Citation
Gift for young students

Material Information

Title:
Gift for young students
Creator:
Creamer, Hannah Gardner
Usher, James M ( James Madison ), 1814-1891 ( Publisher )
Metcalf and Company
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
James M. Usher
Manufacturer:
Stereotyped and printed by Metcalf and Company
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1847
Language:
English
Physical Description:
258 p. : ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Success -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Students -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Governesses -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Teachers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
School stories -- 1852 ( local )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre:
School stories ( local )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
United States -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
By H.G.C.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026618214 ( ALEPH )
44543463 ( OCLC )
ALG3513 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text


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GIFT

FOR

YOUNG STUDENTS.

BY

“Thought in the mine may come forth gold or dross;
When coined in word, we know its real worth:
If sterling, store it for thy future use;
*T will buy thee benefit, perhaps renown.
Thought, too, delivered, is the more possessed ;

Teaching, we learn; and giving, we retain.”
Young.

BOSTON:
JAMES M. USHER.
1853.



Entered according to Act of Congress, In the year 1847, by
Groncs CREAMER,

in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of
Massachusetts. :

CAMBRIDGE:
STEREOTYPED AND PRINTED BY
METCALF AND COMPANY,
PRINTERS TO THE UNIVERSITY,



CONTENTS.

———

PAGE
ANTICIPATION . 1 oe 7 fe . 7
LEAVES FROM THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS 23
THE WANDERER’S RETURN . . . . 94

PATCHWORK, OR CONVERSATION WITH AUNT MABEL 133
REMINISCENCES OF SCHOOL LIFE.
THE SCHOOL AND THE SCHOOL-HOUSE . 157
MRS, MONTROSE, OUR PRECEPTRESS . - 163
MISS BARNARD, OUR TEACHER IN MATHEMATICS 167
MISS IRVINE, OUR TEACHER IN ELOCUTION AND
COMPOSITION . . . . . 172

CELIA. . . . . . . 174
FANNY . . . . . . . %W
LORA . . . . . . . 181

ESTHER. . . . . . - 195
LILIAN. . . . . . . 202
ALICE . . . . . . - 205
BLANCHE . . . . . . Q11
SEQUEL TO REMINISCENCES OF SCHOOL LIFE . 224

1*






ANTICIPATION.

% Alas! we trace
The map of our own paths, and, long ere years
With their dull steps the brilliant lines efface,
On sweeps the storm, and blots them out with tears! ”
Mrs. Hemans.

Tue young Wilburnes were laying plans
for the future, forming schemes for life, or
building castles in the air, as some good people
would have termed their employment. ‘“ 1,”
said Ferdinand, ‘intend to be a great orator ;
I will rivet the attention of my hearers; their
thoughts shall be concentrated upon the subject
of my harangue. They shall listen with breath-
less wonder, and then, when I look around,
and survey the crowded hall, and see the audi-
ence completely in my power, and fascinated



8 ANTICIPATION.

by my eloquence, even as the little bird by the
rattlesnake, how happy I shall be! what a tri-
umph ! ”

His brother Alfred, in a very calm and pas-
sionless tone, remarked :—‘‘I have none of
those lofty ideas. I see not why I should be
dependent for spy happiness upon the applause
of the multitude. I will be a very rich man,
a merchant ; and I will make money so rapidly
that I shall be able to retire from business at
an early age. Then J will have an elegant
country-seat, with beautiful gardens. Every
thing in my house shall be very costly and lux-
urious. I shall have money enough to gratify
every desire of my heart. Then I shall enjoy
life.”

“¢T think,” replied Ferdinand, “that your
plan is quite contemptible. I do not see that
you are much better than an Epicurean.
Very exalted, I must say! How rich do you
intend to be before you commence this life of
pleasure ?”

‘*Q, I must have a million of dollars !”



ANTICIPATION, 9

‘© You do n’t expect to be happy before
that time ? ”

‘¢ No; I shall work hard till I have amassed
that sum, and then live at my ease.”

“¢ Well, if I loved money, and I rejoice
that I do not,” said Ferdinand proudly, ‘I
would not be a slave. I woe work hard,

T had gained a

sum so enormous, because one may be very

and suffer every privation, till

happy with a tithe of the amount you have
mentioned. If I wished to be rich, I would
earn money gradually, that I might enjoy all
the intervening time. You remind me of a
story, which J will try to relate for your ben-
efit. King Pyrrhus told Cineas, his ambas-
sador, that he wished to subject all Italy to his
rule. Cineas replied, —‘ The Romans be-
ing cofiquered, what do you design to do, O
king ?? ‘ Sicily is next to Italy, nor will it
be difficult to occupy that with armed troops.’
‘ Sicily being occupied, what will you do
then?’ The king, who did not yet perceive
the purpose of Cineas, said, —‘I have a



10 ANTICIPATION.

mind to pass over into Africa.’ Cineas pro-
ceeded, — ‘ Where then, O king?’ Pyrrhus
replied, — ‘ Then, finally, my Cineas, we
shall be tranquil, and enjoy sweet peace.’
Cineas asked, — ‘ Why do you not even now
enjoy thag/peace ?? There, Alfred, I believe
. ~+Lhave rep the story word for word, and
I think ait. you admirably.”
peor girls, attracted by the earnestness of
"their brothers’ tones, left their books, and
drew near the fire.

‘<¢ What will you be, sweet sisters ?”? asked
Ferdinand. ‘‘ Alfred and I are planning our
future course ; doubtless holding the opinion
that our destiny is in our own hands, and that
we can have what lot we choose.”’

Juliet was the first to reply. Tossing her
bright curls, she exclaimed, — ‘‘ My plan is
already formed. I will be a belle. Every
body says that I am beautiful. Then I have
the most exquisite taste in dress, so that’ I
cannot fail to be enchanting. I shall be cel-
ebrated as the beautiful, the graceful, and the
attractive Miss Wilburne.”



ANTICIPATION. 11

‘¢O sister!” cried Louisa, ‘* how can you
desire pleasures like those ? They can only
be enjoyed while youth lasts. Besides, who
will ever hear of you after your death ? ”

‘¢T care nothing about posthumous fame.
I want to enjoy life; but it will make very
little difference what people s r Il am
dead. I will be happy while I live? coh

Alfred cordially assented to the wisdom of
these opinions ; but Ferdinand shook his head,
with great gravity, and, turning to Louisa,
said, — ‘‘ What character do you choose,
dear sister ?”

<< | will be a learned lady,”’ replied Louisa ;
‘¢ J will attend to all the branches pursued at
our best colleges. I will be a splendid math-
ematician, an able linguist ; and I will also be
profoundly skilled in the natural sciences. I
shall be the learned, the renowned Louisa
Wilburne.”

‘« My ambitious little sister,” exclaimed
Ferdinand, ‘‘ I like your ideas far better than
Juliet’s ; but you are not very wise to attempt



ANTICIPATION.



so many st ies. ‘The course pursued at col-
leges is Maimense. I should like to know
what individual can excel in all the branches
prescribed for those young men. Better give
y your whole attention to one department. Re-






mathematician, if you please, or
adept in the natural sciences.
y acquire fame ; but if you seek
ence in each of the three, you will utter-
I was reading a work of Spurzheim’s
“Other day, and I will try to remember
some of the ideas, which exactly harmonized
with my own. He argues that every one
should be educated according to his natural
endowments, that the gifts bestowed upon
different individuals are very dissimilar, and
that we should cultivate those mental powers
which are predominant. The state of society
would then advance with great rapidity.”

‘“‘T prefer Madame de Staél’s reasoning,”
said Louisa. ‘‘ Be so kind as to listen to this
paragraph. I will read it as it is written in
la belle Frangaise. ‘La nouvelle philosophie



ANTICIPATION. 13

Allemande est nécessairement plus favorable
qu’aucune autre & l’étendue de l’esprit ; car,
rapportant tout au foyer de lame, et considé-
rant le monde lui-méme comme régi par des
lois dont le type est en nous, elle ne saurait
admettre le préjugé qui destine chaque homme
d’une maniére exclusive a telle ou telle branche
d’études. Les philosophes idéalistes croient
qu’un art, qu’une science, qu’une partie quel-
conque ne saurait étre comprise sans des
connaissances universelles, et que, depuis le
moindre phénoméne jusqu’au plus grand, rien
ne peut étre savamment examiné ou poétique-
ment dépeint sans cette hauteuf d’esprit qui
fait voir Vensemhle en décrivant les dé-
tails.’ ”

‘Well, do as you please, sister. Children
ought, I suppose, to be exercised in a variety
of studies, or some parts of the brain might be
disproportionately developed ; but after they
become young men and women, they should
decide for themselves which path they can
pursue with the greatest credit. Very few

2



14 ANTICIPATION.

people in this country can have as much time
for study as those plodding Germans, of whom
Madame de Staél writes. Besides, I think
that every one is fitted by nature for some
particular course, and that he should follow it
with eagerness. As I believe.that I am des-
tined for an orator, I shall study with a view
to that end. I will attend to logic, that I
may learn how to argue ; to rhetoric, that my
orations may be adorned by all that will render
them attractive ; to criticism, that I may be
able to avoid faults of composition and of” ut-
terance ; to history, that I may have a great

number of facts and examples for illustration ;
”



to the classics, that I may

“Stop, stop, Mr. Orator,”” shouted Lou-
isa, ‘*I agree that you are admirably well
qualified by nature for a public speaker, but
spare us such a display of your powers this
evening.”

The young people had commenced their
conversation in a low tone, that they might not
disturb their seniors ; but, excited by the in-



ANTICIPATION, 15

spiring topic of discussion, they, quite uninten-
tionally, talked with so much vehemence that
their colloquy was not only heard, but listened
to with great interest ; for how could one avoid
giving some heed to what was so eagerly vocif-
erated ?

‘© We will send the children to another
room,”’ said Mr. Wilburne ; but, on discover-
ing the interesting nature of their conversation,
he paused, and did not interrupt the young
disputants till their conference had reached the
point above noted. ‘Then, turning to Mrs.
Wilburne, whd had been engaged in needle-
work, while her husband relieved the tedium
of her employment by reading aloud, he pro-
posed that they should join the children, and |
endeavour to give them some reasonable ideas.
The company soon formed one group. The
father began, — “ How happy I may expect
to be in a few years, with four such children
to confer honor upon my name, — a brilliant
orator, a luxurious millionaire, a dashing belle,
and a woman of profound erudition !””



16 ANTICIPATION.

The children at first evinced some degree
of confusion, but they soon rallied. Ferdi-
nand, with a graceful bow, replied, — ‘* Yes,
papa, we will all be great in some way, and
you shall be honored by children so distin-
guished.”

‘© Do you not know,” asked Mrs. Wil-
burne, ‘‘ that great plans for the future are of-
ten formed by young people, and that these
almost invariably end in disappointment ?”

‘< Well, mamma,’’ answered Louisa, “ the
failure must be attributed to want of strength
in the will, With a powerful will, I can ac-
complish any purpose.”

“‘T acknowledge,” said the lady, ‘‘ that
much depends upon the will, so much that a
good degree of truth may be claimed for the
adage, ‘ Where there is a will there is a way.’
But it must be confessed that circumstances
do frequently exert a powerful influence over
our plans.”

‘Yes, mamma, circumstances must have
some effect ; but I think that a strong will can,
in the end, surmount all obstacles.”



ANTICIPATION. 17

‘< Your position may, with some qualifica-
tion, be granted. It does, indeed, contain so
much truth, that we might almost receive it as
an axiom. The main difficulty, in many cas-
es, is the will itself. Yours may not be so ef-
fective as you think. It is far easier to: re-
solve than to act. I will say nothing yet about
the character of your schemes, but will mere-
ly speak of some obstacles which may prevent
their fulfilment. Ferdinand intends to be an
orator. He may gain a knowledge of those
branches of learning requisite for the successful
speaker, and then find that he has not those
graces of oratory which would render him ac-
ceptable to the public. I understand you, my
son, you are thinking of Demosthenes ;° but it
is questionable whether it would be expedient
for every awkward stammerer, who wishes to
speak in public, to make such efforts. He
might be compelled to admit that he had the
defects, without the genius, of that orator.
Alfred may be defeated in his plans by the
loss of his ships, by the destruction of his

Q*



18 ANTICIPATION.

buildings by fire, and by various other hostile
influences. Juliet may see that she has not
that kind of beauty, and those peculiar attrac-
tions, which would crown her the reigning
belle. Louisa’s health may be destroyed, in
consequence of the intensity of her application
to study. As you have quoted Madame de
Staél, Louisa, I will deepen the impression of
my remarks, by giving you a few extracts con-
cerning her. Her mother, we learn, had
formed an extensive plan. Madame Necker
intended that her daughter should be a woman
of profound learning. The early years of
Madame de Staél were spent in study. The
powerful mind of the child was stimulated to a
high degree. Now I will read. ‘ Her pleas-
ures, as well as her duties, were exercises of
intellect ; and nature, which had originally be-
stowed great gifts, was assisted by every pos-
sible method. In this way, her vigorous fac-
ulties acquired a prodigious growth.’ ‘ The
health of Mademoiselle Necker could not en-
dure the high pressure of excitement so con-



ANTICIPATION. 19

stantly applied to her intellectual faculties.
- Before she was fifteen years old, the physi-
cians were obliged to order complete seclu-
sion, and total abandonment of study. This
was a subject of great regret to Madame
Necker. She had indulged an unbounded
ambition for her daughter ; and, according to
her ideas, to give up great learning was to re-
nounce all hopes of distinction. Having ob-
tained extensive erudition by her own patient
habits of mental labor, she thought every body
could study as intensely and methodically as
she had done.’ ”

“© Why, mamma, I thought that Madame de
Staél was a very learned woman.”

- « She was a very literary woman, my dear,
and quite distinguished, but she was prevented
from gaining that kind of renown which her
mother had desired for her. She had great
genius, wonderful talent, and unrivalled con-
versational powers. Listen to another extract.
‘The place of this extraordinary woman is
marked among the most eloquent writers of



20 ANTICIPATION.

any age ; among the best delineators of human
feelings and passions ; among the truest histo-
rians of the heart. She might not possess
much positive knowledge; sometimes she
spoke of things she did not thoroughly under-
stand ; her imagination often took the lead of
her judgment ; but her errors were invariably
on the generous side, and still bespoke great-
ness of mind and elevated sentiments.’ So,
- you see, my children, that circumstances will
sometimes declare their influence. The for-
mation of a plan and the execution are widely
different. It is, indeed, well in youth to mark
out a course of action for the future; but be
not too sanguine. I entreat, also, that you
will carefully examine your schemes, and con-
sider whether they are worthy of the vigorous
pursuit of immortal beings.”

‘¢ Louisa,” said her father, ‘¢ you may step
into the library and bring me that volume of
Foster’s Essays which you will see lying upon
the table. A passage in that book occurs to
my mind which I should like to read for the



ANTICIPATION. 21

benefit of you children. We will then aban-
don farther discussion of the subject till anoth-
er evening.”

The book was brought, and the father soon
found the passage to which he had referred.

‘¢'The extravagance of imagination in ro-
mance has very much consisted in the display
of a destiny and course of life totally unlike
the common condition of mankind. And you
may have observed in living individuals, that
one of the effects sometimes produced by the
predominance of this faculty is, a persuasion
in a person’s own mind that he is born to
some peculiar and extraordinary destiny, while
yet there are no extraordinary indications in
the person or his circumstances. There was
something rational in the early presentiments
which some distinguished men have entertained
of their future career. When a celebrated
general of the present times exclaimed, after
performing the common military exercise m a
company of juvenile volunteers, ‘I shall be a
commander-in-chief,’ a sagacious observer of



22 ANTICIPATION.

the signs of yet undeveloped powers might
have thought it indeed a rather sanguine, but
probably would not have pronounced it an ab-
surd, anticipation. An elder and intelligent as-
sociate of Milton’s youth might without much
difficulty have believed himself listening to an
oracle, when so powerful a genius avowed to
him that he regarded himself as destined to
produce a work which should distinguish the
nation and the age. The opening of uncom-
mon faculties may be sometimes attended with
these anticipations, and may be allowed to ex-
press them ; perhaps, even, as a stimulus, en-
couraged to indulge them. But in most in-
stances these magnificent presumptions form,
in the observer’s eye, a ludicrous contrast
with the situation and powers of the person
that entertains them. And in the event, how
few such anticipations have proved themselves
to have been the genuine promptings of an ex-
traordinary mind !”’



LEAVES FROM THE AUTOBIOGRA-
PHY OF A GOVERNESS.

CHAPTER I.

‘‘ Man measures earth’s stupendous globe,
And marks its mighty bound ;
His search has solved the mystic tides
In their alternate course,
And sunward traced the viewless winds
Up to their flaming source ;
Yea, his far ken hath read the skies
With all their starry blazonries
That o’er us nightly burn ;
Hath marked the planet's boundless ring,
And fixed the certain years that bring
The comet's dread return :
Yet, spirit! when his curious zeal
To thy deep quest applies,
How like to groping blindness ahows -
The wisdom of the wise!”
Wittiam Pitr Pacwer.

THe sun was diffusing his amber-hued tints
over the little village of L., as through its



24 LEAVES FROM THE

main street, I, the sole passenger of a cum-
brous stage-coach, was whirled in the year
18—. I was sad and weary ; for, about to
appear among entire strangers, a feeling of
loneliness and depression was fast stealing over
me. The day, although oppressively warm,
had been cloudy ; but now Phoebus suddenly
burst forth to gladden the earth with a smile,
before disappearing from the view of its hab-
itants. My spirit had always expanded in
sunshine and prosperity. In my early years,
I had thought that I was certainly born for
wealth and distinction; for only in favorable
circumstances did my mind and body appear
to act to full advantage. But I was not long
in learning that a truly noble character is not
the creature of circumstances, but that it rises
above them, declaring that it will not be form-
ed by their influence. I had learned to study,
even when suffering from dejection and disap-
pointment. I had learned to be cheerful, even
’ when ignorant how I should obtain the money
to buy the next new book which my studies



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 26

might demand. I had learned, also, not to be
low-spirited during a seven days’ storm. Suill,
the weather always would exert some power
over my frame. Did I arise in the morning,
and see every object gilded with the rays of
Heaven’s great luminary, — did I see the pris-
matic colors reflected in every dew-drop, —
my spirits rebounded, and I joyfully prepared
for the duties of the day! This idiosyncrasy
rendered me peculiarly light-hearted, as the
clouds now vanished, and the landscape glis-
tened with the clear, bright emanations of the
sun. My attention was so attracted by the
magnificent, though oft-repeated, spectacle of
the glories of the descending orb, that I for
a while neglected to notice the beauties of the
sequestered little town which would probably
be my home for several years. The sun, in-
deed, appeared like a huge ball of flame, on
which were brilliantly depicted graceful, arbo-
rescent ramifications ; for the king of day was
disappearing behind a superb forest, the tips of
whose trees formed the foreground of the gor-
3



26 LEAVES FROM THE

geous picture. In the intensity of my gaze,
therefore, I left unobserved the few republican
palaces, and the numerous neat, white cotta-
ges, which proclaimed that the village of L.
was of the first rank among country towns in
point of opulence, directed by taste. My at-
tention was at length arrested, for the vehicle
suddenly stopped, and I soon found myself
ringing for admission at the door of a princely
mansion. It was presently opened by a mid-
dle-aged woman, whom I afterward discov-
ered to be the housekeeper, or general super-
intendent of domestic affairs. She was not, of
course, compelled to fill the office of janitor,
but the good woman, having an unusual share
of that gossiping curiosity which seems to be
the concomitant of the uneducated of both
sexes, was always eager to have the first view
of new-comers. Having escorted me to the
parlour, and learned that I was the expected
governess, she left me, that she might commu-
nicate the intelligence to Mrs. Maynard. She
soon returned with the information that the



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 27°

lady was asleep, but that she would probably
awake in the course of an hour, as her slum-
bers rarely exceeded that time. I requested
that in the interim I might be conducted to my
room, for I had a certain consciousness that,
after travelling the whole day, some change in
my habiliments was requisite to render me pre-
sentable. The advantages of journeying are
indeed very ‘great ; but, certainly, no combina-
tion of circumstances does, for the time being,
render one’s appearance more unprepossess-
ing. Not till the expiration of an hour was
I prepared to sit down and devote a few
moments to meditation. I did not long enjoy
my solitary thoughts, for I was soon sum-
moned to Mrs. Maynard’s apartment. I had
heard that she was an invalid, but had not ex-
, pected to find her quite so ill. The expres-
sion of my countenance must have indicated
my emotion, for she sighed, then smiled faint-
ly, and said, — ‘‘ You see, my young friend,
that I am useless to my family.”

‘I trust that you are not entirely useless,



28 LEAVES FROM THE

my dear madam ; you still have the power of
conversing with your children.”

“¢ Sometimes, I am thus happy; but I am
often too feeble to endure their presence. I
feel comparatively well this evening, therefore
I will tell you some of my views and wishes.
I must first give you some information con-
cerning our circumstances ; for I think it im-
portant that the educator of my children
should be acquainted with their prospects for
the future. About four years since, my hus-
band, who was a wealthy merchant, died.
We had been residing in the city of. New
York. After his demise, having lost all love
for a city life, I removed to this place, which
had formerly been our summer abode. I
resolved to live tranquilly in the country, to
.pass my life amid rural scenes, and to devote
my time to the education of my children. I
began to form various schemes ; but they were
soon frustrated. One day, while walking with
my children, my foot slipped ; I fell, and was
instantly deprived of all consciousness. The



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS 29

screams of my terrified children soon brought
the villagers to my assistance. Surgical aid
was immediately obtained, and a most fearful
discovery announced ; I had received a se-
vere spinal injury. For several weeks I was
very ill. I then learned that I was maimed
for life. Since that time 1 have been confined
to my bed, and I now no longer expect any
material alleviation of my sufferings. You see
that my plans for usefulness were destroyed.
I had anticipated much gratification in edu-
cating my children at home, in forming their
minds and manners myself. The idea may
have been a selfish one, but I delighted in the
thought that they should be wholly indebted
to me for their literary attainments. These
illusions were now at an end. My youngest
child was intrusted to the care of her nurse.
Two were sent to the best school in the vil-
lage, which, however, was not of a very high
order. The others were placed in a distant
seminary. Affairs remained thus, while any
hope was afforded of a partial recovery of my
3



30 LEAVES FROM THE

health. Within a few weeks my disease has
assumed a new aspect. I have been informed
that, although I may live many years, J have
reason soon to expect a fatal termination of
my sufferings. This being the case, I sent
for my children ; and, as we have no good
school in the vicinity, I resolved to procure a
governess, that they might all be taught at
home. I demanded high qualifications, such
as are more unusual now than they probably
will be some years from this time. I consider
myself very fortunate in obtaining Miss Emer-
son.”

I bowed in acknowledgment of the compli-
ment, and the lady proceeded.

‘¢T purpose to send my elder son to col-
lege, when he shall have reached the age of
sixteen; and I wish that my daughters may
pursue a similar course of study, or, at least,
one equally extensive, at home. My children
have been with me two weeks. I can see
that great changes have taken place in their
characters. They have been superficially



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. $1

taught, and I fear that you will have much
difficulty in forming habits of diligence and
application. Were it not for my present fa-
tigue, I would give you a description of each
child, that you might be, in some degree,
acquainted with your pupils. But it may be
as well for you to obtain a knowledge of their
talents and dispositions by your own observa-
tion. I will now summon your charge, and
after the introduction I must dismiss you all
to the parlour, for I am quite exhausted.”

The lady rang a small bell, which was
presently answered by a little Irish girl, who
was directed to call the children.

‘© All of them, ma’am?”’ asked the child,
her blue eyes dilating.

*¢ Yes, Nora, I wish to see them all.”

The little girl laughed. ‘‘ And sure,
ma’am, I shall have to look in six different
places for them. I hope you won’t be after
expecting them very soon.”

‘¢ Well, find them as soon as you can,
Nora,” replied Mrs. Maynard, with a smile.



82 LEAVES FROM THE

Then, turning to me, she observed, — “‘ My
children have had almost unbounded liberty
these few days ; but I hope they will soon find
employment.”

While awaiting the entrance of my future
pupils, I had leisure to observe their mother,
who, wearied by the effort of speaking, had
closed her eyes, and was apparently asleep.
Although past the meridian of life, and evi-
dently much. altered by ill health, she was
exceedingly beautiful. Her countenance was
very pale, and her lips slightly compressed
with pain, but her forehead was high, and
exquisitely formed. Her dark hair was
brushed away from the throbbing temples, that
she might feel the revivifying influence of the
pure summer air. The breeze, gently steal-
ing through the masses of woodbine that
shaded the windows, was indeed so genial in
its influence, that I for a moment half won-
dered how any one inhaling it could be ill or
unhappy. The expression of Mrs. Maynard’s
countenance spoke of ambition, tempered by
love and benignity.



AUTOBIOGRAPHY oF A GOVERNESS. 38

The sound of cheerful voices drew my at-
tention to the window. As I listened to the
‘merry laughter of the domestics, who were
lightly performing their household labors, and
Jooked upon their blooming faces and well-
rounded figures, I thought of the inestimable
value of health, and began to speculate wheth-
er or not the suffering lady would be willing to
change places with these active and vigorous,
but humble, individuals. My reverie was in-
terrupted by suppressed tones and gentle foot-
steps.

“Did you send .for us, mamma? Ah!
-how happy we are that you feel able to see us
this evening !’’ was the graceful salutation of
‘a tall and sprightly girl, who approached the
bedside and tenderly kissed the pale sufferer.
The others silently followed her example. I
was partly concealed from view by the folds
of acurtain. The little scene was therefore
over before I was perceived by the children.
Mrs. Maynard now introduced them after the
following style : —



34 LEAVES: FROM THE

‘¢ This is my daughter Helena. Although
she yesterday completed her sixteenth birth-
day, she will not, I hope, for several years,
think that she is too old to profit by your in-
structions.”

My heart was immediately won by Helena’s
irresistible smile, as she said, — ‘* I must in-
form you, Miss Emerson, that 1 am by no
means a hard student, and that you must not
expect too much from me.”

Helena was not beautiful. Indeed, none
of the children equalled in personal appearance
the young Zenobia that, Mrs. Maynard must
have been at their age ; but the expression
of her features was beaming and radiant ; her
eyes sparkled with exuberance of health and
cheerfulness, and her manners were character-
ized by a charming naiveté. This combina-
tion rendered her extremely attractive.

“ This is my son Arthur,” continued the
lady, stroking with her thin hand the clustering
locks of a wild but affectionate looking boy of
thirteen, who stood by her side. The lad



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 35

bowed, took my hand, and stammered, —
‘* Miss Emerson, my mother says that you are
going to fit me for college ; but I do n’t wish
to be a learned man ; I want to go to sea.”

Mrs. Maynard smiled gravely, and said, —
*¢ You will change your opinion, I hope, be-
fore you are sixteen. I do not wish you to
enter college at an earlier age. ‘Till then you
will stay at home and study for my sake, will
you not, my son ?”

‘¢@, yes, mamma, for three long years, if
you will then let me choose for myself.”

The mother promised, and both parties ap-
peared perfectly contented.

“This is my daughter Florence,” said
Mrs. Maynard, gazing fondly upon a fragile
child of twelve years. ‘She is our litte
invalid, and very careful must we be of our
lily. If she does not apply herself too closely
to study, she may soon be as strong as the
others. You must try to cure her of some of
this extreme diffidence, which makes her afraid
to speak to a stranger.’ Again turning to



36 LEAVES FROM THE

Florence, she said, —- ‘‘ You see, my child,
that I am obliged to apologize for your si-
lence.”

The little girl, whose complexion was of a
very transparent nature, allowing the beholder
to witness the trace of every emotion, blushed
deeply and painfully, and courteously kissed
my hand, without daring to raise her eyes.

Henry, a lively boy of eight, Grace, a
smiling little girl of seven, and Ada, a pretty
child of five, were then introduced. “They
saluted me with the confidence and simplicity
of early childhood, and presented a pleasing
picture of infantine loveliness.

‘« Now you may go and get acquainted with
each other,” said the lady, pleasantly waving
her hand for our departure.

On our way to the parlour, we heard the
sound of the tea-bell, and accordingly turned
our steps toward the neat apartment in which
the evening repast was usually served. The
remainder of the day was spent in compliance
with the request of Mrs. Maynard. Helena,



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. $7

Arthur, and the three little ones evinced no
deficiency of companionable qualities, but
Florence uttered hardly a word. She lis-
tened, however, to our remarks with great
attention; and the flashes that occasionally
darted across her intelligent countenance de-
noted that hers was a character which would
amply repay careful study. Henry, Grace,
and Ada brought their playthings for my in-
spection; Arthur gravely asked my opinion
concerning a canoe which he was construct-
ing; Helena eagerly displayed some new mu-
sic that had just arrived. At eight o’clock,
Florence and the three little ones quitted the
room for their respective dormitories, leaving
the elder children with me. J made some re-
mark indicative of my surprise at the alacrity
with which the others had retreated, observing
that I had often witnessed quite a rebellion in
a family on the arrival of bed-time.

“ been at home with mamma, and have become
accustomed to regular habits.”

4



38 LEAVES FROM THE

‘¢ But does your sister Florence retire at
that hour ?”

‘¢ Florence has been away with me, but on
our return, mamma, finding that her health was
still delicate, insisted that she should, for the
present, observe the same rule. Arthur and |
T have a little more freedom.”

‘© Your mother has great influence over her
children.”

‘ Yes, the little ones obey her implicitly,
although they are frequently prohibited from
seeing her for several days. Indeed, I think
that her extreme illness is the cause of their
prompt compliance with her wishes.”

I mentally rejoiced that my pupils had been
so well trained ; but I desired to learn more of
the gentle Florence, whose blushing, expres-
sive countenance was yet, in imagination, be-
fore me. In reply to my inquiries, Helena said,
— ‘¢ She is a dear little girl, but rather pecu-
liar. She is four years younger than myself,
but I am, now and then, quite jealous of her.
Not very often, however, for my ambition is



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 39

not directed to the pursuits which interest her.
You must know that she is quite a scholar.
Arthur and I often call her our little blue
lady. She has always been a slender child,
unable to bear exposure to wind and weather.
When quite young, being too feeble in frame
to join in our rude sports, ——I say ours, for
before we left home I used to play and romp
with Arthur as if I had been a boy myself, —
she would sit quietly in a corner with her little
book, and seem very well contented. Her
memory was very retentive, so that she sel-
dom forgot what she had read. She also
learned her lessons with great ease. Mamma
was delighted, for Florence was very much
like herself. After a while, her health im-
proved, but her love for books continued.
At school she was classed with girls several
years older than herself. I was once very
much alarmed by an intimation from one of
our teachers, that in a new division soon to
be made, Florence and I would probably be
placed in the same class. This, of course,



40 LEAVES FROM THE —

aroused my pride, for I could not endure the

thought that my little sister, as I had called

her, should be considcred my equal in literary

attainments. Therefore I studied hard, and
f thus escaped the threatened humiliation.”

« But you love her warmly ? ”

“Certainly, but I did not quite like the
idea that she should surpass me at school, and
I took good care to prevent such an occur-
rence. That was natural, you must know.”

“ Quite natural,” replied I, with a smile ;
“¢ but is it true, most frank Helena, that you
are as indifferent as you profess with respect
to intellectual advancement ? ”

‘“ Why, I have a great regard for knowl-
edge, but I am no enthusiast. I should like
to know as much as people who are called
well educated and accomplished, but I have
no desire to become a prodigy of learning.
Now I suspect that Florence has some very
ambitious views in her little head. I really
believe that she confidently expects to be very
learned at some future time.”



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 42

‘¢ That would doubtless gratify your moth-
er.”?

‘¢ Ah! yes ; mamma thinks a great deal of
our little blue lady, and is constantly encour-
aging her to persevere in her studies.”

‘‘Ts Florence always as silent as she has
been this evening ?”

‘OQ, no, madam, but you are a stranger,
and she is not yet acquainted with you. For
some days she will be reserved, but afterward
you: may expect to hear her voice for hours.
When much excited, she talks very long and
earnestly.””

During this conversation, Arthur had been
quietly examining his canoe. He now de-
posited it in its place, and, after a few mo-
ments of apparently intense thought, suddenly
raised his eyes, and exclaimed, — “‘I have
heard all that Helena has been saying about
Florence, but, Miss Emerson, what is the use
of so much hard study ? ”

‘* Ah!” said I, mentally, ‘this pupil of
mine is one of the cut bono species ”

4*



42 LEAVES FROM THE

Before I had time to reply, Arthur re-
sumed,— ‘If it had not been for fear of griev-
ing mamma, who is so ill, I should not have
promised to stay at home with my books
three years, for I want to go to sea. I never
could bear to think of spending 2 all my days
in study.”

‘* A complete answer to your question
would require a long lecture, Arthur, but
we will consider the subject a moment. You
do not, of course, imply that all knowledge
is useless ?”’

‘¢ Why, no, we must learn enough to be
respectable, that is, we must learn as much
as people in general are expected to know.”

‘¢ As much, you mean, as will carry you
through life with a good degree of comfort.”

“¢T believe that is my idea. I should like
to know enough to be a good sailor, and that
is all.”

‘©T do not think, Arthur, that all knowl-
edge should be confined to our great schools
for learning. I would have a good share dif-



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 43° —

fused among all classes of men. I would not
object to the life of a sailor, should a boy
manifest a decided preference for it, but I
would have him go forth upon the mighty
deep with his senses refined and elevated,
and his mind enlarged, that he might under-
stand and appreciate the wonders of the sea.
I would have him able to view with a phi-
losophic eye the many kinds of men whom
he must encounter. I would have him so
educated that his leisure time at sea should
not be squandered upon the low amusements
which are too common among mariners.
‘When you speak of the knowledge requisite
for a sailor, what do you mean? Have you
reference to any particular branches ? ”

‘s Why, I think a sailor ought to under-
stand navigation, if he has any desire of be-
coming captain.”

‘‘'Yes, that department of knowledge is
indispensable ; any thing beside ?””

¢ T do not think of any thing more.”

6 What, nothing at all!”



44 LEAVES FROM THE

‘© Q, he must know how to read, of course,
or he could not study books of navigation,
and he ought to learn a little arithmetic, but
I do not gee the use of puzzling one’s self
with exchange, commission, and a hundred
other tedious subjects.”

‘* Suppose that, after sailing a few voyages,
you should be requested to fill the office of
supercargo, would not some of this knowl-
edge be of great importance ? ”’

‘©'Yes, madam, but not for the common
sailor.”

‘¢ Should not a true seaman be qualified
for any office, from the cabin boy’s to the
supercargo’s ? ”?

‘¢ Well, a sailor does not need geography.”

‘¢ My dear Arthur, think a moment. A
man, whose profession exposes him to the
necessity of visiting different countries, ought
certainly to possess some information con-
cerning them, to be acquainted with their
localities, the manners and customs of the
people, their exports and imports, and various
other topics connected with geography.”’



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 45

6 Could he not do without grammar ? ”

“‘ He could do without it, of course. So
might you dispense with shoes and stockings,
but to be deprived of such conveniences
would not be very agreeable. Should a sailor
attain the rank of captain, he would probably -
have occasion to correspond with his em-
ployers. Would it not be desirable that he
should be qualified to write a letter devoid
of ungrammaticisms ? ”

‘¢ T suppose so, but I do n’t like grammar.”

‘© That is not the question. He would
not be considered a gentlemanly and well-
bred sailor, if his letters and conversation
were characterized by inelegant and ungram-
matical expressions.”’

“¢ Well, a sailor does not need languages.”

«¢ What would you do if obliged to transact
business in a foreign land ?”

‘¢ One can always find an interpreter.”

‘© Would it not be better to rely on your-
self, and thus be independent ? ”

“You would not have a sailor learn the



46 LEAVES FROM THE

languages of all the countries which he has
to visit 2???"

‘ Not unless he wishes to be a great lin-
guist; but every sailor might learn French.
As this is the language generally understood
in the civilized world, he might, in many
countries, dispense with the services of an
interpreter.”

‘T see that, even to be a sailor, it is well
to have a little learning.”

‘Yes, and ‘the more, the better,’ as the
idea is expressed in common parlance. The
life of a sailor is by no means despicable.
I would also have him so educated that he
would intelligently enjoy the new scenes
through which he must pass. As he paces
the deck at midnight, how pleasapt would his
lonely watch be rendered by a good knowl-
edge of astronomy! He could raise his eyes
to the heavens, and read, as on a printed
page, the various stars and constellations. In
visiting other latitudes, new subjects for his
‘nocturnal studies would appear before him.



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 47

Beautiful constellations, which he would never:
have seen had he remained at home, will now
greet his vision. In traversing the shores of
foreign lands, how pleasant to understand the
nature of the many new and singular plants
which would present themselves to his view,
to be able to classify them, and, perchance,
to add something to the stores of botanical
science! How gratifying, also, to have some
knowledge of the gorgeous shells which he
would see in such profusion! To be a hap-
py sailor, he should be well educated.””

‘¢ Then my three years of study will not
be lost, if I should be only a sailor.”

‘¢ Certainly not. Every occupation is en-
nobled and refined by the possession of knowl-
edge. Even at sea, I hope you would not
abandon study. Remember that Captain Cook
acquired his greatness upon the ocean. He
found time for the diligent study of math-
ematics and astronomy, and distinguished him-
self by the humane and scientific care with
which he guarded the lives of his men. He



48 LEAVES FROM THE

. became very celebrated, was chosen a mem-
ber of the Royal Society, and after his de-
cease was honored by eulogies and other
testimonials of respect for his character and
attainments. You would not, I hope, be con-
tented with the life of an ignorant sailor.”

Arthur was thoughtful for a few moments.
His countenance then suddenly kindled.
‘Well, Miss Emerson, I will try to study
hard these three years.”

I rejoiced to see the earnest expression of
his fine features, and thought that his moth-
er’s wish might possibly be gratified, for
should he acquire a passionate love for learn-
ing, would he not gladly remain at home,
where he would have better opportunities for
indulging his newly obtained taste? After
a prolonged conversation, Helena, Arthur, and
I parted for the night, feeling as well ac-
quainted as if we had known each other for
years. After retiring to my room, I mused
for some time upon the various circumstances
of my new situation. I saw spread before



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 49

me a delightful prospect. I had always been
ardently attached to the vocation of the teach-
er, and under what more favorable auspices
could I wish to commence intercourse with
a set of pupils? Mrs. Maynard was op-
ulent. Her children would have every ad-
vantage which wealth could procure, — books,
apparatus, and all things essential for illustra-
tion. One child, at least, was a lover of
mental improvement, and all seemed endowed
with good capacity for learning. A liberal
salary had been promised, therefore I should
not be perplexed with distracting thoughts,
but could devote myself wholly to the moral
and intellectual advancement of myself and
my pupils. But, although sanguine by na-
ture, I did feel some trepidation as I thought —
of the immense weight of responsibility that
was to devolve upon me. Mrs. Maynard
being incapacitated for the care of her chil-
dren, I should have almost the entire charge.
T must attend not only to the development
of the mind, but must also give much time
6



60 LEAVES FROM THE

to the cultivation of the heart. I must teach
my pupils to discern good and evil. While
expatiating upon the wonders of our uni-
verse, I must lead their thoughts to its Cre-
ator. While explaining the laws of the heav-
enly host, I must not fail to find time for the
inculcation of the law written upon the heart,
and for the more extended revelation which
God has made in his word. While impart-
ing instruction concerning the nice distinctions,
and minor shades of difference existing in
philological lore, I must not forget to impress
upon their minds views of law, order, and
beauty, —I must give them the grand and
comprehensive motto, ‘* Live to the Truth.”
My miid must frequently revert to the prin-
ciple, that ‘* to educate an individual properly
is to teach him the laws of God, and to induce
him to obey them.”



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 512

CHAPTER I.

“Mrs. Page. Sir Hugh, my husband says my sox
profits nothing in the world at his book ; I pray you ask
him some questions in his accidence,” — SHaksrEare.

Tne next morning I arose early, according
to long-established habit. I soon heard the
prattle of infantine voices beneath my window.
I recognized the tones of the younger mem-
bers of my flock, and was not a little surprised
that they had risen so early. Henry, Grace,
and Ada were busily engaged in watering some
fantastically arranged flower-beds, which I im-
mediately surmised were their own little gar-
dens. Thinking that I should like a stroll over
the elegant grounds which environed the man-
sion, I quitted my room, and proceeded ona
ramble. I soon joined the children.

‘¢ Good morning, my little ones. You are
up early.”

‘¢ Yes, madam,” replied Henry ; ‘‘ mamma



62 LEAVES FROM THE

says itis a shame for people who are well to
be in bed after the sun is up.”

‘“‘ And for that reason,’? added Grace,
‘¢ we have learned to jump out of bed as soon
as we awake ; for if we stop to think, we are
very apt to fall asleep.”

“Your plan is a very good one, but do
Helena, Arthur, and Florence rise thus ear-
ly? IT have not seen them this morning.”

‘© Helena says she can’t wake up early, but
Florence always does. Florence spends all
the time before breakfast in the library. As
for Arthur,” continued Henry, standing very
erect, and assuming an air of self-importance,
‘it is as much as he can do to be ready for
breakéast, which we have at seven o’clock.”

‘“¢ How do you generally employ yourselves
so early in the morning ?”

‘When it rains, we play in the house ;
but in pleasant weather we work in our -gar-
dens. See, Miss Emerson, how pretty our
flowers are! These three beds edged with
little pink-roots are our gardens. Last year we



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 6&3

had them bordered with ‘ Lady in the Green.’
Which should you have chosen, Miss Emer-
on?”

‘¢ The pinks, by all means; for although
‘Lady in the Green’ is a very pretty and a
very singular flower, it is an annual, and
therefore not appropriate for an edge-plant.
I should certainly have chosen a perennial.”

“ Annual, perennial ; I do n’t understand
you, Miss Emerson.”

«JT will give you a short lesson in botany.
In the spring you planted the ‘Lady in the
Green.’ Very soon the little plants were seen
peeping above the ground. Afterward, some
delicate cream-colored flowers, nearly envel-
oped in foliage, made their appearance. Then
you had a very pretty edge for your garden.
But in the autumn the little plants died, stem,
leaves, and root. ‘This spring you were com-
pelled to plant anew border. ‘ Lady in the
Green’ is an annual. A few weeks ago you
planted pink-seeds. You have now a very )
neat, pretty edge, but you must not expect

5 *



54 LEAVES FROM THE

flowers this summer. The roots will not die
in the fall. Next spring, when you begin to
work in your garden, your edge will be ready,
and in a few months you will be delighted
with flowers of great beauty and fragrance.
The roots will live several years, so that you
will not be obliged to plant a new border for
some time. The pink is a perennial.”

‘¢ That is very plain, indeed. How much
pleasure I feel in knowing the difference be-
tween annuals and perennials! But is that
botany? I understand what you have been
telling us very well, but I thought botany was
a very hard study.”

‘© Some people find the long names difficult,
but you could learn a great deal of the science
with ease. Even little Ada could understand
many things about roots and leaves, and could
learn to describe the different parts of a
flower.”

‘¢ Shall we study botany, Miss Emerson ? ””

‘¢T shall not allow you, at present, to look
into a book upon the subject, for you might be



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 55

terrified by the scientific names, but I may
teach you orally, as I have now been doing.
Do you think you can remember what you
have learned this morning ?”

*°Q, yes, madam, I am sure of it!”

The first bell for breakfast now rang, and we
entered the house. The children retired to their
rooms, to remove from their hands all traces of
the occupation in which they had been engag-
ed, and to change their thick shoes and coarse
dresses for some of a lighter character. I sat
down in the parlour, reflecting, with much satis-
faction, on my success in exciting a desire for
knowledge in my new pupils. Soon after break-
fast, we repaired to the school-room, a large,
commodious apartment, well adapted to our
use. I perceived that, on account of the great
diversity in the ages of the children, my atten-
tion would be called to a variety of subjects.
I proposed to have a general examination in
the branches which they had studied, that I
might learn how far they had advanced in
knowledge and mental skill. “Helena colored,



56 LEAVES FROM THE

and Arthur glanced toward the door, as if he
were meditating flight.

‘¢T have not looked at the common branches
for two or three years,” exclaimed Helena ;
* you will not expect me to remember all that
I learned when a child.”

‘¢T hope that you have not forgotten all that
you then learned.”

‘¢ Why, people are not expected to remem-
ber every thing about grammar, geography, and
arithmetic !”?

‘¢T think, my dear Helena, that every one
should be well acquainted with those branches.
If they are superficially studied, the result is
inevitable, the knowledge will soon be lost.
If they are faithfully pursued, the greater part
will probably be retained. If an illiterate per-
son of mature years wishes to lay a good
foundation for a superior education, let him
first become well versed in the studies of child-
hood. Think how preposterous the idea of
being an accomplished musician, while unable
to solve the problems in a common arithmetic ;



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 57

of being a good Italian scholar, while ignorant
of the construction of one’s own language ; of
being acquainted with the literature of the day,
while uninformed concerning the geography of
our earth, and the history of its inhabitants !”

All consented to submit to the trial. I
therefore began with the elementary branches,
and afterward examined them in such of the
higher departments of learning as had received
their attention. All could read with ease and
fluency. The little ones, of course, had studied
only grammatical reading. I proposed that
the three advanced pupils should spend half an
hour with me every day in the practice of
rhetorical reading, for I wished that they should
excel in this important branch of education.
Orthography was the topic of a long discussion.
I conceded that no one could be expected to
spell accurately every one of the forty-three
thousand words of the English language. To
acquire this power would be nearly a hopeless
as well as an unprofitable task, our alphabetic
characters being, in many cases, combined



58 _ LEAVES FROM THE

without any regard to rule or analogy. I
resolutely declared that every one ought to be
able to spell all the words in general use, and
a good proportion of those which are called
uncommon and technical. Arthur was very
deficient in this branch. - He told me that his
last teacher had asserted that time spent in
learning to spell was wasted. My opinion was
the reverse. A great deal of time is certainly
occupied in learning to spell, but those who use
the English language must study its orthogra-
phy, or be in constant danger of suffering on
account of deplorable ignorance. It is cer-
tainly unfortunate to possess so anomalous a
language, but the superiority, in many respects,
of the English to other tongues ought to recon-
cile us to the evil. Two or three hours were
spent in conversing with the children upon the
elementary branches, and in a review of those
important studies. Florence proved herself the
best scholar. Helena, as she said, had forgot-
ten the greater part of what she had formerly
known. Arthur’s knowledge was superficial



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 59

and unsatisfactory. In the afternoon, the three
little ones were allowed to spend their time
in the play-room, while Helena, Arthur, and
Florence reviewed the other branches to which
they had attended. Arthur had just finished
Viri Rome. Florence was reading Cesar.
Helena had not attended to Latin. All three
could read French, but none could write it
with elegance. They knew nothing of algebra
and geometry, and as for the natural sciences,
they were nearly as ignorant as the little chil-
dren. They were sweet singers and skilful
pianists. After the review, we proceeded to
form plans. Their education, although defect-
ive in many points, had been by no means
neglected. They needed mental discipline,
and much careful instruction, in order to insure
eminence in any study. Having convinced
them of the importance of regular hours for
literary pursuits, I recommended a plan for
experiment. Little Ada would spend one
hour a day in solitary study ; this would be
devoted to reading, spelling, and the rudiments



60 LEAVES FROM THE

of arithmetic. ‘Two hours were assigned for
Henry and Grace ; four hours for the elder
children. This time was to be employed in
solitary, unassisted study. Several hours were
allotted for recitation and oral instruction. I
endeavoured to convince my pupils of the many
benefits resulting from solitary study. During
study hours, no questions were to be asked, no
conversation permitted, —all queries to be
reserved for the time devoted to oral instruc-
tion.

For several days, our plans were faithfully
carried into execution. Children are pleased
with novelty, and my scholars delighted in
seeing how closely they could conform to the
rules. Arthur did occasionally yawn over his
’ books, but, fearing that his recitations would be
inferior to those of his sisters, renewed his
efforts. At length, we had rather a dull day
in the school-room. Our gentle Florence, as
usual, acquitted herself well. Clearly demon-
strated problems, carefully analyzed flowers,
and admirably correct recitations characterized



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 61

her part of the performances. Concerning the
exercises of the others, I will suppress all com-
ment. I was disappointed, but merely ob-
served, that, instead of devoting an hour in the
afternoon to oral instruction, I would employ it
in hearing the neglected lessons. This had a
good effect. I saw an expression of blank
dismay, for all loved to participate in the con-
versational exercises I had introduced. We
were now engaged upon an interesting topic.
I had recently explained to them the doctrine
of the centre of gravity, and, on the preceding
day, had related various stories of leaning
edifices, rocking stones, etc., to illustrate the
principle. My pupils were expecting a con-
tinuation of the same subject. To lose this
exercise, in which they all rejoiced, was a
heavy penalty, and for some time I was not
annoyed by disregarded duties.

One day, as I was walking with Grace, I
perceived that she was unusually taciturn.
When I looked at her, I saw that she was

6



62 LEAVES FROM THE

eager to speak, but that she knew not how to
begin.

‘¢ Well, my little Grace,” said I, sportively,
‘¢ what may be the subject of your thoughts ?”?

‘¢ Why, Miss Emerson,” replied the child,
smiling and hesitating, ‘‘ we want — that is—
they told me to ask you, whether we might
have a holiday to-morrow.”

“Ah! is that it? Are you tired of study ?
Does Florence wish for a holiday ? ”

‘¢Q, you must not ask Florence ; she would
study all the time if she could! The rest of
us want one. We are tired of studying so
much every day.”

I mused awhile, and then said, —‘‘ We will
decide the question this evening, Grace.”

The little one looked timidly into my face,
saying, — ‘* You are not displeased, are you,
Miss Emerson ? ”

‘No, my dear, your request is very reason-
able. It is not surprising that children should,
now and then, like a whole day for amuse-
ment.”



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 63

_At the close of the day, as we were sitting
on the piazza, enjoying the summer air, I
said, —‘¢ Well, my pupils, Grace has exe-
cuted her commission, and I have thus learned
that you wish for a holiday.”

*¢T think,’? remarked Florence, ‘ that we
have time enough for recreation without taking
a whole day.”’

‘¢ Never mind what our little blue lady says,”
exclaimed Arthur ; ‘‘ we are five against one !
You will give us the day, will you not, Miss
Emerson ?

*¢ But think, Arthur, of the numerous losses
which you will sustain, if I give you the day.
All the knowledge you might acquire during
your four study hours ; the lecture upon those
curious engines of the ancient Romans ; your
half-hour’s practice on the piano, and various
other matters.”’

‘We can take those the next day.”

‘¢ But the next day we might have had some-
thing else.”

‘‘ We are very tired, Miss Emerson, and
we should study better for a holiday.”



64 LEAVES FROM THE

‘¢ We will try the experiment. You may
have the whole day for amusement; but what
do you intend to do?”

‘¢ We want to go on a long exploring expe-
dition. We should like to visit Mount For-
mosa. Will you go with us? We can carry
our dinner, and stay all day. A great many
berries grow on the hill. We shall also find
wild-flowers, which we can bring home for our
next day’s botany lesson. An old lady, who
used to be our housekeeper, lives in a nice
little cottage at the foot of the hill. “We can
call to see her, and give her some of our ber-
ries, and if, in the course of the day, the
babies get tired, they can go and stay with her
till we are ready to leave.”

This definite proposal was received with loud
acclamations of joy. Henry, however, was
silent. He sat gazing at his brother, with
flashes of indignation gleaming from his large,
black eyes, for Arthur, in speaking of the
babies, had waved his hand majestically toward
the three little children. That Grace and Ada



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 66

should be included in the list of infantine per-
sonages did not, in the least, disturb Henry’s
dignity ; but that he, at the age of eight years
three months and two days, should be thus
styled, was more than he could bear with com-
posure. But while Arthur proceeded to am-
plify his plan, and to expatiate upon its advan-
tages, Helena, who had seen the difficulty,
began to speak to Henry, in a low tone, con-
cerning the part he should take in the next day’s
amusement, and soon succeeded in changing
the current of his thoughts. I witnessed this
little by-scene with pleasure. It was a proof
of Helena’s goodness of disposition. I had
frequently been much gratified by observing
the extreme loveliness of character exhibited
by Helena, the beloved eldest sister, and my
affection for her daily increased. If Florence
was all mind, Helena was all heart. I fore-
saw that, if they should retain their present
characters, Helena would, in a few years, be
a most lovely, amiable being, with no more
mental wisdom than falls to the lot of most
6* ,



66 LEAVES FROM TRE

persons who have not loved study for its own
sake. Florence would be called a woman of
genius, she would have lofty views and pro-
found erudition, but, wholly absorbed in self,
she would have few to love her, or to regard
her with any emotion save respect and admira-
tion. I saw that I must endeavour to guard
against the two extremes. I must try to in-
spire Helena with a veneration for learning,
and a keen desire to obtain the treasures of
knowledge. Then would her endearing traits
of character be enhanced by acquisitions that
would excite, not only love, but respect. The
passionate, enthusiastic Florence must be taught
that life has other duties than the mere cultiva-
tion of the mind, that she must fulfil her mis-
sion upon the earth, that she must not only
cullivate her own invaluable talents, but must
endeavour to do something for her less favored,
less endowed fellow-beings.

Our projects for the next day were soon
completed, except the selection of an hour for
departure.



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 67

‘¢ Let us go at four in the morning,” said
Henry, with a sly glance at his brother.

‘No, indeed!” exclaimed Arthur, in a
tone of eager remonstrance. ‘‘ That plan
might do very well for boys, with their thick
shoes and coarse clothes, but think of the girls’
dresses! They would not like to have their
frocks and stockings covered with grass-stains.
Mount Formosa will be very wet so early in
the morning, and not fit for young ladies to
ascend.”

All laughed at this display of gallantry, and
although some appeared to doubt whether the
speech should be attributed to Arthur’s chival-
ric disposition, or to his love for morning slum-
bers, the sentiments he had expressed seemed
reasonable. .

‘¢ We can start immediately after breakfast,”
said Helena.

‘¢ T object to that proposition,”’ interposed I,
“¢ for reasons based upon physiology. Violent
exercise —and I presume that ours will not
be very gentle— immediately after eating is
injurious to the health.”



68 LEAVES FROM THE

‘¢ Why so?”

*¢ Because much of the arterial blood has
then been called to aid in the process of diges-
tion. If you begin to exercise directly after
eating, this important agent is summoned to the
skin, and the food remains undigested for some
time. I advise you to be tolerably quiescent
for an hour or two after each meal.”?

My opinion was received with due deference,
and the hour of eight was chosen for the com+
mencement of the excursion. Having thus
completed our arrangements, we resorted to
the piano, and devoted the remainder of the
evening to the practice of our favorite songs.
The next morning, the bright effulgence of the
sun’s rays promised us a pleasant day. At
eight, the little group left home, all talking at
once, and in high glee. Arthur and Henry
dragged a small wagon, containing several
empty baskets, and one of huge dimensions,
which held pie, gingerbread, and sandwiches for
our dinner. A little spade was also deposited
in the vehicle, that we might have an imple-



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 69

ment for removing any choice roots, the trans-
plantation or the examination of which might
be considered desirable by the young botanists
or their teacher. The pure, morning air was
invigorating, and the little ones bounded before
us, uttering shouts of joy. The day was a
happy one for all parties. I enjoyed itas much
as our pet Ada, and when I saw that Florence’s
fever-flushed countenance was more natural in
its hue, and that, although fatigued by the mus-
cular exercise she had taken, she actually look-
ed better than she had for some weeks, I
resolved that I would occasionally repeat the
experiment. I perceived that active measures
must be employed to impart to the fragile girl
health and vigor. Our day was quite profitable
in one sense of the word, for, in addition to a
vast quantity of berries, we gathered a pro-
fusion of beautiful wild-flowers, which were
viewed with interest as botanical specimens.
We dined under the refreshing shade of a large
tree, and afterward spent an hour or two in
telling stories and repeating poetry. Arthur



70 LEAVES FROM THE

and Henry evinced no disposition to quarrel
during the whole day. The little ones were
hot too much fatigued, and we returned home
at night as happy as when in the morning we
commenced our expedition. This cannot be
said of all pleasure-parties. That evening, as
we were recounting the incidents of the excur- _
sion, Henry moved that we should have one
holiday every week, and Arthur seconded the
proposition.

“« That,” said I, gravely, ** would be one
sixth of your time.’’

The children asserted, that studying every
day for a week was too much for them. When
Saturday night came, they were so exhausted
that they needed three Sabbaths instead of
one, that they might have sufficient time to rest
after such toil. I laughed, and reminded them
of Sir Matthew Hale, who, for many years of
his life, spent sixteen hours a day in study.
Florence’s eyes sparkled. ~The expression of
Arthur’s countenance was dismal to behold.
The little ones looked as if they thought I had



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 71

been inventing a great story. Finally, Arthur
said, —- ‘ Well, I don’t think he studied so
much at my age. I really believe, Miss Emer-
son, that, if our plan continues much longer, I
shall die in consequence of too great mental
exertion.” ,

Thinking it well to see what effect the pro-
posed change would have upon the perform-
ance of the duties allotted for the rest of the
time, —~ I always liked to try experiments, —I
said to my pupils, — ‘‘ If your lessons and ex-
ercises are as good to-morrow as they probably
would have been had you not spent this day in
amusement, I will give you a holiday next
week, and will pursue the same course for some
time.”

Arthur was quite satisfied. ‘¢ Now,” cried
he, ‘‘ which day of the week shall we have ?”

The majority voted for Saturday ; but Helena
urged so convincing an argument in favor of
Wednesday, that we decided to accept her
choice.

‘‘T vote for Wednesday,”’ she said, ‘ be-



72 LEAVES FROM THE

cause, as we have only one lesson on the Sab-
bath, we become quite refreshed by Monday
morning. We do not need two days in suc-
cession.”

Wednesday, therefore, was devoted to rest
and recreation, on the conditions above
mentioned.



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 7$

CHAPTER Ii.

“ Falsely luxurious ! will not man awake,

And, springing from the bed of sloth, enjoy

The cool, the fragrant, and the silent hour,

To meditation due and sacred song ?

For is there aught in sleep can charm the wise?

To lie in dead oblivion, losing half

The fleeting moments of too short a life —

Total extinction of the enlightened soul ! —

Or else, to feverish vanity alive,

"Wildered, and tossing through distempered dreams ?

Who would in such a gloomy state remain

Longer than nature craves, when every Muse

And every blooming pleasure wait without,

To bless the wildly devious morning walk?"
THomson.

I wap now been with my new pupils four
weeks, and had, in some degree, succeeded in
forming habits of order and application. TI
thought that the time had come for an attempt
to improve still farther the mode of life pur-
sued by the elder children. I wished to in-
duce Helena and Arthur to become early
7



74 LEAVES FROM THE

risers. One pleasant evening, I invited the
former to walk with me. After conversing
awhile upon miscellaneous topics, I said, —
‘¢ Helena, at what hour do you rise in the
morning ?”?

‘© At six, when the first breakfast-bell
rings.”’ .

*¢ About two hours after it is light,”’ said I,
with a quiet smile.

‘¢ Now, I suppose, Miss Emerson, that you
intend to persuade me to rise early ; but I can-
not. Mamma has often entreated me not to
waste so much time ; but J never awake tll the
bell rings.”

‘¢ You retire at ten?”

*¢ Usually.”

‘¢ Now, I cannot think that a young lady
needs eight hours for repose. Do you not
often feel that you have slept too long ?”

“¢ Sometimes I do feel rather dull ; but, if I
do not awake till six, is not that a proof that
my constitution needs all those hours for
sleep ?”



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 176

*¢T think not. The time of awaking in the
morning may generally be attributed to habit.
After a while, you might easily awake two or
three hours earlier, without the aid of a bell or
any other signal. Doubtless, the quality of
your slumbers would be improved by diminish-
ing their length. This opinion is well founded.
Care must certainly be taken not to run into
the other extreme, and sleep too little. Lying
in bed late in the morning is highly injurious to
health. Think how much may be accom-
plished in two hours! That time every day
for a year would suffice for obtaining a good
knowledge of the elementary works on Latin.
Afterward, you could advance with ease in this
language, the acquisition of which you regard
as so Herculean a task. The same amount of
time would give you a vast deal of information
upon any subject, — history, forexample. You
were, not long since, lamenting your ignorance
of this branch. I will tell you of a plan which
I have formed. If you agree to rise at four, I
will read history with you before breakfast. I



76 LEAVES FROM THE

will allow you an hour for your personal duties.
We can then walk half an hour. This will
have a beneficial effect upon your health.
Long walks before breakfast are likely to be
detrimental, rather than salutary, in their influ-
ence. We shall then have one hour and a
half before the second breakfast-bell rings,
which we can devote to reading.”

‘© Why,”’ exclaimed Helena, ‘* how much I
should gain by lengthening every day two
hours! TI should like the plan very well ; but
I fear that I cannot awake till I am summoned
by the bell.”

‘¢T will call you, till you have formed the
habit of awaking unassisted.”

‘¢ Thank you, Miss Emerson. ‘Will you call
me at four to-morrow morning ? ”’

‘¢ Not so fast, my dear Helena. When you
are about to change a habit like this, you must
advance by degrees. It would not be safe, at
once, to make so great an alteration as the one
proposed. I will call you at half past five,
this week ; at five, next ; and thus proceed till



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 77

we reach the proposed standard. Your con-
stitution will, in this way, become gradually
inured to early rising. Your health will soon
improve, and you will have a fairer prospect
of long life.”

I was now satisfied ; for I knew that, having
once formed a resolution, Helena would perse-
vere. Florence was invited to accompany us
in our morning rambles, and to join in our
studies. Many a happy hour did we spend in
the well-furnished library, gleaning wisdom from
the records of the past.

To persuade Arthur to rise early was a
much harder task. I could not tempt him with
the pleasure of historical knowledge. I must
select a different motive. I reflected upon the
prominent traits of his character, and resolved
to excite his benevolent feelings. I soon de-
vised a project, which, besides admirably serv-
ing the present occasion, would be of immense
advantage to Arthur, and also to another lad
with whom I had recently formed an acquaint-

ance. I had lately encountered a very remark-
7* ‘



78 LEAVES FROM THE

able instance of love for knowledge, and had
been purposing to relate the story to my pupils.
- Having formed my plan, I now only waited for
a favorable opportunity. This soon offered.
One day, as we two were returning home,
quite elated with our success in finding a curi-
ous wild-flower for which we had long sought,
I said, — ‘* Arthur, I am much pleased with
your rapid progress in Latin during the last few
weeks.”

“J do really begin to like Latin, Miss
Emerson, and I will try to be a great scholar.”

‘‘ Your assertion renders me very happy.
I have a little story to relate, which I think will
give you pleasure, and also cause you to place
a higher value upon opportunities for mental
improvement. Last Tuesday, in the course
of a long, solitary walk, I called at a little cot-
tage, to ask for some cold water. The dwelling
was evidently an abode of poverty. The mis-
tress of the house invited me to enter. I
readily consented, and soon began to converse
with her. She told me that her husband was



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 79

very poor, and an invalid. He could labor a
part of the time, but he was frequently com-
pelled tq remain at home, instead of going into
the fields to toil. This circumstance rendered
it very difficult for them to maintain their seven
children. While the poor mother was telling’
her simple story, I was surprised to see a Latin
grammar upon the table. I asked whether any
of her children attended the Latin school. She
laughed, and replied, —‘O, no! we can’t
afford to send them to school after they are
large enough to work; but one of the boys
loves study, and we give him a litle time for
himself. Frank says that he will be a scholar, —
but he will have to work hard to get the learn- ,
ing, poor fellow! He makes shoes in the
winter, and works on the farm in the summer.
I often smile to hear his grand schemes. I
believe he does succeed in learning a great
deal, although he has no teacher.’

‘¢T was much interested by this singular ac-
count, and expressed a desire to see the boy.
I decided to wait a while, as his mother was



80 LEAVES FROM THE

then expecting his return. He soon entered,
apparently quite weary, but with a bright and
cheerful countenance. At my request, he gave
me some account of his plans, and of the origin
of his lofty designs. He had not been to
.school for three years. During this time, he
had been obliged to spend many hours every
day in manual labor. For a year after quitting
school, he had no intention of continuing his
studies. About two years since, he chanced
to pass a building in which were assembled
numerous boys undergoing an examination in
their studies. Curiosity induced him to enter.
The pupils, in general, were the children of
' wealthy parents. They were elegantly dress-
ed, and he sighed as he contrasted their situa-
tion with his own. He soon ceased, however,
to regard their external appearance, and listened
eagerly to the performances. He still remem-
bered a portion of his early studies, and there-
fore attended with pleasure to the recitations
in grammar, geography, and arithmetic ; but
he soon found that he knew very little even of



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 81

these elementary branches. He felt sad and
dispirited. Afterward came history, philoso-
phy, Latin, and Greek. He became more and
more unhappy. He glanced around the hall.
Grave men were there, — lawyers, clergymen,
and others esteemed for their learning and wis-
dom. He looked at the young lads, and thought
of their fine opportunities for gaining knowledge,
while he must be a poor drudge, digging pota-
toes, and chopping wood, able to read only a
common English book, and to write a wretched
hand. With no more knowledge, he could
never be happy, for he had now gained a
glimpse of the superiority of mind, of the vast
elevation of the scholar over the illiterate man.
He left the hall, and for some hours wandered
through the streets, absorbed in thought. At
length his heart grew light ; he hastened home,
and communicated to his parents a plan which
he had been forming. He told them that he
wanted to be a learned man, and asked that he
might have a little time for study every day.
He knew that they could not afford to send



&2 LEAVES FROM THE

him even to a public school, for the money
which he could earn was needed to aid in sup-
porting the family. But he pleaded that he
might have a little time for unassisted mental
exertion. His father laughed, but his mother
encouraged the scheme. ‘ Who knows,’ said
she, ‘but that we shall one day see Frank a
great man, speaking to the people?’ His
father finally consented to give him two hours
daily for study, till he was tired of his lofty
dreams. Frank was now contented gnd happy.
The next requisite was a supply of books.
His father could not spare money to buy a
single one. Frank said that for a few days he
would employ his two hours in working for
himself ; he could spend the money thus.earned
for books, and then begin to study. He soon
had the pleasure of buying an Arithmetic,
Latin Grammar, and Reader. He then began
to study, and had continued till the time of my
visit.

‘¢T was delighted with this account. I ex-
amined the boy, and found that he had actually



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 83

learned a great deal without aid. I com-
mended him for his laudable application, and
narrated several stories of learned men who had
risen to eminence from very humble situations
in life. Frank can read Latin almost as well
as yourself, but he needs some assistance both
in that and in his arithmetic. Do you not
wish that he could have a teacher ?”’

‘¢ Yes, indeed ! he is a noble fellow. How
I wish that he could study with us ! ”’

‘¢ That is impracticable ; but how should you

_ like to call and see him once a day and smooth
his progress ?”?

‘¢ I should be very glad to help him, but you
know that I am a dull scholar myself.”

*¢T do not call you dull; and as you are
farther advanced than he, you might render him
very essential service.”

“I am afraid that I should make some
mistake.”

‘¢ J will trust you. Cannot you teach him
the lessons which you receive from me in those
branches ? I find that you understand and re-
member them very well.”



84 LEAVES FROM THE

‘¢ T should like to be useful to Frank. If he
should become a great man, how glad I should
be that I had aided him in his studies ! ”

‘¢'Yes, that would be a pleasure which
would last through life. Will you go, then,
to-morrow morning? His home is about a
mile from yours. He studies from four till
six. Those are the hours which his father can
most conveniently spare. You ought not cer-
tainly to spend the whole of that time with him,
for you know that I have a very high opinion
of the advantages of solitary study ; but if you
could give him half an hour a day, he would
doubtless derive much benefit.”

‘6 Q Miss Emerson, how can I walk a mile
before half after five ?”

‘© Very easily, if you will alter your hour for
rising.”

‘© Q, dear! I cannot do that. I don’t like
to rise early.”

“* Think of the benevolent sentiments which
you uttered a few moments since ; think of the
benefits which you can confer upon this poor



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A Govenness. $3

boy. Are not you willing to sacrifice an
indulgence for the sake of Going so much
good ?”

“Yes, Miss Emerson, I will not be selfish.
I will rise early, and try to help Frank.”

“¢ That is right, my dear Arthur. Do you
awake early?”

“¢ Yes, at daylight, and afterward fall asleep,
"In future, I will rise as soon as I awake.”

‘©T am glad that you have made this good,
resolution, I think that you will be faithful in
adhering to it, for you will soon become much
interested in Frank and his studies. Qccasiton*
ally, I will call and see what progress he makes
under your instructions. J. think that he will
become a distinguished scholar. A superior
education has often been obtained under diffi-
culties greater than his. Keen desire is the
principal requisite ; to this, let diligence and
perseverance be added, and the indigent scholar
may feel confident of success.” ,

A great point was now gained. Motive, the
chief desideratum, had been furnished, and I

8



86 _ LEAVES FROM THE

felt sure.of the event. Mrs. Maynard and I
were soon gratified by seeing that the per-
nicious habit of lying in bed after sunrise was
completely conquered both by Helena and
Arthur.

A favorite object of mine was to persuade
Florence to take exercise sufficient for het
health. She accompanied us on our rambles
with reluctance, and eagerly returned to her
beloved books. She seldom joined in the
sports of the others, but delighted solely in the
acquisition of knowledge. I knew that, should
she live many years, her attainments would be
great ; but in order to insure longevity, it was
essential that her habits should be changed.
As she was one day lying upon the sofa, busily
engaged with a book, I said, ‘‘ My dear,
that is a very bad practice. To read while
in a horizontal position is decidedly injurious
to the eyes.”

‘¢ But I do not feel well enough to sit up,”
replied the little girl.

*¢ Then you are not well enough to read,
my love, and you must give me your book.”



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 87

The gentle Florence complied with a sigh,
and, languidly closing her eyes, was silent for a
few moments. I gazed upon her with deep
interest. Intellect was plainly stamped upon
the beautiful lineaments of her countenance,
but her pallid brow and flushed cheek predicted
the consequences of its too assiduous cultiva-
tion. Soon, the burning tears gushed forth in
atorrent. Taking her hand, I said, ~‘* My
dear child, do not be so unhappy. Be content
to rest a while.” ss

*¢ But I am so ill, and so wretched, Miss —
Emerson! If I were well and strong, like
Helena, how much I might study ! ”

‘¢ Tell me, Florence, why it is that you love
study.”

She looked up with beaming eyes. ‘O, I
cannot tell you half the reasons! Study is
the greatest pleasure I have. When I was a
little girl, I loved the knowledge after I had
obtained it, and would study in anticipation of
the result; but now I feel quite as happy while
engaged in the acquisition. Study itself now
affords me great delight.”



98 LEAVES FROM THE .

‘< What advantage do you expect to derive
from your knowledge, Florence ?

‘¢ Q Miss Emerson ! you who have so often
conversed with us upon the advantages of
knowledge need not ask me that.”

Florence had now become very much ex-
cited. She clasped her little hands, and raised
her eyes to mine with an expression that thrilled
through my very soul. The veins upon her
fair temples dilated, and her whole appearance
indicated that she was in a high state of nervous
excitement. I saw that I must immediately
divert her attention. I said calmly, — ‘ At
another time, Florence, we will talk again upon
this subject. Now take my arm, and we will
stroll around the garden.”

Ta the course of an hour, Florence became
composed, and I then thought it advisable to
resume the topic, for I wished to produce an
immediate alteration in her mode of life. If I
could obtain compliance in no other way, Ire- .
solved to exert my authority ; but I hoped that
she would voluntarily yield to my wishes.



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF & GOVERNESS. &

“ Florence,” I began, * did you ever hear
the story of Henry Kirke White ?”

“The author of those beautiful poems
which you have lately been reading to us ?”

«¢ The same.”

*¢ T never did.”

‘¢ His passion for knowledge, like your own,
was absorbing. ‘To that he sacrificed every
thing. Neglecting all care of his health, he
studied incessantly. He died in early life, a
victim to his wonderful exertions. By prac«
tising a little self-denial, he might have lived
many years, made great attainments in knowl
edge, and effected much for the world.” 7

Florence seemed thoughtful. ‘Do . you
think my health very delicate, Miss Emer-
son ???

‘¢ I do, my dear, and sure I am that, if you
wish to live long, you must be very careful.”

‘¢T would rather die young than spend a
long life in ignorance.”

*¢ I do not see that you are reduced to
either alternative. By judicious care, you

8*



90 LEAVES FROM THE

may attain vigorous health, and also make great
acquisitions in learning ; but you have no right
to throw away your life. If you continue to
read and study as you have recently done, you
will be very culpable. Such a course, in your
present state of health, is suicidal. I wish you
to think of this subject, and to-morrow you may
give me the result of your reflections.”

I did not agree with Mrs. Maynard, who
thought it would be expedient wholly to deprive
Florence of her books. I remembered the
story of Petrarch and his library, and knew
that my eager pupil must have some food for
her mind. To deprive it entirely of its dearly
loved nutriment would be unsafe.

The next day Florence came to me, and
said, — ‘* I have thought much of our conver-
sation, Miss Emerson. I know that my health
is not good, and I promise to do whatever you
think right.”

I embraced the dear child, and said, —
“¢ Then I trust, my love, I shall soon see you
quite well. I will now communicate my plan.



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 91.

You can read and study a little, but the indul-
gence must be quite limited. For the present,
you must spend only half an hour at a time
with a book. An hour and a half must then
elapse before you repeat the pleasure. I know
that these intervals will appear very long, but
you must remember that your health is at stake.
I will devote to you as much time as I can
consistently with my other duties. Gentle ex-
ercise must occupy a great deal of this leisure.
We will have walking, gardening, and callis-
thenics. We will spend some time in conver-
sation, taking care to guard against too great a
degree of cerebral excitement. I believe that
your health will soon improve. Then your
time for study may be extended. Remember,
my dear, that although I firmly agree with you
in thinking that ‘wisdom in an ailing frame’
is preferable to ‘a comnion mind with health,’
I do not think you are called to decide between
the two. I believe that you may have both
good health and great learning. But you
must comply with the laws both of your bodily
and of your mental organization.’



92 LEAVES FROM THE

Florence sadly but calmly acquiesced in my -
decision. I now urged the duty of persever-
ance, and added that she would find much
pleasure in faithfully adhering to the scheme.

yith my assistance and encouragement, my
pupil succeeded in observing the rules I had
given her. At the end of six weeks, a great
alteration was perceptible. The unnatural hue
of her cheeks had gradually subsided, the pain
in her head had diminished in severity, and her
muscles had begun to acquire firmness. She
came to me with a bright smile, saying, —
‘< You are a very good physician, Miss Emer-
son.’

‘* And you are a very good patient, my little
girl. You have seldom complained, although
suffering what must have been a great trial to
you.”

‘¢ Yes, it has been a very great trial; and
now, Miss Emerson, will you permit me to
study an hour at a time?”

“T know, my love, that your health is much
hetter, but I cannot consent to so great a
change.”



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 98

‘¢ Think how well and strong Jam. Mamma
is astonished.”

**T acknowledge that your health is much
impreved. I will, therefore, permit you to
study three quarters of an hour at a time. The
idle intervals, as you call them, must still re-
main of the same length.”

Florence thanked me, and merrily bounded
to her mother’s chamber to tell her of the ex-
tension of her study-time.



THE WANDERER’S RETURN.



“* Hast thou come with the heart of thy childhood back?
The free, the pure, the kind?’
So murmured the trees in my homeward track,
As they played to the mountain wind.

““* Hath thy soul been truo to its early love?’
Whispered my native streams ;
‘ Hath the spirit nursed amidst hill and grove
Still revered its first high dreams?’ ”’
Mrs. Hemaxs.

Hour after hour had the Widow’ Bryant sat
at her cottage-door, awaiting the arrival of her
son. Ten years before, he had left home and
friends to seek a fortune in India. Within a
week, a letter had been received announcing
the very day of his return ; and the proud and
joyful mother, who, since the reception of the
intelligence, had been almost too happy for



THE WANDERERS RETURN. 96

aught save running from one end of the village
to the other to proclaim the good news, had
succeeded in finding time to scour and nicely
sand her unpainted floors, to polish her old-
fashioned furniture, to garnish her hearths with
branches of hemlock and cedar, to place fresh
flowers in all the rooms of her little domicile,
taking especial care that Walter’s own apart-
ment should be decorated in her best style, and
to prepare an enormous quantity of tempting
edibles, to excite the sickly appetite of the
East Indian epicure, for her son was returning
to his home an invalid. He had exchanged the
robust health gained by the invigorating air of
his mountain dwelling, and the athletic exer-
cises of his youth, for immense wealth, and a
constitution debilitated by the heat and luxury
of his abode in the East. His mother had re-
ceived some intimation of the state of his health,
but, having entire confidence in her own power,
firmly believed that she could soon cure him of
his ailments.

The inquisitive neighbours occasionally



08 THE WANDERER’S RETURN.

glanced toward her dwelling, half envying her
felicity, although they truly sympathized with
ber. The arrival of a man of wealth was, to
the humble villagers, a remarkable event ; how
much more so when the individual was one of
their own townsmen, who, but a few years
since, had quitted them with expressions of
warm affection, and with a heart alive to the
value of his own New England home! He
had left the abode of his childhood, with his
imagination, indeed, fired as he thought .of his
future prospects, but with his heart saddened
as he mused upon the separation from those
whom he had loved from infancy. How would
he return? The weary hours elapsed, but still
he came not. The widow arose, walked
tremblingly through her flowers and shrubbery,
till she came to tle public road which bounded
her territory. She strained her eyes in the
attempt to ascertain whether he might not be
turning the angle of the road which concealed
distant objects from view. She remained a
few moments, then looked around to survey her



THE WANDERER’S RETURN. |

litle domain, and see whether of not any alters
ation were desirable. The cottage itself was |
a very humble structure, a plain, white-washed
building ; but Walter, in his boyhood, had en=
deavoured to adorn it by planting

** the pale brier rose, touched so tenderly,
As 4 pure ocean shell, with faintest red,
Melting away to pésrliness,”

and various species of the graceful Lonicerm
During Walter’s absence, his mother had sedus
lously cultivated these, and the cottage was
now completely covered with a robe of green,
from which peeped many fair flowers, for it
‘was the season of summer. This part of the
year is in New England so extremely beautiful,
that it amply repays the inhabitants for the dis-
comfort of the cold and damp spring, which is
80 wearisome to the invalid, and also to many
of those whose bodily vigor enables them to
bear all kinds of weather with exemption from
harm. Beneath the windows flourished roses
and carnations, in all their beauty. In choice
9



98 THE WANDERER’S RETURN.

fruit, Walter had been a connoisseur ; he had
successfully cultivated several of the finest
varieties, and, as his mother’s income was
small, he had taken great pleasure in carrying
a portion of his luscious grapes, peaches, and
nectarines to a neighbouring market town, that,
with the money received from the sale, he
might obtain some little luxuries for the family.
The garden was inclosed by a neat hedge of
the Ligustrum, so common in England, but so
rare in our own country. During Walter’s
boyhood, the cottage and grounds had present-
ed a very beautiful aspect, and, since his
departure, his fond mother had enjoyed a vast
deal of pleasure in her efforts to preserve every
thing in the same order. The climbing plants
had been carefully trained, the shrubbery dress-
ed, the fruit-trees pruned, and the hedge
trimmed. The widow now gazed around with
a complacent air, as she thought that many of
these tenderly cherished favorites were in their
holiday dress, and quite ready for the inspec-
tion of their former master. She again glanced



THE WANDERER’S RETURN. 99

toward the road with an expression of undefined
fear at his delay, for she had expected him in |
the morning, and then slowly returned to her
station. The neighbours began to think that
she was doomed to disappointment ; but their
fears were groundless, for the wanderer was
now within a few miles of his native hills.
Walter Bryant was riding slowly, propped
up in his magnificent carriage, and attended by
several domestics. As each familiar object
met his view, his countenance brightened a
little, and only a little; for how can a man
broken in health and spirits enjoy as keenly as
he who feels life and gladness with every heart-
bound, and to whom the very sense of exist-
ence is pleasure? His thoughts reverted to
his happy boyhood, to his joyous youth, and
he sighed as he compared those periods with
the present. Yet he had accomplished his
design, he had amassed wealth, and he might,
if he chose, spend the remainder of h « days in
ease. As he approached nearer and nearer,
his reflections assumed a still sadder hue, for



100 THE WANDERER’s RETURN.

the contrast between his former and his present
self was brought more and more forcibly to
mind. As he entered the village, the people
gazed inquisitively at the splendid travelling
carriage ; but when they saw the sallow, emaci~
ated countenance of its occupant, they at first
supposed that their village was honored by
some other arrival than the one they were so
_ eagerly expecting ; for was it possible that that
unfortunate invalid was the gay, handsome
Walter Bryant? He, in his turn, surveyed,
with some curiosity, the town of his birth. It
had been a very quiet place, and it had now
lost none of its identity. There was the old
church, with its tall spire pointing heavenward 5
on the one side were the well-remembered
rows of sheds, for the accommodation of the
vebicles employed to convey the country people
to the house of God on the Sabbath; on the
other was the little cemetery in which reposed
the bones of his ancestors. The door of the
sacred edifice was open, and, as Walter glanced
within, he thought of the time when, holding



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GIFT

FOR

YOUNG STUDENTS.

BY

“Thought in the mine may come forth gold or dross;
When coined in word, we know its real worth:
If sterling, store it for thy future use;
*T will buy thee benefit, perhaps renown.
Thought, too, delivered, is the more possessed ;

Teaching, we learn; and giving, we retain.”
Young.

BOSTON:
JAMES M. USHER.
1853.
Entered according to Act of Congress, In the year 1847, by
Groncs CREAMER,

in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of
Massachusetts. :

CAMBRIDGE:
STEREOTYPED AND PRINTED BY
METCALF AND COMPANY,
PRINTERS TO THE UNIVERSITY,
CONTENTS.

———

PAGE
ANTICIPATION . 1 oe 7 fe . 7
LEAVES FROM THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS 23
THE WANDERER’S RETURN . . . . 94

PATCHWORK, OR CONVERSATION WITH AUNT MABEL 133
REMINISCENCES OF SCHOOL LIFE.
THE SCHOOL AND THE SCHOOL-HOUSE . 157
MRS, MONTROSE, OUR PRECEPTRESS . - 163
MISS BARNARD, OUR TEACHER IN MATHEMATICS 167
MISS IRVINE, OUR TEACHER IN ELOCUTION AND
COMPOSITION . . . . . 172

CELIA. . . . . . . 174
FANNY . . . . . . . %W
LORA . . . . . . . 181

ESTHER. . . . . . - 195
LILIAN. . . . . . . 202
ALICE . . . . . . - 205
BLANCHE . . . . . . Q11
SEQUEL TO REMINISCENCES OF SCHOOL LIFE . 224

1*
ANTICIPATION.

% Alas! we trace
The map of our own paths, and, long ere years
With their dull steps the brilliant lines efface,
On sweeps the storm, and blots them out with tears! ”
Mrs. Hemans.

Tue young Wilburnes were laying plans
for the future, forming schemes for life, or
building castles in the air, as some good people
would have termed their employment. ‘“ 1,”
said Ferdinand, ‘intend to be a great orator ;
I will rivet the attention of my hearers; their
thoughts shall be concentrated upon the subject
of my harangue. They shall listen with breath-
less wonder, and then, when I look around,
and survey the crowded hall, and see the audi-
ence completely in my power, and fascinated
8 ANTICIPATION.

by my eloquence, even as the little bird by the
rattlesnake, how happy I shall be! what a tri-
umph ! ”

His brother Alfred, in a very calm and pas-
sionless tone, remarked :—‘‘I have none of
those lofty ideas. I see not why I should be
dependent for spy happiness upon the applause
of the multitude. I will be a very rich man,
a merchant ; and I will make money so rapidly
that I shall be able to retire from business at
an early age. Then J will have an elegant
country-seat, with beautiful gardens. Every
thing in my house shall be very costly and lux-
urious. I shall have money enough to gratify
every desire of my heart. Then I shall enjoy
life.”

“¢T think,” replied Ferdinand, “that your
plan is quite contemptible. I do not see that
you are much better than an Epicurean.
Very exalted, I must say! How rich do you
intend to be before you commence this life of
pleasure ?”

‘*Q, I must have a million of dollars !”
ANTICIPATION, 9

‘© You do n’t expect to be happy before
that time ? ”

‘¢ No; I shall work hard till I have amassed
that sum, and then live at my ease.”

“¢ Well, if I loved money, and I rejoice
that I do not,” said Ferdinand proudly, ‘I
would not be a slave. I woe work hard,

T had gained a

sum so enormous, because one may be very

and suffer every privation, till

happy with a tithe of the amount you have
mentioned. If I wished to be rich, I would
earn money gradually, that I might enjoy all
the intervening time. You remind me of a
story, which J will try to relate for your ben-
efit. King Pyrrhus told Cineas, his ambas-
sador, that he wished to subject all Italy to his
rule. Cineas replied, —‘ The Romans be-
ing cofiquered, what do you design to do, O
king ?? ‘ Sicily is next to Italy, nor will it
be difficult to occupy that with armed troops.’
‘ Sicily being occupied, what will you do
then?’ The king, who did not yet perceive
the purpose of Cineas, said, —‘I have a
10 ANTICIPATION.

mind to pass over into Africa.’ Cineas pro-
ceeded, — ‘ Where then, O king?’ Pyrrhus
replied, — ‘ Then, finally, my Cineas, we
shall be tranquil, and enjoy sweet peace.’
Cineas asked, — ‘ Why do you not even now
enjoy thag/peace ?? There, Alfred, I believe
. ~+Lhave rep the story word for word, and
I think ait. you admirably.”
peor girls, attracted by the earnestness of
"their brothers’ tones, left their books, and
drew near the fire.

‘<¢ What will you be, sweet sisters ?”? asked
Ferdinand. ‘‘ Alfred and I are planning our
future course ; doubtless holding the opinion
that our destiny is in our own hands, and that
we can have what lot we choose.”’

Juliet was the first to reply. Tossing her
bright curls, she exclaimed, — ‘‘ My plan is
already formed. I will be a belle. Every
body says that I am beautiful. Then I have
the most exquisite taste in dress, so that’ I
cannot fail to be enchanting. I shall be cel-
ebrated as the beautiful, the graceful, and the
attractive Miss Wilburne.”
ANTICIPATION. 11

‘¢O sister!” cried Louisa, ‘* how can you
desire pleasures like those ? They can only
be enjoyed while youth lasts. Besides, who
will ever hear of you after your death ? ”

‘¢T care nothing about posthumous fame.
I want to enjoy life; but it will make very
little difference what people s r Il am
dead. I will be happy while I live? coh

Alfred cordially assented to the wisdom of
these opinions ; but Ferdinand shook his head,
with great gravity, and, turning to Louisa,
said, — ‘‘ What character do you choose,
dear sister ?”

<< | will be a learned lady,”’ replied Louisa ;
‘¢ J will attend to all the branches pursued at
our best colleges. I will be a splendid math-
ematician, an able linguist ; and I will also be
profoundly skilled in the natural sciences. I
shall be the learned, the renowned Louisa
Wilburne.”

‘« My ambitious little sister,” exclaimed
Ferdinand, ‘‘ I like your ideas far better than
Juliet’s ; but you are not very wise to attempt
ANTICIPATION.



so many st ies. ‘The course pursued at col-
leges is Maimense. I should like to know
what individual can excel in all the branches
prescribed for those young men. Better give
y your whole attention to one department. Re-






mathematician, if you please, or
adept in the natural sciences.
y acquire fame ; but if you seek
ence in each of the three, you will utter-
I was reading a work of Spurzheim’s
“Other day, and I will try to remember
some of the ideas, which exactly harmonized
with my own. He argues that every one
should be educated according to his natural
endowments, that the gifts bestowed upon
different individuals are very dissimilar, and
that we should cultivate those mental powers
which are predominant. The state of society
would then advance with great rapidity.”

‘“‘T prefer Madame de Staél’s reasoning,”
said Louisa. ‘‘ Be so kind as to listen to this
paragraph. I will read it as it is written in
la belle Frangaise. ‘La nouvelle philosophie
ANTICIPATION. 13

Allemande est nécessairement plus favorable
qu’aucune autre & l’étendue de l’esprit ; car,
rapportant tout au foyer de lame, et considé-
rant le monde lui-méme comme régi par des
lois dont le type est en nous, elle ne saurait
admettre le préjugé qui destine chaque homme
d’une maniére exclusive a telle ou telle branche
d’études. Les philosophes idéalistes croient
qu’un art, qu’une science, qu’une partie quel-
conque ne saurait étre comprise sans des
connaissances universelles, et que, depuis le
moindre phénoméne jusqu’au plus grand, rien
ne peut étre savamment examiné ou poétique-
ment dépeint sans cette hauteuf d’esprit qui
fait voir Vensemhle en décrivant les dé-
tails.’ ”

‘Well, do as you please, sister. Children
ought, I suppose, to be exercised in a variety
of studies, or some parts of the brain might be
disproportionately developed ; but after they
become young men and women, they should
decide for themselves which path they can
pursue with the greatest credit. Very few

2
14 ANTICIPATION.

people in this country can have as much time
for study as those plodding Germans, of whom
Madame de Staél writes. Besides, I think
that every one is fitted by nature for some
particular course, and that he should follow it
with eagerness. As I believe.that I am des-
tined for an orator, I shall study with a view
to that end. I will attend to logic, that I
may learn how to argue ; to rhetoric, that my
orations may be adorned by all that will render
them attractive ; to criticism, that I may be
able to avoid faults of composition and of” ut-
terance ; to history, that I may have a great

number of facts and examples for illustration ;
”



to the classics, that I may

“Stop, stop, Mr. Orator,”” shouted Lou-
isa, ‘*I agree that you are admirably well
qualified by nature for a public speaker, but
spare us such a display of your powers this
evening.”

The young people had commenced their
conversation in a low tone, that they might not
disturb their seniors ; but, excited by the in-
ANTICIPATION, 15

spiring topic of discussion, they, quite uninten-
tionally, talked with so much vehemence that
their colloquy was not only heard, but listened
to with great interest ; for how could one avoid
giving some heed to what was so eagerly vocif-
erated ?

‘© We will send the children to another
room,”’ said Mr. Wilburne ; but, on discover-
ing the interesting nature of their conversation,
he paused, and did not interrupt the young
disputants till their conference had reached the
point above noted. ‘Then, turning to Mrs.
Wilburne, whd had been engaged in needle-
work, while her husband relieved the tedium
of her employment by reading aloud, he pro-
posed that they should join the children, and |
endeavour to give them some reasonable ideas.
The company soon formed one group. The
father began, — “ How happy I may expect
to be in a few years, with four such children
to confer honor upon my name, — a brilliant
orator, a luxurious millionaire, a dashing belle,
and a woman of profound erudition !””
16 ANTICIPATION.

The children at first evinced some degree
of confusion, but they soon rallied. Ferdi-
nand, with a graceful bow, replied, — ‘* Yes,
papa, we will all be great in some way, and
you shall be honored by children so distin-
guished.”

‘© Do you not know,” asked Mrs. Wil-
burne, ‘‘ that great plans for the future are of-
ten formed by young people, and that these
almost invariably end in disappointment ?”

‘< Well, mamma,’’ answered Louisa, “ the
failure must be attributed to want of strength
in the will, With a powerful will, I can ac-
complish any purpose.”

“‘T acknowledge,” said the lady, ‘‘ that
much depends upon the will, so much that a
good degree of truth may be claimed for the
adage, ‘ Where there is a will there is a way.’
But it must be confessed that circumstances
do frequently exert a powerful influence over
our plans.”

‘Yes, mamma, circumstances must have
some effect ; but I think that a strong will can,
in the end, surmount all obstacles.”
ANTICIPATION. 17

‘< Your position may, with some qualifica-
tion, be granted. It does, indeed, contain so
much truth, that we might almost receive it as
an axiom. The main difficulty, in many cas-
es, is the will itself. Yours may not be so ef-
fective as you think. It is far easier to: re-
solve than to act. I will say nothing yet about
the character of your schemes, but will mere-
ly speak of some obstacles which may prevent
their fulfilment. Ferdinand intends to be an
orator. He may gain a knowledge of those
branches of learning requisite for the successful
speaker, and then find that he has not those
graces of oratory which would render him ac-
ceptable to the public. I understand you, my
son, you are thinking of Demosthenes ;° but it
is questionable whether it would be expedient
for every awkward stammerer, who wishes to
speak in public, to make such efforts. He
might be compelled to admit that he had the
defects, without the genius, of that orator.
Alfred may be defeated in his plans by the
loss of his ships, by the destruction of his

Q*
18 ANTICIPATION.

buildings by fire, and by various other hostile
influences. Juliet may see that she has not
that kind of beauty, and those peculiar attrac-
tions, which would crown her the reigning
belle. Louisa’s health may be destroyed, in
consequence of the intensity of her application
to study. As you have quoted Madame de
Staél, Louisa, I will deepen the impression of
my remarks, by giving you a few extracts con-
cerning her. Her mother, we learn, had
formed an extensive plan. Madame Necker
intended that her daughter should be a woman
of profound learning. The early years of
Madame de Staél were spent in study. The
powerful mind of the child was stimulated to a
high degree. Now I will read. ‘ Her pleas-
ures, as well as her duties, were exercises of
intellect ; and nature, which had originally be-
stowed great gifts, was assisted by every pos-
sible method. In this way, her vigorous fac-
ulties acquired a prodigious growth.’ ‘ The
health of Mademoiselle Necker could not en-
dure the high pressure of excitement so con-
ANTICIPATION. 19

stantly applied to her intellectual faculties.
- Before she was fifteen years old, the physi-
cians were obliged to order complete seclu-
sion, and total abandonment of study. This
was a subject of great regret to Madame
Necker. She had indulged an unbounded
ambition for her daughter ; and, according to
her ideas, to give up great learning was to re-
nounce all hopes of distinction. Having ob-
tained extensive erudition by her own patient
habits of mental labor, she thought every body
could study as intensely and methodically as
she had done.’ ”

“© Why, mamma, I thought that Madame de
Staél was a very learned woman.”

- « She was a very literary woman, my dear,
and quite distinguished, but she was prevented
from gaining that kind of renown which her
mother had desired for her. She had great
genius, wonderful talent, and unrivalled con-
versational powers. Listen to another extract.
‘The place of this extraordinary woman is
marked among the most eloquent writers of
20 ANTICIPATION.

any age ; among the best delineators of human
feelings and passions ; among the truest histo-
rians of the heart. She might not possess
much positive knowledge; sometimes she
spoke of things she did not thoroughly under-
stand ; her imagination often took the lead of
her judgment ; but her errors were invariably
on the generous side, and still bespoke great-
ness of mind and elevated sentiments.’ So,
- you see, my children, that circumstances will
sometimes declare their influence. The for-
mation of a plan and the execution are widely
different. It is, indeed, well in youth to mark
out a course of action for the future; but be
not too sanguine. I entreat, also, that you
will carefully examine your schemes, and con-
sider whether they are worthy of the vigorous
pursuit of immortal beings.”

‘¢ Louisa,” said her father, ‘¢ you may step
into the library and bring me that volume of
Foster’s Essays which you will see lying upon
the table. A passage in that book occurs to
my mind which I should like to read for the
ANTICIPATION. 21

benefit of you children. We will then aban-
don farther discussion of the subject till anoth-
er evening.”

The book was brought, and the father soon
found the passage to which he had referred.

‘¢'The extravagance of imagination in ro-
mance has very much consisted in the display
of a destiny and course of life totally unlike
the common condition of mankind. And you
may have observed in living individuals, that
one of the effects sometimes produced by the
predominance of this faculty is, a persuasion
in a person’s own mind that he is born to
some peculiar and extraordinary destiny, while
yet there are no extraordinary indications in
the person or his circumstances. There was
something rational in the early presentiments
which some distinguished men have entertained
of their future career. When a celebrated
general of the present times exclaimed, after
performing the common military exercise m a
company of juvenile volunteers, ‘I shall be a
commander-in-chief,’ a sagacious observer of
22 ANTICIPATION.

the signs of yet undeveloped powers might
have thought it indeed a rather sanguine, but
probably would not have pronounced it an ab-
surd, anticipation. An elder and intelligent as-
sociate of Milton’s youth might without much
difficulty have believed himself listening to an
oracle, when so powerful a genius avowed to
him that he regarded himself as destined to
produce a work which should distinguish the
nation and the age. The opening of uncom-
mon faculties may be sometimes attended with
these anticipations, and may be allowed to ex-
press them ; perhaps, even, as a stimulus, en-
couraged to indulge them. But in most in-
stances these magnificent presumptions form,
in the observer’s eye, a ludicrous contrast
with the situation and powers of the person
that entertains them. And in the event, how
few such anticipations have proved themselves
to have been the genuine promptings of an ex-
traordinary mind !”’
LEAVES FROM THE AUTOBIOGRA-
PHY OF A GOVERNESS.

CHAPTER I.

‘‘ Man measures earth’s stupendous globe,
And marks its mighty bound ;
His search has solved the mystic tides
In their alternate course,
And sunward traced the viewless winds
Up to their flaming source ;
Yea, his far ken hath read the skies
With all their starry blazonries
That o’er us nightly burn ;
Hath marked the planet's boundless ring,
And fixed the certain years that bring
The comet's dread return :
Yet, spirit! when his curious zeal
To thy deep quest applies,
How like to groping blindness ahows -
The wisdom of the wise!”
Wittiam Pitr Pacwer.

THe sun was diffusing his amber-hued tints
over the little village of L., as through its
24 LEAVES FROM THE

main street, I, the sole passenger of a cum-
brous stage-coach, was whirled in the year
18—. I was sad and weary ; for, about to
appear among entire strangers, a feeling of
loneliness and depression was fast stealing over
me. The day, although oppressively warm,
had been cloudy ; but now Phoebus suddenly
burst forth to gladden the earth with a smile,
before disappearing from the view of its hab-
itants. My spirit had always expanded in
sunshine and prosperity. In my early years,
I had thought that I was certainly born for
wealth and distinction; for only in favorable
circumstances did my mind and body appear
to act to full advantage. But I was not long
in learning that a truly noble character is not
the creature of circumstances, but that it rises
above them, declaring that it will not be form-
ed by their influence. I had learned to study,
even when suffering from dejection and disap-
pointment. I had learned to be cheerful, even
’ when ignorant how I should obtain the money
to buy the next new book which my studies
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 26

might demand. I had learned, also, not to be
low-spirited during a seven days’ storm. Suill,
the weather always would exert some power
over my frame. Did I arise in the morning,
and see every object gilded with the rays of
Heaven’s great luminary, — did I see the pris-
matic colors reflected in every dew-drop, —
my spirits rebounded, and I joyfully prepared
for the duties of the day! This idiosyncrasy
rendered me peculiarly light-hearted, as the
clouds now vanished, and the landscape glis-
tened with the clear, bright emanations of the
sun. My attention was so attracted by the
magnificent, though oft-repeated, spectacle of
the glories of the descending orb, that I for
a while neglected to notice the beauties of the
sequestered little town which would probably
be my home for several years. The sun, in-
deed, appeared like a huge ball of flame, on
which were brilliantly depicted graceful, arbo-
rescent ramifications ; for the king of day was
disappearing behind a superb forest, the tips of
whose trees formed the foreground of the gor-
3
26 LEAVES FROM THE

geous picture. In the intensity of my gaze,
therefore, I left unobserved the few republican
palaces, and the numerous neat, white cotta-
ges, which proclaimed that the village of L.
was of the first rank among country towns in
point of opulence, directed by taste. My at-
tention was at length arrested, for the vehicle
suddenly stopped, and I soon found myself
ringing for admission at the door of a princely
mansion. It was presently opened by a mid-
dle-aged woman, whom I afterward discov-
ered to be the housekeeper, or general super-
intendent of domestic affairs. She was not, of
course, compelled to fill the office of janitor,
but the good woman, having an unusual share
of that gossiping curiosity which seems to be
the concomitant of the uneducated of both
sexes, was always eager to have the first view
of new-comers. Having escorted me to the
parlour, and learned that I was the expected
governess, she left me, that she might commu-
nicate the intelligence to Mrs. Maynard. She
soon returned with the information that the
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 27°

lady was asleep, but that she would probably
awake in the course of an hour, as her slum-
bers rarely exceeded that time. I requested
that in the interim I might be conducted to my
room, for I had a certain consciousness that,
after travelling the whole day, some change in
my habiliments was requisite to render me pre-
sentable. The advantages of journeying are
indeed very ‘great ; but, certainly, no combina-
tion of circumstances does, for the time being,
render one’s appearance more unprepossess-
ing. Not till the expiration of an hour was
I prepared to sit down and devote a few
moments to meditation. I did not long enjoy
my solitary thoughts, for I was soon sum-
moned to Mrs. Maynard’s apartment. I had
heard that she was an invalid, but had not ex-
, pected to find her quite so ill. The expres-
sion of my countenance must have indicated
my emotion, for she sighed, then smiled faint-
ly, and said, — ‘‘ You see, my young friend,
that I am useless to my family.”

‘I trust that you are not entirely useless,
28 LEAVES FROM THE

my dear madam ; you still have the power of
conversing with your children.”

“¢ Sometimes, I am thus happy; but I am
often too feeble to endure their presence. I
feel comparatively well this evening, therefore
I will tell you some of my views and wishes.
I must first give you some information con-
cerning our circumstances ; for I think it im-
portant that the educator of my children
should be acquainted with their prospects for
the future. About four years since, my hus-
band, who was a wealthy merchant, died.
We had been residing in the city of. New
York. After his demise, having lost all love
for a city life, I removed to this place, which
had formerly been our summer abode. I
resolved to live tranquilly in the country, to
.pass my life amid rural scenes, and to devote
my time to the education of my children. I
began to form various schemes ; but they were
soon frustrated. One day, while walking with
my children, my foot slipped ; I fell, and was
instantly deprived of all consciousness. The
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS 29

screams of my terrified children soon brought
the villagers to my assistance. Surgical aid
was immediately obtained, and a most fearful
discovery announced ; I had received a se-
vere spinal injury. For several weeks I was
very ill. I then learned that I was maimed
for life. Since that time 1 have been confined
to my bed, and I now no longer expect any
material alleviation of my sufferings. You see
that my plans for usefulness were destroyed.
I had anticipated much gratification in edu-
cating my children at home, in forming their
minds and manners myself. The idea may
have been a selfish one, but I delighted in the
thought that they should be wholly indebted
to me for their literary attainments. These
illusions were now at an end. My youngest
child was intrusted to the care of her nurse.
Two were sent to the best school in the vil-
lage, which, however, was not of a very high
order. The others were placed in a distant
seminary. Affairs remained thus, while any
hope was afforded of a partial recovery of my
3
30 LEAVES FROM THE

health. Within a few weeks my disease has
assumed a new aspect. I have been informed
that, although I may live many years, J have
reason soon to expect a fatal termination of
my sufferings. This being the case, I sent
for my children ; and, as we have no good
school in the vicinity, I resolved to procure a
governess, that they might all be taught at
home. I demanded high qualifications, such
as are more unusual now than they probably
will be some years from this time. I consider
myself very fortunate in obtaining Miss Emer-
son.”

I bowed in acknowledgment of the compli-
ment, and the lady proceeded.

‘¢T purpose to send my elder son to col-
lege, when he shall have reached the age of
sixteen; and I wish that my daughters may
pursue a similar course of study, or, at least,
one equally extensive, at home. My children
have been with me two weeks. I can see
that great changes have taken place in their
characters. They have been superficially
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. $1

taught, and I fear that you will have much
difficulty in forming habits of diligence and
application. Were it not for my present fa-
tigue, I would give you a description of each
child, that you might be, in some degree,
acquainted with your pupils. But it may be
as well for you to obtain a knowledge of their
talents and dispositions by your own observa-
tion. I will now summon your charge, and
after the introduction I must dismiss you all
to the parlour, for I am quite exhausted.”

The lady rang a small bell, which was
presently answered by a little Irish girl, who
was directed to call the children.

‘© All of them, ma’am?”’ asked the child,
her blue eyes dilating.

*¢ Yes, Nora, I wish to see them all.”

The little girl laughed. ‘‘ And sure,
ma’am, I shall have to look in six different
places for them. I hope you won’t be after
expecting them very soon.”

‘¢ Well, find them as soon as you can,
Nora,” replied Mrs. Maynard, with a smile.
82 LEAVES FROM THE

Then, turning to me, she observed, — “‘ My
children have had almost unbounded liberty
these few days ; but I hope they will soon find
employment.”

While awaiting the entrance of my future
pupils, I had leisure to observe their mother,
who, wearied by the effort of speaking, had
closed her eyes, and was apparently asleep.
Although past the meridian of life, and evi-
dently much. altered by ill health, she was
exceedingly beautiful. Her countenance was
very pale, and her lips slightly compressed
with pain, but her forehead was high, and
exquisitely formed. Her dark hair was
brushed away from the throbbing temples, that
she might feel the revivifying influence of the
pure summer air. The breeze, gently steal-
ing through the masses of woodbine that
shaded the windows, was indeed so genial in
its influence, that I for a moment half won-
dered how any one inhaling it could be ill or
unhappy. The expression of Mrs. Maynard’s
countenance spoke of ambition, tempered by
love and benignity.
AUTOBIOGRAPHY oF A GOVERNESS. 38

The sound of cheerful voices drew my at-
tention to the window. As I listened to the
‘merry laughter of the domestics, who were
lightly performing their household labors, and
Jooked upon their blooming faces and well-
rounded figures, I thought of the inestimable
value of health, and began to speculate wheth-
er or not the suffering lady would be willing to
change places with these active and vigorous,
but humble, individuals. My reverie was in-
terrupted by suppressed tones and gentle foot-
steps.

“Did you send .for us, mamma? Ah!
-how happy we are that you feel able to see us
this evening !’’ was the graceful salutation of
‘a tall and sprightly girl, who approached the
bedside and tenderly kissed the pale sufferer.
The others silently followed her example. I
was partly concealed from view by the folds
of acurtain. The little scene was therefore
over before I was perceived by the children.
Mrs. Maynard now introduced them after the
following style : —
34 LEAVES: FROM THE

‘¢ This is my daughter Helena. Although
she yesterday completed her sixteenth birth-
day, she will not, I hope, for several years,
think that she is too old to profit by your in-
structions.”

My heart was immediately won by Helena’s
irresistible smile, as she said, — ‘* I must in-
form you, Miss Emerson, that 1 am by no
means a hard student, and that you must not
expect too much from me.”

Helena was not beautiful. Indeed, none
of the children equalled in personal appearance
the young Zenobia that, Mrs. Maynard must
have been at their age ; but the expression
of her features was beaming and radiant ; her
eyes sparkled with exuberance of health and
cheerfulness, and her manners were character-
ized by a charming naiveté. This combina-
tion rendered her extremely attractive.

“ This is my son Arthur,” continued the
lady, stroking with her thin hand the clustering
locks of a wild but affectionate looking boy of
thirteen, who stood by her side. The lad
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 35

bowed, took my hand, and stammered, —
‘* Miss Emerson, my mother says that you are
going to fit me for college ; but I do n’t wish
to be a learned man ; I want to go to sea.”

Mrs. Maynard smiled gravely, and said, —
*¢ You will change your opinion, I hope, be-
fore you are sixteen. I do not wish you to
enter college at an earlier age. ‘Till then you
will stay at home and study for my sake, will
you not, my son ?”

‘¢@, yes, mamma, for three long years, if
you will then let me choose for myself.”

The mother promised, and both parties ap-
peared perfectly contented.

“This is my daughter Florence,” said
Mrs. Maynard, gazing fondly upon a fragile
child of twelve years. ‘She is our litte
invalid, and very careful must we be of our
lily. If she does not apply herself too closely
to study, she may soon be as strong as the
others. You must try to cure her of some of
this extreme diffidence, which makes her afraid
to speak to a stranger.’ Again turning to
36 LEAVES FROM THE

Florence, she said, —- ‘‘ You see, my child,
that I am obliged to apologize for your si-
lence.”

The little girl, whose complexion was of a
very transparent nature, allowing the beholder
to witness the trace of every emotion, blushed
deeply and painfully, and courteously kissed
my hand, without daring to raise her eyes.

Henry, a lively boy of eight, Grace, a
smiling little girl of seven, and Ada, a pretty
child of five, were then introduced. “They
saluted me with the confidence and simplicity
of early childhood, and presented a pleasing
picture of infantine loveliness.

‘« Now you may go and get acquainted with
each other,” said the lady, pleasantly waving
her hand for our departure.

On our way to the parlour, we heard the
sound of the tea-bell, and accordingly turned
our steps toward the neat apartment in which
the evening repast was usually served. The
remainder of the day was spent in compliance
with the request of Mrs. Maynard. Helena,
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. $7

Arthur, and the three little ones evinced no
deficiency of companionable qualities, but
Florence uttered hardly a word. She lis-
tened, however, to our remarks with great
attention; and the flashes that occasionally
darted across her intelligent countenance de-
noted that hers was a character which would
amply repay careful study. Henry, Grace,
and Ada brought their playthings for my in-
spection; Arthur gravely asked my opinion
concerning a canoe which he was construct-
ing; Helena eagerly displayed some new mu-
sic that had just arrived. At eight o’clock,
Florence and the three little ones quitted the
room for their respective dormitories, leaving
the elder children with me. J made some re-
mark indicative of my surprise at the alacrity
with which the others had retreated, observing
that I had often witnessed quite a rebellion in
a family on the arrival of bed-time.

“ been at home with mamma, and have become
accustomed to regular habits.”

4
38 LEAVES FROM THE

‘¢ But does your sister Florence retire at
that hour ?”

‘¢ Florence has been away with me, but on
our return, mamma, finding that her health was
still delicate, insisted that she should, for the
present, observe the same rule. Arthur and |
T have a little more freedom.”

‘© Your mother has great influence over her
children.”

‘ Yes, the little ones obey her implicitly,
although they are frequently prohibited from
seeing her for several days. Indeed, I think
that her extreme illness is the cause of their
prompt compliance with her wishes.”

I mentally rejoiced that my pupils had been
so well trained ; but I desired to learn more of
the gentle Florence, whose blushing, expres-
sive countenance was yet, in imagination, be-
fore me. In reply to my inquiries, Helena said,
— ‘¢ She is a dear little girl, but rather pecu-
liar. She is four years younger than myself,
but I am, now and then, quite jealous of her.
Not very often, however, for my ambition is
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 39

not directed to the pursuits which interest her.
You must know that she is quite a scholar.
Arthur and I often call her our little blue
lady. She has always been a slender child,
unable to bear exposure to wind and weather.
When quite young, being too feeble in frame
to join in our rude sports, ——I say ours, for
before we left home I used to play and romp
with Arthur as if I had been a boy myself, —
she would sit quietly in a corner with her little
book, and seem very well contented. Her
memory was very retentive, so that she sel-
dom forgot what she had read. She also
learned her lessons with great ease. Mamma
was delighted, for Florence was very much
like herself. After a while, her health im-
proved, but her love for books continued.
At school she was classed with girls several
years older than herself. I was once very
much alarmed by an intimation from one of
our teachers, that in a new division soon to
be made, Florence and I would probably be
placed in the same class. This, of course,
40 LEAVES FROM THE —

aroused my pride, for I could not endure the

thought that my little sister, as I had called

her, should be considcred my equal in literary

attainments. Therefore I studied hard, and
f thus escaped the threatened humiliation.”

« But you love her warmly ? ”

“Certainly, but I did not quite like the
idea that she should surpass me at school, and
I took good care to prevent such an occur-
rence. That was natural, you must know.”

“ Quite natural,” replied I, with a smile ;
“¢ but is it true, most frank Helena, that you
are as indifferent as you profess with respect
to intellectual advancement ? ”

‘“ Why, I have a great regard for knowl-
edge, but I am no enthusiast. I should like
to know as much as people who are called
well educated and accomplished, but I have
no desire to become a prodigy of learning.
Now I suspect that Florence has some very
ambitious views in her little head. I really
believe that she confidently expects to be very
learned at some future time.”
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 42

‘¢ That would doubtless gratify your moth-
er.”?

‘¢ Ah! yes ; mamma thinks a great deal of
our little blue lady, and is constantly encour-
aging her to persevere in her studies.”

‘‘Ts Florence always as silent as she has
been this evening ?”

‘OQ, no, madam, but you are a stranger,
and she is not yet acquainted with you. For
some days she will be reserved, but afterward
you: may expect to hear her voice for hours.
When much excited, she talks very long and
earnestly.””

During this conversation, Arthur had been
quietly examining his canoe. He now de-
posited it in its place, and, after a few mo-
ments of apparently intense thought, suddenly
raised his eyes, and exclaimed, — “‘I have
heard all that Helena has been saying about
Florence, but, Miss Emerson, what is the use
of so much hard study ? ”

‘* Ah!” said I, mentally, ‘this pupil of
mine is one of the cut bono species ”

4*
42 LEAVES FROM THE

Before I had time to reply, Arthur re-
sumed,— ‘If it had not been for fear of griev-
ing mamma, who is so ill, I should not have
promised to stay at home with my books
three years, for I want to go to sea. I never
could bear to think of spending 2 all my days
in study.”

‘* A complete answer to your question
would require a long lecture, Arthur, but
we will consider the subject a moment. You
do not, of course, imply that all knowledge
is useless ?”’

‘¢ Why, no, we must learn enough to be
respectable, that is, we must learn as much
as people in general are expected to know.”

‘¢ As much, you mean, as will carry you
through life with a good degree of comfort.”

“¢T believe that is my idea. I should like
to know enough to be a good sailor, and that
is all.”

‘©T do not think, Arthur, that all knowl-
edge should be confined to our great schools
for learning. I would have a good share dif-
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 43° —

fused among all classes of men. I would not
object to the life of a sailor, should a boy
manifest a decided preference for it, but I
would have him go forth upon the mighty
deep with his senses refined and elevated,
and his mind enlarged, that he might under-
stand and appreciate the wonders of the sea.
I would have him able to view with a phi-
losophic eye the many kinds of men whom
he must encounter. I would have him so
educated that his leisure time at sea should
not be squandered upon the low amusements
which are too common among mariners.
‘When you speak of the knowledge requisite
for a sailor, what do you mean? Have you
reference to any particular branches ? ”

‘s Why, I think a sailor ought to under-
stand navigation, if he has any desire of be-
coming captain.”

‘‘'Yes, that department of knowledge is
indispensable ; any thing beside ?””

¢ T do not think of any thing more.”

6 What, nothing at all!”
44 LEAVES FROM THE

‘© Q, he must know how to read, of course,
or he could not study books of navigation,
and he ought to learn a little arithmetic, but
I do not gee the use of puzzling one’s self
with exchange, commission, and a hundred
other tedious subjects.”

‘* Suppose that, after sailing a few voyages,
you should be requested to fill the office of
supercargo, would not some of this knowl-
edge be of great importance ? ”’

‘©'Yes, madam, but not for the common
sailor.”

‘¢ Should not a true seaman be qualified
for any office, from the cabin boy’s to the
supercargo’s ? ”?

‘¢ Well, a sailor does not need geography.”

‘¢ My dear Arthur, think a moment. A
man, whose profession exposes him to the
necessity of visiting different countries, ought
certainly to possess some information con-
cerning them, to be acquainted with their
localities, the manners and customs of the
people, their exports and imports, and various
other topics connected with geography.”’
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 45

6 Could he not do without grammar ? ”

“‘ He could do without it, of course. So
might you dispense with shoes and stockings,
but to be deprived of such conveniences
would not be very agreeable. Should a sailor
attain the rank of captain, he would probably -
have occasion to correspond with his em-
ployers. Would it not be desirable that he
should be qualified to write a letter devoid
of ungrammaticisms ? ”

‘¢ T suppose so, but I do n’t like grammar.”

‘© That is not the question. He would
not be considered a gentlemanly and well-
bred sailor, if his letters and conversation
were characterized by inelegant and ungram-
matical expressions.”’

“¢ Well, a sailor does not need languages.”

«¢ What would you do if obliged to transact
business in a foreign land ?”

‘¢ One can always find an interpreter.”

‘© Would it not be better to rely on your-
self, and thus be independent ? ”

“You would not have a sailor learn the
46 LEAVES FROM THE

languages of all the countries which he has
to visit 2???"

‘ Not unless he wishes to be a great lin-
guist; but every sailor might learn French.
As this is the language generally understood
in the civilized world, he might, in many
countries, dispense with the services of an
interpreter.”

‘T see that, even to be a sailor, it is well
to have a little learning.”

‘Yes, and ‘the more, the better,’ as the
idea is expressed in common parlance. The
life of a sailor is by no means despicable.
I would also have him so educated that he
would intelligently enjoy the new scenes
through which he must pass. As he paces
the deck at midnight, how pleasapt would his
lonely watch be rendered by a good knowl-
edge of astronomy! He could raise his eyes
to the heavens, and read, as on a printed
page, the various stars and constellations. In
visiting other latitudes, new subjects for his
‘nocturnal studies would appear before him.
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 47

Beautiful constellations, which he would never:
have seen had he remained at home, will now
greet his vision. In traversing the shores of
foreign lands, how pleasant to understand the
nature of the many new and singular plants
which would present themselves to his view,
to be able to classify them, and, perchance,
to add something to the stores of botanical
science! How gratifying, also, to have some
knowledge of the gorgeous shells which he
would see in such profusion! To be a hap-
py sailor, he should be well educated.””

‘¢ Then my three years of study will not
be lost, if I should be only a sailor.”

‘¢ Certainly not. Every occupation is en-
nobled and refined by the possession of knowl-
edge. Even at sea, I hope you would not
abandon study. Remember that Captain Cook
acquired his greatness upon the ocean. He
found time for the diligent study of math-
ematics and astronomy, and distinguished him-
self by the humane and scientific care with
which he guarded the lives of his men. He
48 LEAVES FROM THE

. became very celebrated, was chosen a mem-
ber of the Royal Society, and after his de-
cease was honored by eulogies and other
testimonials of respect for his character and
attainments. You would not, I hope, be con-
tented with the life of an ignorant sailor.”

Arthur was thoughtful for a few moments.
His countenance then suddenly kindled.
‘Well, Miss Emerson, I will try to study
hard these three years.”

I rejoiced to see the earnest expression of
his fine features, and thought that his moth-
er’s wish might possibly be gratified, for
should he acquire a passionate love for learn-
ing, would he not gladly remain at home,
where he would have better opportunities for
indulging his newly obtained taste? After
a prolonged conversation, Helena, Arthur, and
I parted for the night, feeling as well ac-
quainted as if we had known each other for
years. After retiring to my room, I mused
for some time upon the various circumstances
of my new situation. I saw spread before
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 49

me a delightful prospect. I had always been
ardently attached to the vocation of the teach-
er, and under what more favorable auspices
could I wish to commence intercourse with
a set of pupils? Mrs. Maynard was op-
ulent. Her children would have every ad-
vantage which wealth could procure, — books,
apparatus, and all things essential for illustra-
tion. One child, at least, was a lover of
mental improvement, and all seemed endowed
with good capacity for learning. A liberal
salary had been promised, therefore I should
not be perplexed with distracting thoughts,
but could devote myself wholly to the moral
and intellectual advancement of myself and
my pupils. But, although sanguine by na-
ture, I did feel some trepidation as I thought —
of the immense weight of responsibility that
was to devolve upon me. Mrs. Maynard
being incapacitated for the care of her chil-
dren, I should have almost the entire charge.
T must attend not only to the development
of the mind, but must also give much time
6
60 LEAVES FROM THE

to the cultivation of the heart. I must teach
my pupils to discern good and evil. While
expatiating upon the wonders of our uni-
verse, I must lead their thoughts to its Cre-
ator. While explaining the laws of the heav-
enly host, I must not fail to find time for the
inculcation of the law written upon the heart,
and for the more extended revelation which
God has made in his word. While impart-
ing instruction concerning the nice distinctions,
and minor shades of difference existing in
philological lore, I must not forget to impress
upon their minds views of law, order, and
beauty, —I must give them the grand and
comprehensive motto, ‘* Live to the Truth.”
My miid must frequently revert to the prin-
ciple, that ‘* to educate an individual properly
is to teach him the laws of God, and to induce
him to obey them.”
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 512

CHAPTER I.

“Mrs. Page. Sir Hugh, my husband says my sox
profits nothing in the world at his book ; I pray you ask
him some questions in his accidence,” — SHaksrEare.

Tne next morning I arose early, according
to long-established habit. I soon heard the
prattle of infantine voices beneath my window.
I recognized the tones of the younger mem-
bers of my flock, and was not a little surprised
that they had risen so early. Henry, Grace,
and Ada were busily engaged in watering some
fantastically arranged flower-beds, which I im-
mediately surmised were their own little gar-
dens. Thinking that I should like a stroll over
the elegant grounds which environed the man-
sion, I quitted my room, and proceeded ona
ramble. I soon joined the children.

‘¢ Good morning, my little ones. You are
up early.”

‘¢ Yes, madam,” replied Henry ; ‘‘ mamma
62 LEAVES FROM THE

says itis a shame for people who are well to
be in bed after the sun is up.”

‘“‘ And for that reason,’? added Grace,
‘¢ we have learned to jump out of bed as soon
as we awake ; for if we stop to think, we are
very apt to fall asleep.”

“Your plan is a very good one, but do
Helena, Arthur, and Florence rise thus ear-
ly? IT have not seen them this morning.”

‘© Helena says she can’t wake up early, but
Florence always does. Florence spends all
the time before breakfast in the library. As
for Arthur,” continued Henry, standing very
erect, and assuming an air of self-importance,
‘it is as much as he can do to be ready for
breakéast, which we have at seven o’clock.”

‘“¢ How do you generally employ yourselves
so early in the morning ?”

‘When it rains, we play in the house ;
but in pleasant weather we work in our -gar-
dens. See, Miss Emerson, how pretty our
flowers are! These three beds edged with
little pink-roots are our gardens. Last year we
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 6&3

had them bordered with ‘ Lady in the Green.’
Which should you have chosen, Miss Emer-
on?”

‘¢ The pinks, by all means; for although
‘Lady in the Green’ is a very pretty and a
very singular flower, it is an annual, and
therefore not appropriate for an edge-plant.
I should certainly have chosen a perennial.”

“ Annual, perennial ; I do n’t understand
you, Miss Emerson.”

«JT will give you a short lesson in botany.
In the spring you planted the ‘Lady in the
Green.’ Very soon the little plants were seen
peeping above the ground. Afterward, some
delicate cream-colored flowers, nearly envel-
oped in foliage, made their appearance. Then
you had a very pretty edge for your garden.
But in the autumn the little plants died, stem,
leaves, and root. ‘This spring you were com-
pelled to plant anew border. ‘ Lady in the
Green’ is an annual. A few weeks ago you
planted pink-seeds. You have now a very )
neat, pretty edge, but you must not expect

5 *
54 LEAVES FROM THE

flowers this summer. The roots will not die
in the fall. Next spring, when you begin to
work in your garden, your edge will be ready,
and in a few months you will be delighted
with flowers of great beauty and fragrance.
The roots will live several years, so that you
will not be obliged to plant a new border for
some time. The pink is a perennial.”

‘¢ That is very plain, indeed. How much
pleasure I feel in knowing the difference be-
tween annuals and perennials! But is that
botany? I understand what you have been
telling us very well, but I thought botany was
a very hard study.”

‘© Some people find the long names difficult,
but you could learn a great deal of the science
with ease. Even little Ada could understand
many things about roots and leaves, and could
learn to describe the different parts of a
flower.”

‘¢ Shall we study botany, Miss Emerson ? ””

‘¢T shall not allow you, at present, to look
into a book upon the subject, for you might be
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 55

terrified by the scientific names, but I may
teach you orally, as I have now been doing.
Do you think you can remember what you
have learned this morning ?”

*°Q, yes, madam, I am sure of it!”

The first bell for breakfast now rang, and we
entered the house. The children retired to their
rooms, to remove from their hands all traces of
the occupation in which they had been engag-
ed, and to change their thick shoes and coarse
dresses for some of a lighter character. I sat
down in the parlour, reflecting, with much satis-
faction, on my success in exciting a desire for
knowledge in my new pupils. Soon after break-
fast, we repaired to the school-room, a large,
commodious apartment, well adapted to our
use. I perceived that, on account of the great
diversity in the ages of the children, my atten-
tion would be called to a variety of subjects.
I proposed to have a general examination in
the branches which they had studied, that I
might learn how far they had advanced in
knowledge and mental skill. “Helena colored,
56 LEAVES FROM THE

and Arthur glanced toward the door, as if he
were meditating flight.

‘¢T have not looked at the common branches
for two or three years,” exclaimed Helena ;
* you will not expect me to remember all that
I learned when a child.”

‘¢T hope that you have not forgotten all that
you then learned.”

‘¢ Why, people are not expected to remem-
ber every thing about grammar, geography, and
arithmetic !”?

‘¢T think, my dear Helena, that every one
should be well acquainted with those branches.
If they are superficially studied, the result is
inevitable, the knowledge will soon be lost.
If they are faithfully pursued, the greater part
will probably be retained. If an illiterate per-
son of mature years wishes to lay a good
foundation for a superior education, let him
first become well versed in the studies of child-
hood. Think how preposterous the idea of
being an accomplished musician, while unable
to solve the problems in a common arithmetic ;
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 57

of being a good Italian scholar, while ignorant
of the construction of one’s own language ; of
being acquainted with the literature of the day,
while uninformed concerning the geography of
our earth, and the history of its inhabitants !”

All consented to submit to the trial. I
therefore began with the elementary branches,
and afterward examined them in such of the
higher departments of learning as had received
their attention. All could read with ease and
fluency. The little ones, of course, had studied
only grammatical reading. I proposed that
the three advanced pupils should spend half an
hour with me every day in the practice of
rhetorical reading, for I wished that they should
excel in this important branch of education.
Orthography was the topic of a long discussion.
I conceded that no one could be expected to
spell accurately every one of the forty-three
thousand words of the English language. To
acquire this power would be nearly a hopeless
as well as an unprofitable task, our alphabetic
characters being, in many cases, combined
58 _ LEAVES FROM THE

without any regard to rule or analogy. I
resolutely declared that every one ought to be
able to spell all the words in general use, and
a good proportion of those which are called
uncommon and technical. Arthur was very
deficient in this branch. - He told me that his
last teacher had asserted that time spent in
learning to spell was wasted. My opinion was
the reverse. A great deal of time is certainly
occupied in learning to spell, but those who use
the English language must study its orthogra-
phy, or be in constant danger of suffering on
account of deplorable ignorance. It is cer-
tainly unfortunate to possess so anomalous a
language, but the superiority, in many respects,
of the English to other tongues ought to recon-
cile us to the evil. Two or three hours were
spent in conversing with the children upon the
elementary branches, and in a review of those
important studies. Florence proved herself the
best scholar. Helena, as she said, had forgot-
ten the greater part of what she had formerly
known. Arthur’s knowledge was superficial
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 59

and unsatisfactory. In the afternoon, the three
little ones were allowed to spend their time
in the play-room, while Helena, Arthur, and
Florence reviewed the other branches to which
they had attended. Arthur had just finished
Viri Rome. Florence was reading Cesar.
Helena had not attended to Latin. All three
could read French, but none could write it
with elegance. They knew nothing of algebra
and geometry, and as for the natural sciences,
they were nearly as ignorant as the little chil-
dren. They were sweet singers and skilful
pianists. After the review, we proceeded to
form plans. Their education, although defect-
ive in many points, had been by no means
neglected. They needed mental discipline,
and much careful instruction, in order to insure
eminence in any study. Having convinced
them of the importance of regular hours for
literary pursuits, I recommended a plan for
experiment. Little Ada would spend one
hour a day in solitary study ; this would be
devoted to reading, spelling, and the rudiments
60 LEAVES FROM THE

of arithmetic. ‘Two hours were assigned for
Henry and Grace ; four hours for the elder
children. This time was to be employed in
solitary, unassisted study. Several hours were
allotted for recitation and oral instruction. I
endeavoured to convince my pupils of the many
benefits resulting from solitary study. During
study hours, no questions were to be asked, no
conversation permitted, —all queries to be
reserved for the time devoted to oral instruc-
tion.

For several days, our plans were faithfully
carried into execution. Children are pleased
with novelty, and my scholars delighted in
seeing how closely they could conform to the
rules. Arthur did occasionally yawn over his
’ books, but, fearing that his recitations would be
inferior to those of his sisters, renewed his
efforts. At length, we had rather a dull day
in the school-room. Our gentle Florence, as
usual, acquitted herself well. Clearly demon-
strated problems, carefully analyzed flowers,
and admirably correct recitations characterized
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 61

her part of the performances. Concerning the
exercises of the others, I will suppress all com-
ment. I was disappointed, but merely ob-
served, that, instead of devoting an hour in the
afternoon to oral instruction, I would employ it
in hearing the neglected lessons. This had a
good effect. I saw an expression of blank
dismay, for all loved to participate in the con-
versational exercises I had introduced. We
were now engaged upon an interesting topic.
I had recently explained to them the doctrine
of the centre of gravity, and, on the preceding
day, had related various stories of leaning
edifices, rocking stones, etc., to illustrate the
principle. My pupils were expecting a con-
tinuation of the same subject. To lose this
exercise, in which they all rejoiced, was a
heavy penalty, and for some time I was not
annoyed by disregarded duties.

One day, as I was walking with Grace, I
perceived that she was unusually taciturn.
When I looked at her, I saw that she was

6
62 LEAVES FROM THE

eager to speak, but that she knew not how to
begin.

‘¢ Well, my little Grace,” said I, sportively,
‘¢ what may be the subject of your thoughts ?”?

‘¢ Why, Miss Emerson,” replied the child,
smiling and hesitating, ‘‘ we want — that is—
they told me to ask you, whether we might
have a holiday to-morrow.”

“Ah! is that it? Are you tired of study ?
Does Florence wish for a holiday ? ”

‘¢Q, you must not ask Florence ; she would
study all the time if she could! The rest of
us want one. We are tired of studying so
much every day.”

I mused awhile, and then said, —‘‘ We will
decide the question this evening, Grace.”

The little one looked timidly into my face,
saying, — ‘* You are not displeased, are you,
Miss Emerson ? ”

‘No, my dear, your request is very reason-
able. It is not surprising that children should,
now and then, like a whole day for amuse-
ment.”
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 63

_At the close of the day, as we were sitting
on the piazza, enjoying the summer air, I
said, —‘¢ Well, my pupils, Grace has exe-
cuted her commission, and I have thus learned
that you wish for a holiday.”

*¢T think,’? remarked Florence, ‘ that we
have time enough for recreation without taking
a whole day.”’

‘¢ Never mind what our little blue lady says,”
exclaimed Arthur ; ‘‘ we are five against one !
You will give us the day, will you not, Miss
Emerson ?

*¢ But think, Arthur, of the numerous losses
which you will sustain, if I give you the day.
All the knowledge you might acquire during
your four study hours ; the lecture upon those
curious engines of the ancient Romans ; your
half-hour’s practice on the piano, and various
other matters.”’

‘We can take those the next day.”

‘¢ But the next day we might have had some-
thing else.”

‘‘ We are very tired, Miss Emerson, and
we should study better for a holiday.”
64 LEAVES FROM THE

‘¢ We will try the experiment. You may
have the whole day for amusement; but what
do you intend to do?”

‘¢ We want to go on a long exploring expe-
dition. We should like to visit Mount For-
mosa. Will you go with us? We can carry
our dinner, and stay all day. A great many
berries grow on the hill. We shall also find
wild-flowers, which we can bring home for our
next day’s botany lesson. An old lady, who
used to be our housekeeper, lives in a nice
little cottage at the foot of the hill. “We can
call to see her, and give her some of our ber-
ries, and if, in the course of the day, the
babies get tired, they can go and stay with her
till we are ready to leave.”

This definite proposal was received with loud
acclamations of joy. Henry, however, was
silent. He sat gazing at his brother, with
flashes of indignation gleaming from his large,
black eyes, for Arthur, in speaking of the
babies, had waved his hand majestically toward
the three little children. That Grace and Ada
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 66

should be included in the list of infantine per-
sonages did not, in the least, disturb Henry’s
dignity ; but that he, at the age of eight years
three months and two days, should be thus
styled, was more than he could bear with com-
posure. But while Arthur proceeded to am-
plify his plan, and to expatiate upon its advan-
tages, Helena, who had seen the difficulty,
began to speak to Henry, in a low tone, con-
cerning the part he should take in the next day’s
amusement, and soon succeeded in changing
the current of his thoughts. I witnessed this
little by-scene with pleasure. It was a proof
of Helena’s goodness of disposition. I had
frequently been much gratified by observing
the extreme loveliness of character exhibited
by Helena, the beloved eldest sister, and my
affection for her daily increased. If Florence
was all mind, Helena was all heart. I fore-
saw that, if they should retain their present
characters, Helena would, in a few years, be
a most lovely, amiable being, with no more
mental wisdom than falls to the lot of most
6* ,
66 LEAVES FROM TRE

persons who have not loved study for its own
sake. Florence would be called a woman of
genius, she would have lofty views and pro-
found erudition, but, wholly absorbed in self,
she would have few to love her, or to regard
her with any emotion save respect and admira-
tion. I saw that I must endeavour to guard
against the two extremes. I must try to in-
spire Helena with a veneration for learning,
and a keen desire to obtain the treasures of
knowledge. Then would her endearing traits
of character be enhanced by acquisitions that
would excite, not only love, but respect. The
passionate, enthusiastic Florence must be taught
that life has other duties than the mere cultiva-
tion of the mind, that she must fulfil her mis-
sion upon the earth, that she must not only
cullivate her own invaluable talents, but must
endeavour to do something for her less favored,
less endowed fellow-beings.

Our projects for the next day were soon
completed, except the selection of an hour for
departure.
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 67

‘¢ Let us go at four in the morning,” said
Henry, with a sly glance at his brother.

‘No, indeed!” exclaimed Arthur, in a
tone of eager remonstrance. ‘‘ That plan
might do very well for boys, with their thick
shoes and coarse clothes, but think of the girls’
dresses! They would not like to have their
frocks and stockings covered with grass-stains.
Mount Formosa will be very wet so early in
the morning, and not fit for young ladies to
ascend.”

All laughed at this display of gallantry, and
although some appeared to doubt whether the
speech should be attributed to Arthur’s chival-
ric disposition, or to his love for morning slum-
bers, the sentiments he had expressed seemed
reasonable. .

‘¢ We can start immediately after breakfast,”
said Helena.

‘¢ T object to that proposition,”’ interposed I,
“¢ for reasons based upon physiology. Violent
exercise —and I presume that ours will not
be very gentle— immediately after eating is
injurious to the health.”
68 LEAVES FROM THE

‘¢ Why so?”

*¢ Because much of the arterial blood has
then been called to aid in the process of diges-
tion. If you begin to exercise directly after
eating, this important agent is summoned to the
skin, and the food remains undigested for some
time. I advise you to be tolerably quiescent
for an hour or two after each meal.”?

My opinion was received with due deference,
and the hour of eight was chosen for the com+
mencement of the excursion. Having thus
completed our arrangements, we resorted to
the piano, and devoted the remainder of the
evening to the practice of our favorite songs.
The next morning, the bright effulgence of the
sun’s rays promised us a pleasant day. At
eight, the little group left home, all talking at
once, and in high glee. Arthur and Henry
dragged a small wagon, containing several
empty baskets, and one of huge dimensions,
which held pie, gingerbread, and sandwiches for
our dinner. A little spade was also deposited
in the vehicle, that we might have an imple-
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 69

ment for removing any choice roots, the trans-
plantation or the examination of which might
be considered desirable by the young botanists
or their teacher. The pure, morning air was
invigorating, and the little ones bounded before
us, uttering shouts of joy. The day was a
happy one for all parties. I enjoyed itas much
as our pet Ada, and when I saw that Florence’s
fever-flushed countenance was more natural in
its hue, and that, although fatigued by the mus-
cular exercise she had taken, she actually look-
ed better than she had for some weeks, I
resolved that I would occasionally repeat the
experiment. I perceived that active measures
must be employed to impart to the fragile girl
health and vigor. Our day was quite profitable
in one sense of the word, for, in addition to a
vast quantity of berries, we gathered a pro-
fusion of beautiful wild-flowers, which were
viewed with interest as botanical specimens.
We dined under the refreshing shade of a large
tree, and afterward spent an hour or two in
telling stories and repeating poetry. Arthur
70 LEAVES FROM THE

and Henry evinced no disposition to quarrel
during the whole day. The little ones were
hot too much fatigued, and we returned home
at night as happy as when in the morning we
commenced our expedition. This cannot be
said of all pleasure-parties. That evening, as
we were recounting the incidents of the excur- _
sion, Henry moved that we should have one
holiday every week, and Arthur seconded the
proposition.

“« That,” said I, gravely, ** would be one
sixth of your time.’’

The children asserted, that studying every
day for a week was too much for them. When
Saturday night came, they were so exhausted
that they needed three Sabbaths instead of
one, that they might have sufficient time to rest
after such toil. I laughed, and reminded them
of Sir Matthew Hale, who, for many years of
his life, spent sixteen hours a day in study.
Florence’s eyes sparkled. ~The expression of
Arthur’s countenance was dismal to behold.
The little ones looked as if they thought I had
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 71

been inventing a great story. Finally, Arthur
said, —- ‘ Well, I don’t think he studied so
much at my age. I really believe, Miss Emer-
son, that, if our plan continues much longer, I
shall die in consequence of too great mental
exertion.” ,

Thinking it well to see what effect the pro-
posed change would have upon the perform-
ance of the duties allotted for the rest of the
time, —~ I always liked to try experiments, —I
said to my pupils, — ‘‘ If your lessons and ex-
ercises are as good to-morrow as they probably
would have been had you not spent this day in
amusement, I will give you a holiday next
week, and will pursue the same course for some
time.”

Arthur was quite satisfied. ‘¢ Now,” cried
he, ‘‘ which day of the week shall we have ?”

The majority voted for Saturday ; but Helena
urged so convincing an argument in favor of
Wednesday, that we decided to accept her
choice.

‘‘T vote for Wednesday,”’ she said, ‘ be-
72 LEAVES FROM THE

cause, as we have only one lesson on the Sab-
bath, we become quite refreshed by Monday
morning. We do not need two days in suc-
cession.”

Wednesday, therefore, was devoted to rest
and recreation, on the conditions above
mentioned.
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 7$

CHAPTER Ii.

“ Falsely luxurious ! will not man awake,

And, springing from the bed of sloth, enjoy

The cool, the fragrant, and the silent hour,

To meditation due and sacred song ?

For is there aught in sleep can charm the wise?

To lie in dead oblivion, losing half

The fleeting moments of too short a life —

Total extinction of the enlightened soul ! —

Or else, to feverish vanity alive,

"Wildered, and tossing through distempered dreams ?

Who would in such a gloomy state remain

Longer than nature craves, when every Muse

And every blooming pleasure wait without,

To bless the wildly devious morning walk?"
THomson.

I wap now been with my new pupils four
weeks, and had, in some degree, succeeded in
forming habits of order and application. TI
thought that the time had come for an attempt
to improve still farther the mode of life pur-
sued by the elder children. I wished to in-
duce Helena and Arthur to become early
7
74 LEAVES FROM THE

risers. One pleasant evening, I invited the
former to walk with me. After conversing
awhile upon miscellaneous topics, I said, —
‘¢ Helena, at what hour do you rise in the
morning ?”?

‘© At six, when the first breakfast-bell
rings.”’ .

*¢ About two hours after it is light,”’ said I,
with a quiet smile.

‘¢ Now, I suppose, Miss Emerson, that you
intend to persuade me to rise early ; but I can-
not. Mamma has often entreated me not to
waste so much time ; but J never awake tll the
bell rings.”

‘¢ You retire at ten?”

*¢ Usually.”

‘¢ Now, I cannot think that a young lady
needs eight hours for repose. Do you not
often feel that you have slept too long ?”

“¢ Sometimes I do feel rather dull ; but, if I
do not awake till six, is not that a proof that
my constitution needs all those hours for
sleep ?”
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 176

*¢T think not. The time of awaking in the
morning may generally be attributed to habit.
After a while, you might easily awake two or
three hours earlier, without the aid of a bell or
any other signal. Doubtless, the quality of
your slumbers would be improved by diminish-
ing their length. This opinion is well founded.
Care must certainly be taken not to run into
the other extreme, and sleep too little. Lying
in bed late in the morning is highly injurious to
health. Think how much may be accom-
plished in two hours! That time every day
for a year would suffice for obtaining a good
knowledge of the elementary works on Latin.
Afterward, you could advance with ease in this
language, the acquisition of which you regard
as so Herculean a task. The same amount of
time would give you a vast deal of information
upon any subject, — history, forexample. You
were, not long since, lamenting your ignorance
of this branch. I will tell you of a plan which
I have formed. If you agree to rise at four, I
will read history with you before breakfast. I
76 LEAVES FROM THE

will allow you an hour for your personal duties.
We can then walk half an hour. This will
have a beneficial effect upon your health.
Long walks before breakfast are likely to be
detrimental, rather than salutary, in their influ-
ence. We shall then have one hour and a
half before the second breakfast-bell rings,
which we can devote to reading.”

‘© Why,”’ exclaimed Helena, ‘* how much I
should gain by lengthening every day two
hours! TI should like the plan very well ; but
I fear that I cannot awake till I am summoned
by the bell.”

‘¢T will call you, till you have formed the
habit of awaking unassisted.”

‘¢ Thank you, Miss Emerson. ‘Will you call
me at four to-morrow morning ? ”’

‘¢ Not so fast, my dear Helena. When you
are about to change a habit like this, you must
advance by degrees. It would not be safe, at
once, to make so great an alteration as the one
proposed. I will call you at half past five,
this week ; at five, next ; and thus proceed till
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 77

we reach the proposed standard. Your con-
stitution will, in this way, become gradually
inured to early rising. Your health will soon
improve, and you will have a fairer prospect
of long life.”

I was now satisfied ; for I knew that, having
once formed a resolution, Helena would perse-
vere. Florence was invited to accompany us
in our morning rambles, and to join in our
studies. Many a happy hour did we spend in
the well-furnished library, gleaning wisdom from
the records of the past.

To persuade Arthur to rise early was a
much harder task. I could not tempt him with
the pleasure of historical knowledge. I must
select a different motive. I reflected upon the
prominent traits of his character, and resolved
to excite his benevolent feelings. I soon de-
vised a project, which, besides admirably serv-
ing the present occasion, would be of immense
advantage to Arthur, and also to another lad
with whom I had recently formed an acquaint-

ance. I had lately encountered a very remark-
7* ‘
78 LEAVES FROM THE

able instance of love for knowledge, and had
been purposing to relate the story to my pupils.
- Having formed my plan, I now only waited for
a favorable opportunity. This soon offered.
One day, as we two were returning home,
quite elated with our success in finding a curi-
ous wild-flower for which we had long sought,
I said, — ‘* Arthur, I am much pleased with
your rapid progress in Latin during the last few
weeks.”

“J do really begin to like Latin, Miss
Emerson, and I will try to be a great scholar.”

‘‘ Your assertion renders me very happy.
I have a little story to relate, which I think will
give you pleasure, and also cause you to place
a higher value upon opportunities for mental
improvement. Last Tuesday, in the course
of a long, solitary walk, I called at a little cot-
tage, to ask for some cold water. The dwelling
was evidently an abode of poverty. The mis-
tress of the house invited me to enter. I
readily consented, and soon began to converse
with her. She told me that her husband was
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 79

very poor, and an invalid. He could labor a
part of the time, but he was frequently com-
pelled tq remain at home, instead of going into
the fields to toil. This circumstance rendered
it very difficult for them to maintain their seven
children. While the poor mother was telling’
her simple story, I was surprised to see a Latin
grammar upon the table. I asked whether any
of her children attended the Latin school. She
laughed, and replied, —‘O, no! we can’t
afford to send them to school after they are
large enough to work; but one of the boys
loves study, and we give him a litle time for
himself. Frank says that he will be a scholar, —
but he will have to work hard to get the learn- ,
ing, poor fellow! He makes shoes in the
winter, and works on the farm in the summer.
I often smile to hear his grand schemes. I
believe he does succeed in learning a great
deal, although he has no teacher.’

‘¢T was much interested by this singular ac-
count, and expressed a desire to see the boy.
I decided to wait a while, as his mother was
80 LEAVES FROM THE

then expecting his return. He soon entered,
apparently quite weary, but with a bright and
cheerful countenance. At my request, he gave
me some account of his plans, and of the origin
of his lofty designs. He had not been to
.school for three years. During this time, he
had been obliged to spend many hours every
day in manual labor. For a year after quitting
school, he had no intention of continuing his
studies. About two years since, he chanced
to pass a building in which were assembled
numerous boys undergoing an examination in
their studies. Curiosity induced him to enter.
The pupils, in general, were the children of
' wealthy parents. They were elegantly dress-
ed, and he sighed as he contrasted their situa-
tion with his own. He soon ceased, however,
to regard their external appearance, and listened
eagerly to the performances. He still remem-
bered a portion of his early studies, and there-
fore attended with pleasure to the recitations
in grammar, geography, and arithmetic ; but
he soon found that he knew very little even of
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 81

these elementary branches. He felt sad and
dispirited. Afterward came history, philoso-
phy, Latin, and Greek. He became more and
more unhappy. He glanced around the hall.
Grave men were there, — lawyers, clergymen,
and others esteemed for their learning and wis-
dom. He looked at the young lads, and thought
of their fine opportunities for gaining knowledge,
while he must be a poor drudge, digging pota-
toes, and chopping wood, able to read only a
common English book, and to write a wretched
hand. With no more knowledge, he could
never be happy, for he had now gained a
glimpse of the superiority of mind, of the vast
elevation of the scholar over the illiterate man.
He left the hall, and for some hours wandered
through the streets, absorbed in thought. At
length his heart grew light ; he hastened home,
and communicated to his parents a plan which
he had been forming. He told them that he
wanted to be a learned man, and asked that he
might have a little time for study every day.
He knew that they could not afford to send
&2 LEAVES FROM THE

him even to a public school, for the money
which he could earn was needed to aid in sup-
porting the family. But he pleaded that he
might have a little time for unassisted mental
exertion. His father laughed, but his mother
encouraged the scheme. ‘ Who knows,’ said
she, ‘but that we shall one day see Frank a
great man, speaking to the people?’ His
father finally consented to give him two hours
daily for study, till he was tired of his lofty
dreams. Frank was now contented gnd happy.
The next requisite was a supply of books.
His father could not spare money to buy a
single one. Frank said that for a few days he
would employ his two hours in working for
himself ; he could spend the money thus.earned
for books, and then begin to study. He soon
had the pleasure of buying an Arithmetic,
Latin Grammar, and Reader. He then began
to study, and had continued till the time of my
visit.

‘¢T was delighted with this account. I ex-
amined the boy, and found that he had actually
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 83

learned a great deal without aid. I com-
mended him for his laudable application, and
narrated several stories of learned men who had
risen to eminence from very humble situations
in life. Frank can read Latin almost as well
as yourself, but he needs some assistance both
in that and in his arithmetic. Do you not
wish that he could have a teacher ?”’

‘¢ Yes, indeed ! he is a noble fellow. How
I wish that he could study with us ! ”’

‘¢ That is impracticable ; but how should you

_ like to call and see him once a day and smooth
his progress ?”?

‘¢ I should be very glad to help him, but you
know that I am a dull scholar myself.”

*¢T do not call you dull; and as you are
farther advanced than he, you might render him
very essential service.”

“I am afraid that I should make some
mistake.”

‘¢ J will trust you. Cannot you teach him
the lessons which you receive from me in those
branches ? I find that you understand and re-
member them very well.”
84 LEAVES FROM THE

‘¢ T should like to be useful to Frank. If he
should become a great man, how glad I should
be that I had aided him in his studies ! ”

‘¢'Yes, that would be a pleasure which
would last through life. Will you go, then,
to-morrow morning? His home is about a
mile from yours. He studies from four till
six. Those are the hours which his father can
most conveniently spare. You ought not cer-
tainly to spend the whole of that time with him,
for you know that I have a very high opinion
of the advantages of solitary study ; but if you
could give him half an hour a day, he would
doubtless derive much benefit.”

‘6 Q Miss Emerson, how can I walk a mile
before half after five ?”

‘© Very easily, if you will alter your hour for
rising.”

‘© Q, dear! I cannot do that. I don’t like
to rise early.”

“* Think of the benevolent sentiments which
you uttered a few moments since ; think of the
benefits which you can confer upon this poor
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A Govenness. $3

boy. Are not you willing to sacrifice an
indulgence for the sake of Going so much
good ?”

“Yes, Miss Emerson, I will not be selfish.
I will rise early, and try to help Frank.”

“¢ That is right, my dear Arthur. Do you
awake early?”

“¢ Yes, at daylight, and afterward fall asleep,
"In future, I will rise as soon as I awake.”

‘©T am glad that you have made this good,
resolution, I think that you will be faithful in
adhering to it, for you will soon become much
interested in Frank and his studies. Qccasiton*
ally, I will call and see what progress he makes
under your instructions. J. think that he will
become a distinguished scholar. A superior
education has often been obtained under diffi-
culties greater than his. Keen desire is the
principal requisite ; to this, let diligence and
perseverance be added, and the indigent scholar
may feel confident of success.” ,

A great point was now gained. Motive, the
chief desideratum, had been furnished, and I

8
86 _ LEAVES FROM THE

felt sure.of the event. Mrs. Maynard and I
were soon gratified by seeing that the per-
nicious habit of lying in bed after sunrise was
completely conquered both by Helena and
Arthur.

A favorite object of mine was to persuade
Florence to take exercise sufficient for het
health. She accompanied us on our rambles
with reluctance, and eagerly returned to her
beloved books. She seldom joined in the
sports of the others, but delighted solely in the
acquisition of knowledge. I knew that, should
she live many years, her attainments would be
great ; but in order to insure longevity, it was
essential that her habits should be changed.
As she was one day lying upon the sofa, busily
engaged with a book, I said, ‘‘ My dear,
that is a very bad practice. To read while
in a horizontal position is decidedly injurious
to the eyes.”

‘¢ But I do not feel well enough to sit up,”
replied the little girl.

*¢ Then you are not well enough to read,
my love, and you must give me your book.”
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 87

The gentle Florence complied with a sigh,
and, languidly closing her eyes, was silent for a
few moments. I gazed upon her with deep
interest. Intellect was plainly stamped upon
the beautiful lineaments of her countenance,
but her pallid brow and flushed cheek predicted
the consequences of its too assiduous cultiva-
tion. Soon, the burning tears gushed forth in
atorrent. Taking her hand, I said, ~‘* My
dear child, do not be so unhappy. Be content
to rest a while.” ss

*¢ But I am so ill, and so wretched, Miss —
Emerson! If I were well and strong, like
Helena, how much I might study ! ”

‘¢ Tell me, Florence, why it is that you love
study.”

She looked up with beaming eyes. ‘O, I
cannot tell you half the reasons! Study is
the greatest pleasure I have. When I was a
little girl, I loved the knowledge after I had
obtained it, and would study in anticipation of
the result; but now I feel quite as happy while
engaged in the acquisition. Study itself now
affords me great delight.”
98 LEAVES FROM THE .

‘< What advantage do you expect to derive
from your knowledge, Florence ?

‘¢ Q Miss Emerson ! you who have so often
conversed with us upon the advantages of
knowledge need not ask me that.”

Florence had now become very much ex-
cited. She clasped her little hands, and raised
her eyes to mine with an expression that thrilled
through my very soul. The veins upon her
fair temples dilated, and her whole appearance
indicated that she was in a high state of nervous
excitement. I saw that I must immediately
divert her attention. I said calmly, — ‘ At
another time, Florence, we will talk again upon
this subject. Now take my arm, and we will
stroll around the garden.”

Ta the course of an hour, Florence became
composed, and I then thought it advisable to
resume the topic, for I wished to produce an
immediate alteration in her mode of life. If I
could obtain compliance in no other way, Ire- .
solved to exert my authority ; but I hoped that
she would voluntarily yield to my wishes.
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF & GOVERNESS. &

“ Florence,” I began, * did you ever hear
the story of Henry Kirke White ?”

“The author of those beautiful poems
which you have lately been reading to us ?”

«¢ The same.”

*¢ T never did.”

‘¢ His passion for knowledge, like your own,
was absorbing. ‘To that he sacrificed every
thing. Neglecting all care of his health, he
studied incessantly. He died in early life, a
victim to his wonderful exertions. By prac«
tising a little self-denial, he might have lived
many years, made great attainments in knowl
edge, and effected much for the world.” 7

Florence seemed thoughtful. ‘Do . you
think my health very delicate, Miss Emer-
son ???

‘¢ I do, my dear, and sure I am that, if you
wish to live long, you must be very careful.”

‘¢T would rather die young than spend a
long life in ignorance.”

*¢ I do not see that you are reduced to
either alternative. By judicious care, you

8*
90 LEAVES FROM THE

may attain vigorous health, and also make great
acquisitions in learning ; but you have no right
to throw away your life. If you continue to
read and study as you have recently done, you
will be very culpable. Such a course, in your
present state of health, is suicidal. I wish you
to think of this subject, and to-morrow you may
give me the result of your reflections.”

I did not agree with Mrs. Maynard, who
thought it would be expedient wholly to deprive
Florence of her books. I remembered the
story of Petrarch and his library, and knew
that my eager pupil must have some food for
her mind. To deprive it entirely of its dearly
loved nutriment would be unsafe.

The next day Florence came to me, and
said, — ‘* I have thought much of our conver-
sation, Miss Emerson. I know that my health
is not good, and I promise to do whatever you
think right.”

I embraced the dear child, and said, —
“¢ Then I trust, my love, I shall soon see you
quite well. I will now communicate my plan.
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 91.

You can read and study a little, but the indul-
gence must be quite limited. For the present,
you must spend only half an hour at a time
with a book. An hour and a half must then
elapse before you repeat the pleasure. I know
that these intervals will appear very long, but
you must remember that your health is at stake.
I will devote to you as much time as I can
consistently with my other duties. Gentle ex-
ercise must occupy a great deal of this leisure.
We will have walking, gardening, and callis-
thenics. We will spend some time in conver-
sation, taking care to guard against too great a
degree of cerebral excitement. I believe that
your health will soon improve. Then your
time for study may be extended. Remember,
my dear, that although I firmly agree with you
in thinking that ‘wisdom in an ailing frame’
is preferable to ‘a comnion mind with health,’
I do not think you are called to decide between
the two. I believe that you may have both
good health and great learning. But you
must comply with the laws both of your bodily
and of your mental organization.’
92 LEAVES FROM THE

Florence sadly but calmly acquiesced in my -
decision. I now urged the duty of persever-
ance, and added that she would find much
pleasure in faithfully adhering to the scheme.

yith my assistance and encouragement, my
pupil succeeded in observing the rules I had
given her. At the end of six weeks, a great
alteration was perceptible. The unnatural hue
of her cheeks had gradually subsided, the pain
in her head had diminished in severity, and her
muscles had begun to acquire firmness. She
came to me with a bright smile, saying, —
‘< You are a very good physician, Miss Emer-
son.’

‘* And you are a very good patient, my little
girl. You have seldom complained, although
suffering what must have been a great trial to
you.”

‘¢ Yes, it has been a very great trial; and
now, Miss Emerson, will you permit me to
study an hour at a time?”

“T know, my love, that your health is much
hetter, but I cannot consent to so great a
change.”
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A GOVERNESS. 98

‘¢ Think how well and strong Jam. Mamma
is astonished.”

**T acknowledge that your health is much
impreved. I will, therefore, permit you to
study three quarters of an hour at a time. The
idle intervals, as you call them, must still re-
main of the same length.”

Florence thanked me, and merrily bounded
to her mother’s chamber to tell her of the ex-
tension of her study-time.
THE WANDERER’S RETURN.



“* Hast thou come with the heart of thy childhood back?
The free, the pure, the kind?’
So murmured the trees in my homeward track,
As they played to the mountain wind.

““* Hath thy soul been truo to its early love?’
Whispered my native streams ;
‘ Hath the spirit nursed amidst hill and grove
Still revered its first high dreams?’ ”’
Mrs. Hemaxs.

Hour after hour had the Widow’ Bryant sat
at her cottage-door, awaiting the arrival of her
son. Ten years before, he had left home and
friends to seek a fortune in India. Within a
week, a letter had been received announcing
the very day of his return ; and the proud and
joyful mother, who, since the reception of the
intelligence, had been almost too happy for
THE WANDERERS RETURN. 96

aught save running from one end of the village
to the other to proclaim the good news, had
succeeded in finding time to scour and nicely
sand her unpainted floors, to polish her old-
fashioned furniture, to garnish her hearths with
branches of hemlock and cedar, to place fresh
flowers in all the rooms of her little domicile,
taking especial care that Walter’s own apart-
ment should be decorated in her best style, and
to prepare an enormous quantity of tempting
edibles, to excite the sickly appetite of the
East Indian epicure, for her son was returning
to his home an invalid. He had exchanged the
robust health gained by the invigorating air of
his mountain dwelling, and the athletic exer-
cises of his youth, for immense wealth, and a
constitution debilitated by the heat and luxury
of his abode in the East. His mother had re-
ceived some intimation of the state of his health,
but, having entire confidence in her own power,
firmly believed that she could soon cure him of
his ailments.

The inquisitive neighbours occasionally
08 THE WANDERER’S RETURN.

glanced toward her dwelling, half envying her
felicity, although they truly sympathized with
ber. The arrival of a man of wealth was, to
the humble villagers, a remarkable event ; how
much more so when the individual was one of
their own townsmen, who, but a few years
since, had quitted them with expressions of
warm affection, and with a heart alive to the
value of his own New England home! He
had left the abode of his childhood, with his
imagination, indeed, fired as he thought .of his
future prospects, but with his heart saddened
as he mused upon the separation from those
whom he had loved from infancy. How would
he return? The weary hours elapsed, but still
he came not. The widow arose, walked
tremblingly through her flowers and shrubbery,
till she came to tle public road which bounded
her territory. She strained her eyes in the
attempt to ascertain whether he might not be
turning the angle of the road which concealed
distant objects from view. She remained a
few moments, then looked around to survey her
THE WANDERER’S RETURN. |

litle domain, and see whether of not any alters
ation were desirable. The cottage itself was |
a very humble structure, a plain, white-washed
building ; but Walter, in his boyhood, had en=
deavoured to adorn it by planting

** the pale brier rose, touched so tenderly,
As 4 pure ocean shell, with faintest red,
Melting away to pésrliness,”

and various species of the graceful Lonicerm
During Walter’s absence, his mother had sedus
lously cultivated these, and the cottage was
now completely covered with a robe of green,
from which peeped many fair flowers, for it
‘was the season of summer. This part of the
year is in New England so extremely beautiful,
that it amply repays the inhabitants for the dis-
comfort of the cold and damp spring, which is
80 wearisome to the invalid, and also to many
of those whose bodily vigor enables them to
bear all kinds of weather with exemption from
harm. Beneath the windows flourished roses
and carnations, in all their beauty. In choice
9
98 THE WANDERER’S RETURN.

fruit, Walter had been a connoisseur ; he had
successfully cultivated several of the finest
varieties, and, as his mother’s income was
small, he had taken great pleasure in carrying
a portion of his luscious grapes, peaches, and
nectarines to a neighbouring market town, that,
with the money received from the sale, he
might obtain some little luxuries for the family.
The garden was inclosed by a neat hedge of
the Ligustrum, so common in England, but so
rare in our own country. During Walter’s
boyhood, the cottage and grounds had present-
ed a very beautiful aspect, and, since his
departure, his fond mother had enjoyed a vast
deal of pleasure in her efforts to preserve every
thing in the same order. The climbing plants
had been carefully trained, the shrubbery dress-
ed, the fruit-trees pruned, and the hedge
trimmed. The widow now gazed around with
a complacent air, as she thought that many of
these tenderly cherished favorites were in their
holiday dress, and quite ready for the inspec-
tion of their former master. She again glanced
THE WANDERER’S RETURN. 99

toward the road with an expression of undefined
fear at his delay, for she had expected him in |
the morning, and then slowly returned to her
station. The neighbours began to think that
she was doomed to disappointment ; but their
fears were groundless, for the wanderer was
now within a few miles of his native hills.
Walter Bryant was riding slowly, propped
up in his magnificent carriage, and attended by
several domestics. As each familiar object
met his view, his countenance brightened a
little, and only a little; for how can a man
broken in health and spirits enjoy as keenly as
he who feels life and gladness with every heart-
bound, and to whom the very sense of exist-
ence is pleasure? His thoughts reverted to
his happy boyhood, to his joyous youth, and
he sighed as he compared those periods with
the present. Yet he had accomplished his
design, he had amassed wealth, and he might,
if he chose, spend the remainder of h « days in
ease. As he approached nearer and nearer,
his reflections assumed a still sadder hue, for
100 THE WANDERER’s RETURN.

the contrast between his former and his present
self was brought more and more forcibly to
mind. As he entered the village, the people
gazed inquisitively at the splendid travelling
carriage ; but when they saw the sallow, emaci~
ated countenance of its occupant, they at first
supposed that their village was honored by
some other arrival than the one they were so
_ eagerly expecting ; for was it possible that that
unfortunate invalid was the gay, handsome
Walter Bryant? He, in his turn, surveyed,
with some curiosity, the town of his birth. It
had been a very quiet place, and it had now
lost none of its identity. There was the old
church, with its tall spire pointing heavenward 5
on the one side were the well-remembered
rows of sheds, for the accommodation of the
vebicles employed to convey the country people
to the house of God on the Sabbath; on the
other was the little cemetery in which reposed
the bones of his ancestors. The door of the
sacred edifice was open, and, as Walter glanced
within, he thought of the time when, holding
THE WANDERER’S RETURN. 101

his mother’s hand, he feverently trod those
aisles, and listened with a feeling of childish
awe to the words of the venerable preacher.
His whole life in India, his disregard for the
religion of his fathers, and his utter neglect of
his duty to his God, flashed before him. With
a stifled groan, he sank back into the carriage.
He was soon aroused by the sound of merry
voices. The small, antiquated school-house,
in which he had received the rudiments of
learning, was before him. The children had,
within a few minutes, been dismised for the
day. They were now standing by the road-
side greeting the stranger with their rustic salu-
tations. Walter’s heart was touched. He
bowed to the little ones, and continued to look
at them till their figures became indistinct in the
distance. He had directed that inquiries should
be made for the residence of Mrs. Bryant, but
was surprised to see the coachman stop at the
home of his boyhood, for in his letter she had
urged his mother to remove to a more spacious
and elegant abode. The good old lady was
9*
102 THE WANDERER’S RETUR.(.

standing by the hedge, waiting very impatiently
while the careful coachman opened the door,
and cautiously assisted his master to descend.

‘¢ My dear, dear son!” she exclaimed, with
outstretched arms; ‘ but how wretchedly ill
you are!”

*¢ Yes, mother,’’ replied Walter, returning
her embrace, ‘‘ I believe I have come home to
die. Nay, do not distress yourself ; I am sure
that you can cure me. Recollect, mother,
your old medicine-chest, and all those bags of
dried herbs¢ which were the objects of my
horror when a child.”

Walter was endeavouring, by his forced
gayety, to divert the attention of his terrified
mother, who Was gazing upon his altered coun-
tenance with an expression of unutterable an-
guish.

*¢ But do you still live in this little cottage ?””
continued Walter. ‘‘ What shall I do with my
people ? I know that you have not room for
them. James and Philip, you may go to the
hotel. I suppose the good people have one,
THE WANDERER’S RETURN. 108

or a substitute. To-morrow morning, you may
tome hither for my orders.”

With his mother’s arm locked in his, and
partially supported by his valet, who was to
remain at the cottage, Walter slowly passed
through the little avenue. His mother’s heart
was full ; almost entirely ignorant of the effects
of a southern clime upon one’s personal ap-
pearance, she thought that her son’s health was
in a far more alarming state than extended
knowledge would have justified. She had in-
tended to direct his attention to the luxuriance
of his favorite plants, but she could now think
only of her darling child himself. He was im-
mediately assisted to his own room, for both
his appearance and his declarations indicated
that he was in great need of repose. He
desired that he might be left alone ; but the old
lady still lingered, evincing her maternal care
and tenderness by a torrent of questions.
‘¢ Have you too much light, my dear? Will
you have that curtain lowered ? Do you think
this well-water will be too cold for you? Shall
104 THE WANDERER’S RETURN.

I not send you some warm water? What
should you like for supper, Walter ?”

_ Poor Walter supported his aching head with
his hand, closed his eyes, and, prompted by
languor and fretfulness, was about to exclaim
in an impatient tone, — ‘‘O, any thing, mother,
but don’t ask me so many questions!”’ But,
raising his eyes, he saw the anxious expression
depicted upon his mother’s countenance, and,
thinking that the manifestation of some prefer-
ence would please her, he said, — ‘* Fhe light
is rather too powerful for my eyes ; I always
bathe in cold water ; don’t send me any thing
warm ; and, as for the supper, I should like
some strawberries, if the old bed is still in
existence.”

Mrs. Bryant smiled complacently, and
said, —‘‘ The strawberry-bed looks as well
as when you left it ten years ago. Do you
remember, darling, I said it was a pity you
should go away in strawberry-time ?”’

‘Walter smiled. ‘‘ Yes, mother, I remem-
ber it perfectly, and if you will tell my valet to
THE WANDERER’S RETURN. 105

gather some of those nice strawberries, 1 think
I can eat a few.”

‘¢' Your valet, indeed! No one shall pre-
pare my child’s food but myself. I will gather
the strawberries, and have some fresh cream
ready.”

‘¢ Very well, dear mother, do as you please.
Now I will try to sleep. I shall ring for
Thomas when I awake.”

Mrs. Bryant at length quitted the room.
Weary as he was, Walter could not refrain
from minutely surveying the little chamber in
which he had enjoyed the pure slumbers of boy-
hood. The plain, cot-bedstead ; the straight,
high-backed chairs ; the simple wash-stand ;
the pine dressing-table ; the neat bureau, on
which were a pocket Bible and a vase of moss-
rose-buds ; all received a glance. He threw
himself into an easy-chair, which unwonted
article of luxury had that day been conveyed
to his room, on account of his ill-health, closed
his eyes, and abandoned himself to thought.
His reveries were not of the most pleusing
106 THE WANDERER’S RETURN.

kind ; and soon, feeling too much indisposed
for their indulgence, he arose, dashed a quan-
tity of cool water upon his burning brow, and
prepared for sleep. Excessive fatigue brought
the desired oblivion. Three hours after, he
descended to the parlour, looking far less
ghastly and haggard than when he retired. A
most bountiful repast had been provided ; but,
to Mrs. Bryant’s great distress, Walter could
eat only a biscuit and a few strawberries.
Inability to eat was, in his mother’s eyes,
the most infallible of all the symptoms of
disease.

«¢ Why, how long have you been so ill, my
dear ?” she asked, in a melancholy tone.

«¢Q, I don’t know, mother ; but. you need
not be so alarmed. Now that I am at home,
I shall soon recover. To-morrow, we will
send to the city for a physician. I ought to
have returned last year.”

“¢ How I wish that you had, Walter! But
now that you are at home, as you say, you
will soon get well, and then what a pleasant
THE WANDERER’S RETURN. 107

life we will lead! Now come and look at
the garden you used to love so well.”

‘¢ But why is it, mother, that you are still
living in this little bit of a place? Did not
you receive the money I sent about five years
ago? I wanted you to have a better establish~
ment than this. Your cottage is hardly large
enough for a little girl’s baby-house.”

“Why, Walter, here is room enough for
half a dozen people ! I had no idea of leaving
a place that you had taken so much pains with.
I put your money in the bank, and have been
happier here than I should have been in @
palace. Your vines and trees are all flourish-
ing. Look at the sweet-brier! How pretty
itis! Do you remember how you used to
puzzle me with your long names when you
were studying botany ? You called this Rosy
—something ; I forget what.”

“¢O, yes!” replied Walter, laughing merrily
for the first time since his return. ‘* Rosa
rubiginosa, mother dear.”

*¢ And I used to ask you why you could not
108 THE WANDERER’S RETURN.

call the flowers by their common names, ‘in-
stead of frightening people with those monstrous
words ; but you and little Eva Mason would
call all the plants and trees by the longest and
the hardest words I ever heard, and nobody
but the schoolmaster knew what you meant.”

A shade passed over Walter’s countenance.
After a pause he assumed an indifferent tone,
and asked, —‘‘ Where is little Eva now,
mother ?””

“She is not little Eva now, but quite a
young lady. She was twelve years old, you
know, ten years since, when you left us.”’

Walter would have liked a more definite an-
swer, and would gladly have asked another
question, but he had not the courage. He
waited some time, hoping that his mother
would pursue the subject, but finding that her
thoughts were wandering to another topic, he
resolved boldly to obtain the information he
desired. After an awkward pause, he said, —
“ So little Eva is twenty-two now, and I. sup-
pose she has several lovers.”
THE WANDERER’S RETURN. 109

“ Well, she has had two or three, but she
received them so coldly that they soon left
her. She does not go into society much, and
people think that she will never marry, but stay
at home with her father and mother.”

For some unknown reason, Walter now
quickened his pace, and as his mother raised
her eyes, and saw his flushed face and beaming
expression, she exclaimed, — ‘* Why, my dear,
how much better you look! You will soon get
well, I know. There is nothing like country
air for sick people.”

‘ T sincerely believe in the great efficacy of
country air,”? replied Walter, very demurely,
‘¢ but I begin to be rather tired, mother, and,
if you please, we will enter the house.”

In the course of a week, half the people in
the village had called to see Walter. He found
difficulty in recognizing many, but the change
in his own personal appearance was far greater.
Our traveller was fairly overwhelmed by the
interrogatories ‘of the inquisitive country people.
He soon learned that, at every interview, he

10
110 THE WANDERER’S RETURN.

was expected to discuss the wonders of India.
The children asked him concerning the banian
and cocoa, about which they had gleaned some
meagre fragments of information from the geog-
raphy. ‘Their seniors by a few years wished
to obtain some acquaintance with the employ-
ments and amusements of the young East
Indians. The farmers puzzled him with agri-
cultural questions. The store-keepers pro-
posed sundry queries respecting the facilities
for trade. A few were minute in their inquiries

relating to the moral and intellectual condition
- of the people. Walter, in a manner indicative
of both merriment and indignation, told his
visitors one day that he purposed to write a
book about India, and that he would certainly
present a copy to every one of his townsmen.
Finally, the wearisome questions diminished in
number. It may be that the curiosity of the
people was satiated. Another hypothesis is,
that the villagers began to see that, although
Walter sometimes appeared as good-natured as
when a boy, he occasionally answered them
YHE WANDERER’s RETURN. I11

with a degree of impatience which betokened
some alteration of character.

‘¢ Mother,” said Walter, one day, ‘‘ are not
you acquainted with Mrs. Mason ?”

‘Why, no, Walter, their house is two miles
from ours, and I never knew much about the
family. You and Eva went to school together,
and that was all.”

The next day, Walter surprised his mother
by ordering his carriage, and preparing for an
excursion. She in vain endeavoured to dis-
suade him. Walter smiled as he saw the
expression of anxiety depicted upon her coun-
tenance, took his valet’s arm, and said, —
“You see, mother, how much stronger I am
than I was last week. I needed two then,
instead of one.”

Walter took with him a large folio volume,
which greatly excited his mother’s curiosity ;
but seeing that her son was in no mood for an-_
swering questions, she merely charged Thomas
to take good care of his master, and then re-
turned to her domestic affairs.
112 THE WANDERER’S RETURN.

Half an hour afterward, Mrs. Mason was
thrown into consternation by the sight of our
hero’s carriage standing before her garden-gate.
But after the first moment of doubt and uncer-
tainty, she suspected that her guest was Walter
Bryant, of whose arrival she had heard three
days since.

‘¢T presume that you have not quite forgot-
ten me, Mrs. Mason,” began Walter ; ‘‘ where
is the little girl that I used to drag to school on
my sled?”

““Why, Mr. Walter, how delighted I am to
see you! What will Eva say ?”

The good lady ran to the foot of the stairs,
shouting, ‘Eva! Eva!’ in reply to which
summons the young lady presently entered the
room. Walter and Eva stood motionless for
a few moments, each wondering at the altera-
tion in the appearance of the other. Recover-
ing from his awkwardness, Walter began, —
‘¢ Miss Mason, as I suppose I must now call
you eee 2?

‘6No, no, Walter,” interposed his com-
THE WANDERER’S RETURN. 118

-

panion; ‘‘ call me Eva, as in our school-
days.”

‘¢ Well then, Eva, my dear Eva,” resumed
Walter, with a gratified smile, ‘* hoping that
you are as skilful a botanist as in those happy
days, may I beg your acceptance of this herba-
rium of Indian plants ? ”

“ Thank you, Walter,” replied Eva ; ‘* my
love for the floral science ‘has been renewed
every spring with the return of the ‘alphabet
of angels.’ I receive your beautiful gift with
great pleasure. I hope that the flowers were
gathered by yourself.”

‘¢ Every one of them, Eva! You must not
think that I was a mere merchant, in the East.
If you were still a little girl, I might tell you
many stories of Indian life, and give you some
descriptions of those wonders which used to
excite your curiosity.”

‘¢ Although no longer a little girl, Walter, I
am confident that I should be highly entertained
by your stories, and I shall certainly demand
them.”’

10*
114 THE WANDERER’S RETURN.

The way being now prepared, Walter and
Eva had a long and pleasant interview, indulg-
ing very freely in reminiscences of bygone
days.

Without much deliberation, and even with-
out asking the opinion of his medical adviser,
Walter decided that his health would be greatly
benefited by frequent recourse to the passive
exercise of riding. Every few days, therefore, -
his coachman was dirécted to drive him to
Mrs. Mason’s abode. For some time, sub-
jects for conversation were found in the history
of Walter’s life during his long absence ; but
after a while, when opinions, instead of inci-
dents, formed the principal theme, Eva was
surprised at the change she perceived in the
character of her friend. It is true that Eva
was a mere child at the time of his departure,
but she had well remembered the style in which
he formerly conversed. She recalled to mind
the time when she used eagerly to listen, as he
expatiated upon those high and noble topics
upon which he had loved to dwell when in the
THE WANDERER’S RETURN. 115

first flush of hope and buoyancy. Where were
those lofty resolves, those disinterested views,
to which he had then given utterance ?

Walter’s visits were usually made in the
afternoon. One day, he rode over in the
morning. On inquiring for Eva, he learned
that she was engaged in her school-room.

‘© Her school-room !? exclaimed Walter ;
*¢T do not understand you.”

‘*Do you not know that my daughter is a
teacher ?”

Had Walter been told that Eva was a laun-
dress, he could hardly have evinced more sur-
prise.

‘¢ May J ask, my dear madam, if any occa-
sion exists for the pursuance of this course ?
I thought that you had a moderate income,
sufficient for the maintenance of your family.”

Mrs. Mason nodded her head with a myste-
rious air, and said, — ‘‘ You are right. We
have money enough, but you know that Eva
was always a queer child. So, what must she
tell me but that she thought the teacher’s life
116 THE WANDERER’S RETURN.

was more useful than any other, and that she
should like to have a school! J told her it was
not customary for people who had plenty of
money to do any thing to earn more. ‘I know
it, mother,’ she replied ; ‘ but Ido not see why
the circumstance of a little property should
prevent them from employing their time and
talents for the benefit of others.’ I was des-
perate, and said, — ‘ Why, Eva, we have more
teachers than are wanted.’ She answered, —
*T doubt, mother, whether we have more com-
petent teachers than are wanted ; but, if a sur-
plus really exists, some might go to other
places. Thousands of children in our Western
land are suffering for want of instruction. I
would gladly go thither myself to aid in their
emancipation from sin and ignorance, but as I
am an only child, I should think it wrong to
leave you and my father. ‘Will not you allow
me to teach at home?’ Afraid that, if I de-
nied her petition, she would ponder upon that
idea of the West, I gave my consent, thinking
that she would soon weary of her plans. But
THE WANDERER’S RETURN. 117

she has now taught four years, and I am afraid
that she will still continue.”

‘¢ Would she permit me to visit her school ?””
inquired Walter.

‘¢ O, yes, for she frequently admits visitors.”

Mrs. Mason now led the way to the school-
room. Walter knocked gently ; the door was
opened by a young girl, who, for that week,
held the office of porter. Eva advanced to
receive her guest, conducted him to an advan-
tageous position, and then resumed the charge
of her class. Walter hastily surveyed the
apartment. The room was commodious, and
the view from the windows extremely beautiful.
The apartment itself was furnished more like
the study of an accomplished scholar than the
recitation-hall of a few young misses. Splendid
maps and choice engravings adorned the walls.
Numerous, well-filled book-shelves displayed
their treasures. Blackboards were indeed
there, but we venture to say that such ele-
gance was never before exhibited in the ap-
pearance of these articles. Busts of literary
138 THE WANDERER’S RETURN.

individuals were here and there seen. The
windows were filled with beautiful exotics, and
neatly disposed around the room were vases
of freshly-gathered wild-flowers. The young
girls appeared inspired equally by a love for
learning and an enthusiastic devotion to their
noble-minded teacher. Eva was attending to
a lesson in rhetoric, and Walter listened with a -
partial return of his former ardor for literature.
The time for recess soon arrived. Some of
the young ladies resorted to the room in which
they were in the habit of practising callisthenic
exercises ; others dispersed themselves through
the beautiful garden which surrounded the
house. Walter was now alone with the
teacher.

‘¢ How romantic you are, my dear Eva!
Who would have thought of finding you in a
school-room, — you who might spend your time
as you please ! ”

‘“¢I do spend my time as I please, Walter.
I assure you that my mode of life is entirely in
accordance with my taste. I teach but three
THE WANDERER’S RETURN. 119

hours a day, so that I have ample time for. the
performance of my other duties, for my private
study and reading, and for recreation.’’

*¢ You do not, then, teach the prescribed six
hours ? I thought that was the number in New
England.”

‘My plan is my own. My pupils study

* but very little in the school-room. My number
is limited to twelve. These are girls from
fifteen to eighteen years of age. They form
one class. They devote several hours a day
to solitary study at home. The time in the
school-room is, therefore, wholly at my dis-
posal. JI attend to the recitations, remove the
difficulties which they could not surmount with-
out assistance, and give them familiar lectures
upon various subjects. At some other time,
I will disclose to you my plans more fully than
my occupations will now permit. Would you
like to remain this morning ?”

‘¢ To do so would afford me great pleasure,
my eccentric friend, but I must reach home
before the sun attains his meridian. I will call
120 THE WANDERER’S RETURN.

again to-morrow afternoon, if you do not object
to the visits of such a drone in society as I
probably am in your estimation.”

‘¢ Were you in health, I should certainly re-
gard you as rather a useless member of the
community ; but an invalid must be content to
receive the services of others instead of exert-
ing himself for their benefit.”

She playfully bade him adieu, and he depart-
ed, deeply absorbed in this new view of Eva’s
character. He returned the next day, and,
eager to resume the subject, asked, — ‘*‘ Do
you think, Eva, that all young ladies should
teach school ?”

**T do not. All are not qualified for the
work. Now, do not accuse me of vanity. My
parents gave me a good education, and I think
that I have a peculiar talent for communicating
knowledge. I cannot conscientiously neglect
to employ my powers for the good of the race.
If, instead of this gift, I had received great
mechanical skill, I might have attempted sculp-
ture or painting. Had I found myself deficient
°

THE WANDERER’S RETURN. 121

in that genius which constitutes the great artist,
I might have contented myself with the em-
ployment of my skill several hours a day in the
construction of bonnets, which should have
been characterized by beauty, simplicity, and
adaptation, in place of the frightful head-
dresses which are sometimes worn, but I have
very little dexterity in any branch of manual
labor.””

‘*T fervently rejoice that such is the case.

I should deeply regret to have the beauty of
your fingers marred by needle-pricks.””

' Eva laughed. ' ‘I have seen indefatigable
seainstresses whose fingers exhibited not a
single puncture to bear witness to their manipu-
lations. I sew but very little, yet I have
sufficient expertness to avoid pricking my fin-
gers. However, I have no love for needle-
work, and very little skill in any of its depart-
ments. I love teaching, and I am successful ;
you must, therefore, excuse me if I persevere.
Iam not sure, Walter, but that you were the
first who inspired me with the idea. Do you

11
122 THE WANDERER’S RETURN.

recollect how earnestly you formerly dis-
coursed, saying that all should labor in some
way for the good of mankind, and how much
pleasure you took in reading the lives of those
who had been distinguished for their philan-
thropy ?”

*¢ Ah, my dear Eva! I was then a visionary
boy. You think that I am sadly changed, and
it may be true. J have become selfish. In
India, I devoted myself principally to mercan-
tile transactions. Before I went, I told you
that I intended to be rich, but that I should not
spend all my time in acquiring wealth, that I
should try to show the natives and the foreign
residents that life had nobler aims. Although
_ you were a little girl, I talked with you as if
you were of my own age. Soon after my ar-
rival in India, I became fascinated by the
desire of accumulating hoards of money. I
learned that my English and American friends
spent all their leisure in amusement. The
enervating influence of the climate deprived me
of energy. I did, at first, try to persuade my
THE WANDERER’S RETURN. 123.

companions to follow a better course, but,
instead of inducing them to join me, I soon
forsook the path of duty myself, and eagerly
accompanied them to scenes of folly and dissi-
pation. My good intentions vanished. Like
many other wild young men in foreign lands,
by my conduct I aided very materially in frus-
trating the designs of the Christian teachers
who were assiduously endeavouring to give a
knowledge of the true faith to those wretched
idolaters. I very soon Jost the religious im-
pressions I had received in childhood.”

Eva heard this narrative with sorrow and
despair. When it was finished, she raised her
eyes sadly, and said, — ‘‘ You trusted in your
‘ own strength, my friend.”

** Don’t preach, Eva! If you will allow so
degraded a being as I to talk with you, I shall
be very happy to avail myself of the privilege.
You combine all that is pure, noble, and lovely.
You are walking in the path of the true and the
right. I have erred, and strayed far from
duty.”
124 THE WANDERER’S RETURN.

‘‘ The Good Shepherd is always ready to
receive the returning wanderer.”

‘¢ Again, Eva, excuse me, if I say that I
will not permit you to preach to me. I like to
converse with you, and now that my strength
is returning, and the fever of money-getting is
at an end, my former delight in the discussion
of literary topics is beginning to revive, but the
subject of personal religion must be avoided.
I have no faith in the doctrines of any sect.
I shall go to church, because my mother thinks
that I am a heathen if I stay at home ; but, my
dear, it is quite enough to listen to the sermons
of Mr. Elwood, without being favored with
any from yourself, although I plainly see that
yours would far exceed his in eloquence. I
am compelled to hear his discourses, but I
know that you will not inflict yours upon
me.”

*¢ Dear Walter, do not talk thus ; but if you
will not allow me to speak seriously, I shall
certainly forbid you to talk in that style.”

‘¢ Well, it shall be a compromise ; and you
THE WANDERER’S RETURN. 126

will still let me come and talk with you upon
other subjects ?”

*¢ Yes, Walter ; our interviews are pleasant
to me as wel! as to yourself. In my child-
hood, I regarded you with reverence and fond
affection. In many things you were my
teacher, for I was a child, and you kindly con-
descended to be my guide and instructor. I
deeply regret the great alteration in your views,
but I am not without hope that you will yet
seek the right path. You must feel that you
are not acting the part of a reasonable being.
Your ideas are too rational to allow you to
live as if only for this world. Nay, I am not
preaching, Walter ”



§¢ Then, Eva, to remove you from tempta-
tion, we will resume the topic we began to
discuss last week, ‘ Why should climate affect
the character of a nation ?’” .

We will not follow our friends through the
‘mazes of their arguments. Walter’s health,
by reason of an excellent constitution, the
skilful treatment of his physician, and the re-

11*
126 THE WANDERER’S RETURN.

cuperative influence of his native air, was
gradually regaining a portion of the vigor by
which it had been characterized in his youth.
With returning bodily health, his mind also
began to resume its power. He now seriously
thought of forming plans for life. He was pos-
sessor of immense wealth, and therefore did
not intend again to plunge into business. Al-
though he had laid an interdiction upon his
young friend’s preaching, as he termed it, the
silent influence of her character was not with-
out its effect. He began to wish that he were
a sharer of her glorious hopes and aspirations,
that his mind were as deeply imbued with re-
ligious principle. Occasionally, he appeared
to emerge from the skepticism in which he had
been so long engulfed, and to penetrate ‘‘ the
mystery of life and death’? He also spent
much time in forming plans for the indulgence
of his expensive tastes. He told his mother
that, as she now had him with her, she must be
willing to abandon the little cottage and garden,
and dwell in a more elegant abode. He had
THE WANDERER’S RETURN. 127

selected the most beautiful site the vicinity
afforded, and had engaged numerous workmen
to build his house, and gardeners to lay out his
grounds. ‘The villagers, who knew of his fre-
quent visits to Eva, predicted that she would
be mistress of the new mansion. That Walter
frequently pondered upon the subject we are
well aware, but he sighed as he thought of
Eva’s great superiority in moral excellence,
and asked himself how good he must become
before he could venture to entreat that she
would share his fortunes. The building was
at length completed, and the grounds modelled
in a style of Oriental magnificence. Mrs.
Bryant had consented to leave the humble
cottage and garden, and remove with her son
to his luxurious dwelling. Influenced by her
wishes, he gave a large party, that the curiosity
of her friends and acquaintances might imme-
diately be gratified by a minute survey of his
unique: domain. Leaving to his mother the
_ care of inviting the people in general, he him-
self asked Eva to grace his festival by her
presence.
128 THE WANDERER’S RETURN.

“© T am aware, Eva, that you are no lover
of parties ; but will you not, for my sake, con-
sent to be one of our guests ? ”

Eva did consent, and, on the appointed even-
ing, while the majority of the visitors were
examining the different apartments of the prin-
cipal edifice, Walter asked his young friend to
visit his conservatory, which had been con-
structed with much care, and filled with plants
of great beauty and rarity. While inspecting
the elegant collection, Walter alluded to the
many pleasant interviews they had enjoyed
since his return from the Old World. Then,
with some hesitation, he said, — ‘‘ Eva, may I
hope that you will give me the right to spend
all my time with you? Will you be my com-
panion through the remainder of life’s jour-
ney ?”?

‘¢ Walter,” replied Eva, in a gentle but firm
tone, ‘you err in supposing that we are fitted
for a life-union. To meet as friends, and even
to spend many hours in each other’s society, is
pleasant ; but we have not that entire congeni-
THE WANDERER’s RETURN. | 199

ality which would render the marriage state
happy or profitable.”

‘¢ My dear Eva, think in how many points
we sympathize !_ I question whether any other
two individuals in the world would agree on so
, many topics, or would be rendered so happy
by constant intercourse. Our home would be

‘ the resort
Of love, of joy, of peace, and plenty, where,
Supporting and supported, polished friends
And dear relations mingle into bliss.’ ”

“JT allow, Walter, that our mutual agree-
ment on many subjects is indeed great, and that
we are pleasant occasional companions for
each other ; but, on the great topic which
involves man’s interests for time and for eter-
nity, we do not sympathize. You are not a
pilgrim to the Heavenly City, my friend. How,
then, can we travel together ?”?

‘¢ Eva, I have the most profound reverence
for Christianity. I think that the human race
has derived great benefit from the system. I
adore the Maker of this beautiful world. In
my heart, I worship him.”
1380 THE WANDERER’S RETURN.

*¢ Then, why do you not live for his glory,
my dear Walter? Why not publicly avow
your love and reverence? Or is it, as I fear,
only the religion of sentiment which you are
now professing ? Are you sincerely serving
the Lord, choosing him for your portion, and
consecrating yourself to his service ? Is it not
reasonable that you should be a Christian ? ”

‘J am a Christian, my fair preacher ; I am
not a pagan.”

‘¢ Nominally, you are a Christian. You
were born in a land favored by the institutions
of the true religion. But are you not more
culpable than the heathen? You do not re-
ceive the truth which has been revealed to you.
If you believe that the Christian religion is so
beneficial in its effects, why not accept its
blessings for yourself? Why not become a
follower of Jesus, receiving him for your
Saviour, and giving your influence to his
cause? If you believe with the intellect, why
not also believe with the heart ?”

“If I become a Christian, Eva, will you be
my wife ?”
THE WANDERER’S RETURN. 131

“‘T cannot answer that question, Walter.
That my regard for you is great I acknowl-
edge. That it should ever be of that nature
which would authorize me to enter into so
sacred an engagement is impossible, with your
present character. But I can say nothing
which would induce you to act from an inferior
motive. Become a Christian, my friend, that
you may serve and honor God, that you may
contribute to his glory, that you may act your
part in life, that you may assume the duties of
a responsible being gifted by his Creator with
powers which would qualify him for an en-
trance to the path which an immortal being
should wish to pursue. But, come, let us
return ; your guests are doubtless surprised at
your long absence.”

“Yes, it is time that I should rejoin my
visitors ; but we shall have a few moments for
conversation on the way. Eva, I may, at
some time, be able to adopt your views ; but,
whether or not such be the case, I hope you
will not long consider the state of my mind as
132 THE WANDERER’S RETURN.

any barrier to our union. As to regarding
myself as a ‘dismissed,’ or even a ‘ suspended ’
lover, I shall not do it. Long before
‘the twelve celestial signe

Have brought about their annual reckoning,’
I shall return to my wooing. But, my dear
Eva, look not so sadly ; I solemnly promise
that I will devote much time to serious con-

templation upon these topics.”’
PATCHWORK,

OR CONVERSATION WITH AUNT MABEL.



“ While in thy early years,

How prodigal of time!
Misspending all thy precious hours,
Thy glorious youthful prime.”

Burns.

CovuLp you, my young friends, have peeped
into Aunt Mabel’s parlour, one fine afternoon
last winter, you would have been gratified by
a very attractive view. The apartment itself
was characterized by great neatness, and even
elegance, but you would have seen nothing
superfluous in the decorations. The ultra
utilitarian might have condemned the lady for
the lavish display of plants and evergreen which
adorned the room; but what lover of natural

12
134 PATCHWORK.

beauty would say that the time expended in
cherishing some of the most lovely creations
of our Heavenly Father was wasted? The
rose, Aunt Mabel’s favorite, received a large
share of her attention. Some of the finest
varieties freely blossomed under the genial in-
fluence of her care ; and, in several appropriate
nooks and recesses, ‘‘the ground-pine curled
its pretty wreath,” gratifying the beholder with
its grace and freshness. After one glance at
these floral beauties, you would probably have
directed your attention to the group of happy
young people who had been invited to spend a
few hours with Emily, an orphan girl, who had
been adopted and carefully instructed by her
aunt. The guests were rapidly approaching
the age at which young ladies no longer like to
be called children. This may account for the
fact, that during the afternoon they had not, as
on former occasions, spent the time in the en-
joyment of those games which had, from the
days of infancy, occupied many of their leisure
hours. They sat, with work in hand, en-
PATCHWORK. 135

deavouring, doubtless, to deport like very
dignified matrons. But soon the exuberance
of youthful spirits would burst forth, and the
parlour echoed with merry laughter. The
sharp needles ceased to receive quite so much
attention, and the thread was more Jazily
pulled through and through the work.

“ Emily,” said Maria, ‘‘ how can you knit
so diligently on that tiresome stocking? For
my part, I never do any thing of the kind.
All my work is ornamental. Do look at my
Collar ; is it not elegant ? ”

At that moment Aunt Mabel entered. As
this was her first appearance among them for
the afternoon, the visitors arose and eagerly
saluted her. Aunt Mabel was a great friend
of the young, and they were never so happy
as when invited to visit at her abode. Helen
drew forward the easy-chair, and as the heat
of the room was intense, Julia handed her
a fan.

“Thank you, my dear girls ; but as I am
by no means an invalid, I will take a common
136 PATCHWORK.

chair, and as I never use a fan, I must de«
cline the offer of this.”

Then, .seating herself, she looked around
with a benignant smile, and after inquiring
with respect to the health of their friends at
home, and chatting awhile upon the topics
of the day, she turned to Maria, saying, —
‘© As the door was open, my love, I could
not avoid hearing the sentiment to which you
gave utterance immediately before my ingress.
Shall you be offended if I take that as a
text for some remarks, which may be of ser-
vice to yourself and your companions ? ””

“ How could I be offended with any thing
from you, madam???’ replied Maria in an
affectionate tone.

Aunt Mabel smiled, and resumed. ‘ You
said, Maria, that all your work was ornamen-
tal; now, may I ask what kind remains to
be done ?”

‘¢ Why, the useful.”

*¢ Certainly, my dear; and is the idea of
never performing any useful labor a pleas-
ant one ?”
PATCHWORK. 137

Maria blushed, and made no reply.

The lady continued, — “ You are, my young
friends, just commencing life. I should like to
give you a few of my favorite ideas upon the
subject of needle-work, which species of labor,
as you are aware, occupies a very large share
of the time and thoughts of women. Have
you ever reflected upon the great demand that
needle-work makes upon our sex ?”

‘°T have,” answered Agnes, a thoughtful
young girl, who was engaged in some plain
sewing.

“Do you think it a matter for regret or
gratification ? ”?

‘© OF deep regret. Often, when sewing,
I feel very sad that I must spend so much
time with my needle. How much I might
learn from my books, could I be released
from that species of toil ! ”’

‘¢ And I,” exclaimed Laura, tossing her
work-basket into the air, and then amusing
herself by catching the thimble, pin-ball, &c.,
which were descending to the carpet as rap-

12*
188 PATCHWORK.

idly as the law of gravitation would carry
them, ‘‘regard the duty of needle-work as
cause for profound grief. I never can have
any peace, because of some frightful rent in
my dress which must be mended, or some
gaping aperture in a stocking, which imper-
atively demands that I should take up my
working implements in order to look decent.
On my last birthday, which occurred about
six months ago, mamma, with solemn look
and tone, gave the entire charge of my ward-
robe into my own hands, telling me that I
must learn to take care of my clothes as a
young lady should. Since then I have half
envied little Jane and Lucy, whose apparel
yet claims the attention of mamma. I never
prepare to go away, without finding that half a
dozen strings and buttons are to be sewed
on; and fortunate do I consider myself, if
I see that among my dresses I have one
which looks fit to be seen. I do wish that
clothing of all sorts could be bought ready
made, and that the materials were as imper-
ishable as adamant.”
PATCHEVORE. 139

This speech occasioned a general shout
of laughter. Before Aunt Mabel could re-
ply, Agnes said, — ‘I do indeed wish that we
could escape the evil of needle-work. Every
hour that I spend in the employment appears
wasted.”

‘Then, Agnes, you would not, like
Maria, spend your time in embroidering a
collar.”’

‘¢ No, I would rather wear my collars with-
out ornament than spend so many hours in
covering them with embroidery.”

‘¢T think, my dear Agnes, that you and
I will agree very well. We may also suc-
ceed in convincing others of the wisdom of
our views. Let us consider, my young
friends, some of the uses of time. The
Maker of this beautiful world, in which skill
and design are so manifest, did not intend
that we should spend our lives in indolence.
We must all labor in some way.”

‘¢ What!’ cried Laura, ‘‘ must rich people,
who have plenty of money to buy every thing
140 PATCHWORK.

that they want, and numerous domestics to
serve them, work?”

‘¢ They may not be required to perform
all kinds of work ; but you do not consider
the subject in its depth. That wild little head
of yours would not be injured by close
thought upon some topic, while your fingers
were employed in mending the rents of which
you have informed us. Ought any person to
waste time? We are endowed with facul-
ties of body and of mind; should they be
misused, or allowed to lose their energy for
want of action? We are not placed upon the
earth for no end ; each one has a mission to
fulfil. If God gives wealth, it is the duty
of the recipient to employ both that and his
time for some good purpose. The rich lady
has the full command of many hours. Now,
look abroad, and see how many people need
counsel, assistance, or instruction. Has she
a right to live in idleness, when, by a little
exertion, she might alleviate their distress ?
But let us leave the wealthy, and consider
PATCHWORK. 141

the duties of those who are obliged to spend
a portion of their time, at least, in manual
labor. I presume, my young friends, that
you expect to spend a part of almost every
day in actual work. Else why do I see you
thus busily engaged ? But perhaps circum-
stances are different with Maria, since she has
declared that all her work is to be ornamental.
She is certainly not obliged to decorate her
clothes. It may be that she is able to hire
a seamstress for her plain sewing.”

Maria colored, and said, —‘‘ O, no, mad-
am ! my mother does that.’’

*¢ You have, doubtless, learned to do plain
needle-work ?””

“© O, yes! but I am not fond of sewing and
hemming, stitching and gathering; and I
think that mamma is very kind to do such
work for me.”

*¢ You would not like, then, to make and
mend your own clothes ? ”

s©T shudder at the very thought ! the task
would be Herculean ! ”
142 PATCHWORK.

‘¢ Now, my dear, your mother has a double
task to perform, if she sews for herself and
also for you.”

‘‘ Yes, madam, and she also sews for the
baby and for papa.”

‘¢ She then has a large share of woman’s
work to do. I am sorry to say it, Maria,
but I am afraid that you are rather selfish.”

‘¢ T entreat you not to bestow so harsh an
epithet upon me, for I believe that I was only
thoughtless. I remember now that mamma
has often declined an invitation, or neglected
to read a new book, for want of time. In
future, I will take the entire charge of my
wardrobe.”

*¢ So will I!” “ So will I!” “ So will we
all!” chimed in some half-dozen voices.

Aunt Mabel looked around with a gratified
smile. ‘*T certainly think that you ought so
to do, my dear girls. Every young lady
should know how to make and repair her own
clothing. After a little practice, this will not
require a great deal of time. One hour a day
PATCHWORK. 1438

would probably suffice to make all your new
garments, and to keep the old ones in order.”

‘© Not if I wear embroidered collars,’’ said
Maria, with a sigh.

“©T wish to say a few words upon that
subject. Let me look at your collar. I see
that the work is very beautiful and elaborate.
The collar is half done. How much time
have you spent upon this embroidery ? ”

*¢ T cannot tell. I have devoted to it much
of my leisure during the last six months.
People say that it will equal those imported
from France.”

*¢T cannot help thinking, Maria, that a
plain collar, with a simple trimming, which you
could purchase, would be quite as elegant.
It would, too, have the charm of simplicity,
which, in the costume of a young person,
is always becoming. Think of the great ex-
penditure of time and eyesight that such
work as this demands. Whenever I see the
wrought muslin for ladies, or the embroidered
slippers for gentlemen, which are now so fash-
144 PATCHWORK.

ionable, or the chair-coverings made of little
bits of silk and velvet fantastically arranged,
I am reminded of a certain observation of
the celebrated essayist, John Foster. On
seeing some worsted work, in which red was
the predominant color, he remarked that it
was ‘red with the blood of murdered time.’
Think, Maria, how much you could have
accomplished, in any branch of learning or of
useful industry, during the time that you have
lavished upon this collar. I think, while we
have talents to cultivate, while so much yet
remains to be done for the instruction of the
ignorant and for the relief of the poor and
distressed, that time spent upon ornamental
needle-work is worse than wasted. If young .
ladies would study more and embroider less,
how many mental resources might they have
to cheer themselves and their friends through
life! A few days since, I called at the res-
idence of an opulent and fashionable lady. I
was ushered into the parlour, where sat the
mother and her three daughters, all plying
PATCHWORK. 145

their needles as if they were toiling for a
maintenance. I could not refrain from glanc-
ing at the numerous decorations of the apart-
ment. The sofa had a new covering of silk
and velvet patchwork. Fringes and tassels
gracefully depended from the borders. The
chairs were adorned to correspond. Tabou-
rets, covered with worsted work, which might
have excited the indignation of the renowned
Foster, were disposed in conspicuous posi-
tions. Several variegated lamp-stands were
arranged upon the centre-table and piano.
The curtains were wrought in imitation of
foliage and flowers. The mother, observing
that my attention was attracted by this dis-
play of feminine industry, said, —‘I per-
ceive that you are lost in wonder at so many
proofs of my daughters’ skill and assiduity.
All these articles were prepared by them ;
and, if you will accompany us to our sleep-
ing apartments, we will show you some beau-
tiful quilts.’ I accepted the invitation. The
quilts were composed of small bits of calico
13°
146 PATCHWORK.

sewed together in various forms. I could not
resist my desire of saying, that, while the
shops of our tradesmen contained so many
whole pieces of cloth, I thought it a great
waste of time to join a multitude of fragments
to fabricate a bed-covering. Directing my
attention to one of the most elaborate, in
which at least thirty different hues and shades
were mingled, I remarked that a plain white
quilt, or even one of party-colored calico,
would be far more to my taste. The ladies
gazed at me with astonishment. ‘The mother,
with an air of disappointment, said, — ‘I see
that you are not fond of such things.’ I im-
parted some of my views upon the subject.
‘ Why,’ exclaimed the mother, ‘I think that
these occupations are very useful! Besides
furnishing so many pretty articles, they serve
to keep girls employed.? ‘Ah!? said I,
‘can girls complain of want of employment,
while the world comprises so many treas-
ures of knowledge, the mere acquisition of
which is pleasure, and the result usefulness, —
PaTcHWORK. 147

while so many of our brethren and sisters
yet suffer in sin and ignorance? Think how
very numerous are the habitants of this fair
earth, who are yet to be reclaimed from
' vice and misery! If your daughters are not
obliged to labor for a support, might they not
well and profitably employ themselves in stor+
ing their minds with knowledge, and in en-
deavouring to communicate it to others ?
Ought those only to teach who need the com-
pensation awarded to the instructor?’ The
young ladies and their mother looked as if
the idea, that the children of opulence should
labor for the good of others, were novel to
them. I remained some time, and was not
surprised to find that their minds were by
no means so well furnished as the rooms of
their domicile. The indefatigable young seam-
stresses did not even know that the bits of
calico in one of their quilts were hexagonal
in form. I left them more than ever con-
vinced that they, like many others whom I
had seen, were wasting, not only many golden
148 PATCHWORK.

hours, but also the powers of their minds,
for the sake of these time-consuming occu-
pations. Even plain needle-work is a great
demand upon the little leisure which the ma-
jority of women in our country possess. But
this has an imperative claim. What do you
think, my dear girls ? You have all resolved,
I hope, to take the entire charge of your
own clothes. How may this be done with
the least expenditure of time? I may give
you a few useful hints, but you must your-
selves bestow a little thought upon the sub-
ject.”

*¢ Would you have us make our bonnets,
and cut our dresses?’ asked Laura; ‘“* I am
afraid that mine would not look very well.”

‘¢ Not unless some standard costume were
adopted by society. Should such an event
occur, then adieu to all care and thought con-
cerning varying fashions! But if we con-
tinue to change our style of dress, I think it
advisable to support the trades of the milliner
and the mantuamaker. It is better to have
PATCHWORK. 149

persons, who by occupation obtain and modify
the fashions to suit their customers, than for
each individual to waste time in ascertaining
how she must cut her dress, or form her
bonnet. While upon this topic, I would
make one suggestion. If, after you have
worn a new gown awhile, the fashion should
change, do not alter the garment. It will
not become very obsolete, if you wear it till
no longer fit for a dress. I hope you will
never yield to the folly of cutting over and
making anew a garment which is already in
good condition.”

“‘Do you advise us to make our dresses,
after they are fitted ?”

“Certainly. Do all your plain needle-
work. Let the materials of your clothes be
durable, and you will not so soon be com-
pelled to repair them, or to make new ones.
Time may also be saved by performing the
work thoroughly and well.’

‘©I do not think,’”? observed Julia, ‘that

13*
180 PATCHWORK.
Â¥ could do all my sewing by spending only
one hour a day.”

‘If you hemstitch your handkerchiefs, I
do not think you could, my dear,” replied
Aunt Mabel, glancing at Julia’s work.

‘« What ! do you recommend that I should
five up so trifling an ofnament as a hem-
stitch ?”

‘© Abandon every thing of the kind, my
young friend. You could probably hem
twenty handkerchiefs in the time that you
would spend in hemstitching one.”

‘¢ Well, madam,” said Maria, after a pause,
“I think you are right. I will never do any
more worsted work, nor embroider another
collar ; but would not you finish this? If I
leave it half done, all the time that I have
spent upon it will have been wasted.”

“¢ That time is already wasted, and I would
“not again squander an equal amount. If you
think that my views are correct, you will be
satisfied with a plain collar. A simple style
of dress is really far more becoming and at-
PAT CRWORE. 184

tractive. With respeet, also, to your hair, #
it curls naturally, let it still continue so to do,
The ringlets are an ornament given by Nature,
But do not spend time to roll your hair ia
papers. If it is actually without curl or wave,
errange it neatly, and be content.”

The young girls sat a few moments ia
thoughtful silence. Then Laura, her face
beaming with smiles and dimples, glancing at
Emily, said to Aunt Mabel, — ‘ Do n’t you
think, madam, that it is a great waste of time
for people to knit stockings? Think how
cheap they are ! ”?

Aunt Mabel smiled. ‘* When I spoke of
the little time which your wardrobe would
require, I did not include the manufacture
of those articles. To knit cotton stockings
would be absurd. Purchase these, by all
means. As for woollen stockings, the opine
ions of very good economists differ. Those
which are knit by the women of the family
are certainly more durable than those bought
at the stores. But I advise no one to sit
152 PATCHWORK.

down and spend hour after hour in mere
, knitting. I would always have a stocking
begun, because moments occur in every wo-
man’s life when she cannot well attend to
other pursuits — when, for instance, you have
guests, or are visiting your friends. You are
then called upon to exercise your social ca-
pabilities, to excite your conversational pow-
ers. At the same time, your fingers can be
occupied with knitting. Do not sew at such
a time, for although your work may not re-
quire much attention, it will demand your
eyes, which should generally be directed
toward the person with whom you are con-
versing. But knitting-work is so mechanical,
that, while engaged in its performance, you
might not only talk, but even ‘carry on a
duel in the form of a debate.’ You can also
, knit while you are reading. When you have
once formed this habit, you will be able to
advance with rapidity in your work, while
your mind is absorbed with the gems of
thought and fancy, which, in this reading age,
PATCHWORK. 153

are so profusely scattered. The art of sew-
ing and reading simultaneously may be gained,
but it is not worth the labor of acquisition.
Needle-work does demand care and attention.
Besides, if you confine your toil in this de-
‘partment to plain sewing, you are not com-
pelled to let your mind remain inactive.
While sewing, you can form your plans for
the future, mentally review the lessons you
have learned, the books you have read, the
conversations which deserve to be made the
subjects of thought. If you belong to a large
family, one member can read, while others
sew, and thus much of the tedium of needle-
work, that most irksome and monotonous of
all employments, may be relieved.”

The knitting-needles of Aunt Mabel and
her niece Emily had been flying with won-
derful celerity during this conversation ; but
the work of the others, needing more atten-
tion than could well be given during an an-
imated colloquy, had not much advanced.
184 PATCHWORK.

The young girls looked at each other with
hopeful, earnest countenances. Soon, Maria,
after ‘‘ one long, lingering look” at her em-
broidery, threw it into the fire. Her com-
panions started. Emily laughed joyously.
Aunt Mabel smiled. Julia involuntarily ex-
claimed, — ‘‘ What a waste !”

“No,” replied Maria, with energy, ‘it is
not a waste! Henceforth, my time shall be
more wisely employed. I will do all my plain
needle-work, and spend my leisure in study
and reading, and in exertions for the good of
others.”

Julia’s eyes were upon her hemstitched
handkerchief. ‘‘ Must I throw it into the
fire ?”’ she asked, with a smile.

‘© would not throw that into the fire, my
love. The case differs from Maria’s. Cut
off the useless work. You will then have a
large piece of cambric remaining. Edge it
with a plain hem, and your task will soon be
finished.”
PATCHWORK. 155

*¢ Aunt Mabel,”’ asked Helen, ‘‘ would you
have our parlours absolutely without orna-
ment ?”

‘¢ T would have them without the ornaments
which demand so large an outlay of woman’s
time. Do not make patchwork chair-cover-
ings, nor work in worsted. In summer, let
beautiful flowers, specimens of the decorations
with which God has adorned our earthly home,
be culled and placed in your rooms, that they
may delight the observer with their fragrance
and loveliness. In winter, let your window-
seats be filled with choice plants, that, while the
ground is covered with snow, the eye may still
be regaled with the ‘living green’ which the
Author of all beauty has liberally furnished, to
contribute to the development of some of the
finest feelings of our nature.’

The remainder of the day was spent in
farther conversation with dear Aunt Mabel,
whom all now loved and revered more than
ever for the good counsel she had given them.
When the time for their departure arrived,
156 PATCHWORK.

they repaired to their homes, their youthful
countenances radiant with hope and expecta-
tion, resolving to waste no more time with their
needles, but to employ it for higher and nobler
purposes.
REMINISCENCES OF SCHOOL LIFE.

THE SCHOOL AND THE SCHOOL-HOUSE.

“ How fair upon the admiring sight,
In Learning's sacred fane,
With cheek of bloom, and robe of white,
Glide on yon graceful train.”
Mrs. Sieournszr.

I must begin my narrative by a description
of our school-house ; for although, in days of
yore, philosophers taught in the groves, the
instructors of these degenerate times prefer a
good, substantial building. I have called the
structure a school-house. I humbly beg its
pardon. ‘The academy, I should have said ;
for such was the appellation by which it was
usually dignified. Next to the old church, the
academy was the most conspicuous object in
the romantic little village of C. It stood ona

14
158 THE SCHOOL AND

slight eminence, the ascent of which was along
gravelled walks, edged with rows of flourishing
box, that served to border the beds of Juxuriant
perennials, which some of the young ladies de-
lighted to cultivate. During the warm weather,
nothing could be more refreshing than a prom-
enade upon the piazza of the academy. The
cool breezes fanned our weary brows, the odor
of the fair flowers was gently wafted toward us,
the lofty elms and the graceful willows, with
which our academy was literally embowered,
fluttered their green robes above our heads,
and many a time would we gladly have linger-
ed on that sweet spot long after the tea-bells
of the village had summoned us to our evening
repast. But how changed was the scene in
winter! How-+keenly blew the wind, as we
climbed that hill of science! How cheerless
Jooked the driven snow, as it lay upon our
eherished flower-beds ! We hastened up the
broad steps, rushed through the long entries,
threw off our walking habiliments, and, entering
the warm school-room with as much alacrity
THE sCHOOL-HOUSE. 189

ts decorum would permit, eagerly clustered
around the fire. The student’s life in winter
was always a hard one to me. Unfortunately,
I was peculiarly susceptible to cold, and was
compelled to spend a great part of my time in
efforts to preserve the due temperature of the
system. Virgil and Legendre were far from
being pleasant companions in the winter.
Those were the months, I thought, to sit near
the fire, with works of fiction, history, and
poetry, which could be enjoyed without the
trouble of turning over the leaves of a lexicon,
or of drawing diagrams to prove one absurdity
after another. My superiors, however, differed
from me in opinion.

To return to our academy. It was a large,
stone-colored building, of that. hue so grateful
to the eye amid the constant glittering of the
clear white which everywhere dazzles the eye
in New England. A cupola, containing a bell,
graced the roof. This bell was rung at five in
the morning, throughout the year, and many
were the sighs it called forth from: the indoleat
160 THE SCHOOL AND

of the school, who longed for ‘a little more
sleep, a little more slumber.’’ That remorse-
less bell did not soon cease its din ; and after
a few moments of irresolution and dread, all
arose, for the duties of the day were not
tardy in asserting their claims. In pleasant
weather, we frequently stationed ourselves
upon the roof, to obtain a view of the village
and the towns adjacent. It was also a most
eligible position for our astronomical observa-
tions. Corona Borealis, the Pleiades, Cas-
tor and Pollux, Cygnus, Orion, &c., have
many a time been greeted with joy from the
roof of that much-loved edifice.

The interior of the building contained a
Jarge school-room, the walls of which were
adorned with blackboards, the best maps that
could be procured, and some well-executed
drawings. These last were the performances
of the pupils. Desks and chairs were neatly
arranged. But the station of the preceptress
was the chief object of attraction. Her table
was very large, and upon it were deposited
THE SCHOOL-HOUSE. 161

many articles, which, for a part of the time,
at least, might as well have been in their re-
spective places. The globes, terrestrial and
celestial, occupied one side. Various port-
tions of the chemical and philosophical appa-
‘ratus were honored with a favorable position
upon the other. In the centre were numer-
ous heavy volumes ; and had our sessions been
held in the evening, I actually believe that the
huge telescope would have been mounted
upon the same table. At the left hand of the
preceptress was the door for egress and in-
gress from the room, and beyond that the
station of the assistant teachers. The ob-
jects upon their table were not quite so cum-
brous. Books were there in profusion, and
whenever they could be obtained, either from
cultivated garden or tangled underwood, odo-
riferous flowers, arranged with much taste and
elegance, might be seen. At the right hand
of the preceptress was the door of the phil-
osophical room, and beyond that the piano,
which, during the intervals of study, might
14*
162 THE SCHOOL AND THE sCHOOL-HOUSE.

be heard from five in the morning till ten at
night. On the opposite side of the room
was a large and well-seleeted library, and if
it did not receive so much attention as its
merits demanded, the fact must be attributed
to the pressure of out studies, which ellowed
us but little time for miscellaneous reading.

Now, reader mine, I think you have a good
idea of our school-room, the happiest of
places to more than one eager student. In
addition to this hall, the building contained
several rooms for recitation.. The pupils were
thirty girls, whose ages varied from twelve to
eighteen, and better opportunities for educas
tion, or a more favorable combination of cir=
cumstances for the realization of youthful hap-
piness, I venture to say, were found at no
other seminary in the land.
MRS. MONTROSE, OUR PRECEPTRESS.

“Some minds are tempered happily, end mixed
With such ingredients of good sense and taste
Of what is excellent in man, they thirst
With such a zeal to be what they approve,
‘That no restraints can circumscribe them more
Than they themselves by choice, for wisdom's sake.”
Cowrrs.

Mrs. Montrose had one of those rare
characters which it is very difficult to describe,
for the obvious reason that they form, as it
were, models, exhibiting neither redundance
nor deficiency, to call forth the graphic pow-
ers of the delineator. . All is harmony and
proportion. Every pupil in our academy re-
garded the preceptress as a mother, and re-
posed in her the utmost confidence. Nothing
like an opposition party was ever seen. We
all loved our teacher, and were ready to.

codperate with her in every plan and purpose.
Akhough we knew that she was one of the
164 . MRE. MONTROSE,

most learned women in the land, and that her
wonderful talents were regarded with pro-
found respect, such was the warmth and ten-
derness of her heart, that we all looked upon
her as one of our dearest friends. She ap-
peared to have in her mind a perfect standard,
and ever to be striving to approach her ideal
of perfection. She sought the esthetic and
the appropriate in every thing, — character,
attainments, deportment, and conversation.

Tn literary acquirements, I will say that
the same symmetry was not exhibited; for
although well versed in many departments, she
sometimes appeared to have too exalted an
opinion of the value of the natural sciences.
In botany she was an enthusiast, and seemed
able to speak of every plant that grew. She
could readily tell us their names, both in our
vernacular and in the polysyllabic tongue of
the botanist. Very early in the spring, she
might be seen brushing away the snow be-
neath the old oak-trees, in search of the
‘6 wind-flower and the violet,” those delicate
OUR PRECEPTRESS. ' 166

blossoms which may be numbered among the
fairest of Flora’s early offerings. As long as-
the flowers lasted, from April to November,
her abode would be decked: with the beautiful
ornaments provided by Nature. In the fall, .
her mantels and tables would be graced with
the most gorgeous leaves I ever saw. We
in vain tried to rival Mrs. Montrose in our
autumnal collections. So great was her love
for flowers, that I long wondered why she did
not have them upon her table in the school-
room. She frankly told me, one day, that,
despite her habits of self-control, she found
it almost impossible to confine her attention to
this subject within its due limits, and that
therefore, except during the recitations in
botany, she resolutely banished every thing of _
the kind to the table of the assistant teachers,
whose regard for flowers, though warm, was
not passionate like her own.

Trees were great favorites of our precep-
tress. She was familiar, not only with their
names and properties, but also with their ex-
166 MRS, MONTROSE:

pressions. The pine was, to her, the. persou-.
ification of endurance ; the oak, of power.and
dignity. Many a lecture, replete with beauty
of sentiment and richness of illustration, did
we receive upon these pleasing topics.
MISS BARNARD, OUR TEACHER iN
. MATHEMATICS.

‘Our hearts ne’er bow but to superior worth,
Nor ever fail of our allegiance there.”
Youne.

Miss Barnarp possessed a countenance
which was never forgotten by those who had
once gazed upon its singular style of beauty.
The expression was unearthly. Her com-
plexion was of a brilliant olive, such as may be
found in sunny Italy. Her eyes were very
large, and every glance was full of meaning.
She taught us the exact sciences, and’ her fame
as a profound mathamatician and a highly
competent teacher was spread far and wide.
She was apparently exhausting her strength in
the intensity of her love for these studies.
Her teaching was principally oral. Very few
text-books were used by her pupils. Standing
168 ' MIS6 BARNARD.

at the blackboard, she would explain with the
utmost rapidity problems the most abstruse,
and propositions the most difficult of compre-
hension. While expatiating upon her favorite
topics, scintillations of light would flesh from
her eyes, and a deep, rich glow, too beautiful
for health, would illumine her countenance.
The physician, whom she occasionally con-
sulted, entreated that she would do less, that
she would spare herself, that she would pro-
ceed with retarded, instead of with accelerated
velocity. Again and again did he assure her
that intensive life could never be extensive.
He told her, in the most solemn manner, that
she was throwing her life away ; but she heed-
ed him not. She pursued her own path, teach-
ing earnestly and faithfully, and far too eagerly.
With few exceptions, those who did not love
mathematics when they entered the institution
left it with new views. Some of them became
distinguished for their attainments in the exact
sciences.

Miss Barnard’s phrenological develdpments
MISS BARNARD. ‘F69

gave to her head rather a singular appearance.
Causality, of course, was largely developed,
imparting to her brow a strange and startling
aspect. Benevolence and firmness towered
very high, but reverence appeared to be wholly
wanting. The unusual predominance of the
organs denoting benevolence and firmness, and
the total deficiency of the organ located be-
tween those two, marred the beauty of the
head. A deep hollow, such as I never before
saw on human head, was visible. A tea-
spoonful of water might have been deposited in
this cavity .as in a basin, and not a drop over-
flow the margin. Her character was such as
might have been expected from this singular
conformation of brain. In opinion, she was
uncommonly bold, receiving nothing without
deliberation, but investigating truth for herself
with adventurous mind. -I wish you could
have seen her in the lecture-room. There,
she always looked as if ready to contradict the
speaker, and to vindicate opinions the reverse —
of those which he was endeavouring to incul-
15 ,
170 “W188 BARNARD.

cate. She was the firm and unflinching cham-
pion of the oppressed. A better lecturer on
slavery I never heard. During the first few
weeks of our acquaintance, I+ frequently de-
fended the iniquitous system, that I might have
the pleasure of listening to her arguments.
How often did I wish that she would speak in
public, knowing that her manner would have
an electric effect upon any audience! Now
and then, her histrionic style of teaching pre-
vented some of her pupils from receiving all
the benefit usually derived from her instruc-
tions. One day, the fair young Ella came to
me, and said, — ‘‘ For a long time after enter-
ing the school, I could not understand my
lessons in mathematics.”

‘6 What!” exclaimed I, * not understand
lessons taught by Miss Barnard ! ””

*¢ Even so; and I will tell you the reason.
Her eyes fascinated me. My attention was so
attracted by the flashes of light which proceed-
ed fram those beaming orbs, that all thought
concerning the lesson vanished ; and when at
MISS BARNARD. 171

last aroused to consciousness by some question
upon the subject under discussion, I knew
nothing of what she had been saying with so
much earnestness.”
MISS 1RVINE, OUR TEACHER IN ELOCU-
TION AND COMPOSITION.

“ She was adorned
With what all earth or heaven could bestow
To make her amiable.” - Mirror.

An air of gentle repose characterized the
manners of Miss Irvine. After one of the
intensive conversations which I was accustom-
ed to hold with Miss Barnard, an interview
with her colleague was extremely refreshing.
I always preferred the society of the former ;
but after the mind has been wrought up to a
high state of mental excitement, a colloquy with
a person of a calm temperament is welcomed
as a relief,

The character of our gentle teacher was
very lovely. None ever saw her inclining to
anger. She would indeed appear very much
grieved by the wilfulness or misconduct of a
pupil. Said Ellen to me, one day, —‘* We
MISS IRVINE. - 173

must learn all Mrs. Montrose’s lessons, — it

would not do. to fail in any of hers ; and I
don’t know what would happen if we should
not recite well to Miss Barnard ; and we can-
not give Miss Irvine a poor recitation, because,
—because she would look so sorry.” If a
pupil seemed heedless, a shade of sadness
would steal over her meek countenance, and
that would be the only reproof. She labored
so assiduously to gain the good-will of all, that
she frequently smiled more than the occasion
demanded.

15*
CELIA.

“"T was she who sang me many a rhyme,
And told me mzny a tale,
And many a legend of old time,
That made my spirit quail.”
Browrz.

_ Tus dear friend of mine could not be called
beautiful, but she always appeared so to me.
Imagine a young lady, in height far below the
medium, with a pretty, rounded figure, giving
you the exact idea of a little Hebe. Never did
I behold arms and bust so fitted for the model
of a sculptor. She was well aware of their
beauty, and, whenever the weather permitted,
came to school with short sleeves and a low-
necked dress. When I first saw her, she had
recently recovered from a. dangerous fever.
Her hair, which had been removed by order of
her physician, had again begun to grow, and
now clustered in small, shining curls upon her
CELSA. 178

temples. Her eyes were too pale; she used:
to say that they were pretty when she was a
child, but that she had long ago cried all the.
blue out of them. I am inclined to doubt the
crying part of the story, for a more sunny-
tempered being I never saw. Her features
were quite plain, but the beauty of the expres-.
sion, and the fire of intelligence which revealed
itself, amply compensated for the defect. Her
manners were irresistibly winning, and no one
could withstand their sweet influence. Site
was an excellent scholar, the poetess of the
academy, the relater of innumerable marvel-
lous stories and legends, and a greater pro-
ficient in general literature than the majority of.
school-girls. In looking over the books I then
studied, I find numerous iambics and anapests
— the metres in which she usually wrote—
scribbled upon the blank leaves, and even in
the margins. She had embellished her own
books in this style, and then, borrowing mine,
had conferred upon them the like favor. Dear
Celia, never could I be induced to part with.
176 OELIA.

those identical books, containing as they do so
many sweet remembrancers of our happy
youthful days !

With all her good qualities, Celia was the
most lawless of our group. She regarded
rules and regulations with supreme contempt,
and many q sigh was elicited from our worthy
preceptress, who did sometimes almost -admit
that she might as well attempt to control the
whirlwind as Celia. When our talented ‘but
utgovernable friend was anticipating the con-
sequences of a misdemeanour, one might per-
ceive that she was in a state of half-fearful, half-
pleasurable suspense. Celia had a very com-
placent idea of her own good qualities, and also
revelled in the surmise that the few faults of
her character served to render her more inter-
esting. Esther and Celia were two of the
most original characters in the school. Upon
their first interview, they became enamoured of
each other’s eccentricities ; and from that day
to this, with the exception of two or three seri-
ous quarrels, they have continued warm friends.
FANNY.

“ Bright-eyed,
With wealth of raven tresses, a light form,
And a gay heart.”

“The wide old woods resounded with her song
And fairy laughter, all the summer day.”
Bryast.

Fanny was as merry a little maiden as one
might wish to see, with the richest of dark hair,.
the brightest of blue eyes, and the most roguish
of dimples dancing about her mouth. She was
the most perverse and self-willed of all Mrs.
Montrose’s pupils. But she was very warm-
hearted, and one of the most active and reck-
less of coadjutors in our numerous schemes for
amusement. In conversation, she was by no
means polished, but was remarkably loqua-
cious, and could always obtain a ready listener.
Her style was amusing in the extreme; it
abounded in the most singular of comparisons.
178 FANMY.

I have been trying to recollect some of them,
but have not succeeded. The other day, in
glancing my eye over the pages of a certain
work, I noticed one which immediately brought
the image of Fanny, fresh and glowing, before
me. Had the book been written by a lady, I
should have suspected that ‘‘ cacethes scri-
bendi’’ had actually seized poor Jittle Fanny
as a victim. I will give you the example to
which I refer. ‘‘ The guests were seated on
wooden benches around the room, still and
fixed as a row of pins in paper.”” This would
have been considered a fair specimen of the
ludicrous comparisons which were freely. inter-
spersed through the speeches of Fanny. She
had not the least ambition concerning scholar-
ship, and I do not remember more than one
department in which she excelled. She read
with great taste and beauty. It was a pleasure
to listen to her performances. In figure, she
was wonderfully slender. Two or three of the
gitls once attempted to designate. their school-
mates by sundry geometrical appellations. The.
PANNE. . 10

‘peint, the cylinder, and the triangular @risns
were not wanting. Fanmy was honored with
the cognomen of line, and exceedingly appro-
priate it was.

I doubt whether Fanny ever gave an hour at
@ time to serious mental effort. During the
course of her preparatory education, she had
not been taught to apply herself closely to
study, and our unfortunate preceptress found
that she had a hard subject in her wayward
pupil. The assistant teachers regarded her
with fond affection. Miss Irvine would ex-
claim, — ‘“‘ Why is it that Fanny does not
learn more? She is certainly very bright ;
she understands every thing except her lessons.
It must be owing to want of application.”
Fanny never shone in recitation. I have seen
her standing at the blackboard, gazing with
quivering lip at operations which she was vainly
striving to comprehend. In exercises of another
kind, where a long answer was expected, —an
oral abstract of some paragraph, — she would
frequently utter the childish expression, — “I
180 FANNY.

know? but I can’t say.” ‘‘ Have you studied '
the lesson, my dear?’ would Mrs. Montrose
ask with all gentleness. ‘‘ Yes, madam, but I
cannot recite it.’? She always had some play-
ful excuse for not attending to a new study.
When the teachers were forming a class for
the study of botany, she refused to enroll her-
self among its members, saying, —‘*I don’t
wish to study botany, for I cannot bear to see
the beautiful flowers pulled to pieces.” But
Fanny was a dear little girl, and we all loved
her, despite her poor scholarship.
LORA.

© The soul on earth is an immortal guest,
Compelled to starve at an unreal feast ;
A spark that upward tends by nature’s force ;
A stream diverted from its parent source ;
A drop dissevered from the boundless sea ;
A moment parted from eternity !”
H. K. Warrx.

Yes, I will give a brief sketch of Lora ;
for although hers is a sad story, the relation
may be beneficial to some of my young read-
ers. Her father, having early discovered that
she was the possessor of great talent, resolved
that her mind should receive a high degree of
cultivation. She was an only child, and, till
thé age of fourteen, had remained at home
with her parents, under the tuition of private
teachers of eminence. On the death of. her
mother, her father, thinking that he was not
fitted to have the sole charge of his daughter,

16
182 LORA.

decided to place her in our seminary. J well
remember the day of their arrival. How im-
posing was the appearance of the father and
daughter, as they walked arm in arm toward
our residence! A few of the pupils boarded
with the preceptress. I was one of that happy
number ; and fortunate did I consider myself
that I chanced to be standing at my window,
on the approach of the new-comers. The
father was of a commanding figure, tall and
majestic, with an air that might have subdued
thousands ; but what a contrast did the daugh-
ter present, with her delicate complexion, ebon
hair, and look of touching helplessness, as she
confidingly clung to his arm! With the ut-
most eagerness, I ran to open the door my-
self. Having admitted the strangers, and sent
for Mrs. Montrose, I sat down in the parlour,
eengratulating myself on my felicity. Not pre-
suming to speak to the father, except when
addressed by him, I endeavoured to induce the
young lady to enter into conversation. ‘The
effort was useless ; she tried to smile, and to
Lena. 4168
return my civilities, but failed in the attempt.
The tears gquivered on her long, dark eye-
lashes, and, to conceal her emotion, she took
a book from the centre-table and essayed to
read. She was arrayed in deep mourning, and
the sable hue of her garments, added ‘to the
dazzling whiteness of her complexion, and the
pensive beauty of her large, dark eyes, had a
wonderful effect upon me; for, awkward and
homely as I was myself, I was always power-
fully attracted by the graceful and the beauti-
ful. The father glanced at his daughter with
a troubled look, and was evidently relieved by
the entrance of the preceptress. The haughty
old Roman, as I used to call him, advanced
to meet her with as much cordiality as he
could assume, and, having introduced his
daughter, requested some private conversation
with her future teacher. ‘‘ H———,” said the
lady to me, ‘‘ Lora may share your apartment.
Take her with you, and give her what assist-



ance she may require.”” My heart leaped as I
received this joyful intelligence. My room-
184 LORA.

mate had recently left school, and I had been
enjoying the pleasures of solitudes and fearing
that my next associate might not be so agreea-
ble as the dear girl who, for two years, had
been my daily and nightly companion. _First
impressions were all-powerful with me, and
I had an instinctive perception that I should
love the fair Lora. Already were numerous
schemes revolving in my mind, for I resolutely
determined that she should soon cease to be so
very wretched. I did, however, have a strong
desire to listen to the conversation between my
preceptress and Lora’s father. As this was
unpossible, I immediately took the hand of the
young stranger, and conducted her to my
room.

On entering the apartment, Lora tossed
her parasol onto the floor, and threw her-
self upon the bed, crushing her bonnet in the
act, and began to weep floods of bitter tears.
Half terrified by her violence, I was about to
rush from the room, but paused, and, after
pondering a few moments, approached the sar-
LORA. "186

rowing girl, and said, — ‘‘ You must not be so
miserable, my dear Lora ; after a few days,
you will be unwilling to leave us ; we all think
that our school ® paradise itself.”

‘‘T never shall be happy again,” replied
Lora, in a plaintive tone ; ‘‘ my mother has
gone to the angels, and my father will not al-
low me to stay at home, although he knows
how much I love him.”

After a pause, she resumed, with great
animation : — ‘* What are you studying,
H-——— ? As soon as I have some lessons
to learn, I shall feel better; we are always
happy when we are studying, are we not,
H ? ”

I was delighted, both with finding that my
companion was a studious girl, and that she
had given me a clew, by the aid of which I
might divert her attention from her grief.



‘ be unhappy with books at command. I study
mathematics, which I hate ; chemistry, which
I regard with indifference, having neither affec-

16* .
86 LoBA.

tion nor aversion for particles and their rele-
tions; French, rhetoric, and mental philoso-
phy, which I love with all the fervor of which
my nature is susceptible. I@ave no words to
express my devotion to these three studies.”

Lora made one long leap from the bed to
my chair, threw her arms around my neck,
kissed me passionately, and exclaimed, — “ I
know that we shall love each other ! ”

She then proceeded to unpack her trunk,
which had, within a few minutes, been brought
to the room. After recovering from the sur-
prise occasioned by these demonstrations of
affection toward an entire stranger, I proffered
my assistance, which was readily accepted.
When Lora took out her books, I was filled
with consternation by discovering that her at-
tainments far exceeded my own. She was
skilled in Latin, Greek, and French, and had
advanced far into the German. She was also
studying spherical trigonometry, while I had
mastered only an elementary work on geome-

try.
LoRA. 167

*¢ Why, Lora,” said I, thinking that J
might as well own the truth at once, ‘‘T am
a year older than you, but I do not know half
so much.” °

‘¢ Perhaps it is not your fault,” replied my
new friend: ‘‘ Besides, if you have less knowl-
edge now, you may possibly have a great deal
more six years hence than I shall at that time ;
for now and then,”’ she continued, pressing her
clasped hands upon her brow, ‘*I bave so very
strange a feeling here! and then I think that,
after a while, I may not be able to study.”

Lora was now called to take leave of her
father. During the remainder of the day I
had but little intercourse with her, for, except
when absorbed with grief, she was busily en-
gaged with her books. I afterward learned
that her father had given Mrs. Montrose an
account of the system hitherto pursued in the
education of his daughter, and had intimated
that he wished the same course to be contin-
ued. He had resolved that she should pos-
seas vast stores of erudition, and had therefore
188 LORA.

begun by laying a broad foundation. She ea-
gerly seconded him in all his efforts. Her
mind was of a high order, and her bodily con-
stitution remarkably strong. He acknowledged
that he had lately had some fears on account of
her health, for it was almost impossible to per-
suade her to take exercise. He desired that
Mrs. Montrose would be vigilant on that point.

In those days, physiology was a branch of
study not generally pursued, even in our best
schools. The teachers themselves, however
well educated, knew very little of this impor-
tant science. They had, indeed, like other
people, a few general ideas aboug health and
disease ; but they were almost entirely ignorant
of the laws upon which the former depends, or
the causes which tend to the development of
the latter. Mrs. Montrose was delighted with
Lora’s proficiency in so many departments of
knowledge, and immediately ranked her with
the elder and more advanced pupils. She
never lost any opportunity of displaying the ac-
quirements of this youthful prodigy ; in fact,
work. ‘te9

Fanny once asserted that our preceptress
made Lora act as an advertisement of the
wonders which might be effected under the in-
struction of the teachers of C Academy,
for at every examination our talented school-



mate played the most conspicuous part. Mrs.
Montrose did indeed caution Lora against too
great a degree of mental exertion ; but being
unacquainted with the structure of the bram,-
the organ of the mind, she could not enforce
her admonitions by giving the why and the
wherefore, and we all know that young people
of Lora’s age are not accustomed to take ad-
vice without knowing the reason upon which it
is founded. ‘

Although I fervently loved Lora, I was
often dissatisfied. When my friend would
spare the time, no one was more conversable ;
but seldom could I persuade her to lay aside
her books. I was myself an enthusiast in the
pursuit of knowledge ; but having, from my
childhood, been subject to a relentless pain in
the head, I was frequently compelled to aban-
190 LORA.

don all study, and seek the open air, that
I might still the throbbing of my temples,
and refresh my weary frame. Not so Lora.
Endowed with a powerful constitution, she
seldom received any warning of impending
danger. She would occasionally complain
of a strange feeling in her head, and again
that she had not sufficient strength to walk
to school ; but she was usually able to bear
unremitting exertion without experiencing any
serious effects. Many a time did she sit
up till past midnight, then snatch an hour or
two of sleep, and rise Jong before day to ap-
ply herself anew to her arduous labors.

“HH »” said she to me one day, ‘* how
much is to be learned, and how little we have
accomplished! Even if we reach threes¢ore
and ten, we shall not have exhausted half the
treasures of knowledge. Do you not suppose
that we shall study in heaven ? ”

*¢ Certainly, my dear Lora ; I agree with
Sir Walter Scott in thinking that heaven can-
‘pot be an eternal concert. We shall probably


Loma. ei

glorify God in many ways, — by striving to
expand our minds, by laboring in his service,
and by singing his praises.”

. “T hope so; for certain I am that I must
go on acquiring knowledge while I heve any
being.”

At length her abused constitution declared
the injuries it had sustained. One eventful
night, Lora and I were earnestly engaged in
composition. We were writing a dialogue be-
tween an inhabitant of earth and his deceased
friend, whose ghost had returned to visit him.
We were both very much excited by this wild
theme. Lora wrote the part of the ghost, and
I that of the mortal. I think I see her now as
she appeared at that time, with her dark eyes
flashing, her usually pale cheeks glowing with
ardor, and her whole countenance wearing an
expression which seemed almost supernatural.
The clock struck twelve. I could continue my
Jabors no longer ; I was fairly exhausted: I
confessed my weakness, and began to muke
preperations for retiring to rest, leaving Lora
192 , LORA.

half vexed at my want of strength and half
triumphant in the consciousness of her own
bodily vigor. I know not how long she re-
mained immersed in study ; but when I awoke
the next morning, she was nowhere visible. I
was alarmed, and, after a very hasty prepara-
tion, ran to inform Mrs. Montrose of Lora’s
disappearance. Search was immediately made.
I was the one to find my loved companion.
She was strolling by the river’s brink, singing
snatches of various songs, and occasionally en-
deavouring to grasp the aquatic flowers which
were growing in rich profusion quite within her
reach. ‘ My dear Lora,” exclaimed I,
‘¢ what a fright you have given us!” She
dropped her flowers, threw her wet arms
around my neck, and, with a frantic expression,
continued to sing. A terrible suspicion flashed
across my brain. I screamed with terror, and
our friends soon answered the summons. Sad-
ly and tenderly was the dear one led from this
dangerous spot. A messenger was despatched
for a physician, and in a few days, another for
LORA. 1938

her father. Her life was now in imminent
danger.
The fever at length spent its force; the
fearfully anticipated crisis was past. Our
friend became convalescent ; but it was soon
too evident that her brilliant mind was shatter-
ed, at least fora time. With her dark eyes
wildly rolling, she would, for hours, ramble
from one subject to another, without thought
or coherence. This was, to many of us, our
first great grief; we had experienced no other.
The teachers were inexpressibly wretched ;
for, although they had sinned in ignorance in
forcing powers thus prematurely developed,
they felt that they had been, in some way, cul-
pable. The agony of her father was frightful
to behold. He, who had prided himself on
his well-disciplined mind, found it impossible
to restrain his emotion. The day of Lora’s
departure was a very sad era in our calendar.
We would not present ourselves before the
view of the heart-broken father, although we
longed to clasp our unfortunate companion to
17
4 LORA.

our hearts. We stood at our windows, con-
cealed from observation by the closed blinds,
and with tearful eyes saw our loved Lora led
to the carriage, to be conveyed to a distant
asylum, in the faint hope that something might
yet be done for her recovery.
ESTHER.

“But nature neCer framed a woman's heart
Of prouder stuff than that of Beatrice.
Disdain and scorn ride sparkling in her eyes,
Misprising what they look on ; and her wit
Values itself so highly, that to her
All matter else seems weak.”

Saaxsrrane.

For a long time Esther was my room-mate ;:
you may, therefore, expect a faithful account
of this eccentric girl. In personal appearance
she was exceedingly repellent, the very home-
liest of our band. Her hair was of the color
which has been termed “striking.” She
freely admitted that her tresses were really
red. In our mirthful moments, we sometimes
tried to persuade her that they were auburn,
or golden, and once a vivacious girl actually
assured her that they were of that favored hue
denominated ‘‘ brown in the shadow and gold
196 ESTHER.

ia the sun.” Esther would only laugh, and
shake her head. She knew that her merry
companions were not in earnest, and as she
was then not at all sensitive upon the subject,
she bore their raillery with great good-humor.
Her eyes might, by courtesy; have been called
blue ; but they were not pretty. They were
scantily fringed with lashes, corresponding in
color to her hair. Their expression was
wild and rolling, at times almost maniacal.
A nervous twitch was constantly perceptible
about her mouth. Her temperament, indeed,
was nervous, dashed with sanguine. Her
complexion was the sole redeeming point. It
was remarkably transparent, and undisfigured
by freckle or efflorescence of any kind. She
was, however, so excitable, that its effect was
greatly diminished, for the blood would fre-
quently rush in torrents to her head and face,
imparting to the latter a purple hue. Her
countenance was generally illumined by hope,
or flashing with scorn. I verily believe that |
she had not the power of remaining motionless
ESTHER, 197

an instant. One needed the gravity of a Stoic
to be present at her recitations. They were
characterized by wonderful animation and vol-
_ ubility. Her words flowed with great rapid-
ity, and her hands kept time with her tongue.
Mrs. Montrose tried ia vain to cure her of
her nervousness, and finally abandoned the
project in despair ; probably adopting Lilian’s
belief, — ‘‘ that she would turn and twist to
the end of her days.” I wish that she had
been sent when a child to one of those infant-
schools in which the unfortunate pupils are
compelled to sit and stand in image order. Not
that I approve of this method of discipline,
but I think that in her case it would have been
beneficial. In speaking of Esther, Fanny
onte alluded to the variety of her attitudes.
“¢ Attitudes !”? exclaimed Celia, laughing ;
‘I call them twistifications.”” Strange to
say, this singular-looking being, before coming
to our school, thought herself at least pretty.
The illusion was soon dispelled. One day, as
Miss Irvine, Celia, Esther, and myself were
17*
198 ESTHER.

conversing, the lady asked the subject of our
sketch whether she would rather be called
beautiful or intellectual. ‘* Intellectual, of
course,”’ replied Esther, warmly ; ‘‘ why should
you make such inquiry ?”’ ‘* Because I was
in doubt respecting the expediency of repeat-
ing a certain remark which I heard not long
since touching yourself.” ‘‘ Let me hear it, I
entreat,”’ said our heroine, with great eager-
ness, for she was always very desirous of
learning the opinions, good, bad, or indifferent,
which people held concerning her. ‘ Do you
remember the day on which you were exam-
ined preparatory to admission ?”’ ‘* Shall J
ever forget that day which I had dreaded for
weeks ?”’ ‘‘ During the course of that exam-
ination, a learned gentleman of the law whis-
pered to me, — ‘ That young lady’s intellect
amply compensates for her personal appear.
ance.’”” Esther gave a sort of hysteric laugh.
She saw at once that she was considered
homely, but the compliment to her intellect so
delighted her that she could not resent the law-
ESTHER. 199

yer’s opinion of her exterior. From that
time she renounced all claim to beauty. *
Esther excelled in philological learning.
Language, rhetoric, and criticism were her
favorite studies. Her themes always bore the
palm. ‘The teachers predicted that she would
make an able linguist and a fine writer. She
also deserved the first place in the report of
several miscellaneous studies, in the recitation
of which we were required to give long trains
of connected ideas in our own language.
Most satisfactory were the oral abstracts
which she delivered. ‘* How do you learn
the lessons ?’? asked two or three on a cer-
tain occasion, after she had recited one ip
which the majority had utterly failed. ‘ Those
lessons cost me very little labor,” replied
Esther ; ‘¢I love them, but the mathemat-
ics are my aversion. You all surpass me
in those branches.”” This was true ; although
a persevering student, she never became a
good mathematician. Julia, who was an ex-
cellent scholar in algebra and geometry,
200 ESTHER.

began one day to deride Esther for her ev-
ident’ mediocrity in those studies. With an
inimitable look of scorn, Esther replied, ‘* I
neither feel nor express a greater degree
of antipathy to mathematics than did Cole-
ridge and Kirke White ; and before I die,
I will also achieve something which shall
give me a high station in the Temple of
Fame.”? The terrified Julia retreated with
all speed, without venturing a reply to the
enraged hater of mathematics.

In conversation, Esther harangued instead
of talking. Emphatic expressions of coun-
tenance, polysyllabic words, and well-rounded
periods characterized what might be called
her orations. - She was too apt to assume
the position of chief speaker, and to prevent
others from contributing their full share to
the conversation. She certainly talked very
well, but people are not always willing to
be eclipsed. The weekly discussion was her
favorite exercise. There she played the
orator to perfection. Very few ventured to
defend a cause which she opposed.
ESTHER. 201

The majority of the girls had but very
little affection for Esther. She, was too
scornful, too proud of her own power, too
supercilious in her treatment of those who
were deficient in scholarship. A few, those
who were intimately acquainted with her,
loved her with fervor. ‘They appreciated the
really good qualities of her character, and for-
gave the bad. They loved her, as Celia
once said, in spite of her faults.

Esther was frequently called Doctor John-
son. Whether she received the title and
surname of the great lexicographer on account
of her rough manners, her Johnsonian style
of conversation, or her love for philological
lore, I will not attempt to decide.
LILIAN.

* But that loveliness, ever in motion, which plays
Like the light upon autumn’s soft, shadowy days,
Now here and now there, giving warmth as it flies
From the lip to the cheek, from the cheek to the eyes.”
Moorg.

Our gay afd graceful Lilian was neither
beautiful nor the reverse. I used to wonder
why strangers pronounced her homely, till I
recollected, what I had wellnigh forgotten,
that my first impressions of her personal ap-
pearance were unfavorable. But after some
acquaintance with the sprightly girl, it was
almost impossible not to concede that she
was beautiful. I suspect that she was of
Indian descent, for her complexion was very
dark, her hair long, black, and straight,
and her cheek-bones uncommonly high. I
am sorry that these characteristics, together
with her large, black eyes, were not so come
LILA’. 903

bined as to give her that rare and wondrous
beauty attributed to some Indian maidens...

I never saw a more expressive countenance.
Although she could not boast a transparent
complexion, her emotions might be read with
perfect ease. As her thoughts and fancies
were usually very beautiful in their nature,
they revealed themselves in numberless cor-
responding lights and shades. She was very
imaginative, and an enthusiastic lover of poems
and romances. She was well acquainted
with the harmonious strains of our various
writers.

It was a pleasure to look at her room.
Our apartments were indeed very plain, and
very simply furnished, but she disposed every
thing to the best advantage. The windows
were elegantly draped, the curtains hanging
in exuberant folds, and so arranged as to
admit the most pleasing and effective degree
of light. Her bouquets were surpassingly
beautiful, the different hues being blended
with exquisite taste, and the divers flowers
204 LILIAN.

commingled with due regard to size and sym-
metry. She was consulted upon all occa-
sions on which we wished to produce effect
in our preparations. She was a brilliant con-
versationist, and joyously welcomed at every
party and festival. She neither chattered like
Fanny, nor harangued like Esther, but, with
inimitable grace and fluency, contributed her
quota to every colloquy. ur discussions
at school were often vastly amusing. Esther
would declaim for some time with great pow-
er and the utmost eagerness, and then glance
triumphantly around, as if challenging her
opponents to answer if they could. While
some of the girls seemed preparing to over-
throw, if possible, Esther’s arguments, Lilian,
with a pleasant smile, would relate a sportive
anecdote, or utter a playful remark, which
would have more effect than any labored
refutation from the others. When Esther
and Lilian coincided in opinion, their party
was generally victorious. Both united were
invincible.
ALICE.

A thoughtful child,
Intent o'er ancient pages to pore,
Or catch the breath of hallowed lore.”
Mas. Sicounnzy.

4

A partine child was our gentle Alice,
after she had fairly allowed us to learn the
worth and beauty of her character, with a
most lovely expression upon her sweet coun-
tenance, and an air of repose diffused over
her whole person. You doubtless think that
she had soft, blue eyes, to correspond with
the rest of her appearance ; but this was not
the case. I used to believe that they would
have been more in accordance with her char-
acter than the lustrous black orbs which she
knew not how to use to advantage, but kept
veiled by her half-closed eyelids. ‘If Alice
would only use her eyes!” did her compan-
ions often exclaim ; but none of those gleams

18
206 . ALICE.

and flashes which some of the young ladies
would have had the art to display ever pro-
ceeded from her. Understand that we do
not object to gleams and flashes when they
are the true indices of emotion, but only when
they are assumed for effect. Alice probably
thought that her eyes were made to see with,
and she honestly used them for that purpose
and for no other. Although not brilliant, she
was a good scholar. She learned her lessons
thoroughly, and was able to answer the greater
part of the questions proposed by the teach-
ers ; but she seldom hazarded opinions of her
own upon any subject. She took no part
in our weekly discussions. During the first
six months of her attendance, she wrote ‘no
elaborate themes, nor, in fact, did she ac-
complish any thing to prove her claims to
aught beyond mediocrity. The simple pieces
of composition which she did write, in com-
pliance with the laws of the institution, were
extorted from her with great difficulty. Her
appearance at the recitation-stand was fer
ALICE. 307

less favorable than that of many a less dil-
igent pupil. She was a hard student, rarely
allowing herself any leisure for recreation.
For a long time Alice bad neither friends
nor enemies; even her room-mate regarded
her with indifference. Although we knew
that she was the possessor of knowledge,
and that she really deserved a high place in
our estimation, we left her without regret to
her beloved solitude. We had early dis-
covered that she was devoid of conversa-
tional power, and I think I may say that
even the most gifted talker is not altogether
fond of holding monologues. Some inter<
change of opinion is demanded. The teach-
ers wondered how it was that Alice, who
studied so perseveringly, should be surpassed
by some of her indolent companions. ‘That
Lora, Esther, Celia, Lilian, and some others,
should excel her was not surprising, but that
she should produce no better results than
Sarah, Fanny, and Cora was not only on-
accountable, but annoying. Her mental re-
-208 ALICE.

sources were acknowledged; but where were
the brilliance, the invention, and the originality
which characterized the performances of many
of her school-mates? Alice had talents, which
she successfully cultivated, but it was evident
that she had not been very highly endowed
with the power of expression. In conver+
sation, she was at a loss; in recitation, she
was confined to the words of the author, not
having the ability to express the ideas of an-
other with elegance, or even with propriety,
in her own language. Miss Irvine, the teach-
er of composition, was the discoverer of this
fact. Then a change was adopted in the
mode of educating our silent Alice. She was
compelled to recite less, and to write more.
Book after book she was obliged to plod
through, defining every important word, writ-
ing paraphrase after paraphrase, transposing
words and clauses, and turning poetry into
prose. She was also required to write ab-
stracts of all her English lessons. This
course, judiciously pursued for a year, had
ALICE. 300

a wonderful effect. The compositions of the
first month and the last afforded a striking
contrast. She was now obliged to perform
the same tasks orally, instead of giving the
results of her labors in writing. This sadly
puzzled her, and she earnestly entreated that
she might be allowed to bring in written ex-
ercises. But her teacher was inexorable.
Very soon Alice was able to comply with
this new demand. Long before the term
of her school education had expired, a very
satisfactory change had been effected. She
had ideas before ; words had now been given
her ; and her teacher, on beholding the result
of her toil, felt amply rewarded for the pa-
tience with which she had led her pupil
through the long and tedious process which
the circumstances of the case had rendered
so desirable. As Alice had now acquired
the power of expression, the resources of her
mind and the warmth of her heart would have
rendered her the ornament of society, but she
preferred, during the greater part of the time,
18 *
210 ALICE.

to immure herself in her room, there to pur-
sue her studies, like one who loves learning
for its own sake, and who steadily follows
the path of mental improvement, that she
may discipline her mind, enrich it with the
treasures of knowledge, and prepare herself
for future usefulness.
BLANCHE.

* Her eye was bright
Even yet with something of a starry light,
But her form wasted, and her fair young cheea
Wore oft and patiently a fatal streak, —
A rose whose root was death.”
Mas. Hemane.

One morning every girl in our school who
had any perception of the beautiful sat gas
ing with undisguised admiration at the young
stranger whom Mrs. Montrose had just intro-
duced as a new scholar. She resembled e@
fairy rather than a human being. I can ap-
ply to her appearance no better epithet than
ethereal. Her transparent, beautifully-tint-
ed complexion, deep-blue eyes, and the pro-
fusion of golden curls floating over her shoul-
ders, all combined, had a powerful effect.
The homely, unprepossessing Esther almost
worshipped beauty. She now dropped hes
212 BLANCHE. |

book, started from her seat, and, impelled by
the impulse of the moment, was about to rush
forward and embrace the fascinating girl, but,
catching the restraining glance of Miss Bar-
aard’s eye, she sighed and became tranquil. I
muttered in an undertone to Lilian, — ‘* This
beilliant butterfly must be a poor scholar. Na-
ture would not have been so lavish of her gifts
as to unite genius, or even talent, with such rare
beauty.”” My conjecture was not verified.
We soon discovered that Blanche could well
compete with our best and most successful
students. For some time, we were greatly
surprised by observing the emotion evinced
by Mrs. Montrose whenever she addressed
Blanche. We knew that the young girl was
her niece ; but how could that circumstance
account for the mingling of pity, grief, and
tenderness which was continually manifesting
itself in the tone of our preceptress’s voice,
and in the expression of her countenance ?
One day, during the absence of Mrs. Mon-
trose and her young relative, Miss Barnard
BLANCHE. 218

explained the mystery. The beautiful girl,
the model-scholar, the evident possessor of
lofty genius, had been marked by the de-
stroyer. She was destined to be a victim
of pulmonary consumption. Already were
her lungs seriously affected. With looks of
horror did we listen to this communication.
Blanche had excited our admiration by her
surpassing beauty ; our reverence, by the
many proofs which she daily give of supe
rior mental power ; our love, by the numer
ous indications we perceived of uncommon
goodness of heart and life. Must she die ?
Why did she study, ‘if that fearful decree
had been passed? Why not relinquish eve-
ry thing of the kind? We were told that
Blanche so loved study that she would con-
tinue it till the actual arrival of death.
We were informed that she was an orphan;
that Mrs. Montrose had reluctantly yielded to
her earnest solicitations, and received her as
a pupil. After learning these facts, how ine
tensely did I watch the progress of the insid-
214 BLANCHE.

ious disease! Blanche resisted the enemy
as long as she could. She struggled against
pain and weakness ; she endeavoured to be
ebeerful, and she generally succeeded. She
used the utmost precaution, and on all sub-
jects but that of study implicitly obeyed the
directions of her physician. Even when quite
ill, she steadily pursued her studies with her
school-mates. At length she was compelled
to submit. One morning she was too ill to
assemble with her companions. The teach-
ers met us with sadness in their eyes; we
recited our lessons in subdued tones. In
the afternoon, I resolved to spend an hour or
two with my afflicted friend. I was received
with a faint smile. ‘‘ You are very kind, dear
H—~.” I made no reply, but kissed her
pale brow, took her hand in my own, and
sat down by her side. ‘‘ The rosebud of
despair,” as the fatal hectic has been well
ealled, was blooming upon her cheek. She
glanced at the mirror opposite, and burst into
teers. Her books were upon the table be-
BLANCHE. a1p

fore her. ‘‘ My dear Blanche, why will you
study ?” I asked.

Her voice trembled as she replied, — “ I
understand your meaning. You think it use-
less for the early doomed to study.”

‘©T am afraid that you are too ilf for the
mental effort, my friend. As you have your-
self mentioned the subject, I may venture to
proceed. If I knew that I must die, I should
at once abandon study.”

Blanche shook her head, and in a low tone
repeated, —

“6 The more our spirits are enlarged on earth,
The deeper draught will they receive of heaven.’

Besides, dear H » how do we know that
I shall soon die? People sometimes live
twenty years in a consumption.”

I listened to her with pain, for the symp-
“toms of speedy death were too apparent to
be undetected.

«¢ H——.,” said Blanche, with a penetrat-
ing look, ‘* what have you to tell me? You
look as if you had some message.”


216 BLANCHE.

‘© No, my dear; I have only come to sit
with you a little while.”

‘© So I thought, at first ; but within these
few minutes I have been suspecting that you
were sent for some purpose. If so, you
need not be afraid to tell me.” :

I again assured her that I was commis-
sioned by no one; that I came simply to
make her a visit.

“Why, then, do you wear that significant
expression? Do you think that I am very
ill?”

My tears fell in torrents as I replied, —
““T know that you are very ill, my dear
friend.”

BJanche gazed earnestly at me, and after
a pause said, with some effort, —‘* Doctor
Allen came not alone this morning. He
brought with him another physician.”

“I know it, Blanche,” replied I, with
averted eyes.

After a few moments, I again looked at
my friend. She was glancing alternately at
BLANCHE. 917

me and the truth-telling mirror. She re-
sumed,—“ I was not satisfied. They told me
nothing, although I entreated them to let me
know the worst, assuring them that I was not
a child, ‘and that they need not be afraid to
speak the truth; but they merely looked at
me, sounded my lungs, and left some med-
icine.”

I now endeavoured to regain my self-con-
trol, and resolved to introduce another subject.

‘¢ Blanche,” said I, ‘‘ where is your last
theme? I wish you would let me read it
this afternoon.”

‘‘ Nay,” cried Blanche, nervously seizing
my hand, “ I feel confident, H——, that you
have learned something which has not been
disclosed to me. Those physicians have
made a report. You must tell me. I am
sure that you know.”

‘¢ My dear, dear Blanche, be quiet, I en-
treat. Ask your aunt. She knows more
about your case than I do.”

ee »” said Blanche, solemnly, ‘“ my

19


218 BLANCHE.

aunt is as reserved upon the subject of my
illness as my physician. I have hoped that
it would be long before my disease would
reach its termination, but I am sometimes
afraid that I shall die young. I conjure you,
my dear H. , to deal truly with me, as in
like circumstances I know that you would



wish me to do with you.”

I could not deny that, were our situations
reversed, I should wish my friend to tell me
the truth ; but would my teachers approve of
my making the communication which I felt
called upon to do? But I looked at the
suffering Blanche, who would doubtless so
soon be called to pass ‘that bourn from
whilst no traveller returns,” and I could not
hesitate. With great difficulty, for my utter-
ance was wellnigh obstructed by emotion, I
repeated the lines, —

“ On the tree of life eternal,
O, let all our hopes be laid !
This alone, for ever vernal,
Bears a leaf that shall not fade.”
BLANCHE. , 219

Blanche became very pele; she bowed,
to signify that she comprehended my mean-
ing, and for a short time the expression of
her countenance varied every moment. She
then clasped her hands, raised her eyes with
a most earnest look of supplication, and with
impassioned fervor exclaimed, — ‘‘ Blessed
Saviour, enable me to offer thy prayer, ‘ Not
my will, but thine, be done!’ Then, turn-
ing to me, she®@said, —‘*I thank you, my
dear friend ; but leave me now for an hour.”

I obeyed. At the end of the time specified,
IT returned. Blanche asked me to place with-
in reach her writing-desk and a certain small
trunk, in which she was accustomed to keep
her letters and papers. ,

‘Now, dear H )” said the dying girl,
‘“‘T have one request to make, and that is,
that you will assist me in arranging my affairs.
My time upon earth is limited, and I must
leave every thing in order.”

I looked at my friend. She was now very
calm, and a beautiful expression of serenity


220 BLANCHE.

could be easily read in the depths of her
speaking eyes.

From that time, our dear Blanche rapidly
declined. Every day I spent an hour or
two in reading and conversing with her.
‘ Life is so pleasant,” exclaimed the young
invalid one sunny morning, “that one might
almost wish for immortality on earth! ”

It was one of those beautiful days in early
spring, the harbingers of thag Italian weather
which, a few weeks later, so delights us with
its genial influence. Blanche was sitting: in
her easy-chair before the window. The del-
icate blue of the sky was diversified by a
few white, fleecy clouds, which gently floated
amid the azure. The earth was beginning to
assume its vernal robe. A few, a very few,
of the earliest flowers were visible. Blanche
gazed upon the scene with enthusiasm. ‘ How
very, very beautiful! ’’ she exclaimed, look-
ing upon the landscape as if for the last
time. Then turning to me, she softly whis-
pered, —
BLANCHE. 991

“If God hath made this world so fair,
Where sin and death abound,
How beautiful beyond compare
Will paradise be found !”

I expressed my admiration of the prophetic
stanza; Blanche smiled joyously, and re-
peated, —

“ Though earth has full many a beautiful spot,
As a poet or painter might show, e
Yet more lovely and beautiful, holy and bright,
To the hopes of the heart and the spirit’s glad sight,
Is the land which no mortal may know.”

After a while she said, —‘‘I had hoped
for long life. Before coming to school, I
knew that fatal disease had begun to devel-
op itself in my system, but I struggled
against the certainty. Submission was a very
hard lesson, dear H , but I trust that I
have learned it. Shall I confess to you, my
friend, that I sometimes felt almost angry with
God for not granting me long life that I might



accomplish a great deal in his service? I
desired to evince my love and gratitude to the
Saviour by an extended course of usefulness ;
but I have learned that

19% ©
222 BLANCHE.

** God doth not need
Either man’s work, or his own gifts. Who best
Bear his mild yoke, they serve him best.”

I will not linger on the many touching
scenes that followed during those few weeks,
nor expatiate upon the joy, love, and faith
which glowed in her soul. The spirit was
rapidly preparing to return to its Giver. She
died. with the hope of the Christian, bequeath-
ing to her friends the bright example of her
youthful but consistent piety. Her little pos-
sessions had been given as keepsakes and
love-tokens. To many, she had also written
a few lines. I value among my most pre-—
cious treasures a little French Testament, and .
a brief, but most affecting note, which were
given me by my dying friend.

On. a beautiful May morning, the remains
of our dear Blanche were committed to the
earth. It seemed sad indeed that she should
heve died at that season, when all Nature is
beginning to wear ber most beautiful garb ;
but she was not permitted to tarry even a few
BLANCHE. 933

months longer, that she might, as it would
have seemed fitting, ‘‘ perish with the flow-

ers.”?
“ Alas! we think it sad

To part with life when all the carth looks glad,
{n her young, lovely things, — when voices break
Into sweet sounds, and leaves and blossoms wake ;
Is it not brighter, then, in that far clime
Where graves are not, nor blights of changeful time,
If kere such glory dwell with passing blooms,
Such golden sunshine rest around the tombs? "”
SEQUEL TO REMINISCENCES OF
SCHOOL LIFE.



“ All are scattered now and fled,
Some are married, some are dead ;
And when I ask, with throbs of pain,
‘ Ah! when shall they all meet again?’
As in the days long since gone by,
“The ancient timepiece makes reply, -—
* For ever— never!
Never —for ever!’

Never here, for ever there,
Where all parting, pain, and care,
And death, and time shall dieappear, —
For ever there, but never here!
The horologe of Eternity
Sayeth this incessantly, —
‘For ever — never !
Never -«- for ever!’”
LoxerzLtow



Twenty years ago this very day I grad.
uated, with what honors it is not for me to
SEQUEL TO REMINISCENCES. 226 -

hint, and bade farewell to C——— Academy.
Twenty years! How brief, and yet how
long, do they appear in the retrospect! O
that I were again young, again at the portals of
active life! But I will not repine, for every
period of life is productive of happiness, every
period has its avenues to usefulness. - A light-
hearted girl was I at that time, just entering
upon life, and buoyant with hope! My com-
panions, too, were joyous and exultant. We
were sad, indeed, as we thought of leaving
our teachers, and the young friends whom we
had gained at school; but were we not re-
turning to our parents, and to our own loved
homes? How, then, could we be very un-
happy ?

Now those merry girls have entered the
region of middle life. Even so; they are
rapidly approaching that age which then
seemed so venerable. Every one of my
classmates may claim nearly forty years of
experience in this world of ours. What is
now their condition, grave and dignified
$26 3=—s- SEQUEL TO REMINISCENCES

matrons, or quiet and sedate maiden ladies ?
Would that I could know! And why is it that
those youthful friendships have been allowed
to slumber ? Where are those promises of
frequent intercourse by letters and by visits
which were made on that eventful evening ?
Have my school-mates been any more faith-
ful? I will, —yes, I will go on a pilgrim.
age, and see what has become of my early
friends.

Such were my reflections some six months
since, as, fatigued by the labors of the day,
Â¥ was reclining upon the sofa, absorbed in
revery. Think me not indolent, reader; it
was very early in the evening, I acknowledge ;
but I was quite weary, and thought that I
would gain a little repose previous to the sev-
eral hours of application which were yet be-
fore me. My plan was no sooner formed than
I began to consider how I could carry it into
éxecution. Before I had actually decided
upon any one course, I was aroused by the
sed of the door-bell. My domestic pres-
OF SCHOOL LIFE. 22t

ently thrust her head into my sanctum, say-
ing, *‘A gentlemen and lady want to look
at your tenement, ma’am.’’ QO, horrible annoy-
ance! Reader, hast thou ever experienced
this great misery ? Wast thou so unfortunate
as to inherit a house, and hast thou, inconsid-
erate being that thou art, retained said habe
itation, and undertaken to let it for the con-
venience of those who have no home of their
own? If so, you may understand the feeling
of comic agony which has oppressed me
when my tenants have deserted my abode,
and I have been compelled to conduct people
through its deserted apartments, and to dis-
play them all, from garret to cellar. On this
occasion, too, when I was purposing, in the
course of the evening, to pen a review for
a certain Quarterly ! and how did I know but
that the unknown persons might detain me ar
hour ? However, I took a light, and sallied
forth to meet the strangers. - I was in a meas-
ure relieved by seeing that they were none
of the obtrusive, disagreeable individuals, who
228 SEQUEL TO REMINISCENCES

indulge in the practice of house-hunting,
whether or not they have any intention of
changing their abode, but apparently well-
bred people, who, of course, needed a place
for the accommodation of themselves and
their “* goods and chattels.” The gentleman
began, — ‘* We belong to Philadelphia, mad-
am. We purpose to remove to this city
in a few weeks, and are now looking for a
convenient tenement. Will you allow us to
examine yours?” He then handed me a
card, containing his address, and I thus
learned that my caller bore the unexception-
able name of Frederic Ormond. He intro-
duced the lady as his wife. Her face was
partially concealed by her veil, and as I had
no reason to think that she was any acquaint-
ance of mine, I did not particularly inspect
Mrs. Ormond. I had exhibited a good part
of .my tenement to the entire satisfaction of
the strangers, and was now in the parlour,
expatiating upon its beauty and convenience,
when the lady observed, —‘‘ I have only one
OF SCHOOL LIFE. 239

objection to make. The room contains so
many windows, that I fear we should have

an excess of light. The apartment would
not Have a picturesque appearance, even
though we should double the folds of our
curtains.” Not only the characteristic idea,
but something in the tone and manner, forcibly
reminded me of one of those early friends,
who, a few minutes since, had been the sub-
ject of my thoughts. I hastily turned, atten-
tively scrutinized the dark features, and the
next instant exclaimed, ‘‘ Lilian!’? The
lady gazed at me with astonishment. Very
soon, it was her turn to start and to ejac-
ulate. Now, what followed? The gentle-
man, of course, was in a very agreeable state
of bewilderment, but he presently obtained
the idea that I had been one of Lilian’s
school-mates, and that in our youthful days
a very great degree of intimacy had existed
between us. ‘¢ Why, then,” asked Mr. Or-
mond, with a puzzled smile, ‘‘have you so
long been strangers ?”? Lilian and I looked at

20
230 SEQUEL TO REMINISCENCES

each other, and echoed the ‘* Why ?” without _
alleging any reason. Half an hour from that
time, dear reader, Mr. Frederic Ormond, his
and my beloved Lilian, and the writer, were
comfortably seated at my, I must not’ say tea-
table, for I abjure the Chinese narcotic, but
we had the best beverage in the world, pure
water, which we discussed together with some
delicious edibles which I will not take the
trouble to enumerate. Lilian and I recount-
ed the principal events which had occurred
during our twenty years of separation, inter-
spersing the narratives with numerous inter-
‘Togations and exclamations. The gentleman
amused himself with listening to our stories
and turning over my books, occasionally say-
ing, —‘‘ We must soon return, Lilian ; our
friends are doubtless expecting us.”

In a very few weeks, despite the number
of windows in the parlour, I had the pleasure
of receiving Mr. and Mrs. Ormond as ten-
ants. After my friend had become fairly
‘established in her new home, I resolved to
OF SCHOOL LIFE. 231

disclose to her the project which had been
revolving in my mind immediately previous
to our unexpected reunion, and to invite her
to accompany me. At first, she exclaimed,
$¢Ts it possible, H , that you purpose to
visit all our former companions of the acad-
emy?” ‘Far from it,”? I replied, “I am



anxious to find a very few, — those who be-
longed to our coterie. In all humility do I
say it, Lilian, but I think that our band com-
prised the geniuses of the school. We were
not on very intimate terms with the others.”
Lilian was delighted with this plan. Unlike
me, she had continued to correspond with two
or three of our former friends, and was now
quite willing to make them a visit, and also
to go on an exploring tour in search of the
others. ‘‘I will consult my husband,” said
Lilian, ‘and give you my answer in the
afternoon.”? Fortunately or unfortunately, —
which adverb ought I to use, gentle reader ?>—
I had no husband to consult, and gayly pro-
ceeded to make preparation. Mr. Frederic
2382 sEQUEL TO REMINISCENCES

Ormond laughed at what he was pleased to
call our wild scheme, assured us that we
should be obliged to go from Maine to Texas
to find even the few whom we had selected,
but, finally, committed his lady to my care ;
and himself, with little Helen, Walter, Ralph,
and Anne, to the charge -of his sister, who
had benevolently agreed to superintend his
domestic affairs during the flight of their mis-
tress. Lilian wrote various letters of inquiry,
and bought a large blank-book for a journal.
Ihad kept one for years, but Lilian journal-
ized only on great occasions. We examined
maps, statistical tables, and directories. We
were, at last, prepared for our great project.

I should have told you before that Lilian’s
husband was a prosperous merchant, and that
she still displayed the same elegance and
sprightliness as in early life. Her dwelling
was furnished in accordance with the true
principles of good taste; and her children,
although not deficient in spirit or agility, were
miniature ladies and gentlemen, a fine con-
OF SCHOOL LIFE. 333

trast to those romping nieces and nephews
of mine who occasionally favor me with a
visit. Lilian was still a reader of poems
and romances ; she frequently gave and fre-
quented parties. Hers, however, are not the
resort of those who convene merely to kill
the time and to display their jewels and em-
broidery. They rather resemble the literary
soirées of the Old World. Lilian is a very
useful member of society, for she gives to
every thing around her a touch of her magic
wand, and it becomes beautiful. She is no
recluse ; but, firmly believing that
“Man in society is like a flower
Blown in its native bed ; ’t is there alone

His faculties, expanded in full bloom,
Shine out, there only reach their proper use,”

she maintains intercourse with a very large
circle of acquaintances.

‘We commenced our tour, anticipating with
great curiosity the scenes through which we
must pass.

How gladly would we have sought an in-

20*
234 SEQUEL TO REMINISCENCES

terview with our former teachers, whose in»
structions had so greatly benefited us! Our
beloved preceptress had long since left this
world for a brighter and more enlarged sphere
of action. Neither could we visit her grave ;
for her remains were reposing in a distant
portion of the West, whither she had gone
to claiin and adopt the orphan children of
her sister.

* But glory from the dust,
And praise to Him, the Merciful, for those
On whose bright memory love may still repose
With an immortal trust!
Praise for the dead, who leave us, when they part,
Such hope as she hath left, —‘ the pure in heart ’!”
Miss Barnard was in Europe, by order of
her physician. She was a dweller in the
south of France, a confirmed invalid, no
longer daring to inhale the bracing air of
New England. Had she been more cau-
tious, had she lived less intensively, she
might yet have been blessing the world with
the teachings of her gifted mind. She is
doomed to perpetual exile, if she would re-
OF SCHOOL LIFE. 338

tain the boon of life, and must quell her
longing for her native land with the thought
that

‘ All places that the eye of heaven visits
Are to a wise man ports and happy havens.”

May she be happy in the remembrance
that she toiled faithfully for the good of oth-
ers as long as she had the power! Now
she must be content with receiving, instead
of giving.

Miss Irvine had married an Englishman,
and accompanied him to his own country.
Our mild and amiable, but rather inactive,
teacher did indeed appear more like a coy
English maiden than an aspiring, energetic
American. It was most fitting that she
should be called to preside over one of the
sweet homes of our father-land. Her hus-
band was not one of England’s titled sons,
but a private gentleman of moderate fortune.
She is doubtless the guardian angel of her
young children, in their beautiful but humble
dwelling.
236 SEQUEL TO REMINISCENCES

“ Yes, lone and lowly is that home; yet there
Something of heaven in the transparent air

Makes every flower divine.
e

* Something that mellows and that glorifies
" Breathes o'er it ever from the tender skies,
As o’er some blessed isle }
E’en like the soft and spiritual glow
Kindling rich woods, whereon the ethereal bow
Sleeps lovingly awhile.”

We found that Fanny’s residence would
be the first we should approach in our pre-
scribed route. We smiled as we ‘alluded to
the thoughtless but lovely girl, and speculat-
ed upon her present condition in life. We
discovered that she had married a mechanic,
that she kept no domestics, and was consid-
ered a most exemplary wife and mother.
We almost laughed as we thought that our
heedless school-mate had become a prudent,
laborious mechanic’s wife. Her dwelling was
a-neat, unpretending house, such as was most
appropriate for her station in life. The door
was opened by a little girl, the very counter-

part of our former friend,—the same dark
. e
OF SCHOOL LIFE. 237

curls and merry countenance. We simulta-
neously exclaimed ‘‘ Fanny!” ‘* Yes,” said
the innocent child, ‘¢ that is my name; but I
do n’t know you.” ‘That is not surpris-
ing, my dear; can we see your mother ?”
‘¢ Mamma has gone of an errand, and I am
keeping house’; then, with an air of great
dignity, she turned her head, exclaiming,
— “Children, do n’t make such a noise!”
She afterward politely asked us to walk in,
saying that her mother would soon return.
We accepted the invitation, and accompanied
the litle housekeeper\into the sitting-room.
The children, as the little lady who could
claim seniority by a very few years had called
them, were indeed in high glee, but we were
not disturbed by their uproar. The little
Fanny, to maintain her evident superiority in
our presence, refused to rejoin her brothers
and sisters in their frolic, and with a most
ludicrous attempt at gravity, sat down, and
began to talk with us. In a few minutes the
true housekeeper appeared. She did not at
338 SEQUEL TO REMINISCENCES

first see us, but exclaimed, — ‘* Why, chil-
dren, you are as noisy as a cage full of
mocking-birds ! Do be quiet! Here, Fan-
ny, are new dresses for you and Sis. Come,
Willie ! mamma has bought you Noah’s Ark.”
She kissed the little darlings, and was chat-
tering at her former rate, when, suddenly turn-
ing, she perceived her visitors. She looked
at her little daughter for an explanation.
‘6 Some company, niamma; and I have been
taking care of them for you.” The elder
Fanny, Lilian, and I all laughed. Seeing
that the lively lady did not recognize us, I
said, —‘‘ Allow me, Mrs. Fanny, to present
your old friend Lilian.”” My companion, in
her turn, asserted my claims. Fanny’s eyes
sparkled with joy. She bounded across the
room like a child, as she still appeared to
be, was delighted with our project, and wished
that she could accompany us, but looked at
her children, and said that she was perfectly
willing to remain at home. She entreated us
to make her a long visit, but we consented
Of SCHOOL LIFE. #39

to remain only two days. Fanny was still
the same impulsive being. Her children were
sent to school, when she could conveniently
attend to the needful preparations ; but she
‘appeared desirous of giving them merely a
common education, saying that she had gain-
ed nothing from the hard books she had stud-
ied at C Academy, and that she did not
intend to puzzle her darlings with any thing



of the kind. Her little ones were gay, beau-
tiful creatures. We gave them a profusion
of dolls, tops, and picture-books, and were
probably enshrined in their memory as long,
at least, as the pretty things remained unmu-
tilated.

*tLight-hearted group! I see ye still,
For Memory’s pencil, at her will,
Doth tint ye bright and rare
Red lips, from whence glad laughter rang,
Elastic limbs that tireless sprang,
And curls of sunny hair.”

We never could help loving Fanny, although
she so little resembled the rest of our band ;
240 sEQUEL TO REMINISCENCES

and we left her half-reluctantly to the enjoy-
ment of her humble pleasures.

As we were on our way to the city in
which our gentle Alice. resided, Lilian signif-
icantly observed, — ‘* We shall pass through
; I think it will be a pleas-
ure, though a sad one, to stop for an hour.”
I understood my friend, and slightly shuddered
as I replied, —‘‘ Yes, we will certainly pause,



the town of

and see our unfortunate Lora.”” The hospi-
tal to which our school-mate had been con-
veyed was still Sher home. We requested
leave to see the stricken being whom we had
so loved and revered in early life. After
we had received several precautions, permis-
sion was granted, and we were ushered into
the pleasant, spacious apartment which was
used as the common parlour of the harmless
insane women. We had been told that Lora’s
case was hopeless, that she had long since
been pronounced incurable, and that her fa-
ther occasionally visited her, but his emotion,
which he found it impossible to restrain, hav-
OF SCHOOL LIFE. 21

ing an unfavorable effect upon her, great care
was needed. We promised to be very car
tious, and not to attempt to obtain any signs
of recognitian. Lora was dressed neatly, and
even elegantly, for the wretched father sedu-
lously endeavoured to do what little he could
for his unhappy child. A book was lying
upon the table before her. She held pencil
and paper, and appeared to be commenting
upon the style and sentiments of the author.
How vividly did this scene recall the past!
We could almost fancy that we were again
at school, and that Lora was preparing an
exercise. How many times had we seen her
in the same position, busily engaged with
book, pencil, and paper! She was yet beau-
tiful, but the expression of the maniac was
indelibly impressed upon her countenance.

“ Though health and bloom returned, the delicate chain
Of thought, once tangled, never cleared again.
Warm, lively, soft as in youth’s happiest day,

The mind was stil} all there, but turned astray ; —
A wandering bark, upon whose pathway shone
All stara of heaven, except the guiding one!”

21
22 SEQUEL TO REMINISCENCES

After a while, she raised her eyes, nodded
familiarly, and threw her notes upon the floor
at my feet. I gladly retained them. She
now began to sing a melancholy ballad of
the olden time, but soon started, and gazed
intently at Lilian and myself. She pressed
her hands upon her brow, glanced wildly
around the room, and burst into a violent fit
of weeping. Her attendant, who had been
carefully watching the effect of our presence,
now earnestly but quietly motioned for us to
withdraw, and we very unwillingly complied.
With saddened hearts did we leave the asy-
lum, and resume our journey.

We next visited our little Alice, as we
had formerly called her. She was unmarried.
She had devoted her life to the education
of the young, and had been very successful
in her efforts. Her black eyes beamed
with the same quiet radiance as in the days
of her youth, and she embraced us as tran-
quilly as she was then accustomed to do.
She was very glad to see us, and, cheer-
OF SCHOOL LIFE. 243

fully acceding to our request, conducted us
to her school-room. In answer to our in-
quiries, she told us that, soon after leaving
school, she lost her parents, and was thus
left alone in the world, having neither broth-
er nor sister. She readily obtained certifi-
cates of her good scholarship from the teach-
ers of the academy, and boldly came to the
city which she had chosen as her field of
labor. She made a list of the branches of
study in which she was most skilled, and then,
with the ideas,
“ T will undertake all these to teach.
I doubt not but this populous city will
Yield many scholars,”

she courageously commenced her enterprise.
She prospered in all her plans. She em-
ployed assistants to take charge of those de-
partments which she was not quite compe-
tent to fill herself, and was soon at the
head of one of the most flourishing litera-
ry institutions in our land. Many of her
pupils became excellent scholars and very
244 SEQUEL TO REMINISCENCES

amiable young ladies. We looked upon out
friend with deep respect. She had inher-
ited an ample fortune, but, instead of living
in indolence, had nobly resolved to employ
a large share of her time and energies for
the benefit of the young.

“¢Esther is, I think, a resident of this
same city?”

“©O, no!” replied Lilian; ‘her abode
is in the country.”

+“Ts it possible,” I exclaimed, ‘that Es-
ther will condescend to waste her eloquence
upon the rustics, as she used to term them?”

“Why,” replied Lilian, laughing, “you
remember her great love for the country,
and how extravagantly she used to declaim
concerning rural felicity. At the same time,
we knew that she could never be content-
ed without the excitement of society. She
has now effected a compromise. Some years
since, she bought a very fine estate, about
three miles from the heart of the city. There
she can enjoy the delights of which poets
OF SCHOOL LIFE. - 246

have sung and romancers raved, and can also
be a participant of the pleasures of socie-
ty, for she of course can have what visit-
ors she pleases. I frequently receive letters
from her, and she appears as wild and ro-
mantio as in her yow@h. Esther, however,
is not a mere schemer, as I used to regard
her. She is the benefactress of the whole
village, of which she is, as it were, the
queen, so great is the reverence felt for her
by the country people. She has also gained
renown in the literary world. She is one of
the most popular writers of the day, and she
has the satisfaction of knowing that she leads
a very useful life, for all her books have a
good tendency.”

I smiled as I asked, — “Does Esther
write that she may do good, or that she
may acquire the ‘boon of fame’? She
was the most ambitious school-girl I ever
saw. Her ‘love of apprdbation’ was even
painful to her in its excess. Although she
frequently received marks of commendation,

21*
246 SEQUEL TO REMINISCENCES

she would tremble with joy on each occar
sion ; and if her performances were not re-
garded with favor, she was inexpressibly
wretched.”

Lilian smiled in return, and replied, —
‘¢T think that Esther’s motive is to do
good. She has very exalted views of the
‘object of life? She believes that each
one has some mission to fulfil, and having,
as she thinks, discovered hers, labors assidu-
ously in the path she has chosen. I certain-
ly believe that fame is very welcome among
the other results of her mental toil, and that
it affords her extreme gratification. From
the. peculiar constitution of her mind, she
must sometimes be almost intoxicated by
the amount which she receives.”

I had read Esther’s works, and was pre-
pared to meet her, not only as the dear
friend of my youth, but also as one of our
most distinguished writers. As we approach-
ed her dwelling, we were surprised by the
wonderful beauty which characterized the
OF SCHOOL LIFE. 247

house and grounds. I exclaimed, —‘‘ Some
ethereal being, such as our dear Blanche
was when upon earth, should here be the
presiding genius. Esther’s appearance must
be strangely unsuited to so paradisiacal an
abode.”’ .

I used to think it singular that, with Es-
ther’s extreme homeliness, her love for beau-
ty should be so unbounded. Nothing but
her devotion to nobler aims could have ren-
dered her content with the physiognomy be-
stowed by nature. We found her in the
drawing-room, the centre of attraction to
several literary friends from the city, who had
come to spend a few hours with her. She
received us with the warmest demonstrations
of affection, insisted that we should make
her a long visit, assigned to each of us an
elegant sleeping apartment, and playfully as-
sured us that her mansion was at our com-
mand for an indefinite period of time.

She was far less unprepossessing than in
her youth. With all the ardor which had
248 SEQUEL TO REMINISCENCES

then distinguished her, she now united a de-
gree of self-control which had a softening
and harmonizing effect. She still talked
earnestly and volubly, and had lost none of
* her love for argument. She had, by a great
effort, as we afterward learned, gained the
habit of allowing others their part in the
conversation. She still took her full share,
and, when she saw that she could with pro-
priety, gladly assumed the position of chief
speaker.

* At night her guests departed, and I hoped
that we should have the next day to our-
selves. What was my surprise to see a
light carriage, containing six young ladies,
one of whom acted as driver, rapidly ap-
proach the house !

‘¢ Are those girls to be your visitors ? ”
I asked.

‘¢* No,” she replied, gazing lovingly at the
group, ‘* they are my children.”

‘¢ Why, Esther,”? exclaimed Lilian, ‘ you
never told me of this! Have you, a sin-
OF SCHOOL LIFE. 29

gle woman, adopted all those girls? I love
my own children, but nothing would induce
me to be burdened with other people’s.
“Do you think,’’ said Esther, ‘ that, be-
cause I have no children of my own, I
should decline the lot appointed to our sex ?
I think that every woman, who has the
means, ought to bestow a mother’s care upon
several children. While the world contains
so many orphans, we may always find ob-
jects for our love. Those girls are father-
less and motherless ; they are of different
families. At my death, I shall probably
give them a large share of the wealth which
Heaven has so lavishly bestowed upon me.”
I looked upon the visionary, as in my
early days I had considered her, with love
and veneration. Never had I expected that
she would realize her wild schemes! Here
she was, laboring for the development of all
that was good and beautiful, gaining great
celebrity for herself, and expending the treas-
ures of her affections upon six orphan girls !
250 SEQUEL TO REMINISCENCES

On entering the room, the happy young peo-
ple hastened to their benefactress, and greet-
ed her with every manifestation of love and
respect. She tenderly saluted them, and -with
true sympathy inquired concerning the pleas-
ures of their excursion. The ages of the
girls varied from eight to twenty. Esther
afierward told us that she was striving to ed-
ucate each one in accordance with the laws
of her organization. Sophia had great tal-
ents for painting. The best masters had
been engaged for her, and she was making
rapid advancement. Some years hence, Es-
ther intended to send her to Italy, to profit
by the advantages there afforded to the ar-
tist. Jane was becoming a most accomplished
musician. Isabel was preparing herself, un-
der the instructions of the experienced Es-
ther, for great excellence in composition.
Flora was destined for a linguist, and Mar-
garet for a mathematician. Ella, who had
not been highly endowed by nature, spent
@ portion of her time in learning to make
oF SCHOOL Lire. 361

various articles of feminine apparel. At
the same time, all these girls were ¥e-
ceiving a very thorough course of instruc-
tion in the elementary branches of education,
and also in some of the higher departments.
Each one was also learning to take the en-
tire charge of her own wardrobe, and to per-
form all kinds of domestic labor. The elder
ones could prepare all the food of the house-
hold, actually accomplish the sweeping and
scouring of the numerous apartments of the
mansion, and even wash and iron the clothes
of the family. No servants were kept. Es-
ther and her daughters, as she fondly called
them, spent two or three hours a day in
the labor requisite for the comfort of the
family.

We were never weary of listening to Es-
ther’s plans, which she freely communicated.
‘In my youth,” she said, ‘I intended to
be a missionary. I earnestly desired to car-
ry the gospel of Jesus to the heathen; but
the nervous complaints to which I have al-
252 SEQUEL TO REMINISCENCES

ways been subject incapacitated me for that
sphere of action. I cannot always work.
Some days I am nearly useless. When I
have a good measure of health, I endeavour
to effect what I can in my own land.”

With deep emotion did we prepare to
leave our friend. At parting, she gave each
of us a beautiful edition of her various pub-
lished works, and made us promise to re-
peat our visit. I had long known by the
report of the world that Esther might truly
say, —

“ Glory’s light hath touched my name,
The laurel-leaf is mine ” ;
but I was not aware that to her the words,
‘‘Many daughters have done virtuously, but
thou excellest them all,’ might also be sin-
cerely applied.

Our next place of destination was the res-
idence of Celia. The poetess of the school
had married a farmer, and was now living
in the quiet enjoyment of domestic felicity
wth the “Jord of the soil’? whom she had
OF SCHOOL LIFE. 258

chosen for her companion. We arrived one
bright moonlight evening. The farm was
apparently a very fine one, and situated amid
beautiful scenery. As we approached the
house, we saw that every thing evinced plen-
ty and prosperity. The pretty cottage, the
spacious barn, the well-cultivated lands, the
flocks and herds, all indicated that this was
the estate of a wealthy farmer. I was pleased
to see a flower-garden, not one of those, too
common among our rural population, in which
the flaunting marigold and the crimson pe-
ony occupy the most conspicuous positions,
but one containing a ¢hoice selection of beau-
tiful flowers, arranged with great elegance.
We rode very near without attracting atten-
tion. Then the watch-dog commenced a
most furious barking. The farmer himself,
a noble specimen of manhood, now appeared
at the door, called Rover from our horse’s
heels, and gave a cordial welcome to his
wife’s visitors. We entered the little par-
lour. Celia, with a sleeping babe in her
22
254 SEQUEL TO REMINISCENCES

arms, was relating a story to the bright-
eyed, flaxen-haired children at her feet. She
paused in the midst of her narration, con-
signed the infant to the care pf its father,
and joyfully embraced us. We soon saw
that Celia’s dwelling was one of the ‘‘cot-
tages of poetry,’? and not of ‘ poverty.”
We remained several days, visiting every
part of the beautiful farm, observing Ce-
lia’s domestic arrangements, and enjoying the
pleasure of her conversation. She still told
stories, but it was for the benefit of her chil-
dren; she still wrote poetry, but only her
husband and a few friends were allowed to
read the productions of her Muse. ‘ Why,”
I asked, ‘‘ did you not follow in the path of
our friend Esther, and give some of your
thoughts to the public ?” -

Celia replied, with a smile, —‘‘I have no
inclination for the path she has chosen. The
applause of my friends is sufficient. I do not
ask that of the world.”

‘¢ But,” rejoined I warmly, ‘* Esther does’
OF SCHOOL LIFE. "265

‘not write for fame, but that she may do
good.” ,

‘¢J do not question her motives,” said
Celia, ** but I have no desire to make her
my example. My home is my all, and I
shrink from publicity.” Then, glancing af-
fectionately at her husband, who was regard-
ing her with evident admiration, she contin-
ed, —‘‘In writing to Esther, a few days
since, I quoted these lines. I wonder how
she liked them! They exactly express my
feelings.

‘ Happier, happier far than thou,
With the laurel on thy brow,
She that makes the humblest hearth
Lovely but to one on earth !’”

I did not agree with Celia. Whether or
not Lilian did, I am not empowered to say.
After leaving the contented Celia, Lilian
said, — ‘* Let us visit one more place, and
then return home. I propose that we go to
the grave of our dear Blanche. I willingly
256 SEQUEL TO REMINISCENCES

consented. We reached the village at a late
hour in the evening, and very early the next
morning repaired to that portion of ‘¢ God’s
acre’? which contained the grave of our
friend. It was not yet quite dawn. The
air was of that soft, liquid nature which be-
tokens a day of great mildness and beauty.
The sun was just ready to appear above the
horizon. The choristers of the woods had
risen before us, and the air was vibrating
with their gladsome warblings. The light
clouds soon retreated, giving place to hues
of most magnificent aspect. A vivid crim-
son announced the approach of the orb of
day. The dew-drops sparkled with rainbow-
tinted hues, the birds united in a joyful
chorus, and earth appeared in its morning
robe of freshness and beauty.

‘*¢ Dear Lilian,” said I, ‘¢do not this glo-
rious sunrise, this quiet scene, and the grave
of our friend, remind you of the resurrec-
tion morn ? ”

Lilian was kneeling upon the grave, with
OF SCHOOL LIFE. 267

her face buried in her hands, and she made
no reply.

A neat marble tablet, containing her name,
her age, the date of her birth and that of
her death, with the words, ‘‘ The Lord is
my shepherd,” was the simple memorial of
the gifted girl.

‘¢ Young flowers and an evergreen tree”
were growing upon the spot. We remained
some time, indulging in reminiscences of the
past. We. thought with deep sadness of the
early death of her who had died before she
had had time to give more than the proms
ise of the brilliant future which would have
been hers had years been granted her.

O, judge in thoughtful tenderness of those
Who, richly dowered for life, are called to die
Ere the soul’s flame, through storms, hath won repose
In truth’s divinest ether, still and high!
Let their minds’ riches claim a trustful sigh!
Deem them but sad, sweet fragments of a strain,
First notes of some yet struggling harmony,
By the strong rush, the crowding joy and pain,
Of many inspirations met, and held
From its true sphere, — O, soon it might have swelled
258 SEQUEL TO REMINISCENCES.

Majestically forth ! —- nor doubt that He,

Whose touch mysterious may on earth dissolve

Those links of music, elsewhere will evolve

Their grand consummate hymn, from passion-gusts made
free ! ”






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ddd6f019f6796679ad486a243d995bb83f4cb466
'2011-12-16T19:36:26-05:00'
describe
'1025' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKYM' 'sip-files00009.txt'
c3b290774231a8326226b39c385549fd
cfb29f18dee25bf15388d151a8e289e6496e9011
'2011-12-16T19:41:58-05:00'
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKYN' 'sip-files00010.txt'
1940bca6305912c34b04ef6a7157395d
a1c2d40bbba8f5e4382f7436d324933b6fbbb3d4
'2011-12-16T19:34:37-05:00'
describe
'1020' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKYO' 'sip-files00011.txt'
b2cd7249820bf626b272b1d10a156deb
4bdfa18653543e95577016d337d9449263caeea5
'2011-12-16T19:40:58-05:00'
describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKYP' 'sip-files00012.txt'
71097512b4b683edfa14e2e47d231a6a
13590de41c8c6e45764d2f17acd3a9d6c8f30b0a
'2011-12-16T19:35:00-05:00'
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKYQ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
1e628a79029cb88f66f53407bca5ad7a
0b80f0ca0dbe14a8be4395d47ab4a4863fcb0376
'2011-12-16T19:31:01-05:00'
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKYR' 'sip-files00014.txt'
c7d02b1228c59e2e7c70d202506c7628
56c0d39a4867a2c3de58e86ba2abe052084866df
'2011-12-16T19:31:06-05:00'
describe
'1049' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKYS' 'sip-files00015.txt'
7e8d2a50cc12eaf68ea40bdc97a48fc9
cb72a966462a818ad8dbff1a2f26e50be533e7be
'2011-12-16T19:34:31-05:00'
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKYT' 'sip-files00016.txt'
7e12cd1f56b0e4a3fb8fb341b933c80c
9c79f956664783bd15e0c064c9d5858530877943
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKYU' 'sip-files00017.txt'
fe0dba96ce1e0a157b247c4c21fb47d1
fc0623d04e50017a11c839f2d32ce6db282ccdd3
'2011-12-16T19:32:34-05:00'
describe
'1080' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKYV' 'sip-files00018.txt'
685f9a96386d240c2e1f0aafc5cfe8af
131f2417910e69de4c1ae707be82cf7bdc28d290
'2011-12-16T19:39:15-05:00'
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKYW' 'sip-files00019.txt'
8163eba39c89a7383848d1643d18a397
640e5c7af9de64ed2143e924b900b25fd7a9ddf4
'2011-12-16T19:41:01-05:00'
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKYX' 'sip-files00020.txt'
3ca24183b8935bd8e875ea7535046a57
13449772640f20cafa1ff7d97d3210c041216861
'2011-12-16T19:33:02-05:00'
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKYY' 'sip-files00021.txt'
b535df812ed3314b0939a63fdc793a6e
50716ba30b924380652978939c3327bc17322070
'2011-12-16T19:32:50-05:00'
describe
'970' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKYZ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
9a814da58da91620cdb7a7d6302a2b31
38c8c7f3c916ee054f6b1bcde182bd6ca45f774c
'2011-12-16T19:41:53-05:00'
describe
'939' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZA' 'sip-files00023.txt'
d56ae4187f40a1f8330aa0a79b41a63f
e7cb2b5cb30d299d1e3d7194fe848d3ae1a6e4f2
'2011-12-16T19:36:41-05:00'
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZB' 'sip-files00024.txt'
0e8348135f39ed1457febde707d94e58
51e11e039b935ff5b481dd8e40f06a4903147f4b
'2011-12-16T19:34:59-05:00'
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZC' 'sip-files00025.txt'
b7d53020be294d07bbbfb6115bdd0454
ba52efbf0e9acebf31b23958874c327e695c5eda
'2011-12-16T19:35:19-05:00'
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZD' 'sip-files00026.txt'
99dbbcc63c87c2c6d7dcf84382016318
fedfe9ed408818cefad3ad5823053c2804d0866a
'2011-12-16T19:40:26-05:00'
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZE' 'sip-files00027.txt'
db17c7bdf686b09515a1a356e000eebe
a8726cc11f8f270297964ec704ebcc3b14808cd4
'2011-12-16T19:35:14-05:00'
describe
'1081' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZF' 'sip-files00028.txt'
c45446e7abc48cd60cd83cc0fb2c87be
9c7e714cdb65fead9cbf5fdcbc1ef284f1d4e7bd
'2011-12-16T19:41:16-05:00'
describe
'1120' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZG' 'sip-files00029.txt'
e71658f955429af0192b5093d3435efd
4d77eb1a66e9566f9c3a5b0c2dfebca0b53f8a68
'2011-12-16T19:39:46-05:00'
describe
'1011' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZH' 'sip-files00030.txt'
c602d77fa144b8c21e0bb6950d9c4734
5c562d0e548530faea3d7fd27cc144c156ebe22d
'2011-12-16T19:38:57-05:00'
describe
'1040' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZI' 'sip-files00031.txt'
cf86c2a7d46291564d561355cee2e7c9
3c692aa1f8b371b109fad13f1451d450da47a4d5
'2011-12-16T19:37:04-05:00'
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZJ' 'sip-files00032.txt'
e6628c1207de9162d200c97105904997
f4e6ae6710b30101a83e912572965ea2f9975df1
'2011-12-16T19:33:13-05:00'
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZK' 'sip-files00033.txt'
a8badaf477d2eb9b7c6abdd4a1bee256
9809c30a24d3bd611f39ba35bcde7c99857a67f9
'2011-12-16T19:35:24-05:00'
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZL' 'sip-files00034.txt'
cea6e50d8e3c1abf46b738c4fcc1b60a
d9420cc772c8c4a662bff6cef240bae86e24cb1d
'2011-12-16T19:38:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZM' 'sip-files00035.txt'
487c2c2db2e9c901836b28c902b24de9
eaee7141d83b21e8389fb26e9e8afe7a45215be6
'2011-12-16T19:40:59-05:00'
describe
'1016' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZN' 'sip-files00036.txt'
d9d633f0bf5270ecf42580d4f8a0c8ea
059096c749b311d8ae33e6abc3817088fca540cf
'2011-12-16T19:34:15-05:00'
describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZO' 'sip-files00037.txt'
ec3b5a4fb9c21b2a519495f227c0497b
b64fe70cb6076a805cdb7465054080e4e5a72ac3
'2011-12-16T19:39:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZP' 'sip-files00038.txt'
9f0e3c67d4a25047bd74dc16d493db35
363c52722528e3cd9c2cc62c9b94ecc9c5325997
'2011-12-16T19:37:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZQ' 'sip-files00039.txt'
3389fa3f82741cedaf57dcd8b6746949
a3c27b36a6654d49883440492040c95b16cd6232
'2011-12-16T19:36:00-05:00'
describe
'1074' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZR' 'sip-files00040.txt'
b08eb0fb3017cf16daaee76aaad72a48
f89e5fa803256377063f88b8464808dc5dffb483
'2011-12-16T19:33:17-05:00'
describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZS' 'sip-files00041.txt'
997eae0e896b367d9b98b9bf7520d13c
1e8222557f652b1296a24a6e590bbd6ecd7a8098
'2011-12-16T19:40:53-05:00'
describe
'961' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZT' 'sip-files00042.txt'
8fa36837416c50698e5c87de2fa50db5
45f3339ee7a8141c2fe356681b0801a2053e0a99
'2011-12-16T19:29:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZU' 'sip-files00043.txt'
e5a5456c231396e115ae301611be6b82
9b62a426c8fa9e05457b433d4c9c481e1a6626a2
'2011-12-16T19:33:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZV' 'sip-files00044.txt'
24f0386ab6c2e10e85ddb6217175071a
84b9ad91d547ff4594192c5662a229143efc88b6
'2011-12-16T19:40:01-05:00'
describe
'1012' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZW' 'sip-files00045.txt'
0a8c565c2f79f112e12fb68ef1399817
9632cc859208551dee228c1e8c4619867f07fd55
'2011-12-16T19:34:00-05:00'
describe
'991' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZX' 'sip-files00046.txt'
42380199460572c66af2fbeaee8e3dee
d15aa43fb2b3ee90373016a2774846395305aebb
'2011-12-16T19:30:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZY' 'sip-files00047.txt'
f8323d334008e060b13f75a95387609b
85f14f7590e6ddc5f3825e3df511669a8315f5bd
'2011-12-16T19:32:23-05:00'
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAKZZ' 'sip-files00048.txt'
ae03a89862d75fc30f07f59c8e6872f9
99bc729cf797e5ef25a9f4bd26cb76aaa9a8eb37
'2011-12-16T19:34:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAA' 'sip-files00049.txt'
18a3c1b94f8b1f607fbf3ff626b0649c
f6f19cbe3540133a602187e17865e16c93372454
'2011-12-16T19:36:02-05:00'
describe
'875' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAB' 'sip-files00050.txt'
f86486240f4e8e4c0a74e2d689f90dec
4f423f9d8b07619307846718e6bc99de1936c2fa
'2011-12-16T19:35:44-05:00'
describe
'935' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAC' 'sip-files00051.txt'
2c2ffb550d255f1f709aef92ee98bf4f
9ca8ebb1b9f040c2377ad0d863e537d28e0eec15
'2011-12-16T19:36:35-05:00'
describe
'1023' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAD' 'sip-files00052.txt'
0087d85f3707fa8233e5b0a22c949c42
a17ff6ffe34d3d019ea890715e58f0c26b977c11
'2011-12-16T19:37:46-05:00'
describe
'1046' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAE' 'sip-files00053.txt'
7ee49858cbdcb39696f93266ef7f44f8
d6386e312acd8053c614d87168eb00833a3b15ae
'2011-12-16T19:38:30-05:00'
describe
'1024' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAF' 'sip-files00054.txt'
ae6b4e1559b0a7635dc01842219e957a
7a08c4250570c9630b10bf860c93e46afff56d02
'2011-12-16T19:33:55-05:00'
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAG' 'sip-files00055.txt'
0b8bad3def2046027cb36ea1afb8a103
0131d98c6466556436448b548578288c13560751
'2011-12-16T19:38:01-05:00'
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAH' 'sip-files00056.txt'
47ec409a48c4708381760cd898a7b80b
39c759961b0583adab7462e325f2d6e09492108d
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAI' 'sip-files00057.txt'
c0cb520b06ddd64fdbf274f70d47fa45
6d6c0e2f94e8c186696ff806e87a1f2544b2147a
'2011-12-16T19:41:45-05:00'
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAJ' 'sip-files00058.txt'
4bacab4bff8784bb34ad28f8c0b042a3
571fb83ea170a0292a1c49112db87a9fa9cf08c1
'2011-12-16T19:40:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAK' 'sip-files00059.txt'
a3063017007d9f425ec4a1286915e95f
e0f2e9ac7bab6f6ee2b53da5041751f5acdf5ccc
'2011-12-16T19:31:48-05:00'
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAL' 'sip-files00060.txt'
a221e15a672481d06c5e63c745a49bda
8a572e1e75ace526a6fd89c4a27cb032d3e64c31
'2011-12-16T19:41:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAM' 'sip-files00061.txt'
b4660d9449e92bf2e3d989f26d3696a4
01f8d6b0154788d4d7557750c674c4bd00e4f795
'2011-12-16T19:37:00-05:00'
describe
'930' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAN' 'sip-files00062.txt'
9b816f2fab2aa2d564c401393804187d
4c4aa0297259e3a150b6dcb5eecb1dd2a5ae6540
describe
'1002' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAO' 'sip-files00063.txt'
5f13124139849ecda787e240b05f1fc6
04fc6f9211fac9cc5b7b8492909e8a6a9d8d1100
'2011-12-16T19:35:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAP' 'sip-files00064.txt'
fd7151abdc1b6ec32f47ba35c91b2588
43d73773b6690e892e2b51088f2c4b66752a90e8
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAQ' 'sip-files00065.txt'
d898b58f8c9fab845b3a2ca598be1dd5
8bc9756f819be496a40ebb82e1ffd9e2efa11be1
'2011-12-16T19:42:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAR' 'sip-files00066.txt'
087171b3e83641848ce2295736554006
69fbb83a12ce71ff93f0384399d99db723a3ae22
'2011-12-16T19:34:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAS' 'sip-files00067.txt'
14123cc0a838f13cd8f59acf563c14cc
b259b92cc8186cffca752b82235b66da02651615
'2011-12-16T19:35:03-05:00'
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAT' 'sip-files00068.txt'
66e7c01a7f48a2ef0e2d55f123faf25b
a1c9c8775a5d1be3c03f9201727acc30901eaf4a
'2011-12-16T19:41:14-05:00'
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAU' 'sip-files00069.txt'
c4468bca2ce2770962c5f08b4607e69f
a87f75ebe0cc7b9a9bb83c6186bbbd580c2b973f
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAV' 'sip-files00070.txt'
53c6cf1a28f71bd26fb8a4b34a1b3c50
1e5b8ec7ba5b3d2dbc25f5c7df352097b8916768
'2011-12-16T19:36:25-05:00'
describe
'1005' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAW' 'sip-files00071.txt'
56769b1d1e802ff008f4950cacfefd68
534e497e01c2293cf8d272e034540b131e6401bd
'2011-12-16T19:36:17-05:00'
describe
'286' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAX' 'sip-files00072.txt'
bce937843b89c37ab0b82b6b46d46dfc
7f40192d12de87c6a54678a67be1acbfddff12ce
'2011-12-16T19:30:25-05:00'
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAY' 'sip-files00073.txt'
03113d3d83a95571dedd764af5e9c922
a2dfd86966bc04e837e52cf0c1970d76ec67db8d
'2011-12-16T19:40:54-05:00'
describe
'863' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALAZ' 'sip-files00074.txt'
4509ed7568520ed5e04f5d6b54959235
ae171eec6e1beaf2c7231f0d122f8216c191c690
'2011-12-16T19:35:02-05:00'
describe
'1128' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBA' 'sip-files00075.txt'
0ced302d21ec4d8c2c4a287fd5ed7dd6
c374ae33c2cdbab761854b25bf121a6554214cf1
'2011-12-16T19:41:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBB' 'sip-files00076.txt'
23c1ae87b3cbe0772066895239d1c7fc
79aa7f536ff361135743564031647c4eaed35d6b
'2011-12-16T19:31:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBC' 'sip-files00077.txt'
d8583bc24374ecbf5c6a546a1ca559b3
674323d05028303fea036cdd27ae84236c66d61e
'2011-12-16T19:32:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBD' 'sip-files00078.txt'
3f55ca4fd1bc65c7f80ce8c59239da5d
f2cd276fd37109a5e1cf897091c73dbd760bbc64
'2011-12-16T19:34:23-05:00'
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBE' 'sip-files00079.txt'
66410f7e8876f831ecbbb7736db23e9c
4253a18c818f27bea88a69c089244ef699d83d60
'2011-12-16T19:35:58-05:00'
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBF' 'sip-files00080.txt'
f27d03c9eb59ddd604798ce7a0afeed4
dc4eec458ce28e8026f57ef7154ee50fbe1d76e4
'2011-12-16T19:34:47-05:00'
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBG' 'sip-files00081.txt'
8d1a9f5201abeed13cb85be73e789287
285b73c8ca3e60729e1bf7917640da7f540b9501
'2011-12-16T19:36:29-05:00'
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBH' 'sip-files00082.txt'
2a1cba0602f30318330323e038f01144
eeff17ea0da423e3f9ee6dbf31d2e99c7ca85256
'2011-12-16T19:35:01-05:00'
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBI' 'sip-files00083.txt'
1a10f68ad142b804c5a2f22bbdcf05cc
b72ca5cb9a6093136c5dc2ac5adee6cfeccdad53
'2011-12-16T19:33:47-05:00'
describe
'994' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBJ' 'sip-files00084.txt'
c134b76d2edd22eeb786e95721103ac5
5fd15743b4eda0e50621f62b313e0a0ecf3e709a
'2011-12-16T19:33:28-05:00'
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBK' 'sip-files00085.txt'
678b04a6123ee83efa31fb4bc78e29e5
e746c10c136a95137604e54da56d446ce091bfdd
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'1054' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBL' 'sip-files00086.txt'
5d105f60b9e4683435c9fba5144a7c8d
984e09b2315206c0ab45f01ac9fd4dea2b884c10
'2011-12-16T19:38:33-05:00'
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBM' 'sip-files00087.txt'
186f6591f94d9a2dd7a64b94380390fc
b4112c93e5ee1fc7cd6ef01d557d70b1551bc30d
'2011-12-16T19:37:45-05:00'
describe
'1055' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBN' 'sip-files00088.txt'
94cc71eb08c9a1afe9d6533142c507f6
9c5c9e96c8e7167f7315e7d9c5448668b225e96f
describe
'981' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBO' 'sip-files00089.txt'
0e961de9a48893ac8d943b6326f5166a
bf8f2dc9380bfdc5c1394082c49912fed139643f
'2011-12-16T19:41:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBP' 'sip-files00090.txt'
62899d18f8cecaf8a2da9bf3b902f066
35b54477f26c18d2a4ab9659ed147aaa4751a146
'2011-12-16T19:36:14-05:00'
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBQ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
bbcccb5f9cb927db9851f3635295b351
bde1503c8734de6a6f0f3cede67925b0c72433ca
describe
'995' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBR' 'sip-files00092.txt'
ccf05456682e301e85e3c2d70d551c1c
bb26099804aab50dff62ba55d2de082ae41f26f5
describe
'443' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBS' 'sip-files00093.txt'
aa8b36267c35f850d0181d086ec49b79
fa89b529d91ef7b64e238bbcf4904bd3b089a7af
'2011-12-16T19:41:51-05:00'
describe
'870' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBT' 'sip-files00094.txt'
c4738d73f827419e1f43c253b1e86bdc
078103dd39261b34c6bc807eb7707ab1be37a8db
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBU' 'sip-files00095.txt'
5709fb458e6fa4a707918b17b51a9aa0
82f9f29b6cd0abfa16ab258340e85ee693f8dd94
'2011-12-16T19:35:29-05:00'
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBV' 'sip-files00096.txt'
2f4e95e813764fdc93e69b5f02e37035
0f1b14049336742fe7f17276e7b3b765d894cbbf
'2011-12-16T19:40:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBW' 'sip-files00097.txt'
53e443a61b0c5bd4c257e8f353a4a5e3
7034b1888d524ce43be5fb819fff3e52719ed504
'2011-12-16T19:36:09-05:00'
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBX' 'sip-files00098.txt'
b15b53df2319875bcfbf98267271857d
67cc1455889d0385afbe546163a2e6269d1d744f
'2011-12-16T19:39:23-05:00'
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBY' 'sip-files00099.txt'
6b5cb9fe6a96ca135aec23a5e277b69a
37b8468c32a30896e03fe98c9f087bafd703a9b3
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALBZ' 'sip-files00100.txt'
1df08553d85409ae6158f1281fe8da04
26ff6a8248d75d7d0b52851e13a66f7daa946c92
'2011-12-16T19:40:16-05:00'
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCA' 'sip-files00101.txt'
b5adb913b0d7541296322ebbba1cf465
3bf2de7de4f89d759151c195476125bb4b0ba810
'2011-12-16T19:37:43-05:00'
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCB' 'sip-files00102.txt'
9e67c16c00bb97acc07f8b59c1d9dc06
a9513e0b5949f1a7ba69f34b4c22aaa2a42349b6
'2011-12-16T19:34:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCC' 'sip-files00103.txt'
d5b0675c84ff6b6b2c3b1fd5acc38d3d
2cd60d3efdb046b3bbd63d9d81a9fbe3b5977df1
'2011-12-16T19:40:23-05:00'
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCD' 'sip-files00104.txt'
849aa6fb6f6fa7347623677ff38a4046
1bdaded502ad4d0e8b4a2c1a31f9e0dcc1e7bc91
'2011-12-16T19:37:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCE' 'sip-files00105.txt'
5b5017c4ef09ba41d84389682ead346c
1d8e586ed7a4e0c78efbf080bc5a34f2272c8c9e
'2011-12-16T19:38:12-05:00'
describe
'1031' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCF' 'sip-files00106.txt'
0861925681e32c6f3f53667b347900e0
35bec78bae27d366dc2e658bbf135b9208a68d6c
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCG' 'sip-files00107.txt'
8d19e8e5793cbc11f5a0a9b7c738a403
c53a8a3710a58a3b6b27d295457423e18d4dc51d
'2011-12-16T19:30:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCH' 'sip-files00108.txt'
f11604fd14786232996aa7e172653816
5484e55abd1b9904a3d952528b7c75c3132543a2
'2011-12-16T19:36:11-05:00'
describe
'1082' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCI' 'sip-files00109.txt'
a9643bf4df7846ceca3c40038fa2c49f
48a9d9c2a5b03409f58da09b6a8ee3e534441d55
'2011-12-16T19:37:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCJ' 'sip-files00110.txt'
f43165db4957050311d55008fdaf9ede
67028ed223d35fdcd33d3f0d97b3e0dd283c6884
'2011-12-16T19:38:40-05:00'
describe
'1003' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCK' 'sip-files00111.txt'
6211374a0846285ce12fff55539f69e5
fae52cc0a7c89be0f0164f81ceaf9041750f3900
'2011-12-16T19:31:22-05:00'
describe
'983' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCL' 'sip-files00112.txt'
e91a2becd28369fd82666d6461e3ffc7
4e99db2a4e0bf1b60392873dd1f368e482417f32
'2011-12-16T19:38:31-05:00'
describe
'974' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCM' 'sip-files00113.txt'
29ae8d0fe36fa47f966b8bb738337b4b
9e8bad6aeabd52d5b27e986b7f225a3631f49448
'2011-12-16T19:39:05-05:00'
describe
'1071' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCN' 'sip-files00114.txt'
0c1fc1605caeeda7b3826b51322edad4
f08485a72ee87192f18b6c7a060849d181c001b8
'2011-12-16T19:34:46-05:00'
describe
'982' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCO' 'sip-files00115.txt'
a1e73230e4fc9e74520816e2a57b2111
cf17cd3e00e19ec04e5a8acb42ed66c68b16b5cd
'2011-12-16T19:39:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCP' 'sip-files00116.txt'
3a69f678d5a2c030ad2d55e64022a0d4
8b7e582651ac961c7de97deedfb98e58ca70a51e
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCQ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
0f52f91119d043e6407109a3d3b6dd5d
4cde846a0c345ba8db1cde2a9f3fbe962c91eea6
'2011-12-16T19:37:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCR' 'sip-files00118.txt'
d222636c301d59d285afb63972d67c0e
90419090cffb734e0fcd40d2cad1cfbb6e494036
'2011-12-16T19:35:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCS' 'sip-files00119.txt'
45804003bf9d32c669b72dc06081d3b8
d0cea54bfb59b2d03701d4c0038ccb303172b039
'2011-12-16T19:37:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCT' 'sip-files00120.txt'
653a958c009a970920cae90e0e361d6d
8e4fd9ec65ed1f30a1d49a65e090d75d37456a59
'2011-12-16T19:34:09-05:00'
describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCU' 'sip-files00121.txt'
9d28189cb01f648411050922acf78586
ed05eea3afa07b92f4b1e95701e9cd74cda63b78
'2011-12-16T19:40:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCV' 'sip-files00122.txt'
1705adb2bf668a44b11017f6f90dc674
65a8ce3e178333f873fc75472ccac56836aa187d
'2011-12-16T19:41:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCW' 'sip-files00123.txt'
cc86c3a5db04c739fbc40f693d1b06b7
9c432b20d5af3050f7af51f5112b4dd640a65b4c
'2011-12-16T19:38:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCX' 'sip-files00124.txt'
ef6c44c3af0ee248fbc766a2d40fc908
8626f402655d8fbaa6c956c6777387cf32311f24
'2011-12-16T19:39:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCY' 'sip-files00125.txt'
31301906f9556230614e328646a560ef
867db9280097e8bc9b01a0f40d3d8bbfb074e2a2
'2011-12-16T19:33:10-05:00'
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALCZ' 'sip-files00126.txt'
1da3859e31d37d4909d4cb1bed2ebbfb
081c248b593b906ad392bf5543dcf7c12f65f76e
'2011-12-16T19:41:47-05:00'
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDA' 'sip-files00127.txt'
07b090b3f44360d3a066a5a7763f74d3
eeaf297b62ef3ff6229ec274bd204fcf96a0414f
'2011-12-16T19:32:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDB' 'sip-files00128.txt'
e01915df881c26d19661b73aa7a90b66
c4b024a41382d32821e8d40eca0a548d05d67c2d
'2011-12-16T19:39:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDC' 'sip-files00129.txt'
7050367c4727f6b5ed261cd1d2c7ed4c
c57de0ec6c31184caa707bfbbfc878437a441645
'2011-12-16T19:41:00-05:00'
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDD' 'sip-files00130.txt'
c438339f28b976298819e4bf13c915f6
d55deab62e3a5c38f4fdecb529fcc8e1cf39b1a7
'2011-12-16T19:41:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDE' 'sip-files00131.txt'
38ccf844422119a39a7c49dd419bda18
3ec7f6168b2843e329fdfad2b89cc4bae37504b8
'2011-12-16T19:33:23-05:00'
describe
'438' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDF' 'sip-files00132.txt'
a5b46e2bca5474620c50085e5c1828c0
d4fb1e78ba6855d06f3efa648b30c87a882bef0b
'2011-12-16T19:36:33-05:00'
describe
'758' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDG' 'sip-files00133.txt'
971bbfa90bc974bc94b13bdf6621380a
d79b702a546b0bca2e4633b0b99ed19e03fc7637
'2011-12-16T19:34:57-05:00'
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDH' 'sip-files00134.txt'
226ebfaf8b8b153e862c97ef97d481fd
21ddfb8325950b1095f66fe8c6137500d14e74fe
'2011-12-16T19:30:08-05:00'
describe
'997' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDI' 'sip-files00135.txt'
6f639800fd2f8a7e8ffd090fdfe0b7da
84fa89d6ba4a52cc8631ff01184fb4b090828d45
'2011-12-16T19:40:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDJ' 'sip-files00136.txt'
c34c748796afe6e6c2fe668976fd8072
fe175d36620caa982e71e5f6a58a00b01929e1ab
'2011-12-16T19:39:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDK' 'sip-files00137.txt'
54063cb3d97efce970aa51d6484d419f
72dd9b61dba572640c9ff6cd35c6f928ebc6160b
'2011-12-16T19:33:04-05:00'
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDL' 'sip-files00138.txt'
b940f698652fe0585d5dcbd9bbb50593
11814c55d421ef75b13c6c71af5878ae5762be65
'2011-12-16T19:37:24-05:00'
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDM' 'sip-files00139.txt'
47ae862f9847c1bb09ecf3bc67cb5511
ed606f6eec0dea36578a429130529f076995b1dd
'2011-12-16T19:37:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDN' 'sip-files00140.txt'
ebe27740236b1e8adedd5bb0735ac18f
d6a027bd20c8730f766b8607bf12c93e63c38f1c
'2011-12-16T19:42:01-05:00'
describe
'940' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDO' 'sip-files00141.txt'
b5178e906e0e97adca7ffe5df1a2a9be
2629262dda86dc7ae0b4a6541993c70805ef1661
'2011-12-16T19:37:29-05:00'
describe
'975' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDP' 'sip-files00142.txt'
f327550af18b26c4a7076ec3d1f6ecd7
3d57be22f6455ab23399da1e63f8459a540a5aed
'2011-12-16T19:36:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDQ' 'sip-files00143.txt'
1c9e2b81948c7190089ecc46101c5167
ecd6607adf46d919495304a956eec7ed9874b7c2
'2011-12-16T19:30:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDR' 'sip-files00144.txt'
ea229ae371ba38b5a0bd76af5f43ba9e
33083d9f486686e572e4a6702e7e4f074ba1e89b
'2011-12-16T19:38:22-05:00'
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDS' 'sip-files00145.txt'
195715b417620f1d192853f2bb637681
bab386ddae63547e9d32cd3b359c359e02c1ac04
'2011-12-16T19:39:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDT' 'sip-files00146.txt'
dd8a99b93d20eb5c4dbe626dbdf05f75
91abcbf7881b6ff4aba80fe948d4211628ba41c6
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDU' 'sip-files00147.txt'
deb416ccaec981b924a46b98ac4441bc
bd5046520b350531b07f1c94f0b9b33972c4d583
'2011-12-16T19:39:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDV' 'sip-files00148.txt'
dedc0185ee7296ad82d1d2cbc037e815
972baad1c8c68a70372af1706360e900ef1d6fc9
describe
'965' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDW' 'sip-files00149.txt'
ad65f9350aec6874059c3321705e37fc
f863ff7fab88ff11e87d549728990032a05274c4
'2011-12-16T19:37:58-05:00'
describe
'968' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDX' 'sip-files00150.txt'
b57d6bf2c3183a0e618a0f2fad1b430e
d5af4aa741db2a82a5d84889765ffa7f925a8b01
'2011-12-16T19:36:05-05:00'
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDY' 'sip-files00151.txt'
1b899e9f041641b90852089f974104ef
94190d6409d23b24146d9339c4b22a3037ef7295
'2011-12-16T19:38:20-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1043' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALDZ' 'sip-files00152.txt'
8d73782e395fa57fe9fd6ba7fffd6665
03cdc0b0cae663faa4f2baa8524d18d2ef618394
'2011-12-16T19:37:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEA' 'sip-files00153.txt'
ec48b472a91d175004207d7b89056433
24c9b32319346c227f99d738c8cb6e503aa4171b
describe
'912' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEB' 'sip-files00154.txt'
5992bef61ae261d54ad26f1829f0cbb6
db6b1f2bf3359ef5d9dcd1255db6be109fa6fda1
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEC' 'sip-files00155.txt'
562c5b82bb2cf3d1f879a71f47f49aa3
5c1c156067f8817a629ebf6e286157383a40edb1
'2011-12-16T19:40:19-05:00'
describe
'242' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALED' 'sip-files00156.txt'
1756dd642d56e409b3f6da19b086a4dd
82ea52d019b5630f5e84f4ec5624204b8274a82b
describe
'823' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEE' 'sip-files00157.txt'
c586bb1684a089d1a581c2aeb495c79f
aa11134b32daa7c9b64fc61d2762c96da6b2737a
'2011-12-16T19:36:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEF' 'sip-files00158.txt'
ff1671a91b31d41c73929e0c51683556
3af5f8ec4467fbcc0c2909f475af6fbafcb9b251
'2011-12-16T19:32:46-05:00'
describe
'1078' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEG' 'sip-files00159.txt'
aad79b90d6706434032e29f59aa3f052
fa38972b4230cca895910d1f43973ee1ef289990
'2011-12-16T19:39:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEH' 'sip-files00160.txt'
df37189457b360b4a114d8dc347d415e
b4e2522a82e7dde71409d85c3846fb0891d658cc
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEI' 'sip-files00161.txt'
ca01c257afa7e0cab37caf9ec27e185a
4d0432316c4fc113bf139deec186f3320954a7af
'2011-12-16T19:37:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEJ' 'sip-files00162.txt'
f2fa655b37d0b1b2a282a0aa129b4efb
091949680eaf00946de3c1aebbab750d6642d4a9
'2011-12-16T19:35:28-05:00'
describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEK' 'sip-files00163.txt'
b8c204af5be76b6f82f5202759a55355
900df522cb83e305cd844a489c776b05bf5d1e7d
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEL' 'sip-files00164.txt'
f1b248f9301a4e98670ed344bf2fbb69
242d242d2ecf2345b1a9c7ed9629b8fe96178985
'2011-12-16T19:37:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEM' 'sip-files00165.txt'
1c37b6b2b92a055fa5c6be9f5266aa09
4e8fe04d6ee7c7992617178dd65bbffa7b1975bd
describe
'263' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEN' 'sip-files00166.txt'
28fe95c360550bcb1b1ac40423fbca5e
be2b4726d518a17034f237cc13349c703961d8ae
'2011-12-16T19:38:03-05:00'
describe
'847' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEO' 'sip-files00167.txt'
b05f06314065b54179fefa58fce080fc
47c80ea6a87b08099207280173b5f260fd996397
'2011-12-16T19:35:55-05:00'
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEP' 'sip-files00168.txt'
f735ca3129644c4f3164305d245e0280
230a6dd6dce0206ac04f1dd4d2af34fbd8c75880
'2011-12-16T19:36:08-05:00'
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEQ' 'sip-files00169.txt'
c1025ff761fa00cdeea0970567dac531
8c8a7b8376022c3242f63037edb5b7c10408dd40
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALER' 'sip-files00170.txt'
5560f08956a2d5cdd993e42c5943461e
e2349236655b503f5962745052c89589cd6b1fb3
describe
'214' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALES' 'sip-files00171.txt'
22648bc5082ef0d653dd82241a667386
a22dec714a24e585bcac789a5b44b812d21ab99e
describe
'865' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALET' 'sip-files00172.txt'
d0ac9ad73eee6414effd98ab62441903
8ddd88dd11fc19619ea10f698dcdabd20e91ddfc
describe
'541' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEU' 'sip-files00173.txt'
41b5772017a9fd25ffa27dde8f2bffd5
b676d6c55571707db2956e2b6dd423b228c0f305
'2011-12-16T19:36:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEV' 'sip-files00174.txt'
d1370fa6cdbec807c5d2cc355ea2331b
2c1296384edbcf400ce818be4dedbe90689e6f6f
'2011-12-16T19:37:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEW' 'sip-files00175.txt'
a4abe586df8bfce0058d565bb97c8229
9255bf57c8f081386d7db92506da8679f91d65e1
'2011-12-16T19:37:49-05:00'
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEX' 'sip-files00176.txt'
888399d46be740fb8d52af41f202cd4d
d664890f7dcae895df3b323d0186aea2aa89f36c
'2011-12-16T19:40:27-05:00'
describe
'887' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEY' 'sip-files00177.txt'
dc42e678f3155046f19353eebdf37362
edcf3153353470754f151a45b7e4035379b8e500
'2011-12-16T19:34:50-05:00'
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALEZ' 'sip-files00178.txt'
226e37901dfc666671596281a26c13e4
807ddfb72bbd2e09253f9b64c3517666323f13e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFA' 'sip-files00179.txt'
82389cff1d9762c47e1ce7bf8d044ac0
b86641e32a913cca3a692a9d97a508be93c54a5a
'2011-12-16T19:34:55-05:00'
describe
'578' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFB' 'sip-files00180.txt'
3db65c6b8f4a77b235c0520f8654836c
b4dc0758f0cb82eea9c4159f4fea0857ddfe4c0c
'2011-12-16T19:31:21-05:00'
describe
'951' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFC' 'sip-files00181.txt'
0eb28a71f74afbe6348f91737ff83e33
0829bdd606eee36fa15e7c8864506e834d7382c5
'2011-12-16T19:37:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFD' 'sip-files00182.txt'
98810f246b0e399d0773cbd88bb49b1f
30e14b9b36a6254a0b532038f7d7d3ddf3f052e2
'2011-12-16T19:35:38-05:00'
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFE' 'sip-files00183.txt'
bea59c127d3671c81a51c2d193aba93b
13a7ae4dbb819c9d98e6bded260e272996f4afda
'2011-12-16T19:33:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFF' 'sip-files00184.txt'
27e931fed0db4bcddfa9cfd0da3b8939
6d66f5465aae29f9b182f8cd63417d02c7043efc
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFG' 'sip-files00185.txt'
ae9fad9c4b7b93fb9551dfe2bc53ecce
b12aac668241b7b1b1215d7676eff34849529b88
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFH' 'sip-files00186.txt'
9c95859c8fe87574573218485cdc72d1
e0056d9e7821c07687aa1bfa0371e19116d5047d
'2011-12-16T19:36:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFI' 'sip-files00187.txt'
dd7558fe91333caa92d116a6c269dc05
ad6216ec0ca93bf4081b5e1302d3ea7de471ee67
'2011-12-16T19:36:54-05:00'
describe
'1089' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFJ' 'sip-files00188.txt'
a793f502ecc5b3be3d82f8ca8cc50259
52958ba25d7650a2b7996c943172420d3e45888e
describe
'1027' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFK' 'sip-files00189.txt'
015276fc5d35e0c818188b2e4ef97ee4
30aa762d6741e8ec81715515fe258adfa1348805
'2011-12-16T19:41:37-05:00'
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFL' 'sip-files00190.txt'
09aec4198ff09516c19bfb717eb64512
f91c5840e6c5e1f503dc44eea79640d99064f86e
'2011-12-16T19:37:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFM' 'sip-files00191.txt'
7aaaaebaef6c676f4958a880063263a8
3d28176537410950eda4b4823ecb83c1e4ae3c6f
'2011-12-16T19:39:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFN' 'sip-files00192.txt'
b206b7ad4f22c39244204970f3613dde
eda7c8413d1ba62fcb27b316654b95395e31a3b7
'2011-12-16T19:33:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFO' 'sip-files00193.txt'
49bcf1b868dd2db730cd7c0790ed2308
d9b0fb45b8e97e8d823cff85cd5d79ce2b6b1a42
'2011-12-16T19:40:55-05:00'
describe
'295' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFP' 'sip-files00194.txt'
1d541222a6fd91347c1fb1b3ffac9422
d375546046fed10c737b1b503fa6851e91998954
'2011-12-16T19:40:13-05:00'
describe
'906' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFQ' 'sip-files00195.txt'
0e312968f0c31eb94a1c5778ac1b8ef2
56886a03bc8172a92e7c995d04ec91bbc35ee628
'2011-12-16T19:41:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFR' 'sip-files00196.txt'
e55e16bcab62476ac876f9c645209ac3
9460a6183300487d7476e4d8010244e08b4b9312
'2011-12-16T19:35:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFS' 'sip-files00197.txt'
03849f93515b181a8562540c8d649ac6
bc1de0212d4a4cb59480b0861edfd67468ff4127
'2011-12-16T19:32:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFT' 'sip-files00198.txt'
f18e748da92ac8ba6b40b8954b326135
7addb9167c5405133a5717405a5c857410a6ea53
'2011-12-16T19:35:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFU' 'sip-files00199.txt'
b03c8be070a915af72fdfa652684d8c1
837900cc989658553844eb55875e42f44301fb62
'2011-12-16T19:38:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFV' 'sip-files00200.txt'
3ee6ce07cad35356c61628098385e720
cf78d60aebcaa739a0b99022f762b7810b538e6b
describe
'726' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFW' 'sip-files00201.txt'
56a8cdb8d6402418f4975f8e01167a6c
f906f4eeadbbb2af659cbff0b8cee74a11978e74
'2011-12-16T19:31:40-05:00'
describe
'922' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFX' 'sip-files00202.txt'
68a52d3b9e6ff3eddf15ef29586882b5
94ee5ce80b29a1f47fba2fc0e9286ce10832e714
describe
'1017' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFY' 'sip-files00203.txt'
5ec4d810a8c3153621ce9161bf2e9b71
66ba515d50e5327fcec4095439369fee56b2709d
'2011-12-16T19:38:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALFZ' 'sip-files00204.txt'
5ccc94378971fdbc0794b69a2e214f3f
6f95f289f9a5b1075ff0090af16432be1f9004af
describe
'910' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGA' 'sip-files00205.txt'
815555df468a44982cf9171e899b7211
82eddab4a6fc4b6b89a14a8620c6c00e6b8f9108
'2011-12-16T19:37:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGB' 'sip-files00206.txt'
1dba97720d9132586a247cccd828767e
2009cbf47f83a649736bf3742878679f01dee99a
'2011-12-16T19:34:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGC' 'sip-files00207.txt'
8b753873c061aa7e245536dd94778738
ec00746b01740fa6288e86de656f6a60ba91cde2
'2011-12-16T19:37:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGD' 'sip-files00208.txt'
594b9845b82e44458e38b014c74082e5
75e27b24d7d6c155b8c975a71abf3ed468a820dc
'2011-12-16T19:32:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGE' 'sip-files00209.txt'
3e50941ba82d3d336294de859dd37bf4
0b3b9f40f84dd28c34c54e19e7f1428f8e9aef16
'2011-12-16T19:36:10-05:00'
describe
'330' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGF' 'sip-files00210.txt'
cc134059066e12c743fd0683c66101ed
4712d88e2e5291e0ba46ff554dc45c6ff918486e
describe
'904' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGG' 'sip-files00211.txt'
53258af09fb91796068518548d4c3f95
0758b982b7721b523945cc44ac9a1ec80afd8e44
'2011-12-16T19:40:03-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGH' 'sip-files00212.txt'
72f1e2413eeed8ee78f14ef41b06bca1
353741964e25f6e5692ba6de64b6b2645f9c8940
'2011-12-16T19:34:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGI' 'sip-files00213.txt'
ec1f4931b450fbe656c7ab8381c8ae6b
7a5d62f713d681859bc84e5fe4e4aa7944f34ae2
'2011-12-16T19:33:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGJ' 'sip-files00214.txt'
f97db892b6b097576ce3395c1af8fa12
e7a78ecd7f20b3be6402f9789d310c34b57fbd84
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGK' 'sip-files00215.txt'
b91c50aad44c61b8801f36ab9e044212
7d08bbcf611ee0e0a023855fb26df24595424c17
'2011-12-16T19:40:29-05:00'
describe
'882' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGL' 'sip-files00216.txt'
a6411dfb7546668b0faadd56c28e9856
402eb6084f71a61e09a6acf831202a9605d2c503
'2011-12-16T19:37:03-05:00'
describe
'942' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGM' 'sip-files00217.txt'
0da334ef9266b87d3063f895e866342a
eee323fe224050e2211f1f5fb6c991fbcb940789
'2011-12-16T19:37:18-05:00'
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGN' 'sip-files00218.txt'
bcda3f42ecb9477316b502efa9e94dc4
bd07ccb7b90424926fb361563c28d1c28caac726
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGO' 'sip-files00219.txt'
6b94c8e7c48bf0dc4e75f2c5cd0cfc40
9d1b13cd9ca5eb50fdcaa42e6a4b904034adf66c
'2011-12-16T19:37:32-05:00'
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGP' 'sip-files00220.txt'
4a5104151d39ae27a64de63db6d645d8
38987d558e441055b7e2e0adffbdbbf8563ac84e
'2011-12-16T19:41:39-05:00'
describe
'1127' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGQ' 'sip-files00221.txt'
32570c12f1f3b71b54340a75154e17e0
500edae07b0c36069cbaedf19bc2728042b332b0
'2011-12-16T19:35:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGR' 'sip-files00222.txt'
7db9f1dd4e695060b0f5a5c62fd24aaa
d3b9b9b7116ffa1d3e356af057f9dc101f9443de
'2011-12-16T19:41:07-05:00'
describe
'555' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGS' 'sip-files00223.txt'
edd03a279aa03c5265cbff5b1e610638
b0234b8e36e0f7a2dea0aede61b35fcdad321f34
'2011-12-16T19:32:20-05:00'
describe
'866' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGT' 'sip-files00224.txt'
8104290b44ea743c94b950ab7813a22c
0e9dc03fd9312aa7f298d6d800a72addb184105e
'2011-12-16T19:35:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGU' 'sip-files00225.txt'
b33975cdde6bc085e7978826c1047703
1f0a9f6ea48266f144ba9e5b7cd8205822a8f305
'2011-12-16T19:41:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGV' 'sip-files00226.txt'
b451ab27c13ddeb084a269a2ba7b435e
f6bbccd47f2b731213c13a81df0f8dc75611f46a
'2011-12-16T19:30:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGW' 'sip-files00227.txt'
b1fb3b2283c9802c577c6e01132f2d12
805cbe35cc145ac049eed86f8cb68bfe0605fe4e
'2011-12-16T19:41:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGX' 'sip-files00228.txt'
37e1278f884054a067f6c1734b0c2535
9807667a3ab486f0810f33d543bc0bd233841674
'2011-12-16T19:35:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGY' 'sip-files00229.txt'
7ee65b71662ffa258da0f884fc560010
28bf83fb13b1abc381dc7b426a084af6b3b7b363
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALGZ' 'sip-files00230.txt'
f1cf07c45c385ce82793c05a8312ce27
6157ad6c2d1093fae04c7478804d5e45aa41096d
'2011-12-16T19:40:32-05:00'
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHA' 'sip-files00231.txt'
0f032af07614b6bf8cf6763aa5532cb7
06d797712195f19f9afa465f90fa4f2ace1c8619
'2011-12-16T19:31:58-05:00'
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHB' 'sip-files00232.txt'
76a80ddf83a591371f9cc823b6755e20
c58835b3eb2b6599236893d4ae146221ca9e289a
describe
'1045' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHC' 'sip-files00233.txt'
1eed0c7328698a24d4e0520f2e51b71d
0c38891d7b724095a20eeec971acdc9aca24bcba
'2011-12-16T19:37:59-05:00'
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHD' 'sip-files00234.txt'
6317eda24f0e49f6346f51caba1d5a60
51451ae78f9f37709309ea6a51502e2969c2f88a
'2011-12-16T19:36:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHE' 'sip-files00235.txt'
b511f1a683eca769f1dbccd8b0b0f23f
088a137dcfd11e1fc469b5916e4c437a87825139
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHF' 'sip-files00236.txt'
9a5973df8d0705a567074b8d783c9267
889e2c9fe7f7e40e23cc92ba6467d9b2bf896689
'2011-12-16T19:34:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHG' 'sip-files00237.txt'
fab393e7214aa6026bf06d91c6f019d7
02d9cf36d58ca663bcd65a8e76135d189064c76c
'2011-12-16T19:33:14-05:00'
describe
'1060' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHH' 'sip-files00238.txt'
69efcdf78c98333c6e71e3b7233d80ba
afe8044d96bdd251275cd3055e527a7e3ab1e011
'2011-12-16T19:34:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHI' 'sip-files00239.txt'
0995149a6d87857b130c8ce5aa7a618d
482b7baabc1076e843dc3cfcbd67b09d524a588e
'2011-12-16T19:41:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHJ' 'sip-files00240.txt'
4154098bb0509c19868e8cc8864d5e5c
90f7bc3e4516e55c2d34eb0d36be2dce89d0edec
'2011-12-16T19:34:01-05:00'
describe
'1170' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHK' 'sip-files00241.txt'
dce9465b42d569ab2deb2b84ce60d276
b6615cf0482016c330dee8d2795654b749cba9f8
describe
'1057' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHL' 'sip-files00242.txt'
5acc48d530ea5a2d7d58f489bf985c9c
a14315db69b7caaa285df7f15f866488722939c9
'2011-12-16T19:42:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHM' 'sip-files00243.txt'
99b9b6749d03203ac8024f82b38b2666
bb56161b5e83369777121b726700714bd4c3ecc5
'2011-12-16T19:39:51-05:00'
describe
'992' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHN' 'sip-files00244.txt'
68ca359bcfebf906c8bccde29e0a272d
68c498d12095bba333c4516ba920959a19f558f8
'2011-12-16T19:31:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHO' 'sip-files00245.txt'
972e93546ff0651375865fb251186eb7
df94da8498d510169b3ff33a5bf8f6b1e9487b6d
'2011-12-16T19:35:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHP' 'sip-files00246.txt'
40bd67c74e79af14be7ba6fb619f9a13
ebda4b8289b014a08b2bad413a8f9cf785df5e5a
'2011-12-16T19:41:41-05:00'
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHQ' 'sip-files00247.txt'
e0d4e9f742b6772e27940901bcfd8b38
420d4a57dab76eda87d39304d3348d48426145d5
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHR' 'sip-files00248.txt'
84e35305b126c122da0c977e9e94333d
f28408bffa1ea947774de2c469fd146bb44e98b2
'2011-12-16T19:31:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHS' 'sip-files00249.txt'
de114f8e0b8e087de5f3d89f666daad4
a9d430392818b46ae90628edd8a215f3ef066f3e
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHT' 'sip-files00250.txt'
2fcab4ec2243c6d251f37159c159dd79
01911449be6428601106e5082bb59d9b90b42388
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHU' 'sip-files00251.txt'
721e69f3429ded80ed9a2e48e60bab90
e9904015109056d535efeb5e196d0c27624a168c
'2011-12-16T19:37:51-05:00'
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHV' 'sip-files00252.txt'
a56ec2ec5863d57eabf86f4f95df0984
cc2c5d8795c323372ed575311f8ce5ce54e19161
'2011-12-16T19:31:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHW' 'sip-files00253.txt'
d0a21d0253e7492e69ad0914987342aa
54dba7dc213c8a7f99f96bb226114b866ef7914c
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHX' 'sip-files00254.txt'
2a5fb79efa7515eb5f26272b3272ce35
57edb6349f55563a386f58bd149b41f1525e651b
'2011-12-16T19:36:38-05:00'
describe
'908' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHY' 'sip-files00255.txt'
073412e5428e348b7c2cf4f53db1bcde
4ccacc120381ffb66253f1d101d63762ac42a3b8
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALHZ' 'sip-files00256.txt'
ba59aa4546a5d9c9daa059bf069e44f1
3d95dff95bb46736cc25af1738b7078874cd9294
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIA' 'sip-files00257.txt'
0fc0cb128f748721cabe0782553dbcc2
49b93b4a8d4d2eea8b8339c4cbc218a92927bf3d
'2011-12-16T19:31:10-05:00'
describe
'258' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIB' 'sip-files00258.txt'
a1a71b009f6bc176a0ab486a5816958f
f12496cc9f457731991b4940be9118b17b2d93fe
'2011-12-16T19:36:27-05:00'
describe
'9307' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIC' 'sip-files00003.pro'
d957257a867e6922e7bcff0b989c15cc
f48cc7478049feb06ff592f33dcb2d36b44eedef
'2011-12-16T19:35:25-05:00'
describe
'6414' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALID' 'sip-files00004.pro'
f3a84d9039ef31376025fe7c7adf99e6
c852240833ba93af9b739fd8217c5ea531c70eb5
describe
'19079' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIE' 'sip-files00005.pro'
3ec50420f29289838fdd0a305bdd085c
466e099288933463d4d6f37da2b0f094d3f7d272
'2011-12-16T19:37:57-05:00'
describe
'18246' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIF' 'sip-files00007.pro'
ed663bfb74bf4fe7af3a07d5439ac147
77ba752e6e699581c573dc9cb6d9cc53aa51b281
'2011-12-16T19:41:26-05:00'
describe
'24634' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIG' 'sip-files00008.pro'
dbb522a893e1b7268609e9230da38929
ce900a62850ae00bab040acc2eaa497a21c2b562
'2011-12-16T19:37:52-05:00'
describe
'25768' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIH' 'sip-files00009.pro'
c66fe84adcfe8eef535bc140e31e6a73
872f0694f043bf7e5d40717e6d4d424e61d6c6a3
'2011-12-16T19:30:01-05:00'
describe
'25249' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALII' 'sip-files00010.pro'
67b1a1b428bb2518d7b2332eb1a52020
2b6ddbdbcb5a9a0ff7574f5acd7afad757e25a51
'2011-12-16T19:41:54-05:00'
describe
'25310' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIJ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
7049686580b5149e9341efa5549ef414
77461cb7e32d331459e32db4adb22465c8c0f5d0
'2011-12-16T19:33:30-05:00'
describe
'25127' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIK' 'sip-files00012.pro'
dc4c56097db790a1994884c61a70766a
294da67fa7a68c61ec736f9c1e275e3f2101708a
'2011-12-16T19:40:31-05:00'
describe
'26437' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIL' 'sip-files00013.pro'
10c317070466844e18df19848cee5bec
148df89f37a2dbf5ded0944f218b1a453e183311
'2011-12-16T19:41:25-05:00'
describe
'26343' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIM' 'sip-files00014.pro'
7482eb18791a68d12db08c47690487bf
f710b13daf7fe62799b5591e00a3177e495d79c9
'2011-12-16T19:32:36-05:00'
describe
'26440' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIN' 'sip-files00015.pro'
f5e6d196cccae431be31cdaa1e3908d5
56b33ed7ee7b74afff6a9544e92b8f55392b919e
describe
'25620' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIO' 'sip-files00016.pro'
2c718aa102c0e70f6a7f21ac71e45ae4
dae2ee1507db049650a2a40c1755c894affd25b2
'2011-12-16T19:39:33-05:00'
describe
'27605' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIP' 'sip-files00017.pro'
88092f22769c9b0ce85bd9038b5c1c36
d706eb7572395448d89ea3b11822adc2307ccc5f
'2011-12-16T19:42:00-05:00'
describe
'27366' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIQ' 'sip-files00018.pro'
cbd99ffadc5a939ecc4a79795966c8bf
9078e1dd7b96968fb8e14a58ad72f228dd67ebe8
'2011-12-16T19:37:23-05:00'
describe
'26182' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIR' 'sip-files00019.pro'
fdae5f3ab5e58ea265dbfd1c50977c95
eaec8bf386a38e4a0318c4d42234d341f01fc75c
describe
'27215' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIS' 'sip-files00020.pro'
597d1eab355504b0a88fef85cf2aabeb
7c0d1c5d028eb7464d7f2695fd4d140425044dcb
'2011-12-16T19:30:44-05:00'
describe
'26671' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIT' 'sip-files00021.pro'
4387bb826bdf1fef1814d0ce1c5e48f1
caeb6381cc0dcf45e4c52bb07a64b4e51867a26f
describe
'24553' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIU' 'sip-files00022.pro'
99764dd3a72b98b100ea42e84caa3098
ee862aa915c9663947f1cea39b5b9127dc812d60
'2011-12-16T19:39:57-05:00'
describe
'18046' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIV' 'sip-files00023.pro'
d5b9f1a1a15ba584e8a9f9c7d9a99a30
c74ff8cd1ba754c042c3dac9fff17492fab36f88
'2011-12-16T19:31:14-05:00'
describe
'27494' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIW' 'sip-files00024.pro'
696485c0c28dda4d2ded4df39639db6a
8b655e0c584e0a8bc81a1ebb55f546e54de037de
describe
'27452' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIX' 'sip-files00025.pro'
c827ae7e8d3ba472e001e0be537f4501
94926c1be309e1331e9689d2ca7d20f4dc7663e1
describe
'26588' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIY' 'sip-files00026.pro'
2db633e216d79f2bb29e1b151d6cb7bb
5ba30f4ffe46c0e20e4a1d1df9eb6b0402346c66
describe
'27518' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALIZ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
0997f64586f68a9efa793dee9d09088a
2058e0048f286f73fd1d287270eecb938010580b
'2011-12-16T19:36:44-05:00'
describe
'26882' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJA' 'sip-files00028.pro'
2dfe9ef4b6f1de84f97216499ad81f61
82df7922e2a980672489f69138ffb0f6bdf133e9
'2011-12-16T19:34:52-05:00'
describe
'27816' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJB' 'sip-files00029.pro'
a66442254c5e1b30b0b7d711c5a6c2ce
21ab2939f4591c9a3dad7403b46cc4e34af1f47b
'2011-12-16T19:32:05-05:00'
describe
'25436' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJC' 'sip-files00030.pro'
160891b740af8ea148b8b7e51c9e581a
42cd87afd039335dc3dc3e773e3a5754a5ae7f6c
'2011-12-16T19:35:05-05:00'
describe
'25663' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJD' 'sip-files00031.pro'
b3042501b772634bd185e5c5ab468fe7
449ffe98b665fd0753665c1497fe3c1cd6b6093a
'2011-12-16T19:32:13-05:00'
describe
'26595' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJE' 'sip-files00032.pro'
c90d92a78af0da610b6f3d577f40a39c
eb1411d3961e4c3ba1094e25807e3d73826efddb
'2011-12-16T19:30:00-05:00'
describe
'26330' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJF' 'sip-files00033.pro'
3a8f1021224e19b4ebc2501f0cb15fcb
8f0c34c57962cef39431e7f43489503e6b1e312b
'2011-12-16T19:40:40-05:00'
describe
'25840' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJG' 'sip-files00034.pro'
3ffb8c84ad74dc73a9a9eaff9d9e9d7c
134bb229088739aa3df25f7234855fdf10575166
'2011-12-16T19:38:56-05:00'
describe
'25959' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJH' 'sip-files00035.pro'
593b08e0f5d5fa72e55256c4e99a775c
f1ef13a99943416978ac622572edea900035712b
describe
'25503' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJI' 'sip-files00036.pro'
1b0a7b5a3e2de3ab84318ee524b3849a
4aebe3678c5983c78cccf549eafa923c3ff64fee
'2011-12-16T19:38:05-05:00'
describe
'26858' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJJ' 'sip-files00037.pro'
619c2d6160032feeb4d0938905c3aa83
c652d2034bc17ca78b2610f1de61a8088d5648cb
'2011-12-16T19:37:53-05:00'
describe
'25550' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJK' 'sip-files00038.pro'
1d8d00d6d0688d4c5b90d0a689ed6b79
3f3ad1950231d1ab7f50e02989a07b8df7fe52dd
'2011-12-16T19:40:20-05:00'
describe
'27199' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJL' 'sip-files00039.pro'
6166bb3b2795188c161bed9c35215ce3
8c55460dfe0491a7cd41369b9da25d8625267b01
'2011-12-16T19:36:48-05:00'
describe
'25990' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJM' 'sip-files00040.pro'
e6e60ab622f7367aa95ffc7733a26ee8
a3a1d499e38ed894df1d95e0271625e41cd6e970
'2011-12-16T19:41:48-05:00'
describe
'24126' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJN' 'sip-files00041.pro'
f45c3aee02146c21b57683e92d04f606
867575240fb31885b50509a71a72a074767aae06
'2011-12-16T19:39:52-05:00'
describe
'23833' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJO' 'sip-files00042.pro'
1eda65836a7143d69f993ff01c3ef08f
4ad7d13ba1aa5344a34a29054aa3249d07bbc898
'2011-12-16T19:40:00-05:00'
describe
'25141' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJP' 'sip-files00043.pro'
94545e0bb39f8b44577b7bece1101c42
b54359797cf9aaae9ba85dff554a3d52598b91df
'2011-12-16T19:35:46-05:00'
describe
'25145' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJQ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
c52414d3966457592c2fc2b6f81dc1fd
7bcb16784081fc30160ee7f693011ecbadfc1b22
'2011-12-16T19:36:31-05:00'
describe
'24784' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJR' 'sip-files00045.pro'
4a03a86980a2d2b090ea7a5df66dbd58
bbfc881c09c7a4f1513e98a6ee84cb0173789e36
describe
'24830' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJS' 'sip-files00046.pro'
be0ba001a2912bcabef260eccab5d041
bfe6a3b3a8c9951f890a333d3bd13aa6b05c8e8a
'2011-12-16T19:39:58-05:00'
describe
'26912' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJT' 'sip-files00047.pro'
9523b7b21ad5687c80c0fb588a646544
42388e35f8c0e8a0f9049b855953c306c5492b04
'2011-12-16T19:39:42-05:00'
describe
'26292' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJU' 'sip-files00048.pro'
771687b11d02bff91b6ad39d05f17656
4400dbfb6caaa247bc6f5cb8887f4436c6fbdda9
'2011-12-16T19:33:20-05:00'
describe
'27181' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJV' 'sip-files00049.pro'
3fa0590a0ded84f59dafcc24e81f6a9a
46d5f49d4e9a9a63b306fd668e6cdf3dba1960cb
'2011-12-16T19:33:52-05:00'
describe
'22099' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJW' 'sip-files00050.pro'
018d56b4745208beb378cf80494da629
f099798f66a83b5acab1cd9d8c2cb3a5f9ea4563
describe
'22008' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJX' 'sip-files00051.pro'
f72e32b4652baca953cd5d48dbad6fa9
714045dc0111d8c5a2724d1c9f450df34155a613
'2011-12-16T19:38:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJY' 'sip-files00052.pro'
2c4aaefa34d7aa0abdafb1bfca5878c9
a9b6201743c3a9fb39761cf53ac81114addcaa66
'2011-12-16T19:33:36-05:00'
describe
'25600' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALJZ' 'sip-files00053.pro'
8d8ef3e3558906a29d365f4f8074e06b
7c9c96f3c7f16d7afe87ed1052e3a434b71ad77a
describe
'25569' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKA' 'sip-files00054.pro'
4cb0af8c4b0d02a6daf2793a7112fbf2
5012327ceb00027ee281d330bc0ca23a37b76f5b
'2011-12-16T19:33:05-05:00'
describe
'27663' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKB' 'sip-files00055.pro'
de081d39d1a0fd3eda6fae06885f21ef
6d7216ba0a56a74fc9675dcb0be479f8b0888c93
'2011-12-16T19:38:24-05:00'
describe
'25311' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKC' 'sip-files00056.pro'
7b5cbfdddedf2f9b702786871da8bd3d
d09f6f6b249c475721d9292d9b3c65682c994e0e
'2011-12-16T19:30:26-05:00'
describe
'28354' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKD' 'sip-files00057.pro'
bbe1b27efe3eae13c40f1ea3a892e571
5a05578197ba6e161a42b6efda8e6fc56bd612cd
describe
'28224' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKE' 'sip-files00058.pro'
391a24916dc6e779637c70f62dcda64c
6b85897118f34def8cd6aad5f02e0b257ef16aa9
'2011-12-16T19:38:48-05:00'
describe
'27445' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKF' 'sip-files00059.pro'
456f0dae29cd875890f069c72993cb38
34c8539dc0a6edd13b833aa862ee498f16d8aa66
'2011-12-16T19:37:06-05:00'
describe
'26849' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKG' 'sip-files00060.pro'
2bcab0e5df95b9484060249763482904
61d8ac8a6cffc6b59dc6b17f17835d2b0c102c7e
describe
'26371' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKH' 'sip-files00061.pro'
e8bd0a0815a823efbfbb55481e37a350
00f7d0cc2d889594548819e305b61ea1ee71e065
'2011-12-16T19:35:07-05:00'
describe
'23005' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKI' 'sip-files00062.pro'
46bf3617638791c978e3b784f8eedd75
b4c32dde80db4d1ea7fce001837e402c59737b20
'2011-12-16T19:30:17-05:00'
describe
'24579' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKJ' 'sip-files00063.pro'
d8283bdd41c4644f45dcf5630cc5c441
91fb3c2fc029e4361cf25542017155a329d5ee25
describe
'26178' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKK' 'sip-files00064.pro'
df26efb6b051678bd359e754ef9d24a2
bc782d719adf0ee56a15852187d122e30fc94f2e
'2011-12-16T19:31:25-05:00'
describe
'28180' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKL' 'sip-files00065.pro'
b19629f7b876132f71eab34d5d151cb3
4e72a9680a250cc71f38622469dbef50195d8b48
'2011-12-16T19:38:21-05:00'
describe
'26584' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKM' 'sip-files00066.pro'
e8141840dfcf437228fe282eec37f22f
ad402e81f7be73c4e03c849817ba1724c74ee1ed
'2011-12-16T19:34:02-05:00'
describe
'25929' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKN' 'sip-files00067.pro'
5c176932150234350947858fc3499663
9eca16ce25c50986cf24c400823194d7d0b39a12
describe
'26478' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKO' 'sip-files00068.pro'
32b93b7b751ae0b3b40b21f7af8d6396
b4c8892bfd0d5656759719445c32fa528bd5b880
'2011-12-16T19:31:18-05:00'
describe
'27661' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKP' 'sip-files00069.pro'
2bf2a0f666f87d7b06709ef9f09ec70c
ebda32d3319ea4d1114ba5378e950ecfd7bfd629
'2011-12-16T19:41:42-05:00'
describe
'25725' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKQ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
56d2266aece3ff26741494ae074ca40e
1de3f720d78d067602b45917861ece12aed3f2e3
'2011-12-16T19:33:50-05:00'
describe
'25003' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKR' 'sip-files00071.pro'
fd11c75e732f22d573ec49555d3df681
b4452d0fdd1a6c81b28f3b9466d7db42bf9511d2
'2011-12-16T19:41:30-05:00'
describe
'6868' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKS' 'sip-files00072.pro'
239089fd88935e20ceb72c7f355e527d
ba99bff34248417b0983386b50bf42c1cefbf7d7
describe
'24544' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKT' 'sip-files00073.pro'
ea2c919542054e0481662408310dbaa4
5d673efca12c60813b513465d46b5d2cb8eb7b3b
'2011-12-16T19:35:17-05:00'
describe
'21170' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKU' 'sip-files00074.pro'
e242c4d5790effa7b141dc87e8b00d2a
fc2aac94be953bed211f59dc99266a620aa6cc47
describe
'28316' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKV' 'sip-files00075.pro'
bb3f8a6ce91909a134a1a18dfff48f91
f1e935a7923bd258661153e1c18b5f2288a9cf0f
'2011-12-16T19:38:35-05:00'
describe
'25522' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKW' 'sip-files00076.pro'
164225693f1f4a0c7465af7922a97514
ae3a1e0cb2d3b2e99de6375055068d6caafad52e
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKX' 'sip-files00077.pro'
c9db5662d4295071c4a463512e1407ba
11c6279fb5de9b71fc21c8ddac4f6279c072eff1
'2011-12-16T19:40:18-05:00'
describe
'26729' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKY' 'sip-files00078.pro'
ff170c1d71decd1df041bff2cbe61481
f14cd1ba8ff0e33837aaa9c3515c342870faf087
'2011-12-16T19:30:24-05:00'
describe
'27858' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALKZ' 'sip-files00079.pro'
1c6e70bd2d5b2d0ccce85c5336e2b3a4
1be160bd22c242e66666b080512df35573a53342
'2011-12-16T19:30:38-05:00'
describe
'27808' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLA' 'sip-files00080.pro'
d95ccf59298626d0b5ffbc3e358dc84c
c7b47bbb37e26827218a742e2f5aa4732029c066
describe
'27978' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLB' 'sip-files00081.pro'
455714c2f691faf2a56987c7e5553054
7e28c8ea33c512f07e35f94dd809725572cbc45d
describe
'26136' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLC' 'sip-files00082.pro'
8275b0cfcaccf5095c5304c62fbdc4c8
d0ec80967743a8c9c3abcd355aeadedf78b1490d
'2011-12-16T19:33:24-05:00'
describe
'24675' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLD' 'sip-files00083.pro'
17181e5a2a22bbecdeb0a14c5f88cfac
ad3afd638c9cb06a50002a6e01774982cdb0894b
'2011-12-16T19:41:23-05:00'
describe
'24682' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLE' 'sip-files00084.pro'
3c0bdf0a1d1703cd7c70a370b786572e
89c42caf4da12fbee4f76368a829e288bc9408b0
'2011-12-16T19:31:57-05:00'
describe
'25891' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLF' 'sip-files00085.pro'
f6e92f532ec4a497d21b7512a88b4ca6
cfa6774221044059222e3ddaa3e2536d4763889d
describe
'26203' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLG' 'sip-files00086.pro'
ce77d3b08ca573b372b8809bfcfebadd
28d2ae9d8c98e5025df1c5631f2ae8e43dd9e2ae
'2011-12-16T19:41:17-05:00'
describe
'26476' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLH' 'sip-files00087.pro'
24540e83fbc59f19ee1c9b4ab9909b9f
6acaebd5e4bab1d3e17c36119d5eefd1330b7238
describe
'26301' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLI' 'sip-files00088.pro'
07dbb697daee4c250fbaf3589818acde
fec524e73d5906c440155f4697f7f711a3af596d
'2011-12-16T19:31:02-05:00'
describe
'23509' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLJ' 'sip-files00089.pro'
acf9d734ec5ed5fde93c343a1bfed78a
e2b6d255f07d18c710942873d311bbc2ba1f77aa
'2011-12-16T19:35:08-05:00'
describe
'26126' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLK' 'sip-files00090.pro'
4f68a066d708ee1b0f76192a223c0aaf
b58831c422a97eb9bb09f6d07a086371e607755b
'2011-12-16T19:40:37-05:00'
describe
'27908' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLL' 'sip-files00091.pro'
3e023949fc7bdccbd730e612f2729386
e9deb106ac0af522a4333552a34a642c8dbfb104
describe
'24759' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLM' 'sip-files00092.pro'
ee61d3a1a81f56a835182a7834b46058
fdefaa4eea065cccd29a7c5e23b3ba1ebbf365a8
'2011-12-16T19:36:15-05:00'
describe
'10718' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLN' 'sip-files00093.pro'
f80f07f4209728e3fe0834861a7e4434
edb9367f849976de36a67c265b2b965c87b6a160
'2011-12-16T19:32:22-05:00'
describe
'19175' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLO' 'sip-files00094.pro'
01186617b35e6c0b54388166fcc184ed
ba5895fe24184b1d3ca814f9c0ef944250c0ccd2
'2011-12-16T19:34:58-05:00'
describe
'27873' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLP' 'sip-files00095.pro'
113cd1d255656eada76c4977dc70f575
08f5ddcab4330781b6655766c4338dd3beb8beef
describe
'27533' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLQ' 'sip-files00096.pro'
4703a2bc80d66a9de0c1a8b2d7f1b241
eb9c6bb647a85f8dccf03a06f2f875c61d2efa1e
'2011-12-16T19:33:56-05:00'
describe
'25789' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLR' 'sip-files00097.pro'
685fb1f5441ed007f01d39349b32308f
4b3987ba328a1a745bc3c08b91ecde1b1c2811e3
describe
'28199' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLS' 'sip-files00098.pro'
16403898deb2716afe200909d9bc915f
dfc4f784abe8ac6b1f83c7db57a2897171630cbf
'2011-12-16T19:41:04-05:00'
describe
'27595' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLT' 'sip-files00099.pro'
bb3970f58f7cd625af26e7696aa2cff9
0a2b0d2d1e6317e70b4e815b11dc73b17a84e96a
'2011-12-16T19:31:53-05:00'
describe
'28250' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLU' 'sip-files00100.pro'
24d17d4d310ed6a6825c969f91705dfa
942b4487da6c8f4ef8c8e00b9dd61099135db758
'2011-12-16T19:40:21-05:00'
describe
'28126' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLV' 'sip-files00101.pro'
c3c20d682b4c212f5fd949fb3e23c99f
15c3af388af7cd181a85baceaf2e2f3f495434a9
'2011-12-16T19:34:18-05:00'
describe
'25212' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLW' 'sip-files00102.pro'
dc39fb9f5d4464a34056c24b0affe21d
a34f5a391e49fed10d6c615ead8cd618a82c9e08
'2011-12-16T19:31:33-05:00'
describe
'27549' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLX' 'sip-files00103.pro'
e9dadb9d6d3d47960f86bee4d57b4b13
f158d1bf0c01230f7c208f976e0f85d54dcf26f1
'2011-12-16T19:37:19-05:00'
describe
'26290' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLY' 'sip-files00104.pro'
76af9750fdb09c5a65de12f6699e8022
3d3db080e438a62a884553ec90163765f6fdc626
'2011-12-16T19:40:12-05:00'
describe
'25312' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALLZ' 'sip-files00105.pro'
30e8b54c8ec3f898c79413811fd6ed3a
dc7f09d12a30f27431a7fa79e2f2f9d223067b3d
describe
'25616' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMA' 'sip-files00106.pro'
53d100cc42d54c3e667cc41144424014
7d840e84d85e83d81006610d5467ceb18af1a401
describe
'25370' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMB' 'sip-files00107.pro'
a76329936eb89138ca9bbf6df286f186
64b8f406a03f506e104f3baefc2723481a5e2a28
'2011-12-16T19:29:59-05:00'
describe
'25717' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMC' 'sip-files00108.pro'
4f92b39fb4d3b28f4730248ae29ca479
15ef9e526bab88bacb01af79aaef96fdd92bc6d2
describe
'27044' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMD' 'sip-files00109.pro'
71722c0ea91a6b558427ab5e937195c5
7afadd901e058d3c1db996c9da163adba91ac695
describe
'27766' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALME' 'sip-files00110.pro'
2396c6dad5306703f34f506319b74ec7
30b1f2f662472bb9198c7dd6457aadbd17ca622f
'2011-12-16T19:32:04-05:00'
describe
'24865' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMF' 'sip-files00111.pro'
0c83cdf02bdab7bda0a0a592a44a0eb7
b6f5f517785a19c599f7f638a3da51bca9010bd0
describe
'24453' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMG' 'sip-files00112.pro'
a1a548cc7864a61ada4f704280238138
1ed9abc9fba2d4da4eb54f53077f8268a06ae0f3
'2011-12-16T19:34:26-05:00'
describe
'24332' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMH' 'sip-files00113.pro'
8d312442c28ac74c06188512fff6cc66
df24d848a651131e51588130a234d8b5d24411fb
'2011-12-16T19:34:17-05:00'
describe
'26718' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMI' 'sip-files00114.pro'
c656691ff635746bede3958aee9d802f
cdce1ff5a1d87de1a616a3e98cf18f5b05d7bbda
'2011-12-16T19:37:16-05:00'
describe
'24305' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMJ' 'sip-files00115.pro'
f838d9b5ec6336397a4624f647500f41
ff7ee66ef2a250b14628e935676a2a235bee9623
'2011-12-16T19:36:22-05:00'
describe
'27984' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMK' 'sip-files00116.pro'
fe1e5c8d8671222bdddfde280371fd12
58b8b8650e53f4941528e134a703b415ed545571
'2011-12-16T19:41:21-05:00'
describe
'26532' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALML' 'sip-files00117.pro'
921722984ac494a5e4f5136e08636fd0
8dc18e5061043b7bc2325622058dfb297ae0755e
describe
'26056' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMM' 'sip-files00118.pro'
c7ce3807a7ae10537ca6caf6f6a180a0
f767900df6dc186a210e23c7d8a6428b5531d184
'2011-12-16T19:36:18-05:00'
describe
'26258' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMN' 'sip-files00119.pro'
07eb771c3275f553d3157d8443a4a9af
2c4c9cd9b2f4cd55bd841210e8aba28706f2ba8b
'2011-12-16T19:41:34-05:00'
describe
'25576' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMO' 'sip-files00120.pro'
3cee598893d138ce4d9caf1a50ed2586
28ba4bc6c37a2d9a1fd3ac2cc73e71fd33ac3007
describe
'26920' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMP' 'sip-files00121.pro'
ead4da03ab255a7a6ddf4da339dcfc39
570ea35fb04b3cd9131232f95a46fc6be08e7bb6
describe
'26761' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMQ' 'sip-files00122.pro'
9be48c0b8954c3d1ef2a2d6ed947db8a
5b5307f4650a5915b986b3e8f863c2a562f7be18
'2011-12-16T19:41:40-05:00'
describe
'26270' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMR' 'sip-files00123.pro'
4f3b22ab8acf719ee4d8be128d00ab0b
efeb56b0f0ae732a311ca857f76ee87f76e15fae
'2011-12-16T19:39:40-05:00'
describe
'26493' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMS' 'sip-files00124.pro'
7523db8a80910156046c726d8ccca98f
00d80a8ede59b0934dd51643acfde39f4525ad68
describe
'25977' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMT' 'sip-files00125.pro'
02986bb3636672b20c1f07ad7dfdc92e
64ee947933af0e3b096650e71c9c4481905b6dbf
describe
'28116' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMU' 'sip-files00126.pro'
6165277f6fe786b5ccb669d8eacf226a
70e653329c0857008339b96d960a7a16e57cf818
describe
'27753' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMV' 'sip-files00127.pro'
77a2f09191c1012965c86370fc86de3a
2f9351d13c59312ebdaeca27af9054e40cc35743
'2011-12-16T19:41:31-05:00'
describe
'26782' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMW' 'sip-files00128.pro'
6e21ba0e7d01c38ba92a44b9d9e7d3f7
7d0f5cd9a1c3abd2c416f073408a94d799bbcf9f
'2011-12-16T19:38:00-05:00'
describe
'25991' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMX' 'sip-files00129.pro'
79ab00c2c2afbcd4af64a2d2867b4078
a0b83930d1d16e4cc519decf7c0fee70ef2efbd8
'2011-12-16T19:36:34-05:00'
describe
'26714' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMY' 'sip-files00130.pro'
b59906202a51a19dc948964338cd9857
28db8faf1ecad458b7e04d6aa634c28ffda7ecee
describe
'26546' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALMZ' 'sip-files00131.pro'
a52a32f2bea5dc1379106e4e797a67cd
d61094183fa4204b6aa0b6741eb16261b969c694
'2011-12-16T19:38:55-05:00'
describe
'10272' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNA' 'sip-files00132.pro'
8a0162b515088d2dfe9f599c2caec4b9
63f8c5767c8c8c49cdd7119d44c7bdee38f1247c
describe
'16251' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNB' 'sip-files00133.pro'
a605bc25a550dd71c52977277d445038
9e9b8c39da04f7ee40177db684043bb44a7660e8
describe
'27643' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNC' 'sip-files00134.pro'
c3092e64594bf029a6d6682da646c323
7d0f633872d2874f49f264760e4e4f566503f91b
describe
'24844' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALND' 'sip-files00135.pro'
007a5456caac4b7b27ab66a76e95a433
16a8350c4cee5cf1768e5d230999a1aea928b6dc
describe
'23084' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNE' 'sip-files00136.pro'
0f13c377eb9424ce3cdb2ba02965e4d0
117c4dd9b4412c0058b325c56ed2f76326cab187
describe
'24057' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNF' 'sip-files00137.pro'
b7e35574047d251a9e2d21aa3f047899
bcfbbeec5a8d7e7ae98e34f0c9ac274602601cf7
'2011-12-16T19:38:13-05:00'
describe
'26727' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNG' 'sip-files00138.pro'
f0ba086d43a4ac5225840173dc20f5bf
2b8160e4967a63d40b26523106a26f42aadeaaa2
describe
'23461' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNH' 'sip-files00139.pro'
1c4f8c726355b723415a6b3c42086ec3
e0f02e0cbbf67d0ec95fb725a2507395ba34f83c
'2011-12-16T19:41:27-05:00'
describe
'25278' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNI' 'sip-files00140.pro'
3113a6f5d7aaafede79151eee16ff8b8
1bd183c6e4c8925676a0ab717520ce5eb4689d20
'2011-12-16T19:30:58-05:00'
describe
'23344' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNJ' 'sip-files00141.pro'
9a95c5e20b11ce5ea312418b6fff49e0
e0da12827b3eed4faf5be0705df6ae2bed796947
'2011-12-16T19:38:34-05:00'
describe
'23302' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNK' 'sip-files00142.pro'
ad8c51e41f848e67d1a80f094f72674b
85b6dd24e642fad1801b3e7676081d0f21d690ee
describe
'25041' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNL' 'sip-files00143.pro'
cc781508ddedebd6e4255df37af6c598
d0aad72a7910e0613841ebc99f8199d6de25a29a
'2011-12-16T19:40:43-05:00'
describe
'26989' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNM' 'sip-files00144.pro'
5734e78f6e5a9b165b4ba6e05b9d94b9
15fc2f09babc3fb46ed84e7b5139c8573d70173e
'2011-12-16T19:35:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNN' 'sip-files00145.pro'
224e6082acd580d5d4e5767c9754e5d3
ab2b96f554445f931dcdb036940503827b3062d0
'2011-12-16T19:35:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNO' 'sip-files00146.pro'
2a188f533f47d674372dc110d79c8b3d
5bcb39b2a98e59c314ffb0677e182989e8598a78
describe
'26704' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNP' 'sip-files00147.pro'
647e8d07612672a18e86eae9d8f6e1f2
6b59cb6b6f167682fad63b40a4a6640b685415ae
describe
'25458' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNQ' 'sip-files00148.pro'
814086752a767fa479f0f79beea8b1e0
c2a1ba86f1e8931987d9ed2bd606996947f298ff
describe
'23301' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNR' 'sip-files00149.pro'
2ffd724653fa09258fa4acf9dc610923
068cc17270a3f90039f5e0251b7552eb929c98e5
'2011-12-16T19:35:06-05:00'
describe
'24097' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNS' 'sip-files00150.pro'
a9365c99b1e6db249a34a38d2175899d
42c9225e70de3be7cce8bfb4af2d4a0404fb94a3
'2011-12-16T19:38:19-05:00'
describe
'25318' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNT' 'sip-files00151.pro'
f65dbf5788e90832e532b9d4415f8016
100aa0751efca93a1e972380d865cf67aa241b1b
describe
'26419' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNU' 'sip-files00152.pro'
3b952c783d79d3ace7c014869a20a0a6
de8f48c7831af2596f8435de798d3c29b2d7ef98
describe
'25101' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNV' 'sip-files00153.pro'
ed91f256e4a97bf41ab99857cab992fd
c246e019419878bf2a50f2d837737a991e3737ec
'2011-12-16T19:34:30-05:00'
describe
'22777' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNW' 'sip-files00154.pro'
3234340586ca155dbcb3e11f10e4bb57
fef1c86179bd1e3c18661944ed23dbf05b489d1c
describe
'25734' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNX' 'sip-files00155.pro'
0d90be4ee31646a0fc5efbef31d95d08
01dde0a4bbea57f61b24af7fb970c940275c370e
describe
'5815' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNY' 'sip-files00156.pro'
d8224a56be6c72769e23a3794cf9fcf2
45a35f954bbcac8d98d3b2b13b146c1b0c19d4f9
describe
'18036' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALNZ' 'sip-files00157.pro'
cce8cbff6efaaeac86806a7a6580ac80
94ec6fb66a0a5e3eb5b681f620499b84fc382eab
'2011-12-16T19:42:03-05:00'
describe
'27022' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOA' 'sip-files00158.pro'
703bd271e9a16234247c36c7e9c200cd
a48e5ea5d64c41a7c06242d2f5bc441f47111386
describe
'27132' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOB' 'sip-files00159.pro'
b4fe3cff8a4340a79049c73055651812
3f9ad33538d79c1079b530fa05f5bb7a61c47c37
describe
'26818' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOC' 'sip-files00160.pro'
e1cde7260e839cb32729fdfeb4b8e835
c6120f54d568191e47d755414d577958f43d6795
'2011-12-16T19:34:54-05:00'
describe
'26281' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOD' 'sip-files00161.pro'
5a0aa124a824151f10c551b070321273
4973ba29b40fec17116b3c114dd3bbfa3ab1d216
describe
'21631' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOE' 'sip-files00162.pro'
537d8e234e3a0518cb988dbc8b538ab8
4e903a64e92403687eed6228c4694bc03257a124
'2011-12-16T19:34:14-05:00'
describe
'22827' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOF' 'sip-files00163.pro'
d8c03930f323e6322d303d79afe51490
7011d02478ad08554040295af7e2f7253cf6060c
'2011-12-16T19:33:32-05:00'
describe
'26176' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOG' 'sip-files00164.pro'
aefe130462648ff277007b3dc26e2c77
fa8ccd09a5b3176f4874ebbf3851e7e45d9caffe
'2011-12-16T19:34:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOH' 'sip-files00165.pro'
8f5782faa35f2fe2104983ddf2a57ef3
f1d2691f36d369e6fd8da8bb9c6a655f89e31264
'2011-12-16T19:37:30-05:00'
describe
'6411' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOI' 'sip-files00166.pro'
c13b120f663d4792fbb09c84ded16ffa
59b0b68ff46493cd775f582ca6f96d6be2197163
describe
'18979' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOJ' 'sip-files00167.pro'
eccdef004272b6d114b1a8004a45fdfc
92b507b75ce55ff5097342f1eef885ee11d38b0d
'2011-12-16T19:37:09-05:00'
describe
'27322' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOK' 'sip-files00168.pro'
b559514ce3978da9546229de16fea26c
bb6502a08cd2d1760a1bf06eee6ae696e803b370
'2011-12-16T19:37:40-05:00'
describe
'27257' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOL' 'sip-files00169.pro'
f545d53d89f2acc2136b6cf02f58edd8
1901ba8cbd70a04b7e111b12f708a8a4f9fc29e2
describe
'26495' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOM' 'sip-files00170.pro'
16bafc15f13f2ab9c62cbc4df38b924d
c122967da8ec19a969b444beb09273f1aeb347ca
'2011-12-16T19:41:06-05:00'
describe
'4708' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALON' 'sip-files00171.pro'
704fd57354ba0dfcc4066f6539168d0f
c0e4d91231c91da8384242bb877e9ce6f440b80e
describe
'19618' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOO' 'sip-files00172.pro'
0571b23be515c1df088417dbcc94755e
c5f7c163e1f17bd313ff02d92d3609570da1946f
'2011-12-16T19:41:46-05:00'
describe
'13082' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOP' 'sip-files00173.pro'
345d3338d0b0c2f2a9609d203dd098df
cc5c124c75e49d38fd953b7b8a0087e40d9bb8f8
describe
'20244' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOQ' 'sip-files00174.pro'
42036efa4ff18544067b490540b5f843
6654e3c5adcd4803f4bc6d2802be34da58acf49e
'2011-12-16T19:40:04-05:00'
describe
'27333' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOR' 'sip-files00175.pro'
e2308b31d18d8f42cc1eceba4b87b3fc
566a575ea6895b48d6368a02cd53c71adbfa0a97
'2011-12-16T19:36:04-05:00'
describe
'25882' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOS' 'sip-files00176.pro'
58958b82551a40a3b1904fcacf00d0f2
6791f4a602256f0e768262f198473a430e4e7e66
'2011-12-16T19:32:54-05:00'
describe
'19998' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOT' 'sip-files00177.pro'
14d9c4d096289c349c8893e57166db02
29cefa6592a85a3d844472d6cb0b2aa7d36c05a6
'2011-12-16T19:29:57-05:00'
describe
'27317' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOU' 'sip-files00178.pro'
aebfb726256cba14501ac861a9819760
8d9337807d3adc275c97d76c420fbb048eeba867
describe
'26213' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOV' 'sip-files00179.pro'
6b5a52483f93cd337e91dc1889ca0a89
30a5f767b8c806265585185a8aa142483fbe8a0c
describe
'13796' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOW' 'sip-files00180.pro'
da7b0e279b77476ab2cbc6550167528c
4917ce9a0f18a035ab971b815a0909ae93cb15f6
describe
'21217' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOX' 'sip-files00181.pro'
ff0738ea8bb3b90f6ed9756e1cd1f59e
dcd4892c5280cc90d431bfb0d5e8e6746177e4ea
describe
'27287' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOY' 'sip-files00182.pro'
bb213dfd4a587e3e1307af545f089054
764dac5bc97913da03e85d13c72ef7e3b69c2944
'2011-12-16T19:38:17-05:00'
describe
'27161' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALOZ' 'sip-files00183.pro'
5ba7c22dddffa722fb23d324dbbbee2a
29b6ff44a513e77f14bc25d4fd68003a23d0fdf7
'2011-12-16T19:40:24-05:00'
describe
'25258' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPA' 'sip-files00184.pro'
ae784720d59eccc0796deea6d6dcb297
49079291779a2193d8b5828edfd01bd0ab382ea5
'2011-12-16T19:38:44-05:00'
describe
'24640' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPB' 'sip-files00185.pro'
26358bcda220bdbeda8a385cba8ded70
6f97b2d3c2965dfb355eda2dcc09d752de489d19
'2011-12-16T19:36:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPC' 'sip-files00186.pro'
b5a93b363231fd9b529bfefc724a6683
4498c188c5847965e9491752455541f6ef91543c
describe
'26338' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPD' 'sip-files00187.pro'
295259ee51a2f22eca51d41111147200
ab5a4dacc3ed40708d89e5d9df52887116b9865d
'2011-12-16T19:39:53-05:00'
describe
'27474' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPE' 'sip-files00188.pro'
09d871ba05ce63c649cc039bdbf684b9
ac9cfa94bbeec68bf4a66f9ae7b64e0e9d8cf2c5
describe
'25936' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPF' 'sip-files00189.pro'
d8110e6a37cb04ecc6c508b3a81701f4
83acbb3abb96134331fa0b146c0c0db1c9109314
describe
'25180' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPG' 'sip-files00190.pro'
f696e41880f1b52da68d43d137170180
a87b32378415f4970d7b3d5bf81801f7a4fe92cf
'2011-12-16T19:31:34-05:00'
describe
'25791' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPH' 'sip-files00191.pro'
da740c5ed43c377803d0771d71963a74
e6310bfd9da89bbd64c8f53e4434e6faf654e764
describe
'27186' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPI' 'sip-files00192.pro'
49df4cea350b612ce97495502e0bd239
457a42f10738f58093fe5985db3a57e447df8cf5
describe
'26235' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPJ' 'sip-files00193.pro'
5f0f2728b4bff4ece666711f4b2068f5
d5b485f7957d95f99dbd702747bc9b5a58195737
'2011-12-16T19:37:22-05:00'
describe
'7219' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPK' 'sip-files00194.pro'
ada9dc221e66a13c257d1ed3f0e3d2b6
15bbfe4427af4a8cb6304601b288fad04d46f2f7
describe
'20684' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPL' 'sip-files00195.pro'
e7977b7223c72b0c6447ba86af7d8659
cf08538260316bf1002890957e6359af1d92fec9
'2011-12-16T19:32:21-05:00'
describe
'27037' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPM' 'sip-files00196.pro'
538ae1798d287117062093f84d57eea2
b69b50fefcfd36a950dbc5f7acdc31b66880352f
'2011-12-16T19:29:53-05:00'
describe
'26726' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPN' 'sip-files00197.pro'
12817339707124cc301f53c7155b52aa
0e4de1dcab698fd4c901c49170d82e2ec2807200
'2011-12-16T19:39:02-05:00'
describe
'27350' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPO' 'sip-files00198.pro'
a8abb5f0782d0479640ae1b80bd1d707
b0ff353232adc807d94bf1346987c8db7d0bc381
'2011-12-16T19:39:20-05:00'
describe
'26527' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPP' 'sip-files00199.pro'
3ef17d2b05a90df0711e64efc939d39d
cf327d3125fe3b3f655cd925714160fad28bb372
describe
'26747' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPQ' 'sip-files00200.pro'
191547c2fea7c320fd130fa287827036
cd55768240414a98fa06d9d8e24d7869bfc3ea91
describe
'17372' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPR' 'sip-files00201.pro'
1a17c44efe4824bfb699c90ee8a37075
08b3b3b1e1d04bd04ed45ce230ed80e7e33e0119
'2011-12-16T19:34:32-05:00'
describe
'21588' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPS' 'sip-files00202.pro'
dade6cd6dd6a631521e5050795f16c5c
e3c42b2773656a5c259e33023b9b32e6f2c56831
describe
'25463' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPT' 'sip-files00203.pro'
6268bdc5e61d72f407baf6ceb13d6696
b547b1a79d71312d0f4015d022db1142a47e84f6
'2011-12-16T19:38:28-05:00'
describe
'25863' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPU' 'sip-files00204.pro'
2b70a23498b365a727af1cbf765bcee1
940dd94a42027baddebcebd683367113f28a93f2
describe
'20512' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPV' 'sip-files00205.pro'
1a1d69b5d7a1766ed27aec186e6433ee
e1aa21eba30cf3d53307ae3681f07618ce7a6b94
describe
'26848' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPW' 'sip-files00206.pro'
a079706fe088903882eaf157e76cc938
0f56f94cdde6fdc71daf9ca03de7e4c588294096
describe
'26001' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPX' 'sip-files00207.pro'
dd70c3f171c5e7721218e89afb9d2434
61592f6746fee6d1a9323f2c36c501b52c70d47d
'2011-12-16T19:32:30-05:00'
describe
'27111' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPY' 'sip-files00208.pro'
0776a248df27ac78dba911cf5cf9e07f
321fb4fb3fdf7b6514e48f4116f76a60221d5122
'2011-12-16T19:31:07-05:00'
describe
'26626' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALPZ' 'sip-files00209.pro'
8b204f3a8990a6a60376f6d1348b7215
7a8af94d36e70085ddd28e5c014a67a1fcd85138
describe
'8044' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQA' 'sip-files00210.pro'
6f044cc49e7d47f4d77602fa71741d29
d69c844a0f6abb886b3229c76042ae0939dbb6a2
'2011-12-16T19:30:33-05:00'
describe
'20198' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQB' 'sip-files00211.pro'
ecb2009af962f6602305f274a34c43eb
822acc16172121a47b0335ffe3c1b7b5c09c9e35
describe
'26040' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQC' 'sip-files00212.pro'
e6aecdc398a16c9169c3027cc133201d
6db19a778d5ec8e19032588f4fa956f270ce788f
'2011-12-16T19:32:24-05:00'
describe
'25227' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQD' 'sip-files00213.pro'
d4b4a113ba54aa833d00a084f41d5554
2df4cbcbe4c0b566b52546d73221ebebd2c759f0
'2011-12-16T19:39:08-05:00'
describe
'26317' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQE' 'sip-files00214.pro'
52e7a3b6d9d55f2ea4ed38f8301820e6
6502d6164f092106e5e4cd3bbb93f123d76dae32
'2011-12-16T19:36:23-05:00'
describe
'22729' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQF' 'sip-files00215.pro'
8d5c455d1c1d2dd632463e9323367f78
c4e7965c0adca03e12717a70083acca2d5b1f391
describe
'21326' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQG' 'sip-files00216.pro'
6fd58d06c8c9be58915f879fe9600d55
4a78c044186e330f5f29b8a86dc47cf66a8c8cb5
describe
'23262' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQH' 'sip-files00217.pro'
f2864f16f64e015c8cf652e4a32e5cb5
06f2a1c695c63bf08f7d0d2f304432510a53160d
describe
'23952' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQI' 'sip-files00218.pro'
a56401f5f7ee57d90b469de5a53f7124
7445834df27a62e570ea49dae1c704ab21d3494e
'2011-12-16T19:35:37-05:00'
describe
'24862' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQJ' 'sip-files00219.pro'
0343d6a79b90fc80d5f0562e36dc8177
ebb97ea87d49cb3b96d08feee720f0110ef37c78
describe
'24383' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQK' 'sip-files00220.pro'
502f78c76f95c05d6b3a886161d7e0d9
2f7694f2364df0c33960ddd0125b3d3de68b85a9
'2011-12-16T19:39:54-05:00'
describe
'25402' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQL' 'sip-files00221.pro'
7febcd39656d3ef4cb9c5e246c83c52f
44f5e8cf57f2993fbf7668006b8b56b905e3fe10
'2011-12-16T19:35:50-05:00'
describe
'25639' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQM' 'sip-files00222.pro'
0a858993730eb0fa856ec2e6bc1e4cd1
61e8b02a972cff01e3dc42bb16ee08354621c336
describe
'11946' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQN' 'sip-files00223.pro'
56932ab9b4fc1ce2745d87a5dcc38c66
eb19958f1514895604d0c1d16db8b35f17011c8a
'2011-12-16T19:40:51-05:00'
describe
'15887' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQO' 'sip-files00224.pro'
3e0bb3d5eda17d38eff90c8468119970
eb1fd467d3efbf73c2daefea827cacd77964ca99
'2011-12-16T19:33:16-05:00'
describe
'25730' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQP' 'sip-files00225.pro'
6e566614a5b20f638622ff8ff97429e8
689c96cbb7c6ae6479811e27600a4f18f884e9da
describe
'26191' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQQ' 'sip-files00226.pro'
9c69b2d3024f369dfbff33ff75239a6d
dc78670effd2071c09011ef4e78954197db17077
describe
'27072' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQR' 'sip-files00227.pro'
0c74f6c40a819eb218c76235aaef3a68
8d6b04aa5cc231cc7502809320cfc7ffc877bf1c
'2011-12-16T19:30:04-05:00'
describe
'26395' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQS' 'sip-files00228.pro'
77d5e817276c1fa98830b4d65c028211
0c9348f8070d1836e55e74ad98bec3541fb9f723
'2011-12-16T19:35:11-05:00'
describe
'26404' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQT' 'sip-files00229.pro'
f532b3a30623bb8386d8a932ac666d4a
363b32dde7938aa349d5c58597d28c86c24904f5
describe
'26944' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQU' 'sip-files00230.pro'
c19b70da12417b9ddf823d2b41fa2c11
b1806f9b5a0c7a3ef7992c7e5a54e6f6754ec185
'2011-12-16T19:30:55-05:00'
describe
'26549' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQV' 'sip-files00231.pro'
10428494eb79640b169a48c3a70334c8
fbf0e8810a762adb78af6a15ee2354443f376539
describe
'26869' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQW' 'sip-files00232.pro'
37569d87c7a038d0d4999eb46b26c90b
cc92b14cf009ed91b94be39628a8b7ec684e472b
'2011-12-16T19:39:30-05:00'
describe
'24055' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQX' 'sip-files00233.pro'
904dfb2d8637bd3171266063b23ecd7f
0f13004bb410b0255c3cdbf7db00ce2e0f934f47
'2011-12-16T19:41:33-05:00'
describe
'26248' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQY' 'sip-files00234.pro'
09ac8086101cbbc5c83e3f39fda15be6
3fad60467524e0c84dbde07cedaed1943c8b25c0
describe
'22559' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALQZ' 'sip-files00235.pro'
8d763da2705b70e525aa95dfb3af4044
a751732a31cdad4c16fee289c11e3616d6d95812
describe
'26503' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRA' 'sip-files00236.pro'
9312e94c814f17aad8d26951dce37ebb
cec1265abfa37828b90a5b919c25e2f0e159a469
describe
'26564' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRB' 'sip-files00237.pro'
036a926841191939c01aa9875ba02e21
1c7906655d3756a9962248221275f3fb0bc52fce
'2011-12-16T19:40:07-05:00'
describe
'26705' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRC' 'sip-files00238.pro'
25b2b60fa415340c4e92fd4da77c3845
d3e70480e39fe4b4e26a07289c30e2e47636277d
'2011-12-16T19:33:27-05:00'
describe
'23609' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRD' 'sip-files00239.pro'
33022f8dbf5c1675bb64fab99474fb8c
629936cd83b1804c2863f02bfd16fbfb4931eb6d
'2011-12-16T19:33:45-05:00'
describe
'26956' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRE' 'sip-files00240.pro'
1642baa8030b27066bdb4408cfa79a5c
264abb7d659e62a5f9e198e1a1384c09579426b0
describe
'27503' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRF' 'sip-files00241.pro'
e344ae8ab6a31512f104ce7a895481a2
b3f17d2a8badfe974e71607f9690e933bb4dd3e4
describe
'26211' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRG' 'sip-files00242.pro'
717a387c5a48c31e414aab84a861d2aa
e32a48142b86c4431dc46fbf6238503f63abb46a
describe
'25150' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRH' 'sip-files00243.pro'
6d00e7696adc7b1d4a0d09b336e743d1
172914726941e8de8d9d64d0e5262ce0acbb1ea3
describe
'24687' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRI' 'sip-files00244.pro'
5b8742c40e8eb2b9608bbb5f50dd1321
c660c15108429467508e5cb62e253ede3dceee7e
describe
'25672' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRJ' 'sip-files00245.pro'
cc609bed5ffe47f5a2d4f702269e8361
f5bec40e9052dfa9b08fff2e9d94628647661a7e
'2011-12-16T19:39:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRK' 'sip-files00246.pro'
81db22deb87742bf2f8578dc3e872c33
d4c13e4ff664c644f8f62f7103c15b8e009af445
'2011-12-16T19:39:21-05:00'
describe
'25157' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRL' 'sip-files00247.pro'
4aedd7cba3039cd434a7766120785ef2
2d9037cd720675807b73f9897cb3ffbd537e4071
describe
'23885' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRM' 'sip-files00248.pro'
78857675090e523ef38facfe8f8fa6f7
a37326dfbc4be1d09bf3c2a5d49777da729b7e08
'2011-12-16T19:35:21-05:00'
describe
'26114' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRN' 'sip-files00249.pro'
21a572479918df7b5a3f4b9f1bf330e5
07cbcc4f837eef5cde1cc2dc4724c4e555162574
describe
'26833' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRO' 'sip-files00250.pro'
6a10047fc7728a51d6c29187457bda29
7a2c516ecf57ef6739f01277c974c349e8e0b810
'2011-12-16T19:30:19-05:00'
describe
'25653' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRP' 'sip-files00251.pro'
994075e05d953c89fb6d03e82660a337
e5a60db6c52672b9c26d02d469e36185c42bf2e0
describe
'23882' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRQ' 'sip-files00252.pro'
2d1be4845e4047dd966f90e9740112ed
051c9234d0cf7d87cd9da93bcd86ebcbdb0b4a22
'2011-12-16T19:38:59-05:00'
describe
'26750' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRR' 'sip-files00253.pro'
b3da35cfe167e91691b75fee49b1da9a
a64c33f30698ece23cf62cee75cdbd35e75dc765
describe
'25955' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRS' 'sip-files00254.pro'
cc9ad2929eb661e498e96be85f0b7b23
5e267c27dadebfef5a98e0ad03a7918185ca007e
'2011-12-16T19:31:23-05:00'
describe
'21697' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRT' 'sip-files00255.pro'
032f03e9e6a271694e4515389e8cd485
165d2e4d31b83fe234493d6070e1c12f597c396c
'2011-12-16T19:34:10-05:00'
describe
'25481' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRU' 'sip-files00256.pro'
0646d8ddaf95a8843890be5a5255d2da
03553fccac97e87502d43d7b7e8ad2e6f4bfa0f5
'2011-12-16T19:36:37-05:00'
describe
'27253' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRV' 'sip-files00257.pro'
10b96de6fb3cf2990c735d2340c8620a
ed7cc0a7713eda7996b32d8372345dde349a916e
'2011-12-16T19:31:24-05:00'
describe
'5785' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRW' 'sip-files00258.pro'
a54b664d3322df0ffdba07eb51e0af5b
6e18b186983a690ad062cdee2cc6efc9d4448792
'2011-12-16T19:32:18-05:00'
describe
'1071834' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRX' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
aec5646aa17f6146931dc6f638484b0e
2d1d09b3effb129be0469d01544328fb02aa95bb
'2011-12-16T19:38:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRY' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
a8dc415e0037f6f8c400755dfd6278c1
9913e85deedb55fd9ca49db9c99f929237c91348
describe
'16240' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALRZ' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
62e723df16abd8e6ce2aeae3dbdf4fbf
acf324b7af791223a488b0358a8330f77dc388b4
'2011-12-16T19:31:26-05:00'
describe
'9946' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSA' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
7bbcdb8066ee05d14efdf8241f5481ad
1d82d77af8e92901e698e8980e1442e145f3c1da
'2011-12-16T19:38:41-05:00'
describe
'23962' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSB' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
e2fd241a5252ab3033e2f96679fb90a9
0c029d77c5c40d0208aac96e8bf8d6741291c709
'2011-12-16T19:41:57-05:00'
describe
'32401' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSC' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
80ce5dda8fc7295f4554db7c20d22d21
dd1962672a178a6b998e84665c1003d507607012
'2011-12-16T19:30:35-05:00'
describe
'41743' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSD' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
322e1958f3f0e91f2ef693d29dd27290
205e335b5a7ac39761a0c679c96b6378235f113d
describe
'248838' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSE' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
6338f55d79446423e9792d223563ad87
8060d62a8cfc3a677a80177034f7db5441f5d3f4
'2011-12-16T19:41:55-05:00'
describe
'226321' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSF' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
c5a13c0123b4a9af09ad3452ef07c172
8403650a85d53c817a6ffb02e79f77cb398ff094
'2011-12-16T19:32:06-05:00'
describe
'241927' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSG' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
0db59858676ce9f2eca7f3c9fa4a8fbe
938524a90c37c065ad0f5fa33b9590c23d186197
'2011-12-16T19:36:39-05:00'
describe
'229579' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSH' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
11fc7c7cc0d3b6e3479a00a901a61c0d
232ab9b0c94a5657af2645568c3ac662185eca23
'2011-12-16T19:38:10-05:00'
describe
'48644' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSI' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
ae324346d8d28f3ba646559141494ae9
ff16868e406004fc7a0745c4197182ada4b7875b
describe
'47013' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSJ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
b9b421ec459e5cfe852d88f6cfa336c5
691e4535964ddf9c3173410520ed116ff7c64469
'2011-12-16T19:40:33-05:00'
describe
'48491' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSK' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
7ce634bb4ca4290a23e3c5e665a7abce
78f28e01a4dd6017b08074109e21c0b0f5e2e974
'2011-12-16T19:36:53-05:00'
describe
'46772' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSL' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
91946411595d7a94386eb514cdf9d088
d1a2006df061ff81b4bf252f3b960cab93aa5500
describe
'49056' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSM' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
07e7a481c9e19f5a36a72d2e4d44f486
fabc7afc058bf4e0d5848a90fc97b5a8ff63fc0d
describe
'49996' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSN' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
918fbfd35a9a2033b552da42cbff159c
aa3fcfe505caa0696fc6a8d63ed1bf5a013fea4d
describe
'48171' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSO' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
803e8fe3459133b71384f6f3c55b64aa
a743186daeab0d2cbde8132bebd11e42b496b073
'2011-12-16T19:40:22-05:00'
describe
'48754' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSP' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
7f50087ad8b7b55234c6f13e267732df
5fac77fd3b55f1492b0c5694ad927926b2257dfe
'2011-12-16T19:39:13-05:00'
describe
'48285' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSQ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
e735adc3e9edaabd85652e7935678c41
b86ca44058d8a2a51b7191c69366fcca6ca3640b
describe
'44852' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSR' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
f61a651e9d27bbc534f86533d1966974
09b59188620a150c677335c41f7a1b5fa001be21
'2011-12-16T19:34:22-05:00'
describe
'29868' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSS' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
abb47b7231433250bfdda0b0fa15ad3e
49c979f0658080a86ae840ab10e21f88afbeb8df
'2011-12-16T19:30:57-05:00'
describe
'50008' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALST' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
a9c335defb5ba8ff5d1a428d04910c77
8accb313f5d1159edbb477954a1367eeebdd78f8
'2011-12-16T19:38:26-05:00'
describe
'51130' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSU' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
ad79514c94cbd4cbbcd7550052f41c48
acf17dcc5ec8ecddf80139f899a51c7de9577f3c
'2011-12-16T19:35:56-05:00'
describe
'49980' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSV' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
6a2891ca741ddbac5c0ba6ce8e3d0aab
987db23016f84cbebd803f6ecf3b5cb9505650c7
describe
'49909' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSW' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
a10839ebad8a6a4e42483b6dd8971512
3ad70bc015990555860ed3f5bc1fe479d417e271
'2011-12-16T19:32:01-05:00'
describe
'48301' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSX' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
6b2bc23efb6c157f02353d1ace2ec223
4428d7ba9a88fbedf5c44ed6e392028601a96042
'2011-12-16T19:41:11-05:00'
describe
'50792' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSY' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
43a5bdeda287c77e88c2abfc592d9bb2
c7119ab5707b075408e544aa74f207b20b8da97d
'2011-12-16T19:35:10-05:00'
describe
'47055' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALSZ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
d86f8a7fa5d57bb0e2a2f1b84e35efda
173988f1b6eede84ff7269fe9a684b80b1a84d4b
'2011-12-16T19:40:34-05:00'
describe
'46376' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTA' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
9ee901f4a85d7168fb31374d451752d4
d66dc93b7aef178f91b1c3e565d49c60befafe6a
'2011-12-16T19:31:32-05:00'
describe
'49335' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTB' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
cf3ce960ccfd153a0c092bc5bee78a82
646b46bd7b13764a7bf6d85e80b7014e64277730
describe
'48092' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTC' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
d6dd44f532262e2c28b8bd2ec0edecf6
fd2041c300042572597fbdaf653c94a2235cf6ca
'2011-12-16T19:35:57-05:00'
describe
'47245' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTD' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
b66ee0bff3849179cdebef0e13f31a76
8687435ffe6475afe80b8c6a299ea6b916b0892e
'2011-12-16T19:41:09-05:00'
describe
'47555' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTE' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
98d3ddf0b1096b3df0db80ee3383aca0
74dc8fc2b72446e5ad6620be1f48834125367930
'2011-12-16T19:33:41-05:00'
describe
'47043' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTF' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
a48e690169e8a3dfe804a749d19097b3
1839c3381f4b016b2fee84d84f669a0c5860809e
'2011-12-16T19:33:11-05:00'
describe
'49579' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTG' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
923bdb5c1e82d0c1f1f52ef538b07154
cb5bb8e0a7baedd7a05a13666292e1b98704526d
describe
'45566' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTH' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
47f3456baf7d16e578ea94723a9106f7
5dab0a8e4901169a955858c8d606cfdc67823836
'2011-12-16T19:30:59-05:00'
describe
'49239' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTI' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
b829b58e5a20f9edc1b753c65dfe1133
11ff6797d9151d52b2a3ae29e97f272df1123dbf
describe
'47617' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTJ' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
3d008803a86f3d3c873e2f30fcecdca4
7bcfa2e03b5f9594faa90cd8e31d72ec3a8a7ee3
describe
'44332' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTK' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
cebcca0976af4628ef808c5aa4b53bcc
e52ba25e25d16637f51bdd087f11eddffabaffe9
describe
'43925' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTL' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
bfa1b10b06269bcb8501172884fddb56
f9000a1bf85b97ae3e5ba80f0bcfd54ca6b34e7e
'2011-12-16T19:40:11-05:00'
describe
'46452' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTM' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
0309ca609a490c4700d1f082ec8d5f1b
2785a4982b13018933277740ee9120cd613a772b
describe
'46237' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTN' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
60a26663ce3d2d899617d5ff6dd7e1c6
19125d00adf2338d523b73100b5675d359702fe8
describe
'45390' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTO' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
6dec8aa4085731736e5e6d26512dd492
cbf3071c37103f98ff83afced5e3c5ac13b4a0d8
describe
'45459' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTP' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
faa80eedb039757f4c6047e12758b635
b4508b0dc45007f2679eca05bc48cd8db45284e9
'2011-12-16T19:38:14-05:00'
describe
'49870' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTQ' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
e87e117e3c6fac0b0eeb9a9df003f0e4
83aaea3298dcfbdbba726b21244cf5c3c71f857f
describe
'47926' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTR' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
032104da0451b217ca3c7ef9ec9eed51
b3ed9f658a5bf18a5f823a540019f0eec6d266ba
describe
'49869' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTS' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
228751dd3b32d4f51deb15190dc0f1b4
1bd1b0e889d7ae63e2483cfedbdec4b999c3c7eb
describe
'40708' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTT' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
febde31bf68b5b8556e4ac1666255ce0
6c5ab992e178d2d0cdf0972488f34e2fa15cc9b8
'2011-12-16T19:37:26-05:00'
describe
'41120' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTU' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
c741b8ff55f3f12bc8f588246f9d4144
7794efa2b3c476a7c62e100b44a6bc5fea1408e0
'2011-12-16T19:34:13-05:00'
describe
'46488' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTV' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
e34ac0b3ed9a588534c92f8495c4cefb
5d4ace5383cf7962eb470602b303f36b755450c7
'2011-12-16T19:36:43-05:00'
describe
'47236' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTW' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
65250809f39b368650b5294b27b64870
7b60f9d7194d25899abe1e28fa69b51a1eb73742
describe
'46628' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTX' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
3742ce6073b299e97fe9b5a314f61a62
bed5fd6683a406ae1fe0efd6c92923bda242c266
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTY' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
c24ab88fef611c56ac5c1f066985f0cb
53b6e4f1993eac65333f82ede81b2d180f36aa9a
describe
'45905' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALTZ' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
91200f722492873f2ace5ec94082060a
e7cea84aff56acf5eec664352b2eb21dd883e419
'2011-12-16T19:31:03-05:00'
describe
'51610' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUA' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
99676e9eacf0fbfc63ce8b0abd080046
5764ab661f6c73c57c3064436b5cb94958a19773
describe
'50530' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUB' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
5a0212fbc319a67e397442d4f309feae
0bcffcb97b6586f4c37ea17bacad8e561895ffaa
describe
'50143' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUC' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
38c5d231e24ef5294471bf20811f7ac5
59225b903063593a9817ed2534f6fd454ad6d1eb
'2011-12-16T19:36:42-05:00'
describe
'48728' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUD' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
8d0e781360393da46fd62ece01fe3088
80b44edf818f53e8abae32959f9923f781027077
describe
'47782' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUE' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
b19961efba66dbaf19da15fa37c16cd6
8e4d432cc74ba1396fa517a15b2747ea302163d4
describe
'42705' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUF' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
d5b091236cf0782dd21195d3c2e934f5
f33804991524f789bba4f454c8a0e461ebdc2af7
describe
'45644' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUG' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
490b559855926fc90950f5551e5df980
f1abf9b98e36142064e68e197f56c52b66ade421
'2011-12-16T19:36:47-05:00'
describe
'47696' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUH' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
e44393ce1427deef19196e37eef0cb35
403075d8a5e48e3dcd830dde5c8f391bdcd4fb2e
describe
'50828' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUI' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
cd6675d7eb6449f2f04f1db5e2c4d867
3f5fccd2a39ebc9c91bd9ec4adde19f8e31fe845
describe
'47397' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUJ' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
a25668bf5133ca527f1b37da92abf568
744ae1e20be3ed96fe685133f5f524f13b349dc2
'2011-12-16T19:35:59-05:00'
describe
'47125' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUK' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
677cf01566e4190e12276edbc8845a3d
5aebeca2119eef6a1cdab65a62a0e661bfd284a3
'2011-12-16T19:41:03-05:00'
describe
'48721' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUL' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
5d33ffd5a98316314439cdc6cc1a4916
5203ea8ab85e1166620541b2871708f31950b83c
describe
'51699' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUM' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
3c38b04364bfe66424139cb8ee4dde7f
482afb084b36f86a3c2a247b681ff982078a46f9
describe
'48341' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUN' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
cb0957de36113e08ae43468bd8411d16
1c1ae59b90601385c906850eba55f4838fd7662d
describe
'45758' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUO' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
f903f1161ef8ca7d0076869a0f769f78
0af9d2c66f4f0612019e54f384b7428a9b6b09e7
'2011-12-16T19:30:30-05:00'
describe
'14342' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUP' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
b73e0b38317cde16886037b8f932c479
cedbd7d54cd6ffa4a87aeb099e7b1fe4f137b977
describe
'39423' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUQ' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
795993df5e50b1c0f4af394ea371a887
1e8406c4c31d36046f9093aab020973e51a5a3cf
'2011-12-16T19:40:06-05:00'
describe
'38807' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUR' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
8e7c67f9773f6c4103fbd14aa93a699e
8d5393d89425fc8b49692c00dd0f5227467e27f5
describe
'50943' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUS' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
93e216b14ac9ce7f32f6a7264fa8608d
f26f564b4469beaaf0023b9103623d18da4ac318
'2011-12-16T19:37:50-05:00'
describe
'46451' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUT' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
e7eac0ba1515047b36c650543b3a6fd6
a3fecc5f3c3ec76a7918d183e5403fa87c690284
describe
'48241' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUU' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
41cae878e2e98a873f819d0084a2b7da
710987d296734fdcc93ed34fc19ef9acfcec3329
'2011-12-16T19:33:25-05:00'
describe
'48610' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUV' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
35a0cfb3ce6ed1d125925151833efff6
da7caf75678e7ae8d71b4d102f4ef98b055ea944
describe
'49443' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUW' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
e54baa325710e3d06aa6a4bb1053087d
8d1ad45eba19fdb0314479911d30794b73e5f375
describe
'51241' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUX' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
74441f86efc18caf2cb7a846ac314aac
f2db2b456377972c20a55d2671514e2af29907a5
'2011-12-16T19:35:33-05:00'
describe
'51249' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUY' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
d9645bdda900856c216a7999d13ca019
7dfec05d6037ba5b856486ece1745e116c11582f
describe
'48363' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALUZ' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
45532eed4deba2a8cd4c1dd50054e489
9d84e085c631bf491d8bed9a0b6ebb731ec36198
'2011-12-16T19:35:47-05:00'
describe
'46187' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVA' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
c2274c0756f53262904ef86830ba46b6
e9d58237aa774eb9b85fd1bc2fd5e0de1e96e226
describe
'44846' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVB' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
344f19b9fc0fe75a57843fc31f8b7e81
9519b4b6e507aaa3a90d20726f2e10f2418c4d06
'2011-12-16T19:30:27-05:00'
describe
'48259' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVC' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
a7f1df34e054c1b7f2e25d4b9c1597ad
3bbb786db4e532b5f21b231f85e649c3719a1312
describe
'47179' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVD' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
c66d007998cb9ea428b3978e85dbbb08
e02d83ba66df135501bc351068cbc45a2d6d8b26
'2011-12-16T19:33:19-05:00'
describe
'48496' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVE' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
4cf09f61eb2cc778dd0586d7aa38b6c4
333578b2f370d8a5d9f9736bba8e30568db001d9
describe
'48478' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVF' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
fd1bd2a193e56ba0c4acf17b2e35cd43
6d2c2c6b66421d06bd7533f8d6ac2bbb904985ee
'2011-12-16T19:41:18-05:00'
describe
'43519' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVG' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
3d3c6816b60a86a22ee09a422af9d20f
ba4f00b735412995c1616d921fbfce5a927915f1
'2011-12-16T19:40:14-05:00'
describe
'47194' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVH' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
26022cb83c89a892c5ddf7e8b0474560
a7a26f3b4b03a3b7d62907866e7be82eb747d810
'2011-12-16T19:38:08-05:00'
describe
'51561' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVI' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
8d1ff4e6950dfbc0c6524cee78179b0d
b633ab4640574b22788b39a4f5e45a0139319b2d
describe
'47206' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVJ' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
6e8da6d4e9d6436a83c2fa2b408b9b44
e60a1379e08d9376eb89e45f46bd97cb68bd0857
describe
'21143' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVK' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
b3600f2cf8ac52dc1cb1f7318f00a0b0
18510873c6fe7d7d0f1cd337898c00074dc38e86
'2011-12-16T19:41:29-05:00'
describe
'33497' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVL' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
7352881b62d81ee13dd0e1dccc5cad65
04f23bdb40b76ff9ee4ecb3b47d95cbad3dfaf76
'2011-12-16T19:35:16-05:00'
describe
'49993' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVM' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
d2ce1f8eda812f822d0aeeea4317cfb8
22d2441dfb7ef2c2b73323843981b94a467f80ca
describe
'51219' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVN' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
0cee1ced2d98ba39ef6c1dd629d6c3f5
811ab0156b233c2bcb950d55092f220bfb249e7a
describe
'46729' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVO' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
8fb6d201ae1b7fb132027a9ba154004a
7428ec9dc3af0458298feaed91523c8830c2d737
'2011-12-16T19:30:06-05:00'
describe
'51608' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVP' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
fae582a736ae57f6b214c3d95a94ebfa
121adfe76ecea84f5a03366dd95bcee1032a5f85
describe
'50488' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVQ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
a53f63126506ae55d708921e89aa08c5
40b46415581f7767bc9089449cf18c4a455f47d7
describe
'51546' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVR' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
78dc0b20dd4762443d5f912a9f8575cd
33b3dcf223ee8c32df50c0946e3b46203fbe63b4
describe
'50786' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVS' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
027ed8c7cbecf1782da3f8227aa02333
9818e2cc7481fd6c064de0bbeee497b309c3a7c0
'2011-12-16T19:34:44-05:00'
describe
'47099' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVT' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
9c8c0ce20a189eb76a2e44ca232769fd
fbf95f97b0c7c78f511c417e63805e659f4bf7ce
describe
'49808' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVU' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
3c23803db2de3e66561c9c2e29294186
128ef3711db7bd3154e8f3396ced8e975aae7095
describe
'48467' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVV' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
114f314755ac6b654eddb495bf8530b2
952d6c569814d3a3cbde5a5f67a59822c0863c86
describe
'46620' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVW' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
5a82f04f681b54c86b4a416b6eabaaea
c3a06d1de2d74d765919e0ca6430cdadcba129a6
'2011-12-16T19:31:29-05:00'
describe
'47312' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVX' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
41b9d5db172888481d543452e9c6aa93
a868fb5b11659da076b522f1d7300f3a34366a3b
describe
'46495' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVY' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
80c47a787d449b13b35a26f72c318916
a4fe70f5129ee580166f53a51a09ec91d7e84010
'2011-12-16T19:40:50-05:00'
describe
'47184' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALVZ' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
d3f842b3b9657109a18648bb67432049
2c392e37eb1eeac78c9e15ea153cbbee5f75d8fd
'2011-12-16T19:35:34-05:00'
describe
'49034' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWA' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
694efc58cbd519e8d2e071092bb4229a
11cdce80bb3022ed01172f03f3b0262d3facb1f4
'2011-12-16T19:32:28-05:00'
describe
'51183' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWB' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
5a84284f026026ab1e6ae7cbfa82cd35
ea8ea02aa2842af108ddea44021746adfef36248
describe
'45906' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWC' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
822b5327657d2eef9fe9804710101049
7131fa5ced28c90cdfa22bc6a6a84fd8cd95ac6b
'2011-12-16T19:35:04-05:00'
describe
'45635' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWD' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
fa24cc0a0d5954a230e988efa6d7e12b
e56f1335ba2cfab423f52225b67c91a222e65a81
describe
'44664' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWE' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
9ca5e08560686cc11546878c72193bbe
b3abc3e2bd0139da8b937e9a34b6d223536c4cdb
'2011-12-16T19:30:09-05:00'
describe
'49236' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWF' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
77aaa18a4335a776d30a5dde7e60d3aa
fa806f840f26dfa3f61cee05796e35f2d1d1570f
'2011-12-16T19:36:21-05:00'
describe
'44837' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWG' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
e96df8e9417ae3a2c8d2bf8f1a9530d5
b66bb5007753b47417c57632127523d149e9f95f
'2011-12-16T19:37:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWH' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
3696a6bb32d44fcd59d4f809b799c0fd
e488fd1724eafaeef6d50ed2d429e40e7bc53597
'2011-12-16T19:31:41-05:00'
describe
'48804' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWI' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
ebb55abae345b945e78e1d805c8c3ad4
e6708857c76ba0c0a91d093d879d35b7871f4cbc
describe
'47841' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWJ' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
d1fe8885d6d8ae7142bbd30a97092348
fba79bb070d4cbc38ca3a2da5439f89d85bcbcd9
'2011-12-16T19:34:41-05:00'
describe
'48550' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWK' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
1b97c5fa7e0a8881020e8cdee958057f
883d6f0f462f85e1519e391df20c8355b8fd1864
'2011-12-16T19:31:56-05:00'
describe
'48870' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWL' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
8ba318777af11a7859b14308c6d63080
b6f83cebc476342d846df2d06376923523991eea
'2011-12-16T19:34:24-05:00'
describe
'48891' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWM' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
a6a6d2fe87f68c9e0c5273ab1b54586b
5481fc447fd02f9ad3b19c1492403a8b8169cb99
describe
'48233' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWN' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
f0e769120c7e0228ba1ea3cf98bc07ce
03d92b5b624a18222bda288fb6def720d57d213d
'2011-12-16T19:36:51-05:00'
describe
'47655' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWO' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
cd11906f19a62dc13fbbf2ca7839602f
c20d58aa42c91d41bec56b088e8103c80f10abbe
'2011-12-16T19:33:22-05:00'
describe
'47282' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWP' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
350b8c560f70a980b93dbbe76fe03fa1
01a329113a78381ebce0fe1d61e7e6f7b9a090b8
describe
'46917' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWQ' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
18baf22c2959888659c4a74ecf5983f5
079a74a892c03b824a0239960f15050f20964240
describe
'51232' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWR' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
7dfaaf1acc52d2dcbe251adab55f5d00
fddaa45f0f300c3d2f0d1cff4c0a61da22d34d69
'2011-12-16T19:38:11-05:00'
describe
'50597' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWS' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
89d53fa2a2e425f85d3a7d2948f9cdc8
5ab5ffb94c3d1ffd60425c5760b087cf3f26ef7a
describe
'48700' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWT' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
ccdfa1adbe7b012846c3f355435bb63b
84bf93ae20c4279d17af7064725754d8339cb5f7
'2011-12-16T19:40:41-05:00'
describe
'47490' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWU' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
88c5eff5016934ec9e782e24674709c9
c1df1cb795d7ff24fc4d671f158d658e68fe907c
describe
'48631' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWV' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
2c957980c61c17013956ea38b9111bd9
a8af6eac3eacb4c03c76b1f7b4548b72bce5c2fc
describe
'48078' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWW' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
012df3456847ee7fe9d71d71a617c821
62d8ed1e8ee8ad4f16a6ebd50fe7ef1028655e26
describe
'19429' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWX' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
41dcf9fc45c6cd7dd9f2db0273671b6f
01b1c57fe5b6d66e93ed72ab770f457275cb4edd
'2011-12-16T19:30:13-05:00'
describe
'31371' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWY' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
570dfca32f613b2dc36692fe766a3ffb
e76e83998b5cea640755b80d29564e96b8fb6eef
describe
'50527' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALWZ' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
a94c524c447de3605b52e0b7cf9aaf21
6c2afd30c921e488ef17f551edf6b642036556b4
'2011-12-16T19:36:13-05:00'
describe
'45548' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXA' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
8f3ae4227fa0cfdc94ea0cb3f374c154
33460c95994662d039073129d25c559839b0850e
'2011-12-16T19:37:27-05:00'
describe
'44172' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXB' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
bc9980998737485d2f1af4d8dd7ac07f
abca55efd7162a36cbf51ef540f9df66b4b0895b
describe
'44539' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXC' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
082fa32f150f7256629d89223a9a7d82
7985466d8cfd9820d0a45d1c3fe214d7455f6c9d
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXD' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
7db7d59d9913ecb0b852046a5ce3a567
fbb1b90d253fb965765ee009480e8d3a85a52ac1
describe
'44394' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXE' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
1b48210d9b5e1864b2ca80c982dd2f90
d291b1c01ee07d0828f1c0ddda06a1522b7bd756
describe
'47234' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXF' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
2f736ec72867a47f27d991880cb29dbd
1967cf2dca6a076eb02e2701c8bfb2fa728f5239
'2011-12-16T19:36:49-05:00'
describe
'42729' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXG' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
cf4cbf50f2be23c987ab5e797ab6baa5
64cf7cdd53ad39c213f956edd45e604daed7638d
'2011-12-16T19:30:03-05:00'
describe
'43891' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXH' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
cd19018fe6d1f577fd6339724996e054
00f05a6661c3d655ad4b4141a260be41ddc9be6e
'2011-12-16T19:38:16-05:00'
describe
'45601' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXI' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
12fba02d5758d3bffb6727c5a790f256
4d30c1b07764ba756ca7ffab8af95db47c4e6aa9
describe
'49293' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXJ' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
075ea1e29b6af973ca2f2b9bb6b8badb
88d5fe2bf013061fcee30d87785f2e11da8ed657
describe
'49111' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXK' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
ff7c1e64debe4807e9d2d13fa128b7d3
0e9dc08e64691d5a61972bb9af1966ca5dc7b6d8
'2011-12-16T19:36:24-05:00'
describe
'49418' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXL' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
ef5d9ac30277c2af1702cf66d0a5e0c2
06431085b36c7edcf4244ea5a733fe5fd462238c
'2011-12-16T19:37:54-05:00'
describe
'49071' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXM' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
f79af3c9b7d0f050729391a8ddbaf57c
4892fca19022df0eebdfecb4d914087792ab6cfa
'2011-12-16T19:31:44-05:00'
describe
'46285' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXN' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
f7586522468f4d5b8b1513b50fb83d74
038fb199f856c2a42d8af67f3d0ff3b5c25fb588
'2011-12-16T19:32:29-05:00'
describe
'42657' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXO' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
094db021b1bb5d76679e0e5512064d33
aaf8eea89527e288abd3b23558be6d1a50e0611a
describe
'44473' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXP' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
46d19bd7069133fb1c732342a8f27352
1ac58130ac4418e97aa0a2aa90be8fc608c83646
describe
'45847' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXQ' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
b48919e394b79cf91db365ea05252d26
27d2d5b86265fb9d779ac0b5659da7855db8b66b
describe
'48439' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXR' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
44fd47b559e01ff79a997371820d81b7
5d43e100c3ecbc3b5c933c14c50dd59dcc7cbb0d
'2011-12-16T19:36:32-05:00'
describe
'45352' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXS' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
0ec78c1d34680d038e938fbd81773a81
7f83ce9afce42e50ec6322bb9480c3cdf0b1d308
describe
'42884' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXT' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
c83edb9d37bbf626839e8b97e1b94b9d
cdc6beacab5ddefa8dde2642fa9649dab7ab249b
'2011-12-16T19:34:34-05:00'
describe
'47198' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXU' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
f83b54fc1ab92b47d784950126b71252
89c23368f39dba6a3df2a72a8d18d9c5a595bf0e
describe
'12309' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXV' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
d17de431cebb87106a0b87914fcd7e2c
2e43c6427c7daf10b6b9ed1b3716f59ee80c9dc4
'2011-12-16T19:37:01-05:00'
describe
'35092' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXW' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
010b77bc7678e7169df0b88fa658ede3
3398b97d07fddcd5a1421eb80d38a02bd0ab776f
'2011-12-16T19:29:56-05:00'
describe
'51277' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXX' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
97f1dd9b22b6730c96d6949116a8ab6e
be078b7b39ac41d9e1c67bb0bb11a4344bb1033c
describe
'49264' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXY' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
4d2479ef84fe9f462f413332705b1c2b
e732938f0b7f7c5454aa8735022b9fb181710a68
describe
'48082' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALXZ' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
3de0a764f0064cb95f60702d9397a46d
f6260aa24b1b880cf951ef371acb447476ca5c65
describe
'49061' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYA' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
4920970d8fd080ab9152d6f5a02d382f
2777edbfb80cfe5e0ccd4b0f349212a643ef83f4
describe
'39438' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYB' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
5a4b87a5843981c31b4c7ace403a99e1
07634d6de164dca2bf6476957da4596425098fd8
describe
'39760' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYC' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
1ca2cc64386b082d7c4ef22e786068d1
7149728e3057b6d100c3fd30fb4501ece4460e28
describe
'48807' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYD' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
9b6e074604b180fb35d3b6357cba34e4
937fb0f03b343683a6527d7bf2633a31fa1d4da4
describe
'47651' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYE' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
7aa48f5103425807e36a805204686fea
ebba5af76730593d06f17c3ecdca34a167055fa6
describe
'13573' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYF' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
403a1bc04915c40a5fcd805dade6cab2
991b4a6d76d74190c849940356e26e42ee4f4f4c
'2011-12-16T19:39:11-05:00'
describe
'37420' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYG' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
cd0d4531f179aefea26aa18b71d95322
3c0d0989937ee39abc6043acf8a810415736a3b4
describe
'49088' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYH' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
e1b7f5a6a7638ddb98ac76967d8c156c
ebb5360bb2beeaf602532426cb54610880f66029
describe
'49671' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYI' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
766a8424f813660b054e9e1fb9eb5d59
ff566dc4a28ab20eb5670b0d23548859aab54219
describe
'48183' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYJ' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
7d64c7f6ceedb3cd06c02ea94c0dde7b
8fa6aa360288d8c7c7648d19015d5a9dfb55a821
describe
'10023' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYK' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
8cd2968377ade130b2fa8d03ff650dc5
8a9b04b62f4bdf5ddcc8d53dee5d42906562c394
describe
'37818' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYL' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
b0c61bbb6e2a4fd72044fccb2be4d976
78420879ffe3668c2e7bd98d74261318ee8cb095
describe
'25902' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYM' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
1df8f192bdc199bc81ad397be85d703b
30932fcb8a8a54ab61c85cae1c23fc2a382a8838
describe
'36123' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYN' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
2091f23744ff9aa34222a6650fe7718f
b3da0ebc8623856802233e908ee9df827b453994
describe
'49363' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYO' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
ec494a5330ccc5f676cd9488bd46ed66
394f74334e40df93e56aa426c71c37965103b3b6
describe
'48857' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYP' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
c25c49cf702233fc888028baefda66b1
ef0f82c0d3980617bb3c121639a3b2b8490de2e4
'2011-12-16T19:30:46-05:00'
describe
'35425' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYQ' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
a77debb9850a933b371f235ae25aef0a
198d7f28bdd17112990cdf44baff77d197fa001a
'2011-12-16T19:36:57-05:00'
describe
'50018' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYR' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
32bf8317500dd443cc43ef02fff3215f
8aebc0fdadfe33b42fa5f957a910255a58f94e97
describe
'47780' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYS' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
2e3dca57e7e74b22d768fdb5eb2e014b
cfedaaadbd1f5295b46d64fabf02e324229c48c6
describe
'26179' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYT' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
c08dbdda66fadbaa455e643031bc0230
1c526e8a8a1bc630ae7878f806e71354096759e9
describe
'35832' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYU' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
bda2f7d4fed30ff6da65422bfacb0659
e6da028cd9de8b2b6a3360a764eaef400c8ba50a
describe
'49458' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYV' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
878f966a3cb09af450eb8798724297e5
38900f3831c2970158426ed742a574fab2b00db2
describe
'48922' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYW' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
535f62e12dcb2983a365ab718a19b1b2
72998fb5ad91d72be8f05c66d1039d027996f3cf
'2011-12-16T19:31:28-05:00'
describe
'47438' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYX' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
034b7ba6e9708ea268b9dbe52ed88d44
4cd5dda6a97faa5a2dd5cf915881005e0f596541
'2011-12-16T19:35:42-05:00'
describe
'44850' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYY' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
f51289297d3a55ecb21f07ed4d03af75
616a1aca98aea44dc0d934fa768bfe3f0ff71323
'2011-12-16T19:35:51-05:00'
describe
'47465' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALYZ' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
4d6302a7c1b7d03af17b90b4c753c05d
8e5384f50b8d97dccb9f13dd94364f67c072c643
'2011-12-16T19:30:31-05:00'
describe
'47584' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZA' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
64da3a91ff60df503fbbb152ea418553
2c0357e550fae8c814b7dd9b8562086a782a6060
describe
'49963' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZB' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
af33cf3700d3d797b69f54eff76ded1f
d942931758b375fd5534bbac1a8518a77d3ac486
describe
'47327' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZC' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
7e578ea06e5a8f8da8d032a273006db4
7c952c53920287e3ce291138c19cbbc53faabae3
describe
'48138' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZD' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
0e725d0807d615146b92df7ef80fcc49
61acacb3699687412eac83ff3cf5e4356529cd1b
describe
'47066' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZE' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
66d921d7fb384b77d97a122464a2b8f7
f4114ffd82e402070ffb687bcded86229a327070
'2011-12-16T19:30:40-05:00'
describe
'49601' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZF' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
e82d2599932c5de8e718ff0bb515e200
d11aa0434dd9c52df2af5ff1a8fb41abd55e1597
'2011-12-16T19:34:48-05:00'
describe
'47844' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZG' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
ab479e891b3a64aff2003a1b1676456a
ccf0650cfca427ad841c5239acbc19dc756f014a
describe
'14514' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZH' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
147c0533dce87c23cdc7c01aace73687
9b099ef80fd31e5846eff5a3449295b3c3637154
describe
'35500' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZI' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
abbe1e7e4d490deeb2c2c8b76754b99b
77ac28a46046ca5fa7874e66819e4af58c8a4072
'2011-12-16T19:41:13-05:00'
describe
'50070' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZJ' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
24f49b68dd1e9677eec217225121e588
3659241f3efa2b736a2127324b3c4fba9bf2543f
describe
'49408' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZK' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
4471844df83dab99d4bead6f0d9ae7cc
04f3f8ad51bba2d2bfd0a72a82d4607612487e15
describe
'49728' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZL' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
b5a7069becf8678eca04535e3b93e2eb
c6f2a32c10bde8223ae04c0982670bc0eb1e7824
'2011-12-16T19:32:43-05:00'
describe
'48526' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZM' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
fbe5878c843a5a63c1d51afd5a3a052c
71330de23383eeec1a7601e74f7d3c7dbc6032ea
'2011-12-16T19:34:42-05:00'
describe
'49774' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZN' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
f7825365d8822c65e83624f8928e40c5
698003827ea79f5d243359e4ca16152d1adf2ef9
describe
'33193' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZO' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
dde8af31e1f743b002a6c947d9f04aeb
6724092438f2408b7bc94bc75ff5dc043f9c7965
describe
'37545' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZP' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
c0611d81b44f5ecacf9127216104cb8e
2e3b6e73c1099f7c1ac82c91af5d8f6f4b3a3388
describe
'47026' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZQ' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
4c613ee3dee1a4d768483e338891458b
48845534304eb53b0a2a33e5181cb926aa06b5d4
describe
'47414' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZR' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
438acb0afb6245b6fa68e5a08bcba7e6
8afce30086353be8c2a4447cde14f4a817d11f0e
'2011-12-16T19:37:25-05:00'
describe
'35844' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZS' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
299c1ad14fdf97e2e901a5024301752f
8f7868986f285616b1d7c3fa665ae2a542278771
describe
'48719' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZT' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
d5d5caf6cf12514532ffa7fd6bd0fdf7
043ec7d5bdc162d63f6b0f3427556db415053019
'2011-12-16T19:38:49-05:00'
describe
'47041' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZU' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
ed805885c9cd6e121eb116459c0a8ba7
e7e76e397cd15084180d5d12dad7d7aeb95d0859
describe
'49143' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZV' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
cfed1b58be45a15382f8ee80807e4c31
ddca777508296391a1e8697bd3d3a885a25aef9d
describe
'48015' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZW' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
e7cc7dda206a8a7018f310654f3506f8
6b0a0a6dddafa983808a6d19cf4c9afe661a6e35
describe
'15972' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZX' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
dcf1418b313007bcc10801da8c8ee710
bbf69102b9c2472c4e1def91cf1e00d70ff6cef0
'2011-12-16T19:33:40-05:00'
describe
'34610' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZY' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
a2df39c29d00e70b4dceedeff190a71e
0b5daa2dba63679b8d0821fa58c9ff6c0a7fa37a
'2011-12-16T19:39:43-05:00'
describe
'49410' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAALZZ' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
02696ec7bca75e628ff7aa9b32fc912d
f9114078b233d9f6d839da4f3c8e611a2b180eab
describe
'47572' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAA' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
502d091077984ec3a10f0074ce14229e
be259e2f28976c22f18563f794f3e943e669895b
describe
'48646' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAB' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
74e673aa884cf344ab570192af667010
f021d158936e866675ba55cc8a06937e43b30f88
describe
'40857' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAC' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
687ce75e6e72a7b8cb933cffb2ed2f3c
a703a6e964c293937c7b487dfbf43eea5214b81a
describe
'39845' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAD' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
7e6d97cd48ccd435394a53ad830ec0d0
bcaffda1561204f569b1f94f73722d0f0bcd13ee
describe
'43158' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAE' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
a3fa2fcfb4a45c15bee166f3e151db21
95e74da50f9b8d3c01543c580fdaff7c86c6b999
describe
'41836' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAF' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
40bf71e9af33833c6bf1a5b3089ba606
7d2c73b1f769cd9793c65fd5d7d1d1b45a0ae8e7
describe
'46378' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAG' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
b6c186d92719cf932de1f26b72b91ab8
f62388d67a8f2c1922a19df05b0a646ef6a06171
describe
'45678' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAH' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
ff401c5ba1cffc198eca9444a9a58ec4
a0b5a971bea837719af1dd4437abf89a997214bf
'2011-12-16T19:32:40-05:00'
describe
'43805' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAI' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
497db8e4fd6401c4d857c709513b2867
dade49d0d55b7473bb9f57c900325616e49fbc4f
describe
'46284' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAJ' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
3c89b0b4d26e9acff614bb129fba9a96
567975bf77eda7af3b4613159aaeb5e227d915cc
describe
'18585' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAK' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
f47fd12e85a2e999cec4c7e5e220197d
fece6b60878b0b9799683214037faf9efbef73b2
describe
'26963' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAL' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
84f2f0713d6aff9bbcdd81ada4990723
f526bffc86199aec5e870abf641b4e5f6c0390a7
'2011-12-16T19:32:48-05:00'
describe
'46897' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAM' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
e35f1b714563c5f84484444de4e3a8bf
9aa16552753c95058f5d93f49eb6ed752a29fbc9
'2011-12-16T19:39:22-05:00'
describe
'48035' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAN' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
c598563512061fe982d837690a72ee82
345dbec97b091df635dbdaf28a194f28435dafa0
'2011-12-16T19:38:52-05:00'
describe
'48392' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAO' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
dd00ad900033b1b60073069ed153a53c
9f7217464c65093e39fef01b760be3ebb899864d
describe
'48713' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAP' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
da06a2d9ad2d362a8b34af7f49d075b0
310da1e023e032ba85812d425e5aebeb50346005
describe
'48314' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAQ' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
71033574b5dd905579393ab1b2b3d431
5f14f83668f8a8dc897bf973f6080a94639f6761
describe
'48796' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAR' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
f8d5d0387eb93d0dec9958e4483fb120
85c39b070cbe254a717e44df7c7a53d22fa4be4f
describe
'48067' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAS' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
848627359856ddbfa6cb9e2e7adf8519
91959a9bab6a66cd49f96647be8a19c1562bf64e
describe
'50216' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAT' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
41266c366e5171287816ee75e02d6960
5b06baa9e4f16ede19b7fb8a2ec9122e680dc1e6
describe
'43380' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAU' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
2d7b74f89ff7efa0f4a577852e4524c2
deb842944bf34f65bfd9bac801fd44a0c0e79c91
'2011-12-16T19:34:19-05:00'
describe
'45309' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAV' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
e84c3bfca1c1f8b93043b13be498f729
e59102101e02420ef7f36992a4612ce91227811b
describe
'42029' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAW' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
e4e2d45bb58af501403b4716a31db2d1
b8d373dc9c13a43afde11cf2a89f944dc7ec644b
describe
'45730' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAX' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
fa0d87ff553f4908548b4f4d8ffa361b
d3b4cd41a0d05b0189cd584c377371ed2ca5e43e
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAY' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
728f52d37efc2e43b996edbe09a830ef
f1167632fb1fd1a62ad358ed2f577bf2ce10f304
describe
'49150' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMAZ' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
bd4145cd1ce9bfbbded9b938e4f10f67
f14be7b6380515c32ffeb198785d5763b01f5703
describe
'42155' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBA' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
61aac5f5e4b04918297ece02361666e3
08d67f4a14a8af123e9db121eb0e8b150375218d
'2011-12-16T19:34:49-05:00'
describe
'49246' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBB' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
799567879ec1205432e70b256a46648a
e811fa228968122cbf141abe01a5571690025f66
describe
'48829' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBC' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
d8b5dbd7ad814a9a318c4404a6a8e9b0
020b9f6b50a51be35a3aa201a6df6971a8691107
describe
'48226' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBD' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
d6f52c17c8fdb6aa868505ecd8950f2d
b9dc9231019e739ee4914756cd994839ff6d9477
'2011-12-16T19:31:52-05:00'
describe
'43406' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBE' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
dce899666569a0e3ae6b78ab029c1f43
ab96b149fe79556f166579032b47462459bf9f79
describe
'45918' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBF' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
0bde797c7ee04ef21a0235bb1323b47f
ac821febc925f835848cd8d1549ac7dc6d1a05e4
describe
'46500' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBG' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
5cc8146976c74560598a69fc8540d469
a5b309c13269d9fcb129f080b78709e85bd45d3f
describe
'46992' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBH' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
06bfd440619529473759967f50ab7ba0
e76477ccbb3f57329ce0087cd671155868448e72
describe
'46165' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBI' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
5ef3aaecbcc219d52bcb9b1aa60abc71
28e4d8e7f31c42b923ac7b62bacb95c6030d0d35
describe
'44419' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBJ' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
b7c0cf375e2f09a56dad82721b5c7ffb
52b1a63fd601221223df440d8493bdb73be29a0f
'2011-12-16T19:39:06-05:00'
describe
'47288' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBK' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
aa0f9e9eb09cc8d702c53e8da6840d6f
ceb8006db1f6ebf12e3466f28e36cda7cc4614ae
describe
'49625' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBL' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
3751afaaf4d290eb717a76aeaaa9489a
6c48171c2285df269801825df8b6b3ae4d0e9985
'2011-12-16T19:37:48-05:00'
describe
'46811' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBM' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
94b16db51a21731fc4ec453c6b35ad41
58bed9226a7293cb819e69c989cbb29208ba096c
'2011-12-16T19:30:52-05:00'
describe
'43854' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBN' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
f3b27f7a6101ffa327f86b4897466a86
df67311de7e008a90a8442c6f57ce39ee469c63b
describe
'48660' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBO' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
a0f38d9584be8412b703597bc63abb4b
905e0de350a41097a5f78e537de9add01089bbd5
'2011-12-16T19:39:47-05:00'
describe
'47365' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBP' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
f6ea1b91d0d82cd4062a74e60671f62e
507cf35d5968b181d47ea38bd1a0f60041f42f11
describe
'38965' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBQ' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
30b2f13a52c2153b53d8ae1fcd5005ca
178968b420e6b640bfddc4084d993ff5bdc423ed
describe
'46778' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBR' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
8647304d1836257cc411be804b9fc1e2
216f806320048d6faa5110a10ee01c3651d5c269
'2011-12-16T19:32:53-05:00'
describe
'44789' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBS' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
80b85ae9cce6b59338bd6b42a57b4153
ff8ab7ff201b5b20a418f9fb722c22bab3148e93
'2011-12-16T19:33:54-05:00'
describe
'10428' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBT' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
f37a90fb0eea25006a34566578f6172a
1dd84936357cc4f329d6de1521798a742a8f7956
describe
'1510' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBU' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
a1cb202ad98ee2af9368b9770cef6a2b
e2416b5781dd67bb631d32f6832d97ef0d897750
describe
'254973' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBV' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
a904c4b93b1a22f78c389ec88a22c1dd
1a5b904948a40cdbbb9f812ae06d7475a8f79250
describe
'25731748' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBW' 'sip-files00001.tif'
a47f30f93cfc700ee69d3bc559c61f11
e70659c05defb0e4b1e5ec148d6fb267b872b3fa
describe
'235084' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBX' 'sip-files00002.tif'
829050331f82f40fab1d30f560830a7e
44d92d9e41a9a1c5309cfc98548174324ea29053
'2011-12-16T19:34:40-05:00'
describe
'259776' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBY' 'sip-files00003.tif'
d5c1bddf8e01312279703608bba209ff
aafb0df7c39e1684085b906f1741b12c9c0ca8f4
describe
'253212' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMBZ' 'sip-files00004.tif'
0f33353c5068f81751a643d11f3d6bfc
b308b9dd5727c6f06cd6f24dcaf15704952606ab
describe
'253152' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCA' 'sip-files00005.tif'
e3a621e28fee2b0f451d67cc911dc5ca
ff14e62f649220045b916bc5c757592b924afe48
'2011-12-16T19:34:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCB' 'sip-files00006.tif'
f042398cc82532ea7ec9b7eca7b6d7bf
3be5a475b075f27c13107947dee49ac399c829f8
'2011-12-16T19:40:47-05:00'
describe
'257168' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCC' 'sip-files00007.tif'
1de1f5e6544599cd24e92fdb41281e83
ac695dd87770794b171735a573a1c5b3c8ff2e0d
'2011-12-16T19:31:36-05:00'
describe
'241212' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCD' 'sip-files00008.tif'
cd25d51d60e0d2e965ade65b1225481b
41ab0455cf1c6b0360dc3d76e6e6df6caaaaa896
describe
'2003496' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCE' 'sip-files00009.tif'
f8b86a942ef29f13697f95cf43f0f674
be799327fef25106d03b1c2aab05ca19b335edba
'2011-12-16T19:37:07-05:00'
describe
'1822772' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCF' 'sip-files00010.tif'
bc02f6d657e08da9f4d616279f6bfa1e
34e46176ee3af85ee9260f215793bd713ceac028
describe
'1948176' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCG' 'sip-files00011.tif'
cafde213881cdb36a188321eba7e367c
761883b7bdb2e5288c385d2694a7854e87980173
describe
'1849604' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCH' 'sip-files00012.tif'
81bd9c2f8476e4a7604a332684822486
901baf7602cf035cba65736264853b5598e7544a
describe
'259272' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCI' 'sip-files00013.tif'
95b4a26c6a4a2975da2250e51cfa30de
47d3b3b07454d4f955581612afe8427413eec603
describe
'280044' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCJ' 'sip-files00014.tif'
876310676f1a909cf5d2c71f11e0e26d
d6010cf94b810f0cbf19a7a5835b305546e0451b
'2011-12-16T19:31:54-05:00'
describe
'261528' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCK' 'sip-files00015.tif'
a07a3c7040aa802e08d747f2aa0ff2b0
9fc920df1b1695ee28494ef58f3a0a143cc86da5
describe
'279912' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCL' 'sip-files00016.tif'
f3140ccf17c0b680f0ca4c8a434a4861
228732eb8064466204d40cd3953d21db9255d307
describe
'261928' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCM' 'sip-files00017.tif'
88181501ab01d21861634ae84200db4c
52e579b42660d7cc29ef5ae156e423315ae1fb1a
'2011-12-16T19:32:38-05:00'
describe
'272488' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCN' 'sip-files00018.tif'
754e88ca7efb8c1322829ccbe7a4eb99
64d8e0cd85b3e63f90413cfe663996b0ae6621b1
'2011-12-16T19:37:44-05:00'
describe
'256576' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCO' 'sip-files00019.tif'
34d37a3f5b6dc7287f2a459c9b9c5c92
e03ebf368ff7b190f91ecd51cd419008dfd244e3
describe
'267648' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCP' 'sip-files00020.tif'
d243b5aac2ff2ac13163f1954ca54005
ed0c1d8cb44441136a2385204496a1c4fe457260
describe
'268636' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCQ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
5314cb202c7f8ea81a93266dc4f5efc5
7221b9e126a24dfc8c079937159afd5fc8bc38d1
describe
'252524' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCR' 'sip-files00022.tif'
f12d0e1af433df3a204a0239b9d8cc85
bab56ddd0d3184daeaae60359f436c553e326635
'2011-12-16T19:40:39-05:00'
describe
'258776' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCS' 'sip-files00023.tif'
f7c5804b7aef689906e0c4e3e0afcbe8
242cd680699bf71a9842f34af70e437aecc07bc0
'2011-12-16T19:38:18-05:00'
describe
'252724' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCT' 'sip-files00024.tif'
1ef24173d2c3c1214cc72a3e1a2fa734
3e65221b927191075bd3e0dc03264140bdaace82
describe
'266628' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCU' 'sip-files00025.tif'
7ca21d88b111ceb76a74bc55b57638bf
5d7d9e731cb8af119070f86e58d34f86f8165fe1
'2011-12-16T19:34:07-05:00'
describe
'263324' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCV' 'sip-files00026.tif'
c819180f1410d6d27ff21650f0f772e2
d154bbd6aa4084bc81a6bf19b2d9b8d4ea30d58d
describe
'269016' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCW' 'sip-files00027.tif'
bd65e571d2f413b7ea8cd6e8f39dd311
ca964e628cb2c9262e44d66b4d8c121d281c3542
'2011-12-16T19:41:19-05:00'
describe
'252580' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCX' 'sip-files00028.tif'
3b586612f0e2700b333101e7d6419398
33a2e07ea868fa2dc4615e3b0928c3d5644a4263
'2011-12-16T19:38:02-05:00'
describe
'271780' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCY' 'sip-files00029.tif'
e3c323e76b9299e7fbd821c5418ebc06
b33f8ab6da96b1c22bf6c0fa6e267d7f68fc2e93
describe
'258464' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMCZ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
e2cdcebfe646f69260c51ab154995514
3406586253926aeb281d0e850a924857ebdd4b66
'2011-12-16T19:39:56-05:00'
describe
'268716' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDA' 'sip-files00031.tif'
6a8af1c3455afef3b6cf8a0f55b55815
348846d45edc6b81a3da8c577f4d14aef13d90ad
describe
'260916' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDB' 'sip-files00032.tif'
87e7307e7d63a4e76fba34eb2701e617
fbc46cb686427a79dac9d3dfe4214e2fcf945ca0
'2011-12-16T19:37:13-05:00'
describe
'268932' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDC' 'sip-files00033.tif'
bb9a6946f8f1f01a56ef5e5925422ea1
c27463dc32b84ccc4a2803a9d41fd237dfbd6362
describe
'287336' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDD' 'sip-files00034.tif'
9bfbeb151cf2cda111f9c8e3b385cecf
8cff5a9e6888626323a9c1e6c859075f04a7820c
describe
'258468' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDE' 'sip-files00035.tif'
78df839ef4de3119de8a285750edd251
a19f7cae7b93ca7d3d22fde7a8a2113a63dcc6bc
'2011-12-16T19:35:18-05:00'
describe
'277100' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDF' 'sip-files00036.tif'
d91739d9da708b5166793ddf8812a44e
f6577df15d66c43bb240f891a9138fa727201a73
describe
'257776' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDG' 'sip-files00037.tif'
4759ce2608d0a026b03c860c0d847478
7f58acfcd3b6cea836264ab968229b4025bcbe47
describe
'262796' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDH' 'sip-files00038.tif'
ad33da32b4d7450245f041a508a97721
89e22a85fb3bc8e25272189252a801d6c89617e6
describe
'263356' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDI' 'sip-files00039.tif'
b9b025e5c95722862532194177be07fa
d33c6270a8d117d78cbcde25b2c057a5aad9e81c
'2011-12-16T19:31:42-05:00'
describe
'255088' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDJ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
fe0b5e54343d985d741021daeb850c02
2a03724b8045761a016b47bf7b54d290344c4059
describe
'277664' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDK' 'sip-files00041.tif'
07898432aea180fd9a94210f8e566a61
95c65b5c7271d6a7bc501a26ceac0159644c13ad
describe
'254380' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDL' 'sip-files00042.tif'
b656ba53581e335e8055fc3712aeb2c5
e67461e8e7f0b34147e7923fb6528b8b673d9226
'2011-12-16T19:40:44-05:00'
describe
'279596' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDM' 'sip-files00043.tif'
e61e9b506005f1a29d63e544a3a11a27
152f92ed723b741380934a509b70deb1cd6ed006
describe
'260876' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDN' 'sip-files00044.tif'
4ef9177a31426c9a468e312e1d39295c
e6262011987295af30ed7450a8386d0834711bb6
'2011-12-16T19:39:28-05:00'
describe
'267340' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDO' 'sip-files00045.tif'
ec09ba33c7642fbd4a2ee4bf11d4686f
ed998451b9fb40aa8252efc0884ed6ad4a66d9e7
describe
'275144' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDP' 'sip-files00046.tif'
61b82251f328345cfc977928dae8f4ad
5867231537bdc3482666444267294eb4a3e67f5c
'2011-12-16T19:33:57-05:00'
describe
'265304' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDQ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
e4f5910bfbba2b9dd8edca6e27bcadf1
0e64d63709e79df2287070f6046cff6d2d051d8d
describe
'270292' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDR' 'sip-files00048.tif'
dfc439681622fda37a16b37562d59fc9
f2a725b8eaef30c6e7bf021e7f8569732f185978
describe
'265712' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDS' 'sip-files00049.tif'
365adc4e0297b881eb8e6802c2b88bf8
9e243b82eadbb71171b32d70677502a95400feca
describe
'271276' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDT' 'sip-files00050.tif'
b9166b8cb0b1a06787f7676d16430842
036035279a2328808f72bcac7520edc2cb9af8b7
'2011-12-16T19:33:34-05:00'
describe
'251852' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDU' 'sip-files00051.tif'
bf5ae4af82efbd0c00747de169ecf4b2
88f3cf9868a7e24b136d623bd39e30ea69901613
describe
'280056' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDV' 'sip-files00052.tif'
b012cdcd4eedac9648a6851aeab64a12
2bcefcc1b5f8de2e9276a7ce699f7b71f6eb07b8
'2011-12-16T19:40:49-05:00'
describe
'252980' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDW' 'sip-files00053.tif'
faa3530ef1de1d287eaf921a8a89e891
93ae92962fd76c8ebd1e8477bb2565518dcab701
describe
'265568' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDX' 'sip-files00054.tif'
a137bf2034cb18f32670ec0bebe33c36
359f2067e7517246c33d32eb7b4d9c06a8fd0864
'2011-12-16T19:39:14-05:00'
describe
'252916' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDY' 'sip-files00055.tif'
b6fc5e293a823ab96c10a9c9c91b27f2
06acdc1dce30d471a8cd1325d3e848cc2e6033b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMDZ' 'sip-files00056.tif'
3589e6688131f6708313ca567cc10eac
17e855162e942aba41bf619ac6f915e4b983057f
describe
'258024' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEA' 'sip-files00057.tif'
c44b21c8b7545e8c78f892c228976fed
8b426a39eb4b65d6ea12c71d102bc192f717e912
describe
'265128' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEB' 'sip-files00058.tif'
b5bd96080cfc23be5d4326b9da52384a
b4233772964f1337259189228ba988d0c996fc8f
describe
'252520' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEC' 'sip-files00059.tif'
b75f7d82d757d94d71c606c1f44362c3
8129ee33346f693db1e9b836acd667accac9350e
describe
'257084' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMED' 'sip-files00060.tif'
2278da7c0d9255806745440b10de63f5
77f7d046fd15410e8561f7a793ed729bc4eda756
'2011-12-16T19:34:25-05:00'
describe
'250576' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEE' 'sip-files00061.tif'
061035bc1854c27557e051adf1581392
f4ccfa9c91c2250fbdabccf2e4905b92e3724365
'2011-12-16T19:31:49-05:00'
describe
'266116' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEF' 'sip-files00062.tif'
69f1d607ae3e2d488b5ca4e021fdb245
43a5c5ed33ec787356f1ba8819ace2d976cfafe4
describe
'260276' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEG' 'sip-files00063.tif'
a3df8c78744922bc61f08acda3ff88fa
fcd9a6376265ac729df9557aee0adc4341407318
'2011-12-16T19:32:47-05:00'
describe
'267048' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEH' 'sip-files00064.tif'
a7a55dfa15b1ad89d106690053c16155
3b2c0432e71a27ddac5cb65e820e2f259888e4e2
describe
'256320' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEI' 'sip-files00065.tif'
f6bf76d7934f54ced8684e8bc06a4eab
55105181c4c21d9a8367e29c306d34323fab2ec8
describe
'267224' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEJ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
e80ebee7c419dfebc9990bdc62f10e62
30641d819cb129dcaae18c123845a4f410cfecaa
'2011-12-16T19:40:08-05:00'
describe
'275288' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEK' 'sip-files00067.tif'
66e6333728d98c8658d3069d493a4361
123e840f56712c7fa17ca5c3ef4235fdfc80ff7e
'2011-12-16T19:39:45-05:00'
describe
'257204' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEL' 'sip-files00068.tif'
9296e54244f8462a9f46034af4420869
9a754ebe21ef3776dfd88927ec880cab54cbb7fc
'2011-12-16T19:30:56-05:00'
describe
'279856' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEM' 'sip-files00069.tif'
555ab864fe57398d3a12376982edd42e
f4216b1765ec37f2d3427c72146d3d9eb273f10d
describe
'257332' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEN' 'sip-files00070.tif'
b35aa12e059b4e938fa8803a40556ec9
099ee76def1cf190050d6f8b02eeca81120c16b1
'2011-12-16T19:35:15-05:00'
describe
'265008' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEO' 'sip-files00071.tif'
555e646097d9ad738c06593fae86c400
935341b097b51bb69339f4b2b40ebf3d80bb390e
'2011-12-16T19:32:39-05:00'
describe
'252464' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEP' 'sip-files00072.tif'
2ba2940617b48f0c58d8045acfb1ab99
20fc91c14c91ac3117a538aa416949e83ce6a433
'2011-12-16T19:36:36-05:00'
describe
'254132' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEQ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
8ac692feb7a7cc1babc196bea05f17dc
6b6d9155059e8e43eff933ab7c0aff0e992681f3
describe
'256136' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMER' 'sip-files00074.tif'
02cb64d247a2d3bdd6e23d066bb5ef00
368f1bb6e2bb1a11529d4f5f72c2ba115134dd7d
describe
'256256' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMES' 'sip-files00075.tif'
c089cf1b3a09c4ddf946546bdba81e98
813f19d01e1b6666a116b14eb7b596b789643973
describe
'257340' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMET' 'sip-files00076.tif'
e2a2788469c3c9753386a7bc9621d56d
cce837b45cb6050b4593f1b5e1427cbb913937de
describe
'255916' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEU' 'sip-files00077.tif'
05fd281b88ee96d550b3bc99de9c6f38
94ae4db51ceb8097ef119c265e555242e8f0b95d
describe
'269764' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEV' 'sip-files00078.tif'
e5f47889a451c0280feff40883e15987
bc2d42aca73d5bf84160085512cd7da02dd69e63
'2011-12-16T19:33:03-05:00'
describe
'250780' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEW' 'sip-files00079.tif'
ceaedf4275de07f76e913998eddab44b
014f8d8663991f5df3fa65737dda8b76988a6c87
describe
'257600' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEX' 'sip-files00080.tif'
94999e8b72008d40281d51bbd182e3b4
2efc17b20d25112cc26cd1333e30aa220edfe546
'2011-12-16T19:34:11-05:00'
describe
'262924' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEY' 'sip-files00081.tif'
1a3176a79d2a075a3b0ce1cd27a00e13
a2487cf36f508cce27dad7ead5b6d5ee6d38e7b3
describe
'269420' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMEZ' 'sip-files00082.tif'
380cb2ae9b33b0761bae55cbf1a93a8f
0d8680bd1e5ea1f6147b6b8f7094f6f4ac0b0c06
describe
'253712' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFA' 'sip-files00083.tif'
beee7fc279da4839983f89878d78cfb8
f0cd9ff71eefbd4497ed7881bc33ceeedc85507b
'2011-12-16T19:30:54-05:00'
describe
'257300' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFB' 'sip-files00084.tif'
f1b372bac96e88ea87fd581f4d4a848b
747b12503fa0126a4f0075faece13a2767c04c16
'2011-12-16T19:39:31-05:00'
describe
'253748' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFC' 'sip-files00085.tif'
bd2147af96cfc633a958401e5f3a0d5d
76a98114800ae4acc4e19c75b0b3de1f3644cb20
describe
'262300' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFD' 'sip-files00086.tif'
a59eceb1da579bfa7902de4278859256
5ae86548a5ce19695e714a7c55d22f283aebef34
describe
'253528' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFE' 'sip-files00087.tif'
f4d62b054e2fc72b107c2632beec2383
b694efdd111ae2787aef177d3dbcb81595d42c08
describe
'255040' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFF' 'sip-files00088.tif'
b6356b83a84ddc19c724b2d8190fd8b9
cca862d6aa769ffe7e9476dd000027d003906038
'2011-12-16T19:39:17-05:00'
describe
'255588' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFG' 'sip-files00089.tif'
fa41d3a084c5703ae3271a582af4dcc1
29ede2d6db3e97ebc85bfb9f3d12d7702efac273
'2011-12-16T19:41:02-05:00'
describe
'259476' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFH' 'sip-files00090.tif'
51d0a15e40052220d549a8c4d779f3ec
46ff10a3458310fbb7daddd657f764db062b7907
describe
'263944' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFI' 'sip-files00091.tif'
bc1012ebe61833fdec83fa302bb0c096
c4ffae609ee3137011eae0069a57bff67db63958
'2011-12-16T19:37:36-05:00'
describe
'259368' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFJ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
b5fd9e1cde383b930eac6e5778623614
36819b68a5eda5ae73c50c321451b19a9b297373
describe
'254612' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFK' 'sip-files00093.tif'
fd41b43ad3218bbeac98c7f10d7d9578
5ebe2c907eb33f406df3ee9b4208cd81b3fbab42
describe
'249388' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFL' 'sip-files00094.tif'
4ed73d20d37c68a2bb6dacc7b3f27fc1
291305f1deeb0cd1221f83637d75866bd4429845
describe
'251668' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFM' 'sip-files00095.tif'
ea619ee4dcd0c08db84ad88bfd1d9ad3
06a1377644b18723c0f12a033b902677bfc9747b
'2011-12-16T19:40:57-05:00'
describe
'252320' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFN' 'sip-files00096.tif'
f59c3c5d7fd2cd062a191a72966fe50a
19251e6747d0ab540001b65c4775abc31ee0e431
'2011-12-16T19:34:33-05:00'
describe
'251368' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFO' 'sip-files00097.tif'
83191bf8bf4f2f308a84e674aec4d7c8
29c4477beb6064fb5097659449a09a5fc5b3b0af
'2011-12-16T19:41:50-05:00'
describe
'266420' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFP' 'sip-files00098.tif'
df661fb7a7c5f5244f6699473594946b
1548dc6162444078595bb5a6fee05b10225bde37
describe
'244008' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFQ' 'sip-files00099.tif'
603b4756acd5097d37da8ee55b6586da
6ef29a48477bf77affe637270435ea20f84a13dc
describe
'264128' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFR' 'sip-files00100.tif'
23a5c68c18f0147287a32b87cb191e62
6ddae5fa6c4e60c72145efa60eb86e427f62bca8
describe
'240312' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFS' 'sip-files00101.tif'
f7ab844ae9d57d73505eeacc0dfcac02
ab1fd9f7a879a9fac1af539a5a93e4ba39b8d4b6
'2011-12-16T19:32:44-05:00'
describe
'264060' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFT' 'sip-files00102.tif'
39f3435e4502f96c762512fdbba6bc79
b53ca13e0f4f78e55052f29e377a126875a041b4
'2011-12-16T19:30:39-05:00'
describe
'252684' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFU' 'sip-files00103.tif'
858f59050617de7a85b54ec4658184a4
3072a084ad12f6ffaa0e2c57a8d6fbbead238efa
describe
'257156' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFV' 'sip-files00104.tif'
5ae28d1da407349fee72cf3a20c86294
6f58310cc1f509703906fa61fd50a536b14adbd3
'2011-12-16T19:41:12-05:00'
describe
'257232' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFW' 'sip-files00105.tif'
12ae36df3ea46a09432dfae1d2f576cb
623de80a70388d5233211569ffd4e85783cb577c
'2011-12-16T19:35:12-05:00'
describe
'259256' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFX' 'sip-files00106.tif'
43594dc2a212e8a9db3064c6ce2bdb86
adfd3fa17d964fc1c0a236f3301b8acf06377db4
'2011-12-16T19:37:34-05:00'
describe
'250328' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFY' 'sip-files00107.tif'
e3f8821590ea01a6d241caed2fd3e168
389c6071950b666c65b0d771f1107d8462f2dcfa
describe
'249744' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMFZ' 'sip-files00108.tif'
d5ab3d7270c764e0bf7898d8e4fb4c55
76ca4862f43b3d409cca4deaf5ff09bd2a055651
describe
'252124' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGA' 'sip-files00109.tif'
8e67e1a356cb13fdc3166a21bba9408d
3bbc9d622911f4251ccaa0546574c2159d438c67
describe
'250072' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGB' 'sip-files00110.tif'
e121ff8e7e7cdfa2b3279389ab4166ee
3713b197942941b662de32ef9947799cac4a57cc
describe
'245548' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGC' 'sip-files00111.tif'
4b164617e1fb7935f3ba863e7262cbba
11031c5a2cc76afb5d83dfc11756cf6d737ec227
describe
'249292' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGD' 'sip-files00112.tif'
5b348ea5de182b99ece79471af0c07a8
f2454871a46950c34ff5480895c39b9a9cf2f013
'2011-12-16T19:31:19-05:00'
describe
'261852' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGE' 'sip-files00113.tif'
474f5e4e7efbf5f2316a95618bbd26e0
a1d7a18c3c9c08688f19fb0ed89f8ae84dc28802
'2011-12-16T19:35:35-05:00'
describe
'249972' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGF' 'sip-files00114.tif'
723b7a8eab954546c4afe3a150b3885b
8e7341ad27ec00a7a0c27b608d554fabed680836
describe
'245448' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGG' 'sip-files00115.tif'
72b80559f54b09782e6191377cfc134d
cafc799a040ef4d5aa8fcb69041a9ee12ca4e601
'2011-12-16T19:30:45-05:00'
describe
'260032' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGH' 'sip-files00116.tif'
78c1ff5944d01a5283fe98c1344aad96
924ae37f8a493de0c0ff110820daeaa47d4df29e
'2011-12-16T19:40:35-05:00'
describe
'245332' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGI' 'sip-files00117.tif'
eb3b66109908b3aa035879458911c1de
5c5bfd0cb7d8e5efab1a0a2836b06ad503e4fac8
'2011-12-16T19:40:42-05:00'
describe
'249852' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGJ' 'sip-files00118.tif'
db0dba12e3d2c5e0f7a79a523f854e6c
42da4e5a297a010bca5a8ed0a8bfa5f2059cc49f
'2011-12-16T19:38:51-05:00'
describe
'251764' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGK' 'sip-files00119.tif'
3b5189c81fa904aa6fe25d19b0003a4f
9fc8f19427e5a795cc3402c3a2575faece2bc09e
describe
'250052' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGL' 'sip-files00120.tif'
0509d36710e95a935245e65ac5f40cae
395fa09fa40266adcefa4b1f5bbe88702a1c464a
describe
'260268' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGM' 'sip-files00121.tif'
f6fc16a70adb1440362d47b6c026fade
da2f27e8c6dacacedcc5965bf30d57ca8f6d6c29
describe
'237212' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGN' 'sip-files00122.tif'
176ba3bd9aae993a1ef079dd8d8c4772
15daa5671df59120fe8c06deec7b7558708a8c0b
describe
'259440' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGO' 'sip-files00123.tif'
0e32c95485f5395bccde90da8e1a9354
59d1dbd3f0c97c96026ecd1e66c286a2f1098c70
describe
'241924' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGP' 'sip-files00124.tif'
d80213409d4fdd32701b76176f75014c
16cb653f8e90325a120a7240d7153c43fafca337
'2011-12-16T19:37:42-05:00'
describe
'260048' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGQ' 'sip-files00125.tif'
2298c930b7b4c99c79b754d8027c3fe1
fbfdd459720f7d1778d497df61601d17e9205644
'2011-12-16T19:30:14-05:00'
describe
'255136' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGR' 'sip-files00126.tif'
33461ca8caf248e03a79cc6b4332c480
5dd635c02dd85217dad8d7043ce61123b937271c
describe
'249988' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGS' 'sip-files00127.tif'
b40875a2fa672c4c69375a563e143f0d
9ed25f2d5ef41c6055fc011b57d4e4ff6ab84bc2
'2011-12-16T19:36:58-05:00'
describe
'246828' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGT' 'sip-files00128.tif'
1936739fa019df3deb9c5af48ce8894e
069010e78c8c7c1773c8f278c317a9e70007d89e
describe
'257016' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGU' 'sip-files00129.tif'
686c233a5419a480ab08a3cba299bd2f
217a2a26a5f380516f0c8975e65c0a6c58a7859f
'2011-12-16T19:34:35-05:00'
describe
'255096' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGV' 'sip-files00130.tif'
b47083c33a5740bfce35a516fae29836
1ab3e859818bd6e3481bb96b5c23215b4f2e94b5
'2011-12-16T19:40:30-05:00'
describe
'257280' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGW' 'sip-files00131.tif'
bf10525bda771536c26e80dccc4c8150
4047b9649f507ddcf0615b9330688bf0f733a02b
'2011-12-16T19:31:45-05:00'
describe
'267620' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGX' 'sip-files00132.tif'
984a5d2dac58705d4e29a9e76537e225
be2357b89507c45a463a7625f786252cc2d62b64
describe
'254508' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGY' 'sip-files00133.tif'
69906c28be7f17f4ea89127c3964223b
807641f6e9bf1dc1a7d068a9222bba771908536c
describe
'261444' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMGZ' 'sip-files00134.tif'
e5efa4f1ebcef2da1879e582fb4e2996
b947279d57bc3c4e33a8649a8f9d309b7ff75735
'2011-12-16T19:36:28-05:00'
describe
'242608' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHA' 'sip-files00135.tif'
83ac2e4a1589a1b1c8107cdbc39fca92
2e40ccad1bc26e8f4ee194803a37a3958ce5e371
'2011-12-16T19:32:17-05:00'
describe
'264684' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHB' 'sip-files00136.tif'
65a610a628f234c9a71c33c1ad4d2974
44dea3926566f1f5d9ae090b747f932d0a895e62
describe
'256948' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHC' 'sip-files00137.tif'
7f58b11c5a821242185171daebaed820
da55a251154ee1dc341ea1c03597cdf0bd5a2561
'2011-12-16T19:32:19-05:00'
describe
'258192' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHD' 'sip-files00138.tif'
96fa216fed00cddc0ff2f79d9f08661b
8721bd876c9814d88a196ea4c2269a31fe3d66b7
describe
'256992' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHE' 'sip-files00139.tif'
0c9ed17f695da9013a480b78626847ab
bc261ec4e00615f2b08005bd04845c96e5908808
'2011-12-16T19:40:25-05:00'
describe
'257504' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHF' 'sip-files00140.tif'
255ecacbab9ca14583fc9f26685fe50a
23204763deb4e06013dc2275662fd5145ccceb74
describe
'251196' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHG' 'sip-files00141.tif'
44d8d0b7b22daaa2768aa6d952356ed8
484dc0bdc07773a6fae74435ae520ec1f2bf2d9e
describe
'257304' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHH' 'sip-files00142.tif'
0b339dba6531fd73ea35358e2ef7957e
e6a05b77a7343e975c3c20e4661721f13414888f
describe
'251824' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHI' 'sip-files00143.tif'
a0188575628d9f32608e42ce1398b8d4
a600307120d085f71947017c6918eb7c53516906
describe
'263000' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHJ' 'sip-files00144.tif'
15fa2c4e81224d885e7a68597ac200f6
1c81bdc96988913852fb4277a1944bab2e3fcd16
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHK' 'sip-files00145.tif'
9bb8c3122c39404ed80f0e24bf7fed78
ecd0ea4e62f0122da66b4dad4dc2c5c1dd3754b1
'2011-12-16T19:34:05-05:00'
describe
'258348' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHL' 'sip-files00146.tif'
a99f67aa35213fbb5cdd31e89bc975a1
dfd4f482f17bfc9120fb43eb71b332a9887758bf
'2011-12-16T19:34:53-05:00'
describe
'264100' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHM' 'sip-files00147.tif'
47fbd52781abbedb18d98a5ca07f0b78
4cd9788028229bee3695bc5bf8afb49b21f2eb34
'2011-12-16T19:41:36-05:00'
describe
'255812' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHN' 'sip-files00148.tif'
fe947462a65b1b73c9f2d820f4a72aa0
8a334b4f6b3207fa945af7369e505c262eddb2cb
describe
'256932' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHO' 'sip-files00149.tif'
e31419a91eb0605e5f9357e2683ebf5e
ef457bdabb548a930d44dc74d8ffc49d5683fd6f
'2011-12-16T19:33:31-05:00'
describe
'267660' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHP' 'sip-files00150.tif'
651b79c3ef14e62e3eb404a679dfa17c
ed388411d61cbd0f43c9d89c6a3d9c4781e1e598
'2011-12-16T19:39:03-05:00'
describe
'247172' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHQ' 'sip-files00151.tif'
3a35acdaf081472972c4e83545a4f9ab
d82142e4bd7984dd2ea05d3c608babe269e10e96
'2011-12-16T19:35:27-05:00'
describe
'262968' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHR' 'sip-files00152.tif'
9f153c27d91581ff08e4d27def7f94b9
a43290ee70b1106fadc898ffa689f129602df8f7
describe
'246404' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHS' 'sip-files00153.tif'
2f31e01c16758fb10db2a417f51cec8c
44cf32ef3570f359e64d33e579c2a86ee25133d0
describe
'264732' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHT' 'sip-files00154.tif'
8693b88775f4b7a3731c0f8acd6be74d
95b934367820305632b872bcdd72cd59f65d9d2a
describe
'254092' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHU' 'sip-files00155.tif'
ffa758d7eb375abbac47b80f995d1abe
c64b37ad2a9df3df5bb1dd8996db24d5c7e226f2
'2011-12-16T19:40:36-05:00'
describe
'262360' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHV' 'sip-files00156.tif'
921df7496d2d0c45cd0ab211e941abdf
53675ac884a5880396b73771bf6c6615f3fdda35
describe
'253324' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHW' 'sip-files00157.tif'
a30594cb30e0f47c4874e669b770c7b2
8767e6acf324dd2cbe0262ff5a5daeb7537af17c
describe
'270568' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHX' 'sip-files00158.tif'
db5621201fb52f67dbafa0e973ae95a0
90426c0987197e5f4c40ca43aee8f926d49ee5f3
'2011-12-16T19:32:35-05:00'
describe
'252132' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHY' 'sip-files00159.tif'
c69925ed0332342ce6fd7cdbe6cfb5a6
64836acdfb422ba50c986f677d5600cc99314765
'2011-12-16T19:37:37-05:00'
describe
'258580' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMHZ' 'sip-files00160.tif'
c7c54db58883cd801c8c2f21a7e5af7d
88139adb9522459f8f73c4a5771aaa662d86fd05
describe
'259320' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIA' 'sip-files00161.tif'
96315a298a0818ce3b2261c0d8ca5248
39fe00246488ae7489df9365e95876ea9bb3cb41
describe
'251788' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIB' 'sip-files00162.tif'
32557f1c48e30ee3a2d2ed9484a9572f
ec856237888d8e0c04b0fb79fe2a0691cd30972a
describe
'250852' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIC' 'sip-files00163.tif'
e6eb0567e4c0685b1fc4ba4068fb4dc4
96d7375b475b6d7af1850401f41e3ce8fbb2e3b4
describe
'265480' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMID' 'sip-files00164.tif'
87d1c456cf2745a895347eca97f48516
f67b4ec62eeefa1397feb9d9a3465b97efcd5397
describe
'247168' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIE' 'sip-files00165.tif'
926ab391c64d47baae19e291b8b4dc76
4874f7ab3bb24eedb52db058dc6542b846e3d2f4
describe
'259360' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIF' 'sip-files00166.tif'
6520fb9a74dbd54dfe9ab7f68172f710
6b8fd2c98b3ddf5f33f1e7ddce9c703f687f6471
describe
'257404' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIG' 'sip-files00167.tif'
d2153fb5e302fd3b361891e39bbf4d1e
f23cca4bad5f6a541d61ef7e4388b172b37210c8
describe
'276460' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIH' 'sip-files00168.tif'
27f41b82ac23d707e6f9c901e9f54901
4ff56912340d0d1e7b33c871e4ff677a8bfbe116
'2011-12-16T19:36:12-05:00'
describe
'253804' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMII' 'sip-files00169.tif'
e6622bb8f9b7610d5e21cc6508d549b8
2e7a505219658a1cb8a9846726b6082ed728d459
'2011-12-16T19:33:42-05:00'
describe
'247668' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIJ' 'sip-files00170.tif'
47dfecffdb96e9df9b4d028156804a2e
7835a4e5122186b9fa1210db4b6cc225adbd1e8a
'2011-12-16T19:30:53-05:00'
describe
'248136' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIK' 'sip-files00171.tif'
e352a3604d668d24548a602cabd72105
cbccd50b6a5811679c8912e05444e057b15f170b
describe
'245572' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIL' 'sip-files00172.tif'
1d17f20801de0fa4a013494d5189e06b
0acfc283a640729b0782451c5c79782fa831cf7e
describe
'250572' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIM' 'sip-files00173.tif'
fcf300e0b7a60c4b3b885755ea142d9f
6b0aa1327080e8365478ca85775672e2a74a773c
'2011-12-16T19:34:12-05:00'
describe
'245224' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIN' 'sip-files00174.tif'
d5bd0646d2d88a5b8f2d77c87d92aec8
934615d0f125c3339355be3d7d876f2214516e65
describe
'254052' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIO' 'sip-files00175.tif'
0becdd9f701f35b6eeab3d810fd9580a
fc1e90c1a698b0cb5dd4924d5ea5b76971e70e1d
'2011-12-16T19:39:38-05:00'
describe
'250332' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIP' 'sip-files00176.tif'
42f1a2768c63ad06403f989b36e3c2b0
d298de11a5840ac27a4c25f51683dc0d6618bfac
'2011-12-16T19:32:08-05:00'
describe
'251752' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIQ' 'sip-files00177.tif'
580ad342922724c6e11c54ff0ffb1f5d
45cb4a971261dd7053db0ad36bd90608487a9569
describe
'247588' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIR' 'sip-files00178.tif'
c389f1cad29bc6293dad46b96065bc51
35477cd9d9218aebf989c405f88fa6e0f8e8ebb8
'2011-12-16T19:32:10-05:00'
describe
'253844' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIS' 'sip-files00179.tif'
1842ff88aa5548cfe5c843e592d627e3
2f90b16707a091ad7aea263860b5a6f1a57c5992
'2011-12-16T19:39:39-05:00'
describe
'244204' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIT' 'sip-files00180.tif'
9a8a7476c7c894a35ce8ec7778ac2ba5
7bbc6992314e50aa37c6300a03af2ac3e5639cad
'2011-12-16T19:33:06-05:00'
describe
'256852' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIU' 'sip-files00181.tif'
61f3d24d3e697d8542c4aabb8cb2fcfe
523b0cdef3b631551900872ffb4af7354dc09a73
'2011-12-16T19:37:12-05:00'
describe
'252512' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIV' 'sip-files00182.tif'
3cfc29ea370e80716afc639e8d5c434f
d6345ae9c17deef68c2b092b1e4d11a5a9fe6603
'2011-12-16T19:33:18-05:00'
describe
'263664' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIW' 'sip-files00183.tif'
d3d5468c21e78c0cc2e86fd615604fbc
d64b1d77f46e0be58ab45a5f85a9be4c81ef235c
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIX' 'sip-files00184.tif'
f178bd672c0e80b0f8b060422bb05e84
b5e5c41de5fb99b752b4ee3f8cd7bcdc5856fbd0
describe
'263628' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIY' 'sip-files00185.tif'
728a0c1efe67cb0926316a8dd7447eaf
1ab402fadf406e592fdfbd6d351b47ac62d53f46
describe
'256608' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMIZ' 'sip-files00186.tif'
a2149b5bf11eb964c7886f6183253f26
bd709deddb9dcbc56fb98d49f361021a2ecff32a
'2011-12-16T19:33:26-05:00'
describe
'253740' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJA' 'sip-files00187.tif'
ac8642074466570418adc3ad5cb1efae
9897a6c1c5b4e0fced6e97f0525331d41fdee59c
'2011-12-16T19:34:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJB' 'sip-files00188.tif'
4bb5b9860e66b700a6bfae5d3c6273f6
b7d92ccde5f34d4aff121d2fe29a84b6b0571624
describe
'253660' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJC' 'sip-files00189.tif'
e4d061aaac8a773fb9c3a047b5efb206
a1721eb78d0798a082e339ae8aee206c507a23fe
describe
'254628' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJD' 'sip-files00190.tif'
f67ba83a3ae611a25e535fa58bdb95cc
d8200668fe226925e47500300e2dd6f75094ff53
describe
'259072' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJE' 'sip-files00191.tif'
058818a3e13e399b3353c3af48c7a733
a9fea18887b036a7d855190e3bf2d956fd186219
'2011-12-16T19:40:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJF' 'sip-files00192.tif'
a409401a4cd9ebeaa1d9bd924c3c1253
b40a7fc9ae559da031c5dca70a8d4b6c3159ac5e
describe
'268692' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJG' 'sip-files00193.tif'
61ef2394a6679980515d5553ffffe322
c42a833bb622e400a8ecd1b270e71e2def70f6b2
describe
'247300' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJH' 'sip-files00194.tif'
a166a1e5ac9e0356d14760ad4a8e7318
4ce6d0af9b60d7d09615d4d37047c0a320c8b2dc
describe
'257120' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJI' 'sip-files00195.tif'
8cf3e546593fbb0de7caef159572dbd0
63e2ad67a4d97fe1ffa690cb439b6ff759993dc2
'2011-12-16T19:33:00-05:00'
describe
'257128' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJJ' 'sip-files00196.tif'
ceabd243ca8e59b39197ac81bb738c74
a8863d42baca0c33c83383f73f0e7bef76762e7d
describe
'261368' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJK' 'sip-files00197.tif'
99cc562386a72eec7169fb41d99ce0cf
ef8639b66741222cfb7857c378af55beb7e9100e
describe
'266164' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJL' 'sip-files00198.tif'
cfda02dbb18ab33fe0574bf83249e914
d470144b926be4a0acd27e4409afbed1ed9b5762
'2011-12-16T19:38:32-05:00'
describe
'253920' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJM' 'sip-files00199.tif'
97a85243ad85071674dca1b6e8a10d40
ee5d9dbfa51545367e70697dc72531dde322f3e0
describe
'255460' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJN' 'sip-files00200.tif'
fcdd1da3d0d316de8aff9c57eea8e4e2
f3bac2e992ad0082d670a1f43c5a489607b17387
'2011-12-16T19:35:23-05:00'
describe
'252952' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJO' 'sip-files00201.tif'
ec93e54c0107bd4e76c38e5d855d8708
d641c4e681bd593a830ba99c10c19932f5e22f6e
describe
'239760' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJP' 'sip-files00202.tif'
cb8efaa48204dc70ff2db0cabba5f1a6
2475985c6bead08396ce285e044cc94e3ef6853f
'2011-12-16T19:33:15-05:00'
describe
'250704' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJQ' 'sip-files00203.tif'
e53ee58d05107b057dd63690d1a2e4df
ea8049ef0eb75549e8cc16e6e95794821e60181b
'2011-12-16T19:38:06-05:00'
describe
'250752' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJR' 'sip-files00204.tif'
3f81f4ec66dc78922c69dd17531d5673
b7796b3a142cb5a1fc336794bde23038933a8eab
describe
'245720' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJS' 'sip-files00205.tif'
93197971174d67f71cb0520bc00cb2eb
46def98edaac69110724ae1f23a4e03a7d801f73
describe
'251028' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJT' 'sip-files00206.tif'
214c3273bddf8cf07368ab14cb57ac11
83e801b1f7acc92189d5b112e474eb34ca2cb81b
'2011-12-16T19:33:08-05:00'
describe
'257652' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJU' 'sip-files00207.tif'
392498a22e1a7db08d9074e1c43dee1d
33ddffc14a708e76d34b9431eb397be36f45f758
'2011-12-16T19:32:42-05:00'
describe
'250984' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJV' 'sip-files00208.tif'
cd64d0909c523333c8bf02a72b78ba1c
aa33e71e0f4397ee19b11cf3da19ca5ce4605422
'2011-12-16T19:37:21-05:00'
describe
'247832' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJW' 'sip-files00209.tif'
1ddcce46460188beb03f1b8de365e02b
e86e70188d29037a9ff620718f476b9224c1fb0a
describe
'255452' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJX' 'sip-files00210.tif'
2e3b86270fa1d9a277f8292c948e3c8c
b180b925ea8004d13d45f902338cb9dde728d4f2
'2011-12-16T19:39:18-05:00'
describe
'245668' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJY' 'sip-files00211.tif'
4a79e08a52758c63028d126592329299
be7b8b59de158ecdea84225ceaa4a0fe7293a84d
describe
'253088' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMJZ' 'sip-files00212.tif'
9ae328139e309f2875c3a12a6c8436ee
d508cf6fc6acfce5d08e5d320fd6237eed7b68d3
'2011-12-16T19:35:09-05:00'
describe
'246528' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKA' 'sip-files00213.tif'
4adaceb0a4adb6767ca69bf7427f149c
771c1de1a3b5221cab6325415d7049488b58bb36
describe
'269632' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKB' 'sip-files00214.tif'
4d70e3a60fbfb1eb4e1a9091c29af838
0d346735c5b8e304bab3aec428a95717a3cc4a1d
describe
'245792' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKC' 'sip-files00215.tif'
6810b1b9f40cc6524871cea42cea8c09
97557d7c13022ee0b68e893968e2117f5fcc2527
describe
'272308' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKD' 'sip-files00216.tif'
34c08ccc92efe421746ad97390b9fa7a
728ed538ca459ba2c5a089750ef8700cb9eb1df1
describe
'265784' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKE' 'sip-files00217.tif'
5e8c5118a232bce2f52eb7d838189c15
7700aac4963b0b2eb62d6d09bd4e95c71577558d
'2011-12-16T19:38:25-05:00'
describe
'252388' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKF' 'sip-files00218.tif'
1bcc59c8582344bd6872685f13bb36b3
7db418e1a29eb5028e69f8806bf5debd9f7b33c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKG' 'sip-files00219.tif'
e66a2e3a73444b3dcf47082019855f9e
51fe95fe74b689faacad97620895ece6ef4dbd0f
'2011-12-16T19:31:30-05:00'
describe
'265000' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKH' 'sip-files00220.tif'
92822580885cb561dba1548f41abba65
b884574e3ab4d772a36f0553f9927af058762ec2
describe
'248588' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKI' 'sip-files00221.tif'
e7a7ed6efd5661cd1b80969239034fbc
e6e90f68fbd1ca2f794ae2b95165f6ca6a75a973
'2011-12-16T19:33:21-05:00'
describe
'260356' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKJ' 'sip-files00222.tif'
237983ca6102af1d1c6b2dd712058dd3
7ef7d1159b95881d4863933a6e81ac39eb8262e3
'2011-12-16T19:30:51-05:00'
describe
'242116' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKK' 'sip-files00223.tif'
290408eaf9c7405889b8c7018f05ce4d
79db840343a60023e5c5c6ef7164b2df397a3dec
'2011-12-16T19:35:41-05:00'
describe
'276476' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKL' 'sip-files00224.tif'
1b52fc9f0df081c0c435539b245ed702
da77c9ef18e06b8ec3bf5507eefcfffaceec71fc
'2011-12-16T19:31:12-05:00'
describe
'256804' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKM' 'sip-files00225.tif'
52c90984f23be84c6a16d48acfd7b62f
138f7126c36ef3dc545e71885a12fabd241a5c56
'2011-12-16T19:40:05-05:00'
describe
'262696' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKN' 'sip-files00226.tif'
c2d24d38741d57bbd6686beeb57a3ccb
e2a1af8163c1ce466a8f66ea30b2b52d4aa24bd4
'2011-12-16T19:36:59-05:00'
describe
'246356' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKO' 'sip-files00227.tif'
e6309888706660b05abfd8f9988810c2
3d147ea2cde95c7e7472c000c8050b7aded0fc48
describe
'262948' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKP' 'sip-files00228.tif'
345b39cba3dd6cf49739afaf74b24723
e8eaf887246e25119d6b50d2455dabe6a40ac2a3
describe
'251408' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKQ' 'sip-files00229.tif'
da1915845580405b947b332f602fe5a6
c147c522b24687ddbec8bd239e9d03a1d60bff0b
describe
'264948' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKR' 'sip-files00230.tif'
15e8862c6c51eaf3e5d1bf9e574fd8f3
2fe8a14e9defc5c8a7b71ffe6568c342fdca94ea
describe
'254300' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKS' 'sip-files00231.tif'
ebd66ac8dcd5828c46886152d2e472e0
fa765f49ed63a9eb5de6273d408467918f68b69c
describe
'267508' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKT' 'sip-files00232.tif'
04f247e20ac7e8badaebd13d2284c7bc
5ec2286206ad00dc631b27210ea70434c3e5d627
describe
'253400' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKU' 'sip-files00233.tif'
335688bbbefcceaa87db6e8e654644b2
231269b407aaebfe0ba2345924a26f70a82c2112
describe
'243272' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKV' 'sip-files00234.tif'
330b08facf734e68029510da3f584fd4
0fe29afe74a45dd78ed9e185de3020ceae85822f
describe
'245844' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKW' 'sip-files00235.tif'
5609d2862527dded5c826ac80ff6ef8d
c4086262c790513bce8e71515bfca3456da66c5c
describe
'261468' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKX' 'sip-files00236.tif'
548ac67f8811d377058b1c8574f22dc3
2e29b9e63aac4b1d8c650616b6e82393b147d29b
'2011-12-16T19:40:38-05:00'
describe
'254268' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKY' 'sip-files00237.tif'
22040a6eb9e43bee332ba28073c47274
5af6cf08850ca7eca8342a6bcceb2292a9788ea6
describe
'266724' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMKZ' 'sip-files00238.tif'
a5c4e7c92c8b4e5c5b772c16e87a7508
fc64e5c8616bf784d47384d3a29ecf63467ca758
describe
'246036' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLA' 'sip-files00239.tif'
16aa078f4cb60daad4d66f1e9b9457f4
22ba23d586edf0aac71ef20ed7e57eb24cb50cde
describe
'267068' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLB' 'sip-files00240.tif'
b54c4a9a7cb709dd4326540fe86d540b
1fd67c66b824ab6b350c77e082c56643636ae11e
'2011-12-16T19:31:16-05:00'
describe
'251468' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLC' 'sip-files00241.tif'
4f7833e9904e84a9e3d71caa9137cc54
744d1042273fd6f843c3b5ae486778fe308c415f
describe
'257644' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLD' 'sip-files00242.tif'
3a02b165baa5c806b9f07b919a8870a8
89d8687bc159f93341dd8aef27bb38456894ca46
describe
'246160' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLE' 'sip-files00243.tif'
213fa156d674e797e72d00fa36a6706c
1d79c43f0695643d1633d7c3e02258f4f4702ab0
'2011-12-16T19:35:13-05:00'
describe
'269180' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLF' 'sip-files00244.tif'
9aa29adc0c28bef7c42c6277a9926fb1
73a6aef800a8b88fcb9c59fa3a270402726ce54d
'2011-12-16T19:36:30-05:00'
describe
'246312' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLG' 'sip-files00245.tif'
5216fdfefd7bf88bebc491cb7c9c95ee
18b956870cb0ba42fc20f7e05cd711e45c094b00
'2011-12-16T19:35:22-05:00'
describe
'269772' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLH' 'sip-files00246.tif'
d3a9bd9b518856d6233e1ccfbddafa38
aa91dcd978364e437198a687e8e6014c6b4f1142
describe
'259312' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLI' 'sip-files00247.tif'
31eef7c669caebd6567173fcf1c8d3e3
ae8c11206aa3a42565342008553b8e932452d2e5
'2011-12-16T19:36:40-05:00'
describe
'266256' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLJ' 'sip-files00248.tif'
d904fd9b84458b6343087be2feebd48b
09736d540c3528354b9f5b41af6c8cb70ea38757
describe
'261536' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLK' 'sip-files00249.tif'
c61c9a9fa1d37559d99e553c27a68ca7
1212ef5af11d9eb544a9e43825ad637db09663fa
describe
'251848' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLL' 'sip-files00250.tif'
a7dff3df74f72aaf674abbdd9f504194
15e8d2a082590cc96a0c1d812eb665c35cbbff06
describe
'261104' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLM' 'sip-files00251.tif'
4d99580539cb9c5127372474efc7627c
5c9fe1cef0849b9ac4cf0ea831af1e21c9fb2d6a
describe
'255704' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLN' 'sip-files00252.tif'
4ad762423c21ebbcac33908c77fef2e4
91522582a8c68c568fccce2e49e661e8e8f5e271
describe
'258736' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLO' 'sip-files00253.tif'
34e15f5f89055184872167507da5b4f9
5cf09b70ff50029613a31ccdf2259e0ea140f872
'2011-12-16T19:31:35-05:00'
describe
'274420' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLP' 'sip-files00254.tif'
2c00f798eb56b0f77fe4900019fb74d2
c7182033c6034c1f34764e325e058296c29e270a
'2011-12-16T19:39:09-05:00'
describe
'262392' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLQ' 'sip-files00255.tif'
806346338651ad903a06840cbc290847
c1a0250fd6efcb5e76d92ff74799177a8a3fdec7
describe
'277220' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLR' 'sip-files00256.tif'
ee68e6dd89680ae16342633c51ac470d
d01a90edf84f9576668ab128c2beba710e3c1c63
describe
'262248' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLS' 'sip-files00257.tif'
97e3fd27265a845824cfd2d181a47d4f
cc564916756f37b3179edb1f8e65a63f5ea90fc3
'2011-12-16T19:33:58-05:00'
describe
'266936' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLT' 'sip-files00258.tif'
770e04b0822a51e3a3f92d8353fbc4b2
f0b9bfc4c76e22c6ed0e259d8d7c81a064a0aeae
'2011-12-16T19:38:54-05:00'
describe
'241168' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLU' 'sip-files00259.tif'
b1a65e5a042bbf74fe6b25b71a597f6a
f6f6d869a91809fd6efb4843785fae73f0e4e114
describe
'6129464' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLV' 'sip-files00260.tif'
ce28842f7e58f64f3e225a36d90f873f
e058b311006ae650366b9a08a0633298f1d55567
'2011-12-16T19:38:37-05:00'
describe
'470757' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLW' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
858914dd474a4fc09267598329928a25
123b7ed37eb18f064fba6e5349a7af0104d111b7
describe
'4489' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLX' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
8b566907d6164410d3830124f8611ede
3f77a470803ec3f524b01769294a5bd21b77e09c
'2011-12-16T19:39:10-05:00'
describe
'73998' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLY' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
18b0553d5166567d5b44f670d9835173
639fd285ffb51d1946eb2978a7efdf9a706a25cb
describe
'42122' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMLZ' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
8b36e3c83628910b0523aed0bba089db
f58af02e575b09de84c06c0da9016ffa5d3707bb
describe
'112012' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMA' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
144637c5b6f76e2890268c108d65e0c1
370f29cabecdbc293b87775bc443ae06079ed213
'2011-12-16T19:41:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMB' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
61efdc5b77a1c44b799d202a9999fe63
c71d49976d448afe9b08a2683d55f8744eab7731
'2011-12-16T19:30:10-05:00'
describe
'144528' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMC' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
1904ac433bd4bd2e4b5b49b13a1073fb
7840c2881f0da3488b104e40c6fb0871c9ff2338
describe
'201576' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMD' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
335ec071072b8e72798d41dee802dcee
a9c80ac66e60af8865ee4531ab82e1d6ce1ab01e
describe
'176990' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMME' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
bbd347e8e391cb2b3d4379d3c21837d1
87e37325b23a1a9258327a8cf96a222f1b63e0c4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'175195' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMF' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
ff9f9c9ac27ddf5f807806a5beea6064
1e7b6a116605f206c6b4efdad1c0b906b150211e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'179837' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMG' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
24e23c9759e6fd4f121393ceddb4faaf
ec1f8819d6a2ce18670f84fe77e771dd4de78d2a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'197149' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMH' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
16e280140842870d336469e259d8420c
7ca2e165065822a14f475925dde1c8b2909a81bb
'2011-12-16T19:30:48-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'229163' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMI' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
19d8fe010f09736331ab0a897c2215c9
836d4a4c739301e869cb0023f26bd3b2595f4d67
'2011-12-16T19:32:55-05:00'
describe
'218098' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMJ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
7ff3e7b2e578f53eaf9e3e9f668b52a1
42093c1c5be67bd7db9ba7ad69d3b6ab4ba967ee
describe
'220381' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMK' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
a253d83d8a70c051f63c47901992a7e0
53bd4c43ee6f1d327eefd1cc130530baeb7c5eda
describe
'220422' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMML' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
137d8c03cc25a714f94fe348595b2185
6fe3f8ec1c463fdc7a9db13acfb5e158b83cb2ca
describe
'242568' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMM' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
b6e7a8194c0a7bd0aa798cff15e7f1dc
d8d4c0356f445fd889d608b95d4c2928670fb6e5
describe
'222707' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMN' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
ad66fcf68b3644692a90bb4701f66df9
32424fbb95df6732c32eae8b3bb8f5501b646954
'2011-12-16T19:32:41-05:00'
describe
'221851' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMO' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
841849e83375f7008f06cd2a1d9ee8de
7ee935818f432d4fb96e0c0f7a08ec51f5011026
describe
'221196' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMP' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
87595ac83f2e8e4990035967e5d566d0
b33eddff24b64a3c299919ba5430adf64e7cfde8
'2011-12-16T19:30:22-05:00'
describe
'233945' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMQ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
aff14d6479415c99ee535ffb03f7de06
9808c4c89fb16edd329ecdd0d1d17fd82024fab4
describe
'211922' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMR' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
f571a3e65bcae30a619612d7f07c4520
1ae744ad2728b45ada4eb9525e73bb1fed2412f4
describe
'135939' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMS' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
fbfc641a8c0f4c33b44fe017ddb0558f
768dc9f81633d055693737304c55fc0278d261a3
describe
'234495' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMT' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
513a1a1b4d40ebc93a78e5b80a10be38
bbba1e3051a63191827632e226043d76ce182d0c
'2011-12-16T19:38:29-05:00'
describe
'233295' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMU' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
001bf32a88a2389c4e90f345d30c1a66
24a32701981f8d6fede0a5e04aa0ac58732dbd28
describe
'237282' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMV' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
4dc31db8fc39bf915b6a4f4138f46cec
61bdb79d35a6d2cf71af740994a66b60921f3ab6
describe
'252070' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMW' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
7a3215f9337031d92924643f4c057c45
7a5b61a9a840abf8e2913f4139b115e6793e82f6
describe
'230498' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMX' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
cedd2943621775f31bd1ddd9c9232506
3240becae0f1893e41f5ddc343f98985e0c0db3d
'2011-12-16T19:35:43-05:00'
describe
'236375' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMY' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
26577cf640482b12567f39bf246ba452
76633bea786d6e835dbfb55ff7c1a07664c5efc9
describe
'218306' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMMZ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
f5f4796260445ea4b89ef680f19f36f2
73307510bf142be4eb532aff30e2fcf000a35304
describe
'207940' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNA' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
023acc4f47106db515277a958c606411
b9514968bc3752ba6d7446dbb385c3add47cd475
describe
'236567' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNB' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
7ba0086e113ffba5c15fd0b0d7ba1c3e
d8d0e9653a6120d1658d45e3a670c13940fe9fa3
describe
'228586' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNC' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
9884ea34e3bd98d8c9ee49650d12a5ee
39644c0c0ffa5427bd6851fded4c954c5168aaff
'2011-12-16T19:34:36-05:00'
describe
'216816' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMND' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
c1d13b1d0201a4ea8c867fa03dfe460d
a4c21db123099ee8fb6dbc4b3198acec5b60291d
describe
'217819' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNE' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
737d2040ff9b72cabed6d9f80fcb577f
2a225725b06d445f228346a1f7a506f4e53bea69
describe
'208456' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNF' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
860314814640b2afbf0c3523f03a77c3
91d27f94cff2e4e467d1477555730b828ea2970f
describe
'223350' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNG' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
998cd14dd612f89caf33c8e3af2dc04f
4e1646148d5e9c8096be87f36fe156f310a0d319
describe
'207400' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNH' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
f3dcec76601ae094eac796312b6fe40f
2dae4e5feab02124ca8886966cf7587421ae97e3
'2011-12-16T19:40:56-05:00'
describe
'244372' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNI' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
2ec8a34b157b3dfdfb851a339dae00e9
cd0b37cb3e57bdf69dbf95d2f5318dc965269401
describe
'219006' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNJ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
a1254e0c892acd076a856b5a82dfdf6a
8e46b735e4bbc95ee66f84d262fcd1acdde2588d
describe
'202567' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNK' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
163fcb393977682e28c06166f94cd6e9
0518cb1c39bfe0fac454064743c9d35db5191c56
describe
'204099' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNL' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
e35b2bc79f93151ef26082eb97ddd91c
88bd4c26702a320fb73ee5215dc330ff040b3815
describe
'211852' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNM' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
6759f249b78fbb83706d42c2114d7b6a
3f993749411d0db938a50ebec5f5abb15b73e9bc
'2011-12-16T19:29:55-05:00'
describe
'213133' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNN' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
030ffa0a05ec029ed210e0fb5d209740
076b9f6ae43a6e2120837adb0ae09aeccec0bf41
describe
'211882' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNO' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
ac9b69127053f3957cd0d3451bd897fc
0ca28a181df52ee707608342698c8b2fd258526d
describe
'220093' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNP' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
3624ff7c9efc92587bf1423fa1b3ef14
58fa944685ffa3121c11835ec7e826d9efa3c2dd
describe
'218877' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNQ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
ffafbd1b25a2a3924fdfd3cdad2eaaf8
8e1e26b4adf3352839053dfa4565937afdb7d5bd
describe
'211892' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNR' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
5a9f5005fecc60858e1f5a64665373b3
ca90b3b872053bd66ac75a48cae376883252fb8f
describe
'225065' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNS' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
55917c83c47ba92220de59d33f7fae9e
3eb0557f3e2f329c4333571447ff93a4a82cac16
'2011-12-16T19:38:58-05:00'
describe
'194027' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNT' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
1b126db86d750484ef2d8e5fb732bc55
b9af97f8112321a78d43f9a66b62a7bda4cba8d5
describe
'190974' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNU' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
c2c6baa9fd2503ae7a22d053e284fc17
2d0b1da5b233838c75237d4af6c155a20a618842
'2011-12-16T19:33:29-05:00'
describe
'203834' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNV' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
7e8e30771903b23e8d72a8d32611f388
9c5cd103282c1d68bac7c3e944bde2046d23fa54
describe
'221831' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNW' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
a4c7b90bd7ae2265455d45685f123168
dadbf3ffdec0af2fe1de69841daac7177b01e0d8
describe
'226030' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNX' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
e5eed113e1fc9033d4b68a9beb30f877
ccda03d884812aadd5bc9066415832743f0b4884
describe
'236356' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNY' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
e60d7417e41fd683f3d655b14f861e7b
f84ac37ce509be369e1c3d7ea84bcc51db968465
'2011-12-16T19:39:32-05:00'
describe
'199307' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMNZ' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
9c0cef1273c142b93f98876bc088c860
9b8ee74227eac69949904bbda2c238c0b99e57c7
'2011-12-16T19:31:59-05:00'
describe
'242889' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOA' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
489e1c2fec43bd93f98ecbb12a1b802d
ee06ec3d36cee27f33a7e77612515f1bde47da5d
describe
'234224' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOB' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
9decb58c930e1a080e7cffa387f1d9bf
5b6883e4048ba7d6db52fa93ecbe02d85ae178dd
describe
'238169' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOC' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
7133d5daf3dea56a584cb089817b66cf
65479616cb1c00d622ff99bc384ce6c8cbdaf955
describe
'231349' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOD' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
213a47ac6ecb5b4341f413b46ea555ea
7ce2823ecf42e047a1233a73d45f624a658b1ee0
describe
'226025' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOE' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
8b6cf96336068ca4aed4deec2bef1a1b
05c52bc98073d6a4f0f9b65fcf56c6a74b1ad2af
'2011-12-16T19:32:45-05:00'
describe
'200169' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOF' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
096ac6528055ed31af4f1584e7e6729d
179c4628300da3a2c9182dbbbb61e16046b754d2
describe
'215193' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOG' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
013f860e6a8a5f9c53f00fe750fba59a
ba7c4413f1779bf9e8872ceb56840c490b8e1830
describe
'223755' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOH' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
29a338feddd71938f473a4f00334a183
f01abe71a1c75731bc273af24f89e07d1957a07f
describe
'243255' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOI' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
62e6bf10fdf60ce05c49fe56c1490546
6a2b4a3e57ff70f0efe23633dbdedd3a927e07c0
describe
'225084' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOJ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
bc28a82a339ef43e00ad7a34957c9c06
86533a8db23218cefe778c34e1e601c239922b29
describe
'223619' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOK' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
42338741583cc54536ccc573f25eadef
a231a68c41e985780b6b89a106e613ee9c7ad1d1
'2011-12-16T19:38:50-05:00'
describe
'230122' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOL' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
d5d595713db1512fdf13bb47c2cb73a4
328df0d59e3054620ad4cd38ce3eff9b342b1ad1
describe
'229797' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOM' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
73da4666a8cb153c3e11c12bf2ee15bc
5894582b59dc7439e83b2ed1139cd1f7a379883a
'2011-12-16T19:33:59-05:00'
describe
'233859' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMON' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
aea22c02fb8aa9ecd2dfbf1bfab4201e
91862b5b971b5d99bf3544fedc48cd8095b0a414
describe
'217627' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOO' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
eb597b1b43522dcc368fde56f0637711
3dafa972a5cd7e1de9a808f39f82c8a4ac0702b5
describe
'62738' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOP' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
2fcc7e0dcdae6a880d9bb8845b2298e7
6fbc1df0204fc6a7932a134df0e1a42fedcebe59
'2011-12-16T19:34:27-05:00'
describe
'188604' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOQ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
935baa0ce02e8c2a8d6f0317fe5eb9fd
a7a94db841bc239e847e8023000c13a554d3a639
describe
'183324' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOR' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
e69e8a9f8a716ba770eeaf69f092c118
8ec2e05faa78a3c1a2e4a09fca8f5c7b9eaaed4f
describe
'244596' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOS' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
7fc4e4428fda8697cd82e57fa04dc52f
f620ff73ea2eadf0d69c6006ecac2f68d5054c5f
describe
'224281' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOT' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
0451cacbb95169b6e4c583fefd09b1d7
33f6014388b60b7a8593f514ddcd0314256b1b5d
'2011-12-16T19:33:49-05:00'
describe
'226169' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOU' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
223c1852b911ffbf7f54618ac62c615d
ebe9836ef28fc0c0f63651798daa0546b3103e8f
describe
'220055' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOV' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
d76ce9f96518b5e53d52cbb20b78f339
669278b5c66a69325f159c025de6da87bff239b0
describe
'240603' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOW' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
ad362cf280c761c031885c026565acc2
87bce9c260bb4a1eefb0c750a565b095393aa5e0
describe
'241970' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOX' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
c00858711b5b98a0d7cfc54bdd3cfc06
dd2f9bd11ed15c979110958e13148c51f55eef6d
describe
'243083' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOY' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
88ca52bf534757a93b21e334d967b460
d2b6d3335863c70247721ae9f93f76fea05c2e34
describe
'223386' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMOZ' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
5fee606a2151d84e15cac892cf83dbf4
2aad03f38d62ba4257c2660a3c8a6af824ee1400
describe
'221351' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPA' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
f6de2793920cd392137221b61b045f22
21c5a8bd2e4aa4ef8d70dd01686c11e7c175ef9d
'2011-12-16T19:39:25-05:00'
describe
'211241' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPB' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
a24306c68f8a6e656992c2bded6f2b08
643dccc24acfca375716925bed3df2699b580d0b
describe
'223333' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPC' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
d8a88e31ab7fc33c203752ee6d731771
2dbc43baa1c1561c8a0fea930c634b505d979c3b
describe
'229760' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPD' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
fa0d6bf18189a8620de2c1aed9010db3
4ba1a4b237ca84029b58b43e09abe9d6b688c885
describe
'233631' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPE' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
38eb3168370af592c32cbccbf951dabe
9bfee33aa579439645deb98794b3de4ede5eabe0
describe
'235001' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPF' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
f1525f8fb488eb030507bf974f778e07
99841f649db1895b7605370d182707b9a9162858
describe
'211536' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPG' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
51f6d9346e787ee9fb794baf11be174f
50563c6f934d8347b968c0597833c2dfce015ab3
describe
'236497' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPH' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
198c9dbd1ec7922dd885571c31833539
ea026ff8acfabb3403f2bed8798505bdc091c2ec
describe
'253307' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPI' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
e335d688034e0b8b9e65ecc2164314bd
45aa6004d0cae5294387dc3000758f94f092f86d
describe
'220378' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPJ' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
03457a66664b64c165f14bb7b9a2e0b4
545b7220ef2e12cc1cb927683a28e05eda57d34c
describe
'100914' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPK' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
c7286fbdfe5a30b02ac2369266061520
ee3bfb28c547b51e8f32ca5192e1313ba0b0de01
'2011-12-16T19:33:01-05:00'
describe
'157063' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPL' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
5f15e696382cb3d3c292223f527abf03
9f3e5385ac2ba167911900055ef406db19a2bbc7
describe
'241384' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPM' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
313c6fe2aef708031b88160951fd69c8
0bad7087e98813cf04c4166d482f19a203f79495
describe
'247707' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPN' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
48232d1996fa8a7dee19b0b946e471a9
bd4824c4c8b8487034960a3e99a863c534d58175
describe
'223630' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPO' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
36ab4669b213b270bfe27af82dca2984
f2835a34a1b8a37c88c63fb793652331dd19be39
describe
'234717' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPP' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
44b9ac1c3e85306f22fb2a7263e85204
7754a54d1a92c482925613be4551a200cd7c783d
describe
'247595' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPQ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
61ad8fd3444d8a5dcc351ef8c6130c44
5266bf4601e2ff646922dd74d6c61c55e3610ea9
'2011-12-16T19:31:31-05:00'
describe
'243855' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPR' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
53986c0fdd74614521b01336c28bad0f
a77da7f27b8e456c4fe62cc0adeccca14d356396
describe
'244219' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPS' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
dd31013e8971422bd6f38c460eeceff9
4f4d5e9c2f3219c6db9fad037663719a01452d4a
describe
'221645' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPT' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
e89a35a1465e1f721a3d4cdbe1f37ffc
6c60e1280f7cdb3450050ac39e53a29019b3c732
'2011-12-16T19:31:46-05:00'
describe
'239628' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPU' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
fb1c791554a84c258ceebf6e324e8a98
bf0a92d64e07323c7f6b89707efe8256f8bb1d0c
'2011-12-16T19:34:03-05:00'
describe
'233282' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPV' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
e27fd59a48e6928f4835adcd59d0baba
bbe2f7a150d0705be10a7d14696148ffcde208f3
'2011-12-16T19:30:41-05:00'
describe
'220998' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPW' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
64c25ce86e3486ddbd11cba80677f435
3c141782bf01b27737cfbdf20222f4f524b219c4
describe
'223793' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPX' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
46b11066a9fbcd6fcb542589ad967fae
080389507ad4ffa2f1b50f18492b043c106321d5
describe
'229901' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPY' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
72ee5cd9e3bb1ac087fb032cb53e1334
dad4a75cf846e491e9a2da4929be6e45eb246cab
describe
'229474' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMPZ' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
1214b50cba507675d664c7d61bf22c86
b1151a3091c03f39a82da94fab69806554987d19
describe
'232934' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQA' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
22a599f5a3ae9b03660f376a90d37cc6
de064eee78f1b19669363d0a5462db7bdc6d3782
describe
'249048' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQB' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
ffa425f53ad7453ab645a4124d1f48d6
f2bb116409d3682418e4d840916f67fd7b857770
describe
'222599' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQC' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
a081a9b01bc46144f598e5196e8f39c1
8f3765cdbda7d31ec00375a08603578750a002a7
describe
'220743' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQD' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
621819ff8e86c895e331f1df3bb6e1a2
b520ec7e583c9a483176a970de62a77d184e9c5b
'2011-12-16T19:38:36-05:00'
describe
'205875' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQE' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
e4605a0e3a75e90693eb6e287acdc897
3b05054744534640c77f51a8f94e96d0857fe7f6
describe
'236882' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQF' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
fc7ae59abc675724f83bcb806d1e73f2
1dd9bc96225874b046d6ba65f24d3ddd6d9bbadd
describe
'213286' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQG' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
ff90965b9a536fc9a4501c7601cb43d2
1f52ffab9dc05d0cfda4fd91e6713df91b661d4b
describe
'242255' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQH' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
2d0c5c02c30fb08d07a52410889b3fb9
fd7fa59c4815c98c30a510d12c00fd94e7b7c528
describe
'224057' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQI' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
9b1df2e08dbb253a2b0959963021d319
28ef773e23279e4a4bdb32f20382f4ec9f803d5b
describe
'237651' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQJ' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
e9c21e4c2477abd44343c5571ee83052
28f2e4ee5102dc13b0b73141dfd99e2ebaa43865
describe
'230523' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQK' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
c5f321d3df04ac76d4a474b4c2c7c06f
c271c416300ffe8f3843dbc097b5949a6b72df92
describe
'231548' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQL' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
1d906545ff18aef97930863a8caf5c23
1ebacd890ef33ef87bbf38e02b63bbfdbdd44a01
'2011-12-16T19:40:17-05:00'
describe
'221977' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQM' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
dde70fa4fb3462e9f1188b364c723ae6
1174bf98b07fed647b19eb8a536955577f26d242
describe
'238754' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQN' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
628d5fe12fd5728bab674b2ddf56bdff
cbe3a022aaeb78a4f517603075f9677496bed9ea
describe
'222928' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQO' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
3d454763eeaadf331cb6fb817700c655
81e10c0964f5000743f10c102d03e6fd1c2090bd
describe
'235592' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQP' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
6a99fa18966ebe4e36f45d289acf4a8f
3d58fdd23cb6c09473e61a8bca9d915c394a0a14
'2011-12-16T19:30:34-05:00'
describe
'211661' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQQ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
8041730b4d4050e6af2089c96ad8d783
6eeb701181ab656cf1a1fc580132161a124d8c28
'2011-12-16T19:36:20-05:00'
describe
'250007' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQR' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
f6fd2ebc73725cde7ec45b26849e3503
dcfd82a114af6e17bbb1fbb09ddd83604ff34d22
'2011-12-16T19:36:50-05:00'
describe
'242385' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQS' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
e652c5bc608b2e40a1039bfb7b3027d4
d529654452b3886f297568fa68efecbac81cacc0
describe
'233741' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQT' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
8b4513245bea2943ffd8b15961922a18
8962df89ac53cfd1240539ca0b6a282f22e1cbd9
'2011-12-16T19:39:55-05:00'
describe
'213925' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQU' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
c7908bb41d2dda7de180fc3a48ec6d63
f50cee42be44363bc7a84d51dc69ae390817e0ad
describe
'236317' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQV' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
1334c590a9441e7f91d371a9f275ca79
25eb956fe4f8f4fb3fe53b9a21de3dafe80eb2d1
describe
'224304' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQW' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
9373bf34b8dbb077291db2756daf1429
d83f2583b069f257e8d1747020c374e1bd82017f
describe
'90632' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQX' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
34624ef4c9d1e81ef506b9a185471405
c1d23555cd75a1432e0c49dd04f73e502e4ccb3f
describe
'146130' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQY' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
1640a161b97983236df98a58c5ed5d38
74b6f3e439e6785147d6e05dfcf78dcdae45fb95
describe
'240031' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMQZ' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
02362f6ba7da8d24b3c22e58701a1797
3323cfc5816df277f1f2f00e2299a683bcd870d1
describe
'212272' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRA' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
33be06a97a8c61cf3746bf6fce549b2d
2c889166f3d7165ad92f5c4bedc93d6740aad46d
describe
'198682' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRB' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
1de7ebb3182e215a8cad30ba4343573d
7667774ef58baeef14dee74d894aa9815d680a12
describe
'204418' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRC' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
0f496ec83e12ec3efb4e36b621e66b60
809294172c557d692dc117d51c94dd478ab28020
describe
'223614' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRD' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
11886b00f589aaad1b723dc44ac2c153
3d56d43737d84fa14470ffea4a44ad3df9fe0e74
describe
'199275' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRE' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
889a7adf42494f48bbc1e1099067e74a
3911781daa41edbacdac6a300b4067dbec58ba9c
describe
'219508' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRF' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
50160310787da6ea1a0e35f266233eb9
8b42ff88209c92fb707ec08daec6f7c651732616
'2011-12-16T19:38:42-05:00'
describe
'197345' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRG' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
bc40f0dd46f93c2e940414f83457ffd5
66ec864850d9bc9c7da8c76135ebafb27ba13eda
describe
'198874' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRH' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
a6d3e48b3069d90cfa6d74f63394d8f0
36e8a8166604551ca4eff0b21151e427273e4ada
describe
'210643' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRI' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
caca4d4026b0633f865484b6e3b3de68
a8147d6626b86438a8e01178afd204c31f0d4011
'2011-12-16T19:39:49-05:00'
describe
'219893' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRJ' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
40fd944f655b9c88173cf870cfbe5873
9fb724d01aa2e03adf4bb9c72f8f213e8875e515
describe
'225560' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRK' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
50c6c915e4e6670a5e0c9201cdc77c3e
d189706db5863f97d7e40d851cbebeacd99d6dc7
describe
'226979' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRL' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
9fd83ac9f9f87592187ef727404e519d
5d57de1e175344aef045aba1d968536380f69845
describe
'212307' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRM' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
f504c38ac211089dbbc4911edc44cd7e
9e70132e42d8f14983da1f43d26b3404f9b7074f
describe
'217266' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRN' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
24cbdc675665154a734b7e8155d3bbf6
53edb642742dd75d5ee0956cc2ea3edb1eab4d26
describe
'200671' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRO' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
f3be71c68d46fc9851577eefe67368d0
63f1b6ce6d601544333fbc6d4498064b98fc85a7
'2011-12-16T19:35:26-05:00'
describe
'216701' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRP' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
f2f679dd51d048995308131f08e1ff23
6dedd06f258c670899b8d87ec29193f3d1314463
describe
'230126' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRQ' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
dfcaae229af75bcb9b5877c0d723201d
5f03c2848dee61ed6f87be45c2506dc90a238100
describe
'214588' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRR' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
0abf115fc041880df0a9422c6f6e605e
2da4994d313208ce4f32946d9c0465df6b1f0489
describe
'219659' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRS' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
4e36c040e34768cfcaf774c06b8b5730
0c45a41f9b75be8a299d90af7ea2eaf0944895bb
'2011-12-16T19:41:43-05:00'
describe
'185138' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRT' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
f305527e567d1406b9c7434b5908a319
e341dd507bac37b8b621f6a7cddaccf57ede6668
describe
'216984' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRU' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
be512f420ab693bfcf2f744107495b75
32adc4cc4793f4c16456d656e703188372ca0607
describe
'54443' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRV' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
f23bbcd51e5f3e8110b3e7054d22fb6f
feb3fa36eddeb21f7600638c8339390930e5fc68
describe
'165721' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRW' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
872f68136836ba0552e0310b6aeefa3c
59e7730f1582cab47907db25b9b20c9f8c80fca6
describe
'238300' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRX' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
4fe05ae20db5c66175f4281feaccef35
53a55c2ff55a054fa900257bf3c7cac961b28d96
describe
'232861' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRY' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
3d790b7d6a0e7b2d6050ea349060b370
88d3cf1e6b510a712409e2e3e9dd9fcae4f74aeb
describe
'223325' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMRZ' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
dea761f2f013c899d0cd656d33da025e
7b9f8e02c847751aac729a2b4ec544ab942f3d73
describe
'235918' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSA' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
4d86e665e95cddadfc0d026887c5343e
89d3f491bae54d64c02da6159da578166cc982fc
describe
'192338' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSB' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
cfcce2a054823f63d11fdc7ccb77f17e
3738d2140fb4478c4e92b0ace5ffdf1919c488e2
describe
'195096' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSC' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
5b86035f13bc92a3ae2ed6d44faa919f
ce246dc7f714cfd4f1ecc0bbc18b7e30b7def6c1
describe
'240867' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSD' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
110d06904e18cf801b52e61cbed3fe06
e580d85a6586591d856cf420f66c888d11ce6932
'2011-12-16T19:33:12-05:00'
describe
'232565' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSE' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
431944c89bc761cf68677b3a7787472c
245360ea149c898ffde6510d263b6e34d67c970c
describe
'62890' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSF' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
eb90896df463e6355f871c854feeb549
2d97b9884d1455dc74084f46dca426ccacf16e69
'2011-12-16T19:32:07-05:00'
describe
'179671' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSG' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
d3b34801fb156dfe67a914640a450a2c
b3d6ecdb8ec4ff709435d3e5509ef87a5de55eaa
describe
'232431' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSH' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
41acb23c8ac96d70de5c6b4b80a6b491
51857fcde47000188a1c9ac1a62e85054945a652
describe
'241663' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSI' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
e2387dd27451152fef8541bfafb02066
4454134bc8a8cc4fce6955569587c9e9487a73fc
'2011-12-16T19:37:56-05:00'
describe
'245056' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSJ' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
79a39bfb6e0a5760efd0334f035ef1db
eae17bb018863c1cda90f1d4ee7725a022c706fc
describe
'45661' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSK' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
dea2c5bf6bad845989e2238a9d714375
f0687afd7345d09c0c293b7172f293b503999383
describe
'185550' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSL' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
17bea890cc3f72f11924b4080fac3d00
16f7dad89ccf614b87469106362ba53cece90f99
describe
'128842' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSM' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
f56fd98c854e2b8401a5e5b5a68eeb58
3f954eee0e79c16e9f0c19fccf0c27efd0417cf8
describe
'180264' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSN' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
cf0cad646294354f67f616dd551709a4
6c982b5c865271a7a66672f69198590358fe01e4
describe
'247554' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSO' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
34cbc265f580a86f8c7ff3f13eee0b27
3b712390b1eb16c48a0883a03c32eeb7f5273c60
'2011-12-16T19:41:05-05:00'
describe
'237869' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSP' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
798eade7bd173635e77d3063b0829d4f
c539142508ace9c8de85822b096ad25005d6b920
describe
'173873' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSQ' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
30f90402c9a284d29a8a1a7eebc2c934
1949f0f77aa58a8ceb68dfe87f7a2a969d9938ae
describe
'252881' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSR' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
837709836910c7dd43159476e3b79c60
bd15c061317ba0127920a602f72efe2cbbed44f2
'2011-12-16T19:34:08-05:00'
describe
'233982' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSS' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
7f9f92d81d3d6620deb5e356340fbc13
80609c9e9695af236a94181ca3aba55272b55f3f
describe
'131927' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMST' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
c86e19186edf0e619ef7ad7440a740fb
20dd3ec8a66efe2006c22a6237f7c2ce5e6e9b09
describe
'173650' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSU' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
6caccf5678fc00306a303d83ab7536b9
af5367e0a0d7ee6e8d07e4710048ab71bdc383b1
describe
'247452' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSV' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
07803fd2a1816e29ccf2d2e9b16de4d5
106110087a8a604e9f564d4d9f73533a8414a126
'2011-12-16T19:39:01-05:00'
describe
'241761' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSW' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
956c78757456483917cd081253baa826
aa3d4e523bf349d8d3a1558861d82d6936b8310e
describe
'231658' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSX' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
1c00835f61f6546b72c2689efff531de
278939bbe7339083b027a96daa0eedc6f161a952
describe
'217769' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSY' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
24a0ec5637566af7c9b8b9ccb727d4a3
4a0c55f57878b9c7f18c1893e390d81014fc7d5d
describe
'234226' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMSZ' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
e8039a4190d89cdf014b464c51a981b7
336ef96a8ea2b1b7a58329577353031b12642a34
describe
'235579' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTA' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
3178b931e74686b9892e9dfd8796ae10
c376e1de05953f6f22b80b5f60b6b95173c237e9
describe
'245758' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTB' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
fbfb3f8c00cf332a2aadc90b35e1a4c6
232222f90ec3ecde762a69f8420b1ceb18705233
describe
'234455' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTC' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
db16ced8068df09a8d2daba1e0cc3f26
d0a4e6de97e703f5576e526931dd6b539da4e081
describe
'238204' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTD' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
a4b932dc20f3cff470791b5e1b719264
699d03c750fbbae53c8ca51f4ca575bee093e4bb
'2011-12-16T19:30:37-05:00'
describe
'229972' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTE' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
501e369cc5f1fd9cd18452f6b1dbfc86
bf03ad876852cbe0b28f534fc00bc177e63b9583
describe
'243508' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTF' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
c279808b7bda63abb1375852fa974757
8c656951f1f9f28126879f18226e8182e0bc50d3
describe
'225325' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTG' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
22333a1e2f2d9760396ad7d6cd3d1810
d9ddf2cc748df1786a40063e208452c6bd07d99b
describe
'71361' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTH' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
6b7450fe18ffe30a5a96236e3972028e
f627273aa7299d2a3c7042bb09bb58bfcf297bf3
describe
'172867' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTI' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
13a58cd7a81eb77ac7e23c177907830c
3b2636a869aa56cee1fb8d9940569a135dc033a6
describe
'238598' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTJ' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
87bdb1bb222e7c12424bc93560f4cc51
c806176c9f7bbef4aa5731b6328cb86e3b480208
'2011-12-16T19:38:38-05:00'
describe
'241501' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTK' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
81a1bfee736a4f1edfc733fa6499cb9e
989e1234f8f0ed3de490360fdd887fcc8804843c
describe
'241494' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTL' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
c38a179a9920a150ccfbafeb2ca1844d
4d3833142904ae541afac414627dbf6775b7da22
describe
'234375' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTM' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
c77faaccc42f7792aa88ab118a4ed6ec
798f3a538c31c7d562b59c45ff8b2d9c189b665b
describe
'234204' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTN' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
b135ff77d6d23870a79eec5a8cad57ff
9f65612eb7fc634324ad9e56d63026db18322162
describe
'155574' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTO' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
9802b241a0eccb2fd910eafacfb93acb
e67afe0a616ce7e3d1f0c51b9fc609f7e2a47ed9
describe
'177563' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTP' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
4c6074a68da59ea2c7374f0869c5cdae
9f1bcc8740808837a7cab61bf4af2032e2af0fc3
describe
'223069' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTQ' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
b16fbc2c4228bfb23f15e27cd3621278
b004b142a7a19db354a96e680fcec649ae717078
describe
'225580' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTR' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
f5e912c28bf4a3755af167b625a5a202
c12f874aba1ccfb9b9f549a0f72d616054e2ef3b
describe
'172244' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTS' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
50da2b48d7f86925a996a50f1cef611f
109b150b38a3120aa83fef77027b05f661e3dc6a
describe
'234669' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTT' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
9c3ac742a3279a483862cbe73df451ca
bc9c57458d49eb3572fa087d3700543f86c177dd
describe
'226873' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTU' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
e33cd65bc2a06736f776efa197a573e8
c521d01629b367520adaa3e02e836f32e3999461
describe
'229696' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTV' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
cd2101e5b12019b48fa452408893fa61
8eac8a46723e83339b796ed4ca9f27fabffaae91
describe
'232222' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTW' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
ff41432af237cda077e07a19c21b46b9
d8cfff184c1be4bdcbe82ff1a780cbade3d1ed2b
describe
'76211' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTX' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
e453d1656e89e06283699d53177c4649
e4957ca12d03b6853559eef15beefb90515045c7
describe
'166692' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTY' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
1e30240696f0bd3f6eb6b6f17637c5bd
087eefe3aafcb13e98e7013be7c60491017f3c53
describe
'236472' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMTZ' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
61c9393229bd6c5aca00d0ecde74a1c5
1b76f8237fc51a3db9164e2ba880f6ef8b0f9c3a
describe
'228709' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUA' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
571763b23e81a823dbb030dfe6e12989
25c7d3b18ee18afa10e92328cfb7e7a8544ce7c8
describe
'234848' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUB' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
436084991781a90db22d037cf0f5c04a
1ca337c5e051455ab3848a7f34ce347cfe915c9f
'2011-12-16T19:30:43-05:00'
describe
'201859' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUC' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
234540fa45d5a16557e71dfcb57c9839
e058851b487a36b4e49e8c24bd81f421a341a25c
describe
'175307' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUD' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
da08252f58244c5c44633ea6b911dcd2
0c59eba51739ce39f5715f13998da74db3844a4e
describe
'198326' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUE' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
4b6e6aa6c36331a5d1e1f78f0f9e25c3
88e17a8aaf4fcc361dbedbcd0ddd7ece9e17e33c
'2011-12-16T19:30:02-05:00'
describe
'198970' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUF' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
bc227a3b810b86ad38ad5ed9a43ddfd0
acf91d62ccf23d0743722d92506106fd158afad1
describe
'224619' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUG' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
77dcf046b546edfb44c0c319d7e21e40
f2bb910b2b0221ee33fb4a4facc749d680446474
describe
'218365' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUH' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
7a1ce3d66ddd670130a5fa0233086c56
e167fe95f4b412d37d791c67fa9db8a54393e2fe
describe
'215946' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUI' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
b15415edc454e383415448487056542a
ef986271939b598dad0f06a13533bdeece1f782b
describe
'211125' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUJ' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
9e49aa8b7f376a9e2f1306296fde115a
dd0f40a9177978fda2a38ca3bd917d2310a6deb9
describe
'90987' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUK' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
31d6e0dc947133d6fde5f3c17fba1e64
f44edd31fd667d0adf8adcf1003453eb51ebfbf5
'2011-12-16T19:32:59-05:00'
describe
'121867' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUL' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
12f7a44e656e4daa4fd6358949b1b28a
24fff06bdc9050f17872aa68d545263d6e0fe767
describe
'225789' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUM' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
1af546ca0cd9e557e40a83908c13b94a
bec58de21fc881a5e174ecd370834d5a05b680db
describe
'224836' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUN' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
e804c4e743443867baba2ada84bc7aad
e2ca1fb26fb89e73f00afc89d213ca9930950f11
'2011-12-16T19:35:40-05:00'
describe
'231053' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUO' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
b63ea6d484997a3aab70a9f44572d6ad
d6beef2ecd3c7dd8b1dab15ceebfc7669ef2f58b
describe
'232115' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUP' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
ce6030c27670cf08161bfd06fe894d14
0076a96dfb806aca179c801b7a2805edb8b5f30e
describe
'229991' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUQ' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
326b6c212de88438c5529ced610e57ef
f4c0410f5ac7b43134b3f69fc39dd9390f8bf888
'2011-12-16T19:39:36-05:00'
describe
'214892' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUR' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
43c87e923d0b39808475b4e990c2622c
1d3d3f01bd1e381798204b4bf7f256daa8da754d
describe
'231339' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUS' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
190cd7b73ef05663017970eb1d242dd2
138f77d7c62ca2d3d7a01370d235115ee570d256
describe
'230308' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUT' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
b076eab9be8f9f885c9819b7a28a4030
0a7611bd4fd9cde8797df58d83f8502acd435642
describe
'202971' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUU' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
5a206e670c6a96b20906742a7b98c96b
a51578584a993c40fdc336258b41b779e3a17ef6
describe
'218117' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUV' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
8c1cb4dee340477b0b59f0982d3caba2
14de7720ad688b462df53513c1bf7b33b1536040
describe
'200258' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUW' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
43e1661c9cf661dcaa46ee4c2c84eec5
2ba2dcef30b65c280c09acde728e46ec3e117d24
describe
'202408' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUX' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
c5ae2775926319411d07c0f2e7c8e920
195a16acd4484c3150e2c8fae10ab740ee576aeb
describe
'226851' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUY' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
bf83c41c2bd165c944cf776aa2ae0319
4394f30d0d7d00695cd63341376022b2dfff3a8e
describe
'229315' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMUZ' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
46394f2326a6111df01dbdbd98600e57
1cd9fc52f643e71c43d25f5993273af984cdba74
describe
'206075' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVA' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
40d004e4f25085bab7473f911319e370
7208fcdc634eebb656d81a20c8646c6be3a46415
describe
'225368' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVB' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
3cbe433fbf29475d6a558b7a9531ab79
d037390347d5992c6c98dd6bde29c7de55ca6e6a
describe
'227503' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVC' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
4ac82a05a8b945ffa90367599097efe0
a20f0d3bdb1d066f6eec623080708779018319d9
describe
'218491' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVD' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
2f7541c0195eb412b1488d5c689f7495
a7daff4165a687630ea2993a6cf918250d45b808
describe
'208857' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVE' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
152f14f7c3bb010c4b8d5ddcf3b14d3a
2a791e55fcbf69b4e200e2638905474477a78ac3
describe
'206203' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVF' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
9d58456707e88625e75ccdf6b717eee6
b4834c3245a82b440a75f4cb0844eb7f35967a43
describe
'215665' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVG' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
0a15f40e24c8b93c86d8cf3bc8bbf57d
57978066b5f2cf5da954bf312a508552df0a3c2e
describe
'203442' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVH' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
17dceac3540564638da3a41bad196001
c00db9defd80f6ac5ba1255e1378d8521f60a69f
describe
'219292' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVI' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
cbe36f5a7972d8907d5ffe0518b7f18c
03a05b009b40eb902c6e65834dc0bfc4082532e3
describe
'193835' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVJ' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
374ebddcaed7b563fb28f544d39bc467
f28f906341177d1a29d4f3b2e213ed67a22329ef
describe
'220921' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVK' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
cc97febb3744369641b20a1923d22c20
889a2e8f7a9908a50322bdab0139dc3f9eb29532
describe
'230477' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVL' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
72b5359c72296a35ddfc510a86bb43cb
c21eb746b59abb5f5c8254ca2e32984e17cbcb08
describe
'215898' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVM' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
d9f1a82cd76cf6a3648b73b7e88bd3b4
660531fd82d832a52e59d968b77cab90c9f947dc
describe
'210124' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVN' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
99976a2fd279bd41927825a495b1214a
7d5517bae2270e198500739ce4199846ff9fb4fa
describe
'226789' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVO' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
a45cb987dc45b1d28a6f8a91e0af0d48
96f7b0a20905c7db5c993331477d10160830bd3d
'2011-12-16T19:32:31-05:00'
describe
'223415' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVP' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
a8c47e27cc1df0e93669177a5971e509
e3e155ce6e47042219571b938a424482e2791b42
describe
'182195' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVQ' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
7869f9ccc9c611c5f0366e2d64f05c13
1e990f677cfbbb7e591309717f3b2bd386e5b4f7
describe
'214408' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVR' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
aa9e6141ef6994735cbc3a9fccea4a41
7d76abbbca21e187d465a6dbdbac434ace1eb689
describe
'206832' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVS' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
81a595743f07d2e3337baf21860f3ffb
fcadf0dca83524716499003d617cc7a88bfafd3c
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVT' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
3f1531891d69cb8288b312cc26e2d190
e4d9e239e547992c037475de6c01137cf20f7aa5
describe
'4585' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVU' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
b70791886b8de65daad19fe07d1ae9dc
f33555f8d9032386e8c93890538a730303fa851b
describe
'268440' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVV' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
fe720363fd2f99b175853bdeb67ba9d9
366b80c6279ca5f808df7988c38199274fa3fd86
'2011-12-16T19:33:37-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'101544' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVW' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
4cd51783581b2232d09170d3c8a31dab
0470c66481a8d58d6e30dccc1d54311e656a7252
describe
'21810' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVX' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
4bd79041ce3b1e692730acd3339d1e7b
b4db5d5a9208c4c3abd9d4e3f70fb1b2d9d0e5dc
describe
'2884' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVY' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
f07ce45345a971548950645d279a5a52
5a9092416b8d74dff24f8d18aa6ac538f7f76da7
describe
'2494' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMVZ' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
334c966853c3fa91a5ae8ac3794a1a36
00542d426eceea21ab0cfc88f4f3d389416544d3
describe
'29401' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWA' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
40527139fbb3c9c5b1134bf8cb72c775
45851f3525d8a93b57328900ff10a74a7bf79915
describe
'14207' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWB' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
57f12bd50a4d060541cffe4f14213056
b10e28f8d490faa37a5e153c32f0a712db9445d4
describe
'15976' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWC' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
26846bd6c632afc7707c97d11bf29646
a8d4e9db91f9e5b0780202e1b174a2a1806512bf
describe
'8113' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWD' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
7e71ad7659726fbab08bbac8eef52ed5
4cecb1e55d3328991f9a31dfe644bfe401bf1666
describe
'47491' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWE' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
6e887d3169ecb2c47f5bdf92df6fba04
79fba412486f8ad93230321f911a981968f372d2
describe
'21208' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWF' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
e3a03474dde691bab2dee20c453c2968
7e9b54dc2deb78c88f7653fb4180e74a7ff0c8a2
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWG' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
e8885a0c1ae9612e84ff568963aad5c9
d0135200cea666f0045717bc65decdf3978c2849
'2011-12-16T19:33:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWH' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
866d1a673fcdcb9b63b51630d40255b8
1b24a8241f6f619b5b377cb4029b5ec481c7ea5d
describe
'60767' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWI' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
26247b4af5b6b92b58b3ff1cffaefd2e
297145bf8a0fc4a6edb125310883807039513a54
describe
'23564' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWJ' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
aa1bed156271748d27e106f973465140
7821f81b92fd494f131710deeb4ffaced619f8c2
describe
'79972' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWK' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
0a8a10c00263fc2979c1a514a8bb08de
d2cd3a009068ad64b60468ca08c20585cf87277f
describe
'31673' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWL' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
d16e265b4f50424e80fc29bf2d5ee0e6
954f1966bf663a5d88079bce723f6c33e742a95b
describe
'75940' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWM' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
76a087ceee45a5f093d4cf9244a4653c
877124e0599ebe0a0861c16f2a6a4bd9abcf5855
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35011' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWN' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
dd1ef7bb1624a32467ca8ca48620bed5
b7cf9cbe71c08663fa4c063f2a32d36ec4bb0459
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'73571' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWO' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
31ecf737f671a89c3eb359917566ecee
d09a8d45902c461011e9c4ee341888578b5a32ab
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36309' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWP' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
add674c506517d90d7fd68d494d256d3
424135132f8d7b03b9661a4c4d8dedccc4ea7803
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77546' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWQ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
24b5703895420638719dc6feb78cc803
c853714bb93546328b3ae50e3596ab2902eba3fe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35629' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWR' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
dca554a6c42024e3e079e509f744c59e
66cb42a8bace1d875b4ce35e86fbe8f2c6ee7080
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79446' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWS' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
061b75a1b078e5bd6f596c2ff103085b
a5ba0972d7fe36e4a0c33629c3e830ed8fac5fba
'2011-12-16T19:34:51-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38613' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWT' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
fe93c5a64b453d02c7ba17edcfe164ab
f3ffc6f8a87db339cbfb77864b5d150b98823786
'2011-12-16T19:30:07-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88481' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWU' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
757ac988dfba5e41c25d6911e6a14f18
aeb175ef8e481d89ea7c788770c42df83bf8aa86
'2011-12-16T19:37:28-05:00'
describe
'33552' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWV' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
dbd274ab563773b994566bec288249ec
1481ad9c5e828901cdb8bddf67abcb34675eb2ac
describe
'82236' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWW' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
ae75077ad9859e2c2fe89856220a8c20
a5fe33450b14cca3547e403928c3fdb9776d91f6
describe
'29260' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWX' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
6f686e45550cb105f69428fd225fd231
b958301e94e2de959329155133601d7bf5772451
describe
'80950' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWY' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
dcd21c255148569087d426ce64e50830
49e28d99356b3330690082e303be52a7d9e46259
describe
'32513' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMWZ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
ee3e9c6439c5f149d88ec5177cf05ab1
24948d689090c92e103e13a8c0e3626fde56e69d
'2011-12-16T19:30:32-05:00'
describe
'84326' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXA' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
d2e7eae531ac51c35b10eee9f25e5439
4239523a66c21a4946057ddf52f1cc0197bea593
describe
'30560' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXB' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
9aa11bcc66eae10b5c0b24ab47d3069a
6e30bd5feb0657d2648b4ede73a80dff78160049
describe
'93156' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXC' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
c883e67f8b2cf6778e0c003be33e3d3a
9d97b7e7624fa62712d50824a4eb07d49151a7b7
'2011-12-16T19:40:10-05:00'
describe
'33928' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXD' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
35c42bf2b949f5c62bfac7fca872f2c3
2f6391f7cfa99aac8d92ccf4f5735716fd1d95b7
'2011-12-16T19:31:15-05:00'
describe
'92744' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXE' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
b47ef2b8078356e7a166657793afb1ac
52cf473f02a0fd08374cf07033e103ff43005662
describe
'30566' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXF' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
b27d53b3453c96fd065bb90051b7fa1f
cb0d6b5b46c142d07c6576ae7a57173fc0ae5ebc
describe
'87340' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXG' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
16201750c9044d5e6dc0c24790bb547f
3c7db26b169829e2053f5754849a7d0ee7430477
describe
'33286' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXH' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
eb33cc9c88b9c9c8b26831764a96c840
70f8aa80661238e7e369dfaf63a80d71373a2144
describe
'87465' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXI' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
5b15b7cfca234560fce534c2875bc1cb
ab0f8f780af8d2999e2b2c0b1709038782d9df2e
describe
'32025' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXJ' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
6db425ed7d19764461ee63d00e98d69b
f9aac4b0ecc4cb37a43976632d051e86a9fb02dc
describe
'86661' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXK' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
849d3a1a7fc2accf0c917a647e5af6f0
035ac14d57867788ed9fe6b7567cad28ef28bcff
describe
'32324' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXL' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
5eab17cf313ed4748839f48c044bf1a5
7c4ac6ebd17972cb49891d918d14727c4a90fc5b
describe
'84309' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXM' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
13505a55eb7e44fe4fa74d75ab2bb1a4
2e0abb279f0c737b704bbeef4021a653a773b36e
describe
'30935' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXN' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
7937d6f9cc45149e827e923bd5cf50b9
5c9a9e57deb7f4cadd22100340c4805a78e6d4b7
describe
'51066' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXO' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
d7a923f7764cfb68d57673d6ce0548d5
6550f731bb137016b7e7e2907f676081649fade7
describe
'20794' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXP' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
9958b39917b405a6b44a8cac509618d8
08a546be016039c75590e4ff4357ce8aacb87b47
describe
'93796' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXQ' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
1b32e1f5e4f0f2501c7636155d360342
1b48cbcae8aefe1df63118f355f17d41a2a9b5c2
describe
'33994' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXR' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
f283797ca6c7287a19ec86efeb1e49a1
eb26d438e2f040b71435edbd35945fed27c0ea3a
describe
'95983' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXS' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
e5368537a38a4ee6071f6bfaa89f6607
ffca6c04e9034d78d5cf179d0beb16bfea95fa34
describe
'32823' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXT' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
ae1609f0b47b603d52149f1ccf34362f
e5f8388c72c0bc52ce67f303bda3e909745223e1
describe
'90945' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXU' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
34f53ed7fcd1ade6571cc78494e63ad1
4feeec2f1c94a4b44fad7834bc56dcaa2fe672e4
describe
'32559' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXV' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
7fa5663fa525076b415873be129804a4
e56db671ec9c0266a977621424834d5412685245
describe
'93552' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXW' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
49e196f763c85f7938bb9a127d431926
26d055b10cb8fd9a805435511fba2b840b460934
describe
'33536' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXX' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
296db6ad8b63a7b0e5c8840fa5240ae0
9c31f3656e4d96659c6618b1c9cc40bb478eabc8
describe
'91637' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXY' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
00d18e750847d8e17c30f46818d8aced
de61df349234dcb02ad3db73f4f82d9c66a50ad6
describe
'33895' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMXZ' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
08c298d02bdcd7f0caf89ca611a05a16
c34f9c8d5821a44e742d944b9e0f0cc62089ac5f
describe
'87929' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYA' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
c9c8ca674e8a8cee81c2a4988f73f330
e252af66e8a9f7d8252a525a2c4a337dc638bc93
describe
'33462' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYB' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
9c96f8e98bfcd06a6f7f4b51080623fb
903ed5e7d135cafdc347454baf6ac6e26db889b4
describe
'87314' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYC' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
252179e6f9f5d6d78188dac9314952a2
e6716013bd6a6de804b719e57b9cc6e9e33aa8bf
describe
'32961' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYD' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
6f3057ecf19b2f6b2f59ee0f8bf68a3e
dd1ec7e2b0ca89d61c5c1ae64132fab2217fca93
describe
'90266' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYE' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
cab53d4a2893e6c1d324300c1b569610
e1ffd39fb523bc4754eb6d9e966e96054049150e
describe
'32022' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYF' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
97dcc17a2c929bd8d16b22e317c4c722
36c51ea2825e1140155851a7fe509dac5d575b71
describe
'90261' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYG' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
6e851a8166b6fe8af916d856ecef47d2
fdd8bca17963a98780691c157caaa2d03bc9704e
describe
'33275' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYH' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
8035c56852a4c96f89be051bf801f22b
e86a930d8d582821995ca6356040744cdab5464f
'2011-12-16T19:38:27-05:00'
describe
'85952' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYI' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
eb991e5b414c3314c12c495cea88bf6c
32a9b792aa6c6dc5cc56a52d92546d062f0780c4
describe
'32475' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYJ' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
d44b8e542c659ddf81be5e953354fa05
deca21e891ed81c386e52086d4477518c46f9ba0
describe
'84971' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYK' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
a94f4c0d3ccdfc0942742689bb8dd4f7
0376ec530f64eef005f8267de81ea18f7fcd4d5a
describe
'29522' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYL' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
f49f32e682c2e5295e1dd15025775139
caf78b49f0e798869f30a6b7d22878f9844efd72
describe
'91872' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYM' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
0a38d1dc766c609b9829aab55dd13116
420b6567f9bea0a117a9c8775b61172e646ae0fd
describe
'34453' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYN' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
583b518a97176769c79b6b3f0d093a86
755c2080db5841ad478273a7a01def61ea61cfe9
describe
'79074' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYO' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
3a7ca3df4a56a182272be5db3d520c7d
87a742912ad8da60cb37112184cb1ae01b275667
describe
'29760' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYP' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
a12ba9c291f4b4390df82a07b040e43b
10f2c11f5e1df0ca8681fb65235bc1ac11fcc5ed
describe
'94205' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYQ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
0e59e785377afc89e9f8718bc2d6c74f
e8746122228ba1aa0d3c8957005e9cbd1115682f
describe
'33347' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYR' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
86e8863b9e63ff0d8c3d409c66991191
da7bc786c5243e5123eb18615a95feb8822c04a5
describe
'78297' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYS' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
9839b9da2cbedaeed9c2e767688fe4f2
096e43bcef83ce50fe83d3693f6b1e92991cbaf7
describe
'31605' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYT' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
5974a514f7eea8c16731c7ee1d8b9a84
f368ed626ba27928b55867dac1c3f3ba4849df32
describe
'92251' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYU' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
c409165618fa1a1eaf2bb339cf9a6945
036301238b603c39414c600a12df0581ce647539
describe
'34283' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYV' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
008a0de9e42832563a61dc37ede9b078
3ad3261197d84d09181d1d3b74c3ee3960cd1d98
describe
'87293' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYW' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
3c0c8b1ba666bc059dd9b03b61d2ac5b
e4bb2a322455a83c9f75bce211059ef020c9bc25
describe
'33434' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYX' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
7a4bffe6000bcf7c0e1171555c8b8627
3098a8c0a7ad3931cd302926e4f284fc7af59a94
'2011-12-16T19:35:45-05:00'
describe
'80114' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYY' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
717b52285ed677ac92fd4395b499452c
a56d464542e2d2024f552df91af9664f452db9e7
'2011-12-16T19:31:05-05:00'
describe
'30968' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMYZ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
36f506bacab80a78c29f5fa5b9664e59
b88381d90f6330c45c93d76223d9dd9597afdaeb
describe
'82057' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZA' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
25cf321990b71e1ad8f415926c9123dd
fb6861b751a92e8da2a72cd7eb0f332ef7366d85
describe
'31834' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZB' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
1df81702c105d181f25eacc53305520a
76b1de6b5f0b9bfd8a1bc82ac5fd029a3c0e9320
'2011-12-16T19:32:57-05:00'
describe
'79874' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZC' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
5dea90b56704c5a9b1e9e9d5b0b9e89c
6eab5cb98b51f84ec41fb346850f08f02ef4639d
describe
'30577' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZD' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
8a4f278ad75039e88b302830791b6e35
cfe8d9766321b3b6ba20009f719d26c4b4982ad6
describe
'83921' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZE' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
15d310a7cd89e35b613ec25f62b2de11
11fa6026b69bff1f0992effa1c31faa8184debf1
describe
'33074' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZF' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
db67153b944ef560831cd1549461d9cc
a25022163827407fe9925229bd100e0753a2aa13
describe
'85324' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZG' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
4399c6e69b01d928b296df4a42f7e06d
6ba365e91245243667b1d11b54ef35b4472870e6
describe
'31705' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZH' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
d5d9461244a11ccd72a39fb5dbd96a43
d224e8ef63709782e06272ac20de1add148f0604
describe
'85512' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZI' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
3fc926ba9344c37483600ea68d6bd513
e22fa96061ac7f175eac3fe23be64c8349f24603
describe
'31637' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZJ' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
49461746042a76c57af791739b053441
0102d03e4bda29c43ef7e6665f98ff2d394b3b46
describe
'83545' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZK' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
8a73eacf0940ef55ef0c2f8ca62824fa
63885c6edc4d3d2a2af7f43fea5408740f2fe9e1
describe
'34420' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZL' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
1b0cc68a8b8ab77002d4aac631f1ad14
cc516ae60773a373c2100e9d3b809f96fb82d580
describe
'81994' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZM' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
a463f6e9a2fef4cde3cb7c48d073aa3d
2618446704f13f29512002a7303b09e7f0488ab6
describe
'31796' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZN' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
3886f8eca10890cdaee1c68925e38b44
87924aca69d17b91573a3925050b67367d0cdc38
describe
'94568' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZO' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
dea31f19365b91a13e4074592d19d95f
d1039bfb072b6e5049690f4dbcaeea70d81882ba
describe
'34352' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZP' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
8d30793a378ec9567c129822230e3312
deacff3f4c80f273b2bf1c08e51270c006ab06a1
describe
'73037' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZQ' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
4cc3b165b52ee9d8abb0d827feb850b9
cbcb989cbb986ff32b648c16a877c5c575aff8d9
describe
'27491' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZR' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
04bea9bebb913034a9dd3ca67105652f
e72453e752dca913390cf2a0e0f473d98d74dab6
describe
'75232' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZS' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
0abddc626340f4010898c4d86aa399e4
d628038949aecb37636e426a97f7dab83589afd5
'2011-12-16T19:30:36-05:00'
describe
'29851' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZT' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
cc79e9d9095daffc7d08ade8e6c9f7e7
f140c5863c30e099e137b55fa5bd2ffb5d0f6154
describe
'77717' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZU' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
d6d9d6138d8420520d017bde58051dc1
477dfddbe5eeccf57892bb4c22df3ab477e07f47
describe
'30194' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZV' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
759546cdd6c68766ad9eb364e1cba901
358e480abbf7421470fd113d59e2406d6e9ab3c8
describe
'91545' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZW' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
df8d16f287ff66d11f1123c9375cf884
90b7400c80c37c31090061581f186f268dc55ba9
describe
'34703' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZX' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
f5efaf989e94e9a98d7a9c9c630be84b
f3270d74d7bf1a8eb73583a07486dff332379317
describe
'84504' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZY' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
1732bc7c063b41bd12f140572155d7e1
2a860d2ad1be923acc41bbc010e8253d0473a6a0
describe
'32323' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAAMZZ' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
e3c12e91f87df9486feb2845fbfad090
d014d168f14514a8edc8e8d800ea66c3f55e29fe
describe
'93910' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAA' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
62cc70aa9bfaede6140a1da539cce422
56998bd04e3b2792d10a342abf76a22ed98ec28c
describe
'35406' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAB' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
9cf00f8b10d8c57bb246c6b89660789f
17e03b2228c5f088272215592a655b887c6183db
'2011-12-16T19:41:24-05:00'
describe
'87514' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAC' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
eb63a753b2e478c79b004046ee03d84f
1f47e54e17f48bfee0dda8d08cab983ff21dcbb0
describe
'31665' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAD' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
3474effcea1f5d1393194a6921f44b7c
24926b3eaf284df294986afed878ed145032bfd3
describe
'96531' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAE' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
9882f298485f4c0688587ac790ddf8e0
7590a3c3b52839abd1b01bc1a5cd0eced232eec0
describe
'34758' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAF' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
1fb9b335246190aff5f4bb9e2daa3661
265aa3e83aeeb97fe91df63676f9c8894b49ccd2
describe
'95320' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAG' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
d2dcb52b768857c22311aee7cda7a5dc
e82dc86c6f320a65f3c7f98d0daac2fdd25197d2
describe
'33514' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAH' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
cb97fe2e185178530cf13fd74256e2d3
5adc288efd1facb72db284a18d951749f09058e1
describe
'94915' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAI' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
845244e1dd71def355a4edbdbe66196b
5d3a7ad87a1dc7df5b2cab70bf3ea09a855dc9ee
'2011-12-16T19:31:43-05:00'
describe
'34877' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAJ' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
8451a3080e23b3d34418ea8b6681eacf
1ac9a8eb0361674ff7b6869e825d40cac24f90a3
describe
'90013' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAK' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
280df0f6ba58f6af91ea512b2284a753
a5d40e0204ffde8be85ef9b46e511f08529e22d8
describe
'32901' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAL' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
6229c67cab6270a746ffca77340aa857
97c2b58e3d5b54a9e138c9c33b2b28db987a2775
describe
'90019' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAM' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
3bd7e1a4cec20aec621d9bd4af56027d
c5b1f331b3c23590cb4795f215380db0c5a9713d
describe
'35429' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAN' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
d2901f3e4228f247db4df4027c1cfbb2
bc34852b6341359696097e16c283e810bbbfd7a4
describe
'79115' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAO' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
b37c72045a41495260f58fa18cc0bc99
01ebae3791d3fc0853a448d09ab9b14a0c73ac9e
describe
'30728' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAP' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
59b805ac55bd0bb7b79bc082e5eff0de
9cf5536f222c9a0fd8b68fad339a6e5bc2cda6ee
'2011-12-16T19:33:44-05:00'
describe
'86209' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAQ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
03992c60501bc5dd4886c7c83bbee63a
767e5f79e3854e13103a6a9e603ac0297f9c0107
'2011-12-16T19:37:11-05:00'
describe
'33606' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAR' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
eceb53e1d547c347b3849067e0905687
eaca4b080652681f41b148b5083b7250d221310a
describe
'90398' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAS' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
1d1377f41a958f5908e7850a58c543be
e078ad288f065e9c302935186074ac44c2184fbc
describe
'32360' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAT' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
486d9a2647301bfeb5f1f498fe21b051
7e56c240f779c2c85babb5c7411e899f88bee055
'2011-12-16T19:34:28-05:00'
describe
'96869' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAU' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
041a6230b085a0f2df013114d7ef1914
a8c4a7cb6e816ab0794133781fc4d2053060d32e
describe
'35551' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAV' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
bcc12e53c1ff7ed720ee123e6ed070db
aa9f27a7206a645e8cc18547b3b55045bd6a2aa6
describe
'91163' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAW' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
2257d0635e144ad9fa353aec1965d143
791ada599ccbd275defc36a821e04152be11f45c
describe
'32364' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAX' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
5816078befe19b28bad639958b1aa157
75e6321ab13f124ff86dabf7f7546c0f85f65aa3
describe
'87325' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAY' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
28f7e57cb776e75096630180ea2cf840
f1edfef6093f2dde8606af65384182da9e93131c
describe
'32723' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANAZ' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
ceb2ace271b65f48bf0c4f9ecfa75fb4
8f9105e9196132530b95c5eb2724a9a62c1910ab
describe
'90216' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBA' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
eef4cd0a241324443fa99c5ac4577383
94485ca19ee09daee3fdafc89fd1cd06d4b5f18a
describe
'33492' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBB' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
f11656422c3f3e12384fc4dca7b5f4e4
b8f179feec3d9c522838a6eaddc1abc863e0a316
describe
'84766' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBC' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
c01fd41d5792bb7cd9dd3cc28e255347
59e3659c24f5ee2c8912876d3e3b985e86894eca
describe
'31444' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBD' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
ceb5de050116bff560c612538604482f
6578e379b6c25cb585554fcbdec249977e35a63b
describe
'89800' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBE' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
6eb46c3bff66fd8eb8506c14a874170a
962231ff791c2adc42359af99345a00ca40e2cfe
describe
'34008' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBF' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
ce461a327b323e93a97be8cdff93ca6b
4576860b8ff2a32f42a6555c054ff30fb2cd5e8a
describe
'86220' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBG' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
f3bb617927d7ac20bf01d1c4a759dfdf
1d0452e01ffb08af5c2a7f602a9bda0a1c8e1bc9
describe
'32974' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBH' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
d40ec06ef3f5acf9ed97ad0c04864519
1c3f679a0aca76280263600d79f036cd6a82a75b
describe
'28222' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBI' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
532afe0c6cb963a2f47d1ecb187c2ae0
b6930dfae6006721498b462fb8924db0f1c15f95
'2011-12-16T19:30:49-05:00'
describe
'12624' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBJ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
f18af3f02b3c6acb350697b90d28a688
ff63891c03563fbeb02d47d59386fc531c9652f4
describe
'67819' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBK' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
4a15f580f0fe848c3f171cd66e983f97
6d60e4fa7f21be0cc7fcc58225b0c6f2d942cb63
describe
'27890' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBL' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
a297402bdd1fd31f7f5b071d8c30fa95
199ed80c899bcd6da087fa8a08253e566c71e383
describe
'74304' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBM' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
4450c089dff3029c4936729012f5eaeb
a4a4b1d877ddb96c4f653af73a518f6624d13d83
describe
'30184' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBN' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
54068bdb21b592bea1648e58666fc6e2
67682e88e7a059abbd9b52420d2d4a3f1e905884
describe
'94245' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBO' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
7dbd06feb7fdca1da019daedd0c4c1c7
70150d6845e93ee47a97c53bcd571310e526eb80
describe
'35714' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBP' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
6dcdc4f604af64b58d2045e2293ca6ba
79c8ec74bf2663f5ba07abada5d3a2841d38eafb
describe
'87777' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBQ' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
1e6cf1714327a4ca4a253e8ffbc12f4a
185016155b6e7d23bf543bad3a72814a62985215
describe
'33607' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBR' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
e6168e556e77c0356725062ec9244a18
f9a29fe05ec25d02f494953e2e945fbff40f6120
describe
'90361' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBS' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
757c1ed03c1abe5118a20f438712d276
253be269d665da3565b1335b04312179e2610ada
describe
'34337' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBT' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
4c9fd1373f0484ba9b65303f2bd87d65
04e45c89abaf624f8b69f87f76c39b497690b95d
describe
'92484' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBU' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
f484e11cdfcb96199ce008fdf90947de
4114a0242964b0711786dcc6036a16014b2e5a04
describe
'33601' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBV' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
db26204e019637936adc9464fe72caa7
443d4c2579e87f1f43bb0d9457dd720c1b45d916
describe
'93864' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBW' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
50b72e98dba2fae89d7124e00afcd877
b7b6292eebea0b18604ef61199918a99830b7fd3
describe
'35681' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBX' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
32d9d4ca5c8e3a5bd8c4faf34c9d1191
54f44f1c291b5ad55f5cfda419f747a54ead0fd3
'2011-12-16T19:40:15-05:00'
describe
'94066' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBY' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
6823f750f81da63bd695694c777755d5
c2db6b8002b2ae29a49a74c8fefd9ef7e70e7212
describe
'34476' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANBZ' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
0d1b8298772296fb951d6edb0b120ac0
efe3d98214c9e9438ac7e9a5996b0c814b7d33f0
describe
'97565' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCA' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
733661c02129aaaa60709d4efef07efb
6531630429c87433ed0915bd21bd0881ab89635f
describe
'34056' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCB' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
42a1715d98992688178265104be92bf9
9a4f1aae622f5d03297ae25dff38adaaa45a9983
describe
'92303' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCC' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
f166cc3d888c17332458aa51cb19fb4c
77c3c6ae40d154d98a4a30bfab9c21a7b432787e
describe
'32517' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCD' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
87f46aef85c2d22af403f0c1310d0e19
b7e3526d3ed42291f5ab1a0040e1ddd029176f5f
describe
'88192' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCE' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
615357660ae6df21180d8af606669817
1a04dd05f4616d5733fa7eeb912cebaa5016d301
describe
'35050' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCF' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
6c4b29bd4c41a265f2a1a2951829c5fe
3975ba1a9cb9895c616f508f0560ef180fb6e6f9
describe
'82414' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCG' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
8e9c0b2d48007d1ebcf19a99105850ab
4962faa634865ecf5e7165ba0bbf2f93cb94b4cd
describe
'33174' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCH' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
6b937f630d206d4f356656eb3a5b1bac
7021848fb38d5fd8cdea8f86da0b00f8f1e65f18
describe
'89401' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCI' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
21c5cec8d49ab28fe9c3d38c2b223c2d
bc95b3e4e0a5e34c15af0e1bdba0c41c9005ef7a
describe
'34487' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCJ' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
8b3bd36d3d7fae217803fb67efd46b52
b30075dc8601730e23715b1afae1d027a6ca0d49
describe
'88880' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCK' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
29c5008737eb71f83730734613058661
af468a69588fbe0b8c31e5ecaad87b06c72cee8b
describe
'34224' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCL' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
956734564aaac92067c7b91d9d1ff50c
3dd23870210692ebcb15e6ae787791b8516bb2e2
'2011-12-16T19:32:33-05:00'
describe
'90685' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCM' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
5a2fa47940989c0d1dbd8ca8eedac37c
ff1e27efaa2e6512aec879f367117dda4727a05d
describe
'34780' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCN' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
1bbbaf49f636ae29fd5bd9cedbc0906d
56dccd3874bad2648d2f0ac4f77f32c9b3cbb5db
describe
'90242' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCO' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
98c62722e855f62a8a7dca899ea16a56
cebaf2f3d807b8a6d35d937a497cd92072d4e05c
describe
'33907' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCP' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
be6b17c5f1ff57e3b6735eab83ef323d
8468dee0d6e4f82a12b80126383ffe5c23aa610a
describe
'83412' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCQ' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
53e7a17d51f417e50ba271ba4657ad88
ea3e5e946952cea065d1372f52d8384f3f963585
describe
'33030' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCR' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
14ed177b2e6298460969291ad9773a87
bcfc0ab8aabcdf1cbdcf29048739e4eb50572484
describe
'90858' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCS' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
e463b51f05b801816509cb92596845dd
701122d893f5f6b96c87f501a21fbd7087eb8c71
describe
'33826' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCT' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
f3c61fb8074abcd66d1623b1bdb9079a
6e20c6837e938bca0ca3f5e9bf6cd91fe9a003cc
describe
'95040' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCU' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
18a90577548c7e0ca51215ad1b297ed6
d048b658e2cdcf8ba1ca991b184da3311adbf153
describe
'35351' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCV' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
eaae52400c3ab4e986b7ac1e86544077
756ed91710dd0812c0f8ab2ae3764af21163b0f6
describe
'89097' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCW' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
49fb167d9a017c59ceb874b69305f24d
fbbd059aa83e6fcbe636ea7c44e6e9edaf262baa
describe
'33416' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCX' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
d4842eb006c7587a0079902d96b66d40
13f633a2aee31f1f87fad56ab093e2b0655f3dbb
'2011-12-16T19:30:16-05:00'
describe
'41190' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCY' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
849899dc461aaf408fae39e2b7954b5d
7a4e604a7c022f6bec587417ef9849a530751de6
describe
'17312' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANCZ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
b61a6911e000621e6f0bcb198301d8f8
c28b92e2e5314921a2d9c3b0a48aa38ad6562c3f
describe
'62533' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDA' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
1b1358372ea427f1306a7ea882d5e099
611d0dd78db237667b95f6f7d2704b15e00078f1
'2011-12-16T19:33:35-05:00'
describe
'25225' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDB' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
ac8cbf66f79db1452fa7508e9abcda8c
fe300f28f8b5ba5e9b758c960e9ef5c602cefbef
describe
'93295' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDC' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
a6c196f9980728b1ddcd321d397cf131
ea12c75f8059bb8b944e63dac975f8e68bf37fcd
describe
'35359' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDD' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
da1866477bcd6d7d9d3a382651f05ad2
403858b74a73cbc43a3c78443b17e230bf4f6c1e
describe
'98404' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDE' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
5e163e50c5ffb93fd30261ff257943dc
3eef1ff851ec6ee211e38dc4a9378ab1fb92d27f
'2011-12-16T19:31:17-05:00'
describe
'35182' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDF' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
8382dda45d1f450c83dbf406e2827609
0cdf103e1f57bea16f4ffe29560804e9a2a8692b
describe
'87873' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDG' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
fe40c57d5ad4c08811228220dc8b8a7f
6becc928bc52770311481a2f1b20b01f7c05933e
describe
'33360' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDH' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
f7dd1aa54f8e00eb7e438b1b2f65102b
6eec7b7e0dad90e51bd51380c879434f7e021b80
describe
'95470' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDI' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
03228219c5ccf7408faffad7578f8987
fdef07157590038e3a60aae412ce4430f557d8b4
describe
'32885' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDJ' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
288e3bc2dc40a70eda03cade08db7d18
d0c24ea1f87ee87487db6b624f2c9fb5f93acdaa
describe
'95777' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDK' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
f2e6fc16b59b9c2fff2067675f7ff951
b121b2f51e4e7d6381be1bd99f8963a25e9dc87d
describe
'36147' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDL' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
363891345962ebfabb0afc5d2cefd75a
78837539345dd7483405f7d92ce10b8dde3ac2f8
describe
'95417' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDM' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
3cd78a17f7621d3913ec87b46264a9cc
ea9ffc637823f954dda1f16aedc4e4b03eb78657
describe
'32434' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDN' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
a34638dda9f36e9caa200e0d723f7c4b
6063265dc0bb7c69d7cf4aaabf1cd6447faa6cae
describe
'94121' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDO' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
74e33fa1b78035df4a949d4c3e1cf5eb
4cfb1c6a5a25ffc28cd2ea0befe45b05972de592
describe
'37764' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDP' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
f987ddd860095d2a99ba1f68d1ef7f48
5052bd972293fdb953b85f60ac15c68a11b50269
describe
'88763' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDQ' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
ed1db124506a29cd72ac5b6b2b286101
f3168829b06d1834219ef7dfee46087491f12d99
describe
'32706' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDR' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
fd1f1f7cbfeb6ef57752d92561620985
05dd811fed32eed8fea652f313c7353dd7c4acfd
describe
'95005' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDS' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
83d9b2ba974260a9c0fb4ca1db0c8e56
24a9baa8d6150406b3ea13a426825314f70ff6a9
describe
'35879' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDT' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
b9b433487ffb3e169de74e24fb92ec53
a4869a3f94989a6fbe791f02b77e7bd513e9ab21
describe
'91732' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDU' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
e67022202f9b1e2c243f14ffab2ac4be
503aacc81977e7c78d1d9e312905d7a9e39977bd
describe
'33773' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDV' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
26c7b2479ad82e1900339aeef1bd7fde
17dcfae0091d24a04e7ac1547d67dddccdcdf8d2
describe
'89832' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDW' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
e321d9b9c68503d5b05971849cbae0cd
d76e9fa404c748f942c18fcc34454b0340e88774
describe
'34330' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDX' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
f68901fa00f160b668d17953a57eba86
1ab553f7f202531fc2f50595767657652e438bda
describe
'91505' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDY' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
b58ca60a5a3e6da08dce53b7309051b0
e79e6926936eb3f10281366d6c247391291cbd1b
describe
'32955' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANDZ' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
1fe23bc0a52e6b48dfe1c750c58a011e
60ba1c3e3207c3b55dc30aa685c543bf8f2c6832
describe
'92594' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEA' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
60e4c70524d1bbbc2594c9bbdb20e9fa
4d5043d3cdf4bf56d860d298816d82f2aa0384c3
describe
'35527' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEB' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
913a1d8e384d434b40c783b17ca592d8
9eeae3f23eb044208c3ce9e901af27902f46996e
describe
'93329' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEC' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
d9c8f1f3110b2e41a3e5d5374e45db40
401fab4b85b870228f34164eaf9107cdf88f33e4
describe
'34142' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANED' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
57adc09dcdbc303fda245318a5dadb20
9751337c559f4d2d3c78a71f4c63d03b3300c083
describe
'90877' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEE' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
3537ee48ef84235b284bf86017c8d1cc
2655f44458abd9bde498c83c0eb468e4fc97334f
describe
'34532' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEF' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
3da17d4a0ce00bb1cf4a98bc11a6be6f
e5be396fa09eb6aab57aee2ba7fd207b5af5d540
describe
'98770' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEG' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
82502457371d44210656b7d16870a377
9678bcbf7b85bfacd2e4fe6503020ca276a35072
describe
'35191' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEH' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
be02150635f1444a5d211627a38b5785
e81c2a1643c150f8acb6e2015cfa0835bdc5e088
describe
'87311' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEI' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
edc3b9a089dbd9d7429d9f4de2516637
9c0469a1c2606552caa009e867b80e0108fd485c
describe
'35432' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEJ' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
24d05a4631f8f5e0608595dd1ec6af85
aff38c9de3d2233516ae37013c784a0a4e0ac72c
describe
'87782' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEK' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
5e335b0d3c869d577edb027769f1b607
4117926066a697b36cebacb176a103c787074862
describe
'32192' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEL' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
74896755d9773c2367e62ddd3f18b8a0
383d4fb307824faba1d490890e4cd1826a9dca4f
describe
'76513' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEM' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
32e77d3523d9bd60a1f9ff5790498b99
42d13fae053f9594c6490589fdc7ecca159c70b7
describe
'31985' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEN' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
710801334f98b9689352ab5ebd73893a
e210f75617348ae3b13b331e770ce11cb699c0d1
describe
'94258' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEO' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
7e4d984a446df02ef97c72cab1a4955e
f1f26cd0ac5be1e9673b77a97ba67e1393061445
describe
'34959' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEP' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
40042fb5cfc31f75d204bcf173157324
ddd9986eceae2aac02e18e52080b80abb9f66eac
describe
'84162' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEQ' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
a9a64184b0a507f1bdc4eb216baf1adf
479a82c7dab8f94a4e855e1f1a85f47961e1c01a
describe
'34722' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANER' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
faa7d9049a8f10272982e8191da7538c
02923cd5b16cc087881d1656761abcfe849aa25c
describe
'96523' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANES' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
8f85e7b1cc6ad31a78ee6aaf50ace14b
8ade44c42cc2535c0d4ee15b8d3b4af051919072
describe
'33792' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANET' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
9f400a61d947d7cdf9e184707cd102fc
1b9d2f00ca8952738c49fa6111f8fe8bc482c9cf
describe
'90849' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEU' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
3708fb269375a18a9b29b0db3e5ad0ae
19b746d3c8af3591823f68ffc4ff92a9366bb05a
describe
'35825' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEV' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
d22771a5104ff5241bb371df404252c2
fe1d8c27a3e9ca28c5dd0eec0cd9780449054ff8
describe
'91906' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEW' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
9a56234b697e2811620de6c034500ba2
6280afee661ffb73b8ed1db22896b7660d6593e1
'2011-12-16T19:41:56-05:00'
describe
'34220' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEX' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
26913fee09a2a17a7ea8e331da2e1ba3
8a311d7c6b1d4cc836a2dd55145d4fa2ab43f9ed
describe
'90887' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEY' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
16c15cadb1ee1e09dc11c0f24a035e65
60e11ff1d58bd78ecdd6b8b298ed159697e957f4
describe
'34347' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANEZ' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
6eeb9a36e6981d9a8d56e03f8161d282
602239bd62e8c25f962920cad966cc51ec52d5f5
describe
'91885' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFA' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
731908c2449aa9716c103de343387252
43ed9c54a1e952a9d408b90d3ac9444157ea583e
describe
'34422' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFB' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
7d85f3501a2d5f465f408c8245a68e37
892f87b1b6321966e1f84c392631f409ccf0f148
describe
'84128' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFC' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
43dd6ba686485cb5a565d18689ba0162
abaaacb4b5fd6c2bbea28412b27fe197bee61e2d
describe
'34099' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFD' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
e89086aca3b77dd694219d2d1bb6cf71
ca80cf7fa802958f0670c084768669020cab1f96
describe
'94423' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFE' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
2d503476dd5c5356c37b9a0c4023b357
8061c930e542f83787cc583f6213682285044012
describe
'37550' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFF' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
c0ecc6e3fcd09faadafa09f8877dfe74
48bce5986c36d3f434a05546b141db67b9d5d24e
describe
'84634' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFG' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
8fc91fb8d508bd4e8f2b843feb85811c
c9cc8810c72d2e55e29c5379aea838c8322e0592
describe
'33303' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFH' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
0cacc4c614241c2401c1b03af8b28cdb
2ef7d91f0e0404fd8b70b2dc0c8d67b69fd7c97b
describe
'93774' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFI' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
b66cc5952f3da9abe9c8666304505ec0
e446ec02d8ab31814fa9ef56cd0f267e945accf3
describe
'36533' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFJ' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
b7102de75e7f1b5ef7fe9407e2992169
2af58bc2b037baeab896e62162a9e1de4a46ae0d
describe
'81319' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFK' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
3058206e731efbd4c9eba3b8d70a6495
f9aebec60b2c9662dfd785afc6aac2b222969019
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFL' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
ac621bc6a7e6c9a271222c53e1f90713
7da4b38920d85a0554570454261d784e77fbd07c
describe
'98855' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFM' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
9e723efff1cf3f5b97627e6e4bdfae6f
6f025415afa1ec334d339834f9dfb4399dbe9276
'2011-12-16T19:33:48-05:00'
describe
'35049' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFN' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
29a5ee156a38a0920a124b78ebc0a78c
12153e8a13597e9efbb7c450997293af4f2319cd
describe
'95403' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFO' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
7b436566d7aaf64f1960cfd69e8b15d5
8f71ee0030776feb2e9b5ddb3115772ccdc5232b
describe
'36646' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFP' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
a36761cfeb2832394bda1183dd851a61
d7c6f16ded758386128d39c0859d0fb36ce85ad6
describe
'91662' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFQ' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
a5733236faee864c34882c0b649efebf
a6e641f5bff2c3a961ecda1000c0b13a6d585cd3
describe
'35401' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFR' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
9ab72885abf1bd3fb1f62bdec1d5c657
46519060ebddbe6505d45a9142fa8c95d709b28c
describe
'85051' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFS' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
b07c38e7b8c322b63b62dc2f0de09bcc
e194e939aa830f8f85fd0b850ab7a24cad4c8db1
describe
'33519' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFT' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
c0924799865c5c1df0911d072459c75c
515e0095d7e514a0032cfd1319eecaba2e2801d2
describe
'94381' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFU' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
8a30dd2c581b34515ef7e714cc197905
5f87ad98e19f8ff1d5d325120e3cb6d176f80919
describe
'33861' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFV' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
e53c0496f40f9b865083e8d83c5e3179
6faafbe442b906ccb6c2cd492c384d72b02b479b
describe
'93683' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFW' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
864105405e3726b2d0ef4720a65f1a70
f3695b069627039340d52fcab29e8fe53fa75832
describe
'34308' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFX' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
783e9ddc0c56106540a1c53f9832a806
cd053901c45dfa8849b82c3ce6443d9abab50723
describe
'37107' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFY' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
88373f365e65ec5ceda9b4b88a6054a5
075198e7a1db209a379121911f6d8a705de580b0
describe
'14511' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANFZ' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
1a466accb273891e2ee02bd5a754f54a
7700ae3d618dbcbcfbe2fc0bb2b085c0ead55587
'2011-12-16T19:33:09-05:00'
describe
'54497' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGA' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
e491107dee5579c5e978c3e599962b47
8e0d2dfa25721f8807baa7da0b307dfa64cc5c5a
describe
'23024' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGB' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
97e7c3ddd37b5f6769a89dc3ec1c7f79
a0fb45991cb86726eb2ac9a270c58909f3a90d68
describe
'92454' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGC' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
3eb41b15251e18d0d83ac8addf3cf9fb
1394e2dd5792ec1ff6d47ec9b4e71bef4e22f8d6
describe
'32803' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGD' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
feff408f1476972f2cfa27957a1a4088
573b3e207eacba6012c3936ed5ffe332c6a082c8
describe
'86765' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGE' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
e2b01b0d79c5c5bb64af4675f3cde414
667188bd6aef88ddf886cafe7ed5715dfd3e7271
describe
'34795' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGF' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
10e3538c0d26db35b5c9cdba30373d46
9420874c5e2d1e1a64c00bd68b59dc9ccae7717f
describe
'82772' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGG' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
3c7f6ad0bf865fd8b4bf465d40505788
f48fea8e3c1f9587a16ccb078d2edc3d0f3e2b81
describe
'32021' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGH' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
a246ab6b8fa632ded0e0d4136d6af1a4
87cdf914f00573691ac2e08549cea931181c81d4
describe
'81911' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGI' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
00f43a6d26058849a8812f8f368a1caf
c987bb1e2300b0b7e30009908cbe63a6dac66ed8
describe
'32143' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGJ' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
b2c724e51cf924da6320f54b51ea8c60
733954427251ca67a3cf369090d40e5b9eba181b
describe
'92876' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGK' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
81d4c15c1e80891a9efb5c02e9352455
76ca8fd63c954a864ea3b7284d396e8b0cd068a4
describe
'33878' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGL' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
9912d641464a2d88d3a66fe9434206a7
8cd98d23da5c472ab629e7b4add4c1fa3b103ab6
describe
'81655' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGM' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
e9c69a0daa163f6414a25c98c62f9b23
c87b9371d89863ae2225dfe35ac21cefbf33b89e
describe
'32838' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGN' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
297155edfb7c29a0cc345caebbe28b5e
1bef3d750e5e68aefac6413fc61cdea212dc755a
'2011-12-16T19:33:33-05:00'
describe
'90082' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGO' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
7df93a20c1f2a4b7cc04f9dd0f28d523
83a12e2e5b767fe904595db5721f43196038b603
'2011-12-16T19:39:19-05:00'
describe
'32669' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGP' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
91ed67f0f43ee794a20ec9646b82a563
abba5e3745b4843fbe35571b9d9830abc09732eb
describe
'78939' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGQ' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
c506d0f210efb46965e230fe8eec0d0b
8229ae1866b14dcf6a48059f48d58719f629b73d
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGR' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
6f0679e714e0db7751cb12f80586ce7f
7b1ef6f83c1d3a34ea8d84bbe6618ee073871f29
describe
'82804' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGS' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
58003d55b3973af04ea8253a3bd6af28
a0437fabed0b48469167ca83f0a1a5f0328e15a8
describe
'31830' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGT' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
f477010bb5d947cd924bd75c16295672
8c227836b335655ef69478a842d6039a1ab61626
describe
'85459' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGU' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
b96e20741ffc0c203046d3c22feb5bfc
b7ec4cc2523de5af4bb07e1916c2707b12e8c810
describe
'33370' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGV' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
045a34c9aedae6d87782b21cf6bb8a02
f3c4fd272e06510226dd85d66505dbed94ee8e47
describe
'94529' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGW' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
a92bad76a2de7b3391a2763d67e5b206
8b741e829b624265d4f1545d69793d34edbb8335
describe
'33010' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGX' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
153446d43be0eee15e3c72c7225530a2
00940b0f4fbfb0987c35c735c44a374f6db64079
describe
'93050' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGY' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
c0eed7d2454f93c0e0b6c08a7b89a853
7256151833daa8a824fade4d58a86d3c49760c84
describe
'33450' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANGZ' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
fd411e3feec024529936da48bae30429
612c744b39b183bada651a4ddff92535dbfde3a2
describe
'93204' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHA' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
40cd81f880c51308cddc15a1d2eea009
77fb328f336ad73e058ea7f0adf6596febbbe834
describe
'33785' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHB' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
365a0de23321774c1600cdfec1596ac9
a961cef1466e64de75414e7a98cd5c558693ae64
describe
'94371' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHC' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
1753dd88840fc3ab0fde6353af5e2e65
8643323d5d7cc4753b73ae2ca51630b842ebc791
describe
'33451' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHD' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
0d1526c32067dcf08fec4a79ac17c4cd
847425e5475cd4cd0a5fe71108fd8a4f58224699
describe
'91096' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHE' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
9c7754051a72ce3e00f5a74e943cf6f8
1cc22ebb182ef126a24d287324a13ce29b545848
describe
'33790' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHF' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
47b8203e3c6a9c5d48138c3a4ab4044d
23b378c9ec9d6cbc8c3ffc7f10fe42e91150bc02
describe
'76329' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHG' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
1c9a785c20c37086fd0d0bce0b308a5f
9de8ba92afe559394b44e0e39dde1391f8cb03a0
describe
'32375' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHH' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
4f452952608352d228333646a656a0f3
be34b68f309a1602c5e96903bb0be40deb53a85b
describe
'84897' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHI' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
76fc97b7360b511dd17e728ef698725b
ba744aadee0a0ba61d5a384c4750764fab3d03f3
describe
'32846' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHJ' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
1b4b66885d35b1c8e2d39f97c009d80b
9ae697982a6f4788b70d7062bb5eec12de5d458a
describe
'90220' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHK' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
f8433e3944ce038665a7086e6f0424c8
dc1c02bed3e5c72e1a43594d40d27705da833693
describe
'35760' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHL' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
b831f1759c79585bfc12f64d0691771a
2773649d2f5a2e0b5c13371da2c3c27f2362ca90
describe
'80963' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHM' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
4716c4be641abeba7f05267995c1b7e8
a8c36f08ce5d8028b9ea08c9b808739545828304
'2011-12-16T19:39:27-05:00'
describe
'33989' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHN' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
e0d8032e2e2be410ecddf5c5945ad801
bf4fdd90e6dc9f0fed7ceee5fbf0be1d6d385479
describe
'87510' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHO' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
2cf9954e29fe704985696c32e402203e
8b12ab5728271eefb7720a41575c57f7525d4312
describe
'34382' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHP' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
76a03990d5e56b281ac91733abbb1759
838a96ee095d4e73400678a83728b9da694a2905
describe
'80576' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHQ' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
52e0aeae3754fabecfafd7e0552e1455
926c48af3531cbda4c68ecd4d55477733811d4f0
describe
'30335' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHR' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
ddfe4dc40f43ecee790dca0fb7b20b05
1f382d929f1f21be50fd4a73b5c77b29b2a9e940
describe
'86397' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHS' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
2a4f3d77c100b2e0ad93da91c8c3af78
5f18b44c2ba5a82885024ca1d0ccd995239fc567
describe
'33758' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHT' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
ca0d949664c6f9d00280da52778cd2f6
578f64f9f98c91983ba213ea87d2927dab706215
describe
'22382' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHU' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
e85e9f1861335e249cff14d467158aea
2a18114e9e371e714e53b2348b5567e8756fdbe3
describe
'10296' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHV' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
f25c11f17c3baef47826b2083a403319
3ce3bbc40dc0bb332f9212c4412239ca910416f6
describe
'66564' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHW' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
69aea5dc7528920c49995a2cb3c1148a
b83359c44360864f6ad3bb7b550aceb01d3e9d11
describe
'26600' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHX' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
23439ea6d0416c36d0fbf96e4d0989ca
d563bf655f31122db8112e77a839178f559232ba
describe
'86836' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHY' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
f98bc42d20d37eb8360bf1625d01dbfc
daf7aa7986c71aac812bf0cd5922b1dc170ee15f
describe
'33278' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANHZ' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
c751493446dc49fa381ab6f2a5dc7d0e
9f30c8c479af4cc5db4091610953506d3c30a58a
describe
'90704' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIA' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
0a0f45add8e4c053bb7bd47abe29b749
34f65867133f444a49820f8c198178602a1bdcc1
describe
'35964' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIB' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
8c149af97cb0193fd99e9711540a0a8b
c0cdb272e36610297028189180b0c2409faf5d2b
describe
'85258' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIC' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
9d82192183bbfb4c36b02b8b8e2fda90
ca316b8b67b7825e4b1128559fae65fb20513716
describe
'33904' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANID' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
6581204838e87e0a9c581c61f5e35ee1
36bc79e1017a1246d21cf4c72d227b46fe8efd6e
describe
'88043' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIE' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
d0c92661c770f296bea4e89208d4b299
f8768ee5d4f4967294eb70369c3460917b3fc312
describe
'34688' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIF' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
130eabab6d16dd6f3be09cefaa4bf7e8
0daff1dac19a0601f57d4f2aeb8f4c43839d2240
describe
'73064' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIG' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
0a7926f3d83076fb6df6816fe2e4283b
9fb3614d11b0873919a38dec45faeee3138469a5
describe
'29983' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIH' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
ed24995706fe618ddd8db0561133c78f
0abdda0c8a5a664a85d2b34aea679d8303d430c7
describe
'73800' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANII' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
1103a5bca1bc2f0d37b5d6b0681e629d
d4e5620819c17e1f4acae8ba26ede13bc07227f5
describe
'29446' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIJ' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
43d3563cdc1d1b116be1a643601858dc
b0d2b00e427730ff88fbff52e6415476cd1bb1a0
describe
'91502' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIK' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
3d64cd9c4fc55f75235b6c3be841a416
f6eff3b93f9ef5c9f928bc30d7d509c7f6b00579
describe
'33718' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIL' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
472c307b6c1b1615c6aa14854f1277c7
6076b97e0e5575f7c8198828bbd9407310f09190
describe
'92549' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIM' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
d9bae057a63b6c1500135629ed924058
613f4c274ccd806856254a60938e1516e999b945
describe
'36477' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIN' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
ae71c1edb618e716661a25caf201b773
ed7fcfb4d9c8dc747595371e496cc104553b92bb
describe
'24931' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIO' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
5aa53cc32f6e4a61dcfdb9d651105bb0
9cfad65f4fcb9ad14d4ee4778170a33d42ac4092
describe
'10871' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIP' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
6530d38345af5cfd9d581747ab7c4b0a
e2a448ba75d4ba84109c2bcb6abe45e951e361a0
describe
'69216' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIQ' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
eb3e5a3f407274d7abce21c1a6783ed1
1139d9b56962df2d2edc3f94982d5e9ee5e60d70
describe
'26436' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIR' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
bf54970e6b46c2a1d7fdf8b4126dbd8b
c1a9bef782d37396f63426a8e1284c7f7d22bc7e
describe
'90586' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIS' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
c92207dc71b124f993b7ee36c1db4800
a3cec6f0011ca569acbfbc91296a6cddecb42e0f
describe
'29745' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIT' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
538823458868a8141500be59507ead1f
0fef3e2c71b13dc52d1f225c3fdd3c61be2be9f2
describe
'94577' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIU' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
5cd668105ca3ba775e2db933eb5d31a0
87818d9d455746671ac5e8728d66dc66b4bc1bc7
describe
'34535' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIV' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
ea2c40718aac7ff96e75d12e69cb62a3
582a1251154dbd28417895d0ed1a0fb9752ce3ae
describe
'97822' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIW' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
b79774832b87873fc9ce8ae38c0e2626
6ed31de6aadafc3db7bf03cefcf3dc6e5a5270a3
describe
'34710' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIX' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
2ed1dc6150491f4c2cc388c1ed2437be
16e69b736d84821e5321c435d8074b9361186326
describe
'20363' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIY' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
efef65614c2f760c374a33a8106ed3c3
de2971d9fe33843ef08bb1512e9cec3821973819
describe
'9326' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANIZ' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
dd42b461fd09ea26607c9b95f19f4a00
9b32b918fae7aa431c965df7104d99d49843a16c
describe
'73651' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJA' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
b5728dc7e0b386339f6d33ed5cb570a5
a011c094c4d89031b153220ebf4662734e6c7183
describe
'28048' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJB' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
2161b96b3aeb49cd74e98a6ac5921e07
2c64e68fdf893ea6067c0041f1698c5e16166c03
describe
'49568' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJC' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
88f9f612ad4013b88e02b7d99399c02b
c5c3f9f9f0fb33f6bf2a80449e6e9aa89e0bb4fc
describe
'19935' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJD' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
3a4b2754e23455e5cf90fe22b39033f8
b4bdcb87e9e431158a17618027cc996a75bb81be
describe
'69835' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJE' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
523e9c3822dcaccb7fd33cee9b85ad96
606e3aec0421719911cf1693afbc05c8109f5b7e
'2011-12-16T19:31:37-05:00'
describe
'26223' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJF' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
168a517f6d47b973d25a5fb90aed6969
570d78c2591977f02772435b59ce42f435a911c5
describe
'95221' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJG' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
3a5a801367e09ea4e3f0a53c95da13a7
5cb13872fe7050234c3067bcc374970b4f5eabce
describe
'35027' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJH' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
e45649e32d2ea7812676e4e7961359f2
b4f74fa5c76ad2d3e771ec0a51ae621cefc79ff1
describe
'92629' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJI' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
c0a25b0e96165246bb5a758b15fc7c8f
d3cdcc0eabc63a4f8fe67a8fa2d489568259635a
describe
'33889' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJJ' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
91fc33b2675fcf940a40bca62224c193
f04d7d4afea3abe0bf44e52ba8c90d426d9f3b87
describe
'67119' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJK' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
73c204a7c986e8a9ed59faf7e4060bd4
32b4407092098d4dcf7a2f83c39eab81cd3d14c8
describe
'25325' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJL' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
a9f849ceed63ccc7ecf7a17c3ecc1c37
74fa24bfd4c71d7103bd637b4dd3e09f21ccb0bc
describe
'98239' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJM' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
8ad65f934b392643576a63a172a8f48d
ef79ea0471fdce145f8a712a6bceae22704ce2ac
describe
'35274' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJN' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
c336ee084aa08a9c495f9bae7aad42f7
ec5cacb0774ad43eb7d58091a7c6b24c8e7e86ac
describe
'91818' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJO' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
1f4c2857428289ede700ccf5dbe27abc
1e16f54615d5def16eeeb60d565ed5c275e70829
describe
'33684' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJP' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
fca3477c2eaac0a2ce2714ad8727e873
7a9f76c2d9a448d3bd997b4a8a926058d436d4d3
describe
'52916' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJQ' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
53312a65b78ce5d0006123520edb5e3e
c5852b6df2dac5bdfba8958abc36a9fec7caafc1
describe
'20314' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJR' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
2799e19fc7787855326bcbadde8e828e
8d5b74f39a0a0a3faf6351f305a294468d1772a2
describe
'66796' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJS' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
eb382535e02201c922fd3eac56a15744
399ad414f749165d5537c374a1d6bb2115265a69
describe
'24275' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJT' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
d23631ac7585419804a147917b432f3a
f5b44c53160e67425e253f25daebdc7ccd4b471e
describe
'96601' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJU' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
4a5e772d441fbab96367ecaabad61468
b016c15358225811cc86fc464c461a025575d95a
'2011-12-16T19:32:37-05:00'
describe
'33902' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJV' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
427af915006f7ff022aacb20bac898c3
c08a8b7ae338f2ca52bf2c3061de3ebbd67867fa
'2011-12-16T19:41:35-05:00'
describe
'94218' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJW' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
1d99b4b566faab5411b0138d050b32c8
a70d20f9c529310a74eedb5e10ba709d9de72277
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJX' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
c39eeff239a1824a799a5b0f763efd50
30718ff3ba4e12659fb5618600c89d3eace17266
describe
'90980' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJY' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
21e4b8831561cccd872d8535377ac3fc
816a52fe7adfeb6bd414f5ab3dea5dee1f5115bb
describe
'33788' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANJZ' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
b7f30aa6cfbb6307b468f9c30b97f1ab
e3bc2f825eba4c37101b25aafbcd3e42736dc4fb
describe
'85735' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKA' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
0d60ae18b10ee8dbc19e5786e2c78748
edc7d6c57f328f082a3b0e7596d18f2280829b92
describe
'32055' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKB' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
d87664387a1e7074f6800f5ccf1a2f47
87da06f44c17cac80e9d9f3e36c4abb382fa2c3f
describe
'90746' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKC' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
125a1ed1f21c0c5ec5690de9a957b46f
e33b1c64eb61d549def5bb160cee3631658328db
'2011-12-16T19:41:15-05:00'
describe
'31432' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKD' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
4632bc81b1c50e353dddefeada006585
d6022a2957f7faa8ccf844d1ea0b2127696fa3f8
describe
'91682' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKE' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
03f17cf37b357e2d1ea1250f231f1bc6
5250f0654c5c1f14ca55ee79460699535db7ffb7
'2011-12-16T19:32:26-05:00'
describe
'34340' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKF' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
5e21e3b1b91e0fa39f0f3e3b9cc3b64d
d4745ce1b78fecd5a938a83538cbe96d62611bf3
describe
'96733' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKG' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
a42180b0ae190a7debcf304a2c440af2
69c5f03486e413b3fe3a735944b0728a55545aa6
describe
'33847' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKH' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
f12fe4fb979550fe7f704b7895664783
104ae90179df3ac1ea1b1a8df4326717b8fce6dd
describe
'90819' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKI' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
5affc4202d20ad9cdd7cc91e99be2901
dddb971d4d794d2fe10c160e59da27b9588dcf11
describe
'33595' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKJ' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
e382f17048d85627c3260bb6a3b49325
38dfd51ec9ffe94d5e655a15a6ffe64cf76657ca
describe
'93894' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKK' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
57f971b7fc67ccc443f3cf582e1bdffd
f3e9d771377937eb767aefb4c67bbe9babb9c96c
describe
'32381' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKL' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
1be5e1e385ef518ca3cbd7a6d8a4d07e
33c94fd5f3dfdb1115bc553b339c77b2bda03156
describe
'89213' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKM' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
1de2022bb1b28ba2792f553217a3e7b6
57ad9f360f0f832f5f4be6c493ca3bf259af4df0
'2011-12-16T19:32:00-05:00'
describe
'33050' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKN' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
bf0f124aedf026cc6ee21e5df9c1d77d
760607bdf6ae882a83424a416896a97255611a13
describe
'95802' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKO' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
70ecd9d6f6d5b85a4f48c286ae146c6a
10c2d7dd876c6445e2059dba9d9246c73a977d7b
describe
'34210' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKP' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
e5043555cf2f43cb68df801f794d2799
6a34a3bee194ba8df7b1c1a1e50add8f849739c5
describe
'92188' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKQ' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
508d7902ebaffc5fcc79aa15bf721b75
143e50b5434e89163bb92192504884b55bd7fb8d
describe
'32459' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKR' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
01d104fd23d55fbb99ccc6700232c7d7
0d2e93ef6c3cac506405b295d830e97f291b2d4a
describe
'29209' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKS' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
c821905d9674ecfde190e937b9da7c47
69f1e598ff5b8479fffbb737fcfae54d54f2b5bb
'2011-12-16T19:39:44-05:00'
describe
'12397' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKT' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
05bfa090cfb621d05cc0064487789d52
ddd7941855dd7affeca9f2f6a28e03da3952c347
describe
'67205' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKU' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
edd57f9631cdff6b9fcc9a4d3abddce2
2122e7891473b0813bc3657bbd9da53340f3bbed
describe
'25182' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKV' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
dc465f76ce90d3dab94c8c8288244927
89ef29ef2c5acbabc0786fb48143f4d481679877
describe
'95152' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKW' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
f9e5afbc768b3fce28e1deef146a8f0f
6349ca6e29d081a6630c932216b77892c536f144
describe
'33238' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKX' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
7e8fecfca57d3ac782723c351b4a8d8c
579cd021994a80fc1ce26dd95dfbc9201288abc5
describe
'93136' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKY' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
ed6f89b7e9787b47bc9588bc85ca4143
20b7ea812d95e540eceba6f2d155bcf3d9af977f
'2011-12-16T19:38:53-05:00'
describe
'34122' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANKZ' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
5fca7606b1ab562fc6a517555448b1c6
48c1a186fc5372be9a63f097de96abb35c609b64
describe
'94777' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLA' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
209b41858233fcce938a06def0e1b79c
6f143575884ef6adaae56a0459844c2550adbb16
describe
'31667' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLB' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
b1c087bc9cd76fe433bf8089f636caa7
95fc0c4048648fa653b6d3305ada252c8e30f00f
describe
'93913' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLC' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
4ef2134daae340bfac0f593e1de40e0f
d22f948a19f29a30afc4faec47334334a5b883f3
describe
'34492' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLD' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
27856fbbf0487ec0e393692e256211a0
35e2fa76370b947287a573af6c7a264477a35633
describe
'93028' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLE' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
43780c24216ce5a2ab41e0abc414b1b1
85bd2ddaac1b6d996309ce10f60e4f3921bfc6cd
describe
'34595' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLF' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
dc28dd109d60b9e67c2d85b2a8ed12cd
86de16c2b08300041e283d003fab8cedb9fa6202
describe
'64955' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLG' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
fc015db79560003f78e8808bfc4175f1
4d30f480c5954cab6af732042d3c8f3771f04538
describe
'24662' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLH' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
23479f21bd8dbbaec9434a3aafd9d29a
f8950b8be69d344e01f807a17bb3146436550558
describe
'71556' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLI' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
1ca72c17de33d25a8dd682e58cff2d9c
c8b3c3ae73545f54c2349d64e0da7bc961f16e63
describe
'29067' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLJ' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
cf094bf21a735e21e4dfc6b988b41707
bd15b41657c91fb0070f02a2b771a709ee575299
describe
'88562' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLK' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
ea5b00abcaaf931e089d9b61da0904bd
2a41b5cbc763fe82610fb3b9af9942f78e59b75f
describe
'34086' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLL' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
9f08d30fdabe17c31c81c2cdde30886f
999da46f916eb1fe96fc1b2361a177e5462c319c
describe
'89119' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLM' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
e73b7f7aea37b9b3cda14dfb3f379ad8
3a0be286ae9347aeb01c8049ce7370c5bd848f87
describe
'33741' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLN' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
98555862f51f426a04f5d814e6e6c98d
cbdcac9b51a2a11c90da53549f7372c261340e5a
describe
'70074' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLO' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
7e162dbb4fe6675bc8871c3121bec2cb
fac81c8abb626fd291f9e43af49af66f27e10e26
describe
'26793' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLP' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
7d5fbad3ca8539aa791cc4487cf4a174
5999c21e660e0413ac81881674258ad894075c06
describe
'93305' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLQ' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
c71863e65155d445bedb367dd4b4c413
a6ffa2362d5e57dfaab72f11e7d369fc9652a460
describe
'35312' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLR' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
12f66f638b8f5e03d48a5a38da52ed01
2e89d48403e570fcb9b30777b9babee92e889c6a
describe
'89354' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLS' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
14a87694ebec1ef3d3aab4c1fb61e482
ddb9bf6c3ccd487df26fb5125733b34286808520
describe
'34533' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLT' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
9286c4f0f42443901988ae18d923c656
5b883981ee4800cd6cb6dda69f8f6fa402d8360a
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLU' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
2b047ac8113caccc681cb818c405cbe0
9569622aa07494b405fc89b0fb9e38eb6894322a
describe
'34617' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLV' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
3bb733daf07133152a1fb295f5714d98
25845d1477136ea197f6d5f1ae8c9cf7361382f2
describe
'92428' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLW' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
d5be239de3b601a0e8c92f6888b0a372
227c6ea0ad51b9fb584b60c1184542bb6b275237
describe
'35215' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLX' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
d85360253b664e8301be7e1d3ebfe46d
b13182ec38b6bc3e549da88689e1afe261ffbafe
describe
'31081' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLY' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
c9ae224f0a356898d93b3aad97238b39
f22f5e3bb9cec7e5b033a5220c3108e9d6559cc8
describe
'13048' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANLZ' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
68bbdf0f34092502a17e277b4422c72b
52414aa64314273160d6819d9b53abd1df2ce0f4
describe
'66112' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMA' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
f3787a4b8f707e395183153dbbb84f4f
cc5a007b87e77d8265d352b05398f0c341b2a399
describe
'26984' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMB' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
e8635eb330e02447097dfe60f481b5e4
369a6660246ec7fed3a60c764b144133d3b4acf6
describe
'89894' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMC' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
a00e3f7fa9394c19adac013e9ce0f622
5c3695b6c30bfe638132b6314c7b7167ab7a86d8
describe
'35958' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMD' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
353bba51cced5fa9299ad1b2b8f5cbb4
0f26c2ae020b1140f4201433e057cb8d71fcd7f7
describe
'93080' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANME' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
c61149df9bbc58e52e61e74ebe48c59d
d3529beb326580fa4927cb9080c22a22c7e2f747
describe
'35413' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMF' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
cb12353267e6c8f8ae42d8f3123eb4c8
30e3a1982c56b4b92b8af4d4adade8d6b2c881a5
describe
'87232' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMG' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
5d203a8e803b1bab0afc00cb7de141da
49835343f009da58d59e188fb2136ea9f7ad19db
describe
'33470' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMH' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
c8b3f72e51c63c26b0fcf5502a1f8c6d
1b1929107e170bbb314e8a4aaa1aa26dec94a13f
describe
'81729' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMI' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
128836a133005fe344eac07a0c2d79e4
2270e9ab2af5e7531d117a9e9ef1d3e2265be0a6
describe
'33311' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMJ' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
26648d9d0eed30d001b77d371e79e391
83bb31a5702b1b3fe84cdfbc3053ad49596d20b0
describe
'69007' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMK' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
9bd9e5d02e3c86d2a022d73b9c86769b
bd315b83cdb0c1bf6d975ae03ae51462a7ab14b8
describe
'30729' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANML' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
ffe5d7964e949fd8125878ce012a42d9
f1240df341a20c1b97781646cd0d10e98272b9bb
describe
'77440' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMM' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
823b29d7da5098cf65490d3351b770b5
bc424532bfee113bbdd5327f15d1f00cd957a41e
describe
'31490' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMN' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
4eed67eaa1c8546a8ee000824ae9f817
25eae26e76804f36df3b40d34e22ecf09683e70b
describe
'80079' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMO' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
bb2a88b2739de776fee96b22707a741c
0a9465ac76b6c0e06046a8354b13fa94e6286941
describe
'31429' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMP' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
fb5aba0b79565de3734c46edcf23a24b
ea66e9fcc41868186d887f38205e67fd6aed7765
describe
'90014' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMQ' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
0a2ae9f37c97ad9aca36496b96035372
553169091d44c447a67ad1ee7eb4101f2e257500
describe
'33946' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMR' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
886fdc8b09e3e50b6d85126254a7a0bc
8a308b049ef527e0616c90e122513e231398782a
describe
'86095' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMS' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
23ba66877c7b5004fdcbe0add3cd5bf8
203d0de8ab6093318595850f26269f9cc247fba3
describe
'32322' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMT' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
690df5214ba752d81efb8785f9acd5aa
c947f4210e44989a7b1ccb6ac75fdf90612bb9a3
describe
'82464' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMU' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
2d7e4ec6f9616c935f2f1715840a3c82
350727a88b2cf919351619f8d701c9960b66c139
'2011-12-16T19:39:24-05:00'
describe
'32184' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMV' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
9f300a464393a981497454cc6d448f68
9d8c28718f8f5473f686028d342e2586ca30fbb7
describe
'82014' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMW' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
bd29da476f895f073473ac39cd90d50b
6c3b33bfaeb98fb74c6ada40348bdeee19be3b0b
describe
'32766' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMX' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
2fdce48b3314d40e487c64b5d5714f5c
72a21e10dcce785cb4b4bf0cf2e138e2f11d4a35
describe
'34496' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMY' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
c113d7e7d779406f27dea36f43b065ea
bd2877ce5ef094be99274a0dd7bc044bc61cf038
describe
'15012' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANMZ' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
1d1432a45e9c4f20056836045785b77d
6b8c14024e3b26552eebda3bd23cebaab5e5940d
describe
'45106' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNA' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
0954524173327768072df61c943238b6
93bb3383110f921cec768e9bc9d87b6faee7fc3a
describe
'18202' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNB' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
8da6d7e9ac7aa2088c9e2bac33137961
80e4e7d53e46c1d744231d6f89ecbb1c8e581181
describe
'90716' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNC' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
4375cebe2dd84750852bbaaedc307fe7
265a3c481235976250a47551181f0588f6f649bc
describe
'34048' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANND' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
3728891f2403cb880e88962321b82898
4b32fc8cce475ba6c3721ed8825bae2ba158a323
describe
'86600' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNE' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
fdfdc7decfd3b90fc926d42146d19877
d52fd3fe92469bc30e2c7b4e12a6c3a834e6b01e
describe
'33657' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNF' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
8480d3edf4808fa6f107da1c9a3a5337
af01353081dd1857de2bad856584a9d161a1ffa5
describe
'93741' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNG' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
3a6066f9105a32adb837c62a41446fd3
810e105a884fddf02a1493572c2cfbcc22d13c38
'2011-12-16T19:39:37-05:00'
describe
'34899' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNH' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
dbb6734681534404ffa6e3df64f05258
93d3f5fdde6bd915eb42ab3aa43037c92c75706b
describe
'89560' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNI' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
1dc3aa637c0d5e929229ea82a7940e89
df4913abcd6037d54cdb6cbfdc01cf7206483be2
describe
'33832' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNJ' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
1d232d433c39f603dad01335bb57b9cd
496ce59063f021d737c809ab0e0b258b0a5fca60
describe
'91066' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNK' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
c52a804c41d3c706dfdd605673527775
8181b612668a316ec38199b4ebc886da4d4c527a
describe
'34452' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNL' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
eb7f89c49ea2b9efbd84627bf035ef01
98814bd03f159b2b17818f5a685c52c64e4b0a3d
describe
'84080' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNM' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
b628a5b793677da29d5ef959b523df87
4082ce12b6f079790b7203e7fe7be7af082ad24a
'2011-12-16T19:32:25-05:00'
describe
'33691' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNN' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
cece24da69ddf06bea132c6fbb148a03
1656fd45299c29b3a435ae10ed3c6eb3d8d6f575
describe
'90968' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNO' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
e110ac6e67081ea20d123a0bf716cc12
bfd3ae6cef9c76e3a98c04631dff08dfff67b2e2
'2011-12-16T19:32:03-05:00'
describe
'34438' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNP' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
e813f662f512b8bb338ad9a6b296a528
9ecf5d266031bc07392f8d5d0c9a0e055a0dd148
describe
'83490' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNQ' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
e559fd4eeb9e1b8ea08c58232486cb80
b3c474bfaaf5cd4b6c4716dc776d234d07d0ab5c
describe
'34093' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNR' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
a80cb06a2ce21875892958d48b352a8a
cf98f619077150a9e9a428758a0129f595d72423
describe
'82590' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNS' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
e6c064f31da798a069ad9a7bf40d0cd2
fb7e26384ae4d22f7d8bf33da50a7c74a5248876
'2011-12-16T19:32:58-05:00'
describe
'32608' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNT' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
db76fe04ca5b460e9e74f394e179bd5f
1cc298956411f204de9a71a998c5474f41f73531
describe
'85346' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNU' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
78298fae5ff62dc89ca5a235bd8a3512
de8b908e4da58512e39b0b89b4910f3cc16d94c2
describe
'35431' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNV' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
b165fb5d1df37725a15a797887f777cd
775c6518ce0cafd13222612ae3bdd4a5c6d7492d
describe
'82431' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNW' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
6cca18441b1cfbee3736d810b67d7a43
f92e6fc4cc79769614f9ca73023623ebd65ee4ff
'2011-12-16T19:31:08-05:00'
describe
'33520' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNX' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
5bdefe0191a8aa63c5f49c866a36705e
c2eb5254c132df27697b9c61289f4dae408f1ccb
describe
'84858' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNY' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
0f045fb697e7dad31fb8e8a2140fb8f7
53a296e800088f8719b897d49c9e5af6f790a630
describe
'31421' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANNZ' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
597f4997c901113a4bb0602207dfa455
7d1c52f91c05cd8bde6e33e3d26ca027f8c7cab2
describe
'91411' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOA' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
2f561899c5cafdf72f9f165b12dd3c98
59a952b629661762472808152eed48fd1d3dddc6
describe
'34204' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOB' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
80c835707100242a8adebf6ffa120c41
2a20d6df9fac0d141269678305da47a8b9a34996
describe
'85892' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOC' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
314e3bdfceb13d657159bc68648680ec
7e2e115746a4160c4485c1c55d9eb58a78b0bef8
describe
'34027' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOD' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
a0326619545f8adfdbf19ea39ee65899
9b8b42d77f23377e6309955677a9a4d41e4c9c07
describe
'80666' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOE' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
95e453e26c658f888d1477ba6f5bc992
7f198f7af17200fdf6a0770189da2f28b8bc019f
describe
'31785' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOF' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
b0d251308d479d403aefc71b0f9f9ced
b3aa06d0fe4c58c002d3fd4d039c90e5c89cf6b5
describe
'93916' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOG' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
9ce8f2592a2ab807ea51476a8ca5cdc0
e388624aa1218978186a5d6c32ac89670c7ae7b5
describe
'33649' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOH' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
7d93236e1b93424ac0548b88bdbcfc50
111f7ec2c32a6284a2e750b497a8dbcdf02e6fe4
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOI' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
a2fa59bcc9e37d9f53b405260a3eeb57
74f7efc374b1abe5e5d21b4145cf8502f8acd4c9
describe
'33466' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOJ' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
085f88efe9f039887e36029bf7150b0d
afa87a134f1ea08620e3090293728c131dac0a84
describe
'90271' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOK' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
606da0237af044090413704dae0baaac
893e1a21e03db66e44366cad3e244191f1073b9a
describe
'34265' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOL' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
7bb9e6c044b1bddab1cd4b825ae944c3
dc76018f61a380dd5d0f7a08a0df3b0e33fa62a5
describe
'82400' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOM' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
55abeac084e358c96537317f5bbd9f01
db109b4dec32ba10deb25a3e2c560a7f0a24f1ac
describe
'33066' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANON' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
57b35357585a491f7b33c5e967148531
f5c6e8a87ac46570098496792d4161291a28825b
describe
'86228' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOO' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
e119bf8ebfa4cfd5acd3f0a110bcba72
f9812bd2fd3ddc5172f2237fcb56314260f8bc90
describe
'31998' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOP' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
c9c6df91fd143a1022f5f1508f97f153
34803b6eaf820d9e45dacd2141388ce1a75ba987
describe
'90839' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOQ' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
f205ea2c0d16092cfcaf3b89bf98c217
0ce4217d4b095e033d7a90375ff26183f2410122
describe
'34208' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOR' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
35c5baa273501bb14176d37b43491feb
71906528b4dc057f494477be8365839faec05df8
describe
'89610' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOS' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
25ca585477b4c9581169d2409e6c9987
78f6553836b6d410f0d3f183dc117664946ccd5a
describe
'33033' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOT' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
a50e6b80e26713d6089e439676b215eb
c6d7135446e0710f21a9c3f5dbc8cf52d32b192b
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOU' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
fa7da575c65ea2ae645c6220eb62af62
08f9b6c68ff4d2c5437ee81c15042fcfeec114cc
describe
'33219' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOV' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
0d4e2a051c09485b8374239a0b092681
8117af82558db517c6a3f32d6f490284d1f6b26f
describe
'86657' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOW' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
203597c2f01469970e0682535505ebe9
102972af13aac6bfe83926a161ffe7a3a368f216
describe
'32465' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOX' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
d565517b8bba61976aa4a297631ff8bd
630c90576bef95476dc5bc3b11f40344fd6afb53
describe
'93718' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOY' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
d05bc23163043522c2a6be23f749bc49
15a85eaa48568999a419e6c8553039f919bcb352
describe
'33165' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANOZ' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
eddf3583b0eddb5215f98af5c6ec868a
813e2e94aa0714efcdd7c886cc71d9009b4f1156
describe
'93506' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPA' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
4708a57d47055630459c47d77449a18c
530c91854433df2138389f72ac56863416d1f7e3
describe
'35741' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPB' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
29280f162a02b584c0df4ff42f8a10fa
6d4b6a073c1212f3ff1271813cc86e193b8806c7
describe
'89359' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPC' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
95634986171eb9a3de5e03e17e3fbd58
9ffbb442a7558631204e8e1dfeafda15c4955178
describe
'32230' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPD' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
47f4c8d5783308d49ececeb47a2131b3
c0a37a961facfccc1786c8f90a226ed078600c7b
describe
'84014' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPE' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
68350af9c543f177aca30e8ee7afe38e
d720bc7a8700fc9cf797e7dafc6f7afd50328e0b
describe
'32839' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPF' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
f2c2fccde1cfe1d1f39a7070bd26f3f1
0106af03a33cdb627105f54ece6fc0ef40e4fb90
describe
'91195' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPG' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
cf31f932614aad4a62324e1ae915ae6b
19770b0925785d34a0715beab33065c26755f0b7
describe
'33440' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPH' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
d976de60d20c1fe404aef6c93f6e72b0
92a12c23bc943ec56f799c22cc1847e72434162b
describe
'87044' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPI' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
f9d13806c8f5449dadea8b937a566649
bf8086647e318278eac7a6167633793eb9822091
describe
'31243' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPJ' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
ba44ae2e1429af054fca64ef67e74ace
e10908ed572a2652547afae1136f604c727508d1
describe
'73758' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPK' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
8575e9aa40d6d96822f3e7d949efa36b
50d3eab00b0ed1882bd3aa7bfc47786ce17c096f
describe
'29381' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPL' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
c9d2c9ed60955a281658e55c66c440a0
8fd9ab6f2ac8d0c5335f37383cccd92c6e31ac68
describe
'81087' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPM' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
e8a100e1e9cfa47bbc69e149e58ac181
cbc1c2facb0ca4fac5aaac1bbb58aa5d4dbf3738
describe
'31707' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPN' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
3000d1610264ee68c219da66afacbcf9
337bdd1c9f94f71f78d8ca81b9f10489f05db642
describe
'79493' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPO' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
5767974005be33edd60debb224b1188d
abd6371d7a27f3e30bb93c9588de7df999267df7
describe
'30898' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPP' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
a1bbcc22c58737adb64761bcc7b65d4d
d57e716a872d26a7f25512d604c7f6ebdb20d296
describe
'17784' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPQ' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
b5082d0bcca8d52b2989df037ab7366c
c77e1db13c6d76cdab8cef8b0cde59dcb17190f5
describe
'8127' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPR' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
ad95f3fc84987bc0746980a9f41eab1a
3522b5ce8592e9727c41884df2e3d35f98e345a5
describe
'2902' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPS' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
e295fbc313a07f0839b5995312f1f751
154b84b0b3f7be236edd366bc0a9ba18ff7d328a
'2011-12-16T19:32:32-05:00'
describe
'2492' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPT' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
ee3b83e0f388aa0059dae2cd852b41f1
87821659143e2a909c9d448915d03b2328a88d25
describe
'59268' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPU' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
7b0a5eed20cf440e088809c8fc237914
3a8dec49769a92082b8a078c426fb6a240d9ce8b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'19545' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPV' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
bc5243a068ff10e97e76a4033357b09b
68e72966da0d10819edc642dca285970ed3ea2e4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPW' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
d8c10bf8d025ad024a67ae977791f7e7
3a86a07e52ea5dc902d2dd98258e308b9105e09d
describe
'431503' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEEfileF20080602_AAANPX' 'sip-filesUF00020319_00001.mets'
63b52b3f5e03a3819583921e56717f1d
0458a84398357b4bcb7943d92b02b360962183c0
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-18T00:53:19-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.