Citation
Jack the giant killer

Material Information

Title:
Jack the giant killer
Creator:
W.F. McLaughlin & Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Chicago
Publisher:
W.F. McLaughlin & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[16] p.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Fairy tales -- 1880 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre:
Fairy tales ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
028664438 ( ALEPH )
27694080 ( OCLC )
AJM5570 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text






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Jack the Giant=Killer.



The Giant Stepped on Jack’s Trap and Fell Headlong into the Pit.

named Jack, who was famous for his valiant deeds.

His bold and warlike spirit showed itself in his boyish days; for Jack

took especial delight in listening to the wonderful tales of giants and
fairies, and of the extraordinary feats of valor displayed by the knights of King
Arthur’s Round Table, which his father would sometimes relate. Jack’s spirit
was so fired by these strange accounts, that he determined, if ever he became
a man, that he would destroy some of the cruel giants who infested the land.

Not many miles from his father’s house there lived, on the top of St.
Michael’s Mount, a huge giant, who was the terror of the country round, who
was named Cormoran, from his voracious appetite. It is said that he was
eighteen feet in height. When he required food, he came down from his
castle, and, seizing on the flocks of the poor people, would throw half a dozen
oxen over his shoulders, and suspend as many sheep as he could carry, and
stalk back to his castle. He had carried on these depredations many
years ; and the poor Cornish people were well-nigh ruined.

Jack went by night to the foot of the mount and dug a very deep pit,
which he covered with sticks and straw, and over which he strewed the earth.
When all was completed, he blew a loud blast with his horn, which aroused
the giant. He came out of his castle in a great rage, and when he saw Jack
at the foot of the mount he roared in a voice like thunder, ‘‘ You young rascal!

[° the days of the renowned King Arthur there lived a Cornishman





This is the gallant Cornishman,

Who slew the Giant Cormoran.



I will punish you for
daring thus to disturb
me.” And so saying,
he came pacing down
the mount; but as
soon as he reached the
bottom, he stepped on
Jack's trap, and fell
headlong into the pit.

The giant tried to
climb out of the pit,
and as he raised his
head, Jack gave him
such a blow with his
pickaxe that he fell
back dead.

The whole coun-
try round rejoiced at
this news, and de-
termined to bestow

- some honour upon
Jack as a reward for his
bravery.

They accordingly presented him

with a sword and belt, on which was
written :







“ This is the valiant Cornishman
Who slew the Giant Cormoran.”

Jack Crept Under the Bed. 4 And they named him Jack the
Giant-Killer.

The news of his exploit soon reached the ear of a cruel old giant
named Blunderbore, who lived in a castle in the midst of a large wood.
Jack set forth on his journey in pursuit of giants, and it so happened that he
passed through the wood in which Blunderbore resided, and, being rather
tired, he sat down by a clear spring and fell asleep. Whilst in this condition
the giant came to the spring for water, and saw Jack lying there, and, reading
the lines on his belt, he seized him, and walked towards his castle.

‘“Ah! ah! Master Jack,” said he, ‘you are the man I have long wished
to get hold of. You are the man who killed my brother Cormoran, and now
I will torture and kill you.”

He locked Jack in a large dungeon, the floor of which was covered with
dead men’s bones. Jack heard many shrieks and groans from other parts of
the castle. On searching the dungeon, he found a large cord, which he
thought might help to deliver him. After making a noose, he climbed up to

‘the grating of the dungeon, which he found was directly over the castle gate.

At a distance he saw the giant coming towards the castle. ‘‘ Now,” said Jack



ae a lee

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SON

SSS



Jack breakfasts with the two-headed Giant.



to himself, “I must use my
wits, or 1am a dead man. If
I can drop this noose over his
neck as he passes under the
gate, I shall hang the monster.”
Encouraged by this thought,
Jack seized the rope, and, fast-
ening one end: to a hook, he
TI MW i let drop the noose round his
- CCA es i neck as he passed under the
> Fe HG Cue: window, and, putting forth all
his strength, he pulled the rope
so tight that the giant was
strangled. He then crept
through the bars of his prison,
and, sliding down the rope,
pierced him through with his
sword.
Then seizing the keys, which
were tied round the waist of the
giant, he entered the castle and
examined every room. On coming
to one, he found three ladies sus-
pended by the hair of their heads, and
almost starved to death. Jack immedi-
ately released.them and asked how they
came there. They*told him that the giant
A giant with two heads asked him to had murdered and robbed their husbands,
briacaey and had hung them there until they should
be’ starved. He traveled on, till night overtook him, when he entered a
lonely valley, in which he found a large castle. Jack, being hungry and
weary, went boldly up to the gate and knocked with all his might. In a few
seconds he was horrified at the sight of a monstrous giant, having two heads,
who came to the gate.
Jack was determined to try his fortune with him, as he knew there were in
his castle four things, which, if he could get hold of them, would be very
valuable to him —a coat, which would make him invisible, a cap, to tell him
whatever he desired to know, a sword, which would cut through everything
it touched, and shoes, which would render him as fleet as a horse. The giant
saluted Jack very courteously, and asked him his business. Jack replied that
he was a poor traveler overtaken by the night. The giant told him he was
welcome to shelter in his house, and invited him to come in. He then led
him to a large room and gave him some food, after which he conducted Jack
to his bedroom, and wished him a good night. Jack jumped into bed, but
could not sleep. In the middle of the night he heard the giant pacing about,
and muttering these words:







Y

Jack knighted by good King Arthur.



“ Though here you lodge with me tonight,
You shall not see the morning light,
With my club I'll kill you outright.”

“Oh, indeed!” said Jack to himself,
“are these the tricks you play upon
travelers? J’ll be as cunning as you,
Mr. Double-face.”

Jack now crept out of bed and
searched the room for something to put
in his place. He soon found a piece
YY, of wood, which he put into the bed and

2, covered over, whilst he himself crept
under the bed. Shortly after, he heard
the monster coming towards his room.
The giant came quietly in, and going
up to the bed he struck it several times
with his club, and then left the room,
thinking that he had broken all of poor
Jack’s bones. Jack determined to show
Z no fear, but to meet the giant just as
YG MAB ~ though nothing had happened, and
ue led - putting on a bold, undaunted appear-

Ve i C= ance, he went down into the sitting-

aS room, and thanked him for his hospit-

tality. The giant started on seeing

him, and replied: ‘“ You are quite

welcome. Pray, how did you sleep ?
I hope you were not disturbed in the night ?”

“Twas disturbed a little,’ said Jack. ‘Surely you must have rats in
the house, for I felt something like a rat's tail strike my bed two or three
times, but it soon went away.”

This speech mightily surprised the giant, but he said nothing. He then »
produced two huge bowls of hasty pudding, one of which he set before Jack
and the other he took himself. Jack, instead of eating his, contrived to pour
it down his neck into a leather bag which hung round him.

‘When they had finished, Jack said:

“Now, I can do what you cannot; I can run a knife in here,” pointing
to his bag, ‘“ without killing myself.”

He then siezed the knife, plunged it into his leathern bag, and out ran
all the pudding on the floor. The giant was surprised at this, and not liking
to be outdone by such a stripling, he siezed the knife, plunged it into his
body, and died on the spot.

Jack siezed the coat, the cap, the sword, and the shoes, and then pursued
his journey.

In a few days he met with a knight who was going to deliver a lady
from the power of a magician. Jack offered to go with him, and the knight




A Fierce Giant With Two Heads Was Coming.



gladly accepted his
offer, so they trav-
eled on together.
The two travelers
proceeded until they
arrived at the gates
othe castle: ; They) We
knocked for admit- ““*@tccergee
tance, and were
courteously received
by the lady, who en-
tertained them with great hospi-
tality. At the end of the repast the ~ =<.

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lady abruptly left the room, when = —==3==





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Jack put on his cap of knowledge, ia
which immediately informed him that she ~~~
was gone forth to meet a magician in the forest,
where he exercised his diabolical arts. Jack forth-
with put on his coat, and, becoming invisible, he
went into the forest, where he saw the magician exer-
cising his enchantments on the beautiful lady. Jack ad-
vanced quickly towards him, and with his sword cut off his Jack escapes the Giant with
head, and the lady was immediately delivered from her '™® St0es of swiftness.
enchantment. They returned to the castle and were joyfully received by the
knight. The following day the knight and his lady were betrothed, and they
set off for the court of King Arthur, where they were received with great
acclamations of joy. Jack was made Knight of the Round Table, as a reward
for his gallant exploits. But he resolved not to live in idleness; so he
begged permission of the king to go in pursuit of the giants; ‘for,’ said he,
‘there are many living among the Welsh mountains, and they oppress the
people.’ When the king heard the brave proposal of Jack he was highly
pleased, for he knew how cruel and bloodthirsty these giants were. He
therefore ordered everything that was proper to be provided, and Jack de-
parted. He traveled on over hills and mountains until he came to an
extensive forest, through which he had to pass. When he had advanced some
distance he heard the shrieks of a female in distress. He immediately went
towards the spot whence the sounds came, and was horrified at the sight of a
huge giant dragging after him, by the hair of their heads, a knight and his
lady. This was quite enough to rouse Jack’s couragé. He alighted from his
horse and tied him to a tree.. He then put on his invisible coat and advanced”
towards the giant. Jack could not reach higher than his knee, but he drew
his sharp sword, and with a strong blow severed the giant’s legs, and he fell
prostrate on the earth, which shook with his fall. Jack then jumped on his
neck and said, “Cruel wretch! I am come to punish you for your crimes.”
With one blow of his sword he chopped off his head.

The courteous knight and fair lady rejoiced in their escape, heartily
thanked their deliverer, and requested him to take up his abode in their castle,



——

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Jack visits the Magician in the forest.





which was not very far distant. Sir
Jack declined the offer, declaring
that he would not rest until he had
found the monster’s dwelling. The
knight replied, “I entreat you, brave
stranger, not to expose yourself to
further danger. This wretch: lived
under yonder mountain, with a
brother more cruel than himself, who
will most certainly destroy you if you
go near.” ‘Fear not,” answered
Jack. ‘When I have performed my
task, I will visit you with pleasure.”

Jack then mounted his horse,
having his invisible coat on his arm,
and rode toward the mountain.
When he got near he dismounted;
and, putting on his coat, he walked
up to the mouth of the cave, where
he saw the giant, awaiting his
brother's return. He was a most
hideous monster, with eyes as fierce
as a wild boar; huge, rough cheeks,
and a long beard, the hairs of which
were like wire. Sir Jack walked up to
him and aimed a blow with his sword,
which cut off the giant's nose. He jumped from his seat, yelling hideously ;
_ but on looking around he could see no one, for Jack was invisible. Sir Jack
now jumped upon the giant’s seat and pierced him through the back, on which
he gave a deep groan and died. Sir Jack then cut off his head, and sent it,
with that of his brother, to good King Arthur.

Sir Jack then went to the castle of the rescued knight, where he was
received with great joy. The good knight assembled all his friends, to give
a grand entertainment to his deliverer, and the castle resounded with music.
But in the midst of the mirth, a messenger informed the knight that Hundel,
a savage giant, having heard of the death of his brethren, was coming in great
fury to take revenge. This sad news instantly put a stop to all mirth, and a
thrill of horror ran through the company. Jack, however, nothing daunted,
drew his sword and said, “‘ Let him come! I havea rod for him, too.” Now,
the castle was surrounded by a moat thirty feet deep, over which went a
drawbridge. Jack ordered the drawbridge to be lowered, and set some men
to saw it nearly through. Then putting on his invisible coat, and taking his
sword, he went against the giant, who said on his approach :

“Fe, fi, fo, fum,
I smell the blood of an Englishman ;
Be he alive, or be he dead,
I'll grind his bones to make my bread.”













‘Oh, indeed,” cried Jack,
“you are a very fine fel-
low.”

“Art thou,” said the
giant, ‘the villain who
killed my kinsmen? If so,
I will tear thee with my
teeth, and grind thy bones
to powder.”

‘Ah, but you must catch
me first,” replied Jack.

Then, putting on his
shoes of swiftness, he ran
before the giant, who, the
moment he saw Jack run,
pursued him swiftly, mak-
ing the earth shake beneath
his heavy tread.

He then ran over the
drawbridge, and the giant
after him. As soon as he
got to the middle of the
bridg e, the weight of his They shouted when they saw the giant destroyed.
body snapped it asunder,
and he fell headlong into the moat. Jack now turned round and stood on
the edge of the moat, laughing at and deriding the giant. ‘You told me,”
said he, that you would grind my bones to powder; when will you begin ?”

The giant foamed with rage, but could not get out.

Jack then ordered a strong rope to be brought, which he threw over the
head of the giant, and, by the help of horses, drew him to the edge of. the
moat, and cut off his head.

All the spectators shouted when they saw the giant destroyed; and,
returning into the banqueting hall, they lavished their praises on the victorious
conqueror, and renewed their festivities until a late hour. _

Sir Jack stayed several days with his worthy host, and then set off in
search of new adventures. He traveled over hill and dale unmolested, until
he came to the foot of a.mountain, where he saw a little hut, at the door of
which he knocked. The door was opened by a venerable old man with a
flowing beard and snow white head. On seeing him, Jack bowed respectfully
and asked if he could lodge a poor traveler.

“Yes,” replied the hermit, “if you will accept my humble fare.”

He entered the hut, and the hermit set before him some bread and fruit.
Whilst he was eating, the hermit said: “I perceive, my son, that you are
the brave Cornishman who has destroyed so many giants; now, at the top of
this mountain is an enchanted castle, kept by a giant named Galligantus, who,
by the help of a vile magician, gets many knights and ladies into his castle,
where he changes them into owls, wolves, vultures, and other beasts. I







\ Kw
2S ASS

By





All were Princes and Princesses who had been changed into animals by

the Enchanter.



iG

father’s garden, and brought hither in
a chariot drawn by two firey dragons,
and turned her into a deer. Many
knights have. tried to destroy the en-
chantment, but without success.”
Jack promised that, in the morning,
at the risk of his life, he would break
the enchantment; and, after a sound
sleep, he arose early, put on his in-
visible coat, and got ready for the
attempt. When he had climbed to
the top of the mountain, he saw two
fiery dragons; but he passed them
without danger, for they could not
see him because of his invisible coat.
On the castle gates he found a
golden trumpet, and under it these
lines :

lament, above all, the hard fate of
the duke’s daughter, whom they
seized as she was walking in her .

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9
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mae

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me
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5
2 4



““Whoever can this trumpet blow,
Shall cause the giant’s overthrow.”



As soon as Jack had read this he
seized the trumpet and blewa shrill
blast, which made the gates fly open,

and the very castle itself tremble.
~The giant and the magician now
knew that their wicked course was at.
an end, and they stood biting their
thumbs and shaking with fear. :

Jack, with his sword of sharpness, * Phen Codes thet gue EMER
soon killed the giant; and the ‘
magician was then carried away by a whirlwind; and every knight and
beautiful lady, who had been changed into birds and beasts, returned to_ their
proper forms, and the castle vanished. , 3 :

The duke’s daughter thanked him on her knees as her deliverer.

The head of the giant Galligantus was sent to King Arthur.

The knights and ladies rested that night at the old man’s hermitage, and
next day they set out for the court. !

Jack then went up to the king, and gave his majesty an account of all
his fierce battles.

Jack's fame had spread through the whole country; and, at the king’s
desire, the duke gave him his daughter in marriage, to the joy of all the king-
dom. After this the king gave him a large estate, on which he and his wife
lived the rest of their days in joy and contentment.





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Jack married to the Duke’s beautiful daughter.











Full Text


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describe
'179' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUA' 'sip-files00003.txt'
271905e7a1b3ce08cd900cfa547d3188
85d1ce568c2e137d80cb3cae853fbf19a25362fc
'2012-01-11T21:55:14-05:00'
describe
'885197' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUB' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
9f1df38b440238b8d15b8677e88f52f3
4aaa216d4ee28c424e63149d4e1b0eb16f0a6316
'2012-01-11T21:55:17-05:00'
describe
'280481' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUC' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
68c19232262130f93f4728a82f8b17e2
f8d9fdaa0c3fe9352a57fc2f2f462c512f0f4e3b
'2012-01-11T21:55:47-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'43584' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUD' 'sip-files00004.pro'
438ba0621e5e429eb33cbdd54e3bcb4a
500b19241906c639835c18d02349b52ef8858d9f
'2012-01-11T21:55:22-05:00'
describe
'91423' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUE' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
6f94bf211d8be519ce9d2bbc3b5666e1
8a19df2bcb3a58e6cc11833299724deadc36ffbd
'2012-01-11T21:55:23-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7105904' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUF' 'sip-files00004.tif'
9ab6f28ea1a139cb128e69bf996f101c
c2440b9c925a33c5f2f8945ceaa5516dd743baa1
'2012-01-11T21:55:39-05:00'
describe
'1679' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUG' 'sip-files00004.txt'
91aa2ffcf676757d4413e3be33ee677f
0e75dc4bd2515c082352355f94a6803f816e08f1
'2012-01-11T21:55:44-05:00'
describe
'870618' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUH' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
6bec35075d3114c988022b4891d40b17
09966c63a8339bdcdfcd0891b4c993c4237cf74a
'2012-01-11T21:55:35-05:00'
describe
'373383' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUI' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
c42ae3f4620b8488623d000beb28fd60
c5dc86a658bd811aaec2d687dd5b28256bccf2ec
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2115' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUJ' 'sip-files00005.pro'
4b69a3d39243d8be3ced8822b5f4d750
063f9ec19204ee6cf1b132d58d632621ad06d314
describe
'106359' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUK' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
35150e5f0c6a3cb6ba65ec854d10cf51
937c9ec7f2ba0ce0fa0eacde1a6e3f81187727a9
'2012-01-11T21:55:37-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'20916912' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUL' 'sip-files00005.tif'
84762feedcd91c9268fa44986ad783ad
6d75ec3a187f75138aa084f9ea46404bdb71364e
'2012-01-11T21:55:46-05:00'
describe
'241' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUM' 'sip-files00005.txt'
170c04c4e05bbaf85bffe4721a2ec0bc
58c5580364b05765949891680e38ce0a0d684e8e
describe
'903844' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUN' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
155154c6abd9e2ccb1b214a24d0a5e69
8885962bd52e0528f934ae9c075fde68cca7368f
describe
'288026' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUO' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
334329871e266e5c53290d4580ec5f96
23ddc021bde2fd8561f7906e0256cfd2e2b0294a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'49625' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUP' 'sip-files00006.pro'
3561c2eee90112b1ead9541c726df110
fa5adc38cb5d146aef6f4f30fab484c1560ba86b
'2012-01-11T21:55:21-05:00'
describe
'91851' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUQ' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
66945e150917d516713a87fdc7ce3aaa
3824747dfa8ddaf7dfa6e652e9b1d979531991bc
'2012-01-11T21:55:43-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7255628' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUR' 'sip-files00006.tif'
c0a429f31178b064451e5a8a249af0f7
7aa43630251ca7c096def58b302158b6790e4045
'2012-01-11T21:55:28-05:00'
describe
'3290' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUS' 'sip-files00006.txt'
940e6a3e527abc8031a142067b4d7736
73d58b24229d734c05a85959e388649092f9c47a
describe
'866641' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUT' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
885842716c0f64107520dae8f6b23e4c
6f6f4cbe2aa58d5a64a198a6059fc080bd6e97c4
describe
'379048' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUU' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
0022f70b4bc16dfa90867da4965eaf22
9279b0db6eb7e248be03cdf42ec8a03aeb1415af
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1503' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUV' 'sip-files00007.pro'
9d5bfc6453abaf1f531d0127ce1436f7
f0a7d07165c1986cd8464e683c92c0058fb5dfb8
describe
'103670' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUW' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
2401b1ed012e6aae2e32ca4e9b060a99
b4330df627f2343b3c0314adef0b29e5fc1a53a7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'20820444' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUX' 'sip-files00007.tif'
3152f6b10bb0652cc76ac0ce98904b78
5d7f5e3cd9a1e3fcefb26e3c6fd691aceeb83a40
'2012-01-11T21:55:32-05:00'
describe
'157' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUY' 'sip-files00007.txt'
cdfaf23ba945307121e691434ed7e9d3
704acd856b1c97be1bb5f01e1aafecc55b0fc45e
describe
'872023' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFUZ' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
eccdc8e7ae48a39e950626ecf40ef5f0
98ecf69fee26cf707b14f40e7bda0462cf42641e
describe
'316070' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVA' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
85c57235e39e06f1ba874d63b9568b44
9ca47843f8bbb8b36e45e9854c2d0b23346ff032
'2012-01-11T21:55:42-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'58509' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVB' 'sip-files00008.pro'
bdbf088564be7977ee0a741c2ad2f13e
fd4ce2d4a5eeef9e8a90d1cdcd1a0830d04e9f74
describe
'98487' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVC' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
c9cb84672eff1c0d60a7b7b75adeab59
b63ebb710236d425ad3016839d8f4d4019881346
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7002324' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVD' 'sip-files00008.tif'
9567a49f650094652cc4fb5397d01af8
fa1247a66113bc4b9ed1b4e94fda6cb74b54623a
'2012-01-11T21:55:13-05:00'
describe
'3254' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVE' 'sip-files00008.txt'
d104da245c02ef9711a32c7e02063f31
748ccd8c014a28844b46223ff917b4f18256c106
describe
'878218' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVF' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
5c25a4e03e8e8d1a2df95b6961d435fb
462b30884fdb4a0f84fbce09ba154940f85b6a77
describe
'369157' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVG' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
05aebc0f0711bbe77dd7da45e326456c
cfbe7aeb601e97bba67f1e15b272f479be8f8295
'2012-01-11T21:55:34-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3001' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVH' 'sip-files00009.pro'
e9b77fca59e548ebb2b47e1954a1c34f
f06927e40c2d2630524896c8ed28ee26c7309b9e
describe
'101770' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVI' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
b6d2111b42635fb40c7b204c705f02a2
6e10f28c3eefc3899122d1d96d513443c40c648b
'2012-01-11T21:55:19-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'21098156' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVJ' 'sip-files00009.tif'
aac1efac256123a9aaf48cf831389ae1
9c7008111932f8d97520456644e20f0fac9ed080
describe
'162' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVK' 'sip-files00009.txt'
1b5f66df4663f48dd50f87fe44f05814
6b23d7e1da35c2ac9868de99bb3904ea92145e62
'2012-01-11T21:55:38-05:00'
describe
'869697' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVL' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
be64dd6c140f73d627fb7c36558806f7
aa24e752d166635ad67d7caeba0345b20bc26f1f
describe
'321997' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVM' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
6ba26698bcc01c6565bf325834c56883
b81757bd232cd97685c32a97344a7710ed42da2e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'58763' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVN' 'sip-files00010.pro'
00602c5704cd09278819429185ff0e87
b3efa8ab78ed467930bb2870246c6e2342f831ac
describe
'103034' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVO' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
2ac168456e196e19293856fef9cbd305
abae5e6be655f77e879f1d89eadedb805c25319a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'6984664' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVP' 'sip-files00010.tif'
f4278cec58a0f3b3b166b104a69b51c9
6a1030b8ad691ceaf1ef393dc570c31541eeca9b
describe
'3167' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVQ' 'sip-files00010.txt'
afeb3d00fa1d05dadffd3d32d788ccb5
9f4acb8b2bdf343e9e66ae0bf8f6271f6467f818
describe
'888934' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVR' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
a17981502c65d2dc2f6164f775013574
293fbae48bc17c367f06472cbd2f655a873d4dc7
describe
'347913' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVS' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
e2bbd25b1a0c15bd595eb86691130e9d
1740f201ae1d72e04887006385126f482ce96062
'2012-01-11T21:55:24-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'69581' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVT' 'sip-files00011.pro'
34dfcbca4177ebd1340ccac2bd95a5a8
df7c393728bebc31cfd6a82a8faab0fd5fbf3904
describe
'103802' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVU' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
d7e2da71db7aa9b94be7b429ae46e4db
910665729b123ac975ca641cbcfee4de9615bba7
'2012-01-11T21:55:10-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7138152' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVV' 'sip-files00011.tif'
bb284b172a6d1f4cc7b12af53cc35808
04cf7e770ca3e61588bba638130ecf7fb05b08d3
'2012-01-11T21:55:49-05:00'
describe
'2701' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVW' 'sip-files00011.txt'
33fc97ccf30c4d55296fa0b90b50e710
ef60ef9869a7d62ac5c8e46514eaa1c1dcd823b4
describe
'893344' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVX' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
969b9ff529f90e8efa1b1b4392a38d4c
098ca04fe8e74be19749c199f682314056964b26
describe
'376075' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVY' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
bea17710c6d558d3d8273a0630ee39e7
0fa8da2bb444802f8208fe0f50e8cd00297f281a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'4895' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFVZ' 'sip-files00012.pro'
94878b566262331c2781a2d4b737b7d9
1e7f0a4666d9825e5d4302cad29485284ad027a9
describe
'105816' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWA' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
52746938ac68a0b014de4052c9cac3fb
02e64ee4fb8366d3dc4f07d4195405665cb41c46
'2012-01-11T21:55:08-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'21462296' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWB' 'sip-files00012.tif'
47ae661c8465e0c8949cea3aad040e1c
22bf5254e183ee3fa33422a2b931f835d4813a02
'2012-01-11T21:55:16-05:00'
describe
'220' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWC' 'sip-files00012.txt'
8b82afa16fabc96ceee15f479a6516c9
b2d7c5dcefba9c3605942426d4eec9edb1caed39
describe
Invalid character
'884476' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWD' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
93419997889ff13f11dc3332ade35fee
d19b1c09e4e185c885e22325a6f730f8cfcf4217
describe
'334785' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWE' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
c797f7ad2f8be1c9dbeeaf786464d635
d52204164a0c9b2d9d9a8c279103fd53dcc9032a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'61753' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWF' 'sip-files00013.pro'
9aa5c1cc135a9856a7360bd78d963e3b
e194a909a47fc7cca029df39aaa9047e316ed917
describe
'100391' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWG' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
9f81984ee718a72fe725ff7374ba63ee
ceb8eb53f77e7d218aaa15a71b03eac9a4e652d7
'2012-01-11T21:55:31-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7102364' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWH' 'sip-files00013.tif'
cccd7895d085a11405f956ee727eacdc
28592585b86cc3dfe9301e8bc0f55b1da103286a
describe
'2541' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWI' 'sip-files00013.txt'
8b9e2a4edaca40245a9428d2a8e2bb8a
94e1640516b8c8bec3a834f05f531043b4926101
describe
'895961' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWJ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
ee5e8207f00db03b49b4865212fefd8b
287d0931d808448907cb7e0ecd7d64cd56eb9ff8
describe
'370057' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWK' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
10cec1a1aad420410acd7cbc8be958f5
ba19159b7187103847f614b6570b2e897449c012
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2059' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWL' 'sip-files00014.pro'
984e304aee021f27beca47f0c18fcd47
27763e3e1a339a154f6a4a7a96b8dd15c4a92438
describe
'102994' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWM' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
14172a8fdb37c0b3e309e74566fb5844
78ea312219a56e8964908723009d37ebb713f168
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'21525052' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWN' 'sip-files00014.tif'
9ce1e94ee7f5bd2bb4eca13f2438aa22
ee76ee51b96f539dcfd2e3a3e574793e5dde8096
describe
'181' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWO' 'sip-files00014.txt'
8ee1658683241ea8aa2e7fd3cb0525bd
6e4307f65a9b1d4ec79dbb6392688d1cc98aa5d1
describe
'867758' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWP' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
d2293267ff8289339f998d76ba9adbaa
e1fc6d2a2ead604a83e64d92cc0d4b0becbae843
'2012-01-11T21:55:33-05:00'
describe
'325799' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWQ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
deb9eef4f729fe20df15704c967dcd9e
2e77afec5ca39aa30a9b425e1131ec20490db324
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'60926' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWR' 'sip-files00015.pro'
478ea08d7c14f3199721006abf90e9d2
590045e9d2c8ac3ac4ca41363868f4ff5c26d588
describe
'100985' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWS' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
90af769c243edb5f19a7b5894fd6dd4b
f21ba4fd1f030786195826081701314a912ef859
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'6968360' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWT' 'sip-files00015.tif'
ea64059179587475ccada31975d351b6
abbeadb9cb6fae997ce20c6643bf354f2f9de69f
describe
'2431' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWU' 'sip-files00015.txt'
ccfe735faa5473690bfce709c0bfb8d5
01c59332a84b5a1b50ee8271f15c600ef61535a3
describe
'847273' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWV' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
c7d33b2fe04123f2ba5451a1492d375d
a45e9bb4f774f96764500d2a2f11a103d5ffd1a5
'2012-01-11T21:55:09-05:00'
describe
'390933' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWW' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
b40769021cd9319756c55fb911757a63
553c44356130bf0aa351379bc2000e4684927b46
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'4935' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWX' 'sip-files00016.pro'
cbb3584e206ac44dc511a1720a9602f9
b5db3cb21785a22c38cc0a6d1c0e7011654020c6
describe
'104990' 'info:fdaE20090307_AAAAQMfileF20090307_AACFWY' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
4b1d9b8615143842e27018ceda93773e
64dff85a09cd7f413719245f07e90b0683ef71fa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
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'2013-12-13T14:26:32-05:00' 'mixed'
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http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
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TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
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describe
xml resolution








; KOERNER S HAVES BY BUFFALO N Vv
! =

\A



#1
t : 4 ¢
Jack the Giant=Killer.



The Giant Stepped on Jack’s Trap and Fell Headlong into the Pit.

named Jack, who was famous for his valiant deeds.

His bold and warlike spirit showed itself in his boyish days; for Jack

took especial delight in listening to the wonderful tales of giants and
fairies, and of the extraordinary feats of valor displayed by the knights of King
Arthur’s Round Table, which his father would sometimes relate. Jack’s spirit
was so fired by these strange accounts, that he determined, if ever he became
a man, that he would destroy some of the cruel giants who infested the land.

Not many miles from his father’s house there lived, on the top of St.
Michael’s Mount, a huge giant, who was the terror of the country round, who
was named Cormoran, from his voracious appetite. It is said that he was
eighteen feet in height. When he required food, he came down from his
castle, and, seizing on the flocks of the poor people, would throw half a dozen
oxen over his shoulders, and suspend as many sheep as he could carry, and
stalk back to his castle. He had carried on these depredations many
years ; and the poor Cornish people were well-nigh ruined.

Jack went by night to the foot of the mount and dug a very deep pit,
which he covered with sticks and straw, and over which he strewed the earth.
When all was completed, he blew a loud blast with his horn, which aroused
the giant. He came out of his castle in a great rage, and when he saw Jack
at the foot of the mount he roared in a voice like thunder, ‘‘ You young rascal!

[° the days of the renowned King Arthur there lived a Cornishman


This is the gallant Cornishman,

Who slew the Giant Cormoran.
I will punish you for
daring thus to disturb
me.” And so saying,
he came pacing down
the mount; but as
soon as he reached the
bottom, he stepped on
Jack's trap, and fell
headlong into the pit.

The giant tried to
climb out of the pit,
and as he raised his
head, Jack gave him
such a blow with his
pickaxe that he fell
back dead.

The whole coun-
try round rejoiced at
this news, and de-
termined to bestow

- some honour upon
Jack as a reward for his
bravery.

They accordingly presented him

with a sword and belt, on which was
written :







“ This is the valiant Cornishman
Who slew the Giant Cormoran.”

Jack Crept Under the Bed. 4 And they named him Jack the
Giant-Killer.

The news of his exploit soon reached the ear of a cruel old giant
named Blunderbore, who lived in a castle in the midst of a large wood.
Jack set forth on his journey in pursuit of giants, and it so happened that he
passed through the wood in which Blunderbore resided, and, being rather
tired, he sat down by a clear spring and fell asleep. Whilst in this condition
the giant came to the spring for water, and saw Jack lying there, and, reading
the lines on his belt, he seized him, and walked towards his castle.

‘“Ah! ah! Master Jack,” said he, ‘you are the man I have long wished
to get hold of. You are the man who killed my brother Cormoran, and now
I will torture and kill you.”

He locked Jack in a large dungeon, the floor of which was covered with
dead men’s bones. Jack heard many shrieks and groans from other parts of
the castle. On searching the dungeon, he found a large cord, which he
thought might help to deliver him. After making a noose, he climbed up to

‘the grating of the dungeon, which he found was directly over the castle gate.

At a distance he saw the giant coming towards the castle. ‘‘ Now,” said Jack
ae a lee

AY MQ RE

EW

SON

SSS



Jack breakfasts with the two-headed Giant.
to himself, “I must use my
wits, or 1am a dead man. If
I can drop this noose over his
neck as he passes under the
gate, I shall hang the monster.”
Encouraged by this thought,
Jack seized the rope, and, fast-
ening one end: to a hook, he
TI MW i let drop the noose round his
- CCA es i neck as he passed under the
> Fe HG Cue: window, and, putting forth all
his strength, he pulled the rope
so tight that the giant was
strangled. He then crept
through the bars of his prison,
and, sliding down the rope,
pierced him through with his
sword.
Then seizing the keys, which
were tied round the waist of the
giant, he entered the castle and
examined every room. On coming
to one, he found three ladies sus-
pended by the hair of their heads, and
almost starved to death. Jack immedi-
ately released.them and asked how they
came there. They*told him that the giant
A giant with two heads asked him to had murdered and robbed their husbands,
briacaey and had hung them there until they should
be’ starved. He traveled on, till night overtook him, when he entered a
lonely valley, in which he found a large castle. Jack, being hungry and
weary, went boldly up to the gate and knocked with all his might. In a few
seconds he was horrified at the sight of a monstrous giant, having two heads,
who came to the gate.
Jack was determined to try his fortune with him, as he knew there were in
his castle four things, which, if he could get hold of them, would be very
valuable to him —a coat, which would make him invisible, a cap, to tell him
whatever he desired to know, a sword, which would cut through everything
it touched, and shoes, which would render him as fleet as a horse. The giant
saluted Jack very courteously, and asked him his business. Jack replied that
he was a poor traveler overtaken by the night. The giant told him he was
welcome to shelter in his house, and invited him to come in. He then led
him to a large room and gave him some food, after which he conducted Jack
to his bedroom, and wished him a good night. Jack jumped into bed, but
could not sleep. In the middle of the night he heard the giant pacing about,
and muttering these words:




Y

Jack knighted by good King Arthur.
“ Though here you lodge with me tonight,
You shall not see the morning light,
With my club I'll kill you outright.”

“Oh, indeed!” said Jack to himself,
“are these the tricks you play upon
travelers? J’ll be as cunning as you,
Mr. Double-face.”

Jack now crept out of bed and
searched the room for something to put
in his place. He soon found a piece
YY, of wood, which he put into the bed and

2, covered over, whilst he himself crept
under the bed. Shortly after, he heard
the monster coming towards his room.
The giant came quietly in, and going
up to the bed he struck it several times
with his club, and then left the room,
thinking that he had broken all of poor
Jack’s bones. Jack determined to show
Z no fear, but to meet the giant just as
YG MAB ~ though nothing had happened, and
ue led - putting on a bold, undaunted appear-

Ve i C= ance, he went down into the sitting-

aS room, and thanked him for his hospit-

tality. The giant started on seeing

him, and replied: ‘“ You are quite

welcome. Pray, how did you sleep ?
I hope you were not disturbed in the night ?”

“Twas disturbed a little,’ said Jack. ‘Surely you must have rats in
the house, for I felt something like a rat's tail strike my bed two or three
times, but it soon went away.”

This speech mightily surprised the giant, but he said nothing. He then »
produced two huge bowls of hasty pudding, one of which he set before Jack
and the other he took himself. Jack, instead of eating his, contrived to pour
it down his neck into a leather bag which hung round him.

‘When they had finished, Jack said:

“Now, I can do what you cannot; I can run a knife in here,” pointing
to his bag, ‘“ without killing myself.”

He then siezed the knife, plunged it into his leathern bag, and out ran
all the pudding on the floor. The giant was surprised at this, and not liking
to be outdone by such a stripling, he siezed the knife, plunged it into his
body, and died on the spot.

Jack siezed the coat, the cap, the sword, and the shoes, and then pursued
his journey.

In a few days he met with a knight who was going to deliver a lady
from the power of a magician. Jack offered to go with him, and the knight




A Fierce Giant With Two Heads Was Coming.
gladly accepted his
offer, so they trav-
eled on together.
The two travelers
proceeded until they
arrived at the gates
othe castle: ; They) We
knocked for admit- ““*@tccergee
tance, and were
courteously received
by the lady, who en-
tertained them with great hospi-
tality. At the end of the repast the ~ =<.

= x &.

lady abruptly left the room, when = —==3==





a. s
( 8 Sn

IZ Ma

UN

Zo Piscwig' Il

Sa 4
‘loa













£4
tZ

wy 7M 5
“Le Hp WY y
ng



Jack put on his cap of knowledge, ia
which immediately informed him that she ~~~
was gone forth to meet a magician in the forest,
where he exercised his diabolical arts. Jack forth-
with put on his coat, and, becoming invisible, he
went into the forest, where he saw the magician exer-
cising his enchantments on the beautiful lady. Jack ad-
vanced quickly towards him, and with his sword cut off his Jack escapes the Giant with
head, and the lady was immediately delivered from her '™® St0es of swiftness.
enchantment. They returned to the castle and were joyfully received by the
knight. The following day the knight and his lady were betrothed, and they
set off for the court of King Arthur, where they were received with great
acclamations of joy. Jack was made Knight of the Round Table, as a reward
for his gallant exploits. But he resolved not to live in idleness; so he
begged permission of the king to go in pursuit of the giants; ‘for,’ said he,
‘there are many living among the Welsh mountains, and they oppress the
people.’ When the king heard the brave proposal of Jack he was highly
pleased, for he knew how cruel and bloodthirsty these giants were. He
therefore ordered everything that was proper to be provided, and Jack de-
parted. He traveled on over hills and mountains until he came to an
extensive forest, through which he had to pass. When he had advanced some
distance he heard the shrieks of a female in distress. He immediately went
towards the spot whence the sounds came, and was horrified at the sight of a
huge giant dragging after him, by the hair of their heads, a knight and his
lady. This was quite enough to rouse Jack’s couragé. He alighted from his
horse and tied him to a tree.. He then put on his invisible coat and advanced”
towards the giant. Jack could not reach higher than his knee, but he drew
his sharp sword, and with a strong blow severed the giant’s legs, and he fell
prostrate on the earth, which shook with his fall. Jack then jumped on his
neck and said, “Cruel wretch! I am come to punish you for your crimes.”
With one blow of his sword he chopped off his head.

The courteous knight and fair lady rejoiced in their escape, heartily
thanked their deliverer, and requested him to take up his abode in their castle,
——

———_

aT

th yy
—_—_—_—_— y Y, \\ i NY

il

i

AVN Zag

i
HY

hi y
m8

Jack visits the Magician in the forest.


which was not very far distant. Sir
Jack declined the offer, declaring
that he would not rest until he had
found the monster’s dwelling. The
knight replied, “I entreat you, brave
stranger, not to expose yourself to
further danger. This wretch: lived
under yonder mountain, with a
brother more cruel than himself, who
will most certainly destroy you if you
go near.” ‘Fear not,” answered
Jack. ‘When I have performed my
task, I will visit you with pleasure.”

Jack then mounted his horse,
having his invisible coat on his arm,
and rode toward the mountain.
When he got near he dismounted;
and, putting on his coat, he walked
up to the mouth of the cave, where
he saw the giant, awaiting his
brother's return. He was a most
hideous monster, with eyes as fierce
as a wild boar; huge, rough cheeks,
and a long beard, the hairs of which
were like wire. Sir Jack walked up to
him and aimed a blow with his sword,
which cut off the giant's nose. He jumped from his seat, yelling hideously ;
_ but on looking around he could see no one, for Jack was invisible. Sir Jack
now jumped upon the giant’s seat and pierced him through the back, on which
he gave a deep groan and died. Sir Jack then cut off his head, and sent it,
with that of his brother, to good King Arthur.

Sir Jack then went to the castle of the rescued knight, where he was
received with great joy. The good knight assembled all his friends, to give
a grand entertainment to his deliverer, and the castle resounded with music.
But in the midst of the mirth, a messenger informed the knight that Hundel,
a savage giant, having heard of the death of his brethren, was coming in great
fury to take revenge. This sad news instantly put a stop to all mirth, and a
thrill of horror ran through the company. Jack, however, nothing daunted,
drew his sword and said, “‘ Let him come! I havea rod for him, too.” Now,
the castle was surrounded by a moat thirty feet deep, over which went a
drawbridge. Jack ordered the drawbridge to be lowered, and set some men
to saw it nearly through. Then putting on his invisible coat, and taking his
sword, he went against the giant, who said on his approach :

“Fe, fi, fo, fum,
I smell the blood of an Englishman ;
Be he alive, or be he dead,
I'll grind his bones to make my bread.”







‘Oh, indeed,” cried Jack,
“you are a very fine fel-
low.”

“Art thou,” said the
giant, ‘the villain who
killed my kinsmen? If so,
I will tear thee with my
teeth, and grind thy bones
to powder.”

‘Ah, but you must catch
me first,” replied Jack.

Then, putting on his
shoes of swiftness, he ran
before the giant, who, the
moment he saw Jack run,
pursued him swiftly, mak-
ing the earth shake beneath
his heavy tread.

He then ran over the
drawbridge, and the giant
after him. As soon as he
got to the middle of the
bridg e, the weight of his They shouted when they saw the giant destroyed.
body snapped it asunder,
and he fell headlong into the moat. Jack now turned round and stood on
the edge of the moat, laughing at and deriding the giant. ‘You told me,”
said he, that you would grind my bones to powder; when will you begin ?”

The giant foamed with rage, but could not get out.

Jack then ordered a strong rope to be brought, which he threw over the
head of the giant, and, by the help of horses, drew him to the edge of. the
moat, and cut off his head.

All the spectators shouted when they saw the giant destroyed; and,
returning into the banqueting hall, they lavished their praises on the victorious
conqueror, and renewed their festivities until a late hour. _

Sir Jack stayed several days with his worthy host, and then set off in
search of new adventures. He traveled over hill and dale unmolested, until
he came to the foot of a.mountain, where he saw a little hut, at the door of
which he knocked. The door was opened by a venerable old man with a
flowing beard and snow white head. On seeing him, Jack bowed respectfully
and asked if he could lodge a poor traveler.

“Yes,” replied the hermit, “if you will accept my humble fare.”

He entered the hut, and the hermit set before him some bread and fruit.
Whilst he was eating, the hermit said: “I perceive, my son, that you are
the brave Cornishman who has destroyed so many giants; now, at the top of
this mountain is an enchanted castle, kept by a giant named Galligantus, who,
by the help of a vile magician, gets many knights and ladies into his castle,
where he changes them into owls, wolves, vultures, and other beasts. I







\ Kw
2S ASS

By


All were Princes and Princesses who had been changed into animals by

the Enchanter.
iG

father’s garden, and brought hither in
a chariot drawn by two firey dragons,
and turned her into a deer. Many
knights have. tried to destroy the en-
chantment, but without success.”
Jack promised that, in the morning,
at the risk of his life, he would break
the enchantment; and, after a sound
sleep, he arose early, put on his in-
visible coat, and got ready for the
attempt. When he had climbed to
the top of the mountain, he saw two
fiery dragons; but he passed them
without danger, for they could not
see him because of his invisible coat.
On the castle gates he found a
golden trumpet, and under it these
lines :

lament, above all, the hard fate of
the duke’s daughter, whom they
seized as she was walking in her .

ei
a:
9
a.
ie
Oo
a)
ae
mae

9
<
Q
me
>
5
2 4



““Whoever can this trumpet blow,
Shall cause the giant’s overthrow.”



As soon as Jack had read this he
seized the trumpet and blewa shrill
blast, which made the gates fly open,

and the very castle itself tremble.
~The giant and the magician now
knew that their wicked course was at.
an end, and they stood biting their
thumbs and shaking with fear. :

Jack, with his sword of sharpness, * Phen Codes thet gue EMER
soon killed the giant; and the ‘
magician was then carried away by a whirlwind; and every knight and
beautiful lady, who had been changed into birds and beasts, returned to_ their
proper forms, and the castle vanished. , 3 :

The duke’s daughter thanked him on her knees as her deliverer.

The head of the giant Galligantus was sent to King Arthur.

The knights and ladies rested that night at the old man’s hermitage, and
next day they set out for the court. !

Jack then went up to the king, and gave his majesty an account of all
his fierce battles.

Jack's fame had spread through the whole country; and, at the king’s
desire, the duke gave him his daughter in marriage, to the joy of all the king-
dom. After this the king gave him a large estate, on which he and his wife
lived the rest of their days in joy and contentment.


ssi SSS Ta so eee

pee

A
A
H
a
5
H
’
4

SS, os

«
=

Ft
aS
4

2 ise

—————

==
aR

23



Jack married to the Duke’s beautiful daughter.