618daf0f0063f53d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2623572' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVB' 'sip-files00146.tif'
69ce2dea65775918ccd28fe2d169fa25
089b1eea34a5c64e70838dc23d7b9b94718b2810
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVC' 'sip-files00146.txt'
27cbaaaabc1a9307b5307e6ce2ee1847
74f0b87391514db0735663df48772fc386be9a87
'2011-09-25T16:12:11-04:00'
describe
'348224' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVD' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
20680d1b782aeba614b231064efd09a2
8e6b5b113eb0825c060a20c4f69783d8e35037ed
describe
'226704' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVE' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
82c55114fe6efd0f5e8a74a07b3d4135
829e84d599ca2457a75f0fd2125699ae776c6e13
'2011-09-25T16:07:14-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36919' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVF' 'sip-files00147.pro'
20fba4e2054e82d5636cc370c0b7f8b8
30802a8f80704fd3a4607c07a8ebdf6c862d4bc7
describe
'79896' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVG' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
c32f3b470812b8ed8e5651883e61007b
6c83cc2b4115e7d713bb828ac3b8a8c46ae82687
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2798952' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVH' 'sip-files00147.tif'
ecb540cb071f639c057617cf945d584d
2426d7646e107d10c7a22485e50a2f1465f21ad6
describe
'1465' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVI' 'sip-files00147.txt'
110e3ada35ee5af051e58b1bad24ba9d
eb5b240b968b70696058d7814f91c89fd8514a96
describe
'324057' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVJ' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
9f5eebd08fcd86bf7219f094bb0e1bd9
3cbde63e4609f70a89bd493912f83f75a8bf7899
describe
'231728' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVK' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
bea50317707b1ebe7604c7f6c235c000
a67885f2dcc83224ed55f6b7b4352e230447ad28
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34524' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVL' 'sip-files00148.pro'
c0436bd769969239ad9cacf93346bdac
d5bddc54e6923271324dd9e7012fb5e4f334e175
'2011-09-25T16:06:09-04:00'
describe
'82375' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVM' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
80598cd072d21e3bb60c23ad7f9eb9ac
8533adc081dbc91eff4f35ee47c6b73dedfb4dc8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2605768' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVN' 'sip-files00148.tif'
de2c3451344ddff02949bbaae72ee174
5ee3b8b44404ec567338b5c4437e71c8d7d1d2a7
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVO' 'sip-files00148.txt'
5e6b164d6b28227107536c25af40a152
5aa43f1b0069478e0f080c2b6daa2b63475d01d3
describe
'326881' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVP' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
660a70fe7486ad6f92f8164d898db238
b90e2d8e4a4ff11e299e825a1a5667052131c878
'2011-09-25T16:07:03-04:00'
describe
'220255' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVQ' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
590a0440bfdf8d41dce7c152b57ea911
a4a6ed20172d9f70e3ad718ad0755a3d7a3b04f7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36208' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVR' 'sip-files00149.pro'
1f38105b500a3c17021ddf7077fd8ee8
f82c1e695a4e0ed1b4c5a9c2807432692e9759a2
describe
'79456' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVS' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
6e63141e24f0d404ee2d278a05edeab0
2bd7b72689cdf9de50c6b11b9775821dc4b1dcec
'2011-09-25T16:07:37-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2627320' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVT' 'sip-files00149.tif'
fc9bd9aeb3073487602b86314d4c08e6
83e37979abf57e7209529c98e895531fdab7ebf8
'2011-09-25T16:08:14-04:00'
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVU' 'sip-files00149.txt'
015b9fcd6913311bc32e7a3e83adeee1
255fe164690a25efa46b81c559af1cfb5922e179
describe
'329274' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVV' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
e25fc98245149b63c07dc4c11b9cb15e
33bb426d9b7a84bac397a27447a735f1757f99bf
describe
'204970' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVW' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
bf62641b60c1deffef29b997eaa8a108
43ae2950419144469a4a9c10a258bc5e8c7dec88
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30672' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVX' 'sip-files00150.pro'
c83804a24cebc7dc614329ec7099fc1e
71049bfb2b71f1f568563d5be14d4653bd2e4765
describe
'75082' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVY' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
23f0bbd829fdd690ace676e522b6d2a1
ab00c9bef76bd6f6b6a819d1729d4d3b8780272d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2646796' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMVZ' 'sip-files00150.tif'
ce610c8d78756274f8d0bcd2fae4b58d
e82ff27c1d10e28b0543573000eb236fbad00636
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWA' 'sip-files00150.txt'
a543d8879f46ebf009e8600f93f966bc
9a3df73140bf62061aa52600cb3538e58d5166cd
describe
'323724' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWB' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
4971aee4215e4bb5805232ced1808095
3998f066017778f97e5f9445e3d0eb4d68610a0a
'2011-09-25T16:11:42-04:00'
describe
'249564' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWC' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
faeb93458c5f596d0cb419d1d87cba85
41f8459febfdd2f02773166c2365db7dac02caa5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39026' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWD' 'sip-files00151.pro'
0e647bde55e99a22dbb0a7cec7ba7e06
5035ade146d8a9ad7c95b5bcf2a2150f0ace2d4c
describe
'88140' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWE' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
25393fe3b6fe38e662d2299c4f1a24fe
1b0b48497428dbc6a8c4db2ebe82dc8aedf47e6a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2603060' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWF' 'sip-files00151.tif'
be95915463c5689ae994fe59ccda8cc7
d76aa07c445116d4b0f52093b547a7a968c099ff
'2011-09-25T16:06:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWG' 'sip-files00151.txt'
e48c2e0d1b49972c435e19122941d275
d46da5584af6713ecdb4d9acc383097426c3a56e
describe
'347617' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWH' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
ce9c52b32574b2736f124147c8d55427
77c0cbbc65473fb2f1d9fdb32a37ba50232dc2a0
describe
'239099' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWI' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
2ab738805f1db706475352a6827e3d42
b2eaf680647524815061c1a10cc3fd36247573d5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37932' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWJ' 'sip-files00152.pro'
5cf302ce67740e2a8bbac5316e782da6
b0e40dba7002509c5f45b3c665b07e0c6c52d817
describe
'83153' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWK' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
d2e15d48610f2087d7cd9db63ade7cee
fbc2403f11a2fb3b9c87b45006d27498019c127b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2793900' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWL' 'sip-files00152.tif'
dd0b939a6c768c20851c8afb9af516c2
ba8695779316269b115186116c5b4b1fd20c21c0
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWM' 'sip-files00152.txt'
112363de97cf4780d184fa2e6b7047e0
31b1ef55f8d29e1e22cdb5d31d4816de2e253af4
describe
'330049' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWN' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
bd5c5030d996bfdd7bbb1b42555b8b31
bab45f4bc54128085360b6223aaf54d091fa2e4b
describe
'229899' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWO' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
d60048fab754adfa02d36bf2e7b24f31
a49c048bd460d9852f8114db62e70ac1a6a02e0a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36843' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWP' 'sip-files00153.pro'
32c998c04378cbbb60bec1f3205de2f5
d446b3b66d615c759eaa1134deb8836c717a0f59
describe
'83653' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWQ' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
e71ed87d393dc9640bb56e1f2bfc0f87
f76fb6cbace92ddd316e4c59e7dc3513df2eceb5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2653452' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWR' 'sip-files00153.tif'
71b3ed45e537296af090befb8689cd5a
f129458103363f5ee5d8f2a07af1234657434b74
'2011-09-25T16:05:16-04:00'
describe
'1466' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWS' 'sip-files00153.txt'
12475445e2e9832dac94c0e15ef65c1d
a9d715eebda249535bb6c39d1120bca3940988e1
describe
'347594' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWT' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
f083290aad007da91796f072136008b7
6d9c58d74cd3661fbda591786032fe32ce8d42bc
describe
'218673' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWU' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
160ec79a4459ddb2984e71193ae1e0e7
e860e3fbb905339453008542e47be9da1fbc0f79
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34735' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWV' 'sip-files00154.pro'
b1540f2624dcc491bf2edc93a5fa6d59
c7c077b492fcf797c5368d828e3ca4faf39443fe
'2011-09-25T16:13:03-04:00'
describe
'78376' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWW' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
fc94c0b930972abec0996e7d1442a6f7
af7344a0f2f7c421f6c3776e7c88ac1babb00b8e
'2011-09-25T16:12:57-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2793804' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWX' 'sip-files00154.tif'
12ca21173463f44b6114817954013360
5e28c0dc5e5472a295c491b2051e6f828cc86a56
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWY' 'sip-files00154.txt'
ba0e2a7f4aa7a9957e9e1b58935147f6
7c02f67aace79f50bc639e5c3321aaed27b25eb2
'2011-09-25T16:12:09-04:00'
describe
'327217' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMWZ' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
c53bb1424cf8aea2ee2c7fb5a7e230cb
fe99eb9cd540ff046940d1dd9879be3f8671bd01
describe
'236761' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXA' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
24fc3db53f3ceca818c191f9cc010d67
ca60dae6447a6dfccd0cfad06a3c78add8b56c21
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36043' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXB' 'sip-files00155.pro'
a6fdb225974805dbbc8a6504cff03733
6b72d43c7dc685ee87c70af493e45eb390d3cbc8
describe
'85255' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXC' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
87417e9f197ba83344695fd2a7f146e1
5735290eaa520165ebac8df7780c6c30829e46a7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2630604' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXD' 'sip-files00155.tif'
9c65493ad1181fc74adba91d45c9bd63
c64efb9b6195814fde1fec90c575e8c835fbf7b6
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXE' 'sip-files00155.txt'
2f48276e2f5fe8ef32c5276a4f246e3f
a751d4d8bba604108fc21ebbc349bad99cf5b3db
describe
'322404' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXF' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
a63766cea01cd667d6ca4df8dcc5e386
4f287cfb674c1c8e8b9eb540a79db9c526b02f43
describe
'255698' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXG' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
bb503cdb8bf45b5d6f3ada663cc6b0a4
a6e5548f0565d3d042d51214407560b715fbb4d0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37896' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXH' 'sip-files00156.pro'
032a853a721aadbb943fd0df5a7cca62
eaa1c4b104c8e005af8bf42c1add6ed97666f1b2
describe
'90758' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXI' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
2c67dd0be7853a0e1984224c9d0fe091
5ee16c6e550d5ca01a76328144a16bd400f2fb4a
'2011-09-25T16:05:31-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2592460' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXJ' 'sip-files00156.tif'
ea14980e8d00c792414fb5c0da35956b
2c7a5736c4f8a0adf5dc1537aa30cd0c6f48c03d
'2011-09-25T16:05:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXK' 'sip-files00156.txt'
bf6f711527e2c62aebb099b3925f9d57
73e65d46eca2a2bf7b97af81c9be47f5d64e4d89
'2011-09-25T16:06:26-04:00'
describe
'318727' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXL' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
ae471dd8507a4d950f6994ecf4d4b7d5
3d70a643b7ce7954df8c6d064df92e062ad8c04d
describe
'191609' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXM' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
362024252e852533650e3d3fad201665
02708b2a30641de47203c90a43eff09c055d676b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27451' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXN' 'sip-files00157.pro'
a8dfee648e57c130a8b10549b1004328
99ff9e543328b83fd09ce5eb919678763eb4f6cb
'2011-09-25T16:13:04-04:00'
describe
'71601' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXO' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
b44efbc37eba3795e015776049799e30
e35a3e2e32d1660279722e95b1aab0bcd9f3cba2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2561920' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXP' 'sip-files00157.tif'
fd7c97dfa9f8dedaf29f7de027064625
331a9fbab5fab84f471f82d335d2d62453ecc5a8
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXQ' 'sip-files00157.txt'
93cf3b2d5169612b3bb8c20396a19f15
9e96c094e37d2df2ca9bd03be46cad9338f97aa9
describe
'313782' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXR' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
bddedc1a33b5e85124f9f6a987404f9c
32d015d19670c62454ee1feca003045176096728
describe
'252517' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXS' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
14a342558d698e58e72bee3c3907d3dc
1d502a62c4bc8aab875d4a6e98293ab2426f2d21
'2011-09-25T16:07:22-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37420' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXT' 'sip-files00158.pro'
41ee77f5223d76548fd52e22309985aa
d97b15a210977d5e510b26b91529dfd34a2fb3e6
describe
'91608' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXU' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
2b6911b8556a6cf75eb352b0d4c9d563
dd19095158ee3377c4b75f82c1c6ccf942c37a7a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2524560' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXV' 'sip-files00158.tif'
ab8fff1e52cf4856ffac03aa20bb4450
18379ffcf086be8a527a572a295539585ef8ebaa
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXW' 'sip-files00158.txt'
41f0c944a9f766c09de848ace5798478
71201ff4d188d447028d5d9f2fcddad405034c2c
describe
'326282' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXX' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
5847576a2185f1d50eb20aa124040a80
b9542543826a985cbe15a3a825eeaa7d7465e859
describe
'233034' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXY' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
7a198f568bb281566f4b7b6c518d3e84
76a9ee35ec065b3e28a4a574d840f8c6cd462a77
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34842' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMXZ' 'sip-files00159.pro'
6f28cb126456221ce370c08ac456de88
6d3e5fa6473b23d9ce1149a06fa73097017fb93e
describe
'83476' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYA' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
62f2e16cc217de3f9781cda79e4c6c8d
888062bb09c85ec8e758302b3270aa77cca04436
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2623440' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYB' 'sip-files00159.tif'
92b1043e81fbea598dab64bae135900d
fce91d80c3b56b0b30d4eafc40f587a8aa0e60ab
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYC' 'sip-files00159.txt'
d81310eeb6cc3553a02233423783d824
d7a7f2a452afd08561eb62f9257996e8aa3113e3
describe
'347623' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYD' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
df01c3e864704560bc0bec668a6ac5db
df4ea52318c2136c566896cda19213b56a5afe74
describe
'243918' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYE' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
88c3cc3c5d395e6544eafff48ede5bb4
2a3467d6c60844593562c5180423dbbe75991667
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38298' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYF' 'sip-files00160.pro'
2960d68e42b96f93260cfc7c6d6f5aaa
466b6e5dbc7162525c60c22c462e0bc0f863392e
describe
'84230' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYG' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
aef9c86e793f00143380dc4aa6143216
a565073c25d85e9ea57393d52b6c5a34a4d93cab
'2011-09-25T16:06:20-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2793748' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYH' 'sip-files00160.tif'
4b8cd6bbae65a227150b5c74d77a51af
8788351941196fff420f9ec3ffcca9fd7c4cf85f
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYI' 'sip-files00160.txt'
5a5466ed29ce2ce6036e0eb0281cc564
6a66861f78377f1b15504603864baf47eeb7bb0b
'2011-09-25T16:06:22-04:00'
describe
'348163' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYJ' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
970da5a35748a669668c3b00487d5cbb
662bfe6cd8acef4e17ca61395fb0dd8085fe012f
describe
'219226' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYK' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
fa4e97561e155c9ce88ab904973fca5f
a9998482f251f78af08e46f3e6da132e06fa6233
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36166' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYL' 'sip-files00161.pro'
4b50109c754da384efd580289873b3b6
869557f8d280b0cb2a007dc24b275cf314783e91
describe
'79748' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYM' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
aabbf09a494d631644363b2e29659c91
c35c1610e3ebe216e4a597bb6a83fbaec52848dc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2798832' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYN' 'sip-files00161.tif'
1cfa55a17c8301f01d10898692c6dd85
42e5c5b1cdb1034dbb6a2cc04250fcb241aee28c
describe
'1453' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYO' 'sip-files00161.txt'
ca291faa6f76db91ab9105512aaa0edd
2901f196277eaffe8bdaa144c64b045b16b55e72
describe
'331583' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYP' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
6666cc44b1f795e3d7aa6f57e7c8e970
d7c14742ed77619533e5007e05760085b4a5a94e
describe
'232705' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYQ' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
63fe55738c74fcdcd44e23504653fff0
6524d98164989d772cb571971a88eeb1830f287f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35338' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYR' 'sip-files00162.pro'
8bc67968e49b0d9aebef13e2fb51cad0
4b281448910ceb30755e29ff451b7b49fcd509f5
describe
'82431' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYS' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
9613cf6f789b01f376a52a56d50d31f2
0843c7340274e3e0837c328bcd10c907644c0404
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2665796' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYT' 'sip-files00162.tif'
0be0491bfe8eda7f0555b52fd310f1ba
6a8333dbfd2f995bfee10da2798af77e5fb04fa6
'2011-09-25T16:08:29-04:00'
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYU' 'sip-files00162.txt'
3db72fb74deb580187b53977442fe49a
b32a132ad3198c83ea8f4b99543c6595cea0fac9
describe
'348216' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYV' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
541979922ca75d477f866e356bbb731a
b5606bfd39ae7e5046116d2862434027c9718413
describe
'216386' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYW' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
79bc9a7e56e02eb607d4356f4086ab6c
695c6e406dd72efd93cb03150cabe8abda5ba6da
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35111' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYX' 'sip-files00163.pro'
a511cecbb446d8a169c8f6d596e90998
77c56538969dba0b253cfc348efcd156762783b2
describe
'77443' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYY' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
ded9f8114bfe2cd2ed4a01e63437e2ad
5ce71c0b851ed7d0801b77c36b66d63dfd02d960
'2011-09-25T16:08:05-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2798668' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMYZ' 'sip-files00163.tif'
560a9901b65e5ce43bd3dddab4d4f69e
827e6241b7a750760163be03c2e261d2bedb2870
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZA' 'sip-files00163.txt'
94cf0adf66f81fff4aba77fb866c242e
3f9d759ef1b3f681ebc9f9dab6b91b5183d8e179
describe
'327041' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZB' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
df53f650872115dbca72aa93c7033d41
7e64f7a14148a70b5d125b88860927aaad7a238b
describe
'242105' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZC' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
335762fee80e3d3f0b370118e449b43b
6645b7a40d13dd9d6e24107548f627a61419ea3a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35775' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZD' 'sip-files00164.pro'
9a945623c0fa8088f6409e877d1d9ce5
2551d6c75561788f4af97c6c34ba426bb4753ad6
'2011-09-25T16:11:59-04:00'
describe
'84687' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZE' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
57c9af1d50c6b54ad36dbebb7f51d6de
0e45905f23285844e01b6a4ac5308e67d33d6f10
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2629152' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZF' 'sip-files00164.tif'
741ee5d1b7c827ba7dbd0d3a3406b690
e9620d16670f13f75ae5602916b3dcd64e03d9e2
'2011-09-25T16:08:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZG' 'sip-files00164.txt'
f8101cbb7138a1de203237ea84f3db73
c0501df6068deb8d6a0345681754a3e1b3a747b7
describe
'315658' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZH' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
2bb0cf67070984fff63e1566685092b3
c4f7d9edfc8b7ddfa958560c674454cb14ee4289
'2011-09-25T16:05:06-04:00'
describe
'229585' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZI' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
379232926d0170af9c745da3df31756d
750273c8fe57d65e309166cf6cba55147ce53d11
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36243' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZJ' 'sip-files00165.pro'
6f2c5fb7de4269af9a26155249bb9f4e
0419fbca5ac1c3a491293658cae3cfc2962dfa5a
describe
'86536' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZK' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
2b1f22020d1943cd258401e7e21b4920
2516023de9d24036448e89bdc60d153faa137ab6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2538652' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZL' 'sip-files00165.tif'
4ba890401ed0033422c13e0551cf3451
e928578412158d218c854e51fc4cd2a5b48a2f8f
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZM' 'sip-files00165.txt'
3179f367883ef1c0255ee768ac8cda01
b75d86adbf0469a48596ebbe6152077fa2d99dd0
describe
'338446' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZN' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
429f8b7b02b71fc72ab1e47d4d952f6a
3d55eaf2598f5a73ca8e03149d0c21f072e95a45
describe
'203752' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZO' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
b79e41f4aceb8be8e05ed8b634f93389
dd63be002ebb9014aab54830699a9ef568b257e8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28042' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZP' 'sip-files00166.pro'
f5f3db1f696a03bd7b16a86f13b124c4
4ce3bdf3fb266533e3758fa059c52e4d87416d84
describe
'72259' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZQ' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
ed0184731718356695a6c8f566190a4f
7c445a4b054f349d569163dad6389db0e640ff87
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2719448' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZR' 'sip-files00166.tif'
9781526fbc4099441e7f77d099d35f8b
a22e046df8db82c5ef07e90bb7b22c84a8c8dd48
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZS' 'sip-files00166.txt'
8736861ec61625a36912bff65afb6538
2f7d44dd3cd9a98dee4725e7e0775add7ede2569
describe
'322893' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZT' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
ae894d716eaede9475fe1937688ec6b7
4718ca2be68e14db8a44eabadb4e26925d693802
describe
'247822' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZU' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
334d645405f442b62e2c61461057a2af
523cc469ecdeb87ffa3511e0f59459853c4bf1af
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39703' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZV' 'sip-files00167.pro'
7f5d450b3049ba6c57bf1bccd81a39d1
7e36299075291c51892e92601690cb9113fa3dd1
describe
'89305' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZW' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
a446abe3c7821388597f0112aa0de982
f141cc6a1912df0a7a76473ae7e53fc788028b8b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2596896' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZX' 'sip-files00167.tif'
d593f1eb788cc79e08f7a3e30100a131
2fedc010dba66b49c1204857591923ab87979370
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZY' 'sip-files00167.txt'
e388830545b9ff0a0e01efbac5f9f0c5
aad762c1927081f793e71b5f7f3929aebb99a679
describe
'347550' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAAMZZ' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
11db8bc2d6707dd0b142c5d9fe334800
521d59ad6ce76d2762c8977b4281ee80c04d297e
describe
'246605' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAA' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
8d7614e811cddc0543dcc001ee39d128
2f93ad341ecc435df65fc1ace07c3a18b7119988
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38969' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAB' 'sip-files00168.pro'
04a2a9da4d2db066de399d99c69c1e15
b9ccd67cffe8b577abdf9f6fb7e56d2d26becf3b
describe
'84366' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAC' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
697dc0144ca75855c009bbae7a541a6f
9a6f6c281b65ee9bb13b9137704aae855d66645a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2794056' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAD' 'sip-files00168.tif'
19b65dddbc22b5a01a99d19e5068d736
aa6ccbfa42b18caec847fbb8e206d9a6f7b03e15
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAE' 'sip-files00168.txt'
aeb9e6e1f0bc4cb8b746034118a15f03
8371ec25176e943497908946444f1640206aea36
describe
'321630' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAF' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
4188c643ed77e0635b791c970e914891
ba202fb903175472f162be5e55adfb76cd2340aa
describe
'236052' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAG' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
f90be8679047c90e1e02a9ac63038109
ddd76529fe67180c62b08b2cd0230487a26b1375
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37623' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAH' 'sip-files00169.pro'
36db2ca1fe5ff56d2dd7562bda9e1f0b
e083a0b91fe7b0b0543438fc47f3e71ca88dcd26
describe
'85302' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAI' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
4b54a5be08c3945e4b8c5998cc4a37e4
d46ec7c704e5a8a23928a1cfcb70b843ca61dc38
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2586336' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAJ' 'sip-files00169.tif'
79d251436f8354274a1e27da34795659
fe024095263455c9f6b09b27047e2d28bed51566
'2011-09-25T16:12:08-04:00'
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAK' 'sip-files00169.txt'
fe3952ae99ceaa531fba9c5d81bec6f5
ef453f1a7dd60d39422edbbdee9e7f29cab33ce4
describe
'325283' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAL' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
d048f85b0dbb89510c147ed6ad3bf484
0981562405034178e6c73228ce1a8d659958e207
describe
'252648' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAM' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
7e5c7870ad4de7ad5593e19a0b6ff0cb
e815062772ee1e25edc0486219895e6c9267d84b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37795' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAN' 'sip-files00170.pro'
b61d25a7d3934e33049ddb0d137768e6
00644fad877d46702886e2a0592eaa9941edd466
describe
'90027' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAO' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
0658207b9edeb0cb53bb254fcf248796
f5c5261e3fb29a0336ee7df892e69c03ebef9397
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2616172' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAP' 'sip-files00170.tif'
dba8ecad08bce086f923500e691192de
f60a2dddf6f3a1836fa8ebd316d993c3cd7a09bb
describe
'1532' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAQ' 'sip-files00170.txt'
d46a9121e0e4cd5f25b99afe3698ad44
946c6647c110453b0195a83700d250145c79dd48
describe
'314553' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAR' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
8e75aa96b5d2935e49cd746bde6e5136
bdbb4b22d4b5febec4940f656e9682310ed3a345
describe
'253017' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAS' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
2bfeff0b1c8edb02873d8d94bdf64eb2
303f548296b56ce89e0a051860c64b4ee8d90d7d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40074' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAT' 'sip-files00171.pro'
377a33656d24a2acd6e947fff92fb60c
ae63970d47bc2576788bc731a8b4bee69a7437dd
describe
'92490' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAU' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
f60c4b1c059840dfd67d71d95eb33857
8aa489333fca5fa15d1cf69aa1c707566a1dceb1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2529700' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAV' 'sip-files00171.tif'
9cd28a740c47eb4bf13974252654800f
32a2b1bcf9eb3b4803360739cf5b38eb3fa70b3a
describe
'1580' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAW' 'sip-files00171.txt'
9e1af958a5049dcea492daa3968249ef
bb13fbeac0f9b803791b532c2d6c3bb77fbcb95c
describe
'347625' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAX' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
3d3d6f90ca3b83bbe0f383cdb73dcfda
ad3d4f44696e7de0ef899503e5fbb531d7f77e57
describe
'249346' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAY' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
63ff4ce7f352cba0c1bcceec44e475fb
b1158227d95fd3276ccd7d2289f9cc5275e0f052
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38583' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANAZ' 'sip-files00172.pro'
e8fb09ffa65dc7ea018ff954539cf453
3c8e4686d7912baa655ebe93d41cc925900d4d92
describe
'86542' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBA' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
ecf0609cfe69693cb54ebd836e02fc83
dc30c9a590d374e70ee7cdfe239115c771766c38
'2011-09-25T16:05:53-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2794100' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBB' 'sip-files00172.tif'
de93b42f0576228c166a67e61b3f3a67
27cd0639b131c005e11b28ea47e45ffc1a2f8bbc
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBC' 'sip-files00172.txt'
e1ec22122492b45e3b5bb0d94a4886d0
79e52c95c77c4ed6f0ae96c4a0b784c3d3a21124
describe
'334534' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBD' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
6c089907cbe5b1d34cd0058643695c2a
8342e57bb6b73984d1e4bd4297067606fc1cb9cf
describe
'183726' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBE' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
fdff50e4366e20ea37b892ec2f691757
f08bb230c66aa7dcdc855dfc2041d3c0b9dc2881
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26022' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBF' 'sip-files00173.pro'
a9a4c2f9a4ecfa97b17f61b2b8e9a7a4
5daa7338f666cea139cb5a3d12bf0ebe27779b88
describe
'66654' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBG' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
1caaa57322ec4e2e504a2c16fd082739
0ec6eadbaf80e08234eae6b291d02a81468e1a23
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2687952' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBH' 'sip-files00173.tif'
b57be5e07c5d44999652296d59b93148
2355ed3b03e6890dc5033ef642a1795b828d4a9f
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBI' 'sip-files00173.txt'
51efee13066414db1ce3693782a7454f
a6dfc0be8f83da0efa17a99c441970d33977eef8
describe
'325516' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBJ' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
16ddc2548f563ce12b3d3758f7015c78
34c247b8aeec88cf8f46aa301c146eab9323f649
describe
'236322' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBK' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
df0260dcc74f29d36cbf842dea6f23ab
ca2da0dc0cacebd1bd64b0a4cfc9fb9cd8fcab0a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35433' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBL' 'sip-files00174.pro'
d6f6c94d8d1fb3807e37898e64fdccc5
bb6894f39ab574d38da7cf264349a4507ec03afe
describe
'86825' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBM' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
e2f4cb52fedd1fd2abca0594f258df32
4e6810c7869008a1294df685c9840a44883a2f1b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2617700' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBN' 'sip-files00174.tif'
71697c04a9302333b4f82891cb47887b
3052e7babadc0bac37daa48c9bf7d6f29accc1a4
describe
'1425' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBO' 'sip-files00174.txt'
d51a34c448502ad19bca876d568c52f0
cdc7bd35baa79e37e67b0b14ec3ba1bd7e4ff566
describe
'348225' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBP' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
252eb1200c10f0f125370e9876a6e193
ace76fca1befd3de880090b0c3cfbd05ae97bb2e
describe
'225839' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBQ' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
16b30f5e6e367c1842ff030e206601f3
2d77b9bcef0e6d773af7ccfae92f61f55362c818
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35366' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBR' 'sip-files00175.pro'
8350a29aefcfd7582a0123fc86804c45
a642b86d84801eced99e74346f5b65c7b6f2b17b
describe
'79551' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBS' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
da32166be9e30126dc2ffb75ebaaf622
14e3f3515434be241794a17c94f6f4c7931c8d27
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2798684' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBT' 'sip-files00175.tif'
70a2d108ecf276e246f543e0377f17d6
b7329ae8f4b55532299fbfe077a0d55bbdb5b8e6
'2011-09-25T16:07:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBU' 'sip-files00175.txt'
4436908031cbd97a79ce96e370d86091
4d51291ca94bacf4b29112a30d7db081d0da98aa
describe
'347626' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBV' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
b182d87fd559a28c3af2fba14b48e7c5
0b6254c7d928e40806e41329e8001c2101ef77f1
describe
'240991' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBW' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
f1a731f608b428f4ea95c811ce9363fb
f9bd82f2d350a9a5b5b449a8fac9c10e1b27faf7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36548' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBX' 'sip-files00176.pro'
614e41f62640b01bf5d11a80ebc8fae2
2f663f041431a97069dfc5331bd30b7493251700
'2011-09-25T16:09:36-04:00'
describe
'83852' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBY' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
698b18310250b3cdf0ec736f5210cfc0
62cfd74259efeab99953da7d6c10d0b12cd9de3a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2793944' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANBZ' 'sip-files00176.tif'
d19f6d020af0165d10ad528125ce91b7
7b54114c646b371fbd9e8186534aba3edd68eb39
'2011-09-25T16:10:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCA' 'sip-files00176.txt'
477862c27f379d22aba6291563f57577
f7ffecd9303c5530bfb465b88b74e80830656f09
describe
'348235' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCB' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
fc95da79a4860c38f23c1040d168dfa8
935bee56ac5f5c6d37a98cd0f7256f0884add48b
describe
'224553' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCC' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
f4242fcd6fa29bb1edcaf3eee1887505
d945b3ed3343de519733b67f08dddaab1bb508fe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36258' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCD' 'sip-files00177.pro'
f5ec4770224b2cc4dc6a8e884b78c4de
3daf1501b8793324525a3290f492822350a8cd9e
describe
'80423' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCE' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
e52b4ba0d09d384bf6cadf82f9731946
f59c57a59e72cb2117f086e71ff6007f92ed1342
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2799024' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCF' 'sip-files00177.tif'
f9a5965acc2443bf92caf82153618c3f
8d1a0432593eb5b73a1012cdd6a850661d22e27f
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCG' 'sip-files00177.txt'
9df0f5ed854d969f345bd6f87daf9670
820f4298f30ec5306e9802f5aff9ef93dbc363af
describe
'333567' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCH' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
dab97b7a42a4543f185d2dbdd3e65467
87d21d2ddceea06f7ee1f3d51c3cfb699bed4797
describe
'251790' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCI' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
885bab2ed121d01243a3a02338ca805c
bbb11312c9be68878415065c1de15a0356975d7d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38813' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCJ' 'sip-files00178.pro'
0db835e72d56d51d264af6f4329d66a1
2685ac4ba89d4e774ad972aab8816303d75aaddc
describe
'88378' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCK' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
cbedc0a7df5441190dd99a113d08f4bf
56bb8aa81972777b8b64794bec316af189302543
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2681756' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCL' 'sip-files00178.tif'
7cb7505413c1047d1c1c0e088fcb355c
de9c8009869d7230fcbe885d7262335de1d89a24
describe
'1558' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCM' 'sip-files00178.txt'
7fc4510c036ee030d686d5f53b2fe8f6
4ff240e5f2894cdcef3003b057a661c05fd2f8b8
describe
'318958' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCN' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
5ce4ea6a6cfbebadbbdf560175642e65
4e2a00d80baeaf97bcc84b00b216637b74a6f6cc
describe
'243155' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCO' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
11c8aef540cc2af10cb81a82833ac9da
9fdb771907cebfdad4273b1c9f39e78400810995
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36905' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCP' 'sip-files00179.pro'
891c6aa622530e291a83579986e7e5e7
0c55c10abe5ed4e5ad611b60fd355de0570d0599
describe
'88066' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCQ' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
0085901ce63932f80e40a11f8c9d4f4a
1f4836df723a9686d3c489bc47a5e2e4d266f5b0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2564600' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCR' 'sip-files00179.tif'
a49dd7de8f48f6585def32740da4699f
b9830e2959a517e68f49b9b99bff805cd49795b3
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCS' 'sip-files00179.txt'
3ca3e9e91fc62c4e578065e149541823
f1e5c9a7e5a98fccfcff18e8c3820b02458ea997
'2011-09-25T16:12:33-04:00'
describe
'322857' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCT' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
dc39257ce3238f10b52a092216574092
9fb8ee2b23f982837cbe4700e2ac8c8cd41ae596
'2011-09-25T16:10:53-04:00'
describe
'207491' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCU' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
ea9ff8fe7f27a3907cadbb8c0a0a9f3f
33b59fec8776a1b3ccdf8d2305b60d8ed1454094
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28010' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCV' 'sip-files00180.pro'
5eb48ae7091813de00d724311251aa99
707e756ef3c4e30d06ad65d057032b2407e6ed60
describe
'72694' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCW' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
3a6bfcaa220561790d4a7920a5fdc42d
b5967badc2e4e26339c152aadc1c2a80eecfd5d4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2597504' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCX' 'sip-files00180.tif'
fe618deed758459b20c30b6c4e05c54b
1d41fa3fd3119213835a72f11e0be7b276c806f3
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCY' 'sip-files00180.txt'
47b12647c19f569de41fe3929e95001b
24e245010ecac346c7bff55a7f1aa77a6607d0ce
describe
'321839' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANCZ' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
2ca0f29929a98a1bc2ba393e00a313f5
ea747b04b0298d6a32b6c9aeb7809bee673e89d5
describe
'212663' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDA' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
0b046a19252a7e87a9f6d83b6a9b9ec2
a60e516f50fff644bae7b405efaa13dd81aecd8a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'31908' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDB' 'sip-files00181.pro'
9a5030c4ca0aa92af0be1ef5bb1e657c
82509338dd026a1c04a8dcc79e48dc14fcb58a65
describe
'77317' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDC' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
ad8db25a762888d106090acc0f21f8cb
0d1df4c2ebb19d419f22a02fad43a48fc869ece4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2587172' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDD' 'sip-files00181.tif'
39d0e3cb5909e8eb74c9b3363a2323b7
726307aa8c519e21cea349a203738c04ab7a7b86
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDE' 'sip-files00181.txt'
e2bbdbece3bd740df6e7c157ae39bda4
5603bfd9a7bf7cf04f008c1610f62af911baa6ad
'2011-09-25T16:08:50-04:00'
describe
'337670' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDF' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
a3c1a05465434c077adff10036b432b2
d7f173c07ee677ceca244b962662dfc4497f65cb
describe
'245331' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDG' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
5fa644a897601fc19dec43a7c76a2f29
13de2eecb08bbc805dbea44ff355ebdd468c3a42
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39112' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDH' 'sip-files00182.pro'
1ddf188f56e0c191a4d46b0f104a5a70
ba8259dd1158693b03e314edee2eb287eceb1327
describe
'86114' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDI' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
1cdc252792dbec1f788a935b9b413310
88ae81b9253ec7bc75958b9bc087ccb12aeb12dc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2715064' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDJ' 'sip-files00182.tif'
6593373f56dbe153b4b40f4e9f6ad0c3
37c70a2ae5bc697649eb67666d4421408bc5d723
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDK' 'sip-files00182.txt'
a5ee6d3b1390a04cdb65960bf95186df
ae67f91425cb2ce7274647d58b95b7a7fae7d234
describe
'326442' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDL' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
41844cb171aed6a43b18c2f835669c3f
502ddc6e991b496e62abb3e6fd621bceaafb8d07
describe
'244888' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDM' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
1daf6dfcc60e22a05638355e3905242f
c7c9cca85823e87ad265d92d10b92093704af3d4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38065' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDN' 'sip-files00183.pro'
073fb7009e5ebf1da9c0625c02546fc8
6ed463e55ec47fcb9e35abec1d535eddf6b4d10f
'2011-09-25T16:12:36-04:00'
describe
'87528' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDO' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
c057bfd9fb94d50ad74f0ff48081f0b3
ca81b8897ac6c8d67f851f3ce3f306732d68a99a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2625304' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDP' 'sip-files00183.tif'
94ec4755f83dcd877b389b39a0471a36
34783895ac4ee773ab0f1eec496b41972ed12fa1
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDQ' 'sip-files00183.txt'
dd9652dd82bcc6ed976db4b87561a7be
6d0bb53d575e83cdad712c1482cf263a3bd15913
'2011-09-25T16:12:39-04:00'
describe
'335587' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDR' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
0578ce948bfbd4402ea9e625b56a1b2b
2632bf582a3aec7618861ddd2cf63b8b3da2b731
describe
'243123' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDS' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
da3c61d8fa2e38b99512dc7d98936736
1fd03eb411ee1d882609d7c8fd4a2d66dd45d139
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDT' 'sip-files00184.pro'
ee29ccad316050f5c8ccdcc40a2780d4
619c1a88ef685418484fd2dfed6865abc95764a8
describe
'85276' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDU' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
8c360cf85aa9d0b916ec60d9278e06ca
feb00bb0274ba5062bf21ce115f78809d3ea08d2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2697924' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDV' 'sip-files00184.tif'
6499af46c9052177a7259ed5f9af665d
dc72c35a7b79a2e1a0942a21a86952848b47ffa6
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDW' 'sip-files00184.txt'
1e17965916293d4b517f0b8f8bdcabf4
a8fdeee9f4b2f578be85aeb27c735aa8d68467e5
describe
'324517' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDX' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
f5f7b88835d77d9a97816a8b24b6f575
24df87bb46ce6cf179f88d56fd29c19fd4ac993c
describe
'235804' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDY' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
0bb0eb1639cd08e3a713a343ea9aa47e
5f2755011bda25f8ce425d4377bdfc7893a3f29d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37605' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANDZ' 'sip-files00185.pro'
31f3dac2616bf34df519b9713081dcb7
80e5daf303de00a142698e76ab90e1cf199df1ec
describe
'85248' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEA' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
8006a2c5c11505f04ae94d9541ea0357
791242c52c3893399b24ed1161ff22bc5890d513
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2609512' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEB' 'sip-files00185.tif'
4910a186b1b0712f33ab1163400cc882
834ad4818fb04113c9ed34813322ae493aad47c9
describe
'1488' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEC' 'sip-files00185.txt'
9e5a7030434b426640840a7ec2aadcff
b12399443735a373a66938e0c6d38ab1ea1d59c5
describe
'339857' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANED' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
b201ab7ec0660f6c9cce4d55d617c179
06ce468d0a5679759740bd6d37a2073390d83ced
describe
'227986' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEE' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
31ed0d8178dce1f6db628fe05426a3ee
2bf36f0c126b41e381a30999639e36f113440478
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37670' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEF' 'sip-files00186.pro'
7f5589ddcd7ef6764eb05ea83ce2274e
b937412d316e1e2cfc4f1b9354dd30ba2b3df444
describe
'82362' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEG' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
eec02e2e184868c4a49115b5e75b188f
261837117a09da4adf8a3ab2d27b6b0915fdb771
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2732312' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEH' 'sip-files00186.tif'
745c05da1e935aa523c6d076dfe918a7
e091283b05444cd53c39e27ff9b24cc106dc6923
describe
'1541' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEI' 'sip-files00186.txt'
1fe2ac9e51b98d9c5fdc7a219cf74b77
d89b30f336ef65554c2f07c7a70002e590db7945
'2011-09-25T16:05:14-04:00'
describe
'322136' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEJ' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
3f73acf7e41d204b8feab7876d19435a
2e2566d660d47a92abed02e086f2618c8394f121
describe
'231888' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEK' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
b66026059f66eb85246d8ffb602cc820
a80a19c2051bc2524801e9ff1302de4baed7f9f6
'2011-09-25T16:05:59-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36162' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEL' 'sip-files00187.pro'
628ef84c3b41595d1865f77b048c0d56
f167f9e69c9c285a531fed3b56ca3416293ef58d
describe
'84663' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEM' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
db670e1db93930bfdce364da9f6a92d9
f8c72e1ef8ed433f4eb3b671b887478caf06ee2f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2590220' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEN' 'sip-files00187.tif'
5a671b5100aa338929add09f98fdaf61
a1bb9328975f3cdd731c0798cc5ff0b03c8d333e
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEO' 'sip-files00187.txt'
8efc5fd27421081ecce54f2d5d92a979
6c405d9fa6098224cb64c700e40c74e5d6b09f71
describe
'340889' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEP' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
8ef6d88b6c462870cd5b3542076594fc
7ea7fde78e5270df1b0d891378d387b86fd64e4d
describe
'217523' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEQ' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
c7de0ea3e584607fb001c0be6226e0a2
aec3d6bdb7c8a316cba7a361bd289361cd513952
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'32598' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANER' 'sip-files00188.pro'
72dbfca1701ff46e2c38a9ef40a34540
76f3f2ccf98888c822f2617049791b6482ece2e5
describe
'76656' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANES' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
e0da5b0f3704b3d93a760ef431d97f44
3826c30b172e32833c9a0377c17fdee894c38538
'2011-09-25T16:08:22-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2739692' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANET' 'sip-files00188.tif'
406f3faaad85cd573bd805350c66cd3a
8390b2fe81b64bd12e9e5ff13267e56bf609a9d4
'2011-09-25T16:11:48-04:00'
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEU' 'sip-files00188.txt'
d4a2fcd9aaaa83eb29218a6a8ec4f12b
02f0ca344376087b4365aa5c788ddf0a67d6e781
describe
'338308' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEV' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
579a205940af2ca4164519b4622dcf16
14328c0cb60cc4c4d0767ec5715b1be658c326cf
describe
'224422' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEW' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
b554b73864b9b9111bd234c76feea2ad
2a4614dcc3c04acf951336794638c20611c3d868
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36333' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEX' 'sip-files00189.pro'
33c0b70e4c97ff92f733dfdbb556aed7
c8c5693ba2e5bd2ebdcfeb68015e810a0b16bd99
describe
'81711' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEY' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
7c65e77318f6bf0b5693af4676bbd422
9b2edc25286eb6dd11f15dc23d3d32480d57777b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2719788' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANEZ' 'sip-files00189.tif'
9ed26f765f82e986a64528ae46b28c9f
99541b2cf66144c7435716d713e5a402df9efe0a
'2011-09-25T16:12:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFA' 'sip-files00189.txt'
d65ba21d5ceb21c9676ba405ba9acd2b
dff00c00ddcdad8c85aa96ca7256625636dc4b14
describe
'331708' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFB' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
c464782369c341bd9cc5857c1adf9da1
404b97cae78ef09185e6dd2a316b411272a511bc
describe
'231298' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFC' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
0b4a7789517c5e49fd4d8f9787056631
181393721ec52da820af6eba202e714771c25a49
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36517' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFD' 'sip-files00190.pro'
c58ad1d20e5caff7db4fc3e7a50a2376
4c7b110b4c71625c264e4c6167d05f4c57b1ebb5
describe
'83390' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFE' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
0deb0714cef1ab83bad430bb208eadec
5b6e658e199892d4af9edde34e0caa39db8befab
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2666896' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFF' 'sip-files00190.tif'
7f4f4206e409fc35b2ad188243387f56
2a1b31500af4e3c7aa89c22d94870246e8155c81
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFG' 'sip-files00190.txt'
9db4e6cee6d7f4ffedcf75b9b7260846
682dcd8d48e725b98a051bc883d8678167e49cac
'2011-09-25T16:05:27-04:00'
describe
'348275' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFH' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
b5a0eb0ed9cfdb55dcc2bd63adc6ed91
42052349a299e80de9536fa6abf3a5638a64a6d8
describe
'220045' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFI' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
e4cf727f973d099265bdff90d9177be6
5d6a8b3098b0d649973eb8d24deee37f522dc36f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'33858' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFJ' 'sip-files00191.pro'
382c2150488be8df0cac4bcaadc05b5a
48d7d677a2fec16080e02bdb42d2a34a13a101be
describe
'77875' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFK' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
6c913e9f0fd7ef27b6632ee88d76123f
a19d973d6ff154728000a3cbae130f19eb9d4d68
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2798724' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFL' 'sip-files00191.tif'
a37b678b8111232dd15c5ca780ab6415
39439f988c436a63ee87990f08f4b8ccb609355b
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFM' 'sip-files00191.txt'
7c5e250be22e2c98ab9d408a183f1c7a
c3e1d1661e96fb9179b57763baab58f619b20818
describe
'325186' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFN' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
7371c29767e9288386faadb227257de0
77b7b4743f3ab4957c339bf4f1edcb6223b820fa
describe
'240840' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFO' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
4b01a42be85fa32d469054f6d1499b23
e29bbd94bbe0f40fafccc6e418fe2c41c9c716e6
'2011-09-25T16:07:49-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34942' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFP' 'sip-files00192.pro'
0dfbc54f0393ad5fed54e9023efe26e8
8c7752b9c3656f46e2174565d16399d21664ffd2
describe
'86643' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFQ' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
351103b30ebe58cf93e1cff5ee3fd4c0
8f6867f3886a5fbd6bffaf2df22694fa79107e81
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2614532' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFR' 'sip-files00192.tif'
4e68f70b5c41ace64cc3ec97cd19d42a
856eac8f1c5f8c2a45f229b9b5d830de5aa0e048
'2011-09-25T16:12:07-04:00'
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFS' 'sip-files00192.txt'
816bf9344b07926be99734316868eb71
1b5e570f08a635aafc3dc3b10e85676d87a775de
describe
'348261' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFT' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
956588e7a1d734abca54f9cbfbfd8042
361bf598e5caa5f653c1751bd5d316d0b759c4fe
describe
'234659' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFU' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
55bfd58eafb9e1ded71579d8177adc5b
62ef25d58820009ad9a4fcf062d1fd981ab57fc7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37296' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFV' 'sip-files00193.pro'
327205df17b8921963e4eb3aeafea6d1
1829d9ed5888fc23f5f26fef80b8b1ca7abf9a02
describe
'85249' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFW' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
ac2fe47b5899205e989128fb07523cc6
c64139c206c584b4cc883efac07ec6e291b43553
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2799288' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFX' 'sip-files00193.tif'
01cb815a0bafbef07e448e3fee879e82
96bee2ef00183142361d4d1caf18700e68e7958d
describe
'1536' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFY' 'sip-files00193.txt'
ce92daa5a49fb30c63f94cd92c56004d
9694458e5249fe6ae8cf6fe89e0a01cda1d11acc
describe
'329217' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANFZ' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
503abc7f77148ebaf289c086b972c881
b9af8a3c5c338df2afec6edc7842e1ec87c26b8f
describe
'240806' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGA' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
2b4c2400b916359cbdc0a962b22e3364
0fac6994171e03e62f755fbdb69a66ec0c0440ca
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37953' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGB' 'sip-files00194.pro'
e448deb35580a8e08868d73c00d351f9
97f445f50c9cb497160d77f31d16bb547ad08cb7
describe
'87643' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGC' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
f6c0c0c38cd96ab3aafb225046a0063c
c0cda2c00495f10a65b958b712b2a962f097523a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2647440' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGD' 'sip-files00194.tif'
c692458f5ee1d74915971b20acad8f09
1a5df06795fd79f72ebbbd27f7cf15c60b91f098
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGE' 'sip-files00194.txt'
0f21ff20fce41dc886d49b3d71fe9a83
1665a45cefa325062be8de8aafc75afd15211a25
describe
'326104' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGF' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
027c5be101636b5591de55fb47c33717
8a41ecc857bd5a7ac11a5d3353e547ebaaa68f15
describe
'249830' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGG' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
821f424d727a75a0ec15bb5e8262fb74
38a130e7e83139e4f4a05b5c158ca7d28deb87fd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37232' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGH' 'sip-files00195.pro'
5335242f185016415c13e0488eeaee38
bc207b41ff61d4219855545cb91ffd34d7d9423c
describe
'87034' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGI' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
250ce26a0d7ee88e7cdb8d7de5bb9ddb
cfacde26d7f4857702f9f99e7fa6719e93dbf4b8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2622284' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGJ' 'sip-files00195.tif'
fc1a3bbd70bb951877521b96a9dce5e3
fda793bac3099d8be43e914ec159ea07653ca36c
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGK' 'sip-files00195.txt'
6fd300e0f8659f377d8d3e973e4dcaa2
1fe874a1d7fe38c3475eec70921a065676cdd8fc
describe
'347608' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGL' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
ea416f61202c269d18a81e744d612dca
fe5e62335eb9a3716b7b558b355f8831eaacd74a
describe
'229999' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGM' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
02d51e619a2c15e5f39c4465ae69aeef
570b82e9395f54ac7587f00e5651282fa47ddac1
'2011-09-25T16:04:58-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36340' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGN' 'sip-files00196.pro'
b301086564fb9772012005a8f57eb4a3
0f0422a854d41d90d384b0aa66128e32b1de51f4
describe
'82382' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGO' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
41673a26c9331a5a614446f0971a97ee
1e59686ede4683e2fa5b2eb0be5cefd06a8a9990
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2793832' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGP' 'sip-files00196.tif'
1dcd6c7427c82611219eb2372c6f7b79
164fa98003c32c8a93ba47f98b49b78c11da087b
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGQ' 'sip-files00196.txt'
f34f13ff5d5a802c5b30a27baf3ffc3c
6341cc081ffd0a34b92c571d4d8f483b42f98ab7
describe
'348204' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGR' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
4d95e4f232565c1d04cf1f6b3569258f
41a960395112a2e32c1c82b56cd272d8b367c605
describe
'129480' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGS' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
60ebf490c597a5fb8abc3176cbfa195f
4266d98cfaa71a13559fcf8f08cc582225c0dc85
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'14996' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGT' 'sip-files00197.pro'
78a676a54b05973c66bbd157f06c6bbb
cb350c8ab341e870eb7feaf0ae1841f6220c92ab
describe
'47579' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGU' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
4b815f7a743de07fb3b7464ac4133526
2375d7fe4f8210ceeca4771f8c2de4edcbfca483
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2796280' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGV' 'sip-files00197.tif'
71645050b3df17924a0e6cf34bd034e8
698876f7b98cc8c14d02757c689146ab067d937c
describe
'616' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGW' 'sip-files00197.txt'
25f08dc9f16c84c68c89f7725bab0961
65305d181adbcaf9d681ea528097b16eeb628f44
describe
'347448' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGX' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
1b8b3c66695d732d426e7072db0bcd03
786cff7b106b326f81b218f578b20ee41da1de15
describe
'74389' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGY' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
895d7de32e533386a88ce21f82250ac3
b74b72bf49301a9fba1c2312d382d0de35607c6b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'6174' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANGZ' 'sip-files00198.pro'
edf29b4886755135e731d9298d0bcdd3
a4d5a73ef26e5e0e53e712dae52dacbd2e59faec
describe
'26857' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHA' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
7796756067ae53995ab20a96c6dc4ac3
448e32e35823b3d5f22638a3b6195822c24b5fef
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2789556' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHB' 'sip-files00198.tif'
c78eb44dfba0643d1313a0e90de638dc
b962f99d8ba10084013315096a3c5865438d1612
'2011-09-25T16:10:32-04:00'
describe
'305' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHC' 'sip-files00198.txt'
d92f145701abca90dbf67cbc37dabc3c
33a463661822af1d569d18138a64718d094fdc83
'2011-09-25T16:10:54-04:00'
describe
'348230' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHD' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
e4cca914380efb7efb1e7de1cc4ca892
5aa9adb2c4e7ea6e5dfe12977734de176aae9e60
describe
'233699' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHE' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
f84be31bcef5c5aad492b338f027354e
3452804e1d09c6b0e68449de02d229d507ec53ec
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'586' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHF' 'sip-files00199.pro'
5c57ef23859e1fafa146c33af0e85732
e9f1b4a0c6219c26f38ebb87544b88b7fb3ef3f3
describe
'70045' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHG' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
1e5c893e592c54ab71b30dd3b17f9247
7509812fc63a1131f541cec9dfce283286b27055
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2798168' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHH' 'sip-files00199.tif'
b2b504fce923335c9979d0880486db57
e2b1c0afe321ac8d6d35cc3983892f64f57c7f8b
describe
'184' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHI' 'sip-files00199.txt'
0d0c02614aa52150fe21ffea961e2b74
6c668fe79a9936480286cff251f4b6cdb9c2045f
describe
'347629' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHJ' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
7ae8f9257dbac7c5f12a359596b398e4
da1e2d48009143fa36a31eb74182ecf1042b0a60
describe
'194153' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHK' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
ef5dd733d3e5d181de10c7389feeceec
0f6cfa78c53b36612e933dada49ad0b19661869a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27796' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHL' 'sip-files00200.pro'
0fa374a450da7c18fba0de5efe8f9dd6
a9ceba219af1943a24dcdab79c275e9b362583bb
describe
'67201' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHM' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
0f3ef830942da227aede92665a1b6b15
676201815aaf6463cb8bb429e18d0556c97ea03e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2792412' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHN' 'sip-files00200.tif'
b7f1e0fbb87e4477982577f7e24466ae
c5a357d50e4d0bf21ecfc3ae373ae1033a809834
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHO' 'sip-files00200.txt'
bbc68a60499094004cd5f99380a7a3b1
3a41e7d53623db6ae6ca5a25216390b2fc8659b7
describe
'348234' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHP' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
41804b629a160612b1f1ea107f35fdc0
b8a4bc1a7284da75621df9f3a0785427f7544e1d
describe
'242317' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHQ' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
e86642d41e962b0e9361f89c0b23524f
1e9f6bf6c26ba714cceccdde1912f565f492076e
'2011-09-25T16:11:27-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39058' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHR' 'sip-files00201.pro'
70211f8b29cc9cb01076341a65243b51
9823bf9acbcc7a7d5c9cc547f9d3ccc579657de1
describe
'84289' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHS' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
c4912ac637995093fb29b2cfa75609b4
8bdb548f451aad32fa1533c4dd72f3bdb4a491a2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2799012' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHT' 'sip-files00201.tif'
7934294aa945978d5f61799794710a0a
4739b1a2ab024fa6b35734d168336458d5aefe59
describe
'1570' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHU' 'sip-files00201.txt'
8a2f38ea814e9c518b56fff0404b54c7
0ef7013ad080dd475ab26f5930768887fe6903fb
describe
'347630' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHV' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
f1cf31169b8abaa199c1c50f065d6da7
c69a0eeea50cf9fdf22286faed0b8ddbdcc67c10
describe
'244515' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHW' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
070bcf7b49f9b5ccefc512a88ecf41e6
c283fac3f223fb27ea055903d85c0e86780485b8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39401' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHX' 'sip-files00202.pro'
f3cb3c054bc246fd41dc8b30b27375af
f41741eec75d615b03bb78b34a1ce83eb0af528a
describe
'84451' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHY' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
6eb3c671117cb161d00ab8ada749978d
6eb4d494d026c80864a955a0c95a387d77d2986c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2793844' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANHZ' 'sip-files00202.tif'
952fdaf87122a897afba0a6c10afa139
40b0be8f407cd6d3098fee42f5b863863a453b5c
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIA' 'sip-files00202.txt'
b0059bcd2fc8a640ec73e790689301f8
bb231a79b0d4f5b80ae3032e4ac5afe6713de22b
describe
'330135' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIB' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
9123aaa460c1368005539f8beeda3e8b
cb29288fdfaad02d58292d559e3781de555f1697
describe
'251808' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIC' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
58fb20dd6a8bfb1763f09836f25b27b9
74a413090180157f5bbfc2b9b647c6377a6e4c04
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40895' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANID' 'sip-files00203.pro'
a9c6c8f847421fa5fb6d144da157cffe
804d195d36d2dcf1e21c794f8cc29986821cb245
describe
'91214' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIE' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
f1e073de53409ca26c3779ef078067f8
1f59e17368aeab10229651ca398e0f099c595b84
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2654956' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIF' 'sip-files00203.tif'
cf8a001b4580f9d8df75e87fe5c32436
f1c3f1492b1f8691e7fa23300493910de6a5fe29
describe
'1603' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIG' 'sip-files00203.txt'
e2cbc583062f521a645e3b240eb7ac59
abfcb4419c25f9b2a5df879b2912b5cf0112de0c
describe
'330803' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIH' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
2eaa03f22fbde2235e65624b4b4ba24a
7af8199b059c6bb1fc4e516586636cc1baff5611
describe
'255134' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANII' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
005629da929eec8f70476ed5ea4f1677
637d19f635c137aed797e11f9ddc56b482b44a56
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40037' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIJ' 'sip-files00204.pro'
c9986163d9f487cca0ee280f2e82c43c
14481176dd06f2e344137fdf8d44a2ba51dc232d
describe
'90860' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIK' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
c68394a2d7775177e09bfbe295050d0b
0f5a14ca427c0ad173dd4ae61469979f320daea0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2659836' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIL' 'sip-files00204.tif'
c5236e2f5957099e31f18c0cd73e553a
6089d306275b26fb34bb7a36d4e03525ee3aecad
describe
'1575' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIM' 'sip-files00204.txt'
f76750e31b5429f8b56bf8a4badcfec3
9c24704a595441f94db0c638d483c6746178a57b
describe
'327551' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIN' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
7fc68846022d4213e3621b78fce76d09
075ebd31c1e35190a370e93e53d3f063baf0e064
describe
'254032' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIO' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
d088dc3de4ca1f09424008de5d83e144
3c30e055c37baa3f30a9231276372a0a4d445856
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39143' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIP' 'sip-files00205.pro'
dbaf473192c88a185ea666e4adbdb84b
86d06db23052152147b99091f07bfdbbd4cbc982
describe
'90425' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIQ' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
c066d57cc7f4caabef1d95a8996d26d9
21b3834478e182c954ce6cc4eea9284b95c0a2b0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2633956' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIR' 'sip-files00205.tif'
5f2014d73b5a8266cc4dd3b46f8c94bc
4cd85391d2d8e8d1d005143cfcc31bce8bc31954
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIS' 'sip-files00205.txt'
fab1d00d29d245a0006abcb17c24f0bf
6cb26aa28579c4cc2e2d7e426162915e79aae603
describe
'330128' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIT' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
22144858bf11c554426c8bf82d172c44
5024e5efd47c123a909e7578838d984b1cb526d9
describe
'216859' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIU' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
aaf3e1cea58bd4c36146afc98b005a77
f74ec78271bd64d67391e34ead7289969b6292e8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29674' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIV' 'sip-files00206.pro'
5f789c94135c85eaa3a504ca708d26af
6a783bcfcc9d7094b9836654de5e0d5fb65d0ae9
describe
'74645' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIW' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
17259a88d29754b6d6b52cc789d48745
7a01841f5eb32d4a86b4345a07ab002f595e226d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2655720' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIX' 'sip-files00206.tif'
19b97a4d80da0e9679238a4ef50af61f
68001e540385f07e5d570213e5397a93d7752890
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIY' 'sip-files00206.txt'
eae5378e10e60c68e96dd5bff01cd5d4
427c1c317f2d585c9b2318ec7ba616d99bc2acec
describe
'318871' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANIZ' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
1ef74f5a397b3e16e22795f0c202eff3
ff59f6c68212a23242eb67c921c18a288fead419
describe
'240569' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJA' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
8b224efaad2ca42d4be170629c13835f
8f89a82f3a43ad08c1644ab3dd9d4df34a1bd1b1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36151' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJB' 'sip-files00207.pro'
fa6244c31615adb123307eedb62af03c
4162a81d56b6bef7afc057df4bea42602a809e05
describe
'88939' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJC' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
41abed7a3efedf6532e18c80f27d6acd
429847a4352389413a7ad0d5a9834ce5b942138d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2565044' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJD' 'sip-files00207.tif'
c9bfba872a08faa015b1fd86ef0fab46
473ccabf7a004533be833f26a8db4b912ea26af4
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJE' 'sip-files00207.txt'
feaa8e9b13a9b71be048cc48c37091f6
f29b4ef4bf134bf38910b24dc7b99be6eb10b65d
describe
'347588' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJF' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
e2cc8630d6e92b222554e85ee4188c74
e7e5fa2b2306b8a5975ca759f02f190b6d148cc1
describe
'239605' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJG' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
a4a9f6eeb48fabc8d8ce920394f9d438
4dfa45468fa8a6090b5b8cf8126dbbf06dfcdd43
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39641' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJH' 'sip-files00208.pro'
a9160d846dabefdb09c6be066fa53f52
420129586f838a2705476b4bf9f2c2a7fd734280
describe
'85464' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJI' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
3b03ee4186dbca40f383e41d8fef089e
e7728a46b24955ba5bf8de2ea54f16521850ca58
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2794048' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJJ' 'sip-files00208.tif'
ca173e0732d3ae8f3c17d665b510cf17
8e368f789f29508f09773b119891f7ad47d15505
describe
'1577' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJK' 'sip-files00208.txt'
6625d05ffeb7735d1f272f03fe8bdac8
a4677ea17d7b329045f40ec0c8afd214d4549e79
describe
'348265' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJL' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
8e46dde04d08a8158cbb9b83f54b0fd9
3b8770d3ce4815dadd90755dccdafeca5bb8e55c
describe
'235549' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJM' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
ef4c58e20b9c3bedccd6807b35ccfc63
cd68d8d5bce7006580e8c1f8e8f154de2e1330a6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37179' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJN' 'sip-files00209.pro'
9920c2fcac01439e855bb72d4c15e5ed
da74eddfc08cc3458eedae1b5715b3c31e8c9dfb
describe
'81974' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJO' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
4330d483e7942cab3df23812108f1dc9
60ddce6a5eebebd1ab9a200add1df30264ad732a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2798960' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJP' 'sip-files00209.tif'
0d9e16fc4953551c9248492ba5be55e2
d42a534026865e5028fc811751c79d0cd18bf23f
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJQ' 'sip-files00209.txt'
9af400db5cca7eb233f3126ad905cd8b
d028d601354c95226306b64d2c0c29a65303901b
describe
'347622' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJR' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
5eb22059a6124b9de7cb0fa55f74e169
4a768ea9d15fa5b3188e142cfdcbdff0a3ec4090
describe
'254996' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJS' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
5f7f4a2f3d0ccb6e29e32e1e8f95f8de
49427f730c17fbb5e333e994dcf54c606b0c0975
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40990' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJT' 'sip-files00210.pro'
102ccadc9bc6b998b0ab08a6012a1521
2f46948156378134518901bf2b4d7571d23840b8
describe
'87676' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJU' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
d26cb8c41cd2e141401b1418a7a72667
ec080f8e9f5d34d58d15dc42bb620bff374ad3d1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2794144' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJV' 'sip-files00210.tif'
cbe53ba73d52541fcba1e8bdd6ae0a7e
edbd982febb9a2a9472045e4125c9459bd736934
describe
'1609' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJW' 'sip-files00210.txt'
7a7b9a6acea6220feb8d7d94dcd241cb
7a62fb437287996cc25ec06584a31536e2739eb1
describe
'334198' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJX' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
e17403c0806f432473ee239a0cdd813e
9ecedba442b4dabf94eac1b6d6372a48052c612b
describe
'247310' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJY' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
8b2c10599f877d590a53511367e4c843
124c1d9d6a1ef9549a0e444846d38b5ab3055449
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40587' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANJZ' 'sip-files00211.pro'
cffa75ff21ff13c595872890e751bce3
fd464627ee77328fc3b193488ecf050e3787bd78
describe
'88930' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKA' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
c08b01ac6f039df0921fd9cebca4c0e4
9e63cfbb3213ef1fdf4fcbc5fc6b70f4070e5eaa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2686700' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKB' 'sip-files00211.tif'
d2a6b06d894c079ec21a2c839f83f4e1
f42f336bc94232468abbd92bf1d39f08633c0a12
'2011-09-25T16:12:05-04:00'
describe
'1612' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKC' 'sip-files00211.txt'
f079aac0a1648280827ba040d4b62869
99d2b6635b77894e7142547c880c2a4ccceb95be
describe
'322092' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKD' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
84d4f86109d1c9f083b8f91bcde8eead
34e0e9e9155303e5a1bf735611a6097987c2209f
describe
'206528' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKE' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
8c162eb640dcb6e3ad18858f29f5d217
1a675f1454fe8721ae6f1275ad82d6ae5cdefb2c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29884' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKF' 'sip-files00212.pro'
14a489ade099870d0729db5a746db081
90ec0b85deccbcefaa6e8fcce5a494a8b14ab336
describe
'75029' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKG' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
2d16299fb75f4e379d0a63f500bc1008
5761fc41e4a65c389f1e98fd8edd3af3838cf07b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2589228' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKH' 'sip-files00212.tif'
91ac899590a7d22c8a1091e6960b444b
e06f24285be8e7249ad9dba98699b955c2b14585
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKI' 'sip-files00212.txt'
221ed0d1c82f2c8495e9e1b279d8eb7a
9d79b637b2079b4a98bd453c2c91512443f5f5f3
describe
'324846' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKJ' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
f5307dae66f6e616f0a8ed90bc35eb7a
abf16f8232d022063b32fe715ff7d9e2d9392576
describe
'254348' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKK' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
1528eb4b28447970ee1c1d54f06ff920
008a0842ad128d30cd87f961c1e1754651784186
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40072' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKL' 'sip-files00213.pro'
6f2ba39fb9fa1e337622bd823e0c325c
1c3831dc195863fe992890253e0931e76569d287
describe
'88704' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKM' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
8409f44887141678e815145737ec7a30
edd284c650b3d195e6a6032e0fc5ec4542192e18
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2612364' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKN' 'sip-files00213.tif'
21f94f1821127008b0971ba9d40c2c0d
53e7f114b722b0b3be7693edffe73d54769d7ba9
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKO' 'sip-files00213.txt'
1c0d3412d2a06909876756d925aac0a0
f9812bd45f2626fd1a2669631cb69a68b53cdc9b
describe
'347564' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKP' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
518a97400cb7dc0d661c7d1482b7026c
e11eb4e815e436189c79a8fe33cc53d1665e5157
describe
'238886' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKQ' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
4a50118177437856e5838ceaa7e07520
163b6b2aba80453b36e43a5044f205441086aa9d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38504' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKR' 'sip-files00214.pro'
69a04bd38c88ce6aa0a70b6553104b18
f3155b75596e700df893c219d57531fb8bfa8f67
describe
'83541' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKS' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
a627f508d4fe09638aef74fef2b6b64a
40853cb1d6239ad24ecd6f5b5a026680d9ba0870
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2793940' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKT' 'sip-files00214.tif'
396eb8e48020bbe7262fbb6d34aadf88
112bf3bc626138b8d7e5016e3a63e424c98956df
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKU' 'sip-files00214.txt'
a79ebf42a4e8baa9e3b4d1afdbb44173
c011ee27202cf36140405c852debe90ec29f1327
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKV' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
1b725d3bd724330fea36e0b76a5cfb63
5605eb52da040accac6dab0fa5fea8c5f6316ba5
describe
'208602' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKW' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
9fb841d721a984c3c32d2a486d622249
e2bb9913699e64d225cdc94dda92c159a724bd02
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'32510' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKX' 'sip-files00215.pro'
c0f869aac258ee26a1df6ac0d83a6d71
5310afd0f3622df32f801f6dbab303a5e8089683
describe
'74687' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKY' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
0fc39659a78255cb90bc1f50bf744f86
b30c7bc00749142a0b617164b0da07a9d510df24
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2798176' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANKZ' 'sip-files00215.tif'
01d0bf2075935c092e101bcc4c14acb3
be116a89e6f063e9d0a931d3a2f539a6d0ca32a7
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLA' 'sip-files00215.txt'
fc616f1098a54c65a3b8b2cdc8dba38b
06e1d6cd3e433a7d52a765ee0eea44f9ae027bd0
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLB' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
4555446b5ca44fea3d8755e17f37eacc
6931f0ab97a64e95a0f9d75497ffdde5336c7216
describe
'207668' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLC' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
e616dbdb96123ee757f832ea9ab66773
43d7a6a54dbd78c982f179aa349d22875a59ad02
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'31993' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLD' 'sip-files00216.pro'
dd403bcc92826ae773076c533d88d349
39786174873ca16bd9a9ac0878911b4171144865
describe
'74431' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLE' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
3d430cd76e8d6b357a0e4e842ea124ec
bbca190ac5e159cfecb586e248fe0534bb849aaf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2793296' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLF' 'sip-files00216.tif'
d8e343c36f5241f68628b7e85824c951
41d7cda3986846412e25d9d2d69d36f6f3e989cb
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLG' 'sip-files00216.txt'
fbd09f356571fbbcb39480520c336696
1d65792cd7f25585cf3ce8aab9e7fd1831d4dbf8
describe
'331375' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLH' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
46b13a1ae49157e3dc8beb6700937d69
a566cb8b227d6e9cf974b7eaf4b4f2c3c1dcad47
describe
'236387' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLI' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
b40c1f09904024e1d16271b070b5ce10
8719dc16d0b77707ad3fa758f24c557b54066281
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36236' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLJ' 'sip-files00217.pro'
fb6087dc9e3f06864ec176017a134402
f7f28d52cd823b7f371cafd035361310b74ac432
describe
'84652' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLK' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
56cd788ec161d0290ab72352981e9b32
1c2ae2f6d59bd3ddedeefc48694d5cfa3667fcd9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2664028' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLL' 'sip-files00217.tif'
fc2c1b99809e3a9e94833a6ac9832f26
609b3209914d256d835a7beb0644a3b49cea6f8a
describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLM' 'sip-files00217.txt'
fa9f3770c5d1674879be46b41acfea5c
e702df4758a615adf7bd20308f36b941e4f7e9ee
describe
'347592' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLN' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
3756db55f425e2b88ab20fc94edeb678
ac0560e5816dc0f573dabb2d119c3b2f3f44f16c
describe
'235844' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLO' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
1a2af3450a871f18559c5980a00fd90e
f0235f0595eab0e1c670a6d5d6456d052a45fa82
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35420' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLP' 'sip-files00218.pro'
5dfaabddbf1382c2a7317d1e18b2c755
65ae75288994fa5644acd6c5e693a1afbc2b6a6d
describe
'80784' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLQ' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
8dbe2196d0176c3213501236661b1683
0ffc9f86cb010e9d169ffa72708df9e8e14bea17
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2793760' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLR' 'sip-files00218.tif'
8e88ca69f1b5bdaacd85b96187963652
4e6bed4f9a4d6eb0b5ea61bf7c28c779df31693b
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLS' 'sip-files00218.txt'
3900ab97784f05c73342d82385f80d42
a682e7775e832a12e6349c80cc6634e000973a80
describe
'348214' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLT' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
81a586dd7eee67abdb60852d8b6a00fd
d6be333f6d4219ffa9add082207b6bea5a795602
describe
'213815' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLU' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
d4ee995016687118e18cecf809c909b1
8942c0d9e2cdd53811eb5e0877b95502cf110f96
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35466' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLV' 'sip-files00219.pro'
e30d09eda992295449173f86dd7673d8
6923fed28723c34f5f9d83d89fbb2896af5157a1
describe
'79697' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLW' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
482a70923c14e9b644ee1710c6681413
2ec6adf9c16750f7d55aea13c8b44e3e9c2b9148
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2798896' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLX' 'sip-files00219.tif'
b1882a03238e04ffd9c7e87fb4cdf6f5
e6e2c454e3c4e01c523ed85a20c6d8a8461e985e
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLY' 'sip-files00219.txt'
07147b3c0892545b4e902a90592fcc1e
737c6ec91fc27a6a2c060cdfa0978684eb62a6b4
describe
'325820' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANLZ' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
3a0cfe5988154c82c90da9e02d004166
449d5cf6374eccaf7a5d4f68d21da4354e861270
describe
'247200' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMA' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
130d7de50db754293cd44570cfb948b3
bad3263a3687af79b9bdcab64d2883d0822a2583
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38871' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMB' 'sip-files00220.pro'
e9252a09224d63e290c5d9e9224e3ef9
5fc0d2e035baa005f7d5968727c1006dc557db90
describe
'87965' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMC' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
e6c7b5c2bf1b4614a3966032a186b649
72ac6cd230697743cdb1dfda10ec186877e3b362
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2619912' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMD' 'sip-files00220.tif'
f0ef7900294aa3620889f3b310f95dda
ff20ccee2d75bd1594c63bb0b4202fcf9060880e
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANME' 'sip-files00220.txt'
4e1eed90190ef79fe0f9c969cbeb6490
c65f5981a5f942891f99aa5e4e4751d12f605615
describe
'348245' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMF' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
7503532006cace93f0361ef2173d63b4
98a9a9b86f0b6dbac9fdc2186428fd1c1c035b2c
describe
'245192' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMG' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
b30c8fd470b11f66d5eb2f544281e060
cce9916df961a528c052a86a3c6cf45c66286a72
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39422' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMH' 'sip-files00221.pro'
882d6e17c0c59c0066dc679111d5975a
4d40763af5095189e0f84e7a13c9111b8fe89f99
describe
'84875' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMI' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
c93df313516ca4d9f15a34a22b60d45d
c0de71040191ae27e8ee39f0288bd29e84f76923
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2799244' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMJ' 'sip-files00221.tif'
0302500371c05b2921489471dcb6109f
ddfd06b7948241b64274347facf980fb2e060b93
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMK' 'sip-files00221.txt'
1fbc2a5b8616f11bcc18e4f411a670b3
f5020023686c16249398320b1c58afadb8ec5d91
describe
'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANML' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
552712fbe1d79911c562e5386babff09
78f37d62c332c754422c329da3dac04345ea21a7
describe
'137946' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMM' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
14e43c41b53449c13dcc60b36a8b8d75
a5573fb4b000e8ce086affc4fad7084dc40e1a4d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'11775' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMN' 'sip-files00222.pro'
eeef824cf19f6bbcd3742bbb572d5d7f
01c105ac773e7261cc81d39cc2b2e2022f8b8bd5
describe
'44564' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMO' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
b4dc058fb92208587abce73eed43eb17
4b678dd2209cb86c1a8f943dc741540df74ea456
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2790688' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMP' 'sip-files00222.tif'
b2327d13702f0d7bcb771cb39d98c47a
ae59bae61b4acc2a31ab647b029cb22c67fe216b
describe
'552' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMQ' 'sip-files00222.txt'
96c9aabf67f48f1ef9685fabec718a4f
83b1b7b4f4f01a89e71356e0a0f7ff636ab86834
describe
'320546' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMR' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
89abc478fd10bd9a81098f3fb48deb6c
ba9b3c11403935b80213775a9494514cf27abee0
describe
'99765' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMS' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
cf10b6976b36a77f326bacb9c34f308b
6561f85e95b43f9ecfd041213f3022186f9c4a5e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'986' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMT' 'sip-files00223.pro'
a8837b830a73ba173cdd2e1147e1640f
6f87d2b0ff33f4df340aa90d8b1723b654df1b6b
describe
'30498' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMU' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
94101abbb45b2f6cf05e19dc680aa7c5
3026eecb5aeb81bfedeb2250784d6c4da8d6ddf8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2573180' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMV' 'sip-files00223.tif'
6837595491d8c4a1e6a72a346e998bb0
62c40270e9e4688f9ca3b9d620cdd5e83fcfdc1d
describe
'158' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMW' 'sip-files00223.txt'
5ba842963abd8f04c8abee28179c6823
c7646b70a881809288ecec4c94f972dad7163af0
describe
'393753' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMX' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
5267f6521cf5d04ffc9cc77e09876170
617e2118f651cfb8141569ba8eb64707437fe243
describe
'130051' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMY' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
187d8c7a15a00d4b3cde52aa05bc6693
a1ae6b1ff2acd40b50bfebc93bd679ffbb218821
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'42547' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANMZ' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
17ebd0751a44fa6610efceb81cefeb6a
0ba305fef00470c0a337f62e89832191bace8b5f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'9459236' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANNA' 'sip-files00226.tif'
a5a467e4aace0a86fcd72791d394b9cb
80716520233eb1ff28551820dfdc6427b1334f3b
describe
'26' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANNB' 'sip-files00226.txt'
bb41d6d343f391ae1204629576e32bff
040a1f922b8968d8190b761b93aed0216ca93cab
describe
'379437' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANNC' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
d2f9d05fdca8d469b2d14dd8ed99ca77
55aa62552e6df418c342c4a375f81a5d59f69b5f
describe
'328173' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANND' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
1172636b6e3078bc72450ae4e591c4c5
e3bcce5e40ca671363549b2408fb37d1f6d1dfa2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88940' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANNE' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
45997ace45245e64048a31f6a4a21191
39c9fbe9bae36374e94c01606430fe28eb30318a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'9120368' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANNF' 'sip-files00227.tif'
0ff55ac4ae4f39249453c1bd66942813
ba77426a793d76e40748bf86f545cec02c180d19
describe
'83578' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANNG' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
fa079392354b31ccf6bd3d0c54257560
e11c8e4e62a6e5f354e48d9b26606b1a7c472334
describe
'125962' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANNH' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
1654bd6504f3487121aaf861fde1fbc1
3905e88cb1904b5679668260b5b7a795ebfd18c0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'324' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANNI' 'sip-files00228.pro'
20043b7b750dc270c67a3b3cb6edf4aa
811a237c047e6456bc31f4deddf5dbbc38d7e806
describe
'39557' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANNJ' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
aa27b11ceb578380bc80288fdf42d7b7
b3ab459e058c6e46f98651b2061a3c7b9524ccd3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2013276' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANNK' 'sip-files00228.tif'
dae0117b7f38e6f12c143be105c4bf69
a635997d7d17f7413ed1abc181d954c87b6d4b15
describe
'30' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANNL' 'sip-files00228.txt'
e1680491df70a6434bbc9edc9109ea54
2fdcee070e77a94ed20fac89355718a273804125
describe
'41' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANNM' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
c8321b197d91e4de25799b9d08b65f06
b9d82c2f80c67242b7bb85f8ccc2b52ce3c13014
describe
'310040' 'info:fdaE20080313_AAAAAXfileF20080314_AAANNN' 'sip-filesUF00026569_00001.mets'
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THE ,
SALVATION -ARMY

JUNIOR - SOLDIERS

For: GOOD - CONDUCT
DILIGENCE *** AND
REGULAR: ATE

OBTAINING .. le _. MARKS
OUT OFA POSSIBLE. "GA

“ BE THOU AN EXAMPLE”





WORK FOR ALL,

AND OTHER TALES.














































































2











































































































































































































































































































































































































































































WORK FOR ALL.
WORK FOR ALL,

AND OTHER TALES.

WORK FOR ALL, OR PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD.
THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

BRAVE BESSIE, OR THE EPIPHANY LESSON.

BY C. EH. B.,

AUTHOR OF “AMY'S WATCHWORD,” ETC.

SIXTH EDITION.

SEELEY, JACKSON, AND HALLIDAY, 54, FLEET STREET,
LONDON. MDCCCLXXII.
JOUN CHILDS AND SON, PRINTERS.
PREFACE.

Tue following tales have been written at the request
of a friend of the author, who has much at heart the wel-
fare of young girls in the lower ranks of life.

Their purport is to show that wealth and position
are not requisite accompaniments to usefulness. The
cottager’s daughter may, by her energy and sympathy,
cheer the path and lighten the sorrows of others as
effectually as though she occupied a loftier sphere. And
all may rest assured that whether their lot in life be high
or low, rich or poor, God has placed within their reach,

according to their power of action, abundant

© Work ror ALL.”
CONTENTS.

PAGE
WORK FOR ALL, OR PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER
GRANDCHILD. we See 7 we 1
THE SISTER GUARDIAN .., see es vce BF

BRAVE BESSIE, OR THE EPIPHANY LESSON .. 191
WORK FOR ALL,

OR

PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD.

© Honour to those whose words and deeds
Thus help us in our daily needs,
And by their overflow,
Raise us from what is low.”—LONGFELLOW.

CHAPTER I.

Ove bright clear evening in January, a troop of neatly-
dressed girls, between the ages of ten and fifteen, might
be seen proceeding to St Mark’s Vicarage, in the town
of Hanbury, their animated countenances showing that
something of unusual interest was expected.

They were received by Miss Merton, the Vicar’s sister,
who had invited her Sunday school class to the then
novel amusement of a Christmas tree. Another well-
known and pleasant face also greeted them on their en-
trance. Mrs Phebe Edmonds, as she was called, though
a person not much above their own rank, was one uni-
versally looked up to and beloved by the young people;
and as she was the constant dispenser of the Vicar’s
charity, and a valuable assistant to him in many ways,
they were not surprised to see she had been invited by
Miss Merton to aid her on the present occasion. By her
they were conducted to a well-lighted apartment, where a
substantial tea was being prepared, after which the won-
ders of the tree were exhibited, and, unlike anticipated

1 *
4 WORK FOR ALL, OR

marvels in general, the reality exceeded expectation.
But when its gifts were distributed to the delighted
gazers, and, though apparently without any previous ar-
rangement, proved to be precisely what each girl most
wanted, it seemed to*them little short of magic! For in-
stance, Ellen Durnford had often longed for a workbox,
having never yet risen to a higher state of things than a
neatly made print bag. To her surprise and pleasure one
completely furnished was placed in her hand. Fanny Tur-
ton’s prayer-book was minus several leaves, and one side
of the cover. Had a shopful been placed at her disposal,
she would have chosen the very one of which she sud-
denly found herself the possessor! Rachel Fenn’s hat,
though never allowed to be in holes, had been mended so
often that the straw could scarcely be persuaded to meet
. together in some places. It looked sadly shabby on its
peg in the school-room every day by the side of those of
some of the girls whose parents were better off. Poor
Fanny had more than once heard very disparaging re-
marks upon it, which she had felt to be unkind because
it was no fault of hers. She had little thought what that
beautiful tree would provide for her! Nothing less than
a new well-made brown straw bonnet with a good ribbon of
the same colour; and as Miss Merton tied it on her head,
Phebe Edmonds placed on her shoulders a warm woollen
cape that had been pinned as a parcel inside the crown.
It would have been worth while to have watched the
child’s countenance for a minute or two, so full was it of
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 5

joy and surprise—but there was no time, for the coloured
tapers were rapidly getting lower, and the tree had still
much to bestow. Not only had every girl an appropriate
present for herself, but round the foot of the tree lay a
number of packets which proved to be tea and sugar.
These Miss Merton distributed amongst the young people
that they might each one have the pleasure of giving it
themselves to any poor neighbour they chose, and she
trusted by so doing she might enable some at least
amongst them to remember others in the midst of their
own pleasure, and to lead them to enter into the spirit
of our Saou: 8 words, “Tt is more blessed to give than
to receive.’

- That the poor need not consider this saying to ane
ouly to the rich none felt more truly than Phebe Hd-
monds, who for years had been accustomed to save some-
thing for others out of her scanty means. As she escorted
the young folks to their own homes that night, she was
glad to see how greatly some of them appeared to prize the
pleasure of having it in their power to bestow the little
gifts which Miss Merton’s kindness had provided, upon
neighbours who were yet poorer than themselves. Even
little Rachel Fenn spoke with a delight that seemed to
exceed what she had felt on becoming possessed of her
new hat and cape, of going next morning to an old woman
who lived near them and surprising her with the tea and
sugar; for she said she knew she never had anything but
tea-leaves to make her tea from, and no sugar at all.
6 WORK FOR ALL, OR

The cheerful party gradually diminished as one girl after
another arrived at her own home, till at length only Mary
’ Grey and Mrs Phebe were left together, for their houses
lay at some little distance. Mary had been very quiet since
they left the Vicarage, but now that she found herself
alone with her kind friend, for Phebe had known her from
a little child, she unburdened her mind of its thoughts.

“Don’t you think, Mrs Phebe, it must be very pleasant
to be a lady?”

“T dare say it is, Mary; I never thought much about
it.”

“T have been wishing I was one ever since we left
Miss Merton.”

“Then you have been wishing rather a silly thing,
Mary dear. I should never have expected to find that
you were a discontented girl, with your comfortable home
and kind parents; you ought to feel yourself well off as
God has placed you.”

« And so I do, indeed,” exclaimed Mary; “it was not
that, but I thought if I were a lady how much good I
might do, just like Miss Merton.”

“Oh, that is a very different thing. J was afraid
it was the large house and the servants, and those sort of
things, you were longing for. But, my dear girl, I think
it is not necessary for you to be a lady in order to do good
to others.”

“Don’t you think so?” replied Mary, doubtfully ;
then remembering how full of usefulness Mrs Phebe was,
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 7

who was not a lady herself, she added, “ at all events I
must be grown up first, and it seems a long time to wait,
for I am not quite fifteen yet.”

* But I don’t think you need wait till you are grown
up, any more than you need be a lady, Mary. If you are
really and truly desirous to be of use to others, depend
upon it you may find ways and means, young and humble
in station though you are.”

Mary looked incredulously at her friend, and the
moonlight was bright enough to let her see it.

“Yes, Mary, I am sure I am right,” she said, replying
to that look ; ‘‘ another day we will have some more talk
about it.””

They were approaching Mary’s cottage, and Phebe
was about to bid her good-night, when Mary said, “Do
you think, Mrs Phebe, you could show me something to
do? Ishould be so glad.”

“T cannot all at once mention any particular thing,
Mary, but I will think about it. Do you suppose your
mother could spare you to come and drink tea with me
some evening soon ?”

“Yes, I am quite sure she will,” exclaimed Mary.
«When shall I come?”

“To-morrow night I must be busy,” said Phebe,
“but on Thursday I shall be very glad to see you at five
o’clock. Bring your thimble with you, and you can help
me with some flannel petticoats Miss Merton has asked
me to make for a poor family. Good-night.”
8 WORK FOR ALL, OR

“ Good-night, Mrs Phebe, and thank you; I will be
sure to come;” and Maryan merrily up the little slip of
garden that lay in front of their house.

Their voices had been heard at the gate, and the door
was opened even before she could tap at it: Mrs Phebe
might well speak of Mary Grey’s home as a comfortable
one. Few girls of her station were more blessed in this
respect, or had kinder and wiser parents.

Her father was a carpenter in constant work ; Mrs
Grey was a clean, notable woman, who made her husband’s
house what every wife should endeavour to have it,—a
bright and peaceful place of repose and enjoyment after
the day’s toil.

They had but two children,—Mary and a little girl of
three years old. The former had been sent to both day
and Sunday schools at an early age, and the religious and
moral training she received there had been carefully en-
forced at home. Would that this were oftener the case
with parents! Such promising characters as the open-
ing one of Mary Grey seemed likely to form into, would
doubtless be less rare than they are!

She had much to tell her father and mother of what
they had seen, and of Mr and Miss. Merton’s kindness
and liberality. The beauty and wonders of the Christmas
tree lost nothing by her lively description of it, and as an
earnest of the truth of her almost fairy-like tale she had
her treasures to produce.

Her own present had been a small green leather case,
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 9

containing every convenience for writing, which Miss
Merton had purposely contrived should fall to Mary’s
share, because the written answers she expected to certain
questions every week were always so neatly executed by
her. When this had been duly ‘examined, the disposal of
the tea and sugar was discussed.

“ Don’t you think, mother, I had better take it to old
Patty Reed? She is as poor as anybody we know, though
she is so cross and disagreeable.”

“Do, Mary ; it will be a real treat to her, poor old
soul. I passed her house to-day and heard her scold-
ing Lizzie terribly. I am afraid the child leads a wretched
life with the old woman, and that it is hardening her into
a rude, self-willed girl; her manners get worse and worse,
I think, and she is never fit to be seen, with her hair
about her ears and her torn frock.”

“Tt’s a pity she doesn’t go to school, mother ; she
would be obliged to mend her clothes there.”

“Yes ; Mr Merton has long wished she could, I know,
but her grandmother won’t hear of it; she says she can’t
spare her, and indeed I don’t see how the old woman could
be left alone so long together, for she gets very infirm.”

“Come, wife !. come, Mary!” here interrupted John
Grey, “you are forgetting how late it is!” So saying,
he opened the Bible, and the evening closed with the
family prayer, which Mary had never seen missed one
night in her parents’ house since she had been old enough
to be allowed to join in it.
10 WORK FOR ALL, OR

CHAPTER II.

Mary Grey hastened over her breakfast the next
morning, that she might have time to run to Patty Reed
(or Patty Grumbler as she was oftener called) with the
tea and sugar before she went to school. Well did the
old woman deserve the name she had acquired. Nothing
ever seemed to go right with her. It had been so all her
life. She had never learnt the habit of looking at the
bright side of anything when young, and now she was
old it was ten times worse. She was always fancying
people were deceiving her, and that her lot was more to
be pitied than any of her neighbours’. Very few of them
ever cared to go and see one who did nothing but growl
and complain directly they entered ; and consequently it

was one of her grievances that she was left so entirely to
" the company of her grandchild Lizzie, who had lived with
her ever since the death of her parents some years before,
and who certainly was as unfavourable a specimen of
bringing up as could be seen anywhere. Sharp and
clever she was to an unusual degree, but the only use
these qualities had been to her hitherto was to enable her
to trick and outwit her grandmother when it suited her
purpose to do so. She did not bear a very good charac.
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 11

ter either for truth or honesty. Although no one could
exactly say why they would not trust Lizzie, there was a
universal feeling it would be safer not to do so. Her un-
tidy appearance, for not even on Sunday was she ever fit
to be seen, was sadly against her making friends amongst
the more respectable neighbours; and children of her
own age avoided rather than sought her, she was so mis-
chievous in her ways that they were sure to get into
trouble if they played together. In fact, Lizzie Reed was
in the really pitiable situation of one whom no one cared
for, and consequently who cared for no one. Her grand-
mother’s infirmitics had prevented her ever going to
school, and even church was a place almost unknown to
her. Yet there was much that was in reality good in this
poor neglected girl. Circumstances had been sadly
against the better parts of her character coming to light,
and each year seemed to bury them down deeper in the
hard and stubborn soil that was forming over them; but
that there was gold amongst the dross was subsequently
proved.

When Mary Grey reached Patty’s cottage she found
it a wretched contrast to the clean, well-ordered home
she had just left. Patty was not down, but Lizzie was on
her knees before the fire-place, setting light to an untidy,
ill-made collection of sticks and cinders. As she blew
the fresh-lighted fuel into a flame with her mouth, the
clouds of dust that she disturbed from the only partially
cleared grate found a refuge amongst her hair, which hung
12 WORK FOR ALL, OR

in disorder over her shoulders. Her frock was put on
hind-part before, for the convenience of being able to fasten
it herself ; but those useful little articles, the hooks, having
for the most part disappeared, she had supplied their
place with pins. The room was exactly as it had been
left the night before, looking thoroughly uncomfortable,
and as though it would take a week’s work to make it
decently clean and neat.

Lizzie’s astonishment on seeing Mary at that early
hour was expressed in her countenance, but the latter
was the first to speak.

“Good morning, Lizzie, I hope your grandmother is
well.”

“No, she’s not, she says; but what do you want?”

“ve brought her some tea and sugar that Miss Mer-
ton told me last night I might give to any one I pleased,
and I thought she would be glad of it.”

“ That she will,” replied Lizzie, rising from her knees
for the first trme, and shaking back her hair from her eyes ;
“ how droll of you to think of bringing it here.”

“Can’t you get your fire to light ?” said Mary, seeing
the last spark in the grate vanishing, and secretly feeling
a benevolent interest in the kettle boiling that morning,
for she thought a cup of good tea would surprise and
please even Patty Grumbler.

“No; I’ve been ever so long over it already, it’s a
nasty bothersome grate that never will light, do what
one will.”
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 13

“You have not cleared out the ashes from underneath,
and the sticks are all laid far apart,” said Mary. “I don’t
think it can very well light. Mother has always shown
me that I must let plenty of air come in at the bottom,
and you see that is quite choked up.”

Lizzie looked as if she were doubtful as to the truth
of this theory, so Mary, asking her if she might show her
what she meant, took the poker, and clearing out a space
(somewhat to the detriment of her nice stuff dress), laid
the sticks on the top in the scientific manner well known
to clever housewives, and a few pieces of coal on the top
of them from an old box standing in the chimney corner ;
then striking a match, the result was quickly one that
surprised Lizzie into a broad grin and an exclamation of
“La! it won’t do so for me.”

Mary laughed. “It will if you will do as much for it,
Lizzie. Now if you take away the ashes it will look quite
comfortable ; shall I fill the kettle for you?”

“Tt’s too dirty for you to carry to the pump ; T’ll do
it,” said Lizzie, and seizing the ROony article in question,
she rushed out of the door.

At this moment old Patty’s voice was heard from the
room overhead, asking who was there.

“Tt is me, Mary Grey,” said Mary; “I have brought
you a little present.”

‘What is it, child? Bring it up here, don’t give it
to Lizzie.”

Mary took up the tea and sugar and timidly ascended
14 WORK FOR ALL, OR

the wooden ladder leading up to the only other room. It
was rather more tidy than the one below, though very
poorly furnished.

Old Patty lay in bed with her head covered up with a
half shawl to protect it from the draught that came from
the room underneath. Mary explained about her pre-
sent ; the old woman held out her hand for it, and in-
stantly opened the tea at one end to examine it both by
sight and smell.

“Tea, do you call it?” she said, “it seems more like
dust, but I suppose anything’s good enough for me, Miss
Merton thinks.”

“Miss Merton did not know it was for you,” said
Mary rather indignantly, “ it was I settled to bring it to
you, for I thought you would like it.”

“Aye, catch Miss Merton thinking of an old lone
body like me! I might starve and she wouldn’t mind.”

“‘ Miss Merton would let nobody starve if she knew,”
said Mary, “she is good and kind to everybody ; but I
must go now, or I shall be late at school. Shall I take
the tea down and tell Lizzie to make you a cup? the ket-
tle will soon boil, I think.”

“No, that it won’t. Lizzie’s always an hour get-
ting the fire to light, she can’t do nothing like other
girls.”

Mary was not sorry to leave Patty and her complaints.
As she reached the bottom of the ladder the old woman
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 15

called to Lizzie in an angry voice to make haste, and not
go on dawdling another hour. “What should I do if that
were my home, and Patty Grumbler my mother,” thought
Mary as she hastened to school. ‘ No wonder people have
given her that name. Poor Lizzie! how I pity her!”

CHAPTER III.

Mary did not forget her invitation for Thursday even-
ing, which gave her mother almost as much pleasure as
herself, for she knew that her child could gain only good
from the society of such a woman as her she was
going to. She had not very far to walk. Mrs Phebe
lived in lodgings. They were small but extremely com-
fortable. The arrangement of everything showed order
and good taste. She had been housekeeper for many
years to a former vicar of the parish, who had left her a
small annuity at his death, which, with what she easily
earned by her needle, enabled her to live in tolerable
comfort, as well as assist some of her poorer neighbours
a little. But her sympathy with their troubles, the inter-
est with which she entered into all that concerned them,
16 ’ WORK FOR ALL, OR

and her soothing gentle way in a sick room, was what
they most prized, and gave her greater influence over
them than she could ever have acquired by mere money,
had she had it to bestow.

Her late master had left her various articles of furni-
ture, which gave her sitting-room rather a superior air
to what it otherwise would have had. A sofa and easy-
chair were luxuries Mrs Phebe would not have aspired
to; but as having once been her beloved master’s, were
highly valued by her. The crimson moreen curtains
which had belonged to his study gave a warm and cheer-
ful appearance to her little apartment. True, they were
a good deal faded, and her landlady had more than once
suggested that dyeing would make them just like new
again. But for that very reason she did not have
them done. She liked them best in their old colour,
and as she had always remembered them. They were
drawn when Mary arrived. A bright fire burnt in
the grate, before which Mrs Phebe’s tabby cat sat
bolt upright, purring and nodding at intervals, but
not yielding to the luxury of rolling herself round into a
sound sleep till she had had her usual saucerful of
milk from her mistress. The tea-things were on the
table, and as Mrs Phebe was not above keeping her own
things well polished, the little brass kettle and metal tea-
pot shone as they never would have shone if left to the
woman of the house, clean and tidy body though she was
in her way. The small white loaf and pat of butter had
PATTY GRUMBLERB AND HER GRANDCHILD. 17

a delicious appearance, and as Mary sat on the edge of
the easy-chair in which her hostess placed her, with the
shy feelings natural to the first half-hour—she thought
that even Miss Merton’s room could not be more com-
fortable. But good kind Mrs Phebe was not one tu be
shy with long, and before tea was half over her young
_ visitor was chattering with her usual ease.

“Now for the flannel petticoats, my dear,” said Mrs
Phebe when tea was removed, producing from under the
sofa a work-basket well filled with garments of different
kinds in various stages of progress. “I am anxious
to get these finished, the weather is so cold, and the
woman for whom Miss Merton intends them is very deli-
cate.”

‘ Mary’s fingers set to work with the alacrity of one
well skilled for her age in the use of her needle. Mrs
Phebe’s quick eye saw this in an instant.

«You are accustomed to sew, I see.”

“Yes, I mend all my own things, and make a good
many of them. Mother likes me to do them myself.”

“Your mother is quite right. Now since she has
taught you to be so handy in this way, do you not think
you might work a little for the very poor sometimes?
You were wishing to be useful somehow to others, and
this would be just a thing you could do.”

“T should like to very much,” said Mary, her eyes
brightening with the thought; “if you will let me help

you, I will get as much done as I can every evening.”
2
18 WORK FOR ALL, OR

«That would be giving more time to it than you could
properly afford, I think, my dear, for your mother must
have plenty for you to do with your own and your little
sister’s things. But I dare say for one, or even two evenings
she could spare your time, and if so, you will be surprised
how much you will get through if you go on regularly. I
have a quantity of print and calico in that drawer, which
Miss Merton is going to give away—she has asked me to
get them made intofrocks and under-garments. I can easily

_find people who will make them for pay—but perhaps you
would like to give your time and your labour?”

«* And who are to have the clothes? ” inquired Mary.

‘Those who Miss Merton considers most want them,”
said Mrs Phebe. ‘If you know any one in real need
whom you would like to work for, I am sure she will
gladly let you dispose of what you make yourself.”

“T was thinking of Lizzie Reed,” replied Mary. “She
seems scarcely to havea tidy thing belonging to her.
Yesterday morning I took Miss Merton’s tea and sugar
to her grandmother, and really Lizzie’s frock seemed all
to pieces.”

*‘ Unfortunately Lizzie has never been taught to mend
her things, and make the most of them. I am often
sorry for that girl. They are very poor, and I think a
new frock and one or two under-garments would be in-
deed well bestowed there.”

«And I will make them,” said Mary, “for I do not
think Lizzie could do them. Perhaps if she for once saw
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 19

herself neatly dressed she might try to keep so afterwards.

I really do think she is very much to be pitied ; her grand-
mother is always scolding her, and she has never been to
school, and has no one to teach her how to do anything.
I tried to show her how mother taught me to light a fire
yesterday morning, and she seemed quite surprised that
done in that way it would burn up directly.”

Mrs Phebe laid down her work, and took off her
spectacles. She had a way of doing this when she was
going to say anything very earnestly. ‘Now, Mary,”
she said, “here is some work for you which may be
more lasting even than the frocks. There is that poor
Lizzie not much younger than yourself, has lost both father
and mother, and has for years had no one to look after
her but her old grandmother, who spoils her temper and
- makes her life miserable by her grumbling and discon-
tent. She has had no opportunities of learning to read and
write like other girls, and as Patty won’t part with her
even to go to church, she has none of the religious advan-
tages they have constantly. What a different lot to yours,
Mary! Itseems to meas if I might answer the question you
put to me the other night, ‘ Do you think you could show
me something to do?’ by saying, ‘See whether you
cannot show your gratitude to God for all His good-
ness to you, by trying to improve this poor neglected
orphan.’ ”

“T wish I could,” said Mary, the tears starting to her
eyes. “I do feel very sorry for her. I am afraid though

Q*
20 WORK FOR ALL, OR

my mother will not like me to see much of her, she is so
particular who I go with.”

“And so she ought to be, Mary; but it is one
thing to associate with a girl like Lizzie as a companion,
and another to visit her sometimes in order to try
and teach her such things as she has had no means of
learning. Your mother is a sensible and good wo-
man, and will see this, I am sure. But talk to her
about it, for she is your best friend, and will help you
to judge how far you can be of service to the poor
child.”

Much more conversation passed, the good effects of
which did not cease with the hour. When Mary parted
from her kind friend, she thought how much she should
like to resemble one so excellent, and that at least she
might try to follow her example in looking out for op-
portunities of usefulness, however small.

CHAPTER IV.

Mrs Grey cordially entered into Mrs Phebe’s and
Mary’s plan with respect to Lizzie Reed, though she
doubted whether much could be accomplished, owing to
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 21

“her living so constantly as she did in the presence of her
grandmother, who, though apparently caring little for
her, could not bear to have her absent for long together.
“T must try and please old Patty herself first, I think,
mother,” said Mary ; “I feel almost afraid of her though,
she is so cross.”

“You must put up with that and many other dis-
agreeables, I dare say, if you really try to teach Lizzie
anything, but you will be all the more glad if in the
end you succeed. I am afraid Lizzie herself is a rude,
troublesome sort of girl; whenever I have spoken to her,
she only turns away, or stares at me. But I don’t wish
to discourage you, Mary. Girls can manage girls per-
haps better than grown people.”

**T have been thinking, mother, that if I make her a
frock the first thing and take it to her, it will show her
that I wish to be kind, so I will set to work directly, as
Mrs Phebe has given me the print for it. I think
Lizzie-is pretty much my size, though I am older than
she is.” :

So Mary set vigorously to work, and with her mother’s
assistance cut out and made a dark lilac print dress; the
thoughts of the pleasure it would give Lizzie stimulating —
her fingérs to a pace that soon brought her labours to
a conclusion. Armed with it, she proceeded a second
time to Patty’s cottage, but as it was the after-
noon, she had no hope of finding the old woman
22 WORK FOR ALL, OR

in bed as before, which, considering the dislike she
could not help feeling for her, would have been rather
a relief.

She found her seated in the chimney corner in a low
rush-bottomed chair, watching Lizzie, who was employed
in ironing some clothes at a table on the opposite side of
the room.

“Good afternoon, Patty,” said Marys; “T wanted to
speak to Lizzie, if she is not too busy.”

* Busy! she’s never busy, she’s an idle slaty and
that’s what she is. Look at them clothes, washed last
Tuesday, and not ironed yet!”

Lizzie looked sullen and made no reply, but said to
Mary,—

‘‘There’s a chair yonder, if you like to sit down.”

There was enough civilization in this speech to en-
courage Mary to say,—

“Tf you have a great deal to iron, perhaps you would
let me help you a little ; I am not in a hurry.”

Lizzie put down her iron, and turned round with an
astonished stare.

“Do you mean you'll care to help me?”

«Yes, indeed I will, gladly; it is Saturday, so there
is no. school, and mother told me I might stay a little
while.”

So saying, she rose, and taking an iron she saw heat-
ing, began to assist her with such good-will, that Lizzie
exclaimed,—
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 23

“T can’t think why you’re so good-natured like all of
a sudden.”

Mary laughed, and said, ‘‘ Because I want to be good-
natured to somebody, and I wish it to be you.”

Lizzie’s stare was more astonished than before as she
replied,—

“Now yow’re making game of me. Nobody never
cares nothing for me.”

Mary was touched by these words, and still more by
the tone of voice in which they were said, and replied,—

“Yes, I care for you, Lizzie; and I have been making
a frock for you myself—look here!” and she unfolded it
before her.

. Well now, but if you ain’t kind!” exclaimed Lizzy;
“look here, grandmother, Mary has made this for me her-
self, isn’t it a beauty ! ”

“Tt’s more than you deserve,” said Patty; “is it a
good print?” she added, holding out her hand for the
dress.

“Miss Merton bought the stuff,’ replied Mary.
“
Patty’s inspection of its quality seemed to be satisfac-
tory, seeing she laid it down without finding fault. Mary
would have liked to talk more to Lizzie, but felt it impos-
sible whilst her grandmother sat listening and watching,
so they ironed in silence for a little while, and had nearly
finished when Patty growled out that Lizzie was to make
haste and fetch in some things that were wanted from the
24 WORK FOR ALL, OR

shop. Mary was glad to have the opportunity of accom-
panying her that they might talk as they went along. So
when the last article was folded, Lizzie took up a basket,
and asked for money to make her purchases. This was
given with a suspicion and grudging, that made Patty
appear more than ever unamiable to Mary. She counted
out the half-pence for. each thing, as though she ex-
pected Lizzie to cheat her. The girl seemed to take it as
a matter of course, and Mary’s pity for her grew strong..
She could not help expressing something of the sort
when they left the house.

Lizzie did not seem to pity herself however in this re-
spect, for she only replied,—

“Granny thinks she’s as deep as I am, but she’s not;
I can trick her in the price of the butter, I know where
to get it cheaper than she said.”

“ But,” said Mary, “shall you not give her the difference
it makes in the money ?”

“ Now you don’t think I’m such a goose as that! No,
T’ll spend it on sucks, it’ll only be a penny ! ”

“T wish you wouldn’t, Lizzie, that’s stealing after a
way ; it’s your granny’s penny, not yours.”

‘But granny won’t be any the poorer, and I’ll get the
sucks,”

“ Indeed it’s wrong, Lizzie, though you try to persuade
yourself it isn’t. Mother would explain to you what I
mean.”

“I don’t want no explaining to, I know what you
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 25

mean, but I dare say you often get pennies given you
and I never get one.”

Mary felt how true this was, and as if it must seem
hard in her to blame Lizzie. Yet here was an oppor-
tunity of trying to turn her from doing wrong which she
must not suffer to escape.

She pondered an instant, and then a thought struck
her.

“ Lizzie,” she said, “if you will not trick your grand-
mother, you shall still ne your Peeye for I have one in
my pocket I will give you.”

«What were you going to do with it?”

sf Perhaps I ponies have bought Ewcots) but I would
rather give it to you.”

“No, I won’t have it,” replied Lizzie, “thank you though
kindly.” And she returned the penny with so determined
an air that Mary saw it was in vain to pressit. Seeing
she looked disappointed, Lizzie added,—

«T won’t take granny’s penny though.”

“That’s right, Lizzie; I’m sure you’ll feel more com-
fortable when you tell her how you’ve spent the
money.”

No I shan’t; she wouldn’t find me out, I’ve done it
lots of times ; but I won’t now because you don’t like me
to.”

Mary felt that this was not quite the best reason she
could have given, but it seemed the highest Lizzie could
rise to at present.
26 WORK FOR ALL, OR

“Can you read or write?” was her next question.

“No, how should I? I never had any schooling.”

** Should you like to learn? ”

“ Yes, well enough, but granny won’t ever let me go
to school, I know.”

“Would she let me teach you? I should like to, and
would come to your house to give you a lesson as often
as I could, every Saturday I have plenty of time ; and
we might do some writing too.”

Lizzie looked so really pleased at the idea, that Mary
was sufficiently encouraged, though her only exclamation
was,—

“Ta! will you really now ?”

A good deal more talk followed, and before they
parted, it was settled that Mary should give her first
lesson the following Tuesday on her way from school in
the afternoon. Mary went home and told her mother
what she had undertaken, and Lizzie proceeded to make
her purchases, nor was there one half-penny not honestly
accounted for to her grandmother of what she had given
her to lay out.
' PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 27

CHAPTER V.

Ir is only those who have tried it that can have any
idea of the pleasure there is in beginning to live for
others. Although Mary Grey was by no means what is
called a selfish girl, she had hitherto been simply indus-
trious at school and obedient at home, helping her
mother in whatever she was bidden. Such is the history
of many a well-principled girl, and as far as it goes it is
good and encouraging. But as year succeeds year in
early youth, and young people begin to feel that child-
hood is being left behind, it is well they should remem-
ber that our Saviour’s injunction, “ Love thy neighbour as
thyself,” applies to the age at which they have arrived as
well as to an older one. Riches and influence are not
necessary to carry it out. There is probably no respect-
able girl of Mary Grey’s class, who, if she were to con-
sider what it is in her power to effect towards the welfare
of others of her own age, would not be surprised to find
how largely she might contribute to their comfort or im-
provement. They who have once felt the blessedness of
having their minds directed to this point and have tried
to act upon it (and we know some who have, even in
childhood), will not need to be urged on. But unfortun-
28 WORK FOR ALL, OR

ately it is a matter little thought of in general, or is re-
garded as not coming within the range of youthful duties.
Tt is in the hope of arousing the attention of our readers
to. the subject that we record the simple yet earnest efforts
of Mary Grey to benefit the ignorant and despised Lizzie,
- hoping that they may consider the results in her case as
sufficiently encouraging to induce them to “go and do
likewise.”

Mary soon found that the task she had set herself was
in some respects a difficult and trying one. Lizzie,
though a quick clever girl, had lived in such untu-
tored habits both of mind and body, that she either
could not or would not apply steadily to the drudgery of
learning. She was desirous of possessing the power of
reading and writing, but hated the trouble necessary for
its acquisition. Then again, old Patty, though she ac-
quiesced in the plan, hindered it to a most provoking
degree, by vociferating from her chimney corner to Lizzie
about things that had no connection with what she was
about; thus distracting the attention of both teacher and
pupil whilst the lesson was going on. Once or twice
Mary was almost tempted to give up in despair, but the
alacrity with which she saw the proposal would be se-
conded by Lizzie, who persevered chiefly because she
wished to please Mary, recalled her to the recollection
of what her mother had said,—‘ That there would be
many disagreeables in her way, but she would be all the
more glad if she succeeded in the end.” So she returned
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 29

to the charge again and again, and at length succeeded
in making her repeat and write the alphabet correctly.
From that time matters began to improve. Lizzie was so
charmed at the sight of her own letters (albeit they were
none of the most elegant) that every spare moment found
her, pen or pencil in hand, forming them on anything that
fell in her way. Then came the spelling of her own
name, which she soon accomplished with a facility that
surprised Mary, till she discovered that the walls, table,
and even the chairs, were covered with “ Ivzzies”’ of every
possible size and dimensions. The step from this feat to
the reading and writing words and putting them together
was rapid in comparison to what the commencement of
the affair had been, and Lizzie’s interest was now as fully
aroused as her teacher could desire.

Almost imperceptibly too, at first, but very decidedly
as time went on, the girl’s dress changed to a less slatternly
appearance. Her hair was rarely seen hanging over her
face on the days on which she expected Mary to give her a
lesson, and her frock was neatly hooked straight down
instead of pinned over in any zig-zag direction that suited
the convenience of the moment. Little white collars
now generally gave a finished neat appearance to the
dark print dress round the throat. It was a sign of the
times that the red-framed looking-glass had been brought
from up-stairs and hung over the bench in the back
kitchen where Lizzie’s ablutions were usually performed.
Not a sign, be it understood, that she was growing vain,
30 WORK FOR ALL, OR

for no human being could have been freer from that weak-
ness than herself,—but the virtue of cleanliness was be-
‘ginning to assume an importance in her eyes to which it
had hitherto been a stranger. The same gradual yet
visible improvement went on in the state of the cottage.
Lizzie had learnt to light a fire easily now, and as
Mary sometimes peeped in on her way to school in the
morning, and was sure to give a glance at the grate
as she said “good morning,” Lizzie did not like her to
find it untidy and choked up with the ashes of the day
before. She was beginning to love her too dearly not to
try and please her. She felt this all the more because
Mary never tried to speak to her with any authority, or
reprove her for what she wanted to see different. But
she told: her how her mother did things, and how com-
fortable their house was in consequence, till she persuaded
her to try and make theirs the same; so Lizzie com-
menced the attempt by way of pleasing Mary, and ended
by effecting it to satisfy herself.

Another trial in Mary’s way was the observations
made by her companions on her notice of Lizzie. They
were astonished that she should be so often at her house,
devoting to her the best part of her Saturday afternoons,
and some of them did not hesitate to remark on what
they called her low taste. When she explained that she
was teaching her to read and write and work better,
there was a good deal of laughing at her expense, and
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 3l

hints thrown out that she wanted to set herself up as
somebody, and to lord it over Lizzie. There was one
girl in particular, Sarah Dallas by name, who tried to
persuade the other girls that Mary’s love of power and
rule was the motive that actuated her to take such pains
with her. She had her own reasons for disliking Mary Grey.
Sarah was idle and careless to a degree that often brought
upon her the reproof of the schoolmistress, and on one
occasion she had been detected bringing a story book to
read on the sly in class, when only the week before this
breach of the rules had been most severely commented
upon by Mr Merton himself, to whom complaint had been
made that some of the elder girls were in the habit of
thus offending. It was then intimated that any one again
doing so would not be allowed to go to Miss Merton’s
Christmas tree, which was being anticipated with great
anxiety. Notwithstanding what had been said, Sarah Dal-
las soon after was seen by her neighbours in the working
school with a book hidden under the large-sized piece of
work she was engaged upon, which she was contriving to
read whilst the mistress believed she was engaged only
with her needle. No notice was taken by the other girls
till Mrs Jeffrey was called away; then several expressed
their disapprobation, and none more earnestly than Mary
Grey, who entreated her to put it aside. Sarah refused,
saying there was no occasion, for she could both work and
read at the same time, and that she was not afraid of Mrs
32 - WORK FOR ALL, OR

Jeffrey seeing the book, so cleverly as she contrived to
hide it. Mary replied to this speech of the ill-principled
girl rather indignantly, and Sarah was answering with
anger, when Mrs Jeffrey entered and insisted on knowing
what was the cause of the talking and of Sarah Dallas’s
angry looks. None of the older girls would reply, but
on Mrs Jeffrey appealing to one of the younger children
the truth came out. Mrs Jeffrey found the book in
Sarah’s lap, and she was at once struck off from the list
of those who were to go to Miss Merton’s tree. Instead
of seeing how entirely the blame was her own, she ac-
cused Mary Grey of being the cause, as having caused
her detection by her “ preaching.’ Mary was very un-
happy, and went herself secretly to Miss Merton and
begged her to overlook the matter. But Mrs Jeffrey
‘would not second her request; Sarah was too trouble-
some and deceitful a girl to make it wise to do so, and
thus the affair ended, as far as Sarah’s punishment was
concerned. But from that time she began a sort of petty
persecution towards Mary, never letting an occasion slip
of representing her as considering herself better than
others, laying down the law, &c. Mary’s natural character
was so entirely the opposite of this that it did her no harm
with her companions ; but Sarah saw that she shrunk from
ridicule, and was delighted to have found a way of annoy-
ing her. She had a few partisans of her own class, and
from these the words ‘‘ Mary the preacher,” “Mary the
fault-finder,” &c., would reach her ears when saying her
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 33

lessons to Miss Merton on Sunday, who had no idea
why the colour should so suddenly rush over her face,
and her words be stammered in repeating what she
evidently knew. It may readily be imagined how gladly
Sarah would seize on the circumstance of Mary’s exerting
herself for Lizzie’s good, and twist it into a case of love
of power and domineering, and in proportion as her
gentle spirit winced. under the spiteful remarks and inu-
endoes that Sarah threw out, the latter delighted in re-
peating them.

Had Mary Grey’s desire in what she was doing been
praise from others, she would, with her sensitive dis-
position, scarcely have stood proof against these annoy-
ances, and Lizzie would have been gradually left again to
herself, her ignorance, and her cross grandmother. But,
almost unconsciously, a higher motive was at work. The
wish to do something for others had been aroused in her
heart ; and He, without whom we cannot even think a
good thought, was leading her on to know something of
that true charity which beareth all things, hopeth all
things, endureth all things. So Mary persevered with
Lizzie, and bore Sarah’s unkindness with meekness.

Then there was the brighter side of the picture. If
there was shade, there was sunshine also. Lizzie’s na-
tural disposition was most affectionate. Under a rough
exterior lay a heart which required but the touch of kind-
ness to show that it had stores of love and gratitude
ready to be called forth by circumstances. Mary’s interest

3
34 WORK FOR ALL, OR

in her aroused these qualities with a force and warmth that
grew stronger and stronger as time went on. Even grumb-
ling Patty began to look on her with complacency, and to
associate her with the increased comfort that had arisen in
the cottage since she had first tried to improve Lizzie in
the art of tidiness and method. Not only was there a
bright little fire every morning when she came down, but
the kettle was generally boiling, and the tea-cups set
ready for breakfast. ‘The room was no longer left till the
middle of the day to be swept, and then only done because
a scolding from her granny obliged Lizzie to obey. The
table and dresser were subject to sundry scrubbings utterly
unknown to them before, and their complexions were be-.
coming as fair under the new system as nature originally
intended them to be. There was a sad dearth in the cot-
tage of conveniences, such as shelves, pegs, &c. But the
. landlord, a sullen, cross-grained man, obstinately refused
to put them up. So Lizzie’s shawl and bonnet were still
doomed to be. thrown on the first vacant spot, and the
saucepans and other such articles, though not very numer-
ous, were too many for the only place intended for them.
They had to put up with their old quarters on the floor,
to the detriment of Lizzie’s dresses, which showed sooty
saucepan and kettle marks much more easily than form-
erly, seeing that they were now regularly washed every
week instead of just as it might happen. Lizzie was less
perplexed than Mary how to manage, saying, “ they must
just go on as before, there was no help for it.” But
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 385

Mary resolved there should be help, and going to her
father with the difficulty, coaxed him into coming one
evening after working hours and putting up a long deal
shelf in the little back kitchen, and a row of pegs in the
sitting-room. He did not get many thanks from Patty,
who, though secretly pleased, was too much of an habitual
grumbler not to complain that the hammering made her
head ache, and that she didn’t believe Lizzie would ever
use them, except Mary was by to see she did. Lizzie’s
awkward but honest gratitude however pleased him, and
- made him look round to see what else his tools might
effect for her comfort. After various small repairs, he
walked home with his daughter, and gladdened her heart
by expressing an interest in poor Lizzie, and promising
to make a little book-case, which she should give her for
a present on her next birthday; Lizzie’s attainments in
the reading line promising to become such before long as
to make a place for books desirable.

Another and a more serious subject lay on Mary’s
mind respecting her protégée; and this was that she
was seldom or never able to go to church, old Patty’s
infirmities making it undesirable she should be left long
alone. After much thought, she settled on a plan for al-
lowing her to go every Sunday afternoon if her parents
would consent to it. She had always been in the habit
of attending three times herself, after morning and after-
noon school, and again in the evening with her parents.
She ouent she might contrive for Lizzie to go in the

3*
36 WORK FOR ALL, OR

afternoon by undertaking to sit with old Patty, who was
not likely to make any difficulty now she had become so
accustomed to Mary’s presence, she being a decided
favourite with her. Her parents made no objection, and
were pleased with the idea of Lizzie’s being enabled to
attend divine worship regularly, but Mary hoped to ar-
range more than this. She wished her to have the
privilege of Miss Merton’s Sunday afternoon instructions
to her class, which she had for so many years enjoyed.
She confided her wishes to Mrs Phebe. That good
woman was watching Lizzie’s progress in civilization and
education with great interest, and was ever ready to en-
courage Mary with her advice. She at once entered into
her plan.

I will speak to Miss Merton about it, my dear,” she
said, “I am sure of her consent to Lizzie taking your
place in her class in the afternoon.”

Mr and Miss Merton were so much pleased and in-
terested in what Mrs Phebe told them about Mary and
her pupil, that they sent for her and expressed their ap-
probation, and it was settled that Lizzie should have the
offer of going to school before church.

“T am sorry to lose you, Mary,” said Miss Merton,
‘but I consider that the hour will be as profitably spent
by you in enabling Lizzie to partake of the instruction
which has long been yours. The injunction ‘ Freely ye have
received, freely give,’ applies to this case as much as if it
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 37

were money you had to bestow, and will be as favourably
regarded by God as alms rendered by those to whom He
has given riches. If, as I believe is the case, you are
denying yourself a pleasure for Christ’s sake, of you it
may be said you are obeying His command to ‘ give alms
of such things as ye have.’ ”

Mary’s heart beat high at these words, but not because
she was elated with praise, and thought she was doing
great things. Never had she felt more conscious of her
own weakness and unworthiness than as she walked away
from the Vicarage. She feared Miss Merton thought far
higher of her than she deserved, and the tears rose to
her eyes as she remembered how great had been the
struggle of her mind before she had brought herself
to give up her treasured hour with Miss Merton and
spend it in listening to cross old Patty’s grumblings.
“God loveth a cheerful giver,” said she to herself, and
Miss Merton and mother and Mrs Phebe all think I am
one. They cannot see my heart and know as He does
that I thought about this long ago, but would not pro-
pose it because it was disagreeable to me ; Lizzie has lost
several services and hours of Miss Merton’s instructions
through my selfishness.

Her face looked so grave when she arrived at home
that her mother 'scarcely expected to hear Miss Merton
_had consented to the wished-for arrangement. When,
however, her daughter came out of her little bedroom to
38 WORK FOR ALL, OB

tea not a trace of the slight cloud was visible. She had
confessed her short-comings to Him who could bear with
and pardon them, and Who would accept her offering,
small and humble though it was, and made in much
weakness and imperfection.

CHAPTER VI.

Lizzie was well pleased with the proposal: that she
should go to church every Sunday afternoon, and was
grateful to Mary for arranging it. But her countenance
fell at the idea of the school.

“T should like to go,” she said, “but I am so ignor-
ant, and have such poor clothes. The other girls will
only laugh at me. No, Mary, thank you kindly, but I
think I’d rather not.”

“Never mind being ignorant, Lizzie. Miss Merton
knows it, and won’t ask you questions; she will only tell
you things, and talk to you with the rest, so kindly.
Then about the clothes, Mrs Phebe and'I have settled all
that. Mother and I are making you another dress, a
nice dark blue merino one, and it is to have a large cape of
the same, lined with flannel, which you can take in or out
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 39

according to the weather. Miss Merton gave us the
stuff. Then you are to have a new straw bonnet with
some dark blue ribbon on it. Mother wishes to get you
that, and as your granny bought you a new pair of boots
lately, you will be quite as well dressed as any girl there,
so you need not fear being laughed at.”

Lizzie’s face had brightened up wonderfully as Mary’s
speech proceeded. “I’m sure] can’t say thanks enough,”
she said. ‘TI tell you what, Mary, if there was just any-
thing I could do for you I’d be happy, but I feel all chok-
ing with your kindness ;” and Lizzie burst into tears of
pure heart-felt gratitude, sobbing out, “ There’s nothing
I can do but love you!”

Mary felt almost inclined to. cry too, but she said
cheerfully, “Indeed, Lizzie, you are making me very
happy by taking so much pains about everything. I don’t
know what I should do without you, it is so pleasant to
see you getting on with your reading and writing.”

Patty made no objection to Mary supplying Lizzie’s
place with her on a Sunday afternoon, so it was settled
she was to go to school the following Sunday, and as she
still shrunk from the first appearance there, Mary per-
suaded her mother to go on that one occasion to Patty

‘whilst she accompanied her, Lizzie declaring that after
this she should be willing to go by herself.

No mother’s anxiety on her daughter’s first appear-
ance in public could have been greater than was Mary
Grey’s over Lizzie Reed on the occasion of her taking
40 WORK FOR ALL, OR

her place amongst the girls in Miss Merton’s class. She
was quite aware she would be eyed with curiosity by all,
and disdain by some, and she was resolved that she
should appear perfectly neat and properly dressed for her
station. The dark blue dress was finished on Saturday,
and the bonnet trimmed with its curtain and band of
ribbon by Mary’s own hands. Out of. her pocket-
money she had saved enough to purchase a pair of
gloves, as she knew the absence of them would cause
remarks, and poor Lizzie had never in her life had a pair
on her hands.

She and her mother went to Patty’s house after their
early dinner on Sunday, the latter to remain there whilst
the girls went to school. Lizzie was ready, looking so
nice in her new dress and bonnet that a stranger would
scarcely have recognized the modest tidy-looking young
person with her well-brushed hair braided under her
simple bonnet-cap, to be the same Lizzie who used to be
so often seen with it streaming behind her, and her dress
matching the hair in its arrangement.

The gloves however were a trouble to her. “ Must
I wear them, Mary ?” she asked, as they walked along.
«They make my fingers tingle; I can’t bear them; do let
me pull them off;” and Lizzie gave a tug at her left glove
with her right hand.

To Mary’s relief, who had had the trouble of getting
them on, the glove refused to yield to the pull, though by
no means a gentle one.
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 4]

“No, don’t take them off, Lizzie, try and bear it,
you'll soon get used to them ; all the other girls will have
them on, and I want you to be like the rest.”

“Tl wear them,” said poor Lizzie, with a sigh, and
evidently feeling that for the present she had taken leave
of her old comfortable fingers for a set of entirely new
and disagreeable ones; “J’d do more than that to please
you, Mary.”

“Yes, be sure and please preaching Mary,” said a
girl at that moment pushing past, who had overheard the
last words, and Sarah Dallas ran on in front with a com-
panion, looking back however, and saying loud enough
for them to hear,—

“‘ Mary’s in her glory now, with her pupil by her side.
Shan’t we have fine airs to-day ?”

“What is that she’s saying?” asked Lizzie, in utter
ignorance of her meaning, yet seeing by Mary’s hcight-
ened colour that it was something unpleasant connected
w.th her.

“ Nothing of any consequence,” replied Mary ; “ Sarah
often says rather disagreeable things, but it is no use to
mind them. We must come on quick, Lizzie, or school
will have begun,” and they walked on at a pace that
prevented any further remarks about Sarah Dallas.

Miss Merton received Lizzie with extreme kindness.
She saw she was feeling shy and awkward, and that
she was aware every eye was fixed on her with a stare of
curiosity. She placed her between herself and Mary,
42 WORK FOR ALL, OR

and at once called the girls’ attention from her by com-
mencing work. It was her habit to read aloud to them
of an afternoon, explaining and commenting as she pro-
ceeded ; Lizzie had therefore only to sit and listen like
the rest, or if questions were asked, Miss Merton took
care to put them in such a way that she should see no an-
swer was expected of her. When school was over, she
kept Mary and Lizzie back for a few minutes, and spoke
with great kindness to the latter, saying she hoped to see
her regularly, and that if she went on as she was doing
at present, she should find she had a friend in her as well
as in Mary. ate.

From this Sunday began a second and new era in
Lizzie’s history. Her attendance at the afternoon school
was punctual and regular, and her attention to Miss
Merton’s teaching so great that the lady was much grati-
fied. Without seeming to do it on Lizzie’s account,
she so managed her instructions to the class in general,
from the first Sunday of her coming, as to carry them
through a course of simple Scripture teaching such as
most of them knew, but none could be the worse for hear-
ing again. This soon brought Lizzie, who was particularly
quick, to be more on a par with the others, and before
many weeks were over, if a question were put to the girls
generally, none.was more likely to answer correctly than
Lizzie Reed. The extreme disadvantages under which she
had been brought up, and the pains Mary was taking
with her, gave hera great interest in both Mr and Miss -
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 43

Merton’s eyes. This was noticed by Sarah Dallas, whose
inattention made her by no means a favourite ; indeed
such had been her conduct on several occasions, that she
had run great risk of being dismissed from the school.
Although Sarah cared little how she stood with her elders,
her dislike to Mary made that feeling extend to lizzie,
and she could not endure to see the notice that was taken
of her. As Mary never was with her when she came to
school, she had not the satisfaction of throwing out the
insulting speeches which she knew so greatly discom-
posed her. But she did not hesitate to try and annoy
her second-hand by attacking Lizzie in various ways. For
instance, she drew the attention of some of the girls to
her dress, and then after admiring the colour, asked her
who had given it to her? Then turning to her bonnet,
made the same inquiry, and said she was thankful she
was not obliged to go trying to please people in order to
get presents so as to be fit to be seen. Her unkind re-
marks had however little effect on Lizzie, so long as they
were only thrown at her. Straightforward herself, she
scarcely could understand hints and inuendoes.

But at last, Sarah showed her dislike so openly one
day that Lizzie’s indignation was fairly aroused.

It happened that the two girls had entered a shop to
purchase such things as are to be found at small de-
pots. There were a great many customers, and they
had to wait fora time. Others came in, for it was Satur-
day, always a busy day at such places, and Lizzie was
4A, WORK FOR ALL, OB

gradually obliged to stand further and further in, till she
was almost behind the counter. A woman from the
country had been buying some tea and sugar, for which
she laid down half-a-crown as payment. A moment after
she remembered something else she wanted, and was
about to add the money for it to the rest, when it was
found the half-crown had vanished! In vain the counter
was searched, and the floor likewise, though it could
scarcely have fallen without the noise having been heard.
The woman kept declaring she was certain she had laid it
down, and the man who served her said he had cer-
tainly seen her do so. The affair was unpleasant and
mysterious. The woman was unwilling to pay a second
time, the shopman not disposed to let her go away without
doing so. His wife, who was in another part of the shop,
came forward. Sarah Dallas, to whom she was well known,
whispered a few words in her ear which caused her to
look towards Lizzie, who was standing close to the end of
the counter where the half-crown had been laid. What-
ever the whisper was, it had been heard by others, for
she suddenly seemed the object of general attention.
And the wife, going behind the counter, said something
in a low voice to her husband, which caused him, also, to
glance suspiciously at her.

“TI say, Lizzie Reed,” said he, ‘‘ why have you taken
into your head to stand so uncommon close to the
counter? That’s the place for them as takes money, I’m
thinking, not for them as gives it.”
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 45

Lizzie did not detect the double meaning implied in
these words, and replied simply,—

“I was pushed up here when I came in, there were
so many behind me.”

“T suppose then you saw the half-crown put down?”

“Yes I did,” replied she, “it was placed by this
piece of cheese.”

His wife now came forward, saying,—

“If you. know so well where it was, perhaps you can
tell us where it is now.”

“T know no more than you do,” exclaimed Lizzie,
who began to see by the looks around her that she was
suspected, and the blood rushed indignantly to her face.
“Who says I have taken it? is it you, Sarah Dallas ?”
she added, for she saw her nodding and making mysteri-
ous grimaces to the shopwoman.

Sarah laughed aloud. “ past makes you suppose I
lay it on you?” she replied; “is it because you know
you can’t deceive me with your new. ways as you do some
others ?”

“I deceive no one,” said Lizzie passionately. ‘And
I am sure you are trying to make them think I have
stolen the money only because you don’t like me. I
should like to be searched,” she said eagerly to the shop-
man. “I brought only fifteen-pence into the shop, and
now that you think I have taken the half-crown, I want
it to be seen whether I have it about me.”

There was a pause for an instant, and then the coun-
46 WORK FOR ALL, OR

trywoman said, “She would much rather lose the half-
crown than have any more said, for she didn’t believe
the girl had touched it. Perhaps it would turn up, and
in the mean time there was another.”

But Lizzie was resolute. “If it is not found,” she
said, “ Sarah will tell every one that I am a thief;. I want
it to be seen Iam not.”

At this moment the shopman, who was obliged to
serve an impatient customer with some cheese, placed
the slice he had just cut off in the scales. As he did so
there was a metallic sound, and on lifting it up to
examine the cause, with a sudden suspicion of how the
case stood, he found the half-crown had stuck to the
bottom of the cheese, which was soft and decayed, thus
proving he must have himself placed it heavily down
upon it. As it adhered to the bottom it was not seen in
the search that had been made by lifting things from the
counter. :

The tide was instantly turned against Sarah, and in
favour of Lizzie. The shopman-and his wife at once
expressed their regret that she had been suspected, and
the latter said it was Sarah Dallas’ fault, who had whis-
pered to her that she had seen Lizzie leaning with her
arm on the counter in a very strange manner, the
moment after the half-crown had disappeared. A cry
. of Shame! shame! arose from those around, and one
loquacious dame did not hesitate to give Sarah not only
a severe scolding for trying. to ruin the character of an
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 47

innocent girl, but a pretty sharp push as she pressed
by her to get out of the place that was getting too un-
comfortable to remain in. Lizzie became the heroine
of the moment, especially with the countrywoman, who
had been indignant from the first at her having been ~
suspected. She waited for her outside the door, and they
walked together as far as their roads lay the same way.
Her kindness a little soothed poor Lizzie, who had felt
deeply the cruelty of Sarah Dalle, and longed to tell
Mary what had occurred.

Patty had the usual complaints ready when she returned
at her having been too long away, and there was so much
to do before going to bed, she had not time to dwell on the
scene in the shop, but that she had an enemy in Sarah she
was now assured ; nor, if she had searched into her heart,
would she have found that her own feelings towards her
were either amiable or forgiving. Poor Lizzie had yet
much to-learn of the sinfulness of her own heart, and
she lay down that night, having repeated the words
of. the Lord@’s prayer certainly, but without feeling that
she had forgiven, or wished to forgive, them that had
trespassed against her.
43 WORK FOR ALL, OR

CHAPTER VII.

Ir happened that Mrs Phebe’s landlady was in the
shop when the half-crown was lost, and she had con-
sequently been witness to the whole affair, and had related
it to Mrs Phebe when she returned home. Vexed for
the pain Lizzie had been put to, and angry with Sarah
for her disgraceful endeavour to injure her, she thought
it right to mention it to Miss Merton the next day, who
was extremely shocked, and sending for Sarah, spoke to
her with more severity than she had ever done before,
constantly as she had had occasion to reprove her. She
found the girl was sullen and dogged, giving no sign
whatever of contrition, nor did she do so after Miss
Merton had represented to her how great was the sin
she had committed, in trying to fix a charge of theft
on an innocent person. She at length said that, till she
was really sorry for her fault, and had told not only her-
self but Lizzie that she was so, she should not allow her
to come to her class, and desired her to take her place >
ina much lower one. This was a great mortification to
Sarah, but her countenance as she left was more ex-
pressive of temper than sorrow.

Lizzie was astonished when she passed up the school-
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 49

room in the afternoon to her own place to see Sarah
removed to the other end. She had no idea that Miss
Merton had heard of what had occurred, and when that:
lady on her arrival informed the girls that misconduct on
the part of Sarah Dallas had obliged her to remove her
from her class till such time as she was contrite and
grieved for her fault, Lizzie had no suspicion that she
herself was so closely connected with her disgrace. Her
inward feelings on hearing of it were known only to her-
self and God who searcheth the heart. But perhaps there
was something in her countenance which made Miss
Merton choose for her lesson that afternoon the example
set us by our blessed Saviour in His forgiveness to His
enemies, and she exhorted all present to search their
hearts and see whether, if they had been injured in any
way, they could bless them that persecuted them, and
pray for them that despitefully used them. She was
more earnest than usual, and Lizzie’s attention was
completely riveted. She had never before thought on
this subject ; it was a new light opening upon her that
she was to love her enemies. How could she love Sarah
Dallas? How pray for her who had been so cruel? Yet
had not Miss Merton just been describing how Christ
had prayed for His murderers even when in all the agonies
of the death to which they were putting Him; and how
much smaller had been the offence Sarah had committed
against her! Lizzie was quick in her perceptions, and
4
50 WORK FOR ALL, OR

she could catch something of the exquisite beauty and
grandeur of the Divine love of which Miss Merton had
been speaking in glowing language. Perhaps a faint ray
of it illumined her own heart as the first class filed down
the room, for no look of exultation was on her countenance,
nor did ske even raise her eyes as she passed close to
where Sarah stood, thinking it might be painful to her
to be noticed.

From that. time Sarah studiously avoided Lizzie; no-
thing seemed further from her thoughts than to tell her
she was sorry for her unkindness, and it was a bad sign
that before the following Sunday she had persuaded her
parents to let her give up going to the Sunday school at
all. Lizzie’s character continued steadily to improve
under the valuable instructions she received from Miss
Merton and the good influence of Mary Grey’s friendship.
Even Patty, though she still found fault with her inces-
santly, owned she wasn’t like the same girl as before
she knew Mary. The old-woman was not only far more
comfortable than formerly, owing to Lizzie’s greater
thought for her, but she was less discontented with
everybody and everything. Mary used to spend her
Sunday afternoons with her in reading the Bible aloud,
and such simple tracts as Mr Merton thought suitable.
At first she seemed indifferent, and unable to acquire the
habit of listening, but by degrees her attention was
aroused, and she would lean forward as Mary sat on a low
stool by her side with her shrivelled skinny hand over
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 51

her ear, that she might catch the words more distinctly,
sometimes stopping her to ask for some passage that she
could not quite follow, to be repeated. Lizzie also was
now able to read to her, and the last hour of most even-
ings was spent in this way. Mr Merton made them a
present of a large Bible, which Patty valued greatly; at
first because of its appearance on the little book-case
which Mary had given to Lizzie, and afterwards from the
real pleasure it gave her to hear it read.

About a year and half after Mary Grey had begun
to be interested in Lizzie, Mr Merton announced that
the Bishop of the diocese was going to hold a Confirma-
tion, and requested such young people as were of a
proper age to send in their names to him. Mary was
now more than 16 years of age and Lizzie about 10
months younger. Their names were both amongst the
candidates, but that of Sarah, who was as old as Mary,
was not on the list.

“Sarah Dallas is of an age to be confirmed,” said the
Vicar to his sister, “ but she has not entered her name.”

“Tam not surprised,” replied Miss Merton. “ That
girl has baffled all my efforts to do her good, and since
she has given up the school I have of course lost what
little influence I had over her, which however I fear con-
sisted only in her dread of losing any pleasure that might
be going forward. She has never forgiven me for dis-
missing her my class till she should acknowledge her un-
kind conduct to Lizzie Reed.”

4*
52 WORK FOR ALL, OR

“Do you suppose,” said Mr Merton, “that she still
feels her old dislike to Lizzie?”

“Yes, I am afraid she does, from what Mary Grey
told me the other day. She says she does not show it
openly because they are seldom thrown together, but that
she will never lose the opportunity of being disagreeable ~
to both her and Lizzie if it comes in her way.”

“Perhaps the preparation for Confirmation may be
the very means of arousing better feelings in her heart.
Unfortunately her parents are such as will not second
one’s own efforts for her good. They rarely come to
church themselves, or insist on their daughter doing so.”

A: day or two after this conversation, Mr Merton
called at Sarah’s cottage, and as he happened to find the
girl alone he at once spoke to her on the subject of the
Confirmation.

She replied rather pertly that she supposed of course
she had better do as others did.

Mr Merton was not satisfied with her manner, and re-
solving to have some private talk with her before he re-
ceived her with the other candidates, he requested her to
call at the Vicarage on the following evening, at seven
o’clock.

Sarah looked as if she would rather avoid the inter-
view, but, not daring to refuse, promised to go, and Mr
Merton took his leave.

From her he passed on till he came to Patty Reed’s
little cottage. It was a strange contrast to what he once
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 53

remembered it when going his pastoral rounds. Clean
and orderly now as any he ever entered, he looked about
with approbation, and said to Lizzie, who was busily em-
ployed with her crochet needle when he came in,—

_ Why, Lizzie, this is not like the same house I used to
see once on a time; you have learned to be as tidy as
Mary Grey, I think.”

Lizzie coloured with pleasure as she replied,

“Tt was all Mary Grey’s doing, sir; she taught me
everything.”

“She is a good girl, Lizzie, and you have cause to be
grateful to her, and to God who put it into her heart to
take such pains with you. Where is your grandmother ?”

“ She is in bed, sir, very poorly indeed.”

«© Will she like me to go up to her? ”

“T am sure she will, sir; she begins to like to be
spoken to, and to hear the Bible read now, since Mary
Grey took to reading to her every Sunday.”

“ Now you are alone, Lizzie, I want to say a few words
to you on a subject that in the prospect of your Confirma-
tion becomes of great importance. You know that that
sacred rite should be followed by a participation in the
sacrament of the Lord’s Supper, on which subject I shall _
hope to have much conversation with you hereafter; but
one thing I wish to be sure of, namely, that there is no ill
will in your heart towards Sarah Dallas, who I am aware
once tried to injure you.”

Lizzie crimsoned. She thought Mr Merton must
54 WORK FOR ALL, OR

have penetrated into the most secret corners of her
heart. Sarah had aroused angry feelings on that evening
long ago, the sin of indulging which had on the following
day been put before her so forcibly by Miss Merton.
She had struggled with them then, and often since, but
little vexations at different times from Sarah had produced
them again. True they did not often meet except in the
street, but many a scornful look and taunting word she
had had to endure. She could not hide from herself that,
notwithstanding her resolution not to be angry, there
lurked a feeling of resentment within her which ought
not to be there, and when Mr Merton put the unexpected
question, whether she felt any ill will, she was conscious
that she could not truthfully reply in the negative.
Mr Merton did not press her further. But he talked
as his sister had formerly done on this subject, and
showed how she might make this very trouble, for such
she confessed it was, a means of honouring God by trying
to imitate the example of His Blessed Son in His forgive-
ness to His persecutors. His words were not lost on
Lizzie. Whilst he was up-stairs with her grandmother,
she searched deeper into her feelings than she had yet
done. The scrutiny showed her how uncharitable they
were towards Sarah, and she had been too carefully
taught latterly not to know where to turn for help to
struggle against them. Nor did she seek it in vain.
Sarah went to the Vicarage at the appointed hour,
and Mr Merton, after a few remarks on the subject of
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 55

Confirmation, led the subject to that on which he wished
to prove her, namely, her feelings towards Lizzie Reed.
He told her how pained he and his sister had been by her
refusal to confess her fault some months before, which
had obliged Miss Merton to send her from her class.
“And then, Sarah,” he added, “your anger and pride
of heart made you even leave the school rather than ac-
knowledge you had done wrong. Nor is that all, I much
fear that although you may not again have dared openly
to show your dislike to Lizzie, you have suffered it to
rankle in your heart, and perhaps let her see it in
other ways.”

Sarah remembered her many looks and hints at Lizzie
as she had found opportunity, and her conscience at once
led her to rush to the conclusion that she had been telling
Mr Merton about her, for she had seen him go in the di-
rection of her cottage when he left her the day before.
Her anger rose, her heart hardened towards her more
than ever, and she replied sullenly,

“T do not. like Lizzie Reed, and I don’t care if she
knows it. I suppose she has been telling tales of me?”

“No, Sarah, Lizzie has told me nothing. She never
even mentioned your unkind conduct to her in the shop,
T heard of it from entirely another source. It is yourself
alone who have given me cause to suppose your feelings
towards her are not such as they should be.”

Sarah pouted, and muttered loud enough to be heard
that Lizzie was getting quite a proud upstart since she
56 WORK FOR ALL, OR

had been made so much of,—then added more boldly, for
Sarah was not deficient in pertness,

‘Lizzie Reed is nothing to me, sir, and I don’t want
to have anything to do with her.”

“But it is my duty to tell you, Sarah,” replied Mr
Merton, “ that in one sense you have a great deal to do
with her. She is one to whom you have shown unkind-
ness, and when your fault was pointed out to you you re-
fused to acknowledge it. Now although months have
passed since then, you still remain unrepentant, and with
your heart full of resentment towards one who has in no
way injured you. _In this state of mind, how could I pre-
sent you to the Bishop as fit for Confirmation, and how
could I afterwards admit you to the Holy Communion?
No, Sarah! you must be led if possible to see your fault,
and to humble yourself before God, asking Him to soften
your heart and bring you into a different state of mind
towards Lizzie. His grace alone can effect this, but His
grace is all-sufficient for the purpose, and will be given to
you if you seek it with a real desire to obtain it. Come
to me at this hour next Thursday, and we will talk to-
gether again on the subject.”

Sarah left Mr Merton with an air that gave him little
hope his words had taken any good effect. She went
home and complained bitterly to her parents that Lizzie
Reed had done all in her power to set Mr Merton
against her, in order that she might stand well with
him herself. That he had been telling her she was
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 57

not fit to be confirmed because she couldn’t like an ill-
mannered low sort of girl, who, till Mary Grey took it
into her head to set her up, wasn’t fit to be seen with
any decent person. For her part she didn’t care about
being confirmed. If it were necessary to be so very good,
why she didn’t profess to anything of the sort, and would
leave it to such girls as Mary and Lizzie, who perhaps found
it worth their while to try to seem better than others.

Her mother was wrong and imprudent enough to
take her daughter’s part, and consider she had been ill-
used. The result was, that instead of following Mr
Merton’s advice, and asking to be brought into a better
frame of mind, Sarah told him on the following Thurs-
day when she went to the Vicarage, that she had quite
made up her mind not to be confirmed, and that her
parents did not wish it either. ~

“Nor can I wish it in your present hardened state,
Sarah; but have you thought what is to become of you
if you continue thus? Have you considered that you
are throwing away privileges which may never again
be offered? If you turn away from the blessings that
might be yours, you are provoking God to remove you
perhaps beyond the reach of them. Remember that
the same cause which prevents you from being fit to be
confirmed, or to presume to approach the table of the
Lord, unfits you also for death, and who can say, however
young they may be, that they are sure of life?”

Sarah’s look in reply was one of such pert confidence,
58 WORK FOR ALL, OR

that it might be supposed she felt sufficiently sure on the
subject as faras she herself was concerned. Finding he
could do no more with her at present, Mr Merton sent
her away, trusting that God might lead her to repentance
in His own good time.

CHAPTER VIII.

Tr is pleasant to turn from Sarah Dallas to Mary Grey
and- Lizzie, whose preparation for the approaching rite
was a happy period to both. Mr Merton was quite satis-
fied by subsequent conversations with Lizzie that she was
struggling with any resentment she might feel towards
Sarah, though he was not aware how completely, as the
weeks passed on and her mind became more and more
under the good influence of his teaching, she succeeded,
by God’s blessing, in eradicating what had lurked in her
mind against her. Her great desire now was to try and
make Sarah feel more kindly towards her, and she saw with
pain that, on the contrary, she appeared more disposed
to dislike her than ever. Of what had passed between
her and Mr Merton, and of the reason why she was not
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 59

amongst the candidates for Confirmation, she was quite
ignorant. How to conciliate her she knew not, for she
was aware that she would probably meet with a repulse
if she were to speak to her. At length a circumstance
occurred which suggested the idea of offering her a little
present which she hoped might be acceptable.

The art of crochet had been for some time much
practised in the school, and Miss Merton was often in
‘ the habit of lending the girls patterns for collars; and
also of disposing of their work for them amongst her
frieuds for a higher price than they could get in the
shops. Sarah, having now left the school altogether,
had no longer this advantage. Mary had taught Lizzie to
crochet, and she took to it with such a remarkable degree
of skill, that she soon excelled many who had learnt for
years. Miss Merton having called on her one day and
seen some of her work, not only offered to sell it for her,
but to lend her a collar to copy, which she thought she
was capable of executing, though it was somewhat ela-
borate. She charged her to be very careful and
keep it as clean as possible. Lizzie’s skilful fingers set
to work, and she was busily engaged when a girl
named Letty Vernon came in, and after admiring it,
exclaimed,

“Why this is the very collar that Sarah Dallas was
copying when she left school! She has always wanted to
go on with it.”
60 WORK FOR ALL, OR

“‘T am sure Miss Merton would lend it to her,” said
Lizzie, “ she is so good-natured. I shall soon have finished
with it.”’

“ But I know she wouldn’t ask her for the world,”
said Letty; “Miss Merton isn’t pleased with her.”

An hour or two after, Letty appeared again.

“ Lizzie,” said she, “will you let me take that collar
away for a little time? You shall have it back quite
safe.”

“Indeed, Letty,” replied Lizzie, “I mustn’t, Miss
Merton told me to be so very careful of it, and I don’t
think she would be pleased if I let any one have it with-
out her leave. Jam very sorry, but you shall have mine
to copy from directly I have finished it.”

“Tt is not for myself, but for Sarah Dallas,”
said Letty; “she asked me to come and try to bor-
row it.”

Lizzie felt really vexed to be obliged to deny Sarah
the first request she had ever made her, but she was
quite sure she had no right to lend what was not her
own, and was firm in her refusal. Letty, who was a great
friend of Sarah’s, was annoyed, and showed it by saying,
“Sarah said she knew you would not oblige her in
anything!” and she left the house.

Lizzie pondered for some time as she sat working;
she could not bear things to be left so, for she feared
Sarah would mistake her motive for refusing. Suddenly
a thought struck her. ‘I will finish my collar and ask
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 61

her to accept it from me,” she said to herself. ‘ She
will see then that I bear no ill-will towards her.” Tho
idea was pleasant, and her fingers quickened their pace, so
that the collar was soon completed. She felt rather
timid at the thoughts of taking it to Sarah, being doubt-
ful how it would be received. Not liking to go to her
house, she folded it in paper and put it in her pocket,
intending to- watch for an opportunity of giving it.
That very afternoon as she was on her way to the Vic-
arage to take back the pattern collar, she saw Sarah
approaching ; she hastily drew forth her own as she sup-
posed, and stopping said, to the surprise of the girl, who
was passing her with her usual disdainful air, “ Sarah,
_ will you speak to me an instant? I was very sorry I
could not, send you Miss Merton’s collar the other day
when Letty Vernon asked for it.”

“T might have known you would not do anything
good-natured for me,” interrupted Sarah. “I was very
silly to let her go to you about it.”

“Indeed my only reason was, because Miss Merton
said so much to me about being very careful of it, and not
letting it get dirty ; she seemed to value it so.”

“And why should I have hurt or dirtied it more
than you, pray? I dare say I am quite as careful as you,
although Miss Merton doesn’t like me as well, thanks to
your tales about me.”

“Oh, Sarah,” exclaimed Lizzie, indignantly, “I have
never said one word about you to Miss Merton; how can
62 WORK FOR ALL, OR

you say such a thing!” and anger was beginning to rise
up fast and to whisper to her not to offer the collar.

But a better feeling rose also and struggled with it.

“T wish you would be friends with me, Sarah,” she
said. “‘ Look, I have finished the collar, and though it
is not nearly so well done as the copy, it is exactly like
it, and I want to know whether you will accept it from
me for yourself.”

She unpinned the paper at one end as she spoke, and
drew it out, but finding it was the wrong one, took out
the other and held it to her.

Mingled astonishment and shame for a moment were
visible in Sarah’s countenance, that one she had tried to
injure should treat her so generously. But pride quickly
overpowered every other feeling, and she replied,

“Since I cannot have Miss Merton’s to copy for myself
Ido not want the collar at all. I am not going to be
beholden to you for a present.”

Again Lizzie managed to struggle with her wounded
feelings, and answered,

“Then if you will not accept it as a present, will you
let me lend it you as a pattern ?”

“No,” replied the other, “if I may not have Miss
Merton’s, I don’t care for the other. You have it there,
why not let me take it for a day or two?”

“Because I am sure it would not be right,” said
Lizzie. “Tam going with it to the Vicarage now.”
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 63

“I suppose you are afraid of losing favour with Miss
Merton,” replied Sarah, “as a tidy careful girl, such as
you think yourself now,” and she laughed scornfully.

A scuffle between some rude boys, who ran up against
them, here separated the girls, and ended the conversa-
tion. Lizzie put her rejected collar into her pocket
again

It is to be hoped that the tears Sarah’s unkindness
produced were shed more in sorrow than anger. When
she reached the Vicarage, she stood an instant outside
the door to take out Miss Merton’s collar, and arrange it *
neatly in the paper before giving it in charge to the
servant. What was her dismay to find only her own.
The empty piece of paper belonging to the other was
there, but not the collar! She shook out her pocket,
examined the folds of her dress, all to no purpose. It
was gone! Her distress may be imagined. She hastily
retraced her steps, but although not a crowded street,
it was scarcely likely she would find it if dropped. She
knew it was safe when she showed it in mistake for
the other to Sarah, and .she remembered, as she
thought, distinctly putting them both back in her
pocket when the boys came rushing up against them.
Sarah had walked off instantly one way as she went
the other, so she could know nothing about it. She
turned into one or two shops and told her trouble. They
advised her to have a paper written, describing it, and
64 WORK FOR ALL, OR

offered to place it in their windows. Poor Lizzie
walked away feeling quite bewildered with her sorrow.
How careless Miss Merton would think her! It was
such a handsome collar too, far more so than most of
those she was in the habit of lending the girls. She felt
she could scarcely presume to offer her own in its place,
for it was not so well done, and it might appear like a
liberty in her to do so. She had not courage to go back
at once to the Vicarage, but walked sadly to Mary Grey’s
cottage arid mentioned her trouble. Mary urged her to
lose no time in telling Miss Merton ; so she went, and with
much distress explained to that lady the misfortune she
had met with. Miss Merton, though of course vexed, saw
that poor Lizzie felt far more about it than she did, and
told her not to trouble herself further. She, however,
questioned her closely as to the manner in which it had
probably been lost, and in so doing the whole story of
her having wished to give Sarah her own collar was
drawn from her. Miss Merton was more pleased at this
than concerned for her collar, but her bad opinion of Sarah
was unavoidably increased. At Lizzie’s entreaty she
wrote one or two notices that it had been dropped, offer-
ing a small reward to any one who should bring it to
the shop in which the paper was placed. As she gave
these to Lizzie she said,—

“You do not think it at all likely that Sarah knows
anything about it? she did not take the collars into her
hand, did she?”
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 65

“No, ma’am, she never touched them. She cannot
possibly have had anything to do with it. I can only
suppose I dropped it when some boys ran up rudely and
parted us. They were fighting and scuffling together, so
it might have fallen under their feet, without my seeing
it.”

The papers were put into the shop windows, but no-
thing more was heard of the missing article.

CHAPTER IX.

Asout a week after the loss of the collar, old Patty
was taken seriously ill, and a very few days showed that
her end was approaching. Lizzie was indefatigable in
her attendance upon her. Cross as her granny had al--
ways been, she felt in the prospect of losing her, that
she was her only relative, and when she was gone,
she would be left alone in the world. All her scoldings
and her grumblings were forgotten now, and she hung
over her pillow with a yearning towards her she had
never felt before.

Mrs Grey and Mary helped her to nurse Patty day
and night. The poor old body showed that real affection

v
66 WORK FOR ALL, OR

existed in her heart towards her grandchild, by her
anxiety as to what would become of her. She had been
servant in her youth and middle age to a lady to whom
she had been faithful, and who had left her an annuity suf-
ficient to keep her in tolerable comfort. On this she had
subsisted ; but it would of course cease at her death, and
Lizzie be left entirely dependent on charity or her own
exertions, Patty’s penuriousness had been almost pro-
verbial. Many had been provoked with her for denying
herself and her grand-daughter almost the common ne-
cessaries of life when it was known she could afford
them.

But how often are motives mistaken! And under
an unpleasant surface how much good is sometimes
hidden! So thought Mrs Grey, when one night as she
was sitting up with the old woman, who was drawing
near her end, she asked her to put her hand under her
pillow and take thence a small bag. On opening it
at her request, she found within money to the amount
of £23, which she said she had in the course of years
saved for Lizzie against the time when she would be
left entirely an orphan. ‘It was all I could do for
her,” said the old woman ; “I never allowed myself any-
thing I could go without, or she would have been penni-
less at my death.” She then asked Mrs Grey if she and
her daughter would continue to befriend her. She spoke
gratefully of the comfort Mary’s Sunday afternoon read-
_ing had been to her, and thanked Mr Merton for his
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 67

visits in a way that greatly touched him. He had a good
hope that a ray of Divine light illumined the soul of the
poor creature in her last days, great as was the darkness
into which it had to penetrate !

And so old Patty passed away, and Lizzie was left
alone, feeling how gladly she would now listen to the dis-
contented words and oft-repeated. scoldings, which had
become a mere matter of habit, but were hushed for ever
in the grave at last !

“What is to become of that poor child Lizzie?” said
Mrs Grey to her husband after supper the night succeed-
ing Patty’s death. ‘‘ My heart aches to think how lonely
she is in the world, for however cross her granny used to
be to her sometimes, still she was her grandmother, and
after all there’s nothing like kin. That the old woman
loved her in her own way she showed by pinching herself
to save for her. I suppose the girl must go to service at
once, for she should not touch her little store of money if
it can be helped.”

“John Grey was leaning back in his three-cornered
arm-chair, smoking, as his wife spoke. He gave whiff
after whiff, and seemed as though he had not heard
a word, but was looking with a sleepy gaze at a
bit of soft coal lying between the bars, which every
now and then, being filled with a super-abundant
quantity of gas, emitted a jet of bright blue flame,
then as suddenly withdrew it and looked dark and —

black as before. His wife spoke again. “Poor Lizzie!”
5*
68 WORK FOR ALL, OR

she said; “what a thing it would be, John, if our Mary
were to be left as she is! Supposing she were, I wonder
whether any one would be kind to her, and give her a
home for a time?”

John puffed on; the coal continued to send forth its
little bright blazes; and he seemed more absorbed in
contemplating it than ever. Mrs Grey, nevertheless, felt
pretty sure that her 18 years’ experience of her good man’s
character was sufficient to tell her he did not see that coal
at all, but was thinking of just what she had been trying
to draw his mind to. She was mistaken this time, how-
ever, for John was looking at the coal, and thinking of it
too.

“Wife,” he began at last, “do you see that bit of
coal? how it flames out every instant, and how dark and
black it looks between whiles ! ”

“Yes, I see it,” replied Mrs Grey in a slightly dis-
appointed tone of ee “‘T wasn’t thinking of it though,
but of poor Lizze.”

«And I was thinking of Lizzie and the eal too,”
said John, giving a final puff, and laying down his pipe on
the hearth. “I was thinking, wife, how that there bit of
coal is going on just like my heart. You would lke to
take Lizzie Reed into our house for a time, and mother
her till something can be found for her, and you want me
to propose it, and to feel that it is only doing what we
should wish done for our own child if she were left in the
same way. I saw all that whilst you were speaking, and
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 69

my heart was going on just like that coal—one moment
blazing up warm towards Lizzie, and resolving she should
come here, and the next it turned cold and dark, and
thought it wouldn’t be pleasant always to have another
person with us, making the home seem not our own.
Then came the blaze again, then the dark, till my heart
and the coal seemed having a race together. But Pve
won, wife. My light is burning steady now, and please
God won’t go out again. What’s the use of reading the
Bible every night if one can’t do as it bids one when the
right time comes? We have enough for ourselves, and
for an orphan too, for a time at least, so let her come here
and be welcome, and her money be put into the sayings’
bank at once for future need.”

“There! that’s just like yourself, John,” said Mrs”
Grey, and her eyes glistened with tears, called forth, not
by her interest in Lizzie at that moment, but by the
honest pride she felt in her warm-hearted, simple-minded
husband. “Our Mary will be glad to have the girl here
now the Confirmation’s coming on,” continued she.
«They both seem taking after good ways.”

“Tt has done our Mary a deal of good I’m thinking,
wife, looking after Lizzie so much as she has done for a
long time ; and she keeps steady to her like.”

“Indeed, John,” replied Mrs Grey, “I think it’s im-
proved Mary almost as much as Lizzie in a way. She
used to be a bit giddy and thoughtless, forgetting things
I told her to do; but since she has tried to put Lizzie in
70 WORK FOR ALL, OR

the way of managing well, it’s wonderful how she has
begun herself to think, and be orderly in her ways. Liz-
zie’s an affectionate-hearted girl, she’s quite got about my
heart as well as Mary’s.”

So after the funeral Lizzie went home to John Grey’s
house, where she was to share Mary’s little room, and
assist her in her domestic duties. It seemed as if she
could never be doing enough to show her gratitude for
their kindness, and from the moment she came to them
she was so on the watch to render every service in her
power, that Mrs Grey laughingly declared, “if this went
on, she and Mary might as well turn into fine ladies at
once.” Harly as the latter was in the habit of rising, she
found the morning after Lizzie’s arrival that she had been
earlier still; the kitchen fire being made, and the room
swept and dusted, before she could make her appear-
ance. Mary still continued her attendance at school,
so there were abundant opportunities for Lizzie to be
useful to Mrs Grey, both in household affairs and in
taking charge of her little girl, who was not in good
health, and required care.

The thoughts of both girls were now chiefly turned
towards the time of Confirmation, which was close at
hand. Many young voices dn that day repeated the
words by which they declared they took upon them-
selves the vows of their baptism. By some they
were uttered in carelessness, and with hearts more en-
grossed by the novelty of the scene around them than
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 1
by their own solemn part in it. Others there were who
endeavoured to fix their thoughts on what the Bishop was
saying, prayerfully seeking the realities of the blessing
he pronounced upon them. Amongst this last number
we may venture to include Mary Grey and Lizzie Reed.

The following Sunday the celebration of the Lord’s
Supper was to take place. John Grey and his wife had
for many years been communicants, and they started
for church in good time, followed by the two girls. As
they passed down a street which led to the railway
station, they saw a number of people hastening in that
direction.

“There is a cheap excursion to Fisherton to-day,”
said John, in answer to his wife’s inquiry as to the
reason, “and this is about the time fixed for starting.
What a pity that so many are turning their backs on
public worship, and going probably to profane the Lord’s
day.”

As he spoke, a party came running up, expressing
their fears lest they should be late. Amongst them,
dressed in a manner very unbecoming her station, and
talking and laughing loud, was Sarah Dallas.

“Oh! father!” exclaimed Mary, “see there is Sarah
Dallas going with the rest; how grieved Miss Merton
would be after all the pains she used to take with her.”

She came up at this moment, and was passing by
without appearing to see them, when John Grey, who was
a plain outspoken man, stopped and said—
72 WORK FOR ALL, OR

““ Why, Sarah my lass, surely you are not going off to
Fisherton on Sunday! Have you forgotten all you learnt
in the Sunday school already ?” -

The rest of her. party, except one, had hurried on.
John Grey and his wife had often shown Sarah kindness
formerly when as a little girl she used sometimes to go to
their house and play with Mary, and an involuntary feel-
ing of respect made her stand still as he spoke. She
coloured, and seemed ashamed for an instant, but her
companion came to her relief by saying, “Come along,
Sarah, or they will go without us,” and hurried her off.
She, being only too glad to escape any further remon-
strance from John, ran as fast as she could go, and was
just in time to get into her place as the train started.

How differently were the next few hours spent by the
‘several girls. Sarah in the midst of a set of young
people who made open game of the church-going family
they had met, and passed the time as they sat in the
railway carriage in singing unholy and coarse songs; for
the party she was with, was one which hesitated not to
make fun of the most sacred subjects. Sarah was quizzed
about what John Grey had said to her, his words having
been repeated for the edification of the rest by the com-
panion who had remained behind with her. They pro-
duced a roar of laughter, in which Sarah joined, ‘at first
uneasily, but before long she was as merry as the rest,
and even amused them by relating the history of her re-
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 73

fusing to be confirmed, and was rewarded by hearing
herself called a girl of spirit for not having been managed
by Mr Merton. Yet this conversation brought to her mind
what she would gladly have forgotten at that moment ;
viz., Mr Merton’s warning, “Remember, Sarah, that the
same cause which prevents you from being fit to be con-
firmed, or to presume to approach the table of the Lord,
unfits you also for death; and who can say, however
young they may be, that they are sure of life?” Often
had those words haunted Sarah, and now they rose up
before her at a time when the reproaches of her con-
science made them less welcome than ever. She could
not quite recover her former spirits, and was glad when
the arrival of the train at Fisherton changed the scene, and
drew the attention of her companions to other subjects.

And where were Mary and Lizzie at this hour?

Conscious of their own weakness and sinfulness, tremb-
ling at the deep solemnity of the holy rite they were ad-
mitted to, yet clinging to a strength superior to their
own, and trusting to that love they were about to com-
memorate, they approached the table ofthe Lord, and
received from the hands of Mr Merton the sacred
food, which taken in faith and thankfulness would pre-
serve their souls unto everlasting life.
74 WORK FOR ALL, OR

CHAPTER X.,

Ir was a quiet and happy little party in John Grey’s
cottage that sat reading round the table on the even-
ing after Mary and Lizzie’s first communion. Their
book was the “Pilgrim’s Progress,” which next to the
Bible was John’s delight, and every Sunday Mary read
_ it aloud to her parents.

“It’s a wonderful book,” said John ag she closed it at
nine o’clock, the hour for their family prayer. “The
more one reads it, the more it seems to grow like one’s
own history. You don’t know what I mean by that, girls,
yet; you are only just setting out on your journey, and
have most of your battles to come. I ama good way on,
and have had some hard ones to fight, just as Christian
had, and shall have harder yet, may be, before I’ve done
with the enemy. You’ve got them before you, as I said ;
but mark you,” said John, folding his arms and look-
ing at them with his honest face lighted up with earn-
estness, “you have this day buckled on armour, which,
if you keep it bright and fit for use, will serve you in
good stead in many a pitched battle with Satan, and be
sure to bring you off victorious at last.”

At this moment they were surprised by a tap at the
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 75
door, and on Mary running to open it there stood Mrs
Phebe Edmonds! Though always a welcome visitor, her
appearance excited considerable astonishment at present.
She came in, but declined to sit down.

*‘T have brought sad news,” she said, “ which will
greatly shock you all. A dreadful accident has happened
to an excursion train returning from Fisherton, and great
numbers are killed or injured. Sarah Dallas was one of
the passengers, and has been brought home dreadfully
hurt. I am going to see if I can be of any use, for I
hear her mother is in fits, and the neighbours are crowd-
ing in, no one knowing what to do. I called here to see
if you would come with me,” she added to Mrs Grey, “ for
I knew how clever you are as a nurse.”

A general groan of horror broke from her hearers.
Mary Grey was obliged to cling to her father’s arm for
support, and Lizzie’s deadly pale face spoke her feelings.

“Poor girl! poor girl!” said John Grey after a mo-
ment’s silence. ‘May God in mercy give her time for
repentance before He takes her away! Get ready, wife,
you may be a comfort to her body and mind.”

Mrs Grey was already pinning on her shawl.

“Don’t sit up late,’ she said, “perhaps I may be
kept all night.”

“J will walk with you,” said J ati. “and learn some
more particulars. We shall none of us sleep, ’m think-
ing, till we know more.”

They set out, and Mary and Lizzie, putting fresh fuel
76 WORK FOR ALL, OR

on the fire, crouched together in front of it in the shiver-
ing terrified state of nerves which so often follows a sud-
den shock of horror given at night. Neither of them
spoke much to the other, the subject seemed too dreadful
for discussion, with all its attendant circumstances; but
thoughts crowded one after another on their minds, and
many an ejaculatory prayer was silently uttered for poor
Sarah.

It was an hour before John Grey returned. He. had
not been able, he said, to learn any particulars concern-
ing the accident that could be relied upon. Some said
one thing, some another as to the cause. It seemed,
however, that the excursion train had left Fisherton much
behind its time, and owing, it was supposed, to careless-
ness respecting the signals, a regular train had run into
it when it was passing through the tunnel close to Han-
bury station. The amount of injury done was terrible.
Many had been taken to the infirmary. Sarah Dallas
was carried home by her own entreaty.

“ And did you hear any particulars about her, father ? ”
asked Mary.

“T went to the cottage door with your mother and
Mrs Phebe,” said he. “There seemed much confusion,
and as if there were no one to take a lead. I could hear
Mrs Dallas’ screams as the door opened. Some women
were trying to quiet her. The doctor was not come when
I first got there; but he arrived in about a quarter
of an hour, and I waited outside to see if I could be
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 7?

of any use. It was some time before he came out, and
then I ventured to step forward and ask what he thought
of Sarah. It was Dr Kennedy, so he knew me at once,
and said that he considered it a serious case. There is severe
internal injury he thinks, besides the leg being badly hurt
and several ribs broken. He was going to return with
another doctor as soon as possible. He said he was very
glad to find your mother and Mrs Phebe there, and that
he hoped they would remain a few hours to see how she
went on. I came home then, for I could do no good by
staying. You had better not sit up longer, girls, your
mother won’t be home to-night, depend upon it.”

They went to bed after commending poor Sarah to
the tender mercy of God, but sleep was almost un-
known to any of them. It was about eight o’clock
the next morning when Mrs Grey returned, looking pale
and fatigued with her night’s nursing. In answer to their
anxious inquiries about Sarah she replied,—

“She is ina terrible state, both mind and body. It
has been a dreadful time. I have sometimes sat up nurs-
ing for three or four nights together and have felt less
fatigued than now. Her pain is such she cannot lie still
an instant, yet every move she makes causes increase of
it somewhere. The doctors say if she were of a more
placid easy temperament there might be a little hope, but
that her state of mind is enough to produce fever in itself.
Poor soul! she keeps asking if there is any chance of her
life, whether no one can save her from dying. Mrs Phebe
78 WORK FOR ALL, OR

tried to turn her mind to think of Christ, and of His will-
ingness to save her soul.if she would turn to Him—but
she kept saying in reply, ‘Oh! save my life! make me
live! and then see whether I will not do quite differently
to what I have done.’ Another time she exclaimed,
‘Oh! that I had been confirmed! Mr Merton told me
if I were not. fit for that, neither was I fit to die. I kept
thinking of his words as I lay in the dark tunnel in that
dreadful agony ; but I could have borne the pain; it was
my thoughts were the worst part, the dread of dying
there all in the dark with no one to speak to. I tried to
pray but I could not; no words would come; oh! Mrs
Phebe! Mrs Grey! what shall I do?’ That’s how she
kept running on till six o’clock, when she fell into a sort
of sleep... Mrs Phebe went home for an hour or so, and
then came back to let me off, for her mother is not fit for
anything.”

“Oh! mother,” exclaimed Mary, bursting into tears,
“what can be done to comfort poor Sarah? may I run
and fetch Mr Merton to her?”

*T went round by the Vicarage. Mr Merton was out,
he is going from one to another of the poor sufferers, but
Miss Merton said he would be sure and see Sarah, for
he had heard about her being hurt.”

Mrs Grey did not remain long at home, for she knew
how her services were required in the sick room. When
she went back she found the doctors had been again, and
that they intended taking off the: wounded leg in the
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 79

course of the day, as its appearance was becoming sus-
picious. Mrs Phebe said Mr Merton was with her.

“ [hope he may soothe her, poor thing,” she remarked,
“for she is in a dreadful way about her leg coming off.
She has taken into her head she shall die whilst they are
doing it, and her mother makes her worse by her way of
going on—one moment wringing her hands and saying she
is going to lose her, and the next telling her she knows
she will get well, and that there is ro fear, so that Sarah
does not know what to believe. I was quite glad when I
persuaded her to go and lie down a bit.”

At this moment the door of the room where Sarah lay
was opened, and Mr Merton came out.

“‘That poor young creature wants to see Lizzie Reed,
Mrs Grey,” said he ; “she has something on her mind which
she must confess, and ask her forgiveness for, before she can
have a moment’s peace. She should be brought immedi-
ately, for it is possible her time may be short, especially
as the operation must in this case be a dangerous one.”

“T will go and fetch her,” said Mrs Grey, hastily
tying on her bonnet and leaving the cottage.

Mr Merton waited only to say a few words to Mrs
Phebe about Sarah, and then left, saying he would return
and see her again in the course of the day.

Mrs Grey soon returned with Lizzie. She left her in
the outer room whilst she went softly in to tell the suffer-
ing girl of her arrival, but reappeared almost instantly
and beckoned. Lizzie trembled all over, she dreaded
80 WORK FOR ALL, OR

seeing Sarah, though she longed to try and comfort her.
The room was partly darkened, and the bed curtains were
.drawn on the side next the door, so that she had a mo-
ment’s time to recover herself. Mrs Grey was standing
at the foot of the bed, Mrs Phebe was seated near with an
open Bible in her hand. Mrs Grey led Lizzie round to
the side where Sarah lay.

Very awful was the change that had taken place in the
face of the bright blooming girl she had met only the morn-
ing before! White as the pillow on which ‘it lay, except
where several bruises and cuts disfigured the skin, and
expressing vividly the terrors of a disturbed mind, the
face of Sarah Dallas could scarcely be recognized. She’
was burning with fever, and longing to toss about in
hopes of a moment’s relief, yet not daring to move because
of the fresh torture she would create for herself in doing
so. A more melancholy picture than that which she
presented cannot be conceived. But great as was the
agony of her body, it was trifling compared to what she
was undergoing in her mind. She did not perceive Lizzie
at first, but exclaimed to Mrs Phebe, who was reading
such passages of Scripture as she thought would soothe
and comfort her,—

“T can’t listen, I can only keep on thinking! think-
ing! oh! Mrs Phebe, ask the doctors to try and save me.
If I could but get well again and go to Miss Merton’s
class, and be confirmed! But I never shall now. I shall
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 81

die, I know I shall.”” Sobs and moans accompanied the
words.

“‘ Hereis Lizzie Reed, Sarah,” said Mrs Phebe gently,

“you wished to see her.”

Sarah looked up eagerly,.as, drawing close to her,
Lizzie said a few kind affectionate words.

“So you have come to. me, Lizzie Reed,” she said ; “I
want to speak to you alone.”

Mrs Phebe and Mrs Grey immediately quitted the
room, and the girls were left together.

“Can you forgive me ? ” she began again, “ I have been
so unkind to you.”

“‘Indeed, dear Sarah,” said Lizzie, kneeling down
by her, “I have nothing to forgive, do not talk so.”

“T have a great deal to tell you, Lizzie, but my head
is so bad I scarcely know where to begin. Do you re-
member that collar of Miss Merton’s I wanted to copy?
and how we spoke in the street about it? You lost it,
did you not, that day ?”

“
“Yes,” said Sarah, “you did, and I picked it up when
the boys were pushing each other. You had walked on;
I felt too proud to run after you with it, and then suddenly
the thought came into my head that I would hide it
away, that Miss Merton might think you careless. I[
tried to persuade myself I should serve you right for not

letting me have.the collar. Sol brought it home and
6
82 WORK FOR ALL, OR

put it out of sight far back in a drawer, and there it lies
now. I saw the papers that were put in the shop win-
dows, and I knew how vexed you must be at having
lost it. -Now, Lizzie, I have told you all, can you forgive
me?”

“Indeed I do, Sarah, with my whole heart, and I am
quite sure Miss Merton will, so do not think any more
about it. I am very sorry for you, and Mary Grey is
also, she asked me to tell you so.”

Sarah gavea groan of anguish. “Oh, that I were like
Mary Grey,” she exclaimed. “ I always disliked her because
I thought her religious, and trying to be good, and I
laughed at you both yesterday because you were on your
way to church when we were going to Fisherton. It
seems all so terrible now that I am about to die!”

* But perhaps you will get better, Sarah, and then you
will go to church, and be sorry for having done wrong.”

“No, I shall die, J knew I shall,” sobbed Sarah. “Oh!
it is so dreadful! They are going to take off my leg too,
and perhaps I shall not live through it. Lizzie, promise
that you will pray for me that I may not die, and ask
Mary Grey to do so also.”

Lizzie had just promised, when Mrs Phebe came in
and said Sarah must be quiet now, and gave her a com-
posing draught. Lizzie went home and related her af-
fecting interview with Sarah to Mary.

An hour or two later the doctors came to perform the
operation. Her terror was extreme ; not so much of the
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 83

pain, as lest she should die whilst it was’ going on. It
pleased God however to grant her yet a little space for
repentance. After the removal of the limb she became
somewhat easier in body, but not in mind. Her dread of
death seemed to absorb all her thoughts.

Mrs Phebe was unremitting in her efforts to lead her
to throw herself on the refuge of the cross of Christ,
and Mr Merton saw her constantly. Many were the
prayers put up for her by Mary and Lizzie, as well as by
John Grey in their family worship, that she might find the
peace she so sorely needed. And at last Sarah prayed
for herself. Broken-hearted and humbled to the dust, she
cried with her whole soul, “Lord, save me, I perish.” By
degrees a ray of comfort broke in upon her, which was
followed by others as she began to be able to comprehend
in some measure that for such sinners as herself Christ had
died. It was hoped at first that her youth and good consti-
tution would enable her to struggle through the terrible
suffering she was enduring, but about a week after her
leg was taken off, the medical men saw that it could not
be. Poor Sarah’s hours were numbered !

Mary Grey and Lizzie went often to see her by her
own request. Miss Merton spent some time with her
daily, and Mr Merton was indefatigable in his efforts to
prepare her for that end which all saw approaching. Life
ebbed slowly, and latterly without the racking pain that
had at first made her almost unable to collect her

thoughts.
§ *
84. WORK FOR ALL, OR

A great change took place in her on Sunday, exactly
a fortnight after the accident, and on the evening of that
day she breathed her last, having lain in an unconscious
state for some hours previously.

And so ended the sad history, as far as this life j is con-
cerned, of one who turned aside from privileges of which
she found the value too late, and who forgot that in the
midst of life we are in death! Let us hope that her re-
pentance was accepted by Him whose mercy knows no
bounds.

CHAPTER XI.

Tazzte remained with her kind friends for half a year
after Sarah’s death, and then she became anxious to be
no longer a burden to them, for although she was able by
her skill in crochet-work to make sufficient money to pay
for her clothing, she .could not do more, and John Grey
positively refused to touch a penny of the small store left
her by her grandmother. When his neighbours ex-
pressed their astonishment at his keeping her so long, he
used to reply,

“T have not missed’ the little she has had; on the
contrary, work has appeared to be more abundant since
PATTY GRUMBLER AND HER GRANDCHILD. 88

she came to us, and instead of feeling poorer we have
seemed to be richer. God has given me enough for the
wants of myself and my family, and: something over be-
sides for the orphan girl who has been led to us for a
time.”

Lizzie spoke to Miss Merton at last, and respectfully
asked her if she would aid her in getting into service.
It happened that the girl who assisted the cook at the
Vicarage was at this time going to leave, and Miss Mer-
ton was so pleased with all she had seen.of Lizzie as well
as by Mrs Grey’s report of her, that she offered to put
her into the vacant place. Nothing could have been
more desirable for her in all ways, and it was settled
that she should go to her new home in a fortnight. We
must not follow her thither further than to inform our
readers that Miss Merton never regretted having received
her into her family. Her anxiety to please and her na-
tural cleverness made her gradually become a favourite
with mistress and servants. In the course of a few
years she was promoted to the post of cook, and was soon
regarded as their most valued and trusty domestic by
both master and mistress. Her marriage with a respect-
able farmer alone removed her from their service. She
and Mary Grey used often to meet. Lizzie’s love and
gratitude to her kind friends seemed to increase rather
than diminish as years went on. Mary Grey became a
schoolmistress, after having served her time as pupil-
teacher, and when she obtained a situation at some dis-
86 WORK FOR ALL.

tance from her parents, they used to say they felt the
separation from her less than they should have done, had
they not had Lizzie at the Vicarage, who was almost as a
second daughter to them. Mary also became comfort-
ably settled in life in course of time.

Mrs Phebe still lives. The red moreen curtains are
more faded than ever. The tabby cat has been dead for
many years, and her place on the hearth-rug is supplied
by one of her descendants. The large work-basket is no
longer filled with work to be done for the poor, for Mrs
Phebe’s eye-sight will admit of nothing but knitting stock-
ings now. She is old and feeble, calmly waiting her dis-
missal from a world where her great happiness has been
to try and soften sorrow by her sympathy, and to lead
others to know the happiness of doing some good in their
generation, whether the capability placed in their power
be great or small. She is never lonely in her old age.
There are many to watch over one who has so long cared
for others, and foremost amongst these may be found
our old acquaintances, Mary and Lizzie. The latter lives
at no great distance from her, and the former, when
she pays her yearly visit to her parents, never lets an
hour elapse.after her arrival, before going to see this old
and valuable friend of her youth.
THE SISTER GUARDIAN.


















































































































































































































































































































































THE SISTER-GUARDIAN.
CHAPTER I.

Azovut forty miles south of London, in a well-wooded
part of the country, lies a town which was formerly of
little importance, but has greatly increased in size since
the erection of a paper-mill on the banks of the river
Win, which in this part winds its way between eteen and
‘picturesque banks.

At first the inhabitants of Windale were rather indig-
nant at the erection of an unsightly building by their
beautiful stream, but before long they found that the
town was likely to be a gainer by it. The prejudice
which the lower classes had seemed to feel against the
idea of working in the mill, began to give way when they
found families from other neighbourhoods coming to settle
there, attracted by the high wages and the excellent ar-
rangements made by its respectable owner.

Gradually rows of small houses sprang up on the banks
of the river near the mill, which was situated about a mile
and a half from the town. Then was felt the necessity of
anew church and means of instruction for the multitudes of
90 THE SISTER GUARDIAN,

young people who were employed in the business. Fresh
shops were opened, and thus business went on gradually
increasing, till the once humble town of Windale grew
into a place of some pretension.

One fine morning in June there was an arrival of a
cart-load of furniture at the door of a small house which
stood in a row near the mill. It was followed almost im-
mediately by a light conveyance, driven by a farmer-like
sort of man, who handed from it a delicate-looking widow
of middle age and a girl of about fifteen. A boy, two
years younger, had leaped out the instant the vehicle
stopped, and was ina moment employed in taking as rapid
a survey of the cottage as could be obtained by peeping
into the lower windows.

A few women came out of the adjoining doors to look
at the new comers, but for the most part the neighbour-
hood seemed deserted; for almost all, excepting those
who had infants or very young children, were at the mill.

“ This is the house, Mrs May,” said the man who had
driven, “I hope it will suit you, it was the only one to be
had.”

“T have no doubt it will do very well,” said the
widow cheerfully. She took care that neither William
Hemings nor her children should hear the sigh that arose
as she compared the formal town-built cottage before her
with the pleasant creeper-covered lodge in which she had
long lived.

“Tt will seem a bit gloomy at first, I fear,” said Hem-’
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 91

ings, “but one gets used to everything. Now for the
key ; they said it would be left next door. You ought to
find the house all well-cleaned down as I gave orders,
and if so we shall soon get the furniture lifted in.”

The woman in the adjoining cottage now came out with
the key, and told them that the house was scoured from top
to bottom ; and she volunteered her aid in taking in the
furniture and getting things straight. Towards evening,
when William Hemings returned home, he was able to in-
form his wife he had left them getting tolerably tidy.

But we must tell our readers something about Mrs
May and her children, and the circumstances which had
brought them to seek work at Windale Mill.

The early life of Mary Welton, afterwards Mary May,
was passed in different circumstances to those in which
we introduce her.

Her father had been a respectable clerk in a lawyer’s
office, but her mother died, and this was the commence-
ment of misfortunes which seemed to follow him from that
time, and when Mary was about sixteen years old she was
glad to take a situation as under lady’s-maid in a gentle-
man’s family in the country. Her steady upright conduct
soon won for her the respect of her master and mistress,
and in their house she first learnt those lessons of practi-
cal piety with which in after days she strove to impress
the hearts of her children.

In process of time she took the position of nurse in
the family, and remained as such for about ten years,
92 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

when she married Stephen May, the head-gardener, with
the entire approbation of her master and mistress, who
settled them in the entrance lodge to the hall. Here
passed fifteen years of peaceful life, clouded only by the
loss of two infants.

When her eldest child Mary was about thirteen years
old, the family at the hall was broken up by the death of
its master, Mr Wynn. He left Mrs May an annuity of
£10 a year as a mark of his esteem for her. Soon after, it
was arranged that the place should be let, and Mrs Wynn
and her daughters take up their abode on the Continent
for some years whilst the only son was being educated in
England.

A tenant was soon found, who was glad to engage
Stephen May to continue in his post as gardener, and
reside in the lodge as formerly.

The loss of the family to whom she was so attached was
a heavy trial to Mrs May, but a greater was in store for her.

About a year later, Stephen May fell from a high
ladder, and was so severely injured in the head that he
died in the course of a few days, leaving his wife and
children to maintain themselves as best they could.

Of course it was necessary to quit the lodge, and that
without much loss of time, for a new gardener had to be
appointed. Her £10 annuity, though a great help, would
not go far towards supporting them, and the widow’s health
was too delicate to endure much hardship or labour.

Tt was in this dilemma that her daughter Mary, who,
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 93

although but just fifteen years old, was a girl who gave
promise of unusual energy and strength of character,
proposed they should inquire about the paper-mill at
Windale, where she had heard such good wages were
given even to children.

“Cheer up, dear mother,” said she, “why should
not Philip and I work for you, now father is gone?
I am tall and strong of my age, and so is Philip.
William Hemings told me yesterday that he had no
doubt we should be taken into the mill at once and earn
a good deal regularly.”

William Hemings was a highly respectable man, who
held a post as a sort of bailiff on the late Mr Wynn’s
estate. He had been a great friend of Stephen May, and
to him the dutiful and affectionate daughter had gone to
consult privately as to the best way in which she and her
young brother could help their widowed mother.

Windale was about ten miles from Durston, the village
where Hemings lived, and close to which Durston Hall
was situated. It so happened that he had been to_the
_ town only a few days before on business, and had heard
that more hands were wanted at the mill, as its business
was increasing rapidly. He thought of the widow May
and her children when he was told of the numbers of young
people employed. When, therefore, Mary spoke to him
he mentioned what seemed to promise hope of immediate
work if her mother should be inclined to go and reside
there, offering to make inquiries for them about a house.
94 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

Mrs May, though she at first shrunk from the thought,
soon became reconciled to what appeared the step she
ought to take, as being the only one ‘opened to her,
She gratefully accepted Mr Hemings’ offer, empower-
ing him to take any small residence that he could find
suitable.

This he had done, and about a week later, Mrs May
bade adieu to the happy home of so many years, and was
driven by him, as we have seen, to her new abode.

That night, after a day of much fatigue for them all,
and when Mary and Philip were gone to bed, to sleep the
sound sleep of youth, Mrs May sat at the little window
of her room pondering over the future as concerned her
children.

Her own early education had been superior to her
present position, and her residence for so many years
afterwards in the excellent family of the Wynns had
further contributed to refine her mind.

She was not a proud woman, but she would have been
glad had it been in her power to place her children differ-
ently, for she knew there must be much temptation to
evil going on constantly where so many young people
were collected together.

Her anxiety was not for Mary however. She had the
most perfect confidence in her, for she had good reason
for believing that, young as she was, she was under the
influence of that Christian principle which would carry
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 95

her unharmed through dangers which overthrow others
not so defended. :
' But about Philip, her high-spirited, volatile boy, she
had many an anxious thought. She knew that his great
fault was to be too easily led. His love of daring and of
fun in any shape had often brought him into trouble even
in their own quiet village of Durston. What then might
it not do amongst such a variety of companions as he was
now going to mingle with ?

Although scarcely fourteen he was more like fifteen in
appearance, and there was a fearless sort of indifference in
his character which might be valuable or dangerous ac-
cording as that character turned out. She felt he was
peculiarly a lad who required watchfulness and a strong
influence to be exercised over him, and she was conscious
that her own rule was too gentle, too full of loving timid
anxiety to be good for him, and then she thought of the
father he had lost, and the sense of widowhood gathered
around her with double force.

Her eye fell on the Family Bible which Mary had
carefully placed on the side-table after prayers,.and she
remembered the text, ‘“‘ Leave thy fatherless children unto
me, I will preserve them alive; and let your widows
trust in me.” Jt comforted her instantly, and she
fetched the holy Book and turned to the place that she
might read the words again and again.

“T will trust Him who has promised,” said she to
96 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

herself. “Has He not already led us into the way of pro-
viding for our earthly wants, and will He not also guard
my fatherless ones from evil of worse kinds than poverty?”

Then kneeling down she commended herself and her
children to God, and went to rest, feeling a peace they
cannot know who have not yet learnt thus to lay down
their burdens.

It was not difficult to obtain employment at the mill.
The proprietor was ready enough to engage two such
strong vigorous-looking young people.

Mary was at once conducted to the room called the
rag-room, where numbers of women and girls were em-
ployed in cutting up rags. Each of them stood at a sort
of table, the top part of which was covered with a fine
wire grating—underneath was a drawer. An upright
knife blade was fixed in the centre of this grating. By
the side of every table stood an open box, divided into
various partitions. Every person had by her a large
quantity of rags, which she kept examining, unripping
them when sewed together, cutting off buttons, remov-
ing pins or other things, and, lastly, cutting them
into small pieces by drawing them across the edge of the
knife. She then threw them into the different divisions
of the box by her side according to their quality. Mary
was taken to one of these tables, and her work was ex-
plained to her. She was told that the wire grating was
in order to allow the dust and dirt on the rags to fall
through into the drawer underneath. It was such simple
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 97

employment that she soon learnt to do it very quickly,
and though she felt the fatigue of standing so many
hours a good deal at first, the other girls told her she
would soon get used to it.. She was to receive tenpence a
day at first, which was to be increased to a shilling as
she grew more expert.

Philip’s occupation was altogether different, and in a
much more noisy apartment, owing to the constant work-
ing of the vast machine, that seemed to his wondering
eyes like a huge monster endowed with human sense, or
rather super-human! It began its wonderful operations
on a sort of thickish white pulp with which it was fed at
one end, and after going through what seemed most mar-
vellous twistings and groanings, the said pulp came out
at the other in the shape of real paper wound upon a reel!
His work was easy enough, as he had merely to keep sup-
plying a sort of vat or reservoir with a constant succession
of fresh pulp. He thought he should soon get very weary
of the noise and the sameness of the employment. Be-
fore he had been there three hours, he sighed for the
liberty of his old home, and the scampers he used to have
across the fields to Durston on his way to and from the
village school. He wished that any employment had
been thought of for them rather than this. In fact,
whilst his sister was rejoicing that they were going now |
to be of real use to their mother, it must be owned
that Philip was feeling rather cross and inclined to
grumble, and more than once he received a pretty sharp

7
98 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

reminder from the overlooker that he was forgetting his
duty.

«You will soon get to dislike it less, Philip dear,” said
his sister when they were on their road home after work
was over; “it seems hard to us now, because we are not
used to be confined so many hours together, but look at
all this crowd of people, they are laughing and happy
enough, and go will you be after a time.”

“‘T shall never like it, I know,” replied Philip. “I
wish mother would send me to sea or something of that
sort; I think I shall ask her.”

* Oh! Philip, do not distress mother,” exclaimed
Mary. “ You know she could not do it; and if she
could, what a trouble it would be to her to lose you now
you are really of use. Think how pleasant it will be on
Saturday to take home our wages, and give into her own
hand the first money weehave earned! She must not
think you don’t like working for it.”

«Well, then, I won’t say a word about it,” said the
boy, “much as I hate it. I almost feel as if it isn’t so
bad when I think of one’s being able to help her. I say,
Mary, don’t let her think of coming to work at the
mill; she said something about it yesterday.”

“No, that indeed she must not,” said his sister, “she
is not strong enough. She works so nicely with her
needle, that she will get plenty to do in that way when
people know it.”
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 99

Their mother was looking out anxiously for them as
they got near home. Mary gave a cheerful account of the
day’s labours, and said everybody was civil, and that she
thought she should get on very well.

Philip tried to speak gaily also, but it was easy to
see that it was an effort to him to do it, and that
the boy’s spirits were cast down. After a few weeks,
however, he began to be more like himself. He had made
acquaintance with some other lads who liked to take long
walks with him in the summer evenings after the day’s
work was over, and sometimes they played at cricket or
foot-ball on an open space of ground between the town
and the mill. The thought of this evening hour made the
labours of the day much more bearable, and the widow
felt thankful that he should have recreations so suitable
to his age.

As for herself and Mary, they made few intimate ac-
quaintances, and some of the neighbours called them
proud when they saw that they kept so much to them-
selves. There were few with whom she had any feelings
in common.

She was a good deal shocked at the untidy, careless
habits of some of the women, who seemed utterly indif-
ferent to the comfort of their husbands and children.
In consequence the husbands were frequently at the ale-
houses during the evening. On Saturday nights, when
the wages had been paid, it was no uncommon thing to

7*
100 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

hear them returning home tipsy long after Mrs May and
her children were in bed. 1

On Sundays they would sit at their doors smoking and
idling away the hours. Few, very few, went to a place of
worship. As for the girls, they seemed to spend their
Sunday mornings in dressing themselves, and in the
afternoons they came forth in such gay attire, that no
one would have recognized them as the same young
people who were only seen in the week-days in dark cot-
ton gowns with handkerchiefs tied over their heads.

Most of them went to church of an evening, but
whether to worship God or show their smart clothes, it
is perhaps more charitable not to inquire. There were
two Sunday schools, one at the other end of Windale,
and a second close to the new church, but this last
was little frequented by those for whom it was in-
tended.

Mr Monkton, the curate, called often on the parents
to try and induce them to send their children, but the
_answer he too often received was that the poor things
were shut up all the week at their work, and that they
had not the heart to order them off to school on the only
day of rest they had.

In vain did Mr Monkton argue that the time they
would be kept was not long, and that the entire change
from the week-day’s employment would be a sort of rest
in itself. He said they were suffering them to grow up
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 101

in almost entire ignorance of religion, and proposed they
should come at least once in the day. Some promised,
but never insisted on their children going when the time
arrived. Others sent them for a little while, but let them
give it up when they liked. A very few valued the privi-
lege, and took care that they attended regularly, and
amongst this number was the widow May. Mary and
Philip had always been in the habit of going to school at
Durston, to them, therefore, it came quite as a matter of
course.

It is not surprising that Mrs May had few friends
amongst the neighbours we have mentioned, though for
the most part she contrived to be on peaceful terms with
all.

At the end of the row of houses where they resided,
lived:a woman named Sarah Jenner, whose abode was a
pattern of neatness to the whole place. She was un-
married, but had for some years adopted a nephew who
had been left wholly dependent upon her on the death
of his parents. Sarah was herself engaged in the mill,
being in rather a responsible situation, with excellent
wages. Her uniformly trustworthy conduct had for some
years placed her high in the esteem of her employers.

She was a kind and excellent neighbour, being always
ready to lend a helping hand in time of sickness, or to
look after a child in the absence of its mother during an
evening’s shopping.
102 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

She had brought up her nephew with great care, and
was particularly careful to try and keep him from the
company of such boys as she knew would only lead him
wrong. Her carefulness had been hitherto well rewarded,
for amongst the numbers that streamed forth from the
mill daily, there was not such a steady or industrious boy
as James Jenner.

For some time Mrs May and his aunt saw little of
each other, only meeting as chance might occasion, and
exchanging a few civil words,—but an accidental circum-
stance showed them that their spirits were more kindred
than they had hitherto known.

It happened that one night just as Mrs May and
her children were reading their accustomed chapter
before going to bed, Sarah Jenner looked in on her way
from Windale to bring a parcel of work for Mrs May
which had been left for her at the grocer’s, and which
Sarah thought she might as well pecoEnino tate her neigh-
bour by carrying to her.

They were about to close the Bible as she entered,
but Sarah’s eye brightened on seeing their recent occu-
pation, and after depositing the parcel on the table she
ventured to say,—

« Ah! Mrs May, I wish more of our neighbours ended
their day in this way! you’ll excuse my taking notice of
what you’re doing, but the sight of open Bibles is sadly
rare here, and it does one’s heart good to see them.”
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 103

From that night arose a friendship between the widow
and Sarah, which was a great comfort to the former.
They had both found for many years that the ways of
religion are ways of pleasantness, and of them it might be
said in future, “Then they that feared the Lord spake
often to one another.”

CHAPTER II.

’ Tue bright months of summer passed away, and the
tints of autumn were becoming very decided on the trees
which waved their branches by the side of the river Win.

Day after day Mrs May sat at her little window working
during her children’s absence. As she looked at the leaves
which were so lately green, yet now had passed into a
dark brown shade, she sighed deeply, for the slow im-
perceptible change in nature brought thoughts which
made her heart heavy. She was comparing this change
with another of a different kind, which she felé, rather than
saw, taking place in her darling Philip. He was not less
loving and affectionate, not less full of dutiful attention
to her. His wages were brought every week with readi-
104 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

ness. Yet still she was conscious that his character was
deteriorating, and that the cause must be found in the
companions he had chosen. His summer evenings had
been spent with boys very differently brought up to him-
self, and the truth of the old proverb was being verified
in this case, that “evil communications corrupt good
manners.”

Yet she knew not how to remove or remedy the evil,
for relaxation in the way of sports and games was abso-
lutely necessary—nor was it these that did the harm in
themselves: With pain she had noticed of late that he
began to weary of going to the Sunday school, and
but. for Mary’s punctuality would rarely have been in
time.
~, Mr Monkton had called and mentioned his intention
of opening night schools during the winter for the advan-
tage of the young people who had no other opportunity
of learning.

Mrs May thankfully promised: to send her children,
and Mary rejoiced on hearing of the proposed arrange-
ment. Philip looked annoyed, and said he saw no use in
it, as they could both of them read and write.

“You are backward in arithmetic, Philip,” said his
mother, “and there is to be geography and history taught,
and other things you know very little about.”

* But if I am to go on working at that odious mill all
my life, they’ll be of no use to me,” replied the boy. “I
don’t believe many of the lads will go; there are plenty


THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 165

of them laugh at me already for attending the Sunday
school now I’m nearly fifteen.”

“And are you so silly as to mind their laughing at
you, Philip?” said his mother sadly ; “ who do you think
is the best judge of what is for your good? your mother,
or the lads who make game of what she tells you to do?”

“Tom Neston and Jack Wright have said to their
parents flatly they won’t go,” said Philip.

“And did they advise you to tell me plainly you
would not go?” asked Mrs May; “and did they remind
you that you had no father to enforce my wishes ?”

Philip looked at his mother im amazement, almost
believing she must have overheard what had passed
between himself and the two boys named, so exactly had
she put into words the spirit of what they had said. One
glance, however, at her pale gentle face, down which tears
were slowly falling, made him feel ashamed and repentant,
and throwing his arms round her neck he promised to do
whatever she wished.

His mother embraced him affectionately ; it was with
an anxious heart, however, she pondered afterwards on
what had passed.

Affectionate and yielding as he was when with her, ©
‘she knew his impulsive nature too well to hope others
would not lead him astray at times.

The two boys he had spoken of were the most unde-
sirable companions he could have. Sarah Jenner had
warned him against them, and had begged him to avoid
106 “THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

them as much as possible, but, as often happens, this very
precaution had made them an object of some interest in
his eyes.

They were bold, daring lads, and saw that Philip was
the same; wanting only, they asserted, opportunities of
showing his spirit by being released from his mother’s
apron-string.

There was nothing Philip dreaded like ridicule ; this
they soon discovered, and used the weapon unmercifully
whenever they found it suited their purpose.

They had more than once succeeded in making him do

- things he knew his mother would disapprove of, by daring

him to show he was not a coward.

Their jokes about his going to the Sunday school
were so numerous, that with his dread of being
laughed at, he had begun to hate having to accompany
Mary every Sunday. Hence too his dislike to the idea of
the night school, of which he had heard from those
lads who had boasted of their intention not to attend.
They had tried to induce him also to rebel against it,
and had even reminded him that having no father he
ought to manage to be his own master much more than
he was.

These words had shocked him certainly, and well
would it have been had he then determined to have no
more to do with the unprincipled youths; but though in
his heart he despised them, he was not courageous enough
to let them see it.
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 107

Philip was not at this time aware, however, how really
bad they were.

They were considerably older than himself, and were
too cunning to propose to him at first to join them in
what he knew to be wrong. They preferred taking
the surer method of trying to shake his ideas of what was
right and due to his only parent.

His attachment to her was unbounded, however, and
next to religion there is no such safeguard for a boy as
affection for his mother.

At some little distance from Windale, on the bank of
the river, stood a cottage quite by itself. It was in-
habited by a man of somewhat notorious character, who
was almost a giant in size and strength, and a rat-catcher
by trade.

He used to go round the country, calling from house
to house with his ferrets and dogs as his companions.
Jim Raffles was a man with whom most people felt they
would rather not be in close contact, though they could
scarcely say why. Little children shrunk if they saw him
coming as from the approach of something that would
harm them. Older ones carefully avoided the vicinity
of his abode when he was known to be at home, so surly
’ was he if they came in his way. No one lived with him.

Whatever his domestic arrangements were within his
cottage they were all his own, for no female would have
cared to have had anything to do with them, so strange
and wild were his habits.
108 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

There were various suspicions about him. Some de-
clared he possessed a master key to all the poultry yards in
the neighbourhood. Others, that a tall figure was often
seen at night skulking near the adjoining rabbit warren.
Very often his house was shut up for weeks together—for
not only did he go his regular rounds in the rat-catching
line, but he was in the habit of attending every fair and
race for miles round. The absence of his gigantic form
at such places would have occasioned universal remark.
His gambling propensities were well known amongst the
lower classes. As to his honesty, if the question had been
asked generally whether Jim Raffles was a thief and a swin-
dler,no one would have exactly liked to say they thought he
was, but probably there was not a person in the country
but had his own private opinions on the subject, which he
would rather not have delivered within Jim’s hearing.
Yet he was not without partisans. Whether it was the
attraction of his dogs and ferrets, or of the marvellous
tales of which he had always an overflowing stock con-

cerning his rat-hunts, &c., he possessed a sort of fascin-
ation over boys whose inclinations lay in the sporting line.

When he went his rounds, he was sure of a welcome
from all the farmers’ lads, to whom the sight of his huge
person as he entered the farm-yards at once brought the
delightful prospect of a rat-hunt; and surly as were his
manners generally, he could be in his own way amusing
and civil enough when it suited his purpose. With Tom
Neston and Jack Wright he was a great favourite.
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 109

They always hailed his return to the cottage by the
water-side, and with a few others were sure to find their
way to him when work was over.

He used to lend them an old rusty gun, which was the
terror of all the small birds in the neighbourhood, and
this in itself was sufficient to make him popular ; for what
boy can resist the temptation of firing at sparrows and
such-like game !

Jim used to declare that that gun supplied him for the
most part with his dinners and suppers in the shape of
these little winged creatures from the hedges, which ac-
counted for certain savory smells that were occasionally
wafted from his house to the noses of chance passers by.

There were not wanting those who whispered that he
must have a better gun than this in his possession, and
, that the race of small birds must have been exterminated
long before if it were they who kept that herculean form
in such good preservation! Squire Goldney’s game-
keeper had the most decided doubts on the subject.

Poaching was not a crime carried to any considerable
extent in those parts, yet the report of a gun not unfre-
quently aroused him from his slumbers, and made. him
constantly lay plans for discovery of the nocturnal sports-
man. As yet, his vigilance had failed, although it had
not escaped his notice that the circumstance invariably
occurred when Jim Rafiles was at home.

His suspicions, however, had been diverted from him
by a circumstance which we will mention.
110 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

He had resolved, since he could not capture the
offending party, that he would at least ascertain, the next
time he was disturbed, whether or not Jim was at home
and asleep, as it might be presumed he ought to be in the
dead of the night. This he could do by making off
instantly to his cottage on the first report of the gun,
leaving him (supposing him to be the guilty party) to
bag his game in peace. It was not long before an oppor-
tunity for trying his experiment occurred. No one was
in the secret but his son, a youth of about seventeen years
of age.

About two o’clock one morning a shot was heard in
the direction of the preserves. The keeper and his son
dressed themselves and started for Jim’s cottage, not
making any great haste, but deciding to watch about for
his return if the house should be empty.

On arriving they found the door locked, and on pro-
ceeding to shake the latch, and call to Jim to answer if
he were within, a gruff angry voice, which they instantly
recognized as his, shouted out to know what they wanted
in coming to disturb a man out of his sleep at such an
hour. Flinging open the casement, he showed himself to
them in such deshabille as he certainly would not have
chosen to go out poaching in on a cold autumn night.

The keeper was thrown completely out of his
reckoning, and muttered something like an apology,
and received a volley of abuse in reply. Had he
looked behind him as he turned to walk away, Tomkins
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 111

would probably have seen and been puzzlod by a knowing
wink that passed between his son and Jim Raffles, ac-
companied by a jerk of the thumb backward by the latter,
as if to intimate he had something safe in the back-
ground. What that something was could only be known
by a glance into quarters where no one was ever allowed
to pry—but as the eyes of authors and their readers
are privileged to peep where no others can, we may as
well use ours to espy a fine hare lying under a piece of
sacking, which from its appearance cannot have been
dead more than half an hour.

The keeper walked home convinced he had wrongfully
suspected Jim, and turning in his mind how to detect the
real culprit.

His son followed him, inwardly chuckling that he had
kept Jim out of a scrape from having warned him of the
snare laid for him, and by having lent him the key of an
old door in a high wall. By using this he could at any
time make a short cut from the preserves to his own
house, and so with his gigantic strides reach it some time
before the arrival of the more leisurely-going keeper.
Master John Tomkins had his own ends.to serve in thus
aiding Raffles to outwit his father. There were more
ways than one by which he could in return help him to
fun in a variety of shapes ;—we should rather say help
him to different forms of evil, for his so-called fun too
often partook of this nature. It may at first sight appear
strange that a boy brought up as Philip May had been
112 THE SISTER GUARDIAN,

should have any desire.to make the acquaintance of such
a man as we have described. A year before, he would
have recoiled from him; but then a year before he had
not known Neston and Wright, who had talked of Jim
and his exploits till he had assumed almost a hero-like
form in Philip’s eyes before they met, which was rather
increased than lessened when he first saw his athletic
figure. He looked on the others as privileged by their
intimacy with him and his doings. Above all, he longed
for a turn with the gun, but he could only get it by con-
cealing from his mother and sister where he was, for he
knew how highly they would disapprove of such an ac-
quaintance as Raffles. Philip’s character had to proceed
on its downward course still further before it could bring
him systematically to deceive. The others saw this, and
laughed at him as wanting spirit, being under female
government, &c., and we have seen how little his princi-
ples could stand the test of ridicule! Has it not been
the stumbling-block of many a promising boy who has
not seen, till too late, that it was placed in. his way by |
those who wished to lead him from the paths of wisdom
and happiness into those of folly and misery ?
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 118

CHAPTER III.

Tue night schools commenced, and Philip and Mary
attended them. The only part, however, in which the
former took much interest was in a class formed for sing-
ing. Of music in any form he was passionately fond, and
he had a voice of thrilling power and sweetness. Three
nights in a week were thus engaged.

The remainder Mrs May tried to make pleasant and
profitable to them by books which she procured from a
lending library established by Mr Monkton.

She was painfully conscious, though, that Philip never
came in till absolutely obliged, always pleading that he
had been taking a walk with some fellows, and that he
wanted fresh air after being in the mill till dark. Had
she not so often found “the fellows” were the worst he
could have selected, she would have been less anxious
about the matter. She had begged him to associate
more with young Jenner, who she knew would never lead
him wrong, but Philip had unfortunately become too in-
timate with the others for this to be the case.

Not only were they more to his taste in his present
state of mind, but they were in the habit of ridiculing

Jenner because of his regular attendance at school and
8
114 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

church. True, Philip did the same; but then, as Neston
remarked one day, it was easy to see that he had spirit in
him for all sorts of stuff besides religion! Philip heard
the speech, and was weak enough to be pleased at it.

Mary shared her mother’s anxiety about her brother,
though little passed between them on the subject,
She used to hear more than Mrs May did about the
bad characters of some of the boys with whom he spent
so much of his spare time.

But Mary had another source of uneasiness, and this
was respecting her mother’s health.

Always delicate, she had become increasingly so
lately. A cough, which had been very little thought of,
because it had seemed almost habitual for years, was now
violent. Cold had succeeded cold during the autumn,
and greatly reduced her strength, her appetite also was
failing fast.

Young people are generally slow to see signs of
gradually approaching illness in those older than them-
selves. Mary was thoughtful beyond her years; yet she
was not seriously alarmed till one day when Susan Jenner
spoke to her on the subject.

That worthy woman had grown much interested in the
little family. She respected Mary more than any girl at
the mill. Her conduct was correct and steady amongst
the other young people, and at home she saw she was
a help and comfort to her mother. Of Philip she
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 115

knew less, but enough to fear he might cause them
sorrow at a future day—for bright, honest-looking
boy as he was, it was easy to see he had not much
stability of character. She had heard from her nephew
that he was being drawn into Jim Raffles’ set, as it was
called, and to enter that was the probable farewell to all
future respectability and right principle.

A heavy cloud too was, she thought, approaching in
another form. Her experience in sickness made her see
symptoms in Mrs May’s cough and appearance which she
considered betokened rapid decline. Winter had set in with
unusual severity. Christmas was at hand, and a sharp frost
had commenced, which reminded elderly folks of days
gone by, when such weather was more common than at
present.

Mrs May had not complained more than usual the last
few days, but had felt the cold so extremely, that although
Mary had wrapped a thick shawl round her as she sat
working by the fire, no warmth seemed to penetrate her
frame.

It was the middle of the day, and Mary lingered
about before returning to the mill, trying to stir up the
fire into a brighter blaze and make her comfortable before
she left. Cold as it was, the sun was shining bright just
then, and made the little room look cheerful.

“JT think, Mary,” said she, “TI will go out for a
walk. Nothing else will bring any warmth into

8*
116 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

my feet, I do believe. Suppose I try and get as far as the
grocer’s and buy the things for the Christmas pudding ;
I sometimes think I should be stronger if I went out
oftener.”

“It is very cold, mother,” said Mary (hesitating
between the probable advantages and disadvantages of
the walk to her health), “ yet the sun shines warm now.
You must get back in good time.”

“T shall be in before dusk, dear,” replied her mother ;
you must go now, or you will be late for work.”

But Mary waited a few moments longer to place her
mother’s walking things and boots before the fire; then
kissing and charging her to turn back if she felt tired,
she ran off hastily as the one-o’clock bell rang out loud
and clear in the keen frosty air.

At this time of the year work ceased at four. As
Mary was putting on her shawl to go home Susan Jenner
joined her. She had made up her mind to advise her to
persuade Mrs May to speak to a doctor. They walked
together briskly enough, for now the sun was gone it was

piercingly cold, and a rather strong east wind had arisen.
As Susan was thinking how best to begin the subject on
her mind, Mary suddenly introduced it.

“IT do hope that mother reached home before this
bitter wind got up.”

“Do you mean to say she went out to-day with her
bad cough ?”
THE SISTER GUARDIAN, 117

“Yes, she was going into Windale for some things
we wanted. She could not get warm in the house, and .
she thought a walk would do her good. The sun was
very bright in tle middle of the day.”

“But as she walks slow, I am afraid it would
be getting very cold by the time she returned. J can
get to Windale and back in an hour or so—but she
would be double that time. I am sorry to see her look-
ing so ill as she has been doing lately,” she continued,
“T wanted to speak to you about it, Mary. I think she

' should see a doctor. I don’t like that tight cough of hers
at all.”

Mary’s own anxiety was sufficient to make her take
aready alarm. Stopping short, and laying her hand sud-
denly on Susan’s arm, she exclaimed,—

“Do you mean you think mother really ill, or going
to be ill?”

“T think she requires great care, and to be watched
by a doctor, my dear ; and if I were you I would not lose
any time in persuading her to send for one.”

Mary was silent. Susan saw she was for the first
time taking in any idea of there being cause for fear.
They were close to Mrs May’s door by this time.
Philip was standing outside looking for the key in the
spot where it was generally placed for security when any
one was the last to leave the house.

“T say, Mary,” exclaimed he, “here is the door
118 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

locked, mother must be gone out ; it’s so dark I can’t find
the key.” The next moment, however, he produced it,
and opened the door.

The room was dark. The fire had nearly burnt out.
On getting a light they saw that Mrs May had set the tea-
things and filled the kettle before leaving.

It seemed strange that she had not returned.

“Tt is a frightfully cold wind for her to face with her
cough,” said Susan Jenner; “I will go with Philip to
meet her if you will make up the fire, Mary.”

“Oh! I will do that and come with you,” exclaimed
she, “I cannot stay here while she is out in the cold ;”
and she began rapidly to bestir herself to rake together
the expiring embers.

“Take my advice and stay, Mary,” said Susan.
“Your mother cannot be far off. Philip and I shall
meet her probably close by. She will be very cold, and
want some warm tea directly, which you can be prepar-
ing. If you come with us nothing will be ready.”

Mary saw the good sense of this proposal, and at
once assented. She proceeded to blow the fire into a
cheerful blaze, put on the kettle, which soon began to

. boil under the influence of the increasing heat. Then
she made the tea, putting the teapot on the hob to keep
warm. Finally, she placed her’ mother’s house-shoes
within the fender, and hung a shawl before the fire to
wrap her in the moment she arrived.

She looked at the clock. It was now a quarter to
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. , 119

five. Her mother must have been away three hours and
a half. She had no intention of going anywhere except
to the grocer’s. Where then could she be all this time!
She went to the door and looked up the road towards
Windale. It was quite dark now, and everything was
still, for all the people were in their cottages at tea. She
heard the sound of merry voices in the adjoining house,
and in her nervous misery felt it almost unkind of them
to be laughing and enjoying themselves, when her
mother was perhaps taking her death of cold in the night
air.

She might well shudder at the thoughts of her deli-
cate frame being exposed to such a bitter wind as came
sweeping up from the east. Mary shivered partly from
cold, partly from distress of mind, and turning back into
the cottage sat down in Mrs May’s chair, to try and wait
calmly.

A small table always stood by it, on which lay the
large Bible. It was opened at the 107th Psalm. The print
was large, and without at first intending to look there for
comfort, her eye fell on these words, ‘Then they cry
unto the Lord in their trouble, and he bringeth them out
of their distresses.”” She drew the book closer to her and
read them a second time. Her mother had evidently
been reading them also, for there was a pencil mark, and
the day of the month placed against the text. She knew
it was a habit taught her by her mistress when young, to
date any particular passage in her mornimg reading from
120 THE SISTER GUARDIAN,

which she derived help or comfort for daily duties or
difficulties. She had often told Mary of the help she had
found, from thus constantly seeking for a personal text
as it were, and had advised her to do the same. But
hitherto Mary had not felt the searching power of God’s
word. Imbued with reverence for the holy book, and with
love and admiration for its precepts, she had been from
infancy,—but now she suddenly found for the first time
what it could do in time of trouble. She went on to the
next verse. “ He maketh the storm a calm, so that the
waves thereof are still.” Mary sunk upon her knees and
buried her face in her hands. She had been reminded
to call upon God in her trouble, and she did so, be-
seeching Him to make this storm of anxiety respecting
her dear mother’s health into a calm, so that the waves
thereof might be still. She arose with a sense of peace,
although something seemed to tell her sorrow was at
hand,

Another half-hour passed. She heaped more fuel on
the fire, and again went outside the door. Voices
sounded in the distance. They came nearer. It was Susan
Jeuner and Philip, returned, but without Mrs May !

They had gone to the grocer’s, and were informed she
had been there at about a quarter past two. She had
bought what she wanted, but looked so cold and ill that his
wife had asked her to go and warm herself by the fire
in the little parlour behind the shop, and had good-
naturedly made her a cup of tea.
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 121

She had left about three o’clock, and spoke of going
home immediately. This was all the information they
could obtain, except that a man who kept a cobbler’s shop
at the corner of the road which led from the town to the
mill said he had seen a woman such as they described
walking very slowly out of Windale. He had noticed
her because she was coughing so much she had to stop
for a few minutes till she regained her breath. They
thought it possible she might have turned out of her
road to rest at a cottage which stood in a field about
half way home, the woman of which she knew a little.
She had however seen nothing of her, so they had hast-
ened back with the hope they had somehow missed her
and might find her safe with Mary.

Susan Jenner was now seriously alarmed, though
she endeavoured to reassure the terrified children; and
she stopped Philip, who was about to rush back again to
retrace their steps, without any clear intention of what
he was going to do.

“We must ask some of our neighbours to help,”
said she; “but before alarming them, let us think
whether there is any place where she can have taken
shelter. The wind blows so strong across the com-
mon,” said she to Mary (alluding to the spare piece of
ground before mentioned as used for cricket in summer),
“that Philip and I had to take hold of each other to keep
steady on our feet. I don’t see how she could have
stood against it alone.”
122 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

“Do you think,” exclaimed Philip eagerly, “ that
she could have turned. off the road, and have gone
down into Primrose Hollow, and so got on the road
below, where it would be more sheltered than
above ?”

“Tt is possible, indeed, said Susan,” starting up.
«IT wonder we did not think of that before. It is, to
be sure, a much longer way, and there is the steep bank
at the end she would have to climb, perhaps however she
thought only of getting into a sheltered walk.”

“ But the path by the river-side is so narrow! ” said
Mary, clasping her hands in agony.

Philip turned deadly pale as Mary suggested a fright-.
fulidea. He was well acquainted with this way, which was
a common haunt of his with Neston and Wright, for
Raffles’ cottage lay down there. It was little used
by any one except boys, and children who scrambled
down the bank in early spring to get the first primroses
from the hollow, which derived its name from the little
yellow flowers that made this sheltered nook the scene
for the display of their earliest beauty. Philip knew well
that not only was the path very narrow, but that it was
broken away in some places at the edge, so as to make
it dangerous walking in the dark. If Mrs May had taken
this road she would have to go on past her own home,
which stood on the top of the high bank, till she got to
the bleaching house of the mill, where there was a road
that led from the river to the upper ground.
THE SISTER GUARDIAN, 123

Susan proposed that she and Philip should go and
fetch one or two of the neighbouring men, and that they
should separate, one party going down to the river-side
by the way of ‘Primrose Hollow,” the other by the
bleaching house, both searching carefully as they went
along. Lights of course would be necessary, and Mary
with almost unnatural calmness put a candle into their
lantern and held it out to her brother.

They were alone for a moment, Susan had gone out
to get help. Mary’s hand shook so violently that as he
did not take it from her she set it down on the table.
Their eyes met, and with a sudden impulse Philip threw
himself into his sister’s arms. That glance had revealed
to both the nature of each other’s fears.

Was their mother drowned? Even in the shelter of
each other’s embrace they did not dare to clothe the
awful thought with words.

Susan returned almost directly, two sturdy men with
her carrying lights. Again Mary held the lantern to
Philip, but the poor boy turned from it. “I cannot
carry it,” he whispered to her, “I do not know what it
may show me.”

“Stay with Mary, my boy,” said Susan, who had over-
heard the whisper, and whose heart was filled with pity
for them both, herself dreading what he might be called

‘upon to witness if, as she feared, Mrs May had fallen into
the river. ‘Stay here,” she repeated, “you will be a
comfort to your sister.”
124 THE, SISTER GUARDIAN.

But Philip was in a state of too great nervous excite- _
ment to remain behind, so he followed them out, and
Mary was again left. Not alone, however, this time, as
she would have preferred. The alarm had spread, and
several women came in to ask questions and show their
sympathy. They meant kindly, but their blunt way of ex-
pressing their fears as to what had happened harrowed up
the poor girl’s feelings till she could scarcely endure them.

“T??s no wonder she’s not come home,” said Jane
Wheeler, “if she went and took that path by the river-
side in the dark ; why, it’s not half a yard wide in some
parts, and the bank’s broken away here and there by the
swelling of the river.”

“Don’t you remember, Jane,” said the other woman,
“how Polly Wooding was drowned one night coming
from her mother’s cottage to fetch the doctor from Win-
dale? She lived in that hut where Jim Raffles’ is now,
and her sister was taken so ill she went off all in a hurry
about nine o’clock at night. But no Polly ever appeared
at the doctor’s house, and nothing could be heard of her,
so they dragged the river, and sure enough there she was
found. She was thought to have fallen in just below
‘Primrose Hollow,’ where the bank is not safe. Poor
soul! she little thought when she was running to try and
save her sister’s life that she was going to lose her own.”

“Hark!” exclaimed Mary, starting up, “I hear
voices and people coming.”
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 125

The two women ran out, Mary trembled and grasped
the back of the chair by which she was standing for sup-
port. The steps came nearer, close, and then Susan
Jenner ran in hastily.

“Thank God she is not dead, Mary, she breathes, it is
only a faint ;” and as she spoke in stalked the tall figure
of Jim Raffles, carrying in his arms as easily as if she
were an infant, the pale inanimate form of Mrs May.
Philip and the others followed closely behind, and crowded
in till the little room could hold no more. ‘

It was well that Susan Jenner’s precaution in running

on first had enabled Mary to catch at her suggestion of a
faint, for to all appearance her mother was dead. It
enabled her to preserve her presence of mind, and re-
member what must be done.

Flying to the little room in which Philip slept, she
snatched the mattress and pillow from his bed, and car-
ried them into the sitting-room, laying them near the fire.
On this couch Raffles gently laid his burden.

“She'll come to, may be,” said he, looking at
Mary as she chafed her mother’s cold hands, with an ex-
pression more akin to pity than any one would have sup-
posed his countenance could have shown.

«Brandy! she should have a drop or two of brandy,”
exclaimed Susan Jenner.

“ We have none in the house,” said Mary ; “fly, Philip,
‘to Mr Ashton’s, he will have some.”
126 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

But there was no need to go—brandy was at hand at
no greater distance than Raffles’ pocket. Drawing there-
from a worn leather flask, he handed it to Susan.

' “Mayhap the best thing I can do for her now,” said
he, “is to go for the doctor.” So saying, with one stride
he reached the door and disappeared.

Not to keep the reader longer in ignorance of what
had befallen Mrs May, we will relate her history after she
left the friendly grocer’s parlour and passed the cobbler’s
stall, as we have seen.

The tea had revived and enabled her to push on
for a time, but she had to face the wind, and to be
more exposed to it as she cleared the town. A violent fit
of coughing which seized her as she got upon the high
road took away her strength sadly, and when she reached
the open space before-mentioned, she found herself quite
unequal to struggle with the blasts that kept driving
across if with biting fury.
| She leaned against a stile for a few minutes; it
was the one that led down into Primrose Hollow. She
knew there was a path somewhere at the bottom which
would take her home by the river, and that it would at
least be a more sheltered one than the road, so she deter-
mined to try and get down to it.

Being weak and benumbed by cold, it was with
great difficulty she managed to get over the stile, and
the exertion made her cough with fresh violence.

There was a path amongst the brushwood and shrubs,
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 127

not very clearly defined even in broad daylight, and
of which now in the increasing dusk she soon lost
all trace. The bank was exceedingly steep, and in her
weak chilled state the descent was both painful and
perilous.

Many times she fell, bruising herself against the roots
of trees that had been cut down, and tearing both her
dress and her skin amongst the briers which grew abund-
antly around.

Bleeding and faint she at last reached the bottom, of
which circumstance she was apprized by a hedge which
separated the bank from the path on the other side.’

It was some time before she could find any outlet, for
she had wandered far from the stile, which was placed be-
low almost in a straight line with the one above, and was
the only other mode of exit from the little wood.

For an hour and upwards the unfortunate woman
crept about more dead than alive, feeling in the dark for
some place by which she could escape. At last, when
about to lie down exhausted on the ground, she found
she was in front of the stile for which she had searched
so long. It was high, and in a somewhat dilapidated
state. Many times her poor wearied trembling frame
tried to climb to it, and as often sunk back unable to suc-
ceed, At last she managed to place her feet on one of
the topmost rails, but it was loose and seemed to be
giving way under her, causing her to catch at the
hedge. The twigs that alone met her hand were too
128 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

fragile to give any support, and she fell forward over the
narrow path, her head striking against a stone that
happened to lie in that spot, and but for which she must
have fallen into the river.

Here she lay in a state of insensibility, till Raffles, who
was going along that path on his way to Windale, found
her at the foot of the stile. Lifting her up, he had turned
back and carried her as far as the bleaching house, when
he met the party in search of her. The rest has been
told.

CHAPTER IV.

Ir was long before Mrs May gave any signs of re-
turning life, her almost imperceptible breathing and pulse
alone giving symptoms it was not extinct. As soon as
possible Susan Jenner cleared the house of the kind-
hearted neighbours, who each suggested a different
remedy, and were unintentionally causing much noise and
confusion. ,

At last, by reminding them how necessary pure air
was to the invalid, and how distressed she would be by
the sight of so many faces when she revived, she suc-
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 129

ceeded in persuading them all to go home, with the ex-
ception of two who she thought would be useful.

A deep sigh at length escaped Mrs May, followed by
a partial unclosing of the eyelids, then a few low moans,
and an attempt to change her position.

Philip had remained all this time kneeling at his
mother’s feet, his eyes fixed upon her, with an expression
of horror and awe. It was his firm conviction she was
dead, although he knew others thought the contrary.

It seemed to him impossible that anything so death-
like could still be in life. He watched the remedies they
applied with a half-stupified wondering gaze, unable fully
to realize what was expected of them. But when he
heard her sigh, and saw her eyes slowly open, the revul-
sion of feeling made him almost beside himself with joy.
His mother had seemed lost—departed—gone from them
for ever! A horrible feeling of desolation, darkness, and
misery had gathered like ice round his heart. That one
deep-drawn sigh had brought her back from another
world! They had a mother still, and were not going to
be alone on the earth !

He crept to her side and covered her face with kisses,
and Mary’s gentle face touched his, as she too pressed
her cheek against her reviving parent’s. Susan would
not check them, she felt as though love like this must help
to bring back the spirit that had so nearly departed.

It was still some time before she entirely recovered
consciousness, or seemed to understand what had hap-

9
1380 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

pened. When she did it was evident that she was alarm-
ingly ill.

A burning heat succeeded the icy coldness of her
limbs, and she constantly put her hand to her chest, as
if feeling pain there, though the exertion of speaking
seemed too great for her to tell them so.

Tt was a relief to them when the doctor arrived. He.
ordered her to be taken to bed at once, and told
Susan he greatly feared she had received a shock to her
constitution which in her delicate state of health would
prove fatal.

The injury to the head from the stone against which
she had fallen was not of consequence, though it had
stunned her for the time. He apprehended, however,
inflammation of the lungs, and for this the necessary
remedies would be as dangerous in her exhausted state
as the disease itself.

Mary was standing by at the concluding part of this
opinion, and saw at once that the blow which seemed to
have been spared them by her mother’s return to con-
sciousness was averted only for a time.

The doctor was a kind-hearted man; he was touched
by the anguish her countenance expressed, and said,

“Cheer up, my good girl; after all, remember I am
only expressing my fears, none but God can know how
things may turn out.”

“Did you ever find any one recover, sir,” asked
Mary timidly, ‘“‘ when they were so ill as mother ? ”
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 131

Mr Elsey hesitated. He did not like to give any false
hopes, yet to dash all away would probably unfit her for
the arduous task which was before her. At length he
replied,

“T have seen people recover of whom I had entirely
lost hope. If this has been goin some instances it may be
in others. Your mother is in God’s hands. I can but
work under Him, bestowing all the skill I possess upon
the case. You on your part must not suffer your distress
to unfit you for the requisite fatigue and nursing that is
coming. I will see her again early to-morrow.”

And in the morning he came, for he knew it was a
case that would probably soon be decided.

It was as he had predicted. Inflammation had set in
upon the chest, which the only remedies he dared to apply
had not sufficient force to subdue, till her strength was
so encroached upon, that when in the course of a few
days the immediate disease was got under, her weakness
was such as to preclude any hope of recovery.

Susan Jenner was indefatigable in her attention. The
proprietor of the mill was a man of real benevolence,
and at once, on hearing of the circumstances, offered to
make arrangements for sparing her for a time. The
young people, also, he proposed to excuse from attend-
ance without stopping their wages. Susan, however,
thought it desirable for Philip to continue work so long
as Mrs May was too ill to enable him to be in the room.
The poor boy would be better for occupation, rather than

9g *
132 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

sitting, as he had done for a whole day, at her door
listening for the faintest sound of her voice, which too
often reached him in low groans of pain. They tried to
persuade him to sit by the fire below, and to take refresh-
ment, but in vain. At last, towards the middle of the
night following that on which she was found, he fell fast
asleep, with his head leaning against her door-post.
Susan was a strong woman, and taking him gently in her
arms, she carried him into his own little room, and laid
him in his bed. Thoroughly exhausted with watching
and weeping, he slept soundly till the middle of the fol-
lowing day, and as he knew he could be of no use at
home, the necessity of going to work helped to brace his
mind.

Tt was affecting to see how he clung to the hope of
her recovery when all else knew there was none. Not
in the sick room constantly, as Mary was, watching the
pain and suffering that made her speedy release from it
almost a matter of hope in those who knew it could have
but one ending, poor Philip kept expecting all would
yet be well.

In vain did Susan Jenner try to prepare him for the
probability of a fatal termination to her illness. Mary
was the only one who could have convinced him, and she
was herself hoping against hope. Hitherto no one had >
had the heart to tell her that it was not now a question
whether they were going to be left orphans.

Mr Monkton had called several times, but Mrs May
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 133

had been too ill to see him. His visits were a comfort to
Mary, to whom he never failed to say a few words, which
were a help to her in her efforts to resign her will to her
Heavenly Father’s. Hopeful though she was at times
that her mother might struggle through, at others she felt
how impossible it was her strength could hold ont, and
that she and Philip would soon be without any earthly
parent.

At last the pain left Mrs May. Her breathing became
comparatively calm, and her countenance regained its
usually placid and peaceful expression.

Even Susan Jenner caught a ray of hope from Philip,
who saw the great change, as he thought, for the better,
when he came home from work in the afternoon, and
crept up-stairs to her room, as was his habit, directly he
entered the house.

She was sleeping calmly for the first time, no longer
starting or moaning.

The boy looked at her with delighted surprise, and
Mary, who was standing behind the curtain, made him a
sign expressive of satisfaction, though she laid her finger
on her lips to ensure silence. Mr Elsey had not seen her
that day. He arrived about 6 o’clock, and Susan Jenner
told him how their spirits had risen.

He shook his head, and passed softly up-stairs. The
signs were not those of hope to his practised eye, but of a
cessation of all pain because fever and disease had left the
weak tenement, whose vital powers were sinking rapidly.
1384 THE SISTER GUARDIAN,

Philip happened to be out. Mary was at the bed-
side, watching the doctor’s countenance with an inquir-
ing happy look, that told of her conviction he would
think well of her at last. He beckoned to Susan as he
left the room.

“Tt is as I supposed,” he said. ‘‘ She will suffer no
more now. Those poor children should be prepared for
what is coming on them.”

“Then she is worse, sir? ”

“She is dying beyond all doubt, although she may
live for another day or so.”

“Poor dears,” said Susan, wiping her eyes. “ And
they are so pleased and happy because they think she is
better.”

“Té will be kinder to tell them she can never be.
That seems a remarkably sensible, nice girl.”

«‘T never saw such a one, she is more like twenty-six
than sixteen. You don’t think I need speak to them to-
night, sir? better let the boy at all events have a good
sound sleep.”

“Yes, it may beas well. Mrs May will probably
slumber on for many hours, possibly she may pass away
thus in the course of to-morrow, but it is more likely that .
she will awake and be perfectly conscious for some
time.”

About nine o’clock Mary entreated Susan to go to
bed, as she had not undressed for several nights, whereas
she had insisted on Mary taking regular rest for part of
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 135

every day or night, as it might happen. Philip was in his
own room, and a bed was made up on the floor in the
kitchen for Susan and herself when one of them could be
spared from the sick chamber. Susan was willing to
comply with Mary’s wish, for she was really worn out.
She felt too that if this were indeed to be Mrs May’s last
night on earth, it would always be a satisfaction to her
daughter to know she had not left her.

So charging her to call if she awoke or appeared
worse, she lay down and soon fell into a sound slumber.

CHAPTER V.

_ TuErE is scarcely a more solemn time can be passed
under any circumstances than the solitary night-watch by
the sick and dying bed.

Most women have experienced it at some time of their
lives, and sometimes it falls to the lot of even girls of as
tender years as Mary May. If any young person reads
this who has thus early tasted of life’s sorrows, she will
be able to sympathize with her, as on this night she softly
closed the door upon Susan. Mrs May still slept calmly
as an infant. Her face was turned to the wall, so that
136 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

Mary could only see her profile as she bent over her.
The soft almost imperceptible breathing, however, satis-
fied her that she was comfortable.

Mary seated herself by the table on which the little
night-lamp was burning. spirits again since Mr Elsey’ s visit; all the heavier per-
haps because for a short time it had seemed to be taken
off.

She had not dared to ask Susan what he had said to
her about her mother. But she knew that had he thought
as favourably as she had expected, he would not have
looked so grave when he felt her pulse and listened to
her breathing. He would not have left the room with-
out one kind nod of encouragement to her who was
anxiously watching for it. She had seen him beckon
to Susan, and she heard their voices talking below in a
suppressed tone.

Had there been good news to tell how readily
Susan would have come up again. But she had lingered
below, and when they met, her countenance was more
thoughtful and disturbed than before, and she made no
allusion to Mr Elsey’s visit.

All this told Mary what she wished not to be told
in words—yet knew as certainly as if the dreaded truth
were written in large letters before her. Yes! her
mother was dying! Mr Elsey knew it! Susan Jenner
knew it! She knew it now! Philip must soon know it!
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 137

Her hand was lying white and thin outside the sheet.
Soon it would be whiter still, stiff and cold! Oh! had
she dared to, without fear of awakening her, how she
would have loved to take it between her own, and kiss
and fondle it whilst it was still warm and living.

Then her imagination began to work as it is ready to
do with every one under the influence of the dead silence
of a midnight watch. The eight-day clock, which stood
in the room below, had ticked on, week after week,
month after month, without her once noticing a single
stroke. To-night it seemed suddenly to have taken life,
and to be saying a word over and over again in a loud,
dull, monotonous voice that came sounding through the
boards.

And it was a word she hated to hear, but could not
help listening to. She would have given anything to
stop it, so cruel and unfeeling it sounded, not the less
because she was.aware how little it was in fault, and that
the dreaded monosyllable was coined by her own
brain. Still it went on, never stopping, always speaking,
and its speech was “ Death, death! death, death!”

She had seen her father in his coffin. She closed her
eyes, and saw her gentle mother lying there also.

Image after image passed before her of a scene that
she was aware, real as it appeared, was only imagination,
but which she also knew was soon to be real! Mary felt
spell-bound to her own thoughts. She could not dispel
138 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

them. No new ones arose, but the same over and over
again, just like the one awful word for ever pronounced
below by her clock tormentor.

Suddenly her mother moved, and said something in
her sleep. Then all was still as before, and her slumber
seemed ag sound.

That slight movement, however, had been sufficient to
arouse Mary from her painful reverie. A prayer-book
lay on the table by the side of the lamp. It had be-
longed to her father, and was carefully treasured by
Mrs May. She opened it, and saw some blades of
dry grass between the leaves, which she knew had come
from his grave, having been gathered the evening
before they left Durston. They were placed at the
service for the burial of the dead, and her eye fell upon
the words, “O death, where is thy sting? O grave,
where is.thy victory? The sting of death is sin, and the
strength of sin is the law. But thanks be to God, which
giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.”

Mary had often heard these words, but they now
seemed to take a new meaning in her eyes. Why did
she so dread death, if sin alone made it terrible, and
Christ had overcome sin? Had not her mother for years
clung to Christ, and tried to impress upon her mind, from
her earliest childhood, that He, and He only, could wash
away sin? and now that she was going to Him would He
fail her ?

She knew she had no fears, for she had heard her say
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 139

that, to the Christian, death was turned into a friend
rather than an enemy ; one who came to carry him to his
Saviour’s bosom.

When she recalled the visions that had tormented her
a few minutes ago, she saw they had all been about the
poor sinful body, not of the soul that had been redeemed !
Great as would be hers and Philip’s loss, what would even
that be in comparison to her mother’s gain ?

Peace and comfort began to take the place of her
former miserable feelings, as they had done on a former
occasion. The clock still kept uttering its solitary word—
but she could bear to hear it now.

Two hours passed. She rose to stir the fire, and as
she returned to her seat her mother softly said “ Mary ! ”

She was by her side in an instant. Her face was
turned towards the light, and she saw that a great alter-
ation had taken place in it.

“You have had a good long sleep, dear mother, do
you feel better ?”

“Tam free from all pain, thank God, but I am no
better, I am going fast.”

Mary gave her a cordial, which the doctor had ordered
for her when she woke. It revived her a good deal. She
glanced round the room.

« Are we alone, Mary ?”

“Yes, mother; Susan and Philip are asleep, and I am
watching you.”

“Tam glad of that, for I have much to say, and my
140 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

strength will not last long. You and Philip are very
young to be left alone in the world, as you are going to
be.”

Mary did not dare to trust herself to speak. She had
during the last few hours schooled herself to think of
her mother’s death, but she could not calmly talk of it
yet. ,

After a moment’s pause Mrs May continued, “I can
trust you both to God—He will provide for you. I know
He will not suffer you to come to want. But, Mary, I fear
for Philip’s steadiness of conduct; he is so easily led by
others. When I am gone, there will be nobody but
you to watch over him. Will you promise me to do it,
and to keep him from bad companions ?”

Poor Mary! How weak and young she felt at that
moment to be asked to give such a promise. She was
herself for the first time going to be left without a
parent’s guidance, so much needed at her age—yet she
was to take upon herself the responsibility of her brother,
who, though warm-hearted and affectionate, was, she well
knew, likely to be led by his associates rather than herself.

She did not answer immediately. Her mother seemed
to understand what was passing in her mind, and said,

“Mary, from a child you have been thoughtful.
You are more suited by your natural character to
watch over a brother than many girls would be.
God has tempered the wind to the shorn lamb,
as usual, He has a work for you to do, and has
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 141

fitted you for it. Look to Him for strength, and you
will succeed.”

** Mother,” replied she at last, “I solemnly promise
you to do my best to keep Philip from evil. May God
help me,” she added, bursting into tears.

“Do not fear, my child. My dear mistress used to
tell me when IJ was a girl that we should all of us try to live
for the good of others, and that by watching we should
soon find out how best to do it. Your future task is very
clear, Mary.”

Mrs May became much exhausted with the effort of
talking, and had to be silent for some time. After a
while she asked her daughter to read her a psalm.

“T should like to hear the 107th,” she said.

As Mary read, her mother listened intently; she
stopped her when she came to the 28th verse, and re-
peated that and the following one herself in a weak but
clear voice. “Then they cry unto the Lord in their
trouble, and He delivereth them out of their distresses.
He maketh the storm a calm, so that the waves thereof
are still.”

‘I read those lines,” said she, “just before I left
home that afternoon—and when I was wandering about
in the wood I repeated them again and again. I knew
God would in time deliver me out of my distresses, and
so He has done, though not in the way I thought Hoe
would.”

She repeated the next verse. “Thon are they
142 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

glad because they be quiet, so He bringeth them unto
their haven of rest.”

“He is taking me to rest, Mary, even under the
shadow of His own wing. Oh! may you and Philip fol-
low me thither.”

Again she seemed faint with exhaustion, and Mary
insisted on her lying quiet. She was alarmed at the
deadly paleness that was stealing over her face, and pro-
posed calling Susan. But Mrs May signed to her it was
not necessary, and after again swallowing some nourish-
ment she fell into a doze, which lasted till morning.

When she awoke she asked for Philip.

He was startled at the change he saw, which revealed
at the first glance even to his sanguine mind that she was
dying.

The paroxysm of grief it threw him into greatly affect-
ed his mother, and they would have taken him away, but
she stopped them, and whispered words of comfort as he
hung over her, begging him to be guided by his sister,
and so to live on earth that they might be reunited in
heaven. Mr Monkton had been sent for, and arrived soon
after to administer the last holy rites, for it was evident
she was sinking fast.

Her consciousness lasted till they were over, and then
she fell into a placid sleep, during which her spirit depart-
ed to its ‘‘ haven of rest.”

“ And rest more deep than tongue can tell,

Her few brief hours of conflict pass’d,
She finds with Christ her Friend at last.”
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 143

CHAPTER VI.

Tue rest of the winter passed drearily away to the
orphan pair who were left to steer their own course in the
world.

They had no relations sufficiently near to feel any in-
terest in them. Mrs Wynn had, however, written on
hearing of Mrs May’s death, to say that it was her wish
to continue the annuity of £10 a year to her children for
the sake of their mother. This would enable them to be
independent with what they earned at the mill.

The cottage was given up, and they moved into
lodgings with a respectable woman in the same row of
houses, who being single had more room than she required.

Susan Jenner lived close by, and felt undiminished
interest in them.

Philip seemed to be the one who most bitterly felt
the loss of his mother. For some time his grief was
almost wild and uncontrolled, and even when the first
burst had passed away his dejection remained extreme,
and Mary appeared to lay aside her own sorrow in her
efforts to amuse and comfort him.

One object was now ever uppermost in her mind—to
fulfil the trust left her by her mother with regard to Philip.
She had contrived out of the sale of their furniture, &c.,
144 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

to buy him a small second-hand harmonium, knowing his
love for music, which amounted almost to a passion, and
having often heard her mother express a wish to cultivate
this taste.

The school-master had taught him his notes, and this
little device of Mary’s had served to beguile his winter
evenings. Indeed, before long he acquired a degree of
skill on his instrument which astonished Mr Monkton, who
accidentally heard him one day accompanying it with his
voice. As the days of spring began to cast their bright-
ness on everything, Philip’s spirits partook of the influ-
ence, and gradually rose to their natural height.

His former evening rambles commenced, and with
considerable anxiety Mary saw that they were generally
taken with Neston and Wright. She was soon sensible
that their intercourse with him had an undesirable effect,
though for some time she would have found it difficult to
state in what respect. But the same uneasiness that had
been felt by Mrs May on this subject was now on his
sister’s mind.

There was nothing particular, however, to complain
of. No apparent reason for determining to consult Mr
Monkton, her ever-ready friend and adviser. Nor did she
like to express her undefined fears to Susan Jenner even,
lest she should be giving her an unfavourable impression of
Philip. She began to see very little of him. They used
to have tea as soon as they gave over work, and the mo-
ment his was swallowed he would be off, and not return
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 145 ©

till bed time. At first he was quite willing to tell Mary
where he had been, and with whom, but gradually he
began to chafe under her inquiries and her evident fears
lest his companions should lead him into mischief.

One night in May, he stayed out so late that Jane
Fletcher, with whom they lodged, and who was very
regular in her habits, complained, and said she would not
sit up to let him in, nor would she suffer Mary to do so.
She told the latter in pretty plain terms that she feared
her brother would come to no good if he began to stay
out late with such a set as he was getting amongst.

« There’s a whole lot of them,” said she, “ with Jim
Raffles at their head, all as good for nothing as they can
be, and. if Philip doesn’t get into some scrape by being
with them so constantly, my name isn’t Jane Fletcher.”

“T often ask Philip how they spend their evenings,”
said Mary, “and he always seems to be either walking, or
going in a boat for an hour or two with them; at all
events there is nothing wrong in that.”

“No, but once a lad goes with bad companions he’ll
get into all their ways, and depend on it some of them
are dangerous enough for a boy to learn. Why, I’ve heard
that fellow Neston swear worse than Jim Raffles him-
self.” :

“T don’t think anything would make Philip swear,”
said Mary.

“Not yet, but if he’s always with them as do, it
shows he isn’t shocked at it,” persisted Jane, ‘‘and the

10
146 THE SISTER GUARDIAN,

next thing will be, he’ll begin himself, I suspect he’s
where he wouldn’t like to tell you to-night. I know that
Jim Raffles’ set often end off their evenings playing and
drinking at the “‘ Hen and Chickens.”

Mary started with horror. ‘You do not mean you
think Philip goes there!” exclaimed she.

“T can’t tell,” replied Jane Fletcher bluntly, “TI only
know the others do, and I suppose Philip doesn’t stop
outside. However, don’t look so white and miserable,”
said she good-naturedly—for though a plain-spoken
woman she had a kindly heart,—“ perhaps ’'m wrong,
‘only you had better speak to the lad when you’re alone
together, he’s one who’ll listen to you at all events.”

Voices were now heard in the distance, singing and
laughing ; in a few minutes Philip’s tap was heard at the
door.

Jane Fletcher at once told him he must come in by a
proper time, and that he had best take care what he was
about, or his name would get badly spoken of.

Philip looked dogged, and walked off to bed in a
little closet, or room, if so it could be called, without
vouchsafing a word in reply. Thither Mary followed
him as soon as Jane had gone up-stairs. She took with —
her the supper, which had been standing for him on
the table. He refused at first to admit her, but her
gentle pleading prevailed, and he opened the door.

“T don’t want it, ’ve had ERE he said, “a jolly
good one too.”
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 147

Mary set down the bread and cheese, and said,

“Let me come and speak to you, Philip, I won’t keep
you long.”

“« Well, what is it? be quick,” he replied ; “I suppose
it’s another lecture I’m to have.”

“T do not want to lecture you, but only to beg you
to come in by supper-time, it vexes Jane Fletcher so when
you keep her up.”

“What's Jane Fletcher to me? she’s no right to find
fault ; I’m not going to be in leading-strings to her, I can
tell her.”

“But she has a right to insist on your being in in
good time as we live in her house.”

“T tell you, Mary, I can’t always be in by nine o’clock
like a baby. I was asked to supper to-night with a lot
of fellows, and it wasn’t put on the table till nine, so how
could I be home ?”

“ But do you think, Philip, you should have gone to
the supper at all? wasn’t it at the public-house ?”

* And suppose it was, what then ?”

“OQ Philip! I wish you wouldn’t go there.”

“T got into no harm, and never will, so now don’t
you be fretting and watching me, Mary; ’m going on
for sixteen, and can’t stand it. A. fellow must have a
spree sometimes who works like a mill-horse all day.”

“‘ But, Philip, you are with a bad set, and they will lead
you into trouble. You have nobody to tell you so but
me. Oh! do listen, for our dear mother charged me to

10 *
148 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

try and keep you from bad company the night before
she died. I never told you about it before, and that I
promised her I would try to do so.” ~

Philip looked softened, and a tear glistened in his eye.
He made no reply however; Mary did not wait for one,
but bade him good mgt with an affection he warmly
returned.

This conversation was not without its effect on him
for a time. He was not only in to supper for many
nights running, but he several times proposed to Mary
that they should walk together after tea, an offer that
cost him more than she was aware of, from the jeers and
ridicule of those who did not scruple to shower it upon
him because he showed this attention to his sister.

But amendment is always short-lived which is not the
effect of any higher principle than mere softened feeling ;
and Philip was soon as entirely under the influence of the
youths he had joined as before.

He positively refused to go on any longer attending
at the Sunday school. Neither Mr Monkton’s nor.Mary’s
arguments could prevail upon him in this matter.

Mr Monkton was not surprised. He was aware how
much a boy had to contend with who persevered in his
attendance after he was a certain age, and he had long
seen that Philip was not one whose moral courage was of
high standing.

One downward step invariably leads to another, and
poor Mary’s next anxiety was to continue him in his habit
TEE SISTER GUARDIAN. 149

of going to church regularly; but although he always
accompanied her of a morning, he began to be absent
from the evening service, which they had hitherto regu-
larly attended together, pleading the old excuse that they
were shut up in the mill all the week, and that he must
get into the country for a change. Mary knew that it
was no uncommon event for him to join a boating party
on these occasions, composed of young men and women
who spent their Sunday evenings at some tea-gardens
a few miles distant.

She felt her own influence was growing weaker and
weaker, yet her mother’s charge to her was more sacred
than ever in her eyes. Susan Jenner was now her chief
friend and confidant in her trouble. To no‘one else could
she bear to speak of her brother’s short-comings. From
her she got sympathy and advice.

«You must not fret yourself, Mary,” said she, “as
though you were neglecting your promise. Your business
is to do all that lies in your power to keep Philip from
going wrong, and leave the rest to God.”

“T feel,” replied Mary, “as though I am not doing
enough towards persuading him to give up his bad com-
panions ; yet when I say much on the subject he gets im-
patient, and goes away from me.”

* You will do no good by constantly harping about it
to him, my dear,” said Susan, “‘ but only make him avoid
being with you. Neither would I often remind him o.
your promise to your mother about him, it will only
150 THE SISTER GUARDIAN,

weaken the effect against some time or other when you
may want to make use of it. Philip is going on crookedly
enough, it is true, but his mother’s prayers for him
will not be lost, though it may not please God to let
all go straight with him now. Maybe He will let him
suffer first, since he is so wilful and resolved to take his
own way.”

Painful as were honest Susan’s words, Mary felt the
good sense of them, and they made her resolve that if
prayer for her brother was all she could do for him, that
at least should not be wanting.

CHAPTER VII.

We have said that poaching had not been hitherto a
crime much practised in that neighbourhood, though
Squire Goldney’s preserves had not been altogether un-
molested. The autumn of this year brought however
with it so many offences of the kind that the magistrates
began to be on the alert, and to resolve to make an ex-
ample of any who might be caught in the fact.

The autumn had considerably advanced before the
keepers had laid their plans with sufficient success to
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 151

detect any offenders, although suspicion had long been
strong against several parties. A traitor being in the
camp, as we have seen, in the person of Squire Goldney’s
keeper’s son, he had completely misled those who were
watching with a vigilance that must otherwise have been
successful. :

Mary had very little idea that her brother was in any
manner implicated in these matters. Nor, as far as having
actually assisted in snaring the preserves, had he been so,
but that he was in the secret of those who did was a fact
well known to himself. Not only so, but his ambition
was fired to be allowed to make one in a nocturnal lark,
for such the midnight adventures he heard detailed by
others seemed to him. His notions on the subject of
poaching were taken from the creed of those he was now
so constantly with, and though he would have shrunk
from the idea of stealing, he considered that as an entirely
different affair.

Perhaps he did not choose to analyze too closely his
opinions on what seemed so adventurous and pleasurable,
or he might have found that his conscience was by no
means quiet as he did so.

Alas! Philip had long ceased to care to consult that
faithful monitor, and its voice was gradually becoming
hushed and silent !

Mary now seldom saw him except at meals. She had

‘hoped that as soon as the days closed in early, she might
persuade him to attend the night schools again, but found
152 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

he would not listen to her. His harmonium had still suf-
ficient charms to tempt him to remain after tea practising
for a time, and Mary would endeavour by every device in
her power to keep him playing to her. Then she tried
to beguile him into reading, but this she found more difii-
cult.

The book, however interesting, was sure to be shut
before long, and he would make his escape for the rest of
the evening. Jane Fletcher generally shook her head
ominously after him, and expressed her opinion of those.
who were fond of roving out at night, with a bluntness
that kept his sister imagining every description of evil
and mischief he could be falling into, and watching the
hour of his return with nervous anxiety.

He was still affectionate to her so long as she did not
interfere with his ways, but she had long found that it
was useless to do this.

' His horror of being considered under petticoat govern-
ment increased more and more, and she saw that her best
chance of retaining any hold over him was by not suffering
the love between them to become weakened by useless
efforts on her part to control his movements. One even-
ing in the beginning of November he came in earlier
than usual, before supper, and seemed in remarkably high
spirits.

Thankful to get him by her side, Mary exerted herself
to amuse him, and never found the task so easy. She.
THE SISTER GUARDIAN, 153

could not help wondering what had occurred to make him
so unusually merry. They went to bed at ten o’clock.

Jane Fletcher had been poorly all day, and Mary had
persuaded her to go early to rest. She looked into her
room to see that she had all she wanted as she went up-
stairs to her own, and found her fast asleep. As she left
she remembered she had asked her to bring up the key of
the street door, and that she had forgotten to do so,
though she had taken it out for the purpose when she
locked it for the night. Going down again to fetch it,
she found it had disappeared from the table where she
was sure she had laid it.

After some search she called to Philip to ask if he had
seen it, and received for answer it was safe in his room,
and that he would keep it till the morning.

Thinking Jane would be better pleased if she did as
she had told her, and took it up-stairs, she asked her
brother to give it her. His reply was that he could take
as much care of it as they would, and that she should
have it next morning and not before. There was so
much sharpness in the tone with which this was said, that
she, fecling it could not really matter who kept the key
all night, left it with him, and went away to her room.

She happened to have some mending to do, which
kept her sitting up later than usual, and it was past
eleven before she put out her candle and got into bed.

Some time elapsed before she fell asleep, and when at
IBA THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

length she did so she soon started up again, fancying she
heard a nvise below.

All seemed quiet, however, and she was about to lie
down imagining she must have been dreaming, when she
distinctly heard a sound as of some one gently shutting
the house door. Quick as lightning she sprang to the
window and drew aside the blind.

There was quite sufficient moonlight to enable her to
see Philip in the act of unlatching the gate leading from
the little garden in front of the house to the road.

He closed it cautiously, and walked off in the direction
of the mill.

Mary’s heart sunk within her. What could he be
going to do at such an hour? No good, that was certain.
Then a sudden suspicion rushed into her mind.

Could her brother be connected with this poaching
about which there had been so much talk lately! She
recollected having heard Jane Fletcher reprove him
rather sharply in her rough way a few days before, for
having spoken of taking game as a light offence.

More than once he had said he was going to have sup-
per away from home, but had never chosen to be ques-
tioned any further. She wondered she had not thought of
it before, and almost felt as though she had been to blame
for not having done so. It might not, however, be too
late to prevent him from joining whatever was going on
to-night. Her mother’s voice seemed sounding in her
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 155

ears, “ Promise me to try and keep him from bad com-
panions.” Her movements were scarcely less rapid than
her thoughts.

Dressing herself with a speed she would have thought
impossible under other circumstances, and throwing on a
large cloak with a hood to it, which had been her mother’s,
she glided softly down-stairs, trusting that Jane Fletcher
still continued in the sound sleep in which she had left her
some time before.

The street door she found unfastened though closed.

Opening it with a noiseless touch, and as carefully
shutting it behind her, she passed through the gate, and
then hurried down the road Philip had taken, without
having yet had time to reflect on what she intended to do.
One idea only was uppermost in her mind—to save her
brother from doing wrong.

_ She ran swiftly till she reached the mill, and then
turned down the lane to the right, which led to the river-
side past the bleaching house. Something seemed to tell
her Jim Raffles was sure to be concerned in the matter,
whatever it was, and that Philip was likely to have gone
towards his cottage.

To catch him before he got there or joined any one
else was her hope. She continued along the river-side
for some way without seeing him.

At last, at a place where the river made a sudden
bend, she saw a figure perched on a stile which led into
“156 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

some fields at that part. She crept close to the hedge
till she was certain it was Philip from the shape of his
cap, then suddenly ran forwards, exclaiming,—

“Philip!” He must have been Midlings another way,
for he had not seen her till that moment. The sudden
start he gave made him almost lose his balance and fall
backwards. Jumping down, he stared at her as though
he thought the light of the moon must be deceiving his
eyes; at last he Pate

“What on earth has brought you here, Mary? ”

“T saw you leave the house, Philip, and I knew you
must be going to do what you ought not; I have come
to beg you to come back with me.”

“‘T wish you would mind your own business and not
mine,” replied he angrily. “Girls ought to be in bed at
this time of night, not prying about after what doesn’t .
concern them.”

“But it does concern me,” said poor Mary. “If you
get into trouble without my having tried to prevent it, I
shall not be doing what I promised mother. Do come
home with me.”

“T tell you I shall do no such thing, but I wish you
would make haste away. There will be some other fel-
lows here directly, and a pretty laugh they’ll have against
me when they see you spying what; we are about.”

“Tam not spying after them,” replied Mary, sling
nervously anxious to get away before they arrived, “but
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 157

I know they will lead you wrong. I think, Philip,’’ she
added boldly, gathering courage from a conviction that
she was discharging her duty, “I think you are going to
join a poaching party, and poaching is thieving.”

* Poaching is no such thing,” exclaimed he angrily,
«you are talking of what you know nothing about, you
had best go home; but mind you don’t go and tell to’
Jane Fletcher or any one that I’m out. I shall be safe in
bed again in an hour or two.”

He made a movement as if to get over the stile. The
poor girl resolved to make one last trial to persuade him
to return.

“Philip,” she said, laying her hand on his arm, and
letting her hood fall back unheeded in her earnestness,
“ Philip! if our mother is able to look down upon us now,
and to know what you are about to-night, will she see
that you are doing as she would have wished ?”

The words went home. He drew back the foot
he had planted on the stile, and turned to the fair
pleading face by his side. It looked pale in the moon-
light, and so like his mother’s, that he almost started.
Mary saw her advantage, and passing her arm through
his, tried with gentle force to draw him in the direction
of home.

He had suffered her to lead him a few steps, when a
shrill whistle sounded not far behind them. Philip started
and hastily withdrew his arm from his sister’s hand.
' 158 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

«There they are,” he said hurriedly, “I promised to
meet them here, I must go; don’t be afraid, Mary, I shall
come to no harm, and will soon be at home again.”

A second whistle, nearer than the first, caused Philip
immediately to return one in reply.

“Go, go,” he exclaimed, “ they must not see you for
the world, they are coming over the field, and will be at
the stile directly ; run! fly!” and as he spoke he hurried |
back towards the field.

Mary had no inclination to stop any longer now she
saw all hope of getting Philip back was over. Drawing
her hood closely over her head, she flew like a young deer,
dreading lest she should meet any of the lawless set who
were evidently lurking about.

But their game lay in the opposite direction, and no
one disturbed her homeward flight. Breathless and
miserable she softly entered the cottage, fastened the
door, and stole up to her room, thankful that the stillness
in Jane Fletcher’s betokened she was still sleeping. She
threw herself on the bed, and was relieved by a burst of
tears.

“Oh! mother! mother!” she exclaimed (as though
her parent were present and expected from her an
account of her charge), “I have tried to get him back,
but he refused to come. Mother! indeed I have done
my best !”

She soon grew calmer, however, and sought comfort
from the source from which she had learnt to draw it,
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 159

and which has never yet been known to fail any who turn
to it. Shewould not undress, but lay down in her
clothes, anxious to be ready to let in Philip the imstant
he returned. She was far too excited to have any fear of
falling asleep and not hearing him. Thus passed three
long miserable hours !

CHAPTER VIII.

We need not tell the reader that Mary was right in
her suspicion about her brother’s mysterious conduct
being connected with poaching. His longing for adven-
ture was to be gratified this night. He was to form one
of a party who fully intended to return home with a rich
booty of game from Squire Goldney’s land; and a choice
supper at the Hen and Chickens, confined entirely to
their own select numbers, was to be the result of their
success in a few nights.

But it so happened that their secret ally, the keeper
Tomkins’ son, had gone from home a week before to visit
some relations at a distance. He was, therefore, unable
as usual to inform them of his father’s projected night
movements, which were sometimes important to those
169 ‘THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

whom it most concerned. They had consequently no
idea that fresh precautions were being taken to cut off
the retreat of the poachers, which would effectually, it was
hoped, prevent their escape. For two nights scouts, to
the number of ten or twelve, had been secreted in all the
dry ditches, hedges, and bushes surrounding the preserves,
who had gone home towards morning, somewhat disap-
pointed probably that their watch had been such an un-
disturbed one. But on the third, this patience was
likely to bé rewarded, for about one o’clock those in am-
bush had good reason to suppose that the gang whom they
saw creeping onwards in search of the game they had
snared would shortly themselves be completely entrapped.
It was Philip’s first excursion with them. Before he had
been parted from Mary ten minutes, the feelings of re-
morse her remonstrances had aroused vanished, and he
was delighting in the novelty of the adventure.

Jim Raffles and one or two others had fire-arms with
them. On they went, but it was not till they were fairly
within the net spread for them that they were aware of
danger. It is Philip’s fortunes alone we care to follow at
this time.

He was keeping close to Wright, who was leading the
way towards a clump of bushes pretty well known to
him, when there arose a sudden cry and confusion which
bewildered him, and he did not at first clearly comprehend
whether it was occasioned by friend or foe.

Then came a shout of “fly” from Wright, and tho
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 161

next instant the report of fire-arms from several quarters.
Philip flew like lightning in the first direction that pre-
sented itself. He had cleared a great part of the ground,
scarcely knowing whether any one was immediately in
pursuit of him or not, when a shout at no great distance
caused him to put on double speed. The park wall lay
before him, and he was nearing the old door of which Jem
Raffles had had the key given him by John Tomkins.

This fact bemg unknown to the keeper, no particular
watch had been placed in that part. Yet by this very
door they had entered to-night, and it was now standing
open.

To rush through and lock it behind him was the work
of a second, and Philip gave himself a moment to recover
his breath. Almost immediately however he heard foot-
steps on the other side, and knew that the wall was one
it was possible to scale.

Off he started again, but a few minutes brought his
pursuer to bear rapidly upon him with long strides against
which his own shorter ones had little chance. He felt
his strength failing, and that he must soon yield himself,
when a sudden chance of escape occurred to him in the
shape of stratagem. The lane through which they were
running was crossed in one part by a rivulet or small
stream, which was a sort of tributary to the river Win.
Over this a bridge had been thrown, formed of a single
arch, the opening of which on either side was a good deal
overgrown by the hedges and bushes. To make this

: ll
162 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

arch serve as a place of concealment was Philip’s design.
His enemy was near, but the bridge was nearer.

The moon had disappeared, and the darkness befriended
him. Arrived at the bridge, he abruptly lowered himself
from the little parapet at the side and dropt into the
stream below, creeping under the arch so as to hide com-
pletely.

The soft gurgling water was quite shallow; and cool
and refreshing to him in his hot excited state, for the
night was far from being a cold one, although the season
was advanced.

He heard the strong running steps pass over the
bridge above him, and go onwards for about twenty yards.
Then they stopt altogether fora moment. The man had
evidently lost his scent. A muttered oath, and a few
words expressive of vexation followed, and he retraced
his steps, and hovered about the bridge.

*‘He must be somewhere about here,” Philip heard
him say to himself. ‘The rascal shan’t escape me in this
fashion just as I’d nearly laid hands on him.”

He began beating about the hedge, and even de-
scended to the bottom of the bridge and searched amongst
the bushes; having examined them on the one side, he
strode over the rivulet and did the same on the other.

When he had convinced himself no one was secreted
there, he reascended to the top of the bridge, in order to
make another descent on the opposite side of the arch.
Here it was quite open and free from brushwood, but
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 163

Philip had made use of the moment whilst he was cross-
ing above to slip amongst the concealment of the friendly
bushes which had just been searched.

The man gave one look under the arch. Philip felt
thankful for the silvery musical sounds kept up by the
water, for he thought otherwise his breathing must have
been heard.

Once more his pursuer stood upon the bridge, and
once more the fugitive crept under it into the water, fear-
ing he might detect his white collar if he looked over the
side into the bushes.

There was a long pause. The man seemed to have
sat down upon the parapet to rest himself, or perhaps to
watch for the reappearance of the object of his pursuit.

Minutes seemed hours to Philip as he crouched in the
water, which now began to chill him to his very bones,
and caused his teeth to chatter till he almost feared the
hollow noise they made in the arch would be heard above
the gurgling of the stream. At last his tormentor slowly
walked off. As the sound of his retreating footsteps died
away, Philip crept amongst the bushes again. There he
lay wet and shivering for a considerable time, lest the
coast should not yet be clear enough for him to venture
on his way home. When however the clock of Windale
church gave forth the hour of half-past three he thought
it better to run all risks.

He felt wretchedly cold, from having been in the
water so long after the violent heat the running had

* fo
164 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

thrown him into. It was with the greatest difficulty he
could drag his legs along.

A mist much darker than the night seemed to swim
before his eyes, and a violent shivering seized him. When
he reached the stile near which he had parted with Mary
only an hour or two before, a rush of painful recollection
came over him. How she had stood in that spot and im-
plored him to return with her, andhowrudely had herepuls-
ed her endeavours to save him from what had happened.

At length the weary painful walk was ended, and he
tried the latch of the cottage door. Finding it locked, he
tapped gently, and ina moment Mary opened it.

She had no light, but dark as it was, she was aware
that he staggered into the room and sunk, down on the
first seat he could find. He did not speak, but a stifled
groan escaped him, and in great alarm she struck a light.

Soaked to the skin, and deadly pale, she saw he was
suffering terribly, and it was a relief to her when she
heard Jane Fletcher’s voice at the top of the stairs asking
what was the matter below. She was as shocked as Mary
at the state Philip was in, and far more puzzled. But
this was no moment for explanations, their first thought
must be to take off his wet clothes and put him into bed.
Between them they managed to get him up to Mary’s
room, which was larger and more convenient than his
own. The pain in his head and limbs was increasing
every moment, and a burning thirst seized him, that no-
thing they brought seemed to allay fora moment.
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 165

Morning was beginning to dawn, and the mill people
would soon be astir. The doctor must be fetched, and
Jane Fletcher went to Susan Jenner’s house to ask her
nephew to go for him as soon as he was dressed.

When they were left alone together, Mary put a few
questions to her brother.

He told her as well as he was able what had passed.
during the miserable time since they had parted. But
he was too ill to talk much, and when Jane returned with
Susan Jenner he lay without speaking, though his groans
from time to time bespoke unspeakable anguish both of
mind and body. Young Jenner brought back word that
the doctor would come as soon as possible. He told them
also that great excitement was-going on in the town.
An affray with poachers had taken place in the night,
and nearly the whole gang had been taken. Tomkins
the keeper had been, it was feared, fatally wounded by a
shot fired at him by Jem Rafiles, who had been taken into
custody, and was with the rest to be carried before the
magistrates at ten o’clock. Jane Fletcher and Susan
looked at each other as they heard this account. It was
no longer a mystery what had brought Philip into his
present state !

Mary listened with horror, yet with intense gratitude
that he had not been taken. No one but herself knew
the part she had acted in that night’s history, nor did she
ever reveal it even to Susan Jenner, for she knew it must
make her erring brother’s conduct appear in its worst
166 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

light. She hid nothing from him of the news brought
by Jenner, for his anxiety to hear all was intense. His
name did not seem to have been mentioned as forming
one of the gang.

But though he might avoid public disgrace, there was
perhaps not one amongst the set that was that morning
committed to jail for trial, who was suffering so acutely
in all ways for his offence as Philip May.



CHAPTER Ix.

Mr Esty had had a busy time of it for some hours,
for several men had been wounded, and Tomkins’ case
threatened to be very serious. To seize Rafiles with his
own hands had been his ambition for some time, being
quite convinced that he was the principal offender, often
as he had outwitted him. His great height had revealed
his person in the moonlight, and the keeper had closed
upon him in a clump of bushes, taking the advantage
of his being at the moment engaged in examining a
snare.

Both were powerful men, but Raffles considerably
more so than the other,
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 167

It did not come to a trial of strength however.
Whether purposely, or accidentally, as he himself affirmed,
Raffles’ gun ended the matter by the discharge of its
contents into the keeper’s body at the very onset of ‘the
scufle.

He had been captured with most of the others. Tom-
kins was carried to his own house, and his fate was
exceedingly doubtful.

When Mr Elsey saw Philip, he at once pronounced
him in the first and rapidly advancing stage of rheumatic
fever, and made many inquiries as to what could have
produced such severe symptoms.

He soon suspected how matters had been, but said
nothing to him. He saw that his punishment was likely
to be severer far than any the law would have inflicted on
one so young, even if his life were spared.

And so indeed it was !

Any one who has himself endured, or watched over
the agonies of another in rheumatic fever, will be able to
form an idea of what the poor lad endured! And in his
case torture of mind added to that of the body.

For some days his life was almost despaired of, and
when at length his naturally strong constitution tri-
umphed over the strength of the disease, a new and very
alarming danger arose.

The inflammation which had been subdued elsewhere
flew to his eyes. Other causes for uneasiness sub-
sided, but this increased tenfold. The whole virulence
168 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

of the fever seemed to have settled here, as though it
would have prey in some shape.

Mr Elsey called in other medical men. He wrote to a
celebrated oculist in London, and described the case.

All was of no avail. What could the skill of man
effect against the judgment of God! The fiat had gone
forth! and Philip May arose from his sick bed holding
the gift of life still, but charged with the condition of
hopeless, incurable blindness !

When first the terrible truth burst upon. him, it
seemed as though it would almost drive his impetuous
nature to madness. inal loss of sight had never oc-
curred to him. As remedies had in the end succeeded
in the other part of his illness, so he had fully expected
they would in this.

Great then was the shock when told that all had
failed, and that the organs of vision were irrevocably
gone ! é

Deeply, truly penitent for his past wilfulness, and ac-
knowledging he had deserved chastisement, it was still
long before he was able to abstain from the bitter cry,
That his punishment was greater than he could bear !

To be cut off in the very commencement of his youth
and strength from the power of supporting himself!

To exchange the gladness of light and sunshine for
perpetual gloom !

To look forward to life’s long journey, and know it
must be performed in utter darkness !
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 169

Such were Philip’s sad thoughts as he lay hour after
hour brooding over the past, present, and future of his
existence.

He could listen to no comfort at first. Those who at-
tempted it soon saw that it was useless. Time must aid
in softening the blow, they said, and so they left him to
its influence.

Mr Monkton had higher hopes for him. He had
visited him constantly during his illness, and he believed
that God’s dealings, severe as they seemed, were but
leading him from the brink of a precipice into which he
had nearly fallen, to the ruin of both body and soul.

He trusted the time would come when he would be
able to feel that this great sorrow had been sent in mercy.
As for Mary, she was almost able even now to see it thus.
Her brother could not resist temptation. His first steps
in life had shown this. His mother had trembled for him,
and had earnestly prayed he might be kept from evil.
God, whose ways are not as our ways, was answer-
ing her prayer in His own manner; and though it
might seem a harsh one, who could say it was not neces-
sary for Philip to be thus dealt with in order to save him
from ruin?

He seemed to be doubly her charge now in his help-
lessness, and more than ever she resolved to devote her-
self to him, and endeavour to make life less a burden
than he expected it to be.

The keeper, Tomkins, did not die as it was feared he
170 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

would, though it was many weeks before he could leave
his bed. Raffles was sentenced to two years’ imprison-
ment and hard labour, and the others all had a shorter
time. From that period poaching was little heard of
again in the neighbourhood.

The winter season dragged wearily away to poor
Philip. He was necessarily much alone whilst Mary was
at the mill, and time hung heavy on his hands. His
harmonium was his chief resource. He would practise
on it for hours together, and it became the solace and
companion of his lonely hours.

The loss of his wages was a serious matter in their
domestic economy, but Mary was careful that he should
not know how hard she worked in order to maintain them
both. She began to take in sewing, by way of increasing
their little income.

Being particularly clever with her needle she had no
difficulty in obtaining as much employment as she was
able to get through during the evening hours.

She was promoted to a higher department in the mil]
this winter, with an increase of wages. This was a great
help, but not sufficient to make up the deficiency of
Philip’s former earnings without the additional labour we
have named on her part.

Several months passed thus, and again the bright
spring weather brought gladness to young hearts, but
not to the blind youth’s.

He used to sit on his chair outside the door in the
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 171

little garden, and his sister hoped his spirits might revive
in the sunshine that seemed to cheer everything else.
But it was not so. He was uncomplaining, and grateful
for the constant kindness shown him, but the only time
when he was at all like his old self was when Mary led
him for a walk along the river-side, or when they sat
together on a favourite bank which was now covered
with primroses.

A shade of cheerfulness and even merriment would
then sometimes delight his sister, but oftener he would
walk by her side in silence, only now and then asking
whereabouts they were, or some similar question, which
showed how painfully he was feeling the loss of sight.

One evening she drew from him more of his feelings
than he had ever expressed. They were seated on the
bank before mentioned. The days were getting long and
warm, and she often took her work and tried to amuse
him as she sat by his side busily plying her needle.

A boat passed them on the river, and the merry voices
of the lads who were rowing broke upon their ears.

Philip did not speak, but he turned himself from
Mary as he lay on the grass, and she heard a suppressed
sob. ‘The sound of laughter yet rung in the distance as
the boat glided onwards. Mary understood well what he

was feeling, and placed her hand lovingly on his.
« Philip,” she said, “do try and bear it well.”

“I have tried, I do try,” he exclaimed, with some-

thing of his old impetuous manner, “but it is of no use.
172 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

Oh! Mary, it is dreadful, most dreadful to be the useless
thing I am, and to know it will always be so. J am just
a burden and a clog on you, who have to work and keep
me as if I were a baby.”

«But Iam proud and glad to work for you, Philip,
do not be unhappy on that account. If you only knew
how thankful I am to be of use to you.” |

« But to know that I must always be chained to you,”
he said, “ because I would not listen to you that night ;
you are to go on drudging, drudging, for me, and I may
perhaps live forty, fifty, or sixty years longer. Oh!
Mary, how is it you do not hate me, as I hate myself?”
and burying his face in his hands he sobbed aloud.

At this moment a step was heard behind them.

It was Mr Monkton, who was taking his evening walk
in that direction. He spoke kindly to them, but at once
saw that something was wrong, and asked if he could do
anything for them P

His kindness during Philip’s illness, and his deep
sympathy in his affliction, had won the love and con-
fidence of both; and Mary was thankful to tell him the
cause of her brother’s tears.

Mr Monkton sat down by him. “ Philip,” he said,
‘your sorrow is a very great one, greater than I or any
one who has it not to bear can know; but if you could
learn to look upon it as sent to save you from others far
greater, you would bear it better.”

“Oh! sir, what can be worse than to be blind?”
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 173

“Tt is worse to be living alife of sin, Philip ; worse to
be going on in a course that brings a person to such
blindness of the soul, that it goes far astray from God,
and becomes the property of Satan at last.”

Philip was silent. He understood well what the clergy-
man meant.

“T do not wish to seem to be hard about the past,”
Mr Monkton continued, “ or unsympathizing with your
affliction. I would only endeavour to show you that had
things gone on as they were doing, you might have soon
forgotten the dying injunctions of your mother altogether,
and have been given up to such evil ways as would have
ruined you body and soul. Your heavenly Father saw
- this, and He dealt a blow which, though severe, you may
be assured was the result of love. It seems difficult to
believe this now, but perhaps in another world your chief
song of praise may be on this very subject.”

These words by God’s blessing had a very consider-
able effect on Philip, and his sister never again knew him
to give way to his grief as he had done on that evening.
174 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

CHAPTER X.

No one but herself was aware how large an amount of
work Mary’s fingers contrived to get through that sum-
mer. From the time we have been speaking of in the last
chapter she began secretly to sit up at night diligently
sewing. A very few hours’ sleep seemed to suffice her,
and by dawn of day she was again seated at her needle.
She worked for a house which kept her well supplied,
and which valued such steady, neatly performed labour.

Philip knew nothing about these extra hours. Jane
Fletcher was in almost equal ignorance. Mary had her
own reasons for wishing to keep her affairs private. She
wanted money, and money she could only have by labour-
ing for it, so to labour she was resolved.

Her increased wages at the mill and the £10 annuity
went so far towards supporting them, that a small amount
of extra exertion would have been sufficient for the rest.

Why then need she toil early and late till her colour
fled ? and her general appearance grew so delicate, that
many remarked upon it, and wondered what would be-
come of Philip if she went off into a decline.

The reader shall know the secret project which the
devoted, brave-hearted sister had formed for her blind
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 175

brother, hoping to enliven his darkness, and place him in
a position to earn a livelihood. She had thought over his
bitter lament that evening on the bank, at the prospect
of being useless all his life, compelled to be maintained by
herself. She believed that in this lay the greatest bitter-
ness of his lot. That if only he could have still an
object in life, and feel he need not look forward to long
years of idleness and dependence, he would soon learn to
endure the deprivation of sight with resignation and
cheerfulness. Hour after hour she had pondered on the
matter. At length a sudden idea entered her head.

Philip’s love for music! his undoubted talent for it!
might it not be turned to account? How often her
mother used to wish it could be cultivated. She had read
about blind people who had risen to great things by their
musical talents.

Why might not Philip become independent and happy
by the same means ?

True, difficulties arose one after another as if to laugh
at her schemes; but Mary had a quiet energy in her
nature which enabled her to look them in the face, and
resolve to grapple with them at all events.

Money was the first requisite, that was certain. Her
business must be to obtain sufficient to forward her plans.

Not long after, she bought a money-box at Windale,
and secreted it up-stairs. Week after week she deposited
in this the earnings of her industry. It grew heavier
and heavier, and when so full that another shilling could
176 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

not obtain entrance, she opened it, and found herself
mistress of about £4.

The following day she went into Windale directly she
came from the mill, which, as it was Saturday, was earlier
than usual.

Passing through the principal. streets, she never.
stopped till she reached a red house standing not far
from the church. She knocked at the door, and on its
being opened by a tidy-looking woman servant, asked if
she could speak to Mr Keller. The servant replied that
she would inquire, and returned directly, desiring Mary
to follow her to a good-sized apartment plainly furnished,
but containing a piano, an organ, and a harmonium, A.
quantity of music was strewed about, and a pleasant-
looking elderly man was busy tying up a scroll of it at
the table. This was Mr Keller, the organist of Windale
church, about whom we must say a few words before we
proceed,

Mr Keller was one of those musical geniuses who
are occasionally to be found labouring in a sphere far
below their merits; unknown beyond a limited circle,
from want of connections and propitious circumstances in
early life to give their abilities a fair chance with others
of perhaps less talent, but more fortunately situated.
From a child his love for music had been his one absorb-
ing passion, much to the vexation of his plodding, industri-
ous father, who was an office clerk of the highest respect-
ability in London. He had no greater ambition for his
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 17?

son than that he‘should follow in his footsteps in the same
office where his own life was being past.

Day after day, year after year, the worthy man took
his seat on the same high stool, at the same high desk,
and dipped his pen into the ink precisely as the hands
of the office clock pointed to the hour of ten. With equal
punctuality at four o’clock he laid aside that pen, dis-
mounted from the high stool, and went home.

His wife had died about seven years after their
marriage, leaving him one child, 4 boy not yet promoted
to the dignity of trowsers. Mr Keller was much per-
plexed what to do with his little son when he had no
longer a mother to look after him. The difficulty would
be over when he was old enough to go to the office, but
till then something must be arranged.

It ended in his going to a day-school near is own
home; in constant complaints being made of him for in-
attention to his lessons; and in his evenings being spent
at an old piano which had belonged to his mother, and
which enabled him to indulge his youthful yearning after
“sweet sounds.” His father, glad to have him amused
so easily, took no notice of it, and had not the smallest
idea that he had the misfortune to be the parent of a
musical genius, who by the time he was eleven years old,
had picked up the knowledge of music in a most extra-
ordinary manner.

His life so far had been a very independent one, and

12
178 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

he had availed himself of this circumstance to use every
possible chance that presented itself of learning any scraps
of musical science he could pick up. One of his school-fel-
lows and his chief friend was the son of an organist, who
was struck with the child’s intense attention and delight
whenever he could creep near the organ and listen to his
playing on Sundays or other days. Finding he had
taught himself the piano, he good-naturedly gave him a
few lessons on the organ, and was perfectly amazed at
the rapidity with which he learnt the touch and manage-
ment of the stops.

“The boy will be thrown away,” said he one day, “if ©
he is made to turn to anything but music.”

Unfortunately young Keller overheard the speech,
and was quite of the same opinion himself, so he went on
coaxing his old friend to let him practise on the organ,
and give him a lesson now and then when he had time,
and he spent every spare penny he could get from his
father in buying music, or going to hear it.

When he was thirteen years old, Mr Keller got his
employers to allow him to enter the office. The youth
turned from the idea with disgust. ;

“T want to be a musician, father,” said he; “let me
learn music and earn my bread by it.”

Had he asked his father to allow him to have lessons
in foot-ball or cricket by way of earning his bread, the
good man could not have treated the idea with more
sovereign contempt.
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 179

* You are too old to talk nonsense, Edward,” said he.
“You will get your living as I have done. Stick to the
office, and you will make money in time.”

* But I hate accounts, and I love music,” said the
lad.

“Fiddle de dee and nonsense about music,” said his
father impatiently, “you can go on strumming on the
piano at night if you like, but as to making your bread
by it, let me tell you you'll soon find the living it would
bring you would be a starving and nothing more.”

His son was silenced but not convinced. However,
he was not wanting in filial obedience, and for five long
years he drudged on in the office, solacing himself by his
beloved musical studies every evening.

At the end of that time his father died, leaving him a
thousand pounds.

Tt was not likely that with this sum in his possession,
and his hatred of his daily occupation increasing every
year, he would continue at it. He consulted his faithful
friend the organist, bid adieu to the office, and gave him-
self every advantage his means would procure.

He found at first, as his father had predicted, that a
musical life was rather a starving one, but in course of
time he obtained the situation of organist at Windale,
with a very fair salary, and a good opening as a music
master. His talents were too real not to be appreciated
by all who really understood them, and he soon gained

considerable celebrity in his own neighbourhood.
12 *
180 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

Teaching was his aversion in the majority of cases, it
must be owned, except where he found a pupil with what
he called a spark of the real thing. To lead such an one
on was his pride and delight, but that such instances are
rare was his experience as well as that of most other
teachers. This was the history of the worthy organist
whom Mary had sought in hopes of furthering her plans
about her brother, and who placed her at her ease by the
- kind manner in which he inquired her business with him.

“ Tf you please, sir, I wanted to ask you if you would
kindly tell me how much you charge for giving lessons in
music ?””

Mr Keller looked at her in surprise. Neat and pleasing
as was her appearance, it still seemed a strange question
from one in her rank of life.

“Are you asking for yourself, my good girl?” in-
quired he.

“No, sir, but for one I am very anxious should learn
the organ, if you would not be above teaching him.”

Mr Keller was more mystified than before, but suppos-
ing she was in ignorance as to the expense, he said,

“Tam afraid you are not aware that music is a very °
expensive thing to learn. I never give any one a lesson
under five shillings.”

To his surprise she instantly replied, “I shall be very
glad to pay you that, sir; but I think you will want more
for my brother, because of the trouble, for he is quite
blind.”
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 181

« And who are you and your brother?” asked Mr
Keller.

“We live near the paper-mill, sir; I work there and
so did my brother, till last winter he got an illness, which
ended in blindness. He has always been very fond of
music, and can play almost anything on the harmonium.”

“ But what good can lessons do him if he is blind? ”
asked Mr Keller.

“He is very unhappy,” replied Mary, “because he
says he shall have to be supported all his life by others.
He frets sadly about it, more than for losing his sight; and
I have been thinking that perhaps if he is very clever at
music, he might turn it to use some day, even though he
is blind.”

“Do your parents wish him to learn ?”

“ Sir, we have none, we are orphans.”

There was something in the simple touching tone of
voice in which this sentence was uttered that made Mr
Keller rub his hand across his eyes and pause an instant
before he asked,

“ How can you afford to think of music lessons ?”

“‘T have been working after mill-hours for some time,
sir, in order to save money, and I have plenty to begin
with. I have £4, and I shall have earned more by the
time that is gone.”

“‘ Does your brother wish it very much ?”

“T have said nothing to him yet, because I did not
182 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

know whether you would teach a poor boy; but, oh! sir,
if you will it will make him so happy.”

Mr Keller remembered his own early longings. He
had a kind heart towards every one, but especially those
who loved his own glorious science.

“ Bring him to see me,” he said. “‘ Poor fellow! we
will see what can be done. All depends on his ear as he
is blind. Come here to-morrow at this time. Whatis your
name ?”

“ May, sir; we are Philip and Mary May. Mr Monk-
ton knows all about us. Shall I give you the money now ? ”
she asked, drawing a purse from her pocket with intuitive
delicacy that he might see she had it ready for him.

“Nay, nay, my girl, I don’t take pay beforehand.
Put it back. We must see first whether this will be the
best way for you to lay it out. Good evening,” and as
Mary left the room the worthy man fell into a fit of musing
which might be expressed somewhat after this fashion :

“T hope the. girl will not have to be disappointed, but
what could one do with a blind lad unless he’s a marvel ?
It’s the prettiest story though I’ve heard a long time; an
uncommonly pretty story! I’ll play it on the organ,” and
going to the instrument Mr Keller indulged himself, as he
was often accustomed to do, in an extemporaneous effu-
sion drawn from passing thoughts and emotions.

When Mary that night for the first time told Philip
of her plans for him, it seemed as though the bare idea o7
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 183

having occupation was happiness. The hope too of sup-
porting himself some day, though vague and undefined
as to how it was to be, made him so full of joy that it was
almost like a promise of renewed sight. Mary made light
of her own hard work to provide the requisite supplies
for the music lessons, and he, in his ignorance about
needle-work, believed that she easily earned of an even-
ing what had cost her hours and hours of lost sleep.

And to continue her deed of love she knew she must
go on labouring thus, but she shrunk not from the pro-
spect. On the contrary, her true woman’s heart made her
rejoice in sacrificing herself for her afflicted brother.

The next evening they presented themselves at Mr
Keller’s door, and were ushered into the same room as
described before. ;

They were not strangers to him now, for he had seen
Mr Monkton and heard all about them. His interest had
consequently been greatly increased.

“Well, my lad,” said he, “so you are fond of music
and would like to learn it?”

“Yes, sir, I have always loved it better than any-
thing.”

“You can play the harmonium a little I find, will you
let me hear you touch mine ? ”

Mary led him to the instrument. It was a larger and
more powerful one than Philip’s ; but though he was vexed
and dissatisfied with his own attempt, Mary saw Mr
Keller’s look was expressive of great satisfaction.
184 THE SISTER GUARDIAN

“Very good,” said he. “Itis a great thing your not
having to learn the rudiments. You have heard an
organ, I suppose ? ”

“We have none at our Gest sir, but I have some-
times walked to Windale on Sunday, on purpose to hear
you play at St Cuthbert’s.”

“ Have you enjoyed music more since you have become.
blind than you did before ? ”

“*T think I have, sir; I like to play on the harmonium
when Mary is away and I am alone, it seems to be some-
thing to talk to.”

“I suppose, my poor fellow, you tell it all your sorrows,
and then it answers you back again, and seems to do you
good by what it says ?”

Philip’ s face turned towards Mr Keller’s with an ex-
pression of wonder and delight. “ Ah, sir,” said he, ‘‘ how
can you have got to know all about it so well? I never
told even Mary.”

“TI know it, because my organ talks to me and I talk
to it in the same way. It is the dearest friend I have. I
tell it all my troubles and all my joys, and no one else can
understand me half as well.”

He went to it, and sitting down commenced a plaintive
and exquisite piece by Handel, first beckoning to Mary
to place her brother so that he could watch his coun-
tenance. He wanted to prove the power of sublime
music on the soul of the blind youth. Philip listened in
THE sISTER GUARDIAN. 185

rapt attention to the rich sweeping chords that after-
wards introduced at some length a soft mournful air.

Unaware that he was observed, Philip clasped his
hands together at the sudden and unexpected change
produced on the feelings by the turn in the music—and
tears coursed slowly down his cheeks. Mr Keller watched
him attentively.

He played on for some little time, and then ceased
suddenly. Philip raised his head and seemed as if waking
from a dream which had carried him into another world.
He did not speak however; a deep sigh alone expressed
his feelings. Mr Keller was more than satisfied that
he had no ordinary soul for music. But his blindness
formed a difficulty in teaching him which was not to be
easily surmounted. All must depend upon his ear, and
consequent aptitude in catching what he heard.

Mr Keller’s benevolence was, however, completely
-aroused, and, as he remarked to Mr Monkton a few days
afterwards, he would greatly prefer teaching a blind
person with a soul for music than one gifted with sight
without it.

Not to weary the reader with too much detail of
preliminary arrangements, we will pass over the space of
a year and a half, during which time Philip had been
regularly a pupil of Mr Keller, and made astonishing
progress.

At his teacher’s suggestion, he always walked to St
186 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

Cuthbert’s on Sunday morning, and attended the services
there that he might hear the voluntaries and other parts
of the music. -As the distance was considerable, Mr
Keller insisted that he and Mary should dine at his house,
and often in the evening he would entrance his pupil for
an hour or two together with his performances on his
own organ.

It was, in fact, almost as great an enjoyment to him
as to Philip, so intense was the latter’s appreciation of
his music. He seemed to have found in this poor blind
youth the sympathy his heart had often craved after.

He progressed so fast, that latterly Mr Keller had
several times allowed him to play the people out of
church. A proud moment it had been for Mary, when
from her seat below she heard the first chord which she
knew was struck by her brother’s own fingers. Her
midnight labours ceased not. Mr Keller’s generosity
would have made them unnecessary altogether, for he
had positively refused to receive any money for his.
instructions. The only expense they had been to her
was the payment of a little child to lead him almost daily
to Windale, to practise or receive a lesson at his master’s
leisure. But the indefatigable girl had now another
object in view, which stimulated her labours with as
much ardour as before.

Having accomplished her plan for getting him taught
the organ, and being encouraged beyond her utmost
hopes by Mr Keller’s interest in him, and his rapid pro-
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 187

gress, other schemes for his welfare were in her mind,
which, nothing daunted by their difficulty, she intended in
the same quiet way to carry out.

She had heard of asylums for the blind, where they
were taught to read and write. To get her brother into
one for a sufficient length of time to enable him to ac-
quire these inestimable advantages was now her object.
Mr Keller had led her to hope that he might some day
obtain a situation as organist, the chief drawback to this
scheme being his inability to read new music. He men-
tioned, casually, the fact of raised notes being printed
for the purpose by those who had been instructed in
their use ; not, however, with any reference to Philip.
But Mary immediately began to reflect on the possibility
of sending him to an asylum.

Money she knew was necessary, but she had already
a little hoard, owing to Mr Keller’s refusal to touch a
farthing, and as she had earned that she could earn
more.

So she renewed her diligence. Through Mr Monk-
ton’s inquiries (for to him she confided her plan), she as-
certained what was the required sum; and though it
seemed considerable, yet had it been double the amount
she would not have despaired of acquiring it. In a less
time than she had allowed herself when she commenced,
she had the happiness of asking Mr Monkton to write to
the London Asylum for admission for her brother. He
went to London under charge of that gentleman, who
188 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

promised Mary to place him in safety at his destination.
Any one who has visited the excellent institution will
know how his comfort and improvement would be cared
for there, in common with others similarly afflicted.

And now, having already carried our tale to a greater
length than we intended, we will pass over a few years,
before we again take our reader to Windale.

Changes have taken place there as everywhere else,
and some which nearly affect those of whom we have
been writing.

Mr Monkton succeeded in course of time in getting
up a sufficient sum of money for an excellent organ for
the New Church, as it was still called, and Mr Keller’s
assistant, Philip May, was with universal approbation
appointed the organist and choir master. His old teacher
laughingly declared on his appointment, that he con-
sidered he had played him a shabby trick in setting
himself up asa rival. None, however, knew better than
Philip what pains he had taken to procure him the
situation.

Very happy was his sister Mary on that Sunday when
an unusually overflowing congregation assembled at the
New Church on the occasion of the organ being opened.
Her utmost wishes for Philip were realized now.

As he pealed forth the rich strains of praise during ~
the service, she felt her heart swell with gratitude to God
for His answer to her prayers that He would help her to
fulfil her mother’s dying charge.
THE SISTER GUARDIAN. 189

That afternoon the brother and sister again sat on
the sunny bank above the river, where some years before
Philip had so grievously bewailed his miserable lot.

It was much such another balmy day as that had
been. The sweet breath of spring was mingled with the
fragrant scent of the flowering orchards, and the breeze
wafted to their ears the silvery sounds of the bells
chiming for St Cuthbert’s afternoon service.

They sat in silence for some time, then Philip spoke.

** Mary,” said he, “do you remember how wretched I
was once when I was sitting on this bank with you,
looking forward to long years of miserable existence, a
burden to you and myself?” ~

“Yes, Philip, and I was thinking when you spoke.
how good God has been to us.”

“* But how specially merciful to me, Mary, in giving me
such a sister! Thanks to you I am now, I do believe,
one of the happiest men in the world though I am
blind.”

“Thanks to God, Philip, not to me; I could have done
nothing unless He had helped me.”

«When I was playing the organ in church this morn-
ing,” said Philip, “and we came to the verse, ‘ Praise the
Lord, O my soul; while I live will I praise the Lord,’ I
felt as if surely no organist in England could have such
cause for gratitude as I, or to rejoice that my constant
occupation during life will be to play and sing His praises
who has done so much for me.”
190 THE SISTER GUARDIAN.

Let us take one more peep at our brother and sister
two years later, and then say farewell.

Mary’s labours are over now, for she has become the
wife of Susan Jenner’s nephew, and he is in receipt of a
comfortable income as manager of an important portion
of the paper-mill.

They have a house not far from the New Church, and
Philip lives with them, for Mary still looks on him’as her
charge, and will do so during life.

Nor does either of them forget their mother’s last
words,—

* Strive so to live that we may meet again in heaven.”
BRAVE BESSIE,

OR

THE EPIPHANY LESSON.

Oh! sweet is the lark as she sings o’er her nest
And warbles unseen in the clear morning light ;
But sweeter by far is the song in the breast
When in life’s early morning we do what is right.




















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































BRAVE BESSIE.
CHAPTER I.

‘Tr was a cold Sunday in J anuary. The sky had gradu-
ally changed from pale blue to a dull lead colour, and
the wind was blowing with a hollow murmuring sound
that told of an approaching snow storm.

As the Vicar of Edgemoor passed from his parsonage
to the village school-house that morning, he felt thankful
that the well-built cottages around him bid, for the most
part, defiance to the inclemency of the weather. It was
usual with him to explain the Gospel for the day to the
Sunday scholars in a few brief words, by way of endea-
vouring to interest them in that portion of divine service.

This being the Epiphany, he drew their attention to
the story of the Wise Men being guided by a star to the
place where the Saviour lay ; and then he told them how
a lesson could be learnt from it which might be useful to
all, “ For even children,” said he, “ will sometimes find
that they are placed in circumstances of trouble and diffi-
culty, and scarcely know how to act. They need a guid-

ing star to show them their way. But let them ask God
13
194 BRAVE BESSIE, OR

to give it them, and in some way or other He will do so.
Let them pray to be led onward in the path of duty, step
by step, hour by hour, and they will find throughout life’s
journey He will direct them, and at last lead them to the
place where Christ himself dwells.”

There were many bright faces lifted to Mr Melville’s
as he spoke, but there was one whose listening, thought-
ful look might have told a close observer that his words
were more felt and understood by that little girl than by
the others, who too many of them forgot all he had said
as soon as his voice ceased.

Bessie Burton} although but ten years old, had already
known sorrow. Her father, a respectable labourer, had
supported his family in comfort during his life, but that
was unexpectedly closed by an attack of fever brought
on by a neglected cold. He left a widow and two chil-
dren, Bessie, and a sister several years younger. William
Burton was a good man, and Bessie never forgot the so-
lemn manner in which a few hours before his death he
commended them all to God, and prayed that Bessie and
her sister might be a help and comfort to their mother.
Then beckoning to Bessie, he had laid his hand on her
head, and said,

“Care for thy mother, my girl, be unto her a good
and dutiful daughter, so will thy God care for thee, and
be with thee in the hour of trouble.”

Child as she was, these words sunk very deeply into
Bessie’s heart, and the sad hour of bereavement that soon
THE EPIPHANY LESSON. 195

followed, made her understand how much indeed her re-
maining parent needed all the comfort and care she could
give her.

A year had passed since this time, a year of hard
struggle with poverty for the widow and her children.
Few knew how hard, for she was not a complaining
woman, and by constant industry she had been enabled
to provide sufficient for daily need.

They had been allowed to continue in the same cottage,
for the landlord was a man who had respected William,
and who knew that Rachel would be sure to pay the rent
sooner or later as she was able. There might be another
reason also for his willingness to let them continue as his
tenants. ‘The cottage was one not likely to be easily let,
owing to its situation. It was at least a mile from the
village of Edgemoor on the one side, and nearly three
from the town of Laleham on the other. Excepting a
stray farm or two there were no dwellings near. It was
therefore extremely lonely, but this was not its only dis-
advantage. Ata short distance lay a wood of consider-
able extent, through which was a path that led to Lale-
ham, being a much shorter way than that by the high
road. This wood, however,. had a bad name in the neigh-
bourhood, and was thought to be haunted by evil spirits.
The origin of the superstition had been that, many years
ago, a gibbet was placed at the end where it opened on a
common near Laleham, and malefactors used to be hanged
upon it in sight of the road. Long as this custom had

13 ¥*
196 BRAVE BESSIE, OR

fallen into disuse, the dread it had aroused of the dark
wood in whose recesses the murderers’ spirits were said
to lurk, had descended from one generation of children
to another, and no Edgemoor or Laleham child would
have consented to enter it after dusk, or even in daylight
to pass through it quite alone. Older people also, if they
confessed the truth, perferred taking the longer route by
the public road rather than run any chance of being be-
nighted, though the path was so straight that there was
no possibility of going wrong. The vicinity of the Bur-
tons’ cottage to this dreaded wood naturally made it un-
popular. But William Burton had never partaken of the
general superstition, and he and his wife had always
loved the little abode to which they had gone when they
first married, and they had endeavoured to keep their chil-
dren’s minds free from the idea that the wood was haunted.
Tt was not possible, however, to prevent them from hear-
ing the tales which the village crones delighted in telling
about what their parents had heard and seen in former
days. One old woman named Peggy Ward, who sat all
day in the chimney-corner smoking, sometimes amused
and terrified the young ones with wonderful stories.
How a man named Jackson had murdered an old woman
for the sake of getting a purse of money which he knew
was hidden under her bed, and being discovered was
hanged just outside the wood, and how his ghost was
formerly seen wandering about the place holding an
empty purse in its hand! Then she would tell about a
THE EPIPHANY LESSON. 197

certain woman and her son who contrived to poison his
uncle that he might the sooner come into possession of
some fields and a house he was heir to, and they were
hanged side by side, and their spirits had haunted the
wood for years. Nay, Peggy went so far as to assert
that when she was a girl she and a companion had seen
them sitting perched on the top of the stile! and they
shook their long arms at them to show that they would
not allow them to enter the wood, which they evidently
considered their own abode by right. Peggy generally
wound up these marvels by saying that as evil spirits
could have no rest, they were doubtless still wandering
about the paths and trees.

It is scarcely to be wondered that such tales as these
should inspire the Edgemoor children with a dread of
the wood, nor was Bessie’s mind altogether proof against
them. The pains, however, her parents had taken to
show her their folly and untruth, and also the fact of
having lived all her life not far from the place and seen
nothing to alarm her, made her tolerably brave on the
subject. Being an excellent needlewoman, Rachel had
been able to get plenty of work to do from the shops at
Laleham, and as Bessie was now old enough to take most
of the household duties off her hands, she earned enough
in this way to enable them to live and pay their rent.
The inconvenience of their distance from the village was
more felt by her now than in her husband’s lifetime, but
this was counterbalanced by their being in consequence
188. BRAVE BESSIE, OR

nearer to Laieham, to which place she had often to go
with her work when finished, and obtain a fresh supply.
Bessie’s daily attendance at school had to be given up.
She was too useful at home to be spared, for she had
never forgotten her father’s last injunction, to care for
her mother, and in every way she endeavoured to be of
use and comfort. At the Sunday school no child was
more regular. Even in the severest winter weather,
Bessie was sure to be seen in her place if it were possible
to go.

But on the Sunday we have spoken of, she had left
home with somewhat a heavy heart about her mother,
who had not been well for several days. She had caught -
cold in going to Laleham; rain had overtaken her,
and she had sat for some time in wet things waiting for
fresh work. She seemed so poorly this morning that
Bessie had been unwilling to leave her. But Rachel
would not hear of her remaining. She said little Mar-
garet would be company enough, and she put up her -
dinner as usual, for Bessie was in the habit of dining
on Sunday in the school-house, or with a neighbour, in
order that she might be ready for afternoon school and
church, which otherwise the distance from home would
not have permitted her to attend. So she set forth, but
with a vague uncomfortable feelmg that her mother was
looking wretchedly ill. The sorrow of the previous year,
and the anxieties she had since shared with her mother,
had made her thoughtful beyond her years. These cir-
THE EPIPHANY LESSON. 199

cumstances will account for the interest with which she
listened to Mr Melville, when he spoke of even children
having troubles, and needing a guiding star to teach
them how to go on aright in circumstances of difficulty.

CHAPTER II.

Tue sky was looking still more gloomy, and the wind
sounding still more hollow, by the time of afternoon service,
and before it was over flakes of snow began to fall.

Most of the children lived near, and after church
could run speedily to the shelter of their homes. But
Bessie’s little feet had a long way to walk. Through the
village, over three fields, and several stiles, and then a
good way along the road before her cottage came in
sight. The snow came down thick and fast now, and the .
wind blew in gusts, so that at times she could scarcely
keep on her feet. She had an umbrella with her, but it
was in vain to attempt to use it, so she soon looked
almost as white as the ground, which was covered like
herself with snow. It was well for her that just as she
was getting over the last stile into the road, Farmer
Whitworth came by in his gig on his way from church,
200 BRAVE BESSIE, OR

and calling to her to get up behind placed her in a short
time at the foot of the bank on which their cottage
stood.

Wet, cold, and weary, never had Bessie been more
glad to lift the latch of their humble dwelling. Things
did not look, however, quite as usual when she entered.

Instead of the bright little fire her mother was sure to
have against her return on such a day as this, only a few
ashes smouldered on the hearth, and no kettle was put on
for tea. The dinner things were still on the table, but
Bessie saw at a glance that only Margaret’s plate had been
used, and that her mother had touched nothing. No one
was there, so she passed on to the inner room, and found
Rachel lying down on the bed and her little sister watch-
ing anxiously by her side; the child’s face brightened up
on seeing her, as though she thought all would be well
now Bessie was come.

“Are you very poorly, dear mother?” said she, as
she bent over her in alarm.

* My head aches terribly, Bessie, I could hold it up no
longer and was obliged to le down, but it will be better
soon perhaps. I am very thirsty, a cup of tea would do
me good, I think.”

Bessie hastily took off her wet things, and getting
some chips made up the fire and put on the kettle. Then
taking away the dinner things and. setting teacups in
their place, she arranged the room as she knew her
mother liked it, hoping she might be able to sit up by the
THE EPIPHANY LESSON. 201

fire. But on going to her she was startled to see how
flushed and excited she looked by the light of the candle
as it fell on her face. She was in no state to rise, so she
fetched her a cup of tea, which she drank eagerly, and
seemed for the moment refreshed.

Bessie proposed that she should undress and get into
bed, as she would be so much more comfortable. She found
her skin almost burnt her with its heat as she assisted her
to take off her clothes, but felt comforted by Rachel’s de-
claring she only wanted sleep to make her better. So
she arranged the pillows as comfortably as she could,
shaded the light, and beckoning Margaret to the other
room, left her, as she requested, keeping watch, however,
through the open door; and before long she saw she
slept.

Bessie had not had much experience in illness. She
did not understand why her mother tossed about, and
breathed so quick and short, or why she knitted her brow
and muttered in her sleep. These signs made her less
uneasy than they would have done an older person who
had seen the approach of fever. Now she was asleep she
thought she must get better. It was now quite dark, but
as she drew the little curtain across the window she could
see that the snow was falling fast, and had formed a high
thick ridge outside on the window sill. She and Margaret
took their tea, and then, as her mother still slept, she told
her sister the story of the Wise Men, and tried to make
her understand something of what Mr Melville had said
202 BRAVE BESSIE, OR

on the subject, after which she heard her repeat her
prayers, and put her to bed. Rachel woke about ten
o’clock and called her. Bessie flew to her side.

** Bessie,” said she, “ what o’clock is it?”

‘* About ten, mother.”

“No one will be likely to pass to Laleham to-night,
I suppose ? ”

“Oh no! mother, nobody ever goes there from
Edgemoor on Sunday night, and it’s snowing quite fast.”

“Tm afraid ’m not going to get any better, Bessie,
my head feels worse, and my tongue is all dried and burnt
up like. I wish I could see Dr White, for I think it’s a
fever I’ve got coming on. We must send for him some-
how in the morning as soon as it is light; perhaps you
could get one of Farmer Whitworth’s men to go for him
by seven o’clock. I shall be right bad though, I’m afraid,
by that time. Give me a drink of water, dear.”

Bessie fetched the water, but her mother had difficulty
in swallowing it, and said her throat felt sore and swollen..
She fell into the same uneasy troubled sleep again in a
few minutes, to which the sound calm breathing of little
Margaret as she lay in her bed not far off was a great
contrast.

Poor Bessie was now thoroughly miserable. She saw
that her mother was really seriously ill, and knew she
ought to have medical aid at once. She had heard the
neighbours say that perhaps her father’s illness might
have been checked if a doctor had seen him sooner, for
THE EPIPHANY LESSON. 203

that a few hours sometimes made all the difference. But
how was it possible for her to get it to-night! She went
to the window and looked out. -The snow made it less
dark than it would otherwise have been, but it was still
falling, and the wind had drifted it against the window
pane. Nothing could be more dreary and wretched than
the night. Yet the thought crossed her mind, that if she
could venture out and go herself for Dr White, it might be
the means of saving her mother’s life. Poor child! she
was in sore trouble. Mr Melville’s words came to her
mind, that even children are sometimes placed in cir-
cumstances of difficulty, and they need direction from
God how to act. Bessie did the right thing. She knelt
down and asked to be shown what to do, and comfort
came into her heart as she rose from her knees. She put
fresh fuel on the fire, and made some toast and water for
her mother, who seemed to get more and more restless,
though she still slept. Bessie looked at the clock. It
was not far from eleven. She had never been up so late
alone. She almost wished her mother would wake and
tell her how she felt now, for she thought that would show
her what she ought to do. If she were better it might be
time enough to go for the doctor in the morning; if
worse, she would brave the cold dark night and go at
once. As she arrived at this determination a sort of
terror crossed her mind. She remembered the loneliness
of the road, and the lateness of the hour, and tried to
think the sleep would do her mother good, and that she
204 BRAVE BESSIE, OR

should not have to go. She began to feel very sleepy,
and to keep herself awake opened her prayer-book and
again read the gospel for the day, but before she reached
the end her eyes closed, and she fell asleep.

The striking of twelve o’clock and the sound of her
mother’s voice awoke her. She ran to her. She was
sitting up in bed. Her cheeks were crimson, and her
eyes looked at Bessie with a strange wild expression, but
she evidently did not know her, and to the poor child’s
dismay, she kept begging her to go and fetch her hus-
band and Bessie. In vain her little daughter told her
who she was. She only looked vacantly at her, and mo-
tioned her to go away. At length she once more fell
asleep, though she was if possible more restless than be-
fore. Bessie no longer hesitated how to act. That her
mother was getting hourly worse was clear, and if much
more time were lost it might be too late to save her.
She thought it probable she might sleep on again for
some time, and even if she woke, Margaret’s presence ©
would do almost as well as hers. So she quietly aroused
the sleeping child, and taking her into the next room to
dress, explained how ill their mother was, and that as
she was going to Laleham to fetch Dr White, she must
try and be useful and ready to do anything for her during
her absence. By degrees she succeeded in making the
little girl feel somewhat important at being left in charge.
Her next business was to put fresh coals on the fire, set
up a new candle, and finally put on her thick boots and
THE EPIPHANY LESSON. 205

warmest wraps. Then taking a last look at her mother
and telling Margaret to fasten the door after her, she
for the first time in her life stepped forth alone into the
dark night.

CHAPTER III.

Bessiz Burton was naturally a timid child, and any
bravery that was now aiding her, arose from the con-
sciousness she was performing a duty for her sick parent.
But for this, she could never have summoned up courage
to take a walk of three miles in the middle of the night.
It had ceased snowing, and the wind had gone down.
She was surprised to see how light it was in consequence
of the snow. Nor was that so deep as she expected,
though not pleasant to walk through. Her way lay for
a short distance along the high road, and then she came
to the place where, by turning into the wood and taking
the shorter path to Laleham, she might save considerable
time. She paused here and peeped over the gate into
the path, which looked so dark and gloomy under the tall
thick trees, all the more so because they had in a great
measure prevented it from being covered with snow.
Bessie looked up and down the public road. It seemed
206 BRAVE BESSIE, OR

quite cheerful compared to the wood. Then another
timid glance at the other side of the gate! A stouter
heart than hers might have shrunk from entering. But
would not the time lost in going round by the road make
it too late for the doctor to do anything for her mother ?
Was not God in the wood as well as everywhere else,
ready to guard her from harm? The thought brought
courage sufficient to enable her to open the gate and
trudge forwards.

There was no fear of her losing her way, for the path
went straight forwards, and the bushes and trees on
either side kept her from going wrong. But as she got
farther and farther on, and could no longer see the sky
over head and knew that the high road was. being left
behind, her heart began to beat very fast. All the tales
she had been told about evil spirits living in the trees and
straying amongst the paths rushed into her mind, and
she started on hearing a noise not far from her, which
she thought sounded like some one moving in the bushes. -
A few minutes after, when something touched her on the
shoulder, she almost screamed with terror. But again
better thoughts came to her aid, and then she found on
reflection that the noise she had heard was only the snow
falling off the branches. of the trees, and the touch on her
shoulder was nothing but a twig which brushed her as
she passed. She could almost laugh at herself now for
her former fears! She liked thinking about the story of
the Wise Men, and of all Mr Melville had said about it
THE EPIPHANY. LESSON. 207

in the morning. “I think I am doing right,” said she
inwardly, “and that God is being my guiding star, and
leading me through the dark wood, and that must be
why I no longer feel frightened. I cannot see my star ‘as
the wise men did, but I can feel in my heart it is there ;”
and so filled was the child’s mind with peace that she
began to sing the hymn called the Song of the Angels,

‘While shepherds watch’d their flocks by night,” &c.

Had any traveller been passing near he would have
been surprised at the sound of a sweet clear young voice
arising from the thicket in the dead of the night, making
the air resound with her hymn of praise. Thus she be-
guiled the time, and the end of the path arrived sooner
than she expected, and she came in view of the stile on
which old Peggy declared she saw the spirits of the mur-
derers. But here, instead of any sight to alarm her,
Bessie gazed on one which filled her heart with gladness.
The sky was beginning to clear towards the horizon, and
exactly over the spire of Laleham shone forth a large
beauteous star, looking full of brightness and splendour
in the keen frosty air. As she mounted the stile the
chimes of the church clock played out the hour, and their
silvery tones sounded sweet and soothing to the ear of
our little heroine.

“God has sent me a real star,’ thought she, “to
brighten my journey; and the bells remind me of the
angels’ song of ‘Glory to God in the highest,’ &c. Per-
208 BRAVE BESSIE, OR

haps there are real angels too not far from me all the
time instead of the bad spirits Peggy talks about.”

And who shall say that angels were not indeed guard-
ing the path of the brave pious-minded child, on her pil-
grimage of duty for her sick mother ?

Bessie had grown so accustomed to the darkness of
the wood that she was surprised how light it was on the
common! She had no difficulty in finding the road, for
she had often been with her mother to Laleham. She
knew well the old May tree under whose shade they had
sometimes rested on a hot summer day. It was covered
now as with a white sheet, but she recognized her old
friend in its winter’s dress. Then came the finger post at
the place where the common branched out into four dif-
ferent roads. It was too dark to see the writing, but
that did not matter, for the same finger that pointed to
Laleham, pointed also to a well-known clump of bushes
from which Bessie had a few months before gathered the
first and largest blackberries. Once on this path she could.
not go wrong, for the bright star, and the spire, and the
houses of the town were in sight to guide her footsteps,
and she hastened forwards, thankful that she had saved
much time by going through the wood, which had proved
so harmless.
THE EPIPHANY LESSON. 209

CHAPTER IV.

In the middle of the high street in Laleham stood a
red-brick house with a green door and large brass
knocker, underneath which was a plate with the name of
«White, Surgeon,” engraved uponit. This was the
principal entrance. At the side of the house was a
second door, on which Surgery was inscribed. Mr, or, as
he was termed by the poor people, “Dr White” was a
clever and benevolent surgeon, well known to all the
‘neighbourhood for his great professional skill, and his
kindness of heart whenever sorrow or poverty came be-
fore him. By the poor he was regarded as a universal
friend, and by none more so than Rachel Burton, whose
husband he had attended with unremitting attention to
the last moment without asking remuneration from the
widow, who he knew could so ill afford to give it. He
had been much struck at that time with the pious re-
signation and uncomplaining distress of Rachel, as well
as the cleverness and thoughtful ways of her little daughter
Bessie, and he had more than once befriended them
during the winter. He was a bachelor, but his comfort
was well cared for by his housekeeper, worthy Mrs -Wil-
kins, who used to declare that the only earthly person

14
210 BRAVE |BESSIE, OR

master ever forgot was his own self, of whom it was hard
enough to make him think at any time. His practice
was extensive, and it happened that on the Sunday of
which we have been speaking, he had been detained by
a dangerous case till a very late hour, and half-past one
o’clock had chimed before Mrs Wilkins, who was herself
sitting up for him, heard the welcome sound of his gig
stopping at the door. The good woman immediately
sprung from her seat, inserted the poker into the centre
of the coal that had been carefully arranged so as to pro-
duce a cheerful blaze whenever that operation took
place, poured some boiling watcr on the tea already
waiting for it in the tea-pot, and drew the easy chair still
closer to the fire:

Mr White entered the room, fagged with his day’s
work,

“This looks comfortable and warm compared to what
itis outside, my good Mrs Wilkins,” said he, “but I am
sorry you have sat up for me till this hour.”

Mrs Wilkins, who had no pleasure like that of making
her master comfortable, replied by placing his slippers at
his feet and his tea by his side, and very soon the tired
doctor retired to the rest he so needed. Mrs Wilkins a
few minutes later was about to follow his example, when
she heard a single rap upon the brass knocker of the
front door, and at the same moment the church clock
struck the hour of two.
THE EPIPHANY LESSON. 211

“Who can that be now?” said she to herself rather
crossly, “and why do folks come to the front door instead
of to the surgery ? it must be a bad case to make me dis-
turb master again to-night, I can tell them.”

She unlocked the door and opened it cautiously, but
her eyes were prepared to look higher than on the little
form that stood timidly on the step under the lamp burn-
ing in front of the house. The small black cloak and
brown hat formed a contrast to the white snow clinging
to the palings behind her.

«What do you want, child ?”

“Please, ma’am, could Dr White come to see mother?
she is very ill, and I’m afraid she has got the fever like
father had.”

«Who is your mother, and where do you live?”

“ Mother’s name is Rachel Burton, and we live at the
cottage near Edgemoor wood.”

«What! are you Rachel Burton’s girl? and have you
come all that way alone to-night through the snow?”

“Yes, ma’am, and I must go back again directly, for
mother has no one but my little sister with her ; please
will the doctor come?”

“ Come in, don’t stand there outside,” said Mrs Wil-
kins, evading the question, for she had by no means made
up her mind to say anything to her master till the morn-
ing, yet had too kind a heart not to feel pity mixed with

admiration for the child who had thus braved the loneli-
: 14 *
212 BRAVE BESSIE, OB

ness and cold of the winter’s night. “Come in, child,
and warm yourself by the fire, and there’s a cup of tea
still quite hot.”

So saying, she brought Bessie into the parlour, and
made her sit down whilst she poured her out some tea
and cut a thick slice of bread and butter. Very accept-
able fare to the poor girl, who was beginning to feel faint
and hungry under the unusual circumstances in which
she was spending her night. Nothing, however, would
induce her to take off her cloak and hat, for she was
eager to get back.

“Please, ma’am, do you think Dr White will come to
mother to-night?”

‘Is she so very ill then? ” asked the housekeeper.

“Oh! yes, very,” exclaimed Bessie, “she did not
know me when I left; she looks just like father did when
he was so ill, and I am afraid she will die too unless the
doctor comes and gives her medicine. I came here as
quickly as I could lest it should be too late to do her
good in the morning,” and she looked up piteously in
Mrs Wilkins’ face as she spoke.

Whether that good woman’s anxiety for her master
to get a night’s rest, or her compassion for Bessie’s
trouble, would have prevailed in deciding her how to act,
cannot be known, for at this moment the voice of Mr
White was heard calling from above, asking who was
there.

Having no longer any choice in the matter, Mrs Wil-
THE EPIPHANY LESSON. 213

kins went to the foot of the stairs and told him what
Bessie Burton had been saying about her mother’s illness,
suggesting however that perhaps it might do to send some
medicine to-night and go himselfin the morning.

“‘ And send that poor child back alone, after she has

toiled through the snow in hopes of getting me to-night !
No, no, my good Mrs Wilkins, my sleep would not do me
much good under such circumstances. Tell John to put the
horse in the gig directly, and I will take the girl with
me.”
So in what seemed even to the impatient Bessie but a
short time, she found herself seated by Mr White’s side
driving along as rapidly as the snow would permit, witha
basket in her lap, in which Mrs Wilkins had hastily packed
a little arrow-root and other things that might be of
benefit to the invalid.

The clouds had almost all dispersed now, and many
stars glittered in the sky, but our little heroine did not
forget the one that had so cheered her with its brightness
as she emerged from the dark wood. There it was still,
easily recognized by her because of its peculiar rosy
colour. It lay behind her now, and she turned round so
often to look at it, that at last Mr White asked her what
attracted her. He told her that since she was such an
admirer of the star, she ought to know something about
it. Its name, he said, was Mercury, and that it was called
by the ancients, “The messenger of the gods.”

Bessie understood neither astronomy nor mythology.
214 BRAVE , BESSIE, OR

She could not think what the doctor meant, but she had an
astronomy and mythology of her own which she did clearly
comprehend, and it was this. She settled in her mind
that since people gave names to stars, she would always
look. on this as her star of promise, her messenger from

’God, sent to cheer and brighten her way in the dark
night.

They soon reached the cottage. Little Margaret was
keeping faithful watch over her mother, who she said had
not seemed to miss Bessie, but had lain in a half-sleeping,
half-waking state, often talking in a strange wild manner.

Mr White pronounced her to be in a dangerous fever
that was going about the neighbourhood, and which would
probably have baffled his skill had it been left to itself a few
hours longer. He remained some time to watch the effect
of the medicine he administered, and promised to come
again in the course of the day. Always kind and con-
siderate, he pitied the poor wearied child, whose duties.
were now beyond her strength, and before returning
home went and despatched a clever nurse to take care of
Rachel. She was for several days in extreme danger, but
by God’s blessing on the means used, she struggled
through, and by degrees regained her former strength.
Mr Melville often came to see her, and in many ways be-
friended the little family till Rachel was again able to re-
sume her usual employment.

Bessie’s walk through the wood was soon heard of
amongst her young companions, who were the more sur-
THE EPIPHANY LESSON. 215

prised, because they had always regarded her as a timid
girl, and they perhaps did not quite understand how much
courage may be given by a consciousness of doing right.
From this time they laughingly gave her the name of
“ Brave Bessie.”

She is now a woman and has children of her own, to
whom their grandmother often tells the story of their
mother’s midnight walk, and of the bright star which
cheered her on her way. .

THE END.
JOHN CHILDS AND SON, PRINTERS
ABh 4COU