Citation
Emilia Geddie

Material Information

Title:
Emilia Geddie a child of the Covenant who died in 1681 : an example alike to young and old : republished with notes from the earlier editions
Running title:
Life of Emilia Geddie
Creator:
Bonar, Andrew A ( Andrew Alexander ), 1810-1892
Charles Glass & Co ( Publisher )
Houlston and Wright ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Glasgow
Publisher:
Charles Glass & Co. London :
Houlson and Wright
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
81 p., [1] leaf of plates : col. ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Salvation -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Young women -- Death -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Faith -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Biographies -- 1871 ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1871 ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1871
Genre:
Biographies ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
individual biography ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Scotland -- Glasgow
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date from inscription.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by Andrew A. Bonar.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026595258 ( ALEPH )
ALG2564 ( NOTIS )
57510295 ( OCLC )

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TOMB OF EMILIA GEDDIE.





EMILIA GEDDIE;

SB Child of the Covenant,

WHO DIED IN 1681.
AN ‘EXAMPLE ALIKE TO YOUNG AND OLD.

REPUBLISHED WITH NOTES FROM THE EARLY EDITIONS,

BY
REV. ANDREW A. BONAR,

GLASGOW.

“I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because
thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and re-
vealed them unto babes. Even so, Father, for so it seemed good
in thy sight.”—MArT. XI. 25, 26.

GLASGOW :

CHARLES GLASS & CO., 14 MAXWELL ST.
LONDON : HOULSTON & WRIGHT.






CONTENTS.

ne
INTRODUCTION.

Page
The times Emilia Geddie lived in ; the place and family from

which she came; the authorship of the book, -

Cnar. (.—From HER First To ner NintH YuAr.

Stacie ie

. Her reverence towards God in infancy, - =

Her thoughts about the Creator, - = = 2
Asking blessing at meat, - = = .
Her regard for the Sabbath, - = “5 -
Horror at an oath, - ~ - - =
Prayer for the Swear Cres - - = z

. Helping the tempted, - - - -

. How she knew the Lord’s teaching, - a =
. At four years of age joining in a prayer-meeting, -

. No show in her profession, - = a 2
. A minister offending the little ones, - ~ =

. A mother’s reproof felt, - oe oe ie, a :
. Struggles with tem}: i -

. No pride in dress, - - - - a Z
. Thoughts in sickness, - - - - =
. Feeling of the word preached,
. Closet prayer, - - 0 - y =
. Thinking on hell, - - - - -

. Reproof of Sabbath-breakers,

. Remark on Shorter Catechism, - - -

. No need of penance, - - - - f

. Estimate of words in prayer, - - - -
. Faithful reply to a profane captain, - - -

. Her wish to be like David, - - - =

. Her attention to the meaning of wh:
. Grief at the inconsistency of professin,
. Most freedom in private prayer, -
. A minister strengthened by her pre y
. Reasoning with a tempted woman, - - 2

. Useful in another temptation, -. E = Z
. Meetings for prayer with other children -

. Her judgment on the conduct of one of theiz members,














Her mode of dealing with beggars, — -

Her thoughts about the per oner treatment of “the begging
ee «° = - - -
A Sabbath at home alone, -

Her views on public questions and trust | in Pr ovidence,

. Prayer for imprisoned ministers, - - 2 ie
. Severely injured by some boys—her forgiving spirit,

18
19
20
20
20
21

22
22,
24.
24
24
25
25
25
26
26
27
27
28
238
28
28
29
29
30
30
ot
35.
35

36
37
37
59



CONTENTS.

Caav, IL—From ner NintH To HER Firreentit

39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
Ad.
46.
47.
43,
44),
50.
51.
52.
53.

54.

55.

64

65.
06.
67.

68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
73.
74.
75.
76.
77.
78.
79.
80.

St

55.
56.
57.
58. 4
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.



YEAR.

A remarkable answer to prayer for ner schoolmistress, 41
Refusal to go to the house of mirth, - - 3 42
Sadness because of not protesting against the sins of others,44
singularly impressed regarding coming events, — - 44
Her inward struggles and vict ries, - - =) et:
Enmity to levity in holy things. - - e 46
Letter to her father, - - - > ey.
Occasional meditation, - - - - 2 Ay.
Praying for per: secutors, - - - a 43
Coufidence and presentiments, - - . - 48
Too much hearing of the word unedifying, - = 49
Self-upbraiding for ingratitude. - - 2 ae AG
Answers to a Roman Catholic lad ys - e 49
The Lord’s Supper; her sense of God’s free love, - 50
Her testimony against dancing, - - - 52
Improvement ofa fit of sickness, - - - 5)
Conversation-work tried, - - - = 53
Original sin, at ie ag 5S
Salvation b prough? to her w: vith fos wer, - S 54

A contrite heart, - - a8 SSS
Christ himself her délight, - - a BB
Satan’s attempts to hide Christ from her, - =e 6
God’s way.of bringing Scri fee home to her, - 5S
Comfort tested, - - - 2 =.) AE
Her father delivered ; her prayer answered, - 57
Philippians i. 22. - - - = 5 Ee
Reverence to parents, - - 4 o - 58
Sensible advice to a mother. - 59





hanathousaud, , though dete ined from
5G

A Sabbath-day better



ordinances, - - e Bs x
Evidence of a cloudy day, - - = . 60
Letter to her mother, - ti)
Another distinct account of the Lor d’s way of tedching her, 62
Discoveries of Christ. - - = z - 63
Deliverance from doubting, - - - . 64
Her treatment of her own temptations, - - aye Ge
Providences, —- - - - - S 64
Recreation ; fondness for birds, - - - =e 0Ge
Story of John the Divine unbending his mind, - 65
Another story, - - : e 2)° 6
Observations on the habits of birds, - a . 67
Battle of Bothwell Bridge; her thoughts therecr - 67
How ministers felt her words, = = 6)
. Aminister’s testimony to her, - « = 71



Oe ce ee

SONTRODUCTION. $

Tue year 1665, in which Emrita Geppie was borti,
was a ‘“‘cloudy and dark day” in Scotland. Persecu-
tion for conscience sake was begun. Guthrie and
Warriston had already died upon the scaffold, and
oppression was threatening to ‘‘make wise men mad.”
The rising at Pentland ended in disaster, and. gave
occasion to greater severities. It was during those
evil days that Emilia Geddie’s bark was launched, the
waves still rising, and the sky dark as midnight.
Her short life of sixteen years was spent within the
time of suffering in Scotland which is usually called
“the Killing Time.”

She cast in her lot with the sufferers, holding their
faith and principles; so that if any one desires to see
how these principles affected the private walk of
quiet Christians and moulded their character, he may
see what he desires in this brief history of the experience
of a covenanter’s daughter whom the storm led far into
the heart of ‘“‘the Man who is the hiding-place.”

Her father, Mr. John Geddie, was proprietor of a
small estate near the burgh of Falkland in Fife, called
Hinittown, or Hilton, from its situation on a slope
near the town. He held the office of “Clerk to the



8 INTRODUCTION.

King’s Stewartry of Fife,” an office of _respec tabilitby
and of considerable emolument. His office was to col-
lect the rents due to the king in Fife, or in other
words, the crown-rents, and Falkland was the main
oifice for these rents. At that time, the Marquis
of Athole was Steward of Fife, and inasmuch as he
was a high cavalier, and of course an enemy to the
covenant, it must have been no easy matter for Mr.
Geddie to escape annoyance, decided as he was in his
attachment to the covenanting cause. But he did
not swerve. He was a man of some note in his day.
We have a memoir of him ‘in vol. i. of the ‘* Abdots-
ford Miscellany,” giving details of his public life. By
profession he was ,a Writér to the Signet,
and as such we find him getting ‘‘a factory from
William Bonar and others to get in their debts,”
1633, and at another time receiving ‘‘a bond of 800
merks from John Bonar of Lamguhat. ” He afterwards
acquired some wealth, and seems to have added some
lands to the original estate. A discovery which he
made in 1668, brought him into notice: he found out
a new method of ‘‘/mproving and colonizing Bees,”
and his discovery drew the attention of the Royal
Society at Gresham College. In 1657, he married
Aana Wallace, daughter of Mr. William Wallace,
teacher in Ayr, sister to the Provost of Glasgow, and
cousin to Lord Burghly. Their two sons, Michael and
John, died in childhood, and are buried in Falkland.
Lmilia was their only daughter, called after the Mar-
chioness of Athole, Lady Emilia Stanley, Mr. Geddie
being at that time steward under the Marquis, All
we know of the mother’s character is that she was a
woman of like faith with her husband and daughter.
The Hilion of Falkland was the name of the family
property, when Emilia was born. It lies about half
a mile from Falkland, south-east from the town, on
the slope that adjoins to Hast Lomond Hill, It is



INTRODUCTION, 9

now called Templand, having once been the property
of the Kniehts Templar,a remnant of which possession
is preserved in the names given to two old wells, St.
John’s and the Lady’s well. A part of the property
is now included in the minister’s glebe. The old
dwelling-house of John Geddie has given place to a
humble farm-steading ; a lintel stone, with the date
1691, and a few traces of old walls, overshadowed by
six or eight old ash-trees, alone remain to testify that
once this was a proprictor’s dwelling. In olden times,
Falkland was a favourite hunting retreat of the kings
of Scotland, Considerable remains of the fine old
palace exist still at the foot of the hill; and many a
traveller has surveyed that palace-square, and thought
of its ancient fame, who knew not that more com-
placently had the eye of God looked down ‘with
choice regard” on yonder quiet dwelling that con-
fronted the abode of.kings, than on these once festive
halls.

This edition of Emilia Geddie is the result of a com-
parison made between several old editions. There is
one entitled ‘‘Some few choice sentences and practices
of Emilia Geddie ;” and there is another published at
Glascow, 1720, ‘‘Some choice sentences and practices
of Emilia Geddie, daughter to John Geddie of Hilton
in Falkland, in the Sherifidom of Fife, from her infancy
to her death on the 2d February, 1681, in the sixteenth
year of her age, as they are gathered and written by
her Fathers own hand, with an Index, and an acros-
tick on her name.”” It will be seen from the preface
we are about to give, that this copy errs in saying
that ‘“‘her father” drew up these remains. We have
before us the edition of 1762, which gives information
as to the sources.of the memoir. It states that the facts
were ‘‘gathered from her parents and other judicious
persons.” It was Mr, James Hog who compiled the
whole and gave it its present form,



10 INTRODUCTION,

We are told at the commencement that Emilia had
an awe of God on her spirit even before she could
speak ; indeeed, the old copies say, ‘‘for much of the
time after her birth until she arrived at the second year
of her age.” This is attested by judicious witnesses.
But some may be inclined to doubt the interpretation
which these persons put upon her action. Children
at that age are often overawed by the sight of persons
solemnly worshipping,—the very stillness has its
effect on them. At the same time the thing is not
impossible. Janeway, in his ‘‘ Token for Children,”
records two cases not unlike this, and the ‘Short
Account of John Ross, 1836,” shews something quite
similar. Should not parents be led by such cases to
seek for their children very early visits of Him in
whose name (as in a Jordan-flood of grace) their little
ones have been baptized ?

It may have been with his eye on this statement,
and a few other such, that Mr. Whitefield wrote his
** Recommendation” of the little work. He had been
shewn it during one of his visits to Scotland, proba-
bly 1741, at a time when young people were seeking
the Lord, flying as doves to their windows. With
the special design of encouraging such, an edition of
this life was published at that time, and here is

Mr. Whitefield’s Recommendation.

‘¢ As there has been @ concern lately wrought, I
trust, by the Holy Spirit in the hearts of some of the
lambs of the flock, 1 think, the following account of
God’s dealings with the soul of Emilia Geddie may be
very seasonably reprinted in Edinburgh. I remember
nothing very exceptionable in it: if any thing, itis that
which is mentioned about Jobn the Divine. I think
Emilia was justly reproved for spending too much time



INTRODUCTION. il

in feeding her birds. However, I am persuaded she is
now singing praises in heaven.

‘* May the little ones that shall read her life, fol-
low her as she followed Jesus Christ. A better thing
cannot be desired in their behalf by their souls’ real
friend and well-wisher,

GEORGE WHITEFIELD.”

We have said that originally the narrative was
drawn up by Mr. James Hog, who was afterwards
minister of Carnock, and a firm maintainer of the
truth in the ‘‘ Marrow Controversy.” Here is his
preface :-—

Mr, Hog’s Preface.

“CHRISTIAN AND CANDID ReApeR,—I think it
necessary to acquaint you with what belongs to my
conduct in the management and publication of this
little treatise, The whole, both preface and narration,
was sent to me, that I might revise and prepare them
for ‘a more public view. I had much business in
hand, and yet I declined not the motion, expecting
that I should have little (if any thing) more to do,
save only to amend some literal escapes,* and to per
form a few more services of the like nature. But IJ
quickly found my mistake, when [ read the copy that
was sent to me. It doth indeed contain all the materi-
als which now are laid before thee ; but so incorrectly
that I was sometimes straitened how to understand

_ the meaning, This made it necessary for me to go
over the whole, from the beginning to the end, and
to cast it.into a mould at least more intelligible. (I
confess my rudeness in speech, as well as in know-
ledge, is unaccountably great.) And yet I could not
presume so far upon the indigested copy I got, as to

* Mistakes in the writing and spelling.



12 LYTRODUCTION,

cast the materials wholly into my own style: Ireck-
oned myself obliged to keep as near to the words I
found in the draught [ had, as could possibly agree
with orthography, and some little decencies of speech.
Much of the narration consists of our young saint’s
own words: to these I have kept more close, and
would not have altered them so much as in one
syllable, had I been fully confident that each word
was hers, without the least addition, diminution, or
alteration, But I had no assurance of that, in regard
they were not taken from her mouth; though I am
satisfied they were in substance, and to the same
effect, as is mentioned in the narration ; and also her
own words so near as judicious and godly persons
could remember. And therefore I thought I might
take the liberty to make a very few but small altera-
tions, that thestylemightrun somewhatmoresmoothly.
In the mean while, I have kept close to her meaning,
most religiously and carefully, and have changed the
phrase in so very little, that it is scarcely worth the
meniioning. While I was going over the particulars
you have in the narration, I lamented often and heay-
ily, that such a precious treasure should have
remained hid for so long a time; and therefore it
was, that, as soon as I had the copy, I made all pos-
sible haste to bring the materials into so much of a
readiness for thy view as through grace I could at-
tain, You. have them here in a dress which I hope
shall render them intelligible ; they shine illustriously
in their own native beauty. I have affected no orna-
ment, nor could I have given it them, though f{ had
intended.

“The preface shews that the facts were well attested
by many eminently godly persons who knew them,
and now are for most part with the Lord. But,if it may
add a little to the confirmation of the sweet narrative, I
take the occasion to represent, that, though then



INTRODUCTION. 13.

young, yeb I was acquainted with the young gentle-
woman, and can vouch some parts of the relation.
I have been divers times in company with her amongst
other godly persons, aud have heard her speak humbly
.and modestly, but with a prodigious reach, about the
nearest and most weighty concerns of salvation. I also
had my little share in societies of more aged, judicious,
and established Christians, where she made a consid-
erable part, and have therein joined with her in prayer.
There I have heard weighty and difficult questions
and cases proposed, to which, in concurrence with
the rest, she gave her clear and pointed answers, so
close to the respective purposes, and so well
instructed from the word, as if she had been an aged
and experienced divine. All this passed some three
or four years before her death,—Your sincere well-
wisher, , JA. Hoa.”

Mr, Hog had himself been born in days of persecu-
tion, and grown among the sufferers and their friends,
so that he had lively sympathy with the families and
the seed of such as had borne witness and not fainted,
Besides, he had met with Lmilia Geddie in his early
days, aud had wondered at her faith and holy walk.
One who writes a short account of his life, notices of
him ; ‘Access to the private meetings of the godly,
when they poured out their hearts to God with one
accord in prayer, gave him to see much of the reality
of religion,”* though it is not there specified that
meetings in which this young saint took part were
among those that helped to mould his character.

It will be noticed that Mr. Hog refers to another
preface. Properly speaking, this other preface is an
attestation to the truthfulness of all that is related in
her life—the depth of grace, sobriety of judgment,
and maturity of experience displayed herein, being

* Memoir of Hog of Carnock in Christian Instructor for 1838,



Pee INTRODUCTION, ;

thought so wonderful that few would believe the ac-
count unless competent witnesses were adduced. The
following, then, is the testimony, full and unhesitat-
ing, borné by many who knew the subject of the
narrative long and well,

The Testimony of many Witnesses.

‘It is matter of just regret, that the designed ac-
count must needs be imperfect,.in regard no record
was kept of many excellent things most remarkable,
in the conversation of this excellent child, when the
things were more fresh in memory; and many par-
ticulars are lost through the death of godly persons,
who conversed much with her. Nevertheless, the
few kept in memory, and to be here narrated, are of
great weight, and have been well attested by the con-
curring testimony of divers judicious and eminently
godly persons, ministers and others, who knew them.

‘*Many observed such rare endowments in this
young saint, both as to natural parts and graces,that
it was hard to determine in which of them she most
excelled. Her disposition, even from mere infancy,
and throughout the few years of life she attained, was
sweet, modest, meek, and humble. In all these re-
gards, that mind was in her which was also in Christ
Jesus, as much as in any of her day. In the few
stages of her short life, she was still so far beforehand
with the means of her education, that she drank in
necessary instructions from her parents and teachers
a creat deal more quickly than it was advisable to in-
fuse it into such a weak and tender vessel. Thus she
became a woman long before her childhood expired.
It was, as to her case, much debated amongst judi-
cious and godly persons, whether such singular
endowments presaged an excellent life, or an early
death, Her parents would fain have comforted them-



INTRODUCTION, 15

selves, as Lamech did of old concerning his son Noah,
and have promised that such a lovely child shall live,
and give us rest. But the Lord had ordered that mat-
ter otherwise ; he took her home to himself, and ad-
vanced her early to the higher house, where she seeth
no more through a glass darkly, but beholdeth the
Lord face to face. And it gave sufficent ground of
quietness to her parents, that their loss was inex-
pressible gain. A heathen of old, upon the death of
his eldest son, gave the significant reply, namely,
‘Scio me genuisse mortalem,’ ‘I know that I gave
birth to a mortal.’ But her parents might express
their complacence in a higher strain, ‘Scimus nos
genuisseimmortalem,’ ‘We know that we gave birth
to an immortal ;’ for howsoever mortal she was by her
generation, grace rendered her immortal, in the true
import, by regeneration. It remains that we, who
condole the loss, do, through grace, breathe after that
perfection whereof she is already possessed.

‘Her dearest friends could scarcely have wished
her better than she really was, excepting her almost
continual frailties and sicknesses,* and yet these were
improved by her to such spiritual advantages as aston-
ished the beholders. Scarce anything passed her
without a most judicious and profound observation,
and the most enriching spiritual gain. Jn swm,come-
liness of person, amiableness of countenance, solidity of
judgment, acuteness of wit, tenaciousness of memory,
sweetness of disposition, modesty in behaviour, obedience
to parents more near or remote, submission to govern-
ors, observance of superiors, love to equals, condescen-
sion to inferiors, and candor towards all, were found
in her te a very large degree.

“ a singular regard to the Lord’s day; she was careful

* [They seem to have felt toward her as John did to Galua
8 John 2.]



16 INTRODUCTION.

to prepare for it, and was’ exemplarily. diligent in
every part of the observation thereof. She gave rev-
erend attention to the word read or preached,and was
notably fitted to give clear and methodical accounts
of what she heard or read. She took great care to
learn the doctrines of religion taught in catechisms,
of which she gave such distinct accounts as were fitted
to inform and edify persons of good judgment. She
had a notable occasion for this in the answers she
gave in Mr, Thomas Lye’s* meeting-house in London,
and that in public, about the tenth year of her age,
to the great admiration of the. minister and hearers.
During the few years of her life, she still expressed
great love to the best things, due respect to the better
sort of men, and a greater than childish dislike of and
aversion from what she understood to be evil, as also
from everything she. saw to be idle and vain. These
wonderful excellencies, much above the state of chil-
dren, rendered her company so desirable and. useful
to judicious and godly persons, that her distance from
them for a time was looked upon as a little death.
Nevertheless, the comfort (now that we are deprived
of her) remains, namely, We mourn not without hope.

It cannot readily be expected that such distinct ac-
counts of the progress of a gracious work can be looked
for in the case of a child, as may be found in that
of old and experienced Christians; nevertheless the
passage of scripture was eminently accomplished in

*In some copies printed by mistake “Mr. Thomas Lyde.”
Mr. Lye was one of the ministers who preached the well-known
“Morning Exercise” in London. Hjected from Allhallows in
1662, he continued still to carry on his pastoral labours till
1684. Calamy mentions (vol. i. p. 86) his unusual method of in-
structing the young in the first principles of religion, many
being indebted for their first serious impressions to his cat-
echetical exercises, in which he suited himself to the capacity
of his young auditory, to whom he always discovered a most
tender affection.” He wrote “The Child’s Delight,” and an
“ Explanation of the Assembly’s Shorter Catechism,”



INTRODUCTION, 17

her, namely, Out of the mouths of babes and sucklings
thou hast ordained strength, Psalm viii, 2. And
though I will not make the comparison betwixt John
the Baptist, Samuel, and this desirable child, becaxse
the two mentioned might be reckoned persons extra-
ordinarily cireumstanced, yet this or other the like
instances come very near to these singular ones. Such
morning seekers of the Lord’s face give early discover-
ies of the grace of the gospel-covenant, when many
old professors carry their gray-hairs as a badge of
. their ingratitude, and of many other evils. This de-
licious child did not only make conscience of religious
and Christian duties, in public, private, and secret,
(as she was also diligent about any employment her
age was capable of), but to the surprise and astonish-
ment of many, she gave notable evidences of a public
spirit, being in prayer and otherwise much taken up
about the churches of Christ, and exercised in a ten-
der sympathy with the afflicted, especially if they
were gracious persons. Neither was this a sort of
general and flashing concernment, but such as was
built upon solid grounds, whereof she was able and
ready to give the most distinct accounts. In this
manner, our sweet and young sympathizer (who also
had her own distresses by bodily frailty and otherwise)
took such a large share of the burdens of others, as
rendered her truly useful to them, until she was hap-
pily carried up to that land whereof the inhabitants
shall no more say, ‘I am sick.’

Iam afraid I have detained the reader too long by
this preface, somewhat too large for the small bulk of
the work ; and therefore I shall now proceed to the
particular instances themselves.”



3 oe ee
SB EMILIX GEDDIZ. #8

Kiioomeotion action ecapionn-coy,
CHAPTER TI.

FROM HER BIRTH TO HER NINTH YEAR

[We have already noticed the time and place of her
birth, If her parents did not at once see that she was
‘a proper child,” like Moses, they at all events soon
discovered that the Spirit of God was working in her
betimes. She manifested a most remarkable regard
to the worship of God, even while in her mother’s
arms. The narrative runs thus :]

Before she could speak, if she had
Her reverence to- 3 Seay *
wards God in in- been weeping or signifying her desire
fancy. ; .
to have anything she saw or wanted,
in case she either observed or was told they were to
go about worship in the family where she happened
to be present, this silenced her immediately. And
whatever edge had been upon her spirit before, and
though the body had been somewhat uneasy, yet she
was perfectly quict, and waited with patience until
the worship came to be ended. This was so native
to her, I may say, as to the new nature, and hecame



EMILIA GEDDTE. 19

so usual and constant, that in case she happened to
be out of humour (which was not very frequent with
her), the servants of the house would have put them-
selves into a posture of worship, by discovering” their
heads, or otherwise ; whereupon she became instantly
silent and quiet, and thus did these little disorders
go off. So much of high estimation and profound
reverence she discovered for the worship of God,even
before she arrived at the second year of her age.

Ter thoughts about S° soon as she could aim at speak-
the Creator. ing, she began to ask questions con-
cerning God and the creation, with other matters of
religion. For instance, when she observed the sun
shining, she inquired, ‘‘Whether that sun had shined
on her grandfather and grandmother, and made them
to see as well as us.” When it was answered, ‘That
the same sun gave light to the whole world,” she re-
plied, ‘‘Ought we not then to love that God who
made all these things, and gaye them to us?” Many
hundreds of such questions she proposed, and gave
likewise such answers unto questions moyed to her,
which are forgotten and lost through inadvertency.
Her wisdom and gravity were such, even in her infant
years, that every one admired her,and they especially
who saw her more rarely—for these qualities were
less observed by them who were more ordinarily with
her (though afterwards they remembered them, with
regret for the want of her), in regard things of that

__* Discovering, i. e. uncovering. See this old use of the word
in our common translation of Isaiah xxii, 8,



20 THE LIFE oF

nature and value became so common to those who
were ordinarily in her company, that they took little
notice of them.*
Asking blessing Some persons having overheard her
Ao HEe craving a blessing before meat, and
finding that she had expressions more weighty and
significant than could well have been expected from
one of her age, asked her hereupon who had taught
her to crave a blessing to her meat after that manner.
She answered, ‘‘ That she had learned now and then
a word from several persons, and that the Lord had
set these words together, whereupon she had made a
grace of them.” This happened before the third year
of her age.
Her regard forthe Much about the same time, having
Ba ae suspected that one of the servants of
the house, being the maid who attended her, had
cleansed a room on the Lord’s day, she reproved her
sharply in her childish manner, and said, ‘‘ Away,
begone, you sin against the Holy Spirit. You sweep
the house on the Sabbath, and profane the Lord’s
day.” Neither could she be reconciled with her
maid, until it was found to be a mistake, and there-
upon she was satisfied, the matter of fact having been
found otherwise.

About the same time, a servant
who was newly come to the house,
used the devil’s name in a way of cursing, in presence

Horror at an oath.

* “Fence it was,” says the compiler, ‘that the small frag
ments we have were mostly taken notice of by strangers.”

Sad



EMILIA GEDDIE. ; 31

of his other fellow-servants. She, being at that time
with her nurse, reproved him sharply, and said,
‘Henry, if you do this again, I'll tell God on you.”
He, being a wanton youth, answered her scoffingly,
‘*Go then, and do so.” Hereupon she went to the
next room, and one followed her at a distance, with-
out her knowledge, to observe her behaviour. She
Prayer foraswear- fell upon her knees, and continued
eX: in that posture for awhile.. After-
wards she returned to the company, but spoke noth-
ing, until the same young man mockingly inquired,
‘“Have you now told God?” She answered gravely,
“Yea, L have; and the Lord says, if you continue to
do so, He will give you away to the devil, and cast
you into hell.” Whereupon the youth was aston-
ished, and did carry more circumspectly for some
years wherein he served in that family. Nay, after
he had been seven years out of the family, and was
put in memory of that reproof by one who had heard
him swear, the consideration thereof made him to fall
a weeping, and to beg pardon, saying he ought never
to have forgotten such a reproof.

Helping the tempt- Being in company with a woman
eit who was struggling with dreadful
temptations, and who thereupon became afraid to be
in a room alone, the child offered to go out of the
room, and the woman endeavoured to detain her,
saying, ‘You must by no means go away.” Yet the
babe went forward, till she was near the door, and
then she looked back, and said, with a stronger and



22 THE LIFE OF

sharper voice than ordinary, ‘‘God is with you, and
will keep you from all evil.” The tempted woman,
having heard the child speak so pertinently, did pre-
sently say in her heart, ‘‘This is not the voice of the
child, but of the Lord !” And the dispensation was
so blessed to her, that the temptations vanished grad-
ually from that time forward, and did never recur.
How she knew the At another time, when she was ob-
Lord’s teaching. served to be very attentive unto the
word read and heard, and to be much in secret pray-
er, as also diligent in pressing others to that duty, an
old experienced Christian, R. W., met her in return
from her chamber, and said to her, ‘‘ Have you been
at your prayers?” She answered, ‘Yes ;” and add-
ed, ‘‘ When I was a child, my mother taught me to
pray, but now the Lord teaches me.” The honest
man inquired hereupon, ‘How know you the Lord’s
teaching by that of your mother?’ She answered,
“The Lord makes me both to rejoice and to weep;
he makes my heart glad, and gives me new words.”

At fouE ese OL Some godly people having mot to-
age joining ina gether for prayer and conference, her
prayer-meeting. other took her along, and still* her
inclinations carried her to be in such societies. After
they had met, the meeting having consisted of some
old experienced Christians, and others who were but
beginning to point} that way, a debate arose, which
of them should first pray. Some were for the elder,
and others for the younger set. The child not being

* Always. + Turn their thoughts to



EMILIA GEDDIE, 23

four years of age, and sitting at her mother’s feet,
none of the company took notice of her, because of
her nonage. Hearing the dispute, she said, ‘I’m the
youngest of all, I'll begin.” Upon which the whole
company was silent, excepting the mother, who re-
proved her child for insolence, in troubling the meet-
ing with her fondt offer, in regard she had never
prayed in such company before, nor had been ever in-
vited, because of her childhood. There was at that
time in the company an old experienced matron,upon
whom the society had laid it to begin their meeting
with prayer: she said, ‘‘My child, you shall have my
consent to begin,” and did prevail so far with her
mother and the company that it was allowed. This
is the only instance wherein she expressed any for-
wardness ; for such was her modesty and bashfulness
afterward, that she would never adventure upon that
duty in societies, without much entreating and a clear
call. Yet the passage is set down, because a young
gentlewoman who had but newly set out, and had
been present at very few, if any, such meetings be-
fore, was so moved with several expressions the child
had in prayer, that she held on in the Lord’s way
ever afterward,* and acknowledged that the Lord
blessed the child’s praying at that time, and that she
really got good by it. A renewed confirmation, that
“out of the mouth of babes and sucklings the Lord or-
daineth strength.” (Psalm viii. -2.)

} Foolish.

* In spite of the persecutions that arose, in which many
sealed the truth with their blood,



2+ THE LIFE OF

No show in her ‘She was observed to weep much
profession. alone, but was utterly unwilling that
it should be known ; and because of this aversion,she
was very careful to wash her face quictly, and to put
herself in such a posture as might best conceal her
having wept. And in case she heard any person
speaking to her advantage, and repeating any of her
sayings or practices, she would have gone off and hid
herself, or else would have wept.

Awminister offend- A godly minister inadvertently
ing the little ones. said to her, ‘I would not give a
halfpenny fer a child’s religion ;’ the words made
such a deep impression upon her spirit, that she went
on her way with much heaviness for a long time, and
took the occasion for moving the question to any ju-
dicious and godly persons she had opportunity to
meet with, whether they knew any good and religious
children who continued such when they were old





‘A mother’s ve- One day, when her mother had re-
VT f felt oo.
oo proved her for not giving a good enough

account of her lesson, she was afterwards found weep-

ing. Being asked, ‘‘Why weep you ?—you were not

beaten ;” she answered, ‘‘I had rather been beaten
? ?

* Should not this remind us of our Lord’s solemn warning—
‘Whoso shall offend (i. e. cause to stumble) one of these little
ones that believe in me, it were better for him that a millstone
were hanged about his neck, and he were drowned in the depth
of the sea.” ‘‘Take heed that ye despise not one of these little
ones: for I say unto you, that in heaven their angels do always
behold the face of my Father which is in heaven” (Matt. xviii.
6-10:) Angels; the very highest and most honoured angels, do
not disdain to minister for these little ones, for the Lord does
not disdain to send theia to take care of such (Heb. i. 14.)



EMILIA GEDDIE, uD

than that I had angered my mother; the thoughts of
my mother’s being angry make me to weep.”
Struggles with Being sore tossed in wrestling with
SEO temptations, she went to a godly wo-
man, with whom she frequently conversed about her
spiritual cases. She, finding her at this time sore
troubled, did ask the cause. She answered, ‘‘Alas!
the devil takes the good word out of the very bottom
of my heart; and often he says to me, ‘ What needs
all this noise with your religion? You may be like
other children; they will get heaven as soon as you.’
These and the like temptations,” said she, ‘‘I am
vexed with.” Being inquired waat course she took
with them, she replied, ‘‘ That she knew no other
way but to carry them in before the Lord by prayer;
and I desire,” said she, ‘‘that you would pray, and
bid godly people pray for me, for my prayers have
no strength, nor theirs either, without Christ.”
Being on a certain day in a good
dress, with her linens white, and
adorned with red ribbons, a godly man, R. W., said
to her thereupon, ‘‘No doubt you think yourself to
be very trim and clean.” She replied, ‘‘I shall never
think that, until I get on the fair and clean robe of
Christ's imputed righteousness, and then I shall be
truly fine and clean,”

No pride in dress.

Thoughts in sick- Some while afterward she fell sick,
ess: and her bed being made, she was laid
in it, whereupon one of the company said, ‘‘ This is
well, she will now get rest.” She, overhearing, an-



26 THE LIFE OF

swered, ‘‘I am rejoicing at another thing, and that
is, that there is a rest prepared for the people of God
(Heb. iv. 9), among whom I hope to be found; there
T shall sing for evermore.” Then she called for her

father, who came and asked what she would* say.
She answered, ‘‘ Pray. Let us pray together here,

and we will sing the more sweetly when we come to
our rest.”

Feeling of the | When first she began to be more
word preached. sensibly profited by hearing the word
preached,and to give clear evidences of her being edi-
fied thereby, this instance, amongst others, is memor-
able. A minister having preached upon a Sabbath
on these words—‘*‘ In this mountain shall the Lord of
hosts make unto all people a feast of fat things, a feast
of wines upon the lees,” &c. (Isaiah xxy. 6), she de-
clared she found the word very sweet to her, and that
it did her good. Being inquired what good she found
in it, and how it did her good, she answered, ‘It
did go through her bones ; it went into her heart,and
brought tears to this place,” pointing with her finger

to her eye-lids.
Much about the same time, she was

desired to pray with some others just
after she had risen from her bed, she refused, saying,
** How can you bid me pray, seeing my prayers can
bring no comfort: but yours may?” They insisted
further ; she refused absolutely, and told them, “I
am but just now got out of my bed, and will pray
none in company until first I have prayed alone,”

* Wished to say.

Closet prayer.



EMILTA GEDDIE. 27

When at a certain time she was ly-
ing in her bed in a morning, and was
overheard weeping, a friend came to her, and inquired
what troubled her. She first declined to tell, but
being further urged, her answer was, ‘‘I have been
meditating on hell, and the darkness of it, and I think
I cannot endure it.”

Being in a garden on a Sabbath day,

Thinking on hell.

Reproving the 4 a
breaker of the and having seen some children play-

iat ing together, she, rebuking them,
said, ‘‘ It were better for you to be praying.” They
answered, ‘‘We are but children.” She replied,
‘Though we be but children, yet we must die,” and
thereupon she went from them, and hid herself in a
corner. Some of the children went about and sought
her, and having found her at prayer in a secret corner,
they reproached and upbraided her with nicknames.
She answered them meekly and gravely, ‘‘ Know ye
not that the word of God saith, ‘‘ Remember to keep
holy the Sabbath-day ?” 'The children replied, ‘‘ The
word does not say, ‘Emilia Geddie, keep holy the
Sabbath-day.’” Emily answered, ‘‘The word of God
says to you, and you and me, and to all, ‘ Remember
to keep holy the Sabbath-day.’” They replied to her,
‘© You are a violent young Whig* but we will slay
you.” She answered, ‘‘Well, I will complain to God
on you.” They replied, ‘‘You may do so.” Then

* The name given to those who exposed themselves to perse-
cution, because they continued to hear the word of God from
the lips of Presbyterian ministers, when the Prelatic bishops
made a law, that every one must attend the curate of his own
parish. See Cruickshank’s History, chap vii.



28 THE LIFE ov

e retired from them to the house;
while they sought her out again, and, having found
her, they said, ‘‘Now, Emily, have you told God on
us?’ ‘Yes, Ihave,” said she. They replied scoff-
ingly, ‘* Well, what says God?’ She answered,
“The Lord saith this, ‘The wicked shall be turned into
hell, and all that forget God.” (Psalm ix. 17.)
Remark on the When first she began to read the-
Shorter Catechism. assembly's Shorter Catechism, she
said to her teacher, ‘‘I think the Bible is God’s word,
and the Catechism is the Bible’s word.”

One having read this passage of
scripture, ‘‘ Rend your hearts, and
not your garments” (Joel ii. 13), the child said, ‘I

think this reproves the Papists, and their way of pen-
ance ; for God calls for nothing but the breaking and
foahline of the heart.”

and after some

No need of penance.

Her estimate of Having come at a time from one of
words in prayer. her young. societies, which she had
gathered together for prayer, she was asked by a per-
son, ‘Who prayed best?” ‘I cannot tell,” said she,
‘who prayed best, but I can tell those whose words
came best forth,” and named one R. L.. Being in-
quired at anotner time, after she came from her pray-
ing society of children,she gave this account—namely,
“That one, G. W., had most of his prayers about the
rulers, and another, M. G., was much taken up about
the churches abroad.”

Â¥aithful reply toa A captain of the forces, having come
profane captain. into her father’s house, said to: her,



EMILIA GE 29



“Emily, I will marry you.” She answered, ‘‘ No.”
He inquired her reason. She replied, ‘‘ You have no
grace.” ‘‘Have you any?” said the captain. She
answered, ‘‘ Whatever I have, you have none; for
if you had, you would not do the bishop’s bidding, to
take the honest ministers, and persecute all the godly
praying folk.”

Her wish to be A company being engaged in con-
pS aS verse, and each one proposing to his
neighbour, Which of the saints he would chiefly desire
to resemble? she, being present, said, ‘I would fain
be like David.” ‘‘ Would you be a king?” said one.
“No,” said she, ‘‘ but I would gladly be in David's
case. He was aman according to God’s heart; he
dwelt near God, and in the light of God’s counte-
nance,”

EtRenee She ie most attentive in reading
the meaning of the scripture and the catechisms, and
Bg gees did observe carefully what she had
read. She came one day to her father, and proposed
that question, namely, ‘‘Why it was that, in the
fourth commandment, to keep holy the Sabbath, the
wife is not particularly mentioned, and yet others of
the family are set down, as sons, daughters, and
servants? And she observed that, in the tenth com-
mandment, the wife is particularly named amongst
other things of our neighbour’s which we may not
covet, and the daughter is not mentioned in that
command.” Her father asked her, ‘‘what she thought

S

was the reason?” She answered, ‘That the general



30 THE LIFE OF

words of all that is within thy gates, comprehended
every person ;” and so the matter ended.

RR ar Her nCeTe Having one day taken some view
sistency of profess- of a foot-ball game, she thought it
ing Ghesu aes. to be vain and idle, and left them.
When she returned to the company, she was asked,
*“Why she had retired so quickly and wept?” She
answered, ‘‘ That it was not so much for seeing the
idleness and wickedness of the foot-ball men, as be-
cause she had seen a godly and grave gentlewoman
laughing and taking pleasure at the sight.”* It is
very like that wicked speeches were intermingled
with their sport.

Most freedomin She with her young society having
PEN met one day for prayer, a minister
who was occasionally in the house desired to be ad-
mitted into the company, which they modestly de- .
clined. After the first prayer was ended, he renewed
his desire, that he might at least confer with them.
This they granted. Then he demanded, ‘ Whether
they would put any question to him, or he propose
one to them?” Emilia answered, ‘‘ We would ask a
question of you, which is this, Whence is it, that a
Christian for ordinary enjoyeth more of enlargement
in praying alone than with others ?”

* Ts not this the mind of Christ? ‘It was not an enemy that

reproached me ; then I could have borne it; but it was thou.”
—Psalm ly. 12.



EMILIA GEDDIE. ; 31

‘anteater aeisne: + ear to the same time a persecuted
thened by her pray- minister, Mr, D. C.,+ came to her
ing with him. 5 -
father’s house, with a design to stay
until the Sabbath was over, and resolved to preach
on the Lord's day. When Saturday came, he pro-
posed to go to another place, but was much entreated
to stay. Yet he declined, and ingenuously gave his
reason, which was, ‘‘That he had broken in upon two
or three texts, but could get no digested thoughts
about them; which made him suspect he was not
called to preach there at that time.” Nevertheless,
upon further importunity, he was persuaded to stay
a little longer, and to make a new essay; for which
effect the company left him. The child was present,
and heard all this, no person taking notice of her.
Some little while after, she went alone to the minis-
ter, and asked what he was doing, and whether he
was preparing to preach. The minister, wondering
at such gravity and confidence in a mere child, an-
swered her, ‘“‘No, Emily, Iam not.” She replied,
“Sir, go and pray.” He answered, ‘‘ Yes, I will do
so, if you will pray with me.” To which she agreed;
and they both performed the duty the one after the
other. After that the child had prayed, the minister
declared he found himself so refreshed and streng-
thened that he immediately resolved to stay ; and ac-
+ This may have been Donald Cargill, the martyr ; for he fre-
quently preached in Fife, and even during the years in which
he was ordered to keep north of the Tay did not scruple to pass
southward when he saw an opportunity of preaching the Gospel.

Glenvale, among the Lomond Hills, was one of the scenes of his
field preaching.



oo THE LIFE oF

cordingly he tarried, and preached the whole day with
power aad liberty, to the great benefit of the hearers.
These sermons wrought mightily, through the Lord’s
blessing, upon the heart of the child, and were heard
by her with much concern and application.

Reasoning with a A young woman, A. R., had long
tempted woman. struggled under a dreadful tempta-
tion, which procured her.abstaining from food, in re-
gard she thought it would have been presumption in
her to eat, seeing she looked on herself as having no
right to the creatures. Many arguments were used
to persuade her to a taking of meat, but nothing pre-
vailed. Hereupon the child went to her chamber,
and expostulated with her to this purpose: ‘You re-
fuse to eat, but it is the devil that beguiles you: you
cannot live unless you eat. Were I in your place, T
would beguile the devil ; I would eat, and not obey
him, but obey the Lord.” These words and argu-
ments of the child took such impression upon the
poor tempted woman, tliat she shook off the tempta-
tion, and took her meat regularly. When this was
observed, honest people, who saw her, rejoiced much
to find her delivered from under the feet of such a
cruel temptation. And she ingenuously declared,
that the Lord had blessed the words of the child, for
defeating that hellish engine. : So far as was known,
she never afterwards gave way to such diabolical
suggestions,

Usefulin another Some while after, the same woman,
peu Duaton, through the power of temptation, de-



EMILIA GEDDTEL 33

sisted from the duty of prayer, and with so much of
peremptoriness that no persuasion could induce her
to essay it. But again the child prevailed, having
prayed with her ; whereupon, through the blessing of
God, the strength of that temptation was broken, and
she went about the duty afterward.

: She jwas still* much addicted to
Meetings for pray- =
er with other chil- secret prayer, and laid out herself
Bs es in persuading others to it, especially
those of her owa sex and years; by which means she
gathered together a society of children, who did reg-
ularly meet, without admitting any others into their
company. ‘Thus they continued unknown, save that
some persons, whether from curiosity or other
motives, did endeavour to overhear what passed
amongst them. Ona certain day, they having met
in a room where there was a closet, a judicious per-
son, who had gone intothat apartment without their
knowledge, kept the door shut, and made no noise,
that he might know their management ; which he ob-
served with much satisfaction, After they had met,
and before prayer by any of them, a complaint was
given in against M. M., one of their number,who was
the oldest among them all, by three or four years,
and also the tallest of stature. Hereupon they con
stituted themselves into a sort of court of judicature,
and made choice of Emilia to preside amongst them.
After this the alleged delinquent was challenged. The
libel laid against her was this; namely, ‘That she,

* 4.¢., Always.



34 THE LIFE OF

being one of their society, had been guilty of some
practices unsuitable to their profession, and offensive
to other good people :” and the following particulars
were condescended upon : First, That she had heard
a curate* preach in the church of Strathmiglo upon a
Lord’s day. Secondly, that being in a company who
joined in prayer, she had been seen laughing in the
time of duty. Thirdly, That she had spoken evil of
some godly persons. ‘To this libel, M. M. gave the
following answers. As to the first article, she ac-
knowledged that she had indeed heard that curate ;
but without any knowledge beforehand, and also
against her inclination. She had gone to pay a visit
to her sister, married to a gentleman of that parish,
who was in use to attend Presbyterian meetings; and
being desired by him and her sister to attend worship
on the Lord’s day, she knew no other than that they
were going to hear a Presbyterian minister ; whereas,
without her knowledge, and contrary to her design,
she was bronght to the church by force—for which
she declared her sorrow, and promised to do go no
more. As to the second, she confessed she had
laughed in time of prayer, but was induced so to do
by a mere surprise; namely, a young woman had
fallen asleep in time of prayer, and was so far entan-
gled with the chair on which she leaned, that upon
her awaking, she tumbled on the floor, with her stool

upon her, in such sort that none who saw her could
* These were the men of whom Bishop Burnet says, “They

were ignorant to a reproach, the dregs and refuse of the north-
ern parts i



EMILIA GEDDIE. 35

abstain from laughing. As to the third, she denied
the charge; but acknowledged she had mentioned
some evil things, which certain honest people had said
of other godly folk; and that she had done it with
regret, and did sincerely lament it, that such evil re- »
ports should be spread. concerning godly persons, and
declared that she had said nothing of that kind from
herself. :
Her$ This libel, with the answers given
er judgment on

theconductofone thereunto, being considered by the
of her members. :

young meeting, and every one’s
judgment asked, they all, with one voice, referred the
matter to their president, who, after some discourse
to the meeting, proposed her judgment as follows:
namely, ‘‘ That the offender, M. M., should not be
debarred from the society, but allowed to be present
with them for hearing and converse ; but, in regard
of some offence both given and taken in this matter,
she should not be allowed to pray with them in the
society for the space of a month ; so that, during that
space of time, they might have the occasion to ob-
serve her deportment, and she might have access to
improve herself by her following behaviour.” Such
was the grave, impartial, and wise procedure of this
young judicature, by the direction of their grave
president,
Her mode of deal- It was her ordinary custom to get
ing with beggars. from that servant who was intrusted
to serve the poor, so much as her parents allowed for
them, that she might give them their alms out of her



85 THE LIFE OF

own hand. This was thought a little strange, in re-
gard that children of her age are usually afraid of
beggars. It was not so with her; but, upon the con-
trary, she followed them to the outmost gate, and
without it, and was at pains to instruct and exhort
them, shewing them that there is a God, a heaven
and hell, And, moreover, she reproved them for
their wicked lives, and plainly teld them that their,
swearing, drinking, breaking of the Sabbath-day, and
other crimes, would bring them to hell. The maid
who attended her was often afraid when she missed
her, not knowing where she could be; and, after they
had sought her out, she was often found conferring
with the beggars. One day she said to her mother,
“I perceive that you and others give meat, and some-
times a bit of cloth, to beggars; but { see not that
you or others call them in, and inquire of them if
they know they have souls, or teach them a question
or two in the Catechism.” There are more passages
of this sort which are not thought necessary or proper
to be imparted, in this manner.
A minister of the gospel, having ob-

Wise thoughts E : Mit
about proper Served her way and deportment with
eae the the beggars, inquired of her of whom

~ "~~" she thought the begears were descend-
ed. Her answer was, ‘‘She thought the renegado or
randy-beggars were of the accursed race of Cain ;
for,” said she, ‘‘the Lord has sentenced them to be
fugitives and vagabonds upon the face of the earth.”
‘Well,” said the minister, ‘what course would you



.EMILIA GEDDIE. : 37

have taken with them?’ She answered, “I would
have every parish to keep their own poor, and to pro-
vide for them, and teach them; and thus much sin

‘would be prevented. For I think,” said she, “ that
their abominable wickednesses bring much sin and
wrath upon the land.”

A Sabbath at Upon a Sabbath on which she and
ONO other children had been left alone in
the house, when the rest of the family came home,
one of them asked how she had spent the day. She
replied, that she spent it in her ordinary manner, in
reading, singing, praying, and other spiritual exercises ;
all which, she declared, were so sweet to her that she
wearied not, but thought the time very short.
Her father (being clerk to the
a Goines et king’s stewartry of Wife) was re-
aes in provi- quired and pressed to. take The
Declaration,* and threatened in case
of his refnsal; whereupon he called his daughter
Emilia, and said to her, ‘I am threatened and like
to be forced to take The Declaration.” She, from
her concern about the church and nation, came to
know sufficiently what it was. Her father insisted,
and said, ‘*Whether shall I take that oath or not?
What think you of it?’ She answered, ‘‘Take it
not ; God forbid you should take it.” “But,” said
her father, “ Emily, they will take my place from

* This was an Act declaring it unlawful to enter into cove-
nants or leagues, or to hold conventions and gatherings, and
specially denouncing the “National League and Covenant” as
unlawful,

. B



38 THE LIFE OF .

me.” She replied, ‘That he need not much care tor
that.” “* But,” added he, “ they will persecute me
further, and take away my estate; and then how shall -
I and you live?” She very cheerfully answered,
‘* Dear father, take no thought of me; God will pro-
vide for us; let us live by faith.” “But,” replied
her father, ‘‘ God hath appointed means to be used
for an honest livelihood, and hath commanded us to
use them.” She answered, ‘‘He hath indeed ap-
pointed lawful means to be used; but we may not
use such as are unlawful.” ‘“‘Ay, but,” said her
father, ‘‘I see no mean for our livelihood except I
take The Declaration.” All this he spoke for trial,
being fully resolved not to take that wicked oath. At
length, with a great deal of modesty and submission,
she said, ‘‘Dear father, do not take that Declaration,
and I will tell you how we may live.” ‘‘ How is
that?” said he. She answered, ‘‘I will go to service,
and thereby I may get victuals and also old clothes
from some persons of honour ; and so I will save my
wages and give you them to live upon.” Her father
answered, ‘Whom can you serve, or who will give
you wages? you are but young.” (She was at that
time but eight years of age.) She replied, ‘I know
a lady who will give me both food, raiment, and
wages ; which wages I will ‘give to you.” Here we
have notable evidences, not only of a good and duti-
ful child, who bore a fervent love to her parents, but
also some clear indications of grace and parts beyond
her age; and, in particular, she hereby discovered



EMILIA GEDDIE, 39

much of a keen hatred of sin, which was most com-
fortable to her parents and others concerned with
her.

Prayer for impri- Upon a day when she had retired
soned ministers, for secret prayer, a minister, having
put off his shoes that he might the more quietly and
unobservedly hear what she said, went as near to the
door of the room as he possibly could. He, having
returned, did most seriously declare that he thought
every word she spoke came from the very bottom of
her heart. Among other suits she put up, she par-
ticularly insisted for two ministers, Messrs. R. G.
and A. P.,* who were then prisoners in the Bass.
The one was a young man, and the other old. The
expressions she used were, ‘‘There are many,O Lord,
who use means to get the young minister’s liberty,
but we hear of no means used for the old ; therefore,
O Lord, do it thyself, and I will declare thou didst
it thyself, and bless thy name for it.” Some while
after this, the old minister, Mr. A. P., was wonder-
fully delivered from that prison.

. In the ninth year of her age,when
Severely injured :
bysomeboys. Her she was one day going to schoal,
forgiving spirit. >
mee three or four boys, older and bigger

than she, met her in the way ; and, having furnished

* R. G. is Mr. Robert Gillespie. He was before the Council,
and owned that he had kept one conventicle in the town of
Falkland, in 1673. Refusing to inform who were present at
that conventicle, he was sent prisoner to the Bass. ‘The other,
A. P., is the well-known Alewander Peden, sent to the Bass that
same year. It was Peden who said, “Pray much; it is praying
folks that will get through the storm,” :



49 THE LIFE OF

themselves with small rods in their hands, they
threatened to beat her, and said they would slay her,
if she would not swear to be no more a whig, and
promise to go afterwards to church. She answered,
“Though ye should slay me, I will not swear at all.”
Hercupon they lashed her with their rods, and threat-
ened her further. She essayed to make an escape,
but could not, because they were swifter and stronger
than she. This-put her sore to it, because she was
without the reach of help by crying, the place being
remote from houses and company. But having con-
sidered awhile what to do, she remembered that she
had some farthings by her; whereupon she took them
all out, and scattered them amongst the boys, who
did presently run together and contended about
them. ‘Phis fair occasion and advantage she took,
and, running with all her might, she escaped that
danger. Nevertheless, the fear and stripes were very
hurtful to her; for, after that encounter, she con-
tracted a sickness which procured her vomiting a
great deal of blackish humour, that would have been
fatal to her, as many thought, had it not been evacu-
ated. Next day it was told her that the parents of
these boys had corrected them severely for their
heinous crimes; which, when she heard, it brought
this meek answer from her, namely, ‘“That she freely
forgave them, seeing they knew no better.”



EMILIA GEDDIE, 41

CHAPTER If.
FROM HER NINTH TO HER FIFTEENTH YEAR.*

Upon the occasion that a person in

A remarkable
answertoprayer Whom she was very nearly concerned
Per eee eencok: was like to be expelled from the place,
because of refusing to conform, as the

law then required, the child, without acquainting any
person of her design, endeavoured to prevail with
some of her associates that they would join together
in prayer, for detaining that person amongst them.
She had, before this time, as she herself narrated,
much rejoiced at the merciful providence that a per-
son so useful should have come to dwell where she
resided ; and therefore she could not but look upon
it as a heavy stroke to the neighbourbood and upon
herself, in case one should be thrust from them who
was of so great use to them both in spiritual and sec-

* This portion is entitled in the original edition, ‘“‘Some fur-
ther speeches of Emilia Geddie, uttered to and in the hearing
of persons worthy of credit, observed and collected by K.C., her
schoolmistress, who was intimately acquainted with her, and
given in by the said K. C. as followeth.” So careful was the
compiler to give only what was genuine.

This schoolmistress seems to have been Katherine Collace, or
Mrs. Ross, who, when inthe north at Oldearn, was one of the
most intimate friends of Mr. Hog of Kiltearn at the time when
persecution caused him to reside in Morayshire. Circumstances
led her to remove southward to Falkland, after she was left a
widow and had lost twelve children successively. This was in
1672. (See “Spiritual Exercises of Mistress Ross,” p. 62, pre-
faced by Mr. Hog of Carnock.) She taught sewing, and was the
instrument of converting many of her scholars. Her name fre-
quently occurs in the “‘ Diary of James Nimmo,” acopy of which
exists in MS., written by Wm. Geddie, the uncle of Emilia
Geddie.



42 THE LIFE oF

ular regards; and particularly to herself, as having the
charge of her education, She was not fully nine years
of age when she laid out herself for bringing about
the fore-mentioned project; yet it failed, in so far as
she could not procure a joint concurrence in that en-
terprise. Nevertheless, she set about the duty her-
self alone, and, having severed some time for that -
effect, she got (as she herself narrated) a merciful re-
turn, and was encouraged from that word, Be not
afraid, only believe, Mark v. 36. She looked on the
mercy as so much the greater, because .she acknow-
ledged her great want of a concernment upon her
spirit suiting the weight of that matter. The gentle-
woman about whom all this business was made, being
her school-mistress, asked the child ‘‘ What her
thoughts were of the matter, and if she expected her
being suffered to stay in the place.” She readily an-
swered, ‘‘There is no fear ;” but declined to mention
how she came to know so much. But, being impor-
tuned, she humbly and modestly gave the foresaid
account ; and everything fell owt accordingly. For,
though all possible means were used to cast that per-
son out of the place, yet they prevailed not. She
stayed there as long as she thought meet with much
quietness.

Refusestogotothe The child, being very intimate
house of mirth. —_ with her school-mistress, gave her a
particular account of her spiritual concerns from time
to time. One day, upon the earnest suit of a near
relation, her mother was prevailed with to permit the



EMILIA. GEDDIE, 48

child to go to a penny-wedding of a servant of that
friend, Yet her school-mistress, not inclining that
she should go, said nothing, but only gave her a place
of Scripture to read and ponder, namely, Isaiah xxii.
12, 13, 14,* and desired her to inquire into the Lord's
mind init. This she accordingly did; and, having
returned, her mistress asked her what she thought of
that passage. She answered, ‘“‘She had learned so
much from it that she would by no means go to the
wedding.” ‘I have not forbidden you,” said her
mistress. ‘‘But the Lord hath forbidden me by his
word,” said. the child. Hereupon her mistress re-
quired her to shew how that was. She answered,
“My going to that wedding would have been contrary
to the word [ had read, and that in two things. First,
The Lord is calling us at this time to fasting, mourn-
ing, and praying ; and, had I gone to that wedding,
I had gone to feasting, revelling, and mirth. Second,
That place speaks of girding with sackcloth, and I
behoved to have been in a finer dress than ordinary if
T had gone to the wedding. Therefore, it is neither
suitable to the times, nor the suffering condition of
my father’s family, to go to such feastings.” These
were near her very words; so she would not go.

* “And in that day did the Lord God of Hosts call to weep-
ing; and to mourning, and to baldness, and to girding with sack-
cloth ; and behold! joy and gladness, slaying oxen and killing
sheep, eating flesh and drinking wine; ‘Let us eat and drink,
for to-morrow we shall die.’ And it was repeated in mine ears
by the Lord of Hosts, Surely this iniquity shall not be purged,
Srom you till ye die. saith the Lord God of Hosts.”



44.
A day or two after, some of hep
Sadness because » 5 Palle
ofnot protesting Cousins treated with her to go in with
aeinsk Bhs SNS them to a chamber of that house where
the marriage entertainment had been
held. There some of the young gentlewoman danced,
but she was only a spectatrix.* Immediately 'here-
upon she fell under a heavy damp, and went quickly
off from the company, humbly to inquire of the Lord
into the causes. But, finding nothing by prayer, she
essayed reading of the word, waiting for some con-
vincing discovery from thence. And, having found
nothing there, she tried meditation; and searching
her way by that means, but not finding out the cause,
she went to prayer again; and the Lord convinced
her of the evil in countenancing and encouraging the
other children in their lightness and vanity. Hereupon
she was humbled for her sin, and confessed it to the
Lord, and declared she found the access to pardon
easy. She got discoveries of the love of Christ to her
soul clearer than ordinarily, and said, ‘‘she was ad-
mitted to such near embraces of Christ by faith, that
she could have been satisfied to have gone immedi-
ately from thence to heaven.”
anata ieee Being at school, which she punc-
sedregardingcom- tually attended, she was observed to
ee go often forth one day. Whereupon
a certain person traced her, and found that she was
frequently at prayer that day. Having come home
from school, she asked a servant, ‘‘ whether there had

* A looker-on.



EMILIA GEDDIE 45
been any stir about her father’s house?’ The ser-
vant, fearing to trouble her, was at first unwilling to
answer, but, on further importunity, told her that the
house had been carefully searched for papers, but
none were found. After this, she retired and gave
thanks to the Lord for the merciful return of her
prayers, and was much taken up about the public
concerns of the churches, and of this church. At
that time she got a full and strong persuasion of the
Lord’s appearing for the deliverance of his church in
this land. Next day, being demanded the reason of
her greater than ordinary frequency at prayer, as
aforesaid, she modestly gave the fore-mentioned ac-
count, and added, ‘‘she had seen the most glorious
sight she ever saw.” Being desired to impart what it
was, she declined; but, being pressed, she said, ‘I
have seen the Lord on his throne of majesty, ard
coming forth against his enemies, and I saw them
made to fly as chaff before his presence; and I wept,”
said she, ‘‘for the misery of the wicked.” Being in-
quired what she thought of her father’s enemies, she
answered, ‘‘I think they are even taken in with the
Lord’s enemies.” Upon another day she came very
cheerfully and pleasantly to her mistress, and said,
“T have gotten two great mercies; one is, That the
Lord will again appear gloriously in this land; and
the other, That the Lord hath given assurance to my
soul that I am his.” )

lier inward sirug- Thereafter, her mistress having
gles and victories. teen from home a week or thereby,



46 PTE LIFE OF

at her return called the child to an account about
her spiritual condition during her absence—for, as to
her learning, she was exact and diligent, and needed
no incitement. She answered, ‘‘I have been sore
assaulted with temptations, and in prayer I got that
word, ‘ Zhe seed of the woman shall bruise the serpent’s
head’ (Gen. iti, 15), and so he went away. But, a
little after, I was left to a worse evil for a time, even
lightness of heart, and to nave been rid of it I could
have wished to have been again in my former tempted
condition. Next, I was somewhat taken up about
suffering for truth, and found that I am able neither
to suffer nor flee. Then I got aclear discovery of the
sufferings of Christ, which, I am convinced, would
dispose my heart to suffer for him.”

Emmity to levity Upon a Sabbath, when she and
in holy things. " another child were praying and read-
ing sermons in her father’s garden, a girl came in up-

on them who had been one of their society, but had
that day gone to church, She fell a plucking of the
flowers ; whereupon Emilia said, ‘These are the fruits
of the curate’s* preaching, even breaking of the Sab-
bath day.” The girl desired the child who was with-
Emilia to pray ; but Emilia, thinking the desire pro-

ceeded from curiosity, gave her comrade a watchword
not to comply therewith. ‘‘ Her carriage,” said she,

“is very unlike the Lord’s day ; and, had it not been

* These curates had supplanted the godly and much loved
Presbyterian pastors, and besides were ‘‘mean and despicable
in all respects,” according to Archbishop Burnet, who adds this
further testimony, that they were “‘the worst preachers he ever
heard, and many of them openly vicious.”



EMILIA GEDDIE. 47

my father’s garden, I would have bidden her go away,
but, seeing the garden is his, I thought it not
convenient.”

Letter to her About this time; her father being in
father. London, she wrote a letter to him as
follows :—

“Loving Faruer,—I pray you may be guided in
your way, and not left to sin against God; for this
is a very trying time, and the people of God are under
many temptations. You have need to watch over
your heart now. If the Lord bring you to your jour-
ney’s end, I desire you may bring me home a new
Bible, and the Confession of Faith and Catechisms,
with the Covenants. and Scriptures at length, and
what else you please. I am unwilling to trouble you
further ; and so I rest your affectionate daughter,

Eminia GEDDIE.
“FALKLAND, June 11, 1675.

“Present my service to Mr. Carmichael and his
wife. Farewell, dear father; I wish to hear good
news of you.”

Occasional medi: _[n a conference, she said to a cer-
eauloM: tain person, ‘What good get you of
Scriptures which come passingly into your mind
through the day?” The person did put the question
back to herself, and she answered, ‘‘They serve to
divert my mind from other vanities ; but I get no
profit by them to the exercising of my soul to godli-
ness, save when I get them from God by prayer, or
else go to the Lord by prayer with them,”



48 THE LIFE OF

Praying for per- She asked her mother, ‘‘ Have you
Bese prayed for repentance to him who
persecuteth us, and possesseth our estate ?”* Her
mother answered, ‘‘No.” To this she replied humbly
and modestly, “I think you should have done it. I
have been trying it as I could, and do think that no
other rod was fit for us,save Such an one. But he will
be brought low, and your hands shall not be on him.
You shall return and possess your own ; and in your
return you shall have nothing to do but to see the
salvation of the Lord.” All this came exactly to
pass.

Confidence and Tn the time of her sickness, when
presentiments. one day she was observed to be under
great heaviness, a friend inquired the cause. She
answered, ‘I see great and sore troubles coming upon
the church and people of God in this land ; and great
warnings are given them to enter into their chambers
until the indignation be overpast.” And she further
said, ‘The promises ye have been getting these days
past may be chambers for you to hide in. As for
me,” added she, ‘*the Lord will hide me in the hol-
low of his hand; I shall not see these evil days. O
that his people would flee to his promises, and to the

* In the Memoir of John Geddie, ‘ Abbotsford Miscellany,”
p. 362,-we find him speaking of this hardship, *‘My place being
taken from me then (1674), as now it is, because I would not
comply with the English and subscribe their oath, called The
Tender ; yet, considering the estate was old for many hundreds
of years, the love I had to preserve that old inheritance, made
us, under God, toil much and labour to recover the same;
which, by the blessing of God, I did, &c.” He paid 15,000 merks
to relieve the estate.



EMILIA GEDDIE. 49
bleeding wounds of Jesus Christ! In these only
there is safe hiding in a dark and gloomy day.”

Too much hearing She being at a certain time in
unedifyihg. Kirkaldy, and understanding that
some people, who had but just heard sermons, were
yet intent upon hearing more, said toa godly woman,
G. H., ‘“‘These folks are like to some horses, of which
T have been informed, that pull a great deal of fodder
from the rack, and trample it under their feet, eating
little or none of it. I think we should be like the
horses which eat what they pull down. It were good
for us, when we have heard a sermon, to chew the
cud, by meditating on what we have gotten, ere we
look for more.”

Self-upbraiding for Having heard a sermon against
Rigaku: backsliding, she was afterwards ob-
served to be heavy and afflicted; and being asked
the cause, she answered, ‘‘I was reproved by what I
heard on the Lord’s day, for I am a great backslider.”
And being asked how and wherein, she replied, “‘T
had met. with a great deliverance; for, sitting one day
by the wall of a house, a great piece of slate fell by
me, touching only my clothes, and I was not hurt,
and yet I did not set apart a time to praise the Lord
for such a merciful deliverance, as IT had used to do
in less things.”

Tn the beginning of the tenth year
eee iy of her age, when in a coach on her
ena way t0 way to London from York, a Pop-

ish lady, heing providentially in the



50 THE LIFE OF

same coach, took delight to converse with the child
concerning religion, Having endeavoured to persuade
her of purgatory, she answered, ‘‘Madam,\TI have
been taught my catechism, and I have read and heard
from Scripture of heaven and hell; but I never heard
of purgatory, nor do I see any ground to believe it.”
The lady insisted, ‘“‘ What then think you became of
Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and the patriarchs, with
other saints who died before Christ’s coming in the
flesh?” <‘‘ Madam, that is easily answered,” said the
child; ‘‘ for all these patriarchs lived and died in the
faith of Jesus Christ to come in the flesh. It is
written (John viii. 56), ‘Abraham rejoiced to see my
day, and he saw it and was glad ;’ and the prophet
David (Psalm xvi. 8), seeing Christ to come, did set
him always before his eyes. They and all the other
saints believed he was to come in the flesh ; and, by
virtue of his death and satisfaction, they were saved,
as all the elect shall be, from the beginning of the
world to the end thereof.” Many other remarkable
things were spoken during the six days they travelled
together, but they are now forgotten and lost, The
lady did greatly commend the child, and said to her
parents, ‘It were pity she had not some to educate
her in the way of their church,”
Pe gk. When she came to London, having
per: her sense of occasion to be present at the adminis-
God’s free love. 3 ;

tration of the Lord’s supper, she was
much affected, but was silent for some time. Yet
afterwards she spoke to a friend and said, ‘I saw



EMILIA GEDDIE. on

that sacrament given by the Independents at New-
castle, at which I was not moved ; but now, having
seen the Presbyterian way, I am moved: my heart is
more engaged to the Lord Jesus than ever. And I
would have gladly taken the sacrament, but that I
thought myself too young and ignorant, and not fit
to discern the Lord’s body, which is necessary in such
an ordinance.” She inquired whether any of her age
did take that sacrament; and, being demanded the
reason of her inquiry, she said, ‘‘I have read in the
catechisms, and have considered what a sacrament is.
This time I saw much of glory and beauty in it, and
was made to read much of the love of our Lord Jesus
in these words (1 Cor. xi. 28), ‘Zhe same night in
which he was betrayed,’ &e. My heart,” said she,
“was exceedingly affected with the word, and with
the timing of it, namely, when he was to suffer from
men, and to endure the wrath of God; which to me
held forth his love as past all finding out, Zhis made
me to look about, that I might see if any was able to
resist the power and love which I saw and felt, that he
should have looked on man the same night in which
he was betrayed, and far more, that he should have
given him such a token for good.” The ordinance
saw then dispensed in the meeting-house, where Mr.
William Thompson* and Mr. Alexander Carmichael}

5 * Me, W. Thompson was one of the outed ministers of Edin-
urgh.

+ Mr. A. Carmichael, minister of Pitenain, was banished from
Scotland because he upheld Presbyterianism and the gospel;
whereupon he laboured in London during the two years Of his
life that remained. He wrote an excellent treatise “On the
Mortification of Sin.”



52 THE LIFE oF

preached, in New Queen Street, London. She was
observed to have wept much that day, though
covertly.
fer testimony While in London* for the space of
against dancing. ten months, she was in account with
every one, and much esteemed, yea, and admired by
her teachers. Her school-fellows also respected her ;
but she wearied to converse with them because she
found it not for edification. They were much taken -
up about delicacy of food and vanity of apparel, which
she misliked or regarded not. Being desired to go to
a dancing-school for a while, she went to observe their
conduct; which having seen, no persuasion could
move her to go any longer. ‘I cannot,” said she,
‘“‘endure their lightness of speech and behaviour, nor
the danger of bad company.” And therefore she ex-
ercised herself mostly in sewing and learning to write,
and did carefully attend meetings for preaching and
catechising, conversing with few except her own
mother. Hence many remarkable passages of her life
are lost, namely, for these ten months, and seven
more, wherein she sojourned in the north of England,
in regard her mother, who was accustomed with her,
did not much observe, nor kept she any record of her
sayings and practices.
Timprovementiot Upon her return from England, she
ae sickness went to Ayr to visit her grandfather
and grandmother. There it pleased

* Inthe “JZntroduction,” Mr. Hog mentions her attending
the meeting-house of Mr. Thomas Lye (see p. 16 Introd.) She
went to London for her education.



EMILIA GEDDIE. 53

God to try her with a vehement cholic which lasted
for the space of seventecen hours. As soon as she
got a little breathing and was able to speak, she ut-
tered these words, ‘‘Now I know what I have heard
often: if I had died in this case, I could have had no
composed thoughts of the Lord, of death, or of judg-
ment.” And therefore she exhorted all about her not
to delay meditations about death, nor preparations
for it, tilla sick bed; ‘‘for,” said she, ‘‘I find sick-
ness hath enough to do for itself.” After her recov-
ery she was more close and serious than ever in self-
examination, and every other way.

Conversion-work About this time, it seemed as if the
ea Lord anew carried her through all the
steps of effectual calling. She gave some account of
her spiritual concerns as follows: ‘‘Satan,” said she,
‘twas assaulting me after his wonted manner ; he sug-
gested that there is yet time enough for me to be re-
ligious ; let childhood once pass, said he, and ‘ Remem-
ber your Creator in the days of your youth’ (Ecel, xii.
1.)” Moreover, she was afraid lest the religion she
had might only be owing to her good education. This
gave her great trouble for several weeks, fearing lest
she had been hitherto destitute of saving grace, and
caused her to lament heavily that sad estate of mat-
ters, before the Lord.

At this time it pleased him to give
her views of original sin, and of the
enmity of our natures against God, more clearly and
distinctly than ever. ‘I have read,” said she,

Original sin.



54 THE LIFE OF

“ concerning original sin, in the catechisms and otner
books, and I believe that great truth from Rom. v.
12, ‘As by one man sin entered into the world, and
death by sin ; and so death passed upon all men, for
that all have sinned.’ Tis reasonable we be sharers
of the guilt, seeing we would have enjoyed the benefit
and privileges had our first parents stood. How that
sin works in me, I cannot know; only Iam convinced
that I was shapen in iniquity, and in sin did my
mother conceive me. I feel a hard heart in me, a
heart that is deceitful above all things and desperately
wicked.” She was thus for awhile under great soul
trouble, from the sense of her lost estate and utter
distance from the Lord. But in all this she justified
the Lord, whatever it might please him to do.

Salvation brought “T gee,” said she, ‘‘ the necessity.
to her with power. of 4 Saviour; but I cannot come to
be persuaded that he will look upon such a polluted
wretch as Tam.” In this strait, the Lord set home
that word upon her spirit, namely, ‘*G'od so loved the
world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whoso-
ever believeth in him should not perish but have everlast-
ing life” (John iii. 61.) ‘Then,’ said she, “I was
made to gee a possibility of being saved, which is
only by the Lord Jesus. But I find ‘not only inability
but unwillingness to come to him. And that scrip-
ture was borne in upon me, (2 Cor. v. 21,) ‘He hath
made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin, that we
might be made the righteousness of God in him.’ This,”
said she, ‘held forth the Lord Jesus more fully to



EMILIA GEDDIE. 55

me, as our surety and righteousness. But ah! I am
so great a sinner, and yet so unwilling to be denied
to my own righteousness, that my troubles and fears
are increased even by the hearing of him, because I
cannot come to him for righteousness and salvation.
Thus I was sore tossed, and became almost hopeless :
I saw there was no help but by coming to the Lord
Jesus ; and yet I found an utter unwillingness to go to
him. Alas!” said I, ‘“‘shall I thus die eternally ?
Then in my strait that word was given me, ‘ The Son
of man came to seek and to save that which was lost’
(Luke xix. 10.) This instantly calmed my spirit, and
shewed me more than a possibility of salvation, which
T had learned from the former scripture. Then an-
other word followed, namely, ‘ This is a faithful say-
ing, and worthy of all acceptation, &c. That word
came with such power that I was sweetly drawn,and
even compelled. Then I was made willing to part
with my own righteousness, and to take the Lord
Jesus for all things.

After this, I was enabled, through
grace, more fully to prize the Lord
Jesus ; I was also made humbler, and brought to
mourn for sin in a more kindly manner; and I saw
him more lovely in everything.”

A contrite heart.

Some days after, being sick and in
bed, she asked a friend sitting by her,
‘¢ Whether there was such a passage in the Bible as
‘ Himself took our infirmities and bare our sickness,’”
The person answered, ‘There is,” and read it from

Christ himself!



56 THE LIFE OF

Matt, viii, 17. She heard it, and was silent for that
time. The next day she said, ‘‘The word you read
yesternight was made a blessed word tome. He him-
self! O, what an one is He himselj'! I got by faith
a more full discovery of him through the vail of his
flesh, than ever I had attained before. I saw him as
God-man, reconciling the world to himself and even
such sinners as lam. ©, what love and bowels of
compassion did I see in him to sinners, and that from
all eternity! Not that he was new, or that there is
any change in his nature, but he drew more near to
mein that new and living way; which gave more
comfort to my poor, wearied, and languishing soul,
and made me to REJOICE IN Gop my Saviour,
“After this Satan endeavoured to
Satan’s attempt
to hide Christ shake me sore, alleging that my clos-
from her. 3 a
ing with the Lord Jesus was presump-
tion, and that it was merely to get peace and quiet-
ness, and not either from love to God, or hatred of
sin, nor yet for righteousness in and from Christ. He
also brought in several places of scripture to show that
my heart was not right with God. This troubled me
sore. Then the Lord condescended to carry home
that word with power upon my spirit (2 Sam. xxiii.
5), ‘Although my house be not so with God, yet he hath
made with me an everlasting covenant.’ Thus I was
made to covenant with God.
‘ ‘After this I was taught to discern
God’s way of ‘. ;
bringing home Satan’s wiles, and to see my own
Seteente taher: weakness and unbelieving heart more



PMILIA GEDDIE, 57
clearly than ever. Ah! I am always ready to forget
what the Lord has done for me, and to side with the
enemy. At this time, the Lord taught me somewhat
better to understand the difference betwixt His bear-
ing in words upon the soul, and Satan’s citing scrip-
tures tous. I observed that, when the Lord gives
the word, whether for conviction or otherwise, it
makes a divine light to break up in the soul, it
quickens and leads it to the Lord Jesus. But, when
Satan presents the word, it brings the soul into con-
fusion, it weakens the hands, and fills the heart with
hard thoughts concerning the Lord. I fiad my mind
very bent upon such thoughts, howev ou and I need
not be furthered in them.”

Some while after, she said, ‘I never
receive any word, whether for con-
firming me in the faith, or clearing up of duty to me,
but immediately it is tried, whether by temptation
from Satan, or trying dispeasations of Providence
towards myself or others.”

Her faith tested.

PO eranie Her father having been imprisoned
livered; her pray- in the Tolbooth of Edinburgh, and the
ore day for his appearance before the Privy
Council being come, he had catched so great a cold
that he could scarcely speak; for which cause he
used interest with the clerks, that he might not be
called that day; and a delay being promised, his
friends were easy, not expecting his appearance at
that time. Emilia having retired, returned to her
mother, and said, ‘I think my father will be called



58 THE LIFE OF

to appear before the council this night, and T would
have us all go to prayer.” The company agreed,
provided she would begin, and she was persuaded to
do so. In prayer she not only entreated the Lord
that he might be kept from sinning, and delivered out
of prison, but that He would also give him utterance
to speak before them. And it was made evident to
all concerned that her prayers were heard and an-
swered ; for contrary to all expectation, her father
appeared that night, his hoarseness was taken away,
he spoke aloud and freely, and was ordered to be set
at liberty, without any bonds or engagements. Be-
fore the child had well done praying, notice came
concerning her father’s appearance, and all the effects
followed.

On a certain day, being sick,she said,
“‘T have had but a tossed body and a
sickly life all my time; and if it were the Lord's will,
as to what concerns myself, I would be away. Yet
if it may be for the glory of God, and the comfort of
my parents, I would be content to live, and to be
denied my own desires.” Accordingly she livedsome
few years after this.

Philipians i. 23.

Reverence to pa- | Upon the occasion of one’s saying to
Tenis: her, ‘‘Emily, other children call their
parents, sir or mistress, but you do not so.” She
answered, ‘‘I am ready to do so, if it be their pleas-
ure; but the mentioning the relation raiseth awe and
reverence in my spirit, when I speak to them. And
J find it was the way of the patriarchs of old to say



EMILIA GEDDIE, 59

to their children, ‘‘My son,” &¢., and of the children
to say, ‘‘ My father.” ;

a . Being occasionally in a gentleman’s

ensible advice to

a mother (Eph. house, and having observed that the
oo lady was almost continually reprov-
ing and chiding her children, she said to one of the
family, ‘‘ Were it pertinent for me to speak to such a
person, I would advise her ladyship to take some of
that time which she employs in chiding her children,
and set it apart to pray for them. Constant chiding
makes them careless of reproof, and hardens them in
the evils for which they are reproved.”

‘A. Babbath aay Having for the space of four months
better than a sojourned in a country place, where
eee thor she had not the occasion of pure or-
dinances. dinances, and but little of Christian
fellowship, she was asked how she spent the Sabbath.
To this she answered, ‘I am often troubled ere it
come, and concerned about what I shall do, seeing I
must be all day alone ; yet I must say (and O that I
could speak it to the glory of God, and for engaging
others to love Him, and to trust in Him!) I have
found Him faithful, who hath promised to keep poor
souls alive in time of famine. For sometimes the
Lord brought to my remembrance what I had formerly
heard of the word preached, and at other times I was
made to consider and reflect upon it, how He had led
me these years past, which was establishing and very
comfortable tomy mind. And sometimes, when I
had thought to read so much, and to repeat what I



60 THE LIFE OF

had learned from my ordinary reading of the word,
the Lord so breathed upon the word, that I got, as it
were, a letter from every verse, whereby my soul was
so edified, and the Sabbath shortened to me, that
when they called me to supper, I was loth to leave
my retirement,and to return to company,and regretted
that the Sabbath went over so soon.”

Evidence of a In conference with a godly person
CLM yA who had been at Edinburgh, where
she expected to hear how matters were going with the
Lord’s people in the land, amongst many other ques-
tions she asked ‘How it went with them in secret,
and what they found of the Lord’s presence and power
in ordinances?” “Why do you ask that?’ said
the person. She replied, ‘‘It is not with me in my
retirements as sometimes it was; my heart and work
fell naturally to my hand, and I came off from it re-
freshed ; as it was said of Hannah, ‘She returned,
and her countenance was-no more sad” (1 Sam. i. 18.)
But now the great part of my time is spent in getting
my heart brought up to a tune for prayer ; and when I
come back I am weighted* and wearied. 1 think
nobody is in such an evil case, and hath a heart so
bad and slothful as I have; neither do | find that in
the word preached which I used to find, I would
gladly hear that it is better with others than it is
with me.”

Letter to her mo- A letter was written by her to her
uae: mother, from Falkland to Edin-

* Burdened,



EMILIA GEDDIES. cs 61

burgh, where her mother was, and had continued
long. “Dear Moruer,—I trouble you with this
line to let you know weall are in good health, blessed
be the Lord! O that I had grace to improve health
and everything, and all the changes of our lot! I
think the Lord hath been letting me know what it is
to abound, and now what it is to want the precious
opportunities I had in Hdinburgh and the Canonmills
this time twelvemonth. On which times I cannot
but reflect with delight, and say, ‘The Lord was kind
to me there, though I did not see it at the time; the
Lord was then alluring unworthy me, and yet I would
not be allured.’ Ineed not tell you what my case was
at that time. I see the Lord was kind to me, for the
time which is now come. I cannot but say, ‘ The
Lord is the same yesterday, and to-day, and for ever,’
yet all the comfort I have is when alone. Dear mo-
ther, I trouble you with these only to have the help
of your prayers, that the Lord may make up all our
wants in his fulness. It is reported here that the
prisoners who were sent to sea are now cast away.*

} At that time a village at a distance from the town; now
the New Yown includes it.

* This probably refers to the Sixty-seven prisoners,mentioned
in Cruickshank’s ‘‘ History,” chap. xiii., who were banished to
Virginia for no other crime than attending meetings for wor-
ship in the fields. One of these was a mere boy of sixteen, w
wrote to his friends, that he ‘‘supposed he was the youngest
prisoner in Scotland, but the Lord had opened his eyes, and re-
vealed his Son in his heart, since he cane under the cross ; and
that, though he found difficulty in parting with relations, yet
he had found that fellowship with Christ which did much more

than balance the want of the company of his dearest friends.”
t
&

Lhey were landed at Gravesend, and then set on shore, to
fo tye e ma

iyen rise to the report




a









62 3 THE LIFE OF

Let us know the certainty. You tell me my Lord
Harcasst is to sit on the bench. I think it a mercy
the matter is come this length. The Lord, who hath
done all things for you, direct him to adjust our affair
aright, and to put an end to it. The Lord be with
you, and gnide you in His way, which is the earnest
desire of your daughter and servant in all duty,
Eminr1a GEDDIE.

“For my dear mother, Mrs. Geddie, at
Edinburgh, these.”

Another distinct She was three years absent from
eee ee me her mistress who had formerly
poaching fiery taught her at Falkland. When she
had returned from England, her mistress (K. C.) in-
quired into her spiritual condition, and she gave the
following account, which was afterwards sent to her
perents, under her mistress’s own hand. It was thus.
For awhile she was secure, but was not suffered to
continue so long; but was awakened by sad fears lest
she had been still in a natural estate, ‘‘because,”
said she, ‘‘I have backsliden far from what I was
formerly.” Secondly, the great lengths hypocrites
may attain unto alarmed her. Thirdly, it troubled
her that she had not reached that distinctness about
her several cases, which is the mercy of others. Not-
withstanding,she acknowledged that the Lord had dis-
covered to her the great evil of a natural estate, as

+ Lord Harkarse. Wodrow mentions him as “a staunch Pro-
testant.” He was Sir Roger Hog of Harcarse, in the parish of
Fogo, Berwickshire. Along with Wauchope of Edmonston, he
was afterwards “turned out of the Justiciary,” to make way for
Papists,”



28

EMILIA GEDDIE, o

to its sinfulness, and the sinner’s utter distance from
the Lord. She was more fully convinced of the de-
ceitfulness and desperate wickedness of her heart,
and had got clearer discoveries of original sin, She
had formerly blamed Satan too much for wicked sug-
gestions, butthenshesaw these evils springing up clearly
from the fountain of sin in the heart, She was made
more fully to discern a great enmity against Christ,
and the way of salvation through him. She found
the difficulty great of being denied to our own.
righteousness, and to esteem all that to be loss
which she had accounted gain. Moreover, she
found great difficulty to believe, not only from
weakness and utter impotence, but also from un-
willingness, As to all these things, the Lord
opened her eyes by degrees. She was also made to
see the absolute necessity and beauty of the only
Redeemer. ‘‘But,” said she, ‘‘how can He look upon
such a sinful and miserable wretch as I am?”

Diccoveriewor While thus plunged into the depths
a of soul trouble, and not knowing
what to do, and ascribiug righteousness to the Lord,
whatever it might please him to do with her, the Lord
discovered his willingness to save even such as she
found herself to be, by this and such scriptural pas-
sages, “<‘ The son of man came to seek and to save
that which was lost.” I cannot name the particular
places (saith her mistress in the letter to her parents),
but they were all very suitable and effectual for de- -
termining her to come,



G4 ‘THE LIFE oF

Deliverance from Lhus sheentered inte covenant with
COE, the Lord,and found joy unspeakable
thereupon. Yea, she got at length such intimations
of the Lord’s everlasting love, that she afterwards
doubted not. - ‘‘ These things, and more to this pur-

pose, I had from her own mouth,” said her mistress,

‘in answer to some questions I proposed to her. I

shall not say these are the very words, but this is the
purpose, so far as I can remember,” saith her mistress;
‘bub her words, and the manner of her expressing
herself, were, as I judge, both more pertinent and
savoury.”

Her treatment of J- C.,in Canonmills,told some other
temptations. friends that, in a conference which

past in his house, Emilia observed that the exercise
of her mind had an influence upon keeping her body
low, and saw the fallacy (i. e. that she was wrong.)

“But now,” said she, ‘‘I resolve, through grace, on

two things for remedy: One is, I will slight tempta-

tions, and neither take notice from whence they come,

nor whither they go; and the other is,when I find my

corruptions stirring mightily within me, I will go to

the Lord by prayer, and tell that I am not able to

bear them, nor flee from them, while I am in the
body ; and I will beg of him, for Christ’s sake, that
he would strengthen me against my corruptions. So
shall the burden of them be taken off from me, or

strength shall be given me to resist.”

About that time, hearing two godly

Providences. :
persons conferring about the Lord’s



EMILIA GEDDIE, 65

way with them, and concerning providences,she said,
‘These things are no mysteries to me, but O that I
knew them in my own soul !”

Meoreaione fond. She used to divert herself by nour-
as ishing and taming birds of several
sorts. Being challenged why she spent so much time
that way, and employed not the time with other
children which she bestowed on birds, she answered,
**T cannot keep ‘up with other children. They are a
burden to my spirit, because they still talk of vain
things, wherein there is no edification; and thus I
cannot avoid sin, especially by misspending precious
time. And yet I cannot altogether defend or excuse
myself from wasting time upon birds; only I remem-
Story of John un- ber a story told concerning John the
bending his mind. Divine, who, having reproved some
young men for employing toe much time upon archery,
was himself observed to be playing with a bird in the
window of his closet. One of these youths, who was
better acquainted with him than the rest, having ad-
ventured to challenge the great man for being too
much taken up with a childish toy, the Divine asked,
‘What have you in your hand?’ The youth answered,
‘{t is my bow.’ ‘Lend it me,’ said the Divine. And
when going to lock it up in his closet, the young man
demanded it, ‘ Because,’ said he, ‘I have present use
for it.’ ‘Come again in a little time,’ said the
Divine, ‘aiid you shall have it.’ The young man re-
plied, ‘O, sir, it is bended.’ ‘What then? said the
Divine. ‘If it stand so any time,’ answered the



66 THE LIFE OF

young man, ‘it will prove useless.’ Hereupon he gave
back the bow, and said, ‘ Neither can my spirit be
always in bensil ;* it must sometimes be slackened
by innocent diversions.’ And further,” said she,
“T am edified by observing and playing with birds.
They are innocent, harmless, and grateful, as experi-
ence lately taught us concerning a jackdaw,hotly pur-

sued by a hawk. It fled into the
Story of a jackdaw,
bosom of a ploughman for safety.

The jackdaw was observed by hundreds of people
known to myself, to have every day visited the plough-
man, and attended him at his work for more than

* 4. e. Bent.

+ Her father’s fondness for bees (see Introduction) may have
led his daughter to give attention to the habits of animals. It
is on this passage in her life that Mr. Whitefield comments with
needless severity. The story itself seems to be one originating
in a tradition handed down to us about the apostle John, who
was called ‘‘the Divine,” or ‘‘ Theologos,” because of his contin-
ually discoursing on the person and work of Christ, the Logos,
or Word. Gambold has the following beautiful allusion to the
tradition in his “Ignatius :”

**T see the holiness

Of John, not only in his elevations

That struck mankind, but even when he seem’d

T’ express the human and the frailer side,

Thus, in his playing, to unbend the mind,

With a tame partridge, there’s a tacit slur

On mortal care ; as if he said, ‘Be easy,

Your projects and this play meet in a point.’”
There is a curious variation, in some copies, in relating the
story that follows. We give it from the Glasgow copy of 1720,
which calls the animal a bird, and names it a kae or jackdaw.”
A bird quite accords with the subject in hand. But other copies
read “a roe,” and alter the sentences thus; ‘Beasts are often
harmless and grateful, as experience lately taught us concern-
ing aroe, hotly pursued. The beast fled for shelter to a plough-
man, who protected it. Theroe,” &c. A very old copy, bound
up with ‘The Gospel Call,” in metre 1685, in Advocates’ Library
reads it thus. But such a roe in Fife,is very unlikely,especially
“to be thus unmolested for a year!” The old word kae was no
doubt mistaken for roe.



EMILTA GEDDIE. 67

a year thereafter. It went with him to church and
to other places, and yet did not remain with him all
night.”

Observations on Being demanded what way she was
birds: edified by birds, she answered, ‘‘ She
observed much of the wisdom of God in their motions.
For instance: birds drink not before they can fly,and
a very little food serves their young at once, which is
most reasonable, seeing the dam cannot bring in so
much at one time as would suffice all that are in the
nest ; and, in regard all of them cry at her coming,she
divides the little accordingly. I also observe,” said
she, “chow joyful they are when brought out a little
from their imprisonment in a cage; and if the cage
had been much dirtied, they are glad»when they find
the rooms clean at their return. This brings my duty
into my mind, and also reproves me for not retiring
more frequently to get my heart cleansed from sin,
that my soul may rejoice at the returns of the Spirit
of grace, who will not dwell in a polluted heart, but
delights in a clean and contrite spirit.”

Upon the 23d of June, 1679,

Battle of Both- a é fe ,
well Bridge. Her being at dinner in a gentleman’s
eougts on GoW’s house, where also there were several

ealings.

persons of honour and a reverend
divine, Mr, J. ©.* They were all under a heavy
* This may have been Mr. John Carmichael, brother of that
Mr. Alezander Carmichael mentioned at page 51. As Mr.
Alexander was taken at Kirkaldy, it would seem they were con-
nected with Fife. The persons of honour may have been some

of the godly covenanting gentry of the neighbourhood—e.g. the
Laird of Reddie and Heriot of Ramorney.



63 THE LIFE OF

damp, having had an account of the defeat and
slaughter at Bothwell Bridge, which had befallen
just the day before. No account of particulars had
yet come to their hand, the place being above thirty
miles distant ; and the most of them had relations in
both armies, whose condition, whether dead or alive,
they knew not. While in this consternation, the
reverend minister said, ‘‘Emilia, what think you of
the dispensation whereof we have heard the news to-
flay?” She, with a great deal of modesty and meek-
ness, answered, ‘‘Sir, such a question should not be
asked of a child as lam; it is more becoming that
reverend divines and ministers should answer such
questions, and it is well that you propose them in a
time suitable, that you may answer them yourself.”
“No, Emily,” said he, ‘*I will not take that answer
at your hand; I will have you to tell me your judg-
ment.” But she persisted to refuse, and told him
“the matter was above her capacity and considera-
tion.” At length the minister desired her father to
interpose his authority, which he was unwilling to do,
having observed that she refused with so much dis-
cretion, and yet knowing her tenderness of the least
disobedience to parents. Yet forasmuch as the com-
pany suffered by this diversion, which hindered the
minister to speak for the edification of them all, he
said, ‘Emily, tell your thoughts, whatever they be,
and satisfy the minister and honourable company.
Nothing satisfactory, in answer to such a question,
can be expected from a child; yet please the company,



EMILIA GEDDIE, 69

by speaking your judgment, be what it will.” Then,
with much gravity, she said, ‘‘Sir, it becomes not
me, nor the like of me, to speak of such things ; but
I will tell you what presents to my thoughts concern-
ing the present sad dispensation, which is heavy,
whatever way we can look at it. You know, sir,
that the dispensations of the Lord’s providence have
ordinarily two sides—one dark, and another light-
some. We now see the dark side, but I hope the
lightsome side will appear afterward. And therefore
all IT can say for the time, in answer to your question,
is, thatit becomes us to be silent, and to wait upon
the Lord humbly and quietly, in the way of duty,
until it please Him to discover the lightsome part,
Then we may know better what to speak, and then
it may be we shall be in case to answer the question
with satisfaction. I can add no more, only I must
again say that I think it our duty to be silent, and to
wait with patience and submission until the Lord
speak further, which I pray may be in mercy to his
poor afdicted and distressed people, and to the whole
land.” The reverend minister, after a little pause,
said, ‘‘ Emily, if I had proposed the question to any
of my reverend brethren, I would not have expected
a better answer at this time.”

Yow ministers felt Some ministers delighted to con«
her words. verse with the child, and owned that
they received a great deal of satisfaction in these
conferences; and several of these ministers would
not only bring in what they had heard from her at



70 THE LIFE OF

conferences with other godly persons, but did also
mention them in their sermons as rare instances
from a child, and exemplary to the oldest and most
experienced in the Lord’s way. Many years before
what has been mentioned, Mr. J. W.,* a Presbyterian
minister, who laboured much in the east of Fife, had
conference with her. The minister afterwards took
oceasion publicly to rebuke the formality of professing
people. He told them that, though some among
them could pray like printed books, yet they had not
a suitable practice,and that many of them were at best
a suspense and at a may-be, with reference to their
gracious state; they professed to be Christians, and
yet knew nothing of heart work. He also upbraided
them with some Highlanders, ‘‘Who,” he said “would.
rise up in judgment, and condemn many grey-headed
professors amongst them.” He futher added, that he
knew a child little more than seven years old, who
was in case to teach any one he saw thereabout.
“For,” said he, ‘“‘when I was catechising in the
family where that child was, and had asked some
questions concerning faith, and what it really is, and
what are the marks of saving faith, and they had
severally given their judgments about faith and the
reality of it, then I asked the child,” said the minis-
ter, ‘‘ What think you of faith? She gave a clear
and distinct account of it, much beyond what any

* As this happened when Emilia was only seven, this minister
m‘ght be John Welsh of Irongray, who made j ourneys through
Fife, and often preached in vacant churces. He was hid for a

fortnight in a sort of dungeon or cellar, still shewn in the old
castle of Myres, about two miles from Falkland,



EMILIA GEDDIE. 7k

there present had given. In a word,” said he, ‘‘she
told me the very conceptions I myself had of it.
Afterwards, when conferring with her about effectual
calling, she gaveavery fulland distinct account, not only
of what it is, but also how she herself had been called
efiectually.”

A minister’s testi: Lhe same minister, at another time,
BoE informed how that, being in herfather’s
family, he had observed the child retiring for secret
prayer, and did follow her, having put off his shoes,
that he might overhear her without being observed.
Upon his return,he gave this account—namely, ‘‘that
be thought there was not one expression she had
which came not up, as it were, from the bottom of
her soul.” He was just busied in speaking further,
when somewhat fell in that diverted him. He could
have given many excellent accounts concerning her,
having been frequently in her company ; but they are
lost through his decease,



~T
ao

THE LIFE oF

CHAPTER ITI,

THE LAST YEAR OF HER LIFE,

Lettertoayoung SHE sought out opportunities of
Fa doing good. The following is a letter
written by her to a young lady of her own age, with
whom she had some Christian fellowship, dated in
May 1680:

“Mapam,—TI received yours, which ig an obliga-
tion added to all the rest of the kindnesses you have
honoured me with. I was desirous of a line from you
to know of your health; and that you should concern
yourself in my health, which, for the most part, I
have had ever since I came from S—, blessed be the
Lord! O that I could make good use of it,and work
while it is to-day! And O that I may be not found
idle in the market-place ! for we have a particular
command to remember our Creator in the days of our
youth, And seeing the Lord is allowing us encour-
aging promises, whereupon we may ground our hope,
O that we may hold them fast against the day of
temptation, that we may able to answer Satan's
suggestions, and not be put from our duty. It is his
design to hinder us from waiting on the Lord; but
there is nothing that does so much discourage Satan
as prayer and meditation. Dear madam, I hope you
will not take this freedom of mine in bad part, You

2



EMILIA GEDDIE. 73

may call it nonsense, but the experience I have had of
your goodness, and my earnest desire to know of your
welfare, both in soul and body, have moved me to
write. Please to honour me with the knowledge
thereof by the next, The blessings of the God of
Jacob rest upon you! This is the desire of her who
is, madam, your humble friend and servant,
‘ EMILIA GEDDIE.’

com- She learned much of the scriptures
mitted tomemory. by heart, and could faithfully repeat
them, particularly the eighth chapter of the epistle to
the Romans, which she said was a whole Bible to her;
also Hebrews xi., and John xv., xvi, and xvii. chap-
ters; the greatest part of Solomon’s Song; many
chapters of Job and many Psalms, with divers other
places. Being asked why she was at so great pains
to get so much of scripture by heart, seeing she had
the Bible still at hand, she answered, ‘‘I fear the
time may come that I shall want it, and I cannot live
without the precious Bible.”
Special petitions A little while before her last sick-
ADDLINE. ness, When conferring with some god!
persons about the grace and gift of prayer, she said,
“T have not these two years last past bowed a knee he-
fore the Lord without some particular upon my heart.”
And being asked, “How could that be, seeing you are
ometimes required to pray without previous warning,
so that you can have no time to meditate upon any
particular before?” she answered, ‘‘So soon as any
mention is made of prayer where I am present, I am





G4 . THE LIFE OF

helped to look up to the Lord, and to consider the
season wherein I am called to pray; and of a truth
the Lord is so condescending to me, that he always
puts something in my mind either to pray for or
against. But my meaning was chiefly concerning
secret prayer. Then I am kept observing and wait-
ing what the Lord will put into my hand, and what
is taken offfrom my hand, as also what returns I get
from my only Redeemer, the blessed Mediator.”

Calm patiencein ‘In the seventh month of the six-
Seles teenth year of her age she was as-
saulted with the sickness whereof she died, being a
continued flux and gravel, both which were violent.
Considering her youth and tender body, all beholders
admired her patience, for she was observed not to
have uttered one rash word, nor to have given the
least evidence of impatience and weariness. And
when any that were with her would have said,
“Emily, you had a sore night of pain and trouble,”
she would have answered mildly, ‘“‘No; I have been
supported.” When she was asked in the mornings
how it had been with her all the night, she would
have answered, with a pleasant countenance, “1
prayed for rest, and I got it. I see that the Lord
hears prayer, and gives his beloved sleep.” And
being’asked if she was not weary of her bed,she would
have answered very cheerfully, ‘No, for my bed is
green (Song i. 16), and all I meet with is perfumed
with love to me. I have heard of many sick persons,
who have said, when it is morning, ‘O that it were



3 EMILIA GEDDIE. 75

evening!’ and when it was evening, ‘O that it were
morning !’ but, as for me, I must confess,to the praise
of the riches of free grace, that the time, night and
day, is made sweet to me by the Lord. When it is
evening it is pleasant, and when it is morning I am
refreshed.” Some of the beholders observed from
this, ‘ Man lives not by bread alone, but by the word
of God,” as it is blessed unto him.

The whole time of her lying on a
sick-bed, it was observed that she
heard and received the word at all times with much
life and vigour, notwithstanding her heavy sickness
and sharp pains of the stone. All these, together
with the weariness of her body, were made light and
easy, ‘‘In regard,” she said, ‘‘they are but moment-
ary afflictions.” Being asked what supported her,she
answered, ‘First, I look on my trouble as the fruit
of my sin, and do think it my duty to bear the indig-
nation of the Lord, because I have sinned against him,
Secondly, I am made to wonder that it is not and
hath not been always so with me. Thirdly, I am
helped to bless the Lord, that it is not worse.
Fourthly, means are used for my health, and I look
up to the Lord, that he would bless them, in so far
as he shall see meet, for his glory and my comfort.
Fifthly, I submit through grace to the will of God,
whether for life or death. Sixthly, I have the faith
that it will be better ; for I reckon that the afflictions
of this life are not worthy to be compared with the
glory that is to be revealed.”

Supports in trouble.



76 THE LIFE OF

Prayerfulness, even During the six weeks of her last
when sick. sickness, there was not one night
that passed wherin she neglected to pray twice with her
attendants, unless she was discomposed by pain, in which
case she moved one of them to do it; and so soon as
she got any little breathing from the agony of pain,
she would say, ‘‘ Now itis fit we pray.” While she
was in health, it was her custom to pray every night
with any who lay with her; and when she happened
to awake in the night, she sat up a little in bed and
prayed, and afterward she lay down again, composing
herself to sleep till the morning. Every day when
she arose, it was her custom to wrap herself in a night-
gown, and retire to her closet, before she would clothe
herself, dress, or converse with anybody, unless on
necessary occasions.

Passages that re- The last month of her life, she
freshed her. would say in the mornings to those
that were with her, ‘‘I have had a rich and sweet
cluster this night !” and would have named the scrip-
tures. Take for instances these few of many; ‘‘In
the 103d Psalm, which,” said she, ‘‘ I had by heart
in metre, I found somewhat concerning my bodily
diseases which was matter of praise, but I got not so
much of strengthening for my soul.” But on one
night afterward, being much taken up with the
thoughts of death, she was greatly strengthened
against the fears of it from that sweet passage (Matt.
ix. 2,) ‘‘Be of good cheer, thy sins are forgiven thee.”
She thereupon expressed her joy, yet mixed with fear,



EMILIA G@EDDTE, 97

The next day another passage was set home upon her
spirit, namely, “Know that the Son of Man hath
power on earth to forgive sins” (Mark ii. 10.) ‘This
scripture,” said she, ‘‘ came both by way of reproof,
and also to persuade me to believe; and that joy
which flows from believing so filled my heart that I
cannot express it.” Then was that scripture borne
in mind, ‘‘ Speak comfortably, and cry unto her that
her warfare is accomplished, and her iniquity is par-
doned” (Isaiah x]. 2.) This passage comforted and
confirmed her to such a degree, that she found the
fear and sting of death thereby removed. And an-
other scripture served to strengthen her further,
namely, ‘Because I live, ye shall live also. At that
day ye shall know that Iam in my Father, and you in
me, and I in you” (John xiv. 19,) ‘‘This,” said she,
‘*T shall fully understand at the day of death,” At
this time she caused them to sing the 23d Psalm, but
said, ‘‘ My weakness is so great that I cannot sing
aloud; yet my heart joins with the words, andI have
such a feeling and experimental knowledge of that
whole psalm as helpeth me to sing it with great joy
and love to the Lord.” Much about that time, the
passage was borne in upon her, ‘‘ Give me thy heart”
(Proverbs xxiii. 26;) to which she replied, ‘‘O reagon-
able demand! If I had a thousand hearts, Thou ar
worthy of the-n all who art the Lord my God,and none
hath right but thy great Self. Yet,” said she, “when
T consider the nature of my heart, I wondered that
ever he should have sought such a filthy puddle as



78 THE LIFE oF
that deceitful and desperately wicked heart of mine.”

Ganeibane bor: On Saturday night before her death,
mendation of Je- she often said, ‘This following Sab-
ans bath will be my last in time;” and
hereupon she expressed. her vehement longing after an
everlasting Sabbath. In the morning of that Lord’s
day she slept till eight o’clock ; and when awakened
for a little, she asked the hour, and being told it, she
replied, ‘‘I thought to have spent this Sabbath in
another manner than to have slept so long.” After
this she employed some time in secret prayer, and
meditation, and then broke forth into many excellent
and significant words in commendation of the Lord
Jesus, from his nature and offices, and particularly
from the names which are given him in scripture.
For instance—the bright and morning Star, the Lion
of the tribe of Judah, the Lamb slain from the foun-
dation of the world, the Rock which hath followed
his people in all ages, the Chief of ten thousands ;
and she added, ‘‘The chief of all to me. O,” said
she, ‘Paul had great manifestations of the Lord Jesus
which could not be uttered, and Rutherford had
right mavifestations of Christ; but I can get nothing.”
Notwithstanding, sundry judicious and godly persons
who were with her, thought that she scarcely missed
any one of the names and titles which are given to
our Lord Jesus, in the Word. She also spoke some-
what concerning every one of them, to the edification
and astonishment of the hearers. Thus employed she
that Sabbath, excepting the time of seeret worship.



EMILTA GEDDIE, 19

Waiting for depart- About eight at night, before her
ete departure, a little defluxion troubled
her; whereupon her attendants called for a light,
thinking she was just breathing out her last, which
perceiving, she smiled, and said, ‘‘I shall not die
just now.” They answered, ‘“‘How know you that?”
To which she replied, ‘‘I missed that promised pres-
ence,* which for many a day I have believed I shall
get in the moment of death.” Thus she rested, trust-
ing in the unchangeable faithfulness of the God of
truth.

Words to hercom. A little while after, she said, ‘TI
SUSU: would fain speak to my comrades; but
it can have little weight with them, as it comes from
me, forI am a child.” She said briefly to them,
amongst other things, ‘‘O learn a life of holiness,
spend more of your time in seeking God, and be not
idle and slothful, but work with your hands.” Some
of them answered, ‘‘It may be said of you, You have
been diligent in business and fervent in spirit, serving
the Lord.” But she reproved them for speaking so of
her, and commanded them to hold their peace, where-
upon they left speaking at that time.

Afterwards she called her aunt,
and desired her to entreat her mother
to take supper; ‘‘for,” said she, ‘‘she may have work

Words to her aunt.

* Probably referring in her mind to such passages as Isaiah
xliii, 2,—“ When thou passest through the waters, I will be with
thee ;” or Psalm xxiii. 4, “Yea, though I walk through the
valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no ill, for thou art
with me ; thy rod and thy staff, they comfort me.”



80 HE LIEE OF

to do she knows not of, and it is necessary she should
eat.” She also entreated her aunt not to go home,
but to tarry with her that night. This was contrary
to her custom, for she had before this still* desired her
to go home at night.

Her summons he last thing more particularly observ-
ete able, which we remember, relates to some-
thing she had spoken about six hours befove, concern-
ing what she wanted of the Lord’s promised presence,
and it was eminently made out about two hours before
her death. She had not for some time lifted up her
body without help; but then she arose, and sat straight
up. F
Having lifted up her hands and

She goes out from ; ae
the wilderness, eyes toward heaven, she prayed in
a ee the hearing of the company, pleading
the promises, saying: ‘Now let ib
be according to thy precious word to my soul; for there
is nothing in me !” and entreated that the Lord would
not deal with her as she had deserved. She added,
“Tt is only upon the blood of the Lord Jesus, and the
unchangeableness and faithfulness of God, that I rest.”
And several times she repeated, ‘‘ U’here is nothing in
me.” Then she prayed for the suffering people and
church of God, for her parents and the family ; but
her speech fell so low that she could not be under-
stood. Then a little sack} was given her, and she
said, ‘‘Now, no more of the creature,” and immedi-
ately she desired her mother to pray. When her

* Always. + Sack-wine.



EMILIA GEDDIE. 81

mother was giving her up to God, she was observed
to smile ; and as prayer ended, she lifted up her eyes,
with a pleasant countenance, and spoke a word which
we could not hear. Then she closed her own eyes
and lips, as one falling asleep ; and, having stretched
down her body, she had no motion, but slept with her
fathers,

Thus did this young saint take her flight to ‘the
mountain of myrrh and the hill of frankincense,” on
the 2d day of February, 1681, in the sixteenth year
of her age. There she rests with her Lord, in joy
unspeakable, waiting till ‘‘The Day break,” when she
shall appear with Him in glory.

She was born in times of persecution, and died
when the furnace was even seven times heated, yet
hers was an end of undisturbed peace. At that time
Scotland was wet with the blood of her holiest men ;
women, too, were dragged to the scaffold for no oflier
crime than refusing to abjure the truth set forth ia
the Covenant. The month before Emilia Geddie
died, she no doubt heard of the triumphant end of
Isabel Alison, a native of Perth, who gave her life,
saying, ‘I lay down my life for owning and adhering
to Christ’s kingly offlce, His being a free king in his
own house.” Along with her died Marion Harvie,
scarcely twenty years of age, singing the 23d Psalm,
and saying, ‘*I’d rather die ten deaths than want an



82 THE LIFE oF

hour of His presence.”+ But, on the other hand,
Emilia was taken home without violence, the Lord,
who hid Jeremiah and Baruch (Jer. xxxvi. 26,) keep-
ing her from the hand of the oppressor. Her life was
like a stream that gently flowed between green banks,
often ruffled by wild winds, and at times re-
flecting the forms of armed persecutors and weary
martyrs. She was in spirit a martyr, and shall have
a place in The Resurrection with those who never
worshipped the beast nor his image, nor received his
mark on her forehead or in her hand (Rey. xx. 3.)

Tradition has honoured her memory, as if she had
been one of the greater worthies. It is told of her
that ‘ she walked always in whites,”—a curious tradi-
tion, arising from facts probably, but which seems to
be somewhat like a mixing of the literal with the
symbolical, her life being a walking with God in
white.

Her tomb may seen in the churchyard of Falkland.
It is in a small enclosure, (about which the Kirk-Ses-
sion went to law with Mr. Geddie in 1682,) at the
east end of the churchyard, surrounded by a balus-
trade railing on three sides, the wall forming the
other part of the enclosure. It is the burying-ground
of the proprietor of Hilton or Templand.

The inscription on her tomb is not elegant, but itis
expressive :—

+ The year before, 1680, Richard Cameron had fallen at Airs-
moss. Emilia would feel pecular interest in him, he being a
native of Falkland,



EMILIA GEDDIE. 83

“Tn gepulchre within, Emelia Geddie lies.

By faith in Jesus, her death did not surprise.
Because by grace [she] had virtue great in siore,
Her witt renewed, her life did sin abhor.
She walked with God ; in spirit worshippt true,
Exemplarly to all her sex, age, and you.

Born in the year 1665,

Whom troubles then did greatly drive,

Her course was finisht in 1681,

And entered glorie in due tyme.”.

In the ‘Miscellany of the Abbotsford Club”
(vol. 1.,) at the close of the Memoirs of John Geddie,
another epitaph is given, not as written on her tomb,
but as composed by some friend, and runs thus :—

“Most cruel death, thy hand hath no compassion
Of sex or age, of quality or fashion.
Thou hast bereft us of the richest gem
That ever was extracted from her stem,
(Though truly good and of a virtuous race,
Not any from it capable of disgrace.)
Emilia ’s gone to her eternal rest !
Earth’s ornament and nature’s frame the best.
Her tender years fled from these horrid times,
And left them to the punishment of their crimes.
Her nimble fingers were to virtue prone ;
Her prudence was inferior unto none.
Her beauteous face was too good for to be
Made prize by mortals of her chastity ;
So that her pious, prudent, beauteous face
Did so insinuate in her Saviour’s grace,
Her soul’s bridegroom esteems her worth to be
His handmaid, even to all eternity ;
Yielding her soul’s bridegroom her virgin bed,
Eyen unto Him her soul and maidenhead.”

From all this, it would appear that she was even
famed in her day for beauty and accomplishments.
qn the same Miscellany, the following verses are
given as her own composition, and the reference to
“Bees,” of which her father (see Introduction) was so
fond, countenances that idea; though the Glasgow

£4 ¢., her whole mind,



8t THE LIFE OF EMILIA. GEDDIF.

copy gives it as written in her name. It may be her
own in prospect of death.

“When Flowers do seed, the blossom dies.
‘Young women all I do advise
Their time on earth aright to spend,
That living well, so they may end.
The Bees in season food provide,
Which makes them winter storms abide:
Strive in your hearts grace for to plant,
Death you'll surprise, if faith you want.
The Trees in spring do flourish fast ;
When autumn comes their leaves they cast ;
So whilst in youth you beauty have,
It seedeth ere you go to grave.
When death doth come and sceptre sway,
Flowers, bees, and trees with me decay ;
Nothing on earth but change you see ;
Seek God in fear, and he’ll set you free.
Parents, forbear to mourn your loss !
Christ taken hath from me the cross.
{ hope in heaven meet we shall
And joy of our memorial.”

We close by giving an acrostick, made upon her at
her death by one who admired her godly character.
It has been printed in some of the earlier copies, and
is found in the Miscellany already referred to, the
compiler remarking that she deserved it well.

E mblem of wit within this coffin lies ;

M ade peace in time, death did her not surprise.
J esus-redeemed her; Abraham hath received ;
L iving in ’s bosom, hell she hath deceived.

I n soul and body, of virtue was great store ;

A ll vice refrained, all crime she did abhor.

G race in such bulk no more could be contained;

E nding her life, true Presbytery maintained,

D eterred at Popery, she prelates would, supplant,

D esired adherence to the good Covenant.

I n heaven with saints, though not by her own merit,
E ternal rest her soul doth now inherit,










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TOMB OF EMILIA GEDDIE.


EMILIA GEDDIE;

SB Child of the Covenant,

WHO DIED IN 1681.
AN ‘EXAMPLE ALIKE TO YOUNG AND OLD.

REPUBLISHED WITH NOTES FROM THE EARLY EDITIONS,

BY
REV. ANDREW A. BONAR,

GLASGOW.

“I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because
thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and re-
vealed them unto babes. Even so, Father, for so it seemed good
in thy sight.”—MArT. XI. 25, 26.

GLASGOW :

CHARLES GLASS & CO., 14 MAXWELL ST.
LONDON : HOULSTON & WRIGHT.
CONTENTS.

ne
INTRODUCTION.

Page
The times Emilia Geddie lived in ; the place and family from

which she came; the authorship of the book, -

Cnar. (.—From HER First To ner NintH YuAr.

Stacie ie

. Her reverence towards God in infancy, - =

Her thoughts about the Creator, - = = 2
Asking blessing at meat, - = = .
Her regard for the Sabbath, - = “5 -
Horror at an oath, - ~ - - =
Prayer for the Swear Cres - - = z

. Helping the tempted, - - - -

. How she knew the Lord’s teaching, - a =
. At four years of age joining in a prayer-meeting, -

. No show in her profession, - = a 2
. A minister offending the little ones, - ~ =

. A mother’s reproof felt, - oe oe ie, a :
. Struggles with tem}: i -

. No pride in dress, - - - - a Z
. Thoughts in sickness, - - - - =
. Feeling of the word preached,
. Closet prayer, - - 0 - y =
. Thinking on hell, - - - - -

. Reproof of Sabbath-breakers,

. Remark on Shorter Catechism, - - -

. No need of penance, - - - - f

. Estimate of words in prayer, - - - -
. Faithful reply to a profane captain, - - -

. Her wish to be like David, - - - =

. Her attention to the meaning of wh:
. Grief at the inconsistency of professin,
. Most freedom in private prayer, -
. A minister strengthened by her pre y
. Reasoning with a tempted woman, - - 2

. Useful in another temptation, -. E = Z
. Meetings for prayer with other children -

. Her judgment on the conduct of one of theiz members,














Her mode of dealing with beggars, — -

Her thoughts about the per oner treatment of “the begging
ee «° = - - -
A Sabbath at home alone, -

Her views on public questions and trust | in Pr ovidence,

. Prayer for imprisoned ministers, - - 2 ie
. Severely injured by some boys—her forgiving spirit,

18
19
20
20
20
21

22
22,
24.
24
24
25
25
25
26
26
27
27
28
238
28
28
29
29
30
30
ot
35.
35

36
37
37
59
CONTENTS.

Caav, IL—From ner NintH To HER Firreentit

39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
Ad.
46.
47.
43,
44),
50.
51.
52.
53.

54.

55.

64

65.
06.
67.

68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
73.
74.
75.
76.
77.
78.
79.
80.

St

55.
56.
57.
58. 4
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.



YEAR.

A remarkable answer to prayer for ner schoolmistress, 41
Refusal to go to the house of mirth, - - 3 42
Sadness because of not protesting against the sins of others,44
singularly impressed regarding coming events, — - 44
Her inward struggles and vict ries, - - =) et:
Enmity to levity in holy things. - - e 46
Letter to her father, - - - > ey.
Occasional meditation, - - - - 2 Ay.
Praying for per: secutors, - - - a 43
Coufidence and presentiments, - - . - 48
Too much hearing of the word unedifying, - = 49
Self-upbraiding for ingratitude. - - 2 ae AG
Answers to a Roman Catholic lad ys - e 49
The Lord’s Supper; her sense of God’s free love, - 50
Her testimony against dancing, - - - 52
Improvement ofa fit of sickness, - - - 5)
Conversation-work tried, - - - = 53
Original sin, at ie ag 5S
Salvation b prough? to her w: vith fos wer, - S 54

A contrite heart, - - a8 SSS
Christ himself her délight, - - a BB
Satan’s attempts to hide Christ from her, - =e 6
God’s way.of bringing Scri fee home to her, - 5S
Comfort tested, - - - 2 =.) AE
Her father delivered ; her prayer answered, - 57
Philippians i. 22. - - - = 5 Ee
Reverence to parents, - - 4 o - 58
Sensible advice to a mother. - 59





hanathousaud, , though dete ined from
5G

A Sabbath-day better



ordinances, - - e Bs x
Evidence of a cloudy day, - - = . 60
Letter to her mother, - ti)
Another distinct account of the Lor d’s way of tedching her, 62
Discoveries of Christ. - - = z - 63
Deliverance from doubting, - - - . 64
Her treatment of her own temptations, - - aye Ge
Providences, —- - - - - S 64
Recreation ; fondness for birds, - - - =e 0Ge
Story of John the Divine unbending his mind, - 65
Another story, - - : e 2)° 6
Observations on the habits of birds, - a . 67
Battle of Bothwell Bridge; her thoughts therecr - 67
How ministers felt her words, = = 6)
. Aminister’s testimony to her, - « = 71
Oe ce ee

SONTRODUCTION. $

Tue year 1665, in which Emrita Geppie was borti,
was a ‘“‘cloudy and dark day” in Scotland. Persecu-
tion for conscience sake was begun. Guthrie and
Warriston had already died upon the scaffold, and
oppression was threatening to ‘‘make wise men mad.”
The rising at Pentland ended in disaster, and. gave
occasion to greater severities. It was during those
evil days that Emilia Geddie’s bark was launched, the
waves still rising, and the sky dark as midnight.
Her short life of sixteen years was spent within the
time of suffering in Scotland which is usually called
“the Killing Time.”

She cast in her lot with the sufferers, holding their
faith and principles; so that if any one desires to see
how these principles affected the private walk of
quiet Christians and moulded their character, he may
see what he desires in this brief history of the experience
of a covenanter’s daughter whom the storm led far into
the heart of ‘“‘the Man who is the hiding-place.”

Her father, Mr. John Geddie, was proprietor of a
small estate near the burgh of Falkland in Fife, called
Hinittown, or Hilton, from its situation on a slope
near the town. He held the office of “Clerk to the
8 INTRODUCTION.

King’s Stewartry of Fife,” an office of _respec tabilitby
and of considerable emolument. His office was to col-
lect the rents due to the king in Fife, or in other
words, the crown-rents, and Falkland was the main
oifice for these rents. At that time, the Marquis
of Athole was Steward of Fife, and inasmuch as he
was a high cavalier, and of course an enemy to the
covenant, it must have been no easy matter for Mr.
Geddie to escape annoyance, decided as he was in his
attachment to the covenanting cause. But he did
not swerve. He was a man of some note in his day.
We have a memoir of him ‘in vol. i. of the ‘* Abdots-
ford Miscellany,” giving details of his public life. By
profession he was ,a Writér to the Signet,
and as such we find him getting ‘‘a factory from
William Bonar and others to get in their debts,”
1633, and at another time receiving ‘‘a bond of 800
merks from John Bonar of Lamguhat. ” He afterwards
acquired some wealth, and seems to have added some
lands to the original estate. A discovery which he
made in 1668, brought him into notice: he found out
a new method of ‘‘/mproving and colonizing Bees,”
and his discovery drew the attention of the Royal
Society at Gresham College. In 1657, he married
Aana Wallace, daughter of Mr. William Wallace,
teacher in Ayr, sister to the Provost of Glasgow, and
cousin to Lord Burghly. Their two sons, Michael and
John, died in childhood, and are buried in Falkland.
Lmilia was their only daughter, called after the Mar-
chioness of Athole, Lady Emilia Stanley, Mr. Geddie
being at that time steward under the Marquis, All
we know of the mother’s character is that she was a
woman of like faith with her husband and daughter.
The Hilion of Falkland was the name of the family
property, when Emilia was born. It lies about half
a mile from Falkland, south-east from the town, on
the slope that adjoins to Hast Lomond Hill, It is
INTRODUCTION, 9

now called Templand, having once been the property
of the Kniehts Templar,a remnant of which possession
is preserved in the names given to two old wells, St.
John’s and the Lady’s well. A part of the property
is now included in the minister’s glebe. The old
dwelling-house of John Geddie has given place to a
humble farm-steading ; a lintel stone, with the date
1691, and a few traces of old walls, overshadowed by
six or eight old ash-trees, alone remain to testify that
once this was a proprictor’s dwelling. In olden times,
Falkland was a favourite hunting retreat of the kings
of Scotland, Considerable remains of the fine old
palace exist still at the foot of the hill; and many a
traveller has surveyed that palace-square, and thought
of its ancient fame, who knew not that more com-
placently had the eye of God looked down ‘with
choice regard” on yonder quiet dwelling that con-
fronted the abode of.kings, than on these once festive
halls.

This edition of Emilia Geddie is the result of a com-
parison made between several old editions. There is
one entitled ‘‘Some few choice sentences and practices
of Emilia Geddie ;” and there is another published at
Glascow, 1720, ‘‘Some choice sentences and practices
of Emilia Geddie, daughter to John Geddie of Hilton
in Falkland, in the Sherifidom of Fife, from her infancy
to her death on the 2d February, 1681, in the sixteenth
year of her age, as they are gathered and written by
her Fathers own hand, with an Index, and an acros-
tick on her name.”” It will be seen from the preface
we are about to give, that this copy errs in saying
that ‘“‘her father” drew up these remains. We have
before us the edition of 1762, which gives information
as to the sources.of the memoir. It states that the facts
were ‘‘gathered from her parents and other judicious
persons.” It was Mr, James Hog who compiled the
whole and gave it its present form,
10 INTRODUCTION,

We are told at the commencement that Emilia had
an awe of God on her spirit even before she could
speak ; indeeed, the old copies say, ‘‘for much of the
time after her birth until she arrived at the second year
of her age.” This is attested by judicious witnesses.
But some may be inclined to doubt the interpretation
which these persons put upon her action. Children
at that age are often overawed by the sight of persons
solemnly worshipping,—the very stillness has its
effect on them. At the same time the thing is not
impossible. Janeway, in his ‘‘ Token for Children,”
records two cases not unlike this, and the ‘Short
Account of John Ross, 1836,” shews something quite
similar. Should not parents be led by such cases to
seek for their children very early visits of Him in
whose name (as in a Jordan-flood of grace) their little
ones have been baptized ?

It may have been with his eye on this statement,
and a few other such, that Mr. Whitefield wrote his
** Recommendation” of the little work. He had been
shewn it during one of his visits to Scotland, proba-
bly 1741, at a time when young people were seeking
the Lord, flying as doves to their windows. With
the special design of encouraging such, an edition of
this life was published at that time, and here is

Mr. Whitefield’s Recommendation.

‘¢ As there has been @ concern lately wrought, I
trust, by the Holy Spirit in the hearts of some of the
lambs of the flock, 1 think, the following account of
God’s dealings with the soul of Emilia Geddie may be
very seasonably reprinted in Edinburgh. I remember
nothing very exceptionable in it: if any thing, itis that
which is mentioned about Jobn the Divine. I think
Emilia was justly reproved for spending too much time
INTRODUCTION. il

in feeding her birds. However, I am persuaded she is
now singing praises in heaven.

‘* May the little ones that shall read her life, fol-
low her as she followed Jesus Christ. A better thing
cannot be desired in their behalf by their souls’ real
friend and well-wisher,

GEORGE WHITEFIELD.”

We have said that originally the narrative was
drawn up by Mr. James Hog, who was afterwards
minister of Carnock, and a firm maintainer of the
truth in the ‘‘ Marrow Controversy.” Here is his
preface :-—

Mr, Hog’s Preface.

“CHRISTIAN AND CANDID ReApeR,—I think it
necessary to acquaint you with what belongs to my
conduct in the management and publication of this
little treatise, The whole, both preface and narration,
was sent to me, that I might revise and prepare them
for ‘a more public view. I had much business in
hand, and yet I declined not the motion, expecting
that I should have little (if any thing) more to do,
save only to amend some literal escapes,* and to per
form a few more services of the like nature. But IJ
quickly found my mistake, when [ read the copy that
was sent to me. It doth indeed contain all the materi-
als which now are laid before thee ; but so incorrectly
that I was sometimes straitened how to understand

_ the meaning, This made it necessary for me to go
over the whole, from the beginning to the end, and
to cast it.into a mould at least more intelligible. (I
confess my rudeness in speech, as well as in know-
ledge, is unaccountably great.) And yet I could not
presume so far upon the indigested copy I got, as to

* Mistakes in the writing and spelling.
12 LYTRODUCTION,

cast the materials wholly into my own style: Ireck-
oned myself obliged to keep as near to the words I
found in the draught [ had, as could possibly agree
with orthography, and some little decencies of speech.
Much of the narration consists of our young saint’s
own words: to these I have kept more close, and
would not have altered them so much as in one
syllable, had I been fully confident that each word
was hers, without the least addition, diminution, or
alteration, But I had no assurance of that, in regard
they were not taken from her mouth; though I am
satisfied they were in substance, and to the same
effect, as is mentioned in the narration ; and also her
own words so near as judicious and godly persons
could remember. And therefore I thought I might
take the liberty to make a very few but small altera-
tions, that thestylemightrun somewhatmoresmoothly.
In the mean while, I have kept close to her meaning,
most religiously and carefully, and have changed the
phrase in so very little, that it is scarcely worth the
meniioning. While I was going over the particulars
you have in the narration, I lamented often and heay-
ily, that such a precious treasure should have
remained hid for so long a time; and therefore it
was, that, as soon as I had the copy, I made all pos-
sible haste to bring the materials into so much of a
readiness for thy view as through grace I could at-
tain, You. have them here in a dress which I hope
shall render them intelligible ; they shine illustriously
in their own native beauty. I have affected no orna-
ment, nor could I have given it them, though f{ had
intended.

“The preface shews that the facts were well attested
by many eminently godly persons who knew them,
and now are for most part with the Lord. But,if it may
add a little to the confirmation of the sweet narrative, I
take the occasion to represent, that, though then
INTRODUCTION. 13.

young, yeb I was acquainted with the young gentle-
woman, and can vouch some parts of the relation.
I have been divers times in company with her amongst
other godly persons, aud have heard her speak humbly
.and modestly, but with a prodigious reach, about the
nearest and most weighty concerns of salvation. I also
had my little share in societies of more aged, judicious,
and established Christians, where she made a consid-
erable part, and have therein joined with her in prayer.
There I have heard weighty and difficult questions
and cases proposed, to which, in concurrence with
the rest, she gave her clear and pointed answers, so
close to the respective purposes, and so well
instructed from the word, as if she had been an aged
and experienced divine. All this passed some three
or four years before her death,—Your sincere well-
wisher, , JA. Hoa.”

Mr, Hog had himself been born in days of persecu-
tion, and grown among the sufferers and their friends,
so that he had lively sympathy with the families and
the seed of such as had borne witness and not fainted,
Besides, he had met with Lmilia Geddie in his early
days, aud had wondered at her faith and holy walk.
One who writes a short account of his life, notices of
him ; ‘Access to the private meetings of the godly,
when they poured out their hearts to God with one
accord in prayer, gave him to see much of the reality
of religion,”* though it is not there specified that
meetings in which this young saint took part were
among those that helped to mould his character.

It will be noticed that Mr. Hog refers to another
preface. Properly speaking, this other preface is an
attestation to the truthfulness of all that is related in
her life—the depth of grace, sobriety of judgment,
and maturity of experience displayed herein, being

* Memoir of Hog of Carnock in Christian Instructor for 1838,
Pee INTRODUCTION, ;

thought so wonderful that few would believe the ac-
count unless competent witnesses were adduced. The
following, then, is the testimony, full and unhesitat-
ing, borné by many who knew the subject of the
narrative long and well,

The Testimony of many Witnesses.

‘It is matter of just regret, that the designed ac-
count must needs be imperfect,.in regard no record
was kept of many excellent things most remarkable,
in the conversation of this excellent child, when the
things were more fresh in memory; and many par-
ticulars are lost through the death of godly persons,
who conversed much with her. Nevertheless, the
few kept in memory, and to be here narrated, are of
great weight, and have been well attested by the con-
curring testimony of divers judicious and eminently
godly persons, ministers and others, who knew them.

‘*Many observed such rare endowments in this
young saint, both as to natural parts and graces,that
it was hard to determine in which of them she most
excelled. Her disposition, even from mere infancy,
and throughout the few years of life she attained, was
sweet, modest, meek, and humble. In all these re-
gards, that mind was in her which was also in Christ
Jesus, as much as in any of her day. In the few
stages of her short life, she was still so far beforehand
with the means of her education, that she drank in
necessary instructions from her parents and teachers
a creat deal more quickly than it was advisable to in-
fuse it into such a weak and tender vessel. Thus she
became a woman long before her childhood expired.
It was, as to her case, much debated amongst judi-
cious and godly persons, whether such singular
endowments presaged an excellent life, or an early
death, Her parents would fain have comforted them-
INTRODUCTION, 15

selves, as Lamech did of old concerning his son Noah,
and have promised that such a lovely child shall live,
and give us rest. But the Lord had ordered that mat-
ter otherwise ; he took her home to himself, and ad-
vanced her early to the higher house, where she seeth
no more through a glass darkly, but beholdeth the
Lord face to face. And it gave sufficent ground of
quietness to her parents, that their loss was inex-
pressible gain. A heathen of old, upon the death of
his eldest son, gave the significant reply, namely,
‘Scio me genuisse mortalem,’ ‘I know that I gave
birth to a mortal.’ But her parents might express
their complacence in a higher strain, ‘Scimus nos
genuisseimmortalem,’ ‘We know that we gave birth
to an immortal ;’ for howsoever mortal she was by her
generation, grace rendered her immortal, in the true
import, by regeneration. It remains that we, who
condole the loss, do, through grace, breathe after that
perfection whereof she is already possessed.

‘Her dearest friends could scarcely have wished
her better than she really was, excepting her almost
continual frailties and sicknesses,* and yet these were
improved by her to such spiritual advantages as aston-
ished the beholders. Scarce anything passed her
without a most judicious and profound observation,
and the most enriching spiritual gain. Jn swm,come-
liness of person, amiableness of countenance, solidity of
judgment, acuteness of wit, tenaciousness of memory,
sweetness of disposition, modesty in behaviour, obedience
to parents more near or remote, submission to govern-
ors, observance of superiors, love to equals, condescen-
sion to inferiors, and candor towards all, were found
in her te a very large degree.

“ a singular regard to the Lord’s day; she was careful

* [They seem to have felt toward her as John did to Galua
8 John 2.]
16 INTRODUCTION.

to prepare for it, and was’ exemplarily. diligent in
every part of the observation thereof. She gave rev-
erend attention to the word read or preached,and was
notably fitted to give clear and methodical accounts
of what she heard or read. She took great care to
learn the doctrines of religion taught in catechisms,
of which she gave such distinct accounts as were fitted
to inform and edify persons of good judgment. She
had a notable occasion for this in the answers she
gave in Mr, Thomas Lye’s* meeting-house in London,
and that in public, about the tenth year of her age,
to the great admiration of the. minister and hearers.
During the few years of her life, she still expressed
great love to the best things, due respect to the better
sort of men, and a greater than childish dislike of and
aversion from what she understood to be evil, as also
from everything she. saw to be idle and vain. These
wonderful excellencies, much above the state of chil-
dren, rendered her company so desirable and. useful
to judicious and godly persons, that her distance from
them for a time was looked upon as a little death.
Nevertheless, the comfort (now that we are deprived
of her) remains, namely, We mourn not without hope.

It cannot readily be expected that such distinct ac-
counts of the progress of a gracious work can be looked
for in the case of a child, as may be found in that
of old and experienced Christians; nevertheless the
passage of scripture was eminently accomplished in

*In some copies printed by mistake “Mr. Thomas Lyde.”
Mr. Lye was one of the ministers who preached the well-known
“Morning Exercise” in London. Hjected from Allhallows in
1662, he continued still to carry on his pastoral labours till
1684. Calamy mentions (vol. i. p. 86) his unusual method of in-
structing the young in the first principles of religion, many
being indebted for their first serious impressions to his cat-
echetical exercises, in which he suited himself to the capacity
of his young auditory, to whom he always discovered a most
tender affection.” He wrote “The Child’s Delight,” and an
“ Explanation of the Assembly’s Shorter Catechism,”
INTRODUCTION, 17

her, namely, Out of the mouths of babes and sucklings
thou hast ordained strength, Psalm viii, 2. And
though I will not make the comparison betwixt John
the Baptist, Samuel, and this desirable child, becaxse
the two mentioned might be reckoned persons extra-
ordinarily cireumstanced, yet this or other the like
instances come very near to these singular ones. Such
morning seekers of the Lord’s face give early discover-
ies of the grace of the gospel-covenant, when many
old professors carry their gray-hairs as a badge of
. their ingratitude, and of many other evils. This de-
licious child did not only make conscience of religious
and Christian duties, in public, private, and secret,
(as she was also diligent about any employment her
age was capable of), but to the surprise and astonish-
ment of many, she gave notable evidences of a public
spirit, being in prayer and otherwise much taken up
about the churches of Christ, and exercised in a ten-
der sympathy with the afflicted, especially if they
were gracious persons. Neither was this a sort of
general and flashing concernment, but such as was
built upon solid grounds, whereof she was able and
ready to give the most distinct accounts. In this
manner, our sweet and young sympathizer (who also
had her own distresses by bodily frailty and otherwise)
took such a large share of the burdens of others, as
rendered her truly useful to them, until she was hap-
pily carried up to that land whereof the inhabitants
shall no more say, ‘I am sick.’

Iam afraid I have detained the reader too long by
this preface, somewhat too large for the small bulk of
the work ; and therefore I shall now proceed to the
particular instances themselves.”
3 oe ee
SB EMILIX GEDDIZ. #8

Kiioomeotion action ecapionn-coy,
CHAPTER TI.

FROM HER BIRTH TO HER NINTH YEAR

[We have already noticed the time and place of her
birth, If her parents did not at once see that she was
‘a proper child,” like Moses, they at all events soon
discovered that the Spirit of God was working in her
betimes. She manifested a most remarkable regard
to the worship of God, even while in her mother’s
arms. The narrative runs thus :]

Before she could speak, if she had
Her reverence to- 3 Seay *
wards God in in- been weeping or signifying her desire
fancy. ; .
to have anything she saw or wanted,
in case she either observed or was told they were to
go about worship in the family where she happened
to be present, this silenced her immediately. And
whatever edge had been upon her spirit before, and
though the body had been somewhat uneasy, yet she
was perfectly quict, and waited with patience until
the worship came to be ended. This was so native
to her, I may say, as to the new nature, and hecame
EMILIA GEDDTE. 19

so usual and constant, that in case she happened to
be out of humour (which was not very frequent with
her), the servants of the house would have put them-
selves into a posture of worship, by discovering” their
heads, or otherwise ; whereupon she became instantly
silent and quiet, and thus did these little disorders
go off. So much of high estimation and profound
reverence she discovered for the worship of God,even
before she arrived at the second year of her age.

Ter thoughts about S° soon as she could aim at speak-
the Creator. ing, she began to ask questions con-
cerning God and the creation, with other matters of
religion. For instance, when she observed the sun
shining, she inquired, ‘‘Whether that sun had shined
on her grandfather and grandmother, and made them
to see as well as us.” When it was answered, ‘That
the same sun gave light to the whole world,” she re-
plied, ‘‘Ought we not then to love that God who
made all these things, and gaye them to us?” Many
hundreds of such questions she proposed, and gave
likewise such answers unto questions moyed to her,
which are forgotten and lost through inadvertency.
Her wisdom and gravity were such, even in her infant
years, that every one admired her,and they especially
who saw her more rarely—for these qualities were
less observed by them who were more ordinarily with
her (though afterwards they remembered them, with
regret for the want of her), in regard things of that

__* Discovering, i. e. uncovering. See this old use of the word
in our common translation of Isaiah xxii, 8,
20 THE LIFE oF

nature and value became so common to those who
were ordinarily in her company, that they took little
notice of them.*
Asking blessing Some persons having overheard her
Ao HEe craving a blessing before meat, and
finding that she had expressions more weighty and
significant than could well have been expected from
one of her age, asked her hereupon who had taught
her to crave a blessing to her meat after that manner.
She answered, ‘‘ That she had learned now and then
a word from several persons, and that the Lord had
set these words together, whereupon she had made a
grace of them.” This happened before the third year
of her age.
Her regard forthe Much about the same time, having
Ba ae suspected that one of the servants of
the house, being the maid who attended her, had
cleansed a room on the Lord’s day, she reproved her
sharply in her childish manner, and said, ‘‘ Away,
begone, you sin against the Holy Spirit. You sweep
the house on the Sabbath, and profane the Lord’s
day.” Neither could she be reconciled with her
maid, until it was found to be a mistake, and there-
upon she was satisfied, the matter of fact having been
found otherwise.

About the same time, a servant
who was newly come to the house,
used the devil’s name in a way of cursing, in presence

Horror at an oath.

* “Fence it was,” says the compiler, ‘that the small frag
ments we have were mostly taken notice of by strangers.”

Sad
EMILIA GEDDIE. ; 31

of his other fellow-servants. She, being at that time
with her nurse, reproved him sharply, and said,
‘Henry, if you do this again, I'll tell God on you.”
He, being a wanton youth, answered her scoffingly,
‘*Go then, and do so.” Hereupon she went to the
next room, and one followed her at a distance, with-
out her knowledge, to observe her behaviour. She
Prayer foraswear- fell upon her knees, and continued
eX: in that posture for awhile.. After-
wards she returned to the company, but spoke noth-
ing, until the same young man mockingly inquired,
‘“Have you now told God?” She answered gravely,
“Yea, L have; and the Lord says, if you continue to
do so, He will give you away to the devil, and cast
you into hell.” Whereupon the youth was aston-
ished, and did carry more circumspectly for some
years wherein he served in that family. Nay, after
he had been seven years out of the family, and was
put in memory of that reproof by one who had heard
him swear, the consideration thereof made him to fall
a weeping, and to beg pardon, saying he ought never
to have forgotten such a reproof.

Helping the tempt- Being in company with a woman
eit who was struggling with dreadful
temptations, and who thereupon became afraid to be
in a room alone, the child offered to go out of the
room, and the woman endeavoured to detain her,
saying, ‘You must by no means go away.” Yet the
babe went forward, till she was near the door, and
then she looked back, and said, with a stronger and
22 THE LIFE OF

sharper voice than ordinary, ‘‘God is with you, and
will keep you from all evil.” The tempted woman,
having heard the child speak so pertinently, did pre-
sently say in her heart, ‘‘This is not the voice of the
child, but of the Lord !” And the dispensation was
so blessed to her, that the temptations vanished grad-
ually from that time forward, and did never recur.
How she knew the At another time, when she was ob-
Lord’s teaching. served to be very attentive unto the
word read and heard, and to be much in secret pray-
er, as also diligent in pressing others to that duty, an
old experienced Christian, R. W., met her in return
from her chamber, and said to her, ‘‘ Have you been
at your prayers?” She answered, ‘Yes ;” and add-
ed, ‘‘ When I was a child, my mother taught me to
pray, but now the Lord teaches me.” The honest
man inquired hereupon, ‘How know you the Lord’s
teaching by that of your mother?’ She answered,
“The Lord makes me both to rejoice and to weep;
he makes my heart glad, and gives me new words.”

At fouE ese OL Some godly people having mot to-
age joining ina gether for prayer and conference, her
prayer-meeting. other took her along, and still* her
inclinations carried her to be in such societies. After
they had met, the meeting having consisted of some
old experienced Christians, and others who were but
beginning to point} that way, a debate arose, which
of them should first pray. Some were for the elder,
and others for the younger set. The child not being

* Always. + Turn their thoughts to
EMILIA GEDDIE, 23

four years of age, and sitting at her mother’s feet,
none of the company took notice of her, because of
her nonage. Hearing the dispute, she said, ‘I’m the
youngest of all, I'll begin.” Upon which the whole
company was silent, excepting the mother, who re-
proved her child for insolence, in troubling the meet-
ing with her fondt offer, in regard she had never
prayed in such company before, nor had been ever in-
vited, because of her childhood. There was at that
time in the company an old experienced matron,upon
whom the society had laid it to begin their meeting
with prayer: she said, ‘‘My child, you shall have my
consent to begin,” and did prevail so far with her
mother and the company that it was allowed. This
is the only instance wherein she expressed any for-
wardness ; for such was her modesty and bashfulness
afterward, that she would never adventure upon that
duty in societies, without much entreating and a clear
call. Yet the passage is set down, because a young
gentlewoman who had but newly set out, and had
been present at very few, if any, such meetings be-
fore, was so moved with several expressions the child
had in prayer, that she held on in the Lord’s way
ever afterward,* and acknowledged that the Lord
blessed the child’s praying at that time, and that she
really got good by it. A renewed confirmation, that
“out of the mouth of babes and sucklings the Lord or-
daineth strength.” (Psalm viii. -2.)

} Foolish.

* In spite of the persecutions that arose, in which many
sealed the truth with their blood,
2+ THE LIFE OF

No show in her ‘She was observed to weep much
profession. alone, but was utterly unwilling that
it should be known ; and because of this aversion,she
was very careful to wash her face quictly, and to put
herself in such a posture as might best conceal her
having wept. And in case she heard any person
speaking to her advantage, and repeating any of her
sayings or practices, she would have gone off and hid
herself, or else would have wept.

Awminister offend- A godly minister inadvertently
ing the little ones. said to her, ‘I would not give a
halfpenny fer a child’s religion ;’ the words made
such a deep impression upon her spirit, that she went
on her way with much heaviness for a long time, and
took the occasion for moving the question to any ju-
dicious and godly persons she had opportunity to
meet with, whether they knew any good and religious
children who continued such when they were old





‘A mother’s ve- One day, when her mother had re-
VT f felt oo.
oo proved her for not giving a good enough

account of her lesson, she was afterwards found weep-

ing. Being asked, ‘‘Why weep you ?—you were not

beaten ;” she answered, ‘‘I had rather been beaten
? ?

* Should not this remind us of our Lord’s solemn warning—
‘Whoso shall offend (i. e. cause to stumble) one of these little
ones that believe in me, it were better for him that a millstone
were hanged about his neck, and he were drowned in the depth
of the sea.” ‘‘Take heed that ye despise not one of these little
ones: for I say unto you, that in heaven their angels do always
behold the face of my Father which is in heaven” (Matt. xviii.
6-10:) Angels; the very highest and most honoured angels, do
not disdain to minister for these little ones, for the Lord does
not disdain to send theia to take care of such (Heb. i. 14.)
EMILIA GEDDIE, uD

than that I had angered my mother; the thoughts of
my mother’s being angry make me to weep.”
Struggles with Being sore tossed in wrestling with
SEO temptations, she went to a godly wo-
man, with whom she frequently conversed about her
spiritual cases. She, finding her at this time sore
troubled, did ask the cause. She answered, ‘‘Alas!
the devil takes the good word out of the very bottom
of my heart; and often he says to me, ‘ What needs
all this noise with your religion? You may be like
other children; they will get heaven as soon as you.’
These and the like temptations,” said she, ‘‘I am
vexed with.” Being inquired waat course she took
with them, she replied, ‘‘ That she knew no other
way but to carry them in before the Lord by prayer;
and I desire,” said she, ‘‘that you would pray, and
bid godly people pray for me, for my prayers have
no strength, nor theirs either, without Christ.”
Being on a certain day in a good
dress, with her linens white, and
adorned with red ribbons, a godly man, R. W., said
to her thereupon, ‘‘No doubt you think yourself to
be very trim and clean.” She replied, ‘‘I shall never
think that, until I get on the fair and clean robe of
Christ's imputed righteousness, and then I shall be
truly fine and clean,”

No pride in dress.

Thoughts in sick- Some while afterward she fell sick,
ess: and her bed being made, she was laid
in it, whereupon one of the company said, ‘‘ This is
well, she will now get rest.” She, overhearing, an-
26 THE LIFE OF

swered, ‘‘I am rejoicing at another thing, and that
is, that there is a rest prepared for the people of God
(Heb. iv. 9), among whom I hope to be found; there
T shall sing for evermore.” Then she called for her

father, who came and asked what she would* say.
She answered, ‘‘ Pray. Let us pray together here,

and we will sing the more sweetly when we come to
our rest.”

Feeling of the | When first she began to be more
word preached. sensibly profited by hearing the word
preached,and to give clear evidences of her being edi-
fied thereby, this instance, amongst others, is memor-
able. A minister having preached upon a Sabbath
on these words—‘*‘ In this mountain shall the Lord of
hosts make unto all people a feast of fat things, a feast
of wines upon the lees,” &c. (Isaiah xxy. 6), she de-
clared she found the word very sweet to her, and that
it did her good. Being inquired what good she found
in it, and how it did her good, she answered, ‘It
did go through her bones ; it went into her heart,and
brought tears to this place,” pointing with her finger

to her eye-lids.
Much about the same time, she was

desired to pray with some others just
after she had risen from her bed, she refused, saying,
** How can you bid me pray, seeing my prayers can
bring no comfort: but yours may?” They insisted
further ; she refused absolutely, and told them, “I
am but just now got out of my bed, and will pray
none in company until first I have prayed alone,”

* Wished to say.

Closet prayer.
EMILTA GEDDIE. 27

When at a certain time she was ly-
ing in her bed in a morning, and was
overheard weeping, a friend came to her, and inquired
what troubled her. She first declined to tell, but
being further urged, her answer was, ‘‘I have been
meditating on hell, and the darkness of it, and I think
I cannot endure it.”

Being in a garden on a Sabbath day,

Thinking on hell.

Reproving the 4 a
breaker of the and having seen some children play-

iat ing together, she, rebuking them,
said, ‘‘ It were better for you to be praying.” They
answered, ‘‘We are but children.” She replied,
‘Though we be but children, yet we must die,” and
thereupon she went from them, and hid herself in a
corner. Some of the children went about and sought
her, and having found her at prayer in a secret corner,
they reproached and upbraided her with nicknames.
She answered them meekly and gravely, ‘‘ Know ye
not that the word of God saith, ‘‘ Remember to keep
holy the Sabbath-day ?” 'The children replied, ‘‘ The
word does not say, ‘Emilia Geddie, keep holy the
Sabbath-day.’” Emily answered, ‘‘The word of God
says to you, and you and me, and to all, ‘ Remember
to keep holy the Sabbath-day.’” They replied to her,
‘© You are a violent young Whig* but we will slay
you.” She answered, ‘‘Well, I will complain to God
on you.” They replied, ‘‘You may do so.” Then

* The name given to those who exposed themselves to perse-
cution, because they continued to hear the word of God from
the lips of Presbyterian ministers, when the Prelatic bishops
made a law, that every one must attend the curate of his own
parish. See Cruickshank’s History, chap vii.
28 THE LIFE ov

e retired from them to the house;
while they sought her out again, and, having found
her, they said, ‘‘Now, Emily, have you told God on
us?’ ‘Yes, Ihave,” said she. They replied scoff-
ingly, ‘* Well, what says God?’ She answered,
“The Lord saith this, ‘The wicked shall be turned into
hell, and all that forget God.” (Psalm ix. 17.)
Remark on the When first she began to read the-
Shorter Catechism. assembly's Shorter Catechism, she
said to her teacher, ‘‘I think the Bible is God’s word,
and the Catechism is the Bible’s word.”

One having read this passage of
scripture, ‘‘ Rend your hearts, and
not your garments” (Joel ii. 13), the child said, ‘I

think this reproves the Papists, and their way of pen-
ance ; for God calls for nothing but the breaking and
foahline of the heart.”

and after some

No need of penance.

Her estimate of Having come at a time from one of
words in prayer. her young. societies, which she had
gathered together for prayer, she was asked by a per-
son, ‘Who prayed best?” ‘I cannot tell,” said she,
‘who prayed best, but I can tell those whose words
came best forth,” and named one R. L.. Being in-
quired at anotner time, after she came from her pray-
ing society of children,she gave this account—namely,
“That one, G. W., had most of his prayers about the
rulers, and another, M. G., was much taken up about
the churches abroad.”

Â¥aithful reply toa A captain of the forces, having come
profane captain. into her father’s house, said to: her,
EMILIA GE 29



“Emily, I will marry you.” She answered, ‘‘ No.”
He inquired her reason. She replied, ‘‘ You have no
grace.” ‘‘Have you any?” said the captain. She
answered, ‘‘ Whatever I have, you have none; for
if you had, you would not do the bishop’s bidding, to
take the honest ministers, and persecute all the godly
praying folk.”

Her wish to be A company being engaged in con-
pS aS verse, and each one proposing to his
neighbour, Which of the saints he would chiefly desire
to resemble? she, being present, said, ‘I would fain
be like David.” ‘‘ Would you be a king?” said one.
“No,” said she, ‘‘ but I would gladly be in David's
case. He was aman according to God’s heart; he
dwelt near God, and in the light of God’s counte-
nance,”

EtRenee She ie most attentive in reading
the meaning of the scripture and the catechisms, and
Bg gees did observe carefully what she had
read. She came one day to her father, and proposed
that question, namely, ‘‘Why it was that, in the
fourth commandment, to keep holy the Sabbath, the
wife is not particularly mentioned, and yet others of
the family are set down, as sons, daughters, and
servants? And she observed that, in the tenth com-
mandment, the wife is particularly named amongst
other things of our neighbour’s which we may not
covet, and the daughter is not mentioned in that
command.” Her father asked her, ‘‘what she thought

S

was the reason?” She answered, ‘That the general
30 THE LIFE OF

words of all that is within thy gates, comprehended
every person ;” and so the matter ended.

RR ar Her nCeTe Having one day taken some view
sistency of profess- of a foot-ball game, she thought it
ing Ghesu aes. to be vain and idle, and left them.
When she returned to the company, she was asked,
*“Why she had retired so quickly and wept?” She
answered, ‘‘ That it was not so much for seeing the
idleness and wickedness of the foot-ball men, as be-
cause she had seen a godly and grave gentlewoman
laughing and taking pleasure at the sight.”* It is
very like that wicked speeches were intermingled
with their sport.

Most freedomin She with her young society having
PEN met one day for prayer, a minister
who was occasionally in the house desired to be ad-
mitted into the company, which they modestly de- .
clined. After the first prayer was ended, he renewed
his desire, that he might at least confer with them.
This they granted. Then he demanded, ‘ Whether
they would put any question to him, or he propose
one to them?” Emilia answered, ‘‘ We would ask a
question of you, which is this, Whence is it, that a
Christian for ordinary enjoyeth more of enlargement
in praying alone than with others ?”

* Ts not this the mind of Christ? ‘It was not an enemy that

reproached me ; then I could have borne it; but it was thou.”
—Psalm ly. 12.
EMILIA GEDDIE. ; 31

‘anteater aeisne: + ear to the same time a persecuted
thened by her pray- minister, Mr, D. C.,+ came to her
ing with him. 5 -
father’s house, with a design to stay
until the Sabbath was over, and resolved to preach
on the Lord's day. When Saturday came, he pro-
posed to go to another place, but was much entreated
to stay. Yet he declined, and ingenuously gave his
reason, which was, ‘‘That he had broken in upon two
or three texts, but could get no digested thoughts
about them; which made him suspect he was not
called to preach there at that time.” Nevertheless,
upon further importunity, he was persuaded to stay
a little longer, and to make a new essay; for which
effect the company left him. The child was present,
and heard all this, no person taking notice of her.
Some little while after, she went alone to the minis-
ter, and asked what he was doing, and whether he
was preparing to preach. The minister, wondering
at such gravity and confidence in a mere child, an-
swered her, ‘“‘No, Emily, Iam not.” She replied,
“Sir, go and pray.” He answered, ‘‘ Yes, I will do
so, if you will pray with me.” To which she agreed;
and they both performed the duty the one after the
other. After that the child had prayed, the minister
declared he found himself so refreshed and streng-
thened that he immediately resolved to stay ; and ac-
+ This may have been Donald Cargill, the martyr ; for he fre-
quently preached in Fife, and even during the years in which
he was ordered to keep north of the Tay did not scruple to pass
southward when he saw an opportunity of preaching the Gospel.

Glenvale, among the Lomond Hills, was one of the scenes of his
field preaching.
oo THE LIFE oF

cordingly he tarried, and preached the whole day with
power aad liberty, to the great benefit of the hearers.
These sermons wrought mightily, through the Lord’s
blessing, upon the heart of the child, and were heard
by her with much concern and application.

Reasoning with a A young woman, A. R., had long
tempted woman. struggled under a dreadful tempta-
tion, which procured her.abstaining from food, in re-
gard she thought it would have been presumption in
her to eat, seeing she looked on herself as having no
right to the creatures. Many arguments were used
to persuade her to a taking of meat, but nothing pre-
vailed. Hereupon the child went to her chamber,
and expostulated with her to this purpose: ‘You re-
fuse to eat, but it is the devil that beguiles you: you
cannot live unless you eat. Were I in your place, T
would beguile the devil ; I would eat, and not obey
him, but obey the Lord.” These words and argu-
ments of the child took such impression upon the
poor tempted woman, tliat she shook off the tempta-
tion, and took her meat regularly. When this was
observed, honest people, who saw her, rejoiced much
to find her delivered from under the feet of such a
cruel temptation. And she ingenuously declared,
that the Lord had blessed the words of the child, for
defeating that hellish engine. : So far as was known,
she never afterwards gave way to such diabolical
suggestions,

Usefulin another Some while after, the same woman,
peu Duaton, through the power of temptation, de-
EMILIA GEDDTEL 33

sisted from the duty of prayer, and with so much of
peremptoriness that no persuasion could induce her
to essay it. But again the child prevailed, having
prayed with her ; whereupon, through the blessing of
God, the strength of that temptation was broken, and
she went about the duty afterward.

: She jwas still* much addicted to
Meetings for pray- =
er with other chil- secret prayer, and laid out herself
Bs es in persuading others to it, especially
those of her owa sex and years; by which means she
gathered together a society of children, who did reg-
ularly meet, without admitting any others into their
company. ‘Thus they continued unknown, save that
some persons, whether from curiosity or other
motives, did endeavour to overhear what passed
amongst them. Ona certain day, they having met
in a room where there was a closet, a judicious per-
son, who had gone intothat apartment without their
knowledge, kept the door shut, and made no noise,
that he might know their management ; which he ob-
served with much satisfaction, After they had met,
and before prayer by any of them, a complaint was
given in against M. M., one of their number,who was
the oldest among them all, by three or four years,
and also the tallest of stature. Hereupon they con
stituted themselves into a sort of court of judicature,
and made choice of Emilia to preside amongst them.
After this the alleged delinquent was challenged. The
libel laid against her was this; namely, ‘That she,

* 4.¢., Always.
34 THE LIFE OF

being one of their society, had been guilty of some
practices unsuitable to their profession, and offensive
to other good people :” and the following particulars
were condescended upon : First, That she had heard
a curate* preach in the church of Strathmiglo upon a
Lord’s day. Secondly, that being in a company who
joined in prayer, she had been seen laughing in the
time of duty. Thirdly, That she had spoken evil of
some godly persons. ‘To this libel, M. M. gave the
following answers. As to the first article, she ac-
knowledged that she had indeed heard that curate ;
but without any knowledge beforehand, and also
against her inclination. She had gone to pay a visit
to her sister, married to a gentleman of that parish,
who was in use to attend Presbyterian meetings; and
being desired by him and her sister to attend worship
on the Lord’s day, she knew no other than that they
were going to hear a Presbyterian minister ; whereas,
without her knowledge, and contrary to her design,
she was bronght to the church by force—for which
she declared her sorrow, and promised to do go no
more. As to the second, she confessed she had
laughed in time of prayer, but was induced so to do
by a mere surprise; namely, a young woman had
fallen asleep in time of prayer, and was so far entan-
gled with the chair on which she leaned, that upon
her awaking, she tumbled on the floor, with her stool

upon her, in such sort that none who saw her could
* These were the men of whom Bishop Burnet says, “They

were ignorant to a reproach, the dregs and refuse of the north-
ern parts i
EMILIA GEDDIE. 35

abstain from laughing. As to the third, she denied
the charge; but acknowledged she had mentioned
some evil things, which certain honest people had said
of other godly folk; and that she had done it with
regret, and did sincerely lament it, that such evil re- »
ports should be spread. concerning godly persons, and
declared that she had said nothing of that kind from
herself. :
Her$ This libel, with the answers given
er judgment on

theconductofone thereunto, being considered by the
of her members. :

young meeting, and every one’s
judgment asked, they all, with one voice, referred the
matter to their president, who, after some discourse
to the meeting, proposed her judgment as follows:
namely, ‘‘ That the offender, M. M., should not be
debarred from the society, but allowed to be present
with them for hearing and converse ; but, in regard
of some offence both given and taken in this matter,
she should not be allowed to pray with them in the
society for the space of a month ; so that, during that
space of time, they might have the occasion to ob-
serve her deportment, and she might have access to
improve herself by her following behaviour.” Such
was the grave, impartial, and wise procedure of this
young judicature, by the direction of their grave
president,
Her mode of deal- It was her ordinary custom to get
ing with beggars. from that servant who was intrusted
to serve the poor, so much as her parents allowed for
them, that she might give them their alms out of her
85 THE LIFE OF

own hand. This was thought a little strange, in re-
gard that children of her age are usually afraid of
beggars. It was not so with her; but, upon the con-
trary, she followed them to the outmost gate, and
without it, and was at pains to instruct and exhort
them, shewing them that there is a God, a heaven
and hell, And, moreover, she reproved them for
their wicked lives, and plainly teld them that their,
swearing, drinking, breaking of the Sabbath-day, and
other crimes, would bring them to hell. The maid
who attended her was often afraid when she missed
her, not knowing where she could be; and, after they
had sought her out, she was often found conferring
with the beggars. One day she said to her mother,
“I perceive that you and others give meat, and some-
times a bit of cloth, to beggars; but { see not that
you or others call them in, and inquire of them if
they know they have souls, or teach them a question
or two in the Catechism.” There are more passages
of this sort which are not thought necessary or proper
to be imparted, in this manner.
A minister of the gospel, having ob-

Wise thoughts E : Mit
about proper Served her way and deportment with
eae the the beggars, inquired of her of whom

~ "~~" she thought the begears were descend-
ed. Her answer was, ‘‘She thought the renegado or
randy-beggars were of the accursed race of Cain ;
for,” said she, ‘‘the Lord has sentenced them to be
fugitives and vagabonds upon the face of the earth.”
‘Well,” said the minister, ‘what course would you
.EMILIA GEDDIE. : 37

have taken with them?’ She answered, “I would
have every parish to keep their own poor, and to pro-
vide for them, and teach them; and thus much sin

‘would be prevented. For I think,” said she, “ that
their abominable wickednesses bring much sin and
wrath upon the land.”

A Sabbath at Upon a Sabbath on which she and
ONO other children had been left alone in
the house, when the rest of the family came home,
one of them asked how she had spent the day. She
replied, that she spent it in her ordinary manner, in
reading, singing, praying, and other spiritual exercises ;
all which, she declared, were so sweet to her that she
wearied not, but thought the time very short.
Her father (being clerk to the
a Goines et king’s stewartry of Wife) was re-
aes in provi- quired and pressed to. take The
Declaration,* and threatened in case
of his refnsal; whereupon he called his daughter
Emilia, and said to her, ‘I am threatened and like
to be forced to take The Declaration.” She, from
her concern about the church and nation, came to
know sufficiently what it was. Her father insisted,
and said, ‘*Whether shall I take that oath or not?
What think you of it?’ She answered, ‘‘Take it
not ; God forbid you should take it.” “But,” said
her father, “ Emily, they will take my place from

* This was an Act declaring it unlawful to enter into cove-
nants or leagues, or to hold conventions and gatherings, and
specially denouncing the “National League and Covenant” as
unlawful,

. B
38 THE LIFE OF .

me.” She replied, ‘That he need not much care tor
that.” “* But,” added he, “ they will persecute me
further, and take away my estate; and then how shall -
I and you live?” She very cheerfully answered,
‘* Dear father, take no thought of me; God will pro-
vide for us; let us live by faith.” “But,” replied
her father, ‘‘ God hath appointed means to be used
for an honest livelihood, and hath commanded us to
use them.” She answered, ‘‘He hath indeed ap-
pointed lawful means to be used; but we may not
use such as are unlawful.” ‘“‘Ay, but,” said her
father, ‘‘I see no mean for our livelihood except I
take The Declaration.” All this he spoke for trial,
being fully resolved not to take that wicked oath. At
length, with a great deal of modesty and submission,
she said, ‘‘Dear father, do not take that Declaration,
and I will tell you how we may live.” ‘‘ How is
that?” said he. She answered, ‘‘I will go to service,
and thereby I may get victuals and also old clothes
from some persons of honour ; and so I will save my
wages and give you them to live upon.” Her father
answered, ‘Whom can you serve, or who will give
you wages? you are but young.” (She was at that
time but eight years of age.) She replied, ‘I know
a lady who will give me both food, raiment, and
wages ; which wages I will ‘give to you.” Here we
have notable evidences, not only of a good and duti-
ful child, who bore a fervent love to her parents, but
also some clear indications of grace and parts beyond
her age; and, in particular, she hereby discovered
EMILIA GEDDIE, 39

much of a keen hatred of sin, which was most com-
fortable to her parents and others concerned with
her.

Prayer for impri- Upon a day when she had retired
soned ministers, for secret prayer, a minister, having
put off his shoes that he might the more quietly and
unobservedly hear what she said, went as near to the
door of the room as he possibly could. He, having
returned, did most seriously declare that he thought
every word she spoke came from the very bottom of
her heart. Among other suits she put up, she par-
ticularly insisted for two ministers, Messrs. R. G.
and A. P.,* who were then prisoners in the Bass.
The one was a young man, and the other old. The
expressions she used were, ‘‘There are many,O Lord,
who use means to get the young minister’s liberty,
but we hear of no means used for the old ; therefore,
O Lord, do it thyself, and I will declare thou didst
it thyself, and bless thy name for it.” Some while
after this, the old minister, Mr. A. P., was wonder-
fully delivered from that prison.

. In the ninth year of her age,when
Severely injured :
bysomeboys. Her she was one day going to schoal,
forgiving spirit. >
mee three or four boys, older and bigger

than she, met her in the way ; and, having furnished

* R. G. is Mr. Robert Gillespie. He was before the Council,
and owned that he had kept one conventicle in the town of
Falkland, in 1673. Refusing to inform who were present at
that conventicle, he was sent prisoner to the Bass. ‘The other,
A. P., is the well-known Alewander Peden, sent to the Bass that
same year. It was Peden who said, “Pray much; it is praying
folks that will get through the storm,” :
49 THE LIFE OF

themselves with small rods in their hands, they
threatened to beat her, and said they would slay her,
if she would not swear to be no more a whig, and
promise to go afterwards to church. She answered,
“Though ye should slay me, I will not swear at all.”
Hercupon they lashed her with their rods, and threat-
ened her further. She essayed to make an escape,
but could not, because they were swifter and stronger
than she. This-put her sore to it, because she was
without the reach of help by crying, the place being
remote from houses and company. But having con-
sidered awhile what to do, she remembered that she
had some farthings by her; whereupon she took them
all out, and scattered them amongst the boys, who
did presently run together and contended about
them. ‘Phis fair occasion and advantage she took,
and, running with all her might, she escaped that
danger. Nevertheless, the fear and stripes were very
hurtful to her; for, after that encounter, she con-
tracted a sickness which procured her vomiting a
great deal of blackish humour, that would have been
fatal to her, as many thought, had it not been evacu-
ated. Next day it was told her that the parents of
these boys had corrected them severely for their
heinous crimes; which, when she heard, it brought
this meek answer from her, namely, ‘“That she freely
forgave them, seeing they knew no better.”
EMILIA GEDDIE, 41

CHAPTER If.
FROM HER NINTH TO HER FIFTEENTH YEAR.*

Upon the occasion that a person in

A remarkable
answertoprayer Whom she was very nearly concerned
Per eee eencok: was like to be expelled from the place,
because of refusing to conform, as the

law then required, the child, without acquainting any
person of her design, endeavoured to prevail with
some of her associates that they would join together
in prayer, for detaining that person amongst them.
She had, before this time, as she herself narrated,
much rejoiced at the merciful providence that a per-
son so useful should have come to dwell where she
resided ; and therefore she could not but look upon
it as a heavy stroke to the neighbourbood and upon
herself, in case one should be thrust from them who
was of so great use to them both in spiritual and sec-

* This portion is entitled in the original edition, ‘“‘Some fur-
ther speeches of Emilia Geddie, uttered to and in the hearing
of persons worthy of credit, observed and collected by K.C., her
schoolmistress, who was intimately acquainted with her, and
given in by the said K. C. as followeth.” So careful was the
compiler to give only what was genuine.

This schoolmistress seems to have been Katherine Collace, or
Mrs. Ross, who, when inthe north at Oldearn, was one of the
most intimate friends of Mr. Hog of Kiltearn at the time when
persecution caused him to reside in Morayshire. Circumstances
led her to remove southward to Falkland, after she was left a
widow and had lost twelve children successively. This was in
1672. (See “Spiritual Exercises of Mistress Ross,” p. 62, pre-
faced by Mr. Hog of Carnock.) She taught sewing, and was the
instrument of converting many of her scholars. Her name fre-
quently occurs in the “‘ Diary of James Nimmo,” acopy of which
exists in MS., written by Wm. Geddie, the uncle of Emilia
Geddie.
42 THE LIFE oF

ular regards; and particularly to herself, as having the
charge of her education, She was not fully nine years
of age when she laid out herself for bringing about
the fore-mentioned project; yet it failed, in so far as
she could not procure a joint concurrence in that en-
terprise. Nevertheless, she set about the duty her-
self alone, and, having severed some time for that -
effect, she got (as she herself narrated) a merciful re-
turn, and was encouraged from that word, Be not
afraid, only believe, Mark v. 36. She looked on the
mercy as so much the greater, because .she acknow-
ledged her great want of a concernment upon her
spirit suiting the weight of that matter. The gentle-
woman about whom all this business was made, being
her school-mistress, asked the child ‘‘ What her
thoughts were of the matter, and if she expected her
being suffered to stay in the place.” She readily an-
swered, ‘‘There is no fear ;” but declined to mention
how she came to know so much. But, being impor-
tuned, she humbly and modestly gave the foresaid
account ; and everything fell owt accordingly. For,
though all possible means were used to cast that per-
son out of the place, yet they prevailed not. She
stayed there as long as she thought meet with much
quietness.

Refusestogotothe The child, being very intimate
house of mirth. —_ with her school-mistress, gave her a
particular account of her spiritual concerns from time
to time. One day, upon the earnest suit of a near
relation, her mother was prevailed with to permit the
EMILIA. GEDDIE, 48

child to go to a penny-wedding of a servant of that
friend, Yet her school-mistress, not inclining that
she should go, said nothing, but only gave her a place
of Scripture to read and ponder, namely, Isaiah xxii.
12, 13, 14,* and desired her to inquire into the Lord's
mind init. This she accordingly did; and, having
returned, her mistress asked her what she thought of
that passage. She answered, ‘“‘She had learned so
much from it that she would by no means go to the
wedding.” ‘I have not forbidden you,” said her
mistress. ‘‘But the Lord hath forbidden me by his
word,” said. the child. Hereupon her mistress re-
quired her to shew how that was. She answered,
“My going to that wedding would have been contrary
to the word [ had read, and that in two things. First,
The Lord is calling us at this time to fasting, mourn-
ing, and praying ; and, had I gone to that wedding,
I had gone to feasting, revelling, and mirth. Second,
That place speaks of girding with sackcloth, and I
behoved to have been in a finer dress than ordinary if
T had gone to the wedding. Therefore, it is neither
suitable to the times, nor the suffering condition of
my father’s family, to go to such feastings.” These
were near her very words; so she would not go.

* “And in that day did the Lord God of Hosts call to weep-
ing; and to mourning, and to baldness, and to girding with sack-
cloth ; and behold! joy and gladness, slaying oxen and killing
sheep, eating flesh and drinking wine; ‘Let us eat and drink,
for to-morrow we shall die.’ And it was repeated in mine ears
by the Lord of Hosts, Surely this iniquity shall not be purged,
Srom you till ye die. saith the Lord God of Hosts.”
44.
A day or two after, some of hep
Sadness because » 5 Palle
ofnot protesting Cousins treated with her to go in with
aeinsk Bhs SNS them to a chamber of that house where
the marriage entertainment had been
held. There some of the young gentlewoman danced,
but she was only a spectatrix.* Immediately 'here-
upon she fell under a heavy damp, and went quickly
off from the company, humbly to inquire of the Lord
into the causes. But, finding nothing by prayer, she
essayed reading of the word, waiting for some con-
vincing discovery from thence. And, having found
nothing there, she tried meditation; and searching
her way by that means, but not finding out the cause,
she went to prayer again; and the Lord convinced
her of the evil in countenancing and encouraging the
other children in their lightness and vanity. Hereupon
she was humbled for her sin, and confessed it to the
Lord, and declared she found the access to pardon
easy. She got discoveries of the love of Christ to her
soul clearer than ordinarily, and said, ‘‘she was ad-
mitted to such near embraces of Christ by faith, that
she could have been satisfied to have gone immedi-
ately from thence to heaven.”
anata ieee Being at school, which she punc-
sedregardingcom- tually attended, she was observed to
ee go often forth one day. Whereupon
a certain person traced her, and found that she was
frequently at prayer that day. Having come home
from school, she asked a servant, ‘‘ whether there had

* A looker-on.
EMILIA GEDDIE 45
been any stir about her father’s house?’ The ser-
vant, fearing to trouble her, was at first unwilling to
answer, but, on further importunity, told her that the
house had been carefully searched for papers, but
none were found. After this, she retired and gave
thanks to the Lord for the merciful return of her
prayers, and was much taken up about the public
concerns of the churches, and of this church. At
that time she got a full and strong persuasion of the
Lord’s appearing for the deliverance of his church in
this land. Next day, being demanded the reason of
her greater than ordinary frequency at prayer, as
aforesaid, she modestly gave the fore-mentioned ac-
count, and added, ‘‘she had seen the most glorious
sight she ever saw.” Being desired to impart what it
was, she declined; but, being pressed, she said, ‘I
have seen the Lord on his throne of majesty, ard
coming forth against his enemies, and I saw them
made to fly as chaff before his presence; and I wept,”
said she, ‘‘for the misery of the wicked.” Being in-
quired what she thought of her father’s enemies, she
answered, ‘‘I think they are even taken in with the
Lord’s enemies.” Upon another day she came very
cheerfully and pleasantly to her mistress, and said,
“T have gotten two great mercies; one is, That the
Lord will again appear gloriously in this land; and
the other, That the Lord hath given assurance to my
soul that I am his.” )

lier inward sirug- Thereafter, her mistress having
gles and victories. teen from home a week or thereby,
46 PTE LIFE OF

at her return called the child to an account about
her spiritual condition during her absence—for, as to
her learning, she was exact and diligent, and needed
no incitement. She answered, ‘‘I have been sore
assaulted with temptations, and in prayer I got that
word, ‘ Zhe seed of the woman shall bruise the serpent’s
head’ (Gen. iti, 15), and so he went away. But, a
little after, I was left to a worse evil for a time, even
lightness of heart, and to nave been rid of it I could
have wished to have been again in my former tempted
condition. Next, I was somewhat taken up about
suffering for truth, and found that I am able neither
to suffer nor flee. Then I got aclear discovery of the
sufferings of Christ, which, I am convinced, would
dispose my heart to suffer for him.”

Emmity to levity Upon a Sabbath, when she and
in holy things. " another child were praying and read-
ing sermons in her father’s garden, a girl came in up-

on them who had been one of their society, but had
that day gone to church, She fell a plucking of the
flowers ; whereupon Emilia said, ‘These are the fruits
of the curate’s* preaching, even breaking of the Sab-
bath day.” The girl desired the child who was with-
Emilia to pray ; but Emilia, thinking the desire pro-

ceeded from curiosity, gave her comrade a watchword
not to comply therewith. ‘‘ Her carriage,” said she,

“is very unlike the Lord’s day ; and, had it not been

* These curates had supplanted the godly and much loved
Presbyterian pastors, and besides were ‘‘mean and despicable
in all respects,” according to Archbishop Burnet, who adds this
further testimony, that they were “‘the worst preachers he ever
heard, and many of them openly vicious.”
EMILIA GEDDIE. 47

my father’s garden, I would have bidden her go away,
but, seeing the garden is his, I thought it not
convenient.”

Letter to her About this time; her father being in
father. London, she wrote a letter to him as
follows :—

“Loving Faruer,—I pray you may be guided in
your way, and not left to sin against God; for this
is a very trying time, and the people of God are under
many temptations. You have need to watch over
your heart now. If the Lord bring you to your jour-
ney’s end, I desire you may bring me home a new
Bible, and the Confession of Faith and Catechisms,
with the Covenants. and Scriptures at length, and
what else you please. I am unwilling to trouble you
further ; and so I rest your affectionate daughter,

Eminia GEDDIE.
“FALKLAND, June 11, 1675.

“Present my service to Mr. Carmichael and his
wife. Farewell, dear father; I wish to hear good
news of you.”

Occasional medi: _[n a conference, she said to a cer-
eauloM: tain person, ‘What good get you of
Scriptures which come passingly into your mind
through the day?” The person did put the question
back to herself, and she answered, ‘‘They serve to
divert my mind from other vanities ; but I get no
profit by them to the exercising of my soul to godli-
ness, save when I get them from God by prayer, or
else go to the Lord by prayer with them,”
48 THE LIFE OF

Praying for per- She asked her mother, ‘‘ Have you
Bese prayed for repentance to him who
persecuteth us, and possesseth our estate ?”* Her
mother answered, ‘‘No.” To this she replied humbly
and modestly, “I think you should have done it. I
have been trying it as I could, and do think that no
other rod was fit for us,save Such an one. But he will
be brought low, and your hands shall not be on him.
You shall return and possess your own ; and in your
return you shall have nothing to do but to see the
salvation of the Lord.” All this came exactly to
pass.

Confidence and Tn the time of her sickness, when
presentiments. one day she was observed to be under
great heaviness, a friend inquired the cause. She
answered, ‘I see great and sore troubles coming upon
the church and people of God in this land ; and great
warnings are given them to enter into their chambers
until the indignation be overpast.” And she further
said, ‘The promises ye have been getting these days
past may be chambers for you to hide in. As for
me,” added she, ‘*the Lord will hide me in the hol-
low of his hand; I shall not see these evil days. O
that his people would flee to his promises, and to the

* In the Memoir of John Geddie, ‘ Abbotsford Miscellany,”
p. 362,-we find him speaking of this hardship, *‘My place being
taken from me then (1674), as now it is, because I would not
comply with the English and subscribe their oath, called The
Tender ; yet, considering the estate was old for many hundreds
of years, the love I had to preserve that old inheritance, made
us, under God, toil much and labour to recover the same;
which, by the blessing of God, I did, &c.” He paid 15,000 merks
to relieve the estate.
EMILIA GEDDIE. 49
bleeding wounds of Jesus Christ! In these only
there is safe hiding in a dark and gloomy day.”

Too much hearing She being at a certain time in
unedifyihg. Kirkaldy, and understanding that
some people, who had but just heard sermons, were
yet intent upon hearing more, said toa godly woman,
G. H., ‘“‘These folks are like to some horses, of which
T have been informed, that pull a great deal of fodder
from the rack, and trample it under their feet, eating
little or none of it. I think we should be like the
horses which eat what they pull down. It were good
for us, when we have heard a sermon, to chew the
cud, by meditating on what we have gotten, ere we
look for more.”

Self-upbraiding for Having heard a sermon against
Rigaku: backsliding, she was afterwards ob-
served to be heavy and afflicted; and being asked
the cause, she answered, ‘‘I was reproved by what I
heard on the Lord’s day, for I am a great backslider.”
And being asked how and wherein, she replied, “‘T
had met. with a great deliverance; for, sitting one day
by the wall of a house, a great piece of slate fell by
me, touching only my clothes, and I was not hurt,
and yet I did not set apart a time to praise the Lord
for such a merciful deliverance, as IT had used to do
in less things.”

Tn the beginning of the tenth year
eee iy of her age, when in a coach on her
ena way t0 way to London from York, a Pop-

ish lady, heing providentially in the
50 THE LIFE OF

same coach, took delight to converse with the child
concerning religion, Having endeavoured to persuade
her of purgatory, she answered, ‘‘Madam,\TI have
been taught my catechism, and I have read and heard
from Scripture of heaven and hell; but I never heard
of purgatory, nor do I see any ground to believe it.”
The lady insisted, ‘“‘ What then think you became of
Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and the patriarchs, with
other saints who died before Christ’s coming in the
flesh?” <‘‘ Madam, that is easily answered,” said the
child; ‘‘ for all these patriarchs lived and died in the
faith of Jesus Christ to come in the flesh. It is
written (John viii. 56), ‘Abraham rejoiced to see my
day, and he saw it and was glad ;’ and the prophet
David (Psalm xvi. 8), seeing Christ to come, did set
him always before his eyes. They and all the other
saints believed he was to come in the flesh ; and, by
virtue of his death and satisfaction, they were saved,
as all the elect shall be, from the beginning of the
world to the end thereof.” Many other remarkable
things were spoken during the six days they travelled
together, but they are now forgotten and lost, The
lady did greatly commend the child, and said to her
parents, ‘It were pity she had not some to educate
her in the way of their church,”
Pe gk. When she came to London, having
per: her sense of occasion to be present at the adminis-
God’s free love. 3 ;

tration of the Lord’s supper, she was
much affected, but was silent for some time. Yet
afterwards she spoke to a friend and said, ‘I saw
EMILIA GEDDIE. on

that sacrament given by the Independents at New-
castle, at which I was not moved ; but now, having
seen the Presbyterian way, I am moved: my heart is
more engaged to the Lord Jesus than ever. And I
would have gladly taken the sacrament, but that I
thought myself too young and ignorant, and not fit
to discern the Lord’s body, which is necessary in such
an ordinance.” She inquired whether any of her age
did take that sacrament; and, being demanded the
reason of her inquiry, she said, ‘‘I have read in the
catechisms, and have considered what a sacrament is.
This time I saw much of glory and beauty in it, and
was made to read much of the love of our Lord Jesus
in these words (1 Cor. xi. 28), ‘Zhe same night in
which he was betrayed,’ &e. My heart,” said she,
“was exceedingly affected with the word, and with
the timing of it, namely, when he was to suffer from
men, and to endure the wrath of God; which to me
held forth his love as past all finding out, Zhis made
me to look about, that I might see if any was able to
resist the power and love which I saw and felt, that he
should have looked on man the same night in which
he was betrayed, and far more, that he should have
given him such a token for good.” The ordinance
saw then dispensed in the meeting-house, where Mr.
William Thompson* and Mr. Alexander Carmichael}

5 * Me, W. Thompson was one of the outed ministers of Edin-
urgh.

+ Mr. A. Carmichael, minister of Pitenain, was banished from
Scotland because he upheld Presbyterianism and the gospel;
whereupon he laboured in London during the two years Of his
life that remained. He wrote an excellent treatise “On the
Mortification of Sin.”
52 THE LIFE oF

preached, in New Queen Street, London. She was
observed to have wept much that day, though
covertly.
fer testimony While in London* for the space of
against dancing. ten months, she was in account with
every one, and much esteemed, yea, and admired by
her teachers. Her school-fellows also respected her ;
but she wearied to converse with them because she
found it not for edification. They were much taken -
up about delicacy of food and vanity of apparel, which
she misliked or regarded not. Being desired to go to
a dancing-school for a while, she went to observe their
conduct; which having seen, no persuasion could
move her to go any longer. ‘I cannot,” said she,
‘“‘endure their lightness of speech and behaviour, nor
the danger of bad company.” And therefore she ex-
ercised herself mostly in sewing and learning to write,
and did carefully attend meetings for preaching and
catechising, conversing with few except her own
mother. Hence many remarkable passages of her life
are lost, namely, for these ten months, and seven
more, wherein she sojourned in the north of England,
in regard her mother, who was accustomed with her,
did not much observe, nor kept she any record of her
sayings and practices.
Timprovementiot Upon her return from England, she
ae sickness went to Ayr to visit her grandfather
and grandmother. There it pleased

* Inthe “JZntroduction,” Mr. Hog mentions her attending
the meeting-house of Mr. Thomas Lye (see p. 16 Introd.) She
went to London for her education.
EMILIA GEDDIE. 53

God to try her with a vehement cholic which lasted
for the space of seventecen hours. As soon as she
got a little breathing and was able to speak, she ut-
tered these words, ‘‘Now I know what I have heard
often: if I had died in this case, I could have had no
composed thoughts of the Lord, of death, or of judg-
ment.” And therefore she exhorted all about her not
to delay meditations about death, nor preparations
for it, tilla sick bed; ‘‘for,” said she, ‘‘I find sick-
ness hath enough to do for itself.” After her recov-
ery she was more close and serious than ever in self-
examination, and every other way.

Conversion-work About this time, it seemed as if the
ea Lord anew carried her through all the
steps of effectual calling. She gave some account of
her spiritual concerns as follows: ‘‘Satan,” said she,
‘twas assaulting me after his wonted manner ; he sug-
gested that there is yet time enough for me to be re-
ligious ; let childhood once pass, said he, and ‘ Remem-
ber your Creator in the days of your youth’ (Ecel, xii.
1.)” Moreover, she was afraid lest the religion she
had might only be owing to her good education. This
gave her great trouble for several weeks, fearing lest
she had been hitherto destitute of saving grace, and
caused her to lament heavily that sad estate of mat-
ters, before the Lord.

At this time it pleased him to give
her views of original sin, and of the
enmity of our natures against God, more clearly and
distinctly than ever. ‘I have read,” said she,

Original sin.
54 THE LIFE OF

“ concerning original sin, in the catechisms and otner
books, and I believe that great truth from Rom. v.
12, ‘As by one man sin entered into the world, and
death by sin ; and so death passed upon all men, for
that all have sinned.’ Tis reasonable we be sharers
of the guilt, seeing we would have enjoyed the benefit
and privileges had our first parents stood. How that
sin works in me, I cannot know; only Iam convinced
that I was shapen in iniquity, and in sin did my
mother conceive me. I feel a hard heart in me, a
heart that is deceitful above all things and desperately
wicked.” She was thus for awhile under great soul
trouble, from the sense of her lost estate and utter
distance from the Lord. But in all this she justified
the Lord, whatever it might please him to do.

Salvation brought “T gee,” said she, ‘‘ the necessity.
to her with power. of 4 Saviour; but I cannot come to
be persuaded that he will look upon such a polluted
wretch as Tam.” In this strait, the Lord set home
that word upon her spirit, namely, ‘*G'od so loved the
world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whoso-
ever believeth in him should not perish but have everlast-
ing life” (John iii. 61.) ‘Then,’ said she, “I was
made to gee a possibility of being saved, which is
only by the Lord Jesus. But I find ‘not only inability
but unwillingness to come to him. And that scrip-
ture was borne in upon me, (2 Cor. v. 21,) ‘He hath
made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin, that we
might be made the righteousness of God in him.’ This,”
said she, ‘held forth the Lord Jesus more fully to
EMILIA GEDDIE. 55

me, as our surety and righteousness. But ah! I am
so great a sinner, and yet so unwilling to be denied
to my own righteousness, that my troubles and fears
are increased even by the hearing of him, because I
cannot come to him for righteousness and salvation.
Thus I was sore tossed, and became almost hopeless :
I saw there was no help but by coming to the Lord
Jesus ; and yet I found an utter unwillingness to go to
him. Alas!” said I, ‘“‘shall I thus die eternally ?
Then in my strait that word was given me, ‘ The Son
of man came to seek and to save that which was lost’
(Luke xix. 10.) This instantly calmed my spirit, and
shewed me more than a possibility of salvation, which
T had learned from the former scripture. Then an-
other word followed, namely, ‘ This is a faithful say-
ing, and worthy of all acceptation, &c. That word
came with such power that I was sweetly drawn,and
even compelled. Then I was made willing to part
with my own righteousness, and to take the Lord
Jesus for all things.

After this, I was enabled, through
grace, more fully to prize the Lord
Jesus ; I was also made humbler, and brought to
mourn for sin in a more kindly manner; and I saw
him more lovely in everything.”

A contrite heart.

Some days after, being sick and in
bed, she asked a friend sitting by her,
‘¢ Whether there was such a passage in the Bible as
‘ Himself took our infirmities and bare our sickness,’”
The person answered, ‘There is,” and read it from

Christ himself!
56 THE LIFE OF

Matt, viii, 17. She heard it, and was silent for that
time. The next day she said, ‘‘The word you read
yesternight was made a blessed word tome. He him-
self! O, what an one is He himselj'! I got by faith
a more full discovery of him through the vail of his
flesh, than ever I had attained before. I saw him as
God-man, reconciling the world to himself and even
such sinners as lam. ©, what love and bowels of
compassion did I see in him to sinners, and that from
all eternity! Not that he was new, or that there is
any change in his nature, but he drew more near to
mein that new and living way; which gave more
comfort to my poor, wearied, and languishing soul,
and made me to REJOICE IN Gop my Saviour,
“After this Satan endeavoured to
Satan’s attempt
to hide Christ shake me sore, alleging that my clos-
from her. 3 a
ing with the Lord Jesus was presump-
tion, and that it was merely to get peace and quiet-
ness, and not either from love to God, or hatred of
sin, nor yet for righteousness in and from Christ. He
also brought in several places of scripture to show that
my heart was not right with God. This troubled me
sore. Then the Lord condescended to carry home
that word with power upon my spirit (2 Sam. xxiii.
5), ‘Although my house be not so with God, yet he hath
made with me an everlasting covenant.’ Thus I was
made to covenant with God.
‘ ‘After this I was taught to discern
God’s way of ‘. ;
bringing home Satan’s wiles, and to see my own
Seteente taher: weakness and unbelieving heart more
PMILIA GEDDIE, 57
clearly than ever. Ah! I am always ready to forget
what the Lord has done for me, and to side with the
enemy. At this time, the Lord taught me somewhat
better to understand the difference betwixt His bear-
ing in words upon the soul, and Satan’s citing scrip-
tures tous. I observed that, when the Lord gives
the word, whether for conviction or otherwise, it
makes a divine light to break up in the soul, it
quickens and leads it to the Lord Jesus. But, when
Satan presents the word, it brings the soul into con-
fusion, it weakens the hands, and fills the heart with
hard thoughts concerning the Lord. I fiad my mind
very bent upon such thoughts, howev ou and I need
not be furthered in them.”

Some while after, she said, ‘I never
receive any word, whether for con-
firming me in the faith, or clearing up of duty to me,
but immediately it is tried, whether by temptation
from Satan, or trying dispeasations of Providence
towards myself or others.”

Her faith tested.

PO eranie Her father having been imprisoned
livered; her pray- in the Tolbooth of Edinburgh, and the
ore day for his appearance before the Privy
Council being come, he had catched so great a cold
that he could scarcely speak; for which cause he
used interest with the clerks, that he might not be
called that day; and a delay being promised, his
friends were easy, not expecting his appearance at
that time. Emilia having retired, returned to her
mother, and said, ‘I think my father will be called
58 THE LIFE OF

to appear before the council this night, and T would
have us all go to prayer.” The company agreed,
provided she would begin, and she was persuaded to
do so. In prayer she not only entreated the Lord
that he might be kept from sinning, and delivered out
of prison, but that He would also give him utterance
to speak before them. And it was made evident to
all concerned that her prayers were heard and an-
swered ; for contrary to all expectation, her father
appeared that night, his hoarseness was taken away,
he spoke aloud and freely, and was ordered to be set
at liberty, without any bonds or engagements. Be-
fore the child had well done praying, notice came
concerning her father’s appearance, and all the effects
followed.

On a certain day, being sick,she said,
“‘T have had but a tossed body and a
sickly life all my time; and if it were the Lord's will,
as to what concerns myself, I would be away. Yet
if it may be for the glory of God, and the comfort of
my parents, I would be content to live, and to be
denied my own desires.” Accordingly she livedsome
few years after this.

Philipians i. 23.

Reverence to pa- | Upon the occasion of one’s saying to
Tenis: her, ‘‘Emily, other children call their
parents, sir or mistress, but you do not so.” She
answered, ‘‘I am ready to do so, if it be their pleas-
ure; but the mentioning the relation raiseth awe and
reverence in my spirit, when I speak to them. And
J find it was the way of the patriarchs of old to say
EMILIA GEDDIE, 59

to their children, ‘‘My son,” &¢., and of the children
to say, ‘‘ My father.” ;

a . Being occasionally in a gentleman’s

ensible advice to

a mother (Eph. house, and having observed that the
oo lady was almost continually reprov-
ing and chiding her children, she said to one of the
family, ‘‘ Were it pertinent for me to speak to such a
person, I would advise her ladyship to take some of
that time which she employs in chiding her children,
and set it apart to pray for them. Constant chiding
makes them careless of reproof, and hardens them in
the evils for which they are reproved.”

‘A. Babbath aay Having for the space of four months
better than a sojourned in a country place, where
eee thor she had not the occasion of pure or-
dinances. dinances, and but little of Christian
fellowship, she was asked how she spent the Sabbath.
To this she answered, ‘I am often troubled ere it
come, and concerned about what I shall do, seeing I
must be all day alone ; yet I must say (and O that I
could speak it to the glory of God, and for engaging
others to love Him, and to trust in Him!) I have
found Him faithful, who hath promised to keep poor
souls alive in time of famine. For sometimes the
Lord brought to my remembrance what I had formerly
heard of the word preached, and at other times I was
made to consider and reflect upon it, how He had led
me these years past, which was establishing and very
comfortable tomy mind. And sometimes, when I
had thought to read so much, and to repeat what I
60 THE LIFE OF

had learned from my ordinary reading of the word,
the Lord so breathed upon the word, that I got, as it
were, a letter from every verse, whereby my soul was
so edified, and the Sabbath shortened to me, that
when they called me to supper, I was loth to leave
my retirement,and to return to company,and regretted
that the Sabbath went over so soon.”

Evidence of a In conference with a godly person
CLM yA who had been at Edinburgh, where
she expected to hear how matters were going with the
Lord’s people in the land, amongst many other ques-
tions she asked ‘How it went with them in secret,
and what they found of the Lord’s presence and power
in ordinances?” “Why do you ask that?’ said
the person. She replied, ‘‘It is not with me in my
retirements as sometimes it was; my heart and work
fell naturally to my hand, and I came off from it re-
freshed ; as it was said of Hannah, ‘She returned,
and her countenance was-no more sad” (1 Sam. i. 18.)
But now the great part of my time is spent in getting
my heart brought up to a tune for prayer ; and when I
come back I am weighted* and wearied. 1 think
nobody is in such an evil case, and hath a heart so
bad and slothful as I have; neither do | find that in
the word preached which I used to find, I would
gladly hear that it is better with others than it is
with me.”

Letter to her mo- A letter was written by her to her
uae: mother, from Falkland to Edin-

* Burdened,
EMILIA GEDDIES. cs 61

burgh, where her mother was, and had continued
long. “Dear Moruer,—I trouble you with this
line to let you know weall are in good health, blessed
be the Lord! O that I had grace to improve health
and everything, and all the changes of our lot! I
think the Lord hath been letting me know what it is
to abound, and now what it is to want the precious
opportunities I had in Hdinburgh and the Canonmills
this time twelvemonth. On which times I cannot
but reflect with delight, and say, ‘The Lord was kind
to me there, though I did not see it at the time; the
Lord was then alluring unworthy me, and yet I would
not be allured.’ Ineed not tell you what my case was
at that time. I see the Lord was kind to me, for the
time which is now come. I cannot but say, ‘ The
Lord is the same yesterday, and to-day, and for ever,’
yet all the comfort I have is when alone. Dear mo-
ther, I trouble you with these only to have the help
of your prayers, that the Lord may make up all our
wants in his fulness. It is reported here that the
prisoners who were sent to sea are now cast away.*

} At that time a village at a distance from the town; now
the New Yown includes it.

* This probably refers to the Sixty-seven prisoners,mentioned
in Cruickshank’s ‘‘ History,” chap. xiii., who were banished to
Virginia for no other crime than attending meetings for wor-
ship in the fields. One of these was a mere boy of sixteen, w
wrote to his friends, that he ‘‘supposed he was the youngest
prisoner in Scotland, but the Lord had opened his eyes, and re-
vealed his Son in his heart, since he cane under the cross ; and
that, though he found difficulty in parting with relations, yet
he had found that fellowship with Christ which did much more

than balance the want of the company of his dearest friends.”
t
&

Lhey were landed at Gravesend, and then set on shore, to
fo tye e ma

iyen rise to the report




a






62 3 THE LIFE OF

Let us know the certainty. You tell me my Lord
Harcasst is to sit on the bench. I think it a mercy
the matter is come this length. The Lord, who hath
done all things for you, direct him to adjust our affair
aright, and to put an end to it. The Lord be with
you, and gnide you in His way, which is the earnest
desire of your daughter and servant in all duty,
Eminr1a GEDDIE.

“For my dear mother, Mrs. Geddie, at
Edinburgh, these.”

Another distinct She was three years absent from
eee ee me her mistress who had formerly
poaching fiery taught her at Falkland. When she
had returned from England, her mistress (K. C.) in-
quired into her spiritual condition, and she gave the
following account, which was afterwards sent to her
perents, under her mistress’s own hand. It was thus.
For awhile she was secure, but was not suffered to
continue so long; but was awakened by sad fears lest
she had been still in a natural estate, ‘‘because,”
said she, ‘‘I have backsliden far from what I was
formerly.” Secondly, the great lengths hypocrites
may attain unto alarmed her. Thirdly, it troubled
her that she had not reached that distinctness about
her several cases, which is the mercy of others. Not-
withstanding,she acknowledged that the Lord had dis-
covered to her the great evil of a natural estate, as

+ Lord Harkarse. Wodrow mentions him as “a staunch Pro-
testant.” He was Sir Roger Hog of Harcarse, in the parish of
Fogo, Berwickshire. Along with Wauchope of Edmonston, he
was afterwards “turned out of the Justiciary,” to make way for
Papists,”
28

EMILIA GEDDIE, o

to its sinfulness, and the sinner’s utter distance from
the Lord. She was more fully convinced of the de-
ceitfulness and desperate wickedness of her heart,
and had got clearer discoveries of original sin, She
had formerly blamed Satan too much for wicked sug-
gestions, butthenshesaw these evils springing up clearly
from the fountain of sin in the heart, She was made
more fully to discern a great enmity against Christ,
and the way of salvation through him. She found
the difficulty great of being denied to our own.
righteousness, and to esteem all that to be loss
which she had accounted gain. Moreover, she
found great difficulty to believe, not only from
weakness and utter impotence, but also from un-
willingness, As to all these things, the Lord
opened her eyes by degrees. She was also made to
see the absolute necessity and beauty of the only
Redeemer. ‘‘But,” said she, ‘‘how can He look upon
such a sinful and miserable wretch as I am?”

Diccoveriewor While thus plunged into the depths
a of soul trouble, and not knowing
what to do, and ascribiug righteousness to the Lord,
whatever it might please him to do with her, the Lord
discovered his willingness to save even such as she
found herself to be, by this and such scriptural pas-
sages, “<‘ The son of man came to seek and to save
that which was lost.” I cannot name the particular
places (saith her mistress in the letter to her parents),
but they were all very suitable and effectual for de- -
termining her to come,
G4 ‘THE LIFE oF

Deliverance from Lhus sheentered inte covenant with
COE, the Lord,and found joy unspeakable
thereupon. Yea, she got at length such intimations
of the Lord’s everlasting love, that she afterwards
doubted not. - ‘‘ These things, and more to this pur-

pose, I had from her own mouth,” said her mistress,

‘in answer to some questions I proposed to her. I

shall not say these are the very words, but this is the
purpose, so far as I can remember,” saith her mistress;
‘bub her words, and the manner of her expressing
herself, were, as I judge, both more pertinent and
savoury.”

Her treatment of J- C.,in Canonmills,told some other
temptations. friends that, in a conference which

past in his house, Emilia observed that the exercise
of her mind had an influence upon keeping her body
low, and saw the fallacy (i. e. that she was wrong.)

“But now,” said she, ‘‘I resolve, through grace, on

two things for remedy: One is, I will slight tempta-

tions, and neither take notice from whence they come,

nor whither they go; and the other is,when I find my

corruptions stirring mightily within me, I will go to

the Lord by prayer, and tell that I am not able to

bear them, nor flee from them, while I am in the
body ; and I will beg of him, for Christ’s sake, that
he would strengthen me against my corruptions. So
shall the burden of them be taken off from me, or

strength shall be given me to resist.”

About that time, hearing two godly

Providences. :
persons conferring about the Lord’s
EMILIA GEDDIE, 65

way with them, and concerning providences,she said,
‘These things are no mysteries to me, but O that I
knew them in my own soul !”

Meoreaione fond. She used to divert herself by nour-
as ishing and taming birds of several
sorts. Being challenged why she spent so much time
that way, and employed not the time with other
children which she bestowed on birds, she answered,
**T cannot keep ‘up with other children. They are a
burden to my spirit, because they still talk of vain
things, wherein there is no edification; and thus I
cannot avoid sin, especially by misspending precious
time. And yet I cannot altogether defend or excuse
myself from wasting time upon birds; only I remem-
Story of John un- ber a story told concerning John the
bending his mind. Divine, who, having reproved some
young men for employing toe much time upon archery,
was himself observed to be playing with a bird in the
window of his closet. One of these youths, who was
better acquainted with him than the rest, having ad-
ventured to challenge the great man for being too
much taken up with a childish toy, the Divine asked,
‘What have you in your hand?’ The youth answered,
‘{t is my bow.’ ‘Lend it me,’ said the Divine. And
when going to lock it up in his closet, the young man
demanded it, ‘ Because,’ said he, ‘I have present use
for it.’ ‘Come again in a little time,’ said the
Divine, ‘aiid you shall have it.’ The young man re-
plied, ‘O, sir, it is bended.’ ‘What then? said the
Divine. ‘If it stand so any time,’ answered the
66 THE LIFE OF

young man, ‘it will prove useless.’ Hereupon he gave
back the bow, and said, ‘ Neither can my spirit be
always in bensil ;* it must sometimes be slackened
by innocent diversions.’ And further,” said she,
“T am edified by observing and playing with birds.
They are innocent, harmless, and grateful, as experi-
ence lately taught us concerning a jackdaw,hotly pur-

sued by a hawk. It fled into the
Story of a jackdaw,
bosom of a ploughman for safety.

The jackdaw was observed by hundreds of people
known to myself, to have every day visited the plough-
man, and attended him at his work for more than

* 4. e. Bent.

+ Her father’s fondness for bees (see Introduction) may have
led his daughter to give attention to the habits of animals. It
is on this passage in her life that Mr. Whitefield comments with
needless severity. The story itself seems to be one originating
in a tradition handed down to us about the apostle John, who
was called ‘‘the Divine,” or ‘‘ Theologos,” because of his contin-
ually discoursing on the person and work of Christ, the Logos,
or Word. Gambold has the following beautiful allusion to the
tradition in his “Ignatius :”

**T see the holiness

Of John, not only in his elevations

That struck mankind, but even when he seem’d

T’ express the human and the frailer side,

Thus, in his playing, to unbend the mind,

With a tame partridge, there’s a tacit slur

On mortal care ; as if he said, ‘Be easy,

Your projects and this play meet in a point.’”
There is a curious variation, in some copies, in relating the
story that follows. We give it from the Glasgow copy of 1720,
which calls the animal a bird, and names it a kae or jackdaw.”
A bird quite accords with the subject in hand. But other copies
read “a roe,” and alter the sentences thus; ‘Beasts are often
harmless and grateful, as experience lately taught us concern-
ing aroe, hotly pursued. The beast fled for shelter to a plough-
man, who protected it. Theroe,” &c. A very old copy, bound
up with ‘The Gospel Call,” in metre 1685, in Advocates’ Library
reads it thus. But such a roe in Fife,is very unlikely,especially
“to be thus unmolested for a year!” The old word kae was no
doubt mistaken for roe.
EMILTA GEDDIE. 67

a year thereafter. It went with him to church and
to other places, and yet did not remain with him all
night.”

Observations on Being demanded what way she was
birds: edified by birds, she answered, ‘‘ She
observed much of the wisdom of God in their motions.
For instance: birds drink not before they can fly,and
a very little food serves their young at once, which is
most reasonable, seeing the dam cannot bring in so
much at one time as would suffice all that are in the
nest ; and, in regard all of them cry at her coming,she
divides the little accordingly. I also observe,” said
she, “chow joyful they are when brought out a little
from their imprisonment in a cage; and if the cage
had been much dirtied, they are glad»when they find
the rooms clean at their return. This brings my duty
into my mind, and also reproves me for not retiring
more frequently to get my heart cleansed from sin,
that my soul may rejoice at the returns of the Spirit
of grace, who will not dwell in a polluted heart, but
delights in a clean and contrite spirit.”

Upon the 23d of June, 1679,

Battle of Both- a é fe ,
well Bridge. Her being at dinner in a gentleman’s
eougts on GoW’s house, where also there were several

ealings.

persons of honour and a reverend
divine, Mr, J. ©.* They were all under a heavy
* This may have been Mr. John Carmichael, brother of that
Mr. Alezander Carmichael mentioned at page 51. As Mr.
Alexander was taken at Kirkaldy, it would seem they were con-
nected with Fife. The persons of honour may have been some

of the godly covenanting gentry of the neighbourhood—e.g. the
Laird of Reddie and Heriot of Ramorney.
63 THE LIFE OF

damp, having had an account of the defeat and
slaughter at Bothwell Bridge, which had befallen
just the day before. No account of particulars had
yet come to their hand, the place being above thirty
miles distant ; and the most of them had relations in
both armies, whose condition, whether dead or alive,
they knew not. While in this consternation, the
reverend minister said, ‘‘Emilia, what think you of
the dispensation whereof we have heard the news to-
flay?” She, with a great deal of modesty and meek-
ness, answered, ‘‘Sir, such a question should not be
asked of a child as lam; it is more becoming that
reverend divines and ministers should answer such
questions, and it is well that you propose them in a
time suitable, that you may answer them yourself.”
“No, Emily,” said he, ‘*I will not take that answer
at your hand; I will have you to tell me your judg-
ment.” But she persisted to refuse, and told him
“the matter was above her capacity and considera-
tion.” At length the minister desired her father to
interpose his authority, which he was unwilling to do,
having observed that she refused with so much dis-
cretion, and yet knowing her tenderness of the least
disobedience to parents. Yet forasmuch as the com-
pany suffered by this diversion, which hindered the
minister to speak for the edification of them all, he
said, ‘Emily, tell your thoughts, whatever they be,
and satisfy the minister and honourable company.
Nothing satisfactory, in answer to such a question,
can be expected from a child; yet please the company,
EMILIA GEDDIE, 69

by speaking your judgment, be what it will.” Then,
with much gravity, she said, ‘‘Sir, it becomes not
me, nor the like of me, to speak of such things ; but
I will tell you what presents to my thoughts concern-
ing the present sad dispensation, which is heavy,
whatever way we can look at it. You know, sir,
that the dispensations of the Lord’s providence have
ordinarily two sides—one dark, and another light-
some. We now see the dark side, but I hope the
lightsome side will appear afterward. And therefore
all IT can say for the time, in answer to your question,
is, thatit becomes us to be silent, and to wait upon
the Lord humbly and quietly, in the way of duty,
until it please Him to discover the lightsome part,
Then we may know better what to speak, and then
it may be we shall be in case to answer the question
with satisfaction. I can add no more, only I must
again say that I think it our duty to be silent, and to
wait with patience and submission until the Lord
speak further, which I pray may be in mercy to his
poor afdicted and distressed people, and to the whole
land.” The reverend minister, after a little pause,
said, ‘‘ Emily, if I had proposed the question to any
of my reverend brethren, I would not have expected
a better answer at this time.”

Yow ministers felt Some ministers delighted to con«
her words. verse with the child, and owned that
they received a great deal of satisfaction in these
conferences; and several of these ministers would
not only bring in what they had heard from her at
70 THE LIFE OF

conferences with other godly persons, but did also
mention them in their sermons as rare instances
from a child, and exemplary to the oldest and most
experienced in the Lord’s way. Many years before
what has been mentioned, Mr. J. W.,* a Presbyterian
minister, who laboured much in the east of Fife, had
conference with her. The minister afterwards took
oceasion publicly to rebuke the formality of professing
people. He told them that, though some among
them could pray like printed books, yet they had not
a suitable practice,and that many of them were at best
a suspense and at a may-be, with reference to their
gracious state; they professed to be Christians, and
yet knew nothing of heart work. He also upbraided
them with some Highlanders, ‘‘Who,” he said “would.
rise up in judgment, and condemn many grey-headed
professors amongst them.” He futher added, that he
knew a child little more than seven years old, who
was in case to teach any one he saw thereabout.
“For,” said he, ‘“‘when I was catechising in the
family where that child was, and had asked some
questions concerning faith, and what it really is, and
what are the marks of saving faith, and they had
severally given their judgments about faith and the
reality of it, then I asked the child,” said the minis-
ter, ‘‘ What think you of faith? She gave a clear
and distinct account of it, much beyond what any

* As this happened when Emilia was only seven, this minister
m‘ght be John Welsh of Irongray, who made j ourneys through
Fife, and often preached in vacant churces. He was hid for a

fortnight in a sort of dungeon or cellar, still shewn in the old
castle of Myres, about two miles from Falkland,
EMILIA GEDDIE. 7k

there present had given. In a word,” said he, ‘‘she
told me the very conceptions I myself had of it.
Afterwards, when conferring with her about effectual
calling, she gaveavery fulland distinct account, not only
of what it is, but also how she herself had been called
efiectually.”

A minister’s testi: Lhe same minister, at another time,
BoE informed how that, being in herfather’s
family, he had observed the child retiring for secret
prayer, and did follow her, having put off his shoes,
that he might overhear her without being observed.
Upon his return,he gave this account—namely, ‘‘that
be thought there was not one expression she had
which came not up, as it were, from the bottom of
her soul.” He was just busied in speaking further,
when somewhat fell in that diverted him. He could
have given many excellent accounts concerning her,
having been frequently in her company ; but they are
lost through his decease,
~T
ao

THE LIFE oF

CHAPTER ITI,

THE LAST YEAR OF HER LIFE,

Lettertoayoung SHE sought out opportunities of
Fa doing good. The following is a letter
written by her to a young lady of her own age, with
whom she had some Christian fellowship, dated in
May 1680:

“Mapam,—TI received yours, which ig an obliga-
tion added to all the rest of the kindnesses you have
honoured me with. I was desirous of a line from you
to know of your health; and that you should concern
yourself in my health, which, for the most part, I
have had ever since I came from S—, blessed be the
Lord! O that I could make good use of it,and work
while it is to-day! And O that I may be not found
idle in the market-place ! for we have a particular
command to remember our Creator in the days of our
youth, And seeing the Lord is allowing us encour-
aging promises, whereupon we may ground our hope,
O that we may hold them fast against the day of
temptation, that we may able to answer Satan's
suggestions, and not be put from our duty. It is his
design to hinder us from waiting on the Lord; but
there is nothing that does so much discourage Satan
as prayer and meditation. Dear madam, I hope you
will not take this freedom of mine in bad part, You

2
EMILIA GEDDIE. 73

may call it nonsense, but the experience I have had of
your goodness, and my earnest desire to know of your
welfare, both in soul and body, have moved me to
write. Please to honour me with the knowledge
thereof by the next, The blessings of the God of
Jacob rest upon you! This is the desire of her who
is, madam, your humble friend and servant,
‘ EMILIA GEDDIE.’

com- She learned much of the scriptures
mitted tomemory. by heart, and could faithfully repeat
them, particularly the eighth chapter of the epistle to
the Romans, which she said was a whole Bible to her;
also Hebrews xi., and John xv., xvi, and xvii. chap-
ters; the greatest part of Solomon’s Song; many
chapters of Job and many Psalms, with divers other
places. Being asked why she was at so great pains
to get so much of scripture by heart, seeing she had
the Bible still at hand, she answered, ‘‘I fear the
time may come that I shall want it, and I cannot live
without the precious Bible.”
Special petitions A little while before her last sick-
ADDLINE. ness, When conferring with some god!
persons about the grace and gift of prayer, she said,
“T have not these two years last past bowed a knee he-
fore the Lord without some particular upon my heart.”
And being asked, “How could that be, seeing you are
ometimes required to pray without previous warning,
so that you can have no time to meditate upon any
particular before?” she answered, ‘‘So soon as any
mention is made of prayer where I am present, I am


G4 . THE LIFE OF

helped to look up to the Lord, and to consider the
season wherein I am called to pray; and of a truth
the Lord is so condescending to me, that he always
puts something in my mind either to pray for or
against. But my meaning was chiefly concerning
secret prayer. Then I am kept observing and wait-
ing what the Lord will put into my hand, and what
is taken offfrom my hand, as also what returns I get
from my only Redeemer, the blessed Mediator.”

Calm patiencein ‘In the seventh month of the six-
Seles teenth year of her age she was as-
saulted with the sickness whereof she died, being a
continued flux and gravel, both which were violent.
Considering her youth and tender body, all beholders
admired her patience, for she was observed not to
have uttered one rash word, nor to have given the
least evidence of impatience and weariness. And
when any that were with her would have said,
“Emily, you had a sore night of pain and trouble,”
she would have answered mildly, ‘“‘No; I have been
supported.” When she was asked in the mornings
how it had been with her all the night, she would
have answered, with a pleasant countenance, “1
prayed for rest, and I got it. I see that the Lord
hears prayer, and gives his beloved sleep.” And
being’asked if she was not weary of her bed,she would
have answered very cheerfully, ‘No, for my bed is
green (Song i. 16), and all I meet with is perfumed
with love to me. I have heard of many sick persons,
who have said, when it is morning, ‘O that it were
3 EMILIA GEDDIE. 75

evening!’ and when it was evening, ‘O that it were
morning !’ but, as for me, I must confess,to the praise
of the riches of free grace, that the time, night and
day, is made sweet to me by the Lord. When it is
evening it is pleasant, and when it is morning I am
refreshed.” Some of the beholders observed from
this, ‘ Man lives not by bread alone, but by the word
of God,” as it is blessed unto him.

The whole time of her lying on a
sick-bed, it was observed that she
heard and received the word at all times with much
life and vigour, notwithstanding her heavy sickness
and sharp pains of the stone. All these, together
with the weariness of her body, were made light and
easy, ‘‘In regard,” she said, ‘‘they are but moment-
ary afflictions.” Being asked what supported her,she
answered, ‘First, I look on my trouble as the fruit
of my sin, and do think it my duty to bear the indig-
nation of the Lord, because I have sinned against him,
Secondly, I am made to wonder that it is not and
hath not been always so with me. Thirdly, I am
helped to bless the Lord, that it is not worse.
Fourthly, means are used for my health, and I look
up to the Lord, that he would bless them, in so far
as he shall see meet, for his glory and my comfort.
Fifthly, I submit through grace to the will of God,
whether for life or death. Sixthly, I have the faith
that it will be better ; for I reckon that the afflictions
of this life are not worthy to be compared with the
glory that is to be revealed.”

Supports in trouble.
76 THE LIFE OF

Prayerfulness, even During the six weeks of her last
when sick. sickness, there was not one night
that passed wherin she neglected to pray twice with her
attendants, unless she was discomposed by pain, in which
case she moved one of them to do it; and so soon as
she got any little breathing from the agony of pain,
she would say, ‘‘ Now itis fit we pray.” While she
was in health, it was her custom to pray every night
with any who lay with her; and when she happened
to awake in the night, she sat up a little in bed and
prayed, and afterward she lay down again, composing
herself to sleep till the morning. Every day when
she arose, it was her custom to wrap herself in a night-
gown, and retire to her closet, before she would clothe
herself, dress, or converse with anybody, unless on
necessary occasions.

Passages that re- The last month of her life, she
freshed her. would say in the mornings to those
that were with her, ‘‘I have had a rich and sweet
cluster this night !” and would have named the scrip-
tures. Take for instances these few of many; ‘‘In
the 103d Psalm, which,” said she, ‘‘ I had by heart
in metre, I found somewhat concerning my bodily
diseases which was matter of praise, but I got not so
much of strengthening for my soul.” But on one
night afterward, being much taken up with the
thoughts of death, she was greatly strengthened
against the fears of it from that sweet passage (Matt.
ix. 2,) ‘‘Be of good cheer, thy sins are forgiven thee.”
She thereupon expressed her joy, yet mixed with fear,
EMILIA G@EDDTE, 97

The next day another passage was set home upon her
spirit, namely, “Know that the Son of Man hath
power on earth to forgive sins” (Mark ii. 10.) ‘This
scripture,” said she, ‘‘ came both by way of reproof,
and also to persuade me to believe; and that joy
which flows from believing so filled my heart that I
cannot express it.” Then was that scripture borne
in mind, ‘‘ Speak comfortably, and cry unto her that
her warfare is accomplished, and her iniquity is par-
doned” (Isaiah x]. 2.) This passage comforted and
confirmed her to such a degree, that she found the
fear and sting of death thereby removed. And an-
other scripture served to strengthen her further,
namely, ‘Because I live, ye shall live also. At that
day ye shall know that Iam in my Father, and you in
me, and I in you” (John xiv. 19,) ‘‘This,” said she,
‘*T shall fully understand at the day of death,” At
this time she caused them to sing the 23d Psalm, but
said, ‘‘ My weakness is so great that I cannot sing
aloud; yet my heart joins with the words, andI have
such a feeling and experimental knowledge of that
whole psalm as helpeth me to sing it with great joy
and love to the Lord.” Much about that time, the
passage was borne in upon her, ‘‘ Give me thy heart”
(Proverbs xxiii. 26;) to which she replied, ‘‘O reagon-
able demand! If I had a thousand hearts, Thou ar
worthy of the-n all who art the Lord my God,and none
hath right but thy great Self. Yet,” said she, “when
T consider the nature of my heart, I wondered that
ever he should have sought such a filthy puddle as
78 THE LIFE oF
that deceitful and desperately wicked heart of mine.”

Ganeibane bor: On Saturday night before her death,
mendation of Je- she often said, ‘This following Sab-
ans bath will be my last in time;” and
hereupon she expressed. her vehement longing after an
everlasting Sabbath. In the morning of that Lord’s
day she slept till eight o’clock ; and when awakened
for a little, she asked the hour, and being told it, she
replied, ‘‘I thought to have spent this Sabbath in
another manner than to have slept so long.” After
this she employed some time in secret prayer, and
meditation, and then broke forth into many excellent
and significant words in commendation of the Lord
Jesus, from his nature and offices, and particularly
from the names which are given him in scripture.
For instance—the bright and morning Star, the Lion
of the tribe of Judah, the Lamb slain from the foun-
dation of the world, the Rock which hath followed
his people in all ages, the Chief of ten thousands ;
and she added, ‘‘The chief of all to me. O,” said
she, ‘Paul had great manifestations of the Lord Jesus
which could not be uttered, and Rutherford had
right mavifestations of Christ; but I can get nothing.”
Notwithstanding, sundry judicious and godly persons
who were with her, thought that she scarcely missed
any one of the names and titles which are given to
our Lord Jesus, in the Word. She also spoke some-
what concerning every one of them, to the edification
and astonishment of the hearers. Thus employed she
that Sabbath, excepting the time of seeret worship.
EMILTA GEDDIE, 19

Waiting for depart- About eight at night, before her
ete departure, a little defluxion troubled
her; whereupon her attendants called for a light,
thinking she was just breathing out her last, which
perceiving, she smiled, and said, ‘‘I shall not die
just now.” They answered, ‘“‘How know you that?”
To which she replied, ‘‘I missed that promised pres-
ence,* which for many a day I have believed I shall
get in the moment of death.” Thus she rested, trust-
ing in the unchangeable faithfulness of the God of
truth.

Words to hercom. A little while after, she said, ‘TI
SUSU: would fain speak to my comrades; but
it can have little weight with them, as it comes from
me, forI am a child.” She said briefly to them,
amongst other things, ‘‘O learn a life of holiness,
spend more of your time in seeking God, and be not
idle and slothful, but work with your hands.” Some
of them answered, ‘‘It may be said of you, You have
been diligent in business and fervent in spirit, serving
the Lord.” But she reproved them for speaking so of
her, and commanded them to hold their peace, where-
upon they left speaking at that time.

Afterwards she called her aunt,
and desired her to entreat her mother
to take supper; ‘‘for,” said she, ‘‘she may have work

Words to her aunt.

* Probably referring in her mind to such passages as Isaiah
xliii, 2,—“ When thou passest through the waters, I will be with
thee ;” or Psalm xxiii. 4, “Yea, though I walk through the
valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no ill, for thou art
with me ; thy rod and thy staff, they comfort me.”
80 HE LIEE OF

to do she knows not of, and it is necessary she should
eat.” She also entreated her aunt not to go home,
but to tarry with her that night. This was contrary
to her custom, for she had before this still* desired her
to go home at night.

Her summons he last thing more particularly observ-
ete able, which we remember, relates to some-
thing she had spoken about six hours befove, concern-
ing what she wanted of the Lord’s promised presence,
and it was eminently made out about two hours before
her death. She had not for some time lifted up her
body without help; but then she arose, and sat straight
up. F
Having lifted up her hands and

She goes out from ; ae
the wilderness, eyes toward heaven, she prayed in
a ee the hearing of the company, pleading
the promises, saying: ‘Now let ib
be according to thy precious word to my soul; for there
is nothing in me !” and entreated that the Lord would
not deal with her as she had deserved. She added,
“Tt is only upon the blood of the Lord Jesus, and the
unchangeableness and faithfulness of God, that I rest.”
And several times she repeated, ‘‘ U’here is nothing in
me.” Then she prayed for the suffering people and
church of God, for her parents and the family ; but
her speech fell so low that she could not be under-
stood. Then a little sack} was given her, and she
said, ‘‘Now, no more of the creature,” and immedi-
ately she desired her mother to pray. When her

* Always. + Sack-wine.
EMILIA GEDDIE. 81

mother was giving her up to God, she was observed
to smile ; and as prayer ended, she lifted up her eyes,
with a pleasant countenance, and spoke a word which
we could not hear. Then she closed her own eyes
and lips, as one falling asleep ; and, having stretched
down her body, she had no motion, but slept with her
fathers,

Thus did this young saint take her flight to ‘the
mountain of myrrh and the hill of frankincense,” on
the 2d day of February, 1681, in the sixteenth year
of her age. There she rests with her Lord, in joy
unspeakable, waiting till ‘‘The Day break,” when she
shall appear with Him in glory.

She was born in times of persecution, and died
when the furnace was even seven times heated, yet
hers was an end of undisturbed peace. At that time
Scotland was wet with the blood of her holiest men ;
women, too, were dragged to the scaffold for no oflier
crime than refusing to abjure the truth set forth ia
the Covenant. The month before Emilia Geddie
died, she no doubt heard of the triumphant end of
Isabel Alison, a native of Perth, who gave her life,
saying, ‘I lay down my life for owning and adhering
to Christ’s kingly offlce, His being a free king in his
own house.” Along with her died Marion Harvie,
scarcely twenty years of age, singing the 23d Psalm,
and saying, ‘*I’d rather die ten deaths than want an
82 THE LIFE oF

hour of His presence.”+ But, on the other hand,
Emilia was taken home without violence, the Lord,
who hid Jeremiah and Baruch (Jer. xxxvi. 26,) keep-
ing her from the hand of the oppressor. Her life was
like a stream that gently flowed between green banks,
often ruffled by wild winds, and at times re-
flecting the forms of armed persecutors and weary
martyrs. She was in spirit a martyr, and shall have
a place in The Resurrection with those who never
worshipped the beast nor his image, nor received his
mark on her forehead or in her hand (Rey. xx. 3.)

Tradition has honoured her memory, as if she had
been one of the greater worthies. It is told of her
that ‘ she walked always in whites,”—a curious tradi-
tion, arising from facts probably, but which seems to
be somewhat like a mixing of the literal with the
symbolical, her life being a walking with God in
white.

Her tomb may seen in the churchyard of Falkland.
It is in a small enclosure, (about which the Kirk-Ses-
sion went to law with Mr. Geddie in 1682,) at the
east end of the churchyard, surrounded by a balus-
trade railing on three sides, the wall forming the
other part of the enclosure. It is the burying-ground
of the proprietor of Hilton or Templand.

The inscription on her tomb is not elegant, but itis
expressive :—

+ The year before, 1680, Richard Cameron had fallen at Airs-
moss. Emilia would feel pecular interest in him, he being a
native of Falkland,
EMILIA GEDDIE. 83

“Tn gepulchre within, Emelia Geddie lies.

By faith in Jesus, her death did not surprise.
Because by grace [she] had virtue great in siore,
Her witt renewed, her life did sin abhor.
She walked with God ; in spirit worshippt true,
Exemplarly to all her sex, age, and you.

Born in the year 1665,

Whom troubles then did greatly drive,

Her course was finisht in 1681,

And entered glorie in due tyme.”.

In the ‘Miscellany of the Abbotsford Club”
(vol. 1.,) at the close of the Memoirs of John Geddie,
another epitaph is given, not as written on her tomb,
but as composed by some friend, and runs thus :—

“Most cruel death, thy hand hath no compassion
Of sex or age, of quality or fashion.
Thou hast bereft us of the richest gem
That ever was extracted from her stem,
(Though truly good and of a virtuous race,
Not any from it capable of disgrace.)
Emilia ’s gone to her eternal rest !
Earth’s ornament and nature’s frame the best.
Her tender years fled from these horrid times,
And left them to the punishment of their crimes.
Her nimble fingers were to virtue prone ;
Her prudence was inferior unto none.
Her beauteous face was too good for to be
Made prize by mortals of her chastity ;
So that her pious, prudent, beauteous face
Did so insinuate in her Saviour’s grace,
Her soul’s bridegroom esteems her worth to be
His handmaid, even to all eternity ;
Yielding her soul’s bridegroom her virgin bed,
Eyen unto Him her soul and maidenhead.”

From all this, it would appear that she was even
famed in her day for beauty and accomplishments.
qn the same Miscellany, the following verses are
given as her own composition, and the reference to
“Bees,” of which her father (see Introduction) was so
fond, countenances that idea; though the Glasgow

£4 ¢., her whole mind,
8t THE LIFE OF EMILIA. GEDDIF.

copy gives it as written in her name. It may be her
own in prospect of death.

“When Flowers do seed, the blossom dies.
‘Young women all I do advise
Their time on earth aright to spend,
That living well, so they may end.
The Bees in season food provide,
Which makes them winter storms abide:
Strive in your hearts grace for to plant,
Death you'll surprise, if faith you want.
The Trees in spring do flourish fast ;
When autumn comes their leaves they cast ;
So whilst in youth you beauty have,
It seedeth ere you go to grave.
When death doth come and sceptre sway,
Flowers, bees, and trees with me decay ;
Nothing on earth but change you see ;
Seek God in fear, and he’ll set you free.
Parents, forbear to mourn your loss !
Christ taken hath from me the cross.
{ hope in heaven meet we shall
And joy of our memorial.”

We close by giving an acrostick, made upon her at
her death by one who admired her godly character.
It has been printed in some of the earlier copies, and
is found in the Miscellany already referred to, the
compiler remarking that she deserved it well.

E mblem of wit within this coffin lies ;

M ade peace in time, death did her not surprise.
J esus-redeemed her; Abraham hath received ;
L iving in ’s bosom, hell she hath deceived.

I n soul and body, of virtue was great store ;

A ll vice refrained, all crime she did abhor.

G race in such bulk no more could be contained;

E nding her life, true Presbytery maintained,

D eterred at Popery, she prelates would, supplant,

D esired adherence to the good Covenant.

I n heaven with saints, though not by her own merit,
E ternal rest her soul doth now inherit,

PIE eRe etn: Hae


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