Citation
The fruitful papaya

Material Information

Title:
The fruitful papaya how to serve it
Series Title:
Bulletin
Creator:
Thursby, Isabelle S
Place of Publication:
[Gainesville Fla.]
Publisher:
Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
20 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Cooking (Papaya) ( lcsh )
Papaya -- Florida ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
"December, 1940."
Funding:
Bulletin (University of Florida. Agricultural Extension Service)
Statement of Responsibility:
by Isabelle S. Thursby.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
002571052 ( ALEPH )
44697966 ( OCLC )
AMT7367 ( NOTIS )

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HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do not reflect current scientific knowledge or recommendations. These texts represent the historic publishing record of the Institute for Food and Agricultural Sciences and should be used only to trace the historic work of the Institute and its staff. Current WAS research may be found on the Electronic Data Information Source (EDIS)
site maintained by the Florida Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University of Florida











FF U ITFU l IPA FAYA

10W TO SEK\VE I17


I SABELLE 5.Tl -LIkSBY
.oriomist in Food Conservation


BULLETIN 106 DECEMBER
1940


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914)
,ricultural Extension Service, University of Florida, Florida State College for Women, and United States Department of Agriculture, Cooperating
WILMON NEWELL, Director










BOARD OF CONTROL

H. P. ADAIR, Chairman, Jacksonville R. H. GORE, Fort Lauderdale W. M. PALMER, Ocala N. B. JORDAN, Quincy
T. T. SCOTT, Live Oak J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary, Tallahassee

STAFF, AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE JOHN J. TIGERT, M.A., LL.D., President of the University WILmON NEWELL, D.Sc., Director of Extension1 A. P. SPENCER, M.S., Vice-Director and County Agent Leader J. FRANcis COOPER, M.S.A., Editor1 JEFFERSON THOMAS, Assistant Editor' CLYDE BE=E, A.B.J., Assistant Editor' E. F. STANTON, Supervisor, Egg-Laying Contest RUBY NEWHALL, Administrative Manager'
COOPERATIVE AGRICULTURAL DEMONSTRATION WORK W. T. NETTLES, B.S., District Agent H. G. CLAYTON, M. S. A., District Agent, Organization and Outlook Specialist J. LEE SmITH, District Agent and Agronomist R. S. Dm'ins, B.S.A., Assistant District Agent A. E. DUNSCOMBE, M.S.A., Assistant District Agent R. W. BLACKLOCK, A.B., Boys' Club Agent E. F. DEBusx, B.S., Citriculturist A. L. SHEALY, D.V.M., Animal Industrialist' HA MLiN L. BROWN, B.S., Dairyman N. R. MEHBHOF, M.AGR. Poultryman' D. F. SOWELL, M.S.A., Assistant Poultryman WALTER J. SHEELY, B.S., Animal Husbandman L. T. NIELAND, Farm Forester C. V. NOBLE, PH.D., Agricultural Economist' D. E. TimoNs, M.S.A., Agricultural Economist, Marketing CHARLEs M. HIAmPSON, M. S., Agricultural Economist, Farm Management R. H. HOWARD, M. S. A., Asst. Agr. Economist, Farm Management V. V. BOWMAN, M.S.A., Economist and Leader in Land-Use Planning JOSEPH C. BEDSOLE, B.S.A., Assistant Leader in Land-Use Planning J. R. GREENMAN, B.S.A., State Representative, B.A.E. R. V. ALLIsON, PH.D., Soil Conservationist'

COOPERATIVE HOME DEMONSTRATION WORK MARY E. KEOWN, M.S., State Agent Lucy BELLE SETTLE, M.A., District Agent RUBY McDAvID, District Agent ETHYL HOLLOWAY, B.S.H.E., District Agent ANNA MAE SiKEs, B. S., Nutritionist VIRGINIA P. MOORE, Home Improvement Agent ISABELLE S. THURSBY, Economist in Food Conservation CLA iNE BELCHER, M.S., Clothing Specialist

NEGRO EXTENSION WORK A. A. TURNER, Local District Agent BEULAH SHUTE, Local District Agent

1Part-time.









THE FRUITFUL PAPAYA
HOW TO SERVE'IT

By ISABELE S. THURSBY
Extension Economist in Food Conservation


CONTENTS
PAGE PAGE
Appetizers, Cocktails, and Fruit Cups,.! 6 Desserts- Hot! . . - -- . 12 C asserole D ishes .--- ___Z D esserts- Cold I .-------. . . 13
Pastry . . . .------------------ . - - -- 11 Canning Papaya -apaya -. 16


Considering the papaya's many uses, rapid growth, medicinal value, easy culture, strikingly beautiful appearance, and the enormous amount of healthful, delicious and nutritionally -Valuable fruit-food each plant produces, there should be no groves or home grounds in middle and southern Florida without a few of these fruitful plants. Every farm should plant them generously for use on the familytable. The surplus ripe fruit also is eaten greedily by chickens and makes an invaluable feed for turkeys. As with many other tropical fruits, the taste for the papaya usually has to be acquired, but this is not difficult to do. The fruit attains its best qualities if allowed to remain on the tree until very nearly ripe, when it turns from green to yelloworange.
There are many strains or varieties of this melon-like fruit and the variation in size, form, color, fragrance, flavor and quality is remarkable. Some resemble small watermelons in both shape and size, while others are not more than four inches in diameter and are almost round. The flesh is white before maturity, turns to a rich orange-yellow, is of a smooth, tender consistency, is of a sweet cress-like flavor, and is from one to two inches in thickness in the better varieties. The flesh envelopes a somewhat five-angled cavity. Attached to the walls of the cavity are numerous round, wrinkled, greyish-black seed. These are the size of small peas and are enclosed in a thin, gelatinous aril. The seeds have a fine, nasturtium-like flavor, and many like them eaten with the fruit. Others prefer them bruised with vinegar and served in the salad dressing. Likewise, in preserving the seed may be left intact and be cooked with the flesh. When cooked thus in the sugar syrup, the- seed in many







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Fig. I.-The papaya, or tree cantaloupe, is a fast-growing, herbaceous, branchless tree of ornamental foliage and sweet scented flowers, bearing quantities of melon-like fruit. Created in the bounteous fashion of Nature, this "miracle" fruit holds the gift of health in its golden heart.

varieties take on an interesting, nut-like flavor while in some the seed tend to be a bit dry and grainy.
In the full ripe stage the papaya makes a delectable dessert or breakfast fruit, served with lemon or lime. In fruit cups and salads it combines especially deliciously with the more acid







The Fruitiul Papaya


fruits like pineapple and citrus, such as grapefruit, orange, and thinly sliced kumquats. The fresh papaya pulp with milk or cream makes a splendid frozen dessert. Sliced and seasoned the same way as peaches, papayas are used for pie, or with pulp put through a sieve with milk, eggs and spices added they make a delicious custard pie. Indeed, the papaya ranks high as a pie fruit. The surplus fruit may be canned for pie filling. Papaya lends itself to the making of sauce, butter, preserves and exceptionally delightful sweet spiced pickles. It may be used in either the green stage, when the skin is still tender and green in color and the seed are yet white for sweet pickle. Or it may be used full ripe. The same formula used for peach pickles may be used for papaya, or a richer, more translucent product may be secured by following directions contained in this circular.
The syrup from ripe papaya preserves is a rich golden color and is of a delicate, interesting flavor.
Papaya juice is being manufactured in large quantities. Its popularity is due mainly to its values as a health drink and to the addition of other fruit juices of a sprightly nature such as grapefruit and pineapple. Even strong-flavored products like ginger are used in some. papaya juices or nectars now found on the market.
In a study of some 25,000 families selected from different sections of the country, it was found that the diets were generally deficient in vitamin A. For a long time it has been known that yellow fruits (and vegetables) are good sources of this vitamin and the greater depth of color, the higher, as a rule, the vitamin content. Papayas are an excellent source of vitamin A, a good to rich source of vitamin C or ascorbic acid, and a fair source of vitamin G or riboflavin. They also contain some thiamin or vitamin B1.
As a rule, papayas may be purchased on the market by the pound at a very reasonable price during the greater part of the year. However, since weather conditions such as frosts and heavy rains often diminish the supply, the provident Florida housewife will have a few jars of canned papaya on her pantry shelf. Papaya does not appreciably lose flavor or food value when properly canned and stored, and may be found a welcome addition to the menu for making into casserole dishes, for pie and many other delicious, desserts, especially on emergency occasions or when the fresh fruit is not available.
Both the fruit and leaves of the papaya contain pepsin.







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


APPETIZERS, COCKTAILSAND FRUIT CUPS
FROSTED PAPAYA COCKTAIL
2 cu. - ps ripe papaya cut in cubes % 'cup grapefruit sections and juice
2 -or three kumquats sliced thin 1/2 cup fresh pineapple chunks
crosswise Powdered sugar
Mix fruit and chill thoroughly before serving, sugaring very lightly. Have sherbet or cocktail glasses cold. Moisten rim of each glass in grapefruit juice and dip in powdered sugar., Fill with the prepared fruit. Serve very cold. Garnish with surinarn cherry, thinly sliced carissa, other seasonable fruit, or with sprig of mint in center of glass.
PAPAYA AND ORANGE COCKTAIL
1 cup papaya peeled and cut in 3 tablespoons lemon, lime or other
suitable slices acid citrus juice, guava or
I cup orange sections berry juice
3 tablespoons sugar Preserved pineapple
Mix papaya slices and orange sections. Sprinkle with lime, berry or guava juice. Chill and have glasses chilled so that the whole, when served, may be very cold. Garnish with preserved pineapple or citrus.
MIXED FRUIT COCKTAIL IN GRAPEFRUIT SHELLS 1/2medium size papaya 3 slices pineapple
3 large grapefruit 'Is cup guava juice or guava slices,
I large banana fresh or canned
3 kumquats, sliced very thin Fresh mint
Sugar
Peel and slice papaya. Cut grapefruit in half, crosswise. With a grapefruit corer or sharp shears cut a circular piece from the center of each half, being careful not to cut through the skin. Loosen and then remove each section from the membrane and skin with a grapefruit knife. Place shells in cold water to keep them firm until serving time.
Prepare remainder of fruit. Mix together, add fruit juice and sugar. Chill thoroughly. Serve in the cold grapefruit shells and garnish with mint.
The mixed fruit that remains after the shells are filled may be kept in the refrigerator and served at breakfast. It may be used also as a sauce for ice cream or pudding, or when served with a custard sauce, whipped cream or-marshmallow sauce, it may bemused as a: garnish for a delectable dessert.
PAPAYA MILK SHAKE
2 cups full ripe papaya juice I cup ice water V4 cup lemon, lime or calamondin 3 tablespoons sugar
Wice 11/2 cup chilled milk
Combine fruit juices, water and sugar and stir until suger is dissolved. Add to chilled milk and shake with crushed ice.







The Fruitful Papaya


CASSEROLE DISHES
PAPAYA-KUMQUAT EN CASSEROLE
Peel and seed a medium sized, firm, ripe papaya and slice for convenient serving. Butter a casserole and start with a layer of the fruit; sprinkle with brown sugar. Then follow with a layer of very thinly sliced kumquats or 'a few slices of sections of orange, alternating the citrus fruit and the papaya. Make a basting syrup with /4 cup of honey and / cup of orange juice. Pour over the dish, top with fine bread crumbs mixed with an equal quantity of brown sugar. Dot liberally with butter and bake for about / of an hour in a moderate oven. Baste with more orange juice and honey if it threatens 'to burn.
PAPAYA AND APPLE SCALLOP
1 small ripe papaya / cup brown sugar
(about 2 pounds) 4 tablespoons butter
3 medium sized tart apples 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup buttered crumbs (optional)
Peel papaya and remove seed, cutting the papaya in 1/ inch slices, and put in layers in a buttered baking dish or casserole, alternating with layers of the. thinly sliced a .pples. Sprinkle each layer of apples with brown sugar and liberal dots of butter and a very light sprinkling of salt, less than Y2 teaspoon. Settle layers firmly with the papaya on top. Cover top with the buttered crumbs and bake until the papaya and the apple are, tender and the crumbs are brown. If preferred, it may be. finished with sugar and butter and baked in a moderately hot oven until candied and lightly browned.
PAPAYA EN CREAM
Put three cups of cubed ripe papaya into a butter ,ed baking dish. Sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon of salt. and dot with 2' tablespoons butter. Cover and bake in a moderate oven. When the papaya begins to soften cover with 2/ cup coffee cream ,and sprinkle with 1 tablespoon brown sugar or honey. Finish cooking uncovered and serve when delicately brown. Serve hot from the baking dish. This may be seasoned further with a dash of nutmeg and ginger if desired.
GLAZED PAPAYA SLICES
Peel and seed ripe papaya. Cut in wide slices and lay evenly in a flat baking pan. Baste with honey and butter warmed together, sprinkle very lightly with brown sugar. Put in medium to hot oven until thoroughly cooked and nicely browned.
Serve from the pan in which baked.








Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Brown sugar, butter and water, such as is used for glazing carrots and sweet potatoes, may be used in place of the honey mixture.
Likewise, 1/2 cup jelly (guava, kumquat, or strawberry), 4 tablespoons butter and 3 tablespoons lemon juice may be blended together and used for basting the papaya slices until soft and glazed.
BAKED PAPAYA
1 ripe papaya 3/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon butter 2 tablespoons lemon juice
Pare and cut papaya lengthwise into six pieces, place in a baking pan, sprinkle with salt and lemon juice and dot liberally with butter. Add enough water to cover bottom of pan to prevent burning. Decorate with honey or thin slices of lemon. A sprinkle of pecan or chopped walnut meats is a nice addition also. Calamondins or kumquats are as good as, if not better than,

Fig. 2-The papaya, in all its tropical flamboyance, with its slender, usually unbranched trunk topped with the large, dark green, deeply lobed leaves supported by hollow petioles several feet long, deserves a prominent place in gardens of southern Florida. Picture taken in the garden of Mrs. S. M. Godbey, Polk County, Florida.







Tke Fruitful Papaya


lemon for the decoration. Bake in a moderate oven for about 25 minutes or until a nice brown. Serve immediately after removing from the oven. This may be used in place of a vegetable or may even be served with cream as a dessert.
PAPAYA SCALLOP
3 cups mashed, steamed, medium 1/2 cup bread crumbs
ripe papaya 3 tablespoonfuls butter
1 small onion Salt, pepper, paprika
I green pepper
Peel, steam and mash the papaya. Cut the onion and green pepper fine and brown in the butter. Add to the papaya and season with salt, pepper and paprika. Turn the mixture into a baking dish and cover with buttered crumbs. Bake in a hot oven for 20 minutes or until a golden brown.
PAPAYA SLICES (Deep Fat Fried)
Dip 1/2 inc'i slices of medium ripe papaya first in fine bread crumbs, then in egg and again in bread crumbs, and fry in deep fat until a golden brown. These papaya slices are particularly attractive to use on a luncheon or dinner plate with a creamed or roasted meat and a crisp salad.

SALADS
Many interesting salads, molded and otherwise, may be made from papayas mixed with almost any other fruit, fresh or canned. As a rule, however, combinations of a sweet and a sour fruit offer the most piquant flavor. Grapefruit, tangerine, thinly sliced kumquat, tangelo-in fact all the citrus fruits-are particularly delicious to combine w.*"-i any papaya mixture. Surinam cherries, carissa, mangos, -p:.ieapples, crisp, sweet roseapples, and other seasonable fruits of southern Florida, as well as figs, pomegranate arils, peaches, pears, and other fruits, fresh and canned, may be used in many delightful and healthful combinations. I
GOLDEN PAPAYA SALAD
2 cups pineapple juice 1 cup papaya cubes
1 small package lemon or I cup orange sections
orange flavored gelatin 1 cup surinam cherries, seeded or 1/2 cup sliced kumquats
Heat half of pineapple juice to boiling point. Dissolve gelatin in it and add remaining juice. Chill. When gelatin begins to eonged. add fruit. Turn into molds, chill. Serve on lettuce with pineapple mayonnaise garnished with ripe surinarn cherries.







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


PINEAPPLE MAYONNAISE


11/2 teaspoons gelatin 1/4 cup pineapple juice or syrup
from canned pineapple
I tablespoon lemon or lime juice 1 tablespoon sugar (if desired)


Few grains of salt 1/4 teaspoon paprika (if desired) 1/2 cup mayonnaise 1/4 cup heavy cream


Soak gelatin in cold pineapple juice or syrup about 5 minutes. Dissolve over boiling water. Add lemon juice, sugar, salt and paprika. Cool until slightly thickened, beat into mayonnaise and fold in stiffly beaten cream. Chill in a shallow pan, cut in cubes and serve with mixed fruit salads or with molded fruit salads as above. Yield: I cup.

PAPAYA SURPRISE A-LA-MIAMI
I ripe papaya, preferably i/2 cup small pineapple chunks
oblong in sriape 1/2 cup broken grapefruit segments
12 package lime, lemon, or 1/4 cup diced celery and carrot
orange gelatin I cup boiling water

Dissolve gelatin in boiling water and set aside to cool and thicken but not to jell. Cut top from papaya and scrape out seed. Peel. Add fruit and diced celery and carrot to thickened jelly and pour into papaya. Wrap in waxed paper. Place upright in refrigerator until jelly is firm and thoroughly chilled. Arrange lettuce, romaine, or endive on salad plates, add papaya sliced about one-half inch thick and serve with any preferred mayonnaise or a snappy French dressing.

PAPAYA SALAD


2 cups ripe papaya cut in cubes
1 cup grapefruit segments
2 teaspoons finely chopped onion / cup finely chopped celery


11z teaspoon salt 3/ cup snappy, cooked salad
dressing or mayonnaise
well seasoned


Cut papaya into cubes, add grapefruit, fresh or canned, the chopped onion and celery. Chill, serve on lettuce leaves and garnish with mayonnaise.

PAPAYA CITRUS SALAD
I cup ripe papaya peeled and 3 stalks celery, cut fine
cut in inch slices 1/2 cup carrots, shredded
I cup grapefruit sections, 2 tablespoons or more finely
canned or fresh chopped parsley
1 cup orange sections Well seasoned, snappy French
1/2 cup thinly sliced kumquats dressing
I small sweet pepper, diced Crisp lettuce, rorname or endive
3 young onions, cut fine
Blend all ingredients together gently and place on the cold, crisp greens. Sprinkle with the chopped parsley and serve with French dressing and salad wafers or cheese straws.








The Fruitful Papaya


PASTRY
PAPAYA PIE
I quart raw sliced papaya 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon
(very ripe) 2 teaspoons flour
3/4 cup sugar 1 tablespoon water
1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg Butter
1/s teaspoon salt
Pastry:
11/2 cups flour 1/2 teaspoon salt
11/2 cup shortening. Sufficient ice water to mix
Peel and slice the, papaya about the same size as apples. for apple pie. Line pie plate with pastry. Fill with sliced papaya, cover with the mixture of spices, sugar, salt and flour. Add the water and dot over with butter.
Bake 50 minutes oruntil the fruit juice looks clear and thick. Start at 450' F., then reduce the heat to allow the fruit to cook slowly but thoroughly, This has a flavor of peach or pineapple or both combined, yet is not exactly like either. It is a delicious dessert served. with ice cream.
PAPAYA-COCOANUT PIE
I cup sugar IY2 cups stewed papaya put
1/2 teaspoon salt through sieve
11/2 teaspoon cinnam on Y4 cup cocoanut grated
1/4 teaspoon cloves Pastry
2 beaten eggs '%, cup cocoanut finely grated
1 cup rich milk 2 tablespoons honey
Mix first 8 ingredients in order given. Fill unbaked pastry shell and bake about, 45 minutes, first with high heat and then with moderate. When nearly cooked, top with remaining cocoanut, drizzle on warmed honey and return to oven to brown delicately.
PAPAYA CHIFFON PIE
11/4 cups cooked papaya put % teaspoon ginger
through a sieve % teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 cup sugar % teaspoon cinnamon
1 cup milk 3 eggs
1/ teaspoon salt
Put papaya and milk in top of double boiler. Mix with sugar, salt, ginger, nutmeg and cinnamon and combine with papayamilk mixture. Mix well and when hot add to 3 egg yolks slightly beaten. Return to double boiler and stir and cook until thick.
Measure one-fourth cup cold water, add 1 tablespoon gelatin and when soft, add to hot papaya mixture. Mix thoroughly and cool. When it begins to stiffen, beat 3 egg whites until stiff, beat in one-fourth cup sugar, and fold into papaya mixture. Pour into baked pie shell, chill in refrigerator or cold place. Garnish with whipped cream just before serving.







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


PAPAYA PIE
2 cups stewed, strained papaya 3/4 teaspoon ground ginger
(canned papaya may be used) 1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 cup-brown or granulated sugar 1/2 teaspoon allspice
2 eggs, slightly beaten 2 cups rich milk
1h teaspoon salt
Bake 1 large or 2 small pastry shells in hot oven, about minutes. Mix together papaya, sugar, eggs, salt and spices. Add milk gradually to keep mixture smooth. Pour into partially baked pastry shells and bake in moderate oven (350' F.') for about 45 minutes or until firm.
GOLDEN PAPAYA PIE
11/2 cups papaya put through a 1/4 teaspoon salt
sieve % cup mild flavored honey
3 eggs well beaten 3 dropseach extract of nutmeg
I cup rich milk I and cinnamon
% cup sugar 3 drops extract of cloves
Mix ingredients well, allowing the sugar to dissolve thoroughly. Pour into a chilled, pastry-lined pie plate and bake in a hot oven for 10 minutes at 4500 F., then reduce temperature to 3000 F. and bake until pie filling is'firm, about 25 minutes. The use of extracts gives a more golden color than when ground spices are used. Six egg yolks may be substituted for the three whole eggs if desired.
DESSERTS-HOT!
PAPAYA-BANANA PUDDING CASSEROLE 3/4 cup sugar, I cup rich milk
1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup soft bread cubes
1 teaspoon ginger 2 large bananas
I teaspoon cinnamon 1/4 cup brown sugar
21/4 cups stewed papaya I tablespoon flour
2 eggs, well beaten
Mix sugar, salt, Y2 teaspoon each of the spices, eggs, and milk with the papaya (may be canned). Slice thinly 11/2 bananas; fold into papaya. Spread bread cubes in bottom of buttered casserole; fill with papaya mixture. Mix together brown sugar, remaining 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, ginger and flour. Sprinkle over top. Bake in moderate oven for about 35 or 40 minutes. Serve hot. When ready to serve, sprinkle with confectioner's sugar and garnish with remaining banana sliced and placed in circular form on top.
PAPAYA SOUFFLE
2 cups papaya (cooked and Put 2 tablespoons butter
through sieve) 2 eggs
1 cup hot milk 1/2 cup chopped pecans or toasted
1/2 teaspoon salt cocoanut
2 teaspoons sugar I/P teaspoon nutmeg
Marshmallows, if desired







The, Fruitful Papaya


Scald milk, dissolve sugar and salt in it; add butter and stir until melted. Add to papaya. Separate eggs. Beat yolks and add to papaya. Add spice and nuts. Beat whites until stiff and fold into mixture. Pour into buttered baking dish or casserole and bake in moderate oven until souffle is set. Marshmallows, chopped nuts or toasted cocoanut may be sprinkled overtop. Serve at once.
Note To toast cocoanut spread it in thin layer on a baking sheet. Place under low flame of broiler or in hot oven (400' F.). Toast until cocoanut is delicately browned, stirring frequently.
DESSERTS-COLD!
PALM BEACH GOLD
1/2 cup' confectioners' sugar 11/2 cups ripe papaya scooped out
8 marshmallows in round balls
1 cup full ripe Abaca p*e- 1 cup orange segments
apple, shredded with silver I cup whipped cream
fork 2 teaspoons lemon or lime juice
Chill and whip cream, add sugar, then marshmallows cut in fourths. Fold in papaya, orange and pineapple. Pour into serving dish or individual glass dishes. Chill well before serving.
SOUTH FLORIDA SHERBET
I cup grapefruit juice Y4 cup of thinly sliced kumquats
1 cup papaya (put through fine I cup crushed pineapple
sieve) 1/4 teaspoon salt
2/3 cup sugar
Combine ingredients and pour into tray of electric refrigerator. Freeze about 4 hours, stirring twice. This amount will serve 8 when used as a meat accompaniment. It will serve 6 for a dessert with crackers and cheese or refrigerator cookies.
MIAMI MELANGE
Combine gently 1 cup of full-ripe, seeded, surinam cherries, I cup diced pineapple, I cup orange sections or 1 cup grapefruit sections, 1 cup papaya balls, % cup mango sliced. A half cup of shredded cocoanut may be added if liked. Cover with % to I cup mango, roselle or guava syrup. Chill for 4 to 6 hours before serving. Serve in sherbet glasses and garnish with a surinam cherry picked with the stem left on. Cocoanut layer cake or banana cake put together with orange butter icing would be an ideal accompaniment for this delectable tropical fruit mixture. Likewise, in season, thinly sliced, fWl-ripe, crisp roseapples con. tribute an interesting flavor to the fruit mixture.








Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


PAPAYA SOUFFLE
1 package orange or lemon 1 tablespoon lemon or lime -juice
flavored gelatin 1 cup ripe papaya pulp
1 cup boiling water / cup cream, whipped
1 cup orange juice
Dissolve gelatin in boiling water., Add orange juice. Chill until thick. Beat with egg beater until sponge-like and almost double in bulk. Add papaya and fold in whipped cream. Pour into mold rinsed in cold. water. Chill until firm. Unmold and serve with whipped cream, sweetened and, flavored with grated orange rind.
If fruit is not full sweet, 3/ to %2 cup of powdered sugar may be used in foundation of this dessert.
PAPAYA-ORANGE CUSTARD 11/2 cups papaya (sieved) I1Y cups milk
I teaspoon cinnamon 2 eggs
1/2 teaspoon ginger Juice of 1 orange
I cup brown sugar Grated rind of half an orange
12 teaspoon salt
Mix the dry ingredients, add the papaya, milk, orange juice, grated rind and slightly beaten eggs. Pour into well oiled individual ramekins or into one large pudding dish. Set into hot water and bake in a low oven until a knife inserted comes out clean. Do not over-bake. Serve plain or with whipped cream sweetened and flavored with honey.
PAPAYA ICE CREAM
(for the freezer)
I cup sugar 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1 pint milk V2 teaspoon nutmeg
2 beaten eggs / teaspoon salt
1 pint cream, whipped
11/2 cups ripe papaya (sieved)
Prepare and cook custard. To this add the papaya and spices. Chill. Freeze in the usual way in a one-to-eight salt-ice mixture.
If the custard base is not desired, a very delicious ice cream may be made by combining I pint papaya with 2/ cup sugar and 3 tablespoons lime, lemon or calamnondin juice. Add slowly one cup rich milk. Chill and freeze.
PAPAYA ICE CREAM
(for the mechanical refrigerator)
11/2 cups sugar 11/2 cups fresh or canned papaya,
2 tablespoons cornstarch put through sieve
1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 teaspoon grated orange rind
/ teaspoon ginger 1 tablespoon gelatin
1/s teaspoon mace V4 cup cold water
/ teaspoon salt 2/4 cup broken pecan meats, cocoa2 cups milk nut, or preserved citrus peel
4 egg yolks 1 cup cream, whipped







The Fruitful Papaya


Blend thoroughly sugar, cornstarch, and all seasonings. Scald milk, add carefully dry ingredients and cook until thick. Add to beaten egg yolks. Add papaya, orange rind, and gelatin (soaked previously in 1/4 cup cold water); put in tray in refrigerator and freeze to a mush or chill. Add nut meats and fold in cream. Turn refrigerator on fast freezing and freeze for one hour. -Serve in sherbet glasses or any preferred way.
PAPAYA MILK SHERBET
1"/2 Cups ripe papaya pulp 11/2 cups milk
3 tablespoons lemon or lime juice 1 cup sugar
cup orange juice
Press papaya pulp through a coarse sieve and combine with fruit juice. Dissolve sugar in milk, add fruit mixture gradually to milk, and freeze in an ice cream freezer using 8 parts of ice to 1 part of ice cream salt. Ice cream may be made by substituting thin cream for milk.
PAPAYA SHERBET
2 cups sugar 2 cups ripe papaya pulp
I quart water Juice of 2 lemons or limes
1 teaspoon gelatin Juice of 2 oranges
Boil sugar and water together 5 minutes, add the gelatin softened in cold water. When mixture is cold add the papaya pulp which has been pressed through a sieve and the juice of the lemons and oranges. Rangpur or other lime juice, calamondin, or any tart citrus juice may well be substituted for the lemon juice.
Freeze in the usual way. Serve with Tropical Kisses.
TROPICAL KISSES
1Y4 cups medium brown sugar 21/ cups (1/2 pound) shredded " teaspoon salt cocoanut
" cup flour 5 tablespoons cream
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
Mix sugar, salt and flour and put through a fine sieve. Add cocoanut and blend well. Add cream and flavoring and mix all together. If cream does not furnish sufficient moisture, increase the amount. Spread small cookies on a very cold baking sheet greased with cold butter. Spread, using two forks. They should have a lacy effect with holes between the shreds of cocoanut. Put into a medium hot oven. Bake carefully, since they scorch easily. As soon as golden brown and set in shape (about 8 minutes) remove from oven and remove quickly from baking sheet with two spatulas while still hot. Then, with fingers, pull out to be sure they are lacy.








Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


These are of a chewy texture and most delicious. Recipe should make about 40 kisses.

CANNING PAPAYA The papaya may be canned very much as peaches are canned, if lemon or other acid citrus juice is added to the liquid or syrup.
When a fruit acid is added no higher he at is required than f or canning other fruits (212' F.). The papaya may be canned like pumpkin by removing p e e I and seed and steaming until tender. The steamed p a p a y a should be stirred to a smooth, even consistency, t hen be packed steaming hotinto hot containers, c o m pletely sealed and quarts immediately processed for 50 Fig. 3-The papaw, Asimina triloba, commonly minutes at 10 called Indian banana or "dog" banana, is highly desirable as an ornamental but usually attracts pounds pressure. little attention in Florida. Sometimes the papaya Note. - T he is incorrectly called papaw. acidity of food products is the basis for determining the canning processes. A pH of 4.5 has arbitrarily been set as a dividing line between those that may be safely processed in a water bath and those requiring the higher temperatures obtained only in a steam pressure cooker. In this connection it is interesting to note that the composition of the papaya fruit is not of the type that is easily broken down with heat. Therefore, it tends to hold up better under the higher temperature than would many other fruits. Obviously the fat in the papaya, while it is melted, probably tends to congeal again on cooling and the papaya tissue holds its shape, color, flavor and texture under pressure processing.







The Fruitful Papaya


PAPAYA-GRAPEFRUIT JUICE
Select sound, fully ripened papayas. Peel fruit and discard seed. Extract juice by pressing the prepared fruit through the finest sieve of an effective juice extractor. Add an equal volume of freshly extracted grapefruit juice, Sampson tangelo juice, or a blend of grapefruit and Sampson tangelo juice. Sugar or honey is a desirable addition. Heat the blended juices for 15 minutes at simmering, 1800 F., preferably in a double boiler. Pour into hot sterile containers filled to overflowing, seal hermetically immediately, and process 30 minutes at 1701 F. Cool as quickly as possible by placing first in warm water and then in cold. Store in cool, dark, well ventilated pantry.
To prepare a good quality juice it is essential that the temperature of the juice before filling be the same as if not a little higher than that of pasteurization (about 1430 F.). Watch the temperature, using a good thermometer. If bottles are filled cold or at any temperature below that used for pasteurization they may burst because of expansion of the juice. When bottles are used as containers they should be filled to within 18 inch of the top and should be closed with crown caps previously dipped in boiling water. The bottles should be laid immediately in the water bath on their sides with water enough to cover by at least
2 inches.
For most individuals the above juice will be found to be too concentrated for use. It may be diluted at a ratio of I part of water to 3 or 4 parts of juice. Others may prefer to sweeten it more and dilute it still further. It may.also be diluted and combined with ginger ale, mixed with other juices, especially orange juice, and pineapple, in preparing fruit punches.
PAPAYA SYRUP
The syrup left over from preserving and pickling should be heated, bottled, sealed, and stored away for sauces, sundae dressings, flavoring ice creams, sherbets and other desserts and for making beverages.
Papaya juice may be made into syrup by the addition of 11/2 cups of sugar to 1 cup of juice. Boil until clear and bottle while boiling hot.
PAPAYA PRESERVE
Use freshly picked, sound, full-ripe fruit. Peel and cut in sizable, uniform pieces. Remove seed or not, as preferred. Weigh and for every pound of papaya add 1 pound of sugar. Sprinkle







Florida Agricultural Expeyiment Station


over fruit and allow to stand over night or until sugar is dissolved. If enough liquid is not drawn from the fruit to cover it will be necessary to add water to cover.
Place over heat, bring to a boil and boil 15 minutes or until fruit is clear. Cover tightly and let stand over night. Bring again to boil and boil until syrup is thick. It is important that the fruit be kept well covered with syrup at all times.
Pack in hot, sterile jars and cover with the hot syrup and seal at once.
Lime juice, calamondin or other citrus juices may be added if desired, but many prefer only the mild, distinctive flavor of the papaya. The syrup is golden in color and most delicious in flavor. When heavy and. rich it makes a fine accompaniment for ice cream and pudding or a delightful spread for hot cakes or waffles.
SWEET SPICED PAPAYA PICKLE
Prepare the fruit and cook as for preserves. When fruit is clear and syrup thick and heavy remove fruit and add 1/2 cup of best vinegar for each pint of syrup, and add whole spices as follows: I tablespoon whole cinnamon, 1 teaspoon each of cloves and allspice tied loosely in a cheesecloth bag and lightly pounded. Boil 5 minutes, then add to papaya and cook another 5 minutes. Return fruit and let stand over night. Bring to boil, transfer fruit to hot, sterile jars, add hot syrup and seal at once.
PAPAYA-PINEAPPLE MARMALADE
1 ripe papaya put through 1 teaspoon green ginger (shaved
coarse food chopper fine) to each cup of ground
papaya and pineapple
I ripe pineapple put through I cup sugar for each cup pulp
coarse food chopper (If pineapple is very sweet,
use slightly less sugar)
Combine fruit and ginger. Boil gently for 10 minutes. Add sugar and cook in heavy aluminum saucepan untilfruit is clear and as thick as desired. Pour piping hot into hot sterile jars and seal at once.
Note.-Ginger, Zingiber officinale, grows well in Florida when, given its cultural requirements-rich soil, sufficient moisture and semi-shade. More than enough corms to supply the needs of the average ginger-loving family may be produced on a 2-foot plot. Ginger adds snap and zest to anything from spicy fruit cocktails an d drinks to hot gingerbread and hot, sweet chutneys. One of the most popular of the papaya drinks sold in and out of Florida uses ginger and other flavorings to "pep" up what would otherwise be a bland and uninteresting product.








The Fruitful Papaya


Too often ginger is confused with the common ornamental ginger lily. Ginger is an erect, warm weather herb, growing 12 to 24 inches high, canna-like in appearance. It grows from thickened rhizomes which branch finger-like and send up new shoots from the tips near the surface of the soil. If desired, for preserving and candying, the roots should be dug while tender and succulent, rather than when old, tough and fibrous. Ginger will long remain one of the world's most popular spices and fresh, green ginger should be grown in every Florida home garden. Write to your southern Florida nurseryman for information or to the Office of Home Demonstration Work, Florida Agricultural Extension Service, Tallahassee, Florida.
RIPE PAPAYA JAM
6 cups ripe papaya pulp cup lemon or calamondin juice
5 cups sugar
Press ripe papaya through a coarse sieve, then measure. Boil briskly in a smooth, heavy aluminum saucepan until thick enough for jam. Add lemon juice and sugar and continue boiling until thick and clear. Stir frequently in order to prevent scorching. When the desired consistency is obtained pour into hot, clean jars and seal immediately. Store in cool, dark place.
PAPAYA PASTE CANDY
Peel and remove seed from a fully ripe, fine flavored papaya. Press pulp through a rather fine sieve. Measure and for each pint of pulp set aside 11/3 cups of sugar. Cook pulp in smooth heavy aluminum saucepan until somewhat -thick. Then add sugar and cook until clear and very thick, stirring carefully and taking care not to allow it to bum.
The paste will require constant. attention as it nears the finishing point. A wooden paddle with a square edge is decidedly better than a spoon for stirring. The faster the papaya is cooked the brighter and lighter in color it will be.
The paste should be cooked until it is so stiff that when the paddle is drawn through the mass it will not flow together again. Turn out on a platter or pan that has been brushed with an unsalted fat. Let stand until stiff. Cut in cubes, strips, or fancy shapes and roll in sugar. The paste may also be molded in small wooden or tin boxes lined with carefully fitted oiled paper. When molded, cut in squares, place on cardboard that has been covered with waxed paper or cellophane and wrap over all firmly and neatly with cellophane. Paste should be dried as rapidly as possible.








20 Florida Agricultural Experiment Station

VARIATIONS IN PAPAYA PASTE
Just.before removing from heat, pecans, cocoanut or crystal- ' ized fruits may be stirred into the paste for the purpose of giving variety to the candy. Or when paste is poured out a pecan half or kumquat or piece of pineapple may be pushed into it. After cooling, cut so that each piece has its nut or fruit center.
The paste may be rolled into shredded cocoanut which has been slightly moistened with heavy syrup. It may also be coated with fondant -or chocolate after being thoroughly dried. Many delicious and attractive candies may be secured by the interested and ambitious, worker.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The writer wishes to express her appreciation to Miss Julia Wilburn for her fine cooperation. in. pr paring and testing many recipes given in this circular. Appreciation is also given those home demonstration agents who have contributed manyvaluable comments and formulas.
For information on papaya culture, see Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin, 350, by H. S. Wolfe and S. J. Lynch.




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5e6cd7ecbcf7b47bb84a05619ce15dcbe2c6f05a
describe
'518395' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDLN' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
7bc64902f1a1777ba621256827fff541
acd7840dee6e028099c0cfb808a5cb358068e37e
describe
'424551' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDLO' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
a7c6ce4917bffddd40fb24c5705df44c
074b975f1d894b0ff59ed511c48fc467fac264ec
describe
'30438' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDLP' 'sip-files00008.pro'
f2eb7dbb193cc161be8255f59a697b3e
89c14a849e8a9b34f7fc60cbbf0d16b08445da83
describe
'120647' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDLQ' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
59aa4c49e9acfb343015a624d32df80e
559f64ce33ae34c71354815790f21ae219d1f995
'2011-11-03T16:45:42-04:00'
describe
'4158764' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDLR' 'sip-files00008.tif'
8d693d2498d21663a5d9b2eb33a5f43c
8939a8f75700b338fcb301b00c3a083c1e20abad
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDLS' 'sip-files00008.txt'
0428c686b4191b5f23d8b72ba421b097
305d12d2bdeadbfc64eee087029f8735de9cc904
describe
'33560' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDLT' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
717c84425846f7b49d1b7819ccc41b92
344ead266b8de3e17a14ab826f61f0978d7a1000
describe
'108223' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDLU' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
7ad6f84f8107fdf76d4894071a316ed6
3787394ffcafb688c86ab7f5d3065e4290141c07
describe
'302901' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDLV' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
ef2ae3e83055fa295fd47533eb688656
39819467f56e11f11cd90e4bdc521a79c73b14bf
describe
'53890' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDLW' 'sip-files00009.pro'
64398a56792127bdd372fea4431fc730
4e62abb0ede1e4e20c0f417e229c872425740621
'2011-11-03T16:45:50-04:00'
describe
'97198' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDLX' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
082fbed1639e510b259fb55b59f040ca
11e4e3aa9fb11035d9dd8398934c915782384121
describe
'539120' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDLY' 'sip-files00009.tif'
13ec59f4c497e6c053f491bd8b6efaa8
07565051714b7ece0575b8b951dfdb9d72d79c80
describe
'2344' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDLZ' 'sip-files00009.txt'
3fd4f5a50810c7cdaf2e3840c9468017
601411344b1a60adc83feffe741ab911a42d83b0
'2011-11-03T16:45:52-04:00'
describe
'30302' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMA' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
16794591346d2bc31f78f7fd3ac61f15
47f2a78045b0934a0c9b615b2a8784973b12a549
describe
'113023' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMB' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
58aa3b16f176a4ffbacb03034e89cd2c
13d9fe76608b3b2a1c6b38c6fb4b8181b0149d8c
describe
'303087' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMC' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
55ea465dc5bcc54e5a112691a72a266f
66c7fd2ec8bb4613487d98513aa64a9245a0fba8
describe
'58694' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMD' 'sip-files00010.pro'
74a4a7fb7736c9ed8cf57e5c0a36c0bf
026dc17453128b6f5f738c0b570e4e2b7300df63
describe
'95321' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDME' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
403653a35b616a5c663260fad67be2b5
b443b274b2397ac239c147a68ab6522c87d219d1
describe
'540580' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMF' 'sip-files00010.tif'
327e073041c5b5a86b110c2f21e98415
0a9ad60343f7140c2ea292e34b03e62f609a42bd
describe
'2550' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMG' 'sip-files00010.txt'
9c6fbf1ccab383280c6af2d1b67466c7
03a5d93516614b429185ff9bffc7459d30481d3f
describe
'31385' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMH' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
835cbadc81c95652b1c6e714ab886686
4b73275ee6d4820b5fa8e27082e87330379973e5
describe
'117242' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMI' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
84dc5d45502236305372b6a62648ac15
1c65e0559196592f1123dd6ad734078908a49e51
describe
'323868' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMJ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
f4a719fc76010e62993dbbe1c364c866
f1873b629529580ea2663dac4c65bd3d8d4fcc51
describe
'56896' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMK' 'sip-files00011.pro'
b95df2fa9d2e370c9d5e4a524187461e
f28f9ca20dff53b12be61e1b5ac5ff8813f48a8a
describe
'104864' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDML' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
1a83e5a8c75164c22fa678a579598db5
c3592670185df93c07091eb664e1c029b97cd895
describe
'542060' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMM' 'sip-files00011.tif'
5a264e65f62a8d09776fad63678fa0e7
f7b2414e56ed46447d2035fa1cd2077b5f7f2337
describe
'2484' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMN' 'sip-files00011.txt'
bc91658e82b2a5fc480454d68ad152d5
f4e0de5343fad463156e8ff9a3789aa6b34494a9
describe
Invalid character
'31817' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMO' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
b57fa564ff6220e201e8e20f819469bb
93d242ddd0c5bd2d1b106fc1d8e3cea4666e910d
'2011-11-03T16:45:59-04:00'
describe
'128031' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMP' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
6638267c8d49e6f9c5c2e77a95291566
78b23771ee959fad68f23dc2e567968d44d38bc3
describe
'383626' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMQ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
cf5aa4a3a5b832e5056c94d766051e82
85c0c1d258ca2e8d189603cb70183ec56a1e6207
describe
'58399' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMR' 'sip-files00012.pro'
1de5e063fb8ecec950863e4ea8351183
9b30873f10453c7b4f0f5c026f0e0d6287422236
describe
'121939' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMS' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
5bcce3cbfecb708ea6893d518d3dfe60
23435653e44b0ff08dc81cc24a3d54f9f10b82f9
describe
'538472' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMT' 'sip-files00012.tif'
384092c68c33fd2a6004224ee9cf0cb3
605ee7a12929dacca9e4ade76a90485ea6b0153b
describe
'2607' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMU' 'sip-files00012.txt'
b41010fe35672c25039e0ced75542d34
d79ef902e9e55f8051e6e4e8330df68c65eab279
describe
'35542' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMV' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
53a9673a7871cc07f9511736099d8154
1ad6e566c4fecb9ce9702afea97604d235c0d455
describe
'123433' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMW' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
cc640dbe49ebd6eefef0aea4f6411094
af591eab82882029ff270cfe31c5883b56d166ef
describe
'341039' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMX' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
f5b2f20b0978e130b45b9b72c3418ad3
0f93a2d846881073a64489462ef3803368c4aa46
describe
'57291' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMY' 'sip-files00013.pro'
165a02c07c57a29f9548e4e10ec4a3ca
14e8e307b3df24e937fa591a424138904fd9f398
describe
'110927' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDMZ' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
30740b8d5220c97be523d47512c94aec
d9756174e8177292069899e1a28e063d11fabe99
'2011-11-03T16:45:33-04:00'
describe
'532124' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNA' 'sip-files00013.tif'
2d6d214ab8f4a7f3021335848b77178e
47c98a8d211e60cac42612e8919ae3fcc3806d15
describe
'2409' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNB' 'sip-files00013.txt'
7d4563a7b30a7e818cf94fcacf0308ce
7c7429970e974355d8caa1a48923114114aabd29
describe
'34570' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNC' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
2297acd25ac463839f45fd4ac8afd22f
6a10affe6ae8ca700e6531515632b52258940715
describe
'122532' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDND' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
90c7ff342b5741c10648ad85093fc983
1d9322c8d73a0acace50223ece182cf7949908a2
describe
'356264' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNE' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
0c4c7b5b3d0257fe76220c81e02d32de
3961abda590297717a0cde651b9c852bfb4d26e7
describe
'57438' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNF' 'sip-files00014.pro'
b5cce25e57de39b974fa3fc137d83344
2da522aff37759bc0ca2aea819f9647149908348
describe
'113506' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNG' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
1b175f53122d8f8c3a5baed00f728d5d
c2964fec1dae8aebef1b5e81cb510c425e36dc10
describe
'537836' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNH' 'sip-files00014.tif'
0648548a361cdae21a31572ef34e0e07
85936ef288b51a7ae740cfcf20f5f71694dca0fd
'2011-11-03T16:45:31-04:00'
describe
'2602' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNI' 'sip-files00014.txt'
431b777a483095c00334b9af9d369bf2
e615ae3ce32f78e8a2d60be966f834bb48216fa8
'2011-11-03T16:45:41-04:00'
describe
'33801' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNJ' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
433bc61b079a377569da98ff2b660c74
859b1b29a93ab2724664719092c7e3357d269fa5
describe
'124097' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNK' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
8d8a60cb8123da0eb4b47ac9dec1f763
b28dc348e8385a98aef0c691c0ecde10d57029d1
describe
'335951' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNL' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
ce942daf6c9153fd54c78d1f3c18ea4d
3e72c1bf4452ededf1724e4572482eab8b405deb
describe
'57201' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNM' 'sip-files00015.pro'
71415792a2362deb7869f7060fcaf665
85b1498e6386b7c7354e6436bb3fb50c9e299f43
describe
'108181' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNN' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
972b43e1f10a1a5051018113f023e49b
706f1d2a89d516c8094c673a41d841bdc73f4a4e
describe
'551696' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNO' 'sip-files00015.tif'
32f6d1a07b1a4fada10ab74d4fc7a589
dbb2d61004fde97a7fe236e5d8d6cd5e127c0a1f
describe
'2429' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNP' 'sip-files00015.txt'
940292eb88ded5b2ca359d2bc492282c
73d58e54afbe26c97157c5a070b77aa31cdeb701
describe
'33312' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNQ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
fc78218a49ed8de0c26847fe7f392fd5
7933a80656c7efa4d78288e4c3fcceba7ea8dc6d
describe
'523950' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNR' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
47482958dc8b4d992f76ed0891058225
2cf5cb6ea2bbb227397d87fcd401edf49503d00c
describe
'342719' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNS' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
95d77f7bca6c0c260690ab7cdd4695f9
ac0f6759019c75b8e5aa8a020511ca3bd3768721
describe
'42782' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNT' 'sip-files00016.pro'
2a4e285000b1cde9fce88f3681f229aa
46e75640c9984e295bae3f2a867017ca9ddae5f4
describe
'101077' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNU' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
bdb307b86d18adc5c48af4a9828077ce
0e1c58457326c6d8fcb45885bae9798edeca9111
describe
'4202568' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNV' 'sip-files00016.tif'
47218c3bcda6ff5533552174a90614f6
32570c4e6f3d91d97a4444b8ffeb2f2275fa2ae8
describe
'2628' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNW' 'sip-files00016.txt'
048411ad4432dd74acf21578f1d983df
6d7b2bb3d9c9ba391ba1e12f543162f98bcc68ec
describe
'27494' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNX' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
dc7aa9a93633c3b23394e0a2a6a67842
c603e035dcd9fc3d1f8d97f0601a6f9e7a12b852
describe
'133197' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNY' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
44fb075c2c0e9d6fab433af2af995f97
223fbb75f5b0931f7b47ff121f985a6cc3115532
describe
'383272' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDNZ' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
b0b8589d723d70d3b2fec5447d4695b8
3db68107fe8b96ff337ef8fd2469860f435456fd
describe
'60375' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOA' 'sip-files00017.pro'
fa3cf24d127a2ed9a6005228127566db
11934bf8c5ff90e4d42db6cf2b4e6733f7ec5259
describe
'121218' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOB' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
bc81f254fc7f35799944631a8e02293c
bf0f30ad77a7a08af655323509f00a2d459d6fa9
describe
'544204' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOC' 'sip-files00017.tif'
748a11f178f675e3724235c9801b1d3d
2d1db32371a0d76df93647d526da786fdacea4c6
describe
'2448' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOD' 'sip-files00017.txt'
d5776de96c8532e76eb0a815efc20222
02685a165bb542b4ba3c2923dc573c95dca7f4da
describe
Invalid character
'36121' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOE' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
84e87973064a4b4a87a92fa286714e9a
5a999e650091e8ab533732fe8c7d3296626e4fbb
describe
'136715' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOF' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
e473eb4051880ebd431615eb941c887b
1b70219b40ea90ba652b8c3c8a00c631abd1445e
describe
'368627' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOG' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
c7d2c2e28e2a63b45ec7f309e06270e1
24d3d6dbf1528bd8c77767658018a6f240dc0944
describe
'63770' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOH' 'sip-files00018.pro'
068c72cf9846474ae7133197bda98f8f
7baaaf2f3a885de120971c430d4e605c2dc0e697
describe
'114000' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOI' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
018b88a873c0f74ea26aeb46a54b2459
a19fda9fdb932a8c509bc61df370e96ca4b09832
describe
'537100' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOJ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
24051a5a23c76f1991df7e33ac8c52cc
1e9111b1b5a53c769e6e0556f8d7eef38997a77b
describe
'2641' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOK' 'sip-files00018.txt'
50c855423a7404bc6f3a3e7b7a50a0d5
1efbb08b6848407e62165a6071107ecb089d71c1
describe
'32311' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOL' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
9dc59d638ba9fe7c53f0736707ecf0a4
0696f30687299e47b4653cea0b1800ec961ffb38
describe
'139697' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOM' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
76cccbfb659dc6d558977af60ff8406d
a5dc431889bb5230469f312859e2f5ed087e8dea
describe
'382577' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDON' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
a17592b9734dc1e75ac993f574f13068
2d560ee5e7123c9932424823f53d4a49f1b5a6a2
describe
'62614' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOO' 'sip-files00019.pro'
1bd8f716937905d5e4383c6fdd96ec0c
27469f585e2114b4e448769cec13e633a5a957e8
describe
'120334' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOP' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
f533a5e7cd9e4c908fdfdb0f2b0b09cf
c57bc216eb1ca73fa38499d72a4dcb148bc26d0b
describe
'543348' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOQ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
e7c40d3b13a7cf2310d35d4a24c35194
4a3499a47e452512d0418933a9ef89a3e87b16ea
describe
'2525' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOR' 'sip-files00019.txt'
8d328287906abdb5fdb97bb596dcad6e
67a1a6950b432385c987229db6d9a6bcc3a2d17f
describe
'36597' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOS' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
cb4f2caaae5793936203c3ecf0767aba
84d7ac45adabe722cef79a28c1ff16ab036d9c44
describe
'65052' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOT' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
4aaaff6780538c961537b9603f1b6480
10c15099b560776b7cd9ff564a1459aa46db0939
describe
'180886' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOU' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
70c2a7bcc7a857bde054744a0e84ec4e
316ed726c1588bae68cac2bb77e9cea97c03de4e
describe
'28032' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOV' 'sip-files00020.pro'
5607401c8ad3eab8c12936ec57df9eb0
953baf65ae6620213e3d20931359d8a8fa2d08e1
describe
'53781' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABSAfileF20081110_AABDOW' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
0f4dde10092416c68848fbc9aebe3707
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describe
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PAGE 1

HISTORIC NOTE The publications in this collection do not reflect current scientific knowledge or recommendations. These texts represent the historic publishing record of the Institute for Food and Agricultural Sciences and should be used only to trace the historic work of the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS research may be found on the Electronic Data Information Source (EDIS) site maintained by the Florida Cooperative Extension Service. Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University of Florida

PAGE 2

( t -JPAPAY OW TO SE~VE BY ISABE.LLE S.THUR.._SBY cot'\omist in Food Col"\servotion BULLETIN 106 DECEMBER 1940 COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS (Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914) gricultural Extensi on Service, University of Florid a, Florida Stat e College for Women. and United State s Department of Agriculture, Cooperatin g WrnION NE11 E u., Director

PAGE 3

BOARD OF CONTROL H. P. ADAIR, Chairman, Jacksonville W. M. PALMER, Ocala T. T. ScoTT, Live Oak R. H. GoRE, Fort Lauderdale N. B. JORDAN, Quincy J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary, Tallahassee STAFF, AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE JOHN J. TIGERT, M.A., LL.D., President of the University WILMON NEWELL, D.Sc., Director of Extension 1 A. P. SPENCER, M.S., Vice-Director and County Agent Leader J. FRANCIS COOPER, M.S.A., Editor 1 JEFFERSON THOMAS, Assistant Editor' CLYDE BEALE, A.B.J ., Assistant Editor 1 E. F. STANTON, Supervisor, Egg-Laying Contest RUBY NEWHALL, Administrative Manager 1 COOPERATIVE AGRICULTURAL DEMONSTRATION WORK W. T. NETTLES, B.S., District Agent H. G. CLAYTON, M. S. A., District Agent, Organization and Outlook Specialist J. LEE SMITH, District Agent and Agronomist R. S. DENNIS, B.S.A., Assistant District Agent A. E. DuNSCOMBE, M.S.A., Assistant District Agent R. w. BLACKLOCK, A.B., Boys' Club Agent E. F. DEBUSK, B.S., Citriculturist A. L. SHEALY, D.V.M., Animal Industrialist 1 HAMLIN L. BROWN, B.S., Dairyman N. R. MEHRHOF, M.AGR. Poultryman 1 D. F. SowELL, M.S.A., Assistant Poultryman WALTER J. SHEELY, B.S., Animal Husbandman L. T. NmLAND, Farm Forester C. V. NOBLE, PH.D., Agricultural Economist' D. E. TIMMONS, M.S.A., Agricultural Economist, Marketing CHARLES M. HAMPSON, M. S., Agricultural Economist, Farm Management R. H. HOWARD, M. S. A., Asst. Agr. Economist, Farm Management V. V. BOWMAN, M.S.A., Economist and Leader in Land-Use Planning JOSEPH C. BEDSOLE, B.S.A., Assistant Leader in Land-Use Planning J. R. GREENMAN, B.S.A., State Representative, B.A.E. R. V. ALLISON, PH,D., Soil Conservationist' COOPERATIVE HOME DEMONSTRATION WORK MARYE. KEOWN, M.S., State Agent LucY BELLE SETTLE, M.A., District Agent RuB'I McDAVID, District Agent ETHYL HOLLOWAY, B.S.H.E., District Agent ANNA MAE Sins, B. S., Nutritionist VIRGINIA P. MOORE, Home Improvement Agent ISABELLE S. THURSBY, Economist in Food Conservation CLARINE BELCHER, M.S., Clothing Specialist NEGRO EXTENSION WORK A. A. TURNER, Local District Agent BEULAH SHUTE, Local District Agent 'Part-time.

PAGE 4

THE FRUITFUL PAPAYA HOW ',l'O ' Sl!tM:J!}; t I',l' . :::= . :~ t "' st? ~:-' } .'•; By lSABE~j ( S ;f q'HpRs~i . . Extension Econ.om,{ ;t , tt, 1 ~ofd C9~~eiviition , ;, .: ... '.,t nesserts-Coldl ________ 13 Pastry . " w j ,i ( ' ~' .~ Canning Papaya 6 ;~ i:<-1:. . , , ,, .~_/. Considering the Pfl)? , aya 1 ipl~}jy usesl _, rapid growth; m~dicinal value, easy culture, : .str~ig1y ii peautifltl " a,pp~aran.;:e . , and . . the enormous amount of he ,i'. thfiil ; : delicioui' , and nutritionally :Val uable fruit-food each,i>1artt ; pr~duce~, . thete . sho~id \ be . no groves or home grounds in middle ancl , ~outherU!i'loridawithouta few of these fruitful plants \' Every A:arm should 'plant them ' generously for use on the f~miiy \ table. The surplus jipe fruit ~lso ' is eaten greedily by chickens ' and makes ' an invaluable " fe~d for turkeys: As with man~i other iropical f:i::uits, tlje taste for the papaya usually has to be acq.11ired, but ihisis nof difficult to do. The fruit attains its beSt , qualit1es if ; aJlciwed to remain on the tree until very nearly ripe, When it turns from green to yellow,,... , ,. ' ' ' . orange. There are many straii:J.~ or yarietiesof Jhis \ melon-like . fruit and the variation in siz~, . f~rm; i;;olor, fragrance, flayor. atid qual ity is remarkable , Some :reserhble sm:a:l t . ,, wateritielons in both shape and size, while : oth , ers are riot mor i than . four , in ' dhes , in diarneter and are almost .fpund. ' The fltfah is white before ma turity, turns to a . rich g'r;arige-yellow, ' is of a smooth, tender consistency, is of a sweet"cres~~li!W flayor, and is from one to two inches in thickness in the . better varieties. The flesh en velopes a somewhat five-angled cavity. Attached to the walls of the cavity are numerous round, wrinkled, greyish-black seed. These are the size of small peas and are enclosed in a . thin, gela tinous aril. The seeds have a fine, na . sturtium-like flavor, and many like them eaten with the fruit. Others prefer them bruised with vinegar and served in the salad dressing. Likewise, in preserving the seed . may be left intact and , be cooked with the flesh. When cooked thus in the sugar syrup, the seed in many

PAGE 5

4 Flor ida AF!,ricultural Exp e rim e nt Station Fi g. 1.-Th e papaya, or tree cantaloupe, is a fast-growing, herbac e ous , branchless tree of ornamental foliage and sweet scented flowers , bearing quantities of melon-like fruit . Created in the bounteous fashion of Natur e, this " miracle " fruit holds the gift of health in it s golden heart. varieties take on an interesting, nut-like flavor while in some the seed tend to be a bit dry and grainy. In the full ripe stage the papaya makes a delectable dessert or breakfast fruit , served with lemon or lime. In fruit cups and salads it combines especiall y deliciously with the more acid

PAGE 6

The Fruit Jul Papaya 5 fruits like pineapple and citrus, such as grapefruit, orange, and thinly sliced kumquats. The fresh papaya pulp with milk or cream makes a splendid frozen dessert. Sliced and seasoned the same way as peaches, papayas are used for pie, or with pulp put through a sieve with milk, eggs and spices added they make a delicious custard pie. Indeed, the pa.paya ranks high as a pie fruit. The surplus fruit may be canned for pie filling. Papaya lends itself to the making of sauce, butter, preserves and ex ceptionally delightful sweet spiced pickles. It may be used in either the green stage, when the skin is still tender and green in color and the seed are yet white for sweet pickle. Or it may be used full ripe. The same formula used for peach pickles may he used for papaya, or a richer, more translucent product may be secured by foliowing directions contained in this circular. The syrup from ripe papaya preserves is a rich golden color and is of a delicate, interesting flavor. Papaya juice is being manufactured in large quantities. Its popularity is due mainly to its values as a health drink and to the addition of other fruit juices of a sprightly nature such as grapefruit and pineapple. Even strong-flavored products like ginger are used in some. papaya juices or nectars now found on the market. In a study of some 25,000 families selected from different sections of the country, it was found that the diets were generally deficient in vitamin A. For a long time it has been known that yellow fruits (and vegetables) are good sources of this vitamin and the greater depth of color, the higher, as a rule, the vitamin content. Papayas are an excellent source of vitamin A, a good to rich source of vitamin C or ascorbic acid, and a fair source of vitamin G or riboflavin. They also contain some thiamin or vitamin B1. As a rule, papayas may be purchased on the market by the pound at a very reasonable price during the greater part of the year. However, since weather conditions such as frosts and heavy rains often diminish the supply, the provident Florida housewife will have a few jars of canned papaya on her pantry shelf. Papaya does not appreciably lose flavor or food value when properly canned and stored, and may be found .a welcome addition to the menu for making into casserole dishes, for pi~ and many other delicious. desserts, especially on emergency oc• casions or when the fresh fruit is not available. Both the fruit and leaves of the papaya contain pepsin.

PAGE 7

6 Florida Agricultural Experiment Station APPETIZERS, COCKTAILS, AND FRUIT CUPS FROSTED PAPAYA COCKTAIL 2 cups ripe papaya cut in cubes cup grapefruit sections and juice 2 -or three kumquats sliced thin 'cup fresh pineapple chunks crosswise Powdered sugar Mix fruit and chill thoroughly before serving, sugaring very lightly. Have sherbet or cocktail glasses cold. Moisten rim of each glass in grapefruit juice and dip in powdered sugar. Fill with the prepared fruit. Serve very cold. Garnish with surinam cherry, thinly sliced carissa, other seasonable fruit, or with sprig of mint in center of glass. PAPAYA AND ORANGE COCKTAIL 1 cup papaya peeled and cut in 3 tablespoons lemon, lime or other suitable slices acid citrus juice, guava or 1 cup orange sections berry juice 3 tablespoons sugar Preserved pineapple Mix papaya slices and orange sections. Sprinkle with lime, berry or guava juice. Chill and have glasses chilled so that the whole, when served, may be very cold. Garnish with preserved pineapple or citrus. MIXED FRUIT COCKTAIL IN GRAPEFRUIT SHELLS medium size papaya 3 large grapefruit 1 large banana 3 kumquats, sliced very thin 3 slices pineapple cup guava juice or guava slices, fresh or canned Fresh mint Sugar Peel and slice papaya. Cut grapefruit in half, crosswise. With a grapefruit corer or sharp shears cut a circular piece from the center of each half, being careful not to cut through the skin. Loosen and then remove each section from the membrane and skin with a grapefruit knife. Place shells in cold water to keep them firm until serving time. Prepare remainder of fruit. Mix together, add fruit juice and sugar. Chill thoroughly. Serve in the cold grapefruit shells and garnish with mint. The mixed fruit that remains after the shells are filled may be kept in the refrigerator and served at breakfast. It may be used also as a sauce for ice cream or pudding, or when served with a custard sauce, whipped cream or marshmallow sauce, it may be used as a' garnish for a delectable dessert. PAPAYA MILK SHAKE 2 cups full ripe papaya juice 1 cup ice water cup lemon, lime oi' calamondin 3 tablespoons sugar iuice 1 cup chilled milk Combine fruit juices, water and sugar and stir until suger is dissolved. Add to chilled milk and shake with crushed ice.

PAGE 8

The Fruitful Papaya CASSEROLE DISHES PAPAYA-KUMQUAT EN CASSEROLE 7 Peel and seed a medium ' sized, firm, ripe papaya ' and slice for convenient serving. Butter a casserole and start with a layer of the fruit; sprinkle with brown sugar. Then follow with a layer of very thinly sliced kumquats or a few slices of sections of orange, alternating the citrus fruit and the papayl:i'. Make a basting syrup with cup of honey and cup of orange juice. Pour over the dish, top with fine bread crumbs mixed with an equal quantity of brown sugar. Dot liberally with butter and bake for about of a:n hour in a moderate oven. Baste with more orange juice and honey if it threatens to burn. PAPAYA AND APPLE SCALLOP 1 small ripe papaya (about 2 pounds) 3 medium sized tart apples . cup . brown sugar . 4 tablespoons butter teaspoon salt cup buttered crumbs (optional) Peel papaya and remove seed, cutting the papaya in inch slices, and put in layers in a buttered baking dish or casserole, alternating with layers of theJhinly sliced apples ; Sprinkle each layer of apples with brown sugar and liberal dots of ; butter and a very light sprinkling of salt, less than teaspoon'. Settle layers firmly with the papaya on top. Cover top with the buttered crumbs and bake until the papaya and the apple are . tenoer and the crumbs are brown. If preferred, it :max be finished with sug.ir and butter and baked in a mod~rately hot ov~n u.ntil ' candied and lightly browned. : PAPAYA EN CREAM ' . Put three cups of cubed ripe papaya into a buttered baking gish . Sprinkle with teaspoon of salt and dot with 2 ' fable. spoons butter. Cover and bake in a moderate oven ~ When ~: the papaya begins to soften cover with % cup . coffee cre~m and sprinkle with 1 tablespoon br~wn sugar or horiey. Finish cooking uncovered and serve wheri delicately brown. Serve hot from the baking dish. This -_ may . be seasonedforth,er with a . dash of . nutmeg and ginger if desired. GLAZED PAPAYA SLICES Peel and seed ripe papaya. Cut in wide slices and lay evenly in a flat baking pan . Baste with honey arid butter warmed together, sprinkle very lightly with brq.wn sugar. Put in medium to hot oven until thoro1,1ghly cooked and nicely browned. Serve from the pan in which baked.

PAGE 9

8 Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Brown sugar, butter and water, such as is used for glazing carrots and sweet potatoes, may be used in place of the honey mixture. Likewise, cup jelly (guava, kumquat, or strawberry), 4 tablespoons butter and 3 tablespoons lemon juice may be blended together and used for basting the papaya slices until soft and glazed. BAKED PAPAYA 1 ripe papaya teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon butter 2 tablespoons lemon juice Pare and cut papaya lengthwise into six pieces, place in a baking pan, sprinkle with salt and lemon juice and dot liberally with butter. Add enough water to cover bottom of pan to pre vent burning. Decorate with honey or thin slices of lemon. A sprinkle of pecan or chopped walnut meats is a nice addition also . Calamondins or kumquats are as good as, if not better than, Fig. 2.-The papaya, in all its tropical flamboyance, with its slender , usually unbranched trunk topped with the large, dark green, deeply lobed leaves supported by hollow petioles several feet long, deserves a prominent place in gardens of southern Florida . Picture taken in the garden of Mrs. S. M. Godbey, Polk County, Florida .

PAGE 10

Tlte Fruitful Papaya 9 lemon for the decoration. Bake in a moderate oven for about 25 minutes or until a nice brown. Serve immediately after re moving from the oven. This may be used in place of a vegetable or may even be served with cream as a dessert. PAPAYA SCALLOP 3 cups mashed, steamed, medium ripe papaya 1 small onion 1 green pepper cup bread crumbs 3 tablespoonfuls butter Salt, pepper, paprika Peel, steam and mash the papaya. Cut the onion and green pepper fine and brown in the butter. Add to the papaya and season with salt, pepper and paprika. Turn the mixture into a baking dish and cover with buttered crumbs. Bake in a hot oven for 20 minutes or until a golden brown. Pi\PAYA SLICES (Deep Fat Fried) Dip inc'.1 slices of medium ripe papaya first in fine bread crumbs, then in egg and again in bread crumbs, and fry in deep fat until a golden brown. These papaya slices are particularly attractive to use on a luncheon or dinner plate with a creamed or roasted meat and a crisp salad. SALADS Many interesting salads, molded and otherwise, may be made from papayas mixed with almost any other fruit, fresh or canned. As a rule, however, combinations of a sweet and a sour fruit offer the most piquant flavJr. Grapefruit, tangerine, thinly sliced kumquat, tangelo-in fact all the citrus fruits-are particu larly delicious to combine w: any papaya mixture. Surinam cherries, carissa, mangos, r: ;1capples, crisp, sweet roseapples, and other seasonable fruit, of southern Florida, as well as figs, pomegranate arils, peaches, pears, and other fruits, fresh and canned, may be used in many delightful and healthful combina tions. GOLDEH PAPAYA SALAD 2 cups pineapple juice 1 small package lemon or orange fl::fforcd gelatin 1 cup papaya cubes 1 cup orange sections 1 ~ cup surinam cherries, seeded or 1 ;, cup sliced kumquats Heat half of pineapple juice to boiling point. Dissolve gela tin in it and add remaining juice. Chill. When gelatin begins to conge3l. 3dd fruit. Turn into molds, chill. Serve on lettuce with pineapple mayonnaise garnished with ripe surinam cherries.

PAGE 11

10 Florida A K ri c ultural Exp e r i m e nt Station PINEAPPLE MAYONNAISE 1 t eas poons gelatin cup pineapple juice or syrup fr o m canned pineappl e 1 t a blespoon lemon or lime juic e 1 t a bl es p o on sugar (if desired) F e w grains of salt t e aspoon paprik a cup mayonnais e cup heavy cre a m ( if d e sir e d) Soak gelatin in cold pin e apple juice or syrup about 5 minutes. Dissolve over boiling wat e r . Add lemon juice, sugar, salt and paprika. Cool until slightly thick e ned, beat into mayonnaise and fold in stiffly beat e n cream. Chill in a shallow pan, c u t in cubes and serve with mixed fruit salads or with molded fruit salads as above. Yield: 1 cup. PAPAYA SURPRISE A-LA-MIAMI 1 rip e papaya, preferably obloug m snape 3 /2 packag e lime, lemon, or o r ang e gelatin cup small pin e appl e chunk s cup broken grap e fruit s e gm e nts cup diced celery a nd c a rrot 1 cup boiling wat e r Dis s olve gelatin in boiling water and set asid e to cool and thicken but not to jell. Cut t o p fr o m papaya and scrape o ut s e ed. Peel. Add fruit and dic e d c e ler y and carrot to thicken e d j e lly and pour into papa y a . Wrap in waxed paper. Plac e upright in refrigerator until jell y is firm a nd thoroughly chilled . Arrange lettuce , romaine , or endive on salad plates , add papa y a sliced ab o ut one-half inch thick and serve with any pref e rred ma y on nais e o r a snappy French dressing. PAPAYA SALAD 2 c u ps ripe papaya cut in cub e s 1 c up g r a p e fruit segments 2 t easpoo n s finely chopp e d onio n c up fi n e l y chopped cel e r y t e aspoon salt cup snappy, co o k e d sa l ad dressing or m a y o n na i se w ell season e d Cut papa y a into cubes, chopp e d onion and c e l e r y . garnish with ma y onnais e. add grapefruit, fresh or c a nned , the Chill , serve on l e ttuc e leaves and PAPAYA CITRUS SALAD 1 c up r i p e p a paya pe e l e d a nd cut in inch slices 1 cup gr ap e fruit sections, ca n ne d or fresh 1 cup or a n ge sections c u p t hinl y sliced kumqu ats 1 sma ll swee t pepper , di ce d 3 yo u ng onions, cut fin e 3 s t a lks celery, cut f in e cup carrots, shr e dd e d 2 tablespoons or mor e f in e l y chopped parsl e y W e ll seasoned, sn a ppy F ren ch dressing C r i s p lettuce, rom a i ne o r e n d i ve Bl e nd all ingredients tog e ther gently and plac e on th e cold, crisp greens. Sprinkle with the chopped parsley and serve with F re nch dressing and salad wafers or cheese straws .

PAGE 12

1 quart raw sliced papaya (very ripe) % cup sugar The Fruitful Papaya PASTRY PAPAYA PIE 1/s teaspoon cinnamon 2 teaspoons flour teaspoon gr~ted nutmeg 1/s teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon water Butter Pastry: 1 cups flour teaspoon salt cup shortening Sufficient ice water to mix 11 Peel and slice the papaya about the same size as apples for apple pie. Line pie plate with pastry. Fill with sliced papaya, cover with the mixture of spices, sugar, salt and flour. Add the water and dot over with butter. Bake 50 minutes or .until the fruit juice looks clear and thick. Start at 450 F., then reduce the heat to allow the fruit to cook slowly but thoroughly. This has a flavor of peach or pineapple or both combined, yet is not exactly like either. It is a delicious dessert served with ice cream. PAPAYA-COCOANUT PIE 1 cup sugar 1 cups stewed. papaya put teaspoon salt through sieve teaspoon cinnamon cup cocoanut grated teaspoon cloves Pastry 2 beaten eggs . cup cocoanut finely grated 1 cup rich milk 2 tablespoons honey Mix first 8 ingredients in order given. Fill unbaked pastry shell and bake about 45 minutes, first with high heat and then with moderate. When nearly cooked, top with remaining cocoa nut, drizzle on warmed honey and return to oven to brown delicately. PAPAYA CHIFFON PIE 1 cups cooked papaya put through a sieve cup sugar 1 cup milk teaspoon salt teaspoon ginger teaspoon nutmeg teaspoon cinnamon 3 eggs Put papaya and milk in top of double boiler. Mix with sugar, salt, ginger, nutmeg and cinnamon and combine with papaya milk mixture. Mix well and when hot add to 3 egg yolks slightly beaten. Return to double boiler and stir and cook until thick. Measure one-fourth cup cold water, add 1 tablespoon gelatin and when soft, add to hot papaya mixture. Mix thoroughly and cool When it begins to siffen, beat 3 egg whites until stiff, beat in one-fourth cup sugar, and fold into papaya mixture. Pour into baked pie shell, chill in refrigerator or cold place. Garnish with whipped cream just before serving.

PAGE 13

/ . 12 Florida Agricultural Experiment Station PAPAYA PIE 2 cups stewed, strained papaya (canned papaya may be used) l cup brown or granulated sugar 2 eggs; slightly beaten . 1 h teaspoon salt teaspoon ~round ginger 1 teaspoon cinnamon teaspoon allspice 2 cups rich milk Bake 1 large or 2 small . pastry shells in hot oven, about 8minutes. Mix together papaya, sugar, eggs, salt and spices. Add milk gradually to ~eep mixt _ ure smooth. Pour into partially baked pastry shells and bake in moderate oven (350 F:) for about 45 minutes or until firm. GOLDEN PAPAYA PIE Ph cups papaya put through a teaspoon salt sieve 1/3 cup mild flavored honey 3 eggs well beaten 3 drops . each extract of nutmeg 1 cup rich milk . arid cinnamon % cup sugar 3 drops extract of cloves Mix ingredients well, allowing the sugar to dissolve thor oughly. Pour into a chilled, pastry-lined pie )?late and bake in a hot oven for 10 minutes at . 450 F.; th . en reducetemperature to 300 F. and b . ake until pie fining is ' firm, about 25 minutes. The use of extracts gives a more golden color than when ground spices are used. Six egg yolks may be substituted for the three whole eggs if desired. DESSE . RTS-'-HOT! PAPAYA-BANANA PUDDlNG CASSEROLE cup sugar . . teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ginger . 1 teaspoon cinnamon 2 cups stewed papaya 2 eggs, well beaten 1 cup rich . milk cup soft bread cubes 2 large bananas cup , brown sugar 1 tablespoon . flour Mix sugar, salt, teaspoon each of the spices,.eggs, and milk with the papaya (may be canned). Slice thinly 1 bananas; fold into papaya. Spread bread cubes in bottom of buttered casserole; fill with papaya iixture. Mix together brown sugar, remaining teaspoon cinnamon, . ginger and flour. Sprinkle over top. Bake iri moderate oven for about 35 or 40 minutes. Serve hot. When ready to serve, sprinkle with. confectioner's sugar and garnish with remaining banana sliced and placed in circular form on top . . PAPAYA SOUFFLE 2 cups papaya (cooked and put 2 tablespoons butter through sieve) 2 eggs l cup hot milk cup chopped pecans or toasted teaspoon salt cocoanut . . 2 teaspoons sugar telc\spoori nu\meg . lyiarslimallows, . 1f desired

PAGE 14

The Fruitful Papaya 13 Scald milk, dissolve sugar and salt in it; add butter and stir until melted. Add to papaya. Separate eggs. Beat yolks and add to papaya. Add spice and nuts. Beat whites until stiff and fold into mixture. Pour into buttered baking dish or casse role and bake in moderate oven until souffle is set. Marsh mallows, chopped nuts or toasted cocoanut may be ~prinkled over top. Serve at once. Note.-To toast cocoanut spread it in thin layer on a baking sheet. Place under low flame of broiler or in hot oven ( 400 F.). Toast until cocoanut is delicately browned, stirring fre quently. DESSERTS-COLD! PALM BEACH GOLD cup confectioners' sugar 1 cups ripe papaya scooped out 8 marshmallows in round balls 1 cup full ripe Abaca pine1 cup orange segments apple, shredded with silver 1 cup whipped cream fork 2 teaspoons lemon or lime juice Chill and whip cream, add sugar, then marshmallows cut in fourths. Fold in papaya, orange and pineapple. Pour into serving dish or individual glass dishes. Chill well before serving. SOUTH FLORIDA SHERBET 1 cup grapefruit juice 1 cup papaya (put through fine sieve) % cup sugar cup of thinly sliced kumquats 1 cup crushed pineapple teaspoon salt Combine ingredients and pour into tray of electric refrig erator . Freeze about 4 hours, stirring twice. This amount will serve 8 when used as a meat accompaniment. It will serve 6 for a dessert with crackers and cheese or refrigerator cookies. MIAMI MELANGE Combine gently 1 cup of full-ripe, seeded, surinam cherries, 1 cup diced pineapple, 1 cup orange sections or l cup grapefruit sections, 1 cup papaya balls, 1 h cup mango sliced. A half cup of shredded cocoanut may be added if liked. Cover with to l cup mango, roselle or guava syrup. Chill for 4 to 6 hours before serving. Serve in sherbet glasses and garnish with a surinam cherry picked with the stem left on. Cocoanut layer cake or banana cake put together with orange butter icing would be an ideal accompaniment for this delectable tropical fruit mixture. Likewise . , in season , thinly sliced , full-ripe, crisp roseapples con tribute an interesting flavor to the fruit mixture.

PAGE 15

14 Florida Agricultural Experiment Station . PAPAYA SOUFFLE 1 , package orange or lemon flavored gelatin 1 cup boiling water l cup or.ange juice 1 tablespoon . lemon or lime . juice . 1 . cup ripe papaya pulp cup cream, whipped Dissolve gelatin in boiling water. Add orange juice. Chill untiLthick. Beat with egg beater until sponge-like and almost double in bulk. Add papaya and fold hi whipped cream. Pour i~o mold rinsed in cold water. Chill until firm. Unmold and serve with whipped crea:m, sweetened and . flavored with grated orange rind. . If fruit is not full sweet, to cup of powdered sugar may be used in foundation of this dessert, PAPAYA-ORANGE CUSTARD P h ' cups papaya (sieved) 1 cups milk 1 tec1sppon cinnamon 2 eggs teaspoon ginger Juice o f 1 orange 1 cup brown sugar Grated rind of half an orange teaspoon salt . . . .. .. Mix the dry ingredients, add the papaya, milk, orange . juice, gra,ted rind and .slightly beaten eggs. Pour into well . oiled in dividual ramekins or into one large pudding dish. Set into hot wa . ter and bake in a ~ow oven until a knife inserted comes out clean. Do not over-bake. Serve plain or with whipped cream sweetened and flavored with honey; 1 cup sugar 1 pint milk 2 beaten eggs 1 pint cream, whipped PAPAYA ICE CREAM (for the freezer) teaspoon cinnamon teaspoon nutmeg teaspoon salt 1 cups ripe papaya (s i eved) Prepare and cook custard. To this add the papaya and spices. Chill. Freeze in the usual way in a one-to.eight salt•ice mixture . If the custard base is not desired, a very delicious ice cream may be made by combining l pint papaya with 2/a cup sugar and 3 tablespoons lime, lemon or cala:tnondin juice. Add slowly one cup rich milk. Chill and freeze. PAPAYAICE CREAM (for the mechanical refrigerator) 1 cups sugar 2 tablespoons cornstarch 1 teaspoon cinnamon teaspoon ginger 1/ s tea s poon m:ace t e aspoon salt 2 cups milk 4 egg yolks 1 cups fresh or canned papaya, put through sieve . . 1 teaspoon grated orange . rind 1 tablespoon gelatin cup cold water cup broken pecan meats, cocoa• nut, or preserved citrus peel 1 cup . cream, whipped

PAGE 16

The Fruitful Papaya 15 Blend thoroughly sugar, cornstarch, and all seasonings. Scald milk, add carefully dry ingredients and cook until thick. Add to beaten egg yolks. Add papaya, orange rind, and gelatin (soak ed previously in cup cold water); put in tray in refrigerator and freeze to a mush or chill. Add nut meats and fold in cream. Turn refrigerator on fast freezing and freeze for one hour. Serve in sherbet glasses or any preferred way. PAPAYA MILK SHERBET 1 cups ripe papaya pulp 1 cups milk 3 tablespoons lemon or lime juice 1 cup sugar cup orange juice Press papaya pulp through a coarse sieve and combine with fruit juice. Dissolve sugar in milk, add fruit mixture gradually to milk, and freeze in an ice cream freezer using 8 parts of ice to 1 part of ice cream salt. Ice cream may be made by substi tuting thin cream for milk. PAPAYA SHERBET 2 cups sugar 2 cups ripe papaya pulp 1 quart water Juice of 2 lemons or limes 1 teaspoon gelatin Juice of 2 oranges Boil sugar and water together 5 minutes, add the gelatin softened in cold water. When mixture is cold add the papaya pulp which has been pressed through a sieve and the juice of the lemons and oranges. Rangpur or other lime juice, calamondin, or any tart citrus juice may well be substituted for the lemon juice. Freeze in the usual way. Serve with Tropical Kisses. TROPICAL KISSES 1 cups medium brown sugar 1/s teaspoon salt 1/3 cupflour 2 cups pound) shredded cocoanut 5 tablespoons cream teaspoon .vanilla Mix sugar, salt and flour and put through a fin_e sieve. Add cocoanut and blend well. Add cream and flavoring and mix all together. If cream does not furnish sufficient moisture, in crease the amount. Spread small cookies on a very cold baking sheet greased with cold butter. Spread, using two forks. They should have a lacy effect with holes between the shreds of cocoa nut. Put into a medium hot oven. Bake carefully, since they scorch easily. As soon as golden brown and set in _ shape (about 8 minutes) remove from ovenan,d remove quickly from baking sheet with two spatulas while still hot. Then, with fingers, pull out to be sure they are lacy.

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16 Flor i da A g r ic ultural Experiment Station These are of a chewy texture and most delicious . Recipe should make about 40 kisses. CANNING PAPAYA The papaya may be canned very much as peaches are canned, if lemon or other acid citrus juice is added to the liquid or syrup . When a fruit acid is added no higher h e a t is required than f o r canning other fruits (212 F . ) . The papaya ma y be canned like p u m p k i n by re moving p e e 1 and seed and steaming until tender . The steamed p a p a y a should be stirred to a smooth, even consistency, then be packed steam ing hot i n t o hot containers, com pletely sealed and quarts immediate l y processed for 50 minutes at 10 pounds pressure. Note. The F ig. 3. -Th e p a p aw, Asimina triloba , c o mmonly c a ll e d I n di an b anana o r " d og" b a n a n a , is highly d es ir ab l e as a n orn a m e nt a l but usually attracts littl e a t te nt ion in Fl o ri da. S o m e tim e s the papaya i s in cor r ec tl y ca ll e d p a p aw . acidit y of food pro ducts is the basis for determining the canning processes. A pH of 4.5 has arbitrarily b e en set as a dividing line between those that may be safely processed in a water bath and those requiring the higher temperatures obtained only in a steam pressure cooker. In this connection it is interesting to note that the composition of the papa y a fruit is not of the t y p e that is easily broken down with heat . Therefore, it tends to hold up better under the higher tem perature than would many other fruits. Obviously the fat in the papaya, while it is melted, probably tends to congeal again on cooling and the papaya tissue holds its shape , color, flavor and texture under pressure processing .

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The Fruitful Papaya 17 PAPAYA-GRAPEFRUIT JUICE Select sound, fully ripened papayas. Peel fruit and discard :seed. Extract juice by pressing the prepared fruit through the finest sieve of an effective juice extractor. Add an equal volume -0f freshly extracted grapefruit juice, Sampson tangelo juice, or a blend of grapefruit and Sampson tangelo juice. Sugar or honey is a desirable addition. Heat the blended juices for 15 minutes at simmering, 180 F., preferably in a double boiler. Pour into hot sterile containers filled to overflowing, seal her metically immediately, and process 30 minutes at 170 F. Cool as quickly as possible by placing first in warm water and then in cold. Store in cool, dark, well ventilated pantry. To prepare a good quality juice it is essential that the tem perature of the juice before filling be the same as if not. a little higher than that of pasteurization (about 143 F.). Watch the temperature, using a good thermometer. If bottles are filled cold or at any temperature below that used for pasteurization they may burst because of expansion of the juice. When bottles are used as containers they should be filled to within inch of the top and should be closed with crown caps previously dipped in boiling water. The bottles should be laid immediately in the water bath on their sides with water enough to cover by at least 2 inches. For most individuals the above juice will be found to be too concentrated for use. It may be diluted at a ratio of 1 part of water to 3 or 4 parts of juice. Others may prefer to sweeten it more and dilute it still further. It may also be diluted and com bined with ginger ale, mixed with other juices, especially orange juice, and pineapple, in preparing fruit punches. PAPAYA SYRUP The syrup left over from preserving and pickling should be heated, bottled, sealed, and stored away for sauces, sundae dress ings, flavoring ice creams, sherbets and other desserts and for making beverages. Papaya juice may be made into syrup by the addition of 1 cups of sugar to 1 cup of juice. Boil until clear and bottle while boiling hot. PAPAYA PRESERVE Use freshly picked, sound, ft.ill-ripe fruit. Peel and cut in sizable, uniform pieces. Remove seed or not, as preferred. Weigh and for every pound of papaya add 1 pound of sugar. Sprinkle

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18 Florida Agricultural Experiment Station over fruit and allow to stand over night or until sugar is dissolv ed. If enough liquid is not drawn from the fruit to cover it will be necessary to add water to cover. Place over heat, bring to a boil and boil 15 minutes or until fruit is clear. Cover tightly and let stand over night. Bring again to boil and boil until syrup is thick. It is imporitant that the fruit be kept well covered with syrup at all times. Pack in hot, sterile jars and cover with the hot syrup and seal at once. Lime juice, calamondin or other citrus juices may be added if desired, but many prefer only the mild, distinctive flavor of the papaya. The syrup is golden in color and most delicious in flavor. When heavy and rich it makes a fine accompaniment for ice cream and pudding or a delightful spread for hot cakes or waffles. SWEET SPICED PAPAYA PICKLE Prepare the fruit and cook as for preserves. When fruit is clear and syrup thick and heavy remove fruit and add 1h cup of best vinegar for each pint of syrup, and add whole spices as fol lows: 1 tablespoon whole cinnamon, 1 teaspoon each of cloves and allspice tied loosely in a cheesecloth bag and lightly pounded. Boil 5 minutes, then add to papaya and cook another 5 minutes. Return fruit and let stand over night. Bring to boil, transfer fruit to hot, sterile jars, add hot syrup and seal at once. PAPAYA-PINEAPPLE MARMALADE 1 ripe papaya put through 1 teaspoon green ginger (shaved coarse food chopper fine) to each cup of ground papaya and pineapple 1 ripe pineapple put through 1 cup sugar for each cup pulp coarse food chopper (If pineapple is very sweet, use slightly less sugar) Combine fruit and ginger. Boil gently for 10 minutes. Add sugar and cook in heavy aluminum saucepan until . fruit is clear and as thick as desired. Pour piping hot into hot sterile jars and seal at once. Note.-Ginger, Zingib er officinale, grows well in Florida when given its cultural requirements-rich soil, sufficient moisture and semi-shade. More than enough corms to supply the needs of the average ginger-loving family may be produced on a 2-foot plot. Ginger adds snap and zest to anything from spicy fruit cocktails and drinks to hot gingerbread and hot, sweet chutneys. One of the most popular of the papaya drinks sold in and out of Florida uses ginger and other flavorings to "pep" up what would other wise be a bland and uninteresting product.

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The Fruitful Papaya 19 Too often ginger is confused with the common ornamental ginger lily. Ginger is an erect, warm weather herb, growing 12 to 24 inches high, canna-like in appearance. It grows from thickened rhizomes which branch finger-like and send up new shoots from the tips near the surface of the soil. If desired, for preserving and candying, the roots should be dug while tender and succulent, rather than when old, tough and fibrous. Ginger will long remain one of the world's most popular spices and fresh, green ginger should be grown in every Florida hoine gar den. Write to your southern Florida nurseryman for informa tion or to the Office of Home Demonstration Work, Florida Ag ricultural Extension Service, Tallahassee, Florida. RIPE PAPAYA JAM 6 cups ripe papaya pulp cup lemon or cala.mondin juice 5 cups sugar Press ripe papaya through a coarse sieve, then measure. Boil briskly in a smooth, heavy aluminum saucepan until thick enough for jam. Add lemon juice and sugar and continue boil ing until thick and clear. Stir frequently in order to prevent scorching. When the desired consistency is obtained pour into hot, clean jars and seal immediately. Store in cool, dark place. PAPAYA PASTE CANDY Peel and remove seed from a fully ripe, fine flavored papaya. Press pulp through a rather fine sieve. Measure and for each pint of pulp set aside 11/2 cups of sugar. Cook pulp in smooth heavy aluminum saucepan until somewhat •thick. Then add sugar and cook until clear and very thick, stirring carefully and taking care not to allow it to burn. The paste will require constant . attention as it nears the finishing point. A wooden paddle with a square edge is decided ly better than a spoon for stirring. The faster the papaya is cooked the brighter and lighter in color it will be. The paste should be cooked until it is so stiff that when the paddle is drawn thtough the mass it will not flow together again. Turn out on a platter or pan that has been brushed with an un salted fat. Let stand until stiff. Cut in cubes, strips, or fancy shapes and roll in sugar. The paste may also be molded in small wooden or tin boxes lined with carefully fitted oiled paper. When molded, cut in squares, place on cardboard that has been covered with waxed paper or cellophane and wrap over all firmly and neatly with cellophane. Paste should be dried as rapidly as possible.

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20 Florida Agricul _ tural f!,xperinient Station VARIATIONS IN PAPAYA PASTE ', ' ,. . . ' , Jus _ t before rei:n-oving frnm h~at, pecans, cocoanut or crystal ize _ d fruits may be stirred into . the paste for the purpose of giving variety to the candy. _ Or when paste is poured out a pecan half ()r , k _ umquat or piece _ qf pineapple may . be pushed into it. After cooling, cut so thate _ ach piece has its ; nut or fruit center. The paste may be rolled into shredded cocoanut which has been-slightly moisten _ ed with heavy syrup. It may also be coated with fondant : or ch _ ocolate after being thoroughly dried. Many delicious and _ attractive candies may be secured by the interested anq ambitiotfsworke:r. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The writer wishes to express her appreciation to Miss Julia Wilburn for her . fine .. cooperation jp_ pr , eparing and testing many recipes given in this izircular. Appreciation is also _ given those home demonstration agents who have contributed many vah,table comments and formulas. _ For in:fonnation . on papaya culture, see Florida Agricultural Ex periment Station Bulletin _ 350, by H. S , Wolfe and S. J. Lynch.