Citation
Old paths of honour and dishonour

Material Information

Title:
Old paths of honour and dishonour a story of the beatitudes
Creator:
Seeley, M ( Mary )
Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn, 1606-1669 ( Artist )
Guercino, 1591-1666 ( Artist )
Joanes, Joan de, 1523-1579 ( Artist )
Overbeck, Johann Friedrich, 1789-1869 ( Artist )
Blake, William, 1757-1827 ( Artist )
Seeley Jackson & Halliday ( Publisher )
James Ballantyne and Co ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Seeley, Jackson, & Halliday
Manufacturer:
Ballantyne and Company
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
viii, 229, 2 p., [16] leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Beatitudes -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fathers and sons -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1870 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
"List of illustrations mostly copied or adapted from designs by Rembrandt, Guercino, Juanes, Overbeck, Blake, and other masters"--P. [vii]
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by the author of "The kingdom and the people," "Missionary anecdotes," etc.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026894945 ( aleph )
ALH5543 ( notis )
57291119 ( oclc )

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Full Text




Sis Wit SALMA ARAM ARAN RIOT

———

!

Sana



| een
—!











t CLEAN, and returned

before the end of SA days. If any book

is lost or injured, the borrower must replace it.

ee OS One















OLD PATHS
OF

HONOUR AND DISHONOUR.



PRINTED BY BALLANTYNE AND COMPANY

EDINBURGH AND LONDON












OLD PATHS

OF

HONOUR AND DISHONOUR.
A Storp on the Beatitudes.

BY THE

AUTHOR OF “THE KINGDOM AND THE PEOPLE,”
“MISSIONARY ANECDOTES,” erc.

WITH SIXTEEN ILLUSTRATIONS.

SEELEY, JACKSON, & HALLIDAY, 54 FLEET STREET.
LONDON. MDCCCLXX.







CON T-BN TS

<>

CHAP.
I.—THE LESSON,

I.—FRANK’S DIFFICULTY,
III.—TWO SORTS OF PEOPLE,

IV.—THE WALK TO HILL FARM,

V.—A TALK IN THE STUDY,

VI.—A RUFFLED TEMPER,
VII.—A CHANGE OF OPINION,
VIII.—FRANK’S STORY,

IX.—-LONGERS,

X.— UNSATISFIED HUNGERERS,

PAGE

10
28
46
60
TH
85
97

105

117



vi Contents.



CHAP.

XI.—PUT OUT,
XII.—CONSCIENCE-STRICKEN,
XII.—EARNEST WORK,

XIV.—A WARNING,

XV.—A PRACTICAL DIFFICULTY,
XVI.—FIREBRANDS,
XVII.—A FRIEND IN TROUBLE,

XVIII.—A NAIL DRIVEN HOME,

PAGE

129
145
159
174
182
192
202
217



Lisl OF TlLeUStt a rions

Mostly Copied or Adapted from Designs by Rembrandt, Guercino, Juanes,

Overbeck, Blake, and other Masters.

et ase

PAGE
DANIEL AND THE PRINCES, ; Frontispiece
THE PUBLICAN, 22
THE PHARISEE, : : : A ; 38
THE JOURNEY TO EMMAUS, ' E : 66
BELSHAZZAR’S FEAST, : , 72
THE PATIENCE OF JOB, . ‘ : : 92
HAMAN AND MORDECAI, . 2 ; 102

ST PHILIP AND THE ETHIOPIAN, : : 108



viii List of Ilustrations.



PAGE

AHAB AND ELIJAH, . E : a : 124
ST PETER AND TABITHA, . : : : 142
THE DEATH OF ABIMELECH, . ‘ ee 152
THE ANGEL AND DANIEL, : j : 172
THE REMORSE OF JUDAS, : : : 180
MOSES AND THE TWO ISRAELITES, . : 186
THE STONING OF STEPHEN, . : : 212

THE RECONCILIATION OF PILATE AND HEROD, 226



OLD PATHS

OF

HONOUR AND DISHONOUR.



Lae eek A.
THE LESSON.

RN Ma LIAT does ‘poor in spirit’ mean?” said
Frank Leslie, somewhat fretfully, as



he as on the beach in the quiet little bay of
Yelverton, attempting, though perhaps not
very diligently, to learn his verses for the next
day, which was Sunday. ‘‘I wish,” he added,
‘that papa would let me choose my own chapters.
It is always so much easier to learn anything one
takes a fancy to. . Don’t you think so, Susy?”
A



2 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

“ Sometimes, not always,” returned his sister ;
“but why are these so difficult?”

“Oh! I can learn each verse by itself easily
enough; but it is how they come one after another
that I can’t remember ; and besides, a good many
of them I cannot understand.”

“Then you had better ask papa to explain
them. I daresay he had a reason for setting you
this passage to learn; indeed, I am almost sure
he had; so I wouldn’t ask him to change it, if I
were you.”

‘‘ Of course I shouldn’t do that,” returned Frank.
“He would only tell me that 7 had no spirit
if I wanted to give a thing up because it was
difficult ; but what reason do you suppose he had,
Sue ?.”

“Oh! never mind; I can’t tell you,” answered
his sister, smiling. ‘It is only a guess of mine;
he didn’t tell me, so you must not ask.”



The Lesson. 3



“But you say you think you know; so you
might tell, I’m sure. It’s very unkind of you,
Susy.”

“Perhaps papa would be vexed if I did.
I daresay you will find out in time,” his
sister seaid.> * ‘Come, make haste’ and learn
them, like a good boy, and then to-morrow we
will ask him to explain the difficult ones.
You know how interesting he always makes.
things.”

So Frank went to his book again; for, as his
sister was just twice his age, he generally took
her advice in the end, though his own opinions
were pretty strong. For a little while he worked
away as if he had quite made up his mind to
conquer the task; but it was not many minutes
before he stopped once more, and suddenly
asked—

“Susy, what was the name of that schooner



4 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



that was wrecked off the rocks out there last
year, just before we went away ?”

““Wasn’t she called The Betsy?” answered
Miss Leslie.

“Oh, yes! that was it,” said Frank. ‘ What
a night that was ; wasn’t it? Oh! how the wind
did howl! Don’t you remember, we couldn’t hear
a word that any one said? and what a sea there
was, to be sure! The waves were just like moun-
tains, and the bay like a great washing-tub full
of soap-suds, it was so white! Susy, do you
recollect what papa and old Joe said about
that Captain Garty that was in command of
heres ,

‘“‘T remember that they were both very indignant
with him, and said that nobody on board owed
him any thanks; but, Frank, I don’t see what all
this has to do with your lesson.”

“Tt has though, a great deal,” replied Frank,



The Lesson. 5



‘don’t you know, old Joe called him ‘the poorest-
spirited fellow that he had ever known in all his
born days,’ and papa seemed quite to agree with
him.” .

“They were both angry with him then, of
course, as everybody was, because through his
folly so many lives were nearly lost; but, you
know, nobody was drowned after all; so I don’t
think you need rake up his faults a year after the
event, Frankie,” returned his sister.

‘‘T shouldn’t take the trouble,” answered the
boy, impatiently, “only don’t you see now why
I can’t understand this first verse? How
can it be such a good thing to be ‘poor in
spirit ?’”’

Miss Leslie was about to answer, when the
sound of sailors’ voices behind them caused both
to start to their feet. |

The men were running a boat down the beach,



6 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



for the purpose of launching her; and they
seemed to be in haste.

“What is it, Timothy ?” asked the young lady,
as they passed. “You are not going fishing
now, surely.”

“No, ma’am,” said the man, letting go the
boat to pull his cap; “’tain’t the right time, as
ye knows; but look ye at the big vessel out .
yonder, and see how she’s asking for a little
one to come and fetch some passenger out of
her. Belike they’re comin’ in honour of you.
’Tain’t so often we gets visitors in Yelverton.”

“Oh!” cried Frank, ‘I wonder who it can
possibly be. Let us stay and watch till the boat
comes back.”

“Tm afraid you will soon be tired of dear
old Yelverton. After all the gay places that we
have seen, it will seem so dull to you, Frankie,”
said his sister, as they stood gazing after the boat



The Lesson. 7

as it rapidly made its way towards the large
vessel.

“You needn’t then,” returned her young bro-
ther ; “Yelverton is a jolly little place, let who
will abuse it. Besides, most of it belongs to
papa, and will belong to me some day,” he added,
proudly; “and I’m sure those grand red cliffs are
finer than any others that I have seen, either in
France or England; and then, just look at the
woods round our house!”

Miss Leslie looked,—she required no bidding
to make her do so; and her gaze was fonder, if
not so proud, as her young brother's. It was
only yesterday that they had returned to their
native village; and her eyes, which had been
feasting on its scenery ever since they came out,
filled with tears as her brother spoke. But she
did not let him see them.

“There seems to have been no change what-



8 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



ever since we went away; and even the church
tower still wants its flag-staff,” she observed, at
length.

“So it does,” said Frank; “what a shame!
I’ll ask papa to get it put up directly.”

“ There he comes,” returned his sister, as she
observed her father emerging from the wooded
slope behind the village, by a little path which
she knew led only from one place—that very
churchyard where her thoughts had been almost
constantly during the last twenty-four hours, and
in which they had laid, just fourteen months
previously, and only a short time before they
had left the place for foreign climes, her own
dear mother. |

Frank immediately ran to meet his father, and
by the time they rejoined Miss Leslie, all his —
troubles, both about the flag-staff and about his
Scripture-lesson had been communicated to him,



The Lesson. 9



and it had been arranged, much to the young
gentleman’s satisfaction, that after church and
luncheon next day all three should, provided the
day were fine, descend to the beach together to
talk over difficulties.



GHAPTER
FRANK’S DIFFICULTY.

OW, papa, will you answer my question ?”




Wee) Frank said, as his father and sister en-
scapes themselves under the shade of some huge
rocks in one of the quietest parts of the beach,
and he perched himself on one at their feet.

‘Not directly, my boy,’ replied Mr Leslie,
“because I want you, first of all, to try and fancy
yourself one of the company to whom Jesus was
preaching when He uttered these words which
you find so difficult to understand.”

“JT don’t see how I can do that,” said Frank,



frrank's Difficulty. II



‘because they must have been such very different
people from what I am.”

“Yes, they were rather different ; for they lis-
tened to this great sermon very eagerly, I fancy,
and were both interested in it and amazed at its
wisdom ; while you, I understand, think these
chapters the driest in all the Gospels.”

‘Perhaps that is because I don’t understand
them, papa,” returned the boy, colouring a little ;
“and it is just for that reason that I want you to
explain my verses. What mountain was it that
Jesus went up before he began to preach?”

“The gospel does not tell me, Frank, and so I
cannot tell you; but I think it must have been
some mountain in Galilee, and not far from the
Sea of Galilee, which is sometimes called the Lake
of Capernaum ; because when He came down from
the mountain, we learn from St Matthew viii. 5,
that ‘Jesus went into the city of Capernaum.’



12 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



Now, the first thing that I want you to notice is,
that wherever He went He was followed by great
crowds, who pressed to hear Him. How was
this?”

‘I don’t know,” replied Frank, “ but I should
think any one would go to hear Jesus preach.”

‘‘Ah! you think so because you have all your
life been taught who Jesus was, and you know
that He was the Son of God. That was just
what these people did not know, and what some
of them were trying to find out. All Jews knew
that a great Deliverer was to come to their nation
some day ; their prophets had told them so. And
whenever a wonderful person arose about this
time, I suppose many people wondered whether
he would turn out to be the Messiah or not.
Many of them knew also that, according to the
prophet Daniel, He ought to have come some few
years before. When Jesus was born, and all



Frank's Difficudty. 13



those wonders happened which occurred at the
time of His birth, there was no doubt a good deal
of talk about Him; and some people—as the
shepherds, the wise men, Simeon, and Anna—
acknowledged Him to be the Saviour ; but thirty
-years had passed away; and as He had lived
on quietly as the carpenter’s son, I daresay the
nation thought that, after all, people had been
mistaken.”

‘‘But now,” said Miss Leslie, ‘‘there was John
the Baptist, who had been preaching a good
pwiile;;and in St Luke ii, 15, we read that all
men were musing in their hearts of 42, whether
he were the Christ or not.”

“Yes,” said her father ; “ different events had of
late made people think again; and so there was
once more at least a great deal of curiosity about
these two wonderful persons, and a great deal of
excitement to know who they were.”

é



14 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

‘But John said he was not the Christ,” said
Frank.

“Very true; and he told the people to look for
some one greater than himself; and as they
thought him a very great man, they must have
been very eager to hear Jesus—this greater One
—when He began to preach.”

‘‘Didn’t He preach at the same time, papa?”

“T think not. It seems clear that it was not
until John was thrown into prison that our Lord
began His ministry. Look at St Mark i. 14.
He had been baptized by John apparently just
before; and then came that mighty voice from
heaven, which must have made people wonder
exceedingly. He was then, St Luke says, about
thirty years of age. After His baptism, our Lord
spent His. lonely six weeks in the wilderness—
fasting, and tempted of the devil—and then He
began His great work of preaching. You see,



| Frank's Difficulty. 15



now, that it was no great marvel that crowds
went to hear Him; but there was another attrac-
tion, of which we have not yet spoken. What
was it?”

Frank did not know; but, at his father’s sug-
gestion, he looked at the last verses of the fourth
_ chapter of St Matthew, and then exclaimed—

‘“‘Oh, I see! He worked so many miracles!”

“Ves; and that caused His fame to spread
over all the country. People went and said to
their neighbours, ‘ Do you know such a one, who
was lame, or ill, or blind, or deaf, was cured in a
minute by that wonderful person whom they call
Jesus!’ and then, of course, their neighbours
themselves went to see Him. We should do
the same, I think; and probably our Lord
worked. these miracles on purpose to draw
the people to hear Him, that He might teach
them, and to make them listen attentively when



16 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

they came. But now I have got another question
for you before I come to consider yours. Jesus
went up into this mountain in order to get
free from the pressure of the multitude. He
called His own disciples to Him, and was
followed, we may be sure, by as many people as
could get near Him. He probably stood or sat
on some projection, from whence He could most
conveniently address the people, and below Him
there was perhaps some flat, plain ground, some-
thing like what we call table-land, on which
many people might stand. Well, now, supposing
that you had been one of those people who had
seen some of His miracles, and heard the strange
accounts which passed from mouth to mouth
about Him through the land, what do you think
you would have wished Him to say when He
opened His mouth? I mean, what would you
have been most curious to know?”



Frank's Dofficulty. 17



“T suppose that I should have wanted Him to
tell me who He was Himself,” replied Frank,
> after thinking intently for a minute or two. “ At
any rate, I should have liked Him to say some-
thing which would make me know.”

“Well, I have no doubt that was what many
of that crowd were hoping for,” answered his
father ; ‘‘and whatever wishes were in their hearts
Jesus knew them, we are quite sure; though, if
this were the wish, He did not at once gratify it;
for, instead of talking about Himself, He rather
turned their attention back on themselves, and
began by telling them what sort of people were
the blessed or happy ones. Can you imagine at
all why He probably did this?”

“No, papa; not in the least. Can you?”

“The Lord Jesus did not want merely curious
disciples,” his father answered. “‘It was then, as

it still is, His will to ‘draw all men unto Him :
B



18 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



but then He would have them to be sincere and
earnest learners; and if any of these people came
just to satisfy an idle curiosity about Him, I
think that His very first words must have made
them feel that they were not the sort of persons
whom He approved.”

“But wasn’t it right to wish to find out who
Jesus was, papa?”

“Quite right; but a right thing may be done
in a wrong way, you know. They were right if
they wanted to know whether this were He who
was the promised Saviour, who was to bear the
punishment of their sins, and be their King to
reign in righteousness; but wrong if they fol-
lowed Him as men follow a popular preacher,
or run after any one out of the common way.
So, you see, the Lord taught them, and teaches
us, ow to seek Him, and in what sort of spirit.”

‘‘T suppose those crowds were made up chiefly



Frank's Difficulty. 19



of the common people—poor people, I mean?”
Miss Leslie observed.

“No doubt of it,’ replied her father; ‘“ but
you know that the Jews, however poor they
might be, prided themselves on being the children
of Abraham, and thought that, almost as a matter
of course, they would be sharers in the kingdom
of heaven. See, now, my boy, how the blessed
- Jesus showed that He knew the heart of man, when
He began His sermon by saying that it is the
poor zz sfivit that are to possess that kingdom.
He says nothing about outward circumstances,
but only about character, which is the very thing
that most people prefer to forget.”

“Then, now you will tell me what ‘poor in
Spirit’ means ; won’t you?” said Frank.

meewill try,” replied Mri‘Leslie; “ But instead
of explaining it in a few words, I think I shall
pick out one or two people of whom we read in



20 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



the Bible, who seem to me to belong to that class ;
and afterwards I shall expect you to find me some
who evidently did not belong to it.”

“Ohidethat will be. nice,” Frank tried; ‘and
mind, Susy, you must help me.”

‘““There was in the Jews’ country,” Mr Leslie
began, ‘‘a considerable city, beautifully situated
among the mountains. This city was admired
by other nations besides the Jews themselves,
and especially on account of some fine buildings
which it contained. One of these, indeed the
principal one, had once been destroyed by fire, and
again, after it was rebuilt, it had been a good
deal injured by a foreign army. But a certain
king came to the throne who had a great taste
for architecture, and he caused this great edifice
to be repaired and beautified exceedingly; so
that many people were attracted to visit it, besides
those who frequented it for the purposes for



Frank's Difficulty. i



which it was built. Only certain favoured per-
sons were allowed to enter the principal parts ;
but there were rooms and courts around into
which any one might go. Accordingly, one day
there went up to it a poor man, whose counten-
ance told plainly that he was in some great
trouble. It was evident that he had not gone
there for the sake of viewing the building; and,
indeed, his whole appearance showed that he
belonged to a set of men who were very much
disliked and despised by their neighbours, and
usually deservedly so; for their occupation was
to collect the taxes. We do not particularly
dislike tax-gatherers now-a-days ; for though we
may not like paying taxes, yet we know that they
are necessary to pay the expenses of keeping the
country in order and in peace, and that the tax-
gatherers are only doing their duty in coming to
get them in. But in the Jews’ country at that



22 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



time taxes were not paid to a king or govern-
ment of their own, but to a foreign prince who
ruled over them, and whom they hated. Besides
which, as there was no rule how much each man
had to pay, these tax-gatherers might get as much
as they could out of the people, and, provided
they paid the required amount to the king, they
were allowed to keep the rest themselves. In
consequence of this, they were generally wicked,
cruel men; and people who reckoned themselves
respectable would have nothing to do with them.
Well, it was one of these people that I am
speaking of. He stood with his eyes cast down
on the ground, and kept away from other people ;
but if any one had looked at him, they would
have observed that several times he struck his
hand on his breast like one almost in despair, and
also that his lips moved. Then, if curiosity had
drawn them near enough to hear his words,





THE PUBLICAN.







Frank’s Difficulty. 20



this is the cry that would have fallen on their
ear: ‘God be merciful to me a sinner

“Oh!” said Frank, “I know now who you
mean: it was the publican who went up to pray,
of course; and the city was Jerusalem, and the
building the Temple. Then, does ‘poor in spirit’
mean being very miserable?”

“That is jumping to a conclusion,” answered
his father. ‘We have got to consider now why
this man prayed such a prayer.”

“JT thought it was a very common prayer,”
returned Frank. “Some of the poor people here

qe

say it, I know.”

“Very likely; but they learnt it from this
publican, without perhaps being aware of it; and
many use it without being poor in spirit like
him. Let us keep close to this poor man, and
try to find out why he uttered this cry.”

‘‘Perhaps he had done something very bad,”



24. Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

remarked Frank, thoughtfully, ‘‘and was afraid
that God would be angry with him.”

“Only, you see, he does not mention any par-
ticular sin,” replied his father, ‘‘and therefore I
fancy that it is more likely that he was thinking
of all the wicked things that he had done in his
past life, and feeling quite horrified at the picture )
of himself that had lately come before what we
may call the eyes of his mind. I have told you
what sort of people these publicans were; and we
may be sure that our Lord meant what we should
call a wicked man—one who had gone on, all
his life, just trying to please himself, and get
as much as he could for himself—one who had
often been cruel to his fellow-creatures, had made
no profession of religion, and until now had put
away all thoughts of God.

‘But something—we are not told what—had
come to change this man’s view of things; some-



Frank's Difficulty. a5



thing had made him remember his God, and
perhaps also the judgment to come. Then, no
doubt, he went back in thought over his past
life, to see if some good actions could be found
to balance the bad ones, or to recommend him to
(oa'sfavour. He searched and searched, but all
in vain. His whole history was blackened with
sin; his life had been an utterly wasted one;
there was no store of goodness in the past to
draw from—no good thing in him—not a single
reason to plead why God should show him
favour; he was quite poor, blind, miserable, and
naked. It was so; and he knew it now. There-
fore, you see, from the very depths of his shame
and misery broke forth the cry, ‘God be merciful
to me’—not, ‘for I have done this or that bad
thing, but—‘a sinner.’”

“So he was poor in spirit because he knew
that he had no goodness,” Frank said, after a



26 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

pause. “I don’t see how he could help that,
though, when he had been such a wicked man.”

‘And yet, I suppose, he had only just come to
know it,” rejoined his papa. ‘ But, however, let
us go on now to another case, and we will come
back to him by and by.”

“First tell me, though, if you please, papa,
why he was called a publican, if he was really a
tax-gatherer ?”’

“You fancied, I suppose,” said Mr Leslie,
smiling, “that he was like our publicans, and
sold beer and spirits; but the word was used in a
different sense then to what it is now. We call
a man a publican who keeps a house open to all
comers—that is, to the public; but then a man
was called so who collected the public money, or,
as I have explained, the taxes which are intended
for the use of the country in general.”

‘Thank you, papa. I did not know that



Frank's Difficulty. 27



before; and now, please, I am ready for your
other story. Will you tell it in the same way,
and let me guess ?”

“Tf you like; but I see that it must wait till
to-morrow, for look at the time!”—and he held

up his watch.



CHAPTER 111.
TWO SORTS OF PEOPLE.
Rema LL! did you find out who the stranger

ABE = =was whom Susy and you watched
coming ashore the other day?” said Mr Leslie,



as he walked down to the beach again, two or
three days after that Sunday conversation, with
his grown-up daughter leaning on his arm, and
his young son, now off in search of some road-
side treasures, and now for a minute or two by
his side again.

“Oh, he was nobody!” returned Frank; “at
least only a stranger to us and everybody here, as



Two Sorts of People. 29



far as Timothy can make out. Just a young
fellow, neither a poor man nor a gentleman,
without any friends, they say too; but he has got
auianey,) OF somebody has put it into his head,
that the air of this place will do him good—and
so he has come. That’s about all.”

“Ts it?” answered his papa, in a way which
made his young son rather uneasy, because it
seemed to imply some degree of dissatisfaction.
“Our story to-day was to be about a stranger
too; so perhaps you will not care to hear it.”

“Oh, yes, I shall, papa—at least, I daresay it
will turn out to be a more interesting stranger
than that fellow was,” the boy answered, redden-
ing a little as he spoke.

His father shook his head; but he began to tell
his story.

“ There was a country at the north of the Holy
Land in which there were many Gentiles as well



30 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



as Jews. On the sea-coast there were two cities
which had once been very celebrated for their
merchandise, and one of them especially for a
famous purple dye, got from a fish which was
found on the shore. Ages before the time I
speak of, many nations had traded with this city,
and its vessels went to far-distant countries—it is
believed to our own, among the rest. One of the
kings had been a friend of King David’s; and
when his son, Solomon, was building the Temple,
he sent him cedar-wood to help the work.

“‘ Afterwards, to punish the inhabitants of these
cities for their horrible wickedness, God allowed
great conquerors to come and destroy them.
They were rebuilt, but never attained anything
like their former importance. Still there were
the cities in the Saviour’s time, and He more than
once visited them.

‘Well, on one occasion there was a woman on



Two Sorts of People. ai



the watch for Him. She was a Gentile, and
perhaps a descendant of the old inhabitants of
the country; for you remember, that though God
had commanded His people—the Israelites—to
drive them all out when they took possession of
the land of Canaan, yet they left some, saying
that they were too strong for them. I say
perhaps she was descended from some of these ;
but I only know that she was not a Jewess.
However, she had heard of Christ, and of his
power, as well as of his love and pity towards
sick people. You know his fame had spread a
great way. And so we may fancy that she had
often longed for Him to come in that direction;
for she was in great trouble. And this was what
her sorrow was:—‘ Her young daughter was
grievously vexed with a devil. We don’t hear of
such things in this country; but we have mad
people; and that is bad enough. I do not know



32 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



what I should do if one of you were to lose your
senses ; but this was something different, and far
worse. We read of Jesus healing lunatics; but
‘this young girl was worse than a lunatic; for an
evil spirit had actually got possession of her,
and tormented her terribly. Doctors could do
nothing for such a case; but there was just this
hope in the mother’s mind, that perhaps Jesus
would cure her. So no sooner did He come that
way than out ran the poor woman, and, caring
nothing for the people round about, she threw
herself at his feet, crying, ‘Have mercy on me,
O Lord, thou Son of David! my daughter is
grievously vexed with a devil.’”

“Oh!” said Frank, “I remember that story
too. The cities were Tyre and Sidon; and the
woman is called in one place a Syro-Phcenician,
and in another a woman of Canaan.”

‘‘Two names for the same country,’ answered



Two Sorts of People. Be

Nene ee ee EEIEIEEEEEEESESEEET

his father; ‘“‘and do you see yet why I called her
a stranger?”

“‘ Was it because she was not a Jewess?” asked
Frank.

“Ves; and therefore Jesus said she was not one
of those to whom He was sent. Do you under-
stand that ?”

“No, papa; for I always thought He came to
save everybody.”

“So He did; that is, He came to live and die
for everybody; and after He was gone back into
heaven, His apostles were sent to preach every-
where, and to all nations; but our Lord’s own
ministry was confined to the Jews. He was a
Jew; and one part of His work was to be a Prophet
to the Jews. This is why He said ‘I am not sent
but unto the lost sheep of the House of Israel.’”

“Oh! I am so glad you told me that, papa;

for I never could understand it before.”
e



34 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

“ However,” rejoined his father, ‘‘this poor
woman was in such great trouble that she would
not go without getting what she wanted. The dis-
ciples tried to drive heraway ; and the Saviour gave
her this disheartening answer ; but she only came
and worshipped Him, saying, ‘ Lord; help me!’”

“ And then He said, ‘It is not meet to take the
children’s meat and cast it to dogs,’ ” said Frank.
‘How unkind she must have thought Him!
Why did Jesus treat her so, papa?” .

“To try her faith ; there is no doubt of that, my
boy. I don’t mean, to see Himself whether she
had faith ; but to draw it out, and perhaps also to let
the people see it, as well as to leave a lesson for
us. But we are talking of her to-day, you know,
because she was poor in spirit; and you haven't
yet given me the answer which showed that.”

‘Oh! I forgot. Do you mean when she said :
‘Truth, Lord; yet the dogs eat of the crumbs which



Two Sorts of People. 35



fall from their master’s table?’ I have often
thought that I should never have said that, papa.
I should have been so angry to be called a dog.”
“The Jews were in the habit of giving all
Gentiles that name,” answered his father; “ yet,
certainly, it must have seemed very unlike what
she had heard of our Lord’s goodness ; but she
had plainly thought a great deal about Him, and
quite made up her mind that He was the true
Messiah, as we see by her calling Him ‘ Son of
David;’ and so she concluded, I suppose, that He
had a reason for speaking as He did. Then, as to
herself, see how humble she was! She was not
offended even at being classed with dogs. She
knew and felt that she had no claim at all on the
goodness of Christ,—nothing whatever to plead ;
and yet we are not told of her that she had been
avery wicked woman. There is no reason even
to suspect, as we may about the publican,



36 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



that her past life had been worse than some other
people’s. Still, you see, she had come to the
same conclusion about herself that he had. She
felt herself quite poor before God. She knew
that she had no merit, that is, no goodness, of
her own to deserve His favour. And so she,
like the publican, only looked for mercy.

‘‘ Now suppose you try if you can find one or
two characters which were just the opposite of
these; and that will help you still further to see
what I mean.”

“Who shall I say?” whispered Frank to his
sister, after thinking a few minutes.

‘‘T don’t see that you could choose a better
than the Pharisee in the same parable,” replied
Miss Leslie. |

Frank opened his Bible at the eighteenth of St
Luke, and, after looking at the passage, cried out
— Qh, no, I couldn't! What a proud man he



Two Sorts of People. ay



was! I don’t see that he prayed at all, papa.
He only told God how good he was. Papa, who
were the Pharisees?”

“They were a set of men who thought that
religion was made up of long prayers and fasts,
and that the more words they said the better
God would be pleased. They led the common
people to think a great deal of them too, by
making a show of these things. You know they
used to pray at the corners of the streets; and
when they were going to give money to the poor
they blew a trumpet to let people know.”

“What a thing to do!” exclaimed Frank; “ and
what were those things that they made so broad ?”

“ Their phylacteries,” replied his father; “that
is, the borderings to their robes. The Jews
were commanded by God in old time to wear
borders to their clothes as a distinction between
them and other nations; and because they wanted



38 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

to appear very good, the Pharisees made these
phylacteries extra broad.”

‘‘But I suppose they did not do such wicked
things as the publicans did,” said Frank.

“I don’t know about that,” answered his father.
“Tf I hear any one boasting of not having com-
mitted all sorts of crimes, I should instantly
suspect him of being less innocent than he made
out ; but, at any rate, they hid their sins, and
generally kept a fair character. However, for
our present purpose, we had better suppose this
Pharisee to have been all he said he was. Let
us take him for aman who had kept clear of
gross outward sins, and been mindful of external
religious duties, and then consider how he should
have felt in the sight of God. Would such
conduct give him a right to God’s favour? Could
he go into His presence and say, ‘I have com-
mitted no sins ; I am very good ; I need not even





HARISER

2
P

THE







Two Sorts of People. 39

ask for forgiveness; I have a right to the kingdom
of heaven, and, of course, I belong to that
kingdom.’ What do you think ?”

“T should think that any one must be very
conceited who talked like that,” answered Frank ;
‘‘and besides,” he added ‘“ he must have com-
mitted some sins, for the Bible says, ‘There is
none righteous ; no, not one.’”

“Ves; but I have met with people who quite
agree to that, and say, ‘Oh, of course, we are all
sinners ;’ and yet when they get into trouble, or
are ill, these same people will declare that they
cannot think why ¢/ey should be punished, when
they have never done anything wrong! And on
the same ground, they would tell you that they
hope to go to heaven !|” 7

‘What foolish people they must have been to
contradict themselves like that, papa!”

“They were not foolish in other things, Frank ;



40 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

and I am afraid there are more people than you
could easily believe, whose minds are in this
state of confusion about their own merits, though
they may not all talk exactly in this way. Did
you never know any little boys who, while calling
themselves sinners, would never own to any
single fault?”

“ After all, papa,” said Frank, who appeared
not to hear this last question, ‘if the Pharisee
had not done those abominable things which the
publican did, he couldn’t say he had ; could he?”

“Certainly not; and perhaps you think that as
we suppose him to have been what people call ‘a
good sort of man,’ it was not possible for him to
be ‘ poor in spirit.’”

“JT don’t see how he could have felt as the
publican did—at least, not quite the same,
papa.”

‘There was a Pharisee once, though, who had



Two Sorts of People. 41



been quite as blameless as this man, Frank, and
he called himself the ‘ chief of sinners.’ ”

“Who was he, papa?” asked the boy. “I
cannot remember.”

“Don’t you think papa means St Paul?”
whispered Miss Leslie.

“St Paul!” exclaimed Frank; “why, how
_ could he call himself that?”

She turned over the leaves of her Bible, and
pointed to 1 Tim. i. 15, saying, “ This was written
by St Paul, you know.”

‘Do you think he could have meant it, papa >”
Frank asked, while he looked as if he thought
that impossible.

‘All Scripture is given by inspiration of God,”
replied his father; ‘and therefore we may be
sure that St Paul sincerely felt this about himself,
or God would not have let him write it. He was
poor in spirit, you see. He did not feel any the



42 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



richer for all his good deeds of love to his fellow-
creatures, and of zeal for God’s glory. He re-
membered, no doubt, what Jesus taught His
disciples :—‘ When ye have done all these things,
say, We are unprofitable servants, we have done
that which it was our duty to do’—oz/y that, you
see, at the very best. And then St Paul knew
that often it was not his best, though men did
not know it. He knew that he had left undone
many things that he ought to have done, and done
many that should have been left undone; and
besides that, he could see into his own heart, and
knew that, like other human hearts, it was by
nature desperately wicked. And so, Frank, even
he came to the conclusion that he didn’t deserve
a single good thing from God.”

“ Still,” rejoined Frank, “I don’t understand
how it can be better to do bad things, and be
sorry for them, than not to do them at all, and so



Two Sorts of People. 43

have nothing to be sorry for, as the parable seems
to Say.”

‘“‘T do not see that it says that the least in the
world, Frank. Never run away with the idea
that it is really almost a good thing to have been
very wicked, if only you repent and reform at
last, for the Bible never teaches that. What
it teaches is, that if we would gain God's
favour we must go to Him as true men and
women, and boys and girls, and not as shams.
Now, you know this Pharisee was not a true man
—he was a false character, though perhaps he
did not know it. His not knowing himself was
the great evil. He thought that he was rich in

good works, just because he had not done some
particular bad ones, while all the while his heart
was full of pride and selfishness; and he had
never in all his life really tried to serve God.
Well, now, it is better even to have been an open



44 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



sinner, and to know it, than to be such a man as
this ; for it is only those who know themselves to
be poor who will ever go to Jesus to be made
rich ; and it is only to those who ask for a share in
the kingdom of heaven as a free gift that God
will ever give it, just because there is no living
being upon earth who ever deserved it. Can you
tell me of any other people who resembled this
Pharisee in his false way of thinking of himself?”

“T think Nebuchadnezzar was something like
him, papa, when he went marching about his palace
and saying, ‘Is not this great Babylon, that I have
built for the house of my kingdom, by the might
of my power, and for the honour of my majesty?’
and, don’t you know, the same hour he lost his
kingdom, and was driven out into the fields to feed
like the oxen. And then there was King Pharaoh,
who said, ‘ Who is the Lord, that I should obey his
voice? I know not the Lord!’ and Ze got drowned.”



Two Sorts of People. 45



“Well, you have thought of two men who were
anything but poor in spirit, certainly, Frank.
They were heathens, it is true ; but then they had
been mixed up with God’s people, and might have
known how little and poor they were in the sight
of Jehovah. Yet they were rich, instead of poor,
in spirit—that is, they thought that their own
power was equal to anything, and that they
wanted nothing of God. We cannot think of
God’s kingdom as made up of such men as these,
and I see that you do not admire them at all; but
recollect, my boy, that their spirit is just what is
natural to every human being, though all may
not let it be seen so plainly by the world; while
the spirit of the publican, of the Canaanitish
woman, and of Paul, is not natural to any one.
The grace of God only can give it; and unless
you seek that grace, you may be a Pharisee, or
even a little Nebuchadnezzar, here in Yelverton.”



Crarlerk rv.
THE WALK TO HILL FARM.

40 you know, Susy, now we have got to it,
I don’t see that the second ‘blessed’ in
my verses is any easier to understand than the



first. I thought it was until papa told me to
think about it, and see if I could not explain this
one to him, instead of his doing it for me; but
now I find that I don’t know what it means at
all.”

“Oh, Frank, how can you say so?” returned
his sister. “I am sure you do know what
mourning means.”



The Walk to Hill Farm. 47



“Ves, of course; it means being sorrowful. I
understand that well enough,” said Frank ; ‘‘ but
the thing is, why is it so blessed to be sorrow-
ful?”

“The verse says, ‘for they shall be comforted,’
doesn’t it?” answered his sister.

“Ves; but then if people are not sorrowful, they
don’t want comforting.”

“ And you think that the comfort is only like
medicine in sickness,” returned Miss Leslie,
smiling, “and have a sort of notion that it would
be a very good thing if we could get rid of both
the one and the other. Well, Frankie, I have
heard of a world where the inhabitants shall no
more say, ‘I am sick,’ and where, therefore, they
cannot require to take physic; but I think if papa
were here he would bid you keep in mind the
company to whom Jesus spoke, and the sort of
world in which they were all living.”



48 Old Paths of Honour ana Dishonour.



“T don’t know about that,” said Frank. ‘“ He
told me one day that these verses were meant for
all of us.”

“Yes; but sometimes it helps us very much
just to try and put ourselves in the place of those
who first heard our Saviour’s lessons, and then,
afterwards, we can recollect that we are not very
unlike them. But what do you say to a walk
over the cliff this fine afternoon? We can talk, if
you like, as we go along; and we might call at

the Hill Farm, and see if Mrs Barton and Willie
are come yet. I havea sort of notion that they
were to arrive yesterday ; and, if so, we might ask
them to come up to the Hall to-morrow; for I
suppose you will want to see as much as you can
of your schoolfellow.”

‘That I shall, for he is a capital fellow; and I
know you'll say so when you have seen him,
Susy. But how did you get such splendid news



The Walk to F1ill Farm. 49



“Oh! never mind; I don't tell you every-
thing,” answered his sister, laughing. ‘“ Only
take my advice, and come with me to see whether
I have been well informed or not.”

Frank did not require much urging to do that.
He was soon in calling-trim ; and, at his particular
desire, they took a short cut up the face of the
cliff, instead of going round by the road, to save
time, as he said.

That was rather questionable, as it was not so
easy for his sister to scramble up over loose rocks
and crumbling earth, between briars and bushes,
active as she showed herself, as it was for a
strong boy of eleven ; but at length, with his very
energetic assistance, they reached the top. A two
miles’ walk was then before them, and as, so far
as the character of the ground was concerned, it
was rather a monotonous one, they had abundance

of leisure for chatting.
D



50 © Old Faths of Honour and Dishonour.

‘‘T do hope and trust,” remarked Frank, “ that
Will and his mother have come alone, and that
they have not brought that long-faced cousin of
his along with them.”

‘What an unkind hope!” returned his sister.
“Why Frank, I was just wishing exactly the
contrary, because I think it would do the poor
thing so much good.”

“And spoil all our fun,” said Frank, with a
shrug of his shoulder. ‘‘Susy, I believe you
care for every one more than you do for me.”

Miss Leslie made no reply. She seldom did
when her young brother gave vent to his impe-
tuous temper by exclamations of this sort; but
she looked vexed and hurt; and for a minute
or two they walked on in silence. This, how-
ever, was by no means what Frank intended ;
and he soon broke it by saying, in a half-dis-
appointed, half-pouting way—



The Walk to Hill Farm. 51

“T thought you said that we should talk about
my verse as we came along.”

“So we will if you will not say things which
you do not mean, Frankie,” she answered gently,
“and perhaps, as you do not seem to feel very
kindly towards her just now, it may be as well to
try and forget poor Miss Manly. Can't you
think of any Bible people who were as mournful
as she is, and see if they will not help you to
understand the text ?”

“Oh! I never thought of Miss Manly and
this verse together before,” said the startled look
on Frank’s face; but he would not let his lips
speak the words.

‘‘There was Hannah,” he said, after thinking
a minute or two. ‘She was sorrowful because
she had no son; and there was Jacob, when
Joseph was sold into Egypt ;—well, they were
both comforted certainly; but they don't help



52 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



me a bit, because if they hadn’t been in trouble
they wouldn’t have wanted comforting. Besides,
Esau was very unhappy when he lost the bless-
ing; but I do not see that he got comforted,
after all.”

“Do you recollect that St Paul speaks, in
one place, about two kinds of sorrow—one that
was godly, and one that was not?” said his
sister. “TI think we might learn something from
that:

Ob where is that text?” cried Frank, “I
don’t remember it at all.”

‘It is somewhere in one of the Epistles to the
Corinthians, and I will find it for you when I go
home. You will see that it partly explains your
difficulty about Esau; for his was not a godly
sorrow, in that instance, at any rate.”

“Only, you see, it does not say anything about
the sorts of mourning in my verse,” returned



The Walk to Hill Farm. 53

Frank ; ‘that is one reason why I cannot under-
stand what it means.”

“If you look at the passage in St Luke, you
will see that it says, ‘Blessed are ye that weep
now, for ye shall laugh,’ and ‘Woe unto you
that laugh zow, for ye shall mourn and weep,’”
his sister said.

“Oh! that’s another thing I want to know,”
exclaimed Frank. “ How is it that St Luke
did not tell it all exactly as St Matthew
does ?”

‘Many people suppose that the Lord Jesus
preached something like the same sermon on
two or three different occasions,” Miss Leslie
answered, “and to me it seems very likely ; but
however this may have been, the words in the
one certainly help to explain the other. Don't
you think that this little ‘now’ may help us a
good deal?”



54 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



“Tl domte knows 71 mesure; ysaid: Frank. ‘I
wish something would, I know, or else papa
will tell me I haven’t tried. Ive thought it
was coming so plain two or three times; but
its meaning all goes again, just like a little
glimmer of light, when I think I am going to
catch, it”

‘Never mind; you must not be impatient,”
replied his sister; “for you know that poor
ignorant creatures like us cannot expect to take
in the full meaning of the words of the Lord
Jesus all at once. Do not you remember that
the kingdom of heaven is likened to treasure zd
in afield, and that if we do not care to take trouble
to find it, we cannot expect to have it? Papa did
not set you to this task as he would to some
others. He did not want it to be learnt and
done with, Iam sure. It was in that spirit that
too many people came to hear the Saviour; and



The Walk to Fill Farm. cs



you remember how He said that they had ears
and yet heard not.”

‘“‘ Well, what do you think this ‘ now’ teaches us,
then ?” asked Frank. ‘ Please be quick and tell
me all you can, because I expect that papa will
want to talk about it when he comes home this
evening ; and I do want to have found out some-
thing for him.”

“Do you recollect a verse in the 11th of the
Hebrews, which tells us that Moses, when he was
come to years, refused to be called the son of
Pharaoh’s daughter, ‘choosing rather to suffer
affliction with the people of God, than to enjoy
the pleasures of sin for a season ’?”

“Ves,” said Frank ; “ but what has that to do
with it?”

“He chose to mourn rather than to rejoice ;
emda he. did it. because ‘he: had respect -unto
the recompense of the reward.’ He knew that



56 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

hereafter he would be comforted,” replied Miss
Leslie.

“T see! But do you really think he mourned
because he could not be king of Egypt?” asked
Frank.

“JT don’t know exactly about that, because we
are not told so much; but, no doubt, at the time
it must have looked a pleasanter prospect to be
honoured and counted heir to a great throne, than
to see only contempt and ill-treatment before him
for years. Still no doubt Moses, as'a servant of
God, felt something as St Paul afterwards did. I
daresay he was ‘troubled on every side, yet of
distressed ; perplexed, but zo¢ in despair ; perse-
cuted, but zo¢ forsaken.’* For when people mourn
as I think Jesus means us to mourn, they may be
' ‘joyful in tribulation.’”

“Ves, I have often heard so,” answered Frank.

F2°COr, 1Vs" GO, 0:



The Walk to Hill Farm. 57



‘and of course that is the best way of mourning,
if we must mourn atall. But you haven't told me
yet why the people who have reason to mourn are
better off than those who have not.”

‘Are there any people in the world who have
not cause to mourn, Frankie?” his sister asked,
earnestly.

“Why, I suppose so. We don’t see everybody
looking miserable.”

“Perhaps not; they may mourn without that,”
Miss Leslie said ; ‘‘ but

“ «The path of sorrow, and that path alone,
Leads to the land where sorrow is unknown.’ ”

Here they came in sight of Hill Farm, and
Frank’s attention was diverted from this serious
subject, so engrossed was he with the thoughts of
Willy, and all he meant to say to him.

They soon found that Mrs Barton and her son
had arrived, and also that the much-dreaded Miss



58 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



Manly had accompanied them; but as Frank
speedily escaped with his friend into the garden,
her presence at the farm did not so seriously mar
his pleasure as he had anticipated that it would.

He was full of Willy’s sayings and doings on
their way back; and had by no means exhausted
the topic when they met their father coming to
look for them. But Mr Leslie appeared tired and
depressed; and his young son, soon becoming
conscious that his own merry chatter was not so
well appreciated as it sometimes was, gradually
subsided into the attitude of a listener.

He heard his sister telling how much better
Miss Manly seemed than she had done six
months before, when she first made her acquaint-
ance; and, as she continued to speak of her, he
gradually learnt the story of her sorrows, and
began secretly to feel somewhat ashamed of the
way in which he had spoken of her. If he had



The Walk to Full Farm. 59

only suffered half as much, it seemed to him that
he must have felt his lot a very hard one, and
been envious of every one who was happy; but
now he could not help remembering how very
kindly she had spoken to him, and how very par-
ticularly she had inquired about their games
when they came in from the garden. Then he
recollected that Willy had told him once on a time,
before any of these troubles began, that his cousin,
Kitty Manly, was proud and cross; and he could
not make it out at all, and went to bed, thinking
harder than he generally thought about anything
of Miss Manly and his text, which seemed, as
he fell asleep, to be written in large letters all over
her.



CEAY TE. Ve
A TALK IN THE STUDY.

el here you: are. That's right, Susy,”
2 exclaimed Frank, as Miss Leslie entered
the study next evening, and found her father and
brother watching the rapid changes of the red,
gold, and purple glories of the sky over the



western cliffs.

And Mr Leslie added—

“So, atter all, I tnderstand that 1 am to be
called upon to help you out of this difficulty also.
How is it that you and Frank did not make it
out together?”



A Talk in the Study. 61



“We only got half way through, papa,” inter-
posed Frank. “Susy did help me a great deal ;
but we had to stop talking before we had
finished.”

“ And you are still at a loss about your great
puzzle—why people who are made to mourn first,
and then comforted, are better off than those who
never mourn at all?” rejoined his father. ‘ Well,
Frankie, I ought to be able to tell you something
about this; but it is a lesson not learned in a
day, my boy. What are you looking for, Susy?”

“This text, papa,” she said, pointing to Heb.
xii. 11, and reading, “‘ Now no chastening for
the present seemeth to be joyous, but grievous ;
nevertheless, afterward it yieldeth the peaceable
fruits of righteousness unto them which are exer-
cised thereby. That has something to do with
it, hasn’t it?”

“Ves, a good deal, my dear; and in time God’s



62 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

people all come to say, as we have it in the 119th
Psalm, ‘It is good for me that I have been
afflicted,’ but”

“Oh! yes, papa,” interrupted Frank ; “I know



that trouble is meant to make us better; and, by
what Willy says, I suppose it Zas made Miss
Manly better; but then, what I don’t see is, how
it makes any one happier.”

“ Ah! exactly; you don’t see that to be better
and to be happier are, in fact, the same thing. I
hope you will though, some day; but let us leave
that point and follow our old plan of taking
a Bible story, which may throw light on the
matter.”

“Yes, do,” said Frank. “ Stories always make
things easier to understand ; they made the ‘ poor
in spirit’ much easier to me.”

“T’m glad of it. Well, my story to-day is
about a short time of intense sorrow to some



A Talk in the Study. 63



people, but to others one of great exultation and
rejoicing.”

Frank looked puzzled, and turned to his sister,
as if to inquire whether she had any notion when
that time could have been.

But his papa went on—

“T am not going to set you guessing this story ;
for I shall tell you at once what I am thinking
Sip It. is the time. after the ond: Jesus Christ
had really yielded up His spirit and died on the
cross, and when the hopes of those who loved
Him seemed to die also. We think of this now in
connexion with His resurrection, and thank God
for both, on our own account. But it was not so
with the poor disciples who had been His friends
and companions during His ministry on earth ; for
they did not understand that He would rise
again, so their faith was quite shaken, and they
were most miserable.”



64 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

“But why didv’t they understand?” cried
Frank. ‘I never can make out that, because
Jesus had told them plainly enough.”

Vest tout whe idea of a dead body coming to
life again was not an easy one to take in. We
should not have found it so if we had lived in
those days, because the wonderful doctrine of the
resurrection of the body was not. fully believed
until Christ himself had risen again. Jesus and
the Resurrection were what the apostles after-
wards preached everywhere; but it was thrqugh
this dark experience that they were learning the
lessons which they soon afterwards taught to
others. At this time they were in a state of
doubt.”

“ But, if they did not understand, they might
have believed,” objected Frank; “and yet it
seems as if they had never taken any notice of
what Jesus had said.”



A Talk in the Study. 65

“JT imagine that they had never taken His
words literally, but thought He was speaking in
some figurative way,” replied Mr Leslie.

“Only, they had seen Lazarus rise; so why
should they?” persisted Frank.

“When people are in great sorrow, their
understandings and faith too sometimes seem —
to fail them for a time; and it appears to me,
as I just said, my boy, that the faith of all these
disciples had given way during that Friday and
Saturday, since not one seemed prepared for
what, really happened. But I was going to talk
to you about those two that went on the first
day of the week to the village of Emmaus,
which was about seven miles and a half from

Jerusalem.”
“T know; and I always like that chapter so
much,” said Frank, in a tone of satisfaction. ‘I

wonder what their names were ?”
E



66 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

“Why, one was Cleopas; don’t you remem-
ber?” said his sister.

“ Ah! soit was; but the other?” replied Frank.

“We are not told; and it does not matter.
Now, let us think of their conversation,” Mr
Leslie said. ‘‘ They were walking and talking
together, after some who had been at the sepul-
chre had reported that the body was not there,
but that they had seen a vision of angels; yet
they were sad,—so sad that when One whom
they did not recognise joined them, and asked
what they were talking about, and why they were
sad, they were not offended.”

‘Why should they have been offended, papa? ”
said Frank, looking astonished.

‘‘How would you feel, Frank, if, when you
and your sister were taking a walk, some one
came up and asked what you were talking
about ?”





THE JOURNEY TO EMMAUS.






A Talk in the Study. 67

“T never thought of that,” replied the boy ; “ but
then, of course, Jesus could ask any question.”

“Ves, certainly; only you see they did not
recognise Him at all, and asked whether He
were a stranger, that He did not know what
things had taken place in Jerusalem.”

“Ah! I remember, papa; and Jesus did not
answer. He only said, ‘What things ?’”

“So, you see, they were so full of their sadness
that they thought every one must be sad too,
and must know what they were talking about,”
his papa continued; “and yet they knew of
this vision of angels; and notwithstanding they
said, ‘ But we trusted that it had been He which
should have redeemed Israel, which seems to me
as much as to say, ‘Now we don’t know what
to believe.’ ”

“And then Jesus explained the prophecies
about Himself to them,” added Frank, eagerly.



68 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

“Ves; and showed them that unless He had
suffered all these things, He could not have
been the One whom they had taken Him to be.
You remember the rest, my boy; and how the
Lord made Himself known in breaking of
bread?”

“Oh! yes,” said Frank, rubbing his hands ;
“and then how glad they were: I don’t wonder
that they rushed back to Jerusalem, instead of
staying at Emmaus that night. But the others
knew before they told them; because, you know,
so soon as they got into the room, they all cried
out, ‘ The Lord is risen indeed, and hath appeared
unto Simon.’ Don’t you think, papa, that they
all spoke at once?”

“Very likely,” answered his father ; “for those
who had mourned were comforted now, you see,
and most probably thought all the sorrow they
had passed through as nothing compared with



A Talk in the Study. 69

that great joy. But what about those wicked
men who had been rejoicing because they thought
they had got rid of Jesus? How do you suppose
they felt ?”

“Oh! horribly frightened, I should say,” an-
swered. Frank; “but does the Bible tell us
anything about them? I forget.”

“Yes. St Matthew says that when the priests
and elders heard that He was risen, they bribed
the soldiers to say that the body had been stolen.
It does not seem that they doubted the real fact.
Therefore see what a daring hatred to Him
theirs was! One would have supposed that
such a discovery would have caused them to
see the tremendous sin they had committed,
and that these men would have so feared the
wrath of God that they would have cared nothing
about what the people thought; but no, they
still refused to look on Him whom they had



70 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.





pierced and wounded. They hardened their
hearts still more; and as soon as the apostles
began to preach the resurrection, they persecuted
them for doing so.”

(oTecceu cai) Mrank.), “They were just the
ones who ought to have been sad, and yet they
were not.”

“And their want of sadness showed a wrong
state of mind; it showed the hardness of
their hearts,” returned his father. “The sorrow
of the disciples proved their love for their Lord ;
and therefore it was turned into joy; but some
day His enemies must weep. Now, cannot you
think of some other people who ought to have
wept and mourned, but persisted in rejoicing in-
stead ? You needn’t keep to any particular time.”

“TJ thought you would ask me that, papa; and
won't King Belshazzar do?” answered Frank,
eagerly.



A Talk in the Study. We



“Tell me why you think so,” said his papa;
and Frank took his sister's Bible, and turned
quickly to the fifth chapter of Daniel, saying—

“Vou told me once that that feast of his was
a very wicked sort of thing, and that most likely
a good many of his thousand lords were tipsy ;
and, besides, they were drinking out of the
sacred vessels from the Temple,—those that
were used in the service of the true God, and
drinking to the honour of their wooden and
stone gods too, which were no gods at all, you
know. What business had they to do that?”

“Don’t you think, then, that they considered
their own gods as sacred, Frank?” asked his
Sister.

“Why, Susy!” he answered, warmly, “how
could they? Why, if they hadn’t known in any
other way, there was Daniel and lots of other
Jews to tell them; and Nebuchadnezzar knew



72 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour:

plenty about Daniel, and found out from him
that the Jews’ God was the true one. Belshazzar
must have heard what happened to his own
father.”

“Tf you look in the margin of your Bible, you
will see that the word might be translated ‘grand-
father,’ which agrees better with the history,” re-
marked Mr Leslie. ‘ Still, I agree with you that
he must have heard something of those circum-
stances, and might have known more if he had
taken the trouble to ask; but, you see, thought-
less men, like Belshazzar, do not trouble them-
selves about anything but their own pleasure.
They go on doing just as they like, day after day,
but generally intending to become more serious
in old age. However, you have not told me why
you think Belshazzar ought to have been mourn-
ing instead of making himself merry.”

“Because he was so awfully wicked, papa.





BELSHAZZARS FEAST







A Talk in the Study. We

Why, I should think he ought to have been
clothing himself in sackcloth, and repenting, like
the King of Nineveh, instead of feasting and
getting drunk.”

“You think that his rejoicing was of a wrong
sort, and sout of place, — Welle think so too,
and, indeed, the fact of that Hand appearing and
writing those words on the wall is enough to
show us in what a blasphemous and wicked way
the kingdom was being ruled. God told him
that he had been weighed in the balances, and
found wanting. That judgment will be pro-
nounced on many by and by; but such sentences
do not go forth in this present state, unless there
has been outrageous wickedness.”

“He never rejoiced again, at any rate,” said
Frank; ‘for you know, that very same night
he was killed and the city taken. Why, the
army that took it must have been close by



74 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



all the while; and yet Belshazzar went on quietly
with his feasting, just as if there was nothing the
matter! Only fancy!”

‘““Tt was the same with the sinners before the
flood, and with the inhabitants of Sodom and
Gomorrah, and, I am afraid, is so also with a
great many other sinners, Frank; because multi-
tudes put off repentance until it is too late. But
now, tell me whether you understand your verse
any better ?”

“Yes, papa, I think I do—at least I see, for
one thing, that we all ought to mourn for our
sins; and—besides that, there are plenty of
times when the people that mourn are in the
right, and those who don’t are in the wrong ;
and—then troubles are good for us, I suppose.”

‘We are in a wicked world, you see, Frank,”
rejoined his papa,—‘‘in a world at enmity
with God; so, if we have gone to Christ for



A Talk in the Study. 7

pardon, and are no longer at enmity with Him,
there must be plenty around us to cause us
sorrow. Besides which, as you say, troubles are
good for us; but that is because, in our present
state, we are so unfit to be companions for the
angels in the world tocome. When God’s people
are made perfect through the discipline of suf-
fering, all tears shall be wiped from their eyes.”

“But, papa,” said Miss Leslie, “you do not
mean Frank to think that true religion is a
doleful thing, after all; do you?”

‘No, certainly ; and I hope, from the examples
we have taken, he would understand that. The
priests and elders of the Jews, who persecuted
Jesus and many of the disciples to the death,
were not happy men, amidst all their exultation ;
were they, my boy?”

“No, papa; I should not have liked to be one
of them.”



76 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

‘Then, would you have liked to be one of the
drunken lords at Belshazzar’s feast?”

“No; that I shouldn't.”

‘‘Or one of the sinners who rejected the preach-
ing of Noah, or the remonstrances of righteous
Job?”

‘‘No, papa; I would much rather have been
one of those two who went to Emmaus. Only
think, to have walked and talked with Jesus all
that way!”

“Ah! Frank, you may yet walk with Him in
the streets of the New Jerusalem, and hear His
voice and see His blessed face; but remember, if
this is to be your happy lot, it must be reached
through the old, narrow path of pilgrims, and not
by travelling with the giddy throng who crowd
the broad, and as ¢#ey think, the pleasant way.”



CHAPTER V1.

A RUFFLED TEMPER.




WeapOW hot you look, Frankie,” said Miss
Mell Leslie in a tone of dismay, as her young
brother came into the study, and, sitting down by
the window, began to turn over the pages of his
Bible in rather a hasty manner, as if he did not
feel quite prepared for the lesson which his papa
had promised that evening.

‘“Do I?” answered the boy, rather gloomily.
“Well, I’ve had a long walk, and the sun was
baking hot this afternoon. Besides, I was late,
and had to run a good part of the way.”



78 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

“ But you know, Frank, that Dr Wolfe parti-
cularly said that you were not to overheat your-
self in this way,” remonstrated his sister.

d

“T can’t help what the doctors say,’ returned
her brother, impatiently. ‘One must get hot, I
suppose, when one has to run, and especially when
one gets insulted into the bargain.”

“JT was afraid you had been quarrelling,”’
returned his sister, gravely ; ‘‘ but, my dear boy,
why will you allow yourself to be so easily
offended ?”

“T should think any gentleman’s son would be
offended.»when a low fellow like Dick Benson
takes upon him to give him lessons,” answered
the boy, haughtily ; ‘‘ as if I didn’t know the mean-
ing of the Bible a great deal better than he does!”

‘Dick Benson is a very good man; and he is
a great deal older than you are, Frank,” she
answered, quietly.



Full Text




Sis Wit SALMA ARAM ARAN RIOT

———

!

Sana



| een
—!








t CLEAN, and returned

before the end of SA days. If any book

is lost or injured, the borrower must replace it.

ee OS One






OLD PATHS
OF

HONOUR AND DISHONOUR.
PRINTED BY BALLANTYNE AND COMPANY

EDINBURGH AND LONDON



OLD PATHS

OF

HONOUR AND DISHONOUR.
A Storp on the Beatitudes.

BY THE

AUTHOR OF “THE KINGDOM AND THE PEOPLE,”
“MISSIONARY ANECDOTES,” erc.

WITH SIXTEEN ILLUSTRATIONS.

SEELEY, JACKSON, & HALLIDAY, 54 FLEET STREET.
LONDON. MDCCCLXX.

CON T-BN TS

<>

CHAP.
I.—THE LESSON,

I.—FRANK’S DIFFICULTY,
III.—TWO SORTS OF PEOPLE,

IV.—THE WALK TO HILL FARM,

V.—A TALK IN THE STUDY,

VI.—A RUFFLED TEMPER,
VII.—A CHANGE OF OPINION,
VIII.—FRANK’S STORY,

IX.—-LONGERS,

X.— UNSATISFIED HUNGERERS,

PAGE

10
28
46
60
TH
85
97

105

117
vi Contents.



CHAP.

XI.—PUT OUT,
XII.—CONSCIENCE-STRICKEN,
XII.—EARNEST WORK,

XIV.—A WARNING,

XV.—A PRACTICAL DIFFICULTY,
XVI.—FIREBRANDS,
XVII.—A FRIEND IN TROUBLE,

XVIII.—A NAIL DRIVEN HOME,

PAGE

129
145
159
174
182
192
202
217
Lisl OF TlLeUStt a rions

Mostly Copied or Adapted from Designs by Rembrandt, Guercino, Juanes,

Overbeck, Blake, and other Masters.

et ase

PAGE
DANIEL AND THE PRINCES, ; Frontispiece
THE PUBLICAN, 22
THE PHARISEE, : : : A ; 38
THE JOURNEY TO EMMAUS, ' E : 66
BELSHAZZAR’S FEAST, : , 72
THE PATIENCE OF JOB, . ‘ : : 92
HAMAN AND MORDECAI, . 2 ; 102

ST PHILIP AND THE ETHIOPIAN, : : 108
viii List of Ilustrations.



PAGE

AHAB AND ELIJAH, . E : a : 124
ST PETER AND TABITHA, . : : : 142
THE DEATH OF ABIMELECH, . ‘ ee 152
THE ANGEL AND DANIEL, : j : 172
THE REMORSE OF JUDAS, : : : 180
MOSES AND THE TWO ISRAELITES, . : 186
THE STONING OF STEPHEN, . : : 212

THE RECONCILIATION OF PILATE AND HEROD, 226
OLD PATHS

OF

HONOUR AND DISHONOUR.



Lae eek A.
THE LESSON.

RN Ma LIAT does ‘poor in spirit’ mean?” said
Frank Leslie, somewhat fretfully, as



he as on the beach in the quiet little bay of
Yelverton, attempting, though perhaps not
very diligently, to learn his verses for the next
day, which was Sunday. ‘‘I wish,” he added,
‘that papa would let me choose my own chapters.
It is always so much easier to learn anything one
takes a fancy to. . Don’t you think so, Susy?”
A
2 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

“ Sometimes, not always,” returned his sister ;
“but why are these so difficult?”

“Oh! I can learn each verse by itself easily
enough; but it is how they come one after another
that I can’t remember ; and besides, a good many
of them I cannot understand.”

“Then you had better ask papa to explain
them. I daresay he had a reason for setting you
this passage to learn; indeed, I am almost sure
he had; so I wouldn’t ask him to change it, if I
were you.”

‘‘ Of course I shouldn’t do that,” returned Frank.
“He would only tell me that 7 had no spirit
if I wanted to give a thing up because it was
difficult ; but what reason do you suppose he had,
Sue ?.”

“Oh! never mind; I can’t tell you,” answered
his sister, smiling. ‘It is only a guess of mine;
he didn’t tell me, so you must not ask.”
The Lesson. 3



“But you say you think you know; so you
might tell, I’m sure. It’s very unkind of you,
Susy.”

“Perhaps papa would be vexed if I did.
I daresay you will find out in time,” his
sister seaid.> * ‘Come, make haste’ and learn
them, like a good boy, and then to-morrow we
will ask him to explain the difficult ones.
You know how interesting he always makes.
things.”

So Frank went to his book again; for, as his
sister was just twice his age, he generally took
her advice in the end, though his own opinions
were pretty strong. For a little while he worked
away as if he had quite made up his mind to
conquer the task; but it was not many minutes
before he stopped once more, and suddenly
asked—

“Susy, what was the name of that schooner
4 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



that was wrecked off the rocks out there last
year, just before we went away ?”

““Wasn’t she called The Betsy?” answered
Miss Leslie.

“Oh, yes! that was it,” said Frank. ‘ What
a night that was ; wasn’t it? Oh! how the wind
did howl! Don’t you remember, we couldn’t hear
a word that any one said? and what a sea there
was, to be sure! The waves were just like moun-
tains, and the bay like a great washing-tub full
of soap-suds, it was so white! Susy, do you
recollect what papa and old Joe said about
that Captain Garty that was in command of
heres ,

‘“‘T remember that they were both very indignant
with him, and said that nobody on board owed
him any thanks; but, Frank, I don’t see what all
this has to do with your lesson.”

“Tt has though, a great deal,” replied Frank,
The Lesson. 5



‘don’t you know, old Joe called him ‘the poorest-
spirited fellow that he had ever known in all his
born days,’ and papa seemed quite to agree with
him.” .

“They were both angry with him then, of
course, as everybody was, because through his
folly so many lives were nearly lost; but, you
know, nobody was drowned after all; so I don’t
think you need rake up his faults a year after the
event, Frankie,” returned his sister.

‘‘T shouldn’t take the trouble,” answered the
boy, impatiently, “only don’t you see now why
I can’t understand this first verse? How
can it be such a good thing to be ‘poor in
spirit ?’”’

Miss Leslie was about to answer, when the
sound of sailors’ voices behind them caused both
to start to their feet. |

The men were running a boat down the beach,
6 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



for the purpose of launching her; and they
seemed to be in haste.

“What is it, Timothy ?” asked the young lady,
as they passed. “You are not going fishing
now, surely.”

“No, ma’am,” said the man, letting go the
boat to pull his cap; “’tain’t the right time, as
ye knows; but look ye at the big vessel out .
yonder, and see how she’s asking for a little
one to come and fetch some passenger out of
her. Belike they’re comin’ in honour of you.
’Tain’t so often we gets visitors in Yelverton.”

“Oh!” cried Frank, ‘I wonder who it can
possibly be. Let us stay and watch till the boat
comes back.”

“Tm afraid you will soon be tired of dear
old Yelverton. After all the gay places that we
have seen, it will seem so dull to you, Frankie,”
said his sister, as they stood gazing after the boat
The Lesson. 7

as it rapidly made its way towards the large
vessel.

“You needn’t then,” returned her young bro-
ther ; “Yelverton is a jolly little place, let who
will abuse it. Besides, most of it belongs to
papa, and will belong to me some day,” he added,
proudly; “and I’m sure those grand red cliffs are
finer than any others that I have seen, either in
France or England; and then, just look at the
woods round our house!”

Miss Leslie looked,—she required no bidding
to make her do so; and her gaze was fonder, if
not so proud, as her young brother's. It was
only yesterday that they had returned to their
native village; and her eyes, which had been
feasting on its scenery ever since they came out,
filled with tears as her brother spoke. But she
did not let him see them.

“There seems to have been no change what-
8 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



ever since we went away; and even the church
tower still wants its flag-staff,” she observed, at
length.

“So it does,” said Frank; “what a shame!
I’ll ask papa to get it put up directly.”

“ There he comes,” returned his sister, as she
observed her father emerging from the wooded
slope behind the village, by a little path which
she knew led only from one place—that very
churchyard where her thoughts had been almost
constantly during the last twenty-four hours, and
in which they had laid, just fourteen months
previously, and only a short time before they
had left the place for foreign climes, her own
dear mother. |

Frank immediately ran to meet his father, and
by the time they rejoined Miss Leslie, all his —
troubles, both about the flag-staff and about his
Scripture-lesson had been communicated to him,
The Lesson. 9



and it had been arranged, much to the young
gentleman’s satisfaction, that after church and
luncheon next day all three should, provided the
day were fine, descend to the beach together to
talk over difficulties.
GHAPTER
FRANK’S DIFFICULTY.

OW, papa, will you answer my question ?”




Wee) Frank said, as his father and sister en-
scapes themselves under the shade of some huge
rocks in one of the quietest parts of the beach,
and he perched himself on one at their feet.

‘Not directly, my boy,’ replied Mr Leslie,
“because I want you, first of all, to try and fancy
yourself one of the company to whom Jesus was
preaching when He uttered these words which
you find so difficult to understand.”

“JT don’t see how I can do that,” said Frank,
frrank's Difficulty. II



‘because they must have been such very different
people from what I am.”

“Yes, they were rather different ; for they lis-
tened to this great sermon very eagerly, I fancy,
and were both interested in it and amazed at its
wisdom ; while you, I understand, think these
chapters the driest in all the Gospels.”

‘Perhaps that is because I don’t understand
them, papa,” returned the boy, colouring a little ;
“and it is just for that reason that I want you to
explain my verses. What mountain was it that
Jesus went up before he began to preach?”

“The gospel does not tell me, Frank, and so I
cannot tell you; but I think it must have been
some mountain in Galilee, and not far from the
Sea of Galilee, which is sometimes called the Lake
of Capernaum ; because when He came down from
the mountain, we learn from St Matthew viii. 5,
that ‘Jesus went into the city of Capernaum.’
12 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



Now, the first thing that I want you to notice is,
that wherever He went He was followed by great
crowds, who pressed to hear Him. How was
this?”

‘I don’t know,” replied Frank, “ but I should
think any one would go to hear Jesus preach.”

‘‘Ah! you think so because you have all your
life been taught who Jesus was, and you know
that He was the Son of God. That was just
what these people did not know, and what some
of them were trying to find out. All Jews knew
that a great Deliverer was to come to their nation
some day ; their prophets had told them so. And
whenever a wonderful person arose about this
time, I suppose many people wondered whether
he would turn out to be the Messiah or not.
Many of them knew also that, according to the
prophet Daniel, He ought to have come some few
years before. When Jesus was born, and all
Frank's Difficudty. 13



those wonders happened which occurred at the
time of His birth, there was no doubt a good deal
of talk about Him; and some people—as the
shepherds, the wise men, Simeon, and Anna—
acknowledged Him to be the Saviour ; but thirty
-years had passed away; and as He had lived
on quietly as the carpenter’s son, I daresay the
nation thought that, after all, people had been
mistaken.”

‘‘But now,” said Miss Leslie, ‘‘there was John
the Baptist, who had been preaching a good
pwiile;;and in St Luke ii, 15, we read that all
men were musing in their hearts of 42, whether
he were the Christ or not.”

“Yes,” said her father ; “ different events had of
late made people think again; and so there was
once more at least a great deal of curiosity about
these two wonderful persons, and a great deal of
excitement to know who they were.”

é
14 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

‘But John said he was not the Christ,” said
Frank.

“Very true; and he told the people to look for
some one greater than himself; and as they
thought him a very great man, they must have
been very eager to hear Jesus—this greater One
—when He began to preach.”

‘‘Didn’t He preach at the same time, papa?”

“T think not. It seems clear that it was not
until John was thrown into prison that our Lord
began His ministry. Look at St Mark i. 14.
He had been baptized by John apparently just
before; and then came that mighty voice from
heaven, which must have made people wonder
exceedingly. He was then, St Luke says, about
thirty years of age. After His baptism, our Lord
spent His. lonely six weeks in the wilderness—
fasting, and tempted of the devil—and then He
began His great work of preaching. You see,
| Frank's Difficulty. 15



now, that it was no great marvel that crowds
went to hear Him; but there was another attrac-
tion, of which we have not yet spoken. What
was it?”

Frank did not know; but, at his father’s sug-
gestion, he looked at the last verses of the fourth
_ chapter of St Matthew, and then exclaimed—

‘“‘Oh, I see! He worked so many miracles!”

“Ves; and that caused His fame to spread
over all the country. People went and said to
their neighbours, ‘ Do you know such a one, who
was lame, or ill, or blind, or deaf, was cured in a
minute by that wonderful person whom they call
Jesus!’ and then, of course, their neighbours
themselves went to see Him. We should do
the same, I think; and probably our Lord
worked. these miracles on purpose to draw
the people to hear Him, that He might teach
them, and to make them listen attentively when
16 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

they came. But now I have got another question
for you before I come to consider yours. Jesus
went up into this mountain in order to get
free from the pressure of the multitude. He
called His own disciples to Him, and was
followed, we may be sure, by as many people as
could get near Him. He probably stood or sat
on some projection, from whence He could most
conveniently address the people, and below Him
there was perhaps some flat, plain ground, some-
thing like what we call table-land, on which
many people might stand. Well, now, supposing
that you had been one of those people who had
seen some of His miracles, and heard the strange
accounts which passed from mouth to mouth
about Him through the land, what do you think
you would have wished Him to say when He
opened His mouth? I mean, what would you
have been most curious to know?”
Frank's Dofficulty. 17



“T suppose that I should have wanted Him to
tell me who He was Himself,” replied Frank,
> after thinking intently for a minute or two. “ At
any rate, I should have liked Him to say some-
thing which would make me know.”

“Well, I have no doubt that was what many
of that crowd were hoping for,” answered his
father ; ‘‘and whatever wishes were in their hearts
Jesus knew them, we are quite sure; though, if
this were the wish, He did not at once gratify it;
for, instead of talking about Himself, He rather
turned their attention back on themselves, and
began by telling them what sort of people were
the blessed or happy ones. Can you imagine at
all why He probably did this?”

“No, papa; not in the least. Can you?”

“The Lord Jesus did not want merely curious
disciples,” his father answered. “‘It was then, as

it still is, His will to ‘draw all men unto Him :
B
18 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



but then He would have them to be sincere and
earnest learners; and if any of these people came
just to satisfy an idle curiosity about Him, I
think that His very first words must have made
them feel that they were not the sort of persons
whom He approved.”

“But wasn’t it right to wish to find out who
Jesus was, papa?”

“Quite right; but a right thing may be done
in a wrong way, you know. They were right if
they wanted to know whether this were He who
was the promised Saviour, who was to bear the
punishment of their sins, and be their King to
reign in righteousness; but wrong if they fol-
lowed Him as men follow a popular preacher,
or run after any one out of the common way.
So, you see, the Lord taught them, and teaches
us, ow to seek Him, and in what sort of spirit.”

‘‘T suppose those crowds were made up chiefly
Frank's Difficulty. 19



of the common people—poor people, I mean?”
Miss Leslie observed.

“No doubt of it,’ replied her father; ‘“ but
you know that the Jews, however poor they
might be, prided themselves on being the children
of Abraham, and thought that, almost as a matter
of course, they would be sharers in the kingdom
of heaven. See, now, my boy, how the blessed
- Jesus showed that He knew the heart of man, when
He began His sermon by saying that it is the
poor zz sfivit that are to possess that kingdom.
He says nothing about outward circumstances,
but only about character, which is the very thing
that most people prefer to forget.”

“Then, now you will tell me what ‘poor in
Spirit’ means ; won’t you?” said Frank.

meewill try,” replied Mri‘Leslie; “ But instead
of explaining it in a few words, I think I shall
pick out one or two people of whom we read in
20 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



the Bible, who seem to me to belong to that class ;
and afterwards I shall expect you to find me some
who evidently did not belong to it.”

“Ohidethat will be. nice,” Frank tried; ‘and
mind, Susy, you must help me.”

‘““There was in the Jews’ country,” Mr Leslie
began, ‘‘a considerable city, beautifully situated
among the mountains. This city was admired
by other nations besides the Jews themselves,
and especially on account of some fine buildings
which it contained. One of these, indeed the
principal one, had once been destroyed by fire, and
again, after it was rebuilt, it had been a good
deal injured by a foreign army. But a certain
king came to the throne who had a great taste
for architecture, and he caused this great edifice
to be repaired and beautified exceedingly; so
that many people were attracted to visit it, besides
those who frequented it for the purposes for
Frank's Difficulty. i



which it was built. Only certain favoured per-
sons were allowed to enter the principal parts ;
but there were rooms and courts around into
which any one might go. Accordingly, one day
there went up to it a poor man, whose counten-
ance told plainly that he was in some great
trouble. It was evident that he had not gone
there for the sake of viewing the building; and,
indeed, his whole appearance showed that he
belonged to a set of men who were very much
disliked and despised by their neighbours, and
usually deservedly so; for their occupation was
to collect the taxes. We do not particularly
dislike tax-gatherers now-a-days ; for though we
may not like paying taxes, yet we know that they
are necessary to pay the expenses of keeping the
country in order and in peace, and that the tax-
gatherers are only doing their duty in coming to
get them in. But in the Jews’ country at that
22 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



time taxes were not paid to a king or govern-
ment of their own, but to a foreign prince who
ruled over them, and whom they hated. Besides
which, as there was no rule how much each man
had to pay, these tax-gatherers might get as much
as they could out of the people, and, provided
they paid the required amount to the king, they
were allowed to keep the rest themselves. In
consequence of this, they were generally wicked,
cruel men; and people who reckoned themselves
respectable would have nothing to do with them.
Well, it was one of these people that I am
speaking of. He stood with his eyes cast down
on the ground, and kept away from other people ;
but if any one had looked at him, they would
have observed that several times he struck his
hand on his breast like one almost in despair, and
also that his lips moved. Then, if curiosity had
drawn them near enough to hear his words,


THE PUBLICAN.

Frank’s Difficulty. 20



this is the cry that would have fallen on their
ear: ‘God be merciful to me a sinner

“Oh!” said Frank, “I know now who you
mean: it was the publican who went up to pray,
of course; and the city was Jerusalem, and the
building the Temple. Then, does ‘poor in spirit’
mean being very miserable?”

“That is jumping to a conclusion,” answered
his father. ‘We have got to consider now why
this man prayed such a prayer.”

“JT thought it was a very common prayer,”
returned Frank. “Some of the poor people here

qe

say it, I know.”

“Very likely; but they learnt it from this
publican, without perhaps being aware of it; and
many use it without being poor in spirit like
him. Let us keep close to this poor man, and
try to find out why he uttered this cry.”

‘‘Perhaps he had done something very bad,”
24. Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

remarked Frank, thoughtfully, ‘‘and was afraid
that God would be angry with him.”

“Only, you see, he does not mention any par-
ticular sin,” replied his father, ‘‘and therefore I
fancy that it is more likely that he was thinking
of all the wicked things that he had done in his
past life, and feeling quite horrified at the picture )
of himself that had lately come before what we
may call the eyes of his mind. I have told you
what sort of people these publicans were; and we
may be sure that our Lord meant what we should
call a wicked man—one who had gone on, all
his life, just trying to please himself, and get
as much as he could for himself—one who had
often been cruel to his fellow-creatures, had made
no profession of religion, and until now had put
away all thoughts of God.

‘But something—we are not told what—had
come to change this man’s view of things; some-
Frank's Difficulty. a5



thing had made him remember his God, and
perhaps also the judgment to come. Then, no
doubt, he went back in thought over his past
life, to see if some good actions could be found
to balance the bad ones, or to recommend him to
(oa'sfavour. He searched and searched, but all
in vain. His whole history was blackened with
sin; his life had been an utterly wasted one;
there was no store of goodness in the past to
draw from—no good thing in him—not a single
reason to plead why God should show him
favour; he was quite poor, blind, miserable, and
naked. It was so; and he knew it now. There-
fore, you see, from the very depths of his shame
and misery broke forth the cry, ‘God be merciful
to me’—not, ‘for I have done this or that bad
thing, but—‘a sinner.’”

“So he was poor in spirit because he knew
that he had no goodness,” Frank said, after a
26 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

pause. “I don’t see how he could help that,
though, when he had been such a wicked man.”

‘And yet, I suppose, he had only just come to
know it,” rejoined his papa. ‘ But, however, let
us go on now to another case, and we will come
back to him by and by.”

“First tell me, though, if you please, papa,
why he was called a publican, if he was really a
tax-gatherer ?”’

“You fancied, I suppose,” said Mr Leslie,
smiling, “that he was like our publicans, and
sold beer and spirits; but the word was used in a
different sense then to what it is now. We call
a man a publican who keeps a house open to all
comers—that is, to the public; but then a man
was called so who collected the public money, or,
as I have explained, the taxes which are intended
for the use of the country in general.”

‘Thank you, papa. I did not know that
Frank's Difficulty. 27



before; and now, please, I am ready for your
other story. Will you tell it in the same way,
and let me guess ?”

“Tf you like; but I see that it must wait till
to-morrow, for look at the time!”—and he held

up his watch.
CHAPTER 111.
TWO SORTS OF PEOPLE.
Rema LL! did you find out who the stranger

ABE = =was whom Susy and you watched
coming ashore the other day?” said Mr Leslie,



as he walked down to the beach again, two or
three days after that Sunday conversation, with
his grown-up daughter leaning on his arm, and
his young son, now off in search of some road-
side treasures, and now for a minute or two by
his side again.

“Oh, he was nobody!” returned Frank; “at
least only a stranger to us and everybody here, as
Two Sorts of People. 29



far as Timothy can make out. Just a young
fellow, neither a poor man nor a gentleman,
without any friends, they say too; but he has got
auianey,) OF somebody has put it into his head,
that the air of this place will do him good—and
so he has come. That’s about all.”

“Ts it?” answered his papa, in a way which
made his young son rather uneasy, because it
seemed to imply some degree of dissatisfaction.
“Our story to-day was to be about a stranger
too; so perhaps you will not care to hear it.”

“Oh, yes, I shall, papa—at least, I daresay it
will turn out to be a more interesting stranger
than that fellow was,” the boy answered, redden-
ing a little as he spoke.

His father shook his head; but he began to tell
his story.

“ There was a country at the north of the Holy
Land in which there were many Gentiles as well
30 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



as Jews. On the sea-coast there were two cities
which had once been very celebrated for their
merchandise, and one of them especially for a
famous purple dye, got from a fish which was
found on the shore. Ages before the time I
speak of, many nations had traded with this city,
and its vessels went to far-distant countries—it is
believed to our own, among the rest. One of the
kings had been a friend of King David’s; and
when his son, Solomon, was building the Temple,
he sent him cedar-wood to help the work.

“‘ Afterwards, to punish the inhabitants of these
cities for their horrible wickedness, God allowed
great conquerors to come and destroy them.
They were rebuilt, but never attained anything
like their former importance. Still there were
the cities in the Saviour’s time, and He more than
once visited them.

‘Well, on one occasion there was a woman on
Two Sorts of People. ai



the watch for Him. She was a Gentile, and
perhaps a descendant of the old inhabitants of
the country; for you remember, that though God
had commanded His people—the Israelites—to
drive them all out when they took possession of
the land of Canaan, yet they left some, saying
that they were too strong for them. I say
perhaps she was descended from some of these ;
but I only know that she was not a Jewess.
However, she had heard of Christ, and of his
power, as well as of his love and pity towards
sick people. You know his fame had spread a
great way. And so we may fancy that she had
often longed for Him to come in that direction;
for she was in great trouble. And this was what
her sorrow was:—‘ Her young daughter was
grievously vexed with a devil. We don’t hear of
such things in this country; but we have mad
people; and that is bad enough. I do not know
32 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



what I should do if one of you were to lose your
senses ; but this was something different, and far
worse. We read of Jesus healing lunatics; but
‘this young girl was worse than a lunatic; for an
evil spirit had actually got possession of her,
and tormented her terribly. Doctors could do
nothing for such a case; but there was just this
hope in the mother’s mind, that perhaps Jesus
would cure her. So no sooner did He come that
way than out ran the poor woman, and, caring
nothing for the people round about, she threw
herself at his feet, crying, ‘Have mercy on me,
O Lord, thou Son of David! my daughter is
grievously vexed with a devil.’”

“Oh!” said Frank, “I remember that story
too. The cities were Tyre and Sidon; and the
woman is called in one place a Syro-Phcenician,
and in another a woman of Canaan.”

‘‘Two names for the same country,’ answered
Two Sorts of People. Be

Nene ee ee EEIEIEEEEEEESESEEET

his father; ‘“‘and do you see yet why I called her
a stranger?”

“‘ Was it because she was not a Jewess?” asked
Frank.

“Ves; and therefore Jesus said she was not one
of those to whom He was sent. Do you under-
stand that ?”

“No, papa; for I always thought He came to
save everybody.”

“So He did; that is, He came to live and die
for everybody; and after He was gone back into
heaven, His apostles were sent to preach every-
where, and to all nations; but our Lord’s own
ministry was confined to the Jews. He was a
Jew; and one part of His work was to be a Prophet
to the Jews. This is why He said ‘I am not sent
but unto the lost sheep of the House of Israel.’”

“Oh! I am so glad you told me that, papa;

for I never could understand it before.”
e
34 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

“ However,” rejoined his father, ‘‘this poor
woman was in such great trouble that she would
not go without getting what she wanted. The dis-
ciples tried to drive heraway ; and the Saviour gave
her this disheartening answer ; but she only came
and worshipped Him, saying, ‘ Lord; help me!’”

“ And then He said, ‘It is not meet to take the
children’s meat and cast it to dogs,’ ” said Frank.
‘How unkind she must have thought Him!
Why did Jesus treat her so, papa?” .

“To try her faith ; there is no doubt of that, my
boy. I don’t mean, to see Himself whether she
had faith ; but to draw it out, and perhaps also to let
the people see it, as well as to leave a lesson for
us. But we are talking of her to-day, you know,
because she was poor in spirit; and you haven't
yet given me the answer which showed that.”

‘Oh! I forgot. Do you mean when she said :
‘Truth, Lord; yet the dogs eat of the crumbs which
Two Sorts of People. 35



fall from their master’s table?’ I have often
thought that I should never have said that, papa.
I should have been so angry to be called a dog.”
“The Jews were in the habit of giving all
Gentiles that name,” answered his father; “ yet,
certainly, it must have seemed very unlike what
she had heard of our Lord’s goodness ; but she
had plainly thought a great deal about Him, and
quite made up her mind that He was the true
Messiah, as we see by her calling Him ‘ Son of
David;’ and so she concluded, I suppose, that He
had a reason for speaking as He did. Then, as to
herself, see how humble she was! She was not
offended even at being classed with dogs. She
knew and felt that she had no claim at all on the
goodness of Christ,—nothing whatever to plead ;
and yet we are not told of her that she had been
avery wicked woman. There is no reason even
to suspect, as we may about the publican,
36 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



that her past life had been worse than some other
people’s. Still, you see, she had come to the
same conclusion about herself that he had. She
felt herself quite poor before God. She knew
that she had no merit, that is, no goodness, of
her own to deserve His favour. And so she,
like the publican, only looked for mercy.

‘‘ Now suppose you try if you can find one or
two characters which were just the opposite of
these; and that will help you still further to see
what I mean.”

“Who shall I say?” whispered Frank to his
sister, after thinking a few minutes.

‘‘T don’t see that you could choose a better
than the Pharisee in the same parable,” replied
Miss Leslie. |

Frank opened his Bible at the eighteenth of St
Luke, and, after looking at the passage, cried out
— Qh, no, I couldn't! What a proud man he
Two Sorts of People. ay



was! I don’t see that he prayed at all, papa.
He only told God how good he was. Papa, who
were the Pharisees?”

“They were a set of men who thought that
religion was made up of long prayers and fasts,
and that the more words they said the better
God would be pleased. They led the common
people to think a great deal of them too, by
making a show of these things. You know they
used to pray at the corners of the streets; and
when they were going to give money to the poor
they blew a trumpet to let people know.”

“What a thing to do!” exclaimed Frank; “ and
what were those things that they made so broad ?”

“ Their phylacteries,” replied his father; “that
is, the borderings to their robes. The Jews
were commanded by God in old time to wear
borders to their clothes as a distinction between
them and other nations; and because they wanted
38 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

to appear very good, the Pharisees made these
phylacteries extra broad.”

‘‘But I suppose they did not do such wicked
things as the publicans did,” said Frank.

“I don’t know about that,” answered his father.
“Tf I hear any one boasting of not having com-
mitted all sorts of crimes, I should instantly
suspect him of being less innocent than he made
out ; but, at any rate, they hid their sins, and
generally kept a fair character. However, for
our present purpose, we had better suppose this
Pharisee to have been all he said he was. Let
us take him for aman who had kept clear of
gross outward sins, and been mindful of external
religious duties, and then consider how he should
have felt in the sight of God. Would such
conduct give him a right to God’s favour? Could
he go into His presence and say, ‘I have com-
mitted no sins ; I am very good ; I need not even


HARISER

2
P

THE

Two Sorts of People. 39

ask for forgiveness; I have a right to the kingdom
of heaven, and, of course, I belong to that
kingdom.’ What do you think ?”

“T should think that any one must be very
conceited who talked like that,” answered Frank ;
‘‘and besides,” he added ‘“ he must have com-
mitted some sins, for the Bible says, ‘There is
none righteous ; no, not one.’”

“Ves; but I have met with people who quite
agree to that, and say, ‘Oh, of course, we are all
sinners ;’ and yet when they get into trouble, or
are ill, these same people will declare that they
cannot think why ¢/ey should be punished, when
they have never done anything wrong! And on
the same ground, they would tell you that they
hope to go to heaven !|” 7

‘What foolish people they must have been to
contradict themselves like that, papa!”

“They were not foolish in other things, Frank ;
40 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

and I am afraid there are more people than you
could easily believe, whose minds are in this
state of confusion about their own merits, though
they may not all talk exactly in this way. Did
you never know any little boys who, while calling
themselves sinners, would never own to any
single fault?”

“ After all, papa,” said Frank, who appeared
not to hear this last question, ‘if the Pharisee
had not done those abominable things which the
publican did, he couldn’t say he had ; could he?”

“Certainly not; and perhaps you think that as
we suppose him to have been what people call ‘a
good sort of man,’ it was not possible for him to
be ‘ poor in spirit.’”

“JT don’t see how he could have felt as the
publican did—at least, not quite the same,
papa.”

‘There was a Pharisee once, though, who had
Two Sorts of People. 41



been quite as blameless as this man, Frank, and
he called himself the ‘ chief of sinners.’ ”

“Who was he, papa?” asked the boy. “I
cannot remember.”

“Don’t you think papa means St Paul?”
whispered Miss Leslie.

“St Paul!” exclaimed Frank; “why, how
_ could he call himself that?”

She turned over the leaves of her Bible, and
pointed to 1 Tim. i. 15, saying, “ This was written
by St Paul, you know.”

‘Do you think he could have meant it, papa >”
Frank asked, while he looked as if he thought
that impossible.

‘All Scripture is given by inspiration of God,”
replied his father; ‘and therefore we may be
sure that St Paul sincerely felt this about himself,
or God would not have let him write it. He was
poor in spirit, you see. He did not feel any the
42 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



richer for all his good deeds of love to his fellow-
creatures, and of zeal for God’s glory. He re-
membered, no doubt, what Jesus taught His
disciples :—‘ When ye have done all these things,
say, We are unprofitable servants, we have done
that which it was our duty to do’—oz/y that, you
see, at the very best. And then St Paul knew
that often it was not his best, though men did
not know it. He knew that he had left undone
many things that he ought to have done, and done
many that should have been left undone; and
besides that, he could see into his own heart, and
knew that, like other human hearts, it was by
nature desperately wicked. And so, Frank, even
he came to the conclusion that he didn’t deserve
a single good thing from God.”

“ Still,” rejoined Frank, “I don’t understand
how it can be better to do bad things, and be
sorry for them, than not to do them at all, and so
Two Sorts of People. 43

have nothing to be sorry for, as the parable seems
to Say.”

‘“‘T do not see that it says that the least in the
world, Frank. Never run away with the idea
that it is really almost a good thing to have been
very wicked, if only you repent and reform at
last, for the Bible never teaches that. What
it teaches is, that if we would gain God's
favour we must go to Him as true men and
women, and boys and girls, and not as shams.
Now, you know this Pharisee was not a true man
—he was a false character, though perhaps he
did not know it. His not knowing himself was
the great evil. He thought that he was rich in

good works, just because he had not done some
particular bad ones, while all the while his heart
was full of pride and selfishness; and he had
never in all his life really tried to serve God.
Well, now, it is better even to have been an open
44 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



sinner, and to know it, than to be such a man as
this ; for it is only those who know themselves to
be poor who will ever go to Jesus to be made
rich ; and it is only to those who ask for a share in
the kingdom of heaven as a free gift that God
will ever give it, just because there is no living
being upon earth who ever deserved it. Can you
tell me of any other people who resembled this
Pharisee in his false way of thinking of himself?”

“T think Nebuchadnezzar was something like
him, papa, when he went marching about his palace
and saying, ‘Is not this great Babylon, that I have
built for the house of my kingdom, by the might
of my power, and for the honour of my majesty?’
and, don’t you know, the same hour he lost his
kingdom, and was driven out into the fields to feed
like the oxen. And then there was King Pharaoh,
who said, ‘ Who is the Lord, that I should obey his
voice? I know not the Lord!’ and Ze got drowned.”
Two Sorts of People. 45



“Well, you have thought of two men who were
anything but poor in spirit, certainly, Frank.
They were heathens, it is true ; but then they had
been mixed up with God’s people, and might have
known how little and poor they were in the sight
of Jehovah. Yet they were rich, instead of poor,
in spirit—that is, they thought that their own
power was equal to anything, and that they
wanted nothing of God. We cannot think of
God’s kingdom as made up of such men as these,
and I see that you do not admire them at all; but
recollect, my boy, that their spirit is just what is
natural to every human being, though all may
not let it be seen so plainly by the world; while
the spirit of the publican, of the Canaanitish
woman, and of Paul, is not natural to any one.
The grace of God only can give it; and unless
you seek that grace, you may be a Pharisee, or
even a little Nebuchadnezzar, here in Yelverton.”
Crarlerk rv.
THE WALK TO HILL FARM.

40 you know, Susy, now we have got to it,
I don’t see that the second ‘blessed’ in
my verses is any easier to understand than the



first. I thought it was until papa told me to
think about it, and see if I could not explain this
one to him, instead of his doing it for me; but
now I find that I don’t know what it means at
all.”

“Oh, Frank, how can you say so?” returned
his sister. “I am sure you do know what
mourning means.”
The Walk to Hill Farm. 47



“Ves, of course; it means being sorrowful. I
understand that well enough,” said Frank ; ‘‘ but
the thing is, why is it so blessed to be sorrow-
ful?”

“The verse says, ‘for they shall be comforted,’
doesn’t it?” answered his sister.

“Ves; but then if people are not sorrowful, they
don’t want comforting.”

“ And you think that the comfort is only like
medicine in sickness,” returned Miss Leslie,
smiling, “and have a sort of notion that it would
be a very good thing if we could get rid of both
the one and the other. Well, Frankie, I have
heard of a world where the inhabitants shall no
more say, ‘I am sick,’ and where, therefore, they
cannot require to take physic; but I think if papa
were here he would bid you keep in mind the
company to whom Jesus spoke, and the sort of
world in which they were all living.”
48 Old Paths of Honour ana Dishonour.



“T don’t know about that,” said Frank. ‘“ He
told me one day that these verses were meant for
all of us.”

“Yes; but sometimes it helps us very much
just to try and put ourselves in the place of those
who first heard our Saviour’s lessons, and then,
afterwards, we can recollect that we are not very
unlike them. But what do you say to a walk
over the cliff this fine afternoon? We can talk, if
you like, as we go along; and we might call at

the Hill Farm, and see if Mrs Barton and Willie
are come yet. I havea sort of notion that they
were to arrive yesterday ; and, if so, we might ask
them to come up to the Hall to-morrow; for I
suppose you will want to see as much as you can
of your schoolfellow.”

‘That I shall, for he is a capital fellow; and I
know you'll say so when you have seen him,
Susy. But how did you get such splendid news
The Walk to F1ill Farm. 49



“Oh! never mind; I don't tell you every-
thing,” answered his sister, laughing. ‘“ Only
take my advice, and come with me to see whether
I have been well informed or not.”

Frank did not require much urging to do that.
He was soon in calling-trim ; and, at his particular
desire, they took a short cut up the face of the
cliff, instead of going round by the road, to save
time, as he said.

That was rather questionable, as it was not so
easy for his sister to scramble up over loose rocks
and crumbling earth, between briars and bushes,
active as she showed herself, as it was for a
strong boy of eleven ; but at length, with his very
energetic assistance, they reached the top. A two
miles’ walk was then before them, and as, so far
as the character of the ground was concerned, it
was rather a monotonous one, they had abundance

of leisure for chatting.
D
50 © Old Faths of Honour and Dishonour.

‘‘T do hope and trust,” remarked Frank, “ that
Will and his mother have come alone, and that
they have not brought that long-faced cousin of
his along with them.”

‘What an unkind hope!” returned his sister.
“Why Frank, I was just wishing exactly the
contrary, because I think it would do the poor
thing so much good.”

“And spoil all our fun,” said Frank, with a
shrug of his shoulder. ‘‘Susy, I believe you
care for every one more than you do for me.”

Miss Leslie made no reply. She seldom did
when her young brother gave vent to his impe-
tuous temper by exclamations of this sort; but
she looked vexed and hurt; and for a minute
or two they walked on in silence. This, how-
ever, was by no means what Frank intended ;
and he soon broke it by saying, in a half-dis-
appointed, half-pouting way—
The Walk to Hill Farm. 51

“T thought you said that we should talk about
my verse as we came along.”

“So we will if you will not say things which
you do not mean, Frankie,” she answered gently,
“and perhaps, as you do not seem to feel very
kindly towards her just now, it may be as well to
try and forget poor Miss Manly. Can't you
think of any Bible people who were as mournful
as she is, and see if they will not help you to
understand the text ?”

“Oh! I never thought of Miss Manly and
this verse together before,” said the startled look
on Frank’s face; but he would not let his lips
speak the words.

‘‘There was Hannah,” he said, after thinking
a minute or two. ‘She was sorrowful because
she had no son; and there was Jacob, when
Joseph was sold into Egypt ;—well, they were
both comforted certainly; but they don't help
52 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



me a bit, because if they hadn’t been in trouble
they wouldn’t have wanted comforting. Besides,
Esau was very unhappy when he lost the bless-
ing; but I do not see that he got comforted,
after all.”

“Do you recollect that St Paul speaks, in
one place, about two kinds of sorrow—one that
was godly, and one that was not?” said his
sister. “TI think we might learn something from
that:

Ob where is that text?” cried Frank, “I
don’t remember it at all.”

‘It is somewhere in one of the Epistles to the
Corinthians, and I will find it for you when I go
home. You will see that it partly explains your
difficulty about Esau; for his was not a godly
sorrow, in that instance, at any rate.”

“Only, you see, it does not say anything about
the sorts of mourning in my verse,” returned
The Walk to Hill Farm. 53

Frank ; ‘that is one reason why I cannot under-
stand what it means.”

“If you look at the passage in St Luke, you
will see that it says, ‘Blessed are ye that weep
now, for ye shall laugh,’ and ‘Woe unto you
that laugh zow, for ye shall mourn and weep,’”
his sister said.

“Oh! that’s another thing I want to know,”
exclaimed Frank. “ How is it that St Luke
did not tell it all exactly as St Matthew
does ?”

‘Many people suppose that the Lord Jesus
preached something like the same sermon on
two or three different occasions,” Miss Leslie
answered, “and to me it seems very likely ; but
however this may have been, the words in the
one certainly help to explain the other. Don't
you think that this little ‘now’ may help us a
good deal?”
54 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



“Tl domte knows 71 mesure; ysaid: Frank. ‘I
wish something would, I know, or else papa
will tell me I haven’t tried. Ive thought it
was coming so plain two or three times; but
its meaning all goes again, just like a little
glimmer of light, when I think I am going to
catch, it”

‘Never mind; you must not be impatient,”
replied his sister; “for you know that poor
ignorant creatures like us cannot expect to take
in the full meaning of the words of the Lord
Jesus all at once. Do not you remember that
the kingdom of heaven is likened to treasure zd
in afield, and that if we do not care to take trouble
to find it, we cannot expect to have it? Papa did
not set you to this task as he would to some
others. He did not want it to be learnt and
done with, Iam sure. It was in that spirit that
too many people came to hear the Saviour; and
The Walk to Fill Farm. cs



you remember how He said that they had ears
and yet heard not.”

‘“‘ Well, what do you think this ‘ now’ teaches us,
then ?” asked Frank. ‘ Please be quick and tell
me all you can, because I expect that papa will
want to talk about it when he comes home this
evening ; and I do want to have found out some-
thing for him.”

“Do you recollect a verse in the 11th of the
Hebrews, which tells us that Moses, when he was
come to years, refused to be called the son of
Pharaoh’s daughter, ‘choosing rather to suffer
affliction with the people of God, than to enjoy
the pleasures of sin for a season ’?”

“Ves,” said Frank ; “ but what has that to do
with it?”

“He chose to mourn rather than to rejoice ;
emda he. did it. because ‘he: had respect -unto
the recompense of the reward.’ He knew that
56 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

hereafter he would be comforted,” replied Miss
Leslie.

“T see! But do you really think he mourned
because he could not be king of Egypt?” asked
Frank.

“JT don’t know exactly about that, because we
are not told so much; but, no doubt, at the time
it must have looked a pleasanter prospect to be
honoured and counted heir to a great throne, than
to see only contempt and ill-treatment before him
for years. Still no doubt Moses, as'a servant of
God, felt something as St Paul afterwards did. I
daresay he was ‘troubled on every side, yet of
distressed ; perplexed, but zo¢ in despair ; perse-
cuted, but zo¢ forsaken.’* For when people mourn
as I think Jesus means us to mourn, they may be
' ‘joyful in tribulation.’”

“Ves, I have often heard so,” answered Frank.

F2°COr, 1Vs" GO, 0:
The Walk to Hill Farm. 57



‘and of course that is the best way of mourning,
if we must mourn atall. But you haven't told me
yet why the people who have reason to mourn are
better off than those who have not.”

‘Are there any people in the world who have
not cause to mourn, Frankie?” his sister asked,
earnestly.

“Why, I suppose so. We don’t see everybody
looking miserable.”

“Perhaps not; they may mourn without that,”
Miss Leslie said ; ‘‘ but

“ «The path of sorrow, and that path alone,
Leads to the land where sorrow is unknown.’ ”

Here they came in sight of Hill Farm, and
Frank’s attention was diverted from this serious
subject, so engrossed was he with the thoughts of
Willy, and all he meant to say to him.

They soon found that Mrs Barton and her son
had arrived, and also that the much-dreaded Miss
58 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



Manly had accompanied them; but as Frank
speedily escaped with his friend into the garden,
her presence at the farm did not so seriously mar
his pleasure as he had anticipated that it would.

He was full of Willy’s sayings and doings on
their way back; and had by no means exhausted
the topic when they met their father coming to
look for them. But Mr Leslie appeared tired and
depressed; and his young son, soon becoming
conscious that his own merry chatter was not so
well appreciated as it sometimes was, gradually
subsided into the attitude of a listener.

He heard his sister telling how much better
Miss Manly seemed than she had done six
months before, when she first made her acquaint-
ance; and, as she continued to speak of her, he
gradually learnt the story of her sorrows, and
began secretly to feel somewhat ashamed of the
way in which he had spoken of her. If he had
The Walk to Full Farm. 59

only suffered half as much, it seemed to him that
he must have felt his lot a very hard one, and
been envious of every one who was happy; but
now he could not help remembering how very
kindly she had spoken to him, and how very par-
ticularly she had inquired about their games
when they came in from the garden. Then he
recollected that Willy had told him once on a time,
before any of these troubles began, that his cousin,
Kitty Manly, was proud and cross; and he could
not make it out at all, and went to bed, thinking
harder than he generally thought about anything
of Miss Manly and his text, which seemed, as
he fell asleep, to be written in large letters all over
her.
CEAY TE. Ve
A TALK IN THE STUDY.

el here you: are. That's right, Susy,”
2 exclaimed Frank, as Miss Leslie entered
the study next evening, and found her father and
brother watching the rapid changes of the red,
gold, and purple glories of the sky over the



western cliffs.

And Mr Leslie added—

“So, atter all, I tnderstand that 1 am to be
called upon to help you out of this difficulty also.
How is it that you and Frank did not make it
out together?”
A Talk in the Study. 61



“We only got half way through, papa,” inter-
posed Frank. “Susy did help me a great deal ;
but we had to stop talking before we had
finished.”

“ And you are still at a loss about your great
puzzle—why people who are made to mourn first,
and then comforted, are better off than those who
never mourn at all?” rejoined his father. ‘ Well,
Frankie, I ought to be able to tell you something
about this; but it is a lesson not learned in a
day, my boy. What are you looking for, Susy?”

“This text, papa,” she said, pointing to Heb.
xii. 11, and reading, “‘ Now no chastening for
the present seemeth to be joyous, but grievous ;
nevertheless, afterward it yieldeth the peaceable
fruits of righteousness unto them which are exer-
cised thereby. That has something to do with
it, hasn’t it?”

“Ves, a good deal, my dear; and in time God’s
62 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

people all come to say, as we have it in the 119th
Psalm, ‘It is good for me that I have been
afflicted,’ but”

“Oh! yes, papa,” interrupted Frank ; “I know



that trouble is meant to make us better; and, by
what Willy says, I suppose it Zas made Miss
Manly better; but then, what I don’t see is, how
it makes any one happier.”

“ Ah! exactly; you don’t see that to be better
and to be happier are, in fact, the same thing. I
hope you will though, some day; but let us leave
that point and follow our old plan of taking
a Bible story, which may throw light on the
matter.”

“Yes, do,” said Frank. “ Stories always make
things easier to understand ; they made the ‘ poor
in spirit’ much easier to me.”

“T’m glad of it. Well, my story to-day is
about a short time of intense sorrow to some
A Talk in the Study. 63



people, but to others one of great exultation and
rejoicing.”

Frank looked puzzled, and turned to his sister,
as if to inquire whether she had any notion when
that time could have been.

But his papa went on—

“T am not going to set you guessing this story ;
for I shall tell you at once what I am thinking
Sip It. is the time. after the ond: Jesus Christ
had really yielded up His spirit and died on the
cross, and when the hopes of those who loved
Him seemed to die also. We think of this now in
connexion with His resurrection, and thank God
for both, on our own account. But it was not so
with the poor disciples who had been His friends
and companions during His ministry on earth ; for
they did not understand that He would rise
again, so their faith was quite shaken, and they
were most miserable.”
64 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

“But why didv’t they understand?” cried
Frank. ‘I never can make out that, because
Jesus had told them plainly enough.”

Vest tout whe idea of a dead body coming to
life again was not an easy one to take in. We
should not have found it so if we had lived in
those days, because the wonderful doctrine of the
resurrection of the body was not. fully believed
until Christ himself had risen again. Jesus and
the Resurrection were what the apostles after-
wards preached everywhere; but it was thrqugh
this dark experience that they were learning the
lessons which they soon afterwards taught to
others. At this time they were in a state of
doubt.”

“ But, if they did not understand, they might
have believed,” objected Frank; “and yet it
seems as if they had never taken any notice of
what Jesus had said.”
A Talk in the Study. 65

“JT imagine that they had never taken His
words literally, but thought He was speaking in
some figurative way,” replied Mr Leslie.

“Only, they had seen Lazarus rise; so why
should they?” persisted Frank.

“When people are in great sorrow, their
understandings and faith too sometimes seem —
to fail them for a time; and it appears to me,
as I just said, my boy, that the faith of all these
disciples had given way during that Friday and
Saturday, since not one seemed prepared for
what, really happened. But I was going to talk
to you about those two that went on the first
day of the week to the village of Emmaus,
which was about seven miles and a half from

Jerusalem.”
“T know; and I always like that chapter so
much,” said Frank, in a tone of satisfaction. ‘I

wonder what their names were ?”
E
66 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

“Why, one was Cleopas; don’t you remem-
ber?” said his sister.

“ Ah! soit was; but the other?” replied Frank.

“We are not told; and it does not matter.
Now, let us think of their conversation,” Mr
Leslie said. ‘‘ They were walking and talking
together, after some who had been at the sepul-
chre had reported that the body was not there,
but that they had seen a vision of angels; yet
they were sad,—so sad that when One whom
they did not recognise joined them, and asked
what they were talking about, and why they were
sad, they were not offended.”

‘Why should they have been offended, papa? ”
said Frank, looking astonished.

‘‘How would you feel, Frank, if, when you
and your sister were taking a walk, some one
came up and asked what you were talking
about ?”


THE JOURNEY TO EMMAUS.
A Talk in the Study. 67

“T never thought of that,” replied the boy ; “ but
then, of course, Jesus could ask any question.”

“Ves, certainly; only you see they did not
recognise Him at all, and asked whether He
were a stranger, that He did not know what
things had taken place in Jerusalem.”

“Ah! I remember, papa; and Jesus did not
answer. He only said, ‘What things ?’”

“So, you see, they were so full of their sadness
that they thought every one must be sad too,
and must know what they were talking about,”
his papa continued; “and yet they knew of
this vision of angels; and notwithstanding they
said, ‘ But we trusted that it had been He which
should have redeemed Israel, which seems to me
as much as to say, ‘Now we don’t know what
to believe.’ ”

“And then Jesus explained the prophecies
about Himself to them,” added Frank, eagerly.
68 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

“Ves; and showed them that unless He had
suffered all these things, He could not have
been the One whom they had taken Him to be.
You remember the rest, my boy; and how the
Lord made Himself known in breaking of
bread?”

“Oh! yes,” said Frank, rubbing his hands ;
“and then how glad they were: I don’t wonder
that they rushed back to Jerusalem, instead of
staying at Emmaus that night. But the others
knew before they told them; because, you know,
so soon as they got into the room, they all cried
out, ‘ The Lord is risen indeed, and hath appeared
unto Simon.’ Don’t you think, papa, that they
all spoke at once?”

“Very likely,” answered his father ; “for those
who had mourned were comforted now, you see,
and most probably thought all the sorrow they
had passed through as nothing compared with
A Talk in the Study. 69

that great joy. But what about those wicked
men who had been rejoicing because they thought
they had got rid of Jesus? How do you suppose
they felt ?”

“Oh! horribly frightened, I should say,” an-
swered. Frank; “but does the Bible tell us
anything about them? I forget.”

“Yes. St Matthew says that when the priests
and elders heard that He was risen, they bribed
the soldiers to say that the body had been stolen.
It does not seem that they doubted the real fact.
Therefore see what a daring hatred to Him
theirs was! One would have supposed that
such a discovery would have caused them to
see the tremendous sin they had committed,
and that these men would have so feared the
wrath of God that they would have cared nothing
about what the people thought; but no, they
still refused to look on Him whom they had
70 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.





pierced and wounded. They hardened their
hearts still more; and as soon as the apostles
began to preach the resurrection, they persecuted
them for doing so.”

(oTecceu cai) Mrank.), “They were just the
ones who ought to have been sad, and yet they
were not.”

“And their want of sadness showed a wrong
state of mind; it showed the hardness of
their hearts,” returned his father. “The sorrow
of the disciples proved their love for their Lord ;
and therefore it was turned into joy; but some
day His enemies must weep. Now, cannot you
think of some other people who ought to have
wept and mourned, but persisted in rejoicing in-
stead ? You needn’t keep to any particular time.”

“TJ thought you would ask me that, papa; and
won't King Belshazzar do?” answered Frank,
eagerly.
A Talk in the Study. We



“Tell me why you think so,” said his papa;
and Frank took his sister's Bible, and turned
quickly to the fifth chapter of Daniel, saying—

“Vou told me once that that feast of his was
a very wicked sort of thing, and that most likely
a good many of his thousand lords were tipsy ;
and, besides, they were drinking out of the
sacred vessels from the Temple,—those that
were used in the service of the true God, and
drinking to the honour of their wooden and
stone gods too, which were no gods at all, you
know. What business had they to do that?”

“Don’t you think, then, that they considered
their own gods as sacred, Frank?” asked his
Sister.

“Why, Susy!” he answered, warmly, “how
could they? Why, if they hadn’t known in any
other way, there was Daniel and lots of other
Jews to tell them; and Nebuchadnezzar knew
72 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour:

plenty about Daniel, and found out from him
that the Jews’ God was the true one. Belshazzar
must have heard what happened to his own
father.”

“Tf you look in the margin of your Bible, you
will see that the word might be translated ‘grand-
father,’ which agrees better with the history,” re-
marked Mr Leslie. ‘ Still, I agree with you that
he must have heard something of those circum-
stances, and might have known more if he had
taken the trouble to ask; but, you see, thought-
less men, like Belshazzar, do not trouble them-
selves about anything but their own pleasure.
They go on doing just as they like, day after day,
but generally intending to become more serious
in old age. However, you have not told me why
you think Belshazzar ought to have been mourn-
ing instead of making himself merry.”

“Because he was so awfully wicked, papa.


BELSHAZZARS FEAST

A Talk in the Study. We

Why, I should think he ought to have been
clothing himself in sackcloth, and repenting, like
the King of Nineveh, instead of feasting and
getting drunk.”

“You think that his rejoicing was of a wrong
sort, and sout of place, — Welle think so too,
and, indeed, the fact of that Hand appearing and
writing those words on the wall is enough to
show us in what a blasphemous and wicked way
the kingdom was being ruled. God told him
that he had been weighed in the balances, and
found wanting. That judgment will be pro-
nounced on many by and by; but such sentences
do not go forth in this present state, unless there
has been outrageous wickedness.”

“He never rejoiced again, at any rate,” said
Frank; ‘for you know, that very same night
he was killed and the city taken. Why, the
army that took it must have been close by
74 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



all the while; and yet Belshazzar went on quietly
with his feasting, just as if there was nothing the
matter! Only fancy!”

‘““Tt was the same with the sinners before the
flood, and with the inhabitants of Sodom and
Gomorrah, and, I am afraid, is so also with a
great many other sinners, Frank; because multi-
tudes put off repentance until it is too late. But
now, tell me whether you understand your verse
any better ?”

“Yes, papa, I think I do—at least I see, for
one thing, that we all ought to mourn for our
sins; and—besides that, there are plenty of
times when the people that mourn are in the
right, and those who don’t are in the wrong ;
and—then troubles are good for us, I suppose.”

‘We are in a wicked world, you see, Frank,”
rejoined his papa,—‘‘in a world at enmity
with God; so, if we have gone to Christ for
A Talk in the Study. 7

pardon, and are no longer at enmity with Him,
there must be plenty around us to cause us
sorrow. Besides which, as you say, troubles are
good for us; but that is because, in our present
state, we are so unfit to be companions for the
angels in the world tocome. When God’s people
are made perfect through the discipline of suf-
fering, all tears shall be wiped from their eyes.”

“But, papa,” said Miss Leslie, “you do not
mean Frank to think that true religion is a
doleful thing, after all; do you?”

‘No, certainly ; and I hope, from the examples
we have taken, he would understand that. The
priests and elders of the Jews, who persecuted
Jesus and many of the disciples to the death,
were not happy men, amidst all their exultation ;
were they, my boy?”

“No, papa; I should not have liked to be one
of them.”
76 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

‘Then, would you have liked to be one of the
drunken lords at Belshazzar’s feast?”

“No; that I shouldn't.”

‘‘Or one of the sinners who rejected the preach-
ing of Noah, or the remonstrances of righteous
Job?”

‘‘No, papa; I would much rather have been
one of those two who went to Emmaus. Only
think, to have walked and talked with Jesus all
that way!”

“Ah! Frank, you may yet walk with Him in
the streets of the New Jerusalem, and hear His
voice and see His blessed face; but remember, if
this is to be your happy lot, it must be reached
through the old, narrow path of pilgrims, and not
by travelling with the giddy throng who crowd
the broad, and as ¢#ey think, the pleasant way.”
CHAPTER V1.

A RUFFLED TEMPER.




WeapOW hot you look, Frankie,” said Miss
Mell Leslie in a tone of dismay, as her young
brother came into the study, and, sitting down by
the window, began to turn over the pages of his
Bible in rather a hasty manner, as if he did not
feel quite prepared for the lesson which his papa
had promised that evening.

‘“Do I?” answered the boy, rather gloomily.
“Well, I’ve had a long walk, and the sun was
baking hot this afternoon. Besides, I was late,
and had to run a good part of the way.”
78 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

“ But you know, Frank, that Dr Wolfe parti-
cularly said that you were not to overheat your-
self in this way,” remonstrated his sister.

d

“T can’t help what the doctors say,’ returned
her brother, impatiently. ‘One must get hot, I
suppose, when one has to run, and especially when
one gets insulted into the bargain.”

“JT was afraid you had been quarrelling,”’
returned his sister, gravely ; ‘‘ but, my dear boy,
why will you allow yourself to be so easily
offended ?”

“T should think any gentleman’s son would be
offended.»when a low fellow like Dick Benson
takes upon him to give him lessons,” answered
the boy, haughtily ; ‘‘ as if I didn’t know the mean-
ing of the Bible a great deal better than he does!”

‘Dick Benson is a very good man; and he is
a great deal older than you are, Frank,” she
answered, quietly.
A Ruffled Temper. 79

‘“T know that; but he can’t even read! so what
business has he to set up to teach?”

‘What did he try to teach you, dear?”

‘“T’m sure I don’t know; he made all sorts of
impertinent remarks about what gentlemen should
do, and what they shouldn't; and, though I felt
in a towering rage, I never said a word. So you
needn't say that I easily get offended, Susan.
But at last he got asking what I was doing in
the Bible way, and, when I told him, he said with
such an air, ‘Oh! it’s the Beatitudes you’re
upon ; is it, young master?’ that I couldn’t help
telling him that he thought himself wiser than he
was, for it was no such thing, but ‘ the Sermon on
the Mount’ that I was learning; and that, as to
the long word which he thought so grand, I
believed that nobody ever heard of it except him-
self:

“Oh! Frank,” exclaimed his sister, ‘‘ how could
80 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



you say so? Why, of course, Dick was quite
right!”

Here they were interrupted by the entrance of
their father, to whom, in his usual impetuous
way, Frank instantly appealed, and was considet-
ably mortified to have his sister’s verdict con-
firmed.

But Mr Leslie did not attempt either to explain
the word, or to discuss Dick Benson’s conduct.
He was quite silent for a few minutes, and then
gravely saying that he did not think that a good
time to talk over the verse which came in course,
left the room again.

“T’m glad it’s put off,” said the boy, with a
sigh, which was meant to be expressive of relief;
“for I’ve had no time to think about it, and
_ didn’t even know which verse it was.”

Miss Leslie made no answer, knowing very

well that her young brother in reality understood
A Ruffied Temper. 81



his papa’s manner, and feeling for herself that the
evening was spoilt.

She got out her work ; and Frank seemed to be
studying his verse, turning to references, and so
on; but not a word was spoken by either of them
for perhaps half an hour.

At the end of that time, the fiery boy had
become considerably cooler; and murmurs of,
“The meek! the meek!—I wish good people
need not be so very tame and quiet,” began to
be distinctly audible even at the other end of the
room. ;

Still the sister waited, knowing by experience
that it answered best, when Frank’s temper had
been ruffled, to let him reopen the vexed question
himself, as he was sure to do in a little time.
Nor was it long before he did so now, saying—

‘Susy, don’t you wish that we could be good

without being so very tame?”
F
82 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



“T didn’t know it was at all necessary,” replied
his sister. ‘‘ What good people are you thinking
of

“Oh! none in particular; only, you see, this
verse says we ought to be meek—“ Blessed are
the meek ;”—and I never liked meek people in
my life.” |

“What meek people have you known?” his
sister said.

“What meek people? Oh! lots. I can't
think of any one in particular just now; but I
only know, they are never to my taste.”

“Isn't it likely that you are making a mistake
again, and thinking of people who are quite
unlike those that are intended in this verse, just
as you did about the ‘poor in spirit, my boy? I
think you are, for two reasons.”

“And, pray, what are they?” asked Frank,

somewhat curiously.
A Ruffied Temper. 83

“In the first place, I believe, if I remember
right, you do admire some of those very Bible
characters whom I should pick out as models of
meekness; and in the next, you say you have
known lots of meek people; while it seems to me
that they are not so very common.”

‘What Bible people do you call meek?” asked
Frank, opening his eyes wide. “I can’t think of
any.”

“Then you certainly do not know how to look
for them, my dear; and I advise you to hunt
some out before papa asks again, which I daresay
he will do to-morrow,” returned Miss Leslie, as
she rose and began to put away her work.

“Where are you going, Susy? Can't you stay
and help me?” cried Frank, on seeing this.

“No, I can’t,” she said; “for I have just re-
membered that I ought to have been to see
poor Mrs Welsh this afternoon; and as I
84. Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

haven't, I must go now, because she is so very
ill.”

So the boy was left to his own meditations ;
and he spent about three quarters of an hour in
turning over his Bible, in order to find out what
his sister meant, and, in so doing, came upon
more than one passage which staggered him a
good deal as to the justness of his old ideas.
CHAPTER Vil.

A CHANGE OF OPINION.




WHEN they were all sitting together next
BES} evening, ready for a pleasant chat, it was
Frank's first impulse to ask for an explanation
of that long name by which Dick Benson
had called the verses which he was studying.
The boy’s curiosity was not unfrequently strong
enough to overcome his pride, but on this
occasion it did not quite conquer; for he at
last decided to wait, in the hope that his papa
would do what he wanted of his own accord. He
was somewhat surprised that he did not begin
by calling him to account for his ruffled temper
86 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

on the previous evening; for Mr Leslie made no
allusion to that subject, but started the conver-
sation. by asking what sort of notion Frank had
of the character spoken of in his text.

“J hardly know,” said the boy ingenuously ;
‘only I think, from what I can find out, that |
have had a wrong one.”

“And what makes you think so?” asked his
father.

“Why, I thought I didn’t like meek people ;
but then I found this text, ‘Take My yoke upon
you and learn of Me; for I am meek and lowly
of heart, and ye shall find rest unto your souls.’
That was Jesus speaking of Himself ;—wasn’t it,
papa?—and so, I suppose, it must mean something
very good and beautiful. I never thought of His
being meek when I said I didn’t like meek people.”

‘What sort of people have you been thinking
of, I wonder?” said his sister.
A Change of Opinion. 87



“Oh! don’t you know Mrs Mills?” returned
Frank. ‘I thought she was one, because I have
heard her admired for being such a sweet, gentle
person; and I know she always puts me out of
patience. Why, her children do just as they like ;
and if they turn the house out of doors, or say
the most impertinent things to her, she only
sighs, and says that their spirits are quite too
much for her. Why doesn’t she make them
behave themselves ?”

“But that is not true meekness, Frank,” said
Mr Leslie. ‘It isjust want of energy and of self-
respect. The Lord Jesus never acted so. He
always rebuked sin, and sometimes very severely.
Only in cases where the sin had been repented
of, He was tender and gentle. There is another
place in which He is called meek, and that is in
Matt. xxi. 5, in the account of His entry into
Jerusalem on a young ass. There it says, ‘ All
a

88 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

this was done, that it might be fulfilled which
was spoken by the prophet, saying, Tell ye the
daughter of Sion, Behold, thy King cometh unto
thee, meek, and sitting upon an ass, and a colt
the foal of an ass.’ That prophecy is taken from
Zechariah, the ninth chapter and ninth verse,
only the word is lowly there ; and you remember
that Jesus did not enter Jerusalem with pomp
and state, as kings often do. Hecame in a quiet,
peaceful manner, and seated on an animal then
often used by princes in times of peace. You
must not think that it was in a way unworthy of
a king; for it was not. Asses were not despised
in those days as they are now; and horses were
seldom used except in war. Still, it was ina way
more likely to inspire confidence and love than
awe or terror. It was a way likely to draw people
to Him, and not to drive them from Him, just
as in the verses that you found (Matt. xi. 28-30),
A Change of Opinion. 89



He says, ‘Come unto Me, and ‘Take My yoke
upon you, for I am meek and lowly in heart.’
Jesus was patient under His own sufferings ; and
He is patient with all who go to Him, and very
unlike the haughty, overbearing rulers and teachers
among the Jews, who so often opposed and in-
sulted Him. His meekness, like everything else
about Him, was perfect. But now let us see if
we can think of any good people who were at all
like Him in this respect.”

“Can you?” said Frank to his sister.
‘ «J have thought of Moses,” she said, and turn-
ing to’ Numy'xit°3) shetead, -* “Now the man
Moses was very meek, above all the men which
were upon the face of the earth.’”

“Very good,” said Mr Leslie, “and now, Frank,
tell us how you think he showed his meckness.”

‘‘T suppose it was by not flying into a passion
and trying to revenge himself; wasn’t it, papa?
90 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

This was when Aaron and Miriam had been
worrying him; and I think, somehow or other,
Moses was always being worried. I am sure
those children of Israel were enough to drive any
one mad.”

“And Moses was long-suffering and patient
with them, and very seldom gave way to fits of
indignation,” rejoined his father. ‘ Would you,
then, think of Moses as a man without any energy
or decision of character ?”

“Oh, no!” cried the boy. ‘I like Moses. He
always was one of my favourites; but then, you
know, papa, he did not let the people have their own
way. He always made them do what was proper.”

“So you see the two things may go together,
my boy. But cannot you think of any one by
yourself?” |

“TI will try, papa;” and Frank did think for
a good while, until at last he cried out—
A Change of Opinion. QI



“Job, papa—Job, to be sure! Why, it says
somewhere, ‘Ye have heard of the patience of
Job.’”

“That is in St James, the fifth chapter and the
eleventh verse,” said his sister; ‘‘ and it tells us at
the end of the first chapter of Job how meek and
patient he was.”

‘‘So it does; and that was after he had lost—how
much?” cried Frank, looking down the chapter.
‘“‘Let’s see. He was a rich man, to begin with ;
for he had seven thousand sheep, three thousand
camels, five hundred yoke of oxen, five hundred
she-asses, and a very great household! Papa,
what an enormous quantity of animals, to be
sure! Why, he szust have been rich. But it
says, ‘He was the greatest of all the men of the
East ;’ doesn’t it? And then he lost, first, the
oxen and asses, then the sheep, then the camels,
and nearly all the servants, with the beasts; and
92 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

then, at last, a house fell down and killed all his
children! I wonder if anybody ever had such
dreadful troubles. He was patient and meek,
not to complain at all, but only to say, ‘ The Lord
gave, and the Lord hath taken away ; blessed be
the name of the Lord.’ Why, some of our people
make such a fuss if they lose a cow or a sheep,
that you would think they were very badly treated.
And don’t you remember, when Ben Walters lost
his little boy, what dreadful things he said, and
how he made out that God was very cruel to
him ?”

‘And what about a certain little boy, Frank,
who was dreadfully injured,and completely put out
of temper, by a liberty taken with him by one of his
father’s most faithful and attached servants, Dick
Benson by name? How came you to forget that
acquaintance in your list of impatient people?”

“Oh, papa!” said Frank, turning quite crimson,


THE PATIENCE OF JOB.

A Change of Opinion. 93



and his eyes filling with very unwelcome tears ;
“T thought you had forgotten that.”

“Well, it is not a pleasant circumstance to re-
member,” answered his father, kindly; ‘‘ so if you
will not remind me of it, I will try todo so. And
now let us go on with Job’s history. Was what
you have told me the whole of his troubles?”

Oh, no!” said Frank, at length, when he had,
after various attempts, succeeded in gulping down
his feelings. ‘After that, you know, he had that
dreadful disease of boils all over him; and then,
when he was in all that pain, his wife tried to
make him curse God. But he wouldn't. He
only said, ‘ What! shall we receive good at the
hand of God, and shall we not receive evil>’
Papa, I don’t wonder at his refusing to curse God ;
but I do wonder that he didn’t get into a passion
with his wife ; because I know boils make you feel
so cross ; at least mine did.”
94 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

‘“‘ But were these boils his last trouble, Frank ? ”

‘No; I think those three friends of his, who
pretended to come and comfort him, and then
would have it that he must have been a very
wicked man and a hypocrite, while he seemed so
good, must have been worse than all. Don’t you
think their hearts must have been made of stone,
or else they never could have gone on taunting
him, when, as it says, ‘they saw that his grief
was very great ’?”

“Tt is not much to be wondered at that he
called them miserable comforters, at any rate,”
answered his father. ‘ But you should notice,
that though Job’s patience was so remarkable that
we need not marvel at its having passed into a pro-
verb, yet it was not like our Lord’s—perfect. In the
depth of his sorrowhe had begun tosay bitter things,
and to wish that he had never been born, before they
spoke at all; and then they, who had never known
A Change of Opinion. 95

grief like his, would not make allowance for him,
and began to scold, instead of trying to pacify.”

“TI think the most touching part of the whole
story,” observed Susy, “is in the nineteenth
chapter, where poor Job speaks of the way in
which those nearest and dearest to him had
behaved towards him, and ends by crying out,
‘Have pity upon me, O ye my friends; for the
hand of God hath touched me.’”

“They wouldn't, though,” cried Frank. “ They
said more unkind things after that; but at last
God told them they were wrong; and they had to
go and get Job to pray for them. I am glad of
that, for I think it was very much like having to
beg his pardon ; and that served them right. Job
does not seem to have been very angry with them,
after all their unkind speeches ; but what does it
mean by saying that God turned Job's captivity
when he prayed for his friends, papa?”
96 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

“T understand it to mean that happiness came
back-into his soul, while he was forgetting him-
self and praying for others, as often happens,”
replied Mr Leslie. ‘He seemed to get peace
first, and then a fresh stock of earthly joys ; for
his other friends and relations came round him
again, bemoaning him and bringing him presents,
and in time he had twice as much as he had before
in beasts and wealth, and just the same number
of children ; for the Lord blessed the latter end
of Job more than the beginning; and he lived
still an hundred and forty years, and saw four
generations of his descendants. So you see the
promise was fulfilled to him: ‘ Blessed are the
meek ; for they shall inherit the earth. 1 don't
think we can always see it so plainly in this life ;
but in the new heavens and new earth, it will be
seen that God always keeps His word.”
CHAPTER VIII.
FRANK’S STORY.

JAPA,” said Frank, one day, as they were



ies@) walking together over the cliffs up to
the Hill Farm, “I met Dick Benson again the
other day, and then I asked him if he could tell
me why all those verses that begin with ‘blessed’
are called the beatitudes; but he couldn't; only,
he said he should like to know; and so I told him
that I would ask you.”

A look of pleasure came over Mr Leslie’s face
as he replied—

“What! have you been making up your quar-

rel with him, then, my boy?”
G
98 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

“Yes, papa; it came into my head, one day,
that if Job’s friends had to beg his pardon,
perhaps I ought to do the same by Dick; and he
was very good-natured about it, and said that no
doubt you taught me lots of things which he hadn't
had the chance of learning; though in all his life
he doubted but he might have picked up scraps
that hadn’t come in my way; and he thought it
would be ‘a wery good thing’ for us two to go on
the give-and-take plan.”

‘“‘So do I,” replied his father; ‘and my notion
is, that you will have to take a good deal more
than you give, Franky. However, you may tell
him that the word he taught you comes from a
Latin one, which means happiness or blessedness.”

rer etell dam, /\saidi rank: 74 and | there ’s
another thing he wanted me to ask you about.
You know we didn’t find out any one who was, as
Dick calls it, ‘the exact contrary’ of Moses and
Frank's Story. — 99

Job. Who do you think would do? He says
he doesn’t believe we could find a better than
Haman.”

“And by a better I suppose Dick means a
worse man,’ remarked Mr Leslie. ‘No; I do
not think we could find a character that contrasts
more strongly with either of those holy men.
Do you remember his history, Frank?”

“T was looking over it this morning, papa.
It was after King Ahasuerus had married Queen
Esther that Haman got into his favour, and was
set on a higher seat than any of the other princes,
you know; and then all the king’s servants
bowed down to him except Mordecai, the Jew;
and he wouldn't, because he knew he was a bad
man, I suppose. So he got into such a rage that
‘he thought scorn’ only to kill Mordecai him-
self, and made up his mind to get all the nation
of the Jews destroyed! I should think that
100 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

Haman was the greatest wretch that ever lived ;
wasn’t he? Only imagine, wanting to kill
hundreds and thousands of people—babies and
all—because one man wouldn’t bow down to you!
And what a king he must have been, to give leave
only because the Jews’ laws were different from
his!”

‘Eastern kings used to think as little of the
lives of their subjects as they did of those of cats
and dogs, often not so much,” said his father.
“They could have their own way about every-
thing; and see what this brings a man to, my
boy. You ought to be very thankful that you
cannot do just as you like; for you don’t know
what your evil heart would bring you to if it
were left to its own devices; but go on, and tell
me the rest of Haman’s story.”

“ Mordecai heard what he was going to do, and
he sent to his niece to tell her to speak to the king
Frank's Story. IOI

for her people. And then she said she might be
killed if she went to the king without being
called. But he answered that she must not think
to escape only because she was queen, and that
perhaps she had been brought to the throne just
for this. So Queen Esther said she would go;
only she wanted all the Jews in Shushan to fast
for her three days first. And they did; and she
fasted too, and then went dressed in her royal
robes on the third day. Oh! mustn’t she have
been frightened, papa! But the king held
out his golden sceptre; and so she knew it was
all right!”

“All right, so far,” interposed his father.
‘‘She couldn’t know yet whether he would grant
her petition.”

‘No; and she had to stay in a fright about
that a little longer. I suppose she had to get
into his good graces first. So she asked him and
102 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

Haman to come toa feast. How fond those kings
were of eating and drinking, papa! They seemed
to like nothing better ; but she didn’t ask for what
she wanted that day. I wonder if that was
because she couldn’t get up her courage! At any
rate, she asked them to come again next day ; and
Haman went home in great glee, because he
thought he was such a favourite with both the
king and the queen ; only he got in a rage again
on his way home, because Mordecai wouldn’t
move for him; and so his wife advised him to
have a great high gallows made and get him
hanged on it. What a set they were! But was
not it wonderful how God saved Mordecai by
making the king keep awake that night, and want
that book to be read which told how Mordecai had
saved his life by telling about the two men who
were going to murder him. And then, that
Haman should come at that very time to speak to


HAMAN AND MORDECAI.

Frank's Story. 103

the king to have him hanged, and be ordered
instead to dress him in the royal robes, and put
the king’s crown on his head, and set him on the
king’s own particular horse, and take him through
the city crying out, ‘ Thus shall it be done to the
man whom the king delighteth to honour!’ What
a rage he must have been in ; and when he thought
he was going to get it done to himself, too! And
afterwards, you know, he went to the feast, and
Esther told about his wickedness ; and he got
hanged on the very gallows that he had made for
Mordecai ; but all the poor Jews escaped. Haman
came to a different sort of end from Job’s; didn’t
he, papa?”

“Yes; his pride had a very signal fall, as it
alwayswill have in the end, though we do not always
see itnow. I hope you will never forget this lesson,
my dear boy ; and that, whenever you are tempted |
to think it grand and manly to fire up and take
104. Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.





offence because somebody has not been as respect-
ful as you think he ought to be towards Master
Frank Leslie, you will look back at Haman, and see
how very odious proud people really are. There is
a verse in the 16th chapter of Proverbs which fits
in exactly with what we have been talking of:
‘Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty
Spirit before a fall.’”

“Oh! I know that, papa,” cried Frank, “ for I
learnt it once, and the next one too: ‘ Better it is
to be of an humble spirit with the lowly, than to
divide the spoil with the proud.’ That will do for
Job, and the other for Haman.”

“And what will you have for yourself, Frank ?”

“T think I had better take them both; but,
papa, there goes Dick Benson! May I run on
and tell him what we have been talking about ?”

“Certainly,” said his papa; and off set Frank
as fast as his legs would carry him.
CHAPTER, TX:
LONGERS.

HERE goes Dick Benson again, I de-



peti) clare!” cried Frank, springing up from
the beach on which he had only just settled
himself beside his father and sister. “Oh! papa,
would you mind my calling him, because he
would so like hearing our talk? and he’d be sure
to think of something that we didn’t, too.”

‘Not to-day, my boy,” replied Mr Leslie, who
was accustomed to these rapid changes of feeling
in his little son. ‘‘I prefer to keep these lessons
quite to ourselves ; otherwise I would have invited
your friend Willy to join us.”

“Oh! Willy does not care about such things,”
106 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



returned Frank, hastily; ‘at least I don't think
he does ; but Dick always likes to hear everything
that you tell me, or that Susy tells me, or that.
find out for myself.”

‘“Then I’m sure I hope you will tell him every-

thing that you like to repeat,” returned his father,
without commenting on the “always,” which he
knew could not at most include more than two
conversations. “There is nothing like repeating
a thing to another when we wish to impress it on
our own memories,” he added; ‘‘and now, what
have you got for me to-day ?”
_ “It’s averse that I think I understand a@ “tt/e,”
said Frank, “only I can’t explain it. ‘ Blessed
are they which do hunger and thirst after right-
eousness ; for they shall be filled.’ Have you got
a story ready, papa?”

“Ves; I have thought of one for that, or rather
your sister thought of it for me; and this is it—
Longers. 107

“There was a certain country, governed at one
particular time by a queen ; and this queen had set
one man in charge of her riches and treasures,
and made him very great. He was, as I suppose,
unlike the other men about her, for they were
probably heathens, while he seems to have wor-
shipped the one true God. Some people have
supposed that he was a Jew who had entered her
service; but it seems more likely that at some
time in his life he had been amongst Jews, and
become a convert to their religion. People of
this kind were called proselytes; and they went
up, just as Jews by birth did, to Jerusalem to keep
the three great feasts.

‘“‘ At any rate, this man had been there to wor-
ship, and was riding back to his own country in
his carriage. It was rather a long journey, and
as he went along he was reading to himself. Now,
in that part of the world people have a curious
108 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

way of reading aloud, even when they have no
auditors. And so another man, whom this officer
met, heard him reading to himself, and that so
loud that he could tell what he was reading, and
found that it was a part of the prophecy of Isaiah.
He had himself just been preaching the gospel in
Samaria, with much success, and no doubt was
glad to have another opportunity of doing so.
When he found what this great man was
reading, he ran up to tha carriage, at God’s com-
mand, and asked him if he understood his book.”

“Wasn't that a curious question to ask a
stranger, papa?” said Frank, eagerly.

‘Tt would have seemed strange to us; but this
man did not appear surprised at it. It strikes
me that he was so anxious to know the meaning
of what he was reading, that he was ready to
catch at any hope of getting at it. In fact, his
heart was prepared for the good news which he


ILIP AND THE ETHIOPIAN.



Long CYS. 109



was now to hear, so that he received it at once,
though preached by a stranger, believed on the
Lord Jesus Christ, and asked to be baptized.”

“Oh!” cried Frank, “I know now who you
are telling about, papa. It was Philip who
preached, and the man in the carriage, or chariot
as it is in the Bible, was the eunuch who had
charge of Queen Candace’s treasure. She was
Queen of Ethiopia. Where was that, papa? I
don’t know.”

“Tt is supposed to have been the country
which we now call Abyssinia,” replied Mr Leslie,
‘and that, you know, is south of Egypt. Most
likely this was the Greek translation of Isaiah
that the man was reading.”

“Greek, papa! why, they didn’t speak Greek
down there ; did they?”

“Greek had been a great deal spoken for some
time in Egypt, because the Egyptians had been
110 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

conquered by Greeks, and had had a line of
Greek kings. It was at the command of one of
them that the Old Testament Scriptures had been
translated into Greek for the use of that large
body of Jews which had long been settled in
Egypt. And this is the reason why there is a
difference of a few words between the passage
here in Acts and the one from which it is taken
in Isaiah.”

‘“T did not notice the difference until just now,
papa; but the meaning seems the same. I was
wondering how it was that the eunuch did not
know who was meant.”

“Why, Frank,” exclaimed his sister, “ how
should he? He didn’t know anything about Jesus,
as far as we know.”

“But he had just been to Jerusalem; and
wouldn't he hear about Him there?” objected
the boy.
Longers. Ill



“Vou must remember,” said his father, ‘ that
the excitement about the crucifixion had, no doubt,
a little died away by this time. I mean it was
not the general talk of the people as it had been
at first; so his hearing of it would depend on
his meeting with disciples ; and they were fewin _
number compared with the population. He may
have heard some strange story, or nothing at all.
At any rate, it was not until Philip explained it all
to him that he saw how Jesus was ‘the Lamb led |
to the slaughter,’ and cut off for his sins.”

‘“Was this the same Philip who once said to
Jesus, ‘ Lord, show us the Father ?’” interrupted
Frank. ;

“No; I think not. He seems to have been
one of the little band of seven good men, chosen to
help in giving relief to the poor, Stephen was
one of those, you know; and it was after his
martyrdom that this Philip began to go about
112 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

preaching and working miracles. ButI want you
to think more about the eunuch just now, because
he is my example of hungering and thirsting after
righteousness. Evidently, he had been acting
up to what he knew before, and most likely he
had forsaken the worship of idols for that of the
true God. I daresay that brought him some perse-
cution ; but he knew that he ought to go up to the
feast, and so he went. Still, he was not satisfied.
He wanted more light ; and having got the Scrip-
tures, he read them, and was trying hard to under-
stand them when God sent Philip to him. This
is what I call hungering and thirsting. It was
not taking such matters quietly, as if they didn’t
matter. His soul was longing for light when
‘Philip began at the same Scripture, and preached
unto him Jesus.’ ”

‘Wouldn't you like to have heard that sermon,
papa?” said Miss Leslie.
Longers. hr



“T think I should. But, at any rate, it was the
meat and drink provided for the eunuch’s hungry
and thirsty soul. At once he received the out-
ward sign which made him a Christian by pro-
fession, as he knew himself to be in heart ; and
though his teacher was quickly taken from him,
yet he went on his way rejoicing. You see he
had hungered for the right thing; and so he had
been filled. Don’t you think your friend Dick
has something of the same feeling ?”

“Ves; he is always longing to know more about
God,” Frank answered.

“ Ah!” said his papa, ‘‘ but Dick did not a/ways
know that hunger, as he will tell you if you ask
him. Once he was quite content with himself
and his condition as an industrious, steady sort of
man—he didn’t know that he was full of sin and
rebellion against God, or care to be better than he

was. For he flattered himself that God was as
H
114 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



well satisfied with him as he was with himself.
But after a time his eyes were opened ; and then
he saw what a black, ungrateful heart he had ;
then he began to be alarmed, and to wish to be
better. So he remained for some time, really
anxious to know God's will, and to become more
pleasing in His sight. At last, some one preached
Jesus to him; and then, when he saw how His
blood can wash away the blackest sins, and His
righteousness cover the most guilty sinner, his
heart was filled with joy, and his great want
seemed to be satisfied ; for he had found just what
he wanted. Only now, Dick, like every other
true believer, Aungers to be holier himself, to be
able to love more, and to do more for the Lord
his Righteousness ; and this appetite also is being
satisfied, and shall be so more and more, as he
goes on his heavenly course.”

“Papa,” said Frank, “when Willy was joking
Longers. 115



about something the other day, he said that he
thought we were made to be longers, and that we
ought always to wear ‘ wishing-caps, for he knew
that he always wanted something which he had
not got.”

“He was right there,” answered his father.
“Certainly we all hunger for something; but
remember there is a kind of hunger which tor-
ments, and is never satisfied. That is very
different from the appetite of which we have been
speaking. The prophet says (Isaiah lv. 2):
‘Wherefore do ye spend your money for that
which is not bread, and your labour for that which
satisfieth not? Hearken diligently unto me, and
eat ye that which is good, and let your soul delight
itself in fatness.’”

“ Papa,” cried Frank, “I’ve just thought of a
man who had a tremendous longing for some-
thing that he ought not to have wanted. May I
116 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

tell you his story, and see if you can guess his
name?”

‘‘To-morrow,” answered his father; ‘it is too
late now; but I shall be very glad to hear it then,
and you will have till then to get your history

into a good form.”
CHAPTER xX.

UNSATISFIED HUNGERERS.

Ria LL, Frank, and is your story ready for



AEN me this evening?” said Mr Leslie, as he
came into their favourite summer sitting-room, his
study, and, tired out with a long walk, threw him-
self into his own old-fashioned and most rightly-
named easy-chair. It was only in the evenings
that his children had free access to this apart-
ment ; but there was none in the house that they
loved so well; perhaps because old associations
made it especially dear to them.
118 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



“Yes, papa,” said Frank, taking out a folded
paper from his pocket. ‘Only I have written it
out, because Susy thought I had better; and if
you don’t mind, I’ll read it to you, for fear I
should forget something very particular, and then
you shouldn’t be able to guess.”

On I dont mind. .I like people to take
pains with everything that they undertake; and
certainly we ought to do so in telling a Bible
story,” said his father.

‘“My story is about a king of either the ten
tribes of Israel or the two, I am not going to say
which,” the boy began, reading from his paper ;
‘‘and he had a very clever, wicked wife, who was
a heathen, and made him a heathen too. He
reigned twenty-two years, and was worse than any
king of that country that had come before him.
And when he had taken to worshipping idols,
then he wanted to make his people as bad as him-
Unsatisfied Flungerers. 119



self; so he began by building a house and an
altar for his god. And when he had done that,
God sent a great prophet to tell him that there
should be no rain on the earth for a very long
time. It doesn’t say so; but I suppose that the
king knew that this was to punish him, and
that it would bring a famine on the land.
And I should have thought that when the rain
stopped, and the famine came, he would have
been sorry, and turned back to the true God; but
he didn’t. He seemed very obstinate. And his
horrible wife persecuted the people who would
keep to the true religion, and killed all the
good prophets she could find. This great
prophet had to run away from her, to save his
life ; but after a long while, he had to go back and
tell the king that God was going to send rain.
And then there was a great gathering of people
near a high mountain; and when fire came down
120 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



from heaven, and burnt up the sacrifice, after the
true prophet had prayed—though the false ones
couldn’t get it to do so—then all the multitude
_ gave a great shout, and said that their own God
was the true one, and not the idol which the king
and queen worshipped. And after that came
down great torrents of rain; and soon after, God
fought for Israel, and made this wicked king gain
some victories—I suppose because the people had
acknowledged Him again, though they did not
keep to His worship. But the queen only grew
more spiteful; and the prophet had to run away
from her again, to save his life. And now I’m
coming to the part that made me think of this
king yesterday. |

‘‘He had a great palace in his chief town, and
near the palace there was a sort of garden, where
vines grew ; only, it did not belong to the king,
but toanother man. The king thought he should
Unsatisfied Hungerers. 121



like this piece of land very much; so he asked
the owner to change with him for a better one, or
for money, whichever he liked best. But the man
that it belonged to would not, because it was
against the law to sell an inheritance. That law
is in Numbers xxxvi. 7. He knew that law. The
queen, though she was an idolator, and born in
another country, knew of another of the Jewish —
laws—one that is written in Leviticus xxiv. 15, 16
—and she determined to make out that he had
broken it. So when her husband came into his
house, heavy and displeased because he could not
get the ground that he wanted, she told him she
would give it to him. Then she wrote letters,
which looked as if he had written them, to the
men in the city, bidding them tell a great lie, and
say that this poor man to whom the land belonged
had blasphemed both God and the king, and get
witnesses to declare he did it, and then have him
122 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.





stoned to death for it, as the law said people
should be; and they actually served the poor
fellow in that way; and when he was dead the
king took his inheritance for himself. There,
papa,” cried Frank, “now wasn’t that a very
horrid sort of hungering and thirsting?”

“Ves,” answered his father, smiling at the
boy’s eagerness; “but I don’t think you have
finished the story.”

‘Oh, then, you have guessed it?” he exclaimed,
in rather a disappointed tone.

* bithink' so,’ said! Mr Leslie. “Wasn't he a
king of Israel?”

“Ves,” said Frank.

“And he reigned in Samaria, the city which
his father, Omri, had built on the hill which he
had bought; and his name was Ahab, and his
wife’s Jezebel?”

“Oh! yes; you are quite right, papa; only I
Unsatisfied Hungerers. 123



didn’t know about the city; and now, of course,
you know what he longed for.”

“Well, I conclude it was for the vineyard of
Naboth the Jezreelite; but one question I must
ask. The story is very nicely told; did you
write it all by yourself, my boy?”

‘““No; Susy helped, papa, or else I should have
made it a great deal too long; but I thought of
it myself.”

“Quite right. I like to know all about such
_ things, you know; and I am sure that Susy is
very kind to her little brother. But now for the
conclusion of the story. Was Ahab filled ?—for
that was the promise attached to your verse,
remember.”

“Ah! but then he didn’t hunger for the right
thing, papa. He coveted, I think; and Susy showed
me some verses that did very well for him. They
are here in Isaiah Ixv. 11-14 :—‘But ye are they
124. Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



that forsake the Lord, that forget My holy moun-
tain, that prepare a table for that troop, and that
furnish the drink-offering unto that number.
Therefore will I number you to the sword, and
ye shall all bow down to the slaughter, because
when I called ye did not answer; when I spake,
ye did not hear; but did evil before mine eyes,
and did choose that wherein I delighted not.
Therefore, thus saith the Lord God, Behold AZy
servants shall eat, but ye shall be hungry: behold,
My servants shall drink, but ye shall be thirsty.”

“T see you think the last part particularly ap-
plicable to wicked Ahab. But what makes you
think he did not enjoy Naboth’s vineyard?”
asked Mr Leslie.

“Why, papa!” said Frank, with great energy,
‘as soon as ever he had got it, Elijah was sent
to go down and meet him there, and tell him that
in the very place where dogs had licked Naboth’s





ee







=






Unsatisfied Hungerers. 125



blood, other dogs should lick his blood up too.
He couldn’t have cared much for the vineyard
after that, because he knew that Elijah’s words
always came true.”

“And how did these come true?” asked his
father.

“He would go out to battle when another
prophet, Micaiah, told him that he would be killed
in it; and though he disguised himself, a sort of
chance arrow hit him, so that he went home and
died. And the dogs licked up his blood. Papa,
what savage dogs they must have been! I don’t
think English dogs would do so.”

‘*No; but Eastern dogs are wild, savage crea-
tures, and are not thought of as we think of our
faithful companions. But, Franky, I have been
thinking of something more connected with this
subject of hungering and thirsting. You say
that Willy does not care for such things as we
126 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



talk about. Perhaps you are mistaken; but,
supposing you are right, aren’t you sorry for it ?
and if so, what are you going to do?”

“T don’t know, papa; I can’t make him like
what he don’t care for; can 1?”

“No; but yet I think you ought to see what
you can do. What do you think of trying to get
him to listen to these stories, and telling him why
we have talked over them? If I want to tempt
you to eat when you are not well, I put food
before you; don’t I?”

“Ves; but that doesn’t make me hungry, papa,’
answered Frank, quickly, ‘‘and when I am not
well, I hate the sight of it.”

His father smiled, and said, ‘‘ Well, and what
does this teach us?”

Frank did not know, and after puzzling a long
time he was obliged to own it. He looked at
Susy, however, and asked if she could guess.

’
Unsatisfied Hungerers. 127

“T think so,’ answered his sister. ‘‘ You mean,
papa—do you not?—that as it is God who gives
us our bodily health, and our appetite as one proof
and sign of it, so God alone can create this
spiritual hungering in us.”
me Yes; that is it,” replied Ber tather. ¢° We all
hunger or long for something, as Willy said to
Frank; but the right kind of hunger is the effect
of the working of God’s Holy Spirit. And, cer-
tainly, when any one has no taste for God’s Word,
he cannot know what this hungering after right-
eousness means. But don’t deceive yourself, my
boy. Remember that it is quite possible to like
Bible stories just as you would other stories. Ask
God to make you know your own heart, and what
it really longs for. And mind, if you truly begin
to hunger as the eunuch did, you will want others
to do so too; and though we cannot give another

person the feeling, yet God may take our words
128 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



and give them power which we have not to stir
the souls of those we love, so that they may run
to the living waters, and to the wine and milk
which may be had without money and without

price.”
CHAP LE 2.1.

PUL OUN:

ayO you think that papa will give me a Bible



wea lesson this evening?” Frank asked one
day as he was starting for a walk with his friend
Willy, who had been spending a day or two at
the Hall.

“Ves; I rather think he will,” replied Susy;
“at least I know that he intends to spend the
evening with us, and that he has no particular
engagement. So try to be back in good time,
Frankie; and don’t forget to leave the basket at
Mr Barlow’s on your way.” :

“Oh, that basket! I quite forgot it,” exclaimed
I
130 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

the boy. ‘“ What a plague that Mr Barlow is!
I’m sure I would never have watched him land if
I had known how he was going to bore me.”

“ What do you mean, Frank?” asked his sister,
gravely. ‘I don’t believe that Mr Barlow has
ever yet asked you to do a thing for him!”

‘Papa has for him, at any rate,” he returned
sulkily ; ‘‘ soit comes to the same thing. Besides,
it is particularly vexing to-day, because I wanted
to go exactly the other way ; and you know, Susy,
that Willy’s holidays are nearly over. Wouldn't
it do if I went to-morrow?”

“Tf you were ill, and had a bad appetite, and
some one had packed you some little dainties
which you could relish, but which would not be
improved by being kept packed up, how would
you like that plan?” asked his sister.

“Well, if I am late, you will know that it’s
because that stupid fellow kept me, as he always
Put Out. 131





does,” returned Frank. ‘“ But come along, Will;
I suppose it can’t be helped.”

And the two boys disappeared.

Mr Leslie came in about two hours afterwards ;
and in answer to his inquiries, Miss Leslie men-
tioned her brother’s disappointment, and said
that if her father had not so expressly desired
that Frank should take the basket, she should
have sent a servant with it. Voices were heard
in the hall at that moment, which prevented any
further explanation. The study door stood ajar ;
and those inside soon detected an angry and an
entreating tone.

‘Do, sir, if you please, look it over this once,
and I’ll take better care another time. I shall
lose my place—that I shall—if you tell the
master; and then father ll beat me, ’cause he’s
out o’ work himsel’, and can’t afford a-losing on

the money.”
132 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



“Well, and it will serve you right if he does,”
replied the angry voice. ‘“ Why didn’t you take
care to-day and not leave that gate open? If you
had, I shouldn’t have lost my chickens ; and it’s
the very best I had that are killed too, which
makes it all the more provoking. I shad/ tell

ze

papa, you may depend upon it;” and in burst
Frank, in a state of great indignation.

Mr Leslie heard his storyin silence, and then said
—‘ Very well, Frank. The boy is careless; and
as I told him lately that I should dismiss him the
next time such complaints came to my ears, you
may have the satisfaction of telling him that he
has lost his place.”

His papa’s face was very grave when he said
this; and there was something about him which
caused misgivings in Frank’s mind. So the boy
looked up to see if he could make his father out ;
and Susy, with her face full of pity, looked at
Put Ont Te



him too; but the expression did not change, and
Mr Leslie only added quietly—

“Jim is gone, no doubt, by this time; and
therefore, as we are ready, you may as well sit
down at once and take your Bible, reserving the
delivery of your message until the morning.”

Frank obeyed; and in a few minutes his fiery
tone and manner had disappeared, and he was
looking mortified and perplexed—why, perhaps
he would have been puzzled to tell; but so it was.

“J think it might be well to read the whole
chapter through to-day,” said his papa; and
Frank read it, as if glad of the respite from
thought and questioning.

But when it was done, no one seemed as much
inclined to talk as usual; and every one was so
silent, that the subject seemed likely to drop ;
when at length Mr Leslie said—

“ Susy, were you ever struck with the connexion
134 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



between the declarations and the promises in
these verses, and especially in the one we are con-
sidering to-day—‘ Blessed are the merciful; /or
they shall obtain mercy’ ?”

“Ves, papa,” she answered ; ‘“‘and I have been
puzzled too, sometimes; because it almost reads
as if we were to obtain mercy by being merciful—
as'a reward for it, lqmean.”

‘“Well, we know it can’t mean. that; because
we are told in so many other places that we never
can deserve any favour at God’s hand,” said her
father. ‘I think it is an instance of the very
strong and forcible way in which our Lord taught.
He did not think it necessary to be always guard-
ing Himself against the possibility of being mis-
understood ; but, perhaps, in order to force people
to attend and think, He stated things somewhat
in a way to make us start. If it is the merciful
who are to expect mercy, surely we ought to see
Put Out. 135



to it that we ave merciful. We should look at it
in that way; and now, Frank, see if you can tell
me the meaning of the word.”

“Oh! merciful,” repeated Frank; “I’m sure I
don’t know what to say; I thought everybody
knew what that meant. But I don’t know how to
explain it.”

“Then I’m afraid that you only half under-
stood it, at the best,” returned his father; “and
it is high time that you tried to get clearer ideas on
the subject. Come, think! We had the word merci-
ful in one of our very first talks on this passage.”

“Did we?” said’ teabey- Oh yes ;< L:re-
member. It was in the publican’s prayer, ‘God
be merciful to me, a sinner.’ ”

‘Well, when he said that, what did he mean?”
pursued Mr Leslie. ‘‘ What was he asking of
God ?”

“He wanted Him to forgive him, and not to
136 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

be angry with him, or punish him for his sins,”
Frank said.

“And when we say ‘Lord have mercy upon
us’ in church, we mean ‘have pity or compassion,’
don’t we?”

“Yes, papa.”

‘“‘ And when we read in the Psalm ‘for His mercy
endureth for ever,’ what do we understand? What
words could you put instead of mercy, Frank ?”

“ Kindness, goodness, compassion,” replied
‘Frank; “but I don’t think any word does well
instead of mercy; it seems to mean all those
things, and a good deal more too.”

‘Sometimes it includes the idea of forgive-
ness,” returned his father. ‘‘ And, indeed, when
we speak of God’s mercy to us, it always does ;
because, as we have all sinned against Him, we can
only deserve punishment. But it is not always
so when we speak of merciful men and women.
Put Out. 137



However, try to think of some instances of such
people spoken of in the Bible, and then you will
see what I mean.”

‘Tam to find some merciful people,” repeated
Frank, and then, after pondering for a few minutes,
he added, as usual, “ Oh! Susy, help me.”

“No, no, Frank,” returned his sister. ‘I’m
sure you can think of some people who were kind
to other people without my help.”

“Well, there was the good Samaritan,” said
the boy, after a minute. “Papa, will he do?”

“Certainly, Frank. He was very merciful to
the poor man who had been so ill-used by thieves,
and did not grudge a little trouble in order to do
him good. Some people do not mind throwing
a penny to a beggar, nay,—they even think them-
selves very good for doing so,—when they would
not like to give up a pleasure, or even goa dif-

ferent way for a walk, in order to help a poor
138 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



creature. But this man stopped on his journey,
and must have hindered himself a good deal by
all the trouble that he took to serve him.”

“Then there was Joseph,” exclaimed Frank
suddenly, as if for some reason or another he was
delighted to think of another instance. “I am
sure he was very kind to his brothers, though they
had treated him so abominably.” |

‘Ves, said his father: ‘that was'a case in
which the mercy was the same as God’s mercy to
us. I mean there was forgiveness mixed with
the kindness. His brothers deserved evil at his
hands; and, as governor of Egypt, Joseph might
easily have brought evil upon them ; but he chose
to forgive them, and show them kindness. I
think that is one of the most beautiful instances
in the Bible; but goon, and find me some more.”

“T can’t, papa,” said Frank after puzzling for
some time. ‘‘I can’t think of any more.”
Put Out. 139





‘Not of any!” returned his father. “ Well, I
am surprised at that; for you have only told me
of men yet. Are there no kind, good women
mentioned in the Bible?”

‘“‘T don’t know, papa; but, if there are, I can’t
think of any.”

“Very strange!” answered his father. ‘“ Why
there was one whose name has been associated
with one particular sort of good works ever since.
Her story is told us after the account of the first
persecution, not of the apostles, for they were very
soon molested, but of the churches of Judea,
Galilee, and Samaria.

“It was as soon as this ceased, and they had
rest, that ‘ Peter passed throughout all quarters ;’
that is, I suppose, he went on a sort ‘of visit-
ation journey to the congregations of Christians
scattered about, though he preached to others as
well, no doubt; for we are told that ‘all who
140 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



dwelt at Lydda and Saron turned to the
Lord.’

“Now, Frank, get your map and look for these
places, and you will see quite near them, only on
the coast, just where Judea and Samaria join, an-
other town called Joppa. Don’t you know any-
thing about that place?”

“Ol loyes, cried Frank, “Jonah got into a
ship there to go to Tarshish, when God told him
to go to Nineveh.”

“Ah! there you have a man again, but I am
thinking of a woman who once lived at Joppa,
and died there while Peter was at Lydda healing
Eneas and preaching to the people.

“She was a disciple, that is, a believer in
Jesus Christ, one of those who are also called
saints in another part of the chapter; and while
she lived she seems to have spent her time in
doing good to others. There were plenty of poor
Put Out. I4I



people then, as there are now everywhere, and
plenty of sick people too; and no doubt some of
those who had, like herself, become Christians,
lost their employment, and suffered in many ways
for so doing. So this good woman found plenty
to do; and we are told that she was ‘ full of good
works and alms deeds which she did.’ Now, her
work was not of a kind that cost her no trouble ;
for it was making clothes for poor people. There-
fore, you see, she must have sat stitching, stitching,
stitching, many a time when, I dare say, a walk
or rest would have been very pleasant ; but at last
she fell sick and died, and then, having been a good
friend to many, she had many to mourn for her.
“ But they did not only mourn. Hearing that
Peter was only as far away as Lydda, and that he
had just healed a man who had kept his bed for
eight years, they sent off two men to fetch him
without delay. And no sooner was Peter come,
142 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



than they took him up into the room where the
dead body lay, around which gathered also the
poor widows whom she had helped so kindly
whilst she was with them.
“There they all stood weeping, and showing
the nice clothes which the departed one had made.
“But Peter put them all out, and then knelt down
and prayed ; and afterwards, turning to the body,
he said, ‘Tabitha, arise. Immediately ‘she opened
her eyes, and when she saw Peter she sat up. Then
he gave her his hand, and lifted her up, and calling
back the saints and widows, presented her alive.’
“It was a sight to surprise them all, more than
any sight which they had ever seen in all their
lives ; and the news of it spread like wildfire, we
may be sure, and many believed in the Lord.”
‘Oh! yes; I remember that story now,’ said
Frank, “and it’s a very nice one, I think; but
hadn’t the woman another name ?”’







ae eee Ss



Pee 2 eee

i




Put Out. 143



“ Tabitha turned into Greek is Dorcas,” replied
his father; ‘‘and both the words mean a ‘roe.’
Perhaps you did not know that ladies’ meetings
to work for poor people are generally called
‘Dorcas meetings,’ after this good woman.”

‘No, I didn’t, papa; but I always think that
ladies who do that sort of thing must be very
good-natured. I know I should hate to sit work-
ing, as they do, of all things in the world ; and if
I did any needlework, I should like something
pretty.”

‘“ Happily, ladies’ tastes and boys’ tastes differ,”
returned his father, smiling ; ‘‘ but after all, Frank,
where is the mercy in the acts if we only do it to
please ourselves? I am sorry that our talk this
evening has not led you to a better conclusion.”

Frank coloured, and said in his usual ingenuous
way :

“Well, papa, I’m afraid I haven’t got much
144 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



mercy in my composition, or else I shouldn't have
done two things which I have done to-day.”

“ And pray, what are those things ?” asked his
papa.

‘Making a fuss about taking the basket to Mr
Barlow, and telling about Jim,” replied the boy,
getting still more red.

‘‘T am afraid so, too,” rejoined his father, very
gravely. For Mr Leslie, though glad to see this
open-hearted disposition in his boy, was by no
means satisfied with it; because he saw that
Frank was apt to be content with confessing his
faults, without making much effort to amend them.

“Remember, however,” he added with emphasis,
after a pause which his young son felt to be very
uncomfortable, “ that it is ‘the merciful who shall
obtain mercy.’ We are not told that any others
will ; and yet ‘without mercy none of us can see

3599.

salvation.
CHAPTER XII.

CONSCIENCE-STRICKEN.




ay LESLIE had occasion to leave home for
MAU] a week, the day after the conversation
related in our last chapter; and as Willy and his
mother left the Hill Farm to return to their own
home, Frank had to depend a good deal on his
own resources, whenever his sister was engaged ;
and sometimes he felt very dull, and almost
inclined to wish that his holidays were over too.
However, among other things which his papa had
left for him to do, there was the task of finding

some contrasts to the characters discussed at the
K
146 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

last Bible lesson; and I must give him credit for
taking unusual pains about this, though he sighed
a good deal as he turned over the leaves, as if in
despair of finding what he wanted.

“T hope you are not getting tired of that
chapter, and our talks over it,” his sister said, one
day when he seemed particularly restless.

“Oh! no, no—it’s not that at all; but .
Frank answered, and there he stopped ; nor could
even she extract the rest of the sentence from him.

At length Mr Leslie returned ; and on the very
same evening, he announced his readiness to
examine into the result of his boy’s studies.

“Oh, papa!” exclaimed Frank, somewhat in-
dignantly, “you couldn’t look at all, and hear
all, in one evening!”

“Tam glad to hear that,” returned his father,

smiling ; “and by all means begin with what you
prefer.”


Conscience-Stricken. 147

“T would rather have my Bible-lesson to-night,
and do the other things to-morrow, if you don’t
mind,” said Frank.

“Oh, no! I don’t mind atall. Indeed, I would
rather take that first, provided you have got
anything to tell me; only, I don’t like you to come
to me, as you did last time, without having
thought anything about it.”

“T have thought this time,” said the boy, in a
way which seemed to say, “and I know you'll
be pleased with me’”—at which his sister looked
surprised ; but she said nothing.

“Very well; then fetch your Bible,” Mr Leslie
said ; and off went Frank to get it.

He speedily returned; and opening the book,
he took out a slip of paper on which he had made
some notes, and then, turning to the ninth chapter
of Judges, said eagerly—

‘Now, papa, here’s a man that was as good an
148 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

unmerciful man as you could find anywhere. I
wonder whether you have thought of him! I
hope you haven't!”

“T don’t know that I ever saw a good unmerci-
ful man,” his father answered. ‘‘ What sort of
person may he be?”

)

“Oh! you know what I mean,” cried Frank;
‘and now please, papa, guess.”

“Oh, no! I might guess so long that it would
waste our time,” replied his father. ‘“ You had
better tell me; only, I should like to know, first,
whether you thought of the history yourself? ”

“Indeed I did; and nobody helped me this
time, papa. I was almost in despair at first, and
~ then I found two or three; but this one that I am
going to tell you now is the best—for what you
want, I mean—because he was such a horribly
cruel creature.”

‘How did he show his cruelty?”
Conscience-Stricken. 149



“Oh! in several ways, papa; but I’ll tell you
about him;” and Frank closed the book, only
keeping his finger in the place.

“You know all about Gideon, and how he
conquered the Midianites with only three hundred
men ; don’t you?”

“Ves, I think 1 do,” answered his father:
“indeed, some six years ago, I believe I taught
you his history.” —

“Well, papa, it isn’t about him, but about his
son, Abimelech, that I am thinking; and I don’t
much believe that his is one of the vegular Bible
stories.”

‘Perhaps not,” Mr Leslie said. ‘Therefore,
let me see if you can tell it nicely.”

‘He wanted to rule over the people, and be a
judge, as his father, Gideon, had been,” Frank
began ; ‘‘ but he had seventy brothers, who all had
as good a right, if not a better one, than himself; so
150 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



they stood in his way. Still, he was quite deter-
mined; and it seems he didn’t care who was
killed, so long as he became a great man.
I think he cared for himself and for nobody
else in the world. He was the most selfish
creature |”

“Well, well, keep your indignation until you
have finished your story, and told me what he
did,” interposed his father. ‘ You are beginning
at the wrong end.”

‘“‘T can’t help it, papa, because I feel so angry
with him ; but this is what he did. He went up
to Shechem, where his mother’s family lived, and
asked the people whether they would rather have
seventy rulers or one? and whether they wouldn't
rather have him, who was their own relation, than
any others. And they actually chose him, and
gave him some money, and helped to kill all his
brothers. At least they killed all but one—that
Conscience-Stricken. I51



was Jotham, the youngest; and he hid himself.
But when he heard that the men of Shechem had
made Abimelech king, then he climbed on to the
top of a mountain, and spoke a parable to them
about the trees choosing a king, and how the olive,
and the fig-tree, and the vine all refused, but the
bramble agreed to be the king; only, it said, if they
would not trust it, then fire was to come out of it
and burn up the cedars of Lebanon. I suppose
by the cedars he meant the men of Shechem, be-
cause afterwards, when he explained it, he said
that if they had dealt truly with his father, they
should rejoice in Abimelech ; but if not, he said,
‘Let fire come out of Abimelech and devour the
men of Shechem, and the house of Millo; and
let fire come out from the men of Shechem, and
from the house of Millo, and devour Abimelech.’
Papa, how strangely that came true. It was only
three years before the men of Shechem turned
152 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

against Abimelech, and made Gaal their ruler ;

and then when Abimelech came back and chased

them, he conquered and destroyed the city, and

sowed it with salt. But many of the people got

into the hold of an idol’s house. So the cruel fellow

cut down boughs, and made all the people that

followed him do the same. They put the boughs
close to the hold, and set fire to them; and a

thousand people were burned to death. And they

were the men of Shechem who once took his part,

and helped him kill his brothers; so it was just

what they deserved ; only Ze had no business to_
punish them.

‘‘T suppose he was very pleased, though, for
afterwards he tried to do the same thing to people
in another tower ; but there a woman threw a piece
of millstone on him to break his skull; and because
he wouldn’t have people say that a woman killed
him, he told his armour-bearer to thrust him


Conscience-Stricken. 153



through with his sword ; so he died, and the other
part of Jotham’s curse came true.”

“And the unmerciful man was_ punished,”
added Mr Leslie.

“Yes; just as he deserved,” said Frank ; “ and
I don’t knowwhether it’s wrong, but I should have
been very sorry if he had got off.”

‘“ Do you think that Abimelech began life with as
cruel a heart as he had at last?” asked his father.

“Oh! I should hope not,” cried Frank. ‘ What
a boy he would have been!”

‘‘T should think, however, that he was known
asa cruel boy ; and just as the cruel emperor Nero
is said as a boy to have taken delight in killing
flies, no doubt Abimelech showed that he would
stick at nothing to serve himself. I don't
mean to say that the two were just alike ; for we
don’t hear that Abimelech actually took pleasure
in the sight of pain—though we do see that he
154 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

had no mercy on those who offended him ; but, as
boys, I should say, both showed the beginnings
of the wickedness which afterwards distinguished
them. And, perhaps, Frank, these beginnings
were laughed at and made light of. Perhaps their
friends said that they were only like all boys.
Perhaps they thought themselves no worse than
others. That is the way that evil grows. See
what comes of putting oneself first, and loving
one’s own pleasure best. And see what comes too
of not being able to forgive an injury.”

“Yes, papa,” said Frank, looking down.

“But what are your other examples ?” continued
his father.

“Why, papa,” said Frank, “there was Pharaoh,
having all the baby boys drowned.”

“‘ Because they stood in his way,” said his papa.
“If they had all lived he thought the Israelites
would have grown too strong for him.”
Conuscience-Stricken. bes



“Yes; and then how he tried to work the men
to death,” Frank went on. ‘I think he was very
unmerciful. And then, you know, there was King
Saul, how very unkind and cruel he was to David!
And the rich man in the parable, who let the
beggar die at his own gate. Just think of his going
in and out and seeing the poor creature so ill and
never having him taken care of!”

“Tt would have been too much trouble, and cost
too much money,” said his father. ‘‘ Besides, |
suppose he thought, like a good many other people,
‘what was the beggar to him ?’”

“Oh, papa!” said Frank, in a desponding tone,
“I know you mean me; you always do.”

“I did not name any one, my boy; but ‘if the
cap fits,’ by all means put it on.”

“Tam afraid to tell you any more, papa.”

“What! had you found any more? You must
have looked well into this matter, Frank.”
156 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

“Ves; I have thought a good deal about it,
papa ; and I found one other in the Old Testament
and one in the New. The one in the Old is in
the first chapter of Judges. I mean Adoni-bezek,
the king who cut off the thumbs and great toes
of seventy kings, and got served the same him-
self. And the one in the New Testament is in the
parable of the cruel servant, in the eighteenth of
Matthew.”

“You mean the man who would not forgive
his fellow-servant a small sum of two or three
pounds, when he himself had been forgiven not
much less than two millions?”

‘‘A hundred pence and a hundred talents,” said
Frank. ‘Is that what they are in our money,
papa?”

“Ves; and don’t you think they picture to us
a little our debt to God, and our fellow-creatures’
debts to us? Two millions of pounds is a larger
Conscience-Stricken. 157

sum than you can think of. It would be an
enormous heap of sovereigns; and if we put three
pounds beside it, how very small they would look!
Soit is with us. We forget how altogether be-
yond reckoning is our debt of service to God,
and think so much of any little injury which we
may have suffered from any fellow-creature !”

Frank thought of the loss of his chickens, and
was silent. But as it was always difficult to him
to keep anything to himself which was on his
mind, his papa did not ask any questions, knowing
that he should soon be taken into his confidence.

Nor was he mistaken.

“Papa,” said Frank, ‘I hope you won't mind,
but I didn’t say anything to Jim about his losing
his place; and as he doesn’t know that I have
told you, could you let him try a little longer ; and
perhaps he won’t be so careless again?”

“T can only do that on condition that you do
158 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



tell him, and say that you afterwards begged him
off,” said Mr Leslie, gravely; and his young son
sighed as he said, ‘‘ Then I suppose I must; but
it won’t be pleasant.”

However, he soon brightened up again, and
added—

“IT went to see Mr Barlow twice while you
were away, papa, and took him some of my most
amusing books to read ; only, I didn’t tell Susy,
because she always says I can’t keep a secret.
And Mr Barlow lent me a book, which I like
very much. I'll go and fetch it, to show you.”

And off ran the boy, with a lighter heart than
he had carried about for a week past.
CHAPTER ATL

EARNEST WORK.



yy RANK had now two acknowledged helpers
S$ in his work of preparing for his Bible-
feesohis with his papa—namely, his sister and Dick
Benson. The work itself, too, was a thoroughly
recognised business, and one in which he took a
good deal of pleasure. There was no set time for
it, or set way of doing it ; but he was getting quite
to feel that his father would be hurt and displeased
if he: failed to. think over, and, as he ealiedsit,
puzzle out, the meaning of each verse as it came in
turn, though, at the same time, he knew that he
did not mind his getting help
160 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

A week was to elapse before the next conversa-
tion; and Frank wanted to be as well prepared,
and to get as much credit, as on the last occasion.
So, having exhausted his own resources, and find-
ing his sister very busy with several sick people.
whom she had taken under her care, he started off
one morning to find his other counsellor, Dick ;
and, after some difficulty, he found him resting
under a hedge during the dinner-hour.

“Well, Master Leslie! Now I hope you have
got some’at to tell me; for I 've been a-thinking
o that new verse o’ yours; and the more I think,
the deeper it do seem to go,” said Dick.

“ Indeed, I haven’t,” cried Frank; “and I am
sorry to hear you say that, because I hoped that
you were going to help me. But isn’t it strange
how things that seem hard at first often turn out
to be very easy to understand when you look close
at them ; and other things that you thought quite
Frarnest Work. 161

easy, get harder and harder the more you try to
understand them. I never thought I didn’t know
what ‘pure in heart’ meant, until the day before
yesterday.”

‘Ah! well, never you be out of heart, young -
master,” returned Dick. “It’s good sometimes
to be made to dig deep; for treasures are most
times hidden. So, may be, you’ll find more in
these three little words than ever you dreamt of.
What say ye to digging a bit together now?
Here’s my way-book;” and he pulled an old,
worn Bible out of his pocket.

‘That ’s just what I wanted to do,” said Frank :
“and now, Dick, can you make out who will ever
get this blessing ? ”

‘““Or where the ‘ pure in heart’ are to be found ;
That’s what I take it you mean, Master Frank,”
replied Dick.

“Yes; because every one’s heart is bad and
%
162 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

wicked,” Frank said. ‘Don’t you know how it
says, somewhere, that ‘ the heart is deceitful above
all things, and desperately wicked ?’”

“That’s in Jeremiah xvii. 9,” answered Dick;
“and there’s another to match it in the seventh of
St Mark, and the twenty-first to twenty-third
verses. But now, young master, depend on'’t,
it’ll never answer to hammer away too long on
one nail. You’ve been thinking, and so have I,
for the matter o’ that, ‘ Here’s one thing proved,
and certain; therefore, the notion of this other
thing, being the direct contrary, is impossible.’
But this sort 0 reasoning won’t stand; and we
know it, both of us; because the blessed Lord
Jesus would never have talked of a good which
nobody could have. So I say, let’s look a little
further, and see that we’re quite sure He meant
just what we thought by ‘pure in heart.’ You
can read, Master Frank, though I can’t; and
Earnest Work. 163

you know, by the marks at the side of the pages,
we can find some other places where we get the
same word.”

“There are three references,” said Frank, after
looking them out; “ but only one of them has got
‘pure’ init. That’s in the twenty-fourth Psalm,
and the fourth verse :—‘ He that hath clean hands,
and a gure heart, who hath not lifted up his soul
unto vanity, nor sworn deceitfully.’”

“Ah!” cried Dick, ‘‘ and that’s the man who
‘shall ascend into the hill of the Lord, and stand
in His holy place;’ so it is, to be sure!”

“But, Dick,” said Frank, ‘if you can’t read,
how can you tell just where verses are, and what
comes before them, as you do?”

“Well, you see,” returned Dick, “I always
carries this blessed Book along with me, and gets
one and another to read a bit; and I couldn’t tell
them where to find what I wanted, unless so be I
164. Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

knew chapter and verse. So I be just obliged to
store them up.”

‘And do you think this verse helps?” Frank
asked.

‘Yes, I do; but let us go back further first, and
come to it again. I’m thinking of the old law of
Moses, and of the things used in the services of the
Tabernacle. There was to be pure olive oil, and a
ure candlestick ; and I take it that about the oil it
means, not mixed, all of one sort, and good; and
that the candlestick was to be the same—all of pure
gold, not mixed with any other kind of metal.”

‘‘So it seems to mean unmixed in these places,
doesn’t it?” said Frank.

‘Unmixed and good,” returned Dick; “but
now, Master Frank, will you please to look in
another place, somewhere about the middle of the
Book of Ezra; for I believethere is something there
about them that were Juve keeping the passover.”
Ltarnest Work. 165

‘Yes, here it is, in the sixth chapter,|and
nineteenth and twentieth verses,’ said Frank,
after searching for some time; ‘“ ‘And the children
of the captivity kept the passover upon the
fourteenth day of the first month. For the priests
and Levites were purified together, all of them
were pure, and killed the passover for all the
children of the captivity.” But I wonder what
‘purified’ means, Dick; do you know?”

“Yes; it means in a fit state to take part ina
feast or sacrifice,” said Dick. ‘ Don’t you know
that if a man had been near a dead body, for one
thing, he was not reckoned fit; he was counted
unclean, which is the same as not pure, until he
had washed himself and his clothes. People who
had kept away from everything evil, and had gone
through the regular washings, were counted clean
or pure, and the others were counted unclean and
impure.”
166 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



‘So ‘clean’ isanother meaning,” said Frank; “and
there isa verse which says, ‘Create in me a clean
heart, O God, and renew a right spirit within me.’ ”

Just then there was arustling behind the hedge,
and some one made his way through an opening
in it. Frank turned at the noise, and instantly
cried, “‘ Papa! ah, have you been listening ?”

“No,” answered his father smiling, ‘‘ I never
do such mean things ; but I couldn’t help hearing
your last words. I hope you don’t mind that.”

“Not a bit, sir,’ returned Dick; and then
between them they related the subject of the
conversation. _

“Well, and what conclusion have you come to
after all your cogitations?” asked Mr Leslie.”

‘“May be I’m not right,” said Dick; “ but it
seemed to me somehow as if the Lord Jesus
intended those who ‘set their faces like a flint,’

as the Book says, against all sorts of evil, and
Ecarnest Work. 167

who try to drive back the wicked thoughts, and
walk only in the way of the Lord. And if I bean’t
very wrong, there’s a great difference in true
Christians; and some much more than others
seem to shrink from the least bit of evil, and try
to keep themselves as clean and pure as if they
were always going to a feast.”

“ Let us all try to be of that sort, since each of
us has an invitation toa grander feast than any that
has ever yet taken place,” Mr Leslie said ; “ and
now, Frank,” he added, ‘‘ we must be going. Iam
sorry to interrupt your pleasant chat ; but just now
both of us are wanted at home. Good-bye, Dick.”

“ Papa,” said Frank, after they had walked in
silence a few minutes, “who would you say was a
good pattern of a man who was pure in heart? I
can’t think of one that I exactly like.”

“What is your difficulty ?” asked his father.

“Why, papa, most of the good people did such
168 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.







strange things at some part of their lives; and
though I suppose they were sorry afterwards, and
got better and better, yet I don’t like to pick any
of them out for this.”

“There are some though of whose faults we
hear nothing,” replied his father ; “for instance,
Nehemiah, Isaiah, and Jeremiah. Certainly, we
know but little of the lives of the two last. It is
their sayings rather than their doings which are
recorded. But there is another prophet whom we
seem to know very well, for the book which con-
tains his prophecies also describes his conduct on
several most trying occasions; and it gives me
the idea of a remarkably pure-minded person.”

Frank began to think; but, as he was appar-
ently at a loss on whom to fix, his papa added—

‘We hear first about him in early youth, when
he and some of his companions are spoken of as
children.”
Earnest Work. 169

Frank pressed his hands on his forehead, and
then suddenly exclaimed—

“Daniel! papa; you mean Daniel, don’t you?”

“Yes; you have guessed rightly,” answered Mr
Leslie; ‘‘and now see if you can remember what
is the first thing that we read about him?”

“T know,” said Frank. ‘When he was taken
to Babylon, he made up his mind that he would
not eat any of the king’s meat; but, papa, why
wouldn’t he eat it?”

“He would not defile himself with it; that is
what is said. And the reason was, because
amongst the king’s meat there was sure to be
things forbidden to Jews. Many kinds of animals,
remember, were reckoned unclean to them, which
Gentiles constantly eat, and even those which
were clean had to be killed in a particular way.
Besides, the food would often have been offered
to idols, no doubt.
170 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



‘““There are many persons who very easily yield
to the difficulties into which certain positions
bring them, and excuse themselves from doing
what is right on the ground that the people
amongst whom they live think differently, and
would be offended by upright conduct, or even
mock at it; but, you see, Daniel was not one of
this sort. His way was to act as his conscience
told him to act, and leave the consequences to his
God. So he asked for pulse instead of all the
pleasant morsels which he might have had.”

‘‘ And what is pulse, papa?”

“It was made from different plants of the pea
kind,” answered his father; “and I suppose he
chose that because he felt safe about it; but I
don’t think that many boys would have had cour-
age to go on with such plain food when dainties
were constantly before them.”

‘He must have got very tired of it, I should
Earnest Work. £71



think,” Frank said. “ But God helped him, by
making him and his friends get fat upon it.”

“And that strengthened his faith for the next
trouble,” said his father,—“ that great fright which
they must have had, when all the wise men were
to be killed, because they could not tell the king’s
dream. Then it was that he began to explain
visions. You remember that one about the image
that represented the four great empires, which the
king saw in his dream. Then there was the other
about the tree, which set forth Nebuchadnezzar’s
madness.”

“Yes; and then his telling Belshazzar about
the Hand and the writing on the wall,” Frank
said ; “ and what came next, papa? I wish I had
my Bible here.”

“ The next thing was his being thrown into the
lions’ den, because he would go on praying to his
God ; by which we see that he had not only begun
172 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

well, but was still keeping true to his faith. And
after that he had other dreams and visions
himself—wonderful visions of what was to happen
on this earth from that time to the end of the
world ;—about the coming of Jesus, first to die
and afterwards to reign ;—and about the troubles
that should come on the Jews, and the ruin of
their Temple,as well as about the spread of Christ’s
kingdom, the resurrection, and the judgment.”

“Did he learn about all those things, papa?”
said Frank, in amazement. ‘‘And did God ever
tell anyone else as much about what was going
to happen ?”

“There were very few who had such visions,”
Mr Leslie answered, “and all who had seem to
have been very holy men. Think of Isaiah, for
instance, and St John, who saw all that is told in
the Revelations. Among ordinary Christians, it
is those who live the most godly lives who enjoy


THE ANGEL AND DANIEL.






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Earnest Work. 173

most of God’s presence; so it is not surprising
that He showed special favour in old times to
those who strove most to be pure in heart.
‘Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see
God,’ was our Lord’s declaration ; and the verse
which you and Dick talked over out of the twenty-
fourth Psalm has much the same meaning. Yet,
for all that, remember that Daniel, and Isaiah, and
St John, and all the other holy men of old, had
sinful hearts like our own; but then they had a
new nature as well, and this new nature was
minded to shun evil and fear God, and was very

much in earnest in ‘crucifying the old man,’ as
St Paul called those evil hearts with which we
are all born.”

“Thank you, papa,” said Frank, “ I understand
my verse now much better. And here we are at
home, and Susy waiting on the steps.”
CHAPTER Aly:

A WARNING.

VOMEBODY just the very opposite of
| Daniel,” repeated Frank to himself, two



or free times over, as he paced round and round
the garden, with his Bible in his hand, on the
Sunday following that walk home with his papa.
“T can’t think who to settle upon.”

But though he spoke to himself, the words
were uttered aloud, and a voice which he well
knew said gently—

‘Come in here, and let me see if I can help you.”

‘Oh, I didn’t know you were there, Susy!”
A Warning. 175



he exclaimed, starting; “but I wish you would
help me, for I can’t get this out of my head, and
yet I cannot find it out.”

“Here comes papa; let us take him into our
counsel,” she said; ‘and if we say that you have
tried hard without success, he will not mind help-
ing you.”

“ And so you cannot think of a wicked person.
What ! are they grown scarceagain?” Mr Leslie
said, as he seated himself in the summer-house,
and drew his boy to him.

“Oh, no!” returned Frank, decidedly; ‘‘ there
are plenty of them; but you see I want one of a
particular sort. And yet I don’t know; for aren't
all wicked persons impure in heart?”

“Yes, certainly they are,” his papa said; “ and
yet I agree with you, and should not choose Cain,
for instance, or Absalom, to contrast with Daniel:
because we think of one as a murderer, and the
176 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



other as a rebel. It seems to me that it would be
better to select some man or woman who made a
fair profession, but was not what he seemed to be.”

‘“That is a hypocrite,” said Frank. ‘‘I see.
Daniel did make a profession, because three times
a day he prayed to his God, so that other people
could see him; but then he meant what he said,
and didn’t say one thing and do another. He
wasn't a mixed sort of person; was he, papa?”

“IT don’t understand you, my boy.”

“Why, Dick talked about the pure, unmixed
oil, and the pure gold candlestick, in the Taber-
nacle; and I thought Daniel was like those—all
of one stuff, and not mixed.”

“T see,” his father said; ‘“‘and so now we have
to think of people who were mixed, and had
faces of one sort of stuff and hearts of another,
if one may so speak. Very well; let us all set to

work.”
A Warning. ivy.

‘What do you say to Ananias and Sapphira,
papa?” said Miss Leslie.

‘“‘Oh, I never thought of them!” cried Frank.
“They will do, won’t they? because Peter told
them they had been telling a lie; and I remember
once you said that you had no doubt that they
wished to pass for very self-denying people, when
they were as selfish as ever they could be.”

“Ves, my boy; and yet I believe that they
must have deceived themselves first, before they
got to the point of planning that plot. The heart
is deceitful above all things, as well as desperately
wicked ; and the example of these two people just
serves to show what any one may come to who
trusts his own heart, and does not seek the grace
of God. We do not know how long Ananias and
Sapphira had been numbered among the followers
of Christ; it may have been only a short time;

but it is plain that they wanted to be foremost in
M
-178 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

the new sect. Can you not think of some one
else, who for a considerable time kept company,
not only with the disciples, but with Christ him-
self, and yet at last proved a traitor?”

“Judas Iscariot! you mean him, don’t you,
papa? Oh! yes; he was the very, very opposite
to Daniel—that he was! I should think he was
just the worst man who ever lived.”

“And yet I suppose that all that time, while he
went about hearing the Saviour teach, and being .
taught himself by Him—seeing His acts of love
and mercy, and the proofs of His godhead—while
he was treated by Him as a friend, he passed
among his fellow-apostles for a good man,” Mr
Leslie replied.

“Then how he must have kept his wickedness
in!” cried Frank. ‘Papa, the more I think
about him, the more I think what a wretch that
Judas must have been!”
A Warning. 179

‘“‘T don’t wonder ; but indignation was not just
the feeling that I was trying to excite in your
breast, my boy. You should seek to get a lesson
for yourself from each of the characters that we
talk about ; and I want Judas to serve as a warn-
ing. We are not told what led him to follow
Christ in the first instance, but most probably he
made himself believe that it was a good motive.
If he had looked into his own heart, and prayed,
as the Psalmist did, that God would search him
and try him, and see if there were any way of
wickedness in him, he would have found out the
truth. But instead of that, he let Satan lead him
captive as he pleased, and gave way to his great
sin, the love of money, until he was even capable
of selling his Master for a few pieces of silver.”

‘And then repented, when it was too late and
of no use,” added Frank.

“Ah! it was not real godly repentance,” said
180 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

his father. ‘‘If it had been, it would not have
been too late for his own salvation, and he would
not have gone and hanged himself. St Matthew
says that he repented himself when he saw that
he was condemned ; from which I gather that the
wretched man did not suppose it would have
gone so far, but thought that Jesus would work
a miracle to save Himself. I daresay he thought
to get the money, and make all right afterwards.
He did not wish for Christ’s death, as the priests
did ; he only wanted the money; and my belief
is, that up to the last he had felt a sort of regard
for the Saviour. But his heart was not pure ; he
had never been a sincere disciple, and had tried
to serve God and mammon ; and this was the end
of it.”

‘But, papa, if he was sorry, why didn’t he
repent really and truly ; and then, perhaps, Jesus
would have forgiven him as He did Peter?”


THE REMORSE OF JUDAS.


A Warning. 181

‘Because he could not,” answered Mr Leslie,
solemnly. ‘ Repentance is God’s gift, Frank ;
and if people put off repenting to-day, they may
have no power to do so to-morrow. Remember
this, and take warning in time.”

‘“‘T don’t understand,” said Frank. ‘I thought
that people could always repent if they chose.”

‘So do most of the world; and that is why so
many choose the broad road,” his papa replied.
‘“ They don’t mean always to walk in it ; they mean
to turn some day, just at last, when they are dying
perhaps. But God will not be mocked. He gave
His own Son for us ; and, if we think that the fag
end of life is enough to offer in return, most likely
we Shall find that it is not ours togive. It will not
do either to put off, or to be half God’s and half
the devil’s servants. We should make up our
minds to-day, and then try to be all for Christ,
and to serve Him with a pure mind.”
CHAPTER XV.
A PRACTICAL DIFFICULTY.

Keeani USY,” said Frank, one day, “don’t you

SS) think it is very ridiculous of Willy? He
used to be so fond of that fellow, Stephen Morris ;
and now he will hardly speak to him.”

“Why not?” asked Miss Leslie. “What has
caused a quarrel between the schoolfellows ?”

“Oh! I hardly know, I’m sure: because Stevy
got the first prize last half, and Willy thought he
ought to have had it, or something of that sort.
It’s Stevy’s fault as much as Willy’s, they say’
but anyhow it’s absurd, and neither of them


A Practical Difficulty. 183

get on so well as they used to do. I wish they
would make it up, for it was better for every one
when those two were good friends.”

Frank attended the same school as his friend
did now, only he came home on Saturday after-
noon, and did not go back until Monday morning.

‘Why do not you try to bring about a recon-
ciliation ?” his sister inquired.

“Well, I have tried yesterday and to-day too,”
Frank said, colouring a little; “ for while I was
looking over that verse about the peacemakers for
papa, it came into my head that perhaps I ought ;
but it doesn’t seem of any use. Willy says I take
Stevy’s part, and Stevy says I like Willy better
than him; and so they won't listen to me.”

‘Never mind, Franky; we must never ‘be
weary of well-doing,’ you know the Bible says. If
I were you, I would try to be as kind as I could
to both of them ; and then perhaps they may listen
184 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



another day if they won't to-day. It would be
very nice if you could make peace between them ;
wouldn’t it?”

‘‘And pray, who may the people be who have
fallen out?” Mr Leslie inquired, as he at that
moment entered the room.

“Oh, papa!” Frank exclaimed, “I declare you
nearly always happen to come in just at the very
moment that we want you!”

‘“ How very fortunate!” said his father, smil-
ing at the boy’s eagerness; “and why was my
presence so desirable just now?”

In reply, Frank entered into a full explanation
of his difficulties at school, to which his papa
listened most patiently, and then they consulted
together over various little plans which they hoped
might possibly produce a good effect.

This was the way in which Mr Leslie won his
boy’s confidence. Nothing was regarded as small
A Practical Difficulty. 185



by him merely because it was boyish. If it was
a real trouble or difficulty to Frank, it was real to
his father too; and thus the boy learnt to look on
him as his best and wisest friend.

“T was thinking papa, to-day,” said Frank,
when this little matter was pretty well settled,
‘about a text out of St James that I had to learn
a good while ago, ‘The wisdom that cometh from
above is first pure, then peaceable.’ It is just the
same order, you see, as in the verses I’m doing
now. It was the ‘pure in heart’ last time; and
now we have got the peacemakers.”

‘‘Yes; and have you found many peacemakers
for me?” his father asked.

‘No, papa; only two. There are lots of peace-
able people in the Bible; but I can’t find many
peacemakers.” :

‘“ Well, who are the two?” said Mr Leslie.

“ First, there was Abraham,” replied Frank.
186 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

‘Don’t you remember, papa, when his herdsmen
and the herdsmen of Lot got quarrelling, Abraham
said that he thought they had better separate, be-
cause relations shouldn’t quarrel; and he let Lot
have the choice, and did everything he could to
keep peace?”

“Yes; that is a very good example, my boy.
And what is the other ?”

‘Moses, papa; but he didn’t seem to succeed
any better than I do between Willy and Stephen,
which is rather a comfort to me; because, as he
was the meekest man in the world, I expect he
didn’t fail because he spoke hastily.”

“‘ But you haven’t told me the occasion to which
you allude,” Mr Leslie said.

‘Oh! but Iam sure you know, papa. It was
when he saw two Hebrews fighting, and tried to
get them to leave off. He thought they would
listen to him, because he was to be their leader


>
MOSES & THE TWO ISRAELITES.
A Practical Difficulty. 187

and deliverer; but they wouldn’t. They only asked
who made him a prince and a judge, and went
and told Pharaoh how he had killed an Egyptian
who was hurting a Hebrew,—at least I suppose
they told; for he heard; and Moses had to run
away to Midian.”

“Tt does not follow though that they told,” his
father said. ‘‘The king might have heard without
that. And if you want to live peaceably, Franky,
never take such a thing for granted. Quarrels
often grow worse and more bitter, because the
injured person chooses to think that his enemy
causes all his misfortunes.”

“Ves; I know,” Frank said. ‘ At least Willy
is always setting down every scrape he gets into
to Stevy’s ill-nature; and yet I don’t believe
Stephen is half so bad as he thinks. But, do you
know, papa, whenever I speak, even Willy often
says, ‘ Now, don’t put in your word, Frank. It’s
188 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

no business of yours.’ That's something like
what they said to Moses ; isn’t it?”

“Ah, Frank!” said his papa, “there was a
greater Peacemaker than even Moses, who was
treated far worse than that; and you must try
and follow His example, and bear these angry
words with meekness.”

“Do you mean Jesus Christ?” asked Frank,
looking up in surprise. ‘I never thought about
His being a peacemaker, papa.”

“ And yet He is called ‘ The Prince of Peace ;’
and at His birth the angel proclaimed ‘ Peace on
earth,” his father answered.

“T thought that was because He was so meek
and gentle, and because He taught people to be
kind, papa.”

‘““What! and did Jesus only come down from
heaven to teach people to love one another?” his
father said.
A Practical Difficulty. 189

‘“Oh, no! of course He came to die for sinners,”
answered Frank, quickly.

‘Yes, in order to make peace between God and
man—between the King and His subjects ;” and
Mr Leslie was going on, but Frank broke in with—

‘Papa, this is what I can’t understand: the
Bible says that ‘God so loved the world that He
gave His only-begotten Son’ to die; but why
need Jesus have died ?—why couldn’t God have
forgiven sinners without that, just as you tell me
I ought to forgive people who do anything that I
don’t like?”

“As to understanding, Frank, we should
always remember how unlikely it is that we poor
sinners should be able to take in everything
about the great God’s way of saving us. We
cannot expect todo so. But surely you can see
a great difference between your forgiveness of
any of your acquaintance and God’s forgiveness
190 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

of sinners. Why, God is the Ruler of the universe !
What would happen if He let His laws be trampled
on and disobeyed? What would happen if any
king or judge allowed people to do so?”

“T never thought of that,” said Frank.

“ And you must never think of God as a cruel,
vindictive Being, my boy. If He had been, He
would just have left us all to perish, and never
contrived this wonderful plan of salvation at all.
But sin is a barrier between Him and us; and in
order to reconcile God and His creatures, Jesus
Christ came to be ‘wounded for our transgres-
sions and bruised for our iniquities. The chastise-
ment of our peace was laid on Him.’ So you see
why I have called Him the great Peacemaker.”

‘The verse says: ‘Blessed are the peace-
makers, for they shall be called the children of
God,” remarked Frank, thoughtfully. ‘I sup-
pose that is because they are like God.”
A Practical Difficulty. IgI

“T think so, too,” replied his father. “ ‘God
commendeth His love towards us, in that, while
we were yet sinners, Christ died for us;’ so you
see it was the Great Being who was offended who
first sought for peace; not we, who are the
offenders; and now, if we are or wish to be
children of God, we should always try to be
peacemakers.
CHAPTER XVI.

FIREBRANDS.

RUA LLIAT ’S the matter, Susy? you look as if
you had just heard of an earthquake, or



some news quite as dreadful. Don’t you know
that to-morrow is my birthday, and we are to have
great fun!”

“T hadn’t forgotten, dear ; nor have I forgotten
to order you a plum-pudding and a large cake to
take to your schoolfellows when you go back to
school,” returned Miss Leslie, brightening up.
“And I am sorry,” she added, “to have met you
with a gloomy face; but really I have been sadly
Fiurebrands. 193

vexed and troubled by what I heard at the Grange
this afternoon, though the news did not affect my
own safety or welfare; and I think you will be
sorry, too, to hear what I have to tell.”

“Why, what is it?” asked Frank.

“That second boy, Freddy, is such a terrible
plague that he has to be sent away from home,
and Mrs Taylor and Ellen are in such trouble
about it !”

“Fred!” repeated Frank ; “why, I thought he
was getting on better. It’s a shame to send him
away! He is such a good hand at cricket. I
don’t know what they will do without him.”

“Tt seems clear that the family will do better
without him, for he keeps them all in. perpetual
hot water, and is never content unless a quarrel is
going on. Even Mrs Taylor herself allows this ;
and Mr Taylor says that he will not have this

sort of thing, and that it must be stopped in time,
N
194 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



or else his children will all get into the same
way, and grow up nourishing all sorts of feuds,
which will keep them from ever being good friends.
So Fred is going to be sent off to farm or keep
sheep in Australia, and, with his quarrelsome dis-
position, it will not certainly be very surprising if
he gets into some of the scrapes which his poor
mother pictures to herself. I feel so sorry for
her ; though I am sure that the father is right in
his decision.”

“Oh! I know that it was never easy to keep
quiet when Fred was with you,” remarked Frank,
with a wise shake of the head. ‘‘I recollect
how it used to be when I was staying there
when I was little. He was always teasing
somebody, or telling tales of somebody. They
were quiet enough when he was out of the
way; but the moment he came, some rows
began.”
Fiuvebrands. 195



‘““*A froward man stirreth up strife, and a
whisperer separateth chief friends.’ Do you
remember that verse, Franky ?”

“Ves: it’s in. the Proverbs; isn’t it?” ome
answered; “and Susy, I have got to find some
people of that sort out of the Bible for papa, you
know ; and I’m sure if I could only find one or
two like Fred Taylor, they would just do for war-
makers—opposites to peacemakers, I mean. But
what can it be that makes some people like to be
so disagreeable ? ”

“ They are froward, Franky ; that is, they will
have their own way. They do not think about
the law of love. They do not consider other
people, or other people’s happiness at all, but only
think of themselves.”

“TJ think Napoleon Buonaparte was something
like that, then,” said Frank, who happened just
to have been reading his history. ‘‘ His wars all
196 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



seemed to be for his own honour and glory; and
he didn’t seem to care how many fellows were
killed, so long as people called him a great
man.”

“And there is another kind of war-makers, as
you call them, Franky. I mean those evil-minded
people who hate those who are better than
themselves. Can’t you think of any of that
kind ? ”

“Well, there was Cain, of course. Don’t you
know, it says somewhere that he slew Abel
because his own works were evil and his brother's
righteous.”

“Ah! let us look for that text,” Miss Leslie
said; and then, after turning over the pages of
her Bible, she added, “ Here it is, in the First
Epistle of St John, and the third chapter and
twelfth verse. The apostle had just been point-
ing out the difference between the children of
Firebrands. 197



God and the children of the devil; and he speaks
of Cain as one of the latter, and says he was of
‘that wicked one.’ And Jesus said the same
things to His persecutors, when they were trying
to kill Him—‘ Ye are of your father, the devil,’
He said, and added, ‘He was a murderer from
the beginning.’”

“Thanks, dear old Sue, for helping me; and
now let’s go in and tell papa what we have
found out. It’s just time; and I think he is
waiting.”

“Very good,” Mr Leslie said, when he heard
what his son had to tell him; “and now, my
boy, I have thought of another example of
peace-breakers for you, and it occurs in the
history of Daniel.”

“Tam glad of that, for I like anything about
Daniel; he is one of my Bible favourites!” cried
Frank.
198 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



“You remember that he was in great favour,
first with Nebuchadnezzar, and afterwards with
Darius, the Mede,” continued Mr Leslie; “and
yet, as he always so boldly maintained his pro-
fession of faith in the true God, I believe we may
feel quite sure that he spoke of Him, and tried
to get others to believe in Him too. I often
think that some of Daniel’s words must have
been preserved and handed down among those
heathen people, even to the time of the wise men
of the East, who came to worship Jesus. And
perhaps during the ages of eternity we may hear,
among other wondrous things, that the good seed
sown by him took root in many hearts, and
brought forth fruit to God’s glory. But one
thing is quite certain, and that is, that Daniel's
consistency made him many enemies, who could
not bear to see him in a high position. Jealousy,
no doubt, had a great deal also to do with their
Fwvebrands. 199

hatred ; and they were determined, if they could,
to ruin him. But he was so careful and faithful
in his office of first president of the realm, that
they decided that their only chance of finding a
fault lay in his religion.

‘‘So they persuaded Darius to make himself
into a god, and let no one pray to any other for
thirty days, knowing full well, that however
obedient Daniel might be in other things, in this
he would obey God rather than man, notwith-
standing the dreadful den of lions.

“And they were quite right; for as soon as
Daniel knew that the writing was signed, he
went into his house; and the windows in his
chamber being open towards Jerusalem, he kneeled
upon his knees three times a day, and prayed,
and gave thanks before his God, as he did afore-
time.

“Delighted enough were these wicked men, we
200 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.





may be sure, when they assembled and saw this
sight ; and it is not hard to picture their malicious
satisfaction as they pointed him out one to another.

“You remember how grieved Darius was, and
how the prophet’s faith failed not, and the wonder-
ful end of the story, Daniel’s deliverance, and the
death of his persecutors by the teeth of those same
angry lions, who never touched the good man.
And I think it seems like a picture of what must
be the doom of all who are not the children of
God.”

“Papa,” said Frank, “I recollect that once
Jesus said to His disciples that He came not
to send peace, but a sword. What did He
mean?”

“He meant that wars and persecutions would
be the vesul¢ of His coming, my dear boy. It is
not His wez// that people should live at enmity ;
and the gospel is called ‘the gospel of peace.’
Fivrebrands. 201



But it has always been the few, and not the many,
who accept that gospel, while the rest persecute
those who do. So families and nations are
divided ; but the fault rests with themselves, not
with the Lord; and from His coming kingdom
all that offend will be cast out, so that in the end
there shall be no more war.”
CHAPTER XVI:

A FRIEND IN TROUBLE.



Ragey got in your letter to-day? It doesn’t
seem to please you.”

‘Willy wouldn’t much like you to say that, I
should guess, after he has taken such pains to
write all this great sheet full,” returned her young
brother. ‘Why, I should think he never wrote
such a long yarn before!”

‘‘All about his troubles, I suppose,” rejoined
his sister. “I am afraid they must be hard to
bear, since the story will not keep for the short
A Friend in Trouble. 203

time which is likely to elapse before you are well
enough to go back to school. Does he think you
have been very ill?”

“T don’t know what should make him think
so,” said Frank ; ‘‘ but really, Sue, the letter is not
much about either himself or me.”

‘‘Oh!” said his sister; ‘‘and I suppose you
mean that I am not to ask what it is about.”

“How curious you are, Susy!” cried the boy ;
“but I suppose all ladies are alike; aren’t
they?”

‘‘They are said to be,” replied Miss Leslie,
smiling ; ‘‘nevertheless, my notion is, that boys,
at any rate, fully equal them in this matter. As
for myself, you see, that always having been in
your confidence, I am apt to feel jealous when
you try to keep me in the dark.”

“ Jealous of what?” asked Frank.

“Of what I have regarded as my rights, dear,
204. Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

and also of any Willy or Tommy who seems to
be taking my place.”

Frank laughed in a pleased sort of way, and
answered carelessly—

‘“‘T never said there was anything in my letter
that you couldn’t see; did I? Here, you can read
it, if you like.”

Miss Leslie took the letter, and did read it with
considerable interest. Then she said—

“And is this Edwin the new boy whom you
said you couldn’t make out when he first came?”

“Yes; none of us could; but we understand
him better now. He used to keep by himself
so much, and was so quiet, and when the fellows
wanted him to make friends all in a hurry, he
always seemed to keep them off. But I know
now why that was.”

“And why was it ?”

“He told me one day,” Frank said, “ that at
A Friend in Trouble. 205



his last school he was taken in by some of the
boys, and found that they weren’t a bit like what
they seemed at first; and some of them nearly
got him into an awful scrape; so he was deter-
mined to know what sort of stuff we were made
of before he chummed with any of us. Besides,
he says he’s passionate too, and so he doesn’t put
himself in the way of being provoked.”

“But he is good-natured; isn’t he?” Miss
Leslie said.

‘Oh! the best fellow in the world for real help,”
cried Frank, warmly.

“Then, why are they worrying him so?” his
sister asked. |

‘Just because he won’t give in to the mean
ways of alot of them. He will neither use cribs,
nor play tricks on masters ; and he won't let little
boysbe teased either, if he can help it ; and some big
fellows don’t like that, because it’s their great fun.
206 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



‘And are these all the things he does to offend
them?”

No; there’s one thing which they think worse
than any of those,” answered Frank, with an effort.
‘‘ He is something like Daniel, you see, Susy ; he
will say his prayers every night and morning,
whether they laugh at him or not. And that’s
what they are teasing him about just now. Ah!
and they are doing worse than teasing ; for they
are getting up a plan to get him into a scrape with
the masters. That’s what Willy means by his
having to keep his eyes open.”

‘But is Edwin the only boy who says his
prayers night and morning?” asked Miss Leslie,
anxiously.

“The only boy in our room who kneels down
by his bed,” answered Frank, reddening. “ Willy
and I say them in bed, when the fellows think we

are asleep.”
A Friend in Trouble. 207

‘Oh! Franky, dear,” returned his sister, “then
I’m afraid you forget those words of our Saviour,
which papa was speaking about just before you
went to school—

“ “Whosoever therefore shall confess me before
men, him will I confess also before my Father
which is in heaven. But whosoever shall deny
me before men, him will I also deny before my
Father which is in heaven.’”

“YT don’t deny Him, Susy,” Frank replied,
earnestly.

‘At least you do not confess Him,” she an-
swered ; ‘and because you are afraid of a little
persecution, too. Oh! Frank, what would you
have done in times of real trouble ? ”

Mr Leslie came in at that moment, and his
daughter quickly said—

“We were talking about being persecuted for
righteousness’ sake, papa. And the two last of
208 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



Franky’sverses are about that,you know. Couldn't
you come and explain them to us now, as you are
going away to-morrow?”

“Ah! but I haven’t found any people for you,
papa,” exclaimed Frank. ‘I haven't had time.”

“No, I know you haven’t, my boy; but as I
shall be absent a week, we won’t mind about that.
We will look for some people, as you call them, or
rather examples, together. And it will not be
difficult to find a good many who suffered in old
times for righteousness’ sake.”

Frank looked to his sister as usual for help;
and she said—

‘Abel was the first; wasn’t he, papa? Cain
killed him because he was more righteous than
himself; didn’t he? We found the verse which
said so last time.”

“Ves; and no doubt, before he was killed, he
had had to endure plenty of unkind words and
A Friend in Trouble. 209



treatment. But which would you rather be now,
Frank, Cain or Abel ?”

‘“Which ? papa; why, they are both dead !”

‘Their bodies are; but what about their spirits,
Frank. Tzhey live still; and one day their bodies
will live again too. Which of them would you
rather be?”

“Oh! Abel, papa, of course,” said Frank.

‘‘In the eleventh chapter of the Hebrews, we
read of many others who suffered dreadful things
for righteousness’ sake. Find it,my boy ; and look
down the end of the chapter.”

‘Oh! yes, papa; and some were sawn asunder,
it says ; how horrible! Who could bear that ?”

“It is supposed that Isaiah did,” replied his
father, ‘‘and that Jeremiah was stoned. [If so, it
was because they were faithful, and would confess
their God, and reprove those who did evil. The

Bible does not say anything about it, however ;
fe)
210 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

these are traditions handed down about them.
But it does give usa full account of the death
of the first Christian martyr. What was his
name?”

“J don’t remember,” said Frank, looking
puzzled.

“Why, Franky, don’t you recollect about
Stephen ?” said his sister.

“Oh! was he the first? Ididn’t know.”

‘Of course he was, my boy; and now let us
see why he was treated so shamefully,” Mr Leslie
said. |

Frank turned over the chapters in the Acts
until he came to the sixth, which he looked care-
fully through, and then said—

“What does ‘the daily ministration’ mean,
papa?”

“There was relief given to the poor widows
among the Christians, Frank. I told you, not
A Friend in Trouble. 211

long ago, how all believers in Jesus had to suffer
just then in one way or another—by loss of
employment, or by being cast out of the syna-
gogues, which really meant from the society of
their old friends. So when the believers became
numerous, as they did immediately after the
resurrection and St Peter’s sermon, the rich
among them had to give up their possessions to
relieve the poor; and one fund seems to have been
made up for the widows. These Christians were
all, or nearly all, Hebrews—that is, Jews—re-
member; but some Jews spoke Greek, and were
called Grecians. These were rather looked down
upon by other Jews; and so they complained in
this case of being overlooked.”

“And I suppose there were endless disputes
and difficulties, which would have taken up all
the apostles’ time,” remarked Miss Leslie.

“Yes; and as the work which Jesus had given
212 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



them was preaching the gospel, they said that
they must have help. So seven men were chosen ;
but I fancy that the work soon became lighter,
as one of these almost immediately began to
preach.”

‘That was Philip, I know,” Frank said.

“Yes; and Stephen, who was a very holy man,
and full of faith, did great wonders and miracles,
which attracted so much attention that a good
many of the enemies of the faith began to dispute
with him. But they could not resist the wisdom
and spirit by which he spake, we are told, and so
they took another way to ruin him. They bribed
some men to tell falsehoods about him; and to
say that they had heard him speak blasphemous
words against Moses, and against God.”

“That was the same thing that Jezebel
made people say about poor Naboth,” Frank
put in.


THE STONING OF St STEPHEN

A Friend in Trouble. 213



“Yes; and according to the law, you know, he
was condemned to be stoned. In this case, these
wicked people had wilfully misunderstood what
Stephen had said about the Lord Jesus; so there
was a show of truth about it; and he was brought
before the council, and had to defend himself, as
he did so beautifully in the words related in the
seventh chapter of the Acts. If you look at the
fifty-first and following verses, you will see how
bold he was, and how faithfully he told them of
their dreadful sin in resisting the Holy Ghost, and
murdering Jesus. That was what made them so
furious that they rushed on him and stoned him
to death, while he meekly said—‘ Lord, lay not
this sin to their charge.’”

“Then he wasn’t angry with them, after all,”
Frank said.

“ He bore no malice, and forgave his murderers,
just as our Lord had done,” continued his father.
214 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



‘Yet he faithfully told them of their sins, as every
Christian teacher ought to do. And his example
is a good one to imitate.” |

“But, papa, are we always obliged to make
people angry with us, by telling them of their
faults?” Frank asked.

‘That depends on circumstances,” answered
his father ; “and it is very seldom that little boys
are called on to do so. It would generally be
unbecoming, and out of place. _ Boys have gener-
ally enough to do to look to themselves, and take
care that they act consistently; but sometimes
even that sort of conduct is looked on as silent
reproof, and people get into as much trouble as
if they spoke to others of their sins. In short, as
the Bible tells us, ‘all who will live godly in
Christ Jesus must suffer persecution.’ It may
be either in the worst forms by death or im-
prisonment, or it may be by harsh and unkind
A Friend in Trouble. 215

words. And in either case it is very hard to
bear.”

“Ves,” said Frank; ‘“‘and I almost think that
I would just as soon be shut up in prison as
have people always laughing and jeering at me.
It must make one feel so angry, and be so difficult
to bear patiently.”

“Then you think that such things ought to
be borne patiently?” Mr Leslie said, fixing
his eyes steadily on his boy, as if aware that
some recent occurrence had caused him to speak
thus.

‘Edwin says so,” Frank replied; and then,
with his usual candour, he related unasked all the
particulars about this new boy.

“He must be a nice fellow, and a brave one
too,” was his father’s comment when he had done.
“ Ask him here some holidays, if you like; for I
wish you to have honest boys for your friends.”
216 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



And then, much to his son’s vexation, Mr Leslie
was called away on business; nor was it until his
return from town, a fortnight afterwards, that this

conversation was resumed.
CHAPTER XVIII.
A NAIL DRIVEN HOME.

VQ EVERTHELESS, young Frank Leslie
Nt thought a great deal both about it and



Edwin’s troubles. In the course of a few days, a
letter was despatched to Willy, which it had cost a
world of pains to write; and, after that, many were
the talks which he had with Dick Benson. Indeed,
he had just parted from him one day, and was
slowly returning from the field in which Dick
was working, when he espied his father and sister
coming in search of him.

“Oh! papa, are you come back? I never
218 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



thought of expecting you to-day!” cried the boy ;
and then followed many eager questions touching
all that his father had seen and done during his
absence, whilst they walked on and on, until they
had reached the very spot on the beach where
their first talk on the beatitudes had taken place.

There Frank declared they must finish the
subject ; and there, therefore, they all seated them-
selves under the same rocks, Mr Leslie asking,
as they did so, what were the results of his last
fortnight’s reflections.

‘“T don’t think there are any, really, papa,” said
Frank, ‘‘ though my head has been stuffed full of
thoughts about it.”

“Tt will do your head good, then, to let a little
of the stuffing out; so try and put it into form ;
that is, make some of it up into questions,
Frank.”

‘“Oh!” returned the boy ; ‘‘ but indeed a great
_A Natl Driven Home. 219

deal of it was about Edwin, papa. I have been
trying to make plans to get the masters to notice
him. We can’t tell them how he gets used, or else
we should be called sneaks, you know; but I do
so wish a good many knew who are fit to be
trusted, and who are not.”

‘“T don’t think you need fear for your friend,
my boy,” said his father. ‘God will take care of
him and of his honour; depend on it. Besides,
the masters may even now know more than you
think. I don’t believe they are men to be easily
imposed upon.”

Frank looked into his father’s face as if he sus-
pected that he might possibly know what was
going on behind the scenes. But Mr Leslie did
not speak; and his son saw that he was not to
press him further. So he only said—

‘Papa, do you remember last time you called
Edwin an honest boy? What did you mean by
220 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



that? I don’t know that he is more honest
than Duncan Seymour, or Benjamin Smith, or
than Morris Fordham, or half a dozen others that
you don’t care to let come here ; for none of them
would do a dishonest thing, I am sure.”

“Are you? Iam not by any means, Frank.
Why, didn’t you tell me just nowthat all those three
whom you have named let it be thought that they
side with the bad set, while in reality they dislike
their doings, and admire your friend’s conduct ?”

‘Oh! that’s because they want to keep out of
rows,’ replied Frank. ‘There is no peace unless
you do as they do.”

‘What! and do you let them count you as an
ally, also?” his father said.

“No,” said Frank, bluntly. “I got so angry
the first time they set upon him that I couldn’t
help speaking out ; so it’s no use my pretending
anything.”
A Nail Driven Home. 22}





“Tam glad you are not able to pretend what is
not true, my boy; but I had hoped that you would
not wish it. Don’t you see that by this cowardly
conduct, those three boys are really depriving
Edwin of the support which they might give him.
They are also not on the right side in spite of
their better judgment ; so I say they are not either
true, brave, or honest. And, if they grow up like
that, they will never prove men whom I could
respect, and certainly never gain the blessing
promised to those who are persecuted for right-
eousness’ sake. I am afraid our Saviour would
not.say of them, ‘For theirs is the kingdom of
heaven.’”

For a few minutes Frank Leslie seemed to
ponder his father’s words, as, with a stick in his
hand, he industriously scooped out a little pond in
the sand. Then suddenly looking up, he said—

“ Papa, who can we find to set against Stephen ?
222 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.

Do you want people who persecute, like that
wicked Jezebel, or like King Manasseh, in his
bad times; or like Herod, who slew James the
brother of John with the sword, and wanted to
kill Peter too?”

“No; I think we had better seek for some
who shirked persecution,” his father answered ;
“for they will be more in our way at present. Do
you remember how, in the parable of the sower,
our Lord likened such people to seed sown in
stony ground, which springs up quickly because
it has no root, but withers under the scorching
heat of the sun? He says that such hearers
receive the word with joy ; but that when tribula-
tion or persecution cometh, by and by they are
offended.”

“Oh! there was a man of that sort that Dick
was speaking of the other day, papa. He said
that St Paul mentions him in three of his epistles,
A Natl Driven Home. 223

and, in two of them, as if he were one of his
friends. What was his name?”

‘“Demas, you mean; don’t you, dear?” suggested
his sister.

‘“‘Oh! yes; papa, shall we find him out?”

“Tf you like,” replied his father. ‘‘See, here
at the end of the Colossians, ‘Luke, the beloved
physician, and Demas, greet you.’”

“And then in Philemon,” added Miss Leslie,
‘in the twenty-fourth verse, his name is among a
list of those who send greetings.”

“But afterwards,” cried Frank, impatiently,
‘he turned out bad; didn’t he?”

“In II. Timothy iv. 10; St Paul says, ‘ For
Demas hath forsaken me, having loved this present
world, and is departed to Thessalonica.’”

‘This was in a time of persecution, Frank ; and
then, you see, he fell away. But how would your
school-fellows have done? and how would you have
224. Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



done yourself, Frank ? Consider this before you cry
out against Demas. It is not a mere admiration
for what is good and noble that will make us ©
good ourselves. We want something more than
that to enable us to stand through storm as well
as sunshine. But I am thinking of another case of
a different sort. Do you remember how Pilate
acted when Jesus was brought before his judg-
ment-seat ?”

“He didn’t want to have Him killed, be-
cause he knew He didn’t deserve it,’ Frank
answered.

‘‘Ah! and he felt even more than that, we are
sure,” said his father. ‘ He knew and felt that
He was a good man; and, if I mistake not, had
a suspicion of His being more than a common
man ; and yet, to please the people, he gave Him up
to acruel death! Pilate was a bad man; he did
not fall away from the truth, for he never received
A Nail Driven Home. 225

it in any sense, though he had a momentary
curiosity to know what it is. Still, Jesus seldom
if ever spoke to any without making them feel
that never man spake like thisman. And it seems
to me that even Pilate, just then, had a sort of
wish to be different and better than he was; but
the love of the world and the fear of the people
overcame his better feelings.

“It does not appear to have been the same with
Herod. St Luke tells us that when Pilate heard
that Jesus was a Galilean, he sent Him to Herod,
under whose government Galilee was, hoping, I
daresay, to turn the case over to him, and get rid
of the responsibility. And ‘when Herod saw Jesus
he was exceeding glad, for he was desirous to see
Him of a long season, because he had heard many
things of Him ; and he hoped to have seen some
miracle done by Him.’ This shows clearly that
Herod was convinced that Jesus had the power to

7 P
226 Old Paths of Honour and Dishonour.



work miracles, and that, therefore, instead of
mocking, he ought to have inquired diligently
into His claims. But there is no trace of even a
passing wish to doright. Many people think that
if they could but see'a miracle worked, their hearts
would be changed at once; but I should say that
Herod’s example proves this notion to be false.
For, though he did not see a miracle worked, he
believed that Christ could have worked one if He
had chosen; and yet he set Him at nought! And
more than this; these two bad men, who had be-
fore been at enmity, became reconciled to each
other, through their fellowship in crime. Weare
told that Herod, with his men of war, dressed the
despised Saviour in a splendid kingly robe, to
which the soldiers afterwards added a crown of
thorns, in derision of His claim to be King of the
Jews; and then, after He had been sent back to
Pilate, the two governors were made friends!


THE RECONCILIATION OF PILATE & HEROD.
Works for the Young.

The Curate’s Home: a Tale.
By the Author of “ Mignonette,” “Among the Mountains,” &c.
In crown 8vo, Frontispiece, 5s. cloth.

The End of Life, and the Life that has No Ending.
By the Author of “Copsley Annals.” Second Edition. Crown
8vo, Frontispiece, 3s. 6d. cloth.

The Rocky Island, and other Similitudes,
By the Lord Bishop or OxrorpD. An Illustrated Edition.
Large 16mo, with Twenty Engravings, price 5s. cloth, gilt edges.
Also a smaller edition with Four Engravings, 2s. 6d. cloth.

Homeward ; or, The Rest that Remaineth: a Memoir.
By ELLEN BaRLEE. Crown 8vo, 3s. 6d. cloth.

Among the Mountains; or, The Harcourts at Montreux.
A Narrative founded on fact,

In crown 8yo, with Frontispiece, 5s. cloth.

Charity Flelstone: a Tale.
By Mrs Carry Brock. Fourth Thousand, crown 8vo, Frontis-
piece, 5s. cloth,

Mabel and Cora.
By the Author of “Among the Mountains.” In crown 8vo,
Frontispiece, 3s. 6d. cloth,
“I Must Keep the Chimes Going :” a Tale of Real Life.

By the Author of “‘Copsley Annals.” In large 16mo, Engravings,
2s. 6d. cloth.

The Vendale Lost Property Office.

By the Author of “Copsley Annals,” &c. In square 16mo,
Four Engravings 2s. 6d. cloth.

Work for All; and other Tales.
By C. E. B. Engravings. Third Edition. 2s. 6d. cloth.

The Light of Life.

By Maria LouisA CHARLESWORTH. Fourth Edition. 18mo,
2s. 6d. cloth.

Missionary Anecdotes :

Selected from—z1. The Pacific—2. India and Burmah.—
3. China.—4. North Africa and Turkey.—5. South Africa and
Madagascar.—6. North America and. West Indies. Small 8vo,
Twelve Engravings, 2s. 6d. cloth.

Christian Flatherleys Childhood,

By the Author of “Work for All.” With Four Illustrations,
2s. 6d. cloth.

The Cumberstone Contest: A Story for the Young.

By the Author of “A Battle worth Fighting.” In crown 8vo,
Frontispiece, 3s. 6d. cloth.

The Schoolmistress of Herondale: or, Sketches of Life .
among the FIills.

By the Author of ‘The Mountain Refuge.” In crown 8yo,
Frontispiece, 5s. cloth.


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'2012-01-14T09:55:08-05:00'
describe
'63845' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATXV' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
1a1d5d3ca68ec9fda6ad292fd7248365
73156ab03d62ceaace1bbbdc2c115dc5d2c4b353
'2012-01-14T09:57:16-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'12252356' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATXW' 'sip-files00003.tif'
3d146de6facee97483b393dcfec1be15
441cd843ee0e2e962e444329a39bd5f8ef6f8f11
'2012-01-14T09:53:12-05:00'
describe
'49864' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATXX' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
49020ab2639a45b80006eb7bc298a48f
29d9a13c872fc4d467518814a6d4b7291eee5252
'2012-01-14T09:53:08-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3946632' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATXY' 'sip-files00004.tif'
066accb998424d1ce58503444727a242
3f3fed10876ca57496eea4a0b1410ffe54cd3da5
'2012-01-14T09:53:34-05:00'
describe
'19' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATXZ' 'sip-files00004.txt'
dd5353f960cee4851ef5d9f908a3ae4c
091587feb4468f4697ebdabce7f9283d284bf082
'2012-01-14T09:53:52-05:00'
describe
'45675' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYA' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
f12a28e04d9945b5f97e93c7054682ee
e31a3d8e76bd0bb844827b1971fdb65909681bc2
'2012-01-14T09:55:39-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3918960' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYB' 'sip-files00005.tif'
f949fd951c9b76c84e7d45563aa1be1c
dd79178fb6619c6192b8602c7a1798e1fa854e1a
'2012-01-14T09:58:04-05:00'
describe
'35' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYC' 'sip-files00005.txt'
7a3b29d7a7fe7a32e086c55d6b0b085b
343f3b614de7fb9e8f590720e3a0066b638e91c1
'2012-01-14T09:52:28-05:00'
describe
'42098' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYD' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
5f0f6bc2fef9b3dd82bfed27cf768c3b
cc43c77606ffca54cf88bd204e2fef75598983cb
'2012-01-14T09:54:49-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3999456' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYE' 'sip-files00006.tif'
2bfff7267f3933d217065ef107a3f771
410ae55a0777eecf1ab6c86f005fb3642be0d889
'2012-01-14T09:58:55-05:00'
describe
'55' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYF' 'sip-files00006.txt'
d73cb99363f06b1d56214dc5f8d60f23
4fcd019aa9d4edea2c893064942ba092dbbbdb1a
'2012-01-14T09:56:12-05:00'
describe
'14820' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYG' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
5e7eb6e34079d41c343936fdcb496f58
b1ac26782948cbdbd4f54ad2dda4ceb9a205652e
'2012-01-14T09:53:48-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3983820' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYH' 'sip-files00007.tif'
0f1745c95d8212a0e546e93da8eb201a
75746c8d331bdca96493dc120be6334de35b1808
'2012-01-14T09:57:30-05:00'
describe
'138277' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYI' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
c7170fa8cc69b09527948b3eda2483bf
7bb69d862066af1b140cd5330d10e70d2473b308
'2012-01-14T09:52:53-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'11724672' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYJ' 'sip-files00008.tif'
492614a42c47a0ea8b1a4776177bf825
212daf4973dae05a7a2abb8fbe6a68d6361e02ca
'2012-01-14T09:55:23-05:00'
describe
'25' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYK' 'sip-files00008.txt'
d2d7d6f00a4f4d4428b2c579e786dd3a
611e7ce45e3d0e03811b2dc2e6ea8c84e4a3864e
'2012-01-14T09:56:53-05:00'
describe
'60893' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYL' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
efcf073bda4fb1c59ef8f64bb080e7f8
11ce39f1953eac5fa39978df5ca8dd61a7457916
'2012-01-14T09:54:52-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3889384' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYM' 'sip-files00009.tif'
4fd6263eb022362fa81f887adef9d660
4ce4f715d66711b7edaf0715e40767fefbefd58c
'2012-01-14T09:56:56-05:00'
describe
'237' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYN' 'sip-files00009.txt'
7905f22ced9f2f9d989962cc2c84972f
ef3cc8b4e2ee8318f98d65da22c9cc376047ce63
'2012-01-14T09:58:59-05:00'
describe
'37220' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYO' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
6e26bc596ecf72cb1e0e3c1c660f87a6
e5595ff30e6fa6464f6b5ff92fd51df6b4239be6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3964784' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYP' 'sip-files00010.tif'
2b76f569011ab18172bf335f6b664853
16716022eea7d916a5b43c6b362b41057649e15b
'2012-01-14T09:53:20-05:00'
describe
'2' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYQ' 'sip-files00010.txt'
878e08b0c9cf3710b9dc228122b07c7f
a35077a93b180088463ecc1cdf83178d99a53a66
'2012-01-14T09:52:59-05:00'
describe
'62139' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYR' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
e0eec2a706958eb0f33e6adcd3041496
1b032ad119f0df2f99a2d6ccfcddfa6efe4955fa
'2012-01-14T09:56:38-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3956568' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYS' 'sip-files00011.tif'
3aa4ed948fb9efa6b098af61acea520a
88685c65238b09aca7577c9675f13e4c0f8740bd
'2012-01-14T09:57:25-05:00'
describe
'420' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYT' 'sip-files00011.txt'
9b28ff3394450b710e03308a02cdac44
8a9a4ec82444889687bab709b35f1635fd02461f
'2012-01-14T09:53:19-05:00'
describe
'61549' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYU' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
d48e5b9cd933ef222e5e4cc71d4ece27
7baf372c2f4a8a4ee59a509ef815cbfbc3d47511
'2012-01-14T09:58:41-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3843664' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYV' 'sip-files00012.tif'
0275b7882c0f4058d90d1c00e0d8c00b
cfb38a0827fcea084c8884455380fe6b97c91b69
'2012-01-14T09:56:17-05:00'
describe
'385' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYW' 'sip-files00012.txt'
125fc378c58db63c79419830b01eeee9
01b424829302d8e03c8f29cf5c347d1b11339546
'2012-01-14T09:56:13-05:00'
describe
'68318' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYX' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
304d1ee74ca37e4638d427fd2baedb0a
4da096fb2c60063d5078eccfa745966f17b3a2c2
'2012-01-14T09:54:38-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3908800' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYY' 'sip-files00013.tif'
e45cd0559ec0ffa155fc6fb6c6a50929
441602e5d23b40f86fdbd30ef53e108c4256663c
describe
'334' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATYZ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
b22121235f583128c7d4a0141f70b634
7ebd8895ecf11f5bc16c4867b7a4282e1809848a
'2012-01-14T09:58:40-05:00'
describe
'66410' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZA' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
ed6cd37e08bad934ea7324959dc5fca6
b2d7adcf4459373a1481595b0bc8e7eedcf32ebe
'2012-01-14T09:52:34-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3854980' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZB' 'sip-files00014.tif'
dffe22a04070b890c7549f9eab589605
7d745e01fdcfccf72f4fb108240a17cc89c268e2
'2012-01-14T09:57:47-05:00'
describe
'381' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZC' 'sip-files00014.txt'
4f1a9d8a77c6957b529fb18199cd89eb
f222dad662ccfe43d2995c77c67ac964c0fca0cd
'2012-01-14T09:57:10-05:00'
describe
'87560' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZD' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
39e0df164b3ef5a20d68be24901675bb
2bf688414eddfdeaff42d510524c132bc4ea6cb5
'2012-01-14T09:53:01-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3970664' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZE' 'sip-files00015.tif'
897a945ab479479062232de2b518138d
9de0f02e416bddb49a184bfb56dd6953b486902f
'2012-01-14T09:53:32-05:00'
describe
'467' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZF' 'sip-files00015.txt'
3a54e08548ac1ad8fee76a270e792529
6ebdab4036db68f06a7c9399fe619eccbb1b8351
'2012-01-14T09:58:38-05:00'
describe
'108396' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZG' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
cd337b94a5d897d44c6e8356604c19da
50786086a62e185e6c0b3cdd009dfcfec3473610
'2012-01-14T09:55:12-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3813144' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZH' 'sip-files00016.tif'
4348740552a118bbfb2b60667a03ac6c
3f223461872487d47f334e2e4a05d6c8d547a023
'2012-01-14T09:54:04-05:00'
describe
'827' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZI' 'sip-files00016.txt'
55d541a0a7a128e442c4af441dc62eba
55aaf02d9aa6a067af1b1bdddd0467182175a154
'2012-01-14T09:53:18-05:00'
describe
'114041' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZJ' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
23cf0619093c3ecc607a43dda9e7f747
69a36abc380b0fd4dddb2e9f96dfe2932996b043
'2012-01-14T09:52:30-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3646336' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZK' 'sip-files00017.tif'
3dea643ea1ac8b87893f0b0ed9bf4158
452d057aeebbe50fa29476394ed4b46e00511e60
'2012-01-14T09:53:13-05:00'
describe
'747' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZL' 'sip-files00017.txt'
35606a50081552248a1a70b06eb20ecd
284e9927989fa4dce64111c076621ecdffb89a60
'2012-01-14T09:55:34-05:00'
describe
'106955' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZM' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
f7094e5df8e414b7c2af9c7741ff2831
056d60cd3b5217fd600fcbff5fb1bfb1a3f35ce1
'2012-01-14T09:56:05-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3843920' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZN' 'sip-files00018.tif'
c1a5d8419010391f6c7159b0434cfede
c8f26e88a3d9092f071de69e0de4ff33c2c2be92
'2012-01-14T09:53:43-05:00'
describe
'810' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZO' 'sip-files00018.txt'
a83932271e06df7a8b3ec9026b5f2327
debe369750e66f402b115fd1eb59bc20847825ef
'2012-01-14T09:53:36-05:00'
describe
'109154' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZP' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
b45d970acca724860bcdf7e294a99917
388ae0635e5fd91871c52c688a2a3723df0c4e65
'2012-01-14T09:55:20-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3779820' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZQ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
dbb728934f016ce6ce326646ce621bc1
8c970631e3a3ea272417a2d7008fc8008f5f03a0
'2012-01-14T09:56:49-05:00'
describe
'784' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZR' 'sip-files00019.txt'
1100b942851cf9cb9525d384606ad30b
25725ed99d7c364e199f4faeefc6ef83a7185bf9
'2012-01-14T09:52:42-05:00'
describe
'110169' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZS' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
9a783b1cf65972c8b27c4ae23bd4a345
dcdf50d0353edd53ca59d17730de08d8efa18983
'2012-01-14T09:55:07-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3911336' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZT' 'sip-files00020.tif'
9fdd35d79425c564d7d4110b8b8615f3
563874f28830b5432c4d070c7ef2a70360e6095f
'2012-01-14T09:54:00-05:00'
describe
'826' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZU' 'sip-files00020.txt'
32adecfcb228c7436960745862c3c3ad
c448b15062cd3f9eee1aa3da52fb31349f909d3c
'2012-01-14T09:52:50-05:00'
describe
'107946' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZV' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
cf0dec12c4196cfbfa8c6ffccdd0d0b9
774e7b37059b84dec578249c6958c8c5ddedeb06
'2012-01-14T09:52:33-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3740728' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZW' 'sip-files00021.tif'
13e3e4f191854665f87239ccecc9a6e4
d450b0ff46e4f54c2356c9efde3af64e93c4e531
'2012-01-14T09:57:38-05:00'
describe
'823' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZX' 'sip-files00021.txt'
7ca26016bc87a304da9103e58eafdac4
4bbe3577ab0ec45a3527cf6dde80811937df9c94
'2012-01-14T09:53:31-05:00'
describe
'112401' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZY' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
e8a32b09ed84f444538520a66af551a6
ab96175651667aaef2b88b0246e15e1edfc04647
'2012-01-14T09:56:02-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3953128' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAATZZ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
4b7eae8e283116dd90a3e1182a91fd8d
a51fa048a5fabe4e0fccd928a14e3898c5782e54
'2012-01-14T09:58:29-05:00'
describe
'848' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAA' 'sip-files00022.txt'
2e921e3ec240818c85f7c7e6b576a48a
999465f549b66f55184ed587307d946e0e1b48e8
'2012-01-14T09:54:44-05:00'
describe
'39336' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAB' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
a1d0193291fc9c7f646422b57753b88a
340365c594eb503ad18b642f031954144c9d74b4
'2012-01-14T09:57:05-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3824284' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAC' 'sip-files00023.tif'
108b535e39ef1e4759f13c59267dffa6
be5f41ba78688c74c2448b2d5ec3794c1260f811
'2012-01-14T09:54:27-05:00'
describe
'240' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAD' 'sip-files00023.txt'
ab7c1e350957347af640eace17513b63
9e2fae2cfeadb58e69165f6c9ed0aa6c53c4c74f
'2012-01-14T09:58:15-05:00'
describe
'85945' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAE' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
3dc32eb95295d15063346bbe998f52c0
a273552267e828f40d0c9fd0a981c86ea2b1b805
'2012-01-14T09:56:45-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3883528' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAF' 'sip-files00024.tif'
097eee5e968a20f4ca15cd425cb1e155
db3b8c66e9dbb4077b8d6cc9e42a98011dff3acf
'2012-01-14T09:56:36-05:00'
describe
'529' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAG' 'sip-files00024.txt'
b219e27ec6497139ce19b5e958250188
12f405272ae434e9ae8ac6bd196c2746449ebadf
'2012-01-14T09:53:17-05:00'
describe
'108187' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAH' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
01885261b28f2bc32cf41873f0d759de
3ed46edbe7b4eb1729aeaa422cd49057d27d403f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3764060' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAI' 'sip-files00025.tif'
5fafdb78c37babaaca56a983615e62f1
54b90949c5c75520af554640b5fa178cea47ffa9
'2012-01-14T09:54:46-05:00'
describe
'893' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAJ' 'sip-files00025.txt'
0a6f3cb2d7de04b3c66d9ce538186968
4bef23547f53cd4d0aaea134edc28a87b0c4c65b
'2012-01-14T09:55:50-05:00'
describe
'103496' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAK' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
7fdc2b088de9a6390ec0877f8e32c39c
9a6c1eda8d31728c10754935e5648ac73856d363
'2012-01-14T09:54:48-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3814028' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAL' 'sip-files00026.tif'
c4eb14e67968a0300e40a6184a151024
712076fee3060959b83dbb4c509704be9c2e2ec0
'2012-01-14T09:56:28-05:00'
describe
'871' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAM' 'sip-files00026.txt'
8e861467da842dccf3f9d65336932037
c6fd6ba7a41696d65f13544df7d20b11ba0155ce
'2012-01-14T09:53:09-05:00'
describe
'101201' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAN' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
4ab8f23bdf22cd7a74ea4d4842ff7f62
13d698ceb686a350ddecc53de2f5a2a4df747edf
'2012-01-14T09:55:47-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3907392' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAO' 'sip-files00027.tif'
4cede1384eb2310dfebcd32a4fff28be
b0320375aa4247b6f4f740c3ff6f761dcbbdfae5
'2012-01-14T09:57:26-05:00'
describe
'846' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAP' 'sip-files00027.txt'
d24bdb2e7406e108a40b47800a993652
95548bbf49932b3cbb6b18255a7df6eda69392c9
'2012-01-14T09:58:43-05:00'
describe
'108958' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAQ' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
a10fbe7d329156fd8bfa297fb89de6aa
7f7fe142ce856014ea5c67de0ae649dc2a406f9f
'2012-01-14T09:53:38-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3676148' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAR' 'sip-files00028.tif'
d75a12874b99830be253ea0721c66302
c134f0f41980dfe9f9f8b2070b3152ff9756f4ad
'2012-01-14T09:53:33-05:00'
describe
'845' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAS' 'sip-files00028.txt'
dfc91a6ea2d8eb2dab4055d799005257
22ad010a8d38c67094f3005a4fe35101eeeb3f08
'2012-01-14T09:58:13-05:00'
describe
'101311' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAT' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
54652bc20bb20e588747e09b1363ebe9
22918a3e883e316f008e6caaa557a4235589be9d
'2012-01-14T09:53:04-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3648696' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAU' 'sip-files00029.tif'
fc3191c34b8a9c553885a1f22e3ed68f
c697fa654a0dc93718bc44ab4afbbb0deca2d272
'2012-01-14T09:55:53-05:00'
describe
'858' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAV' 'sip-files00029.txt'
e4f633fcebf5a0d879d2106c59a542ca
2e88b7cccd4de60494a1808d37fe85f8ce8978d6
'2012-01-14T09:58:49-05:00'
describe
'106213' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAW' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
1e29c8879673fff730b2dfd17adbb230
0c769f08f70a281a207e008825496d7b13be15a3
'2012-01-14T09:56:20-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3935912' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAX' 'sip-files00030.tif'
420197ec2abe893e627522475d828979
08044d95ef3a0b88f501790e2baca60439a89e97
'2012-01-14T09:52:44-05:00'
describe
'884' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAY' 'sip-files00030.txt'
51c6d43efd37677a9356661952827a5d
915f27477d51aba9be20aba9785192a4b8c966ac
'2012-01-14T09:56:39-05:00'
describe
'102543' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUAZ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
1457d7043a17b6159e7893a6a9ca6398
9218093f9591f7cfbd7239319185b53e910a1bf0
'2012-01-14T09:54:18-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3655000' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBA' 'sip-files00031.tif'
d0a46dd5b1c74478c5bed445e7ce532b
50ac87b34726825e134651f041666888b598294e
'2012-01-14T09:53:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBB' 'sip-files00031.txt'
6ab1217bfaf00f2556bad942105b2d66
8505ec0ff86fd5ce3958ec6f59f594cd7508ba5c
'2012-01-14T09:58:06-05:00'
describe
'104674' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBC' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
83277b23afb7009b0bee2cf7f07201ed
072e49ca923e66ffec8cfeaae08022ae286d1825
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3629268' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBD' 'sip-files00032.tif'
e069ec2970a18921bc69b4fffa156ee3
f3ce8ef1f2bef15211163bbc76c520dfc201eae8
'2012-01-14T09:53:47-05:00'
describe
'866' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBE' 'sip-files00032.txt'
e39cccf61ef48ba99da615f5dcf2c825
11e567a67cbf34fe842718a094310f5400f5a407
'2012-01-14T09:56:26-05:00'
describe
'100019' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBF' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
ae3b6244991f51bf8b6c5c44648d9dbf
36ea9add4ea549f2bc9ff792fc046326b19c8f9b
'2012-01-14T09:52:35-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3546248' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBG' 'sip-files00033.tif'
eb82a3af371263ba381f281cf2d9ffa0
b95cb70914546b9182f9576b99f80f412a082f36
'2012-01-14T09:54:02-05:00'
describe
'864' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBH' 'sip-files00033.txt'
ef51cd7b095cde9dcebdefa798a124a3
d25204c89e6966565f4753d2cc2e5398c006f3a0
'2012-01-14T09:58:19-05:00'
describe
'100737' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBI' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
a6b6a76ebf6b6e356f41dcec446476cb
2b6ec5fb6dc53d30f5b9dbdaaa01d94f449a1d79
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3856208' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBJ' 'sip-files00034.tif'
48d0ffcc2e56df90d4d74a04308c0a20
84d045fe79da56a83ad2ecf3b3c9c9b716d3fb4a
'2012-01-14T09:53:53-05:00'
describe
'917' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBK' 'sip-files00034.txt'
e09f86bb415f9b8a12b640214ca66e51
ad42f2eb3e6fe9c09e5d54f17cbcceba4d5a9073
'2012-01-14T09:53:28-05:00'
describe
'103214' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBL' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
2cd8be84dc2ee38a4b2efa1022f0cd60
deb80f89679c9a1a6c0a7d81ef50a81b95913443
'2012-01-14T09:58:36-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3676392' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBM' 'sip-files00035.tif'
bf2df7cd240f20c30244f81a25e5d592
99f19155b4bd74a490b65728b5b6335b33d100ba
'2012-01-14T09:52:56-05:00'
describe
'920' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBN' 'sip-files00035.txt'
04f5cee2f0bb94fda9e67e290d688a60
1187f0b048b186d0ee83dd27c729a09b95d3f391
describe
'105982' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBO' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
4312615f3b0096ee4b2921a3e4131550
e39faee94ce9626d5f0361ac6708179baec9cd00
'2012-01-14T09:57:45-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3819540' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBP' 'sip-files00036.tif'
c82754d601604d6b14c81dfbbc8106ec
4a72453730fd299716d2deb614c3fef92f743afd
describe
'929' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBQ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
0225aa09d1e003fdbe09092c0f338e4f
c8648f6d9b30ce1873bb9d4f68245e5f3ed1954c
'2012-01-14T09:54:19-05:00'
describe
'128649' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBR' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
c4c00a65f3ec2a0ba84a813c987823fe
5c49cd4a56e844e913cf021799ef6e6ec6d3633d
'2012-01-14T09:56:55-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'10855632' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBS' 'sip-files00037.tif'
8ccc7c3f7437e40465638160a73307d5
d0b0f697d4685bbd4813e90ce8247f0d5e5e5285
'2012-01-14T09:55:44-05:00'
describe
'14' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBT' 'sip-files00037.txt'
c11cf2e5acd49d609d41cdf2f7cff2a3
9b34c97d3614972a59b2702fe08d4dea1e8c3668
'2012-01-14T09:57:36-05:00'
describe
'32069' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBU' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
012b052ecee4eab3d175bed0480e44ff
d83377abba20883f987cca05f74533b8f880c966
'2012-01-14T09:55:29-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3904216' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBV' 'sip-files00038.tif'
90faea468338a4d6e73d23f50f7fc0e1
5655c0bc97acbe8e9f214b8c4695da545de2b3aa
'2012-01-14T09:54:40-05:00'
describe
'98601' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBW' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
aeccea03bd4933578cadfdd6875380bb
425a3fd6ca42f0f25c048a02a5f2cb174eb45cda
'2012-01-14T09:54:23-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3690616' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBX' 'sip-files00039.tif'
c8bbac2fc4493f707e9d0ededa67f073
3fb3ba9346a70c62b1215b50b7fc9caa5e21fa28
'2012-01-14T09:57:24-05:00'
describe
'817' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBY' 'sip-files00039.txt'
6670eac34d10298c62fe630d8888bcca
063fcddacb28b76cc6b04d3243bd05ea359e57ec
'2012-01-14T09:57:06-05:00'
describe
'104592' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUBZ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
833ec3c79c3e7ab31727aa5691f80e59
ee49b155e789ed7d0a241a3314d6471cbc6fde9f
'2012-01-14T09:52:49-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3577752' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCA' 'sip-files00040.tif'
62b9333ac009638cbf0a6b4d0e342064
f88eb5d87efab5bbc2d373fa760e3d8799af7bea
'2012-01-14T09:57:20-05:00'
describe
'911' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCB' 'sip-files00040.txt'
afcbbb2d458a144240e1c909c8f0a5b3
b05824bc55e04b5363245f8b2447a8166eb663ab
'2012-01-14T09:55:06-05:00'
describe
'105993' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCC' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
4b0b23f1a8b82f350cdd86165ab01360
6b125a6a410374c543d2b499d2402230e85b18ff
'2012-01-14T09:57:40-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3352196' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCD' 'sip-files00041.tif'
bb8fb321d0cb19684cd707714e409c43
e4db1276c20c287d97b35b1b3fa723d9d0d0e3fb
'2012-01-14T09:52:52-05:00'
describe
'880' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCE' 'sip-files00041.txt'
6d82b678502566821ba4b9700c19e4be
5b1069836d0028d18d9717ff24c4edcba3a4aa51
describe
'103174' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCF' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
0772a7033cc32803f3c8880b5cafe5e4
f543f3e8ed3008aa0d3a24921c04aa3965f99dd1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3535344' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCG' 'sip-files00042.tif'
f1880fa8c0ee974ea5d8681e756ddca6
5c5cb7f114ed52338e73570a0326fe1e567eaeba
'2012-01-14T09:58:47-05:00'
describe
'865' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCH' 'sip-files00042.txt'
9419ee3dfc54d28c896237d569f2233b
8071ca15a420a9b3959f3540e7304f3b482d790a
describe
'49056' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCI' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
58e51b97c5c7b8951a37ec5e14fc5f3b
5d3895ac1da245375f8b040dbff8fa489650f68f
'2012-01-14T09:54:03-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3665472' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCJ' 'sip-files00043.tif'
843c42e429f3462b3ecfed9039da9dc3
836921b219cb6acf4ab5b60d218a8e03d2b1ee41
'2012-01-14T09:57:52-05:00'
describe
'254' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCK' 'sip-files00043.txt'
ff9aa7e0da07b71d72af5ce3811765ae
b14201e97d7b94f73d11c62ec83040579f341f0c
'2012-01-14T09:58:31-05:00'
describe
'78335' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCL' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
22283309e7e55bf0f222e133b5ae8162
d108c0e3bd5bdd9d8a223aa22f6ff7a93b5e9493
'2012-01-14T09:56:34-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3296744' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCM' 'sip-files00044.tif'
29b15e086aaeb44a36409eb00bfd1bb0
face5d5dc38bc529b7fd9070638c746666f50e29
'2012-01-14T09:58:37-05:00'
describe
'499' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCN' 'sip-files00044.txt'
22aafbd374112d954ffc71471bc94030
976a699773e6ad2be71c34db0a100f98893b569f
describe
'96236' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCO' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
9450d2a070ff3435947f42815d1b60f8
efabe94dc19988a6b01838bed97624fda1a7d061
'2012-01-14T09:55:58-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3687528' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCP' 'sip-files00045.tif'
c0a86d4a82ab061ec290661751e33b6c
95553f8460280aa2826d16f0d7a0bd9d44f06122
'2012-01-14T09:56:47-05:00'
describe
'840' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCQ' 'sip-files00045.txt'
ff9b364597f9154e4009f01f6a57368b
48a9822358e371ac750a538ac7fa58b5c5e72884
'2012-01-14T09:54:45-05:00'
describe
'105342' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCR' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
4537e6b5fa0f624067ea5fc1c2ca952d
86676e6c7af575186ba17ccb69072e365b2c3331
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3539684' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCS' 'sip-files00046.tif'
994ac3baa932ea275564622b67d93dfd
72a487b4301b0fb083b842bf667d7c0f479980d9
'2012-01-14T09:52:58-05:00'
describe
'904' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCT' 'sip-files00046.txt'
4b7a0e705b937a063ae4c6e4f1779ef6
12111beab5707e6dd802a8b7c04505bc2cd13290
'2012-01-14T09:55:27-05:00'
describe
'101831' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCU' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
baaa9f04507e76f4f9a669e4cdabb6aa
54df3f055c40eaa4f3146c715a520395208eb266
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3711096' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCV' 'sip-files00047.tif'
95402b9bd79886e19d917e42b75e1f27
4d969a015c9388c247bc57957404d87e723be4a9
describe
'887' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCW' 'sip-files00047.txt'
f2eb90c10620b40b8ccc0ad7e8e9e62a
9d1b96ccf55dbb0a7a34e20fb5989de54cf6fec7
describe
'104418' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCX' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
a09426b498a637429f8fa6e1fc65b5e5
4cc5a09a6f173b677e03200b6660405df27cd457
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3685512' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCY' 'sip-files00048.tif'
ce35a610e67571661435f08c3a6b1226
94590db48b49a424bf7aaea5979e8d09a4f20657
'2012-01-14T09:57:33-05:00'
describe
'897' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUCZ' 'sip-files00048.txt'
2400ac5e5f03fbaf692ae0c3f3831725
1bcbafb39460599b3006c08f43a70b55f02a18e2
describe
'95298' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDA' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
97b8b81533f036b4263b451097d102b2
5d22ca93b6f673cc764681792f742a9ac4e11601
'2012-01-14T09:55:10-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3548484' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDB' 'sip-files00049.tif'
8c5057c3ca79ed36ac0cd98e99eba308
30643a351c4d1bc5c2590c8b98339f90a251c133
describe
'772' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDC' 'sip-files00049.txt'
54afb48398d9228191cec3a3265ab081
67c32633acf2ebfc641c5a3cdceafb0d687e6269
'2012-01-14T09:52:24-05:00'
describe
'112323' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDD' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
282caeb689b7304d08078f45d34d7cfa
443a26d484969d4844dcf2337e61ed646ad4a8cb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3445748' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDE' 'sip-files00050.tif'
dc7303f64c2d473ff2457b4eccee5e9d
c4f717fb39d3e787045a0068fe2c9cda62912afc
'2012-01-14T09:57:00-05:00'
describe
'937' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDF' 'sip-files00050.txt'
25d638a76c1e8386e23fadcf450f1c03
d136dda09ea912daa9515bc2537f30781c9d0d44
describe
'107393' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDG' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
618092e00a173467052e5be8d8e2c33c
917589c5fb82a28e883ac2e9e40806e56cf8d8b0
'2012-01-14T09:56:33-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3719056' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDH' 'sip-files00051.tif'
cf54b81bc5e2524d7a054dbb7c4f91d6
78843b4fcc00d702182def8b0cf84e6aae77cc05
'2012-01-14T09:55:24-05:00'
describe
'914' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDI' 'sip-files00051.txt'
8c2784cf59de5170b33c336112399c6f
e394976680d0f75c8318cd2d8f3cfd0f8ab5ecb7
describe
'104898' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDJ' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
389eb6ffad7f410eab76c9211eb79a94
4a6546958e884a13b64e56608c77a6cbe249657f
'2012-01-14T09:54:55-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3575016' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDK' 'sip-files00052.tif'
6eedf97098a26695482b2205a52904ef
fa0296fa3c7974671cb98199a0847847e4d166eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDL' 'sip-files00052.txt'
803ed3d057fddb0d6cbbbd2621dcdf47
3469ac34f598ec3adf8f5e6bf6fd4130ae4e98b9
'2012-01-14T09:53:46-05:00'
describe
'96879' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDM' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
72bbe9fb5aa56c7bb482d15d21ef263a
01f10fd7b6084e3c3a2ea040515ff39739a13089
'2012-01-14T09:53:40-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3632608' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDN' 'sip-files00053.tif'
09707b7b0c9f68c40c6469ded0886ed9
04a256824d317717d73f04af6a917ee9d292fadd
'2012-01-14T09:55:15-05:00'
describe
'870' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDO' 'sip-files00053.txt'
58b39625a7833df45c2e85b3c8a3771e
42d222bbc6fb606f1a6304172357f5e96bbe7c2f
'2012-01-14T09:58:21-05:00'
describe
'112999' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDP' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
9f880b4de3c45f12750b310dcfaa9ab5
e5980ebb35b3193ffa2b0ad6b15668af6370ef9d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3566504' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDQ' 'sip-files00054.tif'
e7638125b34ce797efe50693ec118b75
c3fe003f69a5dc01851fe1aa71fdfd450c2c3411
'2012-01-14T09:58:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDR' 'sip-files00054.txt'
a6a192d1a0d0b31b49041c5525249bd7
d9392f63960b3b32ee939da67d8ba868a0bda405
describe
'135925' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDS' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
4bcbc68a08135cb857f6f5f5e8906e28
1680f421c745824dda0cb99462a84b7239f58c01
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'10505244' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDT' 'sip-files00055.tif'
a2337576699df3dd5828b016e3024c43
6699d2b446e93261c0860e10f1e7e051aa6d23bc
'2012-01-14T09:54:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDU' 'sip-files00055.txt'
bf1bed3d53b22e3b3d3c681b037392d3
5fe3334d826defc41b6187993a32fb6fb70a31f5
'2012-01-14T09:56:35-05:00'
describe
'29832' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDV' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
72b93ec3c299192272ac5393f8d107d8
85e8bf6ab45840837709e5ec525d26bd04079cae
'2012-01-14T09:55:43-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3760840' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDW' 'sip-files00056.tif'
741139c0dce6cb9ed0165e6f6b4d3617
302f9b8d44536e7beda040c88c2e9e73c09d3d99
describe
'101559' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDX' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
5e46c2fb773da9484d4dd07419952c93
60d2cd5476eee1bfaafd8f0562ac919685e1df29
'2012-01-14T09:52:43-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3778900' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDY' 'sip-files00057.tif'
05c75a9a82a0c193dae2ff317b6c33c1
55cc9349637c2af1e95cc6566a54002919dd8193
'2012-01-14T09:57:22-05:00'
describe
'854' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUDZ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
e597ea664011bc686196ed3fb8efc8b9
8369af9f4948b07878d3928fcafaf3261f40940b
'2012-01-14T09:53:00-05:00'
describe
'102954' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEA' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
31168a8b159fac4127c9c6d30b2a4417
cd3f872729b2159dae3c95cd5f2ffdb7bc43f8c1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3433576' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEB' 'sip-files00058.tif'
62222b4f53f4b12064711c04e8933277
ba548a7f7c04847c0cebe1b9f6b4b46c32b424bc
'2012-01-14T09:55:52-05:00'
describe
'832' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEC' 'sip-files00058.txt'
2552c6933b0901dea22512ef4df9b48e
dd06b513d78f2d4f2120722dd66cdfe945b7ae95
'2012-01-14T09:56:59-05:00'
describe
'96285' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUED' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
7f50ba87a0c3befa17836daf79fd82f9
f5afd35c6e6ca47ec91a42baa81a33fe50be4040
'2012-01-14T09:52:48-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3712748' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEE' 'sip-files00059.tif'
359b1d2ad28692fe51cec0f89b69288c
c4c506b2adcde75249297f43e1e9d21c758d56a8
'2012-01-14T09:53:29-05:00'
describe
'773' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEF' 'sip-files00059.txt'
b5849f98fd3d0ddaf09fe5e0120adccc
665f7d80cacd12b8f4d29a026d317330a2287517
'2012-01-14T09:54:39-05:00'
describe
'102347' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEG' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
1f46048c09d14794bcf3fddde0e0624e
44f96d7fb2b90a4a131228ed3b6349864503bcb7
'2012-01-14T09:54:21-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3802968' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEH' 'sip-files00060.tif'
318a93957608c99cb34b94a2a6b101ee
4052b6b62c0bcdcc7e3317d92a91985910bf841d
describe
'924' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEI' 'sip-files00060.txt'
fb95108b3b75a4eacfb97e9bc792e4a2
37738701243847527a8cae16c51a2d7e53353a2c
'2012-01-14T09:52:31-05:00'
describe
'104953' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEJ' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
61194beb185dfff2eb87e8a0bc7f5571
973da1a2c7e41b4adbdb14e4b8056804ec1da6d2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3573388' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEK' 'sip-files00061.tif'
8630adefa37c949501d63a62017f0eb4
6d6c9b032e7c5e7751e8cef3e05405876d055236
'2012-01-14T09:54:36-05:00'
describe
'874' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEL' 'sip-files00061.txt'
cc4ab9a62ce36525e4d430fca1a9032c
290dbbd0eb23c727ad98d27a1f11f499fd7671c4
describe
'109156' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEM' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
8961644f0418fff9ed704fbe3892df81
3e3124053e53c8286b12df7b0f2dde7e014f5c0f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3498256' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEN' 'sip-files00062.tif'
df03a5ed3d36a20bac273e0bf7199c7d
118813d00a711625cf0b4312eeb83ed12d18c8b1
'2012-01-14T09:53:15-05:00'
describe
'972' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEO' 'sip-files00062.txt'
cbb2b404dc9457be158d2c432ed31ce3
d913487c452a58f6b8a8730ae06a93c79db07759
describe
'113017' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEP' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
e979267fc91cc3082d3fe5cca5f758d4
bcc6adba960310ae614ed87d72490f83b1854be4
'2012-01-14T09:57:41-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3351124' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEQ' 'sip-files00063.tif'
59f52735a081bf870f223cbca4cc0a85
dd76c5f8fe83fcbfc0e0f54dfec9aaf3d36e0d0f
'2012-01-14T09:53:24-05:00'
describe
'926' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUER' 'sip-files00063.txt'
4a5b48cb6674cd421be58ec93aac1d31
94c0b955c5b67f7fd478d44685c8b9addb1aa7d5
describe
'72907' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUES' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
63d4b7b990ef21914b396e6dddcc1ac0
b1de91790b231666b0f527c969090529f149a7da
'2012-01-14T09:52:55-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3794440' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUET' 'sip-files00064.tif'
6a3823427e85b90f74f819ee0ebbb57c
d292481df635fcd1d16eb2f7b1f544a99a2d2aa2
'2012-01-14T09:57:13-05:00'
describe
'469' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEU' 'sip-files00064.txt'
819ca281fca7698b7ec9233edef882be
a93e9ab3b62b3a33b22bf2085a6fed20f7516d7a
'2012-01-14T09:58:58-05:00'
describe
'99982' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEV' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
c71c02ef621a0ad1560bfdb1d026f8f4
d8efac833105376cf3371a2464334d7f1b99d9e1
'2012-01-14T09:56:37-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3711192' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEW' 'sip-files00065.tif'
6ab265198c53c7286b1338b65d3b1168
a3c3ff9aa5964a0ba9e66d07bc019eb1adc6d5d7
'2012-01-14T09:56:10-05:00'
describe
'844' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEX' 'sip-files00065.txt'
ccfd3ed3d71167b2ecce5b95f2b584b3
0ed6207318c427fdc65f14c44771699341c96775
'2012-01-14T09:55:14-05:00'
describe
'102385' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEY' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
bac00b4f66e706cdd90bb2b2385b0442
0efc41a488f95fbb6e3bd0f8626a56669731b1a1
'2012-01-14T09:52:27-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3578400' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUEZ' 'sip-files00068.tif'
60d9328ee338685a65eba3c406ceed61
97fbd576d6ed4cc6d47579617b25e5e8e6e5414d
'2012-01-14T09:58:56-05:00'
describe
'882' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFA' 'sip-files00068.txt'
8d4745e92afca7540632aac3874ee916
d53ed8a1502d2c72723a9a00205ae630e8b9cb68
describe
'101660' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFB' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
eb95579d40ea157c157889e13ed5351d
12f75bc862feb42bbf207a9957b0082bbbd31ef9
'2012-01-14T09:56:16-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3632696' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFC' 'sip-files00069.tif'
cc2f8ee4303aa9ac8a95dfc7e0366809
4672c589653ff973e15b50a8e2baf34e6210fc8e
'2012-01-14T09:54:26-05:00'
describe
'878' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFD' 'sip-files00069.txt'
6e56a30faf87c1654674e86dfaaea8bd
44532ab2d7eb1e6c490f31caf54a06bb06492abd
describe
'103267' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFE' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
8aed5250254fdef75ed7f3e45cde38e5
bc62a18e29e5d187a26fe9160ee4faefd1122599
'2012-01-14T09:54:13-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3636088' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFF' 'sip-files00070.tif'
bc1a8f0e5f46d0a3f731f24fe7042f73
64982950b64453e086c13645ae424b8caba4d78b
'2012-01-14T09:54:37-05:00'
describe
'838' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFG' 'sip-files00070.txt'
01bbcf74ad39dc7306b7db051fa152c8
a4f40ff9d17cf8261a40afb72337d1fdb3176aab
'2012-01-14T09:54:42-05:00'
describe
'103483' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFH' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
f2b0f09ec53f2e8f32bceeaf56e16ffd
bf23ea0acfeadb988651ce9bad80ffd74f396b2f
'2012-01-14T09:57:01-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3793292' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFI' 'sip-files00071.tif'
8cf4eaaa050af26b479a6a4b0cc72bcd
f5d191d478a3955839e73606473f9fceb233a12e
'2012-01-14T09:57:19-05:00'
describe
'825' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFJ' 'sip-files00071.txt'
49e27c68cd60d39e9874e627aa9ff51a
4abd3d6df440c49f042a811aef6cf1662711cc69
'2012-01-14T09:58:25-05:00'
describe
'103072' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFK' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
7f5fe7cc13c45d3c52225c5b1d50721d
8bae26617b095d286bf3df8ba465aab9447fac24
'2012-01-14T09:53:25-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3439280' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFL' 'sip-files00072.tif'
d1240510c9fefde107a6c05717032050
7ab11060a3890cc933021cb10120883dba95df2f
'2012-01-14T09:54:30-05:00'
describe
'818' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFM' 'sip-files00072.txt'
1c2dcedad19553ed86b417a66ea39040
48889edf0b645bfa6e382011ddcc8a9448867bf1
'2012-01-14T09:53:05-05:00'
describe
'99679' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFN' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
ee8dd9159302b3950bd338cc9fbcf287
f805c3525ca1221b5e6742af2284aac4adff1c4c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3709392' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFO' 'sip-files00073.tif'
028df74004932e8e7c4c943f3e0ff8b0
a4dfd25ca0dfa3cdac663a7136446231aa0d01d3
'2012-01-14T09:55:05-05:00'
describe
'763' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFP' 'sip-files00073.txt'
af47f2aa90a1b443c43eb25821d30849
735c0420e06546814766165ccb0696f36cc5fbf3
'2012-01-14T09:53:16-05:00'
describe
'104811' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFQ' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
5a69916ca666b86b796d01c0bfa10552
4244ea1eaa5f28429f6f24a6650b171bec03595b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3804716' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFR' 'sip-files00074.tif'
b62f35760424573062502393991699a3
78b556fde56a7037d7eae8efa4846df393c606e8
'2012-01-14T09:56:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFS' 'sip-files00074.txt'
f93b6ba6e54da953a01bd17170e84765
e32ffc6d017bbe4ff69bb9f0035086ba92de384d
'2012-01-14T09:56:24-05:00'
describe
'96794' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFT' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
7ce6714eaa3f025bf89ae7d8601b093a
8ca249f22d6541cd7ff8b5722d0354bef008e74f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3786296' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFU' 'sip-files00075.tif'
273ff195dfef5de5f6a46af5fd47bb19
cb2ab7635670b7ab7d1e48c951ac1bf8d7a63b42
'2012-01-14T09:57:17-05:00'
describe
'808' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFV' 'sip-files00075.txt'
0557deb4f1af9ffd688350775af34eee
0ce48923b7eb6adb0bb9310956b2e54a1389297a
describe
'99650' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFW' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
5f191c308301cfb263dce442843afaa0
896c1d9bdae508336e6a19fd5c12b7547c4faa7c
'2012-01-14T09:55:01-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3270596' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFX' 'sip-files00076.tif'
cbf4b687fb3f6e70d367b6ca3cca77d8
7a016a9f153a604d02ce5c0d8fa1972b6e4b271f
describe
'821' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFY' 'sip-files00076.txt'
9edd7d89c424b56a4b6454ec83e7cc18
4f45f7ce27c48d05e82930fdd045064fa9dbdecd
describe
'101707' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUFZ' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
0fbf61d41c25223d8bc0e648f7b307c9
86c5618fc5aee964954c6124fea143b13f9b9ffc
'2012-01-14T09:52:51-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3425536' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGA' 'sip-files00077.tif'
1828ba57a699aa163e0d52e569742d20
5dd6a8dcc55d3a15a7ba62799fba3086f0252660
describe
'807' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGB' 'sip-files00077.txt'
a8a3b99432d45e28068f3da33d195640
f4512b5d5e063982d64784b40e22b4f09e90f348
'2012-01-14T09:53:07-05:00'
describe
'109256' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGC' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
fba6aa356e3ab52460613da81db45780
9a17aa18fb762a693df29867e1594bb03295f99d
'2012-01-14T09:52:46-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3628864' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGD' 'sip-files00078.tif'
8c2970af32158887c5aae2f643dea73c
287054fc7eadd03e5ff00f816da5a0dd2d7bfaf9
describe
'919' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGE' 'sip-files00078.txt'
1b5f698b884850e51a3e5de582848cb0
cd0ecf42fe525ff5c5369c4daca9e38272e32f05
'2012-01-14T09:53:56-05:00'
describe
'87730' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGF' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
4022d634a350ae2c3a835497bcbfdd38
d244dafdce3e73124248c0d54fe63e7a2af7bd45
'2012-01-14T09:57:02-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3728780' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGG' 'sip-files00079.tif'
4a5004051a9a63e06bdb4150a5611a02
63b3a91c102008bb150cb706ab32d8f7e82e7340
'2012-01-14T09:55:33-05:00'
describe
'703' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGH' 'sip-files00079.txt'
f435f2c378335d2132025ff7f1c792d5
e153e87f34638b9ba906f7b506c2802b463a2660
describe
'79031' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGI' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
f5afa94f39a257b54cd3e1c4adffff05
a238ae5b94997c5f8fdaab122c9bffd5062085e4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3418124' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGJ' 'sip-files00080.tif'
825ed2914b3dca0451eb5501ca5cc6e3
4b285cc539d1ca0a75d6a9e5468ca48cc3ab975b
describe
'452' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGK' 'sip-files00080.txt'
9b0ba90588899535d05c718f7a248f17
d2a3a2d8f08102b54e6bd330e538a5057f27c6fb
'2012-01-14T09:52:39-05:00'
describe
'106160' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGL' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
a9320559868c1b56cc463ace171db721
0b0c5e8ba06658ca9a02326115ef77ec362a6017
'2012-01-14T09:56:50-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3633788' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGM' 'sip-files00081.tif'
d0421f220bfab335f9178f40a7732c15
4be73a3cfa43d9a64c0bb78c96c9ca331f2ae565
describe
'851' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGN' 'sip-files00081.txt'
d71f4503f184cdac6652cc60e6bc6f30
3212747c51f12dd26984b2bc8011efe3987c6690
describe
'103059' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGO' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
d18ed0e310dff77c7db2956ae30bd4f7
ebb176b5798840fbe78f602b6aaed16e1b4d46be
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3782472' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGP' 'sip-files00082.tif'
2ed7b940f999e6321016dadd14d757a4
773afa79d796f4159818e91b381a4329c00f35a9
'2012-01-14T09:58:02-05:00'
describe
'822' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGQ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
6f0126fd6e09dfcb58f9acbd71d6e967
a64e4431d6100ba2a7546c84958f2df6edba61ec
describe
'99482' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGR' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
c5c9ea736f2cdb74667c4e35684df261
a0c2baf65f75a0167904a920f97b900f51693290
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3705668' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGS' 'sip-files00083.tif'
e8f279e87ff80f05a70aa1f0224f69c0
99586d5bb06d33397446e0dc5f4e79a9edc42c51
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGT' 'sip-files00083.txt'
e2def542e1bb597a2e5c922da758df3f
5a917b79e8b31c7de8f5c68a8a9f0fe1eddefb1a
describe
'105773' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGU' 'sip-files00083a.jpg'
f72e46c0c24b213af689e812480c02d8
9db4cf4b81c11063103e56c712580534a41f4c4c
'2012-01-14T09:56:11-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3755208' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGV' 'sip-files00083a.tif'
a4592f70af5dd2bc30f221f2460aea01
50ac6a757dacab316bf6b88953c348254c3a5c1d
describe
'843' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGW' 'sip-files00083a.txt'
475c2984b615080c74ef4a19694b2b65
f46c3eb2fdc420b9c7e7b0b9013c8864575997a4
'2012-01-14T09:55:45-05:00'
describe
'109595' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGX' 'sip-files00083b.jpg'
43d408ad25d105a2dddc2315d5a1406d
a7e434c2fb77b0f1cafc706706fcf8eb8b76587d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3828248' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGY' 'sip-files00083b.tif'
a7d3a1f2f96764ac25c00e8ec95d5a55
318b2e4bac26eb487948fbe54897a253d785b948
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUGZ' 'sip-files00083b.txt'
6a51436f1c9517f0c49786189f266f28
aadc277734305deb57f080a23c61ab3906084029
'2012-01-14T09:58:05-05:00'
describe
'107914' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHA' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
6e178a12e273dafe26d2934778cb9500
d93ac146ceea4a4722c4e76edbee84b5b07bb5c5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3456492' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHB' 'sip-files00084.tif'
4c37c5c9dc801bedb9ea6c53cbd42ec0
3e204cb104c85c67c4c52f95a9f3c46677406f70
describe
'803' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHC' 'sip-files00084.txt'
5cdacb6189c4ef8e66b613c239aeea6d
a1c6f481a8baec50eae9992033b13e571574506b
describe
'167798' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHD' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
9bf2b52916f741bbf404d66434a3e5f7
143407173e1e55bb8a31af606f8de3cb0f47e810
'2012-01-14T09:55:13-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'10471560' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHE' 'sip-files00085.tif'
163a3b3c70a3c41ca7614eb5f19b23ca
ee37192df0075c807822474b75c7d9ebcdce4aca
describe
'22' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHF' 'sip-files00085.txt'
f1ec570eaed36722f154338057139a65
1aabe86e3ef05edbcfa66670be6e23ae39fb4b6d
'2012-01-14T09:56:15-05:00'
describe
'14585' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHG' 'sip-files00085a.jpg'
88f5f25ab17fdbd0f2a7ee890a70ebec
de2330319a5546ac5f2f212322ca4ccee64f13bd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3786124' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHH' 'sip-files00085a.tif'
251302dbf406754996bfd8093019f13e
2e47c15c6b512c3e64299c976631b3f4842cafc8
describe
'111438' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHI' 'sip-files00085b.jpg'
f2d72f70da6306d2dc9eba12c6389218
1aa448cf73b35328abcbba356bf58c987fa8efe9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3645968' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHJ' 'sip-files00085b.tif'
b11ec9dcd6fa098f0de1ba227e1ec939
87245e1831e858bd7db66aa17c5b7b6b371687d6
'2012-01-14T09:52:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHK' 'sip-files00085b.txt'
a3dac097720fc0ad8be89bc7a0218c39
86fb6dce9a0611926ce9abc72952c833bf7e235d
'2012-01-14T09:57:27-05:00'
describe
'107630' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHL' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
0776e6c48b293495f24bd49b96f34510
3ee49e647779e57f2991716801162e782bc9a47d
'2012-01-14T09:57:43-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3500396' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHM' 'sip-files00086.tif'
849b51614284526f2a3f161e4595c473
7dd04dbd80bf3b9cbe88adcc91649897ae2b29ec
describe
'839' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHN' 'sip-files00086.txt'
723a84f421a996f19c7f339a2ef6d8e0
fa3a7170e6e5b75d6e1a0ebaf1a0676574a53f22
'2012-01-14T09:55:32-05:00'
describe
'115151' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHO' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
6f464ec401e464c3ec042c03ce3b2c67
a3c55e1a3bccf5ca7e4aee05f9a6f2f48863cfd9
'2012-01-14T09:57:50-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3613636' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHP' 'sip-files00087.tif'
2110f413a007a76406f686c8a596bfc6
64167c02254b326fc32385bfa9daa6ace0c6eabc
'2012-01-14T09:55:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHQ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
9873a19f9e26922bd75bfb2be791557c
697a9e7d9900ec557cd9cffd6d8c6a7b3f513f96
'2012-01-14T09:57:11-05:00'
describe
'99583' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHR' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
dd9b1228fe31f70ff926404903dab8d2
c9646c273ac4b3ff2130ea3c97a7d53b7171e54e
'2012-01-14T09:53:10-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3885404' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHS' 'sip-files00088.tif'
5e690acbf2ee430e1e3db277f980a993
f783958a69ce9586dbdd5c8b24a09092117df494
'2012-01-14T09:52:41-05:00'
describe
'811' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHT' 'sip-files00088.txt'
0f0ae9ab0b388a2d13954feec19c13c6
9926624a7370b5609dcb4f59ebf284b3a351f6fe
describe
'101024' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHU' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
a4be3ea3b854e02c01030a49cf2977f7
dd6844fefd8118d00fda74327ff9cd3cb7ef9f88
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3838704' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHV' 'sip-files00089.tif'
800e383d208daffb7e6b92d4fd795483
1a6bccc041233938bac8682cec208e82d1ea0e38
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHW' 'sip-files00089.txt'
cabb3e075083909e5c995092e57ed203
94a6e7d90e4ecc03b130349e18866347a82d5dee
describe
'111338' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHX' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
7b9908a42f9b1ab91687ce075c295a86
aef1beb92b4b6a02a2f9ee2fbf8d2ff10186038e
'2012-01-14T09:54:33-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3548812' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHY' 'sip-files00090.tif'
7cbe5c1db417e8598f416a6502010581
3e2a7f6669fde1a6bf4e1d48929bc33902c76a2f
'2012-01-14T09:56:32-05:00'
describe
'886' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUHZ' 'sip-files00090.txt'
183eca92faf7485dc9f953c177a439c3
64484c4a0ca0db3bb7c52d7b4c07886b9fa44453
'2012-01-14T09:58:42-05:00'
describe
'146181' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIA' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
9287688198a5d4379efeca0c97eb54a4
c3bb80207a38b38106fb1786f0236d675e1d10e9
'2012-01-14T09:55:28-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'11332744' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIB' 'sip-files00091.tif'
f8224c9206d9e89f073f8e98dd832557
9f57c0278af58fb1d4d02c9ad07a9dcbc5ea7ce3
describe
'18' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIC' 'sip-files00091.txt'
f633f18eb37739705e6e037b5ad5ff34
c09c62ef578daedad9d5140d3cb668447b1f8f4c
describe
'29344' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUID' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
07e97afb1a621107431213185ba079aa
75cebfb18020a8be8469500a5d6fdc8ababa5cb6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3598700' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIE' 'sip-files00092.tif'
855673b498d882d81634b1fd205f4acf
5a145784c5da5f8138276e4e9a6a96491b9d6d74
describe
'107073' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIF' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
a5042e496c6f0194cb08ba28b148477f
ced5ef2eedbb685c2b42d44e4dd9776bc52ffd66
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3422408' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIG' 'sip-files00093.tif'
8fc40f50265b7b2fe9b1869e95bda24d
c0d60a0e111e61039812316ae2be06d38067577c
'2012-01-14T09:54:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIH' 'sip-files00093.txt'
d5e50e802ec7439741ee91076cf019a8
757e4f58c58f43e9478159c52efc8e3cddff8be5
describe
'105045' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUII' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
36e57b95edd33a1fcc4ad08d2cc68e39
0b56b7e4bb975238957e2870b4d08624e763e42b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3436712' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIJ' 'sip-files00094.tif'
da6c7bdb6fcc93ad1ad5824a3d88c5f9
1f4dd3a340c2f719eeb64d879feaf7979e632fd4
'2012-01-14T09:52:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIK' 'sip-files00094.txt'
4bded58fb92558d4bee8900daca36a36
ac1f73d64f0f71da2996353d82081cc305493c43
'2012-01-14T09:57:18-05:00'
describe
'113590' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIL' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
d999ead08914036117f6f37e9bbeae12
856e96d73853610026937437ba38f625d562ee99
'2012-01-14T09:53:54-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3460696' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIM' 'sip-files00095.tif'
f67d9e0b8047c383afcdfab6e6dbabe6
507e5a038d7841360a1f06251c10f01d688c3e4a
'2012-01-14T09:58:44-05:00'
describe
'835' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIN' 'sip-files00095.txt'
15a735adaa83469bf0fe6fbd09ceaa6d
8c2a49b9a633ba373926332b2bb65925f6145565
describe
'101549' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIO' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
e247c26f63c2d0da928eabb99d7f1fd9
95c398b3f5631cf6026a5d10b70e43f098330c2a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3740572' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIP' 'sip-files00096.tif'
5078bd8d554b7a8b215a631aa1656fbe
f6e52dd8289c612f1bcde3187443079211c55629
'2012-01-14T09:54:25-05:00'
describe
'725' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIQ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
e19a0fc4c54572d1bd82f2084a6c356c
31cf161bb222556c9b5a689efa08c893a5f572aa
'2012-01-14T09:57:34-05:00'
describe
'79270' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIR' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
635b46bd6577a5c23e14f4f7035ceb9f
fb24425c31d0494e0a0ee7533fd593f8caf41c46
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3682884' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIS' 'sip-files00097.tif'
512a22fb5c0a4e9ea93d33c3e8ce75f5
cf667b51d775db389ea03e9127abf88cc61fadbe
describe
'515' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIT' 'sip-files00097.txt'
98736ac0ddbc80ae3d4cff368168cf1d
5776ed3cb066fe571282178a8eebaf26dacca0cd
describe
'116280' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIU' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
dd03184f2950bce523975ab8f374386e
058cd406d64c762ae312d188fbc0e67fd8ef432f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3841212' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIV' 'sip-files00098.tif'
cae7dc60c0619673e9e795b3a899baa8
fc80c2405213d749800d151cb17afa08adc27fad
'2012-01-14T09:56:14-05:00'
describe
'857' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIW' 'sip-files00098.txt'
787ff7061f6f1ef1b28a8e5ef6f227f7
c643c75e0968986739505ba674a885388999e2be
'2012-01-14T09:56:01-05:00'
describe
'118106' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIX' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
b5bfe7ccd78cd618c0b46b78999735b8
aa6ff926f72eaeed73be63d7bafcf0c019b0b009
'2012-01-14T09:52:29-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3593680' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIY' 'sip-files00099.tif'
6e7546d1dfcd3f595d7fe0deb275960f
b8891ae5458e6817da2685c3bab97952e473f6c0
describe
'869' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUIZ' 'sip-files00099.txt'
31349ddccdab661aa1f9eec7f8157442
a80f8c4d8f508cacaee14a0e4328329702f9b893
'2012-01-14T09:54:01-05:00'
describe
'112329' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJA' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
fbd5d7aacde1c83c818420ba72fb6060
df4bedf7549b542cc0db9031b31e1aefcff51e91
'2012-01-14T09:52:26-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3701616' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJB' 'sip-files00100.tif'
86775edeebf6db6821b52d1ea2ece499
21ef616f8cb1af18761fee7ba0a661b10675ae4f
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJC' 'sip-files00100.txt'
012dab99e0f04d7d643be4bd11143d40
cfddfb46ea6c0deb8dac67edc7f1890d677de069
'2012-01-14T09:56:08-05:00'
describe
'110098' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJD' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
e639fc5fcca4c7761a9bb33bd3708344
9054ea79cb603aed4db88760b5595c98d25e171a
'2012-01-14T09:54:17-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3659892' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJE' 'sip-files00101.tif'
7a351ba4df615d675acc00a868d30ded
ae6a6dec24659c8c1e88c05c95f47b7f3c4ce53b
'2012-01-14T09:54:29-05:00'
describe
'819' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJF' 'sip-files00101.txt'
a31fc4ea9807e1a7653e70e7c47ac5f5
2c6b694da051b7c58d4d37585c6200c847cc2ea3
describe
'105871' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJG' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
2120ba7f930fd2422161da40c75e114b
404eed9b9fd14d460446160e6706dc657c750b7c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3881352' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJH' 'sip-files00102.tif'
c98d627c24d5492280449ec58c5bd77a
982477c4d5d4e373d1a79bf4a74a455d0e3c82d3
'2012-01-14T09:53:41-05:00'
describe
'753' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJI' 'sip-files00102.txt'
6c34deae709a6e4442c7a83f378e2f81
14441058be3c20fda67afe7444ec053cd1825b27
describe
'110939' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJJ' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
c866816b939504abffe9cd9da23b28ad
410a0b7cd57a1e0f66bf8dd6482bee149ddc5270
'2012-01-14T09:55:51-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3622920' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJK' 'sip-files00103.tif'
9f3ff065e6f1d868c1a07fbf2ef301ee
06ae6d07a4a036c1a9e3889bce34a92addc0a393
'2012-01-14T09:57:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJL' 'sip-files00103.txt'
0cd8918711f9bb15e9748b0ae458e943
1685a9eba89e8ae5aca83fec2e078f36ec4288e8
'2012-01-14T09:53:59-05:00'
describe
'66287' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJM' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
b000475fae6e1519878e1aea52803f5f
4d58b8723fa2ab716552f2d4b217555bfedbe2a1
'2012-01-14T09:55:55-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3731340' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJN' 'sip-files00104.tif'
0dcaf16cba09f9998ae0e2bd87cd469c
c862e4595dc932e67f6e053f4ff9feb0d9c34d59
describe
'372' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJO' 'sip-files00104.txt'
4b9c0861af0a747d5867012271e3818f
de820fed73ba89112a5359c6bc4fc12d2e3022a5
'2012-01-14T09:55:35-05:00'
describe
'88154' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJP' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
130770f00c748a41943bf473899f9bfb
eeff3ad7b5f7703b2421ae4a15a327f5cd46f0e5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3737472' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJQ' 'sip-files00105.tif'
592c033375c0c71495af19972a27e89f
b80f7d91e9b553aa90f6ce468bc053ca5fa8aeb5
'2012-01-14T09:53:02-05:00'
describe
'572' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJR' 'sip-files00105.txt'
fd569f8b8e3d9b2d9e0cdad2dd2c700e
6c0a7f8170c1c0c0963f9c707855f741e8b93442
describe
'116286' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJS' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
2f61b0a73d8bbba6efc53e2d6009bd11
828329c542443f2ecc934eea3b313bf8d64b6922
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3718648' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJT' 'sip-files00106.tif'
cef35dd1aaec952ce09cd6687b0b8544
4356479e8f33d109b40e0e1d560c1f58d54819ca
'2012-01-14T09:57:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJU' 'sip-files00106.txt'
c5f5ba20014e46e7b2124e5b89b80bd2
d712c4cf15bf846f03e8fa96181a6d5d0528996e
describe
'119393' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJV' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
e950d3012f4cad3ae23598525f2c3ad9
b2b020707baa66d7e8dfcfbbced3e2e61a680c0e
'2012-01-14T09:58:03-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3773236' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJW' 'sip-files00107.tif'
4652166e6de2b780d7b1bdfc7a0cf130
4a1162d6b374d363bb786d51f9eef83034360e55
'2012-01-14T09:54:14-05:00'
describe
'883' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJX' 'sip-files00107.txt'
fff9b007c313902a2e2c7141474d1716
a6d48446e1d883672b6cbd7bfd94e77e89aa68cf
'2012-01-14T09:55:17-05:00'
describe
'125210' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJY' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
2f10c4c2bb14576773fee1bbc75abeb5
3cdafc376dc07e1020e190da6e02c5d7ef4aa0b7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3894552' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUJZ' 'sip-files00108.tif'
109fdb9a961c6f034a76e05db1047992
4703b0ab39dd55d1cfe7bb6b2d0db22a2059bc21
'2012-01-14T09:53:22-05:00'
describe
'945' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKA' 'sip-files00108.txt'
23b4563c95ba370124c38aaf75b94401
aa6b39bb55f477e324901141ee706e35e00dae2b
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKB' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
7d9b3f8b72fe30420da63e9410dd5fac
dc664820cf4401f5d5a9a18e15181570e00d2b88
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3931272' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKC' 'sip-files00109.tif'
e868c34860052b477142d3cee5367d9b
ea1e17a2e70e1abace1e0e189a3925805d037957
'2012-01-14T09:52:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKD' 'sip-files00109.txt'
49855db1088b1cabcff451beb6decc57
25c4d3a08da175d29f77b046ce05467f4795c769
describe
'115609' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKE' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
2cdfcd1ae7de6d91f96795e8b6665fd0
075073868adba5e5085cd075fcf9081aad1c856f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3495072' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKF' 'sip-files00110.tif'
9070ebd42afc2807ca343f6a9710b1f2
13eca9d5b27f41dbc026ab90add9ee86accc0512
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKG' 'sip-files00110.txt'
03d75c0964b19c20b15b5614ec69330c
5cb207b2a97a7c3f5d7f1ff994e8b0c145a25e05
describe
'110071' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKH' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
6292be8a89dae32b6129234045f118b4
d644503e38b3693295319fb48ea830a78b59ed2e
'2012-01-14T09:57:07-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3573016' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKI' 'sip-files00111.tif'
c7b31ca22252a2d16b19c11f1052e121
8098504ff18d27c51beb11f26e34dc2a03efc14a
describe
'850' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKJ' 'sip-files00111.txt'
c64286d83f6944a0e8a0cebbe975975a
7483da88cab44e1c89b59b754c13222eb83ca760
describe
'120992' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKK' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
27f0dd1e2ffd25459af3b8f05536b049
214e7f1b450d1b089a01641606935fd87c1d894a
'2012-01-14T09:54:35-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3844932' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKL' 'sip-files00112.tif'
82ab8765147b689a99f4848bffcb8be4
c7cc93d5351f10fe7964d8041c4ae5877fd9de6c
'2012-01-14T09:55:48-05:00'
describe
'912' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKM' 'sip-files00112.txt'
3101955fe70f6a76b172f3020955996e
595f257e35c82a5067c463dbb226b77a8835b8b1
'2012-01-14T09:57:08-05:00'
describe
'150168' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKN' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
32e331d4ffc6d5d1a53983db2a98073e
3d0dd9786cefe09d47535c7faa3e62da2a9b5fe8
'2012-01-14T09:57:48-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'11430800' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKO' 'sip-files00113.tif'
02546a5a506f5d97d5ae5e018351ca4b
813669ef578be7d20393042470d9acf3dfc48e20
'2012-01-14T09:53:11-05:00'
describe
'21' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKP' 'sip-files00113.txt'
9f580ff43ee2fcce66e2129ebb1ddbf2
bd29d1fc5323718f72835c9f20f8d8b1a95716bf
describe
'37109' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKQ' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
8786d632bcf1bb185c0a0e77f718f035
110356a6bc59c4e332eb8c21b40653b5083310e5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3680008' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKR' 'sip-files00114.tif'
a6d66b4aa1edce7ea303b2c2cea58925
ba5d6c72a66c2e30d5a29758b3660573a79e0b52
'2012-01-14T09:58:12-05:00'
describe
'113755' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKS' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
058918c19ca448aba33be3d093269101
2384d02a37391c4db412183e88f2642065bfe0ed
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3702944' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKT' 'sip-files00115.tif'
8d2d77010960214a7f90ce5e79c3f665
92744cdbda2dfa6178c79ed27b1e6e1297fd2622
'2012-01-14T09:55:30-05:00'
describe
'908' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKU' 'sip-files00115.txt'
7111d3ceb0b2e25cfc9e3db0e2f14ed8
e9f934f1562bd5e5afb138d786be373848d48637
'2012-01-14T09:56:25-05:00'
describe
'125831' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKV' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
205c75b2d9b96fd7d2257ab29ab77a31
aed868c0a3045da59740b71a2671ce3e80f5ba1e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3752832' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKW' 'sip-files00116.tif'
4527aba86ef23cf8f76cef30b2f828a9
f569b18a65cf49f60b03cea4edf556e5bf1e347a
'2012-01-14T09:54:20-05:00'
describe
'922' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKX' 'sip-files00116.txt'
3c48a39722e95f042662a31989c04820
faa1fc52a4323a3194b704a1654d123b79e4b4c8
describe
'121396' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKY' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
aa574c071078abdf1d7b2d2c1b3792b7
02e491c352094afd5581fc211d75c40f4315ac7d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3591416' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUKZ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
6305b3bb402909756d7c5ebbadcadffe
43a884e30c18e567cd64f52d46b67436c6bbe726
'2012-01-14T09:52:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULA' 'sip-files00117.txt'
e86c37a4c313c4d6d7a33f757dabd4bb
d9ef56857ef2b3f19da0e10290e3c46d22cefcce
describe
'118338' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULB' 'sip-files00117a.jpg'
68af0ad727e2f75ae2552829f3cd1872
c1f5bf1285c54134efde5536a154da220627d92c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3748148' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULC' 'sip-files00117a.tif'
d32a2957d4f6eab2aef5054ec1b03a6c
5516ac1ade9dd9945e9c1f02f502249a42d39b85
'2012-01-14T09:56:18-05:00'
describe
'895' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULD' 'sip-files00117a.txt'
279eddf8e417d11fea3843240aa4eb8a
19e7e6a8b9457320572de340a59c3e56ac950447
describe
'82752' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULE' 'sip-files00117b.jpg'
e60ef2dd839d47dbf63e6d4f1f826bc3
a8fa8f5acc8a1f7a711d7dd05109b90dce42c34e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3875556' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULF' 'sip-files00117b.tif'
d40244e86443292bc728bf3a05b55bd4
9531232a28a07f8f9880c56c59b16815c52c0f3f
'2012-01-14T09:58:35-05:00'
describe
'516' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULG' 'sip-files00117b.txt'
e1ac017c48c230cc0b23c30a7dc891ec
73cd808ad0b3236767c11adfeac6549d368ca449
'2012-01-14T09:57:44-05:00'
describe
'117313' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULH' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
c78544ffd07afb09c1d208972ae50f8f
2980741b36e58e040d47a67eab2722eedcaf7b76
'2012-01-14T09:54:43-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3658564' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULI' 'sip-files00118.tif'
a4fce0d17b533739cc9b130610adfc52
c684d811f6f3243f0568acf693642756a5ecfa80
'2012-01-14T09:52:36-05:00'
describe
'910' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULJ' 'sip-files00118.txt'
eb2a116bc627c22ef526d72a2b5fe311
54ff543fe09ec0625faff5f85de62e3e5a910ce2
'2012-01-14T09:54:51-05:00'
describe
'118627' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULK' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
d7d7c5b13d7aa5e3e70c169c02b873db
ae4dcfad873f37144575e0d6e7e4c0e8bdd28f65
'2012-01-14T09:56:54-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3898940' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULL' 'sip-files00119.tif'
52d75a7e864bcb779b883eb54965abf2
d32447bff4869e66b34913bc5d4aec2523b00493
describe
'841' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULM' 'sip-files00119.txt'
0fdfcda4884d972fe386899a16d42322
9369f7d58f99bf03d6ac9423376526d08b1a4dc1
describe
'120997' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULN' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
550bb7c851eb01e0db7230b78f41d29e
c171accf70e647c076488fab1d1c700c389e3b75
'2012-01-14T09:52:54-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3676152' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULO' 'sip-files00120.tif'
64fb2a9d49f4884814ee2b0f227092e5
49600ad5ff1e2dae7606ee4ea267568e8e6dbdab
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULP' 'sip-files00120.txt'
271a724d150149eda2372d617519c6e3
71f2249dd997d12b6d8d490f2abd3b58b9122845
describe
'116961' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULQ' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
bd7222a076e6c30a209db059d594b017
4d577982d94551f790d3cc0e279c2d6504053aac
'2012-01-14T09:58:33-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3781236' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULR' 'sip-files00121.tif'
868884b43659cf9a60045e02b9c202bf
21feed78fad79a64ee585594634bff1daecacb67
describe
'834' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULS' 'sip-files00121.txt'
426b09b199f7ef86fc698f17ac3be36c
0bd352bfb506a24e11bd9a1e5b33be6fff054725
'2012-01-14T09:55:19-05:00'
describe
'130430' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULT' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
19999f2f0b055d9af3679450139c68a3
08a1976361ffb8c8c0b317bf02beefd8bc7b4d5a
'2012-01-14T09:53:30-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3641992' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULU' 'sip-files00122.tif'
1ffc590c7a58b29766d3956da9b14fe2
e8dd441cfdaa10fc1d622b256d40d04532be0efe
'2012-01-14T09:56:48-05:00'
describe
'918' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULV' 'sip-files00122.txt'
2a58c69d9fa0086f6102729fe29465ed
fcd28563088f6da2004eec0955686520e423ef53
describe
'137220' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULW' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
379484790af05adf9ed9700a91eaad51
6f560fc6a16ccd534312220291e647e3886e526b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'11584952' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULX' 'sip-files00123.tif'
4b3ebdb403c45eda8a9be3fba5d43a5a
a5ad4ad94f19f6d26027e4a8c2495d218d47c425
'2012-01-14T09:55:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULY' 'sip-files00123.txt'
96bb963db213dbf5f20cf9b32b84d4ba
e18a825666c0577b0cf0348a0ec972af13ef5a20
describe
'36740' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAULZ' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
dadb467b7284a995e91418a73ae62cbf
d2128225d689c17840fe11978b299b7943f6d27a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3739804' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMA' 'sip-files00124.tif'
526186d8bba8dd825a2bf0edaacd0108
4ba4c14a9c0d4a100d15ce8f21d7f43572154eef
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMB' 'sip-files00124.txt'
b2b67013dae78719d829268ce8f801b9
30def5eb57340e82139853de2dbb0fbf324a5e06
'2012-01-14T09:56:40-05:00'
describe
'108931' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMC' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
4d6380ce012f8ef522c9ac37de73d2ec
81c6be7b315ad554416115545a37aa7d737e14e7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3776828' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMD' 'sip-files00125.tif'
a9935808628eaf65dccbcd4f93995c37
44a3b66216fa709f9f7782729fcaa02e687a903b
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUME' 'sip-files00125.txt'
e980e7d4e592f317660d37e12a2be0b3
4fcf265e10e94de1b23159f1c11fc078dd4eb0f7
'2012-01-14T09:55:02-05:00'
describe
'105533' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMF' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
70930d99c2b9e39a4ce5692c91d3eccc
b8560550f3056ab61f97a1af74a1138f0195b2c1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3884592' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMG' 'sip-files00126.tif'
5e41986dd1ce035580fcd0bd52817d61
2247597b4c5d87b9d05f5629a08e151d81344a5e
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMH' 'sip-files00126.txt'
d2daf03751a25fa097adc954d5e2ea58
a0296fc7bf0073afa74a0903254ee9feeb72e5a7
describe
'87110' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMI' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
6693b5bc552fb3f7f641fccda77041e3
fa98ceb13270ceb7603619c1ac44c7ffb801d876
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3769656' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMJ' 'sip-files00127.tif'
30a1117f7e677f199db5d42a3a610c4b
e0fbdd2774dd4139d7746f65ffd9891f8d780f15
'2012-01-14T09:53:06-05:00'
describe
'607' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMK' 'sip-files00127.txt'
c096ee85051dd00186ccbfa6094d3da3
7ecd16324b1445b2d0475d39e01a44038b6ee020
describe
'108260' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUML' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
e016cb11f94508a46385d476706746bb
925c35fcfa529e6b2c6e187b388873a0a1b39f50
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3734464' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMM' 'sip-files00128.tif'
e929e22fad18d0d9aeda67a469ecdd82
a4bec7746c0542f63866c236fa656537d60ba2c4
describe
'898' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMN' 'sip-files00128.txt'
25accfdb4b343000608a24441b80cedd
cf70ed08fd9d1ace1df7145778b567c94f99495d
describe
'110588' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMO' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
ae62963613e9f6e9b9b0bf60c1cc1edf
949db5c0168a7e5198c8089a78688048e1687689
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3495836' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMP' 'sip-files00129.tif'
dcabcf33a10d08fd3cfae57bcdf93164
bbec32261966ed90c0dabfea01d6d516e56175d2
'2012-01-14T09:55:16-05:00'
describe
'907' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMQ' 'sip-files00129.txt'
45e92af854804198818ec02c5bc07852
371046409c5cf26be7b5abbae9273a0e5fcbd027
'2012-01-14T09:57:14-05:00'
describe
'108916' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMR' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
5e97e41bb4c832e06724d05da9e5aa62
ac654541ec7895b8bca41270ec670f342ff3b4a9
'2012-01-14T09:55:09-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3666616' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMS' 'sip-files00130.tif'
6958f3f9504ff2050744ee4f46cdec7e
082fdd1d6fea80b001a0f90d2f0bcc218ee7e36c
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMT' 'sip-files00130.txt'
bcf053d4e0633f5b66eb31f303998a56
0c7d8d9c3fa621492b8e9cd567948829b119dce1
'2012-01-14T09:55:57-05:00'
describe
'124760' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMU' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
77a41864edd465edc48d65a0b8f849a4
d0f8caed6ac55a60623cd218290d0ae88431c52c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'11776088' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMV' 'sip-files00131.tif'
2648258c9eb714af2916333b433393c8
219c61a58a93604b2157b4c3aad38324cc043449
'2012-01-14T09:57:54-05:00'
describe
'61' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMW' 'sip-files00131.txt'
1fbc38681fb1dcdfe98376acff2d9ecc
384210d79b80d99c7caa64f830528851b2440dc3
describe
'36951' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMX' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
d33f239feecb94dd8d345d604d79e9f5
b282465d8f044ad57239ce9519df95243c86b12d
'2012-01-14T09:52:32-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3755768' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMY' 'sip-files00132.tif'
5c2bd04d4ec9e8ab8036b4a10b43626f
aa3677be7b39ef2cf302315251e90d9b6a98abfb
describe
'92' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUMZ' 'sip-files00132.txt'
3bd800fd7e5e05c1d852f5482619df7d
f0317bf7ea49bfccfcc9db1787e753a2c52cea6f
'2012-01-14T09:57:09-05:00'
describe
'112476' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNA' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
d938f3ce544a2bcf20686bac2073c2ce
ff9d5bf543c2b6299a7802d30ed3e911e89e41aa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3819316' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNB' 'sip-files00133.tif'
3490aa74cf9adefe5db91020aed4b033
958178724db89c6f775369bbc56c38216ba8c58d
'2012-01-14T09:56:07-05:00'
describe
'816' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNC' 'sip-files00133.txt'
5d9a7ea6004a1788aea8ea8a851520a0
dd1cf491c6d06a655e54d40da3d1c5ba21a8f63f
'2012-01-14T09:58:11-05:00'
describe
'109128' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUND' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
652795427ce4ee6554bb29ee5a6cf191
f85beae5e8c745ed6d04006a66723fe068b70cbf
'2012-01-14T09:53:42-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'4007004' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNE' 'sip-files00134.tif'
fe2e4cc5c75ef23204699469cad18c14
538641216e4cde7aba5e19fed84bf8d68a061413
'2012-01-14T09:56:52-05:00'
describe
'781' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNF' 'sip-files00134.txt'
03d256774596d94a278fb3503f839905
956dc6fbfb003ea58c3b1101f7a3328c7fe58ab1
describe
'118732' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNG' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
0b57adfc35bba2eff707c22abf9b3fe2
2251f7821e5e326d830806c1d392df02dcc666b6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3994412' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNH' 'sip-files00135.tif'
f27c25f392da97dc17b4b617545baea5
59650518e84872b141c0f44e9f2b5c01e187a109
'2012-01-14T09:53:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNI' 'sip-files00135.txt'
ea29a6cd3d0c43db1f8600b2ef8ea654
4ee0f569bfa918ee7bd4d0e6b604f74a1afa968b
'2012-01-14T09:53:14-05:00'
describe
'126836' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNJ' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
eea767f29b645cb9cefcfe22d03b44ef
ee688f52e7b89d1561ca7b517e48105c427ed8ef
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3822924' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNK' 'sip-files00136.tif'
59d9528b4337941eb7b913f84c12c2a8
7b76a17a32aabd835e25291b1599e11fa3150a38
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNL' 'sip-files00136.txt'
93cc82d5d862945a50b6a7091810d602
7cc0e6b444a4269ac8052dba687e69864fe963e3
describe
'116229' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNM' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
9a3cf05f2664470bb28003b1084ba6bb
90ec93df7c3fa986e4e363c8fdab125c7b9b0851
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'4039380' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNN' 'sip-files00137.tif'
7ea35e1776425d1235d3806732f41bcf
c7fe3b2d38f15b07d23552a45f72400f93e79806
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNO' 'sip-files00137.txt'
9fcc68e92ba30652ad6693c5b95e2baa
e19d7c9cd53211ab5ccc5a354793e502bd218644
describe
'114822' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNP' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
78edcd97137a13b1d5ee0e4e98a9a017
b71d200031e7639380a25bcc9ac8f5aab382671b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3821884' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNQ' 'sip-files00138.tif'
41c87bb9c6f2b6e3730069626e9822e4
6e0dff6598502787b40ebd50135e7678b3773e64
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNR' 'sip-files00138.txt'
7cf620da6791f4872a616506ec4b7009
abb5ae2c09e507a80a2f5658cef54735a6c7c905
'2012-01-14T09:58:23-05:00'
describe
'110501' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNS' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
13a4f2479c8c2398c7783606f6ed2ddc
f203b2e7199397e18427451b82b8b3bfa5572f04
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'4046616' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNT' 'sip-files00139.tif'
2419c85aaff8cb33b77d9bb034876c02
45c33b62dd9435f54f9db36df882955227e03e9c
describe
'849' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNU' 'sip-files00139.txt'
fda7d2776e55b4cdebc0115cd52d9779
cf46bcde9f10b5f35c7bbbc223bf8952e81e9e0f
describe
'63308' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNV' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
be75d6380b2c8932897c09c9888f38e8
6bc3d91dc372199818f07061c73752d98888f55a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3881856' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNW' 'sip-files00140.tif'
4fffa0046a0380933ec12dfa9b46824d
c238a09fda262e32323450915fe71758df5cba34
'2012-01-14T09:58:16-05:00'
describe
'262' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNX' 'sip-files00140.txt'
774ef2ea21c82d0d08d4eb059d528ead
c88f752cf5ad476867ade2c88c6fb52f16180975
describe
'80214' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNY' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
c85a520cbbb0cdf4be2757de4eb75d78
c43b374d1f5069522051d6862ceb2d806806aeb7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3865892' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUNZ' 'sip-files00141.tif'
21de72416cc74ef1c2ffe63730603ba4
99ba1325480b68675c2f63e33320720324bb66d1
'2012-01-14T09:55:38-05:00'
describe
'498' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOA' 'sip-files00141.txt'
da6255db054856a4b4a5f9dec3a1efce
f66547702a8cd5275a3d92a12a7ad8f5a316c348
describe
'117142' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOB' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
f110ad34a16e8788ecd36cc332cc87c3
1258a7db4effb0c22d2c631f93cd27994beac944
'2012-01-14T09:58:46-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3923228' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOC' 'sip-files00142.tif'
fdc80a2552678c510f5d3c75d4b79a3d
cd605884e8f80c7782eed5a0946601ac39faa852
'2012-01-14T09:56:00-05:00'
describe
'894' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOD' 'sip-files00142.txt'
1db60a704cdfe269e6b8ab0fe694882b
9415dc5480886582acfad999c65260732395eb0f
describe
'121359' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOE' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
f3bde9e1da29fbd25e39e759d43b3832
dcd27dfe5230203e67a5f1fa43faaf8dec6ed1e7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3908000' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOF' 'sip-files00143.tif'
19d73452b8dea90c189e8ed7a025215f
1c424010b0c1869e10b259891f844c26d0b3bc10
'2012-01-14T09:58:26-05:00'
describe
'901' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOG' 'sip-files00143.txt'
e609517cd0f0c96995b2396b22afc07c
462abe80da844cd33e5ff6d904fc0cf48b04a35d
describe
'118810' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOH' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
aa2b04040bd2c90e112e7375c1fb6acc
36db83a3ed2b9abc5a3797013729e0ee6e4cf3d6
'2012-01-14T09:52:22-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3892720' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOI' 'sip-files00144.tif'
7795eb5a20b5bf7973e50ec7895d01e2
e41e86d7b3bbbb7f5c21acd75245e8506b227e4b
'2012-01-14T09:54:28-05:00'
describe
'909' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOJ' 'sip-files00144.txt'
b9cff2c97bbf49a1aaf870805295f30b
a00205b147a5110f36380974d5cde6b34e541339
describe
'120675' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOK' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
d1a1638ca5ce61df69516d135f5a2af4
1fc9b336570a34d25b85be4c9418d48c53073fe2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3973612' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOL' 'sip-files00145.tif'
33412407db15ceaee371032a77c76069
f573ffe47fc309d5b5ed7873301c33af127e4ee5
'2012-01-14T09:57:35-05:00'
describe
'938' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOM' 'sip-files00145.txt'
6333f227cb8bfb050620c90708272027
90a802afee6fd49f6028f06857b83c0f8b920031
describe
'106294' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUON' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
6899071d2ba0357ead7aee3d0dbf839b
a12bcba261df1a2bbcc52586855b33d948287fdb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3774632' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOO' 'sip-files00146.tif'
ee895e43ea422c2340c2f716f6c08669
fc08dedbf6269d6e3b5fbe87eeaf9174a310c44f
'2012-01-14T09:57:55-05:00'
describe
'775' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOP' 'sip-files00146.txt'
b35d3e0f930c6a8c439b0ec4d0e92a86
31ca43664747439bfeb84eacac1f753852437abf
describe
'105692' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOQ' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
c7cc9b5ee5f376febcbffc0bd36b1cd3
f550a173d9db016c5f52f3c6024ec0598c600977
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3892464' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOR' 'sip-files00147.tif'
aeddb1c8ee89b898a5bf80b4e83b76c9
43255a04ecddcdbed581940187f5dd7a3de91669
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOS' 'sip-files00147.txt'
baa0689f55085ece542baf0b94b12572
f717f78474ce7e5b572adbf44e36857a95a87674
describe
'121082' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOT' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
e413c849f286021b5db9cd865441d781
a4d731ad8d7d807caf39e3d5b5190c571f7eebb9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3771244' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOU' 'sip-files00148.tif'
c97ce1330db4cc54021ac745778880bf
dc049701ed006932e02dc1f641234d3aab5a0a90
'2012-01-14T09:58:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOV' 'sip-files00148.txt'
c9a0bad10a02ad49b6d71ed5dac53234
2ddce8f76b3a5a57e61341d768caf8f1cdf96c98
describe
'137097' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOW' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
50fac259d60bd35c56dd108033e13153
3ed61a0ee1554952c5ef33f64345fa231b98615a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'11972488' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOX' 'sip-files00149.tif'
11c045e4e1a481246c8b1099f782d49b
3c9d56f8930008338041f97bd91a8766422b8bd0
'2012-01-14T09:54:50-05:00'
describe
'65' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOY' 'sip-files00149.txt'
f53fa4b1e74d34e6a248eda67dd13f2d
3e4c1c3f5a7d726b2354173c829d51b3696b76ca
describe
'39073' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUOZ' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
d767a74d8350779008c6a0fea7b1099f
bbad6d9b297a8a8bbb5fb2f4ecf15d8f3461b1fe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3845108' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPA' 'sip-files00150.tif'
620199fe9c921898067a4b17481dec4b
e969cd05c8acc03fe08b5242db5407a09c3616b7
'2012-01-14T09:57:56-05:00'
describe
'10' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPB' 'sip-files00150.txt'
c77a7c934ff8b9825bc27ec8d290cd76
99046ec2ca48267e77a71572744324dd3eabc917
describe
'106777' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPC' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
35e6ad2f377f3f9a5eb1eda7feb09fb8
5c769a74f3d5a889d4ec7efde8ee2d2dc4a2ba4f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3668828' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPD' 'sip-files00151.tif'
851256493a013715f6c4b8e79a955e0e
681884cb5b2ea9c018f618072aa8d3435f8a8789
describe
'831' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPE' 'sip-files00151.txt'
ed1372a3e66b2be7bd93b65bba60b642
134e9776a05c57afa5cb8eae7c1a712ed76728ba
describe
'112088' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPF' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
f5fbd3fc2eaec19a41434612db481ce0
dd7d5a335627cd9a9e82d45011758bd0452f9c56
'2012-01-14T09:53:35-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3460032' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPG' 'sip-files00152.tif'
2d3e0e196ce5add38940d95a195e7b58
31242ad146cce94f886b61a29736a369124b6c39
describe
'829' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPH' 'sip-files00152.txt'
b4d48635716142b6137e41e66524c646
9b1d858d29942b852a0cd28f7ecff31537ffdbc3
describe
'110230' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPI' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
f59b0a9e8e5a939ad7d101c62c6eacf6
ee846bc3b36c942f1054bef7a954ed8be16b0e19
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3541268' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPJ' 'sip-files00153.tif'
28eb50f115c7ac8d0a0ca4c519aef744
9a742c4ab3d54ed1257db4203e4889ab9a088271
'2012-01-14T09:58:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPK' 'sip-files00153.txt'
34bae0e1541cd4b667219e643c27ccdf
ac44479d1d27026cf2f64b27a2643f99f3c983aa
'2012-01-14T09:53:03-05:00'
describe
'57594' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPL' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
178f3ec6b95d78b0197d072d6925f955
587f2985ae792e756273841124c1e7231d90a50c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3959492' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPM' 'sip-files00154.tif'
5982b46813cbf3f24571c8b49b10488f
420a3678d55be8a2e02148a31c883fcea28019fe
'2012-01-14T09:53:49-05:00'
describe
'232' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPN' 'sip-files00154.txt'
364eb2d6834579dfa35b810064f92014
cf7c6eb373fb158852b07d490b8f7e1a4687df0c
describe
'81500' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPO' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
fdadd7004867250edd1bd9a3ed1a7c90
a2fa39be944f40b3036b2f001d1efe0e9f95352b
'2012-01-14T09:54:24-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3859268' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPP' 'sip-files00155.tif'
7fe45d71d5988913936150b500979011
d945272c38ba08226d8167ac30a7fa3321c72409
'2012-01-14T09:58:30-05:00'
describe
'530' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPQ' 'sip-files00155.txt'
14cfb67e9a372f27ab3f0d03cd574933
3c7d3ec4a01c04dc9f5c3069882ddfeb3fa92a10
describe
'118237' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPR' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
296268d65684ca5a534c38c0935937c3
b94eee48b2c7c42cd0c76a7c534450eaac372662
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3786400' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPS' 'sip-files00156.tif'
c33412ea5ec2838f8533d406cafd4306
e5bc08df25d5977638e70f3122347f4c34701c35
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPT' 'sip-files00156.txt'
3a2bc989ae9513c69b1eb7c9cdb2669e
21037e9548345f14f9b44818079ed311da0024f3
describe
'108554' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPU' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
e606c6c263836ad8759d2d09dec502d0
35f906ddcd408fa0f8336b9fac5f54f14c79b7ae
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3803760' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPV' 'sip-files00157.tif'
8bae367e527ae0cc4e02ad5f71cc4ba2
7180553f9f0b59f4e637389afaee2525a53875fc
'2012-01-14T09:56:58-05:00'
describe
'814' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPW' 'sip-files00157.txt'
cfe4b92052bc984e815da2ffff9f1a7d
185363a1092910d8f0992068956a88dc0229af6e
'2012-01-14T09:56:09-05:00'
describe
'108628' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPX' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
6e1625ee5fe87ae03aae808919812e9f
af7b7ce16be4e68c53c41497f1e600c41777c409
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3912716' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPY' 'sip-files00158.tif'
725c661cb3596dbafdf4547f2992c47b
b81db67fa009d75ca1e105a22d33485891b56a26
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUPZ' 'sip-files00158.txt'
5d26ec90f512f7dc32236a8ad133a17f
710c629b0cbc0b8250e9baa224f8f26f4fa757ee
describe
'103713' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQA' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
2bfcbd74ced6b3b6f8608532396262c6
ee5d478489cc5345aec0d118b06e095b60844f7c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3895516' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQB' 'sip-files00159.tif'
7144d31f0dd84dfec92da5eb6fe81398
617a2e30e148255f0348b919959229c80a953d68
'2012-01-14T09:55:04-05:00'
describe
'852' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQC' 'sip-files00159.txt'
eec039f4bae2330e5283d7fcc6038933
9c18528830c217c12772c7294c1bc616008a03dd
describe
'122922' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQD' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
6164a4a8762fc21b60196b14079edb67
70a457d375b4d99a80f0ca76cf1fdea228035b54
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3762952' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQE' 'sip-files00160.tif'
49df31511943da7506902c79ac030c32
09ed2911df2d14d366c68e39839103553a48c22a
'2012-01-14T09:57:32-05:00'
describe
'915' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQF' 'sip-files00160.txt'
43a23243a0057bf4a0b21c01c6b04fca
74aa8d87ae7da6792308334979d6309532dc7463
describe
'107337' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQG' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
8dc9df23bb23a97c4faf4bf4194008dd
85660323742be94d63abc5a578ec6e8a499dee52
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3860224' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQH' 'sip-files00161.tif'
25866188d0d455a4672dba0976667897
693283f4dd10cbb183c1b797de9e5adc1ca41bb1
'2012-01-14T09:56:51-05:00'
describe
'799' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQI' 'sip-files00161.txt'
adabfb9bf88f3c725aa0dc35b38d115f
83e3f77a302ef5acaa0d9e3ea593656aa92f78a9
describe
'106410' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQJ' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
93b61c3b0fcfcc2a1a443e9988e4ac33
4b6ecb6573eacd27cfb92597f00612d90259f561
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3571716' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQK' 'sip-files00162.tif'
8d594ca1d25f782b49c716da93fa20a7
c4effc5a98d1653dde00c6861ff8584743308dc7
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQL' 'sip-files00162.txt'
47f5914a0e05ddc6934c91789e49c05f
58b35834b75d541d5d58c0612ba27582b5ed1c36
describe
'107976' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQM' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
2bce35059d6c7a7d38d9fb2b9032859f
168199ca671104a616f1b0b45a36a6c5dedc7da3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3738708' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQN' 'sip-files00163.tif'
17b81e9c71b5da3f21f2ec255d31cf48
7530525bd8de998a07291e665798c28d735a182d
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQO' 'sip-files00163.txt'
3f2888463dbe673b716fcfe5b9ad82ee
ae9a2d46f38beca7e127c3cf3c116de99dbf29c3
describe
'114034' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQP' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
8516bd48caf6cd4f7922099d9caea104
98b1afe1587af2c0920c2f3adf0e31408f8e70d9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3852316' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQQ' 'sip-files00164.tif'
44b9ca547eec8dff5aa472f400c37d4a
3d66457cb1144497ad8d235557e549984bd1d24f
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQR' 'sip-files00164.txt'
0499c4fdaaa8a9c3d36dcb84467bd57f
b102063af32c32d9e8f8bc5ac48ec06f3e8a31ea
describe
'104324' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQS' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
e47675e0ba37a620c25b244c7ce783d3
e8881f138c6a2ce045f0744c3426a59f882dc96b
'2012-01-14T09:58:09-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3747712' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQT' 'sip-files00165.tif'
2d0ea9ee995ffecc7d09b9a3f2d2ded1
485be4c3b3f38d3b57b6cc0d2562aadbbb0eb899
'2012-01-14T09:54:15-05:00'
describe
'842' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQU' 'sip-files00165.txt'
33c252490a7acb7ca147996525b78c46
29a070d165029abbaf746fb1c7fe19b22468406a
describe
'111680' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQV' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
e22172a7ed41b7232e8f9891d5efd73b
33b62f0b49be9fcc0a23b14e6a612d54a83cb79c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3846064' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQW' 'sip-files00166.tif'
5b21ace5d21d530255f69caa78b76bec
7afc6238df30a916d1d5846e9258a95aa734c301
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQX' 'sip-files00166.txt'
ec1b68b400356226decc8b48760b6639
5c74a2fdb06dca7527482de2bdd60a70784d096f
describe
'110687' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQY' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
7831d37d575afd5850ed85f52802c5c2
8affbb036e769abe3195b6bb697c586689072529
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3790084' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUQZ' 'sip-files00167.tif'
6d9700ad4854e686f7fd9c6f08e98a3f
1483aa940e77e4ed5c86a6ac5300672db61087c1
'2012-01-14T09:58:50-05:00'
describe
'932' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURA' 'sip-files00167.txt'
8f1228fed221399444ebde0aea3468ca
12765e1ab95651289bad3b99d949eda8a6a0a5c1
'2012-01-14T09:54:34-05:00'
describe
'118317' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURB' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
f068e30751d8f5491ad2a4973b6bc460
fd8948319f5aef24e105ee5df67c526aed6c5eb3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3816628' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURC' 'sip-files00168.tif'
48d0b5c81c5178c988676318ba7720de
73b3b591dd8c55f9a2546a8f8c5fd772712e459c
'2012-01-14T09:54:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURD' 'sip-files00168.txt'
c0a1e0b2ff8c237a659b986bae71a760
3588c92ae15b68515457eb47df76e39b8812f179
describe
'137483' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURE' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
3cc9d2e32c896cd74ed752ab0cd0d9e7
8b001fed5cdf73fae89a83f984f4a270741cbe02
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'11540668' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURF' 'sip-files00169.tif'
70b45116a601573e727f301f3b28e328
8a40677f91b9fca18e0f8fb4b1a5d4c1da9d4362
describe
'23' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURG' 'sip-files00169.txt'
fd37a7a87a3735fd6f541ee53b77b890
ac1cdf4624ae8548545450d5dfbbc87b9c8d74c6
'2012-01-14T09:54:47-05:00'
describe
'36164' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURH' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
be7fb0e0a0d20c4b16b00feefcf07941
1d3f03f17eddaa5ba6fe21c7d1b181de00d11bc0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3815364' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURI' 'sip-files00170.tif'
071ecd75dcfc2b478f6274826d92e34d
5e09e0dcd8a312b6ba4727a66be8fb6520129ffc
describe
'112824' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURJ' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
297e3bc8bd3d517205383e100d93a824
245a64f9848527031dc0983ca61c0cb28a3183cb
'2012-01-14T09:55:49-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3653152' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURK' 'sip-files00171.tif'
73c8aa51603f45dc97ec184047ddf8d3
db36df63e370573be0335110cbc38c0a399ee437
'2012-01-14T09:54:56-05:00'
describe
'853' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURL' 'sip-files00171.txt'
b3352b89b106a53323fd97e06b83d9b7
212ebaa9cc79b48ecd80d8480586c0d6bfb0481d
describe
'104987' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURM' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
fae99f818d11ee0d2f8bab9605c33f62
57a8d94b2edfff85aeb291c8951f02b3494b2be8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3677744' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURN' 'sip-files00172.tif'
4c6d20af0e2131b06b05000db686ef4d
95241ecbe7740107961809d140d06d3d717c54ba
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURO' 'sip-files00172.txt'
b9c53edbdb85981bd3dc2a2b9fe43081
e019229951009ad648bcc97705da7e82b79ad436
describe
'83597' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURP' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
281c3f6c781a7aa3d7861da5b781094f
41862d5e3beecb73acadd7022273e13a3f80e910
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3388080' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURQ' 'sip-files00173.tif'
705f5ccf278fe054b425a2f84fbab06e
392333f3beaf79685665b1059bd21cc552c82c7b
describe
'548' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURR' 'sip-files00173.txt'
88f5ac61250a155beab3955c109b8850
93ae0df0d9349d41ca57412a35f83e9ebbd56acb
describe
'108055' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURS' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
465ccdfa30ce5c91bb9648b7a64234ce
02748cc4c11de4109f49780be822612cf89ab499
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3840888' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURT' 'sip-files00174.tif'
abe76c3c9c8c9ac4808faf379e22d4d0
868554eec1a83a6711f6b521125a3c3d0c2e20e7
'2012-01-14T09:55:42-05:00'
describe
'855' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURU' 'sip-files00174.txt'
62bcef38ffd67b6c4e05d8c501a67da2
a1d2096c240ea4aab0416b8b3f6927164ab09e9a
describe
'109052' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURV' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
fad348a1d17df67b92fb1165dd494e46
17be986a717b1324a09e6f1233f674e7ac7dba98
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3570216' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURW' 'sip-files00175.tif'
026fa71c4b77893c7a0ca1b16e065438
07a47706b0e17b2306ae66372bf42771d2fd983d
'2012-01-14T09:54:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURX' 'sip-files00175.txt'
1830cc346ac60ddea7026a9099c80c2b
7aa0b879cb3792fe253e94a13e30ead633611737
describe
'115411' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURY' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
c82f7fadab874060f69b46e48e7b697f
e3987eee76cd77da596910aecb4ffd33ad89d610
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3547500' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAURZ' 'sip-files00176.tif'
a9e5c1a04793f9b260c592438abeb688
194ba89640ca3c5ab21bb7b046a07f49479c17b0
'2012-01-14T09:57:57-05:00'
describe
'801' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSA' 'sip-files00176.txt'
ee479babc6664a381345c223f4e5faf6
a173bec7c893a6b037e8a6eddd0445db458b05a7
'2012-01-14T09:53:50-05:00'
describe
'109211' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSB' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
c9309a1b153a74e0de5516b51a2df059
5e667f621442ecce66e6f560e321632b2d20ebd3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3728144' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSC' 'sip-files00177.tif'
bcbfa6181d3728664dd3d3472834e8bd
eebb61b93d0bd0326ba4909f4ec1ec20cd7cf605
describe
'800' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSD' 'sip-files00177.txt'
03490482264bbc3e453d62cd5c1a14c9
8f7ec61af8bccd6486e42153b34db13ea87f8b87
describe
'121054' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSE' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
adfd149a16ee690dc46a44c184555dbe
d1f61cf410e0268c386d454cf76249811f11114d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3590448' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSF' 'sip-files00178.tif'
bd942ae3f082d82c658f69c2fef0c698
05e2ef4f9825bf5c2d27ce1decd010c690cc1b56
'2012-01-14T09:57:28-05:00'
describe
'861' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSG' 'sip-files00178.txt'
f5f65ee99b9edf322c7365ffb9193042
7c474e648893375cd9f841c7a0ac740f13490336
'2012-01-14T09:57:37-05:00'
describe
'115454' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSH' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
79823fee082b264cc9c9b7c5288203e4
2d5ceee959650743062e0a5d4580899378fc502b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3740140' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSI' 'sip-files00179.tif'
305c09d29f7d911a3682149ebffd04ab
9f79dad32313231e2ca6fd67fe5c8dd458675890
describe
'941' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSJ' 'sip-files00179.txt'
c511e9e6f041ce45473d5b7b92417f14
0763c9fa2a461bf7c7f30d013cee98bcd1fdb582
describe
'127993' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSK' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
7da0a8b216b243634f6d354bb0b2dc47
086442493152659266b6fc3173ed12bc288bc20f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3582868' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSL' 'sip-files00180.tif'
7030e37200da7d3607d26a3184a42f57
86049c630b34c723478a805639f500c55f39ab3d
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSM' 'sip-files00180.txt'
5391ab06acfbeb4fae33feea80333d7a
fa4e1cc88391058e8f77525e777427f916e2ce8c
'2012-01-14T09:58:51-05:00'
describe
'126629' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSN' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
47266f0deff6e6df76daf159aefd55c0
8b0d8cfbe2eb52a5379e7dbc859d5483a4f21496
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'11237540' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSO' 'sip-files00181.tif'
4c52a2b77002d77a9d03705b257eb405
bd60107d4fddf7ab7f652c6a15880b37c4be93fd
describe
'26' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSP' 'sip-files00181.txt'
ae262f05266090f9dabfb15aedeac689
d1a5cd31019ea1739db2be2c2811ccfac2c3b641
describe
'37608' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSQ' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
b2b0e3af1563f97635c22d4467c0048d
daddde55ef4cf21bcf44893c12d5bb8eef97000a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3538064' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSR' 'sip-files00182.tif'
1773098b8d28b6a2752cbd1b87bf49ad
01d1f99624223fbae74093c53acca1b32aa7293c
describe
'4' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSS' 'sip-files00182.txt'
5ab39e6fe90603e694460bd157740692
c3f2db3629fbbde61b21488e49743eadef33ced4
describe
'107046' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUST' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
575091bb7ed2fd1399c5f202f4bd3bcd
38d9e86707b4905e1f87fb5e347aa2f64c29c51b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3829588' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSU' 'sip-files00183.tif'
10dc9d1df433d074d7c721f03731435d
79513c6332c81604bbf8b5d277b9acfe64f4e790
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSV' 'sip-files00183.txt'
51537e19429c49a2394d2d69830aac97
041365389c7cc926b2319eea31c97dbe4746bd3b
describe
'115824' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSW' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
306121dadf9ae953c5a0b428bb6a856a
276cadbcb1826bf022e41c2e0fe714119c062a66
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3832164' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSX' 'sip-files00184.tif'
b85a9a131dc7c289f2892e3c044e0f97
210bb2f52ce5df4f5d5536dee37b6853bb6c70c6
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSY' 'sip-files00184.txt'
f964e12f372b0497c4abe0be8e5148ff
95b1f5568b43b1402bd86595fb282f9b2d17dfa4
'2012-01-14T09:52:25-05:00'
describe
'115790' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUSZ' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
0c21f620050edd736c9dedd1f7d01bd5
b541f4d1b7b125181f3b1f939f7a7a43aaa9bba2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3801632' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTA' 'sip-files00185.tif'
0582021f9eeb5cbf8b3abb345ff48fc4
dd327f692f69f3614d6bb7cb91cafe1003233d37
'2012-01-14T09:53:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTB' 'sip-files00185.txt'
a0d71766b5c839cc5ae4c340ce004d9e
60144b1a299dab2a37f77b214cdb2632f65ce283
describe
'113331' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTC' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
0abbfcf2ebaee597a3b710d8e8b81943
77a322dec34c7f087349a3d68718cd9f8336449b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3756568' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTD' 'sip-files00186.tif'
0f43e0c69d77f1b5f49ab9093f9c2320
7b8b7977c39d3a6c2084eb2c566e93f69610213d
'2012-01-14T09:55:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTE' 'sip-files00186.txt'
76fbd27f726cbeb184f173d9dcbc9519
1913df884e473a415628d76ff94012ba29a2c4dc
describe
'115569' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTF' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
6112ddc9fb6ae15f7cf7903760eabe9f
00785c971ae73b193b8c733d636740a094b5c752
'2012-01-14T09:57:03-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3719892' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTG' 'sip-files00187.tif'
57d2842dc5fbf196fe39aec2c13b5687
da5d7c776db1b86839ce9bc2e9b5e6dbb93f040c
describe
'899' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTH' 'sip-files00187.txt'
d69846554e21ce9e102631b4f290bd4e
e70c1f3c4f0517e83b0361407e713954c0443793
describe
'91537' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTI' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
ba97a47a5b0818f36599907a9431989b
f45e43bd83cb0fe377b18bb3dd9a2abf748cdba1
'2012-01-14T09:53:45-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3881784' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTJ' 'sip-files00188.tif'
7d77feb61150667fc47da6af0d76f4e4
7a9a5ed424ddacec151cfa5f2ae342de451edeeb
describe
'614' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTK' 'sip-files00188.txt'
c74cb4a56344683f0fc872edc02eef5d
9b35a9066a9023367e1d6934359ef780ce3a9609
'2012-01-14T09:57:46-05:00'
describe
'92891' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTL' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
ed47c062aab00442bc9d8e6f0e837048
9814d85f555a027f2eb2639a93399edf8f4609bf
'2012-01-14T09:54:22-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3664836' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTM' 'sip-files00189.tif'
65b16f6536dfad65f1a7a405f99556f4
ac43f0c4914434e09e9b83a4ed8aee4fce7c0a6f
'2012-01-14T09:58:10-05:00'
describe
'586' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTN' 'sip-files00189.txt'
49f87ea3617476d13e2151ac77db736d
b1799f515549b29a151bcf687d3e2a08a552288b
describe
'108418' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTO' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
b2311a493c3db56c6f1a71522cda1ec9
0c56296cfe45164b59022cd580868b7569c1aa2b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3772172' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTP' 'sip-files00190.tif'
dd9d1b69594a91b067d07f48b6906d05
08cc85010dbc38745dca9ad447cf12a3fe3a5083
describe
'946' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTQ' 'sip-files00190.txt'
bdce9b3c7865dbba7a11afe676f37f80
3290f9586bc807525d7d305b7ef0bbc13d58ac37
describe
'101708' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTR' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
a16b4c859498f4871e36482c71099019
de8c32a495c47fe8aeee6301be5c07d0abfb9a8f
'2012-01-14T09:56:31-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3787556' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTS' 'sip-files00191.tif'
2fd81e504700f0b4076b0b35335170f0
27c738f47ea0defc00339986f4b4f12e36a5d160
describe
'789' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTT' 'sip-files00191.txt'
243724c5aa382e2136c318ef6b2c5f20
449e9841fee0612f3cee44052294577aad6739b2
'2012-01-14T09:55:25-05:00'
describe
'110439' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTU' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
3e94bb6913099d93f4a31f0c37e48c4c
a1d869a7bb49fd3c2de63c99be8b6594e0155f85
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3657120' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTV' 'sip-files00192.tif'
f162fc7408579ca8ed81d527a12ae3f8
dbb0129e53dda63dafc69c8186bb6a0fe82d3971
'2012-01-14T09:55:21-05:00'
describe
'928' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTW' 'sip-files00192.txt'
50943f86b8d6f82506a217ddc2c05dd8
297cb4e54c8f9cee5fdcc9d188ddecdc806789fb
describe
'106021' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTX' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
5d7446aedddb0be206dd6ddab2137e1c
5cccdd08fc2073d6e41a9079e51a4ad265f714b1
'2012-01-14T09:57:31-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3823952' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTY' 'sip-files00193.tif'
5fb3b6444f96985eab8980ca839adec7
fb76238b156b2e11a76f34e433400b250e176428
'2012-01-14T09:54:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUTZ' 'sip-files00193.txt'
c144352c80088bd2e2a5ed596d85fb0d
2fd74001db390ea87871759bfcfababfae2b25fc
describe
'102109' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUA' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
37573fd646192a9914d957aab359ace2
334eff213336a246458446788a367fdc2c29541b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3815088' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUB' 'sip-files00194.tif'
b36c7efed1927ce45394cceaf38b6ea1
7cf59a2abbc5252801a33f64b0f99c1d3383e69f
'2012-01-14T09:55:18-05:00'
describe
'867' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUC' 'sip-files00194.txt'
ff0dd3406062bdb01faf433e2279b06a
4ee0debaa7a52e058d81d887104c869849f79dcd
describe
'112964' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUD' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
9262917a2a58e24efa9ac3f845753cea
56e2e57bc3f4a5036bb65791fa0ad2543cac289d
'2012-01-14T09:56:27-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3785096' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUE' 'sip-files00195.tif'
4aa164e95325fdc569a4e60bfa10c362
289b3716cd81c0678823aafcd4c045f9eef2f18a
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUF' 'sip-files00195.txt'
9d6d613349cd1d261f85474d4ad91831
c249b2238279a79daed79892a4fc5b5a68d1be0c
'2012-01-14T09:55:31-05:00'
describe
'115950' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUG' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
74620bde3732abf9978cc6f5141df122
d8ab7ece320e6785320b3a6c071e94f2204ca448
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3834660' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUH' 'sip-files00196.tif'
7b24d06e119e25783d21b50915f3e0bf
a33129acd0b8bb7a3386d5ce784e81950743ead0
describe
'903' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUI' 'sip-files00196.txt'
cd843dca00130e896de4d48511c8a692
56a603e68e7e0bd3fffb4400249a888c238e0ae5
describe
'119782' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUJ' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
09a964852304134253017496912220f3
5d655eab6cf7ad327e869c36bddbc4cb23487c4b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3634804' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUK' 'sip-files00197.tif'
1893e96c6730b949f76f43a6e2c345ac
e1e88a6695d67822fb5f336936c28a2a710e735b
'2012-01-14T09:54:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUL' 'sip-files00197.txt'
11d4d144f27e1a0ad9d6a28a860b7dbf
30ab88bc9ecfe8b1074cd4b027b74f8b4c65353e
'2012-01-14T09:54:10-05:00'
describe
'119755' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUM' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
1e87a024de01713f0e17a6345cd62b6e
d05c729727042ccb479f19a250133c2a34eebd4c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3600816' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUN' 'sip-files00198.tif'
395b102daf4ce2f66f6182ce4225473a
224414f3b6ec24a6db0a7d2329137b6e93e67f71
describe
'888' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUO' 'sip-files00198.txt'
787fa990a0f917ac179941f952ee52da
e1fff350e0c9575a06b156dc3a70e719ba627d0d
describe
'112677' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUP' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
4161d0826fe7ce4c2576f79bc1b0898c
43d7c05e32350ef3ecd4e976c00c5129d3a59b16
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3797016' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUQ' 'sip-files00199.tif'
3e00e001975119d4987724e42463faab
29402c575f3ae9fdba3078a8d8c502c191355d36
'2012-01-14T09:53:26-05:00'
describe
'824' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUR' 'sip-files00199.txt'
715d9d8285f44a684f2f66c9ce9e4902
06522ec04a6b40d89f9f184873334d459fbc5437
'2012-01-14T09:54:31-05:00'
describe
'112638' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUS' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
48054b7e20d603c14f35ebf77c2dadce
a9f8448e029790be38023ea19827d26065025259
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3782296' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUT' 'sip-files00200.tif'
cced46e667de68481076a37810b7fe07
c3967429cb04693d6730d46aa584ad64f7a83369
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUU' 'sip-files00200.txt'
61738cb8da2a7f160d813ab4101333a5
141d4cee9006d432525887567c3994429946105e
describe
'114296' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUV' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
c5baf2ae96c64148b359d0b63f8d49b8
b9634ba31e62f2735598a366e2d541ac4640b070
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3767256' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUW' 'sip-files00201.tif'
bd2a13cd1228416c5ff075ee4a881298
3fa24df18a77e6c50888918bd9b7e14529edba82
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUX' 'sip-files00201.txt'
b28d02477022dff6d7ed75af4886bc46
090f42e411184a0c3ad38c3192b83b5e2bfc91a6
describe
'116739' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUY' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
30c65e8872f44b61bdd0cf291467e6be
9dc6ad3b9f1d1355bc1adadd2d81936c8841e060
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3711340' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUUZ' 'sip-files00202.tif'
c50b25bb1e7756f7913e81763faaf05e
46780a41a3357f398f6028c7f50eb690cae49655
describe
'905' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVA' 'sip-files00202.txt'
31c2f4b5d1c526cf0e5ebcabfc4beb32
6a0b564b19bb6a0b8f71b2010212c6a2549cce2f
describe
'130534' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVB' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
66ce9c1c43c89310837068130c6983b0
07033d1fb0a94210b3ee56f11743f59bd4f6dd1f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'11155484' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVC' 'sip-files00203.tif'
3b6db656c91b83522f8ebff2778339fc
71e30f75e10587a0ffefb588b5c2718ef26af711
'2012-01-14T09:57:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVD' 'sip-files00203.txt'
0b24a311831c2cf7ccf61e57f442af49
e61fd02e494f1568462e657250408f9051900f59
'2012-01-14T09:53:55-05:00'
describe
'36685' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVE' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
6c207da2f726e060bf712c6933b7a9b5
b3e0e4954ca4a3fae18d6b4a4682b0725698ab99
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3658080' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVF' 'sip-files00204.tif'
fdd9a16c1721c312876c29d35cfb9525
2c03c29bb4d504f096df2e4a896a4bcf7fcd1043
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVG' 'sip-files00204.txt'
76b0b0b60246f4e8e92a39ef7dbea194
11d7d7ce0b68973d37325a5b3f1fdcf7d2e88954
describe
'108842' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVH' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
81d49dc21ba3b9c9de3807e40f69e825
b9d4673296b1583d35df7ec69a4742d782112ce3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3690708' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVI' 'sip-files00205.tif'
1ae4401141f9f870d21591be6ad9921d
85631d32ba5e0d1930536bf38ee01014b7146f2d
describe
'828' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVJ' 'sip-files00205.txt'
b3b37af1e5bfeb249750d356fd9ffdf2
e0a26551aa161a81ba3a1738578bd4f6f9bd1e86
describe
'81601' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVK' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
a17ed1dc4002b2afb08b433b22190d5b
4da619259f5515955db5ffdbb2a54b76ca43c90b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3513944' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVL' 'sip-files00206.tif'
e82aee4fb9f44a7de23fa2c58a779773
7fa0ecd0527197872058513062f412fd4e8df347
describe
'476' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVM' 'sip-files00206.txt'
162bfaeeb065e2a4cc12da65b64f064d
f38da186c7b2633a72de559c1b1b782a48e9a37e
describe
'105597' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVN' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
db9fe1f37b25234165f38ff7dd0e613e
c193e8f4dccb3d53e3ac087dc62147d2c0a20717
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3826232' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVO' 'sip-files00207.tif'
5ae89aaec7ddaf8c4f57d4d1e4e1e5cc
91ab80da9bb0d17c3a4acd3dffafa4957d5ac585
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVP' 'sip-files00207.txt'
6d9959156abf356b243284e63e363c15
47af8bd5b57ab271012310f0bba79d2a7e4766ed
'2012-01-14T09:58:34-05:00'
describe
'110531' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVQ' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
1fdd11b07822b46fdc41ee1242301aaf
649275e3085e41fdc9bbb5b333dcae5900a75840
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3748960' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVR' 'sip-files00208.tif'
045cc0a543673f599856c3ae977a8739
01655d129774ed1f3ed9fb44557781330681cf01
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVS' 'sip-files00208.txt'
3182cde7145343b31138019a9561b673
5fc888d169a6445498ef717703709f6d6d54c0e5
describe
'115152' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVT' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
2a86b1697f8768771a0e71cf30904db9
38abfc241f46b286273ea05767e1b702f0b69432
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3691512' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVU' 'sip-files00209.tif'
548a301a2e5901d8ce4496c1617309e2
b3eed3e8de420e527d26cd1c47b10ec71b25d44f
'2012-01-14T09:53:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVV' 'sip-files00209.txt'
f257b5a1463fc4c0b3382441e8b24529
cd94193bcaf2e054acc44d6d129a85dde264a0bf
'2012-01-14T09:56:06-05:00'
describe
'109094' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVW' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
90be32e0e1ac60b64402a2a557fd22cf
e8a0d96dacde7218a19988022403b43c0e9ba662
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3750708' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVX' 'sip-files00210.tif'
2639763c53e506bcf28a62c93f4a1320
894fff5cdfcf5a58871bed36928c664010812572
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVY' 'sip-files00210.txt'
e9ab7d3b4542336d87569d70b0a5b016
250adece7dac09c372c99b18242bd7ab440fcfac
describe
'118419' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUVZ' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
a4441e4599d1a5771b21862597ea134e
230956673bc8bda16371eb63b78f478cff42ffcd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3692628' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWA' 'sip-files00211.tif'
aab70914e6c56062b9bf6750864dc30c
0c8907e9bfe2c69a29fd9a81798daae065760503
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWB' 'sip-files00211.txt'
d56e4e46435688a89c41c76cf138c964
145a23066d3a63764d4acef6d98accf91613985b
'2012-01-14T09:55:40-05:00'
describe
'114039' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWC' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
ab859baefb3a54a57f96dfa53a62dbfa
02be194eb77ec802ed77a1c8513a9caeb740eb2e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3649800' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWD' 'sip-files00212.tif'
99741582c9bd54accf3f4dc53c9e207c
ce9eb69cc88470f65e7e7dd4c0b56d09f8a09565
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWE' 'sip-files00212.txt'
904b1ab49601d58746b9c40b655086a6
de0c7f648b2b0b5b7f37ad84c4b16eb8e114ccc2
describe
'127101' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWF' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
f4dbf5dcdf6db8af7965ad6e3fdf0d5e
04e7f84a65d8454b82770433646aa8462a818040
'2012-01-14T09:52:45-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'11014156' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWG' 'sip-files00213.tif'
0897a3d8b5080da0a3e5f2ebabfff4d7
8d49e6ef849f5b571891ab752154b1f3ed4ed7ef
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWH' 'sip-files00213.txt'
b24fde3caecad5792d734e42c44202f3
33e087e167304bfd47d60c9504bce150ebd8b3bf
describe
'14471' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWI' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
8fb03de204546bd4d944720bb6bcd4d2
fb315d11af330f0a6288c734f4d52c72889ea76c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3709844' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWJ' 'sip-files00214.tif'
1d846a8d515eacf07e609b9c11e82ab2
b26b50083492d194a93f5f449251858de5f967dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWK' 'sip-files00214.txt'
d2a33790e5bf28b33cdbf61722a06989
f4d60480373006cb24147cd17765000f14aadca3
describe
'112668' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWL' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
825a6b8441e7eec908ab9f61e5d4d4fd
c87c3994b815ebe650b30e9061917f4241e4f178
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3734804' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWM' 'sip-files00215.tif'
53d3aebbcbb047217780f10d50aab36a
2649a4e8c83efd7ec705f46813e5e416ba14564d
describe
'906' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWN' 'sip-files00215.txt'
f7ed0fe2bcb3fb422d3e72a7b82d9a9b
2366cea16a19764160ae38d0d13c287636c70610
describe
'82890' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWO' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
b8c92bdd2804504ae8a9ffe1cffac6df
2fd3dc05b55bc6b7412e663718e31c92cbb5350f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3836884' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWP' 'sip-files00216.tif'
bef88d633ff4657feb675972e5691811
cfdd6639776e1e0d67971a0452f0549eb7daf47b
describe
'536' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWQ' 'sip-files00216.txt'
6ec942d2bb2073d428fe34b4171ff88d
2cfc49ee1d1809fedfe978723519006d7a66c220
describe
'113066' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWR' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
f7af5d768454a1624c749e8c262d69fa
1c211071275519ae5bc2d22109a409ebb2d2a97f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3845592' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWS' 'sip-files00217.tif'
5bd6a4c15c2620d228d5a37cfc11283d
d80acd51df3ac315afb29d37deac5876ba8b1acf
'2012-01-14T09:58:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWT' 'sip-files00217.txt'
4a9c5757db0f5c0b145c2ad18be0f86a
f44b65fa1117e3b5e48fbc91bf3c53db413fab78
describe
'110763' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWU' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
4fe6bde21654b4aca9501afcd6c63762
2a68cd6c6ea218da740ba3cd86ad3f3a3003f3e9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3818624' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWV' 'sip-files00218.tif'
5897d34037c173d4af04605881f52c2d
4dba22317ae4f1db9ef49025510d81eb3d631648
describe
'836' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWW' 'sip-files00218.txt'
c45effac245c0dccf65af07b041c1f46
0dc9deb3dc3a10c24982ff9004749e5468c421ee
describe
'107774' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWX' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
b8506ec8947c84bc2e5ea67fc598f43a
83b4a37301c5c25aff2cc81d95f87590c9e5849f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3652336' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWY' 'sip-files00219.tif'
4c5faaf501b0efd622ea0befbc2ad471
f996384ff023ff70a72b3a2e7c9ef82a54c9399d
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUWZ' 'sip-files00219.txt'
d521051f02780fd44452256fed04ec83
c158e0c281303dfee49ad2d89b9cab61e6ac0ca9
describe
'110227' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXA' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
d34339aa8339e9a41a26f318623241ad
9ef779cc2d2e04d5309f508e12ebe64a757586ec
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3719356' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXB' 'sip-files00220.tif'
1dddacee74308022ab5b256a6875ad59
40958d927a2b9978491014370bd63fe7db0ebeac
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXC' 'sip-files00220.txt'
aa58f4bd155328631ccf550c5730b5f2
00770ff3926015060c7c90cd834f0bd948252112
describe
'106910' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXD' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
59a57494c27a9f5335faa7ca36d5cb12
4a349eeb24373eb8cf4267a547ee7ccf9c4f6cb0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'11314260' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXE' 'sip-files00221.tif'
f195d6aef24d1fb6e0636573458ee1b7
e06f56b53a0dbc7bc505c73f759c8490bbf872da
describe
'32' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXF' 'sip-files00221.txt'
81c52a3ce8c5d24800f6297cb72f6c7a
a08dfe6bf639d5a51e7bdb3978a4cd8911bd0609
describe
'14230' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXG' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
03ede0107051dd3ffe7fd3b41f7bd1e0
9c2e5805f35b11f5f449733fc8e552bbc90bc77b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3638800' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXH' 'sip-files00222.tif'
7614919031fb682d2133807159b5ee8c
8f4473a290f9f1af9cac7e4e2706b3572c116c68
describe
'107904' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXI' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
dd01ddd346de03bd79e9d035edb49a13
5df2bdbaa5d81141593d78abce42f6d68fb2de2c
'2012-01-14T09:58:57-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3729396' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXJ' 'sip-files00223.tif'
1dcffdb9fc00b54c9fd79e7236dd3694
e2de8cb3143bccebf29e3710e6ef38901230dcf5
describe
'875' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXK' 'sip-files00223.txt'
2188c5a2e141a9baa0b7ff80a41babb2
7348d1b2c2c0179164936905df52164687942866
describe
'99956' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXL' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
9b3fd483d9046fee077ecf4104c7552c
129fcba11668e5a7c4a5b4be1ce52ee8dc668f21
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3754716' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXM' 'sip-files00224.tif'
de4c3c179bab93590f8d014e8ac196e1
8bd85efc41c6e0540a3f5a7cab73a4128347cdf7
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXN' 'sip-files00224.txt'
28f789d77216a54086fc73ac34acdf88
5c371bcf6344c3313f84c075125a204f7a34eb47
describe
'107364' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXO' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
1f0aaf4bf85bcc2830fee4ab1c29b4ef
592d36c406b63973a38956ad388e97f7df94c669
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3672960' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXP' 'sip-files00225.tif'
8249f97a010c8eae3e79860fafc39ee1
5c2e4d262b5c9ff6a57e732d4d8aaed2377f71d6
'2012-01-14T09:57:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXQ' 'sip-files00225.txt'
81a02b1a2e98724f4131a34c193727d0
959161acef2bcc1d2fd61793cf50ea4cdbd3f12b
describe
'121399' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXR' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
50bcb85a1470deaa0dad2b1a936eef92
6dcef3b4c38bc5261aaf79d6bbccfb9343f52f76
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3726408' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXS' 'sip-files00226.tif'
fa26e777140378856c200697de057f98
b5b8614f937557b9c97e80e3ba21a7b0a5d87a6c
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXT' 'sip-files00226.txt'
ad21c1421df262734ec99d8ab85db268
34550cc64c0d343db6773cca819fad8d49071bf5
describe
'67536' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXU' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
3c776caabfe785be8d00508316ce335f
385d286bec59ce7f9885ecbd157192754ad2b8a4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3828932' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXV' 'sip-files00227.tif'
2ed92501c722362b633f3ce3fd51b874
77d9582d37a24daa28cafb7f6570df04f820368e
describe
'370' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXW' 'sip-files00227.txt'
2006752037070cc5ba6bb901299227ec
2484c3a48e8ff112b587ab909326627c1f640868
describe
'82509' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXX' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
ca0f3b5ab8d6288a14d113311890f94d
388ba3bf0136f0c75517bc50dd26a61220c9bd63
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3748464' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXY' 'sip-files00228.tif'
a10c6661b3e5d953245342178ba9c4b5
acdfd6d5ab72676a4159ffa0cfcecdee03ed7a64
'2012-01-14T09:56:57-05:00'
describe
'500' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUXZ' 'sip-files00228.txt'
7eb5c3ac4e46bcdd0b1171bbd4b3c0b9
c3848fedadaa88baaa6c2328c9afad8139072917
describe
'114147' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYA' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
c307752a32260098910f88cde4d85f04
597c09cc5223fd9031ca2bd339a10e1784b93dad
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3624340' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYB' 'sip-files00229.tif'
0a17bdb2d128d2375de1ad03e99d0803
8e0f59a8fd7040dac4e54da1655215befcdf4a87
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYC' 'sip-files00229.txt'
388b4f5b3bdcf19f770f98d0da4682b7
9efe36fcae7e783027e8a60d61fd904f816037d1
describe
'111219' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYD' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
80dd24ef7f0a729f020bd88b8799fa3a
9d87e9109fb3346111d39681b318d0270cbea839
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3632468' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYE' 'sip-files00230.tif'
9cc57fd0173b2be1befade500f246ec0
bb5a6630c49be62af34bb266abc2fd6ca5f5e3df
describe
'856' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYF' 'sip-files00230.txt'
3e65c661eb5ba226482edebe0b795f6f
d12ce0aee3cc96f777ec3aa840d1ceca02026024
describe
'115740' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYG' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
510d877604f109338315a2cb9ed588d0
415045499b6a7b2d82dda4504073d61406eaa023
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3672764' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYH' 'sip-files00231.tif'
4bc8eb2b371ab66e6ef96f34b2739c4b
017a1cfe17b4ee35052797f01817c56ab79a0a98
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYI' 'sip-files00231.txt'
a122f7f8a05b28ff8f789a810e9cae1b
a0245ecf5bd9a3750bba1547bf52b3ba3ffb4428
describe
'108051' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYJ' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
8edf9e11de191d579d8bd0e1f2674b01
ba54484e3a4845470a1d17fa537ce40123f51098
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3777136' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYK' 'sip-files00232.tif'
1c40c1447f6d64e5ae914586db6ce903
a004698717b9af6ecfcc2f3327ee440408da3beb
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYL' 'sip-files00232.txt'
dfa94c86b3d300d4148b51e809d9699f
5b9343251095ddfd84b625dea7e9a3f153f9c548
describe
'107420' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYM' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
7ba029526138efdaa2b6d3b283e462ab
cdbec0f89492b7eaadd2b554186af0703c22f93f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3812224' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYN' 'sip-files00233.tif'
50e329f35dbfb4a4d5b97f6076754fe0
a5eda5e76b0ceb71df041f37f79f0618591b0e95
'2012-01-14T09:57:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYO' 'sip-files00233.txt'
7bc3c7bfd365d0efa499af6cf6791d37
5c06175a6e50d736900d2a6202b376299e0c88b4
describe
'120773' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYP' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
577f62de12a30a94aff535ee63f3427f
5e4b8fd0f2ea0e166644643466631fca098e45e5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3659036' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYQ' 'sip-files00234.tif'
987b842bf83e02d9ce09fcb4ccc472e6
58f4bebc4772bda99a234061b4d0a09c00bf4f83
describe
'927' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYR' 'sip-files00234.txt'
27aa81068f632a4e85d04c13d20d6a71
d0c0ce4b3f798815611cc0ccc3c6e8304236020e
'2012-01-14T09:57:12-05:00'
describe
'113490' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYS' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
e0691fe68fa151b49eac246394fdac7b
b40a41c59d58dc159f2c4016c635722180ace7eb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3875860' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYT' 'sip-files00235.tif'
6a464670955f52542dc11c47301f743e
6e24e0a6d302f4402611a8b556ae3d3c31ce63fd
'2012-01-14T09:57:21-05:00'
describe
'833' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYU' 'sip-files00235.txt'
5ae44a994f7ee4093f3746306525eb31
c6d094b0b4c25105189ba5fbefcc8a581cce2fdc
describe
'116432' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYV' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
3f6a8170f3c298f7e102bc5e8c132841
f3ee82f150d5f895f4918bcbc4a08167d440ab52
'2012-01-14T09:57:15-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3777224' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYW' 'sip-files00236.tif'
a6456eb9f864f820988b3db008224ba3
a7813e4f8951cfab8ae619eb8da93de7c324efa2
describe
'862' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYX' 'sip-files00236.txt'
932d624731a5c31762b60b4e14a0bd00
ba39c58b88079dec1f3932b9e1352b543258ed0f
describe
'70897' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYY' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
373350323b27d4343597a3051556bd91
e6da01a7f2522db8c74bf5180774b5e60e7e70f6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3821328' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUYZ' 'sip-files00237.tif'
aa6a9d28f4ae753e4065d61a58f0ec0a
b792f14207377d3a3b28627c686e5da3fe951605
describe
'346' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZA' 'sip-files00237.txt'
92ee36606b67d36acd12226e8f25fdc4
f408f35d02ea109d54bab49e58de5c19e889dd41
'2012-01-14T09:53:44-05:00'
describe
'85136' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZB' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
c7db9660667e6c60c227faaa92cf9c33
4166933179d2e3b4fc0b17b4929d0cc80e2e9c87
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3805336' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZC' 'sip-files00238.tif'
d9c6afdaf6ea0e9b5e6c2fe2367aaaef
003045c7eca5052dc0aa71f186da881a13be318e
describe
'496' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZD' 'sip-files00238.txt'
93d508bbe1ee0fdde822e55db4bf16b1
765910356bb79efeb3f579ed10f324622b44e039
describe
'109270' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZE' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
e569965daf7f424f41651af749a20126
23287d66f262bea9550cf4c8bc05da0815a3c5dd
'2012-01-14T09:57:04-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3536232' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZF' 'sip-files00239.tif'
a3886182d9b9cd9b05fb572392d1f8ba
da8df59c8eb0a185f80a9b9e4f4e3ab40a05c4d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZG' 'sip-files00239.txt'
b368e386a1754933bb8f2b7462db6472
3c1fa2b97249ccfaf51c5246f67aa9b1bc09913b
describe
'107820' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZH' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
c34d659d50f4abf183225cfda69aefaf
56b514d83cafa08000eab985d48adabf22beb856
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3558932' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZI' 'sip-files00240.tif'
cdd6c78e09aba8ac5e40b5cdd7e15de6
68c9f9e3e6a7c9567b39a532d1a5aac45e797039
describe
'764' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZJ' 'sip-files00240.txt'
be1d1270c93dbcbf3d6b224ccc16c791
5cae24a2895ce81dfd5ece1821d41df9da6a87d6
describe
'106395' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZK' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
f0935050c61b71a25469b85700faf306
6da890e43ffef2d32247632e2abaf2ef7c7a5217
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3743224' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZL' 'sip-files00241.tif'
a65ad341bb50891e9a7f6addc7a8fe33
18b93206501a4a21bbea7e3b8bd8efb8503a3516
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZM' 'sip-files00241.txt'
4a84a9ba21fba5bb135d57fe59a732cc
8b1bfdf41017868469de1121709b3fb8c761b7dd
describe
'108485' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZN' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
f8fcb3de1853b21b6c55217955e0f8a6
08cd553304fabc0adc34c6e31665fde58d584164
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3447112' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZO' 'sip-files00242.tif'
0d39324cd6dd463075e13d160e0438ea
6ba290a78be83dd4b11cca9bd91224d1c7198b87
describe
'806' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZP' 'sip-files00242.txt'
5b481172f1260a7959b92f027d91b2c1
4d1dc7b83b144f6584c5c195a0e295086829bef6
describe
'103227' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZQ' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
d6de990a59b5a18444937579ca5b98e8
d16b1f0d35da398b07ddf7023263b108942e6fad
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3758924' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZR' 'sip-files00243.tif'
d89fec1cbe5cfd1abab6589a6dd7044a
dbd400667f562f395c1e4955f4554ae0c67db8c7
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZS' 'sip-files00243.txt'
d1c7d6770a940cd50176bdf660f2ab3b
a66b58181a62abcf15e5ed08fb5b31d690dbe89b
describe
'107186' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZT' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
5f527d2ee754fb2f51765447c5b3ef28
764c715d330850d512dfbf32c7d331dd6daeb847
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3638240' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZU' 'sip-files00244.tif'
cd7a9603366647641140acde3066a169
89c0e39fee7a13ebedb0b89183ff52ebbfe3b075
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZV' 'sip-files00244.txt'
e80dfb90ef798971e9df35f951e77580
314c028676b1638033b27a4acb9f8f04bba204ed
'2012-01-14T09:57:42-05:00'
describe
'114687' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZW' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
48dc18337b30c52f63140d7cdea5ffdc
98c2fec3e9629cf6ff4470ec4d0ce647399c3411
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3676676' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZX' 'sip-files00245.tif'
9418d0356e8bc71ec71e02e3f8f44719
2ec792324a5cacc75ece29b4dc797720eabbf200
'2012-01-14T09:58:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZY' 'sip-files00245.txt'
cc6fd85a93767455e3bb2c7b3416123d
2a86909b88faf03247d19676d747a7f4e059f872
describe
'98807' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAUZZ' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
a5257372225d3e5d737659cf84d4b840
04eb37577ebd5ef05c4a8a1f58e8e0af318764dc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3765056' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAA' 'sip-files00246.tif'
d36abf0ba519c1c099c2ff2acd76fc85
051a159b6f8377a6653b3f358a5012262a6069c1
describe
'701' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAB' 'sip-files00246.txt'
27c64153b0c74733bfcc656f511eb63e
706a2e30ab4c1d1f3a50e97a09283aa7a238d9ed
describe
'114919' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAC' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
69314e1d092441d03487dfe994a19166
acc8ae8b039710635d7709134900e05911de27e2
'2012-01-14T09:54:09-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3895544' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAD' 'sip-files00247.tif'
36fdb8776318c26464354a13ef477619
fbd40eda905b5b291d65c90e398480e0c3c62a64
'2012-01-14T09:56:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAE' 'sip-files00247.txt'
1006e5f6e92cc44eafaf8373eb6650af
b3c94afb987c1c7ca5557f98b9618a8260e6cb75
describe
'110153' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAF' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
1642ed352c48c03c0edcd0b6006f930c
fe05a855439a439ab89f2b8a26113276e5fbbd66
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3644052' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAG' 'sip-files00248.tif'
ee59c5849ad5487487825197d1dc0bb4
86abfd1ccc628a1ae08a6454824bb661d379f76e
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAH' 'sip-files00248.txt'
378fc99556b8f64200340d293fabc693
9251968b6f4df15732b0c36aa91f31f0e737b9e0
'2012-01-14T09:58:08-05:00'
describe
'121872' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAI' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
65635f80511e90273ab001c3b23ea375
352f08ef2af7c55ec20c6ce63591c0c5e6f4f118
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'11838396' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAJ' 'sip-files00249.tif'
9149958fc41a82e5ad337d2e32494e9e
79ddc9db72c1635270f494d76b6e6b388f3b6b32
'2012-01-14T09:55:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAK' 'sip-files00249.txt'
283ab5637ec7946cff1757f4ab2e0f5f
d2e0762e62fd8de28f96800bad24aab46b4e2654
describe
'39806' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAL' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
831ad5ab25b64ce43a0b8f37b298df9f
5e5c4caedbbd36c3b356703204af91b71bc89d59
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3803732' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAM' 'sip-files00250.tif'
2e95bea201236f392667c39f8ee5a63d
3b38f5146e3fdc0acdedf89c19ce2c0185599c94
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAN' 'sip-files00250.txt'
4f309253895352b4fbbc70d5a2df2427
76af26d02e809051189a6657c04d4854b097b6c4
describe
'119529' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAO' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
ad4daca41f7a5d99caa8c194e305ab34
583ea3068235592874f67739ad43c337829e2f5a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3674148' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAP' 'sip-files00251.tif'
7121d3cf5b60729700c3119ee19dae57
055b32d12cb1f07635d3b1e177b1ec1b7606944f
describe
'881' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAQ' 'sip-files00251.txt'
9155bba020039e63c4ee3f7d5489d7aa
a71da2af7280fc98c23d302c44e8e7eaa2e71b0c
describe
'116567' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAR' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
7d43cca16bc3c7f023469485dc9d7f14
eb7c068c3d0e7bbb9452ed3152e9af4e7be9be53
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3764776' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAS' 'sip-files00252.tif'
92ac8bb6e64617d4a6affe8729c957b0
b0175a52ebccd9c1dc67d0b898b0d44646f5c9dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAT' 'sip-files00252.txt'
b0a06e48a26ae31b2952e81b0be38d47
7ba4c8c07367b05a17f88660e89011bbec130e1d
describe
'104826' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAU' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
d20047b29bfcd4c57c1e43922b2b43ed
327b7831462d1a57f266a5c4305fcf87603d7188
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3890736' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAV' 'sip-files00253.tif'
dab88e755cd7fde648ece2b9a5e23578
d35d372cd96665319a9a6526e9bbbf9527cb5c01
describe
'793' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAW' 'sip-files00253.txt'
af3a58f97e761d0c3ad6c2a373c0e0ab
5f5054ec947e767954258e686e451504d9cc2a3b
'2012-01-14T09:54:58-05:00'
describe
'58358' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAX' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
fde764f53a262584e08c3c51fe266319
1bf3088b79cee97b50b5f269bd23740e7308020a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3755608' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAY' 'sip-files00254.tif'
96c8fc34b08b4523e224fab32081ef57
a9d4ae61a9fb805ad5e61f322dda672d3630f392
'2012-01-14T09:54:32-05:00'
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVAZ' 'sip-files00254.txt'
382107ff84c1bf5144bba638a016ef5d
98078032258775ffca279c220e3bd8f333bf662f
describe
'80529' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBA' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
6a385c3986a286999e01d78bd5ea4110
29bfe060b57ea94122ee3cd4ebff2ad2dc6ab1bb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3815408' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBB' 'sip-files00255.tif'
7d8ca7d2752a5766384457658cdb15de
98b24c0e448c3fd51995ea833e03d1990601a49b
'2012-01-14T09:55:00-05:00'
describe
'513' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBC' 'sip-files00255.txt'
a41df8877a2a3541951c5953c111864f
ea51dfcd7d66d5fef338ea42458392f28153034a
describe
'108416' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBD' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
77bd19690b2fcb42fd8d2b4850939eef
853a34ab07ab907d0afaf01958296c74623bc098
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3781000' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBE' 'sip-files00256.tif'
0313567b899690b9b81d3969ca6d7eac
8bb184e33246b61b371e7ca6488d1f4adf36d817
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBF' 'sip-files00256.txt'
e9494ef28cfcf1f3128ebaea257bce5f
d82992422466dd4bfe7fc9097005ee4c4fc92f84
'2012-01-14T09:55:22-05:00'
describe
'117447' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBG' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
7a15b40d43dfd87499bdc104b9cffee8
0d93140bd74d1c921e1536b0aacbf97c5653a960
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3951812' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBH' 'sip-files00257.tif'
c9cf43d7ae7a3e174f5117a4bd642ca5
e770d54bb5b1da6456ccbb365b75361ef006bb88
'2012-01-14T09:55:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBI' 'sip-files00257.txt'
3aef6fcc5b4f573a9bf974d796309bd4
9051287c23d85436671914189251c48a7af4519f
describe
'110215' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBJ' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
cb0ce3e0a755a9564d9f276d7ed5e2e4
f6118c9c6e7391e25cfc1a60b4b24db680693c25
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3756140' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBK' 'sip-files00258.tif'
68b995388524c41c0f3463f75ac2d41a
076719f18d4af886e1e9fd0285266a7ef34bc014
describe
'847' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBL' 'sip-files00258.txt'
50e29873b8043c75103818dc6cf9f4b7
8dd5f5a3804760bebb856b62f262daae1f2ec2ab
describe
'124096' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBM' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
f4880e88ffc83d76473ee5eb9ccb755a
6c2ec42a86a03dfbc6012ceff2d72c366ea8de88
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3777032' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBN' 'sip-files00259.tif'
88ad6ea76f3fb4a561cbb4fadcd276a7
e5e8adae2e4b336eb3ea3baae438186a82415daa
'2012-01-14T09:55:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBO' 'sip-files00259.txt'
111dc030e12b587f4b09b9b84e999c13
c5bab7a417dd5fd04e6211daafdbc3228b3bb4ae
describe
'117787' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBP' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
479d41dde7a1efe15e7eae4b7551b684
7548590dd2888a5fac77bad01945e11c55ea35f4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3656616' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBQ' 'sip-files00260.tif'
403a96d2309942fba850601eecc78a10
e87de2c0c2a03bbc640695da9e3376d9e3bc0317
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBR' 'sip-files00260.txt'
bacda20e9ea85c8e4dab7c82f88c729e
ea0cd513419db5f27e6febd7b5b629a7994468a2
describe
'113734' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBS' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
91bdc4ed68769ffbb636c9909ef5c16d
f47ff6a3b1a3395124ea287587df921b98f6d46a
'2012-01-14T09:58:53-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3858916' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBT' 'sip-files00261.tif'
d878577e9bad7599107f15aa80af052b
4b3a99a7d177f1a3e57ac3f10cd4e4fff87da102
describe
'813' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBU' 'sip-files00261.txt'
73ebe15fb16264045a4eda2368e35c27
6a8fedb212433f3b1611edbd5a5a04a4ace18d22
describe
'116964' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBV' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
b17681c87ef5fe7fee591928aa974d28
8a32a3eaeea4f6f7a38c227b9601e50c28928b41
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3811276' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBW' 'sip-files00262.tif'
66c8813140072112b59d8b76dbbccdf2
8c3ab99445872d7a6fc9d117d13db9c8cdc4774f
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBX' 'sip-files00262.txt'
35e22d58ffc04054de7f824b8af3b85e
15646e2bb0a4832e7c2779f6a6face26675033fb
'2012-01-14T09:58:22-05:00'
describe
'123225' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBY' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
f6c808904139907245aaa8e01014a126
7ae50e89afc4624c3e2fc737e05aa600e0788c4f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3682372' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVBZ' 'sip-files00263.tif'
3c8bb098d6ba0b3f524d3b02e2da90d4
052690712f46c5a92b4feec3b266d7eb45041f05
'2012-01-14T09:58:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCA' 'sip-files00263.txt'
952e007cbc72d01166955521b863c8bf
6930d9de1147b8de642e7e71c4e9922c1d083a4f
describe
'122379' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCB' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
fc50c36e39b2bd02a69b620c52043a3c
4f5266ca55f2ba8b5768c5d453650944b9ee127b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3965560' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCC' 'sip-files00264.tif'
7e120aef7a48a0f25e0eb2de9a62abdb
01be334dce07948a8d2efdf2b074b4e3fdc63b57
describe
'954' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCD' 'sip-files00264.txt'
b85acfec2ee1d550fda15fc2174bf584
dedfc2de0930cd6ab29a046ddeaa570f137c9d7d
describe
'129925' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCE' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
6b0ace320eb883f66823d567b8d9db12
46ab1514527b0e45672cc5d4e917e6887dc992e4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'12005764' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCF' 'sip-files00265.tif'
024242df65a88fe1878a1a39aa2934d6
8fed8521a158a46ba0cf4abe6447538d8f5dd051
'2012-01-14T09:54:05-05:00'
describe
'41' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCG' 'sip-files00265.txt'
d716eed7cf1969bbfcc930f8757627ac
90efd6ecb2d292e0ba83157686ee8dce5f498cd5
describe
'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCH' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
105648ddf69d6fa8ef572c811e8cdbc6
fd8966ba6baa6f3b5aa44daed68982c5577cadf1
'2012-01-14T09:58:28-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3999784' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCI' 'sip-files00266.tif'
29744b38d956842eb069931d3ea007b3
45f192a82fe8aa9c351034bc8070a19c34b34d39
describe
'85604' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCJ' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
7f83b00e5413f6e52e869d79364a1697
0e87528f66b3452fe3c2e2a86b622a143401341f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'4006072' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCK' 'sip-files00267.tif'
6117cbe352ef66d2d80a51735eca164b
e538ce359897f9f6e18709a5e7425ccba72458e4
describe
'930' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCL' 'sip-files00267.txt'
3bb5fdc64cd8b3f3c77d24bb5304ca42
05dfa5232edeca9e5ff76c8f07b6d03e021c2252
describe
'93554' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCM' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
f041e60848243e123c9c9a7d106ee331
0c80a613c6b9c05aeac269fdb875077719f4fa9c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3777572' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCN' 'sip-files00268.tif'
161708ef6102887ae3ba3adce166cd04
a6a37a787bbaeb19c54e0b2e34ca39cc397a748d
describe
'1049' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCO' 'sip-files00268.txt'
4e925e3e2a2d2be03e1142be7e4de7bf
f80373b55984b7ec73e3a520b4c797ae31f895be
describe
'14741' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCP' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
71f69dbbed0dba43eaca4942d6b0eac8
2dfc4ca05a9fa856ebdfcc76f1fe9b209eed99aa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3903440' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCQ' 'sip-files00269.tif'
2e0bf3e96b1eadaf57566443b75ddbbf
4a8bdf789b44d3a05c170e1105d2fc1c9bd68643
describe
'86634' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCR' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
bb513d9b619d8daf8d27e8a7255c12d9
dedffd4468b17887f562fa93d0f00fd6d448bcb6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'12071132' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCS' 'sip-files00270.tif'
bd86384cbb864a381c512f3557dab793
d70a7a5cd25b145439d2c9f8f136d1a5d8167753
describe
'77334' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCT' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
35863f867bf6eafd9bde385d8bade187
c8eeb3e3d247a631fb9a752836e9e91b9c4d9a8f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'12592424' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCU' 'sip-files00271.tif'
b43920f2b453fb43115998d189e186b2
2777dcd13a88383bb6dc87d5220be8cf7c608eb3
'2012-01-14T09:53:37-05:00'
describe
'224072' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCV' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
75ae4029ea986fe5c4c6e3788f274b2c
97886ed323de99aeb5056918c2f398eaf531b33c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'13084828' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCW' 'sip-files00272.tif'
561ffe4af771c5b4fea4ac96750ea4c3
6aeb96cd6a40ef91b4358d4864bf58d3819d2ff8
describe
'49706' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCX' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
f259e9b2b0e5f858f22a66927ddf89ea
6e46602678836f8cdacfef71c7952772d3b6caae
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2567456' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCY' 'sip-files00273.tif'
25b22671c35913b964b0b2137b037ac7
8c5f56f7d083e1ff1c488f0f5b84e882f458d5bd
describe
'289846' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVCZ' 'sip-filesUF00024376_00001.mets'
f3261f98c094bc5c852a00c34c6c4fa6
1d964d8e335095b7419f96e4908f8e5f362d6aaf
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T11:05:36-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'288839' 'info:fdaE20090313_AAAABEfileF20090313_AAAVDC' 'sip-filesUF00024376_00001.xml'
4df8e34b73273c1f5b37161306d0dbdb
01c8d8213070905548b6a788e8a91ffcc167e91a
describe
'2013-12-13T11:05:38-05:00'
xml resolution