Citation
Wild animals for children

Material Information

Title:
Wild animals for children
Creator:
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
McLoughlin bros.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Animals -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
029441298 ( ALEPH )
28755087 ( OCLC )
AJS8142 ( NOTIS )

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fY\HE TIGER is more like a Cat than a Lion,

for he has not such long hair on his neck.
His tail is long and smooth, with no tuft at the
end, and he has bright, dark stripes on his
smooth coat. He is not so bold as the Lion,
but quite as strong, and more quick and lithe.
He will lie in wait for his prey, and hide in the
tall grass and reeds, where he can draw in his
breath and shrink so flat that no one can see
him, if they have not sharp eyes. But the
Tiger does not like to face his foe, though he
is so strong that he can crush the skull of an
ox with a blow of his great paw, and then trot
off with the dead beast to his den. A poor
man in India found one day that his ox had
got loose, and run off to a swamp, where it
had sunk so deep in the mire that it was fixed,
and could not walk back to dry land. While
he was gone to fetch some of his friends to





help him to get the ox out of the bog, a Tiger
came to the spot, and saw the ox. He sprang
at the poor beast at once, and killed him with
one grip of his sharp teeth; then he drew him
out of the mud, and had just thrown him over
his back to take him home to eat, when the
man came back with his friends. The Tiger let
the ox fall and ran off; but it was dead, and all
the blood was sucked from its veins.

The Tiger is found in Asia, and nowhere
else, so that it is there that men hunt him. To
hunt him is hard work, and those who go out
to find him need to be bold and quick, and to
learn to shoot well.

There is a small place in India where a
great heap of stones stands by the side of the
road. All who pass by throw a stone on to the
heap, for it was placed there to show that a
great Tiger had been killed on that spot. This

Se
Ok BS
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Hb TIGER.

fierce beast had slain men, and girls, and cows,
and sheep, and was said to like men’s flesh best
for his food, for he would spring upon the men
who kept the herds, and take them off to his
lair, when he did not touch the ox or the cow
that was close by.

There was a white man there when these
tales were told,—a man who went out day by
day to hunt wild beasts,— and he said he would
vo and fight the Tiger for his life, and kill him,
or else be killed by him. In India the postmen
eo on foot, and their bags are slung at the end
pf along cane. ‘To this cane they hang brass
rings and plates, which clink and ring like bells
as they walk, to let folks know that they are
close at hand. Now the Tiger used to wait in
the wood, by the side of the road, till he heard
this sound, for when he heard it he knew a man
was near, and that he could kill and eat him.
When the white man heard what the fierce
beast had done, he thought of a way to bring
him out of his den. So when the sun was gone
down, he went out, armed with his gun, to the

| lair.



place where he knew the Tiger had made his
He took no one with him—but in one
hand he had a cane, such as the postmen use,
with the rings and bits of brass on it, to clink
and ring as he went. He watched each side
of the road for the Tiger, but he could not see
him till he came to a steep place, where he
thought he heard a noise such as is made when
we crush a dry leaf, and saw the long grass
move as though some live thing were on its
way to the place where he stood. Then came
a low sound, like the purr of a cat. He went
back a yard or two to see what could be done,
and as he did so, a great Tiger sprang at one
bound to the midst of the road, not six feet
from where he stood. There was just time to
fire one shot before the huge beast could give
a fresh spring, and when the smoke of the gun
cleared off, there he was in the dust, not dead,
but with his death wound. One more shot at
the back of the ear made an end of this fierce
beast, which fed on men, and there was great
joy when the news of his death was known.







Loeb Tel ©) IN:



HEN we call the Lion the King of Beasts,

we mean that he looks so bold and grand,
and is so fierce and strong, that none of the rest
of the beasts are like him, or dare to come near
him when he goes out to seek his prey. His
bright eyes flash as he stands and moves his
tail from side to side, his thick mane falls on
his strong neck, and his great paws, though
they are so soft that he can walk and make no
sound, have long sharp claws that can tear
through the hide of an ox, and strike down a
horse. His roar is heard far off in the woods,
and is feared by man and beast. But though
the Lion is so brave and strong, he hunts for
his prey just as a cat hunts fora mouse. He
will crouch in the long grass and shrubs, or
crawl by the side of a hedge or a high bank, till
he comes near the ox, the calf, or the sheep,
which he means to seize. Then he springs on



it, strikes it down, and drags it off to his den,
where he can eat it at his ease. He goes in
search of prey at night, and sleeps by day, so
that those who go out to hunt the Lion must
seek him in his lair, and rouse him up if they
wish to kill him.

At one time—a long time past— Lions
were caught and sent to Rome, where they
were kept to fight with men. _ Slaves who had.
done wrong, or men who had been sent to gaol
for their crimes, were thrown to the beasts,
which means that they were sent to a large
round pit, where they were to fight with wild
beasts. If the man could kill one or two Lions:
with the short sword that was put in his hand,
he was set free, but it was a hard thing to do;
and as the crowd sat on all sides to watch the
fizht, his shrieks and groans were not heard for
their shouts and cries. It was thought to be a



THE

a great sight at Rome, and good as well as bad
men were cast to the Lions in those bad times.

One good tale is told of a poor Greek,
whose name was Androcles. This man was
out in the wild plains one day, when he saw a
Lion not far off. The poor beast was lame, and
lay on the ground to suck his paw. When he
saw the Greek, he got up, and though he could
not do more than limp on three legs, crawled
to him with his paw held out, and made a
sad moan, as if to ask the help of the man, so
Androcles went near, to see what he could do.
The Lion had a great thorn thrust through his
paw. It had gone in so deep that he could
not get it out, and it gave him great pain.
The Greek sat down by him, and with much
care drew out the thorn; then he bound up the
paw with a strip torn from his shirt. The Lion
licked his hand for thanks, and went away. In
two or three years from that time the Greek
was put in gaol, and brought before the judge.
Now, just then a great Lion had been caught

and sent to the place where the wild beasts |





LLON.

were kept for men to fight with, so the judge
said that the man should be thrown to the
beasts. The day came when the Lion was to
be let loose, and he was so fierce and large,
that the vast crowd cried out to the poor
Greek, “You are a dead man.” Androcles
thought so too, when he saw the great beast
come with slow steps to the place where he
stood; but when all there thought that the
brute would leap on him and tear him, the
Lion bent his rough head, and crouched down
upon the ground at the man’s feet. There was
a great shout, and some cried, “ Bring a fresh
Lion,” but more said, “ What does it mean?”
The Greek, when he felt the Lion lick his bare
feet, bent down to look at him, and from some
marks that he saw in his mane and face, knew
that it was the beast from whose foot he had
drawn the thorn. The judge sent to ask how
it was that the fierce beast lay down like a
tame dog at the feet of the Greek, and when
he heard the tale said that Androcles should
be set free.







THE LEOPARD.



HE LEOPARD is not much more than
half the size of the Tiger, and has bright
spots on his skin, and not streaks, like some of
the Cat tribe. He is much to be feared, for he
is fierce and strong, and, as he is smail, he can
crouch in the long grass, or lie on the branch
of a big tree, where he waits till he can spring
down on his prey, and suck its blood. If you
have seen a Cat stretched out, with its paws
straight in front, its hind legs bent, its head
laid down, as it keeps watch on the birds that
fly here and there on a lawn, you can guess
how a Leopard looks when he lies in wait for
its prey. It is such a sly beast, that it glides
with slow, soft steps, and lurks in the grass and

parts of Africa, the Leopard is to be found,
and it is said that some of these brutes have
been seen that are quite black, but they are
more rare. The skin is much prized, and some
of the black men think that some parts of the
flesh can be used; they say that the end of the
tail will act as a charm, to make him who has
it sure of the love of some of his friends, and
that the brain makes men brave, and gives
them luck when they go out to hunt. These
beasts keep out of the way when they see a
man, but for all that they are fierce when they
are brought to bay, and will fight with tooth
and claw.

One way to take them is to form a cage

shrubs, where it can hide so well, that when it | with poles, that are stuck fast in the ground.
is killed there is great joy for those who live | There is a door in the cage, which is not shut,

in the place near its lair.

In Ceylon, and most | but is kept wide open by a young tree.

The



THE LHEOPARD.

top of this tree is bent by six or eight men,
who hold it down till it can be made fast to
the ground by a noose of deer-hide. Then a
young goat is tied in the cage, with a large
stone bound to his ear.. The weight of the
stone makes him cry, the Leopard hears him,
and comes to the door of the cage, where he
tries to get in; the young tree flies up like a
spring, and he is caught by the noose, which
holds him tight round the loins.

The Leopards are called Tigers by the
Dutch folks who live at the Cape of Good
Hope. M. Andersson, while he was in that
part of the world, was waked up one night
by the dogs, who all seemed to howl at once
in loud cries of fright. He sprang out of bed
with his gun in his hand, for he thought one
of the dogs must have been seized by some
beast of prey. He was quite right; though
when he went to the door of the hut, he could

The men soon set light to a torch, and, when
they went out, saw the tracks of a Leopard
on the ground, and found that one of the best
of the dogs was not with the rest. No more
could be done that night, so they all went
back to their beds; but next day, while M.
Andersson was on his way, he heard the same
sort of cries as those that broke his rest, in
the night. He got down from his seat on the
front of the great cart in which he rode, and
there, in the midst of a bush, lay the poor dog,
full of bites and wounds, but not dead. It
seems that he had in some way, got rid of the
Leopard, but it took a long time to cure his
wounds. The next day the men were in the
bed of a stream, when they saw a Leopard
try to make a spring at their goats as they
fed on the banks. When he saw them, he
tried to hide, and sprang up a tree. They
then shot at him, till he fell dead from the

see no sign of what had caused the noise. | tree.



TD bee eV OTB.



F all the wild beasts that roam in the woods,

or hunt on the plains, there are none more
fierce, swift, and sly than the Wolf; and though
Wolves are not of a great size—not so big as
some of our great dogs—they go to seek their
prey in large packs, so that the Bison, the great
stag, and the wild horse are killed by them.
Where the Lion and the Tiger leave some parts
of their meat, the Wolves skulk round the place
to pick the bones; and a pack of Wolves have
been known to kill an old and weak Lion, or to
hunt down a lame and half-dead Elephant. The
Wolf can run so far and so fast, and his scent
is so keen, that he is sure to come up with his
prey; and when his sharp howl is heard in the
clear air of the North, those who are on their
way to some place a long way off may well fear.
It is not one or two Wolves that need be feared

so much, but the pack, which keep on till they |



come up with the light cart or the sledge, and
yelp round and round till some of the first of
them spring up at it, or pull down the horse,
with their sharp, white fangs.

In all lands the Wolf isa foe that men hate.
He is such a mean cur— he skulks in holes, and
by the side of roads, till he sees some beast
much less strong than he is, but he will not
fight till he is made to do so to save his life.
It is strange that the Wolf should be so much
like some dogs that you could not tell which was
which if you saw only the bones, or the beast
stripped of its skin, and yet that the Wolf should
be a mean, base sneak, and the dog so bold and
full of trust in man. When a dog, though he
may be a wild dog, meets with a Wolf, he flies
at him at once as a foe that he hates, and must
fight with all his strength; and the Wolf seems
to feel that it is no use to shun the dog when



THE WOLF.

once his teeth are in his neck, and so the two
bite, and snarl, and roll, and tear, till one of them
is killed. If the Wolf gets the best of it, he eats
the dog; «but the dog will not touch the dead
Wolf. Bad as the Wolf is, it is not killed in
one part of the world. A Hindoo will not hurt
a Wolf, and it is said that these men will go to
the den of the she-Wolf, take out the cubs, and
play with them. This may be true, for the she-
Wolf is so proud of her cubs that she likes to
see them made pets of. While they are quite
young it may be safe to play with them, but not
when their teeth have grown, and they snap, and
snarl, and bite. Wolves are said to teach their
young how to bear pain, and to bite their tails,
strike them with their claws, and drag them on
the ground. till they learn to be still, and not
cry out when they are hurt. They are free from
wild beasts in England now, but in old times
their woods and waste lands were so full of
Wolves, that huts and: sheds, made of great
beams of wood, and with strong doors that
would shut and latch, were built at the road-
sides, that those who were on their way from



town to town might run to find a safe p.ace,
when they were chased by the fierce beasts, who
smelt them from far off, and came in packs, with
yelps and howls to tear them limb from limb.
When Edgar was a King, a man could buy off
a friend who had been put in jail, if he brought
a score or so of Wolves’ tongues; and a price
was put on the Wolf’s head, —a price so large
as to cause the rough, strong North-men to
hunt down these beasts, and at last to leave
but few in the land.

In the cold parts of the world — the lands
of ice and snow, where the sledge is used—a
Wolf hunt is great sport. A band of men set
out, armed with guns, and take with them a
young, fat pig. If there is one thing in the
world that the Wolf loves best, it is pork; and
so when the sledge, with the men in it, has gone
a mile or two, the man who holds the pig bites
its tail till it gives a shrill squeak. If there
are Wolves near the spot, they will come out
when they hear the sound, and try to catch the
sledge, to which they go so near that they can
be picked off with the guns.







‘TE Ga A HP’ E..



HAT a grand beast is the Giraffe, with its

long neck, fine skin, stag-like head, and

soft, bright eye. At one time no one here thought
there could be sucha thing; and when they heard

tales of a beast with the skin of a leopard, the —

head of a deer, the neck of a swan, and the speed
of a grey-hound, they laughed, and thought it
was no more than a tale made up to deceive
them. It is all true, as we know by this time,
for the Giraffe has been brought here for us to
look at, and we may see him stand and use his
long tongue to pull his food, just as the Elephant
will use his trunk; or may stare at his vast height
and think how grand a herd of Giraffes should
look as they bound, at full speed, in the wild
plains of Africa. Though he is so large that a
full-grown male is six yards from his fore-hoof
to the top of his head, the Giraffe is as full of



the foc. His large, soft eye can see for miles,
and on all sides of him, and as he is so tall that
he plucks the young leaves from the trees with
his curled tongue, he can keep a sharp lookout
wher: he is on the plain. His speed is so great
as to give him a good chance when he runs for
his life from the Lion or other beasts of prey.
Of course, it is-great sport to come near a
herd of these tall beasts, and all that there is to
do is to be quite still till it is time to fire at one
of them. One c? the tales of this sport tells how
four or five men who went out to hunt came to a
herd of more than thirty Giraffes, which plucked
the leaves on the high stems in a grove not far
off, The men crept’on as near as they could,
when what should they see but a cross old Rhi-

-noceros and her queer calf, who stood right in

their path. They saw the small eyes of these

fear as a hare, and will fly at the first sound of | great brutes shine, and knew that they were in



THE Gen A PRE.

an ill mood, so one of the men fired at the big | that they had not got to the other side when

one, while the chief of the band set spurs to his
horse, and gave chase to the Giraffes, who all
sprang off at their best speed when they heard
the sound of the gun and the noise of hoofs.
Their great bounds soon lefé man and horse in
the rear. ‘Twice they were hid from view by a
clump of trees, through which the man on his
horse went in search of them, and each time he
was just too late to see more than their great
iong backs as they sprang up a high ridge that
lay just in their way. When he looked round,
the man saw that while he was in chase of
the herd of Giraffes, three Rhinoceroses were
in chase of him, and toiled on in the hope that
they should come up with him. A white cloth
that he wore round his cap was torn off by the
branch of a tree as he passed by, and the threc
great beasts rushed at it, and trod it with their
huge feet. Ina short time the Giraffes reach-
ed.a small stream, the bed of which was of soft
sand, and in this their long, slim legs sank so



man and horse were once more close to them,
and, by the time they had reached the bank and
climbed its steep side, were in the midst of the
herd. Then the man rode at the great male
who led the herd, placed his gun close to the
bright, soft skin of the poor beast, and fired.
The Giraffe did not fall at once, but still went
on with slow steps, till more shots were fired at
him, and then the horse was brought in front
of him to stop him. The grand beast stood
tall, mute, and full of grace, and looked down
at his foe, with his fine neck bent, and tears
in his dark, soft eyes, as he was met by a full
charge from the gun. Then his long limbs
shook, his bright sleek fur stood on end, and,
as the. tenth ball pierced his broad chest, he
bowed his head, and fell like a tall tree to
the ground. His limbs were so strong, that
when he was dead they looked as though they
were made of brass, and his hide was more
than an inch thick. The tail was five feet in

deep that they could not keep up their pace, so | length.











THE as tS ON.



HE BISON was at one time found in Europe,

but there are now none left. It is in America
that the Bison is to be found. He is here known
by the name of Buffalo, and goes in vast herds
through the great plains, where the red men hunt
him, use his flesh for food, and make clothes of
his thick, warm skin. The Buffalo is, in fact, a
wild ox, of great size and strength, but he is not
quite like the tame beasts, for he is more fierce
and strong, has a large hump on his neck, and
a thick mane of hair hangs round his head. The
cows, as well as the bulls, have a mane; but
that of the bull is so thick that it hides his head,
though his fierce eyes can be seen as they glare
and shine through the bush of hair. In the great
plains where no one comes near him, and by the
side of streams where he can drink and roll in
the wet clay, the Buffalo loves to feed. The



herds of these beasts are so vast, that they seem
to reach for miles. While he is in the herd, the
Buffalo fears no other beast, and till he is lame,
or so fat that he can not fight nor run, he need
not fear, for he can kill most of his foes if they
come one at atime. The bear is too much for
him, and the wolves who hunt in packs can kill
him; but in the great herd, where these big
brutes join their strength and crush the foe with
hoofs and horns, they care for none but the men,
who hunt them with bow or guns, and come on
horseback to drive them to the place where they
are shot down and killed. They will run from
men; but should one of them get a wound or
a hurt, the fierce beast, mad with pain and rage,
will turn and rush with all his might at his foe,
who, if he has not a quick eye and a good horse,
may be hurled to the ground and crushed to



THE BISON.

death, or gored by those long, sharp horns, that | knows what to do, and the rein is no more than

can tear a horse from chest to throat, or pin
him to the earth.

There are large tribes of men who hunt the
Buffalo, and to whom that huge beast furnishes
food. All parts of him are used by them, and
they may be said to live on him. His flesh is
their meat, the skin serves them for coats, beds,
boots, rugs, tents, roofs to their huts, slings,
reins and seats. Of the bones are made clubs,
stools, flutes, and all sorts of things for war or
sport, while of the horns are formed spoons,
heads of spears, cups, flasks, and ping. The
feet and hoofs are boiled to make glue, with
which they join the shafts of spears and darts,
the mane is twined to make ropes and cords,
the end of the tail is used as a whisk to keep
off the flies, and the thread and string used to
sew the hide, and to make the robes and stitch
the clothes, is made of some part of the dead
beast. The Indians of North America, who
hunt the Buffalo, wear very little clothing, in
order to have the free use of their limbs. The
horse used is a small, fierce, swift steed, that



a rope of hair tied round his jaw. The man

picks out one Buffalo from the herd, and rides
at it as fast as he can urge his horse. The
huge beast sees that he is chased, leaves the
herd, and flies as hard as he can go; but the
horse comes up with him at last, and when
they are quite close, the man lets fall the rein,
and, quick as a flash, shoots it just at the
front of its ribs. When the horse hears the
shot, he turns round and goes off at great speed,
for when the big bull has a wound, he will turn
and charge man and beast with such fierce
strength that one must be killed if they are not
both very swift. Should the wild bull come up
with the horse, the red man vaults from his -
back, and with his long, two-edged knife, stabs
the huge beast to the heart, or drives the blade
through his thick neck.

Those who go out to hunt the Buffalo,
must take care not to get on that side of him.
to which the wind blows, for his scent is so
keen that he can smell a man a long way
off.











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Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26078004' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADOO' 'sip-files00001.tif'
27cd8c97fb22c864757aa113cbae1fb5
b8e21ec763a13863e1d7afa190aaba3fc01d65dd
'2011-11-10T10:39:30-05:00'
describe
'199' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADOP' 'sip-files00001.txt'
e93c45041cb905aec6f05179be23fd2e
2f0a8922f91e9be6ba7ac366d04cd3f3e0cbf4da
describe
Invalid character
'48229' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADOQ' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
9e74200304a2ee5d75c05660727306f6
c420a9324d7c62c9e617fd8fe74586ce4cbf7464
'2011-11-10T10:39:35-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1051439' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADOR' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
a1057fda32c2fb4c6a269acad7244e05
3a3f835dd3dff4d33e7955beac49ddbcbb9ef6a7
describe
'267048' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADOS' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
6bcadce3b0cf69f7b2f7e213600ce60b
535fa093cb4d2590625634135019a207115f981a
'2011-11-10T10:39:42-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2990' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADOT' 'sip-files00002.pro'
e760ca60c4e8e200b61638168b2194ab
ce2ffbaec12f3b089a01c16ee0b48b321f8b7a95
describe
'92919' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADOU' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
4f0b07ff69e75ef4d1f41f5377818f79
4d954e43aa26f2646be95d5e0f6421d78a193a4f
'2011-11-10T10:39:39-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25262660' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADOV' 'sip-files00002.tif'
0648bf50523688336a1e9e8f314ecb6f
227658da459f3ecddd31975240125f89295e9653
'2011-11-10T10:39:56-05:00'
describe
'258' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADOW' 'sip-files00002.txt'
95d99fedb3ae04c2c5402c595e5b417c
0aff5419692e2a5fdc7cb44bddaef9907de8ff56
'2011-11-10T10:39:52-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1087827' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADOX' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
02f3463daa30709ace1219ab76da1c89
aea755b3ea2c3f74ec7af6d06a41e9a8dc577be2
describe
'166832' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADOY' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
932205296e7060eb06171a7c473278d4
3e2fedb651a7b18b1efbc5c3e6bbaf3b3fb8ab0c
'2011-11-10T10:39:54-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'46625' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADOZ' 'sip-files00003.pro'
9f0edbe10ad8781498571aad08771d5b
c05b821a5fe92e4c29d91471777c3d20cb66ef91
'2011-11-10T10:40:19-05:00'
describe
'60174' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPA' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
b06c73ee6fba38a1a74c5c64c79809d8
4668d719f20b04752aa35ad11c1eb83927adbb16
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'8727540' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPB' 'sip-files00003.tif'
1ea71ae1eec941f41a1eebcd95520a87
a94f98601e0a1661050b8d98ef6adc5e3b4305d4
'2011-11-10T10:40:00-05:00'
describe
'1804' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPC' 'sip-files00003.txt'
e88e10dbdb05ca13267605818cd45f1a
bf3676b6867144bbde30cde46d60c4132d71e6a6
'2011-11-10T10:39:38-05:00'
describe
'1046049' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPD' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
a304a5f1dafb76d84dae4226de935266
c190e34a99223c3eab5f7337f225862d60f276b6
'2011-11-10T10:39:40-05:00'
describe
'181551' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPE' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
30b322bba5dc3dfdf629ed5d35b3dc1a
ebbd8f937d702c0bef8dc882812bcbfadb74fb51
'2011-11-10T10:39:59-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'55873' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPF' 'sip-files00004.pro'
f5f99300529b721ed2a0f0aeaa23fa45
21414524a3ef382f6a42efc1f5d18133ec7653ad
'2011-11-10T10:40:18-05:00'
describe
'65302' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPG' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
5ade341001ea7de1c689ceda350b426c
62329a199b35a4ec1cf843a464be5decec4ca3dd
'2011-11-10T10:39:48-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'8383112' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPH' 'sip-files00004.tif'
c5eda198e1aa029e1b929464f37e12b5
d4ba3a929f6a1f0d88de7e2287b86a19284efd5c
'2011-11-10T10:39:57-05:00'
describe
'2150' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPI' 'sip-files00004.txt'
925abf0f259989b00f4a81b7d79222f6
f99946537f3229540424869ed748aecaf8190a33
'2011-11-10T10:39:53-05:00'
describe
'1082312' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPJ' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
9cb1416709b3fed48fd4c7ce021ca6aa
b6bdf1f1496c5a27e11e2c50f29f10d4f2cc96b9
'2011-11-10T10:39:41-05:00'
describe
'209454' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPK' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
59645a43c2370545815ac1c1db261df8
2d095e5f476fe059ad9692cabf0495dcf10a3c2f
'2011-11-10T10:39:33-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1353' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPL' 'sip-files00005.pro'
fff7a5d8954b9791600784aa599f2931
3b75aada46bec853acaed66ebcc5a89601c4be7c
'2011-11-10T10:39:31-05:00'
describe
'72505' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPM' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
9a4446968897d009a7dd519df49ae3bc
eefe665f6aeac9aa0c16ebf6a87f8a97e0491600
'2011-11-10T10:40:06-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25988968' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPN' 'sip-files00005.tif'
2ce3e110549d7b59651d5b81ea3b50e1
bf0916c34da10228dda186d760f3e3c9e120f4e6
'2011-11-10T10:40:15-05:00'
describe
'168' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPO' 'sip-files00005.txt'
cf80085727be34d8f68d1c3390f28b4e
479ebf65bcb78d051d74e9f39d583883640be548
'2011-11-10T10:39:23-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1034524' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPP' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
6b36133dc2aeaa00f9744deea352ab18
9cb0092be840b2c9799290c6fd4075e77dd40e70
'2011-11-10T10:40:01-05:00'
describe
'157342' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPQ' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
902bce218408c26340dc69bc1c8c251a
1aecc6d4be38cf3a5f298760a11e6cbd6e854a7e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'46284' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPR' 'sip-files00006.pro'
bf89d10b0a1d777879193698210cb558
7086e1c8b0d62bde5386ce0a48ddf1797bf196a3
describe
'57196' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPS' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
aa5ac4f844ea13ac84afb287493a333e
23feda18404a09ea3dc6581ecb97a801b0ba1df0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'8289940' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPT' 'sip-files00006.tif'
7b975a0f691fd43b4c4d965c3ea4a33b
5c3c68582f9fd6a89c688ba871a861e0c86d4994
describe
'1798' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPU' 'sip-files00006.txt'
c57c6d3d68874c16d9b1d023721e05f8
23181630dd59f5757b348ad34fd8452ee904b4e6
'2011-11-10T10:40:04-05:00'
describe
'1089101' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPV' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
eec1d091b569d0848829a94e12f60669
c7c15156af344e4cbe26aca9b933782201b0c76a
'2011-11-10T10:39:36-05:00'
describe
'183330' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPW' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
c5bb8ae4d5851983f0fed8d21d32dd09
16ec21e98dca81e1eaeed117d2c82768ebaffced
'2011-11-10T10:39:32-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'54257' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPX' 'sip-files00007.pro'
1dabea22281ecd5f26143b433be6dad1
ffd9cb1401ef72ddec2a0b7522a81dde41bec23e
'2011-11-10T10:39:21-05:00'
describe
'65680' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPY' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
f2f7e89d5f99de6e4665377601eea44f
72414a60a9d294a88ab1605cca42d820673c0988
'2011-11-10T10:40:03-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'8727792' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADPZ' 'sip-files00007.tif'
6b145d01baf460cb54064ebf2b637866
4b5324be5a8104c34cb7ebfaf22ee7e8aee9c5a9
describe
'2087' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQA' 'sip-files00007.txt'
e2fcd8b9a8cfd57816396b9c77d4ae27
fcc31775d6ddcf219bd04c50bfe783d7225d907f
describe
'1057645' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQB' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
eed7bc2ff2ae8d413865a29dcb4aaa3d
854f82b69c694ae52254f74b1d990eb3c085475b
describe
'240270' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQC' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
0665127f6bd3b4c776be80d222dcc633
f40eb74b9bac67f00d7a040da7d828910e42bdbd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'4035' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQD' 'sip-files00008.pro'
f0309ae50b3977b454da0bc522a01ebd
baa24aa6569832d41f16102575441921e886b557
'2011-11-10T10:39:37-05:00'
describe
'83968' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQE' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
6cfc20985f005339bebab1f5b29639a2
cd7b4cb176de479920f8c77361a87e87d748a474
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25397728' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQF' 'sip-files00008.tif'
f3bb74adc6d4815f7d9b245cdd9be50e
2dead4d460d17c1dccc04ecb44d6d3738638e1c3
'2011-11-10T10:40:05-05:00'
describe
'278' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQG' 'sip-files00008.txt'
d8315a9339b424e6ba502f9d2ecd4822
19b72437aa6904e7dad2a969ac0e5965bf09d343
describe
Invalid character
'1052501' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQH' 'sip-files00008a.jp2'
a1a03fbcfc1a74237a89ad6b7ecdf3a2
1859cbf21df5997dd0ce227cf39bd8b4ed763611
'2011-11-10T10:39:26-05:00'
describe
'147471' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQI' 'sip-files00008a.jpg'
1ca22910bdeaa1735863f27f54758d13
5b20dd75ecc2a93ad90212fde9296c90e4fbd3a1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'43830' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQJ' 'sip-files00008a.pro'
b61709c13f01989293e6495526ac1bb4
c1af55d7573f33fa7bef94d2ec820048d4acc204
describe
'54030' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQK' 'sip-files00008a.QC.jpg'
84ee20a6e76b97a7b4f2bb4146187dbf
5f3d1bbfdb252b1fe2f2c173efa100e534986f77
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'8441156' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQL' 'sip-files00008a.tif'
47934c9d554a2bf72d4a7cf45ac26e5a
8dc48f604639b8678ec71269586b5a510011e304
'2011-11-10T10:40:16-05:00'
describe
'1704' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQM' 'sip-files00008a.txt'
b6fbb18204e57907ee348b1a5387e61c
8978f719ed00efcc1b5d0534a888842dfd56ff00
describe
'1083459' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQN' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
3ec97da616dee4582313240ec96430ce
1cdf26ae9684c24a777a3cd740e478c002e6034f
describe
'168465' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQO' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
4122038d6d495b18078c663fb3372ec7
3679d1022edd7dadc11d1cb551965f8f409220ff
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'48590' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQP' 'sip-files00009.pro'
47f08011c9b65cc52177dbe091ac7b34
f8a0436fea9b7d7a42d40ea577108115878247da
'2011-11-10T10:39:20-05:00'
describe
'60865' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQQ' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
c04a3eaf0a667197752bbfd93a144730
7d489e91b33189ee8501eb9ab23adddabd177737
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'8692976' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQR' 'sip-files00009.tif'
4eb360444776481fdd0ab7479a09064e
66c59c9d144396cd83905075d4448a972fbb34b0
'2011-11-10T10:39:49-05:00'
describe
'1871' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQS' 'sip-files00009.txt'
4361cb10d2e79e0e5fd02343387e2623
a662d4d025611576ebb7b4f73fdc039e569e732f
describe
'1072029' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQT' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
32326c5622dd761f9748c62f9a74dd39
8e1c09f2cf747bda9a9cb0e9ea812d85787947ed
describe
'165543' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQU' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
e73f5ec30c1d6d704eb42a93c9fa94f8
07416083dcd2932e5ffaa0f7b900542cfb1c1e71
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'47809' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQV' 'sip-files00010.pro'
fab1fb6d3e685a4d15c7dd172815f6f1
e727b3584a78a087eb7ca89d5bb3fc3002774268
'2011-11-10T10:39:44-05:00'
describe
'60144' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQW' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
8c87f25151c38f4229f05cb28f57126e
cca2ab450ce3ff5b6436743d90be11146403c2af
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'8590376' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQX' 'sip-files00010.tif'
d393c55c95c45c7c7e37eae18b9a92da
62d10e0bb1f46400a7aff6dd8271001af39db23e
describe
'1855' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQY' 'sip-files00010.txt'
11cd964d830f9181b3a1321e5adc18a1
da79fb5ad8228108126cb4994ed3d38fdcb73ed5
describe
'1100611' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADQZ' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
0ca04761d2c3c522836f826f15959a49
95d7762618d84c420399abeaa2039374e379587d
describe
'185260' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRA' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
6c49546280e0e4dc4dd93ebcb627e076
87c5093e1dcf51fe83a6d937eff7777cf98bf166
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'58893' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRB' 'sip-files00011.pro'
192809def8055ab7aa2260b1e70f848b
54d9ad420dc268497ef79c22ace1c83111741627
describe
'65076' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRC' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
30f54165967d5fc8f5ad26ead542b566
df1acf5f50148043e877ccaf3e2995459c722225
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'8819928' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRD' 'sip-files00011.tif'
012884f5a201e183666f3167de838549
5e79c833997fd80e619b4e9866901bd239796590
describe
'2266' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRE' 'sip-files00011.txt'
e48f7bdec462a43ab3dd622242e2721b
435d2b6a3cc19e663d94267604fb53b2edc0ee2e
describe
'998495' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRF' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
e24a0d97d0c7a1d90c5d31a3612f4920
d289bdaea5db278a015eba5074f4093944221d6c
describe
'211348' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRG' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
6ba3bfb81f905cb3f0b6f9b7bc1d08f3
ab0484fc6efbc53f185783a492f2c08cba3d69da
'2011-11-10T10:39:34-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2511' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRH' 'sip-files00012.pro'
138ea1d8e0b7caf8425c4ec179c4d62e
78c07d7ef9ec99efb1b095a276c846e628ca2e07
describe
'72959' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRI' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
5cc4717f347b0b84a5f20cdc5c09ad2f
a1ccad2bf8b2ddd968a1da048cfa2d36bdb4baf7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23985844' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRJ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
3c9bf5abf42bef1fc981a94c8b8977fd
06a8b052f199d29910eca37c51e13dfa5b8fa07b
'2011-11-10T10:39:28-05:00'
describe
'171' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRK' 'sip-files00012.txt'
3d89601392b59929547de62643470288
a66c2bf8ad012a0cea75f7c09e0aae431bc9d7c8
describe
Invalid character
'1061521' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRL' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
fbb5efdf0a5c9e5b28fc4042f345a67b
cb7c57c0182c9cb6d16d11ec9a3c4ad969ba6ba7
describe
'166591' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRM' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
cb65d39a42679e5f9998dbd59984cb6a
8e5d12e88175962e1eca5adaeffabba092e4ac44
'2011-11-10T10:39:47-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'49624' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRN' 'sip-files00013.pro'
c349c1a6ec58b544c4d76cfd78b47b97
747d0be65e1c0df3b8fe407b5784acf32f50a418
describe
'59934' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRO' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
c59ed77fa4820c4221d0ea00db7ba132
0e20d9e18ca2119af1c692886d57b14684e6b42f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'8506736' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRP' 'sip-files00013.tif'
5904672ffb7059cfde0aff3c8c16df92
541123a6ac9b5cddb2ba6d55095fb4461d85be54
'2011-11-10T10:39:43-05:00'
describe
'1927' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRQ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
3653a2dc157dcd2cde45a42bec776af0
fdbba57df88c67640dbb62b1905d9d63489cdbb4
describe
'1032302' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRR' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
142bdfe5137ce42f1ecdce5721f5b391
3a21559d0f9193822b020c7968738765ecea8192
describe
'179572' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRS' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
eb80541c7c4e35a9f8569bdfaa6798c7
9d7cd36c7bd411a94767607fc896ed7d655dc8a0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'56317' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRT' 'sip-files00014.pro'
a78048bd058493636b21236c160ccc6b
432bea4bd44e3b5b5b868e87e8c71cb48a8c0a59
describe
'64289' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRU' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
e460f1d5098b9bb29b0819480f4d259a
e6a2af76818a7f0c2be566bdd6f84f9b4c90b71b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'8284672' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRV' 'sip-files00014.tif'
77d8757e9d4f53008defd346acc5979e
71de29532927b64c9bf14a15e923be8c1a3b23be
describe
'2165' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRW' 'sip-files00014.txt'
e6478a3877d4500af6d5c577dd88ff4f
94ea05459372ee94dd544d6e691e078cf8cc20f4
describe
'1039663' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRX' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
94db7181612928db6c09aa5c260f5359
3f58eac67b83b3a63cc7401743f3521ff7860f13
describe
'344633' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRY' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
d391072cb21dc955c97b3d0c93dd3930
38a91e7a7f4ab04929131137b0b49f5d7e8582f0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1124' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADRZ' 'sip-files00015.pro'
be15ab2b442cd4843d374ef736ac07de
21eab92b853019d4fb25d1b5dc71e7cecb7b1962
describe
'108550' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSA' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
76c09813fddb2b54a2a2fbe50ded3582
73336f7f4f75cd45e3fb997e0129b4f399150fe6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24977308' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSB' 'sip-files00015.tif'
444b9f0118bd4417a764cbb05e4d7db1
d723199a3624a8feb532907e6c29bcecad81eff6
describe
'72' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSC' 'sip-files00015.txt'
877b194dc9a23e3ee398693874336109
3e840dfe2b05c5e5cc8ad6fd727ce2445fca6ec4
describe
Invalid character
'1050706' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSD' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
a552fc36c33ad36c6f7bb4ccbde6dfc4
9f15c2c744ea21032912f8f19e8461c5f4e2871c
describe
'167868' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSE' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
a0bb4a9f21b24faaa519f184e21f08a5
b8fcd52d40d4150e87f3660cf7e1386e28172352
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'46974' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSF' 'sip-files00016.pro'
08f211065a3eca4fddef6a7cda418833
cace0850b216acbf44591ce4009eccd402030e19
describe
'60559' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSG' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
c617203d0c7ca6a3355590fe5e156c03
ad1b6e6d6b1ce5551f54228950abc5313ac54f8f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'8419792' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSH' 'sip-files00016.tif'
616bde424c2f9d0986e18f17f138fe55
869bbf77440eea6876813e805a7d6e2de2238e7c
describe
'1822' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSI' 'sip-files00016.txt'
c6e6f24b3ef34ba8ef8811c2dbd14d58
69600f579151cfb638eb8f1aceb796435ea8f29f
describe
'1093172' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSJ' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
69254cc07ce62eb258c102865b9c4f29
2cadee735d27bdbe6a6a38e22c383f65928d3f84
describe
'185575' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSK' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
9ca6f39e86be0d7a22921a2e9e61dc8f
50f490132ce05224714db79e5eb8944cace5aaa7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'57267' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSL' 'sip-files00017.pro'
fdebe6bf3691dc5ea8cc6636758e7c0b
0f2bc3b5ca8c1726182d0857ad801826b13c4e08
describe
'66236' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSM' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
80819fa639bad3e75e4b0f380123eb93
f95badd7eb24c78bbdeaf4e02014764a90dd055d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'8760408' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSN' 'sip-files00017.tif'
db12de4148e74d6b9a891c400e79f19f
6a54fbf584423fe98819a398c0df5092cb8c6ae1
describe
'2208' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSO' 'sip-files00017.txt'
6cb5e4fa28e46db08351468c60f1d5da
0e9ed0957e7eaf49130944f1aade8c52ba223253
describe
'1049663' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSP' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
df59a3dd913aa935a7b35a97c48dea03
e8075c1cc110ce313ba8dd4ff059f897437be250
describe
'191822' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSQ' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
1a1c45b882362b2a1a86152f5910725f
0e8171bbeeadff6ba637a05476e9eff5eab20b88
'2011-11-10T10:39:58-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7708' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSR' 'sip-files00018.pro'
9da2f7403f058999b1f84915d0d2ab8a
dfaea669acf125ce5ab0d5b635fe6829813ee132
describe
'68245' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSS' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
7a5cf0878a31b59d18a35719fe98357b
5a2c799b6e227ffcdf1de7eb33ec076478cc9eb2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25204284' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADST' 'sip-files00018.tif'
5e6eb46a8c7c7ee133554f6bbab32d17
3b4dc3a9108f5e3a8c092a5cc5b6f58fa0f5d70b
'2011-11-10T10:39:46-05:00'
describe
'891' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSU' 'sip-files00018.txt'
ebe89a20bbe4394f92965b24efeac383
846585bd3315fc9e7e035be33527377b3e3cba66
describe
Invalid character
'1080059' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSV' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
265efb12c1c8260580e63b5edc10e825
2758d0a86cb5d92934ad8bf75d63147013730cb6
describe
'163123' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSW' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
404b469eefc2388aea58a25a267a8712
bd8af521d4785d29b0f5c4da8153fb2c5982efc2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'865' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSX' 'sip-files00019.pro'
dabd1e5f2ba505d462a501b2b62b0f69
d37467a6e6b3a62725c0edb133586bba578dd28c
describe
'53817' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSY' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
e606b6a5751fed122bfbb3c33a8016c4
d6e11116881234f0ca01893d8963709fc162cd4a
'2011-11-10T10:39:22-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25937016' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADSZ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
804b8c926a95b45e77293f4b3ab6d068
0c0aa79689dc4df366cc5b305c6088605edb6b20
'2011-11-10T10:40:02-05:00'
describe
'108' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADTA' 'sip-files00019.txt'
d051c5bcd45d45b86283001b5baa12f4
fe32eca0d814565db6d24549d7df03e368406276
describe
Invalid character
'39751' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADTB' 'sip-filesUF00025343_00001.mets'
1594660bd8f4737206d5c714f5f53780
726e951d29e5929e040185e87c960c95d4ec4876
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-16T02:29:53-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'43373' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADOfileF20080922_AAADTE' 'sip-filesUF00025343_00001.xml'
58f4d07c7a6adde6553a3bc7ffd45638
4c40cb8be174142efdeba3d328b92d11192c5df6
describe
xml resolution




1

an

es


as

es

i
eae

ai


Dae 1 oR i:



fY\HE TIGER is more like a Cat than a Lion,

for he has not such long hair on his neck.
His tail is long and smooth, with no tuft at the
end, and he has bright, dark stripes on his
smooth coat. He is not so bold as the Lion,
but quite as strong, and more quick and lithe.
He will lie in wait for his prey, and hide in the
tall grass and reeds, where he can draw in his
breath and shrink so flat that no one can see
him, if they have not sharp eyes. But the
Tiger does not like to face his foe, though he
is so strong that he can crush the skull of an
ox with a blow of his great paw, and then trot
off with the dead beast to his den. A poor
man in India found one day that his ox had
got loose, and run off to a swamp, where it
had sunk so deep in the mire that it was fixed,
and could not walk back to dry land. While
he was gone to fetch some of his friends to





help him to get the ox out of the bog, a Tiger
came to the spot, and saw the ox. He sprang
at the poor beast at once, and killed him with
one grip of his sharp teeth; then he drew him
out of the mud, and had just thrown him over
his back to take him home to eat, when the
man came back with his friends. The Tiger let
the ox fall and ran off; but it was dead, and all
the blood was sucked from its veins.

The Tiger is found in Asia, and nowhere
else, so that it is there that men hunt him. To
hunt him is hard work, and those who go out
to find him need to be bold and quick, and to
learn to shoot well.

There is a small place in India where a
great heap of stones stands by the side of the
road. All who pass by throw a stone on to the
heap, for it was placed there to show that a
great Tiger had been killed on that spot. This

Se
Ok BS
at &

Be
Hb TIGER.

fierce beast had slain men, and girls, and cows,
and sheep, and was said to like men’s flesh best
for his food, for he would spring upon the men
who kept the herds, and take them off to his
lair, when he did not touch the ox or the cow
that was close by.

There was a white man there when these
tales were told,—a man who went out day by
day to hunt wild beasts,— and he said he would
vo and fight the Tiger for his life, and kill him,
or else be killed by him. In India the postmen
eo on foot, and their bags are slung at the end
pf along cane. ‘To this cane they hang brass
rings and plates, which clink and ring like bells
as they walk, to let folks know that they are
close at hand. Now the Tiger used to wait in
the wood, by the side of the road, till he heard
this sound, for when he heard it he knew a man
was near, and that he could kill and eat him.
When the white man heard what the fierce
beast had done, he thought of a way to bring
him out of his den. So when the sun was gone
down, he went out, armed with his gun, to the

| lair.



place where he knew the Tiger had made his
He took no one with him—but in one
hand he had a cane, such as the postmen use,
with the rings and bits of brass on it, to clink
and ring as he went. He watched each side
of the road for the Tiger, but he could not see
him till he came to a steep place, where he
thought he heard a noise such as is made when
we crush a dry leaf, and saw the long grass
move as though some live thing were on its
way to the place where he stood. Then came
a low sound, like the purr of a cat. He went
back a yard or two to see what could be done,
and as he did so, a great Tiger sprang at one
bound to the midst of the road, not six feet
from where he stood. There was just time to
fire one shot before the huge beast could give
a fresh spring, and when the smoke of the gun
cleared off, there he was in the dust, not dead,
but with his death wound. One more shot at
the back of the ear made an end of this fierce
beast, which fed on men, and there was great
joy when the news of his death was known.

Loeb Tel ©) IN:



HEN we call the Lion the King of Beasts,

we mean that he looks so bold and grand,
and is so fierce and strong, that none of the rest
of the beasts are like him, or dare to come near
him when he goes out to seek his prey. His
bright eyes flash as he stands and moves his
tail from side to side, his thick mane falls on
his strong neck, and his great paws, though
they are so soft that he can walk and make no
sound, have long sharp claws that can tear
through the hide of an ox, and strike down a
horse. His roar is heard far off in the woods,
and is feared by man and beast. But though
the Lion is so brave and strong, he hunts for
his prey just as a cat hunts fora mouse. He
will crouch in the long grass and shrubs, or
crawl by the side of a hedge or a high bank, till
he comes near the ox, the calf, or the sheep,
which he means to seize. Then he springs on



it, strikes it down, and drags it off to his den,
where he can eat it at his ease. He goes in
search of prey at night, and sleeps by day, so
that those who go out to hunt the Lion must
seek him in his lair, and rouse him up if they
wish to kill him.

At one time—a long time past— Lions
were caught and sent to Rome, where they
were kept to fight with men. _ Slaves who had.
done wrong, or men who had been sent to gaol
for their crimes, were thrown to the beasts,
which means that they were sent to a large
round pit, where they were to fight with wild
beasts. If the man could kill one or two Lions:
with the short sword that was put in his hand,
he was set free, but it was a hard thing to do;
and as the crowd sat on all sides to watch the
fizht, his shrieks and groans were not heard for
their shouts and cries. It was thought to be a
THE

a great sight at Rome, and good as well as bad
men were cast to the Lions in those bad times.

One good tale is told of a poor Greek,
whose name was Androcles. This man was
out in the wild plains one day, when he saw a
Lion not far off. The poor beast was lame, and
lay on the ground to suck his paw. When he
saw the Greek, he got up, and though he could
not do more than limp on three legs, crawled
to him with his paw held out, and made a
sad moan, as if to ask the help of the man, so
Androcles went near, to see what he could do.
The Lion had a great thorn thrust through his
paw. It had gone in so deep that he could
not get it out, and it gave him great pain.
The Greek sat down by him, and with much
care drew out the thorn; then he bound up the
paw with a strip torn from his shirt. The Lion
licked his hand for thanks, and went away. In
two or three years from that time the Greek
was put in gaol, and brought before the judge.
Now, just then a great Lion had been caught

and sent to the place where the wild beasts |





LLON.

were kept for men to fight with, so the judge
said that the man should be thrown to the
beasts. The day came when the Lion was to
be let loose, and he was so fierce and large,
that the vast crowd cried out to the poor
Greek, “You are a dead man.” Androcles
thought so too, when he saw the great beast
come with slow steps to the place where he
stood; but when all there thought that the
brute would leap on him and tear him, the
Lion bent his rough head, and crouched down
upon the ground at the man’s feet. There was
a great shout, and some cried, “ Bring a fresh
Lion,” but more said, “ What does it mean?”
The Greek, when he felt the Lion lick his bare
feet, bent down to look at him, and from some
marks that he saw in his mane and face, knew
that it was the beast from whose foot he had
drawn the thorn. The judge sent to ask how
it was that the fierce beast lay down like a
tame dog at the feet of the Greek, and when
he heard the tale said that Androcles should
be set free.

THE LEOPARD.



HE LEOPARD is not much more than
half the size of the Tiger, and has bright
spots on his skin, and not streaks, like some of
the Cat tribe. He is much to be feared, for he
is fierce and strong, and, as he is smail, he can
crouch in the long grass, or lie on the branch
of a big tree, where he waits till he can spring
down on his prey, and suck its blood. If you
have seen a Cat stretched out, with its paws
straight in front, its hind legs bent, its head
laid down, as it keeps watch on the birds that
fly here and there on a lawn, you can guess
how a Leopard looks when he lies in wait for
its prey. It is such a sly beast, that it glides
with slow, soft steps, and lurks in the grass and

parts of Africa, the Leopard is to be found,
and it is said that some of these brutes have
been seen that are quite black, but they are
more rare. The skin is much prized, and some
of the black men think that some parts of the
flesh can be used; they say that the end of the
tail will act as a charm, to make him who has
it sure of the love of some of his friends, and
that the brain makes men brave, and gives
them luck when they go out to hunt. These
beasts keep out of the way when they see a
man, but for all that they are fierce when they
are brought to bay, and will fight with tooth
and claw.

One way to take them is to form a cage

shrubs, where it can hide so well, that when it | with poles, that are stuck fast in the ground.
is killed there is great joy for those who live | There is a door in the cage, which is not shut,

in the place near its lair.

In Ceylon, and most | but is kept wide open by a young tree.

The
THE LHEOPARD.

top of this tree is bent by six or eight men,
who hold it down till it can be made fast to
the ground by a noose of deer-hide. Then a
young goat is tied in the cage, with a large
stone bound to his ear.. The weight of the
stone makes him cry, the Leopard hears him,
and comes to the door of the cage, where he
tries to get in; the young tree flies up like a
spring, and he is caught by the noose, which
holds him tight round the loins.

The Leopards are called Tigers by the
Dutch folks who live at the Cape of Good
Hope. M. Andersson, while he was in that
part of the world, was waked up one night
by the dogs, who all seemed to howl at once
in loud cries of fright. He sprang out of bed
with his gun in his hand, for he thought one
of the dogs must have been seized by some
beast of prey. He was quite right; though
when he went to the door of the hut, he could

The men soon set light to a torch, and, when
they went out, saw the tracks of a Leopard
on the ground, and found that one of the best
of the dogs was not with the rest. No more
could be done that night, so they all went
back to their beds; but next day, while M.
Andersson was on his way, he heard the same
sort of cries as those that broke his rest, in
the night. He got down from his seat on the
front of the great cart in which he rode, and
there, in the midst of a bush, lay the poor dog,
full of bites and wounds, but not dead. It
seems that he had in some way, got rid of the
Leopard, but it took a long time to cure his
wounds. The next day the men were in the
bed of a stream, when they saw a Leopard
try to make a spring at their goats as they
fed on the banks. When he saw them, he
tried to hide, and sprang up a tree. They
then shot at him, till he fell dead from the

see no sign of what had caused the noise. | tree.
TD bee eV OTB.



F all the wild beasts that roam in the woods,

or hunt on the plains, there are none more
fierce, swift, and sly than the Wolf; and though
Wolves are not of a great size—not so big as
some of our great dogs—they go to seek their
prey in large packs, so that the Bison, the great
stag, and the wild horse are killed by them.
Where the Lion and the Tiger leave some parts
of their meat, the Wolves skulk round the place
to pick the bones; and a pack of Wolves have
been known to kill an old and weak Lion, or to
hunt down a lame and half-dead Elephant. The
Wolf can run so far and so fast, and his scent
is so keen, that he is sure to come up with his
prey; and when his sharp howl is heard in the
clear air of the North, those who are on their
way to some place a long way off may well fear.
It is not one or two Wolves that need be feared

so much, but the pack, which keep on till they |



come up with the light cart or the sledge, and
yelp round and round till some of the first of
them spring up at it, or pull down the horse,
with their sharp, white fangs.

In all lands the Wolf isa foe that men hate.
He is such a mean cur— he skulks in holes, and
by the side of roads, till he sees some beast
much less strong than he is, but he will not
fight till he is made to do so to save his life.
It is strange that the Wolf should be so much
like some dogs that you could not tell which was
which if you saw only the bones, or the beast
stripped of its skin, and yet that the Wolf should
be a mean, base sneak, and the dog so bold and
full of trust in man. When a dog, though he
may be a wild dog, meets with a Wolf, he flies
at him at once as a foe that he hates, and must
fight with all his strength; and the Wolf seems
to feel that it is no use to shun the dog when
THE WOLF.

once his teeth are in his neck, and so the two
bite, and snarl, and roll, and tear, till one of them
is killed. If the Wolf gets the best of it, he eats
the dog; «but the dog will not touch the dead
Wolf. Bad as the Wolf is, it is not killed in
one part of the world. A Hindoo will not hurt
a Wolf, and it is said that these men will go to
the den of the she-Wolf, take out the cubs, and
play with them. This may be true, for the she-
Wolf is so proud of her cubs that she likes to
see them made pets of. While they are quite
young it may be safe to play with them, but not
when their teeth have grown, and they snap, and
snarl, and bite. Wolves are said to teach their
young how to bear pain, and to bite their tails,
strike them with their claws, and drag them on
the ground. till they learn to be still, and not
cry out when they are hurt. They are free from
wild beasts in England now, but in old times
their woods and waste lands were so full of
Wolves, that huts and: sheds, made of great
beams of wood, and with strong doors that
would shut and latch, were built at the road-
sides, that those who were on their way from



town to town might run to find a safe p.ace,
when they were chased by the fierce beasts, who
smelt them from far off, and came in packs, with
yelps and howls to tear them limb from limb.
When Edgar was a King, a man could buy off
a friend who had been put in jail, if he brought
a score or so of Wolves’ tongues; and a price
was put on the Wolf’s head, —a price so large
as to cause the rough, strong North-men to
hunt down these beasts, and at last to leave
but few in the land.

In the cold parts of the world — the lands
of ice and snow, where the sledge is used—a
Wolf hunt is great sport. A band of men set
out, armed with guns, and take with them a
young, fat pig. If there is one thing in the
world that the Wolf loves best, it is pork; and
so when the sledge, with the men in it, has gone
a mile or two, the man who holds the pig bites
its tail till it gives a shrill squeak. If there
are Wolves near the spot, they will come out
when they hear the sound, and try to catch the
sledge, to which they go so near that they can
be picked off with the guns.

‘TE Ga A HP’ E..



HAT a grand beast is the Giraffe, with its

long neck, fine skin, stag-like head, and

soft, bright eye. At one time no one here thought
there could be sucha thing; and when they heard

tales of a beast with the skin of a leopard, the —

head of a deer, the neck of a swan, and the speed
of a grey-hound, they laughed, and thought it
was no more than a tale made up to deceive
them. It is all true, as we know by this time,
for the Giraffe has been brought here for us to
look at, and we may see him stand and use his
long tongue to pull his food, just as the Elephant
will use his trunk; or may stare at his vast height
and think how grand a herd of Giraffes should
look as they bound, at full speed, in the wild
plains of Africa. Though he is so large that a
full-grown male is six yards from his fore-hoof
to the top of his head, the Giraffe is as full of



the foc. His large, soft eye can see for miles,
and on all sides of him, and as he is so tall that
he plucks the young leaves from the trees with
his curled tongue, he can keep a sharp lookout
wher: he is on the plain. His speed is so great
as to give him a good chance when he runs for
his life from the Lion or other beasts of prey.
Of course, it is-great sport to come near a
herd of these tall beasts, and all that there is to
do is to be quite still till it is time to fire at one
of them. One c? the tales of this sport tells how
four or five men who went out to hunt came to a
herd of more than thirty Giraffes, which plucked
the leaves on the high stems in a grove not far
off, The men crept’on as near as they could,
when what should they see but a cross old Rhi-

-noceros and her queer calf, who stood right in

their path. They saw the small eyes of these

fear as a hare, and will fly at the first sound of | great brutes shine, and knew that they were in
THE Gen A PRE.

an ill mood, so one of the men fired at the big | that they had not got to the other side when

one, while the chief of the band set spurs to his
horse, and gave chase to the Giraffes, who all
sprang off at their best speed when they heard
the sound of the gun and the noise of hoofs.
Their great bounds soon lefé man and horse in
the rear. ‘Twice they were hid from view by a
clump of trees, through which the man on his
horse went in search of them, and each time he
was just too late to see more than their great
iong backs as they sprang up a high ridge that
lay just in their way. When he looked round,
the man saw that while he was in chase of
the herd of Giraffes, three Rhinoceroses were
in chase of him, and toiled on in the hope that
they should come up with him. A white cloth
that he wore round his cap was torn off by the
branch of a tree as he passed by, and the threc
great beasts rushed at it, and trod it with their
huge feet. Ina short time the Giraffes reach-
ed.a small stream, the bed of which was of soft
sand, and in this their long, slim legs sank so



man and horse were once more close to them,
and, by the time they had reached the bank and
climbed its steep side, were in the midst of the
herd. Then the man rode at the great male
who led the herd, placed his gun close to the
bright, soft skin of the poor beast, and fired.
The Giraffe did not fall at once, but still went
on with slow steps, till more shots were fired at
him, and then the horse was brought in front
of him to stop him. The grand beast stood
tall, mute, and full of grace, and looked down
at his foe, with his fine neck bent, and tears
in his dark, soft eyes, as he was met by a full
charge from the gun. Then his long limbs
shook, his bright sleek fur stood on end, and,
as the. tenth ball pierced his broad chest, he
bowed his head, and fell like a tall tree to
the ground. His limbs were so strong, that
when he was dead they looked as though they
were made of brass, and his hide was more
than an inch thick. The tail was five feet in

deep that they could not keep up their pace, so | length.





THE as tS ON.



HE BISON was at one time found in Europe,

but there are now none left. It is in America
that the Bison is to be found. He is here known
by the name of Buffalo, and goes in vast herds
through the great plains, where the red men hunt
him, use his flesh for food, and make clothes of
his thick, warm skin. The Buffalo is, in fact, a
wild ox, of great size and strength, but he is not
quite like the tame beasts, for he is more fierce
and strong, has a large hump on his neck, and
a thick mane of hair hangs round his head. The
cows, as well as the bulls, have a mane; but
that of the bull is so thick that it hides his head,
though his fierce eyes can be seen as they glare
and shine through the bush of hair. In the great
plains where no one comes near him, and by the
side of streams where he can drink and roll in
the wet clay, the Buffalo loves to feed. The



herds of these beasts are so vast, that they seem
to reach for miles. While he is in the herd, the
Buffalo fears no other beast, and till he is lame,
or so fat that he can not fight nor run, he need
not fear, for he can kill most of his foes if they
come one at atime. The bear is too much for
him, and the wolves who hunt in packs can kill
him; but in the great herd, where these big
brutes join their strength and crush the foe with
hoofs and horns, they care for none but the men,
who hunt them with bow or guns, and come on
horseback to drive them to the place where they
are shot down and killed. They will run from
men; but should one of them get a wound or
a hurt, the fierce beast, mad with pain and rage,
will turn and rush with all his might at his foe,
who, if he has not a quick eye and a good horse,
may be hurled to the ground and crushed to
THE BISON.

death, or gored by those long, sharp horns, that | knows what to do, and the rein is no more than

can tear a horse from chest to throat, or pin
him to the earth.

There are large tribes of men who hunt the
Buffalo, and to whom that huge beast furnishes
food. All parts of him are used by them, and
they may be said to live on him. His flesh is
their meat, the skin serves them for coats, beds,
boots, rugs, tents, roofs to their huts, slings,
reins and seats. Of the bones are made clubs,
stools, flutes, and all sorts of things for war or
sport, while of the horns are formed spoons,
heads of spears, cups, flasks, and ping. The
feet and hoofs are boiled to make glue, with
which they join the shafts of spears and darts,
the mane is twined to make ropes and cords,
the end of the tail is used as a whisk to keep
off the flies, and the thread and string used to
sew the hide, and to make the robes and stitch
the clothes, is made of some part of the dead
beast. The Indians of North America, who
hunt the Buffalo, wear very little clothing, in
order to have the free use of their limbs. The
horse used is a small, fierce, swift steed, that



a rope of hair tied round his jaw. The man

picks out one Buffalo from the herd, and rides
at it as fast as he can urge his horse. The
huge beast sees that he is chased, leaves the
herd, and flies as hard as he can go; but the
horse comes up with him at last, and when
they are quite close, the man lets fall the rein,
and, quick as a flash, shoots it just at the
front of its ribs. When the horse hears the
shot, he turns round and goes off at great speed,
for when the big bull has a wound, he will turn
and charge man and beast with such fierce
strength that one must be killed if they are not
both very swift. Should the wild bull come up
with the horse, the red man vaults from his -
back, and with his long, two-edged knife, stabs
the huge beast to the heart, or drives the blade
through his thick neck.

Those who go out to hunt the Buffalo,
must take care not to get on that side of him.
to which the wind blows, for his scent is so
keen that he can smell a man a long way
off.





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