Citation
Mary Howitt's poems

Material Information

Title:
Mary Howitt's poems
Creator:
Howitt, Mary Botham, 1799-1888 ( Author, Primary )
Berveiller, E ( Engraver )
Meaulle, F ( Engraver )
Sargent, A ( Engraver )
Whymper, Josiah Wood, 1813-1903 ( Engraver )
Morison, G. A ( Engraver )
Jonnard, Paul, d. 1902 ( Engraver )
Giacomelli, Hector, 1822-1904 ( Illustrator )
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Edinburgh
New York
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
211, 212, [4] p. : ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1872 ( lcsh )
Gift books -- 1872 ( rbgenr )
Bookplates (Provenance) -- 1872 ( rbprov )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1872 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1872
Genre:
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Gift books ( rbgenr )
Bookplates (Provenance) ( rbprov )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
poetry ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrations engraved by Berveiller, Meaulle, Sargent, Jonnard, Whymper, and Morison.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
General Note:
Date from: "Note by the author."
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
illustrated with upwards of two hundred drawings by H. Giacomelli.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026819074 ( ALEPH )
ALH2246 ( NOTIS )
23111546 ( OCLC )

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MARY HOWITT'SPOEMSIllustrated with upwards of Two Hundred Drawings byH. GIACOMELLIBIRDS AND FLOWERSSKETCHES OF NATURAL HISTORYT. NELSON AND SONSLondon, Edinbu'rg, andNew YorkCI__


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Birds and FlowersByMARY HOWITTAnd Illustrated with upwards of One Hundred Drawings byH. GIA COMELLI- r, ----. " ,. "-4LT. NELSON AND SONSLondon, Edinburgh, andNew York


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SOTE BY THE AUTHOR.I AVAIL myself of this opportunity of acknowledging the grati-fication I feel in seeing my book brought out in so beautifula manner, and illustrated and embellished by M. Giacomelli, anartist who has studied Nature so carefully, and who possesses sopeculiar a power of delineating her works, not only with rarefidelity, but, at the same time, both gracefully and poetically.All honour has thus been done to these simple verses, which,in themselves, can. but claim to be as the wild flowers by thewayside, or the songs of the birds in the bushes; and very greatpleasure does it afford me to see it permitted thus to enjoy, asit were, a second springtime.MARY HOWITT.ROME, November 1, 1872.


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SON T E N T S .-----t-4--BUTTERCUPS AND DAISIES, ...... ... ... .... 13THE SWALLOW, ...... ..... ... 16THE NETTLE-KING, .............. .... .. 20SUMMER WOODS, .... ........... ... 24THE MONTHS, ... ... 28THE WOOD-MOUSE, ... .... .. 33THE MILL-STREAM, ..... .. ..... 37THE HORNET, .............. ... ... ... 40THE USE OF FLOWERS, ... ............. .44THE STOCK-DOVE, ... ............ ..47THE OAK-TREE, ............... .50SUNSHINE, ...... ... .... 54HARVEST-FIELD FLOWERS, ... ... ... ... .. 58CEDAR-TREES, ......... ... 61THE HAREBELL, ... ... ... ..... 65THE ROSE OF MAY, ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 69THE FLAX-FLOWER, ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 72FLOWER COMPARISONS, ... ... .76THE MANDRAKE, ............. ..80FLOWER-PAINTINGS, ...... ... ... ... ... ... 86THE WILD SPRING-CROCUS IN NOTTINGHAM MEADOWS, ... ... ... 89


Viii CONTENTS.THE GARDEN, ...... .. ... ... .. ... ... 94WILD FLOWERS, ... .. .. .. ... ...... ... 99BIRDS, ... ... ... ... ... ... 104THE FLOWER-LESSON, ... ... ... ... ... ... 109THE SPARROW'S NEST, ... ... ... ... ....... 117THE IVY-BUSH, ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 121THE NEST OF THE LONG-TAILED TITMOUSE, ... ... ... ... ... 126SPRING, ** ... .. .. ... ... ... ... 130REST-HARROW, ... ... ... ... ... ... 137OLD-FASHIONED WINTER, ... ... .... .. ... ... 140THE WILD FRITILLARY, ... ... ... ... ... ...... 145THE SEA, ... ... ... .. ... ... ... ...... 148MORNING THOUGHTS, ... ... ... ... .. ... 152THE GIRL AND THE DOVE, ... ... ..... ...... ... 155THE CUCKOO, ......... .. ... ... .. ... 159SUMMER, ...... .. ...... .. ... ... ... 163THE BROOM-FLOWER, ... ... ... ... .. ... 167THE TITMOUSE, OR BLUE-CAP, ... ... ... ... ... ... 170CHILDHOOD, ... ... ...... ... ... ... 175LITTLE STREAMS, ... ... ... ... ..... ... .. 181THE PASSION-FLOWER, ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 185THE CHILD AND THE FLOWERS, ... ... ... ... ... ... 194THE APPLE-TREE, ... ......... ... .... ... 197THE POOR MAN'S GARDEN, .. ... ... ....... ... 200L'ENVOI, ......... ... ... 207NOTES, ... ... ... ... ... ... 209aq Oe Oe 8 It " $ co .K


IST OF ILLUSTRATIONS,DRAWN BY H. GIACOMELLI;ENGRAVED BY BERVEILLER, MEAULLE, SARGENT, ROUGET, JONNARD, WHYMPER,AND MORISON, EXPRESSLY FOR THIS WORK.A CLUSTER OF BUTTERCUPS AND DAISIES. ........................... onnard.. .............. 13THE COMING OF THE SWALLOWS ....................................E. Berveiller............ 16CROSSING THE SEA. ..................................................E. Berveiller.......... 18"AN OWL SAT UP IN AN OLD ASH-TREE ". ........... ........ E. Berveiller............ 20" AND A RAVEN WAS PERCHED ABOVE HIS HEAD "...................Jonnard................ 21SUMMER W OODS.................. .................. ............... Rouget............. .. 24"MANY A MERRY BIRD IS THERE ................................ A. Sargent.............. 25THE FREAKISH SQUIRRELS................... ...................... E. Berveiller............ 26A SNOW-SCENE ............. .. ... .. ..... ........ ...... ........ ... W T Whymper ......... 28GATHERING THE APPLES............................................ F. M aulle. ............ 32"IT MAKES ITS NEST OF SOFT, DRY lMoSS " ............... Jonnard................ 33" UNDER A MUSHROOM 'IALL ". ....... .... ...... ....E. Berveiller.......... 35THE M ILL-STR EAM ................... .................. ........... Rouget.................. 37THE M ILLER'S DONKEY .... ............................ ............ ouget ............... 39THE HORNET....................................................... A Sargent.............. 40"SERVE HIM RIGHT !"........................................Jonnard............... 43A POSY OF FLOWERS............................. ............ ...... A. Sargent............. 44THE STOCK-DOVES ......................... .... .. ............ Laly ................ 47" AMID THE GREENWOOD ALLEYS "................................ E. Berveiller............ 48


X LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS."THE MONARCH OF THE WOOD " ..................................J.. W. Whymper........ 50AconNs.. ..................................... ............ ...... E. Berveiller............ 53A SUNNY MORNING ............................................ Jonnard........ ....... 54THE REAPEI S........ .......... ................................... Rouget.................. 55AT SEA ................. .......... ........................... ..A. Sargent.............. 56HARVEST-FIELD FLOWERS .................. .................. ......E. Berveiller.. ........ 58"THE BUGLOS BRIGHTLY BLUE "...... ........ .......... ...... E. Berveiller............ 59" THE ROBIN SINGS HIS SONG ".................................. Rouget.................. 60THE CEDAR-WOOD................................................. J. W. Whymper......... 61BY THE BROOK.... ... ...... .... .................................F. M eaulle. ............ 63THE HAREBELL ... ...... ....................................... Berveiller............ 65" WHERE THE POOR WOUNDED HART CAME DOWN TO DRINK "...... E. Berveiller............ 66"ALONG THE OLD STONE BALUSTRADE" ..........................A. Sargent.............. 69THE ROSE AND THE SWORD .......................................J. W. Whymper......... 70THE FLAX-FLOWER .......................................... ....... ... V. Whymper... ..... 72THE MEADOW POOL ................................................ A. Sargent.............. 75" SWEET COUSIN BLANCHE "..................................... ..J. W. Whymper... .. .... 76AMONG THE TOMBS................. .................. .......... ..F. Mdaulle.......... 80"A NIGHT-PIECE .................. ... .............................. Jonnard............ .. 83"A FLOWER-PIECE................. ............ ................. ....Rouget................ ..86THE WILD SPRING-CROCUS ................. .......................E. Berveiller............ 89" THEY FILL EACH LITTLE PINAFORE " ....... .... .......... Jonnard................ 93IN THE GARDEN.... ........ .... ...... .... ... .... ...... ........ .M aulle. ........... 94THIRSTY BIRDS .................. ... ..............................A. Sargent............ 98A GROUP OF WILD FLOWERS ....................................... E. Berveiller........... 99"( Go, FLORENCE, GATHER WILD FLOWERS "......................F. Meaulle.......... 102" BIRDS BUILDING IN EACH HOARY TREE " ......................... Rouget.................. 104A GROUP OF BIRDS................................................ E. Berveiller............ 105THE N EST. ... .......... .......... ..................... .....E. Berveiller............ 107"BIRDS ARE SINGING LOUD".............................. .......E. Berveiller........... 108THE FLOWER-LESSON .............................................A. Sargent ............ 109"WHERE THE SHINING LIZARD HIDETH "................. ....E......E. Berveiller............ 112LEAF AND BLOSSOM ................ .. ...... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. E. Berveiller.... ...... 116THE SPARROW'S NEST...... .. .. ......... .. .. ...... ..Rouget.... ......... 117


LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. XIFLYING HOME. .......... .... .. .. .... .... .. .. .. .... .... ..E. Berveiller ... ........ 120" How THEY WINKING SIT IN THE IVY-TREE "............ .... .. A. Sargent ............. 121"THE OWLS, WITH A FIERCE DELIGHT, RIOT AND FEAST, LIKE LORDS,AT NIGHT " ........... ... ......... ........ .............. F. Mdaulle............ 125THE LONG-TAILED TITMICE AND THEIR NEST ...................... E. Berveiller............ 126FATHER AND MOTHER. ......................... .. ...........E. Berveiller....... .. ..129" SMALL BIRDS WARBLE ROUND ABOUT "............................ E. Berveiller........ ... 130WAVING BUTTERFLIES. .......... .................................. Jonnard................ 132THE SHEPHERD AND HIS FLOCK ....................................Jonnard.............. 137FRIENDS OUT-OF-DOORS......... ...... ...... .. ........ .... .. ....E. Berveiller .......... 140" D EAD ". ...... .. .. .. .. .. .. ... .. .. ... ....... ... .. .. .... .. .. .. .. ouget...... .. ..143THE WILD FRITILLARY ........................................... Jonnard................ 145"LIKE A DRAGON'S HEAD WELL-MOULDED, IS THE BUD, SO DUSKAND AIRY ".......................... ..............E. Berveiller.. .......... 146A SEA-PIECE.................. .......................... .. ...... .. Jonnard.. .............. 148DOWN BY THE SEA................................................. .. A. Sargent............. 151MORNING IN THE WOODS....... ................................Rouget.................. 152A M ORNING SONG. ......................... ... ..... ... ... ..... ....Jonnard...... .... .. .. 153THE GIRL AND THE DOVE ...........................................F. Mdaulle.............. 155"FORt NOTHING BUT LOVE IT SERVETH ME ".........................E. Berveiller............ 157"THE CUCKOO'S A-COMING !"................ ....................... J. W. Whymper........ 159THE PLUNDERED NEST .................... .................... .E. Berveiller .......... 162THE BIRDS AMONG THE VINE-LEAVES ........... ....................E. Berveiller............ 163"THE RICH FLOWERY GROWTH OF THE OLD PASTURE MEADOWS "..Jonnard................ 164"FALL THE FAR-GLEAMING CATARACTS, SILVERY WHITE "........ A. Sargent.............. 165"BRIGHT SHINING BUTTERFLIES "..................................Jonnard................ 166THE POOL IN THE GLEN .................................... ........J. W. Whymper......... 167THE BROOM-FLOWER .................. ............. ................. E. Berveiller.. .. .. ...... 169BLUE-CAPS UNDER THE COTTAGE-EAVES ............................. A. Sargent.............. 170A M ERRY TRIO ..... ..... ... ...... .... .... .. ........... ..........E. Berveiller............ 173THE SISTERS............................. ................ .. ... .. .F. Me aulle............. 175"THE BRIGHT HAY-HARVEST MEADOW "..........................F. Mdaulle ............ 178"' TiROUGH THE FOREST DIM AND WIDE "........................J. W. Whymper......... 181"' WHERE THE LITTLE STREAMS ARE WELLING ".................... A. Sargent.............. 182


xii LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS."THE GOOD OLD PASSION-FLOWER "............................... Jonnard................ 185IN THE ABBEY-GARDEN................... ......................A. Sargent............. 191THE CHILD AND THE FLOWERS.....................................F. M.aulle......... .. .. 194"PUT BY THY WORK, I PRAY THEE, AND COME OUT, MOTHER DEAR !"A. Sargent............... 195FLOWERS IN " GOD'S ACRE".. .................. .................. ..Jonnard.. .............. 196"<A SONG OF THE APPLE-TREE "................... ....o.......... .. .JOnnard........ .... 197THE LIZARD AND THE APPLES. .................................. ..A. Sargent. ........... 199IN THE POOR MAN'S GARDEN ................. .................... Rouget..... .......... 200"HE TOILETH WITH GOOD WILL ".... ............................ J. W. Whymper..... 201L'ENVOI :-FAREWELL TO THE READER ...........................E. Berveiller............ 207THE LAST VIGNETTE. .................. ............................A. Sargent............. 208TAIL-PIECES ENGRAVED BY G. A. MORISON.........


.N ___---___1IV-, _BUTTERCUPS AND DAISIES.BUTTERCUPS and Daisies-0 the pretty flowers !Coming ere the spring-time,To tell of sunny hours.While the trees are leafless;While the fields are bare,Buttercups and DaisiesSpring up here and there.


14 BUTTERCUPS AND DAISIES.Ere the snow-drop peepeth;Ere the crocus bold;Ere the early primroseOpes its paly gold,Somewhere on a sunny bankButtercups are bright;Somewhere amongg the frozen grassPeeps the Daisy white.Little hardy flowers,Like to children poorPlaying in their sturdy healthBy their mother's door:Purple with the north wind,Yet alert and bold;Fearing not and caring not,Though they be a-cold !What to them is weather !What are stormy showersButtercups and DaisiesAre these human flowers !He who gave them hardshipAnd a life of care,


BUTTERCUPS AND DAISIES. 15Gave them likewise hardy strength,And patient hearts to bear.Welcome, yellow Buttercups !Welcome, Daisies white!Ye are in my spiritVisioned, a delight !Coming ere the spring-time,Of sunny hours to tell-Speaking to our hearts of HimWho doeth all things well.- 'lII:d: ? ___40- ._d- ___- _- ,- o _- "r ..- .."2 --.'.4 j4 -- _? -_-_.."-r :- ; =2- -- z2---. -- -==- .'.=" " ----":


- -'-- -7 --- -- --Xx x'' % -THE SWALLOW.Where thou winter-long hast lain ?TNay, I'll not believe it, Swallow,-Not in England hast thou tarried;/iMany a day,Far away,Has thy wing been wearied,Has thy wing been wearied,


THE SWALLOW.Over continent and isle,Many and many and many a mile!Tell me, prithee, bird, the storyOf thy six months migratory !If thou wert a human traveller,We a quarto book should see;Thou wouldst be the sage unravellerOf some dark, old mystery;Thou wouldst tell the wise men, Swallow,Of the rivers' hidden fountains;Plain and glen,And savage men,And Affghans of the mountains;Creatures, plants, and men unknown,And cities in the deserts lone:Thou wouldst be, thou far-land dweller,Like an Arab story-teller!Was it in a temple, Swallow;In some Moorish minaret;In some cavern's gloomy hollow,Where the lion and serpent met,That thy nest was builded, Swallow?(2) 2


18 THE SWALLOW.Did the Negro people meet theeWith a wordOf welcome, bird,Kind as that with which we greet thee ?Prithee tell me how and whereThou wast guided through the air;Prithee cease thy building-labour,And tell o'er thy travels, neighbour!Thou hast been among the Kaffirs;Seen the Bushman's stealthy arm;Thou hast heard the lowing heifersOn some good Herrnhuter's farm;---- -----_i1On some good I-errnhuter's farm;


THE SWALLOW. 19Seen the gold-dust-finder, Swallow,Heard the lion-hunter's Holla!Peace and strife,And much of life,Hast thou witnessed, wandering Swallow.Tell but this,-we'll leave the rest,-Which is wisest, which is best;Tell which happiest, if thou can,Hottentot or Englishman ?-Nought for answer can we get,Save Twitter, twitter, twitter, twet!p ijl 1 I 'rl ; /' [


THE NETTLE-KING.THERE was a Nettle both great andstrong,And the threads of his poison flowerswere long;He rose up in strength and heightalso,And said, "I'll be king of the plantsbelow!"All~\;~~! L ;~h~ la;i\.~.\MXikhlr~\~, ,~ kko c~:~=-~~~AgAM ,T F-


THE NETTLE-KING.It was in a wood both drear and dank,Where grew the Nettle so broad and rank;And an owl sat up in an old ash-treeThat was wasting away so silently;And a raven was perched above his head,And both of them heard what the Nettle-king said;Af. / 7, -,- " ,. ", "= :7' " -And he heard the words of the Nettle also.The Nettle he throve, and the Nettle he grew,And the strength of the earth around him drewAnd the strength of the e,zrth aroundl himt drew:


"22 THE NETTLE-KING.There was a pale stellaria meek,But as he grew strong, so she grew weak;There was a campion, crimson-eyed,But as he grew up, the campion died;And the blue veronica, shut from light,Faded away in a sickly white;For upon his leaves a dew was hung,That fell like a blight from a serpent's tongue,-Nor was there a flower about the spot,Herb-robert, harebell, or forget-me-not.Yet up grew the Nettle like water-sedge,Higher and higher above the hedge;The stuff of his leaves was strong and stout,And the points of his stinging flowers stood out;And the child that went in the wood to play,From the great King nettle would shrinkaway!"Now," says the Nettle, "there's none like meI am as great as a plant can be!I have crushed each weak and tender root,With the mighty force of my kingly foot;I have spread out my arms so strong and wide,And opened my way on every side;


THE NETTLE-KING. 23I have drawn from the earth its virtues fine,To strengthen for me each poison-spine:Both morn and night my leaves I've spread,And upon the falling dews have fed,Till I am as large as a forest-tree;The great wide world is the place for me!"Said the Nettle-king in his bravery.Just then came up a woodman stout,-In the thick of the wood he was peering about;The Nettle looked up, the Nettle looked down,And graciously smiled on the simple clown:"Thou knowest me well, Sir Clown," said he,"And 'tis meet that thou reverence one like me "Nothing at all the man replied,But he lifted a scythe that was at his side,And he cut the Nettle up by the root,And trampled it under his heavy foot;He saw where the toad in its shadow lay,But he said not a word, and went his way.


SUMMER WOODS.COME ye into the summer woods;There entereth no annoy;All greenly wave the chestnut leaves,And the earth is full of joy.I cannot tell you half the sightsOf beauty you may see,-The bursts of golden sunshine,And many a shady tree.There, lightly swung in bowery glades,The honeysuckles twine;


SUMMER WOODS. 25There blooms the rose-red campion,SAnd the dark blue columbine.There grows the four-leaved plant, " trueSs-love,': In some dusk woodland spot;There grows the enchanter's night-shade,And the wood forget-me-not.M "And many a merry bird is there,Unscared by lawless men:The blue-winged jay, the woodpecker,f> And the golden-crested wren.Come down, and ye shall see them all,The timid and the bold;For their sweet life of pleasantness,SIt is not to be told.And far within that summer wood,Among the leaves so green,There flows a little gurgling brook,The brightest e'er was seen.


26 SUMMER WOODS.There come the little gentle birds,Without a fear of ill,Down to the murmuring water's edgeAnd freely drink their fill!And dash about and splash about-The merry little things;And look askance with bright black eyes,And flirt their dripping wings.I've seen the freakish squirrels dropDown from their leafy tree,The little squirrels with the old,-Great joy it was to meAnd down unto the running brook,I've seen them nimbly go;SAn d th e b rig h t w a te r s e e m e d to s p e a kA welcome kind and low.


SUMMER WOODS. 27The nodding plants they bowed their heads,As if, in heartsome cheer,They spake unto those little things,"'Tis merry living here!"Oh, how my heart ran o'er with joy!I saw that all was good,And that we might glean up delightAll round us, if we would!And many a wood-mouse dwelleth there,Beneath the old wood shade,And all day long has work to do,Nor is of aught afraid.The green shoots grow above their heads,And roots so fresh and fineBeneath their feet; nor is there strife'Mong them for mine and thine.There is enough for every one,And they lovingly agree;We might learn a lesson, all of us,Beneath the greenwood tree


"When days are short and nights are"long;When snows fall deep and frost isstrong;When Wealth by fires doth count hisgold,And Want stands shivering all a-cold.Wet February next comes by,With chill damp earth and dripping sky;


THE MONTHS.But, heart, cheer up; the days speed on;Winds blow, suns shine, and thaws are gone;And in the garden may be seenUpspringing flowers and budding green.March-ha he comes like March of old,A blustering, cordial friend and bold !He calls the peasant to his toil,And trims with him the wholesome soil.Flocks multiply, the seed is sown,Its increase is of Heaven alone !Next, April comes with shine and showers,Green mantling leaves and opening flowers,Loud singing birds, low humming bees,And the white-blossomed orchard trees;And that which busy March did sowBegins in April's warmth to grow.The winter now is gone and past,And flowery May advances fast;Birds sing, rains fall, and sunshine glows,Till the rich earth with joy o'erflows


30 THE MONTHS.O Lord, who hast so crowned the spring,We bless Thee for each gracious thing!Come on, come on! 'tis summer-time,The golden year is in its prime!June speeds along 'midst flowers and dews,Rainbows, olear skies, and sunset hues;And hark the cuckoo! and the blitheLow ringing of the early scythe !The year is full! 'tis bright July,And God in thunder passeth by!Far in the fields till close of dayThe peasant people make the hayAnd darker grows the forest bough,And singing birds are silent now.Next, August comes Now look around,The harvest-fields are golden-crowned;And sturdy reapers bending, go,With scythe or sickle, all a-row;And gleaners with their burdens boonCome home beneath the harvest-moon.


THE MONTHS. 31September, rich in corn and wine,Of the twelve months completeth nine.Now apples rosy grow, and seedRipens in tree and flower and weed;Now the green acorn growth brown,And ruddy nuts come showering down.The summer-time is ended now,And autumn tinteth every bough;The days are bright, the air is still,October's mists are on the hill;Down droops the fern, and fades the heather,And thistle-down floats like a feather.Dark on the earth November lies;Cloud, fog, and storm o'ergloom the skiesThe matted leaves lie neathh our tread,And hollow winds wail overhead;Pile up the hearth,-its heartsome blazeCheers, like a sun, the darkest days!The year it growth old apace:Eleven months have run their race,


82 THE MONTHS.And dull December brings to earthThat time which gave our Saviour birth.The year is done !-Let all revereThe great, good Father of the year!' -"1`, 94; ;*l P~"I~ Y~~""~ ~~"'u: I-\5~C \ii.


%'/ I_ ,'h "- .x v C US And -it,,ll ili2THE WOOD-MOUSE.Do ye know the little Wood-mouse,That pretty little thing,That sits amongst the forest leaves,Beside the forest spring ?Its fur is red as the chestnut,And it is small and slimr It leads a life most innocentWithin the forest dim.(2) 3


34 THE WOOD-MOUSE.'Tis a timid, gentle creature,And seldom comes in sight;It has a long and wiry tail,And eyes both black and bright.It makes its nest of soft, dry moss,In a hole so deep and strong;And there it sleeps secure and warm,The dreary winter long.And though it keeps no calendar,It knows when flowers are springing;And waketh to its summer lifeWhen nightingales are singing.Upon the boughs the squirrel sits,The Wood-mouse plays below;And plenty of food it finds itselfWhere the beech and chestnut grow.In the hedge-sparrow's nest it sits,When the summer brood is fled,And picks the berries from the boughOf the hawthorn overhead.


THE WOOD-MOUSE. 35I saw a little Wood-mouse once,Like Oberon in his hall,With the green, green moss beneath his feet,Sit under a mushroom tall.-r, -TS " "r" ,, '- ^ ( ', 'I saw him sit and his dinner eat,All under the forest tree-c-\His dinner of chestnut ripe and red,And he ate it heartily.I wish you could have seen him there:It did my spirit good,To see the small thing God had madeThus eating in the wood.


36 THE WOOD-MOUSE.I saw that He regardeth them,Those creatures weak and small,Their table in the wild is spreadBy Himrwho cares for all!(\' \,\, P--- 'Q 2,


i /THE MILL-STREAM."4i LONG trails of cistus-flowersii", Creel) on the rocky hill;And beds of strong spear-mintGrow round about the mill;"And from a mountain tarn above,' As peaceful as a dream,"s,' ":,,, ,! Like to child unruly,Though schooled and counselled truly,Foams down the wild Mill-stream !1h,11 'N 0.


38 THE MILL-STREAM.The wild Mill-stream it leapethIn merriment away,And keeps the miller and his sonRight busy all the day!Into the mad Mill-streamThe mountain-roses fall;And fern and adder's-tongueGrow on the old mill wall.The tarn is on the upland moor,Where not a leaf doth grow;And through the mountain-gashesThe merry Mill-stream dashesDown to the sea below.But, in the quiet hollows,The red trout growth prime,And the miller and the miller's sonThey angle when they've time.Then fair befall the streamThat turns the mountain-mill;And fair befall the narrow roadThat windeth up the hill!


THE MILL-STREAM. 39And good luck to the countryman,And to his old gray mare,That upward toileth steadily,With meal-sacks laden heavily,In storm as well as fair!And good luck to the miller,And to the miller's son;And ever may the mill-wheel turnWhile mountain-waters run !Al" " ,-""


,. -. ,4 p ,- 4'>V. .-: .S- 47,/ 7 --a' ,,-- " "'red,.nd yl "ow!net-castle, door!""27" 4" ,:.. ",,' Ar sA rdteeyur standin si""c d oo


THE HORNET. 41Well, what a size you are just like a great wasp-king !What a solemn buzz you make, now you're upon the wing!I'm sure I do not wonder that people fear your sting!So! so !-Don't be so angry! Why do you come at meWith a swoop and with a hum,-is't a crime to look at ye ?See where the testy fellow goes whiz into the hole,And brings out from the hollow tree his fellows in a shoal.Hark! what an awful, hollow boom! How fierce they come lI'd ratherJust quietly step back, and stand from them a little further.There, now, the Hornet-host is retreating to its den,And so, good Mr. Sentinel-lo here I am again!Well! how the little angry wretch doth stamp and raise hishead,And flirt his wings, and seem to say, "Come here-I'll stingyou dead!"No, thank you, fierce Sir Hornet,-that's not at all inviting:-But what a pair of shears the fellow has for biting!What a pair of monstrous shears to carry at his head!If wasp or fly come in their gripe, that moment he is dead!There bite in two the whip-lash, as we poke it at your chin ?See, how he bites but it is tough, and again he hurries in.Ho ho we soon shall have the whole vindictive race,With a hurry and a scurry, all flying in our face.


12 THE HORNET.To potter in a Hornet's nest, is a proverb old and good,So it's just as well to take the hint, and retreat into thewood.Now here behind this hazel-bush we safely may look out,And see what all the colony of Hornets is about.Why, what a furious troop it is, how fierce they seem to be,As they fly now in the sunshine, now in shadow of thetree!And yet they're noble insects! their bodies red and yellow,And large almost as little birds, how richly toned andmellow.And these old woods, so full of trees, all hollow and decayed,Must be a perfect paradise, for the Hornet legions made.Secure from village lads, and from gardeners' watchful eyes,They may build their paper-nests, and issue for suppliesTo orchards or to gardens, for plum, and peach, and pear,-With wasp, fly, ant, and earwig, they'll have a giant's share.And you, stout Mr. Sentinel, there standing at the door,Though Homer said in his time, "The Hornet's soul allo'er,"-You're not so very spiritual, but soon some sunny morningI may find you in a green-gage, and give you little warning;Or feeding in a Windsor pear; or at the juicy stalkOf my negro-boy, grand dahlia,-too heavy much to walk;


THE HORNET. 43Ay, very much too heavy,--that juicy stem deceives,-" Makes faint with too much sweet such heavy-winged thieves."Too heavy much to walk,-then, pray, how can you fly ?No, there you'll drop upon the ground, and there you're doomedto die !W. H."--%--


....., .-.--THE USE OF FLOWERS.GOD might have bade the earth bring forthEnough for great and small,The oak-tree and the cedar-tree,Without a flower at all.We might have had enough, enoughFor every want of ours,For luxury, medicine, and for toil,And yet have had no flowers.


THE USE OF FLOWERS. 45The ore within the mountain mine'Requireth none to grow;Nor doth it need the lotus-flowerTo make the river flow.The clouds might give abundant rain;The nightly dews might fall,And the herb that keepeth life in manMight yet have drank them all.Then wherefore, wherefore were they made,All dyed with rainbow light,All fashioned with supremest grace,Upspringing day and night :-Springing in valleys green and low,And on the mountains high,And in the silent wildernessWhere no man passes by ?Our outward life requires them not-Then wherefore had they birth ?To minister delight to man,To beautify the earth;


46 THE USE OF FLOWERS.To comfort man-to whisper hope,Whene'er his faith is dim;For who so careth for the flowersWill much more care for him.-- ---- =---


t ,- " -I f-4I 1 \ I -" / -" " l *,;* ,' *r " 1*. " -;- ,,;, .. ,''R./, '' " ** :; '" ._ 7 1_Pn.. .. THE STOCK-DOVE.I,7 -) -,TC rELL me, Stock-dove, wherefore thou artmoaning ever,*''r tplaint of woe ?way that I know.I" si_' v-v > ,;( c, ilngalt renodwt hA-~~ h<" "' ,,- .. p?, "+ aint of woe ?"ir~m~L'~~UY.= r %: ..:< "`--,j"Im a osa s eSokdv IpasC, t egra, o d ie


48 THE STOCK-DOVE."I learned my note in Eden, when young was all creation,When wandered sinless Adam beneath those blessed bowers;When the morning stars thrilled heavenwith shouts of exultation,And the joyous Earth was radiant with a rainbow-zone offlowers.And twittered alleluias were heard in every grove;"And, with my mate beside me, amid the greenwood alleys,I praised God as He taught me, with a cooing song of love.16


THE STOCK-DOVE. 49"We did not make our singing, nor one despise the otherBecause his part was humbler or different to his own;God was the loving Father, and every bird a brother,And all strove in glad chorus to make His goodness known."And if I seem to murmur and moan in endless grieving,'Tis thou who hast mistaken the meaning of my lay;I moan not, neither murmur, but coo forth sweet thanksgivingTo that good, loving Father who feeds us day by day."(2) ,(2) 4


The monarch of the wood;Sing for the Oak-tree,That growth green and good:That growth broad and branchingWithin the forest shade;That growth now, and yet shall growWhen we are lowly laid!


THE OAK-TREE.The Oak-tree was an acorn once,And fell upon the earth;And sun and showers nourished it,And gave the Oak-tree birth.The little sprouting Oak-tree !Two leaves it had at first,Till sun and showers had nourished it,Then out the branches burst.The little sapling Oak-tree!Its root was like a thread,Till the kindly earth had nourished it,Then out it freely spread:On this side and on that sideIt grappled with the ground;And in the ancient, rifted rockIts firmest footing found.The winds came, and the rain fell;The gusty tempests blew;All, all were friends to the Oak-tree,And stronger yet it grew.The boy that saw the acorn fall,SHe feeble grew and gray;


52 THE OAK-TREE.But the Oak was still a thriving tree,And strengthened every day !For centuries grows the Oak-tree,Nor doth its verdure fail;Its heart is like the iron-wood,Its bark like plated mail.Now, cut us down the Oak-tree,The monarch of the wood;And of its timber stout and strongWe'll build a vessel good!The Oak-tree of the forestBoth east and west shall fly;And the blessings of a thousand landsUpon our ship shall lie !She shall not be a man-of-war,Nor a pirate shall she be;--But a noble, Christian merchant-ship,To sail upon the sea.Then sing for the Oak-tree,The monarch of the wood!


THE OAK-TREE. 53Sing for the Oak-tree,That growth green and good!That growth broad and branchingWithin the forest shade;That growth now, and yet shall growWhen we are lowly laid!I, A \S/I -i ~\ -CJ


SUNSHINE.I LOVE the sunshine everywhere-In wood, and field, and glen;I love it in the busy hauntsOf town-imprisoned men.


SUNSHINE. 55I love it when it streameth inThe humble cottage door,And casts the chequered casement shadeUpon the red-brick floor.I love it when the children lieDeep in the clovery grass,To watch among the twining rootsThe gold-green beetles pass.I love it on the breezy sea,To glance on sail and oar,:- -- __-------- -~ --- ---------- -_ -- .._._ -- -While the great waves, like molten glass,Come leaping to the shore.I love it on the mountain-tops,Whe gold-gre rests the tawless snow,


56 SUNSHINE.And half a kingdom, bathed in light,Lies stretching out below.' .... .. ___-_--- -And when it shines in forest-glades,Hidden, and green, and cool,Through mossy boughs and veined leaves,How is it beautiful!How beautiful on little streams,When sun and shade, at play,Make silvery meshes, while the brookGoes singing on its way.


SUNSHINE. 57How beautiful, where dragon-fliesAre wondrous to behold,With rainbow wings of gauzy pearl,And bodies blue and gold!How beautiful, on harvest slopes,To see the sunshine lie;Or on the paler reaped fields,Where yellow shocks stand high !Oh yes I love the sunshine !Like kindness or like mirthUpon a human countenance,Is sunshine on the earth !Upon the earth; upon the sea;And through the crystal air;On piled-up cloud;-the gracious sunIs glorious everywhere!


" HARVEST-FIELD FLOWERS.COME down into the harvest-fieldsS\. This autumn morn with me;"P ,7- For in the pleasant autumn fieldsThere's much to hear and see.On yellow slopes of waving cornSThe autumn sun shines clearly;And 'tis joy to walk, on days like this,Among the bearded barley.


HARVEST-FIELD FLOWERS. 59Within the sunny harvest-fieldsWe'll gather flowers enow;The poppy red, the marigold, ,The buglos brightly blue; .We'll gather the white convolvulus,That opes in the morning early;With a cluster of nuts, an ear of \wheat,And an ear of the bearded barley. /Bright over the golden fields of cornDoth shine the autumn sky;So let's be merry while we may,For Time goes hurrying by.They took the sickle from the wallWhen morning dews shone pearly;And the mower whets the ringingscytheTo cut the bearded barley.Come then into the harvest-fields;The robin sings his song;The corn stands yellow on the hills,And autumn stays not long.


60 HARVEST-FIELD FLOWERS.They'll carry the sheaves of corn awayThey gathered to-day so early,Along the lanes with a rustling sound,-Their loads of the bearded barley'S -- -- ------ -----" -- '--~--=I~'--~~--- -- L= -; i


S,. ;, -THE Power that formed the violet,SThe all-creating One;He made the stately Cedar-treesThat crowned Mount Lebanon.And all within the gardenThat angels came to see,He set in groves and on the hillsThe goodly Cedar-tree.


62 CEDAR-TREES.There played the gladsome creatures,Beneath its shadow dim;And from its spreading leafy boughsWent up the wild bird's hymn.And Eve in her young innocenceDelayed her footsteps there;And Adam's heart grew warm with praiseTo see a tree so fair.And though the world was darkenedWith the shade of human ill,And man was cast from Paradise,Yet wast thou goodly still.And when an ancient poetSome lofty theme would sing,He made the Cedar symbol forthEach great and gracious thing.And royal was the Cedar,Above all other trees!They chose of old its scented woodFor kingly palaces.


CEDAR-TREES. 63And in the halls of princes,And on the Phoenix-pyre,'Twas only noble Cedar-woodCould feed the odorous fire.. .^ .; ..., \\-- --S' -.In the Temple of Jerusalem,That glorious Temple old,They only found the Cedar-woodTo match wiith carved gold.


64 CEDAR-TREES.Thou great and noble Solomon!What king was e'er like thee ?Thou, 'mid the princes of the earthWast like a Cedar-tree !But the glory of the Cedar-treeIs as an old renown;And few and dwindled grow they nowUpon Mount Lebanon.But dear they are to poet's heart,And dear to painter's eye:And the beauty of the Cedar-treeOn earth will never die!---= '~-


SIT springeth on the heath,The forest-tree beneath,.r"MLike to some elfin dweller of the wild;Light as a breeze astir,- Stemmed with the gossamer;Soft as the blue eyes of a poet's child.(2) 5rv THE HAREBELL._~_Sot' a~st~e ueeys f a ot' hid


66 THE HAREBELL.The very flower to takeInto the heart, and makeThe cherished memory of all pleasant places;Name but the light Harebell,And straight is pictured wellWhere'er of fallen state lie lonely traces.We vision wild sea-rocks,Where hang its clustering locks,Waving at dizzy height o'er ocean's brinkThe hermit's lonesome cell;The forest's sylvan well,Where the poor wounded hart came downto drink.I


THE HAREBELL. 67We vision moors far spread,Where blooms the heather red,And hunters with their dogs lie down at noon.Lone shepherd-boys, who keepOn mountain-sides their sheep,Cheating the time with flowers and fancies boon.Old slopes of pasture ground;Old fosse, and moat, and mound,Where the mailed warrior and crusader came;Old walls of crumbling stone,Where trails the snap-dragon;Rise at the mention of the Harebell's name.We see the sere turf brown,And the dry yarrow's crownScarce raising from the stem its thick-set flowers;The pale hawkweed we see,The blue-flowered chiccory,And the strong ivy-growth o'er crumbling towers.Light Harebell, there thou art,Making a lovely partOf the old splendour of the days gone by;


68 THE HAREBELL.Waving, if but a breezePant through the chestnut-trees,That on the hill-top grow, broad-branched and hig.Oh, when I look on thee,In thy fair symmetry,And look on other flowers as fair beside,My sense is gratitude,That God has been thus good,To scatter flowers, like common blessings, wide- 4' c~ ~is ;>> s


N -IX THE ROSE OF MAY.7,, Al, there's 'the lily, marble pale,-fi''A f\i r 8' '- The bonny broom, the cistus frail;The rich sweet-pear, the iris blue,The larkspur with its peacock hue;Each one is fair, yet hold I willThat the Rose of May is fairer still.'Tis grand neathh palace walls to grow,To blaze where lords and ladies go;S, tTo hang o'er marble founts, and shineIn modern gardens trim and fine;


70 THE ROSE OF MAY.But the Rose of May is only seenWhere the great of other days have been.The house is mouldering stone by stone,The garden-walks are overgrown ;The flowers are low, the weeds are high,The fountain-stream is choked and dry;The dial-stone with moss is green,Where'er the Rose of May is seen.--.--- ~-The Rose of May its pride displayedAlong the old stone balustrade;And ancient ladies, quaintly dight,In its pink blossoms took delight,


THE ROSE OF MAY. 7]And on the steps would make a stand,To scent its sweetness, fan in hand.Long have been dead those ladies gay;Their very heirs have passed away;And their old portraits, prim and tall,Are mouldering in the mouldering hall;The terrace and the balustradeLie broken, weedy, and decayed.But, lithe and tall, the Rose of MayShoots upward through the ruin gray,With scented flower, and leaf pale green,Such rose as it hath ever been;Left, like a noble deed, to graceThe memory of an ancient race.


THE FLAX-FLOWER.0 THE little Flax-flower !It growth on the hill,And, be the breeze awake or sleep,It never standeth still.It growth, and it growth fast;One day it is a seed,And then a little grassy blade,Scarce better than a weed.But then out comes the Flax-flower,As blue as is the sky;And "'Tis a dainty little thing !"We say, as we go by.-A


THE FLAX-FLOWER. 73A goodly little thing it is !It growth for the poor,And many a peasant blesses it,Beside his cottage door.He thinketh how those slender stems,That simmer in the sun,Are rich for him in web and woof,And shortly shall be spun.He thinketh how those tender flowers,Of seed will yield him store:And sees in thought his next year'scrop'Blue shining round his door.The little, useful Flax-flower!The mother, then says she,-"Go pull the thyme, the heath, the fern,But let the Flax-flower be!It gioweth for the children's sake,It growth for our own;There are flowers enough upon the hill,But leave the Flax alone!The farmer hath his fields of wheat,Much cometh to his share;


74 THE FLAX-FLOWER.We have this little plot of Flax,That we have tilled with care."Our squire he hath the holt and hill,Great halls and noble rent;We only have the Flax-field,Yet therewith are content,We watch it morn, we watch it night,And when the stars are out,The good-man and the little ones,They pace it round about;For it we wish the sun to shine,For it the rain to fall;Good lack! for who is poor doth makeGreat count of what is small!"The goodly, kindly Flax-flower 1It growth on the hill,And be the breeze awake or sleep,It never standeth still!It seemeth all astir with life,As if it loved to thrive;As if it had a merry heartWithin its stem alive


THE FLAX-FLOWER.Then fair befall the Flax-field !And may the fruitful showersGive strength unto its shining stem,Give seed unto its flowers!. ,, I-.-\i-- -: t . .-,


FLOWER COMPARISONS.t 4AH, sweet cousin Blanche, let's seeWith those dove-like eyes of thine,And thy fair hair's silken twine;With thy low, broad forehead, whiteAs marble, and as purely bright;With thy mouth so calm and sweet,And thy dainty hands and feet;What's the flower most like thee ?


FLOWER COMPARISONS. 77Blossom of the orange-tree!Where may the bright flower be metThat can match with Margaret,-Margaret, stately, staid, and good,Growing up to womanhood;Loving, thoughtful, wise, and kind,Pure in heart and strong in mind ?Eyes deep blue as is the skyWhen the full moon sails on high;Eyebrow true and forehead fair,And dark, richly-braided hair,And a queenly head well set,Crown my maiden Margaret.Where's the flower that thou canstfindMatch for her in form and mind ?Fair white lilies, having birthIn their native genial earth;-These, in scent and queenly grace,Match thy maiden's form and face!Now for madcap Isabel--


78 FLOWER COMPARISONS.What shall suit her, prithee tell ?Isabel is brown and wild;Will be evermore a child;Is all laughter, all vagary,Has the spirit of a fairy.Are you grave ?-The gipsy slyTurns on you her merry eye,And you laugh, despite your will.Isabel is never still,Always doing, never done,Be it mischief, work, or fun.Isabel is short and brown,Soft to touch as eider-down;Tempered like the balmy south,With a rosy, laughing mouth;Cheeks just tinged with peachy red,And a graceful Hebe head;Hair put up in some wild way,Decked with a hedge-rose's spray.Now, where is the bud or bellThat may match with Isabel ?Streaky tulip, jet and gold,Dearly priced whenever sold;


FLOWER COMPARISONS. 79Rich in colour, low and sweet,This for Isabel is meet.Last for Jeanie, grave and mild-Jeanie never was a child!Sitting on her mother's knee,Hers was thoughtful infancy;Growing up so meek and good,Even from her babyhood.All her mother's labour sharing;For the house and children caring;To her bed in silence creeping;Rising early, little sleeping;Learning soon of care and need;Learning late to write and read;To all hardships reconciled,For she was a poor man's child !What's the lowly flower of earthMatch for Jeanie's humble worth ?Soon poor Jeanie's flower is met-The meek, precious violet!N


THE MANDRAKE.THERE once was a garden grand and old,tc Its stately walks were trodden by few;l: ~And there, in its driest and deepest mould,The dark green poisonous Mandrake grew.That garden's lord was a learned man,-It is of an ancient time we tell,-He was grim and stern, with a visage wan,And had books which only he could spell.: *'* "-d\W~~ ';,f


THE MANDRAKE. 81He had been a monk in his younger days,They said, and travelled by land and sea;And now, in his old, ancestral place,He was come to study in privacy.A garden it was both large and lone,And in it was temple, cave, and mound;The trees were with ivy overgrown,And the depth of its lake no line had found.Some said that the springs of the lake lay deepUnder the fierce volcano's root;For the water would ofttimes curl and leapWhen the summer air was calm and mute.And all along o'er its margin dankHung massy branches of evergreen;And among the pebbles upon the bankThe playful water-snakes were seen.And yew-trees old, in the alleys dim,Were cut into dragon shapes of dread;And in midst of shadow, grotesque and grim,Stood goat-limbed statues of sullen lead.(2) C


82 THE MANDRAKE.The garden beds they were long, and allWith a tangle of flowers were overgrown;And each was screened with an ancient wall,Or parapet low of mossy stone.And from every crevice and broken ledgeThe harebell blue and wall-flower sprung;And from the wall to the water's edgeWild masses of tendrilled creepers hung;For there was a moat outside, where sleptDeep waters, with slimy moss grown o'er;And a wall and a tower securely keptBy a ban-dog fierce at a grated door.This garden's lord was a scholar wise-A scholar wise, with a learned look;He studied by night the starry skies,And all day long some ancient book.There were lords hard by who lived by spoil,But he did the men of war eschew;There were lowly serfs who tilled the soil,But with toiling serfs he had nought to do.


THE MANDRAKE. 83But now and then might with him be seenTwo other old men with look profound,Who peered 'mid the leaves of the Mandrakegreen,And lightened with care the soil around.For the king was sick, and of help had need;Or he had a foe whom art must quell,So he sent to the learned man with speedTo gather for him a Mandrake spell.


84 THE MANDRAKE.And at night, when the moon was at the full,When the air was still and the stars were out,Came the three the Mandrake root to pull,With the help of the ban-dog fierce and stout.Oh, the Mandrake root! and they listened, all three,For awful sounds, and they spoke no word;And when the owl screeched from the hollow tree,They said 'twas the Mandrake's groan they heard.And words they muttered, but what none knew,With motion slow of hand and foot;Then into the cave the three withdrew,And carried with them the Mandrake root.They were all scholars of high degree,So they took the root of the Mandrake fell,And cut and carved it hideously,And muttered it into a magic spell.Then who had been there by dawn of day,Might have seen the two from the grated doorSpeed forth; and as sure as they went away,The magic Mandrake root they bore.


THE MANDRAKE. 85And the old lord up in his chamber sat,Blessing himself, sedate and mute,That he thus could gift the wise and greatWith more than gold-the Mandrake root.""- A /V- ijii- w;" IkYt ri


FLOWER-PAINTINGS.I LOVE those pictures that we seeAt times in some old gallery,Hung amid armed men of old,And antique ladies quaint and cold;'Mong furious battle-pieces, direWith agony, and blood, and fire;-Flower-pictures, painted long ago,Though worn and old, and dimmed of glow,I love them, although art may deemSuch pictures but of light esteem.


FLOWER-PAINTINGS. 87There are the red rose and the white,And stems of lilies strong and bright;The leaf and tendril of the vine;The iris and the columbine;The streaky tulip, gold and jet;The amaranth and violet;There is the bright jonquil; the trailOf bind-weed, chalice-like and pale;The crumpled poppy, brave and bold;The pea; the pink; the marigold.There are they grouped, in form and hue,Flower, bud, and leaf to nature true!Yes, although slighted and forlorn,And oft the mark of modern scorn,I love such pictures, and mine eyeWith cold regard ne'er passed them by.I love them most, that they presentSome pious, antique sentiment:The Virgin-Mother, young and mild;The cradle of the Holy Child;Or, 'mid a visioned glory faint,The meek brow of some martyred saint;


88 FLOWER-PAINTINGS.And with their painters I can findA kindred sympathy of mind.Flowers are around me bright of hue,The quaint old favourites and the n6w,In form and colour infinite,Each one a creature of delight.But with this fair array is broughtFull many a deep and holy thought,For garden-beds to me, and bowers,Like the old pictures of the flowers,Within their bloomy depths enshrineA hymn of praise, a thought divine !j .) ,- -\1j/j, ~/ ):~; \ ~c;'//// ~'


i ----------------- "---- --------- -- --_____------- -- ---i,---_-----.-_--.-____...__.. .----=-- ____ -- .____ :-- -_-- -- --- -- ---------__ ------ -- --- ------_/1THEWILD SPRING-CROCUS"IN NOTTINGHAM MEADOWS.> Ai, though it is an English(10flower,It only growth here andthere.:, k___.. -- --~:~O~~1 fow AcIforyg-Jeh ee nt~ler37-Sti'


90 THE WILD SPRING-CROCUS.Through merry England you might ride,-Through all its length from side to side,-Through fifty counties, nor have spiedThis flower so passing fair.But in these meadows it is growing.And now it is the early spring;And see! from out the kindly earthHow thousand thousands issue forth!As if it gloried to give birthTo such a lovely thing.Like lilac-flame its colour glows,Tender, and yet so clearly bright,That all for miles and miles aboutThe splendid meadow shineth out;And far-off village children shoutTo see the welcome sight.I love the odorous hawthorn-flower;I love the wilding's bloom to see;


THE WILD SPRING-CROCUS. 91I love the light anemones,That tremble to the faintest breeze;And hyacinth-like orchisesAre very dear to me!The star-wort is a fairy-flower;The violet is a thing to prize;The wild-pink on the craggy ledge;The waving sword-like water-sedge,And e'en the Robin-run-i'-th'-hedge,Are precious in mine eyes.Yes, yes, I love them all, bright things!But then, such glorious flowers as theseAre dearer still. I'll tell you why:There's joy in many and many an eyeWhen first goes forth the welcome cryOf--" Lo, the Crocuses !"Then little toiling children leaveTheir care, and here by thousands throng,


92 THE WILD SPRING-CROCUS.And through the shining meadow run,And gather them; not one by one,But by grasped handfuls, where are noneTo say that they do wrong.They run, they leap, they shout for joy;They bring their infant brethren here;They fill each little pinafore;They bear their baskets brimming o'er,Within their very hearts they storeThis first joy of the year.Yes, joy in these abundant meadowsPours out like to the earth's overflowing;And, less that they are beautifulThan that they are so plentiful,So free for every child to pull,I love to see them growing.And here, in our own fields they grow-An English flower, but very rare;


THE WILD SPRING-CROCUS. 93Through all the kingdom you may ride,-O'er marshy flat, on mountain-side,-Nor ever see, outstretching wide,Such flowery meadows fair!;I1 7 4 V^~~ ~~ ,^ aY" ,-/ '^^


THE GARDEN.I HAD a Garden when a child;I kept it all in order!'Twas full of flowers as it could be,And London-pride was its border.And soon as came the pleasant spring,The singing-birds built in it,-The blackbird and the throstle-cock,The woodlark and the linnet.


THE GARDEN. 95And all within my Garden ranA labyrinth-walk so mazy;In the middle there grew a yellow rose,At each end a Michaelmas-daisy.I had a bush of southern-wood,And two of bright mezereon;"A peony root, a snow-white phlox,And a plant of red valerian;"A lilac-tree, and a guelder-rose;A broom, and a tiger-lily;And I walked a dozen miles to findThe true wild daffodilly.I had columbines, both pink and blue,And thalictrum like a feather;And the bright goat's-beard, that shuts its leavesBefore a change of weather.I had marigolds, and gilliflowers,And pinks all pinks exceeding;I'd a noble root of love-in-a-mist,And plenty of love-lies-bleeding.


96 THE GARDEN.I had Jacob's ladder, Aaron's rod,And the peacock-gentianella;I had asters, more than I can tell,And lupins blue and yellow.I set a grain of Indian corn,One day in an idle humour,And the grain sprung up six feet or more,My glory for a summer.I found far off in the pleasant fields,More flowers than I can mentionI found the English asphodel,And the spring and autumn gentian.I found the orchis, fly and bee,And the cistus of the mountain;The money-wort, and the green hart's-tongue,Beside an old wood fountain.I found, within another wood,The rare pyrola blowing;For wherever there was a curious flower,I was sure to find it growing.


THE GARDEN. 97I set them in my Garden beds,Those beds I loved so dearly,Where I laboured after set of sun,And in summer mornings early.Oh my pleasant Garden-plot !-A shrubbery was beside it,And an old and mossy apple-tree,With a woodbine wreathed to hide it.There was a bower in my Garden-plot,A spiraea grew before it;Behind it was a laburnum-treeAnd a wild hop clambered o'er it.Ofttimes I sat within my bower,Like a king in all his glory;Ofttimes I read, and read for hours,Some pleasant, wondrous story.I read of Gardens in old times,-Old stately Gardens, kingly,Where people walked in gorgeous crowds,Or, for silent musing, singly.(2) 7