Citation
Found at eventide

Material Information

Title:
Found at eventide the true story of a young village infidel
Creator:
Tayler, Charles B ( Charles Benjamin ), 1797-1875
Cooper, Alfred W ( Illustrator )
Religious Tract Society (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
William Clowes and Sons ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Religious Tract Society
Manufacturer:
William Clowes and Sons
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1872
Language:
English
Physical Description:
91, [5] p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. ; 16 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Free thought -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Atheism -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Illness -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Youth -- Death -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1872 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1872
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date from inscription.
General Note:
Illustrations by AWC (Alfred W. Cooper)
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Charles B. Taylor.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AAB9056 ( LTQF )
ALH8824 ( NOTIS )
58526133 ( OCLC )
026981859 ( AlephBibNum )

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FOUND AT EVENTIDE. |

The Crue Story of a Poung Village Infidel,

BY THE
REV. CHARLES B, -TAYLER, M.A.,
Author of “ Memorials of the English Martyrs,” “ The Bar of Iron,” ete.

1

LONDON:
THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY,

56, PATERNOSTER Row ; 65, St. PauL’s CHURCHYARD ;
AND 164, PICCADILLY.

Right of Translation reserved.

|





LONDON:

PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS,
STAMFOLD STREET AND CHARING CROSS,





PREFACE,

1+

* Mucu of the value of the following brief sketch
depends upon its truthfulness. This can be fully
attested. The facts narrated, and the persons de-
scribed were well known to the writer. Names alone
have been changed. Most of the circumstances are
‘indeed detailed with that minute accuracy which no
one but an eye-witness could have related.

May our Heavenly Father bless to the souls of the
readers this simple and unpretending narrative of
what His grace has wrought. Should it fall into the
hands of any who are tempted to despair, feeling that

their sins are too heinous and aggravated to be



6 PREFACE.

forgiven, let them remember that the same Saviour
by whom Francis Morton was found at eventide is
willing and able to save them ; “for the same Lord
over all is rich unto all that call upon him; and
whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall
be saved.”

How few are aware, when they pass the cottage
homes of their poorer neighbours, how much may be |
occurring of deeply affecting and even thrilling interest
under many a lowly roof! The following narrative

may afford an instance that such is the fact.









CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

7 PAGE

A CONTRAST ; ; . . ; . . . 4 9
CHAPTER IT.

CAUSES FOR SORROW. . . : . . . . + 20
CHAPTER III.

THE BRUISED REED AND THE SMOKING FLAX 35
. CHAPTER IV.

Gop Wounns To HEA : : : . : . ‘ » 54

CHAPTER V.

THE CLOSING SCENE . . . 7 . . . 7 » 73

CHAPTER VI.

PRAYER ANSWERED. : 7 7 7 : . . - 86








CHAPTER I.
a Contrast.

SLIGHT delicate-looking youth was sitting

on the trunk of a fallen tree which lay on



a broad belt of green sward by the road
side. It was a calm lovely day, early in autumn.
The thick foliage of the hedgerow trees in that
pleasant lane was already tinted with the rich colour-

ing which tells of approaching decay, and a few flutter-



19 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

ing leaves were dropping from time to time noiselessly
upon the bright green grass. The youth had scarcely.
reached his seventeenth year. There was nothing
remarkable about his appearance. He was poorly
clad, but the turned-down collar of his shirt, and the
linen cuffs at his wrists, were as white and clean as
the whole of his dress was scrupulously neat. His
features were finely shaped, but his face was very pale,
without even a faint glow of healthy colour ; and that
ingenuous expression which imparts a charm to many
a youthful countenance, however plain, was wanting
in his. There was indeed a restless troubled look in
his large grey eyes, and nothing expressive of frank-
ness or openness on the high intellectual forehead.
The sky was intensely blue above his head wherever
there was an open space between the spreading
boughs, heavy with their rich foliage, of the tall elms ;
the balmy breeze, soft as a fan of feathers, waved the
curls of his fair hair; but he heeded neither the biue

beautiful sky, nor the gentle breeze. He sat there as



A CONTRAST. Il

one insensible to all the genial influences which often
make a morning in autumn so delightful.

His eyes were fixed upon an open book which
rested on his knees, and as he turned over the leaves
and folded down a page here and there, his lip curled
with a scornful smile. At times as he did this, he
raised his head and looked with a searching glance
down the lane, and seemed to be listening intently
for the approach of some one yet unseen,

He had not long to wait. A tall man appeared in
the distance coming down the lane. He was an aged

.man, but though his hair was almost white, his thin
figure was erect, and his step firm. He carried a kind
of wallet suspended by a hooked stick over his
shoulder, and on that day for the last few weeks, and
about the same hour, he had passed through that lane
in his way to the town of Market Drayton. Francis
Morton knew this and had often met him. John
Hepworth, for that was the name of the pedlar, was a

man of genuine godliness. He felt a deep interest in



12 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

the slight delicate youth. He had spoken to him
earnestly and with much affection about his immortal
soul, and of that gracious Saviour whom he himself
loved better than his life. But the youth had met all
his gentle persuasive words with a careless laugh, and
avowed himself an unbeliever; and in a spirit of
wicked mischief he had purposely taken his seat in
the lane that morning that he might vex and grieve
the good old man. The youth looked down and
fixed his eyes upon the book, as John Hepworth
stopped on coming to the spot where he was sitting,

“Still at your studies, my young friend,” he said ;
“have you been reading the book I lent you ?”

“Not I,” said the youth, laughing as he locked up ;
“this is more in my way.”

“Not Volney, I trust ?” said the man.
“No, not Volney, but a capital book, I can tell you.
Would you like to look at it?’ and he handed the
volume to him. “I have turned down a few of the

leaves,” he added, “that you may see what a free



A CONTRAST. 13

independent thinker the writer was. Did you ever
hear of him ?”

The old man took the book. He opened it at the
title-page, and as he read the name his eyes filled with
tears. “Hear of him!” he said ; “yes, my poor boy,
before you were born ; and when I was a boy, younger
by several years than you are now, I was living in the
same house with Thomas Paine. He was then
apprenticed to a stay-maker at Diss in Norfolk.
Some time afterwards, when I was grown up, and the
name of Tom Paine had become famous, or, I should
say, infamous, I, like a fool, out of curiosity looked
into one of his books. Thank God, thank God, I had
a wise godly father, and when he found me with that
book, he quietly took it out of my hand and put it
into the fire. ‘My son,’ he said, gravely, ‘when I am
dead and gone, you will perhaps thank me as heartily
for what I have now done as if I had taken away a
cup of poison from your lips; and mind what I say,

I as your father forbid you to read another word of



14 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

that man’s books.’ He thought I hesitated, and he

said very solemnly, ‘John, I must have your sacred

promise. I will not speak to you again till you have

told me, as before God, that you will obey me. I

know,’ he added, kindly, ‘my dear son, that if you.
make that promise you will keep it. I can depend

upon you.’ He was the best, the kindest of fathers,

Francis, and he had long won my full confidence and

love, but he had early taught me that he was not one _
to be disobeyed.”

“And did you obey him ?” asked Francis.

“By the help of God I did obey him. JI have kept
my promise up to this day, when, not knowing what
the book was which you put into my hand, I opened
it—and now I have but read the title and the name
of the miserable author.”

’ “Miserable!” said the youth; “what was there to
make him miserable? Who has a right, I should like
to know, to forbid the exercise of free thought »”

“Miserable : yes, I repeat that word. That wretched



A CONTRAST. 15

1

man spent his life in seeking to unsettle the minds,

‘and ruin the souls of his fellow-créatures, and when
he had to meet death, he began to betray those
_ terrors which he had long before laughed at. Often,
for a long time together, he cried out, ‘O Lord, help
me! O Christ, help me! He could not be left alone
night nor day. On one occasion, he declared, that if
ever the devil had a servant on earth, he had been
one; and when his infidel companions said, ‘You have
lived like a man, we hope you will die like a man,’ he
observed, to a friend near him, ‘You see, sir, what
miserable comforters I have. The woman whom he
had seduced to leave her husband lamented to her
neighbours, ‘For this man, I have given up my family
and my friends, my property and my religion; judge
then, of my distress, when he tells me that the prin-
ciples he has taught me will not bear me out.’ Was
I wrong, dear Francis, when I called that man miser-
able ?” »

Francis looked very grave, and for some time he



16 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

did not speak, but sat with his eyes cast down. Then
he raised his eyes, and said, “But is all that you
have told me true ?”

“Every word is true. I have been anxious to learn
the truth as to the latter portion of his earthly course ;
and what I have told you are well-known facts. As
to his books, it is the opinion of men of first-rate’
talent and education, that he had not the knowledge,
nor had he the habits of perseverance fitted to write
upon such subjects. ' Take iny advice, Francis, as to
that dangerous book. Every time you look into it
you are taking poison into your soul. Give it up to
me, that I may burn it.”

The old man had sat down beside Francis on the .
fallen tree. He now took the young man’s hand in
his own. “If you grant my request, you may live to
thank me, as I thank my father, though I was not
pleased at the time I gave up the book to him. Dear
Francis, I know not how it is, but I feel as a father to

”»

you.



A CONTRAST. 17

The youth hesitated ; he returned the pressure of
his friend’s hand, but he made no reply.

“But that book, dear Francis, may I take it? I
must be going,” he added, after waiting a short time—
then he rose up. “Set my mind at rest, before we
part,” he said.

“JT will think of all you have said to me,” replied

”



the youth, “and when we meet next week

“Who can tell if we may ever meet again ?” said the
old man. “I may be here next week, but afterwards
I have a journey to make into Wales. I wish you
would now give me that book. Promise me, however,
one thing—that you will not ‘look into it again till we
meet ?”

“Well, as you wish it,” said Francis, with a sudden
burst of feeling, “I give you my promise that I will
not open the book till then.”

And so they parted ; but before the old man turned
to go, he again took the hand of the youth, and stood
for a little while looking at him, earnestly and

B



18 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

tenderly. He marked the hectic colour that flushed
the death-like paleness of his face, and his slight,
fragile form ; and as he looked at him the tears fell
from his eyes. “May the Lord, in his tender mercy,
draw you to himself,” he said, with a voice that
trembled with deep inward emotion. “May He
watch over you, and send his Holy Spirit to guide
you, and make you a lamb of his -flock, and lead you
to the fountain of living water. He only knows how
deeply I feel for you, how dearly I love you. Oh, my
poor boy, I am sure you are not happy ; but mark my
words, even as if they were my last words to you—
Christ will have you ; this I believe, this I feel assured,
of. Read His word, and do not resist his voice when
He speaks by his Holy Spirit to your soul, and you
will love Him, and he will make you his for ever.”
He said no more, but with a wistful look in his
eyes, and with silent prayer in his heart, he took up
his wallet and went on his way, praying as he went.
Francis stood deep in thought, looking after his



A CONTRAST, 19

aged friend. “Shall I follow him and give him the
book ?” he said to himself—“I will ;’ but when he had
taken but a few steps, he stopped: “he is walking
faster than I can,” he said, glad to have an excuse.
“Well, I shall see him next week, and then I certainly
will give it ‘to him.”

How often did he wish afterwards that he had
obeyed. his first right impulse, and how bitterly did
he grieve that he had not done so!









CHAPTER IL

Causes for Sorrotv.

pu are late, Francis; I have been expecting

K si

you for the last three hours. What have



you been doing, and where have you been
loitering ? Why, it is past five o’clock.”

“Oh, mother dear,:don’t scold, but come and help
me; I am ready to sink.”

His mother had heard the click of the garden gate
as the latch was lifted, and at the well-known step of
her son upon the narrow path she had raised her
eyes to the clock ; but, when she heard the piteous

tone of his voice, she threw down her work, and








































































































































GATHERING CLOUDS.



CAUSES FOR SORROW. 23

hastened to meet him. She caught his outstretched
hand, then drew~him closer to her, and supported
his tall slight frame, for she saw that he was scarcely
able to stand. His head drooped upon her shoulder ;
he was gasping for breath. He looked up in his
mother’s face, but he did not speak—the could not.
His countenance was paler than usual, even to ghast-
linéss.

Tenderly the mother spoke to him, as she wiped
the heavy sweat-drops from his forehead ;_ tenderly
she soothed him, as she said, “You will soon feel
better now; the walk has been too much for you, my
darling boy. Let me get you into the house, and you
shall lie down upon the sofa, and a cup of tea will
soon revive.you. The tea-things are on the table, and
I was only waiting for you.”

“A drink of cold water first, mother,” said the
youth, as he raised his head from the pillow of the sofa.

She brought him a glass of clear sparkling water,
and he drank it eagerly. “Yes, I am better now,” he



24. FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

said, in reply to her anxious inquiries. He got up
from the sofa and took his usual seat by the fireside.
His mother made some remark from time to time, as
she employed herself in arranging the tea-things, and
stirring up the fire to a cheerful blaze ; but Francis
was silent. He sat with his eyes cast down, and a
look of deepest sadness in his face. Then, without
raising his eyes, he said, “Mother, I shall have to leave
you.”

“Leave me!” she repeated, turning at once to him.
“Have to leave me, my dear boy! what do you
mean ?”

“T mean that I must dic. There is no hope. The
doctor told me I am near death. You wished me to
go to. him, and I went ; but I wish I had not gone.”

“Why not gone?” said his mother.

“ Because, if I am to die, I did not want to know it,
and because Dr: Burton says he can do me no good.
He gave me a bottle of stuff to ease my cough; and

he was kind enough. He sounded me with a kind of



CAUSES FOR SORROW. 25

pipe all over my chest and back, but then he shook
his head, and I asked him what he thought of me. I
wish I had not, for I felt ready to faint, when he told
me I was in a consumption. He is one of your pious
men; so he thought it right, I suppose,” he added,
fretfully, “to talk to me of making use of the time I
still have to prepare to meet God. I did not like it,
mother.”

“But it was right, and I thank him. He ‘is a good
man, and you must not take on.so, and: say such bad
things,”

“You are right, mother, and I am wrong; and
I am sorry, really very sorry! But, oh, dear mother,
I am so unhappy, so very unhappy—what am I
‘to do?”

The poor boy wept bitterly, and buried his face in
the cushion of the sofa, against which he was leaning,
and sobbed aloud. His mother’s tears fell fast, as she
bent over him, and tried to soothe and comfort him.

Suddenly he lifted up his head, and cried out:
f



26 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

“Mother, I have heard more bad news to-day, and
that has helped to upset me.”

“Dear! dear!” said his mother, “what can it be?”

“TI have often. spoken:to you of Mr. Hepworth.
The kindest, ‘dearest friend I ever had. Well, he is
dead—I used to meet him often in the lane to Dray-
ton, and the last time I saw him, he said he would see
me again the next week. I went, but he did not
come, and it is now two months-since that week. I
have never heard of him till to-day. He was sent for
into Wales to go to his sister, who was dying they
thought of a bad fever ; but he took the fever, and as
she was getting well‘he died. He lent me that book,
which you called a beautiful book—the ‘Pilgrim’s
Progress,’—but I would not read it. And, mother, just
before he died, he called his niece to him, made her
promise to send his Bible to me, and write to me, and
beg me to read it and to keep it as his keepsake to
me, and told her to say that he knew Christ would

have me, and that we should meet in heaven. I have



CAUSES FOR SORROW. 27

the letter of his niece in my pocket, and she has sent
the Bible by the carrier to Whitchurch. .I. shall go
and get it in a day or two.”

* * * * *

Francis had suffered a great shock, and was very
ill for several days. -His-mother was ‘filled with alarm,
fearing that she should even then lose him. But he
gradually rallied, and was much in the same state as
he had been before his visit to Drayton. The mother,
however, was fully aroused to the fact that her son’s
time on earth was drawing to its close. She said
nothing to him, but she went quietly to the curate of
the parish, Mr. Charlton, and begged him to lose no
time in coming to her son. On that same evening,
though it was a cold dark night at the end of
November, and the walk was long,a gentle knock
was heard at the door of Mrs. Morton’s cottage.

“Tt is Mr. Charlton the curate come to see you,
dear Francis,” said his mother, as she opened the
door.



28 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

Partly sad, partly out of temper, Fraritis offered not
a word of greeting, and when the curate went up to
him, looking kindly and speaking kindly, and was
about to take his hand, the youth quickly withdrew it ;
then he covered his face with both his hands, and sat
silent, as if determined not to speak. His mother
went to him, but her whispered‘ remonstrances had no
effect upom him: He only murmured, “I don’t want
any one to come to me.”

The curate took no notice of the petulant temper
of the poor youth. He spoke only the more kindly
to him, with a tender sympathy for his weakness
and suffering. He had prayed secretly that he might
be enabled: by Divine grace to win the confiderice of
poor Francis. He knelt down near him and offered
up a prayer—a very simple one; but he poured out his
‘heart in earnest and loving supplications for those who
were “out of the way,” and who were unhappy ; and
he dwelt upon the tender love of that gracious Saviour

whose compassions fail not, and who, while we were



CAUSES FOR SORROW. 29

yet without strength, while we were yet sinners, died
for the ungodly, died for us, and died in unspeakable
agonies,

While he was praying, the large tears began to
trickle through the fingers of the young sufferer, whose
hands still covered his face: then ‘the hands came
down from that pallid countenance,.and he wept aloud.
The pastor, on rising from his knees, at once opened
the word of God; it was the Bible which had been the
dying gift of John Hepworth, and it lay.on the table
near Francis.

“© Lord,” he said, reverently, “be gracious to us, and
make this word a living word ‘by thy Holy Spirit, to
quicken our souls, for Jesus Christ’s sake.” He read
only a few verses from the eleventh chapter of
St. Matthew’s Gospel: “Come unto me all ye that
labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.
Take my yoke upon you and learn of me, for I am
meek and lowly of heart, and ye shall find rest unto

your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is



32 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

light.” - He closed the book, and for some moments
there was silence in the:room.. Then Mr. Charlton
said, “It is the Lord Jesus, even God the Son, who
speaks: to us-in these words of love. It is He, who
shed His -own blood: fot the vilest sinner, who so
tenderly calls us to come to Him, with the burden of
all our sins, and all our sorrows,~—a sore and heavy
burden. I found it so; dear Francis, till I accepted—
oh how thankfully—His most loving invitation, and
went to Him, and laid my sins on Him, and found rest
unto my very soul:. Will you;:my. poor young friend,
come unto Him? He will not reject you, for he has
also said, ‘Him that cometh to me I will in no wise
cast out.’ ”

The pastor déemed it’ wisest to’ say no more at that
‘time. He rose to take his leave; but before he
departed, he turned to Francis,‘and took the thin
hand, now held out to him, affectionately in his, and
said, “ Shall I come to you again ?”

The youth raised his large eyes with an expression



CAUSES FOR SORROW. 31

of the deepest sadness, but with a wistful look : “Oh,
sir,” he said, meekly, “if you would come! I am so
very unhappy! I shall think it long till I see you
again.”

On the next day the curate came again; Francis
was alone. When he saw who his visitor was, his
face brightened ; it was, however, but for a moment;
the look of extreme wretchedness settled down upon
him once more.

For several days the anxious pastor sought in vain
to win his confidence. Francis listened with quiet
attention to every word: addressed to him, but no
efforts could draw him into conversation ; yet always
on the minister going away, Francis earnestly entreated
him to come again, and not to forsake him. As he
afterwards told his friend and pastor, he was at that
time quite hopeless. Young as he was, he had a mind
of extraordinary intelligence, and he had been caught
in the snare of the bold assertions and specious
sophistries of Paine and other writers of the same



32 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

school. He had become indeed so entangled in them
that escape and deliverance seemed impossible to
him. These opinions had, like noxious weeds, rooted
themselves in an uncultivated soil; and it was, alas,
the congenial soil of the natural heart, which is, we
know, at enmity against God* until changed by Divine
grace. All that he knew of the Holy Bible had been
gained from the attacks of the enemies of its glorious
truths—even of the blasphemous infidels whose books
he had read. ;

It might seem ‘improbable that a mere youth, in a
secluded hamlet, should have met with such books.
But he had an only brother, to whom he was de-
votedly attached,—a tall handsome young man, a e
soldier in the Guards. He was unprincipled and
profligate, but good-tempered, and fond of the delicate
boy, who was so fragile and so unlike himself, and
who looked up to him with undisguised admiration.
On his last visit, about a year before, Philip had taken

* Rom, viii. 7.



CAUSES FOR SORROW. 33

more than usual notice of his young brother. He had
found it convenient to avail himself of the services of
the affectionate boy, who was never tired of waiting
‘upon him, as he lounged away his time, during his
leave of absence, in careless idleness,—sometimes
dressing himself with care in his handsome uniform,
and strolling about the lanes and streets of the neigh-
bouring villages, and visiting at the cottages and
houses where he was known, but usually wasting his
time in reading some foolish novel that he had brought
with him. He had however several other volumes
which he thought furnished some excuse, by their
blasphemous denial of the God of truth and holiness,
for his own unprincipled and profligate course of life ;
they were left lying about the room where he and his
brother slept.

“What are you reading, youngster ?” he said, when,
on going up to their chamber, he saw Francis intently
occupied with one of those books, and he took it out
of the boy’s hand, laughing however as he did so,

C



34 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

“Tf you read it,” said Francis, “why may not I ?”

“Oh read it, if you will,” said Philip ; “ but you can’t
understand it. It is above you.”

“Tam quite taken with it,” said the boy; “and I
can understand it.”

“Well, well, it will open your eyes to the truth, you
young dog, as it has mine: only hide it from mother.”

The days passed rapidly by, and the young soldier's
leave of absence expired. “ Will you take your books
with you,” said his young brother on the morning of
Philip’s departure to his regiment.

“Not J,” was the careless reply; “burn them, or
keep them as you will.”

Thus it was that the evil seed had been sown, and

had rooted itself in the heart of the unhappy youth.









CIIAPTER III.

Che bruised reed and smoking flax.

R. CHARLTON had at last won the youth’s

confidence and love; and he felt an in-



creased interest in him. The servant of
God knew, however, that the change he so anxiously
desired and prayed to witness was beyond his power
to effect. All that he cow/d do, he endeavoured to do.
He brought before his young friend the real character
of the word of the living God, by reading to him
those portions of the inspired volume which were
calculated to make known to him its: divine truths ;
and he wep constantly on his knees beside his young

C2



36 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

charge, endeavouring to lead his thoughts, by simple
and. fervent words of prayer, to that gracious Lord
who has said to his sinful creatures, “Him that
cometh to me I will in no wise cast out.” As long
as Francis had strength to kneel, he knelt with his
anxious pastor. He now knew well, and felt deeply,
the affectionate interest with which Mr. Charlton
regarded him.

There was but one thing to be done after humbly
and diligently using the means appointed by God—
to wait upon the Lord. This Mr. Charlton did, in
faith and humble prayer ; and he soon found that the
poor youth was becoming an anxious seeker after
divine light.

About this time Francis began to open his whole
heart to his visitor ; and fearful indeed was the spec-
tacle disclosed, of errors in principle, and their usual
consequences——sins in practice.

“And now, pr,” said the youth, mournfully, “now

that you know me as Tam, can you think there is any



THE BRUISED REED AND SMOKING FLAX. 37

forgiveness for me? I have beena blasphemer, I have
denied that Holy Saviour who paid the price of His
own blood for guilty souls.”

“ And whose blood cleanseth us from all sin,” said
his pastor, gently clasping the hand of the youth, who
wept as if his heart was breaking. Mr. Charlton said
nothing till the grief of Francis had somewhat subsi-
. ded; then he turned to the first Epistle of the disciple

whom Jesus loved, and read in a low but distinct
voice these well-known words, “If we confess our sins,
He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to
cleanse us from all unrighteousness.”

“Dear Francis,” said the earnest pastor, “lay
to heart this great assurance, and trust without a
doubt or a fear that your faith will find acceptance,
and the promise be fulfilled to you. He whose pro-

. Mise it is, never broke the bruised reed, nor quenched
the smoking flax ; and you, my poor broken-hearted
Francis, are but a bruised reed, and your faith is like

the smoking flax ; but His promise is sure, and if he



38 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

whom you now seek has begun his work in your
heart, as I believe He has, his work will stand.
Therefore take comfort from the only source from
which true comfort flows ; you have sinned grievously
and awfully, but there is DE gi Ces with Him and
forgiveness for you. Do not, my dear Francis, add
the guilt of distrust and unbelief to your past sins.
I trust they are forgiven, as they are forsaken. You
do not speak, Francis,” he added. “Did you not
hear? do you not agree with what I have told you ?”

Francis had sat with face cast down, apparently
deep in thought. He, now raised his head, and said,
“Oh, sir, how kind you are! I heard every word you
said, and every word went to my heart ; I must not, I
will not distrust the word of the Lord God. As you
have often told me, it is a precious word, and a living
word, and I must and do believe it.”

In his heart, the minister thanked God that for the
first time he had seen the dawn of divine light in the

mind of the young infidel, gradually clearing away



THE BRUISED REED AND SMOKING FLAX. 39

the dark clouds of unbelief and misery. But though
the light had come, it was for some days scarcely
more than a faint twilight ; but it was not the twilight
that dies away into the darkness of night, but that
which brightens into the clear shining of full daylight ;
and as the light increased, there came with it. a
genial warmth into the cold, trembling heart of the
desponding youth. Thus it was with Francis as it
is written in the word of our Lord, that God, who
commanded the light to shine out of darkness,
had begun to shine in his heart “to give the light
of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face
of Jesus Christ.” * He did not pass from confusion
and wretchedness to ungrounded hope and joy. If
he was at length enabled to believe that his sins
were forgiven and blotted out in the blood of our
adorable Redeemer, he could never forget how awfully
he had offended.

One thing Mr. Charlton remarked during all his

* 2 Cor. iv. 6,



40 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

intercourse with Francis, from the first day that they
met, to his last hour,—that he never attempted, in any
way, to excuse or justify himself. His conviction of
his sin and of his entire unworthiness was deep and
abiding. After leaving him one day apparently calm,
and almost peaceful, Mr. Charlton would find him
with his countenance fallen, and bathed in tears. But
always, after his pastor had drawn his attention to any
passage of Holy Scripture, and explained and pointed
out the instruction or consolation to be derived from
it, the passage was marked and carefully studied with
prayer when Mr. Charlton had left him.

Sometimes Francis spoke of his aged friend, John
Hepworth, the pedlar, and of their interviews, deplor-
ing his own wicked perverseness, describing the
tender anxiety of the good old man, and repeated his
wise counsels and gentle admonitions. He dwelt
especially on their last meeting, and on the bitter

grief and remorse he felt when the tidings of the old



THE BRUISED REED AND SMOKING FLAX. 41

man’s death reached him, on the shock it had been
to him, and the joy he felt when he received the
old man’s message, and the Bible of the dying pedlar.

“He foresaw,” said Francis, as he fixed his eyes
upon the page of the open Bible, which lay upon the
table before him, whilst a few large tears dropped
from his downcast eyes—and the poor youth spoke
in a voice trembling with agitation—“he foresaw that
his prayers for the wretched boy he pitied and loved,
notwithstanding all my wickedness and ingratitude,
would be answered. Truly, sir,” he added, “they
were the prayers of faith, as you have often told me

every prayer should be.”

Francis was very weak one evening when Mr. Charl-
ton came to him; he was growing weaker every day.
“ Dear sir,” said the youth, in a faint voice, “I have a
duty to perform ; it ought to have been attended to
before, but if I put it off any longer it may be too

late, for I feel that I shall soon be gone. I must burn



42 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

those dreadful books so full of blasphemy and ini-
quity. Thank God, I cannot bear the sight of them
now ; but I must take care that no other eyes shall
read them. He who left them with me said I might
keep them or burn them, as I pleased; but if he had
not told me that I might burn them, I would do so
now. Oh, sir, what would have been my feelings at
this time, when I must soon have to die, and to meet
my God! How should I dare to meet Him as an
unpardoned blaspheming sinner! I who have denied
the Lord that bought me with His own blood—I, a
wilful, impious, wicked fool !”

“Francis,” said his pastor, “do not you remember
the words of that most gracious Saviour, the prayer
for his murderers upon the cross when they had cru-
cified him, ‘ Father, forgive them, for they know not
what they do.’ My poor boy, might He not say of
you, he knew not what he did? not from anything
good in yourself, but from his own infinite love, and

his own thorough knowledge of your ignorance and



THE BRUISED REED AND SMOKING FLAX. 43

weakness, might He not say this of you also? I would
not excuse you, I would not help you to find a single
excuse for your past wickedness. I am thankful to
know that you have never excused yourself.”

“T excuse myself! oh, sir, I can never condemn
myself enough. But now that I know something of
that love, that wondrous love, which, as you have
shown tne from His word, passeth knowledge, I have
dared to hope, and to do more than hope—to believe
that He who came to seek and to save those that were
lost has sought and saved me with his blood.”

The impious books of which Francis had spoken

were burnt that night.

“There is one other duty for me to do before I die,”
said Francis, on the following day, to his pastor, now
unspeakably beloved by him ; “there is one duty yet
to be done, dearest, kindest, most respected friend, if
I may call you my friend.”

“What is it, dear Francis? for you are very dear to



44 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

me,” said Mr. Charlton. “Tell me, can I help
you? perhaps I can, in what you have to do; what
is it ?”

“T have a letter to write, and I am sure you will
help me, for I shall need your help. I am becoming
so weak, so much weaker than I was even yesterday,
and the thought of that letter which I must write
has troubled me and kept me awake and feverish
all night; and I am so afraid that I may not live to
write it.”

“Tell me, dear Francis, to whom you wish to
write.”

“To him who put those dreadful books in my way,
who gave them to me—to my brother. He is very dear
to me, but he gave me poison, and I drank it, willingly
drank it, and the fatal effects soon followed ; it began
to circulate through every part of me, and to taint
with its deadly leaven my whole heart and mind.”

“But you have taken the antidote, my dear

Francis.”



THE BRUISED REED AND SMOKING FLAX. 45

“T have indeed, sir, and you brought it to me ; and
when in my wicked perverseness I tried to reject it,
with what patient gentleness, with what sweet persua-
sion, you induced me to take that precious antidote
from your kind hand.” .

“While He who provided it, and taught me to know
its divine efficacy,” said Mr. Charlton, “and to offer
it to you, my poor Francis, was the Good Physician ;
and, blessed be His name, you have experienced its
healing purifying power; He has also made it health
and life to your soul.”

“There is one of the psalms, sir,” said Francis, “a
. very grand and beautiful psalm—I was reading it not
long ago, but I forget which of the psalms it is—which
I might humbly and thankfully employ as my prayer
in blessing and praising the Lord for his mercy to me,
in saving me from the dreadful effects of those
poisonous books. I think it begins with, ‘Bless the
Lord, O my soul, and all that is within me bless His
holy name.’’



46 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

“Tt is the 103rd psalm, Francis; I will read it to
you; and then we will ask the Lord to teach and
help you to write the letter to your brother; for I
agree with you it is right to make no delay, while you
have strength and time, to write to him.”

Mr. Charlton then read: “Bless the Lord, O
my soul: and all that is within me, bless his holy
name!

“Bless the Lord, O my soul, and forget not all his
benefits.

“Who forgiveth all thine iniquities ; who healeth all
thy diseases ;

“Who redeemeth thy life from destruction, who
crowneth thee with loving kindness and tender
mercies,”

He read the whole of that magnificent psalm to his
young companion, dwelling particularly upon many of
the verses, and pointing out how remarkably they
applied to the gracious dealings of the Lord with

those who had been brought to feel the need of a great



THE BRUISED REED AND SMOKING FLAX. 47

forgiveness, as Mr. Charlton humbly and thankfully
declared he himself had been brought to feel.

The tears fell fast from the eyes of the deeply
penitent and deeply thankful youth. “I must learn
that psalm by heart,” he said, as he wiped his tears
away,

“And feed upon it, my Francis,” added the pastor,
“as the prophet has said ;* and you may truly say as
he did, ‘Thy words were found, and I did eat them,
and thy word was unto me the joy and rejoicing of
my heart.’”

They prayed, and then Francis began his letter to

his brother, as follows :-—

“My OWN AND ONLY BROTHER,

“T love you very much, and I now write to tell
you that I shall never see you again in this world. It
is, I see, the will of God to take me away ; and I now
believe that he will take me to be for ever with the

* Jer. xv. 16,



48 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

Lord Jesus. I trust He has forgiven me, His poor
wicked child, for the sake of His blessed Son. It
almost breaks my heart to think that you and I may
never meet in that better country. If God has for-
given me, He will assuredly forgive you; and if we
confess our sins, He will forgive us our sins, and cleanse
us from all unrighteousness. I was long without hope,
but I have now dared to hope; for I am enabled to
believe with a trusting faith in the word of the living
God.

“Oh, my brother, how fervently do I pray that
you may be brought to know what a God we have,
and to know and love Him as I now do, or rather to
believe that He loves me, vile and unworthy as I am ;
and what a Father, what a Saviour, what a comforter
I have found in Him! He has answered many of my
prayers in a wonderful way, and I cannot but believe
that He will answer my prayers for you. You and I,
dearest Philip, are great sinners; but the blood of
Jesus Christ cleanseth from all sin; and the Holy



THE BRUISED REED AND SMOKING FLAX. 49

Spirit will be given to all who ask for Him to apply
that precious blood to the conscience, ,

“Do not destroy this letter—do not throw it aside—
but keep, and sometimes read these, the last words of
"your young brother to you, whom I love as my own
soul.

“Dear Philip, those books which you brought with
you, and left with me last year—I mean those vile,
pernicious books written by wretched and blasphem-
ing infidels—have been like deadly poison to me. I
was bad enough before ; a wicked, ungodly boy ; but
those books made me a scoffing, daring unbeliever,
and brought my soul to the very brink of hell. But
the Lord God had compassion on me, and sent His
messenger to me—my dearest friend as he now is—my
kind, loving pastor, the Rev. Mr. Charlton. At first
I felt angry and displeased at his coming, and I
wanted him to go away, and I let him see that I dis-
liked his coming to me. But I felt so ill and so un-

D



50 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

happy, that I did not get up and go upstairs to avoid
him, as I thought at first I would do. He bore with
me, however, and was so gentle and patient, and he
did not find fault with me and rebuke me—as I sup-
posed he would do, afid as I deserved. But he read
such gracious words from God’s own word; and he
knelt down by me and prayed—such a prayer, so
humble, so full of love, so tender about me, that
my cold, hard heart seemed to melt within me,
and I could only weep and feel that I really loved
him. }

“And now, my Philip, I can bless God and tell you
that Mr. Charlton has brought me the antidote for
the poison of those hateful books—the one and only
antidote—and the effects have passed away. You may
find the same antidote in God’s holy word—there it is
for you as it was for me; and Mr. Charlton would be
as ready to help you as he has been to help me.

Perhaps you will not seek him now. You, my dearest



THE BRUISED REED AND SMOKING FLAX. 51

brother, may have to be brought down by sorrow and
sickness as I-have been. But do not forget what I
say. The time may come—I think it will come—the
days of darkness may come to you; then think of
my Jast words to you, and go to your brother’s dearest
friend, his pastor and teacher, and open your heart, as
I have done to him.
“Yours, with deep heart love,
“ My own dearest brother,

‘ “ FRANCIS MORTON.”

The exertion of writing this letter had been almost
too great for the failing strength of Francis. It had
taken him two days to write it, and his pastor had
come to him on the following day after remaining with
him on the day when he began writing ; on the second
day he had paused more than once, and Mr. Charlton,
seeing how exhausted he was, had begged him to put
off concluding the letter to still another day. But



52 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

with a pleading look in his large melancholy eyes,
Francis gently entreated to be allowed to finish the
letter, and roused himself to another effort, writing
steadily on till he had signed his name. Then the
pen dropped from his hand, his face became deadly
pale, his eyes closed, and he sank down on his chair.
He would have fallen, but his mother, who had been
anxiously watching him, sprang forward and caught
him, and with the assistance of Mr. Charlton, Francis
was laid, almost insensible, on the old sofa. But he
was not insensible. He opened his eyes as they laid
his head on the pillow of the sofa.

“Mother,” he said, faintly, as she bent over him,

“mother, beg Mr. Charlton to stay a little longer with

”

me.

Mr. Charlton came to him, and took his hand.
Francis warmly clasped his pastor’s hand. “ Dear sir,”
he said, “I wanted to ask you to pray with me before

you leave me. I am better now—much better. It was



THE BRUISED REED AND SMOKING FLAX. 53

but a passing faintness; but, thank God, the letter is
written, and I feel so peaceful, so thankful! I shall
join in your prayer, dear sir. I shall hear that name
from your lips, which is above every name. It is to me
dearer and sweeter than any other on earth. His name,
as you have often reminded me, was called Yesus, that

He might save His people from their sins,”









CHAPTER IV.
God wounds to heal. |

HE next day Francis did not rise from his
bed ; but Mr. Charlton found him very calm.




He looked up with his usual smile when
his pastor entered, but he did not speak, except
to answer the few affectionate inquiries addressed to
him. His.voice was weaker than it had been, but he
listened with intense interest to the glorious words of
Holy Scripture which Mr. Charlton read to him:

“The word of God is. quick, and powerful, and

sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing even to



GOD WOUNDS. TO HEAL. 55

the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the
joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts

and intents of the heart. Neither is there any creature
that is not manifest in his sight; but all things are
naked and opened unto the eyes of him with whom
we have to do.

“Seeing then that we have a great High Priest, that
_ is passed into the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let
us hold fast our profession. For we have not a High
Priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our
infirmities ; but was in all points tempted like as we
are, yet without sin.

“Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of
grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to
help in time of need.”*

“May I ask you to grant me a great favour, dear
sir?” said Francis,

“Whatever you may ask, and whatever I can do, I
will do, Francis,” replied his pastor.

* Heb. iv. 12-16.



56 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

“It is to put this letter into my brother’s hands.
You told me you might be going to London soon.
You will find him in the Barracks, at Knightsbridge.
Will you,” added he, “see my poor ungodly brother,
and speak to him? And I pray God that the words,
which have brought life to my soul, may by His
grace bring life also to his.”

“We will hope and pray,” said Mr. Charlton, “that
your words may come true.”

“TI feel that my time is very short,” said Francis,
when Mr. Charlton rose on this occasion to leave him.
“I cannot mistake the inward sinking I have lately
felt. What a comfort your coming to me has been!
Let me thank you now, though no words can express
what I feel for your goodness to me. Let me, how-
ever, thank you now, for I may not be here to do so
when you come again.”

“T will not fail to be with you to-morrow, if it please
God, my dear young friend. I should wish to be with
you at the last ; but you now need rest, and I trust



GOD WOUNDS TO HEAL. 87

that quiet and sleep may restore you to some strength
before we next meet.”

“T do not lean on man,” said Francis; “you have
taught me, sir, to lean on Him who is the Rock. ‘I
will both lay me down and sleep,’” he added, to
himself, after his pastor had left him, “‘for Thou,
Lord, only makest me dwell in safety.’ ”

On the following day, when Mr. Charlton came,
Francis seemed to have revived. “ How very kind of
you to come,” he said; “and how thankful I feel
that I am permitted to see you once more. I felt
very sad after you left me, and I began to doubt and
to fear, as I have done so often, but I kept on crying °
for mercy, and I am sure my prayer was answered ;
for while I was praying, your words came back to me
which I had forgotten—that I must not look to my
own feelings, or my own frame of mind, but trust
simply and entirely to the Lord Jesus Christ.”

Mr. Charlton opened the Bible, and read a few

verses : “ Verily, verily, I say unto you, he that heareth



58 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

my word, and believeth on Him that sent mie, hath
everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation,
but is passed from death unto life.”

“These are our Lord’s own words, Francis; you
have heard, you now hear His word. You believe
in the eternal Father, who hath sent Him his own
co-equal co-eternal Son to redeem your soul, at the
price of his precious blood. I need not ask you if
you believe this, my dear Francis ?”

“No, indeed,” he replied; “yet I am glad that you
do ask me, that I may answer, ‘I do believe in Him,
with all my heart, and all my soul, and I do believe
that in his wonderful love he has sent his Son to
‘save my soul alive.’ ”

“ And this is what you want, my Francis,—a simple
faith and trust in Him who has done everything for
you, and a distrust of yourself, and of all mere frames
and feelings ; which might shake your trust in him.”

There was a pause: Francis was deep in thought ;
then he said’:



GOD WOUNDS TO HEAL. 59

“Thank you, thank you for what you have said to
me, dear sir; it has set me right, and cleared away my
doubts and fears. By God's grace I will never doubt
again. But one thing distresses me more than I can
express,” and his eyes filled with tears. “Oh, sir,” he
added, as his tears trickled down his pale face, “I
cannot, I do not sufficiently love Him, I do not
love that gracious Lord, who died for me, as I ought.”

“My poor child,” said his pastor, “who is there
that might not join with you in your complaint? I,
alas! for one. Who is there: that does love Him as
we know and feel we ought to love him? But,
Francis, let the thought which has often brought
comfort to my heart, when I have deplored my dead-
ness and my coldness, comfort you. He has loved
you—you cannot doubt His love for you.”

The face of Francis brightened. “Yes,” he said ; “I
do believe that, worthless, sinful as I am, the Lord
Jesus does love me ; what peace, what joy there is in

believing in His love for me!”



60 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

“T rejoice, and thank God to hear you say this.
May the Lord shed a deep and lasting sense of his
love in your heart, by his Holy Spirit ; for the deeper
sense you have of his love, the higher your love will
rise to him. Think on those words of our Lord
which I have just read to you; ponder them in your
heart, seeking and praying to realise that present
salvation of which they spe:k; the assurance that
you have passed from death unto life. This is the
very heart of religion, and those who do not receive
these divine words, and seek to realise them, have not
yet entered into the full apprehension of the gospel of
grace. Think of His love, which passeth knowledge,
while you think of those words; and you will find
your love to Him increased and strengthened. ‘We
love Him,’ said the disciple whom Jesus loved,

>”

‘because He first loved us.

Mr. Charlton would not now let a day pass without

seeing Francis; and on his next visit he found the



GOD WOUNDS TO HEAL. 61

dying youth still apparently better ; dying he certainly
was, but the seeming revival was only the fitful flame
of an expiring lamp, flashing up for a little while,
before its light went out.

“My father,” said the youth, fixing his eyes with a
wistful look on his pastor, as he drew near—“more
than father to me ; it is such a joy to me to see you
once more. Last night I thought I was going;
perhaps it was owing to the excitement and agitation
which overcame me, from my conversation with you.
I had not known till then that our most gracious
Lord permits, nay, invites us, to believe that we have
now everlasting life ; now, while still in this body of
death. It seemed to me that the fear of death and
the sting of death had been taken away. I had
always felt, till then, a great dread of death ; but as I
prayed, a wonderful peace came over me, till I fell
asleep and dreamed. It seemed to me that I was in
the pleasant green lane where I had so often met my
‘dear old friend, Mr. Hepworth, and he was there.



62 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

He came to me where I was sitting on a fallen tree,
which lay on the grass by the wayside, and the Bible
he had sent me before he died was on my knees. He
stood before me, and asked me what the book was.
When he saw the Bible, he smiled, and said, ‘My
prayer is heard, my words have proved true, that
Christ would have you.’ Then he took my hand, and
said, ‘Rise up. Come thou with me.’ He drew me
forward, and I saw that we were standing before a
folding-door, all of gold. I turned to ask where he
was leading me; but my astonishment increased.
Could it be my aged friend whom I saw?’ it was he,
and no other, for my hand was still locked in his;
but he was no longer aged. I cannot describe the
wonderful change that had come over him. But I
thought as I looked upon him, of what we read of the
holy martyr, Stephen, that. his face was as the face of
an angel. He pointed to the words, which I then saw
written in letters of light above the door, ‘Knock,
and it shall be opened unto you ;’ then he brought



GOD WOUNDS TO HEAL. 63

me up to the door, and bade me knock. I did as I
was told, joyfully, but with a trembling hand: In-
stantly the golden doors opened, and a flood of light,
so bright that it almost blinded me, streamed forth.

“Tt was only a dream,” added Francis; “but it
seemed so real, that when I awoke I hardly knew
where I was. I could not recover myself, and I
thought that the blaze of light which filled this little
room was the morning sunshine. I lay thinking
quietly of that dream, and I felt so thankful as I
remembered the gracious words of ‘the Lord Jesus,
‘Knock, and it shall be opened unto you.’ Oh, sir,
what love there is in that promise! how could we do
otherwise than knock ?”

“Dear Francis,” said Mr. Charlton, “there is no
love like His. Wonderful as it is that He should
invite us to come to Him, and knock, it is still more
wonderful that He should come to us, even to the
door of our hearts, and knock there for admission.

Let me read to you what he has said,” and opening



64 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

the Bible, the pastor turned to the third chapter of
the book of the Revelation, and read at the twentieth
verse : “‘Behold I stand at the door, and knock: if
any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will
come unto him, and sup with him, and he with me,’
He came to the door of your heart, He came first, and
gave you grace to open it to Him, or you would never
have gone to Him, and knocked at the door, which
he alone can open, and which he has opened to you.”
“And you and Mr. Hepworth have led me to the
door, and told me to knock there,” said Francis,
And then with a look of deep affection, he raised his
“eyes, and fixed them on his pastor’s hand, which lay
upon the open Bible. Mr. Charlton had noticed several
times before that the dying youth seemed to be looking
at his hand, and had withdrawn it, supposing that he

was remarking the contrast between the strong healthy .

hand of his pastor and his own thin delicate fingers.
“Dear Francis,” he said, “why do you often look
so earnestly upon my hand ?”










































De Pp A

LIGHT AT EVENTIDE.



GOD WOUNDS TO HEAL. 67

“ Because,” he replied, raising his eyes for a moment
with a wistful look to the face of his pastor, “ because
I do so love it,” and he suddenly bent down and kissed
the hand which lay on the Bible. “Oh, my father,” he
said, “I cannot find words to express the love which I
feel in my heart for you. I can never pay the debt of
gratitude I owe to you; I can only love you and pray
with my whole heart that our blessed Lord will enrich
you with His choicest blessings for all that you have .
been to me, and done for your poor unworthy and
once miserable child. I may call you my father, may
I not ? you will not think it a liberty, or any want of
respect in me, will you, sir?”

“T will not think it a liberty, my ‘Francis ; I shall
be glad to hear you call me your father, for I love you
as tenderly as if you were my own child. In one
sense, indeed, we must call no man father, that is, in
the highest sense, for the Lord Jesus has told us that
we must call no man our father upon the earth, for one
is our Father, which is in heaven. But on the occa-

E 2



68 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

sion when our Lord gave that command, He was
warning his hearers against the exorbitant presump-
tion of the Scribes and Pharisees, who sought to claim
dominion over their faith, and, setting aside the one
and only word of authority, Holy Scripture, demanded
an unquestioning submission to their unscriptural
teaching, and to themselves. as masters and fathers ;
thus in a manner setting aside the teaching of God’s
word and His supreme authority. But we have no
reason to conclude that the words. then spoken by
the Lord Jesus were intended to forbid the tender
affection toward those true and faithful teachers of his
word which is naturally felt by those who have been
the honoured instruments of bringing them to Christ,
not as claiming dominion over their faith, or their con-
sciences, or as being lords over God’s: heritage, but
helpers of their joy. We cannot suppose that the
inspired apostle St. Paul was disobeying the com-
mand of the Lord Jesus when, writing to Timothy and
to Titus, he called each of them his own son in the



GOD WOUNDS TO HEAL, 69

faith. I think, therefore, my beloved Francis,” he
added, with a look of tender affection, smiling as he
spoke, “since I know that you love me, with all the
genuine affection of a child for his father, I must not
forbid you to call me your father. Why, indeed,
should I not respond to your expressions of affection,
my poor suffering child, by telling you how inex-
préssibly dear you have become to me? I often recall
to my mind the words of the apostle when I think of
you. Where, indeed, do we find expressions of such
deep and holy affection as in those of the apostle
Paul, when writing out of the abundance of his heart
to the beloved disciples of our Lord at Thessalonica ?
I will read to you that part of his first Epistle to them
in the second chapter. ‘We were gentle among you
even as a nurse cherisheth her children, so being affec-
tionately desirous of you, we were willing to have im-
parted unto you, not the gospel of God only, but also
our own souls, because ye were dear unto us; and

again, ‘Ye know how we exhorted and comforted and



7O FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

charged every one of you, asa father doth his children,
that ye would walk worthy of God, who hath called
you unto His kingdom and glory.’” *

As Francis listened to those words, with his eyes
fixed upon the mild grave face of the reader, the tears
stole slowly down his pale cheeks. “How kind,” he
said, with a trembling voice, “to read these beautiful
words to me, and oh what a description! how exact
of yourself in all your tender goodness to me from the
first day that He, the Lord, sent you to me to guide
my feet into the way of peace!—sent you to me, so
vile, so wicked as I have been, so egtirely unworthy
of the interest you have taken in me, or even of your
notice !”

“ Shall I see you again to-morrow ?” said Francis, as
Mr. Charlton presently rose to take leave of him;
“that is if I am still here. May I hope that you will
come, my father? J have taken up much of your
time, and there may be others whom you may wish to

* 1 Thess, ii. 7, 8, 11, 12.



GOD WOUNDS TO HEAL. 71

visit, though no one could need your coming so much
as I do. But to-morrow may be the last day that I
shall see you on earth. Ishould be quite happy to
go if it were not for the thought of parting with you,
and leaving my dear mother. My poor mother! will
you see her sometimes after I am taken from her?
She will be so very desolate. The neighbours are not
kind to her. They have said cruel things about her,
even to me; but do not believe what you hear, judge
for yourself, and do not forsake her in her grief. She
has always been a good and most tender mother to
me, and now she is almost worn out with nursing me.”

Mr. Charlton’s hand was clasped in his, and Francis
still held it; he paused for breath a little while, then
he said, “ There is only one thing more that I have to
ask you, my father; may I remind you of your
promise to see my dear, dear brother, and to put my
letter yourself into his hands, and will you tell him
how constantly I prayed for him,—prayed that I
might meet him, washed in the precious blood of the



72 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

Lord Jesus, and clothed-in the white raiment—prayed
for him to the last.”

“T will do everything that you wish, my dearest
Francis,” said his pastor, as, gently and fondly laying
both his hands upon the head of the youthful sufferer,
he commended him to the gracious mercy and _ pro-
tection of the Lord God, and prayed that the Lord
would bless and help him, that the Lord would make
His face to shine upon him, that the Lord would lift
up His countenance upon him, and give him peace
both then and evermore.

Not another word was spoken ; only one last look,
in which their eyes met, was exchanged as Mr.
Charlton pressed the hand of Francis and departed.
“Dear, dear Francis,” he said to himself, as he walked
slowly home. “TI feel that we shall not meet again in
this world. But I must not grieve for you.”

The next morning, however, he rose early, and was
soon after on his way to the chamber of sickness,
though not as yet of death.







CHAPTER V.

he closing Scene.

SAHE morning was more than usually bright



with the genial sunshine of spring, when
Mr. Charlton went forth on his accustomed
walk to the secluded cottage, where he had long
been almost a daily visitor. There was a delight-
ful freshness, almost an elixir of life, in the pure
morning air. In the open fields cowslips were waving
their scented tassels over the springing grass in the
soft western breeze. The hedgerow banks in the
quiet lanes were spread over with the gay embroidery

of violets and anemones and other flowers of the



74. FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

sweet spring season, all hung with dewdrops sparkling
in the slanting sunbeams. Among the branches of
the tall trees the sportive birds were flying in and out,
singing as they flew, as if rejoicing to return to their
green bowers in the renewed foliage. The soft sweet
monotony of the cuckoo’s welcome note sounded in
the distance, and high up in the blue unclouded sky
the air was ringing with the exquisite song of the lark.
Freshness and fragrance seemed to breathe from
everything around. Life was everywhere—the bright
beautiful life of spring. But the anxious pastor
scarcely noted anything. He could not choose but
feel the soothing influence of that spring morning, the
freshness and the loveliness of the delicious weather ;
but his thoughts were with the dying youth who had
become so endeared to him. Was he still alive, still
waiting to see him once more, to greet him with that
look of yearning affection in his large intelligent eyes,
to speak to him with that low sweet voice, or should

he find only the breathless corpse ?



THE CLOSING SCENE. 75

Francis zwas still alive, the living spirit still lingered
in its fragile tenement. As Mr. Charlton, however,
entered the little upper chamber, he was struck with
the contrast, as it were, almost between life and death,
the freshness and sunshine of life in the open air with-
out, and the aspect of death within; the close atmo-
sphere, the hushed stillness, the gloom of the chamber,
the curtain drawn over the window, the rushlight
which had burnt through the night flickering in its
tarnished candlestick, the phial of medicine and the
cup upon the table near the bed. One cheering sight,
however, met his eyes—the Holy Bible, Mr. Hepworth’s
parting gift, and a small volume of hymns, which he
himself had given to Francis, lay open. He bent
down to see what Francis had been reading, it was

Montgomery’s beautiful hymn:

‘*For ever with the Lord,
Amen, so let it be!
Life from the dead is in that word,
’Tis immortality.



76 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

‘*Here, in the body pent,
' Absent-from him I roam,
Yet nightly pitch my moving tent,
A day’s march nearer home.

‘*My father’s house on high,
Home of my soul, how near
At times to faith’s foreseeing eye,
Thy golden gates appeat !

“‘Ah then my spirit faints
To reach the land I love,
The bright inheritance of saints,
Jerusalem above.”

“ This is the hymn, then, that he has been last read-
ing,” said Mr. Charlton, “these are the thoughts in
which he has learnt to delight,” and he turned to look
upon the sleeping youth.

On the old sofa, which had been brought up from
the room below, lay the languid form of Francis. He
had been very restless during the night, and his
mother, at his request, had removed him from his bed
to the sofa, and covered him up with an: old military
cloak that had been his brother’s. Mr. Charlton had



THE CLOSING SCENE. 7

found the door partly open, as his mother had left it,
when she quitted the room for a short time, after
watching Francis till he slept; and entering with
noiseless footsteps, he now stood there gazing upon
the quiet sleeper, and feeling that he was probably
looking upon him for the last time. His sleep was as
untroubled as: that of an infant in its mother’s arms;
a sweet expression of purity and peace seemed
spread over his whole countenance, over the calm clear
forehead, the closed eyelids, and the delicately-shaped
and partly-opened lips. One slender hand was under
the pale cheek, which was faintly crimsoned with the
pressure.

“So He giveth His beloved sleep,” said the pastor
to himself. As he did so he called to mind all the
mercy and love of his heavenly Father to the once
wayward miserable youth, the. marvellous change
which that gracious God had wrought within him by
His Holy Spirit, and His living word; and how his
sins had been blotted’ out in the blood of the Lord



73 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

Jesus—that precious blood which cleanseth from all
sin—and the once polluted soul clothed in His
spotless righteousness, His thoughts were turned to
prayer and praise. He sank upon his knees and
poured out his heart before God in adoration and
thanksgiving.

He was still kneeling when Francis awoke, and saw
at a glance who was beside him. His face at once
lighted up with smiles. “ How gracious the Lord has
been,” he said, softly, “to give me that sweet refresh-
ing sleep and to bless my waking eyes with the sight
of you, my father, once more before I am called to
go hence. Though I feel better and stronger now, I
know it is only for a little while; perhaps,” he added,
meckly, “to cheer my last hour with your presence.
You will not grieve for me when I am gone,” he said,
as he saw his beloved pastor turn aside wiping the
tears from his eyes.

“ Dearest Francis,” said the visitor, “my tears are

not tears of sorrow, though I must grieve to part with



THE CLOSING SCENE. 79

you for a time ; they are tears of thankfulness and joy,
which rise up from my full heart as I think of the love
of Him who has redeemed you by His precious blood,
and prepared you for His glorious presence. I think
with you, my Francis, that He will now come soon
and call for you.”

“For me—yes even for me, what grace, what mercy
for me, so young in years and yet so old in sin as I
was, when He sent you to me and made you so patient
with me, even when I could not bear to see you, and
looked upon you almost as coming to torment me in
my misery. But, blessed be His name, I can now say,
what I believe from my heart, that this is a faithful
saying and worthy of all acceptation, that Jesus Christ
came into the world to save sinners, of whom I am
chief.” .

There was a pause, for Mr. Charlton had begged
him not to speak again for a time, deeming the exer-
tion would be too much for him. Francis, however,
was the first to break the silence. He looked earnestly.



80 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

at Mr. Charlton, and said, “Your words just now
reminded me that I fell asleep thinking of those same
promises; and during my last sweet sleep, a soft, clear
voice seemed to speak distinctly in my ear. ‘The
Master is come, and calleth for thee, it said; and I
thought that I was in the act of rising up to obey the
gracious message and seek His presence when I
awoke; and you; you also, feel as I do,” he added,
with a grave gentleness, “that' the call will come very
soon,”

“Whenever it may come, my Francis, I believe it
will be to meet Him whose you now are.”

Mr. Charlton had withdrawn the curtain from the
window, and the cheering: sunshine lighted up the
room. :

“Might I not breathe the sweet morning air? I am
sure it would revive me.’

“You are faint, my dear Francis, and.the west wind
is so soft this morning, that ‘think you may safely
breathe it,” said Mr. Charlton,.as he threw open the



THE CLOSING SCENE. 81

casement, and gently raised the feeble, languid youth
upon his pillows, drawing the old military cloak more
closely round him. Francis seemed revived by the
soft, refreshing breeze and the warm sunshine. His
face became animated as he looked out, with a yearn-
ing gaze, over the green meadows and the hedge of
hawthorn with its sweet white blossoms, bordering the
pleasant lane.

“How beautiful it all looks!” he said, with almost
the delight of his boyish days; “how charming it all
is! and the birds—listen, dear father—that is the
linnets’ song : they are singing in the old apple-tree
in the-garden. I never saw it so laden with lovely
blossoms. Oh, how beautiful it allis!” But with a
deep sigh he looked down ; the slight flush which had
tinted his face was gone, and with it all the bright
animation had passed away. His head sank drooping
on his chest, and he was falling ; but his pastor’s arm
was instantly round him, tenderly supporting his
slight frame. He gasped for breath, and his eyes

F



82 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

were closed. After a few minutes, the gasping ceased,
but he was so motionless, that Mr. Charlton thought
that his spirit had departed: again, however, he
revived. He raised his head, and a faint but beautiful
smile brightened his pale face as he looked up at his
pastor. Mr. Charlton laid him gently on the sofa, and
sat down beside him, taking his cold hand in his.
Francis lay with his eyes fixed steadily but affec-
tionately on his friend’s face.

“What is it, my dearest Francis ?”

In almost a whisper he said, “The Bible—would
you—read ?”

Mr. Charlton opened the inspired volume, and
remembered the melancholy words of a dying friend
of his, whom he attended a few years before. He
was sitting at an open window, and as he looked out
on his beautiful garden, and saw the trees, and the
flowers in the first glory of their new life, he said,
“?Tis.sad to leave all this at such a season, and to go

down to the dark grave.” It was but a temporary



THE CLOSING SCENE. 83

sadness, for his friend departed not long after, his
heart filled with peace and joy, with the bright pro-
spect of eternal life in the presence of his glorious
Redeemer gladdening his last hours. The minister
felt, however, that some such thoughts might have
brought a passing shadow over the mind of Francis
after he had looked out over the bright fresh prospect
on that sweet spring morning.

He was probably mistaken: but under this im-
pression he read of the new heaven, and the new earth,
and a few more verses from the two last chapters of
the book of the Revelation: only a few—for he saw,
as once or twice he looked up, that a change had
come over the face of the youth, more beloved than
ever by him at that sad hour; a change which he
knew to be the shadow of coming death. He read
fewer verses than he had intended, for he feared that
Francis was becoming too insensible to hear him.
He drew nearer to the dying youth; he bent down
close to him. There was now an abstracted expression

F 2



84 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

on the drawn features, and yet a calm sweetness
which told of perfect peace within.

“Do you hear me as I read to you, my Francis >”
No reply was given till the question was again asked,
with a voice as low, but more distinctly clear and
articulate; and then, though his eyes were open, the
dying youth spoke as one who had awoke up to a full
consciousness.

“T heard, but not all,” he replied. “Thank you,
thank you, my own dear father! Blessed be the Lord
for His grace and love—I am so very happy. May I
hold your hand in mine till Iam gone? I shall love
to feel that I am with you to the last.” .

There was now no abstracted look on his coun-
tenance, but Francis lay with the full gaze of his mild
intelligent eyes fixed on the face of his pastor. He
evidently heard every word, as Mr. Charlton said,
“You are just about to enter the heavenly country,
the better—far better—land. There will be no more

death, neither sorrow; there will be no night there!



THE CLOSING SCENE, &5

you will behold there the pure river of the water of
life; you will behold the tree of life; and you will
behold——”

But here he paused ; for the dying youth, suddenly
looking upward, interrupted, but continued, the sen-
tence, exclaiming in a distinct and joyful voice,—

“And Christ!’ Even as the expiring flame of
a lamp sometimes flashes up with sudden brightness,
just before it goes out in darkness, so the living spirit
of this dying youth, with the last effort of its expiring
breath, sounded forth the name, which, to the redeemed
and pardoned sinner, is above every name—the name
of Christ !

It was indeed the last word on the now breathless
lips. There had been a gentle pressure of the hand,
which was locked in that of his minister's; but the
fingers relaxed their grasp—Francis had fallen asleep
in Jesus !







CHAPTER VI.

Prayer anstvered.

Rm OT many days after the death of Francis,
Â¥ Mr. Charlton stood at the gates of the



Knightsbridge Barracks, inquiring for Philip
Morton, the brother of his departed friend. The
tall sentinel to whom he spoke told him that he
thought he would be found in one of the rooms which
he named, and to which he directed him. Mr. Charlton
ascended the stairs, and was soon in a large upper
room, where two or three soldiers, then off duty, were
lounging about. On his asking one of them, at an

open window, for Philip Morton, he opened a door



PRAYER ANSWERED. 87

in one side of the room. A large company of
soldiers, fine-looking men, in their not very tidy un-
dress, also off duty at the time, were sitting round
several small tables, playing with packs of very dirty
cards. They looked up, doubtless astonished at the
sight of an unknown clergyman standing in the open
doorway of their common room. Philip Morton, how-
ever, was not there. His name had been called out
in vain. Mr. Charlton went away to seek him else-
where in the barracks. But as he passed down the
stairs a young man in full uniform was coming up,
and seeing the clergyman, stopped on the landing,
and stood there waiting to accost him with the usual
military salute, lifting his hand with the palm outward
to his forehead. He was struck with the appearance
of the young soldier: his easy, graceful carriage, his
handsome face, for he was fair, with large blue eyes,
and light-brown curling hair : very tall, and with a
well-set, manly figure. His manners were pleasing
and respectful.



88 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

And this was the brother of Francis. This fine-
looking, handsome young fellow, in full, bright health,
formed a striking contrast to the slight, drooping, pallid
youth whom he had watched over till his immortal and
redeemed spirit had been delivered from the bondage
of the corruptible body of death and sin, and entered
into the glorious rest of the children of God. This was
the profligate, wicked young man, whose bad example,
and whose infamous books had been well nigh the
ruin of his youthful brother’s soul.

Philip had heard of the death of his brother Francis,
and he looked grave and sorrowful. Mr. Charlton
put the letter into his hand, and said a few words to
him about his brother’s love to him, and his brother’s
prayers for him. He waited to see if Philip would
open the letter in his presence and read it—and ri
did so. He had not read more than the first page,
when he appeared much. agitated, and the tears filled
his eyes ; but soon after, the colour rose to his face

till it became crimson, then hastily folding the pages,



S
‘ PRAVER ANSWERED. 89

he put the letter, without finishing it, into his breast
pocket. He stood for a little while silent and confused.
Then he looked up, and said in a solemn voice, and
put on a look of astonishment :

“ Sir, there must be some mistake. I did not give
those books to Francis. How he got them, I’m sure
I cannot tell; but I did not give them to him. Ihope
you will believe me, sir.”

Mr. Charlton did not believe him ; he only wondered
at the cool assurance with which the lie was told.

“T fear, sir,” added the soldier, “I must leave you ;
I am not off duty at present, as you may see from my
uniform. I must be on guard in a few minutes.”

He raised his hand again respectfully with the
salute. But Mr. Charlton took his hand, as he lowered
it, and said gravely, “A time may come, Philip, when
you may wish to see me. Then remember that, for
the sake of Francis, and for your own sake, you will
find in me a true and faithful friend. Keep that
letter. I pray from my heart that you may be



go FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

brought, as he who wrote it was, to seek and find
pardon for all your sins, and peace and salvation to
your soul, at the feet of the Lord Jesus Christ.”

That time did come, after many years of sin and
wretchedness, of disgrace and crime. It is a strange
story, and alas! it is all true. But the mercy and
grace of God, who is in Christ reconciling sinners °
unto Himself, was marvellously evidenced in his case.
The prayers of the younger brother for the reckless,
worthless prodigal and infidel were at last answered.

Long years passed away, long years after the
death of Francis—years in which the soul of his
wicked brother sank deeper and deeper in iniquity—
before those hopes were realised and those prayers
were answered. His career of crime and disgrace
commenced some months after the disregarded letter
of his brother was given him by Mr. Charlton. After
many years Philip returned to England from trans-
portation. He was no longer the fine handsome
young man he had been—Mr. Chariton would scarcely
have known him—his face was pale and wrinkled, and



PRAYER ANSWERED. g!I

his once erect figure bent and wasted. He was
broken down in health and spirits; with much
difficulty he had sought out and found his brother’s
friend ; he had come back, however, a repentant and
reformed man. Mr. Charlton, at his request, called
on a gentleman who had been a magistrate in
Australia, and Mr. W. gave a most satisfactory
account of Philip Morton. He had been in every
respect so well-conducted and trustworthy, that a free
pardon had been granted to him. After seeking to
obtain employment in this country he returned to
Australia, by the advice of his friends. He had been
in the police force there, and he went back, intending
to enter again into the same service. He did not
long survive his return. Theclergyman who attended
him in his last hours wrote, at his urgent request, to
Mr. Charlton, whom he regarded as his dearest friend
on earth, and who had cause to rejoice, from the
information he received, that Philip had become,
before his death, not only a reformed but a converted
man. Some account may be published before long
of the remarkable incidents in the life of the brother
of Francis Morton.





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Full Text


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FOUND AT EVENTIDE. |

The Crue Story of a Poung Village Infidel,

BY THE
REV. CHARLES B, -TAYLER, M.A.,
Author of “ Memorials of the English Martyrs,” “ The Bar of Iron,” ete.

1

LONDON:
THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY,

56, PATERNOSTER Row ; 65, St. PauL’s CHURCHYARD ;
AND 164, PICCADILLY.

Right of Translation reserved.

|


LONDON:

PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS,
STAMFOLD STREET AND CHARING CROSS,


PREFACE,

1+

* Mucu of the value of the following brief sketch
depends upon its truthfulness. This can be fully
attested. The facts narrated, and the persons de-
scribed were well known to the writer. Names alone
have been changed. Most of the circumstances are
‘indeed detailed with that minute accuracy which no
one but an eye-witness could have related.

May our Heavenly Father bless to the souls of the
readers this simple and unpretending narrative of
what His grace has wrought. Should it fall into the
hands of any who are tempted to despair, feeling that

their sins are too heinous and aggravated to be
6 PREFACE.

forgiven, let them remember that the same Saviour
by whom Francis Morton was found at eventide is
willing and able to save them ; “for the same Lord
over all is rich unto all that call upon him; and
whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall
be saved.”

How few are aware, when they pass the cottage
homes of their poorer neighbours, how much may be |
occurring of deeply affecting and even thrilling interest
under many a lowly roof! The following narrative

may afford an instance that such is the fact.






CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

7 PAGE

A CONTRAST ; ; . . ; . . . 4 9
CHAPTER IT.

CAUSES FOR SORROW. . . : . . . . + 20
CHAPTER III.

THE BRUISED REED AND THE SMOKING FLAX 35
. CHAPTER IV.

Gop Wounns To HEA : : : . : . ‘ » 54

CHAPTER V.

THE CLOSING SCENE . . . 7 . . . 7 » 73

CHAPTER VI.

PRAYER ANSWERED. : 7 7 7 : . . - 86


CHAPTER I.
a Contrast.

SLIGHT delicate-looking youth was sitting

on the trunk of a fallen tree which lay on



a broad belt of green sward by the road
side. It was a calm lovely day, early in autumn.
The thick foliage of the hedgerow trees in that
pleasant lane was already tinted with the rich colour-

ing which tells of approaching decay, and a few flutter-
19 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

ing leaves were dropping from time to time noiselessly
upon the bright green grass. The youth had scarcely.
reached his seventeenth year. There was nothing
remarkable about his appearance. He was poorly
clad, but the turned-down collar of his shirt, and the
linen cuffs at his wrists, were as white and clean as
the whole of his dress was scrupulously neat. His
features were finely shaped, but his face was very pale,
without even a faint glow of healthy colour ; and that
ingenuous expression which imparts a charm to many
a youthful countenance, however plain, was wanting
in his. There was indeed a restless troubled look in
his large grey eyes, and nothing expressive of frank-
ness or openness on the high intellectual forehead.
The sky was intensely blue above his head wherever
there was an open space between the spreading
boughs, heavy with their rich foliage, of the tall elms ;
the balmy breeze, soft as a fan of feathers, waved the
curls of his fair hair; but he heeded neither the biue

beautiful sky, nor the gentle breeze. He sat there as
A CONTRAST. Il

one insensible to all the genial influences which often
make a morning in autumn so delightful.

His eyes were fixed upon an open book which
rested on his knees, and as he turned over the leaves
and folded down a page here and there, his lip curled
with a scornful smile. At times as he did this, he
raised his head and looked with a searching glance
down the lane, and seemed to be listening intently
for the approach of some one yet unseen,

He had not long to wait. A tall man appeared in
the distance coming down the lane. He was an aged

.man, but though his hair was almost white, his thin
figure was erect, and his step firm. He carried a kind
of wallet suspended by a hooked stick over his
shoulder, and on that day for the last few weeks, and
about the same hour, he had passed through that lane
in his way to the town of Market Drayton. Francis
Morton knew this and had often met him. John
Hepworth, for that was the name of the pedlar, was a

man of genuine godliness. He felt a deep interest in
12 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

the slight delicate youth. He had spoken to him
earnestly and with much affection about his immortal
soul, and of that gracious Saviour whom he himself
loved better than his life. But the youth had met all
his gentle persuasive words with a careless laugh, and
avowed himself an unbeliever; and in a spirit of
wicked mischief he had purposely taken his seat in
the lane that morning that he might vex and grieve
the good old man. The youth looked down and
fixed his eyes upon the book, as John Hepworth
stopped on coming to the spot where he was sitting,

“Still at your studies, my young friend,” he said ;
“have you been reading the book I lent you ?”

“Not I,” said the youth, laughing as he locked up ;
“this is more in my way.”

“Not Volney, I trust ?” said the man.
“No, not Volney, but a capital book, I can tell you.
Would you like to look at it?’ and he handed the
volume to him. “I have turned down a few of the

leaves,” he added, “that you may see what a free
A CONTRAST. 13

independent thinker the writer was. Did you ever
hear of him ?”

The old man took the book. He opened it at the
title-page, and as he read the name his eyes filled with
tears. “Hear of him!” he said ; “yes, my poor boy,
before you were born ; and when I was a boy, younger
by several years than you are now, I was living in the
same house with Thomas Paine. He was then
apprenticed to a stay-maker at Diss in Norfolk.
Some time afterwards, when I was grown up, and the
name of Tom Paine had become famous, or, I should
say, infamous, I, like a fool, out of curiosity looked
into one of his books. Thank God, thank God, I had
a wise godly father, and when he found me with that
book, he quietly took it out of my hand and put it
into the fire. ‘My son,’ he said, gravely, ‘when I am
dead and gone, you will perhaps thank me as heartily
for what I have now done as if I had taken away a
cup of poison from your lips; and mind what I say,

I as your father forbid you to read another word of
14 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

that man’s books.’ He thought I hesitated, and he

said very solemnly, ‘John, I must have your sacred

promise. I will not speak to you again till you have

told me, as before God, that you will obey me. I

know,’ he added, kindly, ‘my dear son, that if you.
make that promise you will keep it. I can depend

upon you.’ He was the best, the kindest of fathers,

Francis, and he had long won my full confidence and

love, but he had early taught me that he was not one _
to be disobeyed.”

“And did you obey him ?” asked Francis.

“By the help of God I did obey him. JI have kept
my promise up to this day, when, not knowing what
the book was which you put into my hand, I opened
it—and now I have but read the title and the name
of the miserable author.”

’ “Miserable!” said the youth; “what was there to
make him miserable? Who has a right, I should like
to know, to forbid the exercise of free thought »”

“Miserable : yes, I repeat that word. That wretched
A CONTRAST. 15

1

man spent his life in seeking to unsettle the minds,

‘and ruin the souls of his fellow-créatures, and when
he had to meet death, he began to betray those
_ terrors which he had long before laughed at. Often,
for a long time together, he cried out, ‘O Lord, help
me! O Christ, help me! He could not be left alone
night nor day. On one occasion, he declared, that if
ever the devil had a servant on earth, he had been
one; and when his infidel companions said, ‘You have
lived like a man, we hope you will die like a man,’ he
observed, to a friend near him, ‘You see, sir, what
miserable comforters I have. The woman whom he
had seduced to leave her husband lamented to her
neighbours, ‘For this man, I have given up my family
and my friends, my property and my religion; judge
then, of my distress, when he tells me that the prin-
ciples he has taught me will not bear me out.’ Was
I wrong, dear Francis, when I called that man miser-
able ?” »

Francis looked very grave, and for some time he
16 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

did not speak, but sat with his eyes cast down. Then
he raised his eyes, and said, “But is all that you
have told me true ?”

“Every word is true. I have been anxious to learn
the truth as to the latter portion of his earthly course ;
and what I have told you are well-known facts. As
to his books, it is the opinion of men of first-rate’
talent and education, that he had not the knowledge,
nor had he the habits of perseverance fitted to write
upon such subjects. ' Take iny advice, Francis, as to
that dangerous book. Every time you look into it
you are taking poison into your soul. Give it up to
me, that I may burn it.”

The old man had sat down beside Francis on the .
fallen tree. He now took the young man’s hand in
his own. “If you grant my request, you may live to
thank me, as I thank my father, though I was not
pleased at the time I gave up the book to him. Dear
Francis, I know not how it is, but I feel as a father to

”»

you.
A CONTRAST. 17

The youth hesitated ; he returned the pressure of
his friend’s hand, but he made no reply.

“But that book, dear Francis, may I take it? I
must be going,” he added, after waiting a short time—
then he rose up. “Set my mind at rest, before we
part,” he said.

“JT will think of all you have said to me,” replied

”



the youth, “and when we meet next week

“Who can tell if we may ever meet again ?” said the
old man. “I may be here next week, but afterwards
I have a journey to make into Wales. I wish you
would now give me that book. Promise me, however,
one thing—that you will not ‘look into it again till we
meet ?”

“Well, as you wish it,” said Francis, with a sudden
burst of feeling, “I give you my promise that I will
not open the book till then.”

And so they parted ; but before the old man turned
to go, he again took the hand of the youth, and stood
for a little while looking at him, earnestly and

B
18 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

tenderly. He marked the hectic colour that flushed
the death-like paleness of his face, and his slight,
fragile form ; and as he looked at him the tears fell
from his eyes. “May the Lord, in his tender mercy,
draw you to himself,” he said, with a voice that
trembled with deep inward emotion. “May He
watch over you, and send his Holy Spirit to guide
you, and make you a lamb of his -flock, and lead you
to the fountain of living water. He only knows how
deeply I feel for you, how dearly I love you. Oh, my
poor boy, I am sure you are not happy ; but mark my
words, even as if they were my last words to you—
Christ will have you ; this I believe, this I feel assured,
of. Read His word, and do not resist his voice when
He speaks by his Holy Spirit to your soul, and you
will love Him, and he will make you his for ever.”
He said no more, but with a wistful look in his
eyes, and with silent prayer in his heart, he took up
his wallet and went on his way, praying as he went.
Francis stood deep in thought, looking after his
A CONTRAST, 19

aged friend. “Shall I follow him and give him the
book ?” he said to himself—“I will ;’ but when he had
taken but a few steps, he stopped: “he is walking
faster than I can,” he said, glad to have an excuse.
“Well, I shall see him next week, and then I certainly
will give it ‘to him.”

How often did he wish afterwards that he had
obeyed. his first right impulse, and how bitterly did
he grieve that he had not done so!






CHAPTER IL

Causes for Sorrotv.

pu are late, Francis; I have been expecting

K si

you for the last three hours. What have



you been doing, and where have you been
loitering ? Why, it is past five o’clock.”

“Oh, mother dear,:don’t scold, but come and help
me; I am ready to sink.”

His mother had heard the click of the garden gate
as the latch was lifted, and at the well-known step of
her son upon the narrow path she had raised her
eyes to the clock ; but, when she heard the piteous

tone of his voice, she threw down her work, and


































































































































GATHERING CLOUDS.
CAUSES FOR SORROW. 23

hastened to meet him. She caught his outstretched
hand, then drew~him closer to her, and supported
his tall slight frame, for she saw that he was scarcely
able to stand. His head drooped upon her shoulder ;
he was gasping for breath. He looked up in his
mother’s face, but he did not speak—the could not.
His countenance was paler than usual, even to ghast-
linéss.

Tenderly the mother spoke to him, as she wiped
the heavy sweat-drops from his forehead ;_ tenderly
she soothed him, as she said, “You will soon feel
better now; the walk has been too much for you, my
darling boy. Let me get you into the house, and you
shall lie down upon the sofa, and a cup of tea will
soon revive.you. The tea-things are on the table, and
I was only waiting for you.”

“A drink of cold water first, mother,” said the
youth, as he raised his head from the pillow of the sofa.

She brought him a glass of clear sparkling water,
and he drank it eagerly. “Yes, I am better now,” he
24. FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

said, in reply to her anxious inquiries. He got up
from the sofa and took his usual seat by the fireside.
His mother made some remark from time to time, as
she employed herself in arranging the tea-things, and
stirring up the fire to a cheerful blaze ; but Francis
was silent. He sat with his eyes cast down, and a
look of deepest sadness in his face. Then, without
raising his eyes, he said, “Mother, I shall have to leave
you.”

“Leave me!” she repeated, turning at once to him.
“Have to leave me, my dear boy! what do you
mean ?”

“T mean that I must dic. There is no hope. The
doctor told me I am near death. You wished me to
go to. him, and I went ; but I wish I had not gone.”

“Why not gone?” said his mother.

“ Because, if I am to die, I did not want to know it,
and because Dr: Burton says he can do me no good.
He gave me a bottle of stuff to ease my cough; and

he was kind enough. He sounded me with a kind of
CAUSES FOR SORROW. 25

pipe all over my chest and back, but then he shook
his head, and I asked him what he thought of me. I
wish I had not, for I felt ready to faint, when he told
me I was in a consumption. He is one of your pious
men; so he thought it right, I suppose,” he added,
fretfully, “to talk to me of making use of the time I
still have to prepare to meet God. I did not like it,
mother.”

“But it was right, and I thank him. He ‘is a good
man, and you must not take on.so, and: say such bad
things,”

“You are right, mother, and I am wrong; and
I am sorry, really very sorry! But, oh, dear mother,
I am so unhappy, so very unhappy—what am I
‘to do?”

The poor boy wept bitterly, and buried his face in
the cushion of the sofa, against which he was leaning,
and sobbed aloud. His mother’s tears fell fast, as she
bent over him, and tried to soothe and comfort him.

Suddenly he lifted up his head, and cried out:
f
26 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

“Mother, I have heard more bad news to-day, and
that has helped to upset me.”

“Dear! dear!” said his mother, “what can it be?”

“TI have often. spoken:to you of Mr. Hepworth.
The kindest, ‘dearest friend I ever had. Well, he is
dead—I used to meet him often in the lane to Dray-
ton, and the last time I saw him, he said he would see
me again the next week. I went, but he did not
come, and it is now two months-since that week. I
have never heard of him till to-day. He was sent for
into Wales to go to his sister, who was dying they
thought of a bad fever ; but he took the fever, and as
she was getting well‘he died. He lent me that book,
which you called a beautiful book—the ‘Pilgrim’s
Progress,’—but I would not read it. And, mother, just
before he died, he called his niece to him, made her
promise to send his Bible to me, and write to me, and
beg me to read it and to keep it as his keepsake to
me, and told her to say that he knew Christ would

have me, and that we should meet in heaven. I have
CAUSES FOR SORROW. 27

the letter of his niece in my pocket, and she has sent
the Bible by the carrier to Whitchurch. .I. shall go
and get it in a day or two.”

* * * * *

Francis had suffered a great shock, and was very
ill for several days. -His-mother was ‘filled with alarm,
fearing that she should even then lose him. But he
gradually rallied, and was much in the same state as
he had been before his visit to Drayton. The mother,
however, was fully aroused to the fact that her son’s
time on earth was drawing to its close. She said
nothing to him, but she went quietly to the curate of
the parish, Mr. Charlton, and begged him to lose no
time in coming to her son. On that same evening,
though it was a cold dark night at the end of
November, and the walk was long,a gentle knock
was heard at the door of Mrs. Morton’s cottage.

“Tt is Mr. Charlton the curate come to see you,
dear Francis,” said his mother, as she opened the
door.
28 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

Partly sad, partly out of temper, Fraritis offered not
a word of greeting, and when the curate went up to
him, looking kindly and speaking kindly, and was
about to take his hand, the youth quickly withdrew it ;
then he covered his face with both his hands, and sat
silent, as if determined not to speak. His mother
went to him, but her whispered‘ remonstrances had no
effect upom him: He only murmured, “I don’t want
any one to come to me.”

The curate took no notice of the petulant temper
of the poor youth. He spoke only the more kindly
to him, with a tender sympathy for his weakness
and suffering. He had prayed secretly that he might
be enabled: by Divine grace to win the confiderice of
poor Francis. He knelt down near him and offered
up a prayer—a very simple one; but he poured out his
‘heart in earnest and loving supplications for those who
were “out of the way,” and who were unhappy ; and
he dwelt upon the tender love of that gracious Saviour

whose compassions fail not, and who, while we were
CAUSES FOR SORROW. 29

yet without strength, while we were yet sinners, died
for the ungodly, died for us, and died in unspeakable
agonies,

While he was praying, the large tears began to
trickle through the fingers of the young sufferer, whose
hands still covered his face: then ‘the hands came
down from that pallid countenance,.and he wept aloud.
The pastor, on rising from his knees, at once opened
the word of God; it was the Bible which had been the
dying gift of John Hepworth, and it lay.on the table
near Francis.

“© Lord,” he said, reverently, “be gracious to us, and
make this word a living word ‘by thy Holy Spirit, to
quicken our souls, for Jesus Christ’s sake.” He read
only a few verses from the eleventh chapter of
St. Matthew’s Gospel: “Come unto me all ye that
labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.
Take my yoke upon you and learn of me, for I am
meek and lowly of heart, and ye shall find rest unto

your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is
32 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

light.” - He closed the book, and for some moments
there was silence in the:room.. Then Mr. Charlton
said, “It is the Lord Jesus, even God the Son, who
speaks: to us-in these words of love. It is He, who
shed His -own blood: fot the vilest sinner, who so
tenderly calls us to come to Him, with the burden of
all our sins, and all our sorrows,~—a sore and heavy
burden. I found it so; dear Francis, till I accepted—
oh how thankfully—His most loving invitation, and
went to Him, and laid my sins on Him, and found rest
unto my very soul:. Will you;:my. poor young friend,
come unto Him? He will not reject you, for he has
also said, ‘Him that cometh to me I will in no wise
cast out.’ ”

The pastor déemed it’ wisest to’ say no more at that
‘time. He rose to take his leave; but before he
departed, he turned to Francis,‘and took the thin
hand, now held out to him, affectionately in his, and
said, “ Shall I come to you again ?”

The youth raised his large eyes with an expression
CAUSES FOR SORROW. 31

of the deepest sadness, but with a wistful look : “Oh,
sir,” he said, meekly, “if you would come! I am so
very unhappy! I shall think it long till I see you
again.”

On the next day the curate came again; Francis
was alone. When he saw who his visitor was, his
face brightened ; it was, however, but for a moment;
the look of extreme wretchedness settled down upon
him once more.

For several days the anxious pastor sought in vain
to win his confidence. Francis listened with quiet
attention to every word: addressed to him, but no
efforts could draw him into conversation ; yet always
on the minister going away, Francis earnestly entreated
him to come again, and not to forsake him. As he
afterwards told his friend and pastor, he was at that
time quite hopeless. Young as he was, he had a mind
of extraordinary intelligence, and he had been caught
in the snare of the bold assertions and specious
sophistries of Paine and other writers of the same
32 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

school. He had become indeed so entangled in them
that escape and deliverance seemed impossible to
him. These opinions had, like noxious weeds, rooted
themselves in an uncultivated soil; and it was, alas,
the congenial soil of the natural heart, which is, we
know, at enmity against God* until changed by Divine
grace. All that he knew of the Holy Bible had been
gained from the attacks of the enemies of its glorious
truths—even of the blasphemous infidels whose books
he had read. ;

It might seem ‘improbable that a mere youth, in a
secluded hamlet, should have met with such books.
But he had an only brother, to whom he was de-
votedly attached,—a tall handsome young man, a e
soldier in the Guards. He was unprincipled and
profligate, but good-tempered, and fond of the delicate
boy, who was so fragile and so unlike himself, and
who looked up to him with undisguised admiration.
On his last visit, about a year before, Philip had taken

* Rom, viii. 7.
CAUSES FOR SORROW. 33

more than usual notice of his young brother. He had
found it convenient to avail himself of the services of
the affectionate boy, who was never tired of waiting
‘upon him, as he lounged away his time, during his
leave of absence, in careless idleness,—sometimes
dressing himself with care in his handsome uniform,
and strolling about the lanes and streets of the neigh-
bouring villages, and visiting at the cottages and
houses where he was known, but usually wasting his
time in reading some foolish novel that he had brought
with him. He had however several other volumes
which he thought furnished some excuse, by their
blasphemous denial of the God of truth and holiness,
for his own unprincipled and profligate course of life ;
they were left lying about the room where he and his
brother slept.

“What are you reading, youngster ?” he said, when,
on going up to their chamber, he saw Francis intently
occupied with one of those books, and he took it out
of the boy’s hand, laughing however as he did so,

C
34 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

“Tf you read it,” said Francis, “why may not I ?”

“Oh read it, if you will,” said Philip ; “ but you can’t
understand it. It is above you.”

“Tam quite taken with it,” said the boy; “and I
can understand it.”

“Well, well, it will open your eyes to the truth, you
young dog, as it has mine: only hide it from mother.”

The days passed rapidly by, and the young soldier's
leave of absence expired. “ Will you take your books
with you,” said his young brother on the morning of
Philip’s departure to his regiment.

“Not J,” was the careless reply; “burn them, or
keep them as you will.”

Thus it was that the evil seed had been sown, and

had rooted itself in the heart of the unhappy youth.






CIIAPTER III.

Che bruised reed and smoking flax.

R. CHARLTON had at last won the youth’s

confidence and love; and he felt an in-



creased interest in him. The servant of
God knew, however, that the change he so anxiously
desired and prayed to witness was beyond his power
to effect. All that he cow/d do, he endeavoured to do.
He brought before his young friend the real character
of the word of the living God, by reading to him
those portions of the inspired volume which were
calculated to make known to him its: divine truths ;
and he wep constantly on his knees beside his young

C2
36 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

charge, endeavouring to lead his thoughts, by simple
and. fervent words of prayer, to that gracious Lord
who has said to his sinful creatures, “Him that
cometh to me I will in no wise cast out.” As long
as Francis had strength to kneel, he knelt with his
anxious pastor. He now knew well, and felt deeply,
the affectionate interest with which Mr. Charlton
regarded him.

There was but one thing to be done after humbly
and diligently using the means appointed by God—
to wait upon the Lord. This Mr. Charlton did, in
faith and humble prayer ; and he soon found that the
poor youth was becoming an anxious seeker after
divine light.

About this time Francis began to open his whole
heart to his visitor ; and fearful indeed was the spec-
tacle disclosed, of errors in principle, and their usual
consequences——sins in practice.

“And now, pr,” said the youth, mournfully, “now

that you know me as Tam, can you think there is any
THE BRUISED REED AND SMOKING FLAX. 37

forgiveness for me? I have beena blasphemer, I have
denied that Holy Saviour who paid the price of His
own blood for guilty souls.”

“ And whose blood cleanseth us from all sin,” said
his pastor, gently clasping the hand of the youth, who
wept as if his heart was breaking. Mr. Charlton said
nothing till the grief of Francis had somewhat subsi-
. ded; then he turned to the first Epistle of the disciple

whom Jesus loved, and read in a low but distinct
voice these well-known words, “If we confess our sins,
He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to
cleanse us from all unrighteousness.”

“Dear Francis,” said the earnest pastor, “lay
to heart this great assurance, and trust without a
doubt or a fear that your faith will find acceptance,
and the promise be fulfilled to you. He whose pro-

. Mise it is, never broke the bruised reed, nor quenched
the smoking flax ; and you, my poor broken-hearted
Francis, are but a bruised reed, and your faith is like

the smoking flax ; but His promise is sure, and if he
38 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

whom you now seek has begun his work in your
heart, as I believe He has, his work will stand.
Therefore take comfort from the only source from
which true comfort flows ; you have sinned grievously
and awfully, but there is DE gi Ces with Him and
forgiveness for you. Do not, my dear Francis, add
the guilt of distrust and unbelief to your past sins.
I trust they are forgiven, as they are forsaken. You
do not speak, Francis,” he added. “Did you not
hear? do you not agree with what I have told you ?”

Francis had sat with face cast down, apparently
deep in thought. He, now raised his head, and said,
“Oh, sir, how kind you are! I heard every word you
said, and every word went to my heart ; I must not, I
will not distrust the word of the Lord God. As you
have often told me, it is a precious word, and a living
word, and I must and do believe it.”

In his heart, the minister thanked God that for the
first time he had seen the dawn of divine light in the

mind of the young infidel, gradually clearing away
THE BRUISED REED AND SMOKING FLAX. 39

the dark clouds of unbelief and misery. But though
the light had come, it was for some days scarcely
more than a faint twilight ; but it was not the twilight
that dies away into the darkness of night, but that
which brightens into the clear shining of full daylight ;
and as the light increased, there came with it. a
genial warmth into the cold, trembling heart of the
desponding youth. Thus it was with Francis as it
is written in the word of our Lord, that God, who
commanded the light to shine out of darkness,
had begun to shine in his heart “to give the light
of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face
of Jesus Christ.” * He did not pass from confusion
and wretchedness to ungrounded hope and joy. If
he was at length enabled to believe that his sins
were forgiven and blotted out in the blood of our
adorable Redeemer, he could never forget how awfully
he had offended.

One thing Mr. Charlton remarked during all his

* 2 Cor. iv. 6,
40 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

intercourse with Francis, from the first day that they
met, to his last hour,—that he never attempted, in any
way, to excuse or justify himself. His conviction of
his sin and of his entire unworthiness was deep and
abiding. After leaving him one day apparently calm,
and almost peaceful, Mr. Charlton would find him
with his countenance fallen, and bathed in tears. But
always, after his pastor had drawn his attention to any
passage of Holy Scripture, and explained and pointed
out the instruction or consolation to be derived from
it, the passage was marked and carefully studied with
prayer when Mr. Charlton had left him.

Sometimes Francis spoke of his aged friend, John
Hepworth, the pedlar, and of their interviews, deplor-
ing his own wicked perverseness, describing the
tender anxiety of the good old man, and repeated his
wise counsels and gentle admonitions. He dwelt
especially on their last meeting, and on the bitter

grief and remorse he felt when the tidings of the old
THE BRUISED REED AND SMOKING FLAX. 41

man’s death reached him, on the shock it had been
to him, and the joy he felt when he received the
old man’s message, and the Bible of the dying pedlar.

“He foresaw,” said Francis, as he fixed his eyes
upon the page of the open Bible, which lay upon the
table before him, whilst a few large tears dropped
from his downcast eyes—and the poor youth spoke
in a voice trembling with agitation—“he foresaw that
his prayers for the wretched boy he pitied and loved,
notwithstanding all my wickedness and ingratitude,
would be answered. Truly, sir,” he added, “they
were the prayers of faith, as you have often told me

every prayer should be.”

Francis was very weak one evening when Mr. Charl-
ton came to him; he was growing weaker every day.
“ Dear sir,” said the youth, in a faint voice, “I have a
duty to perform ; it ought to have been attended to
before, but if I put it off any longer it may be too

late, for I feel that I shall soon be gone. I must burn
42 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

those dreadful books so full of blasphemy and ini-
quity. Thank God, I cannot bear the sight of them
now ; but I must take care that no other eyes shall
read them. He who left them with me said I might
keep them or burn them, as I pleased; but if he had
not told me that I might burn them, I would do so
now. Oh, sir, what would have been my feelings at
this time, when I must soon have to die, and to meet
my God! How should I dare to meet Him as an
unpardoned blaspheming sinner! I who have denied
the Lord that bought me with His own blood—I, a
wilful, impious, wicked fool !”

“Francis,” said his pastor, “do not you remember
the words of that most gracious Saviour, the prayer
for his murderers upon the cross when they had cru-
cified him, ‘ Father, forgive them, for they know not
what they do.’ My poor boy, might He not say of
you, he knew not what he did? not from anything
good in yourself, but from his own infinite love, and

his own thorough knowledge of your ignorance and
THE BRUISED REED AND SMOKING FLAX. 43

weakness, might He not say this of you also? I would
not excuse you, I would not help you to find a single
excuse for your past wickedness. I am thankful to
know that you have never excused yourself.”

“T excuse myself! oh, sir, I can never condemn
myself enough. But now that I know something of
that love, that wondrous love, which, as you have
shown tne from His word, passeth knowledge, I have
dared to hope, and to do more than hope—to believe
that He who came to seek and to save those that were
lost has sought and saved me with his blood.”

The impious books of which Francis had spoken

were burnt that night.

“There is one other duty for me to do before I die,”
said Francis, on the following day, to his pastor, now
unspeakably beloved by him ; “there is one duty yet
to be done, dearest, kindest, most respected friend, if
I may call you my friend.”

“What is it, dear Francis? for you are very dear to
44 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

me,” said Mr. Charlton. “Tell me, can I help
you? perhaps I can, in what you have to do; what
is it ?”

“T have a letter to write, and I am sure you will
help me, for I shall need your help. I am becoming
so weak, so much weaker than I was even yesterday,
and the thought of that letter which I must write
has troubled me and kept me awake and feverish
all night; and I am so afraid that I may not live to
write it.”

“Tell me, dear Francis, to whom you wish to
write.”

“To him who put those dreadful books in my way,
who gave them to me—to my brother. He is very dear
to me, but he gave me poison, and I drank it, willingly
drank it, and the fatal effects soon followed ; it began
to circulate through every part of me, and to taint
with its deadly leaven my whole heart and mind.”

“But you have taken the antidote, my dear

Francis.”
THE BRUISED REED AND SMOKING FLAX. 45

“T have indeed, sir, and you brought it to me ; and
when in my wicked perverseness I tried to reject it,
with what patient gentleness, with what sweet persua-
sion, you induced me to take that precious antidote
from your kind hand.” .

“While He who provided it, and taught me to know
its divine efficacy,” said Mr. Charlton, “and to offer
it to you, my poor Francis, was the Good Physician ;
and, blessed be His name, you have experienced its
healing purifying power; He has also made it health
and life to your soul.”

“There is one of the psalms, sir,” said Francis, “a
. very grand and beautiful psalm—I was reading it not
long ago, but I forget which of the psalms it is—which
I might humbly and thankfully employ as my prayer
in blessing and praising the Lord for his mercy to me,
in saving me from the dreadful effects of those
poisonous books. I think it begins with, ‘Bless the
Lord, O my soul, and all that is within me bless His
holy name.’’
46 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

“Tt is the 103rd psalm, Francis; I will read it to
you; and then we will ask the Lord to teach and
help you to write the letter to your brother; for I
agree with you it is right to make no delay, while you
have strength and time, to write to him.”

Mr. Charlton then read: “Bless the Lord, O
my soul: and all that is within me, bless his holy
name!

“Bless the Lord, O my soul, and forget not all his
benefits.

“Who forgiveth all thine iniquities ; who healeth all
thy diseases ;

“Who redeemeth thy life from destruction, who
crowneth thee with loving kindness and tender
mercies,”

He read the whole of that magnificent psalm to his
young companion, dwelling particularly upon many of
the verses, and pointing out how remarkably they
applied to the gracious dealings of the Lord with

those who had been brought to feel the need of a great
THE BRUISED REED AND SMOKING FLAX. 47

forgiveness, as Mr. Charlton humbly and thankfully
declared he himself had been brought to feel.

The tears fell fast from the eyes of the deeply
penitent and deeply thankful youth. “I must learn
that psalm by heart,” he said, as he wiped his tears
away,

“And feed upon it, my Francis,” added the pastor,
“as the prophet has said ;* and you may truly say as
he did, ‘Thy words were found, and I did eat them,
and thy word was unto me the joy and rejoicing of
my heart.’”

They prayed, and then Francis began his letter to

his brother, as follows :-—

“My OWN AND ONLY BROTHER,

“T love you very much, and I now write to tell
you that I shall never see you again in this world. It
is, I see, the will of God to take me away ; and I now
believe that he will take me to be for ever with the

* Jer. xv. 16,
48 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

Lord Jesus. I trust He has forgiven me, His poor
wicked child, for the sake of His blessed Son. It
almost breaks my heart to think that you and I may
never meet in that better country. If God has for-
given me, He will assuredly forgive you; and if we
confess our sins, He will forgive us our sins, and cleanse
us from all unrighteousness. I was long without hope,
but I have now dared to hope; for I am enabled to
believe with a trusting faith in the word of the living
God.

“Oh, my brother, how fervently do I pray that
you may be brought to know what a God we have,
and to know and love Him as I now do, or rather to
believe that He loves me, vile and unworthy as I am ;
and what a Father, what a Saviour, what a comforter
I have found in Him! He has answered many of my
prayers in a wonderful way, and I cannot but believe
that He will answer my prayers for you. You and I,
dearest Philip, are great sinners; but the blood of
Jesus Christ cleanseth from all sin; and the Holy
THE BRUISED REED AND SMOKING FLAX. 49

Spirit will be given to all who ask for Him to apply
that precious blood to the conscience, ,

“Do not destroy this letter—do not throw it aside—
but keep, and sometimes read these, the last words of
"your young brother to you, whom I love as my own
soul.

“Dear Philip, those books which you brought with
you, and left with me last year—I mean those vile,
pernicious books written by wretched and blasphem-
ing infidels—have been like deadly poison to me. I
was bad enough before ; a wicked, ungodly boy ; but
those books made me a scoffing, daring unbeliever,
and brought my soul to the very brink of hell. But
the Lord God had compassion on me, and sent His
messenger to me—my dearest friend as he now is—my
kind, loving pastor, the Rev. Mr. Charlton. At first
I felt angry and displeased at his coming, and I
wanted him to go away, and I let him see that I dis-
liked his coming to me. But I felt so ill and so un-

D
50 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

happy, that I did not get up and go upstairs to avoid
him, as I thought at first I would do. He bore with
me, however, and was so gentle and patient, and he
did not find fault with me and rebuke me—as I sup-
posed he would do, afid as I deserved. But he read
such gracious words from God’s own word; and he
knelt down by me and prayed—such a prayer, so
humble, so full of love, so tender about me, that
my cold, hard heart seemed to melt within me,
and I could only weep and feel that I really loved
him. }

“And now, my Philip, I can bless God and tell you
that Mr. Charlton has brought me the antidote for
the poison of those hateful books—the one and only
antidote—and the effects have passed away. You may
find the same antidote in God’s holy word—there it is
for you as it was for me; and Mr. Charlton would be
as ready to help you as he has been to help me.

Perhaps you will not seek him now. You, my dearest
THE BRUISED REED AND SMOKING FLAX. 51

brother, may have to be brought down by sorrow and
sickness as I-have been. But do not forget what I
say. The time may come—I think it will come—the
days of darkness may come to you; then think of
my Jast words to you, and go to your brother’s dearest
friend, his pastor and teacher, and open your heart, as
I have done to him.
“Yours, with deep heart love,
“ My own dearest brother,

‘ “ FRANCIS MORTON.”

The exertion of writing this letter had been almost
too great for the failing strength of Francis. It had
taken him two days to write it, and his pastor had
come to him on the following day after remaining with
him on the day when he began writing ; on the second
day he had paused more than once, and Mr. Charlton,
seeing how exhausted he was, had begged him to put
off concluding the letter to still another day. But
52 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

with a pleading look in his large melancholy eyes,
Francis gently entreated to be allowed to finish the
letter, and roused himself to another effort, writing
steadily on till he had signed his name. Then the
pen dropped from his hand, his face became deadly
pale, his eyes closed, and he sank down on his chair.
He would have fallen, but his mother, who had been
anxiously watching him, sprang forward and caught
him, and with the assistance of Mr. Charlton, Francis
was laid, almost insensible, on the old sofa. But he
was not insensible. He opened his eyes as they laid
his head on the pillow of the sofa.

“Mother,” he said, faintly, as she bent over him,

“mother, beg Mr. Charlton to stay a little longer with

”

me.

Mr. Charlton came to him, and took his hand.
Francis warmly clasped his pastor’s hand. “ Dear sir,”
he said, “I wanted to ask you to pray with me before

you leave me. I am better now—much better. It was
THE BRUISED REED AND SMOKING FLAX. 53

but a passing faintness; but, thank God, the letter is
written, and I feel so peaceful, so thankful! I shall
join in your prayer, dear sir. I shall hear that name
from your lips, which is above every name. It is to me
dearer and sweeter than any other on earth. His name,
as you have often reminded me, was called Yesus, that

He might save His people from their sins,”






CHAPTER IV.
God wounds to heal. |

HE next day Francis did not rise from his
bed ; but Mr. Charlton found him very calm.




He looked up with his usual smile when
his pastor entered, but he did not speak, except
to answer the few affectionate inquiries addressed to
him. His.voice was weaker than it had been, but he
listened with intense interest to the glorious words of
Holy Scripture which Mr. Charlton read to him:

“The word of God is. quick, and powerful, and

sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing even to
GOD WOUNDS. TO HEAL. 55

the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the
joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts

and intents of the heart. Neither is there any creature
that is not manifest in his sight; but all things are
naked and opened unto the eyes of him with whom
we have to do.

“Seeing then that we have a great High Priest, that
_ is passed into the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let
us hold fast our profession. For we have not a High
Priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our
infirmities ; but was in all points tempted like as we
are, yet without sin.

“Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of
grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to
help in time of need.”*

“May I ask you to grant me a great favour, dear
sir?” said Francis,

“Whatever you may ask, and whatever I can do, I
will do, Francis,” replied his pastor.

* Heb. iv. 12-16.
56 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

“It is to put this letter into my brother’s hands.
You told me you might be going to London soon.
You will find him in the Barracks, at Knightsbridge.
Will you,” added he, “see my poor ungodly brother,
and speak to him? And I pray God that the words,
which have brought life to my soul, may by His
grace bring life also to his.”

“We will hope and pray,” said Mr. Charlton, “that
your words may come true.”

“TI feel that my time is very short,” said Francis,
when Mr. Charlton rose on this occasion to leave him.
“I cannot mistake the inward sinking I have lately
felt. What a comfort your coming to me has been!
Let me thank you now, though no words can express
what I feel for your goodness to me. Let me, how-
ever, thank you now, for I may not be here to do so
when you come again.”

“T will not fail to be with you to-morrow, if it please
God, my dear young friend. I should wish to be with
you at the last ; but you now need rest, and I trust
GOD WOUNDS TO HEAL. 87

that quiet and sleep may restore you to some strength
before we next meet.”

“T do not lean on man,” said Francis; “you have
taught me, sir, to lean on Him who is the Rock. ‘I
will both lay me down and sleep,’” he added, to
himself, after his pastor had left him, “‘for Thou,
Lord, only makest me dwell in safety.’ ”

On the following day, when Mr. Charlton came,
Francis seemed to have revived. “ How very kind of
you to come,” he said; “and how thankful I feel
that I am permitted to see you once more. I felt
very sad after you left me, and I began to doubt and
to fear, as I have done so often, but I kept on crying °
for mercy, and I am sure my prayer was answered ;
for while I was praying, your words came back to me
which I had forgotten—that I must not look to my
own feelings, or my own frame of mind, but trust
simply and entirely to the Lord Jesus Christ.”

Mr. Charlton opened the Bible, and read a few

verses : “ Verily, verily, I say unto you, he that heareth
58 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

my word, and believeth on Him that sent mie, hath
everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation,
but is passed from death unto life.”

“These are our Lord’s own words, Francis; you
have heard, you now hear His word. You believe
in the eternal Father, who hath sent Him his own
co-equal co-eternal Son to redeem your soul, at the
price of his precious blood. I need not ask you if
you believe this, my dear Francis ?”

“No, indeed,” he replied; “yet I am glad that you
do ask me, that I may answer, ‘I do believe in Him,
with all my heart, and all my soul, and I do believe
that in his wonderful love he has sent his Son to
‘save my soul alive.’ ”

“ And this is what you want, my Francis,—a simple
faith and trust in Him who has done everything for
you, and a distrust of yourself, and of all mere frames
and feelings ; which might shake your trust in him.”

There was a pause: Francis was deep in thought ;
then he said’:
GOD WOUNDS TO HEAL. 59

“Thank you, thank you for what you have said to
me, dear sir; it has set me right, and cleared away my
doubts and fears. By God's grace I will never doubt
again. But one thing distresses me more than I can
express,” and his eyes filled with tears. “Oh, sir,” he
added, as his tears trickled down his pale face, “I
cannot, I do not sufficiently love Him, I do not
love that gracious Lord, who died for me, as I ought.”

“My poor child,” said his pastor, “who is there
that might not join with you in your complaint? I,
alas! for one. Who is there: that does love Him as
we know and feel we ought to love him? But,
Francis, let the thought which has often brought
comfort to my heart, when I have deplored my dead-
ness and my coldness, comfort you. He has loved
you—you cannot doubt His love for you.”

The face of Francis brightened. “Yes,” he said ; “I
do believe that, worthless, sinful as I am, the Lord
Jesus does love me ; what peace, what joy there is in

believing in His love for me!”
60 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

“T rejoice, and thank God to hear you say this.
May the Lord shed a deep and lasting sense of his
love in your heart, by his Holy Spirit ; for the deeper
sense you have of his love, the higher your love will
rise to him. Think on those words of our Lord
which I have just read to you; ponder them in your
heart, seeking and praying to realise that present
salvation of which they spe:k; the assurance that
you have passed from death unto life. This is the
very heart of religion, and those who do not receive
these divine words, and seek to realise them, have not
yet entered into the full apprehension of the gospel of
grace. Think of His love, which passeth knowledge,
while you think of those words; and you will find
your love to Him increased and strengthened. ‘We
love Him,’ said the disciple whom Jesus loved,

>”

‘because He first loved us.

Mr. Charlton would not now let a day pass without

seeing Francis; and on his next visit he found the
GOD WOUNDS TO HEAL. 61

dying youth still apparently better ; dying he certainly
was, but the seeming revival was only the fitful flame
of an expiring lamp, flashing up for a little while,
before its light went out.

“My father,” said the youth, fixing his eyes with a
wistful look on his pastor, as he drew near—“more
than father to me ; it is such a joy to me to see you
once more. Last night I thought I was going;
perhaps it was owing to the excitement and agitation
which overcame me, from my conversation with you.
I had not known till then that our most gracious
Lord permits, nay, invites us, to believe that we have
now everlasting life ; now, while still in this body of
death. It seemed to me that the fear of death and
the sting of death had been taken away. I had
always felt, till then, a great dread of death ; but as I
prayed, a wonderful peace came over me, till I fell
asleep and dreamed. It seemed to me that I was in
the pleasant green lane where I had so often met my
‘dear old friend, Mr. Hepworth, and he was there.
62 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

He came to me where I was sitting on a fallen tree,
which lay on the grass by the wayside, and the Bible
he had sent me before he died was on my knees. He
stood before me, and asked me what the book was.
When he saw the Bible, he smiled, and said, ‘My
prayer is heard, my words have proved true, that
Christ would have you.’ Then he took my hand, and
said, ‘Rise up. Come thou with me.’ He drew me
forward, and I saw that we were standing before a
folding-door, all of gold. I turned to ask where he
was leading me; but my astonishment increased.
Could it be my aged friend whom I saw?’ it was he,
and no other, for my hand was still locked in his;
but he was no longer aged. I cannot describe the
wonderful change that had come over him. But I
thought as I looked upon him, of what we read of the
holy martyr, Stephen, that. his face was as the face of
an angel. He pointed to the words, which I then saw
written in letters of light above the door, ‘Knock,
and it shall be opened unto you ;’ then he brought
GOD WOUNDS TO HEAL. 63

me up to the door, and bade me knock. I did as I
was told, joyfully, but with a trembling hand: In-
stantly the golden doors opened, and a flood of light,
so bright that it almost blinded me, streamed forth.

“Tt was only a dream,” added Francis; “but it
seemed so real, that when I awoke I hardly knew
where I was. I could not recover myself, and I
thought that the blaze of light which filled this little
room was the morning sunshine. I lay thinking
quietly of that dream, and I felt so thankful as I
remembered the gracious words of ‘the Lord Jesus,
‘Knock, and it shall be opened unto you.’ Oh, sir,
what love there is in that promise! how could we do
otherwise than knock ?”

“Dear Francis,” said Mr. Charlton, “there is no
love like His. Wonderful as it is that He should
invite us to come to Him, and knock, it is still more
wonderful that He should come to us, even to the
door of our hearts, and knock there for admission.

Let me read to you what he has said,” and opening
64 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

the Bible, the pastor turned to the third chapter of
the book of the Revelation, and read at the twentieth
verse : “‘Behold I stand at the door, and knock: if
any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will
come unto him, and sup with him, and he with me,’
He came to the door of your heart, He came first, and
gave you grace to open it to Him, or you would never
have gone to Him, and knocked at the door, which
he alone can open, and which he has opened to you.”
“And you and Mr. Hepworth have led me to the
door, and told me to knock there,” said Francis,
And then with a look of deep affection, he raised his
“eyes, and fixed them on his pastor’s hand, which lay
upon the open Bible. Mr. Charlton had noticed several
times before that the dying youth seemed to be looking
at his hand, and had withdrawn it, supposing that he

was remarking the contrast between the strong healthy .

hand of his pastor and his own thin delicate fingers.
“Dear Francis,” he said, “why do you often look
so earnestly upon my hand ?”




































De Pp A

LIGHT AT EVENTIDE.
GOD WOUNDS TO HEAL. 67

“ Because,” he replied, raising his eyes for a moment
with a wistful look to the face of his pastor, “ because
I do so love it,” and he suddenly bent down and kissed
the hand which lay on the Bible. “Oh, my father,” he
said, “I cannot find words to express the love which I
feel in my heart for you. I can never pay the debt of
gratitude I owe to you; I can only love you and pray
with my whole heart that our blessed Lord will enrich
you with His choicest blessings for all that you have .
been to me, and done for your poor unworthy and
once miserable child. I may call you my father, may
I not ? you will not think it a liberty, or any want of
respect in me, will you, sir?”

“T will not think it a liberty, my ‘Francis ; I shall
be glad to hear you call me your father, for I love you
as tenderly as if you were my own child. In one
sense, indeed, we must call no man father, that is, in
the highest sense, for the Lord Jesus has told us that
we must call no man our father upon the earth, for one
is our Father, which is in heaven. But on the occa-

E 2
68 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

sion when our Lord gave that command, He was
warning his hearers against the exorbitant presump-
tion of the Scribes and Pharisees, who sought to claim
dominion over their faith, and, setting aside the one
and only word of authority, Holy Scripture, demanded
an unquestioning submission to their unscriptural
teaching, and to themselves. as masters and fathers ;
thus in a manner setting aside the teaching of God’s
word and His supreme authority. But we have no
reason to conclude that the words. then spoken by
the Lord Jesus were intended to forbid the tender
affection toward those true and faithful teachers of his
word which is naturally felt by those who have been
the honoured instruments of bringing them to Christ,
not as claiming dominion over their faith, or their con-
sciences, or as being lords over God’s: heritage, but
helpers of their joy. We cannot suppose that the
inspired apostle St. Paul was disobeying the com-
mand of the Lord Jesus when, writing to Timothy and
to Titus, he called each of them his own son in the
GOD WOUNDS TO HEAL, 69

faith. I think, therefore, my beloved Francis,” he
added, with a look of tender affection, smiling as he
spoke, “since I know that you love me, with all the
genuine affection of a child for his father, I must not
forbid you to call me your father. Why, indeed,
should I not respond to your expressions of affection,
my poor suffering child, by telling you how inex-
préssibly dear you have become to me? I often recall
to my mind the words of the apostle when I think of
you. Where, indeed, do we find expressions of such
deep and holy affection as in those of the apostle
Paul, when writing out of the abundance of his heart
to the beloved disciples of our Lord at Thessalonica ?
I will read to you that part of his first Epistle to them
in the second chapter. ‘We were gentle among you
even as a nurse cherisheth her children, so being affec-
tionately desirous of you, we were willing to have im-
parted unto you, not the gospel of God only, but also
our own souls, because ye were dear unto us; and

again, ‘Ye know how we exhorted and comforted and
7O FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

charged every one of you, asa father doth his children,
that ye would walk worthy of God, who hath called
you unto His kingdom and glory.’” *

As Francis listened to those words, with his eyes
fixed upon the mild grave face of the reader, the tears
stole slowly down his pale cheeks. “How kind,” he
said, with a trembling voice, “to read these beautiful
words to me, and oh what a description! how exact
of yourself in all your tender goodness to me from the
first day that He, the Lord, sent you to me to guide
my feet into the way of peace!—sent you to me, so
vile, so wicked as I have been, so egtirely unworthy
of the interest you have taken in me, or even of your
notice !”

“ Shall I see you again to-morrow ?” said Francis, as
Mr. Charlton presently rose to take leave of him;
“that is if I am still here. May I hope that you will
come, my father? J have taken up much of your
time, and there may be others whom you may wish to

* 1 Thess, ii. 7, 8, 11, 12.
GOD WOUNDS TO HEAL. 71

visit, though no one could need your coming so much
as I do. But to-morrow may be the last day that I
shall see you on earth. Ishould be quite happy to
go if it were not for the thought of parting with you,
and leaving my dear mother. My poor mother! will
you see her sometimes after I am taken from her?
She will be so very desolate. The neighbours are not
kind to her. They have said cruel things about her,
even to me; but do not believe what you hear, judge
for yourself, and do not forsake her in her grief. She
has always been a good and most tender mother to
me, and now she is almost worn out with nursing me.”

Mr. Charlton’s hand was clasped in his, and Francis
still held it; he paused for breath a little while, then
he said, “ There is only one thing more that I have to
ask you, my father; may I remind you of your
promise to see my dear, dear brother, and to put my
letter yourself into his hands, and will you tell him
how constantly I prayed for him,—prayed that I
might meet him, washed in the precious blood of the
72 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

Lord Jesus, and clothed-in the white raiment—prayed
for him to the last.”

“T will do everything that you wish, my dearest
Francis,” said his pastor, as, gently and fondly laying
both his hands upon the head of the youthful sufferer,
he commended him to the gracious mercy and _ pro-
tection of the Lord God, and prayed that the Lord
would bless and help him, that the Lord would make
His face to shine upon him, that the Lord would lift
up His countenance upon him, and give him peace
both then and evermore.

Not another word was spoken ; only one last look,
in which their eyes met, was exchanged as Mr.
Charlton pressed the hand of Francis and departed.
“Dear, dear Francis,” he said to himself, as he walked
slowly home. “TI feel that we shall not meet again in
this world. But I must not grieve for you.”

The next morning, however, he rose early, and was
soon after on his way to the chamber of sickness,
though not as yet of death.




CHAPTER V.

he closing Scene.

SAHE morning was more than usually bright



with the genial sunshine of spring, when
Mr. Charlton went forth on his accustomed
walk to the secluded cottage, where he had long
been almost a daily visitor. There was a delight-
ful freshness, almost an elixir of life, in the pure
morning air. In the open fields cowslips were waving
their scented tassels over the springing grass in the
soft western breeze. The hedgerow banks in the
quiet lanes were spread over with the gay embroidery

of violets and anemones and other flowers of the
74. FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

sweet spring season, all hung with dewdrops sparkling
in the slanting sunbeams. Among the branches of
the tall trees the sportive birds were flying in and out,
singing as they flew, as if rejoicing to return to their
green bowers in the renewed foliage. The soft sweet
monotony of the cuckoo’s welcome note sounded in
the distance, and high up in the blue unclouded sky
the air was ringing with the exquisite song of the lark.
Freshness and fragrance seemed to breathe from
everything around. Life was everywhere—the bright
beautiful life of spring. But the anxious pastor
scarcely noted anything. He could not choose but
feel the soothing influence of that spring morning, the
freshness and the loveliness of the delicious weather ;
but his thoughts were with the dying youth who had
become so endeared to him. Was he still alive, still
waiting to see him once more, to greet him with that
look of yearning affection in his large intelligent eyes,
to speak to him with that low sweet voice, or should

he find only the breathless corpse ?
THE CLOSING SCENE. 75

Francis zwas still alive, the living spirit still lingered
in its fragile tenement. As Mr. Charlton, however,
entered the little upper chamber, he was struck with
the contrast, as it were, almost between life and death,
the freshness and sunshine of life in the open air with-
out, and the aspect of death within; the close atmo-
sphere, the hushed stillness, the gloom of the chamber,
the curtain drawn over the window, the rushlight
which had burnt through the night flickering in its
tarnished candlestick, the phial of medicine and the
cup upon the table near the bed. One cheering sight,
however, met his eyes—the Holy Bible, Mr. Hepworth’s
parting gift, and a small volume of hymns, which he
himself had given to Francis, lay open. He bent
down to see what Francis had been reading, it was

Montgomery’s beautiful hymn:

‘*For ever with the Lord,
Amen, so let it be!
Life from the dead is in that word,
’Tis immortality.
76 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

‘*Here, in the body pent,
' Absent-from him I roam,
Yet nightly pitch my moving tent,
A day’s march nearer home.

‘*My father’s house on high,
Home of my soul, how near
At times to faith’s foreseeing eye,
Thy golden gates appeat !

“‘Ah then my spirit faints
To reach the land I love,
The bright inheritance of saints,
Jerusalem above.”

“ This is the hymn, then, that he has been last read-
ing,” said Mr. Charlton, “these are the thoughts in
which he has learnt to delight,” and he turned to look
upon the sleeping youth.

On the old sofa, which had been brought up from
the room below, lay the languid form of Francis. He
had been very restless during the night, and his
mother, at his request, had removed him from his bed
to the sofa, and covered him up with an: old military
cloak that had been his brother’s. Mr. Charlton had
THE CLOSING SCENE. 7

found the door partly open, as his mother had left it,
when she quitted the room for a short time, after
watching Francis till he slept; and entering with
noiseless footsteps, he now stood there gazing upon
the quiet sleeper, and feeling that he was probably
looking upon him for the last time. His sleep was as
untroubled as: that of an infant in its mother’s arms;
a sweet expression of purity and peace seemed
spread over his whole countenance, over the calm clear
forehead, the closed eyelids, and the delicately-shaped
and partly-opened lips. One slender hand was under
the pale cheek, which was faintly crimsoned with the
pressure.

“So He giveth His beloved sleep,” said the pastor
to himself. As he did so he called to mind all the
mercy and love of his heavenly Father to the once
wayward miserable youth, the. marvellous change
which that gracious God had wrought within him by
His Holy Spirit, and His living word; and how his
sins had been blotted’ out in the blood of the Lord
73 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

Jesus—that precious blood which cleanseth from all
sin—and the once polluted soul clothed in His
spotless righteousness, His thoughts were turned to
prayer and praise. He sank upon his knees and
poured out his heart before God in adoration and
thanksgiving.

He was still kneeling when Francis awoke, and saw
at a glance who was beside him. His face at once
lighted up with smiles. “ How gracious the Lord has
been,” he said, softly, “to give me that sweet refresh-
ing sleep and to bless my waking eyes with the sight
of you, my father, once more before I am called to
go hence. Though I feel better and stronger now, I
know it is only for a little while; perhaps,” he added,
meckly, “to cheer my last hour with your presence.
You will not grieve for me when I am gone,” he said,
as he saw his beloved pastor turn aside wiping the
tears from his eyes.

“ Dearest Francis,” said the visitor, “my tears are

not tears of sorrow, though I must grieve to part with
THE CLOSING SCENE. 79

you for a time ; they are tears of thankfulness and joy,
which rise up from my full heart as I think of the love
of Him who has redeemed you by His precious blood,
and prepared you for His glorious presence. I think
with you, my Francis, that He will now come soon
and call for you.”

“For me—yes even for me, what grace, what mercy
for me, so young in years and yet so old in sin as I
was, when He sent you to me and made you so patient
with me, even when I could not bear to see you, and
looked upon you almost as coming to torment me in
my misery. But, blessed be His name, I can now say,
what I believe from my heart, that this is a faithful
saying and worthy of all acceptation, that Jesus Christ
came into the world to save sinners, of whom I am
chief.” .

There was a pause, for Mr. Charlton had begged
him not to speak again for a time, deeming the exer-
tion would be too much for him. Francis, however,
was the first to break the silence. He looked earnestly.
80 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

at Mr. Charlton, and said, “Your words just now
reminded me that I fell asleep thinking of those same
promises; and during my last sweet sleep, a soft, clear
voice seemed to speak distinctly in my ear. ‘The
Master is come, and calleth for thee, it said; and I
thought that I was in the act of rising up to obey the
gracious message and seek His presence when I
awoke; and you; you also, feel as I do,” he added,
with a grave gentleness, “that' the call will come very
soon,”

“Whenever it may come, my Francis, I believe it
will be to meet Him whose you now are.”

Mr. Charlton had withdrawn the curtain from the
window, and the cheering: sunshine lighted up the
room. :

“Might I not breathe the sweet morning air? I am
sure it would revive me.’

“You are faint, my dear Francis, and.the west wind
is so soft this morning, that ‘think you may safely
breathe it,” said Mr. Charlton,.as he threw open the
THE CLOSING SCENE. 81

casement, and gently raised the feeble, languid youth
upon his pillows, drawing the old military cloak more
closely round him. Francis seemed revived by the
soft, refreshing breeze and the warm sunshine. His
face became animated as he looked out, with a yearn-
ing gaze, over the green meadows and the hedge of
hawthorn with its sweet white blossoms, bordering the
pleasant lane.

“How beautiful it all looks!” he said, with almost
the delight of his boyish days; “how charming it all
is! and the birds—listen, dear father—that is the
linnets’ song : they are singing in the old apple-tree
in the-garden. I never saw it so laden with lovely
blossoms. Oh, how beautiful it allis!” But with a
deep sigh he looked down ; the slight flush which had
tinted his face was gone, and with it all the bright
animation had passed away. His head sank drooping
on his chest, and he was falling ; but his pastor’s arm
was instantly round him, tenderly supporting his
slight frame. He gasped for breath, and his eyes

F
82 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

were closed. After a few minutes, the gasping ceased,
but he was so motionless, that Mr. Charlton thought
that his spirit had departed: again, however, he
revived. He raised his head, and a faint but beautiful
smile brightened his pale face as he looked up at his
pastor. Mr. Charlton laid him gently on the sofa, and
sat down beside him, taking his cold hand in his.
Francis lay with his eyes fixed steadily but affec-
tionately on his friend’s face.

“What is it, my dearest Francis ?”

In almost a whisper he said, “The Bible—would
you—read ?”

Mr. Charlton opened the inspired volume, and
remembered the melancholy words of a dying friend
of his, whom he attended a few years before. He
was sitting at an open window, and as he looked out
on his beautiful garden, and saw the trees, and the
flowers in the first glory of their new life, he said,
“?Tis.sad to leave all this at such a season, and to go

down to the dark grave.” It was but a temporary
THE CLOSING SCENE. 83

sadness, for his friend departed not long after, his
heart filled with peace and joy, with the bright pro-
spect of eternal life in the presence of his glorious
Redeemer gladdening his last hours. The minister
felt, however, that some such thoughts might have
brought a passing shadow over the mind of Francis
after he had looked out over the bright fresh prospect
on that sweet spring morning.

He was probably mistaken: but under this im-
pression he read of the new heaven, and the new earth,
and a few more verses from the two last chapters of
the book of the Revelation: only a few—for he saw,
as once or twice he looked up, that a change had
come over the face of the youth, more beloved than
ever by him at that sad hour; a change which he
knew to be the shadow of coming death. He read
fewer verses than he had intended, for he feared that
Francis was becoming too insensible to hear him.
He drew nearer to the dying youth; he bent down
close to him. There was now an abstracted expression

F 2
84 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

on the drawn features, and yet a calm sweetness
which told of perfect peace within.

“Do you hear me as I read to you, my Francis >”
No reply was given till the question was again asked,
with a voice as low, but more distinctly clear and
articulate; and then, though his eyes were open, the
dying youth spoke as one who had awoke up to a full
consciousness.

“T heard, but not all,” he replied. “Thank you,
thank you, my own dear father! Blessed be the Lord
for His grace and love—I am so very happy. May I
hold your hand in mine till Iam gone? I shall love
to feel that I am with you to the last.” .

There was now no abstracted look on his coun-
tenance, but Francis lay with the full gaze of his mild
intelligent eyes fixed on the face of his pastor. He
evidently heard every word, as Mr. Charlton said,
“You are just about to enter the heavenly country,
the better—far better—land. There will be no more

death, neither sorrow; there will be no night there!
THE CLOSING SCENE, &5

you will behold there the pure river of the water of
life; you will behold the tree of life; and you will
behold——”

But here he paused ; for the dying youth, suddenly
looking upward, interrupted, but continued, the sen-
tence, exclaiming in a distinct and joyful voice,—

“And Christ!’ Even as the expiring flame of
a lamp sometimes flashes up with sudden brightness,
just before it goes out in darkness, so the living spirit
of this dying youth, with the last effort of its expiring
breath, sounded forth the name, which, to the redeemed
and pardoned sinner, is above every name—the name
of Christ !

It was indeed the last word on the now breathless
lips. There had been a gentle pressure of the hand,
which was locked in that of his minister's; but the
fingers relaxed their grasp—Francis had fallen asleep
in Jesus !




CHAPTER VI.

Prayer anstvered.

Rm OT many days after the death of Francis,
Â¥ Mr. Charlton stood at the gates of the



Knightsbridge Barracks, inquiring for Philip
Morton, the brother of his departed friend. The
tall sentinel to whom he spoke told him that he
thought he would be found in one of the rooms which
he named, and to which he directed him. Mr. Charlton
ascended the stairs, and was soon in a large upper
room, where two or three soldiers, then off duty, were
lounging about. On his asking one of them, at an

open window, for Philip Morton, he opened a door
PRAYER ANSWERED. 87

in one side of the room. A large company of
soldiers, fine-looking men, in their not very tidy un-
dress, also off duty at the time, were sitting round
several small tables, playing with packs of very dirty
cards. They looked up, doubtless astonished at the
sight of an unknown clergyman standing in the open
doorway of their common room. Philip Morton, how-
ever, was not there. His name had been called out
in vain. Mr. Charlton went away to seek him else-
where in the barracks. But as he passed down the
stairs a young man in full uniform was coming up,
and seeing the clergyman, stopped on the landing,
and stood there waiting to accost him with the usual
military salute, lifting his hand with the palm outward
to his forehead. He was struck with the appearance
of the young soldier: his easy, graceful carriage, his
handsome face, for he was fair, with large blue eyes,
and light-brown curling hair : very tall, and with a
well-set, manly figure. His manners were pleasing
and respectful.
88 FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

And this was the brother of Francis. This fine-
looking, handsome young fellow, in full, bright health,
formed a striking contrast to the slight, drooping, pallid
youth whom he had watched over till his immortal and
redeemed spirit had been delivered from the bondage
of the corruptible body of death and sin, and entered
into the glorious rest of the children of God. This was
the profligate, wicked young man, whose bad example,
and whose infamous books had been well nigh the
ruin of his youthful brother’s soul.

Philip had heard of the death of his brother Francis,
and he looked grave and sorrowful. Mr. Charlton
put the letter into his hand, and said a few words to
him about his brother’s love to him, and his brother’s
prayers for him. He waited to see if Philip would
open the letter in his presence and read it—and ri
did so. He had not read more than the first page,
when he appeared much. agitated, and the tears filled
his eyes ; but soon after, the colour rose to his face

till it became crimson, then hastily folding the pages,
S
‘ PRAVER ANSWERED. 89

he put the letter, without finishing it, into his breast
pocket. He stood for a little while silent and confused.
Then he looked up, and said in a solemn voice, and
put on a look of astonishment :

“ Sir, there must be some mistake. I did not give
those books to Francis. How he got them, I’m sure
I cannot tell; but I did not give them to him. Ihope
you will believe me, sir.”

Mr. Charlton did not believe him ; he only wondered
at the cool assurance with which the lie was told.

“T fear, sir,” added the soldier, “I must leave you ;
I am not off duty at present, as you may see from my
uniform. I must be on guard in a few minutes.”

He raised his hand again respectfully with the
salute. But Mr. Charlton took his hand, as he lowered
it, and said gravely, “A time may come, Philip, when
you may wish to see me. Then remember that, for
the sake of Francis, and for your own sake, you will
find in me a true and faithful friend. Keep that
letter. I pray from my heart that you may be
go FOUND AT EVENTIDE.

brought, as he who wrote it was, to seek and find
pardon for all your sins, and peace and salvation to
your soul, at the feet of the Lord Jesus Christ.”

That time did come, after many years of sin and
wretchedness, of disgrace and crime. It is a strange
story, and alas! it is all true. But the mercy and
grace of God, who is in Christ reconciling sinners °
unto Himself, was marvellously evidenced in his case.
The prayers of the younger brother for the reckless,
worthless prodigal and infidel were at last answered.

Long years passed away, long years after the
death of Francis—years in which the soul of his
wicked brother sank deeper and deeper in iniquity—
before those hopes were realised and those prayers
were answered. His career of crime and disgrace
commenced some months after the disregarded letter
of his brother was given him by Mr. Charlton. After
many years Philip returned to England from trans-
portation. He was no longer the fine handsome
young man he had been—Mr. Chariton would scarcely
have known him—his face was pale and wrinkled, and
PRAYER ANSWERED. g!I

his once erect figure bent and wasted. He was
broken down in health and spirits; with much
difficulty he had sought out and found his brother’s
friend ; he had come back, however, a repentant and
reformed man. Mr. Charlton, at his request, called
on a gentleman who had been a magistrate in
Australia, and Mr. W. gave a most satisfactory
account of Philip Morton. He had been in every
respect so well-conducted and trustworthy, that a free
pardon had been granted to him. After seeking to
obtain employment in this country he returned to
Australia, by the advice of his friends. He had been
in the police force there, and he went back, intending
to enter again into the same service. He did not
long survive his return. Theclergyman who attended
him in his last hours wrote, at his urgent request, to
Mr. Charlton, whom he regarded as his dearest friend
on earth, and who had cause to rejoice, from the
information he received, that Philip had become,
before his death, not only a reformed but a converted
man. Some account may be published before long
of the remarkable incidents in the life of the brother
of Francis Morton.


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The Wisdom of God displayed in the Body of Man, With Nume-
rous Engravings. Fcap. 8vo. 2s., boards.

THE ReELicious TRacT SOCIEFY, 56 PATERNOSTER Row, AND
164, PICCADILLY. ee
BHINCA I


Ae Pet as -

en nea ee
S84 Arie Spgs amatoone
seeker BA ep mae







xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20100129_AAAAAM' PACKAGE 'UF00026273_00001' INGEST_TIME '2010-01-28T22:06:03-05:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T18:11:19-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 300369; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-10T16:57:46-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '27' DFID 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfile0' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00005.txt '
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 8d3e9ad73e4100752b5d7f537d1d3576
'SHA-1' 49389213beb327293d9177037d1a8306e435ca79
EVENT '2012-05-18T04:59:16-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2012-05-18T04:55:03-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfile1' 'sip-files00012.txt
8d3e9ad73e4100752b5d7f537d1d3576
49389213beb327293d9177037d1a8306e435ca79
'2012-05-18T04:58:09-04:00'
describe
'2012-05-18T04:55:04-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfile2' 'sip-files00069.txt
8d3e9ad73e4100752b5d7f537d1d3576
49389213beb327293d9177037d1a8306e435ca79
'2012-05-18T04:56:41-04:00'
describe
'2012-05-18T04:55:06-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfile3' 'sip-files00102.txt'
8d3e9ad73e4100752b5d7f537d1d3576
49389213beb327293d9177037d1a8306e435ca79
'2012-05-18T04:56:03-04:00'
describe
'2012-05-18T04:55:08-04:00'
redup
'594' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIQN' 'sip-files00001.pro'
d253643e7de835294def570d8c92f41e
c09852dbb7dd1875d4fa1a8317cb9160d4602b24
'2012-05-18T04:57:17-04:00'
describe
'21349' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIQO' 'sip-files00089.pro'
2d257bb173c38a536ff54d030628d211
0745ab0288c7a806c8e74ce232bdba381cc12bd2
'2012-05-18T04:59:58-04:00'
describe
'662' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIQP' 'sip-files00077.txt'
1bd5b2e6fe2e5d15c3739d2807a59984
9f8aa69e1420b1f438c25d7b624ef9d46a77f836
'2012-05-18T04:58:22-04:00'
describe
'879' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIQQ' 'sip-files00089.txt'
50a102e7a4d45f7d4717442b35c0de0b
aa72266147477c6f101f0b089ff29bd4f1bc378d
'2012-05-18T04:59:51-04:00'
describe
'114684' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIQR' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
6d4dcd3245a1814791888ef27c0c7fec
d9ff4413fa245a4022d9d3d6d2aa73cf92120be7
'2012-05-18T04:59:30-04:00'
describe
'214756' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIQS' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
7badc3b9007bc5c1155ff02fba4b2bc8
664c23188ed297b1ae387773197be2357ec8f989
describe
'290652' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIQT' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
48cf83d186b00c3457ebb8a899fda604
bdfb8e0b01af55799784181b6a6d7a6e9ccb2e4c
'2012-05-18T04:55:53-04:00'
describe
'37119' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIQU' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
f761703c8770ac36af11ef562d694b5b
b17de9bf18b21323054b90990628509525f98712
'2012-05-18T04:55:43-04:00'
describe
'25324' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIQV' 'sip-files00034.pro'
e870e407ddf09c520b9646f38c42fa52
a66969fa172c9186cdc701ce9332bd3cb412af23
'2012-05-18T04:56:27-04:00'
describe
'2284544' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIQW' 'sip-files00093.tif'
96e77d1864a0a56b786ab5b98657d8ef
1dba133217d8b21d538dc87aa30a8b56fd40578a
describe
'41373' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIQX' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
c153fd31fea29bc42baa8bf898e18e26
f9b75196fce11a2a7d998c3c194d08be63f64699
'2012-05-18T04:56:02-04:00'
describe
'25038' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIQY' 'sip-files00088.pro'
62a701308a12793f6e0ed05146f2cbf5
eeb0f39b49854f396451b786d2be2aceb2fe3759
'2012-05-18T04:56:57-04:00'
describe
'2417004' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIQZ' 'sip-files00042.tif'
a59cd548b30878a61bac776d5576e126
1e280fbb460f78f70b5ddf90832258660c05f969
'2012-05-18T04:55:45-04:00'
describe
'2261916' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRA' 'sip-files00091.tif'
bf6a5db6bafda1b97907112154102300
f3ca7c207e52c997cf9943c726dd7bc5c09591aa
'2012-05-18T04:55:34-04:00'
describe
'104188' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRB' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
60dbf60f4bf8d390fb256419ca14ebed
0605e7bd20eaa19f35f9f1763922ee9a4155ee12
'2012-05-18T04:57:19-04:00'
describe
'2480116' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRC' 'sip-files00039.tif'
aa89cb8ea837228ac00956f6db2787ab
6f41a5a3a056bfc5677e23b65f11730b284ee7ff
'2012-05-18T04:59:04-04:00'
describe
'176' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRD' 'sip-files00008.txt'
10cde358cbeac530f4490be9243b5e2b
97217db3a219beaf92e106ee32c5ab77cda4e1ad
'2012-05-18T04:57:39-04:00'
describe
'240733' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRE' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
e3d6a8e17bddf064ea1d21f03addb979
d453e605a5ff3a5fd9e919786df5972cf3b0cbc7
'2012-05-18T04:57:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRF' 'sip-files00025.txt'
8d3e9ad73e4100752b5d7f537d1d3576
49389213beb327293d9177037d1a8306e435ca79
'2012-05-18T04:58:42-04:00'
describe
'110718' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRG' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
28c3c9bbc166a51561b1143d50a95580
db3de7f7eea30f2ecaad9f7482794a6467e3a8d4
'2012-05-18T04:57:41-04:00'
describe
'255895' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRH' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
8ffc886642f9214c1d6e094727607fa5
678d1d7ce6c4800936e60429954ca3c03373686c
'2012-05-18T04:59:32-04:00'
describe
'291319' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRI' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
c158ab495ac207dd736562c71bd07d42
5c92eb4bb1e99d383fb68bebde202ef959bc63ff
'2012-05-18T04:58:50-04:00'
describe
'2272660' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRJ' 'sip-files00088.tif'
d4f2fe22624670a59bdfb8e3c1a365e8
c4bd888cf4283d2fd80fcfc47c6e1555f2183ede
'2012-05-18T04:58:05-04:00'
describe
'256091' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRK' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
77db9c375dfda4cc34ac7190ee384068
b2e897f55f2f2ae1f139b3ccce85384fc21d950b
describe
'18121' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRL' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
074fff910b26dad6596074fdcf5661d7
45586c516566ec27694de4432e84e5fa822d53b6
'2012-05-18T04:59:41-04:00'
describe
'23996' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRM' 'sip-files00040.pro'
d6eea5da275f63775a137caca2707916
0b5b1ebe0d90bbb6f21fb781ac501bd8a71fd1b7
'2012-05-18T04:58:36-04:00'
describe
'263320' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRN' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
eb7ce62e52dce3b531a2ac657f692528
307e5d622ffa3a9e2a0a4f9887f30206a956bed9
'2012-05-18T04:59:18-04:00'
describe
'39852' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRO' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
4fbc139bc584d0c2f92bce81ab44ce1e
a27762c73cbfee1377129c44835af423c084b0b5
'2012-05-18T04:59:13-04:00'
describe
'288085' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRP' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
b74641f77105ee1830f2863d9828722c
7c0e75f0ef0d8dc64ad65b5d810b8bab73a90bd6
'2012-05-18T04:57:55-04:00'
describe
'33438' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRQ' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
b1dc4f66958247876b4fea5d092178d0
76c7ce0abbe09f452ba06e285419537e46078279
'2012-05-18T04:56:30-04:00'
describe
'48271' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRR' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
05e2835a481fe6e10b14676ce9b6cef3
3cc01fed3214d7f36f60b4e98f41a04bc0fc10c1
'2012-05-18T04:58:45-04:00'
describe
'238072' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRS' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
16ad09d17537dfedd712b1e6cbfc4e72
92bae9b3bd5ed408c8606092ff040f80f360057c
'2012-05-18T04:58:00-04:00'
describe
'37804' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRT' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
d65f3aee7e7446fbe3b4027eaec8ab8f
0acaf4f50bd2bfcdde16743215961e249a53850c
'2012-05-18T04:57:54-04:00'
describe
'265758' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRU' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
ea72b57a0d8a446eb426d33b7e424ccb
b77030548bd30220929f07a78424c046d55212a0
'2012-05-18T04:56:45-04:00'
describe
'273154' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRV' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
80d20ac4dac8a79d7ddd93110ed51941
20a491dfe81951b13caab7084f5b757172c5bdfd
describe
'13788' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRW' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
6b937ed04ed8b6eabf570a4259fe7fb2
ef14876889df46a3f919be05129aaa493f9a582e
'2012-05-18T04:58:17-04:00'
describe
'42033' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRX' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
b55e03775f5229817e24ab6420a83b76
f6968d232f1bd6126b6b13e2047fe5cf05865b3e
'2012-05-18T04:57:32-04:00'
describe
'294055' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRY' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
5035645344bafda3da6b17361cb8f10b
db973015ec44ec2ed379fc62646358a09baefc9b
'2012-05-18T04:55:23-04:00'
describe
'13697' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIRZ' 'sip-files00058.pro'
695d6adeb3efa5380358c5ae387751b2
16de2dd83c47f3413982739acf72e2548c2662d1
'2012-05-18T04:57:22-04:00'
describe
'292819' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISA' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
e56b338d23ffefea7b22d6597799c51f
34892961216762a3f024928b428fa431ef7ff4eb
'2012-05-18T04:59:02-04:00'
describe
'287285' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISB' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
0f290ebc928cda435524fe35cb9236df
3b842de9cdbb3f582b4a1453b7c8cb86939c8690
'2012-05-18T04:59:09-04:00'
describe
'247333' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISC' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
8f441e00a404aead2d9cea1f806dde94
44463fc4bd349a58e11e4c465f2c07c1908c4a11
'2012-05-18T04:58:02-04:00'
describe
'308650' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISD' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
9d03a5acf081d68947d160409671e7ce
7740f80733a68e42669c0178ceaf219e67704edc
'2012-05-18T05:00:23-04:00'
describe
'36627' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISE' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
6002972d4d6fb03f3738c1d71be50d81
9908b33769ea84ec475b00e5c1a8b79e068a739f
'2012-05-18T04:56:33-04:00'
describe
'264696' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISF' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
257a7ec247f141f63a69bd89a23a2aa1
813d59ae297aae3a8f43ec1b867475dba82bb9e2
'2012-05-18T04:59:10-04:00'
describe
'1767' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISG' 'sip-files00097.txt'
1ca710be85c7af5526526e105ede9745
796a46d46d8433fb440e9f5d62aa53c44eb12848
'2012-05-18T04:56:16-04:00'
describe
'301354' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISH' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
a083f65e69cc42573f2aa18db07b0bc6
9d8261e4f01e6d0b2416cc9c5a4a0465dbc22347
'2012-05-18T04:57:36-04:00'
describe
'283068' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISI' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
f33face57589f1652bee0c804ed07306
a6d06ab6b32abb90dd0272f9eac2db522edb1258
'2012-05-18T04:57:23-04:00'
describe
'2385360' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISJ' 'sip-files00064.tif'
79bf791761be36711b39e53f2dbf776e
1526c4db1f86320391d039085cca006fb61549dc
'2012-05-18T04:56:34-04:00'
describe
'36666' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISK' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
c005ab7e55d34e48ad0b3f7a8b909ac7
c1dcd06a86ec30a407fd2a53593e01dc74c2ffa6
'2012-05-18T04:57:05-04:00'
describe
'59371' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISL' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
2de13f1a1483b47833c3eb2a3c46144c
a7b1271c965b5c8d64300b0fa4bb41eecdc91f27
'2012-05-18T04:57:50-04:00'
describe
'105989' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISM' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
7069b884c0b8e9f119d7877d44cf1abb
7eb8804c27a624a5106f42a9fa3d4d3f260a3d55
'2012-05-18T04:59:37-04:00'
describe
'23858' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISN' 'sip-files00028.pro'
b482c915c1383967e807b8f3345b5f34
0289961f772e5716d7fe36dc11697c6767ec88e7
'2012-05-18T04:56:09-04:00'
describe
'2279516' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISO' 'sip-files00026.tif'
f2ebfbcbe612077820302d782cce1e60
d145f098e8abacb4462bb926090c9d912d6e6ad6
'2012-05-18T04:56:38-04:00'
describe
'1007' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISP' 'sip-files00018.txt'
1f5eaa034a1e9b859a9e6f311b47d18b
39b28c02fbd7e635747cd52f12af9e91d40502fa
'2012-05-18T04:55:11-04:00'
describe
'26723' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISQ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
abdea38b070039f3be45629bf8cc448a
26be018d9b4dd9842f93eb8c677600cdf9d2ec3d
'2012-05-18T04:58:27-04:00'
describe
'2260680' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISR' 'sip-files00005.tif'
d79972e0b011ee126d025bc7e7cecb19
d27e00f4c327856b1fe4c824fba7cbd8d87296b5
'2012-05-18T04:58:24-04:00'
describe
'237035' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISS' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
0b5cf2b6799bdc71f4c3ca712e22ecac
34524d495e523c940841ab186142dfdb4228f592
'2012-05-18T05:00:16-04:00'
describe
'2154460' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIST' 'sip-files00020.tif'
97e43260b14538d298da34943bb8bef2
e27e3ff4906404b61131a48a5ce80727858a820b
'2012-05-18T04:59:53-04:00'
describe
'294891' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISU' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
c5c2c6f991d967bd1135fcfb48ae446b
93cf34af480e460916cc5ae9f4bf71aaadd1c223
'2012-05-18T04:56:12-04:00'
describe
'15407' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISV' 'sip-files00009.pro'
3c4f2ec321f560dbe4649b7f1ca1d426
d806b21311d20bdab253da1500bbca854c78df25
'2012-05-18T04:55:51-04:00'
describe
'300449' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISW' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
71257e6027b31511d457d43789d16241
81576eeb54c437428727b4a6d349a432c1b87931
'2012-05-18T04:58:32-04:00'
describe
'288497' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISX' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
cb968697d7a5e5aa7cf58b767700e6f4
7e6c90f5552846f399628dd2fac3f849882fbeec
describe
'35785' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISY' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
0a5c555223543d2ac4f4370413c65ab9
55378e77995472370d9309c69d45c1e2c9ed1998
'2012-05-18T04:55:17-04:00'
describe
'896' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAISZ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
8011b6e72e8c77dfe7c2f47d4f873d26
f8a0edd326f2b4f062fadcb491f63859337eca24
'2012-05-18T04:57:31-04:00'
describe
'2259096' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITA' 'sip-files00028.tif'
d1148031591e42dd621b92689602cdb2
72e0a784a8d4107cef7fd8d7b68c7a9b413bedcf
'2012-05-18T04:55:29-04:00'
describe
'296759' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITB' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
ad22de4db5a922da1358898d8ba69bc5
fb1d25a37edf3050d29ddc0cffa73f6ce8d2e9cb
'2012-05-18T04:58:52-04:00'
describe
'251590' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITC' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
03df19be516d9f5d42fbafdad915f62f
3dc629b946d28c3fccfa938f334b5f06c8b8409a
'2012-05-18T04:56:50-04:00'
describe
'986' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITD' 'sip-files00040.txt'
cf3da24c19b9c96bcbae0582a99cced2
fa97dd683c61e07dfe9bf5e942b3e21a0008ea88
'2012-05-18T04:56:05-04:00'
describe
'160796' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITE' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
bf866c53e73f17f4b3733e119172a425
e5359dc114f716470e37615ea4f6226eafea16cf
'2012-05-18T04:57:34-04:00'
describe
'2394452' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITF' 'sip-files00056.tif'
76a9af067b5ca0fc059b415fbd9d9eca
2179d1fdbaa938eea22d6fc6a3e1d21e40fe413f
describe
'7880940' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITG' 'sip-files00002.tif'
b59195b8b9cf61637f634679435bb928
cf41a1dcd1754a123c0f45c1db6ed3c18555cb7f
'2012-05-18T04:58:55-04:00'
describe
'324051' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITH' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
d0f47c4500ae0863c0935cee6cee6714
d340cf9dd2215d8c60f8e7a8a4676499a6bd6972
'2012-05-18T04:56:29-04:00'
describe
'220407' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITI' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
c3c983e68f051beea49997c4f5d2969f
953823ea0e643fb1fe0c16485c0c559d0a69ac09
describe
'1940160' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITJ' 'sip-files00008.tif'
33e90b89c56f4f7fc30763afeb9f2db8
4b385e8808a9dbdce2de65c9f5ff2207c90e98ef
'2012-05-18T04:56:58-04:00'
describe
'235992' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITK' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
55a8e6b7e3581cab580356058eb31864
7c26b52a6b6a7efa864a00cb65afc3d469970d17
'2012-05-18T04:59:11-04:00'
describe
'252354' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITL' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
a7d958ff42e84d7a466dea24952671aa
b6062975f7b65f2dce88dfcb9c46179c935a7213
'2012-05-18T04:56:48-04:00'
describe
'37863' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITM' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
e7a6b4878a07e5491bfa4ae131da6723
09fa67a64f000036858c6096e67a940798716ed9
describe
'2365392' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITN' 'sip-files00046.tif'
81f36b54c9997d43870b48b46b09cee2
e59249ac1eb02655bf1631be744ce9d5a2867dd3
'2012-05-18T04:55:16-04:00'
describe
'235956' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITO' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
da5a5f422fe3f315742437a2b8ef3dc3
0a78cdbb5f5ea7bec27fcf65481fcd6fec5646a3
'2012-05-18T04:58:38-04:00'
describe
'38315' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITP' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
97943545bba1255f4e28d2de5396e23c
d4c6b2a2dbdc68df6537600ab508d7fe675ee9fc
'2012-05-18T04:56:54-04:00'
describe
'258248' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITQ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
8de1ea0cda329f21e35fa9111b855f69
f064850fc63ab69526e81fca88b5d0351a2d2442
'2012-05-18T04:56:49-04:00'
describe
'309891' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITR' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
a3457a7b5447f2e188634ee73667145e
5ab3a21b961376c2af7308bc5b1fa6fee0f95a1a
'2012-05-18T05:00:15-04:00'
describe
'30194' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITS' 'sip-files00099.pro'
c54f48f2861f3627242965199c066be9
b915ed1aa8aa57beba18f003ea2cc1c4eccc0704
'2012-05-18T04:59:38-04:00'
describe
'1947216' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITT' 'sip-files00018.tif'
8ddd9c8bc12b9eb8bb00f9ae395e1ecb
dde15d5fd9ecf496e3266ebf10baae959e778476
'2012-05-18T04:58:12-04:00'
describe
'280448' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITU' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
52cdebfb7eda6669ac290853e40bbdf1
533f53b81bd804ca221225824b7f5e681323e8c1
'2012-05-18T04:55:27-04:00'
describe
'2277' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITV' 'sip-files00008.pro'
e5b89efbdf12287e998b952a690f3c0d
b76b931d85d6a2a4483312e4bbadf8b9f849fe8d
'2012-05-18T05:00:20-04:00'
describe
'101735' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITW' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
5cdc531e29af4f09051af2e53a443a87
7fa16d3e6f00a4c73be9a43b6b1be84bb7733168
'2012-05-18T05:00:19-04:00'
describe
'37235' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITX' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
fcd1f109007e3926983b28d228e66f82
cb6074dae0db37119e3611728abebbb85361281d
'2012-05-18T04:57:43-04:00'
describe
'113016' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITY' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
d1e4016966e35fca628fd25759fdc79d
d171388f3c381b02c5d6c035a416b5c7e7775b7b
'2012-05-18T05:00:10-04:00'
describe
'37407' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAITZ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
4a6440afde29a421fef5a546d7d237d3
4e7647db987e2f08bb85d380a3a58d338f60f86f
describe
'40' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUA' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
29d9ae39c89e4e04a62d6245fddf0962
8cffe827e18c20a5696e9f04b4a8b4174e77ffc9
'2012-05-18T04:58:47-04:00'
describe
'294200' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUB' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
bf76da94d189a43a972769b7b32e4111
0208e4b93dde6952378d72c7e4a67118f195e8b4
'2012-05-18T04:56:51-04:00'
describe
'949' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUC' 'sip-files00055.txt'
3389f280aa77ffd43c2ee48a5ebe623a
73ba54efc1c671920d64cce715ff3c5d5cd5ade2
describe
'262934' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUD' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
43d6d49742f8b5a1bf0bb402c7056217
56e144de79d596d6c3b1aa5caa070aa819c49a70
'2012-05-18T04:58:26-04:00'
describe
'1046' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUE' 'sip-files00093.txt'
9690670cc2cb54990abd6a66453964b2
d70b804905d7ad26eec90f403ccfabc2e793d40c
'2012-05-18T05:00:01-04:00'
describe
'244063' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUF' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
0f0a7c35737f278c7af31137fde8e8b2
dc78576ff666762ebb7519b8bdfe3d093634fb85
'2012-05-18T04:55:24-04:00'
describe
'263744' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUG' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
8624717249094cec21ed125c6070a2b7
624f60b2c817a00414ce73a956427a7a7e67f2a0
describe
'35469' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUH' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
92b3b698f53e09eeb508d6063bf16769
87855d8fed59ea1b8ee7badfe305d4251c22abfd
'2012-05-18T04:56:13-04:00'
describe
'289860' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUI' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
13514796ae4283f2662c589920c31972
dcbed16f8168759cfbb521a5dfedb45f9a5e450f
'2012-05-18T04:57:04-04:00'
describe
'25639' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUJ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
373a50ecca8c2a108995bd6ba7753903
885b1221c69f971477eb223a67234a9c3b0eb8e8
'2012-05-18T04:56:37-04:00'
describe
'2307744' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUK' 'sip-files00080.tif'
d77c2bcc2a0c46226eb87b3432e1de79
f5fcd43f2b683fea0467e98d3d3b444649dfd35c
'2012-05-18T04:56:40-04:00'
describe
'294268' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUL' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
8191c58ffd03199c9fc175db403fb09e
7fa703f6f9968b1045d3ccb1b60f3ce4ab913a26
'2012-05-18T04:55:19-04:00'
describe
'299417' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUM' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
df7ef0120dc213054c2b43b3f9e78e5d
83acf23562d575277b27c56fa759296f00762c0f
'2012-05-18T04:58:43-04:00'
describe
'2318796' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUN' 'sip-files00038.tif'
233b91a9b26adc661cf71d0f84f8b966
f1b198a3fdb6ac10fce8be63e0316d0bdcf6fd45
'2012-05-18T04:57:51-04:00'
describe
'256822' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUO' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
b11bdaf0b2b06041abe08daf847f555d
564567832dbcaf641506283de32e415ad0eb7ea6
'2012-05-18T04:56:11-04:00'
describe
'17317' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUP' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
8a72d84aede64d29300d55549bdc0c5f
0cc83db4a1f94718fbb7b704ab30d2f94be5f20b
'2012-05-18T04:55:36-04:00'
describe
'377906' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUQ' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
b0c4cc61d77eeac3b66ac5ebdfd38692
ceee5de79c0209e75863b5eddb9364518be43a48
'2012-05-18T04:58:39-04:00'
describe
'304678' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUR' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
a897e8c6199c55fc1997ac5cee8a7f80
26a2b8fb32e888d33d267ddde1950b1d5652353a
'2012-05-18T04:57:58-04:00'
describe
'25757' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUS' 'sip-files00015.pro'
7e9f4555cb32555ffbb4297131d896d3
06cfe6300bb10cbf4ce7594fc404ca1e0dd46ba7
'2012-05-18T04:55:47-04:00'
describe
'37425' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUT' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
532f9806756f31549bb4700f5b9cefda
37c385b79627157553649788922b741b21f9377a
'2012-05-18T04:57:16-04:00'
describe
'91253' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUU' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
d9815f47ee35b1930098c667695426a2
f1c5e8274ee456edc08aa1e2678781f08c95674a
describe
'286903' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUV' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
531a2e103e74c02939f84310e65342e4
605bb08282609948c501707db35e066d6e769772
describe
'199625' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUW' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
35a3202b3e87d75a62c723359557cfa3
816f01b7e3fe28369eb0197f3a2f67a619240388
'2012-05-18T04:58:31-04:00'
describe
'110082' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUX' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
d56d281f0adb5d6a2dcda739d8d940ad
b40bba8f79b3abcafdc258f8d468fadf42210720
'2012-05-18T04:55:54-04:00'
describe
'99786' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUY' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
fe0e25b58ab199ed8ab9cb060a22ea4c
97aab51f8ab3c23880a7a989dd402a75b864f9d2
'2012-05-18T04:56:55-04:00'
describe
'37541' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIUZ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
9553a7493d45897a27cdc89cd1b1b958
5406c4fc89d9bd9900388b517f8628ff7288aab2
'2012-05-18T04:59:00-04:00'
describe
'25025' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVA' 'sip-files00083.pro'
52d22f298d642f1c6a3ee05e85a9dd14
93fb793097f0fc7fee52a19a231faf562b2ce205
describe
'42337' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVB' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
a6317dc18b80ba1e0846dd801ed38660
5116acf2b2c296c4c19571736fdc549c73e47d56
'2012-05-18T04:56:15-04:00'
describe
'989' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVC' 'sip-files00062.txt'
3518a851b92d173dd01d8b35c2083cb3
a8fa7d6dc7de15bbf7e1d75ddc596140ffc8704f
'2012-05-18T04:58:57-04:00'
describe
'2320928' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVD' 'sip-files00031.tif'
2a1fb0574342bdab487763133c60bbeb
75836adb986c3cb1341226ea9f851cd571694740
'2012-05-18T04:56:23-04:00'
describe
'283063' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVE' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
6e4ff451c34f9aa304c2e1643fdc76ca
96bb1781562eab3ad1ee5dce4925e313261ce9b0
'2012-05-18T04:59:44-04:00'
describe
'413' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVF' 'sip-files00011.txt'
f0e2ad102fc3517f296859e1b2941c80
dc0b7cc2bc17520d6a304b7caff6d88d3df2e2d7
'2012-05-18T04:58:16-04:00'
describe
'295223' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVG' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
2d732cb2734e6d9697a31d7ebceaa949
930948a92dfc6948a4a0184113dbf84a2a29951e
describe
'110918' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVH' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
4ee2a2e1983734d46feff903d2c6adb6
0fc9bfa8d172a0fa32085e5dffa13acceb47d61b
'2012-05-18T04:55:33-04:00'
describe
'24858' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVI' 'sip-files00053.pro'
942e0b81d1540259b4d80482cf693a95
7b3c839d436d3d6b3a429018719ddbf75c86c2c3
'2012-05-18T04:59:24-04:00'
describe
'262075' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVJ' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
80c619d892848c4a0434357845b2a99f
4ce6efa11fd7eb9459435f5bbc86d34c8c597810
describe
'2294060' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVK' 'sip-files00067.tif'
fbcbb2ba47c65d7a83e195cd990503b5
62a954deb671a78cfb272142621d3596768741e1
'2012-05-18T04:55:14-04:00'
describe
'227110' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVL' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
f3f469f8e37772f6b5c014cb8fc10d86
893c5d11ace048384037e35a3380b9821e9ff42a
'2012-05-18T05:00:13-04:00'
describe
'287157' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVM' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
853ab56d070fd7b016a32bf6ddec3032
cafe29ea08306fe05d1187c0d190601fdbc2beff
'2012-05-18T04:59:45-04:00'
describe
'39830' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVN' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
43eda5048b433b443eb4fb624082b8da
9bafd7cef5d4b1e73c8ec2b80d825f3c36c4a83a
'2012-05-18T04:56:35-04:00'
describe
'2116672' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVO' 'sip-files00023.tif'
4658b6d314edde2c64dac5a1fae9b36a
f71c2bb8fdf8422ac119f5c3a4446a0063e391d3
describe
'37453' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVP' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
6eaa1f2ee8fce5ca0720c5efebe0a55c
8528bc1a2486658dcb03c4aa9e816d9a18803c83
'2012-05-18T04:56:19-04:00'
describe
'243295' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVQ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
b85a7ea168aef135bad02fc48d407be2
39b1a7986d325844d41667d83e58611ced95e7e9
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVR' 'sip-files00098.txt'
275c39a7d7800ecf1c9b691649d3df31
ae1d94cd9c1d9c612c484b3fbda35c06909c6f5b
describe
'635' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVS' 'sip-files00024.txt'
c14ae845a6de7e0d19bc55e9dbbcf22f
67f7588657aa42e735de7f71f29042c398bd97ff
'2012-05-18T05:00:30-04:00'
describe
'2384372' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVT' 'sip-files00061.tif'
f0f37eef7030965a78b7413f6678b575
dda797a97417fb8cd5ffd5b06f47fb25ae4fcc72
'2012-05-18T04:58:35-04:00'
describe
'2308700' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVU' 'sip-files00063.tif'
0402dbe7286eb6842ea3de27f3fc57f6
d04469072b287f222ae39324ef38789d6fd8be25
describe
'2139696' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVV' 'sip-files00014.tif'
8ff0c487b649f99f2bccda12cd8d8ef1
f709b451d64618b989026d6727c95f989beb1d19
'2012-05-18T04:56:07-04:00'
describe
'40240' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVW' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
5463b6d871aae25cda5e1d1bf4bb90a5
d06944f283fe2175da5dc1ad0c674430420fa19c
describe
'323435' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVX' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
924d5a800ca97c40b75001d65d3598bd
22188b91729a5ffddf418415639a76fe4cba38bc
'2012-05-18T04:59:03-04:00'
describe
'280948' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVY' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
b4d66c48b1d5c4fa6b5ae6ec73efb662
eda425741ac4f084b64a54deac2457e28ba74d88
'2012-05-18T04:59:34-04:00'
describe
'107942' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIVZ' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
d276bfb4f0bf96ed53308f8238259696
a126cd38ae93bc5145b151e66c9f28c9b1a9b08a
describe
'2344908' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWA' 'sip-files00099.tif'
5e8b09c0189cd9cea8f5051765a4aa66
f640977c26bd108533b2072fa100c765343f4582
'2012-05-18T04:59:01-04:00'
describe
'264909' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWB' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
6a7de32dc963968f9c3dfb9b2dc96d07
a58849bcb51e0ec2173d13505f472e83fb031eb3
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWC' 'sip-files00085.txt'
ca98dfe36e9168b311e7501fc0b09dc3
3d23a213d09219acd8471478417c46d574bfc14f
describe
'27382' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWD' 'sip-files00071.pro'
65b958eb82c847d82833788e4e143eef
b3a4708bd03c5d175e1cd4cb19f13b3e492d6df0
'2012-05-18T04:55:50-04:00'
describe
'24090' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWE' 'sip-files00062.pro'
9c3eb94b154eacf388e3617defbb0d82
f1f99fd9dedcb89f2aebd4ee99d574fbee24926c
'2012-05-18T04:58:15-04:00'
describe
'26122' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWF' 'sip-files00030.pro'
f686d309a08dd31e8782201b6b808bc3
226b199554d320dc71f47d4bf24dcf26b38d3bf6
'2012-05-18T04:55:41-04:00'
describe
'2255576' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWG' 'sip-files00095.tif'
2f1e5e82787af66e58b3d7f192cefa62
a7effe6b92af84fbfc9aae2caf66ed6e34312594
'2012-05-18T04:57:24-04:00'
describe
'368402' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWH' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
c65d34954b9162e94dfd4574970c4445
da04f4600e5e6f9b918c5db69a962f531a0f235d
describe
'34669' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWI' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
04c93661259b6884757fa47210ab43fa
f4301484ccab579d6035d76ebe5975867b12898f
describe
'100849' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWJ' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
f151144a9a25101080e94bd9b5411c46
0935b551bf24c4ca2584f137c7292c5b1bbff35f
'2012-05-18T04:57:21-04:00'
describe
'2206484' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWK' 'sip-files00040.tif'
b03ff284cc578533bfd2e81a6f379104
ba967a8faa44716e79c47eadc7ff90874d6170ad
'2012-05-18T04:57:47-04:00'
describe
'102' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWL' 'sip-files00002.txt'
842eb6a9a73d63037b74359c2aa17f6a
d549ee4a395e162f1dc5436ce7af5ed61a64398a
'2012-05-18T04:59:07-04:00'
describe
'270180' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWM' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
c275f45327efaf051f608a1985f2bafa
b614d30b440df86ae6cfa464f957db24cdfeafa3
'2012-05-18T04:57:07-04:00'
describe
'23398' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWN' 'sip-files00031.pro'
f70fd9f3fdb0e6c5e78fcd1cf5a5a5d4
77ccba50349bee6579217faf78ec3eb056edf7df
describe
'284390' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWO' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
a9145d66ba937a96c892c9f3a163017e
a17aa6a4eef525aa3e4bccb0a5e687eed9cb57a7
'2012-05-18T04:58:08-04:00'
describe
'1024' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWP' 'sip-files00088.txt'
0ef1f06d68c955706cac2fcd0060087c
b1644d8932d6fde71030a9fcd0c8ce9272df94e1
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWQ' 'sip-files00094.txt'
b3f582e14815e4990aae54f324c4eb1e
005bf85951448fadf6d228dee1aa48778b0300d4
describe
'308388' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWR' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
410bd1394ef5b681f84d0acc007b0990
36abc11eb6a9e3172db1374f1301738c9932bba0
describe
'39388' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWS' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
eb4c93079f263ae9ea1759abf4279f16
c9c7592bef707fac83121618d9000621720dff3a
'2012-05-18T04:57:30-04:00'
describe
'24755' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWT' 'sip-files00079.pro'
f535d304ea7654021881eb4627f580f6
0d0238d57082aeedbaaeb39f70dd6c9273d7b1d9
'2012-05-18T04:55:21-04:00'
describe
'9841' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWU' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
7448b56d0a9d0370d4622d9468f142b7
0170da98c3a716a0bdb398944a9b2c8497325b90
'2012-05-18T04:56:25-04:00'
describe
'83314' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWV' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
fa89a912be8ea93973f3e5e0b1c8ae36
9c635c23cb5d692f325b0fa11a474fd0f8b37842
'2012-05-18T04:56:14-04:00'
describe
'283212' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWW' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
8296250da8724b406cd27196408564f7
583f65731f71f0d37368397944c0d2e69c5b64a7
describe
'23289' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWX' 'sip-files00021.pro'
ebcbfd18e2017fc4d2903eef02f6b85f
5eadaf8409524c138032b35619817a936dbb1bc5
describe
'26167' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWY' 'sip-files00066.pro'
622e9d3c60e4ea92bdb3cf299a71a096
ce4a39b83d5b615e232c25e6d1667bc9852826b7
'2012-05-18T04:56:06-04:00'
describe
'103334' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIWZ' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
4252a87e709344285ff6650660add0b1
0da2e16fc1ea6930832c15e6495c88e7db1b4b83
'2012-05-18T04:56:21-04:00'
describe
'270438' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXA' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
941ecf71627a283c43c1ea440ff7ab31
4e9dcadc6ef94e34fcffc865e109915db5b07c99
'2012-05-18T05:00:28-04:00'
describe
'290995' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXB' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
ec8a6f76b43b2fc4575d232e89b7c00c
6974e5777326e2e9577f910b802562365e2c07b0
describe
'146452' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXC' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
c3e5db50c46861d4cafa0b7851b65bdd
5b1d2fcb2906112ac564943ebfeb6740cac22680
'2012-05-18T04:59:28-04:00'
describe
'24757' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXD' 'sip-files00064.pro'
b733eee4b2a35e574797304a77e3aade
0e8ede6e7cf5de7e771d738bfb4360f9574addd5
'2012-05-18T04:56:43-04:00'
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXE' 'sip-files00017.txt'
f77415f4d738f04bd6c3387a5da865ae
e15a4d727afcf0ed678190859ac8c86aceb3b179
'2012-05-18T04:59:39-04:00'
describe
'107408' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXF' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
d627dd431f284acff29242c48d427060
e51833560356655304469cd5a6a9330206923ffc
describe
'38290' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXG' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
4f3064126ad1ce2b82d9a96e1a97df1f
946cfe1714ad38ddd090a75141cb8ca74b4675a3
describe
'2376392' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXH' 'sip-files00030.tif'
77390d7c7816275e6e663f0d79d39660
1d00ba78e6cea87b420f3d77c9b500986c9ca215
'2012-05-18T04:55:25-04:00'
describe
'2363740' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXI' 'sip-files00010.tif'
f5d2819b5a77be8d92d285cd69132c57
f5b55d61106055ba229f48f61cf284d8b0535cee
'2012-05-18T04:56:46-04:00'
describe
'297669' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXJ' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
bf975b6b0c74ef1bcf999d54e1f95a51
18b38436e1ef1b10783188ba434d0fcd7b199977
'2012-05-18T04:57:33-04:00'
describe
'155725' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXK' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
4dda104046d8ab6b85ccd51c0bdc3033
23b56f72c5fd9bf9e2d4e017d7e26c4743007fc5
'2012-05-18T05:00:21-04:00'
describe
'921' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXL' 'sip-files00050.txt'
90e234d09ddfb8492f47ad23a0f0c37c
6db43360e455788e04a3a7f9352ba7b76978d551
describe
'38377' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXM' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
a34c916618365e71a53de36585e237db
c771b932bccb3841ba978b26fabfa90260577281
'2012-05-18T04:55:35-04:00'
describe
'17189' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXN' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
91e99a257e164cfabc82cef8731dafe5
33631f08be029368fca372b30975c7dfec6a51ea
'2012-05-18T04:55:20-04:00'
describe
'11317' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXO' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
e2f22783e21df5357fc143794f340ed9
e143b6f975e3d577c2143b729a8f7a152d3e73f6
describe
'265705' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXP' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
357e0b98faa201c8b5f6c21355d2b313
8feb1b3b60631cb5538b7aae74a1bae1a476d28c
'2012-05-18T04:58:34-04:00'
describe
'281220' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXQ' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
ef5b6fd8a7d06eca36340b4f22c2f601
a2c71c40806dbb01765dc8ce08d210f247cb03b6
'2012-05-18T04:55:12-04:00'
describe
'157075' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXR' 'sip-filesUF00026273_00001.xml'
4b5c360f6ce87407843a763090b25139
36c10e29fedb505429ed880c1a0a6f825aef7854
'2012-05-18T04:57:40-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T16:54:04-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'545436' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXU' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
359d18e46b97c7c4514c2e7419fcd5e9
79bf46c60c10eeb92ebce9718665002dfd03a4f5
describe
'297736' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXV' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
359b2f92b721984a6a2a6db671fc48f3
0ae84f0883654a02024681a54d1bbf55b87a1b0a
'2012-05-18T04:55:40-04:00'
describe
'258018' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXW' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
3f852e7b1957510324e99d8049dd8ab9
e8d8f1e18615cbab74f35f7beadf3a6dedcadd64
'2012-05-18T04:56:56-04:00'
describe
'161856' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXX' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
bcb4f3c6fdc2f0eef5d3c233ef36f209
9213c6d384b70fd79d16191bdffd02708ea02019
describe
'17641' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXY' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
c4996b7ef1c1bdc16c83ff18a2db6255
713feff55a1b4cb10087a304d9e4311dfdeafbb7
'2012-05-18T04:56:42-04:00'
describe
'277988' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIXZ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
c90564133eeda34b82c5d1213cb71aaa
3cf92e39ee3720d787e9f93b9127174ae8bf8368
describe
'265462' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYA' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
e8267e3c14bc48f463b8b4e96290a234
d66412982d7aee4d7ef797f81b629d55d80bc955
'2012-05-18T04:57:48-04:00'
describe
'282114' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYB' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
298b6c549fd4f81f11b9250a8ce2984f
adda6f635d961b7a3016e7f2bc9dafaeb70e5de4
'2012-05-18T04:58:48-04:00'
describe
'273276' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYC' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
db3cf0ee4c32a71507d06ec37972476d
e6a08fad279d25163e5cd9879c35427dc62488ba
'2012-05-18T04:58:10-04:00'
describe
'279381' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYD' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
75531468eddbe656b9932057266ee99e
8df3e9be300f7aedd5247f91a5d6ca8fb1c4676b
'2012-05-18T05:00:35-04:00'
describe
'258464' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYE' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
a45e1a36e52a6fa9e6d8317668ae4796
40bd794dbbc382632ab29b7dabfe5204e6e18e58
'2012-05-18T04:56:53-04:00'
describe
'275548' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYF' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
77389d150d81740b4492d23910b7bed6
5c74f25dde082b1754d094d88d706fa6a109f8be
describe
'222849' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYG' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
575d927461ffc2c64a7188d4b9793482
9d48043e8429f2b838e7b09ea3f542c92245940b
'2012-05-18T04:57:38-04:00'
describe
'253368' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYH' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
630bd9c52180c98285a0a834509f3aef
c426ff37ed180a0552c153164bf9bf46d05ad9e0
'2012-05-18T04:57:49-04:00'
describe
'237890' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYI' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
66bbbc4773fcb457994420d8e58fe15f
82eb117fa25473c54d6e9fa6b9e0b2e0bfb7f583
describe
'276004' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYJ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
535dd7a4228a8a553d5619963cd00150
a3cd0a157983f82fa5172ce43b3d2f5000714991
describe
'243033' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYK' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
d9a0249b4970df5521e907b1208eaa7c
d55d24a8f5709ddf0eb471a459f4b7822e5ff9fe
'2012-05-18T04:57:14-04:00'
describe
'236087' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYL' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
0f7b16226eabc686a0f9219ae9b8ddcc
b2ba8ed4bd3b5affd2a0851df65409579363b907
'2012-05-18T04:56:17-04:00'
describe
'243258' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYM' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
99005fd177a5e4df0bc6d229d442f030
d5ec7b8cba3f161f34928949309af76a4185ed1b
'2012-05-18T04:59:49-04:00'
describe
'226790' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYN' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
4620e5f8bdb36ff8d050d5f5d21e5346
fb9bf3a3e42de00387c030eb45308a0b9b429c0c
describe
'258629' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYO' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
2c8fd021fb9d598195829932402655b5
35f5a42fb4ffffbf02d0899d3efe5388b455b045
'2012-05-18T04:59:12-04:00'
describe
'251652' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYP' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
385f4e0385b2fddf3c2a493da3c0e040
b5894be6cd471dae92895d70e74a4294e9bdf42b
'2012-05-18T04:57:02-04:00'
describe
'255817' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYQ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
270f3c68472f213994a9a6eeaf2d5518
2097e15c96fada6f4bee934e7d8b50ba0c692453
'2012-05-18T04:57:09-04:00'
describe
'237051' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYR' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
0840463ce75a3d228f7435f740f00c25
24173f3aa5046bf5ad4164e664f14aac7cc1df9e
'2012-05-18T04:58:23-04:00'
describe
'249048' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYS' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
e93f6d744ec79c3caa132d4645b2272a
7b81dcdc194c012adff1d6f05b2f45ae21cfec65
describe
'250100' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYT' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
9daf1712c29736206593b75b70ccfb4d
29cc4b98e74a6601fbd3011f4068b041292dde8d
'2012-05-18T04:59:47-04:00'
describe
'236593' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYU' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
3fb8ed561893fd21383142edc0b0144b
ecd1d68288a595315df3916ed27b6ee96306dc24
'2012-05-18T04:56:20-04:00'
describe
'220459' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYV' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
cd79ec1ad2659d3591d176f78369a117
cc93bfcac2ece698344c26b845292498a41ee35b
'2012-05-18T04:59:19-04:00'
describe
'240942' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYW' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
63a6727657f63b4bd66b97ed22beabdc
8e0e27c57cd3dfce41a059156e53cbb333ed48b0
describe
'216498' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYX' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
219b917006a8ed19c22eb209396b2511
a6acf97480d89247653eeca0a33c4c1a0fc1249c
describe
'206875' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYY' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
2a0e13307aacbb91fc746456f923484e
f29b312e4da48a69482154b3c43c7928bc537ff1
describe
'246472' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIYZ' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
94326cd4fb538b21215d4cd4d132ece6
dcd822beb79708b9f51c8ac14c3801f084136987
describe
'268183' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZA' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
57dff92e48b47ee88b3715b2b921dc4b
10a5572717de58884d072c1b338d1cc673a81bf6
'2012-05-18T04:58:11-04:00'
describe
'225267' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZB' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
fb75af68dce555e14f16e700e6ffbb73
74c75a8140e0dc58052445cae33979680e6d1ab5
describe
'233081' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZC' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
d5bc2cef6050572fdc8cacffb21163e8
ecbceb7cfc452f1801b8d3335962288f8e7f4f75
'2012-05-18T04:55:57-04:00'
describe
'125341' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZD' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
8948117df92309dc68f01395b91d7170
9195d2be79ec18538017e26cd869872c79169e2d
describe
'218310' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZE' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
fcfda40e4fe40f3209db3d41a629c359
108ea3a1fe06394caa732283471be5c071c58947
'2012-05-18T04:58:46-04:00'
describe
'219055' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZF' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
75e543153da78f97639a500e1440867b
4e4791f6205112a8779d1cd403a5606f4a1dcedf
describe
'240205' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZG' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
56e80d5f08a3086ed572b4ad94f41b2d
8e58f3b09da7ba2a6997d0d95911c523fc9e05a8
'2012-05-18T04:58:07-04:00'
describe
'246461' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZH' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
2d662f647baffdc26b96493f16c9bc39
88cedfdefe76c49c48e00098c4d03108af59060e
'2012-05-18T04:56:31-04:00'
describe
'241922' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZI' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
4d5436b0eb7e4f8271cbf5efee2e2ae3
0c1085b0ba70f27ac54fedb7d5ea9bee9b2f91ab
describe
'244769' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZJ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
d356b11ce7d4ec20b3f5594059fe5f4e
f8f596fc38a8769960e7b55d055e5f92a914fce2
'2012-05-18T04:56:04-04:00'
describe
'259959' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZK' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
627c8c3cf1fe6fa7e553bf21649befd8
e600490157d074a99e7592e2a2b6224fa483629a
describe
'255122' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZL' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
44fa115ea48d299efb9f3904e3e01c8e
a53c00b9b9c35899a9fb5084d281d29c50d747f7
'2012-05-18T04:58:58-04:00'
describe
'256125' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZM' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
5b56067acbc59d1050dc1d5768753f64
a13bf2325d0996c3bbdc17fbafc14e23c8ee654b
'2012-05-18T04:56:24-04:00'
describe
'331865' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZN' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
db8ba99cd3d7da7e511beb05727bdbab
249ab3e35d18fce98e8859e085a88ef0a2e78b54
describe
'262610' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZO' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
0542f9507871874fd8347f4171aa1d33
0d4b12d78f8a5f99cadec30f305a5202aea31ca7
describe
'251440' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZP' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
2a40a79ba40f030de2af5b6486ef1811
349793d4d752983391e8f1b0e08c6f02ae06bb33
describe
'256270' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZQ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
7c01e14cb59bd94dfc98872b3bfd3245
4478814f58429a8aa6a9128defd722677ae37806
'2012-05-18T04:56:26-04:00'
describe
'217339' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZR' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
7dc18033189dc89f7135b50cd43a911d
aef22ad3359ade779e02fa6493b108e49e63f1ba
'2012-05-18T04:57:00-04:00'
describe
'227991' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZS' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
cef10a82b76a78ad55e75246e20f302c
73fc3389ebf897eaff30f92c690432620677e5ab
describe
'201624' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZT' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
5c92e3d524a09211b3a136d9533e1acb
2279fa0e0fc59021d086d90de845313a98a97f43
'2012-05-18T04:56:36-04:00'
describe
'258244' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZU' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
21a18f1ebbed6b5bae86902edfa2288d
aec6dde18ea31579e8787c8f9f9633eb15cba86c
'2012-05-18T04:57:45-04:00'
describe
'246648' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZV' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
77b11f27077f54b1e855e3b7d55bf28f
d86803a6879eef342927e36c6907be8ef2180c1c
describe
'260138' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZW' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
b425be4057e70f91d2ca636e34a49158
a04a5c81f478e156dd4bc25d1845ad6e961450aa
describe
'242520' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZX' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
a039f393b2ec9370cee51b809ebe391c
45efa85af74853e390b393c412c5410e788c1587
'2012-05-18T04:58:06-04:00'
describe
'263587' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZY' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
9ec805ac03f1b44b541b15cdc5473e79
edb2869b5d3f12f40248e84979c077c114ad6424
describe
'242202' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAIZZ' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
e9b07553d2337aec3a16ab9f1f3a75d7
8085bc30b92f0c78a784d7966ce5e73995933618
'2012-05-18T05:00:31-04:00'
describe
'209030' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAA' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
4ccece8afdf204e78d9ed57912be1b3e
af0f2d5d9f4016b65f0ff38cb72333314bc92d51
'2012-05-18T04:56:52-04:00'
describe
'258793' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAB' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
d934bcb5e3749f5f36d7741c836662b6
15f990746a1d8109a4ecf7a235a33c70294dcf97
'2012-05-18T04:55:58-04:00'
describe
'248404' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAC' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
0e41fe216191f030d6d5266e3e0ddd87
77e81a1b1a2cb991e1226fa03d373ee328ce9f85
'2012-05-18T04:57:01-04:00'
describe
'262797' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAD' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
a67758e6f21ad5cc01933a8b7e9b922a
72d4073f792135586bc5fbc722a0ee84df21f553
'2012-05-18T04:56:22-04:00'
describe
'265263' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAE' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
cf54202adb02c586e8046a0c8b429a2e
723ded146285f50e4272b9c13b6e20b976246177
'2012-05-18T04:58:33-04:00'
describe
'287398' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAF' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
d09f915eb318f4efb63de6a363394b25
59dcfb81ad550fe38ec8969aecbd336e50607126
'2012-05-18T04:56:18-04:00'
describe
'286776' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAG' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
e4be41c22824a41b1564e5c9717cbf1f
3ee66c64d10efc42e44beaf27d8b850481a08d2d
describe
'330065' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAH' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
2af56209574c5cb647b26bdebe8e18fa
34cc628bcc2721807737208087cde4a895d96993
'2012-05-18T04:59:33-04:00'
describe
'574565' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAI' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
95345d9b39084b8cae0d4fcd1152198c
b7ded0dff7ed39db5ab2e5f7b9ca16c7a7436b0c
'2012-05-18T04:55:15-04:00'
describe
'328478' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAJ' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
b22cf9d9e23c4bde24cb37412c7cc557
b6f844317293c552de9cfc3e67917083a89bd074
describe
'327958' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAK' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
b9e0841aac83b495afbc4eea425e3148
0d525be0f5185acfbd0df4f02441e03095b7018c
'2012-05-18T04:56:28-04:00'
describe
'311171' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAL' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
b98e8d60a0855f8bb0d3d16b971fe7d1
ca682b254ab9c366296c1eedfd26fc212f62511a
'2012-05-18T04:59:27-04:00'
describe
'1661' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAM' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
faf0b2c222211721204fe5bd4bdc777a
f2fc565225a2241e551bd3957951cb13a61890d1
'2012-05-18T04:55:30-04:00'
describe
'286959' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAN' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
d2043cf336f1be25fe10d24bcd4c5055
33e9e33033625038e495a589f28b172a4bd6cc2d
describe
'261863' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAO' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
8663003d430302c894d6e602f06c9f98
4768d8ad048ad50f9292450c80371b70783cb6cc
describe
'71566' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAP' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
56fb81d9cd32d4f3023c373c902c2772
721498138abd62e273310c7b03e1994acf056261
'2012-05-18T04:57:25-04:00'
describe
'252276' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAQ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
39256cb6a666b86d3e2241b7a8770caa
8710ba232b61e02915fa24fe10d8fa53172c0f93
'2012-05-18T04:57:37-04:00'
describe
'278806' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAR' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
a23da799e325382087e56be5623c21ac
9288ae721eae3a109b132b4af475c20150a4fde3
describe
'1666' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAS' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
580b64673ee5599936d711dac2b371c0
23f8770c1a77fe364429cff39b333f367820d3ac
describe
'277471' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAT' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
f24161e4cc3e728348de46fc45358481
358bac055ea3dda849e2fb5c59f98342f1590cfd
describe
'286621' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAU' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
1c9d60291c096f6b4263d32b91981f08
5fb7ddb4f04f7207312683afbefee25d7ab2923b
describe
'256011' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAV' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
640ae8b5d072236e615468d8a04b23ba
08e8b8a9193c860da46d90e1e64f125113e27a0b
'2012-05-18T05:00:38-04:00'
describe
'241940' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAW' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
0d7c0c276a1d33e3e8dd5ca1d5ec4877
4433d0de1cb06dc3f00c2be6e49ae1ce42b3a31c
describe
'265949' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAX' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
a51f702763119b9047f43247266dfdfe
5356943fbe22cb5e1da96bd6d3e46dab2c759f10
'2012-05-18T04:58:30-04:00'
describe
'267902' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAY' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
c3f04d931ac7940a7fa0c900146a724b
ddaa74ddd48d1693c41fb834cf611bb959b27bd9
'2012-05-18T04:58:40-04:00'
describe
'264272' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJAZ' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
4073d79e9f655164dd1da8948ac4b546
735c33c37bddec82b1e54aec13bbd83335ea2eef
'2012-05-18T04:57:46-04:00'
describe
'1664' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBA' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
3784106fb3358282ff3c09a6fced9d52
fdcd8766b2cdbd86efaadb0fcb7bd31fa2b1c81f
'2012-05-18T04:59:20-04:00'
describe
'252563' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBB' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
68cd8a06c3f574b350706376de36918b
0494a727a5d023e37af2b9a593b77161de7c627b
describe
'254732' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBC' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
52814f1113f5ac795e8e499783dd35da
62f4c510f26542595901c8405c9511af4167bb3e
'2012-05-18T04:55:32-04:00'
describe
'295621' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBD' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
fce9a209565a81b085a8cb6c8ff0418c
52bbe661e014530f5dfbb6b2b7709221110de962
describe
'288449' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBE' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
8cae5717d3b2269aa145423b7d92d786
b9dc0822d585ab7d5fd957e1f8e30cac6663fa31
describe
'288471' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBF' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
c975b6602a1aee57e2f45a82c84431ea
26ceab1251b3f6095d3a25230217b342a4d1bc66
'2012-05-18T04:55:22-04:00'
describe
'286470' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBG' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
97d24cc8692a7f45609d450879d10ebc
d847560910a95d3a7c98e41c10f9b2cf898a4d3e
describe
'272923' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBH' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
623a86d907dbafbdcbcd0c8d2e4c3556
9102e89e68d151c61ab237056f5513eb15b97d8c
describe
'286179' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBI' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
ce8a276ad1b9276ff7eb51acb03989e1
9c2dc7b3edb827b5b4c4450eb9b3f207c07f464f
describe
'274392' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBJ' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
eb26094628c096d9a3b173c4121235ea
0a18009bf9f31b581832acdc392b0752f4e0bd7f
'2012-05-18T04:59:42-04:00'
describe
'297429' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBK' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
a5a1bf22829b56f8d91e09e74718b4a6
a1003f5f5d09949600c76e2dec22e08d5793a5cb
'2012-05-18T04:55:48-04:00'
describe
'285727' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBL' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
3e2d442e99ed790ff2038500fd0a7e09
8d633df87b05c4410dd99917e0846a6d7ac76a8a
describe
'304757' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBM' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
b9bb2a6b8f84072092d4feb0d6b9c250
cbcf4707765e2f4ce92b17c57094c55ab6d4c828
describe
'289205' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBN' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
e8be3fc3db9378616d60dbdbd9c42d0d
a4416930da8cc0f8755f1ba412c939001575c6d1
'2012-05-18T04:55:38-04:00'
describe
'285896' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBO' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
df44f17bc009fcacf10928fa9864bc7c
42e6e088a680b4961f93120ee1bfd99230dc2fdc
'2012-05-18T04:58:28-04:00'
describe
'293072' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBP' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
a4fd62acf3e71c0d300f8d914e601ee0
252536ec63b9bf00100d58f626704a36a222598d
describe
'283870' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBQ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
72c2b684222d21be4037a9e239d4b112
3b51429b65a57b1622829096a791eb803d935741
describe
'286298' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBR' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
c3f68c991bd81127acfe53f3dd5dbac4
1ac9613e4237f76b179ef9774489f8720449f41c
'2012-05-18T04:56:32-04:00'
describe
'258168' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBS' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
6f86e3538f7dd7ad0389290bc1098bbf
cf2d0bfeedbbfbb3b958d05124abfcb98e31cb51
describe
'287912' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBT' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
c348cd86a34fc9961779c6ba652868f1
e4f3805e1ee584e39441c6275dc9790ddaaef69e
'2012-05-18T04:58:53-04:00'
describe
'293127' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBU' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
e73cc800c27506c384d597d80dcb58b1
99f29f0940ac8c54831d03af7acac871478f07e7
'2012-05-18T04:55:31-04:00'
describe
'296633' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBV' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
38f668f12e29dd74629523bbebecd37c
4c8e0e0e61e42ef51db8fe9894c2e745d31f879c
'2012-05-18T04:58:44-04:00'
describe
'301931' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBW' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
22721c4ca32f87326eb18ff985e0ec09
16da56bceaf41cc668b7cf789737854ed520f71e
describe
'298018' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBX' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
cb6021ceeac86e6637dd4937e0aaf816
069d014d14e927cbd4477cb1838fa938ad0699a8
describe
'285306' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBY' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
c22e944e3e53216496fe4d240f0bc3f0
542e867e34e1ae1173da8a7f80cfa86dff9205dc
describe
'1674' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJBZ' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
c99e764b2dc42c2771602c0c3ef1d4c5
11dd9756188a507af38a6c43eab917c85f2099d5
'2012-05-18T04:56:10-04:00'
describe
'308672' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCA' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
d93d270bb3013095019117d6396b17fe
adac55fe904151710f9f4f9caf5a50fe4816684f
'2012-05-18T04:57:13-04:00'
describe
'301372' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCB' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
6f6c3343ebb0219a83442652961c3207
fce308f4637c94f96143bb3f25376a2ee25614ee
'2012-05-18T05:00:02-04:00'
describe
'288896' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCC' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
8af95044e1e1b75040207f6db54b14af
071baac70a82b6464f1af74f123bb9cd54fc784f
describe
'286842' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCD' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
dc404a7ae4d50f93f2e1422e313caf40
801278142c50002c3195f93f980f8ef1b2dad184
'2012-05-18T05:00:11-04:00'
describe
'289203' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCE' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
458c0dee7b7722c3809f7c4fde0ae46b
e3dc2fe55965c70c0165a00d0aa99cf8f9c3f6ab
'2012-05-18T04:57:10-04:00'
describe
'283938' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCF' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
dcc887adee5eac81aa25089d5d821d16
af02ab5bb70d2185721f6c2273b359969e148a39
describe
'286916' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCG' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
63ce08d40be44361188900a1b15a8e2a
39e7b6df1173e09e51cd2885b4468cdc4d66f4ce
'2012-05-18T04:57:06-04:00'
describe
'285739' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCH' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
39eaf3aab99bf41f007bdba070042f3a
b9b5398b39644922b94572ca3aa75d7665f5d2dd
describe
'299386' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCI' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
58a9b86737ddff540ee70f5624336f51
4a4cb53348c3867ade2a06de63b11eeac53359d7
describe
'277264' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCJ' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
7199b064d6b276e986e802435e9dc241
4c5932aaf0bec10508c431e28bfdf5ffb0f4ce77
describe
'286324' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCK' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
1368f6d5e3b5b65488ad5a6314608623
60712efe6533e930806a6b342224c723c6cad50e
describe
'282727' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCL' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
32034ac9e97a5bff3e4cfc1fff647799
4234c4b086260a1d37db6f3fabb33fa84e1339e7
'2012-05-18T04:57:08-04:00'
describe
'282610' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCM' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
8ad374a82470e8a353261bf6f1d5ce3a
6d7f8edf8e242d147efef127c58ed4cd0f462542
describe
'296600' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCN' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
088c6d49b38a7cb64a313a5171ee120a
e65e5b1d305d7b094a68baf4967bf756c3c945b0
describe
'286348' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCO' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
71feb814ddb258bab2b723e447b220d6
4b2a43443f8dfd522687c9dfa06bc39dd5f54e71
describe
'284132' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCP' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
6581daab204952e4af090df0ef2e8989
769873fb960c4fd6c94c5d966571d4fc4213cc33
'2012-05-18T04:59:25-04:00'
describe
'293990' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCQ' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
2904c625ef0721c7c182cd319831432d
a8f10cdbb74d6f3144b216eeab81887575d0eecc
'2012-05-18T04:55:55-04:00'
describe
'44798' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCR' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
043ed72320398b9a2ce33dcffc2c81bd
b5f17a03c0c27a7ed0bd434327fbba6bcd714142
describe
'286618' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCS' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
3081ecf9494980a0521842221e32c545
81f3b2eed595caec84b5fee4c183ccb3b4b6537b
describe
'300636' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCT' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
ec6696e9ac615dc9fb7caf95f35a84f5
aa6bf2e05bfdd538bc14d83facc3b9186ffa0b05
describe
'291591' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCU' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
c6c8a03a90b181b2fdeea5606a7d7f69
3cd0996bf6462d55a3f512bc06d27f36a9c11837
'2012-05-18T04:57:11-04:00'
describe
'7901184' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCV' 'sip-files00001.tif'
f6844a873e8c1550450e52ef1f5c78bb
1651c94a74787958cdcf762811ad60fb8f4ae221
'2012-05-18T04:58:59-04:00'
describe
'2500712' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCW' 'sip-files00003.tif'
5bec87ec4592e1cf2a6af6a0266fe811
be5d6750107dfc45674064116dbbff30a3bb3841
'2012-05-18T04:57:53-04:00'
describe
'2310012' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCX' 'sip-files00006.tif'
abba450e7808aca68ecbf776f3fe1408
d60cd393c6d7d25bd19f8f360848dfeb4cbb6846
'2012-05-18T04:56:01-04:00'
describe
'2105480' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCY' 'sip-files00007.tif'
26dc44e2c791530870b7481a8fbbf66f
2f89c85e04c52f4de394de5dce79b44183e0667f
describe
'2032484' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJCZ' 'sip-files00009.tif'
88bd68d3b9c2a9a89ca47b3a63a2d1d1
c1dfbcc34dfd13ace4b4a829b84f79e764ba30d9
'2012-05-18T04:56:08-04:00'
describe
'2240516' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDA' 'sip-files00011.tif'
4acfcadbf26ae603502768081af1db1d
17f4944bfa169a96bdfa5a6ad9c833da6b548239
describe
'2328972' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDB' 'sip-files00012.tif'
a0b0f97c2ac6ab841e516778c519bfab
f849dc423c63c1c1c98dc2bd24d8912758adf1b4
'2012-05-18T04:58:56-04:00'
describe
'2129912' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDC' 'sip-files00013.tif'
92a5f1775e09c092124b850368c8d43e
f9d00ebfe19122d9fedac6a3325a13696137f8ca
'2012-05-18T04:58:18-04:00'
describe
'2231180' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDD' 'sip-files00015.tif'
5d12053e76b421be642cbeddd95d22a6
e9970e33511ab87f069839571130043837b51381
'2012-05-18T04:55:49-04:00'
describe
'2306244' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDE' 'sip-files00016.tif'
f7f04ff15b4da0d7bca343a404127957
0e0e94c98d272c4f0068b045804c01dcb3c4e922
describe
'2061880' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDF' 'sip-files00017.tif'
517e5f131b0bd7b82b87129730ab9ed0
fb8fac12e04a9fa2c43cdc56f16ec16fc07832d0
describe
'2138996' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDG' 'sip-files00019.tif'
d8f31c8b866d1ab7ec807a9702ee3029
94e7193c6cd7f8ac129c3ff1419cfd503091df57
describe
'2137196' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDH' 'sip-files00021.tif'
358444794a07dbf24ee7ffe0f19225cb
7f2e1dba9f062d3d9e14491f8d7b7adcb552412c
describe
'2126204' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDI' 'sip-files00022.tif'
e75a6e9d1da74b59a30ae1578a3756e7
80449420f66c2c70a8f89edfbd3436ac10c53457
'2012-05-18T05:00:37-04:00'
describe
'2285928' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDJ' 'sip-files00024.tif'
984d415e354ca569ec3cf7fc979b5b58
ff7ebae2569582c9bba5337ba5d6cb97abe64d66
describe
'2153816' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDK' 'sip-files00025.tif'
f58f6059cd72f39fed750932205c6a8c
7150d6738716cc2fe7bb1d527abe4771cb6208d7
describe
'2034492' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDL' 'sip-files00027.tif'
55d2065a37b000068caa7c170c3ac066
7a4be55038c015297034f2a0a68778aa77ee2fd0
describe
'2049212' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDM' 'sip-files00029.tif'
f6e986255cd0692b77cab27c5cbf195e
4c9a3fc4a19018cabdefa10626513b902cf06a32
describe
'2173412' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDN' 'sip-files00032.tif'
e36ee6aa1b8e7b19ce96a78a766c79f5
69ecf8dbd60eef226659b0a07bf08a029237e8f6
'2012-05-18T04:57:03-04:00'
describe
'2320776' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDO' 'sip-files00033.tif'
f603e2f8a24c1732f4f44c87ea9d934a
2b6c992deff3a7c5cd4461c4d8ab1a15634109b8
describe
'2303364' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDP' 'sip-files00034.tif'
db6207f82372f47f1605fc0a00061e91
36d9cd8ad13fe7dbe1b3b789258ee9160e44bcc3
'2012-05-18T04:57:57-04:00'
describe
'2330372' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDQ' 'sip-files00035.tif'
7b47bc75700fc4e75564be628ea45672
1fc59528004a71b5c1152241058f2f7b36194049
'2012-05-18T05:00:17-04:00'
describe
'2195044' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDR' 'sip-files00036.tif'
d44ac7b32e2d28f9d9c727c395e345bc
3a47af81190a2a3b1d9e196aefa56ce800067a45
describe
'2301084' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDS' 'sip-files00037.tif'
0e93fefe9a5a5b5824ef1061246ec0b8
f64c99ddc367d71ad324ffff160b60f3dfd9b5dd
'2012-05-18T04:57:56-04:00'
describe
'2392616' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDT' 'sip-files00041.tif'
8bf3f004ab6f81f1ca1135be15901767
4a9ec77ebf35e4cc0d67a3c91d5f52dff28d076c
describe
'2297108' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDU' 'sip-files00043.tif'
514ab5795bf4ea2313fb6b0cc5ba76fc
f8df59a5d46f19ca9a91f871bafffdc80094bed9
describe
'2450948' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDV' 'sip-files00044.tif'
9d9f3bc685f0476f13cdffaa7199d76e
4a2c15f0269afe5220e0d9013bc803f3ddb924cc
describe
'2366012' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDW' 'sip-files00045.tif'
afaf0125c28f8be9500f839f45e8c1d7
477aff6db13da4788e862c3d99796ebd72c806ae
'2012-05-18T04:55:46-04:00'
describe
'2326484' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDX' 'sip-files00047.tif'
e4e374893f5e829e20aee1092f354bd1
dc10ff660d093f9233f6e77e6088f4c2210c2878
describe
'2298568' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDY' 'sip-files00048.tif'
ce16021be818294f8a6a1478c6ce5cbe
cb6d13b040172a0a545030d0f5fbcaec80233259
'2012-05-18T04:56:44-04:00'
describe
'2408184' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJDZ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
fdfda2d3bb87d8d18389b5932b6201a2
1827b736be6c94bd1744a6c8b838e14b3e06fea2
'2012-05-18T05:00:36-04:00'
describe
'2355928' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEA' 'sip-files00050.tif'
8acb711a51da982b97e6c744295a5696
d0aa38e99ef55010459b11b43a352ede1febb49c
'2012-05-18T04:55:39-04:00'
describe
'2319696' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEB' 'sip-files00051.tif'
acb8fc5240dcd6c22d911dfdd2bdbd05
0f107aacc3192e817cb141810fc5b1ac2b6e25e0
describe
'2282560' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEC' 'sip-files00052.tif'
feb98c39844e7271bdfe54e2a7b54da7
dbaad4d7ce61defb595a91933d4ae5cf7827df89
'2012-05-18T04:59:15-04:00'
describe
'2175104' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJED' 'sip-files00053.tif'
5703584161ce1d85fa3f6119f6cf564f
a10c8c310f504a6b34ba48752ac7291c8503d7dd
'2012-05-18T04:56:47-04:00'
describe
'2492108' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEE' 'sip-files00054.tif'
41b8a38918bc46ab530806aba4cb7799
37e6d67c5ee25029ab06925f9fb49afaa11d906e
'2012-05-18T05:00:05-04:00'
describe
'2301684' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEF' 'sip-files00055.tif'
dcf7e70489753a195f0e0299a8bb2821
9918a84f88b39c7003176a17a2803b551d66cfb4
'2012-05-18T04:59:35-04:00'
describe
'2426352' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEG' 'sip-files00057.tif'
8d1fbf866a4bfe1e833ec8d2b8373248
050ad5332353ed2975d32c32a2af9349b10a58f8
'2012-05-18T04:55:56-04:00'
describe
'2374024' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEH' 'sip-files00058.tif'
a03f4b50c60e59f5a8db26ebc66657c6
3600aebaad18ce2d5576ab1fdad2d8aadad65cf4
'2012-05-18T04:59:06-04:00'
describe
'2314604' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEI' 'sip-files00059.tif'
2504ac246f185484a2b4cd54b6a5cb71
c5bc9a46ff2dcec0773955453fa1e0a861732e38
'2012-05-18T04:57:28-04:00'
describe
'2356820' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEJ' 'sip-files00060.tif'
cb483c5b9e83d76ebc9bed8b35b0c5ae
582c87378125ba4dbe6f7e16cf83426390eddcb2
'2012-05-18T04:57:35-04:00'
describe
'2336904' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEK' 'sip-files00062.tif'
7d42ea62f9fcf3e54e517bbc3669801d
2c410ca20d46952d4f683c9812950db58bd97cf3
describe
'2426840' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEL' 'sip-files00065.tif'
d8e8c6d148d9f6eb3bfdf96a574124f1
537ead8f1bdefa34b101cdb1266570e112973e14
'2012-05-18T04:57:44-04:00'
describe
'2395868' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEM' 'sip-files00066.tif'
e64e1470029eb9d24524cda125ac5a16
4a622c383a6581d46bbc015ded26a723ca4de64c
'2012-05-18T04:58:49-04:00'
describe
'2373012' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEN' 'sip-files00068.tif'
2ecaf834f4294142faedd53bb1d8570c
d0261618612fb73805c4deb118e21e8803d97e4e
describe
'2480016' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEO' 'sip-files00069.tif'
18575d8e341d0750a9735873112d3237
f99a29999d8f4e7181aa3ff5b5011c5adf427a34
'2012-05-18T04:55:44-04:00'
describe
'2483368' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEP' 'sip-files00070.tif'
71324e455906271a81b11d985a0ec5b2
9ea70818c72dd0a548d58c69fdadbf86fdfbb685
describe
'2422464' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEQ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
7717b34c7098fc50f5c4ffd7f3422c7b
ae0541fdef1565e00a6638794cf1a43ad87da25e
'2012-05-18T04:55:37-04:00'
describe
'2306976' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJER' 'sip-files00072.tif'
7a25022a4b55361bb05c3c59f433c184
37174e4f420ea81ffc86bd071691be7285e46df8
'2012-05-18T04:55:52-04:00'
describe
'2322692' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJES' 'sip-files00073.tif'
c2020ad021d64fe46afc7bdfd420141e
829be0655a18ecb9932c80e9a259cab74be3b72e
'2012-05-18T04:58:29-04:00'
describe
'2196908' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJET' 'sip-files00074.tif'
ef74b5f6f99cc637aaa34dd173a592b1
bf05a1b99f1677cd9544bef9ca57c97bee35a13b
describe
'2276168' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEU' 'sip-files00075.tif'
2a2ca1955240e0fc90414f95895aa608
24f87b9f2b46c9b88873d3d3f01cdb1b97ab75bd
'2012-05-18T04:55:18-04:00'
describe
'2306264' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEV' 'sip-files00076.tif'
aca80a8401a4e84c0360d15056c3c95b
35bff8f0aaeac95f8c46570a2de7907e77ba3d8f
'2012-05-18T04:57:59-04:00'
describe
'2324972' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEW' 'sip-files00077.tif'
1cbc9d9916f2db40a4888ccf77c0142b
46ca6785f7caf601d6abae6f21acb8d0de7e1316
'2012-05-18T04:55:42-04:00'
describe
'2449224' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEX' 'sip-files00078.tif'
7d729142c55a57ff47e3cd3e8ed8b632
f7fee096b6f151c2c4c44a598ad072b69417a072
'2012-05-18T04:58:01-04:00'
describe
'2282792' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEY' 'sip-files00079.tif'
11c7bd660e72782f19caaf565d79b655
ad0ba51d9aaad79ec9a470551b27f320932bf28b
'2012-05-18T04:55:13-04:00'
describe
'2357144' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJEZ' 'sip-files00081.tif'
bbb2c05be07364f123b44395b490c533
78245ef87ed3bd7496681f8bc434e095f60ff262
describe
'2299324' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFA' 'sip-files00082.tif'
7eb41f6f184a42006ac5417807670bf2
f0c7c0b74e01b0b9888f087e3e24ba3a5806a13d
describe
'2408352' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFB' 'sip-files00083.tif'
08e894188fe13964b62a5fbc5a55967c
4ea892e2231bc8714dba32fee466f0094d4ed685
describe
'2230068' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFC' 'sip-files00084.tif'
5ad8dd7598f712cdee28c3b99cc61a52
80dbfbea86cc0cfabe43665a11a94590a239ebb2
describe
'2302084' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFD' 'sip-files00085.tif'
113f1656c443c968dc12cc9ecc8b1cc7
b49098cba2cb4f2bccc233360fb93501d56649fd
'2012-05-18T04:59:17-04:00'
describe
'2339660' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFE' 'sip-files00086.tif'
6c26b858ad653765b902a31f5301d05a
4d928463b708c5c29f379fb274e5c2c6996ca35a
'2012-05-18T04:57:29-04:00'
describe
'2273228' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFF' 'sip-files00087.tif'
1f137a14450dc70522cedde5a6948fdf
29b7f3c020939b1c14e7478d790b4101dfc06f85
describe
'2423980' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFG' 'sip-files00089.tif'
585d1ff51416b13cb0cf82a49f1de52b
5f20fb00324d655ba21383d83f1ef79f81f271b3
describe
'2383820' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFH' 'sip-files00090.tif'
1948acc49fb4f3365adecb89c16d1c6d
93159db1a27230d12c8b9c5f4737105c7963f416
describe
'2302520' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFI' 'sip-files00092.tif'
faaa971d9fef3b474e30a9f1f52672f9
69cde894d413e91995b41f3e813cc57712497baf
'2012-05-18T04:57:52-04:00'
describe
'2363604' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFJ' 'sip-files00094.tif'
1279a4077cda118f288b13b0eb06c9ef
88fa435490674694835a2313c938cdb02dd3a8ee
'2012-05-18T04:57:26-04:00'
describe
'2367068' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFK' 'sip-files00096.tif'
7dab20c1814cc872aea439668422a371
8caee06dbb8288b50a64c8e8b6218a3530d5b3a1
describe
'2306484' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFL' 'sip-files00097.tif'
e9596499a736d2a378c84fe043c2ea53
42b63264f2ae8254310889f699cc9deb47612c84
describe
'2416708' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFM' 'sip-files00098.tif'
ba75f1746a54b9dbb138cd90c99fd2bb
d59e58d48c832c6eadbe88853925b7244d5df502
'2012-05-18T04:59:05-04:00'
describe
'2110496' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFN' 'sip-files00100.tif'
253f3364ff18978642076a562ee7d4b5
9b20f9dec25b0856d372310575905c2e3fc61e34
describe
'7773192' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFO' 'sip-files00101.tif'
bfe26d0a6ad66c45b3f362cd7c623203
ae55b75bc3daba8a11589e852b175ed71bab28c9
describe
'7790932' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFP' 'sip-files00102.tif'
46e7ef8ed2d6f182269f8112cbe86e46
b7b96212514daf06f569f9d0ad20ba2fbc6c402b
describe
'1707' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFQ' 'sip-files00002.pro'
20c475947ff981ba61daeed90bb2a09d
a9865ad920aa93d8e32910d96c67d3a750aa6b37
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFR' 'sip-files00003.pro'
a9e682b4cc4c67863d880f1e92a59326
159c448ca66431f8a3bd254aa26bfab3892d3328
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFS' 'sip-files00006.pro'
8006df734df6ec15e72ff45ec7cc5de2
d4c81fd347e928b3eb9c4bf1220fecfd4b002c69
'2012-05-18T04:57:15-04:00'
describe
'7040' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFT' 'sip-files00007.pro'
1f1c4e0e738c1631469a4fca199721bf
90d6862d596a32257ff0bd5da3af7d3e43f85bbf
describe
'13700' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFU' 'sip-files00010.pro'
f30c56d3f2fa3176971f4922283e0272
75251bdde77bae15312f29e7a46a0c7fec8f1d5f
describe
'6541' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFV' 'sip-files00011.pro'
a742b9e6640f090eeeca3962d9340047
1cd42e62f640414169514cc880df6021cb4c4d70
'2012-05-18T04:59:26-04:00'
describe
'9497' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFW' 'sip-files00013.pro'
ad7efd84c8b6e617e3b45ff929e79103
d59e8c0ad55f6e8b9cdd7d925c060590e0514ded
describe
'28174' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFX' 'sip-files00014.pro'
8839b3648802e498d1fafabfb3c62e46
b13a30503043543f03725d2240110247e48529f2
'2012-05-18T04:59:14-04:00'
describe
'25210' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFY' 'sip-files00016.pro'
6a5110d904c8a9bf6cd5dc5aa8e1ec3d
5065132ce9d5f5bcc091a23d10e4285e87ed0f52
describe
'25448' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJFZ' 'sip-files00017.pro'
03ee301616bdf1586a181563a50c9435
91efd3688866003310e4ae35273563d63f092e73
'2012-05-18T05:00:41-04:00'
describe
'25345' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGA' 'sip-files00018.pro'
efa019f6d60b92fe54e999d88945a42f
8f86fdf881eaa06028f87d2e93e37adc5571f942
describe
'25470' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGB' 'sip-files00019.pro'
163546a77a2422264e5f42a172fb2b88
14d69645c02ed74bf43305d66798f2d16aec3e79
'2012-05-18T04:55:28-04:00'
describe
'25084' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGC' 'sip-files00020.pro'
b3d4b0f895b063de28bdf148ba8f5e29
d70a29f896a1a65b4bedd7b01fefb74c23573420
'2012-05-18T04:59:56-04:00'
describe
'27501' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGD' 'sip-files00022.pro'
06f92d677f5b1d33a253e8ab85ac3c8d
33aaebc3eaf45e7ed2939f0a96e68a693497dc3a
'2012-05-18T05:00:14-04:00'
describe
'11223' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGE' 'sip-files00023.pro'
257ab40ffff2372d2d40f11dab5e80a5
8d966fb5f75012e0700ff8f10b5a2bf2d3e794c1
'2012-05-18T04:58:21-04:00'
describe
'13701' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGF' 'sip-files00024.pro'
fadf4a2161f905dd994c63621ab14615
7b25e72b1a5c70605e3a26efbb35c9f3d981cdfe
describe
'757' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGG' 'sip-files00026.pro'
5f05d50ea0784c53283bf7899a4e4678
3ea35a208f3468c4ed84718da5805ccd8e056955
describe
'23103' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGH' 'sip-files00029.pro'
ba5afe75bc8735c4308eea9b294e0620
706ef41104f1bc7962a5d15940ddfb37a90dfd5a
describe
'25947' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGI' 'sip-files00032.pro'
b8485ebbf44556db0e065819499ed337
e2aaf41176f7123bcd32a7282684a393af3ee8d0
describe
'25907' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGJ' 'sip-files00033.pro'
5b1418c7ed6ffa03bb6128e2e85e1ac3
628fc659eb3ebd81a848cba98648a18d3b7a2215
describe
'25562' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGK' 'sip-files00035.pro'
af9bdba17b7f7d9fdb44d173c25c6a8f
a71030b36514274c354b936968b3b66547dd686b
describe
'24760' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGL' 'sip-files00036.pro'
e373dd17e46ba7af5aac1425cc165ec3
ef8f06f83011621fbe0d7c6a35cd29cfef280e9e
'2012-05-18T04:59:21-04:00'
describe
'26069' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGM' 'sip-files00037.pro'
12d8e7fd43a3e142a3a2b18d71ce3fa6
016a0c9cdb3484dce3c07563aebeb8284009e1ec
describe
'18120' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGN' 'sip-files00038.pro'
e9382f64346eb6cae6178cdd9946386c
f1fcb024bb07832849e179febc20f2c21118527e
describe
'15738' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGO' 'sip-files00039.pro'
4e784d8adeed8090b45fe14a3ea25fee
b9c124f0f706cabeddf048a6cf865eb9a431976f
describe
'26906' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGP' 'sip-files00041.pro'
3ff9d49f42649f801648c1b493c6b93e
d2ab1ef085e17c4905c61e515f2182df87ca24e1
'2012-05-18T05:00:32-04:00'
describe
'27307' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGQ' 'sip-files00042.pro'
ea75eb907a3aa1aae71c75494024ade8
3d91f12ba5ada830f1ec24cb6f80b2227af50446
'2012-05-18T04:56:00-04:00'
describe
'24928' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGR' 'sip-files00043.pro'
ce01fcd1c9017ed274ac32dae64ad145
6cf3e0b9db724be0b4ec11280f143659f9a0018c
describe
'26582' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGS' 'sip-files00044.pro'
40d77c5300e85631975fe4ad6f9a2ebe
516a4eb51e04467e64c39389dae685786265c0f0
describe
'25095' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGT' 'sip-files00045.pro'
20c7c166d0c1883d6297abe8acd86843
bcc7508c922a7a795a04499f4c876d3b03e36b03
describe
'26576' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGU' 'sip-files00046.pro'
640c4302fa7756ad3c13d18f289f5854
cf62b1e6f43874623f80f0681b79a2c16b7194b1
describe
'24119' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGV' 'sip-files00047.pro'
8ad224c1319039f5fddb0b6297fb56e8
bf2c370006d17c648b2c160f532249350c2c5125
describe
'21959' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGW' 'sip-files00048.pro'
9c1607b94cb65281db54cc47b37b29d1
a123bd6d0fa2e70da984160e50167a106db1ce7c
describe
'25044' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGX' 'sip-files00049.pro'
c575015d546592ac68b1dd082457a255
8b265e35d010fa1a2ec1a200f25e5aac8a60e46d
describe
'22736' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGY' 'sip-files00050.pro'
55c9fbf013ce7424bee02b5ec48637d0
b894cdbfe1f7e70eab3fd7c0074c5a631835e471
describe
'21373' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJGZ' 'sip-files00051.pro'
b8627a842f74a41e2f815f1d123abbb2
ba96b6ad779827ac16f9d068f58b81254a14ae8d
describe
'26501' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHA' 'sip-files00052.pro'
adbd906d8d3290d0a7ac249d28c90900
91bb28646993362974860399a9af518cfc7c55d5
'2012-05-18T04:58:03-04:00'
describe
'23920' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHB' 'sip-files00054.pro'
fa478c8a87657a79f4e43db7d99a70ad
3270fe50edb68876353bf9b91ba347d82248de0b
'2012-05-18T04:57:42-04:00'
describe
'21706' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHC' 'sip-files00055.pro'
f22d699ad13da0a955d8639974d5f332
182761d57a94a1d70ed498edbe4ec77c02b9dc5a
describe
'24987' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHD' 'sip-files00056.pro'
f460b49eb6d9c7b50d0da220c33926f5
f111c642a1061a61fc2f9f8b1b33647e7ae4c3fc
describe
'10405' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHE' 'sip-files00057.pro'
528e675eca389357b3daabba8b68dc0a
6359096303c89a19486712919175dfb0d3bb89a4
describe
'22532' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHF' 'sip-files00059.pro'
26d6fc992eead3970b68da73df9fffd2
f7421a31d3e8fa66b5af228ebf1bd812164f7967
describe
'25742' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHG' 'sip-files00060.pro'
4f3f4e3adc13c61accd3abee5334ac53
577b0a0c27edad1a2c353486888d0105c30c9ff2
describe
'26249' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHH' 'sip-files00061.pro'
44ff444132a91a58b9e20a8e89af0d32
7e6dbd885c30c265e7a8a52566443d0dc66a76e6
'2012-05-18T04:59:54-04:00'
describe
'25744' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHI' 'sip-files00063.pro'
3d2c731d6232c3ef122cad20c24b1981
b043f73c632180cec4fb90e89e29dc5cac7272e0
describe
'26276' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHJ' 'sip-files00065.pro'
e103f13cf23ca7d554c1cdacf470ad93
d723309f11adb42f944036e039bcc41228fc89b5
describe
'26413' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHK' 'sip-files00067.pro'
3c9ad930e293139a2f909de11387c5e9
b229240242448a5ff5d455fa16db95e8484d0952
describe
'26326' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHL' 'sip-files00068.pro'
f711f93af86fc13e7dc060572f311421
5739652c2e04c4af01a523ddaaf167c6b5ba5339
describe
'722' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHM' 'sip-files00070.pro'
6c21baf3a88a8fd9ea38d7e6a0a54ccd
5c1fce5457fa00c18a720fc33f69673cacb69b28
describe
'27939' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHN' 'sip-files00072.pro'
42a82b9e79526d9461588cfcf587f17f
04167c5a3286717abdb21a100641b004fa4ecd49
describe
'27335' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHO' 'sip-files00073.pro'
a950458c47a3a33bd3956ea9e65020bc
fd73b9739306c1f347e00bd8f4ad06835f7a2880
describe
'25142' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHP' 'sip-files00074.pro'
52052dcd8f87082382dca50019b511c1
58392f985a9d154f4e817115c656b3d791a3e314
describe
'24463' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHQ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
c50323f813614c477d3f84a7343a2b67
3af565022d48c1107d90055d883dd5fa8d4739b5
describe
'14816' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHR' 'sip-files00077.pro'
de370bc6f25a155837d0de459e4398d8
634623bdd587ff964d4dbe5bd74dba8732aa93e8
'2012-05-18T04:58:13-04:00'
describe
'27958' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHS' 'sip-files00078.pro'
176eb6487ca4c42ca701c9c7ed7356ca
b32e03bab36f3f8ab6a0e8c573d4e96cb2c55673
describe
'21573' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHT' 'sip-files00080.pro'
941f1e804c48de44d35dc1460f3c95f6
f4808cd6a9978df13304fa2037630c18437263f8
describe
'25539' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHU' 'sip-files00081.pro'
9a1b6b845fc296651fcaf67cbcea63f6
73264462f8a817346731aa3cd787f563158c42a7
'2012-05-18T04:59:59-04:00'
describe
'25858' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHV' 'sip-files00082.pro'
b5bdfde2f62e32dc27eb0411f1aa7b53
3e9a41cafc32545650706a3ef92481af941751f8
describe
'24371' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHW' 'sip-files00084.pro'
e28636102488851d1572363f70c0e3dd
d3b0997edcd5dc4a92fd7a66b1e055402076c289
'2012-05-18T04:57:27-04:00'
describe
'26876' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHX' 'sip-files00085.pro'
6db295a3e401e3dffe5fbe4c3a9c0c63
c70c8a3c5e012879897f29ed2d220aad33bd453c
describe
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHY' 'sip-files00086.pro'
e0305cf0e8fc046bb98924d3217fcf2a
0b928d99e64ca4ca1d17b6187127e90d85194eea
describe
'25863' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJHZ' 'sip-files00087.pro'
76d372fcdda9a0bb73e91b3b06e42872
3ed7f24e16f6f7aea461a3ed5b40b85e198c8325
'2012-05-18T04:59:40-04:00'
describe
'14401' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIA' 'sip-files00090.pro'
ea3617bf36b6cf5824a579e30b3b10fe
bc8d715be5121a65dff652c4fa9073ca12793040
describe
'26744' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIB' 'sip-files00091.pro'
d3a81992edbb767b1757eac0cca754e8
b0cefcf61feb7ae17d169da8b165dcf7a1c95cbd
describe
'28061' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIC' 'sip-files00092.pro'
022d026ea2975bf08daf6a203483f55b
dd281f5ec63045e5bfeef2ceee3cad7bd590f1c1
describe
'25416' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJID' 'sip-files00093.pro'
405156f8b30b8e1cea4455d3b4403e85
e8027f8423eec0b8c046d0dcafcd2e81f9066b2a
describe
'27502' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIE' 'sip-files00094.pro'
52367063b88bfbd197ea31d286daef06
1284d1cd8402d7e89134e7543ee21d56c6b3b3e6
describe
'28989' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIF' 'sip-files00095.pro'
852263e592c9241e6dddf6972590d2a3
5635748f337cf196cfb8860375e725a4d8ce0319
describe
'2227' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIG' 'sip-files00096.pro'
ae6361378f5e47597c04557deb15dfaa
c1e226558e4d785da3ce47cf74c483ae1d4e8fc8
describe
'38404' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIH' 'sip-files00097.pro'
86f3215d414397a2c25a4c67cc6bdee8
625af05f2027027d9b2d1c7191db21da268484e0
'2012-05-18T04:58:20-04:00'
describe
'31200' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJII' 'sip-files00098.pro'
193021089245fc0fbb98efa6e0cc9892
88769c47dc6fadbff9124795913bd9d5d92373dc
'2012-05-18T04:59:22-04:00'
describe
'29989' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIJ' 'sip-files00100.pro'
db935c2b1eee5ac278d07afae9a969ef
4fc9a495eb452de0ad763b7afb24a4e1d9a39696
describe
'522' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIK' 'sip-files00101.pro'
e39a1a8872d5b6cdd2c8662f1e336749
7dc8feb6dcd1edff116c5a5e47beb662b2c538c1
describe
'52' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIL' 'sip-files00001.txt'
fbc5c17d6f792f852acd09463d1f1343
04b11ca21555e734c97ad425989d69f6477b7a63
describe
Invalid character
'234' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIM' 'sip-files00003.txt'
1b72007fb93f564e4373658ea1b28aa4
8ed64d66585e5b6f27f0e8f94105a8f6e5d65b3f
'2012-05-18T04:56:59-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'99' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIN' 'sip-files00006.txt'
cb5e2baea058e19f61f52146445c1553
ea80d6deafd4313dab119b0791cb2ab165e36205
'2012-05-18T05:00:18-04:00'
describe
'440' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIO' 'sip-files00007.txt'
f7636979dc148fb2b4f71de5dc58ae14
fb1734c7f4c510f8c765f163bd0fd84c727c13e3
describe
'649' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIP' 'sip-files00009.txt'
c33a17f95a458059ed8911574a14e3f5
dd40f3ecc2a0b4af1c2fafed4016605dfdd175d7
describe
'570' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIQ' 'sip-files00010.txt'
9302ef59e4a2d0bd1ac56179c9eb3775
b3574ed56f6cdc89699adb1b45cdb54acccf5e29
'2012-05-18T04:59:23-04:00'
describe
'424' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIR' 'sip-files00013.txt'
a02884bbdfea16eed93b3eb312b6db6d
9bf0afe8315c796e53f81188934a2da66a31a61b
'2012-05-18T04:59:43-04:00'
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIS' 'sip-files00014.txt'
1695f7d02829ac3c50d0c7a27655c19e
14200632391f33d098d8d2b6cadac961027b9579
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIT' 'sip-files00015.txt'
0b3bb37b4410e92757036029df7c4013
d8d7ae28f785ad6a30f15e685b0fad8c5d7438c6
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIU' 'sip-files00016.txt'
8eede8c58ecda97b7b75a3577088744d
79bd01221e88270da02a024ba297e1f3d722dab0
describe
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIV' 'sip-files00019.txt'
17368908d66a1d3be39bb55ec9a30680
c0591ed0accf0c10cb6350968495b02ffa0d6793
'2012-05-18T04:58:54-04:00'
describe
'992' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIW' 'sip-files00020.txt'
c525509b501ad1fc56fdadd5c0b0346e
e974e7ee43d9d4117d6e791a92d1d0d1af38efad
describe
'968' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIX' 'sip-files00021.txt'
6686f3bff8e8ac6ad9464261eca8a091
0b14a35b8dc7f6cc9f87f99082b7b98a0f389150
describe
'1082' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIY' 'sip-files00022.txt'
6e82a6d16a719b957774077b3a24202d
f7f8bc14687f0bf4b9de55b4b465ecc7196d5e8c
describe
'467' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJIZ' 'sip-files00023.txt'
8a1a0fe6beabf09e6223e5827460ca01
e53a2efdef4dc5d6855a204a582a255e15ab64c9
describe
'124' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJA' 'sip-files00026.txt'
69a8f1c412d4dc9c70ece944ff9d1165
5edbb342c1573d3ee97fb2cfa7821db00cdfa57d
describe
'1020' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJB' 'sip-files00027.txt'
cf64b0dbc97a6b4c5e0f28cf6f982183
2d30d7a840f15f4ec91d35b410dfaf865f4f81d4
'2012-05-18T04:58:19-04:00'
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJC' 'sip-files00028.txt'
ef80e50795a1719fd4143faa25f3a483
690def6ca7ea518a68d731998c25c68b570f15b2
describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJD' 'sip-files00029.txt'
2563625e83af5bdf771016958ddc77fa
eed25cf6b783279d799b4b3e27221d07f0ba9be9
describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJE' 'sip-files00030.txt'
6776aaf3a4492a32adfcfc135dd77e80
31cf5cea22267a628da8a2866e0091f86c6d6b25
describe
'965' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJF' 'sip-files00031.txt'
b05c732fe440bce9e2a8ec0164f4ef6d
adf232ca5ddf0009e7da7f01f57b9c351918d2b6
describe
'1060' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJG' 'sip-files00032.txt'
779ba0bd71c354a351adf885627e13d3
b0b3e51d99dc17240f00ec9f6fd460eb0633aa22
describe
'1025' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJH' 'sip-files00033.txt'
dd3b1174b0701c7c6699f9ecb4743bae
5dafb9e89f17ff8e1d4977ddb857d2b0e9249d08
describe
'1034' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJI' 'sip-files00034.txt'
6706b3a58d306e95ef831f704dc22a9a
17a12a9d8fb4e72bf1a479117460ada2e170f8e5
describe
'1011' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJJ' 'sip-files00035.txt'
310118aee83337941534402e79568c6d
da88fa1485f56244eec7b01859f3d3497a3d4a52
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJK' 'sip-files00036.txt'
69dd444f308bb6cf983fceca08a82e79
551d5c89a16ddf7f9ae08ecfd6bcf46204c422eb
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJL' 'sip-files00037.txt'
d312b74a725ada938dde89473d1e89db
140e06ceab70d5705208a9d40b0f3dd65f5ec6f5
describe
'755' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJM' 'sip-files00038.txt'
2be5b5fb00cba479b1e9ef26bc8c8d9a
9004676b0aa2b3b71909a21ad31a1bdd64346ddf
describe
'725' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJN' 'sip-files00039.txt'
ee3e76c9ab39491d34bd5a19d590be1a
d4261010ebff747506305c5b5c4ee2ea2d8f0cd3
describe
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJO' 'sip-files00041.txt'
585c7dc004e6d7358d7ceaf28fa8ee57
b3f8952938a8a882fedb8f171334a0b8214b7a2c
describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJP' 'sip-files00042.txt'
3c0e717d8f75f87cbeea3a3742398cd7
f6e49aa5dcedeb43df39472360804ced1c7269dd
describe
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJQ' 'sip-files00043.txt'
48990adbae5874e2d3415d63ff933cd0
103bb4d1cd815d58f0b206472158611aacf997f9
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJR' 'sip-files00044.txt'
1318a5d23f0953afa25b5e5a6048d83b
090be044e86bd798ba271aff053e8f23f1328353
'2012-05-18T04:56:39-04:00'
describe
'1040' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJS' 'sip-files00045.txt'
3ba35d825820e5987f895612fd0c6c9a
7daf210a4279b8772cc6ad9d90ee4e618c7254fe
'2012-05-18T04:58:25-04:00'
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJT' 'sip-files00046.txt'
963f3b1f4f0cb0f39ebfae55f73783ea
4bbd97dcd63e321e88f713f7a0e09857a11d5652
describe
'1002' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJU' 'sip-files00047.txt'
febe4d0a7172b4ee953b836c0feab1fc
077a7f5c3b4dcac544cd7fa2ab96204a849f9465
describe
'905' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJV' 'sip-files00048.txt'
003e783b9b90a8a6750e99c5743ae6cb
9765b9a14e442818af85529efc318058ae9fd227
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJW' 'sip-files00049.txt'
396b2b6dc26c674c9b2f3238eecbc3cf
38417a2a3f1602297e7dc9afdb0a4ee4a2457983
'2012-05-18T05:00:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJX' 'sip-files00052.txt'
450a5d1dc75d1057c0e35fb7431ce39a
1e9fc61414ec49cda227f9de46e0802b4af3e3df
describe
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJY' 'sip-files00053.txt'
7c9cc302edfe511423c029539e455837
2431ec63ec689d9e638b1839c5a9952c214ef4e2
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJJZ' 'sip-files00054.txt'
a662a8721decacadb456cae1d9189b48
be2567e2bf0d3aceb7585c5b7e9ee313f3c77d24
describe
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKA' 'sip-files00056.txt'
ed05fcc1fba97402fcb804c82c7d7d9a
ada58d8c007ddd200a0baf51a6a8f8742b599550
describe
'434' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKB' 'sip-files00057.txt'
6720893d77a1e1ba05d64e290aee82f1
50da10ecb285500adbf47d8aed11bad86852224b
describe
'619' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKC' 'sip-files00058.txt'
31f5d46e1baa3ad1935927bf84246af4
f75f89488ef6ab8b3d362aacedacf1d0a9e601f9
describe
'958' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKD' 'sip-files00059.txt'
09609af495627e9816a58decfffff734
b141aecef378a4d654d934c8c2351093ea0354bd
describe
'1015' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKE' 'sip-files00060.txt'
27769449e0e9c364db246ecadf74cd08
78bb5943bc463597fadff7ce3bd7ce2a97165e5f
describe
'1036' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKF' 'sip-files00061.txt'
04321895ee24844b92ac469b555c0db4
1031487804d0b18254924fb86d27f9b519776c15
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKG' 'sip-files00063.txt'
e862a7d283be390bf50df9b3fd12feb9
94d90a4a9c68cc72b364cc3dae554e386c1a0a3f
describe
'1018' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKH' 'sip-files00064.txt'
c8a8bf31833431d2c5a35e026c714704
b98a78b8ca2a79b6bafa7cca090db39a816b361c
describe
'1074' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKI' 'sip-files00065.txt'
ca58ef8b0961b4e34cc3765f334f3f2f
5438833744e384ed0779075d9e93da877269f6d6
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKJ' 'sip-files00066.txt'
bc7ade0ff0f4f8c716590b53b67827f2
5307487e07acd2e5a5c455d63d3d728c2b177bfa
'2012-05-18T04:59:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKK' 'sip-files00067.txt'
7c570a280ce1321529b4d702bfa5a163
c59e427aa9b182ea8ce3010cb566b318649ef97d
describe
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKL' 'sip-files00068.txt'
8a626119163b675a4d8a4ddaeb27113a
d360a4574da223d622fdfe57366d49dbfd714443
describe
'127' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKM' 'sip-files00070.txt'
1b676994d01d94332ae48eb9801db539
d8df25ad1ddf28d7373e7bdaaab9cc33102f33d1
'2012-05-18T04:58:04-04:00'
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKN' 'sip-files00071.txt'
34602000029e0991dd85ffbcf5b5e5cf
c7905fefff3e3e9a49b0903ebac3a2c9783520aa
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKO' 'sip-files00072.txt'
c1d2277555cc8bf51ae175ea8dfe37df
6fc0c1261f03cdc2ecd8ba1ea3ff73e540cfdda5
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKP' 'sip-files00073.txt'
b54991c7132f3445702d05c3374733c4
dc787ab98d42732d4452c68c374d3d159a088a61
'2012-05-18T04:57:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKQ' 'sip-files00074.txt'
a7a0677eb1acfdaab5d5ad38cf6ca5b9
216a31f5fd83e4a5479a6325ce6b67ca902ffab6
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKR' 'sip-files00075.txt'
3b6ecbbbb5d2e1c1a4d1957f8371a3fa
7d43ca4dfa25525793f3f31eaaaa29c8a8987909
describe
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKS' 'sip-files00076.txt'
ae40a4a4815f39a4f7fdec5e9b15a4e1
d4655d496de2d05eccdbd6d13408f8b5e039c36f
'2012-05-18T05:00:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKT' 'sip-files00078.txt'
9fc64303521e29fe13097982005909b1
d26fa55ce46eec8044550dabeded6c44ee5992bd
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKU' 'sip-files00079.txt'
36df493a29ee8575ec8e25756bb0cc01
69771274b7d1615d829e2c9a82310674b084feb4
'2012-05-18T04:55:59-04:00'
describe
'1071' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKV' 'sip-files00080.txt'
a6850c5462f0c4ca9322878a8ce8c1c2
edd036c4e780702ad5b151ac041950e30dbba0e2
describe
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKW' 'sip-files00081.txt'
572ef1fd715badfe6450e38ecda702e3
9d0bad3cc43fd086c2206001b936a1514f283585
describe
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKX' 'sip-files00082.txt'
383f3224acf52389c2da636b64fcafc1
6b0183ddd07cc441270e7036232f0bfe8b02aa18
describe
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKY' 'sip-files00083.txt'
1816af9d146c08c952ec5343163b0ffb
4213ac28f43c044752ccf05f4c86e7a0c3dec34e
describe
'967' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJKZ' 'sip-files00084.txt'
78dde13f2bf8187770bb14d5e9161a62
6f15a550164140cbf334fc792b0c362b32f5943c
describe
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLA' 'sip-files00086.txt'
dfac3e1ed8028c67f60744cc8c80b2bf
9bd5ac4ebfee0e8117b5e801ca3744ec8b69ea05
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLB' 'sip-files00087.txt'
fbb0ecdac2def243ed5c5fe5126cf43a
de1eed0012f9c0db2dc089389b2d6ce691043ff5
describe
'665' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLC' 'sip-files00090.txt'
431e1e5eacdc97e51694cc3720d57732
c1efb862b5b84e2e84d4bf5673cace6f2687aafb
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLD' 'sip-files00091.txt'
975d5a90557617df19620962d00be1ac
bba6dd86bab737bc0d30df414a4629b0f0379d27
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLE' 'sip-files00092.txt'
680ed398ae1fdea84017e83d35bb49db
2594ff65da2d2800668733787f0348704bccc20a
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLF' 'sip-files00095.txt'
77195e4c34ae568f9b79d51f433390ce
dc0b94919767890c1418a23d9cf95ae76e337988
describe
'172' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLG' 'sip-files00096.txt'
03013c269b587837b06fddd0032d7c29
4499b653d8c9b6b5d07f21e2ef5e789c06b350d5
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLH' 'sip-files00099.txt'
29e6db9df17263221a907449d73f5fee
2e7faf527faf4002916ceffc5bbf82012e4533e8
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLI' 'sip-files00100.txt'
41260170a870be8b40b1924a03b2132a
db45c6663d67f86476b34787777a17b4def87f3d
describe
'17' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLJ' 'sip-files00101.txt'
0095a31be36f76911ea4c963582ca3d3
59ca9d22db1fda16b5abe6b137a89dd459bf3a02
describe
'48067' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLK' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
48c18cbcc6d1e4f9657a8bd447357b3c
835ddb9f9982984670796da6694cce3595e61d27
'2012-05-18T04:58:41-04:00'
describe
'152966' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLL' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
93dbbd7f31720f735bf860f28751bcf5
e2c95299e45265cb96b1055a347b1753d6ca5621
describe
'90742' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLM' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
c8299ec17597b46e12d681ee8a9b03e6
66882eb778514079f2c47cbb969d94f221b0b40c
describe
'31205' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLN' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
403e8880562bfe0474c51cc87641cc16
536cdbf496c86c8de70dfc6d810d75b01117cc82
describe
'94470' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLO' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
0ed731f48a1439d111389a130f9b97c5
93a274edd9375badb6b9f9960875ab9d5da3cca1
describe
'33025' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLP' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
f348fd129e0b414ed8ed945da576c013
374dd5e01bf4a15040eab41a6fab6adc01c8e601
describe
'11561' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLQ' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
8bf4bccc01352894c519965db8ed66b0
6a444c7a401d1d109622630a5b51a8c443fec4c2
describe
'112977' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLR' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
c1bd62fd1ae5194a8ddd2c36099c4f37
f759c912c4a4a84594ae1134eca93309e60a8e20
describe
'40746' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLS' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
66521748f30dcf4115d73605c5362fb5
eb413d4eb9cc83e48706d09152220dc1acd2b4eb
describe
'74789' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLT' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
87ae22d575a3a2ccd5f02542d697b013
34b8ce5ec743d290e9790d49b8f44bff919f27a8
describe
'32915' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLU' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
bc2965af63c4fcca4c7b6c5136985c30
85f8ad0bece307375b84afe3b8d23516087487b1
describe
'23596' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLV' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
514d4232f4b99b1ea9ebd3d20cd5c49b
1cf8872adc178f6707a5a39ea3edcc1c7d1cdb18
describe
'103013' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLW' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
a7b662bf34f1934a58cf31fd6dd2074a
1240951afd0768cef7f89f34b57f560f11979c13
describe
'39522' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLX' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
6917e37bc77fad8dcc1b32edb1b2fa78
af473027830d4c280edfa807b259645c4c2d751a
describe
'68734' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLY' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
562c08013864e06ef664db1904a9d502
26be8e28e7d19f3172ea33ab38988999d7d93402
describe
'28227' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJLZ' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
b522075bbe5f145afa21bd78b243c283
7b7de3fc3238103d274f77d33403eed480429051
describe
'26348' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMA' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
d06439eddc26f42e50b7f2823ffb8374
1c34022948de7007378e15552ca6839813066eb7
describe
'11401' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMB' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
881de5887bfb15dcc64aad4259707712
f1777273309256d11983d2317281751ffecffae1
describe
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMC' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
c5c80061616eab10d2c1c6fbb5af29bb
b34f5e6a816a959bf478c2940f41f1c1be989a8f
describe
'90354' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMD' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
a504eafb5262d6dbb838207aae30f343
1d8e094ec7823e14b26546e1e7772bc5498d0f1b
describe
'112856' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJME' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
0c248cc02ad9f0f266da4344db0df26a
aa86c7eecf21ce638b80a953b801811fbdc60ac2
describe
'42402' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMF' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
f07627ace0283e2e435411aca0d394c7
0a6ba77e5f2acc68af5fe7a72d06bc122faa15a7
describe
'106230' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMG' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
6ca711fdfebe35396435fba9ef092c9e
0c8e3047052e0fa8e3d8274fb2a3e803466c0b61
'2012-05-18T04:55:26-04:00'
describe
'39274' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMH' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
ea35d5db555a10b34bfd90e0ff13e2c9
addeb4324f784ebeae60eb0cf9b47afbe23ce903
describe
'40116' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMI' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
0cfdc79d4609016a7e50133ff6a24115
549015e32665b5b36d6c9969cea839693aa37b91
describe
'118912' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMJ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
095811aa3766299031bd6c065c848cc0
a50d2b9029908aec2bebe4fcc68253906c5038f7
describe
'44582' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMK' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
a4a004dca164519d6d907b012ee9d92b
8e10a198cee10f414ab6e128ebfe59c984e62354
'2012-05-18T05:00:26-04:00'
describe
'42559' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJML' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
1d84bf7d463f2565ff7493b74e776c6f
466a385a42e62410ba0eb39359ec7a02cc58806c
'2012-05-18T05:00:06-04:00'
describe
'122434' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMM' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
f5669815068b7124bf05394e404cfdfd
4721ae939c029552528d6c0815a8b270c50a325d
describe
'113218' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMN' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
6bcec6b87d9d6db297343fd0ab8a9d98
0ec8523f73fa6a9eeb13097fc8d58ee2ed74cacb
'2012-05-18T04:59:08-04:00'
describe
'39301' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMO' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
ad2b6d31c46fd3bfc72bba045355ec8e
861da7ac641c5f77b27f2d54a3805b1727b55db7
describe
'133062' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMP' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
c181e1609e286f2f169176a42c439a7e
57bfc27c0c422476196d59a2e1c7a81937191277
describe
'64649' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMQ' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
2c1cef9da0a6cd97596ae5617185c2e7
be60c7cc7cf311fdb11b8adfb3d6cb8df22533de
'2012-05-18T04:59:48-04:00'
describe
'27035' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMR' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
d9024a66c5657d410760c57bf758413a
62edb9cb563e62c20c136957342d63512f130799
'2012-05-18T04:58:37-04:00'
describe
'84917' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMS' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
7c679fcacb75e358949bfdc339254c42
0bb447f7fe5720bb78310ccded5afc4686626599
'2012-05-18T05:00:42-04:00'
describe
'34003' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMT' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
cb263a65f1d8ba8582ba262c3aa4c773
ac2354c3b798e2d3dd96deacbf0afc616a4f269e
describe
'9797' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMU' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
4b3a19de233bf167b673f0754897c63d
5566be442ae3bd62c0e8809fb985ff100bfe3654
describe
'114688' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMV' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
50c64d773b546a6e323cb05cbc3f01dd
dd8d3eb7eedf2e1966be776691fa23cd70b9d192
describe
'40290' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMW' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
c77b243ea952d6218cb1d7f2aacb4fab
aa176635e5da51288a6d728b6a56fbc0b4260783
describe
'125321' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMX' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
8e6c0365847d0e10d07688cb26f01b20
b9dc2852b5d68109500618cfac38a4684c742e39
'2012-05-18T04:59:36-04:00'
describe
'45067' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMY' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
3b7f3a2589125663e72dd7a1b9315ca1
6fc82c7427797fddeb830a4ef34e56db7bc49aba
describe
'102497' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJMZ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
f13378e9a1069bd5d9caa70dd7a61751
ef94c2cc912d8dc62f6bd8412a26ac0cdea42636
describe
'40118' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNA' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
96d700cada58f53cbdcb3daa889091f6
47185858614d08a1241b22fcdbb5b0af352bd5b2
describe
'113353' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNB' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
3a89dcf2e2dcdc4e136b262a6d465cbf
474c43b600e292e0ea0555feb16f1dadc03893cf
describe
'40239' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNC' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
ba8d42a5653fbb52e027ed78856908d3
bf89ceb704f513f6e9282b832a2a868c478ff5fa
describe
'102988' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJND' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
54a28e033a1bd4d5535f2678f93ab8a3
2ccc49c66117d0e306ee5767b39aa76d668405db
describe
'39168' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNE' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
f9b67d3795f7190390233772f477a021
cb47daef29946e642234557284d8a2895221cd43
describe
'102083' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNF' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
f359eac2f6faaad14665b623bb5b9b0f
4d337c9eb622cdf327cd0617f43d8f561caaf86b
describe
'114584' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNG' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
dc6c46751e6eac0a225ea627754c2263
7ae82d75f739d058dac11ac9591e35a483ce1ac3
describe
'41073' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNH' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
e6b0a510353e321cca9838d3b6b3058e
eb4f5c871b1e15a51cb131b44bdbf8f44e284099
describe
'101986' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNI' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
d80eb112827840e4584b3feee096c6af
317456a53bdc442984fa7b6ce3aeff20571776ab
describe
'39791' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNJ' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
322320d1fbbd0f3cd45a278c052e9ef3
f73188bd5e729dfc62dc4de164d57122b44d911e
describe
'37198' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNK' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
f5a51527ef6e8307b9d13cc06f863567
7f3cc981ed84ce43e002fa43f79b7c84bb600cc8
'2012-05-18T04:59:29-04:00'
describe
'102254' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNL' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
91ad69d3cafaea6aee24577222813ac5
273934796d9010bb3edfe71d9239c85588c0dc07
describe
'36261' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNM' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
b6f871e2afedf396fb21378c2af83da9
79d414991881494820c8d07d8561b89834221b91
describe
'112491' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNN' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
c0a7c32c8fe5ea6b4bf2f656eb4e5ff9
9f1a1279001b067d6bc933d7d3a2c90af4335994
describe
'101814' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNO' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
d0ba12a58a288219b42deac4df665573
b1c9f5907944985cb6b910a4f132dfed34bb84b2
describe
'91934' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNP' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
1ad06dd14bdfa1070168c13e34baf106
b3c3f9b5c0e83da81868c6b111aed37d5f590fef
describe
'89664' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNQ' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
48753bf40316a96c71059bd01e00e4b6
3cd0824060364ac628afb55276d121b3914faa32
describe
'35436' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNR' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
28efbd87366d3bc1ab3593c2d40119a4
f2a1f868a41d5a7a65a5068a5ec1ae615ff525b3
describe
'111461' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNS' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
97466697ed0830c1b0a50a26cfbaecbd
351dfadeaa91dba6054e366d93c639914312fb4a
'2012-05-18T04:57:18-04:00'
describe
'38609' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNT' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
4a525f514f50ee7af95972c93d4037b9
c2b380c1ce5cf43d00d93f7cd9ad8f82b6d7dd80
describe
'104327' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNU' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
bc8a92a6005365a51cebd593c8e0721c
80427e8c9e53f220957358de4f6f623500543a8a
describe
'38081' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNV' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
23bb5d336cf4e31a4ac80b7dc5a71f03
8d470ace04462c75f5309cf5f16acf7e81e5a16a
describe
'104140' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNW' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
2f9d8c2f33c3b561795c3e75cbb1921e
bdd2dce7f89171ecfca326442bcad77e1fbb60a6
describe
'106694' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNX' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
137b37f7fafda970b0168359f4122592
2fe2cd9fe589b56053a4ce3d6defd4c588267133
describe
'38487' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNY' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
54ede6d25505b99a7a5f3492a2772a6b
be51ffc6e7db1f4b9e29f99235725de2db56bfe1
describe
'98296' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJNZ' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
dbad25cd84217341ac561d94d056ce74
6b92e07b2e2cfd31dc685eb30c8ba28fbd49cb86
describe
'38916' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOA' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
f150208fda462ce59d439eed033dfc03
2da16ec3c433919681e6bbf8a3295cb33c7ccff6
describe
'102448' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOB' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
e087e1468a973c377b8dc8bac2421891
73c3f99766d325d25de7676a34dc2e5b25755105
describe
'38033' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOC' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
de825126d9fec1ffa0ac91e1bdc05c5f
b6379f2b79008d6ebe92242f1dcc36921583e222
describe
'104918' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOD' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
3c59856da64b86086747603a0a010d84
b4a9eee613013b1975cf4e5eb18c59235ccbd353
describe
'37752' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOE' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
6abb674cae727bd47cd644a00d067031
e8fac8f69643e9b3873711664492f0b7ef6d9890
describe
'97396' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOF' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
7ba3b13e8b72edb16250bcee16a38a85
ab0f6f6b4168ddb47ed228bb0434e9e598e097ef
describe
'37755' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOG' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
74cf88c646539934da65d884a1997b00
25f958bd7c786224620e1c6cd2bb0e36176e1bc2
'2012-05-18T04:59:46-04:00'
describe
'93242' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOH' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
4911d1f05c29862668b2b348209a7e26
ab7a11f950a2a0e6312cf83d63ec72cc83051a3e
describe
'35615' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOI' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
c6f626a1dc967d67442165e905703267
8ff956d6cd51738ada7dd993de875c53d65e2638
describe
'100534' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOJ' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
b82d93c31a3680462ae08b378a3536e3
876d45a1a867180d3305d797fe6d783afa23430a
describe
'38150' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOK' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
167618c4b04ea8c84b3b0f5149365dc1
4e3196c127a1aefac29eacf1f844ae2401c1a303
describe
'90904' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOL' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
b1d7627e68e2b6296b372e0f0ee501d2
9e649d5ede63cfab24ae6efe110a515420dcc80d
describe
'86774' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOM' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
0fbee446364f14619d9e81b9107dc757
379ad71c440b0512470ad6e2ac7dbc73afb4e77b
describe
'36188' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJON' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
4f3abd81ea1c33b1f7faf976108c5215
ca65f020f4ad5feecebe6498ceadf4f4ae9735b8
describe
'104479' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOO' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
8aeabfa64cca3554aaad5e5d900e637c
bfababc01a266a9faf042c9da5187a33ae090caa
describe
'38468' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOP' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
c9e15cec29e04668217dd25ee9bfba16
6b56b322a4f7fa53d5f33a6e9b30aa2f07d4efd0
describe
'109894' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOQ' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
7757f7988fc2c23fc3fb9a1219800f60
f029b7ebfe7f3858641382ebabb290a05e95136a
'2012-05-18T04:55:10-04:00'
describe
'43016' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOR' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
5d7edeb0d6d13709fea3933b1e9e60e5
fa0e58b1d9f661f0a77d335f6f83742e956f8867
describe
'95226' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOS' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
af0fd18d75658e5a2ac9c1602c2e4a90
745be06aab9884a1ee8e0c0f76cf7fe977c63594
'2012-05-18T04:58:51-04:00'
describe
'35682' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOT' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
4dbabb4333538debec2080653e930f5f
36b597627d7feaa285c32e0c5069589471bafe32
describe
'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOU' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
09638c342b727650f05765ae501a5b02
34c7dfe623baf59687acd6b45f928b0eb8332124
describe
'36167' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOV' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
118950e5c1fbde9c8f0765d385fae9e1
d727da8020b93bad5e0fb5559084d2a42d7796cb
describe
'52709' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOW' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
f3f46c2ef1e74863e3eb1eb08108b9dc
59794a4b82983d5784fd8a0799384b29c1cbb816
describe
'23059' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOX' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
68903512fd23d8ec3a989a55a7902656
250f0065482fc2d80ea25bb2f02013341889bef4
describe
'32834' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOY' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
1fa8d72131956d5603aa50ebfbb3cec1
833767c65d5c3ab71d950c4fbee5101624f0d68c
describe
'92279' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJOZ' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
74d016d31386291413cafaea074f765a
6504a0100f66e89248b34a2fd3405bd8bad09159
describe
'34438' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPA' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
c98c7af736f73075cd3ecb487dcad1ce
418b50c5448155655c3ffa6b6a9773c34a2b8374
describe
'100207' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPB' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
9a7cc2e97693a9b7c8b94fd723dedac5
2bf31bd3b9224d9f92015015dcb20f208ac0f2c4
describe
'100284' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPC' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
033d8ab72db4cbaa6fb0f78a2fe56b4c
0761b1a6910287282e19916a4ea70cc24cbb18dd
describe
'105179' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPD' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
b5b86a0613cac2637bd4ea97ae123f81
dc96a6615fdf6274165ff80be6e03c2b9460e53a
describe
'38388' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPE' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
0eabf36baaddf8755cd1da8654ec4ff1
5c392ff6de3217eb401d4d435e3352378805a11f
describe
'103106' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPF' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
09a4d28fc4f4d0eaed7f4b56f8d79399
68713acc3d2eb6f46dbf233f8b320f15ea4a540d
describe
'102459' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPG' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
b639645161bd2f5506fab9229a0f710f
6d67846730de0bd00c101bb07a1adf13c56d7d95
describe
'37018' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPH' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
3ff9da78d4b98d00925bbc8a91d6563e
76dea3e38f1fdf242eb0711a61be7b887b8aee19
describe
'108591' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPI' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
705c504b85ecb84725e505e4757878cd
4bd3cd076b21311fe7b3ef9cc7728155b6b789be
describe
'104953' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPJ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
8cb40c93821f3065f3aec5f128839470
440febf9845c29013eff9deb83dfbba83f5cb4ce
describe
'38954' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPK' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
63d540a81ee3e606a8a9f96ed7dd8b48
056cc4e7e5aef5d5185ca2d52f525b8055d60cca
describe
'108723' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPL' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
5ed1685f23054aeb7cc9f6eb4d4f7dae
d5104b9da8e1486373e6568c70d460286542af2f
describe
'11349' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPM' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
6416cd611400633a420127fc675e0823
062bfd89550a9d1bc17aecd9874a581aadb46867
describe
'9829' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPN' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
58896e3b530255f4d527a83c6629294f
66183d47b6f6997056159f1f4455fd2faa0d95c5
describe
'103197' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPO' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
ce6c4c69c4a4bbaa705b3ecc92c8ac4a
350d0af002b279fa8fd4aae50f58d67045127588
describe
'38114' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPP' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
9bd3e14ca99b3a35a23bcafb79142615
31f114def0fda31a745d4fdf0148689af81c731f
describe
'103484' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPQ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
12cdea0f7a29cf8fa972e43e2d78da9c
d039deb08f08d995bbe826081f342a6e12ab7449
describe
'38079' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPR' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
e67f00df261cea2ac2afc6f6c7e4928e
1bd0046e95e2af154d5715e07ab169e423413d96
'2012-05-18T04:59:50-04:00'
describe
'109865' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPS' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
6d818de912af3696df14e6c24c7e6fb2
80c8ca1d3f430b54c6388e9a75732ad26106319e
describe
'37413' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPT' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
e6a58fd618ca4ca6acde5a96c8e22959
daebdb5812081665151d0e704d3d38c0d4a09806
describe
'109476' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPU' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
724ea97981ad091c4b6057b6595e8162
bb60c4a5a9a4b269ce57047984bd3dd68c5d1cdb
describe
'37777' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPV' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
ba27db0bdd009a69cc14eaca8738c11d
701a2c6c2ffe97d37d8011481219dba39647457a
describe
'102005' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPW' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
f63f8712a747209cb1f8ce8e6a43b8c4
ea6b0ba1a57aa6b9838dd41dec2cd1f247083749
describe
'110558' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPX' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
a14d03ec868352fa73eecc5760e3ddff
f00accd1e8eabd5914dc7b90608fdd38299da32e
describe
'37234' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPY' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
d4d0c021e73c7d48bc16c9a4191ad7f0
ef06d5b165d7500e5d5f9bbf32fee965e3224769
describe
'98293' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJPZ' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
cbd9d1b9a2000cde31e03f1fc4bbf354
2c13d92dd2a61bc6a18c827081b478047cba6d53
describe
'85332' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQA' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
f7bd913a404732cbb8626666b9d0de7f
98ae50f20294db92053d8d90c1ac4e2d00e4941b
describe
'31384' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQB' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
cc12608e2d7ff8f5ea4d6395ae2fabad
38df333e681fa66a589752c00cbaba90e7206111
describe
'95943' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQC' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
95f842663098415e97c1052b5fe2b689
689fcd50b72784254591a9e33cd712b85c5c5579
describe
'33903' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQD' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
d7460aa92c6ea5f76f98464b47765bab
363ed68f5418e15291f45904df2539e01e40b9bb
describe
'81951' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQE' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
20177b3ed089572fd4056ec02d67044f
61a0cb44ac209e77dbea32ea656718e4fe6c2727
'2012-05-18T05:00:09-04:00'
describe
'34114' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQF' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
f177a28a9a69cb27f5235820ea60edcf
f7ac07c0cbae228d578899003a68206e9305be69
describe
'39903' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQG' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
11d837f5ad9d57dd35b8886122bdc9c4
7c52d57a5670af2bcfb3efc0f4e34410948b738a
describe
'103853' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQH' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
c708be52ff6575168e29f035062df4c3
ee2ba7ec0be784e2e9c5a353408971a732d22ef5
describe
'40885' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQI' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
13398a34800069982d73a39a3973e381
3854b0cb6fa642b1fd918bac1d45a0e3650f8803
describe
'107104' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQJ' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
1aaf785ce4b9b53cfda32d6450f85b91
f87fbe460d3968e95710efbc3169aab09b0d537b
describe
'39511' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQK' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
d9a7809fd4d3b6d9918c2b7094c9c87b
6b24bf6b8b2982082e8fdce097930e6eb072ad93
describe
'99474' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQL' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
98873dfdbb6d52bd3c990fe4a226388e
af93e15be741d2e970c76c7feb46b1354e122023
describe
'37734' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQM' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
605bf462cfd9d0095cc98680f6369ef7
24b47b250549a5da61e68cdd2829afb315998433
describe
'39392' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQN' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
1b587ec5526bc5afefb600bcdc3e5443
0e4c62d1a5ee2b705a650c1f6fd181416cafeef5
describe
'104955' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQO' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
05373a152ba405d4916e8172601b8029
5defec7c58eafeb985579244289a68358b264aa8
describe
'109272' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQP' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
1996b468302c686108c9b3390de95679
471418be698ff5413b3b9b0c39564c045f70383f
describe
'39599' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQQ' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
6f2eb7daa3ee9dc993182546067ec6d0
a3d56df50f6e0edd8df1d8f2533821d3f16a8f17
describe
'38710' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQR' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
a1734dab4efae4e0d94a1b9e8c32c9ef
a4abd138051b9160b57e0a0234a00dc346fd6a56
describe
'90045' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQS' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
864d3f2e575add871c92e107c6ddcf5b
c3e6ee69f19b1def6aab74a02dd27a4970e2d419
describe
'34370' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQT' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
7079d8fc8de4dc3febada092b95ed43b
eee0d9f6ff7500b089b92781fba10dc776822667
describe
'84234' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQU' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
547aaabe982c120e66a9b8bf3541aae7
63941805b73b28ea11933445d4fba7a9997b4093
'2012-05-18T04:58:14-04:00'
describe
'32680' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQV' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
21a1d12c78a195174a5e0021df6d3cba
6e6e829541ea646cd5fc32e8b28e33d09f1b1de9
describe
'108864' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQW' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
45b66147d86364871f8b3ee9de687f49
14fc0198ac335d5e8603989e009d0b76c1590b60
'2012-05-18T05:00:03-04:00'
describe
'38870' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQX' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
2860bffa51a464551016b34444881eb9
05302f8158a23a505528f01403c294abd6fc24b1
describe
'109719' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQY' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
dd012cbb5a76be08e076481fd40657c5
8b6ce9845d1d7d10a6bfea92b14d7e47bb6434e4
describe
'38874' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJQZ' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
0b9b1f1be7b4acf7388a95c368b029b7
7cb65e61eb607e59d6b3488d6c54b8e42a39573b
describe
'38563' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJRA' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
526b7714a53ef3a1f79df987b413afae
c7b9dba21a1add3a72a5dcdc6cd1ff86e74864ec
describe
'104185' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJRB' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
3ba6d4fc6d881438bdb6436299f80038
fb8c995e2b75385ef91fb1432d2519e3c3ea6a99
describe
'37288' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJRC' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
b1d33877c744913b14b5412957b947bc
9bc51ca9af2b5f10673bff10bff0ce288819c0ce
'2012-05-18T05:00:27-04:00'
describe
'17364' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJRD' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
f347a650fcf03fccfae6b915c00bec34
b04bd7988133bc6ea69801d5d1c310e04207218c
describe
'11962' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJRE' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
460f42dec629e2fcc408a682ed9ecd5c
89d5dc1c93a1509be0cef32975478d5927a748b9
describe
'40083' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJRF' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
8a587a975d13f4c00de236d7c93754db
ee028f2420874126d0cc25948604b444f7df8640
describe
'97144' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJRG' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
08e3ace781ad65adc17e966a12a518bb
95dd0a4b751d65131b834fd6b2e267a393669209
describe
'99924' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJRH' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
c3266fe551e52b474cbfe88bff3085bb
e0e629fef51db80ec03543dbb06778205d21c8a0
describe
'120637' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJRI' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
84e85a0e3efd11ac687987ef1e2c60c9
72b1a73c5d6cb7ab510709f2f8f6e1945cef9eb5
describe
'41850' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJRJ' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
918385c5d6bedc3e81ba28aa6bad10e6
b684d94a8d4918c268b7270ae28e5ca9bc5c8f17
describe
'99415' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJRK' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
008aa82654038bbc413a9fe04fb70111
24bd3d0289d7ca29bd083892e823b3bb0c46e7e0
describe
'35122' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJRL' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
581a085eeb1e2567bf910587a01dd661
a997ffd161f42612e547f8d4d8808d3681fbf871
describe
'50030' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJRM' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
681bdbc7e6bcec277516b44a2732f128
7629990682832280cdd0494cd04611b1d56d8b9b
describe
'123191' 'info:fdaE20100129_AAAAAMfileF20100129_AAAJRN' 'sip-filesUF00026273_00001.mets'
d298b03de25e927c6ca27e54e829259b
65a7a35beda442ecb2a6773874a67cd27eb615e7
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T16:54:03-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.


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