Citation
Old friends and new faces

Material Information

Title:
Old friends and new faces comprising, Robinson Crusoe, Queer characters, Aesop's fables, Cock sparrow
Uniform Title:
Aesop's fables
Added title page title:
Queer characters
Added title page title:
Cock sparrow
Creator:
Kronheim, Joseph Martin, 1810-1896 ( Printer of plates )
Defoe, Daniel, 1661?-1731
Cassell, Petter, and Galpin ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London ;
New York
Publisher:
Cassell, Petter, and Galpin
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (various pagings), [24] leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Animals -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1870 ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1870 ( lcsh )
Fables -- 1870 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre:
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Fables ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Osborne Coll,
Citation/Reference:
NUC pre-1956,
General Note:
Contains verse and prose.
General Note:
First published in 1868, see Osborne, cited below.
General Note:
Plates have guardsheets.
General Note:
Printed on one side of leaf only.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
with twenty-four pages of illustrations printed in colours by Kronheim.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026453095 ( ALEPH )
ALG4651 ( NOTIS )
13348336 ( OCLC )

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OLD FRIENDS AND NEW FACES:

COMPRISING

ROBINSON CRUSOE. | SOP’S FABLES.

| |
QUEER CHARACTERS. | COCK SPARROW.

WITH

EM ENTY-FOUR, PAGES OF ILLUSTRATIONS,

PRINTED IN COLOURS BY KRONHEIM.

CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN,
BELLE SAUVAGE YARD, LONDON, Ec;
AnD 596, BROADWAY, NEW. YORK.

wt 1870.



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PRE EA e ER.

“Ou, such an-accident,” cried Kate,
“Tas happened to my doll;

Its darling nose is melted off,
Its eyes won’t work at all.

“Oh, dear! oh, dear! what shall I do?
Its face is almost gone!”

Said Maggie, looking very grave,
“Why, put another on.” .

The thing was done, and Katie’s doll
Looked quite as good as new.

I think we might do just the same
In picture books—don’t you?

We do not always want new friends;
We love the old ones best:

So here are four with faces new—
Look at them, while I rest.



























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.DVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.

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ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.

_—_—_——>> =D 0:

Comg, gather round me, little ones,
And hearken unto me,

And you shall hear a tale about
A lad that went to sea—

About a lad that ran away,
Oh, many years ago, ‘
And left his home and parents dear—

Young Robinson Crusoe !

Now when this lad grew up a man,
It came about one day,
That he was cast upon a rock—

An island far away.

And there to shield him from the storm,
And keep him safe and sound,
He built a house, and thatch’d it o’er,

_ And fenced it round and round.

Far off upon a sandy bank
His ship lay all a wreck ;

* And oft-times when the sea was low

He got upon the deck,







For many things he there had found
That he could bring ashore,
Upon the raft that he had made,

And carry to his store.

Two kittens and a faithful dog,

With powder, guns, and shot,
Three cheeses and a chest of tools

’*Mong other things he got.

And now he bravely went to work,
Made tables, chairs, and stools,
And shelves around his little home,

On’ which to lay his tools.

He set a cross upon the beach,
Lest time should go astray,

And with his knife he cut a notch,
To mark each passing day. ;

He caught and tamed a little kid,
That trotted at his heels ;
And with his dog and cats at home,

Tt shared his daily meals.



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Adventures of Robinson, Crusoe.

Yet sometimes he grew very sad,
And then he sat him down
Upon the shore, and thought his God

Looked on him with a frown.

And he would gaze upon the sea,
Across the billows wild ;
And wring his hands and cry aloud,

And weep like any child.

He thought upon his father’s words—
His mother’s prayers and tears ;
How they would grieve for him, their son,

Away so many years!

Yhen he would fall upon his knees,
And clasp his hands in prayer,
And ask his God with many tears,

His wicked life to spare.

At times with gun upon his back,
He roamed the island round,
Where melons, grapes, and sugar-canes,

All growing wild he found.







A parrot, that some years before
He artfully had caught,

Would hop upon his thumb, and shriek
The lessons it was taught.

And so to keep it snug, he made
A cage to put it in:

He made a big umbrella too,
And all his clothes of skin.

I wot he was the strangest sight
That ever you might see ;
In jacket, breeches, cap, and shoes,

A hairy man looked he.

With big umbrella o’er his head,
His sword hung at his side,
His gun and axe upon his back,

He rambled far and wide.

| Now on the island herds of goats

Were running wild and free ;
But when he tried to catch the things,
Away they all would flee.

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Adventures of Robinson Crusoe.



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And 80, to get them in his power, At length he longed when days were fine,
He dug pits in the ground ; Upon the waves to float ;

And there one morn at break of day, So with his doula he went to work,
A goat and kids he found. And made a little boat.

The goat he let away again, He set a mast and sail before,
For it was fierce and strong ; A rudder, too, behind ;

The little kids he tied with strings, And with his dog and gun on board,
And took with him along. He sped before the wind.

And then from running wild again, One summer morning as he walked
His little flock to keep, Abroad, with gun in hand,

A piece of ground he fenced around, He stood aghast as he beheld
Wheré they might feed and sleep. A footprint in the sand!

His crops of barley and of rice, Though many years had passed away,
Now rich and ripe had grown ; Since to that lonely place

For seeds he found upon the wreck, He came, yet he had never caught
He long ago had sown, A sight of human face.

The corn he pounded into meal, | He thought of dreadful savages,
And made it into bread ; All naked, wild, and black ;

The rice he baked in little cakes, And paused at every step he took,
At times to eat instead. To look in terror back.











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Adventures of Robinson Crusoe.

He dreamt about them in the night,
And thought of them by day ;
And searce would stir, lest they by chance

Should come across his way.

At last one day he climbed a hill,
Where oft he used to lie,

And took with him his telescope,
To see what he could spy.

And looking off towards the shore,
A sight he did behold,

That set his very hair on end,
And made his blood run cold.

A band of painted savages,
. He saw to his dismay,
All dancing round a fire, on which

A human body lay.

He saw them kill a helpless man,
And one was standing by,
All in an agony of fear,

For he, too, was to die.





But ere his enemies had time
A hand on him to lay,
He turned and bounded like a roe,

Away—away—away.

Across a stream he swam with speed,
Close followed by his foes ;
But he was saved by our good friend—

The man in hairy clothes!

A young and comely man he was, —
So timid and so shy,
With tawny skin and hair of jet,

And mild and beaming eye.

And oft he paused and looked around,
And knelt as if in fear ;
But Crusoe made him signs to come,

And softly he drew near. —

. Then Crusoe named him Friday there,

And ever called him so,
Because upon that very day

He saved him from the foe.

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Adventures of Robinson Crusoe.

And Friday quickly learned to work,
For ready hand had he;
And helped, in time, to build a boat

And launch it in the sea.

His master taught him many things,
Of God he told him too,
Who made the sun and moon and stars,

And watches all we do.

A touching sight it was to see,
Poor Friday kneel to pray—
To hear him ery to God for help,

In his poor broken way.

Where’er he was, in house or field,
He ever was the same; __
Obeyed his master with a smile,

And feared his Maker’s name.

One morning Friday came in haste,
In trembling and in awe,
And told his master three canoes

Upon the beach he saw.

|



Then Crusoe bade him bring the guns,
And prime witheut delay ;

And soon they beat the savages,
And drove them all away.

In one canoe upon the sands,
Half dead and strongly bound,
All ready for to kill and eat,
A poor old man they found.

When Friday saw his face he paused,
Another look to take, [ wept,

Then laughed and cried, and sobbed and
As if his heart would break.

He clasped the old man round the neck,
And kissed him o’er and o’er ;
And leapt and danced with very joy,

To see that face once more.

He gave him food, he brought him drink,
He cut his bonds in twain ;
The dear old father that he loved,

Nor thought to see again.

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Adventures of Robinson Crusoe.

Poor Friday, though his skin was black,
His heart was warm and kind.
My little ones, a lesson this,

For all to bear in mind.

Now eight and twenty weary years,
Had Crusoe been ashore,
Upon his island night and day,

Nor thought to leave it more.

Then oh, what joy was his to see
One morn a spreading sail
Come dancing o’er the waters blue,

Before the swelling gale.

He watched with Friday from a hill,
Though distant many a mile,
Until he saw a boat put off

And row towards the isle.

And now at last his trials o’er,
With grateful heart he trod





Once more on board an English ship,
And bowed in thanks to God.

His faithful Friday went with him ;
His Friday true and kind,
Who loved him more than all on earth,

He could not leave behind.

His big umbrella, too, he took,

His hairy cap as well ; rye
And parrot with its noisy tongue,

Of other days to tell.

And then with heavy heart he turned,
To bid his home adieu ;
And soon, as onward sped the ship,

It faded from his view.

And when old England’s shore he saw,
Oh, he shed many tears ;
For he had been away in all

Full five and thirty years.

THE END.





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-DOBBIN THE BLACKSMITH.

Tue village forge old Dobbin kept,

And earned his bread from day to day;
For up he rose when others slept,

And worked while others were at play.

The gossips of the town would pay
A morning visit to his shop;

And while old Dobbin worked away,
They talked as if they'd never stop.

Thus Farmer Dogberry, you see,
Lays down the law to Beadle Dio;

While Ploughman Ox appears to be
The wisest of the idle trio.

But Dobbin only blinks his eyes,
For he has honest work»to do,

- And thinks that talk, however wise,

Will never mend a horse’s shoe.

like Dobbin, let us learn to keep
A watchful eye and silent tongue;

And. never let our conscience sleep
When idle gossips we’re among.



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TABBY THE PIPER.

As Tabby lay basking one day in the sun,
A-longing for something to eat,

He thought to himself *twould be capital fun
To play on a pipe for his meat.

So Tabby, who was an ingenious cat,
Ran off to his home in the mews,

Where he put on a coat and a wide-awake hat,
And breeches and stockings and shoes.

And then in the road, with his pipe in his mouth,
He played such a comical air,

That he startled the folk in the north and the south,
And the east and the west of the square.

From Piggy the porter he got but a laugh,
From Ducky the housemaid a quack,

And Carlo the groom gave him nothing but chaff,
So Tabby went dimnerless back.

So people who sometimes, led on by ‘conceit,
Attempt what they cannot well do,

A warning should take from poor. Tabby’s defeat,
Or they may get ridiculed too.



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DOCTOR DONKEY’S ACADEMY.

Doctor Donkey kept a school
For all the brute creation ;

But many thought him more a fool,
Than beast of education.

"Tis true he never much professed
Of learning taught at College;
But then the patience he possessed

Went further than his knowledge.

The worthy doctor here you see,
His scholars catechising ;

That they should all so quiet be
Is really most surprising.

There’s pert Miss Poll, and Pussy Cat,
Fox, Elephant, and Monkey, ;
And Piggy, with a dunce’s hat,
All listening to a donkey.

If thus a brute the beasts can tame,
By patience exercising ;
There’s scarce a virtue we can name
More worthy our advising.
3











THE ARTFUL FOX.

HERE’s a sly, old, cunning Fox,
Trying to appear devout;

Do you think those well-fed Cocks
Know what Reynard is about ?

“Let us shut our eyes,” quoth he,
“Say our grace before our meat;

Surely we should thankful be
That we've barley here to eat.”

But barley’s not the food he seeks,
Nor any other kind of grain;

For Reynard to the farm-yard sneaks
A better supper to obtain.

“No, no,” replies the eldest bird,

“You look as if you’d like to sup;
And I remember to have heard

That Cocks are sometimes eaten up.”

Thus wickedness too often tries,
T'o make itself'a friend appear ;
So mind you never shut your eyes
When danger may be lurking near.
4





















































TOWSER’S TRIAL.

THERE are Some dogs that much prefer
Their neighbour’s dinner to their own;
So Towser, like a selfish cur,

Robbed honest Toby of his bone.

Old 'Toby raised a hue and cry,
And all the village dogs gave’ chase;

Till Watchman Trusty’s practised eye,
Discovered ‘Towser’s hiding-place.

Then to the barn, where Cesar sat,
Arrayed in solemn wig and gown,

They took the wicked ‘Towser, that
Before had braved the judge’s frown.

The cunning counsel, Carlo, tried
To plead a melancholy tale;

But “Guilty” all the jury cried,
And so the thief was sent to jail.

As Towser lost his liberty,

Some silly persons lose their name;
And those who have not honesty,

Will taste his pain and share his shame.



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THE MISCHIEVOUS MONKEYS.

OLp Jacky the carpenter ’s very well known
To all in the village around;

He lives in a neat little house of his own,
Where mischievous monkeys abound.

Each day after dinner he sits in his chair,
The youngsters all being away ;

And tries to get forty winks quietly there,
While they in the fields are at play.

But sometimes it happens that, ere he awakes,
These mischievous monkeys come back ;
And each some impertinent liberty takes
With the tools of old Carpenter Jack.

They play with his whiskers and tickle his chin,
While Jacky sleeps sound as a church;

— But if they awake him he’ll surely begin

To give them a taste of the birch.

The young should remember to honour the old,
And never be rude in their play ;

For they will wish children to do what they’re told,
When they become aged and grey.







THE MAN AND

| THERE lived a man, in olden time,
_ Beneath a sunny, Eastern clime,





a

' Who, with one consort not content,
| The marriage yoke twice under-

went.

_ One of his wives was passing fair,
| With light blue eye, and golden

hair:

_ The other, more advanced in age,
_ Had entered on life’s second stage.

The husband, too, had now begun

Into the vale of years to run—

His hair no longer dark remained,

But black with white alternate
relgned.





HIS TWO WIVES,

The young wife from her husband's
pate

All the white hairs would extricate; |

The elder, in more sombre mood,

Would all the darker locks exclude.

So each, according to her pride,

Alternately her care supplied,

Her husband’s locks to comb and
tend,

Seeking her own peculiar end.

Unconscious of his wives’ intent,

The poor man sat in calm content,
As from his head, from day to day,
Hairs disappeared, both black and

grey;

Until at last, no longer blind,

The unhappy man awoke, to find

That, *twixt the hands of this fond pair,
He had not left a single hair!





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THE MAN AND THE LION.

As a Man and a Lion were travel-
ling together on a long journey,
they began to dispute with one

another as to which was the:

braver and stronger of the two.
Just at the time they happened
to pass by the statue of a man
strangling a lion. “See there!”
said the Man, “what further proof
can you need of my superior
power?” “If this,” said the Lion,
“is all that you have to show for
your cause, let us be the sculp-
tors, and we will soon show you
a lion strangling a man.”

THE LION IN LOVE.

A Lion once met a Forester’s
daughter, and fell so deeply in

love with her that he determined

to ask her father for her hand
in marriage.
fearing to arouse the beast’s
anger by a refusal, consented on
these conditions: that he would
allow
teeth, and cut off all his claws.
The Lion, in the blindness of his

assion, agreed to this; but he

ad no sooner lost his teeth and
claws, than the Forester slew him
with his club.





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The wily Forester, |

him to draw out all his |



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THE GOOSE AND THE GOLDEN EGGS.

A cERTAIN Man had a Goose_
which laid him a_ golden egg |
every day. The Man’s avarice
was so stirred by the sight of
this rich income, that, fearing
it was too good to last long,
he determined to secure his
valuable property once and for
ever, without waiting to receive
it from day to day. So he
decided to Jall the Goose on

| the spot, and make sure of his

treasure; but on cutting her
open, he found that he had not
only gained nothing, but lost all.



- THE BROTHER AND SISTER.

A CERTAIN man had a son who
was extremely beautiful, and a_
daughter who was somewhat
plain. As they were playing near
a looking-glass, the Boy, seeing
his face, remarked how handsome
he was. The Girl, taking offence
at this self- glorification, ran to
her father, and complained of
her brother’s vanity. But their
father told them both to look in
the glass every day—the Boy to
preserve his face from the effects
of vice, and the Girl to make up
for her defects by virtue. :



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THE MAN AND HIS WOODEN GOD.

A cERTAIN Man had a Wooden
God, to which he prayed day by
day for wealth and riches; but
finding that his supplications
were vain, he suddenly seized the

image by the legs and broke it.

to fragments, when a great hoard
of gold and silver flew about the
room. At this he exclaimed to
the idol, “Oh, thou perverse
deity! who, when I worshipped
thee, wouldst take no heed of my
prayers, but now that thou art

re pourest forth more |

good things than I could desire.”

THE BUNDLE OF STICKS,
A Fatuer, who had failed to

reconcile his quarrelsome family |

by words, thought that he might
succeed by an illustration. So
he called his sons together, and
directed them to lay before
a bundle of sticks. “Now try to
break the thegot,’ said he. But
they all failed. Then he gave

them the sticks to break one |

by one, and when they did this
easily, he said, “So will
sons, while united, be invincible;
but separate, and you will as
certainly be undone.”



him |

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MERCURY AND THE WOODMAN,

A Woopman let his axe fall into
a river, when Mercury appeared
to him, and brought up a golden
hatchet. But the man said that
was not his; and the same with a
silver one. Mercury then brought
up the lost hatchet, which the
man took with joy; and the god
gave him the gold and the silver
ones too. Another man, hear-
ing of this, threw his axe into
the stream; and, when Mercury

brought up a golden one, he said

it was his. But the god would
not give him even his own. —

THE ASS AND THE LAP-DOG.,

An Ass and a Lap-Dog belonged |

to the same master; but the one
lived in the stable, and the other
in the house. Jealous of the
Dog’s life, the Ass thought to
out-do his rival in fondness to
his master. So, rushing one day
into the hall, he began to dance
and caper about, and finally tried
to caress his master and sit upon
his knee. The servants seeing

this, came in with sticks and

cudgels, with which they thrashed
the stupid beast so unmercifully,
that he never got up again.




















STULL NT. PR ANN”: SCR STI

THE MOUNTAIN IN LABOUR,

A RUMOUR was spread abroad
that a neighbouring Mountain
was in labour, inasmuch as it had
been heard to send forth pro-
digious groans and mutterings.
Great curiosity was felt among the
pope as to what the wonderful
irth would be—perhaps a giant,
or some extraordinary monster of
the earth. Crowds flocked from
far and near, filled with impa-
tience to witness the result,
when, after a long and anxious
watching, to the dismay of all,
behold, out crept a mouse!

THE ASS IN THE LION'S som

An Ass, having found a Lion’s
skin, clothed himself with it, and
went forth to roam through the
forest in royal attire. All the
animals that encountered him
fled in consternation, mistaking
him for their real monarch. At
length he met a Fox; but Rey-
nard, whose superior cunning
detected the fraud, addressed him
thus: “ You are, indeed, a merry
Ass to wander abroad in this
borrowed majesty; and I, too,
might have been deluded, had I
not heard your silly bray!”





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THE TREES AND THE AXE,

A WoopMAN went into a forest |
to ask the different trees to give
him a handle for his axe. After
some consultation, it was decided
by the more powerful trees that
the homely ash would be the
most. suitable for the purpose.
Having obtained his request, the
Woodman proceeded to fell all
the finest trees in the forest.
Thus they found to their cost
the evil of sacrificing even one
of the poorest of their brethren
to the wily demands of the
most plausible foe.



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THE TOWN AND COUNTRY MICE.

A Town Mouse was on a visit to
his Country Cousin, and while at
their frugal meal, he asked him,
“How can you waste your time
in this lonely place? Come with
me, and I will show you how to
live.’ So the Country Mouse
went to town. But while they
were feasting luxuriously at mid-
night, the doors were burst open
by servants and: barking dogs, so
that the Mice could hardly escape.
“Tf this is life,” said the Country
Mouse, “give me my barley at
the bottom of my old oak.”







THE FOX AND THE APE,

| Te beasts being in council to

elect a king, the Ape, from his
| talents and entertainmg manners,
recommended himself to them as
a fitting monarch. But the Fox
determined to prove to his fellow-
beasts what a miserable choice
they had made. So, seeing a
trap nicely baited with flesh, he
conveyed the news of it to his
royal master. The Ape imno-

cently put his feet into it and

was caught, and the Fox ex-
claimed, “What! a king, and
not know a trap!”



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“THE OWL AND THE GRASSHOPPER.
AN Owl sat blinkin

but a Grasshopper, who was sing-
ing all day below, gave her no
rest, and often abused her. The
Owl, failing to persuade him to
silence, determined to try a stra-

to be kept awake all day by so

yeu must be thirsty.”



went briskly to drmk, when the
Owl made a meal of him.-

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in a tree, |

tagem, and said, “How sweetly |
you sing! it is quite a pleasure |

cheerful a voice. I pray you, |
come and taste some nectar, as |
The Grass-. |

opper, flattered by this civility, |







i

HERCULES AND THE WAGONER,

A WaGoneER was driving his
cart down a narrow, muddy lane,
when the wheels stuck so fast in
the mire that the horses could
not stir them backwards or for-
wards; so, without making any
effort of his own, he went down
on his knees and prayed loud to
Hercules for aid. But Hercules,
looking down from a cloud, told
the idle fellow to flog his horses
lustily, and put his shoulder to

the wheel, reminding him at the |

same time that Heaven only helps
those who help themselves

THE WOMAN AND THE WINE-CASK.

An Old Woman, who was wan- |

dering about in search of food,
found a Wine-Cask lying by the
road-side. The Cask was quite
empty, as all the choice sherry
sack with which it had been
filled had just been drawn off.

But the Old Woman put her nose |

to the hole, and after snuffin

heartily for some time, exclaimed,

“Sweet creature! how delicious
must you have been when you
were full of sack, since your
very lees and dregs send orth
so refreshing a savour.”





i

urs =——
2>~ Oa















THE BLACKAMOOR.

A RICH man once bought a
Blackamoor, and was foolish
enough to suppose that the colour
of his skin arose from the neglect
of his former master. So he
laced the unfortunate slave in a
arge tub, and, with his servants,
proceeded to wash and scrub him
with brush, soap, and mop. But
all their efforts were in vain, for
the poor man’s skin did not.
change a shade of its colour, and
the only result was, that after
many washings the wretched







Blackamoor died of the cold.

A Herpsman, who had _lost a
beautiful and favourite Bull, went
searching for it im all directions,

through wood and glade. Being
unable to find it,
_all the nymphs and deities of |
_ the forest that he would offer

e vowed to |

to them a lamb as a reward for
its discovery. Just then he.saw |
a huge lion standing over the
carcase of his Bull, which the
unhappy wight would now fain |
offer to the gods as well, to |
escape himself from the clutches |
of the noble captor.

THE HERDSMAN AND THE LOST BULL.



4 a aerate nemesis be



eet rnrtntnenannasenecnt msi SMe nissS oh tetanus Sse

THE TRUMPETER TAKEN PRISONER.

A ‘TRUMPETER, who had been
taken prisoner in war, begged
earnestly of his enemies for
quarter. “Spare me! I pray,”
said he; “for I have taken no
man’s life in the battle, nor have
LT any other arms than this poor
trumpet.” “Nay,” replied his

captors, “that is the very fault |
we find with thee, and therefore |

shalt thou die; for though thou
couldst take no part in the fray
thyself, yet to have stirred up
strife with thy wicked blast 1s
the greatest crime of all.”



THE DOG INVITED TO SUPPER.

A Man who had prepared a great
feast invited a Friend to supper,
and his Dog asked the Friend’s
Dog to jom them. The latter
accepted the invitation with glee,
and promised himself a splendid
repast. But while wagging his
tail, he happened to catch the

_ eye of the cook, who forthwith

threw him out of the window.
As he went yelping down the
street, he fold his friends that
he had drunk so much that he
could hardly remember which

_ way he got out of the house.



mne-envevemenmererer)









HOW COCK SPARROW KEPT HIS CHRISTMAS.



ie HARLEY was a shepherd. He lived in a pretty little cottage on his
master’s farm, and he had a wife and one little daughter, named Kitty, and
a large dog named Bob. Isaac’s house was not a very large one, but, if it
wasn’t very big, it was very comfortable ; and outside, it was so covered with
green ivy, and sweet-smelling woodbine, and roses, that it looked in the. summer-
time more like a bower than a house, for the ivy trailed right up the great
chimney, and so on to the roof of the house, where it spread itself in all directions,
so that little Kitty, when she looked out of her bedroom window, had a garland
of ivy all around her pretty little face.

Mrs. Harley was a good, kind woman, and very clever. She could wash, and
brew, and bake, all in a superior manner, and she could make such lovely cheese-
cakes, that they were talked about five miles off and more. Many a farmer's
wife sent for Mrs. Harley, if she was going to have a feast, and the fame of Mrs.
Harley’s pastry grew greater and greater every day. But she could do more
things than these ; she could spin, and she could’sew, and she could make lace.
This last accomplishment was the triumph of triumphs in Mrs. Harley’s eyes.

i other things that she could do, she thought of as mere nothings by the side
of this great power. Her husband boasted of her cheesecakes, Mrs. Harley only
boasted of her lace.

If you had ever seen Isaac, you might be sure, you would have loved him.
He was such a good fellow. He had lived a country life all his days, and he
knew all the secrets the country hides from those who don’t wholly belong to it.
He knew where the owl’s nest was, and whereabouts in the wood you might find
a squirrel. He knew the fish parishes in the river, and could point out all the
big holes where the pirate pikes lay in waiting for their prey. He knew all about
the weather—not as to whether it had or had not been raining, which you and I
know well enough, but whether it was likely to rain, or to be fine, to be hot or
cold, or betwixt and between. He could run and ride, jump and swim; in fact,
all that it became a man to do in the country, that he could do, and could do it
famously. |

And little Kitty? Well, there is no use in attempting to deny it, little Kitty
was a duck. No other word can at all describe her. She had blue eyes, and







How Cock Sparrow kept his Christmas.

golden hair, and rosy cheeks, and such a tiny little neck, that her head looked
like a bud set on a slender stalk. Of course Mr. and Mrs. Harley loved Kitty
very much, and Kitty loved them too, and so they all loved one another, which
was as it should be, and very delightful. Now I must tell you that their house
had a garden. One part of it, nearest the house, was full of flowers ; crocuses
and snowdrops in the spring-time, then tulips and pansies, roses when the days
were at their longest, lilies as the autumn drew near, and Michaelmas daisies, in
their half-mourning clothes, when the nights were getting long, and dark, and
cold again. In the other part of the garden were herbs and vegetables, and in
the furthest corner of all was a sumptuous mansion. This sumptuous mansion
was four feet high, and was built of wood and thatch. In front of it was a
commodious yard, at least six feet square. In one corner of the yard was a
lovely trough, and in these highly desirable premises lived Madam Pig and her
graceful family. Now you know all about the Harleys, who they were and how
they lived, I must tell you something about Cock Sparrow.

Mr. and Mrs. Sparrow had built themselves a sweet little nest, in a snug
corner of the ivy-covered thatch of Isaac Harley’s house. In the nest there were
five little eggs, and Mrs. Sparrow sat warming them day by day. Very early
one morning, Mrs. Sparrow said to her husband, “ Dick,” said she, “I do believe
our darling little chicks are breaking their shells.” And so, indeed, they were ;
and presently, instead of five little eggs, there was one little egg and four funny
little sparrows, with squabby little bodies all naked, and soft yellow little beaks
and shrill little tongues, and very fierce appetites. “Peet, peet,” said all the spar-
rows at once, and away flew the father to fetch them a meal; then, when he came
with it, away flew their mother to fetch them another, until they left off saying
“peet, peet,” and nestled themselves down warmly under their mother’s wings.
Another day came, and still there were four little sparrows and one little egg.
And another day and another, and still this egg did not get hatched ; so that the
_ poor dear mother began to grow sorrowful about it, and the poor dear father
began to hint that it was perhaps just as well as it was, and that four were easier
to feed than five would be. But while they were in all this doubt and perplexity,
the egg settled the matter itself, by cracking right in two one afternoon, and
jetting out little sparrow number five. “ Peet, peet,” he cried, and away flew his
parents to get him his dinner. Now just because he had given by far the most
trouble, his mother was far fonder of him than of his little brothers and sisters ;
not that she did not love them. all very much indeed, but then she loved this
last little one the most.

So the days went on, and, as the sweet summer came, they seemed all to be
strong enough to fly. “You had best wait,” said the mother. “ You had best







How Cock Sparrow kept lis Christmas.

wait a bit, my dears, until your wing feathers are a little more grown; I am so
afraid you should tumble.” And the father said, “ Nonsense about waiting ; they
don’t know what they can do until they try, and I am quite sure they are big —
enough to get their living.” But the mother said, “ My dear, I would rather they
should wait:” and so for three days longer: they waited. On the fourth day,
however, they all ventured out on the thatch, and their father and mother showed
them how to flutter their wings and spread out their tails ; and so, one after the
other, they all got safely into the great apple-tree, which you must know stood
by the side of the cottage. Then they all hopped along its branches until they
got down to the lowest, which was not very far from the ground. “And now,”
said Mr. Sparrow, “let us fly to the garden palings,’ and away he went ; but no,
the little ones were quite too frightened, and not one of them stirred. So then
the mother flew across, to show them how, and then both coming back flew
across again, together, and sat on the palings calling to their little ones. So at
last the biggest of the five flapped out his wings, and. away he went, and got to
the palings safely enough, and so away the other four started after him. Three
of them were, as you know, large and strong, and they fltw away famously ; but
the other, the poor little fellow who was hatched last, felt his wings trembling
beneath him, and though he tried, his best he was not strong enough to fly so far,
and down he came, fluttering and tumbling, right upon the garden walk. “Oh,
dear ; oh, dear,” his mother cried ; “he is killed ;” and away she flew to see, and
away flew the father also, and all the other four little brothers and sisters fell
backwards off the top rail of the palings, overcome with emotion. But they
were quite too strong for such a little fall to hurt them. But not s \ their little
brother.

When Mr. and Mrs. Sparrow got to him they found him fluttering on the
ground, and though he was not dead, yet he was very much hurt, and his wing
seemed broken. What to do they didn’t know; they couldn’t carry him, nor get
him back to the nest; and his poor little wing hung down to the ground, and they
were all very sorrowful. Just at that moment the door opened, and out came
little Kitty and Bob the dog. The two oldSparrows flew round the little one,
and the mother opened her wings, and spread them out along the path, and
chattered and twittered, all in the hope of frightening away the fierce monster of
a dog, and protecting her darling. But Bob cared nothing for Mrs. Sparrow,
and walked slowly towards her, whereupon she and her husband flew up into a
bush, and chattered and twittered so amazingly, that Kitty came along the path
to see what was the matter.

Soon she saw the little fellow on the ground, and lifting him up, she ran to
her mother, calling, “ Look, mother! look, mother! I’ve caught a little sparrow.”

3







rile

«

LG





How Cock Sparrow kept his Christmas.

Now Isaac was sitting in his cottage, and he got up to see. “ Why, poor thing,’
he said, “it’s but just fledged, and I think it’s broke its wing trying to fly.” So
he took it in his great big hand, and the poor little sparrow was; very much
frightened at first, but Isaac handled it so gently and tenderly that it soon began
to think he did not mean to hurt it.

So they thought it was best to get a little basket, too deep for the little
fellow easily to get out of; and they put a little bit of hay in it to make it warm
and soft, and a tiny little saucer full of bread soaked in milk ; and then they put
the basket, with little Cock Sparrow in it, on the window-sill. Presently the
two old birds left off twittering and chattering in the tree, and came near to
the house, in the hope of seeing what had become of their poor little fellow.
So they came nearer and nearer, and at last they ventured on to a rose-tree
overhanging the window, and by degrees they dared to perch on the outside sill
of the window within which the basket was. Now Isaac, and Mrs. Harley, and
Kitty, were standing in the room watching them, and Isaac said, when he saw
the old bird on the window-sill, that he thought if they hung the little basket
on the tree outside, the old ones would perhaps come and feed the little one,
and take care of him. So they hung it up on a low branch of the tree, and sure
enough, as soon as the little sparrow began to chirp and cry, its mother flew up
into the tree, and perched on the basket-side, and fluttered her wings in delight
and called to the father, who came too, and so they flew off, and soon came back
with the little sparrow’s dinner; and, considering all things, were very happy
indeed. Then they found their four other darlings, and took them back to their
nest, and then they flew back again to the little one in the basket. So, as night
came on, they didn’t know what todo. They could hear the little ones in the
nest calling to them, and yet how could they go to them, and leave the poor
little fellow in the basket? But while they were thinking what to do, out of the
house came Isaac and Kitty, and reaching down the basket, carried it into the
house. At this the two old birds felt very unhappy, as they couldn’t know what
Isaac would do with him, and they flew back to their nest, and cried themselves
to sleep.

But they need not have been so very sorrowful, for the very first thing in
the morning Isaac brought out the basket again, and hung it up as before; and
again the old birds came and fed their little one. So wea on this night Kitty
eunied the basket in once more, the old birds were not at all frightened, and flew
away to their nest quite merrily. Thus they went on for several days, and each
day little Cock Sparrow grew stronger and stronger, and at last he was quite well
and brave, and he could perch on the edge of the basket; and at last, one day, he
followed his mother’s example, and flew after her towards the old nest. But

4









How Cock Sparrow kept his Christmas.

though he flew away, he had grown quite tame, and so fond of little Kitty, that
he would take food out of her hand, and sit upon her shoulder ; and he had
grown quite fond of Bob also, and Bob had grown fond of him; and Kitty had
coaxed them’ both, until little Sparrow -had learned to sit upon Bob’s head, and
was as tame with Bob as he was with Kitty.

As for his four little brothers and sisters, they had grown so strong and big,
that they had all gone out into the wide world to make their fortunes, and only
this little Cock Sparrow stayed with his father and mother at home. Well, the
summer was ended, and the dark nights kept growing longer, and the days kept
getting shorter and colder, until at last, a little before Christmas, there came a
great frost and a deep snow. It was so cold that all the poor birds didn’t know
what to do, and the snow was so thick on the ground that they didn’t know
where to find anything to eat; but every morning Kitty used to bring out
plentiful crumbs of bread for her Sparrow, and little Sparrow used to fly down to
eat-them, and carry back some of them to his father and mother ; and so, though
the frost was so bitter and so keen, they were all very comfortable in the nest
in the ivy, and, indeed, grew quite fat on Kitty’s crumbs.

Now Kitty had a grandmother, who lived in a very tiny little cottage, two
or three fields off her father’s house, and there was a path leading from the one
cottage to the other, and Kitty used always to be running backwards and forwards
to see how grandmother was, as the old lady was rather feeble, and a little short
in her breath. And it had been settled that on Christmas-day Kitty should go

to her grandmother’s to dinner, and that her father and mother should come
- to fetch her in the evening ; so Christmas-day having come, little Kitty set off on
her walk, wrapped up warmly in her pretty red cloak, and with a basket in
her hand, full of mince pies, for the poor dear old grandmother. Away she
went; she would soon be there, they thought, she was so used to the road, and
although the snow was deep, she was well used to that also. Although it was
Christmas-day, Isaac had to go to look after his sheep, and had of course taken
Bob with him; so Mrs. Harley set to work to boil the pudding and roast the
meat for their Christmas dinner, and to bake a large and lovely cake for Kitty’s
tea. She was so very busy, that though she heard a tapping at the window she
took no notice of it for some time ; but at last she looked up, and there was little
Sparrow, sitting on the window-sill, flapping his wings, and tapping at the window
with his beak. “Poor little bird!” thought Mrs. Harley ; “ Kitty’s forgotten to

give him his crumbs,” and out she went to see; but no, he had not been for-

gotten, the crumbs had been put on the ground as usual, and, strange to say,

many of them remained uneaten. “ Perhaps he is cold,” thought Mrs. Harley

and she left the door open to see if he would come into the kitchen; but no, he
5







How Cock Sparrow kept his Christmas.

stayed outside, and kept first tapping at the window, and then, when Mrs.
Harley went towards it, off he flew down towards the garden gate, and then pre-
sently came back again. But she could make nothing of it; so directly her
husband came home, she told him what the bird had been doing, and while she
was talking, back little Sparrow came again, and began to tap at the window as
before. So Isaac went out, and again the bird flew towards the garden gate,
and when Isaac stopped the bird stopped too, and fluttered his little wings,
and flew a little way, and stopped again fluttering, until at last Isaac ‘said,
“Something must be the matter, Pll go and see,” and he whistled to Bob, and
away they went. Little Sparrow saw them coming, and flew this time right
down to the garden gate, and perched at the top, and as they came near it flew
a little way into the field, and so by degrees tempted them along, always flying
before them till he got to the second stile, where, as Isaac knew, there was a
very deep ditch. All of a sudden a thought struck Isaac; he called to the dog,
“ Hie, Bob! good dog! hie on!” and away went Bob, at full speed, up to the
second stile. He looked down into the ditch, and then, with a loud bark, tore
back again to Isaac; and he, well guessing what was the matter, ran as fast as
he could to-the stile. There, peeping out from a great drift of snow, was little
Kitty’s red cloak, and deep down in the snow was poor Kitty herself. Isaac
jumped down into the ditch, and lifted out his poor little girl, all blue and cold,
and ran back with her to the cottage. There they put her to bed, and chafed
her little limbs with their hands, until the warmth came back to her body, and
presently she opened her clear blue eyes. Now how glad they were, I leave you
to guess. So she told them by and by how she had slipped off the plank, and
had fallen into the snow, and how she had hurt her ankle so in falling, that she
could not get up again, but that at each trial she made the snow had slipped
more over her ; and so, how she had called on them all till she could call no
more ; and the last thing she could remember was that the little Sparrow had
come and perched. upon her as she lay in the snow, and had then flown away
again. Then she grew colder and colder, and remembered no more until she
awoke in her own little bed.

So poor little Kitty was saved, and they were all so happy together that I
couldn’t tell you one-half of their happiness if I tried all day ; and you may be
sure little Sparrow was happy too, and that he thought, as he tucked his little
head under his wing, how glad he was that he had heard poor Kitty calling as
she lay in the drifted snow. And this is the tale of

How Cock SPARROW KEPT HIS CHRISTMAS,





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Full Text


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'2012-01-14T11:04:23-05:00'
describe
'937267' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGC' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
d8232e5197134cdd51e07978401c380b
5d564056999f54c9d3db3742f6e69222ce4961fa
'2012-01-14T11:03:52-05:00'
describe
'108283' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGD' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
0974d3c6d30458efa28e9f1ae83c72ce
6508fdbcb7e9fef11976435b19c2e47f3ee80395
'2012-01-14T11:05:53-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2253' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGE' 'sip-files00005.pro'
33579ac5e8448093e069990890b7142f
b673b7eb4fa12f31961526c3e0b1addc60ddb8ec
'2012-01-14T11:05:15-05:00'
describe
'39722' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGF' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
f832d573938b6bb66b8554e905840876
6067051693a72f54f48f4bfc14887ac79909f419
'2012-01-14T11:05:51-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7508320' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGG' 'sip-files00005.tif'
63231199999f350eeefa830a8ff3df12
0b486799f26052b2a0c7089b952839e243e6f934
'2012-01-14T11:03:02-05:00'
describe
'139' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGH' 'sip-files00005.txt'
71da30affeda736c02c747bf3d8cea40
353446556c4991f267239e1dff4f99dc4d2aba4d
'2012-01-14T11:05:35-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'985445' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGI' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
d2957d72a1d2aa44b5db70b1521e1dd4
123c5bc8133b6f501306906d187dc4e68f3bdfd9
'2012-01-14T11:03:55-05:00'
describe
'380002' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGJ' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
552e0edb4efb9fedaae47b744c19cdfd
defa41f7f2877a6405672b64624c2e465aa9bd98
'2012-01-14T11:04:01-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1937' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGK' 'sip-files00008.pro'
a54ee762380640dc2d3cc8fa83d34d33
7f680e0f6bc8d507c1b9382400679e6fe8708b9e
'2012-01-14T11:05:36-05:00'
describe
'118747' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGL' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
4d993cd0a9133f72d729a479fd02261a
182b197f68bd8b3f8287745f3f399719d386b43f
'2012-01-14T11:02:58-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23676620' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGM' 'sip-files00008.tif'
1650fa8e6480f5dd5b6c22b58c4f63f4
388ec5402a22548cd7cc598f9f6b65787d65d6ac
'2012-01-14T11:03:20-05:00'
describe
'189' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGN' 'sip-files00008.txt'
bb547404109aeec5bb1b83575d411d6b
c09e6055dab0c545bc92e116e5272f9ffad7d6a1
'2012-01-14T11:03:36-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'947357' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGO' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
235dffc40c1507f2fc6e6de53efeaf00
dd065a516e40a0444fb78376ae661f3792e27025
'2012-01-14T11:03:38-05:00'
describe
'149560' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGP' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
7e3a6ce61ddb2cf57e147c2a81f93f7d
f5aa7f8f58db4d831089d176ddaebb04673b8004
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'8367' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGQ' 'sip-files00009.pro'
3268e8cca2ac9f51b20a378572ae316e
3b3a319877259de1851da3bb93a8446842895e1c
'2012-01-14T11:05:39-05:00'
describe
'52773' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGR' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
2ec365cc2c1c888e5d0e08b4479f76ff
e9cb017220b70431e0e955681bb11b9dae34ca1e
'2012-01-14T11:03:46-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7597828' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGS' 'sip-files00009.tif'
5809cebc5c642c5647205c12db6dd383
4de182a0f2c264f50910932e16b7448bab1ccaae
'2012-01-14T11:05:21-05:00'
describe
'400' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGT' 'sip-files00009.txt'
3236007158e25589c1549f67cc3396bb
29b424d450ea9b6a63663d9e5d936a08f8ee26f3
describe
'905663' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGU' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
494a2b819db3ecc12d8d9ea6943c78c0
dccdd176cd6ecab0edc6a7e07849f1d42b0a1df3
'2012-01-14T11:04:07-05:00'
describe
'150508' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGV' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
e4707bc83c376a49d73ec2d11b888a56
174304b6a4f25a34116d1f8229d46dd391b61f4f
'2012-01-14T11:03:34-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'13899' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGW' 'sip-files00010.pro'
ae957026a206d757ba4b9e9c76d6be8b
48e206b8b9e0914d3efb53bdf3e84859d8ac6211
'2012-01-14T11:04:31-05:00'
describe
'52720' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGX' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
667edd60acd83df3661ae2e4ad88cc6c
fe8b4d5e3e79148d49da3eeeb5f89634fb14e2f3
'2012-01-14T11:03:16-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7256148' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGY' 'sip-files00010.tif'
ea0583a8b494d1d7f2091d504609b028
fab174a37873f4d3cf5f8cc51d9c706015623ca2
describe
'630' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRGZ' 'sip-files00010.txt'
75d1e48319bf8b1dbced64c695263117
f4d20b8514321a88062180fce3804314c53caaa7
'2012-01-14T11:05:03-05:00'
describe
'865151' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHA' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
5f51b9d34bb89357f12e2f54455e7342
a28c44a2298061c06e34c7d4f292fe7c970dbe70
describe
'112604' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHB' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
5b9b185310a4b725f00ff4a75af3e707
05e5d56ed41e90eb4c29ae5e744c4128d991c5ed
'2012-01-14T11:05:17-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1043' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHC' 'sip-files00011.pro'
b7d5f60224407546b7e726ab5ac64279
ef45b6c89cefe8bf21234d6b892d7da83207a17b
'2012-01-14T11:04:30-05:00'
describe
'34753' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHD' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
64e69af2315f753097e871e80e9d4024
5757c8fb5877d12805d66276283c0ac622255f54
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'6930052' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHE' 'sip-files00011.tif'
82fe8ca2d0f899b04742257605254b43
5a796feb3bd81cf9a408642c37d98e69ece5814b
'2012-01-14T11:05:18-05:00'
describe
'75' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHF' 'sip-files00011.txt'
df86e5da17b87b1ad98f7dc1a09bdce0
eb68e2d862214e13e6cba1a24bc575db9b153251
'2012-01-14T11:04:47-05:00'
describe
'909084' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHG' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
fd04ce0f53af2361aae5cee727b0a88d
28512303de740b7e917c14af6a43d2cdd0647271
describe
'193128' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHH' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
02ac488219fdf16a22a66d9ec2402a46
467f651b4f441d0bef920c5b9a45845fe1a2b8e5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35762' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHI' 'sip-files00012.pro'
1e5e30ecd1ad6187c081e449694907bd
9ac219293cba640411212231afd2e2e67dfe707d
'2012-01-14T11:03:25-05:00'
describe
'68809' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHJ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
2f7d3a6b25ac6ff6b0c783244f8d97d3
7cb1b853b01b765a99b48427dbf86e3755e446cb
'2012-01-14T11:04:26-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7284540' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHK' 'sip-files00012.tif'
7e0a9fe3f7dd561919df57cf498d0781
5b6bb7359b05ec3a1400328223d5b4602fd1f828
'2012-01-14T11:03:27-05:00'
describe
'1508' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHL' 'sip-files00012.txt'
01172f084902b6f22b26ca48a6b153f3
977f07557a86a89f429173663a8c1e8a8a2c466a
'2012-01-14T11:05:10-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'982011' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHM' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
d92c372c5e9d409e701149d508ef90d4
eec72f0bd9a29e1eb35f418811d71702f5a73273
'2012-01-14T11:04:39-05:00'
describe
'325706' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHN' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
e0b3423205c263485b27bc9dbb71f101
3bdc0654130f49e5b6d480b638de6195aa002384
'2012-01-14T11:05:34-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1017' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHO' 'sip-files00013.pro'
e05f5a2ef6881b73049c9926a4d28fcb
0d66e7c09b718961b833db2de7a7ba8737247bbd
describe
'101325' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHP' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
8d6d649e08da8f8e1ced39512d1c40b3
40246178a5cd6ccb50af3fb6853c8f0a273e49b9
'2012-01-14T11:04:51-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23591484' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHQ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
ea1b21bd4aaaadcc429064bdd12bda2f
23ed9b4d51f618657e2e1670dec3d5220f5aaa8c
'2012-01-14T11:04:06-05:00'
describe
'73' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHR' 'sip-files00013.txt'
745c8c6a639b484c07595782437a247b
0b0c1176517d34473112b58c14e2aa67c71d1ed1
'2012-01-14T11:04:02-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'941285' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHS' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
a7fd4af2958c12713f16f58a09f3481c
2d7356683d7ade4415e87075772ac5059216af7a
'2012-01-14T11:05:08-05:00'
describe
'191862' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHT' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
3789b89ff4b3bfd0119b3d401da0984e
123346c7ffd0522515e2f1556792f935558b989a
'2012-01-14T11:05:07-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35100' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHU' 'sip-files00014.pro'
9373fa78c2297c40c031c20b3cf651f7
53cb170fe29bc609b8a67e63d716c96f311d5d91
'2012-01-14T11:04:13-05:00'
describe
'67913' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHV' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
22c77a04aa3525b29e0588c6ebe94c36
541a603b00dc15d9a88564d4277cb297540c3b91
'2012-01-14T11:03:15-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7552072' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHW' 'sip-files00014.tif'
1e474867070f51c5d8b2d8d74023002c
91d993f4df3e87daa49853780f59f7c183214940
'2012-01-14T11:05:48-05:00'
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHX' 'sip-files00014.txt'
bd32563946a9b2199f79d4b0c4b031f2
cf0244def15f262b65efa0cc45fb0dd984414263
describe
'979839' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHY' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
a0ffaf8bfe5d690eba4ff25b2ab97bd7
004548b2e65a7fa145ab24ed9f1f8b230ef9f622
'2012-01-14T11:04:46-05:00'
describe
'345710' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRHZ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
029a2c5e2cacedb2a43d7c0b7f907684
1667a9f9414016fa2f6a4be09784f2fba9361863
'2012-01-14T11:03:05-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2785' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIA' 'sip-files00015.pro'
6f1c1559f2c217795667775756a8abfb
37ea9486de0614884e379672e8f44912062b5088
'2012-01-14T11:03:47-05:00'
describe
'101886' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIB' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
5ab898a16d5e18da21957470e5083d42
79f77f947567b8c9a4126a59f3240cca0d0ba7e2
'2012-01-14T11:05:57-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23538876' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIC' 'sip-files00015.tif'
eddfe1cd20f9eebd8bf3af28298eb992
c9439653a176ff3f4824272c9e5172576e0f0ec1
'2012-01-14T11:05:26-05:00'
describe
'544' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRID' 'sip-files00015.txt'
2664cb06869db21225650d8f040731c4
037ff8f3db3308d55f1f262431799b53145d4b86
'2012-01-14T11:05:12-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'941853' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIE' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
fb837154d8e673db35d061e2d2a7840e
af11de32670715a7aa0d6d98c583b7f83210ad80
'2012-01-14T11:04:14-05:00'
describe
'194212' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIF' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
d7772eb4a7ff76dc0ab7b15a0b7a6938
5861c34d88c8aec2dbe2b765b13e3df4e0b9da42
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'33995' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIG' 'sip-files00016.pro'
356cd5f5440e2b6b8159965a1504c3df
5819b35b61d047c017763ca14af0782e73156dad
'2012-01-14T11:04:36-05:00'
describe
'69573' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIH' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
c8607bcf7ae536d7b99ea574db28bf5f
d44f769875460dd8057ab4d909128d40745aa1e5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7557352' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRII' 'sip-files00016.tif'
7e3676f8115e0446ba6b659c7a871e36
732e7a98a9750222f35890be58fb15b5f2498269
'2012-01-14T11:04:27-05:00'
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIJ' 'sip-files00016.txt'
65e0c10a6e49727b7a419611d23ce9d9
7bac223b1c47ae8e9300ae168ed19a1cdfccf616
'2012-01-14T11:04:11-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'973058' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIK' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
9a0d76882f6aeb1e163ff9f690e7f644
35f32ac0b5e4802829a5a9721c0fe25af9b29110
'2012-01-14T11:05:33-05:00'
describe
'342438' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIL' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
39c3f8ed6773d0a416c0c844605a82a9
19671599408896dfefc02e549de873ee31c90723
'2012-01-14T11:03:44-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1895' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIM' 'sip-files00017.pro'
34c59cb70ddc52099179b1d325d22634
9f862f6dc7d2317a1fd38f36d7680352642e15ff
'2012-01-14T11:06:01-05:00'
describe
'108787' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIN' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
f43deae0e29b3e78b54bf4909c7d1f6e
e1ae6a481e5387186336f08de80547f63ac0818e
'2012-01-14T11:02:56-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23378644' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIO' 'sip-files00017.tif'
a86c28bdbbbc243f191e193de8bad9a4
4c638a61e31a3987e5d6e1999152d813ecea035d
describe
'150' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIP' 'sip-files00017.txt'
4d74c3636ead3083df9a5494cfeef81c
6682480e61cdcff497463075f9e683dcb76242ef
'2012-01-14T11:04:35-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'986562' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIQ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
5418a18709e836d3b498455766c36493
6e2eea99967dc2a36f9c40a69bb70b3fd54c5b8c
'2012-01-14T11:03:43-05:00'
describe
'356353' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIR' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
f5b3bbc739a74501e2611089eb8accbc
733767bbd399d8b21743c1fc87050fdb6bc63f73
'2012-01-14T11:03:39-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'939' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIS' 'sip-files00018.pro'
2985cba6342f82d719591026325969dc
3e8b602e1e96db4f2e8a6639d9dfde110d9f89de
describe
'115253' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIT' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
5da819fd44e03eae132106398ac57f4a
c88d79b8031519e4f42406c857fff6263d257d4d
'2012-01-14T11:03:03-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23705120' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIU' 'sip-files00018.tif'
b4ac03541d81ee8a68cc02922c6d5bd7
4f58dc439b7797208740e7e138449d5505092fb4
'2012-01-14T11:04:56-05:00'
describe
'48' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIV' 'sip-files00018.txt'
15abdcfc543526868ce5e161fa719ca9
101ee3a898164813d8e845788c2dd4c4cdaeee5f
describe
'927866' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIW' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
679519e989a3d8c5677e4de853bc9253
325b313a1f787a657bb9736951f106ff44925f87
'2012-01-14T11:04:33-05:00'
describe
'185049' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIX' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
de491194d4a9875a9fa1b726ca4cdd07
d9e3a960c7ac6754c2fa61dfbff7c3e3fc6a96be
'2012-01-14T11:03:18-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'33293' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIY' 'sip-files00019.pro'
17ee6515fefb0dc18c80500de4d028a6
e1f861e57a2542218df06bee57a557ff5c5430ef
describe
'65830' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRIZ' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
96faa0024608cf2f6200f7f3d4dad111
e73e152a15d1a21c98baeb9eaca8ce06f4ee1882
'2012-01-14T11:04:38-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7434880' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJA' 'sip-files00019.tif'
cd15283cbeabe9218bd08d7392d49b38
91298fb9568d0f2f0fd1e4172ff0f096a39cb808
'2012-01-14T11:03:57-05:00'
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJB' 'sip-files00019.txt'
b93626b998acc07c44d68e5867d98cef
b237032ea59f6c9c3f103e623703bf9f461077c4
'2012-01-14T11:03:31-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'996412' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJC' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
16c4cf9710c632fd2950b22450dbc756
e0dc7c0f7d7d3ce1dae7cf4c2b3c84b8d06ae81e
describe
'350426' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJD' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
5b29440dd95bc429804719c2e684e5ab
954d823823877b6213465a0ea76a75134db40f19
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'577' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJE' 'sip-files00020.pro'
68cc875891e6ecba69d0981160a13828
feff13638f5d59f6ab8532b139f453e22337bd66
describe
'109404' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJF' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
cd7c432479c31aa9cdf953e496a61665
e08a951393f26dfcf4d372c906e6c1c811863700
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23939316' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJG' 'sip-files00020.tif'
8929ebd8c1634166e725fe414cd86304
06bc95cdcbea3e39f68510f96e22d94dffb46aaa
'2012-01-14T11:04:21-05:00'
describe
'21' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJH' 'sip-files00020.txt'
fb28b76050d83b71108a5f682be64a2b
5f04a723420a895ac788db80f0367dde3a5db00d
'2012-01-14T11:04:59-05:00'
describe
'952890' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJI' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
8e493d53d7bb5c3e37b69ec493719bca
ff239ef0516c02b4501d020894fbcc5a758075f3
'2012-01-14T11:05:16-05:00'
describe
'192073' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJJ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
ee914918944cbd9098fc4d67708f11da
204fd985bfe44f9a62fac2f864efe018879d4f8d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35814' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJK' 'sip-files00021.pro'
285570cd3bb5a6f55cb49dc8f1fd4dbd
433c5decab0774bd0e4bd54d209516fbc50d7f50
describe
'68021' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJL' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
6e24ef30a91b38d6c0bd62ec9b829c45
17cf54142c06aa394ab332668c8ed3b7e74d076f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7645548' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJM' 'sip-files00021.tif'
0804c019bf833b0159f78f387679d375
bb0354508325bcdf269edced93775fe5fb58932d
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJN' 'sip-files00021.txt'
c082ee4ca9f9dd2b6684e377bacc6eeb
0a097dadaa712b7829e6d4a4edc4f98c45ab533b
describe
'931798' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJO' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
ae52c0ba497aa536834995b171ac694d
b08d8460edd7ca03364f08ee8a633ab526729182
'2012-01-14T11:05:49-05:00'
describe
'178566' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJP' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
6629e4b425cc2b58720397f3e6d2cd6d
575debb3099b7d915222ac701eb5dd764ce95552
'2012-01-14T11:04:05-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'31539' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJQ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
e4a5459c991afd24a602adad7ecf0ec8
c6b812e81573407a5d73f6f33ebd6cd1e38c9152
'2012-01-14T11:05:01-05:00'
describe
'64183' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJR' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
d6be619801b470365e9def30b9b57acf
ac76297dee39e78e8445ae41ea64e7ab84a4bc72
'2012-01-14T11:05:09-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7475296' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJS' 'sip-files00022.tif'
6fa115ec9b90a85702e25973fb2c20b6
07ed581cd095fbedf63e5470e6adeb3a1869ae43
'2012-01-14T11:05:20-05:00'
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJT' 'sip-files00022.txt'
124446a685f74fafa5e93e62a3685d83
91ed4fcb1081025bc47f0890d985157709019f18
'2012-01-14T11:03:09-05:00'
describe
'899695' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJU' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
12285e0ae13a768986e27b14cb6e38ac
7deecd012a6781792708e7b31ef51040b567ca3b
describe
'99587' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJV' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
e971064c4bdfb57fb0a0688f68b83263
2b3f34a0d1fa6b55440f8f1aa5d0f2a2d894758b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'705' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJW' 'sip-files00023.pro'
3634db88f0fe4da1ebb8bd4b778e69fb
0b405efc66e98754fed48e115e47402d5fd2e4aa
'2012-01-14T11:04:03-05:00'
describe
'32272' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJX' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
904aca5a496d42072eca3eb6531cc26c
f67899543a335e7b2d34769fb7cc708b9e661f95
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7206468' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJY' 'sip-files00023.tif'
69db8d264b9fda5f9e23613ff3d8e212
290f842cd0353eb8650f29335393238df7850905
'2012-01-14T11:04:28-05:00'
describe
'66' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRJZ' 'sip-files00023.txt'
59dda380698662c30977459c7d5b1693
89af0759c3877d97aac7d5ddf56f56e0dae6e003
'2012-01-14T11:04:50-05:00'
describe
'859181' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKA' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
591caf34a023d64450c6604a5adff4b0
a8d40dd97358445cd5dd10d6738ce822e86b1241
describe
'185992' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKB' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
aac22e72ddee613ccc141013fe2bc829
6ac212dd8c7fef263c380a65c07adcea32f4b24d
'2012-01-14T11:02:59-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'18778' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKC' 'sip-files00024.pro'
8dd7a0cec0ff7d2d32ebbc8c01ea7144
6b0c9d0cf6ca244417d79d3639df7124fe93d3a5
'2012-01-14T11:05:45-05:00'
describe
'66072' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKD' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
c8d3c2241b4efa1f342fe7a9ca2fd331
208b76372297e63967b2740e2dff383da318ee6f
'2012-01-14T11:02:57-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'6884660' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKE' 'sip-files00024.tif'
a8822f088bc30375d4e4da64ed8c9466
3884937f784fe565d199cad03bc2c2cbb821aad1
'2012-01-14T11:03:33-05:00'
describe
'762' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKF' 'sip-files00024.txt'
cdfcd305cbb429d7280ffe62a41d7bc0
05697c328f55b341b0879b55573e0a5f3dfd3593
'2012-01-14T11:04:19-05:00'
describe
'996409' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKG' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
f291853ea3ae4997a7206b16c173b253
a9df011150db391871ed608bc0b739de01cb9dc6
'2012-01-14T11:03:17-05:00'
describe
'339325' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKH' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
dc89ecc324fa8a9474d0dcfc476d864a
01ee1f8d37b9d4a93b4b36c31059df5c52c74efa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'740' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKI' 'sip-files00025.pro'
5b03bb448e3220a77123d99785e742a4
9ecb58c47b70a4b201178252b50a1c8abed432d2
describe
'111695' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKJ' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
34e5e62c33b883f5460e895b316d485b
547377e3002b58cc61874dbd659e2d0e57248ac8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23939900' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKK' 'sip-files00025.tif'
f733be5ffbeee1dea30b2b60d57209da
0353130bfab135716ae47a548efbab44503f14b1
'2012-01-14T11:03:14-05:00'
describe
'119' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKL' 'sip-files00025.txt'
a2fbc8b299b846c9b5bd7248da05dfa7
c5cf6b8d0ef6540c1f34cfc065a4a4c39f1cfa23
describe
'937485' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKM' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
c10b0c46c3c40031a40b43a694505f65
b6a195c80ae5c1210d72c68546fbb00fb7c9c128
'2012-01-14T11:04:57-05:00'
describe
'174706' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKN' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
020b9a1e8a1a0dae6e46fc32db47db77
efa0073307341de1d345ed9e954d4e0596bdf0be
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'21689' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKO' 'sip-files00026.pro'
b77f9117538dda5ffc583d5debe4e8b8
b546e37a7dc58f9ed03652b4de620056c9a8acb1
'2012-01-14T11:03:01-05:00'
describe
'64807' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKP' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
84b2a33ed9eb58646b0fd880dba79be2
49dabbdfdd6ac721971fd8f226f8f43e59768505
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7523704' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKQ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
e67701ae3c486364b6539ab4e9f5ea90
078d254f1d9413e931f19649c7037b55dfd559fe
'2012-01-14T11:05:55-05:00'
describe
'895' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKR' 'sip-files00026.txt'
11f4592e5060787890cf93dfb22c4b2b
2c4ece6f4e23ae84863fbb7d1a61064bc3a25f8f
describe
'996390' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKS' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
255fdcd1a5352699c1ebffd167c69d6a
ebd4a72e10bf7d96d8666a84d5f8f723e8605929
describe
'339298' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKT' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
a5caa9e2bc2eddd4cf30b167c20897af
af4b4db662575d98ed7d8439d662ca45c5bae4f2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1986' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKU' 'sip-files00027.pro'
4c51f5d5bb1ec1517e3298df25c68ff5
ecee6f9f20e241164beb86b2b0d0449deed0e2f5
describe
'112156' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKV' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
1467133de65da624f9431e3ac5d19ac5
348557ff78dbeaa0ed4e66fca5e44907a4c1e32c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23940048' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKW' 'sip-files00027.tif'
58f34ed1d4b92a4f028d246e06209d72
a021672ebdba3ce195cde1da560d20cbb8755b47
describe
'180' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKX' 'sip-files00027.txt'
8b582bbe500b0ecc781f6c9e6a688c19
a234084bdae6e27c7db56f632b504855b38576ad
'2012-01-14T11:04:34-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'935154' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKY' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
ff62909d7530ac97425c98c6ff26d145
2ceac781f939b0afb47638e3ba4da38f6cd12f5a
describe
'166766' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRKZ' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
15da18409a2967fe0ee78f7673118b09
2c4182036c1539fcc34ff0d45c879600dfc9d604
'2012-01-14T11:04:10-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'17459' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLA' 'sip-files00028.pro'
edebc4261a18721220a20a3ce55c4c4c
76e8fde3625c800c69378695eebe7f461470679e
'2012-01-14T11:05:32-05:00'
describe
'59547' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLB' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
d2c4666436c14bcc7de36fda7f8c272b
46dd2f0289b69bc8d78dfebe9e28a85c6ac11e06
'2012-01-14T11:03:10-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7494172' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLC' 'sip-files00028.tif'
ef6320780201b45f9087dd2b91d7991f
94f6198a901dbf8e755b92dcf03d5c0863d1d744
'2012-01-14T11:03:32-05:00'
describe
'728' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLD' 'sip-files00028.txt'
50c4b569f4608bc32ca7c3208c9c183d
7ac19ed505d5004c18c5b15b3e82ee065c4d381a
describe
'996322' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLE' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
8b354cbc944d2f112e25002d9fb1e247
4c05714991c4a9154ed4fc273926fbc69ee83d64
'2012-01-14T11:05:14-05:00'
describe
'344504' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLF' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
df6d465dd36901321514b225d676588e
ae493d03b30a1efc811d48520074ae18c0da2c2e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'4424' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLG' 'sip-files00029.pro'
2e0242932ea6decd81cc02a21d66d6ba
0fe7a869d798d0794a63d850e799ec5e17528d97
'2012-01-14T11:05:38-05:00'
describe
'113912' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLH' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
db3678ec58be4347d3024574282ae13c
02050ead3fac9df446bd8a8c5ec61b6b2851772d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23940908' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLI' 'sip-files00029.tif'
12b71db64aaaaf8683698858eb89d70e
17cbc79606096ef395314b59d363251778f1c377
'2012-01-14T11:04:25-05:00'
describe
'623' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLJ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
f6af1930c47c049e8d301af6d7875685
4524e96df15717b1e186cf587e36279f444ce46d
'2012-01-14T11:04:12-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'989659' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLK' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
1e3f2363b413c60ff55972935c5c2876
f80e4afa1391089a1ad4565ede29d787484f9100
'2012-01-14T11:04:40-05:00'
describe
'354594' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLL' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
bd9462752e9c0b93f91d4dac9f092aae
68d3b7b80a632f44829531ea07d8719e0aba6a81
'2012-01-14T11:05:02-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLM' 'sip-files00030.pro'
c729371b59fac216a9e84984465ee0f0
10052339d4414f69da3e351375562dcddb0279c0
describe
'110187' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLN' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
86a83ff4b8416457bd32c729577afd79
c4b22e55f7dac8c86f6605b9ca12cda51844fa52
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23782176' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLO' 'sip-files00030.tif'
39422cea54a6df8e6c4ca29812b9abfd
e6cac91742637ca58e6602101cfe8dfe4e58bf3f
'2012-01-14T11:05:41-05:00'
describe
'155' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLP' 'sip-files00030.txt'
8358090bf189ee17bc61b63c2ec601e1
cbd1caa1b85efcf6292f91b25c67e1aefebf5c7d
'2012-01-14T11:04:54-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'759927' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLQ' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
122140aa0901a3df552f97a50f2dbeed
de663d5e5342896157f080c03a1f9d34f77f451e
describe
'211488' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLR' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
525b2ea760a9c0874226a47cbd49b235
90bc42149695da78a47766faaf10851ee8188636
'2012-01-14T11:04:41-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'18222' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLS' 'sip-files00031.pro'
74f8457b57aed15785b67678de6b727d
df37d62aff50b9517277e7ef12c24ffceec0a9a0
describe
'72136' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLT' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
2971d8aead03bf7704159c77d470e78f
950d8df19758b005d985a203dc4361c19ea3e853
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'6090484' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLU' 'sip-files00031.tif'
0fee6579feb109d57c0a71ce37476358
b59d1c6723b6c632182355ee5786f88ae0540cc8
describe
'778' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLV' 'sip-files00031.txt'
d81e76881d3ddb6b2f64bb7d289dbcf8
379f37649ca6c5e30ea367a8534788edfd9916a8
describe
'996370' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLW' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
1ccb9eddedda1fd1f02a8f484788e258
41189cfcdbe81853ff78279de5ed2373f8895982
describe
'337160' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLX' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
04b24498c6555115e48672a107026069
7c67e703061cd58047cce14afbee926d68ded2ba
'2012-01-14T11:03:41-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1225' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLY' 'sip-files00032.pro'
8cc981ee1c5ec6474b11a122ef9f48ab
fb630657f14aed439f87040e6a55ddf50494ddbe
describe
'105890' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRLZ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
23180fedd7468b34d51714de007b75ef
ed7315968370d986f719be7368988e1444620f60
'2012-01-14T11:04:00-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23938680' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMA' 'sip-files00032.tif'
e2c8fb78c32d88991927464b6d17cfea
758ca818667b167431b486a5b07f2f9d15c5882b
'2012-01-14T11:04:29-05:00'
describe
'90' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMB' 'sip-files00032.txt'
87b79f7c5434c89237c3086b0a241393
e75304becd4c45199e0d9dd217556af6921a5ebc
describe
Invalid character
'923080' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMC' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
ce475ba9d48b11678356dd95b5e9a73f
7ea95797269ad28c53ba5cebc703e3de09f15b83
describe
'174887' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMD' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
4aa08684a4abc8c96257c5733aac2171
4435f2d33431ac7025e1d3188faaa5e6b19062ae
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'19054' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRME' 'sip-files00033.pro'
e0c00f32b04227c206b66efbf32fd4c7
fc9d26672ab1ca0e16169b1124903787857f9993
describe
'62079' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMF' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
400fb2a54f20b6996344da36f42812fe
ec0a78d23a9ffb1c046a38477a39c859b07ee1b2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7404844' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMG' 'sip-files00033.tif'
09136a1e992a06afeddddfdcec956f50
3f859909d7e00128a5b23dacde23ff3cd8804f77
'2012-01-14T11:05:42-05:00'
describe
'995' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMH' 'sip-files00033.txt'
e0c0dd3dbe1b0a0e891ca4937986aaa4
4cfa39d2bc00cfb6ca8d4cc62d8ba8715adaa805
'2012-01-14T11:04:15-05:00'
describe
'996377' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMI' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
56af205e41e28cbd8306abf4dd99c432
70a07cb304fb156d747992756d58ffc5b3797310
'2012-01-14T11:05:11-05:00'
describe
'318448' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMJ' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
9a5e1c3f9fbecec99a862b7a6960b7df
e42eeec6379d626f7be9fb93682014e224cfbafd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1273' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMK' 'sip-files00034.pro'
8a9ccf07ad206f7a57fea635627bb2d9
6fc9daa04a7b67d568a6c71083fcbab6627b4bf6
describe
'109163' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRML' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
2a18a2264c480fff180bfa210f368565
f6b9850a2e0d9de50dac372f486c9c07586d6b55
'2012-01-14T11:03:48-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23939768' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMM' 'sip-files00034.tif'
348996f2730f2381797805800107ff1f
1100a2100c5b311ed504f1dd486d55cb9c9fc46d
'2012-01-14T11:04:17-05:00'
describe
'63' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMN' 'sip-files00034.txt'
d1368961fbe06c9b439691b214195514
98529222fcefa1a12a1b2d5d7e2ce13d1a9b11a5
'2012-01-14T11:03:50-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'907306' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMO' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
4a774c399ba5247a025695f7b96e9988
a1c6d1e959a1d209efd82183472708935be1a45a
describe
'196635' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMP' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
bf5ca92994736ca87c88d327e97bf229
2b30dedfb2873eeb733d100ea27f2cb7c5744c3e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'22085' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMQ' 'sip-files00035.pro'
2631616715ecd10824230e4512d97a17
88e11576ed034d844d238fc020758bdbf51e1b20
'2012-01-14T11:05:43-05:00'
describe
'68822' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMR' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
9c74b9db9deb20a0362759b012fc006c
447b7c869741572dbcdcc72f99e4529feba7a69f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7279560' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMS' 'sip-files00035.tif'
3f3aa608d644f55deb0c5e910fd6b21d
f136b9a6e4d98444a5a1b70e6da71db6ecbc73a0
'2012-01-14T11:05:24-05:00'
describe
'910' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMT' 'sip-files00035.txt'
4a203d0d880e82b52b22b79958c85cc7
ac414aeeb3fe44e604a2886910f351cb2d8069b8
'2012-01-14T11:04:52-05:00'
describe
'959853' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMU' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
c8df6fc9fd57b725e117b9861fb14024
ad00f2f0ba45444eb4e2c687745d346e5f28d4ca
describe
'95585' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMV' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
2017f13fb216e1ebc76f2ecdf5ffe572
45ff9aeaa448a022b17e5377f3573bb897d0b210
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'654' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMW' 'sip-files00036.pro'
a02841c10b16563cbf026bde73d369e4
6f7e124642ac1625f8027e1fc294ec2d39d7a532
'2012-01-14T11:05:40-05:00'
describe
'31078' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMX' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
28f5f302f72f5c46e4376dd4450f7f02
59a3e3cb8379264f832073c398604d1a241672b0
'2012-01-14T11:05:25-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7689636' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMY' 'sip-files00036.tif'
148303a50009686b1201d7b2a842294f
adb3b4b84af7f00e0c9947704cf719106686eacd
describe
'70' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRMZ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
41e19bd997f599e995246a06ce6e1185
c5d220932f1f12878de261372fafc6e681bcfc5c
describe
'931481' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNA' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
9dbf6db0072801dc0c7bddc3f7c92855
1fb68ac13c0496ae8687ed1023af7bf25d64aaef
describe
'221881' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNB' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
bb26f60f0b3259f5c5e6da67d891fd90
d421d1bc4a2a611261cd344472725bc8629bcb98
'2012-01-14T11:05:19-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27109' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNC' 'sip-files00037.pro'
c985daa16ae852aac72233caea44ce1d
d52fcb4e3e875728e35a1c67b4041a9e3ffda786
describe
'76642' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRND' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
f70c70f9233782037f179d9a85fd4dbf
48065814d9e5f1fc9999114e795ebb10ad94fe35
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7464484' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNE' 'sip-files00037.tif'
fe88d4c0457751ae5b97abaf450470a2
6014263969fac2c988749ff15abb900e6cfcae5f
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNF' 'sip-files00037.txt'
c4e389897edc3b766b30770cfac459d7
737ca17841654135749112dbf334a5106f3b7f35
'2012-01-14T11:05:04-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'989868' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNG' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
9bc46a74900978ec1443495759b010e5
7f00f2156ab92f5ceff39c197407704e83adb000
describe
'369541' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNH' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
b927bd1dcf86aa1ca651c71952f61450
38ceccc5e9ee78c7e6cc1dac7519ec916bc93be8
'2012-01-14T11:03:42-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'622' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNI' 'sip-files00038.pro'
152d5f0fbc5357cd32e380136c12ed65
6aa0cb88b691c60f3db39c569e12de63f300b386
describe
'110248' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNJ' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
28e4ac14bd4ca642b388e96dcd1d5a0a
46cd6e285d3048efbe8334391314ffc3ea4f22fc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23783204' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNK' 'sip-files00038.tif'
c5f4ff044880339c1b3cbf61d10702bf
dd3e48a7a3c70d4fcc8a5f60f6bb1f1d88b031d7
describe
'97' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNL' 'sip-files00038.txt'
ef09e41a14e00fb7d49b8d3e8fa947ab
d322f0e6d81c5d2fdae72ceda63665258c0dcdfc
'2012-01-14T11:05:58-05:00'
describe
'973921' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNM' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
0f0d2a6a6ab2dd07b7b00e94854571c7
facdea4d62505eb519ff5156dd447c2177e56a3f
describe
'292708' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNN' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
632dabf24a2dd24898a47ee9ee8692ac
83d1e9300904b038a8e8dcb73fda24a6d5782573
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'53006' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNO' 'sip-files00039.pro'
d5a2dbb7fd2a8ca5b8dce54d3914f888
163ffbaaccba573a5b8ef8e4080fe949abb9fcae
describe
'97761' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNP' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
3ba082c66143633982c159a072cc7dc0
75588c0ed0b1d9b4b3439b1858286a53a0391db1
'2012-01-14T11:03:58-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7824120' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNQ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
fe254aaff72f1a5cfda4a45757fcbf12
a53d1a0633850c392ffd124f1163196cfe10df26
describe
'2115' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNR' 'sip-files00039.txt'
09d3c6f1240bb54b68cf3949638918b2
a1d9dbf87f59aafa334d2afe86f0ee28c5419f31
describe
'996424' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNS' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
966774b8c02eed88aa41a7487451b034
c2884b2794d2ef4084f0369588d34d75cffed083
describe
'401479' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNT' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
9a404b40da5274abf7da9fa4abc86583
864d07948ad1e1c7e74988e7ca3764e7ba408b93
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'347' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNU' 'sip-files00040.pro'
65b946e84b7767e4b1b004bf67781c7e
2a327d19f574891fc58a6a7ee5a7b498ab4efcfc
describe
'123171' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNV' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
9b8e96e83ab0294081fce1cacc153a32
c964a2df1cc0b1aa353de5031b77f24db3b10ecb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23942528' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNW' 'sip-files00040.tif'
09c26fef5de3431be7e59d052e894453
0e7ce8bea0cf194ac8ea615e5defbb974e771d3e
describe
'37' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNX' 'sip-files00040.txt'
cfdd60631dfedf4b8e5cb6540540f79c
5f4db347af0633ac82cd88f4525e065bcd0d39a1
'2012-01-14T11:03:59-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'976351' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNY' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
985feb182f18ee785067ea4546667827
ffa0d1ccab51af4f4b7c0ef5d6854b09f469edcf
'2012-01-14T11:03:26-05:00'
describe
'284084' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRNZ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
c1e9f8869b55701be587c4d83f4af43d
f6850b2300f99f001467b474d9326b1fbc01d51a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'53379' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROA' 'sip-files00041.pro'
0394d03b6d0d098dd7ee61d25cd5820a
05cf873521d3a860cbaa661ef233afcc733d0860
'2012-01-14T11:03:54-05:00'
describe
'93416' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROB' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
fb98485fcb7f5926d6c791fe804f8343
ddbca6662a0975190f985a1588ede91114ae4cc8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7842384' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROC' 'sip-files00041.tif'
42d0f42fcd55e22fdd29489dcc31b65e
21a4153532fd5b80a7346404de3a53093e6125a3
'2012-01-14T11:05:59-05:00'
describe
'2092' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROD' 'sip-files00041.txt'
60395876d6cad02c381ad7309948d30e
cc3c9c9308f7b114f77b1adfd190e13596625cda
describe
'979126' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROE' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
9f4d38c55e17bd6febd057f9f8b2d2f1
86772b1756734176bfcf90ddb50be90bf63c1c55
describe
'364119' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROF' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
ff09ae650947d1757e43cd56293c7785
d3259e6266f54d43f1eb8f703fcafb350dd4b0f5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'311' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROG' 'sip-files00042.pro'
33832cd32cfca1f77a8fd6a31e1edd02
0479129dfc2e21690137ba937a3e251c5186fc14
'2012-01-14T11:05:54-05:00'
describe
'114287' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROH' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
842ad6ef208e977e2e10f7528621b523
1db003b81928f90533df4d398158509597bfb8d0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23525260' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROI' 'sip-files00042.tif'
4ec7ea44693af9446497f40334de754a
69718cc2b4b9afcba4f5049682aa4af47ca9f7f2
describe
'27' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROJ' 'sip-files00042.txt'
e015767c0eeff025ab9ce9c0eee43097
6cc53708ed360b95f4f1cb682409c51638e59025
'2012-01-14T11:03:40-05:00'
describe
'972989' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROK' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
d8c7ede8a8593eed171a5870ae80443c
4779604cc4fdc2e07b3e0ee1514fd7a9bf3d175c
describe
'368165' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROL' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
0ee38ef3049ecc253e445f8ebd88c784
600a5fd139f6ab1de605da42b186feb2fd65f1e1
'2012-01-14T11:04:18-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'518' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROM' 'sip-files00043.pro'
5b3570bb8c3c13a908ac279dbc9713e4
e9dc97057c882bcdebe6212d25dff39929e40072
describe
'115501' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRON' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
05acefee51143b6bb56a50b4b9d11a4b
e26d001cbe978de8190802e9bc07e3d10f883b3d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23378816' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROO' 'sip-files00043.tif'
1737ce00e2d9daac4c6cca093193814e
0ed6a5b26caa0108d248c4e632747b3ca67a6f9d
describe
'36' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROP' 'sip-files00043.txt'
c72947b7e581c2bb11671ff3814e35dc
b5ca8dc284e32b9dbeef69bac75ab1717d2d76b2
describe
'978240' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROQ' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
d61202d300c8b81fb801879c351e1601
4137249107879be3df906e648b37d7025cfd55ba
describe
'293527' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROR' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
0da99bf2429ef9087ed6b7dfbda15f60
7d42f9395d1b02340b47ad32f91b1fe947d2719e
'2012-01-14T11:05:23-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'52722' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROS' 'sip-files00044.pro'
b2c54ace746a0a4fe6074fb66d5bab8e
f27c51f59550fc5cf9b356ef423bd63ed10bf065
describe
'96333' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROT' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
a4326d2b2378c7805fcf7776de0c3110
d3b08368e3ba1db4e26ac5b52def60f9dbb9f4b5
'2012-01-14T11:05:00-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7858252' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROU' 'sip-files00044.tif'
bd7fe75d8ef2017c320ff8430f6c29fe
2a14095c91d4521cb90724f190d61aec9603fd35
describe
'2064' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROV' 'sip-files00044.txt'
785dd044999f0c32fb16bc432becf412
0078c336a2ea50d9315a4dc2940ec4570f862aa4
describe
'974925' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROW' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
8e81529bb2bdbacb453e32923baaae1c
6f455856b108d56664e76776b74bdcdb83dfc611
describe
'397147' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROX' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
ebeeeb4833bc36520cf9d208e452ff93
5525c2ed54bcb0f09fd328d2c918cbfaeb48ceaa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'589' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROY' 'sip-files00045.pro'
f3565a16338c978c09f6320e4e9c5d59
08e1ba4d0d2eeb4bb3b91c6d3e74f765bee2b67c
'2012-01-14T11:02:54-05:00'
describe
'122358' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABROZ' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
5c7be53f460dd611179a0265bfbb1022
c92b38c7b63af8893ca53260c5a838c673a3fc86
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23427520' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPA' 'sip-files00045.tif'
7f0699f38fab3b7be0cee0bd93b0d1b2
cc6ed13fa5d21bfc1a72ec31f7ebaf0e5f23c7ae
'2012-01-14T11:04:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPB' 'sip-files00045.txt'
358ad23080c6e9b4adeabe924568de00
da6c0942c605e5a3d6608327186219afedda33cb
describe
Invalid character
'976684' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPC' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
e94e51c0595e1107dc691e1f2dd454b8
84026ea33b393219ef83c9dfa15c26bdaaed9851
describe
'297285' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPD' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
d180f3bd3a0da89ee49050801b7b75c9
9e4ecd2981de8f8c668ba7c5b1011f3ae17cc40c
'2012-01-14T11:04:04-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'52572' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPE' 'sip-files00046.pro'
7ef827d8fca04a883e6e9aa5cbbea188
baf1e12afbd3e0abdc372cf2d3c681c90838b231
describe
'98513' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPF' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
a37c8840c2a8f3bd5848016ccae8a240
d4e08b23d1188135b235d434f046ecc8248610b8
'2012-01-14T11:05:44-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7846224' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPG' 'sip-files00046.tif'
5b90b0b7b256122718532e12f7a6028a
d23a896b927c7f5e64ea2a9cf6e5c7440b349cbd
describe
'2083' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPH' 'sip-files00046.txt'
ab4fcc38a696319bac1fb67b14bf37d1
bd731561208ec56d584bbaae46ad55eacbd97ba8
describe
'996417' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPI' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
73bd117bf113283f67f31c4e00eebdcf
81817ad23afaba2b32da3d6c76a0eab049dd8449
describe
'400528' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPJ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
0b72dd51f20d21241aac55b1eab60005
a99804e567e8b080877833f3613cbe2ccf16db43
'2012-01-14T11:03:35-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'671' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPK' 'sip-files00047.pro'
f7d8497f2b8d11127f400b1202d7a86e
57474b6cb7ce4a1b8c4943cb6af0d81d98853c43
'2012-01-14T11:02:53-05:00'
describe
'125709' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPL' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
9571010a9a495ac74a7221856ac9af80
a9b72803f1929443513f13b41f277c65e0d75988
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23943404' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPM' 'sip-files00047.tif'
653e32f8983588e6f22a4a379899b708
f545b9e158b323b6cc61f029b18d181915f742f3
'2012-01-14T11:03:29-05:00'
describe
'41' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPN' 'sip-files00047.txt'
4fe69d728505463d90a5594cc5600543
cb02ab062efd9536c01b64d7191aafc11ffbbf02
'2012-01-14T11:04:32-05:00'
describe
'981046' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPO' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
619ff9a0774750a6af6af9c73a51bae8
8ea323dc1c96c8e5ab84dca46030c1e2ddf2b257
describe
'280037' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPP' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
49c1a410ca26fd6dd802292655b1c419
e4c92fe481f656607865ffab31be4f50e5b844d8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'52379' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPQ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
919a329faf7fbc660f9989ed2470af22
85ed982eb37099ab14bb5d399d408e8fc0838b42
describe
'92697' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPR' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
aa473b31cc01b16075ef36c4825ede4c
11373b73a584ea12380e0942f6cb50ddafcd40d2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7879908' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPS' 'sip-files00048.tif'
cbf45aee86c92168dc4ccb3ff4558914
b845f77f03804f86cf70f7fb83c03447cd0d251d
describe
'2082' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPT' 'sip-files00048.txt'
5573d7f3442e077897522618eefe40ce
8520d9225011d28ca98cb72907e4af4994dcede8
'2012-01-14T11:03:49-05:00'
describe
'971065' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPU' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
5d04e11a5d446a1c0eb02e3b7a805823
821c0a41432ffef5f54256d91c96ed60be57d297
describe
'101001' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPV' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
6bc0018ea7b46eef838d108ac18aee72
032ea78bb91048ad6419e6fe19e7ea3d7924f4c4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'974' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPW' 'sip-files00049.pro'
75b1df49d08036c4fff84531b04c1536
73d540007162b54fd05f4b2325d7a999724959e5
'2012-01-14T11:03:30-05:00'
describe
'32845' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPX' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
f5f437743c07e2180828b6822fab6113
9d8c8af4d4fada170616bfaee3fb855985b17546
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7780348' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPY' 'sip-files00049.tif'
8a812c5325d3d622b08ffbd4524160bc
5be873c0be565d5181dfb2e17a8890dcfff3ee66
describe
'95' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRPZ' 'sip-files00049.txt'
e7d9da52a287716661a5f9e9dc6d21aa
704845d721164dad380c9221fe2524e86ceb12bb
describe
'943240' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQA' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
2837f3b23a30b47f46977c7ce4ea701b
201e62d16934d5bade471dba6f072d650b9329a1
describe
'258698' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQB' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
0033c3f764efff3d271507dd54664984
a4e412472071b509401bd98cd493162a08b9fbd6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'62969' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQC' 'sip-files00050.pro'
bef61ddbb941fb7034c9797445fd8ae3
72917f1a1c300b4621bcd05822be6799b0a4989b
describe
'81670' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQD' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
9f837763fa20558cab2a026e08eeb3cf
b102cf2b23a317333ba5852eb6dd70614d87db87
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7559984' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQE' 'sip-files00050.tif'
28fedb075766e9be5704d3e7140257cf
f42d0c7d951f99167e909c4cd462a56ee106b32c
'2012-01-14T11:05:06-05:00'
describe
'2488' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQF' 'sip-files00050.txt'
dc7371f97e778c82a696aeea6252d943
a4cc97ba392be49ab60724ecd69cd1032b6f1660
describe
'996425' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQG' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
d846e76bb1017ca01d7a076dbd313169
ffecebaaf86efed53633d8034f863fa924215458
describe
'426287' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQH' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
13be6d35ca29dd6286d9c648cde1118e
5c45d89f13be0c9320f184722461241e7c9dabe1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'336' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQI' 'sip-files00051.pro'
8ec3599f1ac9f28493f7e02a9bfca962
d927f0ebe5dce911187545e438817bc3508ec848
describe
'129257' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQJ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
352fea6be964c053bc62c527eae4a6f5
bb3cc3b4df9c50112a0b519e97be6b68749a3390
'2012-01-14T11:02:55-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23943232' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQK' 'sip-files00051.tif'
bed051c1b44efcb5dc510c7164fef479
fbe3f38a963de681ee2200096dfda7aae294b29e
describe
'56' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQL' 'sip-files00051.txt'
68419691413e86299ed37c3483f091f6
389511c30ac620de969df40201a9cc3a84fe7c8d
describe
'960212' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQM' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
68b03f54fe2c2a29a2c1a8237d2221da
8cdc91db6e9183424bda57150ab3ad641692d8d1
describe
'296670' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQN' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
0330c52868583d2c8991a799e1b2ba2e
d5693bd709598f1ac3ef71bcb51f0c9c5064920c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81050' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQO' 'sip-files00052.pro'
fe64ff705632041779dd99c5ec605af2
adfc58d0f952457b25c94bad8b5b57f20461c35e
describe
'88465' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQP' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
e484245c8de1d4a5c1d3188eacf6461a
9da38a4934fa6d87640f3e2fcb7c3ef02357328d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7709968' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQQ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
20987f64ce9f48e0f0c8460fcd22f47e
f99015baa11f21e30d799adc540e26c94131fb7b
describe
'3167' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQR' 'sip-files00052.txt'
769ba98a61a66cb9b136bbdaea18c2fe
6997988baf9f15a6288ed1d24c006ffa71a3662b
describe
'989855' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQS' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
b31f82fc4c4def6d1335b18469dd3d32
99c9f8964bdab5c834a5bf543999b49dd9d1fcab
describe
'356777' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQT' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
7157b70bb9836e7dcec123b7e1124329
485121d90250ba6ed1b87e38b04501f178692f04
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'538' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQU' 'sip-files00053.pro'
258b2bc77cba9839b706244f9f626bcd
79798aac2903b160efc5621cc2d1bb209361580f
'2012-01-14T11:05:52-05:00'
describe
'112793' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQV' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
c1cf4a921466c7892d37698feed0fbe8
bb3476af95d81b4220cb3c197be32d357f7d8d98
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23783100' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQW' 'sip-files00053.tif'
96a1b46d3a0b634dfb30cbc491df90ae
2ef6f6d216e7a0f516f905f5cc5bdd3f32c67839
'2012-01-14T11:05:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQX' 'sip-files00053.txt'
f99d9e9b2bdd4a4317bd032bc3b0d32e
73345e551350ed2c97aaf9c8d4f6d8b278972855
describe
'922212' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQY' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
efb7587a5a542719bd017dca7ae7f0e6
567f287451dd0f091fe9cf100e54e94f11d66a8b
describe
'300259' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRQZ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
00c3afedb2069da6dc57c7d7a47e66be
1ebb54c44c7966da40c6fa768c765b91fedbf193
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79705' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRA' 'sip-files00054.pro'
c8add8bb34e3d6c98039ed78bc6248a9
42cbd98cb986df62829c372e8b9594a716a23d10
describe
'94657' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRB' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
07c8efefe537d24969c47a98e255afff
a4ddd803c8ca622f416093b1614ad9bc6b2a18c7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7390512' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRC' 'sip-files00054.tif'
6ca39c256f492c554032992619844cf6
62c419b58eccb6fc25338606668ec953a8335896
'2012-01-14T11:06:00-05:00'
describe
'3227' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRD' 'sip-files00054.txt'
f4fe38d5d6e1d16da1188745bda5004e
8ba09277f34724edda3b0c71638280b1a2d1b0d8
describe
'944366' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRE' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
b81722d28cf3151f1ef55ca66a247986
fe80cc912aa597a37e9f9799378484ace57a2446
describe
'376679' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRF' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
3441282ce08dbbe8ba0e2071248f455a
0874205cad0d3d3b13def99810cc98fef3bcc608
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1174' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRG' 'sip-files00055.pro'
dd2fc07c388a90f163ac1b0699fa9ac8
747405a2f0502f63e3ebabed81f1d3599db8bf90
describe
'115289' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRH' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
88d1962386ca8284bcf04c0e827827ae
6fd6c3216c98779f2b50346a87d6817d1e566547
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'22678080' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRI' 'sip-files00055.tif'
56cb15dc685c4d06b1b1a1d3f6af279f
5bc9146295d627d2f647ce35cf08d3ce8b2d9888
describe
'192' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRJ' 'sip-files00055.txt'
0364d9c803d66e1f3093549eebf708de
6097b7067647afe9591c375b399d69d4b1d8d632
describe
'959700' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRK' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
8909b779cf88ede8f6e4ab2d806f57f8
a2512975422642207db6a60d83406b070bdb95a1
describe
'401667' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRL' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
8ee5a786b660531102973b69acbb3cd3
d2436a47e1ec1099eff9d1a84dd8e671fe79641b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'792' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRM' 'sip-files00056.pro'
aa529d43803701dcafe37199c20b2a4d
584a9b624fb343195d288a0053f90dfa18a4d2a2
describe
'126188' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRN' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
056e0681efd8f6165e90f844532bb62f
857329bd9a1c5ae3cea308fa893fd6aab3e107cb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23045364' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRO' 'sip-files00056.tif'
06fc58a70eceda4b8d725334bd99dc60
8efa1656363f33f23a395294cf1c00e7866f59f0
describe
'244' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRP' 'sip-files00056.txt'
12fc2a42ed3830bdce2a82e40933806a
96d533985f09494f85d2682348f4ce264595f300
describe
'941637' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRQ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
ea38d145af4cdd5569728c22a9cbf195
030b5a551a99331d589242578feae08db007b26d
describe
'281343' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRR' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
90d226062ea5ce36f8513d60b74a08da
9dc383bc9f7f91b4a2314512d8bd717184087462
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80464' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRS' 'sip-files00057.pro'
17e3f1ce9ae0862037e9f3dad4c54612
38a3848a2aa32c86038d811481c9804699589134
'2012-01-14T11:04:45-05:00'
describe
'90755' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRT' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
2f8cd3acbc4587cb3447bf2a70763542
cb23e388e908d9ac0f5107f4a89c994b21a21959
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7545940' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRU' 'sip-files00057.tif'
46108a49f02edbe8a0d77451924131df
3bf41cc5cbe2c5fc864933ef9f79b5ca441002bf
describe
'3142' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRV' 'sip-files00057.txt'
beb8cbf045dcd75098ff0b03705e76cd
7298a09eb264e610975835e2f1f56ff0082c155d
describe
Invalid character
'961872' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRW' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
1f716651f2e715a113b13ce9c43c9fde
eff445ead84d5ecab21d0828fef1a0b97002d040
describe
'360062' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRX' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
258cad25607b54fa66b284f1c0e83c58
42104b28c394da93c78e951db17dfa1519da1103
'2012-01-14T11:04:55-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1774' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRY' 'sip-files00058.pro'
3278078aa6957572f6c5b4d1ed98ef81
7c1a3ebc2f1180cdbd3de9a242b1254f210fdb22
describe
'104309' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRRZ' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
fc32fc550297dde4ea74910380befb68
c0701b7eda4b2c9c521d927d8ed47aaae1180a36
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23108820' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSA' 'sip-files00058.tif'
b7593c53758307990926720b37190f68
d327d22af17866049cf69990ae3f401f4da3e909
'2012-01-14T11:03:22-05:00'
describe
'220' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSB' 'sip-files00058.txt'
e235e81c58d69d8ae9578da8408f6926
1c7a4d1972781bc308f0b99cfaa8b786aaa25a3d
describe
'942891' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSC' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
1e82bddbd0bd1cec24ced8030095dfc3
8823ff215c82af3d5ab36833cbdbf23a25129b1c
describe
'285438' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSD' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
87853400c8324c30d7a82d4c58dd6595
3135a05a55bc800e01bffd43b9c1a749415404f6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80532' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSE' 'sip-files00059.pro'
5d5f73d87362ba35e6401ba947ea41cf
8ab388e2fc889a7276fe9e8b9f7fb5b3c8d0a6eb
'2012-01-14T11:05:22-05:00'
describe
'90071' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSF' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
7aae83ee1430c5471ea1d61f555f9a4f
9387511b672081cc051d4c81c15b45889ad43613
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7556204' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSG' 'sip-files00059.tif'
ed3989381dd0b87ecf0931cd3831e5a4
9acc4fc30d7051d27a3344781ab6dfd93d560f52
describe
'3120' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSH' 'sip-files00059.txt'
0982056fb3dffcef8590b4c6812800cf
930d9875fbc33557d28392c1048187632db26802
describe
'974343' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSI' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
86de5289b4b174b31a66ad4a352fb4fb
b90883e9e728138d9728d3232ae5ebec54a9af9c
describe
'397065' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSJ' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
f8589db9c7fa1f7b59c3dd0e94ea132d
8f2a38a50d267f03efcfb08233a0b95ac18e7c11
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1429' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSK' 'sip-files00060.pro'
13fd5708e8def55d21b67b199e24be70
ab2cfb887414bbc8a6f5b83212c47d76a62223e7
describe
'119469' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSL' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
8be0a7576d8d21581a9b1934dc937fbc
9d0438a1d49acc4496efd657f66b2318666c5287
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23413684' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSM' 'sip-files00060.tif'
92e11570c9f9ec4fa90a2e6968f68dc7
62c529811739544fc9010ce2f4e01562bb49ad8f
'2012-01-14T11:03:23-05:00'
describe
'416' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSN' 'sip-files00060.txt'
24a2f06c4b540e38991578881e350d3b
f4666ceb03fbc90e080cf497abc376b619a80d4c
describe
Invalid character
'943460' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSO' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
31aeb75524f0ddc293aa033a69d6577f
43f9620075ff4afdb7c0394449de7ccd22c96c84
describe
'288071' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSP' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
99f92effa8e9ffbd2feda3775de22e62
d5ba712c0f108ea6144a985b4670016ec83d2b01
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75309' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSQ' 'sip-files00061.pro'
bcb98ece25723fe625d2c0eda53444e8
7cd929a60340a851e64872c213481f58df29f9db
describe
'87648' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSR' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
6f03e4e632d16247b33d172aea2d1b87
ce852c8dee6bcca26782b74bca448ffd0674de32
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7575096' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSS' 'sip-files00061.tif'
69220f6d77183d374875ab0601d3e3c0
928909702a29aa1e6ba9d88e615baa55bb3f8b55
describe
'3162' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRST' 'sip-files00061.txt'
67336e0d9d6d776a22cf5e06e31950b2
b6f1157b3f46aedb9121b71e9c6f53a1620b97d8
'2012-01-14T11:05:27-05:00'
describe
'1047366' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSU' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
34e6302ac1bded2a475aa5a7d3cf064c
0afbb2b31752995fc1521666158b715ce105a966
describe
'134730' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSV' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
e476fff0c05296fdc98d9c8213801fa6
474d7bc9ba55488c84b92394081561fddb0a59e9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'504' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSW' 'sip-files00063.pro'
f6b027d52e74792f3a73b4500af40aca
50b6432767e0f2b50189bb03bad3f69f5d41a7fe
describe
'44022' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSX' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
3195f1038b449fe375018357539c0b55
4f2983399e26b5e375bf093931c0aaeea13c4b08
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25147680' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSY' 'sip-files00063.tif'
a796efc424ae4b01889932ed7b6b131e
94e279ed0c6a2070d25d9cb8af0cd89c4f460990
describe
'19' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRSZ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
29f6d97afe892c7e5b46d16d1f9c4632
c45d0b870b99bd703a62ddc1350d08be9a238ee9
describe
'1044224' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRTA' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
d4fe591d99212adb86fd9a29f6810173
6853dc8dad96d38a56b6437e421d7596fb2f71b1
describe
'231977' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRTB' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
d119d082c0b34f3a773b3a1e049baecf
5842e572256970073d3d16c9f0d8ba473ad71e3a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1234' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRTC' 'sip-files00064.pro'
613573f28043cadaa72f823bd847364b
73470ac9e9e2c8a88bee7bfe833f5ba03ddb5afb
describe
'53320' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRTD' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
65104fa0bb9a334e8057c1d199b2d22f
dc39900f1c82df88a7ee42d0c39d2cefc36c1e53
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25072164' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRTE' 'sip-files00064.tif'
37ffddc5134a51aef37a96e9d8404b78
6e65e2d88e5d51edbbf39ee8c5d2a37cff604c31
describe
'221' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRTF' 'sip-files00064.txt'
aa31c0a70a95de9413eab4ad42c353a5
393d47cc855907b1eb7519f66899ecb0420acb8d
describe
'116193' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRTG' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
354800140fd1524113e8bee3c807fb0b
60f07455d3ecfd78e4975267e69445b8491be3ff
describe
'31283' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRTH' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
3ff46fed9b5da5862b8cea6caaf5a38d
f08b67daa0333125cc58938f46e36d88a760e219
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'354' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRTI' 'sip-files00065.pro'
af127abe7a159e749a28a3a2b9d3b56b
40dd4d801029ca8af256ff324d8b4acbf22b1710
describe
'18376' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRTJ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
0dd052fcb172b753ec71b9ce93b3a502
00a77965dce8d22755e28ee9df0c653c6c02a092
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2798972' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRTK' 'sip-files00065.tif'
e615b5ad860f6000676556dfb238dad4
f873eb24956a9657029c1fa5031028ac78b4fcfc
describe
'23' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRTL' 'sip-files00065.txt'
2c79184780128deee269d8d4a14a910a
ca0b7c431a42281344ceafb50d6d3de1707e72df
describe
Invalid character
'232' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRTM' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
9f99abbb2d59a4e6709959d7f6d1350c
cc866961968b1ac5534fa4444144615769141785
describe
'111561' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRTN' 'sip-filesUF00025045_00001.mets'
ffe6271b94f888943f266c663ffec692
883186e2a1733dbf8b1ed47563937bb9321de45f
'2012-01-14T11:03:56-05:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T10:30:24-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'125312' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAACVfileF20090313_AABRTQ' 'sip-filesUF00025045_00001.xml'
3d106f1ea86399b93397d89093fdd392
b08d682c008929f341fc96ed87d087465149d6f7
describe
'2013-12-13T10:30:23-05:00'
xml resolution


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The Baldwin Library

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LD FR



IENDS AND NEW FACES


















oe









OLD FRIENDS AND NEW FACES:

COMPRISING

ROBINSON CRUSOE. | SOP’S FABLES.

| |
QUEER CHARACTERS. | COCK SPARROW.

WITH

EM ENTY-FOUR, PAGES OF ILLUSTRATIONS,

PRINTED IN COLOURS BY KRONHEIM.

CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN,
BELLE SAUVAGE YARD, LONDON, Ec;
AnD 596, BROADWAY, NEW. YORK.

wt 1870.
2 wie: :

PRE EA e ER.

“Ou, such an-accident,” cried Kate,
“Tas happened to my doll;

Its darling nose is melted off,
Its eyes won’t work at all.

“Oh, dear! oh, dear! what shall I do?
Its face is almost gone!”

Said Maggie, looking very grave,
“Why, put another on.” .

The thing was done, and Katie’s doll
Looked quite as good as new.

I think we might do just the same
In picture books—don’t you?

We do not always want new friends;
We love the old ones best:

So here are four with faces new—
Look at them, while I rest.
























4.





et

.







.DVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.

4
.
“



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——E——— ee

ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.

_—_—_——>> =D 0:

Comg, gather round me, little ones,
And hearken unto me,

And you shall hear a tale about
A lad that went to sea—

About a lad that ran away,
Oh, many years ago, ‘
And left his home and parents dear—

Young Robinson Crusoe !

Now when this lad grew up a man,
It came about one day,
That he was cast upon a rock—

An island far away.

And there to shield him from the storm,
And keep him safe and sound,
He built a house, and thatch’d it o’er,

_ And fenced it round and round.

Far off upon a sandy bank
His ship lay all a wreck ;

* And oft-times when the sea was low

He got upon the deck,







For many things he there had found
That he could bring ashore,
Upon the raft that he had made,

And carry to his store.

Two kittens and a faithful dog,

With powder, guns, and shot,
Three cheeses and a chest of tools

’*Mong other things he got.

And now he bravely went to work,
Made tables, chairs, and stools,
And shelves around his little home,

On’ which to lay his tools.

He set a cross upon the beach,
Lest time should go astray,

And with his knife he cut a notch,
To mark each passing day. ;

He caught and tamed a little kid,
That trotted at his heels ;
And with his dog and cats at home,

Tt shared his daily meals.
YY an


a



Adventures of Robinson, Crusoe.

Yet sometimes he grew very sad,
And then he sat him down
Upon the shore, and thought his God

Looked on him with a frown.

And he would gaze upon the sea,
Across the billows wild ;
And wring his hands and cry aloud,

And weep like any child.

He thought upon his father’s words—
His mother’s prayers and tears ;
How they would grieve for him, their son,

Away so many years!

Yhen he would fall upon his knees,
And clasp his hands in prayer,
And ask his God with many tears,

His wicked life to spare.

At times with gun upon his back,
He roamed the island round,
Where melons, grapes, and sugar-canes,

All growing wild he found.







A parrot, that some years before
He artfully had caught,

Would hop upon his thumb, and shriek
The lessons it was taught.

And so to keep it snug, he made
A cage to put it in:

He made a big umbrella too,
And all his clothes of skin.

I wot he was the strangest sight
That ever you might see ;
In jacket, breeches, cap, and shoes,

A hairy man looked he.

With big umbrella o’er his head,
His sword hung at his side,
His gun and axe upon his back,

He rambled far and wide.

| Now on the island herds of goats

Were running wild and free ;
But when he tried to catch the things,
Away they all would flee.

»

ee

e

Adventures of Robinson Crusoe.



nn hii nmin

And 80, to get them in his power, At length he longed when days were fine,
He dug pits in the ground ; Upon the waves to float ;

And there one morn at break of day, So with his doula he went to work,
A goat and kids he found. And made a little boat.

The goat he let away again, He set a mast and sail before,
For it was fierce and strong ; A rudder, too, behind ;

The little kids he tied with strings, And with his dog and gun on board,
And took with him along. He sped before the wind.

And then from running wild again, One summer morning as he walked
His little flock to keep, Abroad, with gun in hand,

A piece of ground he fenced around, He stood aghast as he beheld
Wheré they might feed and sleep. A footprint in the sand!

His crops of barley and of rice, Though many years had passed away,
Now rich and ripe had grown ; Since to that lonely place

For seeds he found upon the wreck, He came, yet he had never caught
He long ago had sown, A sight of human face.

The corn he pounded into meal, | He thought of dreadful savages,
And made it into bread ; All naked, wild, and black ;

The rice he baked in little cakes, And paused at every step he took,
At times to eat instead. To look in terror back.


ee

Adventures of Robinson Crusoe.

He dreamt about them in the night,
And thought of them by day ;
And searce would stir, lest they by chance

Should come across his way.

At last one day he climbed a hill,
Where oft he used to lie,

And took with him his telescope,
To see what he could spy.

And looking off towards the shore,
A sight he did behold,

That set his very hair on end,
And made his blood run cold.

A band of painted savages,
. He saw to his dismay,
All dancing round a fire, on which

A human body lay.

He saw them kill a helpless man,
And one was standing by,
All in an agony of fear,

For he, too, was to die.





But ere his enemies had time
A hand on him to lay,
He turned and bounded like a roe,

Away—away—away.

Across a stream he swam with speed,
Close followed by his foes ;
But he was saved by our good friend—

The man in hairy clothes!

A young and comely man he was, —
So timid and so shy,
With tawny skin and hair of jet,

And mild and beaming eye.

And oft he paused and looked around,
And knelt as if in fear ;
But Crusoe made him signs to come,

And softly he drew near. —

. Then Crusoe named him Friday there,

And ever called him so,
Because upon that very day

He saved him from the foe.

permanence - wenn } $s th mm
UL rN


ee a

Adventures of Robinson Crusoe.

And Friday quickly learned to work,
For ready hand had he;
And helped, in time, to build a boat

And launch it in the sea.

His master taught him many things,
Of God he told him too,
Who made the sun and moon and stars,

And watches all we do.

A touching sight it was to see,
Poor Friday kneel to pray—
To hear him ery to God for help,

In his poor broken way.

Where’er he was, in house or field,
He ever was the same; __
Obeyed his master with a smile,

And feared his Maker’s name.

One morning Friday came in haste,
In trembling and in awe,
And told his master three canoes

Upon the beach he saw.

|



Then Crusoe bade him bring the guns,
And prime witheut delay ;

And soon they beat the savages,
And drove them all away.

In one canoe upon the sands,
Half dead and strongly bound,
All ready for to kill and eat,
A poor old man they found.

When Friday saw his face he paused,
Another look to take, [ wept,

Then laughed and cried, and sobbed and
As if his heart would break.

He clasped the old man round the neck,
And kissed him o’er and o’er ;
And leapt and danced with very joy,

To see that face once more.

He gave him food, he brought him drink,
He cut his bonds in twain ;
The dear old father that he loved,

Nor thought to see again.

tt roi
Adventures of Robinson Crusoe.

Poor Friday, though his skin was black,
His heart was warm and kind.
My little ones, a lesson this,

For all to bear in mind.

Now eight and twenty weary years,
Had Crusoe been ashore,
Upon his island night and day,

Nor thought to leave it more.

Then oh, what joy was his to see
One morn a spreading sail
Come dancing o’er the waters blue,

Before the swelling gale.

He watched with Friday from a hill,
Though distant many a mile,
Until he saw a boat put off

And row towards the isle.

And now at last his trials o’er,
With grateful heart he trod





Once more on board an English ship,
And bowed in thanks to God.

His faithful Friday went with him ;
His Friday true and kind,
Who loved him more than all on earth,

He could not leave behind.

His big umbrella, too, he took,

His hairy cap as well ; rye
And parrot with its noisy tongue,

Of other days to tell.

And then with heavy heart he turned,
To bid his home adieu ;
And soon, as onward sped the ship,

It faded from his view.

And when old England’s shore he saw,
Oh, he shed many tears ;
For he had been away in all

Full five and thirty years.

THE END.


i
eet

Tea:

Day:


-DOBBIN THE BLACKSMITH.

Tue village forge old Dobbin kept,

And earned his bread from day to day;
For up he rose when others slept,

And worked while others were at play.

The gossips of the town would pay
A morning visit to his shop;

And while old Dobbin worked away,
They talked as if they'd never stop.

Thus Farmer Dogberry, you see,
Lays down the law to Beadle Dio;

While Ploughman Ox appears to be
The wisest of the idle trio.

But Dobbin only blinks his eyes,
For he has honest work»to do,

- And thinks that talk, however wise,

Will never mend a horse’s shoe.

like Dobbin, let us learn to keep
A watchful eye and silent tongue;

And. never let our conscience sleep
When idle gossips we’re among.
a

ge
ee

F a
BT ate

i>

8


TABBY THE PIPER.

As Tabby lay basking one day in the sun,
A-longing for something to eat,

He thought to himself *twould be capital fun
To play on a pipe for his meat.

So Tabby, who was an ingenious cat,
Ran off to his home in the mews,

Where he put on a coat and a wide-awake hat,
And breeches and stockings and shoes.

And then in the road, with his pipe in his mouth,
He played such a comical air,

That he startled the folk in the north and the south,
And the east and the west of the square.

From Piggy the porter he got but a laugh,
From Ducky the housemaid a quack,

And Carlo the groom gave him nothing but chaff,
So Tabby went dimnerless back.

So people who sometimes, led on by ‘conceit,
Attempt what they cannot well do,

A warning should take from poor. Tabby’s defeat,
Or they may get ridiculed too.
i
oy
oil


DOCTOR DONKEY’S ACADEMY.

Doctor Donkey kept a school
For all the brute creation ;

But many thought him more a fool,
Than beast of education.

"Tis true he never much professed
Of learning taught at College;
But then the patience he possessed

Went further than his knowledge.

The worthy doctor here you see,
His scholars catechising ;

That they should all so quiet be
Is really most surprising.

There’s pert Miss Poll, and Pussy Cat,
Fox, Elephant, and Monkey, ;
And Piggy, with a dunce’s hat,
All listening to a donkey.

If thus a brute the beasts can tame,
By patience exercising ;
There’s scarce a virtue we can name
More worthy our advising.
3


THE ARTFUL FOX.

HERE’s a sly, old, cunning Fox,
Trying to appear devout;

Do you think those well-fed Cocks
Know what Reynard is about ?

“Let us shut our eyes,” quoth he,
“Say our grace before our meat;

Surely we should thankful be
That we've barley here to eat.”

But barley’s not the food he seeks,
Nor any other kind of grain;

For Reynard to the farm-yard sneaks
A better supper to obtain.

“No, no,” replies the eldest bird,

“You look as if you’d like to sup;
And I remember to have heard

That Cocks are sometimes eaten up.”

Thus wickedness too often tries,
T'o make itself'a friend appear ;
So mind you never shut your eyes
When danger may be lurking near.
4















































TOWSER’S TRIAL.

THERE are Some dogs that much prefer
Their neighbour’s dinner to their own;
So Towser, like a selfish cur,

Robbed honest Toby of his bone.

Old 'Toby raised a hue and cry,
And all the village dogs gave’ chase;

Till Watchman Trusty’s practised eye,
Discovered ‘Towser’s hiding-place.

Then to the barn, where Cesar sat,
Arrayed in solemn wig and gown,

They took the wicked ‘Towser, that
Before had braved the judge’s frown.

The cunning counsel, Carlo, tried
To plead a melancholy tale;

But “Guilty” all the jury cried,
And so the thief was sent to jail.

As Towser lost his liberty,

Some silly persons lose their name;
And those who have not honesty,

Will taste his pain and share his shame.
adil


THE MISCHIEVOUS MONKEYS.

OLp Jacky the carpenter ’s very well known
To all in the village around;

He lives in a neat little house of his own,
Where mischievous monkeys abound.

Each day after dinner he sits in his chair,
The youngsters all being away ;

And tries to get forty winks quietly there,
While they in the fields are at play.

But sometimes it happens that, ere he awakes,
These mischievous monkeys come back ;
And each some impertinent liberty takes
With the tools of old Carpenter Jack.

They play with his whiskers and tickle his chin,
While Jacky sleeps sound as a church;

— But if they awake him he’ll surely begin

To give them a taste of the birch.

The young should remember to honour the old,
And never be rude in their play ;

For they will wish children to do what they’re told,
When they become aged and grey.

THE MAN AND

| THERE lived a man, in olden time,
_ Beneath a sunny, Eastern clime,





a

' Who, with one consort not content,
| The marriage yoke twice under-

went.

_ One of his wives was passing fair,
| With light blue eye, and golden

hair:

_ The other, more advanced in age,
_ Had entered on life’s second stage.

The husband, too, had now begun

Into the vale of years to run—

His hair no longer dark remained,

But black with white alternate
relgned.





HIS TWO WIVES,

The young wife from her husband's
pate

All the white hairs would extricate; |

The elder, in more sombre mood,

Would all the darker locks exclude.

So each, according to her pride,

Alternately her care supplied,

Her husband’s locks to comb and
tend,

Seeking her own peculiar end.

Unconscious of his wives’ intent,

The poor man sat in calm content,
As from his head, from day to day,
Hairs disappeared, both black and

grey;

Until at last, no longer blind,

The unhappy man awoke, to find

That, *twixt the hands of this fond pair,
He had not left a single hair!





Anan aan ar MN



ennai nce ateamesnctAsts

uae

THE MAN AND THE LION.

As a Man and a Lion were travel-
ling together on a long journey,
they began to dispute with one

another as to which was the:

braver and stronger of the two.
Just at the time they happened
to pass by the statue of a man
strangling a lion. “See there!”
said the Man, “what further proof
can you need of my superior
power?” “If this,” said the Lion,
“is all that you have to show for
your cause, let us be the sculp-
tors, and we will soon show you
a lion strangling a man.”

THE LION IN LOVE.

A Lion once met a Forester’s
daughter, and fell so deeply in

love with her that he determined

to ask her father for her hand
in marriage.
fearing to arouse the beast’s
anger by a refusal, consented on
these conditions: that he would
allow
teeth, and cut off all his claws.
The Lion, in the blindness of his

assion, agreed to this; but he

ad no sooner lost his teeth and
claws, than the Forester slew him
with his club.





‘pceneaeaniaees

The wily Forester, |

him to draw out all his |



aacebntd'

THE GOOSE AND THE GOLDEN EGGS.

A cERTAIN Man had a Goose_
which laid him a_ golden egg |
every day. The Man’s avarice
was so stirred by the sight of
this rich income, that, fearing
it was too good to last long,
he determined to secure his
valuable property once and for
ever, without waiting to receive
it from day to day. So he
decided to Jall the Goose on

| the spot, and make sure of his

treasure; but on cutting her
open, he found that he had not
only gained nothing, but lost all.



- THE BROTHER AND SISTER.

A CERTAIN man had a son who
was extremely beautiful, and a_
daughter who was somewhat
plain. As they were playing near
a looking-glass, the Boy, seeing
his face, remarked how handsome
he was. The Girl, taking offence
at this self- glorification, ran to
her father, and complained of
her brother’s vanity. But their
father told them both to look in
the glass every day—the Boy to
preserve his face from the effects
of vice, and the Girl to make up
for her defects by virtue. :



atch tise niente nssnttihitan sR Sana senna aentncantennnatheniiidihdtri te kas weet 6





scone


nn

oe

eee


emer teror rmee mene: soemeancnmants





THE MAN AND HIS WOODEN GOD.

A cERTAIN Man had a Wooden
God, to which he prayed day by
day for wealth and riches; but
finding that his supplications
were vain, he suddenly seized the

image by the legs and broke it.

to fragments, when a great hoard
of gold and silver flew about the
room. At this he exclaimed to
the idol, “Oh, thou perverse
deity! who, when I worshipped
thee, wouldst take no heed of my
prayers, but now that thou art

re pourest forth more |

good things than I could desire.”

THE BUNDLE OF STICKS,
A Fatuer, who had failed to

reconcile his quarrelsome family |

by words, thought that he might
succeed by an illustration. So
he called his sons together, and
directed them to lay before
a bundle of sticks. “Now try to
break the thegot,’ said he. But
they all failed. Then he gave

them the sticks to break one |

by one, and when they did this
easily, he said, “So will
sons, while united, be invincible;
but separate, and you will as
certainly be undone.”



him |

you, my |



|
|



|







MERCURY AND THE WOODMAN,

A Woopman let his axe fall into
a river, when Mercury appeared
to him, and brought up a golden
hatchet. But the man said that
was not his; and the same with a
silver one. Mercury then brought
up the lost hatchet, which the
man took with joy; and the god
gave him the gold and the silver
ones too. Another man, hear-
ing of this, threw his axe into
the stream; and, when Mercury

brought up a golden one, he said

it was his. But the god would
not give him even his own. —

THE ASS AND THE LAP-DOG.,

An Ass and a Lap-Dog belonged |

to the same master; but the one
lived in the stable, and the other
in the house. Jealous of the
Dog’s life, the Ass thought to
out-do his rival in fondness to
his master. So, rushing one day
into the hall, he began to dance
and caper about, and finally tried
to caress his master and sit upon
his knee. The servants seeing

this, came in with sticks and

cudgels, with which they thrashed
the stupid beast so unmercifully,
that he never got up again.











STULL NT. PR ANN”: SCR STI

THE MOUNTAIN IN LABOUR,

A RUMOUR was spread abroad
that a neighbouring Mountain
was in labour, inasmuch as it had
been heard to send forth pro-
digious groans and mutterings.
Great curiosity was felt among the
pope as to what the wonderful
irth would be—perhaps a giant,
or some extraordinary monster of
the earth. Crowds flocked from
far and near, filled with impa-
tience to witness the result,
when, after a long and anxious
watching, to the dismay of all,
behold, out crept a mouse!

THE ASS IN THE LION'S som

An Ass, having found a Lion’s
skin, clothed himself with it, and
went forth to roam through the
forest in royal attire. All the
animals that encountered him
fled in consternation, mistaking
him for their real monarch. At
length he met a Fox; but Rey-
nard, whose superior cunning
detected the fraud, addressed him
thus: “ You are, indeed, a merry
Ass to wander abroad in this
borrowed majesty; and I, too,
might have been deluded, had I
not heard your silly bray!”





LPN L EE TITS SLEYTR



|

|

eR RS Serr ign arian eater ea PR tear

aa

THE TREES AND THE AXE,

A WoopMAN went into a forest |
to ask the different trees to give
him a handle for his axe. After
some consultation, it was decided
by the more powerful trees that
the homely ash would be the
most. suitable for the purpose.
Having obtained his request, the
Woodman proceeded to fell all
the finest trees in the forest.
Thus they found to their cost
the evil of sacrificing even one
of the poorest of their brethren
to the wily demands of the
most plausible foe.



tes nent nena heats

THE TOWN AND COUNTRY MICE.

A Town Mouse was on a visit to
his Country Cousin, and while at
their frugal meal, he asked him,
“How can you waste your time
in this lonely place? Come with
me, and I will show you how to
live.’ So the Country Mouse
went to town. But while they
were feasting luxuriously at mid-
night, the doors were burst open
by servants and: barking dogs, so
that the Mice could hardly escape.
“Tf this is life,” said the Country
Mouse, “give me my barley at
the bottom of my old oak.”

THE FOX AND THE APE,

| Te beasts being in council to

elect a king, the Ape, from his
| talents and entertainmg manners,
recommended himself to them as
a fitting monarch. But the Fox
determined to prove to his fellow-
beasts what a miserable choice
they had made. So, seeing a
trap nicely baited with flesh, he
conveyed the news of it to his
royal master. The Ape imno-

cently put his feet into it and

was caught, and the Fox ex-
claimed, “What! a king, and
not know a trap!”



{

“THE OWL AND THE GRASSHOPPER.
AN Owl sat blinkin

but a Grasshopper, who was sing-
ing all day below, gave her no
rest, and often abused her. The
Owl, failing to persuade him to
silence, determined to try a stra-

to be kept awake all day by so

yeu must be thirsty.”



went briskly to drmk, when the
Owl made a meal of him.-

Caen een “pintinmetminnaetinnaiettieenesesie rit neunatenAtsseedin pstmt eutnstasenameene.nane sean natant nna saattttnntarenetnte me

in a tree, |

tagem, and said, “How sweetly |
you sing! it is quite a pleasure |

cheerful a voice. I pray you, |
come and taste some nectar, as |
The Grass-. |

opper, flattered by this civility, |







i

HERCULES AND THE WAGONER,

A WaGoneER was driving his
cart down a narrow, muddy lane,
when the wheels stuck so fast in
the mire that the horses could
not stir them backwards or for-
wards; so, without making any
effort of his own, he went down
on his knees and prayed loud to
Hercules for aid. But Hercules,
looking down from a cloud, told
the idle fellow to flog his horses
lustily, and put his shoulder to

the wheel, reminding him at the |

same time that Heaven only helps
those who help themselves

THE WOMAN AND THE WINE-CASK.

An Old Woman, who was wan- |

dering about in search of food,
found a Wine-Cask lying by the
road-side. The Cask was quite
empty, as all the choice sherry
sack with which it had been
filled had just been drawn off.

But the Old Woman put her nose |

to the hole, and after snuffin

heartily for some time, exclaimed,

“Sweet creature! how delicious
must you have been when you
were full of sack, since your
very lees and dregs send orth
so refreshing a savour.”


i

urs =——
2>~ Oa












THE BLACKAMOOR.

A RICH man once bought a
Blackamoor, and was foolish
enough to suppose that the colour
of his skin arose from the neglect
of his former master. So he
laced the unfortunate slave in a
arge tub, and, with his servants,
proceeded to wash and scrub him
with brush, soap, and mop. But
all their efforts were in vain, for
the poor man’s skin did not.
change a shade of its colour, and
the only result was, that after
many washings the wretched







Blackamoor died of the cold.

A Herpsman, who had _lost a
beautiful and favourite Bull, went
searching for it im all directions,

through wood and glade. Being
unable to find it,
_all the nymphs and deities of |
_ the forest that he would offer

e vowed to |

to them a lamb as a reward for
its discovery. Just then he.saw |
a huge lion standing over the
carcase of his Bull, which the
unhappy wight would now fain |
offer to the gods as well, to |
escape himself from the clutches |
of the noble captor.

THE HERDSMAN AND THE LOST BULL.



4 a aerate nemesis be



eet rnrtntnenannasenecnt msi SMe nissS oh tetanus Sse

THE TRUMPETER TAKEN PRISONER.

A ‘TRUMPETER, who had been
taken prisoner in war, begged
earnestly of his enemies for
quarter. “Spare me! I pray,”
said he; “for I have taken no
man’s life in the battle, nor have
LT any other arms than this poor
trumpet.” “Nay,” replied his

captors, “that is the very fault |
we find with thee, and therefore |

shalt thou die; for though thou
couldst take no part in the fray
thyself, yet to have stirred up
strife with thy wicked blast 1s
the greatest crime of all.”



THE DOG INVITED TO SUPPER.

A Man who had prepared a great
feast invited a Friend to supper,
and his Dog asked the Friend’s
Dog to jom them. The latter
accepted the invitation with glee,
and promised himself a splendid
repast. But while wagging his
tail, he happened to catch the

_ eye of the cook, who forthwith

threw him out of the window.
As he went yelping down the
street, he fold his friends that
he had drunk so much that he
could hardly remember which

_ way he got out of the house.



mne-envevemenmererer)



HOW COCK SPARROW KEPT HIS CHRISTMAS.



ie HARLEY was a shepherd. He lived in a pretty little cottage on his
master’s farm, and he had a wife and one little daughter, named Kitty, and
a large dog named Bob. Isaac’s house was not a very large one, but, if it
wasn’t very big, it was very comfortable ; and outside, it was so covered with
green ivy, and sweet-smelling woodbine, and roses, that it looked in the. summer-
time more like a bower than a house, for the ivy trailed right up the great
chimney, and so on to the roof of the house, where it spread itself in all directions,
so that little Kitty, when she looked out of her bedroom window, had a garland
of ivy all around her pretty little face.

Mrs. Harley was a good, kind woman, and very clever. She could wash, and
brew, and bake, all in a superior manner, and she could make such lovely cheese-
cakes, that they were talked about five miles off and more. Many a farmer's
wife sent for Mrs. Harley, if she was going to have a feast, and the fame of Mrs.
Harley’s pastry grew greater and greater every day. But she could do more
things than these ; she could spin, and she could’sew, and she could make lace.
This last accomplishment was the triumph of triumphs in Mrs. Harley’s eyes.

i other things that she could do, she thought of as mere nothings by the side
of this great power. Her husband boasted of her cheesecakes, Mrs. Harley only
boasted of her lace.

If you had ever seen Isaac, you might be sure, you would have loved him.
He was such a good fellow. He had lived a country life all his days, and he
knew all the secrets the country hides from those who don’t wholly belong to it.
He knew where the owl’s nest was, and whereabouts in the wood you might find
a squirrel. He knew the fish parishes in the river, and could point out all the
big holes where the pirate pikes lay in waiting for their prey. He knew all about
the weather—not as to whether it had or had not been raining, which you and I
know well enough, but whether it was likely to rain, or to be fine, to be hot or
cold, or betwixt and between. He could run and ride, jump and swim; in fact,
all that it became a man to do in the country, that he could do, and could do it
famously. |

And little Kitty? Well, there is no use in attempting to deny it, little Kitty
was a duck. No other word can at all describe her. She had blue eyes, and

How Cock Sparrow kept his Christmas.

golden hair, and rosy cheeks, and such a tiny little neck, that her head looked
like a bud set on a slender stalk. Of course Mr. and Mrs. Harley loved Kitty
very much, and Kitty loved them too, and so they all loved one another, which
was as it should be, and very delightful. Now I must tell you that their house
had a garden. One part of it, nearest the house, was full of flowers ; crocuses
and snowdrops in the spring-time, then tulips and pansies, roses when the days
were at their longest, lilies as the autumn drew near, and Michaelmas daisies, in
their half-mourning clothes, when the nights were getting long, and dark, and
cold again. In the other part of the garden were herbs and vegetables, and in
the furthest corner of all was a sumptuous mansion. This sumptuous mansion
was four feet high, and was built of wood and thatch. In front of it was a
commodious yard, at least six feet square. In one corner of the yard was a
lovely trough, and in these highly desirable premises lived Madam Pig and her
graceful family. Now you know all about the Harleys, who they were and how
they lived, I must tell you something about Cock Sparrow.

Mr. and Mrs. Sparrow had built themselves a sweet little nest, in a snug
corner of the ivy-covered thatch of Isaac Harley’s house. In the nest there were
five little eggs, and Mrs. Sparrow sat warming them day by day. Very early
one morning, Mrs. Sparrow said to her husband, “ Dick,” said she, “I do believe
our darling little chicks are breaking their shells.” And so, indeed, they were ;
and presently, instead of five little eggs, there was one little egg and four funny
little sparrows, with squabby little bodies all naked, and soft yellow little beaks
and shrill little tongues, and very fierce appetites. “Peet, peet,” said all the spar-
rows at once, and away flew the father to fetch them a meal; then, when he came
with it, away flew their mother to fetch them another, until they left off saying
“peet, peet,” and nestled themselves down warmly under their mother’s wings.
Another day came, and still there were four little sparrows and one little egg.
And another day and another, and still this egg did not get hatched ; so that the
_ poor dear mother began to grow sorrowful about it, and the poor dear father
began to hint that it was perhaps just as well as it was, and that four were easier
to feed than five would be. But while they were in all this doubt and perplexity,
the egg settled the matter itself, by cracking right in two one afternoon, and
jetting out little sparrow number five. “ Peet, peet,” he cried, and away flew his
parents to get him his dinner. Now just because he had given by far the most
trouble, his mother was far fonder of him than of his little brothers and sisters ;
not that she did not love them. all very much indeed, but then she loved this
last little one the most.

So the days went on, and, as the sweet summer came, they seemed all to be
strong enough to fly. “You had best wait,” said the mother. “ You had best

How Cock Sparrow kept lis Christmas.

wait a bit, my dears, until your wing feathers are a little more grown; I am so
afraid you should tumble.” And the father said, “ Nonsense about waiting ; they
don’t know what they can do until they try, and I am quite sure they are big —
enough to get their living.” But the mother said, “ My dear, I would rather they
should wait:” and so for three days longer: they waited. On the fourth day,
however, they all ventured out on the thatch, and their father and mother showed
them how to flutter their wings and spread out their tails ; and so, one after the
other, they all got safely into the great apple-tree, which you must know stood
by the side of the cottage. Then they all hopped along its branches until they
got down to the lowest, which was not very far from the ground. “And now,”
said Mr. Sparrow, “let us fly to the garden palings,’ and away he went ; but no,
the little ones were quite too frightened, and not one of them stirred. So then
the mother flew across, to show them how, and then both coming back flew
across again, together, and sat on the palings calling to their little ones. So at
last the biggest of the five flapped out his wings, and. away he went, and got to
the palings safely enough, and so away the other four started after him. Three
of them were, as you know, large and strong, and they fltw away famously ; but
the other, the poor little fellow who was hatched last, felt his wings trembling
beneath him, and though he tried, his best he was not strong enough to fly so far,
and down he came, fluttering and tumbling, right upon the garden walk. “Oh,
dear ; oh, dear,” his mother cried ; “he is killed ;” and away she flew to see, and
away flew the father also, and all the other four little brothers and sisters fell
backwards off the top rail of the palings, overcome with emotion. But they
were quite too strong for such a little fall to hurt them. But not s \ their little
brother.

When Mr. and Mrs. Sparrow got to him they found him fluttering on the
ground, and though he was not dead, yet he was very much hurt, and his wing
seemed broken. What to do they didn’t know; they couldn’t carry him, nor get
him back to the nest; and his poor little wing hung down to the ground, and they
were all very sorrowful. Just at that moment the door opened, and out came
little Kitty and Bob the dog. The two oldSparrows flew round the little one,
and the mother opened her wings, and spread them out along the path, and
chattered and twittered, all in the hope of frightening away the fierce monster of
a dog, and protecting her darling. But Bob cared nothing for Mrs. Sparrow,
and walked slowly towards her, whereupon she and her husband flew up into a
bush, and chattered and twittered so amazingly, that Kitty came along the path
to see what was the matter.

Soon she saw the little fellow on the ground, and lifting him up, she ran to
her mother, calling, “ Look, mother! look, mother! I’ve caught a little sparrow.”

3

rile

«

LG


How Cock Sparrow kept his Christmas.

Now Isaac was sitting in his cottage, and he got up to see. “ Why, poor thing,’
he said, “it’s but just fledged, and I think it’s broke its wing trying to fly.” So
he took it in his great big hand, and the poor little sparrow was; very much
frightened at first, but Isaac handled it so gently and tenderly that it soon began
to think he did not mean to hurt it.

So they thought it was best to get a little basket, too deep for the little
fellow easily to get out of; and they put a little bit of hay in it to make it warm
and soft, and a tiny little saucer full of bread soaked in milk ; and then they put
the basket, with little Cock Sparrow in it, on the window-sill. Presently the
two old birds left off twittering and chattering in the tree, and came near to
the house, in the hope of seeing what had become of their poor little fellow.
So they came nearer and nearer, and at last they ventured on to a rose-tree
overhanging the window, and by degrees they dared to perch on the outside sill
of the window within which the basket was. Now Isaac, and Mrs. Harley, and
Kitty, were standing in the room watching them, and Isaac said, when he saw
the old bird on the window-sill, that he thought if they hung the little basket
on the tree outside, the old ones would perhaps come and feed the little one,
and take care of him. So they hung it up on a low branch of the tree, and sure
enough, as soon as the little sparrow began to chirp and cry, its mother flew up
into the tree, and perched on the basket-side, and fluttered her wings in delight
and called to the father, who came too, and so they flew off, and soon came back
with the little sparrow’s dinner; and, considering all things, were very happy
indeed. Then they found their four other darlings, and took them back to their
nest, and then they flew back again to the little one in the basket. So, as night
came on, they didn’t know what todo. They could hear the little ones in the
nest calling to them, and yet how could they go to them, and leave the poor
little fellow in the basket? But while they were thinking what to do, out of the
house came Isaac and Kitty, and reaching down the basket, carried it into the
house. At this the two old birds felt very unhappy, as they couldn’t know what
Isaac would do with him, and they flew back to their nest, and cried themselves
to sleep.

But they need not have been so very sorrowful, for the very first thing in
the morning Isaac brought out the basket again, and hung it up as before; and
again the old birds came and fed their little one. So wea on this night Kitty
eunied the basket in once more, the old birds were not at all frightened, and flew
away to their nest quite merrily. Thus they went on for several days, and each
day little Cock Sparrow grew stronger and stronger, and at last he was quite well
and brave, and he could perch on the edge of the basket; and at last, one day, he
followed his mother’s example, and flew after her towards the old nest. But

4



How Cock Sparrow kept his Christmas.

though he flew away, he had grown quite tame, and so fond of little Kitty, that
he would take food out of her hand, and sit upon her shoulder ; and he had
grown quite fond of Bob also, and Bob had grown fond of him; and Kitty had
coaxed them’ both, until little Sparrow -had learned to sit upon Bob’s head, and
was as tame with Bob as he was with Kitty.

As for his four little brothers and sisters, they had grown so strong and big,
that they had all gone out into the wide world to make their fortunes, and only
this little Cock Sparrow stayed with his father and mother at home. Well, the
summer was ended, and the dark nights kept growing longer, and the days kept
getting shorter and colder, until at last, a little before Christmas, there came a
great frost and a deep snow. It was so cold that all the poor birds didn’t know
what to do, and the snow was so thick on the ground that they didn’t know
where to find anything to eat; but every morning Kitty used to bring out
plentiful crumbs of bread for her Sparrow, and little Sparrow used to fly down to
eat-them, and carry back some of them to his father and mother ; and so, though
the frost was so bitter and so keen, they were all very comfortable in the nest
in the ivy, and, indeed, grew quite fat on Kitty’s crumbs.

Now Kitty had a grandmother, who lived in a very tiny little cottage, two
or three fields off her father’s house, and there was a path leading from the one
cottage to the other, and Kitty used always to be running backwards and forwards
to see how grandmother was, as the old lady was rather feeble, and a little short
in her breath. And it had been settled that on Christmas-day Kitty should go

to her grandmother’s to dinner, and that her father and mother should come
- to fetch her in the evening ; so Christmas-day having come, little Kitty set off on
her walk, wrapped up warmly in her pretty red cloak, and with a basket in
her hand, full of mince pies, for the poor dear old grandmother. Away she
went; she would soon be there, they thought, she was so used to the road, and
although the snow was deep, she was well used to that also. Although it was
Christmas-day, Isaac had to go to look after his sheep, and had of course taken
Bob with him; so Mrs. Harley set to work to boil the pudding and roast the
meat for their Christmas dinner, and to bake a large and lovely cake for Kitty’s
tea. She was so very busy, that though she heard a tapping at the window she
took no notice of it for some time ; but at last she looked up, and there was little
Sparrow, sitting on the window-sill, flapping his wings, and tapping at the window
with his beak. “Poor little bird!” thought Mrs. Harley ; “ Kitty’s forgotten to

give him his crumbs,” and out she went to see; but no, he had not been for-

gotten, the crumbs had been put on the ground as usual, and, strange to say,

many of them remained uneaten. “ Perhaps he is cold,” thought Mrs. Harley

and she left the door open to see if he would come into the kitchen; but no, he
5

How Cock Sparrow kept his Christmas.

stayed outside, and kept first tapping at the window, and then, when Mrs.
Harley went towards it, off he flew down towards the garden gate, and then pre-
sently came back again. But she could make nothing of it; so directly her
husband came home, she told him what the bird had been doing, and while she
was talking, back little Sparrow came again, and began to tap at the window as
before. So Isaac went out, and again the bird flew towards the garden gate,
and when Isaac stopped the bird stopped too, and fluttered his little wings,
and flew a little way, and stopped again fluttering, until at last Isaac ‘said,
“Something must be the matter, Pll go and see,” and he whistled to Bob, and
away they went. Little Sparrow saw them coming, and flew this time right
down to the garden gate, and perched at the top, and as they came near it flew
a little way into the field, and so by degrees tempted them along, always flying
before them till he got to the second stile, where, as Isaac knew, there was a
very deep ditch. All of a sudden a thought struck Isaac; he called to the dog,
“ Hie, Bob! good dog! hie on!” and away went Bob, at full speed, up to the
second stile. He looked down into the ditch, and then, with a loud bark, tore
back again to Isaac; and he, well guessing what was the matter, ran as fast as
he could to-the stile. There, peeping out from a great drift of snow, was little
Kitty’s red cloak, and deep down in the snow was poor Kitty herself. Isaac
jumped down into the ditch, and lifted out his poor little girl, all blue and cold,
and ran back with her to the cottage. There they put her to bed, and chafed
her little limbs with their hands, until the warmth came back to her body, and
presently she opened her clear blue eyes. Now how glad they were, I leave you
to guess. So she told them by and by how she had slipped off the plank, and
had fallen into the snow, and how she had hurt her ankle so in falling, that she
could not get up again, but that at each trial she made the snow had slipped
more over her ; and so, how she had called on them all till she could call no
more ; and the last thing she could remember was that the little Sparrow had
come and perched. upon her as she lay in the snow, and had then flown away
again. Then she grew colder and colder, and remembered no more until she
awoke in her own little bed.

So poor little Kitty was saved, and they were all so happy together that I
couldn’t tell you one-half of their happiness if I tried all day ; and you may be
sure little Sparrow was happy too, and that he thought, as he tucked his little
head under his wing, how glad he was that he had heard poor Kitty calling as
she lay in the drifted snow. And this is the tale of

How Cock SPARROW KEPT HIS CHRISTMAS,


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