Citation
Clever Hans

Material Information

Title:
Clever Hans
Creator:
Grimm, Jacob, 1785-1863
Grimm, Wilhelm, 1786-1859
Lawson, John, fl. 1865-1909 ( Illustrator )
Thomas De La Rue & Company
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Thos. de la Rue & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
23 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Fairy tales -- 1880 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1880 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre:
Fairy tales ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Includes publisher's advertisement.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by the Brothers Grimm ; illustrated by J. Lawson.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
029562686 ( ALEPH )
28876972 ( OCLC )
AJT6803 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text
RS GRIMM

BYTHECe

~223

Lt
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©
ge

p
ba
se
a
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-
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=
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PRINTED BY
THOS. DE LA RUE AND CO,

LONDON.





.
Â¥ ais 3 \
4
‘ : Sa
ay
‘
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CGuever Hans

BY THE

BROTHERS GRIMM

ILLUSTRATED BY

J. LAW oGIN:

‘
. MEE MD
C. Mt Ze ae

MN
ae seu BYENCID\
~SW

re . ‘ e W. { " -
SHA aoe oh LUN i ai Qhantiint ee “ype ona ad sway eae
~S ahen nS eae ae ‘ . SU) yu SW oer rs je
ey

esti QI \

sess Se

Lary







CLEVE ReaHANSs.



Hans had served his master faithfully for seven years,
when he said to him, “ Master, my time is out, and I should
of all things like to see my mother again; give me my wages.”
To this his master replied, “ You have served me truly and
faithfully, therefore your wages shall be adequate to your
service. Take this,” giving Hans at the same time a lump of
gold as large. as his head. Hans; much pleased, took his
handkerchief out of his pocket, tied the gold up in it, then
placed it on his shoulder, and set out on his way home.

2







As he trudged on, whistling, and occasionally shifting - his
gold from one shoulder to the other, a. horseman advanced,
who, cheerful’ and sprightly, trotted on upon a nice fresh

horse.




wits Sue
2. Moog 7 FSS
ar, eB XS
Pleas eee Mm Sit

“Ah” said- Hans aloud; “what ‘4 pleasant thing it is to
ride. It is like sitting on your chair : you never hurt your feet
with the stones, you save your shoes, and arrive at your
journey’s end without knowing it.” |

The horseman hearing this, stopped, and cried, “ Well,
Hans, why are you on foot?” ; ; , )

“T am obliged,” replied he; “I am going home, and
have this great lump to carry. It is gold, it is true, but it is
very disagreeable for all that, for I cannot hold my head
straight, and it hurts my shoulder

4



“If you like,” said the horseman, “ we will exchange. I
will give you a horse, and you shall give me your lump of
gold.”

“With all my heart,” replied Hans; “but I ‘tell you,
beforehand, you must carry it yourself.” |

The horseman alighted, assisted Hans. to mount, gave him
the reins in his hand, and, after directing him how to urge his
horse with those magical words, “ hopp,’ hopp,’ if he. wished
to increase his speed, took up the lump of gold and pursued



his way.
a fies (Soe a




Fis»

gory Se ie
a ——S ce





Hans was delighted when he found himself so free and
independent on. the back of his steed. In a short time, desiring
to improve his pace, he made a noise with his tongue, and
cried, “Hopp, hopp,” which had the effect of producing a
quick trot; and, before Hans was able to look round, he was
thrown off, and lay in a ditch, which separated the high road
from the fields) .The horse would have continued its course
without its rider, had it not been stopped by a: farmer, who
was coming along the road driving a cow. Hans, in the mean
time, collected his thoughts, and got up; but he was cross
after bid tumble, and said to the farmer, “It is no joke riding
on horseback, when one has such a mare as this, which
plunges and throws you off, so that you might break your
neck. I shall never get on again. Your cow is the- nicest
creature; you can go comfortably behind her, and are, besides,
secure of milk, butter, and cheese every day. What would I

give if I had such a cow?”







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“Welly” said ge farmer, “JT will do you a very great
favour; I will give you this cow for your horse.”

The joy of Hans at hearing this proposal was delightful
to witness ; the farmer, however, flung himself on the horse,
and rode rapidly off.

Hans drove his cow quietly before him, thinking of the
good bargain he had made. “If I have only a morsel of
bread,” said he, “ane J ce hardly want for threat, | €am eat
my butter and cheese with it as often as I please, and when I
am thirsty, I need only milk my cow. What more can I

want?”



Arriving at an inn, he stopped to rest, ate up entirely,
with great satisfaction, all he had for dinner and supper, and
spent. his . last copper coin on half a glass of beer. Then,
driving on his cow, he advanced towards his mother’s village.

The heat was oppressive, as it was nearly noon, and
Hans was journeying over a heath of two or three miles i

extent; his thirst, therefore, was excessive, so that his tongue

clave: to the roof. of his mouth:

f

Se
= SoA





have a very pleasant resource,” thought Hans; “I will
milk my cow, and refresh myself with the milk.” With these
words he fastened her to a dead tree, and, having no pail, he
prepared to milk her into his leather cap. But his trouble was
in vain: st a drop would she give; and, to add to his sorrows,
Hans being very awkward, the cow lost patience, and gave him
such a kick on the head that he fell unconscious to the ground,
and remained so for some time. Fortunately, a butcher, with a

young pig in a wheelbarrow, came by at this time.



“@ WWihat is thie faster here?” cried he, as he helped Hans
to come to himself, who, when able, told him all that had
occurred. ‘Here,’ said the butcher, handing him his flask,

“take a little, and you will feel better; your cow will never
give any milk; she is old, and good for nothing but to draw

”
°

a cart, or kill

10





er



“Well, well,” said Hane, stroking his head, “who would
have aipughe it? but it is a good thing to have such a beast,
that one may kill Shes one likes, and have plenty of meat in
‘the house, only I do an particularly like cow beef; there is no
aes alt | I had only such a young pig as yours! That is
quite a different thing, ad should have sausages, too.”

| “Well, Hans,” said the butcher, “out of regard for you, I
will change with you—you shall have my pig, and I will oS
your old cow.”

“A thousand thanks,” said oo accepuing the — offer:
accordingly, delivering the cow, the pig was taken out of the
wheelbarrow, and the cord to which it was fastened delivered
into his hand.

Hans now went on, thinking ee everything had prospered
according to his wish, for, if a misadventure overtook him,
something instantly occurred to put him right again; and,
before long, a young man, with a Beanatnl aie goose under

his arm, joined him on the road. They greeted each other



civilly, and Hans then began to relate how fortunate he had
been, and told tim the profitable exchange he Oe male
The young man, on his part, told him he was carrying the
goose to a christening feast. i | .
: ’ Feel it,” saidane: elene it by the wings, “how heavy it
-is; it has been fatted for eight weeks, and whoever eats of it
when roasted will have occasion to congratulate himself.”
“Yes,” said Hans, feeling the ween. Cit: is heavy, but
my pig is a beauty.” | |
: Upon this, the other looked round with a dubious
expression, and shook his head. , )
“Listen,” said he, “I fear your pig is not quite right. As
I passed through the village on my way here a pig had been
stolen out of the constable’s sty, and I much fear it is the one
you now have, People are looking for it in all directions, and
it will be a bad affair for you if they catch you with the pig;
the least you can expect is to be put in the blackhole.”

Poor Hans was in a terrible fright.

a







“Oh, dear,” ad he, “pray help me out of this scrape.
You will be able to do better than I. Pray take my pig, and
give me your goose.” |

“T shall risk something sO doing,” was the reply ;
“however, I will not be the cause of your falling into any
misfortune.” So, taking the cord in his hand, he drove the pig
away by a little by-path; while good Hans, freed from his
apprehensions, put the goose under his arm, and continued his

way home.



“When I come to consider,” said dé latter to himself, “I
am a great gainer by the exchange: first, a capital roast goose,
and then the immense quantity of fat which it will provide us
with—goose fat for our bread for three months! The beautiful
white feathers, too, will make me a pillow, so soft, that I
shall sleep on it without rocking. How pleased will my

mother be!”





Having arrived at the last village on his road, he found
there a scissors-grinder with his apparatus, who was turning his
grindstone and singing merrily.. Hans stood for some time
looking at him; he then remarked:

“You must be doing well, for you are very merry at your
grinding, and sing away.”

“Yes,” replied the grinder, “trade has a golden foundation,
and a good grinder is a man who, whenever he puts Ee hand
in his pocket, is sure to find money there. But where did

you biiy that beautiful goose ?”

16



“I did not buy it; I got it in exchange for my pig.”

“ And your pig?” -

“T took it in exchange for my cow.”

“ And ‘the cow 7 :

“T got it instead of a horse.”

“And the horse?” 7

“TI got it from a man for a lump of gold.”

“And the lump of gold?”

“Oh, that was my wages for seven years’ service.”

“You seem to know how to help yourself on all occasions,”
said the grinder; “but if gold should ever cease to grow in
your pocket, now is the time to make your fortune, if you are
a wise man.” .

“ How is that to be done?” inquired haa

“You must become a grinder, like me, for which nothing
is especially requisite except a grindstone; other things will
come of themselves. Now, here is one—a little worn, it is
true; but for that reason I shall ask you nothing more for it

except your goose. Will you have it?”

ce









































































































































“How can you doubt it?” replied Hans; “for I shall be
the happiest man upon the earth. 1 always find money
when I put my hand in my pocket, what need I care?”

With these words he handed over the goose to the grinder,
and took the grindstone in exchange; and the latter, picking
up an ordinary heavy stone lying near bin, gave it, in addition,
to Eas, saying, “ Here is also another valuable stone that I
will give you; you can knock upon it, or hea your old

nails straight. Take it, and be careful of it.”





Hans took it as offered, and went with a light heart
through the village. His eyes sparkled with joy, and he was
the picture of content. “I must certainly have been born
fortunate,’ said he; “everything I wish for comes half-way to
meet me, like a Sunday child.” These considerations, however,
did not prevent. his feeling very tired. He had been on his
legs ever since daybreak, and as he devoured all his store in
the joy of his io dpowe ne his horse for the cow,
hunger. began to torment him keenly. His ‘step gradually

slackened, and he was obliged to stop every moment to rest.




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20






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The weight of the stones, too, appeared to increase; and he
could -not altogether repress the idea that he should be rather
glad not oo have to carry them just now. At a snail’s pace,
he reached a well in a field, and resolved to rest awhile, and
rehash himself with a draught of “water ; but, being careful not
to injure his treasures of stones, he placed them gently on the
edge of the well; then, seating himself close by them, he
stooped to drink, and, in the act, he gave the stones a slight
push, and they both fell in. |

21







Hans saw them both reach the bottom; then, feeling quite
relieved, he fell on his knees and returned thanks, with tears
in his eyes, that this mercy likewise had Bch chee him, and
that he had been able to get rid of the heavy stones without
having occasion to reproach himself. “Such a fortunate man
as I am could hardly be found!” said he; and, with joyful
heart, he sprang on his way, and, free trom every burthen,

ina short time he was clasped to his mother’s heart.



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Full Text
RS GRIMM

BYTHECe

~223

Lt
i
©
ge

p
ba
se
a
fe
-
o
=
=
nd








PRINTED BY
THOS. DE LA RUE AND CO,

LONDON.





.
Â¥ ais 3 \
4
‘ : Sa
ay
‘
: u
2 i
i




CGuever Hans

BY THE

BROTHERS GRIMM

ILLUSTRATED BY

J. LAW oGIN:

‘
. MEE MD
C. Mt Ze ae

MN
ae seu BYENCID\
~SW

re . ‘ e W. { " -
SHA aoe oh LUN i ai Qhantiint ee “ype ona ad sway eae
~S ahen nS eae ae ‘ . SU) yu SW oer rs je
ey

esti QI \

sess Se

Lary




CLEVE ReaHANSs.



Hans had served his master faithfully for seven years,
when he said to him, “ Master, my time is out, and I should
of all things like to see my mother again; give me my wages.”
To this his master replied, “ You have served me truly and
faithfully, therefore your wages shall be adequate to your
service. Take this,” giving Hans at the same time a lump of
gold as large. as his head. Hans; much pleased, took his
handkerchief out of his pocket, tied the gold up in it, then
placed it on his shoulder, and set out on his way home.

2

As he trudged on, whistling, and occasionally shifting - his
gold from one shoulder to the other, a. horseman advanced,
who, cheerful’ and sprightly, trotted on upon a nice fresh

horse.




wits Sue
2. Moog 7 FSS
ar, eB XS
Pleas eee Mm Sit

“Ah” said- Hans aloud; “what ‘4 pleasant thing it is to
ride. It is like sitting on your chair : you never hurt your feet
with the stones, you save your shoes, and arrive at your
journey’s end without knowing it.” |

The horseman hearing this, stopped, and cried, “ Well,
Hans, why are you on foot?” ; ; , )

“T am obliged,” replied he; “I am going home, and
have this great lump to carry. It is gold, it is true, but it is
very disagreeable for all that, for I cannot hold my head
straight, and it hurts my shoulder

4
“If you like,” said the horseman, “ we will exchange. I
will give you a horse, and you shall give me your lump of
gold.”

“With all my heart,” replied Hans; “but I ‘tell you,
beforehand, you must carry it yourself.” |

The horseman alighted, assisted Hans. to mount, gave him
the reins in his hand, and, after directing him how to urge his
horse with those magical words, “ hopp,’ hopp,’ if he. wished
to increase his speed, took up the lump of gold and pursued



his way.
a fies (Soe a




Fis»

gory Se ie
a ——S ce


Hans was delighted when he found himself so free and
independent on. the back of his steed. In a short time, desiring
to improve his pace, he made a noise with his tongue, and
cried, “Hopp, hopp,” which had the effect of producing a
quick trot; and, before Hans was able to look round, he was
thrown off, and lay in a ditch, which separated the high road
from the fields) .The horse would have continued its course
without its rider, had it not been stopped by a: farmer, who
was coming along the road driving a cow. Hans, in the mean
time, collected his thoughts, and got up; but he was cross
after bid tumble, and said to the farmer, “It is no joke riding
on horseback, when one has such a mare as this, which
plunges and throws you off, so that you might break your
neck. I shall never get on again. Your cow is the- nicest
creature; you can go comfortably behind her, and are, besides,
secure of milk, butter, and cheese every day. What would I

give if I had such a cow?”

NaS = “Dy -
CN
ee

PSS a NER sta
Farry Wye rsa ss an Sse —_~—~ .
ree SNES \ A FP, —
Zs Wa WSS q
z om Wah : :
g> RE ES \ £9
ee ee \ { XOX“ & aS UAL AY ip. fy.
SS ) = S ; take
f 5
——

wt

Ie aN



ss iy
ase =

“Welly” said ge farmer, “JT will do you a very great
favour; I will give you this cow for your horse.”

The joy of Hans at hearing this proposal was delightful
to witness ; the farmer, however, flung himself on the horse,
and rode rapidly off.

Hans drove his cow quietly before him, thinking of the
good bargain he had made. “If I have only a morsel of
bread,” said he, “ane J ce hardly want for threat, | €am eat
my butter and cheese with it as often as I please, and when I
am thirsty, I need only milk my cow. What more can I

want?”
Arriving at an inn, he stopped to rest, ate up entirely,
with great satisfaction, all he had for dinner and supper, and
spent. his . last copper coin on half a glass of beer. Then,
driving on his cow, he advanced towards his mother’s village.

The heat was oppressive, as it was nearly noon, and
Hans was journeying over a heath of two or three miles i

extent; his thirst, therefore, was excessive, so that his tongue

clave: to the roof. of his mouth:

f

Se
= SoA


have a very pleasant resource,” thought Hans; “I will
milk my cow, and refresh myself with the milk.” With these
words he fastened her to a dead tree, and, having no pail, he
prepared to milk her into his leather cap. But his trouble was
in vain: st a drop would she give; and, to add to his sorrows,
Hans being very awkward, the cow lost patience, and gave him
such a kick on the head that he fell unconscious to the ground,
and remained so for some time. Fortunately, a butcher, with a

young pig in a wheelbarrow, came by at this time.



“@ WWihat is thie faster here?” cried he, as he helped Hans
to come to himself, who, when able, told him all that had
occurred. ‘Here,’ said the butcher, handing him his flask,

“take a little, and you will feel better; your cow will never
give any milk; she is old, and good for nothing but to draw

”
°

a cart, or kill

10


er
“Well, well,” said Hane, stroking his head, “who would
have aipughe it? but it is a good thing to have such a beast,
that one may kill Shes one likes, and have plenty of meat in
‘the house, only I do an particularly like cow beef; there is no
aes alt | I had only such a young pig as yours! That is
quite a different thing, ad should have sausages, too.”

| “Well, Hans,” said the butcher, “out of regard for you, I
will change with you—you shall have my pig, and I will oS
your old cow.”

“A thousand thanks,” said oo accepuing the — offer:
accordingly, delivering the cow, the pig was taken out of the
wheelbarrow, and the cord to which it was fastened delivered
into his hand.

Hans now went on, thinking ee everything had prospered
according to his wish, for, if a misadventure overtook him,
something instantly occurred to put him right again; and,
before long, a young man, with a Beanatnl aie goose under

his arm, joined him on the road. They greeted each other
civilly, and Hans then began to relate how fortunate he had
been, and told tim the profitable exchange he Oe male
The young man, on his part, told him he was carrying the
goose to a christening feast. i | .
: ’ Feel it,” saidane: elene it by the wings, “how heavy it
-is; it has been fatted for eight weeks, and whoever eats of it
when roasted will have occasion to congratulate himself.”
“Yes,” said Hans, feeling the ween. Cit: is heavy, but
my pig is a beauty.” | |
: Upon this, the other looked round with a dubious
expression, and shook his head. , )
“Listen,” said he, “I fear your pig is not quite right. As
I passed through the village on my way here a pig had been
stolen out of the constable’s sty, and I much fear it is the one
you now have, People are looking for it in all directions, and
it will be a bad affair for you if they catch you with the pig;
the least you can expect is to be put in the blackhole.”

Poor Hans was in a terrible fright.

a

“Oh, dear,” ad he, “pray help me out of this scrape.
You will be able to do better than I. Pray take my pig, and
give me your goose.” |

“T shall risk something sO doing,” was the reply ;
“however, I will not be the cause of your falling into any
misfortune.” So, taking the cord in his hand, he drove the pig
away by a little by-path; while good Hans, freed from his
apprehensions, put the goose under his arm, and continued his

way home.



“When I come to consider,” said dé latter to himself, “I
am a great gainer by the exchange: first, a capital roast goose,
and then the immense quantity of fat which it will provide us
with—goose fat for our bread for three months! The beautiful
white feathers, too, will make me a pillow, so soft, that I
shall sleep on it without rocking. How pleased will my

mother be!”


Having arrived at the last village on his road, he found
there a scissors-grinder with his apparatus, who was turning his
grindstone and singing merrily.. Hans stood for some time
looking at him; he then remarked:

“You must be doing well, for you are very merry at your
grinding, and sing away.”

“Yes,” replied the grinder, “trade has a golden foundation,
and a good grinder is a man who, whenever he puts Ee hand
in his pocket, is sure to find money there. But where did

you biiy that beautiful goose ?”

16
“I did not buy it; I got it in exchange for my pig.”

“ And your pig?” -

“T took it in exchange for my cow.”

“ And ‘the cow 7 :

“T got it instead of a horse.”

“And the horse?” 7

“TI got it from a man for a lump of gold.”

“And the lump of gold?”

“Oh, that was my wages for seven years’ service.”

“You seem to know how to help yourself on all occasions,”
said the grinder; “but if gold should ever cease to grow in
your pocket, now is the time to make your fortune, if you are
a wise man.” .

“ How is that to be done?” inquired haa

“You must become a grinder, like me, for which nothing
is especially requisite except a grindstone; other things will
come of themselves. Now, here is one—a little worn, it is
true; but for that reason I shall ask you nothing more for it

except your goose. Will you have it?”

ce



































































































































“How can you doubt it?” replied Hans; “for I shall be
the happiest man upon the earth. 1 always find money
when I put my hand in my pocket, what need I care?”

With these words he handed over the goose to the grinder,
and took the grindstone in exchange; and the latter, picking
up an ordinary heavy stone lying near bin, gave it, in addition,
to Eas, saying, “ Here is also another valuable stone that I
will give you; you can knock upon it, or hea your old

nails straight. Take it, and be careful of it.”


Hans took it as offered, and went with a light heart
through the village. His eyes sparkled with joy, and he was
the picture of content. “I must certainly have been born
fortunate,’ said he; “everything I wish for comes half-way to
meet me, like a Sunday child.” These considerations, however,
did not prevent. his feeling very tired. He had been on his
legs ever since daybreak, and as he devoured all his store in
the joy of his io dpowe ne his horse for the cow,
hunger. began to torment him keenly. His ‘step gradually

slackened, and he was obliged to stop every moment to rest.




wes
mm

uss ep “owe mi ee tha = ee)
+s

20



Jjs ails : :
Ve sn &



The weight of the stones, too, appeared to increase; and he
could -not altogether repress the idea that he should be rather
glad not oo have to carry them just now. At a snail’s pace,
he reached a well in a field, and resolved to rest awhile, and
rehash himself with a draught of “water ; but, being careful not
to injure his treasures of stones, he placed them gently on the
edge of the well; then, seating himself close by them, he
stooped to drink, and, in the act, he gave the stones a slight
push, and they both fell in. |

21

Hans saw them both reach the bottom; then, feeling quite
relieved, he fell on his knees and returned thanks, with tears
in his eyes, that this mercy likewise had Bch chee him, and
that he had been able to get rid of the heavy stones without
having occasion to reproach himself. “Such a fortunate man
as I am could hardly be found!” said he; and, with joyful
heart, he sprang on his way, and, free trom every burthen,

ina short time he was clasped to his mother’s heart.



23
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