Citation
Beauty and the beast

Material Information

Title:
Beauty and the beast
Series Title:
Nursery picture books
Creator:
Gall & Inglis ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Edinburgh
Publisher:
Gall & Inglis
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[4] p. : ;

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Fairy tales -- 1880 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1880 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre:
Fairy tales ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
"Gall & Inglis nursery toy books."
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Includes publisher's advertisement.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Special Collections, George A. Smathers Libraries
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
028915764 ( ALEPH )
27994691 ( OCLC )
AJP1600 ( NOTIS )

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PALMM Version

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Full Text
PRICE SIXPENCE, OR MOUNTED ON _OLOTH, ONE SHI LING.

ere

VO

ne





THE MERCHANT LOST IN THE FOREST.





as

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

long time ago there lived a merchant who had three daughters; the
youngest was so lovely that she was called “Beauty.” Her two
sisters were also beautiful, but they were vain and haughty. The merchant was
once very rich. It so happened that, when a fleet of his ships were in
the Persian Gulf, a frightful storm arose, and the merchant’s fleet .was lost.

After a year, news was brought to the merchant of the safe arrival in a
distant port of one of his most precious cargoes, which had been thought to
have been lost. It was necessary that the merchant should go to the port,
and he resolved to start the next day.

“Tell me, my daughters,” said the merchant, ‘“ what presents shall your
father bring for you on his return from his journey?” The two elder asked
for diamonds and Cashmere shawls, lace and Persian turbans. Beauty, who
thought it too soon to spend their new riches, asked only a rose. ‘The
“sisters could not help laughing at her modesty.

The merchant arrived at the port, and found his vessel. He arranged
all his business, and made the purchases which his eldest daughters had
requested; but as it was winter, he could not find a rose. On his way
home he lost his way in a storm. During the lull of the tempest a sweet
sound was heard—

“On, Merchant, on!
Thy journey ’s near done !”
And at the instant a blue light was seen through the trees. The merchant
rode in the direction of the light. The light disappeared, and in its place
was seen the portal of a palace. A tablet above the entrance was in-
scribed in glittering letters,—
“Enter without fear,
All are welcome here
As he passed beneath the marble archway a flourish of trumpets saluted his
‘ear, but nobody was to be seen. He then dismounted from his horse, which
directly trotted across the court, as though he knew the way.

The merchant proceeded across the court, into a bath-room, when he
heard a voice gently saying—

«You ‘re a guest for the night.
And all that is right

Will appear to your sight,
To be used without fright.

1?

The merchant stripped himself, and entered the warm bath. Upon quitting |

tO ¢



it his wet clothes had vanished, and dry garments supplied their place.
From the bath-room he proceeded to the supper-room, and there found a
delicious repast prepared, at which he made a most hearty meal. Having
offered up his grateful prayers, the merchant retired to his bed.

The next morning was bright and peaceful, and the merchant awoke
quite refreshed. After breakfast he walked in the gardens of the palace. The
flowers made him think of Beauty, and at last, entering an arbour, he found
some magnificent red roses., One of these the merchant plucked, when
suddenly a monster seized him. ‘“ Ungrateful wretch!” said the Beast, “ is
this the way you repay the kindness you have received? You are treated
with the best that I can bestow upon you, and in return you steal my roses!”

The merchant, trembling, replied, “‘ Pardon me, Beast; I knew not I was
offending. It was for my youngest daughter.”

‘You have pulled my dearest treasure,” said the Beast, ‘and you must
die; but I will allow you to return home and take leave of your children,
but you must return here in a week, or send one of them in your stead. Take
the rose and be gone.”

In the evening the merchant, broken-hearted, reached his home.

Beauty’s face was radiant with joy; the father looked very sad.
‘Here, my child,” said he, “take the rose you asked for; it will cost thy
father his life!” The merchant took the rose from his bosom, and related
all that had occurred. ‘Oh, father,” said Beauty, “you shall not return ;
I alone will bear the punishment. Your life, dearest father, is more
valuable than mine.”

Whilst Beauty was sacrificing herself for the sake of her father, her
sisters were selfishly turning over the presents brought by their father,
utterly unmindful of his sad countenance; and when they heard Beauty’s
proposal, they only said, it will be a good riddance of her.

The morning for departure came. The sisters, finding that she was
really going, rubbed their eyes with an onion, and thus pretended to be in
great grief. The merchant accompanied his daughter to the monster’s
palace. The inscription on the golden gates of the palace,

« Enter without fear,
All are welcome here

glittered more brilliantly than at the merchant’s first entrance; the gates
instantly flew open. The merchant and Beauty passed into the arcade; as
before, the merchant went to his bath, whilst two humming birds, bearing
little torches of white light, flew before Beauty and lighted her to. her rooms.
Over the door was inscribed, “ Beaury’s APARTMENT,” and a transparency at
the end of the room was thus inscribed :

“Welcome, Beauty, banish fear,
You are queen and mistress here!
Speak your wishes, speak your will,
Swift obedience meets them still.”
Having changed her dress, she went to the supper room, where a magnifi-
cent feast was prepared for them. Everything jvas brought and removed by

1?



THE MERCHANT PLUCKS THE ROSE.





























BEAUTY AT HER FATHER'S DOOR,



= eens

THE ELDEST SISTER THROWN INTO THE PIGGERY.

ee on —— n

BEAUTY DISCOVERS THE BEAST IN THE GARDEN,





invisible agency. During the repast, a magic flute played a few bars of
music, then a voice said,

“The Beast is near,

_ And asks leave to appear.”

The merchant then spoke: ‘ Appear, Beast, if it be your pleasure.”

A door sprung open, and the Beast entered. Beauty clung to her
father’s arm for protection. The Beast saw and pitied her alarm, and
said: ‘‘ Merchant, you have well redeemed your word. Your daughter
will, I trust, find her time pass agreeably. Of my palace she is the mistress,”
Making a graceful bow, the Beast said “ Farewell!” On the morrow the
merchant, with great grief, returned home.

Beauty, now left to herself, resolved to be as happy as she could. What-
ever she wished for seemed to come at hercommand. If she desired to sail
on the water, she had only to step into a boat; its sails at once caught the
breeze, and it glided noiselessly over the crystal waters. If she desired to
ride, her own horse, richly caparisoned, presented himself at the door. But
long before the first day had passed she felt so lonely, that she quite wel-
‘ecomed the magic flute, and was really glad to answer, “‘ Appear, Beast!”
She shuddered as he approached, but her fear wore off as the Beast stayed.
When the clock sounded ten he bid her a respectful ‘‘ Good night.” Thus
the time passed for more than half-a-year, when one evening, after Beauty
and the Beast had been conversing, he took her hand. 'The Beast then said,
“ Beauty, will you marry me?” “Impossible!” replied Beauty. The beast
eroaned deeply, and left as if in the greatest grief.

One day, as Beauty was standing before a large mirror, she exclaimed,
‘Oh that I could see what my father is about!” At that instant her home
appeared in the glass. In one room were her sisters trying on some new
gowns. In another room lay her father on a bed of sickness. Beauty
screamed, and nearly fainted. At that instant the magic flute sounded,
though it was but noon, and the Beast came in. He gently took her hand,
and said, ‘“ Beauty, what ails you? are you ill?” ‘No, Beast, no; but I
have just seen my old home in the mirror, and my father, I fear, is at the
point of death. “Oh, Beast! it would indeed be a great joy to me to visit
him: perhaps it may be the last time I shall ever see him alive.”

‘Take the rose which your father first gathered,” said the Beast, ‘and
you have only to wish, and your wish will be gratified. There is only
one condition I have to make, which is, that you are not absent more than
a week. Even that time will appear like ages to me!”

When the Beast had gone, Beauty took the rose and placed it in her
bosom. She then said, ‘‘I wish to be at home.’ The next instant she
found herself at the porch of her father’s cottage. She knocked gently, and
the door was opened by her eldest sister, who started at seeing her, and said,
“Well, Beauty, indeed! who would have thought of seeing you? We
thought you were dead long ago, and perhaps eaten up by your monster.”

Beauty’s presence hastened the recovery of the old man. He delighted
in hearing all her news: and how kind the Beast was to her. Her account



of the palace and all its wonders made the sisters quite jealous, and anxious
to take Beauty’s place. The eldest then basely attempted to rob Beauty of
the rose: as Beauty slept, she took it from her bosom; but the instant she
seized the rose it withered at her touch, and instead of being transported to
the Beast’s palace as she wished, she was carried into the pigsty. The rose
was lying immediately after on the table in Beauty’s room.

When this scheme failed, the sisters, mad with jealousy and _ spite,
resolved to keep Béauty past the time appointed by the Beast, in the hope
that she would thus fall a victim to his anger. With this view they sud-
denly became most kind and attentive to Beauty, taking her out visiting
with them, and involving her in a round of gaiety to which she was so little
accustomed, that she entirely forgot the day on, which she had promised to
return. One evening on returning from a splendid party, Beauty was so
tired that she threw herself, all splendidly dressed as she was, on her bed,
and fell asleep. She dreamed she was in the palace, and that she saw the
Beast dying, and that he turned his eyes reproachfully on her, as if saying,
‘“‘ How have you kept your promise, ah! Beauty?” She awaked with a start ;
it was early morning, and she remembered the day she had promised to
return was past. Hurriedly she sought her rose, and wished herself in the
Beast’s palace. In an instant she was in her own room. -She passed from
one room of the palace to another, from terrace to gardéh, and from garden
to grove, calling for the Beast, but found him not. In her despair she seized
the rose, and wished herself in the Beast’s presence. There he lay in the
garden as if dead. Beauty felt his heart; it was still beating. The Beast
uttered a groan, and looked up. His eye feebly opened, and seeing Beauty,
he said, “ Beauty, why did you return only to see me die? I could not
have believed you would have deceived me.” ‘Oh, Beast! what can I do
to save you?” “Will you marry me?” faintly murmured the Beast.
‘““Willingly to save your life!” answered Beauty eagerly.

The Beast seemed to revive, and said timidly, “But not otherwise,
Beauty?” ‘Oh, yes! yes!” replied Beauty, covering her face.

That instant the Beast disappeared, and she saw at her feet one of the
handsomest Princes that eyes had ever beheld.

Loud roared the cannon amidst the sounds of the trumpets and timbrels,
and all the palace seemed suddenly peopled with bustling crowds.

The Prince explained to Beauty how he had been changed into a Beast
by a spiteful fairy, who had ordered him to remain in that state until a
beautiful lady would consent to marry him in his frightful form; and how
a good fairy had given him a magic rose-tree, telling him it would be the
means of releasing him from his enchantment.

@ The Prince took Beauty’s arm, and led her into the palace, where to
Beauty’s surprise she found her father,—but not her sisters. They were
changed into stone statues, so to remain until they had repented of their
wickedness.

The Prince and Beauty were married, and lived to a good old age in
great happiness.



En f

> BEAST TRANSFORMED INTO A PRINCE.







| GALL AND INGLIS’ |
| NEW SERIES OF SIXPENNY PICTURE- OS

tae. vers in Colors price 6a, or oe on Cloth, 1s.

Ni ursery ‘Picture Books. sae |
No. 1: NURSERY RHYMES, 24 Pictures, with Age )

\ of letter-press.

Come a riddle, come a riddle, come a rot, fot" tot
A little wee man, with a red, red coat.

No. 2. COMIC ALPHABET OF ANIMALS, —

24 Pictures, with 6 pages letter-press.

F said to a Goose, I’m a Bailiff you see,
Justice Hunger has sent me to take you to tea,

_ | No.3. BEAUTY AND THE BEAST, 10 Sernbadl
ae a mt at with 4 pages of Tetter-press, containing the story of Beauty and he Beast. ai

‘No. 4. JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK, |

11 Pictures, with 4 pages of letter-press, eae the. a of Sack
and the Bean-stalk.

ee No. 5. THE SLEEPING BEAUTY in the WOOD, |
ie 9 Pictures with 4 pages of ee eee the story of thee
Sleeping Boge . . oe of

| Scripture Picture- Books. oo ae
| No 1. ALPHABET OF OLD TESTAMENT | {
: HISTORY, 24 Pictures, with 6 pages letter-press. : [5

' | was a patriarch, gentle and kind,
J was his son, who deceived him when bliad.



No. 2. JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN,

9 Pictures, with 4 pages of le’ ‘er=press, containing the see sa "OF J ope!
and his Br ethren, in Scripture languagee

2 DANIEL AND HIS THREE FRIENDS,

“eg Pictures, with 4 pages of letter-pregs, containing the History of Daniel
and his Three Friends, in aS oe

EDINBURGH: GALL “AND IN GLIS, 6, GEORGE STREET.
etnias a ei

y a ~ SL CA
i Soe Ferre Sk) SENG LO eae en ee ro ae ¢ ~ a





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describe
Invalid character
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Invalid character
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describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-19T10:24:25-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
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http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
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TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
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describe
'2013-12-19T10:24:24-05:00'
xml resolution




PRICE SIXPENCE, OR MOUNTED ON _OLOTH, ONE SHI LING.

ere

VO

ne


THE MERCHANT LOST IN THE FOREST.


as

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

long time ago there lived a merchant who had three daughters; the
youngest was so lovely that she was called “Beauty.” Her two
sisters were also beautiful, but they were vain and haughty. The merchant was
once very rich. It so happened that, when a fleet of his ships were in
the Persian Gulf, a frightful storm arose, and the merchant’s fleet .was lost.

After a year, news was brought to the merchant of the safe arrival in a
distant port of one of his most precious cargoes, which had been thought to
have been lost. It was necessary that the merchant should go to the port,
and he resolved to start the next day.

“Tell me, my daughters,” said the merchant, ‘“ what presents shall your
father bring for you on his return from his journey?” The two elder asked
for diamonds and Cashmere shawls, lace and Persian turbans. Beauty, who
thought it too soon to spend their new riches, asked only a rose. ‘The
“sisters could not help laughing at her modesty.

The merchant arrived at the port, and found his vessel. He arranged
all his business, and made the purchases which his eldest daughters had
requested; but as it was winter, he could not find a rose. On his way
home he lost his way in a storm. During the lull of the tempest a sweet
sound was heard—

“On, Merchant, on!
Thy journey ’s near done !”
And at the instant a blue light was seen through the trees. The merchant
rode in the direction of the light. The light disappeared, and in its place
was seen the portal of a palace. A tablet above the entrance was in-
scribed in glittering letters,—
“Enter without fear,
All are welcome here
As he passed beneath the marble archway a flourish of trumpets saluted his
‘ear, but nobody was to be seen. He then dismounted from his horse, which
directly trotted across the court, as though he knew the way.

The merchant proceeded across the court, into a bath-room, when he
heard a voice gently saying—

«You ‘re a guest for the night.
And all that is right

Will appear to your sight,
To be used without fright.

1?

The merchant stripped himself, and entered the warm bath. Upon quitting |

tO ¢
it his wet clothes had vanished, and dry garments supplied their place.
From the bath-room he proceeded to the supper-room, and there found a
delicious repast prepared, at which he made a most hearty meal. Having
offered up his grateful prayers, the merchant retired to his bed.

The next morning was bright and peaceful, and the merchant awoke
quite refreshed. After breakfast he walked in the gardens of the palace. The
flowers made him think of Beauty, and at last, entering an arbour, he found
some magnificent red roses., One of these the merchant plucked, when
suddenly a monster seized him. ‘“ Ungrateful wretch!” said the Beast, “ is
this the way you repay the kindness you have received? You are treated
with the best that I can bestow upon you, and in return you steal my roses!”

The merchant, trembling, replied, “‘ Pardon me, Beast; I knew not I was
offending. It was for my youngest daughter.”

‘You have pulled my dearest treasure,” said the Beast, ‘and you must
die; but I will allow you to return home and take leave of your children,
but you must return here in a week, or send one of them in your stead. Take
the rose and be gone.”

In the evening the merchant, broken-hearted, reached his home.

Beauty’s face was radiant with joy; the father looked very sad.
‘Here, my child,” said he, “take the rose you asked for; it will cost thy
father his life!” The merchant took the rose from his bosom, and related
all that had occurred. ‘Oh, father,” said Beauty, “you shall not return ;
I alone will bear the punishment. Your life, dearest father, is more
valuable than mine.”

Whilst Beauty was sacrificing herself for the sake of her father, her
sisters were selfishly turning over the presents brought by their father,
utterly unmindful of his sad countenance; and when they heard Beauty’s
proposal, they only said, it will be a good riddance of her.

The morning for departure came. The sisters, finding that she was
really going, rubbed their eyes with an onion, and thus pretended to be in
great grief. The merchant accompanied his daughter to the monster’s
palace. The inscription on the golden gates of the palace,

« Enter without fear,
All are welcome here

glittered more brilliantly than at the merchant’s first entrance; the gates
instantly flew open. The merchant and Beauty passed into the arcade; as
before, the merchant went to his bath, whilst two humming birds, bearing
little torches of white light, flew before Beauty and lighted her to. her rooms.
Over the door was inscribed, “ Beaury’s APARTMENT,” and a transparency at
the end of the room was thus inscribed :

“Welcome, Beauty, banish fear,
You are queen and mistress here!
Speak your wishes, speak your will,
Swift obedience meets them still.”
Having changed her dress, she went to the supper room, where a magnifi-
cent feast was prepared for them. Everything jvas brought and removed by

1?
THE MERCHANT PLUCKS THE ROSE.























BEAUTY AT HER FATHER'S DOOR,
= eens

THE ELDEST SISTER THROWN INTO THE PIGGERY.

ee on —— n

BEAUTY DISCOVERS THE BEAST IN THE GARDEN,


invisible agency. During the repast, a magic flute played a few bars of
music, then a voice said,

“The Beast is near,

_ And asks leave to appear.”

The merchant then spoke: ‘ Appear, Beast, if it be your pleasure.”

A door sprung open, and the Beast entered. Beauty clung to her
father’s arm for protection. The Beast saw and pitied her alarm, and
said: ‘‘ Merchant, you have well redeemed your word. Your daughter
will, I trust, find her time pass agreeably. Of my palace she is the mistress,”
Making a graceful bow, the Beast said “ Farewell!” On the morrow the
merchant, with great grief, returned home.

Beauty, now left to herself, resolved to be as happy as she could. What-
ever she wished for seemed to come at hercommand. If she desired to sail
on the water, she had only to step into a boat; its sails at once caught the
breeze, and it glided noiselessly over the crystal waters. If she desired to
ride, her own horse, richly caparisoned, presented himself at the door. But
long before the first day had passed she felt so lonely, that she quite wel-
‘ecomed the magic flute, and was really glad to answer, “‘ Appear, Beast!”
She shuddered as he approached, but her fear wore off as the Beast stayed.
When the clock sounded ten he bid her a respectful ‘‘ Good night.” Thus
the time passed for more than half-a-year, when one evening, after Beauty
and the Beast had been conversing, he took her hand. 'The Beast then said,
“ Beauty, will you marry me?” “Impossible!” replied Beauty. The beast
eroaned deeply, and left as if in the greatest grief.

One day, as Beauty was standing before a large mirror, she exclaimed,
‘Oh that I could see what my father is about!” At that instant her home
appeared in the glass. In one room were her sisters trying on some new
gowns. In another room lay her father on a bed of sickness. Beauty
screamed, and nearly fainted. At that instant the magic flute sounded,
though it was but noon, and the Beast came in. He gently took her hand,
and said, ‘“ Beauty, what ails you? are you ill?” ‘No, Beast, no; but I
have just seen my old home in the mirror, and my father, I fear, is at the
point of death. “Oh, Beast! it would indeed be a great joy to me to visit
him: perhaps it may be the last time I shall ever see him alive.”

‘Take the rose which your father first gathered,” said the Beast, ‘and
you have only to wish, and your wish will be gratified. There is only
one condition I have to make, which is, that you are not absent more than
a week. Even that time will appear like ages to me!”

When the Beast had gone, Beauty took the rose and placed it in her
bosom. She then said, ‘‘I wish to be at home.’ The next instant she
found herself at the porch of her father’s cottage. She knocked gently, and
the door was opened by her eldest sister, who started at seeing her, and said,
“Well, Beauty, indeed! who would have thought of seeing you? We
thought you were dead long ago, and perhaps eaten up by your monster.”

Beauty’s presence hastened the recovery of the old man. He delighted
in hearing all her news: and how kind the Beast was to her. Her account
of the palace and all its wonders made the sisters quite jealous, and anxious
to take Beauty’s place. The eldest then basely attempted to rob Beauty of
the rose: as Beauty slept, she took it from her bosom; but the instant she
seized the rose it withered at her touch, and instead of being transported to
the Beast’s palace as she wished, she was carried into the pigsty. The rose
was lying immediately after on the table in Beauty’s room.

When this scheme failed, the sisters, mad with jealousy and _ spite,
resolved to keep Béauty past the time appointed by the Beast, in the hope
that she would thus fall a victim to his anger. With this view they sud-
denly became most kind and attentive to Beauty, taking her out visiting
with them, and involving her in a round of gaiety to which she was so little
accustomed, that she entirely forgot the day on, which she had promised to
return. One evening on returning from a splendid party, Beauty was so
tired that she threw herself, all splendidly dressed as she was, on her bed,
and fell asleep. She dreamed she was in the palace, and that she saw the
Beast dying, and that he turned his eyes reproachfully on her, as if saying,
‘“‘ How have you kept your promise, ah! Beauty?” She awaked with a start ;
it was early morning, and she remembered the day she had promised to
return was past. Hurriedly she sought her rose, and wished herself in the
Beast’s palace. In an instant she was in her own room. -She passed from
one room of the palace to another, from terrace to gardéh, and from garden
to grove, calling for the Beast, but found him not. In her despair she seized
the rose, and wished herself in the Beast’s presence. There he lay in the
garden as if dead. Beauty felt his heart; it was still beating. The Beast
uttered a groan, and looked up. His eye feebly opened, and seeing Beauty,
he said, “ Beauty, why did you return only to see me die? I could not
have believed you would have deceived me.” ‘Oh, Beast! what can I do
to save you?” “Will you marry me?” faintly murmured the Beast.
‘““Willingly to save your life!” answered Beauty eagerly.

The Beast seemed to revive, and said timidly, “But not otherwise,
Beauty?” ‘Oh, yes! yes!” replied Beauty, covering her face.

That instant the Beast disappeared, and she saw at her feet one of the
handsomest Princes that eyes had ever beheld.

Loud roared the cannon amidst the sounds of the trumpets and timbrels,
and all the palace seemed suddenly peopled with bustling crowds.

The Prince explained to Beauty how he had been changed into a Beast
by a spiteful fairy, who had ordered him to remain in that state until a
beautiful lady would consent to marry him in his frightful form; and how
a good fairy had given him a magic rose-tree, telling him it would be the
means of releasing him from his enchantment.

@ The Prince took Beauty’s arm, and led her into the palace, where to
Beauty’s surprise she found her father,—but not her sisters. They were
changed into stone statues, so to remain until they had repented of their
wickedness.

The Prince and Beauty were married, and lived to a good old age in
great happiness.
En f

> BEAST TRANSFORMED INTO A PRINCE.




| GALL AND INGLIS’ |
| NEW SERIES OF SIXPENNY PICTURE- OS

tae. vers in Colors price 6a, or oe on Cloth, 1s.

Ni ursery ‘Picture Books. sae |
No. 1: NURSERY RHYMES, 24 Pictures, with Age )

\ of letter-press.

Come a riddle, come a riddle, come a rot, fot" tot
A little wee man, with a red, red coat.

No. 2. COMIC ALPHABET OF ANIMALS, —

24 Pictures, with 6 pages letter-press.

F said to a Goose, I’m a Bailiff you see,
Justice Hunger has sent me to take you to tea,

_ | No.3. BEAUTY AND THE BEAST, 10 Sernbadl
ae a mt at with 4 pages of Tetter-press, containing the story of Beauty and he Beast. ai

‘No. 4. JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK, |

11 Pictures, with 4 pages of letter-press, eae the. a of Sack
and the Bean-stalk.

ee No. 5. THE SLEEPING BEAUTY in the WOOD, |
ie 9 Pictures with 4 pages of ee eee the story of thee
Sleeping Boge . . oe of

| Scripture Picture- Books. oo ae
| No 1. ALPHABET OF OLD TESTAMENT | {
: HISTORY, 24 Pictures, with 6 pages letter-press. : [5

' | was a patriarch, gentle and kind,
J was his son, who deceived him when bliad.



No. 2. JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN,

9 Pictures, with 4 pages of le’ ‘er=press, containing the see sa "OF J ope!
and his Br ethren, in Scripture languagee

2 DANIEL AND HIS THREE FRIENDS,

“eg Pictures, with 4 pages of letter-pregs, containing the History of Daniel
and his Three Friends, in aS oe

EDINBURGH: GALL “AND IN GLIS, 6, GEORGE STREET.
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