Citation
The flowers of the forest

Material Information

Title:
The flowers of the forest
Creator:
Sherwood ( Mary Martha ), 1775-1851
Longking, Joseph ( Printer )
Lane & Scott ( Publisher )
Methodist Episcopal Church -- Sunday School Union
Place of Publication:
New-York
Publisher:
Lane & Scott, for the Sunday-School Union of the Methodist Episcopal Church
Manufacturer:
Joseph Longking
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
79 p. : ill. ; 15 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Faith -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Bookplates (Provenance) -- 1852 ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre:
Bookplates (Provenance) ( rbprov )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
by the author of "Little Henry and his bearer" ; examined and approved by the editors.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026955356 ( ALEPH )
45834954 ( OCLC )
ALH7878 ( NOTIS )

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FLOWERS OF THE FOREST:

BY THE AUTHOR
oF

“LITTLE HENRY AND HIS BEARER”

EXAMINED AND APPROVED BY THE EDITORS.

New-Dork:

PUBLISHED BY LANE & SCOTT,

FOR THE SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL
CHURCH, 200 MULBERRY-STREET,

JOSEPH LONGKING, PRINTER,
1852,






THE

FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

smvarmemet

T suai commence my narrative by stating
that Iam a native of France, though now resid-
ing in England, and a very old man. More
than forty years since I was a curé, or, as such
a one would be called in England, a minister
of a small parish situated in a beautiful pro.
vince of Normandy, in France; that province
which gave her conquerors and her princes for
many generations to the country in which I
have now taken up my abode.

While residing in Normandy I was a Pa.
pist, though now, through the influence of a
clearer light shining upon my soul, I ama Pro.
testant ; and I humbly pray that my mind may
never again be brought under the dark delu-
sions in which it was involved in my younger
days.

It is possible that my youthful reader may
not precisely understand the points on which
the Protestant and the Papist are at variance.
These particulars are numerous, and many of
them are not easily ascertained, because the Pa-
pists do not present the doctrines of their church
in a simple or well defined form. When a
Protestant refere to the works which are held
in authority among them, and points out the
errors contained therein, they shift their ground,



6 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

and in all possible ways evade a straightforward
line of argument. ‘Their most authenticated
modern formularies are deduced from the de-
crecs of the Council of Trent, which commenced
its sittings in 1545, and continucd, though a
long interval intervened, until 1563. ‘That
council was held by the command of the pope
at Trent, a city in the north of Italy, and many
authoritative decrees were issued by it, both as
to matters of faith and ceremonies. These were
sanctioned by the highest authority of the church
of Rome, and never have been in any way re-
pealed or modified ; they may therefore be refer.
red to as the authorized statement of popish
doctrines, and Protestants may reason respect-
ing them as the rule of faith of the Romish
Church. It is true that they were not received
with the same degree of implicit submission, by
all the countries which continued to profess
themselves followers of the Church of Rome;
and in Protestant countries at the present day,
the Papists are unwilling to admit fully that
they, as such, are bound by the decrees of the
Council of Trent; their policy appears to con.
sist in continually shifting their position, and
presenting new forms of defence, which being
of a shadowy, mysterious, and irresponsible na.
ture, are incapable of being overturned by the
artillery of reason, or other means which might
be used against their errors, if advanced in a
more substantial form. The Protestant, on the
other hand, uses no subterfuge whereby he may
confound his enemies, and escape the conse.



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 7

quences to which the principles he recognizes
must lead, but simply maintains his belief in
Scripture, and asserts that whatsoever is not
read therein, nor may be proved thereby, is not
to be required of any man, that it should be be-
lieved as an article of faith, or be thought re-
quisite or necessary to salvation.

But I forget that I am writing for such as
cannot be supposed to enter fully into discus.
sions of this nature. I shall therefore avoid
going more deeply into them, simply request-
ing my youthful reader to bear these things in
mind, namely, that of the two principal orders
of persons calling themselves Christians, the
first, namely, the Protestants, profess to take
the Bible as their rule of life and of belief; the
second, the Papists, bind themselves to obey the
commandments of their church, of which the
pope is, as they pretend, the father, the spiritual
head, the absolute and infallible ruler; and the
priests of that church assume to themselves a
power and authority far beyond that of any mor-
tal being, in all matters connected with religion,

But to proceed with my narrative : as I be-
fore said, [ was born in France, and educated

.for the postoral office; the parish which was
appointed me lieg upon the Seine; it extends
along the left bank of that beautiful river, which,
as is well known, rises near Saint Seine, in
Burgundy, and mingles itself with the sea be-
low the city of Rouen,

It is a region rich in orchards and vineyarda,
in fragrant meadow lands and thymy downs—



8 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

to the north thereof lies a forest, extending itself
for several leagues over a space most beautifully
diversified with hill and dale, and affording
within its deep recesses sucha great variety of
cool grottoes, waterfalls, and natural bowers as I
have seldom seen in any other part of the world.
There is the sweet village, each little dwelling
of which has its thatched roof, its rural porch,
and its gay flower-garden. We had our cha.
teau also, which, being built of gray stone, and
having a commanding site, afforded a pleasing
object to the road which runs from Paris to
Rouen on the other side of the Seine ; its fanes
and turrets at that time being exalted above the
neighbouring woods, though, as I now under.
stand, they are levelled to the dust; and near
the chateau was the Tour de Tourterelle, which
gave the title to the family—a huge old tower
coeval with the first dukes of Normandy.
When first admitted to my cure, the family
at the chateau consisted of many individuals,
but one and another of these being removed by
death or marriage, Madame la Baronne only
was left to us after a few years ; and such was
the kindness and amiable deportment of this
lady, that it was commonly said of her, that all
the virtues of the long and illustrious line of
ancestry of which she was the last in that part
of the country, had centred in her. In fact, her
conduct merited our sincere affection and grati-
tude; but when we are made acquainted,
through the divine teaching, with the fallen
and corrupt state of human nature, we dare not



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 9

to use or admit that high strain of panegyric
which more presumptuous individuals employ
without apprehension.

Between the village and the chateau stood
our church, built also of gray stone, in the Nor.
man Gothic style, and near to the church was a
large black.timbered house, with two gable ends
pointed with wooden crosses, where lived a de-
cayed gentlewoman, a widow, whom I shall call
Madame Bulé,

This lady, being an accomplished woman for
that day, and much reduced in her fortune, re-
ceived young ladies into her house for their
education, and was, I believe, as far as the dark
state of her mind would admit, a faithful and
laborious guide to her young people.

Near to Madame Bulé’s seminary was my
own little mansion, nay, so near, that the win-
dow of my study, which was an upper room,
projected over the garden wall of the seminary ;
and I used often to amuse myself by showering
bonbons from thence upon the little ones who
were assembled on the lawn beneath.

From the period of my entering my cure
until I was more than forty years of age, I en.
joyed a long interval of comparative peace. I
was fond of a retired life. I had a particular
delight in the study of nature, and in that part
of it especially which refers to the habits and
formation of the vegetable world. I made a
collection of all the plants in the neighbourhood,
and would walk leagues for the chancé of ob-
taining a new specimen. I had other pursuits



10 FLOWERS. OF THE FOREST.

of the same kind, which filled up the intervals
of my professional duties, and, through the di-
vine goodness, kept me from worse things
during those years of my life in which I cer-
tainly had not that sense of religion which would
have upheld mein situations of stronger excite-
ment. Thus I was carried on a compara-
tively blameless course through a long period
of my life, for which I humbly thank my God,
and take no manner of credit to myself; though
I feel that it is a mercy for which an individual
cannot be too grateful, when he is brought toa
sense of sin and to a knowledge of his own
weakness, to find that, in the days of his spi-
ritual] darkness, he has been guarded on the
right hand and on the left, from shoals and
rocks and whirlpools, in which wiser persons
than himself have made terrible shipwrecks.
But, as I said above, I was led on from year to
year in a sort of harmless course ; and whereas
I enjoyed much peace, so was the same be-
stowed upon my neighbours in general, in a
larger proportion than could have been expected,
when the agitated state of our country, aa it
regarded religion and politics, is brought under
consideration. In the meantime the little es.
tablishment of Madame Bulé was carried on in
a manner so peaceful and tranquil that it can
hardly be questioned but that the protecting
hand of Providence was extended over this aca-
demy, although undoubtedly the instructions
there received, partook of the spiritual darkness
at that period spread over the whole country.



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 11

At length, however, as madame became less
able to exert herself, and as new modes of in.
struction and more fashionable accomplishments
became requisite, in order to satisfy the parents
of the pensioners, (or boarders,) she thought it
right to procure an assistant ; and Mademoiselle
Victorie, a young lady who had been educated
in Paris, was appointed to the situation. Thus
the wolf was admitted into the fold; for this
young person, being exceedingly vain and
worldly minded, no sooner found herself esta.
blished in the family of Madame Bulé than she
began to disturb the peace of its inmates.

All those accomplishments which delight the
senses were what were chiefly held in esteem by
mademoiselle ; she had no value for the quali-
ties of the heart, and no discernment of retiring
and humble merit: hence her favours were ever
lavished on the vain and frivolous, provided
they were possessed of such qualities as she
admired; while some of the most amiable
young people in the seminary were continually
exposed either to her ridicule or her reproaches.

In consequence of this unjust conduct she
presently raised a very unamiable feeling among
the young people, many of whom began to form
false estimates of each other’s merits, and to
hate and envy those individuals among their
companions who possessed any of those quali-
ties or distinctions whether mental, personal, or
accidental, which were calculated to ensure the
favour of mademoiselle. And then it was that
I first observed a change in the air and appear-



12 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

ance of the young people when they came out
to amuse themselves in their garden during the
intervals of their studies: then it was that the
voice of anger first arose toward my window,
and my ear was then first saluted with the,
tones of discord disturbing the beautiful har-
mony of the scene. I observed, also, after
awhile, that there was an entire cessation of
those games and diversions in which the young
people formerly seemed to take such interest ;
neither did I hear those cries of joy proceeding
from the play ground which were in former
periods so delightful to my ear as I sat in my
study—for worldly purposes and feelings had
crept into this little society ; and I, as if aware
that these symptoms, observed among these
young people, were only the beginnings of mis-
fortunes, frequently at that time looked back on
the days of innocent (comparatively innocent)
pleasure which were fast passing away, with a
sort of regret which seemed even more bitter
than the occasion warranted.

The time had been, nay, it was hardly gone,
when it had been the chief delight of the pupils
of Madame Bulé to cultivate flowers in all at.
tainable varieties, and madame had given a
small piece of ground to each little girl for this

urpose,

I had often busied myself i in procuring rare
seeds and fine specimens of flowers for these
young people, by which small services I had
obtained the name of “Le Bon Pére,”* “Le

* The good father.



FLOWERS OF THE FORES®. 13

Bon Pere Raffré,” and was saluted: with cries
of joy whenever I appeared in the garden.
‘Then with what eager delight did the little re-
bels gather around me, and some indeed were



daring enough to thrust their hands into my
pockets, to rob me of the small packets of seeds
or bulbous roots which had been deposited
therein to attract the pretty thieves. More than
once I have seized a dimpled hand in the very
act of felony, and then it was my custom.to take
out my large clasp knife, to open it wide, to whet
if-on the néarest stone, and to pretend that I
was about to take instant and cruel revenge;
while the sparkling and blooming delinquents
shrieked and danced around me, now receding,
now advancing, now approaching, now retiring,



14 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

till every avenue of the garden re-echoed with
the merry notes of innocent delight. O
joyous days of happy and unapprehensive youth,
when. the light heart never wearies with the
same jest, however often reacted or repeated,
nor yawns at the oft told tale!

Often too, was I invited to the collation at
four o’clock, when the weather would permit
the little party to enjoy that simple meal in the
open air; and when Father Rafiré promised his
company, most happy was that little fair one
who could contribute the most elegant decora-
tions for the feast, or supply the most beautiful
baskets of reeds or osiers to stand in lieu of the
china or plate which adorn the tables of more
magnificent orders.

As I before said, I was then a Roman Catho-
lic ; it wags the religion to which I had been
brought up, and although I will not say that
from time to time some faint apprchensions
might not have crossed my mind even then,
respecting the soundness of the principles in
which I had been nurtured, yet these gleams of
light had hitherto been transitory as the irra-
diations which fall upon the earth when the
morning is spread upon the mountains, and the
clouds are driven forward along the path of the
sun. But this | trust that I may say of myself,
and of many of my brethren at that time,
that, as far as our knowledge went, we were
sincere ; and that if we sometimes appeared to
be otherwise, it was because we were not al.
ways assured that our faith had that foundation



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST, 18

in truth which it must needs have in order to
be effective. Notwithstanding which, I think
I may add that I did endeavour, when thus fa-
miliarly associated with these young people, to
press upon them the importance of spiritual
things, and with this view directed them often
to raise up their hearts to God when employed
in their most ordinary actions. To thig piece
of excellent advice I added, as might be expect-
ed, certain admonitions respecting forms, of a
nature which I now see to have been decidedly
prejudicial, inasmuch as outward forms so fri.
volous as those which are commanded by the
church to which I then belonged, have a direct
tendency to lead the mind from seeking that
inward and spiritual grace, of which outward
forms are but the types. Among those forms
which I particularly enforeed, I well remember
one, which was that of making the sign of the
cross many times during the day; [also in.
sisted that these young people should repeat
the Ave Maria, and certain other prayers which
I taught them in theLatin tongue, as often as
they could make it convenient so to do ; assur-
ing them that by their obedience or disobedi-
eneée in these particulars, they would rise or
fall in favour with God and with the church.
Thus I endeavoured, though on false principles,
to shed the odour of sanctity on our little as.
semblies, and for some years I had no strong
reason to perceive that the weapons of warfare
which I had placed in the hands of my little
pupils, were not sufficiently powerful to enable



16 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

them to resist the snares of Satan and the dan-
gers of the world. For, as I remarked above,
while Madame Bulé alone presided over her
school, and while her pupils were small, the ill
effects of the heartless and forma] system in.
culcated by me did not appear; neither did the
evil break out till the general agitation of the
country was in some degree extended to this
little society, by the arrival of Mademoiselle
Victoire, who, according to the prevailing spirit
of the age, no sooner found herself established
in the seminary than she took the lead, before
her superior, and commenced that work of dis-
organization which was already advancing in
the capital.

At the time of which Iam about to speak,
namely, the year 1789, there were in Madame
Bulé’s seminary three young ladies, whom I
shall have particular occasion to mention by
and by, and shall therefore proceed to describe
in this place. The eldest of these was named
Susetie, and was, in point of external perfec.
tion, the rose of the parterre—a blooming, live-
ly young person, but of a high and haughty
spirit when opposed; yet one, I think, which
might have been led to any thing by a kjnd
and gentle hand.

Susette was a chief favourite of Mademoi-
selle Victoire, and had her warm partisans, her
open admirers, and secret enemies in the little
establishment. Neither was she without her
rival ; for what favourite is so happy as not to
have sometimes reason to dread the influence



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 17

of another. Mademoiselle was capricious, and
whereus at one time she caressed Susette, at
another time she was ali complacency to Fati-
chon, the only young lady among the pupils of
Madatne Bulé whose pretensions could be
brought in comparison with those of Suseite—
but whereas [ have called Susette a rose, Fan.
chon, whose hair was of a bright and rich au-
burn, might best have been compared to the
golden lily, the pride and glory of the oriental
gardens—that floweg which is, as some pre-
tend, emblazoned on the arms of that noble
house the star of which at one time seemed to
have sunk in hopeless darkness, though it has
since arisen again, we trust, to shine with su-
perior splendour, and with a purer light than in
the period of its former exaltation. It is my
prayer, my daily and hourly prayer for my king
and my country, that the same light which has
been vouchsated to me may be bestowed on
them ; aud that as the Holy Scriptures are now,
1 trust, my only rule of life and test of faith, so
also they may henceforward be the strength and
bulwark of the people and land of my fathers.

But to return to my narrative: I must con.
fess that the character of Fanchon never pleased
me; she had none of that candour and dpen-
ness of temper so agreeable in youth, and which
I would rather see in its excess than its deficien.
cy, although that excess may border on impru-
dence ; for age assuredly must add prudence to
the character, whereas it seldom deducts from
a spirit of cold and selfish caution.

2



i8 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

The third among the pupils of Made Bulé
whom I must particularly describe was an Eng.
lish girl, and an orphan. I never knew by
what chance this child had been consigned to
the care of Madame Buké, neither do J recollect
her real name; but she was called Aimée by
her preceptress, and by that name she went
among us. Neither do I know more of her
age, than that she was thought too young for
confession till she had been in the house more
than two years, and therefore I judge that she
was between eleven and twelve years of age at
the time of which Iam speaking. This little girl
was small for her years, and was one who would
generally have passed unnoticed in 4 group of
children, yet when closely examined she had one
of the sweetest countenances I ever beheld ; her
hair and complexion marked her Saxon origin,
and the tender innocence and dimpled beauty
of her face brought her trequently in compari-
son, in my imagination, with some such figure
as I have often seen of an infant Jesus, whom
the artist has represented in the arms of his
mother, looking down from some high altar with
Jove and compassion on the multitude kneeling
before him. Such were the high comparisons
which I made for the lovely little Aimée—yet
why do I call the comparison high? Are not
images, however beautiful, however exalted,
however held in honour, but blocks of wood
and stone, carved into the similitude of a man by
the hand of man? and is not the body of man
the work of Gud himself, and in every instance



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 18

wonderful and past imitation, and even past
comprehension? for what doth David say on |
this subject ? Psalm cxxxix, 14, “I am fearfully
and wonderfully made: marvellous are thy
works, and that my soul knoweth right well.”

Nevertheless, I own that the time has been
when I bowed with religious awe before the
graven image, and poured forth my soul there-
unto in solemn prayer, without considering any
of those subtle distinctions which the learned
of the papal church pretend to make respecting
relative and inferior honour; for the Roman
Catholic Church, when making its comments on
the first commandment, uses the following ex-
pressions, which I shall give in the form of
question and answer, as I found it in the au-
thorized catechism published in England :—

“ Docs the first commandment forbid us to
give any kind of honour to the saints and an.

gels 2
ee No; itonly forbids us to give them supreme
or divine honour, which belongs to God alone ;
but it does not forbid us to give them that infe-
rior honour, which is due to them as the faith.
ful servants and special friends of God.

“ And is it allowable to honour relics, cruci-
fixes, and holy pictures ?

« Yes, with an inferior and relative honour,
as they relate to Christ and his saints, and are
memorials of them.”

But, as I have already remarked, when kneel-
ing before these crucifixes and images, T fear
that I too often retained but very imperfect ideas



Qu FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

of these metaphysical distinctions, and in the
too visible type or representation too often lost
the recollection of the antitype.

To return to little Aimée; she was a child
exactly formed to be the delight and joy of some
venerable grandmother, or of some widowed
and bereaved wife and mother—one who in
retirement would have been the sweetest friend
and companion which sadness or sorrow could
ever know, being no doubt divinely endowed
with that holy peace of mind and tranquillity of
spirit which the world can never disturb, be-
cause the world can have no intercourse there.
with. Yet, at the same time, being a character
which was so entirely overlooked in scenes of
bustle and worldly commotion, that her compa-
nions seemed seldom to take any farther notice
of her than to push her aside when she crossed
their paths ; still, however, she possessed in so
large a degree the spirit of harmlessness so truly
convenial with the Christian character, that it
would have been impossible (one should have
thought) to have hated this little girl. Never-
theless she did incur the active hatred of Made-
moiselle Victoire, and this in a way which such
as are not somewhat skilled in the nature of the
heman heart will not easily comprehend, but
which will be evident enough to those to whom
the secret recesses of that fountain of all that
is impure are in some degree revealed. Some
fault had been committed in the house soon
atter the arrival of mademoiselle: the blame was
laid on Aimée, and on the bare suspicion ma-



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 21

demoiselle punished her severely, neither would
she remit her punishment till madame inter.
fered; it was found afterward that Aimée was
innocent, but mademoiselle never pardoned her.

I had observed, as I have before remarked,
that since the arrival of Mademoiselle Victoire
the simple, cheerful spirit which had formerly
animated the family of Madame Bulé had dis-
appeared ; and, instead of the lively games in
which the pupils of all ages had hitherto en-
gaged, I could see from my window that there
were parties formed in the young society. It
was very evident that there was an open rivalry
established between the rose and the fleur de
lis, (by the by, a rivalry of old and renowned
establishment ;) also [ could perceive that there
were few of the young people who did not en-
list themselves under one or the other of these
banners, and I could sometimes hear words
running very high among individuals of the
different parties, though I could not exactly
understand thd precise subject of these contro.
versies.

At length, however, it happened as I was sit.
ting one afternoon with my window open, it
being two days before the feast of Easter, that
I saw the young people proceeding in a body
from the porch ; Mademoiselle Victoire was in
the midst of them, and she was talking with
great vivacity on a subject which seemed to in-
terest every one. They advanced in a direction
which brought them nearly under my window,
and then mademoiselle sat down on a garden



22 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

chair in the centre of the grass plat, while her
two favourites stationed themselves on each side
of her, and one by one she called each of the
other young people to the footstool of her throne,
for she sat in much state, and after having looked
into the palm of every hand with the grimaces
used by a fortune-teller, for so I understood the
scene, she dismissed each individual, with some
prognostic or witticism, which, as I perceived,
excited peals of laughter, but not such laughter
as I felt agreeable to me. It appears that the
young people had at that moment forgotten that
it was possible I might be so near them, for
although I could see them well, and distinguish
every gesture, yet I was myself so concealed by
a jessamine just bursting into leaf, which I had
trained over a part of my window, it would not
have been easy for the most penetrating eye to

-have detected me behind this natural screen,
and thus as I was not within their view, neither
was I in their thoughts at that period.

This pastime, of whatever tendency it might
have been, had proceeded for some time, and
each of the young people then present had pre-
sented her palm, and heard the prognostics of
her future fate from the self-elected prophetess,
when suddenly a sort of demur arose among
the party, and I saw every one turn to look
around her ; at length I heard the voice of ma-
demoiselle calling Aimée, and at the same time
I perceived that the little girl had not been pre-
sent. ‘The next minute all the young parly
began to seatter themselves over the garden, as



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 23

if in quest of the child, and the name of this
little one proceeded from the various parts of
the pleasure ground, and was returned by an
echo, caused by an angle formed by the tower
and the body of the church. Some minutes
elapsed, it seems, before the little lost one was
discovered ; she was (as I afterward learned)
at last detected in a bosquet formed of flower-
ing shrubs, at-the very bottom of the garden,
cowering down under the shade of a laurusti-
nus, and deeply engaged in reading a very
small book. She was instantly seized upon by



Susette and Fanchon, who both sprang upon
her at the same instant, and dragged her be-
tween them into the awful presence of Made-
moiselle Victoire.



24 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

The little captive uttered no sound, and used
but little resistance ; but when brought directly
before Mademoiselle Victoire, she fell on her
knees, and, pointing to Susette, seemed to be
earnestly imploring some favour of the utmost

_importance. What this favour was I could not
discover ; but I was made to understand that,
so far from having obtained it, she had only in.
curred more violent displeasure by the strength
of her pleadings, for I saw mademoiselle push
her away several times, and then I heard my
own name repeated, with an assurance that
something, I knew not what, should not be con-
cealed from me.

Being thus, as I considered called upon, I
arose, and putting my head out at the window,
I called to mademoiselle, and asked her what
had happened, and wherefore my name was
mentioned.

Mademoiselle, who had stood up to correct
the child, turned hastily at the sound of my
voice, and approaching as near to me as possi-
ble, My good father, she said, we have need of
your advice and counsel, and we hope that you
will insist that this child shall endure a severe
penance—here she stopped to recover breath, of
which her passion had deprived her, and then
proceeded. This wicked little heretic, she said,
whom madame has always upheld as a sort of
saint among us, has, it seems, retained in her
possession, ever since she came in «nis place,
a volume of the Holy Scriptures in te: native
language, though she knows that cureren like



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST 29

herself are not competent to use these holy
books to any advantage. She has actually
been discovered, in a bosquet of this garden,
deep in the study of this volume, using such art
in so doing as shows the blackness and depra-
vity of her heart. Thus speaking, she gave
the child a push from her, with that sort of ex-
pression of abhorrence as one would use to a
loathed animal.

And where is this book? I asked. It was
immediately held up to my view by Susette,
and I perceived that it was an abridgment only
of the sacred Scriptures, being an exceedingly
small volume, not above four inches square ; it
looked old and much worn; and it struck me
that there was a malicious feeling shown to-
ward the child in making so much of this
insignificant matter, and not, as I thought,much
policy in it, as it related to the interests of the
church to which I was then attached. I there-
fore said, Let the book be given to madame,
and to-morrow I will come over and speak to
her on the subject.

I hoped by this that I should have satisfied
all parties; but in this Iwas mistaken. No
sooner did little Aiméce understand that the
tiny volume in question was to be given to
madame, than she dropped on der knees upon
the grass, and looking up to me with streaming
eyes and united hands—O dear father, kind
Father Raffré, she said, order me the severest
penance, let me live on bread and water for a
year to come, but do not take away my book—



26 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

my lovely little book—do not take my poor
little book.



Dear child, I replied, dear child wipe away
your tears; to-morrow I will meet you in the
church, you shall contess all to me about your
little book ; and do not fear, you shall have jus-
tice done to you. And thus I dismissed the
whole party, though I felt that I had not given
satisfaction to either side by the manner in
which I had answered the appeal. Neither
was I mistakensin this my opinion, for made-
moiselle returned in a very ill humour to the
house ; and though Aimée and the affair of the
book were spoken of no more that evening, yet
the young ladies began to quarrel with cach
other upon these grounds,—namely, that Ma-



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST, QT

demoiselle Victoire had promised to one a prince
und a coach and six, a duke to another, a ba-
rouche and four and a marquis to another, a
simple baron to another, a rich burgher to an-
other, and to a less favoured one a mere rotu-
rier. As I had suspected, and I afterward
learned, mademoiselle had been telling her pu-
pils their fortunes, or rather had taken this way
of giving them some idea of their several pre-
tensions, and by this means had excited in
their minds every sort of idea which ought to
have been held back from them; and indeed
so high did the rancour of the several parties
rise on this occasion, that Madame Bulé was
obliged to exert her authority, and very severe
was the reproof she gave when she under-
stood the cause of this uproar which had dis-
turbed her peace. Do you not know, said she,
that the day after to-morrow is Easter, and that
to-morrow you are to meet Father Raffré for
confession ; and in what spirit or temper will
-you be for this sacrament if you retire to rest
in the indulgence of such angry passions? For
shame, young ladies ; do not thus convert an
innocent jest into a subject of discontent and
rancour.

It is needless surely here to remark that, in
this reproof of Madame Bulé, which was faith.
fully reported to me, there were two important
errors: in the first instance, confession is no
sacrament, neither a part of a sacrament, there
being but two sacraments appointed by our
blessed Saviour, namely, baptism and the sup-



28 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

per of the Lord ;* and the jest of Mademoiselle
Victoire was every thing but innocent, therefore
madame should not have so designated it.
Early the next morning, it was signified to
me that Madame Bulé desired to speak with
me ; and when I had obeyed her summons, the
amiable woman opened her mind to me to the
following effect: My dear Father Raffré, she
said, my mind has lately been much troubled
respecting my pupils; the time was, as you
well know, when we enjoyed a degree of peace
which is now utterly foreign to our household.
I was then, she added, and the tear was in her
eye when she spoke, more alert and active than
I now an, and better able to endure the fatigues
of my situation. It was then, she continued,
that every hour brought its pleasures, and every
change its delights; my children came with
cheerfulness to their lessons, and left them with
glee to enjoy their sports: if one did amiss, all
were humbled; if one was praised, all were
pleased ; if one received a present, all were to
have a share in it; if one was unwell, all par-
took in her pain. Now the case is entirely al-
tered, I hear of nothing but of rivalries and of
ili will; if I praise one individual I offend
twenty, and if I find fault with one offender I
give cause of triumph to twenty more. It is not
now a question who can do best, but who is most

*The Church of Rome considers that there are
seven sacraments; adding to the two mentioned in the
New Te-tument five others, namely, penance, confes-
sion, orders, matrimony, and extreme unction,



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 29

accomplished or most genteel; and instead of
joy and peace, my household is one continued
scene of dissatisfaction.

And cannot you account, madame, I said,
for this change in the character of your house-
hold? are you sure that the person whom you
employ to assist you is exactly suited to your
purpose ?

Mademoiselle Victoire, she replied, is diligent
andaccomplished ; [might not get a better were
I to dismiss her: but you, my good father, shall
confess my children, and I am sure that they
will find in you a faithful and pious counsellor.

After this conversation I took the earliest op-
portunity of calling the young people to confes-
sion. ‘The church was set aside for that duty ;
and Madame Bulé made a point of being in the
church with us, although she did not remain
within hearing.

As a confessor, I have, through the course of
a long ministry, heard many awful secrets, and
though I am now neo longer of the Romish
Church, I still would make it a point of honour
not to betray any confidence which was placed
in me under the character which I formerly held
of a father confessor. The confessions, how-
ever, which were made to me by the pupils of
Madame Bulé were not of such a nature as to
render it of the smallest consequence whether
they are or are not divulged; neither, even if
they were more important, can they possibly
now effect the penitents in the smallest point.
I shall theretore venture to inform my reader



30 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

of what passed that morning in the church be-
tween me and those of the young ladies of the
establishment with whose names and descrip-
tions I have made him acquainted. Susette
was the first who was brought to me, and when
she appeared the traces of tears were upon her
cheeks,

Daughter, I said, you are sad; what has af.
flicted you ? Open your whole heart to me, and
be assured that the council I shall give you
shali be to your advantage. She immediately
burst into tears, and, speaking passionately,
made it appear that injustice was done to her
by her companions, especially by Fanchon.

Fanchon, she added, who was once my dear.
est friend, is turned against me, and that because
she is jealous of me. Some persons think me
handsomer than she is, and she cannot endure
a rival, and she bears herself maliciously and
spitefully toward me; and if she can find a
flaw in ny conduct she is pleased, and makes
it a rule to exhibit it, and to make little errors
appear in the light of serious offences.

I shall not repeat all I said to her on this sub-
ject. No doubt my advice, though in some
points good, was mingled with error, for I re-
member well that, after having pointed out to
her the beauty of charity, and recommended the
exercise of it toward her companions, I added,
for know you not, my daughter, that “ charity
remits sin, and gives spiritual life to the soul 1”
By which assertion I set charity in the place of
the Saviour, and gave to our good deeds the



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 3!

power of redeeming us from the consequence
of our evil ones ; whereby I denied the words of
Holy Scripture, for are we not taught that a man
is not justified by the works of the law, but by
the faith of Jesus Christ? Gal. ii, 16.

In reply to what I had said, Susette answer.
ed with a frankness which was natural to her.
She acknowledged that she had a considerable
portion of pride, and that she could neither bear
a rival among her schoolfellows, nor refrain
from despising those whom she thought her in-
feriors. She spoke again of Fanchon as of one
whom she looked upon with envy and jealousy ;
and among others whom she heartily despised
she mentioned Aimée. In reply to all which I
told her “ that pride was counted by the church
among the seven deadly sins. Pride.” I said,
“is an inordinate love and esteem of our own
worth and excellence—it is a mortal sin, and
can only be remitted by hearty contrition and
the sacraments of baptism and penance.”

At the word penance Susetie started, as under
fear ; on which I spoke soothingly to her, and
added that she need not be afraid, that I would
not he severe.

“Fhe sacrament of penance, my daughter,”
I remarked, “ consists of three parts, contrition,
confession, and satisfaction. The tears ot
contrition I have seen on your features; you
have performed the duty of confession ; and
what now remains to be done is satisfaction.”

And in what, asked Susette hastily, does this
duty of satisfaction consist 7



32 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

In what I shall require of you to do, I an-
swered.

Then, dear Father Raffré, she answered, you
surely will not make me ask pardon of little
Aimée, or seek a reconciliation with Fanchon—
and she looked imploringly at me.

I shall exact of you, I replied, before I can
venture to give you absvlution, that satisfaction
which the church requires. “For satisfaction
which is the third part of the sacrament of pe-
nance, is a faithful performance of the prayers
or good works enjoined by the priest to whom
the penitent confesses.”

I am willing, father, she replied, to repeat as
many prayers as you could desire.

Be it so, my daughter, I answered: and I
know not how many Ave Marias and Pater
Nosters I enjoined to be repeated before the
image of the virgin in the closet of Madame
Bult before the hour of mass on the following
day : and thus having slightly healed the wound
of my penitent, or rather administered fresh sub.
ject for future self-satisfaction to one who was
already but too well pleased with herself, and
as it were added fucl to the fire I should have
sought to quench, [ dismissed Susette, and pro-
ceeded to confess her rival, who soon after.
ward entered the church, and approached the
confessional.

The confession of Fanchon was but a repeti-
tion of that of Susette, with this difference only,
that this second penitent was more reserved and
guarded in her acknowledgment of error than



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 383

the former had been. I was in consequence
less satisfied with her, and doubled her portion
of Ave Marias and Pater Nosters, giving her
also for the performance of her service the gloom
of evening, instead of the bright morning hours ;
and this young lady being withdrawn 1 request.
ed that Aimée might be brought to me.

There was some interval between the depar-
ture of Fanchon (with whom Madame Bulé had
gone out) and the entrance of Aimée. I was
left alone, and the scene was an impressive one.
The church was an ancient Gothic edifice, richly
decorated with carved figures and ornaments ; I
was in a chapel of the Virgin, which was situ-
ated at the end of a long arched aisle; all was
motionless around me, and no sound was heard
but the soft low murmuring of the wind among
the towers and battlements ; my mind was full
of what had just passed, and the anxious inquiry
of Susette respecting what satisfaction I should
require of her recurred tomy thoughts. It was
very natural, I perceived, that she should expect
nic to insist on her seeking a reconciliation
with those whom she had offended, common
sense dictated such a sati8faction, and common
justice required it ; but the church (to which I
then belonged) had demanded no such hard ser.
vice—-to put its votaries out of humour with
themselves was no part of its policy. In the
case in question I had acted as a faithful son of
the church; [ had regarded its interests, and
the question was suggested to my mind, Had I
or had I not applied a remedy which would

3



34 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

have the smallest efficacy in humbling a haughty
spirit ? Is then the policy of my church calcu-
lated merely to promote the pleasure and pre-
sent comfort of its votaries, and to quiet and
soothe the conscience, or to remedy the real
evil of our fallen nature ?

I endeavoured to repress and banish these
thoughts, which appeared to be almost blasphe-
mous. I crossed myself and looked up to the
image of the Virgin, repeated the angel’s salu.
tation, Hail, thou that art highly favoured, the
Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among wo.
men ; to which I added, in Latin, “ Hail, Mary,
full of grace, the Lord is with thee ; blessed art
thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of
thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, mother of God,
pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our
death. Amen.”

T had scarcely concluded this prayer, when a
soft footfall sounded along the aisle, and turn-
ing around, I saw a small figure just entering
through the narrow sidedoor of the church. It
was Aimée: she was dressed in white, and the
air from without agitated her flaxen ringlets
and snowy drapery as she advanced toward
me, giving almost an etherial lightness to her
appearance. At one moment, as she passed
under each archway, a deep shade was cast on
her figure, and again a golden gloom was shed
upon it, as she traversed those portions of the
pavement on which the rays of the sun descend-
ed through the richly decorated windows above.
The lightness of this infant figure, together



FLOWERS OF THE ‘FOREST. 35

withthe innocent expression of her gentle eye,
as she ascended the steps of the little chapel at
the door of which I was standing, and looked
up to me half timidly, yet as it were in the no-
ble consciousness of having nothing to conceal,
suggested to my mind the idea of some blessed
spirit just restored to its glorified body, and as-
cending from the grave to mount to that place
of happiness which is prepared for the redeem-
ed. The ideal resemblance was presently
heightened in my imagination by the smile
which illuminated every feature, and sparkled
in her eye, as I extended my hand to her, and
said solemnly, “The Saviour of men, and the



Lord of angels bless my little girl, and as she
is called the beloved on earth, may she be truly
the beloved in heaven?” Fflien took my usual



36 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

place, and invited her to confession, by asking
her to account to me for the scene of the past
night. ‘This question led to many others, and
in the end I obtained from the dear child the
following narrative of her short but till then
comparatively perfect course, for indeed the
words of the wise man could never have been
more justly applied than to this blameless in-
fant: “He being made perfect in a short time,
fulfilled for a long time, for his soul pleased the
Lord ; therefore hastened he to take him away
from among the wicked,” Wisdom iv, 13, 14.

I was born in England, my father, said the
dear child. I remember well my native place,
it was a white house, and there were woods
near it, and a garden full of flowers ; the house
stood on the side of a hill, and from the win-
dows we saw flocks feeding in green fields, and
blue hills at a distance, and villages and groves
of trees, and the woods were so near to us,
that when the windows were opened in the sum.
mer, we heard the wind rustling among the
trees, and blackbirds and linnets singing in the
branches, and waters rushing, and bees hum.
ming. My father used to make me hearken to
these sounds, and now I never hear sounds like
these without thinking of my home. My pa-
rents were alive then, my father dear, continued
the little girl, and my mother, my kind mother,
I remember her dressing room, and her guitar,
and her cabinet. And I had a brother too, he
was a year older than myself, he had golden
hair and soft bright eyes; and I had a very



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 37

little sister too, father ; when she was asleep she
looked like an angel; but she died first, and
then, sir, (and the poor little girl burst into tears, )
then grief came; my little sister died, and my
brother died—-it was a fever; and I was taken
away and was never sent home again ; and my
parents are dead too, and I amhere. I was
brought to this place I know not wherefore, and
I have no home in England to return to: and
the child wiped away a few tears, and then
looked up again, as if awaiting my farther
questions. .

And are you happy here, Aimée? I asked.

Yes, father, she replied; madame is very
kind to me.

And have you nothing to complain of? I
asked.

None, father, she replied, if I might have my
book again.

‘ Why do you love that book so much? I
asked.

It was my brother’s, she replied; and she
wept. May I not have it?

But it is not a proper book, Aimee, I said ;
and [ think you know that it is not proper,
otherwise why did you go into a retired place
to read it?

I always do, she answered.

And why do you, I asked, if you do not think
you are doing wrong when reading that book?

Because nobody here cares for the things
that are in that hook, she answered mildly ; and
those are the things which make me happy.



38 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

What things? I asked.

The things I learned when I was a baby—I
cannot forget them, she replied.

I again asked, What things?

The things papa and mamma, taught me, fa-
ther, she answered.

Please to explain yourself, Aimee, I said.
What things did your parents teach you ?

They taught me that my heart is bad, sir,

“and that I can do nothing good without God’s
help.

Go on, I said.

And that God had sent his Son to die for me,
and his Holy Spirit to make me good ; and they
taught me to read—and told me that I was to
love my Bible, and follow all that is written
in it.

But how, I asked, can a child like you under.
stand the Bible?

I don’t know, father, she meekly answered.

Do you pretend to say that you do under-
stand it? I asked, and drew her near to me
as I sat.

I have not got a large Bible she answered ;
there are only small bits of the Bible in my
little book ; but even my little Bible tells me
many pleasant things.

What pleasant things, Aimee? TI asked.

It tells me, she replied, what my Saviour has
done for me, and I find in it the promises of that
happy world where I shall enjoy a home more
pleasant than that which I have lost, and see my
papa and my mamma, and my brother and sis.



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 39

ter again. And sometimes, my father, when I
have been reading that little book all alone in
the garden, or wherever I can get unseen, I have
had such sweet dreams and such delightful
thoughts ; I fancy I see the world in that time
when Christ shall be King over all the earth.
And then I fancy I see places like what I re.
member of my happy home, and my papa and
my mamma, and brother and sister, all glorious
like angels, and the Lord Jesus Christ in com.
pany with them, and I am so glad to see them
happy—and every thing that is pleasant in this
place brings these things fresher into my mind ;
and there is a valley, sir, in the forest, which I
often visited Jast summer, which reminds me
too of these things. And when I hear music,
or the bells ringing, or the organ at mass, all
these things fill my heart with pleasure, and
make me wish that the time might come when
I might go to my dear parents, but I know that
T ought not to be impatient to leave this world,
where you and madame and so many people
are kind to me.

You talk of much kindness, Aimee, I said,
have you no unkindness to complain of? have
you no feelings of malice or envy in your heart ?
you know that if you have such feelings, it is
your duty to confess them.

She looked very earnestly at me, and repeat.
ed the word “ malice,” as if she did not under-
stand the signification, or at any rate as if she
did not take in the purport of my question.

To be plain with you, Aimee, I said, are the



40 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

young ladies your companions so kind to you
that you never feel any thing like anger or ill
will toward them? Are you in charity with
every one ?

They were cross with me last night, my
father, she answered.

And are they not so often? I asked.

I don’t think they are, she replied.

That is, you do not think much about them,
I said.

I do she replied; I love them, yes, I hope I
love them.

Then you have not perceived that they are
unkind to you? I added.

Not to me particularly, she answered; they
sometimes quarrel a little among themselves ;
but is not that what we must expect? Are not
our hearts bad, father, and dv we not all do
wrong at times? but when they are cross, I think
of my happy home, and then I do not mind it ;
and I have such delight sometimes when I am
alone in my room and see the sun set, and think
of that distant time when I shall be with my
beloved Saviour, as I could not describe.

Then it is because your mind is fixed on the
world which is to come, that you do not enter
into the quarrels of your companions. My little
Aimee, I said, if this be the true state of the case,
you area happy child indeed, happy and blessed
beyond all the children I have ever known, and
tell me, my little girl, how long your mind has
been thus devoted to heavenly things ?

- Udo not think that I am devoted to heavenly



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 4l

things, father, she replied ; for I am not good,
and people who are devoted are, good, I have
heard madame say so; but it 1s now many
months since my parents died, and since I Jost
my brother and sister, and from that time T have
never had so much pleasure in any thing 4m in
thinking of the time when I shall see my rele.
tions again; and I know that I never shall see
them unless I love my Saviour, and am enabled
to obey him; and these thoughts are always
coming to my mind, and I cannot get rid of
them.

And why, my dear child, I answered, should
you wish to get rid of them? Do they not make
your happiness, and do they not mark your call
toa holy life? But think you not, my daughter,
that if you were to intercede with the holy
Virgin and the blessed saints that they would
join their prayers with yours, and that you
might in this manner more easily obtain all
that you desire? and I pointed to the image
above the altar, and directed the child to observe
the benign and beautiful expression of the coun-
tenance of her whom I then called my lady.

That image cannot hear me, she replied.

But she whom it represents, namely, the
holy Mary, can and will hear you, Aimee, Ian.
swered ; she will unite her prayers with yours,
in order that all you ask may be granted you.

Was not she a woman? said the little girl
doubtingly.

She was, I replied; “but as our Lord was
truly God, so she, his mother, was the mother



42 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

of God, and therefore is worthy that we should
address our prayers to her.”

The little girl looked down upon the pave-
ment, but did not speak till I had repeated some
part of what I had before said; she then lifted
up her gentle eyes, and asked, Do you pray to
the saints, my father? Is it right to pray to
them? My mamma told me that there is no
other name under heaven by which we can be
saved but that of our Lord Jesus Christ.

I have before hinted that I had already had
some little misgivings respecting the foundation
of my faith; and at that instant such a gleam
of light shot through my hitherto darkened soul,
that I could not answer the child. I remained
silent and confused, while the little one stood
meekly before me, being wholly unconscious of
my embarrassment. The tolling of the clock
was at that moment heard from the tower of the
church ; I availed myself of it to say that [had
an engagement which demanded my immediate
attention, and bestowing a rapidly pronounced
blessing on the litile girl, I hastened from the
church, assuring her that I would not only pro-
cure the little book for her, but obtain permis-
sion for her to study it whenever she pleased.
I spent the remainder of that day in the solitude
of my study. This little girl isa heretic, I said
to myself—what indeed our church calls such—
but there is no malice or bitterness in her here-
sy; she has not yet even discovered how wide-
ly our religion differs from her own. There is
therefore no prejudice mingled in her mind with



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 48

her prepossessions. She takes her faith en-
tirely from the Bible, as she has been taught to
do by her excellent parents; and surely if the
fruit is to prove the nature of the tree, we can.
not doubt, from the beauty of the fruit which
this dear child is able to produce, that the root
is excellent. While meditating on these sub-
jects, I took a dusty Latin Bible, which had
once belonged to a priest of the church of Ge-
neva, from its shelf in my study, and began to
compare its contents with the received doctrines
of our church, and was struck with thetempa-
rison of Mathew xv, 19, out of the heart pro-
ceed evil thoughts, murders, adulteries, fornica-
tions, thefts, false witness, blasphemies, with
the following clause in our catechism, namely,
“Ts it possible to keep them all? (speaking of
the commandments.) Answer. Itis, by God’s
grace; Zacharias and Elizabeth were both just
before God, walking in all the commandments
of God without reproof.” I felt more and more
confounded while meditating on these things ;
and the result of these reflections was, that I
resolyed not to speak even to Madame Bule of
the heretical state, as I then apprehended it to
be, of the little Aimee.

Under this embarrassment of mind I remain.
ed in my study several days, or walked in the
most solitary places I could find, meditating on
many things. In the meantime, Susette and
Fanchon having wiped away their offences, as
they thought, by the repetition of the prescribed
modicum of Ave Marias and Pater Nosters, re-



44 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

turned, not in the least humbled thereby, to their
usual situations in the school room, where pre-
sently they failed not to administer fresh cause
of dissatisfaction to each other, which bein,
taken up by the parties on either side, the whole
household was shortly again all in flames ; and
Madame Bulé found it more difficult than ever
to set things in order. After various admoni-
tions, all of which she found inefficient, the
worthy lady sent a second time for me, and I
undertook to admonish the young people in a
discourse, which, accordingly, I delivered in an
apartment of the house set aside for purposes
of this kind, where I had formerly given many
lectures on different subjects to the young
people.

I took the text or motto of my discourse from
the various beauties. exhibited in a highly cul-
tivated garden. I understand, my daughters, I
said, that your minds have lately been painfully,
and I may say sinfully agitated, by envious feel-
ings respecting each other, and by the vain de-
sire of outshining and surpassing each other in
those qualities which you esteem admirable in
a human creature. Of the sinfulness of these
feelings, my dear daughters (I continued) I need
not speak: but on their folly I will enlarge, in-
asmuch as it seems that you are not aware of
this folly. The Almighty is not so partial a
Parent that he has not bestowed some beautiful
and excellent quality on each of his children.
Look at the flowers in that blooming parterre
which extends itself beneath the window!



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 45.

among these some attract the eye from a dis.
tance, some shed powerful odours in the air,
some are endowed with healing qualities, some
retire from the view and are only admirable
when closely inspected ; some excel in only one
point, some in several, some in every quality
attributable to the vegetable creation; but all
are so exquisite in their way, so perfect in their
conformation and their internal construction,
that the utmost art of man would endeavour in
vain to imitate the simplest, the most humble
flower among them. Go forth into the forest
and observe the leaves of the trees; compare
them one with another ; remark the delicacy of
their texture, the infinite variety of their forms,
and make a comparison, if it lies in your power,
of the beauty of one with that of another ; say,
if you can, that one is werthy of admiration
and another of contempt, that one is surpass.
ingly fair and another despicably ugly.’ And
such are each and all of you, my fair daugh-
ters; all and each of you have some beauty,
some perfection, some lovely quality, external
or internal, which sets you more on a par with
each other than an inconsiderate observer would
at first suppose: thus the rose of this parterre
has no cause to triumph over the violet, neither
has the tulip any occasion to envy the white-
ness of the lily.

Having finished my exordium much to my
own satisfaction, though I believe with little ef-
fect upon my audience, I withdrew, and that very
evening met Madame Bulé at the chateau,



46 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

where Madame la Baronne happening to men.
tion that she intended to give an entertainment
to the young ladies on the day of her féte, (her
birthday,) Madame Bulé thought it necessary
to tell her the state of her family as it regarded
the jealousies and rivalries which subsisted
among her pupils.

Madame la Baronne smiled at this state of
affairs, and after some reflection said, Make my
compliments to your young ladies, Madame
Bulé, and invite them on my part to the cha.
teau. Tell them that my fete this year is to be
called the Feast of the Flowers, and that I shall
expect each young lady to appear adorned with
a garland or wreath of her favourite flower ;
adding, I shall bestow a crown on that young
lady whose ornaments please me best ; and lest,
she added, my taste should be disputed, there
shall. be a motto woven with the myrtle of
which my crown is to be composed, which shall
signify the rule by which I am to make my
selection. :

Madame Bult assured Madame la Baronne
that her message should be faithfully delivered ,
and I waa very solicitous to know of the lady
what was to be the import of her motto.

I assure you, father, she replied, that it shall
be one yon shall not dare to disapprove; but
lest ybu should give a hint to some little fa-
vourite you may have, I cannot tell you. I was
therefore obliged, after having shrugged up my
shoulders several times, to acquiesce in my
ignorance.



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 41

Madame Bulé did not fail to inform the young
ladies of the kind invitation of the Baronne ;
and the next day, when these young people had
concluded their morning exercises, an envoy
was sent to request my company at the collation,
in order that I might be consulted respecting
preparations for the Feast of the Flowers.

As soon as I arrived, various questions were
put to me by one and by another, to many of
which I was not able to answer.

To whom, said one, does Madame la Baronne
mean to give the crown, father, to the one who
has the fairest garland, or to the one whom
otherwise she likes best?

With respect to the beauty of the garland, I
answered, it might perhaps be hard to judge:
tastes may differ, one person may think that no
wreath can be compared to that which is formed
of roses, while another perhaps might prefer a
garland of jasmine as being more elegant.

Then you do not suppose, said another of my
inquirers, that she will bestow the crown on
her who has the fairest wreath ?

Indeed I cannot tell, I replied.

You are in the secret, we know, Father Raffré,
said Mademoiselle Victoire, we are sure of it.

Well, it may be so, I answered ; but you shall
none of you be the better for my knowledge. I
will for once keep what I know to myself.

Mademoiselle would have been angry at this,
had I cared for her anger, but as I did not, she
proceeded to discuss the choice of the garlands
with her favourite pupils.



48 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

Each one was, it was understood, to select a
different flower, and the eldest chose first ;
Susette chose the rose; Fanchon would, she said,
be royal, and adorn herself with the fleur-de-lis ,
a third selected the jasmine ; a fourth the white
thorn. The laurel, the honeysuckle, the sweet -
scented clematis, the convolvulus, and the
orange flower were none of them forgotten ;
and as there was a fortnight to elapse before
the day of the fete, great pains were taken to
nourish and preserve such flowers as might
then be required to add beauty and fragrance
to the festival.

It was on the eve of the féte, as I was walk-
ing with Madame Bulé in one of the avenues
of her garden, being deep in conversation on
subjects which at that time exercised our minds,
in common with many others—subjects which
had indeedsome tendencies to what our church
would have deemed heretical, for my opinions
on many of our doctrines were beginning to be
more and more confused—when we suddenly
heard several angry voices, proceeding from u
bosquet, in the centre of which was a circular
range of seats, where the young people often
assembled during the hours of leisure. Stand-
ing still and looking through the openings of
the trees, we saw several of the lesser children
gathered around Aimée, who had formed a small
wreath for her waxen baby from an azure-flow-
ering creeper which hung in festoons from an
archway of latticework at the entrance of the
bosquet. The exclamations of rapture uttered



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST 4

by the lesser children had, it seems, attracted
the attention of Susette, Fanchon, and severa
others of the greater girls; and Susette haa
expressed so much admiration of the wreath, as
to declare that, after all, Aimée had made the
best choice, and that there was no wreath
hitherto thought of that would prove so light
and beautiful as that she had chosen. It was
just at the moment she had uttered this opi-
nion when madame and [ stood to listen to what
was passing.

The little sly thing! said Fanchon. I doubt
not but that she had a wreath of this kind al-
ways in her mind, and that she would not men-
tion it, lest any of her elders should have in-
sisted on taking it from her.

If she had such an intention, she would have
done well to have waited a little longer, said
Susette ; for it is not now too late for us, her
elders to change our minds. I am out of hu-
mour with the idea of wearing red roses; I
have been thinking this very day that I should
prefer another colour for my wreath ; I like that
beautiful azure, and I will wear it; and there.
fore, my little lady, you must please to look for
some other ornament for yourself.

Iam content, replied Aimee, meekly : adding,
If you approve it, mademoiselle, I will help you
to make your garland.

And what will you wear yourself? said Su.
sette ; you shall, if you please, adopt the rose I
have relinquished.



50 FLOWERS OF THE FOREET.

I beg your pardon, Susette, said Fanchon ;
there is no one who can come before me but
yourself; you have given up the rose, and I
claimit. I here give notice that to-morrow J
shall wear a garland of roses; and, as we are
all to be different, no one else is to dare to as-
sume even a rosebud.

So violent an altercation then ensued between
the rivals, that Madatne Bule thought it neces.
sary to interfere; and requiring each of the
rival ladies to declare the name of the flower
she meant to adopt, she desired that no change
of plans might henceforth be resorted to. She
did not, however, insist upon the blue wreath
being relinquished to Aimee, as I should have
thought but just; it was evident that she was
under some dread of Susette and Fanchon, and
was afraid of provoking them too far; and it
certainly was not my business to interfere,
neither did I think the matter of sufficient con-
sequence to induce meso to do.

Susette accordingly declared again for her
wreath of roses, while Fanchon adopted that
of the azure creeper, which was in fact a most
elegant ornament. Madame and I then with.
drew ; but I had scarcely reached the garden
gate on my way home, when I was overtaken
by Aimee, who, placing her little hand within
mine, said, My father, you waik out, I think,
every morning before breakfast.

I do, my child, I answered.

Will you permit me to accompany you to-
morrow? said the little girl. I have obtained



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 51



permission from madame. Will you take me
to the forest?

Most willingly, I replied. But for what pur-
pose, my child ?

She smiled, and with a sweet innocent air
repeated these words of an ancient ballad of
her own province :—

The gafden is gay with the gaudy weed,
And attired like the jewell’d queen ;

But the flowers of the forest are fair indeed,
Th6ugh oft times doom’d to blow unseen.

The words, Charming little creature! what
innocent device has that gentle bosom now con-
ceived ? were upon my lips, but I did not utter
my thoughts, and simply answered, I will be at
the garden gate before six to-morrow ee
my dear Aimee; besure that you are punctual.



52 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

The dew was still upon the herbage, and
glistened on every leaf, as I knocked at the gar.
den gate ; it was opened to me at the first sig.
nal by the little maiden, she ran out to me all
prepared for her appointment, with a neat bas.
ket in her hand.

Good morning, lady fair, I said; a blessing
from above be upon my little girl! But whither
are we to bend our steps ?

To the forest, my father, she replied, where
I know of certain deep shades in which those
flowers grow of which I wish to make my gar-
land. 1 only feared that some other person
might have thought of these flowers of the forest,
which are my delight, and have asserted a prior
right to them, but they have not entered into
the mind of any one; and now no one can
take them from me.

O, O, I said, smilingly, you have, I see,
been acting a cunning part, my little one.

Cunning! she repeated; ah, Father Raffre,
that is an ugly word; do not call me cunning.
I would rather wear a wreath of asphodel than
be called a cunning girl.

And why not wear a wreath of asphodel? I
asked.

Because it is hitter, very bitter, she replied ;
but, continued she, was there any harm in my
thinking of a flower and not mentioning it, lest
it should be chosen? I would not be cunning,
indeed I would not, for the whole world ; and
I have no pretensions to that crown of myrtle
which the lady is to bestow, indeed I have not ;



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 53

but I wished for my favourite flower for a very
particular reason.

What might be that very particular reason ?
I asked.

I will give you my reason, father, she an.
swered, when you have seen my favourite flow-
er: but I must tell you that the discourse you
made to us about a fortnight since was what
led me to think of these things : and then I re.
membered a hymn which I had learned when
I lived at my happy home, and some things
which my dear papa taught me when [ was a
very little child, and I put all these things to-
gether, and when [heard of the Feast of the
Flowers I then fixed upon the garland I should
like to wear, though I did not suppose it would
have been left for me.

Indeed, my Aimée, I answered, you must be
a little more explicit before I can understand
you; please to explain yourself; of what things
did my discourse lead you to think? and how
was what I said connected with what your
father had taught you, and with the hymn you
had learned? please to explain all these matters
to me.

You compared us, sir, replied the little girl,
to so many flowers growing in a garden ; and
what my dear papa taught me when I was a
little child was this, that the church of God in
this world is compared in the Bible to a garden,
in which grow all sorts of beautiful plants and
flowers ; he taught me the very verses, and I
have not forgotten them.



54 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

Repeat them, if you please, my dear child, I
said: for, although I confessed it not, I knew
so little of Scripture as to be utterly ignorant
of that beautiful passage to which the child al-
luded. She immediately obeyed, and repeated
what follows :—

A garden enclosed is my sister, my spouse ;
a spring shut up, a fountain sealed. Thy plants
are an orchard of pomegranates, with pleasant
fruits; camphire, with spikenard; spikenard
and saffron; calamus and cinnamon, with all
trees of frankincense; myrrh and aloes, with
all the chief spices: a fountain of gardens, a
well of living waters, and streams from Leba-
non. Canticles iv, 12~15.

Very beautiful, I replied, and well remem-
bered ; but tell me who is it that is supposed
to repeat this passage.

She answered, Our Saviour, sir, and he
speaks it of his church.

‘Then you imagine, I replied, that the garden
enclosed is the true church, and all the plants
therein are the people.

Yes, sir, she said; those who love God are
the plants growing in this garden, and some of
them are tall and noble, like the cedar tree, and
others are small and of less beauty, others sup-
ply pleasant fruit, others are good only for shade,
others are very lovely to look at, and others fill
the air with sweet odours, but altogether they
make the garden very beautiful, and none are
to be despised.

And do you suppose, Aimée, I asked, that



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 55

you yourself are one of the members of this
garden?

She hesitated a little, and at length said, I
desire to be one, and I hope [am; but I know
that my place, if I have a place in this happy
garden, is a very low one, down in some very
deep valley, and under shade and out of sight.
I think I should not do so well if I were to be
removed to the higher parts of the garden and
clothed with many colours, and made to be an
object of admiration, for when I am praised I
become vain, and take less delight in holy
things than when [ am not noticed.

I was on the very point of commending the
ideas of this little girl, when her last remark
gave me a timely check, and I simply said, Ap-
parently your parents took much pains to give
you instruction.

It was the Bibic they used to make me un.
derstand, she answered ; and when they taught
me any thing in the Bible they showed me
something out of doors by which I was to re-
member it ; and by this means, now that they
are gone away, every thing almost which I see
when I walk abroad, reminds me of something
I learned when I wasa baby.

That is, I said, they took pains to associate
natural with spiritual things, and by this beau-
tiful mode of instruction they have succeeded
in impressing their holy lessons so strongly
upon your mind that you never can forget them.
Let me tell you, my daughter, that you have



56 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

reason to bless God for having given you such
parents.

Two gentle tears dropped from her eyes as [
spoke ; and at the same moment my conscience
reproved me for having bid a child to thank
God for having given her parents who were
heretics! and then again such doubts arose in
my mind respecting my own principles, and
their foundation in truth, that I walked on a
considerable way in silence.

We had left the village and the chateau be.
hind us, and were entering on the precincts of
the forest, before I extricated myself from the
labyrinth of perplexing thoughts in which I
was involved. At length, as we passed under
the shade of the trees which skirted the
wood, I recollected myself, and said, Aimée,
where are you leading me? How far are we
to go?

Are you tired, father? she said. If you wish
it I will go no farther; I can make a wreath of
any flower I see in the hedges.

Tired! my dear child, I said, tired in your
company! No; could I not take you by the
hand, and travel the worid over with you! but you
have raised some anxious thoughts in my mind.
I have been considering what place I occupy in
that garden of which you have been speaking.
She made no answer. I know not what she
thought, but she took my hand and kissed it
with a courtesy and tenderness which in one so
young was peculiarly touching. I think she
had a religious dread of flattering me on a sub.



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 57

ject so important, yet was anxious to show her
gratitude and affection.

We passed on, and for the space of a quar-
ter of a mile pursued a straight and wide road
which leads through the centre of the wood.
At length, coming to a spot where the shade was
exceedingly thick, she pointed to a very narrow
pathway which put itself into the road, and
asked me if I should object to follow her. I
knew the path; it led to a small but deep valley,
at the bottom of which ran a pure cold stream ;
but I was surprised at its being so well known
to the child, and asked her how she came to be
so well acquainted with the windings of the
forest.

Last summer, she replied, I was sent, after
an iliness, for change of air to a cottage in these
woods, and then I learned to know where beau-
tiful flowers grow, and sweet birds sing; and I
have not forgotten these places, she added,
smiling, and tripping lightly before me.

But my little guide in her glee had forgotten
that, where she could pass with ease, I, being
taller and larger, would find a thousand obsta.
cles. Accordingly, when she told me that she
had but a very little way to go for the accom-
plishment of her object, I bade her hasten for.
ward, while I followed at my leisure, and in
consequence I soon lost sight of her; but still
pursuing the same wild and tangled path into
which she had led me, I presently arrived at a
more open part of the forest, from whence I
looked down upon a dingle, in the bottom of



58 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST,

which was a pool, and on the side of the poola
sward, which, from its smooth deep green, inti-
mated the moisture of the place. A ruined cot.
tage, of which the gable end and doorway alone
remained entire, peeped out from amid the trees
and underwood. The rays of the morning sun
shot slantingly over the forest, and shed a flick.
ering, trembling light on the whole scene, pre-
senting the most beautiful varieties of light and
shadow. This also was a place for the sweet
singing of birds, and for balmy zephyrs, which,
as they passed, produced that agitation of the
leaves which, together with the rushing of a
waterfall, heard but not seen, filled my senses
with a degree of delight I had not often expe-
rienced. At the moment when I had reached
the brow of the dell, my little guide appeared
near the bottom, springing, like the gazelle,
from one rude step to another, and anon I be-
held her stoopiriz down to gather certain flow.
ers which grew here and there on the green
sward. ‘The rude trunk of a tree near which
I stood formed a convenient seat ; [ placed my-
self upon it, and quietly awaited the return of
the little Aimée. A quarter of an hour had
hardly elapsed, when I saw her reascending the
rocky side of the glen, and presently she stood
before me, all glowing with delight. At my
feet she set her basket, which was filled with
that lovely flower we call the muguet, better
known by its more appropriate name the lys
des vallées, the lily of the valley.

There, my father, she said, there are the



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 50

flowers which are to compose my garland ; and
those are the flowers I would choose for my
device. The rose, added the little girl in high
glee, is the emblem of beauty, the laurel of
glory, the heartsease of content, and the fair
maids of February of innocence—but what are
all these without my lily of the valley? Tell
me, father dear, what is any good quality with-
out humility ?

Aimée, I said, in amazement and admiration,
not only of the sentiments of this dear child,
but of the elegant manner in which she ex-
pressed them, Aimée, my little one, who taught
you all this?

She looked innocently upon me, and ‘said,
Papa and mamma used to instruct me in these
things ; it was poor papa who taught me that
the lily of the valley was the type of humility,
and sometimes when I pleased him he called me
his lily. Ah, sir, I wish I were really like the
lily ; tor the lily loves the cool valley and sha.
dowy places by the streams of living waters.

Dear child, I answered, you are indeed a lily
of the valley. Would to God, and I crossed
myself as I spoke, would to God I were a lily
too!

No, sir, no, she replied, you shall not be a
lily, but you shall be a noble tree, planted by the
waterside, and I will dwell under your shade.

I was affected, I could not help it ; the tear
trembled in my eye; which the little girl ob-
serving, she stooped down and kissed my hand,
at the same time taking up her basket. Having



60 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.
a

obtained what we wanted, we turned our steps
toward our home, and as we went along we re-
marked other flowers growing in the forest ;
among these the wood anemone and the party-
coloured vetch particularly attracted our atten-
tion, and we wondered that things so beautiful
should have been formed in places where none
saw and none admired; and this led me to
speak of the infinite goodness of God, and of
his bounty toward the’ children of men.

At length we reached our village, and parting
at the garden gate, I retired to my study to ex-
amine the Holy Bible respecting those passages
to which my little companion had alluded. And
in that long quiet day, a day never to be forgot-
ten by me, such convictions flashed upon my
mind respecting the errors of my church, that
before the evening hour I was almost, if not en-
tirely, as much what my people would have
called a heretic, as | now am, although I had
not yet made up my mind to acknowledge my
belicf, and give all up for the truth.

Scarcely had the ardent heat of the day sub.
sided, when, according to appointment, I repair.
ed to the chateau ; where, on my having passed
the avenue of linden trees, which then extend-
ed from the gate of the domain to the lawn in
front of the mansion, I entered upon a scene
which chased away, for a time, the perplexing
thoughts by which I had been agitated during
the greater part of the morning. Figure to
yourselves, my gentle readers, an ancient, many-
windowed stone mansion, whose fashion spoke



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 61

of at least two centuries past, in the almost per-
pendicular roof of which were three tiers of
windows, peeping out from the mioss-covered
tiles, closed with wooden shutters instead of
casements. In the front of this ancient and in
some respects dilapidated mansion, extended
the lawn, in the centre of which was a square
marble basin, where a huge Triton spouted
water from a cone to the height of many feet,
affording rather the idea than the reality of
freshness. On each side of the lawn, yet an-
swering exactly to each other, a statue, a bos-
quet, an arbour, and an archway of trelliswork
opening into certain gardens beyond, alternated
with each other, according to the formal taste
then prevalent in my country. The lawn was
set forth with several long tables, covered with
fruit, cakes, cream, and other refreshments;
while on an elevated scaffold near the centre
of the open space was a band of musicians, who
from time to time gave us a national air, while
waiting the commencement of the dancing,
which was to take place toward the end of the
evening. The company fur whom this féte was
prepared were, without exception, every inhabi-
tant of the village who was able cither to walk
or be carried to the chateau, together with some
superior persons from the neighbourhood, who
had come by special invitation. These, the
superiors of the party, were, with the Baronne,
grouped at the upper end of the lawn, sitting,
standing, or moving about, as it suited them ;
the inferior persons being at the lower end, or



62 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

in the centre, according to their stations in so.
ciety, but all seemed equally gay and happy; I
saw not a solemn countenance as I made my
progress around the circle. I had almost omit-
ted to describe a very important part of the
show, whereat I much wonder, considering that
it is the Feast of the Flowers to which Lam en-
deavouring to bring my readers in imagination,
and this was a statue on a pedestal which stood
exactly in a line with the front of the house, at
the bottom of the lawn. This statue wasa fe-
male one, and therefore suited very well to serve
as a representation of the goddess Flora; she
wasrichly decorated with garlands and wreaths,
and on her head was placed the crown of myr-
tle, through which was twisted an azure riband,
on which a motto was wrought in threads of
- gold. The crown on the statue was pointed
out to me by a person who stood near it, and
I attempted to decipher the motto, if such there
might be, but I was not able, the riband was
so curiously and artificially twisted that I could
only make out part of a word here and there,
and was therefore obliged to rest in my igno-
rance.

The party were all assembled when I arrived
on the lawn, with the exception of the family
of Madame Bulé, but while I was paying my
compliments to the Baronne on thearrangement
of the scene, the amiable instructress and her nu.
merous train appeared at the end of the avenue.

There come our queens of the May, said the
Baronne, and she ordered a beautiful and lively



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 63

air to be struck up, while she advanced with
the ladies and gentlemen of the party to meet
the elegant procession. And elegant indeed it
was, elegant and gay, and various and fragrant.
First came Susette and Fanchon, the rival
queens, all attired in white, and decorated, the
one with rose buds, the other with the azure
creeper before mentioned ; ribands of rose co.
lour and of blue mingled with the several gar-
lands; the next pair were the acanthus and the
laurel, with scarfs of green and purple; then
came the fragrant hyacinth, and the auricula ;
the woodbine and the columbine adorned an.
other smiling pair; and as each couple passed
by the group of ladies and gentlemen, they
greeted and were greeted by smiles and cour-
tesies, as gracefully bestowed and received as
if the lawn had been a royal presence-cham-
ber, and the Baronne a crowned head. As
each pair passed the Baronne the parties sepa-
rated, and formed a variety of blooming and
lively groups around the company, meriting and
receiving that admiration which was due to
their smiling and pleasing figures, and the taste
which each had displayed in the arrangement
of her fragrant ornaments. The last of the
procession was Madame Bulé herself, leading
the youngest of her pupils and little Aimée by
the hand; the exercise and excitement of the
scene had given an extraordinary lustre to the
complexion of my little favourite, yet her eyes
retained their usually placid and gentle expres-
sion, She seemed to be attentive to what



64 FLOWEES OF THE FOREST.

passed, and also pleased, but there was not that
restless anxiety in her countenance which was
remarkable in all those among her companions
who thought they had any chance of obtaining
the crown; her enjoyment of the scene was
therefore as unmixed as it had been when she
was gathering her favourite flowers in the
depths of the forest. She, like the rest of her
companions was attired in white, and with no
other head-dress than those clustering ringlets
which, together with the delicate tincture of
her skin, marked her Saxon ancestry. She
had formed a lovely garland of her lilies,
having woven them together with a band of
light green ribands, tied on her right shoulder
with a knot and falling under her left arm. I
saw the eyes of the Baronne rest on this dear
child for a moment; but, as soon as Madame
Bulé dropped her hand, she receded into the
back ground, and her elegant form was soon
wholly shrouded by the more splendid figures
of her companions.

Our nation are remarkable for being able to
pay acompliment with grace and delicacy ; and
what occasion, I would ask, could have admi-
nistered fairer opportunities of doing this with
truth than the present ? Neither were the gen-
tlemen, or even the ladies, then present, slow in
availing themselves of these opportunities ;
every comparison or simile in which flowers
have any concern was called forth on the occa.
sion, and the exhilaration of the moment enabled
even the most dull to do this with effect. But



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 65

did I say dull? What French woman was ever
dull in a scene such as the lawn then presented 7

Your Feast of the Flowers, Madame la Ba-
ronne, said the Viscomtesse de T . is splen-
did, is superb—it surpasses all I could have
conceived of a thing of the kind. Yet I can-
not say that these elegant garlands add beauty
to these charming young ladies ; I would rather
say that these flowers derive new splendour
from the beauty of those who wear them. And
she appealed for the confirmation of her asser-
tion to the Conte de S one of the few
specimens then remaining of the court of
Louis XV.

Being thus called upon, the old courtier en.
deavoured to produce some compliment of a
superior nature to that of the lady, and asserted
that the roses were grown pale, and the jas-
mines yellow, for envy, to find that their bloom
and sweetness were entirely surpassed by those
who had chosen them for ornaments.

This species of light and trifling conversation
had proceeded for some time, when the Baronne
took her place beneath the statue, and having
commanded the band to cease their strain,
caused the crown to be handed to her; while,
by the direction of Madame Bulé, the young
ladies formed a half circle around her, the rest
of the company, of whatever degree they might
be, gathered close in the back ground.

There was a momentary pause and dead si-
lence in the company, while a servant climbed
upon the high pedestal of the statue and care.







66 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

fully lifted the crown from the head. It was
then delivered into the hands of the Baronne,
and as I stood next to her, I saw that it was a
beautiful thing ; it was not of real myrtle, which
would presently have faded, but was an imita.
tion of myrtle, the leaves being formed of foil,
the flowers of gold and mother of pearl, and the
berries of coral; it was beautifully executed,
and the motto, in letters of gold, wrought on a
blue riband, twisted into the wreath. The Vis-
comtesse de T.- » who stood on the right
hand of the Baronne, as I did at the left, would
have taken it for a moment into her own hands,
exclaiming, Permit me, madame! ah, how
beautiful! it is perfectly captivating! But the
Baronne would not part withit from her hand,
nor suffer the golden letters on the blue riband
to be read.

I am, I feel, she said, in a perilous situation ;
Iam about to make a choice among so many
beauties, that I shall be in danger of incurring
the odium of possessing a bad taste in still re-
jecting the most worthy, let my choice fall
where it will; and J, therefore, have nothing
but my motto to depend upon to extricate me
from this difficulty, therefore none must see my
motto till I choose to show it myself.

The Baronne then paused, and looked around
her, and as her eye ran along the lovely circle,
I saw that several of the young ladies changed
colour, especially the two at the head, namely,
Susette and Fanchon; and such was indeed
the glowing bloom of one of these young ladies,





FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 67

and the elegance of the other, that I never
doubted but that the crown would be adjudged
to one of them.

You are at a loss, madame, I see, said the
Conte de 8 , and [ cannot wonder at your
embarrassment; there are so many beautiful
figures in this circle, that it would be very dif-
ficult to say to whom the golden apple ought
to be given.

Pardon me, monsieur, replied the lady, in a
voice which, though low, was so distinct as to
be heard by all present, but you have mistaken
my intention—it is not to the most beautiful or
the most accomplished, the fairest or the ruddi-
est, the most wittv or the most discreet that my
crown is to be given, but to her who, in my
opinion, understands how to select the most
becoming ornament.

So far we understand madame, said the ab-
bé, nor would we be so impolite as to question
your taste. Madame la Baronne can never be
supposed to judge amiss in the eyes of persons
of discernment, but perhaps we may not all
here present be persons of discernment, and
madame has undertaken to render every per-
son in this company satisfied with her decision,
and she depends upon her motto to stop the
mouths of every malcontent. Upon my honour,
madame unless your motto is a very extraordi.
nary one, I do declare, and he shrugged up his
shoulders and smiled, you are in great peril. I
am, I confess, in great pain for you, madame.

Well then, my friend, replied the Baronne,





68 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

I will hasten to place you at ease. Ladies and
gentlemen, you shall hear my motto, and I am
assured that no one here present shall dispute
its authority when I assure them that it is di-
vine, and that it is taken from the Holy Scrip-
tures. So saying, she untwisted the riband
from the myrtle crown; and stating that the
passage was addressed by St. Peter to his fe-
male converts, she proceeded to read it in a
soft, yet clear and distinct voice ; it was to the
following effect :—Whose adorning let it not be
that outward adorning of plaiting the hair, and
of wearing of gold, or of putting on of apparel ;
but let it be the ornament of a meek and quiet
spirit, which is in the sight of God of great
price. 1 Peter iii.

When the Baronne had ceased to read, she
looked up, and her eyes were directed to Aimée.
The lily of the valley, she said, is the acknow-
ledged emblem of humility; this sweet flower
conceals its beauties within its verdant cover-
ing ; it is spotless, pure, and fragrant; its leaves
have a cooling and healing influence; it loves
retirement and shade, yet when brought to view
is exquisitely lovely. The lily, therefore, I must
consider as the best chosen ornament for a
youthful female, and therefore I must adjudge
my crown to her that wears the lily.

There was a murmur of applause throughout
the assembly on this decision, and every eve
was fixed on the little girl, who came blushing
forward at the command of the lady.

Aimée, said the Baronne, as the dear child



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 69

bowed humbly before her, I rejoice that I can,
with a sincere feeling of love and esteem, be-
stow on you this simple preference ; your cha.
racter has long been known to me, and the hu-
mility and meekness of your conduct, since you
entered the family of Madame Bulé has not
only been noticed by me, but has filled me with
admiration. In those talents and external quali-
ties which are pleasing in our sex you have
many equals now present, and you will tho-
roughly understand that the regard I now ex.
press, has no reference to these qualities , it is
your humility and your holy harmlessness, your
exemption from envy, and your treedom from
bad passions, which are your chief and crown.
ing ornament, even that ornament which is
above all price.

So saying, she raised the myrtle crown above
the head of Aimée, and was about to place it
there, when the little girl, bending low, and fall.
ing on one knee in a manner which I thought
exceedingly graceful, raised her lovely eyes to
the lady and said, Ah, madame, could I wear
that crown I should prove to all here assem-
bled, what is but too true, that I have not de.
served it. I desire, indeed, to be like the lily ;
but Iam not so. [ know my own heart; I
know that it is full of evil passions, and if I do
not betray these evil passions so often as I teel
them, it is not to my own strength I dare to
give the glory. My dear lady, I implore you,
do not put the crown upon my head.

There was a dead silence in the assembly,



70 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

every one was impressed with a solemn feel-
ing: at length it was broken by the lady, who
said, while holding the myrtle wreath over the
head of the kneeling child, Aimée, my beloved,
indeed you must not resist our united entrea-
ties, you must submit to wear the honour you
have so justly merited.

Ah, no, lady, lady dear! she replied, lifting
up her face as she knelt, with a sweet and un-
affected earnestness ; no, no! it cannot be; amd
at the same time gently removing the garland
of lilies from her shoulders, and laying it on
the grass at the Baroness’ feet. I am neither
worthy to wear the lily or the crown; sweet
lady, place the crown upon the garland, and
then I will endeavour to merit both; at least,
she added, if not in life, yet perhaps in death,
for then—then I shall be . But we could
not catch the last part of the sentence, for the
little girl was unable to speak clearly by reason
of her tears.

Aimée! lovely, lovely Aimée! sweet, sweet
child! you have conquered, exclaimed the Ba-
ronne, laying the crown at her feet upon the gar-
land, and then coming forward, she embraced the
child, and wept asshe pressed her to her heart.

It was an awful feeling that impressed the
company at that moment; the tear was in eve-
ry eye. The abbé whispered to me, Heaven have
mercy upon me, a sinner! If that child thinks
herself impure in the eyes even of her fellow
creatures, what am I in the sight of God? and
he crossed himself. I heard expressions of the





FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. Tl

same nature from many mouths; and Susette
pleased me much, by assuring me that she now
felt ashamed of herself and of her own vain.
glorious opinions of her merits,

lt is hardly necessary that I should assure
my reader that the conduct of Aimée on this
and on all other occasions evidently showed
that there was no art or affectation in her con-
duct—no pretence of humility which she did
not actually feel, but really a deep and heart-
felt sense of her own unworthiness, and an utter
disregard of what effect might result from her
conduct, or what impressions it might make on
those who were present. I mention this, for
although it isa lovely thing to see érue humili-
ty in a child; nothing is more displeasing to
God, or more offensive to those of our fellow
creatures whose minds are well regulated, than
to perceive attempts to display a humility which
is not really felt.

In the meantime the Baronne ordered the
garland and crown to be carried to the church
and to be placed in the lady chapel there ; and
it was some time before the assembly could so
far divest themselves of their serious feelings
as to enter into the amusements of the evening.
As to myself, I must confess that it was during
that evening that I for the first time made any
serious reflections on the violence which the
mind suffers in being drawn from solemn feel-
ings into those which are merely earthly, and
the contrary ; and I was led to think that hu-
man wisdom consisted in avoiding those excite-



72 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

ments of earthly pleasure by which the feelings
more suited to our state as dying creatures are
rendered distasteful and uncongenial to our
minds.

After the Feast of the Flowers, several
months passed during which nothing particu-
lar took place in our private circle worthy of
record.

During this period our minds were much agi.
tated by public affairs ; that dreadful revolution
in my country which .was so awful in its pro-
gress, and so wonderful in its effects, had com.
menced. The capital was already in confusion,
but we in the provinces still only heard the
thunder rolling in the distance.

In the meantime, the remainder of the sum.
mer and the whole of the autumn and winter
passed away. In the middle of the winter I
was seized with a rheumatic complaint, which
confined me to my bed till toward the end of
spring. During this period a friend took my
duty, and I saw little of my peopie; my Bible
was, I thank God, my constant companion at
that time, and the reading thereof, I have rea.
son to think, was blessed to me in a degree
which canhardly be conceived. It was thought,
however, necessary when I left my bed that I
should change the air, and accordingly I was
carried from my bed to the chaise which was
te convey me to the house of a married sister,
who lived not very far from Rouen ; there I re-
mained two months, but at the end of that pe.
riod was much distressed by letters from the



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 73

Baronne, who informed me that a contagious
disorder had broken out with violence in the
house of Madame Bulé, that many of the chil.
dren were very ill, and that our little Aimée
was in peril of her life. It was very late in
the spring when I received this news, and as
my health was nearly re-established, I lost no
time, but hastened back to my flock—that flock
which I was soon destined to quit under the
most painful circumstances, and to quit for life ;
for the door of my restoration to my former
place is for ever shut against me—my principles
would now be held in abhorrence by those who
loved me formerly—nor could I, even if per-
mitted, now take a part in the services of whose
idolatry I have been long assured. But no more
of this; it has no doubt been good for me, and
for others of my countrymen, that their ancient
ties have been dissolved—ties which bound us
to the world and to a false religion, and which
we should never have had strength to break by
our own efforts,

It was a glorious evening in the end of May
when IJ arrived within view of my own village,
from which I had been absent many weeks. I
had quitted the public vehicle in which I had
travelled, on the opposite bank of the Seine, and
having crossed the river in a small boat, I pro-
ceeded on foot the short remainder of my jour-
ney. As soon as I left the boat J was in my
own parish—I was in fact at home—and I was
making my way along an embowered pathway
toward the village when I overtook a decent



74 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.



peasant in her best apparel going the same way.
To my inquiry, How is it with you, neighbour
Mourque ? How are all our friends? she re-
plied, Ah! Father Raffré, we have lost one of
our fairest flowers, and I am now going to see
the last duties paid to her blessed remains.

Our flowers, I repeated ; not my lily, I trust ;
is it Aimée who is no more?

It is, sir, she replied: and when I last saw
her at the chateau I thought the little angel
would never live to enjoy another féte ; such as
she, father, are not for this world—nay, her own
very words, when she refused the crown and
spoke of what she should be, proved to me how
it would be, and others said the same. But the
crown and the garland are to be placed on her
coffin, sir; the garland indeed, sir, is withered
and shrunk, but the crown is not made of such



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 75

things as can fade, they tell me; but it will be
a touching spectacle, and surely, sir, there will
not be many absent from the church this even-
ing who were at the lady’s Feast of Flowers. ‘

I could not speak—so the good woman pro.
ceeded without interruption.

She informed me of many things concerning
the sickness and death of the poor child—and
of the grief of the Baronne and of Madame
Bulé, who both together, as she said, waited on
the dear child day after day and night after
night ; and she told me how she had prayed
while her senses had been continued to her,
and how she had again and again called upon
her Saviour, and spoken of her hope of being
speedily taken to Him who had died for her—
and how she had expressed her love for her in-
structress and the lady of the chateau, and her
tender regard for her schoolfellows——but, add-
ded the peasant, with some emotion of manner
and some expression of regret, it is a grief to
me to think that the poor child was so insensi-
ble when the priest attempted to administer the
last. sacrament, that she knew nothing of what
passed, she was as insensible to the holy anoint.
ing as the still-born babe ; neither did she take
the smallest cognizance of the holy cross which
was held before her-—the Lord have mercy on
her soult I am thinking, father, could she have
been a heretic? Was she not from England.

Ah! I said, was it so? “tis true, she was
from England.

The woman started at the manner in which



76 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

I spoke, and looked anxiously at me, saying,
Do you doubt, sir, do you doubt of her final
happiness ?

* interrupted her, Ah, would to God, I an.
swered, that I were as blessed and happy as that
dear child now is! On whom did she call in her
dying hours, whom did she live only to please,
to whom did she give all the glory, but unto
the only true Saviour—he who is above all
saints and angels, the God incarnate, he by
whom alone the sinner can be saved.

The poor woman crossed herself as [ spoke,
and assented to my assertion.

Blessed little lamb! [ exclaimed, and art
thou gathered to the fold of the only true Shep.
herd? Sweet lily of the valley! and art thou
removed to a more congenial soil; but who
shall fill the place which thou hast left ?

At that instant the tower of the church broke
upon my view as we turned an angle of the
road, and a distant sound of choral harmony
burst upon my ear. I was ashamed of it, but
I could not help it; I burst into tears and wept
like a child. I did not know till that moment
how dear the orphan Aimée was to my heart.
I roused myself, however, and walked on, and
a few steps brought me into the entrance of the
village street, and in full view of the western
front of the church, the great door of which
being open, I could distinguish the crowd with.
in, and hear the soft melody of the human voice
attuned with the full-toned organ within, in
such a chant, so solemn, so touching, so sublime



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 17

as seemed to raise my mind above all earthly
feelings, and make me (I was about to say al-
most, but I will say entirely) desire to be with
my Aimée, absent from the body and present with
my Lord. As I advanced I perceived that all
the houses in the street were deserted, and the
deep silence which reigned amid these dwell-
ings enabled me to hear the requiem more
clearly and more distinctly. At length, as I
passed under the doorway of the church, I
found myself in a crowd, not only of my own
parishioners, but of persons from the neigh-
bouring villages, who had assembled on this so-
lemn occasion; way was, however, immediate.
ly made for me, and I advanced toward the
high altar, before which was the coffin of my
beloved Aimée, covered with a white pall, and
beyond it, in a semicircle, stood all her former
companions. But there, in that sad hour—sad
for us who remained, yet most blessed for her
who was gone—were no garlands of roses, no
flaunting ribands, no gaudy attire; each fair
young creature wore a long white veil; and
even the once blooming cheeks of Susette were
pale with grief and moist with tears—nay, the
very levity of Mademoiselle Victoire had given
way on this affecting occasion, and she stood a
monument of silent wo. Ah! did she not re-
member then all her cruel carriage toward the
gentle child whose cold remains were stretched
before her ?

On the white pall lay the faded garland of
the lily of the valley ; an affecting emblem of



78 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST,

her who had plucked those flowers and woven
that garland, affecting to all, yet how much
more so to me, who so well remembered the gay
delight of that beloved Aimée when she had ob-
tained the object of her innocent and elegant
desires—an emblem consecrated by holy writ,
which says, As for man his days are as grass;
as a flower of the field, so he flourisheth ; for
the wind passeth over it and it is gone, and the
place thereof knoweth it no more. Psalm ciii,
15, 16. Noeye looked up when I approached
the altar, though all, as I afterward found, had
been aware of my presence. I came up near
to the coffin at the moment when the last note
of the requiem was dying away along the
vaulted aisles, and at the same instant Madame
la Baronne came forward with the myrtle crown
in her hand. ‘The garland had been formed of
perishable materials, but not so the crown—as
compared with the garland of lilies, at least, it
was imperishable—it was fresh and fair as it
had first appeared : it thus formed a beautiful
emblem of that “ crown of glory which fadeth
not away ;” and it was an emblem which ali
present understood, though not one spoke to
point it out. It was laid upon the coffinover the
faded garland by the Baronne herself, and when
she had stooped to kiss the pall, Madame Bulé
and all her pupils stepped forward to follow her
example, after which the service proceeded, and
the remains of our little beloved one were con-
signed to the dust in the vault of the family of
the chateau.



FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 79

I remained alone in the church when all the
congregation had withdrawn, and it was then
that I solemnly resolved to renounce the vani-
ties in which I had been educated, and, with the
divine help, to quit all earthly considerations
to follow the truth as it is stated in the Holy
Scriptures, unto all extremities to which my
abandonment of the Church of Rome might re-
duce me.

I was speedily strengthened in this resolution
by the afflictious of my country, and forced by
persecution to fly from that land in which, un-
der more prosperous circumstances I mighi
have been again involved in the mazes of error
and of death.

And here [ close my little narrative, leaving
my Aimée to rest in her cold grave in a distant
land.

This lily of the valley was indeed nipped ere
yet it had attained its perfect growth ; its stem
was cut down to the earth while yet its flower
was in the bud; but the root has not perished,
it lives still beneath the sod, and in the morning
of the resurrection it shall be translated from
the wild forest of this world to the garden of
our Lord, where it will bloom with a celestial
lustre, and enjoy a never fading verdure. The
grass withereth, the flower fadeth: but the word
of our God shall stand for ever: and blessed are
the dead that die in the Lord.

THE END.









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'2011-10-12T16:49:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFBV' 'sip-files00016.txt'
ad99cbcff6e5a77634770b3a494f07b4
9938db88d2508192a39ccbfef81ac27de6c5ab2f
'2011-10-12T16:50:11-04:00'
describe
'1623' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFBW' 'sip-files00017.txt'
851b3bb8e6395b0985e1fa4e3793ab2d
edd75e8a44c0b9a23adac6b7ecc8169fe4f7e9b3
'2011-10-12T16:50:29-04:00'
describe
'1577' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFBX' 'sip-files00018.txt'
c71c7c840e19a02bf0efeabe3bb61bd0
ef44be201f27205074264b571695b1dd31abf649
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFBY' 'sip-files00019.txt'
4350f9f82ca0879ebe5faf36930b28f5
5958af45bbc88cb0fb9d03d8a0a5ae197484fd82
'2011-10-12T16:49:04-04:00'
describe
'1598' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFBZ' 'sip-files00020.txt'
8e03797e23e7895871b4f883822dc6a1
0110c4abd26f75a12afdb1202d73468991923834
describe
'1564' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCA' 'sip-files00021.txt'
6d1826277404473c4b96a7ff0b647f8c
8c593fe4c5f6900d8092837bc0942523076619bb
'2011-10-12T16:48:44-04:00'
describe
'1627' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCB' 'sip-files00022.txt'
0f39d9d2021013c68ea3f5d075e44857
a56add4f451006185ee1c0f7e4494f1eaad7e2d7
'2011-10-12T16:50:21-04:00'
describe
'795' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCC' 'sip-files00023.txt'
04632ac2929842db641e8b04d65dfabd
046729f8818f2056a4b836d2603f95b5b16c4dc7
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCD' 'sip-files00024.txt'
a1e856be07feea119bca0d55b3aa223f
10248cfd57a31032d36d5a776464fa3485f42f07
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCE' 'sip-files00025.txt'
2a8127e13c53a0095c96f23a9eb90abb
05a2fa972b383b0030dffdf75baf16b03e10bbb7
'2011-10-12T16:50:03-04:00'
describe
'755' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCF' 'sip-files00026.txt'
68183fc6c64aa5eb9a680f656f42d2b1
e6b542923c30bf5af634fa340c55e878f0b667d7
'2011-10-12T16:50:26-04:00'
describe
'1568' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCG' 'sip-files00027.txt'
523fa4d2fd949f985f48532732430d8b
24b8581476587279bb61771983850aed4fdf2f3f
'2011-10-12T16:50:06-04:00'
describe
'1624' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCH' 'sip-files00028.txt'
3e968149fe58eab78a403e322e0cf3f7
3b9ea2b6f98b4dbff99287fb53c79b1a8049d074
'2011-10-12T16:48:49-04:00'
describe
'1538' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCI' 'sip-files00029.txt'
4e1ff5b4811b1f6ebf8c2a5192c1ce4c
304040eb8ae2972391190aaceedc9412c18380cc
'2011-10-12T16:48:48-04:00'
describe
'1557' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCJ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
bb8ffea9700bc8b116a00eac5ecaddbb
217afce475706b5dbb36176c3ddaf903202ddd4f
'2011-10-12T16:50:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCK' 'sip-files00031.txt'
63cdb02bc7db725278fd7b1108743be6
339ae421feaf3831a89e50413d9fd4ab4fd0e1a6
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCL' 'sip-files00032.txt'
cf706b28513a63ac04f1bb09a9231cbe
0fb902db961f97d6574bdedc90dd71420b255b2b
'2011-10-12T16:50:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCM' 'sip-files00033.txt'
78feb032dccbab8d93497d948c3a713f
407781301161378b9f5a500d48c79d04bf41c269
'2011-10-12T16:50:05-04:00'
describe
'1553' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCN' 'sip-files00034.txt'
3b4732e7438efe00324ce5e7a791a730
8c625e728ff0d92942e7ce3f443224752144b215
'2011-10-12T16:50:36-04:00'
describe
'888' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCO' 'sip-files00035.txt'
bb1f688114baf3d1d9b162d56f451966
84fff725c8c1fb8a13c5dac12931ccce1846c379
describe
'1592' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCP' 'sip-files00036.txt'
62ed3b067f43408402f20672e5244826
98297fb12bbe5ab3e30186ddae9f02b8af7cab32
'2011-10-12T16:49:14-04:00'
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCQ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
d7d70a5be1ba81e4ec40b21bef88b283
c66d59d028aa427b1c197e8bd2ba8c4d78b2c1b0
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCR' 'sip-files00038.txt'
7348e2f520cc35e617bdf5b9fa89d2bb
e00ef3a51069bf9c3b94dc619eca279e5bf6f312
describe
'1558' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCS' 'sip-files00039.txt'
5d2d3a3a7d5e4f8cda0ce29c074cc1c3
cb78ba02b04bfdd143415c0692d8ab4001cc40c1
'2011-10-12T16:49:08-04:00'
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCT' 'sip-files00040.txt'
55f83bfd87ee48c8a06f2b2d9ec88a07
abd64643df4b65c585ac2376f557cb9811d3c863
'2011-10-12T16:50:17-04:00'
describe
'1521' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCU' 'sip-files00041.txt'
52c6feb13b2f8a732b14f40a21c92bfd
caecbcfe75d7d2552850c4c231884fe17eb6f4d8
'2011-10-12T16:48:51-04:00'
describe
'1600' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCV' 'sip-files00042.txt'
4fc8a0a3a0af581a193e566d78f5e67c
81e74b97d81decfc9956943cf2acc22a2242909f
'2011-10-12T16:49:09-04:00'
describe
'1602' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCW' 'sip-files00043.txt'
5cc2f158df33e4e814f8c0c9f0a57cc6
ac3b8bcddefacc5e090014398eb3f6f1e8d5f55e
'2011-10-12T16:49:01-04:00'
describe
'1587' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCX' 'sip-files00044.txt'
2a4564e75714e0c2009c2b025472d4de
69bc7b017bbc7429c6b5bf8dd2283c3174ab338d
'2011-10-12T16:49:12-04:00'
describe
'1594' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCY' 'sip-files00045.txt'
525f3ff83c90f895bdb99e9cbef31123
6df934319c853984d3624e91567ba4d203d803c2
describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFCZ' 'sip-files00046.txt'
5d4918fa7898050ea2311a5f3934d5c0
b659df7b8d5a0e63aeed9d7cde700ba96b22ecdb
'2011-10-12T16:49:43-04:00'
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDA' 'sip-files00047.txt'
149aa87e04938afc299e377ff88cc72c
3205cd3fc46d7677683059531c45ec6495b227ff
describe
'1559' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDB' 'sip-files00048.txt'
d73166bf56345f5f6edb27b627aba40d
3429e9d4d09800014e317ddd95ab5cc38b75aebe
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDC' 'sip-files00049.txt'
96ff01331048022c578a2a8cc7a178d5
d3bde7d43e993f07f688e8303ae31b7cc89976b4
'2011-10-12T16:50:15-04:00'
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDD' 'sip-files00050.txt'
f18920441995af84e9687627f65582c4
daf89cee6ec6be99cf1c37481d8039de5af9455f
'2011-10-12T16:49:39-04:00'
describe
'741' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDE' 'sip-files00051.txt'
d89784fbc948809e130754d7a854569b
84b2e01aafb496981bb8aa6b38c8a904b67e106e
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDF' 'sip-files00052.txt'
b04c8652bb67c166a4d3ff20f9857e37
a905d26df515a69e757458ce2206d2af7225baef
'2011-10-12T16:49:18-04:00'
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDG' 'sip-files00053.txt'
cfba6dc6d73c74008005f12f422aa8a7
6046bb879f88fc51ded772b3456d62dc833de2a1
'2011-10-12T16:49:10-04:00'
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDH' 'sip-files00054.txt'
c6f868cddd5825eca2a962a3b793a8bb
b22c5e3b5e7d6719cd001e0ded29ad9b9affee2d
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDI' 'sip-files00055.txt'
298ac09e941063e84b0d39f475abb963
05a84cbbc1fe48f0525234f76da3c8c6c0b87bdf
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDJ' 'sip-files00056.txt'
af45294bfd52940087f3729448131eb1
f360c551cca7509951e23bbb9a36c4bdcfcf30b8
'2011-10-12T16:48:57-04:00'
describe
'1561' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDK' 'sip-files00057.txt'
b88e89aff782b22c8b331379d072cf11
36fc7aeac5d20fa5fb3fdfe7f855a29cdf5fa5e2
'2011-10-12T16:49:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDL' 'sip-files00058.txt'
d42943f5d4222dcbd51d62c168a918d9
1cf010c75023946fbc5897cf6ff74bde7d401d46
'2011-10-12T16:50:20-04:00'
describe
'1512' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDM' 'sip-files00059.txt'
b07af21ab2839d521bbce65ae8c404d5
154fb557564fedcc463b8057b748f96015803d7a
describe
'1573' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDN' 'sip-files00060.txt'
7c8c553f80aaeb54a13f0a4328dcb977
25437b9aa24aa0f420013bad9acb7367b6f3eff2
describe
'1605' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDO' 'sip-files00061.txt'
023e993275fd8f07bf45925bc2fc9431
fb6cde108f2807ec8216a91dd6e92289fe2bd1b2
'2011-10-12T16:50:34-04:00'
describe
'1572' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDP' 'sip-files00062.txt'
b673ecbaea5b60acbf71d0975fa5b36f
1c8a2dfd70f991eb7aec6caec9198947db673fd6
describe
'1618' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDQ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
c4331efdd6dc9f52c34a98c067cb408b
787e5e91fc7a6fc024b9881cebfe7b5d4954cb4a
describe
'1551' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDR' 'sip-files00064.txt'
7d3ef1af313be1f27f21a18975faac06
86581623a08a1066d20cf7c67aeed3489b3c8d05
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDS' 'sip-files00065.txt'
384757a8efdc5d110ede98695fc102bb
cab9f4e5f7ef7e5ca1d074d170986816187a396a
'2011-10-12T16:49:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDT' 'sip-files00066.txt'
ce42acb8ce0baecc364eb0cc545fe3c8
745ba65c1ce1c7fb46b4b3f596c5ee74d84e6270
'2011-10-12T16:48:39-04:00'
describe
'1505' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDU' 'sip-files00067.txt'
19044f4ccb2b67fc50f251f9a1252377
e0cb78e1f5b962273d59c06edb5763cade70c9cc
'2011-10-12T16:49:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDV' 'sip-files00068.txt'
e3ec1d31257ac196b37685bc1e1ce7e4
fff3d77235ce115b89961d278f688b4154d75e76
'2011-10-12T16:48:43-04:00'
describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDW' 'sip-files00069.txt'
b0b5f61517034529d27dbdd35a2de9bc
1ea59e35f5a5cb7fc1b67e638298a6ed0025c738
'2011-10-12T16:49:59-04:00'
describe
'1554' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDX' 'sip-files00070.txt'
1f0ff2c0cde7d1fda4c515a9b320a56c
1f4c0d796e661b6e5545fa6113a3d3bfa548980c
'2011-10-12T16:49:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDY' 'sip-files00071.txt'
0e6196d0ee68d5c61a920fb2338e446d
f1318bceabf75e2b3e3142492b9d25792bc708c9
'2011-10-12T16:48:56-04:00'
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFDZ' 'sip-files00072.txt'
ced5aaa82415cbd6566f0dcb6ccb6c24
73d801186df604462e5b8b54427f1bb3d5e65c2a
'2011-10-12T16:48:42-04:00'
describe
'1603' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEA' 'sip-files00073.txt'
169c252e995fedd4fef56d816c4aa5f8
49ca11495da22edd9e4c6c1ac4d7679ab46c1343
describe
'885' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEB' 'sip-files00074.txt'
6bc84565f2487885f47b1bd9ad4ab143
7ecce1407df5b60d3d6af280f5d96b32e2883292
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEC' 'sip-files00075.txt'
800b253adabd63775b0a46c52c4fbe3e
15407508f53e55b055c26fa33a18ba5c18342a41
'2011-10-12T16:50:22-04:00'
describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFED' 'sip-files00076.txt'
29facb00707ce4b41eb497152a1b5877
ef00fe4c9cb9c648c9cfa8e2be7af478514a1f46
'2011-10-12T16:50:07-04:00'
describe
'1555' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEE' 'sip-files00077.txt'
8239bbb1af17f6b20c2715f1475443e4
ae7e6d87a81658d9a23b19f4c67370e0934fad6c
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEF' 'sip-files00078.txt'
9980ddd4fa4f426db03ba54165640f3f
a626c31ce974fc183ed124f0571c8b3b08c33bd5
'2011-10-12T16:49:32-04:00'
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEG' 'sip-files00079.txt'
b8f40da4501a1066f7ca0a95dbfd1e7c
ba5389d59dafee5a7eb61f5762b5fb140ce438b2
'2011-10-12T16:49:44-04:00'
describe
'6927' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEH' 'sip-files00003.pro'
4e981efac6ba166ce23ce12436dacc76
2332e761e0fbb135caef6007e1a9871ca26a21ac
'2011-10-12T16:50:28-04:00'
describe
'30019' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEI' 'sip-files00005.pro'
ea862282c4107dc910d1d94524926c56
1cd1015438b58f2e0cc54e4d35562fcd2fe7632a
'2011-10-12T16:50:10-04:00'
describe
'39146' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEJ' 'sip-files00006.pro'
d6b67952fbecd6cd23dfa73df09eaf4e
8e7c8c668b84107be57049bc9247ac8b1fc25642
'2011-10-12T16:48:38-04:00'
describe
'38513' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEK' 'sip-files00007.pro'
4279bc5fc90fc57aed9e72cda0173fcc
e8ff1b1a69deed10cd56f214a9c4c88efad95e76
describe
'39217' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEL' 'sip-files00008.pro'
84fc76286a61e9bce217305556b30359
cde8e271dd737b82314ba5bccb1c1470472004c3
describe
'36640' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEM' 'sip-files00009.pro'
46b51a9633f734d1909e0690819d5769
d3774b06e35f9ff187bb512f91eb9ef605979d1d
'2011-10-12T16:48:55-04:00'
describe
'38711' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEN' 'sip-files00010.pro'
6c5aadf1d4e5a1b7396ba1d752291c76
9f41dbf96e3a297adcf9f1d780eea08e550b5159
'2011-10-12T16:48:53-04:00'
describe
'38754' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEO' 'sip-files00011.pro'
4f1438bf2b27e69df43daedf76a3bfcd
7e9b8979cf56602a5a78df07d8f702afac0682d4
'2011-10-12T16:50:33-04:00'
describe
'36619' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEP' 'sip-files00012.pro'
68e7116aba9692f40f774be9e662f815
17bcfe8d9d1cd9dd9cb8edb00c5e19ad6bdc91c0
describe
'18996' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEQ' 'sip-files00013.pro'
a95ccd50f294ca4595a75cbf8cf2a6fb
1f83f86877ed45157b570e5b95976387420260ef
describe
'37472' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFER' 'sip-files00014.pro'
e4a116f0239c6be4efa844669b5c659c
fadfee714d9802b558bbf31f6eb80bfa2cfb56fd
'2011-10-12T16:50:13-04:00'
describe
'38889' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFES' 'sip-files00015.pro'
bb7d33996bd8390dfc643c507fe73625
55eed1e7bf859dbff427b3074c08149b491acea1
describe
'37084' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFET' 'sip-files00016.pro'
c5977569e388ae878a73240225dd03c5
b592ef5452fecbfce73cece0d3d23a517a28e8de
describe
'38592' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEU' 'sip-files00017.pro'
7bbbc0bee13f474fa9d786a81dc4da5e
47db768201edcaa1c03df5835a7355e21345a222
'2011-10-12T16:49:35-04:00'
describe
'38280' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEV' 'sip-files00018.pro'
de410aafaad094a14f109779856e65d5
33de6ba8bae2523a70c125d3a6df96d3a4b3b0e4
describe
'36283' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEW' 'sip-files00019.pro'
e98d4cadc6f8689f7ebe692c1e89d6a6
fd60d8aa701710f5eace302c70b614e2ab4c92e3
'2011-10-12T16:50:25-04:00'
describe
'38722' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEX' 'sip-files00020.pro'
339d5dc582815b638924349584806b68
160b558110a27174db387d183311130b7f533830
describe
'37464' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEY' 'sip-files00021.pro'
270152c52767a88117dddbf6ed9907ad
6c674b88303244c26c8e0c643931f3c8b06c8c3c
describe
'39547' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFEZ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
b8525171c725021ffa00670d53f0d11f
f023fd47caf0f7aed8c37f8e0adca708cba0cc9e
describe
'18000' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFA' 'sip-files00023.pro'
d8df92532d468c3d7b83241d86655358
e06445d099bf8100d3a8e8a237e6164c0b69aa24
'2011-10-12T16:49:55-04:00'
describe
'36956' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFB' 'sip-files00024.pro'
219ca670c48cdf572f61069000dd2175
33ef5275af6d16b21c1c9d5a36e98c5a1b1a54b6
'2011-10-12T16:50:18-04:00'
describe
'36460' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFC' 'sip-files00025.pro'
1f916261be89a67ca1173c618e20fa73
151e46d80deaff796d8b9377cb71ab9a8685fa3b
'2011-10-12T16:50:09-04:00'
describe
'18140' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFD' 'sip-files00026.pro'
b538f2d40ae449b4a0b6af2d43fab520
882e99f91b7a52fbabb3b4e5f3a79f82e541ddb9
describe
'37594' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFE' 'sip-files00027.pro'
867878d0050707e9d60d5c10d9798e92
ffcc68bca54e692ee7eaa30cf389bfa4cd62d816
describe
'39278' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFF' 'sip-files00028.pro'
a2957592c34bd8b6ae274802d9393df4
34ec06b745acb7fce20171beaf4bb3aaf2c4c813
describe
'36753' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFG' 'sip-files00029.pro'
9cd3cdaad5a96554173f5944143ab673
b6e3fc861df3ea153eb2931be82c41d9b58a0ce2
describe
'37749' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFH' 'sip-files00030.pro'
49e1d65479cec5f3696c75f6937d8a3d
426a04e4361fadd90109b7e46053b6694431546d
describe
'37292' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFI' 'sip-files00031.pro'
ab9537a2cd3b289f22a1c4ee627d00dd
e4c6956716dc6396fae4c193d4cf0dd9be8c0e93
describe
'35943' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFJ' 'sip-files00032.pro'
26d31ed02cdc5ec6d3fd773af33ec9d7
01d97fea6ae81ce0d0fd3e94e0df86bb985e20c5
describe
'38611' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFK' 'sip-files00033.pro'
27d17fd724002c672b324d11ef072fc8
023d520fb16575e0fac0ba7ad30827c890679519
'2011-10-12T16:49:57-04:00'
describe
'37649' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFL' 'sip-files00034.pro'
b417e05125db22edb48100126b89d8de
160d0cd67e05ec356088f35f3dd06b656e1590e9
'2011-10-12T16:49:13-04:00'
describe
'20428' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFM' 'sip-files00035.pro'
784b99412e42304f5bd22bb0fc3d65be
4f59d4ca447793368dbbfe3677ca2c71d0172abf
describe
'38615' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFN' 'sip-files00036.pro'
66a8870b6daaba2313c7c9843bd666da
d206d151041c5aa8468dd9771f41c67168ab98db
'2011-10-12T16:48:52-04:00'
describe
'31361' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFO' 'sip-files00037.pro'
712b8b44dd872a874c44b899b6f4e4d0
51a9db339290418a066bceb2bb4e9a67503ab5c5
describe
'30724' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFP' 'sip-files00038.pro'
e8768e7e3dcd8c0b5bbe9bdda370323d
be9c00a7c7395d7a15c4f6674631394820976ce8
'2011-10-12T16:50:02-04:00'
describe
'37373' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFQ' 'sip-files00039.pro'
5098abe29e831204c05b1a2348695be2
45bfc15d40221a315474a51f76976882145b8b1a
describe
'33898' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFR' 'sip-files00040.pro'
d564dfde6daac789eec29e395d166c07
a313a3402141ebc7e39fc910a3d05530ad05833b
'2011-10-12T16:50:01-04:00'
describe
'36350' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFS' 'sip-files00041.pro'
5f6ce4af87e3bbe0b9bf71e84028cc86
c6f3b86d517a4b8a4c8262f401351f23058acc19
describe
'38831' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFT' 'sip-files00042.pro'
0d2e4bcff439b64ffb17faf290a8724b
2b1a63f2a603f4953934b81a43f0df947de3ec8f
describe
'38566' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFU' 'sip-files00043.pro'
d749de249e8f79e412557e32953359c0
b0fa94a5c300fcfb788b4f578bd263e351c08db5
describe
'38590' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFV' 'sip-files00044.pro'
62f47d6277133c98474f97c50ff7f109
9c49cb7f73e962b77f531f358349e15a2b2f1bb0
describe
'38188' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFW' 'sip-files00045.pro'
adb695640c6d75894667d3caa87958c2
fb1520517a8d1e9e1265e04e526db264c19259a7
describe
'35850' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFX' 'sip-files00046.pro'
74143af71cb2d910a3a627ddad7658cf
793d7926514f38561d3ad61f72696aa444634930
'2011-10-12T16:49:52-04:00'
describe
'36402' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFY' 'sip-files00047.pro'
401fe04ae2a8e965c6281d25cab4f86f
f5d589ee7bd6d993164527aabf5b56ba1c47c6c4
'2011-10-12T16:49:54-04:00'
describe
'37745' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFFZ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
6293dcdf67f356b57ee0a2955c5f4f4b
f0c8e7befeb8c9ffb762dba6fe568b3e47ac5327
describe
'34933' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGA' 'sip-files00049.pro'
0834f89f69093b4c86bffc78042cb3dd
eb726ecbca80da9205b9e93bfb49d756e37580e9
describe
'36353' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGB' 'sip-files00050.pro'
5b9e7eb28ccaa72e524438b410464887
d95c6fafc4e984c98cdb23dcab3de12f835a70d0
'2011-10-12T16:48:54-04:00'
describe
'17476' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGC' 'sip-files00051.pro'
5f5ed9736fac6329df6eee1e76364f3a
75ae6639a88c5220f2c6d86b4fea4aaf4beb1dc0
'2011-10-12T16:49:21-04:00'
describe
'34995' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGD' 'sip-files00052.pro'
fcfb34afcefa5de66575b77d37e3baf7
8d9d9877ee58fdc3df59b29d3875ca5dc8669d39
'2011-10-12T16:49:42-04:00'
describe
'34786' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGE' 'sip-files00053.pro'
13b7de31459c550cfe8d7ac2cc513f7f
4184c981d0f19693c47a01fa91f6ff40212e89d5
'2011-10-12T16:48:41-04:00'
describe
'35030' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGF' 'sip-files00054.pro'
d25877946fa62d86906f9957eb81d5bd
18e4f9d9b7e40c7dfc4ce94396990f9844a3dad3
describe
'34864' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGG' 'sip-files00055.pro'
20039bb17e14e5af2ab91c6892105d8f
cb6d65649efa60d1dc7cc650076451143ff61547
'2011-10-12T16:50:12-04:00'
describe
'35265' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGH' 'sip-files00056.pro'
688634aa630de452be64271e4021f16b
61e65169f09df74284b41a999b87cd229382e49d
'2011-10-12T16:48:59-04:00'
describe
'37500' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGI' 'sip-files00057.pro'
f70d30f2078f84bbcabec8a6955b1048
eafcb54e75239de3ad3e2607bfb02307a8643e57
describe
'38589' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGJ' 'sip-files00058.pro'
90d200858448e4cb3da210ec01c423be
02cc68db0f81a5567f5c13fcc6c9eec1f28868cb
describe
'36149' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGK' 'sip-files00059.pro'
ed13030e8d37398e402ac8a6d76d4aa7
e17e1028e76147221e2184fc7790447c3b95918e
describe
'37954' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGL' 'sip-files00060.pro'
9cd1b8a089c1ad501f748ba7cc0b4292
3ee21c8c7dc5c7c4d62e68ffd873731ec491de6f
describe
'38551' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGM' 'sip-files00061.pro'
b03d25da954ca3ccd1acfeb8e01e6f3b
54f4a037df810ca9c99850d1c16b41300e7b9730
describe
'37939' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGN' 'sip-files00062.pro'
144caaff77539376f31393733abfbaa0
61fa02c899d20f1e006c8d3a3e10496c8bfb7a78
describe
'38140' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGO' 'sip-files00063.pro'
50e99f94d5b957c2d5cf425a1c1475d0
dc71dc71afe5eaaa4e295485b93cda4d3d863aa3
describe
'37670' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGP' 'sip-files00064.pro'
16e5909fcd0b159ede9c0a1ab2f303cb
daca5bab1d868faf0d07ffe921bc1b11e6532ee1
'2011-10-12T16:48:50-04:00'
describe
'36808' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGQ' 'sip-files00065.pro'
6aaf0c3a0b2123ad6eeeaab02b02fc10
52205771ae9e029b1fec9b2dcb14feace9c55757
describe
'38251' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGR' 'sip-files00066.pro'
3680f0f5ba78d12104ca7c3c1abd4df8
b43affb852465064122751713341538e6f3914dd
'2011-10-12T16:49:26-04:00'
describe
'35932' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGS' 'sip-files00067.pro'
c62f618ed4897821105bf9cf6dfb3d07
9c78ee260c7d00a397098ffa36c72bc33ac65de0
describe
'38046' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGT' 'sip-files00068.pro'
b0aeffa790cad184222f2a5d4cc058c0
e856a1a99f038ca65469ef040382687cf18fd2a1
describe
'37625' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGU' 'sip-files00069.pro'
e89617f9b5bfd5ef2db59160221aaf93
ff572c72303bd72f7281b67c42845a6521391d05
describe
'37489' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGV' 'sip-files00070.pro'
e1945820d7b66d4928d4621853e94716
947514225851f382ce2a6d14885e00c6a77d843d
describe
'37899' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGW' 'sip-files00071.pro'
f52484a36d9ba03fad36959d9b8cc36b
86a65a1116947f3d185aed214274d0fd11ee2e8e
describe
'35920' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGX' 'sip-files00072.pro'
87fcd427ed6b81d57c76080ae206bbe4
f08527c7a196fde58b06a8fc0b63d409ee1038cb
'2011-10-12T16:49:56-04:00'
describe
'37809' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGY' 'sip-files00073.pro'
4376adf04d669e256c4a62bc7dd67bbe
7640d0c7e184b0276b8e1efe74cb17d882b347db
describe
'21358' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFGZ' 'sip-files00074.pro'
25ac208a59d3dba9d507012c7d8437fc
6635b07bf3be7f73e592033af81cfb5051ce9cd0
describe
'36980' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHA' 'sip-files00075.pro'
d4ebfe44a41187f752503ec9c8a6a252
19517cf812fd42d5a05a4bffb8c6b12420a87256
describe
'36895' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHB' 'sip-files00076.pro'
e99e7be38b4d6fa19e49bfb1431702a6
7ecbfde29b33d46d38cdd49d12663d74109aff8d
'2011-10-12T16:49:06-04:00'
describe
'37352' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHC' 'sip-files00077.pro'
a09533ec9320ccdef492530c4684d970
1104b1eef2426842e9f078dae089385a4c06ae11
describe
'38155' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHD' 'sip-files00078.pro'
d0835b38c8b65284c917df0aa76feccd
7c5a13c0ffc449bddf7e720484528f3001a6e4e6
describe
'33229' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHE' 'sip-files00079.pro'
9a958dea66c62b2a75b0fd7946fcd3a2
59e732748aece7f92bb9acbace7d60c79172a46c
describe
'255013' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHF' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
e50e769ca5e2fc5732801e567c87fd1f
90beb36b64511e7faab29543cd1763f33bccb45a
'2011-10-12T16:48:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHG' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
90f37e0348b1b9963b731438e7c11cb2
9d46fb65e1a08bbd8da90eed6d069587ad260e07
describe
'15303' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHH' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
7fee4095a21e5d954bfbef26bc709b17
d049ee09e64c0c39b4151050d7855b0e4a37f2ef
describe
'54100' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHI' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
a7b7608fd50f00790c5e920cac50cffb
85a5f1619241c74aafb869707ff21b885f9d1185
describe
'63491' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHJ' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
ea4d048f5585a7ef214304a729cd3ca8
10ff041c2ce304c793a0449bb5a2bad3ec687db7
describe
'65176' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHK' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
99a7b79a615378f5d7dbdac42038dca8
b5f28904437dd21cc83e6dd90ba092f536e5c0d0
'2011-10-12T16:49:58-04:00'
describe
'63624' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHL' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
82216f589bdefb6840633627073b023c
342664ab3b51904f63eca52a9c3ea6c89238f865
'2011-10-12T16:49:19-04:00'
describe
'64056' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHM' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
6772bcc6d87cdccf85224f42c1d84938
c19f694429b3e88695a2596ef0d70578ec925531
describe
'65752' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHN' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
a48d06125b2daf3dacdc073567c15fd8
ca66613d121286ea59b8ccab01267385a5a06065
describe
'65961' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHO' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
ff27c5528a665e256ed64151bcba3d8b
b4dfd69954feaa483ec4fe0741181d957dade6cc
'2011-10-12T16:49:00-04:00'
describe
'65081' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHP' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
adbc47ebfb3ec96c8d401e1e564be1a8
aacedeabd01ffe00ccda11e55b7d1fcbb7f33932
describe
'196414' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHQ' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
ed8e833e5b84a8c8b95ccf954a9eccfc
01c02691aa0e740797740c6d8916d34356ef40f2
describe
'64660' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHR' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
52e2f056cf941ba2fed0a82f0410ec5e
e0a8cd681de0f56178a441af7380b755c28c14a4
'2011-10-12T16:49:20-04:00'
describe
'66827' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHS' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
922909c765f4a5542b4f2b96d2584748
98e5a0019d61b9f7c410e2d2c42af4c711e0b26d
describe
'61784' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHT' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
b84a96fac8c9cf8fb4d5066599c6dbc3
749ff733be34adf29d1d9af6d1fcf7b0d9ea19e1
describe
'64943' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHU' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
ac8f7035bb62cf3ce7487fc999d106c5
7f9a10dc6b6f5d70e5132ddbfc2ed0888734ebcc
'2011-10-12T16:48:46-04:00'
describe
'64279' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHV' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
4c7056897fdf169ff6b5c468f5534830
c4d55cfb8378faaa8db1d47461386db409f5b355
describe
'61294' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHW' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
4621c062f78b3a67f3e552b532986a0b
b0c27d9855c8a4a002710673b94319580c59cf17
describe
'65137' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHX' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
bc0fcad230a250461151c5c34e70a3d8
7830490a6bd2283c6be4bbb39b35175628f2b49c
describe
'65057' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHY' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
627b684bc4d9c90b23661d8d83fc379a
95f8aff141b5d579bfc78b8184728463c58a71c6
'2011-10-12T16:49:05-04:00'
describe
'66482' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFHZ' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
66fa11acfdb3b701f5eb69a2bdc518fe
81e459069a05adbdb664eea1e260a3aed8b89530
'2011-10-12T16:49:46-04:00'
describe
'196457' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIA' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
c0c60003a12c3182cbc29970f3374853
e5ea1d79951ad85b59a5d2199915dd857d3dbc8d
'2011-10-12T16:50:04-04:00'
describe
'64804' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIB' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
b538e84a9478b97d9d654804189988ef
c38460a27b437f991c72b6040c24d96c92209bf2
describe
'64126' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIC' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
eec9380b16dca7b2a8e215b176dfae2b
41fb25992a32cd52426c4a864750e7d1e6a9dff5
describe
'213326' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFID' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
79fbf89a7c4e99fd2df8cef8fd96f855
1226d0c67e67d400f95aaf43b09ad6ba4afeda4f
'2011-10-12T16:49:23-04:00'
describe
'63435' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIE' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
78631eb67cfc8e99a5f94b731b5056a9
ec8e672912bec2d551bc2757303e29381cd1a8ac
describe
'65504' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIF' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
ed6605dd9193c6c6ff88aae69923c708
7dae7f0a6ce7e7fbadc10c8e9b8ee6349c8a8c32
'2011-10-12T16:50:35-04:00'
describe
'61864' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIG' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
38dea72e031c2ad5bc542e136e83f3dd
6a210999e73d94b2f8e09fabc091e3a30324e361
describe
'62020' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIH' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
0511cdca54c6e7cce37fc52a30f14de7
b5ac717570fe1b5fd50ff60f9545fae66cd1dc82
describe
'61252' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFII' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
6f31165640340c96411f2630dd822d56
981800a652a7daed55ad23e200475b137056409b
'2011-10-12T16:49:25-04:00'
describe
'59959' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIJ' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
75780470b5134da91f6b8bffd225ac1f
48e2324c5e9c6da4569f1a005ff24158d1676105
describe
'65083' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIK' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
e4bcc1441d29d2e4c1ea8f946c67b9c1
5b3f52a2403b8a9f1a822098da4290ed6a87d8ae
'2011-10-12T16:49:48-04:00'
describe
'62213' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIL' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
4439666a27bbecca28cd100dc4cffe4e
781a64e23f173e9fee280f53147fc1083570f981
describe
'202077' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIM' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
1a085958da2838c80614685b67fafd3c
677c7ed7afac783343757e02ea6dd403d9b91414
describe
'64555' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIN' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
401f5fefd7053983121555541c12733d
9116aad4fd8baed0d341a60b6d56aa1e74aeb73c
describe
'52721' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIO' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
35274082a37eecd388432758fffc9b57
dcdecedde149d66e6905c4dc2ab91d2d66ce4677
describe
'53839' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIP' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
12bd51dd19456850b212b9a36ea26d2b
f30b9065f46d9ef2af79d2c02fe0968cdf06c804
describe
'61003' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIQ' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
942076f99d9c9b6f2cebb115137db776
96f014e3b7d53618a306f70ece8719770cd077b7
describe
'55416' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIR' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
2b2d4481c36950c57e42ea912a15a6e0
0b54874586f24a69dc434da4a052ecaa1b05bf86
'2011-10-12T16:49:41-04:00'
describe
'61897' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIS' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
00ba20bb39de637e10b58b2c8151d905
09044cc14444dd5de414b8ea641f8fffec77ab40
describe
'64182' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIT' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
588107ee77df27dffd66f9cd88afae1d
3041ebc4f132a37260e7ccd63d0048bf160b16d6
'2011-10-12T16:49:38-04:00'
describe
'63210' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIU' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
ec48a514c5bc18030ccfdf5a67e1f98f
092178a7ca19572643bc2885cdd8004e19afe51c
describe
'63706' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIV' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
7e4acb18d7f38340bd15a19018a2996c
8e7446419b10dd302373d4abf3293adf9c14cb55
'2011-10-12T16:49:33-04:00'
describe
'65262' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIW' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
5d5e6010b29625497830b63fa03c62d1
2e8230f2bf6f60a293a704ce9cf354e73db1b803
describe
'62110' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIX' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
53f437c0bb75c7346c95d62b641b0237
05f5280359fcba5f44a249665ad5d54c674db7d0
describe
'61689' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIY' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
2faeebd6f98446fb4bb88ab5cf14e518
462148b116c3427e895cafa0331a44a0a7309a62
describe
'62326' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFIZ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
4c3897f16a2c1ec82fb1cb1696fdb5b1
e70d3a75f1c22c2c0390445770d94461c34befd3
describe
'60217' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJA' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
9f5a61a7ff20961662c06dd82703ba29
fec2398e830d3d7e0c3114fcf64208194664d840
describe
'61558' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJB' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
e91aa28a36a8b73551bfe7c9cec11423
9bede035661dffc449936bd7481e14abbe11513f
'2011-10-12T16:49:40-04:00'
describe
'198942' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJC' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
fdfd22205f1e0f6e01ec013fae06ea10
f6b2e5c256c67b4df5b55cacd63b5f292f98db47
describe
'59535' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJD' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
e2860d79d480957f088412d64ffc51b6
fcf39ff8c9975e08ec5b69a37b68faecfc997334
describe
'58194' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJE' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
46a5c7527190902bbd30a37ef0f6eb07
b744808dfcf916343a7f0ae3bb868f2a4254ed8b
'2011-10-12T16:50:16-04:00'
describe
'60180' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJF' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
75352481f987e6272dfea843d0b02181
3c2f98ff6ee7e65e126939219e513d26e592d29d
describe
'59066' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJG' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
4437b5198dfdc7803ddcd9f4f8942e5e
1382d2cc50713107af784f38da3d8f3c50e41ccc
describe
'60360' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJH' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
c8a898e16b5060933d934f80e5af833a
957379b68278ed686f69df5221121266faa8f2c3
describe
'63083' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJI' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
befb66e597bc5807013f43faf6d34b28
15fc64e4c047492dc3eaa42a0a4b737f2b34a82f
'2011-10-12T16:49:34-04:00'
describe
'65077' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJJ' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
4a05c95a6045c0aa94f6bae615e22032
5a955448ecc9d9df87e4c7221fb091b8432b05ca
describe
'60695' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJK' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
43e6d5841f879ee7eb0ec5f978101273
1c064dafc0cf399c864ef8566b1c791447b7a7a4
describe
'65299' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJL' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
5d7952b240924157ecc39fbed86c216b
17e4468748a178bf553a4fd103b3100b737eca87
describe
'65907' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJM' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
7e47ef2d66725e1b2432411aee52dc0d
af1364a215151c6d3668b10f10652a2bea7c065f
describe
'64222' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJN' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
ffe0e59569cb0053001c4bb1ca944f56
c58e67a3e22c9e46472d38ec8ec9bbf6c665aaf6
describe
'65726' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJO' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
0d193d640960718d33a6a2fb8dc49236
12e2073067119ca3b732d8356d9296bb24c2d3f1
describe
'62321' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJP' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
789ce5174dd6d9dfc903c7ea76f70337
e48b28e4e2eb7557316cc5a70ce29aea5c802673
describe
'64533' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJQ' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
e10ce9efba80b4a5b8fec1fc5deb6dbb
824fec8c00662188a9aedffa5a244430ebd854c2
describe
'62817' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJR' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
00d6f444afe4f70afac3a95c084b2670
009b665bc7e28d47ad68b50178c983ed3b5329b7
describe
'60849' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJS' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
f5faa7ff3bd5be9fe540ae8e65aec70a
13f4d61567d5550a3af337aef883973dff7a6702
describe
'63888' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJT' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
84a0cbbe43b72c106fe6d0939b45bb0a
0cab4193c4eab21a733e35ae4628d5ec7c5feb2a
describe
'62666' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJU' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
70cc1f78cc98961f56352d79d66da694
a53f3e3e2ecc7afe568a25bc8262916ab1db51d1
describe
'62346' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJV' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
285ce2e8032f06e998abff483c2ca607
af2490f2f25377d93a0bf4b72e74a0aded046ff1
describe
'64460' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJW' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
d3cd3d3413fffacb421cfc5dceb9002b
26b9f8dbec8f5de75d91661233f0c2c35f245400
'2011-10-12T16:49:45-04:00'
describe
'61354' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJX' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
8365cabe159b2b02ad50702ca1c6e658
f229de5d5ba18abdc9ff0d4aa7049b8915384423
describe
'61467' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJY' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
f85edfb3ab2a2703b81a459dd26545db
b478c263d4f88658586122a3c408b708412cef20
describe
'204166' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFJZ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
5304977e1c82a3d401cb77845e5fac5c
b2e968b1a7b799bac99a8ce87bebbb8f33dc69c3
describe
'63904' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKA' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
a7ba9e2a23e520511d8f67a5532b1389
d6a5c58f526d6593ad461560203b420475c58280
describe
'60720' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKB' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
ec5ecbeb76436d8b8cd08ff79302e7c8
d16bf67fedef7c89812145bde977f743a35becc5
describe
'63421' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKC' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
bf271ae48514bf246b1b1fb49d56252f
c594a650814ee0740101fcd601c31521e8db05c8
describe
'64685' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKD' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
bdb5bdc5604e977ad78633a6e15dc23c
f68691a167c3db6f0e99711e945f2502aaa8e8d5
'2011-10-12T16:50:23-04:00'
describe
'53513' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKE' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
957aee64e141375b23d43a96eb1b0dbf
87be24b71b254f41689f55c0f48d41c84847073e
describe
'254973' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKF' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
a904c4b93b1a22f78c389ec88a22c1dd
1a5b904948a40cdbbb9f812ae06d7475a8f79250
describe
'6129432' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKG' 'sip-files00001.tif'
515abf4d6ed090d620f3e077e6f2df6e
698b1d5a70d17e4339c1d725b5ce48a6aa84c539
'2011-10-12T16:50:31-04:00'
describe
'209972' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKH' 'sip-files00002.tif'
30ed3172784898ecc0cb59a26242feab
865b3f858dda3aceb9bbcb677a35e379bd8847c8
describe
'215988' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKI' 'sip-files00003.tif'
01e5827423b6450478bf71799524bbf9
26120bca56e8dc482c472859bf2434b48ef8aab1
'2011-10-12T16:49:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKJ' 'sip-files00004.tif'
99c0e60c29703465ded9c64c45fff0a1
296a707999089e0ef5dd75aab02d81f6c3507fe5
describe
'217912' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKK' 'sip-files00005.tif'
e5de62534b7af94eef79cc49fb0d1c2c
bdb4214abde1e70a40b1557f153125f5a95225db
describe
'223440' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKL' 'sip-files00006.tif'
d02f6a3f06f36f115c7cc0c09200a514
c14e09a7d505044d980b343b1e0822ef31f6765a
describe
'214256' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKM' 'sip-files00007.tif'
26f7973b41d132f2936fece028678c9f
c787c5aa4f319babd53a35c2d9a427d247519ccc
describe
'223192' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKN' 'sip-files00008.tif'
f7a114336b58524f38356a16d81721bf
3080dbf9b99931ef0583443e87203f693c0c2fdb
describe
'219292' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKO' 'sip-files00009.tif'
b0924b19443437dee43a64b00bfba529
fd06b986c6f7520c47a3895951b8de751890d9bc
describe
'228100' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKP' 'sip-files00010.tif'
8f0ca9de196238a14a856fb5246f9d7b
7ab42fa813888d1be01890ba7c357a82d13da8f8
describe
'221412' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKQ' 'sip-files00011.tif'
1dc7414bab7dc7b536571ac830bb5772
447f974be93354f0b2973396723d88c6cf09ee45
describe
'229752' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKR' 'sip-files00012.tif'
7e2ef869ec4f9ac4cf3e8b17d367b7b4
8fe360bef9a82f8c320910bc7bde8cd52651abcd
describe
'1585028' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKS' 'sip-files00013.tif'
513a033a3615205c57879e8cd4510cba
57016abb32d1ed08a4a71286f4d81d653dac52cb
describe
'225148' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKT' 'sip-files00014.tif'
a7e0e970e4e83775cdecbd194e4b5c0f
da56fab3136e37909faf077a56f090d46785b834
describe
'225568' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKU' 'sip-files00015.tif'
2ca19d449a1e6bae225b26ee3bd872b8
1ec5a44fc606a56d1662d69a74da995470f78026
describe
'225160' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKV' 'sip-files00016.tif'
2a353e36b73d833bbf49e4f466c2101e
dceba793e3cba3a2b6187edbb6919e7ef923cca2
describe
'217000' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKW' 'sip-files00017.tif'
adcb401c0c3eb0a264ab07b060b37e09
f5a49f95bdb452ccc51013d5d9e3d579154bacbd
describe
'223620' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKX' 'sip-files00018.tif'
cb24c974faf03ead36aaa7fae9b562fb
ac010bdc5638e0bd2a6ffb8b907de1e6eaf56507
describe
'219172' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKY' 'sip-files00019.tif'
8c1ad6bc7c44008057d477e8fde5b303
ed816ce3592f1472f6f6e2c4a72925377dca00c8
describe
'223640' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFKZ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
0e47190ebce43d05d4dae121b115920a
11021d62855bbbf0cb4c59e416852ba69bd49d84
describe
'217172' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLA' 'sip-files00021.tif'
0c922a737b99a152f9067d3b29a1c45c
b7d085a2b04afb3b57bb4dd5fb7dae0a9201f1a8
describe
'227180' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLB' 'sip-files00022.tif'
16992800d90629179fb86a00f9ba834d
e43f7eecb9f868067ae61b14be9f797f95848371
describe
'1585348' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLC' 'sip-files00023.tif'
fc5d2ee3e7b62832bad8f9397079ce3e
cc1d9e0d05fc3b673d55a9303931a24d73171ab1
describe
'218696' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLD' 'sip-files00024.tif'
1810c2eba707f87c32747638c56c0061
ba478f19527ef24d0ebb6fa7044be4ae8d686372
describe
'214460' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLE' 'sip-files00025.tif'
d87c835dfcf40395ec728060355e3fc2
264de9587ac8c461fbd8dfc2c794002872159285
describe
'1721456' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLF' 'sip-files00026.tif'
77100d9bb9131d9544890938e17f9e08
e02b04734d895d46b425ad4281cc8aef44f195f4
describe
'214464' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLG' 'sip-files00027.tif'
646f26ba84566cd51306c786651d2c16
6b433ef51f87f5bdd4be66f8d7f234af0b1d85b0
describe
'236296' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLH' 'sip-files00028.tif'
6dd6f0cceb60bd7db29568bfb08179f0
51e5e219e8da182dac1f03b59371d1b987656794
'2011-10-12T16:49:51-04:00'
describe
'216992' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLI' 'sip-files00029.tif'
8a89af404008229c6bc617700409a39b
89121d1f599f930e6663d4a6d072c69063c79ac4
describe
'225112' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLJ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
b89e7453b8c595ae9af541a5314d6f6d
89b1275e632e3a9e9b3f2b2857b55aa1588fc7fb
describe
'216972' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLK' 'sip-files00031.tif'
12f6f70930463cf1ec0fc0fcd4cc08bb
94c2d120651d9f3e015c6c55c1bb0a5ea2cb8d6e
describe
'217684' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLL' 'sip-files00032.tif'
68e38b73c3b0d257c21c6dbb71b7c129
1a556aac213b7c14d831a40b35f8ddc0f7181ea5
describe
'210208' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLM' 'sip-files00033.tif'
831cbeec446de75288cc8b2705d7ca76
266d27e3fef300e4f72d1d1079f0d009ecff258c
describe
'220312' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLN' 'sip-files00034.tif'
cce74622023255e8dc2d3c6949a1c133
f07c6e7513d1f946b40b78f8f43249b91cb336c7
describe
'1630244' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLO' 'sip-files00035.tif'
2d2ac7bafd912bf6101b83c3b2a2813e
61b8d22583372660f1165b5755bc15a0623de04c
describe
'222604' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLP' 'sip-files00036.tif'
2870b06aafe33cb2b53c3a261476d200
94321785943c46943169f4dd8fd3241e8672cb5d
describe
'216928' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLQ' 'sip-files00037.tif'
bef1d08cc825b52863982e68a6ce94c2
e48c4935e88cc0b83bdb0a312af1ff3aec2f4c0f
describe
'224232' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLR' 'sip-files00038.tif'
a1fc191261c949bc43cd076f6854f859
95c28164790bd98eac4e4a71f51da53e1fa8ac56
describe
'219220' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLS' 'sip-files00039.tif'
bb6e3108fede3b7350c81f7403c2d605
1b8b5878dcf77e120314736a8816dc3f65e5d73c
describe
'220172' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLT' 'sip-files00040.tif'
a398b742820340f6d8b2d25b9d373f70
5a5c41f168cf2d5b233511fa6c5da94f11c9f8da
describe
'219520' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLU' 'sip-files00041.tif'
97c52bdde479c9db79f14e7c1e596395
373b835dc8ac7ea6ec15240ac6e0e4b41cf0c06b
describe
'226960' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLV' 'sip-files00042.tif'
304caa5313f96096d9949d4609289573
290da8db12b26cbe06eaf84d3d469cabf007f6c3
describe
'219260' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLW' 'sip-files00043.tif'
1a1a8a8809029293c87b4ee66785b1ac
8c8ddde15963dbf594b8db9d7c903f40a76fd7a5
describe
'231036' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLX' 'sip-files00044.tif'
d881335928be0689b273113f20d30595
0c186bad5a805d511c7a223c72503e30794bac75
describe
'214512' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLY' 'sip-files00045.tif'
fca15a953e827bbf26e294a9dc85948b
b7a673cf22cacc536a784bde3332431794421d07
describe
'220336' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFLZ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
4e88b9c18ede8f2bb05d4af6bee2df55
9172edee525da8fdae34f29c639ee7cc109551f3
'2011-10-12T16:48:58-04:00'
describe
'214600' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMA' 'sip-files00047.tif'
7405a78832987a1befb508f2f6d36f9c
1ee8d33c698566b93a1b1b602e5bab608014b0f0
describe
'218432' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMB' 'sip-files00048.tif'
8ddce2b7308434d7154dd8c558c438df
d470425ca2ab9374f017e3d69e6dd728aede14d0
describe
'210324' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMC' 'sip-files00049.tif'
158963d7ce4bb447b0ab410aeb36cb39
29ab1159812d540f09ec0fb20a26fa8439f5e318
describe
'218052' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMD' 'sip-files00050.tif'
b7c06ff77530169b9b7d551b3ffa95cf
f6546c354e385dd3c2c59e8d40d449e66b4fb615
describe
'1605000' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFME' 'sip-files00051.tif'
4084f1a6a8625384838a275d2b944c66
9a838a53e8ffe4d4042dad22865ceb1641867ef2
describe
'215832' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMF' 'sip-files00052.tif'
7059a552d723eb10a80645757122ff0d
3cf2a7eb92a95414d6d98d1f5c13bc862b18942e
describe
'215892' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMG' 'sip-files00053.tif'
2dad63043956f970d80873e18734c525
aeaa3f479ad5de3bb0077e265a867b2149a1d198
describe
'215868' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMH' 'sip-files00054.tif'
d98cbfe5b8486fec1ac18343dd7e81e6
4d65023521893b0eb76f57bca76f6a3e1ce142ec
describe
'222172' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMI' 'sip-files00055.tif'
7272a85e670eb3c7f1255fcf67b2e291
c1305c12e5e26fd3c41bfd70942d6374ccead108
describe
'217824' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMJ' 'sip-files00056.tif'
f0d8648e2daeef978936847b5db17045
315983a690d8f226ca5ceadcbece46528608759e
describe
'226652' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMK' 'sip-files00057.tif'
b82b8d821adda3e5e72551e6a961ac80
a618a8bd9db752371048acb1e0bbab6acd267c26
describe
'222344' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFML' 'sip-files00058.tif'
b0d384bb47a2852ec1464181b0f8ceec
1079d4ee3f0f1d942143850359cea6d8b434b39e
describe
'222096' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMM' 'sip-files00059.tif'
a423e7b53430314e037be36429625d2e
a319e9c26afba86b160e41341a5f5723c1f2417f
describe
'213596' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMN' 'sip-files00060.tif'
216109ab2e5454f9b514dc7d90980100
79a277d4f8a915f71005abb067f6ac337d41963c
describe
'208268' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMO' 'sip-files00061.tif'
d94bbd9249179341c0cc27c74bfb39ae
7e9e227b852797769fca4aeb76f4203e17d73fd6
describe
'218300' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMP' 'sip-files00062.tif'
3d07745992a534df1b8f84929a54bd32
9aa17e5377f2fda95caebc1081304416935a0f14
describe
'216236' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMQ' 'sip-files00063.tif'
53b21f9b55ceee836afaba56659139c3
7ee05a65bef100de715e70d2583e93d0d3403d20
describe
'226500' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMR' 'sip-files00064.tif'
879dc48e68979de9535b36267134a808
c87a11e11323198acefe7ddbcbff5cc19d764211
describe
'218016' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMS' 'sip-files00065.tif'
463d050fca822a3374e966a420f239dc
d4f6edeb192f6a77576e2bdaf0db98fb56b4edae
describe
'234008' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMT' 'sip-files00066.tif'
6e135f1ae5f2bcbb45ef21f2629e79ae
a99c9ab842c81fb923c038472fb9be97ec65de94
describe
'213408' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMU' 'sip-files00067.tif'
bffc46972d7fc7fdea49db8b54c7c7fd
2029e4eb2853074035110466867c309aea26044a
describe
'226480' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMV' 'sip-files00068.tif'
ed9a89eea5e2e3f81eb9f94bb24ce28c
6850aa9b193cb5d09b31f354a3ce8decde7b58e8
'2011-10-12T16:50:30-04:00'
describe
'222332' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMW' 'sip-files00069.tif'
107275c924a320e2591581d1274e325d
3c69268b8a76774cee7ff886b330036e04345eee
describe
'217836' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMX' 'sip-files00070.tif'
2189963cd677001936c71e3cce4e2d33
2f001b489a5c8304e9f1eae8572275f1b98c9b60
describe
'222292' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMY' 'sip-files00071.tif'
b4802835051b278533857db80da86a3b
b13c13d29816983cb61371856740a525f8623b10
describe
'222324' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFMZ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
31822ace705b3eedb19ac74bc7e3bb05
8110ce4154f88fc58ba69618c0d89e291d016f70
'2011-10-12T16:49:30-04:00'
describe
'226824' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNA' 'sip-files00073.tif'
c20e315712b6f8ac5ad11dbc305908f0
34a617d0558e0829b8c6a2e1fbac512dba754abb
'2011-10-12T16:50:27-04:00'
describe
'1647512' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNB' 'sip-files00074.tif'
9e4248bca1eab1573386269d07fc1019
04e79f047de9829e28ec0d822fd1fb833881e4f1
describe
'213268' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNC' 'sip-files00075.tif'
5ff48cf147eecd632478c093f17df248
1c9c4daa35eb5eece1418c30acced16290536169
describe
'226596' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFND' 'sip-files00076.tif'
edcd216a71273bff52171b575e673062
e59e2e977445203e7f7a29234fa7160479b3f638
describe
'217892' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNE' 'sip-files00077.tif'
b4b38c9110228d046340364cea48b501
5747ad08da186211506ee57b45170c48c06268ce
describe
'226592' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNF' 'sip-files00078.tif'
378baa18ed1ccfd7dadd1a6bc1c2b453
a91ac5b740a82d8867898e1e168e29c9b548f0ef
describe
'217332' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNG' 'sip-files00079.tif'
3dc61236e5af2cfd441e65bfc72ebddd
025cf1a2351e8939438401847d1e19c223effca7
describe
'6129464' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNH' 'sip-files00080.tif'
b4625dd35286bc1d615237c4195ee53e
aa6991ee7ee16fce676efbe35f685ae178c39660
'2011-10-12T16:50:24-04:00'
describe
'258625' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNI' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
1603d15cbe2e68a82c9099e12543cb5b
9c08ebb7ed62b515dc07bb84d2290e1acbc5e315
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'4842' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNJ' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
d46d166fafb4afea438c2e3c104aa395
91c46c43a4cecfa64a44c25b4c57832b997a3c32
describe
'79152' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNK' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
32c9be17383beeb1fed958abbb39d989
b62d3d1f0c83ef29cd2b86777fdbf24475672c8f
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNL' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
31e42d5991450d21b6961db80365e778
4d455e98c97bcb0629d55c730ea7fb2a5689ba87
describe
'291409' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNM' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
40d9f4b48f473d226276fc42ac3e09e8
dbdfee06ed05f49e5a2d06eaafafa812dfda83ab
describe
'357495' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNN' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
c633ee40baea7cc812cd0796f7c9223b
2dd11ce3649034bb566971e22f7e769bd008f2a1
describe
'354125' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNO' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
08c7962b4d80e4444261523bf1328b55
37a9d0fec4c207950afca4b3d9843bc0d47883e1
describe
'360076' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNP' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
eed4369b6767c4887becc4ddd7b79f22
bd5113dafb827f4f21b137d8c841834cb5ade532
describe
'346695' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNQ' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
6f7d282eb11577d646daf09cab11cbbe
eaa99f50e055361859e514d115b36ada2c1ee16b
describe
'359369' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNR' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
c0e9ad606db82f62a1cb2ca342ac11fc
079ddbe6890fd46ad6c261bd23c682976760e24a
describe
'360889' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNS' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
91625aa1e1de780badfe694da70d35a4
c1d9e60243825ca205229d2a7a2e3134e9ce2570
describe
'329433' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNT' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
2fb35162f1bd3d52c5951cd9a00dc421
41a5cf2769977390557e8d8f338a686b045b2820
describe
'224787' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNU' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
fa2a82fef9eaf5811d1b078f761edcaa
85384e94c1850288ae017b419974e2fc2d30760e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'338679' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNV' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
3abfa3eba205dc108c65746a2b122cb4
39d737a3c86363e2ec6c62534ce5f1e181d93737
describe
'352029' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNW' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
030af8592d7314a6c012a4ede8d764f7
645598d34f71b05fc980e0259535d09eccda24ec
describe
'345137' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNX' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
29740d424e074adae974f68bb97be6a5
2501d193ac6ab55d8a27bb76aa901a92f87a17a5
describe
'357326' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNY' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
05447106619a66c74c98962999a46538
1bd51f2240540532ce08edf7628d2cd761a09081
describe
'350392' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFNZ' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
89486ae659e6f5ef335581079d7b3bde
f282d793e1ad14f4c85d166df875dbd73db4c303
describe
'336197' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOA' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
ec0b01801f13abaa0d243601e0edfcde
7ebabf34c4d96a0ee0db7b8fb4f431675bcd70dd
describe
'351333' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOB' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
3f83d69921398d3aed7fcff099f20e68
c030bf42d110656c005a13992852dbba1e00942a
describe
'349682' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOC' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
8c18a1ab4f60d92b88f64540df584623
73afab347b98e15932f1ec1cf8f17832716cdf5c
describe
'355953' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOD' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
ebe90e44ecd29600126ea3e987cfe9aa
5807eebf9059453e629769e000dcfa484502ccb5
describe
'244566' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOE' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
caeb54975640e8e4e41a73db8210a1c7
e90aaa6dba32a3d51cdf4f52fcc6653d84250647
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'350011' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOF' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
6c2faca8b6d89b521729a481a819e03d
5a11cb136e313438d443d0a5ccefa50ab8c56ea4
describe
'342728' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOG' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
f35002613f00dda9bcb6894996d8f65d
6841f06a58da285a22904038bd0e4c7985730e09
describe
'233848' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOH' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
607ec493f62771cb89f16bbe855bb883
89814785c384f538ee5f06a6d4b68e99c67c6fda
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'347110' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOI' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
c5e314a81959bfb1afd703a768b90626
e7edf32aae00f7ddf908612289426189d7d78164
describe
'326855' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOJ' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
56f44e0a533be32f23c0672e8dc777ad
7cc880ffcac7dacc3669b224726d3594fc6f68f4
describe
'338404' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOK' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
3babaec2b9c3374350af93683ad56cad
f3cb9d732e1e6274c4b7bc08a892425a14ca83ad
describe
'338534' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOL' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
bc3463322069c1bfa32a3fc7650f2811
de3734e37a997c602ef8733edcbddf7cd56e5427
describe
'339344' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOM' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
38c0a18e3735fb81217e8c203063ff5c
f5569f621e61451389879426f9342bcc6f277b0d
describe
'326944' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFON' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
9e37de470a0dcde839def0b28002138d
1c9e7bdb05f1a1a57b0a855077698e45fd5a247d
describe
'360178' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOO' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
75c79535cf68231a88618aa5ac7e2f79
c4924fdef7007a9433747bb2c83e089ce8d0e248
describe
'349618' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOP' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
f65c2f7e7a9ec8c9249aba26c72718f7
5dc88c77b7a0f584cdb1ace655f8bf54100b7e3b
describe
'238183' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOQ' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
b0d4c293810b31f1d42492aa43bcd2d3
ebc291f5a75b984fd41f0513e3b98d68a145dc01
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'356727' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOR' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
a813af1cd8b216f70f83593791cbc5c8
28717980ed2fbdc342ece8c00e5913adf9a3f1b7
describe
'293949' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOS' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
e1d9d3cdd0b7f01ce96794445c287e40
26e9101bddcb025f0c5dbe9d71c76662b606230c
describe
'289661' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOT' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
95e00de7fde4161b64334b5cafd0d043
f4428566998f80cd2a7cfa3fde052c73e7184359
describe
'338225' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOU' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
1de927e372ce9f02f1689e5ba557cf6f
c2218142160b1e96777c03970811c514a829b5fd
describe
'318918' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOV' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
69f78108cedd03d3ecc50a08564d92c1
4b6f03047fca785f6ea809a72b7bbbafdf0f82ee
'2011-10-12T16:49:07-04:00'
describe
'335572' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOW' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
551da0db08d6bdfe648db007e45ba102
5a5fd53e6de04c4529e1ce43c7d86e446e5dd8b9
describe
'357230' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOX' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
aa3c085b1f75748291f97a31c62e1cf0
3cb4a4551ab16e9df0fb16fdb9c446f518739f22
describe
'347675' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOY' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
1b5351a2acda6997aa29ca4f226a1403
28c7f5b9084beabacafca1efa9a653aa11a3606c
describe
'343905' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFOZ' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
b941249f1cdcca94548cb92b261e9acb
4c88e9106d71c5510f838406604b662312266385
describe
'344974' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPA' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
79755ee99ce91706c7fbec152656c195
4f290c532e36d1820b4b090a51fb5e0ed62256cb
describe
'333781' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPB' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
e5676a6a74469253c3be707c143c16b0
607271359f82ec4dfc88c844458e97ed04c1f77c
describe
'335568' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPC' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
17c80f06b96d0ee82fde928bae4703ad
7ae881ec6456b771cddbc0933f23d9fe60653cb7
describe
'354168' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPD' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
0538b3a1d9d0a24a0bc5e0533ffe72e5
b3924da841b6fd10a36610fea2b96e871b13e6a5
describe
'320209' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPE' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
3a0f7c0107cb7b31e8b5e54bfd77502d
020e9b611eefed9f1e8aacabb5254e6728e273c5
'2011-10-12T16:49:27-04:00'
describe
'334329' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPF' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
a4c135edd2cf728b08c2ee29a9cf64d1
5542a6606c40542b83743bf318163f0d644aa375
describe
'227990' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPG' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
1ab1f7ecf86266e60462f54f8334b95d
68c4a485a8b91b9aa6885bc7b97d874b3be38e05
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'315652' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPH' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
831b32d0756572af355bc14313b3de0a
7fb15cbf77f01fd6862527c0656ee82e97f9e76f
describe
'312810' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPI' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
ab3e60cb0cb0a8ab1864b4a173087f26
8fdc873d5555298ca3e64858296ef329ce83504c
describe
'315268' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPJ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
f2d72a23e81a8607a527381255bf45e2
ace383c8e39e65f89890660ddd2a993a66f360c6
describe
'318899' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPK' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
3fc80938d4d3777e9a467ed1c1cff97f
12d9032812a41f22704fafd6e384ed2140fb2433
describe
'325023' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPL' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
e1f6d747f51d6bf9e6200f3e0aac72c9
2e5da14a3e56e839e3de40759b9d4320c4169645
describe
'308678' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPM' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
6d1120831ae49431f276ea6aee1ab404
420b3c042526b8444a8405f69a1152c6a9b471d4
describe
'333142' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPN' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
67f2e69519e0f4c4b0e6eccc5224394f
ec3554146fae12ad70a6ab12a35face1455bfce2
describe
'323699' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPO' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
35891fbda182795b68fe4edd756c3994
3b1598a6f4866345081890a80b3129ed5548d3e7
describe
'353533' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPP' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
93964ada70fb727725f787ad027d2fdb
7615c96236406fc483525300cbd850a691b34fae
describe
'363782' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPQ' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
55863939d8c0e2dbe8d6b2c0f4c38691
1d55f8ccb0b51649597cc187c8e430d96a4d1c80
describe
'342396' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPR' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
ba3e1f095e0d98463015b22a04b0b5dc
20195e29a29d31cdb4d518bb0e93021da01806b4
describe
'360714' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPS' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
2e31fe316760ee4a65577409d74024a1
d4b0fed6e5be3af3787179de0615cdf55bc4278b
describe
'330291' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPT' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
be3538cc08c804467d07d9590792beb7
9db0a4ea3f2f78ae8558710e67c02f280a24df50
describe
'336696' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPU' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
e8c552d61e1cd8fbf881c763a974965b
06e923730ed9f8e838f9db20cff5ebe58d8ec067
describe
'340084' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPV' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
ef69a162d99e23774384590b84be653e
4f7a94df63cb780ffa932cd4ca93fdc3b611eb05
describe
'329969' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPW' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
bdaaf521d751d5a2855688337e5fd1ab
283d41f2c2dad9b1db49c0866ca2a58259953577
describe
'330604' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPX' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
4b7c85d53ef8b07bde345952fa927dbb
7286bf781453de1bab1db473bba78b6a41a8f485
describe
'339285' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPY' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
4d93460320e7629f4cef07fd1a42a154
62cbe3b1a62810e5549640e1581bba3edef6c1dd
describe
'331718' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFPZ' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
5be9a1bccb87b4bad2984c33a632ec48
c52da3fb0bc6c673ab4b0e145501afbce3a006f0
describe
'340019' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQA' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
b48104a607949ef542f10e5fd5e180e4
7bbafefdef7a9a717e41d7d45b922c60c4207915
describe
'317589' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQB' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
dca855185ab22f172a9d9dd56232237f
e633c13206e8369105b116237ca2c3f8dd12376f
describe
'324654' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQC' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
a7a14ae37444845ff174331c49eea823
b15899983cd9f91c7eb1ac66cc08817dd2f4f8c1
describe
'240118' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQD' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
d7147ac35402bcce5b6d5675169fb605
5e290c701f0bb74ce6be2da6db6877a76ca95d30
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'343516' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQE' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
09da638f2b2048cacf5746c5b56f90c9
0b87a5b1722a9ccfd27fa2f9293baa03b9ce667d
describe
'315398' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQF' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
c1ce785042676ac688754df0448fa80f
65beb64dec32c7ab578ce4dc4808fbe77aa098b4
describe
'339040' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQG' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
a14bdcf1ed03794b0fc72115b5c37d05
76c552d80e8445eb5a212438094c7f76b8d5c6c8
describe
'352319' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQH' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
644005ea58a7a3f97f944d6836394004
a4fbf26baa7ece81ec65310cc417f125c69d2206
describe
'295763' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQI' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
f5da97410b85e9caa662db041ecd78b6
cf044d9936a81eae2473618fff10aa0ba36ec8bb
describe
'268440' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQJ' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
de0bccc1994a0346fd35674c721f9257
1bdb2e48426799f120e8c256aaecf0f97997d854
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'57677' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQK' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
e92e10ed43276407856ce383cfc39583
8b315633f3d7c15d61a11601aac59065d0e64770
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'19242' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQL' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
6ffb2545388bf3b6aff491c034da94d1
6f620987e341ba4ff998ffbc5b99eea895777db2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'3003' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQM' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
c55901e465beda032f52da3026374328
5fc39603d59fce608d74a4e657504984f6ef0437
describe
'2515' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQN' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
a5c0df76931ed2de652d299acfe89a31
533f4fec56ee0b727f470be67faaf6e2a43ea2df
describe
'31481' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQO' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
77de569ba516e823bdf6ffc785b36aa5
c1196c2012ff984ae096d84238a87ace254b7310
describe
'14180' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQP' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
71471b0f84495cb724301f54b7408759
1dd1d4b210835026b74953ea512a9f346a6a9b08
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQQ' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
6019663eecce0256a4d0c7d89eb72a77
93d9e75304678d3dabd198f8211c516af7f54dd6
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQR' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
6c8ae5ac3c60a6882e73eaf4a7a7975d
c934057cff17957a00fc75543cc7a17215bb5f9c
describe
'98095' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQS' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
8363ed7271df6421ed30953d3f0ccb7d
f8047492135798d5b175b08faac51e28164ea95a
describe
'33382' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQT' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
810fa5b88f1d3d179ae8f7a84bfb8693
369b3ea362cc08276ec30089a5b9954d246785e1
describe
'116107' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQU' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
7d7a2ccb371fd21f886341d1858abbd3
05ff7e68b072f780a5e450114490138dd1b8ed92
describe
'35708' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQV' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
03839d2f485faa06162bcd469757b0dc
4575ff4083839e750f1f2a1443e5ec4dd18a1301
describe
'117084' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQW' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
5931b2ad20cf818cb774e694e9584805
b538027c8081399ba250afef27509dff98be7864
describe
'36537' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQX' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
489df13295fd726445b81ab9dbffa060
849deb0cb0db26d38dbe59931eec04a700027f7c
describe
'117099' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQY' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
b15757050092716656295942332b952a
1580aef7772595c333964f53a986dbc7871541f4
describe
'36063' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFQZ' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
c976b501d8fb2605d40d6e5d14c0c95c
c879bc0aae49755e4c156fc634773b8f1a48c52b
describe
'113544' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRA' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
988d4ee2d0790b904292d9de48fb4050
c2137a139842d8fa1995a26b86a09a589ebddd15
describe
'36371' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRB' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
fc7444be4233e5d916806433b15a807e
365f433efe7a0dd41e477cac3ae8bcf5fa035f81
describe
'112707' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRC' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
0851e034c1be7a48e548f7307b8254e9
dd3ae90781176e98c713ae2fc314dd264b0115d3
describe
'35547' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRD' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
25f5141e1fe2ad864d0de10439f45544
64f97f6a155859958f9a4a41f7018d42b2a02b98
describe
'116851' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRE' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
b68da07194ac2fe294e914d83b0d0137
1d1dee3dd8c59476b2831121150306d6f4a0b41f
'2011-10-12T16:49:36-04:00'
describe
'35623' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRF' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
309c41971f9e579c5bc11ee75259dda0
89e403e5550bfb92b0b52e1c233f75d4b701d161
describe
'108045' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRG' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
af68ef0f56b0dcfb598794ddf7a985d6
7eef42695c3260e0ff9b12bd3ca779aac4560f69
describe
'34462' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRH' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
6899f40216b97ce3d2b599f4011c6a14
d5f0bb09622f6099b1a828e27fee0081571f5208
describe
'86046' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRI' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
dcd112fc944f818a8c4718069ebba074
5dd67f6d4a1ee4eb52954a992849063a99679f96
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37573' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRJ' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
cb8f9ac69876d793fd43a3a46edd2d95
b886a99584124a4afc327be7d26a8d0a51cbe4a3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'113132' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRK' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
11724fbc8959647cfd0aec523e73c798
daaf7c52918c53596eebbe7a2caf8082c7df9a0b
describe
'35274' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRL' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
ac2072882a233bf26606f175fcc3973d
8de50d7dff00999110b247579ffafaa8a334ca82
describe
'114951' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRM' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
bec591e33b0dda7800c2b5d6f616b5bf
f25fee8b787c9676858f76ed559c258617ab4bf9
describe
'35148' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRN' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
4a124821bcc62b5653a684833c4fd475
fc3fb978ae823d39204ada583ea9c4b65783520c
describe
'112468' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRO' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
a0bbd4a4b7901a3fe5dcee34609769a5
6e125bbf4e1287b2135016b86579405f78a1f9da
describe
'34785' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRP' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
cc5a636a07ad095ad496dd448f7216ae
185cfdf1122da15ec797f2eda485b09cab86567a
describe
'116724' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRQ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
4902a1336e669d3e62e8ef08e24fafeb
9d63b649fb3a02b458500619a4f8c1f70acf6fd5
describe
'36031' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRR' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
c0eca3d2d92d73c8e75ac59f5a93f414
6d5f901b36b9e3e3faf6b8ddacbac2a1e1094df8
describe
'114961' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRS' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
25a6d9a87f4a322ba97cf193c96e58ca
b5975454f721f518c56a40679b51c11007a35a3f
describe
'34935' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRT' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
ed101b062bc08342ef154f87ba9ca4a1
5c94c3be27ae5724c8378e30df9c99de298c2787
describe
'110939' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRU' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
e2a93abaa359617c807be800d422cb88
ab1892a21ac16b507ee3ca05d6ee67d4090c90f5
describe
'35641' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRV' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
2f342e8475e091dff43caa791625517f
7c4682b15f62bb7b367c13705001a05daef60f1f
describe
'115549' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRW' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
9cc24055389335e401fda2904f598b0d
907aadb518e31e1d0072446304be6f4cc80f0d45
describe
'35540' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRX' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
6257d2cd9272f4574a65425adbc776b9
b7de997c925a2a5be6efd5371d0fd68d6d8940ff
describe
'114026' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRY' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
34d66d0c269220f4f910ffa5ab54f4c0
35154c5c676be97687050cbbf43d163776969190
describe
'36364' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFRZ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
6c9ff8997162e14fc69f076ad142848f
47d1f9cfd8f6b1507a23f8d6d19de8bb1bff7456
describe
'114036' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSA' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
4a50c5e824c298caba390753711b7366
4c431740a116e81fffd542d0e70f098efbed61ac
describe
'34876' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSB' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
e478dba0dc395a525dcbd2e1f33d8113
4a8666c3ee131e104d4bda2a00cf99d138592fdf
describe
'93860' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSC' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
defd6b675bc2997f30ce6a352545410d
075acc13203840e6b305c96f2ecd3d644ddf41f3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39458' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSD' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
a4936a936d0de8dfe0874a5b78fe4d0d
ed50840522796a70d1cb67f2462a0aa8cca97462
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'115799' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSE' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
68dc6b1825c9c7906b257ae274414f39
d2b4cdc341da2ade63ba2f70615778cdb676cd3f
describe
'36052' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSF' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
58ec567edd41715bae5285af1ddc358a
af9892d39c3189b2edda3a57d00fa0b50cda7881
describe
'114901' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSG' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
51609ae884f97bcf724b7bae0cb38780
0ca1f0503025677548678ef3ea57ce4404344cc9
describe
'36176' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSH' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
c1723743a0e940b493ecca30aa2e3827
fc5216772b016bae35081daa00ffbb70690a9894
describe
'87794' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSI' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
c75088be5ae2d0938902511166687cff
11ad19b68e4ff5d1741a21c391224ae23d46fb10
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36811' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSJ' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
e1d2cdc6db37d85248e434225a04493d
18dd23acfca7d90ec09a9ac796722b51a833cea2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'114119' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSK' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
1c1fbc429b66ba9496335c0fe91dc8cf
c7282ad715955c97d7b5b52c735276575a631f69
describe
'36533' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSL' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
187d0ebce07f4cb45d8732bccb5f6ec8
efa7c4271932b7843497ea61f5994a1cd25848ed
describe
'105281' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSM' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
27cca5dee11a1ac7c4fcd59467ccf87d
f11308aa75a43cfcbcdc4c91cd6326d082cfe5c2
describe
'33126' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSN' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
2b2a55f3b0ddf4babfcf0398689672a7
468eec4d255a83aa257de0c8edc60ddb09a2d8b3
describe
'113217' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSO' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
99d4917e2d50efab1f22ba16db2b21cb
999d324c0f2d9b2952abf9485f36fac3e7d6e375
describe
'35874' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSP' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
eb920003c8882a1bfdd6c93bcc2625f0
cfe3d2c0ca647affe467c08d89488d3fe0e2f357
describe
'111457' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSQ' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
7dab8e3a5bb37f0a25e70d6a3f1dc1dc
e1bdd797a81443a07b72dd73464ebc1b1486d90f
describe
'34704' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSR' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
805a55a99be9cb4f939fd645b2f63651
74eeed4a0de04ba5a9b88be6b8260245edbf1ccf
describe
'113242' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSS' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
daa3669bf619a09c319fa15a1b94adc7
fbd3e886fc4c4c84680e7c807f4dea613c2fc5de
describe
'35745' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFST' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
34ecff4e535d84cb5d065c7e955b580a
8d500330268bc435c468e70d360067cd0d269d3d
describe
'110948' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSU' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
234782c29c00885f757e6588b30c2f49
7ff4e33ac605409972202d6f25a8bb210448f076
describe
'35715' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSV' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
984a1e90f5386d6bf60b1899cad55ffa
dd954f209754b576c0c64f0b68872f48935859db
describe
'116694' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSW' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
d3a5fcefbcd4e634f4a5abdae32f0713
169453f8cbb34d30ac6521535c23f2452c9c87fa
describe
'37904' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSX' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
124d78211d605a3e6c6010d46d4d6f38
1e3a2c3e0fbd46b02e2de70e9942275abf8f1486
describe
'117100' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSY' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
41e55cfb084da3e2371d48d7f4c29989
be230923cfeafde0390eeacfc450750318c8c1ea
describe
'36810' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFSZ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
9e6116d4cde296123e45097e4d02ae1d
d0429248df9e7433c4010a631493a235312174f1
describe
'87755' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTA' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
51b097c17bb9621300e1179438a58d24
4803d4c20f52830670b4b0ba1b782ddcdbb03e4e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37551' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTB' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
9761af480c4bef8cfc145db41a8725f6
3aa946966e8c4144ec42d1a85705245e267de5da
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'116200' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTC' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
bd211f1a1aa49eaec45dd1645956303e
d2769fcbea9797ce046a89da7a0ddd67647a96dd
describe
'36114' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTD' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
007c28bc4c90539851e85838e6fcb8d9
d6065fbf16c15d943b77975561a8544ff8088aa5
describe
'102898' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTE' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
0f5200d4cb28e1379da273378bf3b5b0
1e9d8a7a4e0bb8d7e62708ff00ff12d136898890
describe
'36113' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTF' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
ea4f187fe64471991d12b3f61a7016f2
1095885c64912629b904808edf8aaf7392a8d9ca
describe
'100140' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTG' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
d751b151e0bc92cf6f42897c454cde1f
d7413ed5481eb5690f01865ca3106ece801d288c
describe
'32994' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTH' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
d9b67063866b6dd196a2b4b6b1c2a5aa
4c4f015fecbafc132222786ae0f63e744991f651
describe
'112911' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTI' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
b0ab72533af9426a3bc13d083de6f98b
bbdd67cebb6d898fe95dc4824dfd351c600b3981
describe
'36553' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTJ' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
1fc49ec06548abdf37defc6a894ad047
9397a2d48ea2dd0738c55807bd932941e7ac6239
describe
'108312' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTK' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
01c88964220e2da6dd764e3a61390c2a
c1d68d1633c1930994d8e555efdaddd7553748fa
describe
'35680' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTL' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
0651d58be8f7a16cab9ccec4b5100e25
f9974aef57278dcb89ba9162279ac18448b09cff
describe
'111190' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTM' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
3d16e3ade554ab9d0c4d02e84ae43b6c
acf590b43ee284eff4935a51d3e2f0bdb9289d45
describe
'36422' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTN' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
04f62d0ddc0f4f01a625f899f51882a0
5f1796fbbfb27b678e1a89884a4dad6165799f02
describe
'114877' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTO' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
0c90ef2ab6447a97b1da53c278271a6d
edc7a537e922243b2815d1ddd48ff8e6d35995e7
describe
'35092' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTP' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
09c031f804c71ae0421b8d109a132e61
cd82a73069e112fc9b0c907b5d9c195dcd95168e
describe
'114642' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTQ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
623acbd96c6519b361c4c3162e06dedc
02b5d1703335eb5c1f8b1f1879caae546119ad48
describe
'37000' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTR' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
c6849bee8266053b14624b74bc1ad26f
bed8ce172921c30a4e06ac06c1999b13e79fad87
describe
'109629' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTS' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
8f9e909eadb6b303a73491f2e63815d9
d6da02a20ce1611add857dbb4b96a477281a9993
describe
'34179' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTT' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
164f00db71a438c13ebb2f456bb6dff1
75da1fc3e3e34440d0d64ed58db403430d618056
describe
'114214' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTU' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
cab449dfe495bad5f847282a8c7aa35f
f00ffb50cabe9aa130bc82d365859c5075854dfb
describe
'37126' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTV' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
aa92a93cd25464da557052f1e347a861
9dead8fb06418356f282d35db93325b734d081b3
describe
'113538' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTW' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
05ede119e366ef10bc04ac24f34d5d30
a3c5a774b33fec43bc13203c787a183511c9550a
describe
'34806' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTX' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
8c0af430c9f746a56911940799db519d
3e9b763121d73d0821b181391a3a5d2abd973bc1
describe
'110409' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTY' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
4d2b806e20ebf2ce363d31a022f070a7
dfc436c34a4982fb2aba09bb4c58144142484847
describe
'36477' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFTZ' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
f8a4b266a1bf2ba95f7abd0b97daed8f
c0443b661e40667662e3cf8e2f9bb020ecd7db57
describe
'117469' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUA' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
b72a7e2dac509f364aace0c30bd31b8e
fa1bdca20c82b62306b85fab430e85efec12fb34
describe
'36321' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUB' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
5ba3d32a34c3f0d0aaf6905f4730ff9c
c906b1343699891ce1c8ecd772d49f8bdb33cadb
describe
'107455' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUC' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
752b847b94fb2264c407d2f3d35ae298
cbad8558ce2f1ba0353290edcbccb0e44dddcac1
describe
'36540' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUD' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
1bf1db46ee761ace5ddb680e4411bb29
058ed2303b9c9f92cc3d15097b4d04c673846cd3
describe
'110176' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUE' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
05dc824c119a24008721532630852a0a
1fc16a0fa3c2cbd9205e182b67647dd6878cfbbb
describe
'36118' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUF' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
b7ff3b7e65a1dd218f55604e760fdb31
d4c872444ff52d0fe118fe57485b7717d27262c9
describe
'85828' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUG' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
2d42995dd10128f4c4502c513f7f68a0
1c2d982584f12602ae39ba229ac38705c6cd0912
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37798' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUH' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
5c64920493343a8364cd126fd8b73766
863ba11eaa2bffeaadd711835301a52147f9b11c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'106390' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUI' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
60968ab896521ae3f7bb3da9b65aac1d
46566e5c9d315b098c391e6d5ddf710873e2d873
describe
'35454' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUJ' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
b56e096f2dcd0cd5f3f94f2524606f24
2df6fbf35a1724997b29e3ce9b2d76373bfe27c3
describe
'106243' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUK' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
9ae354ca65c631465e70350e7f512519
a32c59239eb22b2ed44a0f0eea1af762c0cf9836
describe
'35853' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUL' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
df870aa178a39d4ca4c7c4abc08b10d4
74088a4c1ba7c654e5fc0dacf13a56aab64d494f
describe
'106897' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUM' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
7a35dca9d2ed4e6b09be91d9486f833d
fb63b5a96bac5ae01ae1f02ca3562f38a0049d54
describe
'36233' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUN' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
0e49966ed7c99af564d0a32b2695a23e
a108b28693e6e2951745b9d0549e44ed29ca5bb8
describe
'104990' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUO' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
c99704ef8d6f214db7cef99dc4b9f4f5
1abd61c21878b9e8277566fd27a8e6db7a0da2a2
describe
'34709' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUP' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
36d404b3e103f732464a2ff88e8e818f
7ebb97c05ee7e38cdde599216a3e18113632e0b8
describe
'108858' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUQ' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
346e189c47fd5a8666fc693bfffbef29
f4ed9d755c0c1c8aaf2bae608a11d4a752fa83e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUR' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
f7655ba814f059f0c85c332e3a6a19c1
9591d1cde472f2543dcd378bc2bb930c459b9a4b
describe
'108907' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUS' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
2693de5810a119c4319ad2031f63f835
359a696e24aaf7be6de476cc01a1750dad9ed371
describe
'35040' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUT' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
69e60062d537652bdf0d0a4b583481d8
f8fee65786202d67f6e11ad5d820e52facc78eff
describe
'113413' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUU' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
b7a3f65a7321e1fc65b9c80044261cf5
920ee4b66287a824101cc964ccf791301fda3d32
describe
'35365' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUV' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
db23a9c86d375b6ce294d03d18b46a14
531161edf514ea405c544441e15a60647b8f4ad9
describe
'106660' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUW' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
1fe8ef7c420d05b4c3dc6916d0d62576
eb51ce97aa3a0242e90ec3e7b5123ea6f158d994
describe
'35374' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUX' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
588504723db198b0d8f6178d83c48ba8
5b9ec90ea8ba1157686ce0757f3292e6cc192881
describe
'114910' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUY' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
bca6bd88d9a4a73bef57d5267d77edc0
4f7e069fac268e7c949567eb61a8b506fb8c5962
describe
'37085' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFUZ' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
a0c743453755b9315b1cad1275cc1f93
6bb087bd23f3328afebb2ffb4c223da7ac5c335b
describe
'120878' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFVA' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
ef6c777d0c11b2cb5ce7a963feba14fb
86d39d0284f06643ca28ef046bb5e4a74a94514e
describe
'38886' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFVB' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
476f36c651d6f0059bb5beecd67a7c07
91c657cae663359aad84b67889a62011bb41910b
describe
'112767' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFVC' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
ae6e87f662e213288dd19fbd4ec0413d
fab128aa0b496030afb159c3732818ca5c777e2c
describe
'36634' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFVD' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
aae998604e77312e016efb679c0429ba
ab8f1220e660dff183717cf63ba37c5cea576604
describe
'118961' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFVE' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
83a9535644146cc4eb9f65f4ad4a7f93
3e28e91c8226ed48d924ad0f2c5c508f6e9a29e4
describe
'36933' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFVF' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
1d9c295697f0bbafc8750024c9fcd3f5
1dbe4e6b13b10a9e1b23c5735a2ff8576543fe8d
describe
'112384' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFVG' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
0c6c2af52e431bbf842d81e8f459e0e9
cdeeddff6226e3212161bebd95e0300b9fa2b8a2
describe
'35196' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFVH' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
f989ff2e669a5027db6240bc2a6e2538
a350fe0b7c9019c0c7a245826fd9994942ef9182
describe
'111404' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFVI' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
2a7e932c5b42ac6417c19257577c74b5
90ad7def4a7f399f9933cd3f31a70afe7b8a91f1
describe
'36518' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFVJ' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
c54cc78c502f814106454b2ebf206c1c
ecfa9eafbb0c2fddd9197dd004ed175392e8c4f3
describe
'109579' 'info:fdaE20080416_AAAAICfileF20080416_AADFVK' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
c936f8e72124fefbf2aad397b1420598
2739e300debe83c6c7e57d92f8b381af29b9d53c
'2011-10-12T16:49:37-04:00'
describe
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FLOWERS OF THE FOREST:

BY THE AUTHOR
oF

“LITTLE HENRY AND HIS BEARER”

EXAMINED AND APPROVED BY THE EDITORS.

New-Dork:

PUBLISHED BY LANE & SCOTT,

FOR THE SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL
CHURCH, 200 MULBERRY-STREET,

JOSEPH LONGKING, PRINTER,
1852,
THE

FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

smvarmemet

T suai commence my narrative by stating
that Iam a native of France, though now resid-
ing in England, and a very old man. More
than forty years since I was a curé, or, as such
a one would be called in England, a minister
of a small parish situated in a beautiful pro.
vince of Normandy, in France; that province
which gave her conquerors and her princes for
many generations to the country in which I
have now taken up my abode.

While residing in Normandy I was a Pa.
pist, though now, through the influence of a
clearer light shining upon my soul, I ama Pro.
testant ; and I humbly pray that my mind may
never again be brought under the dark delu-
sions in which it was involved in my younger
days.

It is possible that my youthful reader may
not precisely understand the points on which
the Protestant and the Papist are at variance.
These particulars are numerous, and many of
them are not easily ascertained, because the Pa-
pists do not present the doctrines of their church
in a simple or well defined form. When a
Protestant refere to the works which are held
in authority among them, and points out the
errors contained therein, they shift their ground,
6 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

and in all possible ways evade a straightforward
line of argument. ‘Their most authenticated
modern formularies are deduced from the de-
crecs of the Council of Trent, which commenced
its sittings in 1545, and continucd, though a
long interval intervened, until 1563. ‘That
council was held by the command of the pope
at Trent, a city in the north of Italy, and many
authoritative decrees were issued by it, both as
to matters of faith and ceremonies. These were
sanctioned by the highest authority of the church
of Rome, and never have been in any way re-
pealed or modified ; they may therefore be refer.
red to as the authorized statement of popish
doctrines, and Protestants may reason respect-
ing them as the rule of faith of the Romish
Church. It is true that they were not received
with the same degree of implicit submission, by
all the countries which continued to profess
themselves followers of the Church of Rome;
and in Protestant countries at the present day,
the Papists are unwilling to admit fully that
they, as such, are bound by the decrees of the
Council of Trent; their policy appears to con.
sist in continually shifting their position, and
presenting new forms of defence, which being
of a shadowy, mysterious, and irresponsible na.
ture, are incapable of being overturned by the
artillery of reason, or other means which might
be used against their errors, if advanced in a
more substantial form. The Protestant, on the
other hand, uses no subterfuge whereby he may
confound his enemies, and escape the conse.
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 7

quences to which the principles he recognizes
must lead, but simply maintains his belief in
Scripture, and asserts that whatsoever is not
read therein, nor may be proved thereby, is not
to be required of any man, that it should be be-
lieved as an article of faith, or be thought re-
quisite or necessary to salvation.

But I forget that I am writing for such as
cannot be supposed to enter fully into discus.
sions of this nature. I shall therefore avoid
going more deeply into them, simply request-
ing my youthful reader to bear these things in
mind, namely, that of the two principal orders
of persons calling themselves Christians, the
first, namely, the Protestants, profess to take
the Bible as their rule of life and of belief; the
second, the Papists, bind themselves to obey the
commandments of their church, of which the
pope is, as they pretend, the father, the spiritual
head, the absolute and infallible ruler; and the
priests of that church assume to themselves a
power and authority far beyond that of any mor-
tal being, in all matters connected with religion,

But to proceed with my narrative : as I be-
fore said, [ was born in France, and educated

.for the postoral office; the parish which was
appointed me lieg upon the Seine; it extends
along the left bank of that beautiful river, which,
as is well known, rises near Saint Seine, in
Burgundy, and mingles itself with the sea be-
low the city of Rouen,

It is a region rich in orchards and vineyarda,
in fragrant meadow lands and thymy downs—
8 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

to the north thereof lies a forest, extending itself
for several leagues over a space most beautifully
diversified with hill and dale, and affording
within its deep recesses sucha great variety of
cool grottoes, waterfalls, and natural bowers as I
have seldom seen in any other part of the world.
There is the sweet village, each little dwelling
of which has its thatched roof, its rural porch,
and its gay flower-garden. We had our cha.
teau also, which, being built of gray stone, and
having a commanding site, afforded a pleasing
object to the road which runs from Paris to
Rouen on the other side of the Seine ; its fanes
and turrets at that time being exalted above the
neighbouring woods, though, as I now under.
stand, they are levelled to the dust; and near
the chateau was the Tour de Tourterelle, which
gave the title to the family—a huge old tower
coeval with the first dukes of Normandy.
When first admitted to my cure, the family
at the chateau consisted of many individuals,
but one and another of these being removed by
death or marriage, Madame la Baronne only
was left to us after a few years ; and such was
the kindness and amiable deportment of this
lady, that it was commonly said of her, that all
the virtues of the long and illustrious line of
ancestry of which she was the last in that part
of the country, had centred in her. In fact, her
conduct merited our sincere affection and grati-
tude; but when we are made acquainted,
through the divine teaching, with the fallen
and corrupt state of human nature, we dare not
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 9

to use or admit that high strain of panegyric
which more presumptuous individuals employ
without apprehension.

Between the village and the chateau stood
our church, built also of gray stone, in the Nor.
man Gothic style, and near to the church was a
large black.timbered house, with two gable ends
pointed with wooden crosses, where lived a de-
cayed gentlewoman, a widow, whom I shall call
Madame Bulé,

This lady, being an accomplished woman for
that day, and much reduced in her fortune, re-
ceived young ladies into her house for their
education, and was, I believe, as far as the dark
state of her mind would admit, a faithful and
laborious guide to her young people.

Near to Madame Bulé’s seminary was my
own little mansion, nay, so near, that the win-
dow of my study, which was an upper room,
projected over the garden wall of the seminary ;
and I used often to amuse myself by showering
bonbons from thence upon the little ones who
were assembled on the lawn beneath.

From the period of my entering my cure
until I was more than forty years of age, I en.
joyed a long interval of comparative peace. I
was fond of a retired life. I had a particular
delight in the study of nature, and in that part
of it especially which refers to the habits and
formation of the vegetable world. I made a
collection of all the plants in the neighbourhood,
and would walk leagues for the chancé of ob-
taining a new specimen. I had other pursuits
10 FLOWERS. OF THE FOREST.

of the same kind, which filled up the intervals
of my professional duties, and, through the di-
vine goodness, kept me from worse things
during those years of my life in which I cer-
tainly had not that sense of religion which would
have upheld mein situations of stronger excite-
ment. Thus I was carried on a compara-
tively blameless course through a long period
of my life, for which I humbly thank my God,
and take no manner of credit to myself; though
I feel that it is a mercy for which an individual
cannot be too grateful, when he is brought toa
sense of sin and to a knowledge of his own
weakness, to find that, in the days of his spi-
ritual] darkness, he has been guarded on the
right hand and on the left, from shoals and
rocks and whirlpools, in which wiser persons
than himself have made terrible shipwrecks.
But, as I said above, I was led on from year to
year in a sort of harmless course ; and whereas
I enjoyed much peace, so was the same be-
stowed upon my neighbours in general, in a
larger proportion than could have been expected,
when the agitated state of our country, aa it
regarded religion and politics, is brought under
consideration. In the meantime the little es.
tablishment of Madame Bulé was carried on in
a manner so peaceful and tranquil that it can
hardly be questioned but that the protecting
hand of Providence was extended over this aca-
demy, although undoubtedly the instructions
there received, partook of the spiritual darkness
at that period spread over the whole country.
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 11

At length, however, as madame became less
able to exert herself, and as new modes of in.
struction and more fashionable accomplishments
became requisite, in order to satisfy the parents
of the pensioners, (or boarders,) she thought it
right to procure an assistant ; and Mademoiselle
Victorie, a young lady who had been educated
in Paris, was appointed to the situation. Thus
the wolf was admitted into the fold; for this
young person, being exceedingly vain and
worldly minded, no sooner found herself esta.
blished in the family of Madame Bulé than she
began to disturb the peace of its inmates.

All those accomplishments which delight the
senses were what were chiefly held in esteem by
mademoiselle ; she had no value for the quali-
ties of the heart, and no discernment of retiring
and humble merit: hence her favours were ever
lavished on the vain and frivolous, provided
they were possessed of such qualities as she
admired; while some of the most amiable
young people in the seminary were continually
exposed either to her ridicule or her reproaches.

In consequence of this unjust conduct she
presently raised a very unamiable feeling among
the young people, many of whom began to form
false estimates of each other’s merits, and to
hate and envy those individuals among their
companions who possessed any of those quali-
ties or distinctions whether mental, personal, or
accidental, which were calculated to ensure the
favour of mademoiselle. And then it was that
I first observed a change in the air and appear-
12 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

ance of the young people when they came out
to amuse themselves in their garden during the
intervals of their studies: then it was that the
voice of anger first arose toward my window,
and my ear was then first saluted with the,
tones of discord disturbing the beautiful har-
mony of the scene. I observed, also, after
awhile, that there was an entire cessation of
those games and diversions in which the young
people formerly seemed to take such interest ;
neither did I hear those cries of joy proceeding
from the play ground which were in former
periods so delightful to my ear as I sat in my
study—for worldly purposes and feelings had
crept into this little society ; and I, as if aware
that these symptoms, observed among these
young people, were only the beginnings of mis-
fortunes, frequently at that time looked back on
the days of innocent (comparatively innocent)
pleasure which were fast passing away, with a
sort of regret which seemed even more bitter
than the occasion warranted.

The time had been, nay, it was hardly gone,
when it had been the chief delight of the pupils
of Madame Bulé to cultivate flowers in all at.
tainable varieties, and madame had given a
small piece of ground to each little girl for this

urpose,

I had often busied myself i in procuring rare
seeds and fine specimens of flowers for these
young people, by which small services I had
obtained the name of “Le Bon Pére,”* “Le

* The good father.
FLOWERS OF THE FORES®. 13

Bon Pere Raffré,” and was saluted: with cries
of joy whenever I appeared in the garden.
‘Then with what eager delight did the little re-
bels gather around me, and some indeed were



daring enough to thrust their hands into my
pockets, to rob me of the small packets of seeds
or bulbous roots which had been deposited
therein to attract the pretty thieves. More than
once I have seized a dimpled hand in the very
act of felony, and then it was my custom.to take
out my large clasp knife, to open it wide, to whet
if-on the néarest stone, and to pretend that I
was about to take instant and cruel revenge;
while the sparkling and blooming delinquents
shrieked and danced around me, now receding,
now advancing, now approaching, now retiring,
14 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

till every avenue of the garden re-echoed with
the merry notes of innocent delight. O
joyous days of happy and unapprehensive youth,
when. the light heart never wearies with the
same jest, however often reacted or repeated,
nor yawns at the oft told tale!

Often too, was I invited to the collation at
four o’clock, when the weather would permit
the little party to enjoy that simple meal in the
open air; and when Father Rafiré promised his
company, most happy was that little fair one
who could contribute the most elegant decora-
tions for the feast, or supply the most beautiful
baskets of reeds or osiers to stand in lieu of the
china or plate which adorn the tables of more
magnificent orders.

As I before said, I was then a Roman Catho-
lic ; it wags the religion to which I had been
brought up, and although I will not say that
from time to time some faint apprchensions
might not have crossed my mind even then,
respecting the soundness of the principles in
which I had been nurtured, yet these gleams of
light had hitherto been transitory as the irra-
diations which fall upon the earth when the
morning is spread upon the mountains, and the
clouds are driven forward along the path of the
sun. But this | trust that I may say of myself,
and of many of my brethren at that time,
that, as far as our knowledge went, we were
sincere ; and that if we sometimes appeared to
be otherwise, it was because we were not al.
ways assured that our faith had that foundation
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST, 18

in truth which it must needs have in order to
be effective. Notwithstanding which, I think
I may add that I did endeavour, when thus fa-
miliarly associated with these young people, to
press upon them the importance of spiritual
things, and with this view directed them often
to raise up their hearts to God when employed
in their most ordinary actions. To thig piece
of excellent advice I added, as might be expect-
ed, certain admonitions respecting forms, of a
nature which I now see to have been decidedly
prejudicial, inasmuch as outward forms so fri.
volous as those which are commanded by the
church to which I then belonged, have a direct
tendency to lead the mind from seeking that
inward and spiritual grace, of which outward
forms are but the types. Among those forms
which I particularly enforeed, I well remember
one, which was that of making the sign of the
cross many times during the day; [also in.
sisted that these young people should repeat
the Ave Maria, and certain other prayers which
I taught them in theLatin tongue, as often as
they could make it convenient so to do ; assur-
ing them that by their obedience or disobedi-
eneée in these particulars, they would rise or
fall in favour with God and with the church.
Thus I endeavoured, though on false principles,
to shed the odour of sanctity on our little as.
semblies, and for some years I had no strong
reason to perceive that the weapons of warfare
which I had placed in the hands of my little
pupils, were not sufficiently powerful to enable
16 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

them to resist the snares of Satan and the dan-
gers of the world. For, as I remarked above,
while Madame Bulé alone presided over her
school, and while her pupils were small, the ill
effects of the heartless and forma] system in.
culcated by me did not appear; neither did the
evil break out till the general agitation of the
country was in some degree extended to this
little society, by the arrival of Mademoiselle
Victoire, who, according to the prevailing spirit
of the age, no sooner found herself established
in the seminary than she took the lead, before
her superior, and commenced that work of dis-
organization which was already advancing in
the capital.

At the time of which Iam about to speak,
namely, the year 1789, there were in Madame
Bulé’s seminary three young ladies, whom I
shall have particular occasion to mention by
and by, and shall therefore proceed to describe
in this place. The eldest of these was named
Susetie, and was, in point of external perfec.
tion, the rose of the parterre—a blooming, live-
ly young person, but of a high and haughty
spirit when opposed; yet one, I think, which
might have been led to any thing by a kjnd
and gentle hand.

Susette was a chief favourite of Mademoi-
selle Victoire, and had her warm partisans, her
open admirers, and secret enemies in the little
establishment. Neither was she without her
rival ; for what favourite is so happy as not to
have sometimes reason to dread the influence
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 17

of another. Mademoiselle was capricious, and
whereus at one time she caressed Susette, at
another time she was ali complacency to Fati-
chon, the only young lady among the pupils of
Madatne Bulé whose pretensions could be
brought in comparison with those of Suseite—
but whereas [ have called Susette a rose, Fan.
chon, whose hair was of a bright and rich au-
burn, might best have been compared to the
golden lily, the pride and glory of the oriental
gardens—that floweg which is, as some pre-
tend, emblazoned on the arms of that noble
house the star of which at one time seemed to
have sunk in hopeless darkness, though it has
since arisen again, we trust, to shine with su-
perior splendour, and with a purer light than in
the period of its former exaltation. It is my
prayer, my daily and hourly prayer for my king
and my country, that the same light which has
been vouchsated to me may be bestowed on
them ; aud that as the Holy Scriptures are now,
1 trust, my only rule of life and test of faith, so
also they may henceforward be the strength and
bulwark of the people and land of my fathers.

But to return to my narrative: I must con.
fess that the character of Fanchon never pleased
me; she had none of that candour and dpen-
ness of temper so agreeable in youth, and which
I would rather see in its excess than its deficien.
cy, although that excess may border on impru-
dence ; for age assuredly must add prudence to
the character, whereas it seldom deducts from
a spirit of cold and selfish caution.

2
i8 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

The third among the pupils of Made Bulé
whom I must particularly describe was an Eng.
lish girl, and an orphan. I never knew by
what chance this child had been consigned to
the care of Madame Buké, neither do J recollect
her real name; but she was called Aimée by
her preceptress, and by that name she went
among us. Neither do I know more of her
age, than that she was thought too young for
confession till she had been in the house more
than two years, and therefore I judge that she
was between eleven and twelve years of age at
the time of which Iam speaking. This little girl
was small for her years, and was one who would
generally have passed unnoticed in 4 group of
children, yet when closely examined she had one
of the sweetest countenances I ever beheld ; her
hair and complexion marked her Saxon origin,
and the tender innocence and dimpled beauty
of her face brought her trequently in compari-
son, in my imagination, with some such figure
as I have often seen of an infant Jesus, whom
the artist has represented in the arms of his
mother, looking down from some high altar with
Jove and compassion on the multitude kneeling
before him. Such were the high comparisons
which I made for the lovely little Aimée—yet
why do I call the comparison high? Are not
images, however beautiful, however exalted,
however held in honour, but blocks of wood
and stone, carved into the similitude of a man by
the hand of man? and is not the body of man
the work of Gud himself, and in every instance
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 18

wonderful and past imitation, and even past
comprehension? for what doth David say on |
this subject ? Psalm cxxxix, 14, “I am fearfully
and wonderfully made: marvellous are thy
works, and that my soul knoweth right well.”

Nevertheless, I own that the time has been
when I bowed with religious awe before the
graven image, and poured forth my soul there-
unto in solemn prayer, without considering any
of those subtle distinctions which the learned
of the papal church pretend to make respecting
relative and inferior honour; for the Roman
Catholic Church, when making its comments on
the first commandment, uses the following ex-
pressions, which I shall give in the form of
question and answer, as I found it in the au-
thorized catechism published in England :—

“ Docs the first commandment forbid us to
give any kind of honour to the saints and an.

gels 2
ee No; itonly forbids us to give them supreme
or divine honour, which belongs to God alone ;
but it does not forbid us to give them that infe-
rior honour, which is due to them as the faith.
ful servants and special friends of God.

“ And is it allowable to honour relics, cruci-
fixes, and holy pictures ?

« Yes, with an inferior and relative honour,
as they relate to Christ and his saints, and are
memorials of them.”

But, as I have already remarked, when kneel-
ing before these crucifixes and images, T fear
that I too often retained but very imperfect ideas
Qu FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

of these metaphysical distinctions, and in the
too visible type or representation too often lost
the recollection of the antitype.

To return to little Aimée; she was a child
exactly formed to be the delight and joy of some
venerable grandmother, or of some widowed
and bereaved wife and mother—one who in
retirement would have been the sweetest friend
and companion which sadness or sorrow could
ever know, being no doubt divinely endowed
with that holy peace of mind and tranquillity of
spirit which the world can never disturb, be-
cause the world can have no intercourse there.
with. Yet, at the same time, being a character
which was so entirely overlooked in scenes of
bustle and worldly commotion, that her compa-
nions seemed seldom to take any farther notice
of her than to push her aside when she crossed
their paths ; still, however, she possessed in so
large a degree the spirit of harmlessness so truly
convenial with the Christian character, that it
would have been impossible (one should have
thought) to have hated this little girl. Never-
theless she did incur the active hatred of Made-
moiselle Victoire, and this in a way which such
as are not somewhat skilled in the nature of the
heman heart will not easily comprehend, but
which will be evident enough to those to whom
the secret recesses of that fountain of all that
is impure are in some degree revealed. Some
fault had been committed in the house soon
atter the arrival of mademoiselle: the blame was
laid on Aimée, and on the bare suspicion ma-
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 21

demoiselle punished her severely, neither would
she remit her punishment till madame inter.
fered; it was found afterward that Aimée was
innocent, but mademoiselle never pardoned her.

I had observed, as I have before remarked,
that since the arrival of Mademoiselle Victoire
the simple, cheerful spirit which had formerly
animated the family of Madame Bulé had dis-
appeared ; and, instead of the lively games in
which the pupils of all ages had hitherto en-
gaged, I could see from my window that there
were parties formed in the young society. It
was very evident that there was an open rivalry
established between the rose and the fleur de
lis, (by the by, a rivalry of old and renowned
establishment ;) also [ could perceive that there
were few of the young people who did not en-
list themselves under one or the other of these
banners, and I could sometimes hear words
running very high among individuals of the
different parties, though I could not exactly
understand thd precise subject of these contro.
versies.

At length, however, it happened as I was sit.
ting one afternoon with my window open, it
being two days before the feast of Easter, that
I saw the young people proceeding in a body
from the porch ; Mademoiselle Victoire was in
the midst of them, and she was talking with
great vivacity on a subject which seemed to in-
terest every one. They advanced in a direction
which brought them nearly under my window,
and then mademoiselle sat down on a garden
22 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

chair in the centre of the grass plat, while her
two favourites stationed themselves on each side
of her, and one by one she called each of the
other young people to the footstool of her throne,
for she sat in much state, and after having looked
into the palm of every hand with the grimaces
used by a fortune-teller, for so I understood the
scene, she dismissed each individual, with some
prognostic or witticism, which, as I perceived,
excited peals of laughter, but not such laughter
as I felt agreeable to me. It appears that the
young people had at that moment forgotten that
it was possible I might be so near them, for
although I could see them well, and distinguish
every gesture, yet I was myself so concealed by
a jessamine just bursting into leaf, which I had
trained over a part of my window, it would not
have been easy for the most penetrating eye to

-have detected me behind this natural screen,
and thus as I was not within their view, neither
was I in their thoughts at that period.

This pastime, of whatever tendency it might
have been, had proceeded for some time, and
each of the young people then present had pre-
sented her palm, and heard the prognostics of
her future fate from the self-elected prophetess,
when suddenly a sort of demur arose among
the party, and I saw every one turn to look
around her ; at length I heard the voice of ma-
demoiselle calling Aimée, and at the same time
I perceived that the little girl had not been pre-
sent. ‘The next minute all the young parly
began to seatter themselves over the garden, as
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 23

if in quest of the child, and the name of this
little one proceeded from the various parts of
the pleasure ground, and was returned by an
echo, caused by an angle formed by the tower
and the body of the church. Some minutes
elapsed, it seems, before the little lost one was
discovered ; she was (as I afterward learned)
at last detected in a bosquet formed of flower-
ing shrubs, at-the very bottom of the garden,
cowering down under the shade of a laurusti-
nus, and deeply engaged in reading a very
small book. She was instantly seized upon by



Susette and Fanchon, who both sprang upon
her at the same instant, and dragged her be-
tween them into the awful presence of Made-
moiselle Victoire.
24 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

The little captive uttered no sound, and used
but little resistance ; but when brought directly
before Mademoiselle Victoire, she fell on her
knees, and, pointing to Susette, seemed to be
earnestly imploring some favour of the utmost

_importance. What this favour was I could not
discover ; but I was made to understand that,
so far from having obtained it, she had only in.
curred more violent displeasure by the strength
of her pleadings, for I saw mademoiselle push
her away several times, and then I heard my
own name repeated, with an assurance that
something, I knew not what, should not be con-
cealed from me.

Being thus, as I considered called upon, I
arose, and putting my head out at the window,
I called to mademoiselle, and asked her what
had happened, and wherefore my name was
mentioned.

Mademoiselle, who had stood up to correct
the child, turned hastily at the sound of my
voice, and approaching as near to me as possi-
ble, My good father, she said, we have need of
your advice and counsel, and we hope that you
will insist that this child shall endure a severe
penance—here she stopped to recover breath, of
which her passion had deprived her, and then
proceeded. This wicked little heretic, she said,
whom madame has always upheld as a sort of
saint among us, has, it seems, retained in her
possession, ever since she came in «nis place,
a volume of the Holy Scriptures in te: native
language, though she knows that cureren like
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST 29

herself are not competent to use these holy
books to any advantage. She has actually
been discovered, in a bosquet of this garden,
deep in the study of this volume, using such art
in so doing as shows the blackness and depra-
vity of her heart. Thus speaking, she gave
the child a push from her, with that sort of ex-
pression of abhorrence as one would use to a
loathed animal.

And where is this book? I asked. It was
immediately held up to my view by Susette,
and I perceived that it was an abridgment only
of the sacred Scriptures, being an exceedingly
small volume, not above four inches square ; it
looked old and much worn; and it struck me
that there was a malicious feeling shown to-
ward the child in making so much of this
insignificant matter, and not, as I thought,much
policy in it, as it related to the interests of the
church to which I was then attached. I there-
fore said, Let the book be given to madame,
and to-morrow I will come over and speak to
her on the subject.

I hoped by this that I should have satisfied
all parties; but in this Iwas mistaken. No
sooner did little Aiméce understand that the
tiny volume in question was to be given to
madame, than she dropped on der knees upon
the grass, and looking up to me with streaming
eyes and united hands—O dear father, kind
Father Raffré, she said, order me the severest
penance, let me live on bread and water for a
year to come, but do not take away my book—
26 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

my lovely little book—do not take my poor
little book.



Dear child, I replied, dear child wipe away
your tears; to-morrow I will meet you in the
church, you shall contess all to me about your
little book ; and do not fear, you shall have jus-
tice done to you. And thus I dismissed the
whole party, though I felt that I had not given
satisfaction to either side by the manner in
which I had answered the appeal. Neither
was I mistakensin this my opinion, for made-
moiselle returned in a very ill humour to the
house ; and though Aimée and the affair of the
book were spoken of no more that evening, yet
the young ladies began to quarrel with cach
other upon these grounds,—namely, that Ma-
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST, QT

demoiselle Victoire had promised to one a prince
und a coach and six, a duke to another, a ba-
rouche and four and a marquis to another, a
simple baron to another, a rich burgher to an-
other, and to a less favoured one a mere rotu-
rier. As I had suspected, and I afterward
learned, mademoiselle had been telling her pu-
pils their fortunes, or rather had taken this way
of giving them some idea of their several pre-
tensions, and by this means had excited in
their minds every sort of idea which ought to
have been held back from them; and indeed
so high did the rancour of the several parties
rise on this occasion, that Madame Bulé was
obliged to exert her authority, and very severe
was the reproof she gave when she under-
stood the cause of this uproar which had dis-
turbed her peace. Do you not know, said she,
that the day after to-morrow is Easter, and that
to-morrow you are to meet Father Raffré for
confession ; and in what spirit or temper will
-you be for this sacrament if you retire to rest
in the indulgence of such angry passions? For
shame, young ladies ; do not thus convert an
innocent jest into a subject of discontent and
rancour.

It is needless surely here to remark that, in
this reproof of Madame Bulé, which was faith.
fully reported to me, there were two important
errors: in the first instance, confession is no
sacrament, neither a part of a sacrament, there
being but two sacraments appointed by our
blessed Saviour, namely, baptism and the sup-
28 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

per of the Lord ;* and the jest of Mademoiselle
Victoire was every thing but innocent, therefore
madame should not have so designated it.
Early the next morning, it was signified to
me that Madame Bulé desired to speak with
me ; and when I had obeyed her summons, the
amiable woman opened her mind to me to the
following effect: My dear Father Raffré, she
said, my mind has lately been much troubled
respecting my pupils; the time was, as you
well know, when we enjoyed a degree of peace
which is now utterly foreign to our household.
I was then, she added, and the tear was in her
eye when she spoke, more alert and active than
I now an, and better able to endure the fatigues
of my situation. It was then, she continued,
that every hour brought its pleasures, and every
change its delights; my children came with
cheerfulness to their lessons, and left them with
glee to enjoy their sports: if one did amiss, all
were humbled; if one was praised, all were
pleased ; if one received a present, all were to
have a share in it; if one was unwell, all par-
took in her pain. Now the case is entirely al-
tered, I hear of nothing but of rivalries and of
ili will; if I praise one individual I offend
twenty, and if I find fault with one offender I
give cause of triumph to twenty more. It is not
now a question who can do best, but who is most

*The Church of Rome considers that there are
seven sacraments; adding to the two mentioned in the
New Te-tument five others, namely, penance, confes-
sion, orders, matrimony, and extreme unction,
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 29

accomplished or most genteel; and instead of
joy and peace, my household is one continued
scene of dissatisfaction.

And cannot you account, madame, I said,
for this change in the character of your house-
hold? are you sure that the person whom you
employ to assist you is exactly suited to your
purpose ?

Mademoiselle Victoire, she replied, is diligent
andaccomplished ; [might not get a better were
I to dismiss her: but you, my good father, shall
confess my children, and I am sure that they
will find in you a faithful and pious counsellor.

After this conversation I took the earliest op-
portunity of calling the young people to confes-
sion. ‘The church was set aside for that duty ;
and Madame Bulé made a point of being in the
church with us, although she did not remain
within hearing.

As a confessor, I have, through the course of
a long ministry, heard many awful secrets, and
though I am now neo longer of the Romish
Church, I still would make it a point of honour
not to betray any confidence which was placed
in me under the character which I formerly held
of a father confessor. The confessions, how-
ever, which were made to me by the pupils of
Madame Bulé were not of such a nature as to
render it of the smallest consequence whether
they are or are not divulged; neither, even if
they were more important, can they possibly
now effect the penitents in the smallest point.
I shall theretore venture to inform my reader
30 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

of what passed that morning in the church be-
tween me and those of the young ladies of the
establishment with whose names and descrip-
tions I have made him acquainted. Susette
was the first who was brought to me, and when
she appeared the traces of tears were upon her
cheeks,

Daughter, I said, you are sad; what has af.
flicted you ? Open your whole heart to me, and
be assured that the council I shall give you
shali be to your advantage. She immediately
burst into tears, and, speaking passionately,
made it appear that injustice was done to her
by her companions, especially by Fanchon.

Fanchon, she added, who was once my dear.
est friend, is turned against me, and that because
she is jealous of me. Some persons think me
handsomer than she is, and she cannot endure
a rival, and she bears herself maliciously and
spitefully toward me; and if she can find a
flaw in ny conduct she is pleased, and makes
it a rule to exhibit it, and to make little errors
appear in the light of serious offences.

I shall not repeat all I said to her on this sub-
ject. No doubt my advice, though in some
points good, was mingled with error, for I re-
member well that, after having pointed out to
her the beauty of charity, and recommended the
exercise of it toward her companions, I added,
for know you not, my daughter, that “ charity
remits sin, and gives spiritual life to the soul 1”
By which assertion I set charity in the place of
the Saviour, and gave to our good deeds the
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 3!

power of redeeming us from the consequence
of our evil ones ; whereby I denied the words of
Holy Scripture, for are we not taught that a man
is not justified by the works of the law, but by
the faith of Jesus Christ? Gal. ii, 16.

In reply to what I had said, Susette answer.
ed with a frankness which was natural to her.
She acknowledged that she had a considerable
portion of pride, and that she could neither bear
a rival among her schoolfellows, nor refrain
from despising those whom she thought her in-
feriors. She spoke again of Fanchon as of one
whom she looked upon with envy and jealousy ;
and among others whom she heartily despised
she mentioned Aimée. In reply to all which I
told her “ that pride was counted by the church
among the seven deadly sins. Pride.” I said,
“is an inordinate love and esteem of our own
worth and excellence—it is a mortal sin, and
can only be remitted by hearty contrition and
the sacraments of baptism and penance.”

At the word penance Susetie started, as under
fear ; on which I spoke soothingly to her, and
added that she need not be afraid, that I would
not he severe.

“Fhe sacrament of penance, my daughter,”
I remarked, “ consists of three parts, contrition,
confession, and satisfaction. The tears ot
contrition I have seen on your features; you
have performed the duty of confession ; and
what now remains to be done is satisfaction.”

And in what, asked Susette hastily, does this
duty of satisfaction consist 7
32 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

In what I shall require of you to do, I an-
swered.

Then, dear Father Raffré, she answered, you
surely will not make me ask pardon of little
Aimée, or seek a reconciliation with Fanchon—
and she looked imploringly at me.

I shall exact of you, I replied, before I can
venture to give you absvlution, that satisfaction
which the church requires. “For satisfaction
which is the third part of the sacrament of pe-
nance, is a faithful performance of the prayers
or good works enjoined by the priest to whom
the penitent confesses.”

I am willing, father, she replied, to repeat as
many prayers as you could desire.

Be it so, my daughter, I answered: and I
know not how many Ave Marias and Pater
Nosters I enjoined to be repeated before the
image of the virgin in the closet of Madame
Bult before the hour of mass on the following
day : and thus having slightly healed the wound
of my penitent, or rather administered fresh sub.
ject for future self-satisfaction to one who was
already but too well pleased with herself, and
as it were added fucl to the fire I should have
sought to quench, [ dismissed Susette, and pro-
ceeded to confess her rival, who soon after.
ward entered the church, and approached the
confessional.

The confession of Fanchon was but a repeti-
tion of that of Susette, with this difference only,
that this second penitent was more reserved and
guarded in her acknowledgment of error than
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 383

the former had been. I was in consequence
less satisfied with her, and doubled her portion
of Ave Marias and Pater Nosters, giving her
also for the performance of her service the gloom
of evening, instead of the bright morning hours ;
and this young lady being withdrawn 1 request.
ed that Aimée might be brought to me.

There was some interval between the depar-
ture of Fanchon (with whom Madame Bulé had
gone out) and the entrance of Aimée. I was
left alone, and the scene was an impressive one.
The church was an ancient Gothic edifice, richly
decorated with carved figures and ornaments ; I
was in a chapel of the Virgin, which was situ-
ated at the end of a long arched aisle; all was
motionless around me, and no sound was heard
but the soft low murmuring of the wind among
the towers and battlements ; my mind was full
of what had just passed, and the anxious inquiry
of Susette respecting what satisfaction I should
require of her recurred tomy thoughts. It was
very natural, I perceived, that she should expect
nic to insist on her seeking a reconciliation
with those whom she had offended, common
sense dictated such a sati8faction, and common
justice required it ; but the church (to which I
then belonged) had demanded no such hard ser.
vice—-to put its votaries out of humour with
themselves was no part of its policy. In the
case in question I had acted as a faithful son of
the church; [ had regarded its interests, and
the question was suggested to my mind, Had I
or had I not applied a remedy which would

3
34 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

have the smallest efficacy in humbling a haughty
spirit ? Is then the policy of my church calcu-
lated merely to promote the pleasure and pre-
sent comfort of its votaries, and to quiet and
soothe the conscience, or to remedy the real
evil of our fallen nature ?

I endeavoured to repress and banish these
thoughts, which appeared to be almost blasphe-
mous. I crossed myself and looked up to the
image of the Virgin, repeated the angel’s salu.
tation, Hail, thou that art highly favoured, the
Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among wo.
men ; to which I added, in Latin, “ Hail, Mary,
full of grace, the Lord is with thee ; blessed art
thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of
thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, mother of God,
pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our
death. Amen.”

T had scarcely concluded this prayer, when a
soft footfall sounded along the aisle, and turn-
ing around, I saw a small figure just entering
through the narrow sidedoor of the church. It
was Aimée: she was dressed in white, and the
air from without agitated her flaxen ringlets
and snowy drapery as she advanced toward
me, giving almost an etherial lightness to her
appearance. At one moment, as she passed
under each archway, a deep shade was cast on
her figure, and again a golden gloom was shed
upon it, as she traversed those portions of the
pavement on which the rays of the sun descend-
ed through the richly decorated windows above.
The lightness of this infant figure, together
FLOWERS OF THE ‘FOREST. 35

withthe innocent expression of her gentle eye,
as she ascended the steps of the little chapel at
the door of which I was standing, and looked
up to me half timidly, yet as it were in the no-
ble consciousness of having nothing to conceal,
suggested to my mind the idea of some blessed
spirit just restored to its glorified body, and as-
cending from the grave to mount to that place
of happiness which is prepared for the redeem-
ed. The ideal resemblance was presently
heightened in my imagination by the smile
which illuminated every feature, and sparkled
in her eye, as I extended my hand to her, and
said solemnly, “The Saviour of men, and the



Lord of angels bless my little girl, and as she
is called the beloved on earth, may she be truly
the beloved in heaven?” Fflien took my usual
36 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

place, and invited her to confession, by asking
her to account to me for the scene of the past
night. ‘This question led to many others, and
in the end I obtained from the dear child the
following narrative of her short but till then
comparatively perfect course, for indeed the
words of the wise man could never have been
more justly applied than to this blameless in-
fant: “He being made perfect in a short time,
fulfilled for a long time, for his soul pleased the
Lord ; therefore hastened he to take him away
from among the wicked,” Wisdom iv, 13, 14.

I was born in England, my father, said the
dear child. I remember well my native place,
it was a white house, and there were woods
near it, and a garden full of flowers ; the house
stood on the side of a hill, and from the win-
dows we saw flocks feeding in green fields, and
blue hills at a distance, and villages and groves
of trees, and the woods were so near to us,
that when the windows were opened in the sum.
mer, we heard the wind rustling among the
trees, and blackbirds and linnets singing in the
branches, and waters rushing, and bees hum.
ming. My father used to make me hearken to
these sounds, and now I never hear sounds like
these without thinking of my home. My pa-
rents were alive then, my father dear, continued
the little girl, and my mother, my kind mother,
I remember her dressing room, and her guitar,
and her cabinet. And I had a brother too, he
was a year older than myself, he had golden
hair and soft bright eyes; and I had a very
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 37

little sister too, father ; when she was asleep she
looked like an angel; but she died first, and
then, sir, (and the poor little girl burst into tears, )
then grief came; my little sister died, and my
brother died—-it was a fever; and I was taken
away and was never sent home again ; and my
parents are dead too, and I amhere. I was
brought to this place I know not wherefore, and
I have no home in England to return to: and
the child wiped away a few tears, and then
looked up again, as if awaiting my farther
questions. .

And are you happy here, Aimée? I asked.

Yes, father, she replied; madame is very
kind to me.

And have you nothing to complain of? I
asked.

None, father, she replied, if I might have my
book again.

‘ Why do you love that book so much? I
asked.

It was my brother’s, she replied; and she
wept. May I not have it?

But it is not a proper book, Aimee, I said ;
and [ think you know that it is not proper,
otherwise why did you go into a retired place
to read it?

I always do, she answered.

And why do you, I asked, if you do not think
you are doing wrong when reading that book?

Because nobody here cares for the things
that are in that hook, she answered mildly ; and
those are the things which make me happy.
38 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

What things? I asked.

The things I learned when I was a baby—I
cannot forget them, she replied.

I again asked, What things?

The things papa and mamma, taught me, fa-
ther, she answered.

Please to explain yourself, Aimee, I said.
What things did your parents teach you ?

They taught me that my heart is bad, sir,

“and that I can do nothing good without God’s
help.

Go on, I said.

And that God had sent his Son to die for me,
and his Holy Spirit to make me good ; and they
taught me to read—and told me that I was to
love my Bible, and follow all that is written
in it.

But how, I asked, can a child like you under.
stand the Bible?

I don’t know, father, she meekly answered.

Do you pretend to say that you do under-
stand it? I asked, and drew her near to me
as I sat.

I have not got a large Bible she answered ;
there are only small bits of the Bible in my
little book ; but even my little Bible tells me
many pleasant things.

What pleasant things, Aimee? TI asked.

It tells me, she replied, what my Saviour has
done for me, and I find in it the promises of that
happy world where I shall enjoy a home more
pleasant than that which I have lost, and see my
papa and my mamma, and my brother and sis.
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 39

ter again. And sometimes, my father, when I
have been reading that little book all alone in
the garden, or wherever I can get unseen, I have
had such sweet dreams and such delightful
thoughts ; I fancy I see the world in that time
when Christ shall be King over all the earth.
And then I fancy I see places like what I re.
member of my happy home, and my papa and
my mamma, and brother and sister, all glorious
like angels, and the Lord Jesus Christ in com.
pany with them, and I am so glad to see them
happy—and every thing that is pleasant in this
place brings these things fresher into my mind ;
and there is a valley, sir, in the forest, which I
often visited Jast summer, which reminds me
too of these things. And when I hear music,
or the bells ringing, or the organ at mass, all
these things fill my heart with pleasure, and
make me wish that the time might come when
I might go to my dear parents, but I know that
T ought not to be impatient to leave this world,
where you and madame and so many people
are kind to me.

You talk of much kindness, Aimee, I said,
have you no unkindness to complain of? have
you no feelings of malice or envy in your heart ?
you know that if you have such feelings, it is
your duty to confess them.

She looked very earnestly at me, and repeat.
ed the word “ malice,” as if she did not under-
stand the signification, or at any rate as if she
did not take in the purport of my question.

To be plain with you, Aimee, I said, are the
40 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

young ladies your companions so kind to you
that you never feel any thing like anger or ill
will toward them? Are you in charity with
every one ?

They were cross with me last night, my
father, she answered.

And are they not so often? I asked.

I don’t think they are, she replied.

That is, you do not think much about them,
I said.

I do she replied; I love them, yes, I hope I
love them.

Then you have not perceived that they are
unkind to you? I added.

Not to me particularly, she answered; they
sometimes quarrel a little among themselves ;
but is not that what we must expect? Are not
our hearts bad, father, and dv we not all do
wrong at times? but when they are cross, I think
of my happy home, and then I do not mind it ;
and I have such delight sometimes when I am
alone in my room and see the sun set, and think
of that distant time when I shall be with my
beloved Saviour, as I could not describe.

Then it is because your mind is fixed on the
world which is to come, that you do not enter
into the quarrels of your companions. My little
Aimee, I said, if this be the true state of the case,
you area happy child indeed, happy and blessed
beyond all the children I have ever known, and
tell me, my little girl, how long your mind has
been thus devoted to heavenly things ?

- Udo not think that I am devoted to heavenly
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 4l

things, father, she replied ; for I am not good,
and people who are devoted are, good, I have
heard madame say so; but it 1s now many
months since my parents died, and since I Jost
my brother and sister, and from that time T have
never had so much pleasure in any thing 4m in
thinking of the time when I shall see my rele.
tions again; and I know that I never shall see
them unless I love my Saviour, and am enabled
to obey him; and these thoughts are always
coming to my mind, and I cannot get rid of
them.

And why, my dear child, I answered, should
you wish to get rid of them? Do they not make
your happiness, and do they not mark your call
toa holy life? But think you not, my daughter,
that if you were to intercede with the holy
Virgin and the blessed saints that they would
join their prayers with yours, and that you
might in this manner more easily obtain all
that you desire? and I pointed to the image
above the altar, and directed the child to observe
the benign and beautiful expression of the coun-
tenance of her whom I then called my lady.

That image cannot hear me, she replied.

But she whom it represents, namely, the
holy Mary, can and will hear you, Aimee, Ian.
swered ; she will unite her prayers with yours,
in order that all you ask may be granted you.

Was not she a woman? said the little girl
doubtingly.

She was, I replied; “but as our Lord was
truly God, so she, his mother, was the mother
42 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

of God, and therefore is worthy that we should
address our prayers to her.”

The little girl looked down upon the pave-
ment, but did not speak till I had repeated some
part of what I had before said; she then lifted
up her gentle eyes, and asked, Do you pray to
the saints, my father? Is it right to pray to
them? My mamma told me that there is no
other name under heaven by which we can be
saved but that of our Lord Jesus Christ.

I have before hinted that I had already had
some little misgivings respecting the foundation
of my faith; and at that instant such a gleam
of light shot through my hitherto darkened soul,
that I could not answer the child. I remained
silent and confused, while the little one stood
meekly before me, being wholly unconscious of
my embarrassment. The tolling of the clock
was at that moment heard from the tower of the
church ; I availed myself of it to say that [had
an engagement which demanded my immediate
attention, and bestowing a rapidly pronounced
blessing on the litile girl, I hastened from the
church, assuring her that I would not only pro-
cure the little book for her, but obtain permis-
sion for her to study it whenever she pleased.
I spent the remainder of that day in the solitude
of my study. This little girl isa heretic, I said
to myself—what indeed our church calls such—
but there is no malice or bitterness in her here-
sy; she has not yet even discovered how wide-
ly our religion differs from her own. There is
therefore no prejudice mingled in her mind with
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 48

her prepossessions. She takes her faith en-
tirely from the Bible, as she has been taught to
do by her excellent parents; and surely if the
fruit is to prove the nature of the tree, we can.
not doubt, from the beauty of the fruit which
this dear child is able to produce, that the root
is excellent. While meditating on these sub-
jects, I took a dusty Latin Bible, which had
once belonged to a priest of the church of Ge-
neva, from its shelf in my study, and began to
compare its contents with the received doctrines
of our church, and was struck with thetempa-
rison of Mathew xv, 19, out of the heart pro-
ceed evil thoughts, murders, adulteries, fornica-
tions, thefts, false witness, blasphemies, with
the following clause in our catechism, namely,
“Ts it possible to keep them all? (speaking of
the commandments.) Answer. Itis, by God’s
grace; Zacharias and Elizabeth were both just
before God, walking in all the commandments
of God without reproof.” I felt more and more
confounded while meditating on these things ;
and the result of these reflections was, that I
resolyed not to speak even to Madame Bule of
the heretical state, as I then apprehended it to
be, of the little Aimee.

Under this embarrassment of mind I remain.
ed in my study several days, or walked in the
most solitary places I could find, meditating on
many things. In the meantime, Susette and
Fanchon having wiped away their offences, as
they thought, by the repetition of the prescribed
modicum of Ave Marias and Pater Nosters, re-
44 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

turned, not in the least humbled thereby, to their
usual situations in the school room, where pre-
sently they failed not to administer fresh cause
of dissatisfaction to each other, which bein,
taken up by the parties on either side, the whole
household was shortly again all in flames ; and
Madame Bulé found it more difficult than ever
to set things in order. After various admoni-
tions, all of which she found inefficient, the
worthy lady sent a second time for me, and I
undertook to admonish the young people in a
discourse, which, accordingly, I delivered in an
apartment of the house set aside for purposes
of this kind, where I had formerly given many
lectures on different subjects to the young
people.

I took the text or motto of my discourse from
the various beauties. exhibited in a highly cul-
tivated garden. I understand, my daughters, I
said, that your minds have lately been painfully,
and I may say sinfully agitated, by envious feel-
ings respecting each other, and by the vain de-
sire of outshining and surpassing each other in
those qualities which you esteem admirable in
a human creature. Of the sinfulness of these
feelings, my dear daughters (I continued) I need
not speak: but on their folly I will enlarge, in-
asmuch as it seems that you are not aware of
this folly. The Almighty is not so partial a
Parent that he has not bestowed some beautiful
and excellent quality on each of his children.
Look at the flowers in that blooming parterre
which extends itself beneath the window!
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 45.

among these some attract the eye from a dis.
tance, some shed powerful odours in the air,
some are endowed with healing qualities, some
retire from the view and are only admirable
when closely inspected ; some excel in only one
point, some in several, some in every quality
attributable to the vegetable creation; but all
are so exquisite in their way, so perfect in their
conformation and their internal construction,
that the utmost art of man would endeavour in
vain to imitate the simplest, the most humble
flower among them. Go forth into the forest
and observe the leaves of the trees; compare
them one with another ; remark the delicacy of
their texture, the infinite variety of their forms,
and make a comparison, if it lies in your power,
of the beauty of one with that of another ; say,
if you can, that one is werthy of admiration
and another of contempt, that one is surpass.
ingly fair and another despicably ugly.’ And
such are each and all of you, my fair daugh-
ters; all and each of you have some beauty,
some perfection, some lovely quality, external
or internal, which sets you more on a par with
each other than an inconsiderate observer would
at first suppose: thus the rose of this parterre
has no cause to triumph over the violet, neither
has the tulip any occasion to envy the white-
ness of the lily.

Having finished my exordium much to my
own satisfaction, though I believe with little ef-
fect upon my audience, I withdrew, and that very
evening met Madame Bulé at the chateau,
46 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

where Madame la Baronne happening to men.
tion that she intended to give an entertainment
to the young ladies on the day of her féte, (her
birthday,) Madame Bulé thought it necessary
to tell her the state of her family as it regarded
the jealousies and rivalries which subsisted
among her pupils.

Madame la Baronne smiled at this state of
affairs, and after some reflection said, Make my
compliments to your young ladies, Madame
Bulé, and invite them on my part to the cha.
teau. Tell them that my fete this year is to be
called the Feast of the Flowers, and that I shall
expect each young lady to appear adorned with
a garland or wreath of her favourite flower ;
adding, I shall bestow a crown on that young
lady whose ornaments please me best ; and lest,
she added, my taste should be disputed, there
shall. be a motto woven with the myrtle of
which my crown is to be composed, which shall
signify the rule by which I am to make my
selection. :

Madame Bult assured Madame la Baronne
that her message should be faithfully delivered ,
and I waa very solicitous to know of the lady
what was to be the import of her motto.

I assure you, father, she replied, that it shall
be one yon shall not dare to disapprove; but
lest ybu should give a hint to some little fa-
vourite you may have, I cannot tell you. I was
therefore obliged, after having shrugged up my
shoulders several times, to acquiesce in my
ignorance.
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 41

Madame Bulé did not fail to inform the young
ladies of the kind invitation of the Baronne ;
and the next day, when these young people had
concluded their morning exercises, an envoy
was sent to request my company at the collation,
in order that I might be consulted respecting
preparations for the Feast of the Flowers.

As soon as I arrived, various questions were
put to me by one and by another, to many of
which I was not able to answer.

To whom, said one, does Madame la Baronne
mean to give the crown, father, to the one who
has the fairest garland, or to the one whom
otherwise she likes best?

With respect to the beauty of the garland, I
answered, it might perhaps be hard to judge:
tastes may differ, one person may think that no
wreath can be compared to that which is formed
of roses, while another perhaps might prefer a
garland of jasmine as being more elegant.

Then you do not suppose, said another of my
inquirers, that she will bestow the crown on
her who has the fairest wreath ?

Indeed I cannot tell, I replied.

You are in the secret, we know, Father Raffré,
said Mademoiselle Victoire, we are sure of it.

Well, it may be so, I answered ; but you shall
none of you be the better for my knowledge. I
will for once keep what I know to myself.

Mademoiselle would have been angry at this,
had I cared for her anger, but as I did not, she
proceeded to discuss the choice of the garlands
with her favourite pupils.
48 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

Each one was, it was understood, to select a
different flower, and the eldest chose first ;
Susette chose the rose; Fanchon would, she said,
be royal, and adorn herself with the fleur-de-lis ,
a third selected the jasmine ; a fourth the white
thorn. The laurel, the honeysuckle, the sweet -
scented clematis, the convolvulus, and the
orange flower were none of them forgotten ;
and as there was a fortnight to elapse before
the day of the fete, great pains were taken to
nourish and preserve such flowers as might
then be required to add beauty and fragrance
to the festival.

It was on the eve of the féte, as I was walk-
ing with Madame Bulé in one of the avenues
of her garden, being deep in conversation on
subjects which at that time exercised our minds,
in common with many others—subjects which
had indeedsome tendencies to what our church
would have deemed heretical, for my opinions
on many of our doctrines were beginning to be
more and more confused—when we suddenly
heard several angry voices, proceeding from u
bosquet, in the centre of which was a circular
range of seats, where the young people often
assembled during the hours of leisure. Stand-
ing still and looking through the openings of
the trees, we saw several of the lesser children
gathered around Aimée, who had formed a small
wreath for her waxen baby from an azure-flow-
ering creeper which hung in festoons from an
archway of latticework at the entrance of the
bosquet. The exclamations of rapture uttered
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST 4

by the lesser children had, it seems, attracted
the attention of Susette, Fanchon, and severa
others of the greater girls; and Susette haa
expressed so much admiration of the wreath, as
to declare that, after all, Aimée had made the
best choice, and that there was no wreath
hitherto thought of that would prove so light
and beautiful as that she had chosen. It was
just at the moment she had uttered this opi-
nion when madame and [ stood to listen to what
was passing.

The little sly thing! said Fanchon. I doubt
not but that she had a wreath of this kind al-
ways in her mind, and that she would not men-
tion it, lest any of her elders should have in-
sisted on taking it from her.

If she had such an intention, she would have
done well to have waited a little longer, said
Susette ; for it is not now too late for us, her
elders to change our minds. I am out of hu-
mour with the idea of wearing red roses; I
have been thinking this very day that I should
prefer another colour for my wreath ; I like that
beautiful azure, and I will wear it; and there.
fore, my little lady, you must please to look for
some other ornament for yourself.

Iam content, replied Aimee, meekly : adding,
If you approve it, mademoiselle, I will help you
to make your garland.

And what will you wear yourself? said Su.
sette ; you shall, if you please, adopt the rose I
have relinquished.
50 FLOWERS OF THE FOREET.

I beg your pardon, Susette, said Fanchon ;
there is no one who can come before me but
yourself; you have given up the rose, and I
claimit. I here give notice that to-morrow J
shall wear a garland of roses; and, as we are
all to be different, no one else is to dare to as-
sume even a rosebud.

So violent an altercation then ensued between
the rivals, that Madatne Bule thought it neces.
sary to interfere; and requiring each of the
rival ladies to declare the name of the flower
she meant to adopt, she desired that no change
of plans might henceforth be resorted to. She
did not, however, insist upon the blue wreath
being relinquished to Aimee, as I should have
thought but just; it was evident that she was
under some dread of Susette and Fanchon, and
was afraid of provoking them too far; and it
certainly was not my business to interfere,
neither did I think the matter of sufficient con-
sequence to induce meso to do.

Susette accordingly declared again for her
wreath of roses, while Fanchon adopted that
of the azure creeper, which was in fact a most
elegant ornament. Madame and I then with.
drew ; but I had scarcely reached the garden
gate on my way home, when I was overtaken
by Aimee, who, placing her little hand within
mine, said, My father, you waik out, I think,
every morning before breakfast.

I do, my child, I answered.

Will you permit me to accompany you to-
morrow? said the little girl. I have obtained
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 51



permission from madame. Will you take me
to the forest?

Most willingly, I replied. But for what pur-
pose, my child ?

She smiled, and with a sweet innocent air
repeated these words of an ancient ballad of
her own province :—

The gafden is gay with the gaudy weed,
And attired like the jewell’d queen ;

But the flowers of the forest are fair indeed,
Th6ugh oft times doom’d to blow unseen.

The words, Charming little creature! what
innocent device has that gentle bosom now con-
ceived ? were upon my lips, but I did not utter
my thoughts, and simply answered, I will be at
the garden gate before six to-morrow ee
my dear Aimee; besure that you are punctual.
52 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

The dew was still upon the herbage, and
glistened on every leaf, as I knocked at the gar.
den gate ; it was opened to me at the first sig.
nal by the little maiden, she ran out to me all
prepared for her appointment, with a neat bas.
ket in her hand.

Good morning, lady fair, I said; a blessing
from above be upon my little girl! But whither
are we to bend our steps ?

To the forest, my father, she replied, where
I know of certain deep shades in which those
flowers grow of which I wish to make my gar-
land. 1 only feared that some other person
might have thought of these flowers of the forest,
which are my delight, and have asserted a prior
right to them, but they have not entered into
the mind of any one; and now no one can
take them from me.

O, O, I said, smilingly, you have, I see,
been acting a cunning part, my little one.

Cunning! she repeated; ah, Father Raffre,
that is an ugly word; do not call me cunning.
I would rather wear a wreath of asphodel than
be called a cunning girl.

And why not wear a wreath of asphodel? I
asked.

Because it is hitter, very bitter, she replied ;
but, continued she, was there any harm in my
thinking of a flower and not mentioning it, lest
it should be chosen? I would not be cunning,
indeed I would not, for the whole world ; and
I have no pretensions to that crown of myrtle
which the lady is to bestow, indeed I have not ;
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 53

but I wished for my favourite flower for a very
particular reason.

What might be that very particular reason ?
I asked.

I will give you my reason, father, she an.
swered, when you have seen my favourite flow-
er: but I must tell you that the discourse you
made to us about a fortnight since was what
led me to think of these things : and then I re.
membered a hymn which I had learned when
I lived at my happy home, and some things
which my dear papa taught me when [ was a
very little child, and I put all these things to-
gether, and when [heard of the Feast of the
Flowers I then fixed upon the garland I should
like to wear, though I did not suppose it would
have been left for me.

Indeed, my Aimée, I answered, you must be
a little more explicit before I can understand
you; please to explain yourself; of what things
did my discourse lead you to think? and how
was what I said connected with what your
father had taught you, and with the hymn you
had learned? please to explain all these matters
to me.

You compared us, sir, replied the little girl,
to so many flowers growing in a garden ; and
what my dear papa taught me when I was a
little child was this, that the church of God in
this world is compared in the Bible to a garden,
in which grow all sorts of beautiful plants and
flowers ; he taught me the very verses, and I
have not forgotten them.
54 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

Repeat them, if you please, my dear child, I
said: for, although I confessed it not, I knew
so little of Scripture as to be utterly ignorant
of that beautiful passage to which the child al-
luded. She immediately obeyed, and repeated
what follows :—

A garden enclosed is my sister, my spouse ;
a spring shut up, a fountain sealed. Thy plants
are an orchard of pomegranates, with pleasant
fruits; camphire, with spikenard; spikenard
and saffron; calamus and cinnamon, with all
trees of frankincense; myrrh and aloes, with
all the chief spices: a fountain of gardens, a
well of living waters, and streams from Leba-
non. Canticles iv, 12~15.

Very beautiful, I replied, and well remem-
bered ; but tell me who is it that is supposed
to repeat this passage.

She answered, Our Saviour, sir, and he
speaks it of his church.

‘Then you imagine, I replied, that the garden
enclosed is the true church, and all the plants
therein are the people.

Yes, sir, she said; those who love God are
the plants growing in this garden, and some of
them are tall and noble, like the cedar tree, and
others are small and of less beauty, others sup-
ply pleasant fruit, others are good only for shade,
others are very lovely to look at, and others fill
the air with sweet odours, but altogether they
make the garden very beautiful, and none are
to be despised.

And do you suppose, Aimée, I asked, that
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 55

you yourself are one of the members of this
garden?

She hesitated a little, and at length said, I
desire to be one, and I hope [am; but I know
that my place, if I have a place in this happy
garden, is a very low one, down in some very
deep valley, and under shade and out of sight.
I think I should not do so well if I were to be
removed to the higher parts of the garden and
clothed with many colours, and made to be an
object of admiration, for when I am praised I
become vain, and take less delight in holy
things than when [ am not noticed.

I was on the very point of commending the
ideas of this little girl, when her last remark
gave me a timely check, and I simply said, Ap-
parently your parents took much pains to give
you instruction.

It was the Bibic they used to make me un.
derstand, she answered ; and when they taught
me any thing in the Bible they showed me
something out of doors by which I was to re-
member it ; and by this means, now that they
are gone away, every thing almost which I see
when I walk abroad, reminds me of something
I learned when I wasa baby.

That is, I said, they took pains to associate
natural with spiritual things, and by this beau-
tiful mode of instruction they have succeeded
in impressing their holy lessons so strongly
upon your mind that you never can forget them.
Let me tell you, my daughter, that you have
56 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

reason to bless God for having given you such
parents.

Two gentle tears dropped from her eyes as [
spoke ; and at the same moment my conscience
reproved me for having bid a child to thank
God for having given her parents who were
heretics! and then again such doubts arose in
my mind respecting my own principles, and
their foundation in truth, that I walked on a
considerable way in silence.

We had left the village and the chateau be.
hind us, and were entering on the precincts of
the forest, before I extricated myself from the
labyrinth of perplexing thoughts in which I
was involved. At length, as we passed under
the shade of the trees which skirted the
wood, I recollected myself, and said, Aimée,
where are you leading me? How far are we
to go?

Are you tired, father? she said. If you wish
it I will go no farther; I can make a wreath of
any flower I see in the hedges.

Tired! my dear child, I said, tired in your
company! No; could I not take you by the
hand, and travel the worid over with you! but you
have raised some anxious thoughts in my mind.
I have been considering what place I occupy in
that garden of which you have been speaking.
She made no answer. I know not what she
thought, but she took my hand and kissed it
with a courtesy and tenderness which in one so
young was peculiarly touching. I think she
had a religious dread of flattering me on a sub.
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 57

ject so important, yet was anxious to show her
gratitude and affection.

We passed on, and for the space of a quar-
ter of a mile pursued a straight and wide road
which leads through the centre of the wood.
At length, coming to a spot where the shade was
exceedingly thick, she pointed to a very narrow
pathway which put itself into the road, and
asked me if I should object to follow her. I
knew the path; it led to a small but deep valley,
at the bottom of which ran a pure cold stream ;
but I was surprised at its being so well known
to the child, and asked her how she came to be
so well acquainted with the windings of the
forest.

Last summer, she replied, I was sent, after
an iliness, for change of air to a cottage in these
woods, and then I learned to know where beau-
tiful flowers grow, and sweet birds sing; and I
have not forgotten these places, she added,
smiling, and tripping lightly before me.

But my little guide in her glee had forgotten
that, where she could pass with ease, I, being
taller and larger, would find a thousand obsta.
cles. Accordingly, when she told me that she
had but a very little way to go for the accom-
plishment of her object, I bade her hasten for.
ward, while I followed at my leisure, and in
consequence I soon lost sight of her; but still
pursuing the same wild and tangled path into
which she had led me, I presently arrived at a
more open part of the forest, from whence I
looked down upon a dingle, in the bottom of
58 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST,

which was a pool, and on the side of the poola
sward, which, from its smooth deep green, inti-
mated the moisture of the place. A ruined cot.
tage, of which the gable end and doorway alone
remained entire, peeped out from amid the trees
and underwood. The rays of the morning sun
shot slantingly over the forest, and shed a flick.
ering, trembling light on the whole scene, pre-
senting the most beautiful varieties of light and
shadow. This also was a place for the sweet
singing of birds, and for balmy zephyrs, which,
as they passed, produced that agitation of the
leaves which, together with the rushing of a
waterfall, heard but not seen, filled my senses
with a degree of delight I had not often expe-
rienced. At the moment when I had reached
the brow of the dell, my little guide appeared
near the bottom, springing, like the gazelle,
from one rude step to another, and anon I be-
held her stoopiriz down to gather certain flow.
ers which grew here and there on the green
sward. ‘The rude trunk of a tree near which
I stood formed a convenient seat ; [ placed my-
self upon it, and quietly awaited the return of
the little Aimée. A quarter of an hour had
hardly elapsed, when I saw her reascending the
rocky side of the glen, and presently she stood
before me, all glowing with delight. At my
feet she set her basket, which was filled with
that lovely flower we call the muguet, better
known by its more appropriate name the lys
des vallées, the lily of the valley.

There, my father, she said, there are the
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 50

flowers which are to compose my garland ; and
those are the flowers I would choose for my
device. The rose, added the little girl in high
glee, is the emblem of beauty, the laurel of
glory, the heartsease of content, and the fair
maids of February of innocence—but what are
all these without my lily of the valley? Tell
me, father dear, what is any good quality with-
out humility ?

Aimée, I said, in amazement and admiration,
not only of the sentiments of this dear child,
but of the elegant manner in which she ex-
pressed them, Aimée, my little one, who taught
you all this?

She looked innocently upon me, and ‘said,
Papa and mamma used to instruct me in these
things ; it was poor papa who taught me that
the lily of the valley was the type of humility,
and sometimes when I pleased him he called me
his lily. Ah, sir, I wish I were really like the
lily ; tor the lily loves the cool valley and sha.
dowy places by the streams of living waters.

Dear child, I answered, you are indeed a lily
of the valley. Would to God, and I crossed
myself as I spoke, would to God I were a lily
too!

No, sir, no, she replied, you shall not be a
lily, but you shall be a noble tree, planted by the
waterside, and I will dwell under your shade.

I was affected, I could not help it ; the tear
trembled in my eye; which the little girl ob-
serving, she stooped down and kissed my hand,
at the same time taking up her basket. Having
60 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.
a

obtained what we wanted, we turned our steps
toward our home, and as we went along we re-
marked other flowers growing in the forest ;
among these the wood anemone and the party-
coloured vetch particularly attracted our atten-
tion, and we wondered that things so beautiful
should have been formed in places where none
saw and none admired; and this led me to
speak of the infinite goodness of God, and of
his bounty toward the’ children of men.

At length we reached our village, and parting
at the garden gate, I retired to my study to ex-
amine the Holy Bible respecting those passages
to which my little companion had alluded. And
in that long quiet day, a day never to be forgot-
ten by me, such convictions flashed upon my
mind respecting the errors of my church, that
before the evening hour I was almost, if not en-
tirely, as much what my people would have
called a heretic, as | now am, although I had
not yet made up my mind to acknowledge my
belicf, and give all up for the truth.

Scarcely had the ardent heat of the day sub.
sided, when, according to appointment, I repair.
ed to the chateau ; where, on my having passed
the avenue of linden trees, which then extend-
ed from the gate of the domain to the lawn in
front of the mansion, I entered upon a scene
which chased away, for a time, the perplexing
thoughts by which I had been agitated during
the greater part of the morning. Figure to
yourselves, my gentle readers, an ancient, many-
windowed stone mansion, whose fashion spoke
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 61

of at least two centuries past, in the almost per-
pendicular roof of which were three tiers of
windows, peeping out from the mioss-covered
tiles, closed with wooden shutters instead of
casements. In the front of this ancient and in
some respects dilapidated mansion, extended
the lawn, in the centre of which was a square
marble basin, where a huge Triton spouted
water from a cone to the height of many feet,
affording rather the idea than the reality of
freshness. On each side of the lawn, yet an-
swering exactly to each other, a statue, a bos-
quet, an arbour, and an archway of trelliswork
opening into certain gardens beyond, alternated
with each other, according to the formal taste
then prevalent in my country. The lawn was
set forth with several long tables, covered with
fruit, cakes, cream, and other refreshments;
while on an elevated scaffold near the centre
of the open space was a band of musicians, who
from time to time gave us a national air, while
waiting the commencement of the dancing,
which was to take place toward the end of the
evening. The company fur whom this féte was
prepared were, without exception, every inhabi-
tant of the village who was able cither to walk
or be carried to the chateau, together with some
superior persons from the neighbourhood, who
had come by special invitation. These, the
superiors of the party, were, with the Baronne,
grouped at the upper end of the lawn, sitting,
standing, or moving about, as it suited them ;
the inferior persons being at the lower end, or
62 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

in the centre, according to their stations in so.
ciety, but all seemed equally gay and happy; I
saw not a solemn countenance as I made my
progress around the circle. I had almost omit-
ted to describe a very important part of the
show, whereat I much wonder, considering that
it is the Feast of the Flowers to which Lam en-
deavouring to bring my readers in imagination,
and this was a statue on a pedestal which stood
exactly in a line with the front of the house, at
the bottom of the lawn. This statue wasa fe-
male one, and therefore suited very well to serve
as a representation of the goddess Flora; she
wasrichly decorated with garlands and wreaths,
and on her head was placed the crown of myr-
tle, through which was twisted an azure riband,
on which a motto was wrought in threads of
- gold. The crown on the statue was pointed
out to me by a person who stood near it, and
I attempted to decipher the motto, if such there
might be, but I was not able, the riband was
so curiously and artificially twisted that I could
only make out part of a word here and there,
and was therefore obliged to rest in my igno-
rance.

The party were all assembled when I arrived
on the lawn, with the exception of the family
of Madame Bulé, but while I was paying my
compliments to the Baronne on thearrangement
of the scene, the amiable instructress and her nu.
merous train appeared at the end of the avenue.

There come our queens of the May, said the
Baronne, and she ordered a beautiful and lively
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 63

air to be struck up, while she advanced with
the ladies and gentlemen of the party to meet
the elegant procession. And elegant indeed it
was, elegant and gay, and various and fragrant.
First came Susette and Fanchon, the rival
queens, all attired in white, and decorated, the
one with rose buds, the other with the azure
creeper before mentioned ; ribands of rose co.
lour and of blue mingled with the several gar-
lands; the next pair were the acanthus and the
laurel, with scarfs of green and purple; then
came the fragrant hyacinth, and the auricula ;
the woodbine and the columbine adorned an.
other smiling pair; and as each couple passed
by the group of ladies and gentlemen, they
greeted and were greeted by smiles and cour-
tesies, as gracefully bestowed and received as
if the lawn had been a royal presence-cham-
ber, and the Baronne a crowned head. As
each pair passed the Baronne the parties sepa-
rated, and formed a variety of blooming and
lively groups around the company, meriting and
receiving that admiration which was due to
their smiling and pleasing figures, and the taste
which each had displayed in the arrangement
of her fragrant ornaments. The last of the
procession was Madame Bulé herself, leading
the youngest of her pupils and little Aimée by
the hand; the exercise and excitement of the
scene had given an extraordinary lustre to the
complexion of my little favourite, yet her eyes
retained their usually placid and gentle expres-
sion, She seemed to be attentive to what
64 FLOWEES OF THE FOREST.

passed, and also pleased, but there was not that
restless anxiety in her countenance which was
remarkable in all those among her companions
who thought they had any chance of obtaining
the crown; her enjoyment of the scene was
therefore as unmixed as it had been when she
was gathering her favourite flowers in the
depths of the forest. She, like the rest of her
companions was attired in white, and with no
other head-dress than those clustering ringlets
which, together with the delicate tincture of
her skin, marked her Saxon ancestry. She
had formed a lovely garland of her lilies,
having woven them together with a band of
light green ribands, tied on her right shoulder
with a knot and falling under her left arm. I
saw the eyes of the Baronne rest on this dear
child for a moment; but, as soon as Madame
Bulé dropped her hand, she receded into the
back ground, and her elegant form was soon
wholly shrouded by the more splendid figures
of her companions.

Our nation are remarkable for being able to
pay acompliment with grace and delicacy ; and
what occasion, I would ask, could have admi-
nistered fairer opportunities of doing this with
truth than the present ? Neither were the gen-
tlemen, or even the ladies, then present, slow in
availing themselves of these opportunities ;
every comparison or simile in which flowers
have any concern was called forth on the occa.
sion, and the exhilaration of the moment enabled
even the most dull to do this with effect. But
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 65

did I say dull? What French woman was ever
dull in a scene such as the lawn then presented 7

Your Feast of the Flowers, Madame la Ba-
ronne, said the Viscomtesse de T . is splen-
did, is superb—it surpasses all I could have
conceived of a thing of the kind. Yet I can-
not say that these elegant garlands add beauty
to these charming young ladies ; I would rather
say that these flowers derive new splendour
from the beauty of those who wear them. And
she appealed for the confirmation of her asser-
tion to the Conte de S one of the few
specimens then remaining of the court of
Louis XV.

Being thus called upon, the old courtier en.
deavoured to produce some compliment of a
superior nature to that of the lady, and asserted
that the roses were grown pale, and the jas-
mines yellow, for envy, to find that their bloom
and sweetness were entirely surpassed by those
who had chosen them for ornaments.

This species of light and trifling conversation
had proceeded for some time, when the Baronne
took her place beneath the statue, and having
commanded the band to cease their strain,
caused the crown to be handed to her; while,
by the direction of Madame Bulé, the young
ladies formed a half circle around her, the rest
of the company, of whatever degree they might
be, gathered close in the back ground.

There was a momentary pause and dead si-
lence in the company, while a servant climbed
upon the high pedestal of the statue and care.




66 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

fully lifted the crown from the head. It was
then delivered into the hands of the Baronne,
and as I stood next to her, I saw that it was a
beautiful thing ; it was not of real myrtle, which
would presently have faded, but was an imita.
tion of myrtle, the leaves being formed of foil,
the flowers of gold and mother of pearl, and the
berries of coral; it was beautifully executed,
and the motto, in letters of gold, wrought on a
blue riband, twisted into the wreath. The Vis-
comtesse de T.- » who stood on the right
hand of the Baronne, as I did at the left, would
have taken it for a moment into her own hands,
exclaiming, Permit me, madame! ah, how
beautiful! it is perfectly captivating! But the
Baronne would not part withit from her hand,
nor suffer the golden letters on the blue riband
to be read.

I am, I feel, she said, in a perilous situation ;
Iam about to make a choice among so many
beauties, that I shall be in danger of incurring
the odium of possessing a bad taste in still re-
jecting the most worthy, let my choice fall
where it will; and J, therefore, have nothing
but my motto to depend upon to extricate me
from this difficulty, therefore none must see my
motto till I choose to show it myself.

The Baronne then paused, and looked around
her, and as her eye ran along the lovely circle,
I saw that several of the young ladies changed
colour, especially the two at the head, namely,
Susette and Fanchon; and such was indeed
the glowing bloom of one of these young ladies,


FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 67

and the elegance of the other, that I never
doubted but that the crown would be adjudged
to one of them.

You are at a loss, madame, I see, said the
Conte de 8 , and [ cannot wonder at your
embarrassment; there are so many beautiful
figures in this circle, that it would be very dif-
ficult to say to whom the golden apple ought
to be given.

Pardon me, monsieur, replied the lady, in a
voice which, though low, was so distinct as to
be heard by all present, but you have mistaken
my intention—it is not to the most beautiful or
the most accomplished, the fairest or the ruddi-
est, the most wittv or the most discreet that my
crown is to be given, but to her who, in my
opinion, understands how to select the most
becoming ornament.

So far we understand madame, said the ab-
bé, nor would we be so impolite as to question
your taste. Madame la Baronne can never be
supposed to judge amiss in the eyes of persons
of discernment, but perhaps we may not all
here present be persons of discernment, and
madame has undertaken to render every per-
son in this company satisfied with her decision,
and she depends upon her motto to stop the
mouths of every malcontent. Upon my honour,
madame unless your motto is a very extraordi.
nary one, I do declare, and he shrugged up his
shoulders and smiled, you are in great peril. I
am, I confess, in great pain for you, madame.

Well then, my friend, replied the Baronne,


68 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

I will hasten to place you at ease. Ladies and
gentlemen, you shall hear my motto, and I am
assured that no one here present shall dispute
its authority when I assure them that it is di-
vine, and that it is taken from the Holy Scrip-
tures. So saying, she untwisted the riband
from the myrtle crown; and stating that the
passage was addressed by St. Peter to his fe-
male converts, she proceeded to read it in a
soft, yet clear and distinct voice ; it was to the
following effect :—Whose adorning let it not be
that outward adorning of plaiting the hair, and
of wearing of gold, or of putting on of apparel ;
but let it be the ornament of a meek and quiet
spirit, which is in the sight of God of great
price. 1 Peter iii.

When the Baronne had ceased to read, she
looked up, and her eyes were directed to Aimée.
The lily of the valley, she said, is the acknow-
ledged emblem of humility; this sweet flower
conceals its beauties within its verdant cover-
ing ; it is spotless, pure, and fragrant; its leaves
have a cooling and healing influence; it loves
retirement and shade, yet when brought to view
is exquisitely lovely. The lily, therefore, I must
consider as the best chosen ornament for a
youthful female, and therefore I must adjudge
my crown to her that wears the lily.

There was a murmur of applause throughout
the assembly on this decision, and every eve
was fixed on the little girl, who came blushing
forward at the command of the lady.

Aimée, said the Baronne, as the dear child
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 69

bowed humbly before her, I rejoice that I can,
with a sincere feeling of love and esteem, be-
stow on you this simple preference ; your cha.
racter has long been known to me, and the hu-
mility and meekness of your conduct, since you
entered the family of Madame Bulé has not
only been noticed by me, but has filled me with
admiration. In those talents and external quali-
ties which are pleasing in our sex you have
many equals now present, and you will tho-
roughly understand that the regard I now ex.
press, has no reference to these qualities , it is
your humility and your holy harmlessness, your
exemption from envy, and your treedom from
bad passions, which are your chief and crown.
ing ornament, even that ornament which is
above all price.

So saying, she raised the myrtle crown above
the head of Aimée, and was about to place it
there, when the little girl, bending low, and fall.
ing on one knee in a manner which I thought
exceedingly graceful, raised her lovely eyes to
the lady and said, Ah, madame, could I wear
that crown I should prove to all here assem-
bled, what is but too true, that I have not de.
served it. I desire, indeed, to be like the lily ;
but Iam not so. [ know my own heart; I
know that it is full of evil passions, and if I do
not betray these evil passions so often as I teel
them, it is not to my own strength I dare to
give the glory. My dear lady, I implore you,
do not put the crown upon my head.

There was a dead silence in the assembly,
70 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

every one was impressed with a solemn feel-
ing: at length it was broken by the lady, who
said, while holding the myrtle wreath over the
head of the kneeling child, Aimée, my beloved,
indeed you must not resist our united entrea-
ties, you must submit to wear the honour you
have so justly merited.

Ah, no, lady, lady dear! she replied, lifting
up her face as she knelt, with a sweet and un-
affected earnestness ; no, no! it cannot be; amd
at the same time gently removing the garland
of lilies from her shoulders, and laying it on
the grass at the Baroness’ feet. I am neither
worthy to wear the lily or the crown; sweet
lady, place the crown upon the garland, and
then I will endeavour to merit both; at least,
she added, if not in life, yet perhaps in death,
for then—then I shall be . But we could
not catch the last part of the sentence, for the
little girl was unable to speak clearly by reason
of her tears.

Aimée! lovely, lovely Aimée! sweet, sweet
child! you have conquered, exclaimed the Ba-
ronne, laying the crown at her feet upon the gar-
land, and then coming forward, she embraced the
child, and wept asshe pressed her to her heart.

It was an awful feeling that impressed the
company at that moment; the tear was in eve-
ry eye. The abbé whispered to me, Heaven have
mercy upon me, a sinner! If that child thinks
herself impure in the eyes even of her fellow
creatures, what am I in the sight of God? and
he crossed himself. I heard expressions of the


FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. Tl

same nature from many mouths; and Susette
pleased me much, by assuring me that she now
felt ashamed of herself and of her own vain.
glorious opinions of her merits,

lt is hardly necessary that I should assure
my reader that the conduct of Aimée on this
and on all other occasions evidently showed
that there was no art or affectation in her con-
duct—no pretence of humility which she did
not actually feel, but really a deep and heart-
felt sense of her own unworthiness, and an utter
disregard of what effect might result from her
conduct, or what impressions it might make on
those who were present. I mention this, for
although it isa lovely thing to see érue humili-
ty in a child; nothing is more displeasing to
God, or more offensive to those of our fellow
creatures whose minds are well regulated, than
to perceive attempts to display a humility which
is not really felt.

In the meantime the Baronne ordered the
garland and crown to be carried to the church
and to be placed in the lady chapel there ; and
it was some time before the assembly could so
far divest themselves of their serious feelings
as to enter into the amusements of the evening.
As to myself, I must confess that it was during
that evening that I for the first time made any
serious reflections on the violence which the
mind suffers in being drawn from solemn feel-
ings into those which are merely earthly, and
the contrary ; and I was led to think that hu-
man wisdom consisted in avoiding those excite-
72 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

ments of earthly pleasure by which the feelings
more suited to our state as dying creatures are
rendered distasteful and uncongenial to our
minds.

After the Feast of the Flowers, several
months passed during which nothing particu-
lar took place in our private circle worthy of
record.

During this period our minds were much agi.
tated by public affairs ; that dreadful revolution
in my country which .was so awful in its pro-
gress, and so wonderful in its effects, had com.
menced. The capital was already in confusion,
but we in the provinces still only heard the
thunder rolling in the distance.

In the meantime, the remainder of the sum.
mer and the whole of the autumn and winter
passed away. In the middle of the winter I
was seized with a rheumatic complaint, which
confined me to my bed till toward the end of
spring. During this period a friend took my
duty, and I saw little of my peopie; my Bible
was, I thank God, my constant companion at
that time, and the reading thereof, I have rea.
son to think, was blessed to me in a degree
which canhardly be conceived. It was thought,
however, necessary when I left my bed that I
should change the air, and accordingly I was
carried from my bed to the chaise which was
te convey me to the house of a married sister,
who lived not very far from Rouen ; there I re-
mained two months, but at the end of that pe.
riod was much distressed by letters from the
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 73

Baronne, who informed me that a contagious
disorder had broken out with violence in the
house of Madame Bulé, that many of the chil.
dren were very ill, and that our little Aimée
was in peril of her life. It was very late in
the spring when I received this news, and as
my health was nearly re-established, I lost no
time, but hastened back to my flock—that flock
which I was soon destined to quit under the
most painful circumstances, and to quit for life ;
for the door of my restoration to my former
place is for ever shut against me—my principles
would now be held in abhorrence by those who
loved me formerly—nor could I, even if per-
mitted, now take a part in the services of whose
idolatry I have been long assured. But no more
of this; it has no doubt been good for me, and
for others of my countrymen, that their ancient
ties have been dissolved—ties which bound us
to the world and to a false religion, and which
we should never have had strength to break by
our own efforts,

It was a glorious evening in the end of May
when IJ arrived within view of my own village,
from which I had been absent many weeks. I
had quitted the public vehicle in which I had
travelled, on the opposite bank of the Seine, and
having crossed the river in a small boat, I pro-
ceeded on foot the short remainder of my jour-
ney. As soon as I left the boat J was in my
own parish—I was in fact at home—and I was
making my way along an embowered pathway
toward the village when I overtook a decent
74 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.



peasant in her best apparel going the same way.
To my inquiry, How is it with you, neighbour
Mourque ? How are all our friends? she re-
plied, Ah! Father Raffré, we have lost one of
our fairest flowers, and I am now going to see
the last duties paid to her blessed remains.

Our flowers, I repeated ; not my lily, I trust ;
is it Aimée who is no more?

It is, sir, she replied: and when I last saw
her at the chateau I thought the little angel
would never live to enjoy another féte ; such as
she, father, are not for this world—nay, her own
very words, when she refused the crown and
spoke of what she should be, proved to me how
it would be, and others said the same. But the
crown and the garland are to be placed on her
coffin, sir; the garland indeed, sir, is withered
and shrunk, but the crown is not made of such
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 75

things as can fade, they tell me; but it will be
a touching spectacle, and surely, sir, there will
not be many absent from the church this even-
ing who were at the lady’s Feast of Flowers. ‘

I could not speak—so the good woman pro.
ceeded without interruption.

She informed me of many things concerning
the sickness and death of the poor child—and
of the grief of the Baronne and of Madame
Bulé, who both together, as she said, waited on
the dear child day after day and night after
night ; and she told me how she had prayed
while her senses had been continued to her,
and how she had again and again called upon
her Saviour, and spoken of her hope of being
speedily taken to Him who had died for her—
and how she had expressed her love for her in-
structress and the lady of the chateau, and her
tender regard for her schoolfellows——but, add-
ded the peasant, with some emotion of manner
and some expression of regret, it is a grief to
me to think that the poor child was so insensi-
ble when the priest attempted to administer the
last. sacrament, that she knew nothing of what
passed, she was as insensible to the holy anoint.
ing as the still-born babe ; neither did she take
the smallest cognizance of the holy cross which
was held before her-—the Lord have mercy on
her soult I am thinking, father, could she have
been a heretic? Was she not from England.

Ah! I said, was it so? “tis true, she was
from England.

The woman started at the manner in which
76 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST.

I spoke, and looked anxiously at me, saying,
Do you doubt, sir, do you doubt of her final
happiness ?

* interrupted her, Ah, would to God, I an.
swered, that I were as blessed and happy as that
dear child now is! On whom did she call in her
dying hours, whom did she live only to please,
to whom did she give all the glory, but unto
the only true Saviour—he who is above all
saints and angels, the God incarnate, he by
whom alone the sinner can be saved.

The poor woman crossed herself as [ spoke,
and assented to my assertion.

Blessed little lamb! [ exclaimed, and art
thou gathered to the fold of the only true Shep.
herd? Sweet lily of the valley! and art thou
removed to a more congenial soil; but who
shall fill the place which thou hast left ?

At that instant the tower of the church broke
upon my view as we turned an angle of the
road, and a distant sound of choral harmony
burst upon my ear. I was ashamed of it, but
I could not help it; I burst into tears and wept
like a child. I did not know till that moment
how dear the orphan Aimée was to my heart.
I roused myself, however, and walked on, and
a few steps brought me into the entrance of the
village street, and in full view of the western
front of the church, the great door of which
being open, I could distinguish the crowd with.
in, and hear the soft melody of the human voice
attuned with the full-toned organ within, in
such a chant, so solemn, so touching, so sublime
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 17

as seemed to raise my mind above all earthly
feelings, and make me (I was about to say al-
most, but I will say entirely) desire to be with
my Aimée, absent from the body and present with
my Lord. As I advanced I perceived that all
the houses in the street were deserted, and the
deep silence which reigned amid these dwell-
ings enabled me to hear the requiem more
clearly and more distinctly. At length, as I
passed under the doorway of the church, I
found myself in a crowd, not only of my own
parishioners, but of persons from the neigh-
bouring villages, who had assembled on this so-
lemn occasion; way was, however, immediate.
ly made for me, and I advanced toward the
high altar, before which was the coffin of my
beloved Aimée, covered with a white pall, and
beyond it, in a semicircle, stood all her former
companions. But there, in that sad hour—sad
for us who remained, yet most blessed for her
who was gone—were no garlands of roses, no
flaunting ribands, no gaudy attire; each fair
young creature wore a long white veil; and
even the once blooming cheeks of Susette were
pale with grief and moist with tears—nay, the
very levity of Mademoiselle Victoire had given
way on this affecting occasion, and she stood a
monument of silent wo. Ah! did she not re-
member then all her cruel carriage toward the
gentle child whose cold remains were stretched
before her ?

On the white pall lay the faded garland of
the lily of the valley ; an affecting emblem of
78 FLOWERS OF THE FOREST,

her who had plucked those flowers and woven
that garland, affecting to all, yet how much
more so to me, who so well remembered the gay
delight of that beloved Aimée when she had ob-
tained the object of her innocent and elegant
desires—an emblem consecrated by holy writ,
which says, As for man his days are as grass;
as a flower of the field, so he flourisheth ; for
the wind passeth over it and it is gone, and the
place thereof knoweth it no more. Psalm ciii,
15, 16. Noeye looked up when I approached
the altar, though all, as I afterward found, had
been aware of my presence. I came up near
to the coffin at the moment when the last note
of the requiem was dying away along the
vaulted aisles, and at the same instant Madame
la Baronne came forward with the myrtle crown
in her hand. ‘The garland had been formed of
perishable materials, but not so the crown—as
compared with the garland of lilies, at least, it
was imperishable—it was fresh and fair as it
had first appeared : it thus formed a beautiful
emblem of that “ crown of glory which fadeth
not away ;” and it was an emblem which ali
present understood, though not one spoke to
point it out. It was laid upon the coffinover the
faded garland by the Baronne herself, and when
she had stooped to kiss the pall, Madame Bulé
and all her pupils stepped forward to follow her
example, after which the service proceeded, and
the remains of our little beloved one were con-
signed to the dust in the vault of the family of
the chateau.
FLOWERS OF THE FOREST. 79

I remained alone in the church when all the
congregation had withdrawn, and it was then
that I solemnly resolved to renounce the vani-
ties in which I had been educated, and, with the
divine help, to quit all earthly considerations
to follow the truth as it is stated in the Holy
Scriptures, unto all extremities to which my
abandonment of the Church of Rome might re-
duce me.

I was speedily strengthened in this resolution
by the afflictious of my country, and forced by
persecution to fly from that land in which, un-
der more prosperous circumstances I mighi
have been again involved in the mazes of error
and of death.

And here [ close my little narrative, leaving
my Aimée to rest in her cold grave in a distant
land.

This lily of the valley was indeed nipped ere
yet it had attained its perfect growth ; its stem
was cut down to the earth while yet its flower
was in the bud; but the root has not perished,
it lives still beneath the sod, and in the morning
of the resurrection it shall be translated from
the wild forest of this world to the garden of
our Lord, where it will bloom with a celestial
lustre, and enjoy a never fading verdure. The
grass withereth, the flower fadeth: but the word
of our God shall stand for ever: and blessed are
the dead that die in the Lord.

THE END.