Citation
Soil survey of Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida

Material Information

Title:
Soil survey of Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida
Creator:
Hurt, G. Wade
Noble, Chris V
Drew, Robert W
United States -- Natural Resources Conservation Service
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
University of Florida -- Soil Science Dept
Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Place of Publication:
[Washington D.C.]
Publisher:
The Service
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
vii, 72 p., 30 p. of plates : ill., maps (some col.) ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Soils -- Maps -- Florida -- Monroe County ( lcsh )
Soil surveys -- Florida -- Monroe County ( lcsh )
Genre:
bibliography ( marcgt )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (p. 45-46) and index to map units.
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
"By G. Wade Hurt, Chris V. Noble, and Robert W. Drew"--P. 1.
General Note:
Shipping list no.: 96-0089-P.
Funding:
U.S. Department of Agriculture Soil Surveys
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service ; in cooperation with the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Agricultural Experiment Stations, and Soil Science Department, and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Government Documents Department, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
021211891 ( ALEPH )
AKR3559 ( NOTIS )
34059668 ( OCLC )
96124574 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Related Item:
PALMM Version

Full Text

United States
SDepartment of
Agriculture
Natural
Resources
Conservation
Service


In cooperation with
the University of Florida,
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences,
Agricultural Experiment
Stations, and Soil
Science Department; and
the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services


Soil Survey of

Monroe County,

Keys Area,

Florida















How to Use This Soil Survey


The detailed soil maps are at the back of this survey. These maps can be
useful in planning the use and management of small areas. To find information
about your area of interest, locate that area on the Index to Map Sheets, which
precedes the soil maps. Note the number of the map sheet, and turn to that
sheet. Locate your area of interest on the map sheet. Note the map unit symbols
that are in that area. Turn to the Index to Map Units (see "Contents"), which
lists the map units by symbol and name and shows the page where each map
unit is described. The Summary of Tables shows which table has data on a
specific land use for each detailed soil map unit. See Contents for sections of
this publication that may address your specific needs.





















This soil survey is a publication of the National Cooperative Soil Survey, a
joint effort of the United States Department of Agriculture and other Federal
agencies, State agencies including the Agricultural Experiment Stations, and
local agencies. The Natural Resources Conservation Service (formerly the Soil
Conservation Service) has leadership for the Federal part of the National
Cooperative Soil Survey.
Major fieldwork for this soil survey was completed in 1988. Soil names and
descriptions were approved in 1989. Unless otherwise indicated, statements in
this publication refer to conditions in the survey area in 1990. This soil survey
was made cooperatively by the Natural Resources Conservation Service; the
University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Agricultural
Experiment Stations, and Soil Science Department; and the Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
Soil maps in this survey may be copied without permission. Enlargement of
these maps, however, could cause misunderstanding of the detail of mapping. If
enlarged, maps do not show the small areas of contrasting soils that could have
been shown at a larger scale.
All programs and services of the Natural Resources Conservation Service are
offered on a nondiscriminatory basis, without regard to race, color, national
origin, religion, sex, age, marital status, or handicap.

Cover: An area of the Udorthents-Urban land complex used for building site development.


I -

















Contents


Index to map units ............ ................. iv
Summary of tables ............................... v
Forew ord ............. ....................... vii
General nature of the survey area ................. 1
How this survey was made ........................ 3
Map unit composition ......................... 4
Detailed soil map units .............. ......... 5
Hydric soils .................................... 23
Use and management of the soils.............. 25
Land capability classification ................... 25
Characteristic plant communities............... 26
Recreation .................................... 27
Wildlife habitat ................................ 29
Engineering .................................. 30
Soil properties ................................. 35
Engineering index properties .................. 35
Physical and chemical properties .............. 36


Soil and water features .....................
Classification of the soils .......................
Soil series and their morphology .................
Bahiahonda series .............................
Cudjoe series................................
Islamorada series .............. .............
Keylargo series ..................... ..........
Keyvaca series ........... .....................
Keywest series ................... ...........
Lignumvitae series ............................
Matecumbe series ............... ............
Pennekamp series ...........................
Saddlebunch series ...........................
Tavernier series............................
References.................... ..................
Glossary....................................
Tables ................................... .. ....


Issued October 1995

















Index to Map Units


2-Pennekamp gravelly muck, 0 to 2 percent
slopes, extremely stony ....................... 5
3-Matecumbe muck, occasionally flooded .......... 7
4-Rock outcrop-Tavernier complex, tidal........... 7
5-Islamorada muck, tidal .......................... 9
6-Keylargo muck, tidal ............................ 9
7-Udorthents-Urban land complex .............. 11
8-Rock outcrop-Cudjoe complex, tidal............ 12
9-Lignumvitae marl, tidal ....................... 13
11- Urban land ................................ .. 14


12-Rock outcrop-Cudjoe complex, frequently
flooded..................................
13-Keyvaca very gravelly loam, extremely
stony ......................................
15- Cudjoe marl, tidal ....................... ..
16-Bahiahonda fine sand, 0 to 3 percent
slopes...................................
17-Keywest marl, tidal ...........................
18- Beaches................................ ...
19-Saddlebunch marl, occasionally flooded.......















Summary of Tables


Temperature and precipitation (table 1) ............................... 54

Acreage and proportionate extent of the soils (table 2) .................... 55

Characteristic plant communities (table 3) ................................. 56

Recreational development (table 4) ................. ................... 58

Wildlife habitat (table 5) ................... ............ ................ 60

Building site development (table 6) ................ .................... 62

Sanitary facilities (table 7) ................. ....................... ..... 64

Engineering index properties (table 8) .................................... 66

Physical and chemical properties of the soils (table 9) .................... 68

Soil and water features (table 10) ....................................... 70

Classification of the soils (table 11) ...................................... 72
















Foreword


This soil survey contains information that can be used in land-planning
programs in the survey area. It contains predictions of soil behavior for selected
land uses. The survey also highlights limitations and hazards inherent in the soil,
improvements needed to overcome the limitations, and the impact of selected
land uses on the environment.
This soil survey is designed for many different users. Planners, community
officials, engineers, developers, builders, and home buyers can use the survey
to plan land use, select sites for construction, and identify special practices
needed to ensure proper performance. Conservationists, teachers, students, and
specialists in recreation, wildlife management, waste disposal, and pollution
control can use the survey to help them understand, protect, and enhance the
environment.
Great differences in soil properties can occur within short distances. Some
soils are seasonally wet or subject to flooding. Some are shallow to bedrock.
Some are too unstable to be used as a foundation for buildings or roads. Clayey
or wet soils are poorly suited to use as septic tank absorption fields. A high
water table makes a soil poorly suited to basements or underground
installations.
These and many other soil properties that affect land use are described in this
soil survey. The location of each soil is shown on the detailed soil maps. Each
soil in the survey area is described. Information on specific uses is given for
each soil. Help in using this publication and additional information are available
at the local office of the Natural Resources Conservation Service or the
Cooperative Extension Service.


T. Niles Glasgow
State Conservationist
Natural Resources Conservation Service













Soil Survey of

Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


By G. Wade Hurt, Chris V. Noble, and Robert W. Drew, Natural Resources
Conservation Service

United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service,
in cooperation with
the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Agricultural
Experiment Stations, and Soil Science Department; and the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services



The survey area is the southernmost part of Florida
and the United States (fig. 1). It has a population of
about 80,000 (13). Key West is the southernmost city
and is the county seat. The total area of Monroe County 0 Tallahassee
is about 926,800 acres. The survey area is about
66,000 acres in size. It consists of nonfederally leased
or controlled land and federally owned land.
The survey area consists of a series of small islands
surrounded by the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic
Ocean. Key Largo is the northernmost and easternmost
island and Key West is the southernmost and
westernmost island. The distance from Key Largo to
Key West is about 110 miles.
The keys are underlain by coral limestone bedrock in
the north and east and by oolitic limestone bedrock in
the south and west. The bedrock is near the surface in
all areas except for some areas of mangrove swamps.
The highest elevation in the keys is about 16 feet above
sea level, according to National Geodetic Vertical
Datum of 1929 (7). The lowest elevation is below sea
level.

General Nature of the Survey Area
This section gives general information about the Figure 1.-Location of Monroe County, keys area, In Florida.
survey area. It describes farming, history, geology, and
climate.

Farming area (15). After the completion of U.S. Highway 1 and
the hurricane of 1935, however, the economic
Records indicate that bananas, citrus crops, and production of crops ceased. Currently, no agricultural
vegetable crops were once grown in the survey land is in the survey area (13).







Soil Survey


History
The Caloosa Indians were the first inhabitants of the
keys (15). Plantation Key was inhabited by the Caloosa
Indians centuries ago. A large midden of Caloosa origin
has been found on the bay in the northern part of
Plantation Key. A large Caloosa burial ground is on
Lignumvitae Key. The original name for Key West was
Cayo Hueso, Spanish for Island of Bones. The bones in
this area were of Caloosa origin.
Ponce de Leon came to the keys in 1513 while
searching for gold. In the 1600's, the Spanish logged
the mahogany trees that grew in the keys (15).
In 1821, Florida became part of the United States.
The first settlement was at Cayo Hueso, or Key West,
in 1822. Key West was settled by people from the
Bahamas and later by people from New England. These
people settled at Key West to salvage wrecked ships
after Florida had become part of the United States.
In 1842, after the end of the second Seminole war,
few Indians were left in the keys. Most were sent to live
in Oklahoma. Some moved north to the swamps of the
everglades.
The areas in the Florida Keys other than Key West
were inhabited by very few people until 1874, when the
government surveyed these areas and divided the land
for homesteading. During the period 1905-12, a railroad
was built from Homestead to Key West. In 1926, less
than 500 people were in Key West and only 17 were in
Marathon. The people of the keys were mainly farmers,
fishermen, and wreckers. Very few changes occurred in
the Florida Keys until the completion of U.S. Highway 1
in the 1930's and the completion of an 18-inch water
pipe throughout the keys in 1942. The hurricane of
1935 destroyed much of the keys and ended the
economic production of crops.
The 18-inch water pipe was replaced by a 36-inch
water pipe in 1982. At that time, housing development
also increased. About 80,000 people now live in the
keys. They are mostly retired people who live in the
keys during the winter.

Geology
The survey area consists of two distinct geologic
areas. The material in the area south from Key Largo to
Upper Matecumbe Key is coral and that in the area
south and west from Lower Matecumbe Key is oolite.

The Coral Keys
The coral keys probably were an active coral reef at
one time, possibly while they were emerging to form
mangrove islands. Currently, the coral keys have a
denuded surface, from which the original surface of the


coral reef has been completely removed. In the highest
parts of the coral keys that are mainly on Key Largo
east of where U.S. Highway 1 enters the coral keys
from the mainland and on Windley Key, no evidence of
resubmergence since the original emergence seems to
exist (14). The surface has some considerable local
relief and occasionally has the ragged, irregular
appearance of microkarst. Also, there are local
accumulations of residual soil. All of these features
suggest that these higher parts of the coral keys have
remained under conditions of subaerial exposure for the
greatest part of the 100,000 years since the coral of the
reef was formed.
The remaining part of the coral keys has a lower,
smoother surface that seems to have resulted from
marine denudation. Near the outer and inner edges of
the relict coral reef, the surface slopes gently down
toward the present shore, where it is being cut back by
wave splash in the current cycle of shoreline
denudation. This wave splash is forming a new, similar
surface directly offshore. The shore zone that is
repetitively wet by wave splash has an extremely
ragged, irregular surface of bare coral rock that is
honeycombed with solution holes. Most of these holes
are a few inches to a foot or so wide. They do not vary
greatly in depth.
The higher, rougher, soil-covered parts of the coral
keys, such as areas in the eastern part of Key Largo
and areas near the old quarry on Windley Key, were not
cut away by the wave splash that beveled the lower,
smoother, flatter parts.
The cresting of a transgression rather than an
interval of stability during a regression probably beveled
the coral keys. The Key Largo coral reef was probably
formed when the sea was at its Pamlico level. The
period of time between the regression of the sea from
this level to its 10-foot level rise, which beveled most of
the high coral keys, was probably much longer than the
later timespan since the sea regressed from that 10-foot
level and left the lower, smoother parts of the coral
keys exposed. This theory is supported by the presence
of an appreciable amount of residual soil in some areas
and a virtual absence of residual soil from the lower,
smoother, wave-beveled parts.
The brown residual soil that is in some areas attests
to the transgression that culminated in the 10-foot rise
in sea level. Old solution pits filled with this brown soil
and fragments of limestone are in the walls of two
widely separate cuts in the wave-beveled part of the
coral keys. Apparently, these pits were formed by fresh
ground water before the sea level rose to the 10-foot
level that beveled the surface of the lower, smoother
parts of the coral keys.








Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


The Oolite Keys
The boundary between the coral keys and the oolite
keys is between Upper Matecumbe Key and Lower
Matecumbe Key. The oolite keys extend all the way to
the southwest end of the Florida Keys (3). The elevation
of the oblite keys is more than half that of the elevation
of the coral keys. The eastern part of the oolite keys
from Lower Matecumbe Key to Newfound Harbor Key is
very similar to the coral keys. The oolite keys are
elongated in the same direction as the coral keys and
generally are parallel to the coastline. They form the
western' coastline of the Florida Keys. This western
extension of the curving archipelago, however, curves
back northward a few miles and forms an abrupt break
in the westward trend of the coastline. As a group, the
oolite keys occur in an east to west direction, but
individually they tend to elongate perpendicular to this
direction, usually slightly to the northwest.
The oolite keys probably formed in the same manner
as the coral keys. They have the same low, eroded
surface as that of the coral keys. The surface is smooth
and flat in the center of an island and slopes gently
downward near the shore. Like the wave-beveled parts
of the coral keys, it has little, if any, residual soil. No
solution' pits that were made subaerially were observed,
but it is possible that these pits could be revealed by a
few cuts.
The surface of the oolite keys was probably beveled
by a sea level that was 4 or 5 feet higher than the
present sea level. Because relict subaerially made
features extending below this surface are absent, it is
unclear whether the sea rose to this level from a lower
stand or dropped to it directly from the higher stand that
beveled the lower part of the coral keys.

Climate
The survey area has long, hot, humid summers,
which a e frequently cooled by sea breezes. It has
warm w nters, which are occasionally cooled by
incursio is of air from the north. Rainfall occurs
throughout the year. Every few years a hurricane
crosses the area.
Table 1 gives data on temperature and precipitation
for the survey area as recorded at Key West, Florida, in
the period 1951 to 1986.
In winter, the average temperature is 70 degrees F
and the average daily minimum temperature is 65
degrees. The lowest temperature on record, which
occurred at Key West on January 13, 1981, is 41
degrees. In summer, the average temperature is 84
degrees and the average daily maximum temperature is
89 degrees. The highest recorded temperature, which
occurred on July 23, 1951, is 95 degrees.


The total annual precipitation is 40.09 inches. The
heaviest 1-day rainfall during the period of record was
22.75 inches at Key West on January 11, 1980.
Thunderstorms occur on about 74 days each year.
The average relative humidity in midafternoon is
about 60 percent. Humidity is higher at night, and the
average at dawn is about 85 percent. The sun shines
75 percent of the time possible in summer and 65
percent in winter. The prevailing wind is from the east-
southeast. Average windspeed is highest, 10 miles per
hour, in spring.

How This Survey Was Made
This survey was made to provide information about
the soils in the survey area. The information includes a
description of the soils and their location and a
discussion of the suitability, limitations, and
management of the soils for specified uses. Soil
scientists observed the steepness, length, and shape of
slopes; the general pattern of drainage; the kinds of
crops and native plants growing on the soils; and the
kinds of bedrock. They dug many holes to study the soil
profile, which is the sequence of natural layers, or
horizons, in a soil. The profile extends from the surface
down into the unconsolidated material from which the
soil formed. The unconsolidated material is devoid of
roots and other living organisms and has not been
changed by other biological activity.
The soils in the survey area occur in an orderly
pattern that is related to the geology, landforms, relief,
climate, and natural vegetation of the area. Each kind of
soil is associated with a particular kind of landscape or
with a segment of the landscape. By observing the soils
in the survey area and relating their position to specific
segments of the landscape, a soil scientist develops a
concept, or model, of how the soils were formed. Thus,
during mapping, this model enables the soil scientist to
predict with a considerable degree of accuracy the kind
of soil at a specific location on the landscape.
Commonly, individual soils on the landscape merge
into one another as their characteristics gradually
change. To construct an accurate soil map, however,
soil scientists must determine the boundaries between
the soils. They can observe only a limited number of
soil profiles. Nevertheless, these observations,
supplemented by an understanding of the soil-
landscape relationship, are sufficient to verify
predictions of the kinds of soil in an area and to
determine the boundaries.
Soil scientists recorded the characteristics of the soil
profiles that they studied. They noted soil color, texture,
size and shape of soil aggregates, kind and amount of
rock fragments, distribution of plant roots, reaction, and











other features that enable them to identify soils. After
describing the soils in the survey area and determining
their properties, the soil scientists assigned the soils to
taxonomic classes (units). Taxonomic classes are
concepts. Each taxonomic class has a set of soil
characteristics with precisely defined limits. The classes
are used as a basis for comparison to classify soils
systematically. The system of taxonomic classification
used in the United States is based mainly on the kind
and character of soil properties and the arrangement of
horizons within the profile. After the soil scientists
classified and named the soils in the survey area, they
compared the individual soils with similar soils in the
same taxonomic class in other areas so that they could
confirm data and assemble additional data based on
experience and research.
While a soil survey is in progress, samples of some
of the soils in the area are generally collected for
laboratory analyses and for engineering tests. Soil
scientists interpret the data from these analyses and
tests as well as the field-observed characteristics and
the soil properties to determine the expected behavior
of the soils under different uses. Interpretations for all of
the soils are field tested through observation of the soils
in different uses under different levels of management.
Some interpretations are modified to fit local conditions,
and some new interpretations are developed to meet
local needs. Data are assembled from other sources,
such as research information, production records, and
field experience of specialists. For example, data on
crop yields under defined levels of management are
assembled from farm records and from field or plot
experiments on the same kinds of soil.
Predictions about soil behavior are based not only on
soil properties but also on such variables as climate
and biological activity. Soil conditions are predictable
over long periods of time, but they are not predictable
from year to year. For example, soil scientists can
predict with a fairly high degree of accuracy that a given
soil will have a high water table within certain depths in
most years, but they cannot assure that a high water
table will always be at a specific level in the soil on a
specific date.
After soil scientists located and identified the
significant natural bodies of soil in the survey area, they
drew the boundaries of these bodies on aerial
photographs and identified each as a specific map unit.
Aerial photographs show trees, buildings, fields, roads,
and rivers, all of which help in locating boundaries
accurately.


Map Unit Composition

A map unit delineation on a soil map represents an
area dominated by one major kind of soil or an area
dominated by two or three kinds of soil. A map unit is
identified and named according to the taxonomic
classification of the dominant soil or soils. Within a
taxonomic class there are precisely defined limits for
the properties of the soils. On the landscape, however,
the soils are natural objects. In common with other
natural objects, they have a characteristic variability in
their properties. Thus, the range of some observed
properties may extend beyond the limits defined for a
taxonomic class. Areas of soils of a single taxonomic
class rarely, if ever, can be mapped without including
areas of soils of other taxonomic classes.
Consequently, every map unit is made up of the soil or
soils for which it is named and some soils that belong
to other taxonomic classes. In the detailed soil map
units, these latter soils are called inclusions or included
soils.
Most inclusions have properties and behavioral
patterns similar to those of the dominant soil or soils in
the map unit, and thus they do not affect use and
management. These are called noncontrasting (similar)
inclusions. They may or may not be mentioned in the
map unit descriptions. Other inclusions, however, have
properties and behavior divergent enough to affect use
or require different management. These are contrasting
(dissimilar) inclusions. They generally occupy small
areas and cannot be shown separately on the soil maps
because of the scale used in mapping. The inclusions
of contrasting soils are mentioned in the map unit
descriptions. A few inclusions may not have been
observed and consequently are not mentioned in the
descriptions, especially where the soil pattern was so
complex that it was impractical to make enough
observations to identify all of the kinds of soils on the
landscape.
The presence of inclusions in a map unit in no way
diminishes the usefulness or accuracy of the soil data.
The objective of soil mapping is not to delineate pure
taxonomic classes of soils but rather to separate the
landscape into segments that have similar use and
management requirements. The delineation of such
landscape segments on the map provides sufficient
information for the development of resource plans, but
onsite investigation is needed to plan for intensive uses
in small areas.

















Detailed Soil Map Units


The map units on the detailed soil maps at the back
of this survey represent the soils in the survey area.
The map unit descriptions in this section, along with the
soil maps, can be used to determine the suitability and
potential of a soil for specific uses. They also can be
used to plan the management needed for those uses.
More information on each map unit, or soil, is given
under the heading "Use and Management of the Soils."
Each map unit on the detailed soil maps represents
an area on the landscape and consists of one or more
soils for which the unit is named.
A symbol identifying the soil precedes the map unit
name in the soil descriptions. Each description includes
general facts about the soil and gives the principal
hazards and limitations to be considered in planning for
specific uses.
Soils that have profiles that are almost alike make up
a soil series. Except for differences in texture of the
surface layer or of the underlying material, all the soils
of a series have major horizons that are similar in
composition, thickness, and arrangement. Typical
profiles of the soils in this survey area are described in
the section "Soil Series and Their Morphology."
Soils of one series can differ in texture of the surface
layer or of the underlying material. They also can differ
in slope, stoniness, salinity, wetness, degree of erosion,
and other characteristics that affect their use. On the
basis of such differences, a soil series is divided into
soil phases. Most of the areas shown on the detailed
soil maps are phases of soil series. The name of a soil
phase commonly indicates a feature that affects use or
management. For example, Cudjoe marl, tidal, is a
phase of the Cudjoe series.
Some map units are made up of two or more major
soils. These map units are called soil complexes. A soil
complex consists of two or more soils or miscellaneous
areas in such an intricate pattern or in such small areas
that they cannot be shown separately on the soil maps.
The pattern and proportion of the soils are somewhat
similar in all areas. Rock outcrop-Tavernier complex,
tidal, is an example.
Most map units include small scattered areas of soils
other than those for which the map unit is named.


Some of these included soils have properties that differ
substantially from those of the major soil or soils. Such
differences could significantly affect use and
management of the soils in the map unit. The included
soils are identified in each map unit description. Some
small areas of strongly contrasting soils are identified by
a special symbol on the soil maps.
This survey includes miscellaneous areas. Such
areas have little or no soil material and support little or
no vegetation. Urban land is an example. Miscellaneous
areas are shown on the soil maps. Some that are too
small to be shown are identified by a special symbol on
the soil maps.
Table 2 gives the acreage and proportionate extent
of each map unit. Other tables (see "Summary of
Tables") give properties of the soils and the limitations,
capabilities, and potentials for many uses. The
"Glossary" defines many of the terms used in
describing the soils.


2-Pennekamp gravelly muck, 0 to 2 percent
slopes, extremely stony
Geographic Setting
This soil is on tropical hammocks in the uplands of
the upper keys. About 10 percent of the surface of this
soil is covered with stones that are dominantly 10 to 20
inches in diameter. Individual areas are subject to rare
flooding from hurricanes and other tropical storms.
Elevations are dominantly 5 to 15 feet above sea level,
according to National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929.
The mean annual temperature is about 78 degrees F,
and the mean annual precipitation is about 50 inches.
Map Unit Composition
The Pennekamp soil is dominant in this map unit.
Soils in areas on the keys between Upper Matecumbe
Key and Big Pine Key are more sandy than the
Pennekamp soil; however, uses and interpretations are
the same as those of the Pennekamp soil. Areas that
have different uses and interpretations are rare and
generally are adjacent to the boundaries of the map
unit.







Soil Survey


Figure 2.-Characteristic vegetation in an area of Pennekamp gravelly muck, 0 to 2 percent slopes, extremely stony.


Geographically Associated Soils
Soils that are associated with the Pennekamp soil
are the moderately well drained, organic Matecumbe
soils and somewhat poorly drained, marly Saddlebunch
soils in the slightly lower positions on the landscape
and the poorly drained, marly Cudjoe, Lignumvitae, and
Keywest soils and very poorly drained, organic
Islamorada, Keylargo, and Tavernier soils in the
significantly lower positions on the landscape.
Drainage and Permeability
The Pennekamp soil is well drained. It has a
seasonal high water table at a depth of 3.5 to 5.0 feet
during the wet periods of most years. Permeability is
moderately rapid.


Use and Vegetation
Most areas of this soil support native vegetation and
are used as habitat for woodland wildlife (fig. 2). Some
areas have been developed for residential, urban, or
recreational use. Table 3 lists characteristic vegetation
for the soils in the survey area. Because the species
listed generally are more easily established and require
less maintenance than other species, they should be
selected for planting during beautification and
landscaping.
Threatened or Endangered Plants and Animals
Threatened or endangered plants and animals in
areas of this soil may include the following-








Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


Trees: Thatch palm, buccaneer-palm, Deering's tree
cactus
Shrubs: Pride-of-big-pine
Herbaceous plants: Spleenworts, orchids, ferns, twisted
air plant
Mammals: Key deer, Key Largo cotton mouse, Key
Largo woodrat, Big Cypress fox squirrel
Birds: Bald eagle, white-crowned pigeon, wood stork
Interpretations
Depth to bedrock and the flooding are severe
limitations affecting most uses of this soil, including
most kinds of building site and recreational
development and sanitary facilities. Tables 4, 6, and 7
provide more detailed information about these
limitations.



3-Matecumbe muck, occasionally flooded
Geographic Setting
This soil is on tropical hammocks in the uplands
throughout the keys. Individual areas are subject to
occasional flooding from hurricanes and other tropical
storms. Elevations are less than 15 feet above sea
level, according to National Geodetic Vertical Datum of
1929. The mean annual temperature ranges from 74 to
78 degrees F, and the mean annual precipitation ranges
from 50 to 65 inches.
Map Unit Composition
The'Matecumbe soil is dominant in this map unit.
Areas that have different uses and interpretations are
rare and generally are adjacent to the boundaries of the
map unit.

Geographically Associated Soils
Soils that are associated with the Matecumbe soil are
the well drained, mineral Keyvaca and Pennekamp soils
in the higher positions on the landscape; the somewhat
poorly drained, marly Saddlebunch soils in landscape
positions similar to those of the Matecumbe soil; and
the poorly drained, marly Cudjoe, Keywest, and
Lignumvitae soils and very poorly drained, organic
Islamorada, Keylargo, and Tavernier soils in the lower
positions on the landscape.

Drainage and Permeability
The Matecumbe soil is moderately well drained. It
has a seasonal high water table at a depth of 1.5 to 3.0
feet during the wet periods of most years. Permeability
is rapid.


Use and Vegetation
Most areas of this soil support native vegetation and
are used as habitat for woodland wildlife. Some areas
have been developed for residential, urban, or
recreational use. Table 3 lists characteristic vegetation
for the soils in the survey area. Because the species
listed generally are more easily established and require
less maintenance than other species, they should be
selected for planting during beautification and
landscaping.
Threatened or Endangered Plants and Animals
Threatened or endangered plants and animals in
areas of this soil may include the following-
Trees: Thatch palm, buccaneer-palm
Shrubs: Pride-of-big-pine
Herbaceous plants: Spleenworts, orchids, ferns, twisted
air plant
Mammals: Key deer, Key Largo cotton mouse, Key
Largo woodrat, Big Cypress fox squirrel
Birds: Bald eagle, white-crowned pigeon, wood stork
Interpretations
Depth to bedrock, the flooding, and an excessive
amount of humus are severe limitations affecting most
uses of this soil, including most kinds of building site
and recreational development and sanitary facilities.
Tables 4, 6, and 7 provide more detailed information
about these limitations.


4-Rock outcrop-Tavernier complex, tidal
Geographic Setting
This map unit is in mangrove swamps throughout the
keys. Individual areas are subject to daily flooding by
tides. Elevations are less than 2 feet above sea level,
according to National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929.
The mean annual temperature is about 75 degrees F,
and the mean annual precipitation is about 55 inches.
Map Unit Composition
Approximately 60 percent of this map unit consists of
areas of exposed bedrock. These areas are dominantly
1 to 4 inches above the surface of the surrounding soil
and range from approximately 2 feet to more than 200
feet in diameter. The Tavernier soil is dominant in about
35 percent of this map unit. Areas that have different
uses and interpretations are rare and generally are
adjacent to the boundaries of the map unit.
Geographically Associated Soils
Soils that are associated with the Tavernier soil are
the very poorly drained, organic Islamorada and







Soil Survey


Figure 3.-An area of Rock outcrop-Tavernier complex, tidal. Black mangrove is the dominant vegetative species.


Keylargo soils in landscape positions similar to
those of the Tavernier soil; the poorly drained,
marly Cudjoe, Lignumvitae, and Keywest soils in the
slightly higher positions on the landscape; and the
moderately well drained, organic Matecumbe soils
and somewhat poorly drained, marly Saddlebunch
soils in the significantly higher positions on the
landscape.


Drainage and Permeability
The Tavernier soil is very poorly drained. The
seasonal high water table is at or near the surface
during much of the year. Permeability is rapid.
Use and Vegetation
Most areas of this map unit support native vegetation
and are used as habitat for wetland wildlife (fig. 3).








Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


Some areas have been developed for residential, urban,
or recreational use. Table 3 lists characteristic
vegetation for the soils in the survey area. Because the
species listed generally are more easily established and
require less maintenance than other species, they
should be selected for planting during beautification and
landscaping.
Threatened or Endangered Plants and Animals
Threatened or endangered plants and animals in
areas of this map unit may include the following-
Birds: Bald eagle, white-crowned pigeon, wood stork
Reptiles: American crocodile
Interpretations
The flooding, the depth to bedrock, and the wetness
are severe limitations affecting most uses of this map
unit, including most kinds of building site and
recreational development and sanitary facilities. Tables
4, 6, and 7 provide more detailed information about
these limitations.


5-Islamorada muck, tidal
Geographic Setting
This soil is dominantly on the upper keys in
mangrove swamps. Individual areas are subject to daily
flooding by tides. Elevations are dominantly at or below
sea level, according to National Geodetic Vertical
Datum of 1929. The mean annual temperature is about
75 degrees F, and the mean annual precipitation is
about 50 inches.
Map Unit Composition
The Islamorada soil is dominant in this map unit.
Areas of the Tavernier soils are also included. These
soils have bedrock within a depth of 20 inches. Other
areas that have different uses and interpretations are
rare and generally are adjacent to the boundaries of the
map unit.
Geographically Associated Soils
Soils that are associated with the Islamorada soil are
the very poorly drained, organic Keylargo and Tavernier
soils in landscape positions similar to those of the
Islamorada soil; the poorly drained, marly Cudjoe,
Lignumvitae, and Keywest soils in the slightly higher
positions on the landscape; and the moderately well
drained, organic Matecumbe soils and somewhat poorly
drained, marly Saddlebunch soils in the significantly
higher positions on the landscape.
Drainage and Permeability
The Islamorada soil is very poorly drained. The
seasonal high water table is at or near the surface


during much of the year. Permeability is rapid.
Use and Vegetation
Most areas of this soil support native vegetation and
are used as habitat for wetland wildlife. Some areas
have been developed for residential or recreational use.
Table 3 lists characteristic vegetation for the soils in the
survey area. Because the species listed generally are
more easily established and require less maintenance
than other species, they should be selected for planting
during beautification and landscaping.
Threatened or Endangered Plants and Animals
Threatened or endangered plants and animals in
areas of this soil may include the following-
Birds: Bald eagle, white-crowned pigeon, wood stork
Reptiles: American crocodile
Interpretations
The wetness, the flooding, and depth to bedrock are
severe limitations affecting most uses of this soil,
including most kinds of building site and recreational
development and sanitary facilities. Tables 4, 6, and 7
provide more detailed information about these
limitations.


6-Keylargo muck, tidal
Geographic Setting
This soil is dominantly on the upper keys but can
occur throughout the keys. It is in mangrove swamps
(fig. 4). Individual areas are subject to daily flooding by
tides. Elevations are dominantly at or below sea level,
according to National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929.
The mean annual temperature is about 75 degrees F,
and the mean annual precipitation is about 50 inches.
Map Unit Composition
The Keylargo soil is dominant in this map unit. Areas
that have different uses and interpretations are very
rare and generally are adjacent to the boundaries of the
map unit.
Geographically Associated Soils
Soils that are associated with the Keylargo soil are
the very poorly drained, organic Islamorada and
Tavernier soils in landscape positions similar to those of
the Keylargo soil; the poorly drained, marly Cudjoe,
Lignumvitae, and Keywest soils in the slightly higher
positions on the landscape; and the moderately well
drained, organic Matecumbe soils and somewhat poorly
drained, marly Saddlebunch soils in the significantly
higher positions on the landscape.








Soil Survey


Figure 4.-An area of Keylargo muck, tidal. This map unit is adjacent to open water throughout much of the survey area.


Drainage and Permeability
The Keylargo soil is very poorly drained. The
seasonal high water table is at or near the surface
during much of the year. Permeability is rapid.

Use and Vegetation
Most areas of this soil support native vegetation and
are used as habitat for wetland wildlife (fig. 5). A few
areas have been developed for recreational use. Table
3 lists characteristic vegetation for the soils in the
survey area. Because the species listed generally are


more easily established and require less maintenance
than other species, they should be selected for planting
during beautification and landscaping.
Threatened or Endangered Plants and Animals
Threatened or endangered plants and animals in
areas of this soil may include the following-
Birds: Bald eagle, white-crowned pigeon, wood stork
Reptiles: American crocodile
Interpretations
The wetness, an excessive amount of humus, and








Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


the flooding are severe limitations affecting most uses
of this soil, including most kinds of building site and
recreational development and sanitary facilities. Tables
4, 6, and 7 provide more detailed information about
these limitations.


7-Udorthents-Urban land complex
Geographic Setting
This map unit is in constructed upland areas adjacent
to areas of water throughout the keys. Individual areas


Figure 5.-Vegetation In an area of Keylargo muck, tidal. Prop roots are characteristic of the red mangrove.







Soil Survey


are subject to rare flooding from hurricanes and other
tropical storms. Elevations vary, depending on the
thickness of the fill material, but they are dominantly 3
to 10 feet above sea level, according to National
Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929.

Map Unit Composition
The Udorthents dominantly consist of crushed oolitic
limestone or coral bedrock that has been spread over
the original soil material. They commonly are about 32
inches of extremely gravelly sand underlain by about 40
inches of marl. The marl is underlain by coral bedrock.
Other areas of soils are underlain by muck and other
soil material. Houses and other urban structures cover
up to 40 percent of most areas of the Udorthents;
however, the soils can still be observed.
Geographically Associated Soils
Soils that are associated in this map unit are all of
the other soils that are in the keys.
Drainage and Permeability
The Udorthents are moderately well drained. They
have a seasonal high water table at a depth of 2 to 4
feet during the wet periods of most years. Permeability
is variable.
Use and Vegetation
This map unit generally supports no vegetation. The
stones and droughtiness are severe limitations affecting
any kind of landscaping activity. The Udorthents were
developed for urban use, and many areas are being
used for this purpose (fig. 6).
Interpretations
The stones, seepage, and the wetness are moderate
or severe limitations affecting most uses of this map
unit, including most kinds of building site and
recreational development and sanitary facilities. Tables
4, 6, and 7 provide more detailed information about
these limitations.



8-Rock outcrop-Cudjoe complex, tidal
Geographic Setting
This map unit is in mangrove swamps throughout the
keys. Individual areas are frequently flooded by tides.
Elevations are 0 to 1 foot above sea level, according to
National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929. The mean
annual temperature ranges from 75 to 78 degrees F,
and the mean annual precipitation ranges from 40 to 50
inches.


Map Unit Composition
Approximately 60 percent of this map unit consists of
areas of exposed bedrock. These areas are dominantly
1 to 4 inches above the surface of the surrounding soil
and range from approximately 2 feet to more than 200
feet in diameter. The Cudjoe soil is dominant in about
40 percent of this map unit. Areas that have different
uses and interpretations are rare and generally are
adjacent to the boundaries of the map unit.
Geographically Associated Soils
Soils that are associated with the Cudjoe soil are the
well drained, mineral Keyvaca and Pennekamp soils,
moderately well drained, organic Matecumbe soils, and
somewhat poorly drained, marly Saddlebunch soils in
the higher positions on the landscape; the poorly
drained, marly Keywest and Lignumvitae soils in
landscape positions similar to those of the Cudjoe soil;
and the very poorly drained, organic Islamorada,
Keylargo, and Tavernier soils in the lower positions on
the landscape.
Drainage and Permeability
The Cudjoe soil is poorly drained. The seasonal high
water table is within a depth of 6 inches during the wet
periods of most years. Permeability is moderate or
moderately rapid.
Use and Vegetation
Most areas of this map unit support native vegetation
and are used as habitat for wetland wildlife. Some
areas have been developed for residential, urban, or
recreational use. Table 3 lists characteristic vegetation
for the soils in the survey area. Because the species
listed generally are more easily established and require
less maintenance than other species, they should be
selected for planting during beautification and
landscaping.
Threatened or Endangered Plants and Animals
Threatened or endangered plants and animals in
areas of this map unit may include the following-
Birds: Bald eagle, white-crowned pigeon, wood stork,
peregrine falcon
Reptiles: American crocodile, striped mud turtle
Interpretations
The flooding, the depth to bedrock, and the wetness
are severe limitations affecting most uses of this map
unit, including most kinds of building site and
recreational development and sanitary facilities. Tables
4, 6, and 7 provide more detailed information about
these limitations.








Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


Figure 6.-Residential development in an area of Udorthents-Urban land complex adjacent to water.


9-Lignumvitae marl, tidal
Geographic Setting
This soil is dominantly on the middle and lower keys
in mangrove swamps. Individual areas are frequently
flooded by tides. Elevations are dominantly at sea level,
according to National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929.
The mean annual temperature ranges from 75 to 78
degrees F, and the mean annual precipitation ranges
from 40 to 50 inches.
Map Unit Composition
The Lignumvitae soil is dominant in this map unit.
Areas that have different uses and interpretations are
rare and generally are adjacent to the boundaries of the
map unit.


Geographically Associated Soils
Soils that are associated with the Lignumvitae soil
are the well drained, mineral Keyvaca and Pennekamp
soils, moderately well drained, organic Matecumbe
soils, and somewhat poorly drained, marly Saddlebunch
soils in the higher positions on the landscape; the
poorly drained, marly Cudjoe and Keywest soils in
landscape positions similar to those of the Lignumvitae
soil; and the very poorly drained, organic Islamorada,
Keylargo, and Tavernier soils in the lower positions on
the landscape.
Drainage and Permeability
The Lignumvitae soil is poorly drained. The seasonal
high water table is within a depth of 6 inches during the








Soil Survey


Figure 7.-Lignumvitae marl, tidal, provides anhingas with habitat
for nesting and an access area for feeding.



wet periods of most years. Permeability is moderate or
moderately rapid.

Use and Vegetation
Most areas of this soil support native vegetation and
are used as habitat for wetland wildlife (fig. 7). Some
areas have been developed for residential, urban, or
recreational use. Table 3 lists characteristic vegetation
for the soils in the survey area. Because the species
listed generally are more easily established and require
less maintenance than other species, they should be
selected for planting during beautification and
landscaping.
Threatened or Endangered Plants and Animals
Threatened or endangered plants and animals in
areas of this soil may include the following-
Birds: Bald eagle, white-crowned pigeon, wood stork
Reptiles: American crocodile, striped mud turtle


Interpretations
Depth to bedrock, the flooding, and the wetness are
severe limitations affecting most uses of this soil,
including most kinds of building site and recreational
development and sanitary facilities. Tables 4, 6, and 7
provide more detailed information about these
limitations.


11-Urban land
Geographic Setting
This map unit is on Key West and the adjacent,
smaller keys. Individual areas are subject to rare
flooding from hurricanes and other tropical storms.
Elevations are dominantly 3 to 10 feet above sea level,
according to National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929.
Map Unit Composition
This map unit is covered by asphalt, concrete,
buildings, and other impervious surfaces. The natural
soil is covered and cannot be readily observed. Urban
land makes up about 80 percent of most areas of this
map unit. The undeveloped areas of this map unit
include Udorthents, which were developed by spreading
crushed bedrock over the original soil material.
Geographically Associated Soils
The Urban land is associated with Udorthents and
Beaches.
Drainage and Permeability
The drainage and permeability of the Urban land are
variable.
Use and Vegetation
Most areas of Urban land are covered by impervious
surfaces. Grasses and other plants selected for planting
during landscaping are dominant in the areas that
support vegetation.
Interpretations
Soil properties in this map unit are variable;
therefore, careful onsite investigation is needed to
determine the limitations for any proposed use.


12-Rock outcrop-Cudjoe complex,
frequently flooded
Geographic Setting
This map unit is on low tropical hammocks and in
sawgrass marshes in the uplands throughout the keys.








Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


Individual areas are subject to frequent flooding from
hurricanes and other tropical storms. Elevations range
from 1 to 3 feet above sea level, according to National
Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929. The mean annual
temperature ranges from 75 to 78 degrees F, and the
mean annual precipitation ranges from 40 to 50 inches.
Map Unit Composition
Approximately 55 percent of this map unit consists of
areas of exposed bedrock. These areas are dominantly
1 to 4 inches above the surface of the surrounding soil
and range from approximately 2 feet to more than 200
feet in diameter. The Cudjoe soil is dominant in about
45 percent of this map unit. Areas that have different
uses and interpretations are rare and generally are
adjacent to the boundaries of the map unit.
Geographically Associated Soils
Soils that are associated with the Cudjoe soil are the
well drained, mineral Keyvaca and Pennekamp soils,
moderately well drained, organic Matecumbe soils, and
somewhat poorly drained, marly Saddlebunch soils in
the higher positions on the landscape; the poorly
drained, marly Keywest and Lignumvitae soils in
landscape positions similar to those of the Cudjoe soil;
and the very poorly drained, organic Islamorada,
Keylargo, and Tavernier soils in the lower positions on
the landscape.
Drainage and Permeability
The Cudjoe soil is poorly drained. The seasonal high
water table is within a depth of 6 inches during the wet
periods of most years. Permeability is moderate or
moderately rapid.
Use and Vegetation
Most areas of this map unit support native vegetation
and are used as habitat for wetland and woodland
wildlife. Some areas have been developed for
residential, urban, or recreational use. Table 3 lists
characteristic vegetation for the soils in the survey area.
Because the species listed generally are more easily
established and require less maintenance than other
species, they should be selected for planting during
beautification and landscaping.
Threatened or Endangered Plants and Animals
Threatened or endangered plants and animals in
areas of this map unit may include the following-
Mammals: Key deer, Big Cypress fox squirrel
Birds: Bald eagle, white-crowned pigeon, wood stork
Interpretations
The flooding, the depth to bedrock, and the wetness
are severe limitations affecting most uses of this map
unit, including most kinds of building site and


recreational development and sanitary facilities. Tables
4, 6, and 7 provide more detailed information about
these limitations.


13-Keyvaca very gravelly loam, extremely
stony
Geographic Setting
This soil is on everglade flatwoods in the uplands of
Big Pine Key and the adjacent keys. About 10 percent
of the surface of this soil is covered with stones that are
dominantly 10 to 20 inches in diameter. Individual areas
are subject to rare flooding from hurricanes and other
tropical storms. Elevations are dominantly 4 to 6 feet
above sea level, according to National Geodetic Vertical
Datum of 1929. The mean annual temperature is about
78 degrees F, and mean annual precipitation is about
50 inches.
Map Unit Composition
The Keyvaca soil is dominant in this map unit. Areas
that have different uses and interpretations are rare and
generally are adjacent to the boundaries of the map
unit.
Geographically Associated Soils
Soils that are associated with the Keyvaca soil are
the moderately well drained, organic Matecumbe soils
and somewhat poorly drained, marly Saddlebunch soils
in the slightly lower positions on the landscape and the
poorly drained, marly Cudjoe, Lignumvitae, and
Keywest soils and very poorly drained, organic
Islamorada, Key Largo, and Tavernier soils in the
significantly lower positions on the landscape.
Drainage and Permeability
The Keyvaca soil is well drained. It has a seasonal
high water table at a depth of 3 to 5 feet during the wet
periods of most years. Permeability is moderately rapid.
Use and Vegetation
Most areas of this soil support native vegetation and
are used as habitat for woodland wildlife (fig. 8). Some
areas have been developed for residential, urban, or
recreational use. Table 3 lists characteristic vegetation
for the soils in the survey area. Because the species
listed generally are more easily established and require
less maintenance than other species, they should be
selected for planting during beautification and
landscaping.
Threatened or Endangered Plants and Animals
Threatened or endangered plants and animals in
areas of this soil may include the following-








Soil Survey


Figure 8.-Characteristic vegetation In an area of Keyvaca very gravelly loam, extremely stony.


Trees: Thatch palm, buccaneer-palm, Deering's tree
cactus
Shrubs: Pride-of-big-pine
Herbaceous plants: Spleenworts, orchids, ferns, twisted
air plant
Mammals: Key deer, Key Largo cotton mouse, Key
Largo woodrat, Big Cypress fox squirrel
Birds: Bald eagle, white-crowned pigeon, wood stork
Interpretations
Depth to bedrock and the flooding are severe
limitations affecting most uses of this soil, including
most kinds of building site and recreational


development and sanitary facilities. Tables 4, 6, and 7
provide more detailed information about these
limitations.


15-Cudjoe marl, tidal
Geographic Setting
This soil is dominantly on the lower keys in mangrove
swamps. Individual areas are frequently flooded by
tides. Elevations are 0 to 1 foot above sea level,
according to National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929.
The mean annual temperature ranges from 75 to 78








Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


degrees F, and the mean annual precipitation ranges
from 40 to 50 inches.

Map Unit Composition
The Cudjoe soil is dominant in this map unit. Areas
that have different uses and interpretations are rare and
generally are adjacent to the boundaries of the map
unit.

Geographically Associated Soils
Soils that are associated with the Cudjoe soil are the
well drained, mineral Keyvaca and Pennekamp soils,
moderately well drained, organic Matecumbe soils, and
somewhat poorly drained, marly Saddlebunch soils in
the higher positions on the landscape; the poorly
drained, marly Keywest and Lignumvitae soils in
landscape positions similar to those of the Cudjoe soil;
and the very poorly drained, organic Islamorada,
Keylargo, and Tavernier soils in the lower positions on
the landscape.

Drainage and Permeability
The Cudjoe soil is poorly drained. The seasonal high
water table is within a depth of 6 inches during the wet
periods of most years. Permeability is moderate or
moderately rapid.

Use and Vegetation
Most areas of this soil support native vegetation and
are used as habitat for wetland wildlife. Some areas
have been developed for residential, urban, or
recreational use. Table 3 lists characteristic vegetation
for the soils in the survey area. Because the species
listed generally are more easily established and require
less maintenance than other species, they should be
selected for planting during beautification and
landscaping.

Threatened or Endangered Plants and Animals
Threatened or endangered plants or animals in areas
of this soil may include the following-
Birds: Bald eagle, white-crowned pigeon, wood stork,
peregrine falcon
Reptiles: American crocodile, striped mud turtle

Interpretations
The flooding, depth to bedrock, and the wetness are
severe limitations affecting most uses of this soil,
including most kinds of building site and recreational
development and sanitary facilities. Tables 4, 6, and 7
provide more detailed information about these
limitations.


16-Bahiahonda fine sand, 0 to 3 percent
slopes
Geographic Setting
This soil is on coastal strands and tropical hammocks
in the uplands on Bahia Honda Key and Long Key.
Individual areas are subject to rare flooding from
hurricanes and other tropical storms. Elevations are
dominantly 4 to 7 feet above sea level, according to
National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929.
Map Unit Composition
The Bahiahonda soil is dominant in this map unit.
Soils in areas on Long Key are wetter than the
Bahiahonda soil and have slightly more limitations.
They have a high water table at a depth of 1.5 to 2.5
feet. Areas that have different uses and interpretations
are rare and generally are adjacent to the boundaries of
the map unit.
Geographically Associated Soils
Soils that are associated with the Bahiahonda soil
are the moderately well drained, organic Matecumbe
soils in landscape positions similar to those of the
Bahiahonda soil; the poorly drained, marly Cudjoe soils
in the slightly lower positions on the landscape; and the
very poorly drained, organic Islamorada and Keylargo
soils and Beaches in the significantly lower positions on
the landscape.
Drainage and Permeability
The Bahiahonda soil is moderately well drained. It
has a seasonal high water table at a depth of 2.5 to 3.5
feet during the wet periods of most years. Permeability
is rapid.
Use and Vegetation
Most areas of this soil support native vegetation and
are used as habitat for woodland wildlife. A few areas
have been developed for recreational use. Some areas
support invader, or exotic, species. These invader
species are dominantly Australian pine. Table 3 lists
characteristic vegetation for the soils in the survey area.
Because the species listed generally are more easily
established and require less maintenance than other
species, they should be selected for planting during
beautification and landscaping.
Threatened or Endangered Plants and Animals
Threatened or endangered plants and animals in
areas of this soil may include the following-
Trees: Deering's tree cactus
Shrubs: Pride-of-big-pine
Herbaceous plants: Twisted air plant, small-flowered lily-
thorn, young-palm orchid








Soil Survey


Mammals: Big Cypress fox squirrel
Birds: Bald eagle, white-crowned pigeon, wood stork
Interpretations
The wetness, the flooding, and seepage are severe
limitations affecting most uses of this soil, including
most kinds of building site and recreational
development and sanitary facilities. Tables 4, 6, and 7
provide more detailed information about these
limitations.


17-Keywest marl, tidal
Geographic Setting
This soil is dominantly on the lower keys in mangrove
swamps. Individual areas are frequently flooded by
tides. Elevations are dominantly 0 to 1 foot above sea
level, according to National Geodetic Vertical Datum of
1929. The mean annual temperature ranges from 75 to
78 degrees F, and the mean annual precipitation ranges
from 40 to 50 inches.
Map Unit Composition
The Keywest soil is dominant in this map unit. Soils
in areas on Boot Key do not have a layer of muck;
whereas, the Keywest soil generally has a layer of
muck. This difference, however, does not affect the
uses and interpretations of the soils. Areas that have
different uses and interpretations are rare and generally
are adjacent to the boundaries of the map unit.
Geographically Associated Soils
Soils that are associated with the Keywest soil are
the well drained, mineral Keyvaca and Pennekamp
soils, moderately well drained, organic Matecumbe
soils, and somewhat poorly drained, marly Saddlebunch
soils in the higher positions on the landscape and the
very poorly drained, organic Islamorada, Keylargo, and
Tavernier soils in the lower positions on the landscape.
Drainage and Permeability
The Keywest soil is poorly drained. The seasonal
high water table is within a depth of 6 inches during the
wet periods of most years. Permeability is moderate or
moderately rapid.
Use and Vegetation
Most areas of this soil support native vegetation and
are used as habitat for wetland wildlife. Some areas
have been developed for residential, urban, or
recreational use. Table 3 lists characteristic vegetation
for the soils in the survey area. Because the species
listed generally are more easily established and require
less maintenance than other species, they should be


selected for planting during beautification and
landscaping.
Threatened or Endangered Plants and Animals
Threatened or endangered plants and animals in
areas of this soil may include the following-
Birds: Bald eagle, white-crowned pigeon, wood stork,
peregrine falcon
Reptiles: American crocodile, striped mud turtle
Interpretations
The flooding and the wetness are severe limitations
affecting most uses of this soil, including most kinds of
building site and recreational development and sanitary
facilities. Tables 4, 6, and 7 provide more detailed
information about these limitations.



18-Beaches

Geographic Setting
This map unit consists of barren areas adjacent to
the Atlantic Ocean on the lower keys. Individual areas
are subject to shallow flooding by tides and to deep
flooding from hurricanes and other tropical storms.
Elevations are at or near sea level, according to
National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929.
Map Unit Composition
The Beaches are miscellaneous areas that have
been reworked by the tides. They commonly consist of
about 16 inches of sand underlain by about 44 inches
of fine sand. The fine sand is underlain by muck and
other soil or nonsoil material at a depth of about 60
inches. The width and shape of the Beaches can
change during each major storm.
Geographically Associated Soils
The Beaches are adjacent to Bahiahonda soils
(fig. 9). They are also adjacent to Urban land and water.
The Bahiahonda soils and the Urban land are in the
higher positions on the landscape.
Drainage and Permeability
This map unit is poorly drained. It has a seasonal
high water table at the surface. Permeability is rapid or
very rapid.
Use and Vegetation
Most areas of this map unit are not vegetated. The
Beaches are used for recreational activities, such as
sunbathing and fishing, and as access areas for
swimming and wading.









Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


mdp~i


.iMe-


-rc-k
-i~ -.-

.r. s'--




e~.j- r ~ '~







L


-r~

~i-
.AV
e_ tv -


Figure 9.-An area of Bahiahonda soils in the background and an area of Beaches In the foreground. Both areas are used for recreation.


Interpretations
Because of the unique location of the Beaches and
their value for recreational activities, other uses are not
practical and interpretations have not been provided.



19-Saddlebunch marl, occasionally flooded

Geographic Setting
This soil is on low tropical hammocks on Big Pine
Key and the adjacent keys. Approximately 8 percent of
this map unit consists of areas where limestone bedrock
is exposed at the surface. Individual areas are subject


to flooding from storm tides, hurricanes, and runoff from
the adjacent, higher areas. The mean annual
temperature ranges from 75 to 78 degrees F, and the
mean annual precipitation ranges from 40 to 50 inches.
Map Unit Composition
The Saddlebunch soil is dominant in this map unit.
Areas that have different uses and interpretations are
rare and generally are adjacent to the boundaries of the
map unit.
Geographically Associated Soils
Soils that are associated with the Saddlebunch soil
are the well drained, mineral Keyvaca and Pennekamp
soils in the higher positions on the landscape; the


* .' ?*'








Soil Survey


moderately well drained, organic Matecumbe soils in
landscape positions similar to those of the Saddlebunch
soil; the poorly drained, marly Cudjoe, Lignumvitae, and
Keywest soils in the slightly lower positions on the
landscape; and the very poorly drained, organic
Tavernier, Islamorada, and Keylargo soils in the
significantly lower positions on the landscape.
Drainage and Permeability
The Saddlebunch soil is somewhat poorly drained. It
has a seasonal high water table at a depth of 6 to 12
inches during the wet periods of most years.
Permeability is moderate or moderately rapid.


Use and Vegetation
Most areas of this soil support native vegetation and
are used as habitat for woodland wildlife (fig. 10). Some
areas have been developed for residential, urban, or
recreational use. Table 3 lists characteristic vegetation
for the soils in the survey area. Because the species
listed generally are more easily established and require
less maintenance than other species, they should be
selected for planting during beautification and
landscaping.
Threatened or Endangered Plants and Animals
Threatened or endangered plants and animals in


Figure 10.-Characteristic vegetation in an area of Saddlebunch marl, occasionally flooded.








Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


areas of this soil may include the following-
Trees: Thatch palm
Herbaceous plants: Spleenworts, orchids, ferns, twisted
air plant
Mammals: Key deer, Big Cypress fox squirrel
Birds: Bald eagle, white-crowned pigeon, wood stork,
peregrine falcon


Interpretations
Depth to bedrock, the flooding, and the wetness are
severe limitations affecting most uses of this map unit,
including most kinds of building site and recreational
development and sanitary facilities. Tables 4, 6, and 7
provide more detailed information about these
limitations.

















Hydric Soils


In this section, hydric soils are defined and described
and the hydric soils in the survey area are listed.
The three essential characteristics of wetlands are
hydrophytic vegetation, hydric soils, and wetland
hydrology (4, 6). Criteria for each of the characteristics
must be met for areas to be identified as wetlands.
Undrained hydric soils that have natural vegetation
should support a dominant population of ecologically
facultative wetland plant species and obligate wetland
plant species.
Hydric soils are defined by the National Technical
Committee for Hydric Soils (NTCHS) as soils that are
saturated, flooded, or ponded long enough during the
growing season to develop anaerobic conditions in the
upper part of the soil (11). These soils are either
saturated or inundated long enough during the growing
season to support the growth and reproduction of
hydrophytic vegetation.
The NTCHS definition identifies general soil
properties that are associated with wetness. In order to
determine whether a specific soil is a hydric soil or a
nonhydric soil, however, more specific information, such
as information about the depth and duration of the
water table, is needed. Thus, criteria which identify
those soil properties unique to hydric soils have been
established (11). These criteria are used to identify a
phase of a soil series that normally is associated with
wetlands. The criteria used are selected soil properties
that are documented in "Soil Taxonomy" (9) and in the
"Soil Survey Manual" (12). They are listed in "Hydric
Soils of the United States" (11).
If soils are wet enough for a long enough duration to
be considered hydric, they should exhibit certain
properties that can be easily observed in the field.
These visible properties are indicators of hydric soils.
The list of hydric soil indicators can be used to make


onsite determinations of hydric soils (8). All hydric soil
determinations should be based on observations made
in the field.
Hydric soils are identified by examining the upper 12
inches of a soil in a freshly dug soil pit and checking for
hydric indicators. The presence of one of the indicators
(8) provides evidence that the soil is saturated at or
near the surface at least seasonally or that it is
inundated at least seasonally. The soil can be classified
as a hydric soil when only one positive indicator is
found.
The following map units meet the criteria for hydric
soils (11) and, in addition, have at least one of the
hydric soil indicators (8). This list can help in planning
land uses; however, onsite investigation is needed to
determine the hydric soils on a specific site.


Rock outcrop-Tavernier complex, tidal
Islamorada muck, tidal
Keylargo muck, tidal
Rock outcrop-Cudjoe complex, tidal
Lignumvitae marl, tidal
Rock outcrop-Cudjoe complex, frequently
flooded
Cudjoe marl, tidal
Keywest marl, tidal
Beaches


This soil survey can be used to locate probable areas
of hydric soils. Map units that are made up of hydric
soils, however, may have small areas, or inclusions, of
nonhydric soils in the higher positions on the landscape,
and map units made up of nonhydric soils may have
inclusions of hydric soils in the lower positions on the
landscape.

















Use and Management of the Soils


This soil survey is an inventory and evaluation of the
soils in the survey area. It can be used to adjust land
uses to the limitations and potentials of natural
resources and the environment. Also, it can help to
prevent soil-related failures in land uses.
In preparing a soil survey, soil scientists,
conservationists, engineers, and others collect
extensive field data about the nature and behavioral
characteristics of the soils. They collect data on erosion,
droughtiness, flooding, and other factors that affect
various soil uses and management. Field experience
and collected data on soil properties and performance
are used as a basis for predicting soil behavior.
Information in this section can be used to plan the
use and management of soils as sites for buildings,
sanitary facilities, highways and other transportation
systems, and parks and other recreational facilities and
for wildlife habitat. It can be used to identify the
potentials and limitations of each soil for specific land
uses and to help prevent construction failures caused
by unfavorable soil properties.
Planners and others using soil survey information
can evaluate the effect of specific land uses on
productivity and on the environment in all or part of the
survey area. The survey can help planners to maintain
or create a land use pattern that is in harmony with
nature.
Contractors can use this survey to identify areas
where bedrock, wetness, or very firm soil layers can
cause difficulty in excavation.
Health officials, highway officials, engineers, and
others may also find this survey useful. The survey can
help them plan the safe disposal of wastes and locate
sites for pavements, sidewalks, campgrounds,
playgrounds, lawns, and trees and shrubs.

Land Capability Classification
Land capability classification shows, in a general
way, the suitability of soils for use as cropland. Crops
that require special management are excluded. The
soils are grouped according to their limitations for field
crops, the risk of damage if they are used for crops,


and the way they respond to management. The criteria
used in grouping the soils do not include major and
generally expensive landforming that would change
slope, depth, or other characteristics of the soils, nor do
they include possible but unlikely major reclamation
projects. Capability classification is not a substitute for
interpretations designed to show suitability and
limitations of groups of soils for engineering purposes.
In the capability system, soils are generally grouped
at three levels: capability class, subclass, and unit.
These levels are defined in the following paragraphs.
Capability classes, the broadest groups, are
designated by Roman numerals I through VIII. The
numerals indicate progressively greater limitations and
narrower choices for practical use. The classes are
defined as follows:
Class I soils have few limitations that restrict their
use.
Class II soils have moderate limitations that reduce
the choice of plants or that require moderate
conservation practices.
Class III soils have severe limitations that reduce the
choice of plants or that require special conservation
practices, or both.
Class IV soils have very severe limitations that
reduce the choice of plants or that require very careful
management, or both.
Class V soils are not likely to erode, but they have
other limitations, impractical to remove, that limit their
use.
Class VI soils have severe limitations that make them
generally unsuitable for cultivation.
Class VII soils have very severe limitations that make
them unsuitable for cultivation.
Class VIII soils and miscellaneous areas have
limitations that nearly preclude their use for commercial
crop production.
Capability subclasses are soil groups within one
class. They are designated by adding a small letter, e,
w, s, or c, to the class numeral, for example, lie. The
letter e shows that the main hazard is the risk of
erosion unless a close-growing plant cover is
maintained; w shows that water in or on the soil








Soil Survey


interferes with plant growth or cultivation (in some soils
the wetness can be partly corrected by artificial
drainage); s shows that the soil is limited mainly
because it is shallow, drought, or stony; and c, used in
only some parts of the United States, shows that the
chief limitation is climate that is very cold or very dry.
There are no subclasses in class I because the soils
of this class have few limitations. The soils in class V
are subject to little or no erosion, but they have other
limitations that restrict their use to pasture, rangeland,
woodland, wildlife habitat, or recreation. Class V
contains only the subclasses indicated by w, s, or c.
Capability units are soil groups within a subclass. The
soils in a capability unit are enough alike to be suited to
the same crops and pasture plants, to require similar
management, and to have similar productivity.
Capability units are generally designated by adding an
Arabic numeral to the subclass symbol, for example,
lle-4 and llle-6.

Characteristic Plant Communities
In areas that have similar climate and topography,
differences in the kind of vegetation produced in natural
areas are closely related to the kind of soil. Effective
establishment and maintenance are based on the
relationships between the kind of soils, the kind of
vegetation, and water.
Table 3 shows, for nearly all soils, the ecological
community, the characteristic vegetation, and the
average percentage of each species. Only those soils
that have natural vegetation or can support natural
vegetation are listed. Explanation of the column
headings in table 3 follows.
An ecological community produces characteristic
vegetation that differs from the characteristic vegetation
of other ecological communities in kind, amount, or
proportion of plants. The relationship between soils and
vegetation was ascertained during this survey; thus,
ecological communities can be determined directly from
the soil map.
Characteristic vegetation-the grasses, forbs, trees,
and shrubs that make up most of the potential climax
plant community on each soil-is listed by common
name. Under composition, the percentage of the total is
given for each species making up the characteristic
vegetation.
Ecological Communities
The concept of ecological communities is based on
the awareness that a specific soil type commonly
supports a specific vegetative community, which in turn
provides the habitat needed by a specific wildlife
species (10). Recognizing the characteristics and values
of the ecological communities can help in planning use


and management of these communities (5).
The following paragraphs describe the ecological
communities in the survey area. The names of these
communities are Coastal Strand, Everglade Flatwoods,
Tropical Hammocks, Mangrove Swamp, and Sawgrass
Marsh.

Coastal Strand ecological community. This
community occurs along the Atlantic Ocean from south
of Lower Matecumbe Key to east of Key West. It
generally encompasses the area that is affected by salt
spray from the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, and
saltwater bays.
This community is in nearly level to gently sloping
areas. It is easily identified by its location adjacent to
the Atlantic Ocean and by plants that are adapted to or
influenced by the salty environment. The more inland
parts of this community may include small areas of
hammocks.
The Coastal Strand ecological community is highly
endangered. Privately owned areas that are
undeveloped are in demand for residences, hotels, and
motels. This urban development can seriously affect the
ecological community. Coastal strands play an
important role in regulating wave action along the coast.
This action tends to break away part of one beach and
build up another. Structures and development that are
not planned can alter this process and accelerate the
erosion of beaches and coastal dunes. The clearing and
leveling of dunes for development also can cause
erosion because of the removal of the native vegetation
that helps to hold the dune together and because of the
removal of sand from the offshore transport system.
The coastal strand is an important area for
recreational uses and wildlife habitat. These areas are
in demand for recreational uses, but trampling can
damage and destroy vegetation. When the plants die,
their extensive root systems are no longer available to
hold the dunes together. Even occasional use may
degrade this fragile community. Coastal strands
generally are not used for agriculture or as woodland.

Everglade Flatwoods ecological community. This
community occurs on Big Pine Key and on the adjacent
keys. Areas of the Tropical Hammocks ecological
community generally are interspersed throughout this
community.
This community occurs in nearly level areas. Porous
pinnacle limestone bedrock is at a shallow depth. In
many areas, there is little or no soil and the bedrock is
at the surface. Water moves rapidly through the porous
limestone; consequently, the sites are wet for only short
periods following heavy rainfall.
Fire plays an important role in controlling hardwoods.








Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


The prevention of fire can cause a successional move
to a hardwood community. Building roads and canals
can produce natural firebreaks that endanger areas of
pine.
Decaying plant material is important because it
produces weak acid. This acid dissolves the rock and,
in time, helps in the formation of soil used during seed
germination.
The Everglade Flatwoods ecological community is a
good producer of cellulose, but the distance to
woodland markets generally limits commercial
production. If this ecological community is properly
managed, native forage production and wildlife habitat
are good. This ecological community provides a drier
habitat for the wildlife that inhabit adjacent areas and
serves as a buffer for wildlife in the area between the
wetlands and the urban development near the coast.

Tropical Hammocks ecological community. This
community occurs in elevated areas along the limestone
ridges of the keys. Individual communities range from
less than 1 acre to several acres in size.
This community generally is made up of thick clumps
or stands of small- to medium-sized trees. Sites where
disturbances have not occurred for several years have
a more junglelike appearance. A heavy canopy closure,
which causes deep interior shade, is prevalent. It
moderates temperatures and helps to conserve
moisture. Trees in this ecological community commonly
have dense, heavy, strong wood and shallow, spreading
root systems. These characteristics help the trees to
adapt to a harsh environment that includes wind,
periodic drought, and salt spray.
The Tropical Hammocks ecological community is
probably the most endangered ecological community in
the keys. It is endangered because it is not widespread
and because it has received considerable pressure for
other land uses. Incorporating all existing Tropical
Hammocks ecological communities into an overall land
use plan help to ensure the continued use of these
communities as areas for hurricane protection,
landscaping, greenbelts, parks, and wildlife habitat.

Mangrove Swamp ecological community. This
community occurs primarily along saltwater shorelines
on most of the keys. The coastlines are subject to mild
wave action. They are along back bays and the fringes
of estuaries.
Mangroves grow in thickets in coastal areas. They
are woody plants that have fleshy leaves and grow to a
medium height. In areas of marly soils they range from
3 to 10 feet in height, and in areas of organic soils they
range from 10 to 20 feet in height. In most areas the
red mangrove is nearest the shoreline. Prop roots are


characteristic of this species. The black mangrove and
the white mangrove, however, have modified vertical
roots to facilitate in respiration.
This ecological community plays an especially
important role in protecting and stabilizing shorelines.
Some evidence exists that mangroves can contribute to
land building by trapping sediments. This ecological
community buffers the wind and waves during storm
tides. The most important function of this community
probably is to change the detrital base that has
accumulated beneath it into estuarine deposits. The
estuaries support higher marine life. Many mangrove
swamps have been destroyed or altered when dredging
and filling for urban development. Human activities in
adjacent areas can change waterflow patterns and
affect the plant composition of this ecological
community.

Sawgrass Marsh ecological community. This
community occurs on Big Pine Key and on the adjacent
keys.
This community occurs as a partially open expanse
of sawgrass and scattered trees in areas where the soil
is saturated or covered with surface water during part of
the year.
The sawgrass marshes serve as a filter system for
water. They protect natural bodies of water from
eutrophication. Marshes retain water during drought
periods and also slow down the movement of water
during flooding. Their principal environmental value is
related to water quality and water quantity.
The installation of drainage systems, subsidence of
organic soils, and fires have reduced the quantity of
sawgrass and promoted the growth of other plants in
many areas.
Under natural conditions, the Sawgrass Marsh
ecological community is one of the ecological
communities least resistant to change. Fires and
drainage systems can completely alter the
characteristics of this community within 10 to 20 years.

Recreation
In table 4, the soils of the survey area are rated
according to the limitations that affect their suitability for
recreation. Although Beaches generally are not rated for
recreational suitability, they provide excellent
opportunities for recreation in the survey area (fig. 11).
The ratings are based on restrictive soil features, such
as wetness, slope, and texture of the surface layer.
Susceptibility to flooding is considered. Not considered
in the ratings, but important in evaluating a site, are the
location and accessibility of the area, the size and
shape of the area and its scenic quality, vegetation,
access to water, potential water impoundment sites,

























.,.JU
-i s. -: I ~ -cy~
~"-. C



~'~-. .-C -.r





.


Figure 11.-Beaches provide excellent access to water-related recreational activities.


and access to public sewer lines. The capacity of the
soil to absorb septic tank effluent and the ability of the
soil to support vegetation are also important. Soils
subject to flooding are limited for recreational uses by
the duration and intensity of flooding and the season
when flooding occurs. In planning recreational facilities,
onsite assessment of the height, duration, intensity, and
frequency of flooding is essential.
In table 4, the degree of soil limitation is expressed
as slight, moderate, or severe. Slight means that soil
properties are generally favorable and that limitations
are minor and easily overcome. Moderate means that
limitations can be overcome or alleviated by planning,
design, or special maintenance. Severe means that soil
properties are unfavorable and that limitations can be
offset only by costly soil reclamation, special design,
intensive maintenance, limited use, or by a combination
of these measures.
The information in table 4 can be supplemented by
other information in this survey, for example,


interpretations for septic tank absorption fields in table 7
and interpretations for dwellings without basements and
for local roads and streets in table 6.
Camp areas require site preparation, such as shaping
and leveling the tent and parking areas, stabilizing
roads and intensively used areas, and installing sanitary
facilities and utility lines. Camp areas are subject to
heavy foot traffic and some vehicular traffic. The best
soils have gentle slopes and are not wet or subject to
flooding during the period of use. The surface has few
or no stones or boulders, absorbs rainfall readily but
remains firm, and is not dusty when dry. Strong slopes
and stones or boulders can greatly increase the cost of
constructing campsites.
Picnic areas are subject to heavy foot traffic. Most
vehicular traffic is confined to access roads and parking
areas. The best soils for picnic areas are firm when wet,
are not dusty when dry, are not subject to flooding
during the period of use, and do not have slopes,
stones, or boulders that increase the cost of shaping


Soil Survey


* .;


.'- --
L t.



'P'- -.








Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


sites or of building access roads and parking areas.
Playgrounds require soils that can withstand intensive
foot traffic. The best soils are almost level and are not
wet or subject to flooding during the season of use. The
surface is free of stones and boulders, is firm after
rains, and is not dusty when dry. If grading is needed,
the depth of the soil over bedrock or a hardpan should
be considered.
Paths and trails for hiking and horseback riding
should require little or no cutting and filling. The best
soils are not wet, are firm after rains, are not dusty
when dry, and are not subject to flooding more than
once a year during the period of use. They have
moderate slopes and few or no stones or boulders on
the surface.
Golf fairways are subject to heavy foot traffic and
some light vehicular traffic. Cutting or filling may be
required. The best soils for use as golf fairways are firm
when wet, are not dusty when dry, and are not subject
to prolonged flooding during the period of use. They
have moderate slopes and no stones or boulders on the
surface. The suitability of the soil for tees or greens is
not considered in rating the soils.

Wildlife Habitat
Soils affect the kind and amount of vegetation that is
available to wildlife as food and cover. They also affect
the construction of water impoundments. The kind and
abundance of wildlife depend largely on the amount and
distribution of food, cover, and water. Wildlife habitat
can be created or improved by planting appropriate
vegetation, by maintaining the existing plant cover, or
by promoting the natural establishment of desirable
plants.
In table 5, the soils in the survey area are rated
according to their potential for providing habitat for
various kinds of wildlife. This information can be used in
planning parks, wildlife refuges, nature study areas, and
other developments for wildlife; in selecting soils that
are suitable for establishing, improving, or maintaining
specific elements of wildlife habitat; and in determining
the intensity of management needed for each element
of the habitat.
The potential of the soil is rated good, fair, poor, or
very poor. A rating of good indicates that the element or
kind of habitat is easily established, improved, or
maintained. Few or no limitations affect management,
and satisfactory results can be expected. A rating of fair
indicates that the element or kind of habitat can be
established, improved, or maintained in most places.
Moderately intensive management is required for
satisfactory results. A rating of poor indicates that
limitations are severe for the designated element or


kind of habitat. Habitat can be created, improved, or
maintained in most places, but management is difficult
and must be intensive. A rating of very poor indicates
that restrictions for the element or kind of habitat are
very severe and that unsatisfactory results can be
expected. Creating, improving, or maintaining habitat is
impractical or impossible.
The elements of wildlife habitat are described in the
following paragraphs.
Wild herbaceous plants are native or naturally
established grasses and forbs, including weeds. Soil
properties and features that affect the growth of these
plants are depth of the root zone, texture of the surface
layer, available water capacity, wetness, surface
stoniness, and flooding. Soil temperature and soil
moisture are also considerations. Examples of wild
herbaceous plants are bluestem, goldenrod,
beggarweed, partridge pea, and switchgrass.
Hardwood trees and woody understory produce nuts
or other fruit, buds, catkins, twigs, bark, and foliage.
Soil properties and features that affect the growth of
hardwood trees and shrubs are depth of the root zone,
available water capacity, and wetness. Examples of
these plants are mangrove, stopper, poisonwood,
gumbo-limbo, strangler fig, and locustberry. Examples
of fruit-producing shrubs that are suitable for planting on
soils rated good are wild plum, autumn-olive, and
crabapple.
Coniferous plants furnish browse and seeds. Soil
properties and features that affect the growth of
coniferous trees, shrubs, and ground cover are depth of
the root zone, available water capacity, and wetness.
An example of coniferous plants is pine.
Wetland plants are annual and perennial wild
herbaceous plants that grow on moist or wet sites.
Submerged or floating aquatic plants are excluded. Soil
properties and features affecting wetland plants are
texture of the surface layer, wetness, reaction, salinity,
slope, and surface stoniness. Examples of wetland
plants are sawgrass, saltwort, and glasswort.
Shallow water areas have an average depth of less
than 5 feet. Some are naturally wet areas. Others are
created by dams, levees, or other water control
structures. Soil properties and features affecting shallow
water areas are depth to bedrock, wetness, surface
stoniness, slope, and permeability. Examples of shallow
water areas are marshes, waterfowl feeding areas, and
ponds.
The habitat for various kinds of wildlife is described
in the following paragraphs.
Habitat for woodland wildlife consists of areas of
deciduous plants or coniferous plants or both and
associated grasses, legumes, and wild herbaceous








Soil Survey


Figure 12.-An area of Keyvaca very gravelly loam, extremely stony, which provides excellent wildlife habitat for key deer.


plants. Wildlife attracted to these areas include eagles,
falcons, mice, squirrels, and deer (fig. 12).
Habitat for wetland wildlife consists of open, marshy
or swampy shallow water areas. Some of the wildlife
attracted to such areas are ducks, egrets, herons, shore
birds, alligators, mink, and beaver.


Engineering

This section provides information for planning land
uses related to urban development and to water
management. Soils are rated for various uses, and the
most limiting features are identified. Ratings are given








Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


for building site development and sanitary facilities. The
ratings are based on observed performance of the soils
and on the estimated data and test data in the "Soil
Properties" section.
Information in this section is intended for land use
planning, for evaluating land use alternatives, and for
planning site investigations prior to design and
construction. The information, however, has limitations.
For example, estimates and other data generally apply
only to that part of the soil within a depth of 5 or 6 feet,
and because of the map scale, small areas of different
soils may be included within the mapped areas of a
specific soil.
The information is not site specific and does not
eliminate the need for onsite investigation of the soils or
for testing and analysis by personnel experienced in the
design and construction of engineering works.
Government ordinances and regulations that restrict
certain land uses or impose specific design criteria were
not considered in preparing the information in this
section. Local ordinances and regulations should be
considered in planning, in site selection, and in design.
Soil properties, site features, and observed
performance were considered in determining the ratings
in this section. During the fieldwork for this soil survey,
determinations were made about grain-size distribution,
liquid limit, plasticity index, soil reaction, depth to
bedrock, hardness of bedrock within 5 or 6 feet of the
surface, soil wetness, depth to a seasonal high water
table, slope, likelihood of flooding, natural soil structure
aggregation, and soil density. Data were collected about
kinds of clay minerals, mineralogy of the sand and silt
fractions, and the kinds of adsorbed cations. Estimates
were made for erodibility, permeability, corrosivity,
shrink-swell potential, available water capacity, and
other behavioral characteristics affecting engineering
uses.
This information can be used to evaluate the
potential of areas for residential, commercial, industrial,
and recreational uses; make preliminary estimates of
construction conditions; evaluate alternative routes for
roads, streets, highways, pipelines, and underground
cables; evaluate alternative sites for sanitary landfills,
septic tank absorption fields, and sewage lagoons; plan
detailed onsite investigations of soils and geology;
locate potential sources of gravel, sand, earthfill, and
topsoil; plan drainage systems, irrigation systems,
ponds, terraces, and other structures for soil and water
conservation; and predict performance of proposed
small structures and pavements by comparing the
performance of existing similar structures on the same
or similar soils.
The information in the tables, along with the soil
maps, the soil descriptions, and other data provided in


this survey, can be used to make additional
interpretations.
Some of the terms used in this soil survey have a
special meaning in soil science and are defined in the
"Glossary."
Building Site Development
Table 6 shows the degree and kind of soil limitations
that affect dwellings without basements, small
commercial buildings, local roads and streets, and
lawns and landscaping. The limitations are considered
slight if soil properties and site features are generally
favorable for the indicated use and limitations are minor
and easily overcome; moderate if soil properties or site
features are not favorable for the indicated use and
special planning, design, or maintenance is needed to
overcome or minimize the limitations; and severe if soil
properties or site features are so unfavorable or so
difficult to overcome that special design, significant
increases in construction costs, and possibly increased
maintenance are required. Special feasibility studies
may be required where the soil limitations are severe
(fig. 13).
Dwellings and small commercial buildings are
structures built on shallow foundations on undisturbed
soil. The load limit is the same as that for single-family
dwellings no higher than three stories. Ratings are
made for small commercial buildings without basements
and for dwellings without basements. The ratings are
based on soil properties, site features, and observed
performance of the soils. A high water table, flooding,
shrinking and swelling, and organic layers can cause
the movement of footings. Depth to a high water table,
depth to bedrock or to a cemented pan, large stones,
and flooding affect the ease of excavation and
construction. Landscaping and grading that require cuts
and fills of more than 5 or 6 feet are not considered.
Local roads and streets have an all-weather surface
and carry automobile and light truck traffic all year.
They have a subgrade of cut or fill soil material; a base
of gravel, crushed rock, or stabilized soil material; and a
flexible or rigid surface. Cuts and fills are generally
limited to less than 6 feet. The ratings are based on soil
properties, site features, and observed performance of
the soils. Depth to bedrock or to a cemented pan, depth
to a high water table, flooding, large stones, and slope
affect the ease of excavating and grading. Soil strength
(as inferred from the engineering classification of the
soil), shrink-swell potential, frost-action potential, and
depth to a high water table affect the traffic-supporting
capacity.
Lawns and landscaping require soils on which turf
and ornamental trees and shrubs can be established
and maintained. The ratings are based on soil








Soil Survey


Figure 13.-Udorthents are dominant in areas used for building sites because most soils in the survey area have severe limitations
affecting building site development.


properties, site features, and observed performance of
the soils. Soil reaction, depth to a high water table,
depth to bedrock or to a cemented pan, the available
water capacity in the upper 40 inches, and the content
of salts, sodium, and sulfidic materials affect plant
growth. Flooding, wetness, slope, stoniness, and the
amount of sand, clay, or organic matter in the surface
layer affect trafficability after vegetation is established.
Sanitary Facilities
Table 7 shows the degree and the kind of soil
limitations that affect septic tank absorption fields and
sanitary landfills. The limitations are considered slight if
soil properties and site features are generally favorable


for the indicated use and limitations are minor and
easily overcome; moderate if soil properties or site
features are not favorable for the indicated use and
special planning, design, or maintenance is needed to
overcome or minimize the limitations; and severe if soil
properties or site features are so unfavorable or so
difficult to overcome that special design, significant
increases in construction costs, and possibly increased
maintenance are required.
Table 7 also shows the suitability of the soils for use
as daily cover for landfill. A rating of good indicates that
soil properties and site features are favorable for the
use and that good performance and low maintenance
can be expected; fair indicates that soil properties and








Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


site features are moderately favorable for the use and
one or more soil properties or site features make the
soil less desirable than the soils rated good; and poor
indicates that one or more soil properties or site
features are unfavorable for the use and overcoming
the unfavorable properties requires special design, extra
maintenance, or costly alteration.
Septic tank absorption fields are areas in which
effluent from a septic tank is distributed into the soil
through subsurface tiles or perforated pipe. Only that
part of the soil between depths of 24 and 72 inches is
evaluated. The ratings are based on soil properties, site
features, and observed performance of the soils.
Permeability, depth to a high water table, depth to
bedrock or to a cemented pan, and flooding affect
absorption of the effluent. Large stones and bedrock or
a cemented pan interfere with installation.
Unsatisfactory performance of septic tank absorption
fields, including excessively slow absorption of effluent,
surfacing of effluent, and hillside seepage, can affect
public health. Ground water can be polluted if highly
permeable sand and gravel or fractured bedrock is less
than 4 feet below the base of the absorption field, if
slope is excessive, or if the water table is near the
surface. There must be unsaturated soil material
beneath the absorption field to filter the effluent
effectively. Many local ordinances require that this
material be of a certain thickness.
Sanitary landfills are areas where solid waste is
disposed of by burying it in soil. There are two types of
landfill-trench and area. In a trench landfill, the waste
is placed in a trench. It is spread, compacted, and
covered daily with a thin layer of soil excavated at the
site. In an area landfill, the waste is placed in
successive layers on the surface of the soil. The waste
is spread, compacted, and covered daily with a thin
layer of soil from a source away from the site. Because


of the shallow depth to bedrock in the survey area,
trench landfills are not rated in the table.
Both types of landfill must be able to bear heavy
vehicular traffic. Both types involve a risk of ground-
water pollution. Ease of excavation and revegetation
should be considered.
The ratings in table 7 are based on soil properties,
site features, and observed performance of the soils.
Permeability, depth to bedrock or to a cemented pan,
depth to a water table, slope, and flooding affect both
types of landfill. Texture, stones and boulders, highly
organic layers, soil reaction, and content of salts and
sodium affect trench landfills. Unless otherwise stated,
the ratings apply only to that part of the soil within a
depth of about 6 feet. For deeper trenches, a limitation
rated slight or moderate may not be valid. Onsite
investigation is needed.
Daily cover for landfill is the soil material that is used
to cover compacted solid waste in an area sanitary
landfill. The soil material is obtained offsite, transported
to the landfill, and spread over the waste.
Soil texture, wetness, coarse fragments, and slope
affect the ease of removing and spreading the material
during wet and dry periods. Loamy or silty soils that are
free of large stones or excess gravel are the best cover
for a landfill. Clayey soils are sticky or cloddy and are
difficult to spread; sandy soils are subject to soil
blowing.
After soil material has been removed, the soil
material remaining in the borrow area must be thick
enough over bedrock, a cemented pan, or the water
table to permit revegetation. The soil material used as
final cover for a landfill should be suitable for plants.
The surface layer generally has the best workability,
more organic matter, and the best potential for plants.
Material from the surface layer should be stockpiled for
use as the final cover.

















Soil Properties


Data relating to soil properties are collected during
the course of the soil survey. The data and the
estimates of soil and water features, listed in tables, are
explained on the following pages.
Soil properties are determined by field examination of
the soils and by laboratory index testing of some
benchmark soils. Established standard procedures are
followed. During the survey, many shallow borings are
made and examined to identify and classify the soils
and to delineate them on the soil maps. Samples are
taken from some typical profiles and tested in the
laboratory to determine grain-size distribution, plasticity,
and compaction characteristics.
Estimates of soil properties are based on field
examinations, on laboratory tests of samples from the
survey area, and on laboratory tests of samples of
similar soils in nearby areas. Tests verify field
observations, verify properties that cannot be estimated
accurately by field observation, and help to characterize
key soils.
The estimates of soil properties shown in the tables
include the range of grain-size distribution and Atterberg
limits, the engineering classification, and the physical
and chemical properties of the major layers of each soil.
Pertinent soil and water features also are given.

Engineering Index Properties
Table 8 gives estimates of the engineering
classification and of the range of index properties for
the major layers of each soil in the survey area. Most
soils have layers of contrasting properties within the
upper 5 or 6 feet.
Depth to the upper and lower boundaries of each
layer is indicated. The range in depth and information
on other properties of each layer are given for each soil
series under the heading "Soil Series and Their
Morphology."
Texture is given in the standard terms used by the
U.S. Department of Agriculture. These terms are
defined according to percentages of sand, silt, and clay
in the fraction of the soil that is less than 2 millimeters
in diameter. "Loam," for example, is soil that is 7 to 27


percent clay, 28 to 50 percent silt, and less than 52
percent sand. If the content of particles coarser than
sand is as much as 15 percent, an appropriate modifier
is added, for example, "gravelly." Textural terms are
defined in the "Glossary."
Classification of the soils is determined according to
the Unified soil classification system (2) and the system
adopted by the American Association of State Highway
and Transportation Officials (1).
The Unified system classifies soils according to
properties that affect their use as construction material.
Soils are classified according to grain-size distribution
of the fraction less than 3 inches in diameter and
according to plasticity index, liquid limit, and organic
matter content. Sandy and gravelly soils are identified
as GW, GP, GM, GC, SW, SP, SM, and SC; silty and
clayey soils as ML, CL, OL, MH, CH, and OH; and
highly organic soils as PT. Soils exhibiting engineering
properties of two groups can have a dual classification,
for example, SP-SM.
The AASHTO system classifies soils according to
those properties that affect roadway construction and
maintenance. In this system, the fraction of a mineral
soil that is less than 3 inches in diameter is classified in
one of seven groups from A-1 through A-7 on the basis
of grain-size distribution, liquid limit, and plasticity index.
Soils in group A-1 are coarse grained and low in
content of fines (silt and clay). At the other extreme,
soils in group A-7 are fine grained. Highly organic soils
are classified in group A-8 on the basis of visual
inspection.
If laboratory data are available, the A-1, A-2, and A-7
groups are further classified as A-1-a, A-1-b, A-2-4,
A-2-5, A-2-6, A-2-7, A-7-5, or A-7-6. As an additional
refinement, the suitability of a soil as subgrade material
can be indicated by a group index number. Group index
numbers range from 0 for the best subgrade material to
20, or higher, for the poorest.
Rock fragments larger than 3 inches in diameter are
indicated as a percentage of the total soil on a dry-
weight basis. The percentages are estimates
determined mainly by converting volume percentage in
the field to weight percentage.








Soil Survey


Percentage (of soil particles) passing designated
sieves is the percentage of the soil fraction less than 3
inches in diameter based on an ovendry weight. The
sieves, numbers 4, 10, 40, and 200 (USA Standard
Series), have openings of 4.76, 2.00, 0.420, and 0.074
millimeters, respectively. Estimates are based on
laboratory tests of soils sampled in the survey area and
in nearby areas and on estimates made in the field.
Liquid limit and plasticity index (Atterberg limits)
indicate the plasticity characteristics of a soil. The
estimates are based on test data from the survey area
or from nearby areas and on field examination.
The estimates of grain-size distribution, liquid limit,
and plasticity index generally are rounded to the
nearest 5 percent. Thus, if the ranges of gradation and
Atterberg limits extend a marginal amount (1 or 2
percentage points) across classification boundaries, the
classification in the marginal zone is omitted in the
table.

Physical and Chemical Properties
Table 9 shows estimates of some characteristics and
features that affect soil behavior. These estimates are
given for the major layers of each soil in the survey
area. The estimates are based on field observations
and on test data for these and similar soils.
Clay as a soil separate, or component, consists of
mineral soil particles that are less than 0.002 millimeter
in diameter. In this table, the estimated clay content of
each major soil layer is given as a percentage, by
weight, of the soil material that is less than 2 millimeters
in diameter.
The amount and kind of clay greatly affect the fertility
and physical condition of the soil. They influence the
soil's adsorption of cations, moisture retention, the
shrink-swell potential, permeability, plasticity, the ease
of soil dispersion, and other soil properties. The amount
and kind of clay in a soil also affect tillage and
earthmoving operations.
Moist bulk density is the weight of soil (ovendry) per
unit volume. Volume is measured when the soil is at
field moisture capacity, that is, the moisture content at
1/3-bar moisture tension. Weight is determined after
drying the soil at 105 degrees C. In this table, the
estimated moist bulk density of each major soil horizon
is expressed in grams per cubic centimeter of soil
material that is less than 2 millimeters in diameter. Bulk
density data are used to compute shrink-swell potential,
available water capacity, total pore space, and other
soil properties. The moist bulk density of a soil indicates
the pore space available for water and roots. A bulk
density of more than 1.6 can restrict water storage and
root penetration. Moist bulk density is influenced by


texture, kind of clay, content of organic matter, and soil
structure.
Permeability refers to the ability of a soil to transmit
water or air. The estimates indicate the rate of
movement of water through the soil when the soil is
saturated. They are based on soil characteristics
observed in the field, particularly structure, porosity, and
texture. Permeability is considered in the design of soil
drainage systems and septic tank absorption fields.
Available water capacity refers to the quantity of
water that the soil is capable of storing for use by
plants. The capacity for water storage in each major soil
layer is stated in inches of water per inch of soil. The
capacity varies, depending on soil properties that affect
the retention of water and the depth of the root zone.
The most important properties are the content of
organic matter, soil texture, bulk density, and soil
structure. Available water capacity is an important factor
in the choice of plants or crops to be grown and in the
design and management of irrigation systems. Available
water capacity is not an estimate of the quantity of
water actually available to plants at any given time.
Soil reaction is a measure of acidity or alkalinity and
is expressed as a range in pH values. The range in pH
of each major horizon is based on many field tests. For
many soils, values have been verified by laboratory
analyses. Soil reaction is important in selecting crops
and other plants, in evaluating soil amendments for
fertility and stabilization, and in determining the risk of
corrosion.
Salinity is a measure of soluble salts in the soil at
saturation. It is expressed as the electrical conductivity
of the saturation extract, in millimhos per centimeter at
25 degrees C. Estimates are based on field and
laboratory measurements at representative sites of
nonirrigated soils. The salinity of irrigated soils is
affected by the quality of the irrigation water and by the
frequency of water application. Hence, the salinity of
soils in individual fields can differ greatly from the value
given in the table. Salinity affects the suitability of a soil
for crop production, the stability of soil if used as
construction material, and the potential of the soil to
corrode metal and concrete.
Erosion factor K indicates the susceptibility of a soil
to sheet and rill erosion by water. Factor K is one of six
factors used in the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE)
to predict the average annual rate of soil loss by sheet
and rill erosion. Losses are expressed in tons per acre
per year. These estimates are based primarily on
percentage of silt, sand, and organic matter (up to 4
percent) and on soil structure and permeability. Values
of K range from 0.02 to 0.69. The higher the value, the
more susceptible the soil is to sheet and rill erosion by
water.








Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


Erosion factor Tis an estimate of the maximum
average annual rate of soil erosion by wind or water
that can occur over a sustained period without affecting
crop productivity. The rate is expressed in tons per acre
per year.
Organic matter is the plant and animal residue in the
soil at various stages of decomposition. In table 9, the
estimated content of organic matter is expressed as a
percentage, by weight, of the soil material that is less
than 2 millimeters in diameter.
The content of organic matter in a soil can be
maintained or increased by returning crop residue to the
soil. Organic matter affects the available water capacity,
infiltration rate, and tilth. It is a source of nitrogen and
other nutrients for crops.

Soil and Water Features
Table 10 gives estimates of various soil and water
features. The estimates are used in land use planning
that involves engineering considerations.
Hydrologic soil groups are used to estimate runoff
from precipitation. Soils are assigned to one of four
groups. They are grouped according to the infiltration of
water when the soils are thoroughly wet and receive
precipitation from long-duration storms.
The four hydrologic soil groups are:
Group A. Soils having a high infiltration rate (low
runoff potential) when thoroughly wet. These consist
mainly of deep, well drained to excessively drained
sands or gravelly sands. These soils have a high rate of
water transmission.
Group B. Soils having a moderate infiltration rate
when thoroughly wet. These consist chiefly of
moderately deep or deep, moderately well drained or
well drained soils that have moderately fine texture to
moderately coarse texture. These soils have a
moderate rate of water transmission.
Group C. Soils having a slow infiltration rate when
thoroughly wet. These consist chiefly of soils having a
layer that impedes the downward movement of water or
soils of moderately fine texture or fine texture. These
soils have a slow rate of water transmission.
Group D. Soils having a very slow infiltration rate
(high runoff potential) when thoroughly wet. These
consist chiefly of clays that have a high shrink-swell
potential, soils that have a permanent high water table,
soils that have a claypan or clay layer at or near the
surface, and soils that are shallow over nearly
impervious material. These soils have a very slow rate
of water transmission.
Flooding, the temporary covering of the soil surface
by flowing water, is caused by overflowing streams, by
runoff from adjacent slopes, or by inflow from high


tides. Shallow water standing or flowing for short
periods after rainfall or snowmelt is not considered
flooding. Standing water in swamps and marshes or in
a closed depression is considered ponding.
Table 10 gives the frequency and duration of flooding
and the time of year when flooding is most likely.
Frequency, duration, and probable dates of
occurrence are estimated. Frequency generally is
expressed as none, rare, occasional, or frequent. None
means that flooding is not probable. Rare means that
flooding is unlikely but possible under unusual weather
conditions (the chance of flooding is nearly 0 percent to
5 percent in any year). Occasional means that flooding
occurs infrequently under normal weather conditions
(the chance of flooding is 5 to 50 percent in any year).
Frequent means that flooding occurs often under normal
weather conditions (the chance of flooding is more than
50 percent in any year). Duration is expressed as very
brief (less than 2 days), brief (2 to 7 days), long (7 days
to 1 month), and very long (more than 1 month). The
time of year that floods are most likely to occur is
expressed in months. About two-thirds to three-fourths
of all flooding occurs during the stated period.
The information on flooding is based on evidence in
the soil profile, namely thin strata of gravel, sand, silt, or
clay deposited by floodwater; irregular decrease in
organic matter content with increasing depth; and little
or no horizon development.
Also considered is local information about the extent
and levels of flooding and the relation of each soil on
the landscape to historic floods. Information on the
extent of flooding based on soil data is less specific
than that provided by detailed engineering surveys that
delineate flood-prone areas at specific flood frequency
levels.
High water table (seasonal) is the highest level of a
saturated zone in the soil in most years. The estimates
are based mainly on the evidence of a saturated zone,
namely grayish colors or mottles in the soil. Indicated in
table 10 are the depth to the seasonal high water table,
the kind of water table, and the months of the year that
the water table commonly is highest. A water table that
is seasonally high for less than 1 month is not indicated
in table 10. An apparent water table is a thick zone of
free water in the soil. It is indicated by the level at
which water stands in an uncased borehole after
adequate time is allowed for adjustment in the
surrounding soil.
Two numbers in the column showing depth to the
water table indicate the normal range in depth to a
saturated zone. Depth is given to the nearest half foot.
The first numeral in the range indicates the highest
water level. "More than 6.0" indicates that the water
table is below a depth of 6 feet or that it is within a












depth of 6 feet for less than a month.
Depth to bedrock is given if bedrock is within a depth
of 5 feet. The depth is based on many soil borings and
on observations during soil mapping. The rock is
specified as either soft or hard. If the rock is soft or
fractured, excavations can be made with trenching
machines, backhoes, or small rippers. If the rock is hard
or massive, blasting or special equipment generally is
needed for excavation.
Subsidence is the settlement of organic soils or of
saturated mineral soils of very low density. Subsidence
generally results from either desiccation and shrinkage
or oxidation of organic material, or both, following
drainage. Subsidence takes place gradually, usually
over a period of several years. Table 10 shows the
expected initial subsidence, which usually is a result of
drainage, and total subsidence, which results from a
combination of factors.
Risk of corrosion pertains to potential soil-induced
electrochemical or chemical action that dissolves or
weakens uncoated steel or concrete. The rate of


corrosion of uncoated steel is related to such factors as
soil moisture, particle-size distribution, acidity, and
electrical conductivity of the soil. The rate of corrosion
of concrete is based mainly on the sulfate and sodium
content, texture, moisture content, and acidity of the
soil. Special site examination and design may be
needed if the combination of factors results in a severe
hazard of corrosion. The steel in installations that
intersect soil boundaries or soil layers is more
susceptible to corrosion than steel in installations that
are entirely within one kind of soil or within one soil
layer.
For uncoated steel, the risk of corrosion, expressed
as low, moderate, or high, is based on soil drainage
class, total acidity, electrical resistivity near field
capacity, and electrical conductivity of the saturation
extract.
For concrete, the risk of corrosion is also expressed
as low, moderate, or high. It is based on soil texture,
acidity, and the amount of sulfates in the saturation
extract.

















Classification of the Soils


The system of soil classification used by the National
Cooperative Soil Survey has six categories (9).
Beginning with the broadest, these categories are the
order, suborder, great group, subgroup, family, and
series. Classification is based on soil properties
observed in the field or inferred from those observations
or on laboratory measurements. Table 11 shows the
classification of the soils in the survey area. The
categories are defined in the following paragraphs.
ORDER. Eleven soil orders are recognized. The
differences among orders reflect the dominant soil-
forming processes and the degree of soil formation.
Each order is identified by a word ending in so/. An
example is Entisol.
SUBORDER. Each order is divided into suborders,
primarily on the basis of properties that influence soil
genesis and are important to plant growth or properties
that reflect the most important variables within the
orders. The last syllable in the name of a suborder
indicates the order. An example is Aquent (Aqu,
meaning water, plus ent, from Entisol).
GREAT GROUP. Each suborder is divided into great
groups on the basis of close similarities in kind,
arrangement, and degree of development of pedogenic
horizons; soil moisture and temperature regimes; and
base status. Each great group is identified by the name
of a suborder and by a prefix that indicates a property
of the soil. An example is Fluvaquents (Fluv, meaning
fluvial, flood plain, or delta deposition, plus aquent, the
suborder of the Entisols that has an aquic moisture
regime).
SUBGROUP. Each great group has a typic subgroup.
Other subgroups are intergrades or extragrades. The
typic is the central concept of the great group; it is not
necessarily the most extensive. Intergrades are
transitions to other orders, suborders, or great groups.
Extragrades have some properties that are not
representative of the great group but do not indicate
transitions to any other known kind of soil. Each
subgroup is identified by one or more adjectives
preceding the name of the great group. The adjective
Tropic identifies the subgroup that differs from the
typical subgroup by having a tropical or subtropical


climate. An example is Tropic Fluvaquents.
FAMILY. Families are established within a subgroup
on the basis of physical and chemical properties and
other characteristics that affect management. Generally,
the properties are those of horizons below plow depth
where there is much biological activity. Among the
properties and characteristics considered are particle-
size class, mineral content, temperature regime, depth
of the root zone, consistence, moisture equivalent,
slope, and permanent cracks. A family name consists of
the name of a subgroup preceded by terms that indicate
soil properties. An example is coarse-silty, carbonatic,
isohyperthermic Tropic Fluvaquents.
SERIES. The series consists of soils that have
similar horizons in their profile. The horizons are similar
in color, texture, structure, reaction, consistence,
mineral and chemical composition, and arrangement in
the profile. There can be some variation in the texture
of the surface layer or of the underlying material within
a series.

Soil Series and Their Morphology
In this section, each soil series recognized in the
survey area is described. The descriptions are arranged
in alphabetic order.
Characteristics of the soil and the material in which it
formed are identified for each series. A pedon, a small
three-dimensional area of soil, that is typical of the
series in the survey area is described. The detailed
description of each soil horizon follows standards in the
"Soil Survey Manual" (12). Many of the technical terms
used in the descriptions are defined in "Soil Taxonomy"
(9). Unless otherwise stated, colors in the descriptions
are for moist soil. Following the pedon description is the
range of important characteristics of the soils in the
series.
The map units of each soil series are described in
the section "Detailed Soil Map Units."

Bahiahonda Series
The Bahiahonda series consists of moderately well
drained soils that are deep to rippable coral limestone







Soil Survey


bedrock. These soils formed in sandy marine material
and shells overlying the limestone bedrock. They are on
uplands. Slopes range from 0 to 3 percent.
Taxonomic class: Isohyperthermic, uncoated Aquic
Quartzipsamments
Typical Pedon
Bahiahonda fine sand, in an area of Bahiahonda fine
sand, 0 to 3 percent slopes, on Bahia Honda Key; 800
feet south of U.S. Highway 1 from the entrance to Bahia
Honda State Park; NE/4SW/4 sec. 25, T. 66 S., R. 30
E.
A-0 to 8 inches; dark gray (10YR 4/1) fine sand; single
grained; loose; common fine and medium roots;
neutral; abrupt smooth boundary.
Bw-8 to 35 inches; light gray (10YR 7/2) fine sand;
single grained; loose; few fine and medium roots;
neutral; abrupt smooth boundary.
Cgl-35 to 68 inches; white (10YR 8/1) sand; single
grained; loose; few fine roots; mildly alkaline; clear
smooth boundary.
Cg2-68 to 82 inches; white (10YR 8/1) very gravelly
sand; single grained; loose; about 40 percent, by
volume, limestone and shell fragments less than 1
inch in size; moderately alkaline; abrupt smooth
boundary.
2R-82 inches; soft to hard, rippable coral limestone
bedrock.
Range in Characteristics
The depth to bedrock is 60 to 90 inches.
The A horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 4 or 5, and
chroma of 1 to 3. The texture is sand or fine sand.
Reaction is neutral or mildly alkaline.
The Bw horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 6 or 7,
and chroma of 2 or 3. The texture is sand or fine sand.
The content of shell fragments is less than 10 percent,
by volume. Reaction is neutral or mildly alkaline.
The Cg horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 5 to 8,
and chroma of 1 or 2. The texture of the upper part of
the Cg horizon is sand or fine sand. The content of
shells is less than 10 percent. The texture of the lower
part of the Cg horizon is gravelly sand or very gravelly
sand. The content of shells that are dominantly less
than 1 inch in size is 25 to 60 percent. Reaction in the
lower part of the Cg horizon ranges from neutral to
moderately alkaline.

Cudjoe Series
The Cudjoe series consists of poorly drained soils
that are shallow to rippable coral or oolitic limestone
bedrock. These soils formed in calcareous marl. They
are in tidal areas and other flooded areas. Slopes are 0
to 1 percent.


Taxonomic class: Loamy, carbonatic, isohyperthermic,
shallow Tropic Fluvaquents
Typical Pedon
Cudjoe marl, in an area of Cudjoe marl, tidal, on
Plantation Key; 0.25 mile southwest of Treasure Harbor
and 200 feet south of U.S. Highway 1; NW1/4NW/4NW1/4
sec. 24, T. 63 S., R. 37 E.
A1-0 to 9 inches; light gray (10YR 7/1) marl that has a
texture of silt loam; weak coarse platy structure
parting to weak fine subangular blocky; very friable;
common fine and medium roots; common fine and
very fine pores; strongly alkaline, calcareous, and
effervescent; clear smooth boundary.
A2-9 to 16 inches; white (10YR 8/1) marl that has a
texture of silt loam; weak coarse platy structure
parting to weak fine subangular blocky; very friable;
common fine roots; common fine and very fine
pores; strongly alkaline, calcareous, and
effervescent; about 5 percent limestone flags and
pebbles in the lower 2 inches; abrupt smooth
boundary.
2R-16 inches; soft to hard, rippable coral limestone
bedrock.
Range in Characteristics
The depth to bedrock is 3 to 20 inches. Reaction
ranges from neutral to moderately alkaline. The soils
are calcareous and effervescent. The content of calcium
carbonate is more than 90 percent. The content of coral
or limestone fragments is less than 10 percent, by
volume.
The A horizon has hue of 10YR or 2.5Y, value of 4 to
8, and chroma of 1 or 2. If value is 4 or 5, chroma is 1.
This horizon is marl that has a carbonate-free texture of
silt or silt loam. In some pedons the lower part of the
profile is a massive C horizon. This horizon has the
same ranges in hue, value, chroma, and texture as the
A horizon. In some pedons a sapric Oa horizon, which
is less than 3 inches thick, overlies the bedrock.

Islamorada Series
The Islamorada series consists of very poorly drained
soils that are moderately deep to rippable coral or
oolitic limestone bedrock. These soils formed in sapric
material. They are in tidal areas. Slopes are less than 1
percent.
Taxonomic class: Euic, isohyperthermic Lithic
Troposaprists
Typical Pedon
Islamorada muck, in an area of Islamorada muck, tidal,
on Lower Matecumbe Key; 1 mile southeast of Lignuum







Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


Vitae Channel and 200 feet northwest of U.S. Highway
1; SW/NE1/ sec. 15, T. 64 S., R. 36 E.
Oal-0 to 5 inches; muck, black (5YR 2/1) rubbed and
unrubbed; about 15 percent fiber, less than 5
percent rubbed; massive; nonsticky; about 40
percent, by volume, fine and medium live roots;
neutral; clear smooth boundary.
Oa2-5 to 35 inches; muck, very dark gray (5YR 3/1)
rubbed and unrubbed; about 35 percent fiber, less
than 10 percent rubbed; massive; nonsticky; about
30 percent, by volume, fine and medium live roots;
neutral; abrupt smooth boundary.
2R-35 inches; soft to hard, rippable coral limestone
bedrock.
Range in Characteristics
The depth to bedrock is 20 to 50 inches. Reaction
ranges from slightly acid to mildly alkaline.
The Oa horizon has hue of 5YR, value of 2 or 3, and
chroma of 1 or 2. The content of fiber is 15 to 35
percent before rubbing and less than 15 percent after
rubbing.

Keylargo Series
The Keylargo series consists of very poorly drained
soils that are deep to rippable coral or oolitic limestone
bedrock. These soils formed in sapric material. They
are in tidal areas. Slopes are less than 1 percent.
Taxonomic class: Euic, isohyperthermic Typic
Troposaprists
Typical Pedon
Keylargo muck, in an area of Keylargo muck, tidal, on
Key Largo; 1 mile east of Steamboat Creek on Card
Sound Road and 75 feet south of the road; SW1/4NE1/4
sec. 28, T. 59 S., R. 40 E.
Oal-0 to 6 inches; muck, very dark gray (10YR 3/1)
rubbed and unrubbed; about 20 percent fiber, less
than 5 percent rubbed; massive; nonsticky; about
20 percent, by volume, fine and medium live roots;
about 5 percent, by volume, mineral material;
neutral; clear smooth boundary.
Oa2-6 to 70 inches; muck, dark reddish brown (5YR
3/2) rubbed and unrubbed; about 30 percent fiber,
less than 5 percent rubbed; massive; nonsticky;
about 20 percent, by volume, fine and medium live
roots; about 2 percent, by volume, mineral material;
neutral; abrupt smooth boundary.
2R-70 inches; soft to hard, rippable coral limestone
bedrock.
Range in Characteristics
The depth to bedrock is 50 to 90 inches. Reaction
ranges from slightly acid to mildly alkaline.


The Oa horizon has hue of 5YR to 10YR, value of 2
or 3, and chroma of 1 to 3. The content of fiber is 15 to
30 percent before rubbing and less than 15 percent
after rubbing.

Keyvaca Series

The Keyvaca series consists of well drained soils that
are shallow to rippable oolitic limestone bedrock. These
soils formed in material weathered from the oolitic
limestone bedrock. They are on uplands. Slopes are 0
to 1 percent.
Taxonomic class: Loamy-skeletal, carbonatic,
isohyperthermic Lithic Rendolls
Typical Pedon
Keyvaca very gravelly loam, in an area of Keyvaca very
gravelly loam, extremely stony, on Big Pine Key; 2.2
miles northwest of U.S. Highway 1 on Key Deer
Boulevard and 200 feet southwest of the road;
SE1SE1/NE1/ sec. 22, T. 66 S., R. 29 E.
A-0 to 4 inches; very dark brown (10YR 3/3) very
gravelly loam; weak fine granular structure; very
friable; many fine, medium, and large roots; about 5
percent, by volume, limestone fragments more than
3 inches in size and about 40 percent, by volume,
limestone fragments less than 3 inches in size;
moderately alkaline; abrupt wavy boundary.
R-4 inches; soft to hard, rippable oolitic limestone
bedrock.
Range in Characteristics
The depth to bedrock is 3 to 6 inches. The content of
stones, cobbles, and pebbles ranges from 35 to 55
percent, by volume.
The A horizon has hue of 7.5YR or 10YR and value
and chroma of 2 or 3. The texture is gravelly sandy
loam, gravelly loam, very gravelly sandy loam, and very
gravelly loam or the cobbly and very cobbly analogs of
those textures. The content of gravel-sized oolitic
limestone fragments is 20 to 50 percent, and the
content of cobble-sized fragments is 10 to 25 percent.
The content of silt is less than 45 percent. Reaction is
mildly alkaline or moderately alkaline.

Keywest Series
The Keywest series consists of poorly drained soils
that are deep to rippable coral or oolitic limestone
bedrock. These soils formed in calcareous marl. They
are in tidal areas. Slopes are 0 to 1 percent.
Taxonomic class: Coarse-silty, carbonatic,
isohyperthermic Thapto-Histic Tropic Fluvaquents








Soil Survey


Typical Pedon
Keywest marl, in an area of Keywest marl, tidal, on
Boot Key; 1.4 miles southeast of U.S. Highway 1 on
County Road 931 and 50 feet northwest of the road;
SE1/4SE1/4SW14 sec. 16. T. 66 S., R. 32 E.
A-0 to 9 inches; light gray (10YR 7/1) marl that has a
texture of silt loam; weak coarse platy structure
parting to weak fine granular; very friable; common
medium roots; common fine and very fine pores;
about 5 percent, by volume, shell fragments; mildly
alkaline, calcareous, and effervescent; abrupt
smooth boundary.
Oa-9 to 15 inches; muck, dark brown (7.5YR 3/2)
rubbed and unrubbed; about 30 percent, by volume,
live roots; massive; very friable; neutral in calcium
chloride; abrupt smooth boundary.
A/Oa-15 to 27 inches; gray and brown mucky marl; 70
percent, by volume, light brownish gray (10YR 6/2)
marl and 30 percent, by volume, dark brown (10YR
4/3) muck; massive; very friable; about 3 percent,
by volume, shell fragments; neutral in calcium
chloride and moderately alkaline in water; clear
smooth boundary.
Cg-27 to 65 inches; light gray (10YR 7/1) marl that
has a texture of silt loam; massive; friable; few fine
roots; few fine pores; thin strata of dominantly sand-
sized shells; strongly alkaline; abrupt smooth
boundary.
2R-65 inches; soft to hard, rippable oolitic limestone
bedrock.
Range in Characteristics
The depth to bedrock is more than 50 inches.
Reaction ranges from neutral to moderately alkaline.
The soils are calcareous and effervescent. The content
of calcium carbonate in the marl layers is more than 90
percent. The content of gravel-sized fragments is less
than 10 percent, by volume, throughout the profile.
The A horizon has hue of 10YR or 2.5Y, value of 4 to
8, and chroma of 1 or 2. If value is 4 or 5, chroma is 1.
The horizon is marl that has a carbonate-free texture of
silt or silt loam.
The Oa horizon, if it occurs, has hue of 5YR to
10YR, value of 3 or 4, and chroma of 2 to 4. The
content of fiber is 20 to 50 percent before rubbing and
less than 10 percent after rubbing. Reaction is slightly
acid to mildly alkaline in calcium chloride.
The A/Oa horizon, if it occurs, is neutral to
moderately alkaline. The A part of this horizon has the
same ranges in color and texture as the A horizon. The
Oa portion has the same ranges in color and texture as
the Oa horizon.
The Cg horizon has hue of 10YR or 2.5Y, value of 6
to 8, and chroma of 1 or 2. It is marl that has a


carbonate-free texture of silt or silt loam. In some
pedons the Cg horizon is stratified marl and sand-sized
shell fragments.

Lignumvitae Series
The Lignumvitae series consists of poorly drained
soils that are moderately deep to rippable coral or
oolitic limestone bedrock. These soils formed in
calcareous marl. They are in tidal areas. Slopes are 0
to 1 percent.
Taxonomic class: Coarse-silty, carbonatic,
isohyperthermic Tropic Fluvaquents
Typical Pedon
Lignumvitae marl, in an area of Lignumvitae marl, tidal,
on Windley Key; 0.1 mile southwest of Snake Creek
Bridge and 200 feet north of U.S. Highway 1;
NE1/NE1/NE1/ sec. 23, T. 63 S., R. 37 E.
A1-0 to 4 inches; light brownish gray (10YR 6/2) marl
that has a texture of silt loam; weak coarse platy
structure parting to moderate medium granular; very
friable; common fine and very fine pores; neutral,
calcareous, and effervescent; clear wavy boundary.
A2-4 to 32 inches; light gray (10YR 7/1) marl that has
a texture of silt loam; weak coarse platy structure
parting to weak fine granular; very friable; common
fine and very fine pores; slightly alkaline,
calcareous, and effervescent; abrupt irregular
boundary.
2R-32 inches; soft to hard, rippable coral limestone
bedrock.
Range in Characteristics
The depth to bedrock is dominantly 25 to 35 inches
but can range from 20 to 40 inches. Reaction ranges
from neutral to moderately alkaline. The soils are
calcareous and effervescent. The content of calcium
carbonate is more than 90 percent.
The A horizon has hue of 10YR or 2.5Y. value of 4 to
8, and chroma of 1 or 2. If value is 4 or 5, chroma is 1.
The horizon is marl that has a carbonate-free texture of
silt or silt loam. In some pedons the lower part of the
profile is a massive C horizon. The content of coral or
limestone fragments is less than 15 percent, by volume.

Matecumbe Series
The Matecumbe series consists of moderately well
drained soils that are very shallow to rippable coral or
oolitic limestone bedrock. These soils formed in organic
material in varying stages of decomposition. They are
on tropical hammocks. Slopes are 0 to 1 percent.
Taxonomic class: Euic, isohyperthermic Lithic
Tropofolists








Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


Typical Pedon
Matecumbe muck, in an area of Matecumbe muck,
occasionally flooded, on Key Largo; SW/4SW1/SW1/4
sec. 3, T. 59 S., R. 40 E.
Oa-0 to 6 inches; black (10YR 2/1) muck; about 15
percent fiber, less than 5 percent rubbed; about 5
percent, by weight, sandy and loamy material;
structureless; very friable; about 30 percent, by
volume, live roots; about 10 percent, by volume,
limestone fragments less than 3 inches in size;
medium acid; abrupt smooth boundary.
2R-6 inches; soft to hard, rippable coral limestone
bedrock.
Range in Characteristics
The depth to limestone or coral limestone bedrock is
2 to 9 inches. The Oa horizon has hue of 10YR to 5YR,
value of 3 or less, and chroma of 1 or 2. It is muck,
mucky peat, or gravelly muck that has a mineral content
of less than 20 percent. The content of gravel-sized
limestone or coral fragments ranges from 5 to 35
percent, by volume. Reaction ranges from medium acid
to neutral.

Pennekamp Series
The Pennekamp series consists of well drained soils
that are shallow to rippable coral limestone bedrock.
These soils formed in material weathered from the coral
limestone bedrock. They generally have a thin
overburden of sapric material. They are on uplands.
Slopes range from 0 to 2 percent.
Taxonomic class: Loamy-skeletal, carbonatic,
isohyperthermic Lithic Rendolls
Typical Pedon
Pennekamp gravelly muck, in an area of Pennekamp
gravelly muck, 0 to 2 percent slopes, extremely stony,
on Key Largo; 600 feet east of U.S. Highway 1, about
100 feet south of the service road entrance at
Pennekamp State Park; 800 feet north and 150 feet
east of the southwest corner of sec. 14, T. 61 S.,
R. 39 E.
Oa-0 to 3 inches; black (10YR 2/1) gravelly muck;
about 15 percent fiber, less than 5 percent rubbed;
about 40 percent, by weight, mineral material;
structureless; very friable; many fine, medium, and
large roots; about 5 percent, by volume, coral
fragments more than 3 inches in size and about 15
percent, by volume, coral fragments less than 3
inches in size; medium acid; abrupt smooth
boundary.
A-3 to 8 inches; dark reddish brown (5YR 3/2) very
gravelly loam; weak fine granular structure; very


friable; about 50 percent, by volume, coral
fragments less than 3 inches in size and about 10
percent, by volume, coral fragments more than 3
inches in size; many fine and medium roots; mildly
alkaline; abrupt wavy boundary.
R-8 inches; soft to hard, rippable coral limestone
bedrock.
Range in Characteristics
The depth to bedrock is 4 to 16 inches.
The Oa horizon has hue of 5YR to 10YR, value of 2
or 3, and chroma of 1 or 2. It is muck or gravelly muck.
The content of coral fragments is 5 to 25 percent, by
volume. Reaction is medium acid or slightly acid.
The A horizon has hue of 5YR to 10YR, value of 2 or
3, and chroma of 1 to 3. The texture is very gravelly
loam, very gravelly silt loam, extremely gravelly loam, or
extremely gravelly silt loam. The content of coral
fragments is 35 to 75 percent, by volume, and the
content of silt is more than 45 percent. Reaction is
mildly alkaline or moderately alkaline.

Saddlebunch Series
The Saddlebunch series consists of somewhat poorly
drained soils that are shallow to rippable coral or oolitic
limestone bedrock. These soils formed in calcareous
marl. They are on uplands that are flooded. Slopes are
0 to 1 percent.
Taxonomic class: Loamy, carbonatic, isohyperthermic,
shallow Tropic Fluvaquents
Typical Pedon
Saddlebunch marl, in an area of Saddlebunch marl,
occasionally flooded, on Sugarloaf Key; 2.7 miles south
on County Road 939 from its junction with U.S.
Highway 1, about 0.8 miles east and 1.05 miles north
on County Road 939A and 100 feet west of the road.
A1-0 to 5 inches; grayish brown (10YR 5/2) marl that
has a texture of silt loam; weak coarse platy
structure parting to moderate fine granular; very
friable; mildly alkaline, calcareous, and effervescent;
clear smooth boundary.
A2-5 to 17 inches; light gray (10YR 7/1) marl that has
a texture of silt loam; weak coarse platy structure
parting to weak fine granular; very friable; few fine
and very fine pores; moderately alkaline,
calcareous, and effervescent; abrupt irregular
boundary.
2R-17 inches; soft to hard, rippable oolitic limestone
bedrock.
Range in Characteristics
The thickness of the solum and the depth to oolitic
limestone or coral bedrock are 4 to 20 inches. Reaction












ranges from neutral to moderately alkaline.
The Al horizon has hue of 10YR or 2.5Y, value of 4
or 5, and chroma of 2 or 3. The A2 horizon has hue of
10YR or 2.5Y, value of 6 to 8, and chroma of 1 or 2.
The A horizon is marl that has a carbonate-free texture
of silt or silt loam. It is calcareous and effervescent. The
content of calcium carbonate is more than 90 percent,
by volume. The content of coral or limestone fragments
is less than 15 percent, by volume.

Tavernier Series
The Tavernier series consists of very poorly drained
soils that are shallow to rippable coral limestone
bedrock. These soils formed in sapric material. They
are in tidal areas. Slopes are less than 1 percent.
Taxonomic class: Euic, isohyperthermic, shallow Lithic
Troposaprists
Typical Pedon
Tavernier muck, in an area of Rock outcrop-Tavernier
complex, tidal, on Key Largo; 0.25 mile east of


Crocodile Lake and 150 feet south of State Road 905;
SE/4SE/4 sec. 23, T. 59 S., R. 40 E.
Oa-0 to 8 inches; muck, very dark grayish brown
(10YR 3/2) rubbed and unrubbed; about 20 percent
fiber, less than 5 percent rubbed; massive;
nonsticky; about 30 percent, by volume, fine and
medium live roots; about 10 percent, by volume,
limestone fragments less than 3 inches in size;
slightly acid; abrupt smooth boundary.
2R-8 inches; soft to hard, rippable coral limestone
bedrock.
Range in Characteristics
The depth to bedrock is dominantly 3 to 16 inches
but ranges to 20 inches. Reaction ranges from slightly
acid to mildly alkaline. The content of gravel-sized coral
or limestone fragments ranges from 0 to 20 percent, by
volume.
The Oa horizon has hue of 5YR to 10YR, value of 2
or 3, and chroma of 1 to 3. The content of fiber is 15 to
50 percent before rubbing and less than 10 percent
after rubbing.

















References


(1) American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials.
1986. Standard specifications for highway materials and methods of
sampling and testing. Ed. 14, 2 vols.

(2) American Society for Testing and Materials. 1993. Standard
classification of soils for engineering purposes. ASTM Stand. D 2487.

(3) Cooke, C. Wythe. 1945. Geology of Florida. Fla. State Dep. Conserv.
and Fla. Geol. Surv. Geol. Bull. 29.

(4) Cowardin, L.M., V. Carter, F.C. Golet, and E.T. LaRoe. 1979.
Classification of wetlands and deep-water habitats of the United States.
U.S. Fish and Wildl. Serv. FWS/OBS-79/31.

(5) Craig, Robert M., Louie P. Heard, and John F. Vance. 1980. Using
ecological communities in landscaping. Proc. Fla. State Hortic. Soc. 93:
96-97.

(6) Federal Interagency Committee for Wetland Delineation. 1989. Federal
manual for identifying and delineating jurisdictional wetlands. U.S. Army
Corps of Eng.; U.S. Environ. Prot. Agency; U.S. Fish and Wildl. Serv.;
and U.S. Dep. Agric., Soil Conserv. Serv.

(7) Gunter, Herman. 1948. Elevations in Florida. Fla. State Dep. Conserv.
and Fla. Geol. Surv. Geol. Bull. 32.

(8) Hurt, G.W., W.H. Henderson, and W.E. Puckett. 1990. Field
identification of hydric soils. In Hydric soils of Florida handbook, pp.
45-47.

(9) United States Department of Agriculture. 1975. Soil taxonomy: A basic
system of soil classification for making and interpreting soil surveys. Soil
Conserv. Serv., Agric. Handb. 436.

(10) United States Department of Agriculture. 1987. Technical guides. Soil
Conserv. Serv.

(11) United States Department of Agriculture. 1991. Hydric soils of the
United States. Soil Conserv. Serv. and Natl. Tech. Comm. for Hydric
Soils.









46


(12) United States Department of Agriculture. 1993. Soil survey manual. U.S.
Dep. Agric. Handb. 18.

(13) University of Florida. 1988. Florida statistical abstract. Coll. of Bus.
Admin.

(14) White, William A. 1970. The geomorphology of the Florida peninsula.
Fla. Dep. Natur. Resour., Bur. of Geol. Bull. 51.

(15) Williams, Joy. 1988. The Florida keys.

















Glossary


Available water capacity (available moisture
capacity). The capacity of soils to hold water
available for use by most plants. It is commonly
defined as the difference between the amount of
soil water at field moisture capacity and the
amount at wilting point. It is commonly expressed
as inches of water per inch of soil. The capacity, in
inches, in a 60-inch profile or to a limiting layer is
expressed as:
Very low ............. ............... to 3
Low .................................... '3 to 6
Moderate ......................... 6 to 9
High ................................... 9 to 12
Very high ........................ more than 12
Bedrock. The solid rock that underlies the soil and
other unconsolidated material or that is exposed at
the surface.
Boulders. Rock fragments larger than 2 feet (60
centimeters) in diameter.
Cation-exchange capacity. The total amount of
exchangeable cations that can be held by the soil,
expressed in terms of milliequivalents per 100
grams of soil at neutrality (pH 7.0) or at some
other stated pH value. The term, as applied to
soils, is synonymous with base-exchange capacity
but is more precise in meaning.
Climax vegetation. The stabilized plant community on a
particular site. The plant cover reproduces itself
and does not change so long as the environment
remains the same.
Coarse fragments. If round, mineral or rock particles 2
millimeters to 25 centimeters (10 inches) in
diameter; if flat, mineral or rock particles
(flagstone) 15 to 38 centimeters (6 to 15 inches)
long.
Coarse textured soil. Sand or loamy sand.
Complex, soil. A map unit of two or more kinds of soil
in such an intricate pattern or so small in area that
it is not practical to map them separately at the
selected scale of mapping. The pattern and
proportion of the soils are somewhat similar in all
areas.
Consistence, soil. The feel of the soil and the ease
with which a lump can be crushed by the fingers.


Terms commonly used to describe consistence
are:
Loose.-Noncoherent when dry or moist; does not
hold together in a mass.
Friable.-When moist, crushes easily under gentle
pressure between thumb and forefinger and can
be pressed together into a lump.
Firm.-When moist, crushes under moderate
pressure between thumb and forefinger, but
resistance is distinctly noticeable.
Plastic.-When wet, readily deformed by moderate
pressure but can be pressed into a lump; will form
a "wire" when rolled between thumb and
forefinger.
Sticky.-When wet, adheres to other material and
tends to stretch somewhat and pull apart rather
than to pull free from other material.
Hard.-When dry, moderately resistant to
pressure; can be broken with difficulty between
thumb and forefinger.
Soft.-When dry, breaks into powder or individual
grains under very slight pressure.
Cemented.-Hard; little affected by moistening.
Control section. The part of the soil on which
classification is based. The thickness varies
among different kinds of soil, but for many it is that
part of the soil profile between depths of 10 inches
and 40 or 80 inches.
Depth to rock (in tables). Bedrock is too near the
surface for the specified use.
Drainage class (natural). Refers to the frequency and
duration of periods of saturation or partial
saturation during soil formation, as opposed to
altered drainage, which is commonly the result of
artificial drainage or irrigation but may be caused
by the sudden deepening of channels or the
blocking of drainage outlets. Seven classes of
natural soil drainage are recognized:
Excessively drained.-Water is removed from the
soil very rapidly. Excessively drained soils are
commonly very coarse textured, rocky, or shallow.
Some are steep. All are free of the mottling related
to wetness.








Soil Survey


Somewhat excessively drained.-Water is removed
from the soil rapidly. Many somewhat excessively
drained soils are sandy and rapidly pervious.
Some are shallow. Some are so steep that much
of the water they receive is lost as runoff. All are
free of the mottling related to wetness.
Well drained.-Water is removed from the soil
readily, but not rapidly. It is available to plants
throughout most of the growing season, and
wetness does not inhibit growth of roots for
significant periods during most growing seasons.
Well drained soils are commonly medium textured.
They are mainly free of mottling.
Moderately well drained.-Water is removed from
the soil somewhat slowly during some periods.
Moderately well drained soils are wet for only a
short time during the growing season, but
periodically they are wet long enough that most
mesophytic crops are affected. They commonly
have a slowly pervious layer within or directly
below the solum or periodically receive high
rainfall, or both.
Somewhat poorly drained.-Water is removed
slowly enough that the soil is wet for significant
periods during the growing season. Wetness
markedly restricts the growth of mesophytic crops
unless artificial drainage is provided. Somewhat
poorly drained soils commonly have a slowly
pervious layer, a high water table, additional water
from seepage, nearly continuous rainfall, or a
combination of these.
Poorly drained.-Water is removed so slowly that
the soil is saturated periodically during the growing
season or remains wet for long periods. Free
water is commonly at or near the surface for long
enough during the growing season that most
mesophytic crops cannot be grown unless the soil
is artificially drained. The soil is not continuously
saturated in layers directly below plow depth. Poor
drainage results from a high water table, a slowly
pervious layer within the profile, seepage, nearly
continuous rainfall, or a combination of these.
Very poorly drained.-Water is removed from the
soil so slowly that free water remains at or on the
surface during most of the growing season. Unless
the soil is artificially drained, most mesophytic
crops cannot be grown. Very poorly drained soils
are commonly level or depressed and are
frequently ponded. Yet, where rainfall is high and
nearly continuous, they can have moderate or high
slope gradients.
Erosion. The wearing away of the land surface by
water, wind, ice, or other geologic agents and by
such processes as gravitational creep.


Erosion (geologic)-Erosion caused by geologic
processes acting over long geologic periods and
resulting in the wearing away of mountains and
the building up of such landscape features as
flood plains and coastal plains. Synonym: natural
erosion.
Erosion (accelerated)-Erosion much more rapid
than geologic erosion, mainly as a result of human
or animal activities or of a catastrophe in nature,
such as fire, that exposes the surface.
Eutrophication. The process by which a body of water
becomes either naturally or by pollution rich in
dissolved nutrients (as phosphates) and often
shallow with a seasonal deficiency in dissolved
oxygen.
Excess salt (in tables). Excess water-soluble salts in
the soil that restrict the growth of most plants.
Facultative wetland plants. Plants that generally grow
(estimated probability of more than 67 percent to
99 percent) in wetlands but also (estimated
probability of 1 percent to 33 percent) in
nonwetlands.
Genesis, soil. The mode of origin of the soil. Refers
especially to the processes or soil-forming factors
responsible for the formation of the solum, or true
soil, from the unconsolidated parent material.
Gravel. Rounded or angular fragments of rock up to 3
inches (2 millimeters to 7.6 centimeters) in
diameter. An individual piece is a pebble.
Gravelly soil material. Material that is 15 to 50 percent,
by volume, rounded or angular rock fragments, not
prominently flattened, up to 3 inches (7.6
centimeters) in diameter.
Ground water (geology). Water filling all the unblocked
pores of the material below the water table.
Horizon, soil. A layer of soil, approximately parallel to
the surface, having distinct characteristics
produced by soil-forming processes. In the
identification of soil horizons, an uppercase letter
represents the major horizons. Numbers or
lowercase letters that follow represent subdivisions
of the major horizons. An explanation of the
subdivisions is given in the "Soil Survey Manual."
The major horizons of mineral soil are as follows:
0 horizon.-An organic layer of fresh and
decaying plant residue at the surface of a mineral
soil.
A horizon.-The mineral horizon at or near the
surface in which an accumulation of humified
organic matter is mixed with the mineral material.
Also, a plowed surface horizon, most of which was
originally part of a B horizon.
E horizon.-The mineral horizon in which the main







Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


feature is loss of silicate clay, iron, aluminum, or
some combination of these.
B horizon.-The mineral horizon below an O, A, or
E horizon. The B horizon is, in part, a layer of
transition from the overlying horizon to the
underlying C horizon. The B horizon also has
distinctive characteristics, such as accumulation of
clay, sesquioxides, humus, or a combination of
these; prismatic or blocky structure; redder or
browner colors than those in the A horizon; or a
combination of these. The combined A and B
horizons are generally called the solum, or true
soil. If a soil does not have a B horizon, the A
horizon alone is the solum.
C horizon.-The mineral horizon or layer,
excluding indurated bedrock, that is little affected
by soil-forming processes and does not have the
properties typical of the A or B horizon. The
material of a C horizon may be either like or unlike
that in which the solum formed. If the material is
known to differ from that in the solum, the Arabic
numeral 2 precedes the letter C.
Cr horizon.-Soft, consolidated bedrock beneath
the soil.
R layer.-Consolidated rock unweatheredd
bedrock) beneath the soil. The bedrock commonly
underlies a C horizon but can be directly below an
A or a B horizon.
Humus. The well decomposed, more or less stable part
of the organic matter in mineral soils.
Hydrologic soil groups. Refers to soils grouped
according to their runoff-producing characteristics.
The chief consideration is the inherent capacity of
soil bare of vegetation to permit infiltration. The
slope and the kind of plant cover are not
considered but are separate factors in predicting
runoff. Soils are assigned to four groups. In group
A are soils having a high infiltration rate when
thoroughly wet and having a low runoff potential.
They are mainly deep, well drained, and sandy or
gravelly. In group D, at the other extreme, are
soils having a very slow infiltration rate and thus a
high runoff potential. They have a claypan or clay
layer at or near the surface, have a permanent
high water table, or are shallow over nearly
impervious bedrock or other material. A soil is
assigned to two hydrologic groups if part of the
acreage is artificially drained and part is
undrained.
Infiltration. The downward entry of water into the
immediate surface of soil or other material. This
contrasts with percolation, which is movement of
water through soil layers or material.
Infiltration rate. The rate at which water penetrates the


surface of the soil at any given instant, usually
expressed in inches per hour. The rate can be
limited by the infiltration capacity of the soil or the
rate at which water is applied at the surface.
Intake rate. The average rate of water entering the soil
under irrigation. Most soils have a fast initial rate;
the rate decreases with application time.
Therefore, intake rate for design purposes is not a
constant but is a variable depending on the net
irrigation application. The rate of water intake, in
inches per hour, is expressed as follows:
Less than 0.2 ......................... very low
0.2 to 0.4 ................................ low
0.4 to 0.75 .................... moderately low
0.75 to 1.25............ .......... moderate
1.25 to 1.75 .................. moderately high
1.75 to 2.5 .............................. high
More than 2.5 ....................... very high
Irrigation. Application of water to soils to assist in
production of crops. Methods of irrigation are:
Basin.-Water is applied rapidly to nearly level
plains surrounded by levees or dikes.
Border.-Water is applied at the upper end of a
strip in which the lateral flow of water is controlled
by small earth ridges called border dikes, or
borders.
Controlled flooding.-Water is released at intervals
from closely spaced field ditches and distributed
uniformly over the field.
Corrugation.-Water is applied to small, closely
spaced furrows or ditches in fields of close-
growing crops or in orchards so that it flows in
only one direction.
Drip (or trickle).-Water is applied slowly and
under low pressure to the surface of the soil or
into the soil through such applicators as emitters,
porous tubing, or perforated pipe.
Furrow.-Water is applied in small ditches made
by cultivation implements. Furrows are used for
tree and row crops.
Sprinkler.-Water is sprayed over the soil surface
through pipes or nozzles from a pressure system.
Subirrigation.-Water is applied in open ditches or
tile lines until the water table is raised enough to
wet the soil.
Wild flooding.-Water, released at high points, is
allowed to flow onto an area without controlled
distribution.
Large stones (in tables). Rock fragments that are 3
inches (7.6 centimeters) or more across. Large
stones adversely affect the specified use of the
soil.
Liquid limit. The moisture content at which the soil
passes from a plastic to a liquid state.








Soil Survey


Low strength. The soil is not strong enough to support
loads.
Medium textured soil. Very fine sandy loam, loam, silt
loam, or silt.
Mineral soil. Soil that is mainly mineral material and
low in organic material. Its bulk density is more
than that of organic soil.
Miscellaneous area. An area that has little or no
natural soil and supports little or no vegetation.
Morphology, soil. The physical makeup of the soil,
including the texture, structure, porosity,
consistence, color, and other physical, mineral,
and biological properties of the various horizons,
and the thickness and arrangement of those
horizons in the soil profile.
Muck. Dark, finely divided, well decomposed organic
soil material. (See Sapric soil material.)
Munsell notation. A designation of color by degrees of
the three simple variables-hue, value, and
chroma. For example, a notation of 10YR 6/4 is a
color with hue of 10YR, value of 6, and chroma of
4.
Neutral soil. A soil having a pH value between 6.6 and
7.3. (See Reaction, soil.)
Nutrient, plant. Any element taken in by a plant
essential to its growth. Plant nutrients are mainly
nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium,
magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, copper,
boron, and zinc obtained from the soil and carbon,
hydrogen, and oxygen obtained from the air and
water.
Obligate wetland plants. Plants that almost always
grow (estimated probability of more than 99
percent) in wetlands under natural conditions but
which may also rarely grow (estimated probability
of less than 1 percent) in nonwetlands.
Organic matter. Plant and animal residue in the soil in
various stages of decomposition.
Parent material. The unconsolidated organic and
mineral material in which soil forms.
Pedon. The smallest volume that can be called "a soil."
A pedon is three dimensional and large enough to
permit study of all horizons. Its area ranges from
about 10 to 100 square feet (1 square meter to 10
square meters), depending on the variability of the
soil.
Percolation. The downward movement of water through
the soil.
Permeability. The quality of the soil that enables water
to move through the profile. Permeability is
measured as the number of inches per hour that
water moves through the saturated soil. Terms
describing permeability are:


Very slow ................. less than 0.06 inch
Slow ........................ 0.06 to 0.2 inch
Moderately slow ................ 0.2 to 0.6 inch
Moderate .............. 0.6 inch to 2.0 inches
Moderately rapid .............. 2.0 to 6.0 inches
Rapid ......................... 6.0 to 20 inches
Very rapid ................ more than 20 inches
pH value. A numerical designation of acidity and
alkalinity in soil. (See Reaction, soil.)
Plasticity index. The numerical difference between the
liquid limit and the plastic limit; the range of
moisture content within which the soil remains
plastic.
Poor filter (in tables). Because of rapid permeability,
the soil may not adequately filter effluent from a
waste disposal system.
Profile, soil. A vertical section of the soil extending
through all its horizons and into the parent
material.
Reaction, soil. A measure of the acidity or alkalinity of
a soil expressed in pH values. A soil that tests to
pH 7.0 is described as precisely neutral in reaction
because it is neither acid nor alkaline. The
degrees of acidity or alkalinity, expressed as pH
values, are:
Extremely acid ..................... below 4.5
Very strongly acid ................... 4.5 to 5.0
Strongly acid ........................ 5.1 to 5.5
Medium acid........... ............. 5.6 to 6.0
Slightly acid ......................... 6.1 to 6.5
Neutral ............................... 6.6 to 7.3
Mildly alkaline ....................... 7.4 to 7.8
Moderately alkaline ................. 7.9 to 8.4
Strongly alkaline ..................... 8.5 to 9.0
Very strongly alkaline ............ 9.1 and higher
Residuum (residual soil material). Unconsolidated,
weathered or partly weathered mineral material
that accumulated as consolidated rock
disintegrated in place.
Rippable. Rippable bedrock or hardpan can be
excavated using a single-tooth ripping attachment
mounted on a tractor with a 200-300 draw bar
horsepower rating.
Rock fragments. Rock or mineral fragments having a
diameter of 2 millimeters or more; for example,
pebbles, cobbles, stones, and boulders.
Root zone. The part of the soil that can be penetrated
by plant roots.
Runoff. The precipitation discharged into stream
channels from an area. The water that flows off
the surface of the land without sinking into the soil
is called surface runoff. Water that enters the soil
before reaching surface streams is called ground-
water runoff or seepage flow from ground water.
Saline soil. A soil containing soluble salts in an amount
that impairs the growth of plants. A saline soil








Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


does not contain excess exchangeable sodium.
Sand. As a soil separate, individual rock or mineral
fragments from 0.05 millimeter to 2.0 millimeters in
diameter. Most sand grains consist of quartz. As a
soil textural class, a soil that is 85 percent or more
sand and not more than 10 percent clay.
Sapric soil material (muck). The most highly
decomposed of all organic soil material. Muck has
the least amount of plant fiber, the highest bulk
density, and the lowest water content at saturation
of all organic soil material.
Seepage (in tables). The movement of water through
the soil adversely affects the specified use.
Series, soil. A group of soils that have profiles that are
almost alike, except for differences in texture of
the surface layer or of the underlying material. All
the soils of a series have horizons that are similar
in composition, thickness, and arrangement.
Silt. As a soil separate, individual mineral particles that
range in diameter from the upper limit of clay
(0.002 millimeter) to the lower limit of very fine
sand (0.05 millimeter). As a soil textural class, soil
that is 80 percent or more silt and less than 12
percent clay.
Slope. The inclination of the land surface from the
horizontal. Percentage of slope is the vertical
distance divided by horizontal distance, then
multiplied by 100. Thus, a slope of 20 percent is a
drop of 20 feet in 100 feet of horizontal distance.
Small stones (in tables). Rock fragments less than 3
inches (7.6 centimeters) in diameter. Small stones
adversely affect the specified use of the soil.
Soil. A natural, three-dimensional body at the earth's
surface. It is capable of supporting plants and has
properties resulting from the integrated effect of
climate and living matter acting on earthy parent
material, as conditioned by relief over periods of
time.
Soil separates. Mineral particles less than 2 millimeters
in equivalent diameter and ranging between
specified size limits. The names and sizes, in
millimeters, of separates recognized in the United
States are as follows:


Very coarse sand..................... 2.0 to 1.0
Coarse sand ......................... 1.0 to 0.5
Medium sand ....................... 0.5 to 0.25
Fine sand ........................ 0.25 to 0.10
Very fine sand ................... 0.10 to 0.05
Silt ............................... 0.05 to 0.002
Clay .......................... less than 0.002
Stones. Rock fragments 10 to 24 inches (25 to 60
centimeters) in diameter if rounded or 15 to 24
inches (38 to 60 centimeters) in length if flat.
Stony. Refers to a soil containing stones in numbers
that interfere with or prevent tillage.
Structure, soil. The arrangement of primary soil
particles into compound particles or aggregates.
The principal forms of soil structure are-platy
(laminated), prismatic (vertical axis of aggregates
longer than horizontal), columnar (prisms with
rounded tops), blocky (angular or subangular), and
granular. Structureless soils are either single
grained (each grain by itself, as in dune sand) or
massive (the particles adhering without any regular
cleavage, as in many hardpans).
Surface layer. The soil ordinarily moved in tillage, or its
equivalent in uncultivated soil, ranging in depth
from 4 to 10 inches (10 to 25 centimeters).
Frequently designated as the "plow layer," or the
"Ap horizon."
Texture, soil. The relative proportions of sand, silt, and
clay particles in a mass of soil. The basic textural
classes, in order of increasing proportion of fine
particles, are sand, loamy sand, sandy loam, loam,
silt loam, silt, sandy clay loam, clay loam, silty clay
loam, sandy clay, silty clay, and clay. The sand,
loamy sand, and sandy loam classes may be
further divided by specifying "coarse," "fine," or
"very fine."
Topsoil. The upper part of the soil, which is the most
favorable material for plant growth. It is ordinarily
rich in organic matter and is used to topdress
roadbanks, lawns, and land affected by mining.
Upland (geology). Land at a higher elevation, in
general, than the alluvial plain or stream terrace;
land above the lowlands along streams.






53





Tables










Soil Survey


TABLE 1.--TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION

(Recorded in the period 1951-86 at Key West, Florida)


Temperature Precipitation

I | | | 2 years in 12 years in 10 I
Month IAverage IAveragelAveragel 10 will have-- | will have-- I Average
I daily I daily I daily I Maximum I Minimum (Averagel I number of
Maximum Iminimumi Itemperatureltemperaturel I Less I More I days with
I I I I higher lower I than-- Ithan--I 0.10 inch
I I I I than-- Ithan-- I I I or more
o o o o o I I I I
F F F F F In In In

January----I 74.3 64.3 69.3 83 48 2.24 0.22 3.691 3

February---l 75.0 65.1 70.1 83 50 I 1.89 1 .80 2.801 4

March------ 78.6 69.0 73.8 86 55 1.54 .33 2.49| 3

April------ 81.8 72.5 77.2 87 63 1.77 .27 2.901 2

May--------. 85.0 175.8 80.4 I 90 68 3.27 I .96 5.131 5

June------- 87.6 78.2 82.9 92 71 5.14 2.20 7.63| 8

July-------I 89.1 79.7 84.4 1 93 72 I 3.64 I 1.72 5.301 7

August-----I 89.2 79.3 84.3 I 92 72 I 5.09 I 3.00 6.951 9

September--I 87.9 78.4 83.2 91 72 6.22 3.38 8.711 10
I I I I I I I I I
October----I 84.5 75.7 80.1 90 68 4.51 1.76 6.811 7

November---I 79.9 71.1 75.5 86 57 2.65 .43 4.331 4

December---1 75.9 66.6 71.3 84 49 1 2.13 .45 3.431 3


Yearly: I

Average--I 82.4 73.0 77.7 --- --- --- --- ---I
I I I I I I I I I
Extreme--I --- --- --- 93 46 --- -- --- --
T I I I I I I I I
Total---- --- --- --- --- --- 1 40.09 1 30.47 1 48.761 65
I I I I I I I I I










Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


TABLE 2.--ACREAGE AND PROPORTIONATE EXTENT OF THE SOILS


II I
Map I Soil name I Acres IPercent
symbol


2 IPennekamp gravelly muck, 0 to 2 percent slopes, extremely stony-------------------- 6,980 10.6
3 IMatecumbe muck, occasionally flooded----------------------------------------------- 5,430 8.2
4 IRock outcrop-Tavernier complex, tidal---------------------------------------------- 920 1.4
5 IIslamorada muck, tidal---------------------------------------------------------- 5,890 8.9
6 IKeylargo muck, tidal--------------------------------------------------------------- 12,240 18.5
7 lUdorthents-Urban land complex------------------------------------------------------ 10,940 16.6
8 IRock outcrop-Cudjoe complex, tidal------------------------------------------------ 5,750 8.7
9 lLignumvitae marl, tidal------------------------------------------------------------ 1,360 2.1
11 lUrban land---------------------------------------------------------------------- 3,080 4.7
12 |Rock outcrop-Cudjoe complex, frequently flooded------------------------------------ 1,840 2.8
13 IKeyvaca very gravelly loam, extremely stony--------------------------------------- 2,780 4.2
15 ICudjoe marl, tidal----------------------------------------------------------------- 3,410 5.2
16 IBahiahonda fine sand, 0 to 3 percent slopes-------------------------------------- 240 0.4
17 IKeywest marl, tidal---------------------------------------------------------------- 450 0.7
18 |Beaches----------------------------------------------------------------------------I 100 I 0.1
19 ISaddlebunch marl, occasionally flooded--------------------------------------------- 1,140 1.7
W ater------------------------------------------------------------------------- 3,450 5.2
Total---------I-------
I Total-------------------------------------------------------------------- 66,000 I 100.0
II I










Soil Survey


TABLE 3.--CHARACTERISTIC PLANT COMMUNITIES

(Only the soils that support natural vegetation are listed)


II
Soil name and Ecological community Characteristic vegetation Composition
map symbol I
I Pct
I I Pet
II
2------------------ Tropical Hammocks------------- Poisonwood-------------------- 30
Pennekamp I |Wild tamarind----------------- 10
|Gumbo-limbo------------------ 10
IStrangler fig-----------------I 10
IWild coffee-------------------- 5
ICanella-----------------------I 5

3------------------ Tropical Hammocks------------ IPoisonwood-------------------- 15
Matecumbe I Wild tamarind----------------- 10
IMahogany--------------------- 10
IDeering's tree cactus--------- 5
ICrabwood--------------------- 1 5
IThatch palm------------------- 5
ILocustberry-------------------I 5
IParadise tree-----------------I 5
ISatinleaf--------------------- 5
IStopper----------------------- 5
I
4*:
Rock outcrop. I


Tavernier--------- IMangrove
I
I

5------------------Mangrove
Islamorada


6------------------ Mangrove
Keylargo
I


I
Swamp---------------- Red mangrove------------------I
IBlack mangrove----------------I
IGlasswort---------------------I
I I
Swamp---------------- IRed mangrove------------------I
IBlack mangrove----------------
I
I
Swamp---------------- IRed mangrove------------------I
IBlack mangrove----------------I
I I


8*:
Rock outcrop.

Cudjoe------------ Mangrove Swamp---------------- Black mangrove----------------I
IRed mangrove------------------I
SISaltwort----------------------I
IGlasswort---------------------I
I I
9------------------ IMangrove Swamp---------------- IBlack mangrove----------------I
Lignumvitae I Red mangrove------------------I
|White mangrove----------------I
IButtonwood--------------------I
IGlasswort---------------------I
IWild tamarind-----------------
I
12*:
Rock outcrop. I

Cudjoe------------ ISawgrass Marsh---------------- ISawgrass----------------------I
IButtonwood--------------------I
ILocustberry-------------------I
IWhite mangrove----------------I
IPoisonwood--------------------I
ISeagrape----------------------I
IFlameleaf sumac---------------I
I ~II


See footnote at end of table.










Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida




TABLE 3.--CHARACTERISTIC PLANT COMMUNITIES--Continued


Soil name and Ecological community | Characteristic vegetation Composition
map symbol I

IIPct

13----------------- IEverglade Flatwoods----------- ISouth Florida slash pine------ 25
Keyvaca I ILocustberry-------------------I 15
IPoisonwood-------------------- 10
ISilver palm------------------- 10
ISatinleaf--------------------- 5
IThreeawn---------------------- 5
15 -------------- IMangrove Swamp---------------- Black mangrove---------------- 50
Cudjoe I IRed mangrove------------------ 10
IISaltwort---------------------- 10
IGlasswort--------------------- 10
I 1 I
16----------------- Coastal Strand---------------- IPoisonwood-------------------- 15
Bahiahonda I ICrabwood---------------------- 10
IWild tamarind----------------- 10
IBuccaneer-palm---------------- 5
IStopper-----------------------I 5
IGumbo-limbo------------------ 5
IDeering's tree cactus--------- 5
17----------------- IMangrove Swamp---------------- Black mangrove---------------- 40
Keywest I Red mangrove------------------ 10
I White mangrove---------------- 10
I IButtonwood-------------------- 10
II Glasswort--------------------- 10
I I
19---------------- ITropical Hammocks------------- Wild tamarind----------------- 10
Saddlebunch I IPoisonwood-------------------- 10
IButtonwood-------------------- 10
IWhite mangrove---------------- 10
IMahogany---------------------- 5
IWild tamarind----------------- 5
ICrabwood---------------------- 5
IThatch palm------------------- 5
ILocustberry------------------- 5
I

See description of the map unit for composition and behavior characteristics of the map
unit.











58 Soil Survey


TABLE 4.--RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT


(Some terms that describe restrictive soil features are
definitions of "slight," "moderate," and "severe")


defined in the "Glossary." See text for


I II I I
Soil name and I Camp areas I Picnic areas Playgrounds IPaths and trails Golf fairways
map symbol I I
I I I


I I


2--------------------- ISevere:
Pennekamp flooding,
Excess humus,
depth to rock.

3--------------------- Severe:
Matecumbe Iflooding,
Depth to rock.

4*:
Rock outcrop--------- Severe:
Flooding,
Depth to rock.

Tavernier------------ ISevere:
flooding,
Sweetness,
excess humus.

5--------------------- Severe:
Islamorada flooding,
wetness,
excess humus.

6--------------------- Severe:
Keylargo Iflooding,
Iwetness,
Excess humus.

7*:
Udorthents----------- Severe:
Flooding,
Small stones,
I too sandy.


ISevere:
Excess humus,
Depth to rock.


ISevere:
depth to rock.



ISevere:
Depth to rock.


ISevere:
Iwetness,
|Severe:




Excess humus,
Excess salt.

ISevere:
Iwetness,
Excess humus,
Excess salt.

SSevere:
Iwetness,
Excess humus,
Excess salt.


ISevere:
I wetness,
I excess humus,
I excess salt.


SSevere:
Itoo sandy,
Small stones.
I


ISevere:
Excess humus,
Depth to rock.


ISevere:
depth to rock.



ISevere:
Depth to rock.


ISevere:

excess humus,
wetness,
flooding.
ISevere:
Excess humus,
I wetness,
Flooding.

SSevere:
Excess humus,
wetness,
flooding.


ISevere:
I excess humus,
I wetness,
I flooding.


ISevere:
Small stones,
Itoo sandy.


ISevere:
Excess humus.



IModerate:
Iwetness.



IModerate:
Flooding.


ISevere:
Iwetness,
Excess humus.

ISevere:

wetness,
excess humus.
ISevere:
I wetness,
Excess humus.



ISevere:
f wetness,
I excess humus,



ISevere:
Itoo sandy,
Small stones.


ISevere:
Depth to rock,
Excess humus.


ISevere:
Depth to rock,
I excess humus.


ISevere:
Flooding,
Depth to rock.

ISevere:
Excess salt,
I wetness,
Flooding.

ISevere:
Excess salt,
wetness,
Flooding.

ISevere:
I excess salt,
I wetness,
I flooding,


ISevere:
small stones,
Large stones,


I I I drought~


Urban landVariableVariable Variable Variable I able
Urban land------------IVariable--------IVariable---------IVariable--------IVariable--------IVariable
I I I I I


Rock outcrop--------- Severe:
Flooding,
I depth to rock.

Cudjoe--------------- Severe:
flooding,
Iwetness,
Depth to rock.

9 -------------------- ISevere:
Lignumvitae I flooding,
wetness,


I
ISevere:
Depth to rock.


ISevere:
Iwetness,
excess salt,
Depth to rock.

ISevere:
Iwetness,
Excess salt.


I
ISevere:
Depth to rock.


ISevere:
Iwetness,
Flooding,
Depth to rock.

ISevere:
wetness,
flooding,


IModerate:
flooding.


SSevere:
wetness.


Severe:
wetness.
I


I
ISevere:
I flooding,
depth to rock.

Severe:
excess salt,
wetness,
flooding.

ISevere:
excess salt,
wetness,
I flooding.


Excess salt. excess

11*------------------- IVariable-------- Variable-------- IVariable-------- Variable-------- Variable.
Urban land I


See footnote at end of table.


I


y-










Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


TABLE 4.--RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT--Continued

iI I i I
Soil name and I Camp areas | Picnic areas | Playgrounds IPaths and trails) Golf fairways
map symbol I I I I
I I I I I


12*:
Rock outcrop--------- Severe:
Flooding,
I depth to rock.

Cudjoe--------------- Severe:
Flooding,
I wetness,
I depth to rock.

13--------------------ISevere:
Keyvaca I flooding,
I depth to rock.

15-------------------- Severe:
Cudjoe Iflooding,
I wetness,
I depth to rock.

16-------------------- Severe:
Bahiahonda I flooding,
I too sandy.

17-------------------- Severe:
Keywest Iflooding,
Iwetness,
Excess salt.

18*-------------------- Severe:
Beaches flooding,
Iwetness,
I too sandy.

19-------------------- ISevere:
Saddlebunch I flooding,
I wetness,
I depth to rock.
I


ISevere:
depth to rock.


ISevere:
wetness,
excess salt,
Depth to rock.

ISevere:
depth to rock.


ISevere:
Iwetness,
Excess salt,
Depth to rock.

ISevere:
Itoo sandy.


ISevere:
wetness,
Excess salt.


ISevere:
wetness,
Itoo sandy,
excess salt.

ISevere:
I wetness,
Excess salt,
Idepth to rock.


ISevere:
Depth to rock.


ISevere:
Iwetness,
Flooding,
Depth to rock.

ISevere:
Small stones,
Depth to rock.

ISevere:
Iwetness,
Flooding,
Depth to rock.

ISevere:
Itoo sandy.


ISevere:
Iwetness,
Flooding,
Excess salt.

ISevere:
too sandy,
Iwetness,
Flooding.

ISevere:
Iwetness,
Depth to rock,
Excess salt.
I


IModerate: ISevere:
I flooding. I flooding,
I depth to rock.

ISevere: ISevere:
I wetness. I excess salt,
I wetness,
Flooding.

ISlight---------- ISevere:


ISevere:
I wetness.



Severe:
I too sandy.


ISevere:
I wetness.



ISevere:
wetness,
too sandy.


Severe:
I wetness.


Depth to rock.


SSevere:
I excess salt,
I wetness,
Flooding.

ISevere:
I drought.


ISevere:
I excess salt,
I wetness,
Flooding.

ISevere:
I excess salt,
Sweetness,
Sdroughty.

ISevere:
I excess salt,
Iwetness,
I depth to rock.
I


* See description of the map unit for composition and behavior characteristics of the map unit.











Soil Survey


TABLE 5.--WILDLIFE HABITAT

(See text for definitions of "good," "fair," "poor," and "very poor." Absence of an entry
indicates that the soil was not rated)


I Potential for habitat elements I Potential as habitat for-


Soil name and Wild
map symbol herba-
ceous
Plants


2------------------ Poor
Pennekamp I
I
3------------------IPoor
Matecumbe I

4*:
Rock outcrop------IVery
I poor.

Tavernier---------IVery
I poor.
I
5------------------ IVery
Islamorada I poor.

6------------------ Very
Keylargo I poor.

7*:
Udorthents.

Urban land.

8*:
Rock outcrop------IVery
I poor.
I
Cudjoe------------ IVery
I poor.
I
9----------------- IVery
Lignumvitae I poor.
III*
11*. I
Urban land I

12*:
Rock outcrop------ Very
I poor.
I
Cudjoe------------ IPoor
I

13-----------------IPoor
Keyvaca I
I
15----------------- IVery
Cudjoe I poor.
I
16-----------------IPoor
Bahiahonda I

17----------------- JVery
Keywest I poor.
I


I Conif- wetland Shallow Woodland wetland
IHardwoodl Conif- IWetland Ishallow I Woodland I Wetland


I trees
I


Fair


(Fair



Iery
I poor.
IVery


I poor.
IVery
I poor.
I


IVery
I poor.
I


IVery
Poor.











IVery
Poor.
IVery
I poor.
I










IVery
poor.






IPoor
IVery
I poor.
I r
IVery












Spoor





IVery
I poor.
I poor
I
I Poor
I




[Very
I poor.
I
IPoor
I
I
IVery
I poor.


erous plants
Plants


IVery |Poor
I poor. I
I I
IVery IPoor
I poor. I
I I
I I
Very IVery
I poor. I poor.
I I
Very IPoor
I pdor. I
I I
IVery IPoor
I poor.
I I
IVery |Poor
I poor. I



IVery IVery




poor. | poor.
I I



IVery IPoor
Spoor.
I I







IVery |Poor
poor.
I I






IVery IVery
I poor. I poor.
I I






IVery |Poor
I poor. I
I I













IFair |Poor
IVery IPoor
I poor.
I I








IPoo IVery
I poo
I I
I I
|Very IVery
I poor. I poor.
I I






IVery IPoor
I poor. I
I I
hFair Ipoor
I I

IVery IPoor
I poor. I
I I
Poor Ivery
I I poor.

|Very IPoor
I poor. I
I I


e


See footnote at end of table.


water
areas


IVery
I poor.

Very
Spoor.


IVery
poor.

Good


Good


Good








I ery
poor.
Good


IGood






IVery
Spoor.

I Good

IVery

I poor.
IGood
I
I
I
I












IVery
I poor.
IGood
I Good
I
I


wildlife



Fair


Fair



IVery poor
I
I

IVery poor
I

Iery poor

IVery poor
I






Iery poor

IVery poor
I












IVery poor
I
I
















IVery poor
I r
ai


IVery poor
IPoor
IVy poo
IVery poor







I
I
IVery poor








I
I


I
I


wildlife



IVery poor.
I

Iry poor.

IVery poor.

Fair.

Fair.






Fair.
Very poor.
Fair.


Fair.















IFair.









IVery poor.
air.


















IFair.











Very poor.
air.
iFair.

I
i



I
I

I
I

I
I
iFair.
I
I


-










Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


TABLE 5.--WILDLIFE HABITAT--Continued

I Potential for habitat elements Potential as habitat for--
Soil name and Wild I 1 I I
map symbol I herba- |Hardwoodl Conif- IWetland (Shallow Woodland Wetland
Sceous trees Ierous I plants Iwater wildlife I wildlife
Plants I plants areas
I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I
18*----------------IVery IVery IVery IVery IVery IVery poor lVery poor.
Beaches I poor. I poor. I poor. I poor. I poor. I
I I I I I I I
19----------------- Poor IFair IVery IFair IGood IFair IFair.
Saddlebunch I I I poor. I I I
I I I I I I I

See description of the map unit for composition and behavior characteristics of the
map unit.











62 Soil Survey




TABLE 6.--BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT

(Some terms that describe restrictive soil features are defined in the "Glossary." See
text for definitions of "moderate" and "severe." The information in this table
indicates the dominant soil condition but does not eliminate the need for onsite
investigation)


I I I I
Soil name and I Dwellings ISmall commercial I Local roads I Lawns and
map symbol |without basements buildings I and streets I landscaping
I I I I


2----------------- Severe:
Pennekamp flooding.


3----------------- Severe:
Matecumbe Iflooding.


4*:
Rock outcrop-----ISevere:
Flooding,
Depth to rock.

Tavernier-------- Severe:
Flooding,
wetness.


5-----------------ISevere:
Islamorada subsides,
flooding,
wetness.

6----------------- Severe:
Keylargo Isubsides,
Flooding,
I wetness.

7*:
Udorthents-------ISevere:
Flooding.
I


ISevere:
I flooding.
I

ISevere:
I flooding.



ISevere:
Flooding,
I depth to rock.

Severe:
Flooding,
I wetness.


ISevere:
Subsides,
Flooding,
I wetness.

SSevere:
I subsides,
I flooding,
wetness.


ISevere:
I flooding.
I


(Moderate:
depth to rock,
flooding.

ISevere:
Flooding.



ISevere:
Depth to rock.


ISevere:
Iwetness,
Flooding.


ISevere:
Subsides,
I wetness,
Flooding.

SSevere:
Subsides,
I wetness,
Flooding.


IModerate:
I wetness,
Flooding,


Large stones.

Urban land------- Variable------ ---Variable--------- Variable--------
*I I I


Rock outcrop----- -Severe:
| flooding,
I depth to rock.


Cudjoe-----------ISevere:
Flooding,
wetness,
Slow strength.

9----------------- Severe:
Lignumvitae I flooding,
wetness,
low strength.

11*--------------- -Variable---------
Urban land I


See footnote at end of table.


SSevere:
| flooding,
I depth to rock.
I
ISevere:
I flooding,
I wetness,
I low strength.

SSevere:
I flooding,
I wetness,
Slow strength.


I Severe:
depth to rock.


ISevere:
I wetness,
flooding.


Severe:
wetness,
flooding.


ISevere:
Depth to rock,
Excess humus.

ISevere:
Depth to rock,
Excess humus.


ISevere:
Flooding,
depth to rock.

ISevere:
Excess salt,
wetness,
Flooding.

ISevere:
Excess salt,
I wetness,
Flooding.

SSevere:
Excess salt,
Iwetness,
Flooding.


ISevere:
Small stones,
Large stones,
Idroughty.

IVariable.


ISevere:
Flooding,
Depth to rock.

SSevere:
Excess salt,
Iwetness,
Flooding.

Severe:
excess salt,
Iwetness,
flooding.


IVariable--------- lVariable--------- Variable.
I I I


I I











Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


TABLE 6.--BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT--Continued


Soil name and I Dwellings ISmall commercial I Local roads I Lawns and
map symbol Iwithout basements buildings I and streets I landscaping
I I I I


12*:
Rock outcrop---- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere:
Flooding, Iflooding, Idepth to rock. flooding,
Depth to rock. Depth to rock. I I depth to rock.

Cudjoe----------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere:
Flooding, Iflooding, Iwetness, I excess salt,
Iwetness, I wetness, Iflooding. I wetness,
Ilow strength. low strength. I flooding.

13---------------- Severe: Severe: IModerate: ISevere:
Keyvaca Iflooding. Flooding, Idepth to rock, Idepth to rock.
I I flooding. I

15---------------- Severe: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere:
Cudjoe Iflooding, Iflooding, Iwetness, Iexcess salt,
I wetness, Iwetness, Iflooding. I wetness,
Ilow strength. low strength. flooding.
II I
16---------------- Severe: Severe: IModerate: ISevere:
Bahiahonda flooding, flooding. Flooding. Idroughty.

17---------------- Severe: Severe: Severe: ISevere:
Keywest Iflooding, Iflooding, I wetness, Iexcess salt,
Iwetness, I wetness, Iflooding. Iwetness,
Ilow strength. Ilow strength. I I flooding.

18*---------------- Severe: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere:
Beaches I flooding, Iflooding, wetness, Iexcess salt,
I wetness. I wetness. Flooding. I wetness,
Sdroughty.

19---------------- Severe: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere:
Saddlebunch I flooding, I flooding, I wetness, Iexcess salt,
I wetness, I wetness, Iflooding, Iwetness,
Ilow strength. Ilow strength. depth to rock.
I I I I


See description of the map unit for composition
map unit.


and behavior characteristics of the











4 Soil Survey




TABLE 7.--SANITARY FACILITIES

(Some terms that describe restrictive soil features are defined in the "Glossary." See text for definitions
of "severe," "poor," and other terms. The information in this table indicates the dominant soil
condition but does not eliminate the need for onsite investigation)



Soil name and I
map symbol ISeptic tank absorption fields Area sanitary landfill I Daily cover for landfill

I I I
I I I


2------------------ Severe:
Pennekamp depth to rock,
wetness.

3------------------- Severe:
Matecumbe I flooding,
Depth to rock,
Sweetness.

4*:
Rock outcrop------- Severe:
flooding,
depth to rock.

Tavernier---------- ISevere:
flooding,
Depth to rock,
Iwetness.

5------------------- Severe:
Islamorada flooding,
depth to rock,
wetness.

6------------------- Severe:
Keylargo Isubsides,
flooding,
wetness.

7*:
Udorthents--------- Severe:
wetness,
poor filter.


ISevere:
Depth to rock.


ISevere:
Flooding,
Depth to rock,
Iwetness.


ISevere:
Flooding,
, depth to rock.

SSevere:
Flooding,
Depth to rock,
Iwetness.

SSevere:
Flooding,
Depth to rock,
Seepage.

SSevere:
Flooding,
Seepage,
Iwetness.


ISevere:
Seepage,
wetness.
I


IPoor:
depth to rock.


Poor:
depth to rock.




IPoor:
Depth to rock.


IPoor:
depth to rock,
wetness,
excess salt.

IPoor:
depth to rock,
wetness,
excess humus.

IPoor:
I wetness,
excess humus,
excess salt.


IFair:
I wetness.


Urban land--------- Variable--------------------- IVariable--------------------- IVariable.

8*: .. ..


Rock outcrop-------ISevere:
flooding,
I depth to rock.

Cudjoe------------- Severe:
Flooding,
I depth to rock,
I wetness.


I Severe:
flooding,
depth to rock.

ISevere:
flooding,
depth to rock,
wetness.


IPoor:
depth to rock.


IPoor:
depth to rock,
hard to pack,
wetness.


9------------------- ISevere: Severe: P toor:
Lignumvitae I flooding, I flooding, I depth to rock,
I depth to rock, I depth to rock, I hard to pack,
I wetness. I seepage.
I I .................... Variable.
11*----------------- Variable--------------------- Variabl---------------------ariable.
Urban land I


See footnote at end of table.










Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


TABLE 7.--SANITARY FACILITIES--Continued

I I I
Soil name and I
map symbol ISeptic tank absorption fields Area sanitary landfill I Daily cover for landfill
I I I


12*:
Rock outcrop------- ISevere:
Flooding,
depth to rock.

Cudjoe------------- ISevere:
Flooding,
Depth to rock,
Iwetness.

13----------------- -Severe:
Keyvaca depth to rock,
wetness.

15------------------ISevere:
Cudjoe Iflooding,
depth to rock,
Iwetness.

16--------------- -Severe:
Bahiahonda Iwetness,
Poor filter.

17------------------ Severe:
Keywest Iflooding,
Iwetness.


18*----------------- ISevere:
Beaches Iflooding,
Iwetness,
Poor filter.

19------------------ Severe:
Saddlebunch Iflooding,
Depth to rock,
Iwetness.
I


ISevere:
Flooding,
Depth to rock.

ISevere:
Flooding,
Depth to rock,
Iwetness.

ISevere:
Depth to rock,
Iwetness.

ISevere:
Flooding,
Depth to rock,
Sweetness.

ISevere:
Seepage,
Iwetness.

ISevere:
Flooding,
Seepage,
Sweetness.

ISevere:
Flooding,
Seepage,
Iwetness.

ISevere:
Flooding,
Depth to rock,
I wetness.
I


IPoor:
I depth to rock.


IPoor:
I depth to rock,
Hard to pack,
Iwetness.

IPoor:
Depth to rock.


IPoor:
depth to rock,
hard to pack,
wetness.

IPoor:
seepage,
too sandy.

IPoor:
Hard to pack,
wetness,
excess salt.

IPoor:
Seepage,
Itoo sandy,
wetness.

IPoor:
Depth to rock,
hard to pack,
wetness.


* See description of the map unit for composition and behavior characteristics of the map unit.










i6 Soil Survey




TABLE 8.--ENGINEERING INDEX PROPERTIES

(The symbol < means less than; > means more than. Absence of an entry indicates that data were not estimated)


I I
Soil name and IDepthl USDA texture
map symbol I I
I I
SIn I


2--------------
Pennekamp






3-------------
Matecumbe


4*:
Rock outcrop--


Tavernier----


5--------------
Islamorada

6--------------
Keylargo

7*:
Udorthents ----



Urban land----

8*:
Rock outcrop--


Cudjoe--------


9--------------
Lignumvitae

11*------------
Urban land

12*:
Rock outcrop--


Cudjoe--------


13------------
Keyvaca


)-3 IGravelly muck----
3-8 IVery gravelly
| loam, very
I gravelly silt
I loam, extremely
| gravelly loam.
8 |Weathered bedrock
I


S0-6 IMuck, gravelly
I muck.
6 IWeathered bedrock
I I

I 0-60 Unweathered
I I bedrock.
I I
0-8 IMuck-------------
S8 Weathered bedrock
I I
I 0-35IMuck-------------
S35 IWeathered bedrock
I I
0-70 Muck-------------
S70 (Weathered bedrock
I I
I I
I 0-32|Extremely
S I gravelly sand.
132-60 Marl------------
I I .
0-6 IVariable--------
I I
I I
I 0-60 Unweathered
I I bedrock.
I I
0-16 Marl------------
S16 |Weathered bedrock
I I
0-32|Marl------------
S32 IWeathered bedrock
I I
1 0-6 Ivariable---------
I I
I I
I I
- 0-60 Unweathered
S I bedrock.
I I
I 0-161Marl-------------
S16 Weathered bedrock

0-4 IVery gravelly
I loam.
Weathered bedrock
4 Weathered bedrock
I


I
j



I

|
I


ge passiI


umber--


I Classification [Frag- | Percenta
I |Iments I sieve n
Unified AASHTO | > 3 I I
Inches| 4 I 10 I
SPct I I I
I I I I I I
IPT IA-8 0-5 I --- I ---
IGM, GC, IA-1, A-2,I 0-20 145-75 120-50
SGM-GC, SM| A-4, A-61
I I I I | I




JOL, OH A-8 1-3 ..
I I I I I I











PT A-8 0 --- ---


IPT IA-8 0


SPT IA-8 0 --- ---



GP, GP-GM A-l-a 5-35 110-35 110-30
ML IA-4 I --- 100 1 00







OH A-5 0-2 98-100 95-100
I I I I I I
I --- --- --- .--- --- I


























IOH IA-5 0-2 98-100190-100









OH A-5 1 0-2 98-100 95-100


IGM, GC, IA-l-b, 1 5-25 160-90 50-75
GM-GC, SMI A-2-4,I I I I
I I A-4I I I
I I I I I I.












i --- i --- i --- I --- ---








I --- I--- I--- I--- I







| --- I --- I--- I--- I--





I I I I I


See footnote at end of table.


f


40


--- I
18-45




--- I

---I






--- I










10-25
---I)


















90-100
--- I
|- I























90-100
I

--- |



























90-1001


30-60
I
--- 1

--- |


g I


200



--- 1
16-40




--- I

--- I


















2-12

85-95







85-99
--- I



















85-99
--- I
--- I






--- I


--- I















85-99


20-50
--- |




--- 1


I
Liquid Plas-
limit Iticit3
index
Pet

I- ---
10-26 NP-16

























-- NP

<35 NP-5







<60 NP-
---I-












<60 NP-










<60 NP-


12-24 NP-10
--- 1---


--- | ---

--- | ---


--- ---


-- ---



--- | ---





I-










Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


TABLE 8.--ENGINEERING INDEX PROPERTIES--Continued

I | Classification IFrag- I Percentage passing I I
Soil name and IDepthl USDA texture I I Iments I sieve number-- I Liquidl Plas-
map symbol I I Unified AASHTO I > 3 I I I limit ticity
|I I linchesl 4 I 10 40 | 200 I index
In I I Pct I I I I Pet
I I I I I I I I I I
15-------------I 0-161Marl----------- -OH IA-5 0-2 198-100195-1001 90-1001 85-99 <60 NP-5
Cudjoe 16 IWeathered bedrock -- --- --- --- --- --- 1 --- ---
I I I I I I I I I I I
16------------- 0-8 IFine sand--------ISP, SP-SM IA-3 0 195-100190-1001 80-90 | 2-7 I --- INP
Bahiahonda I8-681Sand, fine sand ISP, SP-SM IA-3 0 195-100190-1001 80-90 I 2-7 --- INP
168-821Gravelly sand, ISP, GP IA-l-b, 0 150-80 130-60 | 30-60 | 2-4 I --- INP
I very gravelly I IA-2-4, I I I
I sand. I I A-3 I I I
S82 IWeathered bedrock --- I --- I --- | I --- --- --

17-------------I 0-9 IMarl-------------OH B A-5 0-2 198-100190-1001 90-1001 85-99 <60 I NP-5
Keywest 9-151Muck------------- IPT (A-8 --- --- I --- I --- --- I --- --
115-271Mucky marl-------IOL IA-4 0 198-100195-1001 90-1001 85-99 --- I NP
127-651Marl------------- JOH A-5 0-2 198-100190-1001 90-100) 85-99 <60 I NP-5
65 IWeathered bedrock --- --- --- I --- --- I --- --- ---
I I I I I I I I I I I
18*------------I 0-6 ISand------------ISP IA-1, A-3 0 I 100 175-1001 5-85 I 0-5 1 --- NP
Beaches I6-60ICoarse sand, ISP IA-1, A-3 0 I 100 175-1001 5-85 I 0-5 -- NP
I sand, fine sand. I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I
19------------- 0-17 Marl------------- oH IA-5 0-2 198-100190-1001 90-1001 85-99 <60 I NP-5
Saddlebunch 17 IWeathered bedrock --- I --- --- --- --- I --- --- --- ---
I I I I I I I I I I I

See description of the map unit for composition and behavior characteristics of the map unit.










Soil Survey


TABLE 9.--PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF THE SOILS

(The symbol < means less than; > means more than. Entries under "Erosion factors--T" apply to the entire
profile. Entries under "Organic matter" apply only to the surface layer. Absence of an entry
indicates that data were not available or were not estimated)


I I I I I I I
Soil name and IDepthlClay Moist I Permea- IAvailablel Soil ISa
map symbol I I bulk I ability I water Ireactionl
I I density I Icapacity I I
| In | Pet g/cc In/hr In/in pH Im
I I I I I I II


2---------------
Pennekamp


3----------------
Matecumbe

4*:
Rock outcrop----

Tavernier-------


5----------------
Islamorada

6----------------
Keylargo

7*:
Udorthents------I


Urban land------

8*:
Rock outcrop----

Cudjoe---------- I


9-----------------I
Lignumvitae

11*--------------
Urban land

12*:
Rock outcrop----l

Cudjoe----------


13---------------
Keyvaca


0-3 I --- 10.40-0.601 2.0-6.0 10.15-0.20


5-1011.35-1.551
--- --- I

2-7 10.30-0.601


--- 0.20-0.30
I I




--- 0.20-0.30

-- 0.20-0.30
--- 10.20-0.301
--- | --- I
I I
--- 10.20-0.301
--- -


I- --- I
I I


2.0-6.0 10.07-0.16
2.0-20.01 ---


3-8
8

0-6
6


0-601

0-8
8

0-351
35

0-701
70
I


I I I
0-321 1-5 11.35-1.501
32-601 5-2510.90-1.201

0-6 ---


0-601 --- ---
I I I
0-16111-2810.90-1.20
16 --- ---
I I I
0-32111-2810.90-1.201
32 I ---

0-6 --.



0-601 --. ..
016 --- I ---
I I I
0-16111-2810.90-1.201
16 I --- I --- |

0-4 1 3-8 11.40-1.60
4 1 --- I --- I


I I I I
15------------ 0-16111-2810.90-1.201
Cudjoe 1 16 --- I

16-------------- 0-8 1-5 11.40-1.601
Bahiahonda 8-681 1-5 11.50-1.70|
168-821 1-3 11.40-1.601
S82 I --- --


See footnote at end of table.


|5.6-6.5
17.4-8.4
1 ---


6.0-20.0 0.16-0.2015.6-7.3
2.0-20.01 --- --
I I
I I
-- --- |I --

6.0-20 10.20-0.2516.1-7.8
2.0-20.01 --- I
I I
6.0-20.010.20-0.2516.1-7.8
2.0-20.01 -- --
I I
6.0-20 10.20-0.2516.1-7.8
2.0-20.01 -- --
I I
I I
6.0-20 10.01-0.0317.4-8.4
0.6-6.0 10.15-0.2016.6-8.4






0.6-6.0 10.15-0.2016.6-8.4
2.0-20.01 --- --
I I






0.6-6.0 10.15-0.20 6.6-8.4
2.0-20.01 -- --








0.6-6.0 10.15-0.2016.6-8.4
2.0-20.01 --- I
I I













2.0-6.0 10.05-0.12 7.4-8.4
2.0-20.01 -- --
0.6-6.0 10.15-0.2016.6-8.4
2.0-20.01 --- I
I I
















6.0-20 10.04-0.086.6-7.8
6.0-20 10.04-0.0816.6-7.8
I- --- I --












>20 10.02-0.0517.4-8.4
2.0-20.01 --- I
I I




I I


I I Erosionl
ilinityl Shrink- I factorslOrganic
I swell I I I matter
Potential I K I T
hos/cml I I Pet
I I I I
2-4 Low------- ---- --1 40-70
2-4 Low------- 10.101
----------I---

4-8 ILow------l---- --1 80-90
-- ---------- ----


<2 1----------I-------I ---
I I I I
>16 ILow------- I--- ---1 70-85
-------------- I

>16 ILow------- ----l---1 75-90
-- ---------- ---

>16 ILow------- ------- 175-90
----------1---


2-4 Low------- 10.021 5 1-2
4-8 ILow-------10.321 1

<2 -----------------I ---
I I o.
I I I I
<2 -------------
I I I I
>16 ILow------- 10.321 1 1-5
----------1----
I I I I
>16 ILow-------10.321 2 1 1-5
---------- ----
I I I I
<2 -------------



<2 I----------I----I---I ---
I I I I
>16 ILow-------10.321 1 1 1-5
I--------------I I

2-4 ILow------- 10.051 1 2-6
I- --------------I I

>16 ILow-------10.321 1 1-5
I------------- I
I I I
4-8 ILow-------10.051 5 1-3
4-8 ILow------- 10.051 I
4-8 ILow-------10.021 1
--- I--------------I I
I I I I










Monroe County, Keys Area, Florida


TABLE 9.--PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF THE SOILS--Continued

I I I I I I I I Erosion
Soil name and IDepthlClay I Moist I Permea- jAvailablel Soil ISalinityj Shrink- factors|Organic
map symbol I bulk I ability | water Ireaction |I swell I I matter
S I density I Icapacity I I (potential IK I T
I In I Pct g/cc In/hr I In/in pH nmmhos/cm I I Pct
I I I I I I I I I I
17--------------- 0-9 111-2810.90-1.201 0.6-6.0 10.15-0.2016.6-8.4 >16 ILow-------10.321 4 1-5
Keywest I 9-151 0-2 10.10-0.401 6.0-20 |0.20-0.2516.1-7.8 >16 ILow-------10.051
115-271 7-1710.70-1.001 2.0-6.0 10.20-0.2516.6-8.4 >16 ILow-------10.281
127-65111-2810.90-1.201 0.6-6.0 10.15-0.2016.6-8.4 >16 ILow-------10.32)
65 l --- I --- 2.0-20.01 --- I --- --- I----------[---I I
I I I I I I I I I I I
18*--------------1 0-6 I 0-1 11.35-1.851 >6.0 10.03-0.0515.1-7.8 >4 ILow-------10.051 5 <.1
Beaches 6-601 0-1 11.35-1.851 >6.0 10.03-0.0515.1-7.8 >4 (Low-------10.051
I I I I I I I I I I I
19--------------- 0-17111-2810.90-1.201 0.6-6.0 10.15-0.2016.6-8.4 8-16 (Low-------10.321 1 1-5
Saddlebunch 17 --- I --- | 2.0-20.01 --- I --- I --- I--------------I I
I I I I I I I I I I I

See description of the map unit for composition and behavior characteristics of the map unit.






TABLE 10.--SOIL AND WATER FEATURES

("Flooding" and "water table" and terms such as "rare," "brief," and "apparent" are explained in the text. The symbol < means
less than; > means more than. Absence of an entry indicates that the feature is not a concern or that data were not
estimated)


Soil name and I Byd
map symbol I l
I gr


2-----------------
Pennekamp

3-----------------
Matecumbe

4*:
Rock outcrop-----

Tavernier--------

5-----------------
Islamorada

6----------------
Keylargo

7*:
Udorthents-------.

Urban land-------

8*:
Rock outcrop-----

Cudjoe-----------

9-----------------
Lignumvitae

11*---------------
Urban land

12*:
Rock outcrop-----

Cudjoe-----------

13----------------
Keyvaca

15---------------
Cudjoe


I Flooding
Lro- I
gic I Frequency IDuration
:oup



I I
D Rare-------- --




I I
I I
D |Occasional Brief---..



D IFrequent---- --
I I
D IFrequent---- Very long
I I
D [Frequent----IVery long
I I

D IFrequent---- Very long
I I


B IRare------- --
I I
D IFrequent-----I
I I
I I
D I Frequent---- Long---
I I





D IRare------- --
I I

I I





D IFrequent---- ---
I I






D I Frequent----L Bief-----
I I


D IFrequent---- ---
I I
D [ Frequent ---- I Brief -----
I 1
D IRare -------- I ---
I I
I I
D IFrequent---- Long---
I I
I I


I High water table I Bedrock | Subsidencel Risk of corrosion
I I I I I I I I I I
IMonths I Depth I Kind IMonths IDepthlHard- IIni- ITotallUncoated |Concrete
I I I I I I ness I tiall I steel I
I I Ft I I I I I I

S--- 13.5-5.OlApparentlJun-Novi 4-161Soft 1-4 3-8 IModerate |Moderate.
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
IJul-Decll.5-3.01ApparentlJul-DecI 2-9 ISoft 1-3 5-9 IModerate ILow.
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
S--- >6.0 | --- I --- 0 IHard --- --- ---
I I I I I I I I I I
IJan-Decl 0 lApparent Jan-DecI 3-20ISoft 1-7 2-14|High----- High.
I I I I I I I I I I
IJan-Dec 0 IApparentlJan-Decl20-501Soft I7-17113-33IHigh----- High.
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
IJan-Decl 0 lApparent Jan-Decl50-901Soft 117-30133-601High----- High.
I I I I I I I I I I



I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I


Jan-Dec- 0-0.5lApparentlJan-Decl 3-20|Soft --- --- Heigh---r Low.
I I I I I I I I I I
IJan-Decl 0-0.5lApparentlJan-Decl2O-40 Soft I --- I --- lHigh-----Low.
I I II 1 I I I I
I I I I I I
I --- 1>2.0 1--- I--- >10 1 --- I --- I ---



S--- >6.0 1 --- -- 0 IHard --- --- I --
I I I 1 I I I I I I
IJan-Decl 0-0.5lApparentlJan-Deci 3-20|Soft I --- I --- High----- Low.
I I I I I I I I I I
I --- 13.0-5.OlApparent Jun-Novi 3-6 |Soft I --- I --- IModerate IModerate.
I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
IJan-Decl 0-0.5lApparentiJan-Deci 3-20ISoft I --- I --- lHigh----- ILow.
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I


See footnote at end of table.







TABLE 10.--SOIL AND WATER FEATURES--Continued

I I Flooding I High water table I Bedrock I Subsidencel Risk of corrosion
Soil name and Hydro- | I I I I I I I I
map symbol logic | Frequency I Duration IMonths I Depth I Kind IMonths lDepthlHard- lIni- ITotallUncoated IConcrete
Group I I I I I I ness I tiall I steel I
I I I Ft I I I In I In In
I I I I 1 I I I
16---------------- B (Rare------ --- --- 12.5-3.51Apparent Jun-Nov 60-901Soft -- --- IModerate |Low.
Bahiahonda |I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I
17---------------- D IFrequent---- Long------ Jan-Decl 0-0.51Apparent lJan-Dec 40-90 Soft I --- I --- IHigh-----(Low.
Keywest I I 1
I I I I I I I I I I
18*---------------I D IFrequent---- Long------ Jan-Dec 0-6.01Apparent Jan-Decl >60 1 --- I --- I --- lHigh----- High.
Beaches | I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I
19---------------- I D Occasional ILong------ Jun-Nov 0.5-1.01Apparent Jun-Novl 4-20 Soft I --- I --- lHigh-----ILow.
Saddlebunch I I I I

See description of the map unit for composition and behavior characteristics of the map unit.
See description of the map unit for composition and behavior characteristics of the map unit.
















TABLE 11.--CLASSIFICATION OF THE SOILS


Soil name Family or higher taxonomic class




Bahiahonda---------------- Isohyperthermic, uncoated Aquic Quartzipsamments
Cudjoe--------------------I Loamy, carbonatic, isohyperthermic, shallow Tropic Fluvaquents
Islamorada---------------- Euic, isohyperthermic Lithic Troposaprists
Keylargo------------------ Euic, isohyperthermic Typic Troposaprists
Keyvaca------------------- Loamy-skeletal, carbonatic, isohyperthermic Lithic Rendolls
Keywest------------------- Coarse-silty, carbonatic, isohyperthermic Thapto-Histic Tropic Fluvaquents
Lignumvitae--------------- Coarse-silty, carbonatic, isohyperthermic Tropic Fluvaquents
Matecumbe----------------- Euic, isohyperthermic Lithic Tropofolists
Pennekamp----------------- Loamy-skeletal, carbonatic, isohyperthermic Lithic Rendolls
Saddlebunch--------------- Loamy, carbonatic, isohyperthermic, shallow Tropic Fluvaquents
Tavernier-----------------I Euic, isohyperthermic, shallow Lithic Troposaprists
Udorthents---------------- Udorthents


* U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1995-386-441/20005/SCS






























































INDEX TO MAP SHEETS
MONROE COUNTY, KEYS AREA, FLORIDA
Scale 1:316,800
1 0 1 2 3 4 5 Mi
I,, I I I I I
1 0 5 10 Km
Irl I I I I I I I I I I


CO LGUVTE4 SR1


1 l19
of HOW EY se sheet 7
or.A o 4- ,.
nset, sheet3NET KEYLORIDA8ALao
outI LITTLE PINE KEY

940 8o020' /"set h
sseets
\E~O~ 16Iq1 81.00,
O GE > CUrtDJ KEY o010
xv'et L g Sugarloaf eS e 10, M marathon
7 9' XVV aerland nish 5DOoT KEY e each
939 Key RAMROD KEY rborN
A Choanee
63 SUAROA ",AAC
K ey W e 's t TOCK KEY ex",G=~ $3 L O ID

ASLTwnF LO RID A
OF
STRAITS












UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE


MONROE COUNTY, KEYS AREA, FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS
SOIL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER SERVICES


SOIL LEGEND


Map unit names without a slope range have 0 to 1 percent slopes. If the map
unit name includes tidal, the unit is frequently flooded by tides. If the map unit
name does not include a reference to flooding, it is rarely flooded. Beaches are
subject to shallow flooding by tides or to deep flooding from hurricanes and other
tropical storms.


SYMBOL



2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
11
12
13
15
16
17
18
19


NAME


Pennekamp gravelly muck, 0 to 2 percent slopes, extremely stony
Matecumbe muck, occasionally flooded
Rock outcrop, Tavemier complex, tidal
Islamorada muck, tidal
Keylargo muck, tidal
Udorthents-Urban land complex
Rock outcrop-Cudjoe complex, tidal
Ugnumvitae marl, tidal
Urban land
Rock outcrop-Cudjoe complex, frequently flooded
Keyvaca very gravelly loam, extremely stony
Cudjoe mar, tidal
Bahiahonda fine sand, 0 to 3 percent slopes
Keywest marl, tidal
Beaches
Saddlebunch mart, occasionally flooded


CONVENTIONAL AND SPECIAL

SYMBOLS LEGEND


BOUNDARIES

National, state, or province

County or parish

Minor civil division

Reservation (national forest or park, state
forest or park, and large airport)

Land grant
Limit of soil survey (label)

Field sheet matchline and neatline

AD HOC BOUNDARY (label)

Small airport, airfield, park, oilfield,
cemetery, or flood pool

STATE COORDINATE TICK
1 890 000 FEET
LAND DIVISION CORNER
(sections and land grants)

ROADS

Divided (median shown if scale permits)

Other roads

Trail

ROAD EMBLEM & DESIGNATIONS


Interstate

Federal

State

County

RAILROAD

POWER TRANSMISSION LINE
(normally not shown)

PIPE LINE (normally not shown)

FENCE (normally not shown)

LEVEES

Without road

With road

With railroad

DAMS

Large (to scale)

Medium or Small
(Named where applicable)
PITS

Gravel pit

Mine or quarry


CULTURAL FEATURES

MISCELLANEOUS CULTURAL FEATURES

S- Farmstead, house (omit in urban area)
(occupied)
Church


School

Indian mound (label)

- Located object (label)

Tank (label)

Wells, oil or gas

Windmill

Kitchen midden


L -L + +


Tower


0
Ga






ri


WATER FEATURES


DRAINAGE

Perennial, double line

Perennial, single line

Intermittent

Drainage end

Canals or ditches

SDouble-line (label)

) Drainage and/or irrigation

S LAKES, PONDS AND RESERVOIRS

-i Perennial

Intermittent

MISCELLANEOUS WATER FEATURES
P-
Marsh or swamp

Spring

Well, artesian

Well, irrigation

Wet spot


I'


SPECIAL SYMBOLS FOR
SOIL SURVEY

SOIL DELINEATIONS AND SYMBOLS 2 1

ESCARPMENTS

Bedrock (points down slope) v v v v v v v

Other than bedrock (points down slope) '" v 7 v v v

SHORT STEEP SLOPE ..........

GULLY v\A

DEPRESSION OR SINK

SOIL SAMPLE (normally not shown) (

MISCELLANEOUS

Blowout

Clay spot X.

Gravelly spot o

Gumbo, slick or scabby spot (sodic) 0

Dumps and other similar non soil areas

Prominent hill or peak 0

Rock outcrop (indudes sandstone V
and shale)

Saline spot +

Sandy spot .

Severely eroded spot

Slide or slip (tips point upslope) )

Stony spot, very stony spot 0 0


3c91


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'41071' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile107' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
40a50ba932d28a6adc156e2248814c07
e4705a08e008c5adfa8ae98369705a1e4e3cf179
'2015-06-09T00:29:41-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:57-04:00'
virus check
'17319' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile108' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
b8660ecfa6ea6ef0d503ff00fb5654de
646809de039274c7344f4c21445d5debb6062d0a
'2015-06-09T00:29:27-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:45-04:00'
virus check
'275297' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile109' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
5c6a74061a463ab7329e93f877694521
6c4e0a876416583c82a3f0508313496e3c94796f
'2015-06-09T00:29:06-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:25-04:00'
virus check
'82197' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile11' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
d92d31d45a91b17880ba9efa62fb636a
accd557adb707ce65b3414c8eeca0d1bc0c89495
'2015-06-09T00:28:59-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:19-04:00'
virus check
'92285' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile110' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
9dab164b8b3109314f149e56651baba8
0ef35e83a9386ecfdf702d0d6aaff7efd1470fbc
'2015-06-09T00:28:14-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:41-04:00'
virus check
'345821' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile111' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
22106c461aaef46dbb518eef83304b20
002a3499fb7e24b2fd28697f94af477cf6ea625a
describe
virus check
'109459' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile112' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
1cfc5dbad691de0e27eccd51660515d4
e0d93469326219a97c144f4609104f8c39114913
'2015-06-09T00:27:28-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:50-04:00'
virus check
'341412' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile113' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
1e9cb3545c277cbefe66a00d99e8726e
a222ebd7bb84c793df92092ab0e122fb97db6e55
'2015-06-09T00:27:10-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:38-04:00'
virus check
'110858' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile114' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
b05420e1e01861b41f22020f176f6ca8
f8ddc44b14b087407562a90ff2171694c88ea7d7
'2015-06-09T00:29:30-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:47-04:00'
virus check
'327785' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile115' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
efc51d7d3a2c18b75ae667376edebf98
032f661a3fe773481e45064a729c50a384263292
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:35-04:00'
virus check
'109461' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile116' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
5134f5254d5097ebac4e68783a8bf84d
1812cee4a4ac368bec01b38648ee596d46f4eeec
'2015-06-09T00:29:29-04:00'
describe
virus check
'286310' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile117' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
83f00742cd7738e51e988d8b64cc88f5
e53527df01521c9d9332b229b64541cd9ccd8ecb
'2015-06-09T00:28:27-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:49-04:00'
virus check
'92257' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile118' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
1ecbd775f61c6e42e7c4c0978774507c
238c1dff5e61c5c9072834501e421cbdce4b3ac5
describe
virus check
'4947' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile119' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
2bff051e64d445731de300f006a32ad8
87022352877afbb225b25f54f3a20a5ec254d684
'2015-06-09T00:28:26-04:00'
describe
virus check
'37021' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile12' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
38f536edd62045c7c67de8d857bdadb5
985991d57c4cc582bdec32e221a6296d90384cad
'2015-06-09T00:29:43-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:58-04:00'
virus check
'3433' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile120' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
293318ea2ee2ab9eddca4f05ca6e5b68
cf79b264ddd975413884319b83a2a1c0d0e435ce
'2015-06-09T00:29:38-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:54-04:00'
virus check
'15839' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile121' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
23a174f6292c42fac602159200f6fc90
29922e89e4b299cb90c2a7328637beaeadb31966
describe
virus check
'9034' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile122' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
6eaafed87707866c7e9fe2eb8aec6048
5be05e2f6206308c0dd3112d251ce5645bcb30a8
'2015-06-09T00:29:16-04:00'
describe
virus check
'146880' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile123' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
7c289b5b7df9f4ffca3455314812a70d
a9170ff55ff4b1807819f361f80064c1c3d071bb
'2015-06-09T00:27:54-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:12-04:00'
virus check
'61426' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile124' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
d1de8cd626ad42b0ac4ec5c40ca7debb
d24143b7cd633bec47037087f81915b7d37eb243
'2015-06-09T00:28:02-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:28-04:00'
virus check
'120931' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile125' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
d279d69f387996bfe0d3f3edc7d65d9c
e36e02546a800d6b3dc32ec133b25e9fe9a6da91
describe
virus check
'45001' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile126' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
a79021c264439bbb1371201f7090fcea
a7fd50a35b470ab556345fc7e3ad0ee773001dd0
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:53-04:00'
virus check
'149652' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile127' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
86a7876b57a3b9ef9d3b56471fbc35a6
0b78aa257135577125323ac47e8dd349a6aa0034
'2015-06-09T00:27:29-04:00'
describe
virus check
'60875' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile128' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
35fecc4c4aec73e114c57d89d8a6b8af
7457440be82f1ffd6cae46dbf145c476be936a89
'2015-06-09T00:28:32-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:52-04:00'
virus check
'125611' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile129' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
d85598b98cc22d5ccd48b471390b55b5
03da04738883e86acd8de9151adc5f5a4c6e741a
'2015-06-09T00:28:28-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:50-04:00'
virus check
'9381' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile13' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
56368e0ae0993620ef8a05f952db2f3e
3bdea070dafa201cb6c15bc985b55c4dcfc59bab
'2015-06-09T00:28:18-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:44-04:00'
virus check
'50684' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile130' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
5e1b9f535c399885c53641942eb7b682
e10f2fb756e57fdf4769c5790adff7447f70b091
'2015-06-09T00:29:42-04:00'
describe
virus check
'204887' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile131' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
c06f84c083f53b48936ea10787cff733
231b20d8513dcc68eebb9c8e74482dd585dde918
describe
virus check
'81856' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile132' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
014f28616fdb17e8fff57db803dc042d
5723d8f5658aa7f9db1d6d70d4154b8dca408cd9
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:57-04:00'
virus check
'167144' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile133' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
4a055fc4a8dc92c1c55e8a582755b81e
fc336f05189d5c50086dc89680e5a167b20fdb07
'2015-06-09T00:27:27-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:49-04:00'
virus check
'65923' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile134' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
fb0e39a66583b02ad4345147c9b8c1a7
5e16870415d5c951fab0a65ad8e9df562b62db3b
'2015-06-09T00:27:35-04:00'
describe
virus check
'175199' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile135' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
f0b3f5111b87acd865e78b02258f54ca
4529eda00dfe639ed9afc67ca74a8a39733539ec
describe
virus check
'74625' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile136' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
c78bf74eff4616c776ffe80b1010d25d
7b217e4a8a7af29004da555e6441b2945fc9e2ec
describe
virus check
'75609' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile137' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
8b85f2e3f7a814e6477ddabd8c2f5af4
a9c1967cd2f348bbe7519103d95808bd8ca6eab0
'2015-06-09T00:28:56-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:17-04:00'
virus check
'32053' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile138' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
cb791d6d79ee0f553aad2afc3818be80
e3dbaf6191136358c88cbbb5b6ebe17961a11a4f
'2015-06-09T00:27:44-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:02-04:00'
virus check
'176552' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile139' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
31df5c56cd2e5ee011f00ba02bb82607
1b9f51e2b9ca2a2d30a16b7d21f59ab72116f04b
'2015-06-09T00:28:10-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:37-04:00'
virus check
'4792' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile14' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
353cad54bb6adc0b15c3f3a338b5c5d6
a49c3da7b9e63980778e07a9025e820a3a3ad513
'2015-06-09T00:27:02-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:30-04:00'
virus check
'69863' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile140' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
c23be1f2b08c16506acc4b22eb8b04f2
fbbdbfa45dc3dde08d4cdd250b06154a2bc7f921
'2015-06-09T00:29:31-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:49-04:00'
virus check
'145889' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile141' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
f4413ec7492c99d3e5d4ec45a8f42427
3cc15541ece8a1c40edc87f7fadc906b55058de5
describe
virus check
'58805' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile142' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
a9d92021af8e819ba3d8d15036e53ee6
9bb4d490c56ca47d0ec4e218fdea5cae739f5774
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:09-04:00'
virus check
'161147' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile143' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
8ec6e797ef0c8982202df97e49dad1ea
3e6fed0c27e10838c9f19d4aed143f3e0ebd3ff1
'2015-06-09T00:28:03-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:29-04:00'
virus check
'65485' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile144' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
02feb586fc088b55bcfd6f9c90611a01
6b74631bd351b89f7390b24d1638e4486e01d9e5
describe
virus check
'132003' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile145' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
56ee9d00b46e12c8908ab8ec7e91879d
391f1eb050761880d6c0c326cc42bc69b38cc38b
'2015-06-09T00:29:00-04:00'
describe
virus check
'54088' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile146' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
8e1f30a50b46e4d028e445a80e28b3c8
4e8f4a501389928f128b24de11514d4bff52b188
'2015-06-09T00:27:12-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:41-04:00'
virus check
'247406' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile147' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
de100bc50230e363d778fac14e6d9a96
021d60207baf10cda2cd9fb07dfd197a6e8118a5
'2015-06-09T00:27:41-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:00-04:00'
virus check
'100139' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile148' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
95ef2dc00d48be5bb1e177722bb44ec8
8fc877cbfad40500c7c19330a11e9d406bf7fd45
'2015-06-09T00:28:19-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:46-04:00'
virus check
'156650' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile149' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
4ff954264182cb0cdbe527a19dacbc86
0531da881679b6713a440aaf01fb4747f56f572b
'2015-06-09T00:28:37-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:58-04:00'
virus check
'138545' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile15' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
dedd04672f8d971da30982f077b87c69
7c343b426e7599c77870d3b0cd637256e39e1908
describe
virus check
'61201' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile150' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
8e3dfaaad68195afed02ca5eacf152dc
973f2f654ac9e808c874d37abfd6c3647008e8c0
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:57-04:00'
virus check
'249209' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile151' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
16306b0076da63157f15f36ab45b33bc
6970b8ecc67cd27ee26f0fe9548bad5bb64f0f7d
'2015-06-09T00:29:04-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:22-04:00'
virus check
'95907' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile152' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
9bae083935c23a94aa12d9e5d95f0a9c
9bde8e31c4b922244276769e07e38504903d3dac
'2015-06-09T00:29:23-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:41-04:00'
virus check
'114641' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile153' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
d857ccfdf34bc3f716171817586f546c
c65037c482f6803c2ca985acc8d5b8eeeab214ed
'2015-06-09T00:28:36-04:00'
describe
virus check
'43882' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile154' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
062c597d8bdc2dfe930b01367d9b88fc
1caf18a87804cc31291762f05131d02f6915f964
'2015-06-09T00:29:11-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:30-04:00'
virus check
'166134' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile155' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
e1af69b6613714d0285d0960b1c594f0
f7884fa3f1ea8a99558159f16b9a30790afeb58c
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:51-04:00'
virus check
'65709' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile156' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
ae5dcddf28cb92eb7b9470cffb51a7f9
44dad7d353346d7d03906063bc7a0b1868328bfb
'2015-06-09T00:27:43-04:00'
describe
virus check
'86448' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile157' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
e155561dca53afc51669709542588cc4
2b1da49c2c1a376e25eb1059c82edaf187e2ba41
describe
virus check
'34518' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile158' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
d80be7f5527f95b82722455a76d74510
7490dd2fd9cc73e6de83b81a0ac7e7105da7cef1
'2015-06-09T00:28:38-04:00'
describe
virus check
'91303' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile159' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
70194c0bb71438182c6bc2c06cc4428c
4cfda35678ce445836d27905c2e14d8ab09e23c8
describe
virus check
'47788' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile16' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
78b7ddd052a29ab37d7fd94440d83f7a
bb9146950344f2b53ad7d850423aad3c9f6e22a7
'2015-06-09T00:28:11-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:38-04:00'
virus check
'34642' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile160' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
fe85e04ccad20d93a09f2bda713bf68a
b74fa705defba9cd26c1cfe7a0544a09e7ede87e
describe
virus check
'80880' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile161' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
585ddef0df4fe35ccaaafa5867a0e880
3207fd1cfbbd827ec3c5f5f9586ce0b295b44e73
describe
virus check
'26466' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile162' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
290a391a98fecb2b71eb6f8133911e6c
31e58fedf628272e2e49b629fb7045eef781f4a0
'2015-06-09T00:27:33-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:54-04:00'
virus check
'125837' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile163' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
3876e2c497d6dccd1fed560477180982
0269e09aaa4c7b7f261b745b5b4a7d3cf2904b3b
'2015-06-09T00:27:24-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:46-04:00'
virus check
'40084' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile164' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
1bea5dd7d17638e3a4658eec6d9b0fa3
74c3e7abb7eb6e91df93741b9e43e78d8eb59f4e
describe
virus check
'154520' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile165' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
63696d2c6ed618b608f67fbfbfcb254b
11abb5aba9daef92cffd9ab0c308531ec9fb55a1
'2015-06-09T00:27:22-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:44-04:00'
virus check
'47343' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile166' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
112f881e6baa65ba10c8ebd4a9ee48ca
ced4581e64ee91574feae5f1c2c3ad84cb04dd72
'2015-06-09T00:27:06-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:34-04:00'
virus check
'127317' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile167' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
86f3630c8845b3ac94bff24db75fc9af
27d9173e67ef3d93a84ec18c23bbd96de98f5700
'2015-06-09T00:29:33-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:50-04:00'
virus check
'38794' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile168' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
d1fcdcbe0dc0b41acfb1a01375d96b98
8f9971c7adc06ad1f2736ad30f7e5c1d9dcb517f
'2015-06-09T00:29:32-04:00'
describe
virus check
'153514' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile169' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
cf70cdf1030a7037478986f2c9b34d63
a34f0dd904defc4e1940019674388596ec243cd1
'2015-06-09T00:27:46-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:04-04:00'
virus check
'206116' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile17' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
70912577631e845a2161899c6cfab06b
39e3119aedf6e2ff86acff6ff4e8ac4274ff77f6
'2015-06-09T00:27:30-04:00'
describe
virus check
'47205' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile170' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
9ed6ab3fcfaf1df4b6cf7cdebcf31bf8
08bf29504d9934eedc35625788f2acb712c8806c
'2015-06-09T00:27:32-04:00'
describe
virus check
'176970' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile171' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
b7a0aa7264f31214982418f42e78b703
4c3f10446b3173b2739d3529a0958f0fd6dee3e1
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:29-04:00'
virus check
'54786' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile172' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
efdbcd7460aa097397f4ef182676c957
ce024098aba5883189ada35d047dbd0e72f1c939
'2015-06-09T00:28:20-04:00'
describe
virus check
'177989' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile173' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
41284bd3c6e36e6bcd167e2f76be63c3
16849733bf7cdf706db8d15af1285c4c7e68c0bb
'2015-06-09T00:29:36-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:53-04:00'
virus check
'54918' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile174' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
dc15688cdc9d2dc97d20c094f55c7477
49e1536461487731c9b61f7983f692b9248a39e2
describe
virus check
'170406' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile175' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
ac3468c08395fe594e2b51ce12754089
83929d573a23260226861ca076eacf6dc7337332
'2015-06-09T00:29:13-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:31-04:00'
virus check
'52229' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile176' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
ccc5e1cdf5121283edfddc4d4c38ba95
29d5e9d723c5d1d890760b0dc8fbd9eacf32fa75
describe
virus check
'161820' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile177' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
8c1ba3f010a7cbae293792b4cd573c8d
22938d6e3e7610b9715a072c7bfa52ff0f295fce
'2015-06-09T00:29:34-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:51-04:00'
virus check
'50314' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile178' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
9bea5cae086986572948505d73bfcaae
9b9b64a2d048cc044c23a5bd4233d573abf36e9f
'2015-06-09T00:29:03-04:00'
describe
virus check
'174874' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile179' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
d52fe659831850827b8ad22e218e92da
ce182cec5bdca5258ebe7cdb8322be9c44aa9218
'2015-06-09T00:28:46-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:04-04:00'
virus check
'77749' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile18' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
46b62bbdc7783275f2ca011956c63cc6
9bcbe39b407073def5f64971123f146db2017c02
'2015-06-09T00:29:37-04:00'
describe
virus check
'55007' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile180' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
93489c269a4ec49f107d46eec19003b1
61636bbf6bac3a4d086e7914c4eae9f0823524c3
'2015-06-09T00:27:26-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:48-04:00'
virus check
'171288' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile181' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
09ff3e5fda7a7183411fab175b2d0c9e
0e18a9c8847bc74656474818b2556d946a3c7067
describe
virus check
'52795' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile182' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
568991bc7275e108636cead4351907ce
5f679a5dbdd65e8f57e9fd80f9f4479e55f13060
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:59-04:00'
virus check
'162425' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile183' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
5b9d0cd55b6cba93c0ab071d2a8d645a
acaa9deb5a6e4fbc3eb3b99aca8be30db769fd80
'2015-06-09T00:27:07-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:35-04:00'
virus check
'50379' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile184' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
5377b97145d0be147f5f2500cc4384a9
2dc996309da38533e46ff1dde8e71aa3eb52bc01
describe
virus check
'141293' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile185' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
543689fddd19af269790438721989374
a8d2de9564dacdc48f82ae244f2ec8054ddd09e7
'2015-06-09T00:27:34-04:00'
describe
virus check
'43008' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile186' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
258b9026d8f5fdd8bf97adf06e4f0ce6
8ccb18304436a99e30864a9c4130d9b074935b39
describe
virus check
'159866' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile187' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
11b5aea57bfcab4c2f1dc1a74c26161a
ad4cb4eb21db3025b8b5f33a485fda8921ca7af1
'2015-06-09T00:28:30-04:00'
describe
virus check
'49071' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile188' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
254c8d9cde0ff60a63b31b2a14b1291c
4e3b0ce4b445ee8a6930a4085823cc001e124b36
describe
virus check
'145118' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile189' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
20bcb7fc94e2ad1122a16b72a5c2f860
2681573a9b5ad39c2485cc952d561d0c22b6813e
'2015-06-09T00:27:08-04:00'
describe
virus check
'349636' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile19' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
a0a217451f0fa564c37876191fd100a1
bf9251c09a68651568262336e1e83faac16f954f
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:36-04:00'
virus check
'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile190' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
0da825277c7c363e1c90728433bbb1ac
438a5cf48a06daf78c25af9f1d9c9e1f640935c5
'2015-06-09T00:29:10-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:29-04:00'
virus check
'133038' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile191' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
a010ee801b9b27987f1f6559d3dc2b49
546e876170b367b9a78802290c5a82b196dcf9c3
'2015-06-09T00:27:40-04:00'
describe
virus check
'38603' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile192' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
73be4b8e78613de8365ab87c183621b2
cc7a251d1f9605adbb650db6c1b7d4f3ad2fbf7e
describe
virus check
'148889' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile193' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
8e800dab8317259d82161150c91654ac
5a4adcd0de0276a56a13c04d16446b513cb03aa4
'2015-06-09T00:28:58-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:18-04:00'
virus check
'45407' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile194' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
7426ce7fecfcaf9f25816fd658d4d0f0
00b28e40415767f04ea87815e397164302107d4c
describe
virus check
'153423' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile195' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
f491faee05751264b40e9ee68da365c1
335ae002cd1e926d68a88083751521afea6aab70
'2015-06-09T00:27:50-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:07-04:00'
virus check
'46677' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile196' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
fc26c1a8a6338f3723b57f8f58e3c281
2c874d1310f05412abca8d814ec507078209fdd4
describe
virus check
'135893' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile197' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
37327532e59d05d91212694f4d97dea8
c0d2d1addc18776b80c103c3aaa9058d377daa2a
'2015-06-09T00:27:01-04:00'
describe
virus check
'40060' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile198' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
9e86f6e07a9934f8ea7015fb69895d91
cfa33afc572a56d33c3168d46407b7d7c4ec9b9c
describe
virus check
'142025' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile199' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
b37267495d7cc7e211fa7f85279ec450
f499f4f68a93400f028ef1814b323e65c15772f6
'2015-06-09T00:28:57-04:00'
describe
virus check
'70785' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile2' 'sip-files00000.QC.jpg'
9091d651e4c5b4225d62dc568d18274e
b87f3e2e1393e45fa842c7bb919da241566bb4e9
'2015-06-09T00:27:57-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:15-04:00'
virus check
'100634' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile20' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
61297726c1a8c9444d7c8525c28e4d68
51de569bfdb73816f16591f01f645836d3738253
'2015-06-09T00:27:23-04:00'
describe
virus check
'42598' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile200' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
b4c42ba44e23230172d635050d0d3a47
57086f12f31d9c7ad35ba90c9c7445efd0fb131d
describe
virus check
'140603' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile201' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
35a34d892f72fa9f9eacdd8fdd42d959
d49930f9d39c37b3d3b06e842aaf5858daa15536
describe
virus check
'41572' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile202' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
7688a926553ab08cf883045bbdf919a4
7360db9b3516090e348753bbe0a2ac5c57c37511
'2015-06-09T00:29:02-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:21-04:00'
virus check
'149269' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile203' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
89f8cedde381dae8d2986c024175efe2
9e16901f137b7f7b6eb6ee50cc64136591314660
describe
virus check
'46985' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile204' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
3087adc1ba1927f67e3fa0e8b14d0b5d
e40a294e344a18e87da9845f8db2572e45b3a94d
describe
virus check
'153239' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile205' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
8f9d6d3c3af3d983f82c903296409a13
36382644d831f1039246ee8d314cff3a2bf8a59d
describe
virus check
'46691' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile206' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
e2cef586164bdd892034e0a03abf8942
b870e20eba15192a3ea1f7a674b898e807d3c80e
describe
virus check
'151462' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile207' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
ae53acc8098384c2394ed8e605eb3044
55da239a3d420936eb82f931879dd30bcabb32e8
'2015-06-09T00:29:19-04:00'
describe
virus check
'46920' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile208' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
47886d8b70554c09e8165c77e814acae
df9a7fdb5f6001770a3e4b4b9421ef80af42612a
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:45-04:00'
virus check
'148929' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile209' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
0d22b92db3f2795a862d6c428c1622d3
39d852dac43e80ef9749b82f1b6598b764f2109e
'2015-06-09T00:28:43-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:01-04:00'
virus check
'369051' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile21' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
208088e5a07d9e5ce180c690a8ebfee8
9f2ae3132a64f470fb0f5e7394fe1f7709a856e2
'2015-06-09T00:27:38-04:00'
describe
virus check
'45921' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile210' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
dd454ed93315de411026ce271066571c
3f1ea409b24d94ded7d36991038cec18fffbdc4f
describe
virus check
'158585' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile211' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
a6bfb35888bb8592693e9455e0f782c4
46c1df050476cfd0c9fb3b0f20132569f1af6d0c
'2015-06-09T00:29:35-04:00'
describe
virus check
'48528' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile212' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
3037ca591312aa977c76d0db0fcbd21d
f25a36cb4c6559ae4394c0114ef71d8642cc1906
describe
virus check
'150233' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile213' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
e197d94c1af2ca0393d0969a447e3702
37ef834f37c244be20a307fdbdee48c20eff581e
'2015-06-09T00:28:13-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:40-04:00'
virus check
'45003' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile214' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
87e6b329c668a4b817f8e7f9de7ab928
1913f573f8aa085e7e70fea391db904a3cbcc04e
'2015-06-09T00:29:12-04:00'
describe
virus check
'136709' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile215' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
0d724d0434b163d6418e107443abe5c0
fd4dc34dbbebe65a56e2b30cc097822ff247d257
describe
virus check
'41329' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile216' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
aca609b8bfff063cf51634ec6f9cacc1
c574f4798bd2cd8df2c59e899ca857aec5e21a8d
'2015-06-09T00:28:52-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:11-04:00'
virus check
'142107' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile217' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
90361f28a3d0dedf6f1c5f638a54a878
84249b667bbc64ff06e2c95cc5be2e8fdc9a1b94
'2015-06-09T00:29:20-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:38-04:00'
virus check
'41711' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile218' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
5fbbc85fd2f540ebdf939ea03cf37718
c656325dcc14fb5b86aa32f220c22928168e828c
describe
virus check
'134468' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile219' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
e57c733f9dc1fe19a6b77e278c9495fa
878b3ea835f565c7f9003ed92b79f246b198159b
'2015-06-09T00:28:50-04:00'
describe
virus check
'118139' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile22' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
f4f463bcca1b4b16952ea529114f6101
24f3c36d15b8b99cffd4d4ce727e689732e989cd
'2015-06-09T00:29:09-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:28-04:00'
virus check
'39740' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile220' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
8ee0cfe6e3d32329e53b9c87d7013ecf
2ea73781778cc26761c6cc51a0dfbd4a4cbe26a0
describe
virus check
'154891' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile221' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
59fedfd959f176f35d15ef3392262e60
7d5eb016613c31bdcd394db465e07a654ca0e6a7
describe
virus check
'46916' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile222' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
a2e8edfd53cd2bb767033ce3307c3e75
c718fa37de59bd8e89576bc4637976a40ac47633
'2015-06-09T00:29:39-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:55-04:00'
virus check
'150355' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile223' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
66e174630c9e90cbde4af5febeb97475
f3dced27779cf6e3f3f3005e9458b4415293f1c2
'2015-06-09T00:28:33-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:54-04:00'
virus check
'45704' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile224' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
c16facd1cd03988976d7ea706b6abaa6
9f643d526bc347214eb27f181d28fa60e21a77db
describe
virus check
'1112804' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile225' 'sip-files00000.jp2'
bc79ab6c4e818642cb71f67ab2e41aac
753956a19b6e6d456beb192ff3de61888bfe9616
describe
virus check
'44482' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile226' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
82c7ac4975cbaa085dab15b66dcbcf33
015de40a5de664c8a2e2c70d9f63722ad76f9f06
'2015-06-09T00:28:05-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:31-04:00'
virus check
'75603' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile227' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
bf7a179b8907be3d7e88df918b535e99
13be7d16edc4730a2ca199e4a5aed6200426ef64
describe
virus check
'63119' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile228' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
5f745b3a42694d310f5739382d43387d
c90fc45e9e870ddd2258a577b797b02144571d55
describe
virus check
'44145' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile229' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
97e9fb0f230a75b81e796401897c7016
d9e66f9a2d2c5cff7f6843c47c9b6d3fb9b4f380
describe
virus check
'346410' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile23' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
5f9fc407822af77319d40ca4e992af7d
7b41dc3db95ff23c5ae14c5b8c69217525df3cad
describe
virus check
'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile230' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
19cd6817e8a06222ea652c5c799192d6
301fd08c07a96c7f2f4e649cb48624cb50b92041
'2015-06-09T00:28:39-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:59-04:00'
virus check
'6171' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile231' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
f7b440ee159c32d137b89736f81a0929
1f91dd607b56c6cc01242c9a8dfc7b3f15afecc4
describe
virus check
'87322' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile232' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
e9eea6fad8bce220f8131c99ca2d82a4
0e9906bb4647d22ab9e663cef39bba8cf821e487
describe
virus check
'122634' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile233' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
9206c8b5b6cbd9d9c6de1953f0ff0f80
1057e19271fd1a5e33b75207783adbed2dd79700
'2015-06-09T00:27:04-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:33-04:00'
virus check
'240773' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile234' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
efe29c5d29934cdb288fa497b5b05a6b
f399e84ffb78674aade95f5f9932ef30dc932607
describe
virus check
'245837' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile235' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
b33443ab0fadca9582ff43787ea24b29
0ef095b0e3ef002550cf1402d3d3e3911185fa01
describe
virus check
'232250' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile236' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
195b8a1eac5c8051b9a2cdab1267e95e
769728aa820674820c65f3c6f4b8e9811a6df502
'2015-06-09T00:28:51-04:00'
describe
virus check
'197787' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile237' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
73fc586904e65e9b87b237ddd7a86526
0c2f31733188126266f6d4011fb81ecdd8766579
describe
virus check
'1038542' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile238' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
89c3f7058ac7aa37793e5eba4875e964
e629a16633971dfc0271031a6d65f347fcdf2d21
'2015-06-09T00:29:40-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:56-04:00'
virus check
'204120' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile239' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
dc51287ce394ce344c248e7b0e5ccb28
04b283f6a04abc00c15d923730af2f4302eb1945
describe
virus check
'109346' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile24' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
40e54127185e4277cb194a5a9358f119
74f46797f58b03c19e1af08df10440f722768b47
describe
virus check
'1002961' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile240' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
24b0c6603a6cee7031a3c0812a6853af
bf242cd525483aa5d08670e4f349e0461b8797e3
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:13-04:00'
virus check
'210499' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile241' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
a370ddac6a1f6944223f2b64adeed640
a511f7f100c6805a5418525378bb83716610fb64
describe
virus check
'1007442' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile242' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
68235e1288fb0f8f6fa5dde7e2549fb7
2f807c253b763de4adb36a64b3447f44865728d1
describe
virus check
'1022732' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile243' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
7feb43b1479854b375c63d220066e31f
a34f56af7d8c694918745e6d375630cf570460ff
describe
virus check
'996060' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile244' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
e6a66632f8d6fef0aadface1e8310a35
7d300f54afb304f3a74adb57f58f727d3c99d957
describe
virus check
'1021194' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile245' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
fac80ad41a766d9bda850a737184ad46
ffd0f297c8fc36d966cf4186d1250636056febfa
'2015-06-09T00:28:04-04:00'
describe
virus check
'1024697' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile246' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
dfb6de90881ae2ff134016f9d871629b
99e29bce0b1de901cff984dbaed4b8875d2561ca
describe
virus check
'221165' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile247' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
3b6b067baec0db8514c508dfaa7abbec
566624fbbd45ce460a2c100b21d3fc56fb552956
describe
virus check
'1024349' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile248' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
27a17a7db30229e525587815a6c3d78d
b6ab2731bff797f6387c812df2e68193f4af55eb
'2015-06-09T00:27:53-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:11-04:00'
virus check
'205532' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile249' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
1357757fac90423fda57001f9be41c8a
d674e97818502e1d526f00a78b3deee6314cfe47
'2015-06-09T00:27:55-04:00'
describe
virus check
'313509' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile25' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
fbe2f20f0ebbe346c3b0ce63e3f7f103
5eed80d4dd01d27ff141e1804ac43daae1d2ef6c
describe
virus check
'196448' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile250' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
a232f9603e2a05964866cc77d953ff01
e580ab688305ea56d3dbd365203c8325dd9a1e5f
describe
virus check
'1020357' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile251' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
228cb4beef860d6964fceb6f23cac382
f2ad6a6f7f539dd67c8567f1d91c329b38ab0cc2
'2015-06-09T00:29:07-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:26-04:00'
virus check
'1015920' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile252' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
7ee7da0fee8f0c990495ac892c9d1fa8
ba989d75a23f5faca44c6c23e823149f1f99b48e
describe
virus check
'34985' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile253' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
65eda7311709cba09f8c32d3ace61905
44f3e3cec2b19f0680b5fe801acbaf63870fdbcf
describe
virus check
'3065' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile254' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
e7e386a00016c187953e875c5b6a87e9
fdfef5e15976dc7db7d5cd8fe1cb3358592b97bb
describe
virus check
'155139' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile255' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
5b92d269353953d1a875d9d66b23b5b4
9b15b50a3b663471a61617f6f9f566f964a7a029
describe
virus check
'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile256' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
3f8e4ba82789286d1da33b7c0f8da401
ca50eb9bee2c63eb88a268c61a1aefb2745521ce
'2015-06-09T00:28:47-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:06-04:00'
virus check
'193985' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile257' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
e3b17ca585348ae190d2a5c3950d4112
454e36de2031b4d527bbda747e4497932d224db5
describe
virus check
'241273' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile258' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
ad31df361896c9d399674dadb13ff6a8
4d6bf99e9c39dbb6a176a4cd4383b440e85a9e23
'2015-06-09T00:28:15-04:00'
describe
virus check
'241871' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile259' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
ed5b5ad9383453dac01be8d11c0d4f74
3268f69a02171306ba6a28efeb055ea1240d61d7
describe
virus check
'100872' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile26' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
77627fbd0e4743e96b6220218a60c5e6
f62838577fee7cdad77a46db6b8c55e4d9c65668
'2015-06-09T00:28:40-04:00'
describe
virus check
'1022186' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile260' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
93378d35e114dc21f4fe10896ab9a72e
11c9078cea4968c0883f21cec0a2d298f9a6a85d
'2015-06-09T00:27:51-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:08-04:00'
virus check
'248208' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile261' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
002afc42673a70463e0a1f202081a5af
400cbe83b5ab888da8bfbd299eae0d786d8eebab
describe
virus check
'1024236' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile262' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
2211c1deeffd20afb51311b10041de51
b805d4806aa10f6e64929c1883722534a31bcd46
describe
virus check
'258178' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile263' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
90e43903cfc5451f18fa3b2512756d9d
47f1d49f512f5f3277c9a3b139f802de5b5376a8
describe
virus check
'1011376' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile264' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
31ae85ac4b48b4487c62638648287513
94f062a2965dae708067932d80c512be6c3df9cc
describe
virus check
'180300' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile265' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
d00d51b1aaf3427ebf811f5abf72630f
45df2e9f1c9a251499071e739c04ca4cbf939203
'2015-06-09T00:29:18-04:00'
describe
virus check
'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile266' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
81a9e9d94938a718e4b682332df411d4
34fdd9fb70c934b156fdc43864964f67ae70ed94
describe
virus check
'203025' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile267' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
d218a8c73f0b247235f2f9655b124ef1
f473eff266c79bb94aee93216cf3bd5e8527a1f7
describe
virus check
'255957' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile268' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
6c8c7c3c7db4bf4705ce7f4735328264
5ec68aafc429d0f5b68925b752ce313c869de337
describe
virus check
'253022' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile269' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
eadcdd784f8fc5acfe0ed29da0ce8a40
ddc6cccf79f924e5f9c37ed1098c2e24ae49fce2
'2015-06-09T00:28:55-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:16-04:00'
virus check
'305548' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile27' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
4183f0fd7c883f1f6ceb5cf296983973
dbf1b39839bf4d39c5b3fac950b8f9f960e5e3f6
'2015-06-09T00:28:41-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:00-04:00'
virus check
'99452' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile270' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
d22bae99f4db564a5e39f2266746ace8
456c61abe460e49a92bf446c024d31a3e166f0c1
'2015-06-09T00:28:17-04:00'
describe
virus check
'203277' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile271' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
d36f947faa9635fa3cb94c3eef69b12a
eda61f10901f7619617da109cd56b20640b7c82f
describe
virus check
'213351' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile272' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
194e62814b4fabae923663cd70ede43a
a95cb22f7ead58bd975c130c238f7071d12fc4dd
'2015-06-09T00:27:05-04:00'
describe
virus check
'205461' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile273' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
3de91a3f1d75062e45e95bd197ff123c
e6ca880cf9dd41dfe7315e1a13c746e6a2172cb8
'2015-06-09T00:27:21-04:00'
describe
virus check
'220553' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile274' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
d66fe9355deb5d0729820f9d15eed86f
b0f07e9c3c4a759ce656b4a5e61b6121f8953fff
'2015-06-09T00:28:53-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:14-04:00'
virus check
'215193' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile275' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
4d3d683eba4746244ea7f36312c45c56
d8ffaf1cec9e41786474fcfd32d3779da325375c
describe
virus check
'88167' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile276' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
1e9f81fffb4741bc63c91ebf9809ba7a
52a68248fa0703c5adb6ca699248a8f084825d68
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:32-04:00'
virus check
'89665' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile277' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
461612912fb6c8215104159330f6a90d
fe5e71771fc07a3ab24545d88c06efa8c0c219be
'2015-06-09T00:28:25-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:47-04:00'
virus check
'22488' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile278' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
038dca2c33a47b27445cdc9043c4b8d6
c305fb12975ef4ec40999cb4c1d15214078e6233
'2015-06-09T00:27:58-04:00'
describe
virus check
'174245' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile279' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
300b9ee82671b98e09045ed9bd1120e6
3438217d0e6cf5b9583cfe7f53d3e1fe4fd5e249
'2015-06-09T00:29:01-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:20-04:00'
virus check
'94954' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile28' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
732e16887f74ae82a3353530523927eb
e2d511b315953fd0ce09f6d8a86dafeaeeefd1c4
describe
virus check
'230474' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile280' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
a3102a19a24136b26eae6033e19c9c71
3d75829272ad9b63ec68cdcf22952e766748a8ee
'2015-06-09T00:27:03-04:00'
describe
virus check
'221869' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile281' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
d1737a56b6fec6f85a1300073c773080
ca873b231820f3133a0dac2277099a695ac911b3
'2015-06-09T00:28:08-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:35-04:00'
virus check
'209863' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile282' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
5332969622626011e76fee22e02feb6c
ff2a4d278b82b636742f524dfaab60db56e361c3
describe
virus check
'186496' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile283' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
70a3a3e386dc3b21b95fb0c691256c52
cfe18203601e9086f02622ab0a47042c072bf2ed
describe
virus check
'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile284' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
0a198d218af917eefdb494505c4fad55
d7288dda8845c72b19041cab2a99e0df113ece7a
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:32-04:00'
virus check
'7494' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile285' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
d27c7bcc2cc83d415fd4a46c856e708c
3965c65572a80aa779b57b66415feba328343d9e
'2015-06-09T00:27:42-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:01-04:00'
virus check
'67405' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile286' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
44dcffb52a8a72168419cda7facc79b5
3788c481889aef3c40e4d5f16c9ca5c2893e6458
describe
virus check
'60990' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile287' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
650a3fc4ab8bf1b11b29a154a7d01f71
2a6593c2d5bc314c21dc41852109109f9a95c850
'2015-06-09T00:28:12-04:00'
describe
virus check
'79895' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile288' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
83243b95a4b615452ae378b37cddaddb
15f288c7a484f0d15d63968a24c0ef193763f07e
describe
virus check
'63766' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile289' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
ab567c45c564615a4f9f629d55850011
c45b362555836cebab864a6063a27bac13f92207
describe
virus check
'325822' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile29' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
992f540c9e3933990d96888aca7e7425
4872c792eee1021b45f04f1e5514645bb03f5f93
describe
virus check
'124011' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile290' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
862959d9a428be765b1cbc7d197a1397
13331e9a5ed2a3a6e328f366c4ab93005f7347c4
describe
virus check
'93488' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile291' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
cc712efc652378d47c505655eccd2234
cbd1759701418f66341bb3ca829fefa3bad3e6ab
describe
virus check
'94151' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile292' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
a426da6195cb84156644325321485f52
d229f94f60f324d49c43f30efd3d918c9b8622a4
describe
virus check
'38276' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile293' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
5a9c01a0b7cbeaf866ee03522624c0d4
f55db7df603d49be510c16ea81eb0dc47ad181e7
describe
virus check
'111353' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile294' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
cf6e013265ee2ef4cfa5d818cd836af3
80e7f8ab35df4316c6e10df846df1c9d535b6cc5
'2015-06-09T00:27:47-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:05-04:00'
virus check
'81367' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile295' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
64853f5d4b4cccb080cae2b5d96cb28e
1bc9bab83a7dd1af3c2e36e6b9917ce889ca835c
describe
virus check
'94704' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile296' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
b2fa445976c3e18a1d5735370e36a77f
13d1d58cd9b684da2ecfa34a1cd243098074f366
describe
virus check
'70475' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile297' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
0c9ddf626d5bf58effa9b1a2633fd1c8
e2f392b42c5fabc1d28458b46f03583c82dc7f54
describe
virus check
'109880' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile298' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
e2262ef04717e16e2888efac13461219
39801750356f2311197041a051aee3903d1120d8
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:52-04:00'
virus check
'76827' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile299' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
e11f2393e3bc74fc1f0200725adbb678
c9b58a9a0ed5284b8b9d99cfb4301aaacb8a5a89
describe
virus check
'76815' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile3' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
fab1be57a01faeb0e1972da2f35b7d15
d76298adbf447098e4ded6e29319b15cecd9d299
'2015-06-09T00:27:37-04:00'
describe
virus check
'109192' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile30' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
e76ddc9740a2d363dd5731c065b4513a
df39172757ea416d4e0101e25ff676f08be4e502
'2015-06-09T00:27:59-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:18-04:00'
virus check
'116557' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile300' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
eaa53479dde3d0015cf4a736a19ef7c0
73da158fc6318950927231a1f3b2a59f94f4df06
describe
virus check
'56679' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile301' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
6e5556443450ab3ce1120942b020e852
8ded7fda4fe9eef785f030dc9c0ea63e9dd06278
'2015-06-09T00:29:28-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:46-04:00'
virus check
'110365' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile302' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
40bd5088abfcba900112f8217ecb46e3
693df9254871c054aa7da92c45200e51bfa62281
describe
virus check
'54354' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile303' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
9a9d1dd983c54b07b5a4dd44bf40572c
8f23a85922f0c8e614085ee05b2d3c169e7e7d2e
describe
virus check
'52948' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile304' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
b6ed6727d3a0af41d7e0007e227d7205
5c50714786ed61dc27d1590ac2fe9f5e6703d39f
describe
virus check
'3376377' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile305' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
4f1d8e47c122e3f35a026792f3fe7c25
41d04cdd849ffc63ea7b3d1952062f84243cb307
'2015-06-09T00:28:16-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:42-04:00'
virus check
'2153652' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile306' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
5145768f27ce3fac21d739c273a35050
e785fd504962c99e46535627f5e3a97d263d79d5
describe
virus check
'2094053' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile307' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
74654c797e41f778bf9d670f11bbd377
9c7ddddc30ad10b128952960a1769ad70dfde545
describe
virus check
'2093155' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile308' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
39359b229ebb26bdef685a2395c54ad9
143885b31a59a3e22a218514bd9db034033d93de
describe
virus check
'2115513' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile309' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
b747215f424ce6539f4cef0f3e115a7c
7768da870431eaa39188c256308bce914b108203
describe
virus check
'328656' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile31' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
7cf4363c7a835dd11173fda4aa190598
1ba16539ddc1fca18928bb4ef6ad3a11d2e2007c
'2015-06-09T00:28:45-04:00'
describe
virus check
'2119380' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile310' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
0b57dea6979ee89422cbe59a9aa2b907
33a36d7547badb6ed04c7fb11013fbc048da5ee8
describe
virus check
'2112392' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile311' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
973763d007ae1b65415dda2506ba47cc
5f588ed4b77566ca7f4ab884e13d550dc2d9d603
describe
virus check
'2095510' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile312' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
6ae79bb7ea039b3d894e245cfda4bed3
54c21f3b2bcf46079bd4d3d8569dcde8b101f990
describe
virus check
'2089763' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile313' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
7ea90ce77fb8301d5444eb9801ca3036
2ae3ecbb80cd286dfd80f2687a72848eef6a1bfb
'2015-06-09T00:27:25-04:00'
describe
virus check
'2081449' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile314' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
232c2d06c2791126ad0d58ed0ac46bac
02bae9acc9865ed060536b5ce786cf3de918a1dd
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:32-04:00'
virus check
'2091067' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile315' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
9160965cffa3334ba523f8cdd75bae3e
5b883ea033f9f43b362e4965f5d86c23c9dd5da6
describe
virus check
'2092897' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile316' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
d5c9b415ee3a9ce763c52cf7e3f44cfe
a91bd1fc09930ccf5c56ec183c165c1c1d876ce4
'2015-06-09T00:29:44-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:27:00-04:00'
virus check
'2087267' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile317' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
a4f2b0eae3194cbab2b64986db6daa96
510e687e107873bc54de3d18c673fd8ab4eafd1f
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:34-04:00'
virus check
'2090428' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile318' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
d813b2043e4c175bfb5b9df895b7f516
0282a4d1ca8949bc16d18865d8aa965b3dc7b1f7
describe
virus check
'2102475' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile319' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
6d8b4fae4588688acfad6ebc9f985352
d80b4d977368209aef3531ea5c0b2470270c3c1f
describe
virus check
'106219' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile32' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
e27017da75ad9989fe64a0d5eedfa721
2ab42ad4705dd476e552c31d226affd9e1fa5758
describe
virus check
'2096431' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile320' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
569e591ef1d644fc33933d7dc3a66616
f0520ce99f0e0ede8cee104e24aaa1f2c5560f4b
describe
virus check
'2105345' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile321' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
f21769e290ea522f41ff9a97c3743fb4
4e12fb23bf147000472cfbc2692404fe17148240
'2015-06-09T00:29:05-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:23-04:00'
virus check
'2093117' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile322' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
6131cafe0a448408de4cb3fce2688741
8d21b1d48dd69aacba2cfff7cf06a35e43a1e01e
describe
virus check
'2088146' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile323' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
9094a664206682373b2eaaaf1c25894f
1773ddfca65892a55c25693b83a1b479161a4d6a
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:13-04:00'
virus check
'2082627' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile324' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
7907170dfc16ae515c1857779fbb2d0d
189cc3638047aa0096861c12d72758fd2c84c02c
describe
virus check
'2083871' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile325' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
43c9d63d66c08db89dce2dde033f880a
8ca1b15de54980bbaff4995eb2333dc6a3345fc8
'2015-06-09T00:29:14-04:00'
describe
virus check
'2083461' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile326' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
f0b42bdbeaf5c874ba5afd001790694d
38f77c4eb04b3d21e07605a4b67197757f9fa4b2
describe
virus check
'2088485' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile327' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
161201061ebe9d90c8d1939f8517c0bb
5e7da4a94f6c174b3ba8f398e3d882714a3e708d
describe
virus check
'2086638' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile328' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
3f0d239b916d9503678a3f6314069b81
e41372dee8bd55b564abc5eb5933d90349596f4d
describe
virus check
'2084726' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile329' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
23e0815532a5f6a1dfee3e78fc9739b9
9ac63ff9d73ba1c393fd5d7ea3b9b798ca448a9e
describe
virus check
'331189' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile33' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
777f18503015eaf7b142f6779a5e0d26
6cfdaa3f37345758fb580c73d136c837773a3630
'2015-06-09T00:28:09-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:36-04:00'
virus check
'2085964' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile330' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
498503a54598e2ac4e8cd0fad250a4d8
d824ed16a35bca5bde1310931f0d2b996683b675
describe
virus check
'2131151' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile331' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
0bc0b9ae875ed4ad624020659e59b717
fb7c9a16680205444b9a8e3e97e5b066738bd8b8
describe
virus check
'2091779' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile332' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
35bc2400da7d88b930d9f03b1e78e1de
351ea3ffa6be4399a529de854f2d696a9978b2e6
describe
virus check
'2135283' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile333' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
f54e078e89b4efe85e747260b1aa3063
4394b76cd32fb75687359eeb6ac97a009081d28f
describe
virus check
'2115400' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile334' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
86eeaeb679251e3dbba6103ec3f26f42
803d13e52684d6401f2337d2e6ecd18d5080155a
describe
virus check
'2146706' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile335' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
db414341266c7505a3ae779fe859c230
8d96039067fdfa7da9a3901333b9ba9bd8cfcd6e
describe
virus check
'2167730' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile336' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
a8ef828180a872cb28aeff6c504e9341
e59c8e5a977dccfd5be05821b0e012fe8fcd69b0
describe
virus check
'401' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile337' 'sip-files00000.txt'
454a56cbd65b3c440cf1f8516816586d
da603644e6ca209bb4431acad0f59bd08f3fddae
describe
virus check
'976' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile338' 'sip-files00002.txt'
58da308b0cb8054a695a7d8d0a4c22dc
09d129b8d8ce65a086134c217b485861597fc834
describe
virus check
'1561' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile339' 'sip-files00003.txt'
88a40d550a7b3e3bd6c1947d1aca6c65
50225b5adc82562720bd783f15c3708a366cfdf9
describe
virus check
'109579' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile34' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
1254c397d8018d2e1ef26a4c2849d6bb
6640b85e08d9791f49f7fdc642697a3a9646054e
'2015-06-09T00:29:24-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:43-04:00'
virus check
'1846' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile340' 'sip-files00004.txt'
e3e0bf7e50060e4a4351eddf7885d761
418c5ccdf659e269ea4dacb5e6c2fd7bd457ae42
describe
virus check
'1062' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile341' 'sip-files00005.txt'
a5cb9ef5126b3d9b3a0554f345efd8fc
7c928db474768931d0df0dc6a540e75d68bd92ad
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:14-04:00'
virus check
'1147' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile342' 'sip-files00006.txt'
af69285ea96b84432010761f28014665
91c0d7179e9e430d92e2583922a8b85f75f199f4
describe
virus check
'2267' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile343' 'sip-files00008.txt'
94a6465a9435f7fa0e426494308ac364
6465c47e8b41e6f0ff724b222d4d741ca0a90eb4
describe
virus check
'2301' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile344' 'sip-files00010.txt'
2dbfd279e26481917cfb0fcd15608d49
34b32a0bfc79721838ede836dfcd61a43d16d241
describe
virus check
'5265' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile345' 'sip-files00011.txt'
102a27dcd34b6ebc5082c4a998277348
fdc759cbd96f4f9fe58f7b0f3a82fbbb6392c857
describe
virus check
'5476' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile346' 'sip-files00012.txt'
8c2b9c40f449fad9f959b4c73b48cd97
8b76194d951e88b7014ec35549ee36eeef45a024
describe
virus check
'5141' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile347' 'sip-files00013.txt'
72e9a996420c89b2f9f076ee84e46265
35154ce6eb4726258faf4ae694860f809441bb4d
describe
virus check
'4323' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile348' 'sip-files00014.txt'
680630f2fa66b147f43e401e518d342d
d5ceab7de5eb94db71e8183280b22992e36d6c1c
describe
virus check
'1476' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile349' 'sip-files00015.txt'
34dd35ee339dbc7a84351d985d13fea9
7191ffe08975361694a1d13ce75a30c2450bc475
describe
virus check
'275510' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile35' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
80ab9afb4bb7f330d606eb7a33edc0d2
28daa3d0c98b596c03b085c9318eb46952b5a7c8
'2015-06-09T00:28:31-04:00'
describe
virus check
'4395' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile350' 'sip-files00016.txt'
edcd149ba8eb7ce9a42c0158c9363a10
27427020128969bb5c4d3ccbad052f8990f8ba30
describe
virus check
'861' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile351' 'sip-files00017.txt'
2147f5b8990ce79982cf85f6588a9ee6
138aa2e1c3d408d13e0137d70bcc80c69d797edf
describe
virus check
'4657' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile352' 'sip-files00018.txt'
fdf9d8ea134b604cbb489e64d34e8708
2a5316d01e0106ffd40c70936680edbb76b8c772
describe
virus check
'1139' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile353' 'sip-files00019.txt'
427e2bd4f9bd1d1893f5b9255235911e
50272e39399aa766ee3a38c04f914f98f84173f9
'2015-06-09T00:28:42-04:00'
describe
virus check
'599' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile354' 'sip-files00020.txt'
b8f9d38cbae085727cfb78a8d6ba106a
3e005a84f46c1324852bd4ce7fff1a02c3e6178c
describe
virus check
'4537' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile355' 'sip-files00021.txt'
b8daf77d008fb74c8fae677bf65783f6
97820590bc0afacd742ec5f54c18e02b65f84fcd
describe
virus check
'1493' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile356' 'sip-files00022.txt'
595b1ea1280bfcb3329857838e5b6f90
00a42eeccc0435afad78f27b974e3823662b7ffe
describe
virus check
'2865' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile357' 'sip-files00023.txt'
ac16717b53acf88c9550df4c59b6591f
f90e9a298a03461cc79264fe87a68513a901b7df
describe
virus check
'4848' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile358' 'sip-files00024.txt'
65b8b0ee4d549e0f9a4602060844b6fa
266eec95beb2d3f8cc8a18c422f5dad1e039e7be
describe
virus check
'1081' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile359' 'sip-files00025.txt'
ddfc94ba6e4dee8ee123bec39a6ecec1
690d5a4dc95d952ca4f7d4cb5c3d87f3d763bfa3
describe
virus check
'81431' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile36' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
70eb75df87b54eecc608c3d74c0e2298
1969243090b3f10eb1aaa8fece4c73cb696032d8
describe
virus check
'4521' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile360' 'sip-files00026.txt'
81c78acb9f07349fd2e9a7aab7368089
95a191cab36ee5c30857be74e70399193d8c08cd
describe
virus check
'4376' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile361' 'sip-files00027.txt'
3dfbb566bf96606c7e4dff85366358ad
a1d014d75e611f82227351b3dc0d6471e017344e
describe
virus check
'1661' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile362' 'sip-files00028.txt'
36f22f776c3a0bfd7c2de7d6388d9af0
43ec49635657dadb7bbd3d4593bf45c678ca96d9
describe
Invalid character
virus check
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
Invalid character
'1339' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile363' 'sip-files00029.txt'
49b25de84dafb206ee683aa35e01f808
8f28d0c3c970a30a15166dbc99e4a1d42aaac8f8
describe
virus check
'640' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile364' 'sip-files00030.txt'
e04efdfd7cc22a46cea8885338c652cc
de45b33074c9c5a3d56f0c5a382622148b451442
describe
virus check
'3355' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile365' 'sip-files00032.txt'
e6e5f16b54e0d5afa963dcf5c785dd3a
5ff445208a0c158e9d889dadbfcb98fc7857d2c0
'2015-06-09T00:27:13-04:00'
describe
virus check
'4269' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile366' 'sip-files00034.txt'
e8e96f472432455782d293ffed997f73
89bb302d7ca60accc3938f6ae5074e37be35bfe3
describe
virus check
'5273' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile367' 'sip-files00035.txt'
c3f5f88f62b6b1be0815529e467f4920
1dcbf564de99ef15cd9259537effb543a86f7a38
describe
virus check
'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile368' 'sip-files00036.txt'
ae91c929e8ceaded5b483eff4334ae49
edab5ce144d3dd809379ceb9ffd06570716aed33
'2015-06-09T00:28:44-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:03-04:00'
virus check
'2697' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile369' 'sip-files00037.txt'
8e555a1fdcd27dcedebb185ab661e9a6
36a81564eebbfcc9bca1cdb59f2bd85a23ce2f6b
describe
Invalid character
virus check
Invalid character
Invalid character
'322818' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile37' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
9764fec568f3ef4f25fa86e47141459c
8f0fa830566f35d6dc1e5f3912340ba9d298877b
describe
virus check
'5421' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile370' 'sip-files00038.txt'
fd770d7d8b94a1cf74a4e45e30ded0a9
65da82a9c60f182d0cca5b25fd626a18284eec4d
describe
virus check
'706' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile371' 'sip-files00039.txt'
eb168c2a576e462be26ba335f6b6df01
928b15d5d7a3a3490d05549ab76e30a21876e6b6
describe
virus check
'5709' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile372' 'sip-files00040.txt'
845d31e7647aa3c6616d5b5ac738ab1c
3d26a45f2adea621adfae323dc58711672a338cf
describe
virus check
'1666' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile373' 'sip-files00041.txt'
7eb664515d648d10a51ef523546a23ed
ec8e60fd3459b1aab41fc9316a9a42dba8ed3671
describe
virus check
'3988' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile374' 'sip-files00042.txt'
5662beed6cc9cc5315d7197f71117900
5e2a273ba8667de2822286f14ca09c7a59b2d3db
describe
virus check
'4374' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile375' 'sip-files00044.txt'
774860bf1a4916ec16fcfbe0b595366d
17f5583b3c3f26ce9358519daee9ba6153b34631
describe
virus check
'5674' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile376' 'sip-files00045.txt'
ee71fc2f604780aa500ac5fd34a94f11
c9e90515e4fdfd4f443e78379310b36b3ba8ad59
'2015-06-09T00:28:06-04:00'
describe
virus check
'5550' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile377' 'sip-files00046.txt'
24aea050f3ecceb7ec72c03114052c12
95050d34c3ec4142a25f7cb4f5aa72400435d12b
describe
virus check
'2151' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile378' 'sip-files00047.txt'
aedb017ccae65ae56ffdb35217294af3
b57d24c41509a175a89734934a72c1fb86dcd18a
'2015-06-09T00:28:48-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:07-04:00'
virus check
'4307' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile379' 'sip-files00048.txt'
43baed3be5512de7ddab62289140bdd7
20cc3688ccb76af97466446cadff684d559db059
describe
virus check
'103659' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile38' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
a4a08b82bcf5d411dbe5ab8502067fae
74b3680cb4cb504a85207bc8942ff901bb5fdba0
describe
virus check
'4763' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile380' 'sip-files00049.txt'
0c188ff106b533637f1c269c3b5c3406
09e826c8eb79fcda99eb25c941644a2a6871046c
describe
virus check
'4616' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile381' 'sip-files00050.txt'
1f52d897d7ec2ca56e43b5f5bb20ceb6
a691c6adc4992796d011f275892d2c8436991f5d
describe
virus check
'4995' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile382' 'sip-files00051.txt'
bdfc042db8021a63391487e4547ed326
8f6e8fef29b824d288b61db2254f9eb5b21615cc
describe
virus check
'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile383' 'sip-files00052.txt'
a2494d86f10e2c7d150994875b61454d
36fd42d40182b43f39ea0bbca26b6d9a82614665
describe
virus check
'1919' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile384' 'sip-files00053.txt'
48892edfb7c83b2ad6ada33827647226
54800d60942b6b142947b1dcf396df820e5dd707
describe
virus check
'2456' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile385' 'sip-files00054.txt'
8eafa6c603754cca043580791c45f441
d395ae55d382968840d9b030d5cdd2b17d6c6d80
describe
virus check
'540' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile386' 'sip-files00055.txt'
fd8bc4aec03bba8b443af8191f947882
dcb74b3faa840a3bb3040a86e3ada39a374d0b7f
describe
virus check
'4314' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile387' 'sip-files00056.txt'
fc42fec652078590249e4a59b6044c88
0a0b8611ac835f64ebc43bb6639aaee2144ec522
describe
virus check
'5443' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile388' 'sip-files00057.txt'
087a5cbc29f05a829723dfa062fac4bd
5c85aa9493e26a61787d444e43005ba3a1fa5d04
'2015-06-09T00:29:25-04:00'
describe
virus check
'5649' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile389' 'sip-files00058.txt'
1d638069b4f90d1ea1e88a1b1207cfe0
94f24cfb509c474fb5858232f6b8b753b4e2c000
describe
virus check
'307234' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile39' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
87a18b60c6392e581a613dc51de0b07d
5306f87d4be22348d2958132b2a41a95cc80974a
describe
virus check
'5488' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile390' 'sip-files00059.txt'
c25fe011568e42c9b93d6e157e447680
bb41a7a3c72551cf043dff0025ae751e8dd09937
describe
virus check
'4664' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile391' 'sip-files00060.txt'
6e58e6ddec8abc8e267f2b414f432b69
0f6e76a08830bf74bfc7912cf00072c2e18a614e
describe
virus check
'76' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile392' 'sip-files00062.txt'
1a4f462276a4a436821283420e6dbb17
9e52502b002a97aada3c42d41d134ec5551369ce
describe
virus check
'2788' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile393' 'sip-files00063.txt'
fce8d1a4d5dc44d51bdfacf876dffb3d
9441605ed27f098d3533d9315b95abd275791b33
describe
virus check
'2433' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile394' 'sip-files00064.txt'
d480554d3311044eba2c91fa9ca6a1de
d882b72f3d6f8e6dce8fd56a1d8b15abe58afb85
describe
virus check
'4392' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile395' 'sip-files00065.txt'
47a151a3eb0fadfd1c8cc53ffd194522
3f1f2a326c09c4ac3a69cc8023987f29fcdbacf3
describe
virus check
'3679' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile396' 'sip-files00066.txt'
bf66cadeba0645fa340d3ab3dd28ba32
4d8f03ef48c0a12b36a1c3a384453aafeb33526a
describe
virus check
'4415' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile397' 'sip-files00067.txt'
1302adaa386e8d8eabed67bbebd4da33
876ccec332de8478b85e950e2678dfd4701c3d47
'2015-06-09T00:27:45-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:03-04:00'
virus check
'3030' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile398' 'sip-files00068.txt'
9fc1834a5dd1e6acafed4ab603519c88
c67087eed3b3fbb7dc5a980faf95d2a8019c0fb9
describe
virus check
'4099' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile399' 'sip-files00069.txt'
576c7b18240e9a9753dc5198c9f98914
5b9bdfc103d7f73ffe1e2c325bf3f2067a0b6ba2
describe
virus check
'28447' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile4' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
7617538253b02c088cb8dd5d92116f8a
6e6681c8fece16a626114cc038a7ff9169d31916
describe
virus check
'98943' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile40' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
bdfa0cb3223f6ffdefe3732c1d04906d
9f79a13764ffef1a3ff7b39282883862bc4024fa
describe
virus check
'1231' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile400' 'sip-files00070.txt'
9902817f133a44d8826dc564b8bbf3f6
3b220e6b9311d0cb14caabc1be0fb05c551e7c95
describe
virus check
'3653' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile401' 'sip-files00071.txt'
9b69eb7d12bf557c1efb3b0940a08898
fcbb3ef8dc6d3ab7c11e115c2234b8d6053f344d
'2015-06-09T00:28:29-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:51-04:00'
virus check
'2934' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile402' 'sip-files00072.txt'
56bef3a01fb30e47f75193a80ee6cdac
5ee94a98308f22c072de537b4c14a9c499c48d51
describe
virus check
'3467' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile403' 'sip-files00073.txt'
a8c20c5cb32bdee9c42399b4c552e646
63f9d1b2174b2c173316f0356f61947fd4c6c132
describe
virus check
'2191' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile404' 'sip-files00074.txt'
37698ec3e8bc3250b34f44c18685e037
1ebb5265f9d352d9ce9add72a110b98ea14ce4ce
describe
virus check
'4561' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile405' 'sip-files00075.txt'
1b994961130099f84f367dfe56be2e27
735241cec467ebb1c0f6b585cd8ffeffe13fb63f
describe
virus check
'3269' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile406' 'sip-files00076.txt'
aa45ee1667b8481c4b754b795d228433
ea65b9a723feeae2f3399783c214da812d7a7e4e
describe
virus check
'4903' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile407' 'sip-files00077.txt'
d5bfa8fbaaa99878f1350c7e4432dc02
520e23ccab848ea5bda8b1a2ea5b64294d6e79b3
'2015-06-09T00:27:48-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:06-04:00'
virus check
'2053' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile408' 'sip-files00078.txt'
e7fa8e199788743f65e899b0c4af0603
07efd000a0c13a1bc033faa861293650d6e3bbd9
describe
virus check
'4824' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile409' 'sip-files00079.txt'
a2107e24a823d7851d0f660eea12ad8a
031142a19311797e880c11b9b07a898f9712d118
describe
virus check
'282933' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile41' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
f7466df0cdb5c9492ab8f143d7dc0774
0cdb7d9ce5a6372ed88e68cbf8a365570bfa0c18
describe
virus check
'2302' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile410' 'sip-files00080.txt'
499eb1671a2764d0bc389572497e66ee
027bfff84610e05de3655fd3a0df807519aa0292
describe
virus check
'1228' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile411' 'sip-files00081.txt'
4a98d3535d46d97b6281ac6cbdd024aa
4e54109ca15acd5f61ac4fddd4dcb3b7590d8f73
describe
virus check
'1004' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile412' 'sip-files00082.txt'
2c83ce7db857ebbfbb044957626d5384
d963b66d02fde668667d084b7ee1fba232b48126
describe
Invalid character
virus check
Invalid character
Invalid character
'4613' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile413' 'sip-files00083.txt'
8f2510b821d1058cd12836e7cd388cf1
847ab22a22b9727cf6d6ab26fb6299a7dcdcbd93
describe
virus check
'340' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile414' 'sip-files00084.txt'
12176de24ba2c28b93f73a0ea6da60fd
9c57c4b31cdea6b60117b33d9f310891b82e8247
describe
virus check
'1615' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile415' 'sip-files00085.txt'
d69c1a98a27c3ecfad17591df59bb0de
c9baca14c8fde32c52c8028c6c7f2ed782d850f4
describe
Invalid character
virus check
Invalid character
Invalid character
'541' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile416' 'sip-files00086.txt'
46cfbb5f32a350220cd12e17431cac96
e878c57341ec6f0134626c2e6cd7039a3674f11b
describe
virus check
'903' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile417' 'sip-files00087.txt'
2d8d7cbfd1453bdede8c3d0c777f09ec
21aeab43e2e7682dd0d8049ddcfa65fbbb8d96ab
describe
Invalid character
virus check
Invalid character
Invalid character
'435' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile418' 'sip-files00088.txt'
9dd36b7fcc656d554b7521cffeb9ac1a
e3f66bff2437ceb5fab63126c0d5ca0a91a6bdad
describe
Invalid character
virus check
Invalid character
Invalid character
'1077' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile419' 'sip-files00089.txt'
4244ac99638595e9a6fe53467ab832f9
a645c65e556d080338719424bb3a93b47fdf3a03
describe
Invalid character
virus check
Invalid character
Invalid character
'85710' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile42' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
642d5b177bd28bed24fac8dbfe2d1919
e3e6c1781b6986417c2612090fb49e541e365ea5
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:39-04:00'
virus check
'611' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile420' 'sip-files00090.txt'
bdb8c4792dba84daba7d654f3a32f846
d0ef470d00edbbfe8347f38230c7b3d7d3db06f8
'2015-06-09T00:27:49-04:00'
describe
virus check
'494' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile421' 'sip-files00091.txt'
68e6708b8ba3a270f260b56d6999cfe4
7efb0b481d9ba12d6fd594fa5f626929d2fa27ba
describe
Invalid character
virus check
Invalid character
Invalid character
'1053' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile422' 'sip-files00092.txt'
ac05aa12a3d3ed09fb2c6a91f8148fd8
8deca8080c0af6524269cac11f0aa9c972d4ea9f
describe
virus check
'569' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile423' 'sip-files00093.txt'
2b47836ae5f61765bd7daa1214838289
dd38d58e5f74e2060b91446878ef83d84dad7f37
describe
Invalid character
virus check
Invalid character
Invalid character
'454' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile424' 'sip-files00094.txt'
03b4eff8127059c234bdc61e62780f7a
9a69830053d011a14afca64017b29caff05558be
describe
virus check
'3877' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile425' 'sip-files00095.txt'
fd96ad734f88fd402bad9c10d11e2edb
c16c4307cadb7cee464d74e835ae9f97dd22bfe1
describe
Invalid character
virus check
Invalid character
Invalid character
'350' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile426' 'sip-files00096.txt'
8d8612af52aefd05d0a6bcec397f6e86
081b2b8389fc11d62b01122ec65380435a89894d
describe
virus check
'4840' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile427' 'sip-files00097.txt'
bbcb912dbf8bed1049b3863d9ef5557d
1b21e08aa24f1e743ec18d6825e4d56e63535910
describe
Invalid character
virus check
Invalid character
Invalid character
'493' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile428' 'sip-files00098.txt'
b8f4dd1803dd242492bd1081002e4068
b9170a6e085ae773efaf94c44feefbc3e1bf3e1e
describe
Invalid character
virus check
Invalid character
Invalid character
'978' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile429' 'sip-files00099.txt'
e6802c33a987806fd0144ef96c26824d
719bdb2be56723a8521071506c7d2f226315848c
'2015-06-09T00:29:21-04:00'
describe
virus check
'274315' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile43' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
d033777995e10f5a7c523305c9dc8b85
eb7a52d7cdbdbb2b7e709f49d402faebfb18edb3
describe
virus check
'474' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile430' 'sip-files00100.txt'
791aa5c40cb2aeb65bbcdb19eeb900f8
0223cdd19aec530058e232e79d4fae7efc08361e
describe
virus check
'889' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile431' 'sip-files00101.txt'
2842adddc98ee595fca35b798817c0f7
1800154ca50b73ccad8d8857eacc2e56980159a5
describe
Invalid character
virus check
Invalid character
Invalid character
'883' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile432' 'sip-files00102.txt'
f00f66ab3588d6e3801ad089a92bb8f9
c67b52daeddc0175fae3c2c07df58beab270d026
describe
virus check
'499' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile433' 'sip-files00103.txt'
cd011aa7c0e4a543936e0fb547188149
6bc11a4f3e7453b8398f7953e8736db51e10233f
describe
Invalid character
virus check
Invalid character
Invalid character
'353' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile434' 'sip-files00104.txt'
20b45c058b3a32270a7996fd4d7d5a0f
2f2ee823eba5e8331e832dc3f5eecbe88d55681b
describe
Invalid character
virus check
Invalid character
Invalid character
'2197' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile435' 'sip-files00105.txt'
9001ebfca8b1d1519ed07259bc99d623
ae8ca773196d173978be6be5a92678ffdd032839
describe
Invalid character
virus check
Invalid character
Invalid character
'477' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile436' 'sip-files00106.txt'
631d44bc6fcc48ab825d191b7dd214ba
bd484d171ddbf21e7eb0f05a88b613e8b5209282
describe
virus check
'442' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile437' 'sip-files00107.txt'
dcb60d6e98c7afa75a1b8d23d2e405c2
26174e9665c6b61f0197ebf827352cb8f65a2cc7
describe
virus check
'1326' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile438' 'sip-files00108.txt'
7eaacec2227d7ef511332f8b9aea1f73
86acf96be648aaaa24b4af3793364844d182d790
describe
Invalid character
virus check
Invalid character
Invalid character
'247' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile439' 'sip-files00109.txt'
f7cc201e9a3bd2b14fece887844fae17
6f3148d7e6c895867248adfa87414e9892b9802c
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:53-04:00'
virus check
'87888' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile44' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
005f6a57dec07d876d29ebc40e7dd01d
e339d10cb7af8157de64a07dbd7439f14801a71c
describe
virus check
'591' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile440' 'sip-files00110.txt'
acee098b9897e7a48aa57dcf919c88da
6a49a6b5ad9582df986e2146862188917bde0356
describe
virus check
'397' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile441' 'sip-files00111.txt'
80b136a3c929702a1ecc8f9426b5e07c
aaac1e2893b1a9c0f76860bdebf0ee6252e54e8a
describe
Invalid character
virus check
Invalid character
Invalid character
'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile442' 'sip-files00112.txt'
d0b0897d55cac6156a05279e2260ab1b
6a72814f0bd696ff1fab010960311b949c03bbe0
describe
Invalid character
virus check
Invalid character
Invalid character
'696' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile443' 'sip-files00113.txt'
569412cd119afc2c748a03695fdeab1e
683e9aa0375313cf9b152194194c278ff6ade5bb
describe
Invalid character
virus check
Invalid character
Invalid character
'8918564' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile444' 'sip-files00000.tif'
bfdd1af0fd7202cb6a5ee99e7749fc7f
92d96322833d56707280020d613c1acd9ef76b42
describe
virus check
'1027316' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile445' 'sip-files00002.tif'
d5b7b6788fca7fdb8ec8b7ca1b42f040
d0d998d94a35aa41f185c93ba944bf001dcee043
describe
virus check
'1024452' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile446' 'sip-files00003.tif'
dad64299f1072302e284d8ab457c35e1
939f5b587005b57cae9d1eced2daebe164d00d61
describe
virus check
'1030628' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile447' 'sip-files00004.tif'
44dc462a83a17fbe7281de7ab69090b5
60113114f97b8dd5994efdf18d1d016c19bfcddf
describe
virus check
'1023824' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile448' 'sip-files00005.tif'
61feff1c85485d3ab0f83969b781c913
5cb75d35413cac4c2401d5d54cefef237b04d04e
describe
virus check
'1028876' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile449' 'sip-files00006.tif'
36fc0f0ab6b0a0fe4d7168bc4ae3751f
ff04763c3448a97f53573fb09d7c9c38412d8a34
describe
virus check
'345609' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile45' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
b2903a07d30a4e5315ba1395e3b64edb
76707474f7207690a999a4d9a4ef041a943ae2c4
describe
virus check
'1020836' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile450' 'sip-files00007.tif'
439fe698a4536684d282eb5bd8db71d0
ae4b2b6eee3a251891c1a22e3172c5662a9abb83
describe
virus check
'1032132' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile451' 'sip-files00008.tif'
78740dc6bd01f310737bc65cdf85f00d
94eff621d0e8e9b9f03757b6779dcbb59989df2b
describe
virus check
'1039568' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile452' 'sip-files00010.tif'
9eb3df29392219fa693d046172cddfd7
7cb2b67fb021babfb10aeca7484c25cc964b374a
describe
virus check
'1032560' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile453' 'sip-files00011.tif'
92a1704cdc5b3dc86db4ee5f47a370b2
8ea06b3f4dcf4de714d8499f47abe0ec782f1a58
'2015-06-09T00:27:09-04:00'
describe
virus check
'1065032' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile454' 'sip-files00012.tif'
b317edb6f0f43a58ced5b86d28125c70
256f2b53379a74d46f347abedecc7d9ab7dd2ff3
describe
virus check
'1062676' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile455' 'sip-files00013.tif'
9fb9166aaf95160c0254d0b5eb7dbf3b
b22d4549a8cf3d89be0372943e1ea1dfb4afd03c
describe
virus check
'1064104' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile456' 'sip-files00014.tif'
1d16b3144b8ac22671151c21ccc39c89
060f84f4509b55d575d99cff88bfded0d3687f33
describe
virus check
'8331476' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile457' 'sip-files00015.tif'
3ac85d1c96ffe541964b810097e93e69
c9d61625a1615909b430c101c58675a8a0467705
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:48-04:00'
virus check
'1053804' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile458' 'sip-files00016.tif'
a14979cea82575329482606b4bb6b295
0150d4a1813aa136c2dfd35b7f291d98c64674cc
describe
virus check
'8049088' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile459' 'sip-files00017.tif'
b923fbdc5429cf656badeb499ef7d864
1a5a0d38bbcbd76da9190526b4c17b93c87708ba
describe
virus check
'113543' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile46' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
59d0fd189fb807508194391280a9b95a
eaf79c072f344560ac883363fa56a1802b8e3cc8
describe
virus check
'1057580' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile460' 'sip-files00018.tif'
2d9f060679e84cf2f62b8602afba6539
78450f2efd2c9d8d94e5e2fdb8c2063e3a840cef
describe
virus check
'8076856' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile461' 'sip-files00019.tif'
426a68511d31170959564a3927603b12
2f2805e9647b17ec348f970154c8bb948cb6e0fa
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:08-04:00'
virus check
'8207476' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile462' 'sip-files00020.tif'
6a6d2f5e642173217705d0a38d12003a
848c48f7df59b62ad630d1c29f7b64883ad2cb7d
describe
virus check
'7994416' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile463' 'sip-files00021.tif'
9f728c0adaa3d82ea952b9a591674c07
10c85e14d13888b4237f170fc670f701d2d6e4d5
describe
virus check
'8188512' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile464' 'sip-files00022.tif'
e78c624459ee115a134d6520ed648b47
d7ba310675b5ced4ecd4afa781ca1d47efacb362
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:37-04:00'
virus check
'8220096' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile465' 'sip-files00023.tif'
cb28994d12474b2403b3ad4c8dea2ecd
8bf18cef58d1c32c0db00c8803bd815f688b044a
describe
virus check
'1063936' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile466' 'sip-files00024.tif'
83b15d790766fded693795ab8eb6b81c
7bdc33de97a48af671d91c2cb3fb7a85f60bbd8b
describe
virus check
'8214892' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile467' 'sip-files00025.tif'
e102ee23f3334310503b3b390fb980b4
c4200331c1600e41f21e092ce2336cf8d58e117e
describe
virus check
'1078336' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile468' 'sip-files00026.tif'
b66abe3192ff49d30c74305d52f37b36
e504a4b2edb8077186902d16c49397847402588d
describe
virus check
'1061984' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile469' 'sip-files00027.tif'
08e583e570f0b0f13188a5b196c5129b
289033ce3d268129ff632761fb4076743fad4565
describe
virus check
'278274' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile47' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
5b0fcfaf8382b1cbb78e32a98dc7381a
65b0a31b2bf959dffa5c315b959c767671102aa6
describe
virus check
'8181596' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile470' 'sip-files00028.tif'
f8a8eabd60235c8d8b4d989d51bfa25f
9010d4e2c4b78504e82339da41604496c8f71fdf
describe
virus check
'8150248' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile471' 'sip-files00029.tif'
333b6e288211fbc522e544643c08e377
87a9e447393a53dd20efafc7da9b21f25adea067
describe
virus check
'1034764' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile472' 'sip-files00030.tif'
7be089dd00d3be2bb228862b8abea6af
9d9118dedfbc16a849e95d2d02c29ae8286e91c2
describe
virus check
'1054896' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile473' 'sip-files00031.tif'
16c985570ec9f009c59817d71dbe91cf
23d91862bd071cd19fae69252895f74ac73ff5a2
'2015-06-09T00:28:54-04:00'
describe
virus check
'1060808' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile474' 'sip-files00032.tif'
54d10d52a50752196fe443803dc1568e
35548303a1a245189720006427435a712106d5d9
describe
virus check
'1061892' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile475' 'sip-files00033.tif'
f55c48df3817e5fffebae6e5d7630794
05fb50ecfcb9e5479f44fd8fc1e39a0e784be282
describe
virus check
'1057684' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile476' 'sip-files00034.tif'
b01dab5645c06087feaebd6c413c9037
90b33be2f25978fbc68b44103205cf990fb99a9b
describe
virus check
'1081072' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile477' 'sip-files00035.tif'
ac35985b5b3d15289b9e955ccad378e4
d92517d9b0d0e07c7b8acc1b0cebd3e659d4879a
describe
virus check
'1063344' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile478' 'sip-files00036.tif'
15e3191362fb3a425be48d1e3f1b3451
a4e2b072fe59c07157e91596d4d1b72d254fab96
describe
virus check
'8196848' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile479' 'sip-files00037.tif'
ce0bf1606c5c4188605c2ed24b8b83aa
d09952c56894037ca0ff3f750599a888e7eb366b
describe
virus check
'89480' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile48' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
2ca8cd308a714fa5a47dccecdbe7e8d6
ad8ce5c7b41309d79b5227d61cbef6830ea952c7
describe
virus check
'1065960' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile480' 'sip-files00038.tif'
0da56e1260d0ffe0f644a2c3df13e0b2
73129df355c6152580e314c535a5c5de71501fc0
describe
virus check
'8215664' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile481' 'sip-files00039.tif'
c5767a8401da4d590e898789afa525e5
c2f5c0a5072686c7363ace5d10456b75ea0e34f5
describe
virus check
'1061952' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile482' 'sip-files00040.tif'
c67bcfc95f7d5c895c3d4b10b42d9598
70f878df8c090dd641b13014a218158833f0e605
describe
virus check
'8110532' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile483' 'sip-files00041.tif'
ad6f73f8bad7c10ef168cde2ed8ad393
20c7a8410902c8d37d560fa2acff6e7128ac5ca9
describe
virus check
'1047776' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile484' 'sip-files00042.tif'
78d5a4d224817086a72d81521f2ab24e
0c613ffadec9ca12ac386d62bba873e1bd62c086
describe
virus check
'1063804' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile485' 'sip-files00043.tif'
6435dc5a58c414a39e82d22bcbd20772
f91bd4e3e9816b7aad181635f591926df5095cd1
describe
virus check
'1064608' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile486' 'sip-files00044.tif'
2c2e259216b4277450e3210eb39862b7
1be840f00f2c3d74864912d66df38c2132e95dc9
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:37-04:00'
virus check
'1051440' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile487' 'sip-files00045.tif'
1dde18d16ba5de62c059a8717b37ebf6
d40a0195021098edc6fd5233931680e11e9b0891
describe
virus check
'1054308' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile488' 'sip-files00046.tif'
614f4c19f3866558866fef09dff871b8
084c25423c952fd4bf29e1245f9498d78c9eee26
describe
virus check
'1076728' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile489' 'sip-files00047.tif'
21b8a9d3948e94e8fcea7d18bd83820a
a9790a4f5ee57216a9c24ca8f8b61571be693111
describe
virus check
'318518' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile49' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
2a99f82ccdddf8daf44e92758f91da58
0410f55dbc5002592e56a40092aca2a3a7c56409
describe
virus check
'1062100' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile490' 'sip-files00048.tif'
eac06506a82e0ece25e3badf94a89b48
73af6c49cd5e2c71ab50e784c2c732d7fad9550d
describe
virus check
'1051188' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile491' 'sip-files00049.tif'
bcde65d34f6063ee333b2c9b6a024e91
fea05becd4d196675163e26a030c379f2175b5dd
describe
virus check
'1062448' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile492' 'sip-files00050.tif'
87df5b8752a1017ca99242db72c025f6
bed55d197fafccc09a608071b0ba4723c17112a0
describe
virus check
'1102872' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile493' 'sip-files00051.tif'
cd7a7df1a9b4e7044103a98fc3551643
2f0a5ac6b04638b84d0f845556debb15869cc39f
describe
virus check
'1047916' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile494' 'sip-files00052.tif'
6d732b175f481f13d6fecaccce7fe6e1
a4facd56e1a2b472d227b9addfb3da463b98d7ca
describe
virus check
'1075540' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile495' 'sip-files00053.tif'
05ed3fd93007c2276b98dfedb4e01d4e
e72717fd7285989fdfae242ca2c2c6b6f5f64e85
describe
virus check
'1047280' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile496' 'sip-files00054.tif'
19d30a211c8f27d2e2c878d55c3a0eae
79eea1ccfbed389827bdc8e13a4b8e5c84825a50
describe
virus check
'1068664' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile497' 'sip-files00055.tif'
0d6dd9b83fb90e82ce8fdeb181c27cbf
8da33fbf90b9e1a525c07b4e63f8d6471012ee19
describe
virus check
'1061212' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile498' 'sip-files00056.tif'
8506259f3728d4efc01e4b3145086d86
1aa2f0d9949001092e3bc5f51efbbab71ef0451a
describe
virus check
'1087028' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile499' 'sip-files00057.tif'
aa7da48f105de76616b23dffa7a5d015
0a9f7111bbc367002eb9860f547cf224e145db83
describe
virus check
'113893' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile5' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
4b0a817d49033a15cf85bb44cdc64f9e
9732bbe52ffc82f5e7a258fce29c3cfedd52a053
describe
virus check
'110362' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile50' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
3de091ba3f632485135b9ead41d3a55b
7549d551135c77129bb53ef50863d75617538ac7
describe
virus check
'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile500' 'sip-files00058.tif'
583529c3763291b7f5cb997e6ed07af9
4afd4ea1f2dafaa3f92274c4257c6ceca583512f
describe
virus check
'1080992' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile501' 'sip-files00059.tif'
fdd0d2e506b6a7002f911fa8d0d66e07
7b2f7113be4179686e2b283f319f4b45f79a02b2
describe
virus check
'1054920' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile502' 'sip-files00060.tif'
28c71de095bfebac938c70aa0a426d37
714549c0e29948831f87263eb54210c8d28627e2
describe
virus check
'1060624' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile503' 'sip-files00061.tif'
0680163b3246a54ac80e5fdf476d1375
e9d848f2e22016ae11899ba117d2cb2c6cbfd143
describe
virus check
'1054964' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile504' 'sip-files00062.tif'
018f2e687cf75e9ddbb0e9e06fbcaade
bb860fc42aebc8012d6a8dd6a8e05cf6c01cfe5c
describe
virus check
'1085448' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile505' 'sip-files00063.tif'
31ab96acbb55f62efd652177d29a566f
96f1095f90e0a29a85fd4d8cf918d3dc993c696f
describe
virus check
'1061456' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile506' 'sip-files00064.tif'
b5ab9e4f60abd2489cb645d0cd0e1cc2
af9736672a3f2173295955feb6d13791c61b4c8e
describe
virus check
'1069652' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile507' 'sip-files00065.tif'
3f856b3cc13e4a09b340d90034ac158e
c9e2f654a45b2ffb43a9b75acb6adf24618579ae
describe
virus check
'1046448' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile508' 'sip-files00066.tif'
28a8ee8d165da4a6652aad76f3207049
40c7b4a7f55b5a2d509ca31357a0996829d70392
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:59-04:00'
virus check
'1109012' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile509' 'sip-files00067.tif'
ee1927cf958dfebb7a798a922d633fd3
02e93dbc902441825a92d96429fc9b84cfafd147
'2015-06-09T00:29:15-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:33-04:00'
virus check
'307056' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile51' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
754880281badf1fffb914e990ffb231e
c4439e0c646dd5b89bd65e46f4fe2c0aeedb1730
describe
virus check
'1034536' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile510' 'sip-files00068.tif'
5d9c49a6e5b260d783afeed5f521331a
f7385ba47759cfc9acc9657b07f5a7df3a83471b
describe
virus check
'1083696' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile511' 'sip-files00069.tif'
026e92ac916bdc8ab004810ac14d30e4
5bee449c91f306634747353aab805848815ce333
describe
virus check
'1022688' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile512' 'sip-files00070.tif'
bca9b9066f57ef431e48c22bbbe85b26
9b1342c7328b428ba23123b8d471f70d58a3c804
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:16-04:00'
virus check
'1093124' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile513' 'sip-files00071.tif'
a843f8ee120caecb385ab03f403f373f
ed786e7ec1e42999f847edc317d6e3c9823f31cf
describe
virus check
'1030960' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile514' 'sip-files00072.tif'
eb88697c80050b46e7063eaa32e4df58
3e21bb8d09e64698ee4395e45faef9763ed6f608
'2015-06-09T00:27:56-04:00'
describe
virus check
'1091108' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile515' 'sip-files00073.tif'
2d5feab63343f73e777d2b4792978ec9
6aa293f05bb4463fdb274f939e4b03cfe709bfe7
describe
virus check
'1027336' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile516' 'sip-files00074.tif'
e35ca2211f13cf62d92d331733e9c389
d87afb8eeb0c1026155f460543894f307105971c
describe
virus check
'1073732' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile517' 'sip-files00075.tif'
88211a617faaefa63d66a010a8bd74f9
a297d7e48d9b6d667956c1d3cb73434a17869a44
describe
virus check
'1063856' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile518' 'sip-files00076.tif'
a474918f711d9494ff2edb41003332ab
02b9d1a0e4d4f3c8ec7706a00b0018d08dc7a93b
describe
virus check
'1078328' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile519' 'sip-files00077.tif'
5d3e04abd37d890c9e6a53d49155eca6
481f58179ae1ddbbd28f908318f05f48b69e7bc9
describe
virus check
'105062' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile52' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
3af047bc6a9fe6c851cf6d0ec621bb6e
13c8ba47222f752cacbe6e688a19cd817cf0988c
describe
virus check
'1046420' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile520' 'sip-files00078.tif'
78c84e2aa31d3a6fad602f552cf494f4
5a921022d0a6aedd216f8360dc11c8ff9369aeec
describe
virus check
'1080640' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile521' 'sip-files00079.tif'
0d2a3ee71628374289148ab0fc7cf6e2
805d7bb05eece478e6aaa325a4920358083b6ab4
describe
virus check
'1064728' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile522' 'sip-files00080.tif'
042ae32b68f0a3bd161f38983a2da433
f6a842b1f8fb3187d02d5e7e45cc46f6b05d43df
describe
virus check
'1068160' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile523' 'sip-files00081.tif'
a1d2fd19e22b1c5098d4ce5724e11711
b8689601c9ab50e902b96e497d61e4b854adefb6
describe
virus check
'81041936' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile524' 'sip-files00082.tif'
52a87de31b600b8bfcb14eef5414a39b
21ca539d29cf8fbc9906d5a8d991874011766d9e
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:22-04:00'
virus check
'17241480' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile525' 'sip-files00083.tif'
2f92b1d347628e5cf75ac63cf9c22e3f
38177af6b89121603bd212f7e453723f07e348bb
'2015-06-09T00:29:26-04:00'
describe
virus check
'16766324' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile526' 'sip-files00084.tif'
3e8ebb7726756b2ca63dc089c6b92df8
51d70735d7b73c3427de292ebc97693bd7a7e3a2
describe
virus check
'16758148' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile527' 'sip-files00085.tif'
346715c1545600e5e926af069b8c8139
e00b9b8c9b6ef5bcdb854235821ec3c773c55100
describe
virus check
'16938496' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile528' 'sip-files00086.tif'
4b0c4482521a4cbe80cd85e044645921
b906bced75eb146b45c33dbc0c084fab675df58d
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:09-04:00'
virus check
'16971208' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile529' 'sip-files00087.tif'
22d495af46d967371680030737c50212
35883182236e668af135d6411f10600feed46ccf
describe
virus check
'285347' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile53' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
e982b390d2d90f3e19016c581d1a2faf
cd4981cf274a01b56795a4c731c7ab4bd1ca307b
describe
virus check
'16915416' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile530' 'sip-files00088.tif'
bacfadb15937abe5ae87141f079e30f2
c469c2c56760dba144d5d7dae2e3c336232c428c
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:43-04:00'
virus check
'16779808' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile531' 'sip-files00089.tif'
8119ae0a9922b8fc0e6de571f5238c97
c823baa6521fe8bca10c4e7be46327e6f0348e76
describe
virus check
'16732808' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile532' 'sip-files00090.tif'
993617cf745b3ea8373269c91288944f
3c81f6a17d16cdec3d95f72c468a0a0aed0f5dc0
describe
virus check
'16668548' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile533' 'sip-files00091.tif'
f1cb3e82894c589f40bdaa7c8af22719
9cd39de6176e2dea0a029ece1cbd6c19249d1180
describe
virus check
'16743720' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile534' 'sip-files00092.tif'
70aa2b0b69147c1d0b3588d7c79b53b2
a470b8067b2f691006e2cb9a75f40fa7ae194a44
'2015-06-09T00:27:52-04:00'
describe
virus check
'16758180' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile535' 'sip-files00093.tif'
67f6a5b891bdfa1d15289270439ce3a5
5f96ffae1803b25fc5e75f872d8277bdedbdd0d3
describe
virus check
'16710408' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile536' 'sip-files00094.tif'
e85ac0e15aa757330a6ee07c524dc0a6
840d8870ed9af19ec1490e13b23562a6bf5edc2a
describe
virus check
'16737376' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile537' 'sip-files00095.tif'
27414aa549d25207eb9fe89382ecd982
59dd18c2fc8d0d02b0ad4638aff0d0f142710be8
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:43-04:00'
virus check
'16832012' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile538' 'sip-files00096.tif'
725603a6a3a3c594e5dfef59d9a96a21
0c260979c3dd0331d7bd23db910c74bf3876d971
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:34-04:00'
virus check
'16782276' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile539' 'sip-files00097.tif'
c9def2554b21b6690b6a6233cf82cedd
b5bde6af3954b82bf74bd75f59bf97214453a184
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:30-04:00'
virus check
'88157' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile54' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
cc85dc5870fae523ca40c2caf218a513
5b1772d7de7fc71bca463d08ea6efc023871470d
describe
virus check
'16855892' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile540' 'sip-files00098.tif'
7fb4ffe4aebc7918812eaa92fdacd26f
1ab181fb3cb3c9e67cc9ef0702eb7eaf19f34d08
describe
virus check
'16759600' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile541' 'sip-files00099.tif'
06539be02b770e9b3c816faf6d65e450
fb93e7fcb484095ad6e0037c63d203c33fcf128a
'2015-06-09T00:28:35-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:56-04:00'
virus check
'16716608' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile542' 'sip-files00100.tif'
48cab9dfd11799c9faaa3e7b0da94542
271336bf97edf62094bb7b6deea7b54da142e8d3
describe
virus check
'16674616' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile543' 'sip-files00101.tif'
1cc3253794799d9c224314145c90fdd7
5a3eedfce326be4502d5c19034ef3babe48a7c38
describe
virus check
'16684660' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile544' 'sip-files00102.tif'
29d0f28e69cbb262a3d12ec8c6c46de3
a99b5353e7e620e00ec0d3fcccd041c4bc6030fc
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:17-04:00'
virus check
'16681152' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile545' 'sip-files00103.tif'
40edcb84d0a3d77086ca8ebff3c28bef
05359d24a552a22777ed31b6e45b496e40e7ee05
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:31-04:00'
virus check
'16721708' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile546' 'sip-files00104.tif'
3150a2872aa7801200166487f66fa8ba
bcc2912ce4fadbc3611ed97bfb276fd523d991e8
'2015-06-09T00:27:11-04:00'
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:39-04:00'
virus check
'16706508' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile547' 'sip-files00105.tif'
de986bfffcd06dff4b4b0346044b51c4
de3e3c3ca7829fcb3f8a8ab4a89992b474bf50d9
describe
virus check
'16691136' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile548' 'sip-files00106.tif'
578aede00662bfc04123948368183f9a
7f5dce87ea13048abb3473349535f72db03caa59
describe
virus check
'16703256' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile549' 'sip-files00107.tif'
0cc62f1d0124eaf9a1bd42a138272ef6
4e79cc025721b390585f44242e10640b066b6bf5
describe
'2015-06-09T00:24:47-04:00'
virus check
'330362' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile55' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
db05340da137b51a37352f9d3462eca8
928f541dbb6d2349e9ac6229a66e00c09942a6d1
describe
virus check
'17062352' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile550' 'sip-files00108.tif'
01c71bbe88eac8d8fab0907ddc4f7a33
1dbef04022e4e8082ac5e4269f4ae9d29a395cf7
describe
virus check
'16747308' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile551' 'sip-files00109.tif'
ddaf94a973842533bac5d567fef791de
25d414253d2d3960808da6e2f0153882204573f7
describe
virus check
'17094748' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile552' 'sip-files00110.tif'
c575ef81b6e1cbbd88d5a07b405669d5
efb973ef58b2af639989990d37f0021309eec284
describe
virus check
'16935708' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile553' 'sip-files00111.tif'
bb083ee15dafbbb7bf1fcd5384aca04d
ecdc193c3a38ab2e31df51d934305ac1d7160e49
describe
'2015-06-09T00:25:45-04:00'
virus check
'17187904' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile554' 'sip-files00112.tif'
ab04a10918f9e6bfb3160cbfe6b33eb7
cb2ca297d6f84b189dd86ee6bd79f1fb7e0aee68
describe
virus check
'17355512' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile555' 'sip-files00113.tif'
eb9f784cd229da37aaad1a03399acb7b
27cc76cbb2fef2440549b4f60a2a7ad425a3652c
describe
virus check
'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile556' 'sip-files00009.tif'
04087563c04d66272539ec233bde3ba8
6b5198fabb2d2a63aceccafb83f776e71506cb4d
describe
virus check
'8387024' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile557' 'sip-files00001.tif'
d6cb2b990797a40e7da85d95dbbefa16
6d4371a51eb2ecc8e660585ce0708995d079420b
describe
virus check
'10179' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile558' 'sip-files00000.pro'
bc606a63e8dbfce1c03dc6e87bbfb476
96e65773fc3503efaa43a8f9496ab11df84ddfcc
describe
virus check
'22008' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile559' 'sip-files00002.pro'
3c5d952c2379cffb734e6290227c07de
4e0a5b1c7706f0d447bf899296c95292b2a6bf32
describe
virus check
'100021' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile56' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
2debc816b59d8febd765fecec3ea5cf7
8f3c83b282dcc5c2514b62edd5f850a49e6882b2
describe
virus check
'41900' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile560' 'sip-files00003.pro'
2ff99a476cb547a6e19c2e4781a96802
38780d8991a521fa8280a7920d90a4f7a2a1609e
describe
virus check
'47770' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile561' 'sip-files00004.pro'
8001e8073e8397d514ceadacee5a5d73
0e27007de9849cdd882a97f3f63a2519b17b5e71
describe
virus check
'27518' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile562' 'sip-files00005.pro'
cd9223c1b5ba8f1d3f122b3d1258917f
c9324c4ed2bbda45f1a87e45a9b6772091ac23fb
describe
virus check
'24827' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile563' 'sip-files00006.pro'
1876029d7b61331226e5d959f9effc53
3cba3b76fbf1459c79dfd52ae536d7a1a4d4daf1
describe
virus check
'49165' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile564' 'sip-files00008.pro'
52725cc2e402a47e9bb59419af431bb6
bd8302d5c4d0bfb15c08c1e26e3629459ce54c87
describe
virus check
'57693' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile565' 'sip-files00010.pro'
08c2ac0ddc4a63a22ccc482a525e580f
855ff9be766a910a939e6684c2a4b279146eb048
describe
virus check
'145059' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile566' 'sip-files00011.pro'
964760cef855a943d40f1ded1d512170
1cb6df0977e83fac67684f2d169f53c5849ab84b
describe
virus check
'149882' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile567' 'sip-files00012.pro'
4840b88db679993a94d1af62d30b75ed
d15b84553c31220edfc51bbe3d32a087f055800e
describe
virus check
'142027' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile568' 'sip-files00013.pro'
3f10831ebe8289ac835d998e7c96f21b
46cdde6f6385ac6fc45afc39817823da0b57370f
describe
virus check
'118582' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile569' 'sip-files00014.pro'
4c952a2e633845bd4ecc1c62810fbf24
1834609284432a975f391c7cdf61d0c5d9527741
describe
virus check
'57067' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile57' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
4b12427fc3c1d7f9ab43183367c7c639
bd8b22421fdb9007ac42d4867f52346e9af8f83d
describe
virus check
'40460' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile570' 'sip-files00015.pro'
0de5792e18f7bc885538cb33b05feb1a
7995e8f154e95c4853e7807c08d442b167ae6d79
describe
virus check
'116467' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile571' 'sip-files00016.pro'
f20c8fac2a3f554bcad50bae1992bf76
0d9318d3219f0283c014163964130474d890e413
describe
virus check
'23642' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile572' 'sip-files00017.pro'
7ba93f2533d8fb9509fd076bb19a4cda
18c04bdf81d8f302a2e7d9bf49a3875f0cb14b46
describe
virus check
'123526' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile573' 'sip-files00018.pro'
6e8efd3eb70a24da6ef5065518ac28e9
ad4871bacd1291f7fa6802da3e932c1ff237a7c9
describe
virus check
'30560' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile574' 'sip-files00019.pro'
db5711bcf10388238f150f35d968fd43
613fb01c7fb62419962ff037e8a2e9b633794739
describe
virus check
'15778' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile575' 'sip-files00020.pro'
62813ad3af420c1f399cac6c84bc7462
aea238e88325e0124d78ffc2e0a1920fa23eccd2
describe
virus check
'120217' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile576' 'sip-files00021.pro'
3c7dfc265b791a9c4d3a46232dced10f
a0415c0e8ec8f80a2b18389e3ed828ef31b1b880
describe
virus check
'40309' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile577' 'sip-files00022.pro'
fdd508fdd76b472306e2e6a6d7c46f7a
b719f38f9dc7035bc16dafb493b55b0a12a0e02b
describe
virus check
'74086' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile578' 'sip-files00023.pro'
4ae9c618950d4627231c84a40e985032
c299a922dce941fd31916df4820aee91cd78de44
describe
virus check
'129986' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile579' 'sip-files00024.pro'
f4967560badaaba5bacd7b758a811074
3d4bc8f82cfd69a2e632d4d78ab608886b98d920
describe
virus check
'23002' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile58' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
565607bdfd49ef770cc29b6f307428c1
e7b02986b9fa644c9d643a781601c3b17694a2f3
describe
virus check
'29036' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile580' 'sip-files00025.pro'
8d641297cf319896388e2d1d4fb9bf98
da7c81584858ce982690d78e7e5f6ae7634c341a
describe
virus check
'120010' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile581' 'sip-files00026.pro'
80c37978dde6bb3db701fa89bb9435ed
b73a986c4cd945ca31583a225252ce90782197d9
describe
virus check
'114626' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile582' 'sip-files00027.pro'
8bad406dd25aeb38d680e00842a5d6f3
91976c6490150922d5815f24c7486e6b1cab3264
describe
virus check
'38760' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile583' 'sip-files00028.pro'
eac6c7edd2f59f2a22516ac1eca97060
10fef0f0ca8e69b17fdf3b2ca49dc40b219348f6
describe
virus check
'35542' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile584' 'sip-files00029.pro'
bf6ba33ee98663fda87a15165d82422e
efda4cfc738aef842f20b693864af8b260dce806
describe
virus check
'16536' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile585' 'sip-files00030.pro'
b40222d69b886fde7bd6f510daf7dc74
118e168c74ca886e679e698023532fda570fa307
describe
virus check
'91588' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile586' 'sip-files00032.pro'
5fcf8cc5aabbce12da9bf886145a7185
e8fee384143f602ca6bf1444cbbeb7ffd3c19b5e
describe
virus check
'116481' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile587' 'sip-files00034.pro'
97efce19c28913c61b9162b422b17cc2
84072907c7b04f8d38100df8b5eb34a76024ec3b
describe
virus check
'145760' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile588' 'sip-files00035.pro'
930623a367a1f0e5577a1716d6dbc9ce
99500b63ae0f0243a0c41372118c26fb2ad07f6e
describe
virus check
'146119' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile589' 'sip-files00036.pro'
5b581959a5d232144110a4f8df485982
caa1a16605e8aca10302bab4413de483fac74eb3
describe
virus check
'4921' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile59' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
8bdb213cc7c118bf00eb475dc162cd29
2f89f0e0b88c6d4a6c3a15bd93a3aea64197c151
describe
virus check
'67973' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile590' 'sip-files00037.pro'
3248ebb224c44148fb2f8d865076804c
6f7b164039b6296a20c2accfd94dbe0b7b7b6e1d
describe
virus check
'150323' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile591' 'sip-files00038.pro'
afcdf037f19aa62b31ecaca2fe93937d
035a2104e1019fcf89062092ebee0c31b06a2cf2
describe
virus check
'20136' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile592' 'sip-files00039.pro'
32615d004548190bc7eb6609aed465ab
306367202c867f7de972b6231fb70c3ae261f41b
describe
virus check
'157151' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile593' 'sip-files00040.pro'
2bddd3e4f08bcdd80542a6416b1541e2
cb5a846011fc120a5c55fdc6f774cab4a7867da4
describe
virus check
'47254' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile594' 'sip-files00041.pro'
5099fa925c7e76f0f669774c1536c7ce
a8959538dbd98cdfa6114e59693dc5688e8106b6
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:44-04:00'
virus check
'108696' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile595' 'sip-files00042.pro'
df5c386cbc38dfc9680ca9e7ac72608f
4849e76a83d446389ca27e2e5f9e8704e712ca09
describe
virus check
'120648' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile596' 'sip-files00044.pro'
6f2e0568881a9fd658ef8893bd153ced
704f10d599d6339e5e44ca7a06f03efd055c3504
describe
virus check
'157323' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile597' 'sip-files00045.pro'
377e15af3cca2749f61bfe8b6b04810c
52da58f8456bfaab81f040ed33b2dd28d9d8bfe3
describe
virus check
'153743' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile598' 'sip-files00046.pro'
e4c0d4ac58af61aa4f3e2061213c5aea
3ea2b31b91a9c61baa71b7baf4b1470db4dd57c2
describe
virus check
'58243' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile599' 'sip-files00047.pro'
e9d252dadaaa600ca6e7e923d8d9b430
d6ea30b6f5a4169481b6f747e55723582a98c895
describe
virus check
'36568' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile6' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
469ef1254e0957046462bb67ad5a73db
f6ef9e16e9596b4b7c54b8f9033c9936987f71b7
describe
virus check
'3417' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile60' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
1f6865f161392f5fd319396132eee223
12ea25274a8e08f5c1888302cd11d20a186e1965
describe
virus check
'118991' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile600' 'sip-files00048.pro'
05528828b2d9181f6e5666328296c59a
746fe1fecb7dc067c64681414850b22d03d96bf2
describe
virus check
'125573' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile601' 'sip-files00049.pro'
16c8b1550b4b263599713d2c3cb93a14
1f89eaa39a78047bc9ccdbe822112591e704932a
describe
virus check
'121954' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile602' 'sip-files00050.pro'
5ee4c7ece3bb495a5ec6b10cc1499c4b
d96fcfa125652b910df34ec50c78155bf1783b8f
describe
virus check
'132511' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile603' 'sip-files00051.pro'
7e507deee12433d879cf8fc4b261752d
027ed32643634ec993115cd4ef6af5ac290fe2af
describe
virus check
'126205' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile604' 'sip-files00052.pro'
759d04f3538d6c6f8971e177baea8d84
7668cca9a3bf5b277847e7024844da2152165e23
describe
virus check
'50266' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile605' 'sip-files00053.pro'
4866f4817a2404ca6d27a47ac017fa04
e45d967aa49694606199c92866f6a4693c546888
describe
virus check
'48543' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile606' 'sip-files00054.pro'
817112d989d4cfef0793084f5ed925f0
87d716a04fc4fb80ddf894bca75f1035b8fa8a4e
describe
virus check
'10254' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile607' 'sip-files00055.pro'
c7fc4afe6061c788afa8da8dc99e7527
198426ed73668ffb0b381fae358953b92559eaa9
describe
virus check
'107302' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile608' 'sip-files00056.pro'
8f286da605ab4657d09f721e750bbbd8
8cc56f931deba1b04692c4fa3ee8b58eb638ee98
describe
virus check
'140007' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile609' 'sip-files00057.pro'
7ac3c64d28f59035ce4c2ea53f293af7
cd5db628c4fd9ebe599e4b7d9f00039d63d5d0dc
describe
virus check
'239187' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile61' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
315dc3d2a413d553a9b7a681b5e932df
622973fac88e91b0b3093da8baef725558ec95f2
describe
virus check
'139894' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile610' 'sip-files00058.pro'
db1b548f722dea1244f36b399463ae04
ec212b1b00c7283f9c08e56cf60f92f8c92ea64b
describe
virus check
'137063' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile611' 'sip-files00059.pro'
ed06bdf383b1d9191fdc52ea68e78e9c
748bd836f69356311641b9700374519d63ddf532
describe
virus check
'116450' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile612' 'sip-files00060.pro'
96768de1c281c3fa86388e44718faff0
a5f468859a968aa5591e53c0d27c0148a68d10e2
describe
virus check
'578' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile613' 'sip-files00062.pro'
42a01a7fc73c4632e7eb47e5a9db186b
851f21fbdaa6006b3473f48c4b3b2571d045bd03
describe
virus check
'49433' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile614' 'sip-files00063.pro'
ecbed92ed3d95a5138b6218078e9ba9f
ce89162da5a45872eca839d35a5404ee285dced1
describe
virus check
'53916' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile615' 'sip-files00064.pro'
42dd2d20284304ad8150e33b03d40bea
614f65f771a90c81739d6494ab7f9ca19e26905f
describe
virus check
'63568' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile616' 'sip-files00065.pro'
4b6ebba0683874c7311421b6fb06ac79
96dcb06ceb566afc3c4f984b743cf5836f75544a
describe
virus check
'49362' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile617' 'sip-files00066.pro'
25f67116dbc3236067c0719f62159fb4
d95b4b34258a21a416f8ae0c160a88370a4b53fc
describe
virus check
'84128' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile618' 'sip-files00067.pro'
a62e7873e248ccf5cafe1ed7f2256e9f
e033bcc4eb73a566ca570292d0a3ef5754a14319
describe
virus check
'55472' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile619' 'sip-files00068.pro'
82730f531f7590f774bca0d37290fcc0
2be02501aaf1b5d6fcfdb7a613c5badb5063b64a
describe
virus check
'80322' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile62' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
3ee043035ec49a560489800d3b5e378d
b2ef15fdf4b61408af7273ad446d5511d33b22be
describe
virus check
'69116' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile620' 'sip-files00069.pro'
47ac1cb1f297a39387197e153a0a58b8
2fc594f51bf94ce0e7e82e64915041f25823591c
describe
virus check
'21758' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile621' 'sip-files00070.pro'
033aa6a2584179ddd78085cbb2fc809f
ada205954645adcb509c85725b2fcbf2c2d01286
describe
virus check
'67701' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile622' 'sip-files00071.pro'
dd98cb72b222c56a443ae760ecf85c5b
cb1b8dab73556bff34c654588df37e33d1fa9104
describe
virus check
'53237' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile623' 'sip-files00072.pro'
6e7fd2e388351c049439b8d0e804578f
616b537911a554d3b8acedfad978d0571432136e
describe
virus check
'61517' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile624' 'sip-files00073.pro'
6b22d906253d45b461f257788a8d709e
33182f093dff882b7ac91811d6811a84817db76f
describe
virus check
'40090' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile625' 'sip-files00074.pro'
1d1eec70d67fae6fb35530c397f118af
f234da3917582a902339ab26e03ac2079e94f6e5
describe
virus check
'76382' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile626' 'sip-files00075.pro'
e6d365822c8346b3b9c8a52e5ebf3e02
6700a1b318b976d7f969cd69a20487ec0adb8207
describe
virus check
'59555' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile627' 'sip-files00076.pro'
27997045d2197854f44654e572b24b4f
63841d3d1141fe6cbc7758b8cb2ea2954dc88353
describe
virus check
'96867' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile628' 'sip-files00077.pro'
ff73ebb4e1f05e9473be20291c8bd19b
ceb5ecf9f57745f71fb47f2258ac960c873cddb2
describe
virus check
'41343' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile629' 'sip-files00078.pro'
270b1bea9889e761c495a90a4cc2a91c
73c966b9df3b5c8924e52eae00dd17934e1fa23d
describe
virus check
'4941' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile63' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
27eaabfd569630270c5282ad927ea09b
35a8930e1e25fc0470832872a5eaec1e2aac0079
describe
virus check
'93781' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile630' 'sip-files00079.pro'
7775a45241f75818af4a5eea3ec40aec
daba7a6d28245323cb41a8aed36a1f3a7d34445b
describe
virus check
'40255' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile631' 'sip-files00080.pro'
d770be39378a6ef9632b1c33b8662b98
f1e281dd762866fbc35a2cefdced706f550222f1
describe
virus check
'28334' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile632' 'sip-files00081.pro'
d5640613758399d725375469a746ab20
05b177a68df4093d0f6d54c91d885000962a815f
describe
virus check
'32017' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile633' 'sip-files00082.pro'
6db5fc67fe210175261a19adb222fe65
d7f86b9637f529063afe6425b93a59a78665dfd5
describe
virus check
'98713' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile634' 'sip-files00083.pro'
7b8154f55975504b1da4ad81d4c91f18
305cdf919d8947c93506176e3e681fde2187622b
describe
virus check
'4115' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile635' 'sip-files00084.pro'
9f8bc74a3bced79daed8bfa9e1aafb3d
ccadcd3d20026e54f0bdb950ffed40837e403b71
describe
virus check
'9876' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile636' 'sip-files00085.pro'
2b10f6dcab7746c7c7b0bc7087fee9f4
f131f823797ec2a59019338e67cdde46d4527852
describe
virus check
'7943' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile637' 'sip-files00086.pro'
0d67e1dd3e6d8b7f0db48e9a93ef8f18
1409717d4d9371a2f781d5f723251f6c0f52cec5
describe
virus check
'11793' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile638' 'sip-files00087.pro'
3dece6a156a994e7c7d16c64ca60b82e
fb05a3c500fabf4e26ce399a4410b6527d43cfdd
describe
virus check
'5143' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile639' 'sip-files00088.pro'
98a155421fb24b4b5ee28272e8ade4ea
126eabb300c54d8a25679f06d1a109a44837887c
describe
virus check
'3427' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile64' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
0dce52dafcc8e170fa4a5eb6eecaa39f
16e9eb909b3254710d0252cbd87be78185290a80
describe
virus check
'14091' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile640' 'sip-files00089.pro'
ed332c1fe977e0eddedb25885a095b47
d1d890adcec37f047a72fcf8dea986030d9fc77b
describe
'2015-06-09T00:26:02-04:00'
virus check
'7235' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile641' 'sip-files00090.pro'
0fdce167f3da3e01266f8c41de10b333
042d7e2190664487aec0c5238da5574e573ea623
describe
virus check
'8965' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile642' 'sip-files00091.pro'
ebaaddfe09756fc37a8de02a4cdf54b5
f92f2a7eff35ac4b10b77300a1cf1d0de5827d4b
describe
virus check
'16116' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile643' 'sip-files00092.pro'
212ee79ff5fd50fed061e043120d0ffa
6cda1b07935214573b05fca641d5595511a849bb
describe
virus check
'5107' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile644' 'sip-files00093.pro'
3c7474fce358d4712aa8a0895a2e448d
1240167b806cf0577265c41881222493be416356
describe
virus check
'5074' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile645' 'sip-files00094.pro'
ff1d44e08af595f4405ab93f51c05836
7d8184ea070d1e629502b0c03e4cb8b4b310a525
describe
virus check
'9326' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile646' 'sip-files00095.pro'
c92b3de17ceaefcc9ed3b66565a465ce
7df624a3d48f20026cb2f7ba21e149cc5cee3358
describe
virus check
'3108' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile647' 'sip-files00096.pro'
7fc657e0605c7559e71996b9790da3d8
f5d5c7c86f0d51fb580ce648d813d1e193bfade2
describe
virus check
'12829' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile648' 'sip-files00097.pro'
efcdb2690e1f196f7d0a9d4f0aef2eb4
ce9decdcc945db878d326eae66c6d26764316bba
describe
virus check
'5948' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile649' 'sip-files00098.pro'
f1de1bd755838ce237a4447d5ebc134b
110938671f6288819df62dbdcc1cab160785e613
describe
virus check
'304315' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile65' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
6761ec932ef6db8301248bbaa20cd0ee
e17fb7a8be2f2ee62a0071b1f9ac3200d25e815a
describe
virus check
'14594' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile650' 'sip-files00099.pro'
58b1795dd92500ec0483f108ba585d66
540c52bf782be3ea4c196fea15c2dd37cb1d815f
describe
virus check
'5687' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile651' 'sip-files00100.pro'
919730db63fe522747ead42d9e350bde
d519e1a6268efe4d748127f046c643ef36069933
describe
virus check
'4975' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile652' 'sip-files00101.pro'
01dc695b87bf2c00783ad4b1db8f6809
8011e7f78255456347a5cf1d9b548fb56d269758
describe
virus check
'11403' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile653' 'sip-files00102.pro'
5781f4a4e9627c2cabd7e602a72b5194
46ae8137b01fefcb5f8c17d29ac0bc6949d7746d
describe
virus check
'8184' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile654' 'sip-files00103.pro'
fac53712485925cf93a3bbf7fe0730ef
5e01109b88ceb9f12c3af7e07f7cca04146b740c
describe
virus check
'5483' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile655' 'sip-files00104.pro'
db7eca9ec11ced5735041e0f7a1429c1
f62eb3189cd47cb617202a21cecd30c08b2caa91
describe
virus check
'5525' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile656' 'sip-files00105.pro'
4ef9f5be591921270fb17c07fa509ee2
7b2f60ff2a4ab657919b729f1421d970d417c9bf
describe
virus check
'6646' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile657' 'sip-files00106.pro'
7f258107dc9808349d23895cf79ea1b8
3fcb26b40efc4027ed27feb93cf0ca9975e70a55
describe
virus check
'7969' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile658' 'sip-files00107.pro'
63b967f238748afca153de8032f60fab
03afa01352f67359bbe4a86fe3146b8749abc951
describe
virus check
'11078' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile659' 'sip-files00108.pro'
c9538341d2bfd056713ed1ae1c93b6e0
0de5dc7bba6b389b72190811b10d8bf41b6fc89d
describe
virus check
'100346' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile66' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
23fe098fe6082c26a03038d5b5030594
881b9b4a25426d96c83dcf2916bf6302080f8502
describe
virus check
'3870' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile660' 'sip-files00109.pro'
79961272a582b0e3575b031e60c18605
a0ed3ff1294842966172f04d5a16e9e3bd37f3d8
describe
virus check
'5925' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile661' 'sip-files00110.pro'
db6d8fc0bf7ea25d525aad759b60f933
68d7f44db9701d392eab089cc8bc404a6a4d0743
describe
virus check
'5548' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile662' 'sip-files00111.pro'
5dcbbc3fd1aa040eb3fd3bab42680084
9903ade290c75e6298eddc76b551353e8b6d3512
describe
virus check
'6194' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile663' 'sip-files00112.pro'
a10f08f98b81f01ecf5ba55124fc7ced
d0a5d19f0d0e70484c3a5b9f4234deb646f4a73e
describe
virus check
'8691' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile664' 'sip-files00113.pro'
df7e57553c0d91a701ecf8bce1ec109a
372239f04e08ed5aa2d8f59e01c71f1e6ab44865
describe
virus check
'27219' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile665' 'sip-files00000thm.jpg'
77698e4da638c8923324741dc2a5ecb7
4aa5d087bafa4f7ecb92c587223ae3dd189c2ee9
describe
virus check
'75738' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile666' 'sip-filesUF00025712_00001.mets'
d632bc4e783c4dfef88995aee9a70527
7bfbcbe8d2a54d12303929733b7d56f88e7b7958
describe
virus check
xml resolution
'364329' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile67' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
a254767e20a123bbbd6209ecb66f90e9
9b9dbdd7dc31dfcd544cf1fd7be21b0d2444d3eb
describe
virus check
'118564' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile68' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
756fcd4e7c9ed62d48baa7a221938d22
8b0e00883618e453c7c4d91f92821d9aff644e41
describe
virus check
'376004' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile69' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
c347d92e487cb83c0ec21df4f8391b17
90f66b8920c5689ebe2369d8613ce2a667d4ecd4
describe
virus check
'130172' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile7' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
7aa5847ff6b16c8c58378cfacc70b469
2ff479df4dffa75d9aa389b3229ddaa5c627ff53
describe
virus check
'120709' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile70' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
398dbafa7357f22c17ce029045f56cf4
357a3ab9f4d3fd77a5442f78d3d27d44c94da6e4
describe
virus check
'319372' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile71' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
0c27e0b610f6aa7d7e5d72f51fa34b37
652c42f9321d171aa7b79406ac65188896beb9f9
describe
virus check
'93129' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile72' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
7610d5a1e7002d03f9f00f5d3b7fa172
56d329e60dfcf23a24c7af9e0b2d1cac2e5eb241
describe
virus check
'378410' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile73' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
f09f21329b8240f9316cf2c331703ee9
40dcc7510e4d8fb2862bebb223aeab989066a969
describe
virus check
'120579' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile74' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
bae2a740b4504ba106ed3944a75d754c
a6eb70d22a66eb7d2c89ae20f682f45d1b617175
describe
virus check
'306308' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile75' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
f45117cfb103d19cd5c510826dabc748
23337d6efd7ff07f432fd3e222bba8bd60503d47
describe
virus check
'96400' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile76' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
37111071403d6c3772904b2367415ab2
e5b090a1b0a3b19230eaf89365d3720ba8876c56
describe
virus check
'387056' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile77' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
dd27ea716af95ae38104b9190bd87a83
c0e38c753f405ff713f3c992c95220309197e6b1
describe
virus check
'121666' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile78' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
a5b99f64731e717c61e6de68f73858e6
c6030cf24fc78e98a986a4278ae8544f31663f43
describe
virus check
'294243' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile79' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
71cb8c80c0bc234b1c9de8e9d84a19f2
d4ae8abff13f3aceb71e9a1b426a6c1945e9cb19
describe
virus check
'44797' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile8' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
e446b48e5136a8c19371a87ed6b0324d
772905fb185c3b94d97034a699e66d9c11d481a1
describe
virus check
'87829' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile80' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
82705d69f40e525e9bb88c4c0d60907f
c4d886c3fd009f367a895fe578d7e6ccd18e45d1
describe
virus check
'272455' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile81' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
e4038919be9dc9235add7ccfe1281527
c236d056de899a06700ab49990888abe66868137
describe
virus check
'87302' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile82' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
cfd997df1363b0ce166ad308ec628405
2d86d9ab15fb3c8304c29d9be31b857bae86b0e7
describe
virus check
'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile83' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
03f8c8e96b4f70c2367fb1e9446c8bef
124eba0afebf1eeddffd602543670a3ff395a220
describe
virus check
'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile84' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
671757eb5a44903335114f2ef695d3f6
a53d31d8bfe2b72377118b3c9d7a34ca6c1631e0
describe
virus check
'303703' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile85' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
058a2d2c5636b30ecaa8c1c7c060a323
0b1065796e5b08857b57956ed79e258f44f6b920
describe
virus check
'100514' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile86' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
4a2d35676ac448a0b20f9bc05077079f
cc1394e5db9c0dafbb0ef663ef9535ed17f002d4
describe
virus check
'387150' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile87' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
cef5230114ed3c0b074915ce1c6e0717
e40907d506bce79e952106eb0d4c498e9fa95927
describe
virus check
'121478' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile88' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
898fb120c7076a7fe8d5b4c1b30292b2
f2cb5595eb23a57e720fd571da413c7b1b865fa0
describe
virus check
'387447' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile89' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
7dabc17f86d6ef6fdebae06716a24491
75d18aa49080d8120be24b36ea35df7581a4f720
describe
virus check
'82155' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile9' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
729aec1f82e6c141a590544d4cf87f5c
b446f4b452ba6591b3712450a1bcd5ad9cbf0617
describe
virus check
'121988' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile90' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
2c6caf13ca287d4e41be6c154a017603
5e6d87ab3b1c2dd515ca25e5d817e2070c9c85e4
describe
virus check
'150357' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile91' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
fea29a981ec935320d801758ed080087
fbaeb84005157a910f0050b71c277a70973dedbe
describe
virus check
'49749' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile92' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
c75b1aece4914821475933bf44b0117a
dcfd27e43694dba7c57e3f2d47645d4e9b5e3956
describe
virus check
'314659' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile93' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
f6f3edb14c7c941e3702cb0a496d4153
1eb3fdbeb9bf682fd1dee87dbcac8eb201b9fc0a
describe
virus check
'102553' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile94' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
05232548f4253d4fcdc749c7ef98921e
d417c8f660564fe86ce957b87a33cba4bbc096cc
describe
virus check
'332507' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile95' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
8b1a6d1d44f1d9caf545d5f115ec1331
6baa85f0954edcd598f1190a230fa73f64cda644
describe
virus check
'112155' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile96' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
76e9a4d74c5188ed31bf6dd826e0d8fe
a0f7ddd630a5bacf54f22567a8a69772cae0679a
describe
virus check
'325339' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile97' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
b4c92af7e0c16e1d412443aa0ef9ef2c
8c31c50ee00adafdb57cac7d71b7b59fab426406
describe
virus check
'109549' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile98' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
8141e5a94c3d21ae82bac3324d0c8c15
aae0b97a0ed73bba9ae682eaf30f5b444650ce1f
describe
virus check
'333563' 'info:fdaEFVKYI961_08G4INfile99' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
3d6475bac5d992da5ebb506c0876ae58
46deff3e0dd06bab6a1155b502658865bc844938
describe
virus check