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Gulliver's travels

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Title:
Gulliver's travels A voyage to Lippiput and A voyage to Brobdingnag
Creator:
Swift, Jonathan, 1667-1745
Robinson, Edward Kilburn, 1883-
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
Ginn
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1914
Language:
English
Physical Description:
vi, 257 p. : illus. ; 18 cm.

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Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Jonathan Swift. (Lemuel Gulliver) ed. by Edward K. Robinson; illus. by Charles Copeland.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AAA9504 ( ltqf )
ADD4292 ( notis )
023594966 ( alephbibnum )
79742662 ( oclc )
14019282 ( lccn )

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Gulliver's ‘Travels

A Voyage to Lilliput
and A Voyage to
Brobdingnag |








By
Jonathan_Swift,D.D.
(Lemuel Gulliver )

First a Surgeon and then
a Gaptain of Several Ships




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COPYRIGHT, 1914, BY GINN AND COMPANY
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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The Atheneum Press

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PRIETORS + BOSTON: U.S.A.



PREPACE

by Jonathan_Swift as a satire upon the
people and customs of his time, but: it
" was unquestionably the fascinating originality of
the tale, rather than its keen satire, which won
widespread interest immediately upon publication.
Members of the royal family read the book and
avowed their admiration for it, although some of
them came in for a share of the ridicule that
abounded throughout its pages. Others of lower
rank read it with equal enjoyment, although in
some cases with less understanding. A master
of a ship is said to have declared that he was
very well acquainted with Gulliver, but that the
printer had been mistaken about his residence,
for he knew that Gulliver lived in Wapping.
Swift did not at first acknowledge the author-
ship of the book, preferring to let the fictitious
. Lemuel Gulliver bear the responsibility until it
became clear whether or not the real author was
likely to become an object for the revenge of
[ iii ]

9986

Ce LLIVER’S -FRAVELS was_written



GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

those whom the book had ridiculed. Events soon
proved: that Swift had little more to fear than
popularity, but it was too late for this to do him
much good or much harm. Although he lived
nineteen years after the publication of “Gulliver's
Travels,” his work practically ended at this time,
the last years of his life being a period of sad
decadence of mind and of spirit.

Swift’s earlier years gave evidence of the ability
which is fully revealed in “Gulliver's Travels.”
His writings, chiefly of a_religions-and political
charactér, possessed the same keen—satire and
sharp wit, but their virulence created many oppo-
nents who stood in the way of his advancement
in the Church or in politics. In spite of many
attempts to secure a distinguished position, the
highest office that he ever held was that of Dean
of St. Patrick’s Cathedral, a place by no means
commensurate with his abilities or ambitions. His
blighted hopes made him a confirmed misanthrope
and were responsible at least for those parts of
“ Gulliver’s Travels” in which he berates his
countrymen with the greatest severity.

Although bitter in his hatred and denunciation |
of many classes, Swift could be a warm friend and
an enthusiastic admirer. He seemed to explain

[iv ]



PREFACE

himself best in a letter to Pope, when he said:
“T have ever hated all nations, professions, and
communities, and my love is towards individuals ;
for instance, I hate the tribe of lawyers, but I love ©
Counsellor Such-a-one and Judge Such-a-one. . . .”
Unmistakably, “Gulliver’s Travels” reveals the
truth of this, for in it Swift dwells, for the most
part, upon the weaknesses not of individuals but
of classes. / A study of the book as a piece of
satire is an interesting revelation of many phases
of Swift’s own character. In its nice distinction
between the right and the wrong, the worthy and
the mean, “Gulliver's Travels” is inspiring; in
its too frequent tendency to place mankind on
the wrong or the mean side the book is itself un-
worthy. It is chiefly in the last two “ Voyages”
that satire and cynicism predominate. ) In the first
two, which make up this volume, the author's
delightful imagination is not dimmed by his
arraignment of his fellow men.

The first edition of the “ Travels” contained
errors and alterations, partly due to the publisher,
who did not have the courage to print the work
just as Swift wrote it. A second edition, corrected
in part, appeared in 1727. Later editions em-
bodied other corrections made by Swift. In the

[v ]



GULL PER Ss CRAY Eis

preparation of the present edition a copy of the
one of 1727 has been found serviceable, also
one edited by G. Ravenscroft Dennis, who made
a careful comparison of all the early editions,
together with a large paper copy of the first edi-
tion, in which one of Swift’s friends made nu-
merous alterations and additions from Swift’s own
list of corrections. Practically all of the modern
editions of “Gulliver” contain inaccuracies and
alterations that have been handed down. from
one editor to another, until they have become far
too numerous.

With the belief that the reader prefers to know
the work of an author at first hand, the two voy-
ages of “ Gulliver’s Travels” that are included in
this volume have been kept as much like their
original form as practicable, only such alterations
having been made as were demanded by modern
ideas of good taste and decorum.

kek.

[ vi ]



A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT



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MAP SHOWING SUPPOSED LOCATION OF LILLIPUT

From the second edition of “Gulliver’s Travels,” London, 1727








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A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

CHAPTER I

The author gives some account of himself and family, his
first inducements to travel. He ts shipwrecked, and
swims for his life, gets safe on shore in the country of
Lilliput,ts made a prisoner, and ts carried up the country.

Y FATHER had a small estate in Not-
tinghamshire; I was the third of five sons.

He sent me to Emmanuel College in
Cambridge, at fourteen years old, where I resided
three years, and applied myself close to my stud-
ies; but the charge of maintaining me (although
I had a very scanty allowance) being too great for
a narrow fortune, I was bound apprentice to Mr.
James Bates, an eminent surgeon in London, with
whom I continued four years: and my father now

[3]



GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

and then sending me small sums of money, I laid
them: out in learning navigation, and other parts
of the mathematics, useful to those who intend
to travel, as I always believed it would be some
time or other my fortune to do. When I left
Mr. Bates, I went down to my father; where, by
the assistance of him and my uncle John, and
some other relations, I got forty pounds, and a
promise of thirty pounds a year, to maintain me
at Leyden: there I studied physic two years
and seven months, knowing it would be useful
in long voyages.

Soon after my return from Leyden, I was recom-
mended by my good master, Mr. Bates, to be sur-
geon to the Swallow, Captain Abraham Pannell,
commander; with whom I continued three years
and a half, making a voyage or two into the Le-
vant, and some other parts. When I came back,
I resolved to settle in London, to which Mr. Bates,
my master, encouraged me, and by him I was rec-
ommended to several patients. I took part of a
small house in the Old Jury; and being advised to
alter my condition, I married Mrs. Mary Burton,
second daughter to Mr. Edmund Burton, hosier,
in Newgate-street, with whom I received four hun-
dred pounds for a portion.

[ 4]



A VOVAGE TO LILLIPUT

But, my good master Bates dying in two years
after, and I having few friends, my business began
to fail; for my conscience would not suffer me to
imitate the bad practice of too many among my
brethren. Having therefore consulted with my
_wife, and some of my acquaintance, I determined
to go again to sea. I was surgeon successively in
two ships, and made several voyages, for six years,
to the East and West-Indies, by which I got some
addition to my fortune. My hours of leisure I
spent in reading the best authors, ancient and
modern, being always provided with a good num-
ber of books; and when I was ashore, in observ-
ing the manners and dispositions of the people, as
well as learning their language, wherein I had a
great facility by the ‘strength of my memory.

The last of these voyages not proving very for-
tunate, I grew weary of the sea, and intended to
stay at home with my wife and family. I removed
from the Old Jury to Fetter-Lane, and from thence
. to Wapping, hoping to get business among the
sailors; but it would not turn to account. After
three years’ expectation that things would mend,
I accepted an advantageous offer ‘from Captain
William Prichard, master of the Axtelope, who
was making a voyage to the South-Sea. We set

[5]



CULRLIVE Rs TRAV EES

sail from Bristol, May 4, 1699, and our voyage at
first was very prosperous.

It would not be proper, from some reasons, to
trouble the reader with the particulars of our
adventures in those seas: let it suffice to inform
him, that in our passage from thence to the East
Indies, we were driven by a violent storm to the
north-west of Van Diemgn’s Land. By an obser-
vation, we found ourselves in the latitude of 30
degrees 2 minutes south. Twelve of our crew
were dead by immoderate labor, and ill food, the
rest were in a very weak condition. On the fifth
of November, which was the beginning of summer
in those parts, the weather being very hazy, the
seamen spied a rock, within half a cable’s length
of the ship; but the wind was so strong, that we
were driven directly upon it, and immediately split.
Six of the crew, of whom I was one, having let
down the boat into the sea, made a shift to get
clear of the ship, and the rock. We rowed, by my
computation, about three leagues, till we were .
able to work no longer, being already spent with
labor while we were in the ship. We therefore
trusted ourselves to the mercy of the waves, and
in about half an hour the boat was overset by a
sudden flurry from the north. What became of

[6 |



Aw On SG Le LILLE oT

my companions in the boat, as well as of those
who escaped on the rock, or were left in the
vessel, I cannot tell; but conclude they were all
lost. For my own part, I swam as fortune directed
me, and was pushed forward by wind and tide. I
often let my legs drop, and could feel no bottom:
but when I was almost gone, and able to struggle
no longer, I found myself within my depth; and
by this time the storm was much abated. The
declivity was so small, that I walked near a mile -
before I got to the shore, which I conjectured was
about eight a-clock in the evening. I then ad-’
vanced forward near half a mile, but could not
discover any sign of houses or inhabitants; at
least I was in so weak a condition, that I did not
observe them. I was extremely tired, and with
that, and the heat of the weather, and about half a
pint of brandy that I drank as I left the ship, I
found myself much inclined to sleep. I lay down
on the grass, which was very short and soft, where
I slept sounder than ever I remembered to have
done in my life, and, as I reckoned, about nine
hours; for when I awaked it was just day-light. I.
attempted to rise, but was not able to stir; for as
I happened to lie on my back, I found my arms
and legs were strongly fastened on each side to

uf



GULLY Res PRAW ELS

the ground; and my hair, which was long and
thick, tied down in the same manner. I likewise
felt several slender ligatures across my body, from
my arm-pits to my thighs. I could only look up-
wards, the sun began to grow hot, and the light
offended my eyes. I heard a confused noise about
me, but in the posture I lay, could see nothing
except the sky. In a little time I felt something
alive moving on my left leg, which advancing
gently forward over my breast, camé almost up. to
my chin; when bending my eyes downward as
much as I could, I perceived it to be a human
creature not six inches high, with a bow and arrow
in his hands, and a quiver at his back. In the mean
time, I felt at least forty more of the same kind
(as I conjectured) following the first. I was in the
utmost astonishment, and roared so loud, that they
all ran back in a fright; and some of them, as I
was afterwards told, were hurt with the falls they
got by leaping from my sides upon the ground.
However, they soon returned, and one of them,
who ventured so far as to get a full sight of my
face, lifting up his hands and eyes by way of
admiration, cried out, in a shrill but distinct voice,
F[ekinah degul: the others repeated the same
words several times, but then I. knew not what

[8]





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GUELLIVIER-S TRAVELS

_ they meant. I lay all this while, as the reader may
believe, in great uneasiness: at length, struggling
to get loose, I had the fortune to break the strings,
and wrench out the pegs that fastened my left arm
to the ground; for, by lifting it up to my face, I
discovered the methods they had taken to bind
me, and at the same time with a violent pull,
which gave me excessive pain, I a little loosened
the strings that tied down my hair on the left side,
so that I was just able to turn my head about two
inches. But the creatures ran off a second time,
before I could seize them; whereupon there was
a great shout in a very shrill accent, and after it
ceased, I heard one of them cry aloud 7olgo phonac ;
when in an instant I felt above an hundred arrows
discharged on my left hand, which pricked me like
so many needles; and besides, they shot another
flight into the air, as we do bombs in Europe,
whereof many, I suppose, fell on my body (though
I felt them not) and some on my face, which I
immediately covered with my left hand. When
this shower of arrows was over, I fell a groaning
with grief and pain, and then striving again to get
loose, they discharged another volley larger than
the first, and some of them attempted with spears
to stick me in the sides; but, by good luck, I had

[ 10 ]



he No YOuMG eine Li i Pow

on a buff jerkin, which they could not pierce. |
thought it the most prudent method to lie still,
and my design was to continue so till night, when,
my left hand being already loose, I could easily
free myself: and as for the inhabitants, I had
reason to believe I might be a match for the’
greatest armies they could bring against me, if
they were all of the same size with him that I saw.
But fortune disposed otherwise of me. When the
people observed I was quiet, they discharged no
more arrows; but, by the noise I heard, I knew
their numbers increased; and about four yards
from me, over against my right ear, I heard a
knocking fer above an hour, like that of people at
work ; when turning my head that way, as well as
the pegs and strings would permit me, I saw a
stage erected, about a foot and a half from the
ground, capable of holding four of the inhabitants,
with two or three ladders to mount it: from
whence one of them, who seemed to be a person
of quality, made me a long speech, whereof I
understood not one syllable. But I should have
mentioned, that before the principal person began
his oration, he cried out three times, Langro dehul
san: (these words and the former were after-
wards repeated and explained to me.) Whereupon

[11 |



PGW inva, Sa RA in

immediately about fifty of the inhabitants came
and cut the strings that fastened the left side of
my head, which gave me the liberty of turning
it to the right, and of observing the person and
gesture of him that was to speak. He appeared
to be of a middle age, and taller than any of the
other three who attended him, whereof one was
a page, that held up his train and seemed to
be somewhat longer than my middle finger; the
other two stood one on each side to support him.
He acted every part of an orator; and I could
observe many periods of threatenings, and others
of promises, pity, and kindness. I answered in a
few words, but in the most submissive manner,
lifting up my left hand, and both my eyes to the
sun, as calling him for a witness; and being almost
famished with hunger, having not eaten a morsel
for some hours before I left the ship, I found the
demands of nature so strong upon me, that I
could not forbear showing my impatience (perhaps
against the strict rules of decency) by putting my
finger frequently to my mouth, to signify that I
wanted food. The //urgo (for so they call a great
lord, as I afterwards learnt) understood me very
well. He descended from the stage, and com- |
manded that several ladders should be applied to

[12]



ACO VNEGE TO LILLE Prue

my sides, on which above an hundred of the inhab- |
itants mounted and walked towards my mouth,
laden with baskets full of meat, which had been
provided and sent thither by the King’s orders,
upon the first intelligence he received of me. I
observed there was the
flesh of several animals,
but could not distin-
guish them by the taste.
There were shoulders,
legs, and loins, shaped
hke those of mutton,
and very well dressed,
but smaller than the
wings of a lark. I ate
them by two or three at
a mouthful, and took
three loaves at a time,
about the bigness of
musket bullets. They supplied me as fast as
they could, showing a thousand marks of won-
der and astonishment at my bulk and appetite.
I then made another sign, that I wanted drink.
They found by my eating, that a small quantity
would not suffice me; and being a most ingen-
1ous people, they slung up with great dexterity

[13]





GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

one of their largest hogsheads, then rolled it
towards my hand, and beat out the top; I drank
it off at a draught, which I might well do, for it
did not hold half a pint, and tasted like a small
wine of Burgundy, but much more delicious.
They brought me a second hogshead, which I
drank in the same manner, and made signs for
more, but they had none to give me. When I had
performed these wonders, they shouted for joy,
and danced upon my breast, repeating several
times as they did at first, Hekznah degul. They
made mea sign that I should throw down the two
_hogsheads, but first warning the people below to
stand out of the way, crying aloud Borach mivolah,
and when they saw the vessels in the air, there
was an universal shout of Hlekznxah degul. | con-
fess I was often tempted, while they were passing
backwards and forwards on my body, to seize forty
or fifty of the first that came in my reach, and
dash them against the ground. But the re-
membrance of what I had felt, which probably
might not be the worst they could do, and the
promise of honor I made them, for so I inter-
preted my submissive behavior, soon drove out
these imaginations. Besides, I now considered
myself as bound by the laws of hospitality to a

[ 14 |



mV OVAGE 1 © L711? Uae

people who had treated me with so much expense
and magnificence. However, in my thoughts, |
could not sufficiently wonder at the intrepidity of
these diminutive mortals, who durst venture to
mount and walk upon my body, while one of my
hands was at liberty, without trembling at the
very sight of so prodigious a creature as I must
appear to them. After some time, when they ob-
served that I made no more demands for meat,
there appeared before me a person of high
rank from his Imperial Majesty. His Excellency,
having mounted on the small of my right leg,
advanced forwards up to my face, with about a
dozen of his retinue. And producing his creden-
tials under the Signet Royal, which he applied
close to my eyes, spoke about ten minutes, with-
out any signs of anger, but with a kind of
determinate resolution; often pointing forwards,
which, as I afterwards found, was towards the
capital city, about half a mile distant, whither it
was agreed by his Majesty in council that I must
be conveyed. I answered in few words, but to no
purpose, and made a sign with my hand that was
loose, putting it to the other (but over his Excel-
lency’s head for fear of hurting him or his train)
and then to my own head and body, to signify that —

[15 ]



GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

I desired my liberty. It appeared that he under-
stood me well enough, for he shook his head by
way of disapprobation, and held his hand ir. a
posture to show that I must be carried as a pris-
oner. However, he made other signs to let me
understand that I should have meat and drink
enough, and very good treatment. Whereupon, I
once more thought of attempting to break my
bonds; but again, when I felt the smart of their
arrows, upon my face and hands, which were all in
blisters, and many of the darts still sticking in
them, and observing likewise that the number of
my enemies increased, I gave tokens to let them
know that they might do with me what they
pleased. Upon this, the //uxgo and his train
withdrew, with much civility and cheerful counte-
nances. Soon after I heard a general shout, with
frequent repetitions of the words Peplom selan,
and I felt great numbers of people on my left
side relaxing the cords to such a degree, that I
was able to turn upon my right. But before this,
they had daubed my face and both my hands
with a sort of ointment very pleasant to the smell,
which in a few minutes removed all the smart
of their arrows. These circumstances, added to
the refreshment I had received by their victuals

[ 16 |



A VOYAGE TO LILLIPU Tye

and drink, which were very nourishing, disposed
me to sleep. I slept about eight hours, as I was
afterwards assured; and it was no wonder, for
the physicians, by the Emperor’s orders, had
mingled a sleepy potion in the hogsheads of wine.

It seems that upon the first moment I was dis-
covered sleeping on the ground after my landing
the Emperor had early notice of it by an express;
and determined in council that I should be tied
in the manner I have related, (which was done in
the night while I slept) that plenty of meat and
drink should be sent me, and a machine prepared
to carry me to the capital city.

This resolution perhaps may appear very bold.
-and dangerous, and I am confident would not be
imitated by any prince in Europe, on the like oc-
casion; however, in my opinion, it was extremely
prudent, as well as generous: for supposing these
people had endeavored to kill me with their spears
and arrows while I was asleep, I should certainly
have awaked with the first sense of smart, which
might so far have roused my rage and strength,
as to have enabled me to break the strings where-
with I was tied; after which, as they were not.
able to make resistance, so they could expect no
mercy.

[17 ]



~GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

These people are most excellent mathemati-
cians, and arrived to a great perfection in me-
chanics, by the countenance and encouragement
of the Emperor, who is a renowned patron of
learning. This prince hath several machines fixed
on wheels, for the carriage of trees and other
great weights. He often builds his largest men of
war, whereof some are nine foot long, in the
woods where the timber grows, and has them
carried on these engines three or four hundred
yards to the sea. Five hundred carpenters and
engineers were immediately set at work to pre-
pare the greatest engine they had. It was a frame
of wood raised three inches from the ground,
about seven foot long, and four wide, moving
upon twenty-two wheels. The shout I heard was
upon the arrival of this engine, which it seems
set out in four hours after my landing. It was
brought parallel to me as I lay. But the principal
difficulty was to raise and place me in this vehicle.
Eighty poles, each of one foot high, were erected for
this purpose, and very strong cords of the bigness

_. of pack-thread, were fastened by hooks to many

bandages, which the workmen had girt round my
neck, my hands, my body, and my legs. Nine
hundred of the strongest men were employed to_

[18]



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' GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

_ draw up these cords by many pulleys fastened on
the poles, and thus, in less than three hours, I was
raised and slung into the engine, and there tied
fast. All this I was told, for, while the operation
was performing, I lay in a profound sleep, by the
force of that soporiferous medicine infused into
my liquor. Fifteen hundred of the Emperor’s
largest horses, each about four inches and a half
high, were employed to draw me towards the
metropolis, which, as I said, was half a mile distant.

About four hours after we began our journey, I
awaked by a very ridiculous accident; for the
carriage being stopped a while to adjust some-
thing that was out of order, two or three of the
young natives had the curiosity to see how I
looked when I was asleep; they climbed up into
the engine, and advancing very softly to my face,
one of them, an officer in the guards, put the sharp
end of his half-pike a good way up into my left
nostril, which tickled my nose like a straw, and
made me sneeze violently; whereupon they stole
off unperceived, and it was three weeks before I
knew the cause of my awaking so suddenly. We
made a long march the remaining part of that
day, and rested at night with five hundred guards
on each side of me, half with torches, and _ half

[ 20 |



A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

with bows and arrows, ready to shoot me if I -
should offer to stir. The next morning at sun-rise
we continued our march, and arrived within two
hundred yards of the city gates about noon. The
Emperor, and all his court, came out to meet us,
but his great officers would by no means suffer
his Majesty to endanger his person by mounting
on my body.

At the place where the carriage stopped, there
stood an ancient temple, esteemed to be the
largest in the whole kingdom; which, having been
polluted some years before by an_ unnatural
murder, was, according to the zeal of those people,
looked upon as profane, and therefore had been
applied to common uses, and all the ornaments

and furniture carried away. In this edifice it was
_ determined I should lodge. The great gate
fronting to the north was about four foot high,
and almost two foot wide, through which 'I could
easily creep. On each side of the gate was a small
window not above six inches from the ground:
into that on the left side, the King’s smiths con-
veyed fourscore and eleven chains, like those that
hang to a lady’s watch in Europe, and almost as
large, which were locked to my left leg with six
and thirty padlocks. Over-against this temple, on

[ 21 |



GULLIVER’'S TRAVELS

t’other side of the great highway, at twenty foot
distance, there was a turret at least five foot high.
Here the Emperor ascended, with many principal
lords of his court, to have an opportunity of viewing
me, as I was told, for I could not see them. It
was reckoned that above an hundred thousand in-
habitants came out of the town upon the same
errand; and, in spite of my guards, I believe
there could not be fewer than ten thousand at
several times, who mounted my body by the help
of ladders. Buta proclamation was soon issued to
forbid it upon pain of death. When the workmen
found it was impossible for me to break loose,
they cut all the strings that bound me; where-
upon I rose up, with as melancholy a disposition
as ever I had in my life. But the noise and
astonishment of the people at seeing me rise and
walk, are not to be expressed. The chains that
held my left leg were about two yards long, and
gave me not only liberty of walking backwards
and forwards ina semicircle, but, being fixed
within four inches of the gate, allowed me to
creep in, and lie at my full length in the temple.

[ 22 |





CHAPTER I]

The Emperor of Lilliput, attended by several of the
nobility, comes to see the Author in his confinement.
The Emperor's person and habit described. Learned
men appointed to teach the Author thetr language. Hc
gains favour by his mild disposition. His pockets are

searched, and his sword and pistols taken from him.

HEN I found myself on my feet, I

looked about me, and must confess

I never beheld a more entertaining
prospect. The country around appeared like a
continued garden, and the enclosed fields, which
were generally forty foot square, resembled so many
beds of flowers. These fields were intermingled
with woods of half a stang, and the tallest trees,
as I could judge, appeared to be seven foot high.
I viewed the town on my left hand, which looked
like the painted scene of a city in a theatre.

| 23 |



GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

The Emperor was already descended from the
tower and advancing on horseback towards me,
which had lke to have cost him dear; for the
beast, though very well trained, yet wholly unused
to such a sight, which appeared as if a mountain
moved before him, reared up on his hinder feet:
but that prince, who is an excellent horseman,
‘kept his seat, till his attendants ran in, and held
the bridle, while his Majesty had time to dismount.
While he alighted, he surveyed me round with
great admiration, but kept beyond the length of
my chain. He ordered his cooks and butlers, who
were already prepared, to give me victuals and
drink, which they pushed forward in a sort of
vehicle upon wheels, till I could reach them. I
took these vehicles, and soon emptied them all;
twenty of them were filled with meat, and ten
with liquor; each of the former afforded me two
or three good mouthfuls, and I emptied the liquor
of ten vessels, which was contained in earthen
vials, into one vehicle, drinking it off at a
draught; and so I did with the rest. The
Empress and young Princes of the blood of both
sexes, attended by many ladies, sat at some
distance in their chairs; but upon the accident
that happened to the Emperor’s horse, they

[ 24 |



AeVOV AGH TO LILGbIPU F

alighted, and came near his person, which I am
now going to describe. He is taller by almost the
breadth of my nail, than any of his court; which
alone is enough to strike an awe into the beholders.
His features are strong and masculine, with an
Austrian lip and arched nose, his complexion
olive, his countenance erect, his body and limbs
well proportioned, all his motions graceful, and
his deportment majestic. He was then past his
prime, being twenty-eight years and three quarters
old, of which he had reigned about seven, in great
felicity, and generally victorious. For the better
convenience of beholding him, I lay on my side,
so that my face was parallel to his, and he stood
but three yards off: however, I have had him since
many times in my hand, and therefore cannot be
deceived in the description. His dress was very
plain and simple, and the fashion of it between
the Asiatic and the European: but he had on his
head a light helmet of gold, adorned with jewels,
and a plume on the crest. He held his sword
drawn in his hand, to defend himself, if I should
happen to break loose; it was. almost three inches
long, the hilt anc" -seabBerdt wore gold enriched
with diamonds “lis? Voice was S shrill hut very clear
and articthate, ind I could me es hear’ it —

oo Badd - cee: . yette



GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

I stood up. The ladies and courtiers were all most
magnificently clad, so that the spot they stood
upon seemed to resemble a skirt spread on the
ground, embroidered with figures of gold and
silver. His Imperial Majesty spoke often to me,
and I returned answers, but neither of us could
understand a syllable. There were several of his
priests and lawyers present (as I conjectured by
their habits) who were commanded to address
themselves to me, and I spoke to them in as
many languages as I had the least smattering of,
which were High and Low Dutch, Latin, French,
Spanish, Italian, and Lingua Franca, but all to
no purpose. After about two hours the court
retired, and I was left with a strong guard, to
prevent the impertinence, and probably the malice
of the rabble, who were very impatient to crowd
about me as near as they durst, and some of them
had the impudence to shoot their arrows at me
as I sat on the ground by the door of my house,
whereof one very narrowly missed my left eye.
But the colonel ordered six of the ringleaders to
be seized, and thought no punishment so proper
as to deliver. theyn; ‘hound: Inte. my hands, which
some of “the “soldiers actoidinghy: ‘did, pushing
thezh, ‘foxWards with the butt-ends: “of. their pikes

ws : = BES +9. HE








MS

) 3) Al

~~ S.Ceearana. .-

-



GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

into my reach; I took them all in my right
hand, put five of them into my coat pocket, and
as to the sixth, I made a countenance as if |
would eat him alive. The poor man squalled terri-
bly, and the colonel and his officers were in much
pain, especially when they saw me take out my
penknife: but I soon put them out of fear; for,
looking mildly, and immediately cutting the strings
he was bound with, I set him gently on the
ground, and away he ran; I treated the rest in
the same manner, taking them one by one out of
my pocket, and I observed both the soldiers and
people were highly obliged at this mark of my
clemency, which was represented very much to
my advantage at court.

Towards night I got with some difficulty into
my house, where I lay on the ground, and con-
tinued to do so about a fortnight; during which
time the Emperor gave orders to have a bed pre-
pared for me. Six hundred beds of the common
measure were brought in carriages, and worked
up in my house; an hundred and fifty of their
beds sewn together made up the breadth and
length, and these were four double, which however
kept me but very indifferently from the hardness
of the floor, that was of smooth stone. By the

[ 28 |



A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

same computation they provided me with sheets,
blankets, and coverlets, tolerable enough for one
who had been so long inured to hardships as I.
As the news of my arrival spread through the
kingdom, it brought prodigious numbers of rich,
idle, and curious people to see me; so that the
villages were almost emptied; and great neglect
of tillage and household affairs must have ensued,
if his Imperial Majesty had not provided, by sev-
eral proclamations and orders of state, against
this inconveniency. He directed that those who
had already beheld me should return home, and
not presume to come within fifty yards of my
house without license from the court; whereby
the secretaries of state got considerable fees.
In the mean time, the Emperor held frequent
councils to debate what course should be taken
with me; and I was afterwards assured by a
particular friend, a person of great quality, who
was looked upon to be as much in the secret as
any, that the court was under many difficulties
concerning me. They apprehended my breaking
loose, that my diet would be very expensive, and
might cause a famine. Sometimes they deter-
mined to starve me, or at least to shoot me in the
face and hands with poisoned arrows, which would

[ 29 |



GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

soon dispatch me. In the midst of these consul-
tations, several officers. of the army went to the
door of the great council-chamber, and two of them
being admitted, gave an account of my behav-
iour to the six criminals above-mentioned, which
made so favorable an impression in the breast of
his Majesty and the whole board, in my behalf,
that an Imperial Commission was issued out,
obliging all the villages nine hundred yards round
the city, to deliver in every morning six beeves,
forty sheep, and other victuals for my sustenance;
together with a proportionable quantity of bread,
and wine, and other liquors; for the due payment
of which his Majesty gave assignments upon his
treasury. For this prince lives chiefly upon his own
demesnes, seldom, except upon great occasions,
raising any subsidies upon his subjects, who are
bound to attend him in his wars at their own
expense. An establishment was also made of six
hundred persons to be my domestics, who had
board-wages allowed for their maintenance, and
tents built for them very conveniently on each
side of my door. It was likewise ordered, that
three hundred tailors should make me a suit
of clothes after the fashion of the country: that
six of his Majesty’s greatest scholars should be

[ 30 |



Ra VeON ea Gt i Or) Vel eed

employed to instruct me in their language: and,
lastly, that the Emperor’s horses, and those of the
nobility, and troops of guards, should be frequently
exercised in my sight, to accustom themselves to
me. All these orders were duly put in execution,
and in about three weeks I made a great progress
in learning their language; during which time, the
Emperor frequently honoured me with his visits,
and was pleased to assist my masters in teaching
me. We began already to converse together in
some sort; and the first words | learnt were to ex-
press my foe that he would please to give me
my liberty, which I every day repeated on my
knees. His answer, as I could comprehend it, was,
that this must be a work of time, not to be thought
on without the advice of his council, and that first I
must Lumos kelmin pesso desmar lon Emposo ;
that is, swear a peace with him and his kingdom.
However, that I should be used with all kindness;
and he advised me to acquire, by my patience and
discreet behaviour, the good opinion of himself and
his subjects. He desired I would not take it ill, if
he gave orders to certain proper officers to search
me; for probably I might carry about me several
weapons, which must needs be dangerous things,
if they answered the bulk of so prodigious a

Pst



GW BRS FRAY ELS |.

person. I said, his Majesty should be satisfied, for
I was ready to strip myself, and turn up my
pockets before him. This I delivered part in words,
and part in signs. He replied, that by the laws
of the kingdom I must be searched by two of
his officers; that he knew this could not be done
without my consent and assistance ; that he had so
good an opinion of my generosity and justice, as
to trust their persons in my hands; that whatever
they took from me should be returned when I left
the country, or paid for at the rate which I would
set upon them. I took up the two officers in my
hands, put them first into my coat-pockets, and
then into every other pocket about me, except
my two fobs, and another secret pocket which I had
no mind should be searched, wherein I had some
little necessaries that were of no consequence to
any but myself. In one of my fobs there was a
silver watch, and in the other a small quantity of
gold in a purse. These gentlemen, having pen,
ink, and paper about them, made an exact iInven- .
tory of everything they saw; and when they had
done, desired I would set them down, that they
might deliver it to the Emperor. “This inventory
I afterwards translated into Pagish and is word
for word as follows. |

[ 32 ]



MOBO’; ASG 2, © 1 Eee Ur

[upriuis, In the right coat-pocket of the Great
Man Mountain (for so | interpret the words Quzn-
bus Flestrin) after the strictest search, we found
only one great piece of coarse cloth, large enough
to be a foot-cloth for your Majesty’s chief room of
state. In the left pocket we saw a huge silver
chest, with a cover of the same metal, which we
the searchers were not able to lift. We desired it
should be opened, and one of us stepping into it,
found himself up to the mid leg in a sort of dust,
some part wherof flying up to our faces, set us
both a sneezing for several times together. In
his right waistcoat-pocket we found a prodigious
bundle of white thin substances folded one over
another, about the bigness of three men, tied with
a strong cable, and marked with black figures;
which we humbly conceive to be writings, every
letter almost half as large as the palm of our
hands. In the left there was a sort of engine, from
the back of which were extended twenty long poles,
resembling the pallisados before your Mayesty’s
court ; wherewith we conjecture the Man Mountain
combs his head; for we did not always trouble
him with questions, because we found it a great
difficulty to make him understand us. In the large
pocket on the right side, we saw a hollow pillar of

see



GUEBPIV ER S-PRAVELS

iron, about the length of a man, fastened to a
strong piece of timber, larger than the pillar;
and upon one side of the pillar were huge pieces
of iron sticking out, cut into strange figures,
which we know not what to make of. In the left

pocket, another engine



Uf, y ox « of the same kind. In the
(UQReZeN Y smaller pocket, on the
WE right side, were several

EK iy round flat pieces of white
and red metal, of differ-
ent bulk; some of the
white, which seemed to
be silver, were so large
and heavy, that my com-
rade and I could hardly
hit theme:diineetne sett
pocket were two black pil-
lars irregularly shaped :
we could not, without difficulty, reach the top
of them as we stood at the bottom of his pocket.
One of them was covered, and seemed all of a
piece: but at the upper end of the other, there
appeared a white round substance, about twice
the bigness of our heads. Within each of these
was enclosed a prodigious plate of steel; which,

[ 34 ]





AS VOYAGE TOs ba Pea

by our orders, we obliged him to show us, because
we apprehended they might be dangerous engines.
He took them out of their cases, and told us,
that in his own country, his practice was to
shave his beard with one of these, and cut his
meat with the other. There were two pockets
which we could not enter: these he called his



fobs. Out of the right fob hung a great silver
chain, with a wonderful kind of engfne at the
bottom. We directed him to draw out whatever
was fastened to that chain, which appeared to be
a globe, half silver, and half of some transparent
metal; for, on the transparent side, we saw certain
strange figures circularly drawn, and thought we
could touch them, till we found our fingers stopped
by that lucid substance. He put this engine to

[ 35]



GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

our ears, which made.an incessant noise like that
of a water-mill. And we conjecture it is either
some unknown animal, or the god that he wor-
ships; but we are more inclined to the latter
opinion, because he assured us (if we understand
him right, for he expressed himself very imper-
fectly) that he seldom did anything without con-
sulting it. He called it his oracle, and said it
pointed out the time for every action of his life.
From the left fob he took out a net almost large
enough for a fisherman, but contrived to open and
shut like a purse, and served him for the same use:
we found therein several massy pieces of yellow
metal, which, if they be real gold, must be of
immense value.

Having thus, in obedience to your Majesty's
commands, diligently searched all his pockets, we
observed a girdle about his waist made of the hide
of some prodigious animal, from which, on the left
side, hung a sword of the length of five men; and
on the right, a bag or pouch divided into two cells,
each cell capable of holding three of your Majesty's
subjects. In one of these cells were several globes
or balls, of a most ponderous metal, about the big- |
ness of our heads, and requiring a strong hand to
lift them : the other cell contained a heap of certain

[36].



AV OVE GH WoL Pie bE ak

black grains, but of no great bulk or weight, for
we could hold above fifty of them 1 in the Pee of
our hands.

This is an exact inventory of what we found
about the body of the Man Mountain, who used
us with great civility, and due respect to your
Majesty's Commission. Signed and sealed on the
fourth day of the eighty-ninth moon of your
Majesty’s auspicious reign. |

CLEFRIN FRELOCK, MARSI FRELOCK.

When this inventory was read over to the
Emperor, he directed me, although in very gentle
terms, to deliver up the several particulars. He
first called for my scimitar, which I took out, scab-
bard and all. In the meantime he ordered three
thousand of his choicest troops (who then attended!
him) to surround me at a distance, with their bows
and arrows just ready to discharge: but I did not
observe it, for mine eyes were wholly fixed upon
his Majesty. He then desired me to draw my
scimitar, which, although it had got some rust by :
the sea-water, was in most parts exceeding bright.
I did so, and immediately all the troops gave a
shout between terror and surprise; for the sun
shone clear, and the reflection dazzled their eyes,

val



COP veaR SS PRAV EIS

as I waved the scimitar to and fro in my hand.
His Majesty, who is a most magnanimous prince,
was less daunted than I could expect; he ordered
me to return it into the scabbard, and cast it on
the ground as gently as I could, about six foot from
the end of my chain. The next thing he demanded,
was one of the hollow iron pillars, by which he
meant my pocket-pistols. I drew it out, and at his
desire, as well as I could, expressed to him the use
of it; and charging it only with powder, which, by
the closeness of my pouch, happened to escape
wetting in the sea (an inconvenience against which
all prudent mariners take special care to provide,)
I first cautioned the Emperor not to be afraid,
and then I let it off in the air. The astonishment
here was much greater than at the sight of my
scimitar. Hundreds fell down as if they had been
struck dead; and even the Emperor, although he
stood his ground, could not recover himself in some
time. I delivered up both my pistols in the same
manner as I had done my scimitar, and then my
, pouch of powder and bullets; begging him that
the former might be kept from fire, for it would
kindle with the smallest spark, and blow up his
imperial palace into the air. I likewise delivered
up my watch, which the Emperor was very curious

[ 38 | |



A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

‘to see, and commanded two of his tallest yeomen
of the guards to bear it on a pole upon their shoul- —
ders, as draymen in England do a barrel of ale.
He was amazed at the continual noise it made, and
the motion of the minute-hand, which he could
easily discern; for their sight is much more acute
than ours; and asked the opinions of his learned
men about it, which were various and remote, as
the reader may well imagine without my repeat-
ing; although ‘indeed I could not very perfectly
understand them. I then gave up my silver and
copper money, my purse, with nine large pieces of
gold, and some smaller ones; my knife and razor,
my comb and silver snuff-box, my handkerchief
and journal-book. My scimitar, pistols, and pouch,
were conveyed in carriages to his Majesty’s stores;
but the rest of my.sgoods were returned me.

I had, as I before observed, one private pocket,
which escaped their search, wherein there was a
pair of spectacles, (which I sometimes use for the
weakness of mine eyes) a pocket perspective,
and some other little conveniences; which being
of no consequence to the Emperor, I did not
think myself bound in honour to discover, and I
apprehended they might be lost or spoiled if I
ventured them out of my possession.

[39]

DAS



\
, 4
yn aH
Matyas TTT:
a fe



CHAPTER III

The Author diverts the Emperor, and his nobility of both
sexes, in avery uncommon manner. The diversions of
the court of Lilliput described. The Author has his
liberty granted him upon ccrtatn conditions.

Y GENTLENESS and good behaviour
had gained so far on the Emperor and
his court, and indeed upon the army

and people in general, that I.began to conceive
hopes of getting my liberty in a short time. I took
all possible methods to cultivate this favourable
disposition. The natives came by degrees to be
less apprehensive of any danger from me. I would
sometimes lie down, and let five or six of them
dance on my hand. And at last the boys and girls
would venture to come and play at hide and seek
in my hair. I had now made a good progress in
understanding and speaking their language. The
[ 40 ]



A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

/ &=peror had a mind one day to entertain me with
several of the country shows, wherein they exceed
, all nations I have known, both for dexterity and
magnificence. I was diverted with none so much
as that of the rope-dancers, performed upon a
slender white thread, extended about two foot, and
twelve inches from the ground. Upon which I
shall desire liberty, with the reader’s patience, to



enlarge a little.

This diversion is only practised by those persons
who are candidates for great employments, and
high favour, at court. They are trained in this art
from their youth, and are not always of noble birth,
or liberal education. When a great office 1s vacant
either by death or disgrace (which often happens)
five or six of those candidates petition the Emperor
to entertain his Majesty and the court with a dance
on the rope, and whoever jumps the highest with-

— out falling, succeeds in the office. Very often the
chief ministers themselves are commanded to show
their skill, and to convince the Emperor that they
have not lost their faculty. Flimnap, the Treasurer,
is allowed to cut a caper on the straight rope, at
least an inch higher than any other lord in the
whole empire. I have seen him do the summerset
several times together upon a trencher fixed on

[41]



GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

the rope, which is no thicker than a common Pp: cx:
thread in England. My friend Reldresal, principal
Secretary for private Affairs, is, in my opinion, if
[ am not partial, the second after the Treasurer ;
the rest of the great officers are much upon a par.



ft

These diversions are often attended with fatal
accidents, whereof great numbers are on record.
I myself have seen two or three candidates break
a limb. But the danger is much greater when the
ministers themselves are commanded to show their
dexterity; for, by contending to excel themselves
and their fellows, they strain so far, that there is
hardly one of them who hath not received a fall,

[ 42 |



A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

and some of them two or three. I was assured that
a year or two before my arrival, Flimnap would
have infallibly broke his neck, if one of the King’s
cushions, that accidentally lay on the ground, had
not weakened the force of his fall. ,
There is likewise another diversion, which is
only shown before the Emperor and Empress,
and first minister, upon particular occasions. The
Emperor lays on the table three fine silken threads
of six inches long. One is blue, the other red, and
the third green. These threads are proposed as
prizes for those persons whom the Emperor hath
a mind to distinguish by a peculiar mark of
his favour. The ceremony is performed in his
Majesty’s great chamber of state, where the candi-
. dates are to undergo a trial of dexterity very
"different from the former, and such as [I have not
‘observed the least resemblance of in any other
country of the old or the new world. The Emperor |
holds a stick in his hands, both ends parallel to
the horizon, while the candidates advancing one
by one, sometimes leap over the ‘stick, sometimes
creep under it backwards and forwards several
‘times, according as the stick is advanced or de-
_ pressed. Sometimes the Emperor holds one end
of the stick, and his first minister the other;

[ 43 ]



GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

sometimes the minister has it entirely to himself.
Whoever performs his part with most agility, and
holds out the longest in leaping and creeping, 1s
rewarded with the blue-coloured silk; the red is
given to the next, and the green to the third, which
they all wear girt twice round about the middle;
and you see few great persons about this court,
who are not adorned with one of these girdles.
The horses of the army, and those of the royal
stables, having been daily led before me, were no
longer shy, but would come up to my very feet
without starting. The riders would leap them over
my hand as I held it on the ground, and one of
the Emperor’s huntsmen, upon a large courser,
took my foot, shoe and all; which was indeed a.
prodigious leap. I had the good fortune to divert
the Emperor one day after a very extraordinary
manner. I desired he would order several sticks /
of two foot high, and the thickness of an ordinary:
cane, to be brought me; whereupon his Majesty
commanded the master of his woods to give direc-
tions accordingly ; and the next morning six wood-
men arrived with as many carriages, drawn by
eight horses to each. I took nine of these sticks,’
fixing them firmly in the ground in a quadrangular '
figure, two foot and a half square. I took four

[ 44 ]



A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

other sticks, and tied them parallel at each corner,
about two foot from the ground; then I fastened
my handkerchief to the nine sticks that stood
erect, and extended it on all sides, till it was tight
as the top of a drum; and the four parallel sticks
‘rising about five inches higher than the handker-
chief, served as ledges on each side. When I had
finished my work, I desired the Emperor to let a
troop of his best horse, twenty-four in number,
come and exercise upon this plain. His Majesty
approved of the proposal, and I took them up,
one by one, in my hands, ready mounted and
armed, with the proper officers to exercise them.
As soon as they got into order, they divided into
two parties, performed mock skirmishes, discharged
blunt arrows, drew their swords, fled and pursued,
attacked and retired, and in short discovered the
best military discipline I ever beheld. The parallel
sticks secured them and their horses from falling
over the stage; and the Emperor was so much
delighted, that he ordered this entertainment to
be repeated several days, and once was pleased to
be lifted up and give the word of command; and,
with great difficulty, persuaded even the Empress
_ herself to let me hold her in her close chair within
two yards of the stage, from whence she was able

[45 ]



GU av ER ST RA Yer es

to take a full view of the whole performance. It
was my good fortune that no ill accident hap-
pened in these entertainments, only once a fiery
horse, that belonged to one of the captains, pawing
with his hoof, struck a hole in my handkerchief,
and his foot slipping, he overthrew his rider and
himself; but I im-
mediately relieved
them both, and
covering the hole
with one hand, I
set down the troop
with the other, in
the same manner
as I took themaip.
The horse that fel!
was Strained in the
left shoulder, but
the aider ‘got no
hurt, and I repaired my handkerchief as well as I
could: however, I would not trust to the strength
of it any more in such dangerous enterprises.
About two or three days before I was set at
liberty, as I was entertaining the court with these
kind ‘of feats, there arrived an express to inform
his Majesty, that some of his subjects riding near

[ 46 |





A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

the place where I was first taken up, had seen a
great black substance lying on the ground, very
oddly shaped, extending its edges round as wide
as his Majesty’s bedchamber, and rising up in the
middle as high as a man; that it was no living
creature, as they at first apprehended, for it lay on
the grass without motion, and some of them had
walked round it several times: that by mounting
upon each other’s shoulders, they had got to the
top, which was flat and even, and stamping upon
it they found it was hollow within; that they
‘humbly conceived it might be something belong-
ing to the Man-Mountain; and if his Majesty
pleased, they would undertake to bring it with
only five horses. I presently knew what they
meant, and was glad at heart to receive this intel-
ligence. It seems upon my first reaching the shore
after our shipwreck, I was in such confusion, that
before I came to the place where I went to sleep,
my hat, which I had fastened with a string to my
head while I was rowing, and had stuck on all the
time I was swimming, fell off after I came to land;
the string, as I conjecture, breaking by some acci-
dent which I never observed, but thought my
hat had been lost at sea. I intreated his Imperial

Majesty to give orders it might be brought to me

[ 47 ]



Grp Vets 2s) as AN ass

as soon as possible, describing to him the use and
the nature of it: and the next day the waggoners
arrived with it, but not in a very good condition ;
they had bored two holes in the brim, within an
inch and half of the edge, and fastened two hooks
in the holes; these hooks were tied by a long cord
to the harness, and thus my hat was dragged along
for about half an English mile; but the ground in
that country being extremely smooth and level, it
received less damage than I expected.

Two days after this adventure, the Emperor
having ordered that part of his army which quar-
ters in and about his metropolis to be in readiness,
took a fancy of diverting himself in a very singu-
lar manner. He desired I would stand like a
Colossus, with my legs as far asunder as | con-
veniently could. He then commanded his Gen-
eral (who was an old experienced leader, and a
great patron of mine) to draw up the troops in
close order, and march them under me; the foot
by twenty-four in a breast, and the horse by six-
teen, with drums beating, colours flying, and pikes
advanced. This body consisted of three thousand
foot, and a thousand horse. }

I had sent so many memorials and petitions for
my liberty, that his Majesty at length mentioned

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the matter, first in the cabinet, and then in a
~ full council; where it was opposed by none, except
Skyresh Bolgolam, who was pleased, without any
provocation, to be my mortal enemy. But it was
carried against him by the whole board, and con-
firmed by the Emperor. That minister was Gallet,
or Admiral of the Realm, very much in his master’s
confidence, and a person well versed in affairs, but
of a morose and sour complexion. However, he
was at length persuaded to comply; but prevailed
that the.articles and conditions upon which I
should be set free, and to which I must swear,
should be drawn up by himself. These articles
were brought to me by Skyresh Bolgolam in per-
son, attended by two under-secretaries, and several
persons of distinction. After they were read, I was
demanded to swear to the performance of them;
first in the manner of my own country, and after-
wards in the method prescribed by their laws;
which was to hold my right foot in my left hand,
to place the middle finger of my nght hand on the
crown of my head, and my thumb on the tip of my
right ear. But because the reader may be curious
to have some idea of the style and manner of ex-
pression peculiar to that people, as well as to know
the articles-upon which.I recovered my liberty, I

[ 50 |



A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT .

have made a translation of the whole instrument
word for word, as near as I was able, which I here
offer to the public.

GoLtpasto MoOMAREM EVLAME GURDILO SHEFIN
Mutty Utrty Gur, most mighty Emperor of
Lilliput, delight and terror of the universe, whose
dominions extend five thousand d/ustrugs (about
twelve miles in circumference) to the extremities
of the globe; monarch of all monarchs, taller than
the sons of men; whose feet press down to the
centre, and whose head strikes against the sun; at
whose nod the princes of the earth shake their
knees; pleasant as the spring, comfortable as the
summer, fruitful as autumn, dreadful as winter.
His most sublime Majesty proposeth to the Man-
Mountain, lately arrived to our celestial domin-
ions, the following articles, which by a solemn
oath he shall be obliged to perform.

First, The Man-Mountain shall not depart from
our dominions, without our licence under our great
seal.

2d, He shall not presume to come into our me-
tropolis, without our express order; at which time,
the inhabitants shall have two hours warning to
keep within their doors.

[51]



GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

3d, The said Man-Mountain shall confine his
walks to our principal high roads, and not offer to
walk or lie down in a meadow or field of corn.

4th, As he walks the said roads, he shall take
the utmost care not to trample upon the bodies
of any of our loving subjects, their horses, or car-
riages, nor take any of our subjects into his hands,
without their own consent.

5th, If an express requires extraordinary dis-
patch, the Man-Mountain shall be obliged to carry |
in his pocket the messenger and horse a six days
journey once in every moon, and return the said
messenger back (if so required) safe to our Im-
perial Presence.
6th, He shall be our ally against our enemies in
; the Island of Blefuscu, and do his utmost to destroy.
~ their fleet, which is now preparing to invade us.

7th, That the said Man-Mountain shall, at his
times of leisure, be aiding and assisting to our
workmen, in helping to raise certain great stones,
towards covering the wall of the principal park,
and other our royal buildings.

8th, That the said Man-Mountain shall, in two
moons’ time, deliver in an exact survey of the

[52]



A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

circumference of our dominions by a computation
of his own paces round the coast. a

Lastly, That upon his solemn oath to observe
all the above articles, the said Man-Mountain shall
have a daily allowance of meat and drink sufficient
for the support of 1728 of our subjects, with free
access to our Royal Person, and other marks of
our favour. Given at our Palace at Belfaborac the
twelfth day of the ninety-first moon of our reign.

I swore and subscribed to these articles with
great cheerfulness and content, although some of
them were not so honourable as I could have
wished; which proceeded wholly from the malice
of Skyresh Bolgolam, the High-Admiral: where-
upon my chains were immediately unlocked, and
I was at full liberty; the Emperor himself in
person did me the honour to be by at the whole
ceremony. I made my acknowledgements by
prostrating myself at his Majesty’s feet: but he
commanded me to rise; and after many gracious
expressions, which, to avoid the censure of vanity,
I shall not repeat, he added, that he hoped I should
prove a useful servant, and well deserve all the
favours he had already conferred upon me, or
might do for the future.

[53 ]



GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

The reader may please to observe, that in the
last article-for the recovery of my liberty, the
Emperor stipulates to allow me a quantity of meat
_and drink sufficient for the support of 1728 Lilli-
putians. Some time after, asking a friend at court
how they came to fix on that determinate number;
he told me that his Majesty's mathematicians,
having taken the height of my body by the help
of a quadrant, and finding it to exceed theirs in the
proportion of twelve to one, they concluded from
the similarity of their bodies, that mine must con-
tain at least 1728 of theirs, and consequently would
require as much food as was necessary to support
that number of Lilliputians. By which, the reader
may conceive an idea of the ingenuity of that
people, as well as the prudent and exact economy
_ of so great a prince.

[54]





CHAPTER IV

Mildendo, the metropolis of Lilliput, described, together
with the Emperors palace. A conversation between
the Author and a principal Secretary, concerning the —
affairs of that empire. The Author's offers to serve the
Emperor tn his wars.

HE first request I made after I had ob-

tained my liberty, was, that I might have

licence to see Mildendo, the metropolis ;
which the Emperor easily granted me, but with a
special charge to do no hurt either to the inhabi-
tants or their houses. The people had notice by
proclamation of my design to visit the town. The
wall which encompassed it, is two foot and an half
high, and at least eleven inches broad, so that a
coach and horses may be driven very safely round
it; and it is flanked with strong towers at ten foot
distance. I stept over the great Western Gate,

[ 55.



GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

and passed very gently, and sideling through the
two principal streets, only in my short waistcoat,
for fear of damaging the roofs and eaves of the
houses with the skirts of my coat. I walked with
the utmost circumspection, to avoid treading on
any stragglers, that might remain in the streets,
although the orders were very strict, that all people
should keep in their houses, at their own peril.
The garret windows and tops of houses were so —
crowded with spectators, that I thought in all my
travels I had not seen a more populous place.
The city 1s an exact square, each side of the
wall being five hundred foot long. The two great
streets, which run across and divide it into four
quarters, are five foot wide. The lanes and alleys,
which I could not enter, but only viewed them as
I passed, are from twelve to eighteen inches. The
town is capable of holding five hundred thousand
souls. The houses are from three to five stories.
The shops and markets well provided.

The Emperor’s palace is in the centre of the city,
where the two great streets meet. It is inclosed
by a wall of two foot high, and twenty foot distant
from the buildings. I had his Majesty’s permis-
sion to step over this wall; and the space being
so wide between that and the palace, I could easily

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GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

view it on every side. The outward court is a
square of forty foot, and includes ¢wo other courts :
in the inmost are the royal apartments, which |
was very desirous to see, but found it extremely
difficult; for the great gates, from one square into
another, were but eighteen inches high, and seven
inches wide. Now the buildings of the outer court
were at least five foot high, and it was impossible
for me to stride over them without infinite damage
to the pile, though the walls were strongly built
of hewn stone, and four inches thick. At the same
time the Emperor had a great desire that I should
see the magnificence of his palace; but this I was
not able to do till three days after, which I spent
in cutting down with my knife some of the largest
trees in the royal park, about an hundred yards
distant from the city. Of these trees I made two
stools, each about three foot high, and strong
enough to bear my weight. The people having re-
ceived notice a second time, I went again through
the city to the palace, with my two stools in my
hands. When I came to the side of the outer
court, I stood upon one stool, and took the other
in my hand: this I lifted over the roof, and gently
set it down on the space between the first and
second court, which was eight foot wide. I then

[ 58 |



A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

stept over the buildings very conveniently from
one stool to the other, and drew up the first after
me with a hooked stick. By this contrivance I
got into the inmost court; and lying down upon
my side, I applied my face to the windows of the
middle stories, which were left open on purpose,
and discovered the most splendid apartments that
can be imagined. There I saw the Empress and
the young Princes, in their several lodgings, with
their chief attendants about them. Her Imperial
Majesty was pleased to smile very graciously upon
me, and gave me out of the window her hand
to kiss. |
But I shall not anticipate the reader with farther
descriptions of this kind, because I reserve them
for a greater work, which is now almost ready for
the press, containing a general description of this
empire, from its first erection, through a long series
of princes, with a particular account of their wars
and politics, laws, learning, and religion: their plants
and animals, their peculiar manners and customs,
with other matters very curious and useful; my
chief design at present being only to relate such
- events and transactions as happened to the public,
or to myself, during a residence of about nine
months in that empire. |

[ 59 ]



GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

One morning, about a fortnight after I had ob-
tained my liberty, Reldresal, principal Secretary
(as they style him) of private Affairs, came to my
house attended only by one servant. He ordered
his coach to wait at a distance, and desired I would
give him an hour's audience; which I readily con-
sented to, on account of his quality and personal
merits, as well as the many good offices he had
done me during my solicitations at court. I
offered to lie down, that he might the more con-
veniently reach my ear; but he chose rather to let
me hold him in my hand during our conversation.
He began with compliments on my liberty; said
he might pretend to some merit in it: but, how-
ever, added, that if it had not been for the present
situation of things at court, perhaps I might not
have obtained it so soon. For, said he, as flourish-
ing a condition as we may appear to be in to
foreigners, we labour under two mighty evils; a
violent faction at home, and the danger of an
invasion by a most potent enemy from abroad.
As to the first, you are to understand, that for
about seventy moons past there have been two
struggling parties in this empire, under the
names of 7vamecksan and Slamecksan, from the
high and low heels of their shoes, by which they

[ 60 ]



A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

distinguish themselves. It is alleged indeed, that
the high heels are most agreeable to our ancient
constitution: but however this be, his Majesty
hath determined to make use of only low heels
in the administration of the government, and all
offices in the gift of the Crown, as you cannot
but observe; and particularly, that his Majesty's
~ Imperial heels are lower at least by a drurr than
any of his court; (dwrr is a measure about the
fourteenth part of an inch). The animosities
between these two parties run so high, that they
will neither eat nor drink, nor talk with each other.
We compute the 7vamecksan, or High-Heels, to
exceed us in number; but the power 1s wholly on
our side. We apprehend his Imperial Highness,
the Heir to the Crown, to have some tendency
towards the High-Heels; at least we can plainly
discover one of his heels higher than the other,
which gives him a hobble in his gait. Now, in the
midst of these intestine disquiets, we are threat-
ened with an invasion from the Island of Blefuscu,
which is the other great empire of the universe,
almost as large and powerful as this of his Majesty.
For as to what we have heard you affirm, that there
are other kingdoms and states in the world in-
habited by human creatures as large as yourself,

[Or |



Ge TE Reset RAVE Ss

our philosophers are in much doubt, and would
rather conjecture that you dropped from the moon,
or one of the stars; because it is certain, that an
hundred mortals of your bulk would, in a short
time, destroy all the fruits and cattle of his
Majesty's dominions. Besides, our histories of six
thousand moons make no mention of any other
regions, than the two great empires of Lilliput and
Blefuscu. Which two mighty powers have, as I
was going to tell you, been engaged in a most
obstinate war for six and thirty moons past. It
began upon the following occasion. It is allowed
on all hands, that the primitive way of breaking
eggs before we eat them, was upon the larger end:
but his present Majesty’s grandfather, while he
was a boy, going to eat an egg, and breaking it
according to the ancient practice, happened to cut
one of his fingers. Whereupon the Emperor his
father published an edict, commanding all his sub-
jects, upon great penalties, to break the smaller
end of their eggs. The people so highly resented
this law, that our histories tell us there have been
six rebellions raised on that account; wherein one
Emperor lost his life, and another his crown.
These civil commotions were constantly fomented _
by the monarchs of Blefuscu: and when they were
[ 62 ]



A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

quelled, the exiles always fled for refuge to that
empire. It is computed, that eleven thousand
persons have, at several times, suffered death,
rather than submit to break their eggs at the
smaller end. Many hundred large volumes have —
been published upon this controversy: but the
books of the Big-Endians have been long for-
bidden, and the whole party rendered incapable
by law of holding employments. During the course
of these troubles, the Emperors of Blefuscu did
frequently expostulate by their ambassadors, ac-
cusing us of making a schism in religion, by offend-
ing against a fundamental doctrine of our great
prophet Lustrog, in the fifty-fourth chapter of the
Blundecral (which is their Alcoran). This, how-
ever, is thought to be a mere strain upon the text:
for the words are these; 7hat all true believers
break their eggs at the convenient end: and which
is the convenient end, seems, in my humble
opinion, to be left to every man’s conscience, or
at least in the power of the chief magistrate to
determine. Now the Big-Endian exiles have found
- so much credit in the Emperor of Blefuscu’s court,
and so much private assistance and encourage-
ment from their party here at home, that a bloody
war has been carried on between the two empires

Les |



GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

for six and thirty moons with various success;
during which time we have lost forty capital ships,
and a much greater number of smaller vessels,
together with thirty thousand of our best sea-
men and soldiers; and the damage received by
the enemy is reckoned to be somewhat greater
than ours. However, they have now equipped a
numerous fleet, and are just preparing to make a
descent upon us; and’his Imperial Majesty, plac-
ing great confidence in your valour and strength,
has commanded me to lay this account of his
affairs before you.

I desired the Secretary to present my humble
duty to the Emperor, and to let him know, that
I thought it would not become me, who was a
foreigner, to interfere with parties; but I was
ready, with the hazard of my life, to defend his
person and state against all invaders.

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[64 ]





CHAPTER V

The Author, by an cxtraordinary stratagem, prevents an
invasion. A high title of honour ts conferred upon him.
Ambassadors arrive from the Emperor of Blefuscu and
sue for peace.

HE Empire of Blefuscu is an island situ-

ated to the north north-east side of Lilliput,

from whence it is parted only by a channel
of eight hundred yards wide. I had not yet seen
it, and upon this notice of an intended invasion,
I avoided appearing on that side of the coast, for
fear of being discovered by some of the enemy’s
ships, who had received no intelligence of me, all
intercourse between the two empires having been
strictly forbidden during the war, upon pain of
death, and an embargo laid by our Emperor upon
all vessels whatsoever. I communicated to his
Majesty a project I had formed of seizing the

[65]



GUE IY eR Ss TRAV ES

enemy's whole fleet: which, as our scouts assured
us, lay at anchor in the harbour ready to sail with
the first fair wind. I consulted the most experi-
enced seamen, upon the depth of the channel,
which they had often plumbed, who told me, that
in the middle at highwater it was seventy g/um-
gluffs deep, which is about six foot of European
measure; and the rest of it fifty elumgluffs at
most. I walked towards the north-east coast over
against Blefuscu; and lying down behind a hillock,
took out my small pocket perspective-glass, and
viewed the enemy’s fleet at anchor, consisting of
about fifty men of war, and a great number of
transports: I then came back to my house, and
gave order (for which I had a warrant) for a great
quantity of the strongest cable and bars of iron.
The cable was about as thick as packthread, and
the bars of the length and size of a knitting-needle.
I trebled the cable to make it stronger, and for
the same reason I twisted three of the iron bars
together, binding the extremities into a hook.
Having thus fixed fifty hooks to as many cables, I
went back to the north-east coast, and putting off
my coat, shoes, and stockings, walked into the
sea in my leathern jerkin, about half an hour
before high water. I waded with what haste I
[ 66 ]



A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

could, and swam in the middle about thirty yards
till I felt ground; I arrived at the fleet in less than —
half an hour. The enemy was so frighted when
_ they saw me, that they leaped out of their ships,
and swam to shore, where there could not be fewer
than thirty thousand souls. I then took my tack-
ling, and fastening a hook to the hole at the prow
of each, I tied all the cords together at the end.
While I was thus employed, the enemy discharged
several thousand arrows, many of which stuck in
my hands and face; and besides the excessive
smart, gave me much disturbance in my work.
My greatest apprehension was for my eyes, which
I should have infallibly lost, if I had not sud-
denly thought of an expedient. I kept among other
little necessaries a pair of spectacles in a private
pocket, which, as I observed before, had scaped
the Emperor's searchers. These I took out and
fastened as strongly as I could upon my nose,
and thus armed went on boldly with my work in
spite of the enemy’s arrows, many of which struck
against the glasses of my spectacles, but without
any other effect, further than a little to discom-
pose them. I had now fastened all the hooks, and
taking the knot in my hand, began to pull; but ©
not a ship would stir, for they were all too fast
[ 67 |



GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

held by their anchors, so that the boldest part of
my enterprise remained. I therefore let go the
cord, and leaving the hooks fixed to the ships, I
resolutely cut with my knife the cables that
fastened the anchors, receiving about two hundred
shots in my face and hands; then I took up the
knotted end of the cables, to which my hooks
were tied, and with great ease drew fifty of the
enemy’s largest men of war after me.

The Blefuscudians, who had not the least imagi-
nation of what I intended, were at first confounded
with astonishment. They had seen me cut the
cables, and thought my design was only to let the
ships run a-drift, or fall foul on each other: but -
when they perceived the whole fleet moving in
order, and saw me pulling at the end, they set up
such a scream of grief and despair, that it 1s almost.
impossible to describe or conceive. When I had
got out of danger, I stopped awhile to pick out the
arrows that stuck in my hands and face; and
rubbed on some of the same ointment that was
given me at my first arrival, as I have formerly |
mentioned. I then took off my spectacles, and
waiting about an hour, till the tide was a little
fallen, I waded through the middle with my cargo,
and arrived safe at the royal port of Lilliput.

[ 68 ]





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GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

The Emperor and his whole court stood on the
shore, expecting the issue of this great adventure.
They saw the ships move forward in a large half-
moon, but could not discern me, who was up to
my breast in water. When I advanced to the mid-
dle of the channel, they were yet in more pain,
because I was under water to my neck. The
Emperor concluded me to be drowned, and that
the enemy’s fleet was approaching in a hostile
manner: but he was soon eased of his fears, for
the channel growing shallower every step I made,
I came in a short time within hearing, and holding
up the end of the cable by which the fleet was
fastened, I cried in a loud voice, Long hve the
most puissant Emperor of Lilliput!’ ‘This great
prince received me at my landing with all possible
encomiums, and created me a Wardac upon the
spot, which is the highest title of honour among
them.

His Majesty desired I would take some other
opportunity of bringing all the rest of his enemy’s
ships into his ports. And so unmeasureable is the
ambition of princes, that he seemed to think of
nothing less than reducing the whole empire of
Blefuscu into a province, and governing it by a
viceroy; of destroying the Big-Endian exiles, and

[ 70 |



A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

compelling that people to break the smaller end
of their eggs, by which he would remain the sole
monarch of the whole world. But I endeavoured
to divert him from this design, by many arguments
drawn from the topics of policy as well as justice ;
and I plainly protested, that I would never be an
instrument of bringing a free and brave people
into slavery. And when the matter was debated
in council, the wisest part of the ministry were of
my opinion.

This open bold declaration of mine was so oppo-
site to the schemes and politics of his Imperial
Majesty, that he could never forgive it; he men-
tioned it in a very artful manner at council, where
I was told that some of the wisest appeared, at
least by their silence, to be of my opinion; but
others, who were my secret enemies, could not |
forbear some expressions, which by a side-wind
reflected on me. And from this time began an
intrigue between his Majesty and a junto of min-
isters maliciously bent against me, which broke
out in less than two months, and had like to
have ended in my utter destruction. Of so little
weight are the greatest services to prinees, when
put into the balance with a refusal..to gratify
their passions.

[71 |



GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

About three weeks after this exploit, there
arrived a solemn embassy from Blefuscu, with
humble offers of a peace; which was soon con-
cluded upon conditions very advantageous to our
Emperor, wherewith I shall not trouble the reader.
There were six ambassadors, with a train of about
five hundred persons, and their entry was very
magnificent, suitable to the grandeur of their mas-
ter, and the importance of their business. When
their treaty was finished, wherein I did them several
good offices by the credit I now had, or at least
appeared to have at court, their Excellencies, who
were privately told how much I had been their
friend, made me a visit in form. They began with
many compliments upon my valour and generosity,
invited me to that kingdom in the Emperor their
master’s name, and desired me to show them some
proofs of my prodigious strength, of which they
had heard so many wonders; wherein I readily
‘obliged them, but shall not trouble the reader with
the particulars.

When I had for some time entertained their
Excellencies, to their infinite satisfaction and sur-
prise, I desired they would do me the honour to
present my most humble respects to the Emperor
their master, the renown of whose virtues had so

[72 |



A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

justly filled the whole world with admiration, and
whose royal person I resolved to attend before I
returned to my own country: accordingly, the next
time I had the honour to see our Emperor, I de-
sired his general licence to wait on the Blefuscu-
dian monarch, which he was pleased to grant me,
as I could perceive, in a very cold manner; but
could not guess the reason, till I had a whisper
from acertain person, that Flimnap and Bolgolam
had represented my intercourse with those am-
bassadors as a mark of disaffection, from which I
am sure my heart was wholly free. And this was
the first time I began to conceive some imperfect
idea of courts and ministers.

It is to be observed, that these ambassadors
spoke to me by an interpreter, the languages of
both empires differing as much from each other
as any two in Europe, and each nation priding
itself upon the antiquity, beauty, and energy of |
their own tongues, with an avowed contempt for
that of their neighbour; yet our Emperor, stand-
ing upon the advantage he had got by the seizure
of their fleet, obliged them to deliver their creden-
tials, and make their speech in the Lilliputian
tongue. And it must be confessed, that from the
great intercourse of trade and commerce between

[73]



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both realms, from the continual reception of exiles,

which is mutual among them, and from the custom
in each empire to send their young nobility and
richer gentry to the other, in order to polish them-
selves by seeing the world, and understanding
men and manners; there are few persons of dis-
tinction, or merchants, or seamen, who dwell in the
maritime parts, but what can hold conversation in
both tongues; as I found some weeks after, when
I went to pay my respects to the Emperor of
Blefuscu, which in the midst of great misfortunes,
through the malice of my enemies, proved a very
happy adventure to me, as I shall relate in its
proper place.









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oC Teale lt E R VI
Of the inhabitants of Lilliput; their learning, laws, and

customs, the manner of educating their children. The
Author's way of living in that country. .

LTHOUGH I intend to leave the descrip-
tion of this empire to a particular treatise,
yet in the mean time I am content to

gratify the curious reader with some general ideas. |
As the common size of the natives is somewhat
under six inches high, so there is an exact pro-
portion in all other animals, as well as plants and
trees: for instance, the tallest horses and oxen are
between four and five inches in height, the sheep
an inch and a half, more or less: their geese about
the bigness of a sparrow, and so the several grada-
tions downwards till you come to the smallest,
which, to my sight, were almost invisible; but
nature hath adapted the eyes of the Lilliputians

[75 ]





g
Gry RS RAV ES

to all objects proper for their view: they see with
great exactness, but at no great distance. And to
show the sharpness of their sight towards objects
that are near, I have been much pleased with
observing a cook pulling a lark, which was not so
large as a common fly; and a young girl thread-
ing an invisible needle with invisible silk. Their
tallest trees are about seven foot high: I mean
some of those in the great royal park, the tops
whereof I could but just reach with my fist clinched.
The other vegetables are in the same proportion ;
but this I leave to the reader’s imagination.

I shall say but little at present of their learning,
which for many ages hath flourished in all its —
branches among them: but their manner of writ-
ing is very peculiar, being neither from the left to
the right, like the Europeans; nor from the right
to the left, like the Arabians; nor from up to down,
like the Chinese; nor from down to up, like the
Cascagians; but aslant from one corner of the
paper to the other, like ladies in England.

_ They bury their dead with their heads directly
downwards, because they hold an opinion, that in
eleven thousand moons they are all to rise again,
in which period the earth (which they conceive to
be flat) will turn upside down, and by this means

[ 76 |



he VOy Net LO Llp rw?

they shall, at their resurrection, be found ready
standing on their feet. The learned among them
confess the absurdity of this doctrine, but the prac-
tice still continues, in compliance to the vulgar.

There are some laws and customs in this empire
very peculiar; and if they were not so directly con-
trary to those of my own dear country, I should
be tempted to say a little in their justification.
It is only to be wished, that they were as well
executed. The first I shall mention, relates to in-
formers. All crimes against the state are punished
here with the utmost severity; but if the person
accused maketh his innocence plainly to appear
upon his trial, the accuser is immediately put to
an ignominious death; and out of his goods or
lands, the innocent person is quadruply recom-
pensed for the loss of his time, for the danger he
underwent, for the hardship of his imprisonment,
and for all the charges he hath been at in making
his defence. Or, if that fund be deficient, it 1s
largely supplied by the Crown. The Emperor
does also confer on him some public mark of his
favour, and proclamation is made of his innocence
through the whole city. :

They look upon fraud as a greater crime than
theft, and therefore seldom fail to punish it with

77





GUE VEkR so TRAVELS

‘death; for they allege, that care and vigilance,
with a very common understanding, may preserve
a man’s goods from thieves, but houesty has no
fence against superior cunning; and since it is
necessary that there should be a perpetual inter-
course of buying and selling, and dealing upon
credit, where fraud is permitted and connived at,
or hath no law to punish it, the honest dealer is
always undone, and the knave gets the advantage.
I remember when I was once interceding with the
Emperor for a criminal who had wronged his
master of a great sum of money, which he had
received by order, and ran away with; and hap-
pening to tell his Majesty, by way of extenuation,
that it was only a breach of trust; the Emperor
thought it monstrous in me to offer, as a defence,
the greatest aggravation of the crime: and truly I
had little to say in return, farther than the com-
mon answer, that different nations had different
customs; for, I confess, I was heartily ashamed.
Although we usually call reward and punish-
ment the two hinges upon which all government
turns, yet I could never observe this maxim to be
put in practice by any nation except that of Lilli-
put. Whoever can there bring sufficient proof that
he hath strictly observed the laws of his country

| 78 |



Ae Ow AG OA in ee el

for seventy three moons, hath a claim to certain »

privileges, according to his quality and condition

of life, with a ’proportionable sum of money out of

a fund appropriated for that use: he likewise
acquires the title of Svz/pal/, or Legal, which is
added to his name, but does not descend to his
posterity. And these people thought it a prodl-
gious defect of policy among us, when I told them
that our laws were enforced only by penalties,

without any mention of reward. It is upon this “

account that the image of Justice, in their courts
of judicature, is formed with six eyes, two before,
as many behind, and on each side one, to signify
circumspection; with a bag of gold open in her
right hand, and a sword sheathed in her left, to
show she is more disposed to reward than to
punish.

In choosing persons for all employments, they
have more regard to good morals than to great
abilities; for, since government is necessary to
mankind, they believe that the common size of
human understandings is fitted to some station
or other, and that Providence never intended to
make the management of public affairs a mystery,
to be comprehended only by a few persons of sub-
lime genius, of which there seldom are three born

[ 79 |



CUE Vera so Wak Aven ias

in an age: but they suppose truth, justice, tem-
perance, and the like, to be in every man’s power;
the practice of which virtues, assisted by expe-
rience and a good intention, would qualify any
man for the service of his country, except where
a course of study is required. But they thought
the want of moral virtues was so far from being
supplied by superior endowments of the mind,
that employments could never be put into such
dangerous hands as those of persons so qualified ;
and at least, that the mistakes committed by igno-
rance in a virtuous disposition, would never be of
such fatal consequence to the public weal, as the
practices of a man whose inclinations led him to
be corrupt, and had great abilities to manage, and
multiply, and defend his corruptions.

In like manner, the disbelief of a Divine Provi-
dence renders a man uncapable of holding any
public station; for, since kings avow themselves
to be the deputies of Providence, the Lilliputians
think nothing can be more absurd than for a prince
to employ such men as disown the authority under
which he acts.

In relating these and the following laws, I would
only be understood to mean the original institu-
tions, and not the most scandalous corruptions

[ 80 ]



eNO weGe Or Lr LI rer

into which these people are fallen by the degenerate
nature of man. For as to that infamous practice of
acquiring great employments by dancing on the
ropes, or badges of favour and distinction by leap-
ing over sticks and creeping under them, the reader
is to observe, that they were first introduced by
the grandfather of the Emperor now reigning, and
grew to the present height, by the gradual increase
of party and faction.

Ingratitude is among them a capital “ioe as
we read it to have been in some other countries:

_ for they reason thus, that whoever makes ill re-
turns to his benefactor, must needs be acommon ‘
enemy to the rest of mankind, from whom he hath >

received no obligation, and therefore such a man
is not fit to live. |

Their notions relating to the duties of parents
and children differ extremely from ours. Their
opinion is, that parents are the last of all others
to be trusted with the education of their own
children; and therefore they have in every town
public nurseries, where all parents, except cottagers
and labourers, are obliged to send their infants of
both sexes to be reared and educated when they
come to the age of twenty moons, at which time
they are supposed to have some rudiments of

[81 |



Gabe aN RS ie RAW eS

docility. These schools are of several kinds,
suited to different qualities, and to both sexes.
They have certain professors well skilled in pre-
paring children for such a condition of life as
befits the rank of their parents, and their own
capacities as well as inclinations. I shall first say
something of the male nurseries, and then of the
female. <

The nurseries for males of noble or eminent
birth, are provided with grave and learned pro-
fessors, and their several deputies. The clothes and
food of the children are plain and simple. They
are bred up in the principles of honour, justice,
courage, modesty, clemency, religion, and love of
their country; they are always employed in some
business, extept in the times of eating and sleep-
ing, which are very short, and two hours for diver-
sions, consisting of bodily exercises. They are
dressed by men till four years of age, and then
are obliged to dress themselves, although their
quality be ever so great; and the women attend-
ants, who are aged proportionably to ours at fifty,
perform only the most menial offices. They are
never suffered to converse with servants, but go
together in small or greater numbers to take
their diversions, and always in the presence of a

[ 82 |



A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

professor, or one of his deputies; whereby they
avoid those early bad impressions of folly and vice
to which our children are subject. Their parents
are suffered to see them only twice a year; the visit
is to last but an hour. They are allowed to kiss
the child at meeting and parting; but a professor,
who always stands by on those occasions, will not
suffer them to whisper, or use any fondling ex-
pressions, or bring any presents of toys, sweet-
meats, and the like.

The pension from each family for the educa-
tion and entertainment of a child, upon failure
of due payment, is levied by the Emperor’s
officers.

The nurseries for children of ordinary gentle-
men, merchants, traders, and handic:ufts, are man-
aged proportionably after the same manner; only
those designed for trades, are put out apprentices
at eleven years old, whereas those of persons of
quality continue in their exercises till fifteen, which
answers to one and twenty with us: but the con-
finement is gradually lessened for the last three
years. no

In the female nurseries, the young gitls of
quality are-educated much like the males, only
they are dressed by orderly servants of their own .

[ 33 |



Cee RS TRAVELS

sex; but always in the presence of a professor or
deputy, till they come to dress themselves, which
is at five years old. And if it be found that these
nurses ever presume to entertain the girls with
frightful or foolish stories, or the common follies
practised by chambermaids among us, they are
publicly whipped thrice about the city, imprisoned
for a year, and banished for life to the most deso-
late part of the country. Thus the young ladies
there are as much ashamed of being cowards and
fools, as the men, and despise all personal orna-
ments beyond decency and cleanliness : neither did
I perceive any difference in their education, made
by their difference of sex, only that the exercises
of the females were not altogether so robust; and
that some rules were given them relating to
domestic life, and a smaller compass of learn-
ing was enjoined them: for their maxim is, that
among people of quality, a wife should be always
a reasonable and agreeable companion, because
she cannot always be young. When the girls are
twelve years old, which among them is the mar-
riageable age, their parents or guardians take
them home, with great expressions of gratitude
to the professors, and seldom without tears of the
young lady and her companions.

[ 84 ]



AE NVONONG AOL TLL oe

In the nurseries of females of the meaner sort,
the children are instructed in all kinds of works
proper for their sex, and their several degrees:
those intended for apprentices, are dismissed at
seven years old, the rest are kept to eleven.

The meaner families who have children at these
nurseries, are obliged, besides their annual pen-
sion, which is as low as possible, to return to the
steward of the nursery a small monthly share of
their gettings, to be a portion for the child; and
therefore all parents are limited in their expenses
by the law. As to persons of quality, they give
security to appropriate a certain sum for each
child, suitable to their condition; and these funds
are always managed with good husbandry, and the
most exact justice.

The cottagers and labourers keep their children
at home, their business being only to till and
cultivate the earth, and therefore their education
is of little consequence to the public; but the old
and diseased among them are supported by hospi-
tals: for begging is a trade unknown in this empire.

And here it may perhaps divert the curious
reader, to give some account of my domestic, and
my manner of living in this country, during a resi-
dence of nine months and thirteen days. Having a

[85 |



GUELIV ERS TRAVELS

head mechanically turned, and being likewise forced
by necessity, I had made for myself a table and chair
convenient enough, out of the largest trees in the
royal park. Two hundred sempstresses were em-
ployed to make me shirts, and linen for my bed
and table, all of the strongest and coarsest kind
they could get; which, however, they were forced
to quilt together in several folds, for the thickest
was some degrees finer than lawn. Their linen is
usually three inches wide, and three foot make a
piece. The sempstresses took my measure as I lay
on the ground, one standing at my neck, and
another at my midleg, with a strong cord extended,
that each held by the end, while the third measured
the length of the cord with a rule of an inch long.
Then they measured my right thumb, and desired
no more; for by a mathematical computation, that
twice round the thumb is once round the wrist, and
so on to the neck and the waist, and by the help
of my old shirt, which I displayed on the ground
before them for a pattern, they fitted me exactly.
Three hundred tailors were employed in the same
manner to make me clothes; but they had another
contrivance for taking my measure. I kneeled
down, and they raised a ladder from the ground to
my neck; upon this ladder one of them mounted,
[ 86 |



ra VO NCA GH WO LL try a

and let fall a plumb-line from my collar to the
floor, which just answered the length of my coat:
but my waist andarms I measured mysel& When
my clothes were finished, which was done in my
house, (for the largest of theirs would not have
been able to hold them) they looked lke the patch-
work made by the ladies in England, only that
mine were all of a colour.

I had three hundred cooks to dress my victuals,
in little convenient huts built about my house,
where they and their families lived, and prepared
me two dishes a-piece. I took up twenty waiters in
my hand, and placed them on the table: an hundred
more attended below on the ground, some with
dishes of meat, and some with barrels of wine,
and other liquors, slung on their shoulders; all
which the waiters above drew up as I wanted, in
a very ingenious manner, by certain cords, as we
draw the bucket up a well in Europe. A dish of
their meat was a good mouthful, and a barrel of
their liquor a reasonable draught. Their mutton
yields to ours, but their beef is excellent. I have
had a sirloin so large, that I have been forced to
make three bits of it; but this is rare. My servants
were astonished to see mé eat it bones and all, as
in our country we do the leg of a lark. Their geese

[ 87 ]



Glave RS PRAY oSs

and turkeys I usually ate at a mouthful, and I
must confess they far exceed ours. Of their smaller
fowl I could take up twenty or thirty at the end
of my knife.

One day his Imperial Majesty, being informed
of my way of living, desired that himself and his
Royal Consort, with the
young Princes of the
blood of both sexes,
might have the happi-
ness (as he was pleased
to call it) of dining with
me. They came accord-
ingly, and I placed them
in chairs of state on my
table, just over against
me, with their guards
about them. Flimnap,
the Lord High Treas-
urer, attended there likewise with his white staff ;
and I observed he often looked on me witha sour
countenance, which I would not seem to regard,
but ate more than usual, in honour to my dear
country, as well as to fill the court with admi-
ration. I have some private reasons to believe,
that this visit from his Majesty gave Flimnap an

[ 88 ]









GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

opportunity of doing me ill offices to his master.
That minister had always been my secret enemy,
though outwardly caressed me more than was
usual t6 the moroseness of his nature. He repre-
sented to the Emperor the low condition of his
treasury; that he was forced to take up money at
great discount; that exchequer bills would not
circulate under nine per cent. below par; that in
short I had cost his Majesty above a million and
a half of sprugs (their greatest gold coin, about
the bigness of a spangle); and upon the whole,
that it would be advisable in the Emperor to take
the first fair occasion of dismissing me.

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The Author, being informed of a design to accuse him
of high-treason, makes his escape to Blefuscu. Hts
reception there.

EFORE I proceed to give an account of
RB my leaving this kingdom, it may be proper
to inform the reader of a private intrigue
which had been for two months forming against me.
I had been hitherto all my life a stranger to
courts, for which I was unqualified by the mean-
ness of my condition. I had indeed heard and
read enough of the dispositions of great princes
and ministers; but never expected to have found
such terrible effects of them in so remote a coun-
try, governed, as I thought, by very different
maxims from those in Europe.
When I was just preparing to pay my attend-

ance on the Emperor of Blefuscu, a considerable -

[91 |



CULDIVER’S PRAVELS

person at court (to whom I had been very service-
able at a time when he lay under the highest dis-
pleasure of his Imperial Majesty) came to my
house very privately at night in a close chair, and
without sending his name, desired admittance.
The chairmen were dismissed; I put the chair,



with his Lordship in it, into my coat-pocket: and
giving orders to a trusty servant to say I was
indisposed and gone to sleep, I fastened the
door of my house, placed the chair on the table,
according to my usual custom, and sat down by it.
After the common salutations were over, observ-
ing his Lordship’s countenance full of concern,

[ 92 |



IANO NGNG Ee AO OE a Bee

and enquiring into the reason, he desired I would
hear him with patience in a matter that highly
concerned my honour and my life. His speech
was to the following effect, for I took notes of it
as soon as he left me.

You are to know, said _ he, aa several Com-
mittees of Council have been lately called in the
most private manner on your account; and it is
but two days since his Majesty came to a full
resolution.

You are very sensible that Skyresh Bolgolam
(Galbet, or High-Admiral) hath been your mortal
enemy almost ever since your arrival. His origi-
nal reasons I know not; but his hatred is much in-
creased since your great success against Blefuscu,
by which his glory, as Admiral, is obscured. This
Lord, in conjunction with Flimnap the High-
_ Treasurer, whose enmity against you 1s notorious,
Limtoc the General, Lalcon the Chamberlain,
and Balmuff the Grand Justiciary, have prepared
articles of impeachment against you, for treason,
and other capital crimes.

This preface made me so impatient, being con-
scious of my own merits and innocence, that I was
going to interrupt; when he entreated me to be
silent, and thus proceeded.

[93 ]



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1fea14de10705240354ae69224378e2e26af2a1b
'2012-05-09T05:50:49-04:00'
describe
'3797' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLE' 'sip-files00003.pro'
2bd19333758bef4847a3d80be970e0ce
44e92a340317734a99db93b6f156e30b6fbb26c7
'2012-05-09T05:49:19-04:00'
describe
'31388' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLF' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
e6171a8c7f900bc9a00316a873ee077f
90f7cc223ee4408da40bbbdf1edc103d5867bb20
'2012-05-09T05:44:44-04:00'
describe
'11073436' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLG' 'sip-files00003.tif'
67aacfde22309992b05ae5b1524dfa65
f1f1230fe41a358d019995365d279e40e78207fb
'2012-05-09T05:51:25-04:00'
describe
'337' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLH' 'sip-files00003.txt'
4ebfe3668cc818f56af1b8e11e2ead0b
60686e038950638ce7a54c74036a29b136817e22
'2012-05-09T05:52:14-04:00'
describe
'22523' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLI' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
5b9004a81623a226f7c2e32fb85c9fbe
b6bd4eb665ac33a4c148da35727cd7eeefb2db95
'2012-05-09T05:53:34-04:00'
describe
'1315902' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLJ' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
85792e15077fc0c9e2216dfa7669871c
14d4f1524ef50a2de0f18ca89403b569df5d14c7
'2012-05-09T05:45:13-04:00'
describe
'437329' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLK' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
4490a663ce444a2c463e3c4ccf819d40
5bbecafbc97f550abbd6326dc7cd7a3ec246a85a
'2012-05-09T05:47:56-04:00'
describe
'26297' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLL' 'sip-files00004.pro'
df35eefda878cb016313f1e44448e15f
40224aaf3e3086e6f8bc03e15acf1edfc42b2955
'2012-05-09T05:48:22-04:00'
describe
'153660' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLM' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
dc8f5254eb7c974e545af709aad354f6
3b568e6f7e7c6f0a9d00b1e2614ce5620ffbbee1
'2012-05-09T05:51:22-04:00'
describe
'10544132' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLN' 'sip-files00004.tif'
817aa4ac204576f4aec069e1de9f56cb
4355b8a64df90c5e4a5eacc4db15dc0452b04a42
'2012-05-09T05:47:23-04:00'
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLO' 'sip-files00004.txt'
2266e71ea7c88001ba5753df1bbce6aa
64a98256be9647ae902ae19ef7df0b16c0c25f42
'2012-05-09T05:52:35-04:00'
describe
'54409' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLP' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
41d8a98ed544f10b208609b71de7cbb3
378520f523bed2064677a1dc3d399418612d4ce9
'2012-05-09T05:48:08-04:00'
describe
'1305547' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLQ' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
0ae6e845508740d5dfd684cc7c0c3f6f
d2fe9634991de4900ed7a6326e504ace3030bdb6
'2012-05-09T05:51:18-04:00'
describe
'384381' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLR' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
e76ba5a50a018762704d669b0a336498
ae26f504bbd2f6003365e4093b46f1193ced6c39
'2012-05-09T05:45:45-04:00'
describe
'32662' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLS' 'sip-files00005.pro'
872ff283733a220d16ee1291b297ef27
8fca41aa6ce8bdcf0078b855357835444a5bb769
'2012-05-09T05:52:53-04:00'
describe
'156254' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLT' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
5f24deff970f40b9060bdd24377ec126
b2d8f6bb75fc63e666d034a1153d1a67e08b9d33
'2012-05-09T05:45:09-04:00'
describe
'10461572' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLU' 'sip-files00005.tif'
0e7340a1a2de31c654cb92731002c32a
a1679f84b1bd76fc88a6ded863ec4fa2ffe77c9a
'2012-05-09T05:52:29-04:00'
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLV' 'sip-files00005.txt'
e19d1941d6801c7110659d0f5a96f3c1
13114a347877c24cc001fa1fc2bd163b74feb7a4
'2012-05-09T05:54:37-04:00'
describe
'54814' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLW' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
5863dbb314fdba5ab783fde9ec0f0c24
8a6f6b5b49540dd7e8d4b29b273358ad63278cc7
'2012-05-09T05:50:16-04:00'
describe
'1341525' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLX' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
a0b32ee91555942d93d8458a37781416
c19fbcb7f0013f161809e7d1197154822226dd0d
'2012-05-09T05:51:44-04:00'
describe
'369817' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLY' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
0fca13bbc932da0e9d7f490883ac2f97
cf6b2c501fb3afbebf9ea8b0b548830a614b0f0e
'2012-05-09T05:50:53-04:00'
describe
'32983' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJLZ' 'sip-files00006.pro'
30c91557fe450f773f8fda3864cf18e1
c6313d2cef91436b7a37fef71b074f3d8fa1b6d7
'2012-05-09T05:54:16-04:00'
describe
'152082' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMA' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
90685bb57905baacccd9300734865f07
b36c279dc77ca2862346a4ea66ab65389cb66638
'2012-05-09T05:48:42-04:00'
describe
'10749468' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMB' 'sip-files00006.tif'
15fef298fd797b3562dc759abf177f78
b3d00ac179f8ae3aa65d6a95dcb998ee91580d53
'2012-05-09T05:46:49-04:00'
describe
'1323' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMC' 'sip-files00006.txt'
5de89264dc35c8389de3b2f06f48f5f6
7c96e74152313a38d505b0f94f9fd1b6d5b489b9
'2012-05-09T05:54:00-04:00'
describe
'53342' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMD' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
9f939d2b21b5017467d6f966bd6e5d8a
634c6d9935a034e1d6096a0b22efc556f354d8fa
'2012-05-09T05:48:14-04:00'
describe
'1305579' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJME' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
a0043244505504ed42d7af11405a4e34
6335ad0c2f8a6c854284fa3a99ff6f7463ad5fd5
'2012-05-09T05:47:12-04:00'
describe
'404497' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMF' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
c8c273c4a952bf13e20d1eb738957b65
f431a6668f6b9c83efb2bc0127410ba67503225c
'2012-05-09T05:47:39-04:00'
describe
'23887' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMG' 'sip-files00007.pro'
337fc6208e2d5b4212b1d7e0568593d1
4ffd37f1a6a2e572730ecd859dd820d447327db1
describe
'143537' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMH' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
5340b58e5ba165026122e619bafcfeb2
eb90933efd0dd91599d7b0c21cc3de166f007e39
'2012-05-09T05:48:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMI' 'sip-files00007.tif'
d7f7c7b0a5568e59a57d24d68469c564
05f5ead3313e0d8a5ffe37f87d424efe8312d7b2
'2012-05-09T05:52:00-04:00'
describe
'987' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMJ' 'sip-files00007.txt'
2fa1de1bd79b7e8ff47dff1dbe5ac750
b0fe2c398b4794bc75eb0cdf7957157c74f1454f
'2012-05-09T05:44:32-04:00'
describe
'51187' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMK' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
eebb30ab582dd7a32be04216bd6cdcfa
d9064926ff8947cd7158d96a448a2f0fbf43cfa4
'2012-05-09T05:50:31-04:00'
describe
'58264' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJML' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
609e33e21aa41388cf697ac920534310
1e0fe74b58b210ef2ef47eeca1908af41dc53d55
'2012-05-09T05:53:16-04:00'
describe
'38332' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMM' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
4365c2b0959c7852b7f70e1507e6f067
3bd9ee47a4412e9cfbf06909f9c78ef722a7eb8f
'2012-05-09T05:51:46-04:00'
describe
'790' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMN' 'sip-files00008.pro'
5d0dc622bc4738127578c45b51495ac5
169e75fb5932a542e12eb4e66854dd3615516644
describe
'24873' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMO' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
a4112ce520b09ac04b375c21aa0332ad
13702825d66ac969e62607027a1a7bc07ef33fb7
'2012-05-09T05:54:24-04:00'
describe
'10659492' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMP' 'sip-files00008.tif'
c6795c87bf70446be0db00129e786219
eb29386c672e30153cd591279fe602b1453b965a
'2012-05-09T05:51:24-04:00'
describe
'61' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMQ' 'sip-files00008.txt'
a4b54fc6e86851057dba0eb963767e88
50dce879798b2b04013c4cc8cacce8ea0a06cef0
'2012-05-09T05:51:29-04:00'
describe
'20746' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMR' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
9d14d52e2fa82b9bca724972c964643f
2601e606ab6966d92ecad5e9cb49d18b8f6c5f77
'2012-05-09T05:54:46-04:00'
describe
'626273' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMS' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
cf7a495e296d58bea717cea0ffa4e264
5d8f0e07981301f1f9ae7f7dcdac84ba3f13d442
'2012-05-09T05:55:36-04:00'
describe
'128824' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMT' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
dd9a6396d0b5c16cda84a2aba26bad61
9f976bc17f013f9e0dfa200afd46b89a2e93cc98
'2012-05-09T05:53:24-04:00'
describe
'3571' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMU' 'sip-files00009.pro'
aa6b965746df207348de1b1aa85af21e
6995c85cb5121c52d0a4061e1e7c2f50f1d05aec
'2012-05-09T05:48:49-04:00'
describe
'57715' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMV' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
e430325f3b0fb2fb80d7667c1d093d2e
90d133275dc854239b7d1700a3f4c838a3b468fb
'2012-05-09T05:50:26-04:00'
describe
'10921640' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMW' 'sip-files00009.tif'
a2af1561eeea06d2d5c5ed66c5617d95
e5255ccfe570de34683d17d30fa7c800093c19fa
'2012-05-09T05:47:02-04:00'
describe
'159' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMX' 'sip-files00009.txt'
97edf4480165f4dfcfc9dae03ef96fde
606ef0370c26312ab1ba13a49c3cac29c2c4ae25
'2012-05-09T05:51:54-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'29973' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMY' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
82757a9deca220d7cb199500f5e4276a
ae8d59f1d86cc4027eb22b643e9531f054641c8f
'2012-05-09T05:54:38-04:00'
describe
'1330692' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJMZ' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
804cb03dffdb3663d432cdbd3b7e9777
a5a2e13fb1ade740071f05be01f5a4ebd2b275b5
'2012-05-09T05:45:29-04:00'
describe
'304382' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNA' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
7325994bfbdb0742b22867bfe1ed80b0
449926aca3a9c4d0f67898d734b4981dfe0c7e77
describe
'18954' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNB' 'sip-files00010.pro'
c7c05b4a8c4a8fc9f95bbd8a47a8ca2f
8501acd87bcb8815f89322fcecab482b88de63c8
'2012-05-09T05:50:43-04:00'
describe
'119727' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNC' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
00108b6220e68babc4ff84147c0b3e64
01f8af20ec5b95b281e25b960044887037647f44
'2012-05-09T05:47:29-04:00'
describe
'10662488' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJND' 'sip-files00010.tif'
5ac15f2f0d5335a5d17a497b04deb361
3fcba5202b27cd7ff6c3f14d50aa77db3fe76bb4
'2012-05-09T05:51:36-04:00'
describe
'838' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNE' 'sip-files00010.txt'
bad218202ad7139060249887503c1947
dd9aa92ecd88aa059bead23d669bd5d288f3dfba
'2012-05-09T05:53:17-04:00'
describe
'45387' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNF' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
b5d94d616ffb700c3c0f5a72a4138e58
aa20c7ddd0d29ea84468f352c7e79cfca131a5c4
'2012-05-09T05:45:14-04:00'
describe
'1305585' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNG' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
f5f9357a6331e055fdc45b3647480f0e
8ab9759372139f7f616c3d04d443bdd354ef077d
'2012-05-09T05:46:56-04:00'
describe
'364465' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNH' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
49e6f1229c91fb0722adf811132e9391
13e2570863069f3330851d7c333c81edfeceadcc
'2012-05-09T05:51:59-04:00'
describe
'31685' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNI' 'sip-files00011.pro'
88d3d502c181c675be49b4e831eccd5f
49dbabef86c83d9898f30e9d178ef81976c37922
'2012-05-09T05:54:55-04:00'
describe
'146635' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNJ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
9c49d4ed0898566750d9c7a418434eec
d8bd840020aa170a58c829bfb36fd1777d248314
'2012-05-09T05:46:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNK' 'sip-files00011.tif'
16cfcaad866ae522282e9ce6897c1ea2
f6b2b1cc6cd24ae6b60cd077b3b7d12badb4d76b
'2012-05-09T05:55:17-04:00'
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNL' 'sip-files00011.txt'
3c52e7bf18217ef8e55007ae5c2da0d5
80a3a17a227fa635f8dd1814c5af698d755bafc6
'2012-05-09T05:44:40-04:00'
describe
'53682' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNM' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
cf5732b088c46219dbe230ca77433bf2
200891fe11a32d2983310a7553558fdf15b0302c
'2012-05-09T05:49:30-04:00'
describe
'1305580' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNN' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
6cd6030c230f9dada5dee13c07b4ef02
e513443c3b458e1a980c57320cf286aebd130d80
'2012-05-09T05:45:49-04:00'
describe
'390483' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNO' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
56e6035a52d51b437172d9c951066077
be615d2291f96a9ee21e38846f74224bfa1e6d27
'2012-05-09T05:51:07-04:00'
describe
'33260' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNP' 'sip-files00012.pro'
5034fcbc131996bd9fe1c794e5061f24
a1b7c68a6702f872742aba5fcd09914c6715389f
'2012-05-09T05:48:25-04:00'
describe
'153150' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNQ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
116d4c0f1befd9f63d1e301b1ee28eca
c0cea5f6b655db42c4359610ac1625702bfb0493
'2012-05-09T05:45:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNR' 'sip-files00012.tif'
4473437249a003b82aa84309cf763091
10e10ea5ae31df4a15248dfcc9ecb21177ecd4d3
'2012-05-09T05:53:53-04:00'
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNS' 'sip-files00012.txt'
46f32091d0cc1376253c7bbb48abf372
994d8e868efe7ac31f8a08150454e83bd147c04d
'2012-05-09T05:46:36-04:00'
describe
'54033' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNT' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
5ba4a90f615e137c7dfcfcd85eb98d7b
c1de63edfed843f845f945852370a0132ef63e21
'2012-05-09T05:49:32-04:00'
describe
'1305568' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNU' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
c3aeac2e45077264fb45f17c61940424
7f259da9178ee7ffd69de55a82a9dafbbcd45cf4
'2012-05-09T05:45:39-04:00'
describe
'479122' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNV' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
198608c660a3b70722020f6a2dbbd1a9
d29f098c2ede81ead338ecadff52b09a66c20197
'2012-05-09T05:46:11-04:00'
describe
'33085' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNW' 'sip-files00013.pro'
9708741b4996f1ab56108f2d93659b74
aaebdad42fa98eb517f337502d4ce483e7d37c47
'2012-05-09T05:53:36-04:00'
describe
'172538' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNX' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
b0b65ec1fd61eb75ab31d77dc235cf5c
7fa47dda72a1e9e253da98435093a97144682ba1
'2012-05-09T05:48:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNY' 'sip-files00013.tif'
b2279fa0d516a10b5ce68949beb5f078
8dbf5038ab379776eb5a67ff5bf119fef76b449e
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJNZ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
062156c80d2a197e8124466a1b32e01b
e116d8755de080ecff170ec2b76fc9fcb7375ebc
'2012-05-09T05:51:16-04:00'
describe
'58142' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOA' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
4d1e1a6407cc2174b2115ee547286527
ac854707358dde7a087ee80ed91d149c635f4fa3
'2012-05-09T05:51:55-04:00'
describe
'1305586' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOB' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
6332b8d984e3d4a7bf627efec9de2ed3
10974de486017973c5e6fb489c9c445f04e53a1a
'2012-05-09T05:50:36-04:00'
describe
'482041' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOC' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
7982d58a5e6d2fde645b73aca90680a8
0738e01d08b15c247ebc656a96ea213ec07030ae
'2012-05-09T05:54:07-04:00'
describe
'33567' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOD' 'sip-files00014.pro'
a04390b0418212212f1b8c0e701ad767
addaa2a994e92a69a5919dd44596ed48cd0599a9
'2012-05-09T05:44:59-04:00'
describe
'173881' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOE' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
ff2bd93b72e943aa1a6676c4734e53e2
962d4bb0f1d1bfbef64ff3506e5ce11edac413d3
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOF' 'sip-files00014.tif'
e69ba90e8845ed1225f145600ce6b617
7a3a73acff8d58b112f9218a3e49b4ecfcc52099
'2012-05-09T05:48:43-04:00'
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOG' 'sip-files00014.txt'
97d29f847141e0ff5d590e8da6cdfb55
882cc9f105ce698306fdd5e77ed95899632db1b0
'2012-05-09T05:46:21-04:00'
describe
'56944' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOH' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
88ce041fce46dec8374d40081b0e6996
349bd49521a8c7d90fa002e06a36cb39caf39dba
'2012-05-09T05:53:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOI' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
1b8e2fd16cbd0669b0e63281e138db54
50c0252ca185e99f10be3e87c97c446e9b598844
'2012-05-09T05:55:19-04:00'
describe
'487054' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOJ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
a342fc03aeb5e04dff64774b4f846f24
cf67dec4ecd0b6be18d7055a164d13ca25a6d148
describe
'33724' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOK' 'sip-files00015.pro'
1c3db2c461d5e33b94a69ca879c12b31
cc2be47ec22f38cb54d41bef48c84bd3829cdf61
'2012-05-09T05:53:44-04:00'
describe
'175085' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOL' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
0c8d69fad87b627f35ff5e23da10722a
538bccdb57108cfc61033369f0a87f9cf658fe80
'2012-05-09T05:52:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOM' 'sip-files00015.tif'
663dc1f237357c88d5e327ff744e0f56
0730e0b319d31ebccac253a49d31f6cd5414d1a4
describe
'1349' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJON' 'sip-files00015.txt'
1eec1e6d7a62af31501dd08cea52e9ce
ec3864c99a22e44279be36a33ceb7ebd48aada68
'2012-05-09T05:55:14-04:00'
describe
'58071' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOO' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
21713d20b4b600e56356f1a4c2a56601
e20fafe0fa01c69fa3ec4658e92af94f9477935a
'2012-05-09T05:53:29-04:00'
describe
'1305461' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOP' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
a525e71a2eb9239b549bbbedaf21ae8b
4c454edb4339da41e55ac9e777548d89cf59a4df
'2012-05-09T05:47:24-04:00'
describe
'407187' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOQ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
96604fc5e5e9d5df61cfc52e0f50425a
0ac2cb516deb34f91f4941e51a0660b2aef0e284
'2012-05-09T05:46:05-04:00'
describe
'133575' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOR' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
e2a0144cf3c616c82de2df64553155c7
013a5a88dbbd4af09509cd005c94bda14f04a319
'2012-05-09T05:54:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOS' 'sip-files00016.tif'
3081a1b7665cc0ab4310ab5de0ce2310
f8b30f7f994a32faf331a30637b0545394edf345
'2012-05-09T05:49:42-04:00'
describe
'49069' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOT' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
4f026891f6f29371259838f4151b6db9
506e5fcaaf220e6cc9bf8da58a0e272750aba51c
'2012-05-09T05:52:49-04:00'
describe
'1305555' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOU' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
c24ba87323429a704495a5e1aefc923c
bb608512e8ccbe762b2be6a74906e2391cfa6b94
'2012-05-09T05:52:07-04:00'
describe
'493961' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOV' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
521c3f8b5b250a7aae26d65d3abcd072
26f1c224ae828e940cdee457a73f933a16e66736
'2012-05-09T05:54:06-04:00'
describe
'34567' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOW' 'sip-files00017.pro'
8e023ff35ab16c909c30b35fc222edb3
dc578e184e1ce9cb79a1298c2ccd8980c69ae130
describe
'174973' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOX' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
0e32a9f8b84b3f0d93b2de6950ffa286
96a553a71d225b0e7d4382fe6ca92e4cb6e6143e
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOY' 'sip-files00017.tif'
346498bf96155cef63bd7260b3b23048
43fd2ee1480cd01da3d83f37612f2a951c10c155
'2012-05-09T05:53:37-04:00'
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJOZ' 'sip-files00017.txt'
430ba160af22e0b0aae1cb96df8a702c
002c3c3ad0b4829c5ca7b9c6d74b6d59dc07738b
'2012-05-09T05:45:46-04:00'
describe
'59149' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPA' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
b185fd831900ee1ffe669aec2c298426
275b722ef21d42613bbb12f9c8171706762bf0a8
'2012-05-09T05:45:50-04:00'
describe
'1305576' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPB' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
da95a335cdbf03bb2141de40b3028c6c
6251f8837640796bf28a3381d07b2e01d8fcf86c
'2012-05-09T05:49:37-04:00'
describe
'485628' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPC' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
f9204dd16c8f8fc0b77d8dc74e550dfc
733bdd79953dc87c4c248cfc8a3ad486e7cc4a1c
'2012-05-09T05:49:23-04:00'
describe
'33236' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPD' 'sip-files00018.pro'
874103f2362237d82be4ec05bc034db4
1712e3b01dac70782904d86d3599edaa551314f9
'2012-05-09T05:45:01-04:00'
describe
'176035' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPE' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
5cebea58cc9764801fc1140f44e78df9
e139be1957b0a8043f08fbfcfe7c75fc8fe29889
'2012-05-09T05:52:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPF' 'sip-files00018.tif'
e4d54350229973b6cdfe8e0ffc5bef35
8abeb43dd6aee121692fe1d54c99158b927e540c
'2012-05-09T05:55:18-04:00'
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPG' 'sip-files00018.txt'
eb9b47f0d890bc30bec91902c2677c91
523174f4de5a647e5947ba6f843ff83f8bd6cfa2
'2012-05-09T05:49:51-04:00'
describe
'57458' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPH' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
67f65f93e4821201a5e6261fcadf48e4
eee9fb21087591e02989448a7b99458a22445f84
describe
'1305581' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPI' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
ae63c0fb7e8b7db913f83c9f9c765db8
fbed01ce5496f633032d8f5c3351d94684fd7941
'2012-05-09T05:46:37-04:00'
describe
'486509' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPJ' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
d98f9f03422eba09da1624f05da817bb
efb5a5fa19c5824d236d7015b59c3003bb3213c2
'2012-05-09T05:55:06-04:00'
describe
'33662' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPK' 'sip-files00019.pro'
784bf569fef533116466b942fdd4639f
e2f51c57652755d6509894d80f2de669d2acf489
'2012-05-09T05:46:54-04:00'
describe
'172981' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPL' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
253d95f8fd5b74a31308daf9a661cc43
a5e193e05e4b454027a844c401c777b8462372cd
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPM' 'sip-files00019.tif'
77cf634ef7b257d9800c00013d6ee7f1
c5be828ffe8f1053491e5d4caa004963decbe879
'2012-05-09T05:45:36-04:00'
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPN' 'sip-files00019.txt'
c63d36305e4878c452ec3acf6f3503ad
95eb5f560dde2f49c9f1698f40000b1cc66615c8
'2012-05-09T05:54:53-04:00'
describe
'58568' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPO' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
44ddb3763bd79a22cb13aee0593fa5de
58d6bf22f8cc90c60462b32d4d5ac7eae9ee00cc
'2012-05-09T05:44:24-04:00'
describe
'1305562' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPP' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
d59bbece991ac4c37fd2dc82d1de8c98
dbf62a09329b4dfa145bdc1e78ab77566abbcfb7
'2012-05-09T05:52:33-04:00'
describe
'474483' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPQ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
711942f7edb75d5868e563093bd976a3
8be5f932f71aafed3f3c36089153bb29e4191fb5
'2012-05-09T05:46:24-04:00'
describe
'24015' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPR' 'sip-files00020.pro'
11de5f2a9a56bb235c6bf5254954c33c
7ebb951fe0e76a41f6ee5dafa7894fa40a6216f5
'2012-05-09T05:48:53-04:00'
describe
'166164' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPS' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
c0b1c815db2a8fd3d3e036579f756d82
7c1c12e02f949b51d8ee2f17c7b80ed083576e24
'2012-05-09T05:52:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPT' 'sip-files00020.tif'
c361e9fdb27034490fd2e3d410d98bf3
ca27c4509b8f27679ab75ccd0c818e6cb220f5aa
'2012-05-09T05:50:46-04:00'
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPU' 'sip-files00020.txt'
8c30c3902022ae1164e6a3d0fd979466
6eacb7d8dc3909185aca44ceb3446848f232b837
'2012-05-09T05:45:04-04:00'
describe
'56387' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPV' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
e6df07291eabf4e4eab93b672b3178d8
1848e87d263fef8c2fd0ce742278846036b03d60
describe
'1313383' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPW' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
b6f7b7ee250645f7cb02df544c61d1fc
2ebaf59763ba865d47999e7443723cb54da37abf
'2012-05-09T05:51:04-04:00'
describe
'482550' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPX' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
09d293ab9b82abd3be2dc71fbabdc972
b03a7862f6c3f6ec3e939c4145cd260b656827e3
'2012-05-09T05:48:21-04:00'
describe
'32972' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPY' 'sip-files00021.pro'
5ebd0c2dda742ba1bbdfaa6063f1bf79
e08261d9bf95b891773b90e6341f618e5e63f143
'2012-05-09T05:55:11-04:00'
describe
'174444' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJPZ' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
cf8b48c666b5d0d3ac10779d07d5d294
3fb527d2f784327bbb2426e3fe84bb5fe6b9e3a5
'2012-05-09T05:46:12-04:00'
describe
'10523944' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQA' 'sip-files00021.tif'
4dee3c623a6a820d433c87c787660341
d9ff481e94dc5a57f6fbc567cedb635968d26129
'2012-05-09T05:52:04-04:00'
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQB' 'sip-files00021.txt'
b24868c6eb4a68bab08c3ef6499e52a5
2170256914dc4569b7d5c78108d327f9c973cc20
'2012-05-09T05:53:33-04:00'
describe
'58629' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQC' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
ea9fffb0f680718b0576568960c8306e
f8abefb39e1c4a40c56c275f521df3f8f4f489d9
'2012-05-09T05:47:42-04:00'
describe
'1305515' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQD' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
a9dbc8fc2f0d61da1aee9ae5f74025a3
5f5526672ab9c00d73526c783669a65c9df3485c
'2012-05-09T05:47:44-04:00'
describe
'461524' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQE' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
cce432e5951b216169f8df1f75d81a43
99cc48b69ee885d8024c53234381d1d8febb9223
'2012-05-09T05:52:39-04:00'
describe
'33026' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQF' 'sip-files00022.pro'
eb16b2eaf5906c216993df8488303126
7ab976f8c1d6879a59ae623b864eee672eb9df68
'2012-05-09T05:55:02-04:00'
describe
'165186' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQG' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
dc35acdd5d05ee5bc967da577ceada26
3aa4add06a4a68fccd69e7c885eb603d1c807725
'2012-05-09T05:47:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQH' 'sip-files00022.tif'
66c6dda79ab5c075f1b21b6855ec5357
6756705acabda66a42596bba7cf321a4caf25198
'2012-05-09T05:49:09-04:00'
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQI' 'sip-files00022.txt'
21b9f4f0cd86d636fa0a1fe58febbc12
0d1267eb6b26895f083aa8b4c92b5c25eb5560e6
'2012-05-09T05:51:47-04:00'
describe
'55633' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQJ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
14e7830aef6873ae635f97a91b0cb408
d0a7a19a8c1e9a37e799267b0997621d0e07264b
'2012-05-09T05:44:58-04:00'
describe
'1305529' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQK' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
784c83bd89d0dec2009a1024b0e3a048
b5afaa50475a36aa6fdb19a27d796b05fbad54fc
'2012-05-09T05:48:12-04:00'
describe
'362639' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQL' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
0414c29fb926a7c4cd1373fcfe0bd342
4b771e62974c90ba5c1c190100285a3d0e6a53a0
describe
'33012' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQM' 'sip-files00023.pro'
71f3f05dd0f5567bd89b4b41be152548
e3bdad240a942c5184016109b561fb9c756a6ec5
'2012-05-09T05:53:51-04:00'
describe
'147487' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQN' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
03e98f475f5c25d22fad46692553a4a8
ee89dd1b472248c81018df703b33229b45a99406
'2012-05-09T05:55:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQO' 'sip-files00023.tif'
2a4e47d35e43489c2e78f9fe54b462ce
487416ac9018248eb9da09fd48ac4a99147e9dd0
'2012-05-09T05:46:00-04:00'
describe
'1316' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQP' 'sip-files00023.txt'
967bb63d3cde1bb0c1e4222ff0f42056
26d98194f36d28f166da3931b32936b42b04dba0
'2012-05-09T05:48:07-04:00'
describe
'53026' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQQ' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
f8bce2f52fd661d3e7addc7442d6289c
68e7ebfc6076f68f51da2b1758210f18dd9282be
'2012-05-09T05:47:15-04:00'
describe
'1305589' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQR' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
37e0e45024944525c76624cb76cffb00
fffafb3b4260b78dc12730c96516fab16eb2b77d
'2012-05-09T05:49:41-04:00'
describe
'369894' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQS' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
fd1e46882e0d16e551be0b52dc45ac85
616fd894403ec2e5cedf51e206cf6355c39d3b19
'2012-05-09T05:46:47-04:00'
describe
'32124' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQT' 'sip-files00024.pro'
6d0ccea0f7ae780351fd26b95fe79dac
6addae19b05b2ffe348e7372dad7a135983d2316
'2012-05-09T05:52:34-04:00'
describe
'149952' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQU' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
1b7fedc9c22da3505285e8ddc9064f0b
5a04404f769b8860195e805feb7dca5213037167
'2012-05-09T05:50:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQV' 'sip-files00024.tif'
d2601f9309f491bb3d1bba7d04ab78de
46628ef82a1227078bd366735d713b8dd8fb2a82
'2012-05-09T05:50:23-04:00'
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQW' 'sip-files00024.txt'
56e7b9512df2a2b5a04a610bc111ce69
975bd42d28c4f3e11ff86dc1961312a8428012d7
'2012-05-09T05:55:10-04:00'
describe
'53703' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQX' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
dcf51f081e9da630531466b96a0316e4
9316e1d8ef172fd787ae23b89a6cfba9a521d5df
'2012-05-09T05:51:52-04:00'
describe
'1349451' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQY' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
22face694751bfd06a7ab56628e3878d
f0af30b1f1af79ede0e3ed50bdae0105f78dd280
'2012-05-09T05:45:55-04:00'
describe
'377809' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJQZ' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
a619f944e1ac40dae581bedc448c307f
eb3e6f1c40ce42a211e1a25a870c9ad1e8d4d31f
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRA' 'sip-files00025.pro'
a5d1fb86532d10564d1ddd8ac8c31714
4daf8fcb0baf2741852c0b22b0a63b8b66812edb
'2012-05-09T05:46:08-04:00'
describe
'152015' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRB' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
99671634e11c0160508afd7fbf9eb7d9
7b58c8b57eaa436af103fa620e364cafd292b687
'2012-05-09T05:55:43-04:00'
describe
'10812548' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRC' 'sip-files00025.tif'
01e383e904d257ddd6b29b8ffe90af43
fe83a7abd0398655fd86bc80b3ec19a77915fe81
'2012-05-09T05:49:35-04:00'
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRD' 'sip-files00025.txt'
339ce0d6e6e67e8f3885b89b888a4b9a
8a2608b86bab7a52d7b755691c4d9bf9eb903155
'2012-05-09T05:44:33-04:00'
describe
'53247' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRE' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
150c0ce5e37de9e61deb1488568763d2
4fe35e39010c8dbc597f5148160f7478bbd612f5
'2012-05-09T05:49:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRF' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
6dd8a080fdf49963327921020265a265
bfd7bc906d7f2058252ccdd1e4d131b0c063a13c
'2012-05-09T05:47:31-04:00'
describe
'264026' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRG' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
c04aafdbbc656ab7bce2f93e4d88ef58
c62741ba48be550f7de3e71435616c94842b5d71
'2012-05-09T05:51:17-04:00'
describe
'95294' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRH' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
ed24a1785d7ca0c63a196ef37fe6b108
98a74f8df170707b2993c328c63f5a92e089334b
'2012-05-09T05:52:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRI' 'sip-files00026.tif'
6558aba6e13040ccbc72f4f04a995ca1
8c2ecc6187a885e90dc15ff937aafdb1766e5b44
'2012-05-09T05:50:56-04:00'
describe
'40580' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRJ' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
19167ca6f67e0749d601d71f0ae591d6
0f00377c2ae9cfef09cde95bd9af2e900d7eedfd
describe
'1305570' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRK' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
015ccbd5cac7478046774850522dbd7d
aaf73623ec57cea378b0c6a51db7ae337b47da2c
describe
'385430' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRL' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
36b33cefe2d75a6735d35bfc0f11b592
6b41b00f26f5d76bf69695a9fc8c141054de498f
'2012-05-09T05:46:01-04:00'
describe
'33817' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRM' 'sip-files00027.pro'
47b078595c6cf286b6d1e9b4c08e1abb
403b18f9b09535bee071cd783b88843767cc8933
'2012-05-09T05:45:12-04:00'
describe
'157190' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRN' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
c6e81aee0ee385a2eea8e892b2350b2b
1cb528c83ef1dca1b6d95976ce950fe598a17920
'2012-05-09T05:50:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRO' 'sip-files00027.tif'
f3f20d429d1feba9bd81d4a4fad37b13
6d573da0218206b98d73c6bdbd78f3aea8abb74b
'2012-05-09T05:44:38-04:00'
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRP' 'sip-files00027.txt'
4f038bc7ed21aaebd20b9e161f148dff
9e6058c61272bdd3583a8cd3b9394719ad32788f
'2012-05-09T05:53:48-04:00'
describe
'54649' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRQ' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
84c62c0abf5d7cc79ab0b2010840412d
b05e173f2bbd8615f6e871dc4e68f54d97f79a6d
describe
'1340687' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRR' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
6887e9101289b978cae08d83421098c6
d476fe24abd24f48d700d46cf3ebdf7e6985de93
'2012-05-09T05:55:45-04:00'
describe
'395456' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRS' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
1ef17aa0c6828211a4f366925ac94f60
046d8fa1e7b2894ca74f5275081f17a0c8343321
'2012-05-09T05:50:07-04:00'
describe
'32318' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRT' 'sip-files00028.pro'
82103a72e707a10782fd00ca1010f97f
de0934875a4970fcd60c1c8ada2fbdb9c90ad62f
'2012-05-09T05:54:42-04:00'
describe
'150939' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRU' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
2477569826399a1a25a581bb74593d42
618150ca466625fd20b4c05db19b684b2db7f8c3
describe
'10742772' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRV' 'sip-files00028.tif'
d57cab7a8ba620256505ddacc8a617ce
c37e586021177424dd2137261c2415d822e9cf9c
'2012-05-09T05:54:33-04:00'
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRW' 'sip-files00028.txt'
19191b453ea840d1a5bf88c2b8ef16bc
76bf8e3de2611b4b9ea1bce0b8c25fc13324b2a1
describe
'51993' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRX' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
9cb1cac708d07789452afe6244df5350
90cc80bad1bcbeb36bfac6288555b857058f48f3
'2012-05-09T05:55:22-04:00'
describe
'1323363' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRY' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
930fcc2cab3792bc06a75d9021d813a8
a3af1a0fb014a81420d437791e6f120ac4c35024
describe
'381570' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJRZ' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
33d9cff51a6fd7a688c48cc86cc266c9
72142d908e1f3cae46c6121e56078ef6f81212d3
'2012-05-09T05:49:26-04:00'
describe
'29809' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSA' 'sip-files00029.pro'
50feb5858a7727aa7d4fccbeef4bf0b0
4ff0945a1a0cde7db08e2309e9f2f1de27dbf2c2
'2012-05-09T05:47:30-04:00'
describe
'146014' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSB' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
b9d2d263b4e3a15e786f36d3bc591d83
1c81272277044f10324dd69a0a7652afbbfa9c00
'2012-05-09T05:54:58-04:00'
describe
'10603788' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSC' 'sip-files00029.tif'
fea308da4b9bdfd7c7208b5e0ad657f7
6213a3fe7d7c0a6544cb69d6ab1d0cfd7ffcbae7
'2012-05-09T05:44:50-04:00'
describe
'1170' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSD' 'sip-files00029.txt'
5530f87a2bdb965d4bbe6082cd2881a7
8c0bc9080d2dbd4ae757054cca741853ad2095f2
'2012-05-09T05:49:25-04:00'
describe
'51980' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSE' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
03ed420111e0b0e65489d5a436707559
78d5d9d3b9b8fde782f9f212d17930cd2fadc90d
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSF' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
8cdfbe32be1f02160edf0fbf861a93a8
5948cabb5b26051cc86b282451aa365e29722a0e
'2012-05-09T05:52:19-04:00'
describe
'304052' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSG' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
dec3733226777fd1ea0e6d8c063fb4f4
0fd98d2f49e242f72e4e435dda7e7fe31b655a2e
describe
'21624' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSH' 'sip-files00030.pro'
2f2172c0f74665a19063c7969565f87d
2f075353df486d0ed21cc9848231f66d26887369
'2012-05-09T05:53:38-04:00'
describe
'121995' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSI' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
69fd7be4d55cda781acba1d949918902
df2c70881b99bcb936ada3141d9c8d0f11d41288
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSJ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
96770c99b653c8e57577ffc4f0230ca9
74b6ae0d0b6877e3dd919a39a0e71e5a18c2311e
'2012-05-09T05:54:36-04:00'
describe
'943' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSK' 'sip-files00030.txt'
bfdb9cf26f5a84b830735970797fd289
9d84306e472d1e05e1cabfa647f6c4a4cc24437d
'2012-05-09T05:44:54-04:00'
describe
'46762' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSL' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
afc7c37ab5d59edd0b54ccea883f8f22
dba19cda21a46a74e868d38dc3be5b54bb099c42
'2012-05-09T05:45:23-04:00'
describe
'1305566' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSM' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
6d6d89e4edfb3101b9ddbe07e3dfd422
cb239da35957ad0bfa29c207c64bfcea4b2afb51
'2012-05-09T05:47:06-04:00'
describe
'356072' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSN' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
b0e88c616149b329058e00924613ee1e
61afc70e43ff1340852b22c1ddc23c7c062afecb
'2012-05-09T05:54:57-04:00'
describe
'32876' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSO' 'sip-files00031.pro'
86c4ce7ff682556a39e0f302f72d0bd8
750d5ef22b99c5a94535f433c118a815a570fc0b
'2012-05-09T05:52:25-04:00'
describe
'145008' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSP' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
59be614bd6fe5cd76e8ad9a29fc5c92a
1f88bd25157d1d5c8e9ca16aafc5f9662e9bca2b
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSQ' 'sip-files00031.tif'
15cd76e146b9ccf51b5e8632a90ef3b5
d13a55b26f64e967ec87f403f919067cad517507
'2012-05-09T05:47:03-04:00'
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSR' 'sip-files00031.txt'
314d840afa862b9d6ab0d6cf0af91231
ec34ee9c7bfa1510812338db14845b7d26efd2ee
'2012-05-09T05:45:30-04:00'
describe
'52581' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSS' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
999c713d4d38c6c37a5415e8cd9e609b
dcbb59616459bbd36a672df14fe705ebe5c0b622
'2012-05-09T05:44:45-04:00'
describe
'1305549' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJST' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
1487f0013528b3f1693182606bc325bc
fb7792deb18c41c06c27ffa68a864be94cfe87ca
'2012-05-09T05:52:30-04:00'
describe
'404360' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSU' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
30b94a8495d29d6d66180d7958172c5b
9f1293417b49b3bbbe5ee1889e232336fde987c1
describe
'35977' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSV' 'sip-files00032.pro'
8fddc0847d96982366242732b9839869
754d4d582da242c56ba4287ca87d0e9db3dbe2dc
describe
'158482' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSW' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
6ad928b900cc825bc610d7d40f3563f3
5e1035ad8efb91e61672c4e5c566726279800dc8
'2012-05-09T05:48:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSX' 'sip-files00032.tif'
35b9533ad64b7b3f1af8211c4c553d91
f5d875f2421337da2fda89aa02ead90def81b648
'2012-05-09T05:45:41-04:00'
describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSY' 'sip-files00032.txt'
12403aa0579375f67795fd16f1179d77
01b277c42e0905aa4a8e0184fcf4a74f5e438d9c
'2012-05-09T05:49:21-04:00'
describe
'53949' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJSZ' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
dc9782d11d481d108a66a4af58a190f6
943e4e38dc28c6eb344d5ecb927c7a154497a9de
'2012-05-09T05:47:55-04:00'
describe
'1305558' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTA' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
1f56460d58916c0f7dce6c7828460242
058f66570977c056f3ee91b801d11874d6e10c1f
'2012-05-09T05:51:45-04:00'
describe
'496879' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTB' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
34975872c6ae2d638d58b4040783df4a
31ec753d1396a1e4555df0331e996137966b413c
'2012-05-09T05:52:47-04:00'
describe
'35470' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTC' 'sip-files00033.pro'
7aa35c3ab4153b71426ab5481c4dedad
c0835ee7bd4b8df0850dc62be307b5b53b7464ac
'2012-05-09T05:53:21-04:00'
describe
'178568' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTD' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
7e139b84b6e67b96daa4c00753585823
80f5b6227748c3017fd3ff78932dc2131b0348fe
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTE' 'sip-files00033.tif'
7e80558987c72dc2714b77c7ff4046e9
2d1bc8237372e159d8f7d084c36f2563885aee37
describe
'1437' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTF' 'sip-files00033.txt'
40016067572d33dcc69d73879dffc63a
55f1b07d6c6cdd56a5463cc8e4496c3bc0d238d4
'2012-05-09T05:53:12-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'59512' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTG' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
8940d84c8c4ff9a821f42ed97f153e55
ae6105c1bdef38776cdd58a004db8b10fa3e26fe
'2012-05-09T05:46:18-04:00'
describe
'1305572' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTH' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
7868ecc2481b2fdbd4fd0500b4fbe188
a05320501544ba7f5e42d5519b6e0b94fc276e46
describe
'294840' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTI' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
2f414d640f29fbc6f9325a732900bcad
3db6617161390b819632d362b6deed05d34924fd
'2012-05-09T05:54:20-04:00'
describe
'105222' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTJ' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
2aac631073c03350d67fd6bcb8c3d239
917195fc31242223e5953455708e34b2a36efe81
'2012-05-09T05:44:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTK' 'sip-files00034.tif'
d13cd0ee494b77da5755a2a84cbcfc70
6f323312f75199c8947e27d64cdf94c2f629ad08
'2012-05-09T05:50:14-04:00'
describe
'43709' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTL' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
01c8ef1f6ca200121aa43c84bb0ca795
1bf6e5618b217d2c3d91a27ded834bd50716a501
'2012-05-09T05:47:21-04:00'
describe
'1305577' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTM' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
43c40e3012f2d72a9497a835fac65545
16b36a0e1065a7730f64c8350f67d424f78acfc4
'2012-05-09T05:50:29-04:00'
describe
'365937' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTN' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
bff39a6fa6227084b917529d0edbd9f8
78824576030127744a186f02303ff7217386ae15
'2012-05-09T05:49:43-04:00'
describe
'32215' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTO' 'sip-files00035.pro'
3a2ff7e44685c88fb30800e1a650b971
2f38327fcafda95c9e4dd8dafa04dea075cba247
'2012-05-09T05:55:56-04:00'
describe
'149202' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTP' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
889ef925f33486290a104286773e0361
9618cd6090accb5aab2b3104b4a78d0d344e6d74
'2012-05-09T05:51:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTQ' 'sip-files00035.tif'
b80f7f75630ef082d3d33c7c2fb77dd9
b67a82afe578a334ad7b434e75962486daa4214c
'2012-05-09T05:52:21-04:00'
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTR' 'sip-files00035.txt'
8cacbc1b258494304edb205cbf43a738
bc0effc504b43998c01a2f3dee32846cd9cc615d
describe
'54072' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTS' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
af1e1fec9048e34d444e229f04f66793
c1753d42cb12bcf7ccd275224a34749bb77d22f8
'2012-05-09T05:45:40-04:00'
describe
'1305541' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTT' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
54388c6d735cce4a51d0826aa7b1efde
c4d4c004d7a720b705bf5e0464bbb0369d7af2c3
'2012-05-09T05:49:00-04:00'
describe
'373737' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTU' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
da60ba24346a3bc2abd44afe646cba93
fdc4d320be33ac7bb5cea25d86cfc50aa4acbb64
'2012-05-09T05:53:40-04:00'
describe
'32812' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTV' 'sip-files00036.pro'
9e11e0c7d39d995ed5ccaf6d9099ec22
ae9396e65ee59dd0608bcc1805a0940deee6eba8
'2012-05-09T05:51:38-04:00'
describe
'149913' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTW' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
351e419dcf531c7f4183fba24e346719
c10b2021c0a4946328099b10cd7486eaeac6b7a5
'2012-05-09T05:47:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTX' 'sip-files00036.tif'
46ba5e640c8dcfa8d8c3e9f0d3b0e50e
2857026d21e5d0c96f2d2db0ba94b85ba727aa5c
'2012-05-09T05:49:17-04:00'
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTY' 'sip-files00036.txt'
737969e79d38aa81475cbe9dd98722b7
b148a5a5b10bd71688ae694a7b5af2ad0f8ce6e7
'2012-05-09T05:50:47-04:00'
describe
'53547' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJTZ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
831fd563977cfc00bc4846c7c703184f
5a6170f313c5ca8b0def762496e3e1c2a983a310
'2012-05-09T05:47:38-04:00'
describe
'1305544' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUA' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
ef6c680714455b50eee281b19226996e
4b0294b961822ef70d91c0d8239e658c27f8f534
describe
'488921' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUB' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
5e3d096b709a2cd8548e9087e6c789f0
98ffa48992dd669fd08a8ab32540cac00b2312ba
'2012-05-09T05:50:48-04:00'
describe
'33639' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUC' 'sip-files00037.pro'
b57caf960ae28a322c8f532d3cc5e25a
59e823b4aca7e811c17a49da12a6578e37bb6ef0
'2012-05-09T05:52:08-04:00'
describe
'175913' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUD' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
9f6a201f4bfb513ea3ae92fcf0ff08b6
8684b9874bf85d96f1225138c091599c1bb77fb3
'2012-05-09T05:55:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUE' 'sip-files00037.tif'
839f817925b84a7d4e1ad12a79de64dc
13b1aeca7960a1540db20b687b8d296f1e0c7f68
'2012-05-09T05:45:26-04:00'
describe
'1337' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUF' 'sip-files00037.txt'
97871e677920592b1ebf40160974c008
e218ad09f4c4755fb3fa5fdcea9c1e816cb4f244
'2012-05-09T05:49:05-04:00'
describe
'58494' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUG' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
f847a05f76564c67b8e5fc938a880b15
0aefdbc55a6481267b98286ca8779fb7c881c36e
'2012-05-09T05:52:42-04:00'
describe
'1305545' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUH' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
8fca2373ad08d727b70ff160700be83a
50078b23fd3ceea380633d90aab11ac1b7a74adf
'2012-05-09T05:45:11-04:00'
describe
'495122' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUI' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
2da4d86d20fec9b5dad5563ade20513c
2c11f7250d497c5482205f5b124c8a7d01bb804b
describe
'34233' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUJ' 'sip-files00038.pro'
f3e7f1123a74679cf0a90a7f7086fc19
2375be855eb9df8cef75f8f3ada75bd2839ce728
'2012-05-09T05:45:07-04:00'
describe
'175736' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUK' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
334cdc11016a9be6b1268978365dbdac
1d192fc528df05cf858540fadd12478a40853039
'2012-05-09T05:55:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUL' 'sip-files00038.tif'
dc3e841843ef800d5b4f98de8d25ef6a
2728bc894a1a58ec1746d52081c228945e9c2c9b
'2012-05-09T05:50:05-04:00'
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUM' 'sip-files00038.txt'
ea640d9c31c6fc9cc81ae9c65540cb44
21acf29a57d2dd75f08c8ba2e6e8546cd3d36608
'2012-05-09T05:45:37-04:00'
describe
'58062' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUN' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
ea5a40b3f4873c9249a43e56acb9b958
a52d878493d572409e372294cd9c3d808457ddab
'2012-05-09T05:48:51-04:00'
describe
'1305587' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUO' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
3d6c3087f5276e1c7c1359ec74e41002
21528ae75b39f08458d2f41ebae329fafe53f76f
'2012-05-09T05:50:35-04:00'
describe
'476022' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUP' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
454af772cb7e68b8003499cebd5a1851
723f36667296f94cd939b84fba22cef5210ee918
'2012-05-09T05:55:08-04:00'
describe
'33145' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUQ' 'sip-files00039.pro'
933b7ebb678676b4e52893b90777ecc6
4e658383f29947ccd08b1ebb556e288dd50e5ebd
'2012-05-09T05:50:00-04:00'
describe
'170007' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUR' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
91974874a478417ec26cc7336e195aa0
c766ec3825d5070a85c1b1bc7ebc866b121ac7ad
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUS' 'sip-files00039.tif'
7bd1459812b8558180d04e54098d381c
3c2f04e824278191ad9b044c6280e6e757e61752
'2012-05-09T05:53:09-04:00'
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUT' 'sip-files00039.txt'
9d84eeea5b04e39a76f5661785640c49
dc65905b58c9d11eeb9ce3e59b1fb3285e0bc169
describe
'57720' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUU' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
28407622a7e60a23eac81c0fded62026
8d92088b30765a8412f4057460c38de7a946d9d3
'2012-05-09T05:55:05-04:00'
describe
'1338059' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUV' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
31f4fc75c81281612c5d4300e500cb4b
90f004ae23ab3f3c93ccd707ca5c5a1939956d67
describe
'462018' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUW' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
478f6ae6dbe64d2232442c726474786f
e9e80bb14a7e0db649b3f350f054d6967d8bfa80
describe
'34300' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUX' 'sip-files00040.pro'
96877728e897a551a5720cda45cd511c
3f94966f1b81fa30625a8e6a2e84420b1daca106
describe
'163547' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUY' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
737fd2f0c514b5952baa157da1f1f504
b7ab59d784489e35b40e2ac05c37b021c619f44d
describe
'10721764' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJUZ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
146ae469b823ce68dc42b2cf8af48210
af371f63999efae6aa1f3af8b958e491429ffb76
'2012-05-09T05:51:51-04:00'
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVA' 'sip-files00040.txt'
b94570e4ffc59f9c62686457744df8b1
fc6aed4681ae502778bf6602e784a63515be9269
'2012-05-09T05:45:38-04:00'
describe
'54575' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVB' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
daa89bbd54e724ae660df9be0452bdc3
7b9874aa45757ee90955ae0d133bb5dce373828a
describe
'1358128' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVC' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
ed1fdf8235decd2823af23671db02b40
1f75b29d073a51521439e173e409929d51be7311
describe
'453331' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVD' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
73c91550ff518aedcd9cefaaf332b631
2193f41e53eae574c88cf16c42a38577e3ac0710
'2012-05-09T05:47:22-04:00'
describe
'25290' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVE' 'sip-files00041.pro'
1eea4abff81b9dca6f3279ca5279fc69
7a75bfdc2be05e503da482137eda388a6b911717
'2012-05-09T05:44:52-04:00'
describe
'155263' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVF' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
7d83eb29c93595af97788cf869ebf4f8
d2e53c258314a289044ffe863a3804dc5d27df04
'2012-05-09T05:53:58-04:00'
describe
'10881884' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVG' 'sip-files00041.tif'
a088249a537928715ca9c400b3bcc7bb
4c4f6ec2567091ed145d703e751f5a5eab0edb8d
'2012-05-09T05:53:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVH' 'sip-files00041.txt'
542bbe7ee2d08df95e02517086c6cad1
6f72eb7dbfd755e3536a21a3fa9ebb1739d3fbc9
describe
'53447' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVI' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
a864b656b9d4af05af682251160b3c41
ee81f92f9ad784eff2ec1ac5e4db57c504dde1d5
'2012-05-09T05:49:38-04:00'
describe
'1278060' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVJ' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
70f67d51d6fde11957a425c073523051
10be2bd11a162868571a041430b855b14cf94e6c
'2012-05-09T05:53:30-04:00'
describe
'434422' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVK' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
3e33fc22a951c26969ea2c2684361e3a
cce9f4928f2de8186a4a61b32d201b7f4dbafbec
'2012-05-09T05:44:29-04:00'
describe
'20848' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVL' 'sip-files00042.pro'
c36c50a82fe62b2f354ffd1146403efa
f1985bf1062b021e8ccde68ffbf2bee8d002a884
'2012-05-09T05:51:08-04:00'
describe
'153333' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVM' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
aaf38361d2caccbf2aa34b1218f6470b
9086ed2d106990bae35426870d90a18d6034f3c3
'2012-05-09T05:45:10-04:00'
describe
'10241404' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVN' 'sip-files00042.tif'
401910d2a9ddc32ce31f0ff99e70d205
40030104bc99a429876d4caa6ea2ca85a6bdfe36
'2012-05-09T05:55:51-04:00'
describe
'869' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVO' 'sip-files00042.txt'
be0a76ad58a4d357fd01401223de05f0
57086cd23c4878e0af38cc29d90f8954b56efbce
'2012-05-09T05:54:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVP' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
b596f4eb897f90e69bc9bb35a1c9b7f5
6957f83dabf9b6b10a7c3447ded3a089c03c37ec
'2012-05-09T05:55:41-04:00'
describe
'1305584' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVQ' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
e9b40b71e588af01609dafe3af71b280
f23850dcc9b1003960d498220dd6dba01ed37048
'2012-05-09T05:52:44-04:00'
describe
'481865' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVR' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
345ef4bfe520edf4487877ffaeb51e25
cbd6ded67e852840e837081992ee28a65b80dfac
'2012-05-09T05:54:10-04:00'
describe
'33712' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVS' 'sip-files00043.pro'
d4b695a944e39cd8653c3fdfcebd2689
3968f2cd17693f9a63532fa20f0b61c866a2e915
'2012-05-09T05:47:07-04:00'
describe
'170411' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVT' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
2d577a880a78b46d52e378ef4cadef74
efc8d22b95426931d2da023897fe33dd5e2c2716
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVU' 'sip-files00043.tif'
d70b7b43a117a58cc06a696625ff0086
bde3df041d131f868a45c73568e9e88704530eb9
'2012-05-09T05:52:13-04:00'
describe
'1344' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVV' 'sip-files00043.txt'
0f353ce464d1e7a6bb966f51c35d461c
eb5175446c70b06811640fa2cbd9d506fbab56ae
'2012-05-09T05:53:49-04:00'
describe
'57362' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVW' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
84db2a3b04d5612f3eaa092da9b47239
22fb4f0a0004778bc46fe58548c30745c3f8f26d
'2012-05-09T05:50:10-04:00'
describe
'1249489' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVX' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
3afd787ee35c4185c0237b5408ef6394
dcd1e046e2d2114c5270b2c2f23b473cc000054b
'2012-05-09T05:55:01-04:00'
describe
'468715' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVY' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
ae95325245059fed61c88ca4f1c4ded7
382e0c7588c161e3c9f750a11e6864c68018942f
'2012-05-09T05:47:54-04:00'
describe
'30348' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJVZ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
2bd42ded96c3127c14c6f80a193896ac
09e21c5843af8445b632334f9ceec1f40d678a19
describe
'167224' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWA' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
848fbee98aa69ddfc8d519ef2b0b5b89
85d3fa1b6706790a1d18c5b8fdc8eba7a32328c4
'2012-05-09T05:44:37-04:00'
describe
'10013236' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWB' 'sip-files00044.tif'
5f16d692f745954bdb2a7dfe893fbae8
24d2278215b889e8fb65a2aca34a043e9584b5b8
'2012-05-09T05:44:23-04:00'
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWC' 'sip-files00044.txt'
ba3f7814cb9a7ceba7397bb991892b14
051f16f73a70037e13ce5c62b702ca0dcf243ea1
'2012-05-09T05:45:17-04:00'
describe
'57648' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWD' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
4b49c2fd8217b28f248fe9c3eb82e5b7
57d11ebc1e7197352f3906a85e0f21bf9e99f665
'2012-05-09T05:53:35-04:00'
describe
'1234020' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWE' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
2ad6284b6e8763d4f96b45b5dee630b6
5e1322113459807e41cdc585936796a263fdfba6
'2012-05-09T05:52:31-04:00'
describe
'511391' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWF' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
b003ec3343667d81ea1877a4d2f55271
68fccc630c5504b53e710f85dd365108ae58c10e
'2012-05-09T05:49:07-04:00'
describe
'34063' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWG' 'sip-files00045.pro'
c6f27c759ad68ad670a557cbe7a239ef
3bac8d5fc05b45235b13ff21d807e317470a8010
'2012-05-09T05:49:01-04:00'
describe
'181003' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWH' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
6c5ca0084a8ec33d2fd32c8fa6256206
ef8371f384097933b5a1692c50631ee0c0a619fe
describe
'9889140' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWI' 'sip-files00045.tif'
b489bfcc3e714b46dba3ffbeec5e79e8
7422bb7b2facd0ef851cb4c7b896d208505a37ed
'2012-05-09T05:45:16-04:00'
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWJ' 'sip-files00045.txt'
529b2749d899e22f4aee914d82362971
360025fd5fb58abfd1de964e7e95035f5753f9ac
'2012-05-09T05:50:30-04:00'
describe
'62278' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWK' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
5d04e3cfb333e4f33e2657ecb4da50db
51879c8354deeebf24020a1f0d1b954d68a57eae
'2012-05-09T05:49:11-04:00'
describe
'1262050' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWL' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
35b5f297c238c297ebfddd3d11d9d68e
0f70e8a6997dbd62f6e455d3a5f74a0d9fbd4d06
describe
'409002' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWM' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
3c02ee410f6dd12d37788cd9e0429522
8ac13196bd5120d3a74e17687220447ebff21180
describe
'33168' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWN' 'sip-files00046.pro'
6ec6960466864d911226b6ed0a2abb29
5df953d9e5719d603dfef6c9580b22be860f3260
'2012-05-09T05:55:49-04:00'
describe
'163906' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWO' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
f40f8a737bc0e8686d2df4dd31a43861
197d08c154b753ea9e8b657d6f0a17d3fb1a45f6
'2012-05-09T05:48:39-04:00'
describe
'10113308' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWP' 'sip-files00046.tif'
6b7739e90daeebc72168319843c079d1
21b6c5d66f974d8486505d429e91a1ba47080f05
'2012-05-09T05:53:56-04:00'
describe
'1331' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWQ' 'sip-files00046.txt'
bb2d295ef0288ff45e8ff56b6bd49980
046f176667083324e3360a6c62e489c714644b58
describe
'56954' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWR' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
bd0cfb5af438fb40cd798627073106ab
cc92c296d1069df60546bb309e8e7a7b5876107c
'2012-05-09T05:51:03-04:00'
describe
'1305582' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWS' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
305bf23cb94257ddf14195e15743e1dc
71804e580cba294f18c550bb09ed986bda09e5a8
describe
'448613' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWT' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
cda43a3b4af89a8a2fc103dfabe6f778
62a42b376fd2e03fea6996a7b163eb6a40eb34b0
describe
'21856' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWU' 'sip-files00047.pro'
57e3207a7966cead7ad473f597bee20f
174c00c4dd948bfac47223fe9ba7293ce09b7218
describe
'155434' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWV' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
a34c08e5b5ddd1483253ad0fddc2ef01
7dd0026edfb0e4bfc7674498347d91774c6c98c9
'2012-05-09T05:48:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWW' 'sip-files00047.tif'
e2ad6e549d5ec3e79205e23a0b9c86db
6b384cee7d0c7349807696206c0136f7febf3c20
describe
'951' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWX' 'sip-files00047.txt'
9fcdc1b8f9db59cd8adb3fe011945ddd
6866af3ffa39c0534039c7bcda7aae6224d3f89a
describe
'55278' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWY' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
e2dc68a8f16b36248b59d47ad8169c62
2c014de087efd8b3b5065d5f53ad97cae0a6065e
'2012-05-09T05:44:39-04:00'
describe
'1305559' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJWZ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
f27310a78c47e59d6da8da2b255201bb
f9f065d9d9b1a3adf04362b82d8f552ee0dbc4c8
'2012-05-09T05:45:42-04:00'
describe
'371812' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXA' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
f5246167fc51f6510f6a543617da1dbc
85b3406794cc5192e1bcd8d57f6b51fc7a8719c3
describe
'33704' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXB' 'sip-files00048.pro'
450342aea207c65c4dcd1e67dd108ae4
1312517c4309cefedc46f365fee6f0cad5043dc6
describe
'144280' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXC' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
1f1c85ca3df5deb8d8e8a1b8c13b917e
006c2e5b59f285fef7bea21b6defa2a914f95505
'2012-05-09T05:48:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXD' 'sip-files00048.tif'
f88f92289e6f565afe78460573ef44c1
6afa60156dff3a7df3c22ea5f1384c4a52ec3b0f
'2012-05-09T05:53:13-04:00'
describe
'1380' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXE' 'sip-files00048.txt'
daa592a0a191c1e1c7575fb90337ff0e
2093e2f4ced8cd3b343a0ceaf104e560e8542efc
describe
'51105' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXF' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
6451b316ac8e17ff2fdcc614bc638fed
1fd144d40a6202bad55ce7c6679e1bfb30f78aa2
'2012-05-09T05:49:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXG' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
e87b9586e47873087576e02c0b8cff35
80fbb6437abea5d9da0c0e93ccdf59cad8c7e0bd
'2012-05-09T05:50:01-04:00'
describe
'296942' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXH' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
66a991ab48dad579ef2368178e30a3ff
d9bdf8d9fee5b8f256a7803dc0ca2b0e9b28a234
describe
'17811' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXI' 'sip-files00049.pro'
21659f5c1b90de6a0dd1a50daec2a866
d4178ffa87247fe4533ce6511ec4604f263fac9e
'2012-05-09T05:54:19-04:00'
describe
'115644' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXJ' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
794af880a93ecae2cd247be4cc262394
88140fb23403131d40e3c9dc0772d5bde00fe3df
'2012-05-09T05:52:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXK' 'sip-files00049.tif'
40435ae713e421857a1a3710bc94cf80
78bcd7d7decac240874eb47da66dd280fcc42f87
'2012-05-09T05:50:38-04:00'
describe
'753' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXL' 'sip-files00049.txt'
a94373af1ff7f2c0b2a2f47a06fab5cc
ee48b3d8fad381332d55085d3f1af02b705d461a
'2012-05-09T05:53:50-04:00'
describe
'46684' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXM' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
736680c9f7149c520c6b6b6ce6bfd7d1
1192e30e744c29931f61733e992d111200b34dda
'2012-05-09T05:45:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXN' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
f5f24d4001283e66bd9285168c3a3938
d451b8b7368704d1a43df8c64b9de672b3cb99fc
'2012-05-09T05:51:26-04:00'
describe
'382368' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXO' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
de5c0797fbba0e98b4ef37d80d32cc73
e89d8c05455c320f5e1008f1c49cccbdd89a7c7e
'2012-05-09T05:46:38-04:00'
describe
'33402' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXP' 'sip-files00050.pro'
fd861049a7e851465bb00373a9b2944b
5184f93d6170ff53b76f7524fbd037f56b62aca0
'2012-05-09T05:47:04-04:00'
describe
'154107' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXQ' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
05fb005e1050b3b6a89b9416c42a672b
3f6bf11c58ae7381106978db2301f7eab61e145e
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXR' 'sip-files00050.tif'
66307fd9c34859454277fd9048610228
d2e4348ee1cd69fd2967327358d966a665ea89f8
'2012-05-09T05:46:20-04:00'
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXS' 'sip-files00050.txt'
9235aeaa867340b5f6db6ea48ab66e75
11aa5e8845b52bca1e09ede5bcafa538fd19844e
describe
'53509' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXT' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
751f0fb505abd3cfb356cfa13862cbf3
6f0795d67a6c141faac46e5f2a4d32b4d38949e6
'2012-05-09T05:50:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXU' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
e4002ac76947e8129845fbdd04efb506
01bcd459c5e7fa4c70787635411b09e65e47e0cc
'2012-05-09T05:45:47-04:00'
describe
'384929' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXV' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
ebe1cbac0e64748684c16c80d9056cd6
8d7efa246262cbe39ecd72eaabb51163b1595850
'2012-05-09T05:47:51-04:00'
describe
'33952' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXW' 'sip-files00051.pro'
dc2b289155adc8bb084b07455f3093ad
8412de54bb1d0eed33cd1398956ee4b103637d2e
describe
'155809' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXX' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
3e9490f2dc45894a214f39d76332efdb
f2a5b332abdb8b02654b8c8a31f4fff9a8cd42e2
'2012-05-09T05:53:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXY' 'sip-files00051.tif'
e8a9ccd73d8e19db379e1c55cae1821d
278d8f0aca49ab6d94fba3ccb4e9003bc10fada2
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJXZ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
814b704ee469506180ce9ed7e6948774
10e1e250c9394c9e8c29f3505898045d5c8a4877
describe
'53114' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYA' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
15dada8fb1541d64ad5ffd62e8fb3813
eb04a37b73814799cda80487d4ad6e5d8ecf5a70
'2012-05-09T05:48:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYB' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
edfd5ba9889c5011ade9661da3e433bb
b4b05ba86be38cc960fabdccee2f44b5cd0a2db1
'2012-05-09T05:51:02-04:00'
describe
'385008' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYC' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
9653305354270cd9b6fa36abdcda1155
5aecf9be12c39a161fc9c3bbbb688316321267ed
'2012-05-09T05:55:15-04:00'
describe
'34353' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYD' 'sip-files00052.pro'
0819d7ed68d949a64979a2973c3f1cd0
5e7ebca2cf5116f3ece922beff7568525ddb59bb
describe
'152703' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYE' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
fff12738f8f553f067fb103bebcdb1e0
83ec711d502eed18c0b57b434a504436ff79c2ad
'2012-05-09T05:46:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYF' 'sip-files00052.tif'
f9522b83056a2257a4406365da396fb1
4af279a14c89f59d54788b725faad10795331f93
'2012-05-09T05:47:48-04:00'
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYG' 'sip-files00052.txt'
11989fba14aed2dad17b389d9c605acf
39bb6ec4e24f48d61d61d2c42bc6d12f26da597c
describe
'53102' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYH' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
32e06ad1e97d230217c7d44a81419c04
56518e23c02dcf4d9c518018867aca69feb25af5
describe
'1243114' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYI' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
d143ce6f765617ff0ca51709cfade9d6
c34fa87cfb913c638b8e3be28fc966bfd7bcc6cb
describe
'475064' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYJ' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
5d40647a051ccc3c20c19d2b763711ca
521ab77a49d89a24631ba76c8e67a977b52c0942
describe
'24526' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYK' 'sip-files00053.pro'
be0aab4005e37a61bb03af6d2e033e98
2ae2f8741d0a7c555f3f019e191fe0846babcff6
'2012-05-09T05:44:56-04:00'
describe
'164153' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYL' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
6a31246e992eadf232ff082a2debade4
839f9f5e17e265572493c684dcbd938404366d36
'2012-05-09T05:50:39-04:00'
describe
'9961772' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYM' 'sip-files00053.tif'
c807d0806df2ff716698018ae49d3041
e15bcbc67653475f7c5c9c444c57d3030715e521
'2012-05-09T05:52:18-04:00'
describe
'1354' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYN' 'sip-files00053.txt'
7da67f84049e0f840a7986c743b738d1
496e223878b46b669acb3681ee5514b57c6f86b2
'2012-05-09T05:45:20-04:00'
describe
'56367' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYO' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
e2afc0396b18b421bf58d015f2b0f81d
f1478708bad81ad9eb0b9bcba425438452c4e81b
'2012-05-09T05:52:01-04:00'
describe
'1305565' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYP' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
9478eab5f3edb65471441f7ba5267e89
151c4fcb3ffbedb7801ca2a685108a1c2ae1746a
'2012-05-09T05:51:00-04:00'
describe
'388918' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYQ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
86d7cf830daeab38b10e7499c7e8e073
8f99257c72c0717697a80abcad5ae66104491239
describe
'33874' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYR' 'sip-files00054.pro'
5c251d38237af4961868b9bdfa0da844
70a9bc75cdfa43e091c6480fb7c07eb2bcb702fe
describe
'155690' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYS' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
225d7b8c6e32c8be1bb9f891a031c9f2
36ead113cabb8255086f840b28a9da6e4506ddb7
'2012-05-09T05:52:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYT' 'sip-files00054.tif'
d244738160a53cde98279b14703571ed
55e58c263326a11336b5a57d1026c372c527f812
'2012-05-09T05:45:28-04:00'
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYU' 'sip-files00054.txt'
721b1066231adde3661d84a9a15ab4df
4316029020e192a369a6af1a73b9999a5a9977bd
describe
'55572' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYV' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
23ce13034f1ba5c4d5518ad84ef3a218
b976b56de68571511da48f10146a5aee2fe56dde
'2012-05-09T05:51:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYW' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
08583b3d4d5920c92cc6b8626a521665
9d9cad3aea012680db9519e151de64b862f4c2a4
'2012-05-09T05:55:09-04:00'
describe
'482804' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYX' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
c51c8022a5c2faeafdad7195492a807d
2c7a65a938b379dd11909ef1d43909b8162696ba
describe
'33218' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYY' 'sip-files00055.pro'
23fc7affa7a9e10ef4a0615ed198d891
d3030bd7d60fd4fcaa50631c401e4c0e5a52abad
'2012-05-09T05:48:34-04:00'
describe
'173266' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJYZ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
2c55a9baa8e17a27aed0cb79326ca802
283e42fc75f14fc00cc9a18d0162efc11ac48558
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZA' 'sip-files00055.tif'
ff136bfdff34df6b31d5d9184ad94f46
4f762feaa260fa14d999cee0ba9665089fc28653
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZB' 'sip-files00055.txt'
bbe6d4612a020728be3990cde021e975
f424bb72010900299c9200f9742169264e8bf8a3
'2012-05-09T05:50:09-04:00'
describe
'56925' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZC' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
e4b561c78da0750a15e5b0ec52aa6b5a
7842e7b2202b6b97105cd7d23599a729b174f1ee
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZD' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
4a85723f89f683707819d0f6bcf625de
6cd2b234d82a102b2e6d562519d73f2177811523
describe
'317652' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZE' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
ba4943bddb161bc593bcd354c0ae5d35
47ce97fa3423a1ca9a550c20298f3d7f1f61ff6f
describe
'114078' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZF' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
d86b9f6007ba398fd9a943083b4978eb
82f003c7d89d046f5bd034b735fe3db6ade94762
'2012-05-09T05:53:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZG' 'sip-files00056.tif'
2b32cdf4ecc64fe7a655dfd61aea7370
a03a4e4f87f94f0a650e6978f6a5b3520d7ed217
'2012-05-09T05:55:48-04:00'
describe
'45231' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZH' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
5eb2b3e6a33cb4f1ffd2f15044472e70
88443880bdf872abf4c146ec2202db86bfc31cf3
'2012-05-09T05:48:30-04:00'
describe
'1305588' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZI' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
89569575e0c4a7468916db4061be0903
74e8bcd39359082e7b71524ffd97ab3d93029c34
describe
'494550' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZJ' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
b7e5a5b4f5dd60fd208b15c0406925e1
6f97435a7e786f20a005eb5d4659f3e47dc8cdb7
'2012-05-09T05:53:54-04:00'
describe
'34166' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZK' 'sip-files00057.pro'
28fe9003771ad919d028fb1453354741
5150efbe81fb6f6a58633452ba4b8bf74b6636ce
describe
'176939' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZL' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
a934f6e59e1ca41f0bc363914d853330
92519fd9c545cffbd7bc54feccfc099db5878781
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZM' 'sip-files00057.tif'
0935638664711e5b7eccf18cbd6347e6
1d04a7ca015308ff195a76123e714db36c7d6751
'2012-05-09T05:47:25-04:00'
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZN' 'sip-files00057.txt'
ac100850c146d047a91c19fe9fae7d56
be83198842fdf3798983337a7e15e8e11b398cbf
'2012-05-09T05:53:28-04:00'
describe
'58342' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZO' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
a1e2071a8600a257c37d97d49e9c6a0f
52ea24000b2e42e349431ec63e344251ea3f3710
'2012-05-09T05:54:34-04:00'
describe
'1305583' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZP' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
b98f9325ddfda900d54551aa4dc827e2
cd270e7f2c0459bcc208baa1294862c2bf19ffc5
'2012-05-09T05:47:05-04:00'
describe
'346074' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZQ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
926c64268c8d235d44ebde984e5530bb
d8bf59c16852df5e249bacc431ecf68914723867
'2012-05-09T05:44:30-04:00'
describe
'29339' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZR' 'sip-files00058.pro'
28df85aaef79256f0d8209105d85ae9e
84e73e97a51b2b942dac2a2b6a0879cf2fc88a53
'2012-05-09T05:54:26-04:00'
describe
'138857' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZS' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
563affdeb98240bf51feb77e2628c2cb
cea8da594200e574d0724091a79a7068c5ab2044
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZT' 'sip-files00058.tif'
169151065870a2058031990211437668
5a023f583f8c165ca57c25e4ebfeabfcec91db53
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZU' 'sip-files00058.txt'
95d0f56fcd8848008c8c0e70b67f2b95
0d399ef4181d889b9ce338b3a25f3b9e235a52bd
'2012-05-09T05:52:09-04:00'
describe
'50364' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZV' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
40a6d0f2691d185085f99aad4a7f1229
d020753459bb233af8d7545c689a5f7141f1181a
'2012-05-09T05:50:44-04:00'
describe
'1305554' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZW' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
99ab5c92f0bb2c3b62807f66801ad4e6
c71b8e806a0ec2afc69496bae482580f051d3897
'2012-05-09T05:47:00-04:00'
describe
'335569' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZX' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
57e13a07ce33e9141eada6ac2a142f9b
022537ce42477270a598dee94fc5188436d3e8c6
'2012-05-09T05:52:38-04:00'
describe
'29758' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZY' 'sip-files00059.pro'
de63f7dae5c6b0b96007f2cffade56d2
86c9cc8c959c939cbae146fd9658fdab14a7b4a7
describe
'136635' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAJZZ' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
5127d6a0da8db1e022c429495f38652e
44ed5a4d3626877ba4923579212fcc1b2ed17db4
'2012-05-09T05:45:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAA' 'sip-files00059.tif'
3ddaf2dc2ce1470e01377098fe606236
a2b5c4e9e1884219d9835190e7b19c6315f3f732
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAB' 'sip-files00059.txt'
68210fa166ab483363622b207a854d64
05f4f1f14e0c7ce5acae5acccdb3ffd43b3282e7
describe
'52178' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAC' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
2cd88a1461565e75bc8f0cc274d6f565
c57006ecaa8457fe99f8be21f19469e312ced6c6
describe
'1305567' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAD' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
9a9879b69437f71eb6e86057283f123c
755e8a3df7c0f9e635e244b80945375fd8b390c2
'2012-05-09T05:51:57-04:00'
describe
'354464' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAE' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
3e6c6c91833b951b853e2d68e17e95c1
31b55a4d7b4c7d52a2dfe1fdefd025de59aa4664
describe
'31024' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAF' 'sip-files00060.pro'
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describe
'141243' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAG' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
cd58723236dbb9d572b27378a30a8dc8
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'2012-05-09T05:49:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAH' 'sip-files00060.tif'
db457a46d4a0b883b2e225a1c4ff3fc4
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'2012-05-09T05:53:19-04:00'
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAI' 'sip-files00060.txt'
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describe
'50944' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAJ' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
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describe
'1219179' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAK' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
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'2012-05-09T05:45:19-04:00'
describe
'267075' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAL' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
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describe
'22265' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAM' 'sip-files00061.pro'
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'2012-05-09T05:50:28-04:00'
describe
'108850' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAN' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:51:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAO' 'sip-files00061.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:50:24-04:00'
describe
'878' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAP' 'sip-files00061.txt'
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'2012-05-09T05:44:49-04:00'
describe
'42194' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAQ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAR' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
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describe
'423915' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAS' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:44:22-04:00'
describe
'21766' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAT' 'sip-files00062.pro'
4ab1d211e14203a8f52ddcac096cb3ec
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describe
'147037' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAU' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAV' 'sip-files00062.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:45:51-04:00'
describe
'925' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAW' 'sip-files00062.txt'
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'2012-05-09T05:51:13-04:00'
describe
'51752' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAX' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
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describe
'1324194' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAY' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
cad4b5282410795fd4b5c2c239c9cea6
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'2012-05-09T05:54:43-04:00'
describe
'380362' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKAZ' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
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describe
'34243' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBA' 'sip-files00063.pro'
a1ae7b0c3c7ed82e1d4c44348317bdbc
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describe
'150911' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBB' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
8150fa86ad4c27b3c6fed53a6c89420f
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describe
'10610444' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBC' 'sip-files00063.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:55:30-04:00'
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBD' 'sip-files00063.txt'
7e7502cdbb8b8134d901f9da4bdfdf49
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'2012-05-09T05:47:41-04:00'
describe
'54835' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBE' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
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describe
'1332738' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBF' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
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describe
'346966' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBG' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
a2fdaffa0e5a1accd73cf1b3a67612c5
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'2012-05-09T05:46:42-04:00'
describe
'122718' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBH' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
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describe
'10679860' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBI' 'sip-files00064.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:54:52-04:00'
describe
'48350' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBJ' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:49:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBK' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
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describe
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'2012-05-09T05:44:55-04:00'
describe
'34526' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBM' 'sip-files00065.pro'
7e3b1ad7c78311bb5d51ad01e41b8fc6
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'2012-05-09T05:48:57-04:00'
describe
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'2012-05-09T05:48:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBO' 'sip-files00065.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:44:31-04:00'
describe
'1373' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBP' 'sip-files00065.txt'
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describe
'54385' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBQ' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
341018f124e55dfed16ab185970608cf
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'2012-05-09T05:48:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBR' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
cd3d9ee79fe7a0fa706d4137f48ddede
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'2012-05-09T05:45:44-04:00'
describe
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c3406d665042d0d4144556e62ecd719a
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'2012-05-09T05:48:09-04:00'
describe
'32569' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBT' 'sip-files00066.pro'
c108292b75caab2bf4418d4bf67ced0f
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describe
'149316' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBU' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
eddf7460af03771f2ecfc603fb8984a6
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'2012-05-09T05:46:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBV' 'sip-files00066.tif'
b68662708dbf076e8a3712151bb56b3e
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'2012-05-09T05:54:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBW' 'sip-files00066.txt'
c37dd43368d405c427e650ac10e4aa3b
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'2012-05-09T05:50:33-04:00'
describe
'52951' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBX' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBY' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
5fcac0792f0db5a8e7fdc9c3913726ea
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describe
'382962' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKBZ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
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describe
'33694' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCA' 'sip-files00067.pro'
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describe
'155301' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCB' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCC' 'sip-files00067.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:48:03-04:00'
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCD' 'sip-files00067.txt'
93379901e58cee2e1e9a150dcd7d0c7c
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'2012-05-09T05:55:50-04:00'
describe
'54999' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCE' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
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describe
'1305578' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCF' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
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describe
'379038' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCG' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
dd786e1928e8c5b4abf5e5872732704d
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'2012-05-09T05:54:23-04:00'
describe
'33772' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCH' 'sip-files00068.pro'
c8c2312d2cd95fd7dd26978a00681d72
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'2012-05-09T05:53:31-04:00'
describe
'152180' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCI' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
37e0952fb4a5841c7733b12fcb392478
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'2012-05-09T05:47:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCJ' 'sip-files00068.tif'
ea1fcf1467341cd3b888d94393f27af2
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'2012-05-09T05:48:35-04:00'
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCK' 'sip-files00068.txt'
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'2012-05-09T05:52:59-04:00'
describe
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19b24a8c333f27ec3d0505a9ecf980d0
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'2012-05-09T05:46:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCM' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
5643e5fa494ceff89fbd88525353cc39
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'2012-05-09T05:52:32-04:00'
describe
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48a3c270d188bd24b5c1f3d1a0d80846
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'2012-05-09T05:51:48-04:00'
describe
'34002' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCO' 'sip-files00069.pro'
4e3a3748a31dff92fa8377def9be830c
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describe
'173748' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCP' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:54:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCQ' 'sip-files00069.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCR' 'sip-files00069.txt'
68b7d2b0c9648363e81c92059012f46d
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'2012-05-09T05:54:45-04:00'
describe
'57596' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCS' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCT' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
425a00a16ce36d1430a7e3261558f48d
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'2012-05-09T05:46:58-04:00'
describe
'389048' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCU' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
238207c303180c7a6af1264f7164a900
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describe
'33387' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCV' 'sip-files00070.pro'
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describe
'155472' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCW' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
fc0b0604ea44e5b103fe9a28c950fe03
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'2012-05-09T05:52:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCX' 'sip-files00070.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:54:40-04:00'
describe
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'2012-05-09T05:49:13-04:00'
describe
'53100' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKCZ' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
123c65cede00760a77cc6851f1b71ec9
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'2012-05-09T05:50:11-04:00'
describe
'1237879' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDA' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:44-04:00'
describe
'265672' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDB' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
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describe
'22247' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDC' 'sip-files00071.pro'
9c1bd74ec59ad855e010c94ecb8272c6
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describe
'112602' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDD' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
1b6b3950d1825d8e31018ab811e338ab
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'2012-05-09T05:48:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDE' 'sip-files00071.tif'
cc7c7aa55bd4f5e180a7be24bab08bf0
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'2012-05-09T05:55:34-04:00'
describe
'898' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDF' 'sip-files00071.txt'
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'2012-05-09T05:53:18-04:00'
describe
'44527' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDG' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:51:58-04:00'
describe
'1348583' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDH' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
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describe
'305176' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDI' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
d3b78853843af92ad2cfe12e4c2badce
cf12482ea83fbfadba6f3e538e5c06eba4dbe467
'2012-05-09T05:44:43-04:00'
describe
'21302' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDJ' 'sip-files00072.pro'
51ecfe876b0d2a598da21aacc58da83c
5badf81177aa38977e0dca8cebb642dfd938cc7c
'2012-05-09T05:51:41-04:00'
describe
'119226' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDK' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
17ac5f3fc88e1ee014bcc895e0ed12e0
44e28d303bab3698a9236cf48e77826ea0a83f99
describe
'10805840' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDL' 'sip-files00072.tif'
30846a50a7d936076698492b789b6fb2
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'2012-05-09T05:52:16-04:00'
describe
'909' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDM' 'sip-files00072.txt'
681bbdc600bd0d5d05bac67dace18c57
5768c341ed842d0d00c0ffd538bb9c5ab1de1db3
'2012-05-09T05:47:27-04:00'
describe
'44927' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDN' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
46eaa15caba8a19260c58195ad8691a4
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'2012-05-09T05:44:42-04:00'
describe
'1377186' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDO' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
79c9ff5559c080fe3362cb8b3d9f9b9e
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describe
'459718' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDP' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
2d542f3df1e910944718dbfb64fabab6
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describe
'34122' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDQ' 'sip-files00073.pro'
7139235c79185c040e1164177c7d3e2e
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describe
'163977' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDR' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
e37b9279446e4c30ae70c3f58587fbc1
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describe
'11035248' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDS' 'sip-files00073.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDT' 'sip-files00073.txt'
ef8d95b432a6bb855a5ac1b79b34c44b
b05d453f679ac3c737667d08f47e37a55bb54f51
'2012-05-09T05:48:02-04:00'
describe
'55041' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDU' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
9ff2f8f3c0901bee1712d3f42c83cbbc
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'2012-05-09T05:48:48-04:00'
describe
'1305574' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDV' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
3d98bf3d10718028e7b9b20987300728
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'2012-05-09T05:51:40-04:00'
describe
'390804' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDW' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
e6ca94a93265209a600a75e7217b7a09
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'2012-05-09T05:50:03-04:00'
describe
'33832' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDX' 'sip-files00074.pro'
b0a7752b4baa1e47f06088e51a54c549
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'2012-05-09T05:55:04-04:00'
describe
'156987' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDY' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
87a1d1e2bc38474ecb7e95502ac262fd
c79c2257c20061cb61a2bac3f115bdcb59b0a24a
'2012-05-09T05:51:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKDZ' 'sip-files00074.tif'
26d066da34e020a9e86426fed7ae3701
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describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEA' 'sip-files00074.txt'
1c03cd22a29769551cf105fbf7377464
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'2012-05-09T05:44:36-04:00'
describe
'55459' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEB' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
8b2c5fa7ef79a24572fc6924c48c7bab
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'2012-05-09T05:53:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEC' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
b84d905cdc5d650e3269f0fe4fdb49a1
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'2012-05-09T05:44:48-04:00'
describe
'374299' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKED' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
28222e1eee12f90450398044ad63a73e
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'2012-05-09T05:49:36-04:00'
describe
'33600' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEE' 'sip-files00075.pro'
e5b8634ed94e7430dfcc611372fc9bc3
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describe
'151953' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEF' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
b9e2d914b64e9d413af276408dc5a629
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEG' 'sip-files00075.tif'
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describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEH' 'sip-files00075.txt'
174e83a7ac8f076d7fd35321fdd82ada
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describe
'52285' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEI' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
4bb86e6c775954fec2b0abd1a8e87a89
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'2012-05-09T05:55:12-04:00'
describe
'1305535' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEJ' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
dffc6b741f1aad112accd54a7dece459
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'2012-05-09T05:47:33-04:00'
describe
'296852' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEK' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
25f4dc9bfd4bcd844007b7399e72bfe2
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describe
'106194' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEL' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
5d5e987cd496a3814d16dd97cad15f55
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEM' 'sip-files00076.tif'
269ed27adb01bc7792c182dc4e4a7eaf
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'2012-05-09T05:55:24-04:00'
describe
'42727' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEN' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
2cce3d8d296f29e55e53252e4e853073
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'2012-05-09T05:46:16-04:00'
describe
'1334191' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEO' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
1339f68fad971c7edf7402a37b83633c
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'2012-05-09T05:48:56-04:00'
describe
'367128' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEP' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
0deb89cee949f49dae28f4442b034b67
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'2012-05-09T05:45:43-04:00'
describe
'32413' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEQ' 'sip-files00077.pro'
bd1b10cf412031b8f49e1e4ed2034f6b
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describe
'149668' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKER' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
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describe
'10690564' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKES' 'sip-files00077.tif'
213d87d437dd48bddcf1d2cbe4cf4892
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'2012-05-09T05:54:56-04:00'
describe
'1292' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKET' 'sip-files00077.txt'
2c4cef0f68c6e969f8f9fa9bddfed07e
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describe
'54926' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEU' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
e1b898a1eaaa97f8b1e05c529f474042
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEV' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
1c1ef73ad710a8f2e41f1f9e25aec7e7
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describe
'367702' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEW' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
e64f0b38c87c3d1d2b0484de65dc9b14
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describe
'31745' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEX' 'sip-files00078.pro'
aea2c9cb7e0e6d8314540e968a7a2747
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describe
'149055' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEY' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
a0cc56ea4649338dc2590bf3cd59599d
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKEZ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
f011ff01eef913f7a98f751f68523e6c
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'2012-05-09T05:45:52-04:00'
describe
'1281' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFA' 'sip-files00078.txt'
912935c3cdfd0c2a15dfb3b210ce044c
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'2012-05-09T05:46:59-04:00'
describe
'52107' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFB' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
38f3f6460af7b6feb6a4e0ee71324c36
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'2012-05-09T05:55:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFC' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
84705e65a55491e138c9c02b4836baa9
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'2012-05-09T05:47:20-04:00'
describe
'369129' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFD' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
50b658a8785ffd1088ba404acfa17d77
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'2012-05-09T05:54:18-04:00'
describe
'33045' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFE' 'sip-files00079.pro'
a2306e9e6658b69ccd71c74e103a6738
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describe
'148621' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFF' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:47:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFG' 'sip-files00079.tif'
3f7b3cc33e197729fedf53b2dd6291d5
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'2012-05-09T05:50:22-04:00'
describe
'1319' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFH' 'sip-files00079.txt'
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describe
'53730' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFI' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFJ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
ff6bb6395c4fdcf1341198eea2f6a1b6
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'2012-05-09T05:49:04-04:00'
describe
'369155' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFK' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
3fe37d182611de1a8c7da1ca989dc192
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'2012-05-09T05:49:52-04:00'
describe
'33219' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFL' 'sip-files00080.pro'
89123989bc9bc4ff0d593d6463e4c8db
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'2012-05-09T05:44:35-04:00'
describe
'149634' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFM' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:50:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFN' 'sip-files00080.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:53:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFO' 'sip-files00080.txt'
5b67436f479bdd805c3c5668ed21544c
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'2012-05-09T05:48:54-04:00'
describe
'52935' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFP' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
25b283e19bfffb7a9f7ef72b17c13d66
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFQ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
f5726936b81d8f7786c95763a3aaebde
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describe
'405005' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFR' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
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describe
'18482' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFS' 'sip-files00081.pro'
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describe
'140622' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFT' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
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describe
'10461564' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFU' 'sip-files00081.tif'
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describe
'785' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFV' 'sip-files00081.txt'
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describe
'50084' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFW' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:02-04:00'
describe
'1305571' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFX' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
ae028a19d2b196384bfea8759af57079
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'2012-05-09T05:51:10-04:00'
describe
'429988' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFY' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:48:37-04:00'
describe
'22295' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKFZ' 'sip-files00082.pro'
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'2012-05-09T05:53:03-04:00'
describe
'149830' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGA' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
2d80485d231bd9a6ec337a0ba4eb5c6c
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'2012-05-09T05:53:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGB' 'sip-files00082.tif'
3f8a573e1a0b493c5f445047ec9e73e3
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describe
'944' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGC' 'sip-files00082.txt'
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'2012-05-09T05:52:17-04:00'
describe
'52073' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGD' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGE' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
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'2012-05-09T05:49:44-04:00'
describe
'477232' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGF' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
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describe
'34272' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGG' 'sip-files00083.pro'
9d0c3b600f8aaa6b19ef918a6b36f054
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'2012-05-09T05:46:31-04:00'
describe
'171657' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGH' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGI' 'sip-files00083.tif'
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describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGJ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
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'2012-05-09T05:48:00-04:00'
describe
'57322' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGK' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGL' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
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describe
'479647' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGM' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
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describe
'33328' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGN' 'sip-files00084.pro'
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describe
'172647' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGO' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:53:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGP' 'sip-files00084.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGQ' 'sip-files00084.txt'
d33b76f9a335b5b53785a83f12aca212
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describe
'56906' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGR' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGS' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
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describe
'486978' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGT' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
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describe
'33980' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGU' 'sip-files00085.pro'
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'2012-05-09T05:51:53-04:00'
describe
'173583' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGV' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGW' 'sip-files00085.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:49:06-04:00'
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGX' 'sip-files00085.txt'
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describe
'57867' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGY' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKGZ' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
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'2012-05-09T05:54:54-04:00'
describe
'479835' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHA' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
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describe
'32492' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHB' 'sip-files00086.pro'
a4fc288b751c7f3dec6c96ea7579c866
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'2012-05-09T05:49:12-04:00'
describe
'172301' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHC' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:51:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHD' 'sip-files00086.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:49:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHE' 'sip-files00086.txt'
8d7fbfe465306ff9b018824fe8faf6f8
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'2012-05-09T05:48:15-04:00'
describe
'57771' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHF' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHG' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
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describe
'470526' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHH' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
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describe
'32992' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHI' 'sip-files00087.pro'
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describe
'167055' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHJ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHK' 'sip-files00087.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:47:46-04:00'
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHL' 'sip-files00087.txt'
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describe
'56025' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHM' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHN' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
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describe
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'2012-05-09T05:49:46-04:00'
describe
'32484' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHP' 'sip-files00088.pro'
518fa0dbea16c24aae6e9faf843b3753
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describe
'169008' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHQ' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:48:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHR' 'sip-files00088.tif'
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describe
'1315' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHS' 'sip-files00088.txt'
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'2012-05-09T05:53:55-04:00'
describe
'57200' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHT' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
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describe
'1305563' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHU' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
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'2012-05-09T05:48:50-04:00'
describe
'477654' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHV' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:49:54-04:00'
describe
'33151' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHW' 'sip-files00089.pro'
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'2012-05-09T05:52:15-04:00'
describe
'170077' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHX' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHY' 'sip-files00089.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:54:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKHZ' 'sip-files00089.txt'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:34-04:00'
describe
'55946' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKIA' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:54:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKIB' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
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describe
'356003' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKIC' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
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describe
'31185' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKID' 'sip-files00090.pro'
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'2012-05-09T05:54:51-04:00'
describe
'142706' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKIE' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKIF' 'sip-files00090.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:29-04:00'
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKIG' 'sip-files00090.txt'
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describe
'52665' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKIH' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKII' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
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'2012-05-09T05:52:55-04:00'
describe
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'2012-05-09T05:48:16-04:00'
describe
'33647' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKIK' 'sip-files00091.pro'
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describe
'172392' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKIL' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKIM' 'sip-files00091.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:46-04:00'
describe
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'2012-05-09T05:52:10-04:00'
describe
'56532' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKIO' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
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describe
'1293077' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKIP' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
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'2012-05-09T05:51:05-04:00'
describe
'464525' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKIQ' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
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describe
'33392' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKIR' 'sip-files00092.pro'
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'2012-05-09T05:54:14-04:00'
describe
'166057' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKIS' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
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describe
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'2012-05-09T05:44:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKIU' 'sip-files00092.txt'
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describe
'56077' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKIV' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
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describe
'1305575' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKIW' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
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describe
'490419' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKIX' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:54:30-04:00'
describe
'34484' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKIY' 'sip-files00093.pro'
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'2012-05-09T05:51:21-04:00'
describe
'174425' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKIZ' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJA' 'sip-files00093.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:55:21-04:00'
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJB' 'sip-files00093.txt'
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'2012-05-09T05:53:25-04:00'
describe
'56969' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJC' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJD' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
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describe
'484457' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJE' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:53:39-04:00'
describe
'33447' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJF' 'sip-files00094.pro'
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describe
'172721' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJG' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:54:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJH' 'sip-files00094.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJI' 'sip-files00094.txt'
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describe
'58477' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJJ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
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describe
'1305569' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJK' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:22-04:00'
describe
'441736' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJL' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:49:45-04:00'
describe
'25284' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJM' 'sip-files00095.pro'
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'2012-05-09T05:51:32-04:00'
describe
'156785' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJN' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:50:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJO' 'sip-files00095.tif'
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describe
'1268' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJP' 'sip-files00095.txt'
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describe
'55960' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJQ' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJR' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
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describe
'413970' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJS' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
c526860e3d6f2e6219ca29cdb1d74f9d
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'2012-05-09T05:50:42-04:00'
describe
'136987' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJT' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
936f1537abf85fc5f881250385e31b5e
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'2012-05-09T05:53:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJU' 'sip-files00096.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:55:53-04:00'
describe
'50131' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJV' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
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describe
'998770' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJW' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
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describe
'216923' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJX' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:54:08-04:00'
describe
'17386' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJY' 'sip-files00097.pro'
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'2012-05-09T05:55:31-04:00'
describe
'91508' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKJZ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:48:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKA' 'sip-files00097.tif'
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describe
'709' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKB' 'sip-files00097.txt'
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describe
'37906' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKC' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKD' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
fcfba7235143b25a00ba9d7657bda42f
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describe
'444835' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKE' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:52:51-04:00'
describe
'20973' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKF' 'sip-files00098.pro'
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describe
'153597' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKG' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKH' 'sip-files00098.tif'
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describe
'904' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKI' 'sip-files00098.txt'
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describe
'53756' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKJ' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKK' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
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describe
'406531' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKL' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
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describe
'17244' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKM' 'sip-files00099.pro'
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describe
'142934' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKN' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKO' 'sip-files00099.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:49:24-04:00'
describe
'729' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKP' 'sip-files00099.txt'
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describe
'51457' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKQ' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:54:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKR' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
d96ff654776a7307dd63f3405489e037
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'2012-05-09T05:50:18-04:00'
describe
'455200' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKS' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:54:22-04:00'
describe
'30537' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKT' 'sip-files00100.pro'
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describe
'163106' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKU' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:53:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKV' 'sip-files00100.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:47:59-04:00'
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKW' 'sip-files00100.txt'
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describe
'56467' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKX' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
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describe
'1305528' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKY' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
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describe
'444760' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKKZ' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:55:47-04:00'
describe
'28780' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLA' 'sip-files00101.pro'
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describe
'159922' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLB' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:49:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLC' 'sip-files00101.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:50:59-04:00'
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLD' 'sip-files00101.txt'
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'2012-05-09T05:55:16-04:00'
describe
'54797' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLE' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:48:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLF' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
7c784c6352cbc26a7d4b95140a80be68
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'2012-05-09T05:49:40-04:00'
describe
'347949' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLG' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
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describe
'29833' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLH' 'sip-files00102.pro'
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'2012-05-09T05:47:50-04:00'
describe
'141181' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLI' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLK' 'sip-files00102.txt'
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describe
'52522' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLL' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLM' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
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describe
'473677' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLN' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
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describe
'32757' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLO' 'sip-files00103.pro'
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describe
'170117' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLP' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLQ' 'sip-files00103.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:53:47-04:00'
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLR' 'sip-files00103.txt'
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describe
'56646' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLS' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLT' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
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describe
'376727' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLU' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
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describe
'32763' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLV' 'sip-files00104.pro'
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describe
'152132' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLW' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:52:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLX' 'sip-files00104.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLY' 'sip-files00104.txt'
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describe
'54594' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKLZ' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMA' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
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'2012-05-09T05:54:47-04:00'
describe
'468464' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMB' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
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describe
'31989' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMC' 'sip-files00105.pro'
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'2012-05-09T05:50:57-04:00'
describe
'167621' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMD' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:47:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKME' 'sip-files00105.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:39-04:00'
describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMF' 'sip-files00105.txt'
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describe
'55704' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMG' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:49:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMH' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
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describe
'380121' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMI' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
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describe
'32848' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMJ' 'sip-files00106.pro'
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describe
'151545' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMK' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:48:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKML' 'sip-files00106.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMM' 'sip-files00106.txt'
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describe
'54748' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMN' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMO' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
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'2012-05-09T05:45:27-04:00'
describe
'467516' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMP' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:47:49-04:00'
describe
'32440' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMQ' 'sip-files00107.pro'
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describe
'168322' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMR' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:48:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMS' 'sip-files00107.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:45:59-04:00'
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMT' 'sip-files00107.txt'
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describe
'56794' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMU' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:51:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMV' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
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describe
'493940' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMW' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
ce54bea67a7c5400729a24265cfcd154
583122dfcad9640b67eac28b2c265e47f9fb792b
'2012-05-09T05:46:40-04:00'
describe
'34216' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMX' 'sip-files00108.pro'
af3c8a66e1a282bfb8b853b6f9d8a238
dc241728022ea4b56aa04db5b99e17b2666a0be4
'2012-05-09T05:49:16-04:00'
describe
'177254' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMY' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
9fe2f0acace79723efa7b35a4ee10708
cf520575b640639eb48c5d7356386f42c34f7216
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKMZ' 'sip-files00108.tif'
1e63cef442bc59db24b6ff8fbcf050c7
cf03a8ac08862de9d5dd7b94c771506aafa6da76
describe
'1405' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNA' 'sip-files00108.txt'
7409877318721604c516c088b122e803
d8dd994efc5d22be3b0cf792802c94069d24d792
'2012-05-09T05:46:43-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'58239' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNB' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
3f2d4970e0d08f78e0b4a9e1e725040c
03ec3eca0f11989b43da9139786d201cf6cb8deb
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNC' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
f21668f616c1ef551422e3f28c0e9a92
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describe
'481118' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKND' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
b29682d2a9dc2425d315c969e07ce52b
8a13efe1a152d7bf359640613c24a35a4b437ade
describe
'33499' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNE' 'sip-files00109.pro'
eb09eeac933fa299ab4c12ee61dd1178
570be463f083fe9855e354b20bda460218bcbff8
'2012-05-09T05:47:08-04:00'
describe
'172204' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNF' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
5c0233ad4300bba77bee8c15ed2145c4
ba0ec943120080b32b5273c1ad80daceb048e6e6
'2012-05-09T05:45:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNG' 'sip-files00109.tif'
933bf699fd8b5235986fa8115d900410
00a50ee6afe2fa929e0b0e59a61b01d2aef86b44
'2012-05-09T05:49:49-04:00'
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNH' 'sip-files00109.txt'
3100a782730ea16b40f190c2b3d016f8
b933bf9b11e94d109eeb22a3ee6a59c919821304
describe
'57232' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNI' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
342a818412c0caa3d4ce071d762f8ef0
e586692a45872768619b075b40ee71082d8f157f
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNJ' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
1e8daa77c1268c1fe05ffef2222e67c4
9c39410a0df6abf343a4f22844552e41f91c36e9
describe
'492190' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNK' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
d541c176a7fd7f9998b6cdfb80cfb663
60b41f92a5f01d5ceeb95e9977d5d69d43e6dd69
describe
'33861' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNL' 'sip-files00110.pro'
51e26389266d1b61292047ccc00333f6
b60ccfde1a660f7f79d673a3b4bd6002766ed2a3
describe
'173056' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNM' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
c6de0153580bd336e410af9fccc5ebd5
6af5279593659a17e679d3dfaf78adde80d0da81
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNN' 'sip-files00110.tif'
abd6709c07a555b4e363ae7a91f34e28
badff729b50419c1400f7b93bca274709d0f704d
'2012-05-09T05:55:13-04:00'
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNO' 'sip-files00110.txt'
6871cc26e4a1db66ccefd938bdbdb209
315a49e349d2b49ce4a3ed1362d7c969f45fbc67
'2012-05-09T05:48:38-04:00'
describe
'57739' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNP' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
c4e5481efd3adc138b4219c0ec6c83ad
ff21e4f345a1e7ada518097cade8bd9142ede26a
describe
'1305505' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNQ' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
e75cb75eb238be97c1899d4f32254651
ab72d11357653d26ac6167fc45e6fc907701a217
'2012-05-09T05:46:17-04:00'
describe
'412541' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNR' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
d8e11f95c92756fdc2e89c862e9f63e6
aa6422e3050376001a003fc04e86ec97aeac934b
'2012-05-09T05:52:03-04:00'
describe
'10508' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNS' 'sip-files00111.pro'
26f9068400949a7897790fb0d8d46872
1ba30bee1980f34b2c42fb04a6472ba025c46780
describe
'135859' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNT' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
bb46a2ed17cb4e4e01a748fb899f3b2d
f724d0f83d6c346d7f3b005b4bff4f94d60afca0
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNU' 'sip-files00111.tif'
8c29fc7a87197be0ce168df4b9263b80
9433ef982b7d650762a97369e018383e842a4ece
'2012-05-09T05:50:21-04:00'
describe
'420' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNV' 'sip-files00111.txt'
07094583524ed5c03154aeff529d8f6e
248f511022dd65c09d11361cb75fd59ba2e2e343
describe
'48852' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNW' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
2f049cbd27b2822cd4f57c46e471db44
58607ca0eb6dfd95d806585c0d178466b8bd8bbb
describe
'1305530' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNX' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
b34438d90b77b31ce29cd36fd56ed3b8
0b7b93ae2915bfb8f9648f15328bf363dc373b3d
describe
'412882' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNY' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
da2bca2a2fc434126950f0489974baf9
662648a72b50261ef2f2de24e7f2ff986d64e309
describe
'21890' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKNZ' 'sip-files00112.pro'
8603897995d58aa4502db8179985dd18
ccf60b8e6fff4b1bf22ad223e9475fbc479d4c43
describe
'145993' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOA' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
18de4b310fb82732458b31068f038dda
7843b78dc92fd11d921dde8c0325f9c3c5ae9923
'2012-05-09T05:45:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOB' 'sip-files00112.tif'
4aea37b6139f7c77d33e081c17392d58
89453e13e9df2de1eec3ebd558fbfe0af275bafd
'2012-05-09T05:54:11-04:00'
describe
'918' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOC' 'sip-files00112.txt'
5a126c597593496d6c6dcb35b9db214f
ccd9812037dc4a08ee7aec25627b07600f4af7a7
describe
'51502' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOD' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
108074c9f5f9a369136d0454a1cc9a8d
b45080e932d795e0bf97763885bb8c12234caa2c
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOE' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
a91ca708e38df1e20892fe220d458ca0
942c511c64075c72c581f74c71578de185b13843
describe
'454103' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOF' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
5ab0f3bfea292bbccdbdb5b9350e2b25
67b7d57601ecc1817c91e06c5bed290a6ba97490
'2012-05-09T05:49:03-04:00'
describe
'20264' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOG' 'sip-files00113.pro'
1d55a814050335d7fef75f5457a40473
e3205ecc446e5cb139442d2f358a806b5d89f8e0
describe
'158337' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOH' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
d58ba223d85b4f77923f971b7e7dcf04
af64a8bacbe4040b57fdaa03d7158b80df2561b1
'2012-05-09T05:47:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOI' 'sip-files00113.tif'
3d7661bd41124f3bb4973eaefea8fff3
5bcbff09fb895c25d187c817220f53f4679f5123
describe
'843' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOJ' 'sip-files00113.txt'
1acbf118ef4605ab44707d7fb2d5b565
ca6832a818d953352b904a3354a1828466d0ba04
describe
'54502' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOK' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
47b0ddfd45798defa41db0addda39601
9333d916dd94ffe7803a4ee6dbed27b58de8d081
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOL' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
8d4459e9c8ae70fa37c196a2afd3f824
0bb76098c60430da7dc21de1639393e1255990dd
'2012-05-09T05:53:14-04:00'
describe
'475134' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOM' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
89d06ecce82a4dc1c940cc19956db8b3
4310efaf648fb5940a53b389d5c71de51b03f930
describe
'33011' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKON' 'sip-files00114.pro'
7be5972d1f73d33adf7f2e931efc1a0c
bc3a2905631a443a1159f906d174f91b0d64c98f
describe
'168036' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOO' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
c8f619aff73f468d920dd887eb323ba9
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOP' 'sip-files00114.tif'
bd5ef6f244362fce710f01b6063b0473
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOQ' 'sip-files00114.txt'
3823911f8d1eb9e9abbd41fe5546d24d
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describe
'56372' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOR' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
e257dc6160000fc7f0169cf057646f97
0c20990fbeda1479ec7a982effa492813927998e
'2012-05-09T05:49:22-04:00'
describe
'1305543' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOS' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
e354a83de0c1c0baed682c8d7941a5df
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describe
'475870' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOT' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
74a053effa0cb8679a478b72a77472b1
2c43f75ec7acd15afa069804b618c4fd43cf4153
describe
'33526' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOU' 'sip-files00115.pro'
8bc062f3b1109adb97f68c79fe16993c
177259cf9491d171a60f26641f631ce2d90ff60e
describe
'171264' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOV' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
cb4243508228399383865152a7b84f2e
ddf7c6e0de810bb7d33e37b1c9fb544d84ef824b
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOW' 'sip-files00115.tif'
1753e6e21ef2da3e6107dfc7190d7263
c8bc9a3416739a2c5b65c227dd07f1f4e2740d0e
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOX' 'sip-files00115.txt'
aead625d3dc0c2f1c6ad08a19afee76d
09dafc9b66468f204e5c88210fea3c724d197f89
describe
'57336' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOY' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
8038eec9dd8bf9726df4ea5789ee7d75
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describe
'1305557' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKOZ' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
8988f9f80d56bb1c7455335fa0e3e207
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describe
'477776' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPA' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
4a310d9b8233849cb8ec9e270ac94d4c
fe8ca9591f02338a374aa8709bead04cada117db
'2012-05-09T05:54:31-04:00'
describe
'32941' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPB' 'sip-files00116.pro'
a3e32a5eb8bd4a718881e679bdc34107
2385bbc85291689ef3607490d9089bd6812a3841
'2012-05-09T05:47:40-04:00'
describe
'169331' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPC' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
619e7941c01ca9845579a3f5c32cd622
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPD' 'sip-files00116.tif'
d99b6cd54ec5eb10190a9a76a2e74ccf
8a550574b950c3293b8b1c5c0e7fced0397e11f4
'2012-05-09T05:46:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPE' 'sip-files00116.txt'
86fe2705eda19616ac53daa1d820d923
4ff988eb8306566bda195d971efb1006df6595d7
describe
'56003' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPF' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
b86aca29a285a841c4630c19a70466f9
e7e55e236bf1d6529b2b300edbde26f9c5e4885c
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPG' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
fb1fa3f23341070320450795501ac18a
1ab168e370875507472d2f0b0d5b1c3f35d1ba5e
'2012-05-09T05:47:47-04:00'
describe
'475122' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPH' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
8ec10d0a182f02c999b8b92bff9cb7c4
cbd123ff5932cd8817ee9176725c24338256fbc9
'2012-05-09T05:47:43-04:00'
describe
'33022' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPI' 'sip-files00117.pro'
ee092e442f35080d609364944579c1c5
30cdb0885ddc6ec6787dcab78b5217b858aa13a6
'2012-05-09T05:46:10-04:00'
describe
'169678' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPJ' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
4418a4a718da6a6173dbd0ccc38329d4
1709cf17cabc4bc36b31e36303049c0fd9f4411c
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPK' 'sip-files00117.tif'
c1711780b4695195135d99a0f3a1c8eb
0b4d1f2f760af69d968dee12dae349dfeb3bd449
'2012-05-09T05:46:52-04:00'
describe
'1318' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPL' 'sip-files00117.txt'
36cdfe29117ca079b10dfa32d8ebafa5
613086455b90ce3af74bc444a2cabda0c15d3470
describe
'57399' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPM' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
31e96e2343c018f080dbbed445af5df0
58410db18ebb69787c78df4a9deb6c954956f91c
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPN' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
f6b4f5ae43055dc1d75807e5e09da65a
21ff89695ee4373263a7c1d371f7fe5b8a1d9c87
describe
'485837' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPO' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
006fa94474c8437175996a31b7347a73
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describe
'33150' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPP' 'sip-files00118.pro'
5e70783a59e029a36ae43a61212b150a
8584ab919b99512255c16828b99b33fff60f77fa
'2012-05-09T05:47:36-04:00'
describe
'174090' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPQ' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
51b56e27e1914e5e0838944c90224ec2
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPR' 'sip-files00118.tif'
640849cc0e1120c62d9c6b04cc5032de
a427fdf80239b01496f82b86382798b13ec0194e
'2012-05-09T05:45:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPS' 'sip-files00118.txt'
e72cc8774daec631adc13e038dcf99be
a94dd46b56396790507c872a5459154f6de985c2
'2012-05-09T05:44:27-04:00'
describe
'57849' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPT' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
e34425fdeee557e3d7652e7dbc482b3d
fc0226d1779ca4e90858bb4f4d7d66f590b50e53
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPU' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
db52f257a50d1227a0bf7e6914ef06ae
b805680a92cebd77c7346765d0c85e48118855d5
'2012-05-09T05:45:34-04:00'
describe
'478050' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPV' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
051c8ef35009995fecc09436f3d101c7
2a67ef4c36606b311ef8cc39bc7c3c8eed178dd2
describe
'34174' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPW' 'sip-files00119.pro'
a53c70790cb6ccf5758f8c8bc31aac2f
227639b964f3770edcadeecaf97b28093e06b04f
'2012-05-09T05:50:50-04:00'
describe
'173021' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPX' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
ee3aeaa8af0da1f80441774c2b631cc1
91878ecc3d86d5c6b0d2872655cfdeecc44cd381
'2012-05-09T05:51:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPY' 'sip-files00119.tif'
7edb6768df72d4ddf6fcd2076a0e6778
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'2012-05-09T05:51:27-04:00'
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKPZ' 'sip-files00119.txt'
4e24a603ebc9a77663ab08c3a50b07d3
27e7036e029dbe578c041461316dd7f570f00789
describe
'57268' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQA' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
dab08bf075e6a9b429e6b0929f4b2aa0
eb7945b2f441c8280c25e4fcd8f2534dd81b728c
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQB' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
2cb23412758bebace478da848f78d716
4a71ac7ff8a6b1701281fffd1dc673c2829be13b
describe
'399443' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQC' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
1a31692746ba581049b4b6ac55f198ed
163278afea7dae8f3cc2f9d64ca4e213c739cdd5
describe
'133059' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQD' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
b9d1cd19b7c93603bb6501aa16f85a56
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQE' 'sip-files00120.tif'
3ab9e2f3d5de4bb4c1ddecd74c37fd87
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describe
'49086' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQF' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
b007011dbe7e4d9d36165d77a62f3781
fb081282829e2e0c7483246d365a7bd3e68b760c
'2012-05-09T05:50:34-04:00'
describe
'1332030' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQG' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
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describe
'481374' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQH' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
ded457c3280bff662c9c783973a28240
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'2012-05-09T05:49:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQI' 'sip-files00121.pro'
eb21689ca417b1bda7b5a1fbce1cfdc1
414d974338fbcb5bc5f37ad96bd88239f98f92d6
'2012-05-09T05:46:27-04:00'
describe
'171087' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQJ' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
3d74f5d621835330abe773a94fedad26
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describe
'10673184' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQK' 'sip-files00121.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:51:20-04:00'
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQL' 'sip-files00121.txt'
12963b31b0324deea4cdb26d815d0895
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'2012-05-09T05:45:35-04:00'
describe
'55988' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQM' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
e2cf79e17cfce9488a35aa8dd3a08edc
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQN' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
e4a7a23d8f4aa1f2064a9caeb12461d7
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'2012-05-09T05:48:36-04:00'
describe
'432647' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQO' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
deb135c6f8e7f9151915cd7d456e763c
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describe
'17675' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQP' 'sip-files00122.pro'
35b9eb7f1a9b2ecb45ab47ad473a720c
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describe
'150975' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQQ' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
f7031a564fae37450c610e30c45c589d
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQR' 'sip-files00122.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:45:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQS' 'sip-files00122.txt'
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describe
'53062' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQT' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQU' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
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describe
'475790' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQV' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
b3eec5a17e7de296acf504d92379d69f
e2f64cafe338d83af1fc3751b7df82e91ed0850a
'2012-05-09T05:53:22-04:00'
describe
'33463' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQW' 'sip-files00123.pro'
bd41b570464b09e768c4b38dc453f589
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'2012-05-09T05:46:04-04:00'
describe
'172333' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQX' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:44:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQY' 'sip-files00123.tif'
e4840022119788be5ff734978fc5e4be
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'2012-05-09T05:54:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKQZ' 'sip-files00123.txt'
ef19d0ff96dcd951c1d57bbb12dd99ec
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describe
'57659' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRA' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRB' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
a1ff76974ce2a896c844f6b5a1d5cdf2
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describe
'368866' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRC' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:45:25-04:00'
describe
'16173' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRD' 'sip-files00124.pro'
a7e3507453fa02e74a8d4287a48b9815
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'2012-05-09T05:51:31-04:00'
describe
'129936' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRE' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
9917261c0f5c708939dd43ad9cb85a41
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRF' 'sip-files00124.tif'
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describe
'641' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRG' 'sip-files00124.txt'
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describe
'47647' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRH' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
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describe
'3598' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRI' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
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describe
'28083' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRJ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
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describe
'20803' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRK' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRL' 'sip-files00125.tif'
1e8c1cb472ff9b5718bde3d230a07de2
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'2012-05-09T05:52:41-04:00'
describe
'18923' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRM' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
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describe
'92259' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRN' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
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describe
'43723' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRO' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
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describe
'868' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRP' 'sip-files00126.pro'
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describe
'27171' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRQ' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
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describe
'11275400' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRR' 'sip-files00126.tif'
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describe
'62' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRS' 'sip-files00126.txt'
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describe
'20631' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRT' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRU' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
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describe
'290998' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRV' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
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describe
'2928' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRW' 'sip-files00127.pro'
e48f3aaa4cf8b572449b0cd6c57e688c
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'2012-05-09T05:49:48-04:00'
describe
'99755' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRX' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
9717e000817a8d6aec570404c910467f
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'2012-05-09T05:45:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRY' 'sip-files00127.tif'
a170b542b4bc64d6646aba90531eec8a
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describe
'219' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKRZ' 'sip-files00127.txt'
1f0fe26c209af3d4ee239ce07b31e0c1
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'2012-05-09T05:52:56-04:00'
describe
'40918' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSA' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
2064e057ae9b597508514c4d9bd531ea
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describe
'1305573' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSB' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
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describe
'406076' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSC' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
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describe
'18203' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSD' 'sip-files00128.pro'
5d50b492a193c1015cb77ab99fbed3ce
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'2012-05-09T05:53:41-04:00'
describe
'142824' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSE' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSF' 'sip-files00128.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:44:28-04:00'
describe
'807' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSG' 'sip-files00128.txt'
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describe
'52168' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSH' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSI' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
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describe
'482787' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSJ' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
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describe
'33815' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSK' 'sip-files00129.pro'
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describe
'173163' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSL' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSM' 'sip-files00129.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:55:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSN' 'sip-files00129.txt'
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'2012-05-09T05:50:02-04:00'
describe
'58385' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSO' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
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describe
'1305531' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSP' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
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'2012-05-09T05:51:50-04:00'
describe
'479901' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSQ' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSR' 'sip-files00130.pro'
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'2012-05-09T05:52:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSS' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
dd903699d8ae159224e23e3c278aecee
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKST' 'sip-files00130.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:54:03-04:00'
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSU' 'sip-files00130.txt'
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describe
'57762' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSV' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSW' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
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describe
'457182' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSX' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
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describe
'31645' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSY' 'sip-files00131.pro'
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describe
'166047' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKSZ' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:55:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTA' 'sip-files00131.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:54:09-04:00'
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTB' 'sip-files00131.txt'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:23-04:00'
describe
'56540' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTC' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:55:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTD' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
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describe
'473489' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTE' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:49:59-04:00'
describe
'33476' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTF' 'sip-files00132.pro'
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describe
'169547' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTG' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTH' 'sip-files00132.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:50:51-04:00'
describe
'1341' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTI' 'sip-files00132.txt'
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describe
'57042' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTJ' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTK' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
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describe
'475213' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTL' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
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describe
'34449' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTM' 'sip-files00133.pro'
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describe
'171803' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTN' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:52:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTO' 'sip-files00133.tif'
380b5b87758db8d70659e3a5066195df
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTP' 'sip-files00133.txt'
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describe
'58089' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTQ' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:47:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTR' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
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describe
'349975' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTS' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:45:02-04:00'
describe
'116229' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTT' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTU' 'sip-files00134.tif'
1d59733d533f460f7e08b1be88a22e0b
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describe
'44132' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTV' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
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describe
'1355625' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTW' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
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describe
'466585' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTX' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
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describe
'34110' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTY' 'sip-files00135.pro'
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describe
'166014' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKTZ' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
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describe
'10862336' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUA' 'sip-files00135.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUB' 'sip-files00135.txt'
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describe
'55656' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUC' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:45:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUD' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
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describe
'485674' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUE' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:44:26-04:00'
describe
'33847' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUF' 'sip-files00136.pro'
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describe
'171104' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUG' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUH' 'sip-files00136.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:45:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUI' 'sip-files00136.txt'
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describe
'57654' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUJ' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:54:21-04:00'
describe
'1305560' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUK' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
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describe
'483414' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUL' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:45:03-04:00'
describe
'33623' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUM' 'sip-files00137.pro'
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'2012-05-09T05:47:13-04:00'
describe
'171944' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUN' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUO' 'sip-files00137.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:55:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUP' 'sip-files00137.txt'
522e8f6528738921d0dfd1d10b196da5
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'2012-05-09T05:47:57-04:00'
describe
'57032' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUQ' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUR' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
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describe
'485140' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUS' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
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describe
'33426' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUT' 'sip-files00138.pro'
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describe
'173371' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUU' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUV' 'sip-files00138.tif'
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describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUW' 'sip-files00138.txt'
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describe
'58192' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUX' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUY' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
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describe
'486090' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKUZ' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:50:45-04:00'
describe
'33961' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVA' 'sip-files00139.pro'
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describe
'175329' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVB' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVC' 'sip-files00139.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVD' 'sip-files00139.txt'
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'2012-05-09T05:47:01-04:00'
describe
'58074' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVE' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVF' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
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describe
'382632' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVG' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
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describe
'129995' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVH' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVI' 'sip-files00140.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:51:14-04:00'
describe
'48987' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVJ' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
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describe
'1345097' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVK' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
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describe
'476881' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVL' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:55:23-04:00'
describe
'34550' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVM' 'sip-files00141.pro'
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describe
'168759' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVN' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
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describe
'10777640' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVO' 'sip-files00141.tif'
e34dfdfa137af62cdc0a25834ebc8ab9
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'2012-05-09T05:53:59-04:00'
describe
'1554' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVP' 'sip-files00141.txt'
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describe
'57199' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVQ' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVR' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
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'2012-05-09T05:51:19-04:00'
describe
'487282' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVS' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
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describe
'33915' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVT' 'sip-files00142.pro'
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'2012-05-09T05:44:57-04:00'
describe
'175590' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVU' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVV' 'sip-files00142.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:53:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVW' 'sip-files00142.txt'
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describe
'58261' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVX' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
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describe
'1305534' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVY' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
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describe
'484839' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKVZ' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
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describe
'33895' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWA' 'sip-files00143.pro'
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describe
'173426' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWB' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWC' 'sip-files00143.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWD' 'sip-files00143.txt'
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describe
'58002' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWE' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWF' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
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describe
'481312' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWG' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
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describe
'33917' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWH' 'sip-files00144.pro'
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describe
'171726' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWI' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWJ' 'sip-files00144.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWK' 'sip-files00144.txt'
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'2012-05-09T05:44:46-04:00'
describe
'57475' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWL' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:53:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWM' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
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'2012-05-09T05:55:00-04:00'
describe
'384057' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWN' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:49:34-04:00'
describe
'14419' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWO' 'sip-files00145.pro'
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'2012-05-09T05:54:44-04:00'
describe
'135957' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWP' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWQ' 'sip-files00145.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:51:30-04:00'
describe
'592' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWR' 'sip-files00145.txt'
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describe
'49977' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWS' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWT' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
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describe
'477631' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWU' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:50:27-04:00'
describe
'33664' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWV' 'sip-files00146.pro'
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'2012-05-09T05:54:27-04:00'
describe
'170614' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWW' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWX' 'sip-files00146.tif'
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describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWY' 'sip-files00146.txt'
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describe
'57165' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKWZ' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:55:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXA' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
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describe
'495060' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXB' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
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describe
'34801' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXC' 'sip-files00147.pro'
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describe
'175332' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXD' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXE' 'sip-files00147.tif'
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describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXF' 'sip-files00147.txt'
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describe
'57950' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXG' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXH' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
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'2012-05-09T05:44:34-04:00'
describe
'431044' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXI' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
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describe
'21977' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXJ' 'sip-files00148.pro'
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describe
'152384' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXK' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXL' 'sip-files00148.tif'
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describe
'922' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXM' 'sip-files00148.txt'
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describe
'52798' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXN' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:48:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXO' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
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describe
'380222' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXP' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
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describe
'16284' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXQ' 'sip-files00149.pro'
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describe
'134640' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXR' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXS' 'sip-files00149.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:52:40-04:00'
describe
'662' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXT' 'sip-files00149.txt'
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'2012-05-09T05:50:40-04:00'
describe
'49754' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXU' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
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describe
'1305564' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXV' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:51-04:00'
describe
'475733' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXW' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
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describe
'33363' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXX' 'sip-files00150.pro'
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describe
'170198' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXY' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:48:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKXZ' 'sip-files00150.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYA' 'sip-files00150.txt'
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describe
'57171' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYB' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYC' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
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'2012-05-09T05:50:20-04:00'
describe
'423772' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYD' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
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describe
'21744' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYE' 'sip-files00151.pro'
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describe
'149469' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYF' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYG' 'sip-files00151.tif'
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describe
'912' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYH' 'sip-files00151.txt'
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describe
'53331' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYI' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
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describe
'1305518' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYJ' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
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describe
'481650' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYK' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
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describe
'33353' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYL' 'sip-files00152.pro'
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describe
'172709' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYM' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:50:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYN' 'sip-files00152.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYO' 'sip-files00152.txt'
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describe
'57346' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYP' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:53:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYQ' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
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'2012-05-09T05:48:06-04:00'
describe
'431747' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYR' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:47:18-04:00'
describe
'16144' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYS' 'sip-files00153.pro'
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describe
'150142' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYT' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYU' 'sip-files00153.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:47:45-04:00'
describe
'657' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYV' 'sip-files00153.txt'
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describe
'53592' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYW' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYX' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
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describe
'481694' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYY' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
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describe
'32889' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKYZ' 'sip-files00154.pro'
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describe
'173721' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZA' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZB' 'sip-files00154.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZC' 'sip-files00154.txt'
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'2012-05-09T05:52:24-04:00'
describe
'57957' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZD' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:51:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZE' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
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describe
'481917' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZF' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
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describe
'34224' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZG' 'sip-files00155.pro'
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describe
'172615' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZH' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZI' 'sip-files00155.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:50:15-04:00'
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZJ' 'sip-files00155.txt'
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describe
'58054' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZK' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZL' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
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describe
'473252' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZM' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
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describe
'33510' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZN' 'sip-files00156.pro'
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describe
'169691' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZO' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZP' 'sip-files00156.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:50:54-04:00'
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZQ' 'sip-files00156.txt'
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describe
'57563' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZR' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZS' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
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describe
'472691' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZT' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
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describe
'33460' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZU' 'sip-files00157.pro'
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describe
'171311' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZV' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZW' 'sip-files00157.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZX' 'sip-files00157.txt'
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describe
'57895' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZY' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:48:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAKZZ' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
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describe
'463787' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAA' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:45:32-04:00'
describe
'31636' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAB' 'sip-files00158.pro'
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describe
'167049' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAC' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAD' 'sip-files00158.tif'
bb4590dd2577531fdb9c90fb37ba6208
11b9929b9f9576f6c17b57da8b37f7c8a3d8dafb
'2012-05-09T05:55:28-04:00'
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAE' 'sip-files00158.txt'
007433dd9feda1bf469203f60d3e795c
575af47f1cdd913a9aeb188ffe7dd4c66a8b226a
describe
'56932' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAF' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
007afed23eed64855ce785325fd55b17
3563f97740d473e091bd5fa6af867c56f51af124
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAG' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
34e8ada322583581185efcb9f20a0844
aa76a52dacba8e156dca87ca2139b6fcad32ce81
describe
'473851' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAH' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
56526ab27417aae93a5d11ceee687929
9294abf5fd46ca6d73ceff5795588c51a5f7c577
describe
'32998' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAI' 'sip-files00159.pro'
de49b85fc0e3bcf387da906174441de4
492b9866e5d2f5814515121eec03c98c72112ec0
'2012-05-09T05:47:58-04:00'
describe
'170814' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAJ' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
0070f896b07942fe6d2ef736d541cf5d
5d25475947ea2ff9fd76d1ce5176c4ecb46d1e62
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAK' 'sip-files00159.tif'
65fb308a2f54571c7e598f735e961368
b3fdf81be616413f00166c6310cc4d511f4d6d89
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAL' 'sip-files00159.txt'
a99d64aaf753ebb1eb20408e86be331f
e0eb593dfc7e03e5c0a1c8e605052cd33ea9e9f7
describe
'58004' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAM' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
79809f2f7bf63ec55a84188e94fc5c77
82dbaf29ca165a2501109b3b24ad263eb7906478
describe
'1305542' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAN' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
3489395fc1b46c8d9d87ef9f213c4433
a33c48d19426e31708c6d11d46ac09da3bae4c07
describe
'481158' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAO' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
57104fc20bf36e4685e6b047041310b7
e3bc2a56d9b1ec4e170bc4b3a4dd3c0935d29736
describe
'33523' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAP' 'sip-files00160.pro'
4036904c8bbe4a48bebd1b5fa978489a
310ed893064b5016b40fae138269a53224a34231
describe
'171120' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAQ' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
2c832f7fd14c96364d233d6fb019e585
117a98aa0239574b14b3ce2889b23cc215b722b5
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAR' 'sip-files00160.tif'
313dc3cbce83522efa259df5ffd58181
894a372e6356ee226ea585991e107c012e40520e
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAS' 'sip-files00160.txt'
fc97498047e0ccd5b9cfb2ad54bfbc4a
f6c78620d0816f2d3b7f959ede01bc6ea5f462f3
describe
'57214' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAT' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
286731095b74aa412b68c9f62e9626ea
1e9955d9e1d67feaa3a999547f378ded92cb40c3
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAU' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
b8876fe915b7a941e1562da45c34a1ca
d8a55b5adb5a0e156591af93cbcca2ae2690ea35
'2012-05-09T05:51:23-04:00'
describe
'343879' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAV' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
46e34b6fcaa036a2d1ff4134c70cf95b
714e0a3aba65915d05fd2d400a7993363807fbdc
describe
'10992' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAW' 'sip-files00161.pro'
46fb72496b9afd95c48a8d4f02964c0a
428051c0e9115e98007115112449451bb66adbfc
describe
'120274' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAX' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
b115e52b9c2c8f9fd376077f3b73e254
8c07a2290bbba486b1bd229d49a901418329019d
'2012-05-09T05:49:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAY' 'sip-files00161.tif'
6fe065895afa6e46faa7b7759221ef46
aa4649536c533eb71cb61d6702feb0ef8048e839
describe
'437' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALAZ' 'sip-files00161.txt'
63f9c2be4d408282adcce1eaa601fcd4
808a7c1dff6ad870f0e75687323adc413a9ad4c9
describe
'44999' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBA' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
1cb00eb85fa13376abcd80409676bb13
1f303331df6ef37b0b8af9d6fc2c7947fda9c6d6
'2012-05-09T05:54:12-04:00'
describe
'1305516' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBB' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
33df20ec38dcbf95cfc0dcb086554a84
b2bf4f38906cfa11b997bb1285217389c654b221
describe
'412743' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBC' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
a2f2e2166dcdb0177be5c19d0ccee476
2bff8e70ec1004ddb025d19f4a4d4717366c1e4d
describe
'22546' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBD' 'sip-files00162.pro'
1cc73f326c59a2bdd13d7269985beb90
e779ab24ec8d98c493ad05cdafc57d9df7776c6d
describe
'146477' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBE' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
e43bebfdb53768c9da4e9b881d37ec29
005240f42c023061218e2c0b19901eda95d9c421
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBF' 'sip-files00162.tif'
45d83e1259d7afaf4f975efcd5bb3536
57eb79bf2e3185ffacf4764153385975ba8567a4
'2012-05-09T05:53:04-04:00'
describe
'947' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBG' 'sip-files00162.txt'
f694c3cce28021f6e72c764c09548699
fb3b4a6eb5335a429cd3e66de5665799f49ce5dc
describe
'52221' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBH' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
e102337ab47e144ce1d76655b8efac8d
168b6418259405d4295687a644886b1b9ca1019c
describe
'1305550' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBI' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
5055dc06a498d41474d0c86d504b2eaf
887265fd9bd0b023ae8621102ee35ee84c45c1ec
describe
'488052' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBJ' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
64eebb605ab542bdb390b562b4f9e8da
8d17fe28477271892384b8fd29197a04537d2891
describe
'33988' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBK' 'sip-files00163.pro'
74c28daa53bb937c8864a6337af2d349
ac96b5f9cb6896249477d7e05224873766d969ff
describe
'173675' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBL' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
bb70f2ff7fad1726c4164d0930ba7e06
2a769e0c1e910111fd83badf02c2484c6e92a58e
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBM' 'sip-files00163.tif'
4aa3a8e0d68016def4136a871b97155a
a7177109ebb49c866316916262546f461cbe40a9
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBN' 'sip-files00163.txt'
39a7ec926b4608b0a809a2bf7a54b830
3a1de6b46689e5bd3fae416adda7dab36429ac52
describe
'58570' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBO' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
75e1970ba9ce1632c0a7f0645b614dda
51f37d4134ad8dea2a472b0c3b11cfc660c62560
'2012-05-09T05:45:57-04:00'
describe
'1305540' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBP' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
a05d4371962827266fe51c22dd45c28d
bc6b8f60fba28cdc4d662a3692730fb7798c0ee8
'2012-05-09T05:53:02-04:00'
describe
'480806' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBQ' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
3dbb0addafbef69eaff4ecafb26c2b1d
a171a320769c3b11e19702a297a0a116458d6ee2
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBR' 'sip-files00164.pro'
e0bea58c44aca7b7b6f72056d0efb370
44cb962c58b07c40bec03b7f4458cf6e42e83473
describe
'171536' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBS' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
a2192f89f0bbb94944aac308ae86261f
283e10403db9474352fbe83f16d7baf679db8fcc
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBT' 'sip-files00164.tif'
4d26d8d6e4754602bd490393b8fc33c0
8c04cc4cb32317d61a223db94d829c249d38f3b8
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBU' 'sip-files00164.txt'
38581988c93ec389a4be6d2bcbb03d95
0940d224cf30bdb5c8edd61afba231c048e55fcd
'2012-05-09T05:48:45-04:00'
describe
'57388' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBV' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
c1546102abe1c40596d5611e20ce2c6c
36fb38b27a6f95af4fc1c8c9cb967973b6aaf43f
describe
'1305519' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBW' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
fa7905fb0ef71e534d768e06faf8922e
ac55df2c73314dba073c7c0aa16b8f3b0fdf56cb
describe
'468682' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBX' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
79756ba5fcf18ea7f34e7f3d61c86bb9
467d5aa8537c0a1623375f48462f60cfb9582e0b
describe
'31623' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBY' 'sip-files00165.pro'
b4915dd2804a59a22724f69036fc647b
e02d5514b13f10d491bb00971e80907b86f315e6
describe
'168566' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALBZ' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
9b0eed8b8a10cd7359fbe6da0460b99d
c18e4a8effbaee924fa90c1ac634453edfa7c16b
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCA' 'sip-files00165.tif'
532aa933b3ca317a7d5daeeb06a788f2
7714de3edeffdf03fe109a286dbea57ee5aff518
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCB' 'sip-files00165.txt'
7c1ae8668dfba5e4c4342c694b09b02a
130c76b1680d060c23710f887d8644ea8180c756
describe
'58482' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCC' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
8b7c8b8fb9a588cc9050529e3157147a
567f01cd63ab129257842e978c52c1406d758472
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCD' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
32600ecb80406c8372be6ab81d56f9d8
3a0212b97835f0d9a1abff591a29055f46af7f14
describe
'479788' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCE' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
dc1091e053d8caa100ce80159181f371
8cdaa273de58a33bb99e05363ac1778235d84ca8
describe
'33844' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCF' 'sip-files00166.pro'
994e8be7942c19e871adacd2eefed625
987aac202bd2ca4f4a9e923956c14015a5883231
describe
'172208' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCG' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
231fe2de8208f03034d13fce94c29778
3e9182e95bd80fc986843903d36ac50a19be4e3a
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCH' 'sip-files00166.tif'
bbb96acbf922f60f49f24a5bc225f444
8d495be2159431f9d8b26e51c24ce82f1ad70dc2
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCI' 'sip-files00166.txt'
54e652b7f72232289c6071ca8dfcf8ac
708abe9fd0c8341c9704a4be70c4c0143f49a064
describe
'58734' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCJ' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
4b83b3ffbf71fafca68ff1f71f590ed1
6d3da8055d5b05e2f5a2524cd6c76202f4205859
'2012-05-09T05:54:05-04:00'
describe
'1352966' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCK' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
de064b9ebe379c33874cdf8b6aa4f96e
c9d3e6799e096283a7ffdbe4496be9a939aefafa
describe
'376695' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCL' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
66c6fa3091a7c22903a271e98a419be8
9a9046918866dcf3085632f6ab0a9ce26dbd2678
describe
'33381' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCM' 'sip-files00167.pro'
3313b1b789642ecd82359bd139e1bb43
f59c55bad1c0d349f966c32e19aea0e665061b0d
describe
'151575' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCN' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
a5aed0e8dc93236c0a304944165c3e55
45c40b83377cf90a1c6685ab66a70b5d357165b2
describe
'10840792' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCO' 'sip-files00167.tif'
9581438bef022ad77f47b05f7c214a20
f0a2f87ed84791b38d931f1ff2609647a90daccf
describe
'1537' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCP' 'sip-files00167.txt'
37b56117ae58f2f86e09f74742f04bc2
4c2b28ab52940fff1a30bcee4a7dcaf37c26c5c7
describe
'53317' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCQ' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
26a56ac8b1263e4070a3f3bd9b31a063
750b54be84968677257f5a380040a85eb04afc4c
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCR' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
cb427bb24394d1bfd891a8b8f171ae9c
6ef64214f4e7e3e822a9b9e9f557f5b414a8ee90
describe
'458358' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCS' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
63df5d256ac3342c4e94007d8adf8d15
94b1b6dfe07f7ee41b471e7d7c9ea0698c688a24
describe
'16261' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCT' 'sip-files00168.pro'
2e2ec7d71c164c3f2e4504c564e7c3c2
cd34d867f8d8de08fd3c24e52de974f55b2c2d57
describe
'158770' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCU' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
a48a10866cb5c349e7c80fe17c73d94f
b96a6886d5ca8111a45ecad00d3aa4e0d5b534fc
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCV' 'sip-files00168.tif'
5755c21deac4f4edc8bed5669355da6c
56eadeb071259b4d1224b21ef9a70a82c3f083ac
describe
'666' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCW' 'sip-files00168.txt'
dbde5780a4ad8787b15941c57c85eeb6
1b4480992509ce773064ad4faf6ca5b26e32be19
describe
'55170' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCX' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
a1b446385120f1b31aeed8583081f224
f532475fe72819e816efa6632a3ea42a807a34d2
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCY' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
ec244444bf5659b24a100a50b037768f
c229e3afbe43f59d0949b44c499c7f7a5b702a2c
describe
'480010' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALCZ' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
ef752e9ef39c18478c9f52d39a3b4786
d96cf40af7171b18061682a0aa68c1ef16a1989c
describe
'33711' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDA' 'sip-files00169.pro'
c63d52b0add1bc7da15cacd00b68c469
544e3ae388d61c3e1f79749a1cffae2859eca2e3
describe
'171745' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDB' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
ec4459bf8421f274205f92f8dc571373
194ff139358b4a0f2b16ba531db16a0c54d96c81
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDC' 'sip-files00169.tif'
230ec35ccf68bf9c6aa5f504326f07dc
fefc975a6dfb95df9e772059c4e83811c7d7bd72
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDD' 'sip-files00169.txt'
89b202a97427c2acf521a7e94a6ae82a
57dad6186c3f48018e0488deb14cfd478a504d8f
describe
'57315' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDE' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
d65ed66fa1ccc4ad9e520be75dc26b83
40bdf314e54d8e8e41a0305db5937a04ba8f9ca6
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDF' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
3a3d928f97c1def14fffcf354157f65d
92ae11f3b961289a5fdb83e1b7ea359d3b8a65c1
describe
'480445' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDG' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
4f4e9984d41335563035bdb58a4197c3
0b5412c0275fe60e5da23cf9e1f20275bc7fe60f
describe
'34028' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDH' 'sip-files00170.pro'
956ac7382ae7092e2d204b91ba71e1a8
b9fb8478c3db49939b8566442630b420b0cc5c28
describe
'173678' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDI' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
9d8be98981a46e48e0fa5bf5e228df77
0b27312e5e7d68420047d3926c6049f2a7c5a276
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDJ' 'sip-files00170.tif'
9b4e7c040e342a274ceeded139729069
9d5e45f1ed7ec0bcb75ea1826e6f3fe2800c2250
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDK' 'sip-files00170.txt'
b8e22d615b4ad133af272d47182dad89
855bda7e4c1c6f7629060f050809c6b811a38146
'2012-05-09T05:51:35-04:00'
describe
'58172' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDL' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
43c26f31d50cd7ff82440964594e347e
399052d5ca1f5e802d53151bd367abe51b058b69
'2012-05-09T05:47:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDM' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
4fe979815dd6e008121348d25c52c3d1
67ca392ff59ce1dd9643b2bb404a43656753209f
describe
'480167' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDN' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
57ba694f2ce1c5801a6cece8faf5d31a
2b7dd4d222ab6a44ba94b2dfac0d30dd73ab9775
describe
'33348' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDO' 'sip-files00171.pro'
80dd454554fe394a7e894dbbc8c20e28
d6dca861032ad4ee4aa6ec3fc7f5c293b542dc6c
describe
'171853' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDP' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
6efe4462280093c3fa18fafabe06a070
0b22b2240c1954396fdc17c709831e052c84fffe
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDQ' 'sip-files00171.tif'
1a48572372669e5756aa54337a7587d7
ce4e49c9b6feae762643d86865d8c7159d370be1
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDR' 'sip-files00171.txt'
b4c80ed328833d9b36b425824b2957d4
6c2fd12a46f90a11e3c4a46e16b775c6dc514633
describe
'57913' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDS' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
dbb7bacf24812aa38dafd45c80fa2a9c
4b8ef6471ce9fe09d6e81b36b30722bc690cce93
'2012-05-09T05:50:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDT' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
f8a8a2d72fafd7952fdbadd7e530b024
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describe
'454877' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDU' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
9271588bd1c57b6d58f342cf90583506
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describe
'24321' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDV' 'sip-files00172.pro'
cf8364edd502b350170a17b87ede836a
0a0fe5fcbeb90cedb819f9b32c4fa663aa5d862b
describe
'161020' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDW' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
f8200c924bfbd6caa8546c1af89f688a
bb06a14f09fd2bf4f96a95a502c4a11841bf51fe
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDX' 'sip-files00172.tif'
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describe
'997' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDY' 'sip-files00172.txt'
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describe
'56336' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALDZ' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
1f3aa2845fdf5b387dd1a293868c1c0f
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEA' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
4bf05de76d46a827e52408aaa38f18a5
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describe
'475280' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEB' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
862571b17c7cb89574e533fe23963d7e
0a9c37ce3a317962510732c44471d616be73224d
'2012-05-09T05:52:37-04:00'
describe
'33228' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEC' 'sip-files00173.pro'
6281cf7d9739f0c920a6de7024cae533
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describe
'169696' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALED' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
da7c995cc6d4da0bcbdb510db4d5eb93
7076918bcd9fe05916ceef84c7753b1063ccaa8a
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEE' 'sip-files00173.tif'
703ea474fbbb7cfe0c1b6dae1d940b33
7aa2ac37a1880d988dbbc20e9c4883626a8567d4
'2012-05-09T05:55:55-04:00'
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEF' 'sip-files00173.txt'
b496d6a18e712c6cd652224998b68db3
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEG' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
1dcd768d66323ae9ad2f76c93cf004b4
be831ef759a6cfd1c5a47b0bbe5d57941166724b
'2012-05-09T05:54:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEH' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
923a8c26eabbf3e216b543eaeeb20f7d
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describe
'492884' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEI' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
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describe
'35158' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEJ' 'sip-files00174.pro'
3dea3c20dd8186cff09d1aa3f9166ecf
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'2012-05-09T05:52:52-04:00'
describe
'174325' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEK' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
09e62260c39633f7050703c9cb983966
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEL' 'sip-files00174.tif'
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'2012-05-09T05:53:42-04:00'
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEM' 'sip-files00174.txt'
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describe
'58465' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEN' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
9005c6c7755845e4e2d43570b0717c1b
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEO' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
b1bc58b5aa3e623daa22e44638fbc6bd
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describe
'481907' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEP' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
538c720d82b6bb3ada1d4e48a9c79cb5
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describe
'33308' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEQ' 'sip-files00175.pro'
7c222ff0dcc6ae96dd0f0b020f39f9b8
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describe
'172405' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALER' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
46e48cb21f39187652f13f9d66ad4d95
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALES' 'sip-files00175.tif'
00b5ca4414ec9bce40ea6e1b88f6d65e
f0efafacfbef367d62ce4688b01ca6e4778c9615
'2012-05-09T05:48:20-04:00'
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALET' 'sip-files00175.txt'
0d87dbf046b87993df9cb764ed6129a4
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describe
'57889' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEU' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
e0d3cbabd9dca6a946c0fa5e9b1b894f
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEV' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
754486ca909ed825b9c7306d4423ded5
df25ed73a73a22939523cd238f03b2a00a487446
'2012-05-09T05:54:32-04:00'
describe
'483442' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEW' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
9c7717fa0abb8f80e47742d77b02f16a
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describe
'33887' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEX' 'sip-files00176.pro'
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describe
'173139' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEY' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
6eb20bba74b44ccca8ae2e5dcf9b9897
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALEZ' 'sip-files00176.tif'
b872e1fe1247b3e10c93201ccb6d73a6
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'2012-05-09T05:47:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFA' 'sip-files00176.txt'
e7cf82a1e0fb4c9b01b6016dedc1ba55
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'2012-05-09T05:54:48-04:00'
describe
'57578' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFB' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
ab62add3ed43f0603d148712bee1e477
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describe
'1305552' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFC' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
7a13aa48bac0c43400a66aaac8e341af
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describe
'474669' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFD' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:46:57-04:00'
describe
'33087' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFE' 'sip-files00177.pro'
90d15522467dc92e14ca093eea3f6701
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describe
'171728' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFF' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
0e9fff97bc21b6462e278d2eedca1a35
c98ca9bdca8eb17d07dae062404ad6c78c7bade1
'2012-05-09T05:47:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFG' 'sip-files00177.tif'
722f86e1be5059a05ed677a31f7ed701
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFH' 'sip-files00177.txt'
55710035d4191da34b2b0b97d17448be
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describe
'57530' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFI' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
a936b8550db493bb53bf33fda525d6bd
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFJ' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
8484124562e1c7e7521b69a93eb12554
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describe
'471406' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFK' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
4376d7efbf31b8172425665726995baa
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describe
'32142' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFL' 'sip-files00178.pro'
85bb7f81fe6d6104dbc3e833ba402a62
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describe
'168509' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFM' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
b73d2667c9f9d3f8a8acf353ea7b1e2a
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFN' 'sip-files00178.tif'
c5a1888f9ec2ebc552808423a8b914c7
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'2012-05-09T05:47:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFO' 'sip-files00178.txt'
aca0e2010e18238c3d017b6113bc4956
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describe
'56835' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFP' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFQ' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
732b3e9a1fbfb217381c0ffea8cb6dea
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describe
'466393' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFR' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:55:40-04:00'
describe
'152116' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFS' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
1f5f4f0140ffadee8376619ea4e592b6
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFT' 'sip-files00179.tif'
e2e6af4e3647f55928bcf5932701bf07
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'2012-05-09T05:50:25-04:00'
describe
'53189' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFU' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
d8bd645ac461693a8da84764e854e354
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFV' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
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'2012-05-09T05:55:27-04:00'
describe
'462756' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFW' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
1379904fd7c88874ef89a3be217ff589
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describe
'31178' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFX' 'sip-files00180.pro'
c8bd2f0cecf6eab05543f434bb3d2b1b
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describe
'165045' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFY' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:49:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALFZ' 'sip-files00180.tif'
a1a7736cce7897bde31c2ae8526af5e7
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describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGA' 'sip-files00180.txt'
808091c5b109389c897d84e8dd021af5
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'2012-05-09T05:55:29-04:00'
describe
'54335' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGB' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
3cb83ce87cd416eff3726064d3db133d
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describe
'1305525' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGC' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
a3d41d2b90b8951873357bfb5185c949
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describe
'422142' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGD' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
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describe
'21830' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGE' 'sip-files00181.pro'
684e7174c8f54596befb054003cee1b0
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describe
'146788' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGF' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGG' 'sip-files00181.tif'
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describe
'928' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGH' 'sip-files00181.txt'
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describe
'51801' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGI' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGJ' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
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describe
'480881' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGK' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
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describe
'33253' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGL' 'sip-files00182.pro'
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describe
'171446' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGM' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGN' 'sip-files00182.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGO' 'sip-files00182.txt'
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describe
'57776' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGP' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
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'2012-05-09T05:49:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGQ' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
1eff14f16cd0129bcebfe29e9167f00a
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describe
'380000' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGR' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
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describe
'32739' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGS' 'sip-files00183.pro'
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describe
'154253' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGT' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
15fdbaf77624aa83e7417aaedc026c07
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'2012-05-09T05:47:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGU' 'sip-files00183.tif'
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describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGV' 'sip-files00183.txt'
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describe
'54553' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGW' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGX' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
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describe
'474335' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGY' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
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describe
'31982' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALGZ' 'sip-files00184.pro'
08f04f2b975649ba5d08e2af4c769dda
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describe
'167199' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHA' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
c91d3e534805ef56b0c203ecc88668f3
7ec4ae1519c865ea18fbc6d24729c4fd64adb792
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHB' 'sip-files00184.tif'
959bb30e4d0d4caddd104ec29af403a6
efdebd24600655f00e5562a90d3fcb952e85d74b
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHC' 'sip-files00184.txt'
0c218c4119d9e920d649694971221447
99f45780c6b3406fe659b97b3f160856fac9d083
describe
'57440' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHD' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
de79f07a04419b197cfa7a8e1b95e569
c7e8945dc6a60deb4ac30e05e3521ff36696cd44
describe
'1305551' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHE' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
614727158816ed78764627ff65387a3f
922aee721e557e9cc1ff9fc82a0795de6882f841
describe
'486909' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHF' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
706f47085bafa451919d16d5e2901981
e11e43dc7b625e80cdcd75c2a08822a14fa8c38b
describe
'33739' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHG' 'sip-files00185.pro'
1b24abb6d6ae41777588cd33e294878e
26b59487495255b4b117ef888d7609dd1c6dc9a9
describe
'172703' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHH' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
c681235f8607ae33f686884419411215
b31672b22692075d4c4aa87a4ae57bd927c967f7
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHI' 'sip-files00185.tif'
5b61a43d702b9fd7d1487ce3d2f42444
eda5c3a05e8b9b137dd079167837dacb554c8aae
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHJ' 'sip-files00185.txt'
c34c0763fe64610bcf096f2983d340a2
efc1ff436dcdeb4642a2d3bfbbb3491dc097935d
describe
'57952' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHK' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
d093b38ac7963bd10b03e77f049fcf11
b0b212ec1d752b72e59a2db950cb34c8d54d8ffb
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHL' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
a9e1dc4eff1057d84e149e6aa80a8b36
d72f02d0647e89e8f6486a98e54dd65fcb541701
'2012-05-09T05:52:12-04:00'
describe
'451641' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHM' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
885cb90a35bdd7e2a0febe01993a2589
c5ce4383e87399ccd39db571ef510f423622f7f1
'2012-05-09T05:54:39-04:00'
describe
'148686' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHN' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
eabf5d3a2482e810729e614e557d8335
92087dac988ff8e8f496247b35689c4915a3947c
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHO' 'sip-files00186.tif'
e900847ac72ea494ff4756db80d552e9
805c4b345831e9722c296fee30eb0c7abe16b383
'2012-05-09T05:49:02-04:00'
describe
'52812' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHP' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
bedb26e2212831bed87b14a8d1768e44
376fa73913c0528f6e5bf72db452357c49d44f46
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHQ' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
b0b242a3095214345816a14b10c41ead
799c63fa45f7bda3c3cdaab1778fa848ae77dcd8
describe
'481971' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHR' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
48995b4ae1883c425ffc08fb053cf6cf
d2f1961d48fa23f272acce4c4ae39dc5926b43cc
describe
'33200' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHS' 'sip-files00187.pro'
7461d68c75301016a13d60e632ca1757
e7c0db3c3d13abcf47ae75d42b1bfcd1753ab141
describe
'171926' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHT' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
b47574bcfd0230e947140806dc2541cc
c98bd3448c42e0be7a52f7b1795ae0da00231e11
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHU' 'sip-files00187.tif'
0516ef9315d4b0217dc27f4ce5b091fa
67c39a4d5a67b0bb78407cf14a4bbfe88b99f6f0
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHV' 'sip-files00187.txt'
2dd459e225dbe70b45c29bb6c87ee69a
e09d9d4c3ce0cd764dc3f2a354759596a85e34cf
describe
'58037' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHW' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
41a839eac18c4eb1006a1cbd1a82616a
c90a2eb018d9c85db10af544f3f0621d8aa01c60
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHX' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
e5c78b701754a81661b74c1c164535f3
9d0d3f35dd9eb67354c8eec8fece5a7d40a5fc15
describe
'474220' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHY' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
a414dd29486978a8d8f5fcf9223c07b5
489f3ee336eceaef83b14aab1b9b2cf635aad6ad
describe
'33377' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALHZ' 'sip-files00188.pro'
795dd80225117725ec74492f57b207c3
d6e7eeb2f49846a2ebbbb87c4954167881b7ab68
describe
'168698' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIA' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
6aab7c7383c20107767eaf2187c528fd
25765bad7fcb99249bebe30ba692be5925875ac0
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIB' 'sip-files00188.tif'
baa7d3dea8d19cef55548126d7d8f43e
b1deab58329eb6c0262734a56a6c4f9f5c43429a
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIC' 'sip-files00188.txt'
1a1a163036bb0f1ba37caf3f0a2aeb32
b4d76d903fa12955aa3cbba0ebb89ca5c841979e
'2012-05-09T05:54:28-04:00'
describe
'57277' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALID' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
e309a55f4ef36b1bb56886472fe07ee7
b63c6b6eca4c0d14e6015b75a5d217952c4c29fd
describe
'1305412' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIE' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
24f3c055d3ea89eaf2d55f67fa341374
d070f924f3dedc2ce933472cd10814acae4852b8
describe
'370342' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIF' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
74316a00db548ca5c4f8f439b3026f63
b3b78d7ad9760641c0751c3d444704a9486ca928
describe
'19907' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIG' 'sip-files00189.pro'
f4bcba40dbe2988be0454c798c5b2045
b066ad9f3c5841b9689394be41057045eb33dc06
describe
'130667' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIH' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
9b566f39ba8c49ea129faea230cacaeb
3996f786ac5cd042ffa751d558d645c7bb2fdeca
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALII' 'sip-files00189.tif'
dba8754eda9eea091c8b5c979076c103
c528ba08e9e91089c83900802e8a37978f3a6f40
describe
'788' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIJ' 'sip-files00189.txt'
8ba2b08e1baf35b10c3d6e6ef83c5d64
0a5f6b21e165062aa63d3c92520744d681107591
describe
'46179' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIK' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
3c7d4967d25a26fa9d6200c0e47cd86d
974c3a7bb886c239a3a3d65c726f10e95b5a3137
describe
'1305468' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIL' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
dc80172ecf48b32331483fc3b2622ec5
c8b99a47f8cb9a6ed73ef7caae0efa77d3b63b7d
describe
'447132' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIM' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
ca5a4857a722c47af5845c7f5411495c
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describe
'21351' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIN' 'sip-files00190.pro'
0f5b4bb02b2a59d389de961ffd72fdb4
fb082f8472f21dfee26482587d38f3d54edc03e7
describe
'153623' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIO' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
7e3dc9ed407092992989878c870865f3
8812f0dbdd7c81c2b146aa6696ee2ddb1ec42e76
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIP' 'sip-files00190.tif'
2831f5ec67d823f1a0dd086dcfa3d6bd
505045c5a1489bf4bc344bf69f190b5552aff7e2
'2012-05-09T05:55:26-04:00'
describe
'911' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIQ' 'sip-files00190.txt'
eeec2c59a45f20aa8960dcccd5fc0c12
993a667e217638322109775ad0b647c991cf4c13
describe
'54124' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIR' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
3ffa3c2441b8e9d95140aaab42259478
c0aa0759d8655152fbba3d7b92467dd6baedb933
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIS' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
1c30a14a6b085b1c208494762c6f9560
c87ff47412ea7f543b325d68590ce9b872ae861c
'2012-05-09T05:53:26-04:00'
describe
'482420' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIT' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
bb5b1a7f7da412c7caffae0c740dcf9a
e005981ac4fbef3c9e91912d259034faab3665a7
describe
'33939' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIU' 'sip-files00191.pro'
cbec8b1324e070f56ac66cd24181e648
e94d67992ac8a1ae39da8baedb20ab6c900211d8
describe
'172032' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIV' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
31e36276122c9e803c7cf3504572fa15
88d39f19aeb0251bd3fa18e6f0f2ef21373d61ee
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIW' 'sip-files00191.tif'
6e9a356c2b2b36e9f296f974577879bf
0e38d7a63b6500ca4de8b42f50ca012a7ee66093
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIX' 'sip-files00191.txt'
3587d989aa48eec5fdd079efb29a30b4
8f2dc348d244a964633cb63fb9b121a2a9a22a8f
describe
'58135' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIY' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
b7d0cd54b7a85f14c3a1acf444d34488
dc6d603f544dad0f0f4d0cfb1ef0c5c456d15349
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALIZ' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
8fd3b83a53a5258cddabb4cd2537c910
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describe
'430633' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJA' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
7a0c56b282785d7df8b3b057b1ad9c03
2dfb2a4752697c333ccd6c315b13e909d21999cd
describe
'16264' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJB' 'sip-files00192.pro'
207905113a4f5ef2dd7380f4620ef858
c2f2d8e99795a03506e5e4326ed25e2d3c5ce805
describe
'147936' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJC' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
af3e8872bb9e87a947668df161478ed4
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJD' 'sip-files00192.tif'
dcc045acdf1f97aa7223a9044da814ab
0e7e9d41f160d966369705370536d83bebb86026
'2012-05-09T05:53:01-04:00'
describe
'669' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJE' 'sip-files00192.txt'
6710b0172b806f336fbb61803a397ecb
2fea41c9d9ec36d0c2f4b4813bf31d58ab326fad
'2012-05-09T05:55:35-04:00'
describe
'52361' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJF' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
6a4730106af3e5339b97b5d4fb737d94
62f36c30eab0a8d47a799985a4af3b87e150713f
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJG' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
e9f4d1a951d7efc787dd6a1a3d59b937
4d6ede0463ae34757a5bf5b633583f93034d6c1a
'2012-05-09T05:46:03-04:00'
describe
'482165' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJH' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
5437643e8071832e2aec1529167d8593
729330d95d2eed1f487f724f6593de87cb1f68ed
describe
'33967' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJI' 'sip-files00193.pro'
e6d29f8b9290dff96317b782d4c82675
ee443e839813914782b22c2b2ec84a029ac88273
describe
'171352' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJJ' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
486a2ae133ab1cb1847b44ee90cce8de
73df07976e0e3c29aa285409100d586ad8c62f3e
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJK' 'sip-files00193.tif'
37313f7a2f9c0d1cb62c7f29b14b7eba
b9b4ebaa35dc95b87e2cd9c6ebfd9eb42ae7c65e
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJL' 'sip-files00193.txt'
ec94e3592d2296dd89f838ffa9b52bf9
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describe
'56380' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJM' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
888865eaa646ce90d02f7c1bb66b1e0c
672ab5e644a0149876c77f00062e980a9144b508
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJN' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
cbd341edfc76a30fdefd794ab00805aa
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describe
'482491' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJO' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
fe42c5686f3d904ce5aafd3a6b14c1e8
44cf9e4f123652ba5ab0ef3e850d127fd2137b44
describe
'33906' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJP' 'sip-files00194.pro'
777a1a62db1dd399477c285679b06939
afd2911a4d0e42e89aa77b1e2a103de285f5b2d4
describe
'171030' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJQ' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
6e37f450af5698544e82a3d0c20f01cd
66668bbd055797051a4fb1c6859d3168ed69c6ec
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJR' 'sip-files00194.tif'
4e16fecfa125eb2883c316ac38423097
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJS' 'sip-files00194.txt'
059330c09ec0f61b5244bf4a7aa4ad50
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describe
'57076' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJT' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
2ec039faad938a94415768e45ece7818
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJU' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
925f6f9f44eacb35a421519099ac4706
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describe
'468730' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJV' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
ebb4c533562b20b16e6d55c07423fb1c
d4ac9b6102138c449bdae92666434f690c5e73cc
describe
'32655' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJW' 'sip-files00195.pro'
d24843f5d46a005a0d52c4d1ae58a6a8
9f2dd560d3545c5a28a227daac11e468b7cff254
describe
'167755' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJX' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
1bb4608ba23050e0be1be9e77b6dc1c5
90b644d5e1ac468824bdce7bf82d3a3073d17ed4
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJY' 'sip-files00195.tif'
3f6960eb8981e799860fdcacc8252d2d
2717070ef8c5257f0783059d7e1c6b010e7e0510
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALJZ' 'sip-files00195.txt'
5267be692db61af708f9bb1979cac33a
903af308f396c210891c725b9810e985f4b2b136
'2012-05-09T05:55:54-04:00'
describe
'56692' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKA' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
9772b6dd54932387a3e2827618a94fd4
cf85e39936f55d5355ecf9e1b28359aa6138b042
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKB' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
ccfeed41df8606eefabfe514547ec23b
8dfa739edb7c2d6c892e5cea2ecef72cda4c2f2a
describe
'476274' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKC' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
0218c9df5f0ea584a0dc96e946330b02
d34f7fcbe329e500d6d34d230e49e9f4b98f74d4
describe
'34308' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKD' 'sip-files00196.pro'
633db1d3d0aa85090cbe3b0c90f82994
9c0558cc2e6b9b5cea1631dff99d0e81cd6fec60
describe
'171315' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKE' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
1afbb6a9de5122877ad7cd820c801876
e2e7cb2f68c9d21663ada8cd89ec3290b0c67068
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKF' 'sip-files00196.tif'
a7e729d7d9d1299c567fe3f9f6e9080d
e9b3d479ecf5ca0041c5ff049902723c07324b4a
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKG' 'sip-files00196.txt'
34f6c26779937d37e976ec46c327c329
705df0e51add344109964a7fa9a2bb486f8ce8c5
describe
'56359' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKH' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
2ff3422504f178faa1ace607b019c203
1e81aa56295a26906fdc3e228b7b73870168a0b4
'2012-05-09T05:50:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKI' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
05fe564259fb29d7d57973bcc4a7661f
0aa65a1969aeed5edd2456256fd055a20155fe91
describe
'471428' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKJ' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
824d7eef6923b65904a46735617f715a
1b26ace6ab7b99cba31ba86a547294be931beb62
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKK' 'sip-files00197.pro'
de8d3301b008e47c9ff6df99714a6f09
9a194cb4b0615efb337cdf0f9bbd75eca690cdd3
describe
'169219' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKL' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
eabb284bf54185e170a1afc9d441304b
94de146d7776a7d43af6a28aaff84329009d4d0c
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKM' 'sip-files00197.tif'
b5fc17a7bcff0325dc00e9e09c115d4a
ca716c03997be0f2151093aa29110b30c57089a3
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKN' 'sip-files00197.txt'
210236f202d7825cca2a247b71de0e66
3bf25a742a9c21812178a5a4e3aa7d6abd6a5e21
describe
'55904' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKO' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
d640c5b7cae09ca47ec49da38634321e
44e06a19c937a0499d314654994a41798e8ba910
'2012-05-09T05:52:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKP' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
2f8d854a11ac6d853b87375f825156b9
cb48cb7a5a28e0c2fa20a99bb4723fcfe6d8eed9
describe
'517754' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKQ' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
e70b1d9e3749e872a9a03d6d652c914c
b60db0eb2e7aeabdd9d14d47ef12658be52ef4a2
describe
'161786' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKR' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
ebe819835b099d71d53abca043831795
0efbf5ffec875fdbf494a7264f8ec3b71e6fe360
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKS' 'sip-files00198.tif'
113483bac01f1c822fc56e84594fd116
ead40bd24e5e9297575d758be965b5a05017ce3d
describe
'54183' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKT' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
1b4b4a03925f1450f6e6a79ca3a4a3e5
a08c9d2ea9bd3f7d79c266dc177cd433750f4961
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKU' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
ec5f71512cf3bfd0c3d95762b76e1298
767cfa4b19e82bc0d507e80dfbd69ed8dec70dba
'2012-05-09T05:52:26-04:00'
describe
'483580' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKV' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
8fcce4032e11360fc68a99d11b439045
c687a02ee20ca35d8444e63b76fb2454decdae4d
describe
'33929' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKW' 'sip-files00199.pro'
007185ce6391a1a5b0db68d42b16fb80
cfef1bffba8e5f8ac1be3cdc2c1fa4fba7ba6358
describe
'171859' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKX' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
0e8e599ba202b02116021c80decc58a7
59dc3532bfa78418c48af4c320672a7ceda785ff
'2012-05-09T05:46:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKY' 'sip-files00199.tif'
ed2eb54fb9a0253938c1d223183a0f84
bfda9ff3ea130a6ff8a3535916c52b48f264c734
'2012-05-09T05:55:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALKZ' 'sip-files00199.txt'
95ece645f261abf4fc4e44c87904cc58
d217bc1d70aa08e916f1363028d84b668e78e211
describe
'56789' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLA' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
e47a0b3696033fbba1b8baf940ddda96
46c8d47510e2dda86496b1ffeed59ea930f6168f
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLB' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
d5973a567011c5928753240ff86dace3
93816d88ad2801913bc39b07583ac3cc46e468f8
describe
'489601' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLC' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
b141e7094ce067067a42ed4d3590625f
ee45ff76c8a7f021b2277f8e78daaa2db066ca16
describe
'34248' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLD' 'sip-files00200.pro'
26ee97c9b98c9b64c50adf48e2c892fd
d52928013403f4c276ea929a6457d35687bf61ed
describe
'172900' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLE' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
04279d2d4894a52706f7504bd02a6a69
3637b921fb78c4923fb46e01160953ab085ee566
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLF' 'sip-files00200.tif'
b0b2ff3a90ac8b04a528a4b88a0f8bbe
dc61d19397c1ecc6b745dacad2d8d66f28de2233
'2012-05-09T05:46:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLG' 'sip-files00200.txt'
c5f6921f7c0da09ca30958416625acaf
54b102da71a7279f98e9740ae3072996f005b14a
describe
'56656' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLH' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
19ea428dd5fb005e05e6f71fcb5bad31
20a6464e0b3ead1a73bc97a325b81eddd9c5d491
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLI' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
b1acccfdb1352ebd718bc60a72161c0c
d5a83f4a3769594be4f39db8442b50686e453a2f
describe
'475637' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLJ' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
5800776c692ca18a2274d759390afee7
43e88eb0655bd01bb3d4e0aa9eb0c5befae5b1cf
describe
'32903' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLK' 'sip-files00201.pro'
dc7de96d28deef68ac75cad3d6fd2d88
f7d7998fb11434df986c92a1555c97039225dc4b
'2012-05-09T05:45:15-04:00'
describe
'170196' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLL' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
2af6f2642eab41894c77972f7ae72766
e3eb5ba70b4cd9dce29f7a5f1d2cade805ee3c4f
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLM' 'sip-files00201.tif'
35165d0a47ebde6a416c5a06ac89d092
750dde01669fb4f1a4943727628a07eefe41b4e0
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLN' 'sip-files00201.txt'
0af13e5d9eb7f7cff56844018373a1d9
2a497620e360b0043918033c4b992baaf48d1e8a
describe
'56362' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLO' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
fe0bec42c110ef672a36fef6da989808
1fa4347f3b66850fbd3d70e8cccafe90bf7376e1
describe
'1305546' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLP' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
e1d544b362cd97a56995e04feffff760
f48ea92a23844c0b9f295e4d4233ad9975e26e33
describe
'471613' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLQ' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
4c2d127479a6ac6301edc150ff56c1c4
9ee5d8d26cf69870bb319f4bef440f18de2efaaf
describe
'31979' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLR' 'sip-files00202.pro'
1d4cd467199d104ed8b76fe5c8e81181
464ffce52b047e9b3c7626b9da88270cd414a24c
describe
'167488' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLS' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
b1d9b4e63129d81db7ba52f1abffb22b
4052745a2684f21fbe394bfc6ce8da7f9bea826c
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLT' 'sip-files00202.tif'
a40f2472c64a2956dae8240c610301c9
494486c9bfec27f10a7f1dfb1cabd76f94e20bee
'2012-05-09T05:46:19-04:00'
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLU' 'sip-files00202.txt'
d9a08feca1977e03968aaa2e1666e33c
87da0efa6dfaad39839190eb368d0beeef515a23
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLV' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
cff3a53424e8c45db92b92ab61ef85de
76246643ac739ccc70c92df521565bbba86f13fc
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLW' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
6547cf231a3ac576acbbe816279eaa8f
880b0280e1d9d1976573805b0d98f27f3ee21849
describe
'485180' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLX' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
7e16b93d76cbc25b086b9e9228b612a2
05cc7f75bdc4ba77daf7e27d2fdfa52f88682d97
describe
'33686' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLY' 'sip-files00203.pro'
da5175f1be149724c8eae9f938ab22dd
9f43e962fc178957b97ba952d0b81b2fc7a4d5c2
'2012-05-09T05:52:11-04:00'
describe
'172619' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALLZ' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
5547719a2018fd046e3a44f3d266efd7
0692ff1c18aedcd9e7078ea1423d5574ee3d495f
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMA' 'sip-files00203.tif'
43fda93c03357d9e5e387c91775c65d7
fe595597220ba23948fbf955ed69fc5e9e8f51c9
'2012-05-09T05:49:14-04:00'
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMB' 'sip-files00203.txt'
fa7d3b0a1a0256e1d9c06de75cee9d4c
cf62fd562e9370841bfa87fbc87606308de4a903
describe
'58353' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMC' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
f93a172c934056d94bf18d0b7e61118c
fb611a2bfbb2b7c98b818e161cc5e61948fd3e8a
describe
'1305496' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMD' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
ed22016581a21c46678672438e1bfd53
7e9aa1de99c9e69135383832aac88e650416d0e8
describe
'308691' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALME' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
14868f366f09d7e14f230808a8c285e3
8227d837c64b81f97eef6bf67e12b23c7fb42d63
describe
'9137' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMF' 'sip-files00204.pro'
9b155adc6c7fba5838c001fd0ed78d9b
f433063d22bf28fb510fe06107ca7b0059f01729
describe
'106076' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMG' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
827c4c9b8d61552e561e9a76ddbb696f
11905e3bfc6963c0d14378354c5c02790c3fd2f6
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMH' 'sip-files00204.tif'
9654f3e933f58972f4de976590edc421
2ac5f677f7084d42296477d152979bb82e604952
describe
'374' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMI' 'sip-files00204.txt'
b8fddd3a535d806a886f3f67e7b4362a
6d8ab73a9553b92caa25ad12ceef99dcd7c6bdc3
describe
'40514' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMJ' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
db9593a23d751d2ebbfeb85d99e07f67
c623bb6e2cd777cc0fc13b2c19f39b484d5d68b3
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMK' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
4e3d45d78f50aabaf94c414d289c5e26
1a2c9ecca4d8dda5f826284b646c397cb99d9e4e
describe
'417792' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALML' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
f35f010fc4e1b2a69bd743a3ff5870a8
03dcb35eb9f0f01cc6a9379d023a439b636588a6
describe
'22602' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMM' 'sip-files00205.pro'
ab8934c1e30d4db7a3057c85350232ed
2fc4f82faf3adfd2594360faa7e2f0e967800a49
describe
'148281' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMN' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
2cddc8069d6801876751d71744a07c43
93fb2b0b8bec9d112a78d22a88d20fbcf20791cd
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMO' 'sip-files00205.tif'
9d847c1b6f2ff3b47edde2e686518aba
2fcc68544d340cfa132cec32464a8fea52e27dda
'2012-05-09T05:53:43-04:00'
describe
'941' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMP' 'sip-files00205.txt'
c78ab97028e3037cd1b5bdea32870e00
8fe292b6575b5ec1c4ea1e6a203e5f95854a2c95
describe
'53231' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMQ' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
684327f9d4678924156a29a3558a47fe
b7b2180a5d3c0928684b53714d933874300f9678
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMR' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
5f1afa99148175edb6bacc6079e3d757
137d5032322297602ab704bc83bd00e8ad298494
describe
'477437' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMS' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
b5c067fa62781ee905fa59f9b5766081
740e4f762dbf3e7e4f3b5a886be7e499ab954992
describe
'33615' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMT' 'sip-files00206.pro'
b651a42d744230559cb9ecc0d08d5af5
38606b8ab16eab9df5bbbf55e3204428be6dc056
describe
'169893' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMU' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
cf741ecfc3596df84ff7255a12c1592a
52c0334f33bd7be48773f2daa7ce36de3e0eb4b8
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMV' 'sip-files00206.tif'
fae63295961f9f114c3da22a2353ce83
d19eb2468a54ccd7e268436f5a864ed5e60ca3c0
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMW' 'sip-files00206.txt'
014da7fead0f48e08a8955cab36c73df
4447f76ea00bf5cdc60dd38687dcf003100342ed
describe
'57565' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMX' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
c8b6a15371924eab7cbfe49a293fca1a
f718b5f3fb88bbf4e14169515c10464a0a785c55
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMY' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
0284a4b81fc1a39eba6e68d2be1ebf49
c7f9b2d9f2cf453326506d3953a9992a5c014bfe
describe
'478225' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALMZ' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
9333e62571607d56ad7ac43c569e973d
c967fb962d41e8f05fccbf674d755a0d7c591f43
describe
'33113' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNA' 'sip-files00207.pro'
d9765a9df80c1ba1e7937647d6f65b13
f31756a7c25769a83579c2c26bc696d8161189ae
describe
'172217' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNB' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
c389f89d2166c01677829754105af086
f9757bcc03be7443ddf631fff81fb909ffdc5e48
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNC' 'sip-files00207.tif'
82a314045d3cca5419f5abc841599a14
0da51884bba931026be81cb479732e6afe5b4890
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALND' 'sip-files00207.txt'
64bc32c0ac67035358eb05dbfeffc8b2
6282cf1f6ed57bbd9e8ec86b65e2c7d887c66a7f
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNE' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
f1a8c10cc0559dae81d63f320d731f67
28959fd1f6728403f77c9c423ef2b788799607d8
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNF' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
f5fca4a119a0cd9dd80823ce7c6251a6
03dbdc0726db7f70dadfa767ae4d5b8f32855224
describe
'395548' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNG' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
804ce149b1322ed9f1c2d7566a171377
0408f944121086ff4a6405745fb0dbe3f9932c49
describe
'135523' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNH' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
699ae509ffec1ea87e8057f71f392261
20a6fcff00c33f4f4c95ed1bd1abc17a527462e4
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNI' 'sip-files00208.tif'
169a0a2a188890ef371ed237c939d67c
f90cd4a5763a239d9bf6b5dff0382ed8ec96fe0d
describe
'50215' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNJ' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
fe6b9e3b50670603b5b9b8063b85e70d
62d282bab9a8bcb996aaefdcae48cdf79cd5a373
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNK' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
2a8bb9aa6ca1e04d27e3a9237dcac74b
a826fc4b2a3d7f3b898fc2c1bfbeb49363635c26
describe
'481729' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNL' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
171b7a9e3904a5f7b04e977431da8bd5
49a5d7b8ef65699996495f2ea08a83983b95f51e
describe
'33990' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNM' 'sip-files00209.pro'
db5636c439ec2ab66f36b11327bc463b
159cfe29209ee05437de2e3042b35c8e65e8df81
describe
'172654' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNN' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
eca82cf336460d067cdee4db0cbd4c92
f95706b766fa633eedd99790c95bbb64f6076b5d
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNO' 'sip-files00209.tif'
60f1b1c5aedf0f0026bfb67ce2e8f70b
780fd61cffb244297a483dc08017596882ef70a6
'2012-05-09T05:53:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNP' 'sip-files00209.txt'
91b4fe25e992f1029bb89969767c7913
22463888786c941ee8c547038cf282a1c3e1bb35
describe
'56910' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNQ' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
088a757b7d587f372317ee19bfb48a30
1560e2fd16cc4a6e017050d4208cc3ff504ba87a
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNR' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
340fc899ae3a6351b474bc282983de0d
e3b42013bb377dc4cce2ad6a3344c42ad8a2dc1b
describe
'485947' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNS' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
fdef5e82329128b02c020b9c1f549770
13c7fd8bd8b093c77e01977de70ab5338ff2be83
'2012-05-09T05:51:43-04:00'
describe
'34352' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNT' 'sip-files00210.pro'
176519d46442dccde7b11296c58ee6d3
32184bf35253eb124c01046d5838849335848c90
describe
'173096' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNU' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
7497d6e5501fc3a6d046d14336ab4139
442b344125f2a1e496613bcd94d164f3e6163e3b
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNV' 'sip-files00210.tif'
85631c1aa8d7d20ef8d92e5ce152456d
9c11e47776015d4d3ef35124119b73b97e2aa216
'2012-05-09T05:47:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNW' 'sip-files00210.txt'
306925e17e90930d83a758f2fb798961
7b1065ac60410b3ba3b5faca7bcfdab96a973a85
describe
'57480' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNX' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
77ed502cfc2f04689bdd2e022c3f82a4
a389b6283162a2fc956fd62b4175a99ae196b671
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNY' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
958a8497691ecd68de32e04b613bf31e
9c68f98658b4f2eab681ebc08a6ef943e94ea45a
describe
'485773' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALNZ' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
f29f5c21d4eff107db81e810268612dd
81640d4b9c4d67b921c55f09dc572161df49e1b7
describe
'33771' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOA' 'sip-files00211.pro'
d48b0b21b5097fb53b5f4890d8b03d42
7b14b80eeda382513ddd3168299b88b2c38826ca
describe
'173570' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOB' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
d591b0ca7ea63f5a7654a3c433be895b
6d8c79a21d81d064b282b7d2ff66968c1753ad82
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOC' 'sip-files00211.tif'
6b266328a6da3972cf37b962ed34aeaa
9b789b76c3372023cb5fe438ae4bb9e7957b7965
'2012-05-09T05:48:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOD' 'sip-files00211.txt'
355a856026100dddb302c45e2ff17af0
2d05f1f9eccbd6e6365592240fa00da49d3a35cf
describe
'57783' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOE' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
d5f2c3b33895d5fd7686a01327728145
9a13de8fd02c75912a766cda9c2a52a096a3be36
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOF' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
07fd480fd1a9122212205356162e50b5
289691828f2a407483d00584cb8f76e20e8db9f2
describe
'483561' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOG' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
b6e65ccd4af6509e7e36086745e9bab0
488ce602fab3c9cf2d13007cbd8b8411fd475eb9
describe
'33565' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOH' 'sip-files00212.pro'
45b8292cb22d2d1d785a1c6bb10745a7
35900256aec3d104a1131f99b50ee6ff2b883699
describe
'170795' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOI' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
7369ff2f683f81bb521d6ab1dfec958b
f00c22725c3c435dd3824daed5d2429ff5a683d4
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOJ' 'sip-files00212.tif'
2b4c1c8baaed145143fc53ca093b3a44
82c1b2bd59a6d0c2f476ba5e4cc7f6ff33f372c0
'2012-05-09T05:45:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOK' 'sip-files00212.txt'
63f9e46660d0f93d06d1f5fa31bc6e26
d52b340ce2a775655fc4591b0ca5bd72a41941c5
describe
'57492' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOL' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
795816ea4e920361afd51075405935c1
a7a7f18951582942f66614f20e299e06c9669533
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOM' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
f875bd7c68bdd95e08f52724a4461eaa
7aa9ab25ded1287224ec7127dbc16a47bbb4cf56
describe
'474142' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALON' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
00ca233fd03c1d87c47b533d2f95f462
542e706fec27ae7c827f752d7b84ee39615d51f1
describe
'32604' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOO' 'sip-files00213.pro'
f5fba294430e8d95164492d3022d895d
4749cc3a093818076b3d787c67a4603d466b3244
describe
'169757' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOP' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
bd4c81525128fc05b5e31277cbcd127c
f26d38a1aee2cb07ad3ce5277b6115a29da29808
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOQ' 'sip-files00213.tif'
506afe34ffe155e44f3323360ee20927
165281218177fe03c4ccdada2b15ef10f173b518
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOR' 'sip-files00213.txt'
90c1a3b7416cc152028a82b4537fbec1
c1a6e6fec3435f578f6320055d9b2f0f5249b6a5
describe
'57513' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOS' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
2878c8ddd718b59df19f7858a9a3b14b
4d96b27b5c4e402414bb71197111ddd0a649bec1
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOT' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
37f33c5ed0d4e7c28d212f8f96d12b06
81fff3f992ede803d4a8c7ba9f84039e4d2796dd
describe
'480432' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOU' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
6ade401984b95608daae18e851b83870
79e57b676cf24b41ad02fecfd8b3822de080447d
describe
'33293' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOV' 'sip-files00214.pro'
c94ec41dece8961d9a10d1820654f6cf
231a74c24c85cff4e72975bb6924438e0cf7ef91
describe
'170089' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOW' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
279b39512c589bba0ad37ec4c2667510
174fc35c8798952a160301376befdde1d39a2dce
'2012-05-09T05:49:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOX' 'sip-files00214.tif'
77cb254cc0acb7dbde29feb06ac2f0ee
59b2f540a1a2f6131cd4efbcbc28858d78c4d1c7
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOY' 'sip-files00214.txt'
c47d4ecb2814e72af121bf6950e2ca5d
7b0c5138ed20fd77b5a5a09e850ac7f163434903
describe
'58143' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALOZ' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
de10494769d5141ea2ff78711f1f88b6
3c7d8053046045a4f2fef21997824b2f625b0ef3
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPA' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
81b5442d121f77e4e3144f85e38adbb0
130857e329e90015bd9ef1db202fdde9d6a0a1c7
describe
'430651' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPB' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
0e4e5d933c0c085471bfe286af4ffd5e
7d151375b273d66dfd08c55a8559d38d85ebbddb
describe
'15163' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPC' 'sip-files00215.pro'
663c7c638cca569d11a9a69cc3e22a45
c9c35725d4f9dedc4fd4bd746b9a97d07f1b88a0
describe
'147016' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPD' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
094b8030c03a90522176e1deea9b28a7
fcc975cd21e9ed903825f14088b287fc48c5819d
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPE' 'sip-files00215.tif'
c918bb0ac5ed6b885731dc54b1dffab5
1bf575bd763f2c696d0287f7fc8b2e61312d0545
describe
'622' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPF' 'sip-files00215.txt'
976da1e445b27372fcd6184f3dec9982
3f3d3a08b2f0d847628457ab5d266f94d1565f39
describe
'51823' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPG' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
f5613af639f1f50115eb57eb1a689694
38ce2b292aecdcdfaa050efbcf04341a648443fd
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPH' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
fe1c8a901ba64313a4c0eecd0e77ac14
229a8ed8ed3d02413f40faf08f69f85f0e028f49
describe
'483897' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPI' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
90cbaeca8e5a37d5a7444c3d9462cbf8
9c8ec08fa05c6ae5e1146b56c6bd672b5c25b3b6
describe
'32791' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPJ' 'sip-files00216.pro'
97584b636164b24af974df6fd6cf4d4f
25abdaf61f866a63f65ebe6f0a5104fdec9e23f3
describe
'170718' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPK' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
4d6d67a4588682e637f8df890379686c
9d1fcb285544dbfd3a2825f012f90065a414eb9c
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPL' 'sip-files00216.tif'
0636e5ed418cf0426e841d5d74f4ddfe
fd7981ce1d38d5c41e8a94a6c0b3ea032236de5c
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPM' 'sip-files00216.txt'
3cdd0ed6ffc0a0b464c3754b7ce841af
f8657779ed8b99af4bc2d14ccd8b6910a220acd1
describe
'57837' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPN' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
dd0abcaa7c573fbe88553245c66bb90a
86b32fcb1a0bd6fde510872c85ca551ea7714aa3
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPO' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
56cb937ba8124716dba536b426f117b8
dd3585070b61d1866417674513cceb5a295c300d
describe
'452417' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPP' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
6d8fd3a643f0d7e2a9cf8fef67dd3ab4
049bc49e636d1765ffa7675aa5301ee739873420
describe
'31698' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPQ' 'sip-files00217.pro'
c60bc97ce6b859f3a5fbfc565150f147
7dbeddf0c3375e977c4e714859103f62cee78445
'2012-05-09T05:51:09-04:00'
describe
'164681' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPR' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
e27d944d61dbd1291d5e2fee2047dd37
e6777c2b3496b34584a61774682956083b206d02
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPS' 'sip-files00217.tif'
fc55c53f8fe722a0ff5f97ed6b242a06
611f0c73cd3c6d613845b2923975b4e55cbda311
describe
'1272' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPT' 'sip-files00217.txt'
d5ae879102d5311e74ae6709478b9d44
0dac3ab3aa041e84289b144098c5e987d5339f0f
describe
'56826' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPU' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
29ad8025c9154f914a66a1249613dff6
7beaee5ea4ed000cdabd7ce49d5e0cdcd76909a4
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPV' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
01c3dfd5f4c117f515807d79720e8c1e
a59b48cf14ca94c41586544deaec38c86eff0bbc
'2012-05-09T05:50:17-04:00'
describe
'461378' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPW' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
82bad25371e22e9e65fa11d1c541a444
c5a8b7042e0cc44dd0567fabcf05d49ae07637d9
'2012-05-09T05:44:51-04:00'
describe
'31647' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPX' 'sip-files00218.pro'
61d0233f154a720336457d2f4bb63631
aa57793e024b5303eb90c746eb92d40aeaf7d1e9
describe
'166307' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPY' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
4ee9625cd63c0d717c01c334aa3ba876
eb27bcd20a57b715ee3c04257536be09f568f694
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALPZ' 'sip-files00218.tif'
809b32ae210d5e502b3b2152f516455b
72fac95dda51875e85d09c84f8fefc222d848499
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQA' 'sip-files00218.txt'
51fa1ed30a84bd49b82b9f83cd076ec8
0ccb05cf0737bcebe9057803a569cbf387eac9b1
'2012-05-09T05:50:04-04:00'
describe
'57272' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQB' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
1dfb8a259eeb0aaccba5256eea2e6869
45318a49d64d01f5a377ec517fa2319bd050e189
describe
'1305524' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQC' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
e804b255dbbd20e0c7720110945107d2
5ae99faff7d427f489cd07796ded7cf775f0a752
describe
'469994' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQD' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
1335c0ec60c7bfa358b615744d26b001
24a1fc7f6e9567efb384c7cef7222d4b6f801ae0
describe
'32438' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQE' 'sip-files00219.pro'
0e8028a4ccc95930d44e283e37796c16
381aa0447b1cb5f5e3e93511f83599e36f8239a7
describe
'167614' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQF' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
1ecb19b313f6f7e22b28d8e401f3b0a4
b57310f7b6644e2a56a0c7d2a281437d04d451dd
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQG' 'sip-files00219.tif'
4954f3fb3cd016af1314b80e4befb190
82a8b6e193635e2b091471a20830c32d0c1e329e
'2012-05-09T05:50:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQH' 'sip-files00219.txt'
66b8d32f090406a89ef3e34e4f62be70
1d125462a406ebbca347f3348257cfc344696158
describe
'56575' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQI' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
9fdcb7f4fbe73448c7c46e838d665d44
55f64a89d62d57b9b24a6dc4ac13e9d976515466
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQJ' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
1b9bda29850b77899c5d6eca706d73a0
3acca3e8e586b1add0cfa697372425ceb1bfbc1c
describe
'486359' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQK' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
b1c30848acfb2d8d8aef32be48d4d6e0
5f71f60efcca1ea9f88186e54071e6f245ac2a9a
describe
'34368' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQL' 'sip-files00220.pro'
fce4272cdfa0732ad9dd9708d63aaeaa
544acccfc0600d9ddb518c3501053de6b6317503
describe
'173443' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQM' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
d8a0657deaf0b747c99bc9bcfe834112
991c591149481987ade09e00d5df5ddf4d890d39
'2012-05-09T05:50:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQN' 'sip-files00220.tif'
9e1139ec1cb47d83b6bcce8111cc8cff
baad6fa7df68861aee76f418aff0922372f75f87
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQO' 'sip-files00220.txt'
7a06e9abb4651e3b5fe10680ff4381a9
8e17723cd836a0b2fb591501dffbabce696f464b
describe
'56788' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQP' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
bb301b2e228f7b519341674f04a439c6
cf96483451d0a378dab332f4614bf2d0235a3165
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQQ' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
b815e025c20c582bd4bf3c4b6cc52a80
28951f9e0d4cc97a62752e7e4e1b1743fa98853a
describe
'350927' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQR' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
8ee68ccef5dec855eded5e808d51faca
47be08a37d37c4de4e88c012f48d951e1048fe10
describe
'6576' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQS' 'sip-files00221.pro'
79144b5c05d238eafe5b307ee5ce7685
56160e56045c03092847aee28ff844db3fa210b6
describe
'117429' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQT' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
cc5ca9d934ebc0a17f43256913d3ed65
25432ce8b549a3dd8d7f2131309fd2efa09ded7c
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQU' 'sip-files00221.tif'
6317baa4f040f64c55b0f8ea2671d427
fcda29b3428e08d2e54c83c381242a44384d1ce5
describe
'264' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQV' 'sip-files00221.txt'
4329a3b865f7676a187d9756f9a9dec1
d63cd332bfdfa8612766c4976accc7ea03fb42fd
describe
'44669' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQW' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
ff56e0a802f5941e30f1dc3f67ef112d
23ccda4f2b09ad92ed34ce79d4dbf37355d5b8ca
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQX' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
2dbf5ddd490a704af79692337a06ac5b
10c95b2719d4b696fae6a4c56c0032fcb9a126bd
describe
'431811' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQY' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
409c1a58c5c2606853c333a36b784aae
d952e7ec2e5e5aac97a32ed81396684c0fb6e409
describe
'22109' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALQZ' 'sip-files00222.pro'
ffd60eaf36a88f78a3e93e8aab34c6ee
f51614f963855a38c55e8cdce451868cb7f59943
describe
'151604' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRA' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
4eb250c1c521140b13d2873741afae9f
50b9c78ba150f9808833063872cd201329f17f34
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRB' 'sip-files00222.tif'
99974037161bd3b5ce94a0c3dfb1e70f
f17eb0eb5bf12dcdbe1c8d5eb547515a0cde3154
describe
'938' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRC' 'sip-files00222.txt'
fbedf68b9cdc935b05cd0715c14dae51
7ec73749af511ae8e464642c13cb7a332a1f8b5c
describe
'52442' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRD' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
4d571589e18cf31e5a334864e63e0524
1ddf3b1708b63a795588345fea7f7d6036236048
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRE' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
4847b09c15de8d0fdb0d74454742ab4e
a1ba763d6561931abf90220e067542491caf29f8
describe
'467618' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRF' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
136460a20c95b8952c1604c0a84c63b2
79265d30851b8992659421a28c1797932af8fe44
describe
'31781' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRG' 'sip-files00223.pro'
c888fea55df62ba8096da7d6c1d49499
0e1b0f7a62458d45b09b5c904265411d32d266c3
'2012-05-09T05:49:31-04:00'
describe
'166863' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRH' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
91e833ed037c72e30e8cd30312aaa05f
869cb9e87addb972f86ec54c48f0912d9571f77e
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRI' 'sip-files00223.tif'
a79ecfd6b65abde27de5eec79ca01248
c07b4dd889587dc6a5de6060063f64e49d3addec
'2012-05-09T05:45:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRJ' 'sip-files00223.txt'
2670ba3620d85783ea8ad9ac64da461d
b5b29668b04edbd33b4db10c0a4738db51252b7b
describe
'56085' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRK' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
e1e016b427f6b2662de8638137f378d8
3c1e8e7fe33a07360780184c64c1f050dd8f71e0
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRL' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
a462ce7a628367a025f2da9fa0e573ab
764267933b55b10c0246ccc0ae19fdc2f2b2e628
'2012-05-09T05:51:56-04:00'
describe
'485405' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRM' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
c4e700db9500436339df74c62bb13536
f224231f49bc0e336731f6acf1585f4f1d80dd33
'2012-05-09T05:49:20-04:00'
describe
'34252' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRN' 'sip-files00224.pro'
ea8d958973f0a744e06201599addd81f
1334694b60d9d38f6bed5ab1d8dc84c3db67c40d
describe
'172191' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRO' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
2b57059176c6f98651a2faba318f8ad5
70c02c44591812b4d2f91702b731257dee402a08
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRP' 'sip-files00224.tif'
154f571eb682303ce3ce445a17b71f74
b78cd34f76a0926b0843ad2f053f284bdd4240d9
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRQ' 'sip-files00224.txt'
053cbfa00b43ad17ccb934210e1c5166
db49fd4ddfb3c85299929932527914c27991c8c0
describe
'57965' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRR' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
5c69eab1d93b936a2fb5bedea0473ade
88690851e6c7a48bf7538c330544789b7a58fcce
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRS' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
7329e82434efecff37da668000d9c5e1
a09041f6340baff20152e03eae3ee56bf5ee38f7
describe
'481684' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRT' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
6986dd130a6e825b71a2f0cff52e2d8e
293a3b18c665970c704933152d8aa7425277785f
describe
'33288' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRU' 'sip-files00225.pro'
be19577eeea372ab9335681c513dfc4d
bcd4b3f9d261a12687dec53feb55ba9301a25ec9
describe
'170290' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRV' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
e95d586667042fd2d7c302e9e70f11fd
a98ebcc59738f6e3b6bb347517aec2bb0df2fff4
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRW' 'sip-files00225.tif'
7f61a17599bcdfd6c4a90abff50890fe
c5efcaf6698517cd7c96a27fa770e5b6d593424b
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRX' 'sip-files00225.txt'
12f71c470f7b484d6eb2716d8a50917c
3baf1d580e49ee0532663da87f406ab58ab0c04a
'2012-05-09T05:47:11-04:00'
describe
'57606' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRY' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
e76635c59ab979348fca8c808f6634ff
217b187f75f7cc9b70aa4f2558fc251cd72c93cc
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALRZ' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
4039cf8c0c6992fa3af7c2fee22e7aab
b0bcd8cee765cab7c15c4ddfb521d0f0bafc39f1
describe
'485075' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSA' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
4dffca5b56ff189b1653b64f53560739
4ba50904c200486d95b3bbf1e44437547d01a30f
describe
'34186' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSB' 'sip-files00226.pro'
7ba46bdc7f305b68f14352c8a6dca54d
98e1df4a50ae2f988e7229f748e83c6a4838cfe4
describe
'175907' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSC' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
5938e3fedea8c272da01187090eba600
06a0701394fb60c4ab919a1124d4cec69bcc9349
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSD' 'sip-files00226.tif'
f04377f165aaa7673b3a85d5745c5f95
c94dd85d2d06dfebcf70d5632e66614d947dc919
'2012-05-09T05:55:46-04:00'
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSE' 'sip-files00226.txt'
dc037447df3ccc2bea88a3c30c533d41
33261d8f2e689d6fbb9a25bdbfbc90a505d8b18f
describe
'58132' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSF' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
39b549d63aa7f05db69623384e05a5eb
d6503b678eb2665795d1bb0923d3a640e5dd2668
describe
'1305503' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSG' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
65fb28a73bc0a8c31c88df26d0ac1511
e7dbdc68618d8bc124088f8f966005f06c65dfaa
describe
'473967' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSH' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
ea8425fa2327384ae21902434434b257
520c94283e68a680d943966960b094c9861a07ea
'2012-05-09T05:51:37-04:00'
describe
'32730' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSI' 'sip-files00227.pro'
622fa526505d32321dcfa5322b05e48d
83835bce5f84c80eb03b465e6d83f0895c3b008d
describe
'170391' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSJ' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
369e7925b7c4fd1d037f17f573677506
92b1902a310a3361ef62f0c4b936def27b3ae590
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSK' 'sip-files00227.tif'
6ab412f6dc4cffe71a8b550eef252bfe
6edc4253393233e289fae6771fd735cb38d39835
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSL' 'sip-files00227.txt'
8b94aa3e5e63e886e1a32a1fc7f026b6
af768a38e8d57fd3062120a8643125aae0eb8c6c
describe
'57406' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSM' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
65cf5cda38725e6b718ca81949dc0bf2
e8de70e7fea25e23d428daccebaf9a480455c27a
'2012-05-09T05:52:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSN' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
a066ebd4292749a915e2f93a28ea08e9
487abfab57734cfc95971b3d0cf6f74d20452ff0
describe
'475920' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSO' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
f948dd241d5d4495ea84c4b539c97c6b
ad0c8c13663f5f381f93fd60ff86a1c7e6298060
describe
'33327' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSP' 'sip-files00228.pro'
722cb70a1f482ceb6840bbc9a4d52986
9bc7803fd03eacca1e8c9599d0172966398fde02
describe
'168525' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSQ' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
c36a0e43c598aabea6d133a0c902e8c5
4e16f661a218129529c1b194cbcc0e566a64d5e5
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSR' 'sip-files00228.tif'
e084bf5c7691b599cfe0924624bd8be0
f6df600e27c572b2ba8353158e5fce4c65dfb8ae
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSS' 'sip-files00228.txt'
a4f249c421937e2a4f3e45fdbc70693f
9989433fb93a808eeb10337cf489edaf6f8c5965
describe
'56807' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALST' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
f10a05f183df86facf8094dfc1dad247
0ff57740420bee29eedcea4958e5c5e78a2a5bed
describe
'1305396' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSU' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
f1e458b2a3ca8d7e4c94ff32d8dda9f6
2d26ad885f2009add7b59bb4927d54b54b350238
describe
'471109' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSV' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
93f695d75047fa7d0b48cdd47e031b42
0540d72dc3c6dade4511d89533ca9b001136d9fe
describe
'32919' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSW' 'sip-files00229.pro'
35488abcdb371cad55a2179e88466f08
64811be195bcc04befc763ec981e0dfc48b90982
describe
'169446' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSX' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
4ffa500811c667ca9ff550e58c382aa1
09356782c3b5886f777623f4e123ae001a2bd9b9
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSY' 'sip-files00229.tif'
efab379ae7acfede52dd21a47079645a
12951c8807e26c72efdc478d5ff8fec8172a4eb6
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALSZ' 'sip-files00229.txt'
f9a9e63ed6c95d84548f51720a9e934e
ef27b77c06c51ef4516828d25b15cfe423fe1f2e
'2012-05-09T05:48:23-04:00'
describe
'57703' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTA' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
bef6867debf2c3bc106c31055ed91d44
4ded29a5d655e0ffd6d5fa12edfe62eabbd11809
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTB' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
8333f905e3f999ed5b353f533feba02b
f037d0e151e8437a750efc297fa65c6defa15c8c
describe
'421499' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTC' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
1e21fe2699653e75bbe1133bbdf4cc8c
7843654ce1aa1f1226400df609f9f007dc13e554
describe
'141860' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTD' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
541913ea5a414ec3c1f5488cff1a1ef6
f632bf1f5f4519a7692b4e28eed89e4760d35e89
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTE' 'sip-files00230.tif'
fab6a7ff36e92414d9b7a68d5870a7a5
754722e7df6ff9f15d0bfa5299843accab06edd0
describe
'51027' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTF' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
b0dca4d77982e2feeff3674f9247ad8b
c0c32a669152ab25d19f4bef7f658692478ade29
describe
'1270641' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTG' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
32005f39eef8b8ef027384defaffe82f
7a682bdc272f509df795f6c2bed9f706b8708f7f
describe
'489426' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTH' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
cd0fc79e170c507afea0abcf4ae721a1
cdc85d3a35bd132dd73414fdea1e2fa43ec3bac9
describe
'33309' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTI' 'sip-files00231.pro'
23fdb0f3dd36af11a936770f6ef33a07
add54070195f698fbc790d80f1f8bd0c67200e34
describe
'174607' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTJ' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
84938166aead0cf666462fc5cfa4edef
af2bce648f6e2da413f7b1281747a2bb56ef7c29
describe
'10181976' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTK' 'sip-files00231.tif'
8e9dfce619dc14fc4d583a72763457da
23f46ac29aed8202c1f3e3d08252871e9181ab25
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTL' 'sip-files00231.txt'
70b15a452a91000550effb81da9ab05f
384307665ee18b55695106021660bc60ffc0a5cf
describe
'59139' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTM' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
27261ebb843e4eca330c3d892a55dda6
fa9f203e12399df3f198a1b21196469fb47d821e
describe
'1340448' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTN' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
3070dc7c4acc2f85659fc74939d9f6d6
ab2239388e057d509359d0f4fb9e4acc40f046c5
describe
'472738' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTO' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
ac25d1fb934e2d0a1bf0db737580cd87
c7b73471b8b85ef3f21f42c897c4ccb93385c155
describe
'33725' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTP' 'sip-files00232.pro'
e389a1d4cafb01df1dcf37cf25c10a8b
6404764bf7c069b121ccb1647662a59c5adf9313
describe
'169136' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTQ' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
4616a2b39bb107508745ec7dfd3a36fe
a8b268e762dcf11f858e6e261e03ff2e931eb172
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTR' 'sip-files00232.tif'
77d2ab63e764a9c8b7644f6cf6663a5f
0b6581ec7b957230ee28074243cff2c0dc3f0405
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTS' 'sip-files00232.txt'
45c378873029b60d71531a7375df78ef
4ea0198d5f5f653c037839e771b2f755aa42ef3b
describe
'55364' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTT' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
42d7250b48d95c618600f94c1bab8d85
a519f61f0377f653d623e1abe7c0bdf52b97a676
describe
'1294080' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTU' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
1efcb55906762d26b6822976facfb019
2513844427e0e7bd978248b4c8a56ce33ce7c28d
describe
'464103' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTV' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
ec5282888d23dfa804bbb55517250397
b3ff4692cb29975853cf6135836a66d49c040d6d
describe
'31917' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTW' 'sip-files00233.pro'
370a8e92e30deb758d71d69e3b899b1e
785233b29594fb661f910bd70d882d997f7761a1
describe
'165344' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTX' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
0d1d19a3eb73199cba191e834998c309
9bde9937a8540f121e6f1fccd764d603a792cc3e
describe
'10369384' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTY' 'sip-files00233.tif'
66d239d13c621db00780dafa25d5da2e
9d4d8e848dd72db971b22a46d4d3e71b4689e687
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALTZ' 'sip-files00233.txt'
c1ba328cf00a1531480877a95959f631
34b6ca1985aeff9afbeeace023537f3dee0b9cc2
describe
'55115' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUA' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
a03740f8d45641fcf1e1c3175127b38d
26bd8b4cb79a8c94a3bdd32f087f72d9ef8bf2d0
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUB' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
ddeea3957420dd192566c6814c67d611
7ef482cbaa5116c68bf979797e6db030556fdac2
describe
'314776' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUC' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
1a0aa68ce8e1486c8c213c421434968c
1e04ed8acbf53f0843227fb5de1ab66ab130211a
describe
'13123' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUD' 'sip-files00234.pro'
9256111c8f0dbf2ea0fde6fa94c1c7ae
8944e01b7e5f54c54d1649ae317ebc1975077efa
describe
'108484' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUE' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
18dfb6aaaa0613880e7548b6850c5614
895ab3b590c707ad4b16870c43e6b7f6b73d51dd
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUF' 'sip-files00234.tif'
e3f574982e832807fd7e8d519c465416
8071a642deca153d94cbdf82bbf0f7c223b4b9ab
describe
'530' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUG' 'sip-files00234.txt'
b709b878e6e9458672fdba1294630b1e
e5bcb2fc882160c4320fe7c77adc0e43f9f4d769
describe
'40778' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUH' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
0340adc8e3b3d46b38609f7666efaf18
aadc454e09f028150389471cba452cc7fbba9bac
describe
'1289082' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUI' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
3f99de5ea2fc61987347cc4429872abf
a4d9c7b62213a7dc1e928bf104aa4799195580c3
describe
'417654' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUJ' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
2e6685a762d05492c6f4890987f53660
3b5e61aca03710b39116f6ab7618e4a17d1edc52
describe
'21676' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUK' 'sip-files00235.pro'
67b228df635bf45ec50cf33a80476949
0a06bce609f4a62acf4c28938f125b4016e5ab10
describe
'147275' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUL' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
a665926c04f5db55467eaa77097898ec
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describe
'10329404' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUM' 'sip-files00235.tif'
6f3368d76117d196029e029d7b8c11aa
f5df0d124d867cde3799e14db037bb495c75b87d
describe
'905' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUN' 'sip-files00235.txt'
042b2f6fef7069374427f51ac8ae0217
c501296a8a2b75585b8b7664214f50c25fbaa784
describe
'51414' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUO' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
1ebf42bf4118d2c0663da5bf881d7e16
0501e5f7068fe165f79e1308b72bb4a6279f77ed
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUP' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
9e9995280938c2c3aee33c14cb35c670
fc2b80787e3216af6c338e57bf550470f45b5f7a
describe
'478655' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUQ' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
9fb3853a34abdbaaddb7f0a79514b03c
ba1e7d919561bd3af0befc8a63852b471cdd8f5e
describe
'33237' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUR' 'sip-files00236.pro'
afd995fbd4d1b6b8ecb176d103666fd8
d155c190dbebe3e8402c5bfcd5a207220f2d66e7
describe
'171322' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUS' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
f69ebc16865dd6971de18f3efd60368b
04ac379a80b194e2d7c326f09906294c87403591
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUT' 'sip-files00236.tif'
ba49c30c9d660ba02c60d9dea120ef0b
9f4a38a037f3767ea6129639b98b6a485314a7cc
describe
'1342' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUU' 'sip-files00236.txt'
8f0267acedc136dcc8fd79b8c58754b6
bfc3b67c8a425b07b303b65cbe68a029870cedc9
describe
'56601' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUV' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
9db5b3f258f91416d09e0cfe6325dc45
2024fdeb8f7408bca0cb95ce6362effb8e07536a
describe
'1274725' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUW' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
5e3f2e06aa552e59270d7e67858860aa
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describe
'479234' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUX' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUY' 'sip-files00237.pro'
7681f897768d4e9cfe2666cae7b8c951
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describe
'172504' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALUZ' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
f1bb69c2bb84cd86d1f94c9b83c629d5
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describe
'10214912' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVA' 'sip-files00237.tif'
e92728f90054481e243f0da4120eff4f
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVB' 'sip-files00237.txt'
19f9be1a3f8389d3fffd7a38dc23b759
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describe
'56890' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVC' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
edca47ab32e4acb9099dd09cc60d437d
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVD' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
f0e69a42bd813cbfe9435a379f94d1c1
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describe
'477645' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVE' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
abeb0b52d28a1b74534eb4eca85f39cf
033fc48bea34b66894182fcfaa6eb71d5fee4dc1
describe
'34343' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVF' 'sip-files00238.pro'
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describe
'169680' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVG' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVH' 'sip-files00238.tif'
366313dcd933f4839caf13c9915efaef
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describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVI' 'sip-files00238.txt'
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describe
'57043' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVJ' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
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describe
'1279347' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVK' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
1e26e10b51de1c2ceb39c207f453e6f7
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describe
'492680' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVL' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
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describe
'34378' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVM' 'sip-files00239.pro'
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describe
'173857' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVN' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
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describe
'10251616' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVO' 'sip-files00239.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVP' 'sip-files00239.txt'
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describe
'57298' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVQ' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
7f20e6ee7f08dc6db9fa9d71ef975c14
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describe
'1345092' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVR' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
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describe
'475309' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVS' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
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describe
'146031' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVT' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVU' 'sip-files00240.tif'
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describe
'51607' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVV' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
1cbc7e197d5479f57d553fab0622a7e7
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describe
'1265114' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVW' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
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describe
'487264' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVX' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
7aa54bb6085d28f1da20a499c6565a4b
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVY' 'sip-files00241.pro'
bf2098e210eac88025ebb763b1c27bb5
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describe
'174219' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALVZ' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
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describe
'10137720' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWA' 'sip-files00241.tif'
d5e227c18d18d289bafb062ed812cfca
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWB' 'sip-files00241.txt'
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describe
'57764' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWC' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
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describe
'1361738' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWD' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
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describe
'451002' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWE' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
9cb839105d22495dcaa9cb8b1a4b1574
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describe
'32776' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWF' 'sip-files00242.pro'
ae877b91a9728a372b6fa6243633cd68
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describe
'159799' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWG' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
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describe
'10910840' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWH' 'sip-files00242.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWI' 'sip-files00242.txt'
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describe
'55284' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWJ' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
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describe
'1254924' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWK' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
1187065e0985e4dac399b5bcc66b98ec
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describe
'490329' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWL' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
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describe
'33956' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWM' 'sip-files00243.pro'
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describe
'177028' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWN' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
da1c6a08eec07bd2d01cb3215e464edd
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describe
'10056536' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWO' 'sip-files00243.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWP' 'sip-files00243.txt'
0a4dcf5d8a41c4667a5045e764a101d0
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describe
'57253' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWQ' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
7dd496f0499ac5c8758ab323400025d4
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWR' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
9ca6b0b9c2bcbf8df03adb1dcaba5c35
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describe
'476027' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWS' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
7120dd295bfc634aa439cc28e0300f11
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describe
'32849' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWT' 'sip-files00244.pro'
c34affac81dc5d796eca227ee35f6399
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describe
'169585' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWU' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
70f13c62e3b1907264966e3aa97a0b64
39237349975291517fbfc682262e0ce77e4a7f12
'2012-05-09T05:55:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWV' 'sip-files00244.tif'
55dd8d1866fa2b0f175d276c7474cc59
1eed41ceb85614d75f212d774919e080c7765c4f
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWW' 'sip-files00244.txt'
ab7366731a038b07637751ac76af7247
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describe
'56773' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWX' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
ec0738194150b5f0050f134e3ab0a801
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describe
'1264614' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWY' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
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describe
'484483' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALWZ' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
4857942b4009beaa076e8c5fc8d2bb01
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describe
'33451' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXA' 'sip-files00245.pro'
c7d2ef3046f3734f041e02070c61c638
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describe
'171511' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXB' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
05c0f155ab9150c931c40353770a6da0
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describe
'10133756' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXC' 'sip-files00245.tif'
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describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXD' 'sip-files00245.txt'
8fdbffc42c05ff033f8913c5b719611d
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describe
'56694' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXE' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXF' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
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describe
'487569' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXG' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
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describe
'160149' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXH' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
27dc4f7ba54e3ee8d3fc7085ec00ee83
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXI' 'sip-files00246.tif'
7f6524b9b2aefb3e78a2770f1f3a3c2c
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describe
'54902' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXJ' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
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describe
'1283982' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXK' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
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describe
'487221' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXL' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
13c6ea77c79cd527c03c3f5c8f75e64f
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describe
'32918' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXM' 'sip-files00247.pro'
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describe
'174635' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXN' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
de5a0e6ac9fa1a18603d38813510b3db
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describe
'10288608' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXO' 'sip-files00247.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXP' 'sip-files00247.txt'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXQ' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXR' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
6fd4f9cf567e88f686ca1811e697e731
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describe
'482588' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXS' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
6cbf0dcad2cfbaf1611a0a02dc75efd4
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describe
'33788' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXT' 'sip-files00248.pro'
3a981cf9f321470a46e2602f2a7e8617
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describe
'172364' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXU' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
8193437ee3849807a5bdd52ff18f8be0
addfd77141945f703d41ada389770a07ccfd105e
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXV' 'sip-files00248.tif'
cb059427320353a217d6ebcd7e57452d
43760c002dcc4859943c2aefdccb243c3155d201
'2012-05-09T05:48:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXW' 'sip-files00248.txt'
ce24e76fbd2f6c2b015ca71a6af6cd1b
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describe
'57496' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXX' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
dddc540c651532d5d28b0bddbb5de7bb
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describe
'1288719' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXY' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
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describe
'486356' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALXZ' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
f46ab2a03a9c499955f350f4ceb6b00e
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYA' 'sip-files00249.pro'
45584bda6211b1cf28cb717b668b4c65
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describe
'173082' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYB' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
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describe
'10326608' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYC' 'sip-files00249.tif'
f2a148646f57145103f77a19e8f3d1f5
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'2012-05-09T05:53:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYD' 'sip-files00249.txt'
8ae35f55301876fad38a23b8981257b9
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describe
'57702' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYE' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
8d4aac7e2b754a52ec67d8736bee9e11
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYF' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
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describe
'479837' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYG' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
35416fea065c5ce5024443c31eafef9a
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describe
'33208' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYH' 'sip-files00250.pro'
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describe
'171362' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYI' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
39d335280dbe547a2198597c823cff3f
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYJ' 'sip-files00250.tif'
d5bb8f7db83e7be8c2b639d7f0f1ad2a
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYK' 'sip-files00250.txt'
7769dadd4990ff67892b5e5f9a1f0318
c549d1a003b61790388542b5d7cb56147f01bd3c
describe
'57078' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYL' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
32353cc6164d3db0882ee1a6fa83e3f1
441c2063ac7cd74f6296cb71485dff62a5e1b2a9
describe
'1289983' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYM' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
e7ef893368a7c0c30e874e1d49672aa8
fe3da865aa66eb8695da21b384c983acb0d01686
describe
'486336' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYN' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
f778f2d25e3083b381f0f9cba80e0bb1
039e46ea8bf49ec984b6b3a61a3c71965eca5577
describe
'33934' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYO' 'sip-files00251.pro'
ca4591ed4456c4cfdb2a227f79e14960
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describe
'174696' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYP' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
66b97c197274098ffcab54ce90ad8103
f406a4c5b3b96a790f21e91dbf36c56edb235f56
describe
'10336712' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYQ' 'sip-files00251.tif'
313fe237662d5088c8439cd92a8ee9d7
8c332aeee804a1e82f28c3b2950e8271ebb2dc0d
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYR' 'sip-files00251.txt'
edc6f63f8efa5c0e4e8745d1b81ff96e
a5b6c831ddc57c9f351352286af708a4f5bb1f93
describe
'57917' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYS' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
f27c647c70d8d6512b9a4e88b5c86142
36f4b42fe55a415b7cf816bf35dab58b635f89ac
'2012-05-09T05:52:58-04:00'
describe
'1350791' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYT' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
30717de59a735c0b2c4f1196c236deef
ae1bf64aad81bdd4db5480e5e09858f9a4cd2026
describe
'461593' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYU' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
e3b45ee9a5a888a27f2717c2eb97cab2
ffea89e4560212d6354dbad092651f245aa89551
describe
'33368' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYV' 'sip-files00252.pro'
472ce043e6aae57daac5f38083a4b98e
2a98759da5d0c489ecc8384a34f901ed4669e340
describe
'166597' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYW' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
450576f603cd0d7f72d34967de07863f
3787a7760ac8fb5863ed7e57526a68173eb52fd3
describe
'10823312' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYX' 'sip-files00252.tif'
1234ef4ac7dba7eeac7b6da02f40f036
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYY' 'sip-files00252.txt'
db5869793f8cbb92dda917149809e612
6e2b0c18552456b326a669b5a3e8997c9ae43147
describe
'56230' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALYZ' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
17373ff327e8669bf1cf8fb7782595a1
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describe
'1278673' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZA' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
8b764f71bc3ed71ec73fcb99590d78fa
1845560c9978031925ad176ffa639e4a3567beb4
describe
'491334' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZB' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
1aeb3441736bd9fe2082b0bf2f65ccc1
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describe
'34240' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZC' 'sip-files00253.pro'
4770365aa16175fb1f3773d2b709ae74
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describe
'176923' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZD' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
a62c559861b21c4d69c2aa78102a3d0d
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describe
'10246468' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZE' 'sip-files00253.tif'
6932747133598c307e65cb1cc2febe08
0d8e9d0abc58d5b281e2bb500515b578371aeabd
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZF' 'sip-files00253.txt'
fa7caa0e5bc96d31c210f35821408ef8
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describe
'58313' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZG' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
3c7c789ce6d32c5396f45cb66096a9ee
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZH' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
131977e356fe114d1a47795899fe187c
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describe
'477947' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZI' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
cff2f03f2b9fe08138110b1222a64aca
0b438958bf28c3d0c641914e0238e58a3a92e9f5
describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZJ' 'sip-files00254.pro'
a148810c6ba83a7c4128f02b6fc76d70
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describe
'169435' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZK' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
9b83722a27df8f0f60cf1e7728dc4421
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZL' 'sip-files00254.tif'
0befca44db86e4cb35d80e190850d8e1
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZM' 'sip-files00254.txt'
0302bbc3074f22c3aa20c6b113782e88
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describe
'56736' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZN' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
b7c0e1ee66447c19014a46a0e5c1e23d
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describe
'1288552' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZO' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
10468d379e89386e0de5975468ebc904
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describe
'482939' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZP' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
48a8fa6ff3189254bccdc90a7005685a
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describe
'33621' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZQ' 'sip-files00255.pro'
461e9c4637fb5e2a92aea6312ea34c6e
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describe
'174803' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZR' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
e984e5789c20172fc4cc2863e06428b1
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describe
'10325424' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZS' 'sip-files00255.tif'
5434ccd4dfeeb6e8bf1d79413acab574
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZT' 'sip-files00255.txt'
7d5130c15abbdb0e011725b28abdd08d
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describe
'56735' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZU' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
8b3b3dfccfdd47ed4fb753755b622eaa
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZV' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
0e7d72a4a9d4c9ee0ee982de9c4610f3
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describe
'396020' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZW' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
31413fb0f08de5ea03655b24ddc3d763
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describe
'129650' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZX' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
768bcb2a4d6c58c11568dbf3c9f83743
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZY' 'sip-files00256.tif'
7bb2b56d2bbc0ec98873fa83f5cda1d5
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describe
'47349' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAALZZ' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
7f11d065556369595a9625e14355a351
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describe
'1265668' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAA' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
da76cae2c9031ff42334ed19726ca609
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describe
'297107' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAB' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
a5722f01ec5455b94c7e19133732f49a
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describe
'10751' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAC' 'sip-files00257.pro'
b44d6d5e7b6627d941230568ab6eebda
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describe
'102358' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAD' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
8da14bc95d7d0180bce3f646cf4991c3
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describe
'10208372' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAE' 'sip-files00257.tif'
c0c4b601f1d5f9c017123eeac8d44341
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describe
'429' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAF' 'sip-files00257.txt'
86ecd8afcbdd718b2d5cef2b9115ca7e
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describe
'39028' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAG' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
940d4a50e35a1a2bf13ddb2d7df34177
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describe
'1357273' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAH' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
2d5fbccf9d5d58bb8e607c7bc1aba69b
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describe
'339299' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAI' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
ecf764abf2b3441538dc0b7466885b80
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describe
'24602' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAJ' 'sip-files00258.pro'
e82a31f936c12ea01d930fe5fa2557ff
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describe
'117382' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAK' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
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describe
'10875792' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAL' 'sip-files00258.tif'
6c5c2362a0a02c4df4ec392b054507a1
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describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAM' 'sip-files00258.txt'
e2c4a644d6df0364d30fb3729e0e27c9
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describe
'43598' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAN' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
9888498d7be78e2b80312f2fde49e296
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describe
'1274450' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAO' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
a66f8e418ed069cab3fe207391064f11
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describe
'418302' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAP' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
c3cab5589ad41a4d0b18321a9729d31f
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describe
'36530' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAQ' 'sip-files00259.pro'
a6a805df0167bff7f2ccafeb4eadcc43
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describe
'144176' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAR' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
ba4d50b451ff5e23bfb4331bc11c4f41
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describe
'10212344' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAS' 'sip-files00259.tif'
f7cb84069d4dbc5fd1eb26e3a6baf95b
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describe
'1635' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAT' 'sip-files00259.txt'
cc0dc0663c45f125a91b0138465e6530
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describe
'50881' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAU' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
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describe
'1137143' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAV' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
6a962c4a0aaab751543b5ae0bf838544
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describe
'229361' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAW' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
fab4d3c4e701cdcd90c5005b8c66d771
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describe
'27223' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAX' 'sip-files00260.pro'
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describe
'94251' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAY' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
0c21ebb1f82af2a7bcbeca4c982159f9
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMAZ' 'sip-files00260.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBA' 'sip-files00260.txt'
73e4661a1935084f4dff0ce69ea2bfad
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describe
'40158' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBB' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
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describe
'1269196' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBC' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
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describe
'453412' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBD' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
0c97f814eca3169ad7f9edf16f5c51ed
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describe
'41066' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBE' 'sip-files00261.pro'
478bb68a7e15727f48996e8e8a7b50e5
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describe
'155812' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBF' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
572f3c8b8943385f1ee6d1be3fcc83db
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describe
'10170328' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBG' 'sip-files00261.tif'
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describe
'1814' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBH' 'sip-files00261.txt'
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describe
'53032' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBI' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
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describe
'1359527' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBJ' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
7da52c362f0e04f0ce4bcbfa9b5adaa5
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describe
'390759' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBK' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
dcaf6f38a59cc265e0882974993e0793
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describe
'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBL' 'sip-files00262.pro'
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describe
'133718' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBM' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
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describe
'10893312' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBN' 'sip-files00262.tif'
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describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBO' 'sip-files00262.txt'
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describe
'48166' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBP' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
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describe
'1269326' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBQ' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
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describe
'311233' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBR' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
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describe
'16917' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBS' 'sip-files00263.pro'
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describe
'104663' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBT' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
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describe
'10172888' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBU' 'sip-files00263.tif'
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describe
'736' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBV' 'sip-files00263.txt'
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describe
'40043' 'info:fdaE20091226_AAAAALfileF20091226_AAAMBW' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
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Gulliver's ‘Travels

A Voyage to Lilliput
and A Voyage to
Brobdingnag |








By
Jonathan_Swift,D.D.
(Lemuel Gulliver )

First a Surgeon and then
a Gaptain of Several Ships




\ Edited by Edward K.Robinson
\\ Illustrated by Charles Copeland __

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COPYRIGHT, 1914, BY GINN AND COMPANY
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

515-11

The Atheneum Press

GINN AND COMPANY: PRO-
PRIETORS + BOSTON: U.S.A.
PREPACE

by Jonathan_Swift as a satire upon the
people and customs of his time, but: it
" was unquestionably the fascinating originality of
the tale, rather than its keen satire, which won
widespread interest immediately upon publication.
Members of the royal family read the book and
avowed their admiration for it, although some of
them came in for a share of the ridicule that
abounded throughout its pages. Others of lower
rank read it with equal enjoyment, although in
some cases with less understanding. A master
of a ship is said to have declared that he was
very well acquainted with Gulliver, but that the
printer had been mistaken about his residence,
for he knew that Gulliver lived in Wapping.
Swift did not at first acknowledge the author-
ship of the book, preferring to let the fictitious
. Lemuel Gulliver bear the responsibility until it
became clear whether or not the real author was
likely to become an object for the revenge of
[ iii ]

9986

Ce LLIVER’S -FRAVELS was_written
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

those whom the book had ridiculed. Events soon
proved: that Swift had little more to fear than
popularity, but it was too late for this to do him
much good or much harm. Although he lived
nineteen years after the publication of “Gulliver's
Travels,” his work practically ended at this time,
the last years of his life being a period of sad
decadence of mind and of spirit.

Swift’s earlier years gave evidence of the ability
which is fully revealed in “Gulliver's Travels.”
His writings, chiefly of a_religions-and political
charactér, possessed the same keen—satire and
sharp wit, but their virulence created many oppo-
nents who stood in the way of his advancement
in the Church or in politics. In spite of many
attempts to secure a distinguished position, the
highest office that he ever held was that of Dean
of St. Patrick’s Cathedral, a place by no means
commensurate with his abilities or ambitions. His
blighted hopes made him a confirmed misanthrope
and were responsible at least for those parts of
“ Gulliver’s Travels” in which he berates his
countrymen with the greatest severity.

Although bitter in his hatred and denunciation |
of many classes, Swift could be a warm friend and
an enthusiastic admirer. He seemed to explain

[iv ]
PREFACE

himself best in a letter to Pope, when he said:
“T have ever hated all nations, professions, and
communities, and my love is towards individuals ;
for instance, I hate the tribe of lawyers, but I love ©
Counsellor Such-a-one and Judge Such-a-one. . . .”
Unmistakably, “Gulliver’s Travels” reveals the
truth of this, for in it Swift dwells, for the most
part, upon the weaknesses not of individuals but
of classes. / A study of the book as a piece of
satire is an interesting revelation of many phases
of Swift’s own character. In its nice distinction
between the right and the wrong, the worthy and
the mean, “Gulliver's Travels” is inspiring; in
its too frequent tendency to place mankind on
the wrong or the mean side the book is itself un-
worthy. It is chiefly in the last two “ Voyages”
that satire and cynicism predominate. ) In the first
two, which make up this volume, the author's
delightful imagination is not dimmed by his
arraignment of his fellow men.

The first edition of the “ Travels” contained
errors and alterations, partly due to the publisher,
who did not have the courage to print the work
just as Swift wrote it. A second edition, corrected
in part, appeared in 1727. Later editions em-
bodied other corrections made by Swift. In the

[v ]
GULL PER Ss CRAY Eis

preparation of the present edition a copy of the
one of 1727 has been found serviceable, also
one edited by G. Ravenscroft Dennis, who made
a careful comparison of all the early editions,
together with a large paper copy of the first edi-
tion, in which one of Swift’s friends made nu-
merous alterations and additions from Swift’s own
list of corrections. Practically all of the modern
editions of “Gulliver” contain inaccuracies and
alterations that have been handed down. from
one editor to another, until they have become far
too numerous.

With the belief that the reader prefers to know
the work of an author at first hand, the two voy-
ages of “ Gulliver’s Travels” that are included in
this volume have been kept as much like their
original form as practicable, only such alterations
having been made as were demanded by modern
ideas of good taste and decorum.

kek.

[ vi ]
A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT
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Difcovered,A.D. 1699.

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MAP SHOWING SUPPOSED LOCATION OF LILLIPUT

From the second edition of “Gulliver’s Travels,” London, 1727





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A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

CHAPTER I

The author gives some account of himself and family, his
first inducements to travel. He ts shipwrecked, and
swims for his life, gets safe on shore in the country of
Lilliput,ts made a prisoner, and ts carried up the country.

Y FATHER had a small estate in Not-
tinghamshire; I was the third of five sons.

He sent me to Emmanuel College in
Cambridge, at fourteen years old, where I resided
three years, and applied myself close to my stud-
ies; but the charge of maintaining me (although
I had a very scanty allowance) being too great for
a narrow fortune, I was bound apprentice to Mr.
James Bates, an eminent surgeon in London, with
whom I continued four years: and my father now

[3]
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

and then sending me small sums of money, I laid
them: out in learning navigation, and other parts
of the mathematics, useful to those who intend
to travel, as I always believed it would be some
time or other my fortune to do. When I left
Mr. Bates, I went down to my father; where, by
the assistance of him and my uncle John, and
some other relations, I got forty pounds, and a
promise of thirty pounds a year, to maintain me
at Leyden: there I studied physic two years
and seven months, knowing it would be useful
in long voyages.

Soon after my return from Leyden, I was recom-
mended by my good master, Mr. Bates, to be sur-
geon to the Swallow, Captain Abraham Pannell,
commander; with whom I continued three years
and a half, making a voyage or two into the Le-
vant, and some other parts. When I came back,
I resolved to settle in London, to which Mr. Bates,
my master, encouraged me, and by him I was rec-
ommended to several patients. I took part of a
small house in the Old Jury; and being advised to
alter my condition, I married Mrs. Mary Burton,
second daughter to Mr. Edmund Burton, hosier,
in Newgate-street, with whom I received four hun-
dred pounds for a portion.

[ 4]
A VOVAGE TO LILLIPUT

But, my good master Bates dying in two years
after, and I having few friends, my business began
to fail; for my conscience would not suffer me to
imitate the bad practice of too many among my
brethren. Having therefore consulted with my
_wife, and some of my acquaintance, I determined
to go again to sea. I was surgeon successively in
two ships, and made several voyages, for six years,
to the East and West-Indies, by which I got some
addition to my fortune. My hours of leisure I
spent in reading the best authors, ancient and
modern, being always provided with a good num-
ber of books; and when I was ashore, in observ-
ing the manners and dispositions of the people, as
well as learning their language, wherein I had a
great facility by the ‘strength of my memory.

The last of these voyages not proving very for-
tunate, I grew weary of the sea, and intended to
stay at home with my wife and family. I removed
from the Old Jury to Fetter-Lane, and from thence
. to Wapping, hoping to get business among the
sailors; but it would not turn to account. After
three years’ expectation that things would mend,
I accepted an advantageous offer ‘from Captain
William Prichard, master of the Axtelope, who
was making a voyage to the South-Sea. We set

[5]
CULRLIVE Rs TRAV EES

sail from Bristol, May 4, 1699, and our voyage at
first was very prosperous.

It would not be proper, from some reasons, to
trouble the reader with the particulars of our
adventures in those seas: let it suffice to inform
him, that in our passage from thence to the East
Indies, we were driven by a violent storm to the
north-west of Van Diemgn’s Land. By an obser-
vation, we found ourselves in the latitude of 30
degrees 2 minutes south. Twelve of our crew
were dead by immoderate labor, and ill food, the
rest were in a very weak condition. On the fifth
of November, which was the beginning of summer
in those parts, the weather being very hazy, the
seamen spied a rock, within half a cable’s length
of the ship; but the wind was so strong, that we
were driven directly upon it, and immediately split.
Six of the crew, of whom I was one, having let
down the boat into the sea, made a shift to get
clear of the ship, and the rock. We rowed, by my
computation, about three leagues, till we were .
able to work no longer, being already spent with
labor while we were in the ship. We therefore
trusted ourselves to the mercy of the waves, and
in about half an hour the boat was overset by a
sudden flurry from the north. What became of

[6 |
Aw On SG Le LILLE oT

my companions in the boat, as well as of those
who escaped on the rock, or were left in the
vessel, I cannot tell; but conclude they were all
lost. For my own part, I swam as fortune directed
me, and was pushed forward by wind and tide. I
often let my legs drop, and could feel no bottom:
but when I was almost gone, and able to struggle
no longer, I found myself within my depth; and
by this time the storm was much abated. The
declivity was so small, that I walked near a mile -
before I got to the shore, which I conjectured was
about eight a-clock in the evening. I then ad-’
vanced forward near half a mile, but could not
discover any sign of houses or inhabitants; at
least I was in so weak a condition, that I did not
observe them. I was extremely tired, and with
that, and the heat of the weather, and about half a
pint of brandy that I drank as I left the ship, I
found myself much inclined to sleep. I lay down
on the grass, which was very short and soft, where
I slept sounder than ever I remembered to have
done in my life, and, as I reckoned, about nine
hours; for when I awaked it was just day-light. I.
attempted to rise, but was not able to stir; for as
I happened to lie on my back, I found my arms
and legs were strongly fastened on each side to

uf
GULLY Res PRAW ELS

the ground; and my hair, which was long and
thick, tied down in the same manner. I likewise
felt several slender ligatures across my body, from
my arm-pits to my thighs. I could only look up-
wards, the sun began to grow hot, and the light
offended my eyes. I heard a confused noise about
me, but in the posture I lay, could see nothing
except the sky. In a little time I felt something
alive moving on my left leg, which advancing
gently forward over my breast, camé almost up. to
my chin; when bending my eyes downward as
much as I could, I perceived it to be a human
creature not six inches high, with a bow and arrow
in his hands, and a quiver at his back. In the mean
time, I felt at least forty more of the same kind
(as I conjectured) following the first. I was in the
utmost astonishment, and roared so loud, that they
all ran back in a fright; and some of them, as I
was afterwards told, were hurt with the falls they
got by leaping from my sides upon the ground.
However, they soon returned, and one of them,
who ventured so far as to get a full sight of my
face, lifting up his hands and eyes by way of
admiration, cried out, in a shrill but distinct voice,
F[ekinah degul: the others repeated the same
words several times, but then I. knew not what

[8]


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GUELLIVIER-S TRAVELS

_ they meant. I lay all this while, as the reader may
believe, in great uneasiness: at length, struggling
to get loose, I had the fortune to break the strings,
and wrench out the pegs that fastened my left arm
to the ground; for, by lifting it up to my face, I
discovered the methods they had taken to bind
me, and at the same time with a violent pull,
which gave me excessive pain, I a little loosened
the strings that tied down my hair on the left side,
so that I was just able to turn my head about two
inches. But the creatures ran off a second time,
before I could seize them; whereupon there was
a great shout in a very shrill accent, and after it
ceased, I heard one of them cry aloud 7olgo phonac ;
when in an instant I felt above an hundred arrows
discharged on my left hand, which pricked me like
so many needles; and besides, they shot another
flight into the air, as we do bombs in Europe,
whereof many, I suppose, fell on my body (though
I felt them not) and some on my face, which I
immediately covered with my left hand. When
this shower of arrows was over, I fell a groaning
with grief and pain, and then striving again to get
loose, they discharged another volley larger than
the first, and some of them attempted with spears
to stick me in the sides; but, by good luck, I had

[ 10 ]
he No YOuMG eine Li i Pow

on a buff jerkin, which they could not pierce. |
thought it the most prudent method to lie still,
and my design was to continue so till night, when,
my left hand being already loose, I could easily
free myself: and as for the inhabitants, I had
reason to believe I might be a match for the’
greatest armies they could bring against me, if
they were all of the same size with him that I saw.
But fortune disposed otherwise of me. When the
people observed I was quiet, they discharged no
more arrows; but, by the noise I heard, I knew
their numbers increased; and about four yards
from me, over against my right ear, I heard a
knocking fer above an hour, like that of people at
work ; when turning my head that way, as well as
the pegs and strings would permit me, I saw a
stage erected, about a foot and a half from the
ground, capable of holding four of the inhabitants,
with two or three ladders to mount it: from
whence one of them, who seemed to be a person
of quality, made me a long speech, whereof I
understood not one syllable. But I should have
mentioned, that before the principal person began
his oration, he cried out three times, Langro dehul
san: (these words and the former were after-
wards repeated and explained to me.) Whereupon

[11 |
PGW inva, Sa RA in

immediately about fifty of the inhabitants came
and cut the strings that fastened the left side of
my head, which gave me the liberty of turning
it to the right, and of observing the person and
gesture of him that was to speak. He appeared
to be of a middle age, and taller than any of the
other three who attended him, whereof one was
a page, that held up his train and seemed to
be somewhat longer than my middle finger; the
other two stood one on each side to support him.
He acted every part of an orator; and I could
observe many periods of threatenings, and others
of promises, pity, and kindness. I answered in a
few words, but in the most submissive manner,
lifting up my left hand, and both my eyes to the
sun, as calling him for a witness; and being almost
famished with hunger, having not eaten a morsel
for some hours before I left the ship, I found the
demands of nature so strong upon me, that I
could not forbear showing my impatience (perhaps
against the strict rules of decency) by putting my
finger frequently to my mouth, to signify that I
wanted food. The //urgo (for so they call a great
lord, as I afterwards learnt) understood me very
well. He descended from the stage, and com- |
manded that several ladders should be applied to

[12]
ACO VNEGE TO LILLE Prue

my sides, on which above an hundred of the inhab- |
itants mounted and walked towards my mouth,
laden with baskets full of meat, which had been
provided and sent thither by the King’s orders,
upon the first intelligence he received of me. I
observed there was the
flesh of several animals,
but could not distin-
guish them by the taste.
There were shoulders,
legs, and loins, shaped
hke those of mutton,
and very well dressed,
but smaller than the
wings of a lark. I ate
them by two or three at
a mouthful, and took
three loaves at a time,
about the bigness of
musket bullets. They supplied me as fast as
they could, showing a thousand marks of won-
der and astonishment at my bulk and appetite.
I then made another sign, that I wanted drink.
They found by my eating, that a small quantity
would not suffice me; and being a most ingen-
1ous people, they slung up with great dexterity

[13]


GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

one of their largest hogsheads, then rolled it
towards my hand, and beat out the top; I drank
it off at a draught, which I might well do, for it
did not hold half a pint, and tasted like a small
wine of Burgundy, but much more delicious.
They brought me a second hogshead, which I
drank in the same manner, and made signs for
more, but they had none to give me. When I had
performed these wonders, they shouted for joy,
and danced upon my breast, repeating several
times as they did at first, Hekznah degul. They
made mea sign that I should throw down the two
_hogsheads, but first warning the people below to
stand out of the way, crying aloud Borach mivolah,
and when they saw the vessels in the air, there
was an universal shout of Hlekznxah degul. | con-
fess I was often tempted, while they were passing
backwards and forwards on my body, to seize forty
or fifty of the first that came in my reach, and
dash them against the ground. But the re-
membrance of what I had felt, which probably
might not be the worst they could do, and the
promise of honor I made them, for so I inter-
preted my submissive behavior, soon drove out
these imaginations. Besides, I now considered
myself as bound by the laws of hospitality to a

[ 14 |
mV OVAGE 1 © L711? Uae

people who had treated me with so much expense
and magnificence. However, in my thoughts, |
could not sufficiently wonder at the intrepidity of
these diminutive mortals, who durst venture to
mount and walk upon my body, while one of my
hands was at liberty, without trembling at the
very sight of so prodigious a creature as I must
appear to them. After some time, when they ob-
served that I made no more demands for meat,
there appeared before me a person of high
rank from his Imperial Majesty. His Excellency,
having mounted on the small of my right leg,
advanced forwards up to my face, with about a
dozen of his retinue. And producing his creden-
tials under the Signet Royal, which he applied
close to my eyes, spoke about ten minutes, with-
out any signs of anger, but with a kind of
determinate resolution; often pointing forwards,
which, as I afterwards found, was towards the
capital city, about half a mile distant, whither it
was agreed by his Majesty in council that I must
be conveyed. I answered in few words, but to no
purpose, and made a sign with my hand that was
loose, putting it to the other (but over his Excel-
lency’s head for fear of hurting him or his train)
and then to my own head and body, to signify that —

[15 ]
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

I desired my liberty. It appeared that he under-
stood me well enough, for he shook his head by
way of disapprobation, and held his hand ir. a
posture to show that I must be carried as a pris-
oner. However, he made other signs to let me
understand that I should have meat and drink
enough, and very good treatment. Whereupon, I
once more thought of attempting to break my
bonds; but again, when I felt the smart of their
arrows, upon my face and hands, which were all in
blisters, and many of the darts still sticking in
them, and observing likewise that the number of
my enemies increased, I gave tokens to let them
know that they might do with me what they
pleased. Upon this, the //uxgo and his train
withdrew, with much civility and cheerful counte-
nances. Soon after I heard a general shout, with
frequent repetitions of the words Peplom selan,
and I felt great numbers of people on my left
side relaxing the cords to such a degree, that I
was able to turn upon my right. But before this,
they had daubed my face and both my hands
with a sort of ointment very pleasant to the smell,
which in a few minutes removed all the smart
of their arrows. These circumstances, added to
the refreshment I had received by their victuals

[ 16 |
A VOYAGE TO LILLIPU Tye

and drink, which were very nourishing, disposed
me to sleep. I slept about eight hours, as I was
afterwards assured; and it was no wonder, for
the physicians, by the Emperor’s orders, had
mingled a sleepy potion in the hogsheads of wine.

It seems that upon the first moment I was dis-
covered sleeping on the ground after my landing
the Emperor had early notice of it by an express;
and determined in council that I should be tied
in the manner I have related, (which was done in
the night while I slept) that plenty of meat and
drink should be sent me, and a machine prepared
to carry me to the capital city.

This resolution perhaps may appear very bold.
-and dangerous, and I am confident would not be
imitated by any prince in Europe, on the like oc-
casion; however, in my opinion, it was extremely
prudent, as well as generous: for supposing these
people had endeavored to kill me with their spears
and arrows while I was asleep, I should certainly
have awaked with the first sense of smart, which
might so far have roused my rage and strength,
as to have enabled me to break the strings where-
with I was tied; after which, as they were not.
able to make resistance, so they could expect no
mercy.

[17 ]
~GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

These people are most excellent mathemati-
cians, and arrived to a great perfection in me-
chanics, by the countenance and encouragement
of the Emperor, who is a renowned patron of
learning. This prince hath several machines fixed
on wheels, for the carriage of trees and other
great weights. He often builds his largest men of
war, whereof some are nine foot long, in the
woods where the timber grows, and has them
carried on these engines three or four hundred
yards to the sea. Five hundred carpenters and
engineers were immediately set at work to pre-
pare the greatest engine they had. It was a frame
of wood raised three inches from the ground,
about seven foot long, and four wide, moving
upon twenty-two wheels. The shout I heard was
upon the arrival of this engine, which it seems
set out in four hours after my landing. It was
brought parallel to me as I lay. But the principal
difficulty was to raise and place me in this vehicle.
Eighty poles, each of one foot high, were erected for
this purpose, and very strong cords of the bigness

_. of pack-thread, were fastened by hooks to many

bandages, which the workmen had girt round my
neck, my hands, my body, and my legs. Nine
hundred of the strongest men were employed to_

[18]
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' GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

_ draw up these cords by many pulleys fastened on
the poles, and thus, in less than three hours, I was
raised and slung into the engine, and there tied
fast. All this I was told, for, while the operation
was performing, I lay in a profound sleep, by the
force of that soporiferous medicine infused into
my liquor. Fifteen hundred of the Emperor’s
largest horses, each about four inches and a half
high, were employed to draw me towards the
metropolis, which, as I said, was half a mile distant.

About four hours after we began our journey, I
awaked by a very ridiculous accident; for the
carriage being stopped a while to adjust some-
thing that was out of order, two or three of the
young natives had the curiosity to see how I
looked when I was asleep; they climbed up into
the engine, and advancing very softly to my face,
one of them, an officer in the guards, put the sharp
end of his half-pike a good way up into my left
nostril, which tickled my nose like a straw, and
made me sneeze violently; whereupon they stole
off unperceived, and it was three weeks before I
knew the cause of my awaking so suddenly. We
made a long march the remaining part of that
day, and rested at night with five hundred guards
on each side of me, half with torches, and _ half

[ 20 |
A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

with bows and arrows, ready to shoot me if I -
should offer to stir. The next morning at sun-rise
we continued our march, and arrived within two
hundred yards of the city gates about noon. The
Emperor, and all his court, came out to meet us,
but his great officers would by no means suffer
his Majesty to endanger his person by mounting
on my body.

At the place where the carriage stopped, there
stood an ancient temple, esteemed to be the
largest in the whole kingdom; which, having been
polluted some years before by an_ unnatural
murder, was, according to the zeal of those people,
looked upon as profane, and therefore had been
applied to common uses, and all the ornaments

and furniture carried away. In this edifice it was
_ determined I should lodge. The great gate
fronting to the north was about four foot high,
and almost two foot wide, through which 'I could
easily creep. On each side of the gate was a small
window not above six inches from the ground:
into that on the left side, the King’s smiths con-
veyed fourscore and eleven chains, like those that
hang to a lady’s watch in Europe, and almost as
large, which were locked to my left leg with six
and thirty padlocks. Over-against this temple, on

[ 21 |
GULLIVER’'S TRAVELS

t’other side of the great highway, at twenty foot
distance, there was a turret at least five foot high.
Here the Emperor ascended, with many principal
lords of his court, to have an opportunity of viewing
me, as I was told, for I could not see them. It
was reckoned that above an hundred thousand in-
habitants came out of the town upon the same
errand; and, in spite of my guards, I believe
there could not be fewer than ten thousand at
several times, who mounted my body by the help
of ladders. Buta proclamation was soon issued to
forbid it upon pain of death. When the workmen
found it was impossible for me to break loose,
they cut all the strings that bound me; where-
upon I rose up, with as melancholy a disposition
as ever I had in my life. But the noise and
astonishment of the people at seeing me rise and
walk, are not to be expressed. The chains that
held my left leg were about two yards long, and
gave me not only liberty of walking backwards
and forwards ina semicircle, but, being fixed
within four inches of the gate, allowed me to
creep in, and lie at my full length in the temple.

[ 22 |


CHAPTER I]

The Emperor of Lilliput, attended by several of the
nobility, comes to see the Author in his confinement.
The Emperor's person and habit described. Learned
men appointed to teach the Author thetr language. Hc
gains favour by his mild disposition. His pockets are

searched, and his sword and pistols taken from him.

HEN I found myself on my feet, I

looked about me, and must confess

I never beheld a more entertaining
prospect. The country around appeared like a
continued garden, and the enclosed fields, which
were generally forty foot square, resembled so many
beds of flowers. These fields were intermingled
with woods of half a stang, and the tallest trees,
as I could judge, appeared to be seven foot high.
I viewed the town on my left hand, which looked
like the painted scene of a city in a theatre.

| 23 |
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

The Emperor was already descended from the
tower and advancing on horseback towards me,
which had lke to have cost him dear; for the
beast, though very well trained, yet wholly unused
to such a sight, which appeared as if a mountain
moved before him, reared up on his hinder feet:
but that prince, who is an excellent horseman,
‘kept his seat, till his attendants ran in, and held
the bridle, while his Majesty had time to dismount.
While he alighted, he surveyed me round with
great admiration, but kept beyond the length of
my chain. He ordered his cooks and butlers, who
were already prepared, to give me victuals and
drink, which they pushed forward in a sort of
vehicle upon wheels, till I could reach them. I
took these vehicles, and soon emptied them all;
twenty of them were filled with meat, and ten
with liquor; each of the former afforded me two
or three good mouthfuls, and I emptied the liquor
of ten vessels, which was contained in earthen
vials, into one vehicle, drinking it off at a
draught; and so I did with the rest. The
Empress and young Princes of the blood of both
sexes, attended by many ladies, sat at some
distance in their chairs; but upon the accident
that happened to the Emperor’s horse, they

[ 24 |
AeVOV AGH TO LILGbIPU F

alighted, and came near his person, which I am
now going to describe. He is taller by almost the
breadth of my nail, than any of his court; which
alone is enough to strike an awe into the beholders.
His features are strong and masculine, with an
Austrian lip and arched nose, his complexion
olive, his countenance erect, his body and limbs
well proportioned, all his motions graceful, and
his deportment majestic. He was then past his
prime, being twenty-eight years and three quarters
old, of which he had reigned about seven, in great
felicity, and generally victorious. For the better
convenience of beholding him, I lay on my side,
so that my face was parallel to his, and he stood
but three yards off: however, I have had him since
many times in my hand, and therefore cannot be
deceived in the description. His dress was very
plain and simple, and the fashion of it between
the Asiatic and the European: but he had on his
head a light helmet of gold, adorned with jewels,
and a plume on the crest. He held his sword
drawn in his hand, to defend himself, if I should
happen to break loose; it was. almost three inches
long, the hilt anc" -seabBerdt wore gold enriched
with diamonds “lis? Voice was S shrill hut very clear
and articthate, ind I could me es hear’ it —

oo Badd - cee: . yette
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

I stood up. The ladies and courtiers were all most
magnificently clad, so that the spot they stood
upon seemed to resemble a skirt spread on the
ground, embroidered with figures of gold and
silver. His Imperial Majesty spoke often to me,
and I returned answers, but neither of us could
understand a syllable. There were several of his
priests and lawyers present (as I conjectured by
their habits) who were commanded to address
themselves to me, and I spoke to them in as
many languages as I had the least smattering of,
which were High and Low Dutch, Latin, French,
Spanish, Italian, and Lingua Franca, but all to
no purpose. After about two hours the court
retired, and I was left with a strong guard, to
prevent the impertinence, and probably the malice
of the rabble, who were very impatient to crowd
about me as near as they durst, and some of them
had the impudence to shoot their arrows at me
as I sat on the ground by the door of my house,
whereof one very narrowly missed my left eye.
But the colonel ordered six of the ringleaders to
be seized, and thought no punishment so proper
as to deliver. theyn; ‘hound: Inte. my hands, which
some of “the “soldiers actoidinghy: ‘did, pushing
thezh, ‘foxWards with the butt-ends: “of. their pikes

ws : = BES +9. HE





MS

) 3) Al

~~ S.Ceearana. .-

-
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

into my reach; I took them all in my right
hand, put five of them into my coat pocket, and
as to the sixth, I made a countenance as if |
would eat him alive. The poor man squalled terri-
bly, and the colonel and his officers were in much
pain, especially when they saw me take out my
penknife: but I soon put them out of fear; for,
looking mildly, and immediately cutting the strings
he was bound with, I set him gently on the
ground, and away he ran; I treated the rest in
the same manner, taking them one by one out of
my pocket, and I observed both the soldiers and
people were highly obliged at this mark of my
clemency, which was represented very much to
my advantage at court.

Towards night I got with some difficulty into
my house, where I lay on the ground, and con-
tinued to do so about a fortnight; during which
time the Emperor gave orders to have a bed pre-
pared for me. Six hundred beds of the common
measure were brought in carriages, and worked
up in my house; an hundred and fifty of their
beds sewn together made up the breadth and
length, and these were four double, which however
kept me but very indifferently from the hardness
of the floor, that was of smooth stone. By the

[ 28 |
A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

same computation they provided me with sheets,
blankets, and coverlets, tolerable enough for one
who had been so long inured to hardships as I.
As the news of my arrival spread through the
kingdom, it brought prodigious numbers of rich,
idle, and curious people to see me; so that the
villages were almost emptied; and great neglect
of tillage and household affairs must have ensued,
if his Imperial Majesty had not provided, by sev-
eral proclamations and orders of state, against
this inconveniency. He directed that those who
had already beheld me should return home, and
not presume to come within fifty yards of my
house without license from the court; whereby
the secretaries of state got considerable fees.
In the mean time, the Emperor held frequent
councils to debate what course should be taken
with me; and I was afterwards assured by a
particular friend, a person of great quality, who
was looked upon to be as much in the secret as
any, that the court was under many difficulties
concerning me. They apprehended my breaking
loose, that my diet would be very expensive, and
might cause a famine. Sometimes they deter-
mined to starve me, or at least to shoot me in the
face and hands with poisoned arrows, which would

[ 29 |
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

soon dispatch me. In the midst of these consul-
tations, several officers. of the army went to the
door of the great council-chamber, and two of them
being admitted, gave an account of my behav-
iour to the six criminals above-mentioned, which
made so favorable an impression in the breast of
his Majesty and the whole board, in my behalf,
that an Imperial Commission was issued out,
obliging all the villages nine hundred yards round
the city, to deliver in every morning six beeves,
forty sheep, and other victuals for my sustenance;
together with a proportionable quantity of bread,
and wine, and other liquors; for the due payment
of which his Majesty gave assignments upon his
treasury. For this prince lives chiefly upon his own
demesnes, seldom, except upon great occasions,
raising any subsidies upon his subjects, who are
bound to attend him in his wars at their own
expense. An establishment was also made of six
hundred persons to be my domestics, who had
board-wages allowed for their maintenance, and
tents built for them very conveniently on each
side of my door. It was likewise ordered, that
three hundred tailors should make me a suit
of clothes after the fashion of the country: that
six of his Majesty’s greatest scholars should be

[ 30 |
Ra VeON ea Gt i Or) Vel eed

employed to instruct me in their language: and,
lastly, that the Emperor’s horses, and those of the
nobility, and troops of guards, should be frequently
exercised in my sight, to accustom themselves to
me. All these orders were duly put in execution,
and in about three weeks I made a great progress
in learning their language; during which time, the
Emperor frequently honoured me with his visits,
and was pleased to assist my masters in teaching
me. We began already to converse together in
some sort; and the first words | learnt were to ex-
press my foe that he would please to give me
my liberty, which I every day repeated on my
knees. His answer, as I could comprehend it, was,
that this must be a work of time, not to be thought
on without the advice of his council, and that first I
must Lumos kelmin pesso desmar lon Emposo ;
that is, swear a peace with him and his kingdom.
However, that I should be used with all kindness;
and he advised me to acquire, by my patience and
discreet behaviour, the good opinion of himself and
his subjects. He desired I would not take it ill, if
he gave orders to certain proper officers to search
me; for probably I might carry about me several
weapons, which must needs be dangerous things,
if they answered the bulk of so prodigious a

Pst
GW BRS FRAY ELS |.

person. I said, his Majesty should be satisfied, for
I was ready to strip myself, and turn up my
pockets before him. This I delivered part in words,
and part in signs. He replied, that by the laws
of the kingdom I must be searched by two of
his officers; that he knew this could not be done
without my consent and assistance ; that he had so
good an opinion of my generosity and justice, as
to trust their persons in my hands; that whatever
they took from me should be returned when I left
the country, or paid for at the rate which I would
set upon them. I took up the two officers in my
hands, put them first into my coat-pockets, and
then into every other pocket about me, except
my two fobs, and another secret pocket which I had
no mind should be searched, wherein I had some
little necessaries that were of no consequence to
any but myself. In one of my fobs there was a
silver watch, and in the other a small quantity of
gold in a purse. These gentlemen, having pen,
ink, and paper about them, made an exact iInven- .
tory of everything they saw; and when they had
done, desired I would set them down, that they
might deliver it to the Emperor. “This inventory
I afterwards translated into Pagish and is word
for word as follows. |

[ 32 ]
MOBO’; ASG 2, © 1 Eee Ur

[upriuis, In the right coat-pocket of the Great
Man Mountain (for so | interpret the words Quzn-
bus Flestrin) after the strictest search, we found
only one great piece of coarse cloth, large enough
to be a foot-cloth for your Majesty’s chief room of
state. In the left pocket we saw a huge silver
chest, with a cover of the same metal, which we
the searchers were not able to lift. We desired it
should be opened, and one of us stepping into it,
found himself up to the mid leg in a sort of dust,
some part wherof flying up to our faces, set us
both a sneezing for several times together. In
his right waistcoat-pocket we found a prodigious
bundle of white thin substances folded one over
another, about the bigness of three men, tied with
a strong cable, and marked with black figures;
which we humbly conceive to be writings, every
letter almost half as large as the palm of our
hands. In the left there was a sort of engine, from
the back of which were extended twenty long poles,
resembling the pallisados before your Mayesty’s
court ; wherewith we conjecture the Man Mountain
combs his head; for we did not always trouble
him with questions, because we found it a great
difficulty to make him understand us. In the large
pocket on the right side, we saw a hollow pillar of

see
GUEBPIV ER S-PRAVELS

iron, about the length of a man, fastened to a
strong piece of timber, larger than the pillar;
and upon one side of the pillar were huge pieces
of iron sticking out, cut into strange figures,
which we know not what to make of. In the left

pocket, another engine



Uf, y ox « of the same kind. In the
(UQReZeN Y smaller pocket, on the
WE right side, were several

EK iy round flat pieces of white
and red metal, of differ-
ent bulk; some of the
white, which seemed to
be silver, were so large
and heavy, that my com-
rade and I could hardly
hit theme:diineetne sett
pocket were two black pil-
lars irregularly shaped :
we could not, without difficulty, reach the top
of them as we stood at the bottom of his pocket.
One of them was covered, and seemed all of a
piece: but at the upper end of the other, there
appeared a white round substance, about twice
the bigness of our heads. Within each of these
was enclosed a prodigious plate of steel; which,

[ 34 ]


AS VOYAGE TOs ba Pea

by our orders, we obliged him to show us, because
we apprehended they might be dangerous engines.
He took them out of their cases, and told us,
that in his own country, his practice was to
shave his beard with one of these, and cut his
meat with the other. There were two pockets
which we could not enter: these he called his



fobs. Out of the right fob hung a great silver
chain, with a wonderful kind of engfne at the
bottom. We directed him to draw out whatever
was fastened to that chain, which appeared to be
a globe, half silver, and half of some transparent
metal; for, on the transparent side, we saw certain
strange figures circularly drawn, and thought we
could touch them, till we found our fingers stopped
by that lucid substance. He put this engine to

[ 35]
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

our ears, which made.an incessant noise like that
of a water-mill. And we conjecture it is either
some unknown animal, or the god that he wor-
ships; but we are more inclined to the latter
opinion, because he assured us (if we understand
him right, for he expressed himself very imper-
fectly) that he seldom did anything without con-
sulting it. He called it his oracle, and said it
pointed out the time for every action of his life.
From the left fob he took out a net almost large
enough for a fisherman, but contrived to open and
shut like a purse, and served him for the same use:
we found therein several massy pieces of yellow
metal, which, if they be real gold, must be of
immense value.

Having thus, in obedience to your Majesty's
commands, diligently searched all his pockets, we
observed a girdle about his waist made of the hide
of some prodigious animal, from which, on the left
side, hung a sword of the length of five men; and
on the right, a bag or pouch divided into two cells,
each cell capable of holding three of your Majesty's
subjects. In one of these cells were several globes
or balls, of a most ponderous metal, about the big- |
ness of our heads, and requiring a strong hand to
lift them : the other cell contained a heap of certain

[36].
AV OVE GH WoL Pie bE ak

black grains, but of no great bulk or weight, for
we could hold above fifty of them 1 in the Pee of
our hands.

This is an exact inventory of what we found
about the body of the Man Mountain, who used
us with great civility, and due respect to your
Majesty's Commission. Signed and sealed on the
fourth day of the eighty-ninth moon of your
Majesty’s auspicious reign. |

CLEFRIN FRELOCK, MARSI FRELOCK.

When this inventory was read over to the
Emperor, he directed me, although in very gentle
terms, to deliver up the several particulars. He
first called for my scimitar, which I took out, scab-
bard and all. In the meantime he ordered three
thousand of his choicest troops (who then attended!
him) to surround me at a distance, with their bows
and arrows just ready to discharge: but I did not
observe it, for mine eyes were wholly fixed upon
his Majesty. He then desired me to draw my
scimitar, which, although it had got some rust by :
the sea-water, was in most parts exceeding bright.
I did so, and immediately all the troops gave a
shout between terror and surprise; for the sun
shone clear, and the reflection dazzled their eyes,

val
COP veaR SS PRAV EIS

as I waved the scimitar to and fro in my hand.
His Majesty, who is a most magnanimous prince,
was less daunted than I could expect; he ordered
me to return it into the scabbard, and cast it on
the ground as gently as I could, about six foot from
the end of my chain. The next thing he demanded,
was one of the hollow iron pillars, by which he
meant my pocket-pistols. I drew it out, and at his
desire, as well as I could, expressed to him the use
of it; and charging it only with powder, which, by
the closeness of my pouch, happened to escape
wetting in the sea (an inconvenience against which
all prudent mariners take special care to provide,)
I first cautioned the Emperor not to be afraid,
and then I let it off in the air. The astonishment
here was much greater than at the sight of my
scimitar. Hundreds fell down as if they had been
struck dead; and even the Emperor, although he
stood his ground, could not recover himself in some
time. I delivered up both my pistols in the same
manner as I had done my scimitar, and then my
, pouch of powder and bullets; begging him that
the former might be kept from fire, for it would
kindle with the smallest spark, and blow up his
imperial palace into the air. I likewise delivered
up my watch, which the Emperor was very curious

[ 38 | |
A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

‘to see, and commanded two of his tallest yeomen
of the guards to bear it on a pole upon their shoul- —
ders, as draymen in England do a barrel of ale.
He was amazed at the continual noise it made, and
the motion of the minute-hand, which he could
easily discern; for their sight is much more acute
than ours; and asked the opinions of his learned
men about it, which were various and remote, as
the reader may well imagine without my repeat-
ing; although ‘indeed I could not very perfectly
understand them. I then gave up my silver and
copper money, my purse, with nine large pieces of
gold, and some smaller ones; my knife and razor,
my comb and silver snuff-box, my handkerchief
and journal-book. My scimitar, pistols, and pouch,
were conveyed in carriages to his Majesty’s stores;
but the rest of my.sgoods were returned me.

I had, as I before observed, one private pocket,
which escaped their search, wherein there was a
pair of spectacles, (which I sometimes use for the
weakness of mine eyes) a pocket perspective,
and some other little conveniences; which being
of no consequence to the Emperor, I did not
think myself bound in honour to discover, and I
apprehended they might be lost or spoiled if I
ventured them out of my possession.

[39]

DAS
\
, 4
yn aH
Matyas TTT:
a fe



CHAPTER III

The Author diverts the Emperor, and his nobility of both
sexes, in avery uncommon manner. The diversions of
the court of Lilliput described. The Author has his
liberty granted him upon ccrtatn conditions.

Y GENTLENESS and good behaviour
had gained so far on the Emperor and
his court, and indeed upon the army

and people in general, that I.began to conceive
hopes of getting my liberty in a short time. I took
all possible methods to cultivate this favourable
disposition. The natives came by degrees to be
less apprehensive of any danger from me. I would
sometimes lie down, and let five or six of them
dance on my hand. And at last the boys and girls
would venture to come and play at hide and seek
in my hair. I had now made a good progress in
understanding and speaking their language. The
[ 40 ]
A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

/ &=peror had a mind one day to entertain me with
several of the country shows, wherein they exceed
, all nations I have known, both for dexterity and
magnificence. I was diverted with none so much
as that of the rope-dancers, performed upon a
slender white thread, extended about two foot, and
twelve inches from the ground. Upon which I
shall desire liberty, with the reader’s patience, to



enlarge a little.

This diversion is only practised by those persons
who are candidates for great employments, and
high favour, at court. They are trained in this art
from their youth, and are not always of noble birth,
or liberal education. When a great office 1s vacant
either by death or disgrace (which often happens)
five or six of those candidates petition the Emperor
to entertain his Majesty and the court with a dance
on the rope, and whoever jumps the highest with-

— out falling, succeeds in the office. Very often the
chief ministers themselves are commanded to show
their skill, and to convince the Emperor that they
have not lost their faculty. Flimnap, the Treasurer,
is allowed to cut a caper on the straight rope, at
least an inch higher than any other lord in the
whole empire. I have seen him do the summerset
several times together upon a trencher fixed on

[41]
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

the rope, which is no thicker than a common Pp: cx:
thread in England. My friend Reldresal, principal
Secretary for private Affairs, is, in my opinion, if
[ am not partial, the second after the Treasurer ;
the rest of the great officers are much upon a par.



ft

These diversions are often attended with fatal
accidents, whereof great numbers are on record.
I myself have seen two or three candidates break
a limb. But the danger is much greater when the
ministers themselves are commanded to show their
dexterity; for, by contending to excel themselves
and their fellows, they strain so far, that there is
hardly one of them who hath not received a fall,

[ 42 |
A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

and some of them two or three. I was assured that
a year or two before my arrival, Flimnap would
have infallibly broke his neck, if one of the King’s
cushions, that accidentally lay on the ground, had
not weakened the force of his fall. ,
There is likewise another diversion, which is
only shown before the Emperor and Empress,
and first minister, upon particular occasions. The
Emperor lays on the table three fine silken threads
of six inches long. One is blue, the other red, and
the third green. These threads are proposed as
prizes for those persons whom the Emperor hath
a mind to distinguish by a peculiar mark of
his favour. The ceremony is performed in his
Majesty’s great chamber of state, where the candi-
. dates are to undergo a trial of dexterity very
"different from the former, and such as [I have not
‘observed the least resemblance of in any other
country of the old or the new world. The Emperor |
holds a stick in his hands, both ends parallel to
the horizon, while the candidates advancing one
by one, sometimes leap over the ‘stick, sometimes
creep under it backwards and forwards several
‘times, according as the stick is advanced or de-
_ pressed. Sometimes the Emperor holds one end
of the stick, and his first minister the other;

[ 43 ]
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

sometimes the minister has it entirely to himself.
Whoever performs his part with most agility, and
holds out the longest in leaping and creeping, 1s
rewarded with the blue-coloured silk; the red is
given to the next, and the green to the third, which
they all wear girt twice round about the middle;
and you see few great persons about this court,
who are not adorned with one of these girdles.
The horses of the army, and those of the royal
stables, having been daily led before me, were no
longer shy, but would come up to my very feet
without starting. The riders would leap them over
my hand as I held it on the ground, and one of
the Emperor’s huntsmen, upon a large courser,
took my foot, shoe and all; which was indeed a.
prodigious leap. I had the good fortune to divert
the Emperor one day after a very extraordinary
manner. I desired he would order several sticks /
of two foot high, and the thickness of an ordinary:
cane, to be brought me; whereupon his Majesty
commanded the master of his woods to give direc-
tions accordingly ; and the next morning six wood-
men arrived with as many carriages, drawn by
eight horses to each. I took nine of these sticks,’
fixing them firmly in the ground in a quadrangular '
figure, two foot and a half square. I took four

[ 44 ]
A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

other sticks, and tied them parallel at each corner,
about two foot from the ground; then I fastened
my handkerchief to the nine sticks that stood
erect, and extended it on all sides, till it was tight
as the top of a drum; and the four parallel sticks
‘rising about five inches higher than the handker-
chief, served as ledges on each side. When I had
finished my work, I desired the Emperor to let a
troop of his best horse, twenty-four in number,
come and exercise upon this plain. His Majesty
approved of the proposal, and I took them up,
one by one, in my hands, ready mounted and
armed, with the proper officers to exercise them.
As soon as they got into order, they divided into
two parties, performed mock skirmishes, discharged
blunt arrows, drew their swords, fled and pursued,
attacked and retired, and in short discovered the
best military discipline I ever beheld. The parallel
sticks secured them and their horses from falling
over the stage; and the Emperor was so much
delighted, that he ordered this entertainment to
be repeated several days, and once was pleased to
be lifted up and give the word of command; and,
with great difficulty, persuaded even the Empress
_ herself to let me hold her in her close chair within
two yards of the stage, from whence she was able

[45 ]
GU av ER ST RA Yer es

to take a full view of the whole performance. It
was my good fortune that no ill accident hap-
pened in these entertainments, only once a fiery
horse, that belonged to one of the captains, pawing
with his hoof, struck a hole in my handkerchief,
and his foot slipping, he overthrew his rider and
himself; but I im-
mediately relieved
them both, and
covering the hole
with one hand, I
set down the troop
with the other, in
the same manner
as I took themaip.
The horse that fel!
was Strained in the
left shoulder, but
the aider ‘got no
hurt, and I repaired my handkerchief as well as I
could: however, I would not trust to the strength
of it any more in such dangerous enterprises.
About two or three days before I was set at
liberty, as I was entertaining the court with these
kind ‘of feats, there arrived an express to inform
his Majesty, that some of his subjects riding near

[ 46 |


A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

the place where I was first taken up, had seen a
great black substance lying on the ground, very
oddly shaped, extending its edges round as wide
as his Majesty’s bedchamber, and rising up in the
middle as high as a man; that it was no living
creature, as they at first apprehended, for it lay on
the grass without motion, and some of them had
walked round it several times: that by mounting
upon each other’s shoulders, they had got to the
top, which was flat and even, and stamping upon
it they found it was hollow within; that they
‘humbly conceived it might be something belong-
ing to the Man-Mountain; and if his Majesty
pleased, they would undertake to bring it with
only five horses. I presently knew what they
meant, and was glad at heart to receive this intel-
ligence. It seems upon my first reaching the shore
after our shipwreck, I was in such confusion, that
before I came to the place where I went to sleep,
my hat, which I had fastened with a string to my
head while I was rowing, and had stuck on all the
time I was swimming, fell off after I came to land;
the string, as I conjecture, breaking by some acci-
dent which I never observed, but thought my
hat had been lost at sea. I intreated his Imperial

Majesty to give orders it might be brought to me

[ 47 ]
Grp Vets 2s) as AN ass

as soon as possible, describing to him the use and
the nature of it: and the next day the waggoners
arrived with it, but not in a very good condition ;
they had bored two holes in the brim, within an
inch and half of the edge, and fastened two hooks
in the holes; these hooks were tied by a long cord
to the harness, and thus my hat was dragged along
for about half an English mile; but the ground in
that country being extremely smooth and level, it
received less damage than I expected.

Two days after this adventure, the Emperor
having ordered that part of his army which quar-
ters in and about his metropolis to be in readiness,
took a fancy of diverting himself in a very singu-
lar manner. He desired I would stand like a
Colossus, with my legs as far asunder as | con-
veniently could. He then commanded his Gen-
eral (who was an old experienced leader, and a
great patron of mine) to draw up the troops in
close order, and march them under me; the foot
by twenty-four in a breast, and the horse by six-
teen, with drums beating, colours flying, and pikes
advanced. This body consisted of three thousand
foot, and a thousand horse. }

I had sent so many memorials and petitions for
my liberty, that his Majesty at length mentioned

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the matter, first in the cabinet, and then in a
~ full council; where it was opposed by none, except
Skyresh Bolgolam, who was pleased, without any
provocation, to be my mortal enemy. But it was
carried against him by the whole board, and con-
firmed by the Emperor. That minister was Gallet,
or Admiral of the Realm, very much in his master’s
confidence, and a person well versed in affairs, but
of a morose and sour complexion. However, he
was at length persuaded to comply; but prevailed
that the.articles and conditions upon which I
should be set free, and to which I must swear,
should be drawn up by himself. These articles
were brought to me by Skyresh Bolgolam in per-
son, attended by two under-secretaries, and several
persons of distinction. After they were read, I was
demanded to swear to the performance of them;
first in the manner of my own country, and after-
wards in the method prescribed by their laws;
which was to hold my right foot in my left hand,
to place the middle finger of my nght hand on the
crown of my head, and my thumb on the tip of my
right ear. But because the reader may be curious
to have some idea of the style and manner of ex-
pression peculiar to that people, as well as to know
the articles-upon which.I recovered my liberty, I

[ 50 |
A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT .

have made a translation of the whole instrument
word for word, as near as I was able, which I here
offer to the public.

GoLtpasto MoOMAREM EVLAME GURDILO SHEFIN
Mutty Utrty Gur, most mighty Emperor of
Lilliput, delight and terror of the universe, whose
dominions extend five thousand d/ustrugs (about
twelve miles in circumference) to the extremities
of the globe; monarch of all monarchs, taller than
the sons of men; whose feet press down to the
centre, and whose head strikes against the sun; at
whose nod the princes of the earth shake their
knees; pleasant as the spring, comfortable as the
summer, fruitful as autumn, dreadful as winter.
His most sublime Majesty proposeth to the Man-
Mountain, lately arrived to our celestial domin-
ions, the following articles, which by a solemn
oath he shall be obliged to perform.

First, The Man-Mountain shall not depart from
our dominions, without our licence under our great
seal.

2d, He shall not presume to come into our me-
tropolis, without our express order; at which time,
the inhabitants shall have two hours warning to
keep within their doors.

[51]
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

3d, The said Man-Mountain shall confine his
walks to our principal high roads, and not offer to
walk or lie down in a meadow or field of corn.

4th, As he walks the said roads, he shall take
the utmost care not to trample upon the bodies
of any of our loving subjects, their horses, or car-
riages, nor take any of our subjects into his hands,
without their own consent.

5th, If an express requires extraordinary dis-
patch, the Man-Mountain shall be obliged to carry |
in his pocket the messenger and horse a six days
journey once in every moon, and return the said
messenger back (if so required) safe to our Im-
perial Presence.
6th, He shall be our ally against our enemies in
; the Island of Blefuscu, and do his utmost to destroy.
~ their fleet, which is now preparing to invade us.

7th, That the said Man-Mountain shall, at his
times of leisure, be aiding and assisting to our
workmen, in helping to raise certain great stones,
towards covering the wall of the principal park,
and other our royal buildings.

8th, That the said Man-Mountain shall, in two
moons’ time, deliver in an exact survey of the

[52]
A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

circumference of our dominions by a computation
of his own paces round the coast. a

Lastly, That upon his solemn oath to observe
all the above articles, the said Man-Mountain shall
have a daily allowance of meat and drink sufficient
for the support of 1728 of our subjects, with free
access to our Royal Person, and other marks of
our favour. Given at our Palace at Belfaborac the
twelfth day of the ninety-first moon of our reign.

I swore and subscribed to these articles with
great cheerfulness and content, although some of
them were not so honourable as I could have
wished; which proceeded wholly from the malice
of Skyresh Bolgolam, the High-Admiral: where-
upon my chains were immediately unlocked, and
I was at full liberty; the Emperor himself in
person did me the honour to be by at the whole
ceremony. I made my acknowledgements by
prostrating myself at his Majesty’s feet: but he
commanded me to rise; and after many gracious
expressions, which, to avoid the censure of vanity,
I shall not repeat, he added, that he hoped I should
prove a useful servant, and well deserve all the
favours he had already conferred upon me, or
might do for the future.

[53 ]
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

The reader may please to observe, that in the
last article-for the recovery of my liberty, the
Emperor stipulates to allow me a quantity of meat
_and drink sufficient for the support of 1728 Lilli-
putians. Some time after, asking a friend at court
how they came to fix on that determinate number;
he told me that his Majesty's mathematicians,
having taken the height of my body by the help
of a quadrant, and finding it to exceed theirs in the
proportion of twelve to one, they concluded from
the similarity of their bodies, that mine must con-
tain at least 1728 of theirs, and consequently would
require as much food as was necessary to support
that number of Lilliputians. By which, the reader
may conceive an idea of the ingenuity of that
people, as well as the prudent and exact economy
_ of so great a prince.

[54]


CHAPTER IV

Mildendo, the metropolis of Lilliput, described, together
with the Emperors palace. A conversation between
the Author and a principal Secretary, concerning the —
affairs of that empire. The Author's offers to serve the
Emperor tn his wars.

HE first request I made after I had ob-

tained my liberty, was, that I might have

licence to see Mildendo, the metropolis ;
which the Emperor easily granted me, but with a
special charge to do no hurt either to the inhabi-
tants or their houses. The people had notice by
proclamation of my design to visit the town. The
wall which encompassed it, is two foot and an half
high, and at least eleven inches broad, so that a
coach and horses may be driven very safely round
it; and it is flanked with strong towers at ten foot
distance. I stept over the great Western Gate,

[ 55.
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

and passed very gently, and sideling through the
two principal streets, only in my short waistcoat,
for fear of damaging the roofs and eaves of the
houses with the skirts of my coat. I walked with
the utmost circumspection, to avoid treading on
any stragglers, that might remain in the streets,
although the orders were very strict, that all people
should keep in their houses, at their own peril.
The garret windows and tops of houses were so —
crowded with spectators, that I thought in all my
travels I had not seen a more populous place.
The city 1s an exact square, each side of the
wall being five hundred foot long. The two great
streets, which run across and divide it into four
quarters, are five foot wide. The lanes and alleys,
which I could not enter, but only viewed them as
I passed, are from twelve to eighteen inches. The
town is capable of holding five hundred thousand
souls. The houses are from three to five stories.
The shops and markets well provided.

The Emperor’s palace is in the centre of the city,
where the two great streets meet. It is inclosed
by a wall of two foot high, and twenty foot distant
from the buildings. I had his Majesty’s permis-
sion to step over this wall; and the space being
so wide between that and the palace, I could easily

[ 56 |





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view it on every side. The outward court is a
square of forty foot, and includes ¢wo other courts :
in the inmost are the royal apartments, which |
was very desirous to see, but found it extremely
difficult; for the great gates, from one square into
another, were but eighteen inches high, and seven
inches wide. Now the buildings of the outer court
were at least five foot high, and it was impossible
for me to stride over them without infinite damage
to the pile, though the walls were strongly built
of hewn stone, and four inches thick. At the same
time the Emperor had a great desire that I should
see the magnificence of his palace; but this I was
not able to do till three days after, which I spent
in cutting down with my knife some of the largest
trees in the royal park, about an hundred yards
distant from the city. Of these trees I made two
stools, each about three foot high, and strong
enough to bear my weight. The people having re-
ceived notice a second time, I went again through
the city to the palace, with my two stools in my
hands. When I came to the side of the outer
court, I stood upon one stool, and took the other
in my hand: this I lifted over the roof, and gently
set it down on the space between the first and
second court, which was eight foot wide. I then

[ 58 |
A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

stept over the buildings very conveniently from
one stool to the other, and drew up the first after
me with a hooked stick. By this contrivance I
got into the inmost court; and lying down upon
my side, I applied my face to the windows of the
middle stories, which were left open on purpose,
and discovered the most splendid apartments that
can be imagined. There I saw the Empress and
the young Princes, in their several lodgings, with
their chief attendants about them. Her Imperial
Majesty was pleased to smile very graciously upon
me, and gave me out of the window her hand
to kiss. |
But I shall not anticipate the reader with farther
descriptions of this kind, because I reserve them
for a greater work, which is now almost ready for
the press, containing a general description of this
empire, from its first erection, through a long series
of princes, with a particular account of their wars
and politics, laws, learning, and religion: their plants
and animals, their peculiar manners and customs,
with other matters very curious and useful; my
chief design at present being only to relate such
- events and transactions as happened to the public,
or to myself, during a residence of about nine
months in that empire. |

[ 59 ]
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

One morning, about a fortnight after I had ob-
tained my liberty, Reldresal, principal Secretary
(as they style him) of private Affairs, came to my
house attended only by one servant. He ordered
his coach to wait at a distance, and desired I would
give him an hour's audience; which I readily con-
sented to, on account of his quality and personal
merits, as well as the many good offices he had
done me during my solicitations at court. I
offered to lie down, that he might the more con-
veniently reach my ear; but he chose rather to let
me hold him in my hand during our conversation.
He began with compliments on my liberty; said
he might pretend to some merit in it: but, how-
ever, added, that if it had not been for the present
situation of things at court, perhaps I might not
have obtained it so soon. For, said he, as flourish-
ing a condition as we may appear to be in to
foreigners, we labour under two mighty evils; a
violent faction at home, and the danger of an
invasion by a most potent enemy from abroad.
As to the first, you are to understand, that for
about seventy moons past there have been two
struggling parties in this empire, under the
names of 7vamecksan and Slamecksan, from the
high and low heels of their shoes, by which they

[ 60 ]
A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

distinguish themselves. It is alleged indeed, that
the high heels are most agreeable to our ancient
constitution: but however this be, his Majesty
hath determined to make use of only low heels
in the administration of the government, and all
offices in the gift of the Crown, as you cannot
but observe; and particularly, that his Majesty's
~ Imperial heels are lower at least by a drurr than
any of his court; (dwrr is a measure about the
fourteenth part of an inch). The animosities
between these two parties run so high, that they
will neither eat nor drink, nor talk with each other.
We compute the 7vamecksan, or High-Heels, to
exceed us in number; but the power 1s wholly on
our side. We apprehend his Imperial Highness,
the Heir to the Crown, to have some tendency
towards the High-Heels; at least we can plainly
discover one of his heels higher than the other,
which gives him a hobble in his gait. Now, in the
midst of these intestine disquiets, we are threat-
ened with an invasion from the Island of Blefuscu,
which is the other great empire of the universe,
almost as large and powerful as this of his Majesty.
For as to what we have heard you affirm, that there
are other kingdoms and states in the world in-
habited by human creatures as large as yourself,

[Or |
Ge TE Reset RAVE Ss

our philosophers are in much doubt, and would
rather conjecture that you dropped from the moon,
or one of the stars; because it is certain, that an
hundred mortals of your bulk would, in a short
time, destroy all the fruits and cattle of his
Majesty's dominions. Besides, our histories of six
thousand moons make no mention of any other
regions, than the two great empires of Lilliput and
Blefuscu. Which two mighty powers have, as I
was going to tell you, been engaged in a most
obstinate war for six and thirty moons past. It
began upon the following occasion. It is allowed
on all hands, that the primitive way of breaking
eggs before we eat them, was upon the larger end:
but his present Majesty’s grandfather, while he
was a boy, going to eat an egg, and breaking it
according to the ancient practice, happened to cut
one of his fingers. Whereupon the Emperor his
father published an edict, commanding all his sub-
jects, upon great penalties, to break the smaller
end of their eggs. The people so highly resented
this law, that our histories tell us there have been
six rebellions raised on that account; wherein one
Emperor lost his life, and another his crown.
These civil commotions were constantly fomented _
by the monarchs of Blefuscu: and when they were
[ 62 ]
A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

quelled, the exiles always fled for refuge to that
empire. It is computed, that eleven thousand
persons have, at several times, suffered death,
rather than submit to break their eggs at the
smaller end. Many hundred large volumes have —
been published upon this controversy: but the
books of the Big-Endians have been long for-
bidden, and the whole party rendered incapable
by law of holding employments. During the course
of these troubles, the Emperors of Blefuscu did
frequently expostulate by their ambassadors, ac-
cusing us of making a schism in religion, by offend-
ing against a fundamental doctrine of our great
prophet Lustrog, in the fifty-fourth chapter of the
Blundecral (which is their Alcoran). This, how-
ever, is thought to be a mere strain upon the text:
for the words are these; 7hat all true believers
break their eggs at the convenient end: and which
is the convenient end, seems, in my humble
opinion, to be left to every man’s conscience, or
at least in the power of the chief magistrate to
determine. Now the Big-Endian exiles have found
- so much credit in the Emperor of Blefuscu’s court,
and so much private assistance and encourage-
ment from their party here at home, that a bloody
war has been carried on between the two empires

Les |
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

for six and thirty moons with various success;
during which time we have lost forty capital ships,
and a much greater number of smaller vessels,
together with thirty thousand of our best sea-
men and soldiers; and the damage received by
the enemy is reckoned to be somewhat greater
than ours. However, they have now equipped a
numerous fleet, and are just preparing to make a
descent upon us; and’his Imperial Majesty, plac-
ing great confidence in your valour and strength,
has commanded me to lay this account of his
affairs before you.

I desired the Secretary to present my humble
duty to the Emperor, and to let him know, that
I thought it would not become me, who was a
foreigner, to interfere with parties; but I was
ready, with the hazard of my life, to defend his
person and state against all invaders.

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[64 ]


CHAPTER V

The Author, by an cxtraordinary stratagem, prevents an
invasion. A high title of honour ts conferred upon him.
Ambassadors arrive from the Emperor of Blefuscu and
sue for peace.

HE Empire of Blefuscu is an island situ-

ated to the north north-east side of Lilliput,

from whence it is parted only by a channel
of eight hundred yards wide. I had not yet seen
it, and upon this notice of an intended invasion,
I avoided appearing on that side of the coast, for
fear of being discovered by some of the enemy’s
ships, who had received no intelligence of me, all
intercourse between the two empires having been
strictly forbidden during the war, upon pain of
death, and an embargo laid by our Emperor upon
all vessels whatsoever. I communicated to his
Majesty a project I had formed of seizing the

[65]
GUE IY eR Ss TRAV ES

enemy's whole fleet: which, as our scouts assured
us, lay at anchor in the harbour ready to sail with
the first fair wind. I consulted the most experi-
enced seamen, upon the depth of the channel,
which they had often plumbed, who told me, that
in the middle at highwater it was seventy g/um-
gluffs deep, which is about six foot of European
measure; and the rest of it fifty elumgluffs at
most. I walked towards the north-east coast over
against Blefuscu; and lying down behind a hillock,
took out my small pocket perspective-glass, and
viewed the enemy’s fleet at anchor, consisting of
about fifty men of war, and a great number of
transports: I then came back to my house, and
gave order (for which I had a warrant) for a great
quantity of the strongest cable and bars of iron.
The cable was about as thick as packthread, and
the bars of the length and size of a knitting-needle.
I trebled the cable to make it stronger, and for
the same reason I twisted three of the iron bars
together, binding the extremities into a hook.
Having thus fixed fifty hooks to as many cables, I
went back to the north-east coast, and putting off
my coat, shoes, and stockings, walked into the
sea in my leathern jerkin, about half an hour
before high water. I waded with what haste I
[ 66 ]
A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

could, and swam in the middle about thirty yards
till I felt ground; I arrived at the fleet in less than —
half an hour. The enemy was so frighted when
_ they saw me, that they leaped out of their ships,
and swam to shore, where there could not be fewer
than thirty thousand souls. I then took my tack-
ling, and fastening a hook to the hole at the prow
of each, I tied all the cords together at the end.
While I was thus employed, the enemy discharged
several thousand arrows, many of which stuck in
my hands and face; and besides the excessive
smart, gave me much disturbance in my work.
My greatest apprehension was for my eyes, which
I should have infallibly lost, if I had not sud-
denly thought of an expedient. I kept among other
little necessaries a pair of spectacles in a private
pocket, which, as I observed before, had scaped
the Emperor's searchers. These I took out and
fastened as strongly as I could upon my nose,
and thus armed went on boldly with my work in
spite of the enemy’s arrows, many of which struck
against the glasses of my spectacles, but without
any other effect, further than a little to discom-
pose them. I had now fastened all the hooks, and
taking the knot in my hand, began to pull; but ©
not a ship would stir, for they were all too fast
[ 67 |
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

held by their anchors, so that the boldest part of
my enterprise remained. I therefore let go the
cord, and leaving the hooks fixed to the ships, I
resolutely cut with my knife the cables that
fastened the anchors, receiving about two hundred
shots in my face and hands; then I took up the
knotted end of the cables, to which my hooks
were tied, and with great ease drew fifty of the
enemy’s largest men of war after me.

The Blefuscudians, who had not the least imagi-
nation of what I intended, were at first confounded
with astonishment. They had seen me cut the
cables, and thought my design was only to let the
ships run a-drift, or fall foul on each other: but -
when they perceived the whole fleet moving in
order, and saw me pulling at the end, they set up
such a scream of grief and despair, that it 1s almost.
impossible to describe or conceive. When I had
got out of danger, I stopped awhile to pick out the
arrows that stuck in my hands and face; and
rubbed on some of the same ointment that was
given me at my first arrival, as I have formerly |
mentioned. I then took off my spectacles, and
waiting about an hour, till the tide was a little
fallen, I waded through the middle with my cargo,
and arrived safe at the royal port of Lilliput.

[ 68 ]


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GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

The Emperor and his whole court stood on the
shore, expecting the issue of this great adventure.
They saw the ships move forward in a large half-
moon, but could not discern me, who was up to
my breast in water. When I advanced to the mid-
dle of the channel, they were yet in more pain,
because I was under water to my neck. The
Emperor concluded me to be drowned, and that
the enemy’s fleet was approaching in a hostile
manner: but he was soon eased of his fears, for
the channel growing shallower every step I made,
I came in a short time within hearing, and holding
up the end of the cable by which the fleet was
fastened, I cried in a loud voice, Long hve the
most puissant Emperor of Lilliput!’ ‘This great
prince received me at my landing with all possible
encomiums, and created me a Wardac upon the
spot, which is the highest title of honour among
them.

His Majesty desired I would take some other
opportunity of bringing all the rest of his enemy’s
ships into his ports. And so unmeasureable is the
ambition of princes, that he seemed to think of
nothing less than reducing the whole empire of
Blefuscu into a province, and governing it by a
viceroy; of destroying the Big-Endian exiles, and

[ 70 |
A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

compelling that people to break the smaller end
of their eggs, by which he would remain the sole
monarch of the whole world. But I endeavoured
to divert him from this design, by many arguments
drawn from the topics of policy as well as justice ;
and I plainly protested, that I would never be an
instrument of bringing a free and brave people
into slavery. And when the matter was debated
in council, the wisest part of the ministry were of
my opinion.

This open bold declaration of mine was so oppo-
site to the schemes and politics of his Imperial
Majesty, that he could never forgive it; he men-
tioned it in a very artful manner at council, where
I was told that some of the wisest appeared, at
least by their silence, to be of my opinion; but
others, who were my secret enemies, could not |
forbear some expressions, which by a side-wind
reflected on me. And from this time began an
intrigue between his Majesty and a junto of min-
isters maliciously bent against me, which broke
out in less than two months, and had like to
have ended in my utter destruction. Of so little
weight are the greatest services to prinees, when
put into the balance with a refusal..to gratify
their passions.

[71 |
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

About three weeks after this exploit, there
arrived a solemn embassy from Blefuscu, with
humble offers of a peace; which was soon con-
cluded upon conditions very advantageous to our
Emperor, wherewith I shall not trouble the reader.
There were six ambassadors, with a train of about
five hundred persons, and their entry was very
magnificent, suitable to the grandeur of their mas-
ter, and the importance of their business. When
their treaty was finished, wherein I did them several
good offices by the credit I now had, or at least
appeared to have at court, their Excellencies, who
were privately told how much I had been their
friend, made me a visit in form. They began with
many compliments upon my valour and generosity,
invited me to that kingdom in the Emperor their
master’s name, and desired me to show them some
proofs of my prodigious strength, of which they
had heard so many wonders; wherein I readily
‘obliged them, but shall not trouble the reader with
the particulars.

When I had for some time entertained their
Excellencies, to their infinite satisfaction and sur-
prise, I desired they would do me the honour to
present my most humble respects to the Emperor
their master, the renown of whose virtues had so

[72 |
A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

justly filled the whole world with admiration, and
whose royal person I resolved to attend before I
returned to my own country: accordingly, the next
time I had the honour to see our Emperor, I de-
sired his general licence to wait on the Blefuscu-
dian monarch, which he was pleased to grant me,
as I could perceive, in a very cold manner; but
could not guess the reason, till I had a whisper
from acertain person, that Flimnap and Bolgolam
had represented my intercourse with those am-
bassadors as a mark of disaffection, from which I
am sure my heart was wholly free. And this was
the first time I began to conceive some imperfect
idea of courts and ministers.

It is to be observed, that these ambassadors
spoke to me by an interpreter, the languages of
both empires differing as much from each other
as any two in Europe, and each nation priding
itself upon the antiquity, beauty, and energy of |
their own tongues, with an avowed contempt for
that of their neighbour; yet our Emperor, stand-
ing upon the advantage he had got by the seizure
of their fleet, obliged them to deliver their creden-
tials, and make their speech in the Lilliputian
tongue. And it must be confessed, that from the
great intercourse of trade and commerce between

[73]
pO tentaey
es

pers
Toe
Le WY

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oe

or
{

cx

GU yok SR Avorn ees

both realms, from the continual reception of exiles,

which is mutual among them, and from the custom
in each empire to send their young nobility and
richer gentry to the other, in order to polish them-
selves by seeing the world, and understanding
men and manners; there are few persons of dis-
tinction, or merchants, or seamen, who dwell in the
maritime parts, but what can hold conversation in
both tongues; as I found some weeks after, when
I went to pay my respects to the Emperor of
Blefuscu, which in the midst of great misfortunes,
through the malice of my enemies, proved a very
happy adventure to me, as I shall relate in its
proper place.






Walle.

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oC Teale lt E R VI
Of the inhabitants of Lilliput; their learning, laws, and

customs, the manner of educating their children. The
Author's way of living in that country. .

LTHOUGH I intend to leave the descrip-
tion of this empire to a particular treatise,
yet in the mean time I am content to

gratify the curious reader with some general ideas. |
As the common size of the natives is somewhat
under six inches high, so there is an exact pro-
portion in all other animals, as well as plants and
trees: for instance, the tallest horses and oxen are
between four and five inches in height, the sheep
an inch and a half, more or less: their geese about
the bigness of a sparrow, and so the several grada-
tions downwards till you come to the smallest,
which, to my sight, were almost invisible; but
nature hath adapted the eyes of the Lilliputians

[75 ]


g
Gry RS RAV ES

to all objects proper for their view: they see with
great exactness, but at no great distance. And to
show the sharpness of their sight towards objects
that are near, I have been much pleased with
observing a cook pulling a lark, which was not so
large as a common fly; and a young girl thread-
ing an invisible needle with invisible silk. Their
tallest trees are about seven foot high: I mean
some of those in the great royal park, the tops
whereof I could but just reach with my fist clinched.
The other vegetables are in the same proportion ;
but this I leave to the reader’s imagination.

I shall say but little at present of their learning,
which for many ages hath flourished in all its —
branches among them: but their manner of writ-
ing is very peculiar, being neither from the left to
the right, like the Europeans; nor from the right
to the left, like the Arabians; nor from up to down,
like the Chinese; nor from down to up, like the
Cascagians; but aslant from one corner of the
paper to the other, like ladies in England.

_ They bury their dead with their heads directly
downwards, because they hold an opinion, that in
eleven thousand moons they are all to rise again,
in which period the earth (which they conceive to
be flat) will turn upside down, and by this means

[ 76 |
he VOy Net LO Llp rw?

they shall, at their resurrection, be found ready
standing on their feet. The learned among them
confess the absurdity of this doctrine, but the prac-
tice still continues, in compliance to the vulgar.

There are some laws and customs in this empire
very peculiar; and if they were not so directly con-
trary to those of my own dear country, I should
be tempted to say a little in their justification.
It is only to be wished, that they were as well
executed. The first I shall mention, relates to in-
formers. All crimes against the state are punished
here with the utmost severity; but if the person
accused maketh his innocence plainly to appear
upon his trial, the accuser is immediately put to
an ignominious death; and out of his goods or
lands, the innocent person is quadruply recom-
pensed for the loss of his time, for the danger he
underwent, for the hardship of his imprisonment,
and for all the charges he hath been at in making
his defence. Or, if that fund be deficient, it 1s
largely supplied by the Crown. The Emperor
does also confer on him some public mark of his
favour, and proclamation is made of his innocence
through the whole city. :

They look upon fraud as a greater crime than
theft, and therefore seldom fail to punish it with

77


GUE VEkR so TRAVELS

‘death; for they allege, that care and vigilance,
with a very common understanding, may preserve
a man’s goods from thieves, but houesty has no
fence against superior cunning; and since it is
necessary that there should be a perpetual inter-
course of buying and selling, and dealing upon
credit, where fraud is permitted and connived at,
or hath no law to punish it, the honest dealer is
always undone, and the knave gets the advantage.
I remember when I was once interceding with the
Emperor for a criminal who had wronged his
master of a great sum of money, which he had
received by order, and ran away with; and hap-
pening to tell his Majesty, by way of extenuation,
that it was only a breach of trust; the Emperor
thought it monstrous in me to offer, as a defence,
the greatest aggravation of the crime: and truly I
had little to say in return, farther than the com-
mon answer, that different nations had different
customs; for, I confess, I was heartily ashamed.
Although we usually call reward and punish-
ment the two hinges upon which all government
turns, yet I could never observe this maxim to be
put in practice by any nation except that of Lilli-
put. Whoever can there bring sufficient proof that
he hath strictly observed the laws of his country

| 78 |
Ae Ow AG OA in ee el

for seventy three moons, hath a claim to certain »

privileges, according to his quality and condition

of life, with a ’proportionable sum of money out of

a fund appropriated for that use: he likewise
acquires the title of Svz/pal/, or Legal, which is
added to his name, but does not descend to his
posterity. And these people thought it a prodl-
gious defect of policy among us, when I told them
that our laws were enforced only by penalties,

without any mention of reward. It is upon this “

account that the image of Justice, in their courts
of judicature, is formed with six eyes, two before,
as many behind, and on each side one, to signify
circumspection; with a bag of gold open in her
right hand, and a sword sheathed in her left, to
show she is more disposed to reward than to
punish.

In choosing persons for all employments, they
have more regard to good morals than to great
abilities; for, since government is necessary to
mankind, they believe that the common size of
human understandings is fitted to some station
or other, and that Providence never intended to
make the management of public affairs a mystery,
to be comprehended only by a few persons of sub-
lime genius, of which there seldom are three born

[ 79 |
CUE Vera so Wak Aven ias

in an age: but they suppose truth, justice, tem-
perance, and the like, to be in every man’s power;
the practice of which virtues, assisted by expe-
rience and a good intention, would qualify any
man for the service of his country, except where
a course of study is required. But they thought
the want of moral virtues was so far from being
supplied by superior endowments of the mind,
that employments could never be put into such
dangerous hands as those of persons so qualified ;
and at least, that the mistakes committed by igno-
rance in a virtuous disposition, would never be of
such fatal consequence to the public weal, as the
practices of a man whose inclinations led him to
be corrupt, and had great abilities to manage, and
multiply, and defend his corruptions.

In like manner, the disbelief of a Divine Provi-
dence renders a man uncapable of holding any
public station; for, since kings avow themselves
to be the deputies of Providence, the Lilliputians
think nothing can be more absurd than for a prince
to employ such men as disown the authority under
which he acts.

In relating these and the following laws, I would
only be understood to mean the original institu-
tions, and not the most scandalous corruptions

[ 80 ]
eNO weGe Or Lr LI rer

into which these people are fallen by the degenerate
nature of man. For as to that infamous practice of
acquiring great employments by dancing on the
ropes, or badges of favour and distinction by leap-
ing over sticks and creeping under them, the reader
is to observe, that they were first introduced by
the grandfather of the Emperor now reigning, and
grew to the present height, by the gradual increase
of party and faction.

Ingratitude is among them a capital “ioe as
we read it to have been in some other countries:

_ for they reason thus, that whoever makes ill re-
turns to his benefactor, must needs be acommon ‘
enemy to the rest of mankind, from whom he hath >

received no obligation, and therefore such a man
is not fit to live. |

Their notions relating to the duties of parents
and children differ extremely from ours. Their
opinion is, that parents are the last of all others
to be trusted with the education of their own
children; and therefore they have in every town
public nurseries, where all parents, except cottagers
and labourers, are obliged to send their infants of
both sexes to be reared and educated when they
come to the age of twenty moons, at which time
they are supposed to have some rudiments of

[81 |
Gabe aN RS ie RAW eS

docility. These schools are of several kinds,
suited to different qualities, and to both sexes.
They have certain professors well skilled in pre-
paring children for such a condition of life as
befits the rank of their parents, and their own
capacities as well as inclinations. I shall first say
something of the male nurseries, and then of the
female. <

The nurseries for males of noble or eminent
birth, are provided with grave and learned pro-
fessors, and their several deputies. The clothes and
food of the children are plain and simple. They
are bred up in the principles of honour, justice,
courage, modesty, clemency, religion, and love of
their country; they are always employed in some
business, extept in the times of eating and sleep-
ing, which are very short, and two hours for diver-
sions, consisting of bodily exercises. They are
dressed by men till four years of age, and then
are obliged to dress themselves, although their
quality be ever so great; and the women attend-
ants, who are aged proportionably to ours at fifty,
perform only the most menial offices. They are
never suffered to converse with servants, but go
together in small or greater numbers to take
their diversions, and always in the presence of a

[ 82 |
A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

professor, or one of his deputies; whereby they
avoid those early bad impressions of folly and vice
to which our children are subject. Their parents
are suffered to see them only twice a year; the visit
is to last but an hour. They are allowed to kiss
the child at meeting and parting; but a professor,
who always stands by on those occasions, will not
suffer them to whisper, or use any fondling ex-
pressions, or bring any presents of toys, sweet-
meats, and the like.

The pension from each family for the educa-
tion and entertainment of a child, upon failure
of due payment, is levied by the Emperor’s
officers.

The nurseries for children of ordinary gentle-
men, merchants, traders, and handic:ufts, are man-
aged proportionably after the same manner; only
those designed for trades, are put out apprentices
at eleven years old, whereas those of persons of
quality continue in their exercises till fifteen, which
answers to one and twenty with us: but the con-
finement is gradually lessened for the last three
years. no

In the female nurseries, the young gitls of
quality are-educated much like the males, only
they are dressed by orderly servants of their own .

[ 33 |
Cee RS TRAVELS

sex; but always in the presence of a professor or
deputy, till they come to dress themselves, which
is at five years old. And if it be found that these
nurses ever presume to entertain the girls with
frightful or foolish stories, or the common follies
practised by chambermaids among us, they are
publicly whipped thrice about the city, imprisoned
for a year, and banished for life to the most deso-
late part of the country. Thus the young ladies
there are as much ashamed of being cowards and
fools, as the men, and despise all personal orna-
ments beyond decency and cleanliness : neither did
I perceive any difference in their education, made
by their difference of sex, only that the exercises
of the females were not altogether so robust; and
that some rules were given them relating to
domestic life, and a smaller compass of learn-
ing was enjoined them: for their maxim is, that
among people of quality, a wife should be always
a reasonable and agreeable companion, because
she cannot always be young. When the girls are
twelve years old, which among them is the mar-
riageable age, their parents or guardians take
them home, with great expressions of gratitude
to the professors, and seldom without tears of the
young lady and her companions.

[ 84 ]
AE NVONONG AOL TLL oe

In the nurseries of females of the meaner sort,
the children are instructed in all kinds of works
proper for their sex, and their several degrees:
those intended for apprentices, are dismissed at
seven years old, the rest are kept to eleven.

The meaner families who have children at these
nurseries, are obliged, besides their annual pen-
sion, which is as low as possible, to return to the
steward of the nursery a small monthly share of
their gettings, to be a portion for the child; and
therefore all parents are limited in their expenses
by the law. As to persons of quality, they give
security to appropriate a certain sum for each
child, suitable to their condition; and these funds
are always managed with good husbandry, and the
most exact justice.

The cottagers and labourers keep their children
at home, their business being only to till and
cultivate the earth, and therefore their education
is of little consequence to the public; but the old
and diseased among them are supported by hospi-
tals: for begging is a trade unknown in this empire.

And here it may perhaps divert the curious
reader, to give some account of my domestic, and
my manner of living in this country, during a resi-
dence of nine months and thirteen days. Having a

[85 |
GUELIV ERS TRAVELS

head mechanically turned, and being likewise forced
by necessity, I had made for myself a table and chair
convenient enough, out of the largest trees in the
royal park. Two hundred sempstresses were em-
ployed to make me shirts, and linen for my bed
and table, all of the strongest and coarsest kind
they could get; which, however, they were forced
to quilt together in several folds, for the thickest
was some degrees finer than lawn. Their linen is
usually three inches wide, and three foot make a
piece. The sempstresses took my measure as I lay
on the ground, one standing at my neck, and
another at my midleg, with a strong cord extended,
that each held by the end, while the third measured
the length of the cord with a rule of an inch long.
Then they measured my right thumb, and desired
no more; for by a mathematical computation, that
twice round the thumb is once round the wrist, and
so on to the neck and the waist, and by the help
of my old shirt, which I displayed on the ground
before them for a pattern, they fitted me exactly.
Three hundred tailors were employed in the same
manner to make me clothes; but they had another
contrivance for taking my measure. I kneeled
down, and they raised a ladder from the ground to
my neck; upon this ladder one of them mounted,
[ 86 |
ra VO NCA GH WO LL try a

and let fall a plumb-line from my collar to the
floor, which just answered the length of my coat:
but my waist andarms I measured mysel& When
my clothes were finished, which was done in my
house, (for the largest of theirs would not have
been able to hold them) they looked lke the patch-
work made by the ladies in England, only that
mine were all of a colour.

I had three hundred cooks to dress my victuals,
in little convenient huts built about my house,
where they and their families lived, and prepared
me two dishes a-piece. I took up twenty waiters in
my hand, and placed them on the table: an hundred
more attended below on the ground, some with
dishes of meat, and some with barrels of wine,
and other liquors, slung on their shoulders; all
which the waiters above drew up as I wanted, in
a very ingenious manner, by certain cords, as we
draw the bucket up a well in Europe. A dish of
their meat was a good mouthful, and a barrel of
their liquor a reasonable draught. Their mutton
yields to ours, but their beef is excellent. I have
had a sirloin so large, that I have been forced to
make three bits of it; but this is rare. My servants
were astonished to see mé eat it bones and all, as
in our country we do the leg of a lark. Their geese

[ 87 ]
Glave RS PRAY oSs

and turkeys I usually ate at a mouthful, and I
must confess they far exceed ours. Of their smaller
fowl I could take up twenty or thirty at the end
of my knife.

One day his Imperial Majesty, being informed
of my way of living, desired that himself and his
Royal Consort, with the
young Princes of the
blood of both sexes,
might have the happi-
ness (as he was pleased
to call it) of dining with
me. They came accord-
ingly, and I placed them
in chairs of state on my
table, just over against
me, with their guards
about them. Flimnap,
the Lord High Treas-
urer, attended there likewise with his white staff ;
and I observed he often looked on me witha sour
countenance, which I would not seem to regard,
but ate more than usual, in honour to my dear
country, as well as to fill the court with admi-
ration. I have some private reasons to believe,
that this visit from his Majesty gave Flimnap an

[ 88 ]



GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

opportunity of doing me ill offices to his master.
That minister had always been my secret enemy,
though outwardly caressed me more than was
usual t6 the moroseness of his nature. He repre-
sented to the Emperor the low condition of his
treasury; that he was forced to take up money at
great discount; that exchequer bills would not
circulate under nine per cent. below par; that in
short I had cost his Majesty above a million and
a half of sprugs (their greatest gold coin, about
the bigness of a spangle); and upon the whole,
that it would be advisable in the Emperor to take
the first fair occasion of dismissing me.

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CH Ae eR 'V Id

The Author, being informed of a design to accuse him
of high-treason, makes his escape to Blefuscu. Hts
reception there.

EFORE I proceed to give an account of
RB my leaving this kingdom, it may be proper
to inform the reader of a private intrigue
which had been for two months forming against me.
I had been hitherto all my life a stranger to
courts, for which I was unqualified by the mean-
ness of my condition. I had indeed heard and
read enough of the dispositions of great princes
and ministers; but never expected to have found
such terrible effects of them in so remote a coun-
try, governed, as I thought, by very different
maxims from those in Europe.
When I was just preparing to pay my attend-

ance on the Emperor of Blefuscu, a considerable -

[91 |
CULDIVER’S PRAVELS

person at court (to whom I had been very service-
able at a time when he lay under the highest dis-
pleasure of his Imperial Majesty) came to my
house very privately at night in a close chair, and
without sending his name, desired admittance.
The chairmen were dismissed; I put the chair,



with his Lordship in it, into my coat-pocket: and
giving orders to a trusty servant to say I was
indisposed and gone to sleep, I fastened the
door of my house, placed the chair on the table,
according to my usual custom, and sat down by it.
After the common salutations were over, observ-
ing his Lordship’s countenance full of concern,

[ 92 |
IANO NGNG Ee AO OE a Bee

and enquiring into the reason, he desired I would
hear him with patience in a matter that highly
concerned my honour and my life. His speech
was to the following effect, for I took notes of it
as soon as he left me.

You are to know, said _ he, aa several Com-
mittees of Council have been lately called in the
most private manner on your account; and it is
but two days since his Majesty came to a full
resolution.

You are very sensible that Skyresh Bolgolam
(Galbet, or High-Admiral) hath been your mortal
enemy almost ever since your arrival. His origi-
nal reasons I know not; but his hatred is much in-
creased since your great success against Blefuscu,
by which his glory, as Admiral, is obscured. This
Lord, in conjunction with Flimnap the High-
_ Treasurer, whose enmity against you 1s notorious,
Limtoc the General, Lalcon the Chamberlain,
and Balmuff the Grand Justiciary, have prepared
articles of impeachment against you, for treason,
and other capital crimes.

This preface made me so impatient, being con-
scious of my own merits and innocence, that I was
going to interrupt; when he entreated me to be
silent, and thus proceeded.

[93 ]
GULLIVER’ S TRAVELS

Out of gratitude for the favours you have done
me, I procured information of the whole proceed-
ings, and a copy of the articles, wherein I venture
my head for your service.:

Articles of Lmpeachment against Quinbus Flestrin
(the Man-Mountazn)

That the said Quinbus Flestrin having brought
the imperial fleet of Blefuscu into the royal port,
and being afterwards commanded by his Imperial
Majesty to seize all the other ships of the said em-
pire of Blefuscu, and reduce that empire to a prov-
ince, to be governed by a viceroy from hence, and
to destroy and put to death not only all the Big-
Endian exiles, but likewise all the people of that
empire, who would not immediately forsake the
Big-Endian heresy: He, the said Flestrin, like a
false traitor against his most Auspicious, Serene,
Imperial Majesty, did petition to be excused from
the said service, upon pretence of unwillingness to
force the consciences, or destroy the liberties and
lives of an innocent people.

That, whereas certain ambassadors arrived from
the court of Blefuscu, to sue for peace in his

[ 94 |
A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

Majesty’s court: He, the said Flestrin, did, like a
false traitor, aid, abet, comfort, and divert the said
ambassadors, although he knew them to be ser-
vants to a Prince who was lately an open enemy
to his Imperial Majesty, and in open war against
his said Majesty.

That the said Quinbus Flestrin, contrary to the
duty of a faithful subject, is now preparing to make
a voyage to the court and empire of Blefuscu, for
which he hath received only verbal licence from
his Imperial Majesty; and under colour of the
said licence, doth falsely and traitorously intend
to take the said voyage, and thereby to aid, com-
fort, and abet the Emperor of Blefuscu, so late an
enemy, and in open war with his Imperial Majesty
aforesaid. |

There are some other articles, but these are the
most important, of which I have read you an
abstract.

In the several debates upon this impeachment,
it must be confessed that his Majesty gave many
marks of his great lenity, often urging the services
you had done him, and endeavouring to extenuate
your crimes. The Treasurer and Admiral insisted
that you should be put to the most painful and

[95 ]
COU iy ai Ret ees IE S|

ignominious death, by setting fire on your house
at night, and the General was to attend with
twenty thousand men armed with poisoned arrows
to shoot you on the face and hands. Some of your
servants were to have private orders to strew a
poisonous juice on your shirts, which would soon
make you tear your own flesh, and die in the
utmost torture. The General came into the same
opinion; so that for a long time there was a
majority against you. But his Majesty resolving,
if possible, to spare your life, at last brought off
the Chamberlain. |

Upon this incident, Reldresal, principal Secre-
tary for private Affairs, who always approved
himself your true friend, was commanded by the
Emperor to deliver his opinion, which he accord-
ingly did; and therein justified the good thoughts
you have of him. He allowed your crimes to be
great, but that still there was room for mercy,
the most commendable virtue in a prince, and for
which his Majesty was so justly celebrated. He
said, the friendship between you and him was so
well known to the world, that perhaps the most hon-
ourable board might think him partial: however,
in obedience to the command he had received,
he would freely offer his sentiments. That if his

[ 96 |
A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

Majesty, in consideration of your services, and
pursuant to his own merciful disposition, would
please to spare your life, and only give orders to
put out both your eyes, he humbly conceived,
that by this expedient, justice might in some
measure be satisfied, and all the world would
applaud the lenity of the Emperor, as well as the
fair and generous proceedings of those who have
the honour to be his counsellors. That the loss
of your eyes would be no impediment to your
bodily strength, by which you might still be use-
ful to his Majesty. That blindness is an addition
to courage, by concealing dangers from us; that
the fear you had for your eyes, was the greatest
difficulty in bringing over the enemy’s fleet, and
it would be sufficient for you to see by the eyes
of the ministers, since the greatest princes do
no more.

This proposal was received with the utmost dis-
approbation by the whole board. Bolgolam, the
Admiral, could not preserve his temper; but rising
up in fury, said, he wondered how the Secretary
durst presume to give his opinion for preserving
the life of a traitor: that the services you had per-
formed, were, by all true reasons of state, the great
aggravation of your crimes; that the same strength

[ 97 ]
Gwe tavEe RS: TRAV EES:

which, enabled you to bring over the enemy’s
fleet, might serve, upon the first discontent, to
carry it back: that he had good reasons to think
you were a Big-Endian in your heart; and as
treason begins in the heart, before it appears in
overt-acts, so he accused you as a traitor on
that account, and therefore insisted you should
be put to death.

The Treasurer was of the same opinion; he
showed to what straits his Majesty’s revenue was
reduced by the charge of maintaining you, which
would soon grow insupportable: that the Secre-
tary’s expedient of putting out your eyes was so
far from being a remedy against this evil, that it
would probably increase it, as it is manifest from
the common practice of blinding some kind of
fowl, after which they fed the faster, and grew
sooner fat: that his sacred Majesty and the Coun-
cil, who are your judges, were in their own con-
sciences fully convinced of your guilt, which was
a sufficient argument to condemn you to death,
without the formal proofs mequited by the strict
letter of the law.

But his Imperial Majesty, fully determined
against capital punishment, was graciously pleased
to say, that since the Council thought the loss of

[ 98 |
A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

_ your eyes too easy a censure, some other may be
inflicted hereafter. And your friend the Secretary
humbly desiring to be heard again, in answer to
what the Treasurer had objected concerning the
great charge his Majesty was at in maintaining
you, said, that his Excellency, who had the sole
disposal of the Emperor’s revenue, might easily
provide against that evil, by gradually lessening
your establishment; by which, for want of suffi-
cient food, you would grow weak and faint, and
lose your appetite, and consequently decay and
consume in a few months; and immediately upon
your death, five or six thousand of his Majesty's
subjects might, in two or three days, cut your flesh
from your bones, take it away by cart-loads, and
bury it in distant parts to prevent infection, leav-
ing the skeleton as a monument of admiration
to posterity.

Thus by the great friendship of the Secretary,
the whole affair was compromised. It was strictly
enjoined, that the project of starving you by de-
grees should be kept a secret, but the sentence of
putting out your eyes was entered on the books ;
none dissenting except Bolgolam the Admiral.

In three days your friend the Secretary will be
directed to come to your house, and read before

[ 99 ]
GAUPEMEAY WR aS aR Advan e Ss

you the articles of impeachment; and then to
signify the great lenity and favour of his Majesty
and Council, whereby you are only condemned to
the loss of your eyes, which his Majesty doth not
question you will gratefully and humbly submit
to; and twenty of his Majesty’s surgeons will
attend, in order to see the operation well per-
formed, by discharging very sharp-pointed arrows
into the balls of your eyes, as you lie on the
ground.

I leave to your prudence what measures you
will take; and to avoid suspicion, I must imme-
diately return in as private a manner as I came.

His Lordship did so, and I remained alone,
under many doubts and perplexities of mind.

_ It was a custom introduced by this prince and —
his ministry (very different, as I have been assured,
from the practices of former times,) that after the
court had decreed any cruel execution, either to
gratify the monarch’s resentment, or the malice
of a favourite, the Emperor always made a speech
to his whole Council, expressing his great lenity
and tenderness, as qualities known and confessed
by all the world. This speech was immediately
published through the kingdom; nor did any thing
terrify the people so much as those encomiums
[ 100 ]
hee Over Ort Tier

on his Majesty’s mercy; because it was observed,
that the more these praises were enlarged and
insisted on, the more inhuman was the punish-
ment, and the sufferer more innocent. And as
to myself, I must confess, having never been de-
signed for a courtier either by my birth or educa-
tion, I was so ill a judge of things, that I could
not discover the lenity and favour of this sentence,
but conceived it (perhaps erroneously) rather to
be rigorous than gentle. I sometimes thought of
standing my trial, for although I could not deny
the facts alleged in the several articles, yet I hoped
they would admit of some extenuations. But hav-
ing in my life perused many state-trials, which I
‘ever observed to terminate as the judges thought
fit to direct, I durst not rely on so dangerous a
decision, in so critical a juncture, and against such
powerful enemies. Once I was strongly bent upon
resistance, for while I had liberty, the whole
strength of that empire could hardly subdue me, -
and | might easily with stones pelt the. netrope
olis to pieces; but I sogn Tejectee that “project
with horror! by remembéring the oath [had
made to the Emperor, the favours I reve ved fem
him, and the high title of Mardac he conferred. ..
upon me. Neither had I so soon J ae -the|)

ty (3 wwe




CULiIMGnR Ss TRAY ELS

gratitude of courtiers, to persuade myself that
his Majesty’s present severities acquitted me of
all past obligations.

At last I fixed upon a resolution, for which it is
probable I may incur some censure, and not un-
justly; for I confess I owe the preserving my
eyes, and consequently my liberty, to my own
great rashness and want of experience: because if
I had then known the nature of princes and minis-
ters, which I have since observed in many other
courts, and their methods of treating criminals
less obnoxious than myself, I should with great
alacrity and readiness have submitted to so easy a
punishment. But hurried on by the precipitancy
of youth, and having his Imperial Majesty’s licence
to pay my attendance upon the Emperor of
Blefuscu, I took this opportunity, before the three
days were elapsed, to send a letter to my frend
the Secretary, signifying my resolution of setting
out that morning for Blefuscu pursuant to the leave
I had got; and without waiting for an answer, |
went to that side of the island where our fleet lay.
I seized a large man of war, tied a cable to the
prow, and, lifting up the anchors, I stripped myself,
put my clothes (together with my coverlet, which
I brought under my arm) into the vessel, and

fo |
RIVOV SG 2 OrLI bb treet

drawing it after me between wading and swim-
ming, arrived at the royal port of Blefuscu, where
the people had long expected me: they lent me
two guides to direct me to the capital city, which
is of the same name. I held them in my hands till
I came within two hundred yards of the gate, and
desired them to signify my arrival to one of the
secretaries, and let him know, I there waited his
_ Majesty’s command. I had an answer in about an
hour, that his Majesty, attended by the Royal
Family, and great officers of the court, was coming
out to receive me. I advanced a hundred yards.
The Emperor and his train alighted from their
horses, the Empress and ladies from their coaches,
and I did not perceive they were in any fnght or
concern. I lay on the ground to kiss his Majesty’s
and the Empress’s hands. I told his Majesty, that
I was come according to my promise, and with the
licence of the Emperor my master, to have the
honour of seeing so mighty a monarch, and to
offer him any service in my power, consistent with
my duty to my own prince; not mentioning a word
of my disgrace, because I had hitherto no regular
information of it,and might suppose myself wholly
ignorant of any such design; neither could I rea-
sonably conceive that the Emperor would discover

[ 103 |
CUP bay ERS MRA LS

the secret while I was out of his power: wherein,
however, it soon appeared I was deceived.

I shall not trouble the reader with the particular
account of my reception at this court, which was
suitable to the generosity of so great a prince;
nor of the difficulties I was in for want of a house
and bed, being forced to lie on the Seoune wrapped
up in my coverlet.



[ 104 |


GEAT TER: Vit

The Author, by a lucky accident, finds means to leave
Blefuscu,; and, after some difficulties, returns safe to
his native country. :

HREE days after my arrival, walking out

of curiosity to the north-east coast of the

island, I observed, about half a league off,
in the sea, somewhat that looked like a boat over-
turned. I pulled off my shoes and stockings, and
wading two or three hundred yards, I found the
object to approach nearer by force of the tide;
and then plainly saw it to be a real boat, which |
supposed might, by some tempest, have been driven
from a ship; whereupon I returned immediately
towards the city, and desired his Imperial Majesty
to lend me twenty of the tallest vessels he had left
after the loss of his fleet, and three thousand sea-
men under the command of his Vice-Admiral.

[ TOs
GUE Rs PeAvVELsS

This fleet sailed round, while I went back the
shortest way to the coast where I first discovered
the boat; I found the tide had driven it still —
nearer. [he seamen were all provided with cord-
age, which I had beforehand twisted to a sufficient
strength. When the ships came up, I stripped



myself, and waded till I came within an hundred
yards of the boat, after which I was forced to swim
till I got up to it. The seamen threw me the end
of the cord, which I fastened to a hole in the fore-
part of the boat, and the other end to a man of
war; but I found all my labour to little purpose;
for being out of my depth, I was not able to work.
_In this necessity, I was forced to swim behind, and
push the boat forwards as often as I could, with
[ 106 |
poe Oe ene Oe Lit Ea eave

one of my hands; and the tide favouring me, I
advanced so far, that I could just hold up my chin
and feel the ground. I rested two or three minutes,
and then gave the boat another shove, and so on
till the sea was no higher than my arm-pits; and
now the most laborious part being over, I took »
out my other cables, which were stowed in one of
the ships, and fastening them first to the boat, and
then to nine of the vessels which attended me; the
wind being favourable, the seamen towed, and |]
_ shoved till we arrived within forty yards of the
shore; and waiting till the tide was out, I got dry
to the boat, and by the assistance of two thousand
men, with ropes and engines, I made a shift to
turn it on its bottom, and found it was but little
damaged. |

I shall not trouble the reader with the difficulties
I was under by the help of certain paddles, which
cost me ten days making, to get my boat to the
royal port of Blefuscu, where a mighty concourse
of people appeared upon my arrival, full of wonder
at the sight of so prodigious a vessel. I told the
Emperor that my good fortune had thrown this
boat in my way, to carry me to some place from
whence I might return into my native country, —

and begged his Majesty's orders for getting
[ 107 |
Ciba ieR 6 eRe Ven Ss :

materials to fit it up, together with his licence to
_ depart; which, after some kind expostulations, he
was pleased to grant.

I did very much wonder, in all this time, not to
have heard of any express relating to me from
our Emperor to the court of Blefuscu. But I was
afterwards given privately to understand, that his
Imperial Majesty, never imagining I had the least
notice of his designs, believed I was only gone to.
Blefuscu in performance of my promise, according
to the licence he had given me, which was well
known at our court, and would return in a few
days when that ceremony was ended. But he was
at last in pain at my long absence; and after con-
sulting with the Treasurer, and the rest of that
cabal, a person of quality was dispatched with the
copy of the articles against me. This envoy had
instructions to represent to the monarch of Ble-
fuscu, the great lenity of his master, who was
content to punish me no farther than with the
loss of my eyes; that I had fled from justice, and
if I did not return in two hours, I should be de-
prived of my title of Mardac and declared a traitor.
The envoy further added, that in order to main-.
tain the peace and amity between both empires, —
his master expected, that his brother of Blefuscu
[ 108 |
EO en amor bill a Pau

would give orders to have me_sent back to Lilliput,
bound hand and foot, to be punished as a traitor.

The Emperor of Blefuscu having taken three
days to consult, returned an answer consisting of
many civilities and excuses. He said, that as for
sending me bound, his brother knew it was im-
possible; that although I had deprived him of his
fleet, yet he owed great obligations to me for many
good offices I had done him in making the peace.
That however both their Majesties would soon be
made easy; for I had found a prodigious vessel on
the shore, able to carry me on the sea, which he
had given order to fit up with my own assistance
and direction; and he hoped in a few weeks both
empires would be freed from so insupportable an
meumibrance, |”

With this answer the envoy returned to Lilliput,
and the monarch of Blefuscu related to me all that
had passed; offering me at the same time (but
under the strictest confidence) his gracious pro-
tection, if I would continue in his service ; wherein
although I believed him sincere, yet I resolved
never more to put any confidence in princes _ or
ministers, where I could possibly ‘avoid 1%; and
therefore, with all due acknowledgments a his
favourable intentions, I humbly begged to be

[ 109 |
GUL by ter: S AakeA Vaiies

excused. I told him, that since fortune, whether
good or evil, had thrown a vessel in my way, |
was resolved to venture myself in the ocean, rather
than be an occasion of difference between two
such mighty monarchs. Neither did I find the
Emperor at all displeased; and I discovered by a
certain accident, that he was very glad of my
resolution, and so were most of his ministers.

These considerations moved me to hasten my
departure somewhat sooner than I| intended; to
which the court, impatient to have me gone, very
readily contributed. Five hundred workmen were
employed to make two sails to my boat, according
‘to my directions, by quilting thirteen fold of their
strongest linen together. I was at the pains of
making ropes and cables, by twisting ten, twenty
or thirty of the thickest and strongest of theirs. A
great stone that I happened to find, after a long
search, by the sea-shore, served me for an anchor.
I had the tallow of three hundred cows for greasing
my boat, and other uses. I was at incredible pains
in cutting down some of the largest timber-trees
for oars and masts, wherein I was, however, much
assisted by his Majesty’s ship-carpenters, who
helped me in smoothing them, after I had done
the rough work.

hiro;
APNOXENGE TO CE Li eee

In about a month, when all was prepared, I sent
to receive his Majesty’s commands, and to take my
leave. The Emperor and Royal Family came out
of the palace; I lay down on my face to kiss his
hand, which he very graciously gave me: so did
the Empress and young Princes of the blood. His
Majesty presented me with fifty purses of two
hundred sfrugs a-piece, together with his picture
at full length, which I put immediately into one of
my gloves, to keep it from being hurt. The cere-
monies at my departure were too many to trouble |
the reader with at this time.

I stored the boat with the carcases of an hundred
oxen, and three hundred sheep, with bread and
drink proportionable, and as much meat ready
dressed as four hundred cooks could provide. I
took with me six cows and two bulls alive, with as
many ewes and rams, intending to carry them into
my own country, and propagate the breed. And
to feed them on board, I had a good bundle of hay,
and a bag of corn. I would gladly have taken a
dozen of the natives, but this was a thing the
Emperor would by no means permit; and besides
a diligent search into my pockets, his Majesty en-
gaged my honour not to carry away any of his sub-
jects, although with their own consent and desire.

Laat i
,

Having thus prepared all things as well as I
was able, I set sail on the twenty-fourth day of
September 1701, at six in the morning; and when
I had gone about four leagues to the northward,
the wind being at south-east, at six in the evening
I descried a small island about half a league to the
north-west. I advanced forward, and cast anchor
on the lee-side of the island, which seemed to be
uninhabited. I then took some refreshment, and
went to my rest. I slept well, and as I conjecture
at least six hours, for I found the day broke in two
hours after I awaked. It was a clear night. I ate
my breakfast before the sun was up; and heaving
anchor, the wind being favourable, I steered the
same course that I had done the day before,
wherein I was directed by my pocket-compass.
My intention was to reach, if possible, one of those
islands, which I had reason to believe lay to the
north-east of Van Diemen’s Land. I discovered
- nothing all that day; but upon the next, about
three in the afternoon, when I had by my compu-
tation made twenty-four leagues from Blefuscu, I
descried a sail steering to the south-east ; my course
was due east. I hailed her, but could get no
answer; yet I found I gained upon her, for the
wind slackened. I made all the sail I could, and in

a2 os

Gi ae deve Roe RSV iS
ee U7 ob oe

je foo sare


GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

half an hour she spied me, then hung out her
ancient, and discharged a gun. It is not easy to
express the joy I was in upon the unexpected hope
of once more seeing my beloved country, and the
dear pledges I had left in it. The ship slackened
her sails,and I came up with her between five and
six in the evening, September 26; but my heart
leaped within me to see her English colours. I put
my cows and sheep into my coat-pockets, and got
on board with all my little cargo of provisions.
The vessel was an English merchant-man, return-
ing from Japan by the North and South Seas; the
Captain, Mr. John Biddel of Deptford, a very civil
man, and an excellent sailor. We were now in the
latitude of 30 degrees south; there were about fifty
men in the ship; and here I met an old comrade
of mine, one Peter Williams, who gave me a good
character to the Captain. This gentleman treated
me with kindness, and desired I would let him *
know what place I came from last, and whither I
was bound; which I did in a few words, but he
thought I was raving, and that the dangers I under-
went had disturbed my head; whereupon I took
my black cattle and sheep out of my pocket, which,
after great astonishment, clearly convinced him of
my veracity. I then showed him the gold given

[114 ]
pee Yoana EO), i Pan

me by the Emperor of Blefuscu, together with his
Majesty’s picture at full length, and some other
rarities of that country. I gave him two purses of
two hundred sfrugs each, and promised, when we
arrived in England, to make him a present of a
cow and a sheep.



I shall not trouble the reader with a particular
account of this voyage, which was very prosperous
for the most part. We arrived in the Downs on
the 13th of April, 1702. I had only one misfortune,
that the rats on board carried away one of my
sheep; I found her bones in a hole, picked clean
from the flesh. The rest of my cattle I got safe

[115 |
GUPrITY DR Ss tT RAV ES

on shore, and set them a grazing in a bowling-
green at Greenwich, where the fineness of the
grass made them feed very heartily, though I had
always feared the contrary : neither could I possibly
have preserved them in so long a voyage, if the
Captain had not allowed me some of his best
biscuit, which, rubbed to powder, and mingled with
water, was their constant food. The short time I
continued in England, I made a considerable profit
by showing my cattle to many persons of quality,
and others: and before I began my second voyage,
I sold them for six hundred pounds. Since my
last return, I find the breed is considerably in-
creased, especially the sheep; which I hope will
prove much to the advantage of the woollen manu-
facture, by the fineness of the fleeces.

I stayed but two months with my wife and
family; for my insatiable desire of seeing foreign
countries, would suffer me to continue no longer.
I left fifteen hundred pounds with my wife, and
fixed her in a good house at Redriff. My remain-
ing stock I carried with me, part in money, and
part in goods, in hopes to improve my fortunes.
My eldest uncle John had left me an estate in
land, near Epping, of about thirty pounds a year;

and I had a long lease of the Black Bull in —

[ 116 |
ae veO NON Gah ale @®) era?

Fetter-Lane, which yielded me as much more;
so that I was not in any danger of leaving my
family upon the parish. My son Johnny, named
so after his uncle, was at the Grammar School,
and a towardly child. My daughter Betty (who
is now well married, and ‘has children) was then
at her needle-work. I took leave of my wife,
and boy and girl, with tears on both sides, and
went on board the Adventure, a merchant-ship
of three hundred tons, bound for Surat, Captain
John Nicholas, of Liverpool, Commander. But
my account of this voyage must be referred to
the second part of my Travels.



pet |


A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG
0 RT ne ee

—

“‘BROBDINGNAG

Janflafnic Hr
: Lorbrulgrud

Wifcovescd ,AD 1703

seen

Plate, Part.





VoOIWINY HLYON



MAP SHOWING SUPPOSED LOCATION OF BROBDINGNAG

From the second edition of ‘*Gulliver’s Travels,” London, 1727


A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

Cla ER. 7

A great storm described, the long-boat sent to fetch water,
the Author goes with tt to discover the country. He ts
left on shore, ts seized by one of the natives, and carried
to a farmer's house. His reception there, with several
accidents that happened there. A description of the
inhabitants. |

AVING been condemned by nature and
fortune to an active and restless life, in
two months after my return, I again left

my native country, and took shipping in the
Downs on the 20th day of June, 1702, in the. Ad-
venture, Captain John Nicholas, a Cornish man,
Commander, bound for Surat. We had a very
prosperous gale till we arrived at the Cape of

eee |
CG UmIneven ee Soe! Acy Hales

Good Hope, where we landed for fresh water, but
discovering a leak we unshipped our goods and
wintered there; for the Captain falling sick of an
ague, we could not leave the Cape till the end of
March. We then set sail, and had a good voyage
till we passed the Straits of Madagascar; but hav-
ing got northward of that island, and to about five
degrees south latitude, the winds, which in those
seas are observed to blow a constant equal gale
between the north and west from the beginning
of December to the beginning of May, on the roth
of April began to blow with much greater violence,
and more westerly than usual, continuing so for
twenty days together, during which time we were
driven a little to the east of the Molucca Islands,
and about three degrees northward of the Line, as
our Captain found by an observation he took the
and of May, at which time the wind ceased, and
it was a perfect calm, whereat I was not a little
rejoiced. But he, being a man well experienced in
the navigation of those seas, bid us all prepare
against a storm, which accordingly happened the
day following: for a southern wind, called the
southern monsoon, began to set in.

Finding it was likely to overblow, we took in
our sprit-sail, and stood by to hand the fore-sail ;

lee.
ee © Vea GC Or BRO BD NGmNe Gee

but making foul weather, we looked the guns were
all fast, and handed the mizen. The ship lay very
broad off, so we thought it better spooning before
the sea, than trying or hulling. We reefed the
fore-sail and set him, we hawled aft the fore-sheet,
the helm was hard a weather. The ship wore
bravely. We belayed the fore-down-hall; but the
sail was split, and we hawled down the yard, and
got the sail into the ship, and unbound all the
things clear of it. It was a very fierce storm; ‘the
sea broke strange and dangerous. We hawled off
upon the laniard of the whipstaff, and helped the
man at helm. We would not get down our top-
mast, but let all stand, because she scudded before
the sea very well, and we knew that the top-mast
being aloft, the ship was the wholesomer, and made
better way through the sea, seeing we had sea-
room. When the storm was over, we set fore-sail
and main-sail, and brought the ship to. Then we
set the mizen, main-top-sail, and the fore-top-sail.
Our course was east north-east, the wind was at
south-west. We got the starboard tacks aboard,
we cast off our weather-braces and lifts; we set
in the lee-braces, and hawled forward by the
weather-bowlings, and hawled them tight, and
belayed them, and hawled over the mizen tack

[ 123 |
GULEIVER’S TRAVELS

to windward, and kept her full and by as near
as she would lie.

During this storm, which was followed by a
strong wind west south-west, we were carried by
my computation about five hundred leagues to
the east, so that the oldest sailor on board could
not tell in what part of the world we were. Our
provisions held out well, our ship was staunch,
and our crew all in good health; but we lay in the
utmost distress for water. We thought it best
to hold on the same course, rather than turn
more northerly, which might have brought us to
the north-west parts of Great Tartary, and into
the frozen sea.

On the 16th day of June, 1703, a boy on the
top-mast discovered land. On the 17th we came
in full view of a great island or continent (for we
knew not whether) on the south side whereof was
a small neck of land jutting out into the sea, and
a creek too shallow to hold a ship of above one
hundred tons. We cast anchor within a league of
this creek, and our Captain sent a dozen of his
men well armed in the long-boat, with vessels for
water if any could be found. I desired his leave
to go with them, that I might see the country,
and make what discoveries I could. When we

[ 124 |
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

came to land we saw no river or spring, nor any
sign of inhabitants. Our men therefore wandered
on the shore to find out some fresh water near the
sea, and I walked alone about a mile on the other
side, where I observed the country all barren and
rocky. I now began to be weary, and seeing noth-
ing to entertain my curiosity, I returned gently
down towards the creek; and the sea being full
in my view, I saw our men already got into the
boat, and rowing for life to the ship. I was going
to hollow after them, although it had been to little
purpose, when I observed a huge creature walk-
ing after them in the sea, as fast as he could: he
waded not much deeper than his knees, and took
prodigious strides: but our men had the start of
him half a league, and the sea thereabouts being
full of sharp-pointed rocks, the monster was not
able to overtake the boat. This I was afterwards
told, for I durst not stay to see the issue of that
adventure; but ran as fast as I could the way I
first went, and then climbed up a steep hill, which
gave me some prospect of the country4,! found it
fully cultivated ; but that which first surprised me
was the length of the grass, which in those grounds
that seemed to be kept for hay, was about twenty
foot high.
pee le
GAG ey aR Ss Ik ARV AES

I fell into a high road, for so I took it to be,
though it served to the inhabitants only as a foot-
path through a field of barley. Here I walked on
for some time, but could see little on either side,
it being now near harvest, and the corn rising at
least forty foot. I was an hour walking to the end
of this field, which was fenced in with a hedge of
at least one hundred and twenty foot high, and
the trees so lofty that I could make no computa-
tion of their altitude. There was a stile to pass
from this field into the next. It had four steps,
and a stone to cross over when you came to the
uppermost. It was impossible for me to climb
this stile, because every step was six foot high,
and the upper stone above twenty. I was endeav-
ouring to find some gap in the hedge, when I dis-
covered one of the inhabitants in the next field,
advancing towards the stile, of the same size with
him whom I saw in the sea pursuing our boat.
He appeared as tall as an ordinary spire-steeple,
and took about ten yards at every stride, as near
as I could guess. I was struck with the utmost
fear and astonishment, and ran to hide myself in
the corn, from whence I saw him at the top of the
stile, looking back into the next field on the night
hand, and heard him call in a voice many degrees

Eze |


Ud
é CS A

Zt \\ sow Ss
; “A eo y
fe SSE FY

SS ag)
GOOEY ERs ERAV ELS

louder than a speaking-trumpet: but the noise was
so high in the air, that at first I certainly thought
it was thunder. Whereupon seven monsters like
himself came towards him with reaping-hooks
in their hands, each hook about the largeness
of six scythes. These people were not so well
clad as the first, whose servants or labourers they
seemed to be: for, upon some words he spoke,
they went to reap the corn in the field where I lay.
I kept from them at as great a distance as I could,
but was forced to move with extreme difficulty, for
the stalks of the corn were sometimes not above
a foot distant, so that I could hardly squeeze my
body betwixt them. However, I made a shift to
go forward till I came to a part of the field where
the corn had been laid by the rain and wind.
Here it was impossible for me to advance a step;
for the stalks were so interwoven that I could not
creep through, and the beards of the fallen ears so
strong and pointed that they pierced through my
clothes into my flesh. At the same time I heard
the reapers not above an hundred yards behind
me. Being quite dispirited with toil, and wholly
overcome by grief and despair, I lay down between
two ridges, and heartily wished I might there end
my days. I bemoaned my desolate widow, and
23]
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG~â„¢

fatherless children. I lamented my own folly and
wilfulness in attempting a second voyage against
the advice of all my friends and relations. In
this terrible agitation of mind I could not forbear
thinking of Lilliput, whose inhabitants looked upon
me as the greatest prodigy that ever appeared
in the world; where I was able to draw an Im-
perial Fleet in my hand, and perform those other
actions which will be recorded for ever in the
chronicles of that empire, while posterity shall
hardly believe them, although attested by millions.
I reflected what a mortification it must prove to
me to appear as inconsiderable in this nation as.
one single Lilliputian would be among us. But
this I conceived was to be the least of my mis-
fortunes: for, as human creatures are observed to
be more savage and cruel in proportion to their
bulk, what could I expect but to be a morsel in
the mouth of the first among these enormous
barbarians that should happen to seize me? Un-
doubtedly philosophers are in the right when they
tell us, that nothing is great or little otherwise
than by comparison. It might have pleased for-
tune to have let the Lilliputians find some nation,
where the people were as diminutive with respect
to them, as they were to me. And who knows but

[ 129 ]
GUWeiik Ss ERAWY eS

that even this prodigious race of mortals might be
equally overmatched in some distant part of the
world, whereof we have yet no discovery?

Scared and confounded as I was, I could not
forbear going on with these reflections, when one
of the reapers approaching within ten yards of the
ridge where I lay, made me apprehend that with
~ the next step I should be squashed to death under
his foot, or cut in two with his reaping-hook. And.
therefore when he was again about to move, I
screamed as loud as fear could make me. Where-
upon the huge creature trod short, and looking
round about under him for some time, at last
espied me as I lay on the ground. He considered
a while with the caution of one who endeavours
to lay hold. on a small dangerous animal in such
a manner that it shall not be able either to scratch
or bite him, as I myself have sometimes done with
a weasel in England. At length he ventured to
take me up behind by the middle between his
forefinger and thumb, and brought me within three
yards of his eyes, that he might behold my shape
more perfectly. I guessed his meaning, and my
good fortune gave me so much presence of mind,
that I resolved not to struggle in the least as he
held me in the air about sixty foot from the grouna,

et'3 OF
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

although he grievously pinched my sides, for fear
I should slip through his fingers. All I ventured
was to raise my eyes towards the sun, and place
my hands together in a supplicating posture, and
to speak some words in an humble melancholy
tone, suitable to the condition I then was in. For
I apprehended every moment that he would dash
me against the ground, as we usually do any little
hateful animal which we have a mind to destroy.
But my good star would have it, that he appeared
pleased with my voice and gestures, and began to
look upon me as a curiosity, much wondering to
hear me pronounce articulate words, although he
could not understand them. In the mean time I
_was not able to forbear groaning and shedding
tears, and turning my head towards my sides;
letting him know, as well as I could, how cruelly
I was hurt by the pressure of his thumb and finger.
He seemed to apprehend my meaning; for, lifting
up the lappet of his coat, he put me gently into it,
_ and immediately ran along with me to his master,
who was a substantial farmer, and the same person
I had first seen in the field.

The farmer having (as I supposed by their talk)
received such an account of me as his servant
could give him, took a piece of a small straw,

[#30]


GULP VE kes LEAVY Es

about the size of a walking staff, and therewith
lifted up the lappets of my coat; which it seems
he thought to be some kind of covering that nature
had given me. He blew my hairs aside to take a
better view of my face. He called his hinds about
him, and asked them (as I afterwards learned)
whether they had ever seen in the fields any little
creature that resembled me. He then placed me
softly on the ground upon all four, but I got im-
mediately up, and walked slowly backwards and
forwards, to let those people see I had no intent
to run away. They all sat down in a circle about
me, the better to observe my motions. I pulled
off my hat, and made a low bow towards the
farmer. I fell on my knees, and lifted up my hands
and eyes, and spoke several words as loud as I
could: I took. a purse of gold out of my pocket,
and humbly presented it to him. He received it
on the palm of his hand, then applied it close to
his eye, to see what it was, and afterwards turned
it several times with the point of a pin (which he
took out of his sleeve), but could make nothing of
it. Whereupon I made a sign that he should place
his hand on the ground. I then took the purse,
and opening it, poured all the gold into his palm.
There were six Spanish pieces of four pistoles

[132 |


TUR
i

Slee L151 4




G UG Bay RS Re eS

each, beside twenty or thirty smaller coins. I saw

him wet the tip of his little finger upon his tongue,
and take up one of my largest pieces, and then
another, but he seemed to be wholly ignorant
what they were. He made me a sign to put them

_ <& again into my purse, and the purse again into my
nih which after offering to him several times,

I thought it best to do.

The farmer by this time was convinced I must
be a rational creature. He spoke often to me, but
the sound of his voice pierced my ears like that of
a water-mill, yet his words were articulate enough.
I answered as loud as I could, in several languages,
and he often laid his ear within two yards of me,
but all in vain, for we were wholly unintelligible
to each other. He then sent his servants to their
work, and taking his handkerchief out of his pocket,
he doubled and spread it on his left hand, which
he placed flat on the ground, with the palm up-
wards, making me a sign to step into it, as I could
easily do, for it was not above a foot in thickness.
I thought it my part to obey, and for fear of fall-

'. ing, laid myself at length upon the handkerchief,

with the remainder of which he lapped me up to
the head for further security, and in this manner
carried me home to his house. There he called his

[ 134 |
a Oe NE OBO ED UINKIN Ge

wife, and showed me to her; but she screamed and
ran back, as women in England do at the sight of
a toad or a spider. However, when she had a while
seen my behaviour, and how well I observed the

signs her husband made, she was soon reconciled, -’

and by degrees grew extremely tender of me.

It was about twelve at noon, and a servant
brought in dinner. It was only one substantial
dish of meat (fit for the plain condition of an
husbandman) in a dish of about four-and-twenty
foot diameter. The company were the farmer and
his wife, three children, and an old grandmother.
When they were sat down, the farmer placed me
at some distance from him on the table, which was
thirty foot high from the floor. I was ina terrible
fright, and kept as far as I could from the edge for
fear of falling. The wife minced a bit of meat, then
crumbled some bread on a trencher, and placed it
before me. I made her a low bow, took out my
knife and fork, and fell to eat, which gave them
exceeding delight. The mistress sent her maid for
a small dram cup, which held about two gallons,
and filled it with drink; I took up the vessel with
much difficulty in both hands, and in a most
respectful manner drank to her ladyship’s health,
expressing the words as loud as I could in English,

[135 ]
GULEEIVER’S TRAVELS

which made the company laugh so heartily, that
I was almost deafened with the noise. This liquor
tasted like a small cyder, and was not unpleas-
ant. Then the master made me a sign to come
to his trencher side; but as I walked on the table,
being in great surprise all the time, as the in-
dulgent reader will easily conceive and excuse, I
happened to stumble against a crust, and fell flat
on my face, but received no hurt. I got up imme-
diately, and observing the good people to be in
much concern, I took my hat (which I held under
my arm out of good manners) and waving it over
my head, made three huzzas, to show I had got
no mischief by my fall. But advancing forwards
toward my master (as I shall henceforth call him)
his youngest son who sat next him, an arch boy of
about ten years old, took me up by the legs, and
held me so high in the air, that I trembled every
limb; but his father snatched me from him, and
at the same time gave him such a box on the left
ear, as would have felled an European troop of
horse to the earth, ordering him to be taken from
the table. But being afraid the boy might owe me
a spite, and well remembering how mischievous
all children among us naturally are to sparrows,
rabbits, young kittens, and puppy dogs, I fell on
[ 136 ]
eV OV GG Bot Orb ROB DENG NAG

my knees, and pointing to the boy, made my mas-
ter to understand, as well as I could, that I desired
his son might be pardoned. The father complied,
and the lad took his seat again; whereupon I
went to him and kissed his hand, which my master
took, and made him stroke me gently with it. °
In the midst of dinner, my mistress’s favourite
cat leapt into her lap. I heard a noise behind me
like that of a dozen stocking-weavers at work; and
turning my head, I found it proceeded from the
purring of this animal, who seemed to be three
times larger than an ox, as I computed by the
view of her head, and one of her paws, while her
mistress was feeding and stroking her. The fierce-
ness of this creature’s countenance altogether dis-
composed me; though I stood at the farther end ©
of the table, above fifty foot off; and although my
mistress held her fast for fear she might give a
spring, and seize mein her talons. But it happened
there was no danger; for the cat took not the
least notice of me when my master placed me
within three yards of her. And as I have been
always told, and found true by experience in my
travels, that flying, or discovering fear before a
fierce animal, is a certain way to make it pursue
or attack you, so I resolved in this dangerous

[ 137 ]
Gumby ER Ss PRAV ELS

juncture to show no manner of concern. I walked
with intrepidity five or six times before the very
head of the cat, and came within half a yard of
her; whereupon she drew herself back, as if she
were more afraid of me: I had less apprehension



concerning the dogs, whereof three or four came
into the room, as it is usual in farmers’ houses;
one of which was a mastiff, equal in bulk to four
elephants, and a greyhound, somewhat taller than
the mastiff, but not so large.

When dinner was almost done, the nurse came

[ 138 |
nV OVOMGE TO BR OBDIENGN AG

in with a child of a yeay old in her arms, who
immediately spied me, ard began a squall that
you might have heard from London-Bridge to
Chelsea, after the usual oratory of infants, to get
me for a plaything. The mother out of pure in-
dulgence took me up, and put me towards the
child, who presently seized me by the middle, and
got my head in his mouth, where I roared so loud
that the urchin was frighted, and let me drop;
and I should infallibly have broke my neck if the
mother had not held her apron under me. The
nurse to quiet her babe made use of a rattle, which —
was a kind of hollow vessel filled with great stones,
and fastened by a cable to the child’s waist. I was
impressed at this time with the apparent coarse-
ness of the skin and complexion of the nurse, as I
had a near sight of her, she sitting down, and I
- standing on the table. This made me reflect upon
the fair skins of our English ladies, who appear so
beautiful to us, only because they are of our own
size, and their defects not to be seen but through
a magnifying glass, where we find by experiment
that the smoothest and whitest skins look rough
and coarse, and ill coloured.

I remember wien I was at Lilliput, the com-
plexion of those aiminutive people appeared to me

[ 139 ]
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

the fairest in the world ; and talking upon this sub-
ject with a person of Jearning there, who was an
intimate friend of mine, he said that my face
appeared much fairer and smoother when he looked
on me from the ground, than it did upon a nearer
view when I took him up in my hand and brought
him close, which he confessed was at first a very
shocking sight. He said he could discover great
holes in my skin; that the stumps of my beard
were ten times stronger than the bristles of a boar,
and my complexion made up of several colours
altogether disagreeable: although I must beg leave
to say for myself, that I am as fair as most of my
sex and country, and very little sunburnt by all
my travels. On the other side, discoursing of the
ladies in that Emperor’s court, he used to tell me,
one had freckles, another too wide a mouth, a third
too large a nose, nothing of which I was able to
distinguish. I confess this reflection was obvious
enough; which however I could not forbear, lest
the reader might think those vast creatures were
actually deformed: for I must do them justice to say
they are a comely race of people; and particularly
the features of my master’s countenance, although
he were but a farmer, when I beneld him from the
height of sixty foot, appeared very vell proportioned.

[ 140 |


A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

When dinner was done, my master went out to
his labourers, and as I could discover by his voice
and gesture, gave his wife a strict charge to take
care of me. I was very much tired, and disposed to
sleep, which my mistress perceiving, she put me
on her own bed, and covered me with a clean
white handkerchief, but larger and coarser than
the mainsail of a man of war.



I slept about two hours, and dreamed I was at
home with my wife and children, which aggravated
my sorrows when I awaked and found myself alone
in a vast room, between two and three hundred foot
wide, and above two hundred high, lying in a bed
twenty yards wide. My mistress was gone about
her household affairs, and had locked me in. The
bed was eight yards from the floor. I desired to
get down, but I durst not presume to call, and if I

[141]

®
Guin iver Ss TRAV tas

had, it would have been in vain, with such a voice
as mine, at so great a distance as from the room
where I lay to the kitchen where the family kept.
While I was under these circumstances, two rats
crept up the curtains, and ran smelling backwards

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and forwards on the bed. One of them came up
almost to my face, whereupon I rose in a fright,
and drew out my hanger to defend myself. These
horrible animals had the boldness to attack me on
both sides, and one of them held his fore-feet at
my collar; but I had the good fortune to np him
up before he could do me any mischief. He fell

[142].
AN Vs Cay 2 Oo BR Ob Di NGA G.

down at my feet, and the other seeing the fate of
his comrade, made his escape, but not without one
good wound on the back, which I gave him as he
fled, and made the blood run trickling from him.
After this exploit, I walked gently to and fro on
the bed, to recover my breath and loss of spirits.
These creatures were of the size of a large mastitf,
but infinitely more nimble and fierce, so that if I
had taken off my belt before I went to sleep, I
must have infallibly been torn to pieces and de-
voured. I measured the tail of the dead rat, and
found it to be two yards long, wanting an inch;
but it went against my stomach to drag the carcass
off the bed, where it lay still bleeding; I observed
it had yet some life, but with a strong slash cross
the neck, I thoroughly dispatched it.

Soon after my mistress came into the room, who
seeing me all bloody, ran and took me up in her
hand. I pointed to the dead rat, smiling and mak-
ing other signs to show I was not hurt, whereat she
was extremely rejoiced, calling the maid to take
up the dead rat with a pair of tongs, and throw it
out of the window. Then she set me on a table,
where I showed her my hanger all bloody, and
wiping it on the lappet of my coat, returned it to
the scabbard. ; ,

[ 143 |


Ohare dri? 7)

A description of the farmer's daughter. The Author
carried to a market-town, and then to the metropolis.
The particulars of his journey.

Y MISTRESS had a daughter of nine
years old, a child of forward parts for
her age, very dexterous at her needle, and

skilful in dressing her baby. Her mother and she
contrived to fit up the baby’s cradle for me against
night: the cradle was put into a small drawer of a
cabinet, and the drawer placed upon a hanging
shelf for fear of the rats. This was my bed all the
time I stayed with those people, though made more
convenient by degrees, as I began to learn their
language, and make my wants known. This young
girl made me seven shirts, and some other linen,
of as fine cloth as could be got, which indeed was
coarser than sackcloth; and these she constantly

[ 144 ]
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

washed for me with her own hands. She was like-
wise my school-mistress to teach me the language:
when I pointed to any thing, she told me the name
of it in her own tongue, so that in a few days |
was able to call for whatever I had a mind to. She
was very good-natured, and not above forty foot
high, being little for her age. She gave me the
name of Grzldrig, which the family took up, and
afterwards the whole kingdom. The word imports
what the Latins call xanunculus, the Italians
homunceletino, and the English manuzkin. To her
I chiefly owe my preservation in that country: we
never parted while I was there; I called her my
Glumdalchtch, or little nurse: and I should be
guilty of great ingratitude, if I omitted this hon-
ourable mention of her care and affection towards
me, which I[ heartily wish it lay in my power to
requite as she deserves, instead of being the inno-

cent but unhappy instrument of her disgrace, as I ©

have too much reason to fear. »

It now began to be known and talked of in
the neighbourhood, that my master had found a
strange animal in the field, about the bigness of
a splacknuck, but exactly shaped in every part
like a human creature; which it likewise imitated
in all its actions; seemed to speak in a little

[145 ]

=,
â„¢~.
G We liver Rese a ROA Vere

language of its own, had already learned several
words of theirs, went erect upon two legs, was
tame and gentle, would come when it was called,
do whatever it was bid, had the finest limbs in the
world, and a complexion fairer than a nobleman’s



, {
Yj }

A
YY
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GIN
Wy) Nia

daughter of three years old. Another farmer who
lived hard by, and was a particular friend of my
master, came on a visit on purpose to enquire into
the truth of this story. I was immediately pro-
duced, and placed upon a table, where I walked
as I was commanded, drew my hanger, put it up
again, made my reverence to my master’s guest,

[ 146 |
A VOY GE FO BROBDINGN AG

asked him in his own language how he did, and
told him he was welcome, just as my little nurse
had instructed me. This man, who was old and
dim-sighted, put on his spectacles to behold me
better, at which I could not forbear laughing very
heartily, for his eyes appeared like the full moon
shining into a chamber at two windows. Our
people, who discovered the cause of my mirth,
bore me company in laughing, at which the old
fellow was fool enough to be angry and out of
countenance. He had the character of a great
miser, and to my misfortune he well deserved it,
by the cursed advice he gave my master to show
me as a sight upon a market-day in the next town, .
which was half an hour’s riding, about two and
twenty miles from our house. I guessed there was
some mischief contriving, when I observed my
master and his friend whispering long together,
sometimes pointing at me; and my fears made me
_ fancy that I overheard and understood some of
their words. But the next morning Glumdalclitch,
my little nurse, told me the whole matter, which
she had cunningly picked out from her mother.
The poor girl laid me on her bosom, and fell a
weeping with shame and grief. She apprehended
some mischief would happen to me from rude

[ 147 ]
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

vulgar folks, who might squeeze me to death, or
break one of my limbs by taking me in their hands.
She had also observed how modest I was in my
nature, how nicely I regarded my honour, and what
an indignity I should conceive it to be exposed
for money as a public spectacle to the meanest
of the people. She said, her papa and mamma had
promised that Grildrig should be hers, but now
she found they meant to serve her as they did last
year, when they pretended to give her a lamb, and
yet, as soon as it was fat, sold it to a butcher. For
my own part, I may truly affirm that I was less
concerned than my nurse. I had a strong hope
which never left me, that I should one day recover
my liberty; and as to the ignominy of being car-
ried about for a monster, I considered myself to
be a perfect stranger in the country, and that such
a misfortune could never be charged upon me as
a reproach, if ever I should return to England;
since the King of Great Britain himself, in my
condition, must have undergone the same distress.

My master, pursuant to the advice of his friend,
carried me in a box the next market-day to the

-. neighbouring town, and took along with him his
’. little daughter, my nurse, upon a pillion behind him.

The box was close on every side, with a little door
[ 148 |
Ae VOvewGH TORR OE DENG NAG

for me to go in and out, and a few gimlet-holes to
let in air. The girl had been so careful to put the
quilt of her baby’s bed into it, for me to lie down
on. However, I was terribly shaken and-discom-
posed in this journey, though it were but of half
an hour. For the horse went about forty foot at
every step, and trotted so high, that the agita-
tion was equal to the rising and falling of a ship
in a great storm, but much more frequent. Our
journey was somewhat further than from London
to St. Albans. My master alighted at an inn which
he used to frequent; and after consulting a while
with the inn-keeper, and making some necessary
preparations, he hired the Grudtrud, or crier, to
give notice through the town of a strange creature
to be seen at the Sign of the Green Eagle, not so
big as a splacknuck (an animal in that country
very finely shaped, about six foot long,) and in
every part of the body resembling an human
creature, could speak several words, and perform
an hundred diverting tricks.

I was placed upon a table in the largest room
of the inn, which might be near three hundred
foot square. My little nurse stood on a low stool
close to the table, to take care of me, and direct
what I should do. My master, to avoid a crowd,

[ 149 ]
GUL wae So TRAVELS

would suffer only thirty people at a time to see
me. I walked about on the table as the girl com-
manded: she asked me questions as far as she
knew my understanding of the language reached,
and I answered them as loud as I could. I turned
about several times to the company, paid my
humble respects, said they were welcome, and
used some other speeches I had been taught. I
took up a thimble filled with liquor, which Glum-
dalclitch had given me for a cup, and drank their
health. I drew out my hanger, and flourished with
it after the manner of fencers in England. My
nurse gave me part of a straw, which I exercised
as a pike, having learned the art in my youth. I
was that day shown to twelve sets of company, and
as often forced to go over again with the same
fopperies, till I was half dead with weariness and
vexation. For those who had seen me made such
wonderful reports, that the people were ready to
break down the doors to come in. My master for
his own interest would not suffer any one to touch
me except my nurse; and, to prevent danger,
_ benches were set round the table at such a dis-
tance as put me out of every body’s reach. How-
ever, an unlucky school-boy aimed a hazel nut
directly at my head, which very narrowly missed

[ 150 |
Ne SEONG Osi © BD NIG IN asGee

me; otherwise, it came with so much violence,
that it would have infallibly knocked out my
brains, for it was almost as large as a small
pumpion: but I had the satisfaction to see the
young rogue well beaten, and turned out of the
room.

My master gave public notice, that he would
show me again the next market-day, and in the
meantime he prepared a more convenient vehicle
for me, which he had reason enough to do; for I.
was so tired with my first journey, and with enter-
taining company for eight hours together, that |
could hardly stand upon my legs, or speak a word.
It was at least three days before I recovered my
strength; and that I might have no rest at home,
all the neighbouring gentlemen from an hundred
miles round, hearing of my fame, came to see me
at my master’s own house. There could not be
fewer than thirty persons with their wives and
children (for the country is very populous;) and
my master demanded the rate of a full room when-
ever he showed me at home, although it were only
to a single family; so that for some time I had
but little ease every day of the week (except Wed-
nesday, which is their Sabbath) although I were
not carried to the town.

[151]
CC eR’ S TRAV is

My master finding how profitable I was likely
to be, resolved to carry me to the most consider-
able cities of the kingdom. Having therefore pro-
vided himself with all things necessary for a long
journey, and settled his affairs at home, he took
leave of his wife, and upon the 17th of August,
1703, about two months after my arrival, we set
out for the metropolis, situated near the middle
of that empire, and about three thousand miles
distance from our house. My master made his
daughter Glumdalclitch mde behind him. She
carried me on her lap in a box tied about her
waist. The girl had lined it on all sides with the
softest cloth she could get, well quilted under-
neath, furnished it with her baby’s bed, provided
me with linen and other necessaries, and made
everything as convenient as she could. We had
no other company but a boy of the house, who
rode after us with the luggage.

My master’s design was to show me in all the
towns by the way, and to step out of the road for
fifty or an hundred miles, to any village or person
of quality’s house where he might expect custom.
_ We made easy journeys of not above seven or
eight score miles a day: for Glumdalclitch, on
purpose to spare me, complained she was tired

[152 |
ay ONES Gr OT R ORDA N GIN ae

with the trotting of the horse. She often took me
out of my box, at my own desire, to give me air,
and show me the country, but always held me fast
by a leading-string. We passed over five or six
rivers many degrees broader and deeper than the
Nile or the Ganges; and there was hardly a
rivulet so small as the Thames at London-Bridge.
We were ten weeks in our journey, and I was
shown in eighteen large towns besides many
villages and private families.

On the 26th day of October, we arrived at the
metropolis, called in their language Lorbrulerud,
or Pride of the Universe. My master took a lodg-
ing in the principal street of the city, not far from
the royal palace, and’ put out bills in the usual
‘form, containing an exact description of my person
and parts. He hired a large room between three
and four hundred foot wide. He provided a table
sixty foot in diameter, upon which I was to act
my part, and pallisadoed it round three foot from
the edge, and as many high, to prevent my falling
over. I was shown ten times a day to the wonder
and satisfaction of all people. I could now speak
the language tolerably well, and perfectly under-
stood every word that was spoken to me. Besides,
I had learnt their alphabet, and could make a shift

£153]
Cio yee Se ae nS

to explain a sentence here and there; for Glum-
dalclitch had been my instructor while we were
at home, and at leisure hours during our journey.
She carried a little book in her pocket, not much
larger than a Sanson’s Atlas; it was a common
treatise for the use of young girls, giving a short
account of their religion: out of this she taught
me my letters, and interpreted the words.

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Wy ees i we


CHAPTER III

The Author sent for to Court. The Queen buys him of hts
master the farmer, and presents him to the King. He
disputes with his Majesty's great scholars. An apart-
ment at Court provided for the Author. He ts in high
favour with the Queen. He stands up for the honour of
his own country. His quarrels with the Queen's dwarf.

HE frequent labours I underwent every

day made in a few weeks a very consider-

able change in my health: the more my
master got by me, the more insatiable he grew. |
had quite lost my stomach, and was almost re-
duced to a skeleton. The farmer observed it, and
concluding I soon must die, resolved to make as
good a hand of meas he could. While he was thus
reasoning and resolving with himself, a Slardra/,
-or Gentleman Usher, came from court, command-
ing my master to carry me immediately thither for

[155 ]
GUsribivesk Ss TRAV EES

the diversion of the Queen and her ladies. Some
of the latter had already been to see me, and re-
ported strange things of my beauty, behaviour, and
good sense. Her Majesty and those who attended
her were beyond measure delighted with my de-
meanour. I fell on my knees, and begged the
honour of kissing her Imperial foot; but this —
gracious princess held out her little finger.towards
me (after I was set on a table) which I embraced
in both my arms, and put the tip of it, with the
utmost respect, to my lip. She made me some
general questions about my country and my travels,
which I answered as distinctly and in as few words
as I could. She asked whether I would be content
to live at court. I bowed down to the board of the
table, and humbly answered, that I was my mas-
ter’s slave, but if I were at my own disposal, I
should be proud to devote my life to her Majesty's
service. She then asked my master whether he
were willing to sell me at a good price. He, who
apprehended I could not live a month, was ready
enough to part with me, and demanded a thousand
pieces of gold, which were ordered him on the
spot, each piece being about the bigness of eight
hundred moidores ; but, allowing for the proportion
of all things between that country and Europe, and

[ 156 |
ney OV AGE 1 O BRO BDINGNAG

the high price of gold among them, was hardly so
great a sum as a thousand guineas would be in.
England. I then said to the Queen, since I was
now her Majesty’s most humble creature and vas-
sal, I must beg the favour, that Glumdalclitch,
who had always tended me with so much care and
kindness, and understood to do it so well, might
be admitted into her service, and continue to be
my nurse and instructor. Her Majesty agreed to
my petition, and easily got the farmer’s consent, °
who was glad enough to have his daughter pre-
ferred at court: and the poor girl herself was not
able to hide her joy. My late master withdrew,
bidding me farewell, and saying he had left me in
a good service; to which I replied not a word, only
making him a slight bow.

The Queen observed my coldness, and when the
farmer was gone out of the apartment, asked me
the reason. I made bold to tell her Majesty that I
owed no other obligation to my late master, than
his not dashing out the brains of a poor harmless
creature found by chance in his field; which obli-
gation was amply recompensed by the gain he had
made in showing me through half the kingdom,
and the price he had now sold me for. That the
life I had since led, was laborious enough to kill

[ 157 |
CU VERS TRAVELS

an animal of ten times my strength. That my
health was much impaired by the continual drudg-
ery of entertaining the rabble every hour of the
day, and that if my master had not thought my life
in danger, her Majesty perhaps would not have
got so cheap a bargain. But as I was out of all
fear of being ill treated under the protection of
so great and good an Empress, the Ornament of
Nature, the Darling of the World, the Delight
of her Subjects, the Phoenix of the Creation; so
I hoped my late master’s apprehensions would
appear to be groundless, for I already found my
spirits to revive by the influence of her most
august presence.

This was the sum of my speech, delivered with
great improprieties and hesitation; the latter
part was altogether framed in the style peculjar
to that people, whereof I learned some phrases
from Glumdalclitch, while she was carrying me
to court. |

The Queen giving great allowance for my de-
fectiveness in speaking, was however surprised at
so much wit and good sense in so diminutive an
animal. She took me in her own hand, and carried
me to the King, who was then retired to his cabinet.
His Majesty, a prince of much gravity, and austere

Pasa
VO AGE TO BR OBD IN GN AG

countenance, not well observing my shape at first
view, asked the Queen after a cold manner, how
long it was since she grew fond of a splacknuck; .
for such it seems he took me to be, as I lay upon
my breast in her Majesty’s right hand. But this
princess, who hath an infinite deal of wit and
humour, set me gently on my feet upon the scru-
tore, and commanded me to give his Majesty an
account of myself, which I did in a very few words;

and Glumdalclitch, who attended at the cabinet .~

door, and could not endure I should be out of
her sight, being admitted, confirmed all that had
passed from my arrival at her father’s house.
‘The King, although he be as learned a person
as any in his dominions, and had been educated
in the study of philosophy, and particularly mathe-
matics; yet when he observed my shape exactly,
and saw me walk erect, before I began to speak,
conceived I might be a piece of clock-work, (which
is in that country arrived to a very great perfec-
tion) contrived by some ingenious artist. But when .
he heard my voice, and found what I delivered to
_ be regular and rational, he could not conceal his
astonishment. He was by no means satisfied with
the relation I gave him of the manner I came into
his kingdom, but thought it a story concerted

[159 ]


GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

between Glumdalclitch and her father, who had
taught me a set of. words to make me sell at a
higher price. Upon this imagination he put several
other questions to me, and still received rational
answers, no otherwise defective than by a foreign
accent, and an imperfect knowledge in the lan-
guage, with some rustic phrases which I had
learned at the farmer’s house, and did not suit
the polite style of a court.

His Majesty sent for three great scholars who
were then in their weekly waiting, according to
the custom in that country. These gentlemen,
after they had a while examined my shape with
much nicety, were of different opinions concerning
me. They all agreed that I could not be produced
according to the regular laws of nature, because I
was not framed with a capacity of preserving my
life, either by swiftness, or climbing of trees, or
digging holes in the earth. They observed by my
teeth, which they viewed with great exactness, that
I was a carnivorous animal; yet most quadrupeds
being an overmatch for me, and field mice, with
some others, too nimble, they could not imagine
how I should be able to support myself, unless
I fed upon snails and other insects, which they
offered, by many learned arguments, to evince

[ 160 |
4

A VOwwe bro BROBDINGNAG

that I could not possibly do. One of these virtu-
osi seemed to think that I might be a partially
developed human being. But this opinion was
rejected by the other two, who observed my limbs
to be perfect and finished, and that I had lived




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several years, as it was manifest from my beard, the
stumps whereof they plainly discovered through a
magnifying-glass. They would not allow me to be
a dwarf, because my littleness was beyond all
degrees of comparison; for the Queen’s favourite
dwarf, the smallest ever known in that kingdom,
was near thirty foot high. After much debate, they
pron |
CU ya Ress i Reaves

concluded unanimously that I was only velplum
scalcath, which is interpreted literally, 4asus nature;
a determination exactly agreeable to the modern
philosophy of Europe, whose professors, disdaining
the old evasion of occult causes, whereby the fol-
lowers of Aristotle endeavour in vain to disguise
their ignorance, have invented this wonderful solu-
tion of all difficulties, to the unspeakable advance-
ment of human knowledge.

After this decisive conclusion, I entreated to be
heard a word or two. I applied myself to the
King, and assured his Majesty, that I came from
a country which abounded with several millions of
both sexes, and of my own stature; where the
animals, trees, and houses were all in proportion,
and where by consequence I might be as able to
defend myself, and to find sustenance, as any of his
Majesty’s subjects could do here; which I took
for a full answer to those gentlemen’s arguments.
To this they only replied with a smile of contempt,
saying, that the farmer had instructed me very
well in my lesson. The King, who had a much
better understanding, dismissing his learned men,
sent for the farmer, who by good fortune was not
yet gone out of town. Having therefore first
examined him privately, and then confronted him

[h62: |
UO VOVAecE 2O BROBDINGN AC

with me and the young girl, his Majesty began to
think that what we told him might possibly be
true. He desired the Queen to order that a par-
ticular care should be taken of me, and was of
opinion that Glumdalclitch should still continue in
her office of tending me, because he observed we
had a great affection for each other. A convenient
apartment was provided for her at court: she had
a sort of governess appointed to take care of her
education, a maid to dress her, and two other ser-
vants for menial offices; but the care of me was
wholly appropriated to herself. The Queen com-
manded her own cabinet-maker to contrive a box
that might serve me for a bed-chamber, after the
model that Glumdalclitch and I should agree upon.
This man was a most ingenious artist, and accord-
ing to my directions, in three weeks finished for
me a wooden chamber of sixteen foot square, and —
twelve high, with sash-windows, a door, and two
closets, like a London bed-chamber. The board
that made the ceiling was to be lifted up and down
by two hinges, to put in a bed ready furnished by
her Majesty's upholsterer, which Glumdalclitch
took out every day to air, made it with her own
hands, and letting it down at night, locked up the
roof over me. A nice workman, who was famous

ue 3" |
Geli bk S PRAV ELS

for little curiosities, undertook to make me two
chairs, with backs and frames, of a substance not»
unlike ivory, and two tables, with a cabinet to put
my things in. The room was quilted on all sides,
as well as the floor and the ceiling, to prevent any
accident from the carelessness of those who carried
me, and to break the force of a jolt when I went in
acoach. I desired a lock for my door, to prevent
rats and mice from coming in: the smith, after
several attempts, made the smallest that ever was
seen among them, for I have known a larger at the
gate of a gentleman’s house in England. I made
a shift to keep the key in a pocket of my own,
fearing Glumdalclitch might lose it. The Queen
likewise ordered the thinnest silks that could be
gotten, to make me clothes, not much thicker than
an English blanket, very cumbersome till I was
accustomed to them. They were after the fashion
of the kingdom, partly resembling the Persian,
and partly the Chinese, and are a very grave and
decent habit.

The Queen became so fond of my company,
that she could not dine without me. I had a table
placed upon the same at which her Majesty ate,
just at her left elbow, and a chair to sit on, Glum-
dalclitch stood upon a stool on the floor, near my

[ 164 ]
Aa RO NeoG EO AERO BIN GaN G,

table, to assist and take care of me. I had an entire
set of silver dishes and plates, and other neces-
saries, which, in proportion to those of the Queen,
were not much bigger than what I have seen of
the same kind in a London
toy-shop, for the furniture
of a baby-house: these my
little nurse kept in_ her
pocket, in a silver box, and
gave me at meals as |
wanted them, always clean-
ing them herself. No per-
son dined with the Queen
but the two Princesses
Royal, the elder sixteen
years old, and the younger
at that time thirteen and a
month. Her Majesty used
to put a bit of meat upon
one of my dishes, out of
which I carved for myself,
and her diversion was to see me eat in minia-
ture. For the Queen (who had indeed but a weak
stomach) took up at one mouthful, as much as a
dozen English farmers could eat at a meal, which
to me was for some time a very nauseous sight.

[ 165 ]


Ger bal Wel 3S RAN EAs

She would craunch the wing of a lark, bones and
all, between her teeth, although it were nine times
as large as that of a full-grown turkey; and put
a bit of bread into her mouth, as big as two twelve-
penny loaves. She drank out of a golden cup,
above a hogshead at a draught. Her knives were
twice as long as a scythe set straight upon the
handle. The spoons, forks, and other instruments
were all in the same proportion. I remember when
Glumdalclitch carried me out of curiosity to see
some of the tables at court, where ten or a dozen
of these enormous knives and forks were lifted up
together, I thought I had never till then beheld
so terrible a sight.
It is the custom that every Wednesday fotos
as I have before observed, was their Sabbath) the
King and Queen, with the royal issue of both ~
sexes, dine together in the apartment of his
Majesty, to whom I was now become a great
favourite; and at these times my little chair and
table were placed at his left hand, before one of
the salt-cellars. This prince took a pleasure in
conversing with me, enquiring into the manners,
religion, laws, government, and learning of Europe;
wherein I gave him the best account | was able. |
His apprehension was so clear, and his judgment
p16e.
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG ©

so exact, that he made very wise reflections and
observations upon all I said. But, I confess, that
after I had been a little too copious in talking of
my own beloved country, of our trade, and wars by
sea and land, of our schisms in religion, and parties
in the state; the prejudices of his education pre-
vailed so far, that he could not forbear taking me up
in his right hand, and stroking me gently with the
other, after an hearty fit of laughing, asked me,
whether I were a Whig or a Tory. Then turning
to his first minister, who waited behind him with |
a white staff, near as tall as the mainmast of the
Royal Sovereign, he observed how contemptible a
thing was human grandeur, which could be mim-
icked by such diminutive insects as I: and yet,
said he, I dare engage, these creatures have ,their
titles and distinctions of honour, they contrive little
‘nests and burrows, that they call houses and cities;
they make a figure in dress and equipage; they
love, they fight, they dispute, they cheat, they betray.
And thus he continued on, while my colour came
and went several times, with indignation to hear
our noble country, the mistress of arts and arms,
the scourge of France, the arbitress of Europe, the
seat of virtue, piety, honour and truth, the pride
and envy of the world, so contemptuously treated.

| 167 |

mene a a
GUY RS’ TRAV EGS

- But as I was not in a condition to resent injuries,
so, upon mature thoughts, I began to doubt whether
I were injured or no. For, after having been accus-
tomed several months to the sight and converse
of this people, and observed every object upon
which I cast my eyes, to be of proportionable
| magnitude, the horror I had first conceived from
their bulk and aspect was so far worn off, that if
I had then beheld a company of English lords and
ladies in their finery and birth-day clothes, acting
their several parts in the most courtly manner, of
strutting, and bowing, and prating; to say the
truth, I should have been strongly tempted to laugh
as much at them as the King and his grandees
_did at me. Neither indeed could I forbear smiling
at myself, when the Queen used to place me, upon
her hand towards a looking-glass, by which both
our persons appeared before me in full view to-
gether; and there could be nothing more ridicu-
lous than the comparison; so that I really began
to imagine myself dwindled many degrees below
my usual size.

Nothing angered and mortified me so much as
the Queen’s dwarf, who being of the lowest stature
that was ever in that country (for I verily think

he was not full thirty foot high) became insolent
[ 168 |
UA VeOVouG © BK © BD TNGN AG

at seeing a creature so “much beneath him, that
he would always affect to swagger and look big
as he passed by me in the Queen’s antechamber,
while I was standing on some table talking with
the lords or ladies of the court, and he seldom
- failed of a smart word or two upon my littleness ;
against which I could only revenge myself by call-
ing him brother, challenging him to wrestle, and.
such repartees as are usual in the mouths of court
pages. One day at dinner this malicious little cub
was so nettled with something I had said to him,
that raising himself upon the frame of her Majesty's
chair, he took me up by the middle, as I was sit-
ting down, not thinking any harm, and let me drop
into a large silver bowl of cream, and then ran
away as fast as he could. I fell over head and ears,
and if I had not been a good swimmer, it might
have gone very hard with me; for Glumdalclitch
in that instant happened to be at the other end
of the room, and the Queen was in such a fright
that she wanted presence of mind to assist me.
But my little nurse ran to my relief, and took me
out, after I had swallowed above a quart of cream.
I was put to bed; however I received no other
damage than the loss of a suit of clothes, which
was utterly spoiled. The dwarf was soundly

[ 169 |
Gwe iy BRS sR AVES

whipped, and as a farther punishment, forced to
drink up the bowl of cream, into which he had
thrown me: neither was he ever restored to
favour: for, soon after the Queen bestowed him
on a lady of high quality, so that I saw him no
more, to my very great satisfaction; for I could
not tell to what extremity such a malicious urchin
might have carried his resentment.

He had before served me a scurvy trick, which
set the Queen a laughing, although at the same
time she was heartily vexed, and would have im-
mediately cashiered him, if I had not been so
generous as to intercede. Her Majesty had taken
a marrow-bone upon her plate, and after knocking
out the marrow, placed the bone again in the dish
erect as it stood before; the dwarf watching his
opportunity, while Glumdalclitch was gone to the
sideboard, mounted the stool she stood on to take
care of me at meals, took me up in both hands,
and squeezing my legs together, wedged:them into
the marrow bone above my waist, where I stuck
for some time, and made a very ridiculous figure.
I believe it was near a minute before any one
knew what was become of me, for I thought it
below me to cry out. But, as princes seldom get
their meat hot, my legs were not scalded, only my

[ 170 |
Re NEONOG PO oe Kk © BD TN GaN ASG

stockings and breeches in a sad condition. The
dwarf, at my entreaty, had no other punishment
than a sound whipping.

I was frequently rallied by the Queen upon ©

account of my fearfulness, and she used to ask me
whether the people of my country were as great
cowards as myself. The occasion was this: the
kingdom is much pestered with flies in summer;
and these odious insects, each of them as big as a
Dunstable lark, hardly gave me any rest while I
sat at dinner, with their continual humming and
buzzing about my ears. Sometimes they would fix
upon my nose or forehead, where they stung me
to the quick, and I could easily trace that viscous
matter, which our naturalists tell us enables those
creatures to walk with their feet upwards upon a
ceiling. I had much ado to defend myself against
these detestable animals, and could not forbear
starting when they came on my face. It was the
common practice of the dwarf to catch a number
of these insects in his hand, as schoolboys do
among us, and let them out suddenly under my
nose, on’ purpose to frighten me, and divert the
Queen. My remedy was to cut them in pieces
with my knife as they flew in the air, wherein
my dexterity was much admired.

[171 |

A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

I remember one morning when Glumdalclitch
had set me in my box upon a window, as she usually
did in fair days to give me air (for I durst not
venture to let the box be hung on a nail out of
the window, as we do with cages in England)
after I had lifted up one of my sashes, and sat
down at my table to eat a piece of sweet cake for
my breakfast, above twenty wasps, allured by the
smell, came flying into the room, humming louder
than the drones of as many bagpipes. Some of
them seized my cake, and carried it piecemeal
away, others flew about my head and face, con-
founding me with the noise, and putting me in the
utmost terror of their stings. However I had the
courage to rise and draw my hanger, and attack
them in the air. I dispatched four of them, but the
rest got away, and I presently shut my window.
These insects were as large as partridges: I took
out their stings, found them an inch and a half
long, and as sharp as needles. I carefully preserved
them all, and having since shown them with some
other curiosities in several parts of Europe; upon
my return to England I gave three of them to
Gresham College, and kept the fourth for myself.

— [173 |


CHAPTER IV

The country described. A proposal for correcting modern
maps. The King’s palace, and some account of the |
metropolis. The Authors way of travelling. The chief
temple described.

NOW intend to give the reader a short de-

scription of this country, as far as I travelled

in it, which was not above two thousand miles
round Lorbrulgrud the metropolis. For the Queen,
whom I always attended, never went further when
she accompanied the King in his progresses, and
there stayed till his Majesty returned from view-
ing his frontiers. The whole extent of this prince's
dominions reacheth about six thousand miles in
length, and from three to five in breadth. From
whence I cannot but conclude that our geogra-
phers of Europe are ina great error, by supposing
nothing but sea between Japan and California; for

[ 174 ]


A VOVAGE TO BROBDINGNAG.

_ it was ever my opinion, that there must be a
balance of earth to counterpoise the great conti-
“nent of Tartary; and therefore they ought to
correct their maps and charts, by joining this
. vast tract of land.to the north-west parts of
America, wherein I shall be ready to lend them
my assistance.

The kingdom is a peninsula, terminated to the
north-east by a ridge of mountains thirty miles high,
which are altogether impassable by reason of the
volcanoes upon the tops. Neither do the most
learned know what sort of mortals inhabit beyond
those mountains, or whether they be inhabited at
all. On the three other sides it is bounded by the
ocean. There is not one sea-port in the whole
kingdom, and those parts of the coasts into which
the rivers issue are so full of pointed rocks, and
the sea generally so rough, that there is no ventur-
ing with the smallest of their boats, so that these
people are wholly excluded from any commerce
with the rest of the world. But the large rivers
are full of vessels, and abound with excellent fish,
for they seldom get any from the sea, because the
sea-fish are of the same size with those in Europe,
and consequently not worth catching; whereby it
is manifest, that nature, in the production of plants

Pio]
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

and animals of so extraordinary a bulk, is wholly
confined to this continent, of which I leave the
reasons to be determined by philosophers. How-
ever, now and then they take a whale that happens
to be dashed against the rocks, which the common
people feed on heartily. These whales I have known
so large that a man could hardly carry one upon
his shoulders; and sometimes for curiosity they
are brought in hampers to Lorbrulgrud: I saw
one of them in a dish at the King’s table, which
passed for a rarity, but I did not observe he was
fond of it; for I think indeed the bigness disgusted
him, although I have seen one somewhat larger
in Greenland.

The country is well inhabited, for it contains
fifty-one cities, near an hundred walled towns,
and a great number of villages. To satisfy my
curious reader, it may be sufficient to describe Lor-
brulgrud. This city stands upon almost two equal
parts on each side the river that passes through.
[t contains above eighty thousand houses, and
about six hundred thousand inhabitants. It is
in’ length three elonzglungs (which make about
fifty-four English miles) and two and a half in
breadth, as I measured it myself in the royal map
made by the King’s order, which was laid on

[176 ]
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

the ground on purpose for me, and extended an
hundred feet: I paced the diameter and circum-
ference several times bare-foot, and computing by
the scale, measured it pretty exactly.

The King’s palace is no regular edifice, but an
heap of buildings about seven miles round: the
chief rooms are generally two hundred and forty
foot high, and broad and long in proportion. A
coach was allowed to Glumdalclitch and me,
wherein her governess frequently took her out to
see the town, or go among the shops; and I was
always of the party, carried in my box; although
the girl at my own desire would often take me out,
and hold me in her hand, that I might more con-
veniently view the houses and the people, as we
passed along the streets. I reckoned our coach to
be about a square of Westminster-Hall, but not
altogether so high; however, I cannot be .very
exact.

Besides the large box in which I was usually
carried, the Queen ordered a smaller one to be
made for me, of about twelve foot square, and ten
high, for the convenience of travelling, because
the other was somewhat too large for Glumdal-
clitch’s lap, and cumbersome in the coach; it was
made by the same artist, whom I directed in the

Pa77 |
Ce YIvV ERS PRAV EES

whole contrivance. This travelling closet was an
exact Square with a window in the middle of three
of the squares, and each window was latticed with
iron wire on the outside, to prevent accidents in
long journeys. On the fourth side, which had no
window, two strong staples were fixed, through
which the person that carried me, when I had a
mind to be on horseback, put in a leathern belt,
and buckled it about his waist. This was always
the office of some grave trusty servant in whom I
could confide, whether I attended the King and
Queen in their progresses, or were disposed to
see the gardens, or pay a visit to some great lady
or_minister of state in the court, when Glumdal-
clitch happened to be out of order: for I soon
began to be known and esteemed’ among the
greatest officers, I suppose. more upon account
of their Majesties’ favour, than any merit of my
own. In journeys, when I was weary of the coach,
a servant-on horseback would: buckle on my: box,
and place it:on a cushion before him; and there I

had a full prospect of the.country on three sides
from my three windows. .I had in this closet a
field-bed’ and a hammock hung from the ceiling,
two chairs and.a table, neatly screwed to the floor,
to prevent being tossed about by the agitation of

[178 ]





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the horse or the coach. And having been long
used to sea-voyages, those motions, although some-
times very violent, did not much discompose me.

Whenever I had a mind to see the town, it was
always in my travelling-closet, which Glumdalclitch
held in her lap in a kind of open sedan, after the
fashion of the country, borne by four men, and
attended by two others in the Queen’s livery. The
people who had often heard of me, were very
curious to crowd about the sedan, and the girl
was complaisant enough to make the bearers stop,
and to take me in her hand that I might be more
conveniently seen.

I was very desirous to see the chief temple, and
particularly the tower belonging to it, which is
reckoned the highest in the kingdom. Accordingly
one day my nurse carried me thither, but I may
truly say I came back disappointed ; for the height
is not above three thousand foot, reckoning from
the ground to the highest pinnacle top; which
allowing for the difference between the size of
those people, and us in Europe, is no great matter
for admiration, nor at all equal in proportion (if I
rightly remember) to Salisbury steeple. But, not
to detract from a nation to which during my life
I shall acknowledge myself extremely obliged, it

[ 180 |
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

must be allowed, that whatever this famous tower
wants in height is amply made up in beauty and
strength. For the walls are near an hundred foot
thick, built of hewn stone; whereof each is about
forty foot square, and adorned on all sides with
statues of Gods and Emperors cut in marble
larger than the life, placed in their several niches.
I measured a little finger which had fallen down
from one of these statues, and lay unperceived
-among some rubbish, and found it exactly four
foot and an inch in length. Glumdalclitch wrapped
it up in a handkerchief, and carried it home in her
pocket to keep among other trinkets, of which the
girl was very fond, as children at her age usually
are,

The King’s kitchen is indeed a noble building,
vaulted at top, and about six hundred foot high.
The great oven is not so wide by ten paces as the
cupola at St. Paul’s: for I measured the latter on
purpose after my return. But if I should describe
the kitchen-grate, the prodigious pots and kettles,
the joints of meat turning on the spits, with many
other particulars, perhaps I should be hardly be-
lieved; at least a severe critic would be apt to
think I enlarged a little, as travellers are often
suspected to do. To avoid which censure, I fear I

Pest: |
GUE EV ERS 5 Raa’

have run too much into the other extreme; and
that if this treatise should happen to be translated
into the language of Brobdingnag (which is the
general name of that-kingdom) and transmitted
thither, the King and his people would have reason
to complain that I had done them an injury by a
false and diminutive representation.

His Majesty seldom keeps above six hundred
horses in his stables: they are generally from fifty-
four to sixty foot high. But when he goes abroad
on solemn days, he is attended for state by a
militia guard of five hundred horse, which indeed
I thought was the most splendid sight that could
be ever beheld, till I saw part of his army in
battalia, whereof I shall find another occasion to
speak. .

[ 182 ]


Cleese Re
Several es that happened to We A uthor. 1G
_ Author shows his skull an navigation. -

SHOULD Wee lived happy enough In ‘that
_ country, if my littleness had not exposed me
JL to several ridiculous and troublesome acci-
dents: some of which I shall venture to relate.
Glumdalclitch often carried me into the gardens
of the court in my smaller box, and would some-
times take me out of it and hold me in her hand,
or set me down to walk. I remember, before the
dwarf left the Queen, he followed us one day into
those gardens, and my nurse having set me down,
he and_I being close together, near some dwart
apple-trees, I must needs show my wit by a silly
allusion between him and the trees, which hap-
pens to hold in their language as it doth in ours.
Whereupon, the malicious rogue watching his
[ 183 ]


GUI VERS TRAVELS

opportunity, when I was walking under one of
them, shook it directly over my head, by which
a dozen apples, each of them near as large as a
Bristol barrel, came tumbling about my ears; one
of them hit me on the back as I chanced to stoop,
and knocked me down flat on my face, but I re-
ceived no other hurt, and the dwarf was pardoned
at my desire, because I had given the provocation.

Another day Glumdalclitch left me on a smooth
grass-plot to divert myself while she walked at
some distance with her governess. In the mean-
time there suddenly fell such a violent shower of
hail, that I was immediately by the force of it
struck to the ground: and when I was down, the
hailstones gave me such cruel bangs all over the
body, as if I had been pelted with tennis-balls ;
however I made a shift to creep on all four, and
shelter myself by lying flat on my face on the lee
side of a border of lemon thyme, but so bruised
from head to foot that I could not go abroad in
ten days. Neither is this at all to be wondered at,
because nature in that country observing the same
proportion through all her operations, a hailstone
is near eighteen hundred times as large as one in
_ Europe, which I can assert upon experience, having
been so curious to weigh and measure them.

[ 184 ]
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

But a more dangerous accident happened to me
in the same garden, when my little nurse believing
she had put me in a secure place, which I often
entreated her to do, that I might enjoy my own
thoughts, and having left my box at home to avoid




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the trouble of carrying it, went to another part of
the garden with her governess and some ladies of
her acquaintance. While she was absent, and out
of hearing, a small white spaniel belonging to one
of the chief gardeners, having got by accident into
the garden, happened to range near the place
where I lay. The dog following the scent, came

[185 |
GUL bIveeR’ S TRAV EES

directly up, and taking me in his mouth, ran straight
to his master, wagging his tail, and set me gently
on the ground. By good fortune he had been so
well taught, that I was carried between his teeth
without the least hurt, or even tearing my clothes.
But the poor gardener, who knew me well, and had
a great kindness for me, was in a terrible fright.
He gently took me up in both his hands, and asked
me how I did; but I was so amazed and out of
breath, that I could not speak a word. In a few
minutes I came to myself, and he carried me safe
to my little nurse, who by this time had returned
to the place where she left me, and was in cruel
agonies when I did not appear, nor answer when
she called: she severely reprimanded the gardener
on account of his dog. But the thing was hushed
up, and never known at court; for the girl was
afraid of the Queen’s anger, and truly as to myself,
I thought it would not be for my ota that
such a story should go about. -

- This accident absolutely determined Glumdal-
clitch never to trust me abroad for the future out
of her sight. I had been long afraid of this reso-
lution, and therefore concealed from her some little
unlucky adventures that happened in those times
when I was left by myself. Once a kite hovering

[ 186 |
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG,

over the garden made a stoop at me, and if I. had not
resolutely drawn my hanger, and run under a thick
espalier, he would have certainly carried me away.
in his talons. Another time walking to the top of
a fresh mole-hill, I fell to my neck in the hole
~ through which that animal had cast up the earth,
and coined some lie, not worth remembering, to
excuse myself for spoiling my clothes. I likewise
broke my right shin against the shell of a snail,
which I happened to stumble over, as I was walk-
ing alone, and thinking on poor England. :

I cannot tell whether I were more pleased or
mortified, to observe in those solitary walks, that
the smaller birds. did not appear to be at all afraid
of me, but would hop about within a yard distance,
looking for worms, and other food, with as much
indifference and security, as if no creature at all
were near them. I remember, a thrush had the
confidence to snatch out of my hand, with his bill,
a piece of cake that Glumdalclitch had just given
me for my breakfast. When I attempted to catch
any of these birds, they would boldly turn against
me, endeavouring to pick my fingers, which I
durst not venture within their reach; and then
they would hop back unconcerned, to hunt for
worms or snails, as they did before. But one day

[ 187 |
GULEAN ER Ss TRAVELS

I took a thick cudgel, and threw it with all my
strength so luckily at a linnet, that I knocked him
down, and seizing him by the neck with both my
hands, ran with him in triumph to my nurse.
However, the bird, who had only been stunned,
recovering himself, gave me so many boxes with
his wings on both sides of my head and body,
though I[ held him at arm’s length, and was out of
the reach of his claws, that I was twenty times
thinking to let him go. But I was soon relieved
by one of our servants, who wrung off the bird’s
neck, and I had him next day for dinner, by the
Queen’s command. This linnet, as near as I can
remember, seemed to be somewhat larger than
an English swan.

The Queen, who often used to hear me talk of
my sea-voyages, and took all occasions to divert
me when I was melancholy, asked me whether I
understood how to handle a sail, or an oar, and
whether a little exercise of rowing might not be
convenient for my health. I answered, that I under-
stood both very well: for although my proper em-
ployment had been to be surgeon or doctor to the

ship, yet often, upon a pinch, I was forced to work
like a common mariner. But I could not see how
this could be done in their country, where the

[ 188 |
VOY AGH? O BRO BDINGNAG

smallest wherry was equal to a first-rate man of war
among us, and such a boat as I could manage
would never live in any of their rivers. Her Majesty
said, if I would contrive a boat, her own joiner
should make it, and she would provide a place for
me to sail in. The fellow was an ingenious work-
man, and, by my instructions, in ten days finished
a pleasure-boat, with all its tackling, able con-
veniently to hold eight Europeans. When it was
finished, the Queen was so delighted, that she ran
with it in her lap to the King, who ordered it to
be put in a cistern full of water, with me in it, by
way of trial; where I could not manage my two
sculls, or little oars, for want of room. But the
Queen had before contrived another project. She
ordered the joiner to make a wooden trough of
three hundred foot long, fifty broad, and eight
deep; which being well pitched to prevent leaking,
was placed on the floor along the wall, in an outer
room of the palace. It had a cock near the bottom
to let out the water when it began to grow stale,
and two servants could easily fill it in half an
hour. Here I often used to row for my own diver-
- sion, as well as that of the Queen and her ladies,
who thought themselves well entertained with my
skill and agility. Sometimes I would put up my

[ 189 ]
GaU FEA iS) TR OANeE aS

sail, and then my business was only to steer, while
the ladies;gave me a gale with their fans; and
when they were weary, some of the pages would
blow my sail forward with their breath, while I
showed my art by steering starboard or larboard
as I pleased. When I had done, Glumdalclitch
always carried my boat into her closet, and hung
it ona nail to dry.
' In this exercise I once met an accident which
had like to have cost me my life: for, one of the
pages having put my boat into the trough, the
governess, who attended Glumdalclitch, very off-
clously lifted.me up to place me in the boat, but
T happened to slip through her fingers, and should
have infallibly fallen down forty feet upon the floor,
if by the luckiest chance in the world, I had not
been stopped by a corking-pin that stuck in the
good gentlewoman’s dress; the head of the pin
‘passed between my shirt and the waistband of my
breeches, and thus I was held by the middle in
the air till Glumdalclitch ran to my relief.
Another time, one of the servants, whose office
it was to fill my trough every third day with fresh
water, was so careless to let a huge frog (not per: °
ceiving it) slip out of his pail. The frog lay con-
cealed till.I was put into my boat, but then seeing
| 190 |
i wh
Hoi
i

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a

00


Gwe Se RAV EES

a resting-place, climbed up, and made it lean so
much on one side, that I was forced to balance it
with all my weight on the other, to prevent over-
turning. When the frog was got in, it hopped at
once half the length of the boat, and then over my
head, backwards and forwards, daubing my face
and clothes with its odious slime. The largeness
of its features made it appear the most deformed
animal that can be conceived. However, I desired
Glumdalclitch to let me deal with it alone. |
banged it a good while with one of my sculls,
and at last forced it to leap out of the boat.

But the greatest danger I ever underwent in
that kingdom, was from a monkey, who belonged
to one of the clerks of the kitchen. Glumdalclitch
had locked me up in her closet, while she went
somewhere upon business, or a visit. The weather
being very warm, the closet-window was left open,
as well as the windows and the door of my bigger
box, in which I usually lived, because of its large-
ness and conveniency. As I sat quietly meditating
at my table, I heard something bounce in at the
closet-window, and skip about from one side to the
other; whereat, although I were much alarmed,
yet I ventured to look out, but not stirring from
my seat; and then I saw this frolicsome animal,

[ 192 |
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

frisking and leaping up and down, till at last he
came to my box, which he seemed to view with
great pleasure and curiosity, peeping in at the
door and every window. I retreated to the farther
corner of my room, or box, but the monkey look-
ing in at every side, put me into such a fright, that
I wanted presence of mind to conceal myself under
the bed, as I might easily have done. After some
time spent in peeping, grinning, and chattering,
he at last espied me, and reaching one of his paws
in at the door, as a cat does when she plays with
a mouse, although I often shifted place to avoid
him, he at length seized the lappet of my coat
(which being made of that country silk, was very
thick and strong) and dragged me out. He took
me up in his right fore-foot, and held me as a nurse
does a child, just as I have seen the same sort of
creature do with a kitten in Europe: and when I
offered to struggle, he squeezed me so hard, that
_I thought it more prudent to submit. I have good
reason to believe that he took me for a young one
of his own species, by his often stroking my face
very gently with his other paw. In these diver-
sions he was interrupted by a noise at the closet
door, as if somebody were opening it; whereupon
he suddenly leaped up to the window, at which he

[ 193 ]
GUEBRPY ERY’ Sei RAV Eis

had come in, and thence upon the leads and gutters,
walking upon three legs, and holding me in the
fourth, till he clambered up to a roof that was
next to ours. I heard Glumdalclitch give a shriek
at the moment he was carrying me out. The poor
girl was almost distracted: that quarter of the
palace was all in an uproar; the servants ran for
ladders ; the monkey was seen by hundreds in the
court, sitting upon the ridge of a building, holding
me like a baby in one of his fore-paws, and feeding
me with the other, by cramming into my mouth
some victuals, and patting me when I would not
eat; whereat many of the rabble below could not
forbear laughing; neither do I think they justly
ought to be blamed, for without question the
sight was ridiculous enough to every body but
myself. Some of the people threw up stones,
hoping to drive the monkey down; but this was
strictly forbidden, or else very probably my brains
had been dashed out.

The ladders were now applied, and mounted by
several men, which the monkey observing, and
finding himself almost encompassed, not being
able to make speed enough with his three legs,
let me drop on a ridge tile, and made his escape.
Here I sat for some time three hundred yards from

[ 194 ]
A VOYAGE. TO BROBDINGNAG

the ground, expecting every moment to be blown
down by the wind, or to fall by my own giddiness,
arid come tumbling over and over from the ridge
to the eaves; but an honest lad, one of my nurse’s
footmen, climbed up, and putting me into his
breeches pocket, brought me down safe.

I was almost choked with the stuff the monkey
had crammed down my throat, and so weak and
bruised in the sides with the squeezes given me
by this odious animal, that I was forced to keep
my bed a fortnight. The King, Queen, and all the
court, sent every day to enquire after my health,
and her Majesty made me several visits during
my. sickness. The monkey was killed, and an
order made that no such animal should ee
about the palace.

When I attended the King after my recovery,
to return him thanks for his favours, he was pleased
to rally me a good deal upon this adventure. He
asked me what my thoughts and speculations were
while I lay in the monkey’s paw; how I liked the
victuals he gave me; his manner of feeding; and
whether the fresh air on the roof had sharpened
my stomach. He desired to know what I would
have done upon such an occasion in my own
country. I told his Majesty, that in Europe we

[195 ]
GUI yk Ss TRAY EUS

had no monkeys, except such as were brought for
curiosities from other places, and so small, that I
could deal with a dozen of them together, if they
presumed to attack me. And as for that monstrous
animal with whom I was so lately engaged, (it was
indeed as large as an elephant) if my fears had
suffered me to think so far as to make use of my
hanger, (looking fiercely and clapping my hand
upon the hilt as I spoke) when he poked his paw
into my chamber, perhaps I should have given
him such a wound, as would have made him glad
to withdraw it with more haste than he put it in.
This I delivered in a firm tone, like a person who
was jealous lest his courage should be called in
question. However, my speech produced nothing
else besides a loud laughter, which all the respect
due to his Majesty from those about him could
“not make them contain. This made me reflect
\ how vain an attempt it is for a man to endeav-
our doing himself honour among those who are
out of all degree of equality or comparison with
him. And yet I have seen the moral of my own
‘behaviour very frequent in England since my
‘return, where a little contemptible varlet, without
the least title to birth, person, wit, or common
sense, shall presume to look with importance, and

[ 196 |
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

/ put himself upon a foot with the greatest persons
of the kingdom.

I was every day furnishing the court with some
ridiculous story: and Glumdalclitch, although she
loved me to excess, yet was arch enough to inform
the Queen, whenever I committed any folly that
she thought would be diverting to her Majesty.



[ 197 ]
— i ———_—
Li, F 3 —
Ye

Sr.
’ F
oy



CEAPTER -VI

Several contrivances of the Author to please the King and
Queen. He shows his skillin music. The King enquires
into the state of Europe, which the Author relates to
him. The King's observations thereon.

USED to attend the King’s levee once or

twice a week, and had often seen him undér

the barber’s hand, which indeed was at first
very terrible to behold: for the razor was almost
twice as long as an ordinary scythe. His Majesty,
according to the custom of the country, was only
shaved twice a week. I once prevailed on the bar-
ber to give me some of the suds or lather, out
of which I picked forty or fifty of the strongest
stumps of hair. I then took a piece of fine wood,
and cut it like the back of a comb, making several
holes in it at equal distance with as small a needle
~ as I could get from Glumdalclitch. I fixed in the

[ 198 |
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

stumps so artificially, scraping and sloping them
with my knife toward the points, that I made
a very tolerable comb; which was a seasonable
supply, my own being so much broken in the
teeth, that it was almost useless: neither did I
know any artist in that country so nice and exact,
as would undertake to make me another.

And this puts me in mind of an amusement
wherein I spent many of my leisure hours. I de-
sired the Queen’s woman to save for me the
combings of her Majesty’s hair, whereof in time I
got a good quantity, and consulting with my friend
the cabinet-maker, who had received general orders
to do little jobs for me, I directed him to make two
chair-frames, no larger than those I had in my box,
and then to bore little holes with a fine awl round
those parts where I designed the backs and seats;
through these holes I wove the strongest hairs |
could pick out, just after the manner of cane-chairs
in England. When they were finished, I made a
present of them to her Majesty, who kept them in
her cabinet, and used to show them for curiosities,
as indeed they were the wonder of every one that
beheld them. Of these hairs (as I had always a
mechanical genius) I likewise made a neat little
purse about five foot long, with her Majesty’s

i teo)),
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

name deciphered in gold letters, which I gave to
Glumdalclitch, by the Queen’s consent. To say
the truth, it was more for show than use, being not
of strength to bear the weight of the larger coins,
and therefore she kept nothing in it but some little
toys that girls are fond of.

The King, who delighted in music, had frequent
concerts at court, to which I was sometimes car-
ried, and set in my box on a table to hear them:
but the noise was so great, that I could hardly
distinguish the tunes. I am confident that all the
drums and trumpets of a royal army, beating and
sounding together just at your ears, could not
equal it. My practice was to have my box removed
from the places where the performers sat, as far
as I could, then to shut the doors and windows
of it, and draw the window curtains; after which
I found their music not disagreeable.

I had learned in my youth to play a little upon
the spinet. Glumdalclitch kept one in her cham-
ber, and a master attended twice a week to teach
her: I call it a spinet, because it somewhat re-
sembled that instrument, and was played upon in
the same manner. A fancy came into my head
that I would entertain the King and Queen with
an English tune upon this instrument. But this

[ 200 |
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appeared extremely difficult: for the spinet was
near sixty foot long, each key being almost a foot
wide, so that, with my arms extended, I could not
reach to above five keys, and to press them down
required a good smart stroke with my fist, which
would be too great a labour, and to no purpose.
The method I contrived was this. I prepared two
round sticks about the bigness of common cudg-
els; they were thicker at one end than the other,
and I covered the thicker ends with a piece of a
mouse’s skin, that by rapping on them I might
neither damage the tops of the keys, nor interrupt
the sound. Before the spinet a bench was placed,
about four foot below the keys, and I was put
upon the bench. I ran sideling upon it that way
and this, as fast as I could, banging the proper keys
with my two sticks, and made a shift to play a jig,
to the great satisfaction of both their Majesties: but
it was the most violent exercise I ever underwent,
and yet I could not strike above sixteen keys, nor,
consequently, play the bass and treble together, as
other artists do; which was a great disadvantage
to my performance.

The King, who, as I before observed, was a prince
of excellent understanding, would frequently order
that I should be brought in my box, and set upon

2027)
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

the table in his closet. He would then command
me to bring one of my chairs out of the box, and
sit down within three yards distance upon the top
of the cabinet, which brought me almost to a level
with his face. In this manner I had several con-
-versations with him. I one day took the freedom
to tell his Majesty, that the contempt he discovered
‘towards Europe, and the rest of the world, did not
seem answerable to those excellent qualities of the
mind he was master of. That reason did not extend
itself with the bulk of the body: on the contrary,
we observed in our country, that the tallest persons
were usually least provided with it. That among
other animals, bees and ants had the reputation of
more industry, art and sagacity, than many of the
larger kinds. And that, as inconsiderable as he took
me-to be, I. hoped I might live to do his Majesty
some signal service. The King heard me with atten-
tion, and began to conceive a much better opinion
of me than he had ever before. He desired I would
give him as exact an account of the government
of England as I possibly could; because, as fond
as princes commonly are of their own customs
(for so he conjectured of other monarchs, by my
former discourses), he should be glad to hear of
any thing that might deserve imitation.
[ 203 ]
CUCU STRAY Bis

Imagine with thyself, courteous reader, how often
I then wished for the tongue of Demosthenes or
Cicero, that might have-enabled me to celebrate
the praise of my own dear native country in a
style equal to its merits and felicity.

I began my discourse by informing his Majesty,
that our dominions consisted of two islands, which
- composed three mighty kingdoms under one sover-
eign, beside our plantations in America. I dwelt
_long upon the fertility of our soil, and the temper-
ature of our climate. I then spoke at large upon
the constitution of an English Parliament, partly
made up of an illustrious body called the House
of Peers, persons of the noblest blood, and of the
most ancient and ample patrimonies. I described
that extraordinary care always taken of their ed-
ucation in arts and arms, to qualify them for being
counsellors born to the king and kingdom; to
have a share in the legislature; to be members
of the highest Court of Judicature, from whence
there could be no appeal; and to be champions
always ready for the defence of their prince and
country, by their valour, conduct, and fidelity.
That these were the ornament and bulwark of the
kingdom, worthy followers of their most renowned
ancestors, whose honour had been the reward of

[ 204 ]
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

_their virtue, from which their posterity were never
once known to degenerate. To these were joined
several holy persons, as part of that assembly,
under the title of Bishops, whose peculiar business
it is to take care of religion, and of those who in-
struct the people therein. These were searched
and sought out through the whole nation,: by
the prince and his wisest counsellors, among such
of the priesthood as were most deservedly distin-
guished by the sanctity of their lives, and the
depth of their erudition; who were indeed the
spiritual fathers of the clergy and the people.
That the other part of the Parliament consisted
of an assembly called the House of Commons, who
were all principal gentlemen, freely picked and
culled out by the people themselves, for their great
abilities and love of their country, to represent the
wisdom of the whole nation. And these two bodies
make up the most august assembly in Europe, to
whom, in conjunction with the prince, the Whole
legislature is committed.
«I then descended to the Courts of Justice, over
which the Judges, those venerable sages and in-
terpreters of the law, presided, for determining ©
the disputed rights and properties of men, as well
as for the punishment of vice, and protection of

[ 205 |
feo Gw Eee oS PRAYED SY 4

innocence. I mentioned the prudent management
of our treasury; the valour and achievements of
our forces by sea and land. I computed the num-
ber of our people, by reckoning how many millions
there might be of each religious sect, or political
party among us. I did not omit even our sports
and pastimes, or any other particular which I
thought might redound to the honour of my
country. And I finished all with a brief historical
account of affairs and events in England for about
an hundred years past.

This conversation was not ended under five
audiences, each of several hours, and the King
heard the whole with great attention, frequently
taking notes of what I spoke, as well as memo-
randums of what questions he intended to ask me.

When I had put an end to these long dis-
courses, his Majesty in a sixth audience consulting
his notes, proposed many doubts, queries, and
objections, upon every article. He asked what
methods were used to cultivate the minds and
bodies of our young nobility, and in what kind
of business they commonly spent the first and
teachable part of their lives. What course was
taken to supply that assembly when any noble
family became extinct. What qualifications were

[ 206 |
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

necessary in those who are to be created new lords:
whether the humour of the prince, a sum of money
to a court lady, or a prime minister, or a design
of strengthening a party opposite to the public
interest, ever happened to be motives in. those
advancements. What share of knowledge these
lords had in the laws of their country, and how
they came by it, so as to enable them to decide
the properties of their fellow-subjects in the last
resort. Whether they were always so free from
avarice, partialities, or want, that a bribe, or some
other sinister view, could have no place among
them. Whether those holy lords I spoke of
were always promoted to that rank upon account
of their knowledge in religious matters, and the
sanctity of their lives, had never been compliers
with the times, while they were common priests,
or slavish chaplains to some nobleman, whose
opinions they continued servilely to follow after
they were admitted into that assembly.

“He then desired to know what arts were prac-
tised in electing those whom I called commoners :
whether a stranger with a strong purse might not
influence the vulgar voters to choose him before
their own landlord, or the most considerable gen-
tleman in the neighbourhood. How it came tol

[ 207 ]

a
\
GU Dri PRS Raw as

pass, that people were so violently bent upon
getting into this assembly, which I allowed to be
a great trouble and expense, often to the ruin
of their families, without any salary or pension:
because this appeared such an exalted strain of












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virtue and public spirit, that his Majesty seemed

to doubt it might possibly not be always sincere:

and he desired to know whether such zealous gen-

tlemen could have any views of refunding them-

selves for the charges and trouble they were at,

by sacrificing the public good to the designs of
[ 208 |
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

& weak and vicious prince in conjunction with a

-eorrupted ministry.. He multiplied his questions,
and sifted me thoroughly upon every part of
this head, proposing numberless enquiries and
objections, which I think it not prudent or con-
venient to repeat.

Upon what I said in relation to our Courts of
Justice, his Majesty desired to be satisfied in
several points: and this I was the better able to
do, having been formerly almost ruined by a long
suit in Chancery, which was decreed for me with
costs. He asked, what time was usually spent in
determining between right and wrong, and what
degree of expense. Whether advocates and orators
had liberty to plead in causes manifestly known to
be unjust, vexatious, or oppressive. Whether party
in religion or politics were observed to be of any
weight in the scale of justice. Whether those
pleading orators were persons educated in the
general knowledge of equity, or only in provincial,
national, and other local customs. Whether they
or their judges had any part in penning those laws -
which they assumed the liberty of interpreting and
glossing upon at their pleasure. Whether they
had ever at different times pleaded for and against
the same cause, and cited precedents to prove

[ 209 |
GULEIVER SS PRAVELS

contrary opinions. Whether they were a rich
or a poor corporation. Whether they received
any pecuniary reward for pleading or delivering
their opinions. And particularly, whether they
were ever admitted as members in the lower.
senate.
He fell next upon the management of our
treasury; and said, he thought my memory had
failed me, because I computed our taxes at about
five or six millions a year, and when I came to
mention the issues, he found they sometimes
amounted to more than double; for the notes he
, had taken were very particular in this point, be-
cause he hoped, as he told me, that the knowl-
edge of our conduct might be useful to him, and ~
he could not be deceived in his calculations. But,
if what I told him were true, he was still at a loss
how a kingdom could run out of its estate like
a private person. He asked me, who were our
creditors; and where we should find money to
pay them. He wondered to hear me talk of such
chargeable and expensive wars; that certainly we
must be a quarrelsome people, or live among very
bad neighbours, and that our generals must needs
be richer than our kings. He asked what business
‘we-had out of our own islands, unless upon the
2107]
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

score of trade or treaty, or to defend the coasts
with our fleet. Above all, he was amazed to hear
me talk of a mercenary standing army in the
midst of peace, and among a free people. He
-said, 1f we were governed by our own consent
in the persons of our representatives, he could
not imagine of whom we were afraid, or against
whom we were to fight; and would hear my
opinion, whether a private man’s house might
not better be defended by himself, his children,
-and family, than by half a dozen rascals picked
up at a venture in the streets, for small wages,
who might get an hundred times more by cutting
their throats. |

He laughed at my odd kind of arithmetic (as he
was pleased to call it) in reckoning the numbers
of our people by a computation drawn from the
several sects among us in religion and _ politics.
He said, he knew no reason, why those who enter-
tain opinions prejudicial to the public, should be
obliged to change, or should not be obliged to
conceal them. And as it was tyranny in any
government to require the first,so it was weak-
ness not to enforce the second: for a man may
be allowed to keep poisons in his closet, but not
to vend them about for cordials.

eZ eae
GUureivVek st TRAVEWsS

He observed, that among the diversions of our
nobility and gentry, I had mentioned gaming.
He desired to know at what age this entertain-
ment was usually taken up, and when it was laid
down; how much of their time it employed;
whether it ever went so high as to affect their
fortunes; whether mean vicious people, by their
dexterity in that art, might not arrive at great
riches, and sometimes keep our very nobles in
dependence, as well as habituate them to vile
companions, wholly take them from the improve-
ment of their minds, and force them, by the losses ©
they have received, to learn and practise that

_infamous dexterity upon others.

He was perfectly astonished with the historical
account I gave him of our affairs during the last
century, protesting it was only an heap of con-
spiracies, rebellions, murders, massacres, revolu-
tions, banishments, the very worst effects that
avarice, faction, hypocrisy, perfidiousness, cruelty,
rage, madness, hatred, envy, lust, malice, or

_ambition, could produce.

- His Majesty, in another audience, was at the
pains to recapitulate the sum of all I had spoken;
compared the questions he made with the answers
I had given; then taking me into his hands, and

fF 2i2 |
me VOC GE 1O BROBDINGN ANG

stroking me gently, delivered himself in these
words, which I shall never forget, nor the manner
he spoke them in: My little friend Grildrig, you
have made a most admirable panegyric upon your
country; you have clearly proved that ignorance,
idleness, and vice, are the proper ingredients for
qualifying a legislator: that laws are best explained,
interpreted, and applied by those whose interest
and abilities lie in perverting, confounding, and
eluding them. I observe among you some lines of —
an institution, which in its original might have
been tolerable, but these half erased, and the rest
wholly blurred and blotted by corruptions. It doth
not appear from all you have said, how any one
virtue is required towards the procurement of any
one station among you; much less that men are
ennobled on account of their virtue, that priests
are advanced for their piety or learning, soldiers
for their conduct or valour, judges for their integ-
rity, senators for the love of their country, or
counsellors for their wisdom. As for yourself (con-
tinued the King), who have spent the greatest
part of your life in travelling, I am well disposed
to hope you may hitherto have escaped many vices
of your country. But by what I have gathered
from your own relation, and the answers I have

[2533
TeV LoiwrR Ss TR AW Eas

with much pains wringed and extorted from you,
I cannot but conclude the bulk of your natives to
be the most pernicious race of little odious vermin
that nature ever suffered to crawl upon the surfac
of the earth. |



[214]


CHAPTER VII

The Author's love of his country. He makes a proposal
of much advantage to the King, which 1s rejected. The
King’s great ignorance in politics. The learning of that
country very tmperfect and confined. Their laws, and
military affairs, and parties in the State.

OTHING but an extreme love of truth

could have hindered me from conceal-

ing this part of my story. It was in vain
to discover my resentments, which were always
turned into ridicule; and I was forced to rest with
patience while my noble and most beloved country
was so injuriously treated. I am heartily sorry as
any of my readers can possibly be, that such an
occasion was given: but this prince happened to
be so curious and inquisitive upon every par-
ticular, that it could not consist either with grati-
tude or good manners to refuse giving him what

[215 |
ier ive RS ER AW EIS

- satisfaction I was able. Yet thus much I may be
allowed to say in my own vindication, that I art-
fully eluded many of his questions, and gave to
every point a more favourable turn by many de-
grees than the strictness of truth would allow.
For I have always borne that laudable partiality
to my own country, which Dionysius Halicarnas-
sensis with so much justice recommends to an
historian: I would hide the frailties and deformities
of my political mother, and place her virtues and
beauties in the most advantageous light. This was
my sincere endeavour in those many discourses |
had with that mighty monarch, although it un-
fortunately failed of success.

But great allowances should be given to a>
King who lives wholly secluded from the rest
of the world, and must therefore be altogether
unacquainted with the manners and customs
that most prevail in other nations: the want of
which knowledge will ever produce many preju-
dices, and a certain narrowness of thinking, from
which we and the politer countries of Europe
are wholly exempted. And it would be hard in-
deed, if so remote a prince’s notions of virtue
and vice were to be offered as a standard for all
mankind.

254
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG |

To confirm what I have now said, and further,
to show the miserable effects of a confined educa-
tion, I shall here insert a passage which will hardly
obtain belief. In hopes to ingratiate myself farther
into his Majesty’s favour, I told him of an inven-
tion discovered between three and four hundred
years ago, to make a certain powder, into an heap
of which the smallest spark of fire falling, would
kindle the whole in a moment, although it were as
big as a mountain, and make it all fly up in the
air together, with a noise and agitation greater
than thunder. That a proper quantity of this
powder rammed into an hollow tube of brass or
iron, according to its bigness, would drive a ball
of iron or lead with such violence and speed, as
nothing was able to sustain its force. That the
largest balls thus discharged, would not only de-
stroy whole ranks of an army at once, but batter
the strongest walls to the ground, sink down ships,
with a thousand men in each, to the bottom of the
_ sea; and, when linked together by a chain, would
cut through masts and rigging, divide hundreds
of bodies in the middle, and lay all waste before
them. That we often put this powder into large
hollow balls of iron, and discharged them by an
engine into some city we were besieging, which

27,
Gn avyaba oe RAV ES

would rip up the pavements, tear the houses to
pieces, burst and throw splinters on every side,
dashing out the brains of all who came near. That
I knew the ingredients very well, which were
cheap, and common; I understood the manner of
compounding them, and could direct his workmen
how to make those tubes, of a size proportionable
to all other things in his Majesty’s kingdom, and
the largest need not be above an hundred foot long ;
twenty or thirty of which tubes, charged with the
proper quantity of powder and balls, would bat-
ter down the walls of the strongest town in his
dominions in a few hours, or destroy the whole
metropolis, if ever it should pretend to dispute his
absolute commands. This I humbly offered to his
Majesty, as a small tribute of acknowledgment in
return of so many marks that I had received of
his royal favour and protection.

The King was struck with horror at the descrip-
tion I had given of those terrible engines, and the
proposal I had made. He was amazed how so
impotent and grovelling an insect as I (these were
his expressions) could entertain such inhuman
ideas, and in so familiar a manner as to appear
wholly unmoved at all the scenes of blood and |
desolation, which I had painted as the common

[p2t3 |
i
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ae

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ak strange effect of narrow principles and short

BVO Gt Oe Bk O RD LNG NG

effects of those destructive machines, whereof he
said, some evil genius, enemy to mankind, must
have been the first contriver. As for himself, he
protested, that although few things delighted him
so much as new discoveries in art or-in nature,
yet he would rather lose half his kingdom than be
privy to such a secret, which he commanded me,
‘asl valued my life, never to mention any more.

views! that a prince possessed of every quality
which procures veneration, love, and esteem; of
strong parts, great wisdom, and profound learning,
endued -with admirable talents for government,
and almost adored by his subjects, should from a
nice unnecessary scruple, whereof in Europe we
can have no conception, let slip an opportunity
put into his hands, that would have made him
absolute master of the lives, the liberties, and the
fortunes of his people. Neither do I say this with
the least intention to detract from the many vir-
tues of that excellent King, whose character I am
sensible will on this account be very much lessened
in the opinion of an English reader: but I take
this defect among them to have risen from their
ignorance, they not having hitherto reduced politics

- Into a science, as the more acute wits of Europe

[ 219 ]
GUY RS’ PRAY ELS

have done. For, I remember very well, in a dis-
course one day with the King, when I happened
to say there were several thousand books among
us written upon the art of government, it gave him
(directly contrary to my intention) a very mean
opinion of our understandings. He professed both
to abominate and despise all mystery, refinement,
and intrigue, either in a prince or a minister. He
could not tell what I meant by secrets of state,
where an enemy or some rival nation were not in
(“the case. He confined the knowledge of govern-
\ ing within very narrow bounds; to common sense
and reason, to justice and lenity, to the speedy
determination of civil and criminal causes; with
‘some other obvious topics, which are not worth
considering. And he gave it for his opinion, that
whoever could make two ears of corn, or two
blades of grass to grow upon a spot of ground
_ where only one grew before, would deserve better
of mankind, and do more essential service to his
country than the whole race of politicians put
together.
- The learning of this people is very defective,
- consisting only in morality, history, poetry, and
mathematics, wherein they must be allowed to
excel. But the last of these is wholly applied. to

\

i220. |
ne VEO Vr Gb @B RO Bball NG Nee

what may be useful in life, to the improvement of
agriculture, and all mechanical arts; so that among
us 1t would be little esteemed. And as to ideas,
entities, abstractions, and transcendentals, I could
never drive the least conception into their heads.
No law of that country must exceed in words
the number of letters in their alphabet, which
consists only in two and twenty. But, indeed, few
of them extend even to that length. They are
expressed in the most plain and simple terms,
wherein those people are not mercurial enough to
discover above one interpretation: and to write a
comment upon any law is a capital crime. As to
the decision of civil causes, or proceedings against
criminals, their precedents. are so few, that they
have little reason to boast of any extraordinary skill

in either. |
_ They have had the art of printing, as well as
the Chinese, time out of mind: but their libraries
are not very large; for that of the King’s, which
is reckoned the biggest, doth not amount to above
a thousand volumes, placed in a gallery of twelve
hundred foot long, from whence I had liberty to
borrow what books I pleased. The Queen’s joiner
had contrived in one of Glumdalclitch’s rooms a
kind of wooden machine five and twenty foot high,

[ 221 |

|
Gti y S RAY ELS

formed like a standing ladder; the steps were each
fifty foot long. It was indeed a moveable pair of
stairs, the lowest end placed at ten foot distance
from the wall of the chamber. The book I had a
mind to read was put up leaning against the wall.
I first mounted to the upper step of the ladder,
and turning my face towards the book, began at
the top of the page, and so walking to the nght
and left about eight or ten paces, according to
the length of the lines, till I had gotten a little
below the level of my eyes, and then descending
gradually till I came to the bottom: after which
I mounted again, and began the other page in
the same manner, and so turned over the leaf,
which I could easily do with both my hands, for
it was as thick and stiff as a pasteboard, and in
the largest folios not above ele eet or twenty
foot long.

Their style is clear, masculine, and smooth,
but not florid, for they avoid nothing more than
multiplying unnecessary words, or using various
expressions. I have perused many of their books,
especially those in history and morality. Among
the rest, I was much diverted with a little old
treatise, which always lay in Glumdalclitch’s bed-
chamber, and belonged to her governess, a grave

2224

CVmMeIne eK Ss TRAY ES

elderly gentlewoman, who dealt in writings of
morality and devotion. The book treats of the
weakness of human kind, and 1s in little esteem,
except among the women and the vulgar. How-
ever, I was curious to see what an author of that
country could say upon such a subject. This
writer went through all the usual topics of Euro-
pean moralists, showing how diminutive, con-
temptible, and helpless an animal was man in his
own nature; how unable to defend himself from
the inclemencies of the air, or the fury of wild
beasts: how much he was excelled by one creature
in strength, by another in speed, by a third ‘in fore-
sight, by a fourth in industry. He added, that
nature was degenerated in these latter declining
ages of the world, and could now produce only
small beings in comparison of those in ancient
times. He said, it was very reasonable to think,
not only that the species of men were originally
much larger, but also, that there must have been
giants in former ages, which, as it is asserted by
history and tradition, so it hath been confirmed
by huge bones and skulls casually dug up in
several parts of the kingdom, far exceeding the
common dwindled race of man in our days. He
argued, that the very laws of. nature absolutely

[224]
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

required we should have been made in the begin-
ning, of a size more large and robust, not so liable
to destruction from every little accident of a tile
‘falling from a house, or a stone cast from the hand
of a boy, or of being drowned in a little brook.
From this way of reasoning the author drew
several moral applications useful in the conduct of
life, but needless here to repeat. For my own part,
I could not avoid reflecting how universally this
talent was spread, of drawing lectures in morality,
or indeed rather matter of discontent and repin-
ing, from the quarrels we raise with nature. And
I believe, upon a strict enquiry, those quarrels
might be shown as ill grounded among us, as they —
are among that people.

As to their military affairs, they boast that the
King’s army consists of an hundred and seventy-
six thousand foot, and thirty-two thousand horse:
if that may be called an army which is made up
of tradesmen in the several cities, and farmers
in the country, whose commanders are only the
nobility and gentry, without pay or reward. They
are indeed perfect enough in their exercises, and
under very good discipline, wherein I saw no great
merit ; for how should it be otherwise, where every
farmer is under the command of his own landlord,

[ 225]
Cl Peiv RSet R AV EES

and every citizen under that of the principal men
in his own city, chosen after the manner of Venice
by ballot? :

I have often seen the militia of Lorbrulgrud
drawn out to exercise in a great field near the
city of twenty miles square. They were in all not
above twenty-five thousand foot, and six thousand
horse; but it was impossible for me to compute
their number, considering the space of ground they
took up. A cavalier mounted on a large steed,
might be about an hundred foot high. I have
seen this whole body of horse, upon a word of
command, draw their swords at once, and brandish
them in the air. Imagination can figure nothing
so grand, so surprising, and so astonishing! It
looked as if ten thousand flashes of lightning were
darting at the same time from every quarter of
the sky.

I was curious to know how this prince, to whose
dominions there is no access from any other
country, came to think of armies, or to teach his
people the practice of military discipline. But I
was soon informed, both by conversation, and read-

f ing their histories. For, in the course of many

ages they have been troubled with the same disease

to which the whole race of mankind is subject;
[ 226 ]
A VOYAGE no BROBDINGN AG

the nobility often contending for power, the people
for liberty, and the King for absolute dominion.
All which, however happily tempered by the laws
of that kingdom, have been sometimes violated by
each of the three parties, and have once or more
occasioned civil wars, the last whereof was happily
put an end to by this prince’s grandfather by a
general composition ; and the militia, then settled .
with common consent, hath been ever since kept
in the strictest duty.

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CHAPTER VIII

lhe King and Queen make a progress to the frontiers.
Lhe Author attends them. The manner in which he
leaves the country very particularly related. He returns
to England.

HAD always a strong impulse that I should

some time recover my liberty, though it was

impossible to conjecture by what means, or
to form any project with the least hope of succeed-
ing. The ship in which I sailed was the first ever
known to be driven within sight of that coast, and
the King had given strict orders, that if at any
time another appeared, it should be taken ashore,
and with all its crew and passengers brought in
a tumbril to Lorbrulgrud. I was, indeed, treated
with much kindness: I was the favourite of a great
King and Queen, and the delight of the whole -
court, but it was upon such a foot as ill became

[ 228 ]
eae Onve SG miea ©: 2b RO BD IN 'GIN Age
the dignity of human kind. I could never forget
those domestic pledges I had left behind me. |
wanted to be among people with whom I could
converse upon even terms, and walk about the
streets and fields without fear of being trod to
death like a frog or a young puppy. But my de-
liverance came sooner than I expected, and in a
manner not very common: the whole story and
circumstances of which I shall faithfully relate. —
I had now been two years in this country; and
about the beginning of the third, Glumdalclitch
and I attended the King and Queen in a progress
to the south coast of the kingdom. I was carried,
as usual, in my travelling-box, which, as I have
already described, was a very convenient closet of
twelve foot wide. And I had ordered a hammock
to be fixed by silken ropes from the four corners at
the top, to break the jolts, when a servant carried
me before him on horseback, as I sometimes de-
sired, and would often sleep in my hammock while
we were upon the road. On the roof of my closet,
just over the middle of the hammock, I ordered
the joiner to cutout a hole of a foot square, to
give me air in hot weather, as I slept; which hole
I shut at pleasure with a board that drew back-
wards and forwards through a groove.

[ 229 |
Gaile venk oS" PRAY ils

When we came to our journey’s end, the King
thought proper to pass a few days at a palace he
hath near Flanflasnic, a city within eighteen Eng-
lish miles of the sea-side. Glumdalclitch and I were
much fatigued; I had gotten a small cold, but
the poor girl was so ill as to be confined to her
chamber. I longed to see the ocean, which must
be the only scene of my escape, if ever it should
happen. I pretended to be worse than I really
was, and desired leave to take the fresh air of the
sea, with a page whom I was very fond of, and
who had sometimes been trusted with me. I shall
never forget with what unwillingness Glumdal-
clitch consented, nor the strict charge she gave
the page to be careful of me, bursting at the same
time into a flood of tears, as if she had some fore-
boding of what, was to happen. The boy took me
out in my box about half an hour’s walk from the
palace, towards the rocks on the sea-shore. |
ordered him to set me down, and lifting up one
of my sashes, cast many a wistful melancholy look
towards the sea. I found myself not very well, and
told the page that I had a mind to take a nap in
my hammock, which I hoped would do me good.
I got in, and the boy shut the windowsclose down
to keep out the cold. I soon fell asleep, and all I

[ 230 |
a VOYAGE 10 BROBDINGNAG

can conjecture is, that while I slept, the page,
thinking no danger could happen, went among
the rocks to look for birds’ eggs, having before
observed him from my window searching about,
and picking up one or two in the clefts. Be that
as it will, I found myself suddenly awaked with a
violent pull upon the ring which was fastened at
the top of my box for the conveniency of carriage.
I felt my box raised very high in the air, and then
borne forward with prodigious speed. The first
jolt had like to have shaken me out of my ham-
mock, but afterwards the motion was easy enough.
I called out several times, as loud as I could raise
my voice, but all to no purpose. I looked towards
my windows, and could see nothing but the clouds -
and sky. I heard a noise just over my head like the
clapping of wings, and then began to perceive the
woful condition I was in; that some eagle had got
the ring of my box in his beak, with an intent to let
it fall on a rock like a tortoise in a shell, and then
pick out my body, and devour it. For the sagacity
and smell of this bird enable him to discover his
quarry at a great distance, though better concealed
than I could be within a two-inch board.

In a little time I observed the noise and flutter
of wings t6 increase very fast, and my box was

[ 231 |
GO er NR SR Ave

tossed up and down, like a sign-post in a windy
day. I heard several bangs or buffets, as I thought,
given to the eagle (for such I am certain it must
have been that held the ring of my box in his
beak), and then all of a sudden felt myself falling
perpendicularly down for above a minute, but with
such incredible swiftness that I almost lost my
breath. My fall was stopped by a terrible squash,
that sounded louder to my ears than the cataract
of Niagara; after which I was quite in the dark
for another minute, and then my box began to rise
so high that I could see light from the tops of my
windows. I now perceived that I was fallen into —
the sea. My box, by the weight of my body, the
_ goods that were in, and the broad plates of iron
fixed for strength at the four corners of the top
and bottom, floated about five foot deep in water.
I did then, and do now suppose that the eagle
which flew away with my box was pursued by two
or three others, and forced to let me drop while he
was defending himself against the rest, who hoped
to share in the prey. The plates of iron fastened
at the bottom of the box (for those were the
strongest) preserved the balance while it fell, and
hindered it from being broken on the surface of
the water. Every joint of it was well grooved, and

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the door did not move on hinges, but up and down
like a sash, which kept my closet so tight that very
little water came in. I got with much difficulty
out of my hammock, having first ventured to draw
back the slip-board on the roof already mentioned,
contrived on purpose to let in air, for want of
which I found myself almost stifled.

How often did I then wish myself with my dear
Glumdalclitch, from whom one single hour had so
far divided me! And I may say with truth, that
in the midst of my own misfortunes I could not
forbear lamenting my poor nurse, the grief she
would suffer for my loss, the displeasure of the
Queen, and the ruin of her fortune. Perhaps many
travellers have not been under greater difficulties
and distress than I was at this juncture, expecting
every: moment to see my box dashed in pieces,
or at least overset by the first violent blast, or a
rising wave. A breach in one single pane of glass
would have been immediate death: nor could any
thing have preserved the windows, but the strong
lattice wires placed on the outside against acci-
dents in travelling. I saw the water ooze in at
several crannies, although the leaks were not con-
siderable, and I endeavoured to stop them as well
as I could. I was not able to lift up the roof of

[ 234 ]
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

my closet, which otherwise I certainly should have
done, and sat on the top of it, where I might at
_ least preserve myself some hours longer than by
being shut up, as I may call it, in the hold. Or, if
I escaped these dangers for a day or two, what
could I expect but a miserable death of cold
and hunger! I was four hours under these cir-
cumstances, expecting and indeed wishing every
moment to be my last.

I have already told the reader, that there were
two strong staples fixed upon that side of my box
which had no window, and into which the servant
who used to carry me on horseback would put a
leathern belt, and buckle it about his waist. Being
in this disconsolate state, I heard or at least
thought I heard some kind of grating noise on
that side of my box where the staples were fixed,
and soon after I began to fancy that the box was
pulled or towed along in the sea; for I now and
then felt a sort of tugging, which made the waves
rise near the tops of my windows, leaving me
almost in the dark. This gave me some faint
hopes of relief, although I was not able to imagine
how it could be brought about. I ventured to
unscrew one of my chairs, which were always
fastened to the floor; and having made a hard

[ 235 |
CG Uni ik? SF Raa

shift to screw it down again directly under the
slipping-board that I had lately opened, I mounted
on the chair, and putting my mouth as near as I
could to the hole, I called for help in a loud voice,
and in all the languages I understood. I then
fastened my handkerchief to a stick I usually car-
ried, and thrusting it up the hole, waved it several
times in the air, that if any boat or ship were near,
the seamen might conjecture some unhappy mortal
to be shut up in the box.

I found no effect from all I could do, but plainly
perceived my closet to be moved along; and in
the space of an hour, or better, that side of the box
where the staples were, and had no window, struck
against something that was hard. I apprehended
it to be a rock, and found myself tossed more than
ever. I plainly heard a noise upon the cover of
my closet, like that of a cable, and the grating of
it as it passed through the ring. I then found |
myself hoisted up by degrees at least three foot
higher than I was before. Whereupon I again
thrust up my stick and handkerchief, calling for
help till I was almost hoarse. In return to which,
I heard a great shout repeated three times, giving
me such transports of joy, as are not to be con-
ceived but by those who feel them. I now heard

[ 236 ]
Me voyv \Gh 10 BROBDENGNAG

a trampling over my head, and somebody calling
through the hole with a loud voice in the English
tongue; If there be any body below, let them
speak. I answered, I was an Englishman, drawn
by ill fortune into the greatest calamity that ever
any creature underwent, and begged, by all that
was moving, to be delivered out of the dungeon
I was in. The voice replied, I was safe, for my
box was fastened to their ship; and the carpenter
should immediately come and saw an hole in the
cover, large enough to pull me out. I answered,
that was needless, and would take up too much
time, for there was no more to be done, but let
one of the crew put his finger into the ring, and
take the box out of the sea into the ship, and so
into the captain’s cabin. Some of them upon
hearing me talk so wildly thought I was mad;
others laughed; for indeed it never came into
my head that I was now got among people of my
own stature and strength. The carpenter came,
and in a few minutes sawed a passage about four
foot square, then let down a small ladder, upon
which I mounted, and from thence was taken into
the ship in a very weak condition.

The sailors were all in amazement, and asked me
a thousand questions, which I had no inclination

237, |
Glen S RAV EES

to answer. I was equally confounded at the
sight of so many pigmies, for such I took them
to be, after having so long accustomed my eyes
to the monstrous objects I had left. But the
Captain, Mr. Thomas Wilcocks, an honest worthy
Shropshire man, observing I was ready to faint,
took me into his cabin, gave me a cordial to com-
fort me, and made me turn in upon his own bed,
advising me to take a little rest, of which I had
great need. Before I went to sleep I gave him to
understand that I had some valuable furniture in
my box, too good to be lost; a fine hammock, an
handsome field-bed, two chairs, a table, and a
cabinet: that my closet was hung on all sides, or
rather quilted, with silk and cotton: that if he
would let one of the crew bring my closet into his
cabin, I would open it there before him, and show
him my goods. The Captain hearing me utter
these absurdities, concluded I was raving: how-
ever, (I suppose to pacify me) he promised to give
order as I desired, and going upon deck sent some
of his men down into my closet, from whence (as
I afterwards found) they drew up all my goods,
and stripped off the quilting; but the chairs, cabi-
net, and bedstead, being screwed to the floor,
were much damaged by the ignorance of the

| 238 |
|

| DN L
r L wee


GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

seamen, who tore them up by force. Then they
knocked off some of the boards for the use of the
ship, and when they had got all they had a mind
for, let the hull drop into the sea, which by reason
of many breaches made in the bottom and sides,
sunk to rights. And indeed I was glad not to
have been a spectator of the havoc they made;
because I am confident it would have sensibly
touched me, by bringing former passages into my
mind, which I had rather forget.

I slept some hours, but perpetually disturbed
with dreams of the place I had left,and the dangers
I had escaped. However, upon waking I found
myself much recovered. It was now about eight
oclock at night, and the Captain ordered supper
immediately, thinking I had already fasted too
long. He entertained me with great kindness,
observing me not to look wildly, or talk inconsis-
tently: and when we were left alone, desired I
would give him a relation of my travels, and by
what accident I came to be set adrift in that
monstrous wooden chest. He said, that about
twelve o’clock at noon, as he was looking through
his glass, he spied it at a distance, and thought it
was a sail, which he had a mind to make, being
not much out of his course, in hopes of buying

[ 240 ]
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

some biscuit, his own beginning to fall short.
That upon coming nearer, and finding his error,
he sent out his long-boat to discover what I was;
that his men came back in a fright, swearing they
had seen a swimming house. That he laughed at
their folly, and went himself in the boat, ordering
his men to take a strong cable along with them.
That the weather being calm, he rowed round me
several times, observed my windows, and the wire
lattices that defended them. That he discovered
two staples upon one side, which was all of boards,
without any passage for light. He then com-
manded his men to row up to that side, and
fastening a cable to one of the staples, ordered
them to tow my chest, (as he called it), towards the
ship. When it was there, he gave directions to
fasten another cable to the ring fixed in the cover,
and to raise up my chest with pulleys, which all
the sailors were not able to do above two or three
foot. He said, they saw my stick and handker-
chief thrust out of the hole, and concluded that
some unhappy man must be shut up in the cavity.
I asked whether he or the crew had seen any
prodigious birds in the air about the time he first
discovered me. To which he answered, that dis-
coursing this matter with the sailors while I was

[ 247]
GU LEVER Sf RAVE ES

asleep, one of them said he had observed three
eagles flying towards the north, but remarked
nothing of their being larger than the usual size,
which I suppose must be imputed to the great
height they were at; and he could not guess the

reason of my question. I then asked the Captain |
how far he reckoned we might be from land; he
said, by the best computation he could make, we
were at least an hundred leagues. I assured him,
that he must be mistaken by almost half, for |
had not left the country from whence I came
above two hours before I dropt into the sea.
Whereupon he began again to think that my brain
was disturbed, of which he gave me a hint, and
advised me to go to bed in a cabin he had pro-
vided. I assured him I was well refreshed with his
good entertainment and company, and as much
in my senses as ever I was in my life. He then
grew serious, and desired to ask me freely whether
I were not troubled in mind by the consciousness
of some enormous crime, for which I was punished
at the command of some prince, by exposing me
in that chest, as great criminals in other countries
have been forced to sea in a leaky vessel without
provisions: for, although he should be sorry to
have taken so ill a man into his ship, yet he would

[ 242 ]
Nev OveNnG b nO EROBDINGNAG

engage his word to set me safe on shore in the
first port where we arrived. He added, that his
suspicions were much increased by some very
absurd speeches I had delivered at first to the
sailors, and afterwards to himself, in relation to
my closet or chest, as well as by my odd looks
and behaviour while I was at supper. |

I begged his patience to hear me tell my story,
which I faithfully did from the last time I left
England to the moment he first discovered me.
And, as truth always forceth its way into rational
minds, so this honest worthy gentleman, who had
some tincture of learning, and very good sense,
was immediately convinced of my candour and
veracity. But further to confirm all I had said, I
entreated him to give order that my cabinet should
be brought, of which I had the key in my pocket,
(for he had already informed me how the seamen
disposed of my closet). I opened it in his pres-
ence, and showed him the small collection of
rarities I made in the country from whence I had
been so strangely delivered. There was the comb
I had contrived out of the stumps of the King’s
beard, and another of the same materials, but fixed
into a paring of her Majesty’s thumb-nail, which
sérved for the back. There was a collection of

[ 243 ]
Caer ay he Re Ss aR A Von ES

needles and pins from a foot to half a yard long;
four wasp-stings, like joiners’ tacks; some comb-
ings of the Queen’s hair; a gold ring which one
day she made me a present of in a most obliging
manner, taking it from her little finger, and throw-
ing it over my head like a collar. I desired the
Captain would please to accept this ring in return
of his civilities; which he absolutely refused. Lastly,
I desired him to see the breeches I had Ea on,
which were made of a mouse’s skin.

I could force nothing on him but a footman’s
tooth, which I observed him to examine with great
curiosity, and found he had a fancy for it. He re-
ceived it with abundance of thanks, more than
such a trifle could deserve. It was drawn by an
unskilful surgeon,in a mistake, from one of Glum-
dalclitch’s men, who was afflicted with the tooth-
ache, but it was as sound as any in his head. I
got it cleaned, and put it into my cabinet. It was
about a foot long, and four inches in diameter.

The Captain was very well satisfied with this
plain relation I had given him, and said, he hoped
when we returned to England, I would oblige
the world by putting it in paper, and making it
public. My answer was, that I thought we were
already overstocked with books of travels: that

[ 244 ]
a VOYAGE tO BRO BDIUNG NAG

nothing could now pass which was not extraordi-
nary; wherein I doubted some authors less con-
sulted truth than their own vanity, or interest,
or the diversion of ignorant readers. That my
story could contain little besides common events,
without those ornamental descriptions of strange
plants, trees, birds, and other animals, or of the
barbarous customs and idolatry of savage people,
with which most writers abound. However, I
thanked him for his good opinion, and promised
to take the matter into my thoughts.

He said he wondered at one thing very much, |
which was, to hear me speak so loud, asking me
whether the King or Queen of that country were
thick of hearing. I told him, it was what I had
been used to for above two years past; and that I
admired as much at the voices of him and his
men, who seemed to me only to whisper, and yet
I could hear them well enough. But when I spoke
in that country, it was like a man talking in the
street to another looking out from the top of a
steeple, unless when I was placed on a table, or
held in any person’s hand. I told him, I had like-
wise observed another thing, that when I first got
into the ship, and the sailors stood all about me,
I thought they were the most little contemptible

[245 ]
Glee ty bak Ss “PRAY BES

creatures I had ever beheld. For, indeed, while I
was in that prince’s country, I could never endure
to look in a glass after my eyes had been accus-
tomed to such prodigious objects, because the
comparison gave me so despicable a conceit of
myself. The Captain said, that while we were at
supper, he observed me to look at every thing with
a sort of wonder, and that I often seemed hardly
able to contain my laughter, which he knew not
well how to take, but imputed it to some disorder
in my brain. I answered, it was very true; and
I wondered how I could forbear, when I saw his
dishes of the size of a silver three-pence, a leg of
pork hardly a mouthful,a cup not so big as a nut-
shell; and so I went on, describing the rest of
his household-stuff and provisions after the same
manner. For, although the Queen had ordered a
little equipage of all things necessary for me while
I was in her service, yet my ideas were wholly
taken up with what I saw on every side of me, and
I winked at my own littleness as people do at their
own faults. The Captain understood my raillery
very well, and merrily replied he would have
gladly given an hundred pounds to have seen my
closet in the eagle’s bill, and afterwards in its fall
from so great an height into the sea; which would

[ 246 ]
A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

certainly have been a most astonishing object,
worthy to have the description of it transmitted
to future ages: and the comparison of Phaeton
was so obvious, that he could not forbear applying
it, although I did not much admire the conceit.

The Captain having been at Tonquin, was in his
return to England driven north-eastward to the
latitude of 44 degrees, and of longitude 143. But
meeting a trade-wind two days after I came on
board him, we sailed southward a long time, and
coasting New Holland kept our course west-south-
west, and then south-south-west till we doubled
the Cape of Good Hope. Our voyage was very
prosperous, but I shall not trouble the reader with
a journal of it. The Captain called in at one or
two ports, and sent in his long-boat for provisions
and fresh water, but I never went out of the ship
till we came into the Downs, which was on the
third day of June, 1706, about nine months after
my escape. I offered to leave my goods in security
for payment of my freight: but the Captain pro-
tested he would not receive one farthing. We took
kind leave of each other, and I made him promise
he would come to see me at my house in Redriff.
I hired a horse and guide for five shillings, which
I borrowed of the Captain.

[ 247 ]
CA Evan Re Sy i ReA YW Ee S

As I was on the road, observing the littleness
of the houses, the trees, the cattle, and the people,
I began to think myself in Lilliput. I was afraid
of trampling on every traveller I met, and often
called aloud to have them stand out of the way, so
that I had like to have gotten one or two broken
heads for my impertinence.

When I came to my own house, for which I
was forced to enquire, one of the servants opening
the door, I bent down to go in (like a goose under
a gate) for fear of striking my head. My wife ran
out to embrace me, but I stooped lower than her
knees, thinking she could otherwise never be able
to reach my mouth. My daughter kneeled to ask
my blessing, but I could not see her till she arose,
having been so long used to stand with my head
and eyes erect to above sixty foot; and then I |
went to take her up with one hand, by the waist.
I looked down upon the servants and one or two
friends who were in the house, as if they had been
pigmies, and I a giant. I told my wife, she had
been too thrifty, for I found she had starved her-
self and her daughter to nothing. In short, I
behaved myself so unaccountably, that they were
all of the Captain’s opinion when he first saw me,
and concluded I had lost my wits. This I mention

[ 248 ]
GULLIVER’ S PRAVELS

as an instance of the great power of habit and
prejudice.

In a little time I and my family and friends
came to a right understanding: but my wife pro-
tested I should never go to sea any more; although -
my evil destiny so ordered that she had not power
to hinder me, as the reader may know hereafter.
In the mean time I here conclude the second part
of my unfortunate voyages.

[ 250 |


NOTES

A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

CHAPTER I

PAGE 3. The name “ Lilliput” is said to be derived from /@/z,
meaning “little” in Swift’s Lilliputian language, and Ju/, a term
of contempt current in Swift’s time. |

PAGE 4. Levant; the coast regions and islands of Asia Minor
and Syria.

Old Jury: correctly spelled ‘‘Old Jewry”; a street in london
that derived its name from the Jews who once lived there, as well
as from the synagogue which stood there prior to 1291.

being advised: considering it wise; being inclined after. due
consideration.

PAGE 5. the South-Sea: the Pacific Ocean.

PAGE 6. According to Swift’s map it would appear that De Van
Diemen’s Land was meant Australia.

PAGE 14. half a pint: it would require one hundred and eight
Lilliputian gallons to make an English half pint.

small wine: mild wine.

PAGE 18. foot: used instead of the plural. This old usage has
been preserved throughout. |

pack-thread: common twine.

PAGE 20. half-ptke: a spear-headed weapon.

[251]
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

CHAPTER: FI

PAGE 23. stang: sixteen feet and a half.
PAGE 24. chairs: sedan chairs, which were commonly used in
Swift’s time.
PAGE 26. adits: clothes.
Lingua Franca was the commercial language of the Orient.
It was made up of Italian, Spanish, Turkish, and other languages.
PAGE 32. fobs: small pockets.
PAGE 33. /mprimis. “in the first place.”
PAGE 39. yeomen of the guards: the soldiers in the king’s special
bodyguard.
perspective: a spygiass.

CHAPTER ITI

‘PAGE 41. Flimnap is a caricature of Sir Robert Walpole, prime
minister of George I. Swift’s satire is here directed against
_ the court of George I.

allowed: acknowledged.

PaGE 43. This incident of Flimnap and his caper on the straight

_ rope is a reference to Walpole’s resignation in 1717. The ‘cush-
ion” that saved Walpole was supposed to be a certain duchess,
a favorite of George I, at whose request Walpole was restored
to favor.

The threads are supposed to represent the ribbons of the Garter,
the Bath, and the Thistle, orders to which people are appointed
by the king as a mark of special favor.

PAGE 45. close chair: sedan chair, as on page 24.

PAGE 50. complexion: disposition. ,

PAGE 51. the globe: an inconsistency occurs here, as we are told on
page 76 that the Lilliputians believed the earth to be flat.

PAGE 52. ‘‘Corn” as used here means grain of any kind that was
used for bread.

PAGE 54. guadrant.: an instrument used for measuring heights.

[ 252 |
NOTES

CHAPTER IV

PAGE 60. The high heels and low heels were intended to represent
High Church and Low Church, or the Whigs and the Tories.

PAGE 61. Blefuscu represented France.

PAGE 63. The Alcoran, or Koran, is the Bible of the Mohammedans.

CHAPTER V

PAGE 70. puissant: powerful, mighty.
PAGE 71. junto. a body of men secretly banded together for politi-
cal purposes.

CHAPTER VI

PAGE 76. pulling: plucking the feathers from.
PAGE 81. The reference in the seventh line is to James I, who
made lavish distributions of titles and honors.
PAGE 85. portion: a sum of money which is given a child on his
coming of age.
domestic: domicile, home.

CHAPTER VIII

PAGE 114. auczent. a flag, or ensign.

A VOYAGE TO BROBDINGNAG

CHAPTER 1

PAGE 123. This description is a parody on the extravagant use of
nautical terms so often found in old books of travel.
PAGE 127. “Corn” here means barley.
The inhabitants of Brobdingnag were twelve times the height
of Gulliver, or about seventy-two feet. Swift seems to have
worked out the dimensions and distances in both the “ Voyage to

[253 ]
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

Lilliput” and the ‘“ Voyage to Brobdingnag” with much accuracy,
so that the proportions are generally consistent. In the ‘ Voyage
to Lilliput” the relative sizes of Gulliver and the inhabitants were
just the reverse of those in the ‘Voyage to Brobdingnag,” he
being about six feet high and the Lilliputians six inches high.
PAGE 132. Ainds: farm laborers. |
pistole: a pistole is equivalent to about four dollars.
PAGE 141. anger: a short broadsword.

CHAPTER II

PAGE 149. From London to St. Albans the distance is about twenty
miles.
PAGE 151. pumpion: old form of ‘* pumpkin.”

CHAPTER III

PAGE 156. mozdore.: about six dollars and seventy-five cents.

PAGE 157. a@ thousand guineas: about five thousand dollars. —

PAGE 158. Phenix: According to oriental mythology the phoenix
was a wonderful bird of great beauty, the only one of its kind.
It was supposed to live five or six hundred years in the Arabian
wilderness, after which it built for itself a funeral pile of spices
and aromatic gums, lighted the pile by fanning its wings, and
was burned upon it, but revived from its ashes in the freshness
of youth. Hence the phoenix often serves as an emblem of im-
mortality or as a complimentary term for a person of singular
excellence or unusual beauty.

cabinet: a small private room.

PAGE 159. scrutore: adesk; this form isacorruption of the French
escritotre, ‘‘a writing desk.”

PAGE 161. vérvtuosz: persons skilled in some art or particular branch
of knowledge.

PAGE 162. lusus nature: a freak of nature.

PAGE 170. cashiered: dismissed from office.

PAGE 173. drone: the largest pipe of the bagpipe.

[ 254 ]

ke aah,
NOMS: vt

CHAPTER IV

PAGE 174. It will be interesting to observe that the map purporting
to show the location of Brobdingnag represents it, compared with
North America, as being aaa smaller than the dimensions
given here.

PAGE 175. Swift refers here to a difference of opinion among the
geographers of his day. Some believed that Japan was joined
to America.

PAGE 177. Westminster-Hall: a structure adjoining the houses
of Parliament and forming part of the ancient palace of West-
minster. It is two hundred and ninety feet long, sixty-eight feet
wide, and ninety-two feet high.

PAGE 180. Salisbury steeple is about four hundred feet high, A
proportionate height in Brobdingnag would be approximately
five thousand feet. |

PAGE 182. zz battalia: in battle array.

CHAPTER V

PAGE 187. espalzer: fruit trees trained to a wall or frame.
PAGE 190. corking-fin: a large toilet pin.

CHAPTER VI

PAGE 203. closet; private room or apartment.
**Cabinet”’ here refers to Gulliver’s box.

PAGE 209. Chancery: formerly the highest court in England next
to Parliament.

CHAPTER VII

PAGE 216, Dionysius Halicarnassensis: Dionysius was a Greek
historian, born at Halicarnassus about 430 B.c. |
PAGE 221. /deas, entities, etc.: terms used in philosophy. |
_ mercurial; as used here, ‘‘ ingenious.”
PAGE 227. composition: agreement.

[255 ]
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

. CHAPTER VIII

PAGE 228. tumbril; a farmer’s rough cart.

PAGE 229. progress: a journey of much pomp and display made
by a sovereign through a part of his domains.

PAGE 245. admired: wondered.

PAGE 246. conceit: notion.

PAGE 247. Phaeton: (the correct spelling is ‘‘ Phaéthon’’), the son
of Phcebus Apollo, the sun god. He obtained permission from his
father to drive his chariot, the sun, across the heavens, but being
unable to control the horses, he nearly set the earth on fire by
coming too near it, whereupon Jupiter, to save the earth, slew
him with a lightning bolt, and he fell headlong from the chariot
into the river Eridanus.

[ 256 ]