Citation
Holly & ivy

Material Information

Title:
Holly & ivy the story of a winter Birds' Nest
Portion of title:
Holly and ivy
Creator:
Davies, Sarah
Herbert, George ( Publisher )
William Hunt & Co ( Publisher )
M'Laren & Erskine ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
Dublin
London
Publisher:
George Herbert
William Hunt & Co.
Manufacturer:
M'Laren & Erskine
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
191, [1] p., [7] leaves of plates : ill (some col.) ; 16 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Orphanages -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Orphans -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Charity -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Poverty -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Volunteers -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Social life and customs -- Juvenile literature -- Dublin (Ireland) ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1871
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Ireland -- Dublin
England -- London
Scotland -- Glasgow
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Added engraved title page printed in colors.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Miss Davies.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026665635 ( ALEPH )
ALG5491 ( NOTIS )
57726903 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

00027.pdf

00027.txt

00028.pdf

00028.txt

00057.pdf

00057.txt

00080.pdf

00080.txt

00159.pdf

00159.txt

00050.pdf

00050.txt

00196.pdf

00196.txt

00046.pdf

00046.txt

00209.pdf

00209.txt

00079.pdf

00079.txt

00111.pdf

00111.txt

00143.pdf

00143.txt

00019.pdf

00019.txt

00071.pdf

00071.txt

00192.pdf

00192.txt

00103.pdf

00103.txt

00101.pdf

00101.txt

00075.pdf

00075.txt

00047.pdf

00047.txt

00025.pdf

00025.txt

00141.pdf

00141.txt

00194.pdf

00194.txt

00158.pdf

00158.txt

00172.pdf

00172.txt

00039.pdf

00039.txt

00086.pdf

00086.txt

00001.pdf

00001.txt

00201.pdf

00201.txt

oai.xml

00017.pdf

00017.txt

00095.pdf

00095.txt

00210.pdf

00210.txt

00120.pdf

00120.txt

00044.pdf

00044.txt

00171.pdf

00171.txt

00023.pdf

00023.txt

00139.pdf

00139.txt

00206.pdf

00206.txt

00008.pdf

00008.txt

00208.pdf

00208.txt

00077.pdf

00077.txt

00214.pdf

00214.txt

00038.pdf

00038.txt

00026.pdf

00026.txt

00162.pdf

00162.txt

00054.pdf

00054.txt

00112.pdf

00112.txt

00085.pdf

00085.txt

00070.pdf

00070.txt

00175.pdf

00175.txt

00135.pdf

00135.txt

00030.pdf

00030.txt

00011.pdf

00011.txt

00131.pdf

00131.txt

00205.pdf

00205.txt

00082.pdf

00082.txt

00176.pdf

00176.txt

00084.pdf

00084.txt

00173.pdf

00173.txt

00198.pdf

00198.txt

00122.pdf

00122.txt

00154.pdf

00154.txt

00110.pdf

00110.txt

00091.pdf

00091.txt

00145.pdf

00145.txt

00200.pdf

00200.txt

00181.pdf

00181.txt

00121.pdf

00121.txt

00004.pdf

00004.txt

00156.pdf

00156.txt

00056.pdf

00056.txt

00188.pdf

00188.txt

00117.pdf

00117.txt

00144.pdf

00144.txt

00053.pdf

00053.txt

00083.pdf

00083.txt

00177.pdf

00177.txt

00066.pdf

00066.txt

00073.pdf

00073.txt

00088.pdf

00088.txt

00146.pdf

00146.txt

00125.pdf

00125.txt

00018.pdf

00018.txt

00020.pdf

00020.txt

00166.pdf

00166.txt

00127.pdf

00127.txt

00142.pdf

00142.txt

00074.pdf

00074.txt

00031.pdf

00031.txt

00129.pdf

00129.txt

00204.pdf

00204.txt

00092.pdf

00092.txt

00115.pdf

00115.txt

00151.pdf

00151.txt

00022.pdf

00022.txt

00147.pdf

00147.txt

00081.pdf

00081.txt

00099.pdf

00099.txt

00061.pdf

00061.txt

00203.pdf

00203.txt

00193.pdf

00193.txt

00069.pdf

00069.txt

00134.pdf

00134.txt

00126.pdf

00126.txt

00068.pdf

00068.txt

00140.pdf

00140.txt

00049.pdf

00049.txt

00036.pdf

00036.txt

00096.pdf

00096.txt

00002.pdf

00002.txt

00076.pdf

00076.txt

00098.pdf

00098.txt

00199.pdf

00199.txt

00065.pdf

00065.txt

00032.pdf

00032.txt

00106.pdf

00106.txt

00113.pdf

00113.txt

00189.pdf

00189.txt

00024.pdf

00024.txt

00009.pdf

00009.txt

00169.pdf

00169.txt

00041.pdf

00041.txt

00190.pdf

00190.txt

00062.pdf

00062.txt

00213.pdf

00213.txt

00185.pdf

00185.txt

00132.pdf

00132.txt

00167.pdf

00167.txt

00118.pdf

00118.txt

00124.pdf

00124.txt

00097.pdf

00097.txt

00052.pdf

00052.txt

00114.pdf

00114.txt

00067.pdf

00067.txt

00104.pdf

00104.txt

00090.pdf

00090.txt

00059.pdf

00059.txt

00094.pdf

00094.txt

00160.pdf

00160.txt

00182.pdf

00182.txt

00155.pdf

00155.txt

00087.pdf

00087.txt

00123.pdf

00123.txt

00040.pdf

00040.txt

00128.pdf

00128.txt

00152.pdf

00152.txt

00170.pdf

00170.txt

00102.pdf

00102.txt

00005.pdf

00005.txt

00060.pdf

00060.txt

00100.pdf

00100.txt

00037.pdf

00037.txt

00007.pdf

00007.txt

00150.pdf

00150.txt

00186.pdf

00186.txt

00108.pdf

00108.txt

00174.pdf

00174.txt

00051.pdf

00051.txt

00163.pdf

00163.txt

00164.pdf

00164.txt

00064.pdf

00064.txt

00119.pdf

00119.txt

00161.pdf

00161.txt

00043.pdf

00043.txt

00105.pdf

00105.txt

00184.pdf

00184.txt

00187.pdf

00187.txt

00133.pdf

00133.txt

00055.pdf

00055.txt

00013.pdf

00013.txt

00137.pdf

00137.txt

00089.pdf

00089.txt

00063.pdf

00063.txt

00179.pdf

00179.txt

00093.pdf

00093.txt

00130.pdf

00130.txt

00157.pdf

00157.txt

00116.pdf

00116.txt

00165.pdf

00165.txt

00138.pdf

00138.txt

00058.pdf

00058.txt

00033.pdf

00033.txt

00153.pdf

00153.txt

00021.pdf

00021.txt

00034.pdf

00034.txt

00029.pdf

00029.txt

00197.pdf

00197.txt

00195.pdf

00195.txt

00191.pdf

00191.txt

00168.pdf

00168.txt

00180.pdf

00180.txt

00042.pdf

00042.txt

00202.pdf

00202.txt

00149.pdf

00149.txt

00006.pdf

00006.txt

00207.pdf

00207.txt

00107.pdf

00107.txt

00109.pdf

00109.txt

00016.pdf

00016.txt

00078.pdf

00078.txt

00014.pdf

00014.txt

00045.pdf

00045.txt

00035.pdf

00035.txt

00183.pdf

00183.txt

UF00026183_00001.pdf

UF00026183_00001.txt

00130_pdf.txt

00002_pdf.txt

00022_pdf.txt

00210_pdf.txt

00152_pdf.txt

00070_pdf.txt

00023_pdf.txt

00066_pdf.txt

00020_pdf.txt

00194_pdf.txt

00181_pdf.txt

00025_pdf.txt

00054_pdf.txt

00151_pdf.txt

00013_pdf.txt

00009_pdf.txt

00131_pdf.txt

00193_pdf.txt

00155_pdf.txt

00019_pdf.txt

00034_pdf.txt

00073_pdf.txt

00026_pdf.txt

00049_pdf.txt

00077_pdf.txt

00200_pdf.txt

00008_pdf.txt

00116_pdf.txt

00184_pdf.txt

00037_pdf.txt

00156_pdf.txt

00160_pdf.txt

00011_pdf.txt

00180_pdf.txt

00038_pdf.txt

00069_pdf.txt

00154_pdf.txt

00186_pdf.txt

00189_pdf.txt

00046_pdf.txt

00105_pdf.txt

00080_pdf.txt

00147_pdf.txt

00095_pdf.txt

00112_pdf.txt

00164_pdf.txt

00161_pdf.txt

00169_pdf.txt

00096_pdf.txt

00098_pdf.txt

00150_pdf.txt

00088_pdf.txt

00128_pdf.txt

00027_pdf.txt

00174_pdf.txt

00207_pdf.txt

00213_pdf.txt

00059_pdf.txt

00198_pdf.txt

00129_pdf.txt

00140_pdf.txt

00103_pdf.txt

00063_pdf.txt

00167_pdf.txt

00044_pdf.txt

00053_pdf.txt

00050_pdf.txt

00120_pdf.txt

00108_pdf.txt

00024_pdf.txt

00177_pdf.txt

00031_pdf.txt

00041_pdf.txt

00183_pdf.txt

00187_pdf.txt

00082_pdf.txt

00040_pdf.txt

00021_pdf.txt

00076_pdf.txt

00074_pdf.txt

00118_pdf.txt

00075_pdf.txt

00206_pdf.txt

00137_pdf.txt

00106_pdf.txt

00052_pdf.txt

00042_pdf.txt

00121_pdf.txt

00190_pdf.txt

00126_pdf.txt

00201_pdf.txt

00033_pdf.txt

00007_pdf.txt

00057_pdf.txt

00064_pdf.txt

00199_pdf.txt

00165_pdf.txt

00081_pdf.txt

00005_pdf.txt

00146_pdf.txt

00032_pdf.txt

00084_pdf.txt

00195_pdf.txt

00153_pdf.txt

00016_pdf.txt

00100_pdf.txt

00102_pdf.txt

00173_pdf.txt

00175_pdf.txt

00196_pdf.txt

00124_pdf.txt

00056_pdf.txt

00125_pdf.txt

00176_pdf.txt

00202_pdf.txt

00039_pdf.txt

00017_pdf.txt

00192_pdf.txt

00036_pdf.txt

00171_pdf.txt

00099_pdf.txt

00093_pdf.txt

00001_pdf.txt

00115_pdf.txt

00191_pdf.txt

00062_pdf.txt

00043_pdf.txt

00109_pdf.txt

00061_pdf.txt

00045_pdf.txt

00085_pdf.txt

oai_xml.txt

00114_pdf.txt

00097_pdf.txt

00168_pdf.txt

00086_pdf.txt

00091_pdf.txt

00101_pdf.txt

00104_pdf.txt

00079_pdf.txt

00159_pdf.txt

00157_pdf.txt

00071_pdf.txt

00145_pdf.txt

00122_pdf.txt

00139_pdf.txt

00047_pdf.txt

00107_pdf.txt

00068_pdf.txt

UF00026183_00001_pdf.txt

00110_pdf.txt

00087_pdf.txt

00163_pdf.txt

00119_pdf.txt

00065_pdf.txt

00134_pdf.txt

00132_pdf.txt

00203_pdf.txt

00144_pdf.txt

00166_pdf.txt

00149_pdf.txt

00030_pdf.txt

00090_pdf.txt

00214_pdf.txt

00018_pdf.txt

00092_pdf.txt

00067_pdf.txt

00138_pdf.txt

00209_pdf.txt

00135_pdf.txt

00078_pdf.txt

00185_pdf.txt

00029_pdf.txt

00123_pdf.txt

00162_pdf.txt

00083_pdf.txt

00113_pdf.txt

00182_pdf.txt

00141_pdf.txt

00111_pdf.txt

00170_pdf.txt

00142_pdf.txt

00208_pdf.txt

00133_pdf.txt

00006_pdf.txt

00094_pdf.txt

00014_pdf.txt

00060_pdf.txt

00172_pdf.txt

00051_pdf.txt

00205_pdf.txt

00004_pdf.txt

00117_pdf.txt

00143_pdf.txt

00028_pdf.txt

00197_pdf.txt

00188_pdf.txt

00035_pdf.txt

00055_pdf.txt

00127_pdf.txt

00058_pdf.txt

00089_pdf.txt

00158_pdf.txt

00204_pdf.txt

00179_pdf.txt


Full Text
y
Fe
aera: A j j .
Sd a { i
4 Z
tis we
: 3 .
aay f 3
4 r
ae : - ¥ t * iN
. sa , en ae
2 at feet) o i agg eT
\ ar < ae
;





&
os ee iE
rer Dire a





The Baldwin Library

—,
Ri ] L esi







cninh nga fe i 7 YE bee +P AN fe ‘oer ue a ey

eat oe ete Bt ee ~e a -ee Ota me ie Tee Vaal = z . * ra

worckor se “we





ys

WINTE

by

ey
















HOLLY AND IVY:

THE STORY

OF
Pp WINTER “BIRDS Nest.”

BY

MISS DAVIES,

EDITOR OF *“*ERIN’S HOPE,’ AND AUTHOR OF “THEM ALSO,”
“WANDERERS BROUGHT HOME,” &c.

DUBLIN:

‘GEORGE HERBERT, 117 GRAFTON STREET.
LONDON: WILLIAM HUNT & CO., 23 HOLLES STREET,
CAVENDISH SQUARE.

18 7 I.



erm Ids duih

[iter strat |
Ao

|| Printers, |]
cot
| Glaser.

=









haw Of 72

‘

Dedirrted
THE MEMBERS

| se OF ae
~The Children’s Association,

WHO WITH LOVING HEARTS AND SELF-DENYING LABOURS HAVE
HELPED TO BUILD “THE NEST’’ AND FEED THE BIRDS
WHO: HAVE FOUND SHELTER FROM THE WINTER

STORMS, BY THEIR GRATEFUL. FRIEND,

THE SECRETARY,



PREFACE TO THE THIRD EDITION.



00



WHEN the Second Edition of this little book was nearly
~ sold off, it was thought well to publish its contents in a
series of little books, which could be issued in large
numbers. ‘This plan has been most successful; but still
many letters are coming asking for the original book; and
therefore we have determined to send forth a Third
Edition, bringing down the story to the present time,
and embodying the contents of the later numbers of
- the little books.

We commend this new edition to the loving care of
our Heavenly Father. May He bless it abundantly, and
‘by it touch many hearts, causing them to feel for the
miseries of destitute little children, and leading them to
help in some way to provide for the little children in the

Birps’ Nest. .
SARAH DAVIES,

35 Urrer FirzwittiaM Street, Dustin,
Honorary Secretary to Children’s Association,

December, 1871.



CONTENTS.





0

“PART I.

. CHAPTER lL. PAGE
INTRODUCTORY, . : : ‘ eee : 9
CHAPTER II.

HOW WE BEGAN, : : : : : . I4
CHAPTER III.
DARK CLOUDS, . vs ‘ . ; . ai
| CHAPTER IV.
GOD’S CARE, : : Se inal , - 224
CHAPTER V.
GOING FORWARD, ; é : ; . . 28
CHAPTER VL
THE BIRDS IN THE NEST, . ‘ : : ee BF
CHAPTER VIL
DAILY WORK, . . : j ‘ pet 60
CHAPTER VIIL
HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS, : : san ye

: CHAPTER IX.
THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION, - + - ~- 82



Vill CONTENTS.
CHAPTER xX.
GOD’S PROVIDINGS, . ; j

CHAPTER XI.
HOW THE BUILDING WAS PAID FOR,

: O





PART II,
3 ) CHAPTER I,
THE FIRST DEATH, . -:. °
i CHAPTER II.
NOT ALONE, . cots .
CHAPTER III.
SAFE AT HOME, . ; ; :
CHAPTER IV.
‘CALLED AND CHOSEN, Gee
CHAPTER V.
WANDERERS WELCOMED, . :
: CHAPTER VI.
“A PILGRIM GOING HOME,” _.
CHAPTER VII.
A CONTRAST, «. 2 « .
CHAPTER VIII
‘SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE, .
| 7 CHAPTER IX,
“CONCLUSION, . : : .

PAGE

— 94

118

123
127
I4i
145
158
166
175
178

1g0



oir Ai se BSN

varie,



PNR Oe oe tater = 2 eqetet, Mit Ne wae WES deme mE oe em Re Agi mM WN ae com oe Nat SU g coe eens Wo,



SPY Rept N04 Ae SAARC HAPS ik AF VOR a needs Site, 5 Me) as en Ont © 5 snp See 4 ok nna beh) = staat GOA ene A pumesome ‘ ~ ces



hn

r

Unrest



Wier .





THE CONTRAST.



&
J



HOLLY AND IVY.

PART I.



00



CHAPTER I.

INTRODUCTORY.

wm OLLY AND IVY! the very words make us
a, feel cold, and yet warm. How they remind one
| i=} of the snow-covered fields, and the keen, biting
winds of winter! How they remind one, too, of times
of joy, and happy homes, and brightness in the midst ee
desolation !

This little book will tell of ibe dreary winter time of
the lives of destitute little children—of their sorrows and
troubles. It also tells of brightness and j joy, and a happy
home; and so I have chosen those magic words for its
title. I hope it will find its way into many Christian
homes, and be read by many of those dear children who





&
J



HOLLY AND IVY.

PART I.



00



CHAPTER I.

INTRODUCTORY.

wm OLLY AND IVY! the very words make us
a, feel cold, and yet warm. How they remind one
| i=} of the snow-covered fields, and the keen, biting
winds of winter! How they remind one, too, of times
of joy, and happy homes, and brightness in the midst ee
desolation !

This little book will tell of ibe dreary winter time of
the lives of destitute little children—of their sorrows and
troubles. It also tells of brightness and j joy, and a happy
home; and so I have chosen those magic words for its
title. I hope it will find its way into many Christian
homes, and be read by many of those dear children who





IO | _ INTRODUCTORY.

have early learned to love the Lord Jesus Christ, and are
earnestly longing to have something to do for Him.
When He was here on earth He took the little children
in His own arms and blessed them. He cares for them
still, and looks down on them with compassionate love,
but He looks to His people to comfort them.

It was because there were so many poor little children
to be comforted that The Birds’ Nest was opened; and it
was because so many dear children in happy homes wanted
to help, that we formed what we call the CuILpREN’s
ASSOCIATION, to the members of which this little book is
dedicated.

An account of the Association and its work will be
found farther on. ‘The children have done much, but not
yet half what is needed, for the daily expenditure of such
an institution as THE Brrp’s Nest. In this great work
there is room enough for all, and we would earnestly call
upon all those into whose hands this book may fall, to
come forward and help. We know there are many calls
upon the purse of charity, but amongst the many claiming
the sympathies of those whom God has made stewards of
His bounty, homes for the destitute must ever take a high
place. And why? Because our Father in heaven com-
forts His dying people with the sweet promise, ‘‘ Leave
thy fatherless children, and I will preserve them alive;



INTRODUCTORY. If

and let thy widows trust in M#.’’—Because the only-
begotten Son, in His wondrous life on earth, left us an
example that we should love little children.—Because
‘when in His risen body He talked with His disciples, and
would have from Peter a proof of constant love, He said,
“¢ Feed my lambs.” Now He is gone, and we are left to
follow out the path He traced; and as alone, or in com-
panies, His servants tread that path, He looks down with
kindly eye and sympathizing heart. Oh let us never for-
get that we are working for Him who took a little child
and set him by Him,—that we have a smile from Him
who said, “Suffer little children to come unto Meg.”
Oh, then—
<¢ Aim to be like Jesus; walk with God,
Look up to learn your heavenly Father’s will— ©
Look round the earth on which your Saviour trod—
And when you find a child of sorrow, ill,
Forlorn and helpless, toiling up the hill, -
Be thou a loving angel, and thy face,
In tending it, shall shine as angels’ do;
As shine those sons of light in that high place,

Hid for a little while from mortal view,
Where, if you follow Christ, you'll be an angel too,”

The Birds’ Nest shelters one hundred and ninety of
these ‘forlorn and helpless’? ones. “They have been
taken out from the wide world, and brought together, not



I2 INTRODUCTORY.

without many fears that funds might not come in for their
support. But the cases were so pressing that one after
another the Committee cou/d not refuse; and they felt
that He who caused twelve baskets of fragments to
remain after the multitude had fed on five barley loaves,
would also cause a blessing to rest on the “‘ basket and
store’? of The Birds’ Nest, if only the children were
received in His name.

So the poor little friendless ones have found a home on
earth, where they are being trained for a Home in

glory—
«¢ A home so happy and so bright,—

A home of rest above—

Where, clothed in raiment pure and white,
In that sweet home of love,

No more a ragged orphan wild,
But dressed in white array,

Our God shall own the homeless child,
And wipe its tears away.”





INTRODUCTORY. . oe &

“Js there a thing beneath the skies .
O’er which the gentle Saviour yearns,
Which finds such favour in His eyes,
Whose tearful cry He never spurns?
It is that little thing so wild,
A poor, neglected, lonely child.

Oh teach that little one to sing

The numbers tuneful, soft and clear,
Hosanna to the Shepherd bring,

Such as that Shepherd loves to hear—
Such as He heard when meek He rode ¥
‘To Salem, His ordain’d abode.

Such as His gracious ear again
Shall welcome from ‘young hearts set free,
Whom Tuov hast rescued from the chain
Of sin and woe; hast taught to flee
To Him who left yon heavenly land
To take a wanderer by the hand.”





CHAPTER Ii.

HOW WE BEGAN.

Marge i was in the month of July, 1859, four ladies

#a| were sitting together in a small room in one of
the back streets of Dublin. SREY were met
to arrange the weekly business of a Home for Destitute
Girls, and to see those who wished for admission.

‘There were many came that day seeking a shelter,
girls who had no place to call ‘ home,”’ who had slept,
some of them, for many a night, in the damp air,
crouched in some doorway, or perhaps an open shed;
and as many as they could those ladies received in the
name of Jesus. |

But amongst the applicants came a woman bringing
a little girl three years of age. She had been deserted.
by her mother a year before, and this woman, poor as she
was, had taken her to her heart and home; but now
worse poverty had come upon her, she could keep the
little one no longer. It-was not the first tine such little ©
ones had come there. Once two little ones came hand-





HOW WE BEGAN. 15

in-hand, their poor little bodies scarcely covered with
wretched rags, their hair tangled, their faces unwashed;
and as they stood together they looked round with a
wondering, half-frightened air; and their faces, which
ought to have been bright with smiles and fun, were
marked by a serious, careworn look, very sad to see in such
little things. Their mother was dead, and their father
was gone, and they had no home and no food but the
breakfast they got in the Ragged School. But these two,
and many others, had been sent away because the Home
was for great girls; there was no room for little ones.
But now the sad case of the little child touched the heart
of one of the ladies very deeply; and Jesus, who longs to
have the little ones come to Him, put into her heart a
thought :-— We must have a Home for the poor little
ones,” she said. ‘‘ There are many children to whom
God has given plenteously, and they will gather the
money to feed them, and so the rich and the poor amongst
the lambs of the fold will be united together, and God
will be glorified.” The woman was told to call again,
and something should be done.

That day the ladies sat long together, and they asked
God’s blessing on the work of their hands. Before they
separated, the youngest among them, the one into whose
heart the thought came, had determined that she would



16 _ HOW WE BEGAN.

be responsible for the new “ Home :” “ It shall be in the
country,’ she said; “cand we will call it ‘Tue Brrps’
Nest.’ ”

The first thing this good lady did was to write an
article in the little magazine called ‘¢ Erin’s Hope,” telling
_of the new idea, and asking children to help; and then a
Committee of four ladies was formed.

- It was some little time before a suitable house sould be- .

fuiid, but at last one was discovered up a little country
road near Kingstown. It belonged to a kind gentleman,
who, when he knew what it was wanted for, charged a
very low rent. It was just the thing for a nest of birdies,
snug and small, and having roses climbing up the small porch.
_ The house wanted some repairs, and the introduction
of gas pipes, before it would be ready to be inhabited; but
however, by the end of September all was finished, and
the ladies assembled in the new Nest. The first thing
they did was to kneel down to thank God that He had so.
far helped them, and to pray that a great blessing might
rest upon that Home, and that it might be a nursery for
heaven. ‘Then they chose a nice motherly woman for a
matron, and the little child was brought in and adopted as
the first nestling; then came another girl, a little older,
and a boy and girl, (brother and sister ;) thus we had four
to begih with; and very happy they were in their Home.



HOW WE BEGAN. | 17 |

We could. not afford to buy bedsteads, but every child
had a little sack, filled with straw, laid on the floor, with
a pair of sheets and blankets; and as we admitted more
children into the Nest, the number of these little beds _
increased, till at last they were so thickly laid, side by side,
that it was with difficulty we could step about the 1 rooms 5
there were forty children.

Week after week the Committee of The Birds’ Nest
met ; and week after week they met with two great diffi-
culties : one was that money did not come in as fast as it
was wanted ; but for this there was a remedy,—prayer and
work, ‘The other difficulty was, how to refuse the mul-
titude of poor children who pressed for admission; it was
so very hard to turn them away, and think that they must
continue to wander the streets, faint and weary; and the
ladies prayed very much for guidance. They felt as if
God was saying to them, ‘Take these children and nurse

them for Me, I will give you money.” And so they de-
termined that as soon as possible they would build a Home
which would hold one hundred and fifty, and they would
write down in a book the cases of the children who were
left without, that as soon as there was room they might all
be taken in,

The little children who had found a home,in The Birds’
Nest were very busy, and very happy. ‘They rose’early

. B



18 HOW WE.BEGAN.

in the morning, and dressed and washed themselves.
Then there were beds to make, and rooms to sweep;
after which they assembled in a long room at, the back of
the house for prayer. After comfortable warm breakfasts
of cocoa and bread, hats and bonnets were brought out,
and the little party set off, two-and-two, followed by their
kind matron, to the Mission School; and in many a home,
as they passed, kind voices said, ‘‘ Here come the children,”’
and kind faces looked out upon them and blessed them ;
and the clatter of forty pairs of wooden clogs was a
constant reminder to collectors to be up and doing. |
But the clatter of the clogs was heard by enemies
too. ‘There were some who were angry because the
children were taken by Protestants, and taught the Bible. —
‘They would break up The Nest if they could; and
many a scheme was laid for the purpose.
_ The children knew they had enemies, and that they
were always in danger; but they knew God as their
Father, they knew they were safe only under His
protection, and so they learned to trust in Him. Up in
the dormitories at night they met for prayer; and a few
trees in the garden formed a tabernacle where these dear
children often met with God. Frequently in the play-
time the voice of mirth would be stopped, and you
might hear sweet children’s voices joining in a hymn,



HOW WE BEGAN. 19.

And then the music would cease, and the voice of one
after anotherymight be heard in earnest prayer.

About this time the children’s friend who had deter-

mined to have The Nest wrote a very nice hymn for
them, suited to their peculiar circumstances. .
_ She meant it to be sung to the tune of “ Uncle Ned,”
a negro melody. She always liked lively tunes for the
children, because the very little ones could learn
them :— |



“¢T saw in a valley a happy little flock,
They lie in a pleasant fold,
The Shepherd who owns them is kind and good,

He loves them with love untold. |
Come all ye who hear, who hear,
Come, and never fear:
There ’s room for all,

‘And the Shepherd doth call,

Oh, come, and be happy here.

Those sheep were lost and wandering once,
And the wolf went about to destroy;
But the Shepherd sought them through wood, waste, and hill,
And brought them here with joy.
Come all, &c.

He made them a fold under green, green trees,
Which healing leaves do bear,
. Close by the stream of the water of life,
And He leads His saved ones. there.
-Come all, &c.



20

HOW WE BEGAN,

The Shepherd saved those lost wandering sheep,
For He fought with their cruel foe ;
And in His blood, then shed for them,
He washed them as white as snow.
Come all, &c.

And He will take them one happy, happy day,
To a fairer, lovelier home, :
Across the mountains, far, far away,
Where the wolf no more can roam. _
~ Come all, &c. |

Come young and old to this happy Gospel fold,
To this tender Shepherd’s care,
For none can go to that lovely distant home,
Till His saving grace they share.
Come all ye who hear,. who hear,
Come, and never fear; |
There ’s room for all, 7
And the Shepherd doth call,
_ Oh, come, and be happy here.”







CHAPTER III.

DARK CLOUDS.

Spa OT quite one year from the opening of The Birds’
ARN ©=Nest a great sorrow fell upon us, in the death
of the beloved and loving one who had gathered
the e children, and called their home The Birds’ Nest.
Brightly and beautifully had her light shone on earth,
and all too soon for us who were left behind was she
called away; but we tried to say, “¢ Thy will be done.”
‘The children of The Birds’ Nest were not the enly
rescued ones who mourned her loss. When her death
was announced, the Ragged School was a place of
‘Weeping. She was a daughter of the late Archbishop
Whately, and though lately married, died at her father’s
house. Some time before her death she had expressed a
wish that her funeral might have none of the usual pomp
about it, but that her dear poor people might be her
mourners. When she was gone her father remembered
her wish. A plain hearse left the palace door, with just
two mourning carriages; but on the. way. to the family









ww *
ie
ape age

. " BA a.

burying-place, four miles out of town, the procession
increased. ‘There were the Scripture Readers and teachers
of the Irish Church Mission Society, a sorrowing troop of
boys and girls from the schools, and a group of mothers,
with their babies in their arms, who had formed her Sunday
School class. These and many others joined the train,
and filled the church. Then all assembled round the
grave and listened to a solemn address by the Missionary,
and as well as they could for tears, they all sang,—

‘¢ Shall we ever all meet again?>—
Yes, we may all meet again,
If not on earth, in heaven we may all meet again,

Shall we ever all wear a crown?— _
Yes, we may all wear a crown, |
If not on earth, in heaven we may a// wear a crown,

Tears shall be all wiped away,
If not on earth, in heaven tears shall be ali wiped away.”

It was a solemn scene; and many a heart too sorrowful to
join in the singing was raised in prayer, that the spirit of
love, so richly given to the departed one, might fall on
others, that the destitute ones might not be forgotten; and
so it came to pass that many hearts were stirred up, and
it was determined that the new building to be erected for
The Birds’ Nest should be a monument to the memory of

Mrs. George’ Wale.



DARK CLOUDS.

“ Come let us join our friends above .
Who have obtained the prize,
And on the eagle wings of love
To joys celestial rise.

Let all the saints terrestrial sing
With those to glory gone;
For all the servants of our King,

In earth and heaven, are one.

One family we dwell in Him,
One Church above, beneath,
Though now divided by the stream,
The narrow stream of death.

One army of the living God,
At His command we bow;

Part of His host have crossed the flood,
And part are crossing now.

Our spirits, too, shall quickly join,

Like theirs with glory crown’d,

_ And shout to see our Captain’s sign,
To hear His trumpet sound.

Lord Jesus, be our constant guide,
And when the word is given,

Bid death’s cold flood its waves divide,
And land us safe in heaven.”

“QP

23.







CHAPTER IV.
GOD’S CARE.
“6 Ff¥e maketh the storm a calm.”

rw toad have spoken of the enemies of these dear chil-
€ | ‘dren; we had often thought that some attack
might be made upon them, but for seven months
they were allowed to come and go unmolested, and we
began to think it would always be so, and perhaps we
were forgetting who it is that sends the peace and quiet-
ness, and so trial came.

On Sunday night, May the 6th, about half-past eight,

when the little children were just going to bed, a rattling
sound was heard on the roof, then another, then another,
and then a window was broken by the blow ofa large
stone. |

_The stones seemed to be coming from the front,
and so the matron gathered the children together in the
back. ‘They were very much frightened, but they knew
God could defend them, and they knelt in prayer. ‘The





é . GOD’S CARE. 2S.

pelting of stones continued two whole hours, and in the
‘morning was renewed; but not a child was hurt.

On Tuesday evening, as the children were sitting at
their supper in the back room, a large stone came in
at the window, just grazed the ear of one child, and
_ passed close to the mistress’s head as she was stooping |
down. It was very remarkable that the little ones who
usually sat along that window had been put to bed an
hour before their usual time. Had they been there
one, at least, must have been killed. See how God
watches over His children, and guides them even in
small things! On Wednesday four extra police were
sent to guard the house,—two in front, and two at the
back. The pelting ceased, and ‘it was never discovered.
who threw the stones; but when ladders were got to
clear the roof, thirty-two stones were found, some five
and a-half pounds weight! It was very wonderful that
no little child was hurt. No, not wonderful! Does
not Jesus say, ‘* The ma hairs of your head are
all numbered ? ”

A few days after this storm I was at The Birds’ Nest,
and talking to the children about it, I said, ‘‘ But how
is itno one was hurt?”’ ‘They all looked very serious,
and one little girl said, “Sure, ma’am, it was the Lord
took care of us!”



26 --. GOD'S CARE. . .

Ah! the little children of The Birds’ Nest have learned
how strong God is, and they rely upon the promise
written in the gtst Psalm, ‘‘ He shall cover thee with His
feathers, and under His wings shalt thou trust.”





GOD’S CARE.. 27.

FEAR NOT,

**'Yra, fear not—fear not, little oness
There is in heaven an eye
That looks with yearning fondness down
On every path you try.

“Tis He who guides the sparrow’s wing,
And guards her little brood;

Who hears the ravens when they cry,
And fills them all with food,

*Tis He who clothes the fields with flowers,
And pours the light- abroad;
°?Tis He who numbers all your hours,
Your Father and your God,

Ye are the chosen of His love,
His most peculiar care;

And will He guide the fluttering dove,
And not regard your prayer?

Nay, fear not—fear not, little ones;
There is in heaven an eye

That looks with yearning fondness down
On all the paths you try.

Hell keep you when the storm is wild,
And when the flood is near;

Oh, trust Him, trust Him, little child,
And you have nought to fear,”





« CHAPTER ¥.

GOING FORWARD.

‘The Lord shall increase you more and more, you, and your children.”

e749 mentioned in an earlier chapter, we had deter-
weaen| mined to build a new Nest for our Birdies—
but we found it very difficult to get a suitable
piece of ground, so we took a larger house, and in a very
short time our numbers rose to sixty-four.

The new comers easily fell into the orderly ways of
those who had been trained to good habits, and so there
was little difficulty; and as time went on we were induced
to increase the number to eighty-one. In every available
spot of the house were the little beds laid down, and the
assembly at meals was a goodly sight to behold. Down
the centre of the room was a long table, occupied by the
elder boys and girls, and round by the walls were high
forms for tables, and low forms for seats, for the little ones,
and yet there was the greatest order amongst them; and





GOING FORWARD. 29 .

as they, with clasped hands, stood to sing their grace, and
then quietly ate their food, you would have supposed that
they had been carefully taught, even from their aby:
hood. |

Still we had many difficulties in this crowded house; no
baths, no convenience at all for washing either the children
or their clothes, a few tubs in the yard being all we could
manage; and we were very anxious that a new building
should be commenced as soon as possible.

In April, 1861, a piece of ground was procured. It was
a green field nearly opposite the house the children occupied.
Just then the Rev. Alexander Dallas,* who has been so
blessed by God in the conversion of Roman Catholics,
was coming over from England, and we asked him to lay
the foundation-stone; he gladly consented.

The day appointed was the rith of April. It was a
most lovely day, and the friends who went down to Kings-
town from Dublin almost filled a train. When we arrived
we walked up first to the old Nest, where the children
were all assembled, dressed in their new summer livery.
When Mr, Dallas came into the playground they all
gathered round him and sang awelcome. He spokea few

~* This beloved and useful servant of God entered into his rest Dec. 12,

1869. His loss is deeply felt throughout a whole of our country, Of him
it a truly be said, ** He loved our nation,’



30 GOING FORWARD.

words to them; after which all formed into a procession,
and walked down the road to the ground selected for the
new building.

The children took their places around the stone, and
then all the other people stood around. The rector of the
parish offered up a prayer for God’s blessing, and then the
Stone was put down. Some nice speeches were made,
and then the children gathered into a group and sang
many beautiful hymns, their voices blending so sweetly
together. We all felt full of joy and thankfulness, and
joined in heart and ee in the children’s chorus, “All
glory to Jesus.” |

After this the building committee worked in earnest.

I could not tell you how often the poor little Birdies
looked out at their new “ Nest, ”’ as stone after stone was
laid, and the walls rose, and the window-places were left,
_and then the roof was put on. And then the carpenters
came, and doors were put in, and windows were made: :
and then the iron railings were put up in front, and the
gates in their places. How they wondered what it would
all be like inside! ;

_ At last April came, and Mr. Dallas was coming over;
and though all the inside things were not ready, still the
school-rooms were finished, and we determined to have
an opening day on the roth of April, exactly a year from



GOING FORWARD. 31

the time when we all stood in the green field, and the
first stone was put down.

I must explain the plan of the building, or I fear
you will not exactly understand all I. shall — to tell
you. It is an oblong building, with a’ door at each end;
one has ‘* Boys”? written over it, the other ‘ Girls.”
‘This is to suit the day-schools. "You remember that,
at first, the Birds’ Nest children went to the Mission
School’; now the Mission School was to come to the
Birds’ Nest. |

The large space between each entrance is divided into

two rooms; the one on the boys’ end is the infants’
school-room; the other is the feeding-room. In this
latter are six deal tables, some of them very low, with
small low forms for the little children; others are e higher,
for those who have longer legs.
_ Over these two rooms are two others, separated by
folding doors. One is the boys’ school-room, the other
the girls’. Over these again are two large sleeping-
rooms. |

At the end you will see there are several smaller
-rooms. On the girls’ end there is first the kitchen, then
two rooms for the matron, two for the teachers, and one,
reaching from back to front, which is intended for any
children who may not be quite well.



af | GOING FORWARD.

At the other end are apartments for the master, and
above, sleeping-rooms for the boys. Loe

On the day of opening the folding-doors were Sietied:
and the two large school-rooms formed one very large
room, which was beautifully decorated with green ayes |
and paper flowers. |

These, with the new school pictures and maps
hanging upon the wall, gave it quite a bright, lively
appearance; and when the bright spring sun shone in at
the windows, our hearts quite danced with joy. On one
of the sides, half-way down the room, was a sort of
platform, on which the ee who were to pa
might stand. | :

At two o’clock the children were all assembled in
the yard of the old house, each neatly dressed. The
girls had new straw bonnets, which had just been given
to them by two kind friends) When Mr. Dallas
appeared they set up a great shout, and then sang a
welcome. Afterwards all formed into a procession,
headed by Mr. Dallas with the very smallest child by the
hand. So they walked through the house and across the
road, and up the stairs of the new Nest, the wonder and
curiosity of the children increasing more and more.

The large room was so full of people, who had come to
the opening, that it was not very easy for the children to



GOING FORWARD. : a3

get in in an orderly manner; but people got out of the
way, and before long the regiment of children in blue and
white was nicely settled upon a temporary gallery which
had been provided for them.

' As we looked round upon that large meeting, our hearts
were very full of gratitude to God that so many poor
children had been brought together to learn of Jesus, and
thankfulness that so many friends had been raised up to
provide what was needful for those children; so we could
sing with all our hearts,

“ Crown Him Lord of all.”

Then there was an earnest prayer to God, that He
would continue to pour His blessing on the Institution,
that every child coming in might be made indeed a child
of God, and that the means might be raised, not only to
feed and clothe the children, but also to pay for the nice
new Home.

Then there were other speeches made, and hymns sung
by the children. It was a very happy meeting.

And now that the Nest was opened, we were very
anxious that the workmen should make as much haste as
possible, and get out, so that the children might come
in, “The Matron’s rooms were finished first, and she came

in to get all into order. There were new bedsteads to be
| a



oe. GOING FORWARD.

got, new little beds to be filled with straw, and: sheets
and blankets to be prepared; and every day the elder girls
came over to help to hem and stitch. |

In about a fortnight the moving day came, and many
little hands carried over bundle after bundle; and there
was such excitement, such rushing over the house to see
all the rooms, such peering into presses, as only children
who have ever moved into a new house can understand.
It was not very easy to reduce all to order, as you may
Imagine. ‘Tvhe new house required new plans, and new
work; and the workmen kept themselves a very long time
about, doing little finishings. Just as we thought they
were quite ready to go, a terrible misfortune happened—
the well ran dry! and there was no water for that great
house and its inmates. Many schemes were thought of,
for water must be had. The only thing that could be done
was to dig a very deep well. At last water was found,
but we were obliged to have a steam-pump to get it up.

You cannot think what a time of trouble we had of it
all the long weeks when there was no water; we never
before felt the comfort of the last part of the promise,
‘* Bread shall be given, and water shall be sure.” During
that time we were glad when we heard the driving rain,
for we knew the cisterns were filling, and for a time the
want would be supplied.



GOING FORWARD. 3 5

But the pump was soon set up, and all was put in
order.

I only wish all the Galen of this book could now visit
The Birds’ Nest; I think they would all agree in thinking
it the very happiest home for poor children they ever saw;
and a noble monument to the memory of her who first
thought of having a Birds’ Nest, and of her dear mother,
the late Mrs. Whately, who, while the building was being
erected, left her earthly labours to enter her heavenly
rest. Mother and daughter had been united in works of
self-denying love in their lives: it was fitting that their
names should be associated in so appropriate a memorial.

HYMN SUNG AT THE OPENING OF THE BIRDS’ NEST.

¢'THERE is a better world they say,
Oh! so bright!
Where sin and death are done away,
~Oh! so bright!
There music fills the balmy air,
And angels with bright wings are there,
And harps of gold, and mansions fair,
Oh! so bright!

No clouds e’er pass along its sky,
~ Happy land!
_No teardrops glisten in the eye,
| Happy land!



GORENG FORWARD.



They yinte the gushing-streams of grace,

They gaze upon the Saviour’s face,

Whose glory fills the holy place,
Happy land!

And wicked things and beasts of prey

' Come not there!
And ruthless death and fierce decay

Come not there!
There all are holy, all are good;
But hearts unwashed in Jesus’ blood,
And guilty sinners unrenewed,

Come not there!

But though we’re sinners every one,
Jesus died!

And though our crown of peace is gone,
Jesus died!

We may ke cleansed from every stain,

May all be clothed with peace again,

And in that land of pleasure reign,
Jesus died!

This world is oft so dark and drear,

Take us there!
We ne’er can be so happy here,
Take us there!
Oh! listen to that music sweet,
It comes so rich from: yonder seat,

_ Where all the saints in glory meet,

Take us there!”



*.



CHAPTER VI.

THE BIRDS IN THE NEST,

“ And He took them up in His arms, put His hands upon them,
and blessed them.”

eg OME people think ““THE Brrps’ Nest” a very
kr» | odd sort of name for an institution; but most of
our friends like it very much indeed. I think it



charming; and I know a great many of our children

helpers agree with me. In this chapter I want to tell
something about the sort of children who are taken into
the Nest. It is very difficult to classify them, but I will
tell the cases of some of them, and that will give an idea.
The more destitute a child is, the more glad we are to
receive it, and bring it up for Jesus. Let us fancy we

are at the Nest, and looking at the children. Here is a

little boy I always call Billy, but I think his real name is

Johnny. When he came to me to be made ready for
the Nest he was the most miserable creature I ever saw.

He was thought to be seven years old; and the day I



38 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.

. expecta him I had otesared clothes which I thought
would have fitted him. But he came—a miserable little
object, about the size of a child of three—a poor, worn
tace; his front teeth gone; his dress—how shall I describe
it? There was a ragged sort of cape over the shoulders,
and then a piece of old calico sewed round his body, so
inlaid with dirt that it was almost impossible to touch it.
But we took a pair of scissors, and cut the stitches. I
am sure this must have been around him at least a year. ©
He cried bitterly when it was taken off; but when first a
clean little shirt, and then a warm, petticoat, and then a
long-sleeved frock were put upon him, he laughed for
joy, and stroked his frock down with his poor little hand.
“‘ Nice, nice!”’ he said; and soon he was in the Birds’
Nest, and had a snug, warm bed to sleep in, and plenty
of food. We had a great deal of trouble with this little
boy. He had been so starved that it was difficult to get
him into anything like health; but he is quite strong now,
and is learning to read and write nicely.

About three years ago a Scripture Reader visited a very |
old and very poor woman. He found she had four grand-
children to support, who had been deserted years before
by father and mother.

They were -all Roman Catholics, and utterly ignorant;
and besides, they were almost naked, and quite starving.



ee uy

PAGE 37.





‘THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 39

The Reader told the grandmother of a ragged school that
‘Was quite near, and asked her to send the children in time
. for breakfast the next day. “They went, and soon became
greatly in love with the school, and the nice things they
learned there.

But one day they were missed ey the teachers. Another
day, and another day, and they did not come. ‘Then the
Reader went to visit them, and he found the four children
weeping over the dead body of their grandmother. “They
had now no relative to care for them; but their sad case
was made known,, and the two elder boys were taken into
the Raccep Boys’ Homg, and the two little ones found
a happy home in the Birds’ Nest. And so they are all
under the tender care of the Good Shepherd, who watches
over His little lambs, and causes His people to go after
them, and find them, and bring them to His fold.

How many of our dear children I could shew you who
have zo friends but those belonging to the Nest! Here
is one—a dear, loving little girlh She was brought by a
poor woman who had taken care of her#as long as she
could. When I first looked at the child ] thought she
must be an idiot, and I took her down stairs at our own
house, and asked the cook, a kind motherly woman, to
keep her for a few hours, and try to make her talk. In
the evening she said, ‘‘The poor child has plenty of



40 _ THE BIRDS IN THE NEST,

sense, but it was want of food made her look stupid.”
So it was. She is now one of our pleasantest and most
useful children.

One time, when forty-five of the children had measles,
one was dangerously ill. I asked her, Had she any friends
I could write to? ‘TI haven’t got none,” she said; ‘only
Mrs. S ”’ And where did she get you?” I asked.

—‘‘In the dae school.”

This dear girl got quite well. She is now in service,
and saves a tenth of her small earnings to give to the
Birds’ Nest.

Another dear girl, now a useful servant, came to us a
poor little wanderer, so starved. We put her in a tub of
warm water and washed her, and then cut her hair, and
dressed her. She had not been long in the Nest before
her cheeks grew round, and her eyes bright, and she
could laugh with the merriest.

Just a few weeks ago we took in two bright, black-eyed
boys. I will tell their story.

One day last winter a poor labouring man, the father
of four children, fell from a ladder and was seriously hurt;
he was carried to an hospital, and attended with care and
skill. “Ihe poor wife went to see him, and her grief was
great to see him sufter so; and when she went home, the
little children gathered around her to hear all about it.





THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. Al

As she looked at them, and gathered them to her arms,
her grief burst out afresh. ‘‘ How shall I feed them?”
she thought.

And day by day this question returned, for it must be
answered. And every day some of their little possessions
were sorrowfully taken to the pawn-shop, and a scant
supply of money brought home to buy bread.

At last, one morning, the poor mother looked around
upon an empty room. Little Johnny saw her trouble;
he did not ask for food, but went out into the street.
Cold and hungry, he sat down on a door-step, resting his
head on his hand. As he sat a bright little boy passed;
he noticed the weary look, and he turned round. ‘* What
is the matter?’’ he asked. ‘The sad tale was soon told.
“Come with me,” said the little fellow; ‘“‘I’m going to
a school where we get a good hot breakfast, if we are in
time—come along, you’ll be welcome.” And Johnny
went to Townsend Street. At three o’clock some of
the boys gota little more food; Johnny stayed with them.

_It was with a very different face from that of the
morning that Johnny entered his home. ‘ Mother,
mother!”’ said he, “‘I’ve found kind people. I’ve been
to a boys’ school, and gotf ood to eat. And, mother,
there’s another school close to it for little ones. Mother,

mayn’t I take the children to-morrow ?”



4.2 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.

And the mother consented. And when the children
were all away, she went out to look for work. When
they all came back in the evening there was news to tell;
for the little ones had greatly enjoyed the lessons, and the
hymns, and the nice dinner Mrs. R provides for the
hungry ones every day, from October to April.

And day by day things improved in that poor home.
And when the father came out of hospital, he had to hear
the whole story; and the children sang some hymns for
him, and repeated their texts; and the poor man said, “I
wish I could go to that school too.” ‘So you can,”
said Johnny. ‘On Sunday I saw men as big as you,
father, and older, sitting in classes, and learning their
verses just like the children.”

And the father went with Johnny, od he liked ha
he learned so much that he never misses a Sunday now,
—always in his place. But he is so crippled that he
cannot work enough to support all four, and Johnny
and his little brother have found a home in the Birds’
Nest. |
Amongst our very little girls there are some who have
suffered much; one little oil left utterly alone, her mother
having been taken to prison. ‘The poor child wandered
about, no one caring for her, until a poor woman, whose
children attended a Ragged School, had-compassion upon





THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 43

her, and took her in until she could get a place for her
in the Birds’ Nest.

Another bright, merry child came to the Nest in 4 sad
- state. Her mother was a widow, nearly blind, who tried
to support her children by selling little things in a basket.
A lady who knew her deep distress got admission for
little Louise; but when she brought her, it was found
‘that the child’s head was dreadfully sore. Miss C
who happened to be at the Nest at the time, hesitated
about receiving her, because of the other children; but
our good matron could not bear to turn ome away. “I
will cure it,’ she said; ‘‘do take her in:”’ and her request —
‘was granted.

Here are two little girls, of seven and eight years old,
standing hand-in-hand ; they love each other very much,
and they look up as if they were used to being loved.
They never were very miserable. Their mother was a
happy Christian, one who managed her large family well,
and made her husband’s small earnings go as far as possi-
ble ; but last year she died, and the older ones being boys,
there was none to care for Margery and Louise; and the
_ father’s health and earnings failed, so the little girls were
admitted to The Birds’ Nest. ‘Tchey are pleasant, happy
children, and dearly love the good matron.

There, in the play-ground, are two little boys, each





44. THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.

holding the hand of a little one between them ; they seem
very happy together. ‘The two elder have been. in the
Nest some time; the younger has just come. Their
mother, too, was a Christian. Their father had deserted
them long ago, and the mother worked for their support
as long as she could. At last she was attacked by an
incurable disease, and obliged to put her children in the
poorhouse and go to hospital. Her sufferings were very
great, but the thoughts of her dear little boys, surrounded
by the influences of the most depraved of characters, was
worse. She could only lay the burden on Jesus. At
length some of the lady visitors heard about these children,
and they applied to our Committee; and first the two
little fellows were got out of the poorhouse, then the
third, and there are not three happier children in the Nest.
‘The mother is dead now, but her boys have found a home.

T'wo other children lately admitted had a Christian
mother. Years ago she came, a poor, dark Roman Catho-
lic, to the Townsend Street Sunday School. She liked
what she learned, and she came again andagain. One by
one every false hope was given up, and at last she was
enabled to lay her sins on Jesus, and trust only in Him.
Her little children were regular attendants at the Luke
Street Infants’ School. A few months ago this poor
woman had to go to the Hospital for Incurables, where she



THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 45

died a most happy death. Her teacher got admission for
the two little children into the Nest. ‘Leave thy father-
less children,”’ Jesus says, ‘‘I will preserve them.” It is
He who takes them up and blesses them; but it is by
-human hands, yours and mine, little children;—we take
them, and nurse them for Him.

Here are three children I must tell you about, a girl
and two boys. Their history is a very sad and strange
one. ‘They were of a respectable class in life, and their
father ought to have earned plenty of money for their
support; but he was a drunkard. ‘That fearful curse of
families, drink, had taken his senses away, and his love
for his wife and children was turned to hatred. After
persecuting them in many ways, he at last went so far as
to take the three children, and go away altogether from
his poor wife. Night came, and they did not return, and
the poor mother mourned alone. Months passed away;
she earned a livelihood by needlework, but tears so often
dimmed her eyes, that she could get but little. One day
she received an anonymous letter, saying that the writer
had seen the three children in the County Wicklow.
‘The poor mother set off to the place named, and after
some difficulty, she got her three dear ones, and brought
them to her poor home. She found from the children
that a priest had taken them, and she was so angry that



40, THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.:

she determined never to go to chapel again. In this state
she was visited by the Town Missionaries, and they told
her of One who cared for her in all her poverty and trials’
—one who, if she trusted in Him, would never leave nor
forsake her. ‘hey gave her a Bible, which she promised
to read. After this she was visited by priests and nuns,
who promised her all sorts of things if she would return
and give up her children. She refused everything; but
work grew more scanty, and she found it hard to feed so:
-many. Happily for the children, they got a good break-
fast every morning in the Luke Street Ragged School, and.
sometimes a piece of bread before they went home. One
day the priest visited the mother, and found her reading
the Bible; he snatched it from her, and threw it into the
fire. Sherescuedit. Her trials were very great and varied ;
she could not stand against them; and her poor room was
without furniture,—an old box served for a table, and the
bed was a little straw in a corner of the room. It was:
very hard for those who had seen better days. The
Missionaries made known the case, and admission was
obtained for the children into the Nest, and a light situa-
tion found for the mother. Nothing has been heard of the
father for many months. We hope these dear children
will be left withus. “hey are nice, clean, well-mannered.
little things, and very fond of each other. |



THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 47

Another group of three are the children of a ‘poor
working man, who lately fell off a cart, and was so injured
that he will never be able to work again; he has been set
up in a little business, selling matches, and laces, and such
things. And the children are naib on finely in the
Nest. The father has been a convert for many years,
and, we believe, a real Christian.

Now let us peep into the nursery. How nice it looks!
_ The fire burns brightly; the cradle stands beside it, with
a new pair of twin-dolls; and the little rocking-chair is
near. Sitting in it is a little girl, looking tenderly at a
dolly which seems a great treasure; its eyes will shut and
_ open, and it is neatly and carefully dressed. It is little
~Kate H——. The doll was given to her, with a beautiful
set of tea-things, on the Christmas-tree day, by some kind
little girls who have adopted her. Katie was such a poor
forlorn child when she came, that it was very hard to
make her smile, and even now the head bends down a
little too much; but there is a very sweet smile on the
face when you can see it.

Another little child has in the course of nine months
become so changed in appearance one would hardly
recognise her. ‘The first time I saw her was at our out-
door féte. The children were playing about in kind
Mrs. Harrison’s lawn, but one little thing was seated all





48 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.

alone on the grass, looking so thin and miserable. I
sat down beside her, and noticed that she had a bad
cough.

“What’s your name?’ I asked.

“¢ Mary,”’ she said, without looking up.

“¢’You are a new child; when did you come?”

“¢ Last week.”’

“You have a bad cough—are you ill?”

“J think I am; I’m very miserable.”

“But you will soon be happy—all the children are
happy.”

‘¢T never was happy in my life.”

‘Have you a father ?”’ |

“No, he’s gone, and my stepmother is unkind to me.
Nobody ever loved me.” |

“* Poor child, Jesus loves you.”

“CT don’t think He does.”’

“ “Do you know who I am?” I asked.—“‘ No.” When —
I told her, a beaming smile lighted up her face. ‘‘Allthe |
children love you,” she said; ‘‘I7ll love you too.”

Here I must tell you that the love of “all the children”
comes to me because I am the representative of all the
members of the Children’s Association, and their gifts and
love come through me. I try to send out all the love



THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 49 -

through the little books; but that does not make my own
share any the less— —
‘¢For we must share, if we would keep
That good thing from above ;

Ceasing to give, we cease to have;
Such is the law of love.”

Of Eddy B I must tell the whole story. He was
a dear little fellow, too young for the Nest, but his father
died in the hospital, a believer in Jesus; his only care was
for his children; they had a very bad mother. A Christian
friend promised they should be cared for, and the poor
man died satisfied.
The little girl was taken into the Nest, but Eddy was
* too young, only a baby. We put him to be nursed by a
kind old woman. As soon as the mother saw him well
dressed she took him away, sold his clothes, and after a
little while went with him into the poorhouse. Some
years passed away, when one day a Scripture Reader met
the woman begging with the child. She said she had been
three weeks without a place to lie down at night. She
said she was very sorry for her conduct, and if we would |
take the boy she would get work. For the sake of the
promise to the dying father, we took Eddy; and a little
girl in the South of England adopted him. Some months

passed away,—happy months for Eddy,—and then his
| | D



cd



59 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST,

mother took him again, dressed him in miserable clothes,
and went out to beg. His friend was greatly distressed,
and she prayed very earnestly for her lost nestling. Often
she wrote for news. I wanted her to take another child,
but she would not “ give up Eddy.”? She said, “1’ll pray
on;”’ arid in October the mother again brought the child,
saying, if he might be in the Nest with his sister, she
would never take him away again. And so little Eddy —
once more had his rags exchanged for Nest clothing, and —
he is safe and happy.

Amongst our children is a blue-eyed, fair-haired boy,
of seven years of age. His father, a most respectable
workman, died some three years ago, leaving the poor
mother with three children, one a little baby. She had .
no means of support, and gradually all her little possessions
were sold to buy food. Her relations would do nothing
for her, because she attended the Mission Church, and
was trying to bring up her little ones in the Protestant
faith, she being a convert. Application was made to vet
the boy into the Nest, but he was too young. We paid
the rent of a room for the poor woman, and gave her
needlework, but her baby hindered her working, and she
became the picture of misery. In March she wrote:—

“I am very thankful for what you do for me, but it is
utterly useless. It is very hard to be utterly destitute, in



THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 5I

the four walls of a back garret, without furniture, friends,
or any earthly comfort but my little ones. My brother
gives me till the gth to consider whether I will give up
my boy to go to the convent, or give up the friendship of
all belonging to me. I am really bewildered. Please,
madam, do not look on me as an imposter.”

The case was so urgent that the little boy, though only
just past six, was taken and put to lodgings for a few
months. ‘The mother got a good situation as nurse, and
is able to pay for her other two children at nurse. At
Christmas her mistress allowed her to have her boy for a
few days’ visit. And if you had seen her coming into the
Mission Church, looking like a model nurse, with her boy
by the hand, you would have thanked God for such an
institution as the Birds’ Nest. :

Late one evening there came a note, written on an old
leaf of a book, begging for a little relief for a sick child
who attended one of the Mission Schools. I sent a
shilling, and the next day went to the home of the poor
child. It was a very small room at the top of a poor
house, a bedstead and a chair the only furniture. An old.
woman sat near the fire with a child on her knee very
ill. Another little one stood beside her. When I
entered, the little one looked up ‘with a smile of wel-
come, and I knew her and the sick one as little children



52 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.

regular attendants at the school, but always so neatly
dressed that we had never guessed their poverty. It
was the little one who had brought the note the night
before. ‘Oh, ma’am,” said the old woman, “‘I never
begged before; but the children said the Lord would help
us. I had not a bit of fire or food; and what was worse,
not a bit of candle to watch my poor child through the
night. I could not face a night of darkness.””? The child
had had fever, and was just beginning to recover; all she
wanted was nourishment and comfort, which we were -
able to provide.

They had been very respectable people; the father, a
good workman, earning large wages; but he died suddenly,
leaving £20 which he had saved for his wife, mother-in-
law, and children. ‘They were induced to go to Man-
chester and set up a lodging-house, which at first suc-
ceeded; but the cotton famine came, and they lost all they
had. ‘hey returned to Dublin; the mother went to
service, where she earned £5 a-year, and 2s. 6d. a-week
to feed herself. This was all the support of the family—
no wonder they suffered so much. We took the two
children into the Nest, and the old woman went to the
poorhouse, where she soon after died. The mother is in
very delicate health, but she is able to support herself, and
comes sometimes to see the little ones.



THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 53

We have two very nice boys now in the Nest, who
‘were some time ago removed to the Boys’ Home, but,
having been very delicate, have come back to be nursed.
They are both, we believe, real Christians, setting a
bright example to all around. I find the history of one
of them in my notes. The family consisted of a father
and mother and seven children. They were all Roman
Catholics, and when first visited by the Scripture-readers,
were in such a very destitute condition, that the children
were obliged to cover themselves with the straw that
formed their bed. One of these children was a bright
little boy of nine years old. He was persuaded to attend
the Ragged School; we sent him a little pair of trousers
to enable him to get out. Willy was delighted with all
he heard and learned, and when he went home at night,
tried to teach his mother to repeat a text: she would not
then. But Willy was one of those boys who are not
easily discouraged, and, as his mother said, “She worrited”
at her till she learned one; and then he tried his father.
This was harder work, for being a violent man, he threw
things at the child’s head; still Willy persevered. And

_ . when he had learned to read, he would take his Bible, and

read chapter after chapter ini, that his parents might be
interested in the story. Soon mother and children were
| all regular attendants at the Sunday School.



54 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.

~ Poor Willy was very delicate, and it was plain that there

was not enough of food in their home for them all; for the
father earned very little, and often spent that little on drink;
and so Willy and a sister found a home in the Birds’ Nest.
She is one of the gentlest of our girls. At Christmas she
got a prize marked for “Sone ever ready to help.”” She
is about thirteen years old, and Willy about twelve.

Nearly two years ago a very nice girl, who had come
from Connemara, left the Nest and went to service. We
have now her two little sisters—such an original-looking
pair of children. _ Biddy is a thin, narrow-faced little
thing, of perhaps eight years old, with straight black hair
and black eyes. Maggie is, I should think, six—a little
round thing, with short, brown, curly hair and blue eyes.
They love each other very much, and Maggie seems to
think that everybody means to be good to her. Both these
little ones are adopted by friends. —

One day last year a poor woman, with four children,
asked charity from a friend of ours. She said her husband
was in India; she had come home with the children, and
had not heard from him since. A little help was given
from time to time, but it seemed of no use; they were
starving, as the mother was too weak to work. So the
three elder children were admitted into the Nest, and then
the mother died, and then the baby.



THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 55

Twelve months afterwards a very respectable-looking
man came to the Birds’ Nest inquiring for three children,
answering to the description of these three. He said his
wife had come to Ireland with them, and he, not hearing
from her, had given up his situation to look for her. He
had traced her to Dublin, and then to the Birds’ Nest,
where he found his lost little ones. He was in great
delight to find them so well taken care of, and begged
that we would still take care of the motherless little ones.
He would go to service, and save all he could to help to
pay for them. So Polly, and Conny, and Tommy remain
in the happy home where they first found rest after their
trials and wanderings. |

Another little child we have taken under like circum-
stances. ‘The father went to America some time ago.
The mother was to follow as soon as the baby was a little
older. She had a situation as servant, where she was
allowed to keep the baby; but the poor woman fell into
ill-health and died. The lady did what she could for the
child, denying herself many comforts that it might be fed
and clothed. Now she is very ill herself, and so we have
taken her little charge. And if the father ever is heard
of again, he will be very glad to get his little girl safe. If
not, we trust she will meet him in the beautiful land,
where



56 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.

**Little children are never hungry
And mothers are never sad;
Where there’s nothing to make them sorry,
And plenty to make them glad.”

There is one wee child in the Nest who attracts every-
body’s attention. What do you think her name is ?—
“Jenny Rosin.’ Is not that a nice name for a birdie?
She is very little, and has eyes as bright as the real robins
that hop about in winter. Jenny has a mother who loves
her very much; but she has a little child younger than
Jenny. She earns £8 a-year, and pays £4 to the nurse
who takes care of him, With the rest she clothes herself.
She was a Roman Catholic; and when I first saw her in
her poor home she knew nothing of Jesus and His love.
Now she is a real Christian, and is so thankful to have
Jenny in the Nest,

T'wo dear little girls came from the country to the
Nest quite lately. ‘Their names are Mary and Nannie.
Mary is ten years old; Nannie is eight. ‘Their case was
so pressing that we were obliged to take both when there
was only a bed for one; so they both sleep together in one of
the small beds. It was in December we heard about them
first. ‘Their father had gone away two or three years ago,
and no one knew anything about him; but he had been
so unkind to his wife and five children that no one wished

&



THE BIRDS IN THE NEST, 57 |

to find him. The mother worked very hard to support
the children, and some kind friends subscribed a little
money to apprentice the eldest boy to a shoemaker. He
worked very well, and was learning his trade nicely, when
he was taken ill of hip-disease. He was in hospital some

_ time, then sent home incurable. Such a home—only a

Stable some one had given this poor woman rent-free! It

was harder than ever for her now, and little Mary had
tried to help her by going on messages for the neighbours;
and an old lady of seventy-seven undertook to teach
Nannie. (There was no Protestant school near.) She
says, ‘‘I have an apt scholar; she spells and reads, learns
multiplication-table, Scripture, and hymns.”? This kind
lady also gave Nannie food every day. This was what

we first heard of this poor family. Then came another

letter, saying they had been told they must leave the stable,
and then they would all be homeless. We wrote to say

"we would take Mary and Nannie in as soon as possible.

*

And when the dear friends at Southampton said they

would support them, we got them in at once. ‘They are

so grateful, and are already quite at home in the Birds’

Nest.
A great many of the children in the Birds’ Nest have
got no fathers, and a great many have no mothers. [

could not give the history of them all. If I did, it would

'



58 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.

only be like the roll mentioned in Ezekiel, “ full of Jam-
entations, and mourning, and woe.”” From what I have
said, you can imagine something of their former misery.
I like much better to tell of their present happiness, and
to lead those who have been our helpers to thank God
that He has made them the means of so much blessing,
and encourage others who have not yet entered upon the
service of the Heavenly Master to join in this work for
Him, that that may be a very large company to whom
He will one day say, ‘‘ Inasmuch as ye have done it unto
one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it
unto ME.”

TO THE WANDERER.

LonE y traveller! little orphan!
Sorrowful and weary,

If thy life seem lone and cheerless,
If the way be dreary,

‘There is One can hear and see,

Looks, and loves, and pities thee.

‘We have got a Home for children
Poor as thee and lonely,
Where they hear of Christ the Saviour,
_ TJis for children only,
Come, then, little wanderer, here
Learn of Christ the Saviour dear,



THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 59

On the cross He died for sinners
Full of sin and cheerless,

And He waits to take you to Him;
Come, oh come, then, fearless,

Meekly bow before His throne,

All your sins and sorrows own,

*

TO THE WANDERERS’ FRIENDS,

Ou! kind friends, help us in pity,
There are very many

Orphans wander through the city
Without e’en a penny.

Give us of your bounteous store,

Give to those distressed and poor.

And our Lord will bless the giver,
For His grace is endless ;
Therefore, friends, where’er you be,
Try to help the friendless,
Christ will say, when life is o’er,
6 Come, for you have helped my poor.”
One of the Collectors.



| oo Des »
hihigha 2.21) Di ne eaened

WT AW aa
or








CHAPTER VII.

DAILY WORK.

pes, HAVE told you a great deal about the history
taf wba, oof the Nest, and now I think I ought to tell
you what it is like. Well, to begin with the
outside. It is just what the picture represents, a great
oblong stone building,—not at all like a real bird’s nest ; I
wish it was. I should like to have had it a cozy-looking
place, with all sorts of nooks about it, porched doors, and
domer windows, and little chimneys popped about the
roof; and then it would have been my taste to have roses,
and ivy, and creeping plants climbing up, and round about
the windows and chimneys. And there should have been
a nice green field round about, surrounded by a good
quick-set hedge. All this would have been very delight-
ful, but would have cost a good deal of money. And do
you know we were obliged to put away all idea of beauty
when we considered the plans for "he Nest. The great
problem we had to solve was, how to accommodate the





PALM mateossh

cers

et

een!

Bee
ia Sie sh abd Nae!
xe

SacAocirae

ee

je

pop errr)

3 EF Tee
ae

RAAT ee

S >
Pye
wien
= s

#

Pee ae f
Si

eR eed ppaeensal

we!

TE here ae



once 8!

Geren anets



PAGE 60



DAILY WORK. | 61

largest number of children for the smallest sum of money.
And after thinking and planning a great deal, we were
obliged to take the plan that was the very simplest possible.
It zs ugly, I allow, outside, but it is economical and useful.
The beauty is all inside. Who cares about the casket
when compared with the precious jewels it contains ? who
cares about the purse when compared with the money it
contains? And so we do not care about the outside of the
house, when we think of the precious jewels that are there
being polished and prepared for the Saviour’s casket. We
are content that no money has been wasted; and though
a great deal has been spent—much more than we at first
thought would have been*enough—yet it is all put to good
practical purposes.

I have elsewhere described the plan of the building;
now let us peep inside, and see what goes on there. It is
just break of day, on a fine spring morning. ‘The green
blinds of the great dormitories are drawn down, but through
the line left at the edge a bright beam of sunlight stretches
in; it rests on a little iron cot-bed covered with a bright
patchwork quilt; it kisses the rosy cheek of a curly-headed
sleeper; he wakes up, and looks round on his sleeping
companions. Forty-five such little iron beds, inhabited by
forty-five such sleepers, are in that room; but they are
not to sleep much longer: one after another awakes, and



62 DAILY WORK.

before very long somewhere about a dozen of the elder
girls come in, and the little ones are soon carried off to the
wishingetoome down stairs, where they are washed, and
dressed, and brushed, and jon turned out inté the ste
ground to wait for breakfast.

Some time before the streak of rutlioke roused up the
little boy in the infants’ dormitory, the elder boys were up
and dressed, beds were neatly made, and if you want to
know where the boys are, you must listen for the sound of
scrubbing-brush, shoe-brush, or knife-board, for this is the
time for household work for the boys; and very much de-
lighted they are to be permitted to take their share. Do
you know we are quite proud of our boys, they are such
pleasant, industrious fellows, and so fond of work. Just
before breakfast-time these busy workers assemble in their
washing-room, to change their clothes and wash; and
when the breakfast-bell rings at half-past eight o’clock,
boys, girls, and infants are all ready to march into the.
dining-room.

‘The sun never shone upona happier set a children. It
is a comfort to look at them seated round the tables, each
provided with a good piece of bread, and a little tin can
filled with hot cocoa. Breakfast is soon despatched, and
then there is a run in the play-ground; and at nine o’clock
the children divide into three companies,—boys, girls,



DAILY WORK. 63

and infants,—each company marching into its respective
school, And now begins new work,—mental work,—
cheerful, happy seeking for the knowledge of which many
of the dearchildren were deprived so long. In any sec-
tion of these schools you may have sweet hymns sung by
first and second voices in beautiful harmony; you will
get wonderful answering in Scripture texts and doctrine;
and you will be surprised to find how much lessons are
loved. |

While lessons are going on the kitchen presents a
busy scene, for there dinner is preparing, not only for the
190 nestlings, but for their teachers and helpers besides. ©
The dinners are very simple,—potatoes and milk, or pease
soup, two days; meat in broth, two days; cold meat and
potatoes, one day; fish or bacon, with vegetables, one
day; and on Sundays, tea and bread and butter. At ten
minutes to one six of the elder girls come out of school
to lay the tables; and at one the great troop marches in,
each child knowing its own place, and quietly taking it.
The bell rings for silence, and then all voices join in
singing— |
| ‘* Be present at our table, Lord ;”
and then begins the clatter of knives and forks or spoons,
and the pleasant murmur of happy voices. At any moment
_a touch of the bell brings silence; and this is a very



64 DAILY WORK.

pleasant time to talk a little to the children, as they are
all there.

At two o’clock all are again in school, till dice: ; and
then, on fine days, there is a walk, the three schools going
separately with their own teachers.

Returning from the walk, there are various small
occupations, till, at six o’clock, another meal of cocoa and
bread; and then the infants are all washed and put to bed,
and the elder children go into evening-school.

This is the regular routine of every oy but Saturday
and Sunday.

I should like to give my readers two peeps at the
family life of our children.

A peep on a winter’s afternoon. When lessons, and
dinner, and walk are all over, a fine fire is made up in
the girls’? schoolroom ; forms are arranged in great semi-
circles around it, inclosing a large basket full of things
to be mended, and a box of needles, thread, scissors, &c.
The Kittle boys and the Hiztle girls are in the infants’
schoolroom, enjoying a game of romps with their be-
loved friend, Miss M—-—; but all the boys and girls who
can sew are gathered around the schoolroom fire, and
some of the mere babies, too small to romp, are there too,
and Mrs. O’Neil in the middle; and scissors and needles,
and hands and tongues, are soon busy enough. ‘“‘ How



DAILY WORK. 65

is this to be done?” and, “‘ Please, what shape-patch shall
I put here ?”? and, “* Wouldn’t it be best to make these
two pinafores into one?” &c., &c. But by-and-by all
is in fair progress; and then one starts a hymn, and all
join; and by the time that is done, perhaps the door
opens, and some dear friend enters with a book in her
hand, and a chair is soon found for her, right in the
middle; and the supper-bell rings before the story is half
read, so it shall be finished next sek

Now for a peep on a summer’s evening. It is eight
o’clock, but it is yet light, and for the last half-hour there
has been undressing going on. And when the night-gown
was on, and the clothes folded, each little one knelt down
beside its bed to thank God for all His blessings, and to
ask for more for itself and all its friends. And now they
are all in bed—forty-fve—in the infants’ dormitory ;
and we open the door and peep in. Some one at the far
end spies us, and strikes up a hymn of welcome, and in a
- moment all are sitting up to join; and the sounds are
heard in the other rooms, and some who have not begun
to undress come in, so we have quite a concert. And
then we say good-bye, and the children go to sleep; and
we pray that each one of those rescued little ones may
_have a place amongst -the white-robed company above,

who shall sing the new song unto Him that loved them.
: E



66 DAILY WORK.

On Saturday school is over at twelve o’clock, and the
elder girls immediately set to work to scrub floors, which
keeps them busy almost all day.

Several of the girls have responsibilities all to themselves.
One has to take care of the tin cans, another of the knives
and forks; several of them have to help in keeping the
wardrobes; and others act as miemners to a certain number
of the small children. |

If our girls were not very industrious they never would
be able to do all the work of the house, as till they have
passed their examination they must be in school in the
morning hours; bus they get up very early, especially on
washing days, and work so heartily, that the great house is
at all times a pattern of cleanliness. One day I was down
at the Nest during the girls’ half-hour’s play, which they
always have in the middle of school. I was passing the
laundry, when I saw three girls hard at work. [I said,
“Well done, little women; but why are you not at play?”’
“Oh!” said one, “Sit zs play-hour; but we like work bet-
ter than play.” And so, of their own accord, they were
spending the half-hour in folding and ironing clothes.
I turned away, feeling very thankful that such was the
spirit of these dear girls; and I wondered less than I had
done before at the cleanliness of the house, and at the suc-
cess of those who go out. Our desire for the children is,



DAILY WORK. 67 |

first of all, that they may be true followers of the Lord
Jesus Christ, and then, that they may find favour in the
eyes of those with whom they have to do.

Now I should like to tell you how our nestlings spend
Sunday. It is a very happy day in Christian homes, and
I am sure it is a happy day in this great Home.

But I must begin with Saturday evenings. Shortly after
dinner washing begins, for every child must have a warm
bath, and be thoroughly cleansed; then, as each one is
undressed to go to bed, its clothes are well brushed, neatly
folded, and laid into a basket; and the Sunday ones
arranged ready for the morning. When morning comes,
at seven o’clock there is a stir in the little beds, and the
clean faces pop up, and one after another turn out of bed;
and soon there is a happy bustle of washing and dressing,
and then the elder ones make the beds and lay the break-
fast, and at nine o’clock all sit down to the tables. After
_ this, while all keep their places, the matron talks a little to
them about the Sabbath-day, and the way in which little
children can serve God. Then she reads a chapter, and
prays.

After this the’ children go into the play-ground, and
walk about, learning hymns, or singing, or reading, for
half-an-hour; then they have to dress for church. Even
the little ones go every Sunday. None remain at home,



68 DAILY WORK.

unless one happens to be sick. “['wo-and-two they go to
church; and they sit very quietly, though many of them
are so little they cannot understand much. After church
they all get home, and the cloth is laid for dinner, and
all sit down to it. ‘Then there is another half-hour’s
quietness in the play-ground, and then Sunday School.
After this there is a spare hour, in which all do as they
like, only there must be no noise; and then all assemble
in the infant schoolroom, and a kind clergyman or friend
meets them, and there is a children’s service. They
answer the responses, and sing the chants; and the sermon
is so simple that the very little ones can understand.
‘They do so enjoy this; and some of the elder ones take
notes of the sermon. After this supper is soon ready,
and then the younger ones go to bed, and the elder ones
sit up a little longer, and read their books.

I am sometimes asked whether we have any 1 naughty
children in the Nest, for all my stories are about good
ones? And one day a lady said to me, in quaint language,
“‘’Thee thinks them a great deal better than they are.”
Well, I don’t know about that. I think it is much better
to think about bright things than dark. And I’m afraid
I must plead guilty of telling bright things, for they are
pleasant to tell, and pleasant to remember; and there is
an old proverb which says, that ‘‘ Every family should



DAILY WORK. 69 ©

wash its own dirty clothes,”—that means, that troubles
should not be made public. And you know kind parents
always try to forget their children’s faults when they are
forgiven. But I suppose, as our birdies have so many
parents, and parents ought to know all about their
children, I ought to shew the dark side of our nestlings
as well as the bright side. Of course we have troubles
and difficulties of all sorts. Our little children come to
us with wild habits and untrained minds. Some of them
have never known loving care, and it takes a great deal of
patience on the part of the Matron and teachers to restrain
wild habits, and instil principles of obedience, and love,
and order.

One cold day in winter I saw a new little girl looking
as if her clothes were very thin. I had lately given warm
petticoats to each, and I looked at hers—she had but one
on. ‘Did you not get a new warm petticoat?” I asked.
“C'Yes, ma’am.’”’ ‘And where is it?” She did not
speak for a moment. Then she said, “‘I sold it to
——-.”? She did not say for what price; but the other
little girl had three petticoats. It is very common to find
new children changing clothes with each other when out
in the play-ground. ‘They have to be taught everything,
even how to put on their clothes.

Sometimes little boys and girls who have been, up to



70 DAILY WORK.

nine or ten years of age, living an idle, wandering life,
cannot bear the restraint of home, and they wander away,
over and over again. Even one boy who has this restless
propensity does great mischief, and will often lead away
others. One day a little girl wandered away with
another, and was found by the Master in the streets of
Dublin, with her bib full of her little possessions. She
had nowhere to go, and was greatly frightened; he took
her safely back again, poor little wanderer! We try to
make the children as happy as we can, surrounding them
with gentle influences, and most of them grow up nicely;
and even the troubles are blessings, if they give us fresh
errands to our loving Saviour. |

We try to teach our children to live as in the presence
of a loving Father; to do the meanest of their daily work
as for Him; to obey, not with “ eye-service ;”” to go to
Jesus in all trouble, and thank Him for all joys. For
even the little ones can thus glorify God in their daily
lessons and daily work. ,





DAILY WORK, 71.

LITTLE LIGHTS,

Jesus bids us shine
With a pure, clear light,
Like a little candle
Burning in the night;
In the world of darkness,
So we must shine,
You in your small corner,
And I in mine.

Jesus bids us shine
First of all for Him;
Well He sees and knows it,
If our light grow dim:
He looks down from heaven
To see us shine, ,
You in your small corner,
And I in mine,

Jesus bids us shine
Then—for all around,
For many kinds of darkness
In the world are found:
There’s sin, there ’s want and sorrow,
So we must shine,
You in your small corner,
And I in mine,





CHAPTER VIII.
HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS.

** Tt is more blessed to give than to receive.”

a eerniOW I think I must tell you something about

RNY «Christmas time in the Birds’ Nest; and how
slatafin the real Holly and Ivy, and the real time of
joy, comes to the poor birdies. If I give you the history
of one Christmas it will do for a specimen. Well, there
is a kind gentleman who lives near the Nest, and who
very often watches the procession of one hundred and fifty
boys and girls going to church on Sundays, and sees their
good behaviour there.

About a fortnight before Christmas time a very kind
thought came into his head and heart—it was this: I
will give those dear children a real Christmas dinner—
beef and plum pudding. He asked a lady to manage it
for him, and he would pay the money. This lady had a
kind heart and a wise head, and so she sat down to
make her calculations. ‘There were raisins and currants,
and sugar and suet, and flour and bread, and beef and





HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS. 72

potatoes, to be bought; and the first question was—how
much of each wouldsbe wanted? and the second was—how
such a great dinner should be cooked? Both these ques-
tions required consultation and calculation; but at last the
plans were all laid, and the children were told what their
kind friend was going to do for them. ‘There was a great
clapping of hands, and a great shout of joy at the news.
And from that time till Christmas-day there was as

- much pleasure in the hearts of the poor little children in

_ the Nest as there is in the hearts of the little children who
live in happy homes, and have kind papas and mammas,
and elder brothers and sisters, who they know are pre-
paring joyful surprises for Christmas-day.

At length the Christmas-eve came, and on that day the
preparations were to be made. Early in the morning
three carts, loaded with ivy, and holly with red berries,
arrived at the gate. And the boys were sent to carry it
all in, which they accomplished in a wonderfully short
time. Then, with the help of the girls, and directed by the .
schoolmaster and schoolmistress, the room was dressed up.
Such a happy time it was! The sun shone in at the win-
dows, and the hum of the mingled happy voices was right
pleasant to hear. ‘* Many hands made light work,” and
by the middle of the day the decorations were finished.
Then came the girls with brooms to sweep out the rub-



74. HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS,

bish, and that was all that could be done in that room for
that day at least, and the work was finished. Not so in
the kitchen. There a number of the elder girls, headed
by the kind matron, Miss Howard,* were most busily
engaged all day long, making those most wonderful
things, plum puddings! |

It was eleven o’clock before they all got to bed; but
no matter, they were all too excited to be sleepy. And
very early on Christmas morning the little ones were
roused, that there might be time for much extra combing,
and washing, and dressing; really I do think the big girls
had made up their minds that every little face should be
polished so as to be a regular looking-glass, reflecting the
brightness around.

But all this washing and dressing was over by breakfast
time; and then the children went to church, all except a
few elder girls, who had to stay at home to lay the tables.
This was accomplished with even more care than usual.
The cloths were quite clean, and the knives and forks
polished up in a marvellous manner. |

The meat was roasting in the kitchen, and the puddings
were boiling in the boiler, when the little ones came home
from church; and they were all seated in their places at

* Miss Howard was the kind friend who undertook the office of matron
when we first got into the new Nest,



HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS. 75

the tables when the kind gentleman and his family and
other friends came in. It did not take long to place the
dishes on the tables, and then grace was sung, and several
kind friends set to work to cut up the joints, and soon all
were helped. |

While the plates were being washed for the pudding,
the children sang some hymns, and so gave pleasure to
the friend who was giving them so much. It was four
o’clock before this happy dinner was over.

I don’t know whether the kind gentleman thought of
- the words of Jesus, but | am sure many others did,—
‘When thou makest a feast, call the poor . . . They
cannot recompense thee, but thou sha/t be recompensed.”’
Oh, yes! in doing good there is a recompense now, in
the joy and lightness of heart;. and there is a recompense
hereafter, for will not Jesus one day say, ‘‘Come, ye
blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for
you; for | was an hungered, and ye gave me meat; I was
a stranger, and ye took me in; naked, and ye clothed me.
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these
-my brethren, ye have done it unto me!”’

These promises, and the smile of Jesus, are the HoLiy
AND Ivy to us,—the bright things of winter time. But
when they are all fulfilled, and we live in His presence,
where there is fulness of joy, there will be no winter time,



76 HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS.

for “the trees yield their fruit every month, and there is
no night there.”

But we have not done with Christmas time yet. There
were some little children living in England, and they
wanted to give pleasure to the poor little nestlings, and
they set to work and made a large number of bags, with
pincushions and thimbles in them, for the elder girls, and
they dressed dolls for the little ones; and when I heard
of this, I said, ‘‘ We must have a Christmas tree to hang
all these nice things on.”? Other children heard of this
plan, and they took up the idea, and some sent balls and
tops, and some sent little books and markers; and at length
there were enough things for each child to have something.
I could not tell you what idea the poor little children
had of a Christmas tree; some of them had never seen
such a thing, and so they puzzled over it till they
dreamed about it, and at length made up their minds that
it must be something very wonderful indeed. And so
it was. | |

We did not set up the tree till one day in January.
The children’s friend, Mr. Dallas, was coming over, and
so we waited for him, for it was to be a regular day of re-
joicing. We opened the folding doors, and so made two
great rooms into one; and then we set up the tree in the
middle, It reached up very high, there were some pretty



HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS, 9s

flags at the top, and each article on the tree had the name
of a child upon it. ‘Tables were set up around the tree,
for the children were to have tea and cake, and they were
to be questioned, and friends were to be present to listen,
and share the fun. The little children of the Nest were
not allowed to see the preparations till all was ready; but
they did not mind this, for zhzy had a secret too, and felt
themselves quite important. I think I must let you into
their secret. Well, you know Jesus said, “It is more
blessed to give than to receive,” and Miss Howard thought
the nestlings should, on this grand occasion, taste of the
pleasure of giving. So she got a piece of canvas, and
prepared the pattern of a lamp-stand, to be given by the
children to Mr. Dallas. She determined that each child
should at least put in a stitch, This was not very easy
to manage; but if Miss Howard once set her heart upon
a thing, she would be sure to carry it out. She arranged
the children all in a row around the schoolroom, then she
took a chair and sat at the head of them, with the work
in her hand. She then gave the order for a very slow
march, and as each child came up to her, it put in one
stitch. In this way all had a little share; and the work
was afterwards finished by some of the elder girls. It
was quite a pretty lamp-stand. When it was ready, a
letter was written, signed by all the children who could



78 HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS,

write, and the little ones’? names were put down for them;
and this was the children’s secret. | |

Well, at last the time came, and friends assembled;
amongst them many of the members of “‘’The Children’s
Association ;”? some who had given the things for the tree,
but notall. ‘Fhenthe children marched in and took their
places; but the little ones opened their eyes so wide, and
wondered so much at the beautiful tree, that they had to
be lifted into their seats; one of them tumbled over a
form, he did not know what he was doing. Very soon
Mr. Dallas came, and then the children sang a song of
welcome, which had been composed for the occasion, to
the tune of “Some folks like to sigh.” I must put it in
here for those who did not hear it.

“Welcome, welcome home,
Father dear, father dear,
Welcome, welcome home,
We’re glad to see you here.
Join all with heart and voice,
And glad hosannas raise,
We’ll swell the song,
Our Jesus’ name we’ll praise,

‘* Once we wandered far,
Father dear, father dear,
Once we wandered far,
Eut you have brought us here.



HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS, 7Q -
Join all with heart and voice,
And loud hosannas raise,
We’ll swell the song,
Our Jesus’ name well praise,

*¢Erin’s children sighed,
Long ago, long ago,
Your arms were opened wide
To shelter them from woe.
Join all with heart and voice,
And loud hosannas raise,
We'll swell the song,
Our Jesus’ name we ’ll praise,

**Erin’s children love
To welcome you, to welcome you,
_ You ’ve taught us how above
Well meet the Saviour, too.
Join all with heart and voice,
And loud hosannas raise,
We'll swell the song,
Our Jesus’ name well praise, '

**In the better land,
Father dear, father dear,
A glorious angel band
Will welcome you up there,
Join all with heart and voice,
And loud hosannas raise,
We’ll swell the song,
Our Jesus’ name we’ll praise.”

When this had been sung, and tea and cake finished,



So HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS.

the smallest child, a little boy with rosy cheeks and curly
hair, was lifted up on the table beside Mr. Dallas; and
he handed him first the letter, which Mr. Dallas read
aloud; and then he gave the paper parcel, and Mr. Dallas
opened it, and expressed his delight and his thanks. And
then he took the little boy in his arms, and kissed him,
and blessed him; and he told the children the kiss and the
blessing was for them all; and all the children looked very
much pleased; and then they answered some questions
nicely; and after that the pretty things were, taken from
the tree, and given round to the children; and there was
such joy, and such wonder, and such looking at each
others’ things as never was known before. And then we
thought all the fun was over; but no, we were mistaken.
A strange gentleman was present, and he was so interested
in the children, that he came forward, and said he had a
nice Magic Lantern, which he would be very glad to
bring and shew igs

Of course all were delighted ; aa so the Magic Lan-
tern was brought; and the happy day had a very happy
ending. And I think you will all agree with me in think-
ing that the children of The Birds’ Nest had indeed, what
we wish to every one of you, as year by year goes by,—

A Happy Curistmas! —



HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS. 81

-CHRISTMAS DAY,

Tis Christmas Day—glad voices
Awake the solemn sound,
And happy voices in our home,
And healthful looks around,
Why do we thus keep Christmas morn ?-—
It is the day when Christ was born,

With little gifts that tell our love,
With garlands on the wall,
With thankful hearts and helpful hands,
We keep a festival.
Why do we thus keep Christmas morn ?—
It is the day when Christ was born.

Full eighteen hundred years ago,
Christ Jesus came on earth:
He came, He rose, He died for us—
We thank God for His birth,
And therefore we keep Christmas morn,
The day our Saviour Christ was born.

Christ healed the sick, and helped the poor,
While He was here on earth.
Do what you can to be like Him,
This morning of His birth.
Help some one to keep Christmas morn,
The day our Saviour Christ was born,





CHAPTER IX.

THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION.

‘The rich and poor meet together: the Lord is the maker of them all.”—-
Prov, xxii. 2.

Rr etea|E. have told a great deal about the Birds’ Nest,
7e@ViVeal| and the children who have there found a home.
Now we want to tell something about the way
in which children in hurd places have joined together to
support them; but I should like all, especially the little
ones, to vida that every good thing we are enabled
to do is of God—it is He “‘ who worketh in us both to
will and to do.” What a wonderful thing it is that He
should let us be sharers in His great work! He could do
it all without us, even as He said, ‘‘ Let there be light,
and there was light. But, in His wonderful mercy, He
takes us, a band of feeble people and little children, into
partnership with himself, and gives us strength to labour,
and then gives us such rewards.

When our dear friend, Mrs. George Wale, died, some
of her work fell into my hands,—the preparation of the





THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION. , 83

““ERin’s Hope,” the juvenile magazine of the Society
for Irish Church Missions. For some years it had been
a great pleasure to her to write true stories about Irish
children for the children of England.

I love little children very much indeed. I think that
when Jesus gathered a group of children around Him,
and ‘‘ put His hands upon them, and blessed them,”? He
meant that His followers should be blessings to little
children. And when he said to Peter, ‘Feed my lambs,”
He meant that not only Peter, but all who could say,
with Peter, ‘‘ Lord, thou énowest that I love thee,”
should take the words of Jesus to their hearts, and should
try to lead the lambs of the flock into the right paths.

Thousands of children every month read “ Erin’s
Hope.” I should have felt it too great a responsibility
to write for so many, only I knew that if Jesus said to
_ me, ‘Feed my lambs,” He would give me stores of food;
He would give me the right thoughts and the right
words; and so I took it as my work for Jesus. Well,
you know, besides the children I was writing for, there
were the. poor little children God had given us to work
for; and one day the thought came to me, Surely these
children belong to each other, we must forma “ CHIL-
DREN’S ASSOCIATION.” The children to whom God
has given good gifts will be glad to share them; and how



84. THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION,

happy:this will make them, _ Jesus said, “ = is ‘more
blessed to give than to receive.”” _

So I asked Jesus about it all, and then formed a
Children’s Association. My own name was put down
as Secretary, and three little children who lived in the
same house were the first members. We made three
resolutions,—

We will pray for the Birds’ Nest.
We will work for the Birds’ Nest.
We will collect for the Birds’ Nest.

The very first thing we did was to pray. And once
every week regularly, and on every special occasion, we
went into a:room together in the dark; and then we
talked a little together of our wants; and then we knelt
down, and each one prayed. And as we got on a little
we found that we had thanks to offer as well as prayer;
and before we knelt we counted our mercies as well as |
our wants; and so in everything, with praise and thanks-
giving, our wants were made known to our Heavenly
Father, who seeth in secret. One of these little girls,
the youngest, is not with us now; she is gone to dwell
in that fair land where |

‘¢ The streets are shining gold,
And the glory is untold.”

We miss her earnest voice at our prayer meetings, and



THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION. 85

her glad voice in the hymn of praise; but we know her’s
is one of the most joyous voices raised in the heavenly
song. And it may be that she and many another little
one who on earth learned to care for poor children, for
Jesus’ sake, talk together of them there.

When we had thus started the Children’s Association,
I published a little penny book, entitled, ‘A few words to
little Children who want to be like Jesus,’’ and wrote
about it in “‘Erin’s Hope.” I asked any little children
who wished to join to write to me, and then prepared
some cards ready for any children who might wish to
collect. |

We took three wretched little children who wanted to
get into the Birds’ Nest, and a friend photographed them;
from this a woodcut was made and printed on the cards;
and then I waited a little while to see what would come of
it. I felt like a gardener who had sown seed in a bed in
his garden; or a farmer who has sown a field all over with
wheat; or a little girl who has planted a geranium slip in
a pot in her nursery window. I thought of some words
of Jesus— Any plant that my heavenly Father hath not
planted shall be rooted up.” And I watched to see
whether my plants were of His planting.

After some days there came a letter by post. It was
directed in a lady’s handwriting. “here was nothing par-



86 THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION,

ticular about it; but the inside caused me great joy. It.
was written in letters copied out of printed books, each
letter about an inch long, and the words, “ My dear Secre-
tary,” filled the first page. When I had read it all, I found
it contained the request of a little girl, that I would send
her a collecting-card. And I did send her a card, and
wrote her a letter directed to herself; and after that the
postman often brought me letters from little children
wanting cards; and some from fathers and mothers, who
were delighted that their children had found a work for
Jesus so suitable to them. One of their dear, loving
mothers says, “‘I feel truly interested; it is so nice for
children to feel that God will graciously employ them in
such a work, I trust, in this coming year, if spared, to
know and to feel more of the power of prayer, to pray
more, and to watch more for answers to prayer; and your
little book has come to help me in this, by giving such
marked answers to your prayers, and those of your dear
children. My child, who will take up the card, is my
only one, and not’strong. I mention this to you, because
I feel your hearts are large enough to take other people’s
children in; and when you pray for the young collectors
and helpers in your interesting work, you will include my
boy in your petition, May God bless and prosper you
abundantly, even as He has promised, and He is faithful.”



THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION. 87

Writing is the best way of talking to friends at a
distance, but for those near it is better to meet face to
face; so we got up some meetings of different kinds.
The first was a tea-party in St. John’s School-
house.

Sometimes we had meetings without tea. Sometimes
we had a magic-lantern meeting at the Nest. One
meeting was a very charming one—a real Children’s Asso-
ciation meeting, ‘‘the rich and the poor meeting together.”
We asked every collector to give a shilling, and to come
to the Nest on a certain Thursday evening, at four o’clock.
When we had got all the shillings, we got a great quantity
of currant-cake made, and ordered the children’s evening
supply of bread to be made into flat cakes, and to be
brought hot. “Then we hired some cups, saucers, teapots,
jugs, and bowls, and we arranged our tea-party. Six
cups and saucers, a bowl, and jug, went to each teapot.
‘The hot cakes were buttered, and the currant-cake cut
up, on plates down each table; and when the collectors
had arrived, the nestlings were all brought into the tea-
room, and a little girl collector presided at each teapot,
while a little boy waited on her. It was a most enjoyable
party. |

Our Children’s Association has grown very fast, and
struck down root in many different places; and year by

~



88 THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION.

year it has grown, and a, and yielded richer
and richer fruits.

When we made up the account at the end of its first
year, and found that the children had sent £35, we were
very much delighted. And year by year the sum in-
creased more and*more, till last year, 1870, it was more
than £900. A wonderful blessing seems to rest on all
engaged in this work, and wonderful pleasure it brings
with it.

Feeding and clothing hungry children is such a real work
—a work that very small children can understand; and it
seems guite worth while to give only a penny, when it
will pay for one breakfast. And fourpence seems quite
a large sum when it will feed a nestling for a whole day.
And then, when a party of children form themselves into
an association, and collect enough for the entire support
of one or two children, they feel all the responsibility of
fathers and mothers, and all sorts of little plans are devised
for the good of.‘ our nestling.” Even the very little
ones can help to make a patchwork quilt to cover its bed,
and the boys can knit stockings for it, or make a scrap-
book; and all can save or collect money.

In our great Children’s Association there are all sorts
of workers. I often think I should like to see them all .
in one view. I can only imagine what a sight it would



THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION. 89

be. We should see a little girl in a beautiful castle ; she
is learning to hem; it is hard work, but for every half-
yard she will get a penny to put in her Birds’ Nest box,
We should see a sick little boy in a garret in London; he
is hoarding up farthings, and trying to fill a little bag for
the nestlings. We should see many groups of children to
whom God has given bounteously: they are gathered
around some kind friend, busy sewing, and on the table
lies the money box, into which they have put their weekly
contributions, and beside it a letter, in large characters,
written by their own nestling. We should see classes of
little children in infants’ schools trying to put very little
stitches into their bits of calico, for they are to be sewed
together one-day to make a quilt to send to the Birds’
Nest. We should see happy parties preparing Christmas
tree sales, and lonely children doing what they can.
And better than all, we should see little groups met for
prayer. |

Dear children, you who have enrolled yourselves mem-
bers of this great Children’s Association, don’t look upon
your work as small or unimportant. It is “‘ your Father’s
_ business ’’—the work He has given you todo. He has
need of your services. You want Jesus to save you, and
make you ready for His glorious home; and Jesus wants
you to minister to His poor. Oh! it is a blessed service,



gO THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION.

enough to make any one happy who enlists in it; but it
must be done from a right motive,—to be real service it
must begin with the heart. If you listen to Jesus saying,
‘‘ My son, give me thy heart,” and you obey Him in that,
you will soon give Him your hands too.

Sometimes children and young people take up a cause
in great earnestness, and work with zeal for a while, and
then—they forget—or they don’t like the trouble—or
there is something else to do. Their kindness passes
away. .

I was very much struck one day by a remark of one of
our little nestlings. We had a great number of collectors
at the Nest. “Chere was a “Holly and Ivy”? tea-party,
and after the tea there was a magic-lantern with dissolving
views. A large group of the little nestlings was gathered
on a raised platform behind the sheet, and I was sitting
amongst them, very much amused at their delight. One
little thing who was sitting close beside me kept stroking
my hand, and manifesting her affection in many childish
ways. She watched the pictures melting one into
another for some time. ‘Then she suddenly looked up at
me and said, ‘Don’t ’oo go and change.” “Why,” I
said, ““how could I change?”’ ‘Oo so kind now,” she
said. It was a wonderful saying. I looked at the child
with a feeling of reverence, and I said to myself, I must



THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION. gi

give this message to the members of the Children’s
Association, for the nestlings look upon me as the
messenger sent to them by all of you; and now I say to
you, ‘Don’t oo go and change.” If you have begun in
the right way, by giving your heart to Jesus, [ do not
fear for you. "I only fear for those who have only sand
for a foundation to their good works.

Of the many children who have joined our Children’s
Association, some are not with us now. In the midst
of their young labours they have heard the secret
message, “The Master is come, and calleth for thee.”
And they have gone up higher. Short was their working
day, but long will be their joyful rest, for of each of these
dear ones we have full confidence that they belonged to
the fold of the Good Shepherd.

Could these glorified little ones look down upon us
from their happy home, I think they would say, ‘‘ We
did not work hard enough for Jesus ; do you who are left
work harder.”” I think they would say, ‘‘ Oh, heaven is
such a glorious place s do what you can to bring the
poor children here.” I think they would say, ‘There
is nothing on earth worth ae compared with serving
our dear Redeemer.”

Are there any reading this little book who will take
their place amongst the workers? Jesus is looking down



Q2 THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION.

upon you now, and longing to have you for His own.
He says to you, ‘My son, give me thine heart.” He
says to you, too, “Son, go work to-day in my vine-.
yard.” ‘There is a multitude to be fed—only Jesus
knows how it is to be done; but are there not many ot
you who are like the “lad obit had five barley loaves and
two small fshes?”? Well, bring them to Jesus; He will
accept, and make them sufficient.

We must never leave our rescued children unfed,
unclothed, and uncomforted. Our “ Holly and Ivy”
must be true evergreen, only looking fresher, and
sparkling brighter, for the depth of the winter time, and
the desolation around.

But it does not grow of itself, therefore we want many
hands to gather and bring it. If you want useful work—
if you want pleasant work —catee and help us to brighten
up the lives of desolate little children ; come and help to
supply HE HoLiy anp Ivy.





THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION. 93.

LITTLE ONES LIKE ME,
‘¢ Jesus, when he left the sky,
And for sinners came to die,
In his mercy passed not by
Little ones like mie,

Mothers then, as mothers ought, #

In the places where He taught,

Unto Him their children brought,
Little ones like me, _

Did the Saviour say, then, nay?

No! He kindly bid them stay,

Suffered none to turn away
Little ones like me,

When into Jerusalem,

Meekly riding, Jesus came,

Children hailed His blessed name,
Little ones like me.

In the glorious heaven above,
Through the gracious Saviour’s love,
Children bliss and glory prove,

Little ones like me,

*T was for them His life He gave,
To redeem them from the grave;
Jesus. died from hell to save

Little ones like me,

Children, then, should love Him now,

Strive His holy will to do,

Pray to Him, and praise Him ‘too,
Little ones like me,”



Full Text

PAGE 1

CHAPTER Xl. HOW THE BUILDING WAS PAID FOR. "We also will be with thee: be of good courage."-EzRA x. 4. HE first plan for the new Birds' Nest was a very commodious, but a very expensive one. The estimate of cost was £6,ooo. This, we felt, was a great deal more than we ought to undertake, so the plan had to be reduced, cutting away all ornament, as well as a laundry and a nursery for delicate children, which we have had to build since. At length we got it down to £4,000. £2,ooo of this sum we borrowed on interest, and £1,000 was lent by a kind friend, without interest, for as long a time as we should require it. We did our best to collect the money, but at the end of two years still owed £3,000, and the Bank managers wanted the £2,ooo to be paid up. The case was made known to a very active servant of God, W. H. Porter, Esq., and he determined to make a vigorous effort to ·······



PAGE 1

The Baldwin Library U o .Vin |



PAGE 1

-* *m CHAPTER II. HOW WE BEGAN. T was in the month of July, 1859, four ladies were sitting together in a small room in one of the back streets of Dublin. They were met to arrange the weekly business of a Home for Destitute Girls, and to see those who wished for admission. There were many came that day seeking a shelter, girls who had no place to call "home," who had slept, some of them, for many a night, in the damp air, crouched in some doorway, or perhaps an open shed; and as many as' they could those ladies received in the name of Jesus. But amongst the applicants came a woman bringing a little girl three years of age. She had been deserted. by her mother a year before, and this woman, poor as she was, had taken her to her heart and home; but now worse poverty had come upon her, she could keep the little one no longer. It was not the first tink such little ones had come there. Once two little ones came hand-



PAGE 1

BIRDS' NEST, HOME FOR DESTITUTE CHILDREN, KINGSTOWN, NEAR DUBLIN. 00 TRUSTEESHON. AND REV. LORD PLUNKET, Old Connaught, Bray; REV. C. F. MACCARTHY, D.D., .NMissionary to Roman Catholics, Dublin; JOHN MURPHY, Eso., Dundalk; PHILIP SMYLY, Esq., M.I 4 Merrion Square, North, DublA9 SECRETARSMRS. J. SMYLY, 35 Upper Fitzwilliam Street, lblir; MISS M. -A.. C-OFTON, I9 York Road, Kingstown. SECRETAR OF CHILDRE , ASSOCIATION-. MISS SARAH "AVIES, 35 UPPER FITZWILLIAM STREET, DUBLIN, TREASURER-FRANCIS LOW, Esq., Bank of MESSRS. BOYLE, Low, MURRAY, & Co. College Green, Dublin.



PAGE 1

136 NOT ALONE. that I was dying, and that the Lord Jesus Christ stood by my bedside, smiling at me, and He told me not to fear, that I would be with Him before long. I should like to see Mrs. S , my more than mother; but if I die before I can see her, I shall be one of the number that will come to meet her when she is leaving the world. Give my love to her, and to Mr. Eade, and Mr. MacCarthy, and tell them that I will love them all throughout eternity." Soon after this it was thought desirable that Emily should be brought again to the hospital, that she might be under the care of the doctors. She could not bear the thoughts of this. " I cannot go," she said to her friend; "I would rather die here." But a few words were enough to recall her to herself, and she whispered, "Pray that I may be ready for God's will in all things." Was she not even here following Jesus? Did not He, in prospect of suffering alone, say, " If it be possible let this cup pass from me: nevertheless, not as I will, but as thou wilt." When the day came for Emily to go, she called Mrs. F , who had nursed her tenderly, to her, and putting her poor wasted arms round her neck, said, "God be with you! We part but for a little season, then we shall meet again round the ' great white throne,' never to part again."



PAGE 1

CHAPTER VII. DAILY WORK. HAVE told you a great deal about the history of the Nest, and now I think I ought to tell you what it is like. Well, to begin with the outside. It is just what the picture represents, a great oblong stone building,-not at all like a real bird's nest; I wish it was. I should like to have had it a cozy-looking place, with all sorts of nooks about it, porched doors, and domer windows, and little chimneys popped about the roof; and then it would have been my taste to have roses, and ivy,.and creeping plants climbing up, and round about the windows and chimneys. And there should have been a nice green field round about, surrounded by a good quick-set hedge. All this would have been very delightful, but would have cost a good deal of money. And do you know we were obliged to put away all idea of beauty when we considered the plans for The Nest. The great problem we had to solve was, how to accommodate the



PAGE 1

HOW WE BEGAN. 15 in-hand, their poor little bodies scarcely covered with wretched rags, their hair tangled, their faces unwashed; and as they stood together they looked round with a wondering, half-frightened air; and their faces, which ought to have been bright with smiles and fun, were marked by a serious, careworn look, very sad to see in such little things. Their mother was dead, and their father was gone, and they had no home and no food but the breakfast they got in the Ragged School. But these two, and many others, had been sent away because the Home was for great girls; there was no room for little ones. But now the sad case of the little child touched the heart of one of the ladies very deeply; and Jesus, who longs to have the little ones come to Him, put into her heart a thought:--"We must have a Home for the poor little ones," she said. " There are many children to whom God has given plenteously, and they will gather the money to feed them, and so the rich and the poor amongst the lambs of the fold will be united together, and God will be glorified." The woman was told to call again, and something should be done. That day the ladies sat long together, and they asked God's blessng on the work of their hands. Before they separated, the youngest among them, the one into whose heart the thought came, had determined that she would



PAGE 1

56 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. "Little children are never hungry And mothers are never sad; Where there's nothing to make them sorry, And plenty to make them glad." There is one wee child in the Nest who attracts everybody's attention. What do you think her name is ?" JENNY ROBIN." Is not that a nice name for a birdie? She is very little, and has eyes as bright as the real robins that hop about in winter. Jenny has a mother who loves her very much; but she has a little child younger than Jenny. She earns £8 a-year, and pays £4 to the nurse who takes care of him. With the rest she clothes herself. She was a Roman Catholic; and when I first saw her in her poor home she knew nothing of Jesus and His love. Now she is a real Christian, and is so thankful to have Jenny in the Nest, Two dear little girls came from the country to the Nest quite lately. Their names are Mary and Nannie. Mary is ten years old; Nannie is eight. Their case was so pressing that we were obliged to take both when there was only a bed for one; so they both sleep together in one of the small beds. It was in December we heard about them first. Their father had gone away two or three years ago, and no one knew anything about him; but he had been so unkind to his wife and five children that no one wished



PAGE 1

12 INTRODUCTORY. without many fears that funds might not come in for their support. But the cases were so pressing that one after another the Committee could not refuse; and they felt that He who caused twelve baskets of fragments to remain after the multitude had fed on five barley loaves, would also cause a blessing to rest on the " basket and store" of The Birds' Nest, if only the children were received in His name. So the poor little friendless ones have found a home on earth, where they are being trained for a HOME in glory"A home so happy and so bright,A home of rest aboveWhere, clothed in raiment pure and white, In that sweet home of love, No more a ragged orphan wild, But dressed in white array, Our God shall own the homeless child, And wipe its tears away."



PAGE 1

176 A CONTRAST. Who had been born in a warm climate, and were more delicate'than other children Two of them, as orphans, had found a home in the Nest-their brother in the Boys' Home. Carry was subject to very severe illness, in which abscesses formed, and she suffered very much; but the present illness was not like the others: it. was a low fever, which terminated in consumption. She was very patient and gentle; for some time she had given evidence that she belonged to Jesus. When I knew that she was seriously ill, I asked her, would she be afraid to die? She said, "No; my sins are all taken away; I shall go to Jesus in heaven." She had two favourite hymns, one beginning"My Jesus, I love thee;" the other"Jesus loves me." These she often sung in the ravings of fever, and even in her sleep. One day I asked her what text she had thought of that day. She said, "I will lay me down in peace and take my rest." A few days before her death a friend went to see her; she could not talk much, but he spoke to her of Jesus' love. When he was gone she sat up in bed and said quite loudly to 'the other patients, "Did you hear him? he says Jesus loves me." The assurance seemed to corn-



PAGE 1

WANDERERS WELCOMED. 163 " How do you know that?" said the Nurse. " Because when the doctor looked at me he shook his head; I know I 'm going to die; and oh! Nurse, I'm not ready." She was indeed dying, and the tempter was near to trouble her. A thick cloud came over the child's faith; she could not see Jesus. The Nurse called up Mrs. R-to talk to her. She spoke of Jesus, His everlasting love, and how He never leaves nor forsakes His own little ones. But Mary Jane could not find peace. A little while after Mrs. R was gone, as the child was lying quietly thinking and praying, the cloud passed away, and she called out in quite a strong voice, "Nurse, I 'm happy; I've found 'Christ' again; I can sleep now, Nurse;" and with a peaceful smile she turned her head and slept sweetly and quietly. She was getting very near the waters of Jordan; but there was no fear-Jesus was with her. As night came on she woke up, and begged of the Nurse to lie down. " You must not stay on your feet for me," she said; "do go to bed." So she had to go for a little while to pacify'the child; but she soon came back; she could not stay away.


y
Fe
aera: A j j .
Sd a { i
4 Z
tis we
: 3 .
aay f 3
4 r
ae : - ¥ t * iN
. sa , en ae
2 at feet) o i agg eT
\ ar < ae
;





&
os ee iE
rer Dire a


The Baldwin Library

—,
Ri ] L esi




cninh nga fe i 7 YE bee +P AN fe ‘oer ue a ey

eat oe ete Bt ee ~e a -ee Ota me ie Tee Vaal = z . * ra

worckor se “we


ys

WINTE

by

ey










HOLLY AND IVY:

THE STORY

OF
Pp WINTER “BIRDS Nest.”

BY

MISS DAVIES,

EDITOR OF *“*ERIN’S HOPE,’ AND AUTHOR OF “THEM ALSO,”
“WANDERERS BROUGHT HOME,” &c.

DUBLIN:

‘GEORGE HERBERT, 117 GRAFTON STREET.
LONDON: WILLIAM HUNT & CO., 23 HOLLES STREET,
CAVENDISH SQUARE.

18 7 I.
erm Ids duih

[iter strat |
Ao

|| Printers, |]
cot
| Glaser.

=






haw Of 72

‘

Dedirrted
THE MEMBERS

| se OF ae
~The Children’s Association,

WHO WITH LOVING HEARTS AND SELF-DENYING LABOURS HAVE
HELPED TO BUILD “THE NEST’’ AND FEED THE BIRDS
WHO: HAVE FOUND SHELTER FROM THE WINTER

STORMS, BY THEIR GRATEFUL. FRIEND,

THE SECRETARY,
PREFACE TO THE THIRD EDITION.



00



WHEN the Second Edition of this little book was nearly
~ sold off, it was thought well to publish its contents in a
series of little books, which could be issued in large
numbers. ‘This plan has been most successful; but still
many letters are coming asking for the original book; and
therefore we have determined to send forth a Third
Edition, bringing down the story to the present time,
and embodying the contents of the later numbers of
- the little books.

We commend this new edition to the loving care of
our Heavenly Father. May He bless it abundantly, and
‘by it touch many hearts, causing them to feel for the
miseries of destitute little children, and leading them to
help in some way to provide for the little children in the

Birps’ Nest. .
SARAH DAVIES,

35 Urrer FirzwittiaM Street, Dustin,
Honorary Secretary to Children’s Association,

December, 1871.
CONTENTS.





0

“PART I.

. CHAPTER lL. PAGE
INTRODUCTORY, . : : ‘ eee : 9
CHAPTER II.

HOW WE BEGAN, : : : : : . I4
CHAPTER III.
DARK CLOUDS, . vs ‘ . ; . ai
| CHAPTER IV.
GOD’S CARE, : : Se inal , - 224
CHAPTER V.
GOING FORWARD, ; é : ; . . 28
CHAPTER VL
THE BIRDS IN THE NEST, . ‘ : : ee BF
CHAPTER VIL
DAILY WORK, . . : j ‘ pet 60
CHAPTER VIIL
HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS, : : san ye

: CHAPTER IX.
THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION, - + - ~- 82
Vill CONTENTS.
CHAPTER xX.
GOD’S PROVIDINGS, . ; j

CHAPTER XI.
HOW THE BUILDING WAS PAID FOR,

: O





PART II,
3 ) CHAPTER I,
THE FIRST DEATH, . -:. °
i CHAPTER II.
NOT ALONE, . cots .
CHAPTER III.
SAFE AT HOME, . ; ; :
CHAPTER IV.
‘CALLED AND CHOSEN, Gee
CHAPTER V.
WANDERERS WELCOMED, . :
: CHAPTER VI.
“A PILGRIM GOING HOME,” _.
CHAPTER VII.
A CONTRAST, «. 2 « .
CHAPTER VIII
‘SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE, .
| 7 CHAPTER IX,
“CONCLUSION, . : : .

PAGE

— 94

118

123
127
I4i
145
158
166
175
178

1g0
oir Ai se BSN

varie,



PNR Oe oe tater = 2 eqetet, Mit Ne wae WES deme mE oe em Re Agi mM WN ae com oe Nat SU g coe eens Wo,



SPY Rept N04 Ae SAARC HAPS ik AF VOR a needs Site, 5 Me) as en Ont © 5 snp See 4 ok nna beh) = staat GOA ene A pumesome ‘ ~ ces



hn

r

Unrest



Wier .





THE CONTRAST.
&
J



HOLLY AND IVY.

PART I.



00



CHAPTER I.

INTRODUCTORY.

wm OLLY AND IVY! the very words make us
a, feel cold, and yet warm. How they remind one
| i=} of the snow-covered fields, and the keen, biting
winds of winter! How they remind one, too, of times
of joy, and happy homes, and brightness in the midst ee
desolation !

This little book will tell of ibe dreary winter time of
the lives of destitute little children—of their sorrows and
troubles. It also tells of brightness and j joy, and a happy
home; and so I have chosen those magic words for its
title. I hope it will find its way into many Christian
homes, and be read by many of those dear children who


IO | _ INTRODUCTORY.

have early learned to love the Lord Jesus Christ, and are
earnestly longing to have something to do for Him.
When He was here on earth He took the little children
in His own arms and blessed them. He cares for them
still, and looks down on them with compassionate love,
but He looks to His people to comfort them.

It was because there were so many poor little children
to be comforted that The Birds’ Nest was opened; and it
was because so many dear children in happy homes wanted
to help, that we formed what we call the CuILpREN’s
ASSOCIATION, to the members of which this little book is
dedicated.

An account of the Association and its work will be
found farther on. ‘The children have done much, but not
yet half what is needed, for the daily expenditure of such
an institution as THE Brrp’s Nest. In this great work
there is room enough for all, and we would earnestly call
upon all those into whose hands this book may fall, to
come forward and help. We know there are many calls
upon the purse of charity, but amongst the many claiming
the sympathies of those whom God has made stewards of
His bounty, homes for the destitute must ever take a high
place. And why? Because our Father in heaven com-
forts His dying people with the sweet promise, ‘‘ Leave
thy fatherless children, and I will preserve them alive;
INTRODUCTORY. If

and let thy widows trust in M#.’’—Because the only-
begotten Son, in His wondrous life on earth, left us an
example that we should love little children.—Because
‘when in His risen body He talked with His disciples, and
would have from Peter a proof of constant love, He said,
“¢ Feed my lambs.” Now He is gone, and we are left to
follow out the path He traced; and as alone, or in com-
panies, His servants tread that path, He looks down with
kindly eye and sympathizing heart. Oh let us never for-
get that we are working for Him who took a little child
and set him by Him,—that we have a smile from Him
who said, “Suffer little children to come unto Meg.”
Oh, then—
<¢ Aim to be like Jesus; walk with God,
Look up to learn your heavenly Father’s will— ©
Look round the earth on which your Saviour trod—
And when you find a child of sorrow, ill,
Forlorn and helpless, toiling up the hill, -
Be thou a loving angel, and thy face,
In tending it, shall shine as angels’ do;
As shine those sons of light in that high place,

Hid for a little while from mortal view,
Where, if you follow Christ, you'll be an angel too,”

The Birds’ Nest shelters one hundred and ninety of
these ‘forlorn and helpless’? ones. “They have been
taken out from the wide world, and brought together, not
I2 INTRODUCTORY.

without many fears that funds might not come in for their
support. But the cases were so pressing that one after
another the Committee cou/d not refuse; and they felt
that He who caused twelve baskets of fragments to
remain after the multitude had fed on five barley loaves,
would also cause a blessing to rest on the “‘ basket and
store’? of The Birds’ Nest, if only the children were
received in His name.

So the poor little friendless ones have found a home on
earth, where they are being trained for a Home in

glory—
«¢ A home so happy and so bright,—

A home of rest above—

Where, clothed in raiment pure and white,
In that sweet home of love,

No more a ragged orphan wild,
But dressed in white array,

Our God shall own the homeless child,
And wipe its tears away.”


INTRODUCTORY. . oe &

“Js there a thing beneath the skies .
O’er which the gentle Saviour yearns,
Which finds such favour in His eyes,
Whose tearful cry He never spurns?
It is that little thing so wild,
A poor, neglected, lonely child.

Oh teach that little one to sing

The numbers tuneful, soft and clear,
Hosanna to the Shepherd bring,

Such as that Shepherd loves to hear—
Such as He heard when meek He rode ¥
‘To Salem, His ordain’d abode.

Such as His gracious ear again
Shall welcome from ‘young hearts set free,
Whom Tuov hast rescued from the chain
Of sin and woe; hast taught to flee
To Him who left yon heavenly land
To take a wanderer by the hand.”


CHAPTER Ii.

HOW WE BEGAN.

Marge i was in the month of July, 1859, four ladies

#a| were sitting together in a small room in one of
the back streets of Dublin. SREY were met
to arrange the weekly business of a Home for Destitute
Girls, and to see those who wished for admission.

‘There were many came that day seeking a shelter,
girls who had no place to call ‘ home,”’ who had slept,
some of them, for many a night, in the damp air,
crouched in some doorway, or perhaps an open shed;
and as many as they could those ladies received in the
name of Jesus. |

But amongst the applicants came a woman bringing
a little girl three years of age. She had been deserted.
by her mother a year before, and this woman, poor as she
was, had taken her to her heart and home; but now
worse poverty had come upon her, she could keep the
little one no longer. It-was not the first tine such little ©
ones had come there. Once two little ones came hand-


HOW WE BEGAN. 15

in-hand, their poor little bodies scarcely covered with
wretched rags, their hair tangled, their faces unwashed;
and as they stood together they looked round with a
wondering, half-frightened air; and their faces, which
ought to have been bright with smiles and fun, were
marked by a serious, careworn look, very sad to see in such
little things. Their mother was dead, and their father
was gone, and they had no home and no food but the
breakfast they got in the Ragged School. But these two,
and many others, had been sent away because the Home
was for great girls; there was no room for little ones.
But now the sad case of the little child touched the heart
of one of the ladies very deeply; and Jesus, who longs to
have the little ones come to Him, put into her heart a
thought :-— We must have a Home for the poor little
ones,” she said. ‘‘ There are many children to whom
God has given plenteously, and they will gather the
money to feed them, and so the rich and the poor amongst
the lambs of the fold will be united together, and God
will be glorified.” The woman was told to call again,
and something should be done.

That day the ladies sat long together, and they asked
God’s blessing on the work of their hands. Before they
separated, the youngest among them, the one into whose
heart the thought came, had determined that she would
16 _ HOW WE BEGAN.

be responsible for the new “ Home :” “ It shall be in the
country,’ she said; “cand we will call it ‘Tue Brrps’
Nest.’ ”

The first thing this good lady did was to write an
article in the little magazine called ‘¢ Erin’s Hope,” telling
_of the new idea, and asking children to help; and then a
Committee of four ladies was formed.

- It was some little time before a suitable house sould be- .

fuiid, but at last one was discovered up a little country
road near Kingstown. It belonged to a kind gentleman,
who, when he knew what it was wanted for, charged a
very low rent. It was just the thing for a nest of birdies,
snug and small, and having roses climbing up the small porch.
_ The house wanted some repairs, and the introduction
of gas pipes, before it would be ready to be inhabited; but
however, by the end of September all was finished, and
the ladies assembled in the new Nest. The first thing
they did was to kneel down to thank God that He had so.
far helped them, and to pray that a great blessing might
rest upon that Home, and that it might be a nursery for
heaven. ‘Then they chose a nice motherly woman for a
matron, and the little child was brought in and adopted as
the first nestling; then came another girl, a little older,
and a boy and girl, (brother and sister ;) thus we had four
to begih with; and very happy they were in their Home.
HOW WE BEGAN. | 17 |

We could. not afford to buy bedsteads, but every child
had a little sack, filled with straw, laid on the floor, with
a pair of sheets and blankets; and as we admitted more
children into the Nest, the number of these little beds _
increased, till at last they were so thickly laid, side by side,
that it was with difficulty we could step about the 1 rooms 5
there were forty children.

Week after week the Committee of The Birds’ Nest
met ; and week after week they met with two great diffi-
culties : one was that money did not come in as fast as it
was wanted ; but for this there was a remedy,—prayer and
work, ‘The other difficulty was, how to refuse the mul-
titude of poor children who pressed for admission; it was
so very hard to turn them away, and think that they must
continue to wander the streets, faint and weary; and the
ladies prayed very much for guidance. They felt as if
God was saying to them, ‘Take these children and nurse

them for Me, I will give you money.” And so they de-
termined that as soon as possible they would build a Home
which would hold one hundred and fifty, and they would
write down in a book the cases of the children who were
left without, that as soon as there was room they might all
be taken in,

The little children who had found a home,in The Birds’
Nest were very busy, and very happy. ‘They rose’early

. B
18 HOW WE.BEGAN.

in the morning, and dressed and washed themselves.
Then there were beds to make, and rooms to sweep;
after which they assembled in a long room at, the back of
the house for prayer. After comfortable warm breakfasts
of cocoa and bread, hats and bonnets were brought out,
and the little party set off, two-and-two, followed by their
kind matron, to the Mission School; and in many a home,
as they passed, kind voices said, ‘‘ Here come the children,”’
and kind faces looked out upon them and blessed them ;
and the clatter of forty pairs of wooden clogs was a
constant reminder to collectors to be up and doing. |
But the clatter of the clogs was heard by enemies
too. ‘There were some who were angry because the
children were taken by Protestants, and taught the Bible. —
‘They would break up The Nest if they could; and
many a scheme was laid for the purpose.
_ The children knew they had enemies, and that they
were always in danger; but they knew God as their
Father, they knew they were safe only under His
protection, and so they learned to trust in Him. Up in
the dormitories at night they met for prayer; and a few
trees in the garden formed a tabernacle where these dear
children often met with God. Frequently in the play-
time the voice of mirth would be stopped, and you
might hear sweet children’s voices joining in a hymn,
HOW WE BEGAN. 19.

And then the music would cease, and the voice of one
after anotherymight be heard in earnest prayer.

About this time the children’s friend who had deter-

mined to have The Nest wrote a very nice hymn for
them, suited to their peculiar circumstances. .
_ She meant it to be sung to the tune of “ Uncle Ned,”
a negro melody. She always liked lively tunes for the
children, because the very little ones could learn
them :— |



“¢T saw in a valley a happy little flock,
They lie in a pleasant fold,
The Shepherd who owns them is kind and good,

He loves them with love untold. |
Come all ye who hear, who hear,
Come, and never fear:
There ’s room for all,

‘And the Shepherd doth call,

Oh, come, and be happy here.

Those sheep were lost and wandering once,
And the wolf went about to destroy;
But the Shepherd sought them through wood, waste, and hill,
And brought them here with joy.
Come all, &c.

He made them a fold under green, green trees,
Which healing leaves do bear,
. Close by the stream of the water of life,
And He leads His saved ones. there.
-Come all, &c.
20

HOW WE BEGAN,

The Shepherd saved those lost wandering sheep,
For He fought with their cruel foe ;
And in His blood, then shed for them,
He washed them as white as snow.
Come all, &c.

And He will take them one happy, happy day,
To a fairer, lovelier home, :
Across the mountains, far, far away,
Where the wolf no more can roam. _
~ Come all, &c. |

Come young and old to this happy Gospel fold,
To this tender Shepherd’s care,
For none can go to that lovely distant home,
Till His saving grace they share.
Come all ye who hear,. who hear,
Come, and never fear; |
There ’s room for all, 7
And the Shepherd doth call,
_ Oh, come, and be happy here.”




CHAPTER III.

DARK CLOUDS.

Spa OT quite one year from the opening of The Birds’
ARN ©=Nest a great sorrow fell upon us, in the death
of the beloved and loving one who had gathered
the e children, and called their home The Birds’ Nest.
Brightly and beautifully had her light shone on earth,
and all too soon for us who were left behind was she
called away; but we tried to say, “¢ Thy will be done.”
‘The children of The Birds’ Nest were not the enly
rescued ones who mourned her loss. When her death
was announced, the Ragged School was a place of
‘Weeping. She was a daughter of the late Archbishop
Whately, and though lately married, died at her father’s
house. Some time before her death she had expressed a
wish that her funeral might have none of the usual pomp
about it, but that her dear poor people might be her
mourners. When she was gone her father remembered
her wish. A plain hearse left the palace door, with just
two mourning carriages; but on the. way. to the family






ww *
ie
ape age

. " BA a.

burying-place, four miles out of town, the procession
increased. ‘There were the Scripture Readers and teachers
of the Irish Church Mission Society, a sorrowing troop of
boys and girls from the schools, and a group of mothers,
with their babies in their arms, who had formed her Sunday
School class. These and many others joined the train,
and filled the church. Then all assembled round the
grave and listened to a solemn address by the Missionary,
and as well as they could for tears, they all sang,—

‘¢ Shall we ever all meet again?>—
Yes, we may all meet again,
If not on earth, in heaven we may all meet again,

Shall we ever all wear a crown?— _
Yes, we may all wear a crown, |
If not on earth, in heaven we may a// wear a crown,

Tears shall be all wiped away,
If not on earth, in heaven tears shall be ali wiped away.”

It was a solemn scene; and many a heart too sorrowful to
join in the singing was raised in prayer, that the spirit of
love, so richly given to the departed one, might fall on
others, that the destitute ones might not be forgotten; and
so it came to pass that many hearts were stirred up, and
it was determined that the new building to be erected for
The Birds’ Nest should be a monument to the memory of

Mrs. George’ Wale.
DARK CLOUDS.

“ Come let us join our friends above .
Who have obtained the prize,
And on the eagle wings of love
To joys celestial rise.

Let all the saints terrestrial sing
With those to glory gone;
For all the servants of our King,

In earth and heaven, are one.

One family we dwell in Him,
One Church above, beneath,
Though now divided by the stream,
The narrow stream of death.

One army of the living God,
At His command we bow;

Part of His host have crossed the flood,
And part are crossing now.

Our spirits, too, shall quickly join,

Like theirs with glory crown’d,

_ And shout to see our Captain’s sign,
To hear His trumpet sound.

Lord Jesus, be our constant guide,
And when the word is given,

Bid death’s cold flood its waves divide,
And land us safe in heaven.”

“QP

23.




CHAPTER IV.
GOD’S CARE.
“6 Ff¥e maketh the storm a calm.”

rw toad have spoken of the enemies of these dear chil-
€ | ‘dren; we had often thought that some attack
might be made upon them, but for seven months
they were allowed to come and go unmolested, and we
began to think it would always be so, and perhaps we
were forgetting who it is that sends the peace and quiet-
ness, and so trial came.

On Sunday night, May the 6th, about half-past eight,

when the little children were just going to bed, a rattling
sound was heard on the roof, then another, then another,
and then a window was broken by the blow ofa large
stone. |

_The stones seemed to be coming from the front,
and so the matron gathered the children together in the
back. ‘They were very much frightened, but they knew
God could defend them, and they knelt in prayer. ‘The


é . GOD’S CARE. 2S.

pelting of stones continued two whole hours, and in the
‘morning was renewed; but not a child was hurt.

On Tuesday evening, as the children were sitting at
their supper in the back room, a large stone came in
at the window, just grazed the ear of one child, and
_ passed close to the mistress’s head as she was stooping |
down. It was very remarkable that the little ones who
usually sat along that window had been put to bed an
hour before their usual time. Had they been there
one, at least, must have been killed. See how God
watches over His children, and guides them even in
small things! On Wednesday four extra police were
sent to guard the house,—two in front, and two at the
back. The pelting ceased, and ‘it was never discovered.
who threw the stones; but when ladders were got to
clear the roof, thirty-two stones were found, some five
and a-half pounds weight! It was very wonderful that
no little child was hurt. No, not wonderful! Does
not Jesus say, ‘* The ma hairs of your head are
all numbered ? ”

A few days after this storm I was at The Birds’ Nest,
and talking to the children about it, I said, ‘‘ But how
is itno one was hurt?”’ ‘They all looked very serious,
and one little girl said, “Sure, ma’am, it was the Lord
took care of us!”
26 --. GOD'S CARE. . .

Ah! the little children of The Birds’ Nest have learned
how strong God is, and they rely upon the promise
written in the gtst Psalm, ‘‘ He shall cover thee with His
feathers, and under His wings shalt thou trust.”


GOD’S CARE.. 27.

FEAR NOT,

**'Yra, fear not—fear not, little oness
There is in heaven an eye
That looks with yearning fondness down
On every path you try.

“Tis He who guides the sparrow’s wing,
And guards her little brood;

Who hears the ravens when they cry,
And fills them all with food,

*Tis He who clothes the fields with flowers,
And pours the light- abroad;
°?Tis He who numbers all your hours,
Your Father and your God,

Ye are the chosen of His love,
His most peculiar care;

And will He guide the fluttering dove,
And not regard your prayer?

Nay, fear not—fear not, little ones;
There is in heaven an eye

That looks with yearning fondness down
On all the paths you try.

Hell keep you when the storm is wild,
And when the flood is near;

Oh, trust Him, trust Him, little child,
And you have nought to fear,”


« CHAPTER ¥.

GOING FORWARD.

‘The Lord shall increase you more and more, you, and your children.”

e749 mentioned in an earlier chapter, we had deter-
weaen| mined to build a new Nest for our Birdies—
but we found it very difficult to get a suitable
piece of ground, so we took a larger house, and in a very
short time our numbers rose to sixty-four.

The new comers easily fell into the orderly ways of
those who had been trained to good habits, and so there
was little difficulty; and as time went on we were induced
to increase the number to eighty-one. In every available
spot of the house were the little beds laid down, and the
assembly at meals was a goodly sight to behold. Down
the centre of the room was a long table, occupied by the
elder boys and girls, and round by the walls were high
forms for tables, and low forms for seats, for the little ones,
and yet there was the greatest order amongst them; and


GOING FORWARD. 29 .

as they, with clasped hands, stood to sing their grace, and
then quietly ate their food, you would have supposed that
they had been carefully taught, even from their aby:
hood. |

Still we had many difficulties in this crowded house; no
baths, no convenience at all for washing either the children
or their clothes, a few tubs in the yard being all we could
manage; and we were very anxious that a new building
should be commenced as soon as possible.

In April, 1861, a piece of ground was procured. It was
a green field nearly opposite the house the children occupied.
Just then the Rev. Alexander Dallas,* who has been so
blessed by God in the conversion of Roman Catholics,
was coming over from England, and we asked him to lay
the foundation-stone; he gladly consented.

The day appointed was the rith of April. It was a
most lovely day, and the friends who went down to Kings-
town from Dublin almost filled a train. When we arrived
we walked up first to the old Nest, where the children
were all assembled, dressed in their new summer livery.
When Mr, Dallas came into the playground they all
gathered round him and sang awelcome. He spokea few

~* This beloved and useful servant of God entered into his rest Dec. 12,

1869. His loss is deeply felt throughout a whole of our country, Of him
it a truly be said, ** He loved our nation,’
30 GOING FORWARD.

words to them; after which all formed into a procession,
and walked down the road to the ground selected for the
new building.

The children took their places around the stone, and
then all the other people stood around. The rector of the
parish offered up a prayer for God’s blessing, and then the
Stone was put down. Some nice speeches were made,
and then the children gathered into a group and sang
many beautiful hymns, their voices blending so sweetly
together. We all felt full of joy and thankfulness, and
joined in heart and ee in the children’s chorus, “All
glory to Jesus.” |

After this the building committee worked in earnest.

I could not tell you how often the poor little Birdies
looked out at their new “ Nest, ”’ as stone after stone was
laid, and the walls rose, and the window-places were left,
_and then the roof was put on. And then the carpenters
came, and doors were put in, and windows were made: :
and then the iron railings were put up in front, and the
gates in their places. How they wondered what it would
all be like inside! ;

_ At last April came, and Mr. Dallas was coming over;
and though all the inside things were not ready, still the
school-rooms were finished, and we determined to have
an opening day on the roth of April, exactly a year from
GOING FORWARD. 31

the time when we all stood in the green field, and the
first stone was put down.

I must explain the plan of the building, or I fear
you will not exactly understand all I. shall — to tell
you. It is an oblong building, with a’ door at each end;
one has ‘* Boys”? written over it, the other ‘ Girls.”
‘This is to suit the day-schools. "You remember that,
at first, the Birds’ Nest children went to the Mission
School’; now the Mission School was to come to the
Birds’ Nest. |

The large space between each entrance is divided into

two rooms; the one on the boys’ end is the infants’
school-room; the other is the feeding-room. In this
latter are six deal tables, some of them very low, with
small low forms for the little children; others are e higher,
for those who have longer legs.
_ Over these two rooms are two others, separated by
folding doors. One is the boys’ school-room, the other
the girls’. Over these again are two large sleeping-
rooms. |

At the end you will see there are several smaller
-rooms. On the girls’ end there is first the kitchen, then
two rooms for the matron, two for the teachers, and one,
reaching from back to front, which is intended for any
children who may not be quite well.
af | GOING FORWARD.

At the other end are apartments for the master, and
above, sleeping-rooms for the boys. Loe

On the day of opening the folding-doors were Sietied:
and the two large school-rooms formed one very large
room, which was beautifully decorated with green ayes |
and paper flowers. |

These, with the new school pictures and maps
hanging upon the wall, gave it quite a bright, lively
appearance; and when the bright spring sun shone in at
the windows, our hearts quite danced with joy. On one
of the sides, half-way down the room, was a sort of
platform, on which the ee who were to pa
might stand. | :

At two o’clock the children were all assembled in
the yard of the old house, each neatly dressed. The
girls had new straw bonnets, which had just been given
to them by two kind friends) When Mr. Dallas
appeared they set up a great shout, and then sang a
welcome. Afterwards all formed into a procession,
headed by Mr. Dallas with the very smallest child by the
hand. So they walked through the house and across the
road, and up the stairs of the new Nest, the wonder and
curiosity of the children increasing more and more.

The large room was so full of people, who had come to
the opening, that it was not very easy for the children to
GOING FORWARD. : a3

get in in an orderly manner; but people got out of the
way, and before long the regiment of children in blue and
white was nicely settled upon a temporary gallery which
had been provided for them.

' As we looked round upon that large meeting, our hearts
were very full of gratitude to God that so many poor
children had been brought together to learn of Jesus, and
thankfulness that so many friends had been raised up to
provide what was needful for those children; so we could
sing with all our hearts,

“ Crown Him Lord of all.”

Then there was an earnest prayer to God, that He
would continue to pour His blessing on the Institution,
that every child coming in might be made indeed a child
of God, and that the means might be raised, not only to
feed and clothe the children, but also to pay for the nice
new Home.

Then there were other speeches made, and hymns sung
by the children. It was a very happy meeting.

And now that the Nest was opened, we were very
anxious that the workmen should make as much haste as
possible, and get out, so that the children might come
in, “The Matron’s rooms were finished first, and she came

in to get all into order. There were new bedsteads to be
| a
oe. GOING FORWARD.

got, new little beds to be filled with straw, and: sheets
and blankets to be prepared; and every day the elder girls
came over to help to hem and stitch. |

In about a fortnight the moving day came, and many
little hands carried over bundle after bundle; and there
was such excitement, such rushing over the house to see
all the rooms, such peering into presses, as only children
who have ever moved into a new house can understand.
It was not very easy to reduce all to order, as you may
Imagine. ‘Tvhe new house required new plans, and new
work; and the workmen kept themselves a very long time
about, doing little finishings. Just as we thought they
were quite ready to go, a terrible misfortune happened—
the well ran dry! and there was no water for that great
house and its inmates. Many schemes were thought of,
for water must be had. The only thing that could be done
was to dig a very deep well. At last water was found,
but we were obliged to have a steam-pump to get it up.

You cannot think what a time of trouble we had of it
all the long weeks when there was no water; we never
before felt the comfort of the last part of the promise,
‘* Bread shall be given, and water shall be sure.” During
that time we were glad when we heard the driving rain,
for we knew the cisterns were filling, and for a time the
want would be supplied.
GOING FORWARD. 3 5

But the pump was soon set up, and all was put in
order.

I only wish all the Galen of this book could now visit
The Birds’ Nest; I think they would all agree in thinking
it the very happiest home for poor children they ever saw;
and a noble monument to the memory of her who first
thought of having a Birds’ Nest, and of her dear mother,
the late Mrs. Whately, who, while the building was being
erected, left her earthly labours to enter her heavenly
rest. Mother and daughter had been united in works of
self-denying love in their lives: it was fitting that their
names should be associated in so appropriate a memorial.

HYMN SUNG AT THE OPENING OF THE BIRDS’ NEST.

¢'THERE is a better world they say,
Oh! so bright!
Where sin and death are done away,
~Oh! so bright!
There music fills the balmy air,
And angels with bright wings are there,
And harps of gold, and mansions fair,
Oh! so bright!

No clouds e’er pass along its sky,
~ Happy land!
_No teardrops glisten in the eye,
| Happy land!
GORENG FORWARD.



They yinte the gushing-streams of grace,

They gaze upon the Saviour’s face,

Whose glory fills the holy place,
Happy land!

And wicked things and beasts of prey

' Come not there!
And ruthless death and fierce decay

Come not there!
There all are holy, all are good;
But hearts unwashed in Jesus’ blood,
And guilty sinners unrenewed,

Come not there!

But though we’re sinners every one,
Jesus died!

And though our crown of peace is gone,
Jesus died!

We may ke cleansed from every stain,

May all be clothed with peace again,

And in that land of pleasure reign,
Jesus died!

This world is oft so dark and drear,

Take us there!
We ne’er can be so happy here,
Take us there!
Oh! listen to that music sweet,
It comes so rich from: yonder seat,

_ Where all the saints in glory meet,

Take us there!”
*.



CHAPTER VI.

THE BIRDS IN THE NEST,

“ And He took them up in His arms, put His hands upon them,
and blessed them.”

eg OME people think ““THE Brrps’ Nest” a very
kr» | odd sort of name for an institution; but most of
our friends like it very much indeed. I think it



charming; and I know a great many of our children

helpers agree with me. In this chapter I want to tell
something about the sort of children who are taken into
the Nest. It is very difficult to classify them, but I will
tell the cases of some of them, and that will give an idea.
The more destitute a child is, the more glad we are to
receive it, and bring it up for Jesus. Let us fancy we

are at the Nest, and looking at the children. Here is a

little boy I always call Billy, but I think his real name is

Johnny. When he came to me to be made ready for
the Nest he was the most miserable creature I ever saw.

He was thought to be seven years old; and the day I
38 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.

. expecta him I had otesared clothes which I thought
would have fitted him. But he came—a miserable little
object, about the size of a child of three—a poor, worn
tace; his front teeth gone; his dress—how shall I describe
it? There was a ragged sort of cape over the shoulders,
and then a piece of old calico sewed round his body, so
inlaid with dirt that it was almost impossible to touch it.
But we took a pair of scissors, and cut the stitches. I
am sure this must have been around him at least a year. ©
He cried bitterly when it was taken off; but when first a
clean little shirt, and then a warm, petticoat, and then a
long-sleeved frock were put upon him, he laughed for
joy, and stroked his frock down with his poor little hand.
“‘ Nice, nice!”’ he said; and soon he was in the Birds’
Nest, and had a snug, warm bed to sleep in, and plenty
of food. We had a great deal of trouble with this little
boy. He had been so starved that it was difficult to get
him into anything like health; but he is quite strong now,
and is learning to read and write nicely.

About three years ago a Scripture Reader visited a very |
old and very poor woman. He found she had four grand-
children to support, who had been deserted years before
by father and mother.

They were -all Roman Catholics, and utterly ignorant;
and besides, they were almost naked, and quite starving.
ee uy

PAGE 37.


‘THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 39

The Reader told the grandmother of a ragged school that
‘Was quite near, and asked her to send the children in time
. for breakfast the next day. “They went, and soon became
greatly in love with the school, and the nice things they
learned there.

But one day they were missed ey the teachers. Another
day, and another day, and they did not come. ‘Then the
Reader went to visit them, and he found the four children
weeping over the dead body of their grandmother. “They
had now no relative to care for them; but their sad case
was made known,, and the two elder boys were taken into
the Raccep Boys’ Homg, and the two little ones found
a happy home in the Birds’ Nest. And so they are all
under the tender care of the Good Shepherd, who watches
over His little lambs, and causes His people to go after
them, and find them, and bring them to His fold.

How many of our dear children I could shew you who
have zo friends but those belonging to the Nest! Here
is one—a dear, loving little girlh She was brought by a
poor woman who had taken care of her#as long as she
could. When I first looked at the child ] thought she
must be an idiot, and I took her down stairs at our own
house, and asked the cook, a kind motherly woman, to
keep her for a few hours, and try to make her talk. In
the evening she said, ‘‘The poor child has plenty of
40 _ THE BIRDS IN THE NEST,

sense, but it was want of food made her look stupid.”
So it was. She is now one of our pleasantest and most
useful children.

One time, when forty-five of the children had measles,
one was dangerously ill. I asked her, Had she any friends
I could write to? ‘TI haven’t got none,” she said; ‘only
Mrs. S ”’ And where did she get you?” I asked.

—‘‘In the dae school.”

This dear girl got quite well. She is now in service,
and saves a tenth of her small earnings to give to the
Birds’ Nest.

Another dear girl, now a useful servant, came to us a
poor little wanderer, so starved. We put her in a tub of
warm water and washed her, and then cut her hair, and
dressed her. She had not been long in the Nest before
her cheeks grew round, and her eyes bright, and she
could laugh with the merriest.

Just a few weeks ago we took in two bright, black-eyed
boys. I will tell their story.

One day last winter a poor labouring man, the father
of four children, fell from a ladder and was seriously hurt;
he was carried to an hospital, and attended with care and
skill. “Ihe poor wife went to see him, and her grief was
great to see him sufter so; and when she went home, the
little children gathered around her to hear all about it.


THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. Al

As she looked at them, and gathered them to her arms,
her grief burst out afresh. ‘‘ How shall I feed them?”
she thought.

And day by day this question returned, for it must be
answered. And every day some of their little possessions
were sorrowfully taken to the pawn-shop, and a scant
supply of money brought home to buy bread.

At last, one morning, the poor mother looked around
upon an empty room. Little Johnny saw her trouble;
he did not ask for food, but went out into the street.
Cold and hungry, he sat down on a door-step, resting his
head on his hand. As he sat a bright little boy passed;
he noticed the weary look, and he turned round. ‘* What
is the matter?’’ he asked. ‘The sad tale was soon told.
“Come with me,” said the little fellow; ‘“‘I’m going to
a school where we get a good hot breakfast, if we are in
time—come along, you’ll be welcome.” And Johnny
went to Townsend Street. At three o’clock some of
the boys gota little more food; Johnny stayed with them.

_It was with a very different face from that of the
morning that Johnny entered his home. ‘ Mother,
mother!”’ said he, “‘I’ve found kind people. I’ve been
to a boys’ school, and gotf ood to eat. And, mother,
there’s another school close to it for little ones. Mother,

mayn’t I take the children to-morrow ?”
4.2 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.

And the mother consented. And when the children
were all away, she went out to look for work. When
they all came back in the evening there was news to tell;
for the little ones had greatly enjoyed the lessons, and the
hymns, and the nice dinner Mrs. R provides for the
hungry ones every day, from October to April.

And day by day things improved in that poor home.
And when the father came out of hospital, he had to hear
the whole story; and the children sang some hymns for
him, and repeated their texts; and the poor man said, “I
wish I could go to that school too.” ‘So you can,”
said Johnny. ‘On Sunday I saw men as big as you,
father, and older, sitting in classes, and learning their
verses just like the children.”

And the father went with Johnny, od he liked ha
he learned so much that he never misses a Sunday now,
—always in his place. But he is so crippled that he
cannot work enough to support all four, and Johnny
and his little brother have found a home in the Birds’
Nest. |
Amongst our very little girls there are some who have
suffered much; one little oil left utterly alone, her mother
having been taken to prison. ‘The poor child wandered
about, no one caring for her, until a poor woman, whose
children attended a Ragged School, had-compassion upon


THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 43

her, and took her in until she could get a place for her
in the Birds’ Nest.

Another bright, merry child came to the Nest in 4 sad
- state. Her mother was a widow, nearly blind, who tried
to support her children by selling little things in a basket.
A lady who knew her deep distress got admission for
little Louise; but when she brought her, it was found
‘that the child’s head was dreadfully sore. Miss C
who happened to be at the Nest at the time, hesitated
about receiving her, because of the other children; but
our good matron could not bear to turn ome away. “I
will cure it,’ she said; ‘‘do take her in:”’ and her request —
‘was granted.

Here are two little girls, of seven and eight years old,
standing hand-in-hand ; they love each other very much,
and they look up as if they were used to being loved.
They never were very miserable. Their mother was a
happy Christian, one who managed her large family well,
and made her husband’s small earnings go as far as possi-
ble ; but last year she died, and the older ones being boys,
there was none to care for Margery and Louise; and the
_ father’s health and earnings failed, so the little girls were
admitted to The Birds’ Nest. ‘Tchey are pleasant, happy
children, and dearly love the good matron.

There, in the play-ground, are two little boys, each


44. THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.

holding the hand of a little one between them ; they seem
very happy together. ‘The two elder have been. in the
Nest some time; the younger has just come. Their
mother, too, was a Christian. Their father had deserted
them long ago, and the mother worked for their support
as long as she could. At last she was attacked by an
incurable disease, and obliged to put her children in the
poorhouse and go to hospital. Her sufferings were very
great, but the thoughts of her dear little boys, surrounded
by the influences of the most depraved of characters, was
worse. She could only lay the burden on Jesus. At
length some of the lady visitors heard about these children,
and they applied to our Committee; and first the two
little fellows were got out of the poorhouse, then the
third, and there are not three happier children in the Nest.
‘The mother is dead now, but her boys have found a home.

T'wo other children lately admitted had a Christian
mother. Years ago she came, a poor, dark Roman Catho-
lic, to the Townsend Street Sunday School. She liked
what she learned, and she came again andagain. One by
one every false hope was given up, and at last she was
enabled to lay her sins on Jesus, and trust only in Him.
Her little children were regular attendants at the Luke
Street Infants’ School. A few months ago this poor
woman had to go to the Hospital for Incurables, where she
THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 45

died a most happy death. Her teacher got admission for
the two little children into the Nest. ‘Leave thy father-
less children,”’ Jesus says, ‘‘I will preserve them.” It is
He who takes them up and blesses them; but it is by
-human hands, yours and mine, little children;—we take
them, and nurse them for Him.

Here are three children I must tell you about, a girl
and two boys. Their history is a very sad and strange
one. ‘They were of a respectable class in life, and their
father ought to have earned plenty of money for their
support; but he was a drunkard. ‘That fearful curse of
families, drink, had taken his senses away, and his love
for his wife and children was turned to hatred. After
persecuting them in many ways, he at last went so far as
to take the three children, and go away altogether from
his poor wife. Night came, and they did not return, and
the poor mother mourned alone. Months passed away;
she earned a livelihood by needlework, but tears so often
dimmed her eyes, that she could get but little. One day
she received an anonymous letter, saying that the writer
had seen the three children in the County Wicklow.
‘The poor mother set off to the place named, and after
some difficulty, she got her three dear ones, and brought
them to her poor home. She found from the children
that a priest had taken them, and she was so angry that
40, THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.:

she determined never to go to chapel again. In this state
she was visited by the Town Missionaries, and they told
her of One who cared for her in all her poverty and trials’
—one who, if she trusted in Him, would never leave nor
forsake her. ‘hey gave her a Bible, which she promised
to read. After this she was visited by priests and nuns,
who promised her all sorts of things if she would return
and give up her children. She refused everything; but
work grew more scanty, and she found it hard to feed so:
-many. Happily for the children, they got a good break-
fast every morning in the Luke Street Ragged School, and.
sometimes a piece of bread before they went home. One
day the priest visited the mother, and found her reading
the Bible; he snatched it from her, and threw it into the
fire. Sherescuedit. Her trials were very great and varied ;
she could not stand against them; and her poor room was
without furniture,—an old box served for a table, and the
bed was a little straw in a corner of the room. It was:
very hard for those who had seen better days. The
Missionaries made known the case, and admission was
obtained for the children into the Nest, and a light situa-
tion found for the mother. Nothing has been heard of the
father for many months. We hope these dear children
will be left withus. “hey are nice, clean, well-mannered.
little things, and very fond of each other. |
THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 47

Another group of three are the children of a ‘poor
working man, who lately fell off a cart, and was so injured
that he will never be able to work again; he has been set
up in a little business, selling matches, and laces, and such
things. And the children are naib on finely in the
Nest. The father has been a convert for many years,
and, we believe, a real Christian.

Now let us peep into the nursery. How nice it looks!
_ The fire burns brightly; the cradle stands beside it, with
a new pair of twin-dolls; and the little rocking-chair is
near. Sitting in it is a little girl, looking tenderly at a
dolly which seems a great treasure; its eyes will shut and
_ open, and it is neatly and carefully dressed. It is little
~Kate H——. The doll was given to her, with a beautiful
set of tea-things, on the Christmas-tree day, by some kind
little girls who have adopted her. Katie was such a poor
forlorn child when she came, that it was very hard to
make her smile, and even now the head bends down a
little too much; but there is a very sweet smile on the
face when you can see it.

Another little child has in the course of nine months
become so changed in appearance one would hardly
recognise her. ‘The first time I saw her was at our out-
door féte. The children were playing about in kind
Mrs. Harrison’s lawn, but one little thing was seated all


48 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.

alone on the grass, looking so thin and miserable. I
sat down beside her, and noticed that she had a bad
cough.

“What’s your name?’ I asked.

“¢ Mary,”’ she said, without looking up.

“¢’You are a new child; when did you come?”

“¢ Last week.”’

“You have a bad cough—are you ill?”

“J think I am; I’m very miserable.”

“But you will soon be happy—all the children are
happy.”

‘¢T never was happy in my life.”

‘Have you a father ?”’ |

“No, he’s gone, and my stepmother is unkind to me.
Nobody ever loved me.” |

“* Poor child, Jesus loves you.”

“CT don’t think He does.”’

“ “Do you know who I am?” I asked.—“‘ No.” When —
I told her, a beaming smile lighted up her face. ‘‘Allthe |
children love you,” she said; ‘‘I7ll love you too.”

Here I must tell you that the love of “all the children”
comes to me because I am the representative of all the
members of the Children’s Association, and their gifts and
love come through me. I try to send out all the love
THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 49 -

through the little books; but that does not make my own
share any the less— —
‘¢For we must share, if we would keep
That good thing from above ;

Ceasing to give, we cease to have;
Such is the law of love.”

Of Eddy B I must tell the whole story. He was
a dear little fellow, too young for the Nest, but his father
died in the hospital, a believer in Jesus; his only care was
for his children; they had a very bad mother. A Christian
friend promised they should be cared for, and the poor
man died satisfied.
The little girl was taken into the Nest, but Eddy was
* too young, only a baby. We put him to be nursed by a
kind old woman. As soon as the mother saw him well
dressed she took him away, sold his clothes, and after a
little while went with him into the poorhouse. Some
years passed away, when one day a Scripture Reader met
the woman begging with the child. She said she had been
three weeks without a place to lie down at night. She
said she was very sorry for her conduct, and if we would |
take the boy she would get work. For the sake of the
promise to the dying father, we took Eddy; and a little
girl in the South of England adopted him. Some months

passed away,—happy months for Eddy,—and then his
| | D



cd
59 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST,

mother took him again, dressed him in miserable clothes,
and went out to beg. His friend was greatly distressed,
and she prayed very earnestly for her lost nestling. Often
she wrote for news. I wanted her to take another child,
but she would not “ give up Eddy.”? She said, “1’ll pray
on;”’ arid in October the mother again brought the child,
saying, if he might be in the Nest with his sister, she
would never take him away again. And so little Eddy —
once more had his rags exchanged for Nest clothing, and —
he is safe and happy.

Amongst our children is a blue-eyed, fair-haired boy,
of seven years of age. His father, a most respectable
workman, died some three years ago, leaving the poor
mother with three children, one a little baby. She had .
no means of support, and gradually all her little possessions
were sold to buy food. Her relations would do nothing
for her, because she attended the Mission Church, and
was trying to bring up her little ones in the Protestant
faith, she being a convert. Application was made to vet
the boy into the Nest, but he was too young. We paid
the rent of a room for the poor woman, and gave her
needlework, but her baby hindered her working, and she
became the picture of misery. In March she wrote:—

“I am very thankful for what you do for me, but it is
utterly useless. It is very hard to be utterly destitute, in
THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 5I

the four walls of a back garret, without furniture, friends,
or any earthly comfort but my little ones. My brother
gives me till the gth to consider whether I will give up
my boy to go to the convent, or give up the friendship of
all belonging to me. I am really bewildered. Please,
madam, do not look on me as an imposter.”

The case was so urgent that the little boy, though only
just past six, was taken and put to lodgings for a few
months. ‘The mother got a good situation as nurse, and
is able to pay for her other two children at nurse. At
Christmas her mistress allowed her to have her boy for a
few days’ visit. And if you had seen her coming into the
Mission Church, looking like a model nurse, with her boy
by the hand, you would have thanked God for such an
institution as the Birds’ Nest. :

Late one evening there came a note, written on an old
leaf of a book, begging for a little relief for a sick child
who attended one of the Mission Schools. I sent a
shilling, and the next day went to the home of the poor
child. It was a very small room at the top of a poor
house, a bedstead and a chair the only furniture. An old.
woman sat near the fire with a child on her knee very
ill. Another little one stood beside her. When I
entered, the little one looked up ‘with a smile of wel-
come, and I knew her and the sick one as little children
52 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.

regular attendants at the school, but always so neatly
dressed that we had never guessed their poverty. It
was the little one who had brought the note the night
before. ‘Oh, ma’am,” said the old woman, “‘I never
begged before; but the children said the Lord would help
us. I had not a bit of fire or food; and what was worse,
not a bit of candle to watch my poor child through the
night. I could not face a night of darkness.””? The child
had had fever, and was just beginning to recover; all she
wanted was nourishment and comfort, which we were -
able to provide.

They had been very respectable people; the father, a
good workman, earning large wages; but he died suddenly,
leaving £20 which he had saved for his wife, mother-in-
law, and children. ‘They were induced to go to Man-
chester and set up a lodging-house, which at first suc-
ceeded; but the cotton famine came, and they lost all they
had. ‘hey returned to Dublin; the mother went to
service, where she earned £5 a-year, and 2s. 6d. a-week
to feed herself. This was all the support of the family—
no wonder they suffered so much. We took the two
children into the Nest, and the old woman went to the
poorhouse, where she soon after died. The mother is in
very delicate health, but she is able to support herself, and
comes sometimes to see the little ones.
THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 53

We have two very nice boys now in the Nest, who
‘were some time ago removed to the Boys’ Home, but,
having been very delicate, have come back to be nursed.
They are both, we believe, real Christians, setting a
bright example to all around. I find the history of one
of them in my notes. The family consisted of a father
and mother and seven children. They were all Roman
Catholics, and when first visited by the Scripture-readers,
were in such a very destitute condition, that the children
were obliged to cover themselves with the straw that
formed their bed. One of these children was a bright
little boy of nine years old. He was persuaded to attend
the Ragged School; we sent him a little pair of trousers
to enable him to get out. Willy was delighted with all
he heard and learned, and when he went home at night,
tried to teach his mother to repeat a text: she would not
then. But Willy was one of those boys who are not
easily discouraged, and, as his mother said, “She worrited”
at her till she learned one; and then he tried his father.
This was harder work, for being a violent man, he threw
things at the child’s head; still Willy persevered. And

_ . when he had learned to read, he would take his Bible, and

read chapter after chapter ini, that his parents might be
interested in the story. Soon mother and children were
| all regular attendants at the Sunday School.
54 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.

~ Poor Willy was very delicate, and it was plain that there

was not enough of food in their home for them all; for the
father earned very little, and often spent that little on drink;
and so Willy and a sister found a home in the Birds’ Nest.
She is one of the gentlest of our girls. At Christmas she
got a prize marked for “Sone ever ready to help.”” She
is about thirteen years old, and Willy about twelve.

Nearly two years ago a very nice girl, who had come
from Connemara, left the Nest and went to service. We
have now her two little sisters—such an original-looking
pair of children. _ Biddy is a thin, narrow-faced little
thing, of perhaps eight years old, with straight black hair
and black eyes. Maggie is, I should think, six—a little
round thing, with short, brown, curly hair and blue eyes.
They love each other very much, and Maggie seems to
think that everybody means to be good to her. Both these
little ones are adopted by friends. —

One day last year a poor woman, with four children,
asked charity from a friend of ours. She said her husband
was in India; she had come home with the children, and
had not heard from him since. A little help was given
from time to time, but it seemed of no use; they were
starving, as the mother was too weak to work. So the
three elder children were admitted into the Nest, and then
the mother died, and then the baby.
THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 55

Twelve months afterwards a very respectable-looking
man came to the Birds’ Nest inquiring for three children,
answering to the description of these three. He said his
wife had come to Ireland with them, and he, not hearing
from her, had given up his situation to look for her. He
had traced her to Dublin, and then to the Birds’ Nest,
where he found his lost little ones. He was in great
delight to find them so well taken care of, and begged
that we would still take care of the motherless little ones.
He would go to service, and save all he could to help to
pay for them. So Polly, and Conny, and Tommy remain
in the happy home where they first found rest after their
trials and wanderings. |

Another little child we have taken under like circum-
stances. ‘The father went to America some time ago.
The mother was to follow as soon as the baby was a little
older. She had a situation as servant, where she was
allowed to keep the baby; but the poor woman fell into
ill-health and died. The lady did what she could for the
child, denying herself many comforts that it might be fed
and clothed. Now she is very ill herself, and so we have
taken her little charge. And if the father ever is heard
of again, he will be very glad to get his little girl safe. If
not, we trust she will meet him in the beautiful land,
where
56 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.

**Little children are never hungry
And mothers are never sad;
Where there’s nothing to make them sorry,
And plenty to make them glad.”

There is one wee child in the Nest who attracts every-
body’s attention. What do you think her name is ?—
“Jenny Rosin.’ Is not that a nice name for a birdie?
She is very little, and has eyes as bright as the real robins
that hop about in winter. Jenny has a mother who loves
her very much; but she has a little child younger than
Jenny. She earns £8 a-year, and pays £4 to the nurse
who takes care of him, With the rest she clothes herself.
She was a Roman Catholic; and when I first saw her in
her poor home she knew nothing of Jesus and His love.
Now she is a real Christian, and is so thankful to have
Jenny in the Nest,

T'wo dear little girls came from the country to the
Nest quite lately. ‘Their names are Mary and Nannie.
Mary is ten years old; Nannie is eight. ‘Their case was
so pressing that we were obliged to take both when there
was only a bed for one; so they both sleep together in one of
the small beds. It was in December we heard about them
first. ‘Their father had gone away two or three years ago,
and no one knew anything about him; but he had been
so unkind to his wife and five children that no one wished

&
THE BIRDS IN THE NEST, 57 |

to find him. The mother worked very hard to support
the children, and some kind friends subscribed a little
money to apprentice the eldest boy to a shoemaker. He
worked very well, and was learning his trade nicely, when
he was taken ill of hip-disease. He was in hospital some

_ time, then sent home incurable. Such a home—only a

Stable some one had given this poor woman rent-free! It

was harder than ever for her now, and little Mary had
tried to help her by going on messages for the neighbours;
and an old lady of seventy-seven undertook to teach
Nannie. (There was no Protestant school near.) She
says, ‘‘I have an apt scholar; she spells and reads, learns
multiplication-table, Scripture, and hymns.”? This kind
lady also gave Nannie food every day. This was what

we first heard of this poor family. Then came another

letter, saying they had been told they must leave the stable,
and then they would all be homeless. We wrote to say

"we would take Mary and Nannie in as soon as possible.

*

And when the dear friends at Southampton said they

would support them, we got them in at once. ‘They are

so grateful, and are already quite at home in the Birds’

Nest.
A great many of the children in the Birds’ Nest have
got no fathers, and a great many have no mothers. [

could not give the history of them all. If I did, it would

'
58 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST.

only be like the roll mentioned in Ezekiel, “ full of Jam-
entations, and mourning, and woe.”” From what I have
said, you can imagine something of their former misery.
I like much better to tell of their present happiness, and
to lead those who have been our helpers to thank God
that He has made them the means of so much blessing,
and encourage others who have not yet entered upon the
service of the Heavenly Master to join in this work for
Him, that that may be a very large company to whom
He will one day say, ‘‘ Inasmuch as ye have done it unto
one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it
unto ME.”

TO THE WANDERER.

LonE y traveller! little orphan!
Sorrowful and weary,

If thy life seem lone and cheerless,
If the way be dreary,

‘There is One can hear and see,

Looks, and loves, and pities thee.

‘We have got a Home for children
Poor as thee and lonely,
Where they hear of Christ the Saviour,
_ TJis for children only,
Come, then, little wanderer, here
Learn of Christ the Saviour dear,
THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 59

On the cross He died for sinners
Full of sin and cheerless,

And He waits to take you to Him;
Come, oh come, then, fearless,

Meekly bow before His throne,

All your sins and sorrows own,

*

TO THE WANDERERS’ FRIENDS,

Ou! kind friends, help us in pity,
There are very many

Orphans wander through the city
Without e’en a penny.

Give us of your bounteous store,

Give to those distressed and poor.

And our Lord will bless the giver,
For His grace is endless ;
Therefore, friends, where’er you be,
Try to help the friendless,
Christ will say, when life is o’er,
6 Come, for you have helped my poor.”
One of the Collectors.



| oo Des »
hihigha 2.21) Di ne eaened

WT AW aa
or





CHAPTER VII.

DAILY WORK.

pes, HAVE told you a great deal about the history
taf wba, oof the Nest, and now I think I ought to tell
you what it is like. Well, to begin with the
outside. It is just what the picture represents, a great
oblong stone building,—not at all like a real bird’s nest ; I
wish it was. I should like to have had it a cozy-looking
place, with all sorts of nooks about it, porched doors, and
domer windows, and little chimneys popped about the
roof; and then it would have been my taste to have roses,
and ivy, and creeping plants climbing up, and round about
the windows and chimneys. And there should have been
a nice green field round about, surrounded by a good
quick-set hedge. All this would have been very delight-
ful, but would have cost a good deal of money. And do
you know we were obliged to put away all idea of beauty
when we considered the plans for "he Nest. The great
problem we had to solve was, how to accommodate the


PALM mateossh

cers

et

een!

Bee
ia Sie sh abd Nae!
xe

SacAocirae

ee

je

pop errr)

3 EF Tee
ae

RAAT ee

S >
Pye
wien
= s

#

Pee ae f
Si

eR eed ppaeensal

we!

TE here ae



once 8!

Geren anets



PAGE 60
DAILY WORK. | 61

largest number of children for the smallest sum of money.
And after thinking and planning a great deal, we were
obliged to take the plan that was the very simplest possible.
It zs ugly, I allow, outside, but it is economical and useful.
The beauty is all inside. Who cares about the casket
when compared with the precious jewels it contains ? who
cares about the purse when compared with the money it
contains? And so we do not care about the outside of the
house, when we think of the precious jewels that are there
being polished and prepared for the Saviour’s casket. We
are content that no money has been wasted; and though
a great deal has been spent—much more than we at first
thought would have been*enough—yet it is all put to good
practical purposes.

I have elsewhere described the plan of the building;
now let us peep inside, and see what goes on there. It is
just break of day, on a fine spring morning. ‘The green
blinds of the great dormitories are drawn down, but through
the line left at the edge a bright beam of sunlight stretches
in; it rests on a little iron cot-bed covered with a bright
patchwork quilt; it kisses the rosy cheek of a curly-headed
sleeper; he wakes up, and looks round on his sleeping
companions. Forty-five such little iron beds, inhabited by
forty-five such sleepers, are in that room; but they are
not to sleep much longer: one after another awakes, and
62 DAILY WORK.

before very long somewhere about a dozen of the elder
girls come in, and the little ones are soon carried off to the
wishingetoome down stairs, where they are washed, and
dressed, and brushed, and jon turned out inté the ste
ground to wait for breakfast.

Some time before the streak of rutlioke roused up the
little boy in the infants’ dormitory, the elder boys were up
and dressed, beds were neatly made, and if you want to
know where the boys are, you must listen for the sound of
scrubbing-brush, shoe-brush, or knife-board, for this is the
time for household work for the boys; and very much de-
lighted they are to be permitted to take their share. Do
you know we are quite proud of our boys, they are such
pleasant, industrious fellows, and so fond of work. Just
before breakfast-time these busy workers assemble in their
washing-room, to change their clothes and wash; and
when the breakfast-bell rings at half-past eight o’clock,
boys, girls, and infants are all ready to march into the.
dining-room.

‘The sun never shone upona happier set a children. It
is a comfort to look at them seated round the tables, each
provided with a good piece of bread, and a little tin can
filled with hot cocoa. Breakfast is soon despatched, and
then there is a run in the play-ground; and at nine o’clock
the children divide into three companies,—boys, girls,
DAILY WORK. 63

and infants,—each company marching into its respective
school, And now begins new work,—mental work,—
cheerful, happy seeking for the knowledge of which many
of the dearchildren were deprived so long. In any sec-
tion of these schools you may have sweet hymns sung by
first and second voices in beautiful harmony; you will
get wonderful answering in Scripture texts and doctrine;
and you will be surprised to find how much lessons are
loved. |

While lessons are going on the kitchen presents a
busy scene, for there dinner is preparing, not only for the
190 nestlings, but for their teachers and helpers besides. ©
The dinners are very simple,—potatoes and milk, or pease
soup, two days; meat in broth, two days; cold meat and
potatoes, one day; fish or bacon, with vegetables, one
day; and on Sundays, tea and bread and butter. At ten
minutes to one six of the elder girls come out of school
to lay the tables; and at one the great troop marches in,
each child knowing its own place, and quietly taking it.
The bell rings for silence, and then all voices join in
singing— |
| ‘* Be present at our table, Lord ;”
and then begins the clatter of knives and forks or spoons,
and the pleasant murmur of happy voices. At any moment
_a touch of the bell brings silence; and this is a very
64 DAILY WORK.

pleasant time to talk a little to the children, as they are
all there.

At two o’clock all are again in school, till dice: ; and
then, on fine days, there is a walk, the three schools going
separately with their own teachers.

Returning from the walk, there are various small
occupations, till, at six o’clock, another meal of cocoa and
bread; and then the infants are all washed and put to bed,
and the elder children go into evening-school.

This is the regular routine of every oy but Saturday
and Sunday.

I should like to give my readers two peeps at the
family life of our children.

A peep on a winter’s afternoon. When lessons, and
dinner, and walk are all over, a fine fire is made up in
the girls’? schoolroom ; forms are arranged in great semi-
circles around it, inclosing a large basket full of things
to be mended, and a box of needles, thread, scissors, &c.
The Kittle boys and the Hiztle girls are in the infants’
schoolroom, enjoying a game of romps with their be-
loved friend, Miss M—-—; but all the boys and girls who
can sew are gathered around the schoolroom fire, and
some of the mere babies, too small to romp, are there too,
and Mrs. O’Neil in the middle; and scissors and needles,
and hands and tongues, are soon busy enough. ‘“‘ How
DAILY WORK. 65

is this to be done?” and, “‘ Please, what shape-patch shall
I put here ?”? and, “* Wouldn’t it be best to make these
two pinafores into one?” &c., &c. But by-and-by all
is in fair progress; and then one starts a hymn, and all
join; and by the time that is done, perhaps the door
opens, and some dear friend enters with a book in her
hand, and a chair is soon found for her, right in the
middle; and the supper-bell rings before the story is half
read, so it shall be finished next sek

Now for a peep on a summer’s evening. It is eight
o’clock, but it is yet light, and for the last half-hour there
has been undressing going on. And when the night-gown
was on, and the clothes folded, each little one knelt down
beside its bed to thank God for all His blessings, and to
ask for more for itself and all its friends. And now they
are all in bed—forty-fve—in the infants’ dormitory ;
and we open the door and peep in. Some one at the far
end spies us, and strikes up a hymn of welcome, and in a
- moment all are sitting up to join; and the sounds are
heard in the other rooms, and some who have not begun
to undress come in, so we have quite a concert. And
then we say good-bye, and the children go to sleep; and
we pray that each one of those rescued little ones may
_have a place amongst -the white-robed company above,

who shall sing the new song unto Him that loved them.
: E
66 DAILY WORK.

On Saturday school is over at twelve o’clock, and the
elder girls immediately set to work to scrub floors, which
keeps them busy almost all day.

Several of the girls have responsibilities all to themselves.
One has to take care of the tin cans, another of the knives
and forks; several of them have to help in keeping the
wardrobes; and others act as miemners to a certain number
of the small children. |

If our girls were not very industrious they never would
be able to do all the work of the house, as till they have
passed their examination they must be in school in the
morning hours; bus they get up very early, especially on
washing days, and work so heartily, that the great house is
at all times a pattern of cleanliness. One day I was down
at the Nest during the girls’ half-hour’s play, which they
always have in the middle of school. I was passing the
laundry, when I saw three girls hard at work. [I said,
“Well done, little women; but why are you not at play?”’
“Oh!” said one, “Sit zs play-hour; but we like work bet-
ter than play.” And so, of their own accord, they were
spending the half-hour in folding and ironing clothes.
I turned away, feeling very thankful that such was the
spirit of these dear girls; and I wondered less than I had
done before at the cleanliness of the house, and at the suc-
cess of those who go out. Our desire for the children is,
DAILY WORK. 67 |

first of all, that they may be true followers of the Lord
Jesus Christ, and then, that they may find favour in the
eyes of those with whom they have to do.

Now I should like to tell you how our nestlings spend
Sunday. It is a very happy day in Christian homes, and
I am sure it is a happy day in this great Home.

But I must begin with Saturday evenings. Shortly after
dinner washing begins, for every child must have a warm
bath, and be thoroughly cleansed; then, as each one is
undressed to go to bed, its clothes are well brushed, neatly
folded, and laid into a basket; and the Sunday ones
arranged ready for the morning. When morning comes,
at seven o’clock there is a stir in the little beds, and the
clean faces pop up, and one after another turn out of bed;
and soon there is a happy bustle of washing and dressing,
and then the elder ones make the beds and lay the break-
fast, and at nine o’clock all sit down to the tables. After
_ this, while all keep their places, the matron talks a little to
them about the Sabbath-day, and the way in which little
children can serve God. Then she reads a chapter, and
prays.

After this the’ children go into the play-ground, and
walk about, learning hymns, or singing, or reading, for
half-an-hour; then they have to dress for church. Even
the little ones go every Sunday. None remain at home,
68 DAILY WORK.

unless one happens to be sick. “['wo-and-two they go to
church; and they sit very quietly, though many of them
are so little they cannot understand much. After church
they all get home, and the cloth is laid for dinner, and
all sit down to it. ‘Then there is another half-hour’s
quietness in the play-ground, and then Sunday School.
After this there is a spare hour, in which all do as they
like, only there must be no noise; and then all assemble
in the infant schoolroom, and a kind clergyman or friend
meets them, and there is a children’s service. They
answer the responses, and sing the chants; and the sermon
is so simple that the very little ones can understand.
‘They do so enjoy this; and some of the elder ones take
notes of the sermon. After this supper is soon ready,
and then the younger ones go to bed, and the elder ones
sit up a little longer, and read their books.

I am sometimes asked whether we have any 1 naughty
children in the Nest, for all my stories are about good
ones? And one day a lady said to me, in quaint language,
“‘’Thee thinks them a great deal better than they are.”
Well, I don’t know about that. I think it is much better
to think about bright things than dark. And I’m afraid
I must plead guilty of telling bright things, for they are
pleasant to tell, and pleasant to remember; and there is
an old proverb which says, that ‘‘ Every family should
DAILY WORK. 69 ©

wash its own dirty clothes,”—that means, that troubles
should not be made public. And you know kind parents
always try to forget their children’s faults when they are
forgiven. But I suppose, as our birdies have so many
parents, and parents ought to know all about their
children, I ought to shew the dark side of our nestlings
as well as the bright side. Of course we have troubles
and difficulties of all sorts. Our little children come to
us with wild habits and untrained minds. Some of them
have never known loving care, and it takes a great deal of
patience on the part of the Matron and teachers to restrain
wild habits, and instil principles of obedience, and love,
and order.

One cold day in winter I saw a new little girl looking
as if her clothes were very thin. I had lately given warm
petticoats to each, and I looked at hers—she had but one
on. ‘Did you not get a new warm petticoat?” I asked.
“C'Yes, ma’am.’”’ ‘And where is it?” She did not
speak for a moment. Then she said, “‘I sold it to
——-.”? She did not say for what price; but the other
little girl had three petticoats. It is very common to find
new children changing clothes with each other when out
in the play-ground. ‘They have to be taught everything,
even how to put on their clothes.

Sometimes little boys and girls who have been, up to
70 DAILY WORK.

nine or ten years of age, living an idle, wandering life,
cannot bear the restraint of home, and they wander away,
over and over again. Even one boy who has this restless
propensity does great mischief, and will often lead away
others. One day a little girl wandered away with
another, and was found by the Master in the streets of
Dublin, with her bib full of her little possessions. She
had nowhere to go, and was greatly frightened; he took
her safely back again, poor little wanderer! We try to
make the children as happy as we can, surrounding them
with gentle influences, and most of them grow up nicely;
and even the troubles are blessings, if they give us fresh
errands to our loving Saviour. |

We try to teach our children to live as in the presence
of a loving Father; to do the meanest of their daily work
as for Him; to obey, not with “ eye-service ;”” to go to
Jesus in all trouble, and thank Him for all joys. For
even the little ones can thus glorify God in their daily
lessons and daily work. ,


DAILY WORK, 71.

LITTLE LIGHTS,

Jesus bids us shine
With a pure, clear light,
Like a little candle
Burning in the night;
In the world of darkness,
So we must shine,
You in your small corner,
And I in mine.

Jesus bids us shine
First of all for Him;
Well He sees and knows it,
If our light grow dim:
He looks down from heaven
To see us shine, ,
You in your small corner,
And I in mine,

Jesus bids us shine
Then—for all around,
For many kinds of darkness
In the world are found:
There’s sin, there ’s want and sorrow,
So we must shine,
You in your small corner,
And I in mine,


CHAPTER VIII.
HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS.

** Tt is more blessed to give than to receive.”

a eerniOW I think I must tell you something about

RNY «Christmas time in the Birds’ Nest; and how
slatafin the real Holly and Ivy, and the real time of
joy, comes to the poor birdies. If I give you the history
of one Christmas it will do for a specimen. Well, there
is a kind gentleman who lives near the Nest, and who
very often watches the procession of one hundred and fifty
boys and girls going to church on Sundays, and sees their
good behaviour there.

About a fortnight before Christmas time a very kind
thought came into his head and heart—it was this: I
will give those dear children a real Christmas dinner—
beef and plum pudding. He asked a lady to manage it
for him, and he would pay the money. This lady had a
kind heart and a wise head, and so she sat down to
make her calculations. ‘There were raisins and currants,
and sugar and suet, and flour and bread, and beef and


HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS. 72

potatoes, to be bought; and the first question was—how
much of each wouldsbe wanted? and the second was—how
such a great dinner should be cooked? Both these ques-
tions required consultation and calculation; but at last the
plans were all laid, and the children were told what their
kind friend was going to do for them. ‘There was a great
clapping of hands, and a great shout of joy at the news.
And from that time till Christmas-day there was as

- much pleasure in the hearts of the poor little children in

_ the Nest as there is in the hearts of the little children who
live in happy homes, and have kind papas and mammas,
and elder brothers and sisters, who they know are pre-
paring joyful surprises for Christmas-day.

At length the Christmas-eve came, and on that day the
preparations were to be made. Early in the morning
three carts, loaded with ivy, and holly with red berries,
arrived at the gate. And the boys were sent to carry it
all in, which they accomplished in a wonderfully short
time. Then, with the help of the girls, and directed by the .
schoolmaster and schoolmistress, the room was dressed up.
Such a happy time it was! The sun shone in at the win-
dows, and the hum of the mingled happy voices was right
pleasant to hear. ‘* Many hands made light work,” and
by the middle of the day the decorations were finished.
Then came the girls with brooms to sweep out the rub-
74. HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS,

bish, and that was all that could be done in that room for
that day at least, and the work was finished. Not so in
the kitchen. There a number of the elder girls, headed
by the kind matron, Miss Howard,* were most busily
engaged all day long, making those most wonderful
things, plum puddings! |

It was eleven o’clock before they all got to bed; but
no matter, they were all too excited to be sleepy. And
very early on Christmas morning the little ones were
roused, that there might be time for much extra combing,
and washing, and dressing; really I do think the big girls
had made up their minds that every little face should be
polished so as to be a regular looking-glass, reflecting the
brightness around.

But all this washing and dressing was over by breakfast
time; and then the children went to church, all except a
few elder girls, who had to stay at home to lay the tables.
This was accomplished with even more care than usual.
The cloths were quite clean, and the knives and forks
polished up in a marvellous manner. |

The meat was roasting in the kitchen, and the puddings
were boiling in the boiler, when the little ones came home
from church; and they were all seated in their places at

* Miss Howard was the kind friend who undertook the office of matron
when we first got into the new Nest,
HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS. 75

the tables when the kind gentleman and his family and
other friends came in. It did not take long to place the
dishes on the tables, and then grace was sung, and several
kind friends set to work to cut up the joints, and soon all
were helped. |

While the plates were being washed for the pudding,
the children sang some hymns, and so gave pleasure to
the friend who was giving them so much. It was four
o’clock before this happy dinner was over.

I don’t know whether the kind gentleman thought of
- the words of Jesus, but | am sure many others did,—
‘When thou makest a feast, call the poor . . . They
cannot recompense thee, but thou sha/t be recompensed.”’
Oh, yes! in doing good there is a recompense now, in
the joy and lightness of heart;. and there is a recompense
hereafter, for will not Jesus one day say, ‘‘Come, ye
blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for
you; for | was an hungered, and ye gave me meat; I was
a stranger, and ye took me in; naked, and ye clothed me.
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these
-my brethren, ye have done it unto me!”’

These promises, and the smile of Jesus, are the HoLiy
AND Ivy to us,—the bright things of winter time. But
when they are all fulfilled, and we live in His presence,
where there is fulness of joy, there will be no winter time,
76 HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS.

for “the trees yield their fruit every month, and there is
no night there.”

But we have not done with Christmas time yet. There
were some little children living in England, and they
wanted to give pleasure to the poor little nestlings, and
they set to work and made a large number of bags, with
pincushions and thimbles in them, for the elder girls, and
they dressed dolls for the little ones; and when I heard
of this, I said, ‘‘ We must have a Christmas tree to hang
all these nice things on.”? Other children heard of this
plan, and they took up the idea, and some sent balls and
tops, and some sent little books and markers; and at length
there were enough things for each child to have something.
I could not tell you what idea the poor little children
had of a Christmas tree; some of them had never seen
such a thing, and so they puzzled over it till they
dreamed about it, and at length made up their minds that
it must be something very wonderful indeed. And so
it was. | |

We did not set up the tree till one day in January.
The children’s friend, Mr. Dallas, was coming over, and
so we waited for him, for it was to be a regular day of re-
joicing. We opened the folding doors, and so made two
great rooms into one; and then we set up the tree in the
middle, It reached up very high, there were some pretty
HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS, 9s

flags at the top, and each article on the tree had the name
of a child upon it. ‘Tables were set up around the tree,
for the children were to have tea and cake, and they were
to be questioned, and friends were to be present to listen,
and share the fun. The little children of the Nest were
not allowed to see the preparations till all was ready; but
they did not mind this, for zhzy had a secret too, and felt
themselves quite important. I think I must let you into
their secret. Well, you know Jesus said, “It is more
blessed to give than to receive,” and Miss Howard thought
the nestlings should, on this grand occasion, taste of the
pleasure of giving. So she got a piece of canvas, and
prepared the pattern of a lamp-stand, to be given by the
children to Mr. Dallas. She determined that each child
should at least put in a stitch, This was not very easy
to manage; but if Miss Howard once set her heart upon
a thing, she would be sure to carry it out. She arranged
the children all in a row around the schoolroom, then she
took a chair and sat at the head of them, with the work
in her hand. She then gave the order for a very slow
march, and as each child came up to her, it put in one
stitch. In this way all had a little share; and the work
was afterwards finished by some of the elder girls. It
was quite a pretty lamp-stand. When it was ready, a
letter was written, signed by all the children who could
78 HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS,

write, and the little ones’? names were put down for them;
and this was the children’s secret. | |

Well, at last the time came, and friends assembled;
amongst them many of the members of “‘’The Children’s
Association ;”? some who had given the things for the tree,
but notall. ‘Fhenthe children marched in and took their
places; but the little ones opened their eyes so wide, and
wondered so much at the beautiful tree, that they had to
be lifted into their seats; one of them tumbled over a
form, he did not know what he was doing. Very soon
Mr. Dallas came, and then the children sang a song of
welcome, which had been composed for the occasion, to
the tune of “Some folks like to sigh.” I must put it in
here for those who did not hear it.

“Welcome, welcome home,
Father dear, father dear,
Welcome, welcome home,
We’re glad to see you here.
Join all with heart and voice,
And glad hosannas raise,
We’ll swell the song,
Our Jesus’ name we’ll praise,

‘* Once we wandered far,
Father dear, father dear,
Once we wandered far,
Eut you have brought us here.
HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS, 7Q -
Join all with heart and voice,
And loud hosannas raise,
We’ll swell the song,
Our Jesus’ name well praise,

*¢Erin’s children sighed,
Long ago, long ago,
Your arms were opened wide
To shelter them from woe.
Join all with heart and voice,
And loud hosannas raise,
We'll swell the song,
Our Jesus’ name we ’ll praise,

**Erin’s children love
To welcome you, to welcome you,
_ You ’ve taught us how above
Well meet the Saviour, too.
Join all with heart and voice,
And loud hosannas raise,
We'll swell the song,
Our Jesus’ name well praise, '

**In the better land,
Father dear, father dear,
A glorious angel band
Will welcome you up there,
Join all with heart and voice,
And loud hosannas raise,
We’ll swell the song,
Our Jesus’ name we’ll praise.”

When this had been sung, and tea and cake finished,
So HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS.

the smallest child, a little boy with rosy cheeks and curly
hair, was lifted up on the table beside Mr. Dallas; and
he handed him first the letter, which Mr. Dallas read
aloud; and then he gave the paper parcel, and Mr. Dallas
opened it, and expressed his delight and his thanks. And
then he took the little boy in his arms, and kissed him,
and blessed him; and he told the children the kiss and the
blessing was for them all; and all the children looked very
much pleased; and then they answered some questions
nicely; and after that the pretty things were, taken from
the tree, and given round to the children; and there was
such joy, and such wonder, and such looking at each
others’ things as never was known before. And then we
thought all the fun was over; but no, we were mistaken.
A strange gentleman was present, and he was so interested
in the children, that he came forward, and said he had a
nice Magic Lantern, which he would be very glad to
bring and shew igs

Of course all were delighted ; aa so the Magic Lan-
tern was brought; and the happy day had a very happy
ending. And I think you will all agree with me in think-
ing that the children of The Birds’ Nest had indeed, what
we wish to every one of you, as year by year goes by,—

A Happy Curistmas! —
HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS. 81

-CHRISTMAS DAY,

Tis Christmas Day—glad voices
Awake the solemn sound,
And happy voices in our home,
And healthful looks around,
Why do we thus keep Christmas morn ?-—
It is the day when Christ was born,

With little gifts that tell our love,
With garlands on the wall,
With thankful hearts and helpful hands,
We keep a festival.
Why do we thus keep Christmas morn ?—
It is the day when Christ was born.

Full eighteen hundred years ago,
Christ Jesus came on earth:
He came, He rose, He died for us—
We thank God for His birth,
And therefore we keep Christmas morn,
The day our Saviour Christ was born.

Christ healed the sick, and helped the poor,
While He was here on earth.
Do what you can to be like Him,
This morning of His birth.
Help some one to keep Christmas morn,
The day our Saviour Christ was born,


CHAPTER IX.

THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION.

‘The rich and poor meet together: the Lord is the maker of them all.”—-
Prov, xxii. 2.

Rr etea|E. have told a great deal about the Birds’ Nest,
7e@ViVeal| and the children who have there found a home.
Now we want to tell something about the way
in which children in hurd places have joined together to
support them; but I should like all, especially the little
ones, to vida that every good thing we are enabled
to do is of God—it is He “‘ who worketh in us both to
will and to do.” What a wonderful thing it is that He
should let us be sharers in His great work! He could do
it all without us, even as He said, ‘‘ Let there be light,
and there was light. But, in His wonderful mercy, He
takes us, a band of feeble people and little children, into
partnership with himself, and gives us strength to labour,
and then gives us such rewards.

When our dear friend, Mrs. George Wale, died, some
of her work fell into my hands,—the preparation of the


THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION. , 83

““ERin’s Hope,” the juvenile magazine of the Society
for Irish Church Missions. For some years it had been
a great pleasure to her to write true stories about Irish
children for the children of England.

I love little children very much indeed. I think that
when Jesus gathered a group of children around Him,
and ‘‘ put His hands upon them, and blessed them,”? He
meant that His followers should be blessings to little
children. And when he said to Peter, ‘Feed my lambs,”
He meant that not only Peter, but all who could say,
with Peter, ‘‘ Lord, thou énowest that I love thee,”
should take the words of Jesus to their hearts, and should
try to lead the lambs of the flock into the right paths.

Thousands of children every month read “ Erin’s
Hope.” I should have felt it too great a responsibility
to write for so many, only I knew that if Jesus said to
_ me, ‘Feed my lambs,” He would give me stores of food;
He would give me the right thoughts and the right
words; and so I took it as my work for Jesus. Well,
you know, besides the children I was writing for, there
were the. poor little children God had given us to work
for; and one day the thought came to me, Surely these
children belong to each other, we must forma “ CHIL-
DREN’S ASSOCIATION.” The children to whom God
has given good gifts will be glad to share them; and how
84. THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION,

happy:this will make them, _ Jesus said, “ = is ‘more
blessed to give than to receive.”” _

So I asked Jesus about it all, and then formed a
Children’s Association. My own name was put down
as Secretary, and three little children who lived in the
same house were the first members. We made three
resolutions,—

We will pray for the Birds’ Nest.
We will work for the Birds’ Nest.
We will collect for the Birds’ Nest.

The very first thing we did was to pray. And once
every week regularly, and on every special occasion, we
went into a:room together in the dark; and then we
talked a little together of our wants; and then we knelt
down, and each one prayed. And as we got on a little
we found that we had thanks to offer as well as prayer;
and before we knelt we counted our mercies as well as |
our wants; and so in everything, with praise and thanks-
giving, our wants were made known to our Heavenly
Father, who seeth in secret. One of these little girls,
the youngest, is not with us now; she is gone to dwell
in that fair land where |

‘¢ The streets are shining gold,
And the glory is untold.”

We miss her earnest voice at our prayer meetings, and
THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION. 85

her glad voice in the hymn of praise; but we know her’s
is one of the most joyous voices raised in the heavenly
song. And it may be that she and many another little
one who on earth learned to care for poor children, for
Jesus’ sake, talk together of them there.

When we had thus started the Children’s Association,
I published a little penny book, entitled, ‘A few words to
little Children who want to be like Jesus,’’ and wrote
about it in “‘Erin’s Hope.” I asked any little children
who wished to join to write to me, and then prepared
some cards ready for any children who might wish to
collect. |

We took three wretched little children who wanted to
get into the Birds’ Nest, and a friend photographed them;
from this a woodcut was made and printed on the cards;
and then I waited a little while to see what would come of
it. I felt like a gardener who had sown seed in a bed in
his garden; or a farmer who has sown a field all over with
wheat; or a little girl who has planted a geranium slip in
a pot in her nursery window. I thought of some words
of Jesus— Any plant that my heavenly Father hath not
planted shall be rooted up.” And I watched to see
whether my plants were of His planting.

After some days there came a letter by post. It was
directed in a lady’s handwriting. “here was nothing par-
86 THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION,

ticular about it; but the inside caused me great joy. It.
was written in letters copied out of printed books, each
letter about an inch long, and the words, “ My dear Secre-
tary,” filled the first page. When I had read it all, I found
it contained the request of a little girl, that I would send
her a collecting-card. And I did send her a card, and
wrote her a letter directed to herself; and after that the
postman often brought me letters from little children
wanting cards; and some from fathers and mothers, who
were delighted that their children had found a work for
Jesus so suitable to them. One of their dear, loving
mothers says, “‘I feel truly interested; it is so nice for
children to feel that God will graciously employ them in
such a work, I trust, in this coming year, if spared, to
know and to feel more of the power of prayer, to pray
more, and to watch more for answers to prayer; and your
little book has come to help me in this, by giving such
marked answers to your prayers, and those of your dear
children. My child, who will take up the card, is my
only one, and not’strong. I mention this to you, because
I feel your hearts are large enough to take other people’s
children in; and when you pray for the young collectors
and helpers in your interesting work, you will include my
boy in your petition, May God bless and prosper you
abundantly, even as He has promised, and He is faithful.”
THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION. 87

Writing is the best way of talking to friends at a
distance, but for those near it is better to meet face to
face; so we got up some meetings of different kinds.
The first was a tea-party in St. John’s School-
house.

Sometimes we had meetings without tea. Sometimes
we had a magic-lantern meeting at the Nest. One
meeting was a very charming one—a real Children’s Asso-
ciation meeting, ‘‘the rich and the poor meeting together.”
We asked every collector to give a shilling, and to come
to the Nest on a certain Thursday evening, at four o’clock.
When we had got all the shillings, we got a great quantity
of currant-cake made, and ordered the children’s evening
supply of bread to be made into flat cakes, and to be
brought hot. “Then we hired some cups, saucers, teapots,
jugs, and bowls, and we arranged our tea-party. Six
cups and saucers, a bowl, and jug, went to each teapot.
‘The hot cakes were buttered, and the currant-cake cut
up, on plates down each table; and when the collectors
had arrived, the nestlings were all brought into the tea-
room, and a little girl collector presided at each teapot,
while a little boy waited on her. It was a most enjoyable
party. |

Our Children’s Association has grown very fast, and
struck down root in many different places; and year by

~
88 THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION.

year it has grown, and a, and yielded richer
and richer fruits.

When we made up the account at the end of its first
year, and found that the children had sent £35, we were
very much delighted. And year by year the sum in-
creased more and*more, till last year, 1870, it was more
than £900. A wonderful blessing seems to rest on all
engaged in this work, and wonderful pleasure it brings
with it.

Feeding and clothing hungry children is such a real work
—a work that very small children can understand; and it
seems guite worth while to give only a penny, when it
will pay for one breakfast. And fourpence seems quite
a large sum when it will feed a nestling for a whole day.
And then, when a party of children form themselves into
an association, and collect enough for the entire support
of one or two children, they feel all the responsibility of
fathers and mothers, and all sorts of little plans are devised
for the good of.‘ our nestling.” Even the very little
ones can help to make a patchwork quilt to cover its bed,
and the boys can knit stockings for it, or make a scrap-
book; and all can save or collect money.

In our great Children’s Association there are all sorts
of workers. I often think I should like to see them all .
in one view. I can only imagine what a sight it would
THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION. 89

be. We should see a little girl in a beautiful castle ; she
is learning to hem; it is hard work, but for every half-
yard she will get a penny to put in her Birds’ Nest box,
We should see a sick little boy in a garret in London; he
is hoarding up farthings, and trying to fill a little bag for
the nestlings. We should see many groups of children to
whom God has given bounteously: they are gathered
around some kind friend, busy sewing, and on the table
lies the money box, into which they have put their weekly
contributions, and beside it a letter, in large characters,
written by their own nestling. We should see classes of
little children in infants’ schools trying to put very little
stitches into their bits of calico, for they are to be sewed
together one-day to make a quilt to send to the Birds’
Nest. We should see happy parties preparing Christmas
tree sales, and lonely children doing what they can.
And better than all, we should see little groups met for
prayer. |

Dear children, you who have enrolled yourselves mem-
bers of this great Children’s Association, don’t look upon
your work as small or unimportant. It is “‘ your Father’s
_ business ’’—the work He has given you todo. He has
need of your services. You want Jesus to save you, and
make you ready for His glorious home; and Jesus wants
you to minister to His poor. Oh! it is a blessed service,
gO THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION.

enough to make any one happy who enlists in it; but it
must be done from a right motive,—to be real service it
must begin with the heart. If you listen to Jesus saying,
‘‘ My son, give me thy heart,” and you obey Him in that,
you will soon give Him your hands too.

Sometimes children and young people take up a cause
in great earnestness, and work with zeal for a while, and
then—they forget—or they don’t like the trouble—or
there is something else to do. Their kindness passes
away. .

I was very much struck one day by a remark of one of
our little nestlings. We had a great number of collectors
at the Nest. “Chere was a “Holly and Ivy”? tea-party,
and after the tea there was a magic-lantern with dissolving
views. A large group of the little nestlings was gathered
on a raised platform behind the sheet, and I was sitting
amongst them, very much amused at their delight. One
little thing who was sitting close beside me kept stroking
my hand, and manifesting her affection in many childish
ways. She watched the pictures melting one into
another for some time. ‘Then she suddenly looked up at
me and said, ‘Don’t ’oo go and change.” “Why,” I
said, ““how could I change?”’ ‘Oo so kind now,” she
said. It was a wonderful saying. I looked at the child
with a feeling of reverence, and I said to myself, I must
THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION. gi

give this message to the members of the Children’s
Association, for the nestlings look upon me as the
messenger sent to them by all of you; and now I say to
you, ‘Don’t oo go and change.” If you have begun in
the right way, by giving your heart to Jesus, [ do not
fear for you. "I only fear for those who have only sand
for a foundation to their good works.

Of the many children who have joined our Children’s
Association, some are not with us now. In the midst
of their young labours they have heard the secret
message, “The Master is come, and calleth for thee.”
And they have gone up higher. Short was their working
day, but long will be their joyful rest, for of each of these
dear ones we have full confidence that they belonged to
the fold of the Good Shepherd.

Could these glorified little ones look down upon us
from their happy home, I think they would say, ‘‘ We
did not work hard enough for Jesus ; do you who are left
work harder.”” I think they would say, ‘‘ Oh, heaven is
such a glorious place s do what you can to bring the
poor children here.” I think they would say, ‘There
is nothing on earth worth ae compared with serving
our dear Redeemer.”

Are there any reading this little book who will take
their place amongst the workers? Jesus is looking down
Q2 THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION.

upon you now, and longing to have you for His own.
He says to you, ‘My son, give me thine heart.” He
says to you, too, “Son, go work to-day in my vine-.
yard.” ‘There is a multitude to be fed—only Jesus
knows how it is to be done; but are there not many ot
you who are like the “lad obit had five barley loaves and
two small fshes?”? Well, bring them to Jesus; He will
accept, and make them sufficient.

We must never leave our rescued children unfed,
unclothed, and uncomforted. Our “ Holly and Ivy”
must be true evergreen, only looking fresher, and
sparkling brighter, for the depth of the winter time, and
the desolation around.

But it does not grow of itself, therefore we want many
hands to gather and bring it. If you want useful work—
if you want pleasant work —catee and help us to brighten
up the lives of desolate little children ; come and help to
supply HE HoLiy anp Ivy.


THE CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION. 93.

LITTLE ONES LIKE ME,
‘¢ Jesus, when he left the sky,
And for sinners came to die,
In his mercy passed not by
Little ones like mie,

Mothers then, as mothers ought, #

In the places where He taught,

Unto Him their children brought,
Little ones like me, _

Did the Saviour say, then, nay?

No! He kindly bid them stay,

Suffered none to turn away
Little ones like me,

When into Jerusalem,

Meekly riding, Jesus came,

Children hailed His blessed name,
Little ones like me.

In the glorious heaven above,
Through the gracious Saviour’s love,
Children bliss and glory prove,

Little ones like me,

*T was for them His life He gave,
To redeem them from the grave;
Jesus. died from hell to save

Little ones like me,

Children, then, should love Him now,

Strive His holy will to do,

Pray to Him, and praise Him ‘too,
Little ones like me,”


, CHAPTER X.

GOD’S PROVIDINGS.

“The birds without barn or storehouse are fed;
From them let us learn to trust for our bread.
The saints what is fitting shall ne’er be denied,
So long as ’tis written, The Lord will provide.”

DON’T know exactly how it is, but I always
feel as if the Birds’ Nest were in an especial
manner under the care of Jesus. It seems such
a real gathering of little ones for Him. Many kind friends
from England have been to see it, and they have talked
to the children, and they have all felt what a Christ-like
work it is. We may take for ourselves those beautiful
promises made to the Israelites. When God described
their land it was in these words: ‘A land that the Lord
thy God careth for: the eyes of the Lord thy God are
always upon it, from the beginning of the year, even unto
the end of it,” (Deut. xi. 12.) And that other beautiful
promise made to Solomon—“I have heard thy prayer and
thy supplication. . . . I have hallowed this house


GOD’S PROVIDINGS. 95

which thou hast built; . . . and mine eyes and my
heart shall be there perpetually.”” Thoughts like these
made us choose for our motto some words taken from an
old house in Chester—

**God’s Providence is mine Inheritance,”

It is a wonderfully rich inheritance. Some one asked us,
‘the other day, if we would not like to have all the money
we should want for a year laid up in the bank. We said
no, for we should lose many a lesson of trust and
love. It is good to have empty vessels, if we may carry
them to God to fill. It is good to have no earthly trust,
for then we feel that we get nearer to Jesus, who is to
us a Saviour ever near.

It is written in God’s Word, “ Be careful for nothing,
but in everything by prayer and supplication let your
request be made known unto God. And the peace of
God shall keep your heart.’ If any of us had the re-_
sponsibility of feeding and clothing all these children we
should faint under the burden; but we feel we are only
instruments, and God will surely provide; and so we cast
our burden on Him, and He sustains us.

Our first great trial about funds came soon after the
formation of the Children’s Association; it was in the
month of October. The Committee met, and they looked
| 96 GOD’S PROVIDINGS.

at the accounts, and they thought of the number of chil-
dren, and they said, “We shall want £300 before the
close of the year; where shall we get it??? And one said,
‘“*T don’t know; I have got in all my cards.” And another
said, ““I don’t know anybody to ask for money.” And
another said, ‘‘ We must not take any more children, and
perhaps there are some we can turn away.” It seemed
as if a dark cloud stood before us, and we could not see
our way. ‘hen there came a little bright opening, and
shewed some of the silver edges of the cloud; yes, there
was light beyond, and the promise shone out, ‘Call upon
ME in the day of trouble, and I will deliver thee, and thou
shalt glorify mz.” So we said, “ Yes, we must pray.”
And then a day was fixed for special prayer—the 3rd of
November—and a lot of little letters were written to the
members of the Children’s Association. "They were all
asked to pray that the year might be closed out of debt.
It was a special request, and we trusted God to give us a
special answer. Did He? Yes, more than we asked,
for we had £42 over to begin the new year! _

But you will ask, How did the money come? Well,
one and another had got a book and card; they had told
others ; and ‘so, with only one large collection of £44, it
ail came; and the wonder is, that those who sent in the
money were not, many of them, those who knew of the
GOD’S PROVIDINGS. 97

distress ; but God just used whom He would: to Him
be the glory. “Two collections were made by mothers
on their deathbeds. ‘They looked at their own children,
so soon to be orphans, and then they thought of the
hungry orphans, and their last strength was spent in help-
ing them.
_ Another time that God helped us in trouble was early
in the year. Funds were coming in very slowly, and
there was not enough to buy food for the children; still
they must be fed, and our Treasurer advanced up to £80.
At that time some little children met to pray on a Sunday
evening; they asked God that this £80 might be sent.
During that week a gentleman said he would give £10, if
the rest was got ina month. ‘The following Sunday the
children prayed again, and that week £20 came. Again
the children prayed, and that week a lady called and left
£50, refusing to give her name. ‘The Lord sent it,”
she said. Yes, indeed, the Lord did send it, in answer
to the children’s prayers.

In these early times we had an instance of God’s kind
care about clothing. One day in August the Matron
went to the lady who manages the clothing, and she said,
“We want under-garments for the girls very much in-
deed; I have got the old ones patched and darned, but

they won’t last any longer.”” ‘‘ How many do you want?”
| G
98 GOD’S PROVIDINGS.

asked the lady. ‘Well, if we had five dozen, it wou!d
give one to each girl.”? ‘* Well,” said the lady, “I have
not any at all, and no money to buy; we must only wait.”
Five days after that a parcel arrived from the North of
England; it contained almost the number of the articles
required, and nothing else! ‘The parcel was accompanied
by a letter, apologizing for sending all the garments of one
sort, as the little children who had made them could make
nothing else. The lady was greatly astonished. She took
the parcel to the “‘ Nest,”’ and told the children how God
had supplied their wants. “Tears stood in many eyes as
they listened, and they learned a lesson of trust in God
they will never forget. Now, I want you to see how
God was preparing the answer before the want came.
You know He says, “‘ Before they call, I will answer.”
And all the time those little children were putting in stitch
after stitch, they were working out the will of God; and
just when the need came the work was ready.

In the first week of November, 1864, we had a re-
markable instance of God’s providings. On Friday the
Committee met, and they found there were five vacancies
to be filled up. Then the application papers were opened,
—and there were no less than fifty-two of them,—some of
them such distressing cases of destitution that they did
not find it possible to refuse them. They chose out five
GOD’S PROVIDINGS. 99

for the vacancies; and then they thought they must, if
possible, get more beds. There was a very small room
that could be spared, and they thought it would just be
possible to put five little beds into it. But then there was
no money to buy the beds! Still the ladies said, ‘‘ God is
sending us these poor desolate children; we must take
care of them; He will provide the means.” ‘They did
not know it; but while they were talking this way, a
young lady in England was writing a letter, and in it she
was putting a bank order for five pounds. She had written
a little poem, and she had sold it, and she had got all this
profit; and she was sending it to me, and asking that it
might be used for some special want at the Birds’ Nest.
This letter arrived the very next morning; and when we
calculated the price of five little iron beds, and five pairs
of blankets, and a little sack of straw, we found they would
exactly come to five pounds. So first we thanked God,
and then we ordered the beds; and now five of the good,
well-trained children sleep in them, and five of the new
comers have taken their places in the large dormitory.
Of course there would arise some little difficulty about
the feeding of five extra children, but this also was pro-
vided.. When the Lord sent the prophet Elyah to the
poor widow of Zarephath to be fed, He increased the meal
in the barrel, so as to make it enough for all the family.
100 GOD’S PROVIDINGS.

And when He sent us these five children, and we received
them, trusting in Him, He looked into our “barrel of meal
‘and cruse of oil;”? and, oh, how He blessed it! He put
it into the heart of five new friends to collect each enough
for one child; and not only that, but by the end of the next
year we were enabled to put £200 into the bank, and had,
besides, enough to pay the bills for January and February.

Our little report for 1868 says:— | :

“We had one very remarkable and welcome gift.
Though this winter has been so mild, yet in October
there were several days of biting wind and frost. I looked
at the nestlings’ beds, and thought them in great need of
new blankets; but it was no use thinking about it when
we were in such debt. Well, as I came home, I met on
the door-steps a lady; she came in with me, and sat down.
‘Now,’ she said, ‘I want you to tell me how many beds
there are in the Birds’ Nest.’ ‘One hundred and seventy-
four,’ I said. ‘Do they all want blankets?’—‘ No,’ I
said, ‘not all; fourteen beds are new ones.’ ‘I will buy
you a hundred and sixty pairs,’ she said. I quite started
with astonishment. Just the thing we wanted! ,And the
lady went on to ask about the needs of the other institu-
tions, and I told all. Then she said that a kind friend
had given her £100 to lay out, and she could buy almost
all I had mentioned.
GOD’S PROVIDINGS. IOL.

“ thing the Matron said was, ‘I do wish we could have new
blankets.” ‘They are coming,’ I said; ‘God has given
them.’ Then I went into the schoolroom, and told the
story. An earnest, solemn look was on each face; tears
stood in many eyes; we felt Jesus was near. And I could
not help thinking that it was something like the feeling in
that crowd, long ago, when Jesus said, ‘ Somebody hath
touched me.’ Some little nestling lying cold in bed, I feel
sure, had told Jesus the need, and had thus brought help.

“ _ day, something of Jesus’ providing in the Birds’ Nest.
She looked at me with eyes full of tears, and said, ‘I
can’t say in English exactly what I mean; but don’t you
feel sometimes as if Jesus was close beside you, and you
could take hold of His hand?’ It is thus He comes in
our darkness, and gives us unexpected help; and, with
the disciples, we can only exclaim, ‘It is the Lord!”

**From the glorious heaven,
Where the angels are,
God looks down on children,
Seeth them afar ;
Heareth alf they ask for
All the night and day ;
Watches like a father
All their work and play.
102 GOD’S PROVIDINGS.

** As a father giveth,
So He gives them bread;
Saves them out of danger,
Watches by their bed ;
Tells all little children
Of their Father’s care ;
How He loves and pities
Children everywhere.”

Towards the close of the following year we were in
great difficulties about funds, and were wonderfully helped.
I will copy the account from a little book, called—

““NEEDS AND HE Lps.’’

It begins with the text, “* My God shall supply aty your
need.”

‘*'T’ hese words were in my mind when, just one month
ago, we chose the title of our new little book. It was a
time of very great need; so great, that we felt we dare
not tell how great. But we thought of other times of
great need out of which our Heavenly Father had delivered
us, and we remembered that, year after year, when the
accounts of the Birds’ Nest had been made up, there was
always something in hand, and we knew that God’s pro-
VIDENCE WAS STILL OUR INHERITANCE, and that could
not fail; so a little paper was sent around to all the
friends, asking for speczal prayer that again the year might
GOD’S PROVIDINGS. | 103

be closed out of debt. It was a great request, but God’s
promises are great—He says, ‘Open thy mouth wide,
I will fill it.’

“The day on which we ask that collections should be
sent in is the 20th of December; our time came, but not
God’s, Many were praying, but answers were few; we
must wait. On the 22nd we counted up the debts, and
found that £1,158 were wanted to pay all! Then we
took a report of last year, and tried to calculate how many
collections could be expected. Not quite £300! Oh
how dark it seemed! One evening, seeking comfort
from God’s Word, we read the story of the feeding of the
five thousand. It was Jesus himself put the question,
“Whence shall we buy bread, that these may eat?’ But
immediately it is added, ‘This He said to prove them, for
He himself new what He would do.’ Then we felt that,
in our trying circumstances, Jesus, putting himself amongst
the workers, was asking the question, ‘ Whence shall we
buy bread?’ He knew then, and He knows mow, what
He will do; we must trust Him and wait. Oh it is
blessed to look only to Him! No matter how rough the
waves, if we can only keep looking to Him, there is no
_sinking; only sometimes a great high wave dashes up and
hides Him from view, and then, while beginning to sink,
we hear His sweet voice—‘ Oh thou of little faith, where-
104 GOD’S PROVIDINGS.

fore didst thou doubt?’ In that time of need how our
hearts rejoiced when we thought of the many friends who

were praying, and trusting, and watching; and how
anxiously we listened for the postman’s knock, how
eagerly we opened the letters, how words of cheer en-
couraged! ‘I am praying for a thousand pounds,’ said
one; ‘I am sure you will get it? Did we? Yes; just
three weeks from that 22nd of December. On the 12th “
of January the last pound of the £1,158 was paid; and
while the lists were being printed, we kept the balance-
sheet open, and gathered a little store for January. In
the £1,158 there were only three large sums—one note
for £20, two for £10; all the rest was sent in small col-
lections. By many hands our Father helped us—many
hearts He used to pray; and now many hearts will send
forth songs of praise. I could not help telling all this on
the first page! I know how those who have been praying
will be watching for the answer: weak ones on their sick
beds, earnest workers in the day’s heat, little children
gathered around a mother’s knee, classes in Sunday Schools,
and Children’s Associations. Thank God, dear friends,
He has answered your prayers largely, abundantly. We
want you not only to thank God for the abundant supply
of our needs, but for the spirit of earnest prayer poured
out on the Collectors, and on the little children of the
GOD’S PROVIDINGS. 105

Nest. There seems to have been such a strong con-
fidence in God; such a hold taken of His strength; such
an absence of human trust. ‘The dark time has been a
time of spiritual blessing to many; and many a little child
has learned that God is indeed ‘a very present help in time
of need.’ |
“We know that a// our good gifts come from Jesus,
and it is very sweet to take each little crumb as from His
hands; but some of our gifts have come in such an as-
tonishing way that the story must be told. Having been
away longer than usual in summer, when I reached home
in October, the first question was, How are the funds of
the Birds’ Nest? £700 in debt, was the answer. It
never was so bad before, though we are always in advance
in October. I went the next day to the Nest, and told
‘the children all about it, describing to them how much
bread, potatoes, and cocoa cost every day, and there was
now nothing to pay for them. ‘Then I asked, ‘ What
shall we do?’ Some very little girls said they thought we
ought to send the baker’s cart away, and tell him not to
come any more; they would do without bread. ‘ You
poor little things,’ I said, ‘what would you say if you
came down and found no breakfast to-morrow morning?
you cannot do without bread.” ‘But we must,’ said a
“little trembling voice, ‘if there is no money to pay.’ ‘No,’
106 GOD’S PROVIDINGS.

I said, ‘we will talk to Jesus about it first. I am sure He
won’t let His little children go hungry.’ Then we had
a great talk about prayer; how Jesus listens and answers;
and how each little one could help to pray. After that,
the Matron said it was sweet to see the little ones at
prayer, and to hear their earnest petitions: ‘O God, send
money for the bread;’ ‘ Jesus, send money to pay the
baker;” ‘Give us this day our daily bread.’ One little
boy would stand at the door in the morning, and ask each
little. one as it went out, ‘Did you pray for the bread ?’
and if it had forgotten, it would return to its bed-side.

‘* Now, did God, the great God, really listen to those
children’s prayers? Would He care to give them exactly
what they asked for? He did. Just ten days after that
talk, an old gentleman, who did not know of our needs,
had a thought put into his heart, and he said to his wife,
‘I want to givé something to the Birds’ Nest.’? Some
one in the room suggested that he should send a gift of
clothing. ‘No,’ said he, ‘I will give money for bread,
and for nothing else.’ And very soon that lady was the
bearer of a cheque for £100, £20 of which was for the
Boys’ Home, and £80 FoR BREAD AT THE Birps’ NEst.
“As soon as possible I went to Kingstown to tell the good
news. ‘The little children gathered around and listened
with varied expressions ;—some had bright tears of joy in
GOD’S PROVIDINGS. 107.

their eyes; some looked surprised; some gave a satisfied
little nod, which said, as plainly as words, ‘I knew it would
come.’ All learned a lesson of the reality and power of
prayer. | |

- © Another marked providence was about clothing.
There are forty little boys in the infant school; all summer
they were dressed in white flannel suits made of strong
Irish flannel, the gift of our faithful friend, Lady 5. B.;
over this they had little pinafores. When that cold, sharp
weather came in October, these poor little fellows looked
very cold, going out to walk, as they had no overcoats.
That very day that we had the talk about praying, the
Matron told me how much these forty little boys wanted
more wintry clothing; I said, ‘We have no money, but
we must see what can be done.” A few days afterwards
a lady noticed these little boys, and asked about their coats ;
the Matron said that we were hoping for something for
them, but could not buy. As she went home the sharp
east wind blew keenly in her face; she felt cold even well ©
wrapped up. ‘I must do something for these poor little
fellows,’ she said, and she determined to ask each of her
friends to contribute one shilling. Many hearts were
touched to give more, and in five days she had £10. It
was Saturday, and she came to town to ask if we could
possibly buy a coat each with this money, and if we could
103 GOD’S PROVIDINGS.

get them soon. I thought it was quite possible, for there
were sellings-off at several clothing-shops just then; and
as soon as my friend was gone, I took a cab and drove
off, At one shop the man said he could’ supply exactly
what was wanted, and took down some nice little coats
at ten shillings each. ‘That would never do;’ we should
only have twenty for the £10. Shop after shop was tried,
with a like result. At last I went to one where I had
bought a coat the week before for five shillings; they had
no more. I was telling the young woman who served
how the forty poor little boys wanted coats, and how the
lady had given £10 to buy them, when the manager, who
was standing near, said, ‘Shall I make them?’ ‘Oh,’ I
said, ‘they would be too dear; we have only £10 for
forty; we will buy some cloth, and make them ourselves.’
‘If you will allow me to make them,’ she said, ‘it will be
a real pleasure. Of course there will be no profit on
them; but do let me.” Then I knew that her heart must
have been prepared, and gladly left the matter in her hands.
And that day week forty Inverness coats of black frieze,
each with two pockets for cold hands, arrived at the Nest;
and the next day a very comfortable little regiment marched
to church, facing the east wind with a pleasant defiance,
cared for and clothed by Him who notices the needs of |
the little sparrows, ‘and not one of THEM is forgotten.’
GOD’S PROVIDINGS. 109:

“We have had some wonderful providences in the gifts
received, Not long ago two dear friends died, who used -
to knit socks for the little boys. I wrote to some invalid
friends, to ask them to pray that their place may be sup-
plied. ‘This winter* scarcely a parcel has arrived without
a few pairs. In all, I have received about two hundred
pairs; and such good, strong, suitable socks, of good sizes.
The forty little boys are those who want them most, for
they are too small to knit enough for themselves: they
are from seven to nine years of age.”’

In the little book for 1869 we find the follow-
ing :-—

‘‘Our nestlings pray for many things besides bread and
clothing. To some petitions answers do not come. God
knows best; we must trust His wisdom. There are prayers
for little companions that seem unheard. We often imagine
a thing would be good, and we earnestly ask that it may
come to pass; and the contrary happens. I remember
once there was a little orphan in a Home. She was a
gentle, loving child, and we thought her path in life would
be a very smooth one. One day a rough-looking poor
woman came to that Orphan Home; she said she was
Biddy’s mother, and had come from America to take her
away. ‘here was great sorrow; much prayer was made;

* 1869,
110 GOD’S PROVIDINGS.

but there was no disputing a mother’s rights, and poor.
Biddy had to go straight to the poorhouse. There she
met a little girl, an orphan like herself. She made friends
with her, and very soon Mary had learned of the love ot
the Saviour, and joined her friend in her prayers and faith.
The mother, too, began to love the hymns Biddy sang to
her, and she learned to repeat, ‘ God so loved the world,’
&c.; and then, in answer to Biddy’s earnest prayers, God
gave her His Holy Spirit, and she, too, learned to love
Jesus, and trust Him; and then He took her to himself,
and Biddy returned to the Home, bringing with her the
orphan Mary. ‘This story has given us courage in many
a time of trial at the Nest: when little children, who had
been with us long, and had learned to love the Lord Jesus
and follow Him, have been claimed by some relatives, and
taken away to some convent school. It seems so very
sad; and when such a thing is threatened, the children
pray that their school-fellow may be spared to them; but
at last the child is forced away. At such times we think
of Biddy’s work in the poorhouse, and pray that our
nestlings may have courage to speak of Jesus wherever
they may be.

‘““A few weeks ago a girl of about fifteen years of age
applied for admission at the Luke Street School. She said
she had no friends; her father and mother had been Pro-
GOD’S PROVIDINGS. 1Il.

testants, but as a little girl she had been placed in
convent. ‘A few months ago,’ she said, ‘two little girls
came there neatly dressed and comfortable, but they were



very unhappy. They would not kneel to the statue of |

the Blessed Virgin, or repeat the catechism we were
taught. ‘They said they had been taken away from a
happy home called the Birds’ Nest, and they prayed to-
gether in the corner of the playground that God would let
them escape. One of them had a leaf of a Bible she kept

hidden away in her breast; she seemed to love it very —

much. ‘They told mea great deal about the Bible, and
how wrong it was of me, a Protestant born, to be where
I could not learn it; and I ran away.’ We knew very
well who these two dear children were. Only last April
they were taken from us, the priest promising to make a
lady of their poor wretched mother if she would only obey
his wishes. For some time she refused, but at length, on
the promise that the children would be left with herself,
she took them. What followed we do not know; but
we do know that the children are in the convent, and the
mother in her wretched cellar, as poor and miserable as
ever. And even now we see that God had work for those
little ones. When it is done, He will provide for them a
way of escape. Pray for them, dear children, that they
may be kept unhurt in the trial, even as those three


112 GOD’S PROVIDINGS.

Hebrew youths were in the hot furnace. If Jesus is with
them, all must be well.”

The next year’s little book completes the story.

‘‘ Besides the supply of the needful money, we have
had many other answers to prayer. Seven of our lost
children have been restored to us—all that we were most
anxious about, except one. She, poor child, is patiently
- waiting until she is of an age when she will be allowed to
* choose for herself, Much prayer is made for her—this
one, and one other whom we fear will never return.

‘Amongst those, who are come back are Polly and
Lizzie, and their little brother, Georgie. One day in
spring I met Georgie in the street. His eyes filled with
tears when he saw me. He said his mother was very
unhappy, and wished so to get them all back, but she was
afraid of the priest. I asked him what he would be when
he was a man. He looked up brightly, and said, ‘I’m
determined to be a Christian.” I told Georgie to tell his
mother how we would make room for Lizzie and Polly,
if they could get back. Not many days afterwards Georgie
and his brother came, as poor and ragged as when we first
knew them. Their poor mother had only a cellar-home.
‘They were soon dressed and sent out, helping the old man
to drive the donkey; for he was going out that day with
a load of parcels of clothing.
GOD’S PROVIDINGS. 113.

‘Very soon after, finding that the boys had been re-
ceived, the mother went to the convent, and with some
ticles got the girls released. "They looked strong and
well. Their faith had been strengthened by adversity.
When they went to the Nest they were received with
open arms. ‘T’here was almost as much surprise and joy
_as there was in that upper room at Jerusalem when Peter
was given to the prayers of the brethren. Lizzie says
she taught many of her hymns to the children in the con-
vent, and we can still pray that the good seed may spring
up. ‘hese two girls are now nearly ready to go out to
service. [hey are very anxious to begin to earn, that
they may help their poor mother. They have been lately
very much pleased to be allowed to make some under-
clothes for her; and when one of them got a present of
a shilling at Christmas, she sent it at once to her mother,
with such a loving letter! The poor woman brought it
to shew, she was so pleased.”

Very soon after Christmas this poor mother died.

Amongst ‘*God’s providings”’ for the Nest I think
we ought to count all the ‘‘office-bearers.” At the
beginning of 1869, we had to get a new Matron.

You know a Matron is a very important person in.such
a Home as the Birds’ Nest. She has to be the mother of

the family; she has to see that proper food is bought, and
| H
II4 GOD’S PROVIDINGS.

well cooked; that the house is kept clean; that the
children are neatly dressed ; that the coals are not wasted.
She has to be wondrously wise, and kind, and patient, and
loving, and active. The Matron who had been with us
four years, got into delicate health, and her work became
a burden to her. We gave her a little holiday, but it did
not make her well, and then she resigned. Now, who
do you think was quite ready to take her place? The
very one who had been the Matron in the little cottage long
ago. She had been mistress of the large Mission Infants’
School since, and had lately been married to one of the
town missionaries. She was very glad indeed to go back
to her old post. Her little children do not hinder her in
her mother-work for the birdies, and they give plenty
of occupation in play-hours to the little girls who love
babies. And the good husband is like a father to the boys,
taking them out bathing and walking, to their great delight.
When it was known that she was to return to the Nest,
the woman who had been her helper long ago begged
to come too; so we have a hearty, happy officer-staff.
Besides the Matron and her helper, there is our assistant-
matron. She has been in the Nest since she was a little
child. She has such a wonderful talent for keeping
presses in order, sewing on strings and buttons, and
dressing little boys, that we have never been able to do
GOD’S PROVIDINGS. II5

without her ; and we have given her a position, and made
her quite at home in the Nest, by settling up a little room
for her close to the nursery, where she can see a friend,
or be alone when she needs a little rest. “I"hen there is
Lizzie, a grown-up nestling, who washes and cares for
all thé little girls; and Mary, who is responsible for the
laundry and washing. Besides these there is a man, a
pensioner, who comes every day, and whose duty it is to
do all the work women and girls cannot do: to lift heavy
pots, pump water, clean everything outside, whitewash,
glaze broken windows, go to market with the donkey
cart, &c.

Then there are the voluntary helpers. God has given
us willing hearts and hands, ready to employ their talents
in His service. One lady gives her talents for drawing,
and designs our pretty book-covers and “ Erin’s Hope”
pictures. Another comes to the Nest to give lessons in
singing. One dear friend devotes herself to the boys,
coming in the evenings to arrange their knitting, and
superintend their patching and darning, for in the Nest
even the boys must do this for themselves. As a reward
for industry and good behaviour, she sometimes invites
them to her house to weed her garden, or do any other
work they can. Her dear, kind grandmamma knits socks.
for them. Boys are wonderfully influenced by kindness,
116 GOD’S PROVIDINGS.

and delight in hearing a story read to them while they are
working. |

Besides these there are voluntary helpers who have
never seen our nestlings—helpers with money—helpers
with clothing—helpers with prayer. And in the ranks of
these workers there is yet room, and volunteers will
be gladly welcomed. Are there any reading this book
who have not begun to work for Jesus? You have
often thought you would LIKE to do something. Well,
just take up some work for the Nest—heart-work
in praying, or hand-work in sewing, or head-work in
collecting. Some of those who began to do this work for
Jesus on earth have met in glory with some of the
rescued ones. Perhaps they were the first to welcome
them. What a joy that would be! and still—

There are little ones glancing about on thy path,
In need of a friend and a guide ;

There are dim little eyes looking up unto them,
Whose tears could be easily dried.

But Jesus may beckon the children away
In the midst of their grief or their glee ;

Will any of them, at the Beautiful Gate,
Be waiting and watching for thee?

There are dear ones at home thou may’st bless with thy love ;
There are wretched ones pacing the street ;

There are friendless and suffering strangers around 3
There are tempted and poor thou must meet.
GOD’S PROVIDINGS. 117

There are many unthought of, whom, happy and blest,
In the land of the leal thou wilt see ;

‘Will any of them, at the Beautiful Gate,
Be waiting and watching for thee?

We feel sure that our Heavenly Father will still, by
the hand of His people, provide for our nestlings, and will
open out paths for them in life, and guide them all along,
for

His PROVIDENCE Is OUR INHERITANCE.




CHAPTER: Xf.

HOW THE BUILDING WAS PAID FOR.

**We also will be with thee: be of good courage.”—Ezra x. 4,

commodious, but a very expensive one. The
estimate of cost was £6,000. This, we felt; was
a great deal more than we ought to undertake, so the plan
had to be reduced, cutting away all ornament, as well as a
laundry and a nursery for delicate children, which we have
had to build since. At length we got it down to £4,000.
£2,000 of this sum we borrowed on interest, and £1,000
was lent by a kind friend, without interest, for as long a
time as we should require it.

We did our best to collect the money, but at the end
of two years still owed £3,000, and the Bank managers
wanted the £2,000 to be paid up. The case was made
known to a very active servant of God, W. H. Porter,
Esq., and he determined to make a vigorous effort to


HOW THE BUILDING WAS PAID FOR. ~~ IIQ

collect the money due. One of his kind associates in the -
matter gives the following account of their work:—

‘The Ladies’ Committee in aid of the Building Fund
of The Birds’ Nest were first brought together in the
autumn of 1863, at the invitation of Mr. Porter, with the
object of making a combined effort to clear off the long-
standing debt, which was such a heavy burden on the Insti-
tution. ‘Io the admirable and systematic arrangements
suggested by him, and to his unwearying energy and zeal
while acting as our honorary secretary, we were deeply
indebted. Having commended our cause to God in
~ earnest prayer, he led us to expect the blessing, and con-
tinually cheered us on, as a band of fellow-labourers, with
unabated interest to the end.

‘“¢ Our plan of working was thus: To each lady collec-
tor was apportioned the whole or part of one of the coun-
ties in Ireland, which she undertook as her field of labour,
writing and sending out the appeals to all those within her
district who might be willing to assist and be interested
in the work. It was thus hoped that, by a vigorous and
united effort, the entire debt of £3,000 might speedily be
removed. We proposed to meet together once a-fort-
night for prayer, for a blessing on our labours, and to hand
in the amount received by each collector. “chose unable
to attend personally were requested to send in their report
*

I20 | HOW THE BUILDING WAS PAID FOR.

to the Secretary before each meeting, and to join us in
spirit at the appointed hour. A few ladies also undertook
to distribute the appeals generally throughout England
and Scotland.

“‘Qur first harvest gathering assembled on the roth
November, 1863, in the vestibule of the Mariners’
Church, Kingstown, when the large sum of £142 was »
handed in. At our second meeting the receipts were
£170; and on the 8th December, an increase of £200
gave us great encouragement,

‘“‘ By the end of the year the sum of £800 was handed
to the Treasurer as our first instalment in liquidation of
the debt.

‘Our meetings continued with occasional interruptions
during the next two years; and in the beginning of
1866, finding a balance of £480 still remaining due, we
determined, in dependence on the Father of mercies, to
make one strong effort to gather in this sum before the
roth April—the anniversary of the laying of the first stone,
as well as of the opening of the new building. Through
the kind liberality of our friends our hopes were fully
realized; and with what feelings of joy and thankfulness
we assembled at The Birds’ Nest on the evening of that
day, our labours successfully brought to an end, and the
Institution free of debt! I can never forget it, and how
HOW THE BUILDING WAS PAID FOR. I2I

kindly dear Mr. Dallas made the exertion to be with us,
though suffering from extreme weakness. He wished to
join in celebrating this happy ‘anniversary birthday,’ as.
he named it, and to join us in raising our Ebenezer of
prayer and praise to Him in whose name, and for whose —
glory the house had been built. |

‘‘’The accounts were finally closed in May follow-
ing, and the Committee dissolved themselves, with deep
thankfulness for the work they had been able to accom-
plish, and the blessing so abundantly bestowed on their
labours.’’


122

WRITTEN ON READING THE FIRST EDITION OF
“HOLLY AND IVY.” i

Hoty Anp Ivy and Christmas Trees

Are linked in the Birdies’ memories

With faces of friends, whose voices mild

Oft soothed the wayward orphan child.

Ivy and Holly, in years to come,

Will tell of our childhood’s happy home,
Where loving friends, in sorrowful hour,

Led weary steps to this cheery bow’r;

They “ll recall the texts and hymns we learn’d
While within the “ Birds’ Nest” we sojourn’d!
Ye freely gave us raiment and food,

And our young hearts stored with all things good,—
Ye sowéd seed without thought of gain, —

In God’s good time it will yield you grain,
Nought can we give but our orphan love,

May the orphan’s pray’r be heard above!






my 4a a t 4



a

Nacsa oasis 8s iN os 0 Scale te ck NS Sas ee eae eae

ae
lean
e

ra

ae
~
a ee



in,

2

YW
ieee er te





3

. a t. ?

Bl ~

; r

ia 0 fe

4 4 fh on
. & x

ma. * ¢ mn

i & —s
3 =
awe ee.
N. 2% — |
mags he! Al
12 Le a
i arg % x §
i 6







<



Ae Rn IO DA ED

Baer ree me *

mi

Pov Minas
hs






SB as wane

Sena ninene mere) 4 a
TR % 5 & “ 4 Bes: PA

Â¥
2
BPP nny

eareay





Boy:

wae .
Oat eat ee SE





x
fades asin ose
ie.



ra
ony eld





om



ou a, 4
aN

F
é
erage








a



aS ie

Tne le RAST ARDS Se trot Te ag
emake %





x a . < Q % S ca) J .
; Bikes . 4 3 ie + = >
POLO REET ee NE “TTR SSB ANAAEE RON IIE AEF Ag tg MARRIES ROSY MSIE A TRWEIST 2s au A SUNIL apa a ASOT AID Parl eevee may ene aon nen set tee, Oy r=


*, :



HOLLY AND IVY.

PART II.





00

CHAPTER I.

THE FIRST DEATH.

‘There are many little children now in heaven with harps of gold,
And harps on earth so beautiful you never could behold;
And these little children play their harps so tenderly and sweet,
That the angels love to listen as they bow at Jesus’ feet.”



‘¢°Scaping the storms of this weary life,
*Scaping the dust and the heat,
Flew up thro’ the great golden archway to God,
To nestle for a at His feet.’

We cannot call them « sad stories,” for they all died
having a sure trust.in the Saviour, knowing their sins
were forgiven; that in His blood they were washed
124 | THE FIRST DEATH.

‘“‘ whiter than snow.” They are all “safe at home”
with Jesus. No more pain and sorrow for them:. God
himself has ‘‘ wiped away all tears from their eyes.”

The first that died was little Nanny Slattery. It was
in April, 1860. Measles had broken out in the Nest, but
only Nanny was dangerously ill. She was a dear child of ©
about six years of age. |

It was Saturday night when the doctor said there was
no hope; but Nanny was not at all afraid to die. On”
Sunday she was singing her favourite hymn, “Come to
Jesus,” in quite a loud voice. Many times during the day °
she clasped her little hands in prayer, murmuring portions
of the Lord’s Prayer—‘ Father in heaven, thy will be
done; forgive our trespasses.”

In the middle of Sunday night she died. When the
other children got up in the morning, they felt very sad
to think that one was entirely gone away; but their sad-
ness was mixed up with joy, for they knew Nanny was
with Jesus. And they could not help feeling as if they
themselves were a little nearer heaven than they were
before. On Tuesday morning the body was to be buried,
and a little grave was prepared in a corner of the old
graveyard around the ruins of the “ Kill ofthe Grange.”

The sun was shining bright and warm, and the birds
were singing in the budding trees; and as we waited in the
THE FIRST DEATH. 125

graveyard we thought of the resurrection morning, when
those graves shall be opened, and the bodies of Christ’s
people shall arise, beautiful and glorious. This was a
joyful thought. Then we looked at the many gravestones
placed over Roman Catholics who had been buried hoping

for nothing better than purgatory; and we mourned there
should be so many still living in the like ignorance.

But while we thought on these things there came a
sound of solemn singing, and looking towards thé road we
saw the funeral procession. The coffin, borne by eight
of the schoolboys in turn, was followed by thirty little

children of the Nest, and many more schoolfellows, with

the teachers. As they walked along they sang sweet
hymns; and when they wound up the little green lane, and
entered the churchyard, they were met by a missionary
clergyman the children all loved very much. Then all
assembled round the grave; and when the service’ had
been read, and the little coffin put down, a few solemn
earnest words were spoken to the children, and they sang,
““Come to Jesus,” and ‘Shall we ever meet again?” and
the little ones went home, solemnly singing as they went.
We felt very thankful that the first death should be such
a happy one; we feel quite sure that little Nanny Slattery
is in heaven.

Just one year after. Nanny’s “death another nestling, .
126 THE FIRST DEATH.

who had long been ill, was taken safe home. I wrote her
Story at the time, and it shall be put in here exactly as it
is. It was published in a little book, and called ‘“‘ Not

Alone.”




ECHAPTER II.
| -

NOT ALONE.

ores, GCHINK if you had seen little Emily when
Gj Wa] she was first brought to the Ragged School, you

sted} ~would have said, “What a nice little girl! I
should just like to make clothes for her, and buy her some
shoes, and take care of her.” And yet her mother, who
brought her, said that she was a very wicked little girl,
that she was disobedient, that she told /es, and that she
could not keep her any longer in her house. The ladies
of the Committee did not know how to believe this story;
and one of them said to Emily, “Is it true that you are
such a naughty little girl?’ She smiled very sweetly, and
said, ‘I try not to be, ma’am.”

‘* And if we take you into our Dormitory, will you try
to be obedient ?”’—-“* Oh! yes, ma’am; please take me.”
And when she was told she should stay for a month, such
a look of joy came into her face, that the ladies felt guite
sure the story was untrue. |


128 - NOT ALONE.

And so it was. Emily had always tried to be a good
child at home, although she was a Roman Catholic, and
did not know the true motives for obedience; and her
mother was very fond of her. But by some means she
got a New ‘Testament, and when she read this, she found
how wrong the Roman Catholic religion is, and she
refused to follow it. Then her mother timed against
her, and she made up the story of Emily’s wickedness, in
order to make people think she was right in turning her
out of the house.

Poor child! she had now no home on earth, but Jesus
was preparing for her a home in heaven; and because He
wanted to make her ready for that home, H e led her young
footsteps as once He led Abraham, saying, ‘‘Get thee out
of thy country, and from thy kihitied: and from thy rene 5
house, unto a land which I will shoe thee.”’

- Abraham went out that he might “‘receive the pro-
eniges," and so did Emily; for when she came to the
Ragged School she had only head knowledge. She her-
self afterwards said, “‘I did not love Jesus when I first
went there; I only had Him in my head; but He was
not in my heart. I did not get Him into my heart till
I was there three weeks, and then I only began to love
Him a /ttle.”’

_ Long before the month was out Emily had endeared
NQT ALONE. 129

herself to her schoolfellows and her teachers; but she was
too young and small to stay in the Dormitory for great
girls; so as soon as “The Birds’ Nest”? was opened at
Kingstown, she was sent there. We hoped, too, that
the air of the country would do her good, for she was not
at all strong; her face was pale, and there was a bright
red spot in the middle of each cheek.

At Kingstown she was quite a ‘‘ mother-bird,” loving
and kind to the little ones, tenderly caring for them, help-
ing them in their plays, and comforting them in their
sorrows. Everybody loved Emily, except her unnatural
relatives. .

Pleasant footsteps were these! ‘The Good Shepherd
was leading His little lamb in ‘‘ green pastures beside the
still waters,’’ and she grew in grace and in likeness to the
Saviour.

But there are rough places as well as smooth in the
road to heaven; it is ‘through much tribulation that we
enter the kingdom;”’ and the true follower of Jesus,
although she be but a little child, will say—

“1 °ll welcome still the heaviest grief,
That brings me near to thee.”

Severe pain in her leg, accompanied by low fever, soon

obliged Emily to find a new home in an hospital.

Here she was laid in a small bed, in a ward in which
| I
130 NOT ALONE.

there were many.other beds; and many patients came and
went, some cured of their diseases, and some called to
another world. But with Emily month after month
passed away with little change, except that she grew
weaker, and the two red spots in her cheeks grew brighter,
and the great pain of her leg obliged her to lie in one
position through the weary nights and days.

Her little Bible lay under her pillow; but at first she
did not know how much consolation it would give her in
her pain. One night she was lying awake, suffering very
much, and she thought, ‘I know the Bible comforts many
nec, sure there must be enough in it to comfort me.”
It was too dark to read it then, so she went over in her
mind some of the texts she had learned, and she soon
found what she needed—* Whom the Lord loveth He
chasteneth;” and, “I will make all thy bed in thy sick-
ness.” ‘These,’ she said, “I repeated over and over
again, and they did comfort me so.”

Sometimes she had to go through painful operations.
When speaking of these, she said, “I never could have
borne them if I had not known Jesus; but His arms were.
always around me.” |

Rough paths, indeed, were these to walk in, but the
marks of the Saviour’s footsteps were there; they lay
thick and close, and Emily stepped into them.
NOT ALONE. 131

Her heart was moved for the miseries of those around
her; she thought of their darkness and ignorance; she
knew that many of them were, as she once was, ignorant
of the only true source of comfort, and she prayed that
God would enable her to speak to some of them, and lead
them to Jesus.

Lying in the next bed was a poor woman, and with her
Emily commenced her missionary work. .She repeated
over and over texts of Scripture, until the dull ear of the
poor woman took them in, and God opened her heart to
receive them. Tthen Emily would talk to her in her own
sweet way, telling her of the love of Jesus, and how He
casts out zone that come to Him. The poor woman came
to Jesus; and though she left that hospital, she was, not
long afterwards, an inmate of another, where she died
rejoicing in Christ as her Saviour. When the dear child
was told of this she did not shew any surprise; it was
what she had asked of God, and He had answered her
prayer ; ‘and when one expressed astonishment that so
much should have been learned in so short a time, Emily
said it was no wonder, because the poor woman had been
taught: by the Holy Spirit.

During this long winter in the hospital Emily endeared
herself to all about her, although the false story of her
“ wickedness”? had been told to all the nurses, in order
132 NOT ALONE.

that they might help in the cruel work of persecution.
But no one minded these wicked stories, because they all
saw by her life what she was.

As spring came on it was thought good that Emily
should spend a short time in the country, and her kind
doctor provided the means. A lodging was procured for
her at Kingstown with a Christian family, and it was with
great joy she removed there. For a little time she was
able to sit out in the small garden, and enjoy the sunshine
and the songs of the birds; and it was so pleasant to sit
beside her, and hear her talk of heaven. She had a oreat
_ store of hymns, and used to repeat them when they would
express her feelings better than her own words. She was
very thankful that she had learned by heart so many hymns
and texts; but it often troubled her that she could not
easily find the places of the texts she loved. A great many
she coudd find, because in the Mission Schools all the chil-
dren learn the place when they learn the verse; but many
a text she had heard had sunk into her heart; and she
_ longed to find these. She would often have quite a store
of them in her mind, waiting till some of her loved friends
should come in; then she would say, “‘ Please find some
texts for me.”” One day she asked for three most beauti-
ful ones— The eternal God is thy refuge, and underneath
are the everlasting arms;” “His left hand is under my
SAS
She etc

ae

Orne

mo

4
nf



PAGE 132.
NOT ALONE. 133

head, and His right hand doth embrace me;” “‘ For me
to live is Christ, and to die is gain.”

A lady who often visited Emily writes the following :
—‘*QOne day in September I found her sitting in the
garden outside the cottage, and her face brightened up so
sweetly when I said, ‘I have come to, stay a long time
with you to-day. Shall I read to you?’—‘Oh! please
do,’ she quickly replied. ‘Is there any passage you
would particularly wish ?’—‘ No; only something about
Jesus.’ I chose some verses in the seventh chapter ot
the Revelation, about the happy ones arrayed in white
robes, and then I read that nice hymn—

‘**Qh! cheer thee, cheer thee, suffering saint.’

The fourth verse she liked very much—

***Yes He will cheer thee, He will prove
The soul, encircled by His love,
Can meekly, ’midst its anguish, say—
“Still will I trust Him though He slay;”
And He will make His words thine own,
Father, Ty will, not mine, be done.’

‘Yes,’ she said, ‘that is what I try to do.’” _

‘Thus was dear Emily following Jesus; and, oh! how
He comforted her! Often, in the still hours of the night,
she felt that Jesus was near, and that she was “not

alone.”” Sometimes she longed for the time when Jesus

x
134 NOT ALONE.

would take her to himself; ‘ But,” she said, “I try to
have no will about it; whatever my Heavenly Father
sees to be best for me, L shall like.” —

As winter came on Emily grew worse, and by-and-by
she was not able to leave her bed.

One Sunday in October her kind friend visited her.
She was suffering extremely, another abscess having
formed; and the poor dear child was too weak to get
up, and yet was suffering too much to allow her to
lie down. Her poor pale face brightened up, as it
always did on seeing those she loved, and she smiled so
sweetly and gratefully at having her back propped up
with pillows. Her first words were, “I am so weary,
SO very ware - cannot get up, and I cannot lie down,
I am so weary.”

“Well, dear, there is rest at home there is no pain
there, but only joy and peace. Would you like, Emily
dear, to go home!’’ Her eyes beamed with such delight
as she said, ‘Oh! indeed, indeed I would.”

After speaking to her for some time longer about
home, and the joy of seeing Jesus face to face, and being
for ever in our Father’s house, she said, ‘‘ But don’t you
think that I shall enjoy heaven more than you? it will be
such rest. Oh! I love to think of the rest; it is so nice—
is it not?” |
NOT ALONE. 135

Speaking on the same subject to another friend, she
said, “If we were at school, how glad we would be
when the holidays drew near, and the time came for us
to go home! And how glad J shall be when the call
comes forme to go HOME! When people are in a ship,
and when it has been very stormy, they. enjoy reaching
the harbour far more than when they have had a good
passage; so I do be often thinking that I shall enjoy
heaven much more-than those who never had any pain.”

Poor Emily! it was no wonder she longed for home
and rest—her’s was indeed a stormy passage; but the
bright light of heaven streamed on the waters, and this
light brightened up the common things of life, and she
saw all things in the light of God. One day a friend
brought her some fruit; she said, ‘‘ What beautiful
fruit! how it reminds me of the fruit that grows on the
tree of life in the midst of the paradise of God, which He
will give me to eat of.” Another day, some time after,
a friend brought her a bit of hawthorn, on. which the
leaves were bursting out in their fresh spring green; she
looked at it, and said, ‘“‘Isn’t it like as if God’s smiles
were coming down to us?”

During one night in November she was much worse
than usual. Towards morning she said to the kind
friends with whom she lodged, “I thought, a while ago,
136 NOT ALONE.

that I was dying, and that the Lord Jesus Christ stood by
my bedside, smiling at me, and He told me not to fear,
that I would be with Him before long. I should like to
see Mrs. S » my more than mother; but if I die
before I can see her, I shall be one of the number that
will come to meet her when she is leaving the world.
Give my love to her, and to Mr. Eade, and Mr.
MacCarthy, and tell them that I will love them all
throughout eternity.”

Soon after this it was thought desirable that Emily
should be brought again to the hospital, that she might be
under the care of the doctors.

She could not bear the thoughts of this. ‘* J cannot
go, she said to her friend; ‘I would rather die here.”
But a few words were enough to recall her to herself, and
she whispered, ‘‘ Pray that I may be ready for God’s will
in all things.” Was she not even here following Jesus?
Did not He, in prospect of suffering alone, say, “If it be
possible let this cup pass from me: nevertheless, not as I
will, but as thou wilt.” |

When the day came for Emily to go, she called Mrs.
I . who had nursed her tenderly, to her, and putting
her poor wasted arms round her neck, said, “‘God be with
you! We part but for a little season, then we shall meet
again round the ‘ great white throne,” zever to part again.”




NOT ALONE. 13

The journey of seven miles into town was a very trying
one to poor Emily; but God supported her, and she spoke
of Jesus as if He were present with them. She handed
her little Bible to Mr. F———, and asked him to read the
14th chapter of John, about the mansions prepared.
When he got to the end of the fourth verse he stopped—
tears were rolling down her poor little face. She said
aloud, “‘ Yes, Lord, you have prepared a place for me,
and you have a crown of glory to give me the moment
my soul leaves this poor body. Oh that you would
convert my father and my mother, that they also might
be with me in that place that God has prepared for those
that love Him!” |

The latter part of the journey the poor child was too
weary to speak. At length they reached the hospital. It
was very hard to part with one with whom she had spent
so long a time, and to be left alone in a little solitary ward,
under the care of a strange nurse. Yet even here she felt
she was walking with Jesus.

It was Saturday evening when Emily was left in the
hospital, and early on Monday, fearing she would be
unhappy, I went to see her. She was lying calmly in
her little bed, one of her own sweet smiles brightening
up her face. I said to her, “Do you feel lonely, now you
have left all your Kingstown friends?” ‘‘ Not now,”


138 NOT ALONE.

she said; “Sbut when Mr. F left me I cried myself
sick. Then it came into my mind, ‘Sure Jesus was oncé
left alone; didn’t His disciples all leave Him? and didn’t
He say, ‘Yet I am not alone, because the Father is with
me?” Sure God is with me, too,’ I said; and I did get
such comfort out of that and, do you know, I haven’t
been a bit lonely since.’

For more than three months Emily dwelt in this a
They were happy and useful months. A great deal ot
suffering of body; but Jesus spread a great calm over the
spirit of the tried child, and she felt that all was well.

Emily was very anxious to be made useful to those
around her, and spoke much to her nurse about coming
to Christ. A

A little before Christmas a young woman was placed
in the same ward, whom Emily soon discovered to be a
Roman Catholic. “To this young woman she longed to
speak, but felt a great difficulty about it. She told me of
this, and asked if I would pray that she might have an
opportunity given to her. |

A few days after Christmas I went to see her. She
took hold of my hand eagerly, and said, “Sit close, I want
to whisper. We had such a happy Christmas eve. I
was well enough to sit up in a chair, and we had a good
fire, and we had our tea; and then I was longing so to


NOT ALONE. 139

talk to that poor girl, and asking God to teach me how to

begin, and she began by saying, ‘Emily, you ought to
pray to the Lord to take you soon.’ [ asked why; and
she said, ‘ Because, don’t you know, on Christmas day, —
and for twelve days after, the gates of heaven stand wide
— open, night and day.’ ‘Yes,’ I said, ‘but not only then—
the gates of heaven are a/ways wide open, and Jesus won’t
turn away any who believe in Him.’ ‘I don’t think you
are right there,’ she said. ‘Believing is not enough.
This is the way it is—we must do our best to make our-
selves good, and then Jesus will take pity on us, and make
up the rest.” I told her the story of the prodigal son;
how he had nothing but his misery and poverty to recom-
mend him to his father, but how the father fell ‘on his -
neck and kissed him. She liked the story very much,
and said she did not know the Bible was such an interest-
ing book. [I said it was full of such beautiful stories, and
I would read some, if she liked. She was very glad.
‘Then I sang for her, ‘ Just as [ am,’ and she liked it so
much that she learned it. Oh! it was such a happy
evening.”’ :

_ That poor young woman went out of the hospital. very
soon after, and we do not know whether the seed thus
sown has yet sprung up; but we know that God has pro-
mised that His word shall not be lost. ,
140 NOT ALONE.

And now dear Emily seemed to be rapidly passing away.
We visited her very often. One day one said to her,
‘“¢J’ll come again to-morrow.” With a sweet smile she
said, “‘[ may be at home to-morrow; but we’ll soon
meet above, and, oh! won’t I have a welcome for you
there!”

Another day her wasted hand was lying outside her
bed, and one said, ‘‘ Poor little hand, how thin it is!”
‘“' Never mind,” she said, “ it will be fashioned like unto
His glorious body.”’

On one of the last days of her life she sent a message
to her former schoolfellows. She said, ‘“‘ Tell all who
remember me to come to Jesus; tell them that, in my
dying hour, He is more to me than all His promises. I
am dying; but, oh! tell them all to come to Jesus.”

Thus lived dear Emily; and one morning, when we
went to the hospital, she was gone. Her sweet face was
not any whiter than usual, but there was the settled calm
of death upon it.

We could not but rejoice for our Emily. She had—

** Reached the sunny shore,
All her toil and griefs were o’er ;
She would never suffer more
Over there.’’


CHAPTER ITI.

SAFE AT HOME.

*¢ And there shall be no more death.”

AN the spring of 1862, two dear girls were absent
from the Nest, sick in the hospital. One of
these two was a dear girl named Hannah. She

early leatned to trust in Jesus; and before she went to
the hospital, felt and éew that her sins were forgiven.
And through those four weary months, when she knew
she was to die, her soul was kept resting in Jesus. She
was often able to be up, and then she would sit beside
the little beds in the children’s ward, and teach the little
ones texts of Scripture and sweet hymns. She was much
beloved amongst them all. She did not die in the hos-
pital, but just a week after she had left it. She was
happy to the last; her faith endured to the end; and she
left behind her a testimony to the faithfulness of Jesus.

The other was quite a little child, about ten years of


142 SAFE AT HOME.

age. About three years before she had been brought to
the Ragged School by a clergyman. He said she had no
one to take care of her; and as soon as there was room
she was admitted into “The Birds’ Nest.”

She was a quiet, serious child, naturally of an amiable
_ disposition, and gave very little trouble.

She studied the Bible earnestly, and so learned the true
motive for obedience. We could not tell exactly when
she became one of Christ’s followers. It was like sun-
shine on a misty morning; the light dawns and spreads
about, but you cannot tell exactly when the sun rises.
But before noon the mist clears away, and then there can
be no mistake about the sunshine. Thus it was with
Janey. It was only morning time with her when she
was laid upon a bed of sickness, but then there was no
mistaking ahout the clear shining of the Sun of Righteous-
ness. Many a long day she lay calmly and patiently on
her little bed in the hospital.

One day when I went to see her, she repeated for me
a little hymn:—_

“¢Jesus, only He can give
Peace and comfort while we live;

Jesus only can supply
Boldness, if we’re called to die.”

She repeated the words as if they came from her heart;
SAFE AT HOME, 143

\

and when I talked to heg about it, I felt quite sure that
she was enjoying that peace.

We had brought her a nice doll and a little Testament.
We gave her the doll first, and she looked admiringly at
it; then we shewed her the Testament. Instantly the
doll was laid down, and with both hands she grasped the
‘Testament; she had been longing so for it, because her
Bible was too heavy for her to hold up.

It did not seem to be any trouble to Janey that she had
no relatives. She had Jesus; that was enough; and He
supported her to the end. |

For five months dear little Janey lay in that hospital,
suffering very much, but patiently “‘waiting for Jesus;”’
her calmness and peace reminded me of the words of a
beautiful hymn:—_ |

** One of Jesus’ lambs am I,
Near His side to keep I try;
Near my Shepherd, loving, tender,
Careful Guide, and strong Defender,

Whose protection I can claim,
And who calls me‘ by my name,

Often in the cooling shade

Tam gladly by Him staid,

Then in pastures green He leads me,
Out of His own hands He feeds me,
For my thirst still water gives;

He who drinks for ever lives,
144 SAFE AT HOME,

Should I not, then, happy be,

Since He takes such care of me?

And when these bright days are ended,
By good angels then attended,

In His arms Hell take me home,
Never forth again to roam.”

Oh yes! Janey is now no more a helpless wanderer,
but safe at home with Jesus, in the land where the
inhabitants are never sick,


el hae

me Liaed }i

fi

rn } Oy _ = ees Ar ae

Ret \ i { ia Sie A ro ee Oe

See ST |e a fore : Rad SaaS NN

i Ca ce) i BS nes * me : Oe xe i ies fr ke Ce un F = Seiad TaN Wee

es, ‘ i ay 4) A 4 ‘ SSS > ao RE er Abc t : hy - Fi
Ee 58 ||) Med eee _ ee yA ae ao i 5 WA tie? Hee

‘ ty Sey La Mee ae Pane eS . aoe Giars ec50y =U G4 Y baaney 7 fee Es

5 iA ad Poe % tere ‘ Ca as orn E Py Fre oe (Geese

Bieta Ree enti he ies BOWS kane ~ > PLS pie ae Se i eae COP sik ie or

+ eR eS cS PS Dp teel at . eae : pe eR a tad TELA a ae SY Bager SRA rat ER haan

. rere aie ate iio rom fe Wreck Neen ae Cees ened etka oe PSP Rat Ae etapa team pred ire Bh She ES, oe



CHAPTER IV.
CALLED AND CHOSEN.
“He shall gather the lambs in His arms, and carry them in His bosom,”

gareaHE following story is that of a dear little boy,
WS Bas whose name stood upon our books for admission
as soon as there should be a vacancy; but while
he waited he was called away to “the beautiful land of
rest.”” | |

When the messengers of the Good Shepherd go out
to seek those who are lost, they cannot see the marks by
which Jesus knows which are His, and so they gather in
all they can find; and they teach them about Him who
loved them enough to die for them, and they try to win
them into the upward path that leads to heaven.

Many of the children who are gathered into the earthly
fold never reach the heavenly; they love sin better than
holiness, and the broad easy road that leads to death

better than the narrow difficult path that leads to life,
K



%
146 CALLED AND CHOSEN.

But many there are who learn to know the gentle voice a,
of the Good Shepherd, and to follow Him. 4

Some time ago a Scripture Reader, out on | his daily
rounds of visiting, entered a room in which there were
two children, a girl and a boy. i

The girl was about eight years old; she hung down
her head, and looked cross, and did not like to be spoken
to. The little boy was about six; he had a noble fore-
head, and deep blue eyes, and he gave very nice answers
to the questions which were put to him. Both children
looked miserably poor and dirty, and the room in which
they lived was more miserable and dirty still.

Before the Reader left he had taught the little boy to |
repeat that nice little text you all know, “‘Suffer little |
children to come to me;”’ and both of them had promised
to attend the Ragged School in the Coombe.

With the girl it was only a promise, but Pat was soon
one of the brightest little boys in the infant school; he —
liked all the lessons very much, but the texts and little
hymns he loved more than all.

Pat had not been attending the school long when a
great persecution was raised against it. Every morning
a large mob assembled in the street to try and keep the
children from going in. Many little children were carried
off to strange schools, in distant parts of the town, and left
CALLED AND CHOSEN. 147

@to find their way home as - best they could; and many a



“ poor mother was searching until late at night for her lost
ones.

On one of these terrible days little Pat was seized by
a priest, who was carrying him away in his arms, when
his missionary friend saw him, afid, to the — joy of the
little boy, rescued him.

That terrible time passed away, and again the smitten
flock assembled in peace; and many were the prayers they
oftered up for their enemies, and many the thanksgivings
that the Good Shepherd had so watched over them, and
quieted the raging of the enemy.

We don’t know why it is, but sometimes God sends
very ‘great trials to even little children. He knows best;
and the roughest path is often the shortest, if it only lead
right upwards.

Thus it was with this poor ragged boy; he had not
been many weeks at school when his teachers noticed that
he grew paler and thinner, and he complained of pain in
his leg; then he had to sit all day, and he could not go
out to play with the other children; still he loved to come
to school, and, though he could not read, he learned a
great many texts of Scripture, and a great many hymns,
quite perfectly. His voice was very sweet and soft, and
it ‘was quite a pleasure to hear him sing.
148 CALLED AND CHOSEN.

But.he grew worse and worse; and just as the winter
was over, and the sun began to warm up the homes of the
poor, Pat had to leave school and go to an hospital. His
leg was so bad that he had to lie many weeks quite still,
suffering great pain; but he was so patient and gentle
that those around could not help loving him.

A good clergyman who visited the hospital used often
to talk with Pat about Jesus, and listen to him while he
sang his hymns. One day he thought the little boy was
dying, and he gathered the other children who were in the
hospital about Pat’s bed, that they might see how happy
he was; and the children sang—

‘*T think when I read that sweet story of old.”

While they were singing the little boy kept his eyes
fixed earnestly on his mother. He was asked why he did
so. He said solemnly, “‘ Because I think she does not
know enough about the Lord Jesus.”” He then asked
her to read the Bible, and attend the school. ‘I don’t
wish to stay any longer here,”’ he said, “I would rather
go to the Lord Jesus; but, mother, won’t ee do as I
asked you?”’ .

Another day his mother was sitting beside him. He
fixed his eyes upon her, and said solemnly, ‘‘ Mother, I
want you to go to heaven—won’t you give your heart to
Jesus? Mother, pray to Jesus; trust in Jesus; He will
CALLED AND CHOSEN. I49

bring you to heaven. Mother, do read God’s book, and
listen to Mr. S——;, he’ll teach you. Oh! mother, I
wish you would give your heart to Jesus; He would make
you happy.”

He was told that a friend had been inquiring for him.
He said, “ Tell him that Pat says good-bye.”

But this was not to be Pat’s good-bye; he revived,
and, after six months’ stay in the hospital, was discharged
as incurable. |

Again he was an inmate of the wretched home in which
the missionary first found him, and there it was that I first
became acquainted with him.

It was a cold, snowy evening, in the early part of Janu-
ary, and we had to walk very quickly through the narrow
_ Streets to keep ourselves warm. When we reached the
house we had to mount three flights of winding stairs
before we found the garret which was Pat’s home. The
door was standing a little open, and we entered without
being seen. |

It was, indeed, a desolate place; a broken chair, an old
form, and an iron pot turned upside down, was all the
furniture. In one corner was a morsel of straw, covered
with a bit of old carpet, which formed a bed. Although it
was not more than enough for one child to lie on, it was
the only resting-place for the whole family.


150 CALLED AND CHOSEN.

In another corner of the room was a fire-place with a
few smouldering cinders in it; and close up to the gritte,
with his face nearly touching it, sat poor little Pat upon a
small bundle of rags—a poor neglected child, his face as
black as the cinders which surrounded him, his hair un-
combed and uncared, and his clothes worn since they had
been sent to him, some weeks before, never even taken off.

When he saw us a look of joy passed over his poor
little face, for he had often seen us in the Ragged School,
although we did. not know him from amongst the other
children. I said to him, “Would you not like to go to
the hospital again?” :

‘* No,” he said; “‘I am going to a better olace,”

‘*¢ And what is that place?”’

‘“¢ Heaven.”

“Do you love Jesus?”

“C'Yes; He died for me.”’

‘And what is Jesus doing for you now?”

“‘ He is making intercession at the right hand of God.”

‘* And where did you learn about Jesus and heaven?”’

‘“‘In the Ragged School; I learnt it all there.”
Ah! how many little children have been taken from

that Coombe Ragged School to glory; and when they meet
together in the act land, they will join Pat in saying,
“¢] learnt it all there.”
CALLED AND CHOSEN. ASE

We asked Pat whe he thought God had sent him his
sickness.

= Because of sin,” he said; ‘I think He i is angry with
me.’ ,

We explained to him that it was sent in love, not in
anger; for “‘whom the Lord loveth He chasteneth.’?
This satisfied him ; he had great faith in the Saviour’s
Jove. :
Before we came away I shewed the little boy a flannel
waistcoat which I had brought for him; he stroked it with
his little wasted, fingers, and said, “‘ Thank you; I shall
be warm now.” I felt very thankful to be permitted to

join the angels in ministering to this heir of glory.

*

The next time I went to. see the poor little boy I
found him lying on the bit of straw in the corner. I
had brought with me a soft sponge, a towel, and a small
piece of scented soap, which I thought sould tempt him
to wash; for he said before that it hurt him; and I’m sure
it did, he was so very thin. He was quite delighted with
the nice things, and: ever afterwards was as clean as one

_ could wish. I knelt down beside his bed to talk to him,

for his voice was weak, and it was difficult to hear what
he said. I asked him if he felt happy. ‘Yes, very,” he |

‘said. ‘‘I’m going to heaven.”

“¢ And why do you like to go there?”
152 CALLED AND CHOSEN.

“¢ Jesus is there.”

“Why else? ”

‘<’There is no sin there.”?

“Why else?”’

‘¢ There is no pain there.”

“Why else?”

“Tears shall be all wiped away.”

‘* How do you know that?”

‘* “God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes.’”

‘“¢' What are you to Jesus?”

“I’m His little lamb.”

‘‘ And what is Jesus to you?”

‘“* He ’s my Good Shepherd.”

‘And what does the Good Shepherd do for His
little lambs ?”’ |

‘“‘ He takes them in His arms, and carries them in His
bosom.” .

‘““Do you know what David said about the valley of
the shadow of death ?”

“Yes: €Though I walk through the valley of the"
shadow of death, I will fear no evil: thy rod and thy
staff they comfort me.’ ”

“¢ David was not afraid ; but are you?”

‘* No; Jesus is with me; His rod and His staff comfort
me. Oh, I should like to die to-morrow!”
CALLED AND CHOSEN. 153

It was quite wonderful to see the peace and happi-
ness of this dear little child in the midst of his poverty,
every little gift was received with such thanks. One
day a lady brought him an orange, the gift of her little
nephew. ‘What message will you send him?” she
asked. oR.

‘¢ Tell him,” he said, ‘I wish him to be as happy as I
am.” |

He was asked what he did when the great pain came
on. “I ask Jesus to give me patience,”’ he said, ‘Sand
then I can bear it.”’

Only once I heard of him being at all impatient. It
was Sunday morning, and the bells were ringing, and he
thought of the many happy Sundays that he had spent at
the Ragged School, and he longed so much to go again
that tears rolled down his cheeks. .Then his mother
took him in her arms to the window, that he might see
the people go by, and this amused him a little.

It was a great trial to him that his mother could not
enter into his feelings. She was a Roman Catholic, and
did not at all understand how any one could be happy in
he thought of death. Pat tried to teach her that “the

lood of Jesus Christ cleanseth from all sin;” but she ~
ould not learn the lesson; only when he sang his hymns

r her she listened ; perhaps even yet the Holy Spirit may
154 ‘CALLED AND CHOSEN.

make her remember his words, and she may learn to give
up every false hope, and rest alone on Jesus. ,

One day some little girls went to see poor little Pat.
One of them brought some bonbons, which had been
given to herself; another, a toy. He was greatly pleased
with these things, and he repeated some hymns for them;
and he told them where he was going, and how happy he
expected to bein heaven. He said that Jesus had a harp
and crown, and a white robe, waiting for him. One of
the little girls could hardly help crying when she saw
how thin Pat was; but they were both very happy to
think that he would soon be where there will be no more
pain. 7 . |
It was quite wonderful how much ‘knowledge of
God’s Word Pat had, though he could not read. In
the Mission Schools they have a little paper, with one
hundred texts marked upon it, for the children to learn.
This little boy could repeat all of these; and besides,
his memory was full of Bible lessons, from histories and
parables which he had been taught. He always kept his
‘Testament under his pillow, that any one who visited him
might read for him. a |

The clergyman to whom Pat sent his ¢ good-bye” from
the hospital went to see him, and talked a long time
with him. Before he went away he asked_ what he
CALLED AND CHOSEN. 2ss

should pray for. The little boy mentioned three things,
—‘‘ Patience to bear pain; to take it away; and that I
may not be afraid when I come to the valley of the
shadow of death.” This Jast prayer was eorer
answered. |

~ About the middle of the day, on Thursday, the rst of
March, I- received a message that Pat was dying. I went
sé Giichdy as possible. When I reached the room the
door was a little open; I went quietly in. Dear little Pat
was lying with his arms stretched out, his eyes fixed and
glazed; his mother knelt on the floor, watching him.
‘‘Ah, ma’am, he’s almost gone!’’ she said. I knelt
beside her, hoping to catch a last smile, but the breathing
~ had ceased. Pat was singing: the song of Moses and the
Lamb in heaven.

That morning, when-he woke up, he put his two little
wasted arms round his mother’s neck, and’ kissed her
many times. She said, “Did you sleep well; my darling?”
‘‘'Yes, mamma, quite well,” said he; but his voice was
changed. She struck a light, and then she saw that his
face, too, was changed, and she knew he was dying. She
sent for their missionary friend. When he came the
child could not speak, but he drew from under his pillow
his little Testament, and listened earnestly to the story of —
_ the death of ee _ He knew he was dying; but his
156 CALLED AND CHOSEN.

prayer was answered, he had no fear in “the valley of the
shadow of death.”’

On the Saturday before, he appeared much stronger
than usual, and sang many of his favourite hymns—
“‘Here’s a message of love;” ““T think, when I read;’’
and ‘*Gentle Jesus, meek and mild.’’ Of this last he
was particularly fond. He sang it all through. When
he had sung the lines—

**In the kingdom of thy grace
Grant a little child a place,”

he said, “A happy, happy place for mr.”

As I heard this, gazing at the wasted form of the little
boy, I tried to think of the wondrous change from that
body of pain, and miserable garret, to the happy, happy
place in the bosom of Jesus, in the midst of the glories
which eye hath not seen; but, oh, we could not realize
that—we can only say, ‘“‘Thanks be unto God, who
giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.”

No stone marks the spot where Pat’s little body lies;
but the Good Shepherd knows it, and He will watch over
it until the resurrection morning, when the trumpet shall
sound, and the dead shall be raised, and we shall ever be

with the Lord.
CALLED AND CHOSEN, 157

THE HOMELAND.

The Homeland ! the Homeland!

_ The land of the free-born—

There’s no night in the Homeland,
But aye the fadeless morn.

I’m sighing for the Homeland, —
My heart is aching here;

There’s no night in the Homeland
To which I’m drawing near.

My Lord is in the Homeland,
With angels bright and fair;
There’s no sin in the Homeland, |
And no temptation there.
The music of the Homeland
Is ringing in my ears;
And when I think of the Homeland,
My eyes gush out with tears.

For those I love in the Homeland
Are calling me away,

To the rest and peace of the Homeland,
And the life beyond decay.

There’s no death in the Homeland—_
There ’s no sorrow above!

Christ bring us all to the Homeland
Of His eternal love !


CHAPTER V.

WANDERERS WELCOMED.

‘For the Father’s fold it is warm and bright,
O’er-flowing with love; and the door
Is open to all of the little ones, |
For ever and evermore,”

eeeARY and Bobby were the children of a kind
ji) mother, but a drunken father. They used
to attend a Ragged School with two little
sisters. “hey were very wretched, naked, hungry chil-
.dren. We pitied them very much, and sometimes gave
them a bib, ora petticoat; but it never appeared the
second time; the wretched father sold it for drink! He
did not care what his little children suffered; and so,
through the long winter, they came hungry and barefooted
to school. |
‘The poor mother was very unhappy, and she tried to
think what she could do to comfort her litile ones.
She determined to go to service, and pay some woman
to mind her children; but she found her wages would


WANDERERS WELCOMED. 159

only pay for two; still she thought it eee to do that
than all starve together. |

She took the two little girls and put them to lodge
with a clean, tidy woman, and told her husband he must
mind Mary and Bobby.- He said he would; and the
mother went to a place in the country. |

There was very soon a great improvement in the
appearance of the two little girls; but poor Mary and.
Bobby grew more and more worn and miserable.

Their case was brought before the Committee of the
Birds’ Nest. ‘They agreed to receive them; and a mes-
Sage was sent to the lady who had applied for them. — 3

That very day, at three o’clock, Mary and Bobby
went to their wretched home from school. “Tvhe woman
with whom their father had placed them met them at
the door, and told them they should not come there any
more, that their father had not been heard of for two
days.

With aching hearts and tearful eyes they turned from
the. door ; they thought they would go. to the woman .
who minded their sisters, perhaps she would have com-
passion on them. But no: ‘I have children of my
own,” she said; ‘‘and your mother can only pay for.
two.” | | | |

Poor Mary and Bobby, what will they do now? They
160 WANDERERS WELCOMED.

thought of their Father in heaven, and they knelt down
and asked Him to take care of them. When they rose
from their knees, it came into Mary’s mind to go to the
house of a lady they had seen at the school, and tell her
their trouble. It was a very cold evening in January,
half-melted snow lay in the streets, and rain and hail
came driving down; but the poor children struggled on
with their bare heads and naked feet. Their hearts nearly
failed them as they went up the hall-door steps; but
Bobby seized the bell and gave it one sudden pull, and it
rang, and the servant came to the door; his mistress was
out, but he had a kind and tender heart; he listened to
the tale of sorrow, and took them to wait in the hall.

It happened that the lady’s business out on that winter
evening had been to seek for these very children, and
she had been unable to find where they lived. Great
was her surprise when she came to find them in her own
hall. ‘They began to tell their story, but she soon told
them the good news that they were to go to the Birds’ —
Nest. Oh, how glad they were! little Mary dried up
her tears, and Bobby looked at his bleeding feet, and then
into the lady’s face, and said, ‘‘ Please, sal me have sues
dere rt? | ie e

Before many minutes the children were standing before.
the kitchen fire warming their frozen limbs; and then
.. 1» fenady:

xe

BH PA Ie


WANDERERS WELCOMED. ‘161

there was such washing, and combing, and fitting on of
nice comfortable clothes; and that very night they lay
down to sleep in the happy Birds’ Nest.

Mary never quite got over her sorrows. She was very
delicate, and talked very little. She was rather downcast,
perhaps a little shy. During the autumn of 1862 her
health grew worse, and early in November she was .
rcreyel to the Adelaide Hospital. It was soon known
that her illness was a fatal one, and we felt very anxious
about her soul.

One day when I visited her I asked her, would she
be afraid if Jesus called her?

She fixed upon me an earnest gaze. ‘‘I’d be very
much afraid,” she said; ‘I don’t think I belong to Him
at all.”’

I spoke to her of His death upon the cross, and how
the way is open to all who will only believe.

She sighed deeply. ‘I know all that,’ she said;
“but I am not one of the saved ones.”

Many times we talked to her, but the same sciiictcly
look was on her face; we prayed very earnestly that
Jesus would give to her the Holy Spirit, that she might
be enabled to trust and not be afraid...

At length, on Tuesday, it was the gth of December, I
went into the ward, and was delighted to see a bright

| "i
162 WANDERERS WELCOMED.

smile on the face of my little friend. “I’m happy now,”
she said; “I know I’il go to heaven.”” And then, when
I questioned her, she said she fe/¢ her sins were laid on
Jesus. Oh! how my heart rejoiced with her! A few
days after, when I again visited the hospital, the Nurse
said to me, “ There’s such a change in Mary Jane; she
has given up fretting.”” ‘To be sure she had. She had
found peace in Jesus; why should she fret? and there,
hung up before her, was one of those “Silent Comforters,”

with a hymn turned down little Mary had learned to love.

It begins—
‘¢A mind at perfect peace with God;
Oh ! what a word is this!
A sinner reconciled through blood,
This, this indeed is peace.”
And then the last verse—

‘¢ Why should I over careful be,
Since such a God is mine?
He watches o’er me night and day,
And tells me mine is thine.”

So for one fortnight Mary Jane lay calmly waiting for
Jesus; but she did not expect to be called very soon.
On Wednesday, the 24th of December, when the doctor
was with her, she looked very earnestly at him. When
he was gone, she said to the Nurse, “‘ Nurse, I’m going
to die.”
WANDERERS WELCOMED. 163

“* How do you know that?” said the Nurse.

‘* Because when the doctor looked at me he shook his
head; I know I’m going to die; and oh! Nurse, /’m not
ready.” |

She was indeed dying, and the tempter was near to
trouble her. |

A thick cloud came over the child’s faith; she could
not see Jesus. The Nurse called up Mrs. R
talk to her. She spoke of Jesus, His everlasting love,
and how He zever leaves nor forsakes His own little
ones. But Mary Jane could not find peace.

A little while after Mrs. R was gone, as the child
was lying quietly thinking and praying, the cloud passed
away, and she called out in quite a strong voice, ‘“‘ Nurse,
I’m happy; I’ve found ‘Christ again; I can sleep now,
Nurse;” and with a peaceful smile she turned her head
and slept sweetly and quietly. She was getting very near
the waters of Jordan; but there was no fear—Jesus was
with her.

As night came on she woke up, and begged of the
Nurse to lie down.

‘‘’You must not stay on your feet for me,” she said:
‘do go to bed.” So she had to go fora little while to
pacify the child; but she soon came back; she could not
stay away.




164 WANDERERS WELCOMED.

As the hours passed Mary Jane grew weaker and
weaker. She was very happy, and about midnight there
came a change; a beautiful light shone on her face; her
eye was fixed upon something none else could see; and
about one o’clock the angels took her away. Nota sigh,
not a struggle, marked the last moment. It was just
before Christmas day; and what a happy one she spent!
Her companions celebrated the birth-day of Jesus on
earth, but she in His presence, where there is “fulness

of joy.”


WANDERERS WELCOMED. 165

BREST THE WAVE, CHRISTIAN,

‘* Brest the wave, Christian,
When it is strongest ;
Watch for day, Christian,

When the night’s longest.
~ Onward and upward still

Be thine endeavour 5 —
The rest that remaineth

Will be for ever.

) Fight the fight, Christian,

Jesus is o’er thee ;

Run the race, Christian,
Heaven is before thee,

He who hath promised
Faltereth never;

The love of Eternity
Flows on for ever.

Lift the eye, Christian,
Just as it closeth ;

Raise the heart, Christian,
Ere it reposeth,

Thee from the love of Christ
Nothing can sever;

Mount when thy work is done,
Praise Him for ever,”


CHAPTER VI.

‘CA PILGRIM GOING HOME.”’

exgHiE was a little orphan pilgrim. She had met
“i swith many trials on the way, but on Monday
evening, the 1st of December, she reached her
Father’s house, and the angel at the gate welcomed her,
for he saw that she had been washed and made clean in
the blood of the Lamb, and on her forehead Jesus had
written His new name.

I want to tell you something about her pilgrimage, and
how,



“With a childlike trust, she gave her hand
To the mighty Friend by her side ;
The only thing she said to Him
As He took it, was—-‘ Hold it fast,

' Suffer me not to lose my way,

#22?

And bring me home at last.

The little pilgrim’s name was Annie. She once had a
kind, loving father, who took great care of her; but he
was taken ill, and he lay for a very long time in consump-
“A PILGRIM GOING HOME.” 167

tion. A kind clergyman used to attend him, and read
the Bible, and pray; and the sick man learned to trust in
Jesus. When he was near death he was very anxious
about his little girl, and he begged of the clergyman to

_ take care of her. He said he would.

The father died, and little Annie was left an orphan.
The young clergyman did not know what to do with the
little girl he had promised to take care of; so he wrote
to his mother in Dublin, and got her admitted into the
“ Birds’ Nest.” This was about four years ago.* Annie
was very happy in the Birds’ Nest. She had a mild, |
loving spirit, and she learned very quickly the hymns and
verses of Scripture; and these hymns and verses were
good seed, falling in good ground; watered by the Holy
Spirit of God, they took root and grew up, and brought
forth good fruit.

Annie was a very delicate child, and very often was
unable to attend school; but about a year ago she became
much more delicate, ee we had to send her to the
Adelaide Hospital, where she spent many months. She
had a disease of the heart, and she suffered a great deal of
pain; but she was very patient, and was much beloved by
those around her. She was in the children’s ward, and
she used to talk so nicely to the other children! One of

* Written in 1864, |
168 “A PILGRIM GOING HOME.”

them, who had come from the Birds’ Nest, had very sore
eyes; and Annie was so glad when we lent her story-
books to read aloud to the blind one.

It was while Annie was in this ward that Mary Jane
died. Annie told me she should not be afraid when death
came to her, if she thought she should die like Mary
Jane.

When summer time came finite grew better, and she
returned to the Birds’ Nest, to the great joy of the dear
children there: but she did not stay very long. In the
beginning of August she had a very severe attack of ill-
ness. We thought she would have died then. She was
not at all afraid; her trust was in Jesus.

From this illness she partially recovered, but was soon .
again an inmate of an hospital, where she remained a
short time. It did not seem likely that she would ever
_be well, and so, instead of sending her back to the Birds’
Nest, she was put to lodge with a kind old Christian
woman who could nurse her and comfort her last days.
You see her pilgrim path was a very rough one, but she
had placed her hand in that of Jesus, and she knew He
would guide her right. From this time Annie’s health
rapidly declined. She suffered a great deal of pain, but
was so very patient through it all, it was quite a pleasure
to do anything for her. Her trust in Jesus was unshaken,
“SA PILGRIM GOING HOME.” 169

and she calmly waited for the change she knew was
coming. She had not a shadow of doubt or fear. Just
three days before her deatli there came a change in her
symptoms, and we knew that her death was rapidly
approaching. There was no difficulty in telling her
this; she was quite ready; she received the news with
a beaming smile. ‘‘I hope it will be very soon,” she
said. Her breathing was so bad that she could not
lic down, so she sat day and night on a little stool,
leaning her head upon the side of her bed. When
any of us went to see her, she would so gratefully ex-
change the bed for our shoulder or knee. On Satur-
day night she would not allow any one to sit up with her,
only she had a candle lighted; she said Jesus would be
with her. Several times in the night, when her kind
_ hurse got up to look at her, she said, “‘I’m so happy!
I’m going to God; not to-day, but to-morrow.”

I never saw anything so beautifully calm as the dying-
time of this dear child. It ‘did so remind me of the
beautiful hymn— |

| ** Jesus can make a dying bed
Feel soft as downy pillows are,

While on His breast I lean my head,
ne breathe my life out sweetly there.”

Farly on Sunday morning I visited Annie, being
170 ‘*A PILGRIM GOING HOME.”’

anxious to spend as much time as possible with her
before she was taken hence. |

She received me with her sweet, grateful smile, and
so gladly changed her position to lay her tired head on
my shoulder.

For a few moments she slept, and waking said, “I
have been thinking a great deal of what you read about
the gates of heaven, and the angel at the gate readyto
let in all Christ’s children.” Then, looking up with
an earnest gaze, she said, ‘‘ Do you chink there is any
fear of met” It was a solemn question. How my
heart rejoiced at that moment to know there was no
fear. I said, “Surely not; you believe in Jesus, do
you not ?”’ :

“Yes,” replied the child; “I’ve trusted Him long.
No, no,”’ she added, “‘there’s no fear. He said him-
self, ‘Him that cometh unto Mg, I will in no wise cast
out.’’’ After this her breathing was very laboured; her
eyes were closed; we almost thought she was going.
Her nurse said, ‘‘ Dear Annie! how patiently she suffers.”
The child roused herself. ‘‘ Why shouldn’t I suffer
patiently?’’ she said. ‘It’s nothing to what Jesus
suffered for me.” . I said, ‘‘ He looked for comforters, and
found none.” ‘I have plenty,” she said, with a grateful
smile, |
‘““A PILGRIM GOING HOME.” 1

The dear child could not talk much at a time. Only
at intervals she spoke her thoughts; some of them were
very beautiful. .

‘I have been thinking very often of the very first verse
you left me to sleep upon, ‘I will never leave thee nor
forsake thee.” They are His own worps.”

7 ‘I think the angels will very soon come for me. I
** shall see Jesus. Don’t you think I shall lay my head on
His breast?” ‘* Yes,” I said, “like John did at the last
supper.” “Only,” she said, ‘I shall have my erown—
I shall be like Him.”’

‘“¢I shall leave you soon, but we shall have a better
meeting than this; there will be no pain nor sorrow.”

‘*When you come to heaven, Emily and me will both

be at the gate with the angel to welcome you. Oh! I
wish I was there now!” ‘* Well, dear,” I said, “we
must wait patiently.” “Yes, yes; ‘rest in the Lord;
wait patiently for Him.’ ”

Later in the day another friend went to see her. She
put her arms round his neck, and said, “Oh, Mr. H :
I’m going to God very fast; pray for me.” He prayed,
and then talked to her of the things she loved, reminding
her of her hymns, referring to one— _



“T'm a pilgrim and a stranger,
Rough and thorny is the road.”
172 ‘SA PILGRIM GOING HOME.”’

‘That is not mine now,”’ she said—
“T’m a pilgrim Gornc KomE!”

All that night she continued in the same beautiful frame
of mind. When they gave her a little wine, she drank if.
then said, ““ No more. I’Il drink no more till I drink in
the kingdom of God.’ Once she said, “Ill give such.
a knock at the gate! No, no; I forgot, I shall have no
need to knock—the gate is always open.”

Early on Monday morning I was again with her. She
was much weaker, and expressed a great wish to see the
friend who had been, as she said, a mother to her. We
sent for her, and as soon as possible she came. Dear —
- Annie took her hand, and thanked her for all her love and
kindness. Seeing a tear, she said, “ You must not fret.
I shall be happy. When I get to heaven I shall see my
father; Ill tell him how good you’ve*been to me.”? At
intervals through the day she spoke, continuing in the
same happy state. Often she asked, “Do you think
they’ll come soon? Oh, I want to go to God.” In the
afternoon I had to leave her to attend to other duties, but
one of her kind friends took my place. ‘After a time of
much suffering, during which she said not a murmuring
word, she felt easier. She looked up at her friend, and
said, “ Do you know why I am so much better?”
‘C', PILGRIM GOING HOME.” 173

‘* No, dear.”
““ Because I asked. Jesus to take away my pain, and
He has done so.”
After this she fell into a kind of sleep; and while she
slept she was taken home:
** Home! where the Bridegroom takes
The purchase of His love—

Home! where the Father waits
To welcome saints above.”

On Wednesday morning dear Annie was laid in her
grave. The words of our beautiful Burial Service,
repeated over one who had died in such a hope, seemed to
gather new force and meaning—‘‘ We commit her body
to the ground; earth to earth, ashes to ashes, dust to
dust; in sure and certain hope of the Resurrection to
eternal life, through our Lord Jesus Christ; who shall
change our vile body, that it may be like His glorious
body, according to the mighty working, whereby He is
able to subdue all things to himself.”’

‘‘T heard a voice from heaven, saying unto me, Write,
Blessed are the dead which die'in the Lord: Yea, saith
the Spirit, that they may rest from their labours.” _

Qo
174 ‘““A PILGRIM GOING HOME.”

HYMN.

“We speak of the realms of the blest,
That country so bright and so fair,
And oft are its glories confessed —
But what must it be to be there !

We speak of its pathways of gold,
Its walls decked with jewels so rare,
Its wonders and pleasures untold —
But what must it be to be there!

We speak of its peace and its love,
The robes which the glorified wear,
The songs of the blessed above—
But what must it be to be there!

We speak of its freedom from sin,
From sorrow, temptation, and care,

From trials without and within—
But what must it be to be there !

Do thou, Lord, ’midst pleasures or woes,
For heaven our spirit prepare,

That shortly we also may know >
And feel what it is to be there !”


CHAPTER VII.

A CONTRAST.

=| NE: day a lady went to visit in the children’s ward
A) of an hospital; she went up to one bed in which
was lying a beautiful little girl; her eyes were ©
bright and sparkling, and there was a brilliant colour in
her cheeks, but on her lips was an expression of great
pain. ‘* You are suffering very much, dear,” said the
lady. ‘S Yes, it’s very bad.”? ‘* But you know Jesus
suffered more for you.’ ‘¢I don’t know nothing avout
Him, but I know His pain could not be like mine.’
“¢ Don’t you love Jesus?” ‘* No; I tell you I don’t know
nothing about Him.” ‘The lady turned to the next bed.
‘Do you know anything about Jesus, dear?” she asked.
“Yes, ma’am, He died for me; I love Him very much,”
said a gentle voice. ‘The lady was struck with the
contrast. ‘* You are from the Birds’ Nest?” she said.
“Yes, ma’am; lam Carry B ‘

Carry B . was one of a family of three children






176 A CONTRAST.

who had been born in a warm climate, and were more
delicate‘than other children Two of them, as orphans,
had found a home in the Nest—their brother in the
Boys’ Home. Carry was subject to very severe illness,
in which abscesses formed, and she suffered very much;
but the present illness was not like the others: it. was a_
low fever, which terminated in consumption. She was
very patient and gentle; for some time she had given
evidence that she belonged to Jesus. When I knew
that she was seriously ill, I asked her, would she be afraid
to die? She said, No; my sins are all taken away; I
shall go to Teas in heaven.”” She had two favourite
hymns, one beginning—
“¢ My Jesus, I love thee;”’
the other— |
** Jesus loves me.”

These she often sung in the ravings of fever, and even
in her sleep. One day I asked her what text she had
thought of that day. She said, “I will lay me down in
peace and take my rest.”

A few days before her death a friend went to see her:
she could not talk much, but he spoke to her of Jesus’
love. When he was gone she sat up in bed and said
quite loudly to ‘the other patients, “Did you hear him?
he says Jesus loves me.” The assurance seemed to com-
A CONTRAST. 177

fort her afresh. The afternoon of the day on which she
died, her brother and sister went to see her. They were
greatly shocked at the change in their darling sister, but
they said nothing about that; silently they sat beside the
bed. Carry spoke first: “‘I’m going to die,” she said.
Charley asked: “‘ Are you afraid?” ‘ No,” said the little
one; “‘I’m going to Jesus.” Charley asked again: “ Are
you sure your sins are forgiven?”? ‘Yes, guite sure,’?
she said; ‘‘good-bye.” No more was said, and the
brother and sister went away. |

~ Carry was followed to the grave by a large number of
the children of the Mission Schools, (it was too far for the
nestlings to come,) and they sang around her grave her
favourite hymn, feeling sure Carry was with, the dear
Jesus she so much loved.




CHAPTER VIII.
SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE.

F = S97 ARAH TOWEL was a dear little girl, who one

night lay down to sleep in one of the small beds
aa of the Birds’ Nest, and awoke up amongst the
angels in heaven, "The bed-clothing had not been dis-
turbed, and there was a bright, happy smile on the cold
face, al it eens as if in a pleasant dream the messenger
had come.

It was a little shock to our children at first, as the news
of so sudden a death passed from one to another; but
soon they thought ‘of Sarah’s bright life, her love for
Jesus, and they began to feel it was something like it was
with Enoch—“ He walked with God, and he was not,
for God took him; for before his srindlusion he had i
testimony, that he pleated God.”? Sometimes when a child
is taken away from its earthly home, we hope it belonged
to Jesus, and that it is gone to be with Him. And we
think over its life, and secret things come to light; words
written; kind actions done; and we are comforted.


SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE, 17g

It was not thus with Sarah; her’s was a bright Chris-
tian life. All who knew her saw how she was trying to
be like Jesus. She was a sweet example to all around.
We could ill spare the child, but Jesus wanted her in
heaven; and when we think of her weakness and suffer-
ing during all her earthly pilgrimage, we feel thankful
that for her there will be ‘‘no more pain.”

The first time I saw little Sarah was in the Adelaide
Hospital, rather more than three years ago. She was a
pale-faced child, with light hair, and large blue eyes. It
was no wonder her face was pale, for she suffered a.
great deal of pain in her leg, and often lay awake a long
time in the night. The dear child had been brought to
the hospital by her mother; but for some time she had
not been to see her, and no one knew anything about
her.

This hospital is visited by some Christian ladies, “he
take a great deal of interest in the suffering children,
making the rooms as pleasant as they can with pictures.
and toys, and teaching the little ones of Jesus. Of this
hospital Sarah could say—’twas there — ey

s To came to Jesus as I was,
“Weary, and worn, and sad;
I found in Him a resting-place,
And He has made me glad,”
180 SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE:

After a stay of about ten months, the doctor under
whose care she was felt that he could do nothing more to
make her well, and that she ought to be sent home, to
make room for others. But where was her home?
When they went to look for her mother, they found she
had died; and the father had not been heard of for a very
long time. So Sarah was sent for a while to the home
for people who are getting better, and the doctor begged
a place for her in the Birds’ Nest.

The day Sarah died I was telling a lady how one of
our nestlings had been taken so suddenly, but so gently.
When I mentioned the name, she said, “Is it dear little
Sarah? I often went to the Nest on purpose to look at
her sweet, happy face. I began to know her at the
‘Home for Convalescents.” When she saw my pony
stop at the gate, she would hop down on her little stick
to meet me; and as we walked up to the house, would
tell me what new texts and hymns she had learned. I
shall miss her very much.”

When little Sarah’s case was brought before the Com-
mittee of the Birds’ Nest, some of the ladies said, “* What
shall we do with her when she grows up? She will never
be able to earn her living. But then, we thought, our
home is for destitute ones, and her lameness only makes
her the more destitute. God will provide for her. And
SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE. | I8I

so she was taken in, and very soon attracted the love of
allaround her,

When I think over Sarah” s life in the Birds’ Nest, I
am most surprised at her constant cheerfulness. The
doctor said that every organ of her body was diseased, and
she often suffered great pain; yet she joined the other
children in the schoolroom and in the playground, and had
always a smile and a kind word for any one who spoke to
her. She could not join her companions in their walks,
because of her lameness; but a kind lady who lived near
asked her to spend the walking-time with her. In winter
she taught her to play on the piano, or gave her some-
thing to do in the house. In summer she weeded the —
garden, and tended the flowers. When little Sarah lay
dead, this lady stood weeping over her. ‘‘ The sunbeam
is gone from our home,’ she said; ‘‘we all loved the
dear child so much.” |

Soon after Sarah came to the Nest a friend noticed that
her stick was too short. He bought a new one, and,
sitting out in the playground, cut it to the right length.
Some months afterwards he saw that the stick’was worn
down again. While preparing a second one, he said,
“<’'You must always let me buy your sticks.’’? Sarah looked
up at him, and said, “I don’t think I shall want many.”

“Why not, dear? =~ are growing stronger now.”
182 | SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE.

“Yes; but I think I shall soon die.”

“But do you think you are ready to die?”’

“Yes, quite ready,” she sweetly said. ‘* Jesus has
taken all my sins. I’m ‘fitter to die than to live.”

‘You mean that your body is not strong enough to
work; don’t you, dear?”

“Yes. I never could work hard; and I’d like to be
with Jesus in heaven.”’

“Do you suffer much?”’

‘“ No, not much at all; God is very good to me about
that; and the children are so kind to me. I’ve never
been knocked down once in the playground.”

Sarah was a very helpful little girl—‘a ministering
child.”” She had always a needle and thread ready to sew
up a tear in any little one’s frock; but her especial charge
was the boys’ collars. ‘“I'wice a-week she had to look
over all the fifty-six boys’ coats, and sew a clean collar on
each. She loved to be useful.

She was humble-minded too, never putting herself
forward, or seeking notice. One day a friend was sitting
in the midst of a group of children in the playground.
He asked them what they had been learning lately. ‘They
said, the Gospel of St. John. So he began to question
them, first about the woman of Samaria; and how Jesus
said if she Anew Him she would have asked for living
SURE AND CERTAIN. HOPE. 183

water; what the living water was; about Nicodemus,
and the teaching Jesus.gave him. The talk grew very
‘solemn, and he said—‘‘Children, all of you here know
about Jesus. How many have asked?—how many are
born again? [don’t want you to tell me, but each one
answer in your own hearts. Quietly the children turned
away, but one little one remained. ‘Touching their
friend’s arm, she timidly said, ‘‘ Sarah Towel has asked.”
“* How do you know, dear?” ‘She could not be so good
if she had not got the Holy Spirit.’ Dear Sarah had
made one of the group. She had not answered for her-
self, but, like Jesus, “she could not be hid.”? And her
little playmate bore testimony to Sarah’s Christian life.

After Sarah’s death, I asked the kind friend who so
often. had her at her house to tell me. something of the
dear child’s life with her. She writes as follows :—

« 3rd March.

“My peaR Miss Davies,—With mingled feelings of
pain and much thankfulness, I comply with your request
of noting down some recollections of the dear child so —
lately and suddenly taken from amongst us. We were all
very fond of her, and we greatly miss her bright face
and cheerful little ways; but we rejoice to know that the
Good Shepherd has gathered the lamb with His arm, and
184 SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE.

taken her to be for ever with himself. No one who
really knew little Sarah has the smallest doubt ‘of this.
It was not difficult to discover that she was one of the
lambs of the fold. Her cheerful response when spoken
to about the love of Jesus, and asked if she had given her
young heart to Him, as well as her happy Christian walk.
as a lowly follower of the Lamb, bore testimony that she
was no stranger to the love of Christ, which passeth
knowledge. Her brief life was filled with acts of love and
self-denial, such as are rarely to be seen in one so young.
Love to her precious Saviour was evidently the con-
straining motive; and thus the tender branch which could
not bear fruit of itself, became fruitful from its union with
the vine. She was truly a ministering child, patient and
uncomplaining in her own sufferings, which must ‘have
been greater at times than she would allow.

‘To make this little girl useful was to make her happy.
It was a great treat to her to be asked to help me in my
garden, or to take part in any little household employment.
Indeed we often invented a little job or message for her,
just for the pleasure it seemed to give; and then it was
always nice to hear her inquiry, ‘Can I do anything more,
ma’am!’? When my mother was often much alone in the
winter afternoons, she would have her up to sit on a
little stool in the room with her, while she examined her
SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE. 185

on the different subjects she was learning at school, or had
her to sing hymns, which she ‘did very nicely. Now her
voice is attuned to the new song in the courts above. She
used to speak of her love for the Bible, and would say, in
her megry way, thag she only wished every lesson were as
easy to her as her Scripture-lesson.

‘She was not spoiled by the notice that was taken of
her, as another child might have been. Any little kind-
ness towards her only seemed to make her grateful and
happy. Her lip was the lip of truth; and we cannot
remember ever seeing her out of temper during the two
years and a-half that she was in the constant habit of
spending her afternoons here. She was always a welcome
visitor. As she hobbled in with the help of her little stick,
every one was glad to see her. She always spoke of her
teachers and Mrs. O‘Neil with affection, and seemed very
proud of being so much employed by the latter in helping
to mend the boys’ clothes, &c.

“Sarah seemed deeply anxious for the conversion of
her father, and that her little brothers should be placed
under proper training. One day she wept bitterly, when
thinking that they might wander about the streets uncared
for, while their father was at his daily labour, and lest they
should not be taught about the Lord Jesus. We never
saw her more thoroughly ‘happy than the last day she was

+
186 SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE.

with us, little more than a week ago. We feel truly
thankful that we were privileged to give the ‘cup of
water,’ and thereby render more bright and cheerful her
last few years on earth. ‘Her memory will be long
cherished by us.

‘The brief life of this young disciple is, I think, a
beautiful example of what a Christian child may be; and.
her sudden removal speaks to all. When the summons
came it found her ready, and she calmly fell asleep in
Jesus. We often felt anxious about her future, knowing
how helpless she would be in undertaking any employment
like other girls; but her Master knew this better than we
did. He saw that the tender plant was unfit to bear the
chilling winds of earth, and He gathered the lily, that it
‘might freely bloom in the genial atmosphere above. Shall
We not rejoice and say, ‘It is well with the child.’

“¢ Believe me, truly yours, |
“ErizaBeTH V. Purses.”

Another friend adds a few particulars :—

“Dear Mapam,—I thank you for the letter relative
to Sarah ‘Towel, which I received yesterday, and have
forwarded to the Rev. E. B , of M , from whose
parish the poor child came. I cannot but feel very




SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE. 187

thankful that she has been so early taken from this world
of sorrow and suffering, to be'‘ for ever with the Lord,’
especially as her delicate health would always have been
against her progress in any kind of employment which
might have been provided for her in the future. I was
very much interested for her when she was an inmate of
_ the Adelaide Hospital, she was such a patient little sufferer;
yet cannot but feel that it is indeed ‘ well with the child,’
whose days of mourning have been ended so early. Her
father was a drunkard, and her mother dead. The Birds’
Nest never opened the doors to one who required a home
~ more than she did. ‘The Lord will say in her case, I am
sure, ‘Inasmuch as ye have done it to one of the least
of these, ye have done it unto me.’

“ Believe me, very truly yours
» Very yy 3

eT M on

Just three years before Sarah’s death the nestlings had
followed to the grave a beloved teacher. The story is
told in the little book, No. 4. They were very anxious
‘that the body of their loved companion might be laid near
to her. Quite close to her grave was a vacant spot; and
there, on a chill March morning, we laid the body of
Sarah Towel, in most “sure and certain hope of a joyful

23

resurrection.” And the children returned home, solemnly


188 SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE.

thinking of death and heaven, and asking themselves the
question, Who will be the next? If I should be called,
am I ready? |

Ten days afterwards another was called; but if any one
of us had been asked’ to say beforehand which it would
be, we should never have chosen Mary Anne M‘Cormaic.
She was one of the most healthy children in the Nest,
never having had a day’s illness. The last evening of
her life she was playing gaily with Mrs. O’Neil’s baby.
None could have guessed how near she was to another
world, In the night she awoke the girl next to her, com-
plaining of sickness, but was soon better, and went to
sleep. At seven in the morning she was found dead, her .
hands clenched. ‘The doctor, who was immediately called,
said it was a fit. Mary Anne was a reserved child; her
deepest feelings were hidden; but she knew Jesus, and
tried to live so as to please Him.

By these two sudden deaths Jesus has spoken solemnly
to all our hearts—“ Be ye also ready, for in such an hour
as ye think not the Son of Man cometh.”

God grant that each child reading this little book may

now begin to follow Jesus; so that, whenever death may
come, friends left behind may be able to rejoice in “* sure
and certain hope.”’

Many others of our dear children have safely reached
-

SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE. : 189

the heavenly home—some peacefully, some joyfully. It
is our most earnest desire that every one of’ our rescued
wanderers may be led to follow the footsteps of the Good
Shepherd, and be enabled to glorify Him whether in life
or death, What a joyful meeting there will be one day

above, when those who have laboured and prayed for the
nestlings shall recognise themn— _

**No more as ragged orphans wild,
But dressed in bright array;
For God has owned the homeless child
And wiped its tears away,”

2




CHAPTER IX.

CONCLUSION.

> aN D now, dear friends, I send forth this little book
(ZSANN| to plead the cause of destitute children. The
: Birds’ Nest is not a thing of the past. At this
moment one hundred and ninety children are to be found
there, each one needing to be fed, and clothed, and taught,
every day; and as these go forth into the world, their
places will be filled by others. And as long as there
are hearts and hands willing to take up this work for
Jesus the Nest will ever be kept full. Our trust is in our
Father in heaven. He never fails His people. And
though we may have times of darkness and trial, we



know that—

‘¢ His mercy watches o’er us in every season still,
Nor cold, nor heat can harm us, unless it be His will.
If He send want or sorrow He still will be our stay,
E’en let the unknown morrow bring with it what it may,

It can bring with it nothing but He will bear us through;
Who gives the lilies clothing will clothe His children too;
CONCLUSION. IQ!

Beneath the spreading heavens no creature but is fed,
And He who feeds the ravens will give His children bread.” _

es

‘Therefore we will not fear.

During the last twelve years upwards of four hundred
children have found a home in the Birds’ Nest. Of these
only twenty-four have died; some have been taken away
by friends able to support them; some have been taken
away and placed in convents; many are out in situations
as faithful servants; and one hundred and ninety remain
in the Nest. We thank God that so much has been
accomplished; that we have been enabled to cheer so
many desolate lives; that friends have been found for the
friendless, @omfort for the comfortless, a home for the
homeless, ae soil

Ours is a winter Birds’ Nest,—a nest for times of cold,
and want, and snow; but it is surrounded with trees of
lovingkindnées— ethieakies ; and the more intense the
cold, and the deeper the darkness, of desolate lives, the
more warm and bright must be our Nest, the more we

shall need ae
Ghe lly and gov,





Armen oO

M‘Laren & Ersxinz, Printers, GLascow.




BIRDS’ NEST,
HOME FOR DESTITUTE CHILDREN,
KINGSTOWN, NEAR DUBLIN.

oi



TRUSTEES— |
HON. AND REV. LORD PLUNKET,
Old Connaught, Bray ;

REV. C. F. MACCARTHY, D.D.,
Missionary to Roman Catholics, Dublin;

JOHN MURPHY, Esc,
Dundalk ;

4 Merrion Bile N on Dubs .





SECRETARIES— ,
MRS. J. SMYLY, |
35 Upper Fitzwilliam Street, Dublin;
MISS M,’A, CROFTON,
19 York Road, Kingstown.

SECRETARY OF CHILDREN’S ASSOCLATION—
MISS SARAH DAVIES,

35 Upper Firzwituam. Sraecr, Dust, .



TRE ASURER—
FRANCIS Low, Esq., Bank of Messrs, Boyte, Low, Murray, & Co,,
College Green, Dublin, |






PAGE 1

HOW WE BEGAN. 17 We could not afford to buy bedsteads, but every child had a little sack, filled with straw, laid on the floor, with a pair of sheets and blankets; and as we admitted more children into the Nest, the number of these little beds increased, till at last they were so thickly laid, side by side, that it was with difficulty we could step about the rooms; there were forty children. Week after week the Committee of The Birds' Nest met; and week after week they met with two great difficulties : one was that money did not come in as fast as it was wanted; but for this there was a remedy,-prayer and work. The other difficulty was, how to refuse the multitude of poor children who pressed for admission; it was so very hard to turn them away, and think that they must continue to wander the streets, faint and weary; and the ladies prayed very much for guidance. They felt as if God was saying to them, " Take these children and nurse them for Me, I will give you money." And so they determined that as soon as possible they would build a Home which would hold one hundred and fifty, and they would write down in a book the cases of the children who were left without, that as soon as there was room they might all be taken in. The little clildren who had found a home.in The Birds' Nest were very busy, and very happy. They ros early -B



PAGE 1

44 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. holding the hand of a little one between them; they seem very happy together. The two elder have been. in the Nest some time; the younger has just come. Their mother, too, was a Christian. Their father had deserted them long ago, and the mother worked for their support as long as she could. At last she was attacked by an incurable disease, and obliged to 'put her children in the poorhouse and go to hospital. Her sufferings were very great, but the thoughts of her dear little boys, surrounded by the influences of the most depraved of characters, was worse. She could only lay the burden on Jesus. At length some of the lady visitors heard about these children, and they applied to our Committee; and first the two little fellows were got out of the poorhouse, then the third, and there are not three happier children in the Nest. The mother is dead now, but her boys have found a home. Two other children lately admitted had a Christian mother. Years ago she came, a poor, dark Roman Catholic, to the Townsend Street Sunday School. She liked what she learned, and she came again and again. One by one every false hope was given up, and at last she was enabled to lay her sins on Jesus, and trust only in Him. Her little children were regular attendants at the Luke Street Infants' School. A few months ago this poor woman had to go to the Hospital for Incurables, where she



PAGE 1

NOT ALONE. 135 Speaking on the same subject to another friend, she said, "If we were at school, how glad we would be when the holidays drew near, and the time came for us to go home! And how glad I shall be when the call comes for me to go HOME ! When people are in a ship, and when it has been very stormy, they enjoy reaching the harbour far more than when they have had a good passage; so I do be often thinking that I shall enjoy heaven much more than those who never had any pain." Poor Emily! it was no wonder she longed for home and rest-her's was indeed a stormy passage; but the bright light of heaven streamed on the waters, and this light brightened up the common things of life, and she saw all things in the light of God. One day a friend brought her some fruit; she said, "What beautiful fruit! how it reminds me of the* fruit that grows on the tree of life in the midst of the paradise of God, which He will give me to eat of." Another day, some time after, a friend brought her a bit of hawthorn, on. which the leaves were bursting out in their fresh spring green; she looked at it, and said, "Isn't it like as if God's smiles were coming down to us?" During one night in November she was much worse than usual. Towards morning she said to the kind friends with whom she lodged, "I thought, a while ago,



PAGE 1

CONTENTS. -o-PART I. CHAPTER 1. PAGE INTRODUCTORY,. ......9 CHAPTER II. HOW WE BEGAN, ......14 CHAPTER III. DARK CLOUDS,. ......21 CHAPTER IV. GOD'S CARE, ....24 CHAPTER V. GOING FORWARD, ...28 CHAPTER VI. THE BIRDS IN THE NEST, .* 37 CHAPTER VII. DAILY WORK, ......60 CHAPTER VIII. HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS, ....72 CHAPTER IX. THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION, ..82



PAGE 1

I« 10 TO THE MEMBERS OF WHO WITH LOVING HEARTS AND SELF-DENYING LABOURS HIVE HELPED TO BUILD " THE NEST" AND FEED THE BIRDS WHOHAVE FOUND SHELTER FROM THE WINTER STORMS, BY THEIR GRATEFUL FRIEND, THE SECRETARY.



PAGE 1

HOW THE BUILDING WAS PAID FOR. 1I9 collect the money due. One of his kind associates in the matter gives the following account of their work:"The Ladies' Committee in aid of the Building Fund of The Birds' Nest were first brought together in the autumn of 1863, at the invitation of Mr. Porter, with the object of making a combined effort to clear off the longstanding debt, which was such a heavy burden on the Institution. To the admirable and systematic arrangements suggested by him, and to his unwearying energy and zeal while acting as our honorary secretary, we were deeply indebted. Having commended our cause to God in earnest prayer, he led us to expect the blessing, and continually cheered us on, as a band of fellow-labourers, with unabated interest to the end. "Our plan of working was thus : To each lady collector was apportioned the whole or part of one of the counties in Ireland, which she undertook as her field of labour, writing and sending out the appeals to all those within her district who might be willing to assist and be interested in the work. It was thus hoped that, by a vigorous and united effort, the entire debt of £3,000 might speedily be removed. We proposed to meet together once a-fortnight for prayer, for a blessing on our labours, and to hand in the.amount received-by each collector. Those unable to attend personally were requested to send in their report



PAGE 1

CHAPTER VII. A CONTRAST. NE day a lady went to visit in the children's ward of an hospital; she went up to one bed in which was lying a beautiful little girl; her eyes were bright and sparkling, and there was a brilliant colour in her cheeks, but on her lips was an expression of great pain. "You are suffering very much, dear," said the lady. "Yes, it's very bad." "But you know Jesus suffered more for you." "I don't know nothing about Him, but I know His pain could not be like mine." " Don't you love Jesus ?" " No; I tell you I don't know nothing about Him." The lady turned to the next bed. "Do you know anything about Jesus, dear?" she asked. " Yes, ma'am, He died for me; I love Him very much," said a gentle voice. The lady was struck with the contrast. "You are from the Birds' Nest?" she said. " Yes,. ma'am; I am Carry B." Carry B--. was one of a family of three children



PAGE 1

NOT ALONE. 139 talk to that poor girl, and asking God to teach me how to begin, and she began by saying, 'Emily, you ought to pray to the Lord to take you soon.' I asked why; and she said, 'Because, don't you know, on Christmas day, and for twelve days after, the gates of heaven stand wide open, night and day.' 'Yes,' I said, 'but not only thenthe gates of heaven are always wide open, and Jesus won't turn away any who believe in Him.' 'I don't think you are right there,' she said. 'Believing is not enough. This is the way it is-we must do our best to make ourselves good, and then Jesus will take pity on us, and make up the rest.' I told her the story of the prodigal son; how he had nothing but his misery and poverty to recommend him to his father, but how the father fell 'on his neck and kissed him. She liked the story very much, and said she did not know the Bible was such an interesting book. I said it was full of such beautiful stories, and I would read some, if she liked. She was very glad. Then I sang for her, 'Just as I am,' and she liked it so much that she learned it. Oh! it was such a happy evening." That poor young woman went out of the hospital very soon after, and we do not know whether the seed thus sown has yet spring up; but we know that God has promised that His word shall not be lost.



PAGE 1

INTRODUCTORY. II and let thy widows trust in Mi."--Because the onlybegotten Son, in His wondrous life on earth, left us an example that we should love little children.-Because when in His ris'en body He talked with His disciples, and would have from Peter a proof of constant love, He said, "Feed my lambs." Now He is gone, and we are left to follow out the path He traced; and as alone, or in companies, His servants tread that path, He looks down with kindly eye and sympathizing heart. Oh let us never forget that we are working for Him who took a little child and set him by Him,-that we have a smile from Him who said, " Suffer little children to come unto ME." Oh, then"Aim to be like Jesus; walk with God, Look up to learn your heavenly Father's willLook round the earth on which your Saviour trodAnd when you find a child of sorrow, ill, Forlorn,and helpless, toiling up the hill, Be thou a loving angel, and thy face, In tending it, shall shine as angels' do; As shine those sons of light in that high place, Hid for a little while from mortal view, Where, if you follow Christ, you'll be an angel too." The Birds' Nest shelters one hundred and ninety of these "forlorn and helpless" ones. They have been taken out from the wide world, and brought together, not « ; '*



PAGE 1

26 GOD'S CARE. " Ah! the little children of The Birds' Nest have learned how strong God is, and they rely upon the promise written in the 9ist Psalm,1c He shall cover thee with His feathers, and under His wings shalt thou trust."



PAGE 1

DAILY WORK. 61 largest number of children for the smallest sum of money. And after thinking and planning a great deal, we were obliged to take the plan that was the very simplest possible. It is ugly, I allow, outside, but it is economical and useful. The beauty is all inside. Who cares about the casket when compared with the precious jewels it contains ? who cares about the purse when compared with the money it contains ? And so we do not care about the outside of the house, when we think of the precious jewels that are there being polished and prepared for the Saviour's casket. We are content that no money has been wasted; and though a great deal has been spent-much more than we at first thought would have been'enough-yet it is all put to good practical purposes. I have elsewhere described the plan of the building; now let us peep inside, and see what goes on there. It is just break of day, on a fine spring morning. The green blinds of the great dormitories are drawn down, but through the line left at the edge a bright beam of sunlight stretches in; it rests on a little iron cot-bed covered with a bright patchwork quilt; it kisses the rosy cheek of a curly-headed sleeper; he wakes up, and looks round on his sleeping companions. Forty-five such little iron beds, inhabited by forty-five such sleepers, are in that' room; but they are not to sleep much longer: one after another awakes, and



PAGE 1

I8 HOW WE BEGAN. in the morning, and dressed and washed themselves. Then there were beds to make, and rooms to sweep; after which they assembled in a long room at, the back of the house for prayer. After comfortable warm breakfasts of cocoa and bread, hats and bonnets were brought out, and the little party set off, two-and-two, followed by their kind matron, to the Mission School; and in many a home, as they passed, kind voices said, "Here come the children," and kind faces looked out upon them and blessed them and the clatter of forty pairs of wooden clogs was a constant reminder to collectors to be up and doing. But the clatter of the clogs was heard by enemies too. There were some who were angry because the children were taken by Protestants, and taught the Bible. They would break up The Nest if they could;, and many a scheme was laid for the purpose. The children knew they had enemies, and that they were always in danger; but they knew God as their Father, they knew they were safe only under His protection, and so they learned to trust in Him. Up in the dormitories at night they met for prayer; and a few trees in the garden formed a tabernacle where these dear children often met with God. Frequently in the playtime the voi*e of mirth would be stopped, and you might hear sweet children's voices joining in a hymn.



PAGE 1

THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 39 The Reader told the grandmother of a ragged school that was quite near, and asked her to send the children in time for breakfast the next day. They went, and soon became greatly in love with the school, and the nice things they learned there. But one day they were missed by the teachers. Another day, and another day, and they did not come. Then the Reader went to visit them, and he found. the four children weeping over the dead body of their grandmother. They had now no relative to care for them; but their sad case was made known,. and the two elder boys were taken into the RAGGED BOYs' HOME, and the two little ones found a happy home in the Birds' Nest. And so they are all under the tender care of the Good Shepherd, who watches over His little lambs, and causes His people to go after them, and find them, and bring them to His fold. How many of our dear children I could shew you who have no friends but those belonging to the Nest! Here is one-a dear, loving little girl. She was brought by a poor woman who had taken care of her#as long as she could. When I first looked at the child I thought she must be an idiot, and I took her down stairs at our own house, and asked the cook, a kind motherly woman, to "keep her for a few hours, and try to make her talk. In the evening she said, The poor child 'has plenty of



PAGE 1

DAILY WORK. 65 is this to be done ?" and, " Please, what shape-patch shall I put here ?" and, "Wouldn't it be best to make these two pinafores into one ?" &c., &c. But by-and-by all is in fair progress; and then one starts a hymn, and all join; and by the time that is done, perhaps the door opens, and some dear friend enters with a book in her hand, and a chair is soon found for her, right in the middle; and the supper-bell rings before the story is half read, so it shall be finished next day. Now for a peep on a summer's evening. It is eight o'clock, but it is yet light, and for the last half-hour there has been undressing going on. And when the night-gown was on, and the clothes folded, each little one knelt down beside its bed to thank God for all His blessings, and to ask for more for itself and all its friends. And now they are all in bed-forty-five-in the infants' dormitory; and we open the door and peep in. Some one at the far end spies us, and strikes up a hymn of welcome, and in a moment all are sitting up to join; and the sounds are heard in the other rooms, and some who have not begun to undress come in, so we have quite a concert. And then we say good-bye, and the children go to sleep; and we pray that each one of those rescued little ones may have a place amongst the white-robed company above, who shall sing the new song unto Him that loved them. E



PAGE 1

182 SSURE AND CERTAIN HOPE. "c Yes; but I think I shall soon die." "c But do you think you are ready to die?" "C Yes, quite ready," she sweetly said. " Jesus has taken all my sins. I 'm fitter to die than to live." " You mean that your body is not strong enough to work; don't you, dear?" "€ Yes. I never could work hard; and I'd like to be with Jesus in heaven." "c Do you suffer much?" " No, not much at all; God is very good to me about that; and the children are so kind to me. I've never been knocked down once in the playground." Sarah was a very helpful little girl-" a ministering child." She had always a needle and thread ready to sew up a tear in any little one's frock; but her especial charge was the boys' collars. Twice a-week she had to look over all the fifty-six boys' coats, and sew a clean collar on each. She loved to be useful. She was humble-minded too, never putting herself forward, or seeking notice. One day a friend was sitting in the midst of a group of children in the playground. He asked them what they had been learning lately. They said, the Gospel of St. John. So he began to question them, first about the woman of Samaria; and how Jesus said if she knew Him she would have asked for living



PAGE 1

JM'Laren & Erskine, ill Printers, Glasgow. (I



PAGE 1

104 GOD S PROVIDINGS. fore didst thou doubt?' In that time of need how our hearts rejoiced when we thought of the many friends who were praying, and trusting, and watching; and how anxiously we listened for the postman's knock, how eagerly we opened the letters, how words of cheer encouraged! ' I am praying for a thousand pounds,' said one; cI am sure you will get it.' Did we? Yes; just three weeks from that 22nd of December. On the 12th / of January the last pound of the £1,158 was paid; and while the lists were being printed, we kept the balancesheet open, and gathered a little store for January. In the £1,158 there were only three large sums-one note for £20, two for £Xo; all the rest was sent in small collections. By many hands our Father helped us-many hearts He used to pray; and now many hearts will. send forth songs of praise. I could not help telling all this on the first page. I know how those who have been praying will be watching for the answer: weak ones on their sick beds, earnest workers in the day's heat, little children gathered around a mother's knee, classes in Sunday Schools, and Children's Associations. Thank God, dear friends, He has answered your prayers largely, abundantly. We want you not only to thank God for the abundant supply of our needs, bit for the spirit of earnest prayer poured out on the Collectors, and on the little children of the



PAGE 1

CHAPTER VI. "LA PILGRIM GOING HOME.' HE was a little orphan pilgrim. She had met with many trials on the way, but on Monday evening, the Ist of December, she reached her Father's house, and the angel at the gate welcomed her, for he saw that she had been washed and made clean in the blood of the Lamb, and on her forehead Jesus had written His new name. I want to tell you something about her pilgrimage, and how, , "With a childlike trust, she gave her hand To the mighty Friend by her side; The only thing she said to Him As He took it, vwas--' Hold it fast, Suffer me not to lose my way, And bring me home at last.' " The little pilgrim's name was Annie. She once had a kind, loving father, who took great care of her; but he was taken ill, and he lay for a very long time in consump-



PAGE 1

GOING FORWARD. 29 as they, with clasped hands, stood to sing their grace, and then quietly ate their food, you would have supposed that they had been carefully taught, even from their babyhood. Still we had many difficulties in this crowded house; no baths, no convenience at all for washing either the children or their clothes, a few tubs in the yard being all we could manage; and we were very anxious that a new building should be commenced as soon as possible. In April, 1861, a piece of ground was procured. It was a green field nearly opposite the house the children occupied. Just then the Rev. Alexander Dallas,* who has been so blessed by God in the conversion of Roman Catholics, was coming over from England, and we asked him to lay the foundation-stone; he gladly consented. The day appointed was the I.Ith of April. It was a most lovely day, and the friends who went down to Kingstown from Dublin almost filled a train. When we arrived we walked up first to the old Nest, where the children were all assembled, dressed in their new summer livery. When Mr. Dallas came into the playground they all gathered round him and sang a welcome. He spoke a few *This beloved and useful servant of God entered into his rest Dec. I2, 1869. His loss is deeply felt throughout the whole of our country. Of him it may truly be said, He loved our nation."



PAGE 1

140 NOT ALONE. And now dear Emily seemed to be rapidly passing away. We visited her very often. One day one said to her, " I'll come again to-morrow." With a sweet smile she said, "I may be at home to-morrow; but we'll soon meet above, and, oh! won't I have a welcome for you there!" Another day her wasted hand was lying outside her bed, and one said, "Poor little hand, how thin it is!" "Never mind," she said, "it will be fashioned like unto His glorious body." On one of the last days of her life she sent a message to her former schoolfellows. She said, "Tell all who remember me to come to Jesus; tell them that, in my dying hour, He is more to me than all His promises. I am dying; but, oh! tell them all to come to Jesus." Thus lived dear Emily; and one morning, when we went to the hospital, she was gone. Her sweet face was not any whiter than usual, but there was the settled calm of death upon it. We could not but rejoice for our Emily. She had" Reached the sunny shore, All her toil and griefs were o'er; She would never suffer more Over there."



PAGE 1

144 SAFE AT HOME. Should I not, then, happy be, Since He takes such care of me-? And when these bright days are ended, By good angels then attended, In His arms He '11 take me home, Never forth again to roam." Oh yes! Janey is now no more a helpless wanderer, but safe at home with Jesus, in the land where the inhabitants are never sick. /



PAGE 1

PREFACE TO THE THIRD EDITION. -00. ---O ---o-WHEN the Second Edition of this little book was nearly sold off, it was thought well to publish its contents in a series of little books, which could be issued in large numbers. This plan has been most successful; but still many letters are coming asking for the original book; and therefore we have determined to send forth a Third Edition, bringing down the story to the present time, and embodying the contents of the later numbers of the little books. We commend this new edition to the loving care of our Heavenly Father. May He bless it abundantly, and by it touch many hearts, causing them to feel for the miseries of destitute little children, and leading them to help in some way to provide for the little children in the BIRDS' NEST. SARAH DAVIES, 35 UPPER FITZWILLIAM STREET, DUBLIN, Honorary Secretary to Children's Association. December, 1871,



PAGE 1

162 WANDERERS WELCOMED. smile on the face of my little friend. " I'm happy now," she said; "I know I'11 go to heaven." And then, when I questioned her, she said she felt her sins were laid on Jesus. Oh! how my heart rejoiced with her! A few days after, when I again visited the hospital, the Nurse said to me, "There's such a change in Mary Jane; she has given up fretting." To be sure she had. She had found peace in Jesus; why should she fret? and there, hung up before her, was one of those " Silent Comforters," with a hymn turned down little Mary had learned to love. It begins"A mind at perfect peace with God; Oh ! what a word is this! A sinner reconciled through blood, This, this indeed is peace." And then the last verse"Why should I over careful be, Since such a God is mine ? He watches o'er me night and day, .And tells mey mine is thine." So for one fortnight Mary Jane lay calmly waiting for Jesus.; but she did not expect to be called very soon. On Wednesday, the 24th of December, when the doctor was with her, she looked very earnestly at him. When he was gone, she said to the Nurse, Nurse, I 'm going to die."



PAGE 1

30 GOING FORWARD. words to them; after which all formed into a procession, and walked down the road to the ground selected for the new building. The children took their places around the stone, and then all the other people stood around. The rector of the parish offered up a prayer for God's blessing, and then the stone was put down. Some nice speeches were made, and then the children gathered into a group and sang many beautiful hymns, their voices blending so sweetly together. We all felt full of joy and thankfulness, and joined in heart and feeling in the children's chorus, "All glory to Jesus." After this the building committee worked in earnest. I could not tell you how often the poor little Birdies looked out at their new 1" Nest," as stone after stone was laid, and the walls rose, and the window-places were left, and then the roof was put on. And then the carpenters. came, and doors were put in, and windows were made; and then the iron railings were put up in front, and the gates in their places. How they wondered what it would all be like inside! At last April came, and Mr. Dallas was coming over; and though all the inside things were not ready, still the school-rooms were finished, and we determined to have an opening day on the Ioth of April, exactly a year from



PAGE 1

THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 59 On the cross He died for sinners Full of sin and cheerless, And He waits to take you to Him; Come,, oh come, then, fearless. Meekly bow before His throne, All your sins and sorrows own. TO THE WANDERERS' FRIENDS. OH! kind friends, help us in pity, There are very many Orphans wander through the city Without e'en a penny. Give us of your bounteous store, Give to those distressed and poor. And our Lord will bless the giver, For His grace is endless; Therefore, friends, where'er you be, Try to help the friendless. Christ will say, when life is o'er, "( Come, for you have helped my poor." One of the Collectors.



PAGE 1

138 NOT ALONE. she said; "but when Mr. Fleft me I cried myself sick. Then it came into my mind, 'Sure Jesus was once left alone; didn't His disciples all leave Him? and didn't He say, "Yet I am not alone, because the Father is with me?" Sure God is with me, too,' I said; and I did get such comfort out of that; and, do you know, I haven't been a bit lonely since." For more than three months Emily dwelt in this ward. They were happy and useful months. A great deal or suffering of body; but Jesus spread a great calm over the spirit of the tried child, and she felt that all was well. Emily was very anxious to be made useful to those around her, and spoke much to her nurse about coming to Christ. A little before Christmas a young woman was placed in the same ward, whom Emily soon discovered to be a Roman Catholic. To this young woman she longed to speak, but felt a great difficulty about it. She told me of this, and asked if I would pray that she might have an opportunity given to her. A few days after Christmas I went to see her. She took hold of my hand eagerly, and said, "Sit close, I want to whisper. We had such a happy Christmas eve. I was well enough to sit up in a chair, and we had a good fire, and we had our tea; and then I was longing so to



PAGE 1

168 A PILGRIM GOING HOME." them, who had come from the Birds' Nest, had very sore eyes; and Annie was so glad when we lent her storybooks to read aloud to the blind one. It was while Annie was in this ward that Mary Jane died. Annie told me she should not be afraid when death came to her, if she thought she should die like Mary Jane. When summer time came Annie grew better, and she returned to the Birds' Nest, to the great joy of the dear children there: but she 'did not stay very long. In the beginning of August she had a very severe attack of illness. We thought she would have died then. She was not at all afraid; her trust was in Jesus. From this illness she partially recovered, but was soon again an inmate of an hospital, where she remained a short time. It did not seem likely that she would ever be well, and so, instead of sending her back to the Birds' Nest, she was put to lodge with a kind old Christian woman who could nurse her and comfort her last days. You see her pilgrim path was a very rough one, but she had placed her hand in that of Jesus, and she knew He would guide her right. Frot this time Annie's health rapidly declined. She suffered a great deal of pain, but was so very patient through it all, it was quite a pleasure to do anything for her. Her trust in Jesus was unshaken,



PAGE 1

"A PILGRIM GOING HOME." I71 The dear child could not talk much at a time. Only at intervals she spoke her thoughts; some of them were very beautiful. "I have been thinking very often of the very first verse you left me to sleep upon,' I will never leave thee nor forsake thee.' They are Hs owN WORDS." S"I think the angels will very soon come for me. I 1shall see Jesus. Don't you think I shall lay my head on His breast?" "Yes," I said, "like John did at the last supper." "Only," she said, "I shall have my grownI shall be like HIM." "I shall leave you soon, but we shall have a better meeting than this; there will be no pain nor sorrow." " When you come to heaven, Emily and me will both be at the gate with the angel to welcome you. Oh ! I wish I was there now!" ' Well, dear," I said, "we must wait patiently." " Yes, yes; 'rest in the Lord; wait patiently for Him.'" Later in the day another friend went to see her. She put her arms round his neck, and said, "Oh, Mr. H---, I'm going to God very fast; pray for me." He prayed, and then talked to her of the things she loved, reminding her of her hymns, referring to one" I'm a pilgrim and a stranger, Rough and thorny is the road."



PAGE 1

38 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST# expected him I had prepared clothes which I thought would have fitted him. But he came-a miserable little object, about the size of a child of three-a poor, worn face; his front teeth gone; his dress-how shall I describe it ? There was a ragged sort of cape over the shoulders, and then a piece of old calico sewed round his body, so inlaid with dirt that it was almost impossible to touch it. But we took a pair of scissors, and cut the stitches. I am sure this must have been around him at least a year. He cried bitterly when it was taken off; but when first a clean little shirt, and then a warm, petticoat, and then a long-sleeved frock were put upon him, hb laughed for joy, and stroked his frock down with his poor little hand. "Nice, nice!" he said; and soon he was in the Birds' Nest, and hid a snug, warm bed to sleep in, and plenty of food. We had a great deal of trouble with this little boy. He had been so starved that it was difficult to get him into anything like health; but he is quite strong now, and is learning to read and write nicely. About three years ago a Scripture Reader visited a very old and very poor woman. He found she had four grandchildren to support, who had been deserted years before by father and mother. They were .all Roman Catholics, and utterly ignorant; :and besides, they were almost naked, and quite starving.



PAGE 1

THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION. 93. LITTLE ONES LIKE ME. "JEsvs, when he left the sky, And for sinners came to die, In his mercy passed not by Little ones like nie. Mothers then, as mothers ought, , In the places where He taught, Unto Him their children brought. Little ones like me. Did the Saviour say, then, nay? No ! He kindly bid them stay, Suffered none to turn away Little ones like me. When into Jerusalem, Meekly riding, Jesus came, Children hailed His blessed name, Little ones like me. In the glorious heaven above, Through the gracious Saviour's love, Children bliss and glory prove, Little ones like me. 'Twas for them His life He gave, To redeem them from the grave; Jesus. died from hell to save Little ones like me. Children, then, should love Him now, Strive His holy will to do, Pray to Him, and praise Him too, Little ones like me."



PAGE 1

68 DAILY WORK. unless one happens to be sick. Two-and-two they go to church; and they sit very quietly, though many of them are so little they cannot understand much. After church they all get home, and the cloth is laid for dinner, and all sit down to it. Then there is another half-hour's quietness in the play-ground, and then Sunday School.% After this there is a spare hour, in which all do as they like, only there must be no noise; and then all assemble in the infant schoolroom, and a kind clergyman or friend meets them, and there is a children's service. They answer the responses, and sing the chants; and the sermon is so simple that the very little ones can understand. They do so enjoy this; and some of the elder ones take notes of the sermon. After this supper is soon ready, and then the younger ones go to bed, and the elder ones sit up a little longer, and read their books. I am sometimes asked whether we have any naughty children in the Nest, for all my-stories are about good ones? And one day a lady said to me, in quaint language, "Thee thinks' them a great deal better than they are." Well, I don't know about that. I think it is much better to think about bright things than dark. And I'm afraid I must plead guilty of telling bright things, for they are pleasant to tell, and pleasant to remember; and there is an old proverb which says,. that "Every family should



PAGE 1

,.. i ',, N't ., , .,, ," ··;; , i·ii , " ,, € .. 'K i ,.:,:.P v. ~~ii~~~~a r~ ~U~ir Ig 'i" .. e --. ,.:-..,'. .i ' Ji .,* ,I .. ~;· .... !f 'dj ~i ··" .r .i .-, ,4 ., -'. 4r ";'ir ~ L.. :, .. ...·. ou .. ,. •:~ ii' •".. ." ..." =... ; ,f , ~" .: AM. -.,"O#...1.q' ,P G 13,, jj" . ,.PAGE 1, ,j· ,, , : .'. ;tPG I32.C



PAGE 1

THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION. 83 " ERIN'S HOPE," the juvenile magazine of the Society for Irish Church Missions. For some years it had been a great pleasure to her to write true stories about Irish children for the children of England. I love little children very much indeed. I think that when Jesus gathered a group of children around Him, and "put His hands upon them, and blessed them," He meant that His followers should be blessings to little children. And when he said to Peter, "Feed my lambs," He meant that not only Peter, but all who could say, with Peter, " Lord, thou knowest that I love thee," should take the words of Jesus to their hearts, and should try to lead the lambs of the flock into the right paths. Thousands of children every month read "Erin's Hope." I should have felt it too great a responsibility to write for so many, only I knew that if Jesus said to me, "Feed my lambs," He would give me stores of food; He would give me the right thoughts and the right words; and so I took it as my work for Jesus. Well, you know, besides the children I was writing for, there were the poor little children God had given us to work for; and one day the thought came to me, Surely these children belong to each other, we must form a " CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION." The children to whom God has given good gifts will be. glad to share them; and how Iv



PAGE 1

100 GOD'S PROVIDINGS. And when He sent us these five children, and we received them, trusting in Him, He looked into our "barrel of meal ,and cruse of oil ;" and, oh, how He blessed it! He put it into the heart of five new friends to collect. each enough for one child; and not only that, but by the end of the next year we were enabled to put £200 into the bank, and had, besides, enough to pay the bills for January and February. Our little report for 1868 says:"We had one very remarkable and welcome gift. Though this winter has been so mild, yet in October there were several days of biting wind and frost. I looked at the nestlings' beds, and thought them in great need of new blankets; but it was no use thinking about it when we were in such debt. Well, as I came home, I met on the door-steps a lady; she came in with me, and sat down. " Now,' she said, ' I want you to tell me how many beds there are in the Birds' Nest.' 'One hundred and seventyfour,' I said. 'Do they all want blankets? '-' No,' I said, 'not all; fourteen beds are new ones.' 'I will buy you a hundred and sixty pairs,' she said. I quite started with astonishment. Just the thing we wanted! *And the lady went on to ask about the needs of the other institutions, and I told all. Then she said that a kind friend had given her £Xoo to lay out, andshe could buy almost all I had mentioned.



PAGE 1

148 CALLED AND CHOSEN. But.he grew worse and worse; and just as the winter was over, and the sun began to warm up the homes of the poor, Pat had to leave school and go to an hospital. His leg was so bad that he had to lie many weeks quite still, suffering great pain; but he was so patient and gentle that those around could not help loving him. A good clergyman who visited the hospital used often to talk with Pat about Jesus, and listen to him while he sang his hymns. One day he thought the little boy was dying, and he gathered the other children whowere in the hospital about Pat's bed, that they might see how happy he was; and the children sang"I think when I read that sweet story of old." While they were singing the little boy kept his eyes fixed earnestly on his mother. He was asked why he did so. He said solemnly, " Because I think she does not know enough about the Lord Jesus." He then asked her to read the Bible, and attend the school. " I don't wish to stay any longer here," he said, "I would rather go to the Lord Jesus; but, mother, won't you do as I asked you?" Another day his mother was sitting beside him. He fixed his eyes upon her, and said solemnly, "Mother, I want you to go to heaven-won't you give your heart to Jesus? Mother, pray to Jesus; trust in Jesus; He will



PAGE 1

CHAPTER IV. CALLED AND ,CHOSEN. " He shall gather the lambs in His arms, and carry them in His bosom." HE following story is that of a dear little boy, whose name stood upon our books for admission as soon as there should be a vacancy; but while he waited he was called away to "the beautiful land of rest." When the messengers of the Good Shepherd go out to seek those who are lost, they cannot see the marks by which Jesus knows which are His, and so they gather in all they can find; and they teach them about Him who loved them enough to die for them, and they try to win them into the upward path that leads to heaven. Many of the children who are gathered into the earthly fold never reach the heavenly; they love sin better than holiness, and the broad easy road that leads to death better than the narrow difficult path that leads to life. K I



PAGE 1

CALLED AND CHOSEN. 153 It was quite wonderful to see the peace and happiness of this dear little child in the midst of his poverty, every little gift was received with such thanks. One day a lady brought him an orange, the gift of her little nephew. "What message will you send him?" she asked. " Tell him," he said, "I wish him to be as happy as I am." He was asked what he did when the great pain came on. "I ask Jesus to give me patience," he said, " and then I can bear it." Only once I heard of him being at all impatient. It was Sunday morning, and the bells were ringing, and he thought of the many happy Sundays that he had spent at the Ragged School, and he longed so much to go again that tears rolled down his cheeks. .Then his mother took him in her arms to the window, that he might see the people go by, and this amused him a little. It was a great trial to him that his mother could not enter into his feelings. She was a Roman Catholic, and did not at all understand how any one could be happy in he thought of death. Pat tried to teach her that "the lood of Jesus Christ cleanseth from all sin;" but she ould not learn the lesson; only when he sang his hymns r her she listened; perhaps even yet the Holy Spirit may



PAGE 1

84 THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION. happy this will make them, for Jesus said, " It is more blessed to give than to receive." So I asked Jesus about it all, and then formed a Children's Association. My own name was put down as Secretary, and three little children who lived in the same house were the first members. We made three resolutions,We will pray for the Birds' Nest. We will work for the Birds' Nest. We will collect for the Birds' Nest. The very first thing we did was to pray. And once every week regularly, and on every special occasion, we went into a room together in the dark; and then we talked a little together of our wants; and then we knelt down, and each one prayed. And as we got on a little we found that we had thanks to offer as well as prayer; and before we knelt we counted our mercies as well as our wants; and so in everything, with praise and thanksgiving, our wants were made known to our Heavenly Father, who seeth in secret. One of these little girls, the youngest, is not with us now; she is gone to dwell in that fair land where "The streets are shining gold, And the glory is untold." We miss her earnest voice at our prayer meetings, and



PAGE 1

86 THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION. ticular about it; but the inside caused me great joy. It was written in letters copied out of printed books, each letter about an inch long, and the words, "My dear Secretary," filled the first page. When I had read it all, I found it contained the request of a little girl, that I would send her a collecting-card. And I did send her a card, and wrote her a letter directed to herself; and after that the postman often brought me letters from little children wanting cards; and some from fathers and mothers, who were delighted that their children had found a work for Jesus so suitable to them. One of their dear, loving mothers says, "I feel truly interested; it is so nice for children to feel that God will graciously employ them in such a work. I trust, in this coming year, if spared, to know and to feel more of thepower of prayer, to pray more, and to watch more for answers to prayer; and your little book has come to help me in this, by giving such marked answers to your prayers, and those of your dear children. My child, who will take up the card, is my only one, and not-strong. I mention this to you, because I feel your hearts are large enough to take other people's children in; and when you pray for the young collectors and helpers in your interesting work, you will include my boy in your petition. May God bless and prosper you abundantly, even as He has promised, and He is faithful."



PAGE 1

134 NOT ALONE. would take her to himself; "But," she said, "I try to have no will about it; whatever my Heavenly Father sees to be best for me, I shall like." As winter came on Emily grew worse, and by-and-by she was not able to leave her bed. One Sunday in October her kind friend visited her. She was suffering extremely, another abscess having formed; and the poor dear child was too weak to get up, and yet was suffering too much to allow her to lie down. Her poor pale face brightened up, as it always did on seeing those she loved, and she smiled so sweetly and gratefully at having her back propped up with pillows. Her first words were, "I am so weary, so very weary, I cannot get up, and I cannot lie down, I am so weary." " Well, dear, there is rest at home; there is no pain there, but only joy and peace. Would you like, Emily dear, to go home?" Her eyes beamed with such delight as she said, "Oh! indeed, indeed I would." After speaking to her for some time longer about home, and the joy of seeing Jesus face to face, and being for ever in our Father's house, she said, " But don't you think that I shall enjoy heaven more than you? it will be such rest. Oh! I love to think of the rest; it is so niceis it not?"



PAGE 1

76 HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS. for "c the trees yield their fruit every month, and there is no night there." But we have not done with Christmas time yet. There were some little children living in England, and they wanted to give pleasure to the poor little nestlings, and they set to work and made a large number of bags, with pincushions and thimbles in them, for the elder girls, and they dressed dolls for the little ones; and when I heard of this, I said, "We must have a Christmas tree to hang all these nice things on." Other children heard of this plan, and they took up the idea, and some sent balls and tops, and some sent little books and markers; and at length there were enough things for each child to have something. I could not tell you what idea the poor little children had of a Christmas tree; some of them had never seen such a thing, and so they puzzled over it till they dreamed about it, and at length made up their minds that it must be something very wonderful indeed. And so it was. We did not set up the tree till one day in January. The children's friend, Mr. Dallas, was coming over, and so we waited for him, for it was to be a regular day of rejoicing. We opened the folding doors, and so made two great rooms into one; and then we set up the tree in the middle. It reached up very high, there were some pretty



PAGE 1

SI16 GOD'S PROVIDINGS. and delight in hearing a story read to them while they are working. Besides these there are voluntary helpers who have never seen our nestlings-helpers with money-helpers with clothing-helpers with prayer. And in the ranks of these workers there is yet room, and volunteers will be gladly welcomed. Are there any reading this book who have not begun to work for Jesus? You have often thought you would LIKE to do something. Well, just take up some work for the Nest-heart-work in praying, or hand-work in sewing, or head-work in collecting. Some of those who began to do this work for Jesus on earth have met in glory with some of the rescued ones. Perhaps they were the first to welcome them. What a joy that would be! and stillThere are little ones glancing about on thy path, In need of a friend and a guide; There are dim little eyes looking up unto them, Whose tears could be easily dried. But Jesus may beckon the children away In the midst of their grief or their glee; Will any of them, at the Beautiful Gate, Be waiting and watching for thee? There are dear ones at home thou may'st bless with thy love ; There are wretched ones pacing the street; There are friendless and suffering strangers around There are tempted and poor thou must meet.



PAGE 1

HOW WE BEGAN. 19 And then the niusic would cease, and the voice of one after anotier.might be heard inr earnest prayer. About this time the children's friend who had determined to have The Nest wrote a very nice hymn for them, suited to their peculiar circumstances. She mneant it to be sung to the tune of Uncle Ned," a negro melody. She always liked lively tunes for the children, because the very little ones could learn them: "I saw in a valley a happy little flock, They lie in a pleasant fold, The Shepherd who owns them is kind and good, He loves them with love untold. Come all ye who hear, who hear, Come, and never fear: There's room for all, And the Shepherd doth call, Oh, come, and be happy here. Those sheep were lost and wandering once, And the wolf went about to destroy; But the Shepherd sought them through wood, waste, and hill, And brought them here with joy. Come all, &c. He made them a fold under green, green trees, Which healing leaves do bear, SClose by #e stream of the water of life, And He leads His saved ones-there. Come all, &c.



PAGE 1

CHAPTER V. WANDERERS WELCOMED. " For the Father's fold it is warm and bright, O'er-flowing with love and the door Is open to all of the little ones, For ever and evermore." ARY and Bobby were the children of a kind mother, but a drunken father. They used to attend a Ragged School with two little sisters. They were very wretched, naked, hungry children. We pitied them very much, and sometimes gave them a bib, or' a petticoat; but it never appeared the second time; the wretched father sold it for drink! He did not care what his little children suffered; and so, through the long winter, they came hungry and barefooted to school. The poor mother was very unhappy, and she tried to think what she could do to comfort her little ones. She determined to go to service, and pay some woman to mind her children; but she found her wages would



PAGE 1

SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE. 189 the heavenly home-some peacefully, some joyfully. It is our most earnest desire that every one of our rescued wanderers may be led to follow the footsteps of tl&e Good Shepherd, and be enabled to glorify Him whether in life or death. What a joyful meeting there Will be one day above, when those who have laboured and prayed for the nestlings shall recognise them"No more as ragged orphans wild, But dressed in bright array; For God has owned the homeless child, And wiped its tears away."





PAGE 1

THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 49 through the little books; but that does not make my own share any the less"For we must share, if we would keep That good thing from above; Ceasing to give, we cease to have; Such is the law of love." Of Eddy BI must tell the whole story. He was ,a dear little fellow, too young for the Nest, but his father died in the hospital, a believer in Jesus; his only care was for his children; they had a very bad mother. A Christian friend promised they should be cared for, and the poor man died satisfied. The little girl was taken into the Nest, but Eddy was "too young, only a baby. We put him to be nursed by a kind old woman. As soon as the mother saw him well dressed she took him away, sold his clothes, and after a little while went with him into the poorhouse. Some years passed away, when one day a Scripture Reader met the woman begging with the child. She said she had been three weeks without a place to lie down at night. She said she was very sorry for her conduct, and if we would take the boy she would get work. For the sake of the promise to the dying, father, we took Eddy; and a little girl in the South of England adopted him. Some months passed away,-happy months for Eddy,-and then his D



PAGE 1

I80 SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE. After a stay of about ten months, the doctor under whose care she was felt that he could do nothing more to make her well, and that she ought to be sent home, to make room for others. But where was her home ? When they went to look for her mother,they found she had died; and the father had not been heard of for a very long time. So Sarah was sent for a while to the home for people who are getting better, and the doctor begged a place for her in the Birds' Nest. The day Sarah died I was telling a lady how one of our nestlings had been taken so suddenly, but so gently. When I mentioned the name, she said, " Is it dear little Sarah? I often went to the Nest on purpose to look at her sweet, happy face. I began to know her at the "Home for Convalescents.' When she saw my pony stop at the gate, she would hop down on her little stick to meet me; and as we walked up to the house, would tell me what new texts and hymns she had learned. I shall miss her very much." When little Sarah's case was brought before the Committee of the Birds' Nest, some of the ladies said, C What shall we do with her when she grows up? She will never be able to earn her living. But then, we thought, our home is for destitute ones, and her lameness only makes her the more destitute. God will provide for her. And



PAGE 1

GOD'S PROVIDINGS. 117 There are many unthought of, whom, happy and blest, In the land of the. leal thou wilt see; Will any of them, at the Beautiful Gate; Be waiting and watching for thee ? We feel sure that our Heavenly Father will still, by the hapd of His people, provide for our nestlings, and will open out paths for them in life, and guide them all along, for HIs PROVIDENCE IS OUR INHERITANCE.



PAGE 1

126 THE FIRST DEATH, who had long been ill, was taken safe home. I wrote her story at the time, and it shall be put in here exactly as it is. It was published in a little book, and called "Not Alone." ,a *q



PAGE 1

THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION. 91 give this message to the members of the Children's Association, for the nestlings look upon me as the messenger sent to them by all of you; and now I say to you, "Don't 'oo go and change." If you have begun in the right way, by giving your heart to Jesus, I do not fear for you. I only fear for those who have only sand for a foundation to their good works. Of the many children who have joined our Children's Association, some are not with us now. In the midst of their young labours they have heard the secret message, " The Master is come, and calleth for thee." And they have gone up higher. Short was their working day, but long will be their joyful rest, for of each of these dear ones we have full confidence that they belonged to the fold of the Good Shepherd. Could these glorified little ones look down upon us from their happy home, I think they would say, " We did not work hard enough for Jesus; do you who are left work harder." I think they would say, " Oh, heaven is such a glorious place; do what you can to bring the poor children here." I think they would say, "There is nothing on earth worth doing compared with serving our dear Redeemer." Are there any reading this little book who will take their place amongst the workers? Jesus is looking down



PAGE 1

THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 53 We have two very nice boys now in the Nest, who were some time ago removed to the Boys' Home, but, having been very delicate, have come back to be nursed. They are both, we believe, real Christians, setting a bright example to all around. I find the history of one of them in my notes. The family consisted of a father and mother and seven children. They were all Roman Catholics, and when first visited by the Scripture-readers, were in such a very destitute condition, that the children were obliged to cover themselves with the straw that formed their bed. One of these children was a bright little boy of nine years old. He was persuaded to attend the Ragged School; we sent him a little pair of trousers to enable him to get out. Willy was delighted with all he heard and learned, and when he went home at night, tried to teach his mother to repeat a text: she would not then. But Willy was one of those boys who are not easily discouraged, and, as his mother said, "he worrited" at her till she learned one; and then he tried his father. This was harder work, for being a violent man, he threw things at the child's head; still Willy persevered. And when he had learned to read, he.would take his Bible, and read chapter after chapter aloud, that his parents might be interested in the story. Soon mother and children were all regular attendants at the Sunday School.



PAGE 1

CALLED AND CHOSEN. 151 We asked Pat why he thought God had sent him his sicness. "Because of sin," he said; < I think He is angry with me." We explained to him that it was sent in love, not in anger; for "whom the Lord loveth He chasteneth." This satisfied him; he had great faith in the Saviour's love. Before we came away I shewed the little boy a flannel waistcoat which I had brought for him; he stroked it with his little wasted fingers, and said, " Thank you; I shill be warm now." I felt very thankful to be permitted to join the angels in ministering to this heir of glory. The next time I went to see the poor little boy I found him lying on the bit of straw in the corner. I had brought with me a soft sponge, a towel, and a small piece of scented soap, which I thought would tempt him to wash; for he said before that it hurt him; and I 'm sure it did, he was so very thin. He was quite delighted with the nice things, andever afterwards was as clean as one could wish. I knelt down beside his bed to talk to him, for his .voice was, weak, and it was difficult to hear what he said. I asked him if he felt happy. " Yes, very," he said. "I'm going to heaven." " And why do you like to go there ?"



PAGE 1

36 GOING FORWARD. They drink the gushing-streams of grace, They gaze upon the Saviour's face, Whose glory fills the holy place, Happy land! And wicked things and beasts of prey SCome not there! And ruthless death and fierce decay Come not there! There all are holy, all are good; But hearts unwashed in Jesus' blood, And guilty sinners unrenewed, Come not there! But though we're sinners every one, Jesus died! And though our crown of peace is gone, Jesus died! We may be cleansed from every stain, May all be clothed with peace again, And in that land of pleasure reign, Jesus died! This world is oft so dark and drear, Take us there! We ne'er can be so happy here, Take us there! Oh! listen to that music sweet, It comes so rich from' yonder seat, Where all the saints in glory meet, Take us there!" I^JSc'^^^~



PAGE 1

THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 43 her, and took her in until she could get a place for her in the Birds' Nest. Another bright, merry child came to the Nest in a sad state. Her mother was a widow, nearly blind, who tried to support her children by selling little things in a basket. A lady who knew her deep distress got admission for little Louise; but when she brought her, it was found that the child's head was dreadfully sore. Miss C--, who happened to be at the Nest at the time, hesitated about receiving her, because of the other children; but our good matron could not bear to turn one away. " I will cure it," she said; "do take her in:" and her request was granted. Here are two little girls, of seven and eight years old, standing hand-in-hand; they love each other very much, and they look up as if they were used to being loved. They never were very miserable. Their mother was a happy Christian, one who managed her large family well, and made her husband's small earnings go as far as possible; but last year she died, and the older ones being boys, there was none to care for Margery and Louise; and the father's health and earnings failed, so the little girls were admitted to The Birds' Nest. They are pleasant, happy children, and dearly love the good matron. There, in the play-ground, are two little boys, each



PAGE 1

40 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. sense, but it was want of food made her look stupid." So it was. She is now one of our pleasantest and most useful children. One time, when forty-five of the children had measles, one was dangerously ill. I asked her, Had she any friends I could write to? "I haven't got none," she said; "only Mrs. S-." "And where did she get you?" I asked. --" In the ragged school." This dear girl got quite well. She is now in service, and saves a tenth of her small earnings to give to the Birds' Nest. Another dear girl, now a useful servant, came to us a poor little wanderer, so starved. We put her in a tub of warm water and washed her, and then cut her hair, and dressed her. She had not been long in the Nest before her cheeks grew round, and her eyes bright, and she could laugh with the merriest. Just a few weeks ago we took in two bright, black-eyed boys. I will tell their story. One day last winter a poor labouring man, the father of four children, fell from a ladder and was seriously hurt; he was carried to an hospital, and attended with care and skill. The poor wife went to see him, and her grief was great to see him suffer so; and when she went home, the little children gathered around her to hear all about it.



PAGE 1

I0$ GOD S PROVIDINGS. get them soon. I thought it was quite possible, for there were sellings-off at several clothing-shops just then; and as soon as my friend was gone, I took a cab and drove off. At one shop the man said he could supply exactly what was wanted, and took down some nice little coats at ten shillings each. 'That would never do;' we should only have twenty for the £Io. Shop after shop was tried, with a like result. At last I went to one where I had bought a coat the week before for five shillings; they had no more. I was telling the young woman who served how the forty poor little boys wanted coats, and how the lady had given £io to buy them, when the manager, who was standing near, said, ' Shall I make them?' Oh,' I said, 'they would be too dear; we have only £1o for forty; we will buy some cloth, and make them ourselves.' 'If you will allow me to make them,' she said, 'it will be a real pleasure. Of course there will be no profit on them; but do let me.' Then I knew that her heart must have been prepared, and gladly left the matter in her hands. And that day week forty Inverness coats of black frieze, each with two pockets for cold hands, arrived at the Nest; and the next day a very comfortable little regiment marched to church, facing the east wind with a pleasant defiance, cared for and clothed by Him who notices the needs of the little sparrows, ' and not one of THEM is forgotten.'



PAGE 1

96 GOD'S PROVIDINGS. at the accounts, and they thought of the number of children, and they said, "We shall want £300 before the close of the year; where shall we get it ?" And one said, "I don't know; I have got in all my cards." And another said, I don't know anybody to ask for money." And another said, " We must not take any more children, and perhaps there are some we can turn away." It seemed as if a dark cloud stood before us, and we could not see our way. Then there came a little bright opening, and shewed some of the silver edges of the cloud; yes, there was light beyond, and the promise shone out, "Call upon ME in the day of trouble, and I will deliver thee, and thou shalt glorify ME." So we said, " Yes, we must pray." And then a day was fixed for special prayer-the 3rd of November-and a lot of little letters were written to the members of the Children's Association. They were all asked to pray that the year might be closed out of debt. It was a special' request, and we trusted God to give us a special answer. Did He ? Yes, more than we asked, for we had £42 over to begin the new year! But you will ask, How did the money come? Well, one and another had got a book and card; they had told others; and 'so, with only one large collection of £44, it all came; and the wonder is, that those who sent in the money were not, many of them, those who knew of the



PAGE 1

0I6 HOW WE BEGAN. be responsible for the new " Home:" " It shall be in the country," she said; "and we will call it 'TrHE BIRDS' NEST. The first thing this good lady did was to write an article in the little magazine called " Erin's Hope," telling of the new idea, and asking children to help; and then a Committee of four ladies was formed. It was some little time before a suitable house could be found, but at last one was discovered up a little country road near Kingstown. It belonged to a kind gentleman, who, when he knew what it was wanted for, charged a very low rent. It was just the thing for a nest of birdies, snug and small, and having roses climbingup the small porch. The house wanted some repairs, and the introduction of gas pipes, before it would be ready to be inhabited; but however, by the end of September all was finished, and the ladies assembled in the new Nest. The first thing they did was to kneel down to thank God that He had so far helped them, and to pray that a great blessing might rest upon that Home, and that it might be a nursery for heaven. Then they chose a nice motherly woman for a matron, and the little child was brought in and adopted as the first nestling; then came another girl, a little older, and a boy and girl, (brother and sister;) thus we had four to begi with; and very happy they were in their Home.



PAGE 1

•. , ;. V .4 '' p.. -.. ...t ,... 1 i Y * *15r-" 'I'7 ' ' " " 'k-P r L'LZ;: i ·.~. ~ : "'..' i. -: Ji ~i ~ ; -. -.. .-,..',.. .:. .;",' i"' '''z S.C. .. "1.A;-''"A l -.l "' . • .~ ~ i "' "'S; ~?p .' Ik: ~ lv¾·· i ?:~· %t, c *tp .·J c,'ir-l~ , ... ,% '.s. ., . "" " K ''.... ....'' ., !IC 41 ... ..... .. 4fJ Ii 1 -r. -l,~i 1·4& j0,jr. j;~ sb' ..... ~c (.; " .," ., , *. .. .* .-.n ...'rr b ,•. Aat %tAL ., , ""',. ... ....,. ....'" °' :' .~. ..4 .' ""' ' ttt ' ' r~n :_, ,,. * * ?I : t S, ..:..': ' " .. ." "f ,I· -56 .*!" ' t ". , *" 1' , SIJ,. ..." .ii :1. ,. .. ".-. ., pp PA GE 160, • ~ ~ :·. ··.,.. ·: , --.' . , ~~~ ~~,:•. ..-...,,< .i •6' ,r * "" t. fi. ;i '!' ; : v ~~~ ... -, , .~ .. <:.: : ..:~ ~ t,, ..15' i -,,., .-,.,,-, ·. ··.' · ; :P ".t.' ,," " , " -.' S:.".*.· ' ·-;s~: .., .~' ·. ,,: ":. -.. ... ,-,; ,, ~ ~.··._.. , .* .',·:· r ,,, i -. ;., ..,1···· ·. 1. .~i' [, .,-" .-.. :,, ;, .,.' ·~vd r ,·; .,.. .:.., ·i'.... [::. , .'' .'' ''~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ o ·;; ''~I : F~r: . .., ,: .. '.., ,,-, ,-.., .'.. "' .. .. PAGE: 160



PAGE 1

DARK CLOUDS. 23 "C COME let us join our friends above A Who have obtained the prize, And on the eagle wings of love To joys celestial rise. Let all the saints terrestrial sing With those to glory gone; For all the servants of our King, In earth and heaven, are one. One family we dwell in Him, One Church above, beneath, Though now divided by the stream, The narrow stream of death. One army of the living God, At His command we bow; Part of His host have crossed the flood, And part are crossing now. Our spirits, too, shall quickly join, Like theirs with glory crown'd, And shout to see our Captain's sign, To hear His trumpet sound. Lord Jesus, be our constant guide, And when the word is given, Bid death's cold flood its waves divide, And land us safe in heaven."



PAGE 1

GOING FORWARD. 33 get in in an orderly manner; but people got out of the way, and before long the regiment of children in blue and white was nicely settled upon a temporary gallery which had been provided for them. As we looked round upon that large meeting, our hearts were very full of gratitude to God that so many poor children had been brought together to learn of Jesus, and thankfulness that so many friends had been raised up to provide what was needful for those children; so we could sing with all our hearts, "Crown Him Lord of all." Then there was an earnest prayer to God, that He would continue to pour His blessing on the Institution, that every child coming in might be made indeed a child of God, and that the means might be raised, not only to feed and clothe the children, but also to pay for the nice new Home. Then there were other speeches made, and hymns sung by the children. It was a very happy meeting. And now that the Nest was opened, we were very anxious that the workmen should make as much haste as possible, and get out, so that the children might come in. The Matron's rooms were finished first, and she came in to get all into order. There were new bedsteads to be. c



PAGE 1

WANDERERS WELCOMED. 165 BREST THE WAVE, CHRISTIAN, " Brest the wave, Christian, When it is strongest; Watch for day, Christian, When the night's longest. Onward and upward still Be thine endeavour; The rest that remaineth Will be for ever. Fight the fight, Christian, Jesus is o'er thee; Run the race, Christian, Heaven is before thee. He who hath promised Faltereth never; The love of Eternity Flows on for ever. Lift the eye, Christian, Just as it closeth; Raise the heart, Christian, Ere it reposeth. Thee from the love of Christ Nothing can sever; Mount when thy work is done, Praise Him for ever."



PAGE 1

"A PILGRIM GOING HOME. " 69 and she calmly waited for the change she knew was coming. She had not a shadow of doubt or fear. Just three days before her deathl there came a change in her symptoms, and we knew that her death was rapidly approaching. There was no difficulty in telling her this; she was quite ready; she received the news with' a beaming smile. "I hope it will be very soon," she sad. Her breathing was so bad that she could not lie down, so she sat day and night on a little stool, leaning her head upon the side of her bed. When any of us went to see her, she would so gratefully exchange the bed for our shoulder or knee. On Saturday night she would not allow any one to sit up with her, only she had a candle lighted; she said Jesus would be with her. Several times in the night, when her kind nurse got up to look at her, she said, "I 'm so happy! I 'm going to God; not to-day, but to-morrow." I never saw anything so beautifully calm as the dyingtime of this dear child. It did so remind me of the beautiful hymn"Jesus can make a dying bed Feel soft as downy pillows are, While on His breast I lean my head, And breathe my life out sweetly there." Early on Sunday morning I visited Annie, being



PAGE 1

70 DAILY WORK. nine or ten years of age, living an idle, wandering life, cannot bear the restraint of home, and they wander away, over and over again. Even one boy who has this restless propensity does great mischief, and will often lead away others. One day a little girl wandered away with another, and was found by the Master in the streets of Dublin, with her bib full of her little possessions. She had nowhere to go, and was greatly frightened; he took her safely back again, poor little wanderer! We try to make the children as happy as we can, surrounding them with gentle influences, and most of them grow up nicely; and even the troubles are blessings, if they give us fresh errands to our loving Saviour. We try to teach our children to live as in the presence of a loving Father; to do the meanest of their daily work as for Him; to obey, not with eye-service;" to go to Jesus in all trouble, and thank Him for all joys. For even the little ones can thus glorify God in their daily lessons and daily work.



PAGE 1

32 GOING FORWARD. At the other end are apartments for the master, and above, sleeping-rooms for the boys. On the day of opening the folding-doors were opened, and the two large school-rooms formed one very large room, which was beautifully decorated with green leaves and paper flowers. These, with the new school pictures and maps hanging upon the -wall, gave it quite a bright, lively appearance; and when the bright spring sun shone in at the windows, our hearts quite danced with joy. On one of the sides, half-way down the room, was a sort of platform, on which the gentlemen who were to speak might stand. At two o'clock the children were all assembled in the yard of the old house, each neatly dressed. The girls had new straw bonnets, which had just been given to them by two kind friends. When Mr. Dallas appeared they set up a great shout, and then sang a welcome. Afterwards all formed into a procession, headed by Mr. Dallas with the very smallest child by the hand. So they walked through the house and across the road, and up the stairs of the new Nest, the wonder and curiosity of the children increasing more and more. The large room was so full of people, who had come to the opening, that it was not very easy for the children to



PAGE 1

INTRODUCTORY. 13 "Is there a thing beneath the skies O'er which the gentle Saviour yearns, Which finds such favour in His eyes, Whose tearful cry He never spurns ? It is that little thing so wild, A poor, neglected, lonely child. Oh teach that little one to sing The numbers tuneful, soft and clear, Hosanna to the Shepherd bring, Such as that Shepherd loves to hearSuch as He heard when meek He rode To Salem, His ordain'd abode. Such as His gracious ear again Shall welcome from young hearts set free, Whom THou hast rescued from the chain Of sin and woe; hast taught to flee To Him who left yon heavenly land To take a wanderer by the hand." ¶* i



PAGE 1

64 DAILY WORK. pleasant time to talk a little to the children, as they are all there. At two o'clock all are again in school, till three; and then, on fine days, there is a walk, the three schools going separately with their own teachers. Returning from the walk, there are various small occupations, till, at six o'clock, another meal of cocoa and bread; and then the infants are all washed and put to bed, and the elder children go into evening-school. This is the regular routine of every day but Saturday and Sunday. I should like to give my readers two peeps at the family life of our children. A peep on a winter's afternoon. When lessons, and dinner, and walk are all over, a fine fire is made up in the girls' schoolroom; forms are arranged in great semicircles around it, inclosing a large basket full of things to be mended, and a box of needles, thread, scissors, &c. The little boys and the little girls are in the infants' schoolroom, enjoying a game of romps with their beloved friend, Miss M--; but all the boys and girls who can sew are gathered around the schoolroom fire, and some of the mere babies, too small to romp, are there too, and Mrs. O'Neil in the middle; and scissors and needles, and hands and tongues, are soon busy enough. " How



PAGE 1

62 DAILY WORK. before very long somewhere about a dozen of the elder girls come in, and the little ones are soon carried off to the washing-rooms down stairs, where they are washed, and dressed, and brushed, and then turned out into the playground to wait for breakfast. Some time before the streak of sunlight roused up the little boy in the infants' dormitory, the elder boys were up and dressed, beds were neatly made, and if you want to know where the boys are, you must listen for the sound of scrubbing-brush, shoe-brush, or knife-board, for this is the time for household work for the boys; and very much delighted they are to be permitted to take their share. Do you. know we are quite proud of our boys, they are such pleasant, industrious fellows, and so fond' of work. Just before breakfast-time these busy workers assemble in their washing-room, to change their clothes and wash; and when the breakfast-bell rings at half-past eight o'clock, boys, girls, and infants are all ready to march into the, dining-room. The sun never shone upon a happier set of children. It is a comfort to look at them seated round the tables, each provided with a good piece of bread, and a little tin can filled with hot cocoa. Breakfast is soon despatched, and then there is a run in the play-ground; and at nine o'clock the children divide into three companies,--boys, girls,



PAGE 1

106 GOD'S PROVIDINGS. I said, 'we will talk to Jesus about it first. I am sure He won't let His little children go hungry.' Then we had a great talk about prayer; how Jesus listens and answers; and how each little one could help to pray. After that, the Matron said it was sweet to see the little ones at prayer, and to hear their earnest petitions: '0 God, send money for the bread;' 'Jesus, send money to pay the baker;' ' Give us this day our daily bread.' One little boy would stand at the door in the morning, and ask each little, one as it went out, ' Did you pray for the bread ?' and if it had forgotten, it would return to its bed-side. "Now, did God, the great God, really listen to those children's prayers ? Would He care to give them exactly what they asked for He did. Just ten days after that talk, an old gentleman, who did not know of our needs, had a thought put into his heart, and he said to his wife, "I want to give something to the Birds' Nest.' Some one in the room suggested that he should send a gift of clothing. 'No,' said he, 'I will give money for bread, and for nothing else.' And very soon that lady was the bearer of a cheque for £ioo, £20 of which was for the Boys' Home, and £80 FOR BREAD AT THE BIRDS' NEST. As soon as possible I went to Kingstown to tell the good news. The little children gathered around and listened with varied expressions;-some had bright tears of joy in



PAGE 1

DAILY WORK. 63 and infants,-each company marching into its respective school. And now begins new work,-mental work,cheerful, happy seeking for the knowledge of which many of the dearchildren were deprived so long. In any section of these schools you may have sweet hymns sung by first and second voices in beautiful harmony; you will get wonderful answering in Scripture texts and doctrine; and you will be surprised to find how much lessons are loved. While lessons are going on the kitchen presents a busy scene, for there dinner is preparing, not only for the 190 nestlings, but for their teachers and helpers besides. The dinners are very simple,-potatoes and milk, or pease soup, two days; meat in broth, two days; cold meat and potatoes, one day; fish or bacon, with vegetables, one day; and on Sundays, tea and bread and butter. At ten minutes to one six of the elder girls come out of school to lay the tables; and at one the great troop marches in, each child knowing its own place, and quietly taking it. The bell rings for silence, and then all voices join in singing" Be present at our table, Lord;" and then begins the clatter of knives and forks or spoons, and the pleasant murmur of happy voices. At any moment a touch of the bell brings silence; and this is a very



PAGE 1

I88 SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE. thinking of death and heaven, and asking themselves the question, Who will be the next? If I should be called, am I ready? Ten days afterwards another was called; but if any one of us had been asked' to say beforehand which it would be, we should never have chosen Mary Anne M'Cormaic. She was one of the most healthy children in the Nest, never having had a day's illness. The last evening of her life she was playing gaily with Mrs. O'Neil's baby. None could have guessed how near she was to another world. In the night she awoke the girl next to her, complaining of sickness, but was soon better, and went to sleep. At seven in the morning she was found dead, her. hands clenched. The doctor, who was immediately called, said it was a fit. Mary Anne was a reserved child; her deepest feelings were hidden; but she knew Jesus, and tried to live so as to please Him. By these two sudden deaths Jesus has spoken solemnly to all our hearts-" Be ye also ready, for in such an hour as ye think not the Son of Man cometh." God grant that each child reading this little book may now begin to follow Jesus; so that, whenever death may come, friends left behind may be able to rejoice in " sure and certain hope.'' Many others of our dear children have safely reached



PAGE 1

HOLLY AND IVY. PART II. S---00---CHAPTER I. THE FIRST DEATH. "There are many little children now in heaven with harps of gold, And harps on earth so beautiful you never could behold; And these little children play their harps so tenderly and sweet, That the angels love to listen as they bow at Jesus' feet." HIS second part of our book is to be about those of our nestlings who from time to time"'Scaping the storms of this weary life, 'Scaping the dust and the heat, Flew up thro' the great golden archway to God, To nestle. for aye at His feet." We cannot call them "sad stories," for they all died having a sure trust in the Saviour, knowing their sins were forgiven, that in His blood they were washed :·: ·i



PAGE 1

SCHAPTER X. GOD'S PROVIDINGS. "The birds without barn or storehouse are fed; From them let us learn to trust for our bread. The saints what is fitting shall ne'er be denied, So long as 'tis written, The Lord will provide." DON'T know exactly how it is, but I always feel as if the Birds' Nest were in an especial manner under the care of Jesus. It seems such a real gathering of little ones for Him. Many kind friends from England have been to see it, and they have talked to the children, and they have all felt what a Christ-like work it is. We may take for ourselves those beautiful promises made to the Israelites. When God described their land it was in these words: " A land that the Lord thy God careth for: the eyes of the Lord thy God are always upon it, from the beginning of the year, even unto the end of it," (Deut. xi. 12.) And that other beautiful promise made to Solomon-" I have heard thy prayer and thy supplication. ...I have hallowed this house



PAGE 1

42 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. And the mother consented. And when the children were all away, she went out to look for work. When they all came back in the evening there was news to tell; for the little ones had greatly enjoyed the lessons, and the hymns, and the nice dinner Mrs. Rprovides for the hungry ones every day, from October to April. And day by day things improved in that poor home. And when the father came out of hospital, he had to hear the whole story; and the children sang some hymns for him, and repeated their texts; and the poor man said, " I wish I could go to that school too." "So you can," said Johnny. " On Sunday I saw men as big as you, father, and older, sitting in classes, and learning their verses just like the children." And the father went with Johnny, and he liked what he learned so much that he never'misses a Sunday now, -always in his place. But he is so crippled that he cannot work enough to support all four, and Johnny and his little brother have found a home in the Birds' Nest. Amongst our very little girls there are some who have suffered much; one little girl left utterly alone, her mother having been taken to prison. The poor child wandered about, no one caring for her, until a poor woman, whose children attended a Ragged School, had compassion upon



PAGE 1

34 , GOING FORWARD. got, new little beds to be filled with straw, and sheets and blankets to be prepared; and every day the elder girls came over to help to hem and stitch. In about a fortnight the moving day came, and many little hands carried over bundle after bundle; and there was such excitement, such ruslbig over the house to see all the rooms, such peering into presses, as only children who have ever moved into a new house can understand. It was not very easy to reduce all to order, as you may imagine. The new house required new plans, and new work; and the workmen kept themselves a very long time about, doing little finishings. Just as we thought they were quite ready to go, a terrible misfortune happenedthe well ran dry! and there was no water for that great house and its inmates. Many schemes were thought of, for water must be had. The only thing that could be done was to dig a very deep well. At last water was found, but we were obliged to have a steam-pump to get it up. "You cannot think what 'a time of trouble we had of it all the long weeks when there was no water; we never before felt the comfort of the last part of the promise, "Bread shall be given, and water shall be sure." During that time we were glad when we heard the driving rain, for we knew the cisterns were filling, and for a time the want would be supplied.



PAGE 1

GOD S PROVIDINGS. 109 "We have had some wonderful providences in the gifts received. Not long ago two dear friends died, who used to knit socks for the little boys. I wrote to some invalid friends, to ask them to pray that their place may be supplied. This winter* scarcely a parcel has arrived without a few pairs. In all, I have received about two hundred pairs; and such good, strong, suitable socks, of good sizes. The forty little boys are those who want them most, for they are too small to knit enough for themselves: they are from seven to nine years of age." In the little book for 1869 we find the following:" Our nestlings pray for many things besides bread and clothing. To some petitions answers do not come. God knows best; we must trust His wisdom. There are prayers for little companions that seem unheard. We often imagine a thing would be good, and we earnestly ask that it may come to pass; and the contrary happens. I remember once there was a little orphan in a Home. She was a gentle, loving child, and we thought her path in life would be a very smooth one. One day a rough-looking poor woman came to that Orphan Home; she said she was Biddy's mother, and had come from America to take her away. There was great sorrow; much prayer was made; 1 x869.



PAGE 1

172 "A PILGRIM GOING HOME." "That is not mine now," she said"I'm a pilgrim GOING HOME!" All that night she continued in the same beautiful frame of mind. When they gave her a little wine, she drank it, then said, ," No more. I '11 drink no more till I drink in the kingdom of God." Once she said, "I11 give such a knock at the gate! No, no; I forgot, I shall have no need to knock-the gate is always open." Early on Monday morning I was again with her. She was much weaker, and expressed a great wish to see the friend who had been, as she said, a mother to her. We sent for her, and as soon as possible she came. Dear Annie took her hand, and thanked her for all her love and kindness. Seeing a tear, she said, " You must not fret. I shall be happy. When I get to heaven I shall see my father; I '11 tell him how good you've'been to me." At intervals through the day she spoke, continuing in the same happy state. Often she asked, "Do you think they'll come soon? Oh, I want to go to God." In the afternoon I had to leave her to attend to other duties, but one of her kind friends took my place. After a time of much suffering, during which she said not a murmuring word, she felt easier. She looked up at her friend, and said, "Do you know why I am so much better?"



PAGE 1

I14 GOD'S PROVIDINGS. well cooked; that the house is kept clean; that the children are neatly dressed; that the coals are not wasted. She has to be wondrously wise, and kind, and patient, and loving, and active. The Matron who had been with us four years, got into delicate health, and her work became a burden to her. We gave her a little holiday, but it did not make her well, and then she resigned. Now, who do you think was quite ready to take her place ? The very one who had been the Matron in the little cottage long ago. She had been mistress of the large Mission Infants' School since, and had lately been married to one of the town missionaries. She was very glad indeed to go back to her old post. Her little children do not hinder her in her mother-work for the birdies, and they give plenty of occupation in play-hours to the little girls who love babies. And the good husband is like a father to the boys, taking them out bathing and walking, to their great delight. When it was known that she was to return to the Nest, the woman who had been her helper long ago begged to come too; so we have a hearty, happy officer-staff. Besides the Matron and her helper, there is our assistantmatron. She has been in the Nest since she was a little child. She has such a wonderful talent for keeping presses in order, sewing on strings and buttons, and dressing little boys, that we have never been able to do



PAGE 1

SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE. .183 water; what the living water was; about Nicodemus, and the teaching Jes.us:gave him. The talk grew very solemn, and he said-" Children, all of you here know about Jesus. How many have asked ?-how many are born again ? I don't want you to tell me, but each one answer in your own hearts. Quietly the children turned away, but one little one remained. Touching their friend's arm, she timidly said, c Sarah Towel has asked." " How do you know, dear ?" c She could not be so good if she had not got the Holy Spirit." Dear Sarah had made one of the group. She had not answered for herself, but, like Jesus, " she could not be hid." And her little playmate bore testimony to Sarah's Christian life. After Sarah's death, I asked the kind friend who so ofteA had her at her house to tell me. something of the dear child's life with her. She writes as follows:" 3rd March. "CMY DEAR MIss DAVIEs,-With mingled feelings of pain and much thankfulness, I comply with your request of noting -down some recollections of the dear child so lately and suddenly taken from amongst us. We were all very fond of her, and we greatly miss her bright face and cheerful little ways; but we rejoice to know that the Good Shepherd has gathered the. lamb with His arm, and



PAGE 1

.GOD'S CARE. ·25 pelting of stones continued two whole hours, and in the morning was renewed; but not a child was hurt. On Tuesday evening, as the children were sitting at their supper in the back room, a large stone came in at the window, just grazed the ear of one child, and passed close to the mistress's head as she was stooping down. It was very remarkable that the little ones who usually sat along that window had been put to bed an hour before their usual time. Had they been there one, at least, must have beexq killed. See how God watches over His children, and guides them even in small things! On Wednesday four extra police were sent to guard the house,-two in front, and two at the back. The pelting ceased, and 'it was never discovered who threw the stones; but when ladders were got to clear theroof, thirty-two stones were found, some five and a-half pounds weight! It was very wonderful that no little child was hurt. No, not wonderful! Does not Jesus say, "The very hairs of your head are all numbered ?" A few days after this storm I was at The Birds' Nest, and talking to the children about it, I said, "But how is it no one was hurt?" They all looked very serious, and one little girl said, "Sure, ma'am, it was the Lord took care of us!"



PAGE 1

HOLLY AND IVY: THE STORY OF .. WINTER "-IRDS' EST. BY MISS DAVIES, EDITOR. OF "ERIN'S HOPE," AND AUTHOR OF "THEM ALSO," " WANDERERS BROUGHT HOME," &c. DUBLIN: GEORGE HERBERT, 117 GRAFTON STREET. LONDON: WILLIAM HUNT & CO., 23 HOLLES STREET, CAVENDISH SQUARE. 1871.



PAGE 1

THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 47 Another group of three are the children of a poor working man, who lately fell off a cart, and was so injured that he will never be able to work again; he has been set up in a little business, selling matches, and laces, and such things. And the children are getting on finely in the NEST. The father has been a convert for many years, and,we believe, a real Christian. Now let us peep into the nursery. How nice it looks! The fire burns brightly; the cradle stands beside it, with a new pair of twin-dolls; and the little rocking-chair is near. Sitting in it is a little girl, looking tenderly at a dolly which seems a great treasure; its eyes will shut and open, and it is neatly and carefully dressed. It is little Kate H -. The doll was given to her, with a beautiful set of tea-things, on the Christmas-tree day, by some kind little girls who have adopted her. Katie was such a poor forlorn child when she came, that it was very hard to make her smile, and even now the head bends down a little too much; but there is a very sweet smile on the face when you can see it. Another. little child has in the course of nine months become so changed in appearance one would hardly recognise her. The first time I saw her was at our outdoor fete. The children were playing about in kind Mrs. Harrison's lawn, but one little thing was seated all



PAGE 1

54 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. Poor Willy was very delicate, and it was plain that there was not enough of food in their home for them all; for the father earned very little, and often spent that little on drink; and so Willy and a sister found a home in the Birds' Nest. She is one of the gentlest of our girls. At Christmas she got a prize marked for "one'eVer ready to help." She is about thirteen years old, and Willy about twelve. Nearly two years ago a very nice girl, who had come from Connemara, left the Nest and went to service. We have now her two little sisters-such an original-looking pair of children. Biddy is a thin, narrow-faced little thing, of perhaps eight years old, with straight black hair and black eyes. Maggie is, I should think, six-a little round thing, with short, brown, curly hair and blue eyes. They love each other very much, and Maggie seems to think that everybody means to be good to her. Both these little ones are adopted by friends. One day last year a poor woman, with four children, asked charity from a friend of ours. She said her husband was in India; she had come home with the children, and had not heard from him since. A little help was given from time to time, but it seemed of no use; they were starving, as the mother was too weak to work. So the three elder children were admitted into the Nest, and then the mother died, and then the baby.



PAGE 1

SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE. 18I so she was taken in, and very soon attracted the love of all around her. When I think over Sarah's life in the Birds' Nest, I am most surprised at her constant cheerfulness. The doctor said that every organ of her body was diseased, and she often suffered great pain; yet she joined the other children in the schoolroom and in the playground, and had always a smile and a kind word for any one who spoke to her. She could not join her companions in their walks, because of her lameness; but a kind lady who lived near asked her to spend the walking-time with her. In winter she taught her to play on the piano, or gave her something to do in the house. In summer she weeded the garden, and tended the flowers. When little Sarah lay dead, this lady stood weeping over her. "The sunbeam is gone from our home," she said; "we all loved the dear child so much." Soon after Sarah came to the Nest a friend noticed that her stick was too short. He bought a new one, and, sitting out in the playground, cut it to the right length. Some months afterwards he saw that the stick'was worn down again. While preparing a second one, he said, " You must always let me buy your sticks." Sarah looked up at him, and said, "I don't think I shall want many." "Why not, dear? you are growing stronger now."



PAGE 1

CALLED AND CHOSEN. 149 bring you to heaven. Mother, do read God's book, and listen to Mr. S--,. he'll teach you. Oh! mother, I wish you would give your heart to Jesus; He would make you appy." He was told that a friend had been inquiring for him. He said, "Tell him that Pat says good-bye." But this was not to be Pat's good-bye; he revived, and, after six months' stay in the hospital, was discharged as incurable. Again he was an inmate of the wretched home in which the missionary first found him, and there it was that I first became acquainted with him. It was a cold, snowy evening, in the early part of January, and we had to walk very quickly through the narrow streets to keep ourselves warm. When we reached the house we had to mount three flights of winding stairs before we found the garret which was Pat's home. The door was standing a little open, and we entered without being seen. It rs, indeed, a desolate place; a broken chair, an old form, and an iron pot turned upside down, was all the furniture. In one corner was a morsel of straw, covered with a bit of old carpet, which formed a bed. Although it was not more than enough for one child to lie on, it was the only resting-place for the whole family.



PAGE 1

DAILY WORK. 69 wash its own dirty clothes,"-that means, that troubles should not be made public. And you know kind parents always try to forget their children's faults when they are forgiven. But I suppose, as our birdies have so many parents, and parents ought to know all about their children, I ought to shew the dark side of our nestlings as well as the bright side. Of course we have troubles and difficulties of all sorts. Our little children come to us with wild habits and untrained minds. Some of them have never known loving care, and it takes a great deal of patience on the part of the Matron and teachers to restrain wild habits, and instil principles of obedience, and love, and order. One cold day in winter I saw a new little girl looking as if her clothes were very thin. I had lately given warm petticoats to each, and I looked at hers-she had but one on. "Did you not get a new warm petticoat ?" I asked. "Yes, ma'am." " And where is it? " She did not speak for a moment. Then she said, "I sold it to "" She did not say for what price; but the other little girl had three petticoats. It is very common to find new children changing clothes with each other when out in the play-ground. They have to be taught everything, even how to put on their clothes. Sometimes little boys and girls who have been, up to



PAGE 1

.' N E 1 1.. .' -I.p ' , II I1



PAGE 1

132 NOT ALONE. that they might help in the cruel work of persecution. But no one minded these wicked stories, because they all saw by her life -what she was. As spring came on it was thought good that Emily should spend a short time in the country, and her kind doctor provided the means. A lodging was procured for her at Kingstown with a Christian family, and it was with great joy she removed there. For a little time she was able to sit out in the small garden, and enjoy the sunshine and the songs of the birds; and it was so pleasant to sit beside her, and hear her talk of heaven. She had a great store of hymns, and used to repeat them when they would express her feelings better than her own words. She was very thankful that she had learned by heart so many hymns and texts; but it often troubled her that she could not easily find the places of the texts she loved. A great many she could find, because in the Mission Schools all the children learn the place when they learn the verse; but many a text she had heard had sunk into her heart, and she longed to find these. She would often have quite a store of them in her mind, waiting till some of her loved friends should come in; then she would say, " Please find some texts for me." One day she asked for three most beautiful ones-" The eternal God is thy refuge, and underneath are the everlasting arms;" "His left hand is under my



PAGE 1

CHAPTER IV. GOD S CARE. "He maketh the storm a calm." E have spoken of the enemies of these dear chil'dren; we had often thought that some attack might be made upon them, but for seven months they were allowed to come and go unmolested, and we began to think it would always be so, and perhaps we were forgetting who it is that sends the peace and quietness, and so trial came. On Sunday night, May the 6th, about half-past eight, when the little children were just going to bed, a rattling sound was heard on the roof,, then another, then another, and then a window was broken by the blow of a large stone. The stones seemed to be coming from the front, and so the matron gathered the children together in the back. They were very much frightened, but they knew God could defend them, and they knelt in prayer. The */



PAGE 1

CHAPTER VIII. HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS. " It is more blessed to give than to receive." OW I think I must tell you something about Christmas time in the Birds' Nest; and how "the real Holly and Ivy, and the real time of joy, comes to the poor birdies. If I give you the history of one Christmas it will do for a specimen. Well, there is a kind gentleman who lives near the Nest, and who very often watches the procession of one hundred and fifty boys and girls going to church on Sundays, and sees their good behaviour there. About a fortnight before Christmas time a very kind thought came into his head and heart-it was this: I will give those dear children a real Christmas dinnerbeef and plum pudding. He asked a lady to manage it for him, and he would pay the money. This lady had a kind heart and a wise head, and so she sat down to make her calculations. There were raisins and currants, and sugar and suet, and flour and bread, and beef and



PAGE 1

A CONTRAST. 177 fort her afresh. The afternoon of the day on which she died, her brother and sister went to see her. They were greatly shocked at the change in their darling sister, but they said nothing about that; silently they sat beside the bed. Carry spoke first: " I'm going to die," she said. Charley asked: " Are you afraid?" " No," said the little one; " I'm going to Jesus." Charley asked again: " Are you sure your sins are forgiven?" " Yes, quite sure," she said; "good-bye." No more was said, and the brother and sister went away. Carry was followed to the grave by a large number of the children of the Mission Schools, (it was too far for the nestlings to come,) and they sang around her grave her favourite hymn, feeling sure Carry was with the dear Jesus she so much loved. SM



PAGE 1

NOT ALONE. 137 The journey of seven miles into town was a very trying one to poor Emily; but God supported her, and she spoke of Jesus as if He were present with them. She handed her little Bible to Mr. F , and asked him to read the i4th chapter of John, about the mansions prepared. When he got to the end of the fourth verse he stoppedtears were rolling down her poor little face. She said aloud, " Yes, Lord, you have prepared a place for me, and you have a crown of glory to give me the moment my soul leaves this poor body. Oh that you would convert my father and my mother, that they also might be with me in that place that God has prepared for those that love Him!" The latter part of the journey the poor child was too weary to speak. At length they reached the hospital. It was very hard to part with one with whom she had spent so long a time, and to be left alone in a little solitary ward, under the care of a strange nurse. Yet even here she felt she was walking with Jesus. It was Saturday evening when Emily was left in the hospital, and early on Monday, fearing she would be unhappy, I went to see her, She was lying calmly in her little bed, one of her own sweet smiles brightening up her face. I said to her, "Do you feel lonely, now you have left all your Kingstown friends?" "Not now,'



PAGE 1

cc ... ..., .',.A .. TH CNA :; 1 •· .+ •. --: ... ": ... . P~t .. ..,':: "i'l: % ··-· .· ~.. -. TH E CONTRAST.



PAGE 1

88 THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION. year it has grown, and strengthened, and yielded richer and richer fruits. When we made up the account at the end of its first year, and found that the children had sent £35, we were very much delighted. And year by year the sum increased more and more, till last year, 1870, it was more than £900. A wonderful blessing seems to rest on all engaged in this work, and wonderful pleasure it brings with it. Feeding and clothing hungry children is such a real work -a work that very small children can understand; and it seems quite worth while to give only a penny, when it will pay for one breakfast. And fourpence seems quite a large sum when it will feed a nestling for a whole day. And then, when a party of children form themselves into an association, and collect enough for the entire support of one or two children, they feel all the responsibility of fathers and mothers, and all sorts of little plans are devised for the good of." our nestling." Even the very little ones can help to make a patchwork quilt to cover its bed, and the boys can knit stockings for it, or make a scrapbook; and all can save or collect money. In our great Children's Association there are all sorts of workers. I often think I should like to see them all in one view. I can only imagine what a sight it would



PAGE 1

90 THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION. enough to make any one happy who enlists in it; but it must be done from a right motive,-to be real service it must begin with the heart. If you listen to Jesus -saying, "My son, give me thy heart," and you obey Him in that, you will soon give Him your hands too. Sometimes children and young people take up a cause in great earnestness, and work with zeal for a while, and then-they forget-or they don't like the trouble-or there is something else to do. Their kindness passes away. I was very much struck one day by a remark of one of our little nestlings. We had a great number of collectors at the Nest. There was a "Holly and Ivy" tea-party, and after the tea there was a magic-lantern with 'dissolving views. A large group of the little nestlings was gathered on a raised platform behind the sheet, and I was sitting amongst them, very much amused at their delight. One little thing who was sitting close beside me kept stroking my hand, and manifesting her affection in many childish ways. She watched the pictures melting one into another for some time. Then she suddenly looked up at me and said, "Don't 'oo go and change." "Why," I said, "how could I change?" "'Oo so kind now," she said. It was a wonderful saying. I looked at the child with a feeling of reverence, and I said to myself, I must



PAGE 1

CALLED AND CHOSEN. 157 THE HOMELAND. The Homeland ! the Homeland! The land of the free-bornThere's no night in the Homeland, But aye the fadeless morn. I'm sighing for the Homeland,My heart is aching here; There's no night in the Homeland To which I'm drawing near. My Lord is in the Homeland, With angels bright and fair; There's no sin in the Homeland, And no temptation there. The music of the Homeland Is ringing in my ears; And when I think of the Homeland, My eyes gush out with tears. For those I love in the Homeland Are calling me away, To the rest and peace of the Homeland, And the life beyond decay. There's no death in the HomelandThere's no sorrow above! Christ bring us all to the Homeland Of His eternal love !



PAGE 1

WANDERERS WELCOMED. 159 only pay for two; still she thought it better to do that than all starve together. She took the two little girls and put them to lodge with a clean, tidy woman, and told her husband he must mind Mary and Bobby. He said he would; and the mother went to a place in the country. There was very soor a great improvement in the appearance of the two little girls; but poor Mary and Bobby grew more and more worn and miserable. Their case was brought before the Committee of the Birds' Nest. They agreed to receive them; and a message was sent to the lady who had applied for them. That very day, at three o'clock, Mary and Bobby went to their wretched home from school. The woman with whom their father had placed them met them at the door, and told them they should not come there any more, that their father had not been heard of for two days. With aching hearts and tearful eyes they turned from the door; they thought they would go to the woman who minded their sisters, perhaps she would have compassion on them. But no: "I have children of my own," she said; " and your mother can only pay for two." Poor Mary and Bobby, what will they do now? They



PAGE 1

CHAPTER VIII. SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE. ARAH TOWEL was a dear little girl, who one night lay down to sleep in one of the small beds Eg of the Birds' Nest, and awoke up amongst the angels in heaven. The bed-clothing had not been disturbed, and there was a bright, happy smile on the cold face, and it seemed as if in a pleasant dream the messenger had come. It was a little shock to our children at first, as the news of so sudden a death passed from one to another; but soon they thought 'of Sarah's bright life, her love for Jesus, and they began to feel it was something like it was with Enoch-" He walked with God, and he was not, for God took him; for before his translation he had this testimony, that he pleased God." Sometimes when a child is taken away from its earthly home, we hope it belonged to Jesus, and that it is gone to be with Him. And we think over its life, and secret things come to light; words written; kind actions done; and we are comforted.



PAGE 1

112 GOD'S PROVIDINGS. Hebrew youths were in the hot furnace. If Jesus is with them, all must be well." The next year's little book completes the story. "Besides the supply of the needful money, we have had many other answers to prayerc Seven of our lost children have been restored to us-all that we were most anxious about, except one. She, poor child, is patiently waiting until she is of an age when she will be allowed to Schoose for herself. Much prayer is made for her-this one, and one other whom we fear will never return. "Amongst those, who are come back are Polly and Lizzie, and their little brother, Georgie. One day in spring I met Georgie in the street. His eyes filled with tears when he saw me. He said his mother was very unhappy, and wished so to get them all back, but she was afraid of the priest. I asked him what he would be when he was a man. He looked up brightly, and said, I'm. determined to be a Christian.' I told Georgie to tell his mother how we would make room for Lizzie and Polly, if they could get back. Not many days afterwards Georgie and his brother came, as poor and ragged as when we first knew them. Their poor mother had only a cellar-home. They were soon dressed and sent out, helping the old man to drive the donkey; for he was going out that day with a load of parcels of clothing.



PAGE 1

46 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. she determined never to go to chapel again. In this state she was visited by the Town Missionaries, and they told her of One who cared for her in all her poverty and trials -one who, if she trusted in Him, would never leave nor forsake her. They gave her a Bible, which she promised to read. After this she was visited by priests and nuns, who promised her all sorts of things if she would return and give up her children. She refused everything; but work grew more scanty, and she found it hard to feed so. many. Happily for the children, they got a good breakfast every morning in the Luke Street Ragged School, and sometimes a piece of bread before they went home. One day the priest visited the mother, and found her reading the Bible; he snatched it from her, and threw it into the fire. She rescued it. Her trials were very great and varied; she could not stand against them; and her poor room was without furniture,-an old box served for a table, and the bed was a little straw in a corner of the room. It was, very hard for those who had seen better days. The Missionaries made known the case, and admission was obtained for the children into the Nest, and a light situation found for the mother. Nothing has been heard of the father for many months. We hope these dear children will be left with us. They are nice, clean, well-mannered little things, and very fond of each other.



PAGE 1

GOD'S PROVIDINGS. 113 "Very soon after, finding that the boys had been received, the mother went to the convent, and with some difficulty got the girls released. They looked strong and well. Their faith had been strengthened by adversity. When they went to the Nest they were received with open arms. There was almost as much surprise and joy as there was in that upper room at Jerusalem when Peter was given to the prayers of the brethren. Lizzie says she taught many of her hymns to the children in the convent, and we can still pray that the good seed may spring up. These two girls are now nearly ready to go out to service. They are very anxious to begin to earn, that they may help their poor mother. They have been lately very much pleased to be allowed to make some underclothes for her; and when one of them got a present of a shilling at Christmas, she sent it at once to her mother, with such a loving letter! The poor woman brought it to shew, she was so pleased." Very soon after Christmas this poor mother died. Amongst "cGod's providings" for the Nest I think we ought to count all the "office-bearers." At the beginning of 1869, we had to get a new Matron. You know a Matron is a very important person insuch a Home as the Birds' Nest. She has to be the mother of the family; she has to see that proper food is bought, and H



PAGE 1

16o WANDERERS WELCOMED. thought of their Father in heaven, and they knelt down and asked Him to take care of them. When they rose from their knees, it came into Mary's mind to go to the house of a lady they had seen at the school, and tell her their trouble. It was a very cold evening in January, half-melted snow lay in the streets, and rain and hail came driving down; but the poor children struggled on with their bare heads and naked feet. Their hearts nearly failed them as they went up the hall-door steps; but Bobby seized the bell and gave it one sudden pull, and it rang, and the servant came to the door; his mistress was out, but he had a kind and tender heart; he listened to the tale of sorrow, and took them to wait in the hall. It happened that the lady's business out on that winter evening had been to seek for these very children, and she had been unable to find where they lived. Great was her surprise when she came to find them in her own "hall. They began to tell their story, but she soon told them the good news that they were to go to the Birds' Nest. Oh, how glad they were! little Mary dried up her tears, and Bobby looked at his bleeding feet, and then into the lady's face, and said, " Please, sal me have sues dere ?" Before many minutes the children were standing before the kitchen fire warming their frozen limbs; and then



PAGE 1

184 SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE. taken her to be for ever with himself. No one who really knew little Sarah has the smallest doubt of this. It was not difficult to discover that she was one of the lambs of the fold. Her cheerful response when spoken to about the love of Jesus, and asked if she had given her young heart to Him, as well as her happy Christian walk, as a lowly follower of the Lamb, bore testimony that she was no stranger to the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge. Her brief life was filled with acts of love and self-denial, such as are rarely to be seen in one so young. Love to her precious Saviour was evidently the constraining motive; and thus the tender branch which could not bear fruit of itself, became fruitful from its union with the vine. She was truly a ministering child, patient and uncomplaining in her own sufferings, which must thave been greater at times than she would allow. "To make this little girl useful was to make her happy. It was a great treat to her to be asked to help me in my garden, or to take part in any little household employment. Indeed we often invented a little job or message for her, just for the pleasure it seemed to give; and then it was always nice to hear her inquiry, 'Can I do anything more, ma'am?' When my mother was often much alone in the winter afternoons, she would have her up to sit on a little stool in the room with her, while she examined her *



PAGE 1

GOING FORWARD. 31 the time when we all stood in the green field, and the first stone was put down. I must explain the plan of the building, or I fear you will not Exactly understand all I shall'have to tell you. .It is an oblong building, with a' door at each end; one has "Boys" written over it, the other " Girls." This is to suit the day-schools. You remember that, at first, the Birds' Nest children went to the Mission School"; now the Mission School was to come to the Birds' Nest. The large space between each entrance is divided into two rooms; the one on the boys' end is the infants' school-room; the other is the feeding-room. In this latter are six deal tables, some of them very low, with small low forms for the little children; others are higher, for those who have longer legs. Over these two rooms are two others, separated by folding doors. One is the boys' school-room, the other the girls'. Over these again are two large sleepingrooms. At the end you will see there are several smaller rooms. On the girls' end there is first the kitchen, then two rooms for the matron, two for the teachers, and one, reaching from back to front, which is intended for any children who may not be quite well.



PAGE 1

HOLLY AND IVY. PART I. -00CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTORY. OLLY AND IVY! the very words make us feel cold, and yet warm. How they remind one of the snow-covered fields, and the keen, biting winds of winter! How they remind one, too, of times of joy, and happy homes, and brightness in the midst of desolation! This little book will tell of the dreary winter time of the lives of destitute little children-of their sorrows and troubles. It also tells of brightness and joy, and a happy home; and so I have chosen those magic words for its title. I hope it will find its way into many Christian homes, and be read by many of those dear children who t



PAGE 1

174 "A PILGRIM GOING HOME. HYMN. " We speak of the realms of the bleet, That country so bright and so fair, And oft are its glories confessedBut what must it be to be there ! We speak of its pathways of gold, Its walls decked with jewels so rare, Its wonders and pleasures untoldBut what must it be to be there! We speak of its peace and its love, The robes which the glorified wear, The songs of the blessed aboveBut what must it be to be there! We speak of its freedom from sin, From sorrow, temptation, and care, From trials without and withinBut what must it be to be there ! Do thou, Lord, 'midst pleasures or woes, For heaven our spirit prepare, That shortly we also may know And feel what it is to be there !"



PAGE 1

.CHAPTER V. GOING FORWARD. "€ The Lord shall increase you more and more, you, and your children." S mentioned in an earlier chapter, we had determined to build a new Nest for our Birdiesbut we found it very difficult to get a suitable piece of ground, so we took a larger house, and in a very short tirpe our numbers rose to sixty-four. The new comers easily fell into the orderly ways of those who had been trained to good habits, and so there was little difficulty; and as time went on we were induced to increase the number to eighty-one. In every available spot of the house were the little beds laid down, and the assembly at meals was a goodly sight to behold. Down the centre of the room was a long table, occupied by the elder boys and girls, and round by the walls were high forms for tables, and low forms for seats, for the little ones, and yet there was the greatest order amongst them; and



PAGE 1

CALLED AND CHOSEN. 155 should pray for. The little boy mentioned three things, --'Patience to bear pain; to take it away; and that I may not be afraid when I come to the valley of the shadow of death." This last prayer was wonderfully answered. About the middle of the day, on Thursday, the ist of March, I received a message that Pat was dying. I went as quickly as possible. When I reached the room the door was a little open; I went quietly in. Dear little Pat was lying with his arms stretched out, his eyes fixed and glazed; his mother knelt on the floor, watching him. "Ah, ma'am, he's almost gone!" she said. I knelt beside her, hoping to catch a last smile, but the breathing had ceased. Pat was singing the song of Moses and the Lamb in heaven. That morning, when-he woke up, he put his two little wasted arms round his mother's neck, and kissed her many times. She said, "Did you sleep well, my darling?" "Yes, mamma, quite well," said he; but his voice was changed. She struck a light, and then she saw that his face, too, was changed, and she knew he was dying. She sent for their missionary friend. When he came the child could not speak, but he drew from under his pillow his little Testament, and listened earnestly to the story of the death of Lazarus. He knew he was dying; but his



PAGE 1

THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION. 87 Writing is the best way of talking to friends at a distance, but for those near it is better to meet face to face; so we got up some meetings of different kinds. The first was a tea-party in St. John's Schoolhouse. Sometimes we had meetings without tea. Sometimes we had a magic-lantern meeting at the Nest. One meeting was a very charming one-a real Children's Association meeting, " therich and the poor meeting together." We asked every collector to give a shilling, and to come to the Nest on a certain Thursday evening, at four o'clock. When we had got all the shillings, we got a great quantity of currant-cake made, and ordered the children's evening supply of bread to be made into flat cakes, and to be brought hot. Then we hired some cups, saucers, teapots, jugs, and bowls, and we arranged our tea-party. Six cups and saucers, a bowl, and jug, went to each teapot. The hot cakes were buttered, and the currant-cake cut up, on plates down each table; and when the collectors had arrived, the nestlings were all brought into the tearoom, and a little girl collector presided at each teapot, while a little boy waited on her. It was a most enjoyable party. Our Children's Association has grown very fast, and struck down root in many different places; and year by



PAGE 1

HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS. 8 CHRISTMAS DAY. 'Tis Christmas Day-glad voices Awake the solemn sound, And happy voices in our home, And healthful looks around. Why do we thus keep Christmas morn ?It is the day when Christ was born. With little gifts that tell our love, With garlands on the wall, With thankful hearts and helpful hands, We keep a festival. Why do we thus keep Christmas morn?It is the day when Christ was born. Full eighteen hundred years ago, Christ Jesus came on earth: He came, He rose, He died for usWe thank God for His birth. And therefore we keep Christmas morn, The day our Saviour Christ was born. Christ healed the sick, and helped the poor, While He was here on earth. Do what you can to be like Him, This morning of His birth. Help some one to keep Christmas morn, The day our Saviour Christ was born. F



PAGE 1

I '' rQv : -] rx-down



PAGE 1

GOD'S PROVIDINGS. 103 be closed out of debt. It was a great request, but God's promises are great-He says, 'Open thy mouth wide, I will fill it.' "The day on which we ask that collections should be sent in is the 20th of December; our time came, but not God's. Many were praying, but answers were few; we must wait. On the 22nd we counted up the debts, and found that £1,158 were wanted to pay all! Then we took a report of last year, and tried to calculate how many collections could be expected. Not quite £300! Oh how dark it seemed! One evening, seeking comfort from God's Word, we read the story of the feeding of the five thousand. It was Jesus himself put the question, "Whence shall we buy bread, that these may eat?' But immediately it is added, ' This He said to prove them, for He himself knew what He would do.' Then we felt that, in our trying circumstances, Jesus, putting himself amongst the workers, was asking the question, 'Whence shall WE buy bread?' He knew then, and He knows now, what He will do; we must trust Him and wait. Oh it is blessed to look only to Him! No matter how rough the waves, if we can only keep looking to Him, there is no sinking; only'sometimes a great high wave dashes up and hides Him from view, and then, while beginning to sink, we hear His sweet voice-' Oh thou of little faith, where-



PAGE 1

"CcA PILGRIM GOING HOME." 173 "cc No, dear." "C Because I asked Jesus to take away my pain, and He has done so." After this she fell into a kind of sleep; and while she slept she was taken home: "Home! where the Bridegroom takes The purchase of His loveHome! where the Father waits To welcome saints above." On Wednesday morning dear Annie was laid in her grave. The words of our beautiful Burial Service, repeated over one who had died in such a hope, seemed to gather new force and meaning-" We commit her body to the ground; earth to earth, ashes to ashes, dust to dust; in sure and certain hope of the Resurrection to eternal life, through our Lord Jesus Christ; who shall change our vile body, that it may be like His glorious body, according to the mighty working, whereby He is able to subdue all things to himself." " I heard a voice from heaven, saying unto me, Write, Blessed are the dead which die'in the Lord: Yea, saith the Spirit, that they may rest from their labours." UT*



PAGE 1

52 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. regular attendants at the school, but always so neatly dressed that we had never guessed their poverty. It was the little one who had brought the note the night before. "c Oh, ma'am," said the old woman, cI never begged before; but the children said the Lord would help us. I had not a bit of fire or food; and what was worse, not a bit of candle to watch my poor child through the night. I could not face a night of darkness." The child had had fever, and was just beginning to recover; all she wanted was nourishment and comfort, which we were able to provide. They had been very respectable people; the father, a good workman, earning large wages; but he died suddenly, leaving £20 which he had saved for his wife, mother-inlaw, and children. They were induced to go to Manchester and set up a lodging-house, which at first succeeded; but the cotton famine came, and they lost all they had. They returned to Dublin; the mother went to service, where she earned £5 a-year, and 2s. 6d. a-week to feed herself. This was all the support of the family-no wonder they suffered so much. We took the two children into the Nest, and the old woman went to the poorhouse, where she soon after died. The mother is in very delicate health, but she is able to support herself, and comes sometimes to see the little ones.



PAGE 1

GOING FORWARD. 35 But the pump was soon set up, and all was put in order. I only wish all the readers of this book could now visit The Birds' Nest; I think they would all agree in thinking it the very happiest home for poor children they ever saw.; and a noble monument to the memory of her who first thought of having a Birds' Nest, and of her dear mother, the late Mrs. Whately, who, while the building was being erected, left her earthly labours to enter her heavenly rest. Mother and daughter had been united in works of self-denying love in their lives: it was fitting that their names should be associated in so appropriate a memorial. HYMN SUNG AT THE OPENING OF THE BIRDS' NEST. "6 THERE is a better world they say, Oh! so bright! "Where sin and death are done away, Oh! so bright! There music fills the balmy air, And angels with bright wings are there, And harps of gold, and mansions fair, Oh! so bright! No clouds e'er pass along its sky, Happy land! No teardrops glisten in the eye, Happy land



PAGE 1

GOD'S PROVIDINGS. 97 distress; but God just used whom He would: to Him be the glory. Two collections were made by mothers on their deathbeds. They looked at their own children, so soon to be orphans, and then they thought of the hungry orphans; and their last strength was spent in helping them. Another time that God helped us in trouble was early in the year. Funds were coming in very slowly, and there was not enough to buy food for the children; still they must be fed, and our Treasurer advanced up to £80. At that time some little children met to pray on a Sunday evening; they asked God that this £80 might be sent. During that week a gentleman said he would give £1o, if the rest was got in a month. The following Sunday the children prayed again, and that week £20 came. Again the children prayed, and that week a lady called and left £50, refusing to give her name. " The Lord sent it," she said. Yes, indeed, the Lord did send it, in answer to the children's prayers. In these early times we had an instance of God's kind care about clothing. One day in August the Matron went to the lady who manages the clothing, and she said, "We want under-garments for the girls very much indeed; I have got the old ones patched and darned, but they won't last any longer." "How many do you want?" G i



PAGE 1

THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 51 the four walls of a back garret, without furniture, friends, or any earthly comfort but my little ones. My brother gives me till the 9th to consider whether I will give up my boy to go to the convent, or give up the friendship of all belonging to me. I am really bewildered. Please, madam, do not look on me as an imposter." The case was so urgent that the little boy, though only just past six, was taken and put to lodgings for a few months. The mother got a good situation as nurse, and is able to pay for her other two children at nurse. At Christmas her mistress allowed her to have her boy for a few days' visit. And if you had seen her coming into the Mission Church, looking like a model nurse, with her boy by the hand, you would have thanked God for such an institution as the Birds' Nest. Late one evening there came a note, written on an old leaf of a book, begging for a little relief for a sick child who attended one of the Mission Schools. I sent a shilling, and the next day went to the home of the poor child. It was a very small room at the top of a poor house, a bedstead and a chair the only furniture. An old woman sat near the fire with a child on her knee very ill. Another little one stood beside her. When I entered, the little one looked up 'with a smile of welcome, and I knew her and the sick one as little children



PAGE 1

CHAPTER VI. THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. A "And He took them up in His arms, put His hands upon them, and blessed them." OME people think "THE BIRDS' NEST" a very odd sort of name for an institution; but most of our friends like it very much indeed. I think it charming; and I know a great many of our children helpers agree with me. In this chapter I want to tell something about the sort of children who are taken into the Nest. It is very difficult to classify them, but I will tell the cases of some of them, and that will give an idea. The more destitute a child is, the more glad we are to receive it, and bring it up for Jesus. Let us fancy we are at the Nest, and looking at the children. Here is a little boy I always call Billy, but I think his real name is Johnny. When he came to me to be made ready for the Nest he was the most miserable creature I ever saw. He was thought to be seven years old; and the day I



PAGE 1

HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS. 73 potatoes, to be bought; and the first question was-how much of each wouldabe wanted? and the second was-how such a great dinner should be cooked? Both these questions required consultation and calculation; but at last the plans were all laid, and the children were told what their kind friend was going to do for them. There was a great clapping of hands, and a great shout of joy at the news. SAnd from that time till Christmas-day there was as much pleasure in the hearts of the poor little children in the Nest as there is in the hearts of the little children who live in happy homes, and have kind papas and mammas, and elder brothers and sisters, who they know are preparing joyful surprises for Christmas-day. At length the Christmas-eve came, and on that day the preparations were to be made. Early in the morning three carts, loaded with ivy, and holly with red berries, arrived at the gate. And the boys were sent to carry it all in, which they accomplished in a wonderfully short time. Then, with the help of the girls, and directed by the schoolmaster and schoolmistress, the room was dressed up. Such a happy time it was! The sun shone in at the windows, and the hum of the mingled happy voices was right pleasant to hear. " Many hands made light work," and by the middle of the day the decorations were finished. Then came the girls with brooms to sweep out the rubb


xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0002618300001datestamp 2009-01-26setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title Holly & ivydc:creator Davies, Sarahdc:description b Statement of Responsibility by Miss Daviesdc:publisher George HerbertWilliam Huntdc:date 1871dc:type Bookdc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00026183&v=00001AAB8933 (ltqf)ALG5491 (ltuf)57726903 (oclc)002225219 (alephbibnum)dc:source University of Floridadc:language Englishdc:coverage Ireland -- DublinEngland -- London



PAGE 1

S102 GOD'S PROVIDINGS. "As a father giveth, So He gives them bread; Saves them out of danger, Watches by their bed; Tells all little children Of their Father's care; How He loves and pities Children everywhere." Towards the close of the following year we were in great difficulties about funds, and were wonderfully helped. I will copy the account from a little book, called" NEEDS AND HELPS." It begins with the text, c My God shall supply ALL your need." "1 These words were in my mind when, just one month ago, we chose the title of our new little book. It was a time of very great need; so great, that we felt we dare not tell how great. But we thought of other times of great need out of which our Heavenly Father had delivered us, and we remembered that, year after year, when the accounts of the Birds' Nest had been made up, there was always something in hand, and we knew that God's PROVIDENCE WAS STILL OUR INHERITANCE, and that could not fail; so a little paper was sent around to all the friends, asking for special prayer that again the year might



PAGE 1

THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION. 85 her glad voice in the hymn of praise; but we know her's is one of the most joyous voices raised in the heavenly song. And it may be that she and many another little one who on earth learned to care for poor children, for Jesus' sake, talk together of them there. When we had thus started the Children's Association, I published a little penny book, entitled, "A few words to little Children who want to be like Jesus," and wrote about it in " Erin's Hope." I asked any little children who wished to join to write to me, and then prepared some cards ready for any children who might wish to collect. We took three wretched little children who wanted to get into the Birds' Nest, and a friend photographed them; from this a woodcut was made and printed on the cards; and then I waited a little while to see what would come of it. I felt like a gardener who had sown seed in a bed in his garden; or a farmer who has sown a field all over with wheat; or a little girl who has planted a geranium slip in a pot in her nursery window. I thought of some words of Jesus-"Any plant that my heavenly Father hath not planted shall be rooted up." And I watched to see whether my plants were of His planting. After some days there came a letter by post. It was directed in a lady's handwriting. There was nothing par-



PAGE 1

152 CALLED AND CHOSEN. " Jesus is there." " Why else? " " There is no sin there." " Why else?" " There is no pain there." "Why else?" " Tears shall be all wiped away." "How do you know that ?" " ' God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes.'" "What are you to Jesus?" "I 'm His little lamb." "And what is Jesus to you?" "He's my Good Shepherd." "And what does the Good Shepherd do for His little lambs ?" " He takes them in His arms, and carries them in His bosom." "Do you know what David said about the valley of the shadow of death ?" "I Yes: Though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.' " "David was not afraid; but are you?" "No; Jesus is with me; His rod and His staff comfort me. Oh, I should like to die to-morrow!"



PAGE 1

74 HOW E KEEP CHRISTMAS. bish, and that was all that could be done in that room for that day at least, and the work was finished. Not so in the kitchen. There a number of the elder girls, headed by the kind matron, Miss Howard,* were most busily engaged all day long, making those most wonderful things, plum puddings! It was eleven o'clock before they all got to bed; but no matter, they were all too excited to be sleepy. And very early on Christmas morning the little ones were roused, that there might be time for much extra combing, and washing, and dressing; really I do think the big girls had made up their minds that every little face should be polished so as to be a regular looking-glass, reflecting the brightness around. But all this washing and dressing was over by breakfast time; and then the children went to church, all except a few elder girls, who had to stay at home to lay the tables. This was accomplished with even more care than usual. The cloths were quite clean, and the knives and forks polished up in a marvellous manner. The meat was roasting in the kitchen, and the puddings were boiling in the boiler, when the little ones came home from church; and they were all seated in their places at * Miss Howard was the kind friend who undertook the office of matron when we first got into the new Nest.



PAGE 1

HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS. 79 Join all with heart and voice, And loud hosannas raise, We 'll swell the song, Our Jesus' name we '11 praise. " Erin's children sighed, Long ago, long ago, Your arms were opened wide To shelter them from woe. Join all with heart and voice, And loud hosannas raise, We '11 swell the song, Our Jesus' name we '11 praise. " Erin's children love To welcome you, to welcome you, You've taught us how above We '11 meet the Saviour, too. Join all with heart and voice, And loud hosannas raise, We '11 swell the song, Our Jesus' name we '11 praise.' " In the better land, Father dear, father dear, A glorious angel band Will welcome you up there. Join all with heart and voice, And loud hosannas raise, We '11 swell the song, Our Jesus' name we'll praise." When this had been sung, and tea and cake finished,



PAGE 1

THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION. 89 be. We should see a little girl in a beautiful castle; she is learning to hem; it is hard work, but for every halfyard she will get a penny to put in her Birds' Nest box. We should see a sick little boy in a garret in London; he is hoarding up farthings, and trying to fill a little bag for the nestlings. We should see many groups of children to whom God has given bounteously: they are gathered around some kind friend, busy sewing, and on the table lies the money box, into which they have put their weekly contributions, and beside it a letter, in large characters, "written by their own nestling. We should see classes of little children in infants' schools trying to put very little stitches into their bits of calico, for they are to be sewed together one day to make a quilt to send to the Birds' Nest. We should see happy parties preparing Christmas tree sales, and lonely children doing what they can. And better than all, we should see little groups met for prayer. Dear children, you who have enrolled yourselves members of this great Children's Association, don't look upon your work as small or unimportant. It is " your Father's business "-the work He has given you to do. He has need of your services. You want Jesus to save you, and make you ready for His glorious home; and Jesus wants you to minister to His poor. Oh! it is a blessed service,



PAGE 1

92 THE CHILDREN S ASSOCIATION. upon you now, and longing to have you for His own. He says to you, "My son, give me thine heart." He says to you, too, " Son, go work to-day in my vine-, yard." There is a multitude to be fed-only Jesus knows how it is to be done; but are there not many ot you who are like the " lad who had five barley loaves and two small fishes?" Well, bring them to Jesus; He will accept, and make them sufficient. We must never leave our rescued children unfed, unclothed, and uncomforted. Our "Holly and Ivy" must be true evergreen, only looking fresher, and sparkling brighter, for the depth of the winter time, and the desolation around. But it does not grow of itself, therefore we want many hands to gather and bring it. If you want useful work-if you want pleasant work-come and help us to brighten up the lives of desolate little children; come and help to supply THE HOLLY AND IVY.



PAGE 1

DAILY WORK. 67 first of all, that they may be true followers of the Lord Jesus Christ, and then, that they may find favour in the eyes of those with whoni they have to do. Now I should like to tell you how our nestlings spend Sunday. It is a very happy day in Christian homes, and I am sure it is a happy day in this great Home. But I must begin with Saturday evenings. Shortly after dinner washing begins, for every child must have a warm bath, and be thoroughly cleansed; then, as each one is undressed to go to bed, its clothes are well brushed, neatly folded, and laid into a basket; and the Sunday ones arranged ready for the morning. When morning comes, at seven o'clock there is a stir in the little beds, and the clean faces pop up, and one after another turn out of bed; and soon there is a happy bustle of washing and dressing, and then the elder ones make the beds and lay the breakfast, and at nine o'clock all sit down to the tables. After this, while all keep their places, the matron talks a little to them about the Sabbath-day, and the way in which little children can serve God. Then she reads a chapter, and prays. After this the'children go into the play-ground, and walk about, learning hymns, or singing, or reading; for half-an-hour; then they have to dress for church. Even the little ones go every Sunday. None remain at home,



PAGE 1

SAFE AT HOME, 143 and when I talked to he. about it, I felt quite sure that she was enjoying that peace. We had brought her a nice doll and a little Testament. We gave her the doll first, and she looked admiringly at it; then we shewed her the Testament. Instantly the doll was laid down, and with both hands she grasped the Testament; she had been longing so for it, because her Bible was too heavy for her to hold up. It did not seem to be any trouble to Janey that she had no relatives. She had Jesus; that was enough; and He supported her to the end. For five months dear little Janey lay in that hospital, suffering very much, but patiently "waiting for Jesus;" her calmness and peace reminded me of the words of a beautiful hymn:"One of Jesus' lambs am I, Near His side to keep I try; Near my Shepherd, loving, tender, Careful Guide, and strong Defender, Whose protection I can claim, And who calls meby my name. Often in the cooling shade I am gladly by Him staid, Then in pastures green He leads me, Out of His own hands He feeds me, For my thirst still water gives; He who drinks for ever lives. /



PAGE 1

CHAPTER III. SAFE AT HOME. " And there shall be no more death." N the spring of 1862, two dear girls were absent from the Nest, sick in the hospital. One of these two was a dear girl named Hannah. She early learned to trust in Jesus; and before she went to the hospital, felt and knew that her sins were forgiven. And through those four weary months, when she knew she was to die, her soul was kept resting in Jesus. She was often able to be up, and then she would sit beside the little beds in the children's ward, and teach the little ones texts of Scripture and sweet hymns. She was much beloved amongst them all. She did not die in the hospital, but just a week after she had left it. She was happyto the last; her faith endured to the end; and she left behind her a testimony to the faithfulness of Jesus. The other was quite a little child, about ten years of



PAGE 1

.411,. ":"1~ ".:.".·L "1; "' '""'': " " " "1 iXi ~ ~~~~~~• -,. ;.-. .."., ....; I. .... ....... ; .; :.',..E .'--: . ...-... . .1. , .., • ... .. 2.1p -; ., -5 ,. ·;P; .... ... ... ;: ,Z ·. ·. ,,?~ ··.. ·L.. ..1:.. -... .,,,~-: ..._ , ...... . ,oL ~... ...·,. , ·, o ..,.: :·..·. .,.. ·.. , ;. ... .. ..' -.,. .. _:j;~-l:: ··.~ , .I.• ...L'i' ;,." , t",,.,'· ~ ,. c ... -=," "" ;. , ., t ',', ., " " • ...,a.,t:... . ; ..: .., ., ',I ', , -',. i. "/" ": "' '"' ,p,. ..,r ·. .--··? P GE',,6" .,.~ ~ ,,.. .:-.( : ·~· -. " '.··:, ;L~~.," ' " .-s S~ ..... .;.?. '~ .... :., .' ;-· •. z]. ,, s . .·l.:-. Ci-··c·.,2!~~~:~;~:·~~~~~, }, ..... .'.n:er ·.:·c ··• .... .. -. c ... ..-" "". -" "' "';i,' , ·., -·--: -.; 1.·.·-··~~~AG i. i :·· 0 : *:1



PAGE 1

NOMT ALONE. 131 Her heart was moved for the miseries of those around her; she thought of their darkness and ignorance-; she knew that many of them were, as she once was, ignorant of the only true source of comfort, and she prayed that God would enable her to speak to some of them, and lead them to Jesus. Lying in the next bed was a poor woman, and with her Emily commenced her missionary work. She repeated over and over texts of Scripture, until the dull ear of the poor woman took them in, and God opened her heart to receive them. Then Emily would talk to her in her own sweet way, telling her of the love of Jesus, and how He casts out none that come to Him. The poor woman came to Jesus; and though she left that hospital, she was, not long afterwards,. an inmate of another, where she died rejoicing in Christ as her Saviour. When the dear child was told of this she did not shew any surprise; it was what she had asked of God, and He had answered her prayer; *and when one expressed astonishment that so much should have been learned in so short a time, Emily said it was no wonder, because the poor woman had been taught by the Holy Spirit. During this long winter in the hospital Emily endeared herself to all about her, although the false story of her "


PAGE 1

II0 GOD S PROVIDINGS. but there was no disputing a mother's rights, and poor Biddy had to go straight to the poorhouse. There she met a little girl, an orphan like herself. She made friends with her, and very soon Mary had learned of the love ot the Saviour, and joined her friend in her prayers and faith. The mother, too, began to love the hymns Biddy sang to her, and she learned to repeat, 'God so loved the world,' &c.; and then, in answer to Biddy's earnest prayers, God gave her His Holy Spirit, and she, too, learned to love Jesus, and trust Him; and then He took her to himself, and Biddy returned to the Home, bringing with her the orphan Mary. This story has given us courage in many a time of trial at the Nest: when little children, who had been with us long, and had learned to love the Lord Jesus and follow Him, have been claimed by some relatives, and taken away to some convent school. It seems so very sad; and when such a thing is threatened, the children pray that their school-fellow may be spared to them; but at last the child is forced away. At such times we think of Biddy's work in the poorhouse, and pray that our nestlings may have courage to speak of Jesus wherever they may be. "A few weeks ago a girl of about fifteen years of age applied for admission at the Luke Street School. She said she had no friends; her father and mother had been Pro-



PAGE 1

THE FIRST DEATH. 125 graveyard we thought of the resurrection morning, when those graves shall be opened, and the bodies of Christ's people shall arise, beautiful and glorious. This was a joyful thought. Then we looked at the many gravestones placed over Roman Catholics who had been buried hoping for nothing better than purgatory; and we mourned there should be so many still living in the like ignorance. But while we thought on these things there came a sound of solemn singing, and looking towards the road we saw the funeral procession. The coffin, borne by eight of the schoolboys in turn, was followed by thirty little children of the Nest, and many more schoolfellows, with the teachers. As they walked along they sang sweet hymns; and when they wound up the little green lane, and entered the churchyard, they were met by a missionary clergyman the children all loved very much. Then all assembled round the grave; and when the service' had been read, and the little coffin put down, a few solemn earnest words were spoken to the children, and they sang, " Come to Jesus," and " Shall we ever meet again?" and the little ones went home, solemnly singing as they went. We felt very thankful that the first death should be such a happy one; vi feel quite sure that little Nanny Slattery is in heaven. Just one year after Nanny's death another nestling,



PAGE 1

* .• ' ., .-*. ... .. .. .I .-'..r ·.,.-, 'r. .sfl ... " "... .At-f .". A -M R-.--C -2. * .. ..,..', ,k,_.4.',.-'' ; .c,.%,%,.. ..*..r .''.. z.,•...ttt. • ..... .kfQrT:.P:\¶;. .Yt.....~' s ..--.:. ." '.I:. ' ,'.4.' ;f *tn~rt'r .. ... , :'-" :tSA t r ',,, a' ," .-: -1 .i .i 0 -• ' " ....., .'...F. v6 q. kr * .., , ., ... .'. ...L..-.j ~ t\ e. ~ * t' ~~~,' ' :'~ .:A 1' i *dP .....a, ' i -.V-. .., ".· .. ...,.~i" c :;:..:. -,, r !:~F~~,·..i-, ~;~ ·,-.1 . : .'! . ..' .o ' -: ..,1: , ; ; A.' ..i ,A .....;2 2.r ' ..j 4' ":T) :-'. " "" ' ' " "'r " -, -'. ..~. -,"r.' , .•*" ., ,' -, :. .-"r * ~ kjrr·;r-· "c·r~. I .-'. ' -,'"¼ '' -, ""' .. :. , -• , , • .i, .. .4 -N biih ,. .-.'.... ., ....... . w" E Am !LU-:, "" .. ,. ... ... • _,t... .i. YddA F,, .1:: .A ha .... ' ..... -, ,*-. .-, , "• ., ....,,. ._._ '7 '.'' .* LA' it, " f' '7, '". 1 "1 AIF, .· ·i . ·:-+ ,4 'P .... PAG 37 . 3'' I~ __ A 1'1 /t r A, I ru, ; '7% ~PAGE 37.



PAGE 1

GOD'S PROVIDINGS. 95 which thou hast built; ..and mine eyes and my heart shall be there perpetually." Thoughts like these made us choose for our motto some words taken from an old house in Chester"God's Providence is mine Inherithce." It is a wonderfully rich inheritance. Some one asked us, the other day, if we would not like to have all the money we should want for a year laid up in the bank. We said no, for we should lose many a lesson of trust and love. It is good to have empty vessels, if we may carry them to God to fill. It is good to have no earthly trust, for then we feel that we get nearer to Jesus, who is to us a Saviour ever near. It is written in God's Word, " Be careful for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication let your request be made known unto God. And the peace of God shall keep your heart." If any of us had the responsibility of feeding and clothing all these children we should faint under the burden; but we feel we are only instruments, and God will surely provide; and so we cast our burden on Him, and He sustains us. Our first great trial about funds came soon after the formation of the Children's Association; it was in the month of October. The Committee met, and they looked



PAGE 1

58 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. only be like the roll mentioned in Ezekiel, "full of lamentations, and mourning, and woe." From what I have said, you can imagine something of their former misery. I like much better to tell of their present happiness, and to lead those who have been our helpers to thank God that He has made them the means of so much blessing, and encourage others who have not yet entered upon the service of the Heavenly Master to join in this work for Him, that that may be a very large company to whom He will one day say, " Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto ME." TO THE WANDERER. LONELY traveller! little orphan! Sorrowful and weary, If thy life seem lone and cheerless, If the way be dreary, There is One can hear and see, Looks, and loves, and pities thee. 'We have got a Home for children Poor as thee and lonely, Where they hear of Christ the Saviour, 'Tis for children only. Come, then, little wanderer, here Learn' of Christ the Saviour dear.





PAGE 1

98 GOD'S PROVIDINGS. asked the lady. "Well, if we had five dozen, it would give one to each girl." "Well," said the lady, " I have not any at all, and no money to buy; we must only wait." Five days after that a parcel arrived from the North -of England; it contained almost the number of the articles required, and nothing else! The parcel was accompanied by a letter, apologizing for sending all the garments of one sort, as the little children who had made them could make nothing else. The lady was greatly astonished. She took the parcel to the " Nest," and told the children how God had supplied their wants. Tears stood in many eyes as they listened, and they learned a lesson of trust in God they will never forget. Now, I want you to see how God was preparing the answer before the want came. You know He says, "Before they call, I will answer." And all the time those little children were putting in stitch after stitch, they were working out the will of God; and just when the need came the work was ready. In the first week of November, 1864, we had a remarkable instance of God's providings. On Friday the Committee met, and they found there were five vacancies to be filled up. Then the application papers were opened, -and there were no less than fifty-two of them,-some of them such distressing cases of destitution that they did not find it possible to refuse them. They chose out five



PAGE 1

HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS. 75 the tables when the kind gentleman and his family and other friends came in. It did not take long to place the dishes on the tables, and then grace was sung, and several kind friends set to work to cut up the joints, and soon all were helped. While the plates were being washed for the pudding, the children sang some hymns, and so gave pleasure to the friend who was giving them so much. It was four o'clock before this happy dinner was over. I don't know whether the kind gentleman thought of the words of Jesus, but I am sure many others did,"When thou makest a feast, call the poor ...They cannot recompense thee, but thou shalt be recompensed." Oh, yes! in doing good there is a recompense now, in the joy and lightness of heart; and there is a recompense hereafter, for will not Jesus one day say, "Come, ye blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you; for I was an hungered, and ye gave me meat; I was a stranger, and ye took me in; naked, and ye clothed me. Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me!" These promises, and the smile of Jesus, are the HOLLY AND IVY to us,-the bright things of winter time. But when they are all fulfilled, and we live in His presence, where there is fulness of joy, there will be no winter time,



PAGE 1

CALLED AND CHOSEN. 147 * to find their way home as best they could; and many a poor mother was searching until late at night for her lost ones. On one of these terrible days little Pat was seized by a priest, who was carrying him away in his arms, when his missionary friend saw him, afd, to the great joy of the little boy, rescued him. That terrible time passed away, and again the smitten flock assembled in peace; and many were the prayers they offered up for their enemies, and many the thanksgivings that the Good Shepherd had so watched over them, and quieted the raging of the enemy. We don't know why it is, but sometimes God sends very great trials to even little children. He knows best; and the roughest path is often the shortest, if it only lead right upwards. Thus it was with this poor ragged boy; he had not been many weeks at school when his teachers noticed that he grew paler and thinner, and he complained of pain in his leg; then he had to sit all day, and he could not go out to play with the other children; still he loved to come to school, and, though he could not read, he learned a great many texts of Scripture, and a great many hymns, quite perfectly. His voice was very sweet and sqft, and it'was quite a pleasure to hear him sing.



PAGE 1

GOD'S PROVIDINGS. 107 their eyes; some looked surprised; some gave a satisfied little nod, which said, as plainly as words, 'I knew it would come.' All learned a lesson of the reality and power of prayer. " Another marked providence was about clothing. There are forty little boys in the infant school; all summer they were dressed in white flannel suits made of strong Irish flannel, the gift of our faithful friend, Lady S. B.; over this they had little pinafores. When that cold, sharp weather came in October, these poor little fellows looked very cold, going out to walk, as they had no overcoats. That very day that we had the talk about praying, the Matron told me how much these forty little boys wanted more wintry clothing; I said, 'We have no money, but we must see what can be done.' A few days afterwards a lady noticed these little boys, and asked about their coats; the Matron said that we were hoping for something for them, but could not buy. As she went home the sharp east wind blew keenly in her face; she felt cold even well wrapped up. I must do something for these poor little fellows,' she said, and she determined to ask each of her friends to contribute one shilling. Many hearts were touched to give more, and in five days she had £1o. It was Saturday, and she came to town to ask if we could possibly buy a coat each with this money, and if we could fk



PAGE 1

THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 55 Twelve months afterwards a very respectable-looking man came to the Birds' Nest inquiring for three children, answering to the description of these three. He said his wife had come to Ireland with them, and he, not hearing from her, had given up his situation to look for her. He had traced her to Dublin, and then to the Birds' Nest, where he found his lost little ones. He was in great delight to find them so well taken care of, and begged that we would still take care of the motherless little ones. He would go to service, and save all he could to help to pay for them. So Polly, and Conny, and Tommy remain in the happy home where they first found rest after their trials and wanderings. Another little child we have taken under like circumstances. The father went to America some time ago. The mother was to follow as soon as the baby was a little older. She had a situation as servant, where she was allowed to keep the baby; but the poor woman fell into ill-health and died. The lady did what she could for the child, denying herself many comforts that it might be fed and clothed. Now she is very ill herself, and so we have taken her little charge. And if the father ever is heard of again, he will be very glad to get his little girl safe. If not, we trust she will meet him in the beautiful land, where



PAGE 1

122 WRITTEN ON READING THE FIRST EDITION OF "HOLLY AND IVY." HOLLY AND IVY and Christmas Trees Are linked in the Birdies' memories With faces of friends, whose voices mild "Oft soothed the wayward orphan child. Ivy and Holly, in years to come, Will tell of our childhood's happy home, Where loving friends, in sorrowful hour, Led weary steps to this cheery bow'r; They '11 recall the texts and hymns we learn'd While within the " Birds' Nest" we sojourn'd! Ye freely gave us raiment and food, And our young hearts stored with all things good,Ye sowed seed without thought of gain,In God's good time it will yield you grain. Nought can -we give but our orphan love. May the orphan's pray'r be heard above!



PAGE 1

120 HOW THE BUILDING WAS PAID FOR. to the Secretary before each meeting, and to join us in spirit at the appointed hour. A few ladies also undertook to distribute the appeals generally throughout England and Scotland. "Our first harvest gathering assembled on the Ioth November, 1863, in the vestibule of the Mariners' Church, Kingstown, when the large sum of £142 was handed in. At our second meeting the receipts were "£170; and on the 8th December, an increase of £200 gave us great encouragement. "1 By the end of the year the sum of £8oo was handed to the Treasurer as our first instalment in liquidation of the debt. " Our meetings continued with occasional interruptions during the next two years; and in the beginning of 1866, finding a balance of £480 still remaining due, we determined, in dependence on the Father of mercies, to make one strong effort to gather in this sum before the loth April-the anniversary of the laying of the first stone, as well as of the opening of the new building. Through the kind liberality of our friends our hopes were fully realized; and with what feelings of joy and thankfulness we assembled at The Birds' Nest on the evening of that day, our labours successfully brought to an end, and the Institution free of debt! I can never forget it, and how



PAGE 1

SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE. 185 on the different subjects she was learning at school, or had her to sing hymns, which she'did very nicely. Now her voice is attuned to the new song in the courts above. She used to speak of her love for the Bible, and would say, in her meyy way, th& she only wished every lesson were as easy to her as her Scripture-lesson. ". She was not spoiled by the notice that was taken of her, as another child might have been. Any little kindness towards her only seemed to make her grateful and happy. Her lip was the lip of truth; and we cannot remember ever seeing her out of temper during the two years and a-half that she was in the constant habit of spending her afternoons here. She was always a welcome visitor. As she hobbled in with the help of her little stick, everf one was glad to see her.She always spoke of her teachers and Mrs. O'Neil with affection, and seemed very proud of being so much employed by the latter in helping to mend the boys' clothes, &c. "c Sarah seemed deeply anxious for the conversion of her father, and that her little brothers should be placed under proper training. One day she wept bitterly, when thinking that they might wander about the streets uncared for, while their father was at his daily labour, and lest they should not be taught about the Lord Jesus. We never saw her more thoroughly happy than the last day she was



PAGE 1

130 NOT ALONE. there were many. other beds; and many patients came and went, some cured of their diseases; and some called to another world. But with Emily month after month passed away with little change, except that she grew weaker, and the two red spots in her cheeks grew brighter, and the great pain of her leg obliged her to lie in one position through the weary nights and days. Her little Bible lay under her pillow; but at first she did not know how much consolation it would give her in her pain. One night she was lying awake, suffering very much, and she thought, "I know the Bible comforts many people, sure there must be enough in it to comfort me." It was too dark to read it then, so she went over in her mind some of the texts she had learned, and she soon found what she needed-" Whom the Lord loveth He chasteneth;" and, "I will make all thy bed in thy sickness." "These," she said, "I repeated over and over again, and they did comfort me so." Sometimes she had to go through painful operations. When speaking of these, she said, "I never could have Sborne them if I had not known Jesus; but His arms were, always around me." Rough paths, indeed, were these to walk in, but the marks of the Saviour's footsteps were there; they lay thick and close, and Emily stepped into them.



PAGE 1

150 CALLED AND CHOSEN. In another corner of the room was a fire-place with a few smouldering cinders in it; and close up to the grae, with his face nearly touching it, sat poor little Pat upon a small bundle of rags-a poor neglected child, his face as black as the cinders which surrounded him, his hair uncombed and uncared, and his clothes worn since they had been sent to him, some weeks before, never even taken off. When he saw us a look of joy passed over his poor little face, for he had often seen us in the Ragged School, although we did. not know him from amongst the other children. I said to him, "Would you not like to go to the hospital again?" "No," he said; I am going to a better place." " And what is that place?" " Heaven." "Do you love Jesus?" "c Yes; He died for me." "And what is Jesus doing for you now?" " He is making intercession at the right hand of God." "And where did you learn about Jesus and heaven?" " In the Ragged School; I learnt it all there." Ah! how many little children have been taken from that Coombe Ragged School to glory; and when they meet together in the promised land, they will join Pat in saying, "CI learnt it all there."



PAGE 1

NOT ALONE. I33 head, and His -right hand doth embrace me;" "For me to live is Christ, and to die is gain." A lady whb often visited Emily writes the following: -" One day in September I found her sitting in the garden outside the cottage, and her face brightened up so sweetly when I said,' I have come to. stay a long time with you to-day. Shall I read to you?'-' Oh! please do,' she quickly replied. 'Is there any passage you would particularly wish? '-' No; only something about Jesus.' I chose some verses in the seventh chapter ot the Revelation, about the happy ones arrayed in white robes, and then I read that nice hymn" ' Oh ! cheer thee, cheer thee, suffering saint.' The fourth verse she liked very much"L 'Yes He will cheer thee, He will prove The soul, encircled by His love, Can meekly, 'midst its anguish, say"Still will I trust Him though He slay;" And He will make His words thine own, Father, Thy will, not mine, be done.' 'Yes,' she said, 'that is what I try to do.'" Thus was dear Emily following Jesus; and, oh! how He comforted her ! Often, in the still hours of the night, she felt that Jesus was near, and that she was "not alone." Sometimes she longed for the time when Jesus



PAGE 1

.22 DARK ",UDS. burying-place, fpr miles out of town, the procession increased. There were the Scripture Readers and teachers. of the Irish Church Mission Society, a sorrowing troop of boys and girls from the schools, and' a group of mothers, with their babies in their arms, who had formed her Sunday School class. These and many others joined the train, and filled the church. Then all assembled round the grave and listened to a solemn address by the Missionary, and as well as they could for tears, they all sang,"Shall we ever all meet again?Yes, we may all meet again, If not on earth, in heaven we may all meet again. Shall we ever all wear a crown ?Yes, we may all wear a crown, If not on earth, in heaven we may all wear a crown. Tears shall be all wiped away, If not on earth, in heaven tears shall be all wiped away." It was a solemn scene; and many a heart too sorrowful to join in the singing was raised in prayer, that the spirit of love, so richly given to the departed one, might fall on others, that the destitute ones might not be forgotten; and so it came to pass that many hearts were stirred up, and it was determined that the new building to be erected for The Birds' Nest should be a monument to the memory of Mrs. George Wale.



PAGE 1

78 HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS. write, and the little ones' names were put down for them; and this was the children's secret. Well, at last the time came, and friends assembled; amongst them many of the members of "The Children's Association;" some who had given the things for the tree, but not all. Then the children marched in and took their places; but the little ones opened their eyes so wide, and wondered so much at the beautiful tree, that they had to be lifted into their seats; one of them tumbled over a form, he did not know what he was doing. Very soon Mr. Dallas came, and then the children sang a song of welcome, which had been composed for the occasion, to the tune of "Some folks like to sigh." I must put it in here for those who did not hear it. " Welcome, welcome home, Father dear, father dear, Welcome, welcome home, We're glad to see you here. Join all with heart and voice, And glad hosannas raise, We'll swell the song, Our Jesus' name we'll praise. "' Once we wandered far, Father dear, father dear, Once we wandered far, But you have brought us here.





PAGE 1

10 INTRODUCTORY. have early learned to love the Lord Jesus Christ, and are earnestly longing to have something to do for. Him. When He was here on earth He took the little children in His own arms and blessed them. He cares for them still, and looks down on them with compassionate love, but He looks to His people to comfort them. It was because there were so many poor little children to be comforted that The Birds' Nest was opened; and it was because so many dear children in happy homes wanted to help, that we formed what we call the CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION, to the members of which this little book is dedicated. An account of the Association and its work will be found farther on. The children have done much, but not yet half what is needed, for the daily expenditure of such an institution as THE BIRD'S NEST. In this great work there is room enough for all, and we would earnestly call upon all those into whose hands this book may fall, to come forward and help. We know there are many calls upon the purse of charity, but amongst the many claiming the sympathies of those whom God has made stewards of His bounty, homes for the destitute must ever take a high place. And why? Because our Father in heaven comforts His dying people with the sweet promise, "Leave thy fatherless children, and I will preserve them alive;



PAGE 1

80 HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS. the smallest child, a little boy with rosy cheeks and curly hair, was lifted up on the table beside Mr. Dallas; and he handed him first the letter, which Mr. Dallas read aloud; and then he gave the paper parcel, and Mr. Dallas opened it, and expressed his delight and his thanks. And then he took the little boy in his arms, and kissed him, and blessed him; and he told the children the kiss and the blessing was for them all; and all the children looked very much pleased; and then they answered some questions nicely; and after that the pretty things were. taken from the tree, and given round to the children; and there was such joy, and such wonder, and such looking at each others' things as never was known before. And then we thought all the fun was over; but no, we were mistaken. A strange gentleman was present, and he was so interested in the children, that he came forward, and said he had a nice Magic Lantern, which he would be very glad to bring and shew them. Of course all were delighted; and so the Magic Lantern was brought; and the happy day had a very happy ending. And I think you will all agree with me in thinking that the children of The Birds' Nest had indeed, what we wish to every one of you, as year by year goes by,A HAPPY CHRISTMAS!



PAGE 1

THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 57 to find him. The mother worked very hard to support the children, and some kind friends subscribed a little money to apprentice the eldest boy to a shoemaker. He worked very well, and was learning his trade nicely, when he was taken ill of hip-disease. He was in hospital some time, then sent home incurable. Such a home-only a stable some one had given this poor woman rent-free! It was harder than ever for her now, and little Mary had tried to help her by going on messages for the neighbours; and an old lady of seventy-seven undertook to teach Nannie. (There was no Protestant school near.) She says, " I have an apt scholar; she spells and reads, learns multiplication-table, Scripture, and hymns." This kind lady also gave Nannie food every day. This was what we first heard of this poor family. Then came another letter, saying they had been told they must leave the stable, and then they would all be homeless. We wrote to say we would take Mary and Nannie in as soon as possible. And when the dear friends at Southampton said they would support them, we got them in at once. They are so grateful, and are already quite at home in the Birds' Nest. A great many of the children in the Birds' Nest have got no fathers, and a great many have no mothers. I could not give the history of them all. If I did, it would



PAGE 1

124 THE FIRST DEATH. "c whiter than snow." They are all "safe at home" with Jesus. No more pain and sorrow for them. God himself has " wiped away all tears from their eyes." The first that died was little Nanny Slattery. It was in April, I860. Measles had broken out in the Nest, but only Nanny was dangerously ill. She was a dear child of about six years of age. It was Saturday night when the doctor said there was no hope; but Nanny was not at all afraid to die. On' Sunday she was singing her favourite hymn, "Come to Jesus," in quite a loud voice. Many times during the day she clasped her little hands in prayer, murmuring portions of the Lord's Prayer-" Father in heaven, thy will be done; forgive our trespasses." "In the middle of Sunday night she died. When the other children got up in the morning, they felt very sad to think that one was entirely gone away; but their sadness was mixed up with joy, for they knew Nanny was with Jesus. And they could not help feeling as if they themselves were a little nearer heaven than they were before. On Tuesday morning the body was to be buried, and a little grave was prepared in a corner of the old graveyard around the ruins of the "Kill of"the Grange." The sun was shining bright and warm, and the birds were singing in the budding trees; and as we waited in the



PAGE 1

CONCLUSION. 191 Beneath the spreading heavens no creature but is fed, And He who feeds the ravens will give His children bread." Therefore we will not fear. During the last twelve years upwards of four hundred children have found a home in the Birds' Nest. Of these only twenty-four have died; some have been taken away by friends able to support them; some have been taken away and placed in convents; many are out in situations as faithful servants; and one hundred and ninety remain in the Nest. We thank God that so much has been accomplished; that we have been enabled to cheer so many desolate lives; that friends have been found for the friendless, ortI for the comfortless, a home for the homeles Ours is a winter Birds' Nest,-a nest for times of cold, and want, and snow; but it is surrounded with trees of lovingkindness -e1ergren; and the more intense the cold, and the deeper the darkness, of desolate lives, the more warm and bright must be our Nest, the more we shall need M'LAREN & ERSINE P, GLASGOW. M'LAREN & ERSKINE, PRINTERS, GLASGOW.



PAGE 1

• "Ilf' " "t" J . __fi ·-·, .--. -...... 4" 1 ·a4 21 4 r , '., W. IN Nit .1nL,. e " S" ' i ' ' .' 4 Lit:> .. ~ ~ 'Y, .~f'" -." ·2. ., .''': , -" .. VA,· -, , ...,.. ..-. .; 1A11 44 146' -t e .·) ...· , : ..../ : iv., in' ' ', 5· + 6 36-4 IL 141 141:11 f <'j Ls r fA .r..-.At l 4 .,, A N • ' ". i, ,, J . ' . •: .·' ·' -··::I~i~t·: ~ ·: .ii " i.i b i -$.. ! " " 1 <-•/E .I .-.o ! C .,. .., . .-i;:+.L t::2. '' MAN ·'P OWS "<' f ~ i b~I



PAGE 1

66 DAILY WORK. On Saturday school is over at twelve o'clock, and the elder girls immediately set to work to scrub floors,.which keeps them busy almost all day. Several of the girls have responsibilities all to themselves. One has to take care of the tin cans, another of the knives and forks; several of them have to help in keeping the wardrobes; and others act as mothers to a certain number of the small children. If our girls were not very industrious they never would be able to do all the work of the house, as till they have passed their examination they must be in school in the morning hours; but they get up very early, especially on washing days, and work so heartily, that the great house is at all times a pattern of cleanliness. One day I was down at the Nest during the girls' half-hour's play, which they always have in the middle of school. I was passing the laundry, when I saw three girls hard at work. I said, " Well done, little women; but why are you not at play ?" "Oh!" said one, "it is play-hour; but we like work better than play.'' And so, of their own accord, they were spending the half-hour in folding and ironing clothes. I turned away, feeling very thankful that such was the spirit of these dear girls; and I wondered less than I had done before at the cleanliness of the house, and at the success of those who go out. Our desire for the children is,



PAGE 1

" A PILGRIM GOING HOME. 167 tion. A kind clergyman used to attend him, and read the Bible, and pray; and the sick man learned to trust in Jesus. When he was near death he was very anxious about his little girl, and he begged of the clergyman to take care of her. He said he would. The father died, and little Annie was left an orphan. The young clergyman did not know what to do with the little girl he had promised to take care of; so he wrote to his mother in Dublin, and got her admitted into the "Birds' Nest." This was about four years ago.* Annie was very happy in the Birds' Nest. She had a mild, loving spirit, and she learned very quickly the hymns and verses of Scripture; and these hymns and verses were good seed, falling in good ground; watered by the Holy Spirit of God, they took root and grew up, and brought forth good fruit. Annie was a very delicate child, and very often was unable to attend school; but about a year ago she became much more delicate, and we had to send her to the Adelaide Hospital, where she spent many months. She had a disease of the heart, and she suffered a great deal of pain; but she was very patient, and was much beloved by those around her. She was in the children's ward, and she used to talk so nicely to the other children! One of * Written in 1864.



PAGE 1

CHAPTER III. DARK CLOUDS. OT quite one year from the opening of The Birds' Nest a great sorrow fell upon us, in the death of the beloved and loving one who had gathered the children, and called their home The Birds' Nest. Brightly and beautifully had her light shone on earth, and all too soon for us who were left behind was she called away; but we tried to say, "Thy will be done." The children of The Birds' Nest were not the only rescued ones who mourned her loss. When her death was announced, the Ragged School was a place of weeping. She was a daughter of the late Archbishop Whately, and though lately married, died at her father's house. Some time before her death she had expressed a wish that her funeral might have none of the usual pomp about it, but that her dear poor people might be her mourners. When she was gone her father remembered her wish. A plain hearse left the palace door, with just two mourning carriages; but on the, way to the family



PAGE 1

GOD'S PROVIDINGS. III testants, but as a little girl she had been placed in -convent. 'A few months ago,' she said, 'two little girls came there neatly dressed and comfortable, but they were very unhappy. They would not kneel to the statue of the Blessed Virgin, or repeat the catechism we were taught. They said they had been taken away from a happy home called the Birds' Nest, and they prayed together in the corner of the playground that God would let them escape. One of them had a leaf of a Bible she kept hidden away in her breast; she seemed to love it very much. They told me a great deal about the Bible, and how wrong it was of me, a Protestant born, to be where I could not learn it; and I ran away.' We knew very well who these two dear children were. Only last April they were taken from us, the priest promising to make a lady of their poor wretched mother if she would only obey his wishes. For some time she refused, but at length, on the promise that the children would be left with herself, she took them. What followed we do not know; but we do know that the children are in the convent, and the mother in her wretched cellar, as poor and miserable as ever. And even now we see that God had work for those little ones. When it is done, He will provide for them a way of escape. Pray for them, dear children, that they may be kept unhurt in the trial, even as those three



PAGE 1

146 CALLED AND CHOSEN. But many there are who learn to know the gentle voice , of the Good Shepherd, and to follow Him. Some time ago a Scripture Reader, out on his daily rounds of visiting, entered a room in which there were two children, a girl and a boy. The girl was about eight years old; she hung down her head, and looked cross, and did not like to be spoken to. The little boy was about six; he had a noble forehead, and deep blue eyes, and he gave very nice answers to the questions which were put to him. Both children looked miserably poor and dirty, and the room in which they lived was more miserable and dirty still. Before the Reader left he had taught the little boy to repeat that nice little text you all know, c Suffer little children to come to me;" and both of them had promised to attend the Ragged School in the Coombe. With the girl it was only a promise, but Pat was soon one of the brightest little boys in the infant school; he liked all the lessons very much, but the texts and little hymns he loved more than all. Pat had not been attending the school long when a great persecution was raised against it. Every morning a large mob assembled in the street to try and .keep the children from going in. Many little children were carried off to strange schools in distant parts of the town, and left



PAGE 1

DAILY WORK. 71 LITTLE LIGHTS. JEsus bids us shine With a pure, clear light Like a little candle Burning in the night; In the world of darkness, So we must shine, You in your small corner, And I in mine. Jesus bids us shine First of all for Him; Well He sees and knows it, If our light grow dim: He looks down from heaven To see us shine, You in your small corner, And I in mine. Jesus bids us shine Then-for all around, For many kinds of, darkness In the world are found: There's sin, there's want and sorrow, So we must shine, You in your small corner, And I in mine.



PAGE 1

GOD'S PROVIDINGS. IOI0 "c I went out to the Nest as soon as I could. The first thing the Matron said was, ' I do wish we could have new blankets.' 'They are coming,' I said; ' God has given them.' Then I went into the schoolroom, and told the story. An earnest, solemn look was on each face; tears stood in many eyes; we felt Jesus was near. And I could not help thinking that it was something like the feeling in that crowd, long ago, when Jesus said, ' Somebody hath touched me.' Some little nestling lying cold in bed, I feel sure, had told Jesus the need, and had thus brought help. "I was telling an old Christian woman in Wales, one day, something of Jesus' providing in the Birds' Nest. She looked at me with eyes full of tears, and said, 'I can't say in English exactly what I mean; but don't you feel sometimes as if Jesus was close beside you, and you could take hold of His hand?' It is thus He comes in our darkness, and gives us unexpected help; and, with the disciples, we can only exclaim, ' It is the Lord !' " "From the glorious heaven, Where the angels are, God looks down on children, Seeth them afar; Heareth all they ask for All the night and day; Watches like a father All their work and play.



PAGE 1

164 WANDERERS WELCOMED. As the hours passed Mary Jane grew weaker and weaker. She was very happy, and about midnight there came a change; a beautiful light shone on her face; her eye was fixed upon something none else could see; and about one o'clock the angels took her away. Not a sigh, not a struggle, marked the last moment. It was just before Christmas day; and what a happy one she spent! Her companions celebrated the birth-day of Jesus on earth, but she in His presence, where there is "fulness of joy." ^»S



PAGE 1

tl CHAPTER II. NOT ALONE. THINK if you had seen little Emily when ishe was first brought to the Ragged School, you would have said, "What a nice little girl! I should just like to make clothes for her, and buy her some shoes, and take care of her." And yet her mother, who brought her, said that she was a very wicked little girl, that she was disobedient, that she told lies, and that she could not keep her any longer in her house. The ladies of the Committee did not know how to believe this story; and one of them said to Emily, " Is it true that you are suoh a naughty little girl?" She smiled very sweetly, and said, I try not to be, ma'am." "And if we take you into our Dormitory, will you try to be obedient? "-" Oh! yes, ma'am; please take me." And when she was told she should stay for a month, such a look of joy came into her face, that the ladies felt quite sure the story was untrue.



PAGE 1

GOD'S PROVIDINGS. 99 for the vacancies; and then they thought they must, if possible, get more beds. There was a very small room that could be spared, and they thought it would just be possible to put five little beds into it. But then there was no money to buy the beds! Still the ladies said, " God is sending us these poor desolate children; we must take care of them; He will provide the means." They did not know it; but while they were talking this way, a young lady in England was writing a letter, and in it she was putting a bank order for five pounds. She had written a little poem, and she had sold it, and she had got all this profit; and she was sending it to me, and asking that it might be used for some special want at the Birds' Nest. This letter arrived the very next morning; and when we calculated the price of five little iron beds, and five pairs of blankets, and a little sack of straw, we found they would exactly come to five pounds. So first we thanked God, and then we ordered the beds; and now five of the good, well-trained children sleep in them, and five of the new comers have taken their places in the large dormitory. Of course there would arise some little difficulty about the feeding of five extra children, but this also was provided. When the Lord sent the prophet Elijah to the poor widow of Zarephath to be fed, He increased the meal in the barrel, so as to make it enough for all the family.



PAGE 1

154 CALLED AND CHOSEN. make her remember his words, and she may learn to give tup every false hope, and rest alone on Jesus. One day some little girls went to see poor little Pat. One of them brought some bonbons, which had been given to herself; another, a toy. He was greatly pleased with these things, and he repeated some hymns for them; and he told them where he was going, and how happy he expected to be in heaven. He said that Jesus had a harp and crown, and a white robe, waiting for him. One of the little girls could hardly help crying when she saw how thin Pat was; but they were both very happy to think that he would soon be where there will be no more pain. It was quite wonderful how much knowledge of God's Word Pat had, though he could not read. In the Mission Schools they have a little paper, with one hundred texts marked upon it, for the children to learn. This little boy could repeat all of these; and besides, his memory was full of Bible lessons, from histories and parables which he had been taught. He always kept his Testament under his pillow, that any one who visited him might read for him. The clergyman to whom Pat sent his "good-bye" from the hospital went to see him, and talked a long time with him. Before he went away he asked what he



PAGE 1

128 NOT ALONE. And so it was. Emily had always tried to be a good child at home, although she was a Roman Catholic, and did not know the true motives for obedience; and her mother was very fond of her. But by some means she got a New Testament, and when she read this, she found how wrong the Roman Catholic religion is, and she refused to follow it. Then her mother turned against her, and she made up the story of Emily's wickedness, in order to make people think she was right in turning her out of the house. Poor child! she had now no home on earth, but Jesus was preparing for her a home in heaven; and because He wanted to make her ready for that home, He led her young footsteps as once He led Abraham, saying, "Get thee out of thy country, and from thy kindred, and from thyfather's house, unto a land which I will shew thee." Abraham went out that he might "receive the promises," and so did Emily; for when she came to the Ragged School she had only head knowledge. She herself afterwards said, "I did not love Jesus when I first went there; I only had Him in my head; but He was not in my heart. I did not get Him into my heart till I was there three weeks, and then I only began to love Him a little." Long before the month was out Emily had endeared



PAGE 1

CHAPTER IX. CONCLUSION. ND now, dear friends, I send forth this little book to plead the cause of destitute children. The -Birds' Nest is not a thing of the past. At this moment one hundred and ninety children are to be found there, each one needing to be fed, and clothed, and taught, every day; and as these go forth into the world, their places will be filled by others. And as long as there are hearts and hands willing to take up this work for Jesus the Nest will ever be kept full. Our trust is in our Father in heaven. He never fails His people. And though we may have times of darkness and trial, we know that"His mercy watches o'er us in every season still, Nor cold, nor heat can harm us, unless it be His will. If He send want or sorrow He still will be our stay, E'en let the unknown morrow bring with it what it may. It can bring with it nothing but He will bear us through; Who gives the lilies clothing will clothe His children too;



PAGE 1

HOW THE BUILDING WAS PAID FOR. 121 kindly dear Mr. Dallas made the exertion to be with us, though suffering from extreme weakness. He wished to join in celebrating this happy anniversary birthday,' as he named it, and to join us in raising our Ebenezer of prayer and praise to Him in whose name, and for whose glory the house had been built. "The accounts were finally closed in May following, and the Committee dissolved themselves, with deep thankfulness for the work they had been able to accomplish, and the blessing so abundantly bestowed on their labours."





PAGE 1

CHAPTER IX. THE CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION. " The rich and poor meet together: the Lord is the maker of them all."PROV. XXii. 2. E have told a great deal about the Birds' Nest, and the children who have there found a home. Now we want to tell something about the way in which children in many places have joined together to support them; but I should like all, especially the little ones, to remember, that every good thing we are enabled to do is of God-it is He "who worketh in us both to will and to do." What a wonderful thing it is that He should let us be sharers in His great work! He could do it all without us, even as He said, "Let there be light, and there was light." But, in His wonderful mercy, He takes us, a band of feeble people and little children, into partnership with himself, and gives us strength to labour, and then gives us such rewards. When our dear friend, Mrs. George Wale, died, some of her work fell into my hands,-the preparation of the if



PAGE 1

Vi11 CONTENTS. CHAPTER X. PAGE GOD'S PROVIDINGS, ....94 CHAPTER XI. HOW THE BUILDING WAS PAID FOR, ...II8 PART II. CHAPTER I. THE FIRST DEATH, .....123 CHAPTER II. NOT ALONE, ..127 CHAPTER III. SAFE AT HOME, ....141 CHAPTER IV. CALLED AND CHOSEN, ....145 CHAPTER V. WANDERERS WELCOMED, ....158 CHAPTER VI. "'A PILGRIM GOING HOME ....66 CHAPTER VII. A CONTRAST, ...175 CHAPTER VIII. SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE, ....178 CHAPTER IX. CONCLUSION, 1. .190 -4 , • •



PAGE 1

50 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. mother took him again, dressed him in miserable clothes, and went out to beg. His friend was greatly distressed, and she prayed very earnestly for her lost nestling. Often she wrote for news. I wanted her to take another child, but she would not "give up Eddy." She said, "I'll pray oN;" and in October the mother again brought the child, saying, if he might be in the Nest with his sister, she would never take him away again. And so little Eddy once more had his rags exchanged for Nest clothing, and he is safe and happy. Amongst our children is a blue-eyed, fair-haired boy, of seven years of age. His father, a most respectable workman, died some three years ago, leaving the poor mother with three children, one a little baby. She had no means of support, and gradually all her little posses'sions were sold to buy food. Her relations would do nothing for her, because she attended the Mission Church, and was trying to bring up her little ones in the Protestant faith, she being a convert. Application was made to get the boy into the Nest, but he was too young. We paid the rent of a room for the poor woman, and gave her needlework, but her baby hindered her working, and she became the picture of misery. In March she wrote:" I am very thankful for what you do for me, but it is utterly useless. It is very hard to be utterly destitute, in



PAGE 1

156 CALLED AND CHOSEN. prayer was answered, he had no fear in "the valley of the shadow of death." On the Saturday before, he appeared much stronger than usual, and sang many of his favourite hymns"Here's a message of love;" "I think, when I read;" and "Gentle Jesus, meek and mild." Of this last he was particularly fond. He sang it all through. When he had sung the lines"In the kingdom of thy grace Grant a little child a place," he said, "A happy, happy place for ME." As I heard this, gazing at the wasted form of the little boy, I tried to think of the wondrous change from that body of pain, and miserable garret, to the happy, happy place in the bosom of Jesus, in the midst of the glories which eye hath not seen; but, oh, we could not realize that-we can only say, "Thanks be unto God, who giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ." No stone marks the spot where Pat's little body lies; but the Good Shepherd knows it, and He will watch over it until the resurrection morning, when the trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall be raised, and we shall ever be with the Lord.



PAGE 1

THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 41 As she looked at them, and gathered them to her arms, her grief burst out afresh. " How shall I feed them?" she thought. And day by day this question returned, for it must be answered. And every day some of their little possessions were sorrowfully taken to the pawn-shop, and a scant supply of money brought home to buy bread. At last, one morning, the poor mother looked around upon an empty room. Little Johnny saw her trouble; he did not ask for food, but went out into the street. Cold and hungry, he sat down on a door-step, resting his head on his hand. As he sat a bright little boy passed; he noticed the weary look, and he turned round. "What is the matter?" he asked. The sad tale was soon told. "Come with me," said the little fellow; "I'm going to a school where we get a good hot breakfast, if we are in time-come along, you'll be welcome." And Johnny went to Townsend Street. At three o'clock some of the boys got a little more food; Johnny stayed with them. SIt was with a very different face from that of the morning that Johnny entered his home. "Mother, mother!" said he, "I 've found kind people. I've been to a boys' school, and gotf ood to eat. And, mother, there's another school close to it for little ones. Mother, mayn't I take the children to-morrow ?"



PAGE 1

SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE, 187 thankful that she has been so early taken from this world of sorrow and suffering, to be" for ever with the Lord,' especially as her delicate health would always have been against her progress in any kind of employment which might have been provided for her in the future. I was very much interested for her when she was an inmate of the Adelaide Hospital, she was such a patient little sufferer; yet cannot but feel that it is indeed c well with the child,' whose days of mourning have been ended so early. Her father was a drunkard, and her mother dead. The Birds' Nest never opened the doors to one who required a home more than she did. The Lord will say in her case, I am sure, 'Inasmuch as ye have done it to one of the least of these, ye have done it unto me.' " Believe me, very truly yours, " J-M--." Just three years before Sarah's death the nestlings had followed to the grave a beloved teacher. The story is told in the littli.book, No. 4. They were very anxious that the body of their loved companion might be laid near to her. Quite close to her grave was a vacant spot; and there, on a chill. March morning, we laid the body of Sarah Towel, in most "sure and certain hope of a joyful resurrection." And the children returned home, solemnly



PAGE 1

VV *" Ia' ?' rc 4,rIMe # -~w a ·-t-* &**· -'aj !t .-s ·'·!1~ d'tMn $1ryu·*ir ~. .·~ ·,· ^UY '



PAGE 1

GOD'S PROVIDINGS. 105 Nest. There seems to have been such a strong confidence in God; such a hold taken of His strength; such an absence of human trust. The dark time has been a time of spiritual blessing to many; and many a little child has learned that God is indeed 'a very present help in time of need.' " We know that all our good gifts come from Jesus, and it is very sweet to take each little crumb as from His hands; but some of our gifts have come in such an astonishing way that the story must be told. Having been away longer than usual in summer, when I reached home in October, the first question was, How are the funds of the Birds' Nest? £700 in debt, was the answer. It never was so bad before, though we are always in advance in October. I went the next day to the Nest, and told the children all about it, describing to them how much bread, potatoes, and cocoa cost every day, and there was now nothing to pay for them. Then I asked, ' What shall we do?' Some very little girls said they thought we ought to send the baker's cart away, and tell him not to come any more; they would do without bread. 'You poor little things,' I said, 'what would you say if you came down and found no breakfast to-morrow morning? you cannot do without bread.' 'But we must,' said a little trembling voice, 'if there is no money to pay.' Nc,'



PAGE 1

NQT ALONE. 129 herself to her schoolfellows and her feachers; but she was too young and small to stay in the Dormitory for great girls; so as soon as "The Birds' Nest" was opened at Kingstown, she was sent there. We hoped, too, that the air of the country would do her good, for she was not at all strong; her face was pale, and there was a bright red spot in the middle of each cheek. At Kingstown she was quite a "mother-bird," loving and kind to the little ones, tenderly caring for them, helping them in their plays, and comforting them in their sorrows. Everybody loved Emily, except her unnatural relatives. Pleasant footsteps were these! The Good Shepherd was leading His little lamb in " green pastures beside the still waters," and she grew in grace and in likeness to the Saviour. But there are rough places as well as smooth in the road to heaven; it is " through much tribulation that we enter the kingdom;" and the true follower of Jesus, although she be but a little child, will say"I '11 welcome still the heaviest grief, That brings me near to thee." Severe pain in her leg, accompanied by low fever, soon obliged Emily to find a new home in an hospital. Here she was laid in a small bed, in a ward in which I



PAGE 1

20 HOW WE JEGAN, The Shepherd saved those lost wandering sheep, For He fought with their cruel foe; And in His blood, then shed for them, He washed them as white as snow. Come all, &c. And He will take them one happy, happy day, To a fairer, lovelier home, Across the mountains, far, far away, Where the wolf no more can roam. Come all, &c. Come young and old to this happy Gospel fold, To this tender Shepherd's care, For none can go to that lovely distant home, Till His saving grace they share. Come all ye who hear,. who hear, Come, and never fear: There's room for all, And the Shepherd doth call, Oh, come, and be happy here."



PAGE 1

SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE. I79 It was not thus with Sarah; her's was a bright Christian life. All who knew her saw how she was trying to be like Jesus. She was a sweet example to all around. We could ill spare the child, but Jesus wanted her in heaven; and when we think of her weakness and suffering during all her earthly pilgrimage, we feel thankful that for her there will be "no more pain." The first time I saw little Sarah was in the Adelaide Hospital, rather more than three years ago. She was a. pale-faced child, with light hair, and large blue eyes. It was no wonder her face was pale, for she suffered a. great deal of pain in her leg, and often lay awake a long time in the night. The dear child had been brought to the hospital by her mother; but for some time she had not been to see her, and no one knew anything about her. This hospital is visited by some Christian ladies, who take a great deal of interest in the suffering children, making the rooms as pleasant as they can with pictures: and toys, and teaching the little ones of Jesus. Of this hospital Sarah could say-'twas there * <"I came to Jesus as I was, Weary, and worn, and sad; I found in Him a resting-place, And He has made me glad."



PAGE 1

170 "A PILGRIM GOING HOME." anxious to spend as much time as possible with her before she was taken hence. She received me with her sweet, grateful smile, and so gladly changed her position to lay her tired head on my shoulder. For a few moments she slept, and waking said, "I have been thinking a great deal of what you read abput the gates of heaven, and the angel at the gate readyto let in all Christ's children." Then, looking up with an earnest gaze, she said, "Do you think there is any fear of me?" It was a solemn question. How my heart rejoiced at that moment to know there was no fear. I said, " Surely not; you believe in Jesus, do you not ? "Yes," replied the child; "I ve trusted Him long. No, no," she added, "there's no fear. He said himself, 'Him that cometh unto ME, I will in no wise cast out.' " After this her breathing was very laboured; her eyes were closed; we almost thought she was going. Her nurse said,' " Dear Annie! how patiently she suffers." The child roused herself. " Why shouldn't I suffer patiently?" she said. cIt's nothing to what Jesus suffered for me." I said, "He looked for comforters, and found none." "I have plenty," she said, with a grateful smile.



PAGE 1

GOD'S CARE. 27 FEAR NOT. "YEA, fear not--fear not, little ones; There is in heaven an eye That looks with yearning fondness down On every path you try. "Tis He who guides the sparrow's wing, And guards her little brood; Who hears the ravens when they cry, And fills them all with food. 'Tis He who clothes the fields with flowers, And pours the lightabroad; "Tis He who numbers all your hours, Your Father and your God. "Ye are the chosen of His love, His most peculiar care; And will He guide the fluttering dove, And not regard your prayer? Nay, fear not--fear not, little ones; There is in heaven an eye That looks with yearning fondness down On all the paths you try. He'11 keep you when the storm is wild, And when the flood is near; Oh, trust Him, trust Him, little child, And you have nought to fear." -,...ILI'



PAGE 1

THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. 45 died a most happy death. Her teacher got admission for the two little children into the Nest. " Leave thy fatherless children," Jesus says, " I will preserve them." It is He who takes them up and blesses them; but it is by human hands, yours and mine, little children;-WE take them, and nurse them for Him. Here are three children I must tell you about, a girl and two boys. Their history is a very sad and strange one. They were of a respectable class in life, and their father ought to have earned plenty of money for their support; but he was a drunkard. That fearful curse of families, drink, had taken his senses away, and his love for his wife and children was turned to hatred. After persecuting them in many ways, he at last went so far as to take the three children, and go away altogether from his poor wife. Night came, and they did not return, and the poor mother mourned alone. Months passed away; she earned a livelihood by needlework, but tears so often dimmed her eyes, that she could get but little. One day she received an anonymous letter, saying that the writer had seen the three children in the County Wicklow. The poor mother set off to the place named, and after some difficulty, she got her three dear ones, and brought them to her poor home. She found from the children' that a priest haa taken them, and she was so angry that



PAGE 1

GOD'S PROVIDINGS. I15 without her; and we have given her a position, and made her quite at home in the Nest, by settling up a little room for her close to the nursery, where she can see a friend, or be alone when she needs a little rest. Then there is Lizzie, a grown-up nestling, who washes and cares for all the little girls; and Mary, who is responsible for the laundry and washing. Besides these there is a man, a pensioner, who comes every day, and whose duty it is to do all the work women and girls cannot do: to lift heavy pots, pump water, clean everything outside, whitewash, glaze broken windows, go to market with the donkey cart, &c. Then there are the voluntary helpers. God has given us willing hearts and hands, ready to employ their talents in His service. One lady gives her talents for drawing, and "designs our pretty book-covers and "Erin's Hope" pictures. Another comes to the Nest to give lessons in singing. One dear friend devotes herself to the boys, coming in the evenings to arrange their knitting, and superintend their patching and darning, for in the Nest even the boys must do this for themselves. As a reward for industry and good behaviour, she sometimes invites them to her house to weed her garden, or do any other work they can. Her dear, kind grandmamma knits socks for them. Boys are wonderfully influenced by kindness,



PAGE 1

48 THE BIRDS IN THE NEST. alone on the grass, looking so thin and miserable. I sat down beside her, and noticed that she had a bad cough. "What's your name?" I asked. " Mary," she said, without looking up. " You are a new child; when did you come ?" "Last week." "You have a bad cough-are you ill ?" " I think I am; I 'm very miserable." "But you will soon be happy-all the children are happy." "I never was happy in my life." "Have you a father ?" "No, he's gone, and my stepmother is unkind to me. Nobody ever loved me." " Poor child, Jesus loves you." " I don't think He does." "I love you." She looked up with a questioning gaze. ", Do you know who I am?" I asked.-"No." When I told her, a beaming smile lighted up her face. " All the children love you," she said; c I '11 love you too." Here I must tell you that the love of "all the children" comes to me because I am the representative of all the members of the Children's Association, and their gifts and love come through me. I try to send out all the love



PAGE 1

HOW WE KEEP CHRISTMAS. 77 flags at the top, and each article on the tree had the name of a child upon it, Tables were set up around the tree, for the children were to have tea and cake, and they were to be questioned, and friends were to be present to listen, and share the fun. The little children of the Nest were not allowed to see the preparations till all was ready; but they did not mind this, for they had a secret too, and felt themselves quite important. I think I must let you into their secret. Well, you know Jesus said, " It is more blessed to give than to receive," and Miss Howard thought the nestlings should, on this grand occasion, taste of the pleasure of giving. So she got a piece of canvas, and prepared the pattern of a lamp-stand, to be given by the children to Mr. Dallas. She determined that each child should at least put in a stitch, This was not very easy to manage; but if Miss Howard once set her heart upon a thing, she would be sure to carry it out. She arranged the children all in a row around the schoolroom, then she took a chair and sat at the head of them, with the work in her hand. She then gave the order for a very slow march, and as each child came up to her, it put in one stitch. In this way all had a little share; and the work was afterwards finished by some of the elder girls. It was quite a pretty lamp-stand. When it was ready, a letter was written, signed by all the children who could



PAGE 1

142 SAFE AT HOME. age. About three years before she had been brought to the Ragged School by a clergyman. He said she had no one to take care of her; and as soon as there was room she was admitted into "The Birds' Nest." She was a quiet, serious child, naturally of an amiable disposition, and gave very little trouble. She studied the Bible earnestly, and so learned the true motive for obedience. We could not tell exactly when she became one of Christ's followers. It was like sunshine on a misty morning; the light dawns and spreads about, but you cannot tell exactly when the sun rises. But before noon the mist clears away, and then there'can be no mistake about the sunshine. Thus it was with Janey. It was only morning time with her when she was laid upon a bed of sickness, but then there was no mistaking about the clear shining of the Sun of Righteousness. Many a long day she lay calmly and patiently on her little bed in the hospital. One day when I went to see her, she repeated for me a little hymn:"Jesus, only He can give Peace and comfort while we live; Jesus only can supply Boldness, if we're called to die." She repeated the words as if they came from her heart;



PAGE 1

I86 SURE AND CERTAIN HOPE. with us, little more than a week ago. We feel truly thankful that we were privileged to give the 'cup of water,' and thereby render more bright and cheerful her last few years on earth. "Her memory will be long cherished by us. "The brief life of this young disciple is, I think, a beautiful example of what a Christian child may be; and her sudden removal speaks to all. When the summons came it found her ready, and she calmly fell asleep in Jesus. We often felt anxious about her future, knowing how helpless she would be in undertaking any employment like other girls; but her Master knew this better than we did. He saw that the tender plant was unfit to bear the chilling winds of earth, and He gathered the lily, that it might freely bloom in the genial atmosphere above. Shall we not rejoice and say, 'It is well with the child.' "Believe me, truly yours, "ELIZABETH V. PHIBBS." Another friend adds a few particulars:-" DEAR MADAM,-I thank you for the letter relative to Sarah Towel, which I received yesterday, and have forwarded to the Rev. E. B , ofM----, from whose parish the poor child came. I cannot but feel very



PAGE 1

WANDERERS WELCOMED. II6 there was such washing, and combing, and fitting on of nice comfortable clothes; and that very night they lay down to sleep in the happy Birds' Nest. Mary never quite got over her sorrows. She was very delicate, and talked very little. She was rather downcast, perhaps a little shy, During the autumn of 1862 her health grew worse, and early in November she was removed to the Adelaide Hospital. It was soon known that her illness was a fatal one, and we felt very anxious about her soul. One day when I visited her I asked her, would she be afraid if Jesus called her ? She fixed upon me an earnest gaze. "I 'd be very much afraid," she said; " I don't think I belong to Him at all." I spoke to her of His death upon the cross, and how the way is open to all who will only believe. She sighed deeply. "I know all that," she said; "but I am not one of the saved ones." Many times we talked to her, but the same melancholy look was on her face; we prayed very earnestly that Jesus would give to her the Holy Spirit, that she might be enabled to trust and not be afraid. At length, on Tuesday,.it was the 9th of December, I went into the ward, and was delighted to see a bright L