Citation
Dreams, dances, and disappointments

Material Information

Title:
Dreams, dances, and disappointments
Creator:
Konstam, Gertrude A
Casella, E ( Ella ) ( Illustrator )
Casella, N ( Nelia ) ( Illustrator )
Thomas De La Rue & Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Thos. de la Rue & Co
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
31 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's poetry -- 1880 ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1880 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre:
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
poetry ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Title from cover.
General Note:
Includes publisher's advertisement.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by Gertrude A. Konstam, and Ella and Nelia Casella.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
029562696 ( ALEPH )
28876975 ( OCLC )
AJT6804 ( NOTIS )

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Related Item:
PALMM Version

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Full Text



Ay Ps C:A-Kon-
held Bey STAM:

| £: GAS:
-ELLA‘|

AND

| N- Cas:
-ELLA:

ee DE LA RUE & CO. LONDON.



























a
5
a
a}
2
&

University
of
Florida

mB







DREAMS, DANCES, AND DISAPPOINTMENTS.

BY
GERTRUDE A. KONSTAM,

AND

ELLA AND NELIA CASELLA.

iit

I
DREAMS.

OUR rose-trees grew in a garden,
Two white, a pink, and a red;
Each rose unfolded her petals,
And nodded a stately head.

For the Rose of roses was coming
Adown the trim garden walk ;
The bees saluted her—humming—
This Rose on: a slender stalk,

In one of her hands she carried
A watering-can of green,

From which the bright drops scattered,
And fell to the ground unseen.

3













For the other hand clasped a treasure
So prized, so new, and so sweet,
That it made her forget her flowers,
Thirsty and parch’d in the heat.

Under the shade of her bonnet,
Safe from the rays of the sun,
She dreamed of her first great party,
And how she’d enjoy the fun!

Again and again she opened

The small pink note from the Hall,
Which invited the joyous maiden

To her very first big ball !















“IT must go in white,” she murmured :
“JT must have a brand-new gown,
Of that muslin soft from India,

I’ve seen in shops in the town:

And creamy ribbons to match it,
Though I’ve no money to spare ;

And Ill wear Aunt Debbie’s corals,
And a nosegay of you in my hair.”

wit





















































































d

|

ey |

4









She stooped, and remember’d the roses,
Thirsty and parch’d in the heat ;
But her garden-can had emptied,
And soaked her dainty feet.

So back she went, tripping and dancing,
Adown the trim path once more ;

Blushing, and smiling, and dreaming,
She stood by the garden door :

“How, when I cross the ball-room

Past the ladies from the town,
The city beaux will whisper,

And all the belles will frown !

“A crowd and a crush around me,
All asking for a dance ;
Harry has asked me already,
But he won't have a chance !”





























































10



Ne
DANCES.
MUSLINS, and ribands, and flowers,

3 Whirl minutes and hours away ;
And the dress was just completed
On the morn of the very day.

Then there was frilling and curling,
And lacing and fitting, full long ;

It took more time 4 eam tell you, .
Than it takes to tell in’ song.

The chairs now wait in the garden,
To take them om fo ele dance ;
_ But dimpled cheeks and shoulders

Deserve one long last glance.

A nosegay of nodding roses,
Fresh cull’d in the morning alr,
With the freshness of dawn upon them,
Smiled ’mid the waves of her hair.







Rosebud had heard it was fashion
Not to be first at the fun ;

So before the chairs had brought them,
The dancing had long begun.

They made their bows to the hostess,
Then found a seat by the wall;
For the lady was much too busy
To. think of our maid at all.

In her muslin soft and roses,
She sat by Aunt Debbie's side,
Watching the maze of the dancers—
The coupée, the step, and the glide. |

And the ladies all were painted,

And they all had gems in their harr,
And each was known to the other,

Of the gallants and ladies there.





14



At last a partner stepped forward,

And begged for a dance, bowing low ;
For beauty, however rustic,

Has claims on a city beau.

Away they whirl with the dancers,
Smooth floor and merry tune;
Alas! like all earth’s pleasures,
It came to an end too soon!

Rosy and smiling and breathless,
Back to Aunt Debbie once more;

But she had gone to the card-room,
To make up a rubber of four.

Said he, “We will not find her,
For then, we can dance all night!

"Tis better for youths and maidens
When guardians are out of sight.”



y

it

My

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j
i

lj
1}

|







16







ay



Through the mazes of old Sir Roger,
And the minuet’s stately glide,
The maid in her dainty muslin

Danced with the beau by her side.

But while she was smiling proudly,
She saw a sight of gloom—

Poor Harry, her old love, frowning,
As he turned and left the room.

Then a gorgeous lady in satin
Tapped her beau with taper fan:
“D’ you know that you’ve not been near me
All the night, you faithless man?”

He turned to the maid in muslin,
Whispering low in her ear:
“Tm grieved I must dance with this lady ;
But do you wait for me here !”























He found her a quiet corner,
And left her with = Nor ton lone
Poor Rosebud felt hot and angry, .

And cross, which she knew was wrong.

She sat for long unheeded,
There was no one there she knew;
Her aunt was in the card-room—

“Why, even Harry would do!”

Harry had left her—offended—
She had seen it at a glance’;
“He knows I could not help it,
He never came for a dance!”

The dancers began to slacken,
Rumours of supper there were ;
The rooms would quickly be empty—

Yet nobody came for her !





aN



“IT shall have to wait for Aunt Debbie !”
Stopping the tears that would rise ;
Tired, excited, and anicm.
She leant back and closed her eyes.

A rustle of lace and satin,
A gentle touch on the arm—
She screamed, and started forward,
Then blushed at her own alarm:

“T thought you were never coming !”
She sighed, as he led her down:
“T love wild flowers,” he answered,
“And they don’t grow in the town.”

He brought her cakes and dainties,
And served her like a queen,

With such scented wines, and sparkling,
As she neer before had seen.

22





23



Gaily he chatted and gossiped,
Telling her who was who;

And when the toasts were being sung,
He bowed and sung them too.

When the guests all rose from supper,
Aunt Debbie fetched her away,

In spite of prayers and entreaties
Just for one more dance to stay!

He wrapp’d her shawls close round her,
And handed her out to her chair,
Whispering very softly, ,
He begged a rose from her hair :

“I know the rose-grown cottage
On the old coach-road to town—

At early morning I'll be there,
By the gate, before youre down!”













wy



Beige
DISAPPOIN PMENTS:

OUR rose-trees grew in a garden,
Two white, a pink, and a red;
Each rose shut up her petals,
And drooped a mournful head.

For the Rose of roses was waiting |
Down by the garden gate ;

And her eyes were full of trouble—
Time went—it was getting late !

Hark ! what was it broke the silence ?
The rolling of distant wheels :

Four horses come round the corner,
A cloud of dust at their heels !

Quick as the coach swings by her,
Rosebud, first red—then white—
Sees her hero sweetly smiling
On her rival of last night !

26





















Then her eyes grew dim with tear-drops :
“He promised to come!” said she—
“*At early morning I'll be there !’—
Yet he never looked at me!”

“Good-morrow, my lovely Rosebud,
Though you look so tired to-day—
More like the last flower of Autumn,
Than the youngest rose of May!”



28



SSN

GOO
eK

FINS



Nyy

rN

wilt
uv

Sas A





And Harry kisses the tear-drops
That lie on her cheek like dew:
“Oh, flattering lips are plenty,
But, true-love ! -hearts are few!

“Give me your hand, my Rosebud—

Though beaux are good at a ball,
Youll surely own next morning

Your old love is worth them all!”















: _ “BLISHED BY THOS. DE LA RUE & C0. BUNHILL ROW, LONDON.



| eo, ILLUSTRATED CHILDREN’S BOOK.
tes - ve Royal gto. Cloth, extra gilt, Price 6s.
| axl an IN ATTRACTIVE COVER, RICHLY ORNAMENTED WITH SPECIAL DESIGN IN GOLD AND BLACK.



THE STORY OF

PRINCE HILDEBRAND AND THE PRINCESS IDA.

By MAJOR T. S. SECCOMBE.
WITH UPWARDS OF 110 ILLUSTRATIONS BY THE AUTHOR.



AN INGENIOUS AND INTERESTING PASTIME FOR OLD AND YOUNG.

a | CASSE-LEPE.

THREE PUZZLES IN ONE—CHINESE, RUSSIAN, AND FRENCH.
By “CAVENDISH,”

Author of the “Laws aND PRINCIPLES OF WHIST,” etc.
WITH A HUNDRED AND FIFTY DIAGRAMS AND SOLUTIONS.

The above work is sent out in an Ornamental Cardboard Box, containing the pieces required for the
solution of the Diagrams.



ra Re Oto

PRICE, TWO SHILLINGS AND SIM 2 â„¢,





Full Text





Ay Ps C:A-Kon-
held Bey STAM:

| £: GAS:
-ELLA‘|

AND

| N- Cas:
-ELLA:

ee DE LA RUE & CO. LONDON.
























a
5
a
a}
2
&

University
of
Florida

mB




DREAMS, DANCES, AND DISAPPOINTMENTS.

BY
GERTRUDE A. KONSTAM,

AND

ELLA AND NELIA CASELLA.

iit

I
DREAMS.

OUR rose-trees grew in a garden,
Two white, a pink, and a red;
Each rose unfolded her petals,
And nodded a stately head.

For the Rose of roses was coming
Adown the trim garden walk ;
The bees saluted her—humming—
This Rose on: a slender stalk,

In one of her hands she carried
A watering-can of green,

From which the bright drops scattered,
And fell to the ground unseen.

3







For the other hand clasped a treasure
So prized, so new, and so sweet,
That it made her forget her flowers,
Thirsty and parch’d in the heat.

Under the shade of her bonnet,
Safe from the rays of the sun,
She dreamed of her first great party,
And how she’d enjoy the fun!

Again and again she opened

The small pink note from the Hall,
Which invited the joyous maiden

To her very first big ball !









“IT must go in white,” she murmured :
“JT must have a brand-new gown,
Of that muslin soft from India,

I’ve seen in shops in the town:

And creamy ribbons to match it,
Though I’ve no money to spare ;

And Ill wear Aunt Debbie’s corals,
And a nosegay of you in my hair.”

wit


















































































d

|

ey |

4






She stooped, and remember’d the roses,
Thirsty and parch’d in the heat ;
But her garden-can had emptied,
And soaked her dainty feet.

So back she went, tripping and dancing,
Adown the trim path once more ;

Blushing, and smiling, and dreaming,
She stood by the garden door :

“How, when I cross the ball-room

Past the ladies from the town,
The city beaux will whisper,

And all the belles will frown !

“A crowd and a crush around me,
All asking for a dance ;
Harry has asked me already,
But he won't have a chance !”


























































10
Ne
DANCES.
MUSLINS, and ribands, and flowers,

3 Whirl minutes and hours away ;
And the dress was just completed
On the morn of the very day.

Then there was frilling and curling,
And lacing and fitting, full long ;

It took more time 4 eam tell you, .
Than it takes to tell in’ song.

The chairs now wait in the garden,
To take them om fo ele dance ;
_ But dimpled cheeks and shoulders

Deserve one long last glance.

A nosegay of nodding roses,
Fresh cull’d in the morning alr,
With the freshness of dawn upon them,
Smiled ’mid the waves of her hair.

Rosebud had heard it was fashion
Not to be first at the fun ;

So before the chairs had brought them,
The dancing had long begun.

They made their bows to the hostess,
Then found a seat by the wall;
For the lady was much too busy
To. think of our maid at all.

In her muslin soft and roses,
She sat by Aunt Debbie's side,
Watching the maze of the dancers—
The coupée, the step, and the glide. |

And the ladies all were painted,

And they all had gems in their harr,
And each was known to the other,

Of the gallants and ladies there.


14
At last a partner stepped forward,

And begged for a dance, bowing low ;
For beauty, however rustic,

Has claims on a city beau.

Away they whirl with the dancers,
Smooth floor and merry tune;
Alas! like all earth’s pleasures,
It came to an end too soon!

Rosy and smiling and breathless,
Back to Aunt Debbie once more;

But she had gone to the card-room,
To make up a rubber of four.

Said he, “We will not find her,
For then, we can dance all night!

"Tis better for youths and maidens
When guardians are out of sight.”
y

it

My

ti\\

j
i

lj
1}

|







16




ay
Through the mazes of old Sir Roger,
And the minuet’s stately glide,
The maid in her dainty muslin

Danced with the beau by her side.

But while she was smiling proudly,
She saw a sight of gloom—

Poor Harry, her old love, frowning,
As he turned and left the room.

Then a gorgeous lady in satin
Tapped her beau with taper fan:
“D’ you know that you’ve not been near me
All the night, you faithless man?”

He turned to the maid in muslin,
Whispering low in her ear:
“Tm grieved I must dance with this lady ;
But do you wait for me here !”

















He found her a quiet corner,
And left her with = Nor ton lone
Poor Rosebud felt hot and angry, .

And cross, which she knew was wrong.

She sat for long unheeded,
There was no one there she knew;
Her aunt was in the card-room—

“Why, even Harry would do!”

Harry had left her—offended—
She had seen it at a glance’;
“He knows I could not help it,
He never came for a dance!”

The dancers began to slacken,
Rumours of supper there were ;
The rooms would quickly be empty—

Yet nobody came for her !


aN
“IT shall have to wait for Aunt Debbie !”
Stopping the tears that would rise ;
Tired, excited, and anicm.
She leant back and closed her eyes.

A rustle of lace and satin,
A gentle touch on the arm—
She screamed, and started forward,
Then blushed at her own alarm:

“T thought you were never coming !”
She sighed, as he led her down:
“T love wild flowers,” he answered,
“And they don’t grow in the town.”

He brought her cakes and dainties,
And served her like a queen,

With such scented wines, and sparkling,
As she neer before had seen.

22


23
Gaily he chatted and gossiped,
Telling her who was who;

And when the toasts were being sung,
He bowed and sung them too.

When the guests all rose from supper,
Aunt Debbie fetched her away,

In spite of prayers and entreaties
Just for one more dance to stay!

He wrapp’d her shawls close round her,
And handed her out to her chair,
Whispering very softly, ,
He begged a rose from her hair :

“I know the rose-grown cottage
On the old coach-road to town—

At early morning I'll be there,
By the gate, before youre down!”










wy
Beige
DISAPPOIN PMENTS:

OUR rose-trees grew in a garden,
Two white, a pink, and a red;
Each rose shut up her petals,
And drooped a mournful head.

For the Rose of roses was waiting |
Down by the garden gate ;

And her eyes were full of trouble—
Time went—it was getting late !

Hark ! what was it broke the silence ?
The rolling of distant wheels :

Four horses come round the corner,
A cloud of dust at their heels !

Quick as the coach swings by her,
Rosebud, first red—then white—
Sees her hero sweetly smiling
On her rival of last night !

26















Then her eyes grew dim with tear-drops :
“He promised to come!” said she—
“*At early morning I'll be there !’—
Yet he never looked at me!”

“Good-morrow, my lovely Rosebud,
Though you look so tired to-day—
More like the last flower of Autumn,
Than the youngest rose of May!”



28
SSN

GOO
eK

FINS



Nyy

rN

wilt
uv

Sas A


And Harry kisses the tear-drops
That lie on her cheek like dew:
“Oh, flattering lips are plenty,
But, true-love ! -hearts are few!

“Give me your hand, my Rosebud—

Though beaux are good at a ball,
Youll surely own next morning

Your old love is worth them all!”









: _ “BLISHED BY THOS. DE LA RUE & C0. BUNHILL ROW, LONDON.



| eo, ILLUSTRATED CHILDREN’S BOOK.
tes - ve Royal gto. Cloth, extra gilt, Price 6s.
| axl an IN ATTRACTIVE COVER, RICHLY ORNAMENTED WITH SPECIAL DESIGN IN GOLD AND BLACK.



THE STORY OF

PRINCE HILDEBRAND AND THE PRINCESS IDA.

By MAJOR T. S. SECCOMBE.
WITH UPWARDS OF 110 ILLUSTRATIONS BY THE AUTHOR.



AN INGENIOUS AND INTERESTING PASTIME FOR OLD AND YOUNG.

a | CASSE-LEPE.

THREE PUZZLES IN ONE—CHINESE, RUSSIAN, AND FRENCH.
By “CAVENDISH,”

Author of the “Laws aND PRINCIPLES OF WHIST,” etc.
WITH A HUNDRED AND FIFTY DIAGRAMS AND SOLUTIONS.

The above work is sent out in an Ornamental Cardboard Box, containing the pieces required for the
solution of the Diagrams.



ra Re Oto

PRICE, TWO SHILLINGS AND SIM 2 â„¢,