Citation
Red Riding Hood

Material Information

Title:
Red Riding Hood
Series Title:
Aunt Kate's series
Added title page title:
Little Red Riding Hood
Creator:
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
McLoughlin Brothers
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
14 p. : ;

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Fairy tales -- 1880 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1880 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre:
Fairy tales ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Caption title: Little Red Riding Hood.
General Note:
Includes publisher's advertisement.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027441327 ( ALEPH )
26032654 ( OCLC )
AJE5162 ( NOTIS )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text






Re
THE LITTLE GIRL RECEIVES A RIDING-HOOD MADE OF SCARLET CLOTH.

NCE upon a time, in a pretty

village, stood a neat little cot-
tage, covered. with roses and honey-
suckles, and shaded by large trees.

In this cottage lived a good wo-



man, who had a very pretty daughter
—a sweet, dear little girl, with bright
eyes and long hair, falling in golden
curls all over her neck and shoul-

ders. Her cheeks were as rosy as



The Baldwin Library

University
RnB
Florida






two ripe peaches, and her laugh was
the merriest you would hear on a
Summer’s day; and what was better
than all this was, that that little girl

was a kind, good child, with a gentle

LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD SENT WITH A PRESENT TO HER GRANDMOTHER.





heart and obliging manners. She
had a pleasant smile and cheerful
word for all, and would do anything
to give pleasure to others.

So it is no wonder she became the



4 Little Red Riding-Food.

greatest favorite with all the villagers.
Every one who knew her liked her;
and when she called to see any poor
or sick neighbor, her presence was
like a ray of sunshine to them, so
pleased were they to see her.

Now, although she was greatly liked
by all the villagers, far and near, none
loved her so dearly as her mother and
grandmother. This little girl’s grand-
mother, to show how much she ap-
preciated her goodness, made her a
beautiful riding-hood of scarlet cloth,
such as ladies wore in those days
when they went out riding.

The little girl looked quite charm-
ing in this riding-hood, and she found
it so handy and convenient, she sel-
dom went abroad without it; hail,
rain, or shine, she would wear it—in
fact, it was her favorite article of
dress. She wore it so frequently,
and looked so nice in it, that when
she was seen coming along the vil-
lage, the neighbors would say :—
“Here comes Little Red Riding-
Hood,” till at last she was known
by that name, and no other ; indeed,
I have never been able to learn her
other name.

Now, the good old grandmother

had been very sick for a long time,



and, although not so bad as she had
been, she was not yet sufficiently
So the
mother, who had been making some
cheese-cakes, |

well to leave her cottage.

and churning some
butter that morning, said to her
daughter: “You may go, my child,
to your grandmother’s, and take her
some of these nice cakes, and a pot
of fresh butter, for her breakfast.”

Little Red Riding-Hood was highly
delighted at the thought of a run to
her grandmother's such a fine morn-
ing, so she went and brought a little
basket for the cakes and butter; and
you may be sure she did not forget
to put on the little scarlet “hood
which became her so well. She was
very soon ready, and the cakes and
butter were put into the basket and
covered with a clean cloth.

Now, it was not very far from Lit-
tle Red Riding-Hood’s home to the
cottage in which her grandmother ,
lived, so her mother thought little of
sending her alone. Still, on parting
with her, she told her not to stop too
long on the way. She also charged
her with many kind messages for
the good old grandmother.

Little Red Riding-Hood promised
not to forget, and giving her two



Little Red Riding-Hood. 5

kisses, and saying “Good-bye,” trip-
ped off as gay and light-hearted
as any of the little birds that
were singing on the boughs of the
trees. i

Now, there were some woodmen
at work in the forest, cutting down
trees for firewood, and singing as
they dealt their strokes with willing
hands and heavy axes. There was
also something there that threatened
danger to the little girl, namely: a
great hungry wolf.

This cruel animal had paid a visit
to a sheep-fold, thinking he could
steal a lamb for dinner, but was
disappointed, for the watch-dog liad
caught him and beaten him soundly.

The wolf knew Little Red Riding-
Hood very well, and had often watched
and plotted to carry her off, that he
might devour her. He was desper-
ately hungry this morning, and out
of temper, for he felt very sore from
his recent beating; but the sight
of the little girl made him grin with
delight.

Now, the wolf would like to have
made one spring at Red Riding-Hood,
and have eaten her up at once; but
he was too cunning for that, for the

woodmen were near, and he was



afraid they would see him, which |
would never do. So he resolved to
make her acquaintance, and pretend
to be her friend.

One of the woodmen saw both the
wolf and Little Red Riding-Hood,
and, suspecting Master Grizzly was
bent upon some mischief, kept a
watch on him without seeming to
do so.

Master Wolf walked daintily up to
Little Red Riding-Hood, wagging his
tail, and tried his best to appear as
amiable as possible, and succeeded
very well; only his green eyes had
look,
in a hungry, uncomfortable manner.
When he smiled he showed a double
But she
felt not the slightest fear of him.
The wolf made a graceful bow, and
said: ‘“Good-morning, Little Red
Riding-Hood.”

“(Good-morning, Master Wolf,” re-
plied Little Red Riding-Hood.

“ And, pray, where are you going

a treacherous and glared

row of sharp white teeth.

so early, my darling?” continued
the wolf.

“T am going to my grandmoth-
er’s,” answered the child.

“Your grandmother? how is the
dear old lady ?” asked the wolf, pre-



,
y

MASTER WOLF MEETS LITTLE RED RIDING- HOOD.

tending to take the greatest interest
in her welfare.

“She has been very sick, and
is not yet well,” said Little Red

Riding-Hood. “I am taking her



some cakes, and a pot of nice fresh
butter.”

“Dear me! I am sorry to hear my
respected friend, your grandmother,

is out of health. I will call upon



her; she will be glad to see me,
I have no doubt. Allow me_ to
carry your basket, my dear; I fear
you are tired.” At the same time

giving a sly, hungry sniff, and

LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD LOITERS ON THE WAY TO GATHER FLOWERS.



almost thrusting his nose into the
basket.

Little Red Riding-Hood thought
| this was rather rude of him, after

| his polite offer, but only said: “O!



8 Little Red Riding-Hood.

no, I thank you; I am not a bit |

tired.”
“Well,” said the wolf, “give my

will call and see her.
I take this path to the right, and you
follow that one, and we'll see which
of us gets there first.”

Now, this cunning old wolf knew
very well he would get to the old
He had chosen
the shortest way, you may be sure;

dame’s cottage first.

and not only that, but as soon as
the child was out of sight, he set off
galloping as hard as he could go.

Little Red Riding-Hood had no
cause to hurry, it being yet early;
she loitered along the pleasant forest
path, to gather the pretty wild-flow-
ers that grew by the wayside, to
make a nosegay. ‘“Grand-mamma
likes flowers,” she said to herself,
“and she will be pleased if I bring
her a handsome nosegay; and a few
wood-strawberries to eat with her
cakes will, perhaps, please her, too.”

The pace at which the wolf ran
soon brought him to the grandmoth-
er’s cottage.

Then he knocked at the door,
giving two little taps, as Little Red
Riding-Hood might have done.

Now, suppose |



“Who's there?” cried the old dame.
“Tis I,” said the wolf, imitating

| Little Red Riding-Hood’s voice.
love to your grandmother, and say I |

The grandmother, as she lay in

bed, almost asleep, thought her grand-
child must have a bad cold to speak
in such a gruff way. Never suspect-
ing for a moment any one else was
there, she said: “Pull the bobbin
and the latch will fly up, and come
in,”
So the wolf took the bobbin in his
teeth, and gave it a jerk; then, putting
his shoulder to the door, pushed it
open and went in—very much to the
old dame’s astonishment and alarm,
for she knew him to be a cruel, dis-
honest fellow ; and as she was certain
he had some evil design in coming
there, she was on her guard against
him.

“Good-morning, Madam,” said the
wolf, trying to be agreeable, but
looking as if he meant to eat her
up.

‘‘Good-morning to you, sir,” replied
the dame, as she moved to the other
side of the bed.

“Your grandchild told me this
morning you had been unwell, so I
thought I would call to see how you

were.”



Little Red Riding-Hood. 9

The granddame saw the wolf looked
fierce and hungry, so she instantly
got off the bed, away from the wolf,
and moved toward the door of a
closet, or small room, saying: “Pray,
excuse me a minute, Sir; I am not
dressed to receive company.”

“Don’t mind me, I beg,” said the
wolf, with a horrid grin, looking
savagely hungry, and made a spring
across the bed, and seized the wrap-
per she had on with his teeth. But
fright made the old dame active,
and, as quick as thought, she slipped
off her loose wrapper which the
wolf had hold of, and darted into
the closet, and bolted the door,
before he could recover himself;
then fell down in a fainting-fit
through fright.

The wolf grinned horribly with
rage and disappointment, saying to
himself: ‘Well, never mind, she is
safe enough; Little Red Riding-Hood
will soon be here; J’ll have her for
breakfast, and finish the old woman
for dinner.”

With these savage thoughts, the
wolf put on the dame’s wrapper and
night-cap, and got into bed, pulling
the clothes well up to hide his hairy

face. Presently he heard Little Red





Riding-Hood coming to the door;
then came tap! tap! tap!

“Who's there?” cried the wolf,
this time trying to imitate the grand-
mother's voice.

Little Red Riding-Hood thought,
“what a bad cold grandmother has
got to make her speak so hoarse ;”
but suspecting nothing wrong, she
replied, “Your grandchild, with some
nice cakes, and a pot of fresh but-
ter.”

“Pull the bobbin, my dear,” said
the wolf, “and the latch will fly

”

up.
Little Red Riding-Hood did as
she was told, and walked into the
room, all fresh and rosy with her
walk, her basket on one arm, and
She
was greatly surprised when she saw

the wild flowers on the other.

how strange the old lady looked as
she lay tucked up in bed.
“Whatever can have made grand-
mother’s eyes so green?” thought
she, as she employed herself in ar-
ranging the flowers she had brought
with her on the mantel-piece; and,
as she was a tasty little thing, she
soon made the place look quite fresh
When she had finished,
she turned her bright face to granny

and neat.



THE WOLF PULLS THE BOBBIN, AND PUSHES OPEN THE DOOR.

with a look of triumph, and bade
her see how pretty she had made
her room.

Now, the pretended grandmother

appeareil to be very ill indeed, and

said in a feeble voice, “Oh! my dear
grandchild, will you not come into
bed with your poor old granny; Iam
oD J}
too ill to get up and talk to you?”
5 d

Little Red Riding-Hood obeyed







THE WOLF PRETENDS TO BE RED RIDING-HOOD'S GRANDMOTHER.

without hesitation, and so tired was | himself at the success of his plans.
She with her long walk, that in a | He could not help admiring the
moment she had fallen asleep. | beautiful little girl as she lay there

Now, the wolf was so sure of his | sleeping, and thought what a nice

prey, that he felt quite pleased with | breakfast he would have presently.



12 Little Red Riudting-Hood.

But, like many wicked people,
he deceived himself, as we shall
presently see.

You remember the wood-cutters,

who saw the wolf with Little Red
Riding-Hood when they met in the
Well, they suspected — the
wolf had some evil design that made
So they thought
it prudent to see that Little Red

Riding-Hood came to no harm, and

forest.

him so very civil.

hastened to the cottage to see that
all was right. But what was their
surprise, on looking through the win-
dow, to see Little Red Riding-Hood
in bed, and the wolf standing over
her. There she lay, with her rosy
cheeks and pretty mouth, and close
to her the great hairy face of the
wolf, with green eyes and long
teeth. While they were looking at
them with astonishment, Little Red
Riding-Hood awoke, and began to
tell her grandmother (as she sup-
posed) all that had occurred since
she left home, and how she had
met the wolf.

“And, oh! grandmamma, he was
so polite, and offered to carry my
basket for me.”

“Did he, indeed, my dear,” said
the wolf, and laughed.



“Yes; and he asked me where I
was going. I told him you were
sick, and I was coming to see you,
and bring you the cakes and butter.
He was sorry to hear you were sick,
and he said he would call and see
you . and I rather expected to find
him here. Do you think I shall see
him before I leave, grandma ?”

“T should not wonder if you did,”
replied the wolf, and gave her a
loving hug.

“Grandmamma,” cried the child,
in the greatest surprise, “ what great
strong arms you have got.”

“The better to embrace you with,
my dear child,” said the wolf.

“But, grandma, what long, stiff
ears you have got.”

“The better to hear what you say,
my darling,” said the wolf, and his
eyes glared greener than ever.

“What large green eyes you have
got, grandma,” said Little Red Riding-
Hood, so frightened she knew not
what to say.

“The better to see you with, my
child,” chuckled the wolf, showing
his ugly teeth.

Little Red Riding-Hood now sat
up in bed, in the greatest terror.

“Grandmamma! what a large



Little Red Riding-Hood. 13

mouth, and ho! what big teeth you
have got.”

“Ah! ah! ah! The better to tear
you to pieces, and eat you with,”
said the wolf—throwing off his dis-
guise, giving a hungry growl, and
opening his mouth to bite her throat



when whack! came a spear on his
head, then two or three stabs, which

knocked him off the bed, howling .

. frightfully.

The woodmen, who had seen and
heard what the wolf was at, rushed
in just in time to save the life of
dear Little Red Riding-Hood. The
wolf howled for mercy, but they
soon killed him.

They asked Little Red Riding-
Hood where her grandmother was,
but she could not tell, because she
supposed the wolf was her grand-
mother. She was like one in a
dream.

They feared at first that the wolf
must have carried her off, or else
eaten her up. But one of the wood-
men, hearing the dame in the closet,
burst open the door, and to their
great relief they found her safe.

Little Red Riding-Hood fell upon
her neck, kissing her and weeping
for joy.



One of the woodmen said to
Little Red Riding-Hood, in a kind,
friendly manner: ‘“ Don’t you think
it would have been better if you
had come straight to your grand-
mother, without stopping to gos-
sip with the wolf? You

then have escaped this danger.

would

Let
this be a warning to you through
life.”

Little Red Riding-Hood was too
much flurried to reply, but she kissed
the woodman, and tears flowed down
When she had
become composed, she promised to

her cheeks freely.

do better in future.

The grandmother soon recovered
from her terrible fright, and produced
what good things she had to regale
the woodmen with, of which they eat
heartily, making a breakfast and
dinner in one. Little Red Riding-
Hood and her grandmother ate but
little, but they did their utmost to
The
woodmen highly complimented the

make their deliverers welcome.

grandmother at her outwitting the
cunning old wolf.

After the woodmen had feasted
well, they escorted Little Red Riding-
Hood home, and took the grand-

mother along with them.



WHAT BIG TEETH YOU HAVE GOT, GRANDMOTHER!



When they got home, and told the | Riding-Hood by her friends, which

end of the wicked wolf, all the vil-
lagers rejoiced to hear their enemy
had been destroyed. A great deal of

good advice was given to Little Red

is to be hoped was a benefit to her.
In the village that evening all the
neighbors assembled, and they had

much rejoicing.





THE WOODMEN KILL THE WICKED WOLF.

But I must leave you to imagine MORAL.
all that, and conclude with the | If in this world secure you'd be,
advice the woodmen gave to Little From danger, strife, and care,

Red Riding-Hood, and which I give | ‘Take heed with whom you keep company,

and when-—and where.



my readers by way of moral— And how





New Picture Books’ for Little Children.





Bic PICTURE SERIES.

42 KINDS.—25 CENTS EACH. Quarto Demi. Six full-page Illustrations, Elegantly
Printed in Colors.

Ten Little Niggers, Baby. \ Alphabet of Country Scenes.
Hey Diddle Diddle. Putnam. Visit to the Menagerie.
Children in the Wood. Pocahontas. House that Jack Built.
Jack and the Bean Stalk. Puss in Boots. Wild Animals.—Part One.
Four-Footed Friends. Cock Robin. Mother Hubbard’s Dog.

Three Little Kittens.
Three Good Friends.
Hare and Tortoise.
Rip Van Winkle.

Three Bears.
Tom Thumb

Visit of St. Nicholas.

Santa Claus and His Works.
White Cat. Humpty Dumpty.—Vol. 1.
Yankee Doodle : Humpty Dumpty.—Vol. 2.

Domestic Animals. Fat Boy. Home Games for Livtle Boys.
Robinson Crusoe. Nursery Rhymes. | Home Games for Little Girls.
World-Wide Fables. : Cinderella. The Little Mulligan Guards.

|
Tit, Tiny, and Tittens. | My Mother. Wild Animals.—Part Two.
|
|
|
|
|
I
|

Little Red Riding Hood. Henny Penny. The Frog he would a-wooing go.

TITTLE FroLlKS’ SARs.

Imperial 16mo. Ten Cents Each. Six full-page Pictures in the best style of Color Printing, with
the determination of having them better than any yet published.

The Five Little Pigs. | Old Woman who lived in a Shoe Dame Trot and her Cat.











Old Mother Goose. | Story of Three Little Pigs. | The Babes in the Wood.
The Three Bears. _ Jack and the Bean-Stalk. Diamonds and Toads.
| Little Bo-Peep. | Singa Song of Sixpence, My First Alphabet.





| UNCLE | NED’S PICTURE BOOKS.
| Large Svo. Fifteen Cents Each.

Frisky, the Squirrel | Playtime Stories. | Ditties for Children,
|| Hector, the Dog. | Home Pictures. | Nursery Play Book.

eT : The Robin’s Christmas Eve. | Little Anna and her Mamma.

GILT COVER PICTURE BOOKS.

LARGE svo. FIFPTHEN CHNTS HACE,

Rambling Rhymes. Proverbs aor the ey The Robin. _lily's Picture Book.











NEW PAPER at a.

The most Amusement for a small outlay of Money that can be found for Little Girls.

SIX CENTS EACH, TEN CENTS EACH. | FIFTEEN CENTS EACH.
Polly Prim. Bessie Bliss. Dottie Dimple. Bride,
| Gerty Good. Lottie Love. | Susie Simple. Bridesmaid, and

tacit June. Myra Mild. | Bertie Bright. | Groomsman.





McLoughlin Bros., Publishers, 1 New York.



un
|
ES










Full Text
xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20081107_AAABOC' PACKAGE 'UF00026025_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-11-09T23:42:10-05:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:36:14-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 299166; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-14T19:48:23-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '827179' DFID 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFME' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00001.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 1134e7fec3200ca7504b7df7771dab95
'SHA-1' cd907ba7c7082386f0b32a934f2d217a3cd5d2cf
EVENT '2011-11-03T13:21:09-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'208783' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMF' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
f0f0bbf4d40c3715f33191ce95f04948
ac3d465500107dc3295eba8f4e4ba5f5459cd61e
'2011-11-03T13:21:12-04:00'
describe
'1797175' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMG' 'sip-files00001.pdf'
645cf20a2b335b019de8550b0485508f
63eac7b096b958ffcd3f3ddc9922215e462bf102
'2011-11-03T13:20:57-04:00'
describe
'987010' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMG-norm-0' 'ARCHIVE' 'aip-filesF20081110_AAAFMG-norm-0.pdf'
ebeb37a207cc9d5dbc4d5fb07204a325
9820e7aa9824cd4570afa0439ff54a21f1b07049
'2013-12-14T19:45:30-05:00'
describe
'2013-12-14T19:43:32-05:00'
normalize
'2164' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMH' 'sip-files00001.pro'
5390cd575404f47406e266f08a3d0591
3665fb7e73093680ffa22a1022d0433f5f4d35ee
'2011-11-03T13:21:31-04:00'
describe
'55545' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMI' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
1f52ef2fe651c323976a09ffca6dffbd
44cc77c820f33c097d9306e8c6477a4568b239cf
'2011-11-03T13:21:21-04:00'
describe
'19873612' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMJ' 'sip-files00001.tif'
b4c870d3f3c49f4f82b198ae42f3df1e
5d04956365f5c554b3507049f6eddfa71c1054ee
'2011-11-03T13:21:30-04:00'
describe
'115' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMK' 'sip-files00001.txt'
950a22fc7c34031bf1ad1f87da8f128d
fdc00db53821de598fd3e39d5dda9bf34a215cd6
'2011-11-03T13:21:28-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'16049' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFML' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
02a2b780a8405d2c4ce1bef1d79b82b8
263b9cbd0e72bfd399e5957f07411ef5044155c7
'2011-11-03T13:21:08-04:00'
describe
'790298' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMM' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
cf7778c52979ed64284e9a516682b6c7
1b2d4708b5d366826dfae76a768a6282dc018dad
'2011-11-03T13:20:52-04:00'
describe
'170213' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMN' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
96c2554523c6afcbc471063039d2e8ec
a1af5d11943b79c45332c9a9bc9f4f3a1b08bf65
'2011-11-03T13:20:59-04:00'
describe
'1369007' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMO' 'sip-files00002.pdf'
3e192ef3cc5d4726a43ad3622d5d6a62
607bc1fffbf91c5ec36dc773285c26e75cbaa24a
'2011-11-03T13:21:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMO-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20081110_AAAFMO-norm-0.pdf'
ebeb37a207cc9d5dbc4d5fb07204a325
9820e7aa9824cd4570afa0439ff54a21f1b07049
'2013-12-14T19:45:59-05:00'
describe
'2013-12-14T19:44:01-05:00'
normalize
'12966' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMP' 'sip-files00002.pro'
63ae49f6e3b7cf07f336ad623dce2734
2415d452aad8356addfa5f75a2a9b9b7213c9270
describe
'44837' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMQ' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
d149745fd1b471f449ec87a426c9f98b
ba90782184f6f07706393132183980134135ec76
'2011-11-03T13:21:32-04:00'
describe
'18983748' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMR' 'sip-files00002.tif'
2b953ebe7ea929acbecb4d213bd4149f
e7e28ba56ff6e8a468ec235d9a321797d5d72cac
'2011-11-03T13:20:51-04:00'
describe
'640' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMS' 'sip-files00002.txt'
097ba9e7637235241a3bde03c4ba22a9
216ca81f006406aa0c23e80fb12f4f0fc5a46ae0
'2011-11-03T13:21:01-04:00'
describe
'14058' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMT' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
3905d5d8c587cbe39cac361b6dcfce44
f1ea89de3d09062f4e5e60e9d561e22c54fe45d2
'2011-11-03T13:21:11-04:00'
describe
'751412' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMU' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
9f1841239e13c393cea4e1ac13aed656
28b3e8b52d4669d420910be4be614a1fc48d93d0
'2011-11-03T13:21:27-04:00'
describe
'187831' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMV' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
dafea6bb4dddb941678d4766177803b7
47f9bfea9ceb29ae5cf2017c1bf509c056276b7b
'2011-11-03T13:21:14-04:00'
describe
'1477088' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMW' 'sip-files00003.pdf'
5eb5fb7a62e865b12e9e0d4443193fba
b630ba0277756ee1b58f0a0a8ce0c5243e7fd309
describe
'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMW-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20081110_AAAFMW-norm-0.pdf'
ebeb37a207cc9d5dbc4d5fb07204a325
9820e7aa9824cd4570afa0439ff54a21f1b07049
'2013-12-14T19:45:47-05:00'
describe
'2013-12-14T19:43:19-05:00'
normalize
'11687' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMX' 'sip-files00003.pro'
0cf88196ae668be7b19fc9c9db659a0c
9b8a0b24692a8a78a4c5fc33e8e071e27e89f0f2
'2011-11-03T13:21:37-04:00'
describe
'48909' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMY' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
1dd05d71dab7feaff17d54e50d186ed5
ccc683bfff37941efd8edaff53522ade0d8a2723
'2011-11-03T13:21:22-04:00'
describe
'18048460' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFMZ' 'sip-files00003.tif'
36863b9856d8f150876d3b5f24758262
b6250485aa541928f245bd2137717e70aa8ab081
'2011-11-03T13:21:03-04:00'
describe
'498' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNA' 'sip-files00003.txt'
cc0515cbea764bf4f49571137457e5ab
6d3894e2a825960fb041f7226f1817b0f47d0a80
'2011-11-03T13:21:06-04:00'
describe
'14637' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNB' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
a8f7a847f6a17bb5ad7104e496548f1d
b8efa056388d1294862922be94f5eb1229d57019
'2011-11-03T13:21:38-04:00'
describe
'754708' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNC' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
d3c6a4bda738fdeb29e11195864fd946
4317d597dbfdf3279ba03f100d3ef150355a3a2b
describe
'154302' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFND' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
bf91cd76eed1f7f65eee57bac537cd19
ecb467551bb955e237c82031641044b7cec3ca87
'2011-11-03T13:21:36-04:00'
describe
'731014' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNE' 'sip-files00004.pdf'
76704be348269ac32929e5f9b9afc7fc
3a7bece931ca1679083294698976b5abcad8591f
describe
'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNE-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20081110_AAAFNE-norm-0.pdf'
ebeb37a207cc9d5dbc4d5fb07204a325
9820e7aa9824cd4570afa0439ff54a21f1b07049
'2013-12-14T19:45:14-05:00'
describe
'2013-12-14T19:44:32-05:00'
normalize
'59666' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNF' 'sip-files00004.pro'
b983549c3b3d80ce36fc49d7b068414d
2643416ce65dcba7119a5182e36d4afc5e7a409e
describe
'47716' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNG' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
c7dac287873274f8bd5b9a689de4bf84
8c90c952fb2adde7fb32721d54f137710887dc8d
describe
'6049900' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNH' 'sip-files00004.tif'
07877e69a996f151622deca24ce0bf28
512f84a5838130a7a851a62749071c056e87d5de
describe
'2337' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNI' 'sip-files00004.txt'
6b9d1d03f156b11dba52f53f17fb08ff
494e6577209da5f73eb781c839f17d3c391873d2
'2011-11-03T13:21:26-04:00'
describe
'11175' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNJ' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
fa99ded4dc8432b658695d9fca582696
d2ebf6e796cd8e98a41382d503f2eb6084a5db48
'2011-11-03T13:20:53-04:00'
describe
'785186' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNK' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
7d438495d41b9bfce7c6369061a3261e
3fcf86a02941783cf07ac2d1720b6616b250718c
describe
'146510' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNL' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
364a2b95b568daa52508d28397463249
7a9c74e7a41d020c393dcc5063826b4c8de8c7ba
'2011-11-03T13:20:55-04:00'
describe
'755688' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNM' 'sip-files00005.pdf'
9a4471a5e075851904b777794dd62a94
f0c465b63eda55007e70b680ebb7715895e85496
describe
'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNM-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20081110_AAAFNM-norm-0.pdf'
ebeb37a207cc9d5dbc4d5fb07204a325
9820e7aa9824cd4570afa0439ff54a21f1b07049
'2013-12-14T19:45:22-05:00'
describe
'2013-12-14T19:43:56-05:00'
normalize
'55050' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNN' 'sip-files00005.pro'
428dae8067e12c1f21b4e3e2115d93ca
e495311808bfbc82b9f91ab886794e65c1256f2e
'2011-11-03T13:21:24-04:00'
describe
'45087' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNO' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
1574441c432c91f274f8ec55a687f6a7
365a2399bdf09b9d5249fc8eb605b160b112e675
'2011-11-03T13:21:23-04:00'
describe
'6293540' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNP' 'sip-files00005.tif'
8be21ac60f3e9f3852362fc275dafd5f
ff460c402109f70b9bb348c80bbe23d4dd65fb3a
describe
'2184' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNQ' 'sip-files00005.txt'
c52399a225179c4b5346dee8c31051e9
4c39ceaafb15cfd731774b044d5756f03cfc2065
describe
'10545' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNR' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
dceeaf90675398dbc0a0af3be665e279
b8cabb512aaa977df287f156ef3cbc08cccc8ddf
'2011-11-03T13:21:33-04:00'
describe
'764037' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNS' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
c6f107b9d35d51dd488c60130dd141eb
85e73a14cb309d8c55df3272d4aa8f7734ac791e
describe
'174091' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNT' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
12351a6289b7fbe46c901e95d1088a21
b15eb53778673612b255facc130c20fddda65618
'2011-11-03T13:21:15-04:00'
describe
'1273899' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNU' 'sip-files00006.pdf'
23e6956f866b991caa5b15c6f1ccedc9
4c9a5d445435c9ab6cd41931f56992014efecd79
describe
'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNU-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20081110_AAAFNU-norm-0.pdf'
ebeb37a207cc9d5dbc4d5fb07204a325
9820e7aa9824cd4570afa0439ff54a21f1b07049
'2013-12-14T19:45:06-05:00'
describe
'2013-12-14T19:44:55-05:00'
normalize
'9733' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNV' 'sip-files00006.pro'
3f0276ab36ada9fee17381a913e70bb2
a0bec318007ec2fc27cddadc0412abb7d1de7e1d
'2011-11-03T13:21:07-04:00'
describe
'46169' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNW' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
f4e391d825cc28e22dd8cb92743831b0
ba362f45055cc7ee997e860715d617f1e7cabe74
describe
'18362236' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNX' 'sip-files00006.tif'
953959125bc1ba960adacad4b21b0f79
6e4a47395fb9f6a1ed0c13ab72359a30647ad985
'2011-11-03T13:21:18-04:00'
describe
'449' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNY' 'sip-files00006.txt'
2696a4d66fed726eafac33b7b101b368
cb6a36689efb611e90d3d739a7570984bc57c8f1
describe
'14401' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFNZ' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
083c40edc367bcfd4a633fe14302d72e
d1561ba64994a0548d77ec72238a06aabae8a178
describe
'806863' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOA' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
4083081fbad005e02a1aef172d21940d
38225ca2af2ee76800a9ecb4759174a1c6d611c9
describe
'159148' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOB' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
de062c2315957d80dcf83aa3449cae6d
a0f5d4b77ac4b0c3ca92ff556f4417f9f8363cf7
describe
'1317164' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOC' 'sip-files00007.pdf'
d82bb9cfbb8886cca37af62661dec7e7
69105c5926c91cd58584bcdde90303349a7842c4
'2011-11-03T13:21:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOC-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20081110_AAAFOC-norm-0.pdf'
ebeb37a207cc9d5dbc4d5fb07204a325
9820e7aa9824cd4570afa0439ff54a21f1b07049
'2013-12-14T19:45:26-05:00'
describe
'2013-12-14T19:43:49-05:00'
normalize
'10743' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOD' 'sip-files00007.pro'
c3bda0188a1a223c0535a0b1a957d79d
c69f5389cd9d4683e310ad23788641dc9ef1b9aa
describe
'41448' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOE' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
5de99af5d8871a24fc77f12fb30ad54f
6308b3c78ab7e32229033f78801f8add60fe74d3
describe
'19380612' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOF' 'sip-files00007.tif'
0934dcd056d519bc7cf6ce99facd3b82
47dee30df2cb84932318c6f1804957f5c42820d5
describe
'490' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOG' 'sip-files00007.txt'
2fd98f22eea57ac20d645fda00ea0060
2057041acb822d8941bf0e0aec3590f9d027caa1
describe
'13404' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOH' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
a03d65b7238683202e99b7d0f1317e2a
9c196f21054091192d2913ba4bfb932d99dc3c47
describe
'753084' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOI' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
bae3795f4377f0a399bc1df77b0cfe48
7661e2981e8c86d0984e2cfef1786f325df00344
describe
'145142' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOJ' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
c4a1b5694d749fa9b3ecc93aa8bd3fa6
6e4d85d04ece779cbf3b73f7244d43e4df329bc6
describe
'671517' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOK' 'sip-files00008.pdf'
a252da26577a89f46df09fc5ad3a43f3
6c0936fa6d7d592d1df0816cc25d5bb1208de938
'2011-11-03T13:21:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOK-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20081110_AAAFOK-norm-0.pdf'
ebeb37a207cc9d5dbc4d5fb07204a325
9820e7aa9824cd4570afa0439ff54a21f1b07049
'2013-12-14T19:45:43-05:00'
describe
'2013-12-14T19:45:02-05:00'
normalize
'55002' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOL' 'sip-files00008.pro'
c29e5afb765b53c56486e19172b04ed9
abb7d8fa9ccee1592824b307c94dce7ae71f6c1e
describe
'44960' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOM' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
932861b664966bd571c8511ffcc1d718
760cbc4f574d1556fb6f11189c42fc7376feec39
'2011-11-03T13:21:20-04:00'
describe
'6037212' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFON' 'sip-files00008.tif'
685c148cc662a89483a0f095b16ff350
07bc042fef3fd5d1da97328169384b48046644c1
describe
'2173' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOO' 'sip-files00008.txt'
481b1764e0a914c96d22e60c19b76666
dbcc8fc95e884bc193cdcb20b636df40a1f425d2
'2011-11-03T13:21:16-04:00'
describe
'10759' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOP' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
3bcff02833e6f06798db0048c7c03ee6
0b2a742aedbccd47b4e227c34bae9b689aac80f5
describe
'773245' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOQ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
45c39c9ab45df064c10916600769d5d6
79794bea065a89970daed3d534bb01280f9931d5
'2011-11-03T13:21:05-04:00'
describe
'154088' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOR' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
e3ff3e1750f01dc7a5687a5c75a4110a
c745f7cc71821ff44e70a42c711f2ab6b202b310
describe
'770938' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOS' 'sip-files00009.pdf'
2a65b7bd41a8d3f7a6a80261f10e3f55
1aa5bea6ff15bdeb6f735e9e17b23b2000be9e8e
describe
'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOS-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20081110_AAAFOS-norm-0.pdf'
ebeb37a207cc9d5dbc4d5fb07204a325
9820e7aa9824cd4570afa0439ff54a21f1b07049
'2013-12-14T19:45:51-05:00'
describe
'2013-12-14T19:44:42-05:00'
normalize
'56123' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOT' 'sip-files00009.pro'
ab4c3694e3485024061aab2bd6ff7287
8da31eea60d24300a9d4e47eb55d8e13f02c77ee
'2011-11-03T13:21:02-04:00'
describe
'47626' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOU' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
b6c2cfea4625253911b24a67c25e4220
dd40a182ed44bb0520444c26b3d37efdd5af0c15
'2011-11-03T13:21:25-04:00'
describe
'6210760' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOV' 'sip-files00009.tif'
0831e3b2a722ad01fb366cd82266145e
13aec99237436058a5db885a272eddcddc46c5cd
describe
'2201' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOW' 'sip-files00009.txt'
9cee17869c024e8b7cfeccb387edc760
1e447b95d9d89fef570b0917f5c6a094f17f1c1d
describe
'11508' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOX' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
fb72836b517833d1acfc79da8f57acc7
fde0b3a71f6ff0650993c31178a615b4aaaa15a1
describe
'808366' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOY' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
a8324f2f64351697165a270b7f87bbcc
bc86b3d320aa59852eb65f5571ee91be2e1e5559
describe
'156789' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFOZ' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
8a123d8442b69614b98d60244d311080
1ec8c96586b5a160d81a767841641b30910328c9
'2011-11-03T13:21:13-04:00'
describe
'1331918' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPA' 'sip-files00010.pdf'
60096b9c94939238cd2063c93eb88f2e
4a3e35243bf0dcae6cd8c4036888e6400ed8fa26
'2011-11-03T13:20:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPA-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20081110_AAAFPA-norm-0.pdf'
ebeb37a207cc9d5dbc4d5fb07204a325
9820e7aa9824cd4570afa0439ff54a21f1b07049
'2013-12-14T19:45:10-05:00'
describe
'2013-12-14T19:43:26-05:00'
normalize
'10863' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPB' 'sip-files00010.pro'
f43348d2da563c7379f8020ce81cf723
7193aed3536c151f74a67f2a6fe1c6ee0251c7f9
describe
'40941' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPC' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
5cfc1120db7acd9dd557e39d49fa03f7
9b95826b91b23ca5faae5a934149b047d8cb8335
describe
'19425336' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPD' 'sip-files00010.tif'
82883b9a1c82df38d6510cf26ed7d8fe
5bbeffb4867c7966c5f7d2bcccfb3ec0dcc7b892
'2011-11-03T13:20:49-04:00'
describe
'497' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPE' 'sip-files00010.txt'
5953c832745ca0ac59b93b830efc3874
99876b008d4bdfaed7e440305c1f5018550d34f2
describe
Invalid character
'12770' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPF' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
5ea3ef997cc533653706b2d919592bd0
aee2b23d9f3fd6b46fb092cf5b9300c2616a15b3
describe
'783776' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPG' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
4e8c44e3bb14124b6b32cb55d4fa6cdc
07e0b424173fdeffa34e36dd78a4914fb64206e5
'2011-11-03T13:21:35-04:00'
describe
'163173' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPH' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
6862a0f0ca296473f14bc2e4c2edeec2
95851dda3f0b33e83ffaeeefdaf521a1d2b8653b
describe
'1354311' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPI' 'sip-files00011.pdf'
c2aabf0e178bf42d24774016bc2aed9c
96d91691c8d52f712495ca9add107faae8714d0f
describe
'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPI-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20081110_AAAFPI-norm-0.pdf'
ebeb37a207cc9d5dbc4d5fb07204a325
9820e7aa9824cd4570afa0439ff54a21f1b07049
'2013-12-14T19:45:38-05:00'
describe
'2013-12-14T19:44:37-05:00'
normalize
'12568' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPJ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
69a7884c90bee2ac959a251aa6401582
2f3c1241af05fe1f1e91af7dfcd91e869a119879
describe
'43078' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPK' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
5739fb65aa3a4235a6a52e30d89533c2
278d3bcdebcd89720f3f70b0b93b0ae91e223196
describe
'18826480' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPL' 'sip-files00011.tif'
19afd127ecb85a7e01e89bd6fa05a03d
454e9c42bdf3de91066d34ddc1ff47670b966da9
'2011-11-03T13:21:34-04:00'
describe
'505' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPM' 'sip-files00011.txt'
d39a935491b90e541d1ca187d1965160
e40df87335c252be8cbaccac5716b035ee1dc38f
describe
Invalid character
'13546' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPN' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
3f88f167291a039abf53512f0c24bce4
9a96bbc4c6e26f7c5aeaf348d54dc4fc3a1a6be7
describe
'785623' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPO' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
c3877e4a8bc8bc9451d98fdd1014ba21
f6b4519c4df323332253d8dbb390f0382f5f51d1
describe
'142685' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPP' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
5842703cc44fea0669be3139001b06b0
5853fee95db7c19341964ac370023e5e31a28f6d
describe
'699424' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPQ' 'sip-files00012.pdf'
71ce1bdef1bdf831a61ecc65f69e405a
234bf258053a791afb3b2e6ec7248c970076ee15
describe
'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPQ-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20081110_AAAFPQ-norm-0.pdf'
ebeb37a207cc9d5dbc4d5fb07204a325
9820e7aa9824cd4570afa0439ff54a21f1b07049
'2013-12-14T19:46:06-05:00'
describe
'2013-12-14T19:44:22-05:00'
normalize
'54314' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPR' 'sip-files00012.pro'
69cf952224384654459acbde466dcf5e
bb107b6105d944ee4a810d559d43aed18214ebf3
describe
'43320' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPS' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
baff99bf6a65f4ea2099f93c2a3f66d9
5028ebfcc84220965a028477c4065ce6155c4e9a
describe
'6309528' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPT' 'sip-files00012.tif'
333a3d0ebaf71e18f27d776fe417e572
89ebe3d1b374bb10bc51899d2c89324afbde2a6a
describe
'2155' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPU' 'sip-files00012.txt'
15b2d60bec45386848a7bb0668b1bfb1
15ec890d8fbee888097941896d8a2fb7b4f18499
describe
'10501' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPV' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
281835abfb743fd118ce399da27b5fe6
af36236c292de89e91c5198ef7a2e3b6ba92628e
describe
'780369' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPW' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
7265fcfffdd4b62efa7294e9f0697a28
b1c92107a2d6f51206a4ecaabbab7d1141097e8a
describe
'146388' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPX' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
aafd65acb24d92da3c3f6d09fc5361fb
75c7d3564007017d94f5ae7e8b642367e72c1203
describe
'761803' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPY' 'sip-files00013.pdf'
bec1a507ed75d8902572f989b7575ff0
0f721b20ed1b9437e24bf4879aee03e3a0163b50
'2011-11-03T13:21:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPY-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20081110_AAAFPY-norm-0.pdf'
ebeb37a207cc9d5dbc4d5fb07204a325
9820e7aa9824cd4570afa0439ff54a21f1b07049
'2013-12-14T19:45:34-05:00'
describe
'2013-12-14T19:44:10-05:00'
normalize
'53690' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFPZ' 'sip-files00013.pro'
60888824816e5a957553f5a743d15867
fe8144c370e331cfd7c1817ab9da0009929a6b9e
describe
'45388' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQA' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
516459be0a8a09d4ac287a594db83855
ef8da1325672f5bbfba95448b2ca91885488bcae
describe
'6256860' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQB' 'sip-files00013.tif'
f5890f5755b9acffc3166b0134f03c34
e1f9eef48ef4c773f030306a521103060f773c0d
describe
'2120' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQC' 'sip-files00013.txt'
c8efa29928193e891d0538c0ceb620ab
9152155f8eead74262ce45472f1b4f1701409b6b
describe
'10753' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQD' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
ec17e615aec27176fce42796e52c53bf
105699b14c6603bbe897d554c2c616022ba1ee1e
describe
'792865' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQE' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
53c322e3b3512ffd6ca1ddcc1de746f1
0e8bc4e0f4fd67ed102993a539bf375c8a6c9a65
describe
'150917' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQF' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
54f0448f089b3eba19cd65accbdd423c
7b1908567a452110378be035348dc417561e59fb
'2011-11-03T13:21:00-04:00'
describe
'1169802' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQG' 'sip-files00014.pdf'
609c68df9f122ac7d38ce6a179fa035f
78d225146e8730db79df3b7fc7e6dd1f3b785b84
describe
'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQG-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20081110_AAAFQG-norm-0.pdf'
ebeb37a207cc9d5dbc4d5fb07204a325
9820e7aa9824cd4570afa0439ff54a21f1b07049
'2013-12-14T19:45:55-05:00'
describe
'2013-12-14T19:43:42-05:00'
normalize
'10764' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQH' 'sip-files00014.pro'
3f43be552942342091766cb745202aa8
918501f46cd0ee4fe3a0bbb6a0ffe3f65ff7bb21
describe
'41111' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQI' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
61473cbfff6a13007c919b21638e2201
ebf893329f5291b1840529fa6a234f55945b0a4b
describe
'19061952' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQJ' 'sip-files00014.tif'
f062bdbfbdab270be807a1568e05d07e
404e6398d96cb0dec0f4e6bfba20bf24c7080aac
'2011-11-03T13:20:58-04:00'
describe
'482' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQK' 'sip-files00014.txt'
fbf638345ce1d1a8b79d42dc0aa1902a
46803a8ee9c350c0edfe3647d8881094ee83be40
describe
'13408' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQL' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
a8e2f06d3b752c10a93bc0a40b8f4a1c
a1d9de5b30c07c802f661528f1c03c904521559c
describe
'715854' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQM' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
450368d3d8979b5799ac04b09f4d1a3d
3d547c20319239f70d0bd5e489ac25c87297777e
describe
'178670' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQN' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
c7b57e70b741556fbd84dc839cd9d960
b675c02c3aa9f79dd20e24d29cc18268668931fd
describe
'1420442' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQO' 'sip-files00015.pdf'
8b415ec0346a4f2fc968170b97d3be64
bff6d28a795b65c339af4c41e7fbde0372637f39
describe
'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQO-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20081110_AAAFQO-norm-0.pdf'
ebeb37a207cc9d5dbc4d5fb07204a325
9820e7aa9824cd4570afa0439ff54a21f1b07049
'2013-12-14T19:45:18-05:00'
describe
'2013-12-14T19:44:50-05:00'
normalize
'9457' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQP' 'sip-files00015.pro'
e054136ca5d99e45e30c1352208918e1
d78e30bf5ad9b080ad8bbe9bb74a9fad19506860
'2011-11-03T13:21:40-04:00'
describe
'45230' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQQ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
de8d6428e7893b574dd3125bf35744dc
1228c9e78a0985c5bcf3e54887158a43137ebd1a
describe
'17197708' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQR' 'sip-files00015.tif'
cec68db08f71363cdbbe78e020b4c848
f017d714a2b880f7782f59d671c71cd085dc53f6
describe
'460' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQS' 'sip-files00015.txt'
449741eefb47adbe57d0fe5ccf82157a
fd0128ddb06d5bcec9607dfa4e663632b8b011a4
describe
'13923' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQT' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
ad2a11e1afaac35265568b8af05c1dd9
669f3e7eb315586fa899debb16688a1c547bd906
describe
'822025' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQU' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
cba3b0246df8bf36a891a06d08951dee
88b2e6032b66dfd9605a0c709f85a876e667ba44
describe
'166135' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQV' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
1e00d8a328bff3c27656a25ab4cddcb7
4e67b3062267280841909c6b39ab781f4f0acb33
describe
'1054839' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQW' 'sip-files00016.pdf'
375c5e2b7b7fcb26bfe990f8f8c3c07d
7548b05b2450ee3bdecbcff835189d36642a9cba
describe
'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQW-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20081110_AAAFQW-norm-0.pdf'
ebeb37a207cc9d5dbc4d5fb07204a325
9820e7aa9824cd4570afa0439ff54a21f1b07049
'2013-12-14T19:46:03-05:00'
describe
'2013-12-14T19:43:38-05:00'
normalize
'61898' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQX' 'sip-files00016.pro'
97dc949bfebbb76b1371d83b1b0ff5d7
9f110810be473316adb2cf5e1a636af9d3d5e1e5
describe
'49762' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQY' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
4efe9b81882627f590aab1f71f3dd949
278167bf23db329175b1be9a00a930c9d20475ea
describe
'19747164' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFQZ' 'sip-files00016.tif'
2d81fe859fcf144682863790d6c7572f
460110737abd6d9df876114dd6263a2ca8304e92
describe
'2554' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFRA' 'sip-files00016.txt'
5faca0b9c7ac7fd1a8869b8a5e3d4f8f
298db4b77965a6594d800265117f3e3315f6ef14
describe
Invalid character
'14909' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFRB' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
357c35b55f62d4ae9bf82241bdc48f4d
3185041289f167ee0dfc95561a76b3c4793fc45b
describe
'30075' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFRC' 'sip-filesUF00026025_00001.mets'
4b8ab7cfac36facb18464f956fec2760
e95f9acef3366cf193c3a00815da329e94cac622
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T19:46:11-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'38743' 'info:fdaE20081107_AAABOCfileF20081110_AAAFRF' 'sip-filesUF00026025_00001.xml'
96e5a3894695cecb03055624e4b3f630
e71856d9020dee73de31671cf43ed6187f1b3514
describe
'2013-12-14T19:46:10-05:00'
xml resolution


xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0002602500001datestamp 2008-10-29setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title Red Riding HoodLittle Red Riding HoodAunt Kate's seriesdc:subject Fairy tales -- 1880Publishers' advertisements -- 1880dc:description Cover title.Caption title: Little Red Riding Hood.Includes publisher's advertisement.dc:publisher McLoughlin Brothersdc:date ca. 1880dc:type Bookdc:format 14 p.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00026025&v=00001001732516 (ALEPH)AAB8877 (LTQF)AJE5162 (LTUF)26032654 (OCLC)dc:source University of Floridadc:language English







Re
THE LITTLE GIRL RECEIVES A RIDING-HOOD MADE OF SCARLET CLOTH.

NCE upon a time, in a pretty

village, stood a neat little cot-
tage, covered. with roses and honey-
suckles, and shaded by large trees.

In this cottage lived a good wo-



man, who had a very pretty daughter
—a sweet, dear little girl, with bright
eyes and long hair, falling in golden
curls all over her neck and shoul-

ders. Her cheeks were as rosy as



The Baldwin Library

University
RnB
Florida



two ripe peaches, and her laugh was
the merriest you would hear on a
Summer’s day; and what was better
than all this was, that that little girl

was a kind, good child, with a gentle

LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD SENT WITH A PRESENT TO HER GRANDMOTHER.





heart and obliging manners. She
had a pleasant smile and cheerful
word for all, and would do anything
to give pleasure to others.

So it is no wonder she became the
4 Little Red Riding-Food.

greatest favorite with all the villagers.
Every one who knew her liked her;
and when she called to see any poor
or sick neighbor, her presence was
like a ray of sunshine to them, so
pleased were they to see her.

Now, although she was greatly liked
by all the villagers, far and near, none
loved her so dearly as her mother and
grandmother. This little girl’s grand-
mother, to show how much she ap-
preciated her goodness, made her a
beautiful riding-hood of scarlet cloth,
such as ladies wore in those days
when they went out riding.

The little girl looked quite charm-
ing in this riding-hood, and she found
it so handy and convenient, she sel-
dom went abroad without it; hail,
rain, or shine, she would wear it—in
fact, it was her favorite article of
dress. She wore it so frequently,
and looked so nice in it, that when
she was seen coming along the vil-
lage, the neighbors would say :—
“Here comes Little Red Riding-
Hood,” till at last she was known
by that name, and no other ; indeed,
I have never been able to learn her
other name.

Now, the good old grandmother

had been very sick for a long time,



and, although not so bad as she had
been, she was not yet sufficiently
So the
mother, who had been making some
cheese-cakes, |

well to leave her cottage.

and churning some
butter that morning, said to her
daughter: “You may go, my child,
to your grandmother’s, and take her
some of these nice cakes, and a pot
of fresh butter, for her breakfast.”

Little Red Riding-Hood was highly
delighted at the thought of a run to
her grandmother's such a fine morn-
ing, so she went and brought a little
basket for the cakes and butter; and
you may be sure she did not forget
to put on the little scarlet “hood
which became her so well. She was
very soon ready, and the cakes and
butter were put into the basket and
covered with a clean cloth.

Now, it was not very far from Lit-
tle Red Riding-Hood’s home to the
cottage in which her grandmother ,
lived, so her mother thought little of
sending her alone. Still, on parting
with her, she told her not to stop too
long on the way. She also charged
her with many kind messages for
the good old grandmother.

Little Red Riding-Hood promised
not to forget, and giving her two
Little Red Riding-Hood. 5

kisses, and saying “Good-bye,” trip-
ped off as gay and light-hearted
as any of the little birds that
were singing on the boughs of the
trees. i

Now, there were some woodmen
at work in the forest, cutting down
trees for firewood, and singing as
they dealt their strokes with willing
hands and heavy axes. There was
also something there that threatened
danger to the little girl, namely: a
great hungry wolf.

This cruel animal had paid a visit
to a sheep-fold, thinking he could
steal a lamb for dinner, but was
disappointed, for the watch-dog liad
caught him and beaten him soundly.

The wolf knew Little Red Riding-
Hood very well, and had often watched
and plotted to carry her off, that he
might devour her. He was desper-
ately hungry this morning, and out
of temper, for he felt very sore from
his recent beating; but the sight
of the little girl made him grin with
delight.

Now, the wolf would like to have
made one spring at Red Riding-Hood,
and have eaten her up at once; but
he was too cunning for that, for the

woodmen were near, and he was



afraid they would see him, which |
would never do. So he resolved to
make her acquaintance, and pretend
to be her friend.

One of the woodmen saw both the
wolf and Little Red Riding-Hood,
and, suspecting Master Grizzly was
bent upon some mischief, kept a
watch on him without seeming to
do so.

Master Wolf walked daintily up to
Little Red Riding-Hood, wagging his
tail, and tried his best to appear as
amiable as possible, and succeeded
very well; only his green eyes had
look,
in a hungry, uncomfortable manner.
When he smiled he showed a double
But she
felt not the slightest fear of him.
The wolf made a graceful bow, and
said: ‘“Good-morning, Little Red
Riding-Hood.”

“(Good-morning, Master Wolf,” re-
plied Little Red Riding-Hood.

“ And, pray, where are you going

a treacherous and glared

row of sharp white teeth.

so early, my darling?” continued
the wolf.

“T am going to my grandmoth-
er’s,” answered the child.

“Your grandmother? how is the
dear old lady ?” asked the wolf, pre-
,
y

MASTER WOLF MEETS LITTLE RED RIDING- HOOD.

tending to take the greatest interest
in her welfare.

“She has been very sick, and
is not yet well,” said Little Red

Riding-Hood. “I am taking her



some cakes, and a pot of nice fresh
butter.”

“Dear me! I am sorry to hear my
respected friend, your grandmother,

is out of health. I will call upon
her; she will be glad to see me,
I have no doubt. Allow me_ to
carry your basket, my dear; I fear
you are tired.” At the same time

giving a sly, hungry sniff, and

LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD LOITERS ON THE WAY TO GATHER FLOWERS.



almost thrusting his nose into the
basket.

Little Red Riding-Hood thought
| this was rather rude of him, after

| his polite offer, but only said: “O!
8 Little Red Riding-Hood.

no, I thank you; I am not a bit |

tired.”
“Well,” said the wolf, “give my

will call and see her.
I take this path to the right, and you
follow that one, and we'll see which
of us gets there first.”

Now, this cunning old wolf knew
very well he would get to the old
He had chosen
the shortest way, you may be sure;

dame’s cottage first.

and not only that, but as soon as
the child was out of sight, he set off
galloping as hard as he could go.

Little Red Riding-Hood had no
cause to hurry, it being yet early;
she loitered along the pleasant forest
path, to gather the pretty wild-flow-
ers that grew by the wayside, to
make a nosegay. ‘“Grand-mamma
likes flowers,” she said to herself,
“and she will be pleased if I bring
her a handsome nosegay; and a few
wood-strawberries to eat with her
cakes will, perhaps, please her, too.”

The pace at which the wolf ran
soon brought him to the grandmoth-
er’s cottage.

Then he knocked at the door,
giving two little taps, as Little Red
Riding-Hood might have done.

Now, suppose |



“Who's there?” cried the old dame.
“Tis I,” said the wolf, imitating

| Little Red Riding-Hood’s voice.
love to your grandmother, and say I |

The grandmother, as she lay in

bed, almost asleep, thought her grand-
child must have a bad cold to speak
in such a gruff way. Never suspect-
ing for a moment any one else was
there, she said: “Pull the bobbin
and the latch will fly up, and come
in,”
So the wolf took the bobbin in his
teeth, and gave it a jerk; then, putting
his shoulder to the door, pushed it
open and went in—very much to the
old dame’s astonishment and alarm,
for she knew him to be a cruel, dis-
honest fellow ; and as she was certain
he had some evil design in coming
there, she was on her guard against
him.

“Good-morning, Madam,” said the
wolf, trying to be agreeable, but
looking as if he meant to eat her
up.

‘‘Good-morning to you, sir,” replied
the dame, as she moved to the other
side of the bed.

“Your grandchild told me this
morning you had been unwell, so I
thought I would call to see how you

were.”
Little Red Riding-Hood. 9

The granddame saw the wolf looked
fierce and hungry, so she instantly
got off the bed, away from the wolf,
and moved toward the door of a
closet, or small room, saying: “Pray,
excuse me a minute, Sir; I am not
dressed to receive company.”

“Don’t mind me, I beg,” said the
wolf, with a horrid grin, looking
savagely hungry, and made a spring
across the bed, and seized the wrap-
per she had on with his teeth. But
fright made the old dame active,
and, as quick as thought, she slipped
off her loose wrapper which the
wolf had hold of, and darted into
the closet, and bolted the door,
before he could recover himself;
then fell down in a fainting-fit
through fright.

The wolf grinned horribly with
rage and disappointment, saying to
himself: ‘Well, never mind, she is
safe enough; Little Red Riding-Hood
will soon be here; J’ll have her for
breakfast, and finish the old woman
for dinner.”

With these savage thoughts, the
wolf put on the dame’s wrapper and
night-cap, and got into bed, pulling
the clothes well up to hide his hairy

face. Presently he heard Little Red





Riding-Hood coming to the door;
then came tap! tap! tap!

“Who's there?” cried the wolf,
this time trying to imitate the grand-
mother's voice.

Little Red Riding-Hood thought,
“what a bad cold grandmother has
got to make her speak so hoarse ;”
but suspecting nothing wrong, she
replied, “Your grandchild, with some
nice cakes, and a pot of fresh but-
ter.”

“Pull the bobbin, my dear,” said
the wolf, “and the latch will fly

”

up.
Little Red Riding-Hood did as
she was told, and walked into the
room, all fresh and rosy with her
walk, her basket on one arm, and
She
was greatly surprised when she saw

the wild flowers on the other.

how strange the old lady looked as
she lay tucked up in bed.
“Whatever can have made grand-
mother’s eyes so green?” thought
she, as she employed herself in ar-
ranging the flowers she had brought
with her on the mantel-piece; and,
as she was a tasty little thing, she
soon made the place look quite fresh
When she had finished,
she turned her bright face to granny

and neat.
THE WOLF PULLS THE BOBBIN, AND PUSHES OPEN THE DOOR.

with a look of triumph, and bade
her see how pretty she had made
her room.

Now, the pretended grandmother

appeareil to be very ill indeed, and

said in a feeble voice, “Oh! my dear
grandchild, will you not come into
bed with your poor old granny; Iam
oD J}
too ill to get up and talk to you?”
5 d

Little Red Riding-Hood obeyed




THE WOLF PRETENDS TO BE RED RIDING-HOOD'S GRANDMOTHER.

without hesitation, and so tired was | himself at the success of his plans.
She with her long walk, that in a | He could not help admiring the
moment she had fallen asleep. | beautiful little girl as she lay there

Now, the wolf was so sure of his | sleeping, and thought what a nice

prey, that he felt quite pleased with | breakfast he would have presently.
12 Little Red Riudting-Hood.

But, like many wicked people,
he deceived himself, as we shall
presently see.

You remember the wood-cutters,

who saw the wolf with Little Red
Riding-Hood when they met in the
Well, they suspected — the
wolf had some evil design that made
So they thought
it prudent to see that Little Red

Riding-Hood came to no harm, and

forest.

him so very civil.

hastened to the cottage to see that
all was right. But what was their
surprise, on looking through the win-
dow, to see Little Red Riding-Hood
in bed, and the wolf standing over
her. There she lay, with her rosy
cheeks and pretty mouth, and close
to her the great hairy face of the
wolf, with green eyes and long
teeth. While they were looking at
them with astonishment, Little Red
Riding-Hood awoke, and began to
tell her grandmother (as she sup-
posed) all that had occurred since
she left home, and how she had
met the wolf.

“And, oh! grandmamma, he was
so polite, and offered to carry my
basket for me.”

“Did he, indeed, my dear,” said
the wolf, and laughed.



“Yes; and he asked me where I
was going. I told him you were
sick, and I was coming to see you,
and bring you the cakes and butter.
He was sorry to hear you were sick,
and he said he would call and see
you . and I rather expected to find
him here. Do you think I shall see
him before I leave, grandma ?”

“T should not wonder if you did,”
replied the wolf, and gave her a
loving hug.

“Grandmamma,” cried the child,
in the greatest surprise, “ what great
strong arms you have got.”

“The better to embrace you with,
my dear child,” said the wolf.

“But, grandma, what long, stiff
ears you have got.”

“The better to hear what you say,
my darling,” said the wolf, and his
eyes glared greener than ever.

“What large green eyes you have
got, grandma,” said Little Red Riding-
Hood, so frightened she knew not
what to say.

“The better to see you with, my
child,” chuckled the wolf, showing
his ugly teeth.

Little Red Riding-Hood now sat
up in bed, in the greatest terror.

“Grandmamma! what a large
Little Red Riding-Hood. 13

mouth, and ho! what big teeth you
have got.”

“Ah! ah! ah! The better to tear
you to pieces, and eat you with,”
said the wolf—throwing off his dis-
guise, giving a hungry growl, and
opening his mouth to bite her throat



when whack! came a spear on his
head, then two or three stabs, which

knocked him off the bed, howling .

. frightfully.

The woodmen, who had seen and
heard what the wolf was at, rushed
in just in time to save the life of
dear Little Red Riding-Hood. The
wolf howled for mercy, but they
soon killed him.

They asked Little Red Riding-
Hood where her grandmother was,
but she could not tell, because she
supposed the wolf was her grand-
mother. She was like one in a
dream.

They feared at first that the wolf
must have carried her off, or else
eaten her up. But one of the wood-
men, hearing the dame in the closet,
burst open the door, and to their
great relief they found her safe.

Little Red Riding-Hood fell upon
her neck, kissing her and weeping
for joy.



One of the woodmen said to
Little Red Riding-Hood, in a kind,
friendly manner: ‘“ Don’t you think
it would have been better if you
had come straight to your grand-
mother, without stopping to gos-
sip with the wolf? You

then have escaped this danger.

would

Let
this be a warning to you through
life.”

Little Red Riding-Hood was too
much flurried to reply, but she kissed
the woodman, and tears flowed down
When she had
become composed, she promised to

her cheeks freely.

do better in future.

The grandmother soon recovered
from her terrible fright, and produced
what good things she had to regale
the woodmen with, of which they eat
heartily, making a breakfast and
dinner in one. Little Red Riding-
Hood and her grandmother ate but
little, but they did their utmost to
The
woodmen highly complimented the

make their deliverers welcome.

grandmother at her outwitting the
cunning old wolf.

After the woodmen had feasted
well, they escorted Little Red Riding-
Hood home, and took the grand-

mother along with them.
WHAT BIG TEETH YOU HAVE GOT, GRANDMOTHER!



When they got home, and told the | Riding-Hood by her friends, which

end of the wicked wolf, all the vil-
lagers rejoiced to hear their enemy
had been destroyed. A great deal of

good advice was given to Little Red

is to be hoped was a benefit to her.
In the village that evening all the
neighbors assembled, and they had

much rejoicing.


THE WOODMEN KILL THE WICKED WOLF.

But I must leave you to imagine MORAL.
all that, and conclude with the | If in this world secure you'd be,
advice the woodmen gave to Little From danger, strife, and care,

Red Riding-Hood, and which I give | ‘Take heed with whom you keep company,

and when-—and where.



my readers by way of moral— And how


New Picture Books’ for Little Children.





Bic PICTURE SERIES.

42 KINDS.—25 CENTS EACH. Quarto Demi. Six full-page Illustrations, Elegantly
Printed in Colors.

Ten Little Niggers, Baby. \ Alphabet of Country Scenes.
Hey Diddle Diddle. Putnam. Visit to the Menagerie.
Children in the Wood. Pocahontas. House that Jack Built.
Jack and the Bean Stalk. Puss in Boots. Wild Animals.—Part One.
Four-Footed Friends. Cock Robin. Mother Hubbard’s Dog.

Three Little Kittens.
Three Good Friends.
Hare and Tortoise.
Rip Van Winkle.

Three Bears.
Tom Thumb

Visit of St. Nicholas.

Santa Claus and His Works.
White Cat. Humpty Dumpty.—Vol. 1.
Yankee Doodle : Humpty Dumpty.—Vol. 2.

Domestic Animals. Fat Boy. Home Games for Livtle Boys.
Robinson Crusoe. Nursery Rhymes. | Home Games for Little Girls.
World-Wide Fables. : Cinderella. The Little Mulligan Guards.

|
Tit, Tiny, and Tittens. | My Mother. Wild Animals.—Part Two.
|
|
|
|
|
I
|

Little Red Riding Hood. Henny Penny. The Frog he would a-wooing go.

TITTLE FroLlKS’ SARs.

Imperial 16mo. Ten Cents Each. Six full-page Pictures in the best style of Color Printing, with
the determination of having them better than any yet published.

The Five Little Pigs. | Old Woman who lived in a Shoe Dame Trot and her Cat.











Old Mother Goose. | Story of Three Little Pigs. | The Babes in the Wood.
The Three Bears. _ Jack and the Bean-Stalk. Diamonds and Toads.
| Little Bo-Peep. | Singa Song of Sixpence, My First Alphabet.





| UNCLE | NED’S PICTURE BOOKS.
| Large Svo. Fifteen Cents Each.

Frisky, the Squirrel | Playtime Stories. | Ditties for Children,
|| Hector, the Dog. | Home Pictures. | Nursery Play Book.

eT : The Robin’s Christmas Eve. | Little Anna and her Mamma.

GILT COVER PICTURE BOOKS.

LARGE svo. FIFPTHEN CHNTS HACE,

Rambling Rhymes. Proverbs aor the ey The Robin. _lily's Picture Book.











NEW PAPER at a.

The most Amusement for a small outlay of Money that can be found for Little Girls.

SIX CENTS EACH, TEN CENTS EACH. | FIFTEEN CENTS EACH.
Polly Prim. Bessie Bliss. Dottie Dimple. Bride,
| Gerty Good. Lottie Love. | Susie Simple. Bridesmaid, and

tacit June. Myra Mild. | Bertie Bright. | Groomsman.





McLoughlin Bros., Publishers, 1 New York.



un
|
ES