Citation
Jack and the bean stalk

Material Information

Title:
Jack and the bean stalk
Uniform Title:
Jack and the beanstalk
Creator:
Darton & Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Darton & Co
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[6] leaves.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Folk tales -- 1880 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1880 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1880
Genre:
Folk tales ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Includes publisher's advertisements.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Special Collections, George A. Smathers Libraries
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
028564471 ( ALEPH )
27468865 ( OCLC )
AJL9655 ( NOTIS )

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Related Item:
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Full Text
E pos ae Se > ”

a: as
eT ee ee Me eee

Se Cer | SE SA TOE SS RIT RR RRR AS ESL NA
( Hee



tos Ben ®&

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*

SHASLE INDESTRUGTIB

JG WA



“And with
many tears
she told Jack
the sad state

of things,









and said that
he must get

che best price









he could for

}



poor C iy

Es \ . < oa)
e = \ ae
\N SS = = ss \ \ x 5 ~
Se =
— 3 =|
AS e =

A LONG time ago, in the days of good King Alfred, there lived in a lonely
-—~village a poor widow and her son Jack. Now Jack was a spoilt boy. His
mother, poor as she was, never denied him anything. He lay in bed as late
as he liked in the morning, and he always chose what he would have for
dinner. Of course he did not like work ; and he played about all day, without
a thought of helping his poor mother. So things went on from bad to worse,
until at last all the poor widow’s money was spent, and there was not a loaf
left for them to eat. There was the cow, to be sure ; but the widow could not
bear to part with her. However, there was no help for it; and with many
tears she told Jack the sad state of things, and said that he must go next day
to market, and get the best price he could for poor Colly. Jack cried too, on
hearing this; and he could not help feeling that if he had been a better boy,
and had spent his time in work instead of play, his poor mother would not
i have been forced to part with her good old friend. So he kissed her, and told
‘hex not to fret, for that he meant,to be a better boy, and would set off early
the next day and make the best bargain he could.

The Baldwin Library

RnB |



“The But-
cher showed
Jack some
strange-look-
ing beans in
his hat, and
offered to let
him have
them in ex-
change for

the cow.”

The next morning Jack set off Heniies: : ind. ie a iy fellow as he was,
instead of driving the cow before him, as any other lad would have done, he
mounted on her back to ride to market. As they went along the road, a
butcher, who was on his way to the next town, chanced to pass that way,
and began to chat with Jack, whom he knew to be an idle, worthless young
fellow. Jack told him that he was going to market to sell his cow. On this
the butcher showed Jack some strange-looking beans which he had in his hat,
and offered to let him have them in exchange for the cow. Now the beans
were certainly very strange-looking beans. But if Jack had made himself
wiser by learning to read and write, he would have known better than to
make such a foolish bargain. As it was, however, the silly fellow caught at
the butcher’s offer, and seizing the beans, gave up poor Colly without a sigh.
Then, running home to his mother, he poured the beans with triumph into
her apron ‘The poor widow, half out of her mind at this last foolish act,
which left them poorer than they were before, threw the beans out into her
little garden, and went with her son supperless to bed.

a.





‘So, in spite
of his mo-
ther’s terror,
up he went,
and was soon

out of sight.”



tee HENS SSS
Jack’s light stomach made him wake up early the next day; and, running
to his window, what was his surprise to find that the beans had taken root
already, and grown up thick and strong, like a green ladder, far above his head.
They seemed to reach quite out of sight. Now Jack had always been a fine
fellow for climbing trees ; and he no sooner saw this wonderful bean-stalk than
he made up his mind to clamber to the very top, and see what he should come to.
So, in spite of his mother’s terror, up he went, and was soon out of sight.
Up and up he went, till he found himself on a large barren plain, which had
neither tree nor house in sight. He was already wishing himself back again
safe at home, when a bright fairy appeared before him. She told Jack that
she was a great friend of his father and mother before he was born, and would
be a friend to him if he would mind all she said to him. She went on to tell
him that some years ago his father and mother had been plundered of everything
they had in the world by a wicked giant who lived in the very land where Jack
now was. That he had not only robbed them, but even killed Jack’s father, who
was a good man; and his mother had with her baby scarcely escaped his rage.





“He wasal-
ready wish-
ing himself
back again
safe at home,

when a
bright fairy
appeared be-

fore him.”



Ss ge MT

The fairy went on to tell Jack that it was his duty, for his mother’s sake, tc
try to destroy this wicked giant, and to get back all that he had robbed her of.
She then told him to go straight on till he found the giant’s house, and not to
tell his mother the story he had just heard until they met again. She then
vanished. Jack walked on and on for a very long time till it was quite dark,
and at length came to the giant’s gate. A kind-looking woman stood there,
and Jack asked her for a slice of bread and a night’s lodging. The woman told
him her husband was a dreadful giant who eat human flesh, and that she should
be afraid to let himin. Jack, however, begged so hard that at last she led him.
into the great kitchen, and gave him some supper; put the groans of some
‘poor people, who were shut up in a dungeon to fatten, almost took away
Jack’s appetite. Soon after the giant came home storming and crying that he
‘smelt fresh meat. But his wife tried to make him believe it was only the
‘victims in the dungeons, and hid Jack in the great oven. She then brought
‘out. a very wonderful hen, which, every time the giant said ‘‘ Lay,” laid a
golden egg ; after which she went to bed, leaving Jack hidden in the oven.



“ Jack, who
had seen all
through a
erack in the
oven-door,
crept softly

out, and
pouncing
upon the hen

earried her

off. 99

At last the giant fell fast asleep. Jack, who had scen all through a crack in
the oven-door, crept softly out, and pouncing upon the hen carried her off, and
found his way down the bean-stalk as fast as he could. His mother was
delighted to see him; and they lived for some months on the gold which the
hen gave them. Jack, who was anxious to do all the fairy told him, resolved
on another journey. He dyed his face with walnut-juice, and once more
persuaded the giant’s wife to take himin. But this time he had more trouble ;
though at last she took him in and hid him in a lumber-closet. When the
giant came in he cried out again, “I smell fresh meat!’ But his wife told
him that the crows had just brought a bit of meat on the house-top ; and she
gave him his supper. The giant then called for his'money bags, and the
poor woman dragged in two great sacks, each of them far too heavy for her.
Yet the cruel giant tried to strike her for being so slow; but she went away
from him to bed as on the former occasion. He began to count his gold and
silver; and this took him so long that he fell asleep over it. Now-.was Jack’s
time ; and creeping out, he seized thé’sacks, and made off with them.





“The giant
came in with
his usual cry
of ‘I smell
fresh meat!
and he _ be-
gan to look
about the

kitchen.”









It was as much as he could do to drag them away, but his earnest wish to
help his poor mother gave him strength. It was time he returned, for
anxiety and grief had made her quite ill. But the sight of Jack and his
treasures quite revived her; and for a long time they lived very happily on
the gold and silver. The cottage was rebuilt, and some nice furniture and
clothes bought. Three years passed away without the bean-stalk being spoken
of by either mother or son. The widow, indeed, hoped her son had forgotten
it; but the fairy’s words were for ever in Jack’s mind. And one day, before
his mother was up, Jack once more set off on his upward journey. He was so
much grown that the giant’s wife did not remember him at all ; and this time
again he prevailed on her to give him a night’s lodging, and she hid him in
the copper. The giant came in with his usual cry of “ I smell fresh meat !”’
and he began to look about the kitchen, as if he thought some one was
hidden there. Once he even laid his hand on the copper-lid. But his -wife
brought him his supper, and afterwards a fine harp, that played a tune when-
ever the giant said “Play.” The harp-played, and the giant got up and
began to dance, till at last he was tired, and went to sleep.



“It was

time he re-

turned for

anxiety and











grief had



made her



quite ill.”



Jack no sooner saw this than he came out and laid hold of the harp; but
it was enchanted, and cried out ‘‘ Master, Master!” This awoke the giant,
who got up and came staggering after Jack. Happily he had drank so much
that he could not run straight, and Jack reached the bottom of the bean-stalk
just as the giant mounted on the top of it. Jack called out loudly for a hatchet,
with which he chopped down the bean-stalk, and the giant tumbled down
into the garden on his head and was killed. At that moment the fairy
appeared, and told Jack’s mother that she had bidden her son take all these
dangerous journeys. The widow was so happy to see the bean-stalk cut down
that she was very ready to forget the past; and Jack begged her pardon
heartily for all the troubles and sorrows he had brought upon her. ‘The fairy
bade him be a good boy and mind all his mother said to him, and then took
leave of them. Jack did not forget the fairy’s words, nor his own promises.
He very soon learned to read and write, and grew up a very good man ; and
he and kis mother lived very happily, and did a great deal of good with all
the treasures they had recovered from the wicked giant.



DARTON'S JUVENILE BOOKS

MAY SAFELY BE PLACED IN THE HANDS OF CHILDREN, BLENDING
AMUSEMENT WITH INSTRUCTION.

Soe BY Post, FPReesz,

ON RECEIVING POSTAGE STAMPS IN ADVANCE,

‘

Darton’s Alphabet of Animals. With Twenty-

Seven Illustrations, printed in Oil Colours, from designs from life, by Harrison
WEIR.

Darton’s Nursery Leading-Strings. With Co-

loured Plates. Imperial 8vo. With Large Letters coloured. Price Sixpence.

Darton’s Child’s First Book, upon a new plan.

Profusely illustrated. Price Sixpence.

Darton’s Children’s Pictures, to Amuse and In-

struct. Printed on stout paper, for Children to colour. (Upwards of Fifty Pictures
in a book). Price Sixpence.

Darton’s Holiday Serap Book. With Iustra-

tions, printed in Oil Colours, from designs by Assoton, GiLBERT, Weir, and the
most popular Artists of the day. Price One Shilling.

Darton’s Indestructible Books. Printed in Oil

Colours, and on Linen. Price One Shilling.

Stories of Tame Animals: Stories of Wild

Animals. Printed in Oil Colours, on Linen. With Illustrations by Harrison
Weir. Price One Shilling.

Darton’s Indestructible a Books for Children,

of strong Linen. Of every form, size, and price. With or without prints.

Several Hundred Illustrations—Now ready. Price One Shilling,

Darton’s Pictorial Pages. Edited by the Rev.

Henry Town ey, illustrated with designs by Gitpert, ANELEY, and the best
Artists of the day. This is the cheapest Shilling Book ever published. A sale of
nearly half a million copies is required to pay the first outlay in producing this
volume.

LONDON: DARTON & CO., 58, HOLBCRN HILL.



ek
ee



2a

" DARTON’S

a

"7
ce

~

ee

INDESTRUCTIBLE

ELEMENTARY CHILDREN'S BOOKS.

ia vein FF





Alphabets and First Sooks, with Fasr Words,
in Great Variety.



Sn na

. SCRIPTURAL STGRIBS AND PICTURES,

. WONDERS OF THE DOG.

. LITTLE. STORIES. AND PICTURES. .

. ALPHABET OF VIRTUES.
ALPHABE®-OF PEACE.

. £N APPLE PIE. : >

. GREEN’S FIRST READUR. bs

. GREEN'S SECOND READER. :

. WILD AND T.ME ANIMALS.

yy

coat

SS Go MED OY Co wD

eden RR ARN AS a aan i NSRP A MN OR

‘ 10, THE HOUSE VHAT JACK BUILY.
ll. NUTS,.TO CRACK.
12. FIREMAN AND HIS DOG.
13. ALPHADET OF GREAT MEN.
_ 14. HAPPY CHILDREN.
15. PET BIRDS.
“16. DARTON’S NURSERY LEADING STRINGS.
17. SURIPTURE ALPHABET. .
of 18. THE ALPHABET OF LONDONERS.
% 19. WONDERS OF THE HORSE.

20. MOTHER HUBBARD.
“1. PET LAMB.
22. COCK ROBIN.

ws
ame



LONDON:
DARTON AMD CO., 58, HOLBORN HILL,

S: i CPOE

BB ecge—

|



be enn:

owe

ree ° 3 6
Soy. a ge
Rae a ‘ ref

Aime
“oy

“4h OD



Full Text
E pos ae Se > ”

a: as
eT ee ee Me eee

Se Cer | SE SA TOE SS RIT RR RRR AS ESL NA
( Hee



tos Ben ®&

g

*

SHASLE INDESTRUGTIB

JG WA
“And with
many tears
she told Jack
the sad state

of things,









and said that
he must get

che best price









he could for

}



poor C iy

Es \ . < oa)
e = \ ae
\N SS = = ss \ \ x 5 ~
Se =
— 3 =|
AS e =

A LONG time ago, in the days of good King Alfred, there lived in a lonely
-—~village a poor widow and her son Jack. Now Jack was a spoilt boy. His
mother, poor as she was, never denied him anything. He lay in bed as late
as he liked in the morning, and he always chose what he would have for
dinner. Of course he did not like work ; and he played about all day, without
a thought of helping his poor mother. So things went on from bad to worse,
until at last all the poor widow’s money was spent, and there was not a loaf
left for them to eat. There was the cow, to be sure ; but the widow could not
bear to part with her. However, there was no help for it; and with many
tears she told Jack the sad state of things, and said that he must go next day
to market, and get the best price he could for poor Colly. Jack cried too, on
hearing this; and he could not help feeling that if he had been a better boy,
and had spent his time in work instead of play, his poor mother would not
i have been forced to part with her good old friend. So he kissed her, and told
‘hex not to fret, for that he meant,to be a better boy, and would set off early
the next day and make the best bargain he could.

The Baldwin Library

RnB |
“The But-
cher showed
Jack some
strange-look-
ing beans in
his hat, and
offered to let
him have
them in ex-
change for

the cow.”

The next morning Jack set off Heniies: : ind. ie a iy fellow as he was,
instead of driving the cow before him, as any other lad would have done, he
mounted on her back to ride to market. As they went along the road, a
butcher, who was on his way to the next town, chanced to pass that way,
and began to chat with Jack, whom he knew to be an idle, worthless young
fellow. Jack told him that he was going to market to sell his cow. On this
the butcher showed Jack some strange-looking beans which he had in his hat,
and offered to let him have them in exchange for the cow. Now the beans
were certainly very strange-looking beans. But if Jack had made himself
wiser by learning to read and write, he would have known better than to
make such a foolish bargain. As it was, however, the silly fellow caught at
the butcher’s offer, and seizing the beans, gave up poor Colly without a sigh.
Then, running home to his mother, he poured the beans with triumph into
her apron ‘The poor widow, half out of her mind at this last foolish act,
which left them poorer than they were before, threw the beans out into her
little garden, and went with her son supperless to bed.

a.


‘So, in spite
of his mo-
ther’s terror,
up he went,
and was soon

out of sight.”



tee HENS SSS
Jack’s light stomach made him wake up early the next day; and, running
to his window, what was his surprise to find that the beans had taken root
already, and grown up thick and strong, like a green ladder, far above his head.
They seemed to reach quite out of sight. Now Jack had always been a fine
fellow for climbing trees ; and he no sooner saw this wonderful bean-stalk than
he made up his mind to clamber to the very top, and see what he should come to.
So, in spite of his mother’s terror, up he went, and was soon out of sight.
Up and up he went, till he found himself on a large barren plain, which had
neither tree nor house in sight. He was already wishing himself back again
safe at home, when a bright fairy appeared before him. She told Jack that
she was a great friend of his father and mother before he was born, and would
be a friend to him if he would mind all she said to him. She went on to tell
him that some years ago his father and mother had been plundered of everything
they had in the world by a wicked giant who lived in the very land where Jack
now was. That he had not only robbed them, but even killed Jack’s father, who
was a good man; and his mother had with her baby scarcely escaped his rage.


“He wasal-
ready wish-
ing himself
back again
safe at home,

when a
bright fairy
appeared be-

fore him.”



Ss ge MT

The fairy went on to tell Jack that it was his duty, for his mother’s sake, tc
try to destroy this wicked giant, and to get back all that he had robbed her of.
She then told him to go straight on till he found the giant’s house, and not to
tell his mother the story he had just heard until they met again. She then
vanished. Jack walked on and on for a very long time till it was quite dark,
and at length came to the giant’s gate. A kind-looking woman stood there,
and Jack asked her for a slice of bread and a night’s lodging. The woman told
him her husband was a dreadful giant who eat human flesh, and that she should
be afraid to let himin. Jack, however, begged so hard that at last she led him.
into the great kitchen, and gave him some supper; put the groans of some
‘poor people, who were shut up in a dungeon to fatten, almost took away
Jack’s appetite. Soon after the giant came home storming and crying that he
‘smelt fresh meat. But his wife tried to make him believe it was only the
‘victims in the dungeons, and hid Jack in the great oven. She then brought
‘out. a very wonderful hen, which, every time the giant said ‘‘ Lay,” laid a
golden egg ; after which she went to bed, leaving Jack hidden in the oven.
“ Jack, who
had seen all
through a
erack in the
oven-door,
crept softly

out, and
pouncing
upon the hen

earried her

off. 99

At last the giant fell fast asleep. Jack, who had scen all through a crack in
the oven-door, crept softly out, and pouncing upon the hen carried her off, and
found his way down the bean-stalk as fast as he could. His mother was
delighted to see him; and they lived for some months on the gold which the
hen gave them. Jack, who was anxious to do all the fairy told him, resolved
on another journey. He dyed his face with walnut-juice, and once more
persuaded the giant’s wife to take himin. But this time he had more trouble ;
though at last she took him in and hid him in a lumber-closet. When the
giant came in he cried out again, “I smell fresh meat!’ But his wife told
him that the crows had just brought a bit of meat on the house-top ; and she
gave him his supper. The giant then called for his'money bags, and the
poor woman dragged in two great sacks, each of them far too heavy for her.
Yet the cruel giant tried to strike her for being so slow; but she went away
from him to bed as on the former occasion. He began to count his gold and
silver; and this took him so long that he fell asleep over it. Now-.was Jack’s
time ; and creeping out, he seized thé’sacks, and made off with them.


“The giant
came in with
his usual cry
of ‘I smell
fresh meat!
and he _ be-
gan to look
about the

kitchen.”









It was as much as he could do to drag them away, but his earnest wish to
help his poor mother gave him strength. It was time he returned, for
anxiety and grief had made her quite ill. But the sight of Jack and his
treasures quite revived her; and for a long time they lived very happily on
the gold and silver. The cottage was rebuilt, and some nice furniture and
clothes bought. Three years passed away without the bean-stalk being spoken
of by either mother or son. The widow, indeed, hoped her son had forgotten
it; but the fairy’s words were for ever in Jack’s mind. And one day, before
his mother was up, Jack once more set off on his upward journey. He was so
much grown that the giant’s wife did not remember him at all ; and this time
again he prevailed on her to give him a night’s lodging, and she hid him in
the copper. The giant came in with his usual cry of “ I smell fresh meat !”’
and he began to look about the kitchen, as if he thought some one was
hidden there. Once he even laid his hand on the copper-lid. But his -wife
brought him his supper, and afterwards a fine harp, that played a tune when-
ever the giant said “Play.” The harp-played, and the giant got up and
began to dance, till at last he was tired, and went to sleep.
“It was

time he re-

turned for

anxiety and











grief had



made her



quite ill.”



Jack no sooner saw this than he came out and laid hold of the harp; but
it was enchanted, and cried out ‘‘ Master, Master!” This awoke the giant,
who got up and came staggering after Jack. Happily he had drank so much
that he could not run straight, and Jack reached the bottom of the bean-stalk
just as the giant mounted on the top of it. Jack called out loudly for a hatchet,
with which he chopped down the bean-stalk, and the giant tumbled down
into the garden on his head and was killed. At that moment the fairy
appeared, and told Jack’s mother that she had bidden her son take all these
dangerous journeys. The widow was so happy to see the bean-stalk cut down
that she was very ready to forget the past; and Jack begged her pardon
heartily for all the troubles and sorrows he had brought upon her. ‘The fairy
bade him be a good boy and mind all his mother said to him, and then took
leave of them. Jack did not forget the fairy’s words, nor his own promises.
He very soon learned to read and write, and grew up a very good man ; and
he and kis mother lived very happily, and did a great deal of good with all
the treasures they had recovered from the wicked giant.
DARTON'S JUVENILE BOOKS

MAY SAFELY BE PLACED IN THE HANDS OF CHILDREN, BLENDING
AMUSEMENT WITH INSTRUCTION.

Soe BY Post, FPReesz,

ON RECEIVING POSTAGE STAMPS IN ADVANCE,

‘

Darton’s Alphabet of Animals. With Twenty-

Seven Illustrations, printed in Oil Colours, from designs from life, by Harrison
WEIR.

Darton’s Nursery Leading-Strings. With Co-

loured Plates. Imperial 8vo. With Large Letters coloured. Price Sixpence.

Darton’s Child’s First Book, upon a new plan.

Profusely illustrated. Price Sixpence.

Darton’s Children’s Pictures, to Amuse and In-

struct. Printed on stout paper, for Children to colour. (Upwards of Fifty Pictures
in a book). Price Sixpence.

Darton’s Holiday Serap Book. With Iustra-

tions, printed in Oil Colours, from designs by Assoton, GiLBERT, Weir, and the
most popular Artists of the day. Price One Shilling.

Darton’s Indestructible Books. Printed in Oil

Colours, and on Linen. Price One Shilling.

Stories of Tame Animals: Stories of Wild

Animals. Printed in Oil Colours, on Linen. With Illustrations by Harrison
Weir. Price One Shilling.

Darton’s Indestructible a Books for Children,

of strong Linen. Of every form, size, and price. With or without prints.

Several Hundred Illustrations—Now ready. Price One Shilling,

Darton’s Pictorial Pages. Edited by the Rev.

Henry Town ey, illustrated with designs by Gitpert, ANELEY, and the best
Artists of the day. This is the cheapest Shilling Book ever published. A sale of
nearly half a million copies is required to pay the first outlay in producing this
volume.

LONDON: DARTON & CO., 58, HOLBCRN HILL.
ek
ee



2a

" DARTON’S

a

"7
ce

~

ee

INDESTRUCTIBLE

ELEMENTARY CHILDREN'S BOOKS.

ia vein FF





Alphabets and First Sooks, with Fasr Words,
in Great Variety.



Sn na

. SCRIPTURAL STGRIBS AND PICTURES,

. WONDERS OF THE DOG.

. LITTLE. STORIES. AND PICTURES. .

. ALPHABET OF VIRTUES.
ALPHABE®-OF PEACE.

. £N APPLE PIE. : >

. GREEN’S FIRST READUR. bs

. GREEN'S SECOND READER. :

. WILD AND T.ME ANIMALS.

yy

coat

SS Go MED OY Co wD

eden RR ARN AS a aan i NSRP A MN OR

‘ 10, THE HOUSE VHAT JACK BUILY.
ll. NUTS,.TO CRACK.
12. FIREMAN AND HIS DOG.
13. ALPHADET OF GREAT MEN.
_ 14. HAPPY CHILDREN.
15. PET BIRDS.
“16. DARTON’S NURSERY LEADING STRINGS.
17. SURIPTURE ALPHABET. .
of 18. THE ALPHABET OF LONDONERS.
% 19. WONDERS OF THE HORSE.

20. MOTHER HUBBARD.
“1. PET LAMB.
22. COCK ROBIN.

ws
ame



LONDON:
DARTON AMD CO., 58, HOLBORN HILL,

S: i CPOE

BB ecge—

|



be enn:

owe

ree ° 3 6
Soy. a ge
Rae a ‘ ref

Aime
“oy

“4h OD





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xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20080108_AAAAAB' PACKAGE 'UF00025030_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-01-08T09:27:33-05:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:05:29-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 297860; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-19T10:34:14-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '800391' DFID 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAADW' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00001.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' b445fc1be7d2dab78202834c54098c68
'SHA-1' 9e81f0c2b85c2e5638466ea684d70e434ae0bc59
EVENT '2011-08-08T07:58:42-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'259461' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAADX' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
42adef06c0c443dad21e3af9bbc05d8e
da40118f7fd843a9e81bc61786793180330d3e72
'2011-08-08T07:58:34-04:00'
describe
'2639' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAADY' 'sip-files00001.pro'
bc92c58797eb02c6c3875cf8df0229a7
ce471172947a7da016a783dd91e810c48891778c
'2011-08-08T07:58:36-04:00'
describe
'95254' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAADZ' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
5123690ae72f6008b1de1529a9d98692
707bccbf6fe558c497747fa925120929a62cd440
'2011-08-08T07:58:43-04:00'
describe
'19241524' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEA' 'sip-files00001.tif'
499dccf510348b26010fce3f478a5fd8
2f1ab4ff35281062617e1d2371ba402cae5a5b1b
'2011-08-08T07:58:38-04:00'
describe
'180' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEB' 'sip-files00001.txt'
da164d6919e072c43f56061415bd2e12
90d1c99f923e86c5c025b8ec339b56bacee89372
'2011-08-08T07:58:35-04:00'
describe
'48062' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEC' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
2feffd1981b98c08c4fd1f273fac00de
205ec962843327fff3c3851b52f2b8f0deb5ad12
'2011-08-08T07:58:41-04:00'
describe
'748958' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAED' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
80fb8e4d312393081b7692537dfbbd23
be40660d9458d74f3b9990f21d68bbf5a39544ae
'2011-08-08T07:58:37-04:00'
describe
'247684' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEE' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
3f0f569d17bfc019255768523d6d53f0
689a583df17b035408f6a061f32eaa888c0954c3
'2011-08-08T07:58:50-04:00'
describe
'27906' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEF' 'sip-files00002.pro'
5ed1a6e2931f0993a85dcaaf3ed0a140
5c25567ec08143cd1186a0c4c539abeb1917f974
'2011-08-08T07:58:39-04:00'
describe
'88591' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEG' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
6b479d723b8c90906a44bc943406b727
6e29e1f9550e5c0fd82798f947c96217e2f1383a
describe
'18002692' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEH' 'sip-files00002.tif'
80e8914194a2422be2fb8a1fc8bda090
24824e10dfe1587d8215c4023b60e3994fa8d43d
'2011-08-08T07:58:46-04:00'
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEI' 'sip-files00002.txt'
59cb00f385a03274a7ac4659c597caa8
da7207c5158bb79ee5b0cb5230fdc2479b469036
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'43163' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEJ' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
5493df4b19c82b679fbe98d8bd48e600
a96e4b747d0d0e23262fc043a0f6ed250f448380
describe
'761360' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEK' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
adb51b5065dc2f125d128f0306a82b91
285dd5d3f0d16660119d0972c1dc9c15a967cde7
describe
'240642' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEL' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
a769cfc090febf2d3c1eb7a6dcd46282
13b46fc069c9b67094506a6c1deb0e660e998b1a
'2011-08-08T07:58:52-04:00'
describe
'38697' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEM' 'sip-files00003.pro'
0164607d252a92c7b4a32bf5b4d4415b
e00e4e962ca7167930ecb3dbee840839849da358
'2011-08-08T07:58:44-04:00'
describe
'86181' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEN' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
db39e4fe4ab137e1faa85482fe165fdb
dc1b2c547f580cbe836b6c119f1be53d7acd29cf
describe
'18300172' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEO' 'sip-files00003.tif'
0c8156065d02fc6e2c1038d4fc3dfcea
96ecf15f2c6480eecabe618f6aa9c271ba0fadb6
'2011-08-08T07:58:51-04:00'
describe
'1593' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEP' 'sip-files00003.txt'
6a822ae41d8fd70051b295c168a46613
8fd433ac60f087c80e6e4abaf2f78ab735982fcc
'2011-08-08T07:58:48-04:00'
describe
'42943' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEQ' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
77340a9276ee3a40db527dd49230aa8d
0e530b2a2e7eb2bf05164ac14b1015ce82b1f813
'2011-08-08T07:58:47-04:00'
describe
'703471' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAER' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
3322ead1684e82cd22cdbe07d5998dd1
8cc2566ad5de4b1f8f6d3076fad9c68cce934c35
describe
'251272' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAES' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
35501070f58e1686be6954927082c39a
9dda3905af2c6f1300420f026e3e41da4d974be8
describe
'38070' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAET' 'sip-files00004.pro'
758f3a2c72bff1e7b09bc9c0f8ab414c
147fa6ef1f0affeb7bb10d78930e7ce772c39e49
describe
'77259' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEU' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
fb5bfced0e5d077bba3c301b9288df83
e489a77c750a4412467fbe47317712b3ea1005bd
describe
'16897308' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEV' 'sip-files00004.tif'
9753d9892d930fd37a84837281fdd4b3
f707c8d360a8ec81b21857d9dba45be4ce697f66
describe
'1561' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEW' 'sip-files00004.txt'
55e7829cefc2518de2298fe1c24361f5
0e27476114cea48a69d596a20247c7447af34eef
describe
'29849' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEX' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
d31c90c2b79dabb60d62c1239c91d025
6801e87308f67ca9c3f3998770bfc96583c75ee8
describe
'750390' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEY' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
68cd31d676a83114cac98771fe5378ef
9a41bb0888caf9d864853ffd4e0adb399443e8dd
describe
'240228' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAEZ' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
91db134bc9ec94deb03baad942cf61f1
5ba8bc14415ec5dad9997cf96f42af2f43756954
describe
'37029' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFA' 'sip-files00005.pro'
42abd278befd315f512ddf86bdce298e
1de595f30dcede92c40f82684caa1d3763f319d3
describe
'84425' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFB' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
28caaa00ee777010e12b2f2015a31fd8
da8c1dcd5468d63726cb6f5caa4cc92d20952ab0
describe
'18034704' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFC' 'sip-files00005.tif'
a4a5995b9bc5888806e4850b5198a027
725b3333caad9133c724e247a1a6569addaea95b
describe
'1594' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFD' 'sip-files00005.txt'
7bf5074579edd5b67019f61ea1cc0dab
6d14ffcaf1f47d391290d8b59e28b9d48adb0cf7
describe
'40506' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFE' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
2b0b89775ea7c32e3f0a6c7426a3d62c
108e60a2530567b9922c8969caa3524412296683
describe
'742961' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFF' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
34a5fafdd260a6eb45bd4b6cecd322ab
6791cc8909c244c79de312ca67d504e8ce942172
describe
'220480' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFG' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
b6e6eec55429aaa5ddcff94890bcf8a8
13b849e30de4679bdbe60df0253537f758d91931
'2011-08-08T07:58:45-04:00'
describe
'36341' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFH' 'sip-files00006.pro'
e9ac4ecf4122978b70689ea49071c675
5c0b9c42f80fcc36e270de3bdfd3cf57835f799a
describe
'71126' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFI' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
a61181684a41a74610c0970e9f0ca2c1
1995e4501e9f5b391f6c388598772d86ed149977
describe
'17845248' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFJ' 'sip-files00006.tif'
1b7cba537e190219d9962f240def4e45
48e295fecc9f18618ff82890ff102911df7bd627
'2011-08-08T07:58:49-04:00'
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFK' 'sip-files00006.txt'
abda5475f35303037906de597d9b4607
b1b4844fef8b1a9e0ff3703afceba2d432519629
describe
'28966' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFL' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
69a26f0f8fa103c81fd1e00863e02a84
e7f52c76a61e63b8639bd5f495218886ee07d63c
describe
'757143' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFM' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
c7cc394950ab112b82945cea5f5beb24
5b2ec6c5d6231079e7ad35d231508d42aa12b173
describe
'232500' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFN' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
254fd3f7663ef5d5c2750260b788823e
1ba9f47340be22b528a7d692109f8934b7d4c042
describe
'37268' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFO' 'sip-files00007.pro'
eccb314ffc84d6f458e0c621d094922a
79cfd2878ca910226d5ba0773aa51fc6f9fd9a70
describe
'82097' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFP' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
14f716cd6433e970a8bd077ee870eac6
2cadbcd52470dbcd7b6a2d9c65340fb09b103307
describe
'18197104' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFQ' 'sip-files00007.tif'
ac0660b885ff611be5b7bdfeae438cca
69f4b5f499f90cd21b7021cfc77838dc2162f9c1
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFR' 'sip-files00007.txt'
9900bb028f4e78527b21d2584541f641
f3460145a225b5d5b06f21ec69c19b1021c3f1b6
describe
'40243' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFS' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
76445a622e1f4227a7d21700b275d070
25b34bd4b9fa59ea49f7ca606854865abd9d4a2d
describe
'756907' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFT' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
0f05ad394127c4b9c3ae1753d48dfb0c
c7c652ca264c6a240720fe83da41432df33f125b
describe
'218600' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFU' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
d857bab7b2f9d22a1d4b60fdcc96d6b4
3c4c20765ff03d1ac5635df77f9c2cb310fb85dc
describe
'34042' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFV' 'sip-files00008.pro'
298b0de74ba8aa88da9ce4a6df8e85a4
620473a00e7d6b774b1d18eaded54b726df28de9
describe
'70476' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFW' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
ecc0ca3488082520436c9d2b3e7fbe1c
b07a9154b98e13c5ea3ba83a59ce8d459a04bbd0
describe
'18181128' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFX' 'sip-files00008.tif'
ee43607483ce7d0babe6b1eab5d2fed1
87b60986f1d4b0ed71100b9a5fcd1a475cc40fd2
describe
'1366' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFY' 'sip-files00008.txt'
34b25a32c02e4b7d3a7a6fdb661316e9
f2a95e93f838104f01f9970b4fc514743ca12368
describe
'28482' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAFZ' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
f63726789ec338e43160074191a1b3ba
9f68906831a6ef789fcd68ba3d1c326d901c0aa5
describe
'749464' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAGA' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
c35cfe483a638e5e3453f35f9319e435
8b21e2fe76c320dac49b1323e3794b2fc7cb8cae
describe
'191343' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAGB' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
7593d7ea940b7273553cf8e8a3b2e03e
2bcb4046f188c813c3319f3b5e09470550b11402
describe
'44352' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAGC' 'sip-files00009.pro'
6ea14a20f8b17e5fbbd665d881a708b0
b091d813f1775407c900287d6600a717a04f38ec
describe
'74037' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAGD' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
4c39260ce49c6325e7f6d7fa3b631e9c
d20ad7c6b3439fcc97ac3c9df8ca8c65e014a74a
describe
'6019488' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAGE' 'sip-files00009.tif'
30425c501a1d8dbf1778df14a7ae8054
8c1f0c19a904d943b6a89546936c1cfc118542e1
describe
'2030' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAGF' 'sip-files00009.txt'
1e21dc5caa282f64e2ef8d876e4ac26b
17ae26ad78577f0f8f0ca4c1eb2b0a307e43bbc8
describe
Invalid character
'36503' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAGG' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
90d53e75478826e2102d593a3def3e78
da78f31bd9af6244a8e4d962c7fbc8812e09c6cd
describe
'760011' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAGH' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
8e10ff81564127f81d0ca5638de9e2da
4488c449f886925218cef78d37e3eed8a95f12f4
describe
'171885' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAGI' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
70c1a49938190e81b4573958483a3669
0847434736add9b12dd2dc3d8286cdb362ca79e5
describe
'29068' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAGJ' 'sip-files00010.pro'
d3d44d03c40b9744aebd1e186b9beb0c
7b7f8f10372816093d29dd58e545018fd5909fd5
describe
'63826' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAGK' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
1e1c69fa2f4f6f36fcde6e8f0b6bb71b
fbb957bc32addc596b3a8582585dd81c873621fa
describe
'18260384' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAGL' 'sip-files00010.tif'
2213230c6f40e8c90c4e51965853495b
c7f071b6822fe0ac2ae8b83a3123992796420fd9
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAGM' 'sip-files00010.txt'
184c47a6ab1a61f788eeca6db2d62133
2e5e7646e025f8801f8be77ba4d37dafc548965f
describe
Invalid character
'32251' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAGN' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
3966e5944bf242f471ab1dc9ecfdf525
f6d12be4fad15eb93976ddd09864eafa424e26ed
describe
'23895' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAGO' 'sip-filesUF00025030_00001.mets'
15dd386cdf1a42f36f068e2990eb811a
d2d4762a22ca5b5cadefe6e07a1e8095d7ca350b
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-19T10:33:06-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'24533' 'info:fdaE20080108_AAAAABfileF20080108_AAAAGR' 'sip-filesUF00025030_00001.xml'
13a5e70d4fb5d1c87a1386b35908383c
ce262a378931f396c36436a278c39eea2469cfcf
describe
'2013-12-19T10:33:05-05:00'
xml resolution