Citation
Which is best

Material Information

Title:
Which is best being stories about the five divisions of the world and stories of the five senses
Added title page title:
Five senses
Added title page title:
Divisions of the world
Creator:
Barfoot, James Richard, 1794-1863 ( Engraver )
Dean & Son
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Thomas Dean and Son
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1851
Language:
English
Physical Description:
51, 47, 2 p., [13] leaves of plates : ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Senses and sensation -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages around the world -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1851 ( lcsh )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding) -- 1851 ( local )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1851 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding) ( local )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date attributed by Bodleian Library.
General Note:
Illustrations engraved and signed by Barfoot.
General Note:
Title page engraved with vignette.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AAA8770 ( ltqf )
ALG9799 ( notis )
43174785 ( oclc )
026763287 ( alephbibnum )

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LONDON:
THOMAS DEAN AND

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CONTENTS.

STORY OF THE KIND GOVERNESS AND HER

PUPILS.
STORY OF THE DEAF GENTLEMAN.

INTERESTING STORY OF PATTY BELL, THE

LITTLE ORPHAN.

THE HAPPY REFORMATION OF COUSIN JAMES.









FIVE SENSES.

LAR ANNA

gl rg CHAPTER I.



WU SA ce dear Miss Murray,” exclaimed
VA both Mary and Julia Belford, as they
clung round their governess, eager to
welcome her return from a visit to
her friends. “Iam so glad you have
come back,” said Mary. “And so
am I,” echoed Julia; “and so I am sure little Freddy
will be, and cousin James, too;” and, as though to
verify the assertion, both the boys at that moment
entered the room. Freddy came up to her in great
glee, holding up his rosy smiling face for a kiss; whilst
cousin James, scarcely giving her a nod, or a hasty
“how d’ye do,” cast an enquiring glance on a present
to them all, of books and toys, that was lying on the
table, in the hope of discovering amongst them a packet
of Banbury cakes, knowing that Miss Murray would
pass through that town on her return.



6 THE FIVE SENSES.

Cousin James was a young Hast Indian, brought up
in all the self-indulgence of those luxurious and indolent
people, and being the only survivor of a large family of
children, had -had the misfortune to have his inclinations
more attended to than his education ; he had been over-
petted and admired, and, consequently, was in a fair
way to be spoiled, when, luckily for him, it was deemed
adviseable to send him to England on account of his
health; and he had been, therefore, consigned by his
parents to the care of his uncle and aunt Belford, with
a thousand tender injunctions as to his comforts, and a
positive interdict against his going to school, or studying
at home, till he was perfectly well, and I am sorry to
add, willing, of which latter condition he seemed in no
hurry to evince any symptoms, though he did abun-
dantly of restored health and vigour; but as he was
naturally neither deficient in talent, or good temper, his
friends were in hopes of eradicating his faults, and
improving his manners, by his association with his
cousins, and being under the daily notice of Miss
Murray. | |
~ “You cannot be more pleased, my dears,” said that
young lady, “at seeing me than I am to be with you
again, though I leave many dear relations and friends
for another six months: but then I am treated so kindly
by your papa and mamma, and have so much to gratify
me in your docility and attachment, that I should be
inexcusable, did I suffer myself to be dull on my
return. I only wish that every one who, like me, has
been obliged to seek a home amongst strangers, could















Mr. Belford showing his children the planets.



THE FIVE SENSES. "

speak of it and feel as I do. But now,’ added Miss
Murray, in her usually cheerful manner, “tell me how
lessons have gone on in my absence.”
QO, papa says he has been governess this time,” said
Julia; “he has taken us out almost every fine morning,
and told us the names, and showed us so many beauties,
that we never noticed before, in little wild flowers and
different grasses.’ “Then, on a clear night, he has
pointed out the stars to us,” added Mary; “telling us
which were planets, and showing us some of the con-
stellations, so that we shall know them again when we
see them.”
« And papa says we have five senses,” chimed in little
- Freddy ;—“ And more too, I should think,” said cousin
~ James, rather out of humour, at failing to discover any-
thing resembling a paper of cakes amongst the packages
before him. “O, no, only five, cousin James,” answered
the little boy; “Tl tell you their names;” and he be-
gan to count on his fingers, “first, there is SEEING,

then comes Hearine, then Frzuimne, then SMELLING,
and last, Tastine.”

“?Stead of last, that ought to be first,’ said cousin
James. “ But why, Master Sedgewick?” enquired
~Miss Murray. “ Because it 1s the best, to be sure,”

answered the rude young epicure. “But you must
prove it to be the best,” rejomed Miss Murray; “ your
merely saying so will convince no one.”

“ Well, then,” said cousin James, “can’t I eat my
edinner without seeing, supposing I was blind; and

without hearing, supposing I was deaf; and even with-



8 THE FIVE SENSES.

out feeling, if somebody would put it into my mouth
for me; and I don’t care much about smelling, when
it is once on my plate, though I do like to sniff at it on
top of the kitchen stairs, when there is anything savoury
going on below. So you see I could do with that one
sense without any other, better than I could do with all
the rest, without that one.’

“ But, even admitting that you would do so,” returned
Miss Murray, “it does not follow that other people
could, and, therefore, you have not proved what you
asserted; to be deprived of any one of the five senses,
would subject us to an infinite number of inconve-
niences. To lose the power of tasting, would undoubt-
edly be a severe infliction; but to preserve it on condi-
tion of giving up the other four, would be a much
worse evil still; consider what a delight it is to hear
beautiful music, lively and clever conversation, the
voices of those we love. Then how much there is in
being able to see; for instance, have you not just heard
how pleased your cousin Julia was in being shown the
minute beauties of even the commonest flower ? ”’

“O, I don’t care for any flower but the baker’s,” in-
terrupted cousin James, who having been encouraged
by his attendants in India, to consider flippancy as wit,
was seldom at a loss for pert answers; “there’s some

3

use in that, it makes us nice tarts and cakes;’’ and then
unable longer to bear his uncertainty as to a present of
the latter, he added, “I suppose you did’nt come
through Banbury this time, did you, Miss Murray?”

«¢ What makes you think that I did not?” “Because,”



THE FIVE SENSES. mm!)

answered cousin James, hesitating a little, and colour-
ing with just a very faint tinge of shame, I thought
that every body who travelled through Banbury bought
some cakes.”

“Perhaps, as that is the custom, I did so too,” an-
swered Miss Murray. O! then its all right,” exclaimed
the youth, with great animation; “I thought, as I
did’nt see them, that you had not brought any.”

““That would be no proof,” said Miss Murray, “ for
I may have found them so particularly good as to be
induced to eat them all before I got home, as you did
the early strawberries you purchased before I went
away.” Cousin James looked for a moment rather
abashed at having this piece of selfishness brought to
his recollection, but disappointment being the stronger
feelmg, he muttered something that implied it was
natural and right to expect cakes from Banbury.

“ But suppose I brought you, mstead of a nice cake
from Banbury, a nice book from Oxford,” said Miss
Murray. “I don’t call books nice,’ grumbled the
ill-educated boy. “Except the cookery book,’ said
Mary, slily; “I often see you reading that.” “ Aye,
there’s some pleasure in reading that,” answered cousin

James;”

and I enly wish that I could always get such
alot of eggs and eream, and almonds and spices, and
other nice things, that they tell us is wanted for even
a little pudding.”

“YT almost believe, cousin,” said Julia, laughing,
that you never think of any thing but eating,” “O,
yes, but I do, though; for, when I have done eating, I



10 THE FIVE SENSES.

think of sleeping,” answered cousin James; half restored.
to good humour, by having an opportunity of showing
what he considered to be his wit, though the joke was
against himself.

“Your thinking of sleeping, according to your own
account,” observed Miss Murray, “is the natural con-
sequences of over feeding; or, as we are speaking of
the five senses, I might say, of gratifying the one sense
of tasting, to the prejudice of the other four; for too
great an indulgence of any one of them, must tend to
blunt the acuteness of the others; and when asleep,
though they still act in a degree, yet it is without our
controul; therefore, to devote more time te slumber
than what nature requires, is to limit not only the
period, but our powers of enjoyment. lLating and
sleeping, and reading the cookery book,” she added,
laughing; “pray, Master James, with these three ways
for disposing of your time, what sort of a man do you
expect to be?” “A eapital one, I hope,” returned
cousin James, “tall, stout, and with a great pair of
black whiskers.”

“Then, I thmk,’ said Miss Murray, “I know a
young lady who, if she should be willing to wait till
you are ten years older, will make you a very suitable
wife; she, like you, gives the preference to one sense
far above all the others, though that one is not tasting.
Seeing is the favourite with her; not that she cares to
read any more than you do; or to look at a beautiful
country, flowers, or stars, as Mary and Julia do; what
she most delights in beholding is herself, her dresses,



THE FIVE SENSES. 1.

and trinkets, for which purpose, she spends a great por-
tion of her time before the looking-glass, trying on
various ornaments, and admiring her own beauty;
never considering that, perhaps, that same glass may,
in the brief course of a few years, reflect a very dif-
ferent appearance, though from the same object, when
it may be too late to attain the cultivation of mind, and
agreeable manners, that so well compensate to their
possessor, for the decay of personal attractions.”

“Ts she very beautiful?” asked Mary. “ Perfectly
so, as to complexion and regularity of features,” an-
swered Miss Murray; “but the spirit and intelligence
that should give expression to both form and face, is
wanting, and she more resembles a wax doll, than a
being endowed with thought and feeling; it is Ellen
Elton that I speak of.” “I thought you did,’ cried
Mary; “but what a nice girl her sister Lucy is, I like
her a great deal the best.” “So everybody does that
T have heard speak of the two,” returned the governess;
“and yet she has neither fine features nor a brilliant
complexion; but then she has what her sister is defi-
cient in, for Lucy has taken as much pains to ornament
her mind, as Ellen has her person.”

Miss Murray would, perhaps, have farther illustrated
her subject of the five senses, had not a loud yawn from
cousin James interrupted her; having but little relish
for such discourse, his eyes were beginning to close, and
he was swaying to and fro, in some danger of tumbling
off his chair.

“O, fie, Master Sedgwick,”-said Miss Murray, going



]2 THE FIVE SENSES.

up to him, “you surely would not be so rude as to fall
asleep in the company of ladies? if you hope to be a
capital man, as you term it, you must be polite; or else,
though you should grow up tall and stout, and with a
great pair of whiskers, you will not be half so much
admired as you would be if well-behaved, although
short, thin, and with no whiskers at all. I am going
now to divide the toys and books; and perhaps I may
find a cake or two from Banbury, though you could
iets:

At these words cousin James sprung from his seat
with an alacrity he seldom evinced, made a stammering
apology, and followed with the rest of the young people
to the table, out of the drawer of which Miss Murray
took a small paper bag, containing but two cakes, which
having divided, she presented a half to each of them,
looking as grave as she possibly could, for it was a great
effort to refrain from at least smiling, perceiving as she
did the effect produced on the countenance of cousin
James, by the smallness of the gift. Little Freddy, as
well as his sisters, saw and understood it too, and with
the truthfulness of early childhood, that suggested no
necessity for concealment, and the generous feeling that
had been nurtured in him, immediately offered his por-
tion to the selfish boy, excusing himself to Miss Murray
for so doing, by saying, “ Please ma’am to let me give
mine to cousin James, because I know he will lke to
have it, for whenever we talked of your coming back,
he used to say he longed for the time too, as he was
sure you would bring us some cakes from Banbury.”







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Miss Murray distributing the presents to her little pupils.



THE FIVE SENSES. 13

This severe though unintended reproof, and practical
lesson against selfishness, from a little fellow so much
his junior, was not without effect.

“No, Freddy,’ said cousin James, colouring partly
with shame, but more with mortification, “I am not
such a pig as that, neither, whatever folks may think of
me; and he felt almost clined to indulge his pride at
the expense of his favourite sense, by resigning his half
to the child; but that was too great an advance in
improvement to be expected as yet, for, a few months
back, he would unscrupulously have taken Freddy’s
share, if offered, promising to make it up to him some
way or other, indeed it mattered not how, as he would
in all probability have forgotten the circumstance as
soon as the gratification produced by it was over.

“You are a dear kind-hearted little boy, Freddy,”
said Miss Murray, kissmg him; “and even had your
cousin been willing to take your cake, which I felt
assured he would not be,” she added, as encourage-
ment to Master James, “there would be no occasion

? and again opening the

for his doing so, for see here;’
drawer, she showed them a large packet not as yet
broken into, and having now given them a whole one
a piece, the rest were put by till next day, and the toys

and books distributed.








FIVE SENSES.



CHAPTER II.

SsN the following morning, whilst Miss
‘(Murray and her pupils were preparing
for their accustomed walk, Mary told
her many other occurrences that had
taken place in her absence;—of a party
her mamma had had, in which were
Miss Ryland, a blind lady, and Mr. Sedley, a gentleman
who had wholly lost his sense of hearmg. “ Mamma
allowed Julia and me to be in the drawing-room for an
hour or two after tea,’ continued Mary, “ and we could
not help noticing all the time, how much happier Miss
Ryland seemed to be than Mr. Sedley ; so I suppose it
is a great deal better to hear than it 1s to see.”

“Tt would very naturally seem so to you, from what
you then remarked,” answered Miss Murray, “ because
you judged at once from what was immediately before
your observation; when you saw them they were both |



THE FIVE SENSES. 15

in society; perhaps, if you were to visit them when at
home and alone, you might think differently, so we will
pay our respects to them in the course of our walk.”
Both Mary and Julia said they should lke it very
much, and so did cousin James, recollecting that Mr.
Sedley’s garden was famed as having the best and
largest quantity of fruit, in the whole neighbourhood.

“T once spent some months with a family,” said Miss
Murray, as they pursued their way, “in which was a
gentleman both deaf and blind; he was not born so, but
had lost the use of those two important senses, after the
age of fourteen years; he was therefore fully aware of
his great privation.” “ How dreadful!” exclaimed
Mary, “ quite deaf and quite blind?” “Yes, quite so,”
answered Miss Murray; “he could neither see a gleam
of the strongest light held up before his eyes, or hear
the loudest sound, though it was close to his ears.”
“Poor, poor gentleman,” cried Julia, her eyes filling
with tears of commiseration.

“Tt was, indeed, a most melancholy case,” rejomed
Miss Murray; “but the human mind, when well regu-
lated, is so much disposed to accommodate itself to
circumstances, that even this unfortunate, in his dark-
ness and solitude, was not only desirous of life, but
often cheerful; he lived as it were in a little world of
his own creating, or rather, I should say, imagined out
of his thoughts. I have frequently heard him convers-
ing, question and answer, with himself.” “ Tow
curious,” said Mary; “but, I suppose, as he could
neither HEAR nor SEE, he used to think he was alone,



16 THE FIVE SENSES.

or forget that he was not.” “His friends, to relieve
the sameness of his existence, would often converse a
little with him,” said Miss Murray; “How do you
think that was managed?”

They each declared their inability to guess, for as he
could not see, they could not talk to him with their
fingers, nor write on a slate, as they did at Mr. Sedley’s,
for him to read it.

“ Another of the FIVE SENSES,’ resumed Miss Mur-
ray, “came to his aid, and this was FEELING, which,
from frequent use, and having his attention so much
fixed upon it, became so acute, that it is wonderful
how quickly, and accurately, he understood us; we used
to write, or rather trace the letters of each word, on the
palm of his hand, with our finger; thus we could make
or answer any enquiry on his part, or tell him anything
we thought might interest or amuse him.”

The young people, even little Freddy, expressed great
sympathy for this singularly afflicted person. “O, how
I should have liked to have brought him plenty of
flowers,” cried Julia; “for I dare say he had the sense
of sMELLING, even more than we have, the same as he
had of FEELING.”

“That he had, my dear,’ said Miss Murray, “and
he would have been most grateful for such attention.”
<¢ And I would have learnt to trace letters on his hand,”
said Mary. “And I could have led him about,” cried
Freddy, “where the grass was softest, and the sun was
shining.” “ All this was done for him, dears,” answered
their pleased geverness, for there were several warm-



THE FIVE SENSES. i

hearted little girls and boys lving im the same house
with him, and he was very fond of them, although he
could neither see nor hear them. But, Master James,
you have not yet told us what you would have done for
him.”

“Why, if he had’nt money to buy it for himself,”
answered cousin James, “ perhaps I might have brought
him something nice to eat.” “ But, supposing he had
sufficient money to purchase for himself?” rejoined
Miss Murray, “such a consideration ought not to deter
you from making an occasional present, if you thought
it would gratify him to receive it. It would be very
hard, because a person is able to buy for themselves,
that they should never be shown those pleasing atten-
tions that it is necessary for others to procure in order
to offer. But here we are at Miss Ryland’s, and Master
James, as you are the tallest, and our squire for the
present, suppose you knock at the door.”

Miss Ryland, with the quickness of hearing peculiar
to blind persons, was aware of their approach long
before cousin James’s rap, which he took care should be
such as became his ideas of self-importance. I eeling
her way to the parlour door, she eagerly welcomed them
all. “I hope you have come to spend a long morning
_ with me,” she said, “for I am dreadfully dall when
alone; I get so tired of playing the same tunes over and
over again.” “I believe your maid, Nancy, reads to
you sometimes, does she not?” enquired Miss Murray.
“QO, yes,” returned the blind lady; “but then, when I
was a girl, and could see, I never cared much about



18 THE FIVE SENSES.

books, so I got tired of them too. I am always wanting
some one to chat with, and tell me all the news and
gossip of the village.”

Miss Murray was perfectly aware of this, so she did
her best to render her conversation such as was cal-
culated to amuse the very frivolous mind of poor Miss
Ryland, who sighed deeply when she departed, and
earnestly begged that she would come again soon.
Mary and Julia both noticed the very dull look with
which she bid them good bye, so different from the
expression of her countenance whilst they remained, and
what it had been when she had visited their mamma;
this they observed to Miss Murray. “I thought you
would notice it, my dears,’ she returned; “but you must
not attribute it solely to her misfortune, for I fear that
Miss Ryland, unless constantly engaged in paying or
receiving visits, would be almost as dull as she is now,
even were her sight restored, never having cultivated
the useful art of amusing herself.”

A few minutes brought them to the door of Mr.
Sedley, where cousin James had the pleasure of again
giving a magnificent double knock. They found him
alone in his study, though he did not consider himself
to be so, for he was surrounded by a well-chosen col-
lection of books, several of which laid open upon the
table. Unhke Miss Ryland, he was more inelined to
be vexed than pleased, at their visit; but, being both
polite and good-tempered, he quickly recovered his
composure, and received them kindly. Mary and Julia
having early learnt to observe and reflect, could not but



THE FIVE SENSES. 19

perceive how cheerful and happy the old gentleman was
in his solitary study, and that it was not their coming
that made him so, for that was evidently, at first, an
unwished-for interruption to his pursuits.

After the first salutations, Miss Murray, by means of
the slate, congratulated him on looking so well and
cheerful; as she understood he had been latterly con-
fined to the house by a sprained foot, and much more
alone than usual.

“ T am never alone,’ returned Mr. Sedley, “ unless
I prefer to be so; “ for I have only to step into this
room,” he added, pointing round to his book shelves,
and I am immediately in the society of some of the
wisest and best men of all ages, and many nations; nor
do I want for the enlivening of wit to recreate a lighter
hour, for I have agreeable as well as intelligent com-
panions among them. Ah! my dear young gentle-
man,” he continued, addressing cousin James, “ let me
recommend you to early cultivate a good taste.”

Cousin James felt it to be quite in his power to
answer that he had; for he had heard nothing of the
previous part of what Mr. Sedley had uttered, having
seated himself close to the library window, his whole
attention engrossed in the contemplation of a fine
strawberry-bed immediately beneath it; but when the
old gentleman explaimed that he meant a love of read-
ing, and a desire to acquire knowledge, Cousin James
checked what he was about to write down, for that
was quite another matter to a taste for raspberry tarts
and Banbury cakes; so he listened in silence, availing



20 THE FIVE SENSES.

himself of Mr. Sedley’s infirmity as an excuse for not
replying. |

A microscope was now produced, for the entertainment
of the young folks. Mary and Julia were delighted,
and only fearful of tirig their kind entertainer, who
had a variety of minute objects, such as the seeds of
plants, and very small insects, ready to shew them
through it. Cousin James was pleased too, for a little
while, and might have been so, longer, only he began to
fear that there would be no time for the expected treat
in the garden, by which he had alone been induced to
come; his imagination was revelling in the thought of
what a grand thing it would be if gardeners could make
strawberries grow really as large as they would appear
through such a powerful magnifier, and he longed to at
least indulge his fancy by seeing one so much increased
in size, though he could not his taste, in eating it;
besides, to ask for it would, perhaps make Mr. Sedley
think of inviting them to a walk in the garden, which
it certainly did, with an apology for not having done so
before, adding, “ You will excuse my accompanying you,
on account of my foot.” “QO, certainly,” returned
Miss Murray, on the slate. “I will take Mary, Julia,
and Freddy; Master Sedgewick will be delighted to
remain with you till our return.”

“ That Pm sure I shant,’ eagerly exclaimed Cousin
James, on hearing her read, in a sort of whisper to
herself, what she had written, before presenting it to
Mr. Sedley. “ O, fie! Master Sedgewick,” said Miss
Murray, “ you surely would not be so ill-bred as not to














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THE FIVE SENSES. 21

propose staying with Mr. Sedley, as he is unable to
walk; you being the eldest, and a gentleman, are the
most proper person to do so.”

“QO, I don’t mind proposing,” said Cousin James,
“if I could be sure he would not keep me; but that
would be dreadful, you know.”

It was almost impossible to help laughing at the
energy with which this was said; but as it would have
been both unfeeling and rude to Mr. Sedley, who could
not have understood the cause of her mirth, Miss
Murray commanded her countenance, presenting the
slate in defiance of the alarmed and breathless look of
poor Cousin James, whose seeming proposal, to his great
relief, was declined with an acknowledgement of which
it was wholly undeserving.

“ Upon second thoughts,” said Mr. Sedley, “I will
take my book, and accompany you as far as the sum-
mer-house, where I shall like to spend an hour or two
this fine morning; you will find the strawberries now in
perfection ; pray do not spare them, or any thing else
that you may like to partake of.”

If any one of the little party felt too modest to take
advantage of this kind permission, you may be sure
that it was not Cousin James; on the contrary, he
walked forward before the rest, that he might have first
choice, bobbing about in all directions, looking eagerly
up to the cherry trees, and down amongst the straw-
berries, and from side to side at the currants and goose-
berries, hoping to find some ripened, though the season
was as yet early.



On THE FIVE SENSES.

But poor Cousin James, in his haste to gratify his
one favourite sense, was doomed, this morning, to be-
come better acquainted with the other four, than he at
all liked or expected. Making a hurried snatch at a
particularly large double strawberry, he took hold of a
nettle that was hidden by the leaves; the sudden smart
caused him to jerk his hand in so rough a manner, that
the tender fruit was smashed in his grasp; so he lost
the expected treat, and had, mstead of Tastine, a
pretty strong idea of what FrrLtine was; then, in
jumping up to reach some fine-looking cherries, he lost
his balance, and tumbled backwards on a little heap of
manure that laid at the foot of the tree, which being
disturbed by his weight, sent forth a smell not at all
agreeable; so here was another sense for Cousin James
to be annoyed by.

As they knew he was not hurt by his fall, and that
his troubles were all owing to his selfishness, little
Freddy and his sisters could not help laughing, which
sound reaching his ears, he was not a bit better pleased
with the sense of Hrearine, than he had been with
those of FrzeLine and SMELLING; and when he looked
at the dirty state of his jacket and trowsers, he was
equally out of humour with Srzine. “ You may laugh,
if you like,’ cried Cousin James; “ but now that I
know, all at once, what the Five Sensss are, Iam more
than ever sure that Tastine is a great, great deal the
best of them all.” Then, followed by the rest, he went
to a cottage at the end of the grounds in which the
gardener lived, that he might get his clothes brushed,



THE FIVE SENSES. 28

and his face and hands washed, before returning to Mr.
Sedley, in the summer house.

The gardener’s wife was frying onions and bits of
meat, all chopped up together, in a pan, and their
savory odour striking on Cousin James’s sense of smell-
ing, in a very pleasant manner, he longed to be eating
too. So when he was brushed and washed, he went up
to the fire-place, and began sniffing in such a manner,
that the woman guessed what he wanted, and invited
him to have some.

Whilst she went to fetch a plate, Miss Murray asked
him if it was his intention to give her the trouble he
had already done, for nothing; and then to eat up her
dinner without paying for it too; further enquiring
whether he had any money about him. “TI have some
pence in my pocket,’ answered Cousin James, in no
hurry to take them out; but being assured that he must
give the woman something, even though he did not taste
the savory mess, he handed them to her, and then
eagerly took a large spoonful of what was set before
him, saying “ Now Pll show you what a famous sense
TASTING is.”

But, alas for Cousin James, the gardener’s wife was
one of those idle slatterns, who never consider what
they are about, so as they can hurry through their work.
In slicing the onions, she had put in decayed parts with |
the sound; and in her carelessness and haste, had taken
stale dripping instead of fresh, pouring into the pan all
the gravy that had settled at the bottom, which was
very stale indeed; the strength of the onions, when



24 THE FIVE SENSES.

frying, had overcome the dripping and the gravy, so
that the whole smelt very good, but when it came to
Tasting! one mouthful was quite enough to prove that
to be altogether different. Cousin James thought of
his money; and always liking to have his pennyworth
for his penny, tried another mouthful; but it would
not do; so he was obliged to own, at least to himself,
that the sense of Tastine might be in fault, sometimes,
as well as those of Szzrne, Hearine, Frevine, and
SMELLING.

Upon their return to the summer-house, they found
Mr. Sedley had laid down his book, and was apparently
thinking very deeply. “I am going to ask a favour of
you,” he said, as Miss Murray held out her hand to
take leave. ‘ I want you to undertake a little com-
mission of enquiry, for which my unfortunate loss of
hearing entirely disqualifies myself.’ Miss Murray
immediately expressed not only her readiness, but the
pleasure she shonld feel, im obliging him; and Mr.
Sedley proceeded to say:

“A few days ago, I met with an incident that greatly
interested me, trifling as it might perhaps appear to
others. When the weather is warm enough, I fre-
quently read in this room, and that being the case on
Monday last, I brought my books and sat down for a
morning’s enjoyment; there came on, soon after, a
sudden and rapid shower. A little girl, who has been
frequently hired by the gardener to assist in weeding,
was employed at the time, close by; seeing that she
continued at her work, though but ill protected from















Patty Bell presenting her books to Mr. Sedley.



THE FIVE SENSES. 29

the wet, her clothes being but scant and old, T desired
her to come in, and resumed my reading. Before the
rain had ceased, a friend arrived at the house, whom I
had not seen for some time, and on being told where I
was, came tome. As I could not hear him, I had almost
all the talk to myself, and in answer to his enquiry on
the slate, of how I amused myself, I expatiated on the
never-failing delight that I found in reading, and on
the goodness of God in affording me time for such a
relief to my infirmity, for I might have been poor, and
occupied in working for my living. The child was still
with me; she sat on that rustic stool opposite, looking
in my face, and listening to what I said, with an ear-
nestness of attention that I attributed to mere childish
anxiety and wonder; having no idea, then, of what was
really passing through her little brain.

“The shower at length being over, the poor thing
went again to her weeding, after dropping me a curt-
sey, and saying, as I suppose, ‘Thank you, sir,’ for I
could see that her lips moved, though I could not hear
what they uttered; my friend then accompanied me
into the house, and I thought no more of the matter.

“ Being in the summer-house again, next day, I was
reading, as I usually do, with great intentness, when, —
suddenly raising my eyes from the page, I saw the little
weeder standing before me on the opposite side of the
table; three or four baby-looking books were in her
hand, tied together with a piece of clean tape; as soon
as she had attracted my notice, she pushed them towards
me, with flushed cheeks and eyes that sparkled with a



26 THE FIVE SENSES.

brightness scarcely conceivable. I never saw so beautiful
and so remarkable a pair of eyes as hers. I was, at first,
too much confused by the study I had been engaged in,
and the unexpectedness of her appearance and _ action,
to take up and undo the little parcel, which the poor
child perceiving, without being able to account for, a
look of the most painful disappointment shadowed her
countenance; then with the ardour of a young spirit
bent on achieving its good purpose, for such it was, she
untied the tape herself, and rendered fearless by the
consciousness of her motive and desire of success, opened
the books, one after the other, at their title-pages, eager-
ly holding them up before my eyes; and in the next
moment, rapidly turning over the leaves, pointed to the
wood-cuts, with an expression on her features of admir-
ing ecstacy, that she evidently expected to see reflected
in mine, and that seemed to say, ‘ You delight in read-
ing, and there’s entertainment for you!’ The books
were, Jack, the Giant Killer; Goody Two Shoes; and
Cinderella; with other stories of the same kind.

“ Soon as I could get a moment in which to arrange
my ideas, everything was evident to me that she wished
I should comprehend, so expressive was all she looked
and did. She had not only listened to, but compre-
hended what she had heard me say on the preceding
day; and had in consequence brought me the whole of
her library, thinking, in her untutored simplicity, that
books which had so highly gratified herself, must be
equally pleasing to me.

JT was puzzled what to do: I could not bear to



THE FIVE SENSES. ot

undeceive her by refusing her present, neither would
it have been right to chill the warm impulse of so
generous a nature, by seeming less charmed than she
expected me to be; so I thanked her very much,
and then took out my purse, intending to give her far
more than their value, that she might supply her-
self with a fresh stock; but the look she gave me, on
perceiving my design, was such as made me sorry,
for her sake, that I had incurred it. I saw immedi-
ately that there was a delicacy of sentiment about
her, as well as ardour, that must have been inherent ;
for where could she have acquired it? and to wound
this feeling would probably be to injure her future cha-
racter ; so I returned the purse to my pocket, and again
made the sort of acknowledgment I thought she wished
for, and she left me in full possession of her treasure,
apparently as happy as she would have been, had I
conferred a favour on her, instead of she having be-
stowed one on me.

“ Now,” continued Mr. Sedley, “I come to the favour
I would request, Miss Murray, of you: I understand
from the gardener that she is an orphan; I should like
to have some enquiries made of the person with whom
she lives, as to who she is, and what has been her gene-
ral conduct, for I feel strongly inclined to do something
for her more than what mere casual charity might sug-
gest; if I am not greatly mistaken, she has both a
heart and mind highly susceptible of cultivation, and
having no children of my own, or relations, to interfere
with the disposition of my property, I have ample



28 THE FIVE SENSES.

means to afford her education, and to place her, after-
wards, in a more respectable rank in life than what her
friends can now possibly contemplate for her. Her
name is Patty Bell, and she dwells with an old woman
called Widow Barton, in one of the smallest cottages
down Willow-lane.”

Miss Murray assured Mr. Sedley that she felt ex-
tremely interested in what he had narrated, and would
visit the widow on the following morning, and immedi-
ately after let him know the result; she then, with her
young charges, took leave.

“TI wonder,” said Cousin James, as they walked
home, “ what Mr. Sedley would give for a book worth
having, when he is willing to do so much for a trumpery
present as that he is making such a fuss about.” “I
cannot exactly say,’ answered Miss Murray, “ and I
would not advise you to try to find out.” “ But I
think I shall, though,” rejoined Cousin James; “I
have got a great many books that I don’t care anything
about, except for their binding, that makes them look
so well on the shelf” “ From which you never take
them; do you, Cousin James?” asked Mary, laughing.
“O, yes, I do, sometimes,” said Cousin James, “to dust
them!” And having made this joke at the expense of
his ignorance, he was for a time supremely happy, but
the idea recurred of presenting to Mr. Sedley a book
which should produce to himself some advantage more
than its value; and he again intimated his determina-
tion to do so. | |

“You put me in mind of a story related of one of the



THE FIVE SENSES. | 99

kings of France,” said Miss Murray; “I believe it was
of Louis XI. When he was Dauphin, which is the
same as our Prince of Wales here, he used often to visit
a gardener who was celebrated for the size and delicious
flavour of his fruit; afterwards, upon ascending the _
throne, he left off these visits; but his humble frend
the gardener, knowing how much he was interested in
the extraordinary growth of both fruits and vegetables,
thought he might still feel so, though his rank as king
prevented his coming to the garden as he had hitherto
done; he therefore one day took to him an enormous
radish, which for colour and thickness was the most
wonderful thing he had as yet produced. The monarch,
in recompense for this attention, and in remembrance
of many others he had received from him in former
times, ordered his treasurer to pay him the sum of a
thousand crowns.

“This great liberality of the king soon became
known all over the village in which the gardener lived,
and the lord of the manor said, as you did just now,
‘If his majesty gives so much for a trumpery radish,
what will he not do for me, if I give him my best horse,
which indeed is not to be matched by any other in all
France? my fortune will surely be made.’ Accordingly,
he went with his horse to the king’s palace, and being
admitted to his presence, begged his majesty’s accept-
ance of the animal, bestowing on it, at the same time,
the most extravagant encomiums, winding up by assur-
ing him it was one of the greatest rarities of its species.
The king, on going to the window and beholding the



30 THE FIVE SENSES.

horse, which a groom was purposely parading before it,
readily admitted that it was a most singularly beautiful
creature, but he was not so willing to acknowledge the
disinterested motive that the lord of the manor at-
tempted to impose on his belief.

“ Finding out, by an adroit question, where he came
from, his majesty directly understood the whole busi-
ness, and turning to the cunning expectant, he said,
‘ And I, too, have in my possession as great a curiosity,
of its kind, as your horse appears to be of his;’ he then
desired an attendant to bring in the radish, which, hav-
ing made suitable acknowledgments for his gift, he
presented to the disappointed courtier, as a valuable
offering in return.

“So take care, Master Sedgewick,” added Miss Mur-
ray, “that you do not get in exchange for your hand-
somely bound volumes, poor Patty Bell’s half worn-out
‘trumpery,’ as you are pleased to call them; though I
certainly think that Mr. Sedley would not easily be
induced to part with them; you may therefore only
obtain thanks, for I believe he can detect motives of
conduct as readily as did kmg Louis XI.”

Cousin James was not a little mortified at having
displayed his selfishness to no purpose: and in order to
hide his vexation by creating a laugh, he asked (in allu-
sion to the story) whether that was not the beginning
of the word horse-radish ; he would have said origin, but
that was a term he had never learnt the signification of.

“IT was in hopes, Master Sedgewick,” replied Miss
Murray, gravely, that instead of attempting to display



THE FIVE SENSES. . 3l

your wit, by making a silly jest of this little anecdote,
you would have shown your good sense by applying its
moral. However, I do not despair of you yet,” she
added, for her principle in education was rather to en-
courage amendment by cheerful admonition, than to
repress error by too much stern severity. “TI still
think that you will allow your better feelings and un-
derstanding to triumph over your faults; and then,
perhaps, we may find your jokes more amusing, being
better pointed, tlian they are at present.”

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CHAPTER III. 6 ine

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N the following morning, Miss Murray, Mary,

Julia, and the two boys, had a delightful

walk across the meadows, to Willow-lane,
for the purpose of making their visit of
enquiry to Widow Barton. They found her seated at
the open door, busily employed in knitting; she was a
respectable old woman, though dressed in very mean
clothes, but then they were neatly mended and per-
fectly clean; her grey hair was tidily arranged beneath
a plain muslin cap of snowy whiteness, the border
fitting closely round her face; she was altogether a very
prepossessing and venerable looking person. Miss
Murray assuring her she had nothing to say but what
might be for the advantage of the child, begged that
she would allow her to make some enquiries about
Patty Bell.

The widow declaring her perfect willingness to answer





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THE FIVE SENSES. 30

any question that might be asked, showed the little
party into her cottage, and shut the door. Having
placed the only three chairs it contained, for the ac-
commodation of her lady visitors, she offered a couple
of stools, with many apologies, to the young gentlemen,
herself remaining standing; but this neither Miss
Murray or the little girls would permit, and, therefore,
making her sit down in what was evidently her own
peculiar seat; they, with the two boys, established
themselves as they could. Cousin James being in an
unusually good humour, having profited by the lesson
of the preceding day, turned a large empty flower pot
upside down, on which to rest his feet, and seated him-
self on the table, only begging that his cousins would
not fancy he was something nice and want to eat him,
because he was dressed and placed there.

“TI suppose you know, Mrs. Barton,” said Miss
Murray, “that your grandchild, Patty, is employed in
weeding the garden of Mr. Sedley.” “She is no
grandchild of mine,” interrupted the Widow; “but,
however, that is of no consequence, for she is just the
same to me as though she was.” “ Well, then,” re-
sumed Miss Murray, “Mr. Selby being, from his
extreme deafness, unfitted to come himself, he has
requested me to enquire for him, with a view to serve
her, for he has taken a strong interest in the child, and
if she is as good as she appears to be, is desirous of
doing something towards educating and providing for
her, in a manner better than her friends may be able
to do.”



34 THE FIVE SENSES.

“She has no friends, ma’am, poor little thing,” said
the Widow; “no father, no mother, nor any other
relation that I ever heard of; when I am gone from her,
she will stand alone in the wide world, with only God
to protect and love her. It is this thought that makes
me still cling to life, though I am only a burthen on
others, being unable now to work hard enough for my
own support: Squire Sedley is a kind gentleman, and
he will have his reward.” 7

“ He has it even now,” answered Miss Murray; “in.
the consciousness of possessing not only the means, but
the will to assist his poor neighbours; but tell me all
you can about this little girl, as it is important to her
that I should be fully informed.”

“Oh, Miss,’’ replied the Widow; “I am only atraid
that when I get talking of my poor Patty, I shall tire
you, and these young ladies and gentlemen too.” “0,
no,” cried Mary, answering for herself and _ sister;
“for we have heard so much about her from Mr. Sedley,
that we quite like little Patty already.” “And I’m
sure,” said the incorrigible cousin James, in a whisper
to Julia, “that I am too fond of nice little patties, ever
to be tired of hearing of them.”

“ Her mother,” said the Widow Barton, addressing
Miss Murray, “ died a few months after her birth, and it
was through that misfortune, pretty dear, that she came
to be with me. I had then two daughters lving with
me, and we gained a livelihood by taking nurse chil-
dren, so the poor father brought his motherless babe to
our cottage; he was but a labourmg man, but being of |



THE FiVE SENSES. 85

frugal habits, and a fond parent, he paid us well for
taking care of her; every Monday, as regular as the
week came round, John Bell’s money was ready for us.
This kept on till Patty was nearly two years old, when,
poor thing, her father caught a fever, and died in less
than a fortnight afterwards, leaving nothing behind him
but a few shillings, and some clothes of little value.

“We had often heard him say, that he was an only
child, and what few relations he had were poor, lke
himself; and had, years ago, emigrated to some foreign
land; his wife had been a servant, and had left Scot-
land, which was her native country, when the family
she lived in came to England, so that there were no
friends to apply to on either side, even about his burial;
the parish did that for him, and offered to take the
child into the house; but somehow, I had grown so fond
of it, that I could not at first make up my mind to let
it go there. Folks said if we waited a bit, we might
perhaps get it into one of the Orphan Asylums; so I
thought that I would, and my daughters agreed to do so
too; and, in the mean time, more than one of the
tradespeople said they would help us to keep her; the ~
‘two bakers gave us three or four little loaves a week,
and the milkman, when he came in the morning, always
asked for little Pat’s mug, that he might fill it with
milk.

“T shall always think,” said the Widow, “ that those
good deeds were lucky to them, for the bakers have
twice the custom now that they had then, and the milk-
man has never lost a cow since, though he sometimes



36 THE FIVE SENSES.

used to do so before. Now and then, when we went to
the village shop, to buy frocks and things for the other
chidren, the master would give us a remnant or two for
the baby, who had no objection to wear clothes, though
she could neither make nor pay for them, he used to
say, for he was a droll man and would have his joke.
‘But never mind, Widow, he afterwards said, ‘she will
settle it all with you some day, I can see that in her
sweet face, and her little loving ways.’ F
«¢ And if she does not, I may never want it,’ I would
answer; and then I used to think of the words of our
blessed Saviour, when he spoke of little children, and I
felt that I could not send her away to be amongst
strangers in the workhouse, though I know it is a great
thing to have such places provided for us, either in
childhood or old age; so, month after month, and at
last, year after year, passed away, and the little friendless
child was still with us.
“When she was about four years old, one of my
daughters married, and went soon after to live with her
husband in the north; and within one year more, the
other settled too, in a county a great way off. This was
a heavy loss to me, for I could not manage to amuse
children without their assistance, but I comforted
myself in thinking of their happiness, for they had
both of them married steady mdustrious men. I was
still able to do something for my living, and they each
sent me a trifle now and then, from their own earnings,
besides which, I had two shillings a week allowed to me
by the parish, for Patty. So I moved to this small



THE FIVE SENSES. 37

cottage, which having a bigger garden than I expected,
I had plenty of vegetables, and managed to pay my
rent, and did very well for the first year. But in the
second, we had so much cold and damp weather, that I
was taken with the rheumatism, and, by degrees, became
so lame, that I could not go out to work as I did before.
The poor child and I were obliged to pinch very hard to
make our money last out, so as to pay for all as we had
it, for I could never bear the thought of being in debt.

“ At last, about a twelvemonth ago, I became very ill;
and I said, one morning, ‘I am no longer able to work;
I feel as though I could not even wash out the few
things we shall want to put on clean for Sunday; I fear
not only you, but I too, Patty, must now go into the
Union-house.’? The poor thing tried to comfort me, and
begged so hard that I would lie down on the bed, that I
did so, and, tired with a long night of pain, I fell into a
sleep that lasted three or four hours. When I awoke, I
missed her from the room, and called; but getting no
answer, got up to look for her; and where, ma’am, do
you think I found her?” asked the Widow Barton, for-
getting in her exultation that it was not likely any of
her visitors could tell; “why, m a shed at the bottom
of the garden, there was little Patty, with a tub before
her, standing on a stool that she might reach up to it,
and washing away as though she would have rubbed all
the skin off her hands, rather than not go on.

“T shall never forget,’ added the old dame, wiping
her eyes with a corner of her apron, “the bright look
that she turned upon me, though one of her dear little

D



38 THE FIVE SENSES.

fingers was nearly bleeding at the time; affectionate,
grateful little creature as she is. The good sleep I had
had, and the finding so much thought and kindness in
such a mere child, seemed to spirit me up in a moment,
so I made her let me finish, though she was very
unwilling that I should. But what I have to tell about
her did’nt end here. Next morning, I awoke early as
usual, for I was in the habit of fetching water-cresses
from a distance, and then carrying them round to the
gentlefolks’ houses before breakfast time. I was saying
to myself, what shall I do if somebody else should get
my customers from me whilst Iam ill? I must try to go,
even if I walk with two sticks; so I got gently out of
bed, for fear of disturbing the poor child; but early as
it was, she was already up and out. Well, I was very
much surprised at first, but recollecting that it was
May morning, I thought she had gone a maying, with
some young companions, who I know had asked her,
and that she had stole away softly for fear of waking
me.

“Finding myself much more lame than I thought
for, I was obliged to give up my intention of going
round the village, though it vexed me very much, so all
I could do was to wait patiently for Patty’s return, and
get a bit of breakfast ready for her; that she had taken
care, before she went, should not be of much trouble to
meé, for I found the cups and saucers set, the kettle
filled and put on the hob, and a pile of wood on the
hearth, ready for lighting the fire. Such a thoughtful
little creature, Miss, I never heard tell of, nor have



THE FIVE SENSES, 389

I seen before, and mine has been a long life, for I am
upwards of sixty; but I fear I tire you, for somehow I
can’t speak of that time, without being quite run away
with, as I may say.” “ Instead of being tired, I am
exceedingly interested,” replied Miss Murray, “and so,
I am sure, are my young friends; pray go on, I long to
know where little Patty had gone to.”

“ Well, Miss,’ resumed Widow Barton, “ back she
came with my water-cress basket on her arm, about the
time that I usually did, her eyes as bright as diamonds,
and her cheeks as fresh as a rose; ‘O, Granny,’ she
said, as she ran up to me, ‘every body has been so
kind; I fetched the cresses, and then I went and sold
them all; all, Granny! and people asked me why I
came instead of you? and when I told them you were
il, and I had come without your knowing it, for fear
you would not let me, they patted me on the head and
said I was a good girl.’ Then she lifted the clean white
cloth that covered her basket, and showed me (instead
of the May flowers I had at first expected to see, a .
greater number of pence than I had ever been able to
collect in any morning that [ had gone round with
cresses, myself; so we sat down to breakfast, quite
cheerful and happy; and the next day, the dear child
went again, and did so every morning till I was better,
and then I wouldn’t let her, for fear she should be over
tired, and perhaps ill.

« As the weather grew warmer, I was less rheumatic,
and able to work a little in the fields, and Patty could
earn a trifie that way too, so we did pretty well whilst



40 THE FIVE SENSES.

the summer lasted; but when winter drew nigh, my
lameness returned, and we were again very poor, and
then it would have done your heart good, though I’m
sure it made mine ache, to see the thoughtfulness of
that young thing when we had but a scanty meal to
sit down to; especially when we think of the selfishness
of some children who are so much better off. She little
thought that I noticed it, but I could see that she ate
as slowly as possible, in the hope that I might get the
bigger share; and I am sure she must often have pre-
tended to have had enough, when she was still almost
hungry: but Providence still befriended us, and all
through little Patty, again.

“ Going out one morning, to sell a few flowers we had
carefully treasured, for they had bloomed very late in
the season, she saw something bright lying in the path
before her; it was nearly covered with dust, but Patty
was walking with her eyes toward the ground, for there
was a cold wind blowing against her, that made the
water run out of them; picking it up, she found it was
a half sovereign.” — |

“ What a piece of good luck!” exclaimed Cousin
James, “ how pleased she must have been.” “ Yes,
sir,” returned the widow; “ from what I could learn
from her, she was indeed very much pleased, for the
first moment; but then, in the next, she thought, if she
was so glad to find it, how sorry somebody might be at
having lost it; so, instead of coming back to me directly,
she went on with her flowers, hoping to find the owner
of the money, for she meant to enquire of everybody
about it.



THE FIVE SENSES. 4]

“On turning down the next lane, leading to where
she was going, she saw a lady at some distance before
her, and thinking the half sovereign might be hers, she
ran after her as fast as she could; when she came up to
her, she was too much out of breath to speak: the lady,
thinking she wanted her to buy her flowers, asked their
price, when Patty, having got her voice again, told her
that was not what she meant; then she showed her the
piece of money she had picked up, and enquired if it
was hers.”

“ She was a goose for that, though,” observed Cousin
James, very much interested in this part of Patty’s
story; “she should first have asked the lady whether
she had dropped any thing; and if she said ‘ Yes,’ told
her to tell what it was.” “'That’s very true, sir,” an-
swered the widow, “and the lady said so, too; but the
good, kind-hearted child was too young and too innocent
to think of all that. She believed everybody to be as
honest as herself; so when the lady, on counting some
money she carried in her glove, told her that it was
hers, she gave it to her, and was going on, without even
asking her to buy a flower; for that, she thought, would
sound like wishing to be paid for doing what she knew
to be right. TI could understand that to be her feeling,
though she did not express it to me; and the lady
understood it too, as I learnt from her own lips, when
she came to the cottage next day; for she had ques-
tioned the child as to who she was, and where she lived ;
and then little Patty had left her, and having sold her



4,2 THE FIVE SENSES.

flowers, came back to me with the money, and told me
all about the half sovereign.”

“And did’nt the lady give her even a few pence to
buy a cake or two with?” asked Cousin James, indig-
nantly.

“No, sir,’ answered the widow, “and if she had,
Patty would not have laid them out in that way; what-
ever she had given to her, she always brought to me;
but of course I never spent it on myself, but kept it
entirely for her use; and when the pence got up to
fourpence or sixpence, she would now and then treat
herself with a book ; for she is very fond of reading, and
the neighbours’ children will sometimes lend her theirs,
for her stock is very small.”

“ Did she never buy anything nice to eat, with her
money?’ enquired Cousin James, in utter astonish-
ment; ‘such as raspberry tarts, cheesecakes,’—“ Or
Banbury cakes, Master Sedgewick,” added Miss Mur-
ray; “you don’t mean to leave them out, I’m sure.”

“ No, sir,” replied Mrs. Barton; “I don’t think she
even knows the taste of such things.”

“ Dear me! how dreadful,” exclaimed the self-in-
‘dulged Cousin James: “ I never heard of anything so
shocking,—I should really like to give her a treat.”

“ Ah, sir,” said the widow, “ that, perhaps, you may
easily do, if you have a few old books you have grown
past the age of being pleased with, and can spare; that
would be a treat to her, indeed.”

“TI don’t mean books,’ cried Cousin James, con-
temptuously ; “ I want to see how she would look ina



THE FIVE SENSES. : 43

pastry-cook’s shop, when I tell her to eat a shilling’s
worth, or perhaps oe pennyworth of any thing
she likes there.”

“ You are very kind, sir,” answered the widow, “ but
Tam afraid Patty, instead of enjoying such a treat as
that, would be thinking of how much bread might be
bought for the money, or perhaps of a new tippet, or
ribbon for her bonnet, to go to church in; for she
never fails, every Sunday, to be there, and likes to be
as clean and tidily drest as our poor means will afford.
You must not think, sir,’ added the good woman, “ that
I tell you this in the hope of your bestowing the same
sum on her, in her own way; I only want to show what
sort of disposition hers is, as this lady wishes to know.”

“ You have not yet told me,” observed Miss Murray,
“what the owner of the half sovereign said to you,
when she called at your cottage.”

“Tn the first place, ma’am,” replied the widow, “ she
said a great deal of how much she was pleased with
Patty, even before the child had spoken, describing to
me the particularly bright and earnest look that she has
when she thinks she is doing what will give pleasure ;
IT know the look well, for I have seen it hundreds of
times. Before she could say that she had found it,
(for she was out of breath,) she had held up the piece
of money to the lady, her eyes speaking for her as
plainly as any words could do. ‘ I would not give her
any reward at the time,’ said the lady, ‘because I would
not ‘mix any selfish feeling with the pure delight that
she felt im having restored to the owner what must have



44, THE FIVE SENSES.

appeared to her of far greater value than it really was;
but now I must beg you to accept what she found ; it
will buy her something more suitable for this cold
weather than what she had on yesterday, poor little
dear; and I shall like, if I can, to be of farther service
to you.’ Then she asked me if I could knit stockings,
and finding that I could, she gave mea long job, for
she had a large family of boys, and besides brought me
some other customers from amongst her friends; so,
what with one thing and another, we have got through
the winter pretty well; and this spring, Patty has
earned more than I could expect from one so young, in
being hired to weed some of the gentlefolk’s gardens,
amongst which is Squire Sedley’s.” |

When the widow had concluded her little narrative,
Miss Murray expressed herself extremely pleased, and
assuring her that she would soon see her again, took
leave, but not till she had slipt into her hand a little
present.of money, given her by Mr. Sedley for the
purpose, not only to indemnify the child for the loss
of her library, for such it was, though voluntarily be-
stowed, but to gladden the widow’s heart with some
little additional comforts, in her humble home.

In crossing the fields on their return, Miss Murray
and her young companions sought shelter from a sud-
den shower, beneath an old shed; and whilst there, had
a fresh opportunity of remarking on the five senses, as
being called into use all at once, and from the same
cause, that is, from the shower: for they FELT it, when
they stretched out their hands; and they could Hzan it,



THE FIVE SENSES. 45

at the same time, pattering on the leaves of a tree close
by; then they smext the pleasant odour it drew from
some newly-dug mould, on which it fell; and looking
up into the sky they BEHELD a beautiful raibow occa-
sioned by it, for the sun was still shinmg. Cousin
James determined that rastine should not be left out,
since they had each of the other four senses, held his
open palm under the eaves of the shed, by which means
he caught some of the drippings, so that he was enabled
to taste it, but, falling from off the dirty thatch, it was
not very nice, as you may suppose.

“1 don’t care,” cried Cousin James, making, at the
same time, a wry face at what he had swallowed, “ bad
luck now, better another time; yonder is a donkey, [ll
make up for all, by having a good ride.” So saying, off
he scampered, and in another minute had clambered on
to the animal’s back; but the donkey seemed to know
that he had no business there, without leave, so he
ducked his head between his fore legs, and threw up his
hind feet, in the hope to get rid of him: but finding
that would not do, he set off in a hard trot, over some
rough ground into the next field, nearly shaking all the
breath out of poor Cousin James’s body; for he was
- not much of a rider, and had neither saddle, bridle, nor
stirrups, to help him; he was therefore obliged to cling
round the creature’s neck to keep himself on, being
afraid to jump off whilst it went so fast, and he could
not stop it; so you may think what a ridiculous figure
he looked. ‘“ Bad luck now, better another time,”

thought Cousin James; but unfortunately for him, it



A6 THE FIVE SENSES.

turned out to be bad luck now, worse another time, for
he had no sooner repeated the saying to himself, than
the donkey, who of course went wherever he pleased,
rode him into the middle of a brook, and stooping low
down to drink, for the water was very shallow, threw
Cousin James over his head; so he not only had a ride,
but another tumble, and a bath at the end of it, out of
which he had to walk about twenty yards, amidst the
brayings of the donkey, who seemed thus to testify his
satisfaction at the prank he had played him; and the
shouting and laughing of some mischievous boys who
were idling about, and thought all they saw and heard
was very good fun. Cousin James, however, was of a
different opinion, so, without waiting for Miss Murray
to overtake him, he ran home as fast as he could, not a
little mortified at meeting with so ludicrous a finish to
his many disasters.








FIVE SENSES.

CONCLUSION.





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IFAISS MURRAY lost no time in communi-
cating the result of her enquiries to
Mr. Sedley, who was exceedingly pleased
at having the opinion he had formed
from Patty’s countenance and manner so fully justified.
He was glad, too, that there were no relations to inter-
fere, because they might have been far less respectable
than the Widow Barton, and therefore have been a great
drawback on his benevolent intentions both for the
presert and future weifare of the child.

Patty was, soon after, entirely new clothed, and sent
as a day-boarder to an excellent school im the village,
returning every evening to the widow, from whom it
would have been cruel to entirely separate her; Mr.
Sedley assuring the grateful and now happy old woman
that he should henceforth consider her only as Patty’s
nurse, put a speedy end to the water-cress trade, and



A8 THE FIVE SENSES.

other contrivances for a subsistance, making her a
weekly allowance amply sufficient for all their expenses.

At the end of the first six months of the little girl’s
schooling, she had made such progress in writing, that
she was enabled to thank her benefactor in her own
words, just as though he could hear them; this had
been the great object of her ambition, from the moment
that a pen was first put into her hand.

During the holidays Mr. Sedley had her with him
for an hour or two every morning, talking to her, and
reading her replies, more and more gratified, the oftener
he conversed with her, so that he gradually began to
feel not only compassion, but attachment to her; this
feeling strengthened, as time passed on, and Patty made
such rapid improvement both in learning and appear-
ance, that before two years were over, she became as
much the child of his love, as she had been of his
bounty, and he was desirous that she should find her
home in his house, that he might have more frequent
opportunities of seeing and speaking to her; but he
thought how dreary the poor widow’s home would be
without her.

At last it occurred to him that Mrs. Barton would be
a fitter companion for Mrs. Howel, his old housekeeper,
than the laughing, gossiping, younger servants, and
help, too, to keep them in order; so Mrs. Howel was
consulted, and being pleased with the arrangement, the
widow was duly installed in the house of Mr. Sedley,
by the title of Nurse; and then Patty’s happiness was
complete, for she could be with her dear granny, as she



THE FIVE SENSES. 49

still affectionately called her, and at the same time be at
hand to render numberless little attentions to her gen-
erous protector, who never had a moment’s cause to
repent having saved from obscurity and poverty a child
so eminently fitted to receive the blessing of a good
education.

In the mean time, Cousin James had been sent to
boarding school; his stout limbs, ruddy cheeks, and
particularly good appetite, contradicting all his asser-
tions of continued weakness and ill health; there the
boys, of whom there were not less than fifty, soon con-.
trived to plague him out of his childishness and epicur-
ism; for he did not at all lke their nicknaming him
“ Raspberry Tart,” “ Squire Lollypop,” and “ Betty the
Cook.” At first he was sullen, then he tried to joke in
return, but it would not do; he found himself treated
with contempt by the bigger boys, and what was still
worse, all the lesser ones got before him in his classes.
Cousin James was, therefore, at last stimulated to make
a great effort, for the purpose of redeeming his lost
time, and there is some hope that he may succeed,
though it is feared that he has still more inclination for
making smart answers, riddles, and conundrums, than
for solving problems in arithmetic, or studying other
sciences.

Mary and Julia are frequent visitors at Mr. Sedley’s,
and Patty Bell, now grown a tall genteel-looking girl,
is as often at Mr. Belford’s, deriving most important
advantages from the instruction and conversation of
Miss Murray. She has become a great favourite with



50 THE FIVE SENSES.

the whole family, for she never presumes upon her good
fortune, but is always modest in her deportment, and
even humble, her grateful heart full of pious thankful-
ness to her Creator, whose benificent care had provided
for the desolate and orphan baby that she was, so many,
and such kind friends.

At the last juvenile fete given by Mr. Sedley, a young
gentleman, rather fonder of such treasures than our
friend, Cousin James, remarked on the number of very
large and handsomely-bound books contained in that
gentleman’s library, and asked him, on the slate, which
he most prized amongst all his volumes. Mr. Sedley
took him by the hand, and leading him to a minute
division on one of the shelves, showed him three very
small shabby-looking books not bound at all. They
were Jack, the Giant-Killer,—Goody Two Shoes,—and
Cinderella.

Mr. Sedley had scarcely dissipated the enquirer’s
astonishment by a brief explanation, when Mary Bel-
ford, running into the room, followed by Cousin James,
asked Miss Murray if she remembered when little
Freddy, three years ago, had spoken of there being
five senses, that Cousin James had said “ and more too,
I should think.” “ I remember it perfectly,” returned
Miss Murray.” “And he says so, still,’ rejomed Mary,
eagerly. “And I’m right, too,’ exclaimed Cousin
James, glancing round with a look of exultation, that
plainly told he thought he had something clever to say,
“for there’s the sense to understand the proper use and
value of them all.”



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Mr. Sedley showing his young friend







THE FIVE SENSES. 51

As this piece of wit, for such it was intended to be,
indicated an improvement in both the disposition and
mind of the speaker, Miss Murray thought proper to
applaud it; it was the first time that such a tribute had
been paid him, in spite of all the many attempts he had
made to gain fame in that way, so there was no one,
amongst all the happy laughing group that now sur-
rounded Mr. Sedley, better pleased than was the once
very rude and excessively selfish—Cousin James.

oe Nes

DEAN AND SON, PRINTER2,
THREADNEKDLE-STREEE,









CONTENTS.

AUSTRALIA AND POLYNKESIA.

OMOKO, KING OF AFRICA.

THE ELEPHAN?, AND LITTLE DOG OF ASIA.

THER AMERICAN SLAVE TRADE,

KUROPE,—ENGLISH FREEDOM.































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sly. considered the a division of
the globe ; they are situated in the Paci-
fic Ocean, between the coasts of Africa
and South America. Australia is a very
large island, indeed, it-is the largest in
the world; and Polynesia consists of a
number of small ones, so called from a compound Greek
word bearing that signification, which being translated
is, “ Many Islands.” 7

Some few years since, the Lotus, an English vessel
returning from Sydney, one of the principal towns in
Australia, was daiffen out of her course by a violent gale
of wind, which lasted through a whole night; and being
much anjured, the captain, at break of day, deemed it

B



4, DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

advisable to seek shelter in the natural harbour of the
island near, that he afterwards found had remained
unknown to the discoverers of Polynesia. Expecting
to find it uninhabited, or else peopled with some portion
of the natives of that part of the world, he was sur-
prised, as the vessel reached the shore, at beholding a
eroup of persons nearly resembling the complexions and
characteristics of Europeans: this astonishment was
not a little increased, on hearing himself addressed by
the chief of these islanders in his own langgage, which,
though corrupted, was nevertheless sufficiently intelli-
gible to be understood.

Although these long-undiscovered people possessed
two indications of a more civilized state, such as lan-
guage and countenance, yet im their dress and deport-
ment, they were almost as uncouth and strange in
manners as the inhabitants of those other islands, scat-
tered on the bosom of the vast Pacific. To account
for this, it will be necessary to give a short history of
them, and how they came into their present condition
in this very remote part of Polynesia: which was related
to the captain by the eldest of the islanders.

-“More than fifty years ago, a ship named the
Hector, had struck on the rocky coast of this obscure
island; she-had previously been nearly destroyed by an
engagement with a pirate vessel, in which the captain
and first mate had been killed. The enemy, soon after,
supposing her to be sinking, had suddenly left her m
pursuit of another prize seen in the distance. After
beating about for several days, her rudder being avholly





eal































the Hector

OL

Wreck



od

AUSTRALIA AND POLYNESIA. oa

useless, the unfortunate ship had drifted upon this
hitherto-unknown shore, by which means, those who
escaped their previous disasters, were saved, with the
principal part of the stores and cargo preserved.

« This was indeed a very important circumstance to
these poor creatures, thrown, as they were, upon a
desert coast; men, women, and children, without any
shelter but what the trees afforded, or any food but
what they might otherwise chance to find; their vessel
a complete wreck, so that their only hope of leaving
the island, was in the possibility of some other ship
coming near enough to observe their signals, or being
within: hail. Yet such is the natural love of life, that,
although in this helpless state, their first feeling was
that of joy for their deliverance from their late danger
of the Hector sinking, and they all knelt down in pious
thanksgiving to the mercy of God for their preservation.
When they arose, they held a council as to what they
should do first. Nearly worn out with incessant exer-
tion, to prevent their ship filling with water, they stood
greatly in need of repose, but this indulgence was not
to be thought of until they had taken measures to
ascertain whether they could. do so with at least com-
parative safety. |

“ Having assured themselves that there was no
appearance of habitation for a considerable distance
round the spot on which they had landed, they resolved
to form a sort of tent for the women and children, by
suspending a sail to the boughs of one of the many
groups of trees growing close by; for this purpose, as



6 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

well as others, they went down to the vessel, which the
receding tide had left nearly dry, and fixed amongst the
rocks on which she had struck; on reaching her, they —
were delighted to perceive that the water with which
she had been nearly filled, was rushing in a torrent
from a large hole just above the keel; this was of the
greatest service, for it enabled them to get at the store
of provisions, without which they must have, perhaps,
perished. Hard had been their labour, and short their
allowance, for many days past; you may judge, then,
with what anxiety they opened two of the casks, hoping
to find them dry inside; nor were they disappointed ;
one contained salted beef, and the other biscuits, with
only some of the outside part of each a little injured
by the damp. A brisk fire was quickly kindled on the
ground, and whilst the women were engaged in prepar-
ing a substantial meal, several of the men busied them-
selves in forming a rude resting-place for their wives
and little ones; others continued to keep a good look
out, in case of being surprised by the natives, if there
were any. Besides this apprehension, there was ano-
ther, and that was the possibility of being visited by
wild beasts in the night. It was necessary to make
some preparation of defence against both these dangers.

-« As the best means of repelling any four-footed assail-
ants, they agreed to keep up a good fire till day-break,
for it is a well-known fact that animals in a wild state
are easily scared by this means. Human beings in the
same condition are as readily alarmed by the flash and
report of guns, so they provided themselves with a



AUSTRALIA AND POLYNESIA. ‘i

plentiful supply of fuel, powder, and even shot, in case
it should be necessary. In addition to these precau-
tions, they took it by turns to keep a strict watch
through the hours of darkness, that they might be
ready to awaken the others, upon the slightest alarm.
Nothing, however, of the kind occurred, and all arose
in the morning, refreshed and invigorated for the
important work they had to do in the course of the day.

“As soon as they had finished a hearty breakfast,
they went again to the wreck, to remove as much as
they could of her cargo and stores, whilst daylight and
the tide permitted, taking advantage of the bright sun-
shine to dry those things that were wet. They now
brought away what live stock had survived the perils
of the voyage; these were two calves, a few sheep, and
a litter of pigs, besides several full grown ones, and
some fowls, all of them not a little delighted at ex-
changing their uncomfortable home in the Hector for
the shelter of the trees and the soft fresh grass beneath
them. ‘The ship’s carpenters, with the assistance of
two of the passengers, who were of the same trade,
soon contrived pens, and sties, besides a large shed for
the casks of provisions and other stores, when dried ;
for the sun has such power in that part of the world,
that it would have spoilt their meat, to expose it to its
rays longer than absolutely necessary.

“ Amongst the crew and passengers of the wrecked
vessel, there was a considerable sum of money, besides
a much larger sum that had been entrusted to the
captain for some purpose unknown to them; this, of



8 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

course, being of no present use, they wrapped up in
separate parcels, and locked up in a strong box, which
they took care to deposit in a safe place where they
could readily get at it, should an opportunity occur of
their leaving the island, as they had now discovered it
to be wholly uninhabited. |

“It is unnecessary to detail all that was done by
these first settlers, from whom the present population
sprung, for every one exerted their ingenuity to
better the condition of the whole, and prepare for the
future. Weeks and months passed away, without a
sail bemg seen, even in the most distant part to which
their sight could reach; so they worked on, patiently
and hopefully, that at no very distant time some friend
would come near them and afford them assistance.

“There were, fortunately, among the passengers,
several emigrants of different callings, who had brought
with them their appropriate tools, intending to settle in
Australia. Two of these were weavers, who when the
common stock of clothes began to fail, contrived from
dried grasses and other materials, having discovered
plants on the island resembling the cotton tree and flax,
to weave a rough sort of cloth, of variegated colours,
which the women made up into summer garments; the
skins of wild animals supplying them with winter cloth-
ing, which, though rather unsightly, were tolerably
comfortable. At first, they had a good stock of needles
and thread; but these became used up and worn out im
the progress of years; and then they had recourse to
the same inventions as we read of in savage nations,



AUSTRALIA AND POLYNESIA. | 9

making needles of fish bones, and thread of the stringy
fibres stript from the bark of trees; using, too, for
coarser purposes, the dried sinews of animals.

“The wreck had, long since, been entirely broken up ;
partly by the action of the waves that beat against her
every tide, but more by the hammers and other tools of
the carpenters; every piece of her, whether of wood or
metal, being a valuable possession, where there was
neither house or furniture of any kind: but so great
_is the ingenuity of man, when compelled to the exertion
of his faculties from the necessity of his condition, that
in less time than might be expected, a village of neat-
looking huts was built, formed of wood and clay, and
thatched with moss and large leaves; patches of land
were sown with English seeds, for luckily, the Hector’s
cargo had been of a varied description, being principally
intended for the use of the British settlers at Sydney.

“The first year’s produce of their agriculture was
nearly all put by, that by having more seed, the next
crop might be greatly increased; the same frugal care
was, IN some measure, continued for several seasons
afterwards; thus at last, by submitting to temporary
privation, they were rewarded in the enjoyment of an
ample supply. The animals they had brought with
them being carefully attended and suffered to grow old,
rapidly increased in number, and at the period at which
the Lotus discovered the island, their domestic live
stock had become abundant. The little colony con-
tinued to build on the coast, first on account of watch-
ing the arrival of some chance vessel; but when this



10 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

object became scarcely remembered by their successors,
they did the same for the sake of the food supplied to
them in the fish with which the harbour abounded.
‘Thus all went on very well for a long, long time ;
but the want of the proper means of education began,
at last, to manifest its consequences amongst them, for
gradually the old people died, and the young ones
succeeded them; and then they grew old in their turn,
and their children became men and women, and they
had sons and daughters, who came after them, and had
children, too, without any schools in which they could
be instructed. Had the captain of the Hector lived to
have landed on the island, or even the first mate, both
being men of education, they might have devised some
plan for preventing the deplorable ignorance that had
gradually increased from year to year. Amongst all
those whose lives had been spared in the engagement
with the pirate vessel, there was not one capable of
becoming either school master or mistress; but few of
them could read at all; and those who could, had so
imperfect a knowledge of this most important art, that
the three or four books preserved from the water that
had flooded them, was nearly beyond their comprehen-
sion; and at last, merely served to give after genera-
tions some idea of what a book was, and were treasured
more as a wonder and curiosity to be looked at, than
from any just conception of their utility; so they grew
up, one set of children after another, ignorant of all but
their own strangely mixed manners and customs, for
there was still something English about them; ’till, at



AUSTRALIA AND POLYNESIA. Il

last, they became the excessively uneducated and odd-
looking people who presented themselves to the captain
of the Lotus.

“ All that they knew of things, history, or circum-
stances, beyond what was under their own daily observ-
ation, had been told them by their elders, and they
having had but very imperfect instruction themselves,
what they communicated was such a mixture of truth,
falsehood, and prejudice, that at length they believed
what was related to them of other countries, had, in
former years, taken place in their own island, and that
they were, even in their present state, the wisest people
in the world, so truly does self-sufficiency and ignorance
go together. .

“The crew of the Hector had, half in jest, and half in
earnest, selected one from amongst them, to rule the
rest; at first he went by the name of the Captain, but
afterwards, not content with this term of distinction, he
chose to be considered as King, by the title of Gabriel
the First, that being his Christian name, his other was
Gosling, which he gave to his territory, the island over
which he at length reigned with absolute power, as
King Gabriel, of Gosling; now those who had chosen
him, had not been induced to do so by any considera-
tion of wisdom or fitness for so important an office as
that he filled; they were merely influenced by his being
the highest in rank on board, having taken command
of the Hector on the death of the captain and first
mate, and his bemg, moreover, a good sailor and a
jovial messmate; but no sooner did he create himself



12 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

king, than this last recommendation began gradually to
disappear, under pretence of the cares of his govern-
ment calling on him for great gravity; he strengthened
his power and indulged his ambition to have a better
habitation than the rest, entirely to himself, besides
gratifying his appetite with more dainty fare, by imsti-
tuting a separate table for his exclusive use.

“‘ His successor, Gabriel the Second, was more import-
ant and kingly still, and by no means less selfish or
conceited.”

‘The present monarch was Gabriel the Fifth, a regular
descendant from the mate king, the same name being
scrupulously preserved in that royal family.

Now it unfortunately happened, through want of
education, not only was each king successively more
ignorant than his predecessor, but his subjects became ~
so too; so that at the period of the Lotus’s arrival, the
whole nation was in danger of possessing as little mental
cultivation as their unknown neighbours, the New Zea-
landers, or even the aborigines of Australia; although
they were certainly of a much more orderly and peace-
ful disposition. ,

Yet foolish, and consequently conceited as his present
majesty was, he had a son a great deal more foolish and
conceited still; his name too was, of course, Gabriel,
but to distinguish it from his father’s, he was called
Prince Gaby; this future Gabriel the Sixth was about
twenty years old, and being vain of his person, spent
the greater part of his time in inventing new ornaments
for it; when fully adorned, he had something of the



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AUSTRALIA AND POLYNESIA. 13

appearance of a New Zealand chief, having, hike them,
attached to his head dress, an embellishment arising on
either side, very much in the shape of a donkey’s ears ;
no other person on the island was permitted to wear a
cap of this description, unless, indeed, the king should
choose to do so, and no one from any other country,
who had the honor of conversing with Prince Gaby,
would probably think of disputing his claim to so ap-
propriate a mark of distinction.

The king, his father, being a very absolute monarch,
rough in speech, and possessing but little sensibility,
kept the prmce as much in fear of him as he did his
other subjects, allowing him no power during his life-
time, nor assigning to him any part of his dominions ;
but Prince Gaby was quite reconciled to this abject
state, for he had one treasure entirely his own, and that
he prized beyond the whole kingdom of Gosling, or
even half a dozen more, could they have been added to
it: this treasure was the last bit of what had once been
a large mirror in the unfortunate ship Hector. Though
a souce of the most infinite delight, yet it had cost poor
Prince Gaby more tears and sighs than any real afflic-
tion he had ever met with; for small as the fragment
was, he had contrived to make it smaller, and this he
had done in the hopes of enlarging it; once he had
placed it in the ground, thinking it might grow, by
which means a portion of the quicksilver had been
rubbed off; finding this experiment fail, he endeavoured
to stretch it, by pulling it on either side with his hands;
but in doing this, he only broke off some more of the



14 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

cracked bits from the edges, and cut his fingers; so he
desisted from further attempts, making up his mind to
gaze upon himself, bit by bit, rather than run the risk
of not seeing himself at all.

The principal persons who landed from the Lotus,
under conviction of safety in so doing, were of different
nations; there was an European, of the name of Mild-
may, formerly a missionary, but latterly, having in-
- herited a large fortune, he travelled for his own amuse-
ment and benevolent purposes; there was an Asiatic
from India; an American from New York; and a
negro king from Africa.

Gabriel the Fifth, attended by his whole court, had
come to the beach, on hearing of the wonderful arrival,
partly impelled by terror, and partly by curiosity, hav-
ing only very vague ideas of ships, or people different
from themselves. The astonishment and fear of the
half-naked children, when the vessel was anchored so
as to be distinctly seen, was almost equal to that of the
Esquimaux who live in the north polar sea amidst ice
and snow; and who, when Captain Ross first landed
there, asked if his ship was a great bird; and when they
were assured that it was not, wanted to know which it
had come from, the sun or the moon. Some of the grown
persons of Gosling, had certainly better, though very
imperfect, ideas about it; but Prince Gaby said “It is
the back of a great fish, or else a garden; for see, there
are rails round it;” and, pointing to the naked masts,
“trees growing out of it, though they have no boughs
or leaves upon them.” As it was not etiquette at Gos-



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AUSTRALIA AND POLYNESIA. 15

ling, for the prince to be contradicted, except by his
father, this opinion was received in admiring silence.

The king as well as his visitors being equally satisfied
that there was no danger to be apprehended from each
other, invited them all to his parlass, by which he, of
course, meant palace; and here it may be as well to
state that I shall take the liberty of rendering his
majesty’s language a little more intelligible than it was,
without a good deal of explanation, to his guests. I shall
likewise leave out the many words otherwise unneces-
sary, that the visitors were obliged to use to make
their meaning apparent to the Goslings.

In order to produce a suitable impression on the
strangers, King Gabriel ordered his prime minister, a
queer little man, to lead the way, playing his best tune
on an instrument slung round his neck, and on which he
drummed with two sticks, in a most discordant manner.

The prime minister of Gosling had a very different
office to that of the same functionary in other countries,
the chief of his ministration being to provide the dain-
tiest fare for the royal table, to stand by his master,
the king’s chair or throne, on all great occasions, that
he might be in readiness to applaud all that his majesty
meant to be considered as either particularly wise or
witty, and that he might be at hand for any errand or
message the king should suddenly desire to send him
upon; as for consultation or advice, as required of
other prime ministers, that was not to be thought of at
Gosling, king Gabriel never heeding any body’s opinion
but one, and that was his own.



16 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

As the little party proceeded to the village, Mr. Mild-
may learnt, in answer to his questions, what was the
present condition of these strange people: as to their
origin, the account given by themselves was so mixed
up with fable, that it was with great diffieulty he could
even guess at the truth.

They were now at the palace, which, instead of being
a house regularly built, was more like a group of differ-
ent sized huts, communicating one with another, having
no stairs to them. King Gabriel, on entering, ascended
what was meant for a throne; a clumsy contrivance, its
chief dignity consisting in its height, for when he had
reached to his seat, his head nearly touched the roof of
the spacious hut in which it was placed. The guests
beimg seated on benches and logs of wood, round a
roughly constructed table, the prime minister was
ordered to help the cooks im bringing in an ample
supply of provisions; but before this useful member of
the government of Gosling could obey the royal man-
date, he was stopped by Prince Gaby, who pointing to
the African, asked if he would not like to wash the
black off his hands and face before his dine, by which
he meant dinner: fortunately for the feelings of Omoko,
such was his name, he was too ignorant of English to
understand what was said, particularly such English as
was spoken by Prince Gaby.

“ Having no knowledge of other countries,” said Mr.
Mildmay, addressing the prince, “you are not aware
that it has pleased the Great Creator of us all to make
us of different complexions: in some places, the inha-



AUSTRALIA AND POLYNESIA. 17

bitants are of a copper colour; in others, of a yellow-
brown ; and there is more than one nation in which the
natives are either nearly or wholly black, hke my friend
here, who though of this complexion,” added Mr. Mild-
may, turning to Gabriel, “is a king in his own country,
the same as you are one here.” This fact was men-
tioned by the good missionary in the hope of creating
respect for Omoko, but it wholly failed in its purposed
effect. A dawning recollection of having heard some-
thing from his grandfather Gabriel the Third, about
niggers, and their great inferiority, arose on the mind
of his white majesty, and this dawning recollection
becoming more vivid, he began to feel himself exceed-
ingly msulted by what appeared to him an invention on
the part of his reverend instructor. As for Prince
Gaby, having no such remembrances to recal, he fixed
his stupid eyes with a wide stare on the object of his
astonishment, his mouth being equally distended, it
seemed indeed doubtful whether he would ever have
shut either of them again, had not his father suddenly
aroused him by exclaiming in his great indignation,
“ Heaking! how can that be?”

Omoko, annoyed by the observations of so many
eyes, and being, besides, an invalid, indicated by signs
that he should like to lie down in some quiet place ;
this being made known to King Gabriel, the prime
minister was dispatched to act the part of chambermaid
to his sable majesty, in an adjoining hut, and to provide
him with dinner there.

The monarch of Gosling, still much ruffled, resumed



18 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

the expression of his incredulity as soon as his guests
were supplied with refreshments. ‘I remember, now,”
said he, “ what I had forgotten as told me by my grand-
father, and he had it from his father, and so on down
to the time of Gabriel the First, and he came from the
great country you call England, where they know every
thing, and so of course do we, for we are English, too,
though we live here.”
~ Mr. Mildmay could not help smiling at this mode of
reasoning, but he did not interrupt the king’s speech,
who went on to say “ My grandfather told me there were
such things in the world as black men; so far you speak
the truth, but as for their being kings! we won’t believe
that; for he said they were made to work for us white
people, and they were to be flogged if they would not ; is
it likely there can be kings among such fellows as those?”
“ Likely or not,” returned Mr. Mildmay, “I know
that it is so; and if you had not had the misfortune to
inhabit a country holding no communication with any
other, and being so wanting in the means of education,
you might have been assured of the fact, too.’ “ But,”
replied his majesty, “ though we are born and bred
here, those who came first, were not; and they knew
and told every thing to their sons and daughters; and
they, in their turn, related all to their children; till at
last it came to us to teach ours: and so, of course, we
must go on knowing all things, just the same as they
did in the beginning.” “ In reasoning thus,” replied
Mr. Mildmay, gently, “ you are wrong: in the first
place, those who were the earliest inhabitants here,



AUSTRALIA AND POLYNESIA. 19

could not know all the things, as you express it, for that
is not within the limits of human capacity; they would
naturally impress upon the minds of those they in-
structed what they believed themselves, whether it was
true or false; but even supposing that all they taught
was real, only think for a moment how some facts must
be lost, and others hecome mixed with fable, in a coun-
try where all knowledge is trusted to one generation
relating to its successor what had been told to them
by the preceding; it would be the same in England,
where your first people came from, and in other lands,
too, if it were not for books. Anything recorded in a
book, if true at first, must be true always; and will
give the same accurate information to ages after, that it
did at the period in which it was written. Now, if your
people had learnt to read, and you had a good supply of
books, though you never left this island, yet you might
become acquainted with the history, manners, and cus-
toms, of other nations, which knowledge is exceedingly
amusing as well as useful.”

“ Well,” said the king, rather tired of being addressed
in so unusual a manner, “ suppose, as you know so
much, you tell us something about other places: we
hke stories, and three or four of my people do nothing
else but make them; when they don’t please us, we
send the teller to bed without his supper, that he may
keep awake and mend them against the morning.”’

“T hope your majesty will not serve me so,” observed
Mr. Mildmay, with a smile, “should I be so unfortu-
nate as not to amuse you.” King Gabriel hesitated

C



20 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

for a moment, and then graciously assured him that he
would not; adding, “whatever your story is, we give
you leave to tell it; so begin.” His reverend guest
replied, “ As you seem to think that a man differing
from us in the colour of his skin, is altogether unlike
us in mind and feeling, I will tell you the story of
Omoko, the African king, who has accompanied us
hither.”

“T like a story makes shake,” said Prince Gaby; by
which he meant, laugh. “ And I don’t,’ interrupted
the king.” “I wish it was m my power to please
both,” said Mr. Mildmay, good humouredly; “ but I
fear it is impossible.’ ‘“ No matter, please me,” an-
swered the king; “that’s enough!” Thus exhorted, Mr.
Mildmay commenced as follows :—





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STORY OF

OMOKO,

KING OF AFRICA.

= FRICA,” he said, “ may be considered
as the third division of the world; it
contains many different countries,
each governed by some chief or king.
Though many persons have gone there
from more educated nations, to make
discoveries, and instruct the natives, they have not been
able to reach far into the interior; thus we are still
ignorant as to many parts of it.” “ Well, I suppose
you know enough to tell us a story about it,” interposed
the king, “ and that is all we want to hear.”

“ Omoko,” resumed Mr. Mildmay, more amused than
offended by the rudeness of his host, ‘“ was married. to
one of the most beautiful princesses of a neighbouring
state.’ © Beautiful!’’ exclaimed Gabriel, with the
utmost contempt; “nonsense! how can that be?” “TI
did not mean that she would be beautiful in the eyes of



ve DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

your majesty,” returned Mr. Mildmay, “ but she cer-
tainly was so in those of King Omoko; for what is
considered as beautiful in one country, is often thought
quite the reverse in another; perhaps, if your majesty
had a daughter, the most perfect in form and face, of
all English girls, she would not have her claim to
beauty allowed, were she to go to Africa, or to visit the
Esquimaux, or many other countries where it is the
nature of the inhabitants to differ in feature and com-
plexion.”

« T can’t believe that,” said the king, “so go on with
your story, and let it be a good one.” “ Or else I may
go supperless to bed,” observed his guest, with a smile.
“ And perhaps get no breakfast in the morning,” re-
plied the king, clapping his hands as a signal to the
prime minister that he had said something witty, and
meant to be applauded; upon which that unfortunate
little man threw himself into various extraordinary
attitudes, jumping about the floor of the hut, and
making a noise he meant for laughter, but having a
small voice, and a great cold, it was as little like that
sound of mirth, as it could well be.

When King Gabriel was satisfied with this tribute to
his cleverness, he took up a long white wand, that was
always placed on his right hand, to be in readiness for
such purposes, and with a gentle rap on the head of
his prime minister, or grand vizier as he would be called
in Asia, signified that he was to be quiet; this done, he
desired Mr. Mildmay to resume his narrative.

« King Omoko being mild in his temper, and just in









can Princes at their sports.

The Afri



AFRICA. 23

the administration of the laws of his country, was
beloved by all his subjects; and he would have been as
perfectly happy as it is possible for human beings to
become, but that, for many years after his marriage, he
had no children: he wished for a son, whom he might
train up to succeed him in the affection and respect of
those he was afterwards to govern. At length, it
pleased Providence to make him the father of two
princes, who, like their parents, were remarkable for
the amiability of their dispositions, and what, in that
country, was considered to be beauty. These youths,
born within a year of each other, grew up as though
they had been twins; so great was the affection sub-
sisting between them, that each felt more pleasure in
commendations bestowed on the other, than in any
praise that was given to himself.

“Thus Wyombo and Piscenee, (for these were their
names,) became a pattern to all other brothers, and the
pride and pleasure of the good king, their father, con-
soling him for the death of their tender mother, which
took place a few years after their birth. They were
early taught the wild sports of their country; for, like
you, they had no books or communication with other
nations out of Africa, and were therefore ignorant of
any art but that of the chase and war, which latter it
was necessary to learn, that they might be able to
defend their kingdom, should it be attacked by other
chiefs.

“One day, when out on an excursion, shooting wild
birds, which they did with bow and arrows, they were



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'2012-05-02T01:33:10-04:00'
describe
'9868652' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACMP' 'sip-files00005.tif'
5a483287b745dcabd6033eca57ab103c
29fc2e4396d3527aded49a9a52fdea135b72c02e
'2012-05-02T01:39:07-04:00'
describe
'54' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACMQ' 'sip-files00005.txt'
404214a65eb685a2ca4fdeef4eb9ce77
bf7ceb9b41dd3b69e7102b3f42afde0c709a14b6
'2012-05-02T01:37:12-04:00'
describe
'20869' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACMR' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
4953b6332fc34ff5862ccc5100833d36
70d1a18fbddf544db82235a6d8331310193a2cab
'2012-05-02T01:41:49-04:00'
describe
'1275039' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACMS' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
03f29dc54cde6205ba8f25759572ad35
3ba281d68a9b9ff8edc0e6c870a4f236e3889d57
'2012-05-02T01:39:26-04:00'
describe
'247579' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACMT' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
e6eb103b13e4cbd3f684f8655a0f19a5
d429ec409783ecb482d70ac1375c77f4a8f3adba
'2012-05-02T01:40:48-04:00'
describe
'74630' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACMU' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
479693204e691b49dfa9abbaf827e751
34c7a89940f62117604d805e79f4a453a4f0a9a7
'2012-05-02T01:31:39-04:00'
describe
'30616660' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACMV' 'sip-files00006.tif'
e317969b6ba224e669cd7eb17bb80135
86d2a4a46bdbb7b02179df6fba7c0c2d4026511f
'2012-05-02T01:42:27-04:00'
describe
'32' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACMW' 'sip-files00006.txt'
bb9da617f9b87297101c8aeab1c5a2cf
97f64ed44c54a54760c91616bedc3b96276e5de1
'2012-05-02T01:34:46-04:00'
describe
'30486' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACMX' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
6c99aea924c71ee2468b3c734cb5e02e
dd017a0351926b6816061dcd67670390d11b3806
'2012-05-02T01:38:38-04:00'
describe
'1251285' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACMY' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
9ecebc8a94de652d235856ea29d93cfc
16fa5e1b940c6eb298719408f48378bb244b4f5c
'2012-05-02T01:37:25-04:00'
describe
'178972' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACMZ' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
488879e983f43d37430bee03da797816
bc16b9687c344eae0725bc9bc4ac29b27f68a77c
'2012-05-02T01:37:08-04:00'
describe
'3388' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNA' 'sip-files00007.pro'
26c92af2d29073056e67b8f1f7eb1467
d8c1963538f278bf2af80a82e9f584b3e5ff1079
'2012-05-02T01:40:12-04:00'
describe
'58420' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNB' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
5f928eacef0cabfda364b1fe9fbfbb37
dde4d09b97b423d51d9ff87b314a064176b11de8
'2012-05-02T01:38:41-04:00'
describe
'30046276' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNC' 'sip-files00007.tif'
5a9a7ffcfc18e2ae984d1a6ffabbe507
b21c0cdf6fe1b24f36f31ae9fb50765d4d345ebf
'2012-05-02T01:36:26-04:00'
describe
'236' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACND' 'sip-files00007.txt'
e467e97ff7119bda3d127828fd0580d0
158ce0b16ad65f4d3b7748d5e080469e67cd171a
'2012-05-02T01:34:05-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'27398' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNE' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
82c62b65008f0f34cc1f9114e6bd6c2b
5c0e6a400b55d4db26a833dac5807c2f940059a2
'2012-05-02T01:32:00-04:00'
describe
'348829' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNF' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
78a570f26561f6145f7abba91ab524bd
e47d2f7b26ae2d8e7692d386f49367ed817e2fea
'2012-05-02T01:39:50-04:00'
describe
'30286' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNG' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
0b3e79ba1daab5ce720d5646598b88a0
8e6aff892bd0d69c01a90329938d99282b4377ee
'2012-05-02T01:34:49-04:00'
describe
'20987' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNH' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
b83e047fcb04c955800b3ae81e06dada
edf910597035b0443f1f0332a88eb38474b1d8f3
'2012-05-02T01:42:19-04:00'
describe
'9963716' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNI' 'sip-files00008.tif'
a3e3e911911fa0028f00cc3e920b3e79
a23e4bdfcb7de753ff1a1cf06cdc3ff377a981f7
'2012-05-02T01:33:42-04:00'
describe
'12' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNJ' 'sip-files00008.txt'
16840b972358ecf05354181544e89802
279df9b27655df59e6137c7a65fb41c87ec9a8b5
'2012-05-02T01:37:57-04:00'
describe
'18198' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNK' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
aed19d9f54133c0f0cd9c5cff20f0495
bb95420b3e45f370bad1f4124564ff390de7b125
'2012-05-02T01:39:46-04:00'
describe
'1282989' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNL' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
7c9228a8ab6595cb40a5b6ae33e4e5c6
b4293ef2337c506da0b2bb71e82110cad8b71110
'2012-05-02T01:38:46-04:00'
describe
'67123' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNM' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
e7b05ee272385bfe8eab402fe8d4a060
b4b08650291e7f4b3335fae234a3a5a3426f90ec
'2012-05-02T01:37:26-04:00'
describe
'4713' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNN' 'sip-files00009.pro'
75f7c1230c9886651e2a78d48e0631ea
20fbd814bad234fa444fcbad162c26f6e9bbf5f3
'2012-05-02T01:35:44-04:00'
describe
'33197' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNO' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
080d7d98e302d40fc912c3c9a6d9b95d
ad63240750a930eddb462b4af063b7e9ff0f90fd
describe
'10281016' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNP' 'sip-files00009.tif'
9383a485a17ae4664d54da96c1070361
847fd087781b31353a5b52a6b292fed1818d5527
'2012-05-02T01:32:29-04:00'
describe
'270' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNQ' 'sip-files00009.txt'
cffea73a55a5bba7f8bdd9043f483ed9
2734b6a91d4fdd78a7a473db3ca7c555eacbf259
'2012-05-02T01:37:33-04:00'
describe
'21575' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNR' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
8e06b325ac429de6cd0fda743f4efda0
9828d44e9c1f1cc8e537f89cb69808954828da8a
'2012-05-02T01:41:26-04:00'
describe
'1213880' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNS' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
e07cafcf15dd957afa6ccefe678d9b47
e389e310574a80cf6715f6eaa4f2afd273626ebb
'2012-05-02T01:33:44-04:00'
describe
'35076' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNT' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
8661fd9d8d4fb22f232cd217f4ad36c4
483da9e386dea595a76dd264b987c6ecf85dd04b
'2012-05-02T01:36:08-04:00'
describe
'21848' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNU' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
e8e74e010c61be16c6f98ffe0d334097
17f35976367a7196a5fff1224e1857c5ff1b01d6
'2012-05-02T01:41:59-04:00'
describe
'9728616' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNV' 'sip-files00010.tif'
9450eee5ff318c78cbb3119412c70c3f
2cdfe41467afa152d13950ab0a00230d008b4b78
'2012-05-02T01:31:41-04:00'
describe
'16' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNW' 'sip-files00010.txt'
a20a8ef5672bebf88ad1bb4f957f41f1
8ef676ec3d18e8b1da991d949a927157dc38fbaa
'2012-05-02T01:42:04-04:00'
describe
'18558' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNX' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
7239d3cc62c9a15c0500a0f9ba207462
58bece592f2c217b27710793854c99cd5799978d
describe
'1248135' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNY' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
2c1df1ac8fe03901cd5b51c353b14d20
2610ccc85c23a637017393967e501af9613ebaaf
describe
'180270' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACNZ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
c0fd656a7bc3547cf2d99d1db2d6d832
c02c778674518ea13a7dd2845c0ec7a05bf4da29
'2012-05-02T01:39:36-04:00'
describe
'21430' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOA' 'sip-files00011.pro'
c2658981a7ae1defd52576c658b5b457
75889f071894b148601b28fed1fbfcec99ac8f31
'2012-05-02T01:38:02-04:00'
describe
'65694' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOB' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
8428619d4ba22fe170bbfcccf4a157ca
b2efa31408212e9fbfea41562f09dc660c7a1487
'2012-05-02T01:38:50-04:00'
describe
'10001884' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOC' 'sip-files00011.tif'
01ab7889112bffebfb91f776e3aec940
1cc5e9adda9bf1ee477b6765e7aea675904d2197
'2012-05-02T01:37:52-04:00'
describe
'942' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOD' 'sip-files00011.txt'
3c247557d608644a18c5abda73801637
cd83da859afbe8aff0da91d78bb05569f4c37757
'2012-05-02T01:34:37-04:00'
describe
'28756' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOE' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
ec9c589189624ca53434e92a39a1afbd
5f5b87bc6823535ef5dedf2063cb6b530fc5457d
'2012-05-02T01:31:38-04:00'
describe
'1221544' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOF' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
de9b366ba5fcd0e17d321f0a775282d1
caf06bfe18a7b2f92197d4008baeb322dd48e7c2
'2012-05-02T01:32:12-04:00'
describe
'190350' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOG' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
44f925731da6865f80d8538af95c3bdf
603142be5be4da5de72e735a896a93aa2edc9649
describe
'41502' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOH' 'sip-files00012.pro'
9ee06d68fbcf7975e8883bde2560921d
3dd1b3068c1c1007f42d3147644681de03e2c2c1
'2012-05-02T01:38:48-04:00'
describe
'73180' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOI' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
7b93192d8865bc73802f94641dc2fa74
aa5fe7694c49b3657649ef6288878b126c143568
'2012-05-02T01:33:18-04:00'
describe
'9789416' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOJ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
9f316dcdf0e4266ad7148dc0d09b53e8
bdc0aa8a013c2ae79221dd3b575ae71f47d0c40e
'2012-05-02T01:32:26-04:00'
describe
'1636' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOK' 'sip-files00012.txt'
d4775fe68df5d7a6d947b2d49715cfbc
9afb16cf2b57dc0c61b6ea585f1acc62ba762f40
'2012-05-02T01:35:46-04:00'
describe
'30098' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOL' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
bb664459975c793de34d16e5599e88f9
0e78ae88846c85a1a71401532c1428450cfca170
'2012-05-02T01:42:11-04:00'
describe
'1215542' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOM' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
a3b912ea8fb374985e1ed33ce75d91ec
f15cfcc3dc42e30a3f7f83157c054674cf031dc1
describe
'34641' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACON' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
be1f2cd54d3eb0e1438d20e0c739da88
c14742ec74c6b96ba30277905886a202d97a90bd
'2012-05-02T01:38:44-04:00'
describe
'21658' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOO' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
fe61e0dbf15a7c0d93fd3500fdae918b
af1380d29a5e7160b0cc1360630ab3a171e51819
'2012-05-02T01:40:30-04:00'
describe
'9741900' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOP' 'sip-files00013.tif'
e00ab28358d84196104c3644bb7962d4
283f4bb941e80d0a6287b40e2ccf2f6c4157287e
'2012-05-02T01:37:53-04:00'
describe
'23' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOQ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
e06c422bff58548f1d866500f95769a9
1eee990b77d4745b6842cb089ffa537d25da86a1
'2012-05-02T01:42:29-04:00'
describe
'18626' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOR' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
ba38a5189d99abd97e2bdafc04236904
43a75a7627c169bdc11136f8a2338b3114ded1f8
'2012-05-02T01:32:40-04:00'
describe
'1223546' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOS' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
874903c80c512a059197e2d0b8146f30
d37d602f72b57273e7848a2954aec898d587881a
'2012-05-02T01:41:02-04:00'
describe
'178464' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOT' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
47721800f11d5e71be9eeaf2ab64949a
790661125ee611766ec36ac6a7401b1d5f57726e
'2012-05-02T01:36:02-04:00'
describe
'1512' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOU' 'sip-files00014.pro'
421b9b67388418e5cad4957449cb0d07
967cf2f86ee5e426e8db6df08d459ed8bd4f10a6
'2012-05-02T01:39:55-04:00'
describe
'56277' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOV' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
2e31370ff9d893a6cc4178fb873968e0
a6a650fe0140ef28ff93d7a5e806138c65c2df5b
'2012-05-02T01:34:31-04:00'
describe
'29380828' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOW' 'sip-files00014.tif'
9fc985fa1f08cf7d25e804001992e290
10c7118da95d2d0763703e36f5625373387dc065
'2012-05-02T01:41:25-04:00'
describe
'167' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOX' 'sip-files00014.txt'
d0e8a0b56aeab3bfeae6e3d6329ba1ad
fc78b986e1ec0efbe678fe703d5f16f28eeb9a0d
'2012-05-02T01:36:18-04:00'
describe
'26894' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOY' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
4f01a4416c1c2b6c09c18b96507d568c
196ca843bc810ce09329028174f3d57fad24e6b5
'2012-05-02T01:43:26-04:00'
describe
'1234454' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACOZ' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
f774db9a90504ef152ace1c79e0f0c77
546f98419a42385c9195f11da137aa1e1c24489c
'2012-05-02T01:40:10-04:00'
describe
'181263' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPA' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
4831ed68c1b928ffc40afbe8bc277e0c
0306640f052d47738b01ccc1aa9e4906ce7520e8
'2012-05-02T01:34:18-04:00'
describe
'39374' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPB' 'sip-files00015.pro'
6d8922df0ed81ba9284216c042f0128c
bafc5bd95aadd1380d17edaf3dd9f2a33bb7b322
'2012-05-02T01:41:15-04:00'
describe
'71593' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPC' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
711c9617d774d461f120e74914207cba
b4cdd35c250f02e571cc32376215debfb24bfd13
'2012-05-02T01:39:10-04:00'
describe
'9892420' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPD' 'sip-files00015.tif'
3c6010af12faa56f64edcc50e8ddd25b
f339c7fe2c206644c469a0f74491704ee41f65d0
'2012-05-02T01:34:22-04:00'
describe
'1596' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPE' 'sip-files00015.txt'
588ef2f3d43c86723c98e556658a0a79
818306181813fe01e43be44810c3fb58dd0a27dc
'2012-05-02T01:38:54-04:00'
describe
'29492' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPF' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
d46288f53899528d702f4ddd596386e9
00b871b4122985b591325c17c865fc0f5cfd2703
'2012-05-02T01:39:42-04:00'
describe
'1258046' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPG' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
b6073f4b5a5ec357804dfb30454a455a
a886aa88728dfc9d59aeb0106092a1e095d32738
'2012-05-02T01:33:19-04:00'
describe
'180792' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPH' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
4bc837eee06ce77a21bf679fc120a41a
546c8d7529eb5ecce3def3fe443328d56d629704
'2012-05-02T01:39:28-04:00'
describe
'41732' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPI' 'sip-files00016.pro'
6599011ab154c2d93fb190d6b579a4c2
7ef9f19560117b5aed42062ade5a1f7161f873c2
'2012-05-02T01:38:09-04:00'
describe
'71988' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPJ' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
d0cd3aae608f3eff636914ce72955422
f4d6c6d7dfdd11cc2e17caf005d6ede326a143d1
'2012-05-02T01:36:00-04:00'
describe
'10081124' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPK' 'sip-files00016.tif'
5518b0909f74cab17e09a894d5c5ea40
404f7eb25dc34c3bc72421cf2cdd1bd34d2c7d3a
'2012-05-02T01:39:01-04:00'
describe
'1648' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPL' 'sip-files00016.txt'
3db924ce73e49c84d42ea766121500cc
c6ac36e36b9fe47eedf90f3e8d050f6d0a7fdebd
'2012-05-02T01:32:18-04:00'
describe
'29412' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPM' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
b345465d1e2ea263c68e7fd99f988def
908dec4a0b644eadf15558e1f2beddc3d5c69f69
'2012-05-02T01:38:25-04:00'
describe
'1290895' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPN' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
fdcbb0c10c649daecfa73d0b52344f19
f5f5870c78e310edbf29224e028b3bc49d25422d
describe
'176334' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPO' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
d6cd61710ed5d13b20f8570ba5c60fa8
40933d5cd3d8c4e64688fb1e9966730f8de8fafd
'2012-05-02T01:39:04-04:00'
describe
'39725' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPP' 'sip-files00017.pro'
0cf53dd64ec8d30088a5ec88b723402b
467492a33a88a139b871a389b520caadbd5db684
'2012-05-02T01:36:34-04:00'
describe
'67429' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPQ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
47a257aa97746cad2eb2a894b3629423
8f62f290018da437520e5ade7155eb7d1d3cbabb
'2012-05-02T01:41:30-04:00'
describe
'10343972' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPR' 'sip-files00017.tif'
518ec992a3fec407b8f8276400a30dc7
4d697d10e564fbd1f74d5c7e0d52c68478f6d2f1
'2012-05-02T01:36:13-04:00'
describe
'1572' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPS' 'sip-files00017.txt'
d1afaf04a062a729aafffbcdd2ff3e22
7a14595e9e2196bff8c0499dfa7e7a3c6066a7c2
'2012-05-02T01:37:34-04:00'
describe
'28416' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPT' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
1c53406effe7dd7c33c04153441cbb37
b1f8659ef83e55e4729d6ad5048b78e9875fc605
'2012-05-02T01:37:04-04:00'
describe
'1282376' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPU' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
755b5f60cf4a24175f0b253b8edfe852
9ff7c09694eee855a9c512686f7b75766d5216bf
'2012-05-02T01:34:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPV' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
42887472ddd5c367ce44573bffbebda9
51adcea8ccc3710c6e90fd709297ca8f9fdb7a74
'2012-05-02T01:35:41-04:00'
describe
'40694' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPW' 'sip-files00018.pro'
efa9f5031e7d50f0d1b072cdf4b28119
9f99085dfeb4d2ddc8fc0199c341e52ab90d0df8
'2012-05-02T01:40:49-04:00'
describe
'69481' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPX' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
8d0df83f63e9123ad9bd5a6cea358a97
7d8baed8a323dd3f896396d815701cfe23030bff
'2012-05-02T01:42:49-04:00'
describe
'10276192' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPY' 'sip-files00018.tif'
5634238f56bed182014923a863ea2552
50bc00c7bbec22ef54297091754c03ed406b43a7
'2012-05-02T01:39:12-04:00'
describe
'1623' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACPZ' 'sip-files00018.txt'
a106c8243236e96f21ce0b0e9f7dbb3d
3658a4183e71a4e2cbac60f0a67aadab330577f9
'2012-05-02T01:32:42-04:00'
describe
'28995' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQA' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
3df7b0cb45dfde45ba5ec4dff63c4987
bd735ee2e25bee8ba2c553590d9c158ebade383a
'2012-05-02T01:33:20-04:00'
describe
'1291224' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQB' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
4c7270292c8053e7fe3f6c3fe7430d73
d18e78ee8f2e070d8b072037c95bd3b788499b71
'2012-05-02T01:36:20-04:00'
describe
'174415' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQC' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
867b7f1a42a55d2d45f1590a14db3745
f4ad12dd57d62a682a0c0d8eab42411551effdfb
'2012-05-02T01:35:18-04:00'
describe
'41338' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQD' 'sip-files00019.pro'
0dd902b4df4fbeaa4d31c955be6d85df
e03745afba8dac17c0ab8a0805f41f95ec58bc18
'2012-05-02T01:40:39-04:00'
describe
'68836' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQE' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
a9cf2e63153d52d429159f9d6ccccf3f
89b6760ed75cb5879c85fd7cc0c00367facd6ed1
'2012-05-02T01:42:54-04:00'
describe
'10346580' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQF' 'sip-files00019.tif'
ee9dddf180344b6fc6052b7101f3480b
6125f4d3606b3c3e268f98db645bd3803e007909
'2012-05-02T01:31:57-04:00'
describe
'1673' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQG' 'sip-files00019.txt'
d00e86992e9197ae377f7e486d008ecf
bda15d0ed6eae75a57902cca72f5008663d9d166
'2012-05-02T01:39:34-04:00'
describe
'28626' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQH' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
404d9abc7c3af463e38cb0dddb170c0f
ff9ed44b513dfd37d364aacecca13137d38287ec
'2012-05-02T01:36:59-04:00'
describe
'1279413' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQI' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
db3d73813d3b02659d241d3069361aae
edcce8e50eb0d27501e524cf07c0305f1ffd9977
describe
'175845' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQJ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
e332419d6099008f7f4bd3861e5e8d26
03f9ddde11bda0877ac73295395d6d93184a6aa3
'2012-05-02T01:38:43-04:00'
describe
'41809' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQK' 'sip-files00020.pro'
c7bca508de749ea3e60556a53b027c2f
5a7e99ae36a64fee2584c766b5146588ef2c41fa
describe
'68873' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQL' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
1f712bef5750fcbbe27847dd4a9b3b5d
c8d4c25d1fc52c29040651ade3764033f2f5a0df
describe
'10252580' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQM' 'sip-files00020.tif'
f84831be32b09563b5299545d0baa197
95c96632902d9240092637cc72e0e74cdc380454
'2012-05-02T01:35:42-04:00'
describe
'1646' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQN' 'sip-files00020.txt'
0ea130f290659ee6f851fb14b7f9d886
b9ea92e009ee26850ae15e804a76dec776c2e8a6
'2012-05-02T01:35:13-04:00'
describe
'28322' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQO' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
4dce7db390a31374e10d50c205007b71
695809cd3bf55008c791b91e86a92da22258eb0d
'2012-05-02T01:34:38-04:00'
describe
'1290556' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQP' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
4e6375315c6c8184f19d460d90e85032
afed37ec665743ba1d388e58efd5c9483c1cdcd1
describe
'31728' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQQ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
031794db5d5dcd30abcb49c17b546367
dc9b0aa13ff44e9c64d9eb2a5a9708f6fb5d4df4
'2012-05-02T01:41:40-04:00'
describe
'21018' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQR' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
d03609b6b92ca19218d2543be16825d8
ef33c13536ab7334fc068801a72d2fbbfe23711f
'2012-05-02T01:40:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQS' 'sip-files00021.tif'
3bd8318dc94c10620891b175a488b600
3c225692b702d9ebe3fb4ef5e7a129320e3014ca
'2012-05-02T01:34:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQT' 'sip-files00021.txt'
7e7730a1ebdc7de30671f512207d75e7
6d4e7b6d481a124930f7e7b31cbcf173c732bfe5
'2012-05-02T01:31:55-04:00'
describe
'18472' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQU' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
d5253afc89104a37ec9ba160ca017c36
3d2220bab00996094b97d3623f2716631aeae15d
'2012-05-02T01:31:52-04:00'
describe
'1277992' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQV' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
c255bc2d6e6d6050a1c62c1072080d23
c1d9378bf67af66a399bc14a23d7f5c2cd8b3208
'2012-05-02T01:35:29-04:00'
describe
'157368' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQW' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
a1a9382c86f2c52c3cfdde2ab0ca32f1
8afea8cdd241f86ac40e834a3ac4f6e69dcf9249
'2012-05-02T01:31:51-04:00'
describe
'2835' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQX' 'sip-files00022.pro'
a8d98ffb7e1048e672d9f33b013f1074
526117f6ff0295ef59e670378efd23b4788319cd
'2012-05-02T01:40:21-04:00'
describe
'50473' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQY' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
abdffe018c85d07ceed118b30461f955
585986e024789e96a65d8852fd6e80ba1b7f9e90
'2012-05-02T01:41:27-04:00'
describe
'30687956' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACQZ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
fde99f7355cabdf60ad4ebe0158fb0af
e5a9d044b1fd90a3e933a1cfe359c4b42070b527
'2012-05-02T01:41:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRA' 'sip-files00022.txt'
c5723f36ecd5b2a9be4383e6cf2eaad4
7beace86b83ab7f69502073a8d57431b7e770a79
'2012-05-02T01:32:01-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'25791' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRB' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
e7d2a142edec00b8b753f95f41ca0958
4503828097d6af539bf7a9d466febecf94f11b33
'2012-05-02T01:35:14-04:00'
describe
'1290899' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRC' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
eb78e3d6c2cc35701ed6658cb229a55a
8e9ec5c619ce69c719a4021749dcc8d94751bf5f
'2012-05-02T01:42:47-04:00'
describe
'167868' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRD' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
cce0f46b993ac0f706d45853be603e6f
b5b85ca0c7930799cb33c934c8f1da567e113dbf
'2012-05-02T01:36:07-04:00'
describe
'34130' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRE' 'sip-files00023.pro'
f69419e84db6b906d4be96e577860e5e
0316fa74bfb1838fa78b0acba4480fc300ea3772
describe
'68012' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRF' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
8704f5c6aa12c8e3acd5626218686501
94b6217f54f2d8e45beaa4d4f93bce237d39ebf8
'2012-05-02T01:42:36-04:00'
describe
'10349528' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRG' 'sip-files00023.tif'
9b4a7b0a561605b19979cfd145457caf
70cdc44fd5f9a368865167f5ea8f70689f4442a1
'2012-05-02T01:32:38-04:00'
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRH' 'sip-files00023.txt'
ae0abb2adbae66c043b6e3c5ef6943fd
5ea3221c83579e396f6a9972b64cb597b0b47dd9
'2012-05-02T01:32:30-04:00'
describe
'32883' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRI' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
5314a937e91201eeeb59b4e8ce674a7b
bbe6b23084320c6f88d6702d91c87b75c06b00e4
'2012-05-02T01:32:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRJ' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
66086cd60283b7e198d064e321b33584
2028cf98c3de10298039a826a540796f3e612340
describe
'172895' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRK' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
4a0ee73aed5cd94a98be07c87037e469
bdfe2ad5e76a200f6a73b6fcefe3e85e3c5d9b66
'2012-05-02T01:39:13-04:00'
describe
'21891' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRL' 'sip-files00024.pro'
e09132d3ecc6ae39c7b5e1f1a4228486
986ba6ceeb88a62772334a3f4f7349d50c88c2dd
'2012-05-02T01:32:45-04:00'
describe
'63701' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRM' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
638c142c4cf6131f4ad76b513bcd90e9
74501abb3f547ef9bac9195d4496a77a8528b44f
'2012-05-02T01:35:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRN' 'sip-files00024.tif'
0ebf500695165926f2d15506c33bf1a9
155550af5ea5d1390d4dbb98b49b5e9aeb29b6ff
'2012-05-02T01:43:05-04:00'
describe
'992' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRO' 'sip-files00024.txt'
2f65195d2148fa73c1434d711cafa250
56be7f59fca09f7e542c12740b1687e2e294510d
describe
'27763' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRP' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
20ea22676cd21b2e205959abc31ac478
3d0051ed0511e5029663e358a97f62fd9643ae00
'2012-05-02T01:36:16-04:00'
describe
'1290710' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRQ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
c35a855b25ea446adea475ec976b22a8
233c6061afa174dfbf3869d3eb005528c0b6029c
'2012-05-02T01:40:40-04:00'
describe
'178402' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRR' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
b08a430fd0c5267eac92104185924b32
81fca9374ef6c0e48f72bb9cf2eab4cea17b63cc
'2012-05-02T01:32:11-04:00'
describe
'41951' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRS' 'sip-files00025.pro'
19c51d7e675be19c347a31b9d545453d
cfe1da9e86f827c0a8b1ee378592dd57a02bb3a6
'2012-05-02T01:35:11-04:00'
describe
'70162' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRT' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
a0310463c142a4360a6a791be4964137
91c111b10958aa9d997424369c801f3823e062b2
'2012-05-02T01:36:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRU' 'sip-files00025.tif'
43445932deb6b37474691ac181731dea
6193d83a850d7e7130d52a18dddf682319076948
'2012-05-02T01:36:15-04:00'
describe
'1655' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRV' 'sip-files00025.txt'
36e4235b5162fc67384270c09a54062e
a93bb803c50117bda390a7c6aa12440e46228403
'2012-05-02T01:41:41-04:00'
describe
'28862' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRW' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
e97a1c1c2624935289cdc7afcf3d8d76
c2385f8e8a10e15ea3af09f27c25a5ed5f6f744e
describe
'1290880' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRX' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
9225a6f9f4dac0e49efca4cb8578af12
cafedadfab52d8aa61855d5668fc0671fc92962d
'2012-05-02T01:33:41-04:00'
describe
'160862' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRY' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
1ffc8b3b5eda22aaa4d8be326a3cd2da
54c94d8af87ed9efdbf0c6bdef58359ab072794c
'2012-05-02T01:40:26-04:00'
describe
'39926' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACRZ' 'sip-files00026.pro'
a883de772730f4823f31a0a6174f5167
22c5e217264413c46957c3cf352f89cfed634699
describe
'63210' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSA' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
0297f21e67bd8d74e646492a84ff1b6a
74e79aa7ac120397dc558ae2f54b3f5a9eb4587e
'2012-05-02T01:31:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSB' 'sip-files00026.tif'
543e1c3750cd25fb29f52a169b69574e
53ab561127d43ef53da7ef24cd2a2dea325eb2d5
'2012-05-02T01:31:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSC' 'sip-files00026.txt'
c4acd72e4541503ec3ad761eced9dfec
58ad2d13ba404c7d2e690620303bed3a07a1a5f9
'2012-05-02T01:32:07-04:00'
describe
'27505' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSD' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
087c99bf982b4e3109ddc52f7cddf49f
e2bc4f45d32dfce67161e2259c31cb64bca3fd04
'2012-05-02T01:41:11-04:00'
describe
'1290784' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSE' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
08cee3e91bb404a52724ba0b6050f0e3
83702309c52efff711c8a487b2bb6d7160e63362
'2012-05-02T01:37:36-04:00'
describe
'172352' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSF' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
ac71d8e06be17018c99c6f474671b204
eb248d00c5dd8de06ba4c851efe93bfd9a298056
describe
'40919' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSG' 'sip-files00027.pro'
00c701abb723228cbb9d909137ef08a8
cee4fac92a36c5be98241e9dbe55f0e3f9b58c7a
'2012-05-02T01:32:25-04:00'
describe
'67298' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSH' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
d66971329b44883aa0860f788c286fd1
419ee98e892006186fb6723ac1eed1dd6c85e4cf
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSI' 'sip-files00027.tif'
81cb1a301d8751a0b1fe627cfd6c77c2
567bb90b7afed920d304cf7ab6c791e30eb2688a
'2012-05-02T01:42:32-04:00'
describe
'1619' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSJ' 'sip-files00027.txt'
de8f4ddbf11be4f2ea2823e43c908488
dc65f3efba5dbdaac4790c4d7ec04dfff73b6940
'2012-05-02T01:33:51-04:00'
describe
'28331' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSK' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
09d39efc6a6ae22686f9c49d6cbc7545
9eeb93c75cdf77babd2ad8b55be4520c27d8d708
'2012-05-02T01:40:56-04:00'
describe
'1291396' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSL' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
38ef670bba43b905dac6967a4a59a439
cfd1cbc25e87d625364ee427c98add1f92e1f1a2
describe
'170037' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSM' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
df3c9485233aee265ba5caa5e0903d79
b8870df27ecfd9e82525452a5465ffa36c525d59
'2012-05-02T01:37:28-04:00'
describe
'40891' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSN' 'sip-files00028.pro'
082ebb66a3985fa62e80739e61329760
e04516fa932649c91ea67591fb124c172f52115c
describe
'67058' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSO' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
e1d7a5bade63268a7fa820902c9b02a5
6d71d6e5726e81f1e202393881f483b9c7883aa4
'2012-05-02T01:38:15-04:00'
describe
'10347932' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSP' 'sip-files00028.tif'
491fd7854bbacfc0b3a4100f540015c9
07069f9e5116220b10cedf272f558dfa64e83329
'2012-05-02T01:39:19-04:00'
describe
'1613' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSQ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
6e67250df73561a21011f8b56e44241e
8b386dcc2ad993befa59e89d349a61d180f73326
'2012-05-02T01:31:43-04:00'
describe
'27870' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSR' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
15d1b3c98519ae14a25aebdee0fa0ffb
79256989da8eb49ab41777784e62e14ad929d0ad
'2012-05-02T01:39:27-04:00'
describe
'1290862' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSS' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
8e7352077a748ed242820793d6e69be0
ecf29f2c391d8c89f11b59e1ba045d86574874bc
describe
'177215' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACST' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
21034becea7e5d3622f3282e9184f7e6
bb5d2e5ac85e72bafe8e42bb1e010e49b597af61
'2012-05-02T01:41:17-04:00'
describe
'40942' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSU' 'sip-files00029.pro'
1b952ea326495965bc9fa6dd7c2954ab
e7537a9511276c4c40d6d2d836e30afc84fba63a
describe
'70159' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSV' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
369a4a080d80b3cda76ec648ef14d70a
023f18df7d0c9766accffdf5e6790baad85dbafd
'2012-05-02T01:37:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSW' 'sip-files00029.tif'
67aa00d62696865b61b9568ed45e588c
b15b497c0901a70af0c33cb7b75aa09fa9288da7
'2012-05-02T01:31:50-04:00'
describe
'1622' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSX' 'sip-files00029.txt'
7b7a0f6823b1df005a2d24268102a1ce
db002e39b109ac1f2a8c2d3fc41f88d981876804
describe
'28900' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSY' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
f8f1e4ca677e56a89c2ee44c2234da5c
9766588f1b4840f65cf3222275dedfb6e44352dd
'2012-05-02T01:33:58-04:00'
describe
'1273995' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACSZ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
6ca32cb9a9301a6b87755e8dad186f32
ec43b78e0e9b0e311ae414c2726a73263e0dbe3b
describe
'179425' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTA' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
b0dd68dab0b35e1f500829581188ffaa
a2145e8485bf85ab3d9637eed37c3969253dc3b4
'2012-05-02T01:40:04-04:00'
describe
'41281' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTB' 'sip-files00030.pro'
1d6b72571bc078111e724517476b460e
9710d7e0c168d16272809f07967cdba7c97ce656
'2012-05-02T01:35:55-04:00'
describe
'68641' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTC' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
f54070dfcfad4f57f5c776b2631c3477
1787516f6a5b147a6a71187d0a8cb2ab1eca1bde
'2012-05-02T01:33:33-04:00'
describe
'10209300' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTD' 'sip-files00030.tif'
0456e12ee00814197447ffac968d4e82
a6f4313c04956b825fbaa6878f6f51699e2027ff
'2012-05-02T01:37:44-04:00'
describe
'1629' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTE' 'sip-files00030.txt'
f7f35ab65bd25e70ad4ab19570c68dc9
ae8afe4bf918d67c5805d8d1c662150748945da0
'2012-05-02T01:40:58-04:00'
describe
'28916' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTF' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
093697b7a98e683c36737de6119f549e
d9b7eac8ef9bdcd316c1c94c61f1c0e559387d16
'2012-05-02T01:36:38-04:00'
describe
'130183' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTG' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
315915ea40158564fee86fab66af4774
2557a4ea62b477f0ff2981f64b4cc6412af6572f
'2012-05-02T01:31:42-04:00'
describe
'22918' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTH' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
e2fadeee891a75a715ab0f5026822fe6
6ea4c27e6eb598a5ef65da4694e52feef14601db
'2012-05-02T01:32:54-04:00'
describe
'18849' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTI' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
e1fd39c490c15a66b7e8bb682eaf072b
1feb51ce5ab459c9860a660e51772c57bc0a66ad
'2012-05-02T01:33:03-04:00'
describe
'9943628' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTJ' 'sip-files00031.tif'
bc53e00990e34b2fa0b7a738f05262d8
ca1bb7b1e32f1991f5a44d4fadb708dbc13b9635
'2012-05-02T01:43:04-04:00'
describe
'78' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTK' 'sip-files00031.txt'
c588bd25a3e978f5f5f81f218bddde59
52ead003925d8dacaaa0c03bf9d0594d296873a7
'2012-05-02T01:41:39-04:00'
describe
'17799' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTL' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
d49f75f1c2b6d30e51cbd34464fa8c98
9a0759836bcb7be682019705613701b89f387826
'2012-05-02T01:35:33-04:00'
describe
'1291928' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTM' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
fd34b723ee4b53f134fda3531839d186
d2562d30a501551aad38695aadfff844b1ae092f
'2012-05-02T01:40:41-04:00'
describe
'177219' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTN' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
e5487f86bdd043262af199eed41aa748
0cf6a6fe8567776f91f6b1af7897082039a4f9de
'2012-05-02T01:38:31-04:00'
describe
'2326' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTO' 'sip-files00032.pro'
8189982990d00644695b3827694db9dc
294ba08bf2ea915dac3b647a45eed4c9e27bae87
describe
'57276' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTP' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
371ab6276242b6289472b33d89cd9bbc
d2c331614b63cb732fd1a270e31c076eb0550114
'2012-05-02T01:34:24-04:00'
describe
'31023128' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTQ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
992e5760b639b6a45ca845c6a5288877
9970d171adb91228861b6be21ae187ac440c738e
'2012-05-02T01:31:46-04:00'
describe
'135' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTR' 'sip-files00032.txt'
096608d5d6fd35cc69e7c3bd78dc640d
86689d45a8388f0b2b41ceebd154d6a41cdc2353
'2012-05-02T01:36:57-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'27004' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTS' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
624d5307b729cf37b8552a0fa04a67bb
afb8424b395f1b8c3ddbad47377854ef8168da15
describe
'1290856' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTT' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
22d6ed5a41e394d0b92a52f1f59a0607
1b0a44a066951f6b3824a0fe432beebf550a0c75
describe
'168714' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTU' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
1213f23a3ba496d165e77dbc717681b3
8409df9d294098c6e8442f737f782277398bef33
'2012-05-02T01:42:59-04:00'
describe
'38968' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTV' 'sip-files00033.pro'
02f9efc12c8b5a724882e7f06b9dabc8
fbc0a3e78409dd43abb9653ea528f3c2cf66752b
'2012-05-02T01:39:45-04:00'
describe
'67734' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTW' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
d3cfd9cb34ef5816b19c5c129fe85903
38b21a834563d9943b223a541fabf457debc0ff8
'2012-05-02T01:35:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTX' 'sip-files00033.tif'
729d808c8c810853c3b6cc4800b459f7
a1d6e9af3cc39e779cf8af007c0648b0154ee78d
'2012-05-02T01:34:59-04:00'
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTY' 'sip-files00033.txt'
12c6c6abf887d8a32867a0c2eb5b2a49
d3f95bb44aff65d1ba9cc24802dbf60dd34ba688
describe
'28986' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACTZ' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
a29f99bd856d959badf7316fe8ff1a03
9939d155f0b407b195bad74f20355403c1841164
'2012-05-02T01:34:42-04:00'
describe
'1290898' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUA' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
7ef3ac017a56317d1c10985d205c6b16
3ec682dae08e7d3d70a35d040041b4be12cae2ee
'2012-05-02T01:40:17-04:00'
describe
'171255' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUB' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
ee6fd4e0f336ce9a008be1d829f422fd
514cc3d3476adf95093c5b50ac302a3279310cb2
'2012-05-02T01:35:16-04:00'
describe
'41297' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUC' 'sip-files00034.pro'
5ddbb04b3467e6db3813b4c8c4efef8f
93ff491f2d20e808356d5c289e65477b7653aa85
'2012-05-02T01:32:46-04:00'
describe
'68669' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUD' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
ca266cf4496f11f4cd64ad2f326dcebc
1d07f2725b2bc1f573320f237d948ad7a3f21781
'2012-05-02T01:35:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUE' 'sip-files00034.tif'
ea48702094d7ac4fa1fa54bf4eadc59a
6cd4ee44172d63368995637353a60083e65b85a3
'2012-05-02T01:35:02-04:00'
describe
'1659' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUF' 'sip-files00034.txt'
2bb3be6afd0c4476266c2c7ed1cc9f7a
82488a945dbc540cffa8c07364e2cbd6bbbdc87c
'2012-05-02T01:42:48-04:00'
describe
'28757' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUG' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
79c9368b9c25e1b8e1b76f5694f43060
cd267345b89669b35f898b3769f6cdcbaf5d746a
'2012-05-02T01:36:48-04:00'
describe
'1290889' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUH' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
bd94eba4d7dedffcb972a3bc3b475334
3eceb51a4ce6320f74cbf9f182f2e57e3615e0cd
'2012-05-02T01:38:29-04:00'
describe
'170822' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUI' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
4622835f7da6c6599d0936fb39f04387
74c01c78607516aa7154fbc3cca65b019fa66e77
'2012-05-02T01:34:11-04:00'
describe
'39868' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUJ' 'sip-files00035.pro'
5048fcc59a4cd77b871484cd761a29a3
1a086ab090a59f7a9443cce28d4bfa0fbd123350
'2012-05-02T01:40:22-04:00'
describe
'68425' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUK' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
290ddcbe427ca660d6584cec44cb6116
94b41bd70666063ec11e39a3464b877c1571ec94
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUL' 'sip-files00035.tif'
1fdd7dac0d830dc7e584e22712228505
66b896d2797e55563ed1f1108ed46d18fca0665f
'2012-05-02T01:32:34-04:00'
describe
'1576' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUM' 'sip-files00035.txt'
202b3faf197622bbec939c2495ec9039
9afb661a759896c715acf6c6fc96a3b08b8e97ee
'2012-05-02T01:38:52-04:00'
describe
'28841' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUN' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
60f2204fea9e06d4ded31a88fe14613d
a5148312ff8a3b0079ff75b0f7ea889ed864196c
describe
'1290872' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUO' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
2c2cb978f1d245fbc00dd3d2faee7b94
44e7ea6ebb05b0b1632b1c741f77b79140adbdaf
describe
'167415' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUP' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
31c2d2305bf86a56755af5691a5e8752
87be3d40d7c0935606aa807e90a4c3fb818585f0
'2012-05-02T01:36:43-04:00'
describe
'39880' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUQ' 'sip-files00036.pro'
1ceba5fb45acfb4f3d92a9710c5f5a2d
839e153c6ed428f1e577cd1239990c45aa0acced
'2012-05-02T01:43:08-04:00'
describe
'67313' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUR' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
290b4f34b6e84ca5a60b871476d6cd81
35928add3c9e72ced58d3b40665ad8130b19dc21
'2012-05-02T01:38:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUS' 'sip-files00036.tif'
e24019d2ea7991425e735bb63fc3bf03
4cd1f80bc921fb5c9e7a7bd5d944cd6e97e92948
'2012-05-02T01:32:37-04:00'
describe
'1578' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUT' 'sip-files00036.txt'
5ef95c0f88caab24d236607679e3cc62
bcedf2aa2f660a0407e0814e7dde7f305bfbfec2
describe
'28794' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUU' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
bcee5e58f54d10a7e9f7d8427f4d6693
14cfb7ef360c7d98fdc16e1ef15b66b60b3a554b
'2012-05-02T01:37:05-04:00'
describe
'413259' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUV' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
04a7aa57d862c1dadf3db58b980d259a
8dce5e9d92ddfdf74f998bab9f4e5477b4000e6b
'2012-05-02T01:40:43-04:00'
describe
'25050' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUW' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
2b7636b5234fb35f5bce0d8a925509ed
8316712b394655cf3247bfa054998d6912ae7224
describe
'19357' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUX' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
19638e5188ada7f92178792eaa5eec35
b3d6e014784933c8ef169d82520dff6d85f6a05f
'2012-05-02T01:43:19-04:00'
describe
'10215012' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUY' 'sip-files00037.tif'
88085ca5342009d9daa3d257b2785fef
dfd05cdc3629b405215ef8152e93652c9d6ce01c
'2012-05-02T01:37:11-04:00'
describe
'18' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACUZ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
a20dfbb327cf920ec488ca2eebdda220
a0531c58c41087fecf93465de307d7353db1ca43
'2012-05-02T01:31:59-04:00'
describe
'17945' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVA' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
74944bde292f2d2e7a854181cd861a39
1388dba78d5d7f2be52126ae6a93b7f8e6e2bf71
'2012-05-02T01:39:30-04:00'
describe
'1247320' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVB' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
3704ab6a01d28df84a2a24901c667b72
42683272824a0e35249d8a0dff0440bce7099c27
'2012-05-02T01:33:04-04:00'
describe
'184318' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVC' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
a7ea7c83b204eb25db83ca0aad7148d7
1c2d1cf706a3855709423b7e483cb1303d335216
'2012-05-02T01:42:17-04:00'
describe
'3131' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVD' 'sip-files00038.pro'
7129e995d707c2bfc7899928ace68286
bd2e3c89830b53fc355693fe34430b27d5bcfc6f
describe
'59288' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVE' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
2f598957e842f23c4b338ab60bf0fd80
34e9c7d90a16a63f91fbe3a352dbcfb6341f8b0c
'2012-05-02T01:38:22-04:00'
describe
'29951212' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVF' 'sip-files00038.tif'
0376e14482010866418fb7a996d7b034
2c5aba27d836d590bd181f59bcb1a4f48ab5352f
'2012-05-02T01:38:56-04:00'
describe
'287' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVG' 'sip-files00038.txt'
e8bb29a67fe6f82d172e47ec248eef2e
7dcea073cb247601c442704cd10298a13f411ba4
describe
Invalid character
'27587' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVH' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
c81ed17b795a90aa9965903a673ebadf
9356fe3459424aa9b8ada5a0c4de7ea83e671bdc
'2012-05-02T01:36:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVI' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
330ca9901eb9754788803486cec77ffb
938f65c7e234d7278f37358b990b0f41f1bbc431
'2012-05-02T01:33:35-04:00'
describe
'176058' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVJ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
f6e44237f330710d60ba5d33a0c0e15b
330cecd0d106c04e3a76044dd7df7831b30afe60
'2012-05-02T01:37:14-04:00'
describe
'42725' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVK' 'sip-files00039.pro'
9235a90c6b9a9aeb0f0649c70f12b79c
7ddbf2a56511ebd9efcdf9f73fab05ac6181231c
'2012-05-02T01:40:35-04:00'
describe
'71679' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVL' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
8bf23c4c3ab5a27f1f7f4ff63d0b915d
a5c11189f1b3afc6296644221d1ca7c18d037915
'2012-05-02T01:35:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVM' 'sip-files00039.tif'
8e7a57bcb9682ffc4ca0eda8c1634a47
dabce75804bc88248174ba7262b89e95c8361bfc
'2012-05-02T01:42:16-04:00'
describe
'1686' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVN' 'sip-files00039.txt'
3552da28106a51d29fa9391ba098df73
eea110a6e64d6ce028eec80ee79972dec20d48ae
'2012-05-02T01:39:29-04:00'
describe
'29143' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVO' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
92d9964bcb9a09b4d547e86ca82b9dc7
fd74fb9c9e2ee12ae3ca2d669c094c00a2a82072
'2012-05-02T01:31:40-04:00'
describe
'1290869' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVP' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
d588c6ef9e55b2eb65073e80f1c0c476
55e4937032d885e622746c96ccb3822542af740e
'2012-05-02T01:32:28-04:00'
describe
'178394' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVQ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
69d7b7f8da8bd2093a38067e60defcf8
9b2b73dd741b73db8cb9efb1b79fccf9a5c97dd5
describe
'42192' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVR' 'sip-files00040.pro'
ea8f62b9e58222c8e9c88b97cc3c8b89
35da290cdb276587a21bb28a3094e9e9ae6d8e2d
'2012-05-02T01:35:27-04:00'
describe
'71156' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVS' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
aa23071c1d2ab37a5facf81cea95f418
d94990d5e5bd10055a6f4bc29e332f3fa6376cbe
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVT' 'sip-files00040.tif'
ff9de3c1f2ee121465c96ecb39960545
c021ed2290f951eed42df717494e825033646cd7
'2012-05-02T01:35:26-04:00'
describe
'1664' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVU' 'sip-files00040.txt'
88dc56ee06c36a25011f75981907ce35
77007ab6fe1ed82fe52fad9d8fd4438be7bb5b46
describe
'28974' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVV' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
8bbf2446c7dd10afaf9c32c14d59c0b4
70ca2f61fa5b187b768d8d986bc42dd4a0071263
'2012-05-02T01:36:21-04:00'
describe
'1290871' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVW' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
b726ed0503997b9a05e114660a15f730
df82cafe86702f10ac8cd439c60ce93aa44f0eab
'2012-05-02T01:39:48-04:00'
describe
'171593' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVX' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
b17b2a1779d4b71c6eff404c4a90ece6
d72ada3a26851057e24eee2a743eabcc6fd74e05
'2012-05-02T01:43:28-04:00'
describe
'41252' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVY' 'sip-files00041.pro'
49fc14a59fb2c8eee39fe1a3c0985bdc
0d7bce40c18df7a448bc6d769772bf7e3c553f60
'2012-05-02T01:42:12-04:00'
describe
'69917' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACVZ' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
6d5489c881613bf64c8c8df6dae8b507
541becffa3fb1add69bd45aa940091bb9bd32c18
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWA' 'sip-files00041.tif'
2147c21dd73c6d0fe16072bb08303a61
19448ff1fc87a60f97ab446503be8a1cf06981fa
'2012-05-02T01:32:41-04:00'
describe
'1624' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWB' 'sip-files00041.txt'
69445ddb4724487886e4f148ba0204c2
31a21ee528bca325e2aa8b0b5a44b0b2f73d58a8
'2012-05-02T01:31:44-04:00'
describe
'29124' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWC' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
d570ba4320405c7501dd7836ecb3b77b
15d3e54cc9bb5874693eb358d072adb0978ff30d
describe
'1290896' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWD' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
093f914a13136104b8c1043576dc5365
6c7f245d65c1c2a7a2a207641a42bbedd0749e5f
describe
'171109' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWE' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
249584f2a796a925feac635d70c55c3e
5466691ceb4dc5a29de226a2ed0e23c067c02130
'2012-05-02T01:33:47-04:00'
describe
'39557' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWF' 'sip-files00042.pro'
5f2f522940a069fac71652816e5cd082
d8176899f1b60f4dd955fa8d7ff413b738850218
'2012-05-02T01:41:20-04:00'
describe
'68427' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWG' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
558b9aabf9afcb375a3b4d1ad201f5ee
51c7ad8a637f48b96e0e44d872a89cf769f4d76e
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWH' 'sip-files00042.tif'
c00c046b979c06fd04ec3bb6ab92ae8e
82a9ee383e5ffb06e803e1ed06b33e359386320a
'2012-05-02T01:40:27-04:00'
describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWI' 'sip-files00042.txt'
37862f82931b5be0d50151a47bf2409c
b1a2201077127fa6f0ab6793a85e5eed82d3907d
'2012-05-02T01:41:48-04:00'
describe
'29006' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWJ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
588c3e306f79d3a3c596d0eb39a12d21
11b2df818e75a5ba1ddfc2cf72ceb803036d6e09
'2012-05-02T01:39:05-04:00'
describe
'1290900' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWK' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
d69f4fa6cbbb198e50a3530629b3b01e
d899d8e77f63e3dcf65c7d25e8c3141eed61ef65
describe
'174673' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWL' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
80512604681f01e13a3365bdb643f831
de03548112044528629353029b9c66edc4bafdd7
'2012-05-02T01:42:30-04:00'
describe
'41812' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWM' 'sip-files00043.pro'
bee0123c81da9c8b85559ca690c48c1d
fa0cc6ef7b06da9de5cf8b9cd83c5a2a14333362
describe
'70116' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWN' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
e5eee93be03651742df71c5b9c8dc65e
b15e38a85f5295655380e1dcc95d63f13088796c
'2012-05-02T01:33:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWO' 'sip-files00043.tif'
974177be35cf45f8d3cfe5e3ab7b57a7
e3c277241159874461603f452b3de52b51144a5f
'2012-05-02T01:39:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWP' 'sip-files00043.txt'
7cb8d4d73987160e7ed79168f57f5618
8f613cdcda3a11210309c3b7feeb063371b703a1
describe
'29004' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWQ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
cb2f0aecef069e50e59faf6ccfe12c2e
53008f0be6f8a405e02195111cb3b946fb54a88a
'2012-05-02T01:32:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWR' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
d4c31a0f8f6ddb339e92645003472464
350dd9ee579c487f025b268b0881c01fc96b3108
'2012-05-02T01:36:40-04:00'
describe
'175524' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWS' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
6155cb45e45c77cd4213f88922c48ab3
6f4badef782a9601a68749bbdf874282e9ced766
describe
'41385' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWT' 'sip-files00044.pro'
fa9fe0c92dfc78465108c6e7e9c6cd5e
83548c829b7c6d24e061688c6e51c701f5a60e59
describe
'69585' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWU' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
bc5766232c351c53a99ac32046f6f714
02362bfc27bc6d3b1c32bfc3dba93d32ed7bb1af
'2012-05-02T01:36:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWV' 'sip-files00044.tif'
f1b27cb68cb9d57a7594bb85a339873c
15fa3bcbcf0605c4643c068d7b2e58764684686b
describe
'1644' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWW' 'sip-files00044.txt'
6c90fdfa446777c7625d50937ff4db25
bcbdb7258d732f3a7cf2587290d2a042151014ed
describe
'29205' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWX' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
a96f9838f4e000f92c5b48464d68d8d5
fc1b3147feb60d0ab502384f28d64530b4ad7573
'2012-05-02T01:39:59-04:00'
describe
'1291393' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWY' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
8f3072cd1f1c9b7c616900f52ba6e4b5
4709f608872a8e1d3926b8adc640a6f4f3785895
'2012-05-02T01:41:22-04:00'
describe
'116453' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACWZ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
b328346ae1461d9f60eada297d94feca
2b1b8a829edac64c05e8f9089353ab58a4f705bc
'2012-05-02T01:40:38-04:00'
describe
'15013' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXA' 'sip-files00045.pro'
3d31ca4e7cfe7283961c6b5e469fcb4e
8442b46b77f7194a2929a42666331b24e4acb0e4
'2012-05-02T01:34:12-04:00'
describe
'46519' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXB' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
74d835432d4bd0355b756ad89d7499c4
206c563995aad087327445776b7cdf7a5bae083f
'2012-05-02T01:34:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXC' 'sip-files00045.tif'
41e190fc8dcfdfff5f7436936ab2633e
15b67cfa1655d3221071e39765493899e12c5a10
'2012-05-02T01:33:43-04:00'
describe
'617' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXD' 'sip-files00045.txt'
e625258b733e1691358b3f713a42f725
cc7d64be024e737d2104edf6b6910b17932cc74d
'2012-05-02T01:33:05-04:00'
describe
'24347' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXE' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
3fd0951417a823be8d9429d91c0626d3
5840b1cfefb4d02ad31bcf2b41cf0f518cb9cdbe
describe
'1269146' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXF' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
1e6449736c1e5f07e6d1f610a1ebe82e
2def4bd2f411089c69df7ed6ec99e3d3f2d91ca6
describe
'176038' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXG' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
b86d6a3cc33c1d40772da875fc5ec444
799c23de1dde790635fd937c3c14b16f22db8c19
'2012-05-02T01:39:23-04:00'
describe
'22536' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXH' 'sip-files00046.pro'
37c2fccd28ea4e74cd3f0870aaffe115
142a10537397c8cc3d9953834ef1a2f082714512
'2012-05-02T01:32:14-04:00'
describe
'65504' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXI' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
39c90ca39ccab13c074ddf461018759a
2dc97eaa461daf3b49d760108b44d53e9a9e7fee
describe
'10170132' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXJ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
e3581c084165b0160092136dae04194a
9cb0e7ef35d7e9c58c44a50d0900de672c644be5
describe
'962' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXK' 'sip-files00046.txt'
6a44d671c9e40bab2e33c8b48120b6ad
008b981be92a76bf1be55a4dce3ff54efda36026
'2012-05-02T01:42:03-04:00'
describe
'28690' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXL' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
7a2e6b0a60ac3596a323ce3e4070107d
0b4bd42ece1fa6f0b8bcf20fc2f52da4972b086c
'2012-05-02T01:33:45-04:00'
describe
'1263785' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXM' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
e0c04fa2a28c3c62ec51000d06a672ee
b563bf21d8cd173f77db0d4713ef4d8730a8b62a
'2012-05-02T01:39:00-04:00'
describe
'164801' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXN' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
ad6d745d3ebaf136c9008aca688aa441
e5c0fc6f5761e6ee0bfd82a13a8685c29ab9c38b
describe
'1774' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXO' 'sip-files00047.pro'
39aadf09c8c2b6cdf9d489545646b1ac
386b104cac8104415f82b8b607973d870fb25935
'2012-05-02T01:37:47-04:00'
describe
'52343' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXP' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
4490aa719f2458102f8cde83c3e0e7da
2c1f1b428a058273df5751dc4e75fdbc59f934f8
'2012-05-02T01:36:53-04:00'
describe
'30348052' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXQ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
a3286a854e2e436edae8aec7e2f4ac2d
bf2ba9881f22ce91f02d526ea71075a65b687dcc
'2012-05-02T01:34:30-04:00'
describe
'93' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXR' 'sip-files00047.txt'
2e74fcd04140232dbdb9ce7e57a8a633
e6bc81d8b2342c5bbc6d0b3cbb7a2edfe048ff2a
'2012-05-02T01:32:09-04:00'
describe
'26244' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXS' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
15ffa4461d40dcc683ba3fb3b208d308
ddee93cb6a54b8f4887f989876df6c1fe0d705c4
describe
'1290731' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXT' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
4ee0dbba8e3a7f374e931a32a1787690
f9759b8b47a8ace8530935a0101f474f5e00ecd7
describe
'29579' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXU' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
2b5bb30c992a5b4ae9a584c43a4db409
f71eecbc830cf6fb35865690e118f137651b3f03
describe
'20707' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXV' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
626afa24552a4464290d07bc5a8d8569
f549900ce10986f4c72de824829365e67310c433
'2012-05-02T01:32:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXW' 'sip-files00048.tif'
a2edaa7aa03124fc11cff7232fcd46d3
eb86a4f391b958de22d838f432d8cf0646d17dec
describe
'30' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXX' 'sip-files00048.txt'
a244e911bd214b13968960ee1c1909e4
d3bba6229522e659170a0cb4a8a4ad39603d26ff
'2012-05-02T01:41:46-04:00'
describe
'18421' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXY' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
4142fd57821681a56db7e3026ca71f18
379690f6de2f337babbe20bfdf2abb4e3c23454a
'2012-05-02T01:38:12-04:00'
describe
'1290878' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACXZ' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
4b43c025e2eab5f80d5b83894b15f240
300470bf63df674cbb2f3986108b1a1d5c1e9b19
describe
'172789' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYA' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
db56a1f08bd4eb4780abb5575ad8ba93
eb785bb518acd1015214f7728bb467bed97f7006
describe
'40626' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYB' 'sip-files00049.pro'
6f4bef29d04cbb16c564e692def9d4a5
aeecbd741b9b8c10887bfea7bce99d74083adf94
describe
'70201' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYC' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
bd56ceaa1a4341f442b1ae4f5e5ee5f2
8cb83f4bb0ec5d97409d5ecaa096bcaa2cb54f34
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYD' 'sip-files00049.tif'
1f6c19f075f02b9c71a7b37ac244f17a
218fd26af1a9b54e8c73b9f9c09cfe2987479227
'2012-05-02T01:39:49-04:00'
describe
'1610' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYE' 'sip-files00049.txt'
3f08239f322fb8acc9de9c6f3763b2f3
ff0d7aeca81831c66b5ff49d021a3ca27ae83507
'2012-05-02T01:35:24-04:00'
describe
'29154' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYF' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
f5f9c43379dc7404a7b1bfa04e7734e2
f8aa6e190fbe2a2af8e069a87cdeb118a66db5dd
'2012-05-02T01:38:37-04:00'
describe
'1290888' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYG' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
435b2f9f0b57c05d78d9af63828d2ac8
570208ea0783bfb45ccdf77144bda49f8df71be3
'2012-05-02T01:41:31-04:00'
describe
'175939' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYH' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
8bb2126e47f51ef9b9fe64a4f23edb27
ba935ddf744c2cfec68bc92c2d48c09bc0b59acb
'2012-05-02T01:34:34-04:00'
describe
'40931' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYI' 'sip-files00050.pro'
ba927778a1fbf27024b1d4252355752a
36591779e5f2e3ef38c59b8a9ba2e0510bc263ab
'2012-05-02T01:40:09-04:00'
describe
'70037' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYJ' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
69d6cfe17bae4fe01e9e6cfb7f166f5e
ae6b025d1d587209dcc9fdd42caa92318a2a833b
'2012-05-02T01:37:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYK' 'sip-files00050.tif'
2be2f6753aadaa72b20a808a67dbfaed
39d9e7f19f8f458541a4ef80a723b2a4b92235ac
'2012-05-02T01:34:09-04:00'
describe
'1618' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYL' 'sip-files00050.txt'
05d7dc2c299a5934b1665a056c010375
a87bc77c0af859303e16acba8d075cc96fbfc82f
'2012-05-02T01:41:51-04:00'
describe
'28990' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYM' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
21c30cab900892bc79655e5b9c793fe5
6d181de7320090f5ac7350350e26e9e4b24fe438
'2012-05-02T01:41:16-04:00'
describe
'1290797' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYN' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
9715250f4242fb50da49065793cb32b3
b22d775824e38704f00e3717aa0f7a69b36bfcf6
'2012-05-02T01:39:54-04:00'
describe
'179462' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYO' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
6edd60ba22ef071a68043c76bc54064c
1107010eccc24c15980f79dbbc4578087261e11d
'2012-05-02T01:40:32-04:00'
describe
'41373' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYP' 'sip-files00051.pro'
0a2acc0a87fa33b81d164a240b55adc1
fe2f3729cc816928ffbbcb5f11237dca0b562eec
'2012-05-02T01:34:52-04:00'
describe
'70365' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYQ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
cd9b5a2ff054f6036f5d116c48b50ca2
5a962fd54a07245c6f3f1bd226e6963c2369c315
'2012-05-02T01:42:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYR' 'sip-files00051.tif'
e7467cb89137a3291cf9d32a1190bab4
9180b9898f85b2aa42b6de86663025d3edefd0ac
'2012-05-02T01:31:47-04:00'
describe
'1638' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYS' 'sip-files00051.txt'
2e14bfbd94637b6ba63f0e3f04616c73
67519488ba5e52a8e2b6a14cd9d75648ba793ba3
'2012-05-02T01:31:56-04:00'
describe
'29352' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYT' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
2a5fb9f9cda2637eb3cfb5d8c46bff16
25f15e3c841cec84e53d11a3c9012bbe400e430f
describe
'1290885' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYU' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
c1c4a8c4a6a62f0d60a5d3f9a50a10f9
6b16e85d73a8ee0aa1f8c39656def8b038ccf4be
'2012-05-02T01:36:56-04:00'
describe
'175384' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYV' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
a250b157fd1c1f52d7f4204837019e60
057600300bfe620cc3cdd500885e242e47fbc9b8
'2012-05-02T01:34:14-04:00'
describe
'41775' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYW' 'sip-files00052.pro'
386d15ba05cd3d5fa7f56b1e068c4db1
d1361d29ac33ec6586a0f044bd3dde63cbf35597
'2012-05-02T01:35:00-04:00'
describe
'70519' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYX' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
55b067ac7c925ca6fc2bfea44ea261d1
a98846ba807ccd1061be1da6bdf41e9a1a2cd665
'2012-05-02T01:36:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYY' 'sip-files00052.tif'
bcb5e43793215116be6ebb2efdd77463
19761de5413939a3ae95ac17f61cb209df880eef
describe
'1647' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACYZ' 'sip-files00052.txt'
9b764a2d272cdf81e769fb02689a0020
e1f90bce3b84b3a56a15e30a477f12dc517ce762
describe
'29027' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZA' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
fcf95a9195be990decdff3e2b1ed8efb
4dbbaab0f3075608c9b65e98de58ef21f87d7b6f
'2012-05-02T01:37:03-04:00'
describe
'1284373' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZB' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
5b0f68a1055e38b5943e261bdbd2c180
8770973a5a3b392e7cc5a33c0f82ce49b8006251
describe
'184404' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZC' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
9c5b089eff8bda6b2c97a3dc9a98b627
73bf3a4ca6474343c9e43e0c0a30553192546f6c
describe
'43355' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZD' 'sip-files00053.pro'
e404dd5a63cbb8c852ff3a9391a26797
b661fa86008b4d33a5db49b6bcca0bf99c4ee6d1
'2012-05-02T01:35:32-04:00'
describe
'73198' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZE' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
ae0176b2aa107065bff95331deff4c7d
edbf38dcd09e6610cc110ce99241123f74598881
'2012-05-02T01:38:11-04:00'
describe
'10291832' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZF' 'sip-files00053.tif'
7f90ab4ef9d2e96c2ed79c5c83e5e552
158f18b1d4dd0cd57dae7deaa1adfe3462d72a4b
'2012-05-02T01:36:04-04:00'
describe
'1750' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZG' 'sip-files00053.txt'
f71180ab0c19d677d732ac0c816f4bce
439a03c31d97e5d2c6e80995f65a64f5d01cc0a2
'2012-05-02T01:35:12-04:00'
describe
'29620' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZH' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
85c4377aadf6706a390fa307ad7cc406
55e07e873d0c67743a2a310cfebe3f507d480034
'2012-05-02T01:32:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZI' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
d872ffced8b47256a5c7de0537df0c19
44d822dc619b58a2e3efc5989cfd13781a4c4545
describe
'178663' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZJ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
442c2b7ba7880c9e4ef906569df17845
74d90db0de9497a1991c599ffa33f2ac4f4fce42
describe
'41645' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZK' 'sip-files00054.pro'
367a92941ba3513b4663361afb8746fd
d3729ceedd6075270e4457709fb8cfe8c1d597f4
describe
'71201' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZL' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
37568eb70721b50a18696abbea1b63fa
b3d4ca1c19699490dc64922fb67ec5400d712b4d
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZM' 'sip-files00054.tif'
5456d4fc5cf71568170621613be6036b
66b5b0e3e59debb6c34cb35dcfc9cb00f5582610
'2012-05-02T01:38:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZN' 'sip-files00054.txt'
5f7a73b926aae54b5e8a3f5ce0a9678f
a83bbee2655789e91a46d5089d4a9bb811f85b08
'2012-05-02T01:34:02-04:00'
describe
'29319' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZO' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
e469331e9bf573373bcd039f3a9eeb96
3b07a1edfad254a950da5609bb40d3ee6cfb8ef6
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZP' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
b4a807de467d1c9fad592b76ed30ab9f
cf82b021fc36bca453bffb3b8dea5e7ff21d2eff
'2012-05-02T01:34:35-04:00'
describe
'174840' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZQ' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
7841c0fa5e7086d20c19cf84a6e00d66
57ed12cda41fa274d1ff669b8c0c2f1baca0a115
'2012-05-02T01:40:18-04:00'
describe
'41503' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZR' 'sip-files00055.pro'
ce8824c29ff86bf19907b9729245a3d4
424077beed15eb47ca86b1c27507b5c4e52e03a6
describe
'69775' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZS' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
19ab87c9ffc3fa0275e9c599abd1a5dc
0dc1ab57fb07ae8a98b0541b6ee804a70d335633
'2012-05-02T01:35:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZT' 'sip-files00055.tif'
0b5d528faba496058446b3c82b34de68
320d0012e6d633b2a6a685b8a8300a9aec82a667
'2012-05-02T01:42:53-04:00'
describe
'1637' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZU' 'sip-files00055.txt'
877d604aa4934e02181ce4840a694802
1f4c18dd7bd6f42d4be2cee8abb2b09c80465dee
describe
'28883' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZV' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
b067ad6631e1cbe8684c5094740fa621
1d74c148d3093af31da0d9f5def85d03e3b990c5
'2012-05-02T01:33:53-04:00'
describe
'1291205' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZW' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
7c1abe3ef4356fa2219e3cf519514c43
b56f00265a0fe4d1f1cbc9f51fbcf7eb3e2de22a
describe
'170780' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZX' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
0f578b8fcb1052c74501b45a7768ef7a
2cb47611e4c54ef169718f218a51035da96295e7
'2012-05-02T01:36:14-04:00'
describe
'41339' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZY' 'sip-files00056.pro'
b3e087a29c118f7acda8046549082be0
1b893cee6c0967456f736fa63d4a9ea75ab688e4
'2012-05-02T01:32:23-04:00'
describe
'69562' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAACZZ' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
6166db40cda8201ba3406530144067b7
fc128ffcfe6364b0556f834553d4643ef1e69764
'2012-05-02T01:34:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAA' 'sip-files00056.tif'
da2713f53af1eb8dd4e027400b6bd19e
fe920646de44b06d6503c35da774d38fa68425ef
'2012-05-02T01:41:23-04:00'
describe
'1631' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAB' 'sip-files00056.txt'
6def8f8ace5ae1c36229eae50e4b9443
67c0bb7fd84b90fbd03a6ff62278bf8455cd5ac4
'2012-05-02T01:36:46-04:00'
describe
'28721' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAC' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
6beeb0d742149ee160f0e0805cd59f71
a9a9549e338f01d227798fb019a268577fb0c37a
describe
'1291391' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAD' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
29586e9f2c8360e22efe41548cfe68b1
05de5b69542597bd9b9b058a02875d26dedd6960
describe
'171799' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAE' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
86ac7738d004d8dadc83447d01581249
0f8b36cc6743eef4cbe56bfe841dedcd653d659a
'2012-05-02T01:32:56-04:00'
describe
'40837' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAF' 'sip-files00057.pro'
045ecdcde4102d7452a6c0e4ddcfb0aa
7ee18b968d663b3b2c744a955767e3cbcccd26c6
describe
'69035' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAG' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
3d89e4e656d20d7f2465607c52e65c62
bfa149aad408b445aa7f260be8c79685d42b91fb
'2012-05-02T01:31:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAH' 'sip-files00057.tif'
33980b84b7d478c62edaefc99403da25
9dd7dd0b2bf962296d619155060c76aa72627637
'2012-05-02T01:42:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAI' 'sip-files00057.txt'
8093cbc90b31c33c862fb872d10240bd
2506fd68ec875b05fa21fe6c9120a4fc4a4dd8fa
'2012-05-02T01:37:00-04:00'
describe
'28852' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAJ' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
6872f4d058a7e0c2860f157b599e7ee9
2987afe3cf453487dd8df9b7f658f9e28c6cc1e1
describe
'1290867' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAK' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
1c30f78325f837d62590d8ef1eec93f8
9a6421bedff2947a15c25b4b2307db49459d0732
'2012-05-02T01:32:05-04:00'
describe
'167872' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAL' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
d38d42f140d4414467deda4bc1c5b6f3
835e3039c518bfdd35a2488a88cc34b6cc8c6499
describe
'38492' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAM' 'sip-files00058.pro'
19753555352151438bce97880dd6004f
4b73657ffb188535df64d8059965c065719fe04b
describe
'67854' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAN' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
2a9a1c7462c4bc57c17421b2bc5078c7
b59d3ef5edd399d4e569c2b63b02808b57b7d056
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAO' 'sip-files00058.tif'
5d83072145da9ec3aacef011bb27ef9e
eba1001f5c60690ad014f645f37f1c6ff46058f7
'2012-05-02T01:35:04-04:00'
describe
'1535' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAP' 'sip-files00058.txt'
47966f1a7f9d130207cdc8488ece405e
77bd00d38dd89975a918a33d0fc8da185f28bf00
'2012-05-02T01:37:54-04:00'
describe
'28589' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAQ' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
b5dd921a3e517cea3674eb7eb7290087
83b80612e412c451512202d483efa9a53762f13b
describe
'1290887' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAR' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
aa30a6788705bd160b2d47739212b6b1
fad0788ce64e7cf4d0e4871f91168b4bfabe8906
describe
'176319' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAS' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
10ce0b7e1af1fa940f29bf4de80d535b
f5f251fe92a257da66b931d283da5448bcf5112c
describe
'41513' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAT' 'sip-files00059.pro'
4528157a0f3cbfde0073008679bf0110
dc6cf5992cb43c646cbf5d1eba73bd531ea22cc2
'2012-05-02T01:39:09-04:00'
describe
'70349' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAU' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
b3a80061947d04c26a2176c39c50d7d3
568feb7739ed87ff8d50be6c6aced8fcabfbf3b3
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAV' 'sip-files00059.tif'
5ee2c2a41b74e76f38efbab01b7f9f49
88113de41ea278298fb5dffb5efae8b5f48c4501
'2012-05-02T01:37:40-04:00'
describe
'1640' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAW' 'sip-files00059.txt'
af32374cc75f958bd0c4ffc9e695f77d
38197a49dc9da6b34954b30e8d501ef0713eca3a
'2012-05-02T01:37:02-04:00'
describe
'29221' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAX' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
de6e8f037af3c170d5463af8dd4b1a79
46216c58823ba22205fc3ae3d4d9ba2059b8ff48
'2012-05-02T01:36:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAY' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
d96d2d82506b3d60a05cc76839d338d4
4703773f59b6b641876093d57dcae0cc09c91b25
'2012-05-02T01:42:00-04:00'
describe
'180940' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADAZ' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
6fabfcb7a7864a4e7d7812af00efc279
84d91937e1f4e8a299b94cbcd288ec64e14e2293
describe
'42015' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBA' 'sip-files00060.pro'
3f612ebb639ad53fe3d6894600b36bd7
839ed39ec3e7ef80ddaaf73e7437b9e3733b3e59
'2012-05-02T01:39:58-04:00'
describe
'72425' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBB' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
8837a6a41046612d80bc46861e17d786
34be56d0cc190164a8572ee49c567b01e08648ad
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBC' 'sip-files00060.tif'
b6f129633c1fbc9ced0a14fe5915e08b
fa497d3e92e97f1dfc450a5f0f179af2e2c3dc21
'2012-05-02T01:35:03-04:00'
describe
'1665' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBD' 'sip-files00060.txt'
a190585785c02ea33a3df77c188b9ed5
4a9a791fe741f0a8cc72c1790a77435d1a0500fb
describe
'29405' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBE' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
0e8bde855c98c63de86008ed61b185da
d6be241804276c77a5b3825b67614e1189b4c41a
'2012-05-02T01:35:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBF' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
e31f203bcba4f4aef4dadf5b300fafec
8a8ed0d324f101e2653ab87278d032514e428cca
'2012-05-02T01:33:39-04:00'
describe
'181154' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBG' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
7ec63385446b62fed81fceb1ad565855
e1a8f75c582c1f5eb7d496356c4130fd2dc8a93b
'2012-05-02T01:32:15-04:00'
describe
'42696' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBH' 'sip-files00061.pro'
c57f4da9eec69b6d1d9b421b11f8d4a6
fbb29f6029fa8e2d9562ed48aba08109ef08cb60
describe
'72234' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBI' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
e331b21cbbaeae61a3d7867bf3cfd8a8
9204d28fee80b8f95df1004a7353667635567ef9
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBJ' 'sip-files00061.tif'
33ed5353f622763b4b01b1ca35381ca1
42a9260c997ac51faefe68351a5ead2ed7ebffa0
describe
'1681' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBK' 'sip-files00061.txt'
2ffad97db4048c5ef456484e5b4a9542
1cd385013caf62d03d680f576d5441a25a9f188a
'2012-05-02T01:43:23-04:00'
describe
'29726' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBL' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
dc8c8598ecfdaee85e59352a3726521b
9766ca24b3f95750d055f905e8884876e9e1750c
'2012-05-02T01:42:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBM' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
435a80342acbb5dc734367a5ca393675
dd72aa8590b99fb37284f35cd73b9d732c8345ec
describe
'133359' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBN' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
0888909a8a6b579fc037842bec173381
a6647abb976fda919ee0925a0bdae43051d3235e
describe
'23761' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBO' 'sip-files00062.pro'
7de528dba68dc7d738e6744c6d2f83b7
e53d3b1cf87872e30c92c0965a18257facc12e06
describe
'55158' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBP' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
d649fdeb17b2ee47e051cc2a76565ee3
b61c418c885b32a1c1a466753c4d1547e07d4771
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBQ' 'sip-files00062.tif'
4a001c45f69fb8691231acdba1567b5f
1926cedca9ca2f20be9ddc9119bb30a0d5c9ad12
'2012-05-02T01:32:43-04:00'
describe
'940' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBR' 'sip-files00062.txt'
867f09625ba5cb59219ef531aecce251
808a788a6e62dd519a42401172924842231c4edb
'2012-05-02T01:42:20-04:00'
describe
'26044' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBS' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
d02f51c775cf5053fd0a7aeb0c98db9d
a2515688ddc5525b64860e29edf4c66aa93783c4
describe
'1290812' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBT' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
6bf81914748c78b92e1a1b5f8bfa6834
3023ce947fffaf5d11f8ac5258299554ad6dcf1f
'2012-05-02T01:35:37-04:00'
describe
'177561' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBU' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
a926c620455be3b6c975937e9dba28ba
73960dc44861e32c65ae3cee4b1ca8add73c0127
'2012-05-02T01:37:20-04:00'
describe
'23823' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBV' 'sip-files00063.pro'
c908601396f31504251cc3b2d4ad1346
8e09e61891ea0a55779535d5b301f8ead59473d8
'2012-05-02T01:42:05-04:00'
describe
'65417' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBW' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
d9b75799ccdaae200091726eeea26678
7e32ea3118fc8a844718a67487eb1fdb523b98a8
'2012-05-02T01:38:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBX' 'sip-files00063.tif'
9ad7d4acf4c794e9813eea8914b72cba
40eed3ade2436279a5746ee598158d66cc30add0
'2012-05-02T01:32:22-04:00'
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBY' 'sip-files00063.txt'
72a22d18137d96ca0f1680d3ecceec2a
9ed6172cdb9a3453503149d3137667dd71ddeb89
'2012-05-02T01:37:51-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'28178' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADBZ' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
78e8536a9f11e88a9e6d34904a600590
8bd41d7db58658fa6105bdee42e4ed1420b2dc24
'2012-05-02T01:40:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCA' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
3ebdc8ecd13db3456f110317c920abd3
d066da95f8673c857fcdb68bbd8151e55198e153
'2012-05-02T01:40:46-04:00'
describe
'177595' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCB' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
90cd31b54246cb85e4182bf06f3cf4e2
364eb43d0115ee5a37cbbe7c2e607a050373b71a
describe
'41090' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCC' 'sip-files00064.pro'
d20aa35d52a2771e52ba66dd33d2389b
fc9d6f314ca6f2d6f3c7ffe8db6893811bdbd74b
'2012-05-02T01:43:16-04:00'
describe
'70787' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCD' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
18064891ec0dcdc01ec4bd5954aeecc2
406f3e41b830cc0ea39502206eb34aaf2f457887
'2012-05-02T01:32:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCE' 'sip-files00064.tif'
b21b5a1ec0ad144d08f8eae7164b22ed
bf06983a4c944d3dedf8c716d2a953546a5c2818
'2012-05-02T01:42:57-04:00'
describe
'1621' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCF' 'sip-files00064.txt'
9a1b593b7fdac4ae006a825433cd8bef
7f5567bad902707904ee3a71359d32749e8f7812
'2012-05-02T01:39:35-04:00'
describe
'29332' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCG' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
a12c171f27bec9fd930207b5e4ac6f8e
7543218bdf6829744e995819c33fc68894c068ad
describe
'1290886' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCH' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
224681cd67a75413e80646e607075102
51065970508bd247781c4d405868a7066a9a9faf
'2012-05-02T01:37:43-04:00'
describe
'173057' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCI' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
329718199b0654eed2b4f2be43c6f793
940bb4c836008801798e63f44ed02941de08e1cd
describe
'40874' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCJ' 'sip-files00065.pro'
68026ac8035a3a6260ed4f6371afeaf9
0c1c0855023e8a06dad5a016a4dc4bdccbb58161
describe
'69979' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCK' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
5fa0fbc4974c9e6d9c3bd2112cc1bbf9
357f6f3b77d20ad3bf692baf837ee98205902d85
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCL' 'sip-files00065.tif'
a69b8a165624842890d09032c6478bbf
f0ce7d0fec31712033e5fcecfad407bd4b0528d5
'2012-05-02T01:35:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCM' 'sip-files00065.txt'
9d3c6209e180c37bc3b93a4909f47fdf
89f559e368ec657f4e151d748c4e979ab17f8c51
'2012-05-02T01:31:35-04:00'
describe
'29081' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCN' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
c807d7191fe6ae9e0ee42a46cfd5b20b
097740695cc0bbf6227dba00acd8c88c52300cd5
describe
'1290893' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCO' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
6df70a1cc4f8c189e286da93b3150146
b5a98917425a861722bcfdfda0126bddb9370a0d
'2012-05-02T01:41:38-04:00'
describe
'175913' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCP' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
59b9fcf0750e670fa3134cee73843335
98ac8614579c692d5acaca6818520e6784fa2860
describe
'39608' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCQ' 'sip-files00066.pro'
98df676691a4fce21bba9013ac734748
1874d4438dc68dbb79c7e564a7143208f1df24d1
'2012-05-02T01:34:51-04:00'
describe
'68732' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCR' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
2b5defb916da87bdeba3e3166665af3c
b955dc175d53f48df935a00c86c6b4ff51e629c7
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCS' 'sip-files00066.tif'
c5a985264288701d8874e69a9eb68dec
e48bd9cdf396ef725a0ee6d7e9243412b6643b96
'2012-05-02T01:35:47-04:00'
describe
'1567' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCT' 'sip-files00066.txt'
adf1bc3942e793c8bcaba3a56afc4241
b623fc81fa9ebaea2fe7e1f0322012136c6c78ac
'2012-05-02T01:33:32-04:00'
describe
'28848' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCU' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
0523bf423e7919b2ac6f9c60acd80e97
b22a8d7635e9b68bf071b940e4886242cd92c539
'2012-05-02T01:39:47-04:00'
describe
'1274547' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCV' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
f4a1d1c82c99a76f0d6a37897749b591
6d2cb9aad7143f7f7e0400e60d1ceae713a9cb2f
'2012-05-02T01:32:47-04:00'
describe
'175847' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCW' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
0417fc6feb5eada7f485b4eca8cf4383
283900c79d617a4caeb97c4c9fd8561e4986f054
'2012-05-02T01:32:02-04:00'
describe
'1969' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCX' 'sip-files00067.pro'
53c5b901d901582fbd61a55a011b7481
bc2946196da7f29ac0804dc97b554ccd486e1b16
describe
'54567' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCY' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
1e7a6a32ca0a2439e05c1c243487926e
ab16b51fde0a170b7f50a4bb7393c728a0f674e3
'2012-05-02T01:37:58-04:00'
describe
'30604776' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADCZ' 'sip-files00067.tif'
59736f86769a472d92531daaaaedeb31
c59f5f3d2bca24985799fb0765915404e7559249
describe
'114' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDA' 'sip-files00067.txt'
cd47af357843518b6dfb20a067a188cc
6a8f1bfbce00160bb311493c4a35b777b13e95c8
describe
'26477' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDB' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
22eba134d7c35927bac59b96996510ad
06a3e4ea444e306ceea3e7909cc0cf7ce592d06e
'2012-05-02T01:35:09-04:00'
describe
'1290487' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDC' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
9d68b7f8e7460cf35b35d9cfc80b088b
b6cc58d072a439e9179f56d79ec0d044780d8efc
describe
'26794' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDD' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
2d1386721b01de1463f75b0504b7308f
8215b38d547293464934478f57acc5a733cd86da
describe
'19638' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDE' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
e7cd9dd39226741c0235bda8b3415ac7
2d9a74a43558e6c1d439ce9ce850cea8b8a2275f
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDF' 'sip-files00068.tif'
f09cfc18ca97b7aa858936aaf1abd7b1
5b02017a3b36e9b3b61eee653f8a2895e01f915e
'2012-05-02T01:36:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDG' 'sip-files00068.txt'
e3988dea9075ee0ff8b1d190fb2fb793
68c2afe54265741f64229b6ca92bb7abc9bcd0f0
'2012-05-02T01:38:06-04:00'
describe
'18056' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDH' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
07a631979439b6e6c656397bdba9ad81
8d15b76f5e8dddf94c351da0f212caf933e8835a
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDI' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
9ccf3546514cfc5f77ecec417fbbe111
1d354e55c5daed47fa687efe69fd5b435a809a53
'2012-05-02T01:43:21-04:00'
describe
'85897' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDJ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
577c1bcbf313914664b77ff649828af4
e8b949b2cb5c04f80055ecd7280ac4d9600c3def
'2012-05-02T01:42:02-04:00'
describe
'14635' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDK' 'sip-files00069.pro'
e0e25c078aaa8a03e7998bee4c3ca2b0
0a3b65c7b39a3bd6720b3766ee964e3655ddd0a1
describe
'38524' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDL' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
e8623d73af11cd3e7de36d3096bf74b1
650b19b4dbc91f1c86df6e9da52b87c49315117a
'2012-05-02T01:36:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDM' 'sip-files00069.tif'
7222760196580b2aeb29d3e30a2dff34
549823d74ddca8931fccfe02b05a22fbe44c2e3b
'2012-05-02T01:39:56-04:00'
describe
'641' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDN' 'sip-files00069.txt'
a0b99923ac01065a581e1f24312ecfa1
8948e0084319f7dee0f5268f368da811a69f59de
'2012-05-02T01:37:59-04:00'
describe
'22298' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDO' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
9dc9a167d75b7fad8d64a457fa132f65
803044a30d41a6446af0b9d60b313e1656431f1a
'2012-05-02T01:35:19-04:00'
describe
'1290665' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDP' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
500a77cacab4c1b9fe00dc2d7e697dcb
26f716241f6e45a24104ccbb59d93e9cc5ce009e
'2012-05-02T01:42:18-04:00'
describe
'34652' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDQ' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
9877f5cfb00bdb1805032ada1470ac9a
d2e9fb5dee8524050bfc8997ac42160d4d5763a0
'2012-05-02T01:33:17-04:00'
describe
'21186' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDR' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
3ea5a30c796bd1a9bb00402d12c25bd8
50fa4346e93ae7194b87d1d353bd6af9fbc24521
'2012-05-02T01:38:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDS' 'sip-files00070.tif'
bcabcbdb41ed37d83b7865684c08c248
c8fed8d790a278689dcbde483a8acdcfc516bf76
'2012-05-02T01:34:43-04:00'
describe
'18372' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDT' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
f255d6174ef3fa0b5c3e2d8c7bd02097
a37c6cea102af5d3fe0ba7f038ee3b1c3042a230
describe
'1267630' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDU' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
fa2ca4683297f738515290ad34ad1d1e
960479e835bc06eca6e6497eb00318dfcb6abc62
'2012-05-02T01:37:41-04:00'
describe
'62250' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDV' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
2964d4d79666bc6cce060c2d0d0ad416
129c79f2724ae65bd16095d195446299f2b4b138
'2012-05-02T01:35:39-04:00'
describe
'4259' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDW' 'sip-files00071.pro'
7e0fb5227a28ffd36c3c48e47dd9f5ee
b31ee9bc38f72fbf56427a20b8b83c50e29c2111
'2012-05-02T01:43:25-04:00'
describe
'31538' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDX' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
fdc707d0c70b90ce929d58c3f2fd8fe2
01dc9dd906c34eeb1ebd619ef8d5990d2bc9af98
'2012-05-02T01:37:31-04:00'
describe
'30438412' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDY' 'sip-files00071.tif'
dc4c3fd9464634dcedb41a11ccbd7e26
d82e2e165488a60cc5a8f68620a447b03292122e
'2012-05-02T01:35:06-04:00'
describe
'227' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADDZ' 'sip-files00071.txt'
da3e6b74008bc60ad5cedd483e0f4c5e
a41a0fd1a6ddcca7277d4862a74f6721472d9698
'2012-05-02T01:37:17-04:00'
describe
'1238788' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEA' 'sip-files00071a.jp2'
92e9164d78e71784e4f22dd832948231
ebcc41b8b564c743458bdd24ecd9803d9a08df42
'2012-05-02T01:42:39-04:00'
describe
'32074' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEB' 'sip-files00071a.jpg'
ff17127202bab41b5aa934ab1b4092db
cd45224de6b9af8064acc153d3600b749e0a7dae
'2012-05-02T01:39:53-04:00'
describe
'20048' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEC' 'sip-files00071a.QC.jpg'
0177cece780d8e70b960ec2e74204df1
7ee9778e301aab4216e645ea5bc816a3e6c22e1f
describe
'9927896' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADED' 'sip-files00071a.tif'
c7d1627aa5a52e7504992bda1b990d67
bfca75d3cafe0b83668f8fdb38e9f2f9435e9552
'2012-05-02T01:34:15-04:00'
describe
'18104' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEE' 'sip-files00071athm.jpg'
4da7b32bded0a927b3a925c4cfac5ae2
4e9e66525c1be6fc292fe05ddb06f967894169f4
'2012-05-02T01:34:07-04:00'
describe
'1266919' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEF' 'sip-files00071b.jp2'
c835daad05b4db3e36f8b5c31f8553b8
81eaab8e5afc4954dc3370820baebf8735d4605d
describe
'170981' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEG' 'sip-files00071b.jpg'
b0e07005f71f118bcf7e51c45314f20e
09bb7113149c4018fb2dd72a44fde2c0c0fe0223
describe
'19479' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEH' 'sip-files00071b.pro'
808b5ff3e79c2e7c292e1af9e512b1ec
849ec0998da98fe77ad7789ca7a6b86775cd56ed
describe
'61471' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEI' 'sip-files00071b.QC.jpg'
ddde7d54321999bb38992ab8a551ccb2
761bea6c0f37bd46e680d27a64863079a51e7122
'2012-05-02T01:34:21-04:00'
describe
'10152160' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEJ' 'sip-files00071b.tif'
27db985ba1e9b95ffe4647ab7ee871bc
da324708c47128b7af3597ecd7c8481b5ab22fa1
describe
'963' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEK' 'sip-files00071b.txt'
78ab389e390e9cdb82e6cecb934a78b6
f2d09ce9a633668110aeac8d3e19ef84b11b8b87
describe
'27677' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEL' 'sip-files00071bthm.jpg'
c2fa11fa45011b3a10734a9ea96de984
258033ff905582a43a2c3b229084191bf8320361
'2012-05-02T01:40:25-04:00'
describe
'21904' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEM' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
2ed8da703048819ff0630b6e433f30c9
cc3b56b226f55deb5974bc0795c6cb73c610eddb
'2012-05-02T01:40:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEN' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
b532979d5ad3aaec776a37969b2a8f7f
e83079b9d1e01952bc9691f4d04aeb0eebc59958
describe
'179047' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEO' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
37dd084e3b7d160e21680df832aa2c9c
cd9dc21dabe4181eeb417c8c91b39285031d04b9
'2012-05-02T01:38:40-04:00'
describe
'42286' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEP' 'sip-files00072.pro'
6f77252995e0be6b97ab71eb0c34356c
0dcee41876a5fb551a6284cf4d1a12c5cd59ab99
describe
'70109' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEQ' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
20dea56d4af81ebc9fd2f5ad677c7f45
be75e3e7b7fd06a829305936a93087174f439201
'2012-05-02T01:34:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADER' 'sip-files00072.tif'
10019b37f89b6318ae899bf04b970e1c
4119110eb67a0a7579f44884cab5d925c5595019
describe
'1666' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADES' 'sip-files00072.txt'
38fc8d95030f95cabeb2182d51764884
1bde52b7c20d8cd0f0ec0662703007792e6de31d
'2012-05-02T01:41:42-04:00'
describe
'28950' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADET' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
bcd5666d012bd7b4ad322bc23c80477f
0d0f7a9159642cb31ae696aa84c4e8ae8642970a
describe
'708945' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEU' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
d770d2d41a4c7cd82715e7eafd34c7a9
f5162d075a6360673b50fcbdaf050da2ff992c4d
'2012-05-02T01:38:35-04:00'
describe
'37573' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEV' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
c25c8077d89d9e74b9df665805a4dd22
2f362a1c7b4b26edfab1b310905d4883f2317429
'2012-05-02T01:42:46-04:00'
describe
'22396' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEW' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
43f33ea9657adcbdd2397c8ca7ed1141
84d85ff1a936a088827739be5ff1867a9c72b4f6
describe
'9932028' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEX' 'sip-files00073.tif'
282d906a54272796b5c04c5f5bfa08ee
d618e2d72e05e772606eec2196031c9f46f73cf6
'2012-05-02T01:36:44-04:00'
describe
'107' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEY' 'sip-files00073.txt'
6894009216ff96c4136c33ec16e3506f
128840657e641d06f2854f0a5fdb86cce39f8fb5
'2012-05-02T01:34:47-04:00'
describe
'18552' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADEZ' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
12515d77d6c69d8296ed2bf7fecae669
059948bcd033432c8770bc944e5a6dcecde9b3af
describe
'1290824' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFA' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
9d8bfaca295998c7092ea2095e099abf
e2364275b65b92cd75fa54a294841a57cf8aa0e3
describe
'150099' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFB' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
a5240e9699d27d60e1d02c0aca454ee6
2f8027e31131a604f7210f32067cc3a938a7de30
describe
'774' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFC' 'sip-files00074.pro'
452318adc4ed2654deff5dcb781fbb09
3d85dc4abe26ecd8998ead6ab25f8d0d7e4a3ca6
'2012-05-02T01:40:05-04:00'
describe
'48210' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFD' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
e02f0671c697db8cbcdfd2988f26cec8
86e7d8f1164abf6ee94f4617a102aa5dc8b92467
'2012-05-02T01:39:21-04:00'
describe
'30996908' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFE' 'sip-files00074.tif'
9b02c36d1774890eac208fe83a896fea
7429880396a1718a38917dea279f1546ef842b6a
'2012-05-02T01:33:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFF' 'sip-files00074.txt'
2fbe30e94acc2105d5b9baac4543cd2a
c8ff4c74113f8ae9091e26d38d1f285afde9f363
describe
'25256' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFG' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
dad6f264b659cfa57e75a30f44754110
c6afbce405edd93d0f716f5b0c1d6f2d3aff1dd1
'2012-05-02T01:32:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFH' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
3bd7711bbf3dda58d617c5c304700c59
db8b44d4da0bdbb411d53b46ef4cb6920d2fe14c
describe
'179885' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFI' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
ac8e5b7d95c9df74cf5a5ee9c9225047
cb51abb8498d7b96e15fb2fff927d50df29a8baa
describe
'41737' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFJ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
49056808bfdf3290359b93781a175f4c
e0076bd237aaa28b48606383248bec0983d6998f
'2012-05-02T01:40:19-04:00'
describe
'70568' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFK' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
ca542d6bf9b46f6d6857d4e0d14ea325
b0e10a0ec41341dc44f4bc2dbe26560b7f1dc06a
'2012-05-02T01:32:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFL' 'sip-files00075.tif'
97f737ba0eb4c3160840f8650eaa4fd6
0fdd4bd9023cfc7753b20ca346cac5341fab657a
'2012-05-02T01:35:38-04:00'
describe
'1650' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFM' 'sip-files00075.txt'
63db681c75fcb151ad9429b85ea0746c
f81a6519809262fece23161af0d62b9babe5e574
'2012-05-02T01:39:52-04:00'
describe
'29087' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFN' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
4f533f169a5c15893477a6b2047baef7
22c9f7acb0a921b4b26631e8fec8a6b9168a0070
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFO' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
d85423e4e2f6a1faad3448ffb279d6dd
c5c01afea05807e8c4ef7cb02ece8cb5cb378c67
'2012-05-02T01:33:24-04:00'
describe
'182257' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFP' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
7236b81dace949e00144552a4ed8dd34
419a90f8607341cbf529e5e989f6d9777febc0bc
'2012-05-02T01:36:27-04:00'
describe
'43478' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFQ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
2e20e73044289cb12f762f013b079b29
2d00d0efc3a7d23e21fe7057946c9456b429bc03
'2012-05-02T01:32:17-04:00'
describe
'71857' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFR' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
ae911fbaec99c5932473974291dbe9e9
dedb0ed3d423998adcaddc7b0b63845a2dbcd604
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFS' 'sip-files00076.tif'
25ad05571529bb616c3cc95c3d2bb317
2ae3e78e820b131732ee08f643ba6cac365e615e
'2012-05-02T01:31:37-04:00'
describe
'1712' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFT' 'sip-files00076.txt'
0a64899d8f8a0daf11e04da72066ed2f
52cb49da78259697cab8c47567fff9f2f2922b9b
'2012-05-02T01:34:16-04:00'
describe
'29430' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFU' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
e676e6b09afbfec60a0c51814f4c5ddf
6c32e6a37bc923bd03ac68f2c975720fb8e46fa9
'2012-05-02T01:35:40-04:00'
describe
'1290881' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFV' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
5779ec25658770905775d5c5379025f6
784ef3f52825b73a43c38d03772525d9540a5fc1
'2012-05-02T01:38:08-04:00'
describe
'174073' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFW' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
a7527d207535c6313c61d52f17f242e0
a5e832a61bd9a6375b12cfbd0cbae224e0966742
describe
'42169' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFX' 'sip-files00077.pro'
4d95c7f4c8de06be323a64f1eef5fff8
811fda05e3cad0d78f84176eff4a7ad3b5b75a94
describe
'71273' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFY' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
41e6f1ed918b3f64d6b9db89b625ba8e
9f4c47db805b61807a5d19ac30828f479f382b7a
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADFZ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
bbbe94a058fdae19be44b2eb52ae17f2
13a730ffa126dfbaa06140b1d64e1bfe174e0201
describe
'1660' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGA' 'sip-files00077.txt'
312612eec1367d54ddf1a6963654fba5
95be0426508273d357c18e44805a9f8417f42d3d
describe
'29299' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGB' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
38485ccf7c7f3b1bb35434d29fd0a1cc
917a2b1e93aa614c35aa8f8f97c163f66917abbf
describe
'1290852' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGC' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
c5683b001394999517f3b60ab5b037c5
808220ed800b6567321a5fd031c6932a4921ec81
describe
'177469' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGD' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
d202a3a5c3590d052d59c0317181eff0
5b1e7c947ffde79061d0328a270291407d7e05f1
'2012-05-02T01:32:27-04:00'
describe
'42032' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGE' 'sip-files00078.pro'
ac98e2ac05d633b42a5cfca500eb9908
9f132556fe9c8ee7d91f175abbaabffdcded56e4
describe
'70497' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGF' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
f7e358eb44c66916778545ed5e38b2a3
e920c77091ddb7e9a460fda4e25e6d62482424e7
'2012-05-02T01:41:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGG' 'sip-files00078.tif'
18f8a40df801302a06d751601b26506f
5ab415ee40f857300e1e868c0173ad1ead55e940
'2012-05-02T01:40:11-04:00'
describe
'1657' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGH' 'sip-files00078.txt'
ceb3b65ed5b4cd9a4b4e23cbe641b610
8d25519da94ac4d56f7606416a764b92a34f4276
describe
'28927' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGI' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
0083a35096034339fa0195f90a918283
f03518b8d19c0498351b37bf7c478e4d47dec271
'2012-05-02T01:33:27-04:00'
describe
'1290901' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGJ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
ad0c6d7398a75b63b93c1f2fa60e7e42
11109b4155f253ce9f587c2707944014e2f28cfd
'2012-05-02T01:40:37-04:00'
describe
'181134' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGK' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
6f38a6ccea36a573e8382cd7e9c0627e
74417bcb2e74ef424a8ff2580b06c68f1bcaa12f
describe
'43155' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGL' 'sip-files00079.pro'
4e27899588f4b108d4fe9454d327a056
91b50f6ecf94f333a6eb9343b83f3dd1926d7960
describe
'71100' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGM' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
f2b8749a37ea5f634b315d2dc4218f52
39589bf0d5d4cb46dfee6a124977280afa739146
'2012-05-02T01:34:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGN' 'sip-files00079.tif'
6be91f9a19510a7dcd1ac6649afcd559
7903ccccce79ca707a8f91caf7c2d7833bd8ca41
'2012-05-02T01:39:11-04:00'
describe
'1710' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGO' 'sip-files00079.txt'
e2d94dd5bf2ce80fd443a5d54a951808
c2de619ae176008e8fa516483faee2d274c3cd16
'2012-05-02T01:42:56-04:00'
describe
'29113' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGP' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
5a86e9fa0c028ae78aa100e6e5d2b1d0
61b1b5a92962a2c849b81374e07f8cae15384af4
describe
'1291095' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGQ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
570ec0f368d5fca4a81a79dfb0dfd576
838fe7301e85c6aa5776c9e0e1cbb2ccd16c5447
describe
'186586' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGR' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
c4c903d909c7da33011fe07d8ee08166
72e021ed9ba89b5db4acd668bdaf243da98766d3
describe
'42756' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGS' 'sip-files00080.pro'
77e5e0c47f26c98a665f2a693e7a8041
08fe8182db9176a78a0037a12b1c65716fcde786
'2012-05-02T01:38:28-04:00'
describe
'72546' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGT' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
497cde99a75a4f3a5d99bdbcdeec73b3
4742a4d80bdd51a38e04a38b1eed856ba1762038
'2012-05-02T01:43:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGU' 'sip-files00080.tif'
c4413c2d8343e0b1f08723d676c5a9f9
115b2a7c8ba32cae505199316eb7fdfa9b707712
'2012-05-02T01:33:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGV' 'sip-files00080.txt'
c2d909e61f691f7aca343fca6ff25d1c
d0b2cc8d63531ea2d9b19b3a786f2d7bdeb3bf39
'2012-05-02T01:40:42-04:00'
describe
'29455' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGW' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
bd20edf5d52a77b7d0717afcfb455150
03a7a4b3871d6207ac66c486a01b35caed11bad3
'2012-05-02T01:42:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGX' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
80e3cd21aec4e518eb53180cc232faeb
7c6cf9147e238f194275686147b8795a502a6ac1
'2012-05-02T01:35:23-04:00'
describe
'174090' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGY' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
a50989b70fa652e4ded7de52e963a4e8
1ff28040257585a11ea3307d2342a729380b71eb
'2012-05-02T01:32:57-04:00'
describe
'41275' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADGZ' 'sip-files00081.pro'
226115876d419226e8875fca52023ba2
b0bca5bcee8315a500567f98b524ebc13456b415
describe
'69216' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHA' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
f56e83fec273980f00d6f39887e3c5fa
e8c362c5e6bab2cdb2d71080442be525fddaccc2
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHB' 'sip-files00081.tif'
e6edb3a3ac8ed8d91a9dcd7ef793e2dd
362f3951864700e370ecc9e602ec9eefee43b463
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHC' 'sip-files00081.txt'
53dc7ad43d7bc342e95715e0448c633c
9637802fd30aa03b8f231bb95d0a693cd350f0e3
describe
'28997' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHD' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
82cc9565bed1f5d3e6cd751486e446b2
8487605ccd2123577778e327af507f4ee06b3505
describe
'1261175' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHE' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
d7d97fcbfa7419470d34d9e392c44d16
44774952d74dbf636647e96abe26b5de66c5257c
'2012-05-02T01:34:55-04:00'
describe
'179714' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHF' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
4ce44f993fe9c8fba5676b6f154dbc19
6d961cba3b129cbd9562e85e91d44708392ad1c3
'2012-05-02T01:43:09-04:00'
describe
'40789' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHG' 'sip-files00082.pro'
6040d332b6a5c73f98d5bb0a10ec5c27
6b5edf7134819fa5084687104ec4f4f1d73d7635
'2012-05-02T01:42:52-04:00'
describe
'71598' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHH' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
2d44803a6568e0eaa1d3b9eefda3d36e
34b272208060b4ad286611791ad7d0f76243ef78
describe
'10106312' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHI' 'sip-files00082.tif'
c9b37ed3981068b298980b5383149602
bf3b6e65a0d4e15521b1de3f0471a887959f2afd
describe
'1615' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHJ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
d11dde91678166c7674879aa2fda7c02
595c49e12cfc70863f4608c77275c9afc556ec2e
'2012-05-02T01:42:44-04:00'
describe
'29135' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHK' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
cb25929a2b1a1e77ead3d0fb87dd554c
e2fc6352dcbdf78c19b0d7e2c832ee47a2311fdd
describe
'1247807' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHL' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
edf5b997e0236bebaaa770dbf3a88640
677cd755844719257b9583b0a4573fc6604a2177
describe
'173224' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHM' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
c6933c25703833a4c6cc488d01430858
539a32e36ebca55c5242fba5a344faf8dca7422e
'2012-05-02T01:41:29-04:00'
describe
'910' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHN' 'sip-files00083.pro'
a9837bf9ec3d71b6840c77f6da94156b
017c77db3db2331390f2fbc43a8a60b10105e5e0
'2012-05-02T01:34:58-04:00'
describe
'53924' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHO' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
b7f06347d0cd48ebba05ac7b99076268
41c937507a85f57098f89dab314f240e50464cf7
'2012-05-02T01:39:02-04:00'
describe
'29963092' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHP' 'sip-files00083.tif'
a370d378964859111e077645ca092e3f
b0976449eaae83ff31d42e4accaebecc85148e7b
'2012-05-02T01:34:57-04:00'
describe
'144' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHQ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
64fd70c2b9b74fe0708ba9175753f35b
ea578ff72485997d9c5982437389c1bf4ed3bad3
'2012-05-02T01:40:53-04:00'
describe
'26330' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHR' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
54a92c7a5dbcfee9b92b5872fbcc670a
82d3c2367c78e84e62cf1493a137079bc6f94b04
describe
'1263053' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHS' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
4dda23f8a9f917baef8aa18c0469d81f
2038a669c6ad1a50dcabb0a591945744f603cd57
describe
'28472' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHT' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
6ce7310c6328b8e4720e3bfaf14b988d
92f85a5b70cdbbb3ab028f368936082bd0befd04
describe
'20295' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHU' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
a66f814191820b63a1c3b4d2919f60a9
1534fe6cc5d1683df5ddfa2238fdb465172efe06
'2012-05-02T01:41:10-04:00'
describe
'10122156' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHV' 'sip-files00084.tif'
bc3e08c225457830fd273cbcd86a84c2
bc4c65d09fbd0038c7eace042a3cc3f176afac37
'2012-05-02T01:32:16-04:00'
describe
'28' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHW' 'sip-files00084.txt'
6099f5216946c5cf7d7a1ad14982240d
5094daa1478f198ed4a04c7d51bfa00bd7aa29bc
'2012-05-02T01:31:58-04:00'
describe
'18207' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHX' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
efbbf67aad59bea8ed61d9860fe04483
e95bf49274c4364d2dd10bb0069583d357254ca1
'2012-05-02T01:40:52-04:00'
describe
'1280869' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHY' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
abfb105b807a9305ca127f045b48b3f3
6441edad6313ad4461775df5516c72bfc2693206
'2012-05-02T01:43:20-04:00'
describe
'183122' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADHZ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
18e38cec3039443e4e26c57473d2e422
798a11b95dff8d1a51cac723325f3b5225619d64
describe
'42869' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIA' 'sip-files00085.pro'
084259e4563a56792387422c55f1b5d2
dae6aa10df2dba32c93ad03ea7d704d494eea7fa
describe
'72643' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIB' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
9e6d5eaeef25f58a794071ecaac4169b
b254c6aef22418a6bbd90854da6c75a5a23b9701
'2012-05-02T01:43:29-04:00'
describe
'10264740' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIC' 'sip-files00085.tif'
aafd57657ba79d839b17bfbe93d45441
41e457b40afdbb73eeaf153c4483e04b00834d4f
'2012-05-02T01:32:44-04:00'
describe
'1687' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADID' 'sip-files00085.txt'
114105157c0af4fb24199888a243b595
9f6435e0d260366d8365de4e70275c00e0d52529
describe
'29452' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIE' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
d5c37725b871136cff001e33beca0cf6
68c42341a4552c801358fff7d2d2ad87c7f44770
'2012-05-02T01:33:08-04:00'
describe
'1282988' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIF' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
9b929e0af800cefb57f1bdb987790cfc
14aea2db9138b5b68fd23ae3c36a7846503e62ec
'2012-05-02T01:36:23-04:00'
describe
'179747' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIG' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
257b04eff6b8a7098782e156e1ef46da
d9824288a00ffbbca17085825244086230ebcb7e
describe
'41716' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIH' 'sip-files00086.pro'
52efa62e4bd4c4e84e5acdd46b055c4c
de6c544b3f16b0b59680b28731eb6afb43dfcdd3
describe
'72401' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADII' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
7beb6dfbf7f30b735e5b6f8bbd8c2737
a4da82671dc556cfa0597dbe1432cdb276d64c9f
'2012-05-02T01:42:23-04:00'
describe
'10280684' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIJ' 'sip-files00086.tif'
4cfb7b606ba9e9a69deb5d33b350ce77
20b02b6f9f1cd3e2526885678b2ab1e1bb3d3623
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIK' 'sip-files00086.txt'
d48d6baa519187abeda9cc6c4d925887
0ea02c1e84ad2d30e1fefa2983549d5c1f54a53a
describe
'29494' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIL' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
cee5b125316085f8cea829d2e06dd21a
10efedd2fa1ea7e99cbb7bbffb33757750f2a680
describe
'1290847' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIM' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
8423b5d98767361f41b7a1006b654f9d
e09d4e7386f068ec265729afc165aded200d0432
describe
'150292' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIN' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
c7376ec049c8444e70f6c2c4fa035e16
4daf7e048cfa33e479ddafbb0e4e3cdf24ca8a4b
'2012-05-02T01:39:14-04:00'
describe
'2073' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIO' 'sip-files00087.pro'
c88df3c3314c524905933650cab94881
3e9a23c73f6631e46dabef231f50197daf01f40e
describe
'50932' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIP' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
fce17483a06036746684997d24d43e41
1f75f04cb92ede30398eb8a3c17af0c1f0187c6a
describe
'30996916' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIQ' 'sip-files00087.tif'
6060a231dabbc11f2cc454cee6452dd3
7c86505c9a40a7230ee39d3c2a0cbaf87d7210a7
'2012-05-02T01:36:50-04:00'
describe
'166' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIR' 'sip-files00087.txt'
abe89db8e0b132a3faa5ac276d481fff
b40270c5150258bf7a86ec739936cf56b1bb4bd5
describe
'25858' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIS' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
bd3729c9f41f0545d83dfb6671e58899
0b0f95bbe3e3cc90e18facc754d4d616003f20c8
'2012-05-02T01:37:23-04:00'
describe
'1275233' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIT' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
52f6e7e9773bd74df55aa69ef45f5077
cf3f63e6a724b73c47e1c03d0f13689bc8c2a27d
'2012-05-02T01:33:22-04:00'
describe
'35375' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIU' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
380a9e4a825d506e720badf7c1b6da25
dd326fe85e0e64d7f5e1a348b6717a3cfa9603e0
describe
'22222' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIV' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
8c7fb5d389907f1123129e962126e578
5b82641678c512f2e4829b7030c3894ba30acaee
'2012-05-02T01:37:30-04:00'
describe
'10218836' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIW' 'sip-files00088.tif'
87386cbfe58e62575e14f2eb3b056fe1
03402ddf485af458717c79bc5741fc0f933b171f
'2012-05-02T01:37:39-04:00'
describe
'18804' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIX' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
bf8d36ddda366246604823d5e4c755b6
c9963efa8d464d3782d5a1ef406b8a7df8dd590e
'2012-05-02T01:38:07-04:00'
describe
'1290894' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIY' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
486f3407680423ec2a499f750daf289f
11e3856c16179712a477b4f38b2c23a46aaaffab
'2012-05-02T01:41:09-04:00'
describe
'177382' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADIZ' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
84f766cf4bdc77b984afca53d1cb2e07
609173a92df2e693ed7fa8f84988fc9d7e03b40c
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJA' 'sip-files00089.pro'
974a8ff05d9c9dab5e970c1dc62db3f9
5965ca47de09bcb797874e8c3b09448e54299aa0
'2012-05-02T01:41:03-04:00'
describe
'71002' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJB' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
01bfd9c378961cb1a6da709df2012224
15620791fe21414216f218bee144f7570c756db8
'2012-05-02T01:40:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJC' 'sip-files00089.tif'
5980ee24fc567c87e30f954785ddbe55
3296a8df5e8822366c4a9c446f8e4608ab1bcbc0
'2012-05-02T01:35:07-04:00'
describe
'1699' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJD' 'sip-files00089.txt'
30e3d4114176b24cc6a9902b508a830d
19a1932861ea71e2030ae7d30e384fee4db2bb3a
describe
'29083' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJE' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
3ae9834b9b1a24d093010da6f7e62334
edcdd8d8582b84a7fb0b7fce573de1730085be06
'2012-05-02T01:42:13-04:00'
describe
'1290892' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJF' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
7a713b33ec1d9d192329072a509b0720
e7fd5f73039bae5ab3e98acfd3d3d6abfd4ae192
'2012-05-02T01:40:13-04:00'
describe
'178616' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJG' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
c9ab44793a7641faa3521a6feb1a218d
1bd46d366811dbf20b80825429b9222acd90fd89
describe
'41594' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJH' 'sip-files00090.pro'
123df7988ffdde57d01cc200cf9281c6
99395f375d08c6419a4e79ab2876226e7e6750f7
describe
'71200' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJI' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
680ebd8d3d8b6d8802bb062a06aac9da
6afee778fc406c7f0b30529a7a13b6ae51b03f71
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJJ' 'sip-files00090.tif'
206d3d5b540b8c821b692d17d2ea2d43
6e87edc0c239e9443b9c38f01acee6af3efc448e
describe
'1645' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJK' 'sip-files00090.txt'
dea0d6575d93ddf83d1c09f5781d9ed1
ba2046ec30971c69f19148f4f1e58fafb7c63fc6
'2012-05-02T01:34:36-04:00'
describe
'29120' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJL' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
1538e59b1b87380b50fa0a79be0e3e73
6a45fc5e110ba50eed2e1666af12d01146fb9845
'2012-05-02T01:42:42-04:00'
describe
'1290845' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJM' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
455d74d1b19710dba9c4746c37c5fd18
d1646dcff1c7a5f94f09d2a3a54b13c3bf77d1f8
'2012-05-02T01:43:11-04:00'
describe
'177751' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJN' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
d8c89e7d3ee118540be78964519f42ec
fe661cb71e33006e4090452b49a690c6ce5ceb4f
'2012-05-02T01:37:38-04:00'
describe
'41419' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJO' 'sip-files00091.pro'
35ada6f6e376d66a35f16376560b3623
adc4ce8dd9b35b0f4a3139b03e56498b87705a22
'2012-05-02T01:36:37-04:00'
describe
'70221' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJP' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
317bd0d6517563c15888ce9c3cd80577
88402140c0630e9d73454d69ddf6e0c9ad4d070d
'2012-05-02T01:42:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJQ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
16846b3cc3dced774e27664b1d08dcd7
d90fe713f5f756fdfa19f58d73656099997893ab
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJR' 'sip-files00091.txt'
dc09ef9c2528cbcfcf64531d58c98ddf
a2e06840451a31d0509df8194c28e67af105c263
'2012-05-02T01:36:36-04:00'
describe
'29056' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJS' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
68f9618dd121dde64df4321b22e0639e
97a27e3f6fbebe961917facea92276601b90746c
'2012-05-02T01:31:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJT' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
1e90317d3848e135baa9f76bfa53228e
0ab45dd48e55c38958b28edfc6392051b92902f3
'2012-05-02T01:32:06-04:00'
describe
'177541' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJU' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
4830b8f810363103fefbc48c2d090686
cfd3a869416ec4eb2aec7b8786fe40959b744cde
describe
'42669' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJV' 'sip-files00092.pro'
d1e67b4652b01b8eaf7df1be11e5d9db
5c08fb6f49c23149ffc3f3b49b2ce2b4521c4887
describe
'71233' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJW' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
618a2f925d217e1fbfa520b45995564e
1c5fc95d32e2b0199da622a191b607e2f56eb874
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJX' 'sip-files00092.tif'
0183b63cf93ea7077125ef3e5348cde8
b47687f16b1ac13f08431cbeeda4715fc75f2b83
'2012-05-02T01:36:11-04:00'
describe
'1684' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJY' 'sip-files00092.txt'
fdf2e5e8fd3d1ec9a77e5e5e5a31450e
90254b5cc4c60877180f58229d12f6c1a1b8785e
describe
'29111' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADJZ' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
4d9732c076a02b6dcf8d171281774b3f
5e7c235b747eb7ebfe3d585f99c5ed51d8fe4536
describe
'1314957' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKA' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
82a9b7406bafbc449bc78e64031dbb62
d7fd937dc25fc2368ce73e8ded9519d3db848bde
describe
'179217' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKB' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
3079b06c5d31df85e0b2386445429fc5
6f7f3e2e6c72042bbe073d38b28b7c48951365bb
'2012-05-02T01:34:01-04:00'
describe
'42456' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKC' 'sip-files00093.pro'
5bb7cf8f44f3a4c19143bc137ba4d507
4244ee181330e119eab1a75f233e7ac091c5bafc
describe
'70536' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKD' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
be31929b8896c594ede6073642cf1930
bf90db1b607682fe7434ee276fbb38da275ca0ca
describe
'10537644' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKE' 'sip-files00093.tif'
27ec8bb06de334d19a59b2de72e154e6
aa92320085225229a70f3e37c646268cdaca4fbf
describe
'1717' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKF' 'sip-files00093.txt'
8652730e40228943f924a0fd9ba3c625
44610f15f6646d0f44d21e9369b62c838f1e2cca
describe
'29265' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKG' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
062bf37e9fbac254d42741a722eb3d1f
9f8a3cdac3478f8a1538b07faf69b6805240cc0e
describe
'1291388' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKH' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
1afcde6dfe11f4ca6245e7e0ffa34427
5b6b0bf7bb08ea47c547afc55a9c845de43fbc26
describe
'139973' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKI' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
8c3432c3c3ea9214f1b1cf12db437bf9
d90ce64d7f464d5727d7e80af50a3d3756375139
describe
'19490' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKJ' 'sip-files00094.pro'
217ffa97e739abbaee1fb3aa16b7a37d
d721d5289efe3510beb9aa43e5129655647d2fe0
'2012-05-02T01:42:34-04:00'
describe
'54244' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKK' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
13754768280048ff0c1a29f5ec20383a
35ba7ca14326062caf18f5431ca7bf8ea63bcdf4
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKL' 'sip-files00094.tif'
3800fe030547537b729846f3e1a27036
c7595bb3b456d6341d7322edc913787c4120b99a
describe
'780' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKM' 'sip-files00094.txt'
feba181af1a7dfd8d62763f31295de23
f56de6a1c4af3dc2fa5f5b711cbd2f2eb2f450a6
describe
'25861' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKN' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
394be92c1d3e4fb090b4431945abcb5d
ea821c01164b9cc5b845cbf095dd4cc71a30ed3a
'2012-05-02T01:37:29-04:00'
describe
'1254789' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKO' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
b2da652e220e725ccdb3b2d211806d45
439ab074e899442be364012eff13a5ffd544a628
'2012-05-02T01:38:36-04:00'
describe
'178295' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKP' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
31915b8f4a559f55c80251e192a4cb07
7fa5f7a8686d18e25860b01d27bc6e59b228b93f
describe
'22134' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKQ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
577befd8d9a10a129826b22e7bc404f7
da95d6180e6e8e17aa4b59a3da6a1172cc8e9fa2
'2012-05-02T01:38:20-04:00'
describe
'65296' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKR' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
82205976e5cdeb2f9086c71836800b83
2575cda346275a35309e986ae215670104b6da18
'2012-05-02T01:39:40-04:00'
describe
'10055404' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKS' 'sip-files00095.tif'
0b3606a66e115e063c3c5de941fbc995
4eedf50d10c54bb039d0ab4f7cc2cc8edb37a943
'2012-05-02T01:42:07-04:00'
describe
'991' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKT' 'sip-files00095.txt'
993778a57389a5690de80edd32068f58
a75cdf6fcd748fdddf4f24cefa8bd6794631ecb0
'2012-05-02T01:35:25-04:00'
describe
'28492' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKU' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
945d44ea0909e7ec4690bb811a71974d
012154f1985e72e58f2f3da4ebc568fb3531959a
'2012-05-02T01:36:45-04:00'
describe
'1290876' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKV' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
5604522ae8e0ab1370d01dfd0c7278c0
fc5d7af8c47ae5284b580068ab42516e07571ab5
describe
'179677' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKW' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
b4907a3e210a33acc79e078500510c76
3979ec84d01ed06314fb818284823bbcdf5eec47
'2012-05-02T01:33:56-04:00'
describe
'41139' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKX' 'sip-files00096.pro'
73c76eeb276dcf1d5e6bf7c950d648a8
2d5f045ec7462f6c8b62840450d24bf52b8fd73a
'2012-05-02T01:41:12-04:00'
describe
'70403' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKY' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
cc03b7e58638c924afb7151d7fb35ed5
447984801874d3a90459d3374f508730f396f9ec
'2012-05-02T01:38:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADKZ' 'sip-files00096.tif'
43ae2c689825d0904a37ab90ea7c387f
f1166fe2a59d364f597d0a830e6ab0fea5b262b9
describe
'1626' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLA' 'sip-files00096.txt'
0062b7aad929897aa5e05237fc5e534c
f1bde7ee6ebade7a8a4a47a83e07ed1c8d90c672
'2012-05-02T01:42:22-04:00'
describe
'29325' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLB' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
98a11ee8ee476c2e2cf16b074fac4a5e
0d468586c332c08b2f0216d77f72e5fc74bb5f3a
describe
'1290684' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLC' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
bdade39bfb95316eca002c61d7f5efeb
a0301b6647143f060e606c67cf4460617e198ea8
'2012-05-02T01:35:51-04:00'
describe
'37614' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLD' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
3dedf40e7d3272870667500fc2cd6016
43c95b846485976461451a33e1c518586f77afa0
'2012-05-02T01:43:15-04:00'
describe
'22605' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLE' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
8a2428489c18fcce400d06304fa06d92
523394537b1d273a1f93a75dd9003da49d6a2a21
'2012-05-02T01:32:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLF' 'sip-files00097.tif'
f4f5ffd9b7b50e21419d890784a8678a
00d17217b3db7169854d2be2603d19df2aff2f08
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLG' 'sip-files00097.txt'
16e40dde39197cf9e478168771fab51f
1ac23d3978a6caa6dc5b80c5610f968affc7c931
'2012-05-02T01:40:33-04:00'
describe
'18857' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLH' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
87d1741e50ae1924cd2c0b7b903ff30f
aaa2ee80e191b4dc8a3fbe052a14ac4b67e62eb7
'2012-05-02T01:33:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLI' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
0a831ba8f532cb2fb6cbe06472082d63
e825fc6cb63b38e43132c3256507947248f5ea82
describe
'158950' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLJ' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
5e3e5c7433e3b49a74e5b6c7ea2d98f2
67f212e0187749165a566d71434293a56ca504ff
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLK' 'sip-files00098.pro'
db5567ed0239db17c9af7c6e190cecd7
d71b9e64403b4877ba6ba796845e9af6a42d419f
describe
'54469' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLL' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
eb612da9747fb711237e6e9fe2fe531f
11701818ba1b936a1eb2e63b5b53bbbcf4393e19
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLM' 'sip-files00098.tif'
ce819ac4c72393cd1e91798ffd8c07c4
afa2a75d3cdc0ba43f8aef67c805150a62d34b25
'2012-05-02T01:41:57-04:00'
describe
'151' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLN' 'sip-files00098.txt'
b60d4e9804fd5fc11e52e835e7789ef2
74de4c387dcd8a6dba8fd75be4156c9632e0ce20
describe
'26777' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLO' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
3f98a52a4bfef33c75d87087fcbc4fbd
d86e70443117ca3dccf28d52a75765c5c133ad13
'2012-05-02T01:32:10-04:00'
describe
'1273324' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLP' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
2f2c5c68aaa71f06d0ebcbc84c5f0102
ba6223d55c59743fdf3caa3f6a28d487c99b0537
describe
'179220' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLQ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
803e132bdd5d13007d63b02defcea859
660c71d3395530e7c0cea1d4ff6f4c91622be236
'2012-05-02T01:34:54-04:00'
describe
'40383' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLR' 'sip-files00099.pro'
fd45d498ba5ea8a66f06359c4b9c7ade
410aae16e5d9d0f91c3368c8f8349baa72f7c9af
describe
'72040' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLS' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
7d21ec060e4f57dfba8083daaec04b7b
59cb52f23015680125b4a806680f0d590465af89
'2012-05-02T01:41:35-04:00'
describe
'10203500' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLT' 'sip-files00099.tif'
c210f40dc6c556000552cffd26514013
3faad0bc1d18ee76087a13ae5c36a9e3c2bc5c86
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLU' 'sip-files00099.txt'
9b2a2a045401258f1fcd2532bd9f2a66
44472221d5181e53a5c1631ffdabc8a961acdb9f
'2012-05-02T01:35:45-04:00'
describe
'29439' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLV' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
4e6802866184abeb1501ef27fde86bc2
880c1eb18afd889b80397dd967f8ec9208a52ae9
describe
'1290612' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLW' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
7a9ca0ea199d57261c942c4f5f886fe0
86dc7492c6c820efa38a781fb2e0433018dc23b7
describe
'180862' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLX' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
c445a370c5990e5d2f47cc3e9799e0ba
d5a21da2507206a8784e6d3b3645132103fc2f43
'2012-05-02T01:33:12-04:00'
describe
'41761' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLY' 'sip-files00100.pro'
dbe978dd1b1d815ad9a60ab1d31001ed
f9f01c2a509e10a9becd78f46d1abb67539e3581
'2012-05-02T01:40:15-04:00'
describe
'71938' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADLZ' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
fa9fdf0e55638c788523e03e413db450
c93d131d326901a377cd2c449d41eb97dd2a14ab
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMA' 'sip-files00100.tif'
2302bee2073d141b4d174f6ae0408f1b
c4ecf2a0fc00072433d5de0ceb3e71974bb1fc58
'2012-05-02T01:38:10-04:00'
describe
'1653' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMB' 'sip-files00100.txt'
d9d880c86185bc0ad91a52efb290e536
f2b008b0a7014e595b0a5d4b7f0d4a37d21942cc
describe
'29484' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMC' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
70cd2be2841d41e0bbbc447a027fb8e3
5c3a2d4432c70006e4adf2d67afa2d8fa6323c02
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMD' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
db254be02030121d34767b0772944bc3
bbdd3e5e065d5c42b9aaa27c9628345a8cf60f69
describe
'185689' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADME' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
74387a7a1337bc6bea3c8374d45f9307
c5c8865238e4ea401389af924ece60269fa9ba7e
describe
'42651' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMF' 'sip-files00101.pro'
cefeb9a4d107f9eb43791590c44265a8
df2e9292ea7f6c65151359220f42e03f74444b7e
describe
'73281' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMG' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
689bc07d7a652262bc721b4cbc5efb3b
a64c7e56ba59e8a088ce4b7e0be405f23a9124e7
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMH' 'sip-files00101.tif'
49cf608ae4c8fe925762c48f2577af22
06b085f8f7f80f35c79a56aa3281a747bbb89238
'2012-05-02T01:32:21-04:00'
describe
'1677' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMI' 'sip-files00101.txt'
8aadf7ea87882f57b4332c6df2168ee9
933331193ff32c4bb9e4816231afd1724570e886
'2012-05-02T01:39:44-04:00'
describe
'29432' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMJ' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
69ebdb46a8b8d3648263ee88a5eb3fcc
a1efb3e8d43079ac30a6c11a8beb764db1a13ac2
'2012-05-02T01:42:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMK' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
484e6ca6814f40ce5f9ef4d325a2290f
a1350de2f163075d9f2896108b3b870f7f127312
describe
'177742' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADML' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
8ac969d5a106bf58a7ad748f04e156f1
cc1ce65feb9b9718c1247e3784669e43b713bf4e
'2012-05-02T01:33:07-04:00'
describe
'40375' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMM' 'sip-files00102.pro'
82c1a016bf3e6b3f152e391fc30521f5
4116b19bf8a4b67995937c7902b99112addc8e3b
describe
'70600' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMN' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
1b09db52299174ea0f386761f88eb76b
2abf80d942e23dc31e3bd7544303058cfb64ead2
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMO' 'sip-files00102.tif'
99e49593cbea98c56e2422607a82bf6c
17acf45684f39835f20b599585e755ddbebcfb38
describe
'1597' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMP' 'sip-files00102.txt'
e0dc2d75ffe155abd618b570ff6efc75
3380c272a3da2116cc3dffed78800090d82cfd47
describe
'29257' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMQ' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
5e5ce964bb8b8e071de8de6bb18fa46b
c59e5eca50dfb1178cd08acbd4867cbf38205e3b
describe
'1291218' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMR' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
4bca5a780377e3e1fbb5013251a60ac0
6f86002aee680d81f40b3cec5f1deaf6c7098e17
describe
'177094' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMS' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
45276dd142e9ec85af2b9239aada286a
4c8c165cc3d0229772c5cd004c76e0941e42b295
describe
'40315' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMT' 'sip-files00103.pro'
9ae6cdb529ec50d8a3e8feb9c1558cae
83dbf1bc8833fc75e47e0a3c6064cce5d34582c0
describe
'70603' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMU' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
d96412ee67db7164804133031d50ef6a
33988420f0b819cf53988587cac7b84c331da95b
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMV' 'sip-files00103.tif'
31a20bc009308231be40ce8f62b757b4
bed255af78fbe88712f23400f8b33e975c42dce3
'2012-05-02T01:32:33-04:00'
describe
'1593' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMW' 'sip-files00103.txt'
c7dcf66fd75aefc266a721536f261627
b648874f9eeec2c4f84382cab68be137e6703bef
describe
'28983' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMX' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
fdd2f65d8973aa28569c93556f086276
64afc229abf011df12e3f1ff2a9844e737239297
describe
'1290865' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMY' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
acbac6855698a72a97ed0b170a019ee0
b6cdae5fecd9e11583f94cbac5d17e1dcf09baae
describe
'181326' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADMZ' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
f558861da028d5f1e28613b28578bc49
2b4265423e65e3a9c2bfbdcd4851d446b86dd29d
describe
'42128' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNA' 'sip-files00104.pro'
8a285fa65c5cb782a7566ada52665b9c
6ec319b4bb21925d47d9cca64600477d20d77fa7
describe
'71747' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNB' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
2421f2179d5b76485da3a12158284aa3
93e6bad8285a90f14639cc1a9dae24ee40af0c8d
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNC' 'sip-files00104.tif'
2575301042ac322857eb684ded36af1a
51cda6b428437ea1264057d2a9bd7f6201e59e91
'2012-05-02T01:43:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADND' 'sip-files00104.txt'
bc639c092774fc62de00b3c0c56c3d9f
b8f6e75815fd686ae1494e6f811e573b8c280745
'2012-05-02T01:39:08-04:00'
describe
'29235' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNE' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
d222e6ebd7104e30ae561dcff4806837
82a6b1b248eace7e6438f6c1ed97a8df2a334b76
'2012-05-02T01:40:51-04:00'
describe
'1290804' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNF' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
2f485d915fe706db3de9800b8d02fd47
e0e45262faed56609e084c27e994606536a576db
'2012-05-02T01:37:15-04:00'
describe
'181001' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNG' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
741e18bc1efc37bceb719ea48260c739
61381db23297cebb435b18406d929e2dc5d68d47
describe
'41350' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNH' 'sip-files00105.pro'
2ec4fbd91d34cc9b63e9472775f225f0
a8e3fd7e3392ed4c4163e9eab6149972fc9164cf
describe
'70963' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNI' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
24a861b0d2526ae1d5f4be3a385b0c1f
b320dc5ea4db7eb70fdb4a060ea1c9cc935ef830
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNJ' 'sip-files00105.tif'
338efb32940aa45e3f1dd0876a009ec2
23289abe0de224f9e9c044c858d7eea880b469d9
'2012-05-02T01:40:54-04:00'
describe
'1633' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNK' 'sip-files00105.txt'
4c4bf61c37a742e761dcba563dff2c74
cf7e19caa229c41deae5ecb130762c54a93dc6ba
describe
'29142' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNL' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
f73cfb2d8b7d53fe70bbb4831a20d9e3
0b19d11e787affc01b5356df5322781a9293db4b
'2012-05-02T01:33:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNM' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
3697e5201529d3df41b6ff2b51e85f71
2b247143f0bb9fdfcc039c2bc8751e48a3ca0b03
'2012-05-02T01:39:03-04:00'
describe
'91781' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNN' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
d92ea293a2ca0c4532cd3cfd873ef061
0aab261a6d9bb4af4206011ac97a63ffc86068e2
describe
'6840' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNO' 'sip-files00106.pro'
6f0f1fa9eca8fc40c8e2c6149e1cd4af
500ecbff8fee56370561688f1772bf6ce77c8b81
describe
'37906' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNP' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
b8dc0c7f2790229fc8a2f61de53cb0d7
6443e9e31bfa7f9f22055c601be73796e6d9ee24
'2012-05-02T01:35:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNQ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
ef84454315644c4047332ea5ea3040b3
79ff8701d71d591dd221f776bac1c751c6cebd90
'2012-05-02T01:34:41-04:00'
describe
'283' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNR' 'sip-files00106.txt'
dc673babf64be0ec58e0b76ffbee863e
1dd531f459b71490dc49a18ddf10bc4c9bff67d4
describe
'22388' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNS' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
598a9076120c171948e348f54d4cfa6e
97f12d9d2c1a6b90a5dd7cf5165edd696b6b65f0
describe
'1291690' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNT' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
a469a31e1a10b01c5f5cf483365d6861
e31496fe8a23a5447a922fc6d11604b927a6d8ad
'2012-05-02T01:41:28-04:00'
describe
'167657' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNU' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
adfbe1feddd55152c5c3b2942d2a2739
45051382c490266693aaec09945fdb229c5d73ef
describe
'24173' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNV' 'sip-files00107.pro'
45a13ab250b1a56967d5ad03c5142e2d
c73b216ceabc06cbbd07fcc334b9302cc53e39c5
describe
'63816' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNW' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
94768e6a9b401b24a04cf6a09b6f7ac3
353c9be2568962df0c100b17dac3ed17a013e10b
describe
'10350540' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNX' 'sip-files00107.tif'
b6cdcec7bf42c9a9742f7d16704c4f7c
5328e48a676d2e0a1992b1c74ba167af2beee761
'2012-05-02T01:37:42-04:00'
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNY' 'sip-files00107.txt'
a5536239801b7f253c15b8566977c753
4af8261c3942d6c563dd43528c46afe41fef9e2c
'2012-05-02T01:34:53-04:00'
describe
'28497' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADNZ' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
b080548ab61d5185b6bc78640c38ebfe
911776e501a85f0c47ccc80feca179eeb636af68
describe
'1290860' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOA' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
f0e852b517e60c906dcfbe3e9a1c0040
a419787574643d0767dc633473dbf68626c181d0
describe
'182123' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOB' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
a93aae856d1fceaa7712b1789ab3dd97
37eb7caddcb8eec63e99590a75b15b906e520a12
describe
'41782' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOC' 'sip-files00108.pro'
80ae5228298a54d4aee8b4b386e92380
76d5e92323ec781e9512c463e918ddd89b4e56a5
describe
'72942' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOD' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
35ddd2484ee47297825396ec8bbe5fbc
8249fd3a8911863150aef2570733d451ebf9161c
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOE' 'sip-files00108.tif'
af6e3281ba23eb43fff8f48d5f7404b8
82fe35d01bdc8299fdf72008415e7f2baac8a9b4
'2012-05-02T01:35:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOF' 'sip-files00108.txt'
ccefb1a1282253d92b557e85be414f50
904364caffd12c582abc4fbed5bb051dc41bc337
describe
'29298' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOG' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
accb70f3b6d61959ae0a78ccb83649f4
0b57bda055938b2037786bf13c50f8143e7a2a8d
describe
'1260796' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOH' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
7a7aa101315cddcf3d8f89a48bd54844
5b1885a7f9c4ae361f4f364298234911b14ca5ab
describe
'46868' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOI' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
f2ba8797022d05e1b05933e9a2554f3d
1cbf993255e190d41f1a6ed21b994ce81e17d184
'2012-05-02T01:37:18-04:00'
describe
'24822' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOJ' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
f179fb671897bce226a0c84b2ac0236f
bbfd0f5b4ffcf94d0342691bf8c485c44949eede
describe
'10103388' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOK' 'sip-files00109.tif'
5d5d0ddf03b6f9b32680ec335a00bbc5
a83e3c66c1afa938132bdd009e78c565a870b80a
'2012-05-02T01:34:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOL' 'sip-files00109.txt'
281a3e7edee7993b27d75db8d4517fcf
50d160d88c40638ec27660c5d9ef84af043d4afe
describe
'19279' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOM' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
534e39c90df6855b05e7763e55579841
0e43b6d33efe43f137daa33c1af7273a6ef1eee5
describe
'1290735' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADON' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
57fd00a0dd4003fe3d9f47d9057d20e4
ecc7732ff6c0d3ff25bfaceb4236c2d061f6d173
describe
'146826' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOO' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
439206c576cdf40362b240d80335bb09
772c52342ea43d8fba1eac2750f9df3aa2565dc6
describe
'1803' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOP' 'sip-files00110.pro'
090a298f18926cf6fb3a460aed2e114a
ef70e17ad86d032f5ccfd06155a144ce0d25d8dc
'2012-05-02T01:32:36-04:00'
describe
'49651' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOQ' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
99528eeca88d48dc5e7bf9c1d2c43c7e
f76b5482d70ec6d2797927f22f822bb54630755c
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOR' 'sip-files00110.tif'
40002a9abb04238b9aa49bd248171831
078337f1abd69e5409158cfa3d8782e4fc8ae5ee
'2012-05-02T01:33:55-04:00'
describe
'339' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOS' 'sip-files00110.txt'
4eba1b449b385e132248c51e59b8a49f
685230bf736ef206f32e91af93e500ea20e7fa3b
describe
Invalid character
'25487' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOT' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
fe8c4e0a8eb5c7121028bb74b9d70c85
a1cbf1c90e7e07555302667a8ae5a69574fb1f35
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOU' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
4a031434856dfd229419d599e677c959
8a39c333d9c9d7925584be379c234041ace94359
describe
'182606' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOV' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
76a813586a6b2d929c87cec6ca626703
38d1b6b3ed3a74fcca9d4a90d0a338fd89fa9217
describe
'41465' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOW' 'sip-files00111.pro'
d6e9612730ed047ddb81b31d80a695f9
a6fbb0051803834cd56e8e0fd91d5830c38e6cbe
describe
'71240' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOX' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
1a66dec83923421a554d6e122e95ff8f
cc6da93ce643304ac4d415f743dc1476b9c352f5
'2012-05-02T01:41:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOY' 'sip-files00111.tif'
d6634f4f4f8e67599ffd95a26d785c9d
4395a83d2a61e9b3cc54496196c92066d3514c41
'2012-05-02T01:42:50-04:00'
describe
'1639' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADOZ' 'sip-files00111.txt'
696a39a582b98a0eee8c2e4683176d1a
ab6a62c1a5e5d4034db4222a6ff31a1f40ade3b1
'2012-05-02T01:33:38-04:00'
describe
'29316' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPA' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
753fcf55d650b6da35859b01a8c09e9b
c4bbf6db8fea65ff415466b7c00dc7a1133d3834
describe
'1290850' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPB' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
ccf5a2989ca74e08d455ec33051901b9
38bfa9e3ee87bf4c63fdc452522e3f79aeefaa0a
describe
'148033' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPC' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
84541543aeb0e91633e7f9335a368cff
6a77c7b09d89bfa9a98c4cbce8ce9a1f073b7399
describe
'5423' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPD' 'sip-files00112.pro'
7757d056d680e5e15dfc603686641dfb
57566c426cfd90d230749781d6effab8201bfc2c
describe
'49078' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPE' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
d49391acb5d08978e018c18d39b614fd
2c829fe327f2751bcb92952d6c91b03a1e4b8b44
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPF' 'sip-files00112.tif'
a6f7ad1fbb67da2650fd5f64f58f7fc2
f810a0e8b66ed8c18845c824cb1d5dd436d8ae57
'2012-05-02T01:41:01-04:00'
describe
'229' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPG' 'sip-files00112.txt'
4aca5257931e4e809f221d4b7e34426e
b6674fb140a6422dcbbcb0dfd149b090321437da
describe
'24547' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPH' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
86fde64c06a5be9accb8e6c54e223117
49df7cb831931630fd6b4ba8b369a31f79ff132c
describe
'1290861' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPI' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
f0e5a63448a7fd56a66f8f329608c615
bcd2ffd31c50223ec18fd4cf190a5396ba108b29
describe
'173261' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPJ' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
0512a2152b67d9e23673cc4343eeecee
b441b7c1dae5a99720ef68b77c37dbb4c471c8ee
describe
'23464' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPK' 'sip-files00113.pro'
32bc45d2552205813c47db419de193ed
f5fdbaa6dcc5c5e262877842bda4e99a5b95541d
'2012-05-02T01:41:08-04:00'
describe
'65474' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPL' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
f4d3bfdccfc29c8f5df17fd8e83177f1
dec153b2ad75095e6522f40f19fe088a66cc8073
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPM' 'sip-files00113.tif'
b4f5bc043028ec05b40d920d03d0cae4
91753771fba5655c8a0dd79536d7a65a475938ff
'2012-05-02T01:32:19-04:00'
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPN' 'sip-files00113.txt'
fa29c0a33fa2bee3ec48ed46c2871862
2d28323cb0644e68747501dbd602cb492cceb6cf
describe
'28471' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPO' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
a9e1bbff15211d9b1d31ed74c5326ec2
580ab4d3aef39e02a8be70ff13ea19a4f1e7810b
'2012-05-02T01:40:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPP' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
0462148bf42cd66b2a6cef7e7910da1d
cc95480c4c55ad9fb780cc41a153370a1b2f3fb5
'2012-05-02T01:38:23-04:00'
describe
'173222' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPQ' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
e831e1fc6685de4993b1f1685df2ff8e
9d4ea2ea840cd73a3efe6970145ddee90faa5dd7
describe
'41089' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPR' 'sip-files00114.pro'
0886a6716ab02425ca73f68872d8141e
bf623453b0a84e339e96b8d371727f9db056e89b
'2012-05-02T01:38:16-04:00'
describe
'70204' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPS' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
be26a928ef94e9d754f68cff3817520e
52592b60bf8da834eb3eb91e76f706b661dd8fa9
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPT' 'sip-files00114.tif'
3d205f7db52e86669631ff16477af179
7a542e597f25c170c0af1ec2f911a5d928a7ca30
'2012-05-02T01:37:48-04:00'
describe
'1634' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPU' 'sip-files00114.txt'
5e1edcca7131e3acfad6d8a1e2ddc599
5fcf59c5d57b278c67fb9c257e30639e2aae22db
describe
'28968' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPV' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
e4d56fb52be63f79a6ae6d5654ff8fd0
73ab531d78529773fdc97fb73e7f51cb7f2ec8bb
'2012-05-02T01:33:54-04:00'
describe
'1290883' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPW' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
ad63de3133dbf6f8723af681d783a12a
056d5c9fe260871cb7e7ea797587520c453873f5
describe
'179973' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPX' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
6b0ec8f56e0cb08dc78a006c9a2862b7
ead4c8e5a9be5e5e129d01fa816437f7e7e77647
describe
'42281' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPY' 'sip-files00115.pro'
07bcd4ab81326efe4a824fa280f0f3cc
34ee1f283f98d1a8e9981eba1ffbf45f84f1fedb
describe
'71373' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADPZ' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
b0460e905da7d815499be4a79c84f81f
4c9df22c96b5312e9c0087e4cee47d1691bcd583
'2012-05-02T01:38:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQA' 'sip-files00115.tif'
748bac8869c87791680aa6b473919dfd
bada1ba1380ff689382806c68a97108e720ed6ef
describe
'1670' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQB' 'sip-files00115.txt'
6727f5a0d37f941e4a3bea57430cf6e7
dd031cb6af520235bdb3be6fd10e682470083975
describe
'29123' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQC' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
ed28e6ed8bcf8a45552dcea1134e6688
5f24a26b43bc420a6f24361c2bbb3a089c94069f
describe
'1291377' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQD' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
c10b905ee2092646d0135929ab52d360
f9f23e5b80237e8669b80c62e7874bda2a405d69
'2012-05-02T01:37:01-04:00'
describe
'181104' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQE' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
4bb3ec9bf5171ce8bcd6d0c4be207ec2
ccea042f4b322dd8ca2d7bafa1534688fd7a21ea
describe
'43384' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQF' 'sip-files00116.pro'
f15460100d79db1a18fd7f467bdeae46
c7d64ba30e0ae557bc7f890c253101aa55a8a9d5
describe
'71829' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQG' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
b1f6bdf72120123fb2ae9241ee794e7b
64e2ebb5e90400a8cf2ef995a51d30bd367dbcfa
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQH' 'sip-files00116.tif'
41a84c6c3fb13b8d05fc47f81daf496e
f1bf0f0463ae8c04055f9dd11df7051a5a35c233
'2012-05-02T01:33:23-04:00'
describe
'1704' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQI' 'sip-files00116.txt'
145299ae2c6b61954c112112020e28d1
9c226aac33e10196dccd459e7476a113c97accbd
describe
'28946' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQJ' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
efbc41e0f804659d30712c2c6957b024
d744739dcf12ee5d08b37c849d1786f787026408
describe
'1291375' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQK' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
cace981d078d98035ad0944de635d2d7
dfe40502845403830197a8607f86cc4980e5e9e2
describe
'177090' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQL' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
589abcffac2822455749ddf7e3200306
efd1b38dc8ea3137c0a06a04b75091193074673d
'2012-05-02T01:32:51-04:00'
describe
'42095' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQM' 'sip-files00117.pro'
bc54833410c74e978d88801298f211ae
6bdf834eeb329262fcd9f493bf75e186fd313f52
describe
'70627' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQN' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
aa99b8f5f1c62bb2f19dd0231d5a66cc
351444de0438cbe30d6f566177c984268e79d2d2
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQO' 'sip-files00117.tif'
cae26f5ca1620ed0c89ffaa9ec0c021b
5843977c7135cf06fdce51e13d6b6a6df144e041
'2012-05-02T01:38:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQP' 'sip-files00117.txt'
02231552b545794de2d4426b2933323b
4f0f8c7daceb38fc3d1953d0c4bda134ca3eeeeb
describe
'28909' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQQ' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
05abb72c3578263375af15945e571952
f2435cb9b1f4cefc1c479879d9ed6a247982758c
'2012-05-02T01:41:05-04:00'
describe
'1290875' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQR' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
7d6418a87433cdc7cc3da3be0b5cc3bf
829e3b01dc904a238cc43c5280bbb4998f3578b7
describe
'178225' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQS' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
8aa08b3f0021457dd4fa1b5605c71d2f
f015bbc10c3e9dfbd852ae69537320a9621c74a2
describe
'39010' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQT' 'sip-files00118.pro'
1a9c1183462aebcac1236c52d7cdf6a3
1ca7797a821ae98361f43a5793a776e47d6f3378
'2012-05-02T01:38:42-04:00'
describe
'70931' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQU' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
a6f9753a1ef61378d19b5f63c795eec8
fb94cde10a51e083f2ca7d87855319c6d017f156
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQV' 'sip-files00118.tif'
7a220309033aaee59d7139c4f402fc78
51a633389c0f19e0c7c525d77444f8fb4db635b2
'2012-05-02T01:38:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQW' 'sip-files00118.txt'
f178c9d1696823259ff3050f89a926ea
3ac4134175bfae2275f440eba1fe9e1c29ea7af8
'2012-05-02T01:32:50-04:00'
describe
'29085' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQX' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
184fb1aec9710c3e13b3ade0e20a250c
738e73f9dc47d06156d4a9ce14d19ebe4a602602
describe
'1291359' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQY' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
69a267b19b5d43071e37e6fa90ed497d
67183554fb6410822c070e6e465c61404134a914
describe
'109013' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADQZ' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
10193d3c59144d56efefb16e9e96fcae
3106c837110b4a4c9cbbe9f41832c86dbb679e30
describe
'16506' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRA' 'sip-files00119.pro'
0bfe86ebebf7f6bad4587499fb8ada28
112eba2af756b828947a44d7457ffc919d2cc81a
describe
'45647' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRB' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
1f1f0243a5646ef28e940ad32b0b00ea
05448d01642104c3926112102b01d4aa6a944b24
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRC' 'sip-files00119.tif'
3888b787fb149b435bebcc61371ecb86
f35796c331fb12aba281aa6e575ce52ffdb76136
'2012-05-02T01:36:33-04:00'
describe
'659' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRD' 'sip-files00119.txt'
625a27579524328cc0c5f7a318d47ed0
1f526bcdede28fba5d355c19f2afa5802e0fe320
describe
'23901' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRE' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
afbf04a2fba831af80401ad0a5700bfe
9599346ace9f62027a7f95480c97457263ca6d8f
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRF' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
2f28482bb0e9e5e4ef8f501370de306f
5173a6169b6e189204b8d2bcea19b08f1c9e108c
describe
'170579' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRG' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
4f2cf34250385e0583674965a461220b
c21dd2e179a3e91b33d11ecc00a4191b72025c2e
'2012-05-02T01:42:51-04:00'
describe
'20936' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRH' 'sip-files00120.pro'
ab0c31d2b5e4840caebc8d76bd038a2b
40422041bbc88e47b1e4fd3df3bed161eae61fa8
describe
'63593' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRI' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
c2cd18cb54aabf000b41f55ba28f73c3
8e335991db52ea5069f9488a058915744fae15eb
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRJ' 'sip-files00120.tif'
0e7ca4a824e3a18c83068e09f20bb74d
795264b8912e65626ebae108f8ef99ed71dba32c
'2012-05-02T01:34:33-04:00'
describe
'989' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRK' 'sip-files00120.txt'
0fd8360e78105304cf283a6c882e6d84
6e761d2da6b782022a1e44b30ed171ab823e4b1e
'2012-05-02T01:42:14-04:00'
describe
'28139' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRL' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
75d8149a4478feb2cdb897893e0d0ec3
2b4e747eb1c72fab4ab76b35f3548fd72c842995
describe
'1290897' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRM' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
f60b4347c82d17f81eb93fe218524720
4c92dd3eb8dec81dce855ec25fca5336a333ac9f
describe
'180058' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRN' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
b4a63f1312a4a5b0fa87d14ba2a4af28
0c0e076bdc2514631852f48000663d64509fe593
describe
'42678' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRO' 'sip-files00121.pro'
f87fad8c4bf28691cba394821abbd9a1
a84d42d107633375031b9fb18083b6b555d21984
describe
'71880' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRP' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
097930b9a4e990c42146607bae4baa7f
d218a58f54e1eba1304169bfa822b303e847ea56
'2012-05-02T01:40:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRQ' 'sip-files00121.tif'
876bdea579ba1b4491371e3d23be389b
c4eca408b436ae432ee3c322ce67ed6fa46f1933
describe
'1705' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRR' 'sip-files00121.txt'
359a97132d478bf59232d80e28d05d61
259cd0cb0da080661c339360996045fc763c26fe
'2012-05-02T01:34:28-04:00'
describe
'29276' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRS' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
d858202eeee4ca4858e304131c1e3bf0
108f093774fb928b5881bdb98c1fbd267cedc514
'2012-05-02T01:42:08-04:00'
describe
'1290864' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRT' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
cd9fbfac621eddd825ed977ef75f5a89
dd108f60bd8214fc94664f60a7596f7818245e21
describe
'181274' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRU' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
89bc37395e57e42118d569e630cb9ca1
6bc6b24dc7454f9acb69ce52aa8ef0e64b1e5d90
describe
'41816' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRV' 'sip-files00122.pro'
00aad64f9d3addb653b2a55c5041006c
ff2dd901d46e9c823ee72342c4f37925f53f4a09
describe
'71524' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRW' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
219a5bef03db7a313fb646f73b089955
eb19b80d053a262087c6ae0f5b02354ec938a405
'2012-05-02T01:37:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRX' 'sip-files00122.tif'
caeab21dd04ca233fc98a500a4aa7faf
2424772eb47662df88e1bf9bffaa3658827c882d
'2012-05-02T01:33:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRY' 'sip-files00122.txt'
fc7ab30e380b4c1e9f910490d7ceb1f6
4b22a48a52ac25724621d3b52606855df7bb07c7
describe
'29403' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADRZ' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
dd4cef796aecf3c738bb624af5ea7bbd
413e114ec740427c564736eb4be98f449c400bef
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSA' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
d0c40628a16d656242a2e57ccf33ea12
3301532d045d2f776ff0c101a3af9da93bd5ebe7
describe
'41360' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSB' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
0383f4036f6ccb0fec94e6b1f746d777
96da3660444136d6ec071a2432d31b7dc1adef52
describe
'23514' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSC' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
77a12c413aa7761dcd3e98cfca5fe10a
7b5c7ab739aa067bd6c044fb06d899113e12ae46
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSD' 'sip-files00123.tif'
dcb845a44c0de4731a2de3e1767cbd39
5c29ddcf132e40d05880038bdae03125792535a3
'2012-05-02T01:37:22-04:00'
describe
'19068' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSE' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
52674e61f22b0d844f435fb8fa32c04c
13872c205dceff038170959e277acec9efe690ba
'2012-05-02T01:41:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSF' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
2897e4d18fa843196b82c82235be3a64
d91370501d2588c957117049781295fa47fab971
'2012-05-02T01:38:27-04:00'
describe
'153720' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSG' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
399665a9b1b07bb3db6c9c96d745da7f
cfb12a974a77bc6136d45bbde4ad5df879324a85
describe
'1549' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSH' 'sip-files00124.pro'
1d0b3b423d4f8adbbfc4997eda98ebee
eefbb23f5f4e1c282c20bdf5490e6c5e241607ee
describe
'51418' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSI' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
f4efe6c8dfafb9666a80b401305151bc
20b04dfbb56f15c2e8e955e0f233724c246fd786
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSJ' 'sip-files00124.tif'
eb231586d8b82727d69433a62cad532c
7c6ff8a97493f3a8c8b761c5a57cc7282a98cac5
'2012-05-02T01:40:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSK' 'sip-files00124.txt'
0cfa260c7069674a5a9e0be40d44320e
0265502fede24d4ad60517c3eba914f8657c2513
describe
'26255' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSL' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
87110ccacfcabeb2708f69f9fcb7b74d
2b45fc5afe54c22f1870aadde3de4785a09efe75
'2012-05-02T01:34:26-04:00'
describe
'1290873' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSM' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
0dbdf267b0a56a5e585fc9d76d42e11d
92c996e4cc893831cea547022490e4ee693e33f4
describe
'182860' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSN' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
ff4fe02a1a0a723c04f0a27b6c0c2b92
55448ee36a27e5a1941ba27094903572aea48571
describe
'41034' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSO' 'sip-files00125.pro'
0bf6e154209bc21b33178eebc32322c0
b6ac1562712b505baa503a3aeac36a9f773351d4
describe
'72068' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSP' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
51cb13f60ad11d70ec2cdf461419db09
e73580ec6fac5f32d1511a5c5bb6c9044b636fb7
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSQ' 'sip-files00125.tif'
12a91b72a2327c4520194e5020bb9cc4
5e7c7dd43b544ce91eb7279d50b64958d8d5c78b
describe
'1625' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSR' 'sip-files00125.txt'
eb619964a3123e741346ae7474f69dfa
f7d0b28befffbd5f9e2f2110a8a2333012f3c57b
'2012-05-02T01:32:49-04:00'
describe
'29388' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSS' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
fbd14dbf65b197d79b430a76692136fc
f0e12450ebe7d5f348e2522bb0f114dee5a53a58
'2012-05-02T01:35:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADST' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
e57529ea9a9793251c18b3ef12f84b47
ab888115c35e4a64b1b8cabc6e9e0063f12ba14a
describe
'176050' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSU' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
1c9a85b6c7cd613c6fed51f5fa09c528
b71632c139b8ad694449b0f4a19aad83b239ef7f
describe
'41079' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSV' 'sip-files00126.pro'
8cb8172102301e193d0a8aa5cee63626
7f1e6b485f6b993379b0ea2140f66df51b314643
'2012-05-02T01:35:17-04:00'
describe
'69748' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSW' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
d48d85fc9318d48fe868ec873cef2f69
4816fea14e5d52f74560a2f7a8a77bd43720fbc8
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSX' 'sip-files00126.tif'
f9bfb63834ee69e80658ec6eaf146ab1
985f8fcdf03c08b7bb815b16d2b15d225ad7387c
'2012-05-02T01:32:39-04:00'
describe
'1627' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSY' 'sip-files00126.txt'
98b6ef403e531925f5d897c415b7090f
45fdd55f56160ac5634e642e781a279d13796c7e
describe
'28896' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADSZ' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
e9752fb793a107af902a1585277675f5
1e9f7bb54e4f6a5ed39b1a1a5e5fe9ffb18c9340
'2012-05-02T01:38:59-04:00'
describe
'1290683' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTA' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
9633fb2903b33143a0b33cd4916aa0d8
3830318b6d352a4a51720a96296b36166023deb0
describe
'175775' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTB' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
c06d4e42514e26ad94d31c89f81f6ef0
7831699be15184288febbb91ad1d8731ce767e7d
describe
'39607' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTC' 'sip-files00127.pro'
9dec5db5a7acd4de85df3f88c69c8328
58ebc36950fa5200a63f1afa5359e3b92be01ef4
describe
'68934' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTD' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
21ca10913b6b78297503cc0ff1acd0d2
3695cb80d31b5e07fdfa0148342343550d59ccd8
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTE' 'sip-files00127.tif'
5003d3224abd867ea1c297da9442e0ac
4e896ed123b284c3ef0a9d729963e9e4dc9b1944
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTF' 'sip-files00127.txt'
95cb85c2cf7eda68371fe6bd87f56289
b4124e6654bdb8f48a7083e9b8a67a2f34e089e6
describe
'28703' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTG' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
a11a690ac4d793e6e42c6762c71637c6
5bf5193b5bc3204ca1ba1637145863cb68e3b2f3
'2012-05-02T01:35:10-04:00'
describe
'1291213' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTH' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
2262a352b1049f470bee2aa7af15ce76
9ee6dc6021c04c063411ad7e959711cf9ed50f3d
describe
'43842' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTI' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
8937b9e2e9e9647ac877f6ff65a2f596
14f88758d60df35700ab321e21cd485ba8bd7912
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTJ' 'sip-files00128.pro'
5eaa50fe47bfd7e026db947dc387c0b7
d9ffb6ffc9af630eed7d8d530d03ad1bfb3e7bd0
describe
'23138' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTK' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
cbc60ecdb2ac4cd3079454f9252095a3
eb73f64635a446b4ddbaa95e8f11c3a70717c473
'2012-05-02T01:33:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTL' 'sip-files00128.tif'
963d3c5171bad65f946e5ed78668cb3c
1b88093aeba8f0f705e2690af07e6f8bbf8d56f2
'2012-05-02T01:33:40-04:00'
describe
'165' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTM' 'sip-files00128.txt'
bdc5e5d8e5d431f9a18d1156f34727c7
a420bd1bd6202dc720b6deae4b8a47f29199bf0b
describe
'18885' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTN' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
5f91cceea6bf6df29c5e14b5bd082fa6
0cdd284d254ddcb19bfa85cc8cf52dd717a5a481
describe
'1291219' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTO' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
b11b5a95ae22d5a9eca2927e2e734e7d
afe16d6ce641ee4066958fc7cd20def173021526
describe
'165553' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTP' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
c014607d97306dffb146fbc0e1f291d0
8ba61f93ce27985cd78865889f6ce55beffa7da6
describe
'40161' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTQ' 'sip-files00129.pro'
6d9e1993d772718538cb92aac1dda0ce
b669a70751a30e1e342e656621ec529da608674b
'2012-05-02T01:43:03-04:00'
describe
'59924' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTR' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
cbe4090ca930994253c57d1670b3e4ba
3f5ea01d31527a3900e0c11e505962040f842336
'2012-05-02T01:39:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTS' 'sip-files00129.tif'
339418632fac0061af133b0934ccc8f2
4633eb5b554e522b8a127b1fcf4cbd8ecb6512cb
'2012-05-02T01:36:31-04:00'
describe
'1795' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTT' 'sip-files00129.txt'
e89978e2632a19bcfc608c6fdf4c3389
af821757d22c833b4d6d036b50996280ddd74350
describe
'27436' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTU' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
da882d4170c47493b81923036b4385ee
96f1b776fdf27db163a82fac929b8ae614dcdab7
describe
'1273747' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTV' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
71ea409d495961d5f21e2b947127aa01
118ac2db3552d67ee135750324dd092edf8cb2f6
describe
'180004' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTW' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
93b9f24b2d141ca71810cc4e25423327
aa0eff7b91f7facd19887b331896b23653937957
describe
'54618' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTX' 'sip-files00130.pro'
ec24edc6f2b976d3a2a8f294339683cc
cd83c42904e86e25a8e4c5c7c4cd28a20dd17945
describe
'66627' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTY' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
4d2970ff8d9635ce48448e938854eee7
bd01a27a933cf1f188a6b92da8482ca1a2703c93
describe
'10206736' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADTZ' 'sip-files00130.tif'
df18338d7563fec24b40ba516568ca94
0a1f433cd81c965bae3902652c3597fc9aee8fa7
'2012-05-02T01:41:53-04:00'
describe
'2620' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUA' 'sip-files00130.txt'
022ff4a78093ce9be2ad06a951112a69
c13f8a0e594a7e38e6908781a1de29de26468df9
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUB' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
a56383c9418287843a98c96ec5c9ecfe
73d4e04e1cb74438fffd61681efcf2dfc95182d4
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUC' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
1336d978e8dc404fe732037fed6deca1
8c0b738b0871891b238ae6ba8849ee43c778e5ff
describe
'45196' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUD' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
5d7ef2ddde41d7edc79f0ab6b5c97cb6
1f171ab66f3f3583921a459c4a8b68e3f69ba247
describe
'23713' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUE' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
66589af952d9d6ccdd84373d4434e174
83d3a55e967c70fa1b57dcf80a2d5ca5c384d3f3
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUF' 'sip-files00131.tif'
3b310ae04e2ca5c7359a494e6401c849
41a9990a4070e1c7f8348168961d3a2b01f068cc
'2012-05-02T01:34:44-04:00'
describe
'18943' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUG' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
0f980ceefbe7ec23f8732b17daf30eec
5f29e99ae6f874aaa08677d99a99556d8776de0b
'2012-05-02T01:36:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUH' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
0aa57cd32ca09ece84721bf0c4860465
a07cd4b2fb32dfb16a2293a24501bd085ef0608b
describe
'30515' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUI' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
96cd6cff2f0be65fd709f48fc9b7e50d
b6982d1c332e1bff269ced617457fc3a197593c0
'2012-05-02T01:35:48-04:00'
describe
'20133' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUJ' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
669770bbebcb5c97b4943c92dfd08efe
3729fa20a7eff52ece9b138b2c87242e98fff546
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUK' 'sip-files00132.tif'
6332c1fc09e39badbed932fcae0affe7
b68cbe137f436478943cbfe03fdfa74a98de2a07
'2012-05-02T01:39:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUL' 'sip-files00132.txt'
d6d32f4bc587b6d0b033f2212bb1ddc7
bd4b23cd98017712d23d5bb135844cf3e1a093a5
'2012-05-02T01:38:49-04:00'
describe
'18026' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUM' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
32d86b0def77768d4d98bd60c0c4f1ba
2f58550fb65381112634ca3dd95547219b0b1570
describe
'1469959' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUN' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
334459af96e448cd7104cbd4bab4679e
3fb171910d7d722bc7a2c80d4ce59202b714409f
describe
'72468' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUO' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
90f2052361735278bb4101c508b9651c
c36674514b64cee53599de010a593985aa259b44
describe
'31879' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUP' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
fd35bb99cb472f18a2cd0bdd29810d4d
38496eba437390e4679514c73203a552ed1f3b35
'2012-05-02T01:38:03-04:00'
describe
'35294404' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUQ' 'sip-files00133.tif'
fc13df3e4e97593340206174e29c4644
6496f5ab2014487c6a32f0c343bdd43e1af7df59
describe
'64' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUR' 'sip-files00133.txt'
ebf2f3f19f43cade36cbd8590c947e63
fd32c32d493398bbe5c188cc56c2709df1a401ac
'2012-05-02T01:39:16-04:00'
describe
'21324' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUS' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
275a1eb30110a5ce5de7c2ed3a9bf2f1
422b3132a1c9cf4d4afed0230331b9dd9ee79efc
describe
'1383777' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUT' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
8711f7b80fea9ce801fe9a9af3c91446
f1a72d145325510e1b0141226bbffdc86ae9522a
describe
'221557' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUU' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
a2e756a37dc43ddd41cebad7d3bef08d
d30466f86c6a726a61dbfe05d9b3a847e49c4ad1
'2012-05-02T01:37:37-04:00'
describe
'70025' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUV' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
0f7b7eaa160e6614baf40df3c20112c3
60109108a2e0c1bbb656f52b41f6d7802b793a8b
describe
'33229252' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUW' 'sip-files00134.tif'
b089bbbdff5b2e733a39e2a60036e1fe
b6f4b418f804d244e18952fa9085d506c71ce90a
'2012-05-02T01:33:50-04:00'
describe
'11' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUX' 'sip-files00134.txt'
059cec0ff46fc35c7de63c85524331b2
797dac638c6ac783a6bf6339e52c0af5537fc229
describe
'26448' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUY' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
18a08e105b579e0a46954d7e8a6141c5
f7dbaa26a62e7c91c34215b976d794b1f3760cff
describe
'182618' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADUZ' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
068f6250c02b92454ef19242e29540b6
0158c17e1ec8656b32a9e7f9fbb2e6d8fbd22803
'2012-05-02T01:42:41-04:00'
describe
'55746' 'info:fdaE20091126_AAAAARfileF20091126_AAADVA' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
9b45349f5df17a7bccb7d75fdde81f02
aeb3749e4a9e514dfc2f1807395aa7eedb1ba85f
'2012-05-02T01:33:28-04:00'
describe
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4
ey
The Baldwin Library
University
of

RmB







Florida




nee.


-







TEBE: Bee
C265) EES

LONDON:
THOMAS DEAN AND

SON,
PHREADNEEDLE =STREET
CONTENTS.

STORY OF THE KIND GOVERNESS AND HER

PUPILS.
STORY OF THE DEAF GENTLEMAN.

INTERESTING STORY OF PATTY BELL, THE

LITTLE ORPHAN.

THE HAPPY REFORMATION OF COUSIN JAMES.



FIVE SENSES.

LAR ANNA

gl rg CHAPTER I.



WU SA ce dear Miss Murray,” exclaimed
VA both Mary and Julia Belford, as they
clung round their governess, eager to
welcome her return from a visit to
her friends. “Iam so glad you have
come back,” said Mary. “And so
am I,” echoed Julia; “and so I am sure little Freddy
will be, and cousin James, too;” and, as though to
verify the assertion, both the boys at that moment
entered the room. Freddy came up to her in great
glee, holding up his rosy smiling face for a kiss; whilst
cousin James, scarcely giving her a nod, or a hasty
“how d’ye do,” cast an enquiring glance on a present
to them all, of books and toys, that was lying on the
table, in the hope of discovering amongst them a packet
of Banbury cakes, knowing that Miss Murray would
pass through that town on her return.
6 THE FIVE SENSES.

Cousin James was a young Hast Indian, brought up
in all the self-indulgence of those luxurious and indolent
people, and being the only survivor of a large family of
children, had -had the misfortune to have his inclinations
more attended to than his education ; he had been over-
petted and admired, and, consequently, was in a fair
way to be spoiled, when, luckily for him, it was deemed
adviseable to send him to England on account of his
health; and he had been, therefore, consigned by his
parents to the care of his uncle and aunt Belford, with
a thousand tender injunctions as to his comforts, and a
positive interdict against his going to school, or studying
at home, till he was perfectly well, and I am sorry to
add, willing, of which latter condition he seemed in no
hurry to evince any symptoms, though he did abun-
dantly of restored health and vigour; but as he was
naturally neither deficient in talent, or good temper, his
friends were in hopes of eradicating his faults, and
improving his manners, by his association with his
cousins, and being under the daily notice of Miss
Murray. | |
~ “You cannot be more pleased, my dears,” said that
young lady, “at seeing me than I am to be with you
again, though I leave many dear relations and friends
for another six months: but then I am treated so kindly
by your papa and mamma, and have so much to gratify
me in your docility and attachment, that I should be
inexcusable, did I suffer myself to be dull on my
return. I only wish that every one who, like me, has
been obliged to seek a home amongst strangers, could









Mr. Belford showing his children the planets.
THE FIVE SENSES. "

speak of it and feel as I do. But now,’ added Miss
Murray, in her usually cheerful manner, “tell me how
lessons have gone on in my absence.”
QO, papa says he has been governess this time,” said
Julia; “he has taken us out almost every fine morning,
and told us the names, and showed us so many beauties,
that we never noticed before, in little wild flowers and
different grasses.’ “Then, on a clear night, he has
pointed out the stars to us,” added Mary; “telling us
which were planets, and showing us some of the con-
stellations, so that we shall know them again when we
see them.”
« And papa says we have five senses,” chimed in little
- Freddy ;—“ And more too, I should think,” said cousin
~ James, rather out of humour, at failing to discover any-
thing resembling a paper of cakes amongst the packages
before him. “O, no, only five, cousin James,” answered
the little boy; “Tl tell you their names;” and he be-
gan to count on his fingers, “first, there is SEEING,

then comes Hearine, then Frzuimne, then SMELLING,
and last, Tastine.”

“?Stead of last, that ought to be first,’ said cousin
James. “ But why, Master Sedgewick?” enquired
~Miss Murray. “ Because it 1s the best, to be sure,”

answered the rude young epicure. “But you must
prove it to be the best,” rejomed Miss Murray; “ your
merely saying so will convince no one.”

“ Well, then,” said cousin James, “can’t I eat my
edinner without seeing, supposing I was blind; and

without hearing, supposing I was deaf; and even with-
8 THE FIVE SENSES.

out feeling, if somebody would put it into my mouth
for me; and I don’t care much about smelling, when
it is once on my plate, though I do like to sniff at it on
top of the kitchen stairs, when there is anything savoury
going on below. So you see I could do with that one
sense without any other, better than I could do with all
the rest, without that one.’

“ But, even admitting that you would do so,” returned
Miss Murray, “it does not follow that other people
could, and, therefore, you have not proved what you
asserted; to be deprived of any one of the five senses,
would subject us to an infinite number of inconve-
niences. To lose the power of tasting, would undoubt-
edly be a severe infliction; but to preserve it on condi-
tion of giving up the other four, would be a much
worse evil still; consider what a delight it is to hear
beautiful music, lively and clever conversation, the
voices of those we love. Then how much there is in
being able to see; for instance, have you not just heard
how pleased your cousin Julia was in being shown the
minute beauties of even the commonest flower ? ”’

“O, I don’t care for any flower but the baker’s,” in-
terrupted cousin James, who having been encouraged
by his attendants in India, to consider flippancy as wit,
was seldom at a loss for pert answers; “there’s some

3

use in that, it makes us nice tarts and cakes;’’ and then
unable longer to bear his uncertainty as to a present of
the latter, he added, “I suppose you did’nt come
through Banbury this time, did you, Miss Murray?”

«¢ What makes you think that I did not?” “Because,”
THE FIVE SENSES. mm!)

answered cousin James, hesitating a little, and colour-
ing with just a very faint tinge of shame, I thought
that every body who travelled through Banbury bought
some cakes.”

“Perhaps, as that is the custom, I did so too,” an-
swered Miss Murray. O! then its all right,” exclaimed
the youth, with great animation; “I thought, as I
did’nt see them, that you had not brought any.”

““That would be no proof,” said Miss Murray, “ for
I may have found them so particularly good as to be
induced to eat them all before I got home, as you did
the early strawberries you purchased before I went
away.” Cousin James looked for a moment rather
abashed at having this piece of selfishness brought to
his recollection, but disappointment being the stronger
feelmg, he muttered something that implied it was
natural and right to expect cakes from Banbury.

“ But suppose I brought you, mstead of a nice cake
from Banbury, a nice book from Oxford,” said Miss
Murray. “I don’t call books nice,’ grumbled the
ill-educated boy. “Except the cookery book,’ said
Mary, slily; “I often see you reading that.” “ Aye,
there’s some pleasure in reading that,” answered cousin

James;”

and I enly wish that I could always get such
alot of eggs and eream, and almonds and spices, and
other nice things, that they tell us is wanted for even
a little pudding.”

“YT almost believe, cousin,” said Julia, laughing,
that you never think of any thing but eating,” “O,
yes, but I do, though; for, when I have done eating, I
10 THE FIVE SENSES.

think of sleeping,” answered cousin James; half restored.
to good humour, by having an opportunity of showing
what he considered to be his wit, though the joke was
against himself.

“Your thinking of sleeping, according to your own
account,” observed Miss Murray, “is the natural con-
sequences of over feeding; or, as we are speaking of
the five senses, I might say, of gratifying the one sense
of tasting, to the prejudice of the other four; for too
great an indulgence of any one of them, must tend to
blunt the acuteness of the others; and when asleep,
though they still act in a degree, yet it is without our
controul; therefore, to devote more time te slumber
than what nature requires, is to limit not only the
period, but our powers of enjoyment. lLating and
sleeping, and reading the cookery book,” she added,
laughing; “pray, Master James, with these three ways
for disposing of your time, what sort of a man do you
expect to be?” “A eapital one, I hope,” returned
cousin James, “tall, stout, and with a great pair of
black whiskers.”

“Then, I thmk,’ said Miss Murray, “I know a
young lady who, if she should be willing to wait till
you are ten years older, will make you a very suitable
wife; she, like you, gives the preference to one sense
far above all the others, though that one is not tasting.
Seeing is the favourite with her; not that she cares to
read any more than you do; or to look at a beautiful
country, flowers, or stars, as Mary and Julia do; what
she most delights in beholding is herself, her dresses,
THE FIVE SENSES. 1.

and trinkets, for which purpose, she spends a great por-
tion of her time before the looking-glass, trying on
various ornaments, and admiring her own beauty;
never considering that, perhaps, that same glass may,
in the brief course of a few years, reflect a very dif-
ferent appearance, though from the same object, when
it may be too late to attain the cultivation of mind, and
agreeable manners, that so well compensate to their
possessor, for the decay of personal attractions.”

“Ts she very beautiful?” asked Mary. “ Perfectly
so, as to complexion and regularity of features,” an-
swered Miss Murray; “but the spirit and intelligence
that should give expression to both form and face, is
wanting, and she more resembles a wax doll, than a
being endowed with thought and feeling; it is Ellen
Elton that I speak of.” “I thought you did,’ cried
Mary; “but what a nice girl her sister Lucy is, I like
her a great deal the best.” “So everybody does that
T have heard speak of the two,” returned the governess;
“and yet she has neither fine features nor a brilliant
complexion; but then she has what her sister is defi-
cient in, for Lucy has taken as much pains to ornament
her mind, as Ellen has her person.”

Miss Murray would, perhaps, have farther illustrated
her subject of the five senses, had not a loud yawn from
cousin James interrupted her; having but little relish
for such discourse, his eyes were beginning to close, and
he was swaying to and fro, in some danger of tumbling
off his chair.

“O, fie, Master Sedgwick,”-said Miss Murray, going
]2 THE FIVE SENSES.

up to him, “you surely would not be so rude as to fall
asleep in the company of ladies? if you hope to be a
capital man, as you term it, you must be polite; or else,
though you should grow up tall and stout, and with a
great pair of whiskers, you will not be half so much
admired as you would be if well-behaved, although
short, thin, and with no whiskers at all. I am going
now to divide the toys and books; and perhaps I may
find a cake or two from Banbury, though you could
iets:

At these words cousin James sprung from his seat
with an alacrity he seldom evinced, made a stammering
apology, and followed with the rest of the young people
to the table, out of the drawer of which Miss Murray
took a small paper bag, containing but two cakes, which
having divided, she presented a half to each of them,
looking as grave as she possibly could, for it was a great
effort to refrain from at least smiling, perceiving as she
did the effect produced on the countenance of cousin
James, by the smallness of the gift. Little Freddy, as
well as his sisters, saw and understood it too, and with
the truthfulness of early childhood, that suggested no
necessity for concealment, and the generous feeling that
had been nurtured in him, immediately offered his por-
tion to the selfish boy, excusing himself to Miss Murray
for so doing, by saying, “ Please ma’am to let me give
mine to cousin James, because I know he will lke to
have it, for whenever we talked of your coming back,
he used to say he longed for the time too, as he was
sure you would bring us some cakes from Banbury.”

:

> .







i) yy Hf} Hyp l
Wy ve

t wll}



:

"

Miss Murray distributing the presents to her little pupils.
THE FIVE SENSES. 13

This severe though unintended reproof, and practical
lesson against selfishness, from a little fellow so much
his junior, was not without effect.

“No, Freddy,’ said cousin James, colouring partly
with shame, but more with mortification, “I am not
such a pig as that, neither, whatever folks may think of
me; and he felt almost clined to indulge his pride at
the expense of his favourite sense, by resigning his half
to the child; but that was too great an advance in
improvement to be expected as yet, for, a few months
back, he would unscrupulously have taken Freddy’s
share, if offered, promising to make it up to him some
way or other, indeed it mattered not how, as he would
in all probability have forgotten the circumstance as
soon as the gratification produced by it was over.

“You are a dear kind-hearted little boy, Freddy,”
said Miss Murray, kissmg him; “and even had your
cousin been willing to take your cake, which I felt
assured he would not be,” she added, as encourage-
ment to Master James, “there would be no occasion

? and again opening the

for his doing so, for see here;’
drawer, she showed them a large packet not as yet
broken into, and having now given them a whole one
a piece, the rest were put by till next day, and the toys

and books distributed.





FIVE SENSES.



CHAPTER II.

SsN the following morning, whilst Miss
‘(Murray and her pupils were preparing
for their accustomed walk, Mary told
her many other occurrences that had
taken place in her absence;—of a party
her mamma had had, in which were
Miss Ryland, a blind lady, and Mr. Sedley, a gentleman
who had wholly lost his sense of hearmg. “ Mamma
allowed Julia and me to be in the drawing-room for an
hour or two after tea,’ continued Mary, “ and we could
not help noticing all the time, how much happier Miss
Ryland seemed to be than Mr. Sedley ; so I suppose it
is a great deal better to hear than it 1s to see.”

“Tt would very naturally seem so to you, from what
you then remarked,” answered Miss Murray, “ because
you judged at once from what was immediately before
your observation; when you saw them they were both |
THE FIVE SENSES. 15

in society; perhaps, if you were to visit them when at
home and alone, you might think differently, so we will
pay our respects to them in the course of our walk.”
Both Mary and Julia said they should lke it very
much, and so did cousin James, recollecting that Mr.
Sedley’s garden was famed as having the best and
largest quantity of fruit, in the whole neighbourhood.

“T once spent some months with a family,” said Miss
Murray, as they pursued their way, “in which was a
gentleman both deaf and blind; he was not born so, but
had lost the use of those two important senses, after the
age of fourteen years; he was therefore fully aware of
his great privation.” “ How dreadful!” exclaimed
Mary, “ quite deaf and quite blind?” “Yes, quite so,”
answered Miss Murray; “he could neither see a gleam
of the strongest light held up before his eyes, or hear
the loudest sound, though it was close to his ears.”
“Poor, poor gentleman,” cried Julia, her eyes filling
with tears of commiseration.

“Tt was, indeed, a most melancholy case,” rejomed
Miss Murray; “but the human mind, when well regu-
lated, is so much disposed to accommodate itself to
circumstances, that even this unfortunate, in his dark-
ness and solitude, was not only desirous of life, but
often cheerful; he lived as it were in a little world of
his own creating, or rather, I should say, imagined out
of his thoughts. I have frequently heard him convers-
ing, question and answer, with himself.” “ Tow
curious,” said Mary; “but, I suppose, as he could
neither HEAR nor SEE, he used to think he was alone,
16 THE FIVE SENSES.

or forget that he was not.” “His friends, to relieve
the sameness of his existence, would often converse a
little with him,” said Miss Murray; “How do you
think that was managed?”

They each declared their inability to guess, for as he
could not see, they could not talk to him with their
fingers, nor write on a slate, as they did at Mr. Sedley’s,
for him to read it.

“ Another of the FIVE SENSES,’ resumed Miss Mur-
ray, “came to his aid, and this was FEELING, which,
from frequent use, and having his attention so much
fixed upon it, became so acute, that it is wonderful
how quickly, and accurately, he understood us; we used
to write, or rather trace the letters of each word, on the
palm of his hand, with our finger; thus we could make
or answer any enquiry on his part, or tell him anything
we thought might interest or amuse him.”

The young people, even little Freddy, expressed great
sympathy for this singularly afflicted person. “O, how
I should have liked to have brought him plenty of
flowers,” cried Julia; “for I dare say he had the sense
of sMELLING, even more than we have, the same as he
had of FEELING.”

“That he had, my dear,’ said Miss Murray, “and
he would have been most grateful for such attention.”
<¢ And I would have learnt to trace letters on his hand,”
said Mary. “And I could have led him about,” cried
Freddy, “where the grass was softest, and the sun was
shining.” “ All this was done for him, dears,” answered
their pleased geverness, for there were several warm-
THE FIVE SENSES. i

hearted little girls and boys lving im the same house
with him, and he was very fond of them, although he
could neither see nor hear them. But, Master James,
you have not yet told us what you would have done for
him.”

“Why, if he had’nt money to buy it for himself,”
answered cousin James, “ perhaps I might have brought
him something nice to eat.” “ But, supposing he had
sufficient money to purchase for himself?” rejoined
Miss Murray, “such a consideration ought not to deter
you from making an occasional present, if you thought
it would gratify him to receive it. It would be very
hard, because a person is able to buy for themselves,
that they should never be shown those pleasing atten-
tions that it is necessary for others to procure in order
to offer. But here we are at Miss Ryland’s, and Master
James, as you are the tallest, and our squire for the
present, suppose you knock at the door.”

Miss Ryland, with the quickness of hearing peculiar
to blind persons, was aware of their approach long
before cousin James’s rap, which he took care should be
such as became his ideas of self-importance. I eeling
her way to the parlour door, she eagerly welcomed them
all. “I hope you have come to spend a long morning
_ with me,” she said, “for I am dreadfully dall when
alone; I get so tired of playing the same tunes over and
over again.” “I believe your maid, Nancy, reads to
you sometimes, does she not?” enquired Miss Murray.
“QO, yes,” returned the blind lady; “but then, when I
was a girl, and could see, I never cared much about
18 THE FIVE SENSES.

books, so I got tired of them too. I am always wanting
some one to chat with, and tell me all the news and
gossip of the village.”

Miss Murray was perfectly aware of this, so she did
her best to render her conversation such as was cal-
culated to amuse the very frivolous mind of poor Miss
Ryland, who sighed deeply when she departed, and
earnestly begged that she would come again soon.
Mary and Julia both noticed the very dull look with
which she bid them good bye, so different from the
expression of her countenance whilst they remained, and
what it had been when she had visited their mamma;
this they observed to Miss Murray. “I thought you
would notice it, my dears,’ she returned; “but you must
not attribute it solely to her misfortune, for I fear that
Miss Ryland, unless constantly engaged in paying or
receiving visits, would be almost as dull as she is now,
even were her sight restored, never having cultivated
the useful art of amusing herself.”

A few minutes brought them to the door of Mr.
Sedley, where cousin James had the pleasure of again
giving a magnificent double knock. They found him
alone in his study, though he did not consider himself
to be so, for he was surrounded by a well-chosen col-
lection of books, several of which laid open upon the
table. Unhke Miss Ryland, he was more inelined to
be vexed than pleased, at their visit; but, being both
polite and good-tempered, he quickly recovered his
composure, and received them kindly. Mary and Julia
having early learnt to observe and reflect, could not but
THE FIVE SENSES. 19

perceive how cheerful and happy the old gentleman was
in his solitary study, and that it was not their coming
that made him so, for that was evidently, at first, an
unwished-for interruption to his pursuits.

After the first salutations, Miss Murray, by means of
the slate, congratulated him on looking so well and
cheerful; as she understood he had been latterly con-
fined to the house by a sprained foot, and much more
alone than usual.

“ T am never alone,’ returned Mr. Sedley, “ unless
I prefer to be so; “ for I have only to step into this
room,” he added, pointing round to his book shelves,
and I am immediately in the society of some of the
wisest and best men of all ages, and many nations; nor
do I want for the enlivening of wit to recreate a lighter
hour, for I have agreeable as well as intelligent com-
panions among them. Ah! my dear young gentle-
man,” he continued, addressing cousin James, “ let me
recommend you to early cultivate a good taste.”

Cousin James felt it to be quite in his power to
answer that he had; for he had heard nothing of the
previous part of what Mr. Sedley had uttered, having
seated himself close to the library window, his whole
attention engrossed in the contemplation of a fine
strawberry-bed immediately beneath it; but when the
old gentleman explaimed that he meant a love of read-
ing, and a desire to acquire knowledge, Cousin James
checked what he was about to write down, for that
was quite another matter to a taste for raspberry tarts
and Banbury cakes; so he listened in silence, availing
20 THE FIVE SENSES.

himself of Mr. Sedley’s infirmity as an excuse for not
replying. |

A microscope was now produced, for the entertainment
of the young folks. Mary and Julia were delighted,
and only fearful of tirig their kind entertainer, who
had a variety of minute objects, such as the seeds of
plants, and very small insects, ready to shew them
through it. Cousin James was pleased too, for a little
while, and might have been so, longer, only he began to
fear that there would be no time for the expected treat
in the garden, by which he had alone been induced to
come; his imagination was revelling in the thought of
what a grand thing it would be if gardeners could make
strawberries grow really as large as they would appear
through such a powerful magnifier, and he longed to at
least indulge his fancy by seeing one so much increased
in size, though he could not his taste, in eating it;
besides, to ask for it would, perhaps make Mr. Sedley
think of inviting them to a walk in the garden, which
it certainly did, with an apology for not having done so
before, adding, “ You will excuse my accompanying you,
on account of my foot.” “QO, certainly,” returned
Miss Murray, on the slate. “I will take Mary, Julia,
and Freddy; Master Sedgewick will be delighted to
remain with you till our return.”

“ That Pm sure I shant,’ eagerly exclaimed Cousin
James, on hearing her read, in a sort of whisper to
herself, what she had written, before presenting it to
Mr. Sedley. “ O, fie! Master Sedgewick,” said Miss
Murray, “ you surely would not be so ill-bred as not to








inying his ‘young friends to the

©

Comp:

Sedley ac

VA
IVLY.

2.
se.

summer-hou
THE FIVE SENSES. 21

propose staying with Mr. Sedley, as he is unable to
walk; you being the eldest, and a gentleman, are the
most proper person to do so.”

“QO, I don’t mind proposing,” said Cousin James,
“if I could be sure he would not keep me; but that
would be dreadful, you know.”

It was almost impossible to help laughing at the
energy with which this was said; but as it would have
been both unfeeling and rude to Mr. Sedley, who could
not have understood the cause of her mirth, Miss
Murray commanded her countenance, presenting the
slate in defiance of the alarmed and breathless look of
poor Cousin James, whose seeming proposal, to his great
relief, was declined with an acknowledgement of which
it was wholly undeserving.

“ Upon second thoughts,” said Mr. Sedley, “I will
take my book, and accompany you as far as the sum-
mer-house, where I shall like to spend an hour or two
this fine morning; you will find the strawberries now in
perfection ; pray do not spare them, or any thing else
that you may like to partake of.”

If any one of the little party felt too modest to take
advantage of this kind permission, you may be sure
that it was not Cousin James; on the contrary, he
walked forward before the rest, that he might have first
choice, bobbing about in all directions, looking eagerly
up to the cherry trees, and down amongst the straw-
berries, and from side to side at the currants and goose-
berries, hoping to find some ripened, though the season
was as yet early.
On THE FIVE SENSES.

But poor Cousin James, in his haste to gratify his
one favourite sense, was doomed, this morning, to be-
come better acquainted with the other four, than he at
all liked or expected. Making a hurried snatch at a
particularly large double strawberry, he took hold of a
nettle that was hidden by the leaves; the sudden smart
caused him to jerk his hand in so rough a manner, that
the tender fruit was smashed in his grasp; so he lost
the expected treat, and had, mstead of Tastine, a
pretty strong idea of what FrrLtine was; then, in
jumping up to reach some fine-looking cherries, he lost
his balance, and tumbled backwards on a little heap of
manure that laid at the foot of the tree, which being
disturbed by his weight, sent forth a smell not at all
agreeable; so here was another sense for Cousin James
to be annoyed by.

As they knew he was not hurt by his fall, and that
his troubles were all owing to his selfishness, little
Freddy and his sisters could not help laughing, which
sound reaching his ears, he was not a bit better pleased
with the sense of Hrearine, than he had been with
those of FrzeLine and SMELLING; and when he looked
at the dirty state of his jacket and trowsers, he was
equally out of humour with Srzine. “ You may laugh,
if you like,’ cried Cousin James; “ but now that I
know, all at once, what the Five Sensss are, Iam more
than ever sure that Tastine is a great, great deal the
best of them all.” Then, followed by the rest, he went
to a cottage at the end of the grounds in which the
gardener lived, that he might get his clothes brushed,
THE FIVE SENSES. 28

and his face and hands washed, before returning to Mr.
Sedley, in the summer house.

The gardener’s wife was frying onions and bits of
meat, all chopped up together, in a pan, and their
savory odour striking on Cousin James’s sense of smell-
ing, in a very pleasant manner, he longed to be eating
too. So when he was brushed and washed, he went up
to the fire-place, and began sniffing in such a manner,
that the woman guessed what he wanted, and invited
him to have some.

Whilst she went to fetch a plate, Miss Murray asked
him if it was his intention to give her the trouble he
had already done, for nothing; and then to eat up her
dinner without paying for it too; further enquiring
whether he had any money about him. “TI have some
pence in my pocket,’ answered Cousin James, in no
hurry to take them out; but being assured that he must
give the woman something, even though he did not taste
the savory mess, he handed them to her, and then
eagerly took a large spoonful of what was set before
him, saying “ Now Pll show you what a famous sense
TASTING is.”

But, alas for Cousin James, the gardener’s wife was
one of those idle slatterns, who never consider what
they are about, so as they can hurry through their work.
In slicing the onions, she had put in decayed parts with |
the sound; and in her carelessness and haste, had taken
stale dripping instead of fresh, pouring into the pan all
the gravy that had settled at the bottom, which was
very stale indeed; the strength of the onions, when
24 THE FIVE SENSES.

frying, had overcome the dripping and the gravy, so
that the whole smelt very good, but when it came to
Tasting! one mouthful was quite enough to prove that
to be altogether different. Cousin James thought of
his money; and always liking to have his pennyworth
for his penny, tried another mouthful; but it would
not do; so he was obliged to own, at least to himself,
that the sense of Tastine might be in fault, sometimes,
as well as those of Szzrne, Hearine, Frevine, and
SMELLING.

Upon their return to the summer-house, they found
Mr. Sedley had laid down his book, and was apparently
thinking very deeply. “I am going to ask a favour of
you,” he said, as Miss Murray held out her hand to
take leave. ‘ I want you to undertake a little com-
mission of enquiry, for which my unfortunate loss of
hearing entirely disqualifies myself.’ Miss Murray
immediately expressed not only her readiness, but the
pleasure she shonld feel, im obliging him; and Mr.
Sedley proceeded to say:

“A few days ago, I met with an incident that greatly
interested me, trifling as it might perhaps appear to
others. When the weather is warm enough, I fre-
quently read in this room, and that being the case on
Monday last, I brought my books and sat down for a
morning’s enjoyment; there came on, soon after, a
sudden and rapid shower. A little girl, who has been
frequently hired by the gardener to assist in weeding,
was employed at the time, close by; seeing that she
continued at her work, though but ill protected from









Patty Bell presenting her books to Mr. Sedley.
THE FIVE SENSES. 29

the wet, her clothes being but scant and old, T desired
her to come in, and resumed my reading. Before the
rain had ceased, a friend arrived at the house, whom I
had not seen for some time, and on being told where I
was, came tome. As I could not hear him, I had almost
all the talk to myself, and in answer to his enquiry on
the slate, of how I amused myself, I expatiated on the
never-failing delight that I found in reading, and on
the goodness of God in affording me time for such a
relief to my infirmity, for I might have been poor, and
occupied in working for my living. The child was still
with me; she sat on that rustic stool opposite, looking
in my face, and listening to what I said, with an ear-
nestness of attention that I attributed to mere childish
anxiety and wonder; having no idea, then, of what was
really passing through her little brain.

“The shower at length being over, the poor thing
went again to her weeding, after dropping me a curt-
sey, and saying, as I suppose, ‘Thank you, sir,’ for I
could see that her lips moved, though I could not hear
what they uttered; my friend then accompanied me
into the house, and I thought no more of the matter.

“ Being in the summer-house again, next day, I was
reading, as I usually do, with great intentness, when, —
suddenly raising my eyes from the page, I saw the little
weeder standing before me on the opposite side of the
table; three or four baby-looking books were in her
hand, tied together with a piece of clean tape; as soon
as she had attracted my notice, she pushed them towards
me, with flushed cheeks and eyes that sparkled with a
26 THE FIVE SENSES.

brightness scarcely conceivable. I never saw so beautiful
and so remarkable a pair of eyes as hers. I was, at first,
too much confused by the study I had been engaged in,
and the unexpectedness of her appearance and _ action,
to take up and undo the little parcel, which the poor
child perceiving, without being able to account for, a
look of the most painful disappointment shadowed her
countenance; then with the ardour of a young spirit
bent on achieving its good purpose, for such it was, she
untied the tape herself, and rendered fearless by the
consciousness of her motive and desire of success, opened
the books, one after the other, at their title-pages, eager-
ly holding them up before my eyes; and in the next
moment, rapidly turning over the leaves, pointed to the
wood-cuts, with an expression on her features of admir-
ing ecstacy, that she evidently expected to see reflected
in mine, and that seemed to say, ‘ You delight in read-
ing, and there’s entertainment for you!’ The books
were, Jack, the Giant Killer; Goody Two Shoes; and
Cinderella; with other stories of the same kind.

“ Soon as I could get a moment in which to arrange
my ideas, everything was evident to me that she wished
I should comprehend, so expressive was all she looked
and did. She had not only listened to, but compre-
hended what she had heard me say on the preceding
day; and had in consequence brought me the whole of
her library, thinking, in her untutored simplicity, that
books which had so highly gratified herself, must be
equally pleasing to me.

JT was puzzled what to do: I could not bear to
THE FIVE SENSES. ot

undeceive her by refusing her present, neither would
it have been right to chill the warm impulse of so
generous a nature, by seeming less charmed than she
expected me to be; so I thanked her very much,
and then took out my purse, intending to give her far
more than their value, that she might supply her-
self with a fresh stock; but the look she gave me, on
perceiving my design, was such as made me sorry,
for her sake, that I had incurred it. I saw immedi-
ately that there was a delicacy of sentiment about
her, as well as ardour, that must have been inherent ;
for where could she have acquired it? and to wound
this feeling would probably be to injure her future cha-
racter ; so I returned the purse to my pocket, and again
made the sort of acknowledgment I thought she wished
for, and she left me in full possession of her treasure,
apparently as happy as she would have been, had I
conferred a favour on her, instead of she having be-
stowed one on me.

“ Now,” continued Mr. Sedley, “I come to the favour
I would request, Miss Murray, of you: I understand
from the gardener that she is an orphan; I should like
to have some enquiries made of the person with whom
she lives, as to who she is, and what has been her gene-
ral conduct, for I feel strongly inclined to do something
for her more than what mere casual charity might sug-
gest; if I am not greatly mistaken, she has both a
heart and mind highly susceptible of cultivation, and
having no children of my own, or relations, to interfere
with the disposition of my property, I have ample
28 THE FIVE SENSES.

means to afford her education, and to place her, after-
wards, in a more respectable rank in life than what her
friends can now possibly contemplate for her. Her
name is Patty Bell, and she dwells with an old woman
called Widow Barton, in one of the smallest cottages
down Willow-lane.”

Miss Murray assured Mr. Sedley that she felt ex-
tremely interested in what he had narrated, and would
visit the widow on the following morning, and immedi-
ately after let him know the result; she then, with her
young charges, took leave.

“TI wonder,” said Cousin James, as they walked
home, “ what Mr. Sedley would give for a book worth
having, when he is willing to do so much for a trumpery
present as that he is making such a fuss about.” “I
cannot exactly say,’ answered Miss Murray, “ and I
would not advise you to try to find out.” “ But I
think I shall, though,” rejoined Cousin James; “I
have got a great many books that I don’t care anything
about, except for their binding, that makes them look
so well on the shelf” “ From which you never take
them; do you, Cousin James?” asked Mary, laughing.
“O, yes, I do, sometimes,” said Cousin James, “to dust
them!” And having made this joke at the expense of
his ignorance, he was for a time supremely happy, but
the idea recurred of presenting to Mr. Sedley a book
which should produce to himself some advantage more
than its value; and he again intimated his determina-
tion to do so. | |

“You put me in mind of a story related of one of the
THE FIVE SENSES. | 99

kings of France,” said Miss Murray; “I believe it was
of Louis XI. When he was Dauphin, which is the
same as our Prince of Wales here, he used often to visit
a gardener who was celebrated for the size and delicious
flavour of his fruit; afterwards, upon ascending the _
throne, he left off these visits; but his humble frend
the gardener, knowing how much he was interested in
the extraordinary growth of both fruits and vegetables,
thought he might still feel so, though his rank as king
prevented his coming to the garden as he had hitherto
done; he therefore one day took to him an enormous
radish, which for colour and thickness was the most
wonderful thing he had as yet produced. The monarch,
in recompense for this attention, and in remembrance
of many others he had received from him in former
times, ordered his treasurer to pay him the sum of a
thousand crowns.

“This great liberality of the king soon became
known all over the village in which the gardener lived,
and the lord of the manor said, as you did just now,
‘If his majesty gives so much for a trumpery radish,
what will he not do for me, if I give him my best horse,
which indeed is not to be matched by any other in all
France? my fortune will surely be made.’ Accordingly,
he went with his horse to the king’s palace, and being
admitted to his presence, begged his majesty’s accept-
ance of the animal, bestowing on it, at the same time,
the most extravagant encomiums, winding up by assur-
ing him it was one of the greatest rarities of its species.
The king, on going to the window and beholding the
30 THE FIVE SENSES.

horse, which a groom was purposely parading before it,
readily admitted that it was a most singularly beautiful
creature, but he was not so willing to acknowledge the
disinterested motive that the lord of the manor at-
tempted to impose on his belief.

“ Finding out, by an adroit question, where he came
from, his majesty directly understood the whole busi-
ness, and turning to the cunning expectant, he said,
‘ And I, too, have in my possession as great a curiosity,
of its kind, as your horse appears to be of his;’ he then
desired an attendant to bring in the radish, which, hav-
ing made suitable acknowledgments for his gift, he
presented to the disappointed courtier, as a valuable
offering in return.

“So take care, Master Sedgewick,” added Miss Mur-
ray, “that you do not get in exchange for your hand-
somely bound volumes, poor Patty Bell’s half worn-out
‘trumpery,’ as you are pleased to call them; though I
certainly think that Mr. Sedley would not easily be
induced to part with them; you may therefore only
obtain thanks, for I believe he can detect motives of
conduct as readily as did kmg Louis XI.”

Cousin James was not a little mortified at having
displayed his selfishness to no purpose: and in order to
hide his vexation by creating a laugh, he asked (in allu-
sion to the story) whether that was not the beginning
of the word horse-radish ; he would have said origin, but
that was a term he had never learnt the signification of.

“IT was in hopes, Master Sedgewick,” replied Miss
Murray, gravely, that instead of attempting to display
THE FIVE SENSES. . 3l

your wit, by making a silly jest of this little anecdote,
you would have shown your good sense by applying its
moral. However, I do not despair of you yet,” she
added, for her principle in education was rather to en-
courage amendment by cheerful admonition, than to
repress error by too much stern severity. “TI still
think that you will allow your better feelings and un-
derstanding to triumph over your faults; and then,
perhaps, we may find your jokes more amusing, being
better pointed, tlian they are at present.”

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CHAPTER III. 6 ine

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N the following morning, Miss Murray, Mary,

Julia, and the two boys, had a delightful

walk across the meadows, to Willow-lane,
for the purpose of making their visit of
enquiry to Widow Barton. They found her seated at
the open door, busily employed in knitting; she was a
respectable old woman, though dressed in very mean
clothes, but then they were neatly mended and per-
fectly clean; her grey hair was tidily arranged beneath
a plain muslin cap of snowy whiteness, the border
fitting closely round her face; she was altogether a very
prepossessing and venerable looking person. Miss
Murray assuring her she had nothing to say but what
might be for the advantage of the child, begged that
she would allow her to make some enquiries about
Patty Bell.

The widow declaring her perfect willingness to answer


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Widow Barton rela

THE FIVE SENSES. 30

any question that might be asked, showed the little
party into her cottage, and shut the door. Having
placed the only three chairs it contained, for the ac-
commodation of her lady visitors, she offered a couple
of stools, with many apologies, to the young gentlemen,
herself remaining standing; but this neither Miss
Murray or the little girls would permit, and, therefore,
making her sit down in what was evidently her own
peculiar seat; they, with the two boys, established
themselves as they could. Cousin James being in an
unusually good humour, having profited by the lesson
of the preceding day, turned a large empty flower pot
upside down, on which to rest his feet, and seated him-
self on the table, only begging that his cousins would
not fancy he was something nice and want to eat him,
because he was dressed and placed there.

“TI suppose you know, Mrs. Barton,” said Miss
Murray, “that your grandchild, Patty, is employed in
weeding the garden of Mr. Sedley.” “She is no
grandchild of mine,” interrupted the Widow; “but,
however, that is of no consequence, for she is just the
same to me as though she was.” “ Well, then,” re-
sumed Miss Murray, “Mr. Selby being, from his
extreme deafness, unfitted to come himself, he has
requested me to enquire for him, with a view to serve
her, for he has taken a strong interest in the child, and
if she is as good as she appears to be, is desirous of
doing something towards educating and providing for
her, in a manner better than her friends may be able
to do.”
34 THE FIVE SENSES.

“She has no friends, ma’am, poor little thing,” said
the Widow; “no father, no mother, nor any other
relation that I ever heard of; when I am gone from her,
she will stand alone in the wide world, with only God
to protect and love her. It is this thought that makes
me still cling to life, though I am only a burthen on
others, being unable now to work hard enough for my
own support: Squire Sedley is a kind gentleman, and
he will have his reward.” 7

“ He has it even now,” answered Miss Murray; “in.
the consciousness of possessing not only the means, but
the will to assist his poor neighbours; but tell me all
you can about this little girl, as it is important to her
that I should be fully informed.”

“Oh, Miss,’’ replied the Widow; “I am only atraid
that when I get talking of my poor Patty, I shall tire
you, and these young ladies and gentlemen too.” “0,
no,” cried Mary, answering for herself and _ sister;
“for we have heard so much about her from Mr. Sedley,
that we quite like little Patty already.” “And I’m
sure,” said the incorrigible cousin James, in a whisper
to Julia, “that I am too fond of nice little patties, ever
to be tired of hearing of them.”

“ Her mother,” said the Widow Barton, addressing
Miss Murray, “ died a few months after her birth, and it
was through that misfortune, pretty dear, that she came
to be with me. I had then two daughters lving with
me, and we gained a livelihood by taking nurse chil-
dren, so the poor father brought his motherless babe to
our cottage; he was but a labourmg man, but being of |
THE FiVE SENSES. 85

frugal habits, and a fond parent, he paid us well for
taking care of her; every Monday, as regular as the
week came round, John Bell’s money was ready for us.
This kept on till Patty was nearly two years old, when,
poor thing, her father caught a fever, and died in less
than a fortnight afterwards, leaving nothing behind him
but a few shillings, and some clothes of little value.

“We had often heard him say, that he was an only
child, and what few relations he had were poor, lke
himself; and had, years ago, emigrated to some foreign
land; his wife had been a servant, and had left Scot-
land, which was her native country, when the family
she lived in came to England, so that there were no
friends to apply to on either side, even about his burial;
the parish did that for him, and offered to take the
child into the house; but somehow, I had grown so fond
of it, that I could not at first make up my mind to let
it go there. Folks said if we waited a bit, we might
perhaps get it into one of the Orphan Asylums; so I
thought that I would, and my daughters agreed to do so
too; and, in the mean time, more than one of the
tradespeople said they would help us to keep her; the ~
‘two bakers gave us three or four little loaves a week,
and the milkman, when he came in the morning, always
asked for little Pat’s mug, that he might fill it with
milk.

“T shall always think,” said the Widow, “ that those
good deeds were lucky to them, for the bakers have
twice the custom now that they had then, and the milk-
man has never lost a cow since, though he sometimes
36 THE FIVE SENSES.

used to do so before. Now and then, when we went to
the village shop, to buy frocks and things for the other
chidren, the master would give us a remnant or two for
the baby, who had no objection to wear clothes, though
she could neither make nor pay for them, he used to
say, for he was a droll man and would have his joke.
‘But never mind, Widow, he afterwards said, ‘she will
settle it all with you some day, I can see that in her
sweet face, and her little loving ways.’ F
«¢ And if she does not, I may never want it,’ I would
answer; and then I used to think of the words of our
blessed Saviour, when he spoke of little children, and I
felt that I could not send her away to be amongst
strangers in the workhouse, though I know it is a great
thing to have such places provided for us, either in
childhood or old age; so, month after month, and at
last, year after year, passed away, and the little friendless
child was still with us.
“When she was about four years old, one of my
daughters married, and went soon after to live with her
husband in the north; and within one year more, the
other settled too, in a county a great way off. This was
a heavy loss to me, for I could not manage to amuse
children without their assistance, but I comforted
myself in thinking of their happiness, for they had
both of them married steady mdustrious men. I was
still able to do something for my living, and they each
sent me a trifle now and then, from their own earnings,
besides which, I had two shillings a week allowed to me
by the parish, for Patty. So I moved to this small
THE FIVE SENSES. 37

cottage, which having a bigger garden than I expected,
I had plenty of vegetables, and managed to pay my
rent, and did very well for the first year. But in the
second, we had so much cold and damp weather, that I
was taken with the rheumatism, and, by degrees, became
so lame, that I could not go out to work as I did before.
The poor child and I were obliged to pinch very hard to
make our money last out, so as to pay for all as we had
it, for I could never bear the thought of being in debt.

“ At last, about a twelvemonth ago, I became very ill;
and I said, one morning, ‘I am no longer able to work;
I feel as though I could not even wash out the few
things we shall want to put on clean for Sunday; I fear
not only you, but I too, Patty, must now go into the
Union-house.’? The poor thing tried to comfort me, and
begged so hard that I would lie down on the bed, that I
did so, and, tired with a long night of pain, I fell into a
sleep that lasted three or four hours. When I awoke, I
missed her from the room, and called; but getting no
answer, got up to look for her; and where, ma’am, do
you think I found her?” asked the Widow Barton, for-
getting in her exultation that it was not likely any of
her visitors could tell; “why, m a shed at the bottom
of the garden, there was little Patty, with a tub before
her, standing on a stool that she might reach up to it,
and washing away as though she would have rubbed all
the skin off her hands, rather than not go on.

“T shall never forget,’ added the old dame, wiping
her eyes with a corner of her apron, “the bright look
that she turned upon me, though one of her dear little

D
38 THE FIVE SENSES.

fingers was nearly bleeding at the time; affectionate,
grateful little creature as she is. The good sleep I had
had, and the finding so much thought and kindness in
such a mere child, seemed to spirit me up in a moment,
so I made her let me finish, though she was very
unwilling that I should. But what I have to tell about
her did’nt end here. Next morning, I awoke early as
usual, for I was in the habit of fetching water-cresses
from a distance, and then carrying them round to the
gentlefolks’ houses before breakfast time. I was saying
to myself, what shall I do if somebody else should get
my customers from me whilst Iam ill? I must try to go,
even if I walk with two sticks; so I got gently out of
bed, for fear of disturbing the poor child; but early as
it was, she was already up and out. Well, I was very
much surprised at first, but recollecting that it was
May morning, I thought she had gone a maying, with
some young companions, who I know had asked her,
and that she had stole away softly for fear of waking
me.

“Finding myself much more lame than I thought
for, I was obliged to give up my intention of going
round the village, though it vexed me very much, so all
I could do was to wait patiently for Patty’s return, and
get a bit of breakfast ready for her; that she had taken
care, before she went, should not be of much trouble to
meé, for I found the cups and saucers set, the kettle
filled and put on the hob, and a pile of wood on the
hearth, ready for lighting the fire. Such a thoughtful
little creature, Miss, I never heard tell of, nor have
THE FIVE SENSES, 389

I seen before, and mine has been a long life, for I am
upwards of sixty; but I fear I tire you, for somehow I
can’t speak of that time, without being quite run away
with, as I may say.” “ Instead of being tired, I am
exceedingly interested,” replied Miss Murray, “and so,
I am sure, are my young friends; pray go on, I long to
know where little Patty had gone to.”

“ Well, Miss,’ resumed Widow Barton, “ back she
came with my water-cress basket on her arm, about the
time that I usually did, her eyes as bright as diamonds,
and her cheeks as fresh as a rose; ‘O, Granny,’ she
said, as she ran up to me, ‘every body has been so
kind; I fetched the cresses, and then I went and sold
them all; all, Granny! and people asked me why I
came instead of you? and when I told them you were
il, and I had come without your knowing it, for fear
you would not let me, they patted me on the head and
said I was a good girl.’ Then she lifted the clean white
cloth that covered her basket, and showed me (instead
of the May flowers I had at first expected to see, a .
greater number of pence than I had ever been able to
collect in any morning that [ had gone round with
cresses, myself; so we sat down to breakfast, quite
cheerful and happy; and the next day, the dear child
went again, and did so every morning till I was better,
and then I wouldn’t let her, for fear she should be over
tired, and perhaps ill.

« As the weather grew warmer, I was less rheumatic,
and able to work a little in the fields, and Patty could
earn a trifie that way too, so we did pretty well whilst
40 THE FIVE SENSES.

the summer lasted; but when winter drew nigh, my
lameness returned, and we were again very poor, and
then it would have done your heart good, though I’m
sure it made mine ache, to see the thoughtfulness of
that young thing when we had but a scanty meal to
sit down to; especially when we think of the selfishness
of some children who are so much better off. She little
thought that I noticed it, but I could see that she ate
as slowly as possible, in the hope that I might get the
bigger share; and I am sure she must often have pre-
tended to have had enough, when she was still almost
hungry: but Providence still befriended us, and all
through little Patty, again.

“ Going out one morning, to sell a few flowers we had
carefully treasured, for they had bloomed very late in
the season, she saw something bright lying in the path
before her; it was nearly covered with dust, but Patty
was walking with her eyes toward the ground, for there
was a cold wind blowing against her, that made the
water run out of them; picking it up, she found it was
a half sovereign.” — |

“ What a piece of good luck!” exclaimed Cousin
James, “ how pleased she must have been.” “ Yes,
sir,” returned the widow; “ from what I could learn
from her, she was indeed very much pleased, for the
first moment; but then, in the next, she thought, if she
was so glad to find it, how sorry somebody might be at
having lost it; so, instead of coming back to me directly,
she went on with her flowers, hoping to find the owner
of the money, for she meant to enquire of everybody
about it.
THE FIVE SENSES. 4]

“On turning down the next lane, leading to where
she was going, she saw a lady at some distance before
her, and thinking the half sovereign might be hers, she
ran after her as fast as she could; when she came up to
her, she was too much out of breath to speak: the lady,
thinking she wanted her to buy her flowers, asked their
price, when Patty, having got her voice again, told her
that was not what she meant; then she showed her the
piece of money she had picked up, and enquired if it
was hers.”

“ She was a goose for that, though,” observed Cousin
James, very much interested in this part of Patty’s
story; “she should first have asked the lady whether
she had dropped any thing; and if she said ‘ Yes,’ told
her to tell what it was.” “'That’s very true, sir,” an-
swered the widow, “and the lady said so, too; but the
good, kind-hearted child was too young and too innocent
to think of all that. She believed everybody to be as
honest as herself; so when the lady, on counting some
money she carried in her glove, told her that it was
hers, she gave it to her, and was going on, without even
asking her to buy a flower; for that, she thought, would
sound like wishing to be paid for doing what she knew
to be right. TI could understand that to be her feeling,
though she did not express it to me; and the lady
understood it too, as I learnt from her own lips, when
she came to the cottage next day; for she had ques-
tioned the child as to who she was, and where she lived ;
and then little Patty had left her, and having sold her
4,2 THE FIVE SENSES.

flowers, came back to me with the money, and told me
all about the half sovereign.”

“And did’nt the lady give her even a few pence to
buy a cake or two with?” asked Cousin James, indig-
nantly.

“No, sir,’ answered the widow, “and if she had,
Patty would not have laid them out in that way; what-
ever she had given to her, she always brought to me;
but of course I never spent it on myself, but kept it
entirely for her use; and when the pence got up to
fourpence or sixpence, she would now and then treat
herself with a book ; for she is very fond of reading, and
the neighbours’ children will sometimes lend her theirs,
for her stock is very small.”

“ Did she never buy anything nice to eat, with her
money?’ enquired Cousin James, in utter astonish-
ment; ‘such as raspberry tarts, cheesecakes,’—“ Or
Banbury cakes, Master Sedgewick,” added Miss Mur-
ray; “you don’t mean to leave them out, I’m sure.”

“ No, sir,” replied Mrs. Barton; “I don’t think she
even knows the taste of such things.”

“ Dear me! how dreadful,” exclaimed the self-in-
‘dulged Cousin James: “ I never heard of anything so
shocking,—I should really like to give her a treat.”

“ Ah, sir,” said the widow, “ that, perhaps, you may
easily do, if you have a few old books you have grown
past the age of being pleased with, and can spare; that
would be a treat to her, indeed.”

“TI don’t mean books,’ cried Cousin James, con-
temptuously ; “ I want to see how she would look ina
THE FIVE SENSES. : 43

pastry-cook’s shop, when I tell her to eat a shilling’s
worth, or perhaps oe pennyworth of any thing
she likes there.”

“ You are very kind, sir,” answered the widow, “ but
Tam afraid Patty, instead of enjoying such a treat as
that, would be thinking of how much bread might be
bought for the money, or perhaps of a new tippet, or
ribbon for her bonnet, to go to church in; for she
never fails, every Sunday, to be there, and likes to be
as clean and tidily drest as our poor means will afford.
You must not think, sir,’ added the good woman, “ that
I tell you this in the hope of your bestowing the same
sum on her, in her own way; I only want to show what
sort of disposition hers is, as this lady wishes to know.”

“ You have not yet told me,” observed Miss Murray,
“what the owner of the half sovereign said to you,
when she called at your cottage.”

“Tn the first place, ma’am,” replied the widow, “ she
said a great deal of how much she was pleased with
Patty, even before the child had spoken, describing to
me the particularly bright and earnest look that she has
when she thinks she is doing what will give pleasure ;
IT know the look well, for I have seen it hundreds of
times. Before she could say that she had found it,
(for she was out of breath,) she had held up the piece
of money to the lady, her eyes speaking for her as
plainly as any words could do. ‘ I would not give her
any reward at the time,’ said the lady, ‘because I would
not ‘mix any selfish feeling with the pure delight that
she felt im having restored to the owner what must have
44, THE FIVE SENSES.

appeared to her of far greater value than it really was;
but now I must beg you to accept what she found ; it
will buy her something more suitable for this cold
weather than what she had on yesterday, poor little
dear; and I shall like, if I can, to be of farther service
to you.’ Then she asked me if I could knit stockings,
and finding that I could, she gave mea long job, for
she had a large family of boys, and besides brought me
some other customers from amongst her friends; so,
what with one thing and another, we have got through
the winter pretty well; and this spring, Patty has
earned more than I could expect from one so young, in
being hired to weed some of the gentlefolk’s gardens,
amongst which is Squire Sedley’s.” |

When the widow had concluded her little narrative,
Miss Murray expressed herself extremely pleased, and
assuring her that she would soon see her again, took
leave, but not till she had slipt into her hand a little
present.of money, given her by Mr. Sedley for the
purpose, not only to indemnify the child for the loss
of her library, for such it was, though voluntarily be-
stowed, but to gladden the widow’s heart with some
little additional comforts, in her humble home.

In crossing the fields on their return, Miss Murray
and her young companions sought shelter from a sud-
den shower, beneath an old shed; and whilst there, had
a fresh opportunity of remarking on the five senses, as
being called into use all at once, and from the same
cause, that is, from the shower: for they FELT it, when
they stretched out their hands; and they could Hzan it,
THE FIVE SENSES. 45

at the same time, pattering on the leaves of a tree close
by; then they smext the pleasant odour it drew from
some newly-dug mould, on which it fell; and looking
up into the sky they BEHELD a beautiful raibow occa-
sioned by it, for the sun was still shinmg. Cousin
James determined that rastine should not be left out,
since they had each of the other four senses, held his
open palm under the eaves of the shed, by which means
he caught some of the drippings, so that he was enabled
to taste it, but, falling from off the dirty thatch, it was
not very nice, as you may suppose.

“1 don’t care,” cried Cousin James, making, at the
same time, a wry face at what he had swallowed, “ bad
luck now, better another time; yonder is a donkey, [ll
make up for all, by having a good ride.” So saying, off
he scampered, and in another minute had clambered on
to the animal’s back; but the donkey seemed to know
that he had no business there, without leave, so he
ducked his head between his fore legs, and threw up his
hind feet, in the hope to get rid of him: but finding
that would not do, he set off in a hard trot, over some
rough ground into the next field, nearly shaking all the
breath out of poor Cousin James’s body; for he was
- not much of a rider, and had neither saddle, bridle, nor
stirrups, to help him; he was therefore obliged to cling
round the creature’s neck to keep himself on, being
afraid to jump off whilst it went so fast, and he could
not stop it; so you may think what a ridiculous figure
he looked. ‘“ Bad luck now, better another time,”

thought Cousin James; but unfortunately for him, it
A6 THE FIVE SENSES.

turned out to be bad luck now, worse another time, for
he had no sooner repeated the saying to himself, than
the donkey, who of course went wherever he pleased,
rode him into the middle of a brook, and stooping low
down to drink, for the water was very shallow, threw
Cousin James over his head; so he not only had a ride,
but another tumble, and a bath at the end of it, out of
which he had to walk about twenty yards, amidst the
brayings of the donkey, who seemed thus to testify his
satisfaction at the prank he had played him; and the
shouting and laughing of some mischievous boys who
were idling about, and thought all they saw and heard
was very good fun. Cousin James, however, was of a
different opinion, so, without waiting for Miss Murray
to overtake him, he ran home as fast as he could, not a
little mortified at meeting with so ludicrous a finish to
his many disasters.





FIVE SENSES.

CONCLUSION.





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IFAISS MURRAY lost no time in communi-
cating the result of her enquiries to
Mr. Sedley, who was exceedingly pleased
at having the opinion he had formed
from Patty’s countenance and manner so fully justified.
He was glad, too, that there were no relations to inter-
fere, because they might have been far less respectable
than the Widow Barton, and therefore have been a great
drawback on his benevolent intentions both for the
presert and future weifare of the child.

Patty was, soon after, entirely new clothed, and sent
as a day-boarder to an excellent school im the village,
returning every evening to the widow, from whom it
would have been cruel to entirely separate her; Mr.
Sedley assuring the grateful and now happy old woman
that he should henceforth consider her only as Patty’s
nurse, put a speedy end to the water-cress trade, and
A8 THE FIVE SENSES.

other contrivances for a subsistance, making her a
weekly allowance amply sufficient for all their expenses.

At the end of the first six months of the little girl’s
schooling, she had made such progress in writing, that
she was enabled to thank her benefactor in her own
words, just as though he could hear them; this had
been the great object of her ambition, from the moment
that a pen was first put into her hand.

During the holidays Mr. Sedley had her with him
for an hour or two every morning, talking to her, and
reading her replies, more and more gratified, the oftener
he conversed with her, so that he gradually began to
feel not only compassion, but attachment to her; this
feeling strengthened, as time passed on, and Patty made
such rapid improvement both in learning and appear-
ance, that before two years were over, she became as
much the child of his love, as she had been of his
bounty, and he was desirous that she should find her
home in his house, that he might have more frequent
opportunities of seeing and speaking to her; but he
thought how dreary the poor widow’s home would be
without her.

At last it occurred to him that Mrs. Barton would be
a fitter companion for Mrs. Howel, his old housekeeper,
than the laughing, gossiping, younger servants, and
help, too, to keep them in order; so Mrs. Howel was
consulted, and being pleased with the arrangement, the
widow was duly installed in the house of Mr. Sedley,
by the title of Nurse; and then Patty’s happiness was
complete, for she could be with her dear granny, as she
THE FIVE SENSES. 49

still affectionately called her, and at the same time be at
hand to render numberless little attentions to her gen-
erous protector, who never had a moment’s cause to
repent having saved from obscurity and poverty a child
so eminently fitted to receive the blessing of a good
education.

In the mean time, Cousin James had been sent to
boarding school; his stout limbs, ruddy cheeks, and
particularly good appetite, contradicting all his asser-
tions of continued weakness and ill health; there the
boys, of whom there were not less than fifty, soon con-.
trived to plague him out of his childishness and epicur-
ism; for he did not at all lke their nicknaming him
“ Raspberry Tart,” “ Squire Lollypop,” and “ Betty the
Cook.” At first he was sullen, then he tried to joke in
return, but it would not do; he found himself treated
with contempt by the bigger boys, and what was still
worse, all the lesser ones got before him in his classes.
Cousin James was, therefore, at last stimulated to make
a great effort, for the purpose of redeeming his lost
time, and there is some hope that he may succeed,
though it is feared that he has still more inclination for
making smart answers, riddles, and conundrums, than
for solving problems in arithmetic, or studying other
sciences.

Mary and Julia are frequent visitors at Mr. Sedley’s,
and Patty Bell, now grown a tall genteel-looking girl,
is as often at Mr. Belford’s, deriving most important
advantages from the instruction and conversation of
Miss Murray. She has become a great favourite with
50 THE FIVE SENSES.

the whole family, for she never presumes upon her good
fortune, but is always modest in her deportment, and
even humble, her grateful heart full of pious thankful-
ness to her Creator, whose benificent care had provided
for the desolate and orphan baby that she was, so many,
and such kind friends.

At the last juvenile fete given by Mr. Sedley, a young
gentleman, rather fonder of such treasures than our
friend, Cousin James, remarked on the number of very
large and handsomely-bound books contained in that
gentleman’s library, and asked him, on the slate, which
he most prized amongst all his volumes. Mr. Sedley
took him by the hand, and leading him to a minute
division on one of the shelves, showed him three very
small shabby-looking books not bound at all. They
were Jack, the Giant-Killer,—Goody Two Shoes,—and
Cinderella.

Mr. Sedley had scarcely dissipated the enquirer’s
astonishment by a brief explanation, when Mary Bel-
ford, running into the room, followed by Cousin James,
asked Miss Murray if she remembered when little
Freddy, three years ago, had spoken of there being
five senses, that Cousin James had said “ and more too,
I should think.” “ I remember it perfectly,” returned
Miss Murray.” “And he says so, still,’ rejomed Mary,
eagerly. “And I’m right, too,’ exclaimed Cousin
James, glancing round with a look of exultation, that
plainly told he thought he had something clever to say,
“for there’s the sense to understand the proper use and
value of them all.”
=== == —
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Mr. Sedley showing his young friend

THE FIVE SENSES. 51

As this piece of wit, for such it was intended to be,
indicated an improvement in both the disposition and
mind of the speaker, Miss Murray thought proper to
applaud it; it was the first time that such a tribute had
been paid him, in spite of all the many attempts he had
made to gain fame in that way, so there was no one,
amongst all the happy laughing group that now sur-
rounded Mr. Sedley, better pleased than was the once
very rude and excessively selfish—Cousin James.

oe Nes

DEAN AND SON, PRINTER2,
THREADNEKDLE-STREEE,



CONTENTS.

AUSTRALIA AND POLYNKESIA.

OMOKO, KING OF AFRICA.

THE ELEPHAN?, AND LITTLE DOG OF ASIA.

THER AMERICAN SLAVE TRADE,

KUROPE,—ENGLISH FREEDOM.

























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sly. considered the a division of
the globe ; they are situated in the Paci-
fic Ocean, between the coasts of Africa
and South America. Australia is a very
large island, indeed, it-is the largest in
the world; and Polynesia consists of a
number of small ones, so called from a compound Greek
word bearing that signification, which being translated
is, “ Many Islands.” 7

Some few years since, the Lotus, an English vessel
returning from Sydney, one of the principal towns in
Australia, was daiffen out of her course by a violent gale
of wind, which lasted through a whole night; and being
much anjured, the captain, at break of day, deemed it

B
4, DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

advisable to seek shelter in the natural harbour of the
island near, that he afterwards found had remained
unknown to the discoverers of Polynesia. Expecting
to find it uninhabited, or else peopled with some portion
of the natives of that part of the world, he was sur-
prised, as the vessel reached the shore, at beholding a
eroup of persons nearly resembling the complexions and
characteristics of Europeans: this astonishment was
not a little increased, on hearing himself addressed by
the chief of these islanders in his own langgage, which,
though corrupted, was nevertheless sufficiently intelli-
gible to be understood.

Although these long-undiscovered people possessed
two indications of a more civilized state, such as lan-
guage and countenance, yet im their dress and deport-
ment, they were almost as uncouth and strange in
manners as the inhabitants of those other islands, scat-
tered on the bosom of the vast Pacific. To account
for this, it will be necessary to give a short history of
them, and how they came into their present condition
in this very remote part of Polynesia: which was related
to the captain by the eldest of the islanders.

-“More than fifty years ago, a ship named the
Hector, had struck on the rocky coast of this obscure
island; she-had previously been nearly destroyed by an
engagement with a pirate vessel, in which the captain
and first mate had been killed. The enemy, soon after,
supposing her to be sinking, had suddenly left her m
pursuit of another prize seen in the distance. After
beating about for several days, her rudder being avholly


eal




























the Hector

OL

Wreck
od

AUSTRALIA AND POLYNESIA. oa

useless, the unfortunate ship had drifted upon this
hitherto-unknown shore, by which means, those who
escaped their previous disasters, were saved, with the
principal part of the stores and cargo preserved.

« This was indeed a very important circumstance to
these poor creatures, thrown, as they were, upon a
desert coast; men, women, and children, without any
shelter but what the trees afforded, or any food but
what they might otherwise chance to find; their vessel
a complete wreck, so that their only hope of leaving
the island, was in the possibility of some other ship
coming near enough to observe their signals, or being
within: hail. Yet such is the natural love of life, that,
although in this helpless state, their first feeling was
that of joy for their deliverance from their late danger
of the Hector sinking, and they all knelt down in pious
thanksgiving to the mercy of God for their preservation.
When they arose, they held a council as to what they
should do first. Nearly worn out with incessant exer-
tion, to prevent their ship filling with water, they stood
greatly in need of repose, but this indulgence was not
to be thought of until they had taken measures to
ascertain whether they could. do so with at least com-
parative safety. |

“ Having assured themselves that there was no
appearance of habitation for a considerable distance
round the spot on which they had landed, they resolved
to form a sort of tent for the women and children, by
suspending a sail to the boughs of one of the many
groups of trees growing close by; for this purpose, as
6 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

well as others, they went down to the vessel, which the
receding tide had left nearly dry, and fixed amongst the
rocks on which she had struck; on reaching her, they —
were delighted to perceive that the water with which
she had been nearly filled, was rushing in a torrent
from a large hole just above the keel; this was of the
greatest service, for it enabled them to get at the store
of provisions, without which they must have, perhaps,
perished. Hard had been their labour, and short their
allowance, for many days past; you may judge, then,
with what anxiety they opened two of the casks, hoping
to find them dry inside; nor were they disappointed ;
one contained salted beef, and the other biscuits, with
only some of the outside part of each a little injured
by the damp. A brisk fire was quickly kindled on the
ground, and whilst the women were engaged in prepar-
ing a substantial meal, several of the men busied them-
selves in forming a rude resting-place for their wives
and little ones; others continued to keep a good look
out, in case of being surprised by the natives, if there
were any. Besides this apprehension, there was ano-
ther, and that was the possibility of being visited by
wild beasts in the night. It was necessary to make
some preparation of defence against both these dangers.

-« As the best means of repelling any four-footed assail-
ants, they agreed to keep up a good fire till day-break,
for it is a well-known fact that animals in a wild state
are easily scared by this means. Human beings in the
same condition are as readily alarmed by the flash and
report of guns, so they provided themselves with a
AUSTRALIA AND POLYNESIA. ‘i

plentiful supply of fuel, powder, and even shot, in case
it should be necessary. In addition to these precau-
tions, they took it by turns to keep a strict watch
through the hours of darkness, that they might be
ready to awaken the others, upon the slightest alarm.
Nothing, however, of the kind occurred, and all arose
in the morning, refreshed and invigorated for the
important work they had to do in the course of the day.

“As soon as they had finished a hearty breakfast,
they went again to the wreck, to remove as much as
they could of her cargo and stores, whilst daylight and
the tide permitted, taking advantage of the bright sun-
shine to dry those things that were wet. They now
brought away what live stock had survived the perils
of the voyage; these were two calves, a few sheep, and
a litter of pigs, besides several full grown ones, and
some fowls, all of them not a little delighted at ex-
changing their uncomfortable home in the Hector for
the shelter of the trees and the soft fresh grass beneath
them. ‘The ship’s carpenters, with the assistance of
two of the passengers, who were of the same trade,
soon contrived pens, and sties, besides a large shed for
the casks of provisions and other stores, when dried ;
for the sun has such power in that part of the world,
that it would have spoilt their meat, to expose it to its
rays longer than absolutely necessary.

“ Amongst the crew and passengers of the wrecked
vessel, there was a considerable sum of money, besides
a much larger sum that had been entrusted to the
captain for some purpose unknown to them; this, of
8 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

course, being of no present use, they wrapped up in
separate parcels, and locked up in a strong box, which
they took care to deposit in a safe place where they
could readily get at it, should an opportunity occur of
their leaving the island, as they had now discovered it
to be wholly uninhabited. |

“It is unnecessary to detail all that was done by
these first settlers, from whom the present population
sprung, for every one exerted their ingenuity to
better the condition of the whole, and prepare for the
future. Weeks and months passed away, without a
sail bemg seen, even in the most distant part to which
their sight could reach; so they worked on, patiently
and hopefully, that at no very distant time some friend
would come near them and afford them assistance.

“There were, fortunately, among the passengers,
several emigrants of different callings, who had brought
with them their appropriate tools, intending to settle in
Australia. Two of these were weavers, who when the
common stock of clothes began to fail, contrived from
dried grasses and other materials, having discovered
plants on the island resembling the cotton tree and flax,
to weave a rough sort of cloth, of variegated colours,
which the women made up into summer garments; the
skins of wild animals supplying them with winter cloth-
ing, which, though rather unsightly, were tolerably
comfortable. At first, they had a good stock of needles
and thread; but these became used up and worn out im
the progress of years; and then they had recourse to
the same inventions as we read of in savage nations,
AUSTRALIA AND POLYNESIA. | 9

making needles of fish bones, and thread of the stringy
fibres stript from the bark of trees; using, too, for
coarser purposes, the dried sinews of animals.

“The wreck had, long since, been entirely broken up ;
partly by the action of the waves that beat against her
every tide, but more by the hammers and other tools of
the carpenters; every piece of her, whether of wood or
metal, being a valuable possession, where there was
neither house or furniture of any kind: but so great
_is the ingenuity of man, when compelled to the exertion
of his faculties from the necessity of his condition, that
in less time than might be expected, a village of neat-
looking huts was built, formed of wood and clay, and
thatched with moss and large leaves; patches of land
were sown with English seeds, for luckily, the Hector’s
cargo had been of a varied description, being principally
intended for the use of the British settlers at Sydney.

“The first year’s produce of their agriculture was
nearly all put by, that by having more seed, the next
crop might be greatly increased; the same frugal care
was, IN some measure, continued for several seasons
afterwards; thus at last, by submitting to temporary
privation, they were rewarded in the enjoyment of an
ample supply. The animals they had brought with
them being carefully attended and suffered to grow old,
rapidly increased in number, and at the period at which
the Lotus discovered the island, their domestic live
stock had become abundant. The little colony con-
tinued to build on the coast, first on account of watch-
ing the arrival of some chance vessel; but when this
10 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

object became scarcely remembered by their successors,
they did the same for the sake of the food supplied to
them in the fish with which the harbour abounded.
‘Thus all went on very well for a long, long time ;
but the want of the proper means of education began,
at last, to manifest its consequences amongst them, for
gradually the old people died, and the young ones
succeeded them; and then they grew old in their turn,
and their children became men and women, and they
had sons and daughters, who came after them, and had
children, too, without any schools in which they could
be instructed. Had the captain of the Hector lived to
have landed on the island, or even the first mate, both
being men of education, they might have devised some
plan for preventing the deplorable ignorance that had
gradually increased from year to year. Amongst all
those whose lives had been spared in the engagement
with the pirate vessel, there was not one capable of
becoming either school master or mistress; but few of
them could read at all; and those who could, had so
imperfect a knowledge of this most important art, that
the three or four books preserved from the water that
had flooded them, was nearly beyond their comprehen-
sion; and at last, merely served to give after genera-
tions some idea of what a book was, and were treasured
more as a wonder and curiosity to be looked at, than
from any just conception of their utility; so they grew
up, one set of children after another, ignorant of all but
their own strangely mixed manners and customs, for
there was still something English about them; ’till, at
AUSTRALIA AND POLYNESIA. Il

last, they became the excessively uneducated and odd-
looking people who presented themselves to the captain
of the Lotus.

“ All that they knew of things, history, or circum-
stances, beyond what was under their own daily observ-
ation, had been told them by their elders, and they
having had but very imperfect instruction themselves,
what they communicated was such a mixture of truth,
falsehood, and prejudice, that at length they believed
what was related to them of other countries, had, in
former years, taken place in their own island, and that
they were, even in their present state, the wisest people
in the world, so truly does self-sufficiency and ignorance
go together. .

“The crew of the Hector had, half in jest, and half in
earnest, selected one from amongst them, to rule the
rest; at first he went by the name of the Captain, but
afterwards, not content with this term of distinction, he
chose to be considered as King, by the title of Gabriel
the First, that being his Christian name, his other was
Gosling, which he gave to his territory, the island over
which he at length reigned with absolute power, as
King Gabriel, of Gosling; now those who had chosen
him, had not been induced to do so by any considera-
tion of wisdom or fitness for so important an office as
that he filled; they were merely influenced by his being
the highest in rank on board, having taken command
of the Hector on the death of the captain and first
mate, and his bemg, moreover, a good sailor and a
jovial messmate; but no sooner did he create himself
12 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

king, than this last recommendation began gradually to
disappear, under pretence of the cares of his govern-
ment calling on him for great gravity; he strengthened
his power and indulged his ambition to have a better
habitation than the rest, entirely to himself, besides
gratifying his appetite with more dainty fare, by imsti-
tuting a separate table for his exclusive use.

“‘ His successor, Gabriel the Second, was more import-
ant and kingly still, and by no means less selfish or
conceited.”

‘The present monarch was Gabriel the Fifth, a regular
descendant from the mate king, the same name being
scrupulously preserved in that royal family.

Now it unfortunately happened, through want of
education, not only was each king successively more
ignorant than his predecessor, but his subjects became ~
so too; so that at the period of the Lotus’s arrival, the
whole nation was in danger of possessing as little mental
cultivation as their unknown neighbours, the New Zea-
landers, or even the aborigines of Australia; although
they were certainly of a much more orderly and peace-
ful disposition. ,

Yet foolish, and consequently conceited as his present
majesty was, he had a son a great deal more foolish and
conceited still; his name too was, of course, Gabriel,
but to distinguish it from his father’s, he was called
Prince Gaby; this future Gabriel the Sixth was about
twenty years old, and being vain of his person, spent
the greater part of his time in inventing new ornaments
for it; when fully adorned, he had something of the
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Prince Gaby at his toilet.

AUSTRALIA AND POLYNESIA. 13

appearance of a New Zealand chief, having, hike them,
attached to his head dress, an embellishment arising on
either side, very much in the shape of a donkey’s ears ;
no other person on the island was permitted to wear a
cap of this description, unless, indeed, the king should
choose to do so, and no one from any other country,
who had the honor of conversing with Prince Gaby,
would probably think of disputing his claim to so ap-
propriate a mark of distinction.

The king, his father, being a very absolute monarch,
rough in speech, and possessing but little sensibility,
kept the prmce as much in fear of him as he did his
other subjects, allowing him no power during his life-
time, nor assigning to him any part of his dominions ;
but Prince Gaby was quite reconciled to this abject
state, for he had one treasure entirely his own, and that
he prized beyond the whole kingdom of Gosling, or
even half a dozen more, could they have been added to
it: this treasure was the last bit of what had once been
a large mirror in the unfortunate ship Hector. Though
a souce of the most infinite delight, yet it had cost poor
Prince Gaby more tears and sighs than any real afflic-
tion he had ever met with; for small as the fragment
was, he had contrived to make it smaller, and this he
had done in the hopes of enlarging it; once he had
placed it in the ground, thinking it might grow, by
which means a portion of the quicksilver had been
rubbed off; finding this experiment fail, he endeavoured
to stretch it, by pulling it on either side with his hands;
but in doing this, he only broke off some more of the
14 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

cracked bits from the edges, and cut his fingers; so he
desisted from further attempts, making up his mind to
gaze upon himself, bit by bit, rather than run the risk
of not seeing himself at all.

The principal persons who landed from the Lotus,
under conviction of safety in so doing, were of different
nations; there was an European, of the name of Mild-
may, formerly a missionary, but latterly, having in-
- herited a large fortune, he travelled for his own amuse-
ment and benevolent purposes; there was an Asiatic
from India; an American from New York; and a
negro king from Africa.

Gabriel the Fifth, attended by his whole court, had
come to the beach, on hearing of the wonderful arrival,
partly impelled by terror, and partly by curiosity, hav-
ing only very vague ideas of ships, or people different
from themselves. The astonishment and fear of the
half-naked children, when the vessel was anchored so
as to be distinctly seen, was almost equal to that of the
Esquimaux who live in the north polar sea amidst ice
and snow; and who, when Captain Ross first landed
there, asked if his ship was a great bird; and when they
were assured that it was not, wanted to know which it
had come from, the sun or the moon. Some of the grown
persons of Gosling, had certainly better, though very
imperfect, ideas about it; but Prince Gaby said “It is
the back of a great fish, or else a garden; for see, there
are rails round it;” and, pointing to the naked masts,
“trees growing out of it, though they have no boughs
or leaves upon them.” As it was not etiquette at Gos-
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AUSTRALIA AND POLYNESIA. 15

ling, for the prince to be contradicted, except by his
father, this opinion was received in admiring silence.

The king as well as his visitors being equally satisfied
that there was no danger to be apprehended from each
other, invited them all to his parlass, by which he, of
course, meant palace; and here it may be as well to
state that I shall take the liberty of rendering his
majesty’s language a little more intelligible than it was,
without a good deal of explanation, to his guests. I shall
likewise leave out the many words otherwise unneces-
sary, that the visitors were obliged to use to make
their meaning apparent to the Goslings.

In order to produce a suitable impression on the
strangers, King Gabriel ordered his prime minister, a
queer little man, to lead the way, playing his best tune
on an instrument slung round his neck, and on which he
drummed with two sticks, in a most discordant manner.

The prime minister of Gosling had a very different
office to that of the same functionary in other countries,
the chief of his ministration being to provide the dain-
tiest fare for the royal table, to stand by his master,
the king’s chair or throne, on all great occasions, that
he might be in readiness to applaud all that his majesty
meant to be considered as either particularly wise or
witty, and that he might be at hand for any errand or
message the king should suddenly desire to send him
upon; as for consultation or advice, as required of
other prime ministers, that was not to be thought of at
Gosling, king Gabriel never heeding any body’s opinion
but one, and that was his own.
16 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

As the little party proceeded to the village, Mr. Mild-
may learnt, in answer to his questions, what was the
present condition of these strange people: as to their
origin, the account given by themselves was so mixed
up with fable, that it was with great diffieulty he could
even guess at the truth.

They were now at the palace, which, instead of being
a house regularly built, was more like a group of differ-
ent sized huts, communicating one with another, having
no stairs to them. King Gabriel, on entering, ascended
what was meant for a throne; a clumsy contrivance, its
chief dignity consisting in its height, for when he had
reached to his seat, his head nearly touched the roof of
the spacious hut in which it was placed. The guests
beimg seated on benches and logs of wood, round a
roughly constructed table, the prime minister was
ordered to help the cooks im bringing in an ample
supply of provisions; but before this useful member of
the government of Gosling could obey the royal man-
date, he was stopped by Prince Gaby, who pointing to
the African, asked if he would not like to wash the
black off his hands and face before his dine, by which
he meant dinner: fortunately for the feelings of Omoko,
such was his name, he was too ignorant of English to
understand what was said, particularly such English as
was spoken by Prince Gaby.

“ Having no knowledge of other countries,” said Mr.
Mildmay, addressing the prince, “you are not aware
that it has pleased the Great Creator of us all to make
us of different complexions: in some places, the inha-
AUSTRALIA AND POLYNESIA. 17

bitants are of a copper colour; in others, of a yellow-
brown ; and there is more than one nation in which the
natives are either nearly or wholly black, hke my friend
here, who though of this complexion,” added Mr. Mild-
may, turning to Gabriel, “is a king in his own country,
the same as you are one here.” This fact was men-
tioned by the good missionary in the hope of creating
respect for Omoko, but it wholly failed in its purposed
effect. A dawning recollection of having heard some-
thing from his grandfather Gabriel the Third, about
niggers, and their great inferiority, arose on the mind
of his white majesty, and this dawning recollection
becoming more vivid, he began to feel himself exceed-
ingly msulted by what appeared to him an invention on
the part of his reverend instructor. As for Prince
Gaby, having no such remembrances to recal, he fixed
his stupid eyes with a wide stare on the object of his
astonishment, his mouth being equally distended, it
seemed indeed doubtful whether he would ever have
shut either of them again, had not his father suddenly
aroused him by exclaiming in his great indignation,
“ Heaking! how can that be?”

Omoko, annoyed by the observations of so many
eyes, and being, besides, an invalid, indicated by signs
that he should like to lie down in some quiet place ;
this being made known to King Gabriel, the prime
minister was dispatched to act the part of chambermaid
to his sable majesty, in an adjoining hut, and to provide
him with dinner there.

The monarch of Gosling, still much ruffled, resumed
18 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

the expression of his incredulity as soon as his guests
were supplied with refreshments. ‘I remember, now,”
said he, “ what I had forgotten as told me by my grand-
father, and he had it from his father, and so on down
to the time of Gabriel the First, and he came from the
great country you call England, where they know every
thing, and so of course do we, for we are English, too,
though we live here.”
~ Mr. Mildmay could not help smiling at this mode of
reasoning, but he did not interrupt the king’s speech,
who went on to say “ My grandfather told me there were
such things in the world as black men; so far you speak
the truth, but as for their being kings! we won’t believe
that; for he said they were made to work for us white
people, and they were to be flogged if they would not ; is
it likely there can be kings among such fellows as those?”
“ Likely or not,” returned Mr. Mildmay, “I know
that it is so; and if you had not had the misfortune to
inhabit a country holding no communication with any
other, and being so wanting in the means of education,
you might have been assured of the fact, too.’ “ But,”
replied his majesty, “ though we are born and bred
here, those who came first, were not; and they knew
and told every thing to their sons and daughters; and
they, in their turn, related all to their children; till at
last it came to us to teach ours: and so, of course, we
must go on knowing all things, just the same as they
did in the beginning.” “ In reasoning thus,” replied
Mr. Mildmay, gently, “ you are wrong: in the first
place, those who were the earliest inhabitants here,
AUSTRALIA AND POLYNESIA. 19

could not know all the things, as you express it, for that
is not within the limits of human capacity; they would
naturally impress upon the minds of those they in-
structed what they believed themselves, whether it was
true or false; but even supposing that all they taught
was real, only think for a moment how some facts must
be lost, and others hecome mixed with fable, in a coun-
try where all knowledge is trusted to one generation
relating to its successor what had been told to them
by the preceding; it would be the same in England,
where your first people came from, and in other lands,
too, if it were not for books. Anything recorded in a
book, if true at first, must be true always; and will
give the same accurate information to ages after, that it
did at the period in which it was written. Now, if your
people had learnt to read, and you had a good supply of
books, though you never left this island, yet you might
become acquainted with the history, manners, and cus-
toms, of other nations, which knowledge is exceedingly
amusing as well as useful.”

“ Well,” said the king, rather tired of being addressed
in so unusual a manner, “ suppose, as you know so
much, you tell us something about other places: we
hke stories, and three or four of my people do nothing
else but make them; when they don’t please us, we
send the teller to bed without his supper, that he may
keep awake and mend them against the morning.”’

“T hope your majesty will not serve me so,” observed
Mr. Mildmay, with a smile, “should I be so unfortu-
nate as not to amuse you.” King Gabriel hesitated

C
20 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

for a moment, and then graciously assured him that he
would not; adding, “whatever your story is, we give
you leave to tell it; so begin.” His reverend guest
replied, “ As you seem to think that a man differing
from us in the colour of his skin, is altogether unlike
us in mind and feeling, I will tell you the story of
Omoko, the African king, who has accompanied us
hither.”

“T like a story makes shake,” said Prince Gaby; by
which he meant, laugh. “ And I don’t,’ interrupted
the king.” “I wish it was m my power to please
both,” said Mr. Mildmay, good humouredly; “ but I
fear it is impossible.’ ‘“ No matter, please me,” an-
swered the king; “that’s enough!” Thus exhorted, Mr.
Mildmay commenced as follows :—





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STORY OF

OMOKO,

KING OF AFRICA.

= FRICA,” he said, “ may be considered
as the third division of the world; it
contains many different countries,
each governed by some chief or king.
Though many persons have gone there
from more educated nations, to make
discoveries, and instruct the natives, they have not been
able to reach far into the interior; thus we are still
ignorant as to many parts of it.” “ Well, I suppose
you know enough to tell us a story about it,” interposed
the king, “ and that is all we want to hear.”

“ Omoko,” resumed Mr. Mildmay, more amused than
offended by the rudeness of his host, ‘“ was married. to
one of the most beautiful princesses of a neighbouring
state.’ © Beautiful!’’ exclaimed Gabriel, with the
utmost contempt; “nonsense! how can that be?” “TI
did not mean that she would be beautiful in the eyes of
ve DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

your majesty,” returned Mr. Mildmay, “ but she cer-
tainly was so in those of King Omoko; for what is
considered as beautiful in one country, is often thought
quite the reverse in another; perhaps, if your majesty
had a daughter, the most perfect in form and face, of
all English girls, she would not have her claim to
beauty allowed, were she to go to Africa, or to visit the
Esquimaux, or many other countries where it is the
nature of the inhabitants to differ in feature and com-
plexion.”

« T can’t believe that,” said the king, “so go on with
your story, and let it be a good one.” “ Or else I may
go supperless to bed,” observed his guest, with a smile.
“ And perhaps get no breakfast in the morning,” re-
plied the king, clapping his hands as a signal to the
prime minister that he had said something witty, and
meant to be applauded; upon which that unfortunate
little man threw himself into various extraordinary
attitudes, jumping about the floor of the hut, and
making a noise he meant for laughter, but having a
small voice, and a great cold, it was as little like that
sound of mirth, as it could well be.

When King Gabriel was satisfied with this tribute to
his cleverness, he took up a long white wand, that was
always placed on his right hand, to be in readiness for
such purposes, and with a gentle rap on the head of
his prime minister, or grand vizier as he would be called
in Asia, signified that he was to be quiet; this done, he
desired Mr. Mildmay to resume his narrative.

« King Omoko being mild in his temper, and just in



can Princes at their sports.

The Afri
AFRICA. 23

the administration of the laws of his country, was
beloved by all his subjects; and he would have been as
perfectly happy as it is possible for human beings to
become, but that, for many years after his marriage, he
had no children: he wished for a son, whom he might
train up to succeed him in the affection and respect of
those he was afterwards to govern. At length, it
pleased Providence to make him the father of two
princes, who, like their parents, were remarkable for
the amiability of their dispositions, and what, in that
country, was considered to be beauty. These youths,
born within a year of each other, grew up as though
they had been twins; so great was the affection sub-
sisting between them, that each felt more pleasure in
commendations bestowed on the other, than in any
praise that was given to himself.

“Thus Wyombo and Piscenee, (for these were their
names,) became a pattern to all other brothers, and the
pride and pleasure of the good king, their father, con-
soling him for the death of their tender mother, which
took place a few years after their birth. They were
early taught the wild sports of their country; for, like
you, they had no books or communication with other
nations out of Africa, and were therefore ignorant of
any art but that of the chase and war, which latter it
was necessary to learn, that they might be able to
defend their kingdom, should it be attacked by other
chiefs.

“One day, when out on an excursion, shooting wild
birds, which they did with bow and arrows, they were
24, DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

led m pursuit of the game much further from home
than they had intended to go; the part of the country
they were then in, was new to them, and being near
the coast, they determined to go on till they reached
the sea, delaying their return till the morrow; a mes-
senger from among their attendants was dispatched>
therefore, to apprise Omoko of their intention, and
prevent his feeling uneasiness at their protracted ab-
sence. In the course of two more hours, they reached
a part of the shore they had never beheld till then.
Delighted with the novelty, they pursued the windings
of the beach, looking for eggs amongst the fissures of
the rocks, and picking up shells more beautiful than
any they had hitherto observed.

“Thus they went on, till they came to a sharp turn-
ing in the line of cliffs beneath which they were wan-
dering, and which now jutted into the sea, so that its
waves washed up against them to some considerable
height. ‘I wonder what’ is behind here?’ said Wyombo.
“ We will soon see,’ answered Piscenee, as with active
steps he climbed to a ledge half way up the protruding
rocks, and, followed by his brother and the rest, walked
towards the end that ran into the sea. On rounding
the point, they beheld, to their terror and astonishment,
a bay formed by the cliffs running out on either side
from the main land, and in it what they immediately
knew to bea slave ship, preparing to sail, on the deck
of which there were a number of white men.

“ Both the princes and their followers immediately
retreated from a scene they had so much reason to
AFRICA. 25

dread; but unfortunately, Piscenee, in his hurry to
escape, struck his foot against a sharp projection of the
crag, and losing his balance, fell into the bay, and was
borne away by a heavy wave, as it receded from the
shore ; nor did the mischief end there, for Wyombo, on
seeing his brother’s danger, uttered so piercing a cry of
distress, that it was heard not only by the persons on
board the anchored vessel, but by others on the beach,
who were getting a boat ready to join them. These
men made immediately for the spot where Wyombo, in
an agony of anxiety and fear, was watching the fate
of his brother, only restramed by a strong hand that
grasped his arm, from plunging into the sea after him ;
Mootoo, this faithful servant, who, regardless of his
own danger, had suffered all his companions to hurry
away without him, would have dragged his young mas-
ter from the fatal spot, but Wyombo resisted all his
efforts to do so; he had no thought but for his brother.

Piscenee, impelled by the waves, alternately rose or
sunk from his view; but after a brief interval that
appeared to the excited mind of Wyombo of intermin-
able length, the body of the unfortunate youth was
washed on the beach that bounded the opposite side of
the bay, where it laid, to all appearance, lifeless. Wy-
ombo no sooner beheld this afflicting sight, than by a
violent effort bursting from the grasp of Mootoo, he ran
round to that side of the shore, followed by the white
men and Mootoo, whom they fancied they were forcing
along, thinking, perhaps, as you might have done,”

added Mr. Mildmay, “ that Mootoo, being but a negro,
26 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

he had not the feelings and attachment of a white
servant, and that he would therefore abandon his young
charge for the chance of securing his own safety ; but in
this they were rhistaken, the poor faithful creature
would have gone with them of his own accord, though
he was fully aware of the wretched destiny that might
await him atthe hands of those who are infinitely more
treacherous and cruel than are they whom they refuse
to acknowledge as their fellow men, on account of their
colour.

“Qn reaching the spot where Piscenee laid extended,
Wyombo threw himself beside him, embracing and
callmg on him by every term of endearment and dis-
tress; the poor boy was beginning to revive, under the
influence of the warm sun that was shining immedi-
ately over him, when the voice of his brother recalled
him fully to life; but the pain and lameness of his still
bleeding foot was such, that when he attempted to rige,
he fell down again. |

“ Whilst Wyombo, with a part of the garment he
wore twisted round his body, was tenderly bandaging
the wound, their captors appeared to be debating
whether they should take Piscenee with them, or leave
him, even in his helpless condition, alone upon the
shore: it was soon evident that they had come to the
latter determination, for they began to hurry Wyombo
and Mootoo away; but no sooner did the wounded boy
perceive this, than with desperate energy he arose from
the ground, and clinging to his brother, dragged him-
self forward, his nerves and sinews braced by the ear-
AFRICA. | eh

nestness of hjs purpose, to go with him. One of the
men attempted to_part them; but another, higher in
command, thinking probably that the boy might recover
and be of value, decided on taking him; and perceiving
that he could not walk, made signs to Mootoo to carry
him. Glad enough was poor Mootoo to do so, for he
knew that he should take more care of the injured
limb, than would the inhuman wretches who traffic in
this dreadful trade.

“The boat, that was before in readiness, soon brought
the remainder of the crew and their unhappy captives
on board the vessel; the anchor was immediately drawn
up, the sails set, and they had left the bay, before
Mootoo and his two young masters had time to compose
their thoughts so as fully to comprehend the extent of
their misfortune, in being thus borne away from the
fond and anxious parent who was thus suddenly de-
prived of the two dearest objects of his affection, and
the support of his age.”

“ Ah, I can understand that,” interrupted Prince
_ Gaby; “what would my father have done, had he been
the black king, and I the two princes?” “ Better,
perhaps, than he did,” answered the most ungracious of
monarchs, the King of Gosling. Mr. Mildmay, with-
out noticing this little break in upon his narrative, pro-
ceeded with his story, pleased to observe that he had
awakened in the mind of his auditors a humane interest.

* On arriving on board, Mootoo, Wyombo, and
Piscenee, were more shocked than surprised at behold-
ing above a hundred of their own people, men, women,
28 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

and children, huddled together in what seemed a dark
hole below the level of the waves, receiving its only
light from a grating above.

“ The two boys, having never been in so dreadful a
place before, or ever having heard the varied expres-
sions of so much misery as now fell on their ears, felt a
sickening sensation that nearly overcame their fortitude ;
and whilst Wyombo sat at the feet of his brother, sup-
porting. the wounded foot in his lap, they joined their
unfortunate companions in lamentations for the homes
they had left, and in fearful anticipations for the future.

“On a sudden, the wind, which had been too unfa-
vourable for them to make much progress, shifted, and
increasing in force, blew still more directly on to the
shore; and presently the man on the look out, disco-
vered bearing down upon them an English vessel em-
powered to attack any slave ship she might meet with,
and restore the captives to liberty.

“Tf”? continued Mr.-Mildmay, “I have been fortu-
nate enough to engage your pity by what I have already
narrated, what will you think of the terrible fact I am
now about to relate? When a slave-ship finds a vessel,
such as I have just mentioned, gaining upon her, the
captain, in order to get time for escape, has, every
now and then, one or more of the unfortunate negroes
thrown into the sea, being well assured that those who
are in chase, will hazard some delay in their progress,
by endeavouring to pick them up: this artifice, in the
present case succeeded but too well. No tongue can
describe the scene of increased distress that now oc-
AFRICA. 7 29

curred; children, for the cruel purpose I have just
stated, had been snatched from the bosoms of their
parents! husbands from the clinging arms of their
wives! and every fresh plunge and scream that was
heard amidst the dashing of the waves, was answered
by the cries of some bereaved family, in that dark den
of misery, the hold of the slave ship.

“ Mootoo had been one of those who were cast into
the ocean, and had been saved by the English vessel,
amongst others of his drowning fellow-sufferers. —Be-
ing afterwards set on shore in his own country, he made
the best of his way to tell his sad tale to the king, his
master; and it was from Mootoo, through the means of
an interpreter, that I learnt these particulars.

“ The unhappy father, inconsolable for his loss, felt a
strong, though very hopeless, desire, to go in search of
his lost boys; and thinking travel might divert his
grief, I have taken him with me to the different coun-
tries I purposed visiting, leaving his government in
charge of the faithful Mootoo, whose affliction was only
secondary to that of his master. It is now more than
two years since the period of the event I have just
recorded ; and though in that time I have visited many
places, and some in which slavery is permitted, I have
never heard any tidings of either Wyombo or Piscenee,
or of the ship that bore them away.”

When Mr. Mildmay had finished this sad history,
King Gabriel, to prove his satisfaction, told him he
might pass the rest of his life on the island; for he
thought that, in time, he might, perhaps, become his
30 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

head story-teller. This honour was of course declined,
though with suitable acknowledgments, so that his
testy majesty was not offended; and now, turning to-
wards the Asiatic, he asked him what he had to tell
about his country.
















STORY OF

THE ELEPHANT |



AND THE

LITTLE DOG OF |
AST Aterur lsc |



COULD relate to you,’ answered the Indian
voyager, “a vast variety of curious things, such
as hunting the tiger, and other wild beasts,



mounted two, three, and sometimes more
persons, on one immense animal called an elephant;
of soldiers passing over rivers, in time of war, by means
of the wonderful strength, sagacity, and docility of
these useful creatures; but never having read of, or seen
one, you would scarcely understand, and, perhaps, not
believe me; however, there is one short account of an
elephant and a little dog, that I knew to be true, and
that may, perhaps, amuse you.” “Then tell it,” said
the king; “if I don’t like it, I can easily stop you.”
Of that there was no doubt: so the Asiatic began,
hardly able to refrain from laughing, though a very
grave man.

“ Kebrah, a small Indian dog, m the absence of his
32 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

master, was chained up near to a shed, in which was an
elephant, who, day after day, hearing its cries for
liberty, at length became so much distressed at the
sound, that it attracted the notice of some mischievous
persons working on the estate; not content with the
reality, they would frequently imitate the voice of the
dog, in order to excite the compassion of his friend, for
their amusement. :

“At last, the elephant became furious, and, having
succeeded in breaking through one side of the shed,
went to the object of his compassion, stroking him
gently down the back with his great paw, and by other
indications, testified his sympathy with what appeared
to be his sufferings; the dog, no less sagacious than the
elephant, evinced his disposition to return the attach-_
ment, by licking his feet and jumping upon him as
high as his chain permitted; and from that day a great
friendship grew up between them. _

“A week or so afterwards, the elephant in charge of
the men who still occasionally sported with his feelings,
was securely fastened in a ferry boat, for, the purpose of
crossing the river, his little friend Kebrah was there
too. One of the party, to amuse the rest, took the dog
in his arms and began to teaze him: the poor Elephant,
unable to come to his assistance, soon began to make
his usual sounds of uneasiness and displeasure. This
wert on for some time, the man still restraining the
dog from going to his protector. But though the noble
beast they were wronging could not reach his little
friend, he could reach the water over the ferry’s side, as
a.
ba re
ere








Ny

He:



The Indian Elephant and the little dog.
ASIA. 33

they found at last to their cost, for stooping his head to
the river, and drawing into his chest as much as it would
hold, he immediately threw it out again, with all his
force, over his tormentors. This he repeated several
times, though slowly at first; but when he perceived,
by means of his wonderful instinct, that the men were
counteracting the mischief, by bailing the boat, he
quickened his movements and poured in such a deluge,
that they were in great danger of sinking.

“The dog had, of course, been released in the be-
ginning, and running to his huge friend, found shelter
beneath his body, where, in security, he watched, and
by his barking and frisking, seemed to enjoy the sport.
The man had hoped, by allowing Kebrah his liberty,
to appease the anger of his protector: but the generous
beast that had so long forborne its revenge, was now
thoroughly excited, and it was with the greatest diffi-
culty that they reached the opposite shore, for the river
was very wide in that part; they, however, received a
lesson they never forgot, for the master, coming home
soon after, and learning what had been their conduct,
dismissed them all from his service, and ordered that
Kebrah, instead of being tied up, should have a bed
made for him in the house of his friend, a hole being
cut through the bottom of the door, that he might go
in and out just when he liked, which, as though to
make up for previous restraint, he did pretty well all
day long, and was from that time the happiest little dog
in all India.”

“T like that stery very much,” said King Gabriel,
34: DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

“for that great beast you call an elephant, puts me in
mind of myself, it being wiser and stronger than other
beasts, and therefore fit to be a king over them, as I
am here.”































































































































































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STORY OF ;
| NES

THE AMERICAN | 8

SLAVE TRADE. |

HE American was now desired to tell
what sort of a country his was. “It
would be impossible to describe it
Nile ce briefly,” replied the person addressed,
“CoM S . “for though but one of the five, it is
nearly as large as all the other divisions of the globe
put together, and contains an immense variety of lakes,
rivers, and forests; some of the latter, it is supposed,
that no human foot has ever penetrated, owing to the
extreme heat of the sun in the southern parts, where
they mostly are, and the danger from wild beasts and
large reptiles, with which they abound.

“We have in America one of the largest rivers in the
known world, it is called St. Lawrence, and in one part
of its course, suddenly falls from a height of one hun-
dred and fifty feet, into a lake beneath, the name of
which is Ontario; the sound occasioned by this tre-

D
36 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

mendous cataract, is heard at a distance of many
leagues; the breadth of the steep over which it is pre-
cipitated is nearly three quarters of a mile, and the
quantity of water that falls in a minute is estimated at
two millions six hundred and ¢ighty-eight hogsheads
full.’ |

The American, led away by admiration of this great
wonder of his country, forgot that he was addressing
an audience ignorant of terms of arithmetic. Prince
Gaby, however, soon recalled his recollection to that
fact, for taking hogshead to mean only the skull of
the animal, he asked him how they came in such a
great country to have nothing better to measure in than
that? offering him, at the same time, from a sort of
cupboard, near where he sat, half a cocoa-nut shell, for
the purpose of ascertaining the quantity of water con-
tained in any future river St. Lawrence, or fall, like
that of Niagara, he might chance to meet with.

The American good’ humouredly accepted the gift,
for he saw it was kindly meant, and endeavoured to
make the prince understand what he meant by the
term hogshead, but finding it difficult to do so, and
recollecting an incident that he thought would interest
the king, he said—‘‘ Mr. Mildmay’s little narrative of
Africa reminds me of a scene I once witnessed in an
American state, where the slave trade 1s still permitted.
In wandering to the outskirts of a town, to which I had
travelled on business, I suddenly found myself in a
market place, for the sale and purchase of slaves.
Though the whole scene, thus unexpectedly before me,
AMERICA. ad

was of the most distressing nature imaginable, yet my
interest in its details was so forcibly excited, that I
could not refrain from looking on. I there saw human
beings bought and sold, with no more feeling on the
part of those who trafficked in them, than they would
have testified had their merchandize been sheep or oxen,
or even bales of cotton, or other inanimate substances.
The unfortunate negroes evidently dejected, or in terror,
and some even languid from illness, were nevertheless
obliged to exhibit themselves to the best advantage;
for those who came to buy, examined them with the
_ utmost caution, fearful of being imposed upon. They
were made to stamp with their feet, throw out their
arms in different directions, and to do other acts of
-strength, in order to prove the soundness of their con-
dition. Not content with all this, the purchaser looked
into their mouths, as sporting men do into those of
horses and dogs. Painful and degrading as such in-
spection was, it might, perhaps, have been patiently
borne, had. the poor creatures been free, in their turn,
to reject such masters as they thought would not be
kind to them; but this was, of course, not the case, and
they awaited their fate, the men mostly in silence, the
women and children weeping.

“ Amidst this harrowing scene of diet suffering,
my attention was particularly attracted to two youths of
about fifteen and sixteen years of age, who were stand-
ing a little apart from the rest, they had each an arm
round the neck of the other, and thus they stood, silent
and motionless. I never saw,’ added the American,
38 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

with great emotion, “in any of the many countries I
have visited, grief, affection, and anxiety, so strongly
depicted as on the countenances of those two boys thus
clinging together, in their terror of being sold to dif-
ferent masters. A hard-looking man, a planter, who
had beer the greatest purchaser, was going with the
slave merchant again through the market, for the pur-
pose of marking such as he had bargained for; this was
done by tying a piece of coloured tape round the wrist.
Having performed this closing ceremony, he was turn-
ing away, when suddenly he beheld, for the first time,
the two young friends, as they appeared to be; he
walked up to them, and putting a double glass to his
eyes, for he was near sighted, examined them minutely.
I could see that the limbs of both quivered, with the
anxiety of their minds for the result, and that they
drew still closer together. It must have been evident,
even to him, that what they most dreaded, was separa-
tion; but heedless of this manifest indication of strong
attachment and tenderness of feeling, he turned from
their imploring gaze, and after a rather brief negocia-
tion with the slave merchant, again approached them,
tying the fatal mark, for such it may be called, around
the wrist of but one of them, and then was passing on;
the cry of disappointment and anguish that burst at the
same moment from the lips of the two boys, was such
as I can never forget; the one who had been bought,
fell on the neck of the other, supine and helpless; but
his companion, starting from his embrace, threw him-
self at the feet of the planter, casting, for a moment, a
AMERICA. 39

look of the most earnest entreaty on his face; then sud-
denly springing to his feet, he stamped with an energy
almost superhuman, throwing up his arms, and inviting
further inspection, by opening his mouth and revealing
teeth of dazzling whiteness, and of perfect regularity;
but, in spite of all this, the planter and the merchant
-passed by, aud the two unfortunate youths fell into
each others arms, in a passion of grief it is impossible
to describe.

“‘T felt so much concern at their distress, that I fol-
lowed my countryman, in the vain hope of interesting
him in their favour, he only ridiculed what I stated,
saying, ‘he should soon work such nonsense,’ as he
ealled it, ‘out of the one he had bought, and he sup-
posed whoever had the other, would do the same by
him.’ However, self interest prevailed where humanity
pleaded in vain. I suggested to him that being bought
together, they would probably be incited to their utmost
exertion, in the hope of still retaining the same master,
and the threat of separating them would be of great
force in any case of misconduct. ‘The slave owner,
whose aim was to dispose of two rather than one, came
to my assistance, and offering to abate something of the
price for which he had stipulated, the planter returned
to the spot where the boys still remained, in a state of
the deepest dejection, and a piece of the coloured string
was affixed to the wrist of the second. No words can
do justice to the sudden change that now took place in
the feelings of both; tears of joy rained down their
faces, and they actually kissed the token that told them
40 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

they were the property of a master from whom they
had little or no indulgence to expect.”

“Improbable as such a conjecture may appear,” said
Mr. Mildmay, when the American had ended his narra-
tive, “I cannot help thinking that those two boys, so
fondly attached to each other, were the unfortunate
sons of our poor friend Omoko; did you by any chance
hear either of their names? :

~“T cannot say that I did,” returned the American,
but I recollect the slave dealer saying, when the planter
was out of hearing, that he was glad he had got rid of
them, for they had fretted so much, he was afraid they
would become good for nothing; and he added, as
though it was a good jest, he had called them Piny and
Winy.”

“That strengthens my suspicion,” said Mr. Mildmay,
“for Piny and Winy sounds like an abbreviation of
their own names, though so unfeelingly applied.” And
Mr. Mildmay was right in his conjecture; it was indeed
Wyombo and Piscenee.

“Did you ever hear any more about them?” asked
King Gabriel. ‘Yes, I did,” replied the American,
“for I was in the same town again, a year afterwards,
and made some enquiries, hoping to learn that the
planter had proved to be a better master than his
appearance indicated; but I found that it was quite the
reverse; and that the two boys, after endurimg great
suffering from ill treatment, had made their escape on
the day before my arrival. Their master was then in
pursuit of them, accompanied by others of his slaves,
AMERICA. Al

and what was worse, with blood hounds to track their
course, in case their, human pursuers were unable to
overtake them, or discover the direction in which they
had fled. I was about to return home before the result
was known, and immediately after left for Australia.”
“ Let us trust in the mercy of God,’ said Mr. Mild-
may, fervently, and much affected; “ HE ‘is no re-
spector of persons,’ but a friend to the friendless, alike
to the poor black as to the white.”

It was now time for supper, after which, King Gabriel
and his guests took a friendly leave of each other, and
separated till the next day.





Seemed Cogito Eee


















STORY OF





CONCLUSION. ee

ENGLISH FREEDOM.



HILST the captain superintended the
repairing of his vessel, Mr. Mildmay
remained with King Gabriel, in-
structing and urging on him the
advantages of opening a communi-
cation with other nations; by which
means he would procure a supply of proper clothing,
and other essentials, for the comfort and improvement
of his people.

The island was not only rich in fruits and timber,
but possessed a mine of metal, which though long dis-
covered, could not be turned to account, even for home
use, from want of knowledge of the art, and proper
tools; such is the deplorable consequences of people
existing from generation to generation, without the
means of education. The fruit, the timber, and the
mine, would have enabled them to hold a market, taking
ENGLAND. 43

the goods of other countries in exchange; of this, King
Gabriel at last became sensible; and as it was necessary
‘that he should see something of other parts of the
_ world, that he might acquire further information as to
the future management of his kingdom, he determined
on accompanying Mr. Mildmay to England, his own
country, as he persisted in calling it.

The long-hoarded box of money was now likely to be
of great use, as it would not only defray his expenses
whilst away, but on returning, would enable him to
bring with him some well-selected persons to act as
school masters and mistresses to the young Goslingers.

As Prince Gaby was to succeed his father, it was
_ equally requisite that he, too, should be rendered a little
more competent than he at present was, so Mr. Mild-
may invited him to join the party now about to sail;
but the prince, like all foolish people, was averse to the
trouble of learning, persuading himself that he knew
enough already; besides which, he thought it would be
very nice to reign in his father’s stead, during his ab-
sence, having the unfortunate prime minister always on
his right hand to applaud him, just as he did his present
master, the king; so he refused to go. “ But you will
have lots of fine clothes,” said a sailor to him, one day.
“T have fine clothes here,” replied Prince Gaby, proud-
ly; “spotted skins, coloured grass, feathers!’ ‘Then,
’stead of that bit of an old cracked glass, you are so
fond of,” resumed his persuader, “you will have, in my
country, one as tall as any of your huts, in which you
can see yourself from the top of your head to the sole
4.4, DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

of your foot, front and back, and sides and all, every
inch of you; and that, too, all day long.” This allure-
ment was irresistible. “ All day long,” repeated the
Prince, musingly; ‘ I think I should like to do that
very much.” And he gave his consent accordingly.

Good weather and favourable winds brought the
voyagers to England, much sooner than they had ex-
pected. Mr. Mildmay, continuing his work of instruc-
tion, had been rewarded by perceiving a satisfactory
result; he was much pleased, too, at finding the health
of Omoko, the African king, much improved, though
he was still, generally speaking, silent and melancholy ;
on reaching the English port, this dejection increased
to a very painful extent, and observing two or three
sailors of his own complexion on a vessel that had just
dropped her anchor a little way off, he became so much
affected that he burst to tears. Mr. Mildmay kindly
tried to soothe him. ‘“ You very kind, sir, you try to
comfort poor father!” said the unhappy Omoko; “ but
dear Wyombo! dear Piscenee! I never see you more:
—go back to own country,—die !”

The boat being now ready to convey the passengers
ashore, Mr. Mildmay took the passive hand of his
afflicted companion, and led him to the side of the ship,
and they were soon after at the landing place. The
good missionary had been so much engaged in attend-
ing to Omoko, that he had not observed another boat
that had just gained the strand before them, neither did
Omoko, for his face was buried in his hands, or he
might have felt interested in the circumstance, for it

ie
bis

LN

ly

2”



Omoko, the African King, recognising his tw

oO sons.
ENGLAND. Ad

had left the vessel, the view of which had so much
affected him; but suddenly their attention was drawn
to the spot, by a rough but good-humoured voice
loudly shouting, “I say, you two black chaps, where
are you scampering to? leaving me to fasten the boat.”
But the lads, for such they were, had not gone far,
urged by an impulse of joyful ecstacy, they had sprung
over the last wave between them and the shore, and
exclaiming, “Enetanp! Free!” had prostrated them-
selves on the earth, as though they would embrace and
kiss it. Omoko and Mr. Mildmay had heard those
exclamations, and were close to the two happy crea-
tures when they arose from the ground. One moment
was enough for recognition. “ Wyombo! Piscenee!”
-“Pather!”’ were sounds that struck on the ears of all
present, and at the same instant.

To describe the effects on each of so much, and such
unexpected joy, would be impossible. Mr. Mildmay,
whose home was as open as his heart to all his fellow
creatures, be their nation what it might, was rendered
supremely happy by such an unhoped-for addition to his
guests; and, perhaps, there never was a happier group
in the whole Five Divisions of the Wort», than were
to be found in the long bereaved father, the recovered
children, and the good man who felt such benevolent
delight in contemplating their restoration to each other.

After a long journey on foot, and encountering a
variety of perils, the two brothers had reached a sea-
port where slavery had been abolished; here they had
been fortunate enough to interest the master of a vessel
46 DIVISIONS OF THE WORLD.

belonging to one of the northern countries of Europe;
being full of hands, he at first could only agree to take
one of them with him; but, still true to each other, they
mutually refused this offer; for how could they decide
on which of them was to accept the means of safety,
when both were determined to be the one still left to
danger. Their new friend was so much pleased with
this affecting instance of fraternal affection, that he
took them both; nor had he cause to repent his kind-
ness, for the grateful boys soon gave proof of how
much may be done by a willing mind and a thankful
spirit, though instruction might be wanted; this the
rough but kind seaman readily supplied, and they soon
became expert in assisting the rest of the crew. They
had been several short voyages since with the same
master, though not till now to England, always lookmg
forward to the time when they should be able to return
to Africa. |

In a year after the arrival: of Mr. Mildmay in his
native country, the monarch of Gosling, and his heir
apparent, returned thither in a vessel, purposely fitted
out by government, with a vast variety of what would
be of the greatest use to them, amongst the most
important of which were the materials for establishing
schools; several intelligent persons of both sexes being
engaged to conduct them.

King Gabriel, however, amidst all these articles of
utility, had taken care to procure a portable throne, of a
rather more dignified appearance than the one that had
hitherto been honoured by his royal person; and having
ENGLAND. 4.7

been presented to King George the Third, had bought
himself a dress resembling his majesty’s, far less ex-
pensive, yet a great deal finer, with which he meant to
dazzle the eyes of all his subjects, his prime minister in
particular; to that busy little body he took, for the
future exercise of his musical capacity, a brass trumpet,
a barrel organ, and a real drum, besides a suit of
clothes, such as is worn here by very smart footmen.

As for Prince Gaby, had he been left to his own
guidance, he would have covered his fingers with rings,
and, perhaps, his toes too, not forgetting necklaces, and
_ long glittering drops for his ears; but a twelvemonth’s
careful instruction had began to convince him that
there were ornaments for the mind more worthy atten-
-tion than those for the body; so poor Prince Gaby,
though he could never be a wise man, certainly went
home much wiser than he came, and, consequently, less
conceited; yet he had more than one looking-glass care-
fully packed amongst his peculiar baggage, besides a
variety of smaller ones.

Omoko, Wyombo, and Piscenee, had casks taken
a grateful and affecting leave of Mr. Mildmay, and had
returned to the faithful, and now happy Mootoo, in
their own country; there, to rejoicing auditors, they
would often relate, in their own history, a tale illus-
trious of Europe, as setting forth the good and glorious
deed of England, when she achieved, by her own
power, benevolence, and energy, “Tur ABOLITION OF
THE Stave Trav.”

FINIS.
ete genase nh fn en ncn

DEAN AND SON, PRINTERS, THREADNEEDLE-STREET,
Q

a ¢ ©



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