Citation
Marco Paul's voyages & travels

Material Information

Title:
Marco Paul's voyages & travels : Vermont
Series Title:
Marco Paul's voyages & travels
Added title page title:
Vermont
Added title page title:
Marco Paul in Vermont
Added title page title:
Adventures in Vermont
Creator:
Abbott, Jacob, 1803-1879 ( Author, Primary )
Doepler, Carl Emil, 1824-1905 ( Illustrator )
Harper & Brothers ( Publisher )
Bobbett & Edmonds ( Engraver )
Abbott, Jacob, 1803-1879
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Harper & Brothers
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
208, 2, 4, 2 p. : ill. (wood-engravings) ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Boys -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Responsibility -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Tutors and tutoring -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Cousins -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Juvenile fiction -- Vermont ( lcsh )
Travelogue storybooks -- 1852 ( local )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1852 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1852
Genre:
Travelogue storybooks ( local )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
"The design of the series of volumes... is [to communicate] as extensive and varied information as possible, in respect to the geography, the scenery, the customs and the institutions of this country"--preface.
General Note:
Title-page, illustrations engraved by Bobbett & Edmonds after C.E. Dopler.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
by Jacob Abbott.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026784990 ( ALEPH )
00849769 ( OCLC )
ALH0747 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text











j vis} Hy
anf 77
3 -

bhatt elton ,












Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year one thousand
eight huudred and fifty-two, by

Haerer & BROTHERS,

in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Southern District
of New York.



PREFACE.

———————_++o—_

Tue design of the series of volumes, entitled
Marco Pavut’s ADVENTURES IN THE Pursuit oF
KNowLepee, is not merely to entertain the reader
with a narrative of juvenile adventures, but also to
communicate, in connection with them, as extensive
and varied information as possible, in respect to
the geography, the scenery, the customs and the
institutions of this country, as they present them-
selves to the observation of the little traveler, who
makes his excursions under the guidance of an
intelligent and well-informed companion, qualified
to assist him in the acquisition of knowledge and in
the formation of character. The author has en-
deavored to enliven his narrative, and to infuse into
it elements of a salutary moral influence, by means
of personal incidents befalling the actors in the

story. These incidents are, of course, imaginary—



vi PREFACE.

but the reader may rely upon the strict and exact
truth and fidelity of all the descriptions of places,
institutions and scenes, which are brought before
his mind in the progress of the narrative. Thus,
though the author hopes that the readers who may
honor these volumes with their perusal, will be
amused and interested by them, his design through-
out will be to instruct rather than to entertain



CONTENTS.

eee
CHAPTER
I.—JouRNEYING,
Il.—Accients,
{1.—Tue Grass Country,
IV.—Tue Vitiacr, .
V.—-Stupyine, .
VI.—-Tne Loe Canor.
VIL—A Dinemma,
VHI.—A Conression. .
1X.—Boatine,
X.—An Exrenition,
XI.~—Lost m tHe Woops, .

PaQk

11
26
44
62
80
98

. 116

135

. 152

171

. 191



ENGRAVINGS.

~ OO One

PAGE
Tre Great Ex, . . . . . . 14

Tne Hitt, . . . . . . . . 24
THE ACCIDENT, . . . . . . . 34

WHo ARE you? . . . . . . . 46
THe Lumsper Box, . . . : . . 53
Tue Tire, . . : : . . . . 710

Tue Risk, . . . . . . . . 7
Tue Stvpy, . . . . . . . 81
Marco's Desk, : . . . . . . 93
Boat ADRIFT, . . . . . . - 106
Car Gone, . . : . . . . . 112
Tue Mituman’s Hovusr, . . . : . 118
Papp.ine, . . . : . . . . 122
Marco’s Room, . . . . . . . 137
Toss, . . . . . . . . . 157

"Ban Rowtne, : . . . . . 160
Goov Rowine, . . . ' . . . 169
Tue Portace, . . . . . . . 177
Tne EXpepition, . . . : . . . 186

Tue Drae, . . . . . . - 190
Tue Scnoot House, . . . . . 197
Tue Ripe, . . . : . . 208



ORDER OF THE VOLUMES.

nn pee

Parca Parl,

IL—IN NEW YORK.
I1.—ON THE ERIE CANAL.
Tl].—IN MAINE.
IV.—IN VERMONT.
V.—IN BOSTON.
VI.—AT THE SPRINGFIELD ARMORY.



PRINCIPAI, PERSONS.
Mr. Baron, a merchant of New York.
Maxco, his son, a boy about twelve years old.

Jon Forester, Marco’s cousin, about nineteen years old.

Marco is traveling and studying under Forester’s care,



MARCO. PAUL IN VERMONT.

Cuarprer I.

JouRNEYING.

‘Plan for Marco. Situation of Vermont.
HEN Mr. Baron, Marco's father, put
Marco under his cousin Forester’s care,
it was his intention that he should spend a con-
siderable part of his time in traveling, and in
out-of-door exercises, such as might tend to re-
establish his health and strengthen his constitu-
tion. He did not, however, intend to have him
give up the study of books altogether. Accord-
ingly, at one time, for nearly three months,
Marco remained at Forester’s home, among the
Green Mountains of Vermont, where he studied
several hours every day.

It was in the early part of the autumn, that
he and Forester went to Vermont. They .
traveled in the stage-coach. Vermont lies upon
one side of the Connecticut river, and New
Hampshire upon the other side. The Green



12 Marco Patr in VeRMonrT.



Lake George. Lake Champlain.



Mountains extend up and down, through the
middle of Vermont, from north to south, and
beyond these mountains, on the western side of
the state, is lake Champlain, which extends from
north to south also, and forms the western
boundary. Thus, the Green Mountains divide
the state into two great portions, one descend-
ing to the eastward, toward Connecticut river,
and the other to the westward, toward lake
Champlain. There are, therefore, two great
ways of access to Vermont from the states south
of it; one up the Connecticut river on the
eastern side, and the other along the shores of
lake George and lake Champlain on the western
side. There are roads across the Green Moun-
tains also, leading from the eastern portion of
the state to the western. All this can be seen
by looking upon any map of Vermont.

Marco and Forester went up by the Connec-
ticut river. The road lay along upon the bank
of the river, and the scenery was very pleasant.
They traveled in the stage-coach ; for there
were very few railroads in those days.

The country was cultivated and fertile, and
the prospect from the windows of the coach
was very fine. Sometimes wide meadows and
intervales extended along the river,—and at



J oOURNEYING. 13

me
"Valley of the Connecticut. Various stages. The passengers.

other places, high hills, covered with trees, ad-
vanced close to the stream. They could see,
too, the farms, and villages, and green hills,
across the river, on the New Hampshire side.
On the second day of their journey, they
turned off from the river by a road which led
into the interior of the country ; for the village
where Forester’s father resided was back among
the mountains. They had new companions in
the coach too, on this second day, as well as a
new route ; for the company which had been
in the coach the day before were to separate
in the morning, to go off in different directions.
Several stage-coaches drove up to the door of
the tavern in the morning, just after breakfast,
with the names of the places where they were
going to, upon their sides. One was marked,
“ Haverhill and Lancaster ;’ another, “ Mid-
dlebury ;” and a third, “ Concord and Boston ;”
and there was one odd-looking vehicle, a sort
of carryall, open in front, and drawn by two
horses, which had no name upon it, and so
Marco could not tell where it was going. As
these several coaches and carriages drove up
to the door, the hostlers and drivers put on the
baggage and bound it down with great straps,
and then handed in the passengers ;—and thus



14 Marco Pauu in VERMONT.



The elm-tree.



the coaches, one after another, drove away.
The whole movement formed a very busy scene,
and Marco, standing upon the piazza in front
of the tavern, enjoyed it very much.

There was a very large elm-tree before the
door, with steps to climb up, and seats among
the branches. Marco went up there and sat
some time, looking down upon the coaches as
they wheeled round the tree, in coming up to
the door. Then he went down to the piazza
again.



THE GREAT ELM.



JouRNEYING. 15



The factory girl. — Her orange-tree.

There was a neatly-dressed young woman,
with a little flower-pot in her hand, standing
near him, waiting for her turn. There was a
small orange-tree in her flower-pot. It was
about six inches high. The sight of this
orange-tree interested Marco very much, for it
reminded him of home. He had often seen
orange-trees growing in the parlors and green-
houses in New York.

“What a pretty little orange-tree!”’ said
Marco. “ Where did you get it ?”

“ How did you know it was an orange-tree ?”
said the girl.

« O, 1 know an orange-tree well enough,” re-
plied Marco. “Ihave seen them many a time.”

“ Where ?” asked the girl.

“In New York,” said Marco. “Did your
orange-tree come from New York ?”

“ No,” said the girl. “I planted an orange-
seed, and it grew from that. I’ve got a lemon-
tree, too,’ she added, “but it is a great deal
larger. The lemon-tree grows faster than the
orange. My lemon-tree is so large that I
couldn’t bring it home very well, soI left it in
the mill.” s

“In the mill?” said Marco. “Are you a
miller ?”



16 Marco Pauu in Vernon.



Monipelier. The trunk. Mary Williams,

The girl laughed. She was a very good-
humored girl, and did not appear to be dis-
pleased, though it certainly was not quite
proper for Marco to speak in that manner to a
stranger. She did not, however, reply to his
question, but said, after a pause,

“Do you know where the Montpelier stage
is ?”

The proper English meaning of the word
stage is a portion of the road, traveled between
one resting-place and another. But in the
United States it is used to mean the carriage,
—hbeing a sort of contraction for stage-coach.

“No,” said Marco, “we are going in that
stage.”

“TI wish it would come along,” said the girl,
“ for I’m tired of watching my trunk.”

“ Where is your trunk ?” said Marco.

So the girl pointed out her trunk. It was
upon the platform of the piazza, near those be-
longing to Forester and Marco. The girl
showed Marco her name, which was Mary
Williams, written on a card upon the end of
it.

“Tl watch your trunk,” said Marco, “and
you can go in and sit down until the stage
comes.”



JouRNEYING. 17



The sailor and his chest. The passengers.
eee ee EE

Mary thanked him and went in. She was
not, however, quite sure that her baggage was
safe, intrusted thus to the charge of a strange
boy, and so she took a seat near the window,
where she could keep an eye upon it. There
was a blue chest near these trunks, which
looked like a sailor’s chest, and Marco, being
tired of standing, sat down upon this chest.
He had, however, scarcely taken his seat, when
he saw a coach with four horses, coming round
a corner. It was driven by a small boy not
larger than Marco. It wheeled up toward the
door, and came to a stand. Some men then
put on the sailor’s chest and the trunks. Mary
Williams came out and got into the coach.
She sat on the back seat. Forester and Marco
got in, and took their places on the middle seat.
A young man, dressed like a sailor, took the front
seat, at one corner of the coach. These
were all the passengers that were to get in
here. When every thing was ready, they drove
away.

The stage stopped, however, in a few min-
utes at the door of a handsome house in the
town, and took a gentleman and lady in.
These néw passengers took places on the back
seat, with Mary Williams.

B



18 Marco Paut in VERMonrT.

Marco and the sailor.

This company rode in perfect silence for
some time. Forester took out a book and be-
gan to read. The gentleman on the back seat
went to sleep. Mary Williams and Marco
looked out at the windows, watching the
changing scenery. The sailor rode in silence ;
moving his lips now and then, as if he were
talking to himself, but taking no notice of any
of the company.: The coach stopped at the vil-
lages which they passed through, to exchange the
mail, and sometimes to take in new passengers.
In the course of these changes Marco got his
place shifted to the forward seat by the side of
the sailor, and he gradually got into conversa-
tion with him. Marco introduced the conver-
sation, by asking the sailor if he knew how far
it was to Montpelier.

“No,” said the sailor, “1 don’t keep any
reckoning, but I wish we were there.”

“Why ?” asked Marco.

“O, I expect the old cart will capsize some-
where among these mountains, and break our
necks for us.”

Marco had observed, all the morning, that
when the coach canted to one side or the other,
on account of the unevenness of the road, the
sailor always started and looked anxious, as if



JouRNEYING. 19

a
The sailor afraid. Nature of fear.



afraid it was going to be upset. He wondered
that a man who had been apparently accustomed
to the terrible dangers of the seas, should be
alarmed at the gentle oscillations of a stage-
coach,

« Are you afraid that we shall upset ?” asked
Marco.

“ Yes,” said the sailor, “over some of these
precipices and mountains ; and then there'll be
an end of us.”

The sailor said this in an easy and careless
manner, as if, after all, he was not much con-
cerned about the danger. Still, Marco was
surprised that he should fear it at all. He was
not aware how much the fears which people
feel, are occasioned by the mere novelty of the
danger which they incur. A stage-driver, who
is calm and composed on his box, in a dark
night, and upon dangerous roads, will be alarmed
by the careening of a ship under a gentle breeze
at sea,—while the sailor who laughs at a gale
of wind on the ocean, is afraid to ride in:a car-
riage on land.

“ An’t you a sailor ?” asked Marco.

“ Yes,” replied his companion.

“] shouldn’t think that a man that had been



20 Marco Paut in VeRmMonrT.

“The sallor’s story. His character.

used to the sea, would be afraid of upsetting in
a coach.”
“Tm not a man,” said the sailor.
+ “ What are you ?” said Marco.

“I’m a boy. I’m only nineteen years old;
though I’m going to be rated seaman next voy-
age.”

“Have you just got back from a voyage ?”
asked Marco.

“ Yes,” said the sailor. “I’ve been round the
Horn in a whaler, from old Nantuck. And
now I’m going home to see my mother.”

“ How long since you've seen her?” asked
Marco.

“O, it’s four years since I ran away.”

Here the sailor began to speak in rather a
lower tone than hejhad done before, so that
Marco only could hear. This was not difficult,
as the other passengers were at this time en-
gaged in conversation.

“T ran away,” continued the sailor, “and
went to sea about four years ago.”

« What made you run away ?” asked Marco.

“0,1 didn’t want to stay at home and be
abused. My father used to abuse me; but my
mother took my part, and now I want to go
and see her.”



JOURNEYING. 21

~ Btories of whaling,

« And to see your father too,” said Marco.

“No,” said the sailor. “I don’t care for him.
I hope he’s gone off somewhere. But I want
to see my mother. I have got a shawl for her
in my chest.”

Marco was shocked to hear a young man
speak in such a manner of his father. Still
there was something in the frankness and open-
ness of the sailor’s manner, which pleased him
very much. He liked to hear his odd and
sailor-like language tvo, and he accordingly en-
tered into a long conversation with him. The
sailor gave him an account of his adventures
on the voyage ; how he was drawn off from the
ship one day, several miles, by a whale which
they had harpooned ;—how they caught a shark,
and hauled him in on deck by means of a pulley
at the end of the yard-arm ;—and how, on the
voyage home, the ship was driven before an
awful gale of wind for five days, under bare
poles, with terrific seas roaring after them all
the way. These descriptions took a strong
hold of Marco’s imagination. His eye bright-
ened up, and he became restless on his seat,
and thought that he would give the world for a
chance to stand up in the bow of a boat, and
put a harpoon into the neck of a whale.



22 Marco Pauu in Vermont.

The road. Incidents. The sailor’s proposal.

In the mean time, the day wore away, and
the road led into a more and more mountainous
country. The hills were longer and steeper,
and the tracts of forest more frequent and soli-
tary. The number of passengers increased too,
until the coach was pretty heavily loaded ; and
sometimes all but the female passengers would
get out and walk up the hills. On these occa-
sions Forester and Marco would generally walk
together, talking about the incidents of their
journey, or the occupations and amusements
which they expected to engage in when they
arrived at Forester’s home. About the middle
of the afternoon the coach stopped at the foot
of a long winding ascent, steep and stony, and
several of the passengers got out. Forester,
however, remained in, as he was tired of walk-
ing, and so Marco and the sailor walked togeth-
er. The sailor, finding how much Marco was
interested in his stories, liked his company, and
at length he asked Marco where he was going.
Marco told him.

“ Ah, if you were only going on a voyage
with me,” said the sailor, “that would make a
man of you. I wouldn’t go and be shut up with
that old prig, poring over books forever.”

Marco was displeased to hear the sailor call



JouRNEYING. 23

Marco declines it. - Marco afraid.

his cousin an old prig, and he felt some com-
punctions of conscience about forming and con-
tinuing an intimacy with such a person. Still
he was so much interested in hearing him talk,
that he continued to walk with him up the hill.
Finally, the sailor fairly proposed to him to run
away and go to sea with him.

“O no,” said Marco, “I wouldn’t do such a
thing for the world. Besides,” said he, “ they
would be after us, and carry me back.”

“No,” said the sailor ; “ we would cut across
the country, traveling in the night and laying
to by day, till we got to another stage route, and
then make a straight wake, till we got to New
Bedford, and there we could get a good voyage.
Come,” said he, “let’s go to-night. I'll tuyn
right about. Idon’t care a great deal about
seeing my mother.”

Though Marco was a very bold and adven-
turous sort of a boy, still he was not quite pre-
pared for such a proposal as this. In the course
of the conversation the sailor used improper
and violent language too, which Marco did not
like to hear; and, in fact, Marco began to be
a little afraid of his new acquaintance.. He
determined, as soon as he got back to the coach
to keep near Forester all the time, so as not



24 Marco Paut in VeERMonrT.



The sailor invites Marco to take a drink.



to be left alone
again with the sail-
“ or. He tried to
hasten on, so as to
overtake the coach,
, but the sailor told
him not to walk so
r fast; and, being un-
willing to offend
him, he was obliged
to go slowly, and
keep with him; and
thus protracted the
conversation.
About half-way up the hill there was a small
tavern, and the sailor wanted Marco to go in
with him and get a drink. Marco thought that
he meant a drink of water, but it was really a
drink of spirits which was intended. Marco,
however, refused to go, saying that he was not
thirsty ; and so they went on up the hill. At
the top of the hill, the stage-coach stopped for
the pedestrians to come up. There was also
another passenger there to get in,—a woman,
who came out from a farm-house near by. The
driver asked the sailor if he was not willing to
ride outside, in order to make room for the new



THE GILL.



JOURNEYING. 25

The sailor will not ride outside,

passenger. But he would not. He was afraid.
He said he would not ride five miles outside for
a month’s wages. Marco laughed at the sail-
or’s fears, and he immediately asked Forester
to let him ride outside. Forester hesitated, but
on looking up, and seeing that there was a se-
cure seat, with a good place to hold on, he con-
sented. So Marco clambered up and took his
seat with the driver, while the other passengers
re-established themselves in.the stage.



26 Marco Paun in VeRMonrT.

Marco outside. Jerry.







CHarrer II.
ACCIDENTS.

ARCO liked his seat upon the outside of
the stage-coach very much. He could
see the whole country about him to great ad-
vantage. He was very much interested in the
scenery, not having been accustomed to travel
among forests and mountains. The driver was
a rough young man,—for the boy who drove
the coach up to the door was not the regular
driver. He was not disposed to talk much, and
his tone and manner, in what he did say, did
not indicate a very gentle disposition. Marco,
however, at last got a little acquainted with
him, and finally proposed to the driver to let
him drive.

“Nonsense,” said he, in reply, “ you are not
big enough to drive such a team as this.”

“ Why, there was a boy, no bigger than J,
that drove the horses up to the door when we
started, this morning,” replied Marco.

“QO yes—Jerry,”’—said the driver,—* but
he’ll break his neck one of these days.”



AcCcIDENTS. 27

“Marco asks to drive. Marco’s forbearance.

“T didn’t see but that he drove very well,”
said Marco.

The driver was silent.

“Come,” persisted Marco, “let me drive a
little way, and I'll do as much for you some
day.”

“ You little fool,” said the driver, “ you never
can do any thing for me. You are not big
enough to be of any use at all.”

Marco thought of the fable of the mouse and
the lion, but since his new companion was in
such. ill-humor, he thought he would say no
more tohim. A resentful reply to the epithet
“little fool,” did in fact rise to his lips, but he
suppressed it and said nothing.

It was fortunate for Marco that he did so.
For whenever any person has said any thing
harsh, unjust, or cruel, the most effectual reply
is, generally, silence. It leaves the offender to
think of what he has said, and conscience will
often reprove him in silence, far more effectually
than words could do it. This was the case in
this instance. As they rode along in silence,
the echo of the words “ little fool,” and the tone
in which he had uttered them, lingered upon
the driver’s ear. He could not help thinking



28 Marco Pau.t in VERMONT.



Marco drives. He succeeds very well.

that he had been rather harsh with his little
passenger. Presently he said,

“I don’t care though,—we are coming toa

level piece of ground on ahead here a little way,
and then I’ll see what you can make of team-
ing.”
_ Marco was quite pleased at this unexpected
result, and after ten or fifteen minutes, they
came to the level piece of road, and the driver
put the reins into Marco’s hand. Marco had
sometimes driven two horses, when riding out
with his father in a barouche, up the Blooming-
dale road in New York. He was therefore not
entirely unaccustomed to the handling of reins ;
and he took them from the driver's hand and
imitated the manner of holding them which he
had observed the driver himself to adopt, quite
dexterously.

The horses, in fact, needed very little guid-
ance. They went along the road very quietly
of their own accord. Marco kept wishing that
a wagon or something else would come along,
that he might have the satisfaction of turning
out. But nothing of the kind appeared, and he
was obliged to content himself with turning a
little to one side, to avoid a stone. At the end
of the level piece of road there was a tavern.



ACCIDENTS. 29



The tavern.



where they were going to stop, to change the
horses, and Marco asked the driver to let him
turn. the horses up to the door. The driver
consented, keeping a close watch all the time,
ready to seize the reins again at a moment’s
notice, if there had been any appearance of dif-
ficulty. But there was none. Marco guided
the horses right, and drawing in the reins with
all his strength, he brought them up properly at
the door ; or rather, he seemed to do it,—for,
in reality, the horses probably acted as much
of their own accord, being accustomed to stop
at this place, as from any control which Marco
exercised over them through the reins.

There was, however, an advantage in this
evolution, for Marco became accustomed to the
feeling of the reins in his hand, and acquired a
sort of confidence in his power over the horses,
—greater to be sure than there was any just
ground for, but which was turned to a very im-
portant account, a few hours afterward, as will
be seen in the sequel.

The sailor went several times into the tav-
erns on the way, in the course of the afternoon,
to drink, until, at length, he became partially
intoxicated. He felt, however, so much re-
strained in the presence of the passengers with-



30 Marco Pavut in VERMONT.

The sailor’s drinks. His condition.

in the coach, that he did not become talkative
and noisy, as is frequently the case in such cir-
cumstances ; but was rather stupid and sleepy.
In fact, no one observed that any change was
taking place in his condition, until, at last, as he
was coming out from the door of a tavern,
where he had been in to get another drink, the
driver said,

“Come, Jack, you must get up with me now,
there is another passenger to get in here.”

Marco, who was still in his seat, holding the
reins of the horses, looked down, expecting that
the sailor would make objections to this propo-
sal,—but he found, on the contrary, that Jack,
as they called him, acquiesced without making
any difficulty, and allowed the driver to help
him up. The new passenger got inside. For-
ester felt somewhat uneasy at having Marco
ride any longer on the top, especially now that
the sailor was going up too. But the coach
was full. He himself was wedged into his seat,
so that he could not get out easily. He knew,
too, that two or three of the passengers were
going to get out at the next stage, and so he
concluded to let Marco remain outside until
that time, and then to take him in again.

Marco’s admiration for the sailor was very



ACCIDENTS. 31

The sailor in danger. Evening.

much diminished when he saw how helpless he
had rendered himself by his excesses, and how
unceremoniously the driver pulled and hauled
him about, in getting him into his seat.

“There! hold on there,” said the driver to
him, in a stern voice,—“ hold on well, or you'll
be down head foremost under the horses’ heels,
at the first pitch we come to.”

The poor sailor said nothing, but grasped an
iron bar which passed from the top of the coach
down by the side of the seat, and held on as
well as he could.

They rode on in this manner for some miles,
the head of the sailor swinging back and forth,
helplessly, as if he was nearly asleep. When-
ever Marco or the driver spoke to him, he either
answered in a thick and sleepy tone of voice, or
he did not reply at all. Marco watched him
for a time, being continually afraid that he
would fall off. He could do nothing, however,
to help him, for he himself was sitting at one
end of the seat while the sailor was upon the
other, the driver being between them. In the
mean time the sun gradually went down and
the twilight came on, and as the shadows ex-
tended themselves slowly over the landscape,
Marco began to find riding outside less pleasant



32 Marco Pauu 1n VERMONT.
Bridge. A jolt. Etfecta of it.

than it had been before, and he thought that,
on the whole, he should be very glad when the
time arrived for him to get into the coach again,
with his cousin.

At length they came to a bridge, covered
with planks, which led across a small stream.
It was in rather a solitary place, with woods on
each side of the road. Beyond the bridge there
was a level piece of road for a short distance,
and then a gentle ascent, with a farmhouse
near the top of it, on the right hand side of the
road. At the end of the bridge, between the
planks and the ground beyond them, there was
a jolt, caused by the rotting away of a log which
had been imbedded in the ground at the begin-
ning of the planking. As it was rather dark,
on account of the shade of the trees, the driver
did not observe this jolt, and he was just begin-
ning to put his horses to the trot, as they were
leaving the bridge, when the forward wheels
‘struck down heavily into the hollow, giving the
front of the coach a sudden pitch forward and
downward. Marco grasped the iron bar at his
end of the seat, and saved himself; and the
driver, who was habitually on his guard, had his
feet so braced against the fender before him,
that he would not have fallen. But the poor



ACCIDENTS. 33

A fall.

sailor, entirely unprepared for the shock, and
perhaps unable to resist it if he had been pre-
pared, pitched forward, lost his hold, went over
the fender, and was tumbling down, as the
driver had predicted, head foremost, under the
horses’ heels. The driver seized hold of him
with one hand, but finding this insufficient,
dropped his reins and tried to grasp him with
both. In doing it, however, he lost his own
balance and went over too. He, of course, let
go of the sailor, when he found that he was
going himself. The sailor fell heavily and
helplessly between the pole and the side of one
of the horses, to the ground. The driver fol-
lowed. He seized the pole with one hand, but
was too late to save himself entirely, and think-
ing there was danger of being dragged, and
finding that the horses were springing forward
in a fright, he let himself drop through to the
ground also. The coach passed over them in
8 moment, as the horses cantered on.

All this passed in an instant, and Marco, be-
fore he had a moment’s time for reflection, found
himself alone on his seat,—the driver run over
and perhaps killed, and the horses cantering
away, with the reins dangling about their heels.
The first impulse, in such a case, would be to

C



34 Marco Paut 1n VERMONT.

The horses run away.




THE ACCIDENT.

scream aloud, in terror,—which would have
only made the horses run the faster. But Mar-
co was not very easily frightened ; at least, he
was not easily made crazy by fright. So he
did not scream ; and not knowing what else to
do, he sat still and did nothing.

In the mean time, the passengers inside knew
nothing of all this. Many of them had been
asleep when they came over the bridge. The
jolt had aroused them a little, but there was



- ACCIDENTS. 35

Marco’s danger.

nothing to indicate to them the accident which
had occurred forward, so they quietly adjusted
themselves in their seats, and endeavored to
compose themselves to sleep again.

The horses were well trained and gentle.
They cantered on as far as: the level ground
extended, and then they slackened their pace
as they began to rise the ascent. The idea
then occurred to Marco, that perhaps he might
clamber down over the fender to the pole, and
then walk along upon that a little way till he
could gather up the reins. Then he thought
that if he could get back again with them to
the driver’s seat, perhaps he could stop the
horses. Marco was an expert climber. He
had learned this art in his gymnasium at New
York ; so that he had no fears in respect to his
being able to get down and back again. The
only danger was, lest he might frighten the
horses again and set them to running anew.

After a moment’s reflection, he concluded
that at any rate he would try it; so he cautious-
ly stepped over the fender and clambered down.
When his feet reached the pole, he rested them
a moment upon it, and clung with his hands to
the fender and other parts of the front of the
coach. He found his position here more un-



36 Marco Paut 1n Vermont.

He clambers down. He recovers the reins.

stable than he had expected; for the coach be-
ing upon springs, the forward part rose and fell
with many jerks and surges, as the horses trav-
eled swiftly along, while the pole was held in its
position straight and firm. Thus the different
parts of his body were connected with different
systems of motion, which made his position very
uncomfortable.

He found, however, after a moment’s pause,
that he could stand, and probably walk upon
the pole; so he advanced cautiously, putting
his hands on the backs of the horses, and walk-
ing along on the pole between them. The
horses were somewhat disturbed by the strange
sensations which they experienced, and began
to canter again; but Marco, who felt more and
more confidence every moment, pushed boldly
on, gathered up the reins, and got all the ends
together. Then taking the ends of the reins in
one hand, he crept back, supporting himself by
taking hold of the harness of one of the horses
with the other hand. By this means he re-
gained the coach, and then, though with some
difficulty, he clambered up to his seat again.

He then endeavored to stop the horses by
gathering the reins together, and pulling upon
them with all his strength ; but it was in vain.



AccrpDENTS. 37

His plan for stopping the horses. He succeeds,

The horses had by this time reached a part of
the road where it was more level, and they be-
gan to press forward at a more rapid pace.
Marco thought of calling to Forester to get out
of the window and climb along the side of the
coach to the box, in order to help him; but just
at that moment he saw that they were coming
up opposite to the farm house, which had been
in sight, at a distance, when they were crossing
the bridge. So he thought that though he
could not stop the horses, he might perhaps
have strength enough to turn them off from the
road into the farmer’s yard; and that then
they could be more easily stopped. In this he
succeeded. By pulling the off rein of the lead-
ers with all his strength, he was able to turn
them out of the road. The pole horses follow-
ed as a matter of course,—-the coach came up
with a graceful sweep to the farmer’s door, and
then the horses were easily stopped. The farm-
er came at once to the door, to see what strange
company had come to visit him in the stage,—
his wife following; while several children
crowded to the windows.

“ What’s here ?” said a voice from the win-
dow of the coach,—“a post-office?’ They



33 Margco Pavuut in VERMONT.

Wonder of the passengers.

thought the stage had been driven up to the
door of some post-office.

Marco did not answer ; in fact he was bewil-
dered and confounded at the strangeness of his
situation. He looked back over the top of the
coach down the road to see what had become
of the driver. To his great joy, he saw him
running up behind the coach,—his hat crushed
out of shape, and his clothes dusty. The pas-
sengers looked out at the windows of the stage,
exclaiming,

“ Why, driver! what's the matter ?”

The driver made no reply. He began to
brush his clothes,—and, taking off his hat, he
attempted to round it out into shape again.

“ What is the matter, driver ?” said the pas-
sengers.

“Nothing,” replied he, “only that drunkard
of a sailor tumbled off the stage.”

“Where ?” “ When ?” exclaimed half a doz-
en voices. “Is he killed ?”

“Killed ? no,” replied the driver ; “1 don’t be-
lieve he is even sobered.”

Forester and another gentleman then urgent-
ly asked where he was, and the driver told
them that he was “back there a piece,” as he
expressed it.



ACCIDENTS, 39

re
The sailor. The driver's charge to Marco.



«What! lying in the road ?” said Forester ;
“open the door, and let us go and see to him.”

“No,” said the driver; “he has got off to the
side of the road, safe. I don’t believe he’s hurt
any. Let him take care of himself, and we'll
drive on.”

But Forester remonstrated strongly against
leaving the poor sailor in such a condition, and
in such a place; and finally it was agreed that
the farmer should go down the road and see to
him, so as to allow the stage-coach with the
passengers to go on.

Forester was not willing, however, to have
Marco ride outside any longer; and so they
contrived to make room for him within. As
Marco descended from his high seat, the driver
said to him, as he passed him, in a low voice,

“How did you get the reins? I thought
they all came down with me, under the horses’
heels.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “they did, and I climbed
down upon the pole and got them.”

“Well,” said the driver, “ you’re a smart
boy. But don’t tell them inside that I tumbled
off. Tell them I gave you the reins, and jump-
ed down to see the sailor.”

After receiving this charge, Marco would



40 Marco Pauu in VeRmMonrt.

Instinctive caution of horses.

have been under a strong temptation to tell a
falsehood, if the company in the coach had
asked him any questions about it. But they
did not. They were so much occupied in ex-
pressing their astonishment that the sailor did
not break his neck, that they asked very few
questions, and after riding a short time, they re-
lapsed into silence again. The fact that both
the driver and the sailor escaped being serious-
ly hurt, was not so wonderful as it might seem.
Horses have generally an instinctive caution
about not stepping upon any thing under their
feet. Ifa little child were lying asleep in the
middle of a road, and a horse were to come
galloping along without any rider, the mother,
who should see the sight from the window of
the house, would doubtless be exceedingly ter-
rified ; but in all probability the horse would
pass the child without doing it any injury. He
would leap over it, or go around it, as he would
if it were a stone. This is one reason why, in
sO many Cases, persons are run over without
being hurt. The driver and the sailor, how-
ever, fell rather behind the horses’ heels, and
escaped them in that way, and they came down
so exactly into the middle of the road, that they



ACCIDENTS. 41

Rough road. Caution to travelers,

were out of the way of the track of the wheels,
and thus they escaped serious injury.

The misfortunes of the evening, however, did
not end here. The road was rather rough, and
there were many ruts and joltings; and one or
two of the passengers seemed to feel some fear
lest the stage should upset. One, who sat near
the door, put his arm out at the window over
the door, so as to get his hand upon the handle
of the catch, in order, as he said, to be ready to
open the door and spring out, at a moment’s
warning. The gentleman on the back seat ad-
vised him not to do it.

‘If you have your arm out,” said he, “the
coach may fall over upon it, and break it.
That’s the way people get hurt by the upsetting
of coaches, by thrusting out their legs and arms
in all directions, when they find they are going
over, and thus get them broken. You ought to
fold your arms and draw in your feet, and when
you find that we are going over, go in an easy
attitude, with all the muscles relaxed, as if your
body was a bag of corn.”

The passenger laughed and took his arm in;
and all the other passengers, seeing that the ad-
vice of the gentleman was reasonable, con-
cluded to follow it if they should have occasion.



42 Marco Paut in VERMONT.

Danger. Coach upset.



And they did have occasion sooner than they
had expected. For, just after dark, as they
were going down a long hill at a pretty rapid
rate, with a wagon a short distance before
them, one of the horses of the wagon stumbled
and fell, which brought the wagon to a sudden
stand just before the coach. The driver per-
ceived in an instant that there was not time to
stop his horses, and that the only chance was
to turn out of the road and drive by. The
ground at the road-side was so much inclined,
that he was almost afraid to venture this expe-
dient, but he had no time for thought. He
wheeled his horses out,—just escaped the hind
wheel of the wagon—ran along by the road-
side a short distance, with the wheels on one
side, down very near the gutter,—and then, just
as he was coming back safely into the road
again, the forward wheel nearest the middle of
the road, struck a small stone, and threw the
coach over. The top rested upon the bank, and
the horses were suddenly stopped. Sometimes,
on such occasions, the transom bolt, as it is
called, that is, the bolt by which the ferward
wheels are fastened to the carriage, comes out,
and the horses run off with the wheels. It did
not come out in this case, however. The man



ACCIDENTS. . 43

Foolish fears.

who had put his arm out of the window, imme-
diately called out, in great alarm, “Hold the
horses! Hold the horses! Don’t let the
horses run and drag us.” But this vociferation
was needless. A coach full of passengers and
baggage is a full load for four horses, when it
is mounted on wheels. It would require an ex-
ertion far beyond their strength to drag it when
on its side. The horses remained quiet, there-
fore, while the wagoner and the driver, who
was not hurt, opened the door in the upper side
of the coach. The passengers then climbed
out, one by one, without injury. Mary Wil-
liams came out last, with her orange-tree safe
in her hand.



44 Marco Paun in VERMONT.

Large farmhouse.

Cuaprer III,
Tue Grass Counrry.

re scene of confusion, produced by the
double accident described in the last chap-
ter, was great, but not long continued. The
wagoner got his fallen horse up, and then the
passengers, with the driver and wagoner, all
taking hold together, soon righted the stage.
None of the passengers were hurt, but the
coach itself was so much injured that the driver
thought it was not safe to load it heavily again.
The female passengers got in, but the men
walked along by the side of it, intending to
travel in that way about four miles to the next
- tavern. Forester, however, was not inclined
to take so long a walk. Fortunately, at a small
distance before them, was a farmhouse which
looked as if it belonged to a large and thrifty
farmer. The great barns and sheds, the neat
yards, the well-built walls and fences, and the
large stock of cattle in the barn-yard, indicated
wealth and prosperity. Forester concluded to
apply here for a lodging for the night, for him-



Tue Grass Country. 45



Plans. The room,



self and Marco. The farmer was very willing
to receive them. So the driver took off their
trunks, and then the stage-coach, with the rest
of the passengers, went on.

“ How long shall we have to stay here ?”
asked Marco.

“ Only till to-morrow,” said Forester. “ An-
other stage will come along to-morrow. We
can stop just as well as not, as we are in no
haste to get home. Besides, I should like to
have you see something of the operations of a
great grass farm.”

Marco and Forester went into the house, and
were ushered into a large room, which seemed
to be both sitting-room and kitchen. A large
round table was set in the middle of the floor,
for supper. A monstrous dog was lying under
it, with his chin resting upon his paws. There
was a great settle in one corner, by the side of
the fire. There were chairs also, with straight
backs and seats of basket-work, a spinning-
wheel, an open cupboard, and various other
similar objects, which, being so different from
the articles of furniture which Marco had been
accustomed to see in the New York pariors,
attracted his attention very strongly. Marco
went and took his seat upon the settle, and the



46 Marco Pau. in VERMONT.
Marco and the dog.

dog rose and came tohim. The dog gazéd into
his face with an earnest look of inquiry, which
plainly said, “Who are you?” while Marco
patted him on the head, thereby answering as
plainly, “A friend.” The dog, perfectly un-
derstanding the answer, seemed satisfied, and,
turning away, went back to his place again
under the table.

| Mm td

wei mm \ { Mi .
7 icc iy er [J |





WHO ARE YOU?
One of the farmer’s young men carried the

trunks into a little bed-room, which opened from
‘the great room ; and then the farmer sat down



Tue Grass Counrry. 47

Arrangements for the night. The bed-room.

and began to enter into conversation with For-
ester and Marco about their accident. Fores-
ter told him also about the sailor, who had
tumbled off the coach a mile or two back, and
been left behind. Forester said that he should
like to know whether he was hurt much. Then
the farmer said that he would let him take a
horse and wagon the next morning and ride
back and inquire. This plan was therefore
agreed upon. Marco and Forester ate a good
supper with the farmer’s family, and then spent
the evening in talking, and telling stories about
horses, and sagacious dogs, and about catching
wild animals in the woods with traps. About
nine o’clock the family all assembled for even-
ing prayers. After prayers Marco and Forester
went to bed in their little bed-room, where they
slept soundly till morning.

In the morning they were both awakened by
the crowing of the cocks, at an early hour.
They also heard movements in the house and
in the yard before sunrise; so they arose and
dressed themselves, and after attending to their
morning devotions together in their room, a
duty which Forester never omitted, they went
out. Marco was very much interested in the
morning occupations of the farm. There was



48 Marco Pau. in Vermont.
“Thefarmyard. ~~ Catching thehorses,
the milking of the cows, and the feeding of the
various animals, and the pitching off a load of
corn, which had been got in the evening before
and allowed to stand on the cart, on the barn-
floor, over night. The cows were then to be
driven to pasture, and the boy who went with
them, took a bridle to catch a horse for Fores-
ter and Marco to have for their ride. Forester
and Marco went with him. It was only a short
walk to the pasture bars, but they had to ramble
about a little while, before they found the horses.
At last they found them feeding together at the
edge of a grove of trees. There were two or
three horses, and several long-tailed colts. The
boy caught one of the horses, which he called
Nero. Nero was a white horse. Marco
mounted him and rode down, with the other
horses and the colts following him. They put
the horse in the stable until after breakfast, and
then harnessed him into the wagon. When all
was ready, the farmer told them to bring the
sailor along with them to his house, if they
found that he was hurt so that he could not
travel.

When they were seated in the wagon, and
had fairly commenced their ride, Marco asked
Forester, what he meant last evening by a grass



Tae Grass Country. 49
A grasa farm. Uses of grass.

farm.- “ You told me,” said he, “that you
wanted me to see a great grass farm.”

« Yes,” replied Forester. “ The farms in this
part of the United States may be called grass
farms. This is the grass country.”

“Isn’t it all grass country ?” asked Marco.
“ Grass grows everywhere.”

“ Grass is not cultivated everywhere so much
as itis among the mountains, in the northern
states,” replied Forester. “The great articles
of cultivation in the United States are grass,
grain, and cotton. The grass is cultivated in
the northern states, the grain in the middle
states, and the cotton in the southern states.
The grass is food for beasts, the grain is food
for man, and the cotton is for clothing. These
different kinds of cultivation are not indeed ex-
clusive in the different districts. Some grass is
raised in the middle and southern states, and
some grain is raised in the northern states ; but,
in general, the great agricultural production of
the northern states is grass, and these farms
among the mountains in Vermont are grass
farms.

“ There is one striking difference,” continued
Forester, “between the grass farms of the
north, and the grain farms of the middle states,

D



50 Marco Pauu in VeERMonT.

“Cultivation of grass. Grags and cotton.



or the cotton plantations of the south. The
grass cultivation brings with it a vast variety
of occupations and processes on the farm,
making the farm a little world by itself; whereas
the grain and the cotton cultivation are far
more simple, and require much less judgment
and skill. This is rather remarkable; for one
would think that raising food for beasts would
require less skill than raising food or clothes for
man.”

“1 should have thought so,” said Marco.

“The reason for the difference is,” replied
Forester, “ that in raising food for animals, it is
necessary to keep the animals to eat it, on the
spot, for it will not bear transportation.”

“Why not ?” said Marco.

“Because it is so cheap,” replied Forester.

“TI don’t think that is any reason,” replied
Marco.

“ A load of grass” — said Forester.

“ A load of grass!” repeated Marco, laughing.

“Yes, dried grass, that is, hay. Hay, you
know, is grass dried to preserve it.”

“Very well,” said Marco; “go on.”

“A load of grass, then, is so cheap, that the
cost of hauling it fifty miles would be more than
itis worth. But cotton is worth a great deal



Tae Grass Country. 51

~‘Transportation.



more, in proportion to its bulk. It can there-
fore be transported to distant places to be sold
and manufactured. Thus the enormous quan-
tity of cotton which grows every summer in
the southern states, is packed in bags, very
tight, and is hauled to the rivers and creeks,
and there it is put into steamboats and sent to
the great seaports, and at the seaports it is put
into ships, which carry it to England or to the
northern states, to be manufactured ; and it is
so valuable, that it will bring a price sufficient
to pay all-the persons that have been employed
in raising it, or in transporting it. But the
grass that grows in the northern countries can
not: be transported. The mills for manufactur-
ing cotton may be in one country, and the cot-
ton be raised in another, and then, after the
cotton is gathered, it may be packed and sent
thousands of miles to be manufactured. But
the sheep and oxen which are to eat the hay,
can not be kept in one country, while the grass
which they feed upon grows in another. The
animals must live, in general, on the very farm
which the grass grows upon. Thus, while the
cotton cultivator has nothing to do but to raise
his cotton and send it to market, the grass cul-
tivator must not only raise his grass, but he



52 Marco Pauzt 1n VERMONT.

Northern and southern states. Wool.



must provide for and take care of all the animals
which are to eat it. This makes the agricul-
ture of the northern states a far more compli-
cated business, because the care of animals runs
into great detail, and requires great skill, and
sound judgment, and the exercise of constant
discretion.

“ You observe,” continued Forester, “that
it is by the intervention of animals that the far-
mer gets the product of his land into such a
shape that it will bear transportation. For in-
stance, he feeds out his hay to his sheep, at-
tending them with care and skill all the winter.
In the spring he shears off their fleeces; and
now he has got something which he can send
to market. He has turned his grass into wool,
and thus got its value into a much more
compact form. The wool will bear transpor-
tation. Perhaps he gave a whole load of hay
to his sheep, to produce a single bag of wool.
So the bag of wool is worth as much as the
load of hay, and is very much more easily car-
ried to market. He can put it upon his lum-
ber-box, and drive off fifty miles with it, to
market, without any difficulty.”

“ His lumber-box ?” asked Marco. “ What
is that ?”



Tue Grass CountTry. “58



Lumber-boxes.



“ Didn’t you ever see a lumber-box ?” asked
Forester. “It isa
square box, on run-
ners, like those of
asleigh. The far-
mers have them }
to haul their pro- 4
duce to market.”

“Why do they
call it a lumber- ‘g
box ?” asked Mar-
co



“Why, whenthe <=
country was first THE LUMBER-BOX,
settled, they used

to carry lumber to market principally ; that is,
bundles of shingles and clapboards, which they
made from timber cut in the woods. It requires
some time for a new farm, made in the forests,
to get into a condition to produce much grass
for cattle. I suppose that it was in this way
that these vehicles got the name of lumber-
boxes. You will see a great many of them, in
the winter season, coming down from every
part of the country, toward the large towns on
the rivers, filled with produce.”



54 Marco Paut in VERMONT.

Beef. Going to market. Drovers.

“ What else do the farmers turn their grass
into, besides wool ?” asked Marco.

“Into beef,” said Forester. “They raise

‘cows and oxen. They let them eat the grass
as it grows, all summer, and in the winter they
feed them with what they have cut and dried
and stored in the barn for them. The farmers
are all ambitious to cut as much hay as they
can, and to keep a large stock of cattle. Thus
they turn the grass into beef, and the beef can
be easily transported. In fact, it almost trans-
ports itself.”

“ How do you mean ?” asked Marco.

“ Why, the oxen and cows, when they are fat
and ready for market, walk off in droves to
Boston, to be killed. They don’t kill them
where they are raised, for then they would have
to haul away the beef in wagons or sleighs, but
make the animals walk to market themselves,
and kill them there. But the farmers don’t
generally take their own cattle to market. Men
go about the country, and call upon the far-
mers, and buy their cattle, and thus collect
great droves. These men are called drovers.
In traveling in this part of the country, late in
the fall, you would see great droves of cattle



Tue Grass Country. 55

Brighton market. Horsea, ,

and sheep, passing along the road, all going to
Boston, or rather Brighton.”

“ Where is Brighton ?” asked Marco.

“It is a town, very near Boston, where the
great cattle market is held. The Boston deal-
ers come out to Brighton, and buy the cattle,
and have them slaughtered, and the beef packed
and sent away all over the world. Thus the
farmers turn the grass into beef, and in that
shape it can be transported and sold.”

“And what else ?” asked Marco.

“Why, they raise a great many horses in
Vermont,” replied Forester. “These horses
live upon grass, eating it as it grows in the
pastures and on the mountains, in the summer,
and being fed upon hay in the barn in the win-
ter. These horses, when they are four or five
years old, are sent away to market to be sold.
They can be transported very easily. A man
will ride one, and lead four or five by his side.
They will be worth perhaps seventy-five dollars
apiece ; so that one man will easily take along
with him, three or four hundred dollars’ worth
of the produce of the farm, in the shape of
horses ; whereas the hay which had been con-
sumed on the farm to make these horses, it
would have taken forty yoke of oxen to move.”



56 Marco Pauu in VERMONT.

“Vermont horses. Care of animals.

“Forty yoke!” repeated Marco.

“T don’t mean to be exact,” said Forester.
“T mean it would take a great many. So that,
by feeding his hay out to horses, the farmer
gets his produce into a better state to be trans-
ported to market. The Vermont horses go all
over the land. Thus you see that the farmers
in the grass country have to turn the vegetable
products which they raise, into animal products,
before they can get them to market; and as
the rearing of animals is a work which requires
a great deal of attention, care, patience, and
skill, the cultivators must be men of a higher
class than those which are employed in raising
cotton, or even than those who raise grain.
The animals must be watched and guarded
while they are young. There are a great many
different diseases, and accidents, and injuries
which they are exposed to, and it requires con-
stant watchfulness, and considerable intelli-
gence, to guard against them. This makes a
great difference in the character which is re-
quired in the laborers, in the different cases.
A cotton plantation at the south can be culti-
vated by slaves. A grain farm in the middle
states can be worked by hired Jaborers; but a
northern grass farm, with all its oxen, cows,



Tue Grass CounrTry. 57

Cultivation of cotton. . The planter.

sheep, poultry, and horses, can only be success-
fully managed by the work of the owner.”

“Ts that the reason why they have slaves at
the south ?” asked Marco.

“It is a reason why slaves can be profitable
at the south. In cultivating cotton or sugar, a
vast proportion of all the work done in the year
is the same. Almost the whole consists of a
few simple processes, such as planting, hoeing,
picking cotton, &c., and this is to be performed
on smooth, even land, where set tasks can be
easily assigned. But the work on a grass farm
1s endlessly varied. It would not be possible to
divide it into set tasks. And then it is of such
a nature, that it could not possibly be performed
successfully by the mere labor of the hands.
The mind must be employed upon it. For in-
stance, even in getting in hay, in the summer
season, the farmer has to exercise all his judg-
ment and discretion to avoid getting it wet by
the summer showers, and yet to secure it in
good time, and with proper dispatch. A cotton
planter may hire an overseer to see to the get-
ting in of his cotton, and he can easily tell by
the result, whether he has been faithful or not.
But hay can not be got in well, without the
activity, and energy, and good judgment, which



58 Marco Pavui in VERMONT.

Large grass farms.



can come only from the presence and imme-
diate supervision of an owner. This produces
vast differences in the nature of the business,
and in the whole state of society in the two re-
gions.”

“ What are the differences ?” asked Marco.

“Why, in the first place,” said Forester,
“the fact that cotton and sugar can be culti-
vated by hired overseers, with slaves to do the
work, enables rich men to carry on great plan-
tations without laboring themselves. But a
great grass farm could not be managed so. A
man may have one thousand acres for his plan-
tation at the south, and with a good overseer
and good hands, it will all go on very well, so
far as his profit is concerned. They will pro-
duce a great amount of cotton, which may be
sent to market and sold, and the planter realize
the money, so as to make a large profit after
paying all his expenses. But if a man were to
buy a thousand acres of grass land, and employ
an overseer and slaves to cultivate it, every
thing would go to ruin. The hay would get
wet and spoiled,—the carts, wagons, and com-
plicated tools necessary, would get broken to
pieces,—the lambs would be neglected and die,
and the property would soon go to destruction.



Tue Grass Country. 59

Mr. Warner’s farm. Difficulties.

Even when a rich man attempts to carry on a
moderate farm by hired laborers, taking the
best that he can find, he seldom succeeds.”

* Does he ever succeed ?” said Marco.

« Yes,” replied Forester, “ sometimes. There
is Mr. Warner, who lives near my father’s ; he
was brought up on a farm, and is practically
acquainted with all the work. He has been
very successful, and has a very large farm.
He works now very little himself, but he
watches every thing with the greatest care, and
he succeeds very well. He has a great stock.
He cuts fifty tons of hay.”

«T should like to see his farm,” said Marco.

« We'll go some day,” replied Forester.

«So you see,” continued Forester, “ that the
work of a cotton or sugar plantation, is com-
paratively simple and plain, requiring little
judgment or mental exertion, and a great deal
of plain straightforward bodily labor ; while on
a northern stock farm the labors are endlessly
varied. Every month, every week, and almost
every day brings some change. New emer-
gencies are constantly arising, which call for
deliberation and judgment. It is necessary to
have a great variety of animals, in order to
consume all the different productions of the





60 Marco Paut tn VERMONT.

Nero. The sailor.

farm to advantage. I can explain it all to you
better, when you come to see Mr. Warner’s
farm.” /

As Nero traveled very fast, they began by
this time to draw near to the place where they
had left the sailor. When they came up to
the house, they fastened the horse to a post, and
went in. The man who lived there had gone
away, but the woman said that the sailor was
somewhat hurt, and asked them to come in and
see him. They found him in the kitchen, with
his foot up in a chair. He seemed to be in
some pain. There was a great bruise on his
ankle, made by the cork of one of the horses’
shoes. These corks, as they are called, are
projections, made of steel, at the heel of a
horse-shoe, to give the horse a firm footing.
They are made quite sharp in the winter sea-
son, when there is ice and snow upon the
ground, but they are generally more blunt in
the summer. This prevented the ankle’s being
cut as badly as it would have been, if the corks
had been sharper. Forester looked at the ankle,
and found that nothing had been done for it. It
was inflamed and painful. He got the woman
to give him a basin of warm water, and then
he bathed it very carefully, which relieved the



Tue Grass CounrTry. 61

Forester’s treatment of the foot.

sense of tension and pain. Then he made an
ointment of equal parts of tallow and oil, which
he put upon the end of a bandage, and thus
bound it up. This treatment relieved the poor
sailor very much. Then Forester proposed to
the sailor to get into the wagon and go with
him to the next house, and the sailor consented.
Forester was then going to pay the woman for
his night’s lodging, but the sailor said at once,
—“ No, squire, not at all. I’m much obliged
to you for doing up my foot, but you need not
pay any thing for me. I’ve got plenty of shot
in the locker.”

So saying, he put his hand in his pocket and
drew out a handful of gold and silver pieces.
But the woman, who began now to feel a little
ashamed that she had not done something for
the wounded foot, said he was welcome to his
lodging; and so they all got into the wagon,
and Nero carried them rapidly back to his
master’s.



62 Marco Paut rin VERMONT.





“Forester’s home. The valley.

Cuaprer IV.
Tue VILuaceE.

[* due time, and without any farther adven-
ture, Forester and Marco arrived at the
end of their journey. The village where For-
ester’s father lived was situated in a gorge of
the mountains, or rather at the entrance of a
valley, which terminated at last in a gorge.
There was a river flowing through this valley,
and the village was upon its banks. At the up-
per end of the village a branch stream came in
from the north, and there was a dam upon it,
with some mills. The river itself was a rapid
stream, flowing over a sandy and gravelly bot-
tom, and there were broad intervals on each
side of it, extending for some distance toward
the higher land. Beyond these intervals, the
land rose gradually, and in an undulating man-
ner, to the foot of the mountains, which ex-
tended along the sides of the valley, and from
the summits of which, one might look down
upon the whole scene, with the village in the
center of it, as upon a map.



Tue VILLAGE, 63

es
Yards and gardens. The office.



Marco was very much pleased with the situ-
ation, and with the appearance of the village.
The street was broad, and it was shaded with
rows of large maples and elms on each side.
The houses were generally white, with green
blinds. Most of them had pleasant yards be-
fore them and at their sides; these yards were
planted with trees and shrubbery. There were
also gardens behind. The mountains which
surrounded the scene, gave a very secluded and
sheltered appearance to the valley.

The house in which Forester lived was the
largest in the village. It was a square house
of two stories. It stood back a little from the
road, in the middle of a large yard, ornamented
with rows of trees along the sides, and groups
of shrubbery in the corners and near the house.
There were gravel walks leading in different
directions through this yard, and on one side
of the house was a carriage-way, which led
from a great gate in front, to a door in one end
of the house, and thence to the stable in the
rear. On the other side of the house, near the
street, was the office,—for Forester’s father was
a lawyer. The office was a small square build-
ing, with the lawyer’s name over the door.
There was a back door to the office, and a foot-



64 Marco Pavut in VERMONT.

The village.

path, winding among trees and shrubbery,
which led from the office to the house.

The morning after they arrived, Forester
took Marco out to see the village. He intend-
ed not only to show him the various objects of
interest which were to be seen, but also to ex-
plain to him why it was that such villages
would spring up in a farming country, and what
were the occupations of the inhabitants.

“ The first thing which causes the commence-
ment of a village in New England,” said For-
ester, “is a water-fall.”

“ Why is that ?” asked Marco.

“ There are certain things,” replied Forester,
“which the farmers can not very well do for
themselves, by their own strength, particularly
grinding their corn, and sawing logs into boards
for their houses. When they first begin to set-
tle in a new country, they make the houses of
logs, and they have to take the corn and grain
a great many miles on horseback, through paths
in the woods, or, in the winter, on hand-
sleds, to get it ground. But as soon as any
of them are able to do it, they build a dam on
some stream in the neighborhood, where there
is a fall in the water, and thus get a water
power. This water power they employ, to turn



Tue ViILuaes. 65



Origin of villages. Milis,

a saw-mill and a grist-mill. Then all the far-
mers, when they want to build houses or barns,
haul logs to the mill to get them sawed into
boards, and they carry their grain to the grist-
mill and get it ground. They pay the owner
of the mills for doing this work for them. And
thus, if there are a great many farms in the
country around, and no other mills very near,
so that the mills are kept all the time at work,
the owner gets a great deal of pay, and gradu-
ally acquires property.

“ Now, as soon as the mills are built, perhaps
a blacksmith sets up a shop near them. If a
blacksmith is going to open a shop anywhere
in that town, it will be better for him to have it
near the mills, because, as the farmers all have
to come to the mills at any rate, they can avail
themselves of the opportunity, to get their
horses shod, or to get new tires to their wheels,
when they are broken.”

“Tires?” repeated Marco. ‘What are
tires ?”

“They are the iron rims around wheels.
Every wheel must have an iron band about it,
very tight, to strengthen it and to hold it firmly
together. Without a tire, a wheel would very

E .



66 Marco. Paut in VERMONT.

“The bincksmith’s shop. Wood work.

soon come to pieces, in rattling over a stony
road.

“ Besides,” continued Forester, “there is a
great deal of other iron work, which the farmers
must have done. Farmers can, generally, do
most of the wood work which they want them-
selves. They can make their rakes, and drags,
and cart-bodies, and sleds, and tool handles ; but
when they want iron work, they must go to the
blacksmith’s. They can make a harrow-frame,
but the blacksmith must make the teeth.”

“ Now I should think,” said Marco, “that it
would be easier to make the teeth than the
frame.”

“Perhaps it is as easy, if one has the forge
and tools,” replied Forester ; “ but the tools and
fixtures, necessary for blacksmith’s work, are
much more expensive than those required for
ordinary wood work. There must be a forge
built on purpose, and an anvil, supported on a
solid foundation, and various tools. All these
are necessary for shoeing a single horse, and
when they are all procured, they will answer
for all the horses of the neighborhood. Thus
it happens, that though farmers do a great deal
of their wood work themselves, at their.own
farms, in cold and stormy weather, they gener-



Tue VILLAGE. 67

Tron work. An operation.

ally have their iron work done at a blacksmith’s
at some central place, where it is easy and con-
venient for all of them to go.”

The above conversation took place between
Marco and Forester, as they were walking
along together through the village, toward the
part of the town where the mills were situated.
Just at this moment, Marco happened to cast
his eyes across the street a short distance be-
fore them, and he saw a fire on the ground in a
little yard. He asked Forester what that fire
could be. As soon as Forester saw the fire, he
exclaimed,

“Ah! they are putting a tire upon a wheel ;
that’s quite fortunate ; we'll go across and see
them.”

So they left the path under the trees where
they had been walking, and went obliquely
across the street toward the fire. Marco saw
that there was a large blacksmith’s shop there.
It was a very neat-looking building, painted red.
There was a large door in the front, and a very
low window, with a shutter hanging over it, by
the side of the door. In an open yard, by the
side of the shop, was the fire. The fire was in
the form of a ring. There were several men
standing about it; one of them, whom Marco



68 Marco Paut «in VERMONT.

“The round tire. Tires, Philosophy of tiring a wheel.

supposed was the blacksmith, by his leather
apron, was putting on small sticks of wood and
chips, here and there, around the ring. Marco
saw that there was a large iron hoop, as he call-
ed it, on the fire. It was not really a hoop; it
was atire. It was made of a much larger and
thicker bar of iron, than those which are used
for hoops. It was a tire belonging to a wheel.
The wheel was lying upon the ground near,
ready to receive the tire. It was the hind
wheel of a wagon. The wagon itself was
standing in front of the shop, with one end of
the hind axletree supported by a block.

“What do they heat the tire for?’ asked
Marco.

“ To swell it,” replied Forester. “It is ne-
cessary to have the tire go on very tight, so as
to hold the wheel together with all the force of
the iron. Now when iron is heated it swells,
and then shrinks again when it cools. So they
heat the tire hot, and put it upon the wheel in
that state. Then when it cools it shrinks, and
binds the whole wheel together with a very
strong grip.”

“But if they put it on hot, it will burn the
wood,” said Marco.

“ Yes,” replied Forester, “it will burn‘ -



Tue VILLAGE. 69

"Fellies. Putting on the tire.

wood a little. They can not help that entirely ;
but they stand ready with water, to pour on, as
soon as the tire is in its place, and so cool it
immediately, so that it does not burn the fellies
enough to injure them.”

“ What are the fellies ?” asked Marco.

“ They are the parts of the wooden rim of the
wheel. The rim is made of several pieces of
wood, which are called fellies.”

So Forester took Marco to the wheel, and
showed him the parts of which the rim was
composed. While Marco was looking at the
wheel, the blacksmith began to push away the
burning brands a little from the tire, as it began
to be hot enough. Presently he went into his
shop and brought out several pairs of tongs.
With these the men lifted the tire out of the
fire, but the blacksmith said it was a little too

ot, and he must let it cool a minute or two.

“ Why, if it’s very hot,” said Marco, “ it will
grip the wheel all the harder.”

“It will grip it too hard,” said Forester.
“Sometimes a tire shrinks so much as to
spring the spokes out of shape. Didn’t you
ever see a wheel with the spokes bent out of
shape ?”



70 Marco Paut in VERMonrT.

Bending the spokes.

“T don’t know,” said Marco. “I never no-
ticed wheels much.”

“ They do get bent, sometimes,” said Forester.
“It requires great care to put on a tire in such
a manner, as to give it just the right degree of
force to bind the wheel strongly together, with-
out straining it.”



THE TIRE,

As soon as the tire became of the right tem-
perature, the men took it up again with the
pairs of tongs—taking hold with them at differ-



Tay VILLAGE. 71



The tire hot. Water. The store,

ent sides of it—and then they put it down care-
fully over the wheel. The wheel immediately
began to smoke on all sides. In one or two
places it burst into aflame. The blacksmith,
however, paid no attention to this, but with a
hammer, which he held in his hand, he knocked
it down into its place, all around the rim; then
he took up a brown pitcher full of water, which
was standing near, and began to pour the
water on, walking round and round the wheel
as he did it, so as to extinguish the flames in
every part and cool the iron. When this pro-
cess was completed, Forester and Marco walked
on.

“ Let me see,” said Forester, “where did I
leave off, Marco, in my account of the growth
of a village ? 1 was telling you about the black-
smith’s shop, I believe.”

“ Yes,” said Marco.

“ The next thing to the blacksmith’s shop, in
the history of a New England village,” said
Forester, “is generally a store. You see the
farmers can not raise every thing they want.
There are a great many things which come
from foreign countries, which they have to
buy.”

“Such as sugar and tea,” said Marco.



72 Marco Paut In jv BRMonrt.

Making sugar. The store. The physician.

“ Yes,” replied Forester, “only they make a
great deal of sugar in Vermont out of the sap
of the maple-tree. We will go and see Mr.
Warner’s sugar bush next spring. But there
are a great many things which the farmers must
buy. One of the most important articles is iron.
Now when a man concludes to open a store,
the best place.that he can have for his business
is near the mills and the blacksmith’s shop ; be-
cause the people have to come there on other
business, and so that is the most convenient
place for them to visit his store. And so, by
and by, when a carpenter and a mason come
in‘o the country, the little village which has
thus begun to form itself, is the best place for
them to settle in, for that is the place where
people can most conveniently call and see them.
After a while a physician comes and settles
there, to heal them when they are sick, and a
lawyer to prevent disputes.”

“To prevent disputes!” said Marco. Marco
had not much idea of the nature of a lawyer's
business, but he had a sort of undefined and
vague notion, that lawyers made disputes
among men, and lived by them.

“Why, I know,” said Forester, laughing,
“that lawyers have not the credit, generally, of



Tue VILLAGE. 73

Lawyers. Forester’s opinion. The dam.

preventing many disputes, but I believe they
do. Perhaps it is because I am going to be a
lawyer myself. But I really believe that law-
yers prevent ten disputes, where they occasion
one.”

“ How do they do it?” asked Marco.

“Why, they make contracts, and draw up
writings, and teach men to be clear and dis-
tinct in their engagements and bargains. Then
besides, when men will uot pay their debts, they
compel them to do it, by legal process. And
there are a vast many debts which are paid, for
fear of this legal process, which would not have
been paid without it. Thus, knowing that the
lawyers are always ready to apply the laws,
men are much more careful not to break them,
than they otherwise would be. So that it is no
doubt vastly for the benefit of a community,
not only to have efficient laws, but efficient
lawyers to aid in the execution of them.”

By this time, Forester and Marco had reach-
ed the part of the village where the mills were
situated. Forester showed Marco the dam. It
was supported by ledges of rocks on each bank,
and there was a flume, which conducted the
water to the wheels of the mills. There were
two mills and a machine-shop. They went



14 Marco Pau, 1n VERMONT.
The lathe. The mill-pond.

into the machine-shop. There was a lathe here
carried by water. A man was at work at it,
turning hoe handles. Forester asked him what
other articles were turned there; and he said
posts for bedsteads, and rounds for chairs, and
such other things as were used in quantities in
that part of the country. Forester asked him
whether the lathe would turn brass and iron as
well as wood ; but he said it would not. It was
not fitted for that work.

“T suppose you might have a lathe here, to
work in the metals,” said Forester.

“ Yes,” replied the man, “but it would not
be worth while. There is very little of that
kind of work wanted in this part of the coun-
try.”

After looking at the mills, Forester and Mar-
co walked along up the stream a little way, to
look at the mill-pond. Whenever a dam is
made, it causes a pond to be formed above it,
more or less extensive, according to the nature
of the ground. In this case there was quite a
large pond, formed by the accumulation of the
water above thedam. The pond was not very
wide, but it extended more than a mile up the
stream. The banks were picturesque and beau-
tiful, being overhung with trees in some places,



Tue Vivace. 75
An exploring expedition.

and in others presenting verdant slopes, down
to the water's edge.

“ That’s a good pond to go a-fishing in,” said
Marco.

“Yes,” said Forester, “and it makes fine
skating ground in the winter.”

Marco and Forester followed the banks of
the mill-pond, until they came to the end of the
still water; beyond that they saw a rapid run-
ning stream, coming down from the mountains.
Marco wished to follow this stream up farther,
to see what they would come to, and Forester
consented. The ground ascended more and
more the farther they proceeded, and the view
began to be shut in by forests, precipices and
mountains. Marco liked clambering over the
rocks, and he found a great deal to interest
him at every step of the way. He saw several
squirrels and one rabbit. He wanted Forester
to get him a gun and let him come out into
those woods a-gunning.

“ No,” said Forester.

“Why not ?” asked Marco.

“That is dangerous amusement.”

“Why? Do you think I should get killed
with my gun?” asked Marco.

“No,” replied Forester, “I don’t think you



76 Marco Paut in VERMonrT.

Taking riske. Different kinds of risks.

would; but you might get killed. The risk
would be too great for the benefit.”

“Why, you told me the other day, that it
was a great thing to learn to take risks coolly.
If I had a gun I could practice and learn.”

“ Yes,” said Forester, “ it is well to take risks
coolly, when the advantage is sufficient to jus-
tify it. For instance, when you crept down
upon the pole the other day, to get the reins,
you took a great risk, but perhaps you saved
the lives of the passengers by it. That was
right—but to hazard your life, for the sake of
the pleasure of shooting a squirrel, is not wise.”
Marco had before this time told him about his
getting the reins.

“T shouldn’t think there was much danger,”
said Marco.

“ No,” said Forester, “ there’s very little dan-
ger. In using a gun, you put yourself in a very
little danger of a very great calamity: There’s
very little probability that your gun would
burst, or that you would ever shoot accidentally
any other person ;—very little indeed. But if
the gun were to burst, and blow off one of your
arms, or put out your eyes, or if you were to
shoot another boy, the calamity would be a very
terrible one. So we call it a great risk.”



Tue VILLAGE. 17



The log.

“It seems to be a small risk of a great ca-
lamity,” said Marco.

“ Yes,” replied Forester, “but we call it a
great risk. We call the risk great, when either
the evil which we are in danger of is great, or
when the chance of its befalling us is great.
For example, if you and I-were to walk over
that log which lies across the stream, we should
run a great risk ; but that would be, not a small
chance of a great evil, but a great chance of a
small evil. There would be a great chance
that we should fall off into the stream ; but that
would not be much of an evil as we should only
get ourselves wet.”

“Let us go and
try it,” said Marco. 4

“Not I,” said
Forester. “You 3am
may, however, if aN
you please. I am §
willing to have you °
take such a risk .'
as that, for your 7
amusement.” x

Marco went to ¢
the log, and walked
back and _ forth

across it, as com-





78 Marco Paut in VeERmonrT.

Marco’s dexterity. A fine view.

posedly as if it were a broad plank, lying upon
the ground. Finally, he hopped across it on one
foot, to show Forester his dexterity. Forester
was surprised. He did not know how much
skill in such feats Marco had acquired by his
gymnastics in New York.

After this, Forester and Marco clambered up
some rocks on an elevated summit, where they
had a fine view of the village below them.
They could trace the river, winding through
the valley, with the green intervals on both
sides of it. They could see the village and the
streets, with the spire of the meeting-house in
the center. The mill-pond was in full view
also; and Marco’s attention was attracted by
a boat, which he saw gliding over the surface
of the water.

“QO! there is a boat,” said Marco.

Yes,” said Forester. “I have paddled over
the water many a time in her.”

“How many oars does she pull?” asked
Marco.

“Oars ?” said Forester, “no oars; they use
paddles.” .

“TI wish they had some oars,” said Marco,
“and then I would get a crew of boys, and
teach them to manage a boat man-o’-war
fashion.”



Tue VILLAGE. 79

The boat.

“How do you know any thing about it?”
asked Forester.

“O, I learned at New York, in the boats at
the Battery.”

“ Well,” said Forester, “ we'll have some oars
made, and get a crew. I should like to learn
myself.”

“Let us go down and see the boat,” said
Marco, “ now.”

“ No,” replied Forester, “it is time to go to
dinner now; but we'll come and see the boat
the next time we go to take a walk.”

So Marco and Forester came down the hill,
and thence went across the fields home to din-
ner. They dined at half-past twelve o’clock,
which seemed a very strange hour to Marco.



80 Marco Pau. in VeEerRMonrT.

The back office. Books.

CHarrer V.
StrupyiIne.

HE little building where Forester’s father
had his office, had a small back room in
it, which opened from the office proper, and
which was used as a library and private study.
It had a small fire place in it, and there was a
table in the middle of the room, with a large
portable writing-desk upon it. This desk was
made of rosewood. The sides of the room were
lined with book-shelves. There was one large
window which looked upon the yard and gar-
den behind. The books in this room were
principally law-books, though there were some
books of history and travels, and great diction-
aries of various kinds. Forester conducted
Marco into this room, a day or two after their
arrival in the village, saying, ,
“Here, Marco, this is to be our study. How
do you like it ?”
“Very well,” said Marco. “It is a very
pleasant room. Am] to study all these books ?”



Srupyine. 81



Marco’s desk.



“ Not more than one at a time, at any rate,”
said Forester.

“ This is my place, I suppose,” said Marco ;
and so saying he sat down in a great arm-chair,
before the portable writing-desk, which was
open on the table.

SS
i
f}

we
\X

Y
Z
aot

th
=5

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a4
aes
7

te)
i nt



- THE STUDY.

“No,” said Forester, “that is my place. I
am going to arrange your establishment near
the window. James has gone to bring your
desk now.”

:



82 Marco Pauu in VERMONT.

ee
Forester’s arrangements. Ink, paper and pens.

While he was speaking, the door opened, and
James, the young man who lived at Forester’s
father’s came in, bringing a desk. It was
painted blue, and had four legs. These legs
were of such a length as to make the desk just
high enough for Marco. James put it down, at
Forester’s direction, near the window. It
was placed with the left side toward the win-
dow, so that the light from the window would
strike across the desk from left to right. This
is the most convenient direction for receiving
light when one is writing. Forester then placed
a chair before the desk, and Marco went into
the house and brought out all the books and
papers which he had, and arranged them neatly
in his desk. While he was gone, Forester took
an inkstand and a sand-box out of a closet by
the side of the fire, and filled them both, and
put them on the desk. He also placed in the
desk a supply of paper, in quarter sheets. After
Marco had come back, and had put in his
books and papers, Forester gave him a ruler
and:a lead pencil ; also a slate and half a dozen
slate pencils ; also a piece of sponge and a piece
of India-rubber. He gave him besides a little
square phial, and sent him to fill it with water,



STUDYING. 83

Marco’s questions. A bunch of pens,

so that he might have water always at hand to
wet his sponge with.

“Now is that all you will want?” asked
Forester.

“ Why, yes, I should think so,” said Marco.
“If I should want any thing else, I can ask
you, you know. You are going to stay here
and study too ?”

“ Yes,” said Forester ; “but your asking me
is just what I wish to avoid. I wish to arrange
it so that we shall both have our time to our-
selves, without interruption.”

“ But I shall have to ask you questions when
I get into difficulty,” said Marco.

“No,” said Forester, “1 hope not. I mean
to contrive it so that you can get out of diffi-
culty yourself. Let me see. You will want
some pens. I will get a bunch of quills and
make them up into pens for you.”

“ What, a whole bunch ?” said Marco.

“ Yes,” replied Forester. “I don’t wish to
have you come to me, when I am in the midst
of a law argument, to get me to make a pen.”

Steel pens were very little used in those days.

While Forester was making the pens, he said,

“ There are twenty-five quills ina bunch. I
shall tie them up, when they are ready, into



84: Marco Pau.t in VERMONT.

Rules for Marco. . Various arrangements,

two bunches, of about a dozen in each. These
you will put in your desk. When you want a
pen, you will draw one out of the bunches and
use it. You must not stop to look them over,
to choose a good one, but you must take any
one that comes first to hand, because, if any one
should not be good, the sooner you get it out
and try it, and ascertain that it is not good, the
sooner you will get it out of the way.”

“ Well,” said Marco, “and what shall I do
with the bad ones ?”

“Wipe them clean,—by the way, you must
have a good penwiper,—and then put them to-
gether in a particular place in your desk.
When you have thus used one bunch, tie them
up and lay the bunch on my desk to be mended,
and then you can go on using the other bunch.
This will give me opportunity to choose a con-
venient time to mend the first bunch again.
When I have mended them, I will tie them up
and Jay them on your desk again. Thus you
will always have a supply of pens, and I shall
never be interrupted to mend one. This will
be a great deal more convenient, both for you
and for me.”

“Only it will use up a great many more
pens,” replied Marco.



StTupyIne. 85
Recese. A difficulty.

“No,” said Forester; “not at all. We shall
have more in use at one time, it is true, but the
whole bunch may last as long as if we had only
one cut at a time.

“We shall begin to study,” continued For-
ester, “at nine o'clock, and leave off at twelve.
That will give you half an hour to run about
and play before dinner.”

“ And a recess ?” said Marco,—“I ought to
have a recess.”

“Why, there’s a difficulty about a recess,”
said Forester. “I shall have it on my mind
every day, to tell you when it is time for the
recess, and when it is time to come in.”

“Ono,” replied Marco, “I can find out when
it is time for the recess. Let it be always at
ten o’clock, and I can look at the watch.”

Marco referred to a watch belonging to For-
ester’s father, which was kept hung up over the
mantel-piece in their little study.

“I think it probable you would find out when
it was time for the recess to begin,” said For-
ester, “but you would not be so careful about
the end of it. You would get engaged in play,
and would forget how the time was passing,
and I should have to go out and call you in.”

“Couldn’t you have a little bell ?” said Marco.



86 Marco Pauu «in VERMONT.



Various plans. Forester’s ideas.



“ But I don’t wish to have any thing of that
kind to do,” said Forester. “I am going to in-
struct you half an hour every morning, begin-
ning at nine o’clock, and I want to have it all
so arranged, that after that, I shall be left en-
tirely to myself, so that can go on with my
studies, as well as you with yours. If we can
do this successfully, then, when noon comes, I
shall feel that 1 have done my morning’s work
well, and you and I can go off in the afternoon
on all sorts of expeditions. But if I have to
spend the whole morning in attending to you,
then I must stay at home and attend to my own
studies in the afternoon.”

“ Well,” said Marco, “I think I can find out
when to come in.”

“ We'll try it one or two mornings, but I have
no idea that you will succeed. However, we
can give up the plan if we find that you stay
out too long. You may have five minutes’ re-
cess every day, at eleven o'clock. On the
whole it shall be ten minutes. And this shall
be the plan of your studies for the morning. At
nine o’clock, I shall give you instruction for half
an hour. Then you may study arithmetic for
one hour; then write half an hour; then have
a recess for ten minutes ; then read for the rest



Strupyine. 87
=»

Directions about studying. The schedule.

of the last hour. That will bring it to twelve
o'clock.”

“But I can’t study arithmetic, alone,” said
Marco.

“ Yes,” said Forester, “I shall show you how,
in the first half-hour when I am giving you my
instructions. Now, are you willing really to
try to carry this system into effect, pleasantly
and prosperously ?”

“Yes,” said Marco, “I'll try.”

“We shall find some inconveniences and
troubles at first, I have no doubt,” said Forester ;
“but if we are patient and persevering, we
shall soon make the system go smoothly.”

Forester then said, that as Marco might for-
get what he had to do each hour, he would
make a sort of map of the hours, with the name
of the study which he was to pursue marked in
each. This he called a schedule. The sched-
ule, when it was completed, was as follows:

XI

go foo tg
Eley

This schedule was drawn neatly on a piece

Ix.

ms
iA

Instruction. -
Arithmetic. ><.

Writing.





88 Marco Paut tn VERMONT.
oe

—____SSSSSSSSSssSsSsseS
Forester a teachor. The writing-book.

of paper, and fastened with wafers to the under
side of the lid of Marco’s desk, so that he could
look at it at any time, by opening his desk.

It was in the afternoon that this conversation
was held, and these preparations made. The
next morning, at nine o'clock, Marco and For-
ester went into the little study, and Forester
gave him his instructions. He took his arith-
metic, and explained to him how to perform
some examples, under one of the rules. Fores-
ter performed one or two of them himself, ex-
plaining very particularly all the steps. He
then rubbed out his work, and directed Marco
to perform them by himself in the same man-
ner. “If you succeed in doing these right,” said
he, “ you may set yourself some others of the
same kind, with different numbers, and perform
those too. If you get into any difficulty, you
must not ask me, but you may set yourself
sums in addition, and spend the rest of the hour
in doing them. That, you can certainly do
without help.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “I can do that.”

“ The next half-hour is for writing,” said For-
ester. “I will set you some copies.”

So Forester took a writing-book, which he
had prepared, and wrote Marco some copies,



SrTupyi na. 89
‘Gopiss (ttt”t”*~ one on the top of each page. Marco looked
over him while he wrote. It is very important
that a child should see his teacher write his
copies, for thus he will see how the letters
should be formed. Forester wrote four or five
copies for Marco, and while he was writing
them he gave him particular instructions about
the manner of holding his pen, and shaping the
letters.

“ Now,” said Forester, “ you can not pos-
sibly have occasion to come to me about your
writing ; for here are pages enough for you to
write upon for several days, and you have plen-
ty of pens.”

“ But I should think you would want to see
whether I write it well,” said Marco.

“J shall examine it carefully to-morrow
morning,” said Forester.

“ Very well,” said Marco; “ after the writing
will come the recess.”

“ Yes,” said Forester, “ and then the reading.”

“ What shall I read ?” asked Marco. -

Forester then rose and. went to one of the
book-shelves, where there was a set of books,
entitled the American Encyclopedia. There
were thirteen octavo volumes in the set. It
was rather too high for Marco to reach it, and



90 Masco Paut in VERMONT.

Marco’s reading-book. Memoranda to be made.

so Forester took all the volumes down and
placed them on a lower shelf, not far from the
window, in a place where Marco could get easy
access to them.

“There,” said Forester; “there is your li-
brary. The American Encyclopedia is a sort
of a dictionary. When your reading hour
comes, you may take down any volume of this
Encyclopedia, and turn to any article you
please. Or you may think of any subject that
you would like to read about, as for instance,
boat, cannon, camel, eagle, trout, horse, or any
other subject, and take down the proper vol-
ume and find the article. You can find it by
the letters which are printed on the backs of
the volumes.”

“Let us look now,’ said Marco, “ and see
what it says about trouts.”

“No, not now,” replied Forester; “when
your reading hour comes, you may read what
you choose. Only you must have a piece of
~paper at hand, and write upon it the title of
every article which you read, and show it to
me the next morning, because I shall wish to
know what you have been reading, and perhaps
to question you about it. Now you understand
your work, do you not ?”



STuDYING. 91

Marco not to be watched.





“Yes,” said Marco; “ and what are you go-
ing to do?”

“0, I’m going to study my law-books.”

“Shall you stay here and study ?”

“ Yes,” replied Forester, “I shall be here most
of the time. Sometimes I shall be called into
the other room, perhaps, on business with my
father; but that need not make any difference
with you.”

“Only, then there will be nobody to watch
me,” said Marco.

“©, I shall not watch you any, even when |
am here. I shall pay no attention to you at all.
I can judge to-morrow morning, when I come
to look at your work and give you new instruc-
tions, whether you have been industrious or not.
Even if I accidentally see you doing any thing
wrong, I shall not probably say any thing about
it. I shall remember it, and speak to you about
it to-morrow morning, in my half-hour. I shall
do everything in my half-hour.”

Marco felt somewhat relieved, to think that
he was not going to be under a very rigid ob-
servation in his studies.

“T do not expect,” said Forester, “that you
will do very well for the first few days. It will
take some time to get this system under full



92 Marco Paut in Vermont.

Marco’s promises. Ab answer.

operation. I presume that you will come to me
as many as ten times the first day.”

“O, no,” said Marco, “I don’t mean to come
to you once.”

“ You will,—I have no doubt. What shall 1
say to youif you do? Will it be a good plan
for me to answer your question ?”

“ Why, no,” said Marco, “I suppose not.”

“ And yet, if I refuse to answer, it will not be
very pleasant to you. It will put you out of
humor.”

“No,” said Marco.

“T will have one invariable answer to give
you,” said Forester. “It shall be this,—Act
according to your own judgment. That will
be a little more civil than to take no notice of
your question at all, and yet it will preserve our
principle,—that I am to give you no assistance
except in my half-hour. Then, besides, I will
keep an account of the number of questions you
ask me, and see if they do not amount to ten.”

By this time Forester’s half-hour was out,
and Marco went to his desk.

“There’s one thing,” said Marco, “before I
begin :—may I have the window open ?”

“ Act according to your own judgment,” said
Forester, “and there is one question asked.”



STuDYING. 93

Coming to an understanding.

So Forester made one mark upon a paper which
he had upon the table.

“ But, cousin Forester, it is not right to count
that, for I had not begun.”

Forester made no reply, but began arranging
his note-books, as if he was about commencing
his own studies. Marco looked at him a mo-
ment, and then he
rose and_ gently
opened the window
and began his
work.

Marco was but
little accustomed
to solitary study, ;
and, after perform- "WHiAg
ing one of the ex- 7j
amples which For -
ester had given
him, he thought he
was tired, and he
began to look out the window and to play with
his pencil. He would lay his pencil upon the
upper side of his slate, and let it roll down. As
the pencil was not round, but polygonal in its
form, it made a curious clicking sound in roll-
ing down, which amused Marco, though it dis-





MARCO’S DBSE.



94 Marco Pauu in VERMONT.

eC
Marco’s amusement. He loses his pencil.



turbed and troubled Forester. Whatever may
have been the nice peculiarities in the delicate
mechanism of Forester’s ear, and of the nerves
connected with it, compared with that of Mar-
co’s, by which the same sound produced a sen-
sation of pleasure in one ear, while it gave only
pain in the other, it would require a very pro-
found philosopher to explain. But the effect
was certain. Forester, however, did not speak,
but let Marco roll his pencil down the slate
as long as he pleased.

This was not long, however; Marco soon
grew tired of it, and then began to look out the
window. There was a little staple in the
window sill, placed there as a means of fas-
tening the blind. Marco pushed the point of
his pencil into this staple, in order to see if it
would go through. It did go through in an in-
stant, and slipping through his fingers, it fell out
of the window.

“Dear me! there goes my pencil. My pen-
cil has dropped out of the window, cousin For-
ester ; shall I go out and get it ?”

“ Act according to your own judgment,” said
Forester. At the same time he was saying
this, he made another mark upon his paper.

“Why, vou ought not to count that, cousin



STUDYING. 95

Marco goes out for his pencil.

Forester,” said Marco, “for I don’t know
whether you'd wish me to go and get that pen-
cil, or take another out of my desk.”

“ Act according to your own judgment,” re-
plied Forester.

Marco looked perplexed and troubled. In
fact, he was a little displeased to find that For-
ester would not answer him. He thought that
it was an unforeseen emergency, which Forester
ought to have considered an exception to his
rule. But he was obliged to decide the ques-
tion for himself, and he concluded to go out for
his pencil. It took him some time to find it in
the grass, and after he had found it, he stopped
for'some time longer, to watch some ants which
were passing in and out, at the entrance to
their nest, each one bringing up a grain of sand
in his forceps. When Marco came in, he found
that his hour for arithmetic was so nearly ex-
pired, that he should not have time to finish
another sum, if he should begin it; so he put
his arithmetical apparatus away, and took out
his writing-book.

Marco went through the whole forenoon
pretty much in the same way. He spent a
large part of his time in looking out of the win-
dow and about the room. ' He went out at the



96 Marco Pauvt in VERMONT.

Forester satisfied with Marco.

time for the recess, but he stayed out twenty
minutes instead of ten. He was astonished,
when he came in, to see how rapidly the time
had passed. He then took down a volume of
the Encyclopedia, and read until twelve o’clock,
and then, leaving the volume of the Encyclo-
pedia and his writing-book on his desk, he told
Forester that the study hours were over, and
went away.

The next morning, at nine, Forester asked
him how he had got along the day before.
Marco had the frankness to admit that he did
not get along very well.

“Still,” said Forester, “ I am well satisfied on
the whole. You did very well for a first ex-
periment. In the first place, you did really
make some effort to. carry out my plan. You
kept the reckoning of the hours, and changed
your studies at the appointed time. You did
not speak to me more than three or four times,
and then you acquiesced pretty good-naturedly
in my refusing to help you. To-day you will
do better, I have no doubt, and to-morrow better
still. And thus, in the course of a week, I have
great confidence that you will learn to study for
three hours by yourself, to good advantage.”

“ Two hours and a half it is,” said Marco.



Stupyine. 97

Marco's recreations.



“Yes,” said Forester.

It resulted as Forester predicted. Marco,
finding that Forester was disposed to be pleased
with and to commend his efforts, made greater
efforts every day, and, in the course of a week,
he began to be a very respectable student. In
the afternoon he used to ramble about, some-
times with Forester, and sometimes alone. He
was very fond of fishing, and Forester used to
allow him to go to certain parts of the river,
where the water was not deep, alone, trusting
to his word that he would confine himself
strictly to the prescribed bounds.

a



98 Marco Pauu in Vermont.

Marco’s character.

Crarrer VI,
Tur Loe Canor.

KY’ thing went on very prosperously,
for a week or two, in the little study.
Marco became more and more attentive to his
studies, and more and more interested in them.
He was often getting into little difficulties, it is
true, and giving trouble to his uncle and aunt;
but then he generally seemed sorry afterward
for the trouble which he had thus occasioned,
and he bore reproof, and such punishments as
his cousin thought it necessary to inflict, with
so much good-humor, that they all readily for-
gave him for his faults and misdemeanors.

One day, however, about a fortnight after
he had commenced his studies, he got led away,
through the influence of a peculiar temptation,
into a rather serious act of transgression, which
might have been followed by very grave con-
sequences. The circumstances were these.
He had commenced his studies as usual, after
having received his half-hour’s instruction from
Forester, and was in the midst of the process



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'927' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIQY' 'sip-files00007.txt'
9b9b33bc6a1505f90c90036ce284ab32
5baaab435075d03e1e2408dae2b3335728cf1f5a
'2011-12-16T20:24:24-05:00'
describe
'452' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIQZ' 'sip-files00008.txt'
371f373a5833fc73b857416db19a9d6a
3cb8a8c6e23f6a608fce21e6f81b9eb63736e116
'2011-12-16T20:23:38-05:00'
describe
'444' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRA' 'sip-files00009.txt'
9f17538ccd86ed0c9c461f89aa51883f
b5601066e33976c9b9ff37bf8cd74bb1e2001dff
'2011-12-16T20:21:20-05:00'
describe
'544' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRB' 'sip-files00010.txt'
19e87b7dc48a28f07d952ed415bc51b2
1af7bdc34506061e7476ded58ced7b1092d5403b
'2011-12-16T20:23:28-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'224' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRC' 'sip-files00011.txt'
9ca35649467de2ce2e2a10330778cdd9
840c8da949983872cdce65eef57296793fb5855d
'2011-12-16T20:24:11-05:00'
describe
'280' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRD' 'sip-files00012.txt'
f63e7283217eae9fc9f1b975d112bc46
46e4b916d35e6e7758c265e51681a210bbc97b99
'2011-12-16T20:17:16-05:00'
describe
'937' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRE' 'sip-files00013.txt'
35de09f4b16b15ffcde2ce8575cac2ce
acdb836bf68dc5553c0efd283792fefd33738026
'2011-12-16T20:16:40-05:00'
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRF' 'sip-files00014.txt'
7f113367d1de61de7a4802c2fb4f1243
ed976f31c8e7eeb5a05162468477555350eadd01
'2011-12-16T20:14:41-05:00'
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRG' 'sip-files00015.txt'
c80617e6ae58b8ffe0d0eb3faa31e709
da4073527c7635eda42e7ea5573d45b7b7c8759c
'2011-12-16T20:23:08-05:00'
describe
'546' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRH' 'sip-files00016.txt'
c735d5320fa46a89562fc6e82bc9e66b
b4c13f90ccd9915fd6628512226247e997fe29dd
'2011-12-16T20:16:02-05:00'
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRI' 'sip-files00017.txt'
b43793b2a4b2b2520494f6b3f39b70f7
ec3606a1f79c6fdc1f17002e6703077be14fadfe
'2011-12-16T20:21:27-05:00'
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRJ' 'sip-files00018.txt'
b3f6cba4f587d99b67a8d32b76af3abe
bb710f830843f490c0e50e9d9a87c21fe18427c2
'2011-12-16T20:14:05-05:00'
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRK' 'sip-files00019.txt'
2c6c1830a839c9ff41f1340ba88fa856
0a01a19b2ac9c0056dc65d08eb2c6498c2e027d2
'2011-12-16T20:20:23-05:00'
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRL' 'sip-files00020.txt'
8f6ed37b77545e3b136674fa244fac23
39404805541065e9cda792c7da61f3ce02a78487
'2011-12-16T20:20:31-05:00'
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRM' 'sip-files00021.txt'
952eb139acf5a04a46be141c43cba0e1
cdf20f434d626da62b6d7c3009cb45cb07494813
'2011-12-16T20:22:23-05:00'
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRN' 'sip-files00022.txt'
202ef1f4a10c5a86855da89356fb41fb
0f5af5009fe4fdf4bcad2a4db5360cebd0f65263
'2011-12-16T20:18:42-05:00'
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRO' 'sip-files00023.txt'
0365b1771042bd284b4f1c7a5295984c
b8dd8d126c174346a6f31c7e5111af4398557049
'2011-12-16T20:24:14-05:00'
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRP' 'sip-files00024.txt'
026bda0cd879e52f90510962424d304f
c879775a2ec1b62780ffc32cb56c29cf139b73ab
'2011-12-16T20:15:08-05:00'
describe
'1354' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRQ' 'sip-files00025.txt'
222d4b13dcb589b6d0c4749824651677
5dc6e2a2d7446d1618f2fcdbbf745ea59ef52425
'2011-12-16T20:20:56-05:00'
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRR' 'sip-files00026.txt'
79f7cc2586a213b4a6415c2d99c297cb
1e66b9d7d64ce90447a9817099fa790fb6775a3a
'2011-12-16T20:25:39-05:00'
describe
'574' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRS' 'sip-files00027.txt'
5a991251b979471a78c922d1e8206d88
853d9e3ff2de84a180ce56a9b69de81707f4d9a4
'2011-12-16T20:18:22-05:00'
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRT' 'sip-files00028.txt'
7e4f0579041a609b995ef51dba46ae25
426bb87d3a5e2ac9350990e646e86a13bf465fd8
'2011-12-16T20:25:25-05:00'
describe
'1218' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRU' 'sip-files00029.txt'
ddd4b51207d1455e2b485b768d58c219
a602fb23660b65be8a36a3027bc14e6d345974ca
'2011-12-16T20:23:30-05:00'
describe
'1277' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRV' 'sip-files00030.txt'
6ae4dc723aa7a56d85e4f7867cd7dfbd
8c07ea8e25b1749cef8892d9c8ef40aef29f52e7
'2011-12-16T20:19:44-05:00'
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRW' 'sip-files00031.txt'
943c084efd911e1c114a356f8c95cb9d
fca91ffe4887d56cbe69ff4a2d05008288054a95
'2011-12-16T20:19:31-05:00'
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRX' 'sip-files00032.txt'
a0cb22a77725b8795e4cbfc6b095cfca
e602cf1ae98367be99e4a88a399c05350ccc35df
'2011-12-16T20:23:36-05:00'
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRY' 'sip-files00033.txt'
92c4e68d016908a66c419d57fc15cc92
dafd32e2ef50850c8b2b30af86332489a4c09838
'2011-12-16T20:14:46-05:00'
describe
'1349' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIRZ' 'sip-files00034.txt'
5066e4545a33133d1622ddec0e84b860
a93f2bc128ad5434c1f6f7739c97dd9a6a64fe41
'2011-12-16T20:23:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISA' 'sip-files00035.txt'
d469de0c1d3c23cb498a055d904dcf20
cc17c9c54f5411851abe186d3780b3990d202082
'2011-12-16T20:18:06-05:00'
describe
'548' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISB' 'sip-files00036.txt'
1914a88270c7b937e4d5958bec2e6ecf
6cfa1e2ac4f4020743404ef861cd7bb31f7404b7
'2011-12-16T20:16:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISC' 'sip-files00037.txt'
682e572b12b0fcabd61f12ede2764e1f
c3a94e74e4c8ccb0fa6bb6413a22654535337a7d
'2011-12-16T20:15:56-05:00'
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISD' 'sip-files00038.txt'
0b6cd50123e9cc132d40b6d7620ba592
b173bc2353a107fa0f3e35266fa2c62862bf24c3
'2011-12-16T20:23:12-05:00'
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISE' 'sip-files00039.txt'
cb31e4ee46d22f79f5e421dcde21a4a4
98e6051dd6b9807f9745523fd17d9cf3a911e99d
'2011-12-16T20:16:35-05:00'
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISF' 'sip-files00040.txt'
81c8490438d9dc3a20de70eef0238f4d
655ed99d4bcf635efffad57a07a5ce168ecbd73c
'2011-12-16T20:25:15-05:00'
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISG' 'sip-files00041.txt'
55592727e099f39089a2777ffbb23f5c
2591894e9ec5d235f5f4ccef79665c481565428a
'2011-12-16T20:15:35-05:00'
describe
'1316' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISH' 'sip-files00042.txt'
8a460ca769b5edae6c9f8764a501019a
dbb8c6fac154746ab945d3719e73c1f870d64903
'2011-12-16T20:25:32-05:00'
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISI' 'sip-files00043.txt'
19fbacaac4b8b852ef908e5f4411d725
2d43f64d0eaf7ad495ec93749e29bfdd6c3901b6
'2011-12-16T20:16:33-05:00'
describe
'1341' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISJ' 'sip-files00044.txt'
f354abdde28ddc787483dfb1c7d10255
d14bcd766cb133141d5ec2efc09705210042662d
'2011-12-16T20:21:32-05:00'
describe
'758' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISK' 'sip-files00045.txt'
6262bb8aec75e295c2d5ed4a4e8ca22d
d725c1879fd8bbdb15b0bf83af05c34f96f5e9ce
'2011-12-16T20:20:21-05:00'
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISL' 'sip-files00046.txt'
96941f30458aef3a48aa649a8e5ccfa8
cb89235729f655850fe4486e1bc2c08ba5484da0
'2011-12-16T20:23:46-05:00'
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISM' 'sip-files00047.txt'
3ec490993804068aaaa236b8454f3d65
27bfddfab9747d21cfce31fe373acdf5b6f0bcef
'2011-12-16T20:21:23-05:00'
describe
'628' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISN' 'sip-files00048.txt'
644780bb82c1592ef1ca8f1680efce18
15869087cad9a3d49b7d2d97bcc8a610fb0a5709
'2011-12-16T20:22:30-05:00'
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISO' 'sip-files00049.txt'
022d0643b6d49af113ff1433ac4eaa93
44ef987a79c5f563a638ccf277b05353ec685b27
'2011-12-16T20:19:37-05:00'
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISP' 'sip-files00050.txt'
c6a2ffa4334b8c9ff5174690ce7740b4
0149a93cb4a6074374362a5f1f60a14b644e75ec
'2011-12-16T20:15:03-05:00'
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISQ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
1d92733ccfbc35dd5f276104c5fc1113
67c1d0f81b6c0c25519932f6e2597e91f1534df2
'2011-12-16T20:21:17-05:00'
describe
'1256' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISR' 'sip-files00052.txt'
797319c61d493dceff4491dfaea28475
c68e9cca5fac986adfb40d0331aa781017087065
'2011-12-16T20:14:56-05:00'
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISS' 'sip-files00053.txt'
4e072fbf244b234f7c631f9ad7d028d5
8dbb93938146ed0052b5ad05dbcacdff52bb145c
'2011-12-16T20:22:16-05:00'
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIST' 'sip-files00054.txt'
c830c858c60630aabd16963420342cdf
ffcf7c219a6bdc340cf648d354e6d1648d7c302c
'2011-12-16T20:18:04-05:00'
describe
'907' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISU' 'sip-files00055.txt'
07968351fbb01f1969a2ea7efd9d2dbd
9fe44f2fd5f7cd1a231dffb39c7f9dc327024b24
'2011-12-16T20:14:20-05:00'
describe
'1251' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISV' 'sip-files00056.txt'
b23d5175d0ea75dcf221943fc3b289b2
202a4e8ed13d481882d1bcee19a872cbd102f47d
'2011-12-16T20:15:43-05:00'
describe
'1321' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISW' 'sip-files00057.txt'
6c2b07d8af1afad31cc696cb1b264b64
7cd639629ac81efaefb4ee4ec1a3eef99d3f39e9
'2011-12-16T20:17:04-05:00'
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISX' 'sip-files00058.txt'
8a4cf9b858b0eea6f2a7a26adb159fe2
35142cf77abd4434adf6c4438b99053d0c858c28
'2011-12-16T20:21:12-05:00'
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISY' 'sip-files00059.txt'
a9c12f5c0db2e63a14b11e3a332b6c72
eb9bcf8cd63c221a44202fefa9b2440f2d881fcf
'2011-12-16T20:24:32-05:00'
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAISZ' 'sip-files00060.txt'
da3b75c55c44bec6dca3a7d7bc0b130c
5afb9106cc5c721ba754d48738d7c1338f110bcf
'2011-12-16T20:18:27-05:00'
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITA' 'sip-files00061.txt'
73d19a4ee21438f3989b588397189903
6dcfa2489f9a5d8e42faa8f574e001873fe997da
'2011-12-16T20:16:49-05:00'
describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITB' 'sip-files00062.txt'
c1ee20acd99f4270fc99293393244fd4
15f1a1c379e6aec9dacb7240579fa264e44aa13b
'2011-12-16T20:23:03-05:00'
describe
'991' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITC' 'sip-files00063.txt'
4a00eefae4a59549c4faea31916c2547
164e8a4460146241d3d00306cd3c40ec340c051d
'2011-12-16T20:17:08-05:00'
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITD' 'sip-files00064.txt'
5c11da226c12a31d1944d94a8b2b7b86
45ac743a4aedbfc97886cf53dcc4c02062b8d727
'2011-12-16T20:15:41-05:00'
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITE' 'sip-files00065.txt'
8e5cd466a851901b9493cce673f6911e
09779dfef926c11032e55c2c4ec435c2df1b8370
'2011-12-16T20:21:24-05:00'
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITF' 'sip-files00066.txt'
0fe2f7efde69c55c060a7d8bbd94c49a
a3a720b9e596e1751a7bf63f844a800482e331b5
'2011-12-16T20:25:24-05:00'
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITG' 'sip-files00067.txt'
dac49c832791087736d4e653ff55cdc7
c3e17196ac78091cc43858afbe98d4b926c7d73b
'2011-12-16T20:15:13-05:00'
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITH' 'sip-files00068.txt'
a4efde7ea7a96d1ab7fe2382f8c83425
ed222983b5d26a834a37028ca7b366b3dc91ba02
'2011-12-16T20:15:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITI' 'sip-files00069.txt'
5f757fc346cdc202c419d95858879106
dc6a6b5491182ba5dac5b74169d44e321f1a89ad
'2011-12-16T20:16:04-05:00'
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITJ' 'sip-files00070.txt'
ab1b6f98a61c5aa32e9549dd69a83ace
706286eca0e214b47d752388346615790025b26e
'2011-12-16T20:21:56-05:00'
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITK' 'sip-files00071.txt'
10393da48ee0375b2cbd10778252b4fb
ab6a9ae4b2d5de70da984f5d94eabc527026c04f
'2011-12-16T20:21:33-05:00'
describe
'524' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITL' 'sip-files00072.txt'
ecefb7427da5e7c6ea8d6935988589be
2ac87e511b62e70bd86eb36262a3bdbe84bc994f
'2011-12-16T20:23:42-05:00'
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITM' 'sip-files00073.txt'
b21675ad1e365ca0b707421c3059f232
50ccd55f2f3d2abb7b06c6c8fa3f8c7cfcac6b2e
'2011-12-16T20:22:54-05:00'
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITN' 'sip-files00074.txt'
1d2801851bee6d9d59386f3ed211b5a2
dd3dc4fc7e6b44b939afc1ee651d66ae183e1a25
'2011-12-16T20:21:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITO' 'sip-files00075.txt'
d57885eff5d29517b9234389c99c58ad
f633b4492681e13720e622d45d31eb94c2a315ad
'2011-12-16T20:16:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITP' 'sip-files00076.txt'
a3e6539b6e51faf6cc274e3e32e12120
ee112468a930bbac3830a340aa7112d20b07bd33
'2011-12-16T20:24:50-05:00'
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITQ' 'sip-files00077.txt'
7f4638ef2c571919d8573a150fdc2621
1a49756eb83b5fe8c5fe4adacc7ebd909c11096f
'2011-12-16T20:19:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITR' 'sip-files00078.txt'
72f980e30e9a18c1d93471743dbbbe1c
7108de6599ee67b41a7f38f317e01dc32a53267a
'2011-12-16T20:23:31-05:00'
describe
'979' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITS' 'sip-files00079.txt'
800061ef36d1a2bd9c672797e753d3fb
75d91d5443455313149b3e8c3c7914499050176a
'2011-12-16T20:23:50-05:00'
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITT' 'sip-files00080.txt'
4b7dc68da46e8a3d99c043cc2668f6ff
7e204ffe44fde97ba824d6b44b0b03413aa48bb1
'2011-12-16T20:20:44-05:00'
describe
'662' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITU' 'sip-files00081.txt'
deb5d0fcea98c05ab9a797fa1c2b30d3
e29f5e34153772a7762c5cc1107fd7c0914b34e3
'2011-12-16T20:24:21-05:00'
describe
'1045' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITV' 'sip-files00082.txt'
4f312b76d3be9d49cec9b76449eef607
8fec3186981d5d32231bdb8a1e870d7aa36087b0
'2011-12-16T20:22:53-05:00'
describe
'470' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITW' 'sip-files00083.txt'
b13ee1695270cecde93542dc84d4903f
711f665d664585db0e8125023d22e533978dc989
'2011-12-16T20:18:49-05:00'
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITX' 'sip-files00084.txt'
6a5e989c193eb77fb73d0807d358b6bf
49f895e8547cbabe4e0c7b51182d48bc1876c604
'2011-12-16T20:15:15-05:00'
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITY' 'sip-files00085.txt'
78440e95d59babe68f305b1233f4570c
09334a517d37f6b8d1d4c8ca5756fca8fce8238f
'2011-12-16T20:17:03-05:00'
describe
'1254' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAITZ' 'sip-files00086.txt'
f3bb86b6e78227ddb00aa0f46dc886e8
76f65c98d2b6332d519d46d661b9a7779913dbf9
'2011-12-16T20:21:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUA' 'sip-files00087.txt'
3aed098a62c05b5234aa5fed6e1e7a7b
fc17a8ab87e5f075f1079a6123f3b58485e050ed
'2011-12-16T20:14:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUB' 'sip-files00088.txt'
e9c2ae0c60ff4dc09193c5dfcae87071
09445004a4791c86bc174c147bae5b6ff0507010
describe
'1030' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUC' 'sip-files00089.txt'
0841cc985399dbf51420e6533c331ffe
4e0d7e55d294a43e710a1ad6b7c138ff47585c55
'2011-12-16T20:23:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUD' 'sip-files00090.txt'
f41cd2025ca06ac62262c39fda09c8c3
a0f5d46cf99f891029362bc9708823543726e9bb
'2011-12-16T20:24:41-05:00'
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUE' 'sip-files00091.txt'
7f6d3952bcb1a2c560431450bdce75c6
6bc75b6567c3baa4a818ed9f299af33cbf735afb
'2011-12-16T20:15:00-05:00'
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUF' 'sip-files00092.txt'
1d1b489d9390ddd43e6ab155c04629c2
a1aeadd6b4435d6dd961163a6e41272a0c692ef7
'2011-12-16T20:16:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUG' 'sip-files00093.txt'
378f78845a38dda90cf237871c7b27ad
d9bef843a0890d7aa17f4305fe121245b0ceaeb7
'2011-12-16T20:20:50-05:00'
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUH' 'sip-files00094.txt'
d3cb54cb10a8eb64f21fc3dd448627c8
cb17ec898c0a2fa5ede08f812fc5f59392266fcd
'2011-12-16T20:20:46-05:00'
describe
'951' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUI' 'sip-files00095.txt'
fac2b3315186188d23234f527ab6677b
2e861f946fdb05efc6879b2aefb5b899e957c613
'2011-12-16T20:18:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUJ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
5a0ab0ce8c03ce6bc0a1eef7dbb80348
29df1af791a6477fba0e43fdcb8396885f4cd265
'2011-12-16T20:14:48-05:00'
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUK' 'sip-files00097.txt'
55119ab7ad989e2cbc3ba8c65d6ef14c
ea81ac1c37cdf6c9d277b3967c6cb80164cc360f
'2011-12-16T20:14:14-05:00'
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUL' 'sip-files00098.txt'
6cce8f6b5517ecd97a95d6a6c85f02e1
dcf283b9800cb2b828484c2f3bc006312b7d5c99
'2011-12-16T20:18:50-05:00'
describe
'697' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUM' 'sip-files00099.txt'
dfce43f7f00e744c8eead46f95bada69
a80e2e67eb0914d5d6c7a6df6ceae71dcb8cc9b6
'2011-12-16T20:23:16-05:00'
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUN' 'sip-files00100.txt'
41af313956709cb4908fd624ac88d358
9329d7d11bab9c051f7ff8661cbbe2b0686ba65c
'2011-12-16T20:19:46-05:00'
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUO' 'sip-files00101.txt'
9b4adc61d2f6541d4f6e1cb8f39f960e
c56930b13a04ede14dcc0f8300b85178be870800
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUP' 'sip-files00102.txt'
3c2b14d2503c56e265c5dd4f0e7f36d4
b72ade569803801008079e4185f4bcf19da19138
'2011-12-16T20:24:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUQ' 'sip-files00103.txt'
1e072299ca0cf8408d38843bb8426c6e
d73ddb2190f1d7c844e302f30cc4ab2ed7dd88af
'2011-12-16T20:25:18-05:00'
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUR' 'sip-files00104.txt'
5bc55adb49f499389686057e941d3761
425fae35f197d7c59a19007815b98059efb13732
'2011-12-16T20:22:08-05:00'
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUS' 'sip-files00105.txt'
81ad0ce3621d8c1a8918c2b0fa29e6f3
05e4288acd012dd6cf9f45fc8a86ac344f3a94c0
'2011-12-16T20:23:24-05:00'
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUT' 'sip-files00106.txt'
bb3a8f9a5c2812b717e691a50b3624c7
e9d737e64429553ee2e0767551e613e5888a8348
'2011-12-16T20:15:33-05:00'
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUU' 'sip-files00107.txt'
43cc85058bef824027acbe9c09f406b6
df87c22e35359dd4c8d1ea5e86149077a5ecd1a9
'2011-12-16T20:21:18-05:00'
describe
'549' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUV' 'sip-files00108.txt'
a1c2f7e7c9f915f7505237c386568cae
c6d64e12c027788962e490912d391cad7fcc0fa9
'2011-12-16T20:21:50-05:00'
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUW' 'sip-files00109.txt'
9b491f66b76ed3fcf99837c1af376927
b7b9deb0feb0d0182c25895edac46cecf82b55ab
'2011-12-16T20:24:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUX' 'sip-files00110.txt'
dd27e5dbe69fae7d50ccb498aa5e3453
748912857fa15e6f6708ec6e7866c9c936a48b69
'2011-12-16T20:16:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUY' 'sip-files00111.txt'
4153837d68f3aba4d53af1856c7385e8
cce6dc18c68e232593cee5c1e94b7002180a6723
'2011-12-16T20:20:30-05:00'
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIUZ' 'sip-files00112.txt'
14fc5649f2215dde71f0048795b82d6f
0593af55b398597027ad216a2caba2ae32332790
'2011-12-16T20:24:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVA' 'sip-files00113.txt'
01e8b078ef2e0db64ba680c15a818bc9
456467767e2de1ac59211ef1fb7f4262f057106a
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVB' 'sip-files00114.txt'
238506498a63965eef21500f54249a48
e6fe97d030f61a8ee8e6f567c0beb207b6fc4123
'2011-12-16T20:16:39-05:00'
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVC' 'sip-files00115.txt'
0f7c61d5dae2174790f47f1e41753c1d
60b836f3343a41db65398b80f9320a3bf8061c0e
'2011-12-16T20:14:17-05:00'
describe
'1315' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVD' 'sip-files00116.txt'
60cad39d32952775ccfff259b31b964b
0415089973370f3c159035f64d61405ae1c4e4a7
describe
'529' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVE' 'sip-files00117.txt'
b68bb91cd0acb2a540b3e6d0cb154a60
d1d55897ff07df60c6a298a74bf3ada2b9ba60c3
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVF' 'sip-files00118.txt'
575aeab5f9b45133cdf2302146c09e59
b589c1298ffe4d651e4830975a84a4fa89a4f4f9
'2011-12-16T20:19:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVG' 'sip-files00119.txt'
9f8b32c539c18c940d82995c1c729ff7
dd6fcc2fdce3b7785c6277f96dde681ad1208363
'2011-12-16T20:23:15-05:00'
describe
'589' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVH' 'sip-files00120.txt'
6df815145dc24d2ace32394702ebcb4d
763d3d6b0117a678944a2019992a4852cabb7e6f
'2011-12-16T20:23:11-05:00'
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVI' 'sip-files00121.txt'
251b585be5e55624057cbe71e3a28f6d
ba73e7e68e326bc1f0f9a7c0c1f83c33cee173e6
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVJ' 'sip-files00122.txt'
0ea6c742b82d0a074b1d7d1b8a1b4b61
3111bfcf211a4246156051e0dca856e0dc7feadd
'2011-12-16T20:21:52-05:00'
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVK' 'sip-files00123.txt'
9f59c4ff4d83cfaba4bb3a9d139587a5
2320f8fb13697775fb9f65800a3b37411d0c9ef9
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVL' 'sip-files00124.txt'
0effc270706a3e43e9e9709d1ccaaccb
d86acf0442ce0d20a85cfe2eab4d755b411b97d0
'2011-12-16T20:22:48-05:00'
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVM' 'sip-files00125.txt'
469ab39a4fd505c62e93d8e7927332b9
00d410cd6f87b8b5fb804414efff4d6bdc3a65e8
'2011-12-16T20:20:42-05:00'
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVN' 'sip-files00126.txt'
8aa979fb73992b81a23e9de13de828d2
23c627bcb9a990a8f7f6940fd91706f3bdb513c6
'2011-12-16T20:19:02-05:00'
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVO' 'sip-files00127.txt'
c18af0998e9c63539935d2ea35ef32a4
11ca643135163dffd2e6bb94de0c271458fd1026
'2011-12-16T20:24:13-05:00'
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVP' 'sip-files00128.txt'
06ee70357af8a550e2e84e5e07c859a6
1e06b84e7049e0bc3fd5c1b985ac51ab7be08c90
'2011-12-16T20:19:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVQ' 'sip-files00129.txt'
718ed1840744b6eacec2151ca17de053
8b2976bf8f96dc6ad93e1851410075a2925d1021
'2011-12-16T20:17:17-05:00'
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVR' 'sip-files00130.txt'
bc420092e8fa2adad54f17aa86b2f51d
9b48aece34209965d62dffc4f54fc75875101050
'2011-12-16T20:14:21-05:00'
describe
'1272' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVS' 'sip-files00131.txt'
ceaf16d63f849f4b7986d1b703f6a371
838843084e8ff75a7628dfdadf06abcf4e6f9104
'2011-12-16T20:22:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVT' 'sip-files00132.txt'
b4941c14b37dbdb09706676d74224176
39a4e42cc8dcb9d00fb91cb8bc5cd2bee8c7d7b5
'2011-12-16T20:18:37-05:00'
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVU' 'sip-files00133.txt'
ca76c9cae7cb50a74811671455abfc21
bc0bd410c59d6278cb1b26389194e311c590573a
'2011-12-16T20:20:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVV' 'sip-files00134.txt'
ee24a1802149f46c3c02251b2e336960
27628d55fb08ce848aee12518692247f0c8fb91f
'2011-12-16T20:14:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVW' 'sip-files00135.txt'
5b5c192bbb26cc29e8d79771fde2dd90
9fca3ef167cd9c1c227b0137a785d9ee024bea4f
describe
'725' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVX' 'sip-files00136.txt'
52d46af39278f3a7b3d28409ed3f5893
3bc31ccaffa6d279831697b316f7f2185a7e23c1
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVY' 'sip-files00137.txt'
b65b5761af7319504308a5421901194b
2b9d40c98f98582d6dbcc23579c3dfe405c6a8fb
'2011-12-16T20:21:16-05:00'
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIVZ' 'sip-files00138.txt'
ad93c5a6a384a5bc640bb3d023317acc
570fc370a61bdee042c2644858400912be1dd904
'2011-12-16T20:20:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWA' 'sip-files00139.txt'
3419058739f41b0ab8006f4b1812ac17
672cb36cb190802ab8156825b3f876cf3d73b9a9
'2011-12-16T20:14:06-05:00'
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWB' 'sip-files00140.txt'
547442c0e5bd7058f40d9f4955053e15
84dc89d75c7786c2450a597eae1ffc27f929bd1a
'2011-12-16T20:16:54-05:00'
describe
'1184' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWC' 'sip-files00141.txt'
90eed933393ad53f403c3edd821ec884
802758a1065df7b1b01872ddb43d9435df6deeb0
'2011-12-16T20:16:14-05:00'
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWD' 'sip-files00142.txt'
d48f154ac5ead9640d97acd4695530ee
0dd8b1785d2a69284eb392c15907f041f2cdd920
'2011-12-16T20:21:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWE' 'sip-files00143.txt'
24c40dd62e0461f7fb9670897512b027
67a09b21f07e0ab972f768a50229418d4fe84dee
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWF' 'sip-files00144.txt'
5683df6f760205b4f61709031c5f88f0
aa25c15301294b6ba6c71183d7a85206224a7777
'2011-12-16T20:18:54-05:00'
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWG' 'sip-files00145.txt'
97ae8240885cdd354ba960279e5dc61b
7a7402bcd0614c1198a522cd6598b2fe2fdac271
'2011-12-16T20:23:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWH' 'sip-files00146.txt'
1916d5ef5b179b5c0acbd2c922faddca
d68c4731d9b498de0301470778cc0336b83863c3
'2011-12-16T20:21:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWI' 'sip-files00147.txt'
a1086e74a5ce1a5a2de65c9e4d9ae26a
79822aa36cd8cd8fdfb2be2a581647ffee787c3e
'2011-12-16T20:19:03-05:00'
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWJ' 'sip-files00148.txt'
188427aae1c6c27d70870bf6739c636c
0d5afc2b12ce8b0c8a3734259cd003c113f03965
'2011-12-16T20:23:20-05:00'
describe
'1279' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWK' 'sip-files00149.txt'
f1a736d65edc1282afcc5c7a4cde09d5
20e5fca5993418eb98d211162cab521ad6038df2
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWL' 'sip-files00150.txt'
df292b47d75d8e31f6bbb4ff82119e8b
a14a3d1bd4c79c21684fb1dd7ec40dd9f85e64e8
'2011-12-16T20:16:24-05:00'
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWM' 'sip-files00151.txt'
13084d13940e3d86e21adcff09588029
9a6dccd57b0ba2bb16d3d80276da54c61c20f648
'2011-12-16T20:19:28-05:00'
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWN' 'sip-files00152.txt'
dd349598e79962bba5624dffca079efe
699b07529eae731f73486afb1c77b710e8bc4c64
describe
'289' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWO' 'sip-files00153.txt'
42f0bba75fb448f110559e1e36e91803
a587e8b4b2e59986049c7abbe2664c537cab7b87
'2011-12-16T20:25:29-05:00'
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWP' 'sip-files00154.txt'
a466a5fe1c448b723fa7c61d2619138f
5f506989f8831c8f6422b98a62d11f5b7adc4211
'2011-12-16T20:16:53-05:00'
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWQ' 'sip-files00155.txt'
f00f6b1182b1d42a230b97d0903a295f
525a27ab0fefdf6e090f9e9da42fd649e9c8e9f3
'2011-12-16T20:14:36-05:00'
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWR' 'sip-files00156.txt'
18f5a0e6c874fbd4c482bb73e0427c40
da8ccb8c7b18b5ec088bb44c5513849ac33ca59f
'2011-12-16T20:24:53-05:00'
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWS' 'sip-files00157.txt'
565182b0d766fb154d76a725f4afd7a2
9cd4c99a8b22b06a55ee25e65e2a16d2c9fa95d3
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWT' 'sip-files00158.txt'
8e535d43460841619fc10e1eeeb24228
ce1d5a3d477fa70fb8b3250be74426fb9fed9967
'2011-12-16T20:14:39-05:00'
describe
'974' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWU' 'sip-files00159.txt'
d3179c935280c4ac4f701362b9606331
64d9683161d5f173826a71bfa40e38db18b505c6
'2011-12-16T20:23:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWV' 'sip-files00160.txt'
5ba3cbbb886512acc58f3c017cd87d30
294111a630a55dece986fec8f39ab7c1eb5d6c00
'2011-12-16T20:16:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWW' 'sip-files00161.txt'
eab4930e8a9a0d47cf221888c4ab5273
39c3c2d9dd4da3130894e6b0926380fffe519a66
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWX' 'sip-files00162.txt'
db764740d5cb71dc7edba6d7f404d0d3
b74589b11a790726a9cdef9491613afa31137b66
'2011-12-16T20:21:43-05:00'
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWY' 'sip-files00163.txt'
6c31d35a1609a210f9e66d35e50ad4cc
2cd594bcf3ffaada925be32efda1aad107874cea
'2011-12-16T20:23:34-05:00'
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIWZ' 'sip-files00164.txt'
097d822a24ef768eda2cdd590e542344
85e298cf367ea29274d09f355bae7f04adff5111
'2011-12-16T20:23:54-05:00'
describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXA' 'sip-files00165.txt'
6bac053af2710f8b0d9ecbf8aab313b8
1aea42dc30e95e6283278945658a677510cc2d0d
'2011-12-16T20:21:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXB' 'sip-files00166.txt'
edb998f49c554e8e9b3ec6372d1bfab1
c1c4fc262f47cb5ff99d5464843f04aa4b7a6f53
'2011-12-16T20:18:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXC' 'sip-files00167.txt'
f987cfc2d00b7dadb134106f97b3bb12
3fce9c2839ea0233176bf2a2239f8b05b1a4038e
'2011-12-16T20:17:39-05:00'
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXD' 'sip-files00168.txt'
90f7abdab3b9558ac40c1549173b6373
3e07164b3a0b4b88163b3419b7b6b0dcfe9322c5
'2011-12-16T20:21:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXE' 'sip-files00169.txt'
b221342d3038c91ca3fbd3584f41bf49
6955d86b622b92871f55a04fcc0feb1927d57fb2
'2011-12-16T20:15:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXF' 'sip-files00170.txt'
8cc6bfb867c51e99ffdea6a472c6f60d
8c69a901d82add6139786fd4d3de044797b99e95
'2011-12-16T20:24:26-05:00'
describe
'1005' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXG' 'sip-files00171.txt'
f5f92129490136cf6b0bb57f6e0e3094
7a7b00203bffee084bb51aa43db5fd38b0e81d0d
'2011-12-16T20:25:35-05:00'
describe
'750' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXH' 'sip-files00172.txt'
f1d78bcf0acc2871854a150461117020
bbb940ecc12c12c9682d5882fdf0ec83a4b34deb
'2011-12-16T20:19:51-05:00'
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXI' 'sip-files00173.txt'
6a6a7a00a19c629d79eb8bb12c2fb893
bec3bd12a774636a9cad7e6085a794149cdc3155
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXJ' 'sip-files00174.txt'
3cee54af96ab429bb503620a95c0085b
4053fe9eb0fa31eaeab5c664113200c29acef4c1
'2011-12-16T20:13:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXK' 'sip-files00175.txt'
fabeb87ba12973751520781664b47980
a2fd6d0798b6f35068609c0027c968c250631c00
'2011-12-16T20:20:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXL' 'sip-files00176.txt'
db40d26c5eb83295c164051a137884b1
3bfc08c978b1be57d0336ccbf5e8db7ba1e998d1
'2011-12-16T20:24:49-05:00'
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXM' 'sip-files00177.txt'
876a4376e96f035435e97d805263bad2
d2fdca5a5d68a32733286404fe1ba8b66de6dfc3
'2011-12-16T20:15:02-05:00'
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXN' 'sip-files00178.txt'
4656efb759105a3f75ef362aa2f7588a
08f6e0aa2aba8cb03a62937db66eff8715f6aa77
describe
'1008' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXO' 'sip-files00179.txt'
f8e4315d23924953706d9898469ecd30
dde3dbcfd56acfe9f5727d2b4823ac08553e7f76
'2011-12-16T20:19:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXP' 'sip-files00180.txt'
0ade335555b5e109847739c04a0bd10c
3f3cf0c75fae918611d8b49671a412d8cddbfa17
'2011-12-16T20:18:23-05:00'
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXQ' 'sip-files00181.txt'
5eaa5bf83b7540f6f3ed3ba6d520db1c
9568db49bb403696f7ae801f372c1bd7c58c0a80
'2011-12-16T20:18:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXR' 'sip-files00182.txt'
a81051dcc7cccd2d98936639719ac85a
860a1a909f1afc428036bfce2526c70cf5bc0ecf
'2011-12-16T20:24:45-05:00'
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXS' 'sip-files00183.txt'
4a2e6b6c25b86001892d5f85c0982485
e84fb5c2a1f2bef4ed93b5bcc2298eec601cc70e
'2011-12-16T20:19:06-05:00'
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXT' 'sip-files00184.txt'
b8476792265d49400f8d6a8fb5b8c4ce
09d82b7beb0452b783dd4e4ec6b709797c95f3f8
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXU' 'sip-files00185.txt'
530ef6235dd29d2fcd4037d735433af3
9866013d642eef5ba8df61d2b046788c7b1faddf
'2011-12-16T20:25:44-05:00'
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXV' 'sip-files00186.txt'
b4df5268ad9ca53afbcb730187a9d33c
ed51c4b7156af0c08d36ecbe7a6662542d7cb6ef
'2011-12-16T20:24:01-05:00'
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXW' 'sip-files00187.txt'
3b2bb783c49027dab7bc50f999df1d15
08894fe4c22ec38bc58d65b2878f1e29591a006a
describe
'519' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXX' 'sip-files00188.txt'
1a753dff11360eb80a8070f474fe4453
6ba6356a1fa861e632fb977556f6d1d0ead7d407
'2011-12-16T20:21:08-05:00'
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXY' 'sip-files00189.txt'
cfc0d00bd8a71d7121de84aa88b31e94
9a752eff5db6ded3d84407811c0c4d18dd8da493
'2011-12-16T20:16:26-05:00'
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIXZ' 'sip-files00190.txt'
60d697b91acc83e22d8bcc4b6b8f028e
79fb4a0395e251c6ebedf148ab6b3863e6c53bbd
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYA' 'sip-files00191.txt'
ad8499ac84cd5969a14659408942d668
221b03aa0adaaf39526e340f3bb3d57b389961cb
'2011-12-16T20:15:42-05:00'
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYB' 'sip-files00192.txt'
71113eb49ab3246f333acf7193907715
1f3c928a88988155273291af250074001be2a02a
'2011-12-16T20:16:48-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'890' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYC' 'sip-files00193.txt'
0e8aa795731e31181e4be475ca6cacb8
05a794368953a1e95aa5a477941ea9e4c23b38d7
'2011-12-16T20:25:40-05:00'
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYD' 'sip-files00194.txt'
f875f6b975028427fe13db03d19183b0
eec853980ca63ed4a89fbc6c30526065cc7ce1cf
'2011-12-16T20:17:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYE' 'sip-files00195.txt'
03dbee97130d1b4338e6943e1e832b47
d68b601e70747dfe06678b65525a81315e8b54f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYF' 'sip-files00196.txt'
1f5b40ea3d431c9927dc4ec6c35ed51f
084e2d34cba075be3e3351a1b3c07e7432ddb9f1
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYG' 'sip-files00197.txt'
b7938553023322bca486735607b2ee66
23cc46ba66e4c19701fc6041febce69a0d6bec9b
'2011-12-16T20:18:44-05:00'
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYH' 'sip-files00198.txt'
d5fe4684d187585fdc144f02453cc1a3
e04d73dbc5b1257c061d74bc5bf9b7d8cd49a0ba
describe
'997' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYI' 'sip-files00199.txt'
94319961f7a02ae64948bd6bfd262c48
65745050afb00a73a30875ab546d95ca87d936a4
'2011-12-16T20:18:21-05:00'
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYJ' 'sip-files00200.txt'
9e83ffa16a9b6c5935dc0abbc6404e67
7872f96721f5660bd448102ff7831f1c889b9b8d
'2011-12-16T20:18:16-05:00'
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYK' 'sip-files00201.txt'
9725ef7a306a81feab4a28f67f8a4f55
dd9f7641b5a93b2a80ed55c6a39412c3232ef810
'2011-12-16T20:16:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYL' 'sip-files00202.txt'
d4de475284b728943ccdd73367baf2e8
4b19ca5301aef8404a8e080ccda154716d84e5bb
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYM' 'sip-files00203.txt'
8a248f8e21e96243efddd6636c91be8b
67bcaf3b517996546f4a783505d35e9d7108bad9
'2011-12-16T20:23:21-05:00'
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYN' 'sip-files00204.txt'
2923bc1fcb2ba51c3a86ea0c4846b571
6c5eb6c82dcddf86272ac9b9172f4f2307feec33
'2011-12-16T20:14:54-05:00'
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYO' 'sip-files00205.txt'
64d11c8b33b3b3d9527b998c1926d74b
afd82bb77f26df733b704e6f354dc3665fe0d2bc
'2011-12-16T20:20:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYP' 'sip-files00206.txt'
a48a1b4a2b7826a72b1c287a55d97412
b7a48f0bd0f98bf04fd5bd4e4514137fe0820f53
'2011-12-16T20:25:37-05:00'
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYQ' 'sip-files00207.txt'
9c70bdac9e4de54501baf73d41e12b52
7501eb464f362d175ab498be32f85f88b851fc73
'2011-12-16T20:14:29-05:00'
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYR' 'sip-files00208.txt'
a63cfb3adbc2f17611b09e5628a7bf0e
76e91951fd1892acecd3f7dc94b33dbc3c0e2bf5
'2011-12-16T20:22:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYS' 'sip-files00209.txt'
8a888f57385dab87752f2b87ee1d60b6
5b38346a8adf3b918d19b89c37081575a0e8982b
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYT' 'sip-files00210.txt'
979e29cd9031adae588f71079d81f9c4
0ee90e3a049e8bc93617225f2e84b3eefe409516
'2011-12-16T20:16:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYU' 'sip-files00211.txt'
a9770722119adf3215129a1f6e4bbbf5
4859224e18cce68fbc09fe0e4a332c28fcfe73c2
'2011-12-16T20:16:44-05:00'
describe
'1907' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYV' 'sip-files00212.txt'
bccf1cd00d5bded607dda2d5fce6941d
341d9966919ab35dc92abddb9cad8c3a93221f43
'2011-12-16T20:22:10-05:00'
describe
'1800' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYW' 'sip-files00213.txt'
71b97f5de5b9b9d1ed99f0a20bf03b5f
dda397cadf24dc6af3220ad7226d2390822ad7bd
'2011-12-16T20:17:15-05:00'
describe
'2293' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYX' 'sip-files00214.txt'
21bb588a5cd85b07b87534e70e64b200
66c25eced09a60673f4d5717465210ad34b5f871
'2011-12-16T20:23:19-05:00'
describe
'1976' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYY' 'sip-files00215.txt'
087c784c6c479b6dab10080f69f81e7a
cce910fe4234119340dc11f7f53cc35b601f5dd5
'2011-12-16T20:18:20-05:00'
describe
'2135' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIYZ' 'sip-files00216.txt'
687651838ffa50872e741a7f7259371d
64364b39d11defb83b4d8ebced2bc478eb9cd2cc
'2011-12-16T20:25:02-05:00'
describe
'1764' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZA' 'sip-files00217.txt'
4fc489b60005c4704e03497bad60a086
67787fced3e01902a7570ff2c1fbd386f5083484
describe
'2175' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZB' 'sip-files00218.txt'
6daf63712e9e634d3d2cb215b50831fd
f62aadb6303a8a0d287ccc298073f45a61fd5c54
'2011-12-16T20:24:04-05:00'
describe
'463' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZC' 'sip-files00005.pro'
de9e37a5c5ade138661b1f4d3c111626
9718e40b3f2908622e786508e068f149b077abd9
'2011-12-16T20:21:26-05:00'
describe
'5198' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZD' 'sip-files00006.pro'
1f98e500d3c04de24784beb85b8ce233
6b4e518757dbc6721c235258ab11335dca867d05
'2011-12-16T20:18:46-05:00'
describe
'21778' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZE' 'sip-files00007.pro'
f325c0582f617197c6157e4488ad5082
26f6b9739643ffe6bb15e90c4af65ded1f718e32
'2011-12-16T20:17:02-05:00'
describe
'11212' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZF' 'sip-files00008.pro'
f545238fe52ff44f272dd3a04f01e1aa
c8927f6c56c16fe7953f802c63ea02f3eafc5141
describe
'7493' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZG' 'sip-files00009.pro'
b050c98ed237243e9c9b3dfb58a80866
4823e2d2c6bb0869629d75f66e60d46b3c8d867a
'2011-12-16T20:15:58-05:00'
describe
'11611' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZH' 'sip-files00010.pro'
e66ab8e279f01e06af111f424fae797d
993b9228bb0723db4cc0e185d8c7838fab7e2f84
'2011-12-16T20:16:45-05:00'
describe
'4469' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZI' 'sip-files00011.pro'
8dd26f3ce5ce126c96fbd45a41978146
e682ccb02877b90b99a4425260c2d399085a9586
'2011-12-16T20:20:25-05:00'
describe
'5681' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZJ' 'sip-files00012.pro'
f7c047a3164d86f490691fe8c3bd49e8
d086a50b5dd4c370b6163d1e3f72c85148a77660
'2011-12-16T20:14:42-05:00'
describe
'21993' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZK' 'sip-files00013.pro'
6078939dc029a736a789fc7d9efcb135
e0fda00de01eac3d08259f89eeece1f7f9a34c81
describe
'33203' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZL' 'sip-files00014.pro'
273aec76c02d0babc5f37dd96ab6492a
d71a27a680d39eb0828c0a5a285570eef92d0fc3
describe
'34365' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZM' 'sip-files00015.pro'
d85be49d0c107c65cd3d3e6fbf9beefe
c431625d93acaa28cd8fc39d31a03d86211b4852
describe
'13162' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZN' 'sip-files00016.pro'
190b846425e526bd7eb8ed5817f820c4
edeb5904069e831975e9f95b9e17872ab7b24215
describe
'28653' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZO' 'sip-files00017.pro'
8721caac1d88f9a114bbb7eea6aedcb6
d6771caff2e8761b8e08062f25ed41a81d95972e
describe
'28126' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZP' 'sip-files00018.pro'
e53fdf23238574bd82f348946e0b28a4
1541b4e7533d28b3a31245d0dea1b6a16db27687
'2011-12-16T20:23:17-05:00'
describe
'31657' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZQ' 'sip-files00019.pro'
298d1288843ce3e86044f1fcc98d8d3a
a142def9cb866012bdbe51f16319f7b4d9089123
'2011-12-16T20:21:22-05:00'
describe
'31085' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZR' 'sip-files00020.pro'
018b214e513316f529d8e8a9c64c1319
d967b9d4c1dda3ee7575353554a92d7aa52cd26a
'2011-12-16T20:18:39-05:00'
describe
'28719' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZS' 'sip-files00021.pro'
27e6b565ddea15d40db936de1aeb54ef
849084cac9c76cdfa16b24286577a8e3a7c11e26
'2011-12-16T20:25:30-05:00'
describe
'26727' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZT' 'sip-files00022.pro'
3399bd808ff40856b1a34909f29a400c
ff067c69142dbb689835f352b7957a4b51527730
describe
'31954' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZU' 'sip-files00023.pro'
0308b1975ef226ccef55d3a8805364c8
258126df6f63b54b18ade05cc53034a336fd4558
'2011-12-16T20:19:56-05:00'
describe
'33312' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZV' 'sip-files00024.pro'
2352d47973d6be3e4e130a77669c110d
c20bdba75ea9153390839a0d3da8205db8dde28c
'2011-12-16T20:25:12-05:00'
describe
'33144' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZW' 'sip-files00025.pro'
d9abef64e341850edcf95b8cf3e2b4b5
72b9864327f90bb53a3f48b9c6738247b30135d8
describe
'25474' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZX' 'sip-files00026.pro'
e9a1f1ce02fe8b604cd05c0883370e4a
45b40c4cb7bc176bd9f0862af3791d363315ff0a
describe
'13566' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZY' 'sip-files00027.pro'
d6b80be4835728b06a522449dc034bd3
b9b13e465fbd741f341bf40bb6949b932e4c50cd
'2011-12-16T20:17:47-05:00'
describe
'25318' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAIZZ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
c0d820c62f29ecddf033bee06e12fbec
f574aad188db37d143f5221a77342cfda1608c3b
'2011-12-16T20:19:21-05:00'
describe
'29871' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAA' 'sip-files00029.pro'
e045dc0d138f82f88bb3ca3388e997db
1ee231a498397dc967d3f037249785095fd47345
describe
'31940' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAB' 'sip-files00030.pro'
317f1b751ab1f06e8f2511cd6c827082
29030b3e6dd7492064fe9722363ce792a8fdacac
'2011-12-16T20:24:05-05:00'
describe
'32649' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAC' 'sip-files00031.pro'
155dad91b7f50722db71c170aa9292e3
928efc2764a46489831ccd0089a0fcbdc2e78d31
'2011-12-16T20:19:33-05:00'
describe
'33331' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAD' 'sip-files00032.pro'
014c8fea88d69f2ca95d99b19d9d0600
1c38bfb82028ac2a3a2ab98f98d5105c84115d9c
'2011-12-16T20:18:58-05:00'
describe
'32640' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAE' 'sip-files00033.pro'
95ab39269f625cf98fa6d0a3ca93527c
01315be551b19744c0bdc0bb9cd6526a511d1905
'2011-12-16T20:25:42-05:00'
describe
'33936' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAF' 'sip-files00034.pro'
3c01f7cfa2a8327126858353016ee0ca
ca1111efa5f51b2d9f5d12342f4f377d0274f1af
'2011-12-16T20:16:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAG' 'sip-files00035.pro'
cc03463fc475ae381353ff20db27713f
dc3bcc054ce2a67f023eb870cb86fa57ac2ee25b
describe
'13278' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAH' 'sip-files00036.pro'
ce537524913407d0094ee0256ea62437
53e55d7e23b3c801d2fd7683aa5565ef21216643
'2011-12-16T20:20:51-05:00'
describe
'32549' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAI' 'sip-files00037.pro'
0fa7cc07fd195c8dfce9eb0263f856d6
e39ea7a0b644afcfa8a23e9e875c6082ed30d219
describe
'33668' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAJ' 'sip-files00038.pro'
93d06d9bab48522915dbf1545970b862
2d3528e1329ef55854ac787b2160416f21426485
'2011-12-16T20:23:44-05:00'
describe
'32261' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAK' 'sip-files00039.pro'
b50e84dc99021737c4ab0876b36c94fb
7fefa0d20503f1684dedb845ca2dba5f1115c482
describe
'28636' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAL' 'sip-files00040.pro'
3704e282b4efb5a8de8f21079e20c268
74f32dd85a0e076a2d1f347599e97db97b62d7c1
'2011-12-16T20:19:41-05:00'
describe
'30535' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAM' 'sip-files00041.pro'
f196978b837ec770ab6d951fcfa7b3a0
834baf0696759a5ba1a2ccf95679c7ad5c76a276
'2011-12-16T20:24:55-05:00'
describe
'33038' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAN' 'sip-files00042.pro'
16b59d60e1b6f1791104e810fdd2a796
f62befa1ceaaa02b0fe77a4cdfb41f372dd28aff
describe
'33162' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAO' 'sip-files00043.pro'
357fb61d7b61b0616ab552b395b9be00
12842d55cee57bdbb34d92b117c815f2e9aaa594
'2011-12-16T20:16:10-05:00'
describe
'33623' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAP' 'sip-files00044.pro'
144c4fe14073d4578969f46355cc20dc
18b0092111c4872c9e813738ce9900f239b5e4e5
describe
'18132' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAQ' 'sip-files00045.pro'
e58ecc56121740d892c6ecd689add08f
27463c60be08d2fe18bb8e9937ae94fe605bcabf
describe
'27252' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAR' 'sip-files00046.pro'
d47d92b92421f73ceea96ac234f0d7ee
f59cae6e82cfbae2db03095312c208a856e15ac8
describe
'31763' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAS' 'sip-files00047.pro'
0b78baddb024dced2f1dc79d87fbfb1b
6622422e8dab928bded1e74ef0b5defa35a0f0cd
'2011-12-16T20:21:30-05:00'
describe
'13933' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAT' 'sip-files00048.pro'
8c1115ecf25d914e29867942e6b735db
73439a6a316ce98c9203a753d939fbe60bceb6bb
describe
'33399' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAU' 'sip-files00049.pro'
29c400b1a63311a85d6c19f69161c9f5
e396051f2cf1dade4a67db6d8bc4586c6805e46a
'2011-12-16T20:23:53-05:00'
describe
'33326' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAV' 'sip-files00050.pro'
f010ee2d1d3ad312bc849ee6511d0cd5
3739d791561cf76eaf1194093c9efd6903b2e5c9
'2011-12-16T20:19:22-05:00'
describe
'32515' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAW' 'sip-files00051.pro'
d2098c93103bb798093bea269934c1bf
282a716de05b6df1bcbbff55031720a77dcce956
describe
'31166' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAX' 'sip-files00052.pro'
57f66a289af288f0ca18d34406c6c633
d3d394948cb38d87f4cb7f96dc8944311a48ab11
'2011-12-16T20:25:07-05:00'
describe
'34094' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAY' 'sip-files00053.pro'
cab378086db43eaaa2e2876eeae1092a
503fea6a0f8b0a4259e426aedfa11a6b7cbbd859
'2011-12-16T20:19:32-05:00'
describe
'31991' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJAZ' 'sip-files00054.pro'
786dc5d3cf9900613c1e9b2c70e9e541
fdfc1d0eaac7fac2857e692246a19eea09796d1e
'2011-12-16T20:14:23-05:00'
describe
'21961' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBA' 'sip-files00055.pro'
41026b794d314314bb0c2e17d7f691a2
65e4727b057a661ae7795e13b48750245e4df035
'2011-12-16T20:14:33-05:00'
describe
'31298' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBB' 'sip-files00056.pro'
d4c9dd4ad50a269487367048a6b69192
a9cde080f87bd7967ac13e7506635f32d82d7059
'2011-12-16T20:15:12-05:00'
describe
'32613' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBC' 'sip-files00057.pro'
ac1c41a8c2f05bb929a4849d61072ad1
46e5564d4d62b995ea4a497a1513b18e5e05a619
'2011-12-16T20:24:30-05:00'
describe
'33794' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBD' 'sip-files00058.pro'
116b06b2c596fa56ac44815719bb4363
e771ae3194015dbb1d2c68f81deaeadfd955b3fe
'2011-12-16T20:21:31-05:00'
describe
'34208' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBE' 'sip-files00059.pro'
e3d1d2bc9de6bcddde15a2f1faeeefe7
ce75729c221bac95f38d04ace7515b491410840f
'2011-12-16T20:20:09-05:00'
describe
'32655' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBF' 'sip-files00060.pro'
4e2f200958185167071605d496389782
22a9f3fe2e843eefda0f95738474fd16f885e5e6
'2011-12-16T20:18:11-05:00'
describe
'32800' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBG' 'sip-files00061.pro'
e7af139a23606a22ee524c7735a2bbf6
68693893566f1507801632c70e53c94586a01209
describe
'32501' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBH' 'sip-files00062.pro'
df9b114b5c3fd7606754ee9babac3596
9566ccee22999b19da3ea8fcddb968ce6546ba20
'2011-12-16T20:18:51-05:00'
describe
'24764' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBI' 'sip-files00063.pro'
d68bfd33718a86b030122c19cace38ca
606b4ad869c8b184397a9836c26f827cd6a3ffa0
'2011-12-16T20:17:55-05:00'
describe
'26885' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBJ' 'sip-files00064.pro'
91aff2fd37fe70464cc0bf7e8ea225d3
b7e4cd033097f49529cd7ad4b4ccca5127853d47
'2011-12-16T20:23:07-05:00'
describe
'33653' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBK' 'sip-files00065.pro'
0e08cd4c1f4ca94e07313b824ae1f63b
ceb35be7b6127f1fd8f56ad37e3002203ade3522
'2011-12-16T20:24:23-05:00'
describe
'32197' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBL' 'sip-files00066.pro'
4f11c4eb7bccebe903a0718329199496
d60355f439206876086e7619bc04ca6de90c7c53
'2011-12-16T20:23:04-05:00'
describe
'30848' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBM' 'sip-files00067.pro'
6650e15323e112c772b46b05b799b3e6
84e17d1652a2d9ea5c161d64b36e16b53d91f416
'2011-12-16T20:20:05-05:00'
describe
'32008' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBN' 'sip-files00068.pro'
ef69e65a841700f9fb0bfcb5f5096299
4186abf1600c7133ab80f13a3579b61ed8740f6a
'2011-12-16T20:18:47-05:00'
describe
'31726' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBO' 'sip-files00069.pro'
d303c4f9b0447c0402f25a2229d28256
44af02708c8fd213fa988c64f1e9bef0abe1432b
describe
'31659' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBP' 'sip-files00070.pro'
48eef4317039d8e3fafe104c5c56b0bb
5f91d7e4c8358d0cbce44034cbaecf7488abe0a2
'2011-12-16T20:16:42-05:00'
describe
'30302' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBQ' 'sip-files00071.pro'
b9ebf31a7e3de54898937ae688e39151
6c07f620c347ce7fca4bc679e51afa5fd20f1ba3
'2011-12-16T20:22:56-05:00'
describe
'12533' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBR' 'sip-files00072.pro'
ccf4f83454c692dfde5a359cffdcfffc
c7ae4967c3e89e7ff57d5db5671a52c3e3a34c29
describe
'30213' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBS' 'sip-files00073.pro'
63eb11b6d311ba6894dd6bc297992b4f
0a0ae2cb41494007d879b5a2f292cde46ea7e04b
describe
'33057' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBT' 'sip-files00074.pro'
24152372bc3bdd93612ba14c4657aa0b
67929d3595300ce3d1fc4c393916c65b17858ef7
'2011-12-16T20:14:24-05:00'
describe
'32380' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBU' 'sip-files00075.pro'
29af8ea35fbb7c08990f46b296e7b2a3
448301f9d7634e3506d3ac6c0712811c10d74ac3
'2011-12-16T20:20:17-05:00'
describe
'32236' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBV' 'sip-files00076.pro'
2c35977abf412046a2a6976e7efc6783
3f2f02b710bc1307b032cfd687d954ecfbb4ab80
'2011-12-16T20:17:44-05:00'
describe
'28269' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBW' 'sip-files00077.pro'
4fa9100780b0e1ec6b54e893515eeb0f
c715c433a7737363fb337eac4735092531091e05
'2011-12-16T20:18:00-05:00'
describe
'32920' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBX' 'sip-files00078.pro'
8e9a20be7baf74e7d9f3c24455ed46b4
4e809d1592ff7a59af90236c8388e8f630dde040
describe
'23435' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBY' 'sip-files00079.pro'
e78ebda242dda8035e80464095da6d1e
7af92f55fbfcde457b3ef4744c02f4ab176b1982
describe
'29597' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJBZ' 'sip-files00080.pro'
a7442c74f118cc2da46279436554be1a
47f8f24f7621f4a6c92a32d125930c45c1fb52f3
'2011-12-16T20:17:37-05:00'
describe
'15967' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCA' 'sip-files00081.pro'
c042ba33d4b06d3da6115564bbe11f8c
015653db004b8650abcae246489a0b1450577450
'2011-12-16T20:15:28-05:00'
describe
'24655' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCB' 'sip-files00082.pro'
f42935fb3e44fbf312f8fd2c7e7e5b19
2f92484c37d89a8a42adade9b2e56e66482c5b51
'2011-12-16T20:14:04-05:00'
describe
'10929' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCC' 'sip-files00083.pro'
04a835fada55880162f055d8a0944a9d
5b3fcbabbd7fed2f5856fdc6377b58d2a8ff13a0
'2011-12-16T20:20:48-05:00'
describe
'33180' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCD' 'sip-files00084.pro'
68dcd15527d992d654059d127ee5217a
46b87ef3b5517dcd4f60dfc221c547eccde778c3
'2011-12-16T20:18:12-05:00'
describe
'29956' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCE' 'sip-files00085.pro'
0085702cb00b161c17689ead1fd0313c
4175d56b358b4cb15c491be86defb543d2c31430
'2011-12-16T20:22:33-05:00'
describe
'31390' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCF' 'sip-files00086.pro'
d614e55cbcfabf67737be18bb350f73b
574856869e8d495d69e859709de13e94c5c8ac88
'2011-12-16T20:19:15-05:00'
describe
'31536' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCG' 'sip-files00087.pro'
6af9fe3471484c83684ad5e515f18844
86cd5f949a92686cd9c4bf8dcd7aafdefaf256ac
'2011-12-16T20:23:51-05:00'
describe
'33214' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCH' 'sip-files00088.pro'
a776e8b55cfc3686100201caa5539500
19b1d3e22f9e7b712266d0bb0bebcf5a76c39bef
'2011-12-16T20:18:28-05:00'
describe
'24328' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCI' 'sip-files00089.pro'
cc5f0d29dc9074cad78a81603b045f5e
354390cabdbd8f05ed79bc83119664795f4157b2
describe
'32796' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCJ' 'sip-files00090.pro'
1a217e8a9ab2d50a02d21c9cde239f7c
9483b4d02e883b7624fec5f941c5967a674be85e
describe
'29796' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCK' 'sip-files00091.pro'
6cb88f25f51944a009424ad4f89e01ec
dc4134a428ca9033a6c69e597af919ac7ba667a3
'2011-12-16T20:18:59-05:00'
describe
'30663' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCL' 'sip-files00092.pro'
e0ff86b219f38f4fd1f17a207d4be46a
ce14860e36eb865c39cd4d6ce9be888e115d55d5
'2011-12-16T20:20:22-05:00'
describe
'29844' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCM' 'sip-files00093.pro'
5fee4fc8366a66efa0220090d2f1deaf
7a7b0d2b0567b695fa50b4f7a8a16890dd5009a4
'2011-12-16T20:18:01-05:00'
describe
'30086' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCN' 'sip-files00094.pro'
0dd330812af6ba1e325ba766a6b2ac45
2f2f76e473bedbbbda1be5c68a36e5edeb46ccac
'2011-12-16T20:22:24-05:00'
describe
'22673' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCO' 'sip-files00095.pro'
4f137b44fef9bf17d44e943ad9a27869
319a7278edfe3fa9afe019048deeb76ae338efe4
describe
'32370' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCP' 'sip-files00096.pro'
2a72ae7fab26f7d9b16e280ce0071048
aa80365aaec2d6e73ebe83556b1b990643b82fea
'2011-12-16T20:17:20-05:00'
describe
'31740' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCQ' 'sip-files00097.pro'
ccbf57bb861439157a93f8d28b7475a6
6a7604d28adaff410c8702b364a3cfa9853256e9
'2011-12-16T20:17:00-05:00'
describe
'32206' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCR' 'sip-files00098.pro'
b8361a14bed36a4d87cdf52a4f46c611
733d9a176f8390781ce785572913840bccfca529
describe
'15918' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCS' 'sip-files00099.pro'
46713bbbcb2797d7072d8480652eb5f1
79c76219841f865959df36bbb9f884a9cb1da559
'2011-12-16T20:14:15-05:00'
describe
'27087' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCT' 'sip-files00100.pro'
1f64cb47fd5282229c61fa2d5f569cfa
b9ec349b1bb31cc0fc8056089db6981dfa7e3e7d
'2011-12-16T20:23:02-05:00'
describe
'33337' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCU' 'sip-files00101.pro'
ebddef3ca7593b96ee5c67ee8e1d6c26
143605f0a0c8750ccf624987a6ad69a1a1cf1b2a
'2011-12-16T20:14:26-05:00'
describe
'30226' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCV' 'sip-files00102.pro'
1fdf12b7e00895f6a30ac567b7d97985
4f1a35c659e5c470763576265a58361e2e6fc395
'2011-12-16T20:22:39-05:00'
describe
'32198' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCW' 'sip-files00103.pro'
7eac3148b49f196312345d97a3e1e854
38d80a7c3361a856cf2b0721586aed10e917fbe0
'2011-12-16T20:16:11-05:00'
describe
'33594' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCX' 'sip-files00104.pro'
639b41e92a316eef51f93c484cd93295
2960e5517b2e7d719ded8a2cd2c6266a58866fb9
'2011-12-16T20:22:44-05:00'
describe
'33587' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCY' 'sip-files00105.pro'
7794e070f2d004ad74e9716f99fe0a13
a537df58843b9baa28d8a1f04c6ae879511c6f0f
'2011-12-16T20:15:18-05:00'
describe
'32407' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJCZ' 'sip-files00106.pro'
fd01d55f52211331e2792b2e57363e04
658e0fa335692095067c5467381e02f4ce2dd108
describe
'33914' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDA' 'sip-files00107.pro'
060bcb19a60429fbeff619075f05c7f3
3878cf642184fef482b87eb95261dde6fb410c7b
'2011-12-16T20:20:43-05:00'
describe
'13133' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDB' 'sip-files00108.pro'
06666a9e11bdf9dc1ed41e01f51834e4
f0b0e45fa64e3af52bcef4f9e6c7da1de6cf6810
describe
'32602' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDC' 'sip-files00109.pro'
ec1fe1b28ccc8a0a9ec41ce35f47908f
be92c23bff13c0004d433781db8fadea6bc8c569
'2011-12-16T20:14:18-05:00'
describe
'33509' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDD' 'sip-files00110.pro'
e6d7c5c42f3c30c7fe152a52d213ee11
c603166aa4805544412c78d88dec4d883ccb294a
'2011-12-16T20:23:39-05:00'
describe
'32277' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDE' 'sip-files00111.pro'
b13236be2bbdb1c629f77e2b481477d5
d412260dc3da254cf5fd649269b0424d4cfdb1ae
describe
'33126' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDF' 'sip-files00112.pro'
faf7ffa2f35f7d7621dce4851bb6f071
2d250587a992902eb66fc1ea0eaa3d40e7c0a93e
'2011-12-16T20:17:07-05:00'
describe
'34082' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDG' 'sip-files00113.pro'
976e0e478651dd9729f5c92d792d90e9
4e61e2e5c1c6c722a99e09c7d9b6d1a47012f176
describe
'23213' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDH' 'sip-files00114.pro'
e14bc48a5357b724ef8c0a5cf25344c3
f58a535bab08af52587941ed1948753dacb77245
'2011-12-16T20:21:34-05:00'
describe
'33149' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDI' 'sip-files00115.pro'
fbe9953a7e940b0a26b7aa2d7c15101e
daa4e89cba92ba46ad0ad90518c892504db8fc0b
'2011-12-16T20:16:58-05:00'
describe
'32970' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDJ' 'sip-files00116.pro'
d4dfb09addb2a9c2b8c932a5b3143144
07f885141e5edd5c187aa1c6e60c9bbde23696f2
'2011-12-16T20:14:19-05:00'
describe
'12398' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDK' 'sip-files00117.pro'
b101deea6595fe5f6c983e645af61e9a
c1e78493db85f2f33b1b741d028bb1de61408535
'2011-12-16T20:24:34-05:00'
describe
'27152' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDL' 'sip-files00118.pro'
2eebf3d1762bcb5160ad2ed95e509447
3c352947947562026370dcf05778a4a1bad7a373
'2011-12-16T20:23:27-05:00'
describe
'32732' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDM' 'sip-files00119.pro'
8e96f6339f29709e61ce06a3c444d8cc
d8bccff5e11738cc37b0c1956967d45e2f5f687c
'2011-12-16T20:16:21-05:00'
describe
'14301' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDN' 'sip-files00120.pro'
381ed1b22de18db20952d2faf649c977
a55e3211f94b15616d557b37f7662091db5fc1d6
describe
'32931' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDO' 'sip-files00121.pro'
267c609bc7e6b5f9ccecef02d0f402c4
b36b672019a3a177c4633a41e8153db3cb8ff8b3
'2011-12-16T20:18:45-05:00'
describe
'28646' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDP' 'sip-files00122.pro'
f8d0bd16c60ceffdf868dd8ed93b242a
58b369fcdfd863ddcfc34a7eec5c3efe960d7b15
'2011-12-16T20:24:37-05:00'
describe
'30846' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDQ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
82b041edca596ba6219183f32c5b8f56
9acd3effd147409fdf092ff49284e279786f76ee
'2011-12-16T20:19:05-05:00'
describe
'22268' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDR' 'sip-files00124.pro'
74925d1b1e73090d372a35566127f03f
8b098c9f77631ea2affc1ee6fdd4df64222485ce
'2011-12-16T20:23:18-05:00'
describe
'30787' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDS' 'sip-files00125.pro'
b54e3c6cf6b34e84ae85a6410135769f
300647510352e5649258239c82171a442e578109
'2011-12-16T20:21:01-05:00'
describe
'28424' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDT' 'sip-files00126.pro'
d12052b26160c0b5c16da5f54680b968
9b8d6c3caca38c0f95db5159d80f92e5545ed582
describe
'32822' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDU' 'sip-files00127.pro'
166c95af7264c549f605e490e65a15a0
876f6296dd46dd89392a5987a4cd2c8de4bca5be
'2011-12-16T20:14:07-05:00'
describe
'33839' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDV' 'sip-files00128.pro'
d24036cfe17c11f84360e8fd3375cc07
f63cf746d807cd593e9d48f2beddbc605e0ef577
describe
'32766' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDW' 'sip-files00129.pro'
fcb51467ab93b97dfe8317eef8665134
bfbf3df0d7abde6cd5f394410f5aef8d73fba418
describe
'30750' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDX' 'sip-files00130.pro'
4ed4604d363e7fe41fdd0985a4144188
ddcb5ed4688eb7929509d73ba819dd120c954f9a
describe
'31262' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDY' 'sip-files00131.pro'
0f80eb060dbb2ee77b1228935ebeec2d
9fb9e90f3a7d87ca14b349c2fcef8c0162e6013e
'2011-12-16T20:16:05-05:00'
describe
'32375' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJDZ' 'sip-files00132.pro'
04c7cdede8aadf6c423bef69b7c63383
5d66241528011254df049831f6447577a24ba4fa
describe
'33496' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEA' 'sip-files00133.pro'
6d1a4ceaf2de986c51929933c0f3ef33
15515131cf7da37a7e990daacaa8a4ef91cc007b
'2011-12-16T20:15:24-05:00'
describe
'33276' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEB' 'sip-files00134.pro'
d22c028639b423bb209a0b86e23ee743
7938cf8a0e23e5b9dadbcf508b73030f8ddc3da1
describe
'33097' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEC' 'sip-files00135.pro'
cf4626b5d226b0881a35dbe22965a7a2
64b2a00ee3a0543a41d3818c5279778a11e1d170
'2011-12-16T20:18:18-05:00'
describe
'17589' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJED' 'sip-files00136.pro'
1ab54bccea24223c5b155afc373d4ec9
3a06bb95965909d14a362ff7c2c529d64ef8834a
describe
'23632' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEE' 'sip-files00137.pro'
a7d1b830484b37c061a60018d6081bbd
52ec4e7759f3470d9f439d96642f0df1fd5f670c
'2011-12-16T20:22:42-05:00'
describe
'26909' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEF' 'sip-files00138.pro'
f56b7c7ece0279a450bfebe7d4609d9b
91d594cc8b4fbbca0cfad3ef1b26cea20ee3e780
'2011-12-16T20:18:35-05:00'
describe
'13861' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEG' 'sip-files00139.pro'
cb1c90107974c3ef1f258dc0bcc3d206
6dcf76fda391f7c0186303ff4f91032db2d8aee3
'2011-12-16T20:23:48-05:00'
describe
'27672' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEH' 'sip-files00140.pro'
1babf737335025244866fa077962ee1f
3c16d2f7e364aceb2bc74fd51458694dcc943a80
'2011-12-16T20:24:00-05:00'
describe
'29250' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEI' 'sip-files00141.pro'
e1d749a6d0005bfc6f8c499efd907039
61d54a4b8fded6128384f77134fe9934a82a73f1
'2011-12-16T20:20:49-05:00'
describe
'29246' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEJ' 'sip-files00142.pro'
136f7900fdb4f14b9faa21d895865412
e801bea7e7f902c4497a37cc80a94a6df31a6d35
'2011-12-16T20:16:30-05:00'
describe
'31977' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEK' 'sip-files00143.pro'
1c9b37e9344ffc646e8458ded9330b8c
f44c0ba1d6d01df4fbe186693cd5e946be30775d
describe
'29239' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEL' 'sip-files00144.pro'
055bd0879b55ead125fc51a8d449396f
173c5f0d56eefc371922f73320140eaa20519e61
'2011-12-16T20:20:53-05:00'
describe
'29792' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEM' 'sip-files00145.pro'
6712dcb4c37469db52937151b144daf1
d37896e83de1023e71cbb124bfcf939d435af55f
'2011-12-16T20:14:37-05:00'
describe
'28996' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEN' 'sip-files00146.pro'
9622c6e245988e1f8a4baeab6ddf7ada
f2a68ab263fad97cbdf54dd7a01b532521be1ca1
'2011-12-16T20:20:00-05:00'
describe
'30629' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEO' 'sip-files00147.pro'
89faff783744343553701be28cf82640
cf2ee2a5509566a625b4ebc0fe15866e2db5c9a7
'2011-12-16T20:17:14-05:00'
describe
'29877' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEP' 'sip-files00148.pro'
04af40321b3ef1c34e6b99960821ab01
a4b631ab01dede5c777c330d894f71b2f068720b
'2011-12-16T20:14:55-05:00'
describe
'31237' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEQ' 'sip-files00149.pro'
78de95fd8da4a914e0116a746626be72
94b00c424e132e60f88d32c7ccf4ffa2a61d475a
'2011-12-16T20:22:04-05:00'
describe
'34463' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJER' 'sip-files00150.pro'
73f0e9746194fbf1db4bd93d156fcdb7
bd8d85277ba07e3747e3667f8f1485a6c97a79fd
describe
'33192' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJES' 'sip-files00151.pro'
728d3e978b60c19fc01d8b34ba5c8493
17ad80278aee75387a683808e47d5bdee6d70a5d
'2011-12-16T20:18:57-05:00'
describe
'32923' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJET' 'sip-files00152.pro'
c375f5287e2a443a182db3baab5dbdcc
3e007e24ada79f974586f0dd2eca1fa2001f547e
'2011-12-16T20:21:55-05:00'
describe
'6420' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEU' 'sip-files00153.pro'
af31b7cc7c7d9c487c4568c789896bc6
dddc597efa77868bb10f8cb7a9e6fdf5b3f21844
'2011-12-16T20:17:33-05:00'
describe
'24360' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEV' 'sip-files00154.pro'
cf5e3942f79332c64405751f249c5af7
0f11129565965ee4d9844fce3e5992d296072635
'2011-12-16T20:25:23-05:00'
describe
'32163' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEW' 'sip-files00155.pro'
9ff4085227388e478fecf92a3b58200d
cda58a7d093388c5f2537541bdf7b23288c35d6d
'2011-12-16T20:22:43-05:00'
describe
'29311' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEX' 'sip-files00156.pro'
16580ac86c07e4944018d6ecd117c55f
cc9aa374db91c0bd1b2ffe00604aa7a248f032f2
describe
'29340' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEY' 'sip-files00157.pro'
3f596a81bd0fe0ca0234ac2689f1abb5
7664ccf06070a3f7769295ce5296a582458b97e8
'2011-12-16T20:16:19-05:00'
describe
'34265' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJEZ' 'sip-files00158.pro'
e10d1e657fb8e0a8807818fbe7c1329e
02665b4c90f31729098331cb7d3cc7b098447a35
describe
'22946' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFA' 'sip-files00159.pro'
e44c1f8534d4b3e8bcba3d28edab47b0
92c49b8275edd245ae67f020debab50576161d64
'2011-12-16T20:15:16-05:00'
describe
'33154' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFB' 'sip-files00160.pro'
9e5ba1ffeee4e097f144f63a120bb745
da7bbdbd24afb45d33b9a627091cc878aad2d695
'2011-12-16T20:19:39-05:00'
describe
'33317' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFC' 'sip-files00161.pro'
4ea754643d9b42d4f4464c379366c0af
10f0275057747f38969c50ca018a4dadc245a178
describe
'22553' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFD' 'sip-files00162.pro'
d2c7747419dfd880fc07f4ac04f6f9b3
346f4e5f0c8a2d3363daf69b25dd9207b34f111e
describe
'30582' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFE' 'sip-files00163.pro'
20fda9d3807be4e3e4d48876932c3443
3691a52e8ecb7a7dc11ece27f92fabd8583c5096
'2011-12-16T20:19:35-05:00'
describe
'28799' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFF' 'sip-files00164.pro'
c5b7bca546582d540860beba8be0f188
1e04c92ca0ab83833484a24166ef1a92042e96fd
describe
'31480' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFG' 'sip-files00165.pro'
a32f4153f6e0851e382a62ffef6c33be
13e36a88694cf4197913be3cf509d5d2d56e3307
describe
'30538' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFH' 'sip-files00166.pro'
0621a2b016318e57b712ffdd9c1525e8
b17371b56fb91e3acaa7c03cf94c479b48e26e1e
'2011-12-16T20:19:23-05:00'
describe
'30897' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFI' 'sip-files00167.pro'
c0a56dd2378f72504b63f0b0bc703204
1c7c03f8e4346d9d81dbdec9df787fd69dd35c25
describe
'34165' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFJ' 'sip-files00168.pro'
2ff2ead464c18fc562e1bb56c25dce3d
81a7ead464c7c0b639870c9278661e58e0360cae
'2011-12-16T20:17:05-05:00'
describe
'32523' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFK' 'sip-files00169.pro'
4decf72fccbce27a778fa382eea96a43
2da02ae1b3dd0c1bb884a8899ac20813bb32f682
'2011-12-16T20:25:21-05:00'
describe
'33141' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFL' 'sip-files00170.pro'
606bd6d4c5b39ee54c1ac81d8606be2d
da7aa49a1a099778715bf7e8f7148f8f83761165
describe
'23948' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFM' 'sip-files00171.pro'
4ec68e560b1a9157261216f0786acf73
8ec32fc068d6487b49710c4aaa7216c2b1df72b2
'2011-12-16T20:16:36-05:00'
describe
'18534' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFN' 'sip-files00172.pro'
41ec00aedd155dcd6906f58614364343
709db303298a6f6337aeb7e6d344d3d56656b086
'2011-12-16T20:14:53-05:00'
describe
'27299' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFO' 'sip-files00173.pro'
da023f55dbdc99d940aaf6d3836dba13
baf789af960ef67f504bd30d7897d8e6549138ce
'2011-12-16T20:18:05-05:00'
describe
'29845' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFP' 'sip-files00174.pro'
28e559dddb6a788d0d7fe2f24029710a
366dbf34d411d196d39b36e5c68ae60cc60b2830
'2011-12-16T20:15:52-05:00'
describe
'31359' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFQ' 'sip-files00175.pro'
b41538b9c20a523ae70a6c2e10364aef
6be80d6a681cc06ae9495bd927363fe5df71cd03
describe
'31941' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFR' 'sip-files00176.pro'
decf39715e3320321b86312e23343837
6461ead50e93c4a3d17ce5a072b36d2461046db1
'2011-12-16T20:14:09-05:00'
describe
'31854' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFS' 'sip-files00177.pro'
3f4ea5fbf9b936dd599252f60c3060b4
290cde5dee92aa4445e2370c78fde75644564b63
'2011-12-16T20:19:36-05:00'
describe
'31649' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFT' 'sip-files00178.pro'
0babe08f3ea4c719adf8d753033226dc
6a41fcdbe0509024b8c6162391102b6c65608922
describe
'23667' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFU' 'sip-files00179.pro'
09bfa0502a4c9d4c9fd988a48f0514ed
5bc40053ec8d9d3b616dfbb76b58ee033f38304e
'2011-12-16T20:21:13-05:00'
describe
'32359' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFV' 'sip-files00180.pro'
ec43d2074a2a82fd57d86e9bc0b6ee7d
7aaf8942ba94e566cfd31d2ae29e22c353d7cc32
describe
'33822' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFW' 'sip-files00181.pro'
51bfba0c8a764747a6b045199a3f1a19
80a52789b83b8ab81504a45f4009a7c0ff8ddb4e
'2011-12-16T20:22:07-05:00'
describe
'32940' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFX' 'sip-files00182.pro'
9be7fd530e255c304b5df6c7e70c53a3
0261041850730ffcc857fa1bda299ff94f20970b
'2011-12-16T20:25:26-05:00'
describe
'30905' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFY' 'sip-files00183.pro'
c9d70a9400232e0d2601062841dfdc67
c1365466f6e1156e695fd5954c54bf3b32a7ba1c
describe
'30392' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJFZ' 'sip-files00184.pro'
1d522d418060cd362edb39ea2ff5feed
e8aa08da0371719cdd8ebc4053f87e0dccf61621
'2011-12-16T20:17:10-05:00'
describe
'32253' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGA' 'sip-files00185.pro'
0a45f2328e45431c525ede12a80c151c
8d0ff88abc52ac51562c7c6b6447ccf9eafa616a
'2011-12-16T20:18:40-05:00'
describe
'30957' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGB' 'sip-files00186.pro'
f94246d95a2763bf70ce8a883a177c07
d0b564a0a7bd5baca5e5c42736436dc56ee5b4e1
'2011-12-16T20:24:08-05:00'
describe
'33233' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGC' 'sip-files00187.pro'
daeab898e169fd2a3bed75da1fd9b6e6
6f467572613e148c9df2c5a4ab0817f3bc211e42
'2011-12-16T20:22:09-05:00'
describe
'12323' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGD' 'sip-files00188.pro'
cb4f96c70866cd8bc0578eb4e25fc575
b3d8fbcd75980660c617dc234a9dba34da9f721c
'2011-12-16T20:14:51-05:00'
describe
'33081' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGE' 'sip-files00189.pro'
32fa2f52d6ad7fe3848560769c04640b
3ea83890aad4b0613958beb701fb5d06e0c514a3
'2011-12-16T20:19:59-05:00'
describe
'29749' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGF' 'sip-files00190.pro'
713812cc9e92c50b315e6932a60eba63
16fb1dcbb4b109fec57f37e0a589598b37cd5a02
describe
'31802' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGG' 'sip-files00191.pro'
025490bc89d559cc792cc94fa47798f7
fc0058aa5eace48ef35e672ca9eba30e9e7d34cb
'2011-12-16T20:16:51-05:00'
describe
'18170' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGH' 'sip-files00192.pro'
655c2cf0747bbcc6ef34c9b2dee5caf0
7def09b8df93c587706d7645951271577b6303ad
describe
'20394' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGI' 'sip-files00193.pro'
aeaa3fa401e81237aa8373fec741f762
cec05357c6b90020f961b39001a1276b06590e95
describe
'29636' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGJ' 'sip-files00194.pro'
64c239ee4c8e08e890807d533eb0d5b3
529e10df6325cc495f15e9827bb7687c4afaed12
describe
'32503' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGK' 'sip-files00195.pro'
8bab2be4432252fcb6b716fded41fbe6
89a4e7118dd827f74ff05962f405b3a49b0801f4
describe
'32955' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGL' 'sip-files00196.pro'
11fd20f3596088bdf19052acf4c77b62
d7a887a17187ddf37ec49aebbc1618bab7fbcce4
'2011-12-16T20:17:27-05:00'
describe
'29918' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGM' 'sip-files00197.pro'
d483cd91510507b5867b245c628e723f
f67efe30c6e2816cf675f97c6a661817ebbf56c4
'2011-12-16T20:19:13-05:00'
describe
'29605' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGN' 'sip-files00198.pro'
27cd2eb2444854c31a75404f0d8ec65a
58402a18a46975029aad6b47bf78c981d99379ff
'2011-12-16T20:15:09-05:00'
describe
'23874' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGO' 'sip-files00199.pro'
c27988a1fa23b4484171d95865df7cee
d54a22e6306a1a7f0b6b1b0b05b5fc64fc097af0
describe
'31655' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGP' 'sip-files00200.pro'
7cae46476301d49d8d436bb1ebd3af8a
3848b28110169208d5a38a79ddf6d6269951c192
'2011-12-16T20:16:34-05:00'
describe
'28011' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGQ' 'sip-files00201.pro'
acab033bae00f51fffbba147914a63f5
28b04f26047ef042436b41156c4338a834ef0fbb
describe
'33433' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGR' 'sip-files00202.pro'
e3dc1b708da201778125bb98846b2e90
37247b5aa32a870df40d1fdaefba54678efbebb2
'2011-12-16T20:22:40-05:00'
describe
'33373' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGS' 'sip-files00203.pro'
0fa6efa1d6f2723aafd22f9b35dc673d
6bbd8e48c5a8c98ca5559778dd0abdb2a8366287
'2011-12-16T20:19:20-05:00'
describe
'30619' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGT' 'sip-files00204.pro'
901bc4a6c4582c7919da69a9c1d95cb9
54b4787ab641079773d7704531aecce0cb667726
describe
'32321' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGU' 'sip-files00205.pro'
0603fb50989b7bf4500ac8c88ad02676
11bcb60b5f5d15b86cfa4be6bab1bcdd73737c7c
'2011-12-16T20:25:36-05:00'
describe
'30760' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGV' 'sip-files00206.pro'
b5b13465840392c01e9b466c8e214c0b
39291639f9c912d954eebba189dd7eaa35d7d2e1
describe
'31646' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGW' 'sip-files00207.pro'
5d9de8a4357eb55e989147184741477f
d2717ea61fc0718ed7975a3ab405a390119dbf0b
'2011-12-16T20:14:16-05:00'
describe
'30576' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGX' 'sip-files00208.pro'
cb191a97f9cf368234cfdade4bd528c8
13b7dda6123966a239073c592be0f9da8664b940
describe
'33325' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGY' 'sip-files00209.pro'
7fa8019d9663a680b7edfeb265d224fe
07bd9a0b4513110efc4aa7cd8aa7e702cd21fd84
'2011-12-16T20:21:11-05:00'
describe
'23162' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJGZ' 'sip-files00210.pro'
4829b917a2b5be7fe94f6de14b2ae483
76bb71377d2d6a7aa2f3f61134a1cfc8468ba28e
'2011-12-16T20:23:00-05:00'
describe
'30636' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHA' 'sip-files00211.pro'
2e8cf65715a9509ab11f0deed2ea8931
6d8c8f1dcd52cb6486e6ae225716382aed996e04
describe
'44382' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHB' 'sip-files00212.pro'
760ee6c15d44abf4fb26278c2eebe647
d8e98b3a188810dc83fe0cfe9dc1e6805f225813
'2011-12-16T20:17:34-05:00'
describe
'41433' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHC' 'sip-files00213.pro'
e5bb9babfdb6fed4c1676e7b8dae7b41
4904b6a67470c494caecf96156424898b5e1ef30
'2011-12-16T20:14:22-05:00'
describe
'54035' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHD' 'sip-files00214.pro'
7789aa9e18c72de8bac07aef4447bc07
72b92770b0527eb06cf4120da0aef5f8963f211d
'2011-12-16T20:18:29-05:00'
describe
'45606' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHE' 'sip-files00215.pro'
4165c03c3930ffd5aa959a49f4268efc
dc0eef11bcca9952cc185685aad489f0ed8745b3
describe
'50325' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHF' 'sip-files00216.pro'
648bcec1c13f73c00c20dd0d6088086c
093540bf7521191ba6e1a66226a4906d6382b6f8
'2011-12-16T20:23:47-05:00'
describe
'41946' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHG' 'sip-files00217.pro'
86f8d57edff663968aa7ba434f59158e
1cd2a12ba8d3812fdb39fc6182b0363ba2918e9a
'2011-12-16T20:14:03-05:00'
describe
'52263' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHH' 'sip-files00218.pro'
3d7f372c082995bd67770cce4085a86b
74279f6b12bac958e87f67e55607b81bbe163bb9
describe
'255013' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHI' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
e50e769ca5e2fc5732801e567c87fd1f
90beb36b64511e7faab29543cd1763f33bccb45a
describe
'1513' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHJ' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
40fb37637867dca65e945ceab60ed293
783e66c49f6e75f3e501d7539309079f3b7ef037
describe
'6937' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHK' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
7c86cb639cec60f595c5cccc6e9891d0
de562695adcb8c2946bbf6692fe098fee949dc52
'2011-12-16T20:15:38-05:00'
describe
'1998' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHL' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
efb95a22d715c01ecbe351f827c36976
4d8dcbd67903e2e962251dd9c879513179ce2f3d
'2011-12-16T20:16:59-05:00'
describe
'305048' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHM' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
c93361ee67226071bb92a2566d258b10
42ea9e769aae43a99ffff42531c15436587322ee
describe
'9665' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHN' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
855be8dfe0d8186c6c95aff78691137d
7a91b6462f39ef5429ad3c9490583ca8a86477c6
'2011-12-16T20:23:43-05:00'
describe
'42858' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHO' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
5b0f6071dd3b58d02e1ffa970a1e0687
42a34e81be200870a7ad166cf185557119776078
describe
'21383' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHP' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
1d79d718da34a3378523f01266748eb4
5fc097c4efc9f6edfe05d740fd27ce8d32e02b33
'2011-12-16T20:24:59-05:00'
describe
'16976' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHQ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
11ebbc32e33585e94c17d92306175b97
e9b7dd6fd3f46cb42147902a73f5794546365182
'2011-12-16T20:21:39-05:00'
describe
'25849' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHR' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
7d66a6153b2cabaa89e7e73a8f37e9cd
a2fc6a444f7224e1b51d2bd041962773e06d6544
'2011-12-16T20:23:09-05:00'
describe
'14742' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHS' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
d774c4fd4fa0f75ba02b12777909eea5
f179dad2c4cd5a0407eaaa5bda0a31b4da7b64b6
'2011-12-16T20:24:18-05:00'
describe
'11819' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHT' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
1551b9f25dc2c3201c3b149fd18d5f44
feff0501df942097d29aef27974f58115d8eca5c
'2011-12-16T20:19:10-05:00'
describe
'45117' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHU' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
01e6beb92f73313bb2abaa7b8a9208d3
ddca0bc2a2aaf01e14b6ecc9bfd595074a94f4c4
'2011-12-16T20:22:26-05:00'
describe
'66005' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHV' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
8aa0ddaa9609a3f44c257ab32ff05436
5df6bd3b4135f13bee6f1d781ce4c92e847c9465
describe
'67039' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHW' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
daddd83842f91f937fb13452e102026d
3b7cb87c0aae1ee541951df1201b71d55c20e254
'2011-12-16T20:15:06-05:00'
describe
'299100' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHX' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
1581ce5d8cd9ee3a8fa0726b11b72f74
6e7f5d0b8bc12dd802ad7f1f438702959c07c8fc
'2011-12-16T20:23:32-05:00'
describe
'56740' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHY' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
e45e691db896795e49570cecd7047858
1ab813abc2b7d2d384440acf13d637a0f5f4ec93
'2011-12-16T20:18:19-05:00'
describe
'56926' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJHZ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
89b63647b9eb7f966a40a496dd4689f0
71d2f0caee1c30e563d5ff4e7d1778f5a7b2d165
describe
'62906' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIA' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
ac5a2b172d3f7308826494b4f05fb7c8
e3391f02a6216dd1c22f7a9f7f4b4b818660b5ea
'2011-12-16T20:14:12-05:00'
describe
'62707' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIB' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
2fe369858e639471a0dcc53903ac9663
e1be918f45704d56da13ba974e31282d2667d832
'2011-12-16T20:14:00-05:00'
describe
'57326' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIC' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
1caced137840cca7b4cd108bed070a7a
f0d732286174e990442bbde895da0110ea85d3da
describe
'54527' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJID' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
b47a640582b432827ec8de23f217e1da
bb4a6446e5036f73ffc59d8a9d1437a45b6c1b0f
'2011-12-16T20:17:59-05:00'
describe
'64220' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIE' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
8b7264b5143caf7203be10637be4bcb3
8e9262f6924fdcf0488428e79d7a859e021f9d19
describe
'66033' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIF' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
ec3f6cf14c22b6f05cab6b90e2d181d9
9fa2f26b13dc4a6f9ee42d9b9107eff23620d401
describe
'64126' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIG' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
61b34b75a83af6f87136e28af3f1e81f
c8c6bea5ffae154303c3d4ceeb7d78ccf450e7eb
'2011-12-16T20:23:57-05:00'
describe
'293096' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIH' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
cfc47f18aec5b71eb6d0dac55e1c6a26
e7db6d15997f66dbfb227892e2f30e138a39fedf
'2011-12-16T20:23:35-05:00'
describe
'28907' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJII' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
6221b863b6dd0bb5190bfc13ae905277
1c9a9895cb1081ffd6d1199baece755a5fc5d8c7
'2011-12-16T20:17:25-05:00'
describe
'51268' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIJ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
43c24fa9f45e3a139bbf5f054ba259d8
a305b6cf5d82a321e7a352590c43b95bb6ae1153
describe
'57290' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIK' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
58fb187e3e3cc48629f045ea0e62998c
f94f79483f2d7786f9cd981d8d63a6bfd21da637
describe
'63787' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIL' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
00049ccec0484ade8620d8372d8aaa0a
a3a59336ca955b0948110a1f42f840b838431601
'2011-12-16T20:19:53-05:00'
describe
'64871' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIM' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
6c1d45616fadd929f3629ff67827301c
48545eb581ec09ab881397932e978bc363e42f49
'2011-12-16T20:16:55-05:00'
describe
'65019' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIN' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
559a9a6f21c6f24ad43ac30f9abf9b2b
32c7fd4179172afb3b1a3c0772105f95fd7eba19
describe
'63826' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIO' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
c370c6efed36c000d80d0204c7317611
887e1df638647e49029988893035437ce9ef3d85
describe
'66842' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIP' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
c4d1a38c84f2563881ced75db2f4a2d7
6ad7875a26ef4ff04af55c28290b8f5efe102833
'2011-12-16T20:22:59-05:00'
describe
'64700' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIQ' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
8178f82b68f54a814b2d670e4680eba6
e8b2035374e292e4a882c65086aa9601c5ce4288
'2011-12-16T20:24:44-05:00'
describe
'298910' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIR' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
7d4d3fdf42c5734a9a790940221003c4
8b7fbbe8dfdbb0b25ac42e736172bb007f70c717
'2011-12-16T20:21:53-05:00'
describe
'63948' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIS' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
6e2e4f1172c6a08781e165d4514c4eb7
eca906c2a7fbd6403629178a5a053006ce42923f
describe
'67433' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIT' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
589a9318e78c9f6da228b777a96e2963
65aa1d24d2a089cba695e6c221f1651ddc1a0e98
describe
'63054' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIU' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
73e45c660b32d98a420c25ac52d86a22
252a498f78b39a0d7a7646b86fb83c880f05435f
'2011-12-16T20:22:00-05:00'
describe
'57336' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIV' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
9ce3460036331eb1a4ad28c6a4b1f590
ea22d4dc2644279a452a1b865939ea3836b11061
describe
'59576' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIW' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
ca0bb1af81d97b4783acac9f9972920d
58bba3b8ec44a6acefa93c0d7e30efde275f2926
'2011-12-16T20:22:36-05:00'
describe
'64668' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIX' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
d60202ac61d1d982ddeec8864856ecec
beec89cf29d4648374980f31f1008475b9ee8785
'2011-12-16T20:24:39-05:00'
describe
'63512' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIY' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
9691a8c6af858fe56cf9ec90e1200667
96b944850ddd28a63b73cf262c41828b2b1a1f27
describe
'65603' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJIZ' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
85132397b75d41153074db0875879e1d
d7938a0ce4b5d073d80aa8d523ac5385a0fc62ce
'2011-12-16T20:18:02-05:00'
describe
'37138' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJA' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
8032346ae616b5b93adf8853262678f1
bf49fc80fb03712d302e7a16a78176607bd7f758
'2011-12-16T20:21:06-05:00'
describe
'55038' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJB' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
5b444ee60969bf4a4ad4200ef1bf13fc
59f83397f9404bb82af2c620ded202779530b6d1
'2011-12-16T20:20:57-05:00'
describe
'63066' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJC' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
fe5616e5f6aee27f376262de89ca695d
4ad2a86f4609af6bd08cf76d2c8f6df1e453abf2
'2011-12-16T20:18:03-05:00'
describe
'299017' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJD' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
10be5cb426ced54b22dd381e74c7b263
016ac0d7a4991511cc74b4305a95b414caf2a49a
'2011-12-16T20:24:38-05:00'
describe
'66069' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJE' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
b6a094f03c3b35cfc04dec8baa4942b4
5663efe796fd00e734c0e4acfb5b0fc87581579a
describe
'66072' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJF' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
8b3e2cae057d06f939fcd98750d663c6
1d2b0370faa4d2e22aab3c7264b4b3d4ededa32d
'2011-12-16T20:16:46-05:00'
describe
'63243' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJG' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
de130458fe86011c3a0e107104fb8b37
363cffbf0d9ac7c0bd4960492d3c20b7c2b143c2
describe
'60460' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJH' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
efbf2a4da4707ede99b4b469fc20a9fd
ccb44145a3b13793818db0028c4a337d9d0fba49
describe
'66408' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJI' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
a44dda7abac52002943f99409e61c03d
c3dd8e86cd05dc231d199a8f2faf1decdeb6513a
describe
'62926' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJJ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
fe72adc7c40df70fe0ac338529bf7913
a29866504905abcbe7f7a0b0606227bc88ba21cd
describe
'291460' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJK' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
7f761de842c145524b68f5734a25b6bf
6cc705dd443e75fd55b71eedceed9b49646e57ad
describe
'61589' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJL' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
70756afc6caf5472a9a5f3ec3a508d9f
589986fd85b51da7d26edcf96a259b209b5357bf
'2011-12-16T20:18:07-05:00'
describe
'63444' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJM' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
846a3b4c02e52f539c1182f95cfa08c4
5b5489df7c2f888aaa6b829101fa856a9e2ff15c
'2011-12-16T20:19:26-05:00'
describe
'66611' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJN' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
70ccdf1405c0000f65c7932b1bdd68e8
1b390d9bfc2d9a532233e59d630fa9f003e3f208
'2011-12-16T20:25:06-05:00'
describe
'65735' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJO' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
9e04cc5fad216935fb13adc54394c27d
33afd46048ae7e3fcfefff00579450ae9c55529b
'2011-12-16T20:14:35-05:00'
describe
'65106' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJP' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
baf23ef22e23424673d401c771df3a53
87a8ea7518eca86cf02bd62d216b8aba2ea28e8b
describe
'64762' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJQ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
bb33bfd9e14980d526925286d3e81d41
1c77fe6dc1381553b52b73f82dc5e3cc3b70bf67
describe
'64273' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJR' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
50a72dc2b4dd9b3f1db5c19c6a6c7aa1
a9134707f7f1613d17b2434d540e8547d6578390
describe
'49486' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJS' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
f10fb1b844fd427c913cc5892b2450fa
62f719da7daafb4eb18f3b1cf79727751db7fab9
'2011-12-16T20:20:33-05:00'
describe
'53511' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJT' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
f7848f2e29680434370efec2ac29b06e
12964169759a4a9b40efe5ead8e16c8c99c8e712
describe
'65794' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJU' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
e84ba5107cfc5a411d512bbba13b7a83
f20ac002735db3176ccbdcabf8bd03156f9cc22c
describe
'63828' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJV' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
883a8e47b2461b7a85567ab213166572
9a3c6c1b2f3f27894b613dfd90d04d0e0865d921
'2011-12-16T20:24:22-05:00'
describe
'58852' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJW' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
015cea55156e65cc721a6767638a1207
e7f32e8a318ddac332436f86bfb010192e5ec39a
'2011-12-16T20:24:10-05:00'
describe
'64191' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJX' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
e2f41ef975757bf376589abd61f65750
b94e700e45589880acfdc5b5b7b49784dfcb86cd
'2011-12-16T20:24:09-05:00'
describe
'61594' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJY' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
404ae9e0934f032d53ad66dea45d539e
67362856cd5e0431b1f9ac2bf512afbc00241da0
describe
'61178' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJJZ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
e693eb9f7af8abd83056b7a491f940ed
72a3d22cb0dfef2a2694f2586ce52af86cd166c0
describe
'58785' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKA' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
43a9f52d808c7c9d088a523bd44a72a8
79ac063a89d8604c405ce3cb8b901018857f9ea7
describe
'299019' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKB' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
a3e60a8ac27e636a23c8e7167792cd8b
ec4900808097b51c70794430c51e6c5b3185504c
describe
'59466' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKC' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
b5d230de97f8dd327cbfeedb83ef6842
1957fc64a866ab061a3b66740fcf7fb71b8159f0
describe
'65097' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKD' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
a37005290610f100879da0ff329b3c73
b7596c023b0aaf9a90ccc01030ee6f3fab877de3
'2011-12-16T20:21:10-05:00'
describe
'63953' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKE' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
240cf1c1b82509d9dc425d94a73e6f7d
4a90ead27197e930ba0345b3a67fa73a1991246e
describe
'62717' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKF' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
2d2f78aa5bdc021e1d20a673d81ed9c4
785c751577e4faf027774067a7f999e384c532dc
describe
'58105' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKG' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
e19b12dc1087e064e671679594837e70
de3cad56048b24b36ef8422a796783801b660393
describe
'63058' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKH' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
71f366908259339714ca58355eacfe97
5e56ef676dc6b3ba4e76226fbbdc4826708c6bb5
describe
'301546' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKI' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
d126ff332c7ad66a296aa7a67e558a9f
d13882264bb26d08b3214f3ec32af7b57af38066
describe
'59782' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKJ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
c5a795c75d6d60b546bcfb1619da3194
73bc260f271b84485d74ac08941238fc2adaba00
'2011-12-16T20:20:28-05:00'
describe
'33828' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKK' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
d7208cffbbe828d800d62fbc4537ccc1
7a5b259bde9b7b6af7b5015d045e665ebdadcbfd
'2011-12-16T20:16:31-05:00'
describe
'49952' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKL' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
9b53b9e0178f9a292e9a0dd38e4e5ccf
1319e7a58ca6770a392faa75b4ae4c59a5753f33
describe
'299985' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKM' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
283aa401f5646120a34887b16387c777
7d81dca7479eadc058a21e3066710f54c35035d5
'2011-12-16T20:16:52-05:00'
describe
'65998' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKN' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
059d1969df517e376408ea0c3942a5b8
53321a285a15b4b265cab7a85e318f2cb9b11706
describe
'57616' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKO' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
7c9407448e77e671cde5d46b9943e07e
75e50ad1f5ed0f99a5392c2699064b7b7cf31e91
describe
'61350' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKP' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
0368213a1020907e484b9052841c6e23
a1b6282e8c5ceb0f0db1c9b640c1a6ea6de73dca
'2011-12-16T20:14:30-05:00'
describe
'59879' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKQ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
7d44fec7c2ca1d9cc6c04f2e21fc9142
2676e9f30ffa0700069bf637e6a4298d08a462ad
describe
'62554' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKR' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
c9063e3d5da277418d13dee8ab42973e
3a09c07143b3272637c6033da9a3e953c717fb2c
describe
'50979' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKS' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
ba7d9f3715c52d37d1b687913fd76940
af39043195cb008724504953914f84eb4f21d529
describe
'63093' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKT' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
dd95150f777ec74c6c95578306d652cb
b005ed966ed298a450e86ddc7fd5bd80eac4ebc7
'2011-12-16T20:19:29-05:00'
describe
'58299' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKU' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
0a4cc1690b41ebf8224e570e591a2360
71ea781c611e8afbd0692439cb9134bcfc4777de
describe
'60365' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKV' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
dde30b199d284fb2d692baba072aee10
ccb7d9f3b0bc1a97c6833e4a10fd85e43f36f1c8
describe
'57528' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKW' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
e601558b0d845c68e8023acd72a798f6
e2a98faf1a299fdcf1b46e8654451e29d1e2dc51
'2011-12-16T20:16:22-05:00'
describe
'57843' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKX' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
3d9d6e16e606af3504d1ae1a093fc889
1d1321e9002ed40ca4603c5f4f2205dd27849893
describe
'293376' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKY' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
658b4ee9c9f23ea4c896b4cdba2f0bcc
b87009fe23ce1f242e8c03b4eec276a08a490ca6
describe
'62185' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJKZ' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
baba16d867af79460a46a03fb3c4be55
a53dc1bb985c4e20c8f03397fdb3e016a16f401b
describe
'62149' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLA' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
6b75b4250170aa8f21d4171c4144ffd7
e2395fddf21d27c57ba41ad809ebef3714434cce
'2011-12-16T20:19:19-05:00'
describe
'63061' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLB' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
a6721b35ab664ba957674c6c685f522a
6c30fd0d5f3accfdc733bfd0fa22a982f0a64405
describe
'32756' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLC' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
429ec50d93bf5f7317ca5ccd445a50eb
1e1a53de5857b8bfb40861bffcdd2ad4b5ca8a92
describe
'54812' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLD' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
59d048bf5bf0cca4c24c30da7b5b70a5
8d78419057ebe4c91d6514d0b6949be1e086cbf7
'2011-12-16T20:18:26-05:00'
describe
'64882' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLE' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
c805f4114e4a5ef3d1a6dc5bc9464c2a
a4a2b112c3046e2710e1af9d051408181cbf4f6b
describe
'61349' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLF' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
8c27f2742bbb74686547b208f72d8041
27ecc87c843a8c1b67ecdf93015cbd01b7115c4e
'2011-12-16T20:24:25-05:00'
describe
'64531' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLG' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
3473b6df69aceba1b3b2aa3fe04b7082
3da723a210348fba9c79c46a1de4de571ae81680
'2011-12-16T20:15:34-05:00'
describe
'66478' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLH' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
34a05adab627e9e922ae05b675c9a500
8185547ab4e3e8c0ef75751d79788df3e9b4b348
'2011-12-16T20:24:47-05:00'
describe
'65053' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLI' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
f5cb14c261829e369c163f71598591e1
74650ac9828c4cb04857d0e906f14f980d39d412
'2011-12-16T20:19:11-05:00'
describe
'63677' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLJ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
681d668608be60f3eeec3e4e75bfabf7
0c4692b7ca906c202340f25427ff5ef0fa0889af
'2011-12-16T20:16:06-05:00'
describe
'66723' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLK' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
19660ebd0b4d1c11367a63ccc7aa4b47
c1b8162dd2d764fbcadd6e1364e139a754a36943
'2011-12-16T20:16:12-05:00'
describe
'285320' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLL' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
206d490eebf9ab1ba6bc068771e17114
860dcc2a531a8f319b37669936f31759da331997
describe
'63551' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLM' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
14ae2233991955155b288cb85fdfb6c1
f59daf79eaab8ecea55c5095892aabbd4a5790fb
describe
'65051' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLN' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
0fda38997b27edbb5ebf7b0b037e74ea
b537e80305e9c9669c5e3b792bc543cb51657f19
describe
'63460' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLO' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
c16ff5922fd310601cafacef253f6ac2
5c18c1f5c6f74def639f635b4bfc56301e97a372
'2011-12-16T20:25:10-05:00'
describe
'64982' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLP' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
5a1a3d26a8357cf8c56bf67513657d0b
e06d46a995db4ce7ab45b94c94122727d4f97870
describe
'65278' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLQ' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
bda987ee1f621713caf3db6bf49d6462
f3e1902bde422f8c8680b9a795d95e9dddb1a9cd
describe
'308956' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLR' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
6c7a21fa402994f64874b9e87d4da1ad
65aea16d49da3eb8d7aee14a240891659b4221dd
describe
'64719' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLS' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
a14082f57d951f8019224401f91e14a6
c9cba51eca86aaf0d80585f3bab0fa21e9f7c7c3
describe
'64971' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLT' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
65d640352b7c45ddf4c2233c32e2670e
7796c44e99a06df7d6934420a4ab098e16d2a977
'2011-12-16T20:22:47-05:00'
describe
'26704' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLU' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
a21635509910bf37b078c827fdb7f015
dce5043360a8efa56beacc6636a6f1f95443f4f6
'2011-12-16T20:14:02-05:00'
describe
'53742' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLV' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
6de616bd9fb3c39a29d0f3772260f11c
e0f89162e135f8fa70bfff11efc9ba423fedc255
describe
'63328' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLW' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
2a32c6f3d2c6269553113905077bbb76
98b96eaf40ed02be7b88dbfc931310b8e3f06da5
'2011-12-16T20:16:20-05:00'
describe
'303524' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLX' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
8c76a61010733b8173eb7391f080c601
1382e29f8fac00d56540dd8dfbf83f9be3ca3dc2
'2011-12-16T20:24:52-05:00'
describe
'64657' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLY' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
e9f18de0a845a8e9514c4d4c0076e870
43bb9795e245b89fa32a701105a0fc7b239aaf4e
'2011-12-16T20:18:41-05:00'
describe
'56750' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJLZ' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
1a8d1ca326d1401400eacb5dcfb75205
7686d6c3879a3af4703a9bc39955932ad1ae3b7c
'2011-12-16T20:20:37-05:00'
describe
'60143' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMA' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
83874a5185f7284a8a36a89944b66a29
1d63c820bffea9530eed43d8f4b480081f8923d9
'2011-12-16T20:21:36-05:00'
describe
'289304' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMB' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
fc35601006f06bb6569dbf3c7dc3ffb3
4a0b41f32600e6086ef3a0952a08a777b92ccb15
describe
'59363' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMC' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
6cb739ef751e625e84daea617c60fbd6
d7aa09b85a2ef91131680de8e26c9356fffd7d6d
'2011-12-16T20:24:35-05:00'
describe
'56422' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMD' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
95af3f33b6e23e03cb78c0b00e3a5e0c
c9be64d9fad7bd339f2003109d28e46d57f3fce4
describe
'64085' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJME' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
b4a8a31cbc8ba22258c0e206fe6f5c1b
9dec7a53288869440f260baa00fb64695edf5c7d
describe
'65759' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMF' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
a157849218612ab31418cac6feef354a
a60d39f1193e799ee2ffd791999c96b428e57016
'2011-12-16T20:21:07-05:00'
describe
'63819' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMG' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
9c3174d3bd48b367e9e95e5fc2406b96
947102b7ca33b9d619d35ddc4038c1f993f11d1d
'2011-12-16T20:19:38-05:00'
describe
'61139' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMH' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
d3973933143fa8e14143b077a4bfdbda
80b5827a719117c3b9e5e557f8bf7a8c6f093877
'2011-12-16T20:14:44-05:00'
describe
'61401' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMI' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
7e8ac21c425539735bdc2b1aa8a6b421
7a7524320abf82cc9e7587feeb4de81888c51175
'2011-12-16T20:17:30-05:00'
describe
'64469' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMJ' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
75d08bd995210a54d69fc76b46884b38
5025d866d466a674e69ed987be63dfba13bbeee6
'2011-12-16T20:20:47-05:00'
describe
'66678' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMK' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
d3f223bed9c2dabef44e00228e2215bb
45901b270618e2b8572f8b4c3e4acb314be3e71c
describe
'65451' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJML' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
e43d704d97e63d08ee0c9bfebbf319ea
e04c565bb63e49875322fcec1ec12b29fc85d314
describe
'65330' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMM' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
4ab467fabb07cb8487fff9bfc8b34a89
4f7df8febff2cbc64409b4b34b542125393b491f
describe
'37096' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMN' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
c92e17c4b3219ae54055d624fdfc2c99
e323ec1a866f24280a48afdf319937f034eda252
'2011-12-16T20:15:01-05:00'
describe
'49715' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMO' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
1b7e94da27d156e3dfce514feb265c49
46f8b4cf107178f07cab06b4233983480fbe22ba
describe
'53468' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMP' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
ab0edfffff9963828a5ea56bd51951da
3b7a935fc553025c13f9c5922b1e50e16ed818a6
describe
'292526' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMQ' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
896300825ee0a2fac80f3ea99ee7d85f
1af2e7214cce14e1462d969ecde4a8ecf600ba4f
'2011-12-16T20:19:58-05:00'
describe
'55700' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMR' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
9a04ac0dc9bc0ca33e2504704f2d90f6
dd013fb47a4ff785b1b9844fa68130db16d6e6fb
describe
'58311' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMS' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
faccc97bafe161486d0fbb992c75e7a6
1dd3037159f25c1a5d7ba2a7dd74fd99bf59fadb
'2011-12-16T20:20:04-05:00'
describe
'57693' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMT' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
ff36a581e330df3472c76163549355f3
0841b35dbed3d532f10876ace6989ecf147efc02
describe
'62632' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMU' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
e8cd656832530e80c8539f5abc5199ac
1448750808fd8fd39a9a039ec0aa28a39d2d81d3
describe
'57601' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMV' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
f1379bec5b0296f4e21174f900798757
a13e7443fc03790a2e5d8088ccd3ae727d00fb57
describe
'59677' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMW' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
dae8db6e2b6f20d8b396a755bb05b882
705cd7aa2370f21fda7ebf5d268dfd3d2763ab6c
describe
'57494' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMX' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
859c0b743d846db40d427d2c70976953
b2ffbec043ed50554006edb9106a60211d643bb1
'2011-12-16T20:17:58-05:00'
describe
'59650' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMY' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
1192dff7d1f743de5e228bef7d7b1d0e
64c02de2bf4e09a9c1fd44c6fb313e735132f7dd
describe
'58129' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJMZ' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
c5b047a6d7ecac000533b1dde5f101f7
11c4fa3b22be7dd797bd8e98a5059402d8c379b0
'2011-12-16T20:17:46-05:00'
describe
'61511' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNA' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
6b992ffc20b97d8ee554111381158ba3
9b19308cc015d807fb4c723773824eb9bfde52c3
'2011-12-16T20:21:21-05:00'
describe
'66082' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNB' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
3b5d4152dd8f7ae8d5d87683b51528dc
ba229917980c93572d13b3d955b9c4c4d0c54c31
describe
'64176' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNC' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
370758fb87ae05eabe134f9d0e881799
30e6cb98b27f55d0bf9d7ef9376ec04b7a57aca4
'2011-12-16T20:19:07-05:00'
describe
'65059' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJND' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
d1036d93770ed69c552e5acc0cf926d5
a553ebbef6d50a7a61162a4529972739a9324edd
describe
'15090' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNE' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
46e3bc5ffa7d19423a8fc9246046cbe1
bfe165c49170dbc84388091a2c2b9eab24d8c041
'2011-12-16T20:24:27-05:00'
describe
'49520' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNF' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
bf7596a6a8dbdae80a6eb8469e09a990
ce34b975247a79e7b4af166341c970fcba123998
describe
'61626' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNG' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
8a0258ec50fa9d3b17777c0f34084d44
38500cf80727a54b424fb98aab6949115a738a43
describe
'58120' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNH' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
14ee6d6deb6dd898cb83570cfef1cc1b
16e3c653334e6c77316d31e1776cb735d79d36fa
'2011-12-16T20:18:48-05:00'
describe
'58338' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNI' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
c70da6014f07c55fb86eea93d6773df7
43b3404f315e76c9822d78e1a4dc896ef45d73d3
describe
'66171' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNJ' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
fbca3fe9ac10a3ae32fed2a2d36d54e6
b92b3be6303dfca8c57817f98cf0b412612f1d69
describe
'286192' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNK' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
53ba716f6d181b15003cbc25bf262eb2
dfa16f3b620f789d678cc45811194bcb5b22e100
describe
'65587' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNL' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
e5b45dfe21d79e922ca88052276f3e28
f4052b7f1a098057d1a86e2513365c35147fb31d
describe
'65213' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNM' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
bc33c9b31028748f0155df80d3137b6f
40d8ec7fb9b963f123dccff8a54b40e2ce8de330
describe
'306572' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNN' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
72cf22fe68a46ea48282c300b4c66af2
4ab251a922a4800b31514dd98167b7c8cbdbe5cc
describe
'60111' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNO' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
0198d27c0e442c22e953dbb5e4f678cd
b11265e3dae66be36f2c79a63b0f8ce7d504d579
describe
'56859' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNP' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
26817771cff4b0f9f028f08a389ad53b
6da6b5e613c7ebb39f4c14684b4a717370a57b8a
describe
'61953' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNQ' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
02be5c1a6a0f2a9d5bd1f0bba1a81140
f9e420d5a0ebd032d4f5dfaf30611dd255bdea8f
'2011-12-16T20:23:23-05:00'
describe
'61108' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNR' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
19b7ee7f27f4db496029ccfe9ae9dac1
2b29672a5025183fa19ff0633bed5b881cd36fdc
'2011-12-16T20:22:14-05:00'
describe
'60288' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNS' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
3ac9225ec6a5810f088276f58efd31fd
75a008d3a257a80818bab793475e762276ef3d3f
describe
'68588' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNT' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
b6de1930e40ef7aecb4e0f0ec7fb6790
a7b49221459a862904789b81f5b6813b024e691c
'2011-12-16T20:16:23-05:00'
describe
'63955' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNU' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
31fbb86c49895aec6a98a270aa758c71
cbdf06fbc4b2b2f9936ed1e2e90ee6377866fe08
'2011-12-16T20:22:49-05:00'
describe
'66267' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNV' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
df063c0915496d561690a09fe0aff343
9a714df9e02069e3a82d7e39e28f4e96a99ad9c9
describe
'286237' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNW' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
18549378f2f4ebfd64de2c957fc30433
1e7952fe12c7a9f52140053c56c3e9f74fcd5fd0
describe
'38439' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNX' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
440d29313ee55ee971becc44d25f5eaa
96412627bb8d1d4ab06ca90495bf2832bb1658da
describe
'53919' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNY' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
b0038a8c705895fd7b00403d59e264dc
63cb20cee20e06c4e0cda0db19ab7506e30a31c7
describe
'60183' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJNZ' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
c429ddeca6abaca09fa470f99ec33a14
0124a7a673d320daf44ce2efcfc0f8ffe9383071
describe
'61677' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOA' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
1cba250e7512a1d7da458014924fe5cf
1a3ff858ef543cc380f76fab9632b3441124d7f3
'2011-12-16T20:14:08-05:00'
describe
'62956' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOB' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
d9b177b9669ad13c1761912a1cc6ffd9
4fb4f7e9128b00e65a24ff7cc38cea3a9a81fb0a
describe
'63030' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOC' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
f7494179c0ef893f24104bbf17c3f38c
92caaf0e1e9ebe2be156b78729f1b330f43e205b
'2011-12-16T20:20:24-05:00'
describe
'61784' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOD' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
8ea50546bfc5ecb1c498490ae987fec4
92dfe7ed4b19f74ab3ada80637d866a5fefb5e03
'2011-12-16T20:20:06-05:00'
describe
'286243' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOE' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
0140e9db6071bfb5116d824eb00a9c00
fa60c28b0a1b54cd1095437293f0ccc7ed8ae22e
'2011-12-16T20:14:10-05:00'
describe
'64305' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOF' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
4a5cef44c1b547da8bd5910d3871befc
a72e421f2b2ff6c72676b4a332bd014052c9f4bf
'2011-12-16T20:15:59-05:00'
describe
'65855' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOG' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
7cd025aeb47ea47ea6bb2df5db9306df
4c13b5c9008306cac3aa582a1b1a0ea5b12623db
'2011-12-16T20:21:19-05:00'
describe
'65354' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOH' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
e27afe24bd415902bcf663a971822181
621963e90123201b0c30835a85a8d482935e3f7d
'2011-12-16T20:15:30-05:00'
describe
'61179' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOI' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
5b02f693dbe93f476bc59984658de944
76bdc054a916b88a241e2f0f4aeb76a6d2f34fd5
describe
'59805' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOJ' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
acb0b4d19c9abba0469f0b943db53b5f
fe6707e816009002ebbd3e2f883252a525f73022
'2011-12-16T20:15:05-05:00'
describe
'63370' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOK' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
71606f93aa1c34a8774804dd02096468
7f0bcab4793e0e113d5e926a398956a86761972f
'2011-12-16T20:19:00-05:00'
describe
'62172' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOL' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
b3cbe6cdca2da2c7692b51d0357c7837
45917680ee2cc7c1bf46547487bc7d0c41a5e6b8
'2011-12-16T20:22:38-05:00'
describe
'66438' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOM' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
fc6549ad96254ee6434009a44e5311c6
c0d279b0808f4b2b223c027da46bc1463141eb15
describe
'299024' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJON' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
e64f95b51d2c5f3f01bd061885a4ea44
9ef9542541045526183e9728a14787be0141fb69
'2011-12-16T20:19:48-05:00'
describe
'65710' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOO' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
0c4c0fc0b5a432db4bdef9d8f034b29d
1e23eec280aaae22a0dc643afabef5eb4c2ac55a
'2011-12-16T20:17:51-05:00'
describe
'60898' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOP' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
876bac9c759293a6dd1727455305b7bd
7d6045600bf36f17cf76346d6ca86684cea6cb75
describe
'63790' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOQ' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
67142ecf292fcfa9eff1341a202aeb6b
a86bc75487fd754d4ab6a3e4f4e9f7fc18c289c5
describe
'297461' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOR' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
1d33ad45ae1d5123a6b18bca6028dd30
499bd324525fc3643bb8d439e34fd51545768fde
describe
'42751' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOS' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
6f78851cd9629ad07e62df76802d63f3
48fb30cf226b86730fd23a2f252f424c564e06ef
describe
'60489' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOT' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
ae076cf21c217afe3b0ae955bdc7ec4b
47805b039f706095b9a524b3584147bc03e1cd8e
'2011-12-16T20:15:25-05:00'
describe
'64002' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOU' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
a653a46a359a86597cc0be357e3c2049
f3e1349d55872d1e1513db419184e9e775c02337
describe
'63689' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOV' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
2ab3a397c573e958636f18114c24ffd7
5e9a4c1ec57efbc47302e1f15e1e999024700302
'2011-12-16T20:14:01-05:00'
describe
'59165' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOW' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
2ce0ee1b6b51d4866e0c886b59705fc5
1e7c8840bac6cecfa56cacef8ba709bf1ce3d349
'2011-12-16T20:23:33-05:00'
describe
'58321' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOX' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
7b1706d972e97ea74351f43967230cdd
c40c1797449954a60de7ff207e898d69537ec105
describe
'304766' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOY' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
20439a68834c412b4736e71ca26fd8fa
fec89c323c3b4d193109a4933bb248575cb14b30
describe
'62763' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJOZ' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
6115c2e3431bebb76b46d524466c9d5b
1c6a0060d09a41c89ea155f4c4d1ddf44f099b83
'2011-12-16T20:15:49-05:00'
describe
'55965' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPA' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
183e521b4054f88e1de01fa8b829304b
5a6e91429f26042e29993fb252415c19125402dd
'2011-12-16T20:25:04-05:00'
describe
'66151' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPB' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
49162c9ed6f89ab04a59bced853cda03
74045302c7ef82f5df29e68888a6fa78c903fa0e
'2011-12-16T20:21:51-05:00'
describe
'64751' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPC' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
bbf4ae80c4b69005bc6ec3ef51daf923
e7a69d8e18d89139611b23c7ca06a32ef02d778c
describe
'61447' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPD' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
f6dc1ce90eaf98fc8ce3e1a8a3195dcf
31ebe49f548c7dfdc6ce5536131f552c8ac985fd
describe
'62676' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPE' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
dbff8065f80d580e6b33b51b57772c98
4392915585a7b78322cff39bfdcb553b55ae66e1
describe
'61473' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPF' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
78a994e968cf341b1ec75c537e81c7c0
92170e643eb33765349dfadb3a2111d2f8ef5130
describe
'61024' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPG' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
3b73ce243a31ccbf7634788790ec3f86
29336175bb8a1433890aa5273b8361e67fcda3e1
describe
'59187' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPH' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
40f9adf6b0fad347e3e20c8e7746cb56
78ca96c957209cc33d870f1d819abaee1692f362
describe
'65497' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPI' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
139e96b8720b5a1d8fff257c7cfbc8fa
708162d02cdd45086c24800e23dfada6958e19c1
'2011-12-16T20:21:41-05:00'
describe
'302610' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPJ' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
cfd449b32708b8028aed7c32e8f2c737
6456b3cc5a2795c55a1c79ed58a3e7c6318d3c4b
describe
'52085' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPK' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
972ada876276ce9b11292986350b51cd
a5eed94df205830a88a05aa87c180e0e99fdb3c9
describe
'66589' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPL' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
f76327603400a9d26eb04d23348c120a
4af1d990b47e83332c72e4d20f130928a2d85ea7
describe
'58868' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPM' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
20abda8ec0503656df1771b49f536467
a4a8df075dd4bf20cbdfc0fdc6fe540ca5ee096a
describe
'67547' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPN' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
ee27a6feae9949ea028b4ae10bc60a28
3a3f8a30276514bd197496f982fd4d375c4f2ccb
'2011-12-16T20:23:40-05:00'
describe
'60671' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPO' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
26401db4e008c10af38ba6de480f3ca3
e8f1c96de74d4b90ea52a2c1bc77cdc8f8de4970
'2011-12-16T20:24:19-05:00'
describe
'64695' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPP' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
0bbfa6e2b578038371598a926b016704
1394f2c3a5d75cbd608ddc6a79b3990ba85052b1
'2011-12-16T20:24:17-05:00'
describe
'66871' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPQ' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
a9b2410573cdb64053f912747c5ef07f
d9ae8b132626dc08cc9459b71dc9862435cff81f
describe
'76161' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPR' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
227f841d68a03c2c8defbdc576500375
efb93bdb716b06113f2a6fde401de531401f3af2
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPS' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
e85451324c1761dd93290049bf360bd0
5029c763676f378bef2bc84077d8aabf91e0bd3c
describe
'254973' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPT' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
a904c4b93b1a22f78c389ec88a22c1dd
1a5b904948a40cdbbb9f812ae06d7475a8f79250
describe
'6129432' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPU' 'sip-files00001.tif'
79b912ed3fa2068f5e2abe9f667b0ba6
898c2c4fb02bb696a68ac812c0a8095971d9ac05
'2011-12-16T20:23:58-05:00'
describe
'302172' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPV' 'sip-files00002.tif'
056902c458fe11c3cf9576dc03da77c6
c39bca42f50daa9334a91ec622bc7cd369d12255
describe
'346544' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPW' 'sip-files00003.tif'
6204db57dc04862f8ed3cb47e52e39ea
5f5ab6847abe07303b5b47bcffa97407d7876f45
describe
'301884' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPX' 'sip-files00004.tif'
fcf2a30e44f6b3df168b6eb16f847f46
ba47e5a587e07e60979398620049e70f50350443
describe
'2453944' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPY' 'sip-files00005.tif'
0900762ddabfeef6dbd142cda1c28e04
5bc5fbc06ecc214b312a70d558c51fdc61c5f630
describe
'322492' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJPZ' 'sip-files00006.tif'
569339353e098df80507ec586e77f96b
42f98ebe739c9fdbb16bd75bc851c1b9bfcd2f27
'2011-12-16T20:14:32-05:00'
describe
'325588' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQA' 'sip-files00007.tif'
f2fb16afb6a2e8be47b18d9e0905c2f7
f38bc75b0580b932c2d04a58c81a320c5abf9095
describe
'315564' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQB' 'sip-files00008.tif'
f240efb247791c02e02ce983a72a2168
97ec02b1c5bbae0eb219f04dfdb38112730d7b60
'2011-12-16T20:23:56-05:00'
describe
'333164' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQC' 'sip-files00009.tif'
8db7d90ed729677b132e1b03d79f6e76
bbbf0da0211f95a5022e376f3d9f6a26a0d50f7a
describe
'330428' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQD' 'sip-files00010.tif'
e70726f21337b53ab91d630c5cd8b6a8
d91d799bc4510a0724a63c1cd00e0879a3cc1695
'2011-12-16T20:17:22-05:00'
describe
'316972' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQE' 'sip-files00011.tif'
e96004fd35f36350b6b0086a54157db0
71276e7cf5b406ee3eb4a71e2c9d06b0e504ac8d
'2011-12-16T20:25:43-05:00'
describe
'319416' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQF' 'sip-files00012.tif'
28e451215e87e1213004cca5bd4e0bc0
25b325f7242cb6010e14864d2dbbdbe74be5892a
'2011-12-16T20:21:37-05:00'
describe
'317948' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQG' 'sip-files00013.tif'
7223490dc1487ae671eb5c100f0aef1e
887bbfc2d15d5dfb39b61fc0f0a664673756a1a3
'2011-12-16T20:15:04-05:00'
describe
'317604' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQH' 'sip-files00014.tif'
1b3cdd1429c7fdc33835203cebb00721
871a8ca10e349ad6d584ffdc561de875e09629e5
describe
'320056' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQI' 'sip-files00015.tif'
5b864964e352fa25b1f0d8245a21ce82
bd743c5e1455ebc59d5275a327c8227d5d088c58
describe
'2406636' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQJ' 'sip-files00016.tif'
7ec507f0f447fecc90f7698fbd8b6517
630c67dee9ee2bd12818ad9abb9502ce13ac4108
describe
'313760' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQK' 'sip-files00017.tif'
aeda7f0ec14facba4086253dd6628dac
86bedae0b3c1b4de8e100d05d8e6c2aaa308b4fe
'2011-12-16T20:20:34-05:00'
describe
'309480' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQL' 'sip-files00018.tif'
1d6dee69227ee25762785642b63b7c23
e3a9fec7a42d4329512834dba7e204e4bf3b32ae
'2011-12-16T20:17:11-05:00'
describe
'314324' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQM' 'sip-files00019.tif'
516e153f8d21c2a0903d950ed52c84ea
407706a8f85e753ba2eb240092e7d668862c4a0f
'2011-12-16T20:22:15-05:00'
describe
'317344' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQN' 'sip-files00020.tif'
e383eaca0e2533fcb6ea8ded5f2f8461
e20494d4a9f61625db8a4a478d96bbea9a31aea4
'2011-12-16T20:18:38-05:00'
describe
'308112' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQO' 'sip-files00021.tif'
255f12cfe3d8548fbc589a6c3de9ba14
c20321b92f3b6e2f9aded55e1abdc3be68d3628e
'2011-12-16T20:15:11-05:00'
describe
'317024' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQP' 'sip-files00022.tif'
0316908dd83a8c1080fe01e0da61c3bb
a80d2160dbbe0cbd20eb4ceb94cae3c46739c044
describe
'314280' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQQ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
e6e26a931deff3a766219db0e5d81032
e502e9ef9a6dcd13bac4d506ed1d233711840d10
'2011-12-16T20:18:32-05:00'
describe
'317532' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQR' 'sip-files00024.tif'
5c9eac7c4da77eccd89dcb02cf0e95b0
2432b9c4bb9ee91ebaf3ace279ccfd876debb492
describe
'314212' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQS' 'sip-files00025.tif'
0020faf735cf408be4ebad7a1009c802
1bb2f8fb0fd5fed5666814b21ad4d8b1df021415
describe
'2358624' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQT' 'sip-files00026.tif'
2f778720012d5dffef6c22fe8323fb35
53dbbad6d34c64a674f178a932016e73fa4c1687
'2011-12-16T20:18:43-05:00'
describe
'315732' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQU' 'sip-files00027.tif'
27385a0d49e338118c245c314b4ca64e
0dc829417d5c4b04e7c32e1aca8eb3e3be0e04ef
describe
'315780' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQV' 'sip-files00028.tif'
2990d090eacaa68bd22f30fce5e04deb
717ca1038515b910f340f3273f46cf4a0bbfe6db
'2011-12-16T20:20:11-05:00'
describe
'313984' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQW' 'sip-files00029.tif'
93404ee2fcacfbe4a74ad826503ab6b9
d402cdc073151f31743e417d2a97ce1d5d547c83
describe
'309744' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQX' 'sip-files00030.tif'
28b43e941a4243c5aab4dd4efabd2b9e
2f5462567fcab92bd39bdf6113fcfc99eeef4039
describe
'308556' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQY' 'sip-files00031.tif'
9f03f5f7d720ed4a5232d1318553c83d
29bba9f4f0026cf6b7c3e067b0a3d20e446259ec
describe
'310068' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJQZ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
91dd9530714d5168b2597564520d3bbf
276d3f0d71ffd8f0f6521795841b713da42a9616
'2011-12-16T20:21:46-05:00'
describe
'308460' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRA' 'sip-files00033.tif'
3cf1ce24060783ac8def05f03d5674a8
cb711de647115458d5f90b49e5583011dc848823
'2011-12-16T20:20:02-05:00'
describe
'317896' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRB' 'sip-files00034.tif'
11b8e13e9070c78250e222b77f80c8ba
15b673417c08ab8d320f1c6f8d7b23b8d7e196c7
describe
'308684' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRC' 'sip-files00035.tif'
8213c8f6ac072252c8aa70cc345833fc
74f5f7803bcc90a7bbc0b66e6be740e142d69dd9
'2011-12-16T20:14:31-05:00'
describe
'2406172' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRD' 'sip-files00036.tif'
2e3f3e8e545e662e26d6834a4d04382d
80dbf7c63d76d97bea3580b8e521505a205cd597
'2011-12-16T20:14:13-05:00'
describe
'314368' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRE' 'sip-files00037.tif'
82b29c08417ac027df9fd819d3553616
06ab7ebb1204e8cce62ef0aa35790ad81b84f6c4
describe
'309588' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRF' 'sip-files00038.tif'
c0b393848d9fd1637ec325a265c2498f
378af1e90c189538cefde077be2e320739e3b937
'2011-12-16T20:20:41-05:00'
describe
'314056' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRG' 'sip-files00039.tif'
03c623359de305c6d050798d2f6078d6
255f3f2156a0211b9afd2316386e1402537556cb
'2011-12-16T20:16:29-05:00'
describe
'309304' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRH' 'sip-files00040.tif'
e5ecccfdb79d7be41d7be6806c27115c
308c4a7417bcb644603818010df9e7c9ed132cd9
describe
'314432' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRI' 'sip-files00041.tif'
9dfdedb447889f87b876c4b557f38ef3
46d335f1c7186184ffab7c07eb5cc92113f699ce
'2011-12-16T20:15:57-05:00'
describe
'309884' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRJ' 'sip-files00042.tif'
9e3d8db374f6fe09c8937dfe775d268e
63f4a9542284efffbb721d197d2cdfe7deda61a4
describe
'319928' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRK' 'sip-files00043.tif'
a4bcb72add56a0838ad55b125d02a82a
0cd7e2ed41bbe48e332067d54ef20ab85056cd47
describe
'317756' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRL' 'sip-files00044.tif'
8980292472c274ad667af29a84398421
d343a3a6941c0a594d6a9d767901945de8e44e59
describe
'311196' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRM' 'sip-files00045.tif'
1bdeb3a228d79f1fb43ce1728c5aa6b1
af2dd9921d4d4cf12cda648218f0a701a84bbb3a
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRN' 'sip-files00046.tif'
427e2374a0199077efc9484bc01d1b5e
5202affc6e8fc69962277b756911750318ff6bdd
'2011-12-16T20:18:08-05:00'
describe
'320188' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRO' 'sip-files00047.tif'
6ea2b16f74527b845f4e7836fa86a88a
3b586b60137836e8db5b04027ef80a1bd8a4272a
describe
'2406428' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRP' 'sip-files00048.tif'
179825d67c9b5047733ff059a6683732
775e88569fb30d068af6fb323e23e6b0b432ed3d
'2011-12-16T20:19:27-05:00'
describe
'314652' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRQ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
5e2a014bff1f3870ee91220617f66ee9
8b4da1d8df2065d2d9d54096acbd3b8471755dcf
describe
'328672' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRR' 'sip-files00050.tif'
8faea8a705addd946bad624275c391b0
f0485c0b8c83f3873c6ddab1122c98a06bbc670d
describe
'308664' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRS' 'sip-files00051.tif'
7730869f74c838c2ef28a4871c7a5ab1
4a6f178a759f2a887e19e586bae09a2703e537fd
'2011-12-16T20:16:27-05:00'
describe
'323276' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRT' 'sip-files00052.tif'
e8eb0f0d0d8cf9da181e811ed7b96544
12c53a499b773286c28df2e4dd99ba244f4e1f4b
'2011-12-16T20:19:12-05:00'
describe
'314568' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRU' 'sip-files00053.tif'
accfc6d4e608db01e992abd95dea9228
b1da21b3beeb8197a4f4dbfa0f7614cab4f1fca5
'2011-12-16T20:16:38-05:00'
describe
'317528' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRV' 'sip-files00054.tif'
fca17e9cbba245602fd8a8f8bd9cf974
1e8f7838334e24816fd81bbbda28fd6b279a1628
'2011-12-16T20:25:33-05:00'
describe
'2344980' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRW' 'sip-files00055.tif'
72e1e58133fc321c670ff77b7c507353
463751d439b3e72728597c91dafe668009ed0c40
'2011-12-16T20:14:57-05:00'
describe
'317296' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRX' 'sip-files00056.tif'
d6f77ecb526f801e0a9147ccfaf8201a
93a5af0701c302c54b7729b87327605019c6b343
'2011-12-16T20:19:52-05:00'
describe
'314264' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRY' 'sip-files00057.tif'
ff59a79530ba70d56efecd71c5150f0f
413082ae5b69777ffab26b989a9cb73d7ca17ec3
describe
'310072' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJRZ' 'sip-files00058.tif'
9c51bbd3bb402af7eb5f1dcfe4913b6c
4d7c9b27072722c69cbeaddb401a3b3517fd936b
describe
'314580' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSA' 'sip-files00059.tif'
3fe11ece0c14f604f0e308c145628fb5
9811a3f4e84c8bbbde5fdd79e647ba0ef76feb2f
describe
'317984' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSB' 'sip-files00060.tif'
909206fa05b014bfc486adcd18c57235
8d0e096280b7950b5b6ca94a8640668a9eef1ec5
describe
'322468' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSC' 'sip-files00061.tif'
3844ae61e37c6ff9f20c999fb13c4524
6eee2ded37acc4a2a839c308daae1769a55f2318
'2011-12-16T20:14:47-05:00'
describe
'328660' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSD' 'sip-files00062.tif'
006d8d8bd93ad372648adfee5508b66e
fc50698e7a5028d05a2230177ded7130bac346c4
'2011-12-16T20:22:21-05:00'
describe
'312736' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSE' 'sip-files00063.tif'
00238a263db3773db2159056f08125db
21a99863888bb475befacf5d70ad05442536422f
'2011-12-16T20:23:41-05:00'
describe
'308768' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSF' 'sip-files00064.tif'
c361d92236faf776dfc9454828b34826
6008e2c3a64b24148493b9db2f97a33545d5c370
describe
'308468' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSG' 'sip-files00065.tif'
4a8294ef0e0b10f896021fc9d168ba19
5d53de40bc110b81c76a37bc43e4fabab0f38621
'2011-12-16T20:17:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSH' 'sip-files00066.tif'
5550f6a1276eaac17d0031cb706019aa
cbad90e7efa6b6253093ffe523a995d0911faf1f
'2011-12-16T20:20:36-05:00'
describe
'308144' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSI' 'sip-files00067.tif'
b537ac7507565e726de697bb8a55fdc2
993013d38b058efc31e232e1a3565495a910ea3f
describe
'317600' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSJ' 'sip-files00068.tif'
053db3692c0db7116de8c1702ae55faa
23e1abbc38646aeb1e5bcadbf9586f41b8c030a7
'2011-12-16T20:24:31-05:00'
describe
'308500' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSK' 'sip-files00069.tif'
a5db3ab621e5b903f9a555b0c430370f
7325e003e0444a9574e31d4a637889138094df39
describe
'309172' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSL' 'sip-files00070.tif'
c11b5529b58dfe59e4d99b6d455a5c2a
be69bc519d0b15911c3a361d24ac268d320a64c6
'2011-12-16T20:20:19-05:00'
describe
'319572' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSM' 'sip-files00071.tif'
f406b5e5a9dfa182e73c8e9a32ddc66d
05e5130d1d419c7f2a753d707e4cb67f910ac350
'2011-12-16T20:16:09-05:00'
describe
'2406860' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSN' 'sip-files00072.tif'
3f28af442516d20b3d4925fe43491214
2fa19188eb8f139b2b146ee846dc7d3c2cd2615a
describe
'329476' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSO' 'sip-files00073.tif'
326e9ce440cad3b8955c1c9d158745f6
3c5cdfc1fe04d9eaef41a728d71252fed70a58b7
describe
'309772' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSP' 'sip-files00074.tif'
41df70f39254bab30e53530af1599c7a
e19d1d7799eff2e42d61d82e1d9d402cf96079a4
describe
'322136' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSQ' 'sip-files00075.tif'
949d32660d304401f30093d4c0925850
882156b9c620c08fdc353551b06b989420c8e2e1
describe
'315196' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSR' 'sip-files00076.tif'
111d03359c0b9cab4c28253b5786bbcb
d36d3398539dc5c433f57024431af83fd8221290
'2011-12-16T20:20:08-05:00'
describe
'318960' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSS' 'sip-files00077.tif'
0630c18119eb5e51a1a8ca38a95da072
7edd2c683e7078afba94f9a3f28beb0cf66a449c
'2011-12-16T20:19:24-05:00'
describe
'320464' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJST' 'sip-files00078.tif'
36f236de13e9bb416c0ecc2753c42ac4
8b50e0db81b2fe8807e85b5e84fce7e655910c30
describe
'2425960' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSU' 'sip-files00079.tif'
10a120511fc1b7a2be4820fc01addb06
cec25674e9a5912c428e11d06292005dce41cbb6
describe
'320676' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSV' 'sip-files00080.tif'
8e6b3dd8938ee07d4a11c39eefeb24ba
eb366c234ed61943630bce53bd60bce829f06fba
describe
'316180' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSW' 'sip-files00081.tif'
dc81a907025def0ce63ae9f12d3c9e55
0e77b9e037fd5eb846a6ec9b33745a7e55bc40ae
'2011-12-16T20:17:18-05:00'
describe
'319000' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSX' 'sip-files00082.tif'
3cff201ffd3177a8ed14850bad842015
a5f94552890fce5dd58ba5eb9b100b9d8ca84842
'2011-12-16T20:15:37-05:00'
describe
'2412444' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSY' 'sip-files00083.tif'
fed37fad2fe54968bbeda72826a854b1
1bc19b12a4dd0520350a82822624933b92ed5a2c
'2011-12-16T20:16:15-05:00'
describe
'315036' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJSZ' 'sip-files00084.tif'
fd330f6c1044592b94753ff12c32b664
6ca86681135a5390fe3db931d780818d11015d79
'2011-12-16T20:14:50-05:00'
describe
'319332' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTA' 'sip-files00085.tif'
3f7be5ae07c047b01aee16113ec9a02a
aa4ca15820f14441118ff51db77e71232e77398e
describe
'317492' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTB' 'sip-files00086.tif'
8ade56a90156439c3a43b6f5ca193281
9889fd0c011305533fb5d045066cb20b8c76a645
'2011-12-16T20:14:40-05:00'
describe
'327424' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTC' 'sip-files00087.tif'
ac613b293c4bbadd18e4fa42c799bf55
5731f8d7e67f95f482c8fba47d96b89c31d495a1
'2011-12-16T20:23:55-05:00'
describe
'303048' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTD' 'sip-files00088.tif'
78eb5b4e43a83186e8ac42d03bc4bef2
0dc6df1487048bc22d6376c2fb767389bd55f9e6
describe
'324664' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTE' 'sip-files00089.tif'
ca7f05c43340f8bb053a045db6359021
b8f94de013caa5c0a1d3ca0bd3a09bc84f48adba
'2011-12-16T20:25:22-05:00'
describe
'303200' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTF' 'sip-files00090.tif'
4fefa5af509da2e88e7031168644a1d4
d972f5e20bb0adad0c4bf299d379a71badc6e421
'2011-12-16T20:17:35-05:00'
describe
'314204' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTG' 'sip-files00091.tif'
9f36271250bb57e614ec0c9618207695
53b10571a471f2b70cafe383af38dc710e98d80a
describe
'308912' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTH' 'sip-files00092.tif'
30e36a693d6e7ca8b6152954485f8f5e
c52e805d5ef0eb26889d9999e6c65537374665d7
'2011-12-16T20:24:03-05:00'
describe
'303428' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTI' 'sip-files00093.tif'
b85829bd786063aca47aacd54d33133e
6808c655f4ac17ec0efa98b5a1d74eb79b5f89f9
'2011-12-16T20:20:52-05:00'
describe
'309104' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTJ' 'sip-files00094.tif'
149f800150a4e07cea7e67bc6b5a8820
f56697f25581d6bf3e4d47abaae3218882ba3e96
'2011-12-16T20:14:28-05:00'
describe
'2360076' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTK' 'sip-files00095.tif'
c0ff1ab45ec5bc9b149435a3b4351aa4
ebed7f487b5f0389788c9f385d01a3a5dfc95a3d
describe
'303172' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTL' 'sip-files00096.tif'
8bec8f74e1d9a5332c6fa4d90ee9568e
15e6365e495d3d7e8200e3f21d089001875473c1
describe
'309788' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTM' 'sip-files00097.tif'
63ccdd612275a432af44d003008d3d0a
b59d56b285ed2faf7696b85dfbcb7202a3644542
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTN' 'sip-files00098.tif'
4a249eda4747f12bf3c9732a0dfa2a8d
92deeb1765d18b155bd0470f926991e03a234d37
'2011-12-16T20:17:24-05:00'
describe
'310920' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTO' 'sip-files00099.tif'
5ceae0b1072fdc84322fb7b84dfe43bf
ca49b605e1c67ec090ed4438b3eabc8eb56509f3
describe
'315972' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTP' 'sip-files00100.tif'
368b179a26a33528a86dc543d93bf21f
57d439e4cc9435ae69442816cc5bbe733b7087f8
describe
'307056' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTQ' 'sip-files00101.tif'
77a5cfa4f526dbb760b9a1dc440863c8
030d4c627b8b2977b0736d0c7ebcefd75a6dbb84
describe
'306396' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTR' 'sip-files00102.tif'
09d0aab18a579d56fed8e65a82e03e8c
b41482f7bad115986afcdd1d20a68fb93d8ec9fb
'2011-12-16T20:24:28-05:00'
describe
'317952' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTS' 'sip-files00103.tif'
4d14330b0d50d70eec5f575094bc0a67
88deb47a389ed8137110073b12bd299c4ec5eee0
describe
'314608' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTT' 'sip-files00104.tif'
668d5af9798ddbab60de2cd371a846f9
bf0ad0922b65c2b7149e3c8724242d7741878314
'2011-12-16T20:22:22-05:00'
describe
'315208' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTU' 'sip-files00105.tif'
518174cc3008c055c84a6ae6a335aece
03f221016420e9b363faa1233ffc18c063aa30b5
'2011-12-16T20:15:20-05:00'
describe
'303364' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTV' 'sip-files00106.tif'
2719b38ac5538896684f34a207e96036
40ba821cee564b19df57caf5b1a7b9acac35197f
describe
'317632' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTW' 'sip-files00107.tif'
399446c299730a2ac4f36efb9019d0b2
cb2b75c05d65992562ce6c7d6d1028aa096d41f4
'2011-12-16T20:22:52-05:00'
describe
'2294904' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTX' 'sip-files00108.tif'
ca152c27c0998c600535f17df59e5dec
6aeb9363cd2ec7767a31fc0af6c50c859ab36f31
describe
'309844' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTY' 'sip-files00109.tif'
7a115bf46d4e9939520a92a06423f48c
c7fb5719647a79c5e4f4b2c2063d131652647a85
'2011-12-16T20:16:17-05:00'
describe
'309056' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJTZ' 'sip-files00110.tif'
224b92ce21c38759b765b41785fb2965
37df682e320659db3fdaff8de6821a98cdcf5b23
'2011-12-16T20:15:31-05:00'
describe
'317584' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUA' 'sip-files00111.tif'
db68a44ef03caa284b0970dea5769412
f1395da06cbf60fa679018ad6cfc4a23b63de228
'2011-12-16T20:22:25-05:00'
describe
'303288' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUB' 'sip-files00112.tif'
575040361e85c480e1c7509d382a6a51
2d6c1cf928741f0a29df53a662239e4f96979f78
describe
'312036' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUC' 'sip-files00113.tif'
abf9921de1b8212bbf4f8ae041cafd98
5f3abf519b8085117203832cfc2b158802646234
describe
'2485356' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUD' 'sip-files00114.tif'
5378b81a0559122a128888c7ed1eb03d
d92416d32a77cc7180a66c3b11d1214d6527d709
describe
'303880' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUE' 'sip-files00115.tif'
44c9a7a6e901d507915857ccf86f8ccf
e652fe14f6367608d0df02d6fd4800d5d5937c7d
describe
'314644' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUF' 'sip-files00116.tif'
3d990af7c6382182ad8c33f9a129e451
c76670a0cee8418b20193e70c1e879834c4ef779
'2011-12-16T20:16:37-05:00'
describe
'299352' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUG' 'sip-files00117.tif'
8232de5cf57fd6d86e7c8fdf39b8e1c4
f9d27db8292eee86e70203dc518c12628a7fa003
describe
'308028' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUH' 'sip-files00118.tif'
c28b55b4821ca5f018bc74ec0b224859
2a0c296bb74667a9ce0afc75ca164c32dafd4fd9
describe
'303748' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUI' 'sip-files00119.tif'
5ec89714270a8273359b828a2870b8f2
9a4a9ac08ce9ac2047a26ba0a536be69dad6065d
describe
'2441616' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUJ' 'sip-files00120.tif'
10088c3fcafcf09511e7f7b7a120b106
cf6ccd3f4b034f8faf138a87ab39384b61cf1c28
'2011-12-16T20:21:09-05:00'
describe
'312292' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUK' 'sip-files00121.tif'
ed10a8ba5b18070f0e08c05cae23e183
52bc81116ab77f6c2b35b66904fc95bff16271ae
describe
'302840' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUL' 'sip-files00122.tif'
d2089ba96e27594eecf5527eaadb3374
89b9685dc33c4588191d6a52e00e873b10b20d64
describe
'303552' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUM' 'sip-files00123.tif'
a06f478949628f3d3120ea47e0a66c0f
068809ad82d062e54fe6a34b9c9ed89708a67682
'2011-12-16T20:14:11-05:00'
describe
'2327712' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUN' 'sip-files00124.tif'
126da42f88ef5d582b2c71e39c9f5d13
b6cc26be1ef1870fd518d8af7fd6c3af151b29cc
describe
'309336' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUO' 'sip-files00125.tif'
7073740b98e087c6f2d6d0f009a82b82
2e4b6e5bf854bf399a482c756b1fa55e77413845
describe
'308784' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUP' 'sip-files00126.tif'
e32b0b9c5e4c8688ae2529f43a3575d7
34dc0b90ef636b8f1560bcf0d34e745eacadf458
'2011-12-16T20:25:19-05:00'
describe
'309632' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUQ' 'sip-files00127.tif'
70843b3c9d7cb9ed74586978ad4ad2d7
21b5f10b579a4c55e3acaeb7347f304e3dc37e4d
'2011-12-16T20:20:58-05:00'
describe
'316988' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUR' 'sip-files00128.tif'
90e7364fe7f462a1d140423c843b9265
d9e0297678f999c6e3fb4dc57a7d859923116c16
describe
'303840' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUS' 'sip-files00129.tif'
e2cb451d99c1fa1fbb2350d1ab4567c0
18dc3579d4f86aebad9430a5b2265c9e5269c690
'2011-12-16T20:22:45-05:00'
describe
'302952' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUT' 'sip-files00130.tif'
d4f1ff7ba027e915ee3c7dafdbf93a75
4cc6f6cb8629be588ef59d5e6a4e62a2dcc1a5bf
describe
'303644' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUU' 'sip-files00131.tif'
c61a34d9f6d77aa7cb1762d46eddee64
a213b8bb2a6063127f47f93331da2ace333a2919
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUV' 'sip-files00132.tif'
e366dc918e81f3acf9299068af1ac940
a24459342014f5f7a8a869f6bb2e722b0c25e927
describe
'307556' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUW' 'sip-files00133.tif'
e5230c5bc8de1145413c97e89127bc16
5e0117f21b1112ccc835e213e7a4aa4a82a19a09
'2011-12-16T20:16:28-05:00'
describe
'309272' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUX' 'sip-files00134.tif'
68c2d149b53c749b4224971b6886e5ed
588daf0df42ca43441efff55dbb5ce82775cf8a8
describe
'309808' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUY' 'sip-files00135.tif'
f82b92cde1d75ae639c86a615f83e711
6647cf7f570be91b2fedaef34dde567971dd6226
'2011-12-16T20:20:54-05:00'
describe
'306248' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJUZ' 'sip-files00136.tif'
6ff07e2fd21c55cc6ad6777162e030bb
87ac87806fa6ba401660ebc2372a8c08b581ba60
describe
'302580' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVA' 'sip-files00137.tif'
5034522cd1c69c285844f55834bfc83b
f2ebc6fba7882d3ade709273f3440b0c577f8139
describe
'308740' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVB' 'sip-files00138.tif'
d2c2165161370389529b0ce1da83e519
6f4f5c4d93cee6417e994533735e8a4dd36af101
describe
'2353296' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVC' 'sip-files00139.tif'
6452b8586bdaafabf9f8f3331fb65f61
2e4b56e996c6467fbd4b8165d9ba59954adca2bc
describe
'306040' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVD' 'sip-files00140.tif'
7c822deb24133ad6c49224b18a0a43f3
f71a0f9fca5ef580164be54c0afbb6d1f9e29256
describe
'312132' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVE' 'sip-files00141.tif'
dce43a64da52b221d34d8acd721bc2d0
d17f0ae476b4e76ca2bb7e510d41f5152d2ab8f0
'2011-12-16T20:16:47-05:00'
describe
'302856' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVF' 'sip-files00142.tif'
55a078c233a589fdabe053809987ec92
21fb45e0a1497927eb16049d67ef67781649fffc
'2011-12-16T20:19:08-05:00'
describe
'303752' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVG' 'sip-files00143.tif'
ea5115b2eeda582d986caf6c94237a9c
0ced91f723c9a7d7af595d32c939f51d77627035
'2011-12-16T20:15:40-05:00'
describe
'313976' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVH' 'sip-files00144.tif'
b86cddb944142e1a4f9447e44d9d9c5e
e6198db0b0cd2706833029a8860e789033e02c3e
'2011-12-16T20:18:36-05:00'
describe
'303336' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVI' 'sip-files00145.tif'
5943f25bd2eb9da988157ad010cb6682
8c9f258b2e396f3ac3c9a1741b2811954dff3f98
'2011-12-16T20:15:47-05:00'
describe
'311364' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVJ' 'sip-files00146.tif'
78077e2461b558dbb01ac44aeea00bfb
105c02cd240704193c8ad9ae57c8fb30743dc44b
describe
'303476' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVK' 'sip-files00147.tif'
58ebfeba087581722df7b8d2f5282eda
94df30bb8b90014c3d1166b87e3fc9f2c3de2bd7
'2011-12-16T20:25:27-05:00'
describe
'302968' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVL' 'sip-files00148.tif'
4f2ae40fe017e86e9d018f30247017fd
1e6caf6f4705548dc78c1ce37213f5bca7144c8c
'2011-12-16T20:20:39-05:00'
describe
'303808' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVM' 'sip-files00149.tif'
e1a90798a95a0a000383dd50389ba6ea
05d80fd15b19b7c4bd858f46179ffd5f20b208cc
'2011-12-16T20:20:29-05:00'
describe
'303264' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVN' 'sip-files00150.tif'
864e12179b8d3b831af5be59e0ce67f2
2ffd606cc033eb8232c32624470889ee49e5c02d
describe
'303664' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVO' 'sip-files00151.tif'
c9ff04f6c2e4ff76823cf33ad6fb2c2b
bfe6d78990a861a25e82331951a3309a39d53de2
describe
'303208' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVP' 'sip-files00152.tif'
385bfa58dcbb3f978645eb79b9755ddb
21c10d5be8fef64f6dbfe639f75cc24dccf1ec6e
'2011-12-16T20:17:12-05:00'
describe
'297840' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVQ' 'sip-files00153.tif'
efdde08ddce6cf9e40008876a069a9a5
7ec563e15b999284e6d6551bde57b02d61958700
'2011-12-16T20:17:21-05:00'
describe
'305156' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVR' 'sip-files00154.tif'
8bac4679f4f323c6eaa96c7ab2521b02
d8e1db6622d4c326d780e2ffe637a1a6805a6450
describe
'303648' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVS' 'sip-files00155.tif'
855b6e11c842eb2999d3d4fc00041fba
98ccdaf9f3eb72f488091c13efc2780ea176118f
describe
'303008' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVT' 'sip-files00156.tif'
597fd23c9e001c56c22e0cd41b596b5f
9b55619068e652d82efb1235dde76072a879d062
'2011-12-16T20:24:58-05:00'
describe
'314784' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVU' 'sip-files00157.tif'
a240f576263861e009c701ace15febbf
4af35ee157f0e3d55f155a72b478c4ed403b1ce9
describe
'306552' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVV' 'sip-files00158.tif'
c1a030c30e515a1b39a084711dbedb61
2c1e7ddc55376e44c630f8683070977693d3364c
describe
'2303284' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVW' 'sip-files00159.tif'
66d2d90558c9b3df128a8e736212bb56
6bba3ee284e79c6a8727ccd8a62d5062daf76bd0
'2011-12-16T20:19:17-05:00'
describe
'329328' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVX' 'sip-files00160.tif'
5c3780039cc48cf0e863df1f4fba5541
3b0e2de7710739e15c93d04cb41d480e1152e15b
'2011-12-16T20:24:29-05:00'
describe
'309812' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVY' 'sip-files00161.tif'
e5234a0203e357686b5514c72faa760c
d49408989df3d1af462c42958b76baf43fd2ab80
describe
'2465940' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJVZ' 'sip-files00162.tif'
11ac58eae643062583fa42790a721089
229bb58cd650268ff3ccea24d15bd3333af78a13
'2011-12-16T20:22:51-05:00'
describe
'306860' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWA' 'sip-files00163.tif'
be0c87e546e3655b03328a411c625a23
04992fd0386186a696346e7d5a743baf7d22645f
describe
'335112' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWB' 'sip-files00164.tif'
60b95ddee0d2ba9030642ee7745adffd
47f4703db63d979aea910019e310a299b821318c
'2011-12-16T20:17:19-05:00'
describe
'306816' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWC' 'sip-files00165.tif'
2dc16fb092aaccaa37041e7eefba11c2
1fbc7748fbcbe2b9003735efc0f5ebb536465b60
'2011-12-16T20:21:49-05:00'
describe
'332660' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWD' 'sip-files00166.tif'
b45af83a75485fbd6be4dc9e6d6ddbd1
9bcd4a753f5b4e59b6ab820d77a357d64feb6a32
describe
'303252' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWE' 'sip-files00167.tif'
ac61fcb502659fc009562a5b5816aa27
7a8abbb64fdedc41ed8b0fb3422b8e149d7203dd
describe
'333048' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWF' 'sip-files00168.tif'
1bacb74846e8db091352d52702921297
b48b717cab993a1834ccddb420cbe9b258b3f830
describe
'309956' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWG' 'sip-files00169.tif'
314d44ea84c8f8aa8940dab2cf0bdf04
be3fec9701e5cd3f42560f020159e0a1c4bb5dc6
describe
'322832' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWH' 'sip-files00170.tif'
b753c20249f36238c0b92cf54a6079fc
09959e10b66d1f2fc1d4e6b718184986f795f830
'2011-12-16T20:17:49-05:00'
describe
'2303092' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWI' 'sip-files00171.tif'
c8e01585052d7e5baec8605e817e520a
fc7c64759d0a8a1e65cb020b31f87b72118bfca5
'2011-12-16T20:17:45-05:00'
describe
'308060' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWJ' 'sip-files00172.tif'
9e47f44eaa65aa868a9877d205096d40
9c116db7aa6833ea7358b252029ae929d83d7d8e
describe
'311236' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWK' 'sip-files00173.tif'
3d22ca44ebf420494ad75fcd27931b7d
7e71bd7bd9ba75674b8a6565f8b868f96cb4f82b
'2011-12-16T20:22:41-05:00'
describe
'314200' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWL' 'sip-files00174.tif'
4d532c1c09f208e29ca9d732aed43f93
e348053e4101efc0939b9aa35781fac43de40053
describe
'307224' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWM' 'sip-files00175.tif'
4b430f58c00579fb33e1691ea51a36c8
0df15fa8c9c829a9e96ebdec00fd749008d30c3a
describe
'319432' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWN' 'sip-files00176.tif'
7a450a1dacce0ec8e8172cdfbe9fff28
ed46f596b39f218c21185b5c6470ce16720ddfe8
describe
'307412' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWO' 'sip-files00177.tif'
0d334affb5e1b9c3d066dccb9d8f7804
3f608c572f3293fc6230f0b78f188a435326d5f6
describe
'311612' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWP' 'sip-files00178.tif'
5a18f6222c1409620cc9a1c2fd64dd6c
3526902c93102267aefdb7e15aef8b3fa7dd1537
describe
'2303440' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWQ' 'sip-files00179.tif'
06af41a828ee334050bb20fdb005460f
72b04c5af2fd3f34991a92a7efccaa9583d392fa
describe
'319392' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWR' 'sip-files00180.tif'
c7586c14d6dfdd6dc25f857fceaa08a5
7636188204ee881fd58769668cd10276531b16dc
'2011-12-16T20:25:01-05:00'
describe
'303692' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWS' 'sip-files00181.tif'
4950de6ec16817220cb6b7040df6dec2
c26a11e99317bbcb4fb98fd74deec2f9a97e97e1
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWT' 'sip-files00182.tif'
83e137f4e58959030a4fd0a31ae5bd70
c8f31bd16086b30161f25dc00cf169ec09fa25b9
describe
'309220' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWU' 'sip-files00183.tif'
9e5ee85dc14585d31739cfd8a637ec1f
f4c99783cab805300c8bbab65d8b47762e090997
describe
'319944' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWV' 'sip-files00184.tif'
5edf27f2282f2bad03783138a109adef
c3a918501b7fe4fd8cee9201540db26871b932b9
describe
'309524' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWW' 'sip-files00185.tif'
7be35e79d9359e8d71d57f9156949268
1a4ae97b6bc508f07bca652cdfa39a312b5b0cca
describe
'327544' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWX' 'sip-files00186.tif'
9c2751e113556d159758b73a597e0107
76baf1eaa1e0dafba1b9bbcbce582594baef15c9
describe
'322900' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWY' 'sip-files00187.tif'
fb697993d75de12a62b776ffd315acf0
0fdbd51ffb66e7c93e21faa08bb48c749a5533bc
'2011-12-16T20:18:13-05:00'
describe
'2404888' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJWZ' 'sip-files00188.tif'
09edd3697dd5b54bdaaa5e6d087f43a9
b0cc7566b2b137ed13929331d72e63e243c1689f
describe
'320956' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXA' 'sip-files00189.tif'
2f5be7d15c5d00f580c227c36b133469
5ef57317563644582254d54386f2e56efbf512c8
'2011-12-16T20:24:48-05:00'
describe
'308532' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXB' 'sip-files00190.tif'
bf48e1d4c7934e5f6b1f9904cce57af7
86f0097ff85b9d285f6303935715b78191561c8c
'2011-12-16T20:21:05-05:00'
describe
'314896' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXC' 'sip-files00191.tif'
5ecb6345e2c44d8fd9cd48b677c4e6ec
b99c7fb83015c111332f0326753430c74d045929
'2011-12-16T20:23:52-05:00'
describe
'2392316' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXD' 'sip-files00192.tif'
98afceafd7f1ea46157b6af0b0d8468c
386ed73c950d890c121224dfcf454f77c2794e5b
describe
'316820' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXE' 'sip-files00193.tif'
14c68a3a2149c5017d11b43b89386313
805fe9344151100932a435ee5c086eff591d6a4c
describe
'326272' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXF' 'sip-files00194.tif'
388f6fd0845d6053f9edff1f0043bf5d
922db4c830c49d3738c6dc73781fdd096442d113
'2011-12-16T20:20:32-05:00'
describe
'305464' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXG' 'sip-files00195.tif'
a65569b7c3e7ace3e0fd15a2cdef4c37
fe2efa0027ba9ef019397375a6789dfaaea94fe0
describe
'331540' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXH' 'sip-files00196.tif'
222a25a80afee413f6344304f6a4fdca
3fd714067dab5fe76966e76dd7aacfa7ea749999
describe
'323852' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXI' 'sip-files00197.tif'
af9943bd240d2c7988287146ca3f9fe6
889afd1baaf7b8e5727e1794f0905d753c874557
'2011-12-16T20:20:26-05:00'
describe
'328612' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXJ' 'sip-files00198.tif'
76dfa6a510e0eaf9e5232cfe6694e2fd
711c81f86f8d20e0ddf19ce67d8cc175201de744
describe
'2451684' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXK' 'sip-files00199.tif'
bd4748a24804a83cf2453929830003fb
764226ceb2e20623eb4418ac8e82f3cb8a73f14d
'2011-12-16T20:16:03-05:00'
describe
'318356' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXL' 'sip-files00200.tif'
3970f994b4fa1ac412be895b88203348
754a5693deb6c10dfe1ff00e0bc27f8f5ffc9df7
describe
'324268' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXM' 'sip-files00201.tif'
c850b62200d6afa9c24275f7750f4945
3b5357735de5cf922aaac10a7812971492e4cbe2
'2011-12-16T20:25:00-05:00'
describe
'324384' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXN' 'sip-files00202.tif'
52dac13074baaf2efbca0b4ad8bc1c6a
ca016630901f9da15b0afede4537885e50f8417c
'2011-12-16T20:17:06-05:00'
describe
'305272' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXO' 'sip-files00203.tif'
d91173761097e251eee995c6d846cb22
71a20945b6c9139bb73d9d344c8c92b76c1b1351
'2011-12-16T20:21:47-05:00'
describe
'324036' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXP' 'sip-files00204.tif'
4daefcb8cb1323e0b35517628863055c
0fa44d045f23fcf2ee3f325ff20a9c1e9234fd8b
'2011-12-16T20:24:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXQ' 'sip-files00205.tif'
4c2c17f9df8de7f1de7321618ba4c9c3
5dcf684224070524da629854627d3d86af6a3fac
describe
'323824' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXR' 'sip-files00206.tif'
95f5d820d9b3ed5ef19df7ec3f9556c6
5a6036a02a941006ca074919da380a6ce96a8611
describe
'319116' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXS' 'sip-files00207.tif'
59916a0d2edfa99c4124d99a25094c77
4bf2a461ed51a369fa46675db0fbdb093e3de156
describe
'318172' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXT' 'sip-files00208.tif'
0f06bb62cf8aedbbd3fa01d9f41910e9
4cee461ecf877186bbb099fec82c815154ddd4a2
describe
'321484' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXU' 'sip-files00209.tif'
d23b6a8afbf447b7606aabbfc9ad546f
c947603a47e3ff9921966e8b2a331cecebab85f0
describe
'2433780' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXV' 'sip-files00210.tif'
ec029a237c9b300572d9f55f1a4df33d
adf6900c276a97dfb6292c8a359b05218e32a851
describe
'309612' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXW' 'sip-files00211.tif'
e6397747e2ffb150763ae0b8829a0cb8
20201465bc6b43beeca4679331499225e475b7ab
describe
'334500' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXX' 'sip-files00212.tif'
1ee675577d09b8dcc2da9468203f0228
407c59987e88c7e27ec766698f14faba3e7d8fe0
'2011-12-16T20:14:25-05:00'
describe
'322952' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXY' 'sip-files00213.tif'
9311e1b2417cb607029f619e438dc840
e0e1ae5883ad875573dd33ffc4eb87b565408709
describe
'325744' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJXZ' 'sip-files00214.tif'
905ac44c30fc0a293cd6aeea65eef9d6
d09e13893b180d3f54ddf33c50a40a9932e59cee
'2011-12-16T20:24:16-05:00'
describe
'320988' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYA' 'sip-files00215.tif'
4a3ca661253063c08f47b89d32bcf8b4
05e85fd93c4584c34f1512a3c2748fd6186a1899
describe
'322904' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYB' 'sip-files00216.tif'
5949cbb0b63df7a21c538ae6566d56cc
af66291bf4cd33c72105a815e514bcec042e4617
describe
'329416' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYC' 'sip-files00217.tif'
9e76c3b0f2f1b458c14a5173d7b4cf65
a9fe69ba0b3808222b6a7a23f4c66671f43df7b0
'2011-12-16T20:25:31-05:00'
describe
'318704' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYD' 'sip-files00218.tif'
50550f70091d61961128aafff504d97e
2beec6a7389d9e5fffb72170676483e7b35bb760
'2011-12-16T20:16:43-05:00'
describe
'297532' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYE' 'sip-files00219.tif'
276d937e97a8a383764220a3a98b0557
7aef4a87d8fbee475942e468e62d96af632c5bb2
'2011-12-16T20:23:25-05:00'
describe
'6129464' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYF' 'sip-files00220.tif'
0c0e8d02e3151a5dc784a6c30c97d4b8
70a47ae45cc01ab8013379c027c77cfe7a8f9204
describe
'258625' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYG' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
08345dd32ddb9cd7afd1d9b67e580cc3
4af4d20a9243acb4e4883cd4e155e69f87e56025
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'4677' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYH' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
da305cfb8c0b210aa5b9f7ee75b74a76
286471d6ed71e9bfd10c11bd0fc2763b4565cc99
describe
'23143' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYI' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
87283f555aa0764a8e28b93eba3a91c7
11d37302a7f8b487a6b739926d4b029e08152c04
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYJ' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
7c35931d142bdd18aedf82edc4630091
d2da25ff1a22fcddd6b334c606c894bab8f6760f
'2011-12-16T20:16:18-05:00'
describe
'226003' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYK' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
4ba6001fb0ab71877136cf794d05bdad
0b15a4f77e9207e010810dbf4325eb33c11214f4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35621' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYL' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
356dc0bbfaad88e8aab9b8000c59de0a
b99c284b060848ae104ea742eb2091da0cefc460
describe
'171482' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYM' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
9733f011ff21c17fb0acf4c934a7a445
6a15bb68492a369b22a5ef5b278a54577e3be5dc
describe
'89167' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYN' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
6807147cddc1e3ccd016676bfaeed28a
f75d9e749d7f6909f01b2ae5df28d676e7509dc9
describe
'65608' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYO' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
f62460f5a42f16dad0a3af869fb5be5d
a1e306c934af5574809e5a49829c2853e71e1112
'2011-12-16T20:17:50-05:00'
describe
'108753' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYP' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
5d59db848631cc4178fa0dc0b3534685
9be2ab38a8033e4827840774ad5a55c8fe68a2ac
describe
'58156' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYQ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
633aa749e37996f5d97167cbd03f821c
76bd6bf17c0c7b20c952bed31e13fcdc1f2fc248
describe
'43234' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYR' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
b12d3919b0f440badda7140f5c31a223
0746431fe8a13670025a6bf7c91114034d25a361
describe
'192897' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYS' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
22a4f147b4c85d5e67b7451536806510
66e97048d92ad215ebff5d71d56498a1901ac5b8
'2011-12-16T20:17:23-05:00'
describe
'284068' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYT' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
42611fa403e3eb95dd2f7c6b7e607f38
830d8269a549d9465fa74909a20521845078e418
'2011-12-16T20:16:56-05:00'
describe
'286160' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYU' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
0dfe4f668e61612983aab0c349df06cb
0852e3dd62099d3322c88aabbcbabf6ffda8eb68
describe
'210479' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYV' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
6ad197e8a1c619ffec41639cee7923bc
153c441181da8f73ceceb2fd0b24de9457c24e33
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'245307' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYW' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
7b335ef9cafc93ff34b97dcb7819177a
b22e0a679376e18b294d86b9bf63ec025b94e34f
describe
'242717' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYX' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
5553c9b33ea50b5a5eb424e872da8644
c44d21d28c15e31ccec000d911d7a75fa26f6f31
'2011-12-16T20:21:44-05:00'
describe
'268690' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYY' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
969516d3f71822561a95ed7990bf7e58
caccd0ae641709a158f8d7991245fa24f989d8c0
'2011-12-16T20:18:34-05:00'
describe
'272082' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJYZ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
2f14430bb0a011f8a7c9de1bca30b230
e172a18168bb8629cc07c4269a8b91352446de0f
describe
'241179' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZA' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
62c744ef03aaf9b57ea4d6a3c8b765a6
ef602c195b82f95bac41764f6ae72164fb00c5f1
'2011-12-16T20:14:27-05:00'
describe
'237729' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZB' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
a5b796575b320664da12736de458d52a
d714689c26006a89e0ee5f72b03a82a2b40aa20c
describe
'275279' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZC' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
b47384bb7f124c29d67b26014b201d82
64cd0f2243e101fb69c3cba30e8e6cdfb5058c00
describe
'283223' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZD' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
89161188c26e42bd62cc801b8259d64f
f057e1f0b1e4ea8521714aada8f6a9af70aa1404
describe
'271794' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZE' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
0b3ca78fd41e5ab2817d03c1a2747d98
241e96ca0d96bcbbdb95f87a910556e3f45ed776
describe
'210382' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZF' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
238bcb56a045bf0244aa695df7ee8484
0862d5f7a5852bd485eabe926105cc0d7b1a974e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'122261' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZG' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
483d1ab20e9b05fe0ce780ea58e7ead3
f0417716997437d2555c3ab02ecfd46697da4a16
describe
'220746' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZH' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
43eabe58db59bdff178cda0b9ce365a0
424311b621911e09899cffdb570cb1cfcd10aa2b
describe
'244911' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZI' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
84e7e551afed99e292021bbbad9f782f
69367bb5e67805af1a6d693c971fb0046543c5d0
describe
'276071' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZJ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
7d517dc95ade5d2de46f847bda577f16
ca7ede0e6cdd8915b23ba695622c1882ddc2bd3d
describe
'279591' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZK' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
3f55b1316d8e1c68f92fe6a064399657
0a3382a7010bbfbea3b7087c775d89dee7b6a9d7
describe
'280497' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZL' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
bd25bb6cfde82754a87ee17957903636
99182ec0a198737e47eac06ba7c963d68ec9f202
'2011-12-16T20:15:23-05:00'
describe
'277353' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZM' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
f2e0a97954f4538424b896b59435b08c
d83b35285c89561e571b068fc54fa6f2f2acd2d4
'2011-12-16T20:22:35-05:00'
describe
'293080' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZN' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
d771f97abfcb16d3d760b85adbfa7aad
dadf16f0feed513c5ce1dade508ae32748bb0d87
describe
'287193' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZO' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
3c13044639aee5b43e64a12e028a6b87
b4afaab04444faffbee057c997e84ba6b066f079
describe
'200237' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZP' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
75ed33d46747238008c3e24c32407b01
c17ff7ae980fa294fbfeda67f5d66ec3033ea4ae
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'279693' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZQ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
052785546dcd6538934ce4fc054f90e0
57ef0e6af5952d14ba8bd147cf6d555b831a9577
describe
'296038' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZR' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
827e6dc0507c07cbbfc5325020ed6d97
3b2a101caf8e320e981c80226f9a427b8a8eef75
'2011-12-16T20:25:38-05:00'
describe
'273972' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZS' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
f1711c6968e7a340a224a69d425b7859
b4e8220f6bdfd614b1365495cf2f8484dbb1ec2a
'2011-12-16T20:22:06-05:00'
describe
'251377' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZT' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
1a2738ccf2233f23da1e5eef7993b4e5
e6abaac0b34bc694f1270aea16ba8cb8bf510ec3
'2011-12-16T20:21:35-05:00'
describe
'257248' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZU' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
f41570d8e971509c9144fda20fa7fd66
a311b73a65fdb7f557f06d77cfb87b83657bc4a9
describe
'287430' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZV' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
7fdd09ee76f55e42f6858cee8523fc88
aeb5d9288d452a936197fb6e58f0dfc67e9188a6
describe
'278838' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZW' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
a729171bee7ed25fca2d5c47c59622e2
5b0393b8328c3ad779e2130412ee7bc119c322ec
describe
'288733' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZX' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
ac155e9bc96c48ffc4c67b8eb6410192
0c9b98d52e48e361dd68ff65f0da01f54dec2592
describe
'158142' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZY' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
ddb869d3339615548e9fb3e74d8632b6
88e8b0ce2ef61b2ebd0f43fe36c9d3c8668f06b6
'2011-12-16T20:18:55-05:00'
describe
'245141' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAJZZ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
46772c1dbfa759a17c879af2b4520539
e571818a59b075fca53fa561d107e3f77a8cc188
describe
'272169' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAA' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
6bf80c06dd007af029efb355ca411a69
2412b3d95b0f1b317cfda93db9358db83878faf2
describe
'200439' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAB' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
68baaa10d1a4cfbe7a156077a03927de
5788511bf1b22eadbda19cff104aa151637fab1b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'288243' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAC' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
0c0c28b0a5eab96bb9914ce253eb8928
8b9676bd578372bdbc4e70dc39940199ffc3a8c3
describe
'286615' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAD' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
de7d49a512fde2bca567bd66aed66834
fcd95446679a86b39c91dfa0c68bbb03d7f060d6
describe
'271027' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAE' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
3f1e6ca62c75bfddd6eb5e874254adab
10eff4909efc452ef2243aee27af7b6555c3f54a
describe
'261349' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAF' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
4326e34fcf5906795dfe4ce8d55b393e
2e63018128bf293db47e20a7f0d6962f65bc59c6
describe
'287815' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAG' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
c34a2132285735f2c9709e79af754c0a
2df3d18425e82accd7a9e408fdb77a8b58dd3607
describe
'273560' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAH' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
40f48e6cbaea7d69af79d78eef4d57ea
d995f955e8c496bb0ccc3023efbd9aa53d862437
describe
'194891' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAI' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
4bc6dff711235f93aa03bea7854e9ddd
4c501955904d0cd07210d74b5e8d361e7f639c3b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'267869' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAJ' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
c0d81893007b44fbb9624974a7340fd5
ab30b338ef20127a0624dd2cb3099a11bceacd47
describe
'268836' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAK' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
3bcb943a01641916151e325f8969cc15
fe6718aff6236693ca29af5857510591047d01b5
'2011-12-16T20:24:20-05:00'
describe
'292704' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAL' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
c552f57bd7cd9fb1b10fc2a08c51b15e
7de600461b7e4293137893b37b14cf6a897cbd67
'2011-12-16T20:19:01-05:00'
describe
'281150' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAM' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
2c7f4f2e0db9dbb30753f63ba5fc5a72
ea7e3689de674f3be4c33e8fb787002482d800d6
describe
'277411' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAN' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
49c0e7d85a9c036351e42a4382973793
955b6b4b7b96d538a40697a9f2931bcbf9a5b31d
'2011-12-16T20:23:45-05:00'
describe
'274906' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAO' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
1110ee64408338f7f608bec7a46233a9
0841e47f7e0e6bb989c9cc5e36db9e643264dd75
'2011-12-16T20:17:01-05:00'
describe
'276722' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAP' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
81593f477f061b12eaa3ca5a206f23b4
f5903dc5add674d231703e484d583c9e9d3c2f1f
describe
'216199' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAQ' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
3dc1a25d366dcc92da2e4ca79622210d
d75d2a041d1323ce3b1ac54b468e5272c6415d59
describe
'231438' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAR' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
84d8f41544265502635bb39f54aa2685
720234c5c4a62d136e3d3c14dda574ad3983b0a0
describe
'279272' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAS' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
4f2748bb7c2f9859dfbd8159aeb2b381
bf290914cfe98a98cfca2bf7cb8948413f0a7bb6
describe
'274412' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAT' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
6703b0120adf1408df01ab8f8af61b56
4b97ac764c870bec4023b74ba5a6e28848fe332f
describe
'258077' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAU' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
e6dced8838d2d71826902297cca0628a
c255e8992853b0295ea92b3884bb5a3dab42dccb
'2011-12-16T20:24:43-05:00'
describe
'277632' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAV' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
c51e352ec99e94d15adf853039c1baed
94ec6d33fa713f01034b36437bc31ef83195b4e6
describe
'270741' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAW' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
030b69f4688f0daec3c9e61661fd7b24
29b3cdf348f09a399c815c1f8a687ed87bf15040
describe
'269715' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAX' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
e27a2cdba0035de2985614c0268de47d
a3f739eb01cd8002721ea2813d945a1cbe064f14
describe
'256604' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAY' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
7ff327a84c7212ff7c1e8d0f370e5a90
1b9c5ec16ff1fe43749c4e3629471c0cebc497ce
describe
'217188' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKAZ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
c6df3fe8199fc1f184e5876e29eff051
33278aaf99114e70712c7ff91b6d23f3623e70d4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'258696' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBA' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
0ef28cafaa4b9107db6ffa69984943c4
65ab466140221b4b7a1f1d1870ea92baf2e49839
describe
'286067' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBB' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
5927c8b966df368a5fba70b6457c74b7
391768226fecb1f772e2fa74fa7745676e14c09d
'2011-12-16T20:21:00-05:00'
describe
'274748' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBC' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
b0ac18378afabb88c32d59bda68db2e4
7712ad0b66f9347c64dbdc7cb938dfe3acf5088a
describe
'278322' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBD' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
a2d719f31f45bada768a2291b971d9d9
4d926f17f011f0b5898df2cfccf1ac2b0e8c05c6
'2011-12-16T20:14:38-05:00'
describe
'249013' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBE' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
c5cc52153234ec5eab09a250a1e63b58
146b4b2f1eaf6c8f7ae23e76d7ce9cd76ce3638c
describe
'274001' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBF' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
8fc15d9d4e1503026b4ec13e545d1b2e
f3210b08cb18deff64a14fcbaa5a89e9fc14b596
describe
'207441' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBG' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
78ba021251e72d77269b917c882ebdbe
1fbf7f51d38fcc8584cac417039cb237d302b8e4
'2011-12-16T20:19:16-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'259050' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBH' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
d54abea5e6aebc0537bd2372f99d3b9b
0bf305023b0753d3b958bad59973fcad5fb5903a
'2011-12-16T20:24:36-05:00'
describe
'147695' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBI' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
675bc441d1d560fa5aa23e5e757a9f5d
0da9e2edc7efe6ad4b681316c8692f1c1d448131
describe
'216626' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBJ' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
9b4ca2b93ff2acae54a84f39bb3b41c1
d694324ef23d93d7927c5ac51cd0733992129123
describe
'186404' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBK' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
220cbb347fab365fab11000261e9b6ad
a4f4e8463877d5080e39ee2c7731f9d7473ff8b5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'285378' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBL' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
c89b20363f2b36b77454e4cad639b8e6
d64e7f000d1f88f2c6bcb907b049067907d9331e
describe
'244083' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBM' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
27b66f9e9d4225380ed08530ae2ea1e8
092dcd7c0b9c2487e5d2682a7281c36bbb47389f
describe
'270012' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBN' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
921614536455565e8b346ee2e2c8fb87
b43de7d819c4d103a6d5b3711059d7448c18dc2e
describe
'253747' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBO' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
9ea5838b4fe2ed19bd69f71918f6cf54
292784920e25385493ccd8875e347f43cb89479e
describe
'280856' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBP' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
197eda90003e4473c0c9f7a2346dcf8a
b75d35b1e261b12e32b7d4dba6f902439323892e
describe
'217808' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBQ' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
d37d52feaaa780bd13398b84b091751e
4770f86afde348162ccdaa6dbd890428016566b2
describe
'276483' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBR' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
94669716c3cebe8850ed3e118dbdf558
045cafa63c7a33e88ee8990794bd3ec5c4cc1c7e
describe
'247002' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBS' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
0f0531940cb838ffdf1b40886edbaf42
0c0fe296314beaf3576bf5508d056add28b63f57
describe
'260317' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBT' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
cd3486b306bdb313cbdc552c8d302aa2
1b6f64d06df7fbe90eb92834b0a277c4862d6d3d
'2011-12-16T20:15:39-05:00'
describe
'256543' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBU' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
549a3f81c9ab2342f5a907f09f081e37
17ecf8ded9102c8776a98a83ea482f8706f77cec
describe
'251801' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBV' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
8b9effa648a8340e1813ccca49a12c2f
d873c923ab5c7c0074f42578772fac7264096114
describe
'208934' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBW' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
753f8683dc6f7de104db0c6afa7de2f3
940d46cc218bfd8a637b8526ff312fbefee8c2a1
'2011-12-16T20:15:21-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'277263' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBX' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
6c73e4c2fe29322901c3ad8dc28d8a89
9d31e9ace418dcb04b83b89eb3137fd84cf97b93
describe
'270674' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBY' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
93914bdd1d78cc9b4ac70e4d818d69a7
fad54379235c498c48a1029c4f792c1b86a5008b
describe
'273736' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKBZ' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
cf5e0e872eaf9367211d12d0d2563616
a34c7c7ac26a861245b1f4dbaa75c81a8e95a18b
describe
'143015' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCA' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
693470038fe94713d16cbe5b0a47ec66
c247cb7ffe900b4533dffb0cb6a1ea4cf4d157ff
describe
'239378' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCB' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
8063b3099930263ad56bd74bf8594b17
e6c36e9206320b003a634540ef779113b956b081
'2011-12-16T20:22:01-05:00'
describe
'287656' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCC' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
392ea638279e012289f0cd9c78dca05a
f76db9b6d0a36427537bbfc153d8fe1355cd7105
describe
'272193' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCD' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
b9b53f44709ceb3e06563ed0749e7cf4
9ae2c9031cac0c9cc365f77b5014bdb8fb63dad5
describe
'283866' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCE' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
2e4575ba04bd9a671cdee133b286a27d
8017b3e3d6f113e31dfed56f34caaa0dc4542428
'2011-12-16T20:19:14-05:00'
describe
'288119' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCF' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
b2d132616c7c12a04e082efb1090cf72
644ee26955ea8b6f3f3f2aaa2e1a8956e48211ef
describe
'290765' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCG' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
804605f348206eab3885cbe3417db8b5
884b65e5b575bd610359cfec0e5bdb7009fea34f
describe
'285891' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCH' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
adf52a70709a81eeb24fa94d6f5c2b36
52e519bbcbcf2ec17d6bb793d585b2295f30cbce
describe
'290582' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCI' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
bdc4042444ae86fe2a37f800a1d935c4
6cadfeb1d52fe2ecdf92d090a7e09b667999593a
describe
'183631' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCJ' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
227391e9aa9f7befef5da7431165dfde
581297e5735d599af9b87fe192b6aa210f8ef276
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'282951' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCK' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
de2e7c26dd39269feadd34798f7423a4
eb3eaae37e022353dc716d4d13264f0a1aac7c2a
describe
'284601' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCL' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
b48f07d2ac3c15a4c2ad93efc98d0cde
29428396df00c9b27b5a6db4166071d3508dc3ad
describe
'275971' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCM' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
597079af39d553fa04b9e711949a8363
cbbbb8542844c2f11c540667783048d699e78e78
'2011-12-16T20:22:50-05:00'
describe
'287335' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCN' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
8df1469382929ca35b40df1e22357195
ddd75ee8a280fe0690108ab3706a92ac2cb43d6f
describe
'287130' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCO' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
4e7c63bd74187fabb372ae78dc04b8b6
64003b467603561de0001cb962e5ea9a52dcd8d9
'2011-12-16T20:17:48-05:00'
describe
'208202' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCP' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
6f518a97f7962afe56da8e2f19ad1e4e
8036d54d0fdadb1172b97a0305a1ed9c3b88738c
'2011-12-16T20:17:53-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'286790' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCQ' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
3bc49b1bbfefd6496b4258fd0e54200d
59a321c2e77890baf3c52eaa7e16dbc32c1a3ef8
describe
'278797' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCR' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
94b473406c9431f7f4983530314e22a1
ca78478d965c8442e3dfa37c430ab965f5b70e14
describe
'117364' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCS' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
d6ae068b2cbab1d0d3bad9cc7da092ba
89497b04bd355fcddc4aa4ee8818b6e15e0364b3
describe
'233455' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCT' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
db9fe72459d8dfe1bb59c9ff66a78d07
01cc53671b0ca38faaee94d4b2b36ce2e0016915
describe
'275260' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCU' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
ce8c2cae5f54454c5bfea95ec7e6047f
7cf67b6a5634a59e0c7ec3b13df66a4b117d95a9
describe
'210081' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCV' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
d562e2abdc5c6d20e93e1f53661bb232
da03406fa5430bf456d482c109df4fcaabc4c523
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'281600' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCW' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
e47a400ad0a9362c9229560504369645
e8fe1d7aa07fcf8d1aee638e1f69486573ea7f5d
describe
'243128' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCX' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
9ef4d3ab6dc71600570a72f26c7b7ebc
068f0b7de2417569ab52251b4cab2496b86b435a
describe
'266095' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCY' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
9d5d35bdd8a2f1bea49409125f30bc2e
b716d59498f442ae384ac1de77dfc707af1f148b
describe
'198248' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKCZ' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
829ed21d44b99fa2018d56f8a84b572f
d969485811b142471ee9acf603efa5a29b315fb2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'258582' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDA' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
c78cb546331b514b4ae6f9ccd6f4781d
5c3d37d48264fa326246ca6d2eea121e5233c9de
describe
'237351' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDB' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
34c8b7c737714cb17adaafcba0bdd5d8
173bd918678d14f3db3b1772673fe43612ceba79
'2011-12-16T20:24:46-05:00'
describe
'279490' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDC' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
48cbac7fff4e45ec8d237dfad6f2ffc6
d9ab359d6ae373023f7cb3ca68d8e023649e109e
describe
'284742' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDD' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
c5277b40ab2f71b0a6a792f0fa955636
e1ca0df0207c60cf4854201c37139b0c2aa5a31f
describe
'284795' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDE' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
a0888c219e3f63098b38ca25884e656b
c66f62d1b7d37125516218fed3a18155017127be
'2011-12-16T20:25:13-05:00'
describe
'262847' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDF' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
a42249bf5d0d8f5837fa4b44903560fc
621284dd06efde2c5e1b095c9b78d8028a80819e
describe
'268292' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDG' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
57dc96abcb781f5ecdc82357ee127f55
ee1332588a845eff782c0e2b46239ed1489157d6
describe
'282454' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDH' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
025cf66f3e504e1eccf7e41a7064e44a
4ea1fa664d0957e33310ba2eb60da086719703e2
describe
'295908' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDI' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
b1e1359049994a215eab71e429c7d2da
47b6fc7a6f36457f53054e5c87f0f98608bb59ca
describe
'289452' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDJ' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
1519371cb08ae6be6e6c42d888173450
0e352e67370e62df5b3460c8871a06fd7497efd1
describe
'284153' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDK' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
c39dbeb049514a1d01367ccd1ba7c3f4
4a917ae5a6c1b8a5ec7bdb97bab1a8fe74870df9
describe
'157379' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDL' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
d0df97c5075a3102a914c59b4fac21c8
d5966a1e0b616e0ca5c28ea3f013bf087451cfa1
'2011-12-16T20:20:18-05:00'
describe
'216736' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDM' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
610b12a2608cefca17d703c3eb1e8e32
ab3d806cb461ad97451ac7c0410bca322a303f7b
describe
'234813' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDN' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
98849a7227537105eb82ec30e93bdbbc
d5c26a3d1a75cb3e4ff60f193576bade8c910b6e
'2011-12-16T20:25:41-05:00'
describe
'184298' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDO' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
93dc2cb3d400d5f9b821dab2e8fd6d22
3c68dcd8a61d08cdb4562f1a6c3d7e6012180df9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'237269' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDP' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
ef3bd3b830afe04989e55a32fd79edd4
738c5d88f99b450c64d8955788e4602158d59404
'2011-12-16T20:15:22-05:00'
describe
'255754' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDQ' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
27768a6514a270b93e5ccf11215072a3
3de8b2941bfc34db72ca4f0733699eadb517b582
'2011-12-16T20:17:13-05:00'
describe
'257731' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDR' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
236d85fe5c634f6766b7d4d0fd015673
0cc84b4ae6b456f1dc5e8c1bc0f656327d49fd31
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDS' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
0cd905fb06571aab0527283c391815af
d82bc79f3553f8a149b4ac769511f1b1a9951da3
describe
'245282' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDT' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
8aea12655f5f45c4bbdd85f066b2b3d4
0eae76dfe596644b20806697b4fff1617107a0e6
'2011-12-16T20:23:10-05:00'
describe
'264238' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDU' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
c5ad726faac4a1bdc3d402c44f6ebdca
e307ecc90af253f421a7205e658c90a03dfc4108
describe
'245073' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDV' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
70b18a51777a6e0291fcadfc66bce1d6
747c8b560d2da87f9b1fd9a436d0a0b14ed93c6b
describe
'272158' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDW' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
13b1211c982d1a2cd4bf347bbdb50c44
b2c383d07c84063821132caac18b13bee83fa39f
describe
'261065' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDX' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
a16fac6a7cd3bb458120087e9a6da393
634edcbeab2a6885f53d23ff3424ac763d76b1fa
describe
'272829' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDY' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
a723584081f22817f5ef45f3fa501e58
5d4778e1c7daa85d225381ee0a3f60ab941eb096
'2011-12-16T20:20:55-05:00'
describe
'291942' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKDZ' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
73c7e77ac3acd6f6f69e8e5b19d6c771
66ef242b7099d7756b006307dd4d98b427551960
describe
'277426' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEA' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
7b604f3cc3c8e46d5dc56417b0894597
78c137b9b4eeb285f3a7a11b8281be52e263c25b
describe
'287585' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEB' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
f2ac23bb3622fd176b82b7b789b362fc
6025820e72e7849362b0a94604779107b3b51c24
describe
'63815' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEC' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
895e460c3b605839ac6de296cdad4e57
2238eb7b7735b22e68ff1b80bd2e8c8f538622df
describe
'216588' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKED' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
5fafe6837df6c99559c158ce70e3fe55
e426314892750c6624b69b1825f0028a4fac1b7f
describe
'271153' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEE' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
71abacde9271f1ec76059ebcf76f2bd6
697bdc64eb3ca7980186048714bd266ab1314870
describe
'254629' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEF' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
bd8bb238ed4a69cdfd72bdd31f527769
2b87f521f91ac03a0f2302e4c3454e9c4b0fec9d
describe
'251862' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEG' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
36b311258a623ac623df2bb771d9bac2
6dbb95334bf4291c216505a71e9d471d04a57b78
describe
'287659' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEH' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
4acc163ee04548b5b41c9be6bdf29ee4
343f5ba8776df75ff0ba51c36edf16cc2ca01140
describe
'206580' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEI' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
2692122a63be79b0da88de9cd3ad1c54
8d4a1ad061fb4ed8e0e2576c42b8f64d0037d442
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'274767' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEJ' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
5542587eba7fb65c6b2cade360520fd1
38944d80af05bb20f054f99398b9fca6734f004d
'2011-12-16T20:15:14-05:00'
describe
'280097' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEK' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
352fedfc4873733ee81b0575910d24fb
0ae96a216109d9e906edf395d6a00744c3a797ec
'2011-12-16T20:16:01-05:00'
describe
'197770' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEL' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
797627cf6cb5e510bfc6b3e241f53b8b
b9e6e351a81f301ede364f04b98d854ce575c44f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'262896' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEM' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
6e66d06b021498f6c8d25dd5a1eb60bf
47c040ca212d713896c18e45537400ec313a16c1
describe
'240993' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEN' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
54c7a1cc6b1bf871ef23ee75514fd635
cc4556f480dba40b83596a7b3017c2d8609649c5
describe
'269063' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEO' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
1f2929d6f368c83407948f21a4411836
64398605136c9b796f3944be24135ac8021cd3d3
describe
'253923' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEP' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
a1c96bf2700bb699bac680436ef7724b
edb230c4cde28fa3463d121977724cc0259f3da2
describe
'265225' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEQ' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
7e3c9d095130e4c2fa1d4e19edb274cc
59fe61096cc4fd9deeacb316c6c42b4f89a131c8
describe
'280584' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKER' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
052662b59a3f896aefffd5deeaf8b08d
c3441c248e499374577b5035c8263a2b1871fcbe
'2011-12-16T20:19:40-05:00'
describe
'280302' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKES' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
65982eb6451637961158ba795784c24b
6fbf152cb9c3f81e56c90e1a5cca644ebb15d2ec
describe
'274992' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKET' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
4a3c226f44ec6db1d594bf4dced500bf
7b5c1b5a77bd1551d3eadebcf0b7a7fb71673a45
describe
'207475' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEU' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
689b9b9e20b4f697459ebe37579bc825
60db53d7091aff3e772b9d455ca3c90f149b9e50
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'165669' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEV' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
f76e014758035f41a70b92b84a0b1424
06ac0fec60164dae6e9239c7e0c8c2187aefd33e
describe
'238875' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEW' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
bfbc14b38fe5b004945c871aa99d3352
9dc5af0fd7d38d6879cf3132506fa41e2faa8114
describe
'256360' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEX' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
dde4ca2d8c692dbbd270ff7648b01353
55389e240aff01478b3e269f089caebb9f81cfbb
describe
'271692' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEY' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
e646871d0e1436377056dc17861c522c
643b52d25d00360b49bd41c3d38fa455327f0b63
describe
'270834' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKEZ' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
1a4d2a9b0c5de88a0db77f225248cd07
16533f102fb155dd3031aa63eb79f3a9851572d5
describe
'278942' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFA' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
85787d685804e95c76a411ad52b4c46f
36f4ec98b16dffbeec6e1d2bfe81d5e22ae753c5
describe
'273202' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFB' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
a6e8e92f7c505fad4a1cb38ae8ce1829
a3cca81874aa4e74ca72a69ddc4876e6ef9e6242
describe
'213277' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFC' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
2f8642ec15290baa2c547e046d35f5a7
6f85f21cbfb1200dded2a313bc372d2ede6fe49d
'2011-12-16T20:14:43-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'273600' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFD' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
7a6c631e438bc703b8ec1d526186b1f0
e90adc869acdbb6684ffa232537138e61ca5e3b2
describe
'290326' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFE' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
5d0f534c933b8ca0d076fc8dbc3e65ef
3b41c6bf8ff50b9713273489ecd4ef30ebc9b7e3
describe
'277098' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFF' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
15b4126b5016980a0e35d5dfdd30ad51
685ffc9884346b0800cd92454becb18a70a402ce
'2011-12-16T20:17:09-05:00'
describe
'266477' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFG' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
57ba75fa995db3fddf8251ee6e59764f
289b72363e8f0c45122317a545eeeda0812b0bd3
describe
'250704' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFH' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
8eda6bc037096462a2cdb6c7a5a39adc
ce51d0540a19b8594d6d7c50becc8d3c2014dab4
describe
'275329' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFI' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
3b8c1e140bb67ffa2ac0a518ca558d75
e2b4818f81e38a0da5d80bcae1526cc958f3ec63
'2011-12-16T20:22:31-05:00'
describe
'264721' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFJ' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
58a5b30f82a6a61a954923830a0a1657
714ba378e59590a573413cd81976184fcc4d7a30
describe
'283586' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFK' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
0c4347b498f5f77bd0d4461d365572ea
a60275c4d9374c71f2a5afae56f0f381466b1ff6
describe
'171936' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFL' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
a6035dd02836e4d13367de5be4aed6e8
8ba261bcf431fb8795d267d828dda89d17287bb9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'280493' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFM' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
9aeaa1961c14d138dcb236be7d1450ea
006206f089b11747b9fca11830c4d824ac4308bb
describe
'267842' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFN' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
7421fd09cf97fd93942aaac5458271b9
5043e414cb7b701178c2f7b905d1d20b50aabe96
describe
'273256' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFO' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
3f80990545b6352c2d8da151aa678de4
618c98ad6c43c826ff755cadeabb436daee7de6b
describe
'175554' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFP' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
4518bfb483a1c7d28881a6350197cca9
0f7474e6563ee5a7ae9c5818108be41d089f9d97
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'183298' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFQ' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
58cd06567fb74c1717b228b9968b942b
b7aab8a5e2df293c4be05dbc9f220271fcc905f7
describe
'247308' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFR' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
29ece295a176670fe59f150c977e603f
b2b504473d03e0490bbc901bda1bb66f1d0eea0e
describe
'285051' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFS' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
b78d20d9bf40fe15ef30d82102f9dbf7
5a7bcb79d866e241180b16e6a8454f6fc2c04e6b
describe
'268821' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFT' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
0fc1954faadc74e14c5fe2cc83c0096f
7e728db2e57d38fa18cb821c73e764d5e95ec727
describe
'251041' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFU' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
3a1daaf1a53cda158b3aa92d738902d9
e51f1460a62c697b7954dcc9ca1cec8723d22661
describe
'248589' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFV' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
27d5e948342a0beabbb22f6943486348
e521cf62f5c04b03577ab18efe96f0adf832edaa
describe
'198567' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFW' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
105f60cdf68f3fa3a7217bd69e352be4
1bb25ae45a2ab755817c06b16b731c5112a32b65
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'269796' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFX' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
541ef3e7fb31878f84c2f42967889ea3
878f095f8a9aeaa79a1f77c30a6e2c7bdcb05993
describe
'236524' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFY' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
bdf8af2ab78962840aefe55913e88f2e
c935322109092ddea92fd8e1bc66e64cd4f5590d
describe
'285277' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKFZ' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
e7b3f706308e7bb54f824d6882cd7402
98c1b3591af00c0b570f3bb439e29e04ecc4bf64
'2011-12-16T20:19:43-05:00'
describe
'286043' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGA' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
4a5355b375846017a1b6a0de89eafebe
5f17b6efd3b25671c26bd879ae8c47061903b6bd
'2011-12-16T20:17:43-05:00'
describe
'257448' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGB' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
46a0bc863a3bfb4fcc4964eeb4961cfc
4f1750614f05a70848eb43a42c70582dd70586fb
describe
'271318' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGC' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
de090a7c088f53b89e48494c8c395184
3a2b23876f9663b7dc4100a38202fc7bccd60967
'2011-12-16T20:19:42-05:00'
describe
'257816' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGD' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
4d02c28d287829f14ec1cd3c3dda2e26
5346b819b84b6f99c54fae64f8c525d7f6aae55d
describe
'266650' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGE' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
ce497c0c6142f9bc4f83545aafa8e47f
8c461ff943b0b57d6120d81845281ff8cd22563d
'2011-12-16T20:15:07-05:00'
describe
'254013' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGF' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
9d129480d57cb63bbfee92e0e048ebfe
079a9697ca982b591595ee2d2d65ba05d4336241
describe
'277748' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGG' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
fdc2636653975a7702585e52afe3cdf3
9068fc405bdf86737a983539d16c9903d1f600fb
describe
'199037' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGH' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
d556ab59c127aa7a8cc4902e774aba9c
75484c6763d348deed4cac69f4e6da735a812bb1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'214973' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGI' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
c6f6e859288dad16209065a53ef982bb
bd2d20e8d6e386a85d2e4c9965da9729dde29f87
'2011-12-16T20:21:28-05:00'
describe
'262454' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGJ' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
dff2ed23d817579201de88694f5da1e9
4d887f4ac51faab0924b6a8cac07bd39b15050be
describe
'237518' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGK' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
e723e5185198822aeacedb32e0de6fd7
f9b37f0cca5dd18ab71a91c3d7881a28dee7ec0c
describe
'274969' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGL' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
51e19e657fdeb2bae2261c1c5345cd7f
7303d12823c3deb708f537e0710b124e83b86110
describe
'251378' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGM' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
df90fc8ae35fecd5a5801689c2838a04
c6c62c7d631b1e6dfc94eb10fe03f7a11608e4aa
describe
'264202' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGN' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
3d49fd10a812e2a27ae0dccc621813ab
7f94fae1cef74f506f8dc7a3b4d1d7e065f8b205
describe
'262479' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGO' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
3c21e63400eb062a528b12347380c71f
98ea1d1a2a4e4509bd450473f73c29bc58533790
describe
'296586' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGP' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
f7b6068354a436b3b637a52a8d6fe799
fc554ab4255bb7d86a68beea4b55fea4696f04cf
describe
'4614' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGQ' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
d9dbeeca1599e5d764d086a7a17ab53f
2b64887c8dc9c6fd4cd5e3318294c4bd37725898
describe
'268440' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGR' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
b9a0e7daf53cd6156b57e7f696a1fcf0
be8514a5ad8e3f72aaeae624b6dc56f174389c0c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'57677' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGS' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
06b9179ac240c9a05b78416371a8703b
60c39fad7b55cd0ff6ced7e24d4e2d72bc0ba20c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'19242' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGT' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
d6b6e775dd3d4b0876a5c3802240d34a
ce614e17b9d9d85209c2c2c4377921b80d72ad8f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2931' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGU' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
594d88e86be53224a19c050090528ecd
72285ad25200e4351c8e1c096cd56d548906e965
describe
'2485' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGV' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
975f33baab22177ec92da5726053f7b6
ed4b3b6f90dfc58ef8d90dac78fa7c29bc26a7eb
describe
'10783' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGW' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
24fc5a2a0c718f4bc136dda8eb5989d9
b1fbc804a9835a47a7361dc44ea36697810547d0
describe
'5353' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGX' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
10bb68257cf6de54f7a21a3edbe4be36
971ed005068f96a51f741f96558b5653ec93e377
'2011-12-16T20:17:28-05:00'
describe
'3358' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGY' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
9e5a9503234abdbcaeff5e419e29cef4
4036ccc25387a3a26f8078e480cda7a6375a2615
describe
'2695' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKGZ' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
10e3d67f229e4546e3a1a8ae2ba88223
08272780ff11079120e8c807abf6871b19db188e
describe
'77820' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHA' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
616aefc87245a5daf6ffc1e2e44e0080
3af7cbd898faf93d9f8113610fb3b2063552c785
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35604' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHB' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
e14ff7d7cd076c595bebe0fb04cef6f6
d4e123a74846d11393ecdb5e1b0a4bb477c3ede7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'13569' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHC' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
f8c2077896bb5907177b214330fdfc3a
363098d14b5dd8c45e511eaa65ffb31f69b40a7f
'2011-12-16T20:18:14-05:00'
describe
'6362' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHD' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
2178e980fd795b6c864ead85d913999c
16fd8d3e3cf7b8afda538aa737e892485d7a6cf0
'2011-12-16T20:15:19-05:00'
describe
'67984' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHE' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
bea1f8ffe6572a0fdbd30d6c1a3e21ba
c47da552795c388b3dd143e7d274bc8ff6bf588e
describe
'24467' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHF' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
a93bc7b60335116b33a48ad38e8b8fa9
65f8462e529d2c0156a10c2a122b14e0ffa0ac3c
describe
'33463' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHG' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
d2abfd0cd08064196cff71510cdc9c37
feb05dac415c4e64835b620d32d414e2dab3ffd9
describe
'13778' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHH' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
f40fadf433f2f6385ffee7a3c7097572
b6f597874badcc07321f3a2cc3f55416926f6caf
describe
'28823' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHI' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
8054eb2bf8de28ed1daecbb58649439f
276004cf000cb2f33519a00a5a1edfa5fa489905
'2011-12-16T20:24:15-05:00'
describe
'13110' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHJ' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
b6e60061eb1d21face0267cc6e1ee2be
75069b101d05cdbbd0297d5632667701da5b6850
describe
'50981' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHK' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
bd158a4cd87a00a2b287129db3618080
c9cbc50dec18a88b5e8fbe0d9a1235e487d68020
describe
'22832' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHL' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
4f61a88de685f7697760f6cceff12b6f
6a2ed4a59e07f8a4ad1a45b0c95227405861fc7e
describe
'25258' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHM' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
506afd87b2832639a41a90715934144a
04772aae978b464734387567cecdda4c9cfadb72
describe
'12124' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHN' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
6d12f4af898544cdd55225599b4192f7
0fd5a4feb808936fd002fe37ae9ba8e23af2465e
describe
'18103' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHO' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
e1033dd351e908766fd9de4d614e6d00
6dcdbba16617e3a6c78fb4e398fea74d79860298
describe
'8604' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHP' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
52b4a34a3a0ebf82e0fe427ad184c8ed
ec512958641136909f7e35822e283b1263049a08
describe
'70927' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHQ' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
cdcf67c4626aeb3582f05b3b6379ca32
323fbcc683d323dffccd0f1b1668d1f612644a4a
describe
'25917' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHR' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
164e303e2225c23973bf17815a07c7af
d20c3d54f3b6f6c89fa51a6fbea34f98b0e8c2e0
'2011-12-16T20:20:40-05:00'
describe
'103785' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHS' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
cd3818f3331e95fbe2e79458913818c9
c056757bf744c9c03fa0ec38bf1c338e86204a76
'2011-12-16T20:25:17-05:00'
describe
'33909' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHT' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
1a9386356e13669e794afccaacb3eac4
077eb69ea3613514ebce450a551b0caee05d6718
'2011-12-16T20:21:58-05:00'
describe
'103395' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHU' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
601708da5addf6036db42e8713825a99
e969cc271c9b0bc7bc0c4445a1e697f772c606e3
describe
'33968' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHV' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
46dca24ae9977cc55c6d5a62ad0ebbd0
e874f41426b4e6ea786261e4f6aabe6ad1723a1c
describe
'81069' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHW' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
e0fadf4f1426941044a27f1a9b53a67b
9f52379db411984623a08bbda2935a04e7e1e5a7
'2011-12-16T20:19:57-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36926' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHX' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
8af7450633d04e2f35dbc8dfdfeabed1
1c85e775e4b765e2f32480ae2c6e524123950b5e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'90656' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHY' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
0b3272221c1c4f47f5633def2ae8d195
e19654da540e261fdf6566bbc24909144d7588b3
'2011-12-16T20:19:30-05:00'
describe
'32648' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKHZ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
6064fdbb9c43575fb3677137007372bc
5a67cd29691df677c3b283893a4a87813ad0a9be
describe
'92009' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIA' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
4d18b4c438eb0b069026422de401a413
07efaaaf24253441db12c33c8535768a0a3ae37e
describe
'33083' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIB' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
4305a3065ba2e3be38e69a44688a5a41
25e6fd8ebf3c36049c43262a541700d57120ca01
describe
'99613' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIC' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
4821e4a6a450e2983d43ff76f9fe3c86
e4c4af51a3f58cae2ac90c266b2b881bdb163e70
describe
'34095' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKID' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
55f8251758ad8a37d78d00aeda8462cd
216d1197aa370874858fb0645c600b844ac757e2
describe
'99325' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIE' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
ae1e8c0a10dc307f56096bf8c723aa8d
f0a46429d5dc81e53d63b27cb733fefde23e450f
describe
'33532' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIF' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
27586b2a346d7f56427eb5bdd7d9b626
90501b2fba532bcad6e4e2332244ecb212eac8ae
describe
'90046' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIG' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
cc86719d5f8209000ac278b420b4c1c3
6027b17c5de990449265707cecf9d7353bcdac1b
describe
'33169' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIH' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
db728e0b360e178b6cd42e33f8c22d69
43b5013e4f9180a7bb873b1ffc814ae352c13710
describe
'88957' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKII' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
53275571262fea84bdba7e7cb9f1f377
54dbce25177a75c14fc0779fb064093e678da217
'2011-12-16T20:22:02-05:00'
describe
'32087' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIJ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
960f60bd23ff05f3a534661e414d059a
ec3a8b62b9640ed9169c26bd4c1a162f7b9a95d4
describe
'100157' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIK' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
944834dbbfaf5c2584e3d6f9bb02d3e3
ed0849fd80a4c388792ef0e6af2e5fe94dfbb105
describe
'34373' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIL' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
4b32bea423c3da1eee8e4feb9ae784b3
320dd8f44e46270b4ac194b7c6d51c477ad86d5e
describe
'104047' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIM' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
969b023c872a178f8eb1c91a7aafff68
7023a1596445652bec544366d9fbfb3445d9c28f
describe
'33964' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIN' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
663d1ab797e5d393a0b7aa93bc726c36
824620d46a0980d7e57f8aff2573989d48dd8257
describe
'98560' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIO' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
d45fa7309fabff784d7efa237d6bfd43
4f671dd120b5de5e90c9f4ccd59f72f7536f88a0
describe
'34179' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIP' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
41ed516064f4e48e1602ed5a95a5543c
9cfe1937e4df0d4d57bf7e6d5627bfb7391c6b82
'2011-12-16T20:25:20-05:00'
describe
'85230' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIQ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
7657ef5586f2a4705f9f622f27bcda4a
c955afeac47a474bd2766a9e9ebaf87188ec7575
'2011-12-16T20:20:16-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37895' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIR' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
3ec958d0298bbc763e01beab4335284c
e87f1c927f01aa535c403d695e55a0b4d949b7f1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'45225' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIS' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
a64eb415f8f90c2d2d3e05ea1836c4cb
ac2e025edafbf38b51b755d5056fc04fab15ebe0
describe
'16039' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIT' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
8d9f5f4cd3db65c8ee4fe7520257cc1e
cf8949717b30e5eb686f5e722af6ea7019537272
describe
'80598' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIU' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
7b2b5a8091b983165e80f94ff250d1bf
98b8a61b39ce3cf3cb54577352d34871be42177c
describe
'28321' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIV' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
168c0771479127cd62c6358c2e6e0a26
bb21221584f657b04594fde8820f5c294955b558
describe
'91689' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIW' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
69f336b08905d7f132e1fb24117797b8
ef5748fabdf0491f02b1eca53dd5fc68686f4db2
describe
'32449' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIX' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
37a6d0420544cac6ec604c80f2873110
b9980cef7e0e2129f0df38c72c6fdcf90d435899
describe
'101456' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIY' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
14500a83ffc594ef4be45f56822118aa
e4eb6abad1c8f94af66ee6f4302e86b4f94ef8ba
describe
'34542' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKIZ' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
3b4e79e7a763cab7250a408308479942
656ff27c7aac985962a26e948b373a7906c4c357
describe
'102708' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJA' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
3b9f37ffada2c29e03de3d0dc336527c
b33d741619ca3350aa84c80fe50563acb91930ee
describe
'35398' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJB' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
b6f9e6c66440ce5854678fa5cc1fa0ff
9183bc152ca9de94587501a86f225731e7e4a1b7
describe
'103202' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJC' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
de4e6ac77e7d7c6092131dfc104e5b84
dd65bdd3054b2039bda4afde0b719a41b3e5038f
'2011-12-16T20:20:45-05:00'
describe
'34648' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJD' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
9853d6c26b910a78a292f0312009cbd0
2818f0c92e94f8de83bdfcc56f1a7f9b67476e9c
describe
'101266' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJE' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
e9320153ed83eb56172d60747ace89b1
87e00cea2980e6f42ae736114592c801557c60ab
describe
'34889' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJF' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
49231f0aee806adeaca4616d3a19bd8a
2b62fa578fa5a5ae01e598359c7fa374c16239f3
describe
'104897' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJG' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
7945fe39d566b3630b6a8ade2416bb0c
e17ebf1202b90958a21a20f38faf5747c77e65e4
describe
'35780' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJH' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
15d2684ff1982e9fc8705b48e98235b9
42cad9f4aa8acc8b3b56320edc12ce62f8152469
describe
'103686' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJI' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
a80b0b7183db1afaba5b1c7b7d45d023
fec6959f1a6f3f1330de1998090f561fff736541
describe
'35863' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJJ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
54ab013c3427f7b392163dfdb5525749
bb0b88f26a118c6190db1d2294b3866a99f5daf8
'2011-12-16T20:22:19-05:00'
describe
'77345' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJK' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
4cbf0c4d2da01b5c2f381f4f22ccc392
f56ddec72fc738f3af0a56283f1294507f8ac99a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34979' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJL' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
d3d981f4e11b458b8941eb310a60e194
2371c0253edba449df97f364be1fb57dcf152c57
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'102202' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJM' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
746a5c4797f07e5bf9c9b7e49800856e
077dbb94ceb3b0f70898e3edf1797acad159fe2d
describe
'34323' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJN' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
1da1052a44321c941f207b0e5e2129ba
8980e237ea34536be3da871431ad3b0459a3170c
describe
'106501' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJO' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
6efed87c3d89bf884c3e68a4d7bebb26
de91a4a443c34d91576988879a7bc1a1429a9138
'2011-12-16T20:17:31-05:00'
describe
'35077' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJP' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
9167c932974b2b7876e04243688a0fc8
74d96a87f4e063498bdfddfb0f41c0f5c8a797b5
describe
'98532' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJQ' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
9155cc43425c946eaf7290a64a9a0c05
ac47e6089a37037c78d6f1b5e091aa563c33f070
describe
'33809' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJR' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
100ee31b9d606005b26d61fc4bd335ba
7fdea63344be1fb7030bd7595ab788b64f772e6a
describe
'93225' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJS' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
8c428e9814207084e77f77bb9ddde37c
220c2ef772d7aff634ac863db27e88c5b272d75e
'2011-12-16T20:17:57-05:00'
describe
'33917' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJT' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
47037002179775e53d6ab97b82510373
791ae9ffbae3dc4a72da115aa7857c4b2d1a270b
describe
'95031' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJU' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
9ab60018a3386f16024be61f0a231562
4ad9007cb70d18dcda61e2d80760aee2e320fdf0
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJV' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
4d50a252c36d0c08b325b655b47be216
ad645ea3be172ee3d7403432a0fa8a6d99efad4a
describe
'104924' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJW' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
97c6cc1f4fb593ebbf109f5e1cc1db7b
d6757a1fe8b33cf9c799b39127f35d2263575dce
describe
'34809' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJX' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
d28de6e170cde25694897500bb5d15d2
2b463883130665994f16dcda6cf9cc1c43d2dfcb
describe
'100850' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJY' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
4cd300b162cbfe716855a0007cbfd17c
b88636256d3bbc9f2983d9cdd5f07a5df0ad4e2c
describe
'34425' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKJZ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
15821c25f5343197b00a900b94075ec0
2eaf6b7dd5e35507cba1d08adacea9e27b19f059
describe
'105935' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKA' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
7126156dc5990ffaaf7302e986ce7baf
764249a50edd0dd7f864f748be5150a806d2e958
describe
'34758' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKB' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
57331ee459c7c1546f9af1176c63583a
1fa07646ce1d61256d3362d6f14d3da8480c8330
'2011-12-16T20:17:29-05:00'
describe
'60006' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKC' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
99b3a695302df958ee3fe8caf4d49e79
877feec052dfeedf759cc48e4c92828cc5e6fb18
describe
'21352' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKD' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
096eb63df210d1b64412fab9774830f2
644b7d08f0f1deb01bae66072019d77bb127eadf
describe
'90716' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKE' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
883d90fcb3396acda2ff98e93c03d3ee
a110627910db07d67b4f21fa02779d5a1c0264cd
describe
'31229' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKF' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
d2f23213a9a78378cbc0ae0c8c8d9b4a
2862b6f87325a0fdac79be8db1e568c6bb975dbf
describe
'98193' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKG' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
5f64e5632c2c4d3bffc331ed84ead8ee
56e8ae38d6b96caf092985015ed6f7d4d8ec8c9a
'2011-12-16T20:22:05-05:00'
describe
'34068' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKH' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
8d22598a4ae9c16ac5c3e90e1edc7441
3b3730133cd3366064b8eeedd122714f16de5a2d
describe
'78768' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKI' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
6278b735f3488d7ed72cf3d5631f6222
fea122e43df8d8e07047469172ccb41cb1698e7f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36508' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKJ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
941a772e6e64d3697e2689cb2feee842
e58e7ca9a55a1f5af85024d406948192b88ba5ef
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'104426' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKK' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
97ae84f32dc8036627101450af344547
e17823ca3ba7fd2302ee99ed8fde60cbcc54d226
describe
'35201' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKL' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
e3cad9ceeefc2c71f4928f715f817299
d28a257f187d9500615ca70a2545b8c7bce16799
describe
'102565' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKM' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
d2f4447e1aa9249836df5de0a7efc55e
0a62478f7fbb005bfaec507068d0daf0f90587b0
'2011-12-16T20:22:12-05:00'
describe
'33996' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKN' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
350970aac7e21afca49644b7698cad3c
29d0601b562bf13143e05a5e6399ae081b85051e
'2011-12-16T20:18:33-05:00'
describe
'101161' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKO' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
d8b171da8a0f16dc3b585d1213eb533f
e375fe8fb8b4f043b82af6a632ae86b653d2ccdf
'2011-12-16T20:15:36-05:00'
describe
'35679' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKP' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
cc1f94bc5c791c48cf040f1c93fc2821
2f928814c1efa99f523d1b32235879799003a4d7
describe
'95649' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKQ' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
177ec53d5f7e6e0ab64265c85719c7ac
e369a265f1e1dc6b143ddefdcc14d139ecb9d13d
describe
'32194' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKR' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
865659a004bd3c9606533a1f42f9fdb1
0337220ebe2cff642f7dd7cf7785b7639fd29e6a
describe
'104523' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKS' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
d19ab5b0458858f3b000f2ff09045fda
bbeeb6004ac4e6b4e5aa4d79c35d49236921185d
describe
'35032' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKT' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
5f644b014f3c4178f09362d58b4ed49b
1af7d48564fdcc6856296e7092eed3fb6d9e407d
describe
'100024' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKU' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
5395491a807405ab119f3b4a873b0a1f
58698c71476e235afad2c1767e12bdc14c7cfee3
describe
'33478' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKV' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
e3a4cda59a8046838d0801b9446f673b
cb7d4c8d4ee1ea12b53c68c2560a3dbc2da996d5
'2011-12-16T20:20:10-05:00'
describe
'80077' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKW' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
a28b136e68bb93102c0ee84a71f0513c
8d82f4f14a5f06067650a35501f48b0fec809196
'2011-12-16T20:24:56-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37464' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKX' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
1f9ce40c75d598d4799106374cf95163
bea96b7ef8a9405919e90777995490036fb6bf29
'2011-12-16T20:19:54-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99136' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKY' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
5a17ac0e3d3029146a1313c75276aacb
0db4b9275f70fc313c2620547234693d89b6c42b
describe
'32848' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKKZ' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
e30e7ae60eebd5e2af520b3302a2a022
4e158020a245d6be80dc792861409d8bdea821bf
'2011-12-16T20:22:32-05:00'
describe
'99388' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLA' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
290b32162a2b4662f6e46e8d9e85d52c
94ebc76e4f236de1aecc7bdcbebb38a9df8a3093
describe
'33846' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLB' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
01e0553fe9c0f7dd681daef26cc6b91b
38bbbd12023c8f9ffdbd3a4d1103a506fdacac6f
'2011-12-16T20:20:01-05:00'
describe
'106594' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLC' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
5d0c83c2eb190de1f77286e48c979767
f921a10e22d08d409f97710a69e016ada7615494
describe
'34667' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLD' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
5a4f686b265c165a1137bf2f5a5ad7a0
472f4fb54d76d8c8b780b29a8a146e35c3a8eb82
describe
'102931' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLE' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
c019ada7980733785201decf2e17cda1
0dfb4090f6e331dfa584866f3d986e58a9ec8758
'2011-12-16T20:23:13-05:00'
describe
'35103' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLF' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
307ea681ef09ad17b7bcbf001843ca8e
8a29883eed6c7cfe5007dd53a0345ba63f74c267
describe
'101415' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLG' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
4bac5e2f516d63b61d55d8f26b7fd674
a7a4f4fdb71fee385c61b0b814705e4ff9d209ed
describe
'34509' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLH' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
beb353e5181ee8aa46cdacda7a51b3d0
c547e0b95511029f189d889eaa6b7b1ea261379e
describe
'100083' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLI' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
d68c8f5a5fcf720eb540373da28cf538
99020ad755ec62bbd51cc0e39d9d6f5ea83e177f
describe
'33911' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLJ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
881b80e07291af218f44a41111abd6f6
2af91cf512f6e85d16770424bc96ed92f538aeba
describe
'102290' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLK' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
75e85511cf832e01e37b836f6b6330e4
6ac27ed7f69734db60b89ac32aabdd5349401903
'2011-12-16T20:21:59-05:00'
describe
'33503' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLL' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
877e70a005e12c4890143775f59613e8
46f300b379a8461e6ed1e21fe3fbf3f4a9e659fa
'2011-12-16T20:15:46-05:00'
describe
'80425' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLM' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
1276de48b40ae0861efc18d59bd5c551
4570ec23d9740606c035eb187e74609624ad7031
describe
'27602' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLN' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
797c6ff1cb74d31d469a19f82af0a833
31fd5e295d0bb79f6cd2498083a19189579ef854
describe
'87243' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLO' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
2e3edce004493febe3556749c307fb52
356b5d5642c55b15e623c75a357e6bce4d224436
'2011-12-16T20:15:17-05:00'
describe
'30248' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLP' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
d24a8e5403f7e24b19b46c8ba3fc5f74
c133ee75bf0f404995d95a2c3c22546ca2f6da45
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLQ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
4c27ae3fb4b2f54c93bde9f65e3f2105
2de5596b1e6e0bd149ccee446ef1e60ead23362a
describe
'35134' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLR' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
8cae10018c3327e1760039bdb8fc08c4
eca8214ae82d693dac4fc5a53dcb206956abbebe
describe
'103825' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLS' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
cee7a1e62b9f04a2789a2527bbd3d14a
38b76ecc03d3605a8e8f5231501d5c0e51cacc99
describe
'34446' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLT' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
1bf0dc1101be0031a6ce6e1f3b8c6edc
cf544d224f73d8979c60c5f78c81dba22f9489df
describe
'95325' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLU' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
25c32a6a36e67e4547155d27a52de7c2
693df8b7ad48f4d48e5d48a37117ef54cf8f32f5
describe
'34890' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLV' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
27e08409777aa3abe52cd7b5fba702af
96c8d6b8cbe3604bf3519ace38c4cd6fa283df3f
describe
'101813' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLW' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
4ba97aa95ada6e7350d1cb526aa0266f
3bcebf295f31a53ae47a8f6537b753ef7e38536f
describe
'35042' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLX' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
8a7d6a8502e294076c267859e476758b
2a33f40b6e487394eccf8094f942359785182134
describe
'99119' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLY' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
d5ca1867bac9525236915bd4f3892610
394d9b6da628bbefac9326b6786d0fe313bfa45f
describe
'35348' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKLZ' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
210adb5aecd692ac722e60a39dfc0a4f
07e6519c82efa71203ac11e8ad8a94aebee91e04
describe
'99681' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMA' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
f3e95ea78ca0874b661efdd32801f5b6
6490a7ed338f13d6e72d2bb09f17808dff898420
describe
'34156' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMB' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
1663243b09efecf8478d5a97a7d6ceba
70aef8fc085a4eb4fda8112047381e3584dc84d7
describe
'93725' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMC' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
bd28bdc2a71f35d3d45795994d5d443b
e9efbc5f45e76c6550eb3940a120ce296c38d6a6
describe
'32812' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMD' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
04bd650868c93c92a98139d8f57a386e
d52a8349c1cae958e6a50b9f6a3cb05b90832e3e
describe
'83533' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKME' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
8f24b136cd5fd074db8acb656e4d079e
54dbfdd0dbc80a3d9e056d3d338a7e36c039dd2d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38162' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMF' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
5a221a0f052f8828afe8eec3eae54bbb
970765f36473498222408a9235752a6e4cfcb5a6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'93100' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMG' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
6facbd2ebb62a69d7efb3efced0c59c0
84ccf8c2dbebafc2abe62a4506bab37700990e4c
describe
'32178' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMH' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
b50a5058fbea64187f79673eddbbf6cc
1869c4dba612889f7b4ccba983c062fbe6eb8a21
describe
'103964' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMI' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
c490d591e592049ad1c7743c08968e2d
15a595ae12a6844bcfa17d8adc77f0227f4ba128
describe
'34702' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMJ' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
24499e88f6ab526fb08c51268d6be32a
ff4e343209da1441ae1d9d9dad57c749a417a176
describe
'100002' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMK' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
f63191f00f0770b5a625bf83a8c2f66c
be4b4fb76c4950d23cc0a9db93c7b9f738a09907
describe
'34352' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKML' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
fb752a4a2b5f4200ad4083b9e642542f
3535abbfa100b5f8c84debaf0e70d56dbfb5c26b
describe
'101292' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMM' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
c8c55a6e7aed41bcd9571330e2ad55b5
b2753046a645ee884bdf6a53288bfe6ad005a0d7
describe
'34528' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMN' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
cdbd309041f68b3b7e99d654cfb8f714
10e37ab992b710f64edb370e2907dce80481bee6
'2011-12-16T20:16:32-05:00'
describe
'91518' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMO' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
e7ea4310894b9373de9bd0ec8118a35f
7b8b1ab10152c0d8c9a8bd40a82584486adca524
'2011-12-16T20:17:42-05:00'
describe
'33424' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMP' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
ed117f2f0c6d3720d4fca09832a66b96
6765d81deda25947be84d69825e92074bcc81458
'2011-12-16T20:25:14-05:00'
describe
'100960' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMQ' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
e01aff4a431aa530ba0c1665dec03387
2b325b3f2d1a3a21fd7f18efe830845a0a1d6916
describe
'33829' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMR' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
c2bf267f56a06602132a31f2ab51cabe
ccc3e1a77639d39029e73250c16a03d9bfa4ac53
describe
'85660' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMS' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
5ad76c991976c126afbc28459c9e273a
bdcd0123f7213fba888b40c3ae6fba32d91f1794
'2011-12-16T20:23:29-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38478' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMT' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
9f6ee72c556d3107310209c119f7cf38
eeb833634d2cacf9c10c27259be3cc8494209a6f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'97931' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMU' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
eb67c48b1da2a03b7219aa52097f5abf
2cd6bf88d5c2a1de68689f9ad442c9ccf0147880
describe
'33894' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMV' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
6c85e9ed33a532bcbecd7947842ab495
bc4fcb54383bbc66fe2eeec0164b575cac821d16
describe
'56758' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMW' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
16be6c937ff2b0a786177efc4b8de0eb
a865392ec6ae14b44a5167b5d1d0a025b45f90cc
describe
'21296' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMX' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
4305273c998f6369fe91748b19c8f288
5f64cc8c3eecb60d1397541f6e1b947dc2aad876
'2011-12-16T20:21:38-05:00'
describe
'80710' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMY' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
c54ac5003baa2cf902502a786122cb93
45a712384d3d269717d75ff6a6a552a6e0b172b2
describe
'28394' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKMZ' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
ba3178aba55f48444af73620e6b6c9cf
60df12084c0b68a0ac67f8b14958c3c793691830
describe
'71147' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNA' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
810f5b2e94693a44e12d4d58486d1b22
3c14d6bb15935519f5759a1f261197349a4bcbda
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'33953' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNB' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
1d86f51cc538699723ce26b57783b96f
a94c3eedc6d7246f2a2776cae1760aa9a8da2ebf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'104295' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNC' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
21edeaef061ea0cfc89c5564b0b9158a
e48614b82e9d6a4b828e6ad109bfe7648a1a4cd9
describe
'34360' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKND' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
7d930a2e6b4112773bf147163e05a936
e1ef66a51fc8244f2abe3b2c9b60ad46bfe2c2fb
describe
'92471' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNE' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
1cfe48f8ffa580d08215bebfe0690179
cbbdbdf6c3b47f134cb7cf3c650f1ad046d05d0c
describe
'33355' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNF' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
e7d799168b8e6ad531f41bc45bac776e
f1fb4fda0b65821bbaa2e1bc019efa8780a218ee
describe
'99923' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNG' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
cfe1d5f31fb3774f789ef4b9c32c493b
d00898b10a397a7dd34bb287511ad1cf2d5246f1
describe
'33112' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNH' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
c9dc87b5b5131a8740dc8dd1f875726f
60deb1b324e0ab957c5dd08cea66d78b3d864791
describe
'94521' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNI' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
e52822212e321e6124632df96cd3dfdf
e9a1ec2632e94cdac0b2033c874d59e4e456c00c
describe
'32886' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNJ' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
62519d8020d2d3db8c0d29cbc7deb577
5b7e5d25aa573950434018539d40b4d18ac01279
describe
'101287' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNK' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
22a7009880c77fd35867dd4c4dd4cee4
d92c4ab13ee2930557a3ab73574827760e490ac7
describe
'36046' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNL' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
359b1cab45f72d87e94fd75bab884e7f
17ac5088c960bbfcbb32eb3267d0f91ef83ad763
'2011-12-16T20:22:13-05:00'
describe
'83381' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNM' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
1c16ada97c5fdfd000408c3579ab8e75
3c798a75faee07d5f98b2d473688aa0ffca4634d
describe
'30318' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNN' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
4d5227769a9dbd7fb2623fbf54a400b2
7d384130bac975e65990bee70760e2800ff69c53
describe
'101919' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNO' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
214eb1f7e81ad5d55dbc863304cdaf09
27102a4b780de7386312df5b9ddf5b22b0b7fa3f
describe
'36049' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNP' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
6ba52f1fc202a1a163d60a4556bf1cd8
891c8c32a6866f6bfc904538de053805be60fffe
describe
'95579' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNQ' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
d5109ebb1cc4adf51253a22c9a8f13e1
77fe0466691986caa5154c77ec2a92e4975a11e9
describe
'33252' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNR' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
8fe24e08efb022de051d658677c0a2b8
f0f6d536fe392cae8617a86ebe13c416fcbc3a12
describe
'98746' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNS' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
89cb6addb92b6cc8d6573606394f339d
6b99d159927716d3324f49fa10220559e93bf77e
describe
'34254' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNT' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
3727b931623d8e5a8046bd9696a6bae4
3cec81ff89792382b7bb2b2b94170f6d0a8b6920
'2011-12-16T20:19:47-05:00'
describe
'93190' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNU' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
84910045aecf2866ff5bd0d4773b3593
4d289d672d89ec4b34225b263eb6d526734a8726
'2011-12-16T20:25:34-05:00'
describe
'33978' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNV' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
195aba78fc9cc149ba01cd1007dcedde
65f21794c25ccc6bf06135735b25f7c5837f18d0
describe
'94989' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNW' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
f2a74513d4cc818c6c3b5c4ca599d947
f6bd1f1e9335cca65b1a4b4ea8038e1cf2f385d2
describe
'33617' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNX' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
1120dd0cca052939b9148e198c02b2ac
0f6da0f29f2c94a4900cc954f86ff9de37952b04
describe
'82679' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNY' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
443b5aa7086002e36fbc05a3237063e8
20d0d0ae6125db22027ac79efb21c6047ef8c175
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37170' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKNZ' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
1e800603c0684dfe3019b878459e3354
2e0e7d0c994eef3c7ab94503a65b61115a900ec2
'2011-12-16T20:19:45-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100547' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOA' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
d8c4adb20d58b2fa584e9b8d55483b45
b6e4fdfd809a9cf334495dfbcf9a88700318e3cc
describe
'36445' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOB' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
9fc2ef4aec6f623ba34e8e69cbf3ecc6
069304ee4a1ff5a2c35fb160ee6b4080a7d4a029
describe
'99765' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOC' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
2889481b03775d26c8062d8d448fbb89
a4f0a25ce7c7eff258e2f64fdc55aa02333df21a
describe
'34296' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOD' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
bb60e03a716e30f0fbddbd8228aa6f0b
d35745282ac14ec55b40688c07d1570f5ad4bee2
describe
'100197' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOE' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
d7ba96a4a7d49a105f45c3e5536ba014
b187b83d6842004845b3aa7fcf42e9c3cf3ed366
describe
'34487' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOF' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
52875cdf29043238ee80fc083cef6e57
d525c8c91e9d9386cbce739e7bc98a313bc2249c
'2011-12-16T20:15:26-05:00'
describe
'53950' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOG' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
bf3429766cafe536cbd101358037c197
a8e2079d4e0ae197625ceab976c672bbd5cb4692
describe
'19189' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOH' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
47888e565a53d0867b0cb1536ab8f4e8
95ca99b5521ed6afd0d958613c9110ab45b52f5c
describe
'87942' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOI' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
44f0185babb448fdb30b7fabf7b40b86
29847aa319973d91adf5318d0441dbee200389ce
describe
'30539' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOJ' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
c3aff48172356208848c9205f7062ff4
d8bbf4b97c57f5b8f34265a633ab43404b7052fe
describe
'104703' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOK' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
45841c6b3b1bbd819ebefeb6a9c1ff2f
d154bfbbbeeed81b0384ddea1b85da7b7a02dae1
describe
'35099' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOL' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
7da730614671dfe9d7abdc4a2fdcbeeb
9e7b50a30c9a10f593335962f415e22e55ff06ca
describe
'100351' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOM' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
440bd76b36a87056e7aa01b2ed818d2e
4f09b630c808050b7033c3c5c7b0cbe05eaa3283
describe
'36027' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKON' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
2904a3af87b26101d7799adaf79bf64f
1c775560ab101fc4447035125b00db4f4ba65078
describe
'101182' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOO' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
71094be4e5533c36305159bfa932bae9
ba293e1ae63889e88e2ddaef32d799570e428472
describe
'34473' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOP' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
f4d69bddc0254d13bd3632c566559fff
f979a6f2b2e7f22450572ee7634942f0ee0a9300
describe
'104271' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOQ' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
293b3d328a0dc22b86ebf54c057f24d5
1a5f31402755411400547baefb850292e3f67cda
describe
'35731' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOR' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
951eddc1961fb53d3967fb74d036c730
fcf44f25a19e04263ef9498e045563597aff62a9
describe
'104180' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOS' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
a11f886505d38c523a21d5ca226bb4a8
7a27bf3e4c4bb7a42fc087d0e011b46f08d842c5
describe
'35207' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOT' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
4b4856ff5aed87a44ea1b392a1997a20
060c256955dc6b5ed532e45b78758f14716e3ee1
describe
'104821' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOU' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
bec04872bef8916a4ebfbd8ced341891
443568f833b45998d7339e55bf6c05bc57959d5e
describe
'36501' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOV' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
0db974e5d3cef07438fef4375adf62a0
44b89058ea3490ec758374ee8cd9cca97c413c37
describe
'105292' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOW' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
a4afd09d6e475105834153f8b84eb77b
d29e7e83aa6af15c0e66360aff37bba97aa9be2c
describe
'35245' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOX' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
e12a00a72ccaf83d124f9daa1d41a193
0592d28900ad13c537ddd1d488c793179fa00c49
describe
'73214' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOY' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
20c11711fee62b694879101eeee1ebf9
2a279274f848edbedf23a349552eb3ce7000c3de
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35405' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKOZ' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
e9fbc4c458a420756cfc2961cf05c09a
dc6b281725e664d81c67bceab80d39a431e99db1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'102677' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPA' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
7917a092095b9dc298d72276fa0fe027
8683fbbb7442873d4fa19c6d6c4cb25a92dee56c
describe
'35169' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPB' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
28b124cd19efafbe3c13bd40ffc38533
0583c404d3d01269c2010d37536a1c9a94c4b9a2
'2011-12-16T20:22:03-05:00'
describe
'102971' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPC' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
400aa06a2d17c0378f801198ddd815ba
de92577e84a1052502dbd84f1798cf90e9cce9a5
'2011-12-16T20:21:57-05:00'
describe
'35313' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPD' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
c09ea975251f0c08ab81aaa5c1ca31d6
267f2a4430c29d10a3ea716e39c97600eef0e2d9
describe
'99176' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPE' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
6f863d18320e1a96f329c9ab24525af9
a6830fe2e9a3431d5abb2dc51ba637b743859259
'2011-12-16T20:22:18-05:00'
describe
'34581' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPF' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
d7d5482bda517818a4025cd0d3e9dc39
4c758bc2997808d95882ff40f85f42cc96a920a9
describe
'104530' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPG' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
fcb6ebd1423e6f6313e71c9b254b4263
278b493558515ac93bf24618f9b1e49085ad66f4
describe
'37577' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPH' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
a163eda66b5b2e67822651d5be6005a2
a14799d79e6c1019fb4f6659969240e0d4e7daf1
describe
'105012' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPI' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
0318fb76336357d7e34d60196cbdccb3
bb3847fd61c76c53403071ae60bf5aca37dcc70d
describe
'34849' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPJ' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
07ce28b8660d0d02622db30ed485edb6
a78e1c93078dc51639b9b97523d2db226fbbcd66
describe
'85468' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPK' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
4af41042663b59c24584239e027ae4cb
2d3f53d2145ae8dd37ea8dd2034ee6da6946351a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38756' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPL' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
74a3553f6e3402c8439f0ca8dd00b6f2
a608f401c78e724c86962f41f8a7a0a61fe59dea
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'104701' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPM' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
2f82e683a6729b62048286b887b18368
6bfacd927aed2a416ded19e670fbd7c5d83a03b0
describe
'35566' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPN' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
ee052f38408a924b314741b36ba686e0
9203d006a0e7e8090e41d81ef357d3a8ff7471b8
describe
'103848' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPO' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
45644434123267558a5725ae18ea93d1
c55466dca6550d1bd52c43f508eee43b324113a7
describe
'35111' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPP' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
6c389524abba60cc69434e95d80a8fcf
956dd77a642bb95e3bd1a27b47f5eba759c2e6b0
describe
'44797' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPQ' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
18dff157e24369ac32ed9132e7e118fa
6e5a020295e41e802042b1effc996a578e2de339
describe
'16501' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPR' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
8a886b11a1e790bdc795637d373beefd
6a66bd5df49bcaf71fa43ad38f8fb79a84397573
describe
'86156' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPS' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
3bd3048261e4329294482bf51420836a
aaec7af8263c516a51774897be9fd17a63ca4ffa
'2011-12-16T20:18:25-05:00'
describe
'30864' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPT' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
f8e6bad0c40fa7e991798c6fcb966b57
a3f5dcbeeb5e7529e8c245e0a62e8b236f49aa3b
describe
'102356' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPU' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
69cb00ed97f51b34bb969d77dd8e032a
f5b8653fabc1f57e60b7d19fcf66ca45edd3e208
describe
'35224' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPV' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
75112b4b22185504ffa116bb6381e2b9
f3446edb940b1ead7e41d6141288bd13b0e6a5c7
'2011-12-16T20:23:22-05:00'
describe
'80516' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPW' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
82dc8be96a06fab0bdc786a43eb7eb3c
39d5c5f546ca9e5c61f751587b137234221623d0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37250' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPX' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
2105f66c1b7348243097be869bfba4e1
90cbe1ba089af7fe6be85d7fd3518ac332945443
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'103076' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPY' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
2a41e46b8c34581085e741fc3cbcab9c
941e8ffeb5a1963ca78f5e92add5bec8ea6dd58f
describe
'34902' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKPZ' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
ffe99eb702fa23e634ef6ca161d55edc
a43a41d30ce7716c2bdf4debf5890267083c0c7a
describe
'93789' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQA' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
fd2d3c24d3568b0e01874e50ba5b19d8
4ac98361368e7311ee0c7644cea14e65703bd613
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQB' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
480edeb3c13d2d2d50a427d4343c4d0e
51573d4e1561fa9f18915d7c6f8ab45eb0abda27
describe
'99007' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQC' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
e6eab6e1032eb601efca7f7da019936f
7ad1851a20720415b955d5d7ec499dc37e29297b
describe
'34652' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQD' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
d52068cf5647c7218da240806fd38efa
8257a22da1e1dea6c7f2a348f76fc74619f1b2c5
describe
'81181' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQE' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
6e734a3d2d946cc4886297fdd10b7062
a6eaf8a8fad3b762c62c0c333a046f9e5bf78209
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37412' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQF' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
4917d100b8aeeb5cb90085758b301855
dcb4e6ed94f5fe78f3c7300eb32bce3972a4750f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96165' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQG' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
5f27463e8a015f993cbbd2dff2818531
84e02e4bf1ed637944a27c7af11735290b2a908b
describe
'33858' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQH' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
8f137a6bc79f780cb17df59eea0a3eda
8cb7ce0a9c9a4b3bb526d2f6e5cde65faf9d2b6d
describe
'89412' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQI' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
75300be6ef45358617bdf4f058b5889d
ce93677e72f8fd0537dc87b24d1383deeedd7f3a
describe
'34033' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQJ' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
a5e75719a847423adf717a17f7b1adb0
151f041843eef0940fd33f812cc412a07525dfb4
'2011-12-16T20:25:11-05:00'
describe
'102718' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQK' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
4fcced6207f6e24c6687b12eccd23a1b
63cb707ee72644775bd90a6c420dc69e7940aeb4
'2011-12-16T20:19:09-05:00'
describe
'34751' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQL' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
00cb07c6665fd165c2771ea729d03148
276620c5bbcd2a67c84863f496d1c50fe79f7b66
describe
'105037' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQM' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
373c8468ef35a922eb5b73e78db1d7d0
136bc92959edad6b7fd7bc9b9cd119beb762bed5
describe
'35379' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQN' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
468e28e100856b612d642cb25edaf4db
ee8c2d9c8d2116bb30fdc7c286de0206430ea685
describe
'103769' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQO' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
7db452e0d0f8d8a7561152d5cd78f8b0
bcc7c1ac8337fa232fa41b2a7664e0f97a2cbd3a
describe
'35475' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQP' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
39549cafa86fb07102aeb29b27864f22
379d1a195998d0f5856e5ce1758f644d6d7f0c20
describe
'97657' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQQ' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
5728fc3ee28511f3a9c999b232b93fa0
3d33c1ad23d1734d02fe5bd956a610f191307289
describe
'35688' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQR' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
21b1cdf552348b1ac68ac8cc177dbe44
e99e2c7fe3aae115921aaa4ce68a8d3e27289c89
describe
'100604' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQS' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
a395bcd65ed869a0e22cc9c632544c8d
c66fba645c8a71b38780a92feb785f19f1591817
describe
'35454' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQT' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
126fb4cc933aecc7c7fafe031e798eee
02baf424d73ad342c215abd244288431e3a98351
'2011-12-16T20:25:03-05:00'
describe
'102535' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQU' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
d5df4d0323ea8c1ae5ce402d8c881208
bf7336fe9e1223e7732db7a8470c02cdcabec931
describe
'35100' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQV' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
391430b551e9a5d58e056e3b8db4c008
c0efbc68a512f6d0634326d7ac9077890333186c
describe
'106395' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQW' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
271496e216f37dac1add31d076128e2e
a9444efdfc7d2cfda3c7a460581be648a9aa8097
'2011-12-16T20:20:03-05:00'
describe
'35944' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQX' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
e18e60f77f24e963398c1d42db0556b0
02f65c5bbaa73e3434813b0384e13d67f278ba80
describe
'104260' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQY' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
b0321c33cbbd3c6e93593da1871327c0
8c39d529e43d2876fc054995f8a46260efa722e5
describe
'35749' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKQZ' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
3b5d57b126da8a3f005b6dc05cfd73d0
586cfbc1b9ada10c3276bdc3d37ee9f2efafbbcc
describe
'104028' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRA' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
df9e63a795777cb3713493ca5926985a
87083e145bbf3872efb538e84cbce2eaa30a9076
'2011-12-16T20:25:16-05:00'
describe
'35295' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRB' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
b6381e671fda6b9fb75cf01f1dcddb66
be4a4c790dd30a4c9f4aa59f4f1afa18c619e25d
describe
'60209' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRC' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
6237f6fa7bf3ee4b717a38feddb31713
8f15f68ada64c9c058d963dd0bf0ecd92bc099b7
'2011-12-16T20:18:30-05:00'
describe
'23125' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRD' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
0aff43c062f24185bcad2ee7278aad98
ae7153c653574dac0fa98576a1f88cb5448acb0a
describe
'81423' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRE' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
3595f434277f1bc4e2b85ff1b80dc8ac
100c9f80b073e5c858b123006850464c38498236
'2011-12-16T20:17:41-05:00'
describe
'30469' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRF' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
1048bf096110422b6c9c85c03e660683
5c60dda0abdd8c1cac1cb8a1284e80f51b003edb
describe
'89391' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRG' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
b20dad149fe450c449ceecc253ec3e00
ba6200434bbf0a95ddd30d3bb4da106dd96bff7b
'2011-12-16T20:20:59-05:00'
describe
'34152' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRH' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
706f9a5c8d522b2fd6985bee03e1f4df
6d36874a6bd2299e0d9bac5971cf67492ffeb8f1
describe
'72243' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRI' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
7d20e86cece6b32c66e8c6d30f7b36cd
3d04ba0fdf0eed4ec2b97678da33737e4e238091
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34745' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRJ' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
89b8f3ad7208bcc8ec35c68193b64441
f2bd1062ee79a279613cd8b6ad2be1dc7149926c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'89768' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRK' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
8daf776cbcdad423e5872282f0a8b65d
b5447288fba181844bcce41df63266ebac295aa5
describe
'33109' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRL' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
9bca692a42ccacf2d83733d200019a51
92c7690e5f471cd1e66b17bf0bdbc341dfab18ab
describe
'95541' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRM' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
9274bdcef4157135629399596822dbf5
3c333c5f3a86aa41c8aafd583d73d90bdab8cf86
describe
'33318' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRN' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
22a652e35668c03cdc13aa6d0ada0f10
e973aa2326c6d03efe6f4a4d8bbc8381eeea7251
'2011-12-16T20:15:51-05:00'
describe
'95797' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRO' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
46f423068c19f0ef0d11e5491be68e41
c2ddf808fd81cd47a93ccc2ca088f20c73bb7e27
describe
'35457' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRP' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
972e3102ead6ffa2098ca5e0845e7c66
2935c0cd7f3a62672d2e9ff63b1208a0f38cb415
describe
'100464' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRQ' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
93219f926fd4c65e707f498aff48c1b1
2f2ed02f283ead523e89b54fd03019152997f331
describe
'35186' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRR' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
4a3c587ee08314ac1d3b08a9001fe918
6dc45149371c0cc173927c67cb61aba36baa18eb
describe
'92226' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRS' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
3e41245402ecc1ee513447bbfdf3b275
1b26edddb8d33d788c4efc8e4029d602ea6e0173
describe
'33940' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRT' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
6c65b61a7e074977ada249942175b154
48d023315f4b316e232d6c61486cc7858e4f58d0
describe
'94633' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRU' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
d58f7663de909886910143c84ffb6222
dc4f9281a3727800cc7ddf6a49285a1e65a7b7f8
describe
'32818' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRV' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
572bf2a50e37f24cf51f71bc459317c1
5a6b4c866337b587a4cb7383583b42004753f7aa
describe
'93265' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRW' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
f6f943b87c598e2f393f885636bc5902
f4f88ad2686ee9fb55ec41937eb2244bfef28127
describe
'35304' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRX' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
0a98fa2a633ebe26c60e20f29ff03d17
6cad4a35c6df7911b0a1beb539e4a11018c77957
describe
'99173' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRY' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
3eb47eee167a238b0e884256f7cd9596
410549a40fdeff38631c238de59352e991703101
describe
'34472' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKRZ' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
1bc39d92bf2f01a30b883c62b59eda99
b9fbd357664128292ce0ec5b73b0fdeafd983455
describe
'97186' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSA' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
ee3cea8f0d25bbe894b24809d1e1ef79
8e7178a98c80ce2454b168e56b758eb012d44de6
describe
'36186' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSB' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
26716f23da8c333602ce41d02139d72f
2c70192fd66aaba689576bb1f359fbd9ecfe8b91
describe
'100076' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSC' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
8ca7b49e62be83f7b81fca029b706716
20879d32674f97085b31fcf38656260b5a374255
describe
'35723' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSD' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
d70de6c5087143522672bbcb397ec24b
1f596e7ebc8fefd288e5fd1a405b12a943d04136
describe
'106271' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSE' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
8a3fad551217caa733801977b0a57108
43a78d43be7f60686059b9c3dbbdedf825b01e88
describe
'36138' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSF' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
9264dfca5035706164d88d71bb902875
b9fae0ab4f88163c9358cd9b2d5790355fd2d80f
describe
'102805' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSG' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
364f7b50fc737b6c67e020c4bb703657
1ab1529b269260c82ef2f10311d96f744263e566
'2011-12-16T20:22:29-05:00'
describe
'34628' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSH' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
f1c96fa7967b6a76a3a4760a0d6c5278
c265b0cc991c68241c923b15f127641389ebd7f4
describe
'104794' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSI' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
476dc4885ff699dac9a1b4f6f2b9efa0
e931e790bc6ba0f82b5484f80b0439aee3619459
describe
'36655' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSJ' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
d71cc11d91ba0b3d937a66538d15e97a
5b15fd6f91177a8c0bb8d73e54ddfa2a2225f6b3
describe
'24604' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSK' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
290935e494f24a429fb1b3037ee35eb8
a12b895081cfd407b9b59953978d1cda4537e2f2
'2011-12-16T20:24:06-05:00'
describe
'10372' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSL' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
d10cfef4ef58f1a7cedb73b08e1a3d4d
665a6a3f2c97a89889903b6d4057af4c6d20f467
describe
'79827' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSM' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
053e4f4203db2fdc4a49765b760ccda1
aa40e4fbe224c79965af21763a5ad73971c04223
describe
'30277' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSN' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
606bcccc7ed8e73e9b65ee445d155927
a1288704dfc539335745b8a954a9921531bd8029
describe
'99041' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSO' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
ca1c9331e1b0ad8fa14ee08e0b2369ed
935a1d1e61f97fb3d48253bb9f67fa835b7a9eed
describe
'34752' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSP' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
25fb637d781b97f4b3c870addec42aaa
8d0da60e7edd4b7f499077c7078215e4cae77e56
describe
'95394' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSQ' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
9e79ee6cbb3e70b906ed6b55ec1cc882
047d15fa5308ec10a5c3e3335bf6ef17d58ceeba
describe
'35570' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSR' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
53acb2da2066de3c51b93f2e680aab01
835dc12585bf43c0a842e883c42acbab843872a9
describe
'92711' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSS' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
a8aafa0e3323e6d3c5a9057f0cccd3a9
00a3486a6556c7c626fcdb95a55a124b64092084
describe
'32736' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKST' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
4a108adebf88f2d1934a6a460f35c038
1c3fb733b5b112a97f28fdfd84236496dfa1fdb2
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSU' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
ac727c5f8bc04aba84a36018eb73ca11
cc0d4c4133eb45d947ca5ebe05486af3ec96adc1
describe
'35571' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSV' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
722b0cd074fe27dcf3d0278e9693cb1a
2e81543f1aa1e2e9a8ce7977dbc8031bc58ba50d
describe
'84715' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSW' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
38243fb2e55f1c7354ecd970f6d20091
25bbd1f41d1e8ff401d6e3874358dfc1ccb4f7b1
'2011-12-16T20:22:20-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38778' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSX' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
a3c2590126d3b89b5347b4098698f549
9d8d3609c4591f8490be0386a7fd2bf71bcf2841
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99614' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSY' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
a3dc4d69afa364c3bd644d1bf4733395
120fe45f2f0cca1516414b58e33e55493c03cfaa
describe
'33300' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKSZ' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
9b00626118c611314789e1536161c8ac
5a4cb686b7bb90866275630be4231b31a9280a8f
describe
'101526' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTA' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
d30a40d22c5347dafbc6b2fedd3e391e
50fe7b6e994fa23689f1cd6c2f72704a5cf74c1b
describe
'34988' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTB' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
fb869017bd598b94cc0d8270bb4f5d39
38041186f4255906eea7e6f67dcf017498651f1d
describe
'82154' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTC' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
b3bf33d267e3f73092db866151806173
a55a520f0e38fdf78214e333e99e9d3fbdc80f40
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'37274' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTD' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
a43ed6fdc140f257ce7393c8db1b47d5
69caa4ea326b397258e26bb0fc93aa703390bf94
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96957' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTE' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
b5e3ac7ee5a4e85bc793e0e4f3a8b5a3
10e2b4d0b1ba31ea4631d07132caa6c2638544c7
'2011-12-16T20:17:40-05:00'
describe
'34361' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTF' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
38d7089bfd3979ce91adc2e0e3af0ff4
10fe38077d57f600397cda2f5267c2b86040a42d
describe
'88731' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTG' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
a8ea25fb64ff669df6e0c14521652f92
c4f8fbf3c7f1ad06701aab6ca2bc68adcb039837
describe
'32026' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTH' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
e45a1320e620573ed4df0262faaab196
b55ca59939102dea7661bbd183ed9b338ceaa24a
describe
'98960' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTI' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
a341d4f0bc2753b89294185a29b58478
d4013ee7d7c3d6b1ee4b2b641a7c0e46e0bc301b
describe
'34389' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTJ' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
4a4da2c5257c26405d970ca665540dee
7ca06cf36089bda9294d8433243a174fa5c01892
describe
'92873' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTK' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
c077c44e52239bc3ea11ca8f54fa78dc
950ab4bd6cfca035a88e55f80372016175378f6d
describe
'32182' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTL' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
ed2c68f599ea40499779333ec20d69fc
e4bc41fd38b6f4c25dd37f98d745dea714263f48
describe
'97217' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTM' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
cbbbf11d79feb19aadded0f4283842a4
25050221ef52d2a124b6a2af79e3385483537b3a
describe
'35680' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTN' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
e6a78b1ed5060b9b15324dc937979c74
8040744b6759fe14a275533dbee2a8d6d983a542
'2011-12-16T20:22:28-05:00'
describe
'100528' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTO' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
9caafeb5f0ce4c6a868ea8b46164966a
9080a5b105236096cf65f36be3715794bd955110
describe
'33632' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTP' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
4a4137e73c298dfa2fba9b5672407944
bfddeec69beca05b8827857e1dc061a3a434caef
describe
'102551' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTQ' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
6b3aa1f6bf289428b500f643f812a5f3
30f8049c6f512262a6777e8dd1279ce4a818eb48
'2011-12-16T20:18:15-05:00'
describe
'34975' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTR' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
66146fd6a86446cd16cf40cb184506f8
9f4cc9e2cd1f2d0be324649ee2fda525dbcd0155
describe
'100827' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTS' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
d3e060d7207e9bd4f084a4f20b0e9d84
47e32d9dcdf64d8d9509e21d9e172d629e95b673
describe
'34547' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTT' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
0ffcb0318bf454050f2cba4c9d197c35
921cb10996dd09e5ae01ecfcbfa01c471f6d9c00
describe
'84807' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTU' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
ea29b08d8a44bd7acc5867207bdb3122
402af328693fd07d4f4ccd63a45fe769febd0d7e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38654' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTV' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
3bf90ec3f6a36988309d664e1e13fe59
6458440dab6d1cb0b331f237fa151ca801a6f44a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'60813' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTW' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
f2b0b94696af7ec6c69f638748daca1e
1a5729d83472c4dc2d94236cd748b02f7dd8cf76
describe
'21427' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTX' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
f07cb1f21db12f77400d455dc99cce8e
fd9b28e6a02815c150268b5653bf9b12222fa8ae
describe
'88379' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTY' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
4f90421d0a648780c5e298d1d24c2e7f
fbe92ab29939336f746699b5f7171d30a9963277
describe
'31155' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKTZ' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
621a472ddc1f7088799a5e86cb023e65
c22cb53a1063050bf5989b65643d5415fda300f0
describe
'93854' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUA' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
195794d70f11f93b6adb40e3b74715cc
b4c5e49dd662a92e6d54937f7f13bde70a3102ac
describe
'33644' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUB' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
fce76e4d6f13e3aad189265817b988ab
0d9e6f7deb0ade4897fb7a4ef3d049303e4f1a86
describe
'98398' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUC' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
e774e023494a5b899f186a646ce636fb
c189107db8d593adea5f65aaf32594a7ed0a9697
describe
'35085' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUD' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
80ddf5b8a0d3c4e58a50bf8841dbbeb5
4a88e27e8e226537738e4d51d9f815b4d8c941ae
'2011-12-16T20:18:56-05:00'
describe
'97726' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUE' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
38eb76d42bde43028570c4c00af38b3c
fef88f28fbf6a91d5a95e9b97ab3bbff7a518bd7
describe
'33720' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUF' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
a6a6495fd613ded4c96f8f745c806a3c
f966e6c2b86cc3be503393b446ea9929cc20ec0c
describe
'101752' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUG' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
48f73a20b827218e7c4ba708eebc6539
2038e1462a3080fef13f7537aa20b1b32f5a9a7d
describe
'35250' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUH' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
1d09c38ffa1d3f72fa839f9435765da0
7ba327676a9ce0d2d7b57903713566c39df1230f
describe
'99686' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUI' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
1fabc9d3d0eb91dba43b1a4caaa3fed9
9e23b51bc15e240da21b549dc8eadae1587fbf56
describe
'34899' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUJ' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
1e63921be8547c68bcd85cb1372809e1
8e7f81ffc1334e75e4a6994eb992c4125371f71f
describe
'87491' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUK' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
094f154b61d6dfc7b96031648b038eb0
661cfd940f42bc043d652d277e875d337ca0cf0a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39725' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUL' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
9a66f46ea74a3c2df5af95c5231257a8
d872b942d9d0d5a2b60f579f027d59999185617d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100789' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUM' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
346dca50c8836bb5b9c3e5ec3cf2657d
10c3147733d925dddc453960c84ce58ef8b1ee0e
describe
'34191' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUN' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
a17e82b88706f077406e8f434829a7e3
ece6b19c04302f6caa63091e3e346eefa6ed7782
describe
'104971' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUO' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
62d57cce5f823660ce6f22e9fbf1f343
3d2605338992fd3a1f9ce8c63bf2298c92c4bc32
describe
'35663' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUP' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
309c3330f841ef7bf78283e1965def7c
0522e7b34a514bd3251cad09c3a28bf132e1b737
describe
'102327' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUQ' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
02db0625f078cc63aa2d04e29f240f60
34e5f96244763a01ad94c4a3eefe64a4e24fecc7
describe
'34362' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUR' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
dc3eba2c78d11c5982af0e9dcf9a2fa5
ff23f90136210c5ec799910f053fd93533131ea2
describe
'95254' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUS' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
7701b55d9feb7845fe8de31f8b38040c
71097cb035e3fe17f8f9039ab953c254d797384c
describe
'32811' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUT' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
f3c1fae3c6cb49b7a0d7ba4b978b5413
ee50a63531b41bb39fa6a2b1f2af4eafd7846d83
'2011-12-16T20:25:09-05:00'
describe
'94104' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUU' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
631eb7290718d48d74f9d38176620aa3
3871464d87d23a35eb134c524bf0fc2645665146
describe
'33450' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUV' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
f803558014adc73be29a2fc0257c7728
c76eef4295d741870645d60f16c55772b036d6c0
describe
'100954' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUW' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
336da5a06ee9e279dc1626d8a3685230
cb192ada48c0534b33e4a8a7dab0ed190c823390
describe
'34644' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUX' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
1884f6b2012f4fa75cddde343bee7b82
53bb9d46cc5feedc631d4bdde870996c48eca322
describe
'95643' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUY' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
6318d30549cc15ed8b14ab3b92df05b3
79347573dd9b593ccd1387c48576ce1ba149cd17
describe
'33210' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKUZ' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
df42fc1e946ceea3f6775a5702d3544a
00527f827a8f30fb203864e518e2cfd97610cd13
describe
'101992' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKVA' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
a745609fe5747d64f8f517b3aa89c16d
67c232df4dfb00ca8f2b8346817ee5a950dac983
describe
'34726' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKVB' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
29725c29c43bcc79c5531f77ad026e86
5c4c0dfc67f6ee887772d36845d048306f69cdbb
describe
'66375' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKVC' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
85be8acff53e256bf472096a1363bd4f
7559be540a53ef41c8fbcb7005757bc943901a97
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'32540' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKVD' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
b60a35d1b3e062a60761154deb15217f
d8ef3d482a5cb7724cd65ec8357804d0ba1798c6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 173Value offset not word-aligned: 153
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'102138' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKVE' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
e2ad6490275e1b1851170005ccc9d7d6
5e0bdf2385aeb4478d3db2ea7c3b9e0ef85f3cde
describe
'34824' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKVF' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
8c24248fb61c6fd6b0823825643c926a
aeed67317e17a3040bec6ed11536fb588b9fafa4
describe
'98501' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKVG' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
894b007335cacd6515891015c2ce8709
3123ff702687650ac2b457a29d7440d8fdabfbde
describe
'34311' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKVH' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
9840dbbcc5436634ca47cc0019dfaafb
dc2f5a8dab87d8e803e41cb4f3fc7639ec3dd9fa
describe
'98789' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKVI' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
39df2964e6fb589cda4b9b522bce4335
0e042daab160032af396dfbdfa51e24a8f50558b
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAEDfileF20080602_AAAKVJ' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
37dcfb4ce533de79f3e04010fb34ef20
50747d0a5123d5c3a3950f70980d909b4c91ffc8
'2011-12-16T20:16:50-05:00'
describe
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'2013-12-18T00:30:01-05:00' 'mixed'
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The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
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TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.









j vis} Hy
anf 77
3 -

bhatt elton ,



Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year one thousand
eight huudred and fifty-two, by

Haerer & BROTHERS,

in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Southern District
of New York.
PREFACE.

———————_++o—_

Tue design of the series of volumes, entitled
Marco Pavut’s ADVENTURES IN THE Pursuit oF
KNowLepee, is not merely to entertain the reader
with a narrative of juvenile adventures, but also to
communicate, in connection with them, as extensive
and varied information as possible, in respect to
the geography, the scenery, the customs and the
institutions of this country, as they present them-
selves to the observation of the little traveler, who
makes his excursions under the guidance of an
intelligent and well-informed companion, qualified
to assist him in the acquisition of knowledge and in
the formation of character. The author has en-
deavored to enliven his narrative, and to infuse into
it elements of a salutary moral influence, by means
of personal incidents befalling the actors in the

story. These incidents are, of course, imaginary—
vi PREFACE.

but the reader may rely upon the strict and exact
truth and fidelity of all the descriptions of places,
institutions and scenes, which are brought before
his mind in the progress of the narrative. Thus,
though the author hopes that the readers who may
honor these volumes with their perusal, will be
amused and interested by them, his design through-
out will be to instruct rather than to entertain
CONTENTS.

eee
CHAPTER
I.—JouRNEYING,
Il.—Accients,
{1.—Tue Grass Country,
IV.—Tue Vitiacr, .
V.—-Stupyine, .
VI.—-Tne Loe Canor.
VIL—A Dinemma,
VHI.—A Conression. .
1X.—Boatine,
X.—An Exrenition,
XI.~—Lost m tHe Woops, .

PaQk

11
26
44
62
80
98

. 116

135

. 152

171

. 191
ENGRAVINGS.

~ OO One

PAGE
Tre Great Ex, . . . . . . 14

Tne Hitt, . . . . . . . . 24
THE ACCIDENT, . . . . . . . 34

WHo ARE you? . . . . . . . 46
THe Lumsper Box, . . . : . . 53
Tue Tire, . . : : . . . . 710

Tue Risk, . . . . . . . . 7
Tue Stvpy, . . . . . . . 81
Marco's Desk, : . . . . . . 93
Boat ADRIFT, . . . . . . - 106
Car Gone, . . : . . . . . 112
Tue Mituman’s Hovusr, . . . : . 118
Papp.ine, . . . : . . . . 122
Marco’s Room, . . . . . . . 137
Toss, . . . . . . . . . 157

"Ban Rowtne, : . . . . . 160
Goov Rowine, . . . ' . . . 169
Tue Portace, . . . . . . . 177
Tne EXpepition, . . . : . . . 186

Tue Drae, . . . . . . - 190
Tue Scnoot House, . . . . . 197
Tue Ripe, . . . : . . 208
ORDER OF THE VOLUMES.

nn pee

Parca Parl,

IL—IN NEW YORK.
I1.—ON THE ERIE CANAL.
Tl].—IN MAINE.
IV.—IN VERMONT.
V.—IN BOSTON.
VI.—AT THE SPRINGFIELD ARMORY.
PRINCIPAI, PERSONS.
Mr. Baron, a merchant of New York.
Maxco, his son, a boy about twelve years old.

Jon Forester, Marco’s cousin, about nineteen years old.

Marco is traveling and studying under Forester’s care,
MARCO. PAUL IN VERMONT.

Cuarprer I.

JouRNEYING.

‘Plan for Marco. Situation of Vermont.
HEN Mr. Baron, Marco's father, put
Marco under his cousin Forester’s care,
it was his intention that he should spend a con-
siderable part of his time in traveling, and in
out-of-door exercises, such as might tend to re-
establish his health and strengthen his constitu-
tion. He did not, however, intend to have him
give up the study of books altogether. Accord-
ingly, at one time, for nearly three months,
Marco remained at Forester’s home, among the
Green Mountains of Vermont, where he studied
several hours every day.

It was in the early part of the autumn, that
he and Forester went to Vermont. They .
traveled in the stage-coach. Vermont lies upon
one side of the Connecticut river, and New
Hampshire upon the other side. The Green
12 Marco Patr in VeRMonrT.



Lake George. Lake Champlain.



Mountains extend up and down, through the
middle of Vermont, from north to south, and
beyond these mountains, on the western side of
the state, is lake Champlain, which extends from
north to south also, and forms the western
boundary. Thus, the Green Mountains divide
the state into two great portions, one descend-
ing to the eastward, toward Connecticut river,
and the other to the westward, toward lake
Champlain. There are, therefore, two great
ways of access to Vermont from the states south
of it; one up the Connecticut river on the
eastern side, and the other along the shores of
lake George and lake Champlain on the western
side. There are roads across the Green Moun-
tains also, leading from the eastern portion of
the state to the western. All this can be seen
by looking upon any map of Vermont.

Marco and Forester went up by the Connec-
ticut river. The road lay along upon the bank
of the river, and the scenery was very pleasant.
They traveled in the stage-coach ; for there
were very few railroads in those days.

The country was cultivated and fertile, and
the prospect from the windows of the coach
was very fine. Sometimes wide meadows and
intervales extended along the river,—and at
J oOURNEYING. 13

me
"Valley of the Connecticut. Various stages. The passengers.

other places, high hills, covered with trees, ad-
vanced close to the stream. They could see,
too, the farms, and villages, and green hills,
across the river, on the New Hampshire side.
On the second day of their journey, they
turned off from the river by a road which led
into the interior of the country ; for the village
where Forester’s father resided was back among
the mountains. They had new companions in
the coach too, on this second day, as well as a
new route ; for the company which had been
in the coach the day before were to separate
in the morning, to go off in different directions.
Several stage-coaches drove up to the door of
the tavern in the morning, just after breakfast,
with the names of the places where they were
going to, upon their sides. One was marked,
“ Haverhill and Lancaster ;’ another, “ Mid-
dlebury ;” and a third, “ Concord and Boston ;”
and there was one odd-looking vehicle, a sort
of carryall, open in front, and drawn by two
horses, which had no name upon it, and so
Marco could not tell where it was going. As
these several coaches and carriages drove up
to the door, the hostlers and drivers put on the
baggage and bound it down with great straps,
and then handed in the passengers ;—and thus
14 Marco Pauu in VERMONT.



The elm-tree.



the coaches, one after another, drove away.
The whole movement formed a very busy scene,
and Marco, standing upon the piazza in front
of the tavern, enjoyed it very much.

There was a very large elm-tree before the
door, with steps to climb up, and seats among
the branches. Marco went up there and sat
some time, looking down upon the coaches as
they wheeled round the tree, in coming up to
the door. Then he went down to the piazza
again.



THE GREAT ELM.
JouRNEYING. 15



The factory girl. — Her orange-tree.

There was a neatly-dressed young woman,
with a little flower-pot in her hand, standing
near him, waiting for her turn. There was a
small orange-tree in her flower-pot. It was
about six inches high. The sight of this
orange-tree interested Marco very much, for it
reminded him of home. He had often seen
orange-trees growing in the parlors and green-
houses in New York.

“What a pretty little orange-tree!”’ said
Marco. “ Where did you get it ?”

“ How did you know it was an orange-tree ?”
said the girl.

« O, 1 know an orange-tree well enough,” re-
plied Marco. “Ihave seen them many a time.”

“ Where ?” asked the girl.

“In New York,” said Marco. “Did your
orange-tree come from New York ?”

“ No,” said the girl. “I planted an orange-
seed, and it grew from that. I’ve got a lemon-
tree, too,’ she added, “but it is a great deal
larger. The lemon-tree grows faster than the
orange. My lemon-tree is so large that I
couldn’t bring it home very well, soI left it in
the mill.” s

“In the mill?” said Marco. “Are you a
miller ?”
16 Marco Pauu in Vernon.



Monipelier. The trunk. Mary Williams,

The girl laughed. She was a very good-
humored girl, and did not appear to be dis-
pleased, though it certainly was not quite
proper for Marco to speak in that manner to a
stranger. She did not, however, reply to his
question, but said, after a pause,

“Do you know where the Montpelier stage
is ?”

The proper English meaning of the word
stage is a portion of the road, traveled between
one resting-place and another. But in the
United States it is used to mean the carriage,
—hbeing a sort of contraction for stage-coach.

“No,” said Marco, “we are going in that
stage.”

“TI wish it would come along,” said the girl,
“ for I’m tired of watching my trunk.”

“ Where is your trunk ?” said Marco.

So the girl pointed out her trunk. It was
upon the platform of the piazza, near those be-
longing to Forester and Marco. The girl
showed Marco her name, which was Mary
Williams, written on a card upon the end of
it.

“Tl watch your trunk,” said Marco, “and
you can go in and sit down until the stage
comes.”
JouRNEYING. 17



The sailor and his chest. The passengers.
eee ee EE

Mary thanked him and went in. She was
not, however, quite sure that her baggage was
safe, intrusted thus to the charge of a strange
boy, and so she took a seat near the window,
where she could keep an eye upon it. There
was a blue chest near these trunks, which
looked like a sailor’s chest, and Marco, being
tired of standing, sat down upon this chest.
He had, however, scarcely taken his seat, when
he saw a coach with four horses, coming round
a corner. It was driven by a small boy not
larger than Marco. It wheeled up toward the
door, and came to a stand. Some men then
put on the sailor’s chest and the trunks. Mary
Williams came out and got into the coach.
She sat on the back seat. Forester and Marco
got in, and took their places on the middle seat.
A young man, dressed like a sailor, took the front
seat, at one corner of the coach. These
were all the passengers that were to get in
here. When every thing was ready, they drove
away.

The stage stopped, however, in a few min-
utes at the door of a handsome house in the
town, and took a gentleman and lady in.
These néw passengers took places on the back
seat, with Mary Williams.

B
18 Marco Paut in VERMonrT.

Marco and the sailor.

This company rode in perfect silence for
some time. Forester took out a book and be-
gan to read. The gentleman on the back seat
went to sleep. Mary Williams and Marco
looked out at the windows, watching the
changing scenery. The sailor rode in silence ;
moving his lips now and then, as if he were
talking to himself, but taking no notice of any
of the company.: The coach stopped at the vil-
lages which they passed through, to exchange the
mail, and sometimes to take in new passengers.
In the course of these changes Marco got his
place shifted to the forward seat by the side of
the sailor, and he gradually got into conversa-
tion with him. Marco introduced the conver-
sation, by asking the sailor if he knew how far
it was to Montpelier.

“No,” said the sailor, “1 don’t keep any
reckoning, but I wish we were there.”

“Why ?” asked Marco.

“O, I expect the old cart will capsize some-
where among these mountains, and break our
necks for us.”

Marco had observed, all the morning, that
when the coach canted to one side or the other,
on account of the unevenness of the road, the
sailor always started and looked anxious, as if
JouRNEYING. 19

a
The sailor afraid. Nature of fear.



afraid it was going to be upset. He wondered
that a man who had been apparently accustomed
to the terrible dangers of the seas, should be
alarmed at the gentle oscillations of a stage-
coach,

« Are you afraid that we shall upset ?” asked
Marco.

“ Yes,” said the sailor, “over some of these
precipices and mountains ; and then there'll be
an end of us.”

The sailor said this in an easy and careless
manner, as if, after all, he was not much con-
cerned about the danger. Still, Marco was
surprised that he should fear it at all. He was
not aware how much the fears which people
feel, are occasioned by the mere novelty of the
danger which they incur. A stage-driver, who
is calm and composed on his box, in a dark
night, and upon dangerous roads, will be alarmed
by the careening of a ship under a gentle breeze
at sea,—while the sailor who laughs at a gale
of wind on the ocean, is afraid to ride in:a car-
riage on land.

“ An’t you a sailor ?” asked Marco.

“ Yes,” replied his companion.

“] shouldn’t think that a man that had been
20 Marco Paut in VeRmMonrT.

“The sallor’s story. His character.

used to the sea, would be afraid of upsetting in
a coach.”
“Tm not a man,” said the sailor.
+ “ What are you ?” said Marco.

“I’m a boy. I’m only nineteen years old;
though I’m going to be rated seaman next voy-
age.”

“Have you just got back from a voyage ?”
asked Marco.

“ Yes,” said the sailor. “I’ve been round the
Horn in a whaler, from old Nantuck. And
now I’m going home to see my mother.”

“ How long since you've seen her?” asked
Marco.

“O, it’s four years since I ran away.”

Here the sailor began to speak in rather a
lower tone than hejhad done before, so that
Marco only could hear. This was not difficult,
as the other passengers were at this time en-
gaged in conversation.

“T ran away,” continued the sailor, “and
went to sea about four years ago.”

« What made you run away ?” asked Marco.

“0,1 didn’t want to stay at home and be
abused. My father used to abuse me; but my
mother took my part, and now I want to go
and see her.”
JOURNEYING. 21

~ Btories of whaling,

« And to see your father too,” said Marco.

“No,” said the sailor. “I don’t care for him.
I hope he’s gone off somewhere. But I want
to see my mother. I have got a shawl for her
in my chest.”

Marco was shocked to hear a young man
speak in such a manner of his father. Still
there was something in the frankness and open-
ness of the sailor’s manner, which pleased him
very much. He liked to hear his odd and
sailor-like language tvo, and he accordingly en-
tered into a long conversation with him. The
sailor gave him an account of his adventures
on the voyage ; how he was drawn off from the
ship one day, several miles, by a whale which
they had harpooned ;—how they caught a shark,
and hauled him in on deck by means of a pulley
at the end of the yard-arm ;—and how, on the
voyage home, the ship was driven before an
awful gale of wind for five days, under bare
poles, with terrific seas roaring after them all
the way. These descriptions took a strong
hold of Marco’s imagination. His eye bright-
ened up, and he became restless on his seat,
and thought that he would give the world for a
chance to stand up in the bow of a boat, and
put a harpoon into the neck of a whale.
22 Marco Pauu in Vermont.

The road. Incidents. The sailor’s proposal.

In the mean time, the day wore away, and
the road led into a more and more mountainous
country. The hills were longer and steeper,
and the tracts of forest more frequent and soli-
tary. The number of passengers increased too,
until the coach was pretty heavily loaded ; and
sometimes all but the female passengers would
get out and walk up the hills. On these occa-
sions Forester and Marco would generally walk
together, talking about the incidents of their
journey, or the occupations and amusements
which they expected to engage in when they
arrived at Forester’s home. About the middle
of the afternoon the coach stopped at the foot
of a long winding ascent, steep and stony, and
several of the passengers got out. Forester,
however, remained in, as he was tired of walk-
ing, and so Marco and the sailor walked togeth-
er. The sailor, finding how much Marco was
interested in his stories, liked his company, and
at length he asked Marco where he was going.
Marco told him.

“ Ah, if you were only going on a voyage
with me,” said the sailor, “that would make a
man of you. I wouldn’t go and be shut up with
that old prig, poring over books forever.”

Marco was displeased to hear the sailor call
JouRNEYING. 23

Marco declines it. - Marco afraid.

his cousin an old prig, and he felt some com-
punctions of conscience about forming and con-
tinuing an intimacy with such a person. Still
he was so much interested in hearing him talk,
that he continued to walk with him up the hill.
Finally, the sailor fairly proposed to him to run
away and go to sea with him.

“O no,” said Marco, “I wouldn’t do such a
thing for the world. Besides,” said he, “ they
would be after us, and carry me back.”

“No,” said the sailor ; “ we would cut across
the country, traveling in the night and laying
to by day, till we got to another stage route, and
then make a straight wake, till we got to New
Bedford, and there we could get a good voyage.
Come,” said he, “let’s go to-night. I'll tuyn
right about. Idon’t care a great deal about
seeing my mother.”

Though Marco was a very bold and adven-
turous sort of a boy, still he was not quite pre-
pared for such a proposal as this. In the course
of the conversation the sailor used improper
and violent language too, which Marco did not
like to hear; and, in fact, Marco began to be
a little afraid of his new acquaintance.. He
determined, as soon as he got back to the coach
to keep near Forester all the time, so as not
24 Marco Paut in VeERMonrT.



The sailor invites Marco to take a drink.



to be left alone
again with the sail-
“ or. He tried to
hasten on, so as to
overtake the coach,
, but the sailor told
him not to walk so
r fast; and, being un-
willing to offend
him, he was obliged
to go slowly, and
keep with him; and
thus protracted the
conversation.
About half-way up the hill there was a small
tavern, and the sailor wanted Marco to go in
with him and get a drink. Marco thought that
he meant a drink of water, but it was really a
drink of spirits which was intended. Marco,
however, refused to go, saying that he was not
thirsty ; and so they went on up the hill. At
the top of the hill, the stage-coach stopped for
the pedestrians to come up. There was also
another passenger there to get in,—a woman,
who came out from a farm-house near by. The
driver asked the sailor if he was not willing to
ride outside, in order to make room for the new



THE GILL.
JOURNEYING. 25

The sailor will not ride outside,

passenger. But he would not. He was afraid.
He said he would not ride five miles outside for
a month’s wages. Marco laughed at the sail-
or’s fears, and he immediately asked Forester
to let him ride outside. Forester hesitated, but
on looking up, and seeing that there was a se-
cure seat, with a good place to hold on, he con-
sented. So Marco clambered up and took his
seat with the driver, while the other passengers
re-established themselves in.the stage.
26 Marco Paun in VeRMonrT.

Marco outside. Jerry.







CHarrer II.
ACCIDENTS.

ARCO liked his seat upon the outside of
the stage-coach very much. He could
see the whole country about him to great ad-
vantage. He was very much interested in the
scenery, not having been accustomed to travel
among forests and mountains. The driver was
a rough young man,—for the boy who drove
the coach up to the door was not the regular
driver. He was not disposed to talk much, and
his tone and manner, in what he did say, did
not indicate a very gentle disposition. Marco,
however, at last got a little acquainted with
him, and finally proposed to the driver to let
him drive.

“Nonsense,” said he, in reply, “ you are not
big enough to drive such a team as this.”

“ Why, there was a boy, no bigger than J,
that drove the horses up to the door when we
started, this morning,” replied Marco.

“QO yes—Jerry,”’—said the driver,—* but
he’ll break his neck one of these days.”
AcCcIDENTS. 27

“Marco asks to drive. Marco’s forbearance.

“T didn’t see but that he drove very well,”
said Marco.

The driver was silent.

“Come,” persisted Marco, “let me drive a
little way, and I'll do as much for you some
day.”

“ You little fool,” said the driver, “ you never
can do any thing for me. You are not big
enough to be of any use at all.”

Marco thought of the fable of the mouse and
the lion, but since his new companion was in
such. ill-humor, he thought he would say no
more tohim. A resentful reply to the epithet
“little fool,” did in fact rise to his lips, but he
suppressed it and said nothing.

It was fortunate for Marco that he did so.
For whenever any person has said any thing
harsh, unjust, or cruel, the most effectual reply
is, generally, silence. It leaves the offender to
think of what he has said, and conscience will
often reprove him in silence, far more effectually
than words could do it. This was the case in
this instance. As they rode along in silence,
the echo of the words “ little fool,” and the tone
in which he had uttered them, lingered upon
the driver’s ear. He could not help thinking
28 Marco Pau.t in VERMONT.



Marco drives. He succeeds very well.

that he had been rather harsh with his little
passenger. Presently he said,

“I don’t care though,—we are coming toa

level piece of ground on ahead here a little way,
and then I’ll see what you can make of team-
ing.”
_ Marco was quite pleased at this unexpected
result, and after ten or fifteen minutes, they
came to the level piece of road, and the driver
put the reins into Marco’s hand. Marco had
sometimes driven two horses, when riding out
with his father in a barouche, up the Blooming-
dale road in New York. He was therefore not
entirely unaccustomed to the handling of reins ;
and he took them from the driver's hand and
imitated the manner of holding them which he
had observed the driver himself to adopt, quite
dexterously.

The horses, in fact, needed very little guid-
ance. They went along the road very quietly
of their own accord. Marco kept wishing that
a wagon or something else would come along,
that he might have the satisfaction of turning
out. But nothing of the kind appeared, and he
was obliged to content himself with turning a
little to one side, to avoid a stone. At the end
of the level piece of road there was a tavern.
ACCIDENTS. 29



The tavern.



where they were going to stop, to change the
horses, and Marco asked the driver to let him
turn. the horses up to the door. The driver
consented, keeping a close watch all the time,
ready to seize the reins again at a moment’s
notice, if there had been any appearance of dif-
ficulty. But there was none. Marco guided
the horses right, and drawing in the reins with
all his strength, he brought them up properly at
the door ; or rather, he seemed to do it,—for,
in reality, the horses probably acted as much
of their own accord, being accustomed to stop
at this place, as from any control which Marco
exercised over them through the reins.

There was, however, an advantage in this
evolution, for Marco became accustomed to the
feeling of the reins in his hand, and acquired a
sort of confidence in his power over the horses,
—greater to be sure than there was any just
ground for, but which was turned to a very im-
portant account, a few hours afterward, as will
be seen in the sequel.

The sailor went several times into the tav-
erns on the way, in the course of the afternoon,
to drink, until, at length, he became partially
intoxicated. He felt, however, so much re-
strained in the presence of the passengers with-
30 Marco Pavut in VERMONT.

The sailor’s drinks. His condition.

in the coach, that he did not become talkative
and noisy, as is frequently the case in such cir-
cumstances ; but was rather stupid and sleepy.
In fact, no one observed that any change was
taking place in his condition, until, at last, as he
was coming out from the door of a tavern,
where he had been in to get another drink, the
driver said,

“Come, Jack, you must get up with me now,
there is another passenger to get in here.”

Marco, who was still in his seat, holding the
reins of the horses, looked down, expecting that
the sailor would make objections to this propo-
sal,—but he found, on the contrary, that Jack,
as they called him, acquiesced without making
any difficulty, and allowed the driver to help
him up. The new passenger got inside. For-
ester felt somewhat uneasy at having Marco
ride any longer on the top, especially now that
the sailor was going up too. But the coach
was full. He himself was wedged into his seat,
so that he could not get out easily. He knew,
too, that two or three of the passengers were
going to get out at the next stage, and so he
concluded to let Marco remain outside until
that time, and then to take him in again.

Marco’s admiration for the sailor was very
ACCIDENTS. 31

The sailor in danger. Evening.

much diminished when he saw how helpless he
had rendered himself by his excesses, and how
unceremoniously the driver pulled and hauled
him about, in getting him into his seat.

“There! hold on there,” said the driver to
him, in a stern voice,—“ hold on well, or you'll
be down head foremost under the horses’ heels,
at the first pitch we come to.”

The poor sailor said nothing, but grasped an
iron bar which passed from the top of the coach
down by the side of the seat, and held on as
well as he could.

They rode on in this manner for some miles,
the head of the sailor swinging back and forth,
helplessly, as if he was nearly asleep. When-
ever Marco or the driver spoke to him, he either
answered in a thick and sleepy tone of voice, or
he did not reply at all. Marco watched him
for a time, being continually afraid that he
would fall off. He could do nothing, however,
to help him, for he himself was sitting at one
end of the seat while the sailor was upon the
other, the driver being between them. In the
mean time the sun gradually went down and
the twilight came on, and as the shadows ex-
tended themselves slowly over the landscape,
Marco began to find riding outside less pleasant
32 Marco Pauu 1n VERMONT.
Bridge. A jolt. Etfecta of it.

than it had been before, and he thought that,
on the whole, he should be very glad when the
time arrived for him to get into the coach again,
with his cousin.

At length they came to a bridge, covered
with planks, which led across a small stream.
It was in rather a solitary place, with woods on
each side of the road. Beyond the bridge there
was a level piece of road for a short distance,
and then a gentle ascent, with a farmhouse
near the top of it, on the right hand side of the
road. At the end of the bridge, between the
planks and the ground beyond them, there was
a jolt, caused by the rotting away of a log which
had been imbedded in the ground at the begin-
ning of the planking. As it was rather dark,
on account of the shade of the trees, the driver
did not observe this jolt, and he was just begin-
ning to put his horses to the trot, as they were
leaving the bridge, when the forward wheels
‘struck down heavily into the hollow, giving the
front of the coach a sudden pitch forward and
downward. Marco grasped the iron bar at his
end of the seat, and saved himself; and the
driver, who was habitually on his guard, had his
feet so braced against the fender before him,
that he would not have fallen. But the poor
ACCIDENTS. 33

A fall.

sailor, entirely unprepared for the shock, and
perhaps unable to resist it if he had been pre-
pared, pitched forward, lost his hold, went over
the fender, and was tumbling down, as the
driver had predicted, head foremost, under the
horses’ heels. The driver seized hold of him
with one hand, but finding this insufficient,
dropped his reins and tried to grasp him with
both. In doing it, however, he lost his own
balance and went over too. He, of course, let
go of the sailor, when he found that he was
going himself. The sailor fell heavily and
helplessly between the pole and the side of one
of the horses, to the ground. The driver fol-
lowed. He seized the pole with one hand, but
was too late to save himself entirely, and think-
ing there was danger of being dragged, and
finding that the horses were springing forward
in a fright, he let himself drop through to the
ground also. The coach passed over them in
8 moment, as the horses cantered on.

All this passed in an instant, and Marco, be-
fore he had a moment’s time for reflection, found
himself alone on his seat,—the driver run over
and perhaps killed, and the horses cantering
away, with the reins dangling about their heels.
The first impulse, in such a case, would be to

C
34 Marco Paut 1n VERMONT.

The horses run away.




THE ACCIDENT.

scream aloud, in terror,—which would have
only made the horses run the faster. But Mar-
co was not very easily frightened ; at least, he
was not easily made crazy by fright. So he
did not scream ; and not knowing what else to
do, he sat still and did nothing.

In the mean time, the passengers inside knew
nothing of all this. Many of them had been
asleep when they came over the bridge. The
jolt had aroused them a little, but there was
- ACCIDENTS. 35

Marco’s danger.

nothing to indicate to them the accident which
had occurred forward, so they quietly adjusted
themselves in their seats, and endeavored to
compose themselves to sleep again.

The horses were well trained and gentle.
They cantered on as far as: the level ground
extended, and then they slackened their pace
as they began to rise the ascent. The idea
then occurred to Marco, that perhaps he might
clamber down over the fender to the pole, and
then walk along upon that a little way till he
could gather up the reins. Then he thought
that if he could get back again with them to
the driver’s seat, perhaps he could stop the
horses. Marco was an expert climber. He
had learned this art in his gymnasium at New
York ; so that he had no fears in respect to his
being able to get down and back again. The
only danger was, lest he might frighten the
horses again and set them to running anew.

After a moment’s reflection, he concluded
that at any rate he would try it; so he cautious-
ly stepped over the fender and clambered down.
When his feet reached the pole, he rested them
a moment upon it, and clung with his hands to
the fender and other parts of the front of the
coach. He found his position here more un-
36 Marco Paut 1n Vermont.

He clambers down. He recovers the reins.

stable than he had expected; for the coach be-
ing upon springs, the forward part rose and fell
with many jerks and surges, as the horses trav-
eled swiftly along, while the pole was held in its
position straight and firm. Thus the different
parts of his body were connected with different
systems of motion, which made his position very
uncomfortable.

He found, however, after a moment’s pause,
that he could stand, and probably walk upon
the pole; so he advanced cautiously, putting
his hands on the backs of the horses, and walk-
ing along on the pole between them. The
horses were somewhat disturbed by the strange
sensations which they experienced, and began
to canter again; but Marco, who felt more and
more confidence every moment, pushed boldly
on, gathered up the reins, and got all the ends
together. Then taking the ends of the reins in
one hand, he crept back, supporting himself by
taking hold of the harness of one of the horses
with the other hand. By this means he re-
gained the coach, and then, though with some
difficulty, he clambered up to his seat again.

He then endeavored to stop the horses by
gathering the reins together, and pulling upon
them with all his strength ; but it was in vain.
AccrpDENTS. 37

His plan for stopping the horses. He succeeds,

The horses had by this time reached a part of
the road where it was more level, and they be-
gan to press forward at a more rapid pace.
Marco thought of calling to Forester to get out
of the window and climb along the side of the
coach to the box, in order to help him; but just
at that moment he saw that they were coming
up opposite to the farm house, which had been
in sight, at a distance, when they were crossing
the bridge. So he thought that though he
could not stop the horses, he might perhaps
have strength enough to turn them off from the
road into the farmer’s yard; and that then
they could be more easily stopped. In this he
succeeded. By pulling the off rein of the lead-
ers with all his strength, he was able to turn
them out of the road. The pole horses follow-
ed as a matter of course,—-the coach came up
with a graceful sweep to the farmer’s door, and
then the horses were easily stopped. The farm-
er came at once to the door, to see what strange
company had come to visit him in the stage,—
his wife following; while several children
crowded to the windows.

“ What’s here ?” said a voice from the win-
dow of the coach,—“a post-office?’ They
33 Margco Pavuut in VERMONT.

Wonder of the passengers.

thought the stage had been driven up to the
door of some post-office.

Marco did not answer ; in fact he was bewil-
dered and confounded at the strangeness of his
situation. He looked back over the top of the
coach down the road to see what had become
of the driver. To his great joy, he saw him
running up behind the coach,—his hat crushed
out of shape, and his clothes dusty. The pas-
sengers looked out at the windows of the stage,
exclaiming,

“ Why, driver! what's the matter ?”

The driver made no reply. He began to
brush his clothes,—and, taking off his hat, he
attempted to round it out into shape again.

“ What is the matter, driver ?” said the pas-
sengers.

“Nothing,” replied he, “only that drunkard
of a sailor tumbled off the stage.”

“Where ?” “ When ?” exclaimed half a doz-
en voices. “Is he killed ?”

“Killed ? no,” replied the driver ; “1 don’t be-
lieve he is even sobered.”

Forester and another gentleman then urgent-
ly asked where he was, and the driver told
them that he was “back there a piece,” as he
expressed it.
ACCIDENTS, 39

re
The sailor. The driver's charge to Marco.



«What! lying in the road ?” said Forester ;
“open the door, and let us go and see to him.”

“No,” said the driver; “he has got off to the
side of the road, safe. I don’t believe he’s hurt
any. Let him take care of himself, and we'll
drive on.”

But Forester remonstrated strongly against
leaving the poor sailor in such a condition, and
in such a place; and finally it was agreed that
the farmer should go down the road and see to
him, so as to allow the stage-coach with the
passengers to go on.

Forester was not willing, however, to have
Marco ride outside any longer; and so they
contrived to make room for him within. As
Marco descended from his high seat, the driver
said to him, as he passed him, in a low voice,

“How did you get the reins? I thought
they all came down with me, under the horses’
heels.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “they did, and I climbed
down upon the pole and got them.”

“Well,” said the driver, “ you’re a smart
boy. But don’t tell them inside that I tumbled
off. Tell them I gave you the reins, and jump-
ed down to see the sailor.”

After receiving this charge, Marco would
40 Marco Pauu in VeRmMonrt.

Instinctive caution of horses.

have been under a strong temptation to tell a
falsehood, if the company in the coach had
asked him any questions about it. But they
did not. They were so much occupied in ex-
pressing their astonishment that the sailor did
not break his neck, that they asked very few
questions, and after riding a short time, they re-
lapsed into silence again. The fact that both
the driver and the sailor escaped being serious-
ly hurt, was not so wonderful as it might seem.
Horses have generally an instinctive caution
about not stepping upon any thing under their
feet. Ifa little child were lying asleep in the
middle of a road, and a horse were to come
galloping along without any rider, the mother,
who should see the sight from the window of
the house, would doubtless be exceedingly ter-
rified ; but in all probability the horse would
pass the child without doing it any injury. He
would leap over it, or go around it, as he would
if it were a stone. This is one reason why, in
sO many Cases, persons are run over without
being hurt. The driver and the sailor, how-
ever, fell rather behind the horses’ heels, and
escaped them in that way, and they came down
so exactly into the middle of the road, that they
ACCIDENTS. 41

Rough road. Caution to travelers,

were out of the way of the track of the wheels,
and thus they escaped serious injury.

The misfortunes of the evening, however, did
not end here. The road was rather rough, and
there were many ruts and joltings; and one or
two of the passengers seemed to feel some fear
lest the stage should upset. One, who sat near
the door, put his arm out at the window over
the door, so as to get his hand upon the handle
of the catch, in order, as he said, to be ready to
open the door and spring out, at a moment’s
warning. The gentleman on the back seat ad-
vised him not to do it.

‘If you have your arm out,” said he, “the
coach may fall over upon it, and break it.
That’s the way people get hurt by the upsetting
of coaches, by thrusting out their legs and arms
in all directions, when they find they are going
over, and thus get them broken. You ought to
fold your arms and draw in your feet, and when
you find that we are going over, go in an easy
attitude, with all the muscles relaxed, as if your
body was a bag of corn.”

The passenger laughed and took his arm in;
and all the other passengers, seeing that the ad-
vice of the gentleman was reasonable, con-
cluded to follow it if they should have occasion.
42 Marco Paut in VERMONT.

Danger. Coach upset.



And they did have occasion sooner than they
had expected. For, just after dark, as they
were going down a long hill at a pretty rapid
rate, with a wagon a short distance before
them, one of the horses of the wagon stumbled
and fell, which brought the wagon to a sudden
stand just before the coach. The driver per-
ceived in an instant that there was not time to
stop his horses, and that the only chance was
to turn out of the road and drive by. The
ground at the road-side was so much inclined,
that he was almost afraid to venture this expe-
dient, but he had no time for thought. He
wheeled his horses out,—just escaped the hind
wheel of the wagon—ran along by the road-
side a short distance, with the wheels on one
side, down very near the gutter,—and then, just
as he was coming back safely into the road
again, the forward wheel nearest the middle of
the road, struck a small stone, and threw the
coach over. The top rested upon the bank, and
the horses were suddenly stopped. Sometimes,
on such occasions, the transom bolt, as it is
called, that is, the bolt by which the ferward
wheels are fastened to the carriage, comes out,
and the horses run off with the wheels. It did
not come out in this case, however. The man
ACCIDENTS. . 43

Foolish fears.

who had put his arm out of the window, imme-
diately called out, in great alarm, “Hold the
horses! Hold the horses! Don’t let the
horses run and drag us.” But this vociferation
was needless. A coach full of passengers and
baggage is a full load for four horses, when it
is mounted on wheels. It would require an ex-
ertion far beyond their strength to drag it when
on its side. The horses remained quiet, there-
fore, while the wagoner and the driver, who
was not hurt, opened the door in the upper side
of the coach. The passengers then climbed
out, one by one, without injury. Mary Wil-
liams came out last, with her orange-tree safe
in her hand.
44 Marco Paun in VERMONT.

Large farmhouse.

Cuaprer III,
Tue Grass Counrry.

re scene of confusion, produced by the
double accident described in the last chap-
ter, was great, but not long continued. The
wagoner got his fallen horse up, and then the
passengers, with the driver and wagoner, all
taking hold together, soon righted the stage.
None of the passengers were hurt, but the
coach itself was so much injured that the driver
thought it was not safe to load it heavily again.
The female passengers got in, but the men
walked along by the side of it, intending to
travel in that way about four miles to the next
- tavern. Forester, however, was not inclined
to take so long a walk. Fortunately, at a small
distance before them, was a farmhouse which
looked as if it belonged to a large and thrifty
farmer. The great barns and sheds, the neat
yards, the well-built walls and fences, and the
large stock of cattle in the barn-yard, indicated
wealth and prosperity. Forester concluded to
apply here for a lodging for the night, for him-
Tue Grass Country. 45



Plans. The room,



self and Marco. The farmer was very willing
to receive them. So the driver took off their
trunks, and then the stage-coach, with the rest
of the passengers, went on.

“ How long shall we have to stay here ?”
asked Marco.

“ Only till to-morrow,” said Forester. “ An-
other stage will come along to-morrow. We
can stop just as well as not, as we are in no
haste to get home. Besides, I should like to
have you see something of the operations of a
great grass farm.”

Marco and Forester went into the house, and
were ushered into a large room, which seemed
to be both sitting-room and kitchen. A large
round table was set in the middle of the floor,
for supper. A monstrous dog was lying under
it, with his chin resting upon his paws. There
was a great settle in one corner, by the side of
the fire. There were chairs also, with straight
backs and seats of basket-work, a spinning-
wheel, an open cupboard, and various other
similar objects, which, being so different from
the articles of furniture which Marco had been
accustomed to see in the New York pariors,
attracted his attention very strongly. Marco
went and took his seat upon the settle, and the
46 Marco Pau. in VERMONT.
Marco and the dog.

dog rose and came tohim. The dog gazéd into
his face with an earnest look of inquiry, which
plainly said, “Who are you?” while Marco
patted him on the head, thereby answering as
plainly, “A friend.” The dog, perfectly un-
derstanding the answer, seemed satisfied, and,
turning away, went back to his place again
under the table.

| Mm td

wei mm \ { Mi .
7 icc iy er [J |





WHO ARE YOU?
One of the farmer’s young men carried the

trunks into a little bed-room, which opened from
‘the great room ; and then the farmer sat down
Tue Grass Counrry. 47

Arrangements for the night. The bed-room.

and began to enter into conversation with For-
ester and Marco about their accident. Fores-
ter told him also about the sailor, who had
tumbled off the coach a mile or two back, and
been left behind. Forester said that he should
like to know whether he was hurt much. Then
the farmer said that he would let him take a
horse and wagon the next morning and ride
back and inquire. This plan was therefore
agreed upon. Marco and Forester ate a good
supper with the farmer’s family, and then spent
the evening in talking, and telling stories about
horses, and sagacious dogs, and about catching
wild animals in the woods with traps. About
nine o’clock the family all assembled for even-
ing prayers. After prayers Marco and Forester
went to bed in their little bed-room, where they
slept soundly till morning.

In the morning they were both awakened by
the crowing of the cocks, at an early hour.
They also heard movements in the house and
in the yard before sunrise; so they arose and
dressed themselves, and after attending to their
morning devotions together in their room, a
duty which Forester never omitted, they went
out. Marco was very much interested in the
morning occupations of the farm. There was
48 Marco Pau. in Vermont.
“Thefarmyard. ~~ Catching thehorses,
the milking of the cows, and the feeding of the
various animals, and the pitching off a load of
corn, which had been got in the evening before
and allowed to stand on the cart, on the barn-
floor, over night. The cows were then to be
driven to pasture, and the boy who went with
them, took a bridle to catch a horse for Fores-
ter and Marco to have for their ride. Forester
and Marco went with him. It was only a short
walk to the pasture bars, but they had to ramble
about a little while, before they found the horses.
At last they found them feeding together at the
edge of a grove of trees. There were two or
three horses, and several long-tailed colts. The
boy caught one of the horses, which he called
Nero. Nero was a white horse. Marco
mounted him and rode down, with the other
horses and the colts following him. They put
the horse in the stable until after breakfast, and
then harnessed him into the wagon. When all
was ready, the farmer told them to bring the
sailor along with them to his house, if they
found that he was hurt so that he could not
travel.

When they were seated in the wagon, and
had fairly commenced their ride, Marco asked
Forester, what he meant last evening by a grass
Tae Grass Country. 49
A grasa farm. Uses of grass.

farm.- “ You told me,” said he, “that you
wanted me to see a great grass farm.”

« Yes,” replied Forester. “ The farms in this
part of the United States may be called grass
farms. This is the grass country.”

“Isn’t it all grass country ?” asked Marco.
“ Grass grows everywhere.”

“ Grass is not cultivated everywhere so much
as itis among the mountains, in the northern
states,” replied Forester. “The great articles
of cultivation in the United States are grass,
grain, and cotton. The grass is cultivated in
the northern states, the grain in the middle
states, and the cotton in the southern states.
The grass is food for beasts, the grain is food
for man, and the cotton is for clothing. These
different kinds of cultivation are not indeed ex-
clusive in the different districts. Some grass is
raised in the middle and southern states, and
some grain is raised in the northern states ; but,
in general, the great agricultural production of
the northern states is grass, and these farms
among the mountains in Vermont are grass
farms.

“ There is one striking difference,” continued
Forester, “between the grass farms of the
north, and the grain farms of the middle states,

D
50 Marco Pauu in VeERMonT.

“Cultivation of grass. Grags and cotton.



or the cotton plantations of the south. The
grass cultivation brings with it a vast variety
of occupations and processes on the farm,
making the farm a little world by itself; whereas
the grain and the cotton cultivation are far
more simple, and require much less judgment
and skill. This is rather remarkable; for one
would think that raising food for beasts would
require less skill than raising food or clothes for
man.”

“1 should have thought so,” said Marco.

“The reason for the difference is,” replied
Forester, “ that in raising food for animals, it is
necessary to keep the animals to eat it, on the
spot, for it will not bear transportation.”

“Why not ?” said Marco.

“Because it is so cheap,” replied Forester.

“TI don’t think that is any reason,” replied
Marco.

“ A load of grass” — said Forester.

“ A load of grass!” repeated Marco, laughing.

“Yes, dried grass, that is, hay. Hay, you
know, is grass dried to preserve it.”

“Very well,” said Marco; “go on.”

“A load of grass, then, is so cheap, that the
cost of hauling it fifty miles would be more than
itis worth. But cotton is worth a great deal
Tae Grass Country. 51

~‘Transportation.



more, in proportion to its bulk. It can there-
fore be transported to distant places to be sold
and manufactured. Thus the enormous quan-
tity of cotton which grows every summer in
the southern states, is packed in bags, very
tight, and is hauled to the rivers and creeks,
and there it is put into steamboats and sent to
the great seaports, and at the seaports it is put
into ships, which carry it to England or to the
northern states, to be manufactured ; and it is
so valuable, that it will bring a price sufficient
to pay all-the persons that have been employed
in raising it, or in transporting it. But the
grass that grows in the northern countries can
not: be transported. The mills for manufactur-
ing cotton may be in one country, and the cot-
ton be raised in another, and then, after the
cotton is gathered, it may be packed and sent
thousands of miles to be manufactured. But
the sheep and oxen which are to eat the hay,
can not be kept in one country, while the grass
which they feed upon grows in another. The
animals must live, in general, on the very farm
which the grass grows upon. Thus, while the
cotton cultivator has nothing to do but to raise
his cotton and send it to market, the grass cul-
tivator must not only raise his grass, but he
52 Marco Pauzt 1n VERMONT.

Northern and southern states. Wool.



must provide for and take care of all the animals
which are to eat it. This makes the agricul-
ture of the northern states a far more compli-
cated business, because the care of animals runs
into great detail, and requires great skill, and
sound judgment, and the exercise of constant
discretion.

“ You observe,” continued Forester, “that
it is by the intervention of animals that the far-
mer gets the product of his land into such a
shape that it will bear transportation. For in-
stance, he feeds out his hay to his sheep, at-
tending them with care and skill all the winter.
In the spring he shears off their fleeces; and
now he has got something which he can send
to market. He has turned his grass into wool,
and thus got its value into a much more
compact form. The wool will bear transpor-
tation. Perhaps he gave a whole load of hay
to his sheep, to produce a single bag of wool.
So the bag of wool is worth as much as the
load of hay, and is very much more easily car-
ried to market. He can put it upon his lum-
ber-box, and drive off fifty miles with it, to
market, without any difficulty.”

“ His lumber-box ?” asked Marco. “ What
is that ?”
Tue Grass CountTry. “58



Lumber-boxes.



“ Didn’t you ever see a lumber-box ?” asked
Forester. “It isa
square box, on run-
ners, like those of
asleigh. The far-
mers have them }
to haul their pro- 4
duce to market.”

“Why do they
call it a lumber- ‘g
box ?” asked Mar-
co



“Why, whenthe <=
country was first THE LUMBER-BOX,
settled, they used

to carry lumber to market principally ; that is,
bundles of shingles and clapboards, which they
made from timber cut in the woods. It requires
some time for a new farm, made in the forests,
to get into a condition to produce much grass
for cattle. I suppose that it was in this way
that these vehicles got the name of lumber-
boxes. You will see a great many of them, in
the winter season, coming down from every
part of the country, toward the large towns on
the rivers, filled with produce.”
54 Marco Paut in VERMONT.

Beef. Going to market. Drovers.

“ What else do the farmers turn their grass
into, besides wool ?” asked Marco.

“Into beef,” said Forester. “They raise

‘cows and oxen. They let them eat the grass
as it grows, all summer, and in the winter they
feed them with what they have cut and dried
and stored in the barn for them. The farmers
are all ambitious to cut as much hay as they
can, and to keep a large stock of cattle. Thus
they turn the grass into beef, and the beef can
be easily transported. In fact, it almost trans-
ports itself.”

“ How do you mean ?” asked Marco.

“ Why, the oxen and cows, when they are fat
and ready for market, walk off in droves to
Boston, to be killed. They don’t kill them
where they are raised, for then they would have
to haul away the beef in wagons or sleighs, but
make the animals walk to market themselves,
and kill them there. But the farmers don’t
generally take their own cattle to market. Men
go about the country, and call upon the far-
mers, and buy their cattle, and thus collect
great droves. These men are called drovers.
In traveling in this part of the country, late in
the fall, you would see great droves of cattle
Tue Grass Country. 55

Brighton market. Horsea, ,

and sheep, passing along the road, all going to
Boston, or rather Brighton.”

“ Where is Brighton ?” asked Marco.

“It is a town, very near Boston, where the
great cattle market is held. The Boston deal-
ers come out to Brighton, and buy the cattle,
and have them slaughtered, and the beef packed
and sent away all over the world. Thus the
farmers turn the grass into beef, and in that
shape it can be transported and sold.”

“And what else ?” asked Marco.

“Why, they raise a great many horses in
Vermont,” replied Forester. “These horses
live upon grass, eating it as it grows in the
pastures and on the mountains, in the summer,
and being fed upon hay in the barn in the win-
ter. These horses, when they are four or five
years old, are sent away to market to be sold.
They can be transported very easily. A man
will ride one, and lead four or five by his side.
They will be worth perhaps seventy-five dollars
apiece ; so that one man will easily take along
with him, three or four hundred dollars’ worth
of the produce of the farm, in the shape of
horses ; whereas the hay which had been con-
sumed on the farm to make these horses, it
would have taken forty yoke of oxen to move.”
56 Marco Pauu in VERMONT.

“Vermont horses. Care of animals.

“Forty yoke!” repeated Marco.

“T don’t mean to be exact,” said Forester.
“T mean it would take a great many. So that,
by feeding his hay out to horses, the farmer
gets his produce into a better state to be trans-
ported to market. The Vermont horses go all
over the land. Thus you see that the farmers
in the grass country have to turn the vegetable
products which they raise, into animal products,
before they can get them to market; and as
the rearing of animals is a work which requires
a great deal of attention, care, patience, and
skill, the cultivators must be men of a higher
class than those which are employed in raising
cotton, or even than those who raise grain.
The animals must be watched and guarded
while they are young. There are a great many
different diseases, and accidents, and injuries
which they are exposed to, and it requires con-
stant watchfulness, and considerable intelli-
gence, to guard against them. This makes a
great difference in the character which is re-
quired in the laborers, in the different cases.
A cotton plantation at the south can be culti-
vated by slaves. A grain farm in the middle
states can be worked by hired Jaborers; but a
northern grass farm, with all its oxen, cows,
Tue Grass CounrTry. 57

Cultivation of cotton. . The planter.

sheep, poultry, and horses, can only be success-
fully managed by the work of the owner.”

“Ts that the reason why they have slaves at
the south ?” asked Marco.

“It is a reason why slaves can be profitable
at the south. In cultivating cotton or sugar, a
vast proportion of all the work done in the year
is the same. Almost the whole consists of a
few simple processes, such as planting, hoeing,
picking cotton, &c., and this is to be performed
on smooth, even land, where set tasks can be
easily assigned. But the work on a grass farm
1s endlessly varied. It would not be possible to
divide it into set tasks. And then it is of such
a nature, that it could not possibly be performed
successfully by the mere labor of the hands.
The mind must be employed upon it. For in-
stance, even in getting in hay, in the summer
season, the farmer has to exercise all his judg-
ment and discretion to avoid getting it wet by
the summer showers, and yet to secure it in
good time, and with proper dispatch. A cotton
planter may hire an overseer to see to the get-
ting in of his cotton, and he can easily tell by
the result, whether he has been faithful or not.
But hay can not be got in well, without the
activity, and energy, and good judgment, which
58 Marco Pavui in VERMONT.

Large grass farms.



can come only from the presence and imme-
diate supervision of an owner. This produces
vast differences in the nature of the business,
and in the whole state of society in the two re-
gions.”

“ What are the differences ?” asked Marco.

“Why, in the first place,” said Forester,
“the fact that cotton and sugar can be culti-
vated by hired overseers, with slaves to do the
work, enables rich men to carry on great plan-
tations without laboring themselves. But a
great grass farm could not be managed so. A
man may have one thousand acres for his plan-
tation at the south, and with a good overseer
and good hands, it will all go on very well, so
far as his profit is concerned. They will pro-
duce a great amount of cotton, which may be
sent to market and sold, and the planter realize
the money, so as to make a large profit after
paying all his expenses. But if a man were to
buy a thousand acres of grass land, and employ
an overseer and slaves to cultivate it, every
thing would go to ruin. The hay would get
wet and spoiled,—the carts, wagons, and com-
plicated tools necessary, would get broken to
pieces,—the lambs would be neglected and die,
and the property would soon go to destruction.
Tue Grass Country. 59

Mr. Warner’s farm. Difficulties.

Even when a rich man attempts to carry on a
moderate farm by hired laborers, taking the
best that he can find, he seldom succeeds.”

* Does he ever succeed ?” said Marco.

« Yes,” replied Forester, “ sometimes. There
is Mr. Warner, who lives near my father’s ; he
was brought up on a farm, and is practically
acquainted with all the work. He has been
very successful, and has a very large farm.
He works now very little himself, but he
watches every thing with the greatest care, and
he succeeds very well. He has a great stock.
He cuts fifty tons of hay.”

«T should like to see his farm,” said Marco.

« We'll go some day,” replied Forester.

«So you see,” continued Forester, “ that the
work of a cotton or sugar plantation, is com-
paratively simple and plain, requiring little
judgment or mental exertion, and a great deal
of plain straightforward bodily labor ; while on
a northern stock farm the labors are endlessly
varied. Every month, every week, and almost
every day brings some change. New emer-
gencies are constantly arising, which call for
deliberation and judgment. It is necessary to
have a great variety of animals, in order to
consume all the different productions of the


60 Marco Paut tn VERMONT.

Nero. The sailor.

farm to advantage. I can explain it all to you
better, when you come to see Mr. Warner’s
farm.” /

As Nero traveled very fast, they began by
this time to draw near to the place where they
had left the sailor. When they came up to
the house, they fastened the horse to a post, and
went in. The man who lived there had gone
away, but the woman said that the sailor was
somewhat hurt, and asked them to come in and
see him. They found him in the kitchen, with
his foot up in a chair. He seemed to be in
some pain. There was a great bruise on his
ankle, made by the cork of one of the horses’
shoes. These corks, as they are called, are
projections, made of steel, at the heel of a
horse-shoe, to give the horse a firm footing.
They are made quite sharp in the winter sea-
son, when there is ice and snow upon the
ground, but they are generally more blunt in
the summer. This prevented the ankle’s being
cut as badly as it would have been, if the corks
had been sharper. Forester looked at the ankle,
and found that nothing had been done for it. It
was inflamed and painful. He got the woman
to give him a basin of warm water, and then
he bathed it very carefully, which relieved the
Tue Grass CounrTry. 61

Forester’s treatment of the foot.

sense of tension and pain. Then he made an
ointment of equal parts of tallow and oil, which
he put upon the end of a bandage, and thus
bound it up. This treatment relieved the poor
sailor very much. Then Forester proposed to
the sailor to get into the wagon and go with
him to the next house, and the sailor consented.
Forester was then going to pay the woman for
his night’s lodging, but the sailor said at once,
—“ No, squire, not at all. I’m much obliged
to you for doing up my foot, but you need not
pay any thing for me. I’ve got plenty of shot
in the locker.”

So saying, he put his hand in his pocket and
drew out a handful of gold and silver pieces.
But the woman, who began now to feel a little
ashamed that she had not done something for
the wounded foot, said he was welcome to his
lodging; and so they all got into the wagon,
and Nero carried them rapidly back to his
master’s.
62 Marco Paut rin VERMONT.





“Forester’s home. The valley.

Cuaprer IV.
Tue VILuaceE.

[* due time, and without any farther adven-
ture, Forester and Marco arrived at the
end of their journey. The village where For-
ester’s father lived was situated in a gorge of
the mountains, or rather at the entrance of a
valley, which terminated at last in a gorge.
There was a river flowing through this valley,
and the village was upon its banks. At the up-
per end of the village a branch stream came in
from the north, and there was a dam upon it,
with some mills. The river itself was a rapid
stream, flowing over a sandy and gravelly bot-
tom, and there were broad intervals on each
side of it, extending for some distance toward
the higher land. Beyond these intervals, the
land rose gradually, and in an undulating man-
ner, to the foot of the mountains, which ex-
tended along the sides of the valley, and from
the summits of which, one might look down
upon the whole scene, with the village in the
center of it, as upon a map.
Tue VILLAGE, 63

es
Yards and gardens. The office.



Marco was very much pleased with the situ-
ation, and with the appearance of the village.
The street was broad, and it was shaded with
rows of large maples and elms on each side.
The houses were generally white, with green
blinds. Most of them had pleasant yards be-
fore them and at their sides; these yards were
planted with trees and shrubbery. There were
also gardens behind. The mountains which
surrounded the scene, gave a very secluded and
sheltered appearance to the valley.

The house in which Forester lived was the
largest in the village. It was a square house
of two stories. It stood back a little from the
road, in the middle of a large yard, ornamented
with rows of trees along the sides, and groups
of shrubbery in the corners and near the house.
There were gravel walks leading in different
directions through this yard, and on one side
of the house was a carriage-way, which led
from a great gate in front, to a door in one end
of the house, and thence to the stable in the
rear. On the other side of the house, near the
street, was the office,—for Forester’s father was
a lawyer. The office was a small square build-
ing, with the lawyer’s name over the door.
There was a back door to the office, and a foot-
64 Marco Pavut in VERMONT.

The village.

path, winding among trees and shrubbery,
which led from the office to the house.

The morning after they arrived, Forester
took Marco out to see the village. He intend-
ed not only to show him the various objects of
interest which were to be seen, but also to ex-
plain to him why it was that such villages
would spring up in a farming country, and what
were the occupations of the inhabitants.

“ The first thing which causes the commence-
ment of a village in New England,” said For-
ester, “is a water-fall.”

“ Why is that ?” asked Marco.

“ There are certain things,” replied Forester,
“which the farmers can not very well do for
themselves, by their own strength, particularly
grinding their corn, and sawing logs into boards
for their houses. When they first begin to set-
tle in a new country, they make the houses of
logs, and they have to take the corn and grain
a great many miles on horseback, through paths
in the woods, or, in the winter, on hand-
sleds, to get it ground. But as soon as any
of them are able to do it, they build a dam on
some stream in the neighborhood, where there
is a fall in the water, and thus get a water
power. This water power they employ, to turn
Tue ViILuaes. 65



Origin of villages. Milis,

a saw-mill and a grist-mill. Then all the far-
mers, when they want to build houses or barns,
haul logs to the mill to get them sawed into
boards, and they carry their grain to the grist-
mill and get it ground. They pay the owner
of the mills for doing this work for them. And
thus, if there are a great many farms in the
country around, and no other mills very near,
so that the mills are kept all the time at work,
the owner gets a great deal of pay, and gradu-
ally acquires property.

“ Now, as soon as the mills are built, perhaps
a blacksmith sets up a shop near them. If a
blacksmith is going to open a shop anywhere
in that town, it will be better for him to have it
near the mills, because, as the farmers all have
to come to the mills at any rate, they can avail
themselves of the opportunity, to get their
horses shod, or to get new tires to their wheels,
when they are broken.”

“Tires?” repeated Marco. ‘What are
tires ?”

“They are the iron rims around wheels.
Every wheel must have an iron band about it,
very tight, to strengthen it and to hold it firmly
together. Without a tire, a wheel would very

E .
66 Marco. Paut in VERMONT.

“The bincksmith’s shop. Wood work.

soon come to pieces, in rattling over a stony
road.

“ Besides,” continued Forester, “there is a
great deal of other iron work, which the farmers
must have done. Farmers can, generally, do
most of the wood work which they want them-
selves. They can make their rakes, and drags,
and cart-bodies, and sleds, and tool handles ; but
when they want iron work, they must go to the
blacksmith’s. They can make a harrow-frame,
but the blacksmith must make the teeth.”

“ Now I should think,” said Marco, “that it
would be easier to make the teeth than the
frame.”

“Perhaps it is as easy, if one has the forge
and tools,” replied Forester ; “ but the tools and
fixtures, necessary for blacksmith’s work, are
much more expensive than those required for
ordinary wood work. There must be a forge
built on purpose, and an anvil, supported on a
solid foundation, and various tools. All these
are necessary for shoeing a single horse, and
when they are all procured, they will answer
for all the horses of the neighborhood. Thus
it happens, that though farmers do a great deal
of their wood work themselves, at their.own
farms, in cold and stormy weather, they gener-
Tue VILLAGE. 67

Tron work. An operation.

ally have their iron work done at a blacksmith’s
at some central place, where it is easy and con-
venient for all of them to go.”

The above conversation took place between
Marco and Forester, as they were walking
along together through the village, toward the
part of the town where the mills were situated.
Just at this moment, Marco happened to cast
his eyes across the street a short distance be-
fore them, and he saw a fire on the ground in a
little yard. He asked Forester what that fire
could be. As soon as Forester saw the fire, he
exclaimed,

“Ah! they are putting a tire upon a wheel ;
that’s quite fortunate ; we'll go across and see
them.”

So they left the path under the trees where
they had been walking, and went obliquely
across the street toward the fire. Marco saw
that there was a large blacksmith’s shop there.
It was a very neat-looking building, painted red.
There was a large door in the front, and a very
low window, with a shutter hanging over it, by
the side of the door. In an open yard, by the
side of the shop, was the fire. The fire was in
the form of a ring. There were several men
standing about it; one of them, whom Marco
68 Marco Paut «in VERMONT.

“The round tire. Tires, Philosophy of tiring a wheel.

supposed was the blacksmith, by his leather
apron, was putting on small sticks of wood and
chips, here and there, around the ring. Marco
saw that there was a large iron hoop, as he call-
ed it, on the fire. It was not really a hoop; it
was atire. It was made of a much larger and
thicker bar of iron, than those which are used
for hoops. It was a tire belonging to a wheel.
The wheel was lying upon the ground near,
ready to receive the tire. It was the hind
wheel of a wagon. The wagon itself was
standing in front of the shop, with one end of
the hind axletree supported by a block.

“What do they heat the tire for?’ asked
Marco.

“ To swell it,” replied Forester. “It is ne-
cessary to have the tire go on very tight, so as
to hold the wheel together with all the force of
the iron. Now when iron is heated it swells,
and then shrinks again when it cools. So they
heat the tire hot, and put it upon the wheel in
that state. Then when it cools it shrinks, and
binds the whole wheel together with a very
strong grip.”

“But if they put it on hot, it will burn the
wood,” said Marco.

“ Yes,” replied Forester, “it will burn‘ -
Tue VILLAGE. 69

"Fellies. Putting on the tire.

wood a little. They can not help that entirely ;
but they stand ready with water, to pour on, as
soon as the tire is in its place, and so cool it
immediately, so that it does not burn the fellies
enough to injure them.”

“ What are the fellies ?” asked Marco.

“ They are the parts of the wooden rim of the
wheel. The rim is made of several pieces of
wood, which are called fellies.”

So Forester took Marco to the wheel, and
showed him the parts of which the rim was
composed. While Marco was looking at the
wheel, the blacksmith began to push away the
burning brands a little from the tire, as it began
to be hot enough. Presently he went into his
shop and brought out several pairs of tongs.
With these the men lifted the tire out of the
fire, but the blacksmith said it was a little too

ot, and he must let it cool a minute or two.

“ Why, if it’s very hot,” said Marco, “ it will
grip the wheel all the harder.”

“It will grip it too hard,” said Forester.
“Sometimes a tire shrinks so much as to
spring the spokes out of shape. Didn’t you
ever see a wheel with the spokes bent out of
shape ?”
70 Marco Paut in VERMonrT.

Bending the spokes.

“T don’t know,” said Marco. “I never no-
ticed wheels much.”

“ They do get bent, sometimes,” said Forester.
“It requires great care to put on a tire in such
a manner, as to give it just the right degree of
force to bind the wheel strongly together, with-
out straining it.”



THE TIRE,

As soon as the tire became of the right tem-
perature, the men took it up again with the
pairs of tongs—taking hold with them at differ-
Tay VILLAGE. 71



The tire hot. Water. The store,

ent sides of it—and then they put it down care-
fully over the wheel. The wheel immediately
began to smoke on all sides. In one or two
places it burst into aflame. The blacksmith,
however, paid no attention to this, but with a
hammer, which he held in his hand, he knocked
it down into its place, all around the rim; then
he took up a brown pitcher full of water, which
was standing near, and began to pour the
water on, walking round and round the wheel
as he did it, so as to extinguish the flames in
every part and cool the iron. When this pro-
cess was completed, Forester and Marco walked
on.

“ Let me see,” said Forester, “where did I
leave off, Marco, in my account of the growth
of a village ? 1 was telling you about the black-
smith’s shop, I believe.”

“ Yes,” said Marco.

“ The next thing to the blacksmith’s shop, in
the history of a New England village,” said
Forester, “is generally a store. You see the
farmers can not raise every thing they want.
There are a great many things which come
from foreign countries, which they have to
buy.”

“Such as sugar and tea,” said Marco.
72 Marco Paut In jv BRMonrt.

Making sugar. The store. The physician.

“ Yes,” replied Forester, “only they make a
great deal of sugar in Vermont out of the sap
of the maple-tree. We will go and see Mr.
Warner’s sugar bush next spring. But there
are a great many things which the farmers must
buy. One of the most important articles is iron.
Now when a man concludes to open a store,
the best place.that he can have for his business
is near the mills and the blacksmith’s shop ; be-
cause the people have to come there on other
business, and so that is the most convenient
place for them to visit his store. And so, by
and by, when a carpenter and a mason come
in‘o the country, the little village which has
thus begun to form itself, is the best place for
them to settle in, for that is the place where
people can most conveniently call and see them.
After a while a physician comes and settles
there, to heal them when they are sick, and a
lawyer to prevent disputes.”

“To prevent disputes!” said Marco. Marco
had not much idea of the nature of a lawyer's
business, but he had a sort of undefined and
vague notion, that lawyers made disputes
among men, and lived by them.

“Why, I know,” said Forester, laughing,
“that lawyers have not the credit, generally, of
Tue VILLAGE. 73

Lawyers. Forester’s opinion. The dam.

preventing many disputes, but I believe they
do. Perhaps it is because I am going to be a
lawyer myself. But I really believe that law-
yers prevent ten disputes, where they occasion
one.”

“ How do they do it?” asked Marco.

“Why, they make contracts, and draw up
writings, and teach men to be clear and dis-
tinct in their engagements and bargains. Then
besides, when men will uot pay their debts, they
compel them to do it, by legal process. And
there are a vast many debts which are paid, for
fear of this legal process, which would not have
been paid without it. Thus, knowing that the
lawyers are always ready to apply the laws,
men are much more careful not to break them,
than they otherwise would be. So that it is no
doubt vastly for the benefit of a community,
not only to have efficient laws, but efficient
lawyers to aid in the execution of them.”

By this time, Forester and Marco had reach-
ed the part of the village where the mills were
situated. Forester showed Marco the dam. It
was supported by ledges of rocks on each bank,
and there was a flume, which conducted the
water to the wheels of the mills. There were
two mills and a machine-shop. They went
14 Marco Pau, 1n VERMONT.
The lathe. The mill-pond.

into the machine-shop. There was a lathe here
carried by water. A man was at work at it,
turning hoe handles. Forester asked him what
other articles were turned there; and he said
posts for bedsteads, and rounds for chairs, and
such other things as were used in quantities in
that part of the country. Forester asked him
whether the lathe would turn brass and iron as
well as wood ; but he said it would not. It was
not fitted for that work.

“T suppose you might have a lathe here, to
work in the metals,” said Forester.

“ Yes,” replied the man, “but it would not
be worth while. There is very little of that
kind of work wanted in this part of the coun-
try.”

After looking at the mills, Forester and Mar-
co walked along up the stream a little way, to
look at the mill-pond. Whenever a dam is
made, it causes a pond to be formed above it,
more or less extensive, according to the nature
of the ground. In this case there was quite a
large pond, formed by the accumulation of the
water above thedam. The pond was not very
wide, but it extended more than a mile up the
stream. The banks were picturesque and beau-
tiful, being overhung with trees in some places,
Tue Vivace. 75
An exploring expedition.

and in others presenting verdant slopes, down
to the water's edge.

“ That’s a good pond to go a-fishing in,” said
Marco.

“Yes,” said Forester, “and it makes fine
skating ground in the winter.”

Marco and Forester followed the banks of
the mill-pond, until they came to the end of the
still water; beyond that they saw a rapid run-
ning stream, coming down from the mountains.
Marco wished to follow this stream up farther,
to see what they would come to, and Forester
consented. The ground ascended more and
more the farther they proceeded, and the view
began to be shut in by forests, precipices and
mountains. Marco liked clambering over the
rocks, and he found a great deal to interest
him at every step of the way. He saw several
squirrels and one rabbit. He wanted Forester
to get him a gun and let him come out into
those woods a-gunning.

“ No,” said Forester.

“Why not ?” asked Marco.

“That is dangerous amusement.”

“Why? Do you think I should get killed
with my gun?” asked Marco.

“No,” replied Forester, “I don’t think you
76 Marco Paut in VERMonrT.

Taking riske. Different kinds of risks.

would; but you might get killed. The risk
would be too great for the benefit.”

“Why, you told me the other day, that it
was a great thing to learn to take risks coolly.
If I had a gun I could practice and learn.”

“ Yes,” said Forester, “ it is well to take risks
coolly, when the advantage is sufficient to jus-
tify it. For instance, when you crept down
upon the pole the other day, to get the reins,
you took a great risk, but perhaps you saved
the lives of the passengers by it. That was
right—but to hazard your life, for the sake of
the pleasure of shooting a squirrel, is not wise.”
Marco had before this time told him about his
getting the reins.

“T shouldn’t think there was much danger,”
said Marco.

“ No,” said Forester, “ there’s very little dan-
ger. In using a gun, you put yourself in a very
little danger of a very great calamity: There’s
very little probability that your gun would
burst, or that you would ever shoot accidentally
any other person ;—very little indeed. But if
the gun were to burst, and blow off one of your
arms, or put out your eyes, or if you were to
shoot another boy, the calamity would be a very
terrible one. So we call it a great risk.”
Tue VILLAGE. 17



The log.

“It seems to be a small risk of a great ca-
lamity,” said Marco.

“ Yes,” replied Forester, “but we call it a
great risk. We call the risk great, when either
the evil which we are in danger of is great, or
when the chance of its befalling us is great.
For example, if you and I-were to walk over
that log which lies across the stream, we should
run a great risk ; but that would be, not a small
chance of a great evil, but a great chance of a
small evil. There would be a great chance
that we should fall off into the stream ; but that
would not be much of an evil as we should only
get ourselves wet.”

“Let us go and
try it,” said Marco. 4

“Not I,” said
Forester. “You 3am
may, however, if aN
you please. I am §
willing to have you °
take such a risk .'
as that, for your 7
amusement.” x

Marco went to ¢
the log, and walked
back and _ forth

across it, as com-


78 Marco Paut in VeERmonrT.

Marco’s dexterity. A fine view.

posedly as if it were a broad plank, lying upon
the ground. Finally, he hopped across it on one
foot, to show Forester his dexterity. Forester
was surprised. He did not know how much
skill in such feats Marco had acquired by his
gymnastics in New York.

After this, Forester and Marco clambered up
some rocks on an elevated summit, where they
had a fine view of the village below them.
They could trace the river, winding through
the valley, with the green intervals on both
sides of it. They could see the village and the
streets, with the spire of the meeting-house in
the center. The mill-pond was in full view
also; and Marco’s attention was attracted by
a boat, which he saw gliding over the surface
of the water.

“QO! there is a boat,” said Marco.

Yes,” said Forester. “I have paddled over
the water many a time in her.”

“How many oars does she pull?” asked
Marco.

“Oars ?” said Forester, “no oars; they use
paddles.” .

“TI wish they had some oars,” said Marco,
“and then I would get a crew of boys, and
teach them to manage a boat man-o’-war
fashion.”
Tue VILLAGE. 79

The boat.

“How do you know any thing about it?”
asked Forester.

“O, I learned at New York, in the boats at
the Battery.”

“ Well,” said Forester, “ we'll have some oars
made, and get a crew. I should like to learn
myself.”

“Let us go down and see the boat,” said
Marco, “ now.”

“ No,” replied Forester, “it is time to go to
dinner now; but we'll come and see the boat
the next time we go to take a walk.”

So Marco and Forester came down the hill,
and thence went across the fields home to din-
ner. They dined at half-past twelve o’clock,
which seemed a very strange hour to Marco.
80 Marco Pau. in VeEerRMonrT.

The back office. Books.

CHarrer V.
StrupyiIne.

HE little building where Forester’s father
had his office, had a small back room in
it, which opened from the office proper, and
which was used as a library and private study.
It had a small fire place in it, and there was a
table in the middle of the room, with a large
portable writing-desk upon it. This desk was
made of rosewood. The sides of the room were
lined with book-shelves. There was one large
window which looked upon the yard and gar-
den behind. The books in this room were
principally law-books, though there were some
books of history and travels, and great diction-
aries of various kinds. Forester conducted
Marco into this room, a day or two after their
arrival in the village, saying, ,
“Here, Marco, this is to be our study. How
do you like it ?”
“Very well,” said Marco. “It is a very
pleasant room. Am] to study all these books ?”
Srupyine. 81



Marco’s desk.



“ Not more than one at a time, at any rate,”
said Forester.

“ This is my place, I suppose,” said Marco ;
and so saying he sat down in a great arm-chair,
before the portable writing-desk, which was
open on the table.

SS
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f}

we
\X

Y
Z
aot

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=5

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7

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- THE STUDY.

“No,” said Forester, “that is my place. I
am going to arrange your establishment near
the window. James has gone to bring your
desk now.”

:
82 Marco Pauu in VERMONT.

ee
Forester’s arrangements. Ink, paper and pens.

While he was speaking, the door opened, and
James, the young man who lived at Forester’s
father’s came in, bringing a desk. It was
painted blue, and had four legs. These legs
were of such a length as to make the desk just
high enough for Marco. James put it down, at
Forester’s direction, near the window. It
was placed with the left side toward the win-
dow, so that the light from the window would
strike across the desk from left to right. This
is the most convenient direction for receiving
light when one is writing. Forester then placed
a chair before the desk, and Marco went into
the house and brought out all the books and
papers which he had, and arranged them neatly
in his desk. While he was gone, Forester took
an inkstand and a sand-box out of a closet by
the side of the fire, and filled them both, and
put them on the desk. He also placed in the
desk a supply of paper, in quarter sheets. After
Marco had come back, and had put in his
books and papers, Forester gave him a ruler
and:a lead pencil ; also a slate and half a dozen
slate pencils ; also a piece of sponge and a piece
of India-rubber. He gave him besides a little
square phial, and sent him to fill it with water,
STUDYING. 83

Marco’s questions. A bunch of pens,

so that he might have water always at hand to
wet his sponge with.

“Now is that all you will want?” asked
Forester.

“ Why, yes, I should think so,” said Marco.
“If I should want any thing else, I can ask
you, you know. You are going to stay here
and study too ?”

“ Yes,” said Forester ; “but your asking me
is just what I wish to avoid. I wish to arrange
it so that we shall both have our time to our-
selves, without interruption.”

“ But I shall have to ask you questions when
I get into difficulty,” said Marco.

“No,” said Forester, “1 hope not. I mean
to contrive it so that you can get out of diffi-
culty yourself. Let me see. You will want
some pens. I will get a bunch of quills and
make them up into pens for you.”

“ What, a whole bunch ?” said Marco.

“ Yes,” replied Forester. “I don’t wish to
have you come to me, when I am in the midst
of a law argument, to get me to make a pen.”

Steel pens were very little used in those days.

While Forester was making the pens, he said,

“ There are twenty-five quills ina bunch. I
shall tie them up, when they are ready, into
84: Marco Pau.t in VERMONT.

Rules for Marco. . Various arrangements,

two bunches, of about a dozen in each. These
you will put in your desk. When you want a
pen, you will draw one out of the bunches and
use it. You must not stop to look them over,
to choose a good one, but you must take any
one that comes first to hand, because, if any one
should not be good, the sooner you get it out
and try it, and ascertain that it is not good, the
sooner you will get it out of the way.”

“ Well,” said Marco, “and what shall I do
with the bad ones ?”

“Wipe them clean,—by the way, you must
have a good penwiper,—and then put them to-
gether in a particular place in your desk.
When you have thus used one bunch, tie them
up and lay the bunch on my desk to be mended,
and then you can go on using the other bunch.
This will give me opportunity to choose a con-
venient time to mend the first bunch again.
When I have mended them, I will tie them up
and Jay them on your desk again. Thus you
will always have a supply of pens, and I shall
never be interrupted to mend one. This will
be a great deal more convenient, both for you
and for me.”

“Only it will use up a great many more
pens,” replied Marco.
StTupyIne. 85
Recese. A difficulty.

“No,” said Forester; “not at all. We shall
have more in use at one time, it is true, but the
whole bunch may last as long as if we had only
one cut at a time.

“We shall begin to study,” continued For-
ester, “at nine o'clock, and leave off at twelve.
That will give you half an hour to run about
and play before dinner.”

“ And a recess ?” said Marco,—“I ought to
have a recess.”

“Why, there’s a difficulty about a recess,”
said Forester. “I shall have it on my mind
every day, to tell you when it is time for the
recess, and when it is time to come in.”

“Ono,” replied Marco, “I can find out when
it is time for the recess. Let it be always at
ten o’clock, and I can look at the watch.”

Marco referred to a watch belonging to For-
ester’s father, which was kept hung up over the
mantel-piece in their little study.

“I think it probable you would find out when
it was time for the recess to begin,” said For-
ester, “but you would not be so careful about
the end of it. You would get engaged in play,
and would forget how the time was passing,
and I should have to go out and call you in.”

“Couldn’t you have a little bell ?” said Marco.
86 Marco Pauu «in VERMONT.



Various plans. Forester’s ideas.



“ But I don’t wish to have any thing of that
kind to do,” said Forester. “I am going to in-
struct you half an hour every morning, begin-
ning at nine o’clock, and I want to have it all
so arranged, that after that, I shall be left en-
tirely to myself, so that can go on with my
studies, as well as you with yours. If we can
do this successfully, then, when noon comes, I
shall feel that 1 have done my morning’s work
well, and you and I can go off in the afternoon
on all sorts of expeditions. But if I have to
spend the whole morning in attending to you,
then I must stay at home and attend to my own
studies in the afternoon.”

“ Well,” said Marco, “I think I can find out
when to come in.”

“ We'll try it one or two mornings, but I have
no idea that you will succeed. However, we
can give up the plan if we find that you stay
out too long. You may have five minutes’ re-
cess every day, at eleven o'clock. On the
whole it shall be ten minutes. And this shall
be the plan of your studies for the morning. At
nine o’clock, I shall give you instruction for half
an hour. Then you may study arithmetic for
one hour; then write half an hour; then have
a recess for ten minutes ; then read for the rest
Strupyine. 87
=»

Directions about studying. The schedule.

of the last hour. That will bring it to twelve
o'clock.”

“But I can’t study arithmetic, alone,” said
Marco.

“ Yes,” said Forester, “I shall show you how,
in the first half-hour when I am giving you my
instructions. Now, are you willing really to
try to carry this system into effect, pleasantly
and prosperously ?”

“Yes,” said Marco, “I'll try.”

“We shall find some inconveniences and
troubles at first, I have no doubt,” said Forester ;
“but if we are patient and persevering, we
shall soon make the system go smoothly.”

Forester then said, that as Marco might for-
get what he had to do each hour, he would
make a sort of map of the hours, with the name
of the study which he was to pursue marked in
each. This he called a schedule. The sched-
ule, when it was completed, was as follows:

XI

go foo tg
Eley

This schedule was drawn neatly on a piece

Ix.

ms
iA

Instruction. -
Arithmetic. ><.

Writing.


88 Marco Paut tn VERMONT.
oe

—____SSSSSSSSSssSsSsseS
Forester a teachor. The writing-book.

of paper, and fastened with wafers to the under
side of the lid of Marco’s desk, so that he could
look at it at any time, by opening his desk.

It was in the afternoon that this conversation
was held, and these preparations made. The
next morning, at nine o'clock, Marco and For-
ester went into the little study, and Forester
gave him his instructions. He took his arith-
metic, and explained to him how to perform
some examples, under one of the rules. Fores-
ter performed one or two of them himself, ex-
plaining very particularly all the steps. He
then rubbed out his work, and directed Marco
to perform them by himself in the same man-
ner. “If you succeed in doing these right,” said
he, “ you may set yourself some others of the
same kind, with different numbers, and perform
those too. If you get into any difficulty, you
must not ask me, but you may set yourself
sums in addition, and spend the rest of the hour
in doing them. That, you can certainly do
without help.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “I can do that.”

“ The next half-hour is for writing,” said For-
ester. “I will set you some copies.”

So Forester took a writing-book, which he
had prepared, and wrote Marco some copies,
SrTupyi na. 89
‘Gopiss (ttt”t”*~ one on the top of each page. Marco looked
over him while he wrote. It is very important
that a child should see his teacher write his
copies, for thus he will see how the letters
should be formed. Forester wrote four or five
copies for Marco, and while he was writing
them he gave him particular instructions about
the manner of holding his pen, and shaping the
letters.

“ Now,” said Forester, “ you can not pos-
sibly have occasion to come to me about your
writing ; for here are pages enough for you to
write upon for several days, and you have plen-
ty of pens.”

“ But I should think you would want to see
whether I write it well,” said Marco.

“J shall examine it carefully to-morrow
morning,” said Forester.

“ Very well,” said Marco; “ after the writing
will come the recess.”

“ Yes,” said Forester, “ and then the reading.”

“ What shall I read ?” asked Marco. -

Forester then rose and. went to one of the
book-shelves, where there was a set of books,
entitled the American Encyclopedia. There
were thirteen octavo volumes in the set. It
was rather too high for Marco to reach it, and
90 Masco Paut in VERMONT.

Marco’s reading-book. Memoranda to be made.

so Forester took all the volumes down and
placed them on a lower shelf, not far from the
window, in a place where Marco could get easy
access to them.

“There,” said Forester; “there is your li-
brary. The American Encyclopedia is a sort
of a dictionary. When your reading hour
comes, you may take down any volume of this
Encyclopedia, and turn to any article you
please. Or you may think of any subject that
you would like to read about, as for instance,
boat, cannon, camel, eagle, trout, horse, or any
other subject, and take down the proper vol-
ume and find the article. You can find it by
the letters which are printed on the backs of
the volumes.”

“Let us look now,’ said Marco, “ and see
what it says about trouts.”

“No, not now,” replied Forester; “when
your reading hour comes, you may read what
you choose. Only you must have a piece of
~paper at hand, and write upon it the title of
every article which you read, and show it to
me the next morning, because I shall wish to
know what you have been reading, and perhaps
to question you about it. Now you understand
your work, do you not ?”
STuDYING. 91

Marco not to be watched.





“Yes,” said Marco; “ and what are you go-
ing to do?”

“0, I’m going to study my law-books.”

“Shall you stay here and study ?”

“ Yes,” replied Forester, “I shall be here most
of the time. Sometimes I shall be called into
the other room, perhaps, on business with my
father; but that need not make any difference
with you.”

“Only, then there will be nobody to watch
me,” said Marco.

“©, I shall not watch you any, even when |
am here. I shall pay no attention to you at all.
I can judge to-morrow morning, when I come
to look at your work and give you new instruc-
tions, whether you have been industrious or not.
Even if I accidentally see you doing any thing
wrong, I shall not probably say any thing about
it. I shall remember it, and speak to you about
it to-morrow morning, in my half-hour. I shall
do everything in my half-hour.”

Marco felt somewhat relieved, to think that
he was not going to be under a very rigid ob-
servation in his studies.

“T do not expect,” said Forester, “that you
will do very well for the first few days. It will
take some time to get this system under full
92 Marco Paut in Vermont.

Marco’s promises. Ab answer.

operation. I presume that you will come to me
as many as ten times the first day.”

“O, no,” said Marco, “I don’t mean to come
to you once.”

“ You will,—I have no doubt. What shall 1
say to youif you do? Will it be a good plan
for me to answer your question ?”

“ Why, no,” said Marco, “I suppose not.”

“ And yet, if I refuse to answer, it will not be
very pleasant to you. It will put you out of
humor.”

“No,” said Marco.

“T will have one invariable answer to give
you,” said Forester. “It shall be this,—Act
according to your own judgment. That will
be a little more civil than to take no notice of
your question at all, and yet it will preserve our
principle,—that I am to give you no assistance
except in my half-hour. Then, besides, I will
keep an account of the number of questions you
ask me, and see if they do not amount to ten.”

By this time Forester’s half-hour was out,
and Marco went to his desk.

“There’s one thing,” said Marco, “before I
begin :—may I have the window open ?”

“ Act according to your own judgment,” said
Forester, “and there is one question asked.”
STuDYING. 93

Coming to an understanding.

So Forester made one mark upon a paper which
he had upon the table.

“ But, cousin Forester, it is not right to count
that, for I had not begun.”

Forester made no reply, but began arranging
his note-books, as if he was about commencing
his own studies. Marco looked at him a mo-
ment, and then he
rose and_ gently
opened the window
and began his
work.

Marco was but
little accustomed
to solitary study, ;
and, after perform- "WHiAg
ing one of the ex- 7j
amples which For -
ester had given
him, he thought he
was tired, and he
began to look out the window and to play with
his pencil. He would lay his pencil upon the
upper side of his slate, and let it roll down. As
the pencil was not round, but polygonal in its
form, it made a curious clicking sound in roll-
ing down, which amused Marco, though it dis-





MARCO’S DBSE.
94 Marco Pauu in VERMONT.

eC
Marco’s amusement. He loses his pencil.



turbed and troubled Forester. Whatever may
have been the nice peculiarities in the delicate
mechanism of Forester’s ear, and of the nerves
connected with it, compared with that of Mar-
co’s, by which the same sound produced a sen-
sation of pleasure in one ear, while it gave only
pain in the other, it would require a very pro-
found philosopher to explain. But the effect
was certain. Forester, however, did not speak,
but let Marco roll his pencil down the slate
as long as he pleased.

This was not long, however; Marco soon
grew tired of it, and then began to look out the
window. There was a little staple in the
window sill, placed there as a means of fas-
tening the blind. Marco pushed the point of
his pencil into this staple, in order to see if it
would go through. It did go through in an in-
stant, and slipping through his fingers, it fell out
of the window.

“Dear me! there goes my pencil. My pen-
cil has dropped out of the window, cousin For-
ester ; shall I go out and get it ?”

“ Act according to your own judgment,” said
Forester. At the same time he was saying
this, he made another mark upon his paper.

“Why, vou ought not to count that, cousin
STUDYING. 95

Marco goes out for his pencil.

Forester,” said Marco, “for I don’t know
whether you'd wish me to go and get that pen-
cil, or take another out of my desk.”

“ Act according to your own judgment,” re-
plied Forester.

Marco looked perplexed and troubled. In
fact, he was a little displeased to find that For-
ester would not answer him. He thought that
it was an unforeseen emergency, which Forester
ought to have considered an exception to his
rule. But he was obliged to decide the ques-
tion for himself, and he concluded to go out for
his pencil. It took him some time to find it in
the grass, and after he had found it, he stopped
for'some time longer, to watch some ants which
were passing in and out, at the entrance to
their nest, each one bringing up a grain of sand
in his forceps. When Marco came in, he found
that his hour for arithmetic was so nearly ex-
pired, that he should not have time to finish
another sum, if he should begin it; so he put
his arithmetical apparatus away, and took out
his writing-book.

Marco went through the whole forenoon
pretty much in the same way. He spent a
large part of his time in looking out of the win-
dow and about the room. ' He went out at the
96 Marco Pauvt in VERMONT.

Forester satisfied with Marco.

time for the recess, but he stayed out twenty
minutes instead of ten. He was astonished,
when he came in, to see how rapidly the time
had passed. He then took down a volume of
the Encyclopedia, and read until twelve o’clock,
and then, leaving the volume of the Encyclo-
pedia and his writing-book on his desk, he told
Forester that the study hours were over, and
went away.

The next morning, at nine, Forester asked
him how he had got along the day before.
Marco had the frankness to admit that he did
not get along very well.

“Still,” said Forester, “ I am well satisfied on
the whole. You did very well for a first ex-
periment. In the first place, you did really
make some effort to. carry out my plan. You
kept the reckoning of the hours, and changed
your studies at the appointed time. You did
not speak to me more than three or four times,
and then you acquiesced pretty good-naturedly
in my refusing to help you. To-day you will
do better, I have no doubt, and to-morrow better
still. And thus, in the course of a week, I have
great confidence that you will learn to study for
three hours by yourself, to good advantage.”

“ Two hours and a half it is,” said Marco.
Stupyine. 97

Marco's recreations.



“Yes,” said Forester.

It resulted as Forester predicted. Marco,
finding that Forester was disposed to be pleased
with and to commend his efforts, made greater
efforts every day, and, in the course of a week,
he began to be a very respectable student. In
the afternoon he used to ramble about, some-
times with Forester, and sometimes alone. He
was very fond of fishing, and Forester used to
allow him to go to certain parts of the river,
where the water was not deep, alone, trusting
to his word that he would confine himself
strictly to the prescribed bounds.

a
98 Marco Pauu in Vermont.

Marco’s character.

Crarrer VI,
Tur Loe Canor.

KY’ thing went on very prosperously,
for a week or two, in the little study.
Marco became more and more attentive to his
studies, and more and more interested in them.
He was often getting into little difficulties, it is
true, and giving trouble to his uncle and aunt;
but then he generally seemed sorry afterward
for the trouble which he had thus occasioned,
and he bore reproof, and such punishments as
his cousin thought it necessary to inflict, with
so much good-humor, that they all readily for-
gave him for his faults and misdemeanors.

One day, however, about a fortnight after
he had commenced his studies, he got led away,
through the influence of a peculiar temptation,
into a rather serious act of transgression, which
might have been followed by very grave con-
sequences. The circumstances were these.
He had commenced his studies as usual, after
having received his half-hour’s instruction from
Forester, and was in the midst of the process
Tae Loa Canog. 99
A fraction. Forester goes away.

of reducing the fraction $44 to its lowest terms,
when he happened to look out of the window
and to see two boys climbing over a garden
fence belonging to one of the neighbor’s houses,
at a little distance in the rear of his uncle’s
house. It was a very pleasant morning, and
Marco had the window open ; so he could see
the boys very plainly. They stopped on the
farther side of the fence which they had got
over, and though they were partially concealed
by the fence, yet Marco could plainly perceive
that they were busily employed in doing some-
thing there, though he could not imagine what.
He wished very much to go and see; but he
knew that it would be in vain to make request
for permission, and so he contented himself
with watching them.

Just at this moment his uncle opened the
door which led into the little study, and asked
Forester if he would step into the office. For-
ester did so; and then, after a few minutes, he
returned, put up his books, and said that he had
got to go away, and that perhaps he should not
be back till noon. Marco had often been left
alone at his studies for a time, but never for a
whole morning before. He knew that he was
to go on with his work just as if Forester had
2100 Marco Paut in VERMONT.

A mystery.

A
remained. So Forester bade him good morn-
ing, and then went away.

Marco watched the boys, wondering more
and more what they could be doing. They
kept stooping down to the ground, and moving
about a little, as if they were planting seeds.
But as it was entirely the wrong season for any
such work, Marco concluded that they must
be hiding something in the ground. “ Per-
haps,” said he to himself, “they have been
stealing some money, and are burying it. I
wish I could go and see.”

If there had been a door leading directly
from the study into the yard, Marco would
have left his studies and have gone out at once;
but as it was, he could not get out without
going through the office where his uncle was
sitting. At last the thought struck him that he
might jump out the window. He felt some
hesitation at taking this step, but finally he
concluded that he would do it, and just go near
enough to see what the boys were hiding, and
exactly where they were putting it, so that he
could go afterward and find it without fail. He
determined to return then immediately.

“J shall not be out longer than five minutes,”
Tus Loc Canog. 10]

Marco goes out to see the boys.

said he to himself, “and I will let it go for my
recess.”

So he took his cap from the nail where he
was accustomed to hang it, while he was at his
studies, and then climbing out the window, feet
foremost, he let himself down gently to the
ground. He then crept slyly along through the
yards and gardens, until he got pretty near the
place where the boys were at work. The mys-
tery, however, was rather increased than di-
minished by the near view. He could make
nothing of the operations which they were en-
gaged in; and while he was hesitating whether
to go nearer, one of the boys happened to look
up and spied him. Marco had intended to keep
himself concealed by a tree, behind which he
had taken his station, but the boy having looked
up suddenly, at a moment when he happened
to be off his guard, saw him before he had time
to draw back under the cover he had chosen.

“ Holloa, Marco,” said the boy, “come here.”

Marco was astonished at this frank and open
invitation. He had expected that the boys,
when they saw him, would have dropped at
once behind the fence to conceal themselves,
or that they would have caught up what he
supposed they were burying, and have run
102 Marco Pauu in Vermont.

“Mystery explained. = =—s—=*=<“*‘* gd ewoltio,
away. Their accosting him in this fearless
manner deranged his ideas about their probable
object, and increased his curiosity to know
what they were doing. So he came forth from
his concealment and went toward them. When
he reached the spot, the mystery was suddenly
dispelled by his finding out that they were dig-
ging worms for bait, to go a-fishing.

Marco’s curiosity was now changed to eager
desire. The boys told him that they were go-
ing down to the river to fish for eels, and Mar-
co’s soul was all on fire to accompany them.
He had never fished for eels. He knew the
boys very well, and they offered to lend him a
hook and line. But Marco thought that on the
whole it would not do. He tried to persuade
them to wait until the afternoon, but they would
not consent to such a postponement of their
pleasure. So Marco wished them good luck,
and began to mount the fence again, with the
intention of returning to his studies.

On looking toward the office, he saw his uncle
coming out of the door in the rear of it, and
walking toward the house. Marco immediately
reflected that it would not answer for him to
meet his uncle, and he descended from the fence
again on the same side with the boys, until his
Tue Log Canoes. 1038

Trimming trees. . Marco decides to go.



uncle should go back. The boys thought he
came back because he was undecided whether
to go with them or not, and they renewed their
invitations with redoubled urgency. Marco
did not reply, but looked steadily toward the
house. He saw a man standing in the yard
with a small ladder in his hand. A moment
afterward, Marco’s uncle came out of the house,
and, to Marco’s great consternation, he per-
ceived that he had a saw and a hatchet in his
hand, and then he recollected that his uncle had
been intending to prune some trees that fore-
noon. The trees were situated in various po-
sitions about the yard, so that Marco could
neither go in at the front door of the office, nor
climb in at the window, without being discov-
ered. He did not know what to do.

In the mean time, the boys urged him to go
with them. They did not know any thing
about his studies, and supposed that his hesita-
tion was only owing to his want of interest in
the object of the expedition. Finally, Marco
concluded to go. He supposed that he should
not be able to get back into his study till noon,
as he recollected that his uncle expected to be
employed all the forenoon about his pruning.
He thought, therefore, that his chance of detec-
104 Marco Pavut in VeERMonT.



Marco escapes.

tion would not be increased by staying out an
hour or two longer, and so he told the boys that
he would go.

When they had procured sufficient bait, they
went toward the river. Their way led them
not very far from the house, and they were sev-
eral times in situations where they were ex-
posed to view, in case Marco’s uncle had looked
toward them. Marco, however, contrived to
walk by these places in such a manner as to
cover himself as much as possible from view by
the other boys; and besides, he hoped that his
uncle was too much occupied with his pruning,
to notice what boys were prowling about the
village. They passed across the street in this
manner, and then went down over the inter-
vales toward the river. Marco felt quite re-
lieved at seeing that his uncle kept steadily at
his work, holding the ladder for the other man
to mount by, or sawing off low branches him-
self, without appearing to notice the boys at all.

The river was circuitous in its course, and
its banks were in some places steep, and in
others low and sandy. The water was gener-
ally shallow, but in some places it was deep,—
especially under the high banks. In many
places there were willows and elms, overhang-
Tus Loe Canokr. 105
Fishing place. Fishing. Bad luck.

ing the water. It was in one of these places
that the boys were going to fish for eels. It
was a point where the river took a sudden turn,
forming a sort of angle in the stream, where
the water was very dark and deep. The bank
was high at that place, and it was covered with
trees and bushes. Some of these trees had
been undermined, and their roots and branches
were floating in the water. The boys scrambled
down to the brink and made ready for fishing.
They cut slender poles in the bushes, for fishing-
poles. There was a trunk of a tree lying along
the shore, extending obliquely out a little way
over the water, which furnished them a conve-
nient footing. They stood or sat upon it, baited
their hooks, and threw them over into the
water. They followed the bait with their eyes
as it sunk slowly down into the dark depths,
among the logs, and roots, and trunks of trees,
which were lying submerged in the water.

The boys remained here an hour, but they
caught no eels. Either there were none there,
or for some reason or other they chose not to
bite. They had some talk about going to
another place, but before they decided upon
that plan, Marco’s attention was arrested by
the sight of what appeared to be a large log
106 Marco Paut in VERMONT.



A discovery.





floating down the river. He pointed it out to
the other boys, and, on closer examination, they
saw that it was an old canoe, of the kind that
are formed by hollowing out a log. Jt was not
of very large size, and it appeared to be rather
old and decayed. Still, the boys wanted to get
it very much. They gathered in their lines,
and ran along the bank, keeping pace with the
boat as it floated down.

They very soon came to 4 reach of the riv-
Tue Loe Canog. 107

Condition of the boat.



er,—that is, to a length of it between one bend
and another, where the water was swift and
shallow. So the two boys who had been fish-
ing with Marco threw off their shoes, and
pulled up their trowsers, and ran down the
bank, and into the river. The boat was far out
in the stream, and they had to wade some dis-
tance before they came to it. Besides, asthe
boat was floating down all the time, while they
were wading across, it got some distance down
the stream before they could reach it. They,
however, succeeded in getting it at last, and,
with much floundering in the water and many
shouts of laughter, they brought it over to |
Marco.

Marco was much pleased with the prize. It
was in better condition than they had expected
to find it. There was, indeed, a piece knocked
out at one end, near the upper edge, but they
found that it would support all three of the
boys, if they sat in it carefully, and with their
weight principally at the other end. For want
of oars or paddles they cut poles on the banks,
thinking that they could push the boat along,
by planting the poles against the bottom, as the
water was not deep. They drew the boat up
to the shore, and poured out some water which
/

108 Marco Paut in VERMONT.



The river. Navigation.



had got into her, and then they all carefully em-
barked, intending to make a little voyage.

It happened that just below the place to
which the boat had drifted before they overtook
it, the water became somewhat deeper, and of
course more smooth and still, so that it afforded
a favorable place for navigating such a boat.
Tn fact, the character of the stream, throughout
its whole course for several miles, was to pre-
sent a constant succession of changes, from
deep and almost still water, to shallow and rapid
currents, rippling over beds of sand and gravel.
One of these rapids, or rips, as they were called,
the boys had just passed; it being in one of
them, though one more broad and less rapid
than many of the others, that they had pursued
and overtaken the boat. In the smooth and
still water below, therefore, they had a very
favorable opportunity to try their boat, for the
water, though not so shallow as it was above,
was still not so deep as to prevent their pro-
pelling their boat, by pushing their poles against
the bottom. It required some care to preserve
their equilibrium, but then the water was not
deep, and they knew, therefore, that there was
no danger of being drowned if they should
upset.
Tue Loa Canog. 109

Looking for eels. The ripe.

Things went on very prosperously, until, after
a few minutes, the boys suddenly found them-
selves drifting into deeper water. Their poles
would scarcely touch the bottom. Marco, who
was not much accustomed to this kind of navi-
gation, was at first somewhat alarmed, but the
other boys told him to keep quiet, and they
would soon drift into shallow water again.
They accordingly drew in their poles, and began
to look over the edge of the boat into the water,
to see if they could see any eels, They saw no
eels, but the water soon began to grow shallow
again, and so the boys, feeling that they were
in no danger, remained quietly in their places,
looking idly into the water, talking about the
various objects which they saw upon the bot-
tom.

After some minutes spent in this manner, one
of the boys looked down the stream, and saw
that the boat was gradually approaching another
of the rapids.

“ Come, boys,” said he, “ we must go to work,
or we shall be down over the rips.”

So the boys all took their poles and began to
push the boat up the stream ; but they found it
harder than they had expected. In fact, the
boat had drifted down nearer to the rapids than
110 Marco Paut 1n VeERMonT.

“Boat in the whirlpools, Water not deep.

they ought to have allowed it to go. The water
was running quite swiftly where they were, and
they soon found that all their efforts were not
sufficient to stem the current. The boat was
carried round and round in every direction, ex-
cepting up the stream. In fact the current was
rapidly acquiring the entire mastery over them,
and hurrying them down to a point where the
water poured on in a furious torrent through
a long narrow passage between beds of stone
and gravel.

“Pull, boys, pull!” said Marco; “we shall
go down over the rips in spite of every thing.”

The boys did pull, but they could effect
nothing. The water was sweeping them along
with great rapidity, notwithstanding all their
struggles. Finally, when they found that they
could not make head against it, so as to go up
the stream, they concluded to pull for the shore.
They were not in any great fear, for the river
was very narrow and not more than knee
deep in the rapids, so that there was no real
danger of any calamity greater than getting
well wet. They seemed to be also in a fair
way to escape this, for they found that they
could make some progress in getting their boat
toward the shore. But, just as they began to
THe Loe Cawnokg. 111
‘Danger. Boat upset.

think their object was about to be accomplished,
they were arrested by a sudden mishap. It
happened that there was a little snag in the
river, nearly in the direction in which they
were going. It was the end of a small log,
which rose almost to the surface of the water.
The greater part of the log was firmly imbedded
in the sand, but there was a small portion of it
which projected so far as barely to be sub-
merged. The boys did not notice this, and, in
their eagerness to run the boat ashore, it hap-
pened that they were running it across the cur-
rent, just above this snag. But as the current
was sweeping them down the stream at the
same time that they were pushing themselves
across it, it carried the boat with great force
against thissnag. The bottom of the boat was
confined by it, while the force of the current,
still pressing upon the side, overset it in a mo-
ment, and threw all the boys out into the water.

The boys scrambled out without much diffi-
culty, and stood upon the gravelly beach. They
saw at the same moment a man on the bank of
the river above, who looked as if he was about
to run to their aid ; but when he saw that they
were safe, he turned around immediately and
disappeared. An instant afterward, Marco,
112. Marco Paut in Vermont.

Cap gone.

finding that his. cap
was not upon his
head,looked around
F for it, and, to his
' dismay, he saw
it floating swiftly
away down the
rapids. He ran in-
to the water and
" seized the boat,
= which was then
beginning also to
CAP GONE. goaway. He call-
ed upon the boys
to help him pull it up and pour the water out.
He then lanched it again with all speed, seized
one of the poles, clambered into it, and pushed
off into the swiftest part of the current, and
away he went after his cap.

He resorted to this desperate measure, be-
cause he was greatly alarmed at the idea of
going home without his cap. It would have
certainly insured his detection, and, as he sup-
posed, a double punishment. He now was as
eager to go down the rapids as he had before
been to escape them. His only care was to
keep his boat head down, so that if he should


Tue Loe Canoe. 118

“Marco goes after his cap. Marco’s remorse.

encounter any snag or rock he might not be
thrown broadside on. He kept a good lookout
too ahead. The boat shot through the water
like an arrow, and was soon clear of the rapids
in the comparatively still water below.

Marco contrived to paddle with his pole, so
as to overtake the cap and recover it. Then
he went to the shore and landed. He drew up
the boat as high as he could, and went back to
seek the other boys. He concluded that it was
time to go home. His conscience now began
to reproach him with the wrong which he had
been doing. His promised pleasure had failed.
His clothes were wet and uncomfortable.. His
mind was anxious and unhappy. With a heavy
heart he began to retrace his steps, sure of de-
tection when he reached home, and of punish-
ment. He did not, however, dread the punish-
ment so much as the just displeasure which his
cousin would manifest, and the evidence of the
pain which he knew his cousin would suffer,
when he came to learn how his pupil had be-
trayed the confidence which had been reposed
in him. Before he set out for home, however,
he took off such of his clothes as were most
wet, and wrung out the water as well as he
could, and then put them on again.

H
114. Marco Paut 1n VERMONT.



He returns to the office.

When he drew near to the house, he expected
to see his uncle still at work, but he was not
there. Marco reconnoitered the place carefully,
and then went into the office. His uncle was
not in the office. He passed through into the
study. He was afraid that Forester would be
there, but, to his surprise and joy, he was not,
and there was no sign that he had been there
since the morning. Marco looked at.the watch,
and found that it was only about half-past
eleven. So he took down a volume of the En-
cyclopedia and began to read. He read the
article canoe, and he found some information
about. the bark canoes made by Indians, but
nothing about log canoes. In about fifteen
minutes he heard the office door open, and his
cousin Forester came in. Forester walked
into the study, but said nothing to Marco.
Marco kept at his work, without speaking to
his cousin. He began to hope that he might
yet escape. His only fear now was lest his
wet clothes should be observed. He put his
hand down many times to his knees, to ascer-
tain how fast they were drying. The clothes
that he wore were of woolen, and of a dark
color, so that they did not show the wet very
distinctly, and, besides, the sun and the air
Tue Loe Canog. 115

Clothes dry.

were warm that day, and the clothes had dried
fast. In a word, when twelve o’clock arrived
and Marco put his books away, nobody would
have observed that his clothes had been wet.
He ran about in the open air until dinner-time,
and though, when he went in to dinner, he felt
oppressed with a sense of guilt and of self-con-
demnation, he was satisfied that no one sus-
pected him. Marco thought that he had had a
very lucky escape.
116 Marco Pauu in VERMONT.

“Marco's fears. Detection.



Cuaprer VII.
A DitemMa.

rpoucH Marco’s first feeling was that of

relief, to find that he had got back from
his truancy without detection, he felt, after all,
ill at ease. He kept out of sight till the dinner-
bell rang, and then he was almost afraid to go
in, for fear that, by some accident or other, his
uncle might have noticed his absence, and
might ask him something about it. He was
usually much interested at dinner-time in talk-
ing with Forester about plans for the afternoon ;
but now he felt guilty and afraid, and he was
disinclined to look his uncle or his cousin in the
face, or to speak a word.

And yet it was not punishment that Marco
was afraid of. There were very few boys who
could bear punishment of any kind with more
fortitude than he, or to whom the idea of pun-
ishment gave less concern. It was the detec-
tion itself, rather than what was to come after
it, that he feared. There is something in the
very act of being detected and exposed in guilt,
A DitemmMa. 117

“The mili-pond. The secret a burden.

which the heart instinctively shrinks from ; and
many a boy would willingly bear in secret twice
the pain which the punishment of an offense
would bring, rather than have his commission
of the offense discovered and made known.

There was, however, no indication, at the
dinner table, that Marco’s cousin or uncle sus-
pected him of any wrong. They talked of va-
rious subjects in their usual manner. Forester
had arranged it with Marco, to go that after-
noon down to the mill-pond, to examine the
boat, in order to see whether they could have it
fitted with oars, and to make arrangements to
that effect. Marco now hoped that Forester
had forgotten this plan, and would not go.
Though he had been very much interested in
the plan the day before, he now felt disinclined
to go. He wished to be alone, or at least out
of sight of Forester. He felt as if he had a ter-
rible secret on his mind, and that there was
great danger that something or other would oc-
cur to discover it. So he hoped that Forester
would have forgotten the appointment, and that
it would be thus postponed to some future
time.

But Forester had not forgotten it ; and after
dinner, he asked Marco how soon he should
118 Marco Paut in Vermont.

Walk to the mill-pond.

be ready to go. Marco said that he should be
ready at any time; and in about half an hour
they set out. They walked together to the
mill-pond. Forester said that the boat be-
onged to a man who worked in the mills, but
he lived a little distance above them. His
house was near the water, in a little valley.
The water of the pond extended up into this
valley, forming a sort of bay.

A road led to the house, but did not go be-
yond it. The house was small, but it had



SSSR



THE MILLMAN’S HOUSE
A DruemMa. 119

“The! house, Animals, The dog.



pleasant little yards and gardens about it, and
various pens and coops for different sorts of
animals. The man who lived there was fa-
mous for keeping a great many animals, He
had pigs, and cows, and Malta cats, and two
dogs,—one of them a water dog,—and ducks
and geese,—among the latter, two wild geese,—
and hens and rabbits ; and there were two gray
squirrels, hanging up in a cage by the side of the
front door. Forester told Marco about these
animals as they walked along.

Marco was very fond of animals, and he be-
gan to anticipate great pleasure in seeing these.
When they came near the house, he ran for-
ward to look at the wild geese. The water d g
ran to meet Forester. He knew Forester, hav-
ing often seen him there before. Forester and
Marco rambled about the yards, looking at the
animals for some time, and then went to the
water’s edge, which was very near the house.
The ducks and geese were swimming in the
water. Forester called the dog there, and Mar-
co amused himself for some time in throwing
sticks into the water, and ordering the dog,
whose name was Nelson, to plunge in and go
and bring them back. The boat was there too,
fastened by a rope to a post in the bank. At
120 Marco Paut in VERMONT.

Paddles. Oars and paddies.



length, after Marco had satisfied himself with
. these amusements, he said,

“ Well, cousin Forester, here is the boat.”

“Yes,” said Forester, “but the man don’t
seem to be at home. I presume he’s at the
mill.”

« And what shall we do in that case ?” asked
Marco.

«Why, I will go into the house first, and
ascertain the fact, and get a paddle.”

So Forester went into the house, and soon
afterward returned, bringing with him a paddle.
He said that the man was at the mill, but that
his wife said that they might have the boat to
go and find him. “I thought,” said Forester,
“that you would rather go in the boat than
walk.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “I should.”

“ Besides,” continued Forester, “I can teach
you to paddle.”

Marco took the paddle from Forester’s hand.
He had never seen one before. He said that
they always used oars, not paddles, in New
York harbor. A paddle is shaped very differ-
ently from an oar. It is much shorter and
lighter,—though the bladeis broader. A paddle
is worked, too, differently from an oar. An oar
A DivemmMa. 121

Marco’s opinion. Secret hard to keep.





acts as a lever against the side of the boat,—
the middle of it resting in a small notch called
a row-lock, or between two wooden pins. But
a paddle is held in the hands entirely.

“What do they have paddles for in this
country ?” said Marco. “Oars are better.”

“You are not competent to decide that ques-
tion,” replied Forester.

“Why not?” said Marco; “I have rowed
boats many a time.”

“Yes, but you have never paddled much.
You have used oars, but not paddles, and so
you can not compare them.”

“Well,” said Marco, “I mean to try this
paddle now, and then I can tell.”

Marco had seen the boys who were with him
in the boat that morning, using their poles as
paddles, and he had used one of the poles in
that manner himself; and he was just upon the
point of saying something upon the subject,
when suddenly he recollected that it would be-
tray him. In fact, Marco found that having
such a secret as this upon his mind, was a
source of great embarrassment and constraint,
as he more than once came very near making
some allusion inadvertently, which would have
resulted in his exposure. While speaking of
122 Marco Pauu 1n VERMONT.

Paddling.

boats, and oars, and paddles, and such subjects,
he had to be continually upon his guard and to
watch all his words.
They got into

“EE SS the boat and push-
~~ ed out upon the
water. Forester
taught Marco how
to use the paddle.
He gave him his
seat in the stern
of the boat, and
directed him to
‘grasp the lower
~ end of the handle
with the other
hand. Then, by
dipping the blade in the water and pushing the
water back, the boat was propelled forward.
He also explained to him how, by turning the
blade of the paddle, one way or the other, he
could give the bow of the boat an impulse to-
ward the right or toward the left.

“Thus you see,” said Forester, “ with a pad-
dle you can steer, but with an oar you can not.”

“ With two oars I can,” said Marco.

“Yes,” replied Forester. “ You must have


A DivemmMa. 123

‘Bteersman needed in rowing. ~ Philosophy of rowing.



two oars to guide a boat, but you can do it with
one paddle. Therefore, if you can have but one,
a paddle is better than anoar. There is anoth-
er advantage in a paddle ; that is, in using it,
your face looks the way that you are going.”

“ Yes,” rejoined Marco, “that is a great ad-
vantage.”

- “In rowing, you must sit with your back to
the bow of the boat, and look over your shoul-
der to see where you are going.”

“Yes,” said Marco, “unless you have a
steersman.”

“True,” replied Forester. ‘“ When you have
several men to row, and one to steer, you get
along very well with oars, but in case of only
one man, there is an advantage in a paddle.
There is still another point to be considered,—
a paddle is better for a narrow boat and oars
for wide ones.”

“ Why so?” asked Marco.

“ Because,” said Forester, “a certain width
is required in a boat in order to work oars well.
The oarsman must sit upon the seat, and ex-
tend the oar off upon one side of the boat, and
there must be a certain distance between the
part which he takes hold of, and the row-lock,
in order to work to advantage. But it is no
124 Marco Paut 1n VERMONT.
__ ec
Philosophy of paddling. To trail oars.

matter how narrow the boat is if he has a pad-
dle, for he holds it perpendicularly over the
side.”

“So paddles are better,” said Marco, “for
one kind of boat, and oars for another.”

“Yes,” replied Forester, “and paddles are
better for one kind of navigation, and oars for
another. Oars require greater breadth of water
to work in. In a narrow, crooked stream flow-
ing among logs and rocks, oars would not an-
swer at all. But with a paddle a man can
worm a boat through anywhere.”

“That is, if it is only wide enough for the
boat to go,” said Marco.

“ Of course,” replied Forester. “The paddle
itself requires no additional space. But oars
extend so far laterally” —

“ Laterally ?” asked Marco.

“ Yes,” rejoined Forester ; “ that is, on each
side. Oars extend so far on each side, that they
require a great breadth of water. If you at-
tempt to go through a narrow place, the oars
would strike.”

“Why, no,” said Marco. “ You can give
orders to trail oars.”

“I don’t know any thing about that,” said
Forester.
A DitemmMa. 125
A beautiful manceuver. The miliman,

“ That’s a beautiful manceuver,” said Marco,
“only it is hard to do. You see, you order
them to give way hearty, so as to get a good
headway, till just as you get to the narrow
place, and then trail is the word. Then the ©
oarsmen all whip their oars out of the row-locks
in an instant, and let ’em trail alongside under
the boat’s counters, and she shoots through the
narrow place like a bird.”

Marco became very enthusiastic in describing
this manceuver, but Forester did not get a very
clear idea of it, after all.

“ You'll teach it to us,” said Forester, “ when
we get our oars and a godd boat’s crew of boys.
At any rate, a boat can be paddled continuously
through a narrow space, better than it can be
rowed. Therefore, paddles are generally used
on rivers, where there are many narrow places
to pass through. Indians and savages almost
always use paddles, for they navigate many
intricate and narrow passages of water.”

By this time they began to draw near the mill.
They landed near some great logs which were
floating in the water, ready to be drawn up into
the mill and sawed. They went up the bank
and thence into the mill. The man who owned
the boat, was tending the mill. When he
126 Marco Pauut in VERMONT.



‘Gotting up the logs. Sawing.



wanted a log. he would take the end of a long
chain down a sloping plane of planks which led
to the water, and fasten it to alog. The other
end of the chain was fastened round an axle in
the mill, and when all was ready, the man
would set the axle in motion by the machinery,
and that would draw the log up. When the
log was in the mill, the man would roll it over
into its place, on a long platform of timber,
where it was to be sawed. Then he would set
the saw machinery in motion, and the platform
would begin to move forward, and the saw at
the same time to go up and down, sawing the
log as it advanced. Thus it would saw it
through, from end to end, and then, by reversing
the motion of the machinery, the log was carried
back again. The man would then move it a
little to one side, just far enough for the thick-
ness of the board which he wished to make,
and then begin to saw again. He moved the
log by means of an iron bar with a sharp point,
which he struck into the end of the log, and
thus pried it over, one end at a time. When
the log was placed in its new position, the ma-
chinery was set in motion again, and the log
was sawed through in another place, from end
to end, parallel to the first sawing, leaving the
A DitemMa. 127

“Forester’s proposal. Acceded to.

width of a board between. This process was
continued until the log was sawed entirely into
boards, except a piece in the middle, which it
was necessary to leave of double thickness, and
this answered for a plank.

Marco was much interested in watching this
process, and when the sawing of this log was
completed, and another log drawn up into its
place, Forester introduced the subject of the
boat. He told the man what he wished to do,
namely, to have some row-locks or thole-pins
made along the sides of the boat, and some oars to
row it with. It would also be necessary to have
seats, or thwarts, as they are called, placed in
such a manner that there should be one just
before each row-lock. These seats were for
the oarsmen to sit upon, in rowing. The man
told Forester that he might do any thing he
pleased with the boat. He was sure that For-
ester would do it no injury. Forester asked
him who would be a good man to do the work,
and the man recommended to him a wagon-
maker who had a shop very near the mill.

They went to the wagon-maker and explained
to him what they wanted. The wagon-maker
readily undertook the work. They all went
down to the boat together, to plan the seats and
128 Marco Paut in Vermont.

ne
The wagon-maker. Marco’s surprise.



the places for the thole-pins. They concluded
to have three pairs on each side. This would
require six oars. These oars the wagon-maker
promised to make, and to have all the work
done by the beginning of the next week. They
also concluded to have the boat taken out of
the water and thoroughly calked again, and her
bottom payed over with pitch, as she was not
perfectly tight. This being all arranged, For-
ester and Marco began to walk toward home.

“It seems to me strange to get a wagon-
maker to work on a boat,” said Marco.

“In New York, I suppose you would go toa
boat-builder,” said Forester.

“Yes,” replied Marco, “ to be sure.”

“There are no boat-builders here,” rejoined
Forester. “In fact, there are very few trades
represented here, and workmen are willing to
do any kind of jobs that they can.”

As only a small part of the afternoon was yet
passed away, Marco asked Forester if he might
go down to the river a-fishing. “I can keep
within my bounds, you know,” said he.

“ Yes,” said Forester, “ you can keep within
your bounds.”

“ And I will,” said Marco. “ Don’t you sup-
pose I will ?”
A DitemmMa. 129

Doubts about Marco. Marco disconcerted.

“ Why, you can tell better than I can about
that,” said Forester. “You have been here
now some weeks, and I have treated you with
considerable trust and confidence,—have I
not ?”

“ Why, yes,” said Marco.

“TI have given you leave to go a-fishing,
trusting to your fidelity in keeping within your
bounds. I have left you alone in your study,
several times in the forenoons. I have let you
go up on the mountains with other boys, and
lent you my watch, so that you might know
when it was time to come back. Now you can
tell better than I, whether you have been faith-
ful to all of these trusts.”

Marco did not answer. He did not know
what to say. He walked along in silence.

“TI will leave it with you to decide,” said
Forester. ‘“ Here we are just home; now you
may go into the study and reflect a few mo-
ments upon the subject. Call to mind all the
cases in which I have treated you with trust
and confidence, and consider whether you have
always been faithful to the trust. If, on reflec-
tion, you think that you have, you may take
your fishing-line and go a-fishing. If you feel
conscious that you have at any time betrayed
180 Marco Paut in Vermont.

The conditions,



my confidence, you must not go this afternoon.
You may go out to play wherever you please
about the house and garden, but you must not
go a-fishing. If you are in doubt whether you
have betrayed my confidence or not, and wish
to ask my opinion about some particular case
which comes up to your mind, you may remain
in the study till 1 come in, and ask me, and I
will tell you. I shall be in, in a few minutes.”

There was a pause here. Marco looked very
serious, and walked along in silence. Such a
turn to the conversation was entirely unex-
pected to him, and he did not know what to
say.

“It is possible,” continued Forester, “that
you may be conscious that you have clearly
been guilty of betraying the confidence which
I have placed in you in some instance which I
know nothing of, or which you suppose I know,
nothing of, and you may wish to confess it to
me. If you have been guilty of any such act,
the best thing that you can do is to confess it
to me at once ; and if you wish to do it, you may
wait till 1 come, for that purpose. So you may
wait till I come either to ask me a question, or
to confess a fault. If you do not wish to do
either, you may go out without waiting for me ;
A DitemMa. 131

Marco much perplexed. His conclusions.

but you must not go a-fishing unless you can
truly say that you have been faithful and hon-
est, whenever I have trusted you before.”

So saying, Forester parted from Marco and
went into the house. Marco slowly walked
into the office, and through it into the little
study. He was greatly perplexed to know
what to make of this address. “Can it be,”
thought he, “ that he knows that I went away
this morning? How could he have found it
out ? Or did he say that, only to find out now
whether I have been honest or not heretofore ?”

On mature reflection, Marco concluded that
Forester did not probably know any thing
about his having gone away. He thought that
what he had just said was only a part of For-
ester’s general plan of managing his case, and
that it did not imply that Forester entertained
any particular suspicions. Marco thought that
he might therefore safely go a-fishing that after-
noon if he was disposed ; but we must do him
the justice to say, that he did not entertain the
idea of doing it a moment. He determined
that he would not go. But as he was not pre-
pared to confess his fault, and as he had no
question to ask, he determined to go and play
about the garden. He thought a little of wait-
182 Marco Paut in VERMONT.

He wishes to confess his fault.

ing till his cousin came in, and then honestly
making a confession ; but he could not quite
conclude upon this, and so he determined to go
and think more of it. Besides, he concluded
that if he were going to make a confession at
all, he should rather do it that evening when he
went to bed; for Forester always came up to
his room after he went to bed, to have a little
friendly and serious conversation with him, and
to bid him good night.

He accordingly went out before Forester
came in. He spent the afternoon in a misera-
ble state of mind. He could not divest himself
of the feeling of anxiety, that in some way or
other, Forester had found out his transgression.
He rather wondered, that, if it were true that
Forester had found it out, he had not said some-
thing to him directly about it,—but then he
knew it was Forester’s way not always to make
known, at once, all that he knew in such cases.
But then he thought, again, that Forester could
not know any thing about it. There was no
way for him to have known it. He was away
all the morning, and did not come home until
after Marco got back. So he concluded that
Forester did not know; but he began to wish
that he did. He could not bear to think of tell-
A Di,emMa. 133

“Marco in the garden with James. Plans for the boat.
ne

ing him, but he wished that he knew. The
burden of such a secret became intolerable to
him. He strolled about the yards and garden,
not knowing what to do with himself, and grow-
ing all the time more and more anxious and un-
happy. He was in a very serious dilemma.

Marco cast his eyes occasionally toward the
office, expecting to see Forester come out. He
thought Forester would want to know whether
he went a-fishing or not. But he did not come.
Marco spent some time in the garden with
James, who was at work there raking over the
ground, and gathering in such things as might
be hurt by any sudden frost. Marco worked
with him for some time, and endeavored to con-
verse with him, but he did not find him very
communicative, and at last he went into the
house and sat on the sofa in the parlor, reading,
until supper time.

Marco fully expected that Forester would ask
him at supper time whether he had been a-fish-
ing or not; but he said nothing about it. For-
ester told his father and mother about their plan
for a boat, and gave them a full account of
their visit to the mill. His mother seemed
quite interested in the account, and told Marco,
that, after he got his crew well trained, she
184 Marco Paut in VERMONT.

An explanation.

should hope that he would invite her on an ex-
cursion in the boat.

“Yes,” said Marco, “we will. We must
have a seat, cousin Forester, for passengers and
visitors, in the stern sheets.”

“ The stern sheets ?” said Forester, “ what do
you mean by the stern sheets ?”

“Why, it is aft,” said Marco, “between the
coxswain’s place and the stroke-oarsman.”

“You'll have to show us,” said his aunt,
“when we come to see the boat.”

This kind of conversation somewhat relieved
Marco’s mind,—but still he was ill at ease, and
he determined to tell Forester the whole story
at bedtime, if he could only summon up cour-
age to begin.
A ConFeEssion. . 135

Marco's room. James,

Cuarprer VIII.
A ConFreEssION.

N the room where Marco slept, there was a
large, stuffed arm-chair, which was com-
monly called, the easy chair; it was one that
was seldom used by the family, except in sick-
ness. It stood in a corner of the room not far
from the head of Marco’s bed. Forester used
to sit in this chair while he remained convers-
ing with Marco, when he came up to take his
light.

When Forester had taken his seat in the
great chair this evening, according to his usual
custom, he began his conversation by saying.

“ Well, Marco, have you been helping James
in the garden this afternoon ?”

“ Why, no,” said Marco, “I did not help him
much,—I don’t like James very well.”

“Why not ?” asked Forester.

“Why, I don’t think he is very accommo-
dating,” replied Marco.

“What has he done to-day, which is unac-
commodating ?” asked. Forester.
136 Marco Paut in VERMONT.

SS
Marco finds fault with James. Forester’s questions,

“He would not lend me his knife. I wanted
to borrow his knife to cut me a cane from some
apple-tree trimmings, and he would not let me
have it.”

“Haven't you got a knife of your own ?” ask-
ed Forester.

“ Yes,” said Marco, “but mine won’t open.”

“Won't open?” repeated Forester. “ What’s
the cause of that ?”

“Why, I suppose because the joint is rusty,”
replied Marco.

“ How came it rusty ?” asked Forester.

“Why, you see I laid it down one day on a
stone, where I was at work with it, and left it
there, and there happened to come a rain in the
night and rusted it. I did not know where it
was, and so I didu’t find it for a good many
days.”

“Then, I presume,” said Forester, “that
James supposed that you would leave his knife
out in the same way and spoil it.”

“No,” replied Marco, “ that was not the rea-
son.”

“ You are sure that you asked him for it dis-
tinctly, and he refused ?”

“Yes,” said Marco.

Here there was a moment’s pause. Marco
A ConreEssION. 187

Marco’s thoughts.

thought that his cousin Forester was consider-
ing what should be done to James, for being so
unaccommodating. He did not know but that
he would report him to his father and have him
turned away; though Marco did not really
wish to have him turned away.

But Forester said, after reflecting a moment,
“That makes me think of a story I have got
here ; listen and hear it.”

So Forester took out his pocket-book and
opened it, and then appeared to be turning over


188 Marco Pavuu in VERMONT.

Forester’s story. Mary and Anne.

‘the leaves, for a moment, to find a place. Then
he began to read, or to appear to read, as fol-
lows:

Once there was a little girl named Anne.
She came to her mother one day, as she was
sitting in the parlor, and began to complain bit-
terly of her sister Mary. Her sister Mary was
older than she was, and had adoll. Anne com-
plained that Mary would not lend her her doll.

“Are you sure that she refused to lend you
her doll?” asked her mother.

“ Yes, mother, Iam sure she did,” replied Anne.

“ Perhaps she is playing with it herself,” said
her mother.

“No,” replied Anne, “she is ironing in the
kitchen.”

“I think you must be mistaken,” said her
mother. “Go and ask her again. Don’t tell
her I sent you, but ask her yourself, whether
she really meant that she was not willing to
lend you her doll.”

So Anne ran off to put the question to Mary
again; presently she returned with the same
answer. “Mary,” she said, “ would not lend it
to her.”

“TI am very sorry to hear it,” said her mo-
A ConrFreEssiIon. 139

An unexpected conclusion.

ther, “for now I suppose I shall have to punish
you.”

“To punish her, you mean,” said Anne.

“No,” said her mother, “to punish you. 1
don’t suppose she is to blame.”

“Why, mother—how can J be to blame, for
her not being willing to lend me her doll ?”

“You are, I’ve no doubt,” said her mother.
“ Mary is a good-natured, accommodating girl,
—always ready to do kindnesses, and if she has
any unwillingness to lend any thing to you, it
must be that you have created it yourself, by
some misconduct. So that it will prove, no
doubt, that you are the one to be punished.”

Here Anne began to hang her head and look
a little ashamed. Her mother’s supposition
proved to be correct, for, on inquiring, it ap-
peared that Mary had lent her doll to Anne a
few days before, and that when she wanted it
again, Anne was unwilling to give it to her,
and when Mary insisted on her bringing it to
her, she became angry and threw the doll out
the window.

“I never heard that story before, cousin For-
ester,” said Marco. “ And I did not know that
you had stories in your pocket-book.”
140 Marco Paust tn VERMONT.

Doubts about the story. Good character.

Forester laughed and put up his pocket-book.

“{ don’t believe there is any story there,”
said Marco. “ You made it up for me, I verily
believe.”

“Yes,” said Forester, “I did. Don’t it fit
your case pretty well ?”

“ Why, I don’t know,” said Marco. “I don’t
see why he could not let me have his knife.”

“Suppose J had asked him for his knife;
don’t you suppose he would have lent it to me ?”

“Yes,” said Marco, “I’ve no doubt he
would ; he would do any thing for you, of
course, because you pay him—or uncle pays
him, which is the same thing.”

“JT don’t think that that is the reason alto-
gether,” replied Forester. “There was the
man at the mill to-day, who said that I might
take his boat and do any thing I chose to do
with it.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “I noticed that.”

“ And perhaps you thought it was very much
to his credit that he did so.”

“ Yes,” said Marco.

“But the fact is,” rejoined Forester, “as I
think, it was more to my credit than his; be-
cause I have had his boat a great many times
heretofore, and his having so much confidence
A Con Fression. 141
“Advantage ofa goodcharacier. = s*=~C~S*S«S
in me now, shows how I have acted with his
property before. I have always taken a great
deal of pains to use it carefully, to bring it back
to its place safely, to get the water out, if there
was any in it, and leave every thing in order.
I have done this, not only because it is just and
right that I should not make him suffer incon-
venience on account of his doing me a favor,
but as a matter of policy.”

“What do you mean by a matter of policy ?”
asked Marco.

“ Why, regard to my own interest. If I did
not do so, I should soon make people unwilling
to lend me their things. And I think there
must be some good reason why James is not
willing to lend you his knife.”

“Why, he says,” answered Marco, “that I
don’t bring back his things.”

“ Ah!” rejoined Forester, “that’s it. I thought
there must be some such reason as that. You
have lost your character with James, and I ad-
vise you to acquire a new one as soon as you
can. Besides, you have done him injustice this
evening. You represented him as refusing you
his knife because he was unaccommodating and
selfish, whereas it was only proper regard to the
safety of his property. What you said was
142 Marco Pau. in VERMONT.

Marco's knife. Remedies proposed.

calculated to make an unfavorable impression
on my mind against him, and one which would
have been unjust.”

Marco perceived that it was so, and was si-
lent.

“T am sorry that your knife is rusty,” re-
sumed Forester. “Perhaps I can get it open
for you.”

“ How ?” asked Marco.

“ Why, I believe the best way is to soak the
joint in oil. The oil will insinuate itself into
the joint, and then we can get hold of the blade
with a pair of nippers, or something of the kind,
and open it; and then, by working it to and fro
a few times, the rust will work out, and the
knife be as good as it was before. If it is very
rusty indeed, this plan will not answer.”

“What must be done in that case?” asked
Marco.

“ The only way then is to carry it te some
kind of smith and get him to punch out the
rivet. Then we can take the blade out entirely.
By this means we can clean it of its rust, and
then put it in again with a new rivet. If you
will give me your knife to-morrow, I will try to
put it in order for you again, in one or the other
of these ways.
A ConFreEssIon. 143

Marco in bed. Forestor about to go.

“ And now,” continued Forester, after a short
pause, “it is time for me to go down, unless you
have something which you wish to say.”

Although it was not unusual for Forester to
close his evening conversation in this manner,
Marco’s attention was particularly arrested by
the excellent opportunity which this remark af-
forded him to make his confession. He really
wished to make it,—but he did not know how
to begin. He wished that his cousin would ask
him something about it, or introduce the sub-
ject in some way or other, but Forester was
silent. Presently he rose, came to Marco’s
bedside, and asked him if he was warm enough,
—for the nights at this season of the year were
beginning to be cool.

“ Yes,” said Marco, “I’m very comfortable.”

“ Well, then, good night.’ So Forester took
the lamp and walked slowly toward the door.

“ Cousin Forester,” said Marco.

“What ?” said Forester.

“Don’t go just yet.”

Forester turned back and advanced to the
foot of the bed. There was a high foot-board
at the foot of the bed, and Forester leaned upon
it with the lamp in his hand.
144 Marco Paut in VERmMonrt.
Confession. Forester’s account.

“Is there any thing that you want to say to
me ?”

Marco was silent. He looked distressed and
embarrassed, and moved his head restlessly on
his pillow.

“ There’s something wrong, isn’t there, Mar-
co,” said Forester, “that you are thinking
whether to confess to me or not? If there is,
do just as you choose about it. I like to have
you confess what you have done that is wrong,
but then, if you do it at all, it must be done of
your own accord.”

“Well,” said Marco, “I want to tell you
about my going away to play this forenoon.”

“ How long were you gone ?” asked Forester.

“Pretty much all the forenoon,” replied
Marco.

“ Well,” said Forester, “I am very glad you
concluded to confess it of your own accord, but
I know all about it.”

Marco started up in his bed and looked his
cousin in the face, and said,

“ Why, cousin Forester, how did you know ?”

“To prove to you that I really did know, I
will tell you what you did. You got out of the
window soon after I went away, and went over
into Mr. Eldon’s garden, where George Eldon
A ConFression. 145

Marco much surprised.

and Samuel Warner were digging worms for
bait. Then you went with them down to the
river. You hid behind them when you passed
in sight of the house, for fear that father would
see you, as he was out in the yard, pruning,
trees. Then you went down to the river and
sat on a log under some bushes, fishing. After
a while you spied an old log canoe, drifting
down the river, and the other boys waded out
and got it. Then you all got into it and pad-
dled about a while, and afterward got carried
over the rips and upset in the water. Your cap
drifted down the stream, and you went after it
in the canoe and got it. After that, you took
off your stockings and wrung out the water
from them, and then came home. You got into
the study only about a quarter of an hour be-
fore I came.”

Marco listened to this minute account of his
adventures with eager interest, wondering how
his cousin could have obtained so early and such
complete information. After Forester had con-
cluded, he paused a moment and breathed a
long sigh. Then he laid his head down upon
his pillow again, saying,

“ Well, I don’t see how you found it out; and

G
146 Marco Paut 1n VeERMonT.

A great mystery. Where Forester went.

Iam sorry that you did, for I meant to have
told you all about it myself.”

Marco seemed really disappointed at having
lost the opportunity to make his full confession,
but Forester told him that he considered that
he had made full confession. “ You made up
your mind to do it,” said he, “and you did be-
gin, and it was the beginning which required
all the effort. I only refrained from asking you
about the details, from a wish to show you that
I really knew all about it.”

“I don’t see how you found it out,” said
Marco. “I suppose it must have been that the
boys told you.”

“No,” replied Forester; “I have not seen
either of the boys, or heard any thing from
them, directly or indirectly.”

“ Then you must have watched me yourself,”
said Marco, “ instead of going away.”

“Do you think,” said Forester, “that I

* would pretend that I was going away, and then
just go out a little way and lie in wait to watch
you ?”

“Why, no,’—said Marco,—“I don’t really
suppose that you would.”

“No,” said Forester, “I really went away
out of town. I went to visit a sick man and
A ConreEssion. 147

Marco’s honesty.

help him make his will, and I did not return
until just before you saw me.”

“Then I don’t see how you knew,” said
Marco.

“It is of very little consequence to you toj
know that,” said Forester, “ but I want to ask
you a little more about the affair. Are you
willing to answer any question that I may ask ?”

Marco said that he was, and Forester asked
him about the circumstances which led him
to go away. Marco explained to him how he
saw the boys, and what he thought that they
were doing, and what induced him to go and see
them, and how he was prevented from coming
back as he had intended. There was an air of
openness and honesty in the manner in which
Marco related these facts, which convinced
Forester that he was telling the truth.

Forester was glad to find that it was not a
deliberate and preconcerted plan, between Mar
co and the other boys, to go off on this expedi-
tion ; for, bad as it was for Marco to allow him- .
self to be drawn away by such temptations, it
would have been worse, or rather it would
have indicated a worse state of character. if he
had deliberately planned such a truancy.

“Well,” said Forester, as he was about to
148 Marco Paut in VERMONT.

ee
Punishment proposed. Marco concludes to be punished.



close the conversation, ‘I am very glad that
you concluded to confess your fault. I am
very glad, too, that you did not go a-fishing this
afternoon under the sort of permission which I
gave you. I infer from these two things that
you wish to be cured of these faults, and to be-
come a boy of firm moral principle. Now it is
a rule with me, generally, not to punish a boy
for what he confesses of his own accord. Still,
I think it probable it would be better for you to
have some punishment for this. It would help
to make a strong impression upon your mind,
and make it much more easy for you to resist
such temptations in time to come. But you
may decide this question yourself. If you
choose to submit to a punishment, and will tell
me so to-morrow morning, I will think of some
suitable one for you. If you do not say any
thing to me about it, I shall not punish you.”
So saying, Forester bade Marco good night.
The next morning, Marco met Forester on
the stairs, as he was coming down to breakfast,
and told him that he thought he should feel bet-
ter to be punished. So Forester reflected upon
the subject, and at nine o’clock, when Marco
went in to commence his studies, Forester told
him that he had concluded upon his punishment.
A Conression. 149
SS
Solitary confinement. An explanation.

“ What is it to be ?” said Marco.

“It is for me not to allow you to study,” re-
plied Forester, “all this forenoon, but to require
you to sit still at your desk, with nothing to do.
You see it will be a sort of solitary imprison-
ment, only your prison will in itself be a pleas-
ant place.”

Marco thought that this would not be a very
severe punishment, but he found, in enduring it,
that it was in fact much more severe than he
had imagined. He got very tired indeed, long
before the forenoon was out. He concluded
that solitary imprisonment for years, in a gloomy
dungeon, must be a terrible punishment indeed.

A year or two after this time, when Marco
had been entirely cured of ail such faults, he
one day asked Forester to explain to him how
he knew where he went on this memorable
forenoon; and Forester willingly explained it
tohim. It seems that Forester’s father, though
a very gentle and kind-hearted man, was a very
shrewd one, and having been accustomed to
the discovery, in the course of his practice, of
all sorts of pranks and roguery, was less dis-
posed to place confidence in others till he knew
the confidence was deserved, than Forester
himself was, who had less experience. And


150 Marco Pau In VERMONT.

The way that Marco was found out.



when he knew that Forester had gone away,
leaving Marco alone, he doubted a little whether
he would remain industriously at his work.
While he was thinking of this, he heard a slight
noise which Marco made with his feet against
the clapboards of the house in getting out the
window. He therefore came into the study a
moment afterward, and found that Marco had
gone. He looked out the window and saw him
going off toward the other boys. Just at that
moment the man came to help him prune his
trees, but before he began this work he went
into the house to James, called him to a win-
dow and pointed out Marco to him, and said,

“I want you, James, to follow him, and keep
in sight of him until he returns, but if possible
don’t let him see you. Say nothing to me
about it, but give my son Forester an account
of all that you observe.”

James did as he was directed, and when For-
ester came back he told him the whole story,
just before Forester went into the study. So
that Forester knew all about it, before Marco
saw him. James managed the affair very
adroitly, for he kept himself entirely out of sight
except in one instance, and that was when the
boys fell into the water. He then rushed to-
A ConrFression. 151
Marco much perplexed. His conclusions,
ward them for fear that they might be drowned,
but he stopped on the bank when he saw that

there was no danger, and disappeared again be-
fore Marco had time to recognize him.
152 Marco Pauit in VeEerRMonrt.

‘A boat’s crew. The coxswain.



Cuarprer 1X.
BoatTine.

ye alterations and improvements, which

Forester had ordered in the boat, were
completed at the time promised. Marco said
that it would require a crew of eight to man
the boat properly: six oarsmen, a bowman,
and acoxswain. Marco pronounced this word
as if it was spelt cozen. This is the proper
way to pronounce it. It means the one who
sits in the stern, to steer the boat and direct the
rowers. In fact, the coxswain is the commander
of the boat’s crew.

“ IT will be bowman,” said Marco, “and you
can be coxswain, and then we shall want six
boys for oarsmen.”

“You will have to explain to me then what
my duties will be,” said Forester, “for I don’t
even know what a coxswain is.”

“Why, he’s the commander,” said Marco.
“ He gives all the orders.”

“Then you must be coxswain at first,” said
Forester, “for I don’t know any thing about it.
BoatTine. 153
Arrangements, Boys invited.

You have got to teach us all. After I have
learned to manage a boat with six oars, man-of-
war fashion, I should like to be coxswain some-
times very much. And it seems to me,” added
Forester, “that you and I had better go down
first alone, until you get me taught, and then we
can get the boys to come afterward.”

“O no,” said Marco, “ you'll all learn easily
enough together. 1 can tell you all exactly
what to do.”

Forester acceded to this proposal, and they
made out a list of six boys, and Forester author-
ized Marco to invite them to come. “Be sure,” |
said Forester, “ to tell their parents that we are
going out in a boat, and tell them that I am go-
ing too.” Marco did this. The boys all glad-
ly accepted the invitation. They came first to
the house, and then proceeded by a path, from
the foot of the garden, which led to the mill-
pond. It was about half-past one when they
reached the boat.

Here there was a great scene of confusion, as
the boys all commenced talking and asking
questions together. They found the boat in
fine order, being perfectly tight and dry, and
the new seats being all in their places. The
oars, however, were not there. Forester re-
154 Marco Paun in VERMonrT.

Oars. Boys must wait for orders.

commended to Marco to send a detachment of
his men, to go to the wagon-maker’s shop and
get them. So Marco sent off three of the boys,
‘calculating very correctly that they could bring
two oars apiece. Before many minutes they
returned, each of the boys having two oars, one
on each shoulder.

The other boys immediately began to take
the oars, and they all advanced together toward
the boat, to get in.

“ Stop,” exclaimed Marco, “stop, boys! you
must not go aboard without an order. I’m cox-
swain; you must wait till I tell you, before one
of you goes aboard. John, come out.”

John, who had stepped into the boat, came
back again on hearing this peremptory order,
and the boys waited on the bank. Marco then
told them to put the oars in. The boys began
to pitch them in, in confusion, some falling upon
the thwarts, and some into the bottom of the
boat.

“No,—stop,” said Marco; “that isn’t the
way. Put ’em in in order.”

“Yes, put ’em in order,” said John. “ Let’s
put ’em in order.”

“Lay ’em along the thwarts,” said Marco,
“the blades forward.”
Boaringe. 155

Arrangement of the oars. The recruits too eager.

Marco explained to the boys how to place
the oars. They were laid along the middle of
the thwarts so as to leave room to sit by the
side of them. They were placed in such a man-
ner that the handle of one came upon each,
seat.

“ Aboard !” said Marco, in a military tone.

The boys did not understand that order, and
of course did not obey it.

« Aboard, I say !” repeated Marco ; “ when!
say Aboard, you must all get into the boat.”

With this explanation of the word of com-
mand, the boys understood what they were to
do, and got aboard the boat as fast as they
could. There was much confusion among
them in getting their seats. Several of them
began to take up their oars, until they were for-
bidden to do so by Marco, in a loud voice.

“You must not touch the oars,” said he,
“until I say Toss. Then you must take them
and toss them right up in the air.”

“ How ?” said one of the boys, named Joseph.
“ How, Marco ?”

This question was scarcely heard amid the
confusion.

“ Be silent, boys; don’t talk, and don’t stop
to ask how, but do just as I tell you.”
156 Marco Pauu in VERMONT.



Marco’s explanations, “Toss.”



Marco was so much accustomed to the idea
which sailors attach to the word ¢ess, and to the
manner in which they perform the evolution,
that he forgot how many different ways there
might be of tossing up an oar. The proper way
is, when the command is given, for each oars-
man to: raise the blade of his oar quick, but
gently, into the air, letting the end of the handle
rest upon the thwart. Jt is then in a position
to be let down into the water conveniently when
the next order, which is, Let fall, is given.

The raising of the oars, and then letting them
fall, all exactly together, by the crew of a man-
of-war’s boat, makes a very pretty spectacle.

The boys, however, knew nothing about this,
for Marco, as it was all very plain and familiar
to him, did not realize the necessity of making
very minute explanations to such new recruits
as those that were under his command. Ac-
cordingly, when the order came to toss, some
of the boys sat still, looking at Marco, and not
knowing what to do; others raised their oars
into the air, some one way and some another ;
and Joseph, who was a little discomposed by
the rebuff he had met with, concluded that he
would obey as literally as possible, let what
would come of it, and he gave his oar a high
BoaTINe. 157
Confusion. Much noise.

toss into the air.
It fell at a short
distance from him
into the water,went §
down fora moment §
out of sight, and 3
then, shooting out 3
for half its length,
it fell over upon its -
side and began to
float away.

Hereupon = en-
sued just. such a
scene of laughter,
shouts, and confusion as might have been ex-
pected. All began to shout out exclamations
and orders, and to give directions how to pro-
ceed to recover the lost oar. The boys whose
oars were still left, thrust them confusedly into
the water, and began pushing, poking, and pad-
dling with them, in order to get the boat out to
where Joseph’s oar was floating. All this time
Forester remained on the bank, laughing at
this specimen of nautical command and subor-
dination.

After a time the oar was recovered, and
Marco, after much scolding and vociferation,


158 Marco Paut In VERMONT.

New explanations. The stroke-oarsman.

got his crew in order again. Forester said that
he would remain where he was, on the bank,
until Marco had tried his oarsmen a little.
So Marco went on giving his orders. He suc-
ceeded finally in getting the boys all in their
seats again, with their oars in their hands.

“ Now, boys, mind,” said he, “and I'll tell
you exactly what to do. Attention! When
I say Attention, you must all stop talking. At-
tention! Now you mustn’t speak a word. You
must hold your oars out over the water and
have them all ready, the handles in your hands,
and when I say Give way, then you must all
begin to row, all together exactly, so as to keep
the stroke. You must keep the stroke with the
stroke-oarsman.”

But the boys did not know who the stroke-
oarsman was, and they began clamorously to
inquire, notwithstanding the injunction to si-
lence which they had received. Marco ex-

plained to them that the stroke-oarsman was
the one who sat nearest to him, that is, the one
farthest aft. As the oarsmen were all sitting
with their backs toward the bow of the boat,
their faces were toward the stern, and therefore
the one who sat farthest aft could be seen by
all the rest. This is the reason why the thwart
BoaTINa. 159
Keeping the stroke. § Give way.”

which is farthest aft is made the seat of the best
oarsman, and the others are required to make
their motions keep time with his. For the oars
in a boat that is fully manned are so close to-
gether, that, unless they keep time exactly with
each other, the blades would cross and hit one
another in utter confusion. But if they keep
the stroke, as they call it, exactly together, all
goes right. For this reason the oarsman who
sits aft, by whose oar the movements of all the
other oars are to be regulated, is called the
stroke-oarsman.

The boys, however, knew nothing of all this.
Marco contented himself with giving one gen-
eral direction to them, to keep the stroke with
the stroke-oarsman, and to begin when he gave
the order, “ Give way.” Accordingly, after all
were silent again, the oars being extended over
the water, and Forester standing on the bank
watching the operation, Marco called out in the
tone of command, “ Give way !”

The boys immediately began to row, all look-
ing at the stroke-oarsman, but failing entirely
to keep time with him. The oars thumped
against each other, crossed each other, and
made all manner of confusion. Some could not
get into the water, and others could not get out ;
160 Marco Paut in VERMONT.



Great confusion. “ Oars.”



and Joseph’s oar,
# which somehow or
- other came out too
¢ suddenly, while he
= was pulling hard
_ upon it, caused him
, to pitch backward
off his seat and
i- tumble over into
- the bottom of the
boat.

“Oars!” — said

BAD ROWING. Marco, “Oars!”

What Marco
meant by oars they-did not know, so they paid
no attention to the command, but some stopped
rowing in despair, while others kept on, banging
the blades of the oars against one another, and
plashing the water, but produced no effect
whatever in respect to propelling the boat. In
the mean time the air was filled with shouts of
laughter and loud vociferations.

“Oars!” exclaimed Marco again, with the
voice of a colonel at the head of his regiment.
“Oars! Why don’t you stop when I say
Oars ?”

The boys began to. stop, shouting to one


BoatTine. 161

Marco’s despair. Fault in the commander.

another, “Stop!” “Stop!” In a few minutes
all was still again. The boys began to take
their oars in, and one of them rose and said,

“ Poh! this is all nonsense. You can’t do
any thing with oars. I'd rather have one good
paddle than all the oars in New York.”

In fact, Marco himself began to despair. He
uttered some impatient exclamations, and tried
to paddle the boat toward the shore. ~But he
found he was almost as awkward in managing
a paddle, as the other boys were in working
oars. He succeeded, however, at last, in get-
ting the boat to the shore, and then he told the
boys that they might as well get out, for they
could not do any thing at all about rowing.

“You don’t seem to get along very well,
Marco,” said Forester; “ what is the matter ?”

“ Why, I havn’t got any crew. They don’t
know any thing about it.”

“It seems to me the fault is in the comman-
der,” said Forester.

“In me?” said Marco. “ Why 1 ordered
them right, but they wouldn’t obey.”!

“ Yes, your orders would have been right, if
you had had a trained crew. But you don’t
manage in the right way to teach raw recruits.”

L
162 Marco Paut in VeERMonrT.

Forester takes command.

“I wish you would try, then, cousin Fores-
ter,” said Marco.

“ Well,” said Forester, “I have no objection
to try. Boys, are you willing to have me for
commander ?”

“ Yes, sir,” “ Yes, sir,” said all the boys.

“T shall be a great deal more strict than
Marco,” said Forester. “So I don’t expect
that you will like me. But I will try. I don’t
want quite so many oarsmen to begin with; I
should rather teach a few at a time. Are there
any of you that would like to come ashore, and
let the rest practice first ?”

None of the boys moved. They all ‘wished
to practice first. This was just as Forester ex-
pected.

“ Very well,” said Forester ; “I know how I
can thin out my crew. As fast as I find that
you don’t obey my orders, I shall put you
ashore.”

“But suppose we don’t understand ?” said
one of the boys.

“T shall explain fully beforehand what you
are todo. And, Marco, you must observe how
I manage, and then you will know another time.
When you have got any thing to teach, the art
consists in dividing the lesson into a great many
Boatine. 163

Short steps. Marco bowman. Forester’s management,

very short steps, and letting your pupils take
one at a time.”

Forester knew nothing about managing a
boat’s crew until that day, but he had observed
very attentively all the orders which Marco
had given, and noticed their meaning, and thus
he was prepared to manceuver the boat as far
as Marco had gone in giving his orders. He
accordingly stepped into the boat and took
Marco’s place; while Marco himself walked
forward and took his place at the bow of the
boat, saying that he was going to be bowman.

Marco,” said Forester, “ you say that when
the order is Attention, the crew must be silent ;
what is the order when I want to give them
liberty to talk again ?”

“ Crew at ease,” said Marco.

“Very well. Now, boys, when I say Atten-
tion, you must be still, look at me, hear all I
say, and obey the orders as exactly as you can,
but ask no questions and give me no advice,
nor speak to one another, till I say, Crew at
ease. Then you can talk again. Perhaps two
or three of you will disobey, and I have no ob-
jection to that, as I should like some excuse for
putting some of you ashore.”

Forester smiled as he said this, and every
164. Marco Paun in VERMONT.

Boys very attentive.



boy determined that he would not be the one
to be sent ashore.

“ Attention !” said Forester.

Forester then put his paddle into the water
and paddled the boat out into the pond a little
way. While he was doing this, there was a
dead silence on board the boat. Not a boy
spoke a word; and when, at last, Forester stop-
ped paddling, the boat floated on a little way
gently through the water, and not a sound was
to be heard except the distant barking of a dog
on the opposite shore.

“ Crew at ease,” said Forester. The boys
laughed, changed their -positions, and began to
talk.

“I didn’t get any of you ashore then,” said
Forester, “ but I shall succeed the next time, for
I shall watch my opportunity when you are all
busy talking, and say, Attention, suddenly ; then
you will not all stop in an instant, but some will

Â¥go on just to finish their sentence, and this will
be disobeying the order, and so I shall get you
ashore.”

The boys laughed ; they thought that it was
not very good policy for Forester to give them
this warning of his intention, as it put them all
upon their guard. Presently the word of com-
BoaTIna. 165

The boys learn. Forester’s good management,

mand came very suddenly —“ Attention !”
Every voice was hushed in an instant ; the boys,
assumed immediately an erect position, and
looked directly toward Forester.

“ Joseph,” said Forester, “ when I give order
Toss, you are to take up your oar and raise the
blade into the air, and hold it perpendicularly,
with the end of the handle resting on the thwart
by your side, on the side of the boat opposite to
the one on which you are going to row,—
Toss !”

So Joseph raised his oar in the manner di-
rected, the other boys looking on.

“ Let it down again,” said Forester. Joseph
obeyed.

“ Crew at ease,” said Forester.

Forester acted very wisely in not keeping the
attention of the crew very long at atime. By
relieving them very frequently, he made the
distinction between being under orders and at
ease a very marked and striking one, so that
the boys easily kept it in mind. In a few mo-
ments he commanded attention again, with the
same success as before. He then ordered
another boy to toss his oar, then another, and so
on, until he had taught the movement to each
one separately. He gave to each one such ex-
166 Marco Pauut in VeERMonrT.

ee
The boys succeed. Forester teachos other manceuvers,

planations as he needed, and when necessary
he made them perform the evolution twice, so
as to be sure that each one understood exactly
what was to be done. Then Forester gave the
command for them all to toss together, and they
did so quite successfully. The oars rose and
stood perpendicularly like so many masts ; while
Forester paddled the boat slowly through the
water. Then he directed the boys to let the
oars down again, gently, to their places along
the thwarts, and put the crew at ease.

The boys perceived now that they were
making progress. They were gaining slowly,
it is true, but surely, and Marco saw where the
cause of his failure was. He had not realized
how entirely ignorant all these boys were of
the whole mystery of managing an oar and of
acting in concert ; and besides, he had not had
experience enough as a teacher, to know how
short the steps must be made, in teaching any
science or art which is entirely new.

In the same slow and cautious manner, For-
ester taught the boys to let the blades of their
oars fall gently into the water, at the command,
“ Let fall.” He taught one at a time, as before,
each boy dropping the blades into the water and
letting the middle of the oar come into the row-
Boatinae. 167

Forester teaches them to row.

lock, while he held the handle in his hands
ready to row. Then, without letting them row
any, he ordered them to toss again ; that is, to
raise the oars out of the water and hold them in
the air, with the end of the handle resting upon
the thwart. He drilled them in this exercise
for some time, until they could go through it
with ease, regularity, and dispatch. He then
gave the order, “ Crew at ease,” and let the
boys rest themselves and enjoy conversation.

While they were resting, Forester paddled
them about. The boys asked him when he was
going to let them row, and Forester told them
that perhaps they had had drilling enough for
one day, and if they chose he would not require
any thing more of them, but would paddle them
about and let them amuse themselves. But
they were all eager to learn to row. So For-
ester consented.

He taught them the use of the oar, in the
same slow and cautious manner by which his
preceding instructions had been characterized.
He made one learn at a time, explaining to him
minutely every motion. As each one, in turn,
practiced these instructions, the rest looked on,
observing every thing very attentively, so as
to be ready when their turn should come. At
168 Marco Paut in VERMONT.



Gradual progress. Caution,

length, when they had rowed separately, he
tried first two, and then four, and then six to-
gether, and finally got them so trained that they
could keep the stroke very well. While they
were pulling in this manner, the boat would
shoot ahead very rapidly. When he wanted
them to stop, he would call out, “ Oars.” This
was the order for them to stop rowing, after
they had finished the stroke which they had
commenced, and to hold the oars in a horizontal
position, with the blades just above the water,
ready to begin again whenever he should give
the command.

At first the boys were inclined to stop im-
mediately, even if they were in the middle of a
stroke, if they heard the command, oars. But
Marco said that this was wrong ; they must fin-
ish the stroke, he said, if they had commenced
it, and then all take the oars out of the water
regularly together. Forester was careful too
to give the order always between the middle and
the end of a stroke, so that the obeying of the
order came immediately after the issuing of it

By this means Forester could stop them in a
moment, when any thing went wrong. He
would order, “ Give way,” and then the boys
would all begin to pull their oars. As soon as
BoatTING. 169

Marco’s wishes.

any of them lost the
stroke, or whenev-
er any oars began
to. interfere, or any
other difficulty or
accident occurred
he would immedi-
ately give the or- «
der, “ Oars.” This
would instantly ar-
rest the rowing,
before the difficul- =
ty became serious. GOOD ROWING.
Then, after a mo-
ment’s pause he would say, “ Give way,” again,
when they would once more begin rowing all
together. All this time, he sat in the stern and
steered the boat wherever they wanted to go.
Marco wished to have Forester teach the
boys how to back water, and to trail oars, and
to put the oars apeak, and to perform various
other evolutions. But Forester was very slow
in going on to new manceuvers before the old
ones were made perfectly familiar. He accord-
ingly spent nearly an hour in rowing about the
pond, up and down, to make the boys familiar
with the stroke. He found, as is, in fact, uni-


170 Marco Pauu in VERMONT.

Improvement of the boys.

versally the case with beginners in the art of
rowing, that they were very prone to row faster
and faster, that is, to accelerate their strokes,
instead of rowing regularly, keeping continually
the same time. They gradually improved,
however, in respect to this fault, and by the
middle of the afternoon Marco began to think
that they were quite a good crew. They prac-
ticed several new evolutions during the latter
part of the afternoon, and just before tea time
they all went home, much pleased with the af-
ternoon’s enjoyment, and with the new knowl-
edge and skill which they had acquired. They
also planned another excursion the following
week.
An ExXpepDITION. 171

An expedition planned. Duty of a bowman.

CHAPTER X.

Aw ExpepDITION.

HORESTER and Marco got their boat’s
crew well trained in the course of a week
or two, and one pleasant day in September they
planned a long expedition in their boat. The
boys collected at the house of the owner of the
boat, at one o’clock. Two of them carried a
large basket which Forester had provided. It
was quite heavy, and they did not know what
was in it ; but they supposed that it was a store
of some sort of provisions for a supper, in case
they should be gone so long as to need a supper.
Forester carried a hatchet also.

At the proper word of command, the boys
got into the boat and took their several stations.
Marco took his place forward to act as bow-
man. It is the duty of the bowman to keep a
lookout forward, that the boat does not run into
any danger ; and also, when the boat comes to
land, to step out first and hold it by the painter,
that is, the rope which is fastened to the bow,
while the others get out. Marco had a pole,
172 Marco Paut in Vermont.

" Ordera, Boys quite pleased.
Orders

with an iron spike and also an iron hook in the
end of it, which he used to fend off with, as
they called it, when the boat was in danger of
running against any obstacle. This was called
a boat-hook.

« Attention!” said Forester, when the boys
were all seated.

“ Toss!”

Hereupon the boys raised the oars into the
air, ready to let them down into the water.

« Let fall!” said Forester. The oars all fell
gently and together into their places.

“ Give way !” said Forester.

The boat began-immediately to glide rapidly
over the water, under the impulse which the
boys gave it in rowing. “ Crew at ease,” said
Forester.

So the boys went on rowing, but understood
that they had liberty to talk. One of them
wished to know where Forester was going with
them; but Forester said it was entirely con-
trary to the discipline aboard a man-of-war for
the crew to ask the captain where they were
going. “Besides,” said Forester, “though I
could easily tell you, I think you will enjoy the
expedition more, to know nothing about it be-
forehand, but to take every thing as it comes.”
An EXPEDITION. 173

The boat approaches the land. “ Fegd off.”

Forester steered in such a manner as to put
the head of the boat toward a bank at some
distance from where they started, on which
there was a thick forest of firs and other ever-
greens, growing near the water. When they
got pretty near the land, he gave the order for
attention, that they might observe silence in
going through whatever manceuvers were re-
quired here. The next order was, Oars. At
this the oarsmen stopped rowing, and held
their oars horizontally over the water. The
boat in the mean time was gliding on toward
the shore. ,

“ Aboard !” said Forester.

The crew then gently raised their oars into
the air, and passed them over their heads into
the boat, laying them upon the thwarts in their
proper position, along the middle of the boat.
By this order the crew supposed that Forester
was going to land.

“Bear a hand, Mr. Bowman,” said Forester,
“and fend off from the shore.” .

Forester, by means. of his paddle, had steered
the boat up to a log which lay in the edge of
the water, and Marco, at first fending off from
the log, to keep the boat from striking hard, and
then holding on to it with his hook, got it into
174 Marco Paut in VERMONT.

Mysterious doings. Forester cuts up the stem of the tree.

a good position for landing, and held it se-
curely.

“ Crew ashore,” said Forester.

The crew, who had learned all these orders
in the course of the repeated instructions which
Forester and Marco had given them, began to
rise and to walk toward the bow of the boat
and to go ashore. Marco landed first, and held
the boat with his boat-hook, while the rest got
out. Forester then ordered Marco to make
the boat fast, until they were ready to embark
again.

Forester then went up in the woods a little
way, with his hatchet in his hand, and began to
look about among the trees. Finally, he se-
lected a small tree, with a round, straight stem,
and began to cut itdown. The boys gathered
around him, wondering what it could be for.
Forester smiled, and worked on in silence, de-
clining to answer any of their questions. Mar-
co said it was for a mast, he knew, but when
they asked him where the sail was, he seemed
perplexed, and could not answer.

As soon, however, as the tree was cut down,
it was evident that it was not intended to be
used as a mast, for Forester began at once to cut
it up into lengths of about two feet long. What
An ExXpeEpDITION. 175

Boat proceeds.





could be his design, the boys were utterly un-
able to imagine. He said nothing, but ordered
the boys to take these lengths, one by one, and
put them into the boat. There were five in all.
Then he ordered the crew on board again.
Marco got in last. When all were seated, the
order was given to shove off, the oars were
tossed—then let fall into the water. He order-
ed them to back water first, by which manceuver
the boat was backed off from the land into deep
water. Then he commanded them to give way,
and at the same time bringing the stern of the
boat round by his paddle, the boat was made to
shoot swiftly down the stream.

The boat went rapidly forward along the
shores of the pond, and presently, on coming
round a wooded point, the mills appeared in
sight. As they approached the mills, they kept
pretty near the shore, and at length landed just
above the dam.

Forester ordered the crew ashore, at a place
where there was a road leading down to the
water's edge. This road was made by the
teams which came down to get logs and lumber
from the water. At Forester’s direction, the
boys drew the bow of the boat up a little way
upon the land. Then he ordered the boys to
176 Marco Pauu in VeERMonT.

The rollers. Boat drawn up.

take out the pieces of the stem of the little tree,
and he placed one of them under the bow as a
roller. The boys then took hold of the sides
of the boat, three on each side, each boy oppo-
site to his own row-lock, while Marco stood
ready to put under another roller. The ascent
was very gradual, so that the boat moved up
easily, and the boys were very much surprised
and delighted to see their boat thus running up
upon the land.

It seemed to them an exercise of great pow-
er to be able to take so large a boat so easily
and rapidly up such an ascent upon the land.
They were aided to do it by two principles.
One was the combination of their strength in
one united effort, and the other was the influ-
ence of the rollers in preventing the friction of
the bottom of the boat upon the ground.

Presently the whole length of the boat was
out of water and resting on four rollers, which
Marco had put under it, one by one, as it had
advanced. Forester would then call out,
“ Ahead with her!” when the boys would
move about two steps. Then Forester would
give the command, “ Hold on,” and they would
stop. By this time one of the rollers would
Aw EXPEDITION. 177

Boat taken round the falls.

come out behind,
and Marco would , 3
take it up and car- #4
ry it round for- §
ward, and place it
under the bow, and
Forester would a
then say, “ Ahead
with her!” again,
and the boat would
immediately ad- 5
vance again up = ee

the acclivity. THE PORTAGE

In a very few

minutes the boat was thus rolled up into a sort
of a road, where the way was level. Here it
went very easily. Presently it began to de-
scend, and soon the boys:saw that Forester
was taking a sort of path which led by a gentle
slope down to the water immediately below the
mill. They were very much pleased at this, for,
as they had had a great many excursions al-
ready on the mill-pond, they had become fa-
miliar with it in all its parts, and they were
much animated at the idea of exploring new
regions. In going down to the water on the
‘ower side of the mill, they had, of course, no


178 Marco Paut in VERMONT.

Down hill. Rapid current.

exertion to make to draw the boat, as its own
weight was more than sufficient to carry it
down upon the rollers. They only had to hold
it back to prevent its running down too fast,
and to keep it properly guided.

“It goes down pretty easy,” said Marco;
“but I don’t see how you are ever going to get
it back again.”

It was, in fact, a long and rather steep de-
scent. The boys thought that it would require
far more strength than they could exercise, to
bring the boat up such an inclination. For-
ester told them not to fear. He said that a
good commander never put too much upon his
men, or voluntarily got them into any difficulty
without planning beforehand a way to get out.

They soon got down to the water’s edge
again. Here, instead of the broad and smooth
pond which they had above the dam, they found
a stream eddying, and foaming, and flowing
rapidly down between rocks and logs. There
was a bridge across the stream too, a short dis-
tance below. The boys were a little inclined
to be afraid to embark, in what appeared to be
a rather dangerous navigation, but they had
confidence in Forester, and so they readily
obeyed when Forester ordered the crew aboard.
‘An Expepirion. 179
‘Bridge. tst=—
“Now, Mr. Bowman,” said Forester, “keep
a sharp lookout ahead for rocks and snags, and
fend off well when there is any danger.”

So Marco kneeled upon a small seat at the
bow of the boat, and looked into the water be-
fore him, while Forester propelled and guided
the boat with his paddle. They advanced
slowly and by a very tortuous course, so as to
avoid the rocks and shallows, and at length,
just above the bridge, they came to a wider and
smoother passage of water: and here Forester
ordered the oars out. There was only room
for them to take four or five strokes before they
came to the bridge, and under the bridge there
was only a very narrow passage where they
could go through. This passage was between
one of the piers and a gravel bed. As they ad-
vanced toward it, Forester called out, “ Give
way strong !” and all the boys pulled their oars
with all their strength, without, however, accel-
erating the strokes. This gave the boat a rapid
headway, and then Forester gave the order to
trail, when the boys simultaneously lifted the
oars out of the row-locks and let them drift in
the water alongside of the boat. As the boat
was advancing very swiftly, the oars were im-
mediately swept in close to her sides, and thus
180 Marco Paut in VERMONT.



« Recover.” Oars apeak.



were out of the way, and the boat glided safely
and swiftly through the passage, and emerged
into a broader sheet of smooth water beyond.

« Recover !” said Forester. The boys then,
by a peculiar manceuver which they had learned
by much practice, brought back their oars into
the row-locks, and raised the blades out of the
water, so as to get them into a position for row-
ing. “Give way!” said Forester, and imme-
diately they were all in motion, the boat gliding
swiftly down the stream.

After they had gone on in this way a few
minutes, Forester ordered the oars apeak, and
put the crew at ease. When the oars are apeak,
they are drawn in a little way, so that the
handle of each oar may be passed under a sort
of cleat or ledge, which runs along on the in-
side of the boat near the upper edge of it.
This keeps the oar firm in its place without the
necessity of holding it, the handle being under
this cleat, while the middle of the oar rests in
the row-lock. Thus the oarsmen are relieved
from the necessity of holding their oars, and yet
the oars are all ready to be seized again in a
moment, whenever it becomes desirable to com-
mence rowing.

Meantime the boat slowly drifted down the
An Expepirion. 181

a eee
Boat goes down stream. A council of war.

stream. The water was here deep and com-
paratively still, and the boys amused themselves
with looking over the sides into the depths of
the water. They glided noiselessly along over
various objects,—now a great flat rock, now a
sunken tree, and now a bed of yellow sand.
Every now and then, Forester would order the
oars out, and make the oarsmen give way for a
few strokes, so as to give the boat what they
called steerage way, that is, way through the
water, so that holding the paddle in one posi-
tion or the other would steer it. In this way
Forester guided the boat in the right direction,
keeping it pretty near the middle of the stream.

This mill-stream, as has already been stated,
emptied into the river, and the boat was now
rapidly approaching the place of junction. In
a few minutes more the river came into view.
The boys could see it at some distance before
them, running with great rapidity by a rocky
point of land which formed one side of the
mouth of the brook.

“ Now, boys,” said Forester, “is it safe for
us to go out into that current ?”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “ by all means,—let us

”

go.
182 Marco Paut 1n VeRmonrT.

A little mathematics.

“Perhaps we shall upset in the rips,” said
some of the boys.

“No matter if we do,” said Marco; “it is
not deep in the rips, and of course there is no
danger.”

“ That isin our favor certainly,” said Forester.
“ Whenever the current sets strong, there it is
sure to be shallow, so that if we upset we should
not be drowned ; and where it is deep, so as to
make it dangerous for us to get in, it is always
sti]l, and thus there is no danger of upsetting.”

“ What is the reason of that?” said one of
the boys.

“ The reason is given in this way,” said For-
ester, “in the college mathematics. The velo-
city of a stream is inversely as the area of the
section.”

The boys did not understand such mathemat-
ical phraseology as this, and so Forester clothed
his explanation in different language. He said
that where the stream was shallow or narrow,
the current must be more rapid, in order to get
all the water through in so small a space, but
where it is deep, it may move slowly.

Forester landed his crew upon the rocky
point, where they had a very pleasant view up
and down the river. He proposed to them to
Aw ExpepitTIon. 183

The encampment. The silver mug.

have their luncheon there, and to this they
agreed. So they went back to the edge of the
rocks, where there was a little grove of trees,
and they sat down upon a log which had been
worn smooth by the action of the water in
floods, and bleached by the sun.

There were plenty of dry sticks and slabs
lying about upon the shore, which Forester or-
dered the crew to collect in order to build a
fire. It was not cold, and they had no need of
a fire for any purposes of cooking, but a fire
would look cheerful and pleasant, and they
accordingly made one. Forester had some
matches in his pocket. Two of the crew
brought the basket from the boat, and when
they had opened it, they found an abundant
store of provisions. There was a dozen or
more of round cakes, and a large apple-pie,
which, as there were just eight of them, gave
forty-five degrees to each one. There was also
a jug of milk, and a silver mug, which Forester’s
mother had lent them for the excursion, to drink
out of.

The boys, whose appetites had been sharpened
by their exertions in the portage of the boat
round the falls, and in rowing, did not cease to
eat until the provisions were entirely exhausted,
184 Marco Paut in Vermont.

An absolute government.

and then they carried the empty basket back to
the boat. Soon after this, Forester summoned
what he called a council of war, to consider the
question whether they had better go down the
river. He said he wanted their true and deliber-
ate judgment in the case. He did not wish them
to say what they would like, merely, but what
they thought, on the whole, was best. He told
them that he should not be governed by their
advice, but, after hearing all that they had to
say, he should act according to his own judg-
ment.

“Then what’s the use of asking us at all ?”
said Marco.

“Why, what you will say may modify my
judgment. I did not say that I shall decide
according to my judgment as it is now, but as
it will be after I have heard what you will
have to say. I shall be influenced perhaps by
your reasons, but I shall decide myself. That
is the theory of a council of war. The com-
mander may be influenced by the arguments
of his subalterns, but he is not governed by
their votes.”

Forester then called upon each of the boys,
in succession, to give his opinion on the point.
Marco was in favor of going down the river, but
An ExpepiTIon. 185

‘They embark again. The river.

all the rest, though they said that they should
like to go very much, thought it would not
answer, as it would be almost impossible to get
the boat up again over the rips. After the
consultation was concluded, Forester said,
“ Well, boys, you have all given wise opinions
except Marco, and his is not wise. Now we'll
go aboard the boat.”

“ Crew aboard !” said Forester. The other
orders followed in rapid succession : Attention !
Toss! Let fall! Back water! Oars! Give
way! The boys considered it settled, on hear-
ing what Forester had said of the wisdom of
their several opinions, that they were now going
back toward the mill; but how they were going
to get the boat back above the dam they did not
know, though they did not doubt that Forester
had some good plan which he had not explained
tothem. Instead, however, of turning the head
of the boat up the stream, Forester pointed it
toward the river. They supposed that he was
going out to the edge of the river, and that then
he would turn and come back ; but, to their
utter amazement, he pushed boldly on directly
into the current, and then, putting his helm
hard up and calling out to the crew to give
way strong, the boat swept round into the very
186 Marco Pauu in VERMONT.



The rips,



center of the stream and shot down the river.
over the rips like an arrow.



THE EXPEDITION.

“Give way, boys, hearty,” said Forester.
“Give way strong.”

The boys pulled with all their strength, and
the boat went swifter and swifter. Forester
kept it in the middle of the current, where the
water was deepest, though even here it was
very shallow. Marco, im the mean time, who
was stationed at the bows, kept a sharp lookout
An ExpepDiITIoNn. 187

The boys surprised. Forester goes down the stream.

forward, and gave Forester notice of any im-
pending danger. They soon got through the
rips and came to the deep and still water below,
where the current was gentle and the surface
smooth. Here Forester ordered the oars apeak,
and the crew at ease.

“ We never shall get back in the world,” said
one of the boys; “forty men couldn’t row the
boat up those rips.”

“Let us try,’ said Forester. So he ordered
the oars out again, and put the boat under way.
He brought her head round so as to point up
stream, and calling upon the crew to give way
strong, he forced her back into the rapid water.
They went on a few rods, but long before they
reached the most rapid part, they found that
with all their exertions they could make no pro-
gress. The boat seemed stationary. “Oars,”
said Forester. The boys stopped rowing, hold-
ing their oars in the air, just above the water.
Forester then, by means of his paddle, turned
the boat round again, saying, “ Well, if we can’t
go up, we can go down stream.” He then or-
dered the crew to give way again, and they
began to glide along swiftly down the river.

. The boys wondered how Forester was going
to get back, but he told them to give themselves
188 Marco Paut in VERMONT.

He will not explain.

no concern on that score. “That responsibility
rests on me,” said he.

“But how came you to come down here,”
said Marco, “when you said my advice wasn’t
good ?”

“T said your opinion was not wise. The
boys who advised me not to come were wiser
than you. They gave better advice, so far as
they and you understood the case. But I
know something which you do not, as is usual
with commanders,—and therefore I came down.
In view of all that you know, it would have
been wisest to have gone back, but in view of
all that I know, it is wisest to come down.”

The curiosity of the boys was very much ex-
cited to know what it could be that Forester
knew which rendered coming down the river
wise ; but Forester would make no explanations.
He said that commanders were not generally
very communicative to their crews. In the
mean time the boat went on, sometimes shoot-
ing swiftly through the rapids, and sometimes
floating in a more calm and quiet manner on
the surface of the stiller water. In this way
they went on more than a mile, enjoying the
voyage very highly, and admiring the varied
Aw EXPEDITION. 189

A pleasant voyage. The return of the boat.

scenery which was presented to their view at
every turn of the stream.

At one place the boys landed upon a small
sandy beach under some overhanging rocks.
They amused themselves in climbing about the
rocks for a time, and then they were ordered
aboard again, and sailed on.

Now it happened that the river, in the part
of its course over which this voyage had been
performed, took a great circuit, and though they
had followed its course for more than a mile,
they were now drawing near to a place which
was not very far from Forester’s father’s house,
—being about as much below it, as the place
where the boat belonged in the mill-pond was
above it. As they approached the point where —
the river turned again, Marco, who was looking
out before, saw a sort of landing, where there
was a man standing, together with a yoke of
oxen. It was just sunset when they approached
this spot. When they arrived at it, the whole
mystery was explained, for they found that the
man was James, who lived at Forester’s father’s,
and the oxen were his father’s oxen. James
had come down, under an appointment which
Forester had secretly made with him, with the
190 Marco Paut in VERMONT.

Boat hauled across to the mill-pond. Portages.

oxen and a drag,
and by means of
them he hauled the
boat across to the
mill-pond again, by
a back road which
led directly across
‘ge the pastures, and
ifs lanched it safely
S again into the wa-
- ter close to the
dwelling of its
owner. So the
boys had, as it
were, the pleasure of sliding down hill, without
the labor of drawing their sleds up again.

Marco was very much pleased with this ex-
pedition. Forester told him when they got
home, that the Indians often carried their
canoes around falls, or from one river to an-
other, and that such carrying-places were called
portages.


Lost 1n THE Woops. 191

eee
Marco and James. James's plan. Marco’s requests,

Cuarrer XI,
Lost in THe Woops.

HILE Marco Paul was in Vermont, he
and Forester had aremarkable adventure
in the woods. They got lost in fact, and for a
time it seemed quite doubtful how they were
ever to find their way home. It happened thus.
One morning in the fall of the year, Marco,
walking along toward the barn with James,
asked James what he was going to do that day.
“TI expect that I am going to gather apples,”
said James.
“ Well,” said Marco. “Are you going in the
cart ?”
“Yes,” said James.
“And may I go with you?” asked Marco.
“ Yes,” said James.
“ And help gather the apples ? said Marco.
“Yes,” said James.
- “And drive the oxen a little way ?” asked
Marco.
“ Yes,” said James.
192 Maxrco Pauut in VERMONT.



The goad-stick. Question to be settled. The horses.

“Well,” said Marco. “I will run and get
my goad-stick.”

Marco went toward the house intending to
go in and get his goad-stick. On his way he
met his uncle. His uncle asked him whether
James was out in the barn. Marco said that
he was, and his uncle then asked him to go and
request James to come to him. Marco did so,
and he and James then came along toward the
house together.

Marco’s uncle stood upon the step of the
door.

“ James,” said he, “I was thinking that we
ought to send for the horses ;—and the apples
ought to be gathered too. Which is it best to
do?” .

“hardly know, sir,” said James. “It is high
time that the apples were gathered, and yet we
promised to send for the horses to-day.”

“J can go and get the horses,” said Marco,—
“just as well as not. Where is it?”

“Oh no,” said his uncle. “It is ten or fifteen
miles from here. Isn’t it, James?”

« Yes,” said James, “by the road. I suppose
it is about four miles through the woods. I
was intending to walk there, through the woods,
and then to come home round by the road. It
Lost in tHE Woops. 193

Marco’s proposal to Forester. Forester acoedes to it.
eee

is rather a rough road for horses through the
woods.”

“ Let cousin Forester and me go,” said Mar-
co. “I will go and ask him.”

So Marco went and found Forester. When
Forester heard of the plan he was quite inclined
to accede to it. He had been much engaged
in studying for some time, and had had very
little exercise and recreation, so that he was
easily persuaded to undertake an expedition.
The plan was all soon agreed upon. The
horses had been put out to pasture at a farm-
er’s up the river about twelve miles. In going
that twelve miles the river took a great turn, so
that in fact the farm where the horses were
pastured was not, in a straight line, more than
four miles from Mr. Forester’s house. But the
intermediate country was a desolate and almost
impassable region of forests and mountains.
There was, indeed, a sort of footpath by which
it was possible for men to get through, but this
path was dangerous, and in fact almost imprac- .
ticable for horses. So James had formed the
plan of walking through the woods by the path,
and then of coming home by the road, riding
one of the horses and leading the other.

Forester and Marco concluded to adopt the

N
194 Marco Pauti in VERMONT.

The way. The school-house in the Jones district.



same plan; except that in coming home there
would be just a horse a-piece for them to ride.
They put up some provisions to eat on the way,
packing them in Marco’s knapsack. The knap-
sack, when it was ready, was strapped upon Mar-
co’s back, for he insisted on carrying it. For-
ester consented to this arrangement, secretly
intending, however, not to allow Marco to car-
ry the load very far.

Forester asked James if there would be any
difficulty about the way. James said that there
would not be. The path, though it was not an
easy one to travel, was very easy to find.

“You go on,” said he, “along the back road
about three quarters of a mile, and then you
will come to a small school-house on the left
hand side of the road, on a sort of hill. It is in
the Jones district.”

“ What sort of a school-house is it ?” asked
Forester.

“Tt is a small school-house, with a little cu-

_pola upon the top of it,” said James, “ fora bell.
It stands upon a knoll by the side of the road.
Just beyond it the main road turns to the right,
and there is a narrower road leading off to the
left through a gate. You must go through that
gate and then follow the path into the woods.”
Loar In THE Woops. 195

Through the garden and orchard. Apples, Back road.

“We can find it, I think,” said Forester.

“ Yes,” said Marco, “I know the place very
well.”

Forester said he thought that they should
find the way without any difficulty, and so bid-
ding his uncle and aunt good-bye, he and Mar-
co set out.

They went through the garden, and from the
garden they passed out through a small gate
into the orchard. Marco wished to go this way
in order to get some apples. He chose two
from off his favorite tree and put them into the
‘knapsack, and took another in his hand to eat
by the way. Forester did the same, only he
put the two that he carried with him, into his
pockets.

From the orchard the travelers walked across
a field and down into the glen, and after cross-
ing a brook upon some stepping-stones, they
ascended upon the other side, and presently
climbing over a fence, they came out into what
James had called the back road. They walked
along upon this road, for about three quarters
of a mile, until at last they came in sight of the
school-house. Marco spied it first.

“There,” said Marco, “that is the school-
house.”
196 Marco Paut in VERMONT.

‘SchooF-districts. Squirrel trap. Thomas Jones.

“How do you know that that is the one ?”
asked Forester.

“Oh, I know the Jones district very well,”
said Marco.

In New England the tract of country in-
cluded within the jurisdiction of a town, is di-
vided into districts for the establishment and
support of schools. These districts are called
school-districts, and each one is generally named
from some of the principal families that happen
to live in it. It happened that there were sev-
eral families of the name of Jones that lived in
this part of the town, and so their district was
called the Jones district. ,

“ How do you happen to know it?” said For-
ester.

“ Oh, I came out here two or three times with
Thomas Jones to set my squirrel trap,” said
Marco. “ There goes Thomas Jones now.”

“ Where ?” asked Forester.

“There,” said Marco, pointing along the
road a little way. ,

Forester looked forward, and saw in the road
before them a boy walking toward the school-
house, with his slate under his arm. Beyond
the boy, upon the knoll on the left side of the
road, was the school-house itself.
Lost rn THE Woobs. 197



The school-house. The great gate. Going through the bars.

The school-house
was not far from
the road, and there -..,
was a little grove
of trees behind it.
Beyond the school-
house, and almost
directly before
them, Marco and
Forester saw the
road turning alittle &
to the left toward = =
the gate. HS SUBUOL-HOU8S,

“There is the
gate,” said Marco, “ that we are to go through.”

“ Yes,” said Forester, “that must be the
one.”

Forester and Marco walked on until they
came to the school-house. Thomas got to the
school-house before them, and went in. For-
ester and Marco passed on and went through
the gate. They then went on beyond the gate
a little way till they came to a pair of bars.
Marco took down all but the topmost bar, and
Forester, stooping down, passed under. Marco
attempted to do the same; but forgetting that
he had a knapsack upon his back, he did not


198 Marco PauL in Vegmonrt.
“The woods. Birds. Conversation.

stoop low enough, and gave his knapsack such
a knock as almost threw him down. Fortu-
nately there was nothing frangible inside, and
so no damage was done. One of his apples was
mellowed a little ; that was all.

The path led the travelers first across a rough
and rocky pasture, and then it suddenly entered
a wood where every thing wore an expression
of wild and solemn grandeur. The trees were
very lofty, and consisted of tall stems, rising to
a vast height and surmounted above with a tuft
of branches, which together formed a broad
canopy over the heads of the travelers, and
produced a sort of somber twilight below.
Birds sang in plaintive notes on the tops of dis-
tant trees, and now and then a squirrel was
seen running along the ground, or climbing up
the trunk of some vast hemlock or pine.

“IT hope that we shall not lose our way in
these woods,” said Forester.

“Oh, there is no danger of that,” rejoined
Marco. “ The path is very plain.”

“Tt seems plain here,” said Forester, “ and I
presume that there can not be any danger, or
James would have recommended to us to go
the other way.”

“We shall come home the other way,” said
Lost in tHe Woops. 199

Marco. “I wonder if there are any saddles.
Twelve miles would be too far to ride bareback.”

“ Yes,” said Forester, “there are saddles. I
asked James about that.”

The path which Forester and Marco were
pursuing soon began to ascend. It ascended at
first gradually, and afterward more and more
precipitously, and at length began to wind
about among rocks and precipices in such a
manner, that Marco said he did not wonder at
all that James said it would be a rough road for
horses.

“IT think it is a very rough road for boys,”
said Forester.

“Boys?” repeated Marco. “Do you call
yourself boys.”

« For men then,” said Forester.

“But J am not a man,” said Marco.

“Then I don’t see how I can express my
idea,” said Forester.

Marco’s attention was here diverted from
the rhetorical difficulty in which Forester had
become involved, by a very deep chasin upon
one side of the path. He went to the brink of
it and could hear the roaring of a torrent far
below.

“T mean to throw astone down,” said Marco.
200 Marco Paun 1n VERMONT.

Marco rolls stones down. An unexpected difficulty.

He accordingly, after looking around for a
moment, found a stone about as large as his
head. This stone he contrived to bring to the
edge of the precipice and then to throw it over.
It went thundering down among the rocks and
trees below, while Marco stood upon the brink
and listened to the sound of the echoes and re-
verberations. He then got another stone larger
than the first, and threw that down; after which
he and Forester resumed their journey.

The path, though it was a very rough and
tortuous one, was pretty plain; and it is prob-
able that the travelers would have found no
difficulty in following it to the end of their
route, had it not been for an occurrence which
they had not at all anticipated, but which was
one, nevertheless, that has often taken place to
confuse the steps of mountain travelers and
make them lose their way. This occurrence
was a fall of snow.

It was not late enough in the year for snow
upon the lowlands, but snow falls very early in
the autumn upon the summits of mountains.
Marco and Forester had not anticipated stormy
weather of any kind, when they left home;
for the wind was west and the sky was clear.
When, however, they had accomplished about
Lost 1n THE Woops. 201

a
Snow squall. Marco pleased. Forester anxious.
aR

one half of their journey, large masses of fleecy
clouds began to drive over the mountains, and
presently, all at once, it began to snow. Marco
was extremely delighted to see the snow falling.
Forester was not so much pleased. On the
~ other hand, he looked somewhat concerned.
He did not at first think how the snow could
do them any serious injury, but he seemed to
have an undefined sense of danger from it, and
appeared uneasy. They both, however, walked
on.

The region through which the path led at the
time when the snow came on, was a tract of
fat land on the summit of the mountainous
‘ange, with small and scattered trees here and
shere upon it. The best thing, probably, for
the travelers to have done in the emergency
would have been to have turned round the mo-
ment it began to snow, and go back as fast as
possible by the way that they came, as long as
they were sure of the path, and then to wait until
the fallen snow had melted. If they found then
that the snow did not melt, so that they could
see the path again, it would be better to return
altogether, as their chance of being able to fol-
low the path back toward their home would be
much greater than that of pursuing it forward ;
202 Marco Paut in VERMONT.

They press forward. The flakes of snow.

for they might expect to find some guidance, in
going back, by their recognition of the place
which they had passed in ascending.

Forester, however, did not happen to think
of this; and so when it began to snow, his only
immediate desire was to go forward as fast as
possible, so as to get into the woods again where
he and Marco would be in some measure under
shelter.

Marco finding that Forester appeared some-
what anxious, began to feel some sentiment of
fear himself.

“ Who would have thought,” said he, “ that we
should have got caught out in this snow-storm ?”

“Qh, it is not a snow-storm,” replied For-
ester. “It is only a litle snow flurry. It will
be over in a few minutes.”

“ How do you know that it is not going to be
a snow-storm ?” asked Marco.

“Because storms never come out of the
west,” replied Forester.

It snowed, however, faster and faster, and
the ground soon began to be entirely whitened.
Forester pressed on, but he soon found himself
at a loss for his way. The air was so filled
with the descending flakes, that he could see
only a very short distance before him. The
Losr «1n THE Woobs. 203

Ground covered. Under the hemlock-tree.

view of the forests and mountains was cut off
on every side, and nothing presented itself to
the eye but the dim forms of the rocks and trees
which were near. These, too, were indistinct
and shapeless. The ground was soon entirely
covered, and all hope of finding the path en-
tirely disappeared. Forester went back then a
short distance, endeavoring to retrace his steps.
He followed the foot-prints a little way, but all
traces of them were soon obliterated. When
he found that the steps could no longer be seen,
he went toward a tree which he saw rising
dimly at a little distance before him. The tree
proved to be a large hemlock, with wide-spread-
ing branches. ‘There was a place under this
tree where the ground was bare, having been
sheltered from the snow by the branches of the
tree. There were some rocks too lying under
this tree. Forester walked up to them and sat
down. Marco followed his example.

“Well, Marco,” said Forester, “we are
really lost.”

“ And what are we going todo?” asked Mar-
co, with a countenance of great concern.

“ The first thing is,” said Forester, “to open
the knapsack, and see what there is inside that
is good to eat.”
201 Marco Pau. in Vermont.

The luncheon. A consultation. Camping out.

So Forester took the knapsack off from his
shoulders,—for he had taken it from Marco
some time before, and laying it upon a large
flat stone by his side, he began to open it, and
to take out the provisions.

Forester was afraid that he and Marco had
got themselves into somewhat serious difficulty,
but he wished to teach Marco that in emergen-
cies of such a nature, it would do no good to
give way to a panic, or to unnecessary anxiety.
So he assumed an unconcerned and contented
air, and made arrangements for the luncheon,
just as if they had stopped there to eat it of
their own accord, and without being in any
difficulty whatever about the prosecution of the
journey.

Marco, however, seemed to be quite uneasy.

“ What are we going to do?” said he. “If
we get lost in this snow-storm, we shall have to
stay in the woods perhaps all night.”

“Yes,” said Forester, “that we can do. We
have done that before.”

Forester here alluded to an occasion on which
he and Marco had spent the night in a hut in
the woods, when traveling in Maine.

“ But we had an axe then,” said Marco, “to
make a camp.”
Losr in tHe Woops. 205
“Three chances. Chance of finding the path. Second chance,

“Yes,” replied Forester, “that is true. I
don’t think, however, that we shall have to stay
in the woods all night now. We have three
chances for avoiding it.”

“ What are the three ?” said Marco.

“Why, in the first place,” replied Forester,
“ we can stay where we are until it stops snow-
ing,—in fact it has almost stopped now. Then
I presume that the sun will come out, and in
half an hour melt away all the snow. Then we
can find our path again, and go on.”

“ But I don’t think it is certain that we can
find our path again,” said Marco.

“Nor do I,” said Forester, “but there’s a
chance of it. I did not say that we had three
certainties, but three chances.”

“ Well,” said Marco; “go on; what are the
other two ?”

“If we can not find the path,” said Forester,
“either because the snow does not melt, or for
any other reason, then we can remain where
we are until night, and the people, finding that
we do not come home, will send up for us.”

“ And how can they find us?” asked Marco.

“Why, they will come up the path, of course,
and we can not be very far from the path, for
we only lost it a few minutes before we came
206 Marco Paut in Vermont.
“Thirdchance. =—SSS*=*~S~*~S«~& oiling a brook down,
here. Of course they will come up very near
to this place ;—and they will come shouting out,
every few minutes, as loud as they can, and so
we shall hear them.”

“Yes,” said Marco, “I see; that is a pretty
good chance.”

“ The third chance for us,” said Forester, “ is
to go down into the first glen or valley that we
can find, and then we shall probably come to a
stream. Then we can follow the stream down
to the river.”

“ How do you know that it goes to the river ?”
asked Marco.

“ All mountain streams do, of course,”’ said
Forester. ‘“ They go down wherever they can
find a valley or a hollow,—joining together and
taking in branches as they proceed,—until they
get down into the level country, and then they
flow to the nearest river, and so to the sea.
Now I know that the river takes a bend around
this mountainous tract, and almost surrounds it,
and all the streams from it must flow into the
river without going very far. We could fol-
low one down, though we should probably find
the way very rough and difficult.”

“ Let us try it,” said Marco.

This plan was decided upon, and so, when
Lost in rue Woops. 207



They conclude to go on. The plan succeeds. Way very rough.

the snow squall was entirely over and the sun
had come out Marco and Forester, taking
their departure from the great tree and guiding
their course by the sun, the travelers set out,
proceeding as nearly in a straight line as pos-
sible, intending to go on in that manner until
they should come to some stream, and then to
follow the stream down to the river. The plan
succeeded perfectly well. They soon descended
into a valley, where they found a little brook
flowing over a bed of moss-covered stones.
They followed this brook down for about a mile,
when they came to a junction between the
brook that they were following and another
one. After this junction of course the stream
was larger, and in many places they found it
difficult to get along. The way was encum-
bered with bushes, rocks, and fallen trees, and
in one place the stream flowed in a foaming
torrent through the bottom of a deep chasm,
with sides rising directly out of the water.
Here the travelers were obliged to find a way
at a distance from the brook—guiding them-
selves, however, by the sound of its roaring.
After passing the chasm, they got back to the
stream again.

They came out into the open country about
208 Marco Paut in VERMONT.

The ride home. Marco’s account of his adventures.

one o'clock, and found to their great joy that
they were very near the place where the horses
were pastured. The horses were all ready for
them, and Forester and Marco mounted them
immediately, and set out on their return home.
It was very pleas-
ant riding along at
their ease on horse-
back, after all the
dangers and fa-
tigues that they
~had encountered.
A part of the way
= the road which they
———— _took lay along the
shore of the river.
~ Marco enjoyed this
‘THE RIDE. part of theride very
much indeed.

They reached home about sunset, with an
excellent appetite for supper. Marco was very
enthusiastic in his manner of giving his aunt
Forester an account of his adventures, and he
said, in conclusion, that he would just as licf
get lost in the woods as not. It was good fun.










Abbott’s Franconia Stories.



Frourodia Sturies:

BY THE

Author af the “Holla Banks.”



Complete in Five Volumes, 16mo, elegantly bound m
Muslin, with engraved Title-pages and numerous Illustra-
tions, price Fifty Cents per Volume. Each Volume sold ~
separately.



Mlealleville.

Pleasing pictures of still life in the country, which the young
will gladly read, and gather much usefal knowledge, while they
find pleasure in the story.— Presbyterian.

The pleasing simplicity of style in which these volumes are
written—the amusing anecdotes related—and the little sketches
of scenery so naturally introduced, can not fail to secure for them
the warm appreciation of that class of readers for which they are
orepared.— Toronto Globe.

ee

Wallace.

Delightful stories for children —Albany State Register.

If any of our readers are troubled with noisy urchins, who dis-
tarb their evening’s comfort, they may find an effective opiate in
these attractive volumes. We hope the experiment may be fairly
tested — Christian Chronicle.

An admirable series of tales for children —New Orleans Bee.

The most attractive tales for children which have been issued
from the press for years—Cincinnats Gazette.
2 Abbott's Franconia Stories.





Beechnut.

The whole tendency of this series is in favor of a bigh tone of
morals, and these graceful and simple lessons of life can not fail
to be useful to those who read them.— Watchman and Observer.

Mr. Abbott is doing very much for the instraction and health-
fal amusement of the young. The “Franconia Stories” are de-
lightful reading for young people of both sexes.—Providence
Daily Journal.

Suited to the tastes and capacities of young people, and the
tendency of which is to call into action the nobler sympathies and
the best affections of the youthful heart.—Northern Budget

—

Marp Erskine.

The author is so well known to the juvenile world that he
needs no introduction from us. His histories for children have
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Mr. Abbott's books have been, and doubtless always will be,
popular with all._— Worcester Palladium.

The fertility of invention manifested by the writer of this ae-
ties of stories seems literally to have no limit.—N. Y. Observer.

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No better or more acceptable present could be made from
parent to child than a set of the “ Franconia Stories,’—Buffalo
Courier.

A delightful series of stories.—American Spectator.

These little volumes belong to the series of good Jacob Abbott’s
books, now in course of publication in handsome style by the Har-
pers. The aim of the aathor is to instruct and entertain youth,
by stories in which the moral sentiments are exercised and
strengthened.— Savannah Daily Morning News.

It ia not often we meet with better told fictions—ALFRrep B
Srreer.

HARPER & BROTHERS, Publishers, New York.
ABBOTT'S HISTORIES,

Ff UBLISHED BY

Burger X Brothers, Clif Street, H. Y.

POR Rope

*,* The Volumes of the Series are printed and bound
uniformly, and are adorned with richly Illuminated Title-
pages, Maps, and numerous Engravings. 16mo, Muslin, 60
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Each Volume sold separately.





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This series of historical narratives is scarcely inferior in interest to Sir
Walter Scott’s “Tales of a Grandfather.” Mr. Abbott has a remarkable
power of seizing on the most available features of the character which he
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expression.—Courter and Engutrer.

The style of illustration might be advantageously adopted in histories de-
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plain, clear narrative of facts, interspersed with reflections.— London Spect.

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we have so often noticed and approved. The story of Madame Roland and
the French Revolution, as far as necessary to make her memoirs intelligi-
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—_———~—_—_—-

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2 ABBOTT'S HISTORIES.



Cleopatra.

Another of the crimson-garbed works of the historic series that have
proved themselves so popular, not only with the young, but all classes of
readers. * * * The details are given with clearness and simple beauty ; the
style suitable to the comprehension of the child, as being interesting to the
adalt.— ALFRED B. STREET.

————

Hannibal.

A new volume of the series projected by the skillful book-mapufacturer,
Mr. Abbott, who displays no little tact in engaging the attention of that
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from the attractively-printed and easily-perased -volumes of Mr. Abbott.
The story of Hannibal is well adapted for popular treatment, and loses noth-
ing for this purpose in the present explanatory and pictorial version.—LAt-
erary World.

—p_————.

Aleranter the Great.

The history of Alexander the Great, as penned by Jacob Abbott, will be
read with thrilling interest. It is profusely embellished, containing mape
of the Expedition of Alexander, of Macedon and Greece, the plain of Troy,
the Granicus, and the plain of Issus; and engravings of Alexander and
Bucephalus; Paris and Helen ; the bathing in the River Cyndus ; the siege
of Tyre ; Alexander at the siege of Susa; and the proposed improvement of
Mount Athos. Jt is written in a graphic and attractive style.—Spectator.

Portus the Great.

Mr. Abbott’s design to write a succession of histories forthe young is
admirable, and worthy of all encouragement, and the manner in which he
has executed the work thus far is most excellent. Let him be encour-
aged to proceed till he has reached the last volume of history, that the
coming generation may turn from the world of romance to that of reality,
and learn that what is and has been is as brilliant in character, as glorious
in description, and as captivating in detail, as that which the genius of
fiction ever created.—New York Observer.
ABBOTT'S HISTORIES. 3



Anling Cesar.

Tho author seems gifted with that peculiar faculty, possessed by so few,
of holding communion with and drawing out ardent imagination and bud-
ding genius, and at the same time of directing both into the great channel
of truth. The labors of such a man are productive of incalculable good,
and deserve the highest reward.—_New Hampshire Patriot.

—————

Cyrus the Great.

The style is smooth, easy, and attractive, and the whole preparation of
the work is such as will secure a large popularity for the series. The
great condensation of facts, and the picturesquenesa of the style will com-
mend these books to the young. The illuminated title-pages are very
beautiful.— Southern Methodist Pulpit. :

—

Xecres the Great.

Oar admiration for the manner in which Mr. Abbott executes his task
is increased by each addition to the series. Woe are glad to learn that ne
works of the kind have ever been more highly appreciated, as evinced by
the extent of the sales.—Amertean Whig Review.

They possess more than the interest of fiction, and yet are replete with
solid information. The youth that becomes interested in these glowing
pictures will find a growing taste for historical reading generally.—Chris-
tian Parlor Magazine.

Alfred the Great,

History, under the pen of Mr. Abbott, discloses its narratives and utters
its lessons in a style of great simplicity and intelligence, and, above all,
with no danger of detriment to morals. He has selected his field with
excellent taste. In their line, these volumes have never been surpassed.
— Baptist Recorder.

—

Hoary Queen of Grote.

Charming compendiume of history. ‘We know of few books we are
more ready to commend to the public than Mr. Abbott's. They fill a lit-
tle place which has heretofore been empty.— Two Worlds.
4 ABBOTT’S HISTORIES.



William the Conguerar.

These historical works by Mr. Abbott have so much merit for the inter-
esting style in which they are written, and the beauty of their mechan-
ical execution, that we place them at the head of the more unpretending
histories. We know of no works extant calculated to produce a more sal-
utary effect upon the young reader of bistory ; certainly none where lead-
iug historical incidents are communicated in a more fascinating manner.—
Buffalo Courier.

ee

Queen Elijaheth.

Fall of instractive and heart-stirring incident, displayed by the hand of
a@ master. We doubt whether old Queen Bess ever before had so much jus-
tice done to her within the same compass. Such a pen as Jacob Abbott
vields, especially in this department of our literature, has no right to lie
still.— Albany Express.

They are admirable works for youth, and make a valuable fund of reading
for the fireside and for schools.— Evangelist.

—o-——.

Charles the Firat.

We incline to think that there never was before so much said about this
unfortunate monarch in so short a space ; so much to the purpose ; with
so much impartiality ; and in such a style as just suits those for whom it
is designed—the “two millions” of young persons in the United States,
‘who ought to be supplied with such works as these. The engravings rep-
Yesent the prominent persons and places of the history, and are well exe-
cuted. The portrait of John Hampden is charming. The antique title-
page is rich.—Southern Christian Advocate.

Charles the Serand.

A valuable engraving of Lely’s portrait of Cromwell opens the book, and
there are several illustrative wood-engravings and an illuminated title-page.
This is a comprehensive and simple narration of the main features of the
period during which Charles the Second reigned, and it is done with the
clear scope and finely-written style which would be expected from the pen
of Jacob Abbott—one of the most able and useful literary men of his time.
—Home Journal.
ENTERTAINING WORKS

FROM THE PRESS OF

HARPER & BROTHERS, NEW YORK.





The Young Christian.

Forming the First Volume of Jacop Assott’s “Young
Christian Series.” In Three Volumes.—I. The Young
Christian; II. The Corner-stone; III. The Way to do Good.
Very greatly Improved and Enlarged. With numerous
Engravings. 12mo, Muslin, $1 00.

The Lady and the Priest.

An Historical Romance. By Mrs. Maserty. 8vo, Paper,
25 cents.

* * She has chosen a subject fruitful in romantic incident, and
has treated it with great skill, delicacy, and power. The fair an-
thor has grasped with consummate tact all the picturesque de-
taile of chivalry, its poetry, romance, and heroism, which, blending
with the various incidents, profusely decorate her story. In re-
counting the history of those days of old, she reflects on her pages
the very age and body of the time.—United Service Gazette.

The Fifteen Decisive Battles of the

World; from Marathon to Waterloo. By E. 8. Creasy.
M.A. 12mo, Muslin.

The Nile-Boat ;

Or, Glimpses of the East. By Wa. H. Barttert. With
Engravings on Steel, and numerous I!lustrations on Wood.

8vo, Muslin, $2 00.

This is a gem, and no small one, and of no small value; rich in
matter, rich in illustrations, it is undoubtedly to be classed with
the best and most splendidly got up books of the year.—Bentiley’s
Miscellany.

Mr. Bartlett has identified his name with Egypt and the Holy
Land; he has brought the manners and customs of the inhabit-
ants of that enchanting land to our very doors, and we know
not which to admire most, his delightful narrative, or the beaati-
ful engravings with which it is eo profusely illustrated. —North
British Mad.
2 Entert@ing Works from the Press of H. §& B.



Rule and Misrule of the English in

America. By the Author of “ Sam Slick the Clock-maker,”
“The Letter Bag,” “ Attaché,” “Old Judge,” etc. 12mo,
Paper, 60 cents; Muslin, 75 cents.

Invaluable for its accuracy and impartiality —Herald.

A new work from the pen of Judge Haliburton always finds a
hearty welcome. We have no doubt that this work will be con-
sidered as the cleverest which the author has ever produced.—
Messenger.

Arthur Conway ;

Or, Scenes in the Tropics. By Capt. E.H.Minman. 8vo,
Paper, 25 cents.

Captain Milman has painted West Indian scenery and life
with equal clearness, force, and richness of coloring, his book
has the higher merit of being a cleverly-constracted and interest-
ing story. It will be read and re-read with interest by all who
love a gooil novel for its own sake.— Weekly Chronicle.

History of the Restoration
Of Monarchy in France. Being a Sequel to the “ His
tory of the Girondists.” By ALPHonsE pr LaMaRtIND,
Portrait. Vol. I., Muslin, 75 cents. ,

It reveals an independence of judgment which was hardly to
be expected from the immediate antecedents of the writer, will
instruct some readers, and certainly will entertain all—London
Examiner.

But what will probably interest the greatest number of readers
in this volume, are its references to the private and domestic life
of Napoleon. Lamartine is the firat writer of mark and author}
who has fairly put lance in rest for the good name and fame of
Marie Louise.—Commonwealth.

Drayton.

A Story of American Life. 12mo, Paper, 60 cents; Mus-
lin, 75 cents.

An American novel, showing the progress of the hero from a
ashoemaker’s bench to eminence at the bar. It evinces great
invention, and descriptive powers of the highest order. The
characters are drawn with strength and discrimination, and it con-
tains many powerful scenes. Those who admire pure and deep
poetic feeling, high, ennobling principles, accurate delineations of
character, lively and graceful dialogue, and easy, pleasant narra-
tive, will be charmed with Drayton.