Citation
Dick and his cat

Material Information

Title:
Dick and his cat an old tale in a new garb
Uniform Title:
Whittington and his cat
Creator:
Ellis, Mary
Hamilton, J ( Publisher )
J. Fagan & Son ( Stereotyper )
T. Sinclair's Lith ( Lithographer )
Place of Publication:
Philadelphia
Publisher:
J. Hamilton
Manufacturer:
J. Fagan & Son, stereotypers
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1866
Language:
English
Physical Description:
91 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 15 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Cats -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Success -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Poverty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1871 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1871
Genre:
Fairy tales ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Frontispiece chromolithographed by T. Sinclair's Lith.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by Mary Ellis.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
002225791 ( ALEPH )
ALG6070 ( NOTIS )
57510155 ( OCLC )

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PALMM Version

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Full Text













































































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DICK AND HIS CAT.








DICK AND HIS CAT.


An Old Tale

IN A NEW GARB.


BT MARY ELLIS.


J. HI AMILTON,
1344 CHESTNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA.
1871.































Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1866, by J. HAMILTON, . in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.











A WORD TO PARENTS.


THm story of "1Dick Whittington and his Cat" has so often amused the little ones, who never wearied of its repetition, that the author of the following version thought she might extend the pleasure derived from it by putting it in language which they could read for themselves.
No word contains more than four 7etter8, and none is over mne syllabl in length, so that ainy child who has the least knowledge of reading will be able to enjoy it for himself.









DICK AND HIS CAT.


Imam 14
43NCE on a time, Ta poor boy was seen to go utp and .down the side M walk of a town,
(7)




8 DICK AND
and sob and cry. At last he sat down on a doorstep. He was too weak to run more. He, had had no food all the day.
It was a da-v in June, The air




HIS CA T 9
was mild. The warm sun sent down its. rays of love on all. But poor Dick had no joy on this fair day.
He laid his head down on the step,




10 DICK AND
,and took a nap; for he was sick and weak for- wan t of food. As he lay, a girl came to the door. She saw the poor boy lie on the step ; but he did not see




HIS CA T 11
her. She went in, and said to a man who was in the room, I 'A poor boy has lain down on our step to take a nap. "
The man came to the., door to see




12 DICK AND
the boy. He said, This boy does not look nice. His hair has not seen a comb all day; his face. and feet are full of dirt; and his coat is torn*,,




IS CA T 13
The man -did not like such a mean boy to be at his door. But when he saw the lad's thin, pale face, as he lay at his feet, hie felt sad for him.




DICK AND


Just then the boy woke up,, He went to run, off when he saw the man and girl at the door, but they made him stay.
Why did you lie down here ?




HIS CA T


the man said to
the boy.
" I was weak and sick."
"Have you had no food to eat?"
"I have had no food all day."1
Then the girl




16 DICK AND
went in and got him a roll and a mug of milk. The boy ate so fast and so much that they had to wait till he was done, to talk to him more .




HIS CA T


"Have you no pa nor ma?" said the man. A tear fell from the poor boy's eye, as he said, "I have no pa, and my ma
they took from me, and I can not
2




18 DICK AND
find her. She was sick a long times. I used to sit at her side and lay, my head onj her knee. Once she said to me that my pa had gone -home to




HIS OA E 19
God, and that she must go too. Then she got too sick to rise from her bed. One da'-v they put me on the bed by her side. She laid her hand on my




20 DICK AND
head, and she said, "I pray Thee, 0 God, take care of my poor boy." "Then she shut her eyes and grew so pale, and heir hand got so cold,




HIS CA T


it made me cry. But she did not move, nor turn her eyes on me. They took me off the bed and sent me out to play. But I sat down at the door and




DICK AND


wept for my ma."
"The next day I saw them lay her in a long box of wood and take her off. I have run up and down all day to find her. Do you




IS CA T 23
kn ow what they have done with my ma? Oh! tell Me, if you can." Then the poor lad wept so hard that the man and the girl felt sad for him.




"H


DICK AND
ow old are


you, my toy. said. the man.
"I was six last May."
" What is your name ? "
"Dick."
"Well, Dick,"




IS CA T 25
said this good Man, " you may come in here, if you like, and stay till yout can find your Mae I will give you food to eat, and you can help me to -work.




26 DICK AND HIS CAT.
When your ma does come for you, you may go home with her.))





PARZ5


IL


DICKsoon made up his mind to
(27)




28 DICK AND
live with this kind, good man. The man was not rich. He had to work hard, and Dick was made to work too. But he did n . ot, mind that. But the girl was




HIS CA T 29
not kind to Dick,. She gave him a box on the. ear when. he did notdo as she bid him. She did not let him sit down to eat till she had done, and all that




30 DICK AND
she gave him was the bits that she had left. She made him a bed of a pile of old rags, at one end of the loft.
Dick had no one now to show




IS C T


him how to be good, and he soon got to be a bad boy. He told lies, and when no eye was on him, he took what was not his. He did not know God saw




32 -DICK AND
him. He used a bad word now and then, and did not work so well as once he did.
The man who took Dick to live with him was sad to see him such a




HIS CA T 33
bad boy, and did not know what to do with him.
Dick had now no joy in life, for no bad boy can be gay and glad. But he did not like to feel that




34 DICK AND HIS CAT
he was made sad by his own bad ways. He said it was the way he had to live that made him bad,





Poop, Dick had now 1,10 one to
t 3.5 )




36 DICK AND
love him but a cat. One day, when he was out at play, lie saw some boys pelt a cat to -kill her. He did not like to have them kill the cat, so he ran to her, took




IS CA T


her up in his
arms, and took her home. The girl let him keep
the cat, for she kept off all therats and mice. She was a gray cat. She had fine




DICK AND


Soft fur, and a long tail. When Dick had done his tea, he took puss on his knee to pat her on the head, and talk to her, as if she knew all that he said. to her.




H CA T 39


She then did rub her head on his arm, and purr, and lie down on his knee and take a nap. She had her bed on his heap of rags. Once when Dick


HI




40 DICK AATD
had felt bad all day, he lay down on his bed. He said to puss, "No one is kind to me but you, puss; no one has love for me. I will run off. I will not stay."




HIS CA T .41
Dick did not shut his eyes, but when it was yet dark, he got up, and. went out of his room,. down to the door. He put his hand ' on the key and gave




42 DICK AND
it a turn. He felt the cold air on his face when he went out. But
he ran on fast, till he was so weak, lie had to stop.
Just then a hig




HIS CAT


bell near' him rang out loud on the air to say that day had come once more. it made Dick turn his eyes to see this bell, and as it rang, lie felt




DICK AND


it say to him,
4 Turn back, Dick! Turn
back, Dick ! Turn back, Dick! Dick did not move* He did not know what to do. I His eyes




IS CA T 45
were on the bell as it rung out,
",,Turn back, Dick ! Turn back, Dick ! Turn back, Dick!
It put. him in mind of the time when his ma had




46 DICK AND
laid her hand on his head ere she went to God, and said, " 0 God, take care of my poor boy! " It put him in mind what a bad boy lie had beenj, and




IlS CART 47
how he had made his life a hard one by his ill. ways,. He made Up his mind to go back*- But then hie said, "If they find out I have run off, they will




48 DICK AND
beat me." This fear made him run so fast, that he got home and back to his heap of rags ere the man and the girl were up.
As Dick lay on




IS -A T 49
his bed, he made tip his mind to be a good boy. He knew his ma used to pray to God to make him good, so he bent his own knee to pray, and said, "0 God,
4-




50 DICK AND
make D ick a good boy,,"
Just then the girl came to the door, and said, "Dick! Dick! g7et up! It is day!" So Dick soon went down and




HIS CA T 51
was so kind and good, they did not know what to make of it. But Dick went on day by day, and soon he saw that when he was kitj d and good, they were




52 DICK AND
kind and true to him.
It was hard work for Dick to gi-ve "p all his bad ways. But each morn and eve he went to God, to ask Him for help,




HIS CA T 53
and he did. not ask in vain. ByM and - by the girl let him sit with her. She made him a good-bed. Miss Puss yet kept her seat onhis knee, when lie




54 DICK AND HIS CAT.


sat down to and all was an d j oy.


rest, love








ONE day a man, by the name of Jack,
came to see them. He was


(55)




DICK AND


to go on the sea in a big, ship, to a far off land. He. had come to say good - b-ve. He said to them, "The land that the ship will sail to, is a far off




HIS A T. 57
land, and the men who live in it are not like us, and do not know our ways. They do not eat or wear what we do. Now what you give me I will take with




58 DICK AND
Meg and sell it for you, and when I come back I will pay you what I get for it. It may be that I will get much gold for it; for the men in that




HIS CA T 59
far off' land like what is made here, more than what they have at home."I So the man and the girl were glad, and gave him inuch to sell for




60 DICK AND
them. Poor Dick sat,with his cat on his knee; a tear was in his eye, for he too felt the wish to have some gold. The man saw him look sad, and said, " Well,




HIS CA T


Dick, my son, and what will you send?" Dick wept. "I have but my cat," said Dick. " Well, send that," said Jack; "it may be she will sell for




62 DICK AND
more than all the ,rest.,, They all had much fun at this, and Dick had to join in. He took puss up in his arms. He gave her a kiss and a pat on her




HIS CA T 63
head. fe felt her soft fur. It was hard for him to part with her, for she had been his pet for a long time. But at last he set her down. He got a big bag,




64 DICK AND
He put puss in it. She did not like to be thus shut up, but Dick tied her in.
So the man took the bag in his arms, and went to his ship. When




HIS CA T


he got to the ship, lie let the cat out of the bag. She was glad to be free once more, and ran to find Dick. But poor D ick w as at Ito me, sad; for lie knew
5




66 DICK AND
that he had see n his puss for the last time.
The ship was full of rats and mice, and puss had a fine time. She made them fly, and soon 110




HIS CA T


more rats and mice were to be seen in the ship. The men were, glad to have the catq and gave her food and milk, so that she was well off.





Lill


THE ship we nt o n her way. It
(68)




DIOK AND IllS OAT.


was more than a year when they got to that far off land.
The man who took the cat, had, as was said, the name of Jack. He left the ship




DICK AND


when he go the land, went to see king. The was glad to Jack, and him, he must and dine him,


t to and the king see told stay with




HIS OA T 71
When they went to the room to dine, they saw that rats and mice were in it too, and had eat much of the food. They saw the rats and mice jump down




DICK AND


and run when they went, in the room'.
The king was in a rage, that he had lost hi's meal* Jack said to him, Why do you let the rats and mice




IlS CA T 73
do so?" "I do not know how to help it," said the kin g. "I will gi-ve a pile of gold to one who will rid me of them."
Then Jack was glad. He said to




74 DICK AND
the king, "If you will give me a pile of gold, I will rid you of the rats and mice." The king said, "You are in fun. You do not know how to get rid of




HIS CAT 75
them." Jack said, "NWe will see." So the next day, he put the cat in a bag, and went with the bag in his arm to the king. Puss did
not like to be




DICK AND


shut up in the bag, and made much fuss.
The king was glad to see Jack, and said, "Let me see what you have in your bag." But Jack




HIS CA T
said., ,Not yet; wait till see the rats mice. I I


just we and


S o they went to the room to dine. The rats and mice were at the food just as




78 DICK AND
they had been. Jack took the
cord off the bag, and took out the cat. The king did not know what a cat was; for he had no cats in his land.




HIS C-A T 79
Jack held her in his arms till she had lost her fear, and then set her down with the rats and mice. She soon made them know what a cat was, and. put




DICK AND


them in such fear that they all fled. The king was so glad that he did riot know what to do .


They's dine. t came


at down Not a o tit of


to
ra




HIS CA T 81
its hole. The king ate his meat with joy, and puss sat on his knee and fed out of his dish. The king told Jack he must let him keep the cat. Jack said,




82 DICK AND
"I will give her to you, but you must give me the pile of gold." The king was
glad to keep the cat and pay the gold. So Jack put the gold in




HIS CAT 83
the bag that had held the cat, and went back to the Ship.
A year more went by, ere Jack and his ship came back to port. He soon went to see




84 DICK AND
Dick, with the bag of gold. The man and the girl were both glad to find that Jack had sold what they ga-ve him, and that he had got a good deal for




HIS0- AT 85
them. But when Jack told them of the -cat, and to ok out the bag of go ld, they did not know what to say. And when poor Dick was told that it ,was




86 DICK AATD
all for him, he had to cry for j oy, and all the rest wept with him, for they were all fond of Dick now, he had come to be such a good boy,




HIS CA T 87
"XWell, Dick,"
said Jack, "what will you do with all this gold? Let us see what will be best." So they all said much, and sat up till it was late, to talk of




88 DICK AND
Dick and his pile of gold.
At last Dick said, "I will gi-ve some of it to each of you, who ha-ve been so good and kind to me.- I will take part of




IS CA E


the rest and lay it out upon my mind, that I may be wise when I grow to be a man. And what is left I will lay up, so that, when I am a man, I will ha-ve




DICK AND


it to work with, that I may .grow to be rich;, for to be good,.and wise,
and rich, is what I wish."
They all said Dick knew what was best. So that




HIS~ CA T. 91
is what was done with the pile of gold that the king ga-ve for the cat.







sv l III