Citation
The Pumpkin house

Material Information

Title:
The Pumpkin house
Added title page title:
Adventures of little Flora and Jack
Creator:
John
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1880
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[10] leaves : ill. ; 27 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Juvenile literature -- 1880 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1880 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Title from cover.
General Note:
Caption title: The pumpkin house, or, The adventures of little Flora and Jack.
General Note:
Includes publisher's advertisement.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AAB8873 ( LTQF )
AJV3632 ( NOTIS )
29394010 ( OCLC )
027445478 ( AlephBibNum )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
rally, ee
rea
i i





THE:

PUMPKIN HOUSE,

OR THE ADVENTURES OF

LITTLE FLORA AND JACK.



BY UNCLE JOHN.
One EEL

CHAPTER I.

HEN old Time was a few hundred years younger than

he is now, in a far away country, there lived in a

fine old mansion, a very wealthy family. They had an only

daughter, named Flora. She was very pretty, and had long

golden hair; she wore beautiful and costly dresses, and when

she was dressed, she sat with her hands in her lap, admiring

herself in a large mirror. To be brief, and at the same time

truthful, Flora was idle and vain, and that pitiful creature
called a spoiled child.

Whose fault was this? Partly, but not wholly Flora’s. Her
parents indulged her every whim, the servants fawned upon
her, and she had not a single friend who ever told her of a
better way‘of living.

Not far distant, in a little cottage, lived a poor and honest
couple; they also had an only child, a boy called Jack. He
had no fine clothes to make him vain, no servants to teach
him idleness. On the other hand he was a bright and willing
servant himself, constantly aiding his father ‘and mother in
their daily struggle with want.

Sometimes Jack would be hired by the rich man’s gardener
When Flora saw
him, she used to parade up and down displaying her fine
Jack used to
take a sly peep at her, and the simple, good-natured boy

thought she was the most beautiful creature in the world.

to do a day’s work, in weeding the garden.

clothes, with her head very high in the air.

After a while, Flora was so pleased with his modest and
silent admiration, that she would stand near him, watching
him at his work. One day she put some questions to Jack,
which he readily answered. He was very happy, you may be
sure, to be addressed by the object of his admiration. Poor
fellow! He little knew the capricious nature of vain little
girls. The day following as she walked in the garden, wearing
for the first time an elegant dress, she never so much as looked
at him.

But Jack had other things to do and think of, and he did
not brood over his disappointment. He had his good mother’s
smile to reward and cheer him, and wisely thought that
Flora’s treating him like the ground under her feet, did not
at all lower him in the estimation of those he most dearly
loved and respected.

Then again, much to Jack’s surprise, Flora would be very
pleasant and treat him very kindly, and also accepted from
him a very tasteful rustic basket, to hold growing plants and
flowers. It had cost Jack all his spare moments for a month
to construct it.

They were on these varying terms of intercourse, when one
day, Flora being alone and not knowing what to do with
herself, strolled by the shore of a very large and beautiful
lake, near her father’s dwelling. In it lay a pretty little boat,
painted white and blue. She had been forbidden ever to get

into it without her father was with her. Fear had hitherto

The Baldwin Library

University

RmB Fistita







LAE POMPE RIN (AO ES a

induced her to obey; but this day the water looked so calm
and smiling, and the boat rocked so gently, that she stepped
into it and sat down. Looking over the edge of the boat she
saw a pretty face looking up at her, framed in golden ringlets.

“As good as mamma’s mirror!” murmured Flora, as she
smiled her approbation of the pretty face, looking at her out
of the water. Perhaps she really thought it was a mirror.
So intent was she in admiring herself that she forgot all
about the boat, and the lake, and her father’s injunction.

Suddenly she heard a cry of alarm. Looking around she
saw that the boat was drifting away, and that Jack was run-
ning with all his might to reach the shore of the lake.

“Ol! Jack! Jack,” she cried in alarm, “what will become
of me. O papa! O mamma! I shall never see you again.”

Jack, on reaching the water side, sprang into the lake and
swam lustily for the drifting boat.
arisen, and was blowing the boat rapidly from the shore. It
was no easy task to overtake it, and Flora watched with
anxious, trembling heart, the gallant efforts of Jack. Well
was it those brown arms had been used to labor; that Jack’s
chest had been broadened and deepened by constant exertion
in the open air. It was a fearful race. The stake, perhaps
two lives. For Jack’s life was also imperilled. He was fast
becoming exhausted, and Flora watched him with pale cheek
and quivering lip. She could not speak—could scarcely
breathe. Was the brave lad gaining or losing, in this watery
race ?

Just then there came a little lull, and Jack made a last
desperate effort to reach the boat. Flora felt rather than
saw, his extended hand strike the stern of the boat. Her
gallant rescuer was safe! But he was obliged to hold on for
a few moments, before he had strength to climb in. Then he
clambered in dripping like a great water-dog.

There were no oars in the boat. Jack tried to paddle it
back with his hands, but the boat drifted on—drifted on,
away from shore—away from home—away from father and
mother, and anxious, loving hearts.

Flora burst into tears when she understood at last their
She did not think it was her disobedience that had

caused their trouble; alas! true to her bringing up, she

danger.

A wind had suddenly —

to lie down on it.

thought only of herself. Jack, on the other hand, dismissed
his own cares, to think of some way of softening the discom-
fort to Flora. He cheered her with words of courage and
hope.

After wringing out his coat and drying it, he laid it down
on the bottom of the boat, and begged the still weeping Flora
He then covered her carefully from the
night air and dew, and soon after she sobbed herself to sleep.

The sun sank down and the stars came out, and the brave,
steadfast Jack watched all through the long and weary night.
And still the boat floated on, and when daylight came, the
shore by which stood the rich and the lowly homes of these
children, had disappeared. ‘Land in the opposite direction
was, however, in sight, and in a few hours more they drij/ted
into a rocky inlet.

Before leaving the boat Jack carefully searched it, and
found in a little box in the bow, a large ball of twine, some
sail needles, a chisel, and a small hatchet. In assisting Flora
to land, Jack had to help her out of the boat, she insisting that
In doing this,

she could never jump on the slippery rocks.
she gave a backward impulse to the boat that sent it gliding
out into the lake. There a current caught it, and carried it
rapidly past a jutting rock out of their sight.

At this new misfortune Flora sank down and declared she
could go no further. Jack, with untiring patience consoled
and cheered her. This loss of the boat was clearly her fault.
She did not think of that, and if Jack did, he never reproached
her for it.

At length, Flora stopped crying and really began to think,
for the first time in her life—why should Jack be so kind,
courageous, and unselfish, and she only a burden to him?
Suppose he had not swam after her, but had staid home with
his parents who loved him. And even now how useless she
was; she determined that if she could do nothing else, she .
would at least stop whining and crying.

To Jack’s surprise and delight she dashed away her tears,
sprang to her feet, and placing her little white hand in Jack’s
brown and honest one, said :

“Jack, you are a dear, good fellow; and I am a foolish,

useless girl. Teach me what I can do to be useful.”



Por i) Pt APO PN LOO SE.

Full of courage they clambered up the rock. Jack was
surprised at the enormous size of the trees; the grass
in a neighboring meadow was as high as a house; the birds
were like eagles, and a red squirrel running up one of the
great trees, was as tall as Flora. They were evidently in the
land of giants. Flora was on the point of giving up in
despair, when she thought of her lately formed resolution, and
went bravely on.

The ascent of the rocks had tired her, and Jack proposed
looking over their property while they rested; he pro-
duced the ball of twine, the sail needles, the chisel, and
hatchet he had taken from the boat, and took from his pocket
that boy’s constant companion a jack-knife, some matches
which needed a little drying, a fish-line, and some marbles.
Flora found in her pocket a pair of scissors, a needle-book, a
spool of thread, and a thimble. After taking an inventory
of their effects they went house-hunting.

It was a tiresome tramp. Finally their perseverance was
rewarded. In a gigantic cornfield they found a monstrous
pumpkin.

“Tt will make a two-story house, basement and attic,”
laughingly said Jack.

With his hatchet he made a front door and two windows,
giving the finishing touches with the faithful jack-knife. Then
he scooped out the seeds, made a chimney up through the
pumpkin stem, and fashioned a fire-place.

“Can you cook breakfast?” asked Jack. Flora blushed,
and confessed she had never been taught to do anything
useful.

“Teach me, dear Jack,” she added.

“That I will,” cried the delighted boy. He made a fire in
the fire-place, and in the hot ashes roasted two pumpkin seeds.
He placed his hat on the floor for a table, covering it with
Flora’s cambric handkerchief for a table-cloth. He then
went out, and soon returned with two acorns as large as
goblets, filled with pure cold water from a spring. The flat
part of the acorns served as plates, on which Jack finally
dished the roasted pumpkin seeds, and invited Flora to par-
take of this novel repast.

There is no sauce like hunger. Flora was naturally very



dainty, but she declared the meal was delicious—the pumpkin
seeds tasting like sweet potatoes. After breakfast, Flora took
her first lesson in washing dishes.

As the walls and floors of Pumpkin House were still very
moist, and trying to Flora’s nice clothes, Jack strewed the
floor with dry leaves at night, and gave her his coat for a
coverlet to her leafy couch. ;

CHAPTER ILI.
Pumpxin House had done well enough for a first night’s
He labored
constantly to improve it, for there was not an idle fibre in his
whole body.
a stone fire-place, added a porch and door-steps, and after-

shelter, but Jack was far from satisfied with it.
He made a door and window-shutters, put in

wards constructed a table and two chairs.

While Jack attended to all this, Flora was cook, and it
must be confessed a rather poor one; her unvarying meal
was roasted pumpkin seeds. Her experience did not extend
beyond them. Jack, more for her sake than his, climbed up a
corn-stalk one day, and with his hatchet cut off an ear of corn;
it lasted a week; and then pumpkin seeds came on again
after that, as something new.

Flora
missed carpets, and Jack said he must see their landlord about
it, as they had taken the house furnished. Jack had been
taught to weave rushes into baskets, mats, &c., and having

The floors of Pumpkin House were now quite dry.

found some growing near, he soon completed, first a carpet for
Flora’s boudoir, and finally every room was covered in like
manner.

The walls then proved an eyesore to the luxury-loving Flora;
they looked blank and dingy. Jack set his wits at work,
and while he was thinking, something came between him and
the sun ; looking up, he saw an immense butterfly.

“Flora, P’'ve got your wall covering!” he exclaimed ; or
rather, “I will have it.”

While this new kind of decoration was floating in the air,
Jack fashioned a bow and arrows, and having a keen eye, and
steady aim, he soon shot a large number of butterflies. He







THEA POMS KEIO OOS.

did not plaster these wings on at random, beautiful as they
were, but formed ‘them into figures, matching the colors, and
contrasting them, until the walls of Pumpkin House would
have done no discredit to a fresco painter.

Flora was delighted with this improvement, and requested
Jack to make window curtains and bed spreads also, out of
butterflies’ wings, which he gladly did; and Flora in turn
surprised him by adding a new dish to their usual fare of
pumpkin seeds and corn; this was roasted butterfly.

The house was now furnished in such a resplendent man-
The lake trip, the
clambering over the rocks, the “house-hunting” through

ner that Flora began to notice her dress.

briars and brambles, had reduced it to a sorry plight.

Jack with his bow and arrows, shot butterflies enough to
Then with the skin of a bat
he captured for her, she made for herself a rich sacque, and

make Flora a dazzling dress.

trimmed her hat with the plumage of a humming-bird.

CHAPTER III.

Fora was now quite happy—not altogether owing to her
fine dress, but that she had finally overcome her idle habits.
She loved now to make herself useful, and time passed
rapidly and pleasantly when she had employment for every
hour. Her fondness for her fine dress was a very innocent
thing compared to her old vanity; she loved it now for the
sake of the kindness that Jack had shown in procuring it
for her.

Jack’s clothes, too, were nearly worn out. Flora certainly
-had commenced with something, for she was nicely dressed
But Jack had only

his work-day clothes, and what a trial they had undergone!

when she stepped into that fatal boat.

Butterfly wings, bat skins, and humming-bird’s plumage were
of no use to him.

Now there was a remarkably well dressed gentleman Jack
had seen in a suit of green and gold that would fit him to a
nicety, and he determined, on the next occasion, he would use
his bow and arrows. It had been a pleasant fiction with

them when the house wanted fixing, that Jack would “see

the landlord.”
he was going to “see his tailor.”
Still on Sunday the hours passed slowly with Flora. At

He now mysteriously intimated to Flora that

home she had been used to going to church with her mamma,
dressed in her finest clothes, but there was no church
here.

One Sunday, however, Flora was surprised to hear somc-
thing unusual, and going to her front door, saw a huge frog
that had crawled out of a spring in front of the house and
was croaking slowly and solemnly; she sat down on the door-
step facing him and listened.

“Croak! Croak! Croak!”

Flora could not understand a word of frog talk, but the
gentleman looked so wise and spoke so solemnly, that Flora
Still
she fancied it was of some benefit to her, and if there had

was certain she was missing much useful information.

only been some other well dressed persons present, so
there could have been a mutual interchange of observation
and criticism, it would have been a very fair imitation of
“Sundays at Home.”

So Flora listened and Froggy croaked.

And so it came to pass, as Flora listened, and as Froggy
croaked, Jack, concealed in a neighboring bush, let fly an
arrow that pierced the preacher’s neck. He turned ‘over on
his side, gave two or three convulsive kicks, and croaked his
last croak.

“O Jack! what have you done?”

An explanation soon followed and Flora appeared pacified,
but there are yet grave doubts whether she ever fully forgave
Jack for killing her preacher.

Jack, although sorry for Flora’s loss, was delighted with
his success, and stripped Froggy of his green and gold suit,
and got into it himself. He had an elegant form, and his
handsome suit became him well; and he said to himself:
“Now I will not be ashamed to appear in Flora’s presence
when she is dressed in her finest.”

It was the first time that poor Jack had felt anything like
pride in his personal appearance.



WP OP OAR IL IN OFT GU SE.

CHAPTER IY.

One day, while Jack was absent trying to shoot something
more to Flora’s taste, than had been his last effort in that line,
and when Flora was busily intent on home duties, a huge
“stump-tailed” cow, belonging to the giant who raised the
mammoth corn and pumpkins, broke into the cornfield, and
catching a glimpse of Pumpkin House, ended by catching it
in her enormous jaws.

Flora, seeing nothing, could not imagine what was the matter,
until she was pitched out of the window, into the humane
bosom of a cabbage growing near by. From that sheltered
place, she witnessed the total destruction of their once happy
home with all its furniture, decorations, and table crockery.
Yes! this voracious, milky mother “left not a trace behind”;
for when the giant appeared and drove her out of the field,
she carried away everything in her capacious stomach, not
excepting even the chimney—to wit, the pumpkin stem.

When Jack returned, he looked in vain for Pumpkin House,
but hearing Flora sobbing somewhere, at last climbed up into
the cabbage, where he found her half concealed. She soon
explained the awful catastrophe brought about by the cow.
Jack consoled her for the loss of their home, and told her
it would be useless to build another such habitation, for the
next time she might possibly play Jonah in the cow's
stomach. For what a cow does once, she can do again.

“We must go further West, Flora!” added Jack, and as
they had no Saratoga trunks and nothing to put in them, they
were soon on their journey toward the setting sun. Before
getting there, however, they reached a broad and deep river,
which they could not cross.

It was a beautiful place, and Flora proposed looking for a
house in the neighborhood. As they wandered about a little
distance from each other, Jack heard Flora calling him to
come and tell her what this was. “This” turned out to be an
immense shoo that some tired and footsore giant had left on
the river’s bank before wading across.

Jack’s trusty hatchet was soon in his active hand, and a
After cut-
ting a hole, there was a larger hole to close over—the one the

door was fashioned on the river side of the shoe.



giant had used to put his foot in. Making a waterproof roof
is no easy matter, and it required a great deal of patching
after the first rain.

Flora sighed, in spite of herself, for their lost Pumpkin
House. Old leather is not the most delicate perfume in
Lubin’s assortment, and then this new house was decidedly
low. Jack, in order to make Flora forget what she had lost
in her late lovely abode, in Pumpkin Villa, set about making
up a new dress, for her butterfly dress was nearly worn out.
He wove for her a skirt out of the green flags that grew by
the river's side, and, having shot a mole, he, with her assist-
ance, turned its skin into a sacque. He secured, one day,
when alone, a mammoth lily, which, with a little ingenuity and
much patience, he transformed into a parasol.

This shielded her from the sun, but not from the air; and
Jack, recalling the wealth of smiles’ Flora had lavished on him
for this surprise of the sunshade, determined to out-do him-
self. He actually made her a cobweb veil of lace-like fineness
and showing in the sun all the colors of the rainbow. As the
spiders in that country were very large, their webs were of
course very strong.

Flora was so delighted with her outfit that she ceased re-
pining, and was fast getting reconciled to Shoe House, when
one day, as she was sitting near their front stoop, under a
toadstool, watching Jack in the distance angling for their
dinner, she heard a rush like a tornado, and looking around
saw to her horror an enormous dog running off at full speed
with their house in his mouth, scattering “things” out of the
window. It was very fortunate that Flora was not one of the
“things,” for there were no benevolent cabbages around to
catch her. The poor child did not think of this, but only
of their new loss; although she was a little consoled when
she recollected that her parasol and cobweb veil were with
her.

Jack returned from his fishing with only a good appetite,
but no fish. He looked so disappointed at his ill luck that
Flora thought it was her turn now to cheer up Jack. So with
a charming smile she asked :

‘Jack, have you caught anything ?”

“Nothing, Flora.”



eae

oe
Bs
ri









PETE POI KR TN lho SEs,

“Well,” added Flora, gaily, “the giant’s dog, and I fancy | not the third time. After some minutes of profound medita-

an intimate friend of his cow, has—”
“What has he caught?”
“Shoe House, to be sure.

inquired the astonished Jack.

See if you can see it.”

Jack was so surprised and pleased to find that Flora bore
this new grief with so much cheerfulness, that he scarcely
He thought if he had only
caught a fish for their supper, they would be quite happy.
At that moment a fish fell at his feet. As he looked up to
see where such curious but welcome rain fell from, he saw a

regretted the loss of their house.

bird which had carelessly dropped its prey that it had just
taken out of the river.

“Thank you!” gaily exclaimed Jack ; “you are a better
fisher than I am.”

“ Give me back my fish,” screamed the bird. As Jack did
not understand bird language, the fish was soon broiling
over the fire, and the bird wisely concluded to seek for
another, for he did not fancy an encounter with such a stout
lad as Jack, fighting for a supper.

A good meal gives good courage; and any one hearing how
gaily they chatted would never have imagined, that they had
met with such a sudden and serious loss.

Now, although the weather was clear and pleasant, Jack had
no idea of letting Flora pass the night with no covering
nearer than the sky. The wonderful hatchet was soon at
work, and before the sun had put on his nightcap, Jack had
built what he called “only a hut,” but what Flora called a
leafy bower. It was made of boughs cut from the surround-
ing trees. Her bed was made of dry leaves, covered with
Jack’s old coat, which had answered many a useful purpose
before. At its entrance Jack made a porch, in which he lay,
her faithful guardian. The next morning Flora declared she
had never slept better in her life. Jack put a few improve-
ments on their new dwelling in the way of strengthening it in
case of a sudden gust of wind.

“Tt will answer pretty well in fair weather, Flora, but we
must go house-hunting again. It is a pity houses are so easily
carried off in this country.’

This remark set Jack thinking that their next house must

tion, Jack exclaimed :

“Tve got it!”

“ What! another house?” ;

“Yes! and one that will be permanent, this time. There
is a big hollow tree not far away. Neither the stump-tailed
cow, nor her friend the dog, nor even the whole race of
giants will be able to carry that off.”

Jack, having the day before him, and his faithful hatchet
with him, went to work. He cleared out the decayed wood,
and found, much to their mutual delight, that the aperture
The trunk

near the ground was as large around as a good sized house.

extended some distance into this mammoth tree.

Jack managed, by putting in some partitions, to make three
good sized rooms; in that intended for Flora, he put in a
window, about eight feet from the ground.

They spent three nights more in what Flora called their
bower home, before they were ready to take possession
of their Giant Tree House.

many improvements, for he felt there was no danger this

Jack designed and carried out

time, of having their house carried off in a cow’s stomach
or a dog’s mouth.

Besides the rooms, Jack made some nice little pantries,
much to Flora’s delight, who had become quite an accom-
plished little housekeeper. They had quite a number of
dishes now, and cups and plates fashioned out of wood.

Still they had hard work to get food to put on the dishes.
Jack had poor luck at fishing, and the birds kept what
they got. Occasionally, he shot what was considered in that
country a little chippee, but was, in fact, larger than a turkey,
and lasted them much longer than they liked.

Did Flora ever think of her parents? Yes, every day of
her life, and Jack too. But there was this difference in their
thoughts, however. Flora had not been a dutiful daughter,
and she felt it keenly; she longed bitterly for home, and
thought now how differently she would treat her parents and
little friends. Jack’s regrets were, that he was not at home
to help his parents, but then he felt he was doing his duty
now in taking care of Flora, and so had little trouble in

‘be more secure. Flora had escaped twice, but she might | keeping up a stout and cheerful heart.



THE+PUMPKANGAO OSE.

Poor Flora had many a crying time when Jack was away
hunting for food. The very stability of this new house, its
completeness, seemed to say to her—“ This is your home for
life.”

One day, when Jack was away doing his best to entice the
fish to eat a little, that Flora and he might eat them in
return, she was having what girls call a “real good cry.”
What was her surprise to hear a voice above her, saying:

“ Little girl, what are you crying for?”

Looking up, she saw a red squirrel on the tree above her
head. Though the squirrel was quite as tall as herself, she
had such a kind eye that Flora felt no fear, but answered :

**T am a good deal home-sick, and a little hungry.”

**T don’t know what kind of sickness that is, but I know
all about hunger. I would like to help you, but we are very
poor ourselves.”

“You have a family, then?” asked Flora, forgetting her
troubles in anticipation of a chat with a neighbor.

“O yes,” replied the lady, with pardonable pride; “I have
six infants. I nurse them all. My husband is away now
trying to find some nuts for our young family. Hoe is a
colored gentleman. My family, who are all very proud, were
opposed to my marrying a black squirrel, and since my
marriage, they have disowned me, simply on account of my
husband’s color.”

Flora listened so attentively to Madame Red Squirrel, and
showed so much sympathy for her, that she finally concluded
she could spare Flora a few nuts out of their winter’s store.

Flora thanked her, and slipped them in her pocket.

“Why don’t you eat them, if you are hungry ?” asked Mrs.
Squirrel.

“ Because I cannot crack them with my teeth.”

The new neighbor laughed outright.

“A fig for such teeth. Why, my four teeth are better
But wait!

My cousin, Chipmunk, who lives under

than your whole mouthful. Perhaps you would
rather have roots.
this tree, has some roots and things in his cellar; he might
exchange some of them for your nuts. There are my babies
erying for their supper, so I must go; remember Mr. Chip-

munk, under the tree.”



Flora had no disposition to make acquaintance with any
more strangers till Jack came home. She thought a stone
would help her to the meat inside the nuts, as well as squir-
rels’ teeth ; looking around for one, she saw a pair of bright
black eyes peering at her out of a hole beneath the tree.

“Are you Mr. Chipmunk, that keeps roots and things down
a cellar?”

He acknowledged the name, but was very guarded as to
the contents of the cellar, till he knew Flora’s reasons for
asking.

Flora explained she had “nuts to exchange for roots.”
Then Cousin Chipmunk grew more communicative, and
admitted he had some roots and things laid up for winter,
and that, to accommodate a lady, he would make an ex-
change.

Flora, unused to barter, said it would accommodate her
very much, as her teeth were not strong enough to crack the
nuts. Mr, Chipmunk, on this, went down and brought up
some sweet potatoes. Poor Flora made another mistake in
saying how dearly she loved sweet potatoes, roasted.

She tried to recover lost ground by a great deal of hag-
gling. Finally, a bargain was struck. To be sure the
potatoes were large, but the nuts were, too. Flora was con-
vinced that Mr, Chipmunk had overreached her, and that he
was a snarp, tricky fellow.

She soon started a fire, preparatory to roasting the sweet
potatoes in the hot ashes, before Jack’s return; and was
quite happy in the thought of the joyful surpriso that await-
ed him, when, suddenly, she was recalled from her pleasant
revery by an uproar in the tree above her, caused by the
crying, coughing, and sneezing of the infant squirrels. At
last, above this din, Flora heard Madame ery:

“Little girl! what on earth are you doing down there?
You have nearly killed my babies, to say nothing of myself.
I was up nearly all night with one of them who had the
colic, and how this is going to affect him, I am sure I
cannot tell.”

Flora apologized very humbly and prettily: she said she
was very thoughtless and careless, but would take more care

in future, as she was desirous of living on the very best of







if f) PAM RK IPN. fl Olt SAL

terms with all her neighbors. She further excused herself
by saying it was the first time she had ever lived in a tenc-
ment-house.

Madame Squirrel accepted Flora’s apology, with the grace
belonging to a lady of good family, and wished Flora to tell
her what was good for the colic.

Flora confessed her ignorance of any cure for this formid-
able complaint, never having had it within her recollection.
She had had a great deal of trouble with her teeth, so her
mother told her.

“You seem to have it yet, little girl, since you cannot crack
nuts.”

Flora was determined not to take offence, and so inquired
if the little squirrels ever ran away.

“Not yet,” replied Madame, “they are too little.” They
were larger than the cats Flora had seen at home.

“Perhaps they will when they grow up.”

“ Perhaps.”

“Mamma tied me up when I ran away,” confessed Flora.

“Did that cure you?”

“Yes,” innocently answered Flora.

“Then Pll try that way.” And the good mother hurried
back to her little ones.

Flora moved her fire away from the tree, and by the time
Jack came back, hungry, tired and disappointed, for he had
returned empty-handed, an ample dish of roasted sweet
potatoes was set before him, by the delighted little cook.

Such a gay and happy meal as it proved to be! It was
a glorious dinner of herbs, with contentment.

CHAPTER V.

THE important question of food-supply, now no longer
troubled them. Hither Jack had acquired more skill, or else
the season had changed for the better. They always had
enough and to spare.

Jack and Flora made the acquaintance of Mr. Squirrel,
the colored husband of Madame, who had so shocked the
prejudices of her family. Jack declared he was a fine fellow,

an affectionate father, and faithful husband ; and often made
him a present of nuts.

Mr. Chipmunk rather improved on further acquaintance.
He was as sharp as ever at a bargain, but Jack said that was
no great fault. Where he procured sweet potatoes he kept
Much

to Flora’s delight, Jack discovered his weak spot. He was

a profound secret. He was always ready for a trade.

immoderately fond of a certain root he found it very difficult
When he suc-
ceeded in finding this coveted nicety, he paid Mr. Chipmunk

to procure. To Jack it was much easier.
off for the sharp bargain he had made with Flora.

Within doors Jack had improved things almost to hollow-
tree perfection. Flora’s boudoir, as she called it, was a
triumph of skill. Jack never tired of working on it.

But it was shelter and comfort,

and they were thankful for it.

Still it was not home.
Jack had contrived a stout
door, and when it was closed at night, they were safe from
all intrusion.

One day, Flora was in her little room looking out of the
window, and longing, it must be confessed, for parents and
home, Suddenly the light failed, owing to a large white ball
flying through the air. Looking up, she saw it had caught in
the branches opposite to where Mr. and Mrs. Squirrel lived.
In an instant she was out of the house, and pointing it out to
Jack, asking what the wonder was.

He told her it was a monster thistle down.

“Why, if we can get it down, we can make some nice soft
beds of it,” said Flora.

“We will do better than that, Flora. We will not get it
down, but if I can carry out my idea it will take us up, and
then away to our lost homes again.”

Tears came into Flora’s eyes from joy. Oh! if her gallant
preserver and guardian could do that, she would love him
and be proud of him all her life.

“Now, first to fasten our carriage, for it must not run
away till we and the wind are ready.”

All this was Greek to Flora. All she understood was home.
Jack had promised that, if he succeeded, and she had great
faith in him. So far, Jack had always done what he said he
could do.



1OE dee NEP KGL IN, tI -O. CL SAE.

She watched the fastening of the huge ball to the strong
limbs of the tree. Mr. and Madame Squirrel helped in this,
they carrying the strings, and Jack fastening them.

“Now, you are safe, so far,” said Jack, as he descended the
tree, and lighted softly on the earth.

Then he brought out the great ball of twine, and they com-
menced weaving a net, as some fishermen had taught Jack
to do at home. In the old days, Flora would have despised
such work. Now it was working out for them, a blessed
deliverance from exile, and restoration to home.

When the net was finished, Jack procured some ash slips
from a tree near by, and made of them a basket large and

strong enough to hold Flora and himself.

And now Flora’s eyes were opened. The big white ball |

was to be a balloon. The network was to enclose it, and to
that, the basket or car was to be fastened.

“But oh! dear Jack, what shall we do for ropes?’

“Do without, since we cannot get them; and take these
stout vines instead.”

And suiting the action to the word, Jack stripped from a
tree, a vine that had grown around it; twisting this into
cords, he found it strong enough to sustain more than their
united weight.

All had succeeded so far.

over and around the ball, the car was fastened and hung at

The network had been passed
a few feet distance from the earth. The balloon tugged at
its fastenings as if it would break loose. All that was now
needed, was a North West wind.

“When the wind comes, we will go,” said Jack.

They waited several days. At length, early one morning
the wished-for wind appeared, blowing very softly at first.
Jack waited till it gained more strength, which it soon did.

“Come, Flora, all is ready.” Hasty adieus were made.
Flora, like the good little housekeeper she had grown, ap-
peared promptly, having in her hand a nice little lunch
basket, well filled. The rest of the eatables were given to
the Squirrel family.

As a faithful historian I am obliged to add, that while the
Squirrel family were making tearful adieus, Mr. Chipmunk,

with dry eyes, but very intent ones to his own interest,





transferred a portion of these eatables to his cellar under
the tree.

Jack carefully lifted Flora into the basket, and then fol-
lowed himself.

“Now hold on fast, Flora, and have a stout heart. We are
homeward bound.”

As the words were uttered he had cut the cords. Up
sprang the balloon like a living, palpitating thing.

Bump! Bump! went the car in its contact with the trees.
Flora held fast from very fear.

Scratch! Scratch! went Flora’s head through the branches,
while high up above the tree shot the balloon into the clear

alr.

Flora was too happy to have kept her head on, after such
a rush. She looked over the side of the basket, and was
dazzled by the magnificent prospect.

Far, far below, away down through the clear air, she saw
at a glance all the country they had traveled over. There
was the river looking like a silver thread, and near must be
their Tree House. Now just beneath them is the cornfield
where Pumpkin House had stood and disappeared, and look!
that is the giant pulling weeds as large as trees out of his
garden, but from here he looks like a little boy.

That shining piece of silver over there is the lake. Now
“Tf the cords should break,” said Flora,

Jack removed her fears by saying

it is under us.
with anxious heart.
“they are stronger than ropes.”

Then it grew cold. Flora trembled with cold and fear.

“Tie down in the bottom of the basket,’ said Jack, “and
T'll cover you with my old coat.”

She obeyed. The rocking motion of the car lulled her at
last to sleep, and Jack watched alone.

By noon the opposite shore of the lake was reached. Then
Jack awakened his companion, and told her they were near
home. Flora could not think for a moment where she was.
The word “home” soon roused her. She watched with trem-
bling lip and strained eye to catch the first glimpse of her
dear home.

Soon the outlines of a large mansion came into view. The

delighted Flora clapped her hands for joy. Yes, it was home.







LAL POT MEP RT NN. FLO SE:

See! there is the garden—that is the observatory on the

house—there are the tall poplars !

“Home! dear, dear home!” and Flora fairly wept for

joy: :
They had crossed the lake, and the balloon was settling

fast.

that Flora could recognize old Job the gardener, with his

Now they were over the garden, and so near the earth

face as usual toward the ground.

When they came between him and the sun, he, thinking
it a cloud, kept on his work without looking up. When
bump! the bottom of the basket smashed his hat down over
his eyes and then danced up as if it was playing with the
old man.

With such a hint he got his eyes clear, and saw his little
mistress with Jack, in a curious looking dress, coming from
goodness knows where, in a goodness knows what sort of
carriage, without horses.

Flora’s parents now hastened from the house, and soon
they had their lost darling clasped in their arms.

Jack, not waiting to hear the thanks Flora’s parents show-
ered on him, when they understood they owed their daughter’s
safety to his untiring and unselfish care, hastened away to
his lowly home, to reassure his parents, by his safe return.
Jack was too modest to make himself the hero of a story,

but Flora told it to his parents, as to her own, and the worthy
couple shed tears of joy, and thanked Heaven for giving
them such a son.

Flora never “put on airs” again with her friend Jack.
She felt in her heart that he had not only saved her life and
cared for her comfort, by the sacrifice of his own, but had
taught her to lead a better and more useful life.

Her parents were delighted with the improvement in her.
She became gentle, obedient, and always glad and willing to
do good to others.

As for Jack, he needed very little to make him a gentleman,
in the best sense of the word. Flora’s father sent him to
school, and he made such progress that his benefactor re-
solved to give him a collegiate education.

He graduated with high honors, and became one of the
most eloquent, wise, and good lawyers of the country in
which he lived.

It seems to me that I heard my grandmother tell of a
wedding she went to, when a young lady. The bride was
very beautiful, and amiable, and the bridegroom was distin-
guished for talent and goodness of heart. If I recollect right,
the name of the bride was Flora. She wore a very singular
veil, fine as a cobweb, and showing all the colors of the
rainbow when the sun shone on it,







BIG PICTURE BOOKS





=]

@ |

FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

TWeabNTY-FIVE GENTS EACH,

Comprise fifty kinds, representing the finest Picture Books that can be found in the market. They are printed upon
fine paper, specially prepared by ourselves, with a view of producing the best effects in color. The designs for the
illustrations have been executed by the best artists, and give the books pre-eminence as an attractive line for young
people. The language employed is simple, and easily understood by those for whom they are intended, and many of
the series have become almost juvenile classics. 4to. Demi, with six to twelve illustrated pages.

NOTE.—Any of these Books can be had Mounted on Linen.
Puss in Boots.

Ten Little Niggers.
Nine Niggers More.
Ten Little Mulligan Guards.
Alphabet of Country Scenes.

My Mother.

Fat Boy.

Children in the Wood.

Price, Sixty Cents each.

Mother Hubbard’s Dog.
Tit, Tiny, and Tittens.
Four-Footed Friends.
Three Little Kittens.

Baby. Visit of St. Nicholas. Three Good Friends.
Putnam. : “ in German.| Cock Robin
Pocahontas. Santa Claus and his Works. The Froggy who would a woo-

66 ce

Three Bears.

Tom Thumb.

Visit to the Menagerie.
Home Games for Boys.
Home Games for Girls.
Yankee Doodle.
Robinson Crusoe.
White Cat.

Hey Diddle Diddle.
Jack and the Bean-Stalk.
Hare and Tortoise.



“

Domestic Animals.
Kindness to Animals.
Home Kindness.

Rip Van Winkle.

Humpty Dumpty.—Vol. 1.
Humpty Dumpty.—Vol. 2.
Nursery Rhymes.

| House that Jack Built.
Wild Animals.—Part One.
Wild Animals.—Part Two.

in German.| ing go.

Nonsense for Girls.

World-Wide Fables.

Cinderella and the Little Glass
Slipper.

IN PRESS.

Henny Penny.

Little Red: Riding Heod.
The Bears.

The Monkeys.





New Paper Dolls.

The most Amusement at little cost that can be found.

SIX CENTS EACH. TEN CENTS EACH.

Polly Prim. GertyGood. | LottieLove. Myra Mild.

Jennie June Bessie Bliss.
EIETEEN CENTS EACH.

Dottie Dimple. Susie Simple. Bertie Bright.
Bride, Bridesmaid, and Groomsman.





Dolly Varden Dolls.

LAR GFE

Figures cut out, and put up i elopes.

IWENTY-FIVE CENTS EACH,

Baby Blue. Bertha Blonde. Betsy Brunette.



\



|
{|
|
|

|



|

STANDARD FOLDING GAME BOARDS.

Each Game played upon a separate and large

sized design.

Pilgrim’s Progress contains the games of Pilgrim’s Pro-
gress, Tower of Babel, and Going to Sunday School. ‘Three
moral games in one Board. The Pilgrim’s Progress is unsur-
passed in beauty of coloring and artistic excellence. The design
of the Tower of Babel is a splendid representation of the Biblical
Tower, some fifteen inches in height. The Sunday School game
is a novelty in appearance. Played with the Indicator, a new
method of playing games, superior to dice and teetotums, and
wholly unobjectionable.............--.c0000 Price,

The Jerome Steepie Chase Game contains three
games—The Steeple Chase Game, Balky Horse, and Pool—in
the same style as foregoing Price, $2.00

Life’s Mishaps and Domino Rex - two games in
ONG RB Oad! a dress castes oe Veena Re ee Price, $1.00 |

Captive Princess—tThe simplest and best game published.
.00

New method throughout. Directions for playing occupy only
ten lines Price, $1







Full Text


rally, ee
rea
i i


THE:

PUMPKIN HOUSE,

OR THE ADVENTURES OF

LITTLE FLORA AND JACK.



BY UNCLE JOHN.
One EEL

CHAPTER I.

HEN old Time was a few hundred years younger than

he is now, in a far away country, there lived in a

fine old mansion, a very wealthy family. They had an only

daughter, named Flora. She was very pretty, and had long

golden hair; she wore beautiful and costly dresses, and when

she was dressed, she sat with her hands in her lap, admiring

herself in a large mirror. To be brief, and at the same time

truthful, Flora was idle and vain, and that pitiful creature
called a spoiled child.

Whose fault was this? Partly, but not wholly Flora’s. Her
parents indulged her every whim, the servants fawned upon
her, and she had not a single friend who ever told her of a
better way‘of living.

Not far distant, in a little cottage, lived a poor and honest
couple; they also had an only child, a boy called Jack. He
had no fine clothes to make him vain, no servants to teach
him idleness. On the other hand he was a bright and willing
servant himself, constantly aiding his father ‘and mother in
their daily struggle with want.

Sometimes Jack would be hired by the rich man’s gardener
When Flora saw
him, she used to parade up and down displaying her fine
Jack used to
take a sly peep at her, and the simple, good-natured boy

thought she was the most beautiful creature in the world.

to do a day’s work, in weeding the garden.

clothes, with her head very high in the air.

After a while, Flora was so pleased with his modest and
silent admiration, that she would stand near him, watching
him at his work. One day she put some questions to Jack,
which he readily answered. He was very happy, you may be
sure, to be addressed by the object of his admiration. Poor
fellow! He little knew the capricious nature of vain little
girls. The day following as she walked in the garden, wearing
for the first time an elegant dress, she never so much as looked
at him.

But Jack had other things to do and think of, and he did
not brood over his disappointment. He had his good mother’s
smile to reward and cheer him, and wisely thought that
Flora’s treating him like the ground under her feet, did not
at all lower him in the estimation of those he most dearly
loved and respected.

Then again, much to Jack’s surprise, Flora would be very
pleasant and treat him very kindly, and also accepted from
him a very tasteful rustic basket, to hold growing plants and
flowers. It had cost Jack all his spare moments for a month
to construct it.

They were on these varying terms of intercourse, when one
day, Flora being alone and not knowing what to do with
herself, strolled by the shore of a very large and beautiful
lake, near her father’s dwelling. In it lay a pretty little boat,
painted white and blue. She had been forbidden ever to get

into it without her father was with her. Fear had hitherto

The Baldwin Library

University

RmB Fistita

LAE POMPE RIN (AO ES a

induced her to obey; but this day the water looked so calm
and smiling, and the boat rocked so gently, that she stepped
into it and sat down. Looking over the edge of the boat she
saw a pretty face looking up at her, framed in golden ringlets.

“As good as mamma’s mirror!” murmured Flora, as she
smiled her approbation of the pretty face, looking at her out
of the water. Perhaps she really thought it was a mirror.
So intent was she in admiring herself that she forgot all
about the boat, and the lake, and her father’s injunction.

Suddenly she heard a cry of alarm. Looking around she
saw that the boat was drifting away, and that Jack was run-
ning with all his might to reach the shore of the lake.

“Ol! Jack! Jack,” she cried in alarm, “what will become
of me. O papa! O mamma! I shall never see you again.”

Jack, on reaching the water side, sprang into the lake and
swam lustily for the drifting boat.
arisen, and was blowing the boat rapidly from the shore. It
was no easy task to overtake it, and Flora watched with
anxious, trembling heart, the gallant efforts of Jack. Well
was it those brown arms had been used to labor; that Jack’s
chest had been broadened and deepened by constant exertion
in the open air. It was a fearful race. The stake, perhaps
two lives. For Jack’s life was also imperilled. He was fast
becoming exhausted, and Flora watched him with pale cheek
and quivering lip. She could not speak—could scarcely
breathe. Was the brave lad gaining or losing, in this watery
race ?

Just then there came a little lull, and Jack made a last
desperate effort to reach the boat. Flora felt rather than
saw, his extended hand strike the stern of the boat. Her
gallant rescuer was safe! But he was obliged to hold on for
a few moments, before he had strength to climb in. Then he
clambered in dripping like a great water-dog.

There were no oars in the boat. Jack tried to paddle it
back with his hands, but the boat drifted on—drifted on,
away from shore—away from home—away from father and
mother, and anxious, loving hearts.

Flora burst into tears when she understood at last their
She did not think it was her disobedience that had

caused their trouble; alas! true to her bringing up, she

danger.

A wind had suddenly —

to lie down on it.

thought only of herself. Jack, on the other hand, dismissed
his own cares, to think of some way of softening the discom-
fort to Flora. He cheered her with words of courage and
hope.

After wringing out his coat and drying it, he laid it down
on the bottom of the boat, and begged the still weeping Flora
He then covered her carefully from the
night air and dew, and soon after she sobbed herself to sleep.

The sun sank down and the stars came out, and the brave,
steadfast Jack watched all through the long and weary night.
And still the boat floated on, and when daylight came, the
shore by which stood the rich and the lowly homes of these
children, had disappeared. ‘Land in the opposite direction
was, however, in sight, and in a few hours more they drij/ted
into a rocky inlet.

Before leaving the boat Jack carefully searched it, and
found in a little box in the bow, a large ball of twine, some
sail needles, a chisel, and a small hatchet. In assisting Flora
to land, Jack had to help her out of the boat, she insisting that
In doing this,

she could never jump on the slippery rocks.
she gave a backward impulse to the boat that sent it gliding
out into the lake. There a current caught it, and carried it
rapidly past a jutting rock out of their sight.

At this new misfortune Flora sank down and declared she
could go no further. Jack, with untiring patience consoled
and cheered her. This loss of the boat was clearly her fault.
She did not think of that, and if Jack did, he never reproached
her for it.

At length, Flora stopped crying and really began to think,
for the first time in her life—why should Jack be so kind,
courageous, and unselfish, and she only a burden to him?
Suppose he had not swam after her, but had staid home with
his parents who loved him. And even now how useless she
was; she determined that if she could do nothing else, she .
would at least stop whining and crying.

To Jack’s surprise and delight she dashed away her tears,
sprang to her feet, and placing her little white hand in Jack’s
brown and honest one, said :

“Jack, you are a dear, good fellow; and I am a foolish,

useless girl. Teach me what I can do to be useful.”
Por i) Pt APO PN LOO SE.

Full of courage they clambered up the rock. Jack was
surprised at the enormous size of the trees; the grass
in a neighboring meadow was as high as a house; the birds
were like eagles, and a red squirrel running up one of the
great trees, was as tall as Flora. They were evidently in the
land of giants. Flora was on the point of giving up in
despair, when she thought of her lately formed resolution, and
went bravely on.

The ascent of the rocks had tired her, and Jack proposed
looking over their property while they rested; he pro-
duced the ball of twine, the sail needles, the chisel, and
hatchet he had taken from the boat, and took from his pocket
that boy’s constant companion a jack-knife, some matches
which needed a little drying, a fish-line, and some marbles.
Flora found in her pocket a pair of scissors, a needle-book, a
spool of thread, and a thimble. After taking an inventory
of their effects they went house-hunting.

It was a tiresome tramp. Finally their perseverance was
rewarded. In a gigantic cornfield they found a monstrous
pumpkin.

“Tt will make a two-story house, basement and attic,”
laughingly said Jack.

With his hatchet he made a front door and two windows,
giving the finishing touches with the faithful jack-knife. Then
he scooped out the seeds, made a chimney up through the
pumpkin stem, and fashioned a fire-place.

“Can you cook breakfast?” asked Jack. Flora blushed,
and confessed she had never been taught to do anything
useful.

“Teach me, dear Jack,” she added.

“That I will,” cried the delighted boy. He made a fire in
the fire-place, and in the hot ashes roasted two pumpkin seeds.
He placed his hat on the floor for a table, covering it with
Flora’s cambric handkerchief for a table-cloth. He then
went out, and soon returned with two acorns as large as
goblets, filled with pure cold water from a spring. The flat
part of the acorns served as plates, on which Jack finally
dished the roasted pumpkin seeds, and invited Flora to par-
take of this novel repast.

There is no sauce like hunger. Flora was naturally very



dainty, but she declared the meal was delicious—the pumpkin
seeds tasting like sweet potatoes. After breakfast, Flora took
her first lesson in washing dishes.

As the walls and floors of Pumpkin House were still very
moist, and trying to Flora’s nice clothes, Jack strewed the
floor with dry leaves at night, and gave her his coat for a
coverlet to her leafy couch. ;

CHAPTER ILI.
Pumpxin House had done well enough for a first night’s
He labored
constantly to improve it, for there was not an idle fibre in his
whole body.
a stone fire-place, added a porch and door-steps, and after-

shelter, but Jack was far from satisfied with it.
He made a door and window-shutters, put in

wards constructed a table and two chairs.

While Jack attended to all this, Flora was cook, and it
must be confessed a rather poor one; her unvarying meal
was roasted pumpkin seeds. Her experience did not extend
beyond them. Jack, more for her sake than his, climbed up a
corn-stalk one day, and with his hatchet cut off an ear of corn;
it lasted a week; and then pumpkin seeds came on again
after that, as something new.

Flora
missed carpets, and Jack said he must see their landlord about
it, as they had taken the house furnished. Jack had been
taught to weave rushes into baskets, mats, &c., and having

The floors of Pumpkin House were now quite dry.

found some growing near, he soon completed, first a carpet for
Flora’s boudoir, and finally every room was covered in like
manner.

The walls then proved an eyesore to the luxury-loving Flora;
they looked blank and dingy. Jack set his wits at work,
and while he was thinking, something came between him and
the sun ; looking up, he saw an immense butterfly.

“Flora, P’'ve got your wall covering!” he exclaimed ; or
rather, “I will have it.”

While this new kind of decoration was floating in the air,
Jack fashioned a bow and arrows, and having a keen eye, and
steady aim, he soon shot a large number of butterflies. He

THEA POMS KEIO OOS.

did not plaster these wings on at random, beautiful as they
were, but formed ‘them into figures, matching the colors, and
contrasting them, until the walls of Pumpkin House would
have done no discredit to a fresco painter.

Flora was delighted with this improvement, and requested
Jack to make window curtains and bed spreads also, out of
butterflies’ wings, which he gladly did; and Flora in turn
surprised him by adding a new dish to their usual fare of
pumpkin seeds and corn; this was roasted butterfly.

The house was now furnished in such a resplendent man-
The lake trip, the
clambering over the rocks, the “house-hunting” through

ner that Flora began to notice her dress.

briars and brambles, had reduced it to a sorry plight.

Jack with his bow and arrows, shot butterflies enough to
Then with the skin of a bat
he captured for her, she made for herself a rich sacque, and

make Flora a dazzling dress.

trimmed her hat with the plumage of a humming-bird.

CHAPTER III.

Fora was now quite happy—not altogether owing to her
fine dress, but that she had finally overcome her idle habits.
She loved now to make herself useful, and time passed
rapidly and pleasantly when she had employment for every
hour. Her fondness for her fine dress was a very innocent
thing compared to her old vanity; she loved it now for the
sake of the kindness that Jack had shown in procuring it
for her.

Jack’s clothes, too, were nearly worn out. Flora certainly
-had commenced with something, for she was nicely dressed
But Jack had only

his work-day clothes, and what a trial they had undergone!

when she stepped into that fatal boat.

Butterfly wings, bat skins, and humming-bird’s plumage were
of no use to him.

Now there was a remarkably well dressed gentleman Jack
had seen in a suit of green and gold that would fit him to a
nicety, and he determined, on the next occasion, he would use
his bow and arrows. It had been a pleasant fiction with

them when the house wanted fixing, that Jack would “see

the landlord.”
he was going to “see his tailor.”
Still on Sunday the hours passed slowly with Flora. At

He now mysteriously intimated to Flora that

home she had been used to going to church with her mamma,
dressed in her finest clothes, but there was no church
here.

One Sunday, however, Flora was surprised to hear somc-
thing unusual, and going to her front door, saw a huge frog
that had crawled out of a spring in front of the house and
was croaking slowly and solemnly; she sat down on the door-
step facing him and listened.

“Croak! Croak! Croak!”

Flora could not understand a word of frog talk, but the
gentleman looked so wise and spoke so solemnly, that Flora
Still
she fancied it was of some benefit to her, and if there had

was certain she was missing much useful information.

only been some other well dressed persons present, so
there could have been a mutual interchange of observation
and criticism, it would have been a very fair imitation of
“Sundays at Home.”

So Flora listened and Froggy croaked.

And so it came to pass, as Flora listened, and as Froggy
croaked, Jack, concealed in a neighboring bush, let fly an
arrow that pierced the preacher’s neck. He turned ‘over on
his side, gave two or three convulsive kicks, and croaked his
last croak.

“O Jack! what have you done?”

An explanation soon followed and Flora appeared pacified,
but there are yet grave doubts whether she ever fully forgave
Jack for killing her preacher.

Jack, although sorry for Flora’s loss, was delighted with
his success, and stripped Froggy of his green and gold suit,
and got into it himself. He had an elegant form, and his
handsome suit became him well; and he said to himself:
“Now I will not be ashamed to appear in Flora’s presence
when she is dressed in her finest.”

It was the first time that poor Jack had felt anything like
pride in his personal appearance.
WP OP OAR IL IN OFT GU SE.

CHAPTER IY.

One day, while Jack was absent trying to shoot something
more to Flora’s taste, than had been his last effort in that line,
and when Flora was busily intent on home duties, a huge
“stump-tailed” cow, belonging to the giant who raised the
mammoth corn and pumpkins, broke into the cornfield, and
catching a glimpse of Pumpkin House, ended by catching it
in her enormous jaws.

Flora, seeing nothing, could not imagine what was the matter,
until she was pitched out of the window, into the humane
bosom of a cabbage growing near by. From that sheltered
place, she witnessed the total destruction of their once happy
home with all its furniture, decorations, and table crockery.
Yes! this voracious, milky mother “left not a trace behind”;
for when the giant appeared and drove her out of the field,
she carried away everything in her capacious stomach, not
excepting even the chimney—to wit, the pumpkin stem.

When Jack returned, he looked in vain for Pumpkin House,
but hearing Flora sobbing somewhere, at last climbed up into
the cabbage, where he found her half concealed. She soon
explained the awful catastrophe brought about by the cow.
Jack consoled her for the loss of their home, and told her
it would be useless to build another such habitation, for the
next time she might possibly play Jonah in the cow's
stomach. For what a cow does once, she can do again.

“We must go further West, Flora!” added Jack, and as
they had no Saratoga trunks and nothing to put in them, they
were soon on their journey toward the setting sun. Before
getting there, however, they reached a broad and deep river,
which they could not cross.

It was a beautiful place, and Flora proposed looking for a
house in the neighborhood. As they wandered about a little
distance from each other, Jack heard Flora calling him to
come and tell her what this was. “This” turned out to be an
immense shoo that some tired and footsore giant had left on
the river’s bank before wading across.

Jack’s trusty hatchet was soon in his active hand, and a
After cut-
ting a hole, there was a larger hole to close over—the one the

door was fashioned on the river side of the shoe.



giant had used to put his foot in. Making a waterproof roof
is no easy matter, and it required a great deal of patching
after the first rain.

Flora sighed, in spite of herself, for their lost Pumpkin
House. Old leather is not the most delicate perfume in
Lubin’s assortment, and then this new house was decidedly
low. Jack, in order to make Flora forget what she had lost
in her late lovely abode, in Pumpkin Villa, set about making
up a new dress, for her butterfly dress was nearly worn out.
He wove for her a skirt out of the green flags that grew by
the river's side, and, having shot a mole, he, with her assist-
ance, turned its skin into a sacque. He secured, one day,
when alone, a mammoth lily, which, with a little ingenuity and
much patience, he transformed into a parasol.

This shielded her from the sun, but not from the air; and
Jack, recalling the wealth of smiles’ Flora had lavished on him
for this surprise of the sunshade, determined to out-do him-
self. He actually made her a cobweb veil of lace-like fineness
and showing in the sun all the colors of the rainbow. As the
spiders in that country were very large, their webs were of
course very strong.

Flora was so delighted with her outfit that she ceased re-
pining, and was fast getting reconciled to Shoe House, when
one day, as she was sitting near their front stoop, under a
toadstool, watching Jack in the distance angling for their
dinner, she heard a rush like a tornado, and looking around
saw to her horror an enormous dog running off at full speed
with their house in his mouth, scattering “things” out of the
window. It was very fortunate that Flora was not one of the
“things,” for there were no benevolent cabbages around to
catch her. The poor child did not think of this, but only
of their new loss; although she was a little consoled when
she recollected that her parasol and cobweb veil were with
her.

Jack returned from his fishing with only a good appetite,
but no fish. He looked so disappointed at his ill luck that
Flora thought it was her turn now to cheer up Jack. So with
a charming smile she asked :

‘Jack, have you caught anything ?”

“Nothing, Flora.”
eae

oe
Bs
ri



PETE POI KR TN lho SEs,

“Well,” added Flora, gaily, “the giant’s dog, and I fancy | not the third time. After some minutes of profound medita-

an intimate friend of his cow, has—”
“What has he caught?”
“Shoe House, to be sure.

inquired the astonished Jack.

See if you can see it.”

Jack was so surprised and pleased to find that Flora bore
this new grief with so much cheerfulness, that he scarcely
He thought if he had only
caught a fish for their supper, they would be quite happy.
At that moment a fish fell at his feet. As he looked up to
see where such curious but welcome rain fell from, he saw a

regretted the loss of their house.

bird which had carelessly dropped its prey that it had just
taken out of the river.

“Thank you!” gaily exclaimed Jack ; “you are a better
fisher than I am.”

“ Give me back my fish,” screamed the bird. As Jack did
not understand bird language, the fish was soon broiling
over the fire, and the bird wisely concluded to seek for
another, for he did not fancy an encounter with such a stout
lad as Jack, fighting for a supper.

A good meal gives good courage; and any one hearing how
gaily they chatted would never have imagined, that they had
met with such a sudden and serious loss.

Now, although the weather was clear and pleasant, Jack had
no idea of letting Flora pass the night with no covering
nearer than the sky. The wonderful hatchet was soon at
work, and before the sun had put on his nightcap, Jack had
built what he called “only a hut,” but what Flora called a
leafy bower. It was made of boughs cut from the surround-
ing trees. Her bed was made of dry leaves, covered with
Jack’s old coat, which had answered many a useful purpose
before. At its entrance Jack made a porch, in which he lay,
her faithful guardian. The next morning Flora declared she
had never slept better in her life. Jack put a few improve-
ments on their new dwelling in the way of strengthening it in
case of a sudden gust of wind.

“Tt will answer pretty well in fair weather, Flora, but we
must go house-hunting again. It is a pity houses are so easily
carried off in this country.’

This remark set Jack thinking that their next house must

tion, Jack exclaimed :

“Tve got it!”

“ What! another house?” ;

“Yes! and one that will be permanent, this time. There
is a big hollow tree not far away. Neither the stump-tailed
cow, nor her friend the dog, nor even the whole race of
giants will be able to carry that off.”

Jack, having the day before him, and his faithful hatchet
with him, went to work. He cleared out the decayed wood,
and found, much to their mutual delight, that the aperture
The trunk

near the ground was as large around as a good sized house.

extended some distance into this mammoth tree.

Jack managed, by putting in some partitions, to make three
good sized rooms; in that intended for Flora, he put in a
window, about eight feet from the ground.

They spent three nights more in what Flora called their
bower home, before they were ready to take possession
of their Giant Tree House.

many improvements, for he felt there was no danger this

Jack designed and carried out

time, of having their house carried off in a cow’s stomach
or a dog’s mouth.

Besides the rooms, Jack made some nice little pantries,
much to Flora’s delight, who had become quite an accom-
plished little housekeeper. They had quite a number of
dishes now, and cups and plates fashioned out of wood.

Still they had hard work to get food to put on the dishes.
Jack had poor luck at fishing, and the birds kept what
they got. Occasionally, he shot what was considered in that
country a little chippee, but was, in fact, larger than a turkey,
and lasted them much longer than they liked.

Did Flora ever think of her parents? Yes, every day of
her life, and Jack too. But there was this difference in their
thoughts, however. Flora had not been a dutiful daughter,
and she felt it keenly; she longed bitterly for home, and
thought now how differently she would treat her parents and
little friends. Jack’s regrets were, that he was not at home
to help his parents, but then he felt he was doing his duty
now in taking care of Flora, and so had little trouble in

‘be more secure. Flora had escaped twice, but she might | keeping up a stout and cheerful heart.
THE+PUMPKANGAO OSE.

Poor Flora had many a crying time when Jack was away
hunting for food. The very stability of this new house, its
completeness, seemed to say to her—“ This is your home for
life.”

One day, when Jack was away doing his best to entice the
fish to eat a little, that Flora and he might eat them in
return, she was having what girls call a “real good cry.”
What was her surprise to hear a voice above her, saying:

“ Little girl, what are you crying for?”

Looking up, she saw a red squirrel on the tree above her
head. Though the squirrel was quite as tall as herself, she
had such a kind eye that Flora felt no fear, but answered :

**T am a good deal home-sick, and a little hungry.”

**T don’t know what kind of sickness that is, but I know
all about hunger. I would like to help you, but we are very
poor ourselves.”

“You have a family, then?” asked Flora, forgetting her
troubles in anticipation of a chat with a neighbor.

“O yes,” replied the lady, with pardonable pride; “I have
six infants. I nurse them all. My husband is away now
trying to find some nuts for our young family. Hoe is a
colored gentleman. My family, who are all very proud, were
opposed to my marrying a black squirrel, and since my
marriage, they have disowned me, simply on account of my
husband’s color.”

Flora listened so attentively to Madame Red Squirrel, and
showed so much sympathy for her, that she finally concluded
she could spare Flora a few nuts out of their winter’s store.

Flora thanked her, and slipped them in her pocket.

“Why don’t you eat them, if you are hungry ?” asked Mrs.
Squirrel.

“ Because I cannot crack them with my teeth.”

The new neighbor laughed outright.

“A fig for such teeth. Why, my four teeth are better
But wait!

My cousin, Chipmunk, who lives under

than your whole mouthful. Perhaps you would
rather have roots.
this tree, has some roots and things in his cellar; he might
exchange some of them for your nuts. There are my babies
erying for their supper, so I must go; remember Mr. Chip-

munk, under the tree.”



Flora had no disposition to make acquaintance with any
more strangers till Jack came home. She thought a stone
would help her to the meat inside the nuts, as well as squir-
rels’ teeth ; looking around for one, she saw a pair of bright
black eyes peering at her out of a hole beneath the tree.

“Are you Mr. Chipmunk, that keeps roots and things down
a cellar?”

He acknowledged the name, but was very guarded as to
the contents of the cellar, till he knew Flora’s reasons for
asking.

Flora explained she had “nuts to exchange for roots.”
Then Cousin Chipmunk grew more communicative, and
admitted he had some roots and things laid up for winter,
and that, to accommodate a lady, he would make an ex-
change.

Flora, unused to barter, said it would accommodate her
very much, as her teeth were not strong enough to crack the
nuts. Mr, Chipmunk, on this, went down and brought up
some sweet potatoes. Poor Flora made another mistake in
saying how dearly she loved sweet potatoes, roasted.

She tried to recover lost ground by a great deal of hag-
gling. Finally, a bargain was struck. To be sure the
potatoes were large, but the nuts were, too. Flora was con-
vinced that Mr, Chipmunk had overreached her, and that he
was a snarp, tricky fellow.

She soon started a fire, preparatory to roasting the sweet
potatoes in the hot ashes, before Jack’s return; and was
quite happy in the thought of the joyful surpriso that await-
ed him, when, suddenly, she was recalled from her pleasant
revery by an uproar in the tree above her, caused by the
crying, coughing, and sneezing of the infant squirrels. At
last, above this din, Flora heard Madame ery:

“Little girl! what on earth are you doing down there?
You have nearly killed my babies, to say nothing of myself.
I was up nearly all night with one of them who had the
colic, and how this is going to affect him, I am sure I
cannot tell.”

Flora apologized very humbly and prettily: she said she
was very thoughtless and careless, but would take more care

in future, as she was desirous of living on the very best of

if f) PAM RK IPN. fl Olt SAL

terms with all her neighbors. She further excused herself
by saying it was the first time she had ever lived in a tenc-
ment-house.

Madame Squirrel accepted Flora’s apology, with the grace
belonging to a lady of good family, and wished Flora to tell
her what was good for the colic.

Flora confessed her ignorance of any cure for this formid-
able complaint, never having had it within her recollection.
She had had a great deal of trouble with her teeth, so her
mother told her.

“You seem to have it yet, little girl, since you cannot crack
nuts.”

Flora was determined not to take offence, and so inquired
if the little squirrels ever ran away.

“Not yet,” replied Madame, “they are too little.” They
were larger than the cats Flora had seen at home.

“Perhaps they will when they grow up.”

“ Perhaps.”

“Mamma tied me up when I ran away,” confessed Flora.

“Did that cure you?”

“Yes,” innocently answered Flora.

“Then Pll try that way.” And the good mother hurried
back to her little ones.

Flora moved her fire away from the tree, and by the time
Jack came back, hungry, tired and disappointed, for he had
returned empty-handed, an ample dish of roasted sweet
potatoes was set before him, by the delighted little cook.

Such a gay and happy meal as it proved to be! It was
a glorious dinner of herbs, with contentment.

CHAPTER V.

THE important question of food-supply, now no longer
troubled them. Hither Jack had acquired more skill, or else
the season had changed for the better. They always had
enough and to spare.

Jack and Flora made the acquaintance of Mr. Squirrel,
the colored husband of Madame, who had so shocked the
prejudices of her family. Jack declared he was a fine fellow,

an affectionate father, and faithful husband ; and often made
him a present of nuts.

Mr. Chipmunk rather improved on further acquaintance.
He was as sharp as ever at a bargain, but Jack said that was
no great fault. Where he procured sweet potatoes he kept
Much

to Flora’s delight, Jack discovered his weak spot. He was

a profound secret. He was always ready for a trade.

immoderately fond of a certain root he found it very difficult
When he suc-
ceeded in finding this coveted nicety, he paid Mr. Chipmunk

to procure. To Jack it was much easier.
off for the sharp bargain he had made with Flora.

Within doors Jack had improved things almost to hollow-
tree perfection. Flora’s boudoir, as she called it, was a
triumph of skill. Jack never tired of working on it.

But it was shelter and comfort,

and they were thankful for it.

Still it was not home.
Jack had contrived a stout
door, and when it was closed at night, they were safe from
all intrusion.

One day, Flora was in her little room looking out of the
window, and longing, it must be confessed, for parents and
home, Suddenly the light failed, owing to a large white ball
flying through the air. Looking up, she saw it had caught in
the branches opposite to where Mr. and Mrs. Squirrel lived.
In an instant she was out of the house, and pointing it out to
Jack, asking what the wonder was.

He told her it was a monster thistle down.

“Why, if we can get it down, we can make some nice soft
beds of it,” said Flora.

“We will do better than that, Flora. We will not get it
down, but if I can carry out my idea it will take us up, and
then away to our lost homes again.”

Tears came into Flora’s eyes from joy. Oh! if her gallant
preserver and guardian could do that, she would love him
and be proud of him all her life.

“Now, first to fasten our carriage, for it must not run
away till we and the wind are ready.”

All this was Greek to Flora. All she understood was home.
Jack had promised that, if he succeeded, and she had great
faith in him. So far, Jack had always done what he said he
could do.
1OE dee NEP KGL IN, tI -O. CL SAE.

She watched the fastening of the huge ball to the strong
limbs of the tree. Mr. and Madame Squirrel helped in this,
they carrying the strings, and Jack fastening them.

“Now, you are safe, so far,” said Jack, as he descended the
tree, and lighted softly on the earth.

Then he brought out the great ball of twine, and they com-
menced weaving a net, as some fishermen had taught Jack
to do at home. In the old days, Flora would have despised
such work. Now it was working out for them, a blessed
deliverance from exile, and restoration to home.

When the net was finished, Jack procured some ash slips
from a tree near by, and made of them a basket large and

strong enough to hold Flora and himself.

And now Flora’s eyes were opened. The big white ball |

was to be a balloon. The network was to enclose it, and to
that, the basket or car was to be fastened.

“But oh! dear Jack, what shall we do for ropes?’

“Do without, since we cannot get them; and take these
stout vines instead.”

And suiting the action to the word, Jack stripped from a
tree, a vine that had grown around it; twisting this into
cords, he found it strong enough to sustain more than their
united weight.

All had succeeded so far.

over and around the ball, the car was fastened and hung at

The network had been passed
a few feet distance from the earth. The balloon tugged at
its fastenings as if it would break loose. All that was now
needed, was a North West wind.

“When the wind comes, we will go,” said Jack.

They waited several days. At length, early one morning
the wished-for wind appeared, blowing very softly at first.
Jack waited till it gained more strength, which it soon did.

“Come, Flora, all is ready.” Hasty adieus were made.
Flora, like the good little housekeeper she had grown, ap-
peared promptly, having in her hand a nice little lunch
basket, well filled. The rest of the eatables were given to
the Squirrel family.

As a faithful historian I am obliged to add, that while the
Squirrel family were making tearful adieus, Mr. Chipmunk,

with dry eyes, but very intent ones to his own interest,





transferred a portion of these eatables to his cellar under
the tree.

Jack carefully lifted Flora into the basket, and then fol-
lowed himself.

“Now hold on fast, Flora, and have a stout heart. We are
homeward bound.”

As the words were uttered he had cut the cords. Up
sprang the balloon like a living, palpitating thing.

Bump! Bump! went the car in its contact with the trees.
Flora held fast from very fear.

Scratch! Scratch! went Flora’s head through the branches,
while high up above the tree shot the balloon into the clear

alr.

Flora was too happy to have kept her head on, after such
a rush. She looked over the side of the basket, and was
dazzled by the magnificent prospect.

Far, far below, away down through the clear air, she saw
at a glance all the country they had traveled over. There
was the river looking like a silver thread, and near must be
their Tree House. Now just beneath them is the cornfield
where Pumpkin House had stood and disappeared, and look!
that is the giant pulling weeds as large as trees out of his
garden, but from here he looks like a little boy.

That shining piece of silver over there is the lake. Now
“Tf the cords should break,” said Flora,

Jack removed her fears by saying

it is under us.
with anxious heart.
“they are stronger than ropes.”

Then it grew cold. Flora trembled with cold and fear.

“Tie down in the bottom of the basket,’ said Jack, “and
T'll cover you with my old coat.”

She obeyed. The rocking motion of the car lulled her at
last to sleep, and Jack watched alone.

By noon the opposite shore of the lake was reached. Then
Jack awakened his companion, and told her they were near
home. Flora could not think for a moment where she was.
The word “home” soon roused her. She watched with trem-
bling lip and strained eye to catch the first glimpse of her
dear home.

Soon the outlines of a large mansion came into view. The

delighted Flora clapped her hands for joy. Yes, it was home.

LAL POT MEP RT NN. FLO SE:

See! there is the garden—that is the observatory on the

house—there are the tall poplars !

“Home! dear, dear home!” and Flora fairly wept for

joy: :
They had crossed the lake, and the balloon was settling

fast.

that Flora could recognize old Job the gardener, with his

Now they were over the garden, and so near the earth

face as usual toward the ground.

When they came between him and the sun, he, thinking
it a cloud, kept on his work without looking up. When
bump! the bottom of the basket smashed his hat down over
his eyes and then danced up as if it was playing with the
old man.

With such a hint he got his eyes clear, and saw his little
mistress with Jack, in a curious looking dress, coming from
goodness knows where, in a goodness knows what sort of
carriage, without horses.

Flora’s parents now hastened from the house, and soon
they had their lost darling clasped in their arms.

Jack, not waiting to hear the thanks Flora’s parents show-
ered on him, when they understood they owed their daughter’s
safety to his untiring and unselfish care, hastened away to
his lowly home, to reassure his parents, by his safe return.
Jack was too modest to make himself the hero of a story,

but Flora told it to his parents, as to her own, and the worthy
couple shed tears of joy, and thanked Heaven for giving
them such a son.

Flora never “put on airs” again with her friend Jack.
She felt in her heart that he had not only saved her life and
cared for her comfort, by the sacrifice of his own, but had
taught her to lead a better and more useful life.

Her parents were delighted with the improvement in her.
She became gentle, obedient, and always glad and willing to
do good to others.

As for Jack, he needed very little to make him a gentleman,
in the best sense of the word. Flora’s father sent him to
school, and he made such progress that his benefactor re-
solved to give him a collegiate education.

He graduated with high honors, and became one of the
most eloquent, wise, and good lawyers of the country in
which he lived.

It seems to me that I heard my grandmother tell of a
wedding she went to, when a young lady. The bride was
very beautiful, and amiable, and the bridegroom was distin-
guished for talent and goodness of heart. If I recollect right,
the name of the bride was Flora. She wore a very singular
veil, fine as a cobweb, and showing all the colors of the
rainbow when the sun shone on it,




BIG PICTURE BOOKS





=]

@ |

FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

TWeabNTY-FIVE GENTS EACH,

Comprise fifty kinds, representing the finest Picture Books that can be found in the market. They are printed upon
fine paper, specially prepared by ourselves, with a view of producing the best effects in color. The designs for the
illustrations have been executed by the best artists, and give the books pre-eminence as an attractive line for young
people. The language employed is simple, and easily understood by those for whom they are intended, and many of
the series have become almost juvenile classics. 4to. Demi, with six to twelve illustrated pages.

NOTE.—Any of these Books can be had Mounted on Linen.
Puss in Boots.

Ten Little Niggers.
Nine Niggers More.
Ten Little Mulligan Guards.
Alphabet of Country Scenes.

My Mother.

Fat Boy.

Children in the Wood.

Price, Sixty Cents each.

Mother Hubbard’s Dog.
Tit, Tiny, and Tittens.
Four-Footed Friends.
Three Little Kittens.

Baby. Visit of St. Nicholas. Three Good Friends.
Putnam. : “ in German.| Cock Robin
Pocahontas. Santa Claus and his Works. The Froggy who would a woo-

66 ce

Three Bears.

Tom Thumb.

Visit to the Menagerie.
Home Games for Boys.
Home Games for Girls.
Yankee Doodle.
Robinson Crusoe.
White Cat.

Hey Diddle Diddle.
Jack and the Bean-Stalk.
Hare and Tortoise.



“

Domestic Animals.
Kindness to Animals.
Home Kindness.

Rip Van Winkle.

Humpty Dumpty.—Vol. 1.
Humpty Dumpty.—Vol. 2.
Nursery Rhymes.

| House that Jack Built.
Wild Animals.—Part One.
Wild Animals.—Part Two.

in German.| ing go.

Nonsense for Girls.

World-Wide Fables.

Cinderella and the Little Glass
Slipper.

IN PRESS.

Henny Penny.

Little Red: Riding Heod.
The Bears.

The Monkeys.





New Paper Dolls.

The most Amusement at little cost that can be found.

SIX CENTS EACH. TEN CENTS EACH.

Polly Prim. GertyGood. | LottieLove. Myra Mild.

Jennie June Bessie Bliss.
EIETEEN CENTS EACH.

Dottie Dimple. Susie Simple. Bertie Bright.
Bride, Bridesmaid, and Groomsman.





Dolly Varden Dolls.

LAR GFE

Figures cut out, and put up i elopes.

IWENTY-FIVE CENTS EACH,

Baby Blue. Bertha Blonde. Betsy Brunette.



\



|
{|
|
|

|



|

STANDARD FOLDING GAME BOARDS.

Each Game played upon a separate and large

sized design.

Pilgrim’s Progress contains the games of Pilgrim’s Pro-
gress, Tower of Babel, and Going to Sunday School. ‘Three
moral games in one Board. The Pilgrim’s Progress is unsur-
passed in beauty of coloring and artistic excellence. The design
of the Tower of Babel is a splendid representation of the Biblical
Tower, some fifteen inches in height. The Sunday School game
is a novelty in appearance. Played with the Indicator, a new
method of playing games, superior to dice and teetotums, and
wholly unobjectionable.............--.c0000 Price,

The Jerome Steepie Chase Game contains three
games—The Steeple Chase Game, Balky Horse, and Pool—in
the same style as foregoing Price, $2.00

Life’s Mishaps and Domino Rex - two games in
ONG RB Oad! a dress castes oe Veena Re ee Price, $1.00 |

Captive Princess—tThe simplest and best game published.
.00

New method throughout. Directions for playing occupy only
ten lines Price, $1







xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20100402_AAAACC' PACKAGE 'UF00026021_00001' INGEST_TIME '2010-04-02T17:51:35-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T18:12:58-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 300440; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-10T10:40:12-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '2755' DFID 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAB' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00001.pro'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 5013d80b416f89d50c902ebfb814e434
'SHA-1' 7a77c1814686d5ec40f40bddbe831322e7d6c7ba
EVENT '2012-06-11T18:13:01-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'72982' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAC' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
fadf850529b4670ce1dff0be99532189
eaf8b2c8d4a395c6bc0ee34ca27ea904c9536392
'2012-06-11T18:13:04-04:00'
describe
'8278448' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAD' 'sip-files00004.tif'
456d544cfe45da18d728d5e21d1e3ec6
4948a1766a8edfd211eee780e9a59291b5df48a6
'2012-06-11T18:13:20-04:00'
describe
'4572' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAE' 'sip-files00008.txt'
d32ede00bbd1c30dd2f5d48021eee49d
b2ccf090bec32150212724cdbcef73e64d5de199
'2012-06-11T18:12:55-04:00'
describe
'41890' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAF' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
b9a8ac3070ae24f2419ec6047b4a5613
6a1910161d419ede3cf0074fe64044ee1f368410
'2012-06-11T18:12:27-04:00'
describe
'108907' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAG' 'sip-files00012.pro'
f0e111d9e1ea7ce54ea5c26035ca4b4e
7a5fa9381c33bae21747f17caa305be6bb8e7c99
'2012-06-11T18:12:49-04:00'
describe
'225518' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAH' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
6cc9985395dc76a005373bf39b6bb0e4
7ae8a10e4013bd17f17e510210f3f224a0e36123
'2012-06-11T18:12:16-04:00'
describe
'218210' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAI' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
e50337b9c1fadb6cb293a4c6b7e0bfab
0e7791652acc4ee719628f51921710544ef1b1c0
'2012-06-11T18:13:28-04:00'
describe
'1057301' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAJ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
047ebbb4fa4bd6646bda047db1cebe48
1aa6dc9013010bff1b21586742ebc0edc58343af
'2012-06-11T18:13:16-04:00'
describe
'26985' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAK' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
ae95cb2c54e125f664e9cf8dae9922b7
e6092799185654a46385a1015988df2c2507bae9
'2012-06-11T18:13:26-04:00'
describe
'30658' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAL' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
306b9873d6dce9a72ab7bb6d06abb7aa
bc61549463aab9502432ba4a3f6d5f3a08d00a88
'2012-06-11T18:13:05-04:00'
describe
'187097' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAM' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
97d5acfa860e47a3eab1f7f714402d78
81bb381812ea0d2aea100822593261f022160f55
'2012-06-11T18:12:48-04:00'
describe
'1081347' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAN' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
8f0779d6a57aa875e0a21419f043ea67
7dbefc062ddc381ac862aa068378d9867166fc8f
'2012-06-11T18:13:23-04:00'
describe
'83213' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAO' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
a09c75d1370a6b0eda08cdbf455e570a
b48ec55165b99a8e06bc581d63ca7f51ea1e3795
'2012-06-11T18:13:30-04:00'
describe
'27036' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAP' 'sip-filesUF00026021_00001.mets'
81c9b60498defb259f804538e28eb297
3df4bc5f5a26c2736efc184fa8a50fa4ed4db910
'2012-06-11T18:13:21-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T10:37:42-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'250624' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAS' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
3c2061b3c54e2e53c6db616ae64299a2
4d1465e1dd8f40b29dc2d8189f54fba488b6950f
'2012-06-11T18:12:31-04:00'
describe
'170295' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAT' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
304e8ce42c9f2758bee2b2127c414453
a2332d98e48ab94ef570283f0426db42b6a70bf3
'2012-06-11T18:12:15-04:00'
describe
'241413' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAU' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
41721bbca55a8621f506584611e3d9e5
dbe6bc9ab03ec1a2c0ac65f2176b6423f025fbfa
'2012-06-11T18:12:32-04:00'
describe
'205271' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAV' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
825b70cde80b7cf2acf9fb7d5f4fc4e0
7acc68ee2b6e45d2c144113436c01eb032ffad03
'2012-06-11T18:13:27-04:00'
describe
'221419' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAW' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
dbe68ae2a6c7d29c7eba30e21d4265a4
76da3f72a1192a107ccf028c400ebc4c7158e1c5
'2012-06-11T18:13:29-04:00'
describe
'216105' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAX' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
09f01a14104e9cc4828d287b748aa74e
163482fd36b5fbca6de65b8fa0ce526a62231c65
'2012-06-11T18:12:39-04:00'
describe
'201874' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAY' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
0545151b43323f152884d22e5e46f136
707c9702b189f6b3b2561557903eba4366e198df
'2012-06-11T18:13:07-04:00'
describe
'241174' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYAZ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
d55685f3b262f6c601637aba35f01117
75fdbfda70de90f5793f4fa2404a0be3a7b51bc8
'2012-06-11T18:13:13-04:00'
describe
'236659' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBA' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
b05ea9e0e3ae5c126e6ade53f71e2294
751efff4564f109c4c2f8a7066378078f03451e5
'2012-06-11T18:12:21-04:00'
describe
'186659' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBB' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
fd89bf14cbe93bda6d89173e13ff1f98
4fb74e472c343a5b82982d63bc56128bf67acb66
'2012-06-11T18:12:24-04:00'
describe
'222444' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBC' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
ca692714887a9a252ac6470cf8423e3b
a2ef1b01b883aca45f86360bd4fece008dd6966c
'2012-06-11T18:12:35-04:00'
describe
'227255' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBD' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
138a17955dd1a53634cede33fea9aa5a
14ecd29a5b7ac67b7d1b6afc3a3df535255e37fa
'2012-06-11T18:12:23-04:00'
describe
'185761' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBE' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
fe99547c6e31aa749be0f82b85106101
1703b606bd9f31d1e4513fdf6ffa4d32a92ba19d
'2012-06-11T18:12:54-04:00'
describe
'152254' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBF' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
dbdac512852f1622fb5eb42156d01761
952cb1d4d69b37a443c1672a2d6e288dda329db5
'2012-06-11T18:12:25-04:00'
describe
'224064' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBG' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
0b0192bc4dda221de506016137ff31ad
ff787784a754ac644685c18b966bcc1b9dd8f7ab
'2012-06-11T18:13:12-04:00'
describe
'1091372' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBH' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
8fe262fcb1f1c6a08b9568c0e519680b
d1bc6bbd75632e7aa436f306a58c335ad0594539
'2012-06-11T18:12:42-04:00'
describe
'1071964' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBI' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
2c3ba94a608b209d8eb923b8197530cd
5fdf12b97df9e3d96494bf4e7f34793dc8f96174
'2012-06-11T18:13:11-04:00'
describe
'1070132' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBJ' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
64524ee09586ce86414b8bb014458503
d8b952e7553725241fc79841ba4d57650d59df34
'2012-06-11T18:12:37-04:00'
describe
'1031072' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBK' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
677f382d955c6573f651a2936d7d0908
4c75b23ec4b26b8d7ac69fa0634ce2a1cb7331df
describe
'1056653' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBL' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
8416a46fef0a7133adab99e7a0c0bae9
005527a48cd7847911f152283e4332d7a098f115
'2012-06-11T18:12:58-04:00'
describe
'1062097' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBM' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
0805a45b2029d609379427b869c5e8b4
ceb1dc5e2530c3df6dfd7b59fe1603e1deeba967
'2012-06-11T18:12:28-04:00'
describe
'1067415' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBN' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
b3bcfd1742386527a00ed779f0159830
5a887902826b05e344d18e621663f34f02831c0a
'2012-06-11T18:13:02-04:00'
describe
'1061017' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBO' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
ecc44d59d3da261e5a897909e4984757
0f752d4a80c1579616f271f3e689e1aefa688624
'2012-06-11T18:12:46-04:00'
describe
'1062537' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBP' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
45409a4a0fca3921d1dc2fecf82bb81d
4e610c2e76250799a7da3f76c98261bbfe0eef7c
describe
'1037644' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBQ' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
cb30feb14349ee595acef281483335dc
4950896842620c4794823e7c6ff1ee0b0d156c95
'2012-06-11T18:12:14-04:00'
describe
'1036080' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBR' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
fb1e982e413a4c3253ba33ff964f48db
e91b7ce09b9ec6b87175dc03ef57851254c1fcd4
describe
'1020587' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBS' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
584a5ee7492349732f6111a12bad6b78
017f0c5c49cab6ee752f7585bf6639f7d743a726
'2012-06-11T18:13:06-04:00'
describe
'1022229' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBT' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
a4dc6b2f10747ee704adc6b8c76f71c6
a7ec4c31e7967d41643f0167e8f402a2fae0cf4a
describe
'1083059' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBU' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
e53d91bbd7ffba51cc229bf4d3551977
a8e7e030120b7ac8b90de8cd034a487a1bbb63ab
describe
'1058454' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBV' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
cfe5f25438dfc0d533f9ed3d6cd5fd14
7aa840cb60e7866f98c9b4e84005d4e79e3e28ca
'2012-06-11T18:13:03-04:00'
describe
'1058043' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBW' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
c858bfe8bd82b517743f19da4c2888a4
56bb8701ad55f7263d5655bc660b2f86977569d9
describe
'26223708' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBX' 'sip-files00001.tif'
73f2d1534da9b560fd32c43b1a4e79a2
a17f84f790c6af22284fd2cc2c957fb48d385931
'2012-06-11T18:12:53-04:00'
describe
'8600996' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBY' 'sip-files00002.tif'
2d24b39751237dfd80dcb80120c2ad35
9fe44d2c0cb2a5314b44dda947a62a513968727a
describe
'25696772' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYBZ' 'sip-files00003.tif'
666485e9b0f2197dbe93918d431c39a7
e708b48c8a3ea53d3aa8c4c22aac4424d04254ff
'2012-06-11T18:13:09-04:00'
describe
'8480428' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCA' 'sip-files00005.tif'
0774d48482a6029ae8ace49046e39930
21e72e1850e4a9a3264ad1f4794df6ea249a59e8
'2012-06-11T18:12:33-04:00'
describe
'25516528' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCB' 'sip-files00006.tif'
c9a50087de3339f162622cbbbbcea1b2
35c8fb4a533581fbd4b1b2ad744181d8bc6f6612
'2012-06-11T18:13:15-04:00'
describe
'8566156' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCC' 'sip-files00007.tif'
ac4ba198f9c51cba7a228ccdee33b3ae
a463cc20371b3f9783960f79d7898eea16e6478c
'2012-06-11T18:12:59-04:00'
describe
'8502808' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCD' 'sip-files00008.tif'
d4e742b16b73e0677e1a8fc26db23722
8fc3dc4da5f39b8dd711eef8580ef6ac5c16a86d
'2012-06-11T18:12:20-04:00'
describe
'25520232' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCE' 'sip-files00009.tif'
54977b38fb1622ec639442d8ae671676
fc73d399473e8d0f7f7a11d2436502b7a33003f9
'2012-06-11T18:12:17-04:00'
describe
'24918984' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCF' 'sip-files00010.tif'
2dab774e39dd0ea4157797d01b55a742
afcfe935954ffff1026fee5c90aa4bfa420d2888
describe
'8317184' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCG' 'sip-files00011.tif'
3880fbff6243b9c93c3098b09866838c
cee931d6dd5a25c966baa8ea90133f94abc761b6
'2012-06-11T18:12:19-04:00'
describe
'8193620' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCH' 'sip-files00012.tif'
c94844605274bc0586b399176e5c266f
2519f7e34a72c8a3f659880ed3d5a0e1ad7e5caf
'2012-06-11T18:12:47-04:00'
describe
'25967468' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCI' 'sip-files00013.tif'
299c9168d3c1cc95e598e66306f2e90f
487f46181a1131b869f811eb3abce3a70b9e4ddf
'2012-06-11T18:12:45-04:00'
describe
'8486124' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCJ' 'sip-files00014.tif'
400f656e32afb479ad00732499711c39
3ff12445be1b8f5229bccd238da04880cdedd486
'2012-06-11T18:13:10-04:00'
describe
'8205860' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCK' 'sip-files00015.tif'
69a5a8702ac3b8f4622bcd5691aad938
0a26d67c79ada1ab1015de6619b7d73d1276e300
'2012-06-11T18:12:29-04:00'
describe
'26006352' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCL' 'sip-files00016.tif'
00352d9f317405a638b493abcaa2696a
01b671314f7c4ccce799180a1d0facce30f39469
'2012-06-11T18:12:41-04:00'
describe
'8488220' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCM' 'sip-files00017.tif'
a843dda849bdd840571a1ae88a0225ed
ccffd09934dd5c5a46edbb12da4e10d6aca24781
'2012-06-11T18:12:56-04:00'
describe
'8481552' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCN' 'sip-files00018.tif'
58c7a3024efaaac2599411f540ddb75d
eaf2b1ad1042b0ae54fbff8d749fc53692c57e85
'2012-06-11T18:13:18-04:00'
describe
'78368' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCO' 'sip-files00002.pro'
786107d10af5ed41fc03f02f14f6bd51
b62b4356a137d4b77344d23d3f4f12f0cfe657a5
'2012-06-11T18:13:17-04:00'
describe
'118075' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCP' 'sip-files00004.pro'
0c85c6073e109ea3bf0e48f086ed3970
09177e19541eeb0849b2868e072a5019c212d182
describe
'107061' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCQ' 'sip-files00005.pro'
9776c282fa413f5601cd8136ab8f0eff
7446c478c01a87cd9cd3385ab57e4f68d83d97e3
'2012-06-11T18:12:26-04:00'
describe
'103324' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCR' 'sip-files00007.pro'
5dbba5b163c933b995393a41dcfbfb14
e4d35f99805d82bd5c48902bacb9f99481027a17
describe
'115015' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCS' 'sip-files00008.pro'
f22b577933a80f73fcacb38add885a80
0a49af50f70ef6037b9eed42831840ae731ed9d9
describe
'113309' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCT' 'sip-files00011.pro'
0bed301d7573cc83f7db3b33d81b32a5
c988f75704d496f932b6d62d76861882a88653fa
'2012-06-11T18:12:43-04:00'
describe
'100439' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCU' 'sip-files00014.pro'
61f9758ed5415aba4b22ac7ab3e7fc5c
8963985358eb9346e217d1bc328148de6a10e441
describe
'107590' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCV' 'sip-files00015.pro'
00b0e9f38400969f2e6d3099dee6e15d
b9052670a2a1815d70be79290c4d7108aed1250e
describe
'64189' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCW' 'sip-files00017.pro'
601a996d9704c503a8abab4ff441b1b2
47b03f8cb2f3520f36ffee6790617f1c4240e77f
describe
'84824' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCX' 'sip-files00018.pro'
344046c9ac90456b68c9c24cca85bd81
aa9e720215dee7581021ceae815cb759679ef766
'2012-06-11T18:12:34-04:00'
describe
'303' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCY' 'sip-files00001.txt'
09bad9282968ef24e0b544affbe08f91
9c8688115361325a3300238157ae1d72d7b4866c
'2012-06-11T18:12:50-04:00'
describe
'3231' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYCZ' 'sip-files00002.txt'
af21325e2372bbbd1f4d8a11bca548ad
1a3cdd0f69da9f16211db8988c2cc75168d9343c
'2012-06-11T18:13:31-04:00'
describe
'2620' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDA' 'sip-files00003.txt'
f91160cc7f6bc4e8d07f77ce4bf5fd52
729aa975b382f012a10077409998c4b9e2c22bd4
'2012-06-11T18:13:32-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'4564' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDB' 'sip-files00004.txt'
6f9582d39e6bc7718bc515a1b186c8bb
bda5382b6ec91f2da842e65c7c22b332ce7b1660
'2012-06-11T18:13:33-04:00'
describe
'4181' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDC' 'sip-files00005.txt'
d626800d4e462a390f588818f3345683
8e70af658634d418b44bf49cb1142560e1cec031
'2012-06-11T18:13:25-04:00'
describe
'188' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDD' 'sip-files00006.txt'
a4e959fd53872d36550f94a9eab8a2c7
e5a5fd067b02c51fd2c43e2b5bb978002e6df238
'2012-06-11T18:12:38-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'4043' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDE' 'sip-files00007.txt'
43be117996bed5cd9876d60419b3ea03
0e5a54809bcc14d7c8ab13e60fd6c8fae40481d2
describe
'214' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDF' 'sip-files00009.txt'
d8a187bf9ad9bdcf0ffc2aba27cb916c
378be18b1628fb2697a42cbe7c985def4b1f706d
'2012-06-11T18:12:22-04:00'
describe
'353' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDG' 'sip-files00010.txt'
c5f7cae5b4c848e0133898b5a03f1380
f4f3f1fc3c688dde577adefb8a52b257f821969c
describe
'4409' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDH' 'sip-files00011.txt'
c428d0d8f7484cfae174cdb2dfb8dbbd
45ceb0ba4dd49b810bcfef253e6e24d7abe558c5
describe
'4274' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDI' 'sip-files00012.txt'
cd93c1164017ed9ce10b5b56c4dab921
50b1576cd98d5c4daa2a80fafb8ea362117cba49
'2012-06-11T18:12:18-04:00'
describe
'422' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDJ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
a7844988798f04cadcc0670043c5331a
cef2cd51cc36952ce2a8c7a3400e475b4ae9b6de
describe
'3974' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDK' 'sip-files00014.txt'
b711c73dfcc4ee977298a05d5cfbf08a
759fe2fb734d08a5b29a7903b8f8488e72b96a7a
describe
'4233' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDL' 'sip-files00015.txt'
27506fdb4775a187f25ac71f1843997d
b4ba7c7aae0af4798289e4d3d020f59b74aa178c
describe
'2194' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDM' 'sip-files00016.txt'
f071a8f5313a707cac5b199856051647
7249ae2796ecebef42977fd88e1461ed5615a0d4
describe
Invalid character
'2522' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDN' 'sip-files00017.txt'
b50ec35af0a6f5bce8bae6f45295501b
06a527c3e7732172dc934887ab2a15f27a3f4feb
'2012-06-11T18:12:36-04:00'
describe
'3451' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDO' 'sip-files00018.txt'
0bb8f8629149ac26c04c0a4585f11680
2a986f64a355fbf4fe4a57786ea93493a788126d
describe
'47114' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDP' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
1e5e4c3af03d9117485a313982b06b38
038908341f2626361adbd6005c57138e96451ea4
'2012-06-11T18:13:24-04:00'
describe
'60466' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDQ' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
c3254f01f140b1655bdcdd7646eac54a
a6e8a35dabc7cb4d04e25eb4e160a2a1591001f0
describe
'29506' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDR' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
3dd05c375783e6f26d32622c856536d8
66f305b4c9bfb7cd81787829cc720d3f8cab1781
describe
'39816' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDS' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
46725c09fa7d38aec8ba6ede8089d68d
f49dc45c546ad568f2d8ceecd980ce1ae264aeeb
describe
'66723' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDT' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
3b9acac03d97f216328127ac11368b44
ba7e26efe07b6d76d8b66eba377ce06cbcade64b
describe
'56071' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDU' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
b4b63c699a45447ae79388b5dc12e2c7
eccf74ee67d1dcc4bbd653514edbb5b162c93634
describe
'71739' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDV' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
47b44c3d8e6abf3be211605cbe3cf5ce
feeba89bcabc261e58641f4a2fd5d3434d92e881
describe
'39994' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDW' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
5d92ee89df641b5d4d87807fd71ec098
0b69556e68f819238f9808d2eb1ae173fe21f289
describe
'66120' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDX' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
7d415e7069a353baa3e6dcbe5b8482de
388b8f1385c6ded51932ee81c75958056454d13b
describe
'80633' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDY' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
711f44fcf4c85586869ed52f0cfce5d0
188005a6f8afc6f92d05a35c9f5fcd3e177b6159
describe
'41759' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYDZ' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
0b3ac2d403c97c5ac08801fb0c2a1d8e
fde8a3907e92b013341334a4d0c31e4d54787651
describe
'41100' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYEA' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
af42df309f9e72ba9eedaeaa932baf75
20341fa2a971a605df1e34416dedbdc9fbb9cb5c
describe
'79148' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYEB' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
2d1aaf6d807b6c589ba18871bcbc31c0
56ca3bb6318d90c98da80f75176047c3a9674028
describe
'36370' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYEC' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
824753dfe2bcc2ca85feb4a2f268190c
68bddf5bdb901982b69d8f0f2ccfaf6605f0bb75
describe
'63208' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYED' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
a10d1de90d2d8317242f0adf318d4ad5
98e276bc138505d564d35fae63220706a07d20f4
'2012-06-11T18:12:30-04:00'
describe
'33563' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYEE' 'sip-filesUF00026021_00001.xml'
44be4535f012ebf107cd898cf46360b2
b9215c92761ea64b23cb178b9bdddc7b4dd290f0
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T10:37:41-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'92062' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYEF' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
be14588189f0825006aca7334b768051
dba4f240c2d703bdc2d0a0d39fcd2ebe8fb61755
describe
'68819' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYEG' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
99ece136dc03204c28218d4c480e24fc
5e387f031845421f9e3901148c5f5bf09de22088
'2012-06-11T18:13:22-04:00'
describe
'56409' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYEH' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
2130dd0b74d0de17fea2f2c74a9fb676
03a026876cf70692749de83bad2f8e530cb746a8
describe
'26596' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYEI' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
d4127c3f3085eedf26dc72f05de11fde
cb5485619a9c013e008571375c8d9d317b0fac80
describe
'83966' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYEJ' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
4866b9ef6a3ab79e1c23aebd675e1fa0
b357b4368934b6528e258b300cf9c2fcf17a43a2
'2012-06-11T18:12:57-04:00'
describe
'76153' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYEK' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
9d451afa98aa4e2310126263af6d49f7
46b82ef0151a2fecda071ff4befc1202d35af7ea
describe
'40341' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYEL' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
12b05defd01a711eaffc4db44acf71e4
35006bb089c6854388302cf7d1e3003f039b3f57
describe
'77394' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYEM' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
318599dcb7cac90e4c1386d7b8ab432e
e48e71e2f38bdc2fc2708b210ad9e96ba185c3f7
describe
'38874' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYEN' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
c2f307769a40aee77ea96e813f659192
8a20c8a6afdba7c8c404c716493dba443f6b18be
describe
'31902' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYEO' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
c6be1a0cd7a4b1e61929d3e19cd14356
56e0230b94261b900e1d5555cdfebd94c23eddbc
describe
'30218' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYEP' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
1c04393b02f475ce8fbc88f9128fb018
ddb43e9ecb16c1df245f71216f669884a7ae01ed
describe
'83336' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYEQ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
dbdd0f23fddd50098fc149305731d9d3
2a05421189e91eefc2068af59b265c5513448531
describe
'78560' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYER' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
26b6c57f1b8d55154cb1f76a656a46d8
6bbb65b0a313697a7f3038b099cf71dfa4a452a9
describe
'40621' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYES' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
b8e3cd832c45608e1af62627518979f0
96cc65b1f3670d4904778fd598e04c4aaabf532b
describe
'27315' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYET' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
09c355c826cbe3a6b2deb9f3815ba125
21c4b030f69787a64b642806b617c23e7f524fc1
describe
'29499' 'info:fdaE20100402_AAAACCfileF20100402_AAAYEU' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
24a4b9e229ee9ec038c1c6c3997466e7
fcea0ba47598d8f51107dbab3355612f8aa46a80
'2012-06-11T18:13:19-04:00'
describe