Citation
Sports and pastimes for in-doors and out

Material Information

Title:
Sports and pastimes for in-doors and out
Creator:
Optic, Oliver, 1822-1897 ( Author )
Cottrell, George W., d. 1895 ( Publisher )
J. Mayer & Co ( Lithographer )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
G.W. Cottrell
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
431 p., <2> leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Games -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Magic tricks -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Amusements -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Gymnastics -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Sports -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Outdoor recreation -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Fishing -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Acting -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Riddles -- 1863 ( rbgenr )
Puzzles -- 1863 ( rbgenr )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1863 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1863
Genre:
riddles (documents) ( aat )
puzzles (recreational artifacts) ( aat )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston

Notes

General Note:
Includes index.
General Note:
Plates chromolithographed by J. Mayer & Co.
Statement of Responsibility:
with additions by Oliver Optic embracing physical and intellectual amusements for young people, the family circle and evening parties; containing acting, pantomine, and dialogue charades, anagrams, puzzles, conundrums, transpositions, games, magic, forfeits, chess, draughts, backgammon, gymnastics, fishing, skating, rowing, etc.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026965588 ( ALEPH )
05934215 ( OCLC )
ALH8253 ( NOTIS )
05029748 ( LCCN )

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PARLOR THEATRICALS.







SPORTS AND PASTIMES

FOR |

IN-DOORS AND OUT.

WITH ADDITIONS BY

OLIVER OPTIC.,.

EMBRACING PHYSICAL AND INTELLECTUAL

AMUSEMENTS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE,

%
FAMILY CIRCLE AND EVENING PARTIES.

CONTAINING

ACTING, PANTOMIME, AND DIALOGUE CHARADES, ANAGRAMS,
PUZZLES, CONUNDRUMS, TRANSPOSITIONS, GAMES, MAGIC,
FORFEITS, CHESS, DRAUGHTS, BACKGAMMON, GYM-
NASTICS, FISHING, SKATING, ROWING, ETC.



BOSTON: f

PUBLISHED BY G. W. COTTRELL,
86 CORNHILL.







Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1868, by
G. W. COTTRELL,
In the Clerk’s Office of the District gout of Massachusetts.



PREFACE.



OYS will be boys, and girls will be girls,

says Mrs. Partington, good humoredly,

when somebody complains of the mischief

and romping going on in the school-room and
garden. And it is well that it should be so;

for surely it is pleasanter to see children
amusing: themselves at children’s games than to
make little men and women of them before their
time. The wise Son of David tells us that for every-
thing there is a season—a time to weep, and a time
to laugh; a time to mourn, and a time to dance.
And there is, in this work-a-day world of ours, a
time to learn, so there is, or should be, a time to
play. Amusement, when properly regulated, is a
grand help-mate to study; and in order that boys
and girls may know how to amuse themselves in a
sensible manner, this Collection of Indoor and Out-
door Games has been compiled. In these pages will
‘be found not only the good old-fashioned sports

which delighted our grandsires, but many, new and
3



iv PREFACE.

diverting pastimes for sunny days and winter even-
ings; games which not only provide innocent amuse-
ment in the family circle, but exercise the memory,
wit, intelligence, and imagination of the players.

It has been the earnest endeavor of the Editor to
render this collection as complete as possible. He
has been careful to exclude everything objectionable
to sound morality and good home training, and trusts
that the present repertoire. will be acceptable alike to
children of all ages.

It may be as well to mention that he has produced
a companion volume, consisting of Scientific Recrea-
tions and Exercises for ingenuity, in which will be
found many of the most celebrated arithmetical puz-
ales, together with a large variety of chemical and
other experiments. For both books he seeks publie
favor and appreciation.

Tue AvtHor.



PARLOR PASTIMES,



ACTING CHARADES.



INTRODUCTION.

F all in-door recreations, that of acting
Charades is the most amusing and the most
popular. Noy are these amateur performan-

ces at all difficult to manage. We will sup-

pose a party of young people assembled on a

winter’s evening; nothing is easier than for
half a dozen of them to entertain the rest with an
impromptu drama. All that is necessary is a room
or part of a room, for a stage, a few old clothes for
dresses, and a little mother-wit. ‘Where parlors open
into each other with folding doors, one room will
serve for the stage, and the other for the audience— |
the folding doors serving both for curtain and side }
scenes, lehind which the actors can retire on leaving
the stage. Those of the company who are to act in

the Charade withdraw and determine upon a word
5



6 INTRODUCTION.

or sentence, which may be either represented in dumb
show or dialogue, as suits the actors. Some word
or phrase should be selected, whose syllables possess
_ especial meanings independent of the sense of the
whole word. In the first Charade, for instance, the
word ‘“‘ backgammon” is used; here the first and
last syllables are made each a scene, and the whole
acted word forms a key to the rest. Again, in the
word ‘‘mendicant” it will be observed that each of
its syllables has a meaning of its own, each syllable
forming a separate act of the Charade. In the first -
act the word mend is shown by a young lady repair-
ing a lace veil; the pronoun 7 is played upon in the
second act; the word cant is made the subject of the
third act; and the whole word is shown in the fourth.
When the Charade or. Drama is concluded, the audi-
tors endeavor to find out on what word it was found-
ed, and much amusement will be afforded by their
efforts to detect the covert meaning of each scene as
it proceeds.

It is by no means pretended that the actors shall
exactly follow the words here set down; if they play
with spirit, they will soon find that they can im-
provise language suitable to the situations introduc-
ed; and in the case of Pantomime Charades many
characters may be brought on the stage, and much
entertainment obtained at little cost of thought or
time.



INTRODUCTION.

7

The following words will be found suitable for
either Pantomime or Dialogue Charades :—

Air-gun,
Arch-bishop,
Band-box,
Bride-cake,
Bull-rush,
Court-ship,
Cross-bow,
Dice-box,
Dog-rose,
Lye-glass,
Fag-end,
Fan-light,

- Game-cock
Grand-child,
Great-coat, —
Heir-loom,

Horse-chest-nut,
I-dol,

T-rate,
Jack-pudding,
Jew-el,
King-craft,
Key-hole,
Leap-frog,
Love-apple,
Mad-cap, »
Mend-i-cant,
Milk-maid,
Nap-kin,
Night-cap,
Out-rage,
Out-pour,
Pack-cloth,
Pop-gun,
Quarter-staff,

Rain-bow,

Rope-yarn,

Sauce-box,

Sea-shell,

Sweet-heart,”

Tell-tale, |
Time-wreft, |
Tow-line,

Up-braid,

Up-shot,

Vat-i-can

Watch-man,

Waist-cord,

Way-bill,

Water-fall,

Young-ster,

Zeal-ot,





PANTOMIME CHARADES.



BACKGAMMON.
A Chavave in Chree Acts.

ACT I. — BACK-
Dramatis Persone.
_ Two Lirrix Boys. e BEADLE.
Susan, a Servant. Girl. Otp Morurr.
Joun, a Footman. Recruiting SERGEANT.

Scens I.—A Street.

This scene may be made by pinning several news-
papers, or large pieces of paper against the window
curtains, showing part of the window at back, and
placing cheese, butter, &c., on dishes, on a table be-
hind. A lamp-post may be shown by introducing a
straight prop, with a candle alight on top, &c.

Enter Two Lirtte Boys, who take halfpence from
their pockets, and show them asif for odd and even.
The one who loses then makes a back, over which
the other jumps. The other boy then stands with

his*head down as if to-make a back. ‘‘ Higher!”
8



‘«*

PANTOMIME CHARADES.

a

cries his playfellow; the boy makes a higher
and the other is just about to jump over it, w'

In rushes a Beapte, and drives the boys out. ‘The
dress of the Beadle may be made by an old great-
coat with a red collar, a cane in his hand, and a
cocked hat on hishead. The Beadle shakes his cane
after the boys and exit.

Re-enter Boys, who point to where the Beadle has
gone, laugh, and re-commence their game at leap-
frog.—Eaxit Boys. ‘

Enter Orv Woman, Servant Girt, and. Foorman.
—They stand and talk to each other, and make signs,
as if the young people were going to be married.
Show wedding-ring, kiss each other, and so on.

Enter Recrurrine Serceant.—The dress of this
character may be easily made by fastening a red sash
round his waist, putting a ribbon in his hat, &e.

Recruiting Sergeant goes up to Footman, places a
shilling in his hand, and marches him off. The old
Mother and Girl express sorrow violently, wringing
their hands and pretending to weep; old woman imi-
tates the act of firing a gun to express the office of a
soldier ; young girl puts out her finger, as if to show
that her chance of marrying is lost. Both weep and
wail in comic pantomime.

Enter Foorman running.—Old woman and girl ex-
press great astonishment at his return; and he ex-
hibits a large placard, on which is written, ‘ Sent
BACK.—Not short enough.” Scene closes.



10 _ PARLOR PASTIME. —

ACT II.— GAMMON.

* Dramatis Persone.
Rica Oxp Lapy. | SHasBy-Lookine Lover.

Scuiu.—A Parlor.

Enter Rica Otp Lapy with a long purse in her
head. She begins to count her money, sighs deeply,
takes a letter from her pocket, and reads.

Enter Suasspy Lover, who advances to the rich
old Lady, makes great protestations of affection, and
tries to take the purse from her hand. She resists,
when he drops on one knee, places his hand on his
heart, and pretends to be violently in love. Old lady
seems subdued, and gives him her purse. He kisses
her hand, rises, cuts a caper, and exit. * Old lady
raises her hands in astonishment, and cries out—
“He wants to gammon me, he does.”—WScene closes.

ACT. III.—BACKGAMMON.

Dramatis Persone.

Youne Lavy. | Youna GEnTLEMAN.
VIsIToRS.

Scenz.— A’ Drawing-room.

Visitors arrange themselves in groups; one young
lady plays the piano, another looks over a book of
prints; a third amuses herself with the flowers on the
table, &c. :

Enter Young Lapy and Gentieman from opposite
sides of the room. They advance, shake hands, and



——E———————————_S

ae

PANTOMIME CHARADES. — 11

go to back of room. Young gentleman comes for-
ward with little table, which he places in centre.
He then brings two chairs, which he places on either
side of the table. One of the visitors brings a draft-
board, which he opens. The young lady and gentle-
man sit down to the table and commence rattling
dice-boxes and moving the draft-men. Visitors group
themselves round the players.—WScene closes.

A LITTLE MISUNDERSTANDING.

A Charave in Four Acts.



ACT I. —A LITTLE MISS-
Dramatis Persone.

A Youna Lavy or Five. Lavy VisrTors.
Her MAMMA AND SISTERS. SERVANTS.

Scunze I.—Parlor in the house of the Mamma.

Enter Mai Servant, who dusts and arranges the
furniture, and exit.

Enter Turer Sisters, bringing with them a quan-
tity of silk lace and other articles of dress. They
sit down and begin working busily, one cutting out,
another sewing, &c.

Enter Mamma with child of five in night-cap and

morning dress. The Sisters clap their hands, laugh,

and express surprise. They take the child’s cap off,



12 PARLOR PASTIMES.

and exhibit its rough, uncombed hair. One rings the
bell, and makes signs to the servant. who enters.
Servant goes out and presently returns with basin
and water, combs, brushes, and various articles of
toilette, which she sets down and exit. The sisters
then brush the child’s hair, wash its face, and so on,
_ the mamma assisting. They then dress the child in
very fine clothes, a small bonnet and parasol, white
lace handkerchief in her hand, &c. The child looks
pleased, kisses her sisters and mamma, and struts
about the room. Double knock heard: at the door.
Enter servant introducing visitors. Sisters try to
hide the litter, and mamma brings forward the little
miss in her finery. Visitors express delight. Little
miss takes her seat in centre of room, the rest group-
ing round her with various signs of homage and ad-
miration. Mamma exclaims, ‘ Pretty little Miss.”—
Scene closes.

aa



ACT Il.—UNDER-

Dramatis Persone.
Marp Servant. MIsTREss.
POLICEMAN. MASTER.
Scene.—Kitchen in the house of the Lady, with
table in centre, discovers maid-servant nicely dressed.
Clock strikes nine, and three gentle taps are heard
on the wall outside. Maid goes out, and returns
cautiously with a policeman on her arm; they look
lovingly on each other. Maid prepares supper, -
spreads a large cloth on the table so as nearly to —



PANTOMIME CHARADES. - 13

touch the ground, and places dishes and plates,
knives and forks, &c.; they sit down and eat, the
maid-servant daintily, the policeman ravenously.
‘Just in the middle of the feast a loud double knock
is heard at the front door. They rise in confusion,
the maid calling out ‘* Master!” Policeman’ hides
under the table, from which the maid hastens to clear
the things. Knocking continues impatiently. Po-
liceman puts his head out from under the cloth, the
maid kisses him, and runs up stairs to open the
door. Noise heard in the passage as if the Master _
and Mistress were remonstrating at being kept so
long at the door. Policeman is creeping cautiously
from under the table, when steps are heard outside,
which cause him instantly to hide again.

Enter Master, Mistress, and Servant, all disput-
ing with many gestures. Mistress looks about the
room, goes to the cupboard, and at last approaches
thevtaile, and is about to lift the cloth. At this mo-
ment the maid servant rusbes up to her master and
falls fainting in his arms. Mistress lifts up side of

auble-cloth and discovers policeman under the table.
The policeman then looks up from his knees, bran-
dishes his staff, and inquires in a loud voice, ‘* Does
_ Mr. UnpDERDOWN live here Scene closes.









14 PARLOR PASTIME.

ACT — II.
Dramatis Persone.
TRAVELLER, WITH CARPET BAG, ETC.
CABMAN. | PUBLICAN.
CusTOMERS.
-Scuens—Bar of a Public-House—Publican discovered behind,
and Customers in front.

This Scene may be made by laying a shutter across

Bg

a couple of chairs, and placing another shutter in

front. Place pewter pots, glasses, &c., on counter.

_ Enter TRAVELLER and Casman.—They go up to
counter and drink. . Various persons close up to the
Traveller and request him to treat them. He nods,
and publican serves out glasses and mugs to all.
They all, drink, and appear very merry. Publican
holds out his hand for the money after counting up
the sum. ‘Traveller pulls out a very long purse and
pays—Cabman and company dance for joy.—Scene
closes.

ACT IV.—A LITTLE MISUN DERSTANDING.
Dramatis Persone.



THE LITTLE Miss. A Lover. â„¢
Her THREE SISTERS. POLICEMAN. -
Toe MAMMA. Marp SERVANT. ee

Scene.—A drawing-room—Curtain rises, and distovers a
lady sitiing with her two daughters, and the Little Miss,
Jinely dressed, as before. The young ladies are engaged in
crochet work, and the Little Miss admires her figure in the
glass. ae :

(A double knock is heard at thé outer door.)
Enter Servant, bringing bouquet, which she takes
to the little“Miss. The Sisters and Mamma express”
great surprise.





- PANTOMIME CHARADES. 15

Enter Lover, gaily dressed, with a crush hat un-
der his arm. He advances to the Mamma, who bows
and shakes hands with him. He then goes up to the
‘young ladies, and begins to make himself agreeable.
They turn away from him and pout their lips, at the
same time pointing to the Little Miss, who is admir-
ing the bouquet. The Lover starts, ad rushes from

- the room.

The Mamma and ee look uci at the Little
Miss, and endeavor to obtain the bouquet. She re-
sists and begins to cry; stamps on the floor, and
turns over the chairs, and pulls about the curtains.
Servant rings the bell, and calls ‘‘ Police!”

Enter Lover with Porticeman, who brandishes his
staff, and looks very important. Lover produces
three large bouquets, one of which he gives to each of
the young ladies. Policeman takes a great doll
out of his pocket and presents it to the Little Miss.
Maid-servant. goes up to Policeman and boxes his
ears; the Policeman immediately shows her a
wedding-ring, when she kisses him, and appears much

leased. Little Miss comes forward, nursing the
doll. Loverakes bouquet from her hand, and gives
it to the elder’ “young lady. Young ladies and Moth-
er smile gratibusly upon him. The whole party then
form a group about the lover and the young lady,




















her. Policeman fand Maid-servant in the back-ground
ged and. Epis the wedding-ring. Lover

Curtain Fall





DIALOGUE CHARADES. .



MEND-I-CANT.

A Charade in Four Acts.



Dramatis Persone.

Mr. Epwarp Seymour. Mrs. Emity Seymour.
CoLONEL SEYMOUR. . Marta, her Map.
Brown, the BuTiEr.

ACT I.—MEND-

Mrs. Sryrmour’s dressing-room. Flowers and green-house
plants arranged about, Maria seated on a low SOB, repar=
ang a torn lace veil. :

Maria. Well, people may talk as they will abou
black slaves; but I know no slavery can be wor SC.
than that of a finished lady’s maid by profession... %
Slaves indeed! look at me, expected by my lady to —
do everything for her. Did ever anybody seesucha @ .
_ ragged, jagged rent as this? and she will expect to a

see the veil look as good as new before she goes out; |
and after all I shall be reproached. 3 her things are |,
not laid out, her lunch broughtup, the lap-dog *
washed, the flowers renewed, and the carriage prop-

16 S







DIALOGUE CHARADES, 17

erly heated. Well, mend I can’t, nor won’t. Then
all day long I have to sit and work in this dreadful
hot-house, and dare not open a window, just because
my lady never feels warm. How can she feel warm,

indeed, with such a cold heart? A pretty bargain

Mr. Seymour made when he married her for the
money; she is always telling himaboutit. But he
was right served: he is as bad as she is with his fine

talk, talk, talk—all gammon! and don’t I see that

while they are both as smooth as oil with their grand,
rich old uncle, they wish him in his coffin! I have
half a mind to open his eyes, for I am vexed to see
him cheated: he’s a real gentleman, and always has
a civil word for a respectable upper servant. And
here he comes. :

Linter COLONEL SEYMOUR.

Colonel Seymour. Where’s my niece—my pretty,
gentle Emily? I wish to-bid her good morning be-
fore Iget out on my ride.
Maria. My lad never rises so early as this, sir.
Col. S. Very bad plan; people should always rise

_ with the sun in this fine climate. Might as well be

in India if we indulge in bed so long. 'There—there
goes my glove. Sew it up, my good girl. I would»

not trouble you, but I am ina hurry to be out. I

vill sit down and watch your pretty, nimble fingers.

. But, whew! (whistles) how can you live in this atmo-

sphere? Wellseasoned as I am, I can’t stand this
heat; I must open the window, my little woman.
3 [Opens a window.]



18 PARLOR PASTIME.

Maria. Oh, sir, how refreshing the air is! but I
fear my lady will be displeased. She insists on.the
window being at all times shut.

Col S: Poor thing! poor thing ! ‘Quite a aistabe.
T must see her doctor; I must have him prescribe
to her early rising and fresh air. I must hint to my
worthy nephew, without alarming him, that such
habits may endanger her precious health.

(Maria sighs deeply.)

Col. S. Why do you sigh, my good creature”
Have you any fears about my dear niece’s health ?

Maria. Oh, no, sir; sheis in excellent health.
Iam sorry I sighed, sir—I was only thinking about
myself; and I couldn’t have anything more unhappy
to think about. I ask your pardon, sir; you are al-
ways considerate to poor servants ; I wish there were-
more like you; and sew your glove I will, that 1 am
determined, though I should be discharged, on the
spot for not having finished mending her veil.

Col. S. But surely, Maria, you need have no fear
of the reproofs of my gentle niecé.

Maria. I know very well what she will say, sir, if —
she orders a thing to be done, and it isn’t done. :

Col: S. Why, that-is certainly a vexation; but
you need not dread her words, child, they are so few
—so soft and sweet. .

Maria. No doubt,‘she can be sweet enough when
it pleases her; and you, sir, have little chance of
seeing her as I see her, as my fellow-servants see
her, and as poor folks see her, when they get a chance





DIALOGUE CHARADES, > 19

of it, which isn’t often. Bless you, sir, certainly
servants should see all and say nothing; but she és
a hard lady to’please.

Col. S. I am-sorry to hear this from you, young
woman; I would not have suspected it, and I would
gladly believe you are mistaken. If her words are
unkind to those beneath her, what pain it must give
to my virtuous and philanthropic nephew to hear
the feelings of a fellow-creature wounded in his
house; for his every thought, word, and act, are for
the good of his fellow-creatures.

Maria. To-speak the truth, sir, I think Mr. Sey-
mour is the worst of the two. My lady does not
mind for saying out down right that she cares for
nobody but herself: but he talks like an angel about
his feelings, and never does one good deed. He
feeds and clothes. the poor with fine words, and
blinds great folks with his preaching. I’m but a
_ poor, silly servant girl; but I can see through them
both, sir; I can see how they dupe you, and I made
up my mind to speak and tell you; for it’s a sin to
let such a kind-hearted gentleman be cheated.
There’s your glove, sir.

Col. S. You have shocked me very much, girl;
I must think over this; and I will certainly find out
the fact, Thank you for your work and your words;
both were meant in kindness. (Gives her money.)
Nay, don’t refuse. You have dofie me a favor, and
I can afford to do one to you. Now, good morning,
and go on with your tiresome work. (E7zit.)



90 3 PARLOR PASTIMES,

Maria. There, now! I have gone and done it!
See if I don’t lose my place for my prattling! Not
that I should call that any loss, if theyll only give
me a character ; and after all I feel as if I had done
right, though I haven’t finished mending the veil.
I must go and see what cook can send up for my la-
dy’s lunch. (Ezit.)

ACT IL—L-
The same dressing-room. Marta at work.
Enter Mrs. SEYMOUR.

Mrs. S. Wow wretched everything seems! Noth-
ing is as it ought to be: nothing as I ordered it.
My silk mantle laid out for this chilly day! And
bless me! who has taken the liberty to open my
windows ?

Maria. It was I that did it, madam. I was near
fainting with the heat, and I thought

Mrs. S. Ihave no wish to hear your thoughts.
If you chose to be faint, was that any reason why
my windows should be set open to endanger my life?
You know I never suffer the air to be admitted here ;
but my delicate constitution is perfectly shattered
in this comfortless house. Everybody here is oppos-
ed to me—all do their own way: I am nobody—no
one cares for me! I am miserable. Who was that
making so much noise, and trotting the horses be-
neath my windows? » |



Maria. Colonel Seymour, setting out for a ride.
- Mrs. S. Colonel Seymour! I hate to hear his





DIALOGUE CHARADES. ) 21

name. How selfish of Edward to bring that old bru-
tal, vulgar, East Indian uncle of his to my house!
He oontinually offends my eyes and ears and taste.
Did you inquire, as I ordered you, of Mrs. Norris,
what soup she intends to send to table to-day ?

Maria. I did, maa’m; it is to be mulligatawny.
Mr. Seymour ordered it himself, because, as he told
Mrs. Norris, it was the colonel’s favorite soup.

Mrs. S. And my feelings never consulted! Ed-
ward knows—Mrs. Norris knows—that mulligatawny
is poisén to me; but I am never considered. Go
down immediately, Maria, and tell Mrs. Norris that
I insist on it, that my soup, the white soup, be sub-
stituted for the mulligatawny. How can TL. possibly
dine. without soup? And, at the same time, tell
Brown to give out some. of the rich old Madeira, the
same as we had yesterday. I choose to have some
for my lunch. (zit Maria, with a curtsy.) The
mulled Madeira may perhaps restore the circulation
Which has been quite checked by the chill occasioned
by that selfish young woman opening the windows.
Servants think only of themselves. - What wretched
creatures we are, to be compelled to depend for every
comfort, on such heartless beings!

Enter Marta,

Have you ordered my soup?—and when am I to
have my lunch? .

Maria. Please, ma’am, Mrs. Norris says she has
no objection to send two soups, as you wish for the



22, | PARLOR PASTIMES.

white ; but Mr. Seymour was positive in his orders
for the mulligatawny.

Mrs. S. And they will enjoy it, though they see
I cannot touch it. Selfish and unfeeling men! But
when will my lunch be ready?

Maria. Please, ma’am, about the wine—Mr.
Brown

Mrs. S. What does the oirl mean? 2 has

- Brown to do with my lunch?
Maria. Were he comes, madam.



Enter Brown in a cotton Jacket.

Mrs. S. What is the meaning of this intrusion
into my apartments, unsummoned, and in that ex-
traordinary dress? Am I to be insulted by all my
servants ?

Brown. Please ma’am, Miss Maria was so prem-
tery, insisting on having the wine directly; and I
was quite out of my head, and never thought of my |
jacket, but came off all in a fluster, to say as how
Mr. Seymour ordered me, strict, to keep the Madeira
number thirtyeseven—only one dozen of it left—to
keep it all for the colonel, who is remarkable fond of
that Madeira; as well he may, after the four long
voyages it made before it came into our cellars. -

‘Mrs. S. Our cellars, man! the cellars are mine;
the contents of the cellars are mine; you are my
servant; and / order you to keep the wine for me.
I shall have some of the wine every day as long as it
lasts ; because.1 like the wine, and I choose to be



DIALOGUE CHARADES. 258

obeyed. Go immediately, and give out the wine.
(Exit Brown.) Come and arrange my hair again; it
is quite discomposed with the agitation I have under-
gone this morning, from the presumption, imperti-
nence and selfishness of my servant. . Exeunt.



ACT ITIT.— CANT
The dressing-room. Mrs. Szymour reclining on a couch.

Mrs.S. What unheard-of tyranny : with my fortune,
not to be allowed to choose my own dinner, or my own
lunch! Edward is abominably selfish. I’m glad I in-
sisted on having the Maderia, though I do think it is
rather heating, and injurious to the complexion [rising
and looking at herself in a mirror]; but I should be
crushed to the earth if I did not sometimes make a
struggle to obtain a small share of attention in a house
which it is supposed is mine. What does Edward.
want? I shall be wearied with long speeches now.

Enter Epwarp Srymoovr.

Mr. S. My sweet Emily! what is this that Brown
tells me, that my Emily wishes the bin of Maderia
thirty-seven to be reserved for her? My discrimin-
ating angel must surely have perceived the pure and
holy motive which induced me to set apart this fatal
_ liquor, ever a snare of the evil ihe for our worthy
and respected uncle.

Mrs. S. You know perfectly well, Edward, that I
have no respect for the vulgar, unfecling old fellow ;
and I see no reason why he should have the wine I
want for my own use. .



o4. PARLOR PASTIME.

Mr. S. But, my love, you are aware that my good
_ uncle, with his usual wisdom, has announced his de-
cided intention of bequeathing his vast wealth to us,
—in trust, of course,—in trust for the unfortunate !
for the poor! the widow and the orphan! A rich
Pool of Bethesda! from which I will lave the pre-
cious waters to a needy world.

Mrs. S. What absurdity, Edward! You will in-
vest it all in railway shares, I have no doubt; and
very probably make more widows and wheerNs than
you will relieve.

Mr. S. Alas! alas! it is the misfortune of the
benevolent never to be comprehended by the chil-

dren of this world! It is the ‘‘ crook in the lot” to .
which we, whose affections are devoted to our fellow-_

creatures, are exposed. I bow to my martyrdom.
[ glory in the contumely of the world.
Mrs. S. But Ihave no desire for the glory of
martyrdom; I do not wish to deny myself the nec-
essaries of life, and I do not see yet why I should
vive up any of my few comforts to please this ex-
acting old uncle of yours.
Mr. S. This trifle might offend him, my -love;
and I would not willingly cast away the means of

benefitting my fellow-creatures. I must have’ this

dangerous juice of the vine for the frail old man; it
is his foible to rejoice in the delusive draught of evil
and sorrow. My Emily knows I wish it not for my-
self.

Mrs. S. Certainly not ; | because you always drink
port.



DIALOGUE CHARADES. .

Mr.S. Tt is indeed my painful duty to do so;
left to myself, the simplest diet—the fruits, the roots
that the bounty of nature scatters round, the pure’
water from the spring—would supply all my wants;
but Dr. Wiseman, as you know, my dear, says im-
peratively, ‘‘ Do this, or die.” He commands me to
eat rich food, to drink generous wine, if I desire to
retain that life which is granted to.me solely to do
good to. all that surround me.

Mrs. S. You may fancy you are swallowing phys-
ic when you take your turtle and your port, Mr. Sey-
mour; but you seem to enjoy it more than any one
else at the table. |

Mr. 8S. I am resigned, my love ; I abhor the means,
but I sacrifice my inclinations to the duty of preserv-
ing my life. To the world it seems that I eat and

_ drink and live like a on vivant, but they know me



not; my heart is far from the festive board, in the
lowly hut of privation and sorrow. |
_ Mrs. S. I pray Edward, cease your preaching.
In all your sympathy for the unhappy, I am quite
sure lam never considered; and your plausible words
will not deceive me now. , I know that you did once

_ dupe me: now you want to dupe your uncle; you
_ fancy you can dupe the whole world; but one thing
is sure, you know what you are about—you do not |
dupe yourself. Now I shall go down to lunch, and
you can have bread and water if you desire it. (Ez-
it.) . )
Mr. 8. (holding up his hands).—Unfortunate wo-
man! (Ezit.)



26 “PARLOR PASTIMES,

SCENE THE LAST.— MENDICANT. |

The dressing-room. Marta arranging ‘the wig of Cou. Sry-
MOUR, disguised as an old Beggar.

Maria. That will do excellently. Now step into
this closet till I can introduce you, and you will preb-
ably hear your own character.

(Cox. Szymour enters the closet. Manta sits down to her
‘ work.)

; _ Enter Mr. and Mrs. Srymour.

_ Mrs. 8S. How painful to me is this miserable life!

I cannot comprehend, Edward, how you can be so
barbarous as to compel me to tolerate the provoking
eccentricities of that ill-bred, unfeeling, hideous old
man. When will he go away? —

Mr. 8S. Iventure to hope, my love, that he may
never leave us. I have carefully studied his consti-
tution; I have remarked in him a fulness of habit, |
a redness in the face, a short neck—all sad, sad symp-
toms. In short cate love, I caution you not to be.
alarmed if he should be tied carried off by apo- —
_plexy.
- Mrs. S. I should n6% be the least alarmed or —
troubled to hear that he was dead, but I cannot al- —
low him to die in my house; it would be a most un-
pleasant circumstance fer me. |

Mr. S. Emily, how can you be blind to the fact
that his death while staying with us would be of im- i
mense advantage to us! If he were to leave us he ~
might be induced to alter his will. He has left all to ©





DIALOGUE CHARADES. Zt

us—a beautiful arrangement of Providence! Al-
ready I feel in possession of his coffers, which might
then be truly inscribed ‘‘ Treasury of the Poor.”

Mrs. S. (Impatiently.) A treasury never to be
ppened for the poor, I dare to say. Maria, go and
wring me a shawl, to protect me from the draught
when I descend the cold staircase. (Maria goes.)
You may as well speak the truth before the servants,
Edward, for they must have long ago discovered that
you never give to the poor or the rich.

Mr. S. Mrs. Seymour, you are mistaken—you
do not comprehend my character. A thick veil con-
ceals my charities from the million, and I am ever
studious that my right hand should not know what
my left hand does. My tender heart—(sharply)—
What does that ragged old vagabond want here?

Enter Marta with the shawl, introducing Old Man.

Maria. (Putting on Mrs, Seymour’s shawl.) Please,
sir, Brown begged me to bring up the old man, who
has said he must see you immediately ,on a case of
life or death.

Mr. S. What can he want? Perhaps some acci-
dent has happened to the colonel, my dear. Speak,
old man, and at once declare the cause of this intru-
sion. : / ‘

Old Man. Your own words, nmaiie and exalted | |
man. I was waiting in the hall at the meeting of |
the magistrates yesterday, and shed tears to hear
you declare before that crowded assembly that all
your wealth belonged to the poor. Iam the poor-



28 PARLOR PASTIMES.

est of the poor: for I have been rich, and I feel more
keenly the cold and deadly pressure of poverty and
famine. )
Mr.8S. Do you belong to our parish? I know
nothing of you. |
Old Man. I am a stranger. When sudden and
total ruin fell upon me, I set out, accompanied by an

aged wife and a sick and helpless daughter, with the

hope of reaching the home of my early days, where
some might still be living who would remember and
befriend me.. When we arrrived at -your city our
strength and our scanty means were alike exhausted.
We took shelter in the humblest hut we could find,
hoping to be able to earn, by our labor, the small
pittance necessary to support life. f

Mr: S. Well, oldman, I suppose somebody would
give you work. |

Old Man. Alas! sir, my wife and child are pros-
trated by an attack of fever. I cannot even pay for
a shelter for their dying bed. Encouraged by your
noble sentiments, I come to ask of you, from your
abundance, the single piece of gold that may save
the lives of those dear to me, or at all events, render
their death-bed less miserable.

Mrs. 8. Send him away, Edward: he may have

brought infection: I may take this fever. I shall .

faint if he remains in my dressing-room.
Mr. S. Go away,}good man; I am myself very,
very poor; the demands of charity have completely

drained my purse. My ardent desire to bless the 4







DIALOGUE CHARADES. a.

needy with a share of my humble means, must be
reined néw by prudence. I subscribe largely to all
benevolent societies, those blessed fountains for the
support of the respectable poor ; what more can char-
ity require from me? Depart in peace; the union-
house is already crowded ; leave this poor and heavi-
ly-rated parish. Proceed.forward to another town,
where there are many men of larger means, though,
perhaps, with less feeling hearts than I possess.
There, old man, you will be received into a spacious
and commodious union-house: go, without delay.

Mrs. S. Why do you waste your words on sucha
wretch? Send him to prison if he will not leave.

Old Man. My wife and child cannot travel; I
will not be separated from them, Give me but a tri-
fle; they surely ought not to perish for want while
any of their fellow-creatures are revelling in luxury.

Mr. S. Strict principle forbids me to bestow
- money on unknown beggars. I give you my prayers.
Go. ) Ss sf

Maria. Please, sir, I think the cdlonel is riding
up the avenue; he is very rich, and perhaps he may.
be able to do something for the poor man.

Mr. S. However rich he may be, he gives noth-
ing, and has a great aversion to beggars. Go imme-
diately, man; for if Col. Seymour enters, I shall be

reluctantly compelled to commit you as vagrant.
Old Man. Will you not bestow a shilling on me? |
Mrs. S. Carry him off, girl, before the colonel
- comesup. I would not have such a miserable object
geen in my apartment.



30 PARLOR PASTIMES,

Mr. 8S. Be careful to take him out through the
back yard: not a moment longer, stubborn and im-
portunate offender; be grateful for my leniency, and
go quickly. ;

Old Man. Farewell, admirably-mated pair! And
in taking the liberty of removing my night-cap in
your ladyship’s luxurious abode (throwing off his dis-
guise) I will drop into the P. P. C. card of Colonel
Seymour. You may well be amazed; for much as I
abhor deception, I have stooped to practice it in or-
der to discover the truth. I have other nephews
and nieces, whom I shall now seek; and after reward-
ing this honest girl, I shall take leave of this house
forever ; hoping to be more successful in my next ex-
periment. I will search over half the world for a
worthy object, rather than bestow my wealth on sel-
fishness and falsehood.—Scene closes.



DIALOGUE CHARADES. 31

PATRIOT.

A Charade in Chree Acts,

Dramatis Persone.

Mr. James ARunDEL. Mrs. ARUNDEL. }
Caprain O’Brien. G=ERALDINE,
Parrick O’ BRALLAGAN. Mary.
Lucas. Coox.

ACT I.—PAT-

A Drawing-room. Mr. Arunpzt, Mrs. ArunpEt, GEratpine.

Mrs. Arundel. And now, my dear Geraldine, that
you are restored to me, I hope you will forget speed-
ily your Irish manners and customs.

Geraldine. Never, mamma; remember that the
seventeen years of my-life have been passed almost
entirely in dear Ireland.

Mr. A. And remember, too, my lady, the drop
of pure Milesian blood that runs in Geraldine’s veins.
My mother is proud of her country, and we can
‘scarcely expect her adopted child should have d‘u-
similar feelings.

Mrs. A. But I would not have the world believe
she cherishes such feelings; Mr. Dellington, whose
attentions to her last night were gratifying, has, I

know, a peculiar antipathy to Ireland.
. i



es
32 PARLOR PASTIMES.

Enter Lucas.

Lucas. A man, sir, about the footman’s place;
but I am afraid he is Irish.

Geraldine. Do let him come up, papa.

Mr. A. Well, we are really in immediate need of
a servant? we will see him at all events. Show him
up, Lucas.

Lucas ushers in O’BRALLAGAN, and retires.

O’Brallagan. Bless yer honors, and its a beauti-
ful parlor ye’re havin’ to yerselves. I’m the boy,
shure, that’s come to take the place, for want ofa
bettaer; and by the same token, it’s a capital servant
yer honors will Set, musha!

Mr. A. You are premature, my friend.

O’Brallagan. Will it be well-looking yer honor is
maning? arrah! and that’s thruly what all the girls
are saying.

Mr. A. I mean, young man, that I must hear
something more of you before I engage you. :

O’Brallagan. No offence in the world, yer honor,
and, if agraable to their lady-ships, Pll tell the his-
thory of all the root and stock of the O’Brallagans.

Mrs. A. No, no, it is quite unnecessary, O’Bral-
lagan, if that is your name.

O’Brallagan. Is it the name that’s on me, yer
ladyship? sure it’s Patrick O’Brallagan: Terence,
he’s the boy that comes next to me—and then there’s
Nora, our sisther, a sweet purty girl, she that died?’
the famine faver. Then——



ye

é

-

DIALOGUE CHARADES. 83

Mr. A. You wust not talk so much, O’Brallagan,
before the ladies. Be content to answer. my ques-
tions. Where did you last live?

O’Brailagan. Wt would be in the steerage, yer
honor, aboard of the stamer; and a very dacent
place it was to lie down in, saving yer ladyship’s
presence.

Mr. A. You misunderstand me; I wish to know
in whose service you have lived.

O’Brallagan. Och! sure wasn’t I at any gintle-
man’ 8 service that wanted a nate job done.

pe Mr. A. J am perfectly puzzled; I believe Ger-
aldine, I shall need your services to question the wit-
ness.

Geraldine.—(laughing.)—Tell me, Pat, what can
you do?

O’Brallagan. And is it yer honorable ladyship
asks me that with your own beautiful mouth? Sure
ye might ask the thing that Patrick O’Brallagan is
short of knowing, and if I don’t answer yer ladyship,
I have never seen the boy that will do that thing at
all, at all.

Mrs..A. I do hope, James, you will not think of
engaging this ignorant Irishman. Iam positively
alarmed, he appears so eccentric.

O’Brallagan. Not a bit of the same, yer ladyship.
It’s the quietest boy in the world ye’ll find me, and
that’s the thruth; barring any spalpeen blackens me
counthry, and thin me blood is riz, and no help for
that, at all, at all. es



84. . PARLOR PASTIMES.

Geraldine. Oblige me, dear papa, ly hiring Pat
O’Brallagan. He looks honest; Mary will teach him
his duty; and in truth, papa, my heart warms to the
brogue—it is home language to me.

' Mrs. A. Geraldine, I qujte shudder at your inel-
egant vehemence. I must entreat you to control this
Irish impetuosity before the refined Mr. Dellington.

Geraldine. Oh,mamma! I hate to hear of Mr.
Dellington..

Mr. A. That is an improper expression, my child.
Mr. Dellington is a good man in the world, a man of
fortune, of large estates, and above all, he admires
my little wild Irish girl.

Geraldine. But he is nearly as old as you are,
papa; and I should really like to choose a husband
myself.

Mrs. A. James, I am in despair; this is indeed
terrible.

Mr. A. We will discuss the matter afterwards ;
in the meantime we must endeavor to extract some
information of Patrick’s abilities. Can you perform
the duties of a house servant?

O’Brallagan. Musha! is it the work? Sure I'll
do all the work of the house beautiful! Will yer la-
dyship be kaping pigs, and won’t I engage to make
them so fat theyll bate the parson’s?

Geraldine. But we don’t keep pigs, Pat; we want
a footman. |

O’Brallagan. And that’s mighty lucky, my lady.
Where will yer two beautiful eyes see a nater foot-



PARLOR PASTIMES. 3D

man, if I was having but the fine coat? Would yer
ladyship be agreeable to me havin’ a green coat,
in regard of ould Ireland; may the sun never set
on her! But maybe yer ladyship would be wantin’
a choice about the coat: and faith! Pm aisy about
the color, barring it wouldn’t be orange, bad-luck to
it! And now, long life to yer ladyship, will I go
down to yer illigant kitchen and set to work?

Mr, A. Wowever unpromising our first acquaint-
ance is, I think I must oblige you, Geraldine, by giv-
ing this man a trial, as we really need a servant.
You may stay, O’Brallagan: Lucas and the maids
will teach you your duty. 13 galls

O’Brallagan. Sure and they will! and my blessin’
on yer honors, and the beautiful young cratur you
own, and she will be having the handsomest husband
in Ireland, and free of his money, long life to him,
and not an honester boy nor Pat O’Brallagan ever
darkened yer door, and quiet, barring the sup of
whiskey, when the heart’s heavy. And a good day
this has turned up for us all, by the powers! (Ezit.)

Mrs. A. I am by no means gatisfied with your
decision, James. We might surely have engaged a
more respectable servant than this extraordinary
savage. —

Geraldine. Do not think so harshly of him, mam-
ma—you are not accustomed to the Irish: but be-
lieve me, they are true and faithful. (Aside with a
sigh.) Dear, dear, O’Brien !



86 DIALOGUE CHARADES.

Mr. A. He is certainly a wild Irishman ; ‘but
with a little training, we may make a good servant
of Pat O’Brallagan. [Exeunt.

cero

ACT II.—RIOT-
A Kitchen. O’Bratuacan, Mary.

O’Brallagan, Faith and troth, it’s an illigant place,
and plenty to ate, and your purty face to comfort me,
and long may it last.. And didn’t I tell you before,
och! mavourneen, it would do yer bright éyes good
to look on the fine, grand captain, the thruest of lov-
ersg—when would an Irishman not be thrue?—one
of the ould race, a raal O’Brien; the blood runs right
down from the ould, ancient kings, thrue for him.
Isn’t it all to see on paper, and made out in Latin,
as ould Corney O’Neil can show, musna! musha!
So darling of me heart, the captain comes to me
and says,—Patrick O’Brallagan, you'll be the bach-
elor of purty Mary.

Mary. What assurance, indeed !—and what did
you say to that, Mr. O’Brallagan ?

O’Brallagan. Wouldn’t I tell the captain the
thruth? how we came togither, and how I was proud
to get a sight of yer face; and by the same token, it
was not your fault-that ye were not knowen me, in
regard that we had niyer met since we were born, at
all, at all. Then says the captain, wouldn’t your
purty Mary be the girl to put the bit of paper to
Miss Geraldine, and the mother that owned her niv-



- PARLOR PASTIMES. 37

er be the wiser. And didn’t I spakefor you, mavour-
neen, and give yer consint, and take the captin’s illi-
gant letther and the gold piece, for you entirely.
Few it is of them same gold pieces iver rests with
the O’Briens, in regard of their being remarkable free
in parting wid them, blessins on them for iver and
iver, itis them that are the raal thrue race. May
the heavens shower gold upon their heads.
Mary. And I must give Miss Geraldine the letter,
Patrick?
-O'Brallagan. In course ye will, my darlin’; and
A7ghen they are married, you are my choice to be Mrs.
Patrick O’Brallagan, and then we will apply for the
place of lady’s maid to the captain and his bride,
secing that same would shute us entirely.
Mary. Well, Patrick, I will do it, if you say itis
right; but I feel rather shy about it, for Mr. Lucas
has been watching us all along from his pantry win-
dow ; and Patrick, you know he is jealous about you.
Then Cook, she is jealous of him, and treats me like
a slave, and I cannot help being better looking than
she is. < P
O’Brallagan. Not a bit of it, you beauty o’ the
world, and if ye were wishiw’ the fairies to make you
ill-lookin’, they couldn’t find it in their hearts to do
it. Here comes Mrs. Cook, so lave me to discourse
her nately, and go in with the letther, ye good cratur.
Evit Mary.
Enter Cook with @ plucked fowl.
O’Brallagan. Shure I knowed that would-be your
purty foot makin’ the music on the flore. . Och, by



38 DIALOGUE CHARADES. |

8

the powers, it is a wonderful woman ye are, Mrs.
Cook. I’m thinking ye jewel, ye would aisily make
a roasted goose out of a_prater, musha. A raal clev-
er cratur ye are wi’ the pans and eridirons.

Cook. You say so, Mr: O’Brallagan, and you is
haltogether a gentleman, but there’s hothers that
hought to be the first to speak them words that ’old
their tongues and run after other girls as hought to
be hashamed o’ theirselves to be hinviggling hother
people’s sweetarts, and making their hinny henders
hagen them as is their betters.

O’Brallagan. And sure, it woldun’t be purty Mary
you. would mane, Mistress Cook. Bad luck to him
that would make her out to be a rogue, and me here
to let that word be said, and Mary my own counthry-
woman, and that’s the thruth intirely.

Cook. There hagan, Mr. O’Brallagan, you’re a
standin’ up for her, and the girl’s hinsensed you as
she’s a Hirisher. No such a thing! My lady never
’ires no Hirishers.

O’Brallagan. Och! only to see that same! But
be aisy, my jewel. Isn’t Mary my own lawful cous-
in? Leastways, her own born mother, which was
Biddy O’Neal, was second cousin to my Aunt Honor
Delaney, which same was born at Cilfinane, and ber-
red 7 the thrubbles, and it follows quite nat’ral that
Mary would be cousin tome. And sure Biddy O’
Neal was a Kilkenny woman, and anyhow her daugh-
ter would be a born Irishwoman.

Cook. Really, Mr. O’Brallagan, you talk a deal



a

PARLOR PASTIMES, . 39

of nonsense. I stand to itas Mary’s Hinglish, and
’old up ’er ’ed, and perk’erself about ’er beauty, sich
as it his, and him hencouraging ’er as hought to
know better, and telling ’er he hadmire black heyes—
more shame hon ’im, when, he knows my heyes is
surillen blue, hand that he swear with his hown
tongue, till she tice ’im hoff, a himperent ’ussy.

O’Brallayan. Be aisy now, my fine woman, arrah !
what would ye be havin’? It’s Patrick O’Brallagan
that’s her sworn bachelor, and will be thrue to her,
and be the friend of her and hers foriver and iver, and
~ pad luck to the spalpeen that lays his eyes on her at
all at all, without my lave from this day out.. (Sees
Lucas enter behind.) And you'd be hearing my words,
Mr. Lucas, long life to you for a.snake, stalen be-
hind to listen to our discourse. Maybe it’ll not be
plasin’ to you. :

Iucas. 1 hadvise you, O’Brallagan, not to forget
that you are speaking to a hupper servant, and to re-
spect your betters, and to keep a civil tongue in your
ed. IJ’ear what you say of me and Miss Mary, and
I hadvise you to mind your own affairs.

OBrallagan. Shure now! and a fine bit of advice
it is, and grand words; maybe it would be the Mas-
ther that said them words to you, and you being such
a mighty fine gentleman! (Enter Mary.) Och?
Mary, mayourneen, it wouldn’t be thrue that youd
be lettin’ him come round you with his grand dis-
coorse: ye wouldn’t be shaming them that come
afore you. Shure! it’s not for your mother’s daugh-
ter to demane herself to an Englishman.



40 DIALOGUE CHARADIES. ~

_ Lucas. What do you mean, you low Hirish feller?

I allays say you to be quite inferior to us; and I take
care that this ’ouse is too ’ot to’old ye. I say to
Mr. Arundel as how you hinsults the hupper servants,
and as you conways cladderintestine letters to our
Miss, which inference I’se make it my dooty to re-
port to my lady hin honor. ;

O’Brallagan. By the powers, and that’s what ye
mane to do, ye ould rogue o’ the world ; and it’s a hul-
labaloo ye’llriz, ye will! Arrah! then what'll Patrick
O’Brallagan be doing, musha! musha! To blazes
wi’ ye, ye schamer o’ life, ye slave of a Saxon, may
ye get yer desarvins, Sooner or later. Hoorah! for
the rights of Ireland !

Cook.—(Shrieks.)\—Poles! poles! ’elp! ’elp! Oh,
the willun will murder poor hinnocent Mr.-Lucas!

Cook and Mary hold O’ Brallagan back.

Lucas.—’Old ’im Cook, ’old ’im: get back to Hire-
land, you poor hignorant savage. Hall them Hirish
is rogues and beggars.

O’Brallagan. Wisha, girls, let me be. (Breaks
away.) Arrah, you spalpeen, wait till we git our
rights, and won’t we driv’ all ye venomous Saxons be-
fore us into the wide say, and clare you out of our
own counthry, outright. Wisha! wisha! ‘(Dances
about, waving his arms ; the women scream.)

Enter Mr. ARUNDEL.
Mr. A. What means all this noise? Are you all
drunk or mad? You have terrified the ladies into
hysterics.



* DIALOGUE CHARADES. 41



All together. Please, sir

Mr, A. Ymust understand the matter thoroughly ;
I command you all to follow me to the library, that
I may learn the truth. (Ezeunt.)

SCENE THE LAST.—PATRIOT.

The Library. Mr. Arunpet, Mrs. Arunpet, GrraLprve,
seated at a table; the Servants standing, the Wouun weep-
ing, Lucas and O’Bratiacan making gestures of anger.
Mr. A. Now, I must insist upon knowing the

cause of this strange uproar. You appeared to be a

quiet young man, O’Brallagan; what has thus pro-

voked you to lado violence?
O’Brallagan, It’s me counthry, yer honorable wor-
ship! That desaving thaifo’ the world, what does

She do but turn his black tongue to abuse me country !

Treland, yer honor, the finest ould counthry o’ the —
world. And by the same token, isn’t it every inch
of the ground is blessed, in regard of St. Patrick
himself that walked without a shoe to his foot from
‘one end to another, and left it to us for iver and iver,
that the boys would be the bravest, and the girls the
purtiest, of all the world, and that’s thrue of it, and
no lie, at.all at all, as Corney knows, and——

Mrs. A. Pray be silent, young man, your words
are perfectly distracting to me.

OBrallagan. Ochone! see that now! what will
{do at all, wisha? Sorra a bit would Patrick O’-.
Brallagauwbe the boy to give the -fear to her beauti-



\

42 ‘PARLOR PASTIMES.

ful honorable ladyship; and the illegant young miss
with the smile on her purty mouth, and one, too, that
knows the captain, him that’s the thruest of lovers,
and wanted to go off to fight the Rooshins, barring
he wouldn’t displease the jewel that owned his heart
altogether. Wisha! wisha! what will I be saying
now? That’s the way wid me iver, the truth always
comes out; and if it wer’ the killing o’ me, my heart
gets the betther o’ me.

Mrs. A. What does the man mean by these im-
pertinent allusions to lovers?

Lucas. Please, my lady, them were the very words
i say which aggravate O’Brallagan. I think it my
dooty, my lady, to infer, when I see O’Brallagan give
Miss Mary a cladderintestine letter to take to Miss
Geraldine.

O’Brallagan, Arrah, then, bad luck to yez, for a
maker of mischief! it’s the saints themselves that ye
would provoke, let alone a civil-spoken boy like me,
that cannot put up with yer ways. Musha! it’s thrue
for the master that yer all alike, and it’s divarshun
from morn till night, and nothing else in the world
ye think on, down below in the jintale kitchen, where
there’s plinty and no stint, and niver a pig durst
show his purty face at all.

Mr. A: Do not look alarmed, my dear Mrs. Ar-
undel. The cladderintestine letter enclosed one to
me, which Geraldine dutifully delivered, and told me
the tale which she has yet been too timid to commu-
nicate to her mother. It was my mother who sanc-



DIALOGUE CHARADES. 43

tioned and approved the addresses of Captain
O’Brien, a gallant soldier who has already earned
laurels—the nephew and heir of our old friend, Lord
O’Brien. The letter was from him, making such pro-
posals for our daughter as I think even you will not
reject, though the captain is Irish. I-expect the
gentleman to call himself this morning—and proba-
bly that may be his knock. Go, Lucas, and usher in
the visitor.

Lucas retires, and returns, announcing Captain O’BRIEN,
Mr. Arunpet goes forward, and shakes hands, and intro-
duces him to Mrs. ARUNDEL.

Capt. O’Brien. Truly, an introduction to your
gentle lady encourages me to hope. Who can be-
hold her and not see at once that she must be the .
mother of the lovely Geraldine! if they did not de-
cide that one so young and beautiful could only be
her sister.

Mrs. A. You gentlemen of Ireland certainly ex-
cel in the art of flattering the matrons, and winning
the maidens.

Capt. O’Brien. So the world say; but then, where
are there such sons and such husbands as the true-
hearted sons of Erin? Make me your devoted ser-
vant forever, dear lady, by granting me the hand of
your fair image, my lovely Geraldine.

Mrs, A. I had other views for my daughter, but
Tleave all inthe hands of her father: for though -
usually I have somewhat of prejudice against the
Irish, there is a nobility about your manner, worthy



‘44 PARLOR PASTIMES,

of the nephew of Lord O’Brien, whom I knew well
many years ago—in fact—I thought him too old.

Capt. O’Brien. How fortunate, dear Mrs. Arun-
del! for if you had not thought so, the world would
not have seen the flower of beauty, Geraldine Arun-
del, and I should not have been the heir of the
O’Briens. :

Mr. A. We will know you a little more, O’Brien,
and then I think you need not despair.

Capt. O’Brien. And blessed will be the day when
I shall carry my little pearl of the world back to the
land of love and beauty, dear Erin!

O’Brallagan. And would ye be wanting a lady’s
maid, Captain? . - 25

Capt. O’Brien. Arrah, Patrick, is that you?
‘What in the world have you been brought up for?—
you surely havn’t been breaking the peace here?

O’Brallagan. Wisha! wisha! what will Ido? It
was me blood was up! wasn’t it the innemies of our
counthry, Captain, ’ud provoke me?

Capt. O’Brien. And so you wished to go out as a
lady’s maid to Ireland?

O’Brallagan. Plase your -honor, that was in re-
gard to purty Mary and Miss Geraldine, and she :
willin’ to take me entirely, if Miss Geraldine will
want us for the lady’s maid, or the lodge at the grand
gate, when we would be having a praty all the year
round, and maybe a pig on the floor and not a penny
of rint to pay. And isn’t Mary the girl that’ll make
me come home straight, niver looking at the shebeen
at all at all.



DIALOGUE CHARADES. - 45

Capt. O’Brien. Well, O’Brallagan, I believe we
Trish boys are best at home: so, if Mr. Arundel will
allow it, and Mrs. Arundel will pardon your trespass-
es, you must return with me to the ould counthry,
good luck to i!

O’Brallagan. God bless your honor’s glory. You’re
araal patriot! Erin go bragh! [Scene closes.



RAINBOW.
A Charvare in Three Scenes,



Dramatis Persone.
Sire Witttam WALLACE,
Lomonr, Scottish officers.
Hawpen,
Dueatp, a Scottish soldier.
Fiona, the soldier’s sister. ;
Scunu, about the river Carron.—Time, towards sunset.
Sounz I.—The border of a wood.
Enter ‘Louon, Hawpen.
Lom. All, then, is lost!
Alas! long injured country\, Wallace down,
Who will redress thine evils!
Haw. Wallace,
Tho’ doubtless deeply grievetl, will not so sink
As to be lost to Scotland, but will rise
Heroic—like her thistle downward bent—
After a suiting space.



46 PARLOR PASTIMES,

Lom. Our troops dispers’d,
Dispirited ! severe is our late loss!
Oh, fatal Falkirk! .
Haw. Let us not despond ;
But seeking Wallace, plan re-union wise
With our dislodg’d array!
Lom. Wellurged! Eve glooms
As she advances, threatening us with rain 5
But storm of combat renders reckless.
Haw. Ay!
Nevertheless, we'll hail lone cot, to glean
News of our missing men!

SECOND.
Screnz Il.—Front of Recluse Cottage.
‘Enter Frora, Ducat. :

Flora. Oh, Dugald! Dugald!
Thouw’st brought us dreadful, dark intelligence!
Our country, then, is lost?

Dug. *Twould seem so now:

But our commander, coining ever good,
Will, while we speak, be active.

Flora. But, Dugald,

He will be shorn of every needful aid
In this sad juncture !

Dug. Itrust not, Flora!
But I must soon depart to join his fate—
My country calls!



DIALOGUE CHARADES. . 47

Flora. ow could our noble troops
Be beaten so?
Dug. Dissension—linked unto the Saxon bow—
Prov’d our dissolving bane.
Flora. Alas! ’tis oft
The fate of ardent soldiers, trusty, firm,
To fall thro’ leading envy.
Dug. Too true, indeed !
Now Flora, seek with me the edge of wood,
When I must quit thee. [Ezeunt.]

WHOLE.
Sonn II.—Side of Carron.
Enter W AuLace.

Wall. The sun is low!
So certainly, is Wallace’s fortune-star, :
That hath been erewhile bright! Yon swift rainbow,
Spanning ethereal spaces, in the east,

. ° ° 2
Reminds me of my lot; sunshine awhile,

To close in sudden sombrousness. Yet I,

The son of wild variety, will trust
Again, as heretofore, in heavenly aid ;
Nor, like a tyro in the freaks of war,
Yield my strong spirit, school’d in peril’s field,
To the deluding demon. of despair,

E’er on the watch, like an insidious foe

That settles in the bush. Here, by Carron,
Ranging so wildly to the quiet Forth,

_Are many meet retreats, wherein to plant
; “



_ Are thankful to enjoy their simple will.

48 PARLOR PASTIMES.

Our thistle-garnish’d standard. Lov’d Scotland.
Altho’ to-day thou’rt down, another hour,

I do invoke, with all a Patriot’s zeal,

Shall scan thee rais’d again; else Wallace will

Be borne from Hope to that depressing doom

That dark Despondence weaves, never to toil

Again for liberty! [ Scene. closes.

—_—___-<>-2-<—___—_—
WITCHCRAFT.

A Pastoral Charade in Three Scenes,



Dramatis Persone.
AtErto, a gentleman resident by Deeside.
Cxrop10, a sensible shepherd.
Urs1no, a skeptical shepherd.
Reais, a lady resident by Deeside.
Eros, daughter of Clodio.
Ovina, sister to Erica.

SCENE I.—THE HILL SIDE.
Scenes I.—Hizil.

Enter Erica, Ovina.

" Erica. How sweetly smiles the morning’s rising
ray, r
Piercing the mist upon the mountain gray.
The flock, Ovina, scents the fragrant air,
Grateful for Nature’s ever active care ;
The deer, delighting in the heathy hill,





DIALOGUE’ CHARADES. 49

Ovina. Ay! these, the creatures gifted less than
we,
Do yet appear to move more gratefully.
Man, lordling over all, is ever lax
In his discharge of gratitude’s just tax :
None other seems to meet with less regard,
From the bold biped of the terrene sward.
Erica. Nay, sister? sure thou gett’st alittle stern ;
I know we all have very much to learn.
Our ancestors old dame for witch would burn,
Then, for applause, to youthful damsel turn.
Ovina. Well, I do own I am a bit severe ;
Yet men do silly, certes, oft appear.
Erica. So do the maids—but see, the sheep do
stray,
Let us fast check them on their roving way.
[ Ezeunt.

Stunz II—A Meadow.
Enter Cxop10, Ursino. ~

‘Clodio. Now, sooth, Ursino, I must really say,
Thou talk’st like cynic of an early day.
I rather far o’erlook a little ill,
Than foster wenom, that would credit kill.
Ah! let us think, if Heaven resented so,
Where wickedness of Earth would after go!
Ursino. Thou think’st of Crathie! Iam a little
stirr’d )
By what doth move the common-minded herd.



50 PARLOR PASTIMES.

The churchyard stalker conning o’er a tomb,
May fill his heart with fear-arraying gloom;
Not so Ursino acts—hears he a tale
Unmoved, where craft can mightily prevail.
Clodio. So sceptics ever tall; but even these
Find fear disposed their hearts sometimes to freeze.
Ursino. So do discourse, oft seasons, old divines; .
But I take sermon by our open pines.
Clodio. Thoul’t rue this doctrine, bred by snaring
; strife,
Tf not before, at least by close of life.
Ursino. So says our clerk; but I will persevere,
At least till closure of this solar year.
Clodio. 'Then will I leave thee, never to return!
Ursino. I care not; for I such advices spurn! a
[ Exeunt.

Scene III.—A Lawn.
Enter Reatsa, ALerto,

Regisa. How lik’st thou faithful friend, to wander
forth, 3
While old Autumnus rules, amid the north?
Where the deer-stalker seeks soul-stirring sport,
*T would seem desirable to pleasure court®
Yet when I look upon the graceful train,
I hope the antler may escape o’er plain.
Alerto. Lady rever’d! there are more scenes to
please
Here, than such as one nigh the antlers sees ;



DIALOGUE CHARADES. 51

Tho’ I do own, a sportsman must enjoy
His skill, in such king-like sport, to employ.
There seems a sort of witchcraft in the spell
That leads the step to th’ antler-hunted dell.
ftegisa. It doth appear so! Well we subject
change.
How lik’st thou, then, thro’ birchen groves to range?
There, to the Muses meet, in Autumn day,
Is, sure, sage manner to wile time away !
Alerto. Ay, truly madam, so I do desire,
That I was favor’d with Parnassus fire.
Regisa. But are not poets, when they have but
zeal,
By deep devotion led to greately feel?
Alerto. It is so surmis’d, yet I dare to doubt,
Regisa. Well, let us try to draw some musers out?
Scene closes.



52 PARLOR PASTIMES.

MIS (S) CHIEF.
a Charave in Three Acts,



Dramatis Persone.

GLENALLIN. JESSY.
M’Lomonp. . Marraa WIttAns.
Jacos Hopazs.

ACT 1.—ROOM IN A HIGHLAND COTIGAE.

Enter Jacop Hopass.

Jacob. ‘ All the world’s a stage,” and I must say
my performances in this old highland castle have
been very successful. First, I succeeded in releasing
the young lady’s hawk unperceived and unsuspected ;
and then I recover it, of course, at the peril of my
life, and restore it to its fair mistress. How charm-
ingly she thanked me for my rash and dangerous ex-
ploit ; overcome by her matchless beauty, I revealed
my love. She blushed and trembled; and then re-
vealed to me, with a deep sigh, that she had the mis-
fortune to be the heiress of Glenallin; which dis-
closure naturally filled me with grief and despair.
In my distraction I threatened to terminate my
wretched life ; but at her urgent entreaties, I consent-
ed to live for her sake. By accident, we have met
again and again; and I have acted Romeo to the



DIALOGUE CHARADES. 53

life, and have I trust, captivated my admiring Juliet.
It has become necessary to take a bolder step, and
having opportunely to-day found the falcon’s silver
chain, I have ventured into the very den of the lion,
in order to restore the young lady’s property, but
above all to have a peep into the interior of the es-
tablishment, to rub down the governor, and then, if
the cards are in my favor, to present the happily-
worded letter 6f my Lord Glasgow.

Enter Jussy.

Jessy. Oh, Montague, rash and thoughtless man,
how could you disobey me ? how could you~-venture
to enter the castle uninvited ? Glenallin is fiery in
temper, and you have all the pride and bravery of an
English knight. I tremble to think on your meeting ;
should you quarrel, what would be my misery !
Promise me, Montague, not to resent any hasty words
my father may utter.

Jacob. Rest happy, gentle maiden, your soft wish-
es will form a shield to protect your parent. CouldI
by word or act create a pang in that valued heart?
He is safe though he insult me: but though le should
call out all his clan, he cannot stop me; for, Jessy,
* there lies more peril in thine eyes, than twenty of
their swords.”

Jessy. O, gentle Montag gue ! ! itis very strange! al-
mostmaryellous how all my ‘dreams of fancy have been
fulfilled. Would you believe it, that when my sweet
friend, Augusta Victoria Smith, and lused to speculate





54 PARLOR PASTIMES.

onour future prospects—for we shared the same dormi-
tory at Mount Ida House, at Hampstead, and used
to solace the long hours of our nocturnal watchfulness
by planning charming romances of love—would you
believe it, that I then vowed I would tolerate no lov-
er unless he was named Montague?

‘Jacob. Wappy, prophetic inspiration ! and did that
ideal Montague resemble—<- —

Jessy. I must confess that my fancied adorer.
spoke very much as you do, and except for the uni-
form, the personal resemblance is striking. But alas!
Glenallin wishes to betroth me to his constant ally
and fast friend ; and his name is unfortunately Alex-
ander. Besides, his accent is Scottish, and I am
persuaded he would be laughed at and ridiculed at
Mount Ida House. I allow that he is noble and
rich, tall and handsome; but he has no sentiment,
no romance in his character; he laughs so loudly
that I am convinced Miss Primley would faint to
hear him, and I fear many of his habits would be
thought low at Mount Ida House Academy.

Jacob. Then cast him from you, noble maiden,
*¢ Love is all gentle words, or sighs, or tears.”

Jessy. Whatwould Augusta Victoria Smith think
of such arude and unfashionable futur? She is already
betrothed ; but sad to say, her lover, though a captain
inthe Hampshire Militia, is named John Thompson.
This was ever a painful fact to her, till I suggested
that we should always name him Giovanni; she was
enchanted with the idea, and ever after addressed



DIALOGUE CHARADES. oo

him I mio caro Giovanni. Beloved, highly gifted,
Augusta Victoria !

Jacob. Oh, say to your charming friend that Mon-

tacue Fit-zAlan, throws himself at her feet, entreat-
ing her to intercede with the peerless Jessy to aceept
the devoted love of her slave. ‘*Turn not away,
light of my soul, from my bold words. O beauty!
till now Inever knew thee!”
* Jessy. Iam weak and blamable to listen to your
. wild vows; besides I cannot accept you—there is
one insuperable objection; the hero of my school
fancies was a soldier. Why, Montague, with your
noble nature, and distinguished figure, have you not
adopted the graceful and honorable uniform that
marks the defender of his country, in this her hour
of need ?

Jacob. Alas! fair maiden, family reasons have re-
strained my ardent desire to join the brave band.
But now, sweet Jessy, I am you slave; ‘‘ Call me
but love, I will forsake my name:’ Decide for me,
fair mistress of my fate; name your favorite regi-
ment ; and such is the influence of the name of Fitz-
Alan, that my.commission will be secured.

Jessy. Not on any account, Montague: in truth,
I fear I am wrong. I tremble at the thoughts of
your raeeting with Glenallin; that is, with papa.
You have no idea how absolute and imperious papa
can be, Montague; and probably he will insist on
knowing your business at the Castle.

Jacob. AndI am fully prepared to reply to him.

o



nO - PARLOR PASTIMES,

Glenallin is no more formidable to me than Derby,
Aberdeen, or any of my noble friends at the Court
of England.

Jessy. But Iam not sure that I should like to'ap-
pear at the Court of England, among your great
friends. I am but a simple Scottish lassie. And
then papa is so anxious that I should marry M’Lom- |
ond.

Jacob. M’Lomond! Is he in the Castle?

Jessy. No, he is gone off on a hunting party ; and
besides, he was so offended with my indifference, that
it will be long before he comes here again.

Jacob.—(Aside)—I trust it may.

Jessy. But why do youask? Do you know him?

Jacob. I have hunted with him at Lord Glasgow’s.

Jessy. Glasgow is papa’s great friend ; therefoze,
his name will be your introduction. We will go to
‘him in his study. [Ezeunt.



.



ACT II.—CHIEF.

Al room in the castle, with books, trophies of the chase, &c. QuEN- ‘

ALLIN seated, with papers before him.

What can have become of my bonnie spoilt lassie?
Ah! my lady Glenallin, it was a dark day for me
when you lay on your death-bed, and urged me to
promise to send my heartsome lassie to learn English
manners at a southron school. And what has come
of the deed ; it will be long before she bounds over



DIALOGUE CHARADES. 57

the heath again with the free step of the Gael. It
will be long before she forget the mincing, sickening
tongue of the south: nay, worse than all, I fear it
will be long before her wayward fancy will see the
worth of the gallant, faithful young M’Lomond.
My winsome Jessy! I would not have her to give
her hand till he has won her heart: but Ihave again —
urged him to come, unknown to her; and this day I
trust to see him at the head of: his brave clansmen ;
then I ken little of a young lassie’s fancy, if the bold
M Lomond, towering above his clan, clad in his gray
kilt and plaid, and wearing-his eagle plume above
his noble brow, does not win my Jesys. Ihear the
music of her foot; but who is this stranger?

Enter Jacop and Jussy.

Jessy. Dear papa—Glenallin, I mean—this gen-
tleman, an English traveller, was. so obliging as to
secure my fugitive falcon; and he has now kindly
come to restore to me the silver chain which he has
found. This is Mr. Montague Fitz-Alan, papa.

Glenallin. I thank Mr. Montague Fitz-Alan for
his exploit, and I make no doubt that you have also
thanked him, my daughter. The halls of Glenallin
are ever open to the stranger : he is welcome.

Jacob. My lord, I come to claim more from you
than your hospitality ; I would not be a stranger in
these honored halls. Ihave long, unknown to her,
admired and loved your fair daughter. Deem it not
presumption ; I am the heir of a noble house, and I





58 PARLOR PASTIMES.

come forward boldly to beseech you to accept me as
your son-in-law. I have set my life upon the cast,
yet dare not to urge my passion to the lovely maid
without your sanction. I rest all my hopes on your
generosity—I "ask but the maid; wealth I need not.
“My love, more noble than the world, prizes not
quantity of dirty lands.” She aloneis my attraction. |
That miracle !—that queen of gems!

Glenallin. But who, and what are you, young
Englishman? Your words are many and beyond the
comprehension of our northern simplicity. You are
welcome to the hospitality of my castle, as a stran-
ger; but, as the wooer of my daughter I would know
more of you.

Jacob. ‘I stand for judgment.” Know you not
the high-born Lord Glasgow?

Glenallin. Well1I know the heroic Glasgow; but he
is no longer in Scotland; ten days ago, at the head of
the bravest of his clan, he sailed to fight the battles
of his country in the East. Even if you knew him,
he cannot appear to certify who you are.

Jacob. ‘* Doubt not mine honor.” The noble
Glasgow has ever been my firm friend; we parted
on the strand, and at that anxious moment, I poured
into his friendly bosom my tale of silent love. He
heard and pitied me; nay, more, he urged me to seek
you, his noble friend, and declare my passion; he
even wrote a few brief words, before he left the shore,
to advocate my cause. Behold the letter! (Gives
letter.)





DIALOGUE CHARADES. 59

Glenallin. I am satisfied that you are honorable
by the sight of my friend’s writing; it is scarcely
needful to read his letter. (Opens and reads it.)

“ Will you, for my sake, dear Glenallin, grant the
bearer, if possible, the favor he asks from you; he
will peove all you can wish.

Ever yours,
ss _ GuLascow.”

Truly, Mr. Fitz-Alan, this is high testimony, and
had I not built my hopes on my little lassie becom-
ing the bride of the brave M’Lomond, I should have
proudly welcomed you .as my son. Now, I must
perforce disappoint you, for

Jacob. Yet, stay, Glenallin. ‘‘ Hear the lady !—
let the lady speak!” I will abide by her decision.



** Tf she love me not,
Let me be no assistant to a state,
But keep a farm and carters!’?

Glenallin. Young Englishman, it is not usual for
“Scottish maidens to dictate to their parents. I am
the head of a clan, of which my daughter forms an
individual. I require obedience, though I am’ no
despot. My clansmen give me their services; I do
not hold them in slavery. My daughter must yield
me her duty; but I do ‘not wish her to forfeit her hap-
piness. Speak, then, my Jessy : is it true that you
have so soon bestowed your heart on this stranger ;
and would you be his bride?

Jessy. Oh, Montague, I cannot leave Glenallin. I



60 PARLOR PASTIMES.

believe I never meant seriously to leavehome. But,
papa, Augusta Victoria wrote to assure me that you
would compel me to marry M’Lomond; and I thought
that would be terrible.

Glenallin. And you thought your silly English
correspondent knew your father better than you did
yourself. No, Jessy; I would not force you to mar-
ry my friend, though I shall expect that the daughter
of Glenallin wed only her equal. But you shall not
decide hastily, my child. We will descend to the
dining hall, and introduce the noble Saxon to High-
land Hospitality. [Lzeunt.

SCENE THE LAST.— MISCHIEF.

A hall in the Castle. Table covered with jugs, glasses, g-c.
GLENALLIN, Jacos, Jussy seated.

Glenallin. Leave us not yet, my Jessy. (Aside,)
I shall weary of this stranger’s fantastic words, if I
am left alone withhim. (Alouwd.) Ihave some hopes
of a visit from an old friend to-day; when he arrives,
you can seek your bower, and consider over the
grand question.

Jacob, (Aside.) I should like to know whom the
old fellow expects; it would be advisable to cut him
in time. (Alowd.) And I must tear myself awhile
from all I love. I expect important despatches from
Government, and must be at my inn to receive them.



DIALOGUE CHARADES. 61

Enter Sprvant.

Servant. There’s a puir sonsie English lassie,
clamoring for justice fra ye, Glenallin.

Glenallin. _ Take her to my study, Andrew.

Servant. But there’s no haulding her, Glenallin,
she is greetin’ just ahint me.

Jessy. Let the poor woman come here, papa, if
she be in sorrow. _ [Exit Servant.

Enter Marrua, who rushes up to Jacos.
: co

Martha. Oh; Jacob Hodges, shame on you!
you're at your play-actor tricks again; gettin’ into
grand folks’ houses wi’ your rigmarole speechifying.
' How dar’ ye lift up your head, man, after swearing

to marry a poor lass, and then Tne off an’ leav-
ing her altogether.

Jacob. Woman, avaunt! I know thee not. “This

is mere madness.” .

Martha. Not know me, Martha “Willans? Heay-

en forgi’ thee Jacob! (sobbing) and oh, miss! sic a
bonny, quiet lad he was down i’ Yorkshire, when we
“were bits of bairns together; but nought wad sarve
him, but gang off wi? V player folks; and it was
nobbit last Martinmas was a twelvemonth, that he
sattled down, and we cam’ together into yan house.

Glenallin. Young man, what means this woman’s

violence? Are not you a Fitz-Alan?

Jacob. ‘‘ You are abused, my lord.”

Glenallin. J fear indeed that Iam; and you must

certainly have greatly imposed on Lord Glasgow.



62 PARLOR PASTIMES,

Martha. That he never did, I'll stand to it. Ja-
cob there, wi’ all his bits of fine duds, and his silly
ways, is as good a groom as ever rubbed down a
horse, and that’s what my lord couldn’t but say on
him. See”

Jessy. A groom! can it be possible?

Martha. Yes, miss, we baith lived wi’ my lord,
till he sat off a soldering, and then Jacob, -he had no
mind for fighting, so my lord sits down and writes
him a charackter, to get him a good place. Then
Jacob he’ticed me on to ei warning, and he telled
me he would be sartain to meet me at Glasgow
town-end last Monday was a week, and he would
wed me. And I went, like a fule that I was, and
saw none on him, not I, and some folks we kenned
tuik me in, and there I fell bad wi’ crying and fret-
ting, till our folks heard on him seeking for a place
at Glenallin, and after him I cam’ and——

Jacob. Amazing! The woman labors under a
strong mental delusion. Believe her not.

Mine honor is my life; both grow in me3
Take honor from me, and my life is done.

Enter M’Lomonp.

MM’ Lomond—(Taking Jessy’s hand.) —How fares my
bonnie Jessy? What! in tears, my winsome lassie?
What means this? o

Jessy. Oh, do not ask me, M’Lomond! I am |
ashamed to look on you.

M’Lomond. I am in a mist. Speak Glenallin,



DIALOGUE CHARADES. 63

my good friend. You seem to be holding a court of
justice in your banqueting hall. Who is this weep-
ing woman and the gentleman? Why, Hodges!
what in the world has Eboneh you. in this gay attire
to Glenallin?

Jacob.. “A truant erosion, good my lord.”

M Lomond. Oh, I see, then the lass you left be-
hind you has followed to claim her property ; a com-
mon case. But yet I cannot understand how Lord
Glasgow’s groom happens to be seated at Glenallin’ 8
board.

Jessy. I will tell you all afterwards, iy uemana:
my romantic folly has produced this vexatious scene.
Entreat Glenallin to pardon his English school-girl,
who promises in fyture to act like Glenallin’s daugh-
ter. : C
Jacob. Oh, woman! woman! “Now could I drink

hot blood.” But no, I will not. “Would you please,
Glenallin, to return me my character, “ out of holy
pity?” I must needs resume the duties of my pro-
fession. See, girl what a pretty kettle of fish thou
‘hast made, but I forgive thee, and.





Mark but my fall and that which ruined me!
Martha, I charge thee, fling away ambition.’®
Let us leave the gorgeous palaces of the proud.
“ Not a frown more ;” ner’ my brief inconsistency,
and:



s¢ All my fortune at thy feet I lay, :
And follow thee, my love, through all the world.”’

[E£xeunt Jacop and Marrua.



64 PARLOR PASTIMES.

M’Lomond. (Laughing.) And now for explana-
tions of all this mischief. I am anxious to discover
the meaning of Martha’s “‘ Kettle of fish.”

Scene closes. .





FIRE-SIDE GAMES.

——_—_—_—-&-@ ©



WHAT IS MY THOUGHT LIKE.

The leader of the game, having thought of some
object, asks” her a ‘¢ What is my thought

like?” :
As all are ignorant of what she is thinking about,
their answers can of course be but random ones.
When she has questioned them all, they must give a
reason why the answers Sahota resemble the thought;
for instance:

“T have a thought aie what iv it like?”
1 ‘It is like the sea.”

2. ** Like a family.”

3. ‘Like a tree.” |

4, ‘Like a troop of soldiers.”

5. *‘ Like a dinner-bell.”

6. “Like General Williaina.” ,

7. ** Like this play.”

8. ‘Like a person of nobility.”

Then she gives her thought, which was @ book, and

proceeds to question each one as to the resemblance
65



66 PARLOR PASTIMES.

between that thought and the objects they selected—
as thus:
«‘ Why is a book like the sea?”
*¢Some are of great depth.”
“Why is it like a family?”
“Because it contains different characters.”
‘Why is it like a tree?”
“Oh, it is full of leaves.”
“Why is it like a.troop of soldiers?”
“‘Because both should be reviewed.”
‘cWhy is it like a dinner-bell?”
‘Tt calls us to a feast.”
“ Why is it like General Williams? ”
‘Because both have a title.”
¢ Why is it like this play?”
“They both must come to an end.”
‘““Why is it like a person of nobility?”
‘‘ Because both have titles.”

Then another player declares that she has 4
thought, and collects these answers.

. “It is like a garden.”
“It is like a ship.”

. ‘Like a rose.”

. “Like paper.”

‘¢ Like a coat.”

» ** Like mud.”

‘¢ Like a child.”

‘¢ Like cloth.”

Then she says her thought was a carpet.

SNS Rew



FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 67

“Why is a carpet like a garden?”
“Because some have borders.”

“Why is a carpet like a ship?”

“ Because both require tacking.”

““Why is a carpet like a rose?”

*¢ Both. are liable to fade.”

‘Why is it like paper?”

‘Some kinds are made of rags.”.

“ Why is it like a coat?”

‘Both need brushing.”

“Why is it like mud?”

‘Some are so soft that the feet sink into them.”
‘Why is it like a child?”

“When a child is naughty it is often shaken.”
“Why is it like cloth?

‘ Because both are sold by the yard.”

If the answers are given quickly it will enhance
the pleasure of the game. Many other questions of
this character will suggest themselves to our young
friends.

QUOTATIONS.

This game is instructive as well as pleasing, some-
times extending. one’s knowledge of literature, and
often refreshing the memory in cases where disuse
had produced a partial forgetfulness.

- A well-known quotation is repeated by one of the
party; and the one who can tell the author immedi-



68 PARLOR PASTIMES.

ately, gives another quotation to be guessed as be
fore. For instance, one commences with:

*¢ The quality of mercy is not strain’d;
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Upon the place beneath; it is twice blessed;
It blesseth him that gives, and him that takes:
Tis mightiest in the mightiest; it becomes
The throned monarch better than his crown.”’

The one who first says Shakspeare, might give a
passage from Moore:

*¢ QO! ever thus from childhood’s hour,
I’ve seen my fondest hopes decay 5
I never loved a tree or flower,
But ’twas the first to fade away.
I never nursed a dear gazelle,
To glad me with its soft black eye,
But when it came to know me well,
And love me, it was sure to die!’

The one who can name the author, might give this
selection from Burns :

*¢ 0, wad some power the-giftie gie us
To see ourselves as others see us!
It wad frae manie a blunder free us
And foolish notion.’?

The one who guesses the name of this last author,
might give a quotation from Lessing, the German
poet:

s¢ "Tig better to sit in Freedom’s hall,
With a cold, damp floor and.a mouldering wall,
Than to bow the neck or to bend the knee
In the proudest palace of slavery.’*



FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 69

THE TRAVELLER’S TOUR.

This game may be played by any number of per-
sons.
One of the party announces himself as a traveller,

“about to take a little tour. He calls upon any of

the party for information respecting the objects of
the greatest interest to be noticed in the different
cities and towns through which he intends to pass.
An empty bag is given to him, and to each of the
persons joining in the game are distributed sets of

counters with numbers on. Thus, if twelve persons

were playing, the counters required would be up to
the number twelve, and a set of ones would be given
to the first person, twos to the second, threes to the
third, and so on. é
When the traveller announces the name of the

place at which he intends to stop, the first person is

at liberty to give any information, or make any re-
marks respecting it; if he cannot: do’ so, the second
person has the chance, or the third, or it passes on
until some one is able to speak concerning it. If the
traveller considers it correct information, or worthy
of notice, he takes from the person one of his count-
ers, as a pledge of his obligation to him; the person
next in order is to proceed, so as not each time to
begin with No.1. If no one of the party speaks, the
traveller may consider there is nothing worthy of
notice at the plage he has announced, and he then
passes on to another.

CE ee ee ee a es



70 PARLOR PASTIMES.

After he has reached his destination, he turns out
his bag to see which of the party has given him the
greatest amount of information, and that person is
considered to have won the game, afd is entitled to
be the “‘ Traveller” in the next game.

If it should happen that two or more persons should
have given the same number of counters, those per-
sons are to be allowed in suceession to continue to
assist the traveller and deposit their pledges until
one alone remains.

EXAMPLE OF THE GAME.

Traveller. ‘¢T intend taking a little excursion this
summer, and shall shortly start from London for

Bridport; but as I wish to stop at several places, I

shall travel chiefly by post. As Windsor is only
twenty-two miles from London I shall first stop there.

No.1 ‘Then pray go and see the castle. It isa
noble building originally built by William the Con-
queror: but it has been so altered and added to by
‘other mogersl ants that little if any, of the original
building remains.’

Traveller. ‘Thank you for this information;
pray deposit a counter in _ bag, that I may re-
member to whom I owe it... I should like to know
who formed*the noble terraces.”

No. 2 and 3 not answering,

No. 4 said, “Queen Elizabeth,” and deposited a
counter.

4
No 7. “* Pray notice a long walk from Windsor Cas-













FIRE-SIDE GAMES, 71

tle to the top of Snow Hill; it isa perfectly straight
line, above three miles in length, and considered the
finest thing of the kind in Europe.” A counter of
No. 7 was put in the bag.

Lraveller. “I cannot stop longer at Windsor, but
Must proceed with my journey. Where shall I stop
next?” :

No. 9. ‘Do not pass Reading without seeing the
ruins of the abbey, which was built by Henry I., who
was interred there in 1185, as they are very beauti-
ful, especially the remains of one of the gates.” No.
9 deposits a, counter. .

No. 12. “* Will you pass Marlborough? for at that
place the royalists, in the time of Charles I., were
successful, and took the town, which was guarded by
the Parliamentarians.” No 12 puts a counter in the
traveller’s bag.

Traveller. “‘ Would you advise my stopping at-
Bath?”

No. 2. ‘By all means, as the natural hét springs in
that city are very curious and well worthy your no-
tice. These waters are of incalculable benefit in
many diseases, and have often cured the sufferer
when all other remedies have failed.” No. 2 depos-
its a counter. a

Traveller. “I think I shall now take the train for
Bridgewater.”

No. 3. “The inhabitants of Bridgewater supported
the claims to the throne of the Duke of Monmouth,
and he was proclaimed king by. the Mayor and cor-



72 PARLOR PASTIMES.

poration. There is a fine painting in the parish
church dedicated to St. Mary, representing the de-
seent.from the cross, which was found on board a
French privateer, which you had better go and see.”
No. 8 deposits a counter.

Traveller. ‘I think that I have heard that a cel-
ebrated admiral was born at Bridgewater. Who can
tell me his name?”

No. 7. ‘‘ Admiral Blake, in 1599.” No. 7 puts a
counter in the bag.

No. 8. ‘‘ As you approach Bridport, pray observe

the beautiful castle and park at Dunster; it hasbeen

in the Luthell family ever since the reign of Edward

Til. It was a military post of the royalists in the

civil war of Charles I.” No 8 deposits a counter.
No. 9. “* When you reach Bridgport, I beg, after

_ resting, you will walk over that lovely North Hill,
‘when I am sure you will thank me for giving you a

treat. Observe also, the fine statue of Queen Ann
in the church carved in white alabaster.” No. 9 de-
posits a counter.

The traveller having reached the place of his des-
tination, examines his bag, when he finds that 7 and
9 are equal as to the counters they have deposited,
so he asks those two to give him some further infor-
mation.

No. 7. ‘Pray go to Selworthy, near Bridport,
and observe the beautiful little cottages for the poor
which have been built there of late years by Sir J
Thomas Acland; you will, Iam sure, be delighted
with them.”



FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 73

This decided that No 7 had won the game.

' It must be perfectly evident that many - more
places might have been stopped at, and a great deal
more information collected respecting the places now
slightly touched upon; but as it was only to give an
example of the pastime, it was not necessary to go
into more particular details; but it may easily be
perceived that endless amusement and information
may be gained by varying not only the ultimate des-
tination of the traveller, but also the different routes
taken.

A SECRET THAT TRAVELS

This is a short game, but rather amusing ; it is to
be played with either a circle or line formed of the
players. When all are ready, one person begins by
whispering a secret to her left-hand neighbor, who
repeats it to the next, and so on until all have heard
it; then the last one to whom it is told, tells it aloud,
and the one who commenced must repeat what his
or her secret was exactly as she worded it, and then
all the party will know whether it returned as it was
given, or how much it gained, or lost, while travelling.

If the players are told to pass on the secret with-
out knowing that it will be exposed, they will not be
80 careful to repeat it exactly as when they know the
game, and by this means greater amusement will be
afforded. ;



74 PARLOR PASTIMES.

THE TEN BIRDS.

_ The company sit in a circle, and the leader of the
game says, ‘* A good fat hen,” then each in their turn (
repeat the words. The leader says, ‘ Two ducks and

a good fat hen,” which is also repeated by each of

the company separately ; then, ‘‘ Three squeaking wild

‘geese, two ducks and a good fat hen ;” then, ‘‘ Four

plump partridges, three squeaking wild geese, two

ducks and a good fat hen;” then, ‘ Five pouting

pigeons, four plump partridges, three squeaking wild

geese, two ducks and a good fat hen;” then, “Six

long-legged crows, five pouting pigeons, four plump

partridges, three squeaking wild geese, two ducks -
and a good fat hen;” then, ‘Seven green parrots,

six long-leeged crows, five pouting pigeons, four

plump partridges, three squeaking wild geese, two

ducks and a good fat hen ;” then, ‘¢ Hight screeching

owls, seven green parrots, six long-legged crows,

five pouting pigeons, four plump partridges, three

squeaking wild geese, two ducks and a good fat

hen ;” then, ‘‘ Nine ugly buzzards, eight screeching

owls, seven green parrots, six long-legged crows, five

pouting pigeons, four plump partridges, three squeak-

ing wild geese, two ducks and a good fat hen ;”

then, “Ten bald eagles, nine ugly buzzards, eight

screeching owls, seven green parrots, six long-legged

crows, five pouting pigeons four plump partridges,

three squeaking wild geese, two ducks and a good fat

hen.”



FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 75





The player must repeat all this separately after the
loader, and if any omissions or mistakes are made, a
forfeit must be paid.



HUNT THE RING.

All the company are seated in a circle, each one
holding a ribbon, which passes all round. A large,
brass or other ring is slipped along the ribbon; and
while all hands are in motion, the hunter in the cen-
tre must try and find out where itis. The person
with whom it is caught becomes the hunter.



HUNT THE SLIPPER.

the ground in a circle, and the slipper is passed from
hand to hand, the hunter trying all the time to find

This game is similar to the last, the players sit on
; who has it. It is a very amusing game.
|



. . ZOOLOGICAL RECREATIONS,

The names of each member of the party must be
written on slips of paper, and the whole placed to-
gether in a hat. Each person is then to choose a
beast, or bird, and write his name on a slip of paper,
its size and colors on another, and its habits on a



FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 75





The player must repeat all this separately after the
loader, and if any omissions or mistakes are made, a
forfeit must be paid.



HUNT THE RING.

All the company are seated in a circle, each one
holding a ribbon, which passes all round. A large,
brass or other ring is slipped along the ribbon; and
while all hands are in motion, the hunter in the cen-
tre must try and find out where itis. The person
with whom it is caught becomes the hunter.



HUNT THE SLIPPER.

the ground in a circle, and the slipper is passed from
hand to hand, the hunter trying all the time to find

This game is similar to the last, the players sit on
; who has it. It is a very amusing game.
|



. . ZOOLOGICAL RECREATIONS,

The names of each member of the party must be
written on slips of paper, and the whole placed to-
gether in a hat. Each person is then to choose a
beast, or bird, and write his name on a slip of paper,
its size and colors on another, and its habits on a



FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 75





The player must repeat all this separately after the
loader, and if any omissions or mistakes are made, a
forfeit must be paid.



HUNT THE RING.

All the company are seated in a circle, each one
holding a ribbon, which passes all round. A large,
brass or other ring is slipped along the ribbon; and
while all hands are in motion, the hunter in the cen-
tre must try and find out where itis. The person
with whom it is caught becomes the hunter.



HUNT THE SLIPPER.

the ground in a circle, and the slipper is passed from
hand to hand, the hunter trying all the time to find

This game is similar to the last, the players sit on
; who has it. It is a very amusing game.
|



. . ZOOLOGICAL RECREATIONS,

The names of each member of the party must be
written on slips of paper, and the whole placed to-
gether in a hat. Each person is then to choose a
beast, or bird, and write his name on a slip of paper,
its size and colors on another, and its habits on a



76 PARLOR PASTIMES.

third. The names, the sizes, and the habits are to
be placed each by themselves, in different lots. This
being arranged, one of the party draws out a name
from the first hat, and reads it aloud, and then
draws#out and reads a slip from each of the other
hats, and much merriment will be caused by the odd
associations ; as when Mr. Smith, for instance, is de-
scribed as Ten inches long, with a green head and
brilliant eyes, and prettily marked yellow and purple,
with a tail of beautiful blue feathers, and lives on
slugs and snails. The hat containing the names of
‘the animals should be placed aside until the conclu-
sion of the game, when some knowledge may be
gained by the attempts to arrange the descriptions
under their proper heads.



PARADOXES.

Each letter of the alphabet should be taken in turn,
and a paradoxical verse be made upon it, by the play-
ers. For instance; the first one commences with A.

A.

It is in the Apple, but not in the Seed,
It is in an Act, but not in a Deed.

B.

It is in a Bonnet, but not in a Hood,
It is in a Block, but not in Wood.



FIRE-SIDH GAMES,'

.;

It is in the Centre, but not in the Middle,
It is in a Conundrum, but not in the Riddle.

D.

It is in a Dress, but not in a Frock,
It is in a Door, but not in the Lock.

E.

It is in the Elbow, but not in the Arm,
It is in the Earth, though not in a Farm.

x.

It is in the Flour, but not in Bread,
It is in Fear, though not in Dread.

G.
It is in the Globe, but nof in the Land,
It is in Gravel, but not in Sand.

H.

It is in the Hour, but not in the Day,
It is found in the Happy, but not in the Gay.

I.

It is in an Instrument, but not in a Tool,

It is in the Ignorant, but not in a Fool.

°

7



73° ‘PARLOR PASTIMES, | |
ip “

"Tig found in June, but not in the Year, a
*Tis not in Taunt, but it is in a Jeer, |

Bop: |

It is in the Knee, but not in the Leg,
*Tis not in a Barrel, but ’tis in a Keg.

L.

- It is in a Laugh, but not in a Noise,
It is found in Lads, but not in Boys.

M.

"Tis found in Magnolia, but not in a Flower,
"Tis found in Might, but not in Power.

N.
"Tis in the beginning of Nephew and the end of Son.
“It is found in None, yet it is in every One.

Oo.

It is in the Ocean, but not in the Main,
It is found in Oats, though not in Grain.

Ps 5 |

Tis always in Pear, but not in Fruit,
"Tis found in a Plant, but not in the Root.

s



FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 79

e ©).
It is in Queerness, but not in Oddness,
It is in Quietness, but not in Stillness.

R.

"Tis always in a Road, but never in a Path,
It will be found in Water, but not in a Bath.



Ss.

- It is in a Speech, though not a in Word, “*
It is in a Sparrow, but not in a Bird.

a.

“
*

It is in a Tavern, but not in an Inn, ©
It is in a Tumult, but not in a Din.

Uv.

It is in an Uncle, but not in a Brother,
_ It’s not ina Niece, nor yet in a Mother.

V.

- *Tis in the Visage, though not in the Face,
- *Tis found in Vacuum, though not in Space.

W.

It is in a Window, but not in the Sash,
It is in a Whip but not in the Lash.



















80 PARLOR PASTIMES.
X.

*Tis seen in a Box, and in a Fix,
*Tis not in Number, yet ’tis in Six.

Y.

It’sin the beginning of Year, and the end of Day,
It’s never in Decline, but always in Decay.

Z.

It is never in Flame, but always in Blaze,
It is never in Mist, but always in Haze.

——

CUPID.

One of the players is seated at the end of the room,
as Head, or Leader—Venus, we would propose
as the title, ifa lady. The players range themselves
in a row, and each one represents a letter of the al-
phabet, and comes forward in turn before Venus to
personate Cupid, by the sentiment expressed in any
word they may choose that commences with the let-
ter they respond to—taking care that the countenance,
gesture, and manner, express the idea of the word
selected. :

For instance the first one in the row begins with
A, and says, Cupid comes Awkward, and at the same
time walks aéross the room towards the person seat-





FIRE-SIDE GAMES, 81

ed, ina very awkward manner, and takes her station
behind her; then the next one says Cupid comes
Begging, and acts accordingly while walking across
the room: the next one takes C, and so they proceed

‘until the alphabet is exhausted; and then if there

are more persons, they can begin the alphabet again,
or if but a few players, when the last one has played,
the one who commenced the game can take the next
letter, and so proceed again.

As all may not think of words as quickly as they
should, they will find here a variety from which they
can choose.

A. Cupid, comes sel cali gubatie.dion:
ished—A ffronted.
B. Cupid comes Boisterously—Bravely—Bending—

Blundering.
C. Cupid comes Carefully—Carelessly—Crossly—
_ Crooked.
D. Cupid comes Daringly—Disdainfully—Dancing
_ —Dejected.
E. Cupid comes Elegantly—Earnestly—Exhausted
—Egotistical. : ,
F. Cupid comes Fearfully—Foolishly—Furiously—
Fidgeting.
G. Cupid comes Gracefully—Grumbling—Gallant-
ly—Gaping.
H. Cupid comes Humbly—Hopping—Halting—Hum-
ming.
I. Cupid comes el pratcapeminty Te gaint ye
Inquisitively.

—- ..-



82

Hy oO WHO wo

1m)

U.

e

Ne

Ww.

X.

PARLOR PASTIMES.

. Cupid comes Joyously—J: ae umping—

Justly.

. Cupid comes Kindly—Kickine—Knocking—Kiss-

ing.

. Cupid comes ‘Lively—Listlessly—Laughing—

Leaping.

. Cupid comes Mischievously—Madly—Marching

—Musing.

- Cupid comes ee ee

ling.

. Cupid comes Officiously—Observant—Originally

—Obediently.

. Cupid comes Proudly—Patiently—Pleadingly—

Puffing.

. Cupid comes Quietly—Queerly—Quaking—

Quaintly.

. Cupid comes Reading—Rapidly—Rudely—Ri-

gid.

. Cupid comes Scornful—Steadily—Shivering—

Singing.

. Cupid comes Tediously—Talking—TAppine—

Tyrannical.

Cupid comes Eine aRi ier neenb=Enevenlie
Urbane.

Cupid comes Vainly—Vindietive—Vehemently—
- Victorious.

Cupid comes Wildly—Waltzing—Whispering—
Warbling.

Cupid comes Xhalting—or the letter may be.

omitted.





FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 83

Y. Cupid comes Yelling—Yielding—Youthful—
_ Yawning.
Z. Cupid comes Zealously—Zigzagging.

‘The one who fails to make the proper expression
or attitude, must do so at the command of Venus.

Cupid can be performed under these various as-
pects, and many more that are not given here, and
the alphabet can be gone over several times, by al-
ways using different words. It will be found to bea
very amusing game, especially if the players are
quick in thinking of their words, so as to avoid de-
lay.

UNIVERSAL BIOGRAPHY.

_ This game may be played by any number of per-
‘sons. One, by arrangement, is to leave the room.

—. the rest, with the knowledge of one an-
other, are each to fix on. some celebrated character.

The absent person is then admitted, and is to address

the following questions to each, beginning at the
right: ©

1. What countryman was he?
2. What was his calling?
3. For what is he chiefly remarkable? -

Suppose Robert Fulton be fixed upon, the answers
may be:—1. An American.” 2. An inventor and



84 PARLOR PASTIMES.

navigator. 3. For bringing steam to perfection in
propelling boats. Or suppose Edmund Burke, the
replies may be:—-1. An Englishman. 2. A states-
man. 8. For his Essay on the Sublime and Beauti-
ful. It must be borne in mind that the last ques-
tions will require some decided.and not general an-
swer, which must refer to some particular act, event,
or thing. i

If, from the answers to the queries, the questioner
is enabled to guess the character referred to, he or
she must pronounce it, and should it be correct, takes
the seat of the one questioned, who must then leave the.
room, the others each furnishing themselves with a
fresh character. The new questioner is then admit-
ted and puts the same three queries,,always commence
ing with the person sitting on the right hand of the
previous questioner, so that allmay thus be question-
ed in turn. :

Should the first person questioned baffie the in-
quiries, the questioner must address them to the
next on the right hand, and so on through the com-
pany, until a correct name is guessed, when the one
who had fixed upon it, must leave the room, and be-
come the questioner. If the queries have been put
to all without success, the same questioner leaves the
room and a new name is chosen as before. It may
be made a game of forfeits, where parties are guilty
of anachronism, or false answers (which should be
at once exposed by the rest of the company), and al-
so where the questioner addresses the queries to all
ussuccessfully.



FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 85

Among young people it may be made a@ game of
reward, some older person being present to decide
who among those questioned evinces the most cor-
rect biographical knowledge, and which among the
questioners is the cleverest at discovering the names
chosen.





POETICAL DOMINOES.

Provide some clean fine pasteboard and cut it up
in slips rather longer than they are ‘wide, about the
shape of dominoes, but they will need to be a little
larger. |

Then divide them in half, with a mark of ink, and
on one half of each piece write a quotation or verse
of poetry, and on the other half write the names of
one of the authors from whom you have made your
selections ; but be careful not to put a quotation and
its author’s name both on the same card ;—for in-
stance, if one of your selections be, “‘ If it were done,
when ’tis done, then ’twere well it were done quick-
ly: ” do not write Shakespeare on the other half of
that card, but Byron, Milton, or some other author
you have chosen from. Shakespeare must be writ-
ten on another card where there is a selected passage
from another author.

As many selections as you take from one author so
many times must his name be written on the cards.

Suppose you select three different passages from



86. PARLOR PASTIMES.

Moore, his name must be written an equal number
of times on separate cards.

When all is arranged, then shuffle and deal them .
to the players, and let one commence by laying one
of his cards in the centre of the table, reading the
quotation written upon it. His left hand neighbor
must then look over his cards, and if he has the name
of the author of the passage read, he will announce
it, and then read the selection that is on the other
half of his card, and put it down by the one on the
table, matching the author’s name to his production ;
but if the player has not the name of the author, he
must look for a passage that was written by the
author whose name is on the card first laid down,
read it, and also the name that is on the card, and
put it by the other, taking care to adjoin the quota.
tion with the author’s name to whom it belongs.

Then the first player’s left-hand neighbor must
look for the author’s name, and so the game pro-
ceeds. :

The one who first exhausts his cards, wins the
game.



THE INITIAL LETTERS.

Let one withdraw while a word is selected by the
remaining players, which being done, the absent
player is recalled, who, upon re-entering, walks up
to the person, to the right or left hand, as may be
agreed upon, and there stops until that person names



FIRE-SIDE GAMES. - eet

something that begins with = first letter of the
word that was chosen.

The guesser then stops before the next one, who
says a word that must commence with the second
letter of the selected word, and so proceeds until the
word is finished, and then by remembering what each
one said, and putting the first letter of each word
together, is enabled to find out the word determined
upon. _For instance, jire-side is fixed upon as the
word.

First one says Flower.
Second, ‘ Ink.
echird, ‘¢ River.
Fourth, “ Eagle.
ich, . .° Sunshine,
Sixth, “ India.
Seventh, ‘‘ Date.
Eighth, ‘“ Emery.

The player. then puts the initial letters of each
word together, and exclaims it is ‘‘ Fire-side.” The
next one in order then goes out, while another word
is proposed.

If most of the players are unacquainted with this
game, it would makeit more diverting, perhaps, if not
explained to them at once, the head one or leader
merely telling each one what word they must use
when the guesser comes to them in turn. They will
be quite surprised at the readiness with which the
word is detected, little dreaming how it isdone.



88 ; PARLOR PASTIMES,

CHARACTERS; OR, WHO AM I?

One of the party is sent out of the room; some
well-known hero, or equally well-known character
from a.book, like Dickens’s novels, or Shakspeare’s
plays, is selected, and when the absentee returns to
the assembly, he or she is greeted as the person fix-
ed upon, and he must reply in such a manner as to
elicit more information, as to the character he has
unconsciously assumed.

Suppose the game has commenced, and when the
player enters the room, he is thus accosted :

“Your military ardor must have been very great,
and you had a very adventurous spirit, when you left
your home in England, and set out with a determin-
ation of fighting the Turks.”

_“ Yes, I was always very fond of adventure.”
we Well, you had plenty of them: and when you
were taken prisoner and sold to the Bashaw, your
mistress to whom he presented you, felt so much
sympathy and affection for you that you were sent to
her brother, but he not being so well pleased with
you, treated you cruelly.”

“He did; and although I suffered much from his
treatment, I suffered more in the idea of being a.
slave.”

“The thought must have been terrible to you,”
remarks another of -the players, “‘ or you would not
have killed your master, hid his body, clothed your-







FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 89

self in his attire, mounted his horse and galloped to
the desert, where you wandered about for many days,

until at last yoy reached the Russian garrison, where

you were safe.”

“ And well pleased was I to aed there in safety ;
but was I then content with my travels?”

“¢ For a while, but the spirit of enterprise, so great
within you, caused you to set sail for the English
colony of Virgina, when you were taken a prisoner
again by the Indians, and your head placed upon a

large stone, in order to have your brains beaten out

with clubs.”

“What a dreadful situation I was in, with only en-
emies around me.”

“But there was one who proved a friend, the
young and beautiful princess, finding that her en-
treaties for your life were useless, rushed forward,
laid her head upon yours, and thus resolved to share
your fate, or save your life.”

“T am deeply grateful-to Pocahontas for her noble
act, and I am also glad to find myself so renowned
a person as Captain John Smith.”

Or suppose a lady has left the room and on re-
entering she is thus addressed :—

“Your Majesty’s many remarkable adventures
seem more like romance than reality. Accomplish-

ed, beautiful, spirited, and very courageous, you com-

mand our respect, especially for the vigorous and en-
ergetic action you displayed in trying to aid your
royal husband, who was preparing to maintain his





90 “PARLOR PASTIMES.

just rights to the crown of England. After purchas-
ing aid and military stores in Holland, you set sail
for England, when there arose a great storm which
increased in violence until at length the danger be-
come so imminent, that all the self-possession of the
passengers. was entirely gone, and you alone were
quiet and composed, rebuking their panic and telling
them not to fear, for ‘ Queens of England were Bas
drowned.’ ”

“That was a terrible storm, and we were all
thankful when we reached land in safety.”

* But you had to put back to the port from which
you sailed, which caused some delay, but the second
voyage was more prosperous, although you were
closely pursued by an English squadron, which came
into port the night after you landed, and the next
' morning the village was bombarded by your enemies’
ships. You and your attendants escaped into the _
open fields, stopped at a trench, and were obliged to
remain there for two hours, the balls passing over
your heads and covering you with dirt; but there
soon came an army to your relief;at the head of
which you marched. triumphantly on, stopping on
your way to take a town held by your husband’s en-
emies. Thus was added the glory of a conquest to
your other triumphs.”

‘¢ Well, was I enabled to reach my husband after
so many adventures?”

‘Yes, but in a short time you were obliged to
separate again, as you were accused of treason, for





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PARLOR THEATRICALS.




SPORTS AND PASTIMES

FOR |

IN-DOORS AND OUT.

WITH ADDITIONS BY

OLIVER OPTIC.,.

EMBRACING PHYSICAL AND INTELLECTUAL

AMUSEMENTS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE,

%
FAMILY CIRCLE AND EVENING PARTIES.

CONTAINING

ACTING, PANTOMIME, AND DIALOGUE CHARADES, ANAGRAMS,
PUZZLES, CONUNDRUMS, TRANSPOSITIONS, GAMES, MAGIC,
FORFEITS, CHESS, DRAUGHTS, BACKGAMMON, GYM-
NASTICS, FISHING, SKATING, ROWING, ETC.



BOSTON: f

PUBLISHED BY G. W. COTTRELL,
86 CORNHILL.




Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1868, by
G. W. COTTRELL,
In the Clerk’s Office of the District gout of Massachusetts.
PREFACE.



OYS will be boys, and girls will be girls,

says Mrs. Partington, good humoredly,

when somebody complains of the mischief

and romping going on in the school-room and
garden. And it is well that it should be so;

for surely it is pleasanter to see children
amusing: themselves at children’s games than to
make little men and women of them before their
time. The wise Son of David tells us that for every-
thing there is a season—a time to weep, and a time
to laugh; a time to mourn, and a time to dance.
And there is, in this work-a-day world of ours, a
time to learn, so there is, or should be, a time to
play. Amusement, when properly regulated, is a
grand help-mate to study; and in order that boys
and girls may know how to amuse themselves in a
sensible manner, this Collection of Indoor and Out-
door Games has been compiled. In these pages will
‘be found not only the good old-fashioned sports

which delighted our grandsires, but many, new and
3
iv PREFACE.

diverting pastimes for sunny days and winter even-
ings; games which not only provide innocent amuse-
ment in the family circle, but exercise the memory,
wit, intelligence, and imagination of the players.

It has been the earnest endeavor of the Editor to
render this collection as complete as possible. He
has been careful to exclude everything objectionable
to sound morality and good home training, and trusts
that the present repertoire. will be acceptable alike to
children of all ages.

It may be as well to mention that he has produced
a companion volume, consisting of Scientific Recrea-
tions and Exercises for ingenuity, in which will be
found many of the most celebrated arithmetical puz-
ales, together with a large variety of chemical and
other experiments. For both books he seeks publie
favor and appreciation.

Tue AvtHor.
PARLOR PASTIMES,



ACTING CHARADES.



INTRODUCTION.

F all in-door recreations, that of acting
Charades is the most amusing and the most
popular. Noy are these amateur performan-

ces at all difficult to manage. We will sup-

pose a party of young people assembled on a

winter’s evening; nothing is easier than for
half a dozen of them to entertain the rest with an
impromptu drama. All that is necessary is a room
or part of a room, for a stage, a few old clothes for
dresses, and a little mother-wit. ‘Where parlors open
into each other with folding doors, one room will
serve for the stage, and the other for the audience— |
the folding doors serving both for curtain and side }
scenes, lehind which the actors can retire on leaving
the stage. Those of the company who are to act in

the Charade withdraw and determine upon a word
5
6 INTRODUCTION.

or sentence, which may be either represented in dumb
show or dialogue, as suits the actors. Some word
or phrase should be selected, whose syllables possess
_ especial meanings independent of the sense of the
whole word. In the first Charade, for instance, the
word ‘“‘ backgammon” is used; here the first and
last syllables are made each a scene, and the whole
acted word forms a key to the rest. Again, in the
word ‘‘mendicant” it will be observed that each of
its syllables has a meaning of its own, each syllable
forming a separate act of the Charade. In the first -
act the word mend is shown by a young lady repair-
ing a lace veil; the pronoun 7 is played upon in the
second act; the word cant is made the subject of the
third act; and the whole word is shown in the fourth.
When the Charade or. Drama is concluded, the audi-
tors endeavor to find out on what word it was found-
ed, and much amusement will be afforded by their
efforts to detect the covert meaning of each scene as
it proceeds.

It is by no means pretended that the actors shall
exactly follow the words here set down; if they play
with spirit, they will soon find that they can im-
provise language suitable to the situations introduc-
ed; and in the case of Pantomime Charades many
characters may be brought on the stage, and much
entertainment obtained at little cost of thought or
time.
INTRODUCTION.

7

The following words will be found suitable for
either Pantomime or Dialogue Charades :—

Air-gun,
Arch-bishop,
Band-box,
Bride-cake,
Bull-rush,
Court-ship,
Cross-bow,
Dice-box,
Dog-rose,
Lye-glass,
Fag-end,
Fan-light,

- Game-cock
Grand-child,
Great-coat, —
Heir-loom,

Horse-chest-nut,
I-dol,

T-rate,
Jack-pudding,
Jew-el,
King-craft,
Key-hole,
Leap-frog,
Love-apple,
Mad-cap, »
Mend-i-cant,
Milk-maid,
Nap-kin,
Night-cap,
Out-rage,
Out-pour,
Pack-cloth,
Pop-gun,
Quarter-staff,

Rain-bow,

Rope-yarn,

Sauce-box,

Sea-shell,

Sweet-heart,”

Tell-tale, |
Time-wreft, |
Tow-line,

Up-braid,

Up-shot,

Vat-i-can

Watch-man,

Waist-cord,

Way-bill,

Water-fall,

Young-ster,

Zeal-ot,


PANTOMIME CHARADES.



BACKGAMMON.
A Chavave in Chree Acts.

ACT I. — BACK-
Dramatis Persone.
_ Two Lirrix Boys. e BEADLE.
Susan, a Servant. Girl. Otp Morurr.
Joun, a Footman. Recruiting SERGEANT.

Scens I.—A Street.

This scene may be made by pinning several news-
papers, or large pieces of paper against the window
curtains, showing part of the window at back, and
placing cheese, butter, &c., on dishes, on a table be-
hind. A lamp-post may be shown by introducing a
straight prop, with a candle alight on top, &c.

Enter Two Lirtte Boys, who take halfpence from
their pockets, and show them asif for odd and even.
The one who loses then makes a back, over which
the other jumps. The other boy then stands with

his*head down as if to-make a back. ‘‘ Higher!”
8
‘«*

PANTOMIME CHARADES.

a

cries his playfellow; the boy makes a higher
and the other is just about to jump over it, w'

In rushes a Beapte, and drives the boys out. ‘The
dress of the Beadle may be made by an old great-
coat with a red collar, a cane in his hand, and a
cocked hat on hishead. The Beadle shakes his cane
after the boys and exit.

Re-enter Boys, who point to where the Beadle has
gone, laugh, and re-commence their game at leap-
frog.—Eaxit Boys. ‘

Enter Orv Woman, Servant Girt, and. Foorman.
—They stand and talk to each other, and make signs,
as if the young people were going to be married.
Show wedding-ring, kiss each other, and so on.

Enter Recrurrine Serceant.—The dress of this
character may be easily made by fastening a red sash
round his waist, putting a ribbon in his hat, &e.

Recruiting Sergeant goes up to Footman, places a
shilling in his hand, and marches him off. The old
Mother and Girl express sorrow violently, wringing
their hands and pretending to weep; old woman imi-
tates the act of firing a gun to express the office of a
soldier ; young girl puts out her finger, as if to show
that her chance of marrying is lost. Both weep and
wail in comic pantomime.

Enter Foorman running.—Old woman and girl ex-
press great astonishment at his return; and he ex-
hibits a large placard, on which is written, ‘ Sent
BACK.—Not short enough.” Scene closes.
10 _ PARLOR PASTIME. —

ACT II.— GAMMON.

* Dramatis Persone.
Rica Oxp Lapy. | SHasBy-Lookine Lover.

Scuiu.—A Parlor.

Enter Rica Otp Lapy with a long purse in her
head. She begins to count her money, sighs deeply,
takes a letter from her pocket, and reads.

Enter Suasspy Lover, who advances to the rich
old Lady, makes great protestations of affection, and
tries to take the purse from her hand. She resists,
when he drops on one knee, places his hand on his
heart, and pretends to be violently in love. Old lady
seems subdued, and gives him her purse. He kisses
her hand, rises, cuts a caper, and exit. * Old lady
raises her hands in astonishment, and cries out—
“He wants to gammon me, he does.”—WScene closes.

ACT. III.—BACKGAMMON.

Dramatis Persone.

Youne Lavy. | Youna GEnTLEMAN.
VIsIToRS.

Scenz.— A’ Drawing-room.

Visitors arrange themselves in groups; one young
lady plays the piano, another looks over a book of
prints; a third amuses herself with the flowers on the
table, &c. :

Enter Young Lapy and Gentieman from opposite
sides of the room. They advance, shake hands, and
——E———————————_S

ae

PANTOMIME CHARADES. — 11

go to back of room. Young gentleman comes for-
ward with little table, which he places in centre.
He then brings two chairs, which he places on either
side of the table. One of the visitors brings a draft-
board, which he opens. The young lady and gentle-
man sit down to the table and commence rattling
dice-boxes and moving the draft-men. Visitors group
themselves round the players.—WScene closes.

A LITTLE MISUNDERSTANDING.

A Charave in Four Acts.



ACT I. —A LITTLE MISS-
Dramatis Persone.

A Youna Lavy or Five. Lavy VisrTors.
Her MAMMA AND SISTERS. SERVANTS.

Scunze I.—Parlor in the house of the Mamma.

Enter Mai Servant, who dusts and arranges the
furniture, and exit.

Enter Turer Sisters, bringing with them a quan-
tity of silk lace and other articles of dress. They
sit down and begin working busily, one cutting out,
another sewing, &c.

Enter Mamma with child of five in night-cap and

morning dress. The Sisters clap their hands, laugh,

and express surprise. They take the child’s cap off,
12 PARLOR PASTIMES.

and exhibit its rough, uncombed hair. One rings the
bell, and makes signs to the servant. who enters.
Servant goes out and presently returns with basin
and water, combs, brushes, and various articles of
toilette, which she sets down and exit. The sisters
then brush the child’s hair, wash its face, and so on,
_ the mamma assisting. They then dress the child in
very fine clothes, a small bonnet and parasol, white
lace handkerchief in her hand, &c. The child looks
pleased, kisses her sisters and mamma, and struts
about the room. Double knock heard: at the door.
Enter servant introducing visitors. Sisters try to
hide the litter, and mamma brings forward the little
miss in her finery. Visitors express delight. Little
miss takes her seat in centre of room, the rest group-
ing round her with various signs of homage and ad-
miration. Mamma exclaims, ‘ Pretty little Miss.”—
Scene closes.

aa



ACT Il.—UNDER-

Dramatis Persone.
Marp Servant. MIsTREss.
POLICEMAN. MASTER.
Scene.—Kitchen in the house of the Lady, with
table in centre, discovers maid-servant nicely dressed.
Clock strikes nine, and three gentle taps are heard
on the wall outside. Maid goes out, and returns
cautiously with a policeman on her arm; they look
lovingly on each other. Maid prepares supper, -
spreads a large cloth on the table so as nearly to —
PANTOMIME CHARADES. - 13

touch the ground, and places dishes and plates,
knives and forks, &c.; they sit down and eat, the
maid-servant daintily, the policeman ravenously.
‘Just in the middle of the feast a loud double knock
is heard at the front door. They rise in confusion,
the maid calling out ‘* Master!” Policeman’ hides
under the table, from which the maid hastens to clear
the things. Knocking continues impatiently. Po-
liceman puts his head out from under the cloth, the
maid kisses him, and runs up stairs to open the
door. Noise heard in the passage as if the Master _
and Mistress were remonstrating at being kept so
long at the door. Policeman is creeping cautiously
from under the table, when steps are heard outside,
which cause him instantly to hide again.

Enter Master, Mistress, and Servant, all disput-
ing with many gestures. Mistress looks about the
room, goes to the cupboard, and at last approaches
thevtaile, and is about to lift the cloth. At this mo-
ment the maid servant rusbes up to her master and
falls fainting in his arms. Mistress lifts up side of

auble-cloth and discovers policeman under the table.
The policeman then looks up from his knees, bran-
dishes his staff, and inquires in a loud voice, ‘* Does
_ Mr. UnpDERDOWN live here Scene closes.






14 PARLOR PASTIME.

ACT — II.
Dramatis Persone.
TRAVELLER, WITH CARPET BAG, ETC.
CABMAN. | PUBLICAN.
CusTOMERS.
-Scuens—Bar of a Public-House—Publican discovered behind,
and Customers in front.

This Scene may be made by laying a shutter across

Bg

a couple of chairs, and placing another shutter in

front. Place pewter pots, glasses, &c., on counter.

_ Enter TRAVELLER and Casman.—They go up to
counter and drink. . Various persons close up to the
Traveller and request him to treat them. He nods,
and publican serves out glasses and mugs to all.
They all, drink, and appear very merry. Publican
holds out his hand for the money after counting up
the sum. ‘Traveller pulls out a very long purse and
pays—Cabman and company dance for joy.—Scene
closes.

ACT IV.—A LITTLE MISUN DERSTANDING.
Dramatis Persone.



THE LITTLE Miss. A Lover. â„¢
Her THREE SISTERS. POLICEMAN. -
Toe MAMMA. Marp SERVANT. ee

Scene.—A drawing-room—Curtain rises, and distovers a
lady sitiing with her two daughters, and the Little Miss,
Jinely dressed, as before. The young ladies are engaged in
crochet work, and the Little Miss admires her figure in the
glass. ae :

(A double knock is heard at thé outer door.)
Enter Servant, bringing bouquet, which she takes
to the little“Miss. The Sisters and Mamma express”
great surprise.


- PANTOMIME CHARADES. 15

Enter Lover, gaily dressed, with a crush hat un-
der his arm. He advances to the Mamma, who bows
and shakes hands with him. He then goes up to the
‘young ladies, and begins to make himself agreeable.
They turn away from him and pout their lips, at the
same time pointing to the Little Miss, who is admir-
ing the bouquet. The Lover starts, ad rushes from

- the room.

The Mamma and ee look uci at the Little
Miss, and endeavor to obtain the bouquet. She re-
sists and begins to cry; stamps on the floor, and
turns over the chairs, and pulls about the curtains.
Servant rings the bell, and calls ‘‘ Police!”

Enter Lover with Porticeman, who brandishes his
staff, and looks very important. Lover produces
three large bouquets, one of which he gives to each of
the young ladies. Policeman takes a great doll
out of his pocket and presents it to the Little Miss.
Maid-servant. goes up to Policeman and boxes his
ears; the Policeman immediately shows her a
wedding-ring, when she kisses him, and appears much

leased. Little Miss comes forward, nursing the
doll. Loverakes bouquet from her hand, and gives
it to the elder’ “young lady. Young ladies and Moth-
er smile gratibusly upon him. The whole party then
form a group about the lover and the young lady,




















her. Policeman fand Maid-servant in the back-ground
ged and. Epis the wedding-ring. Lover

Curtain Fall


DIALOGUE CHARADES. .



MEND-I-CANT.

A Charade in Four Acts.



Dramatis Persone.

Mr. Epwarp Seymour. Mrs. Emity Seymour.
CoLONEL SEYMOUR. . Marta, her Map.
Brown, the BuTiEr.

ACT I.—MEND-

Mrs. Sryrmour’s dressing-room. Flowers and green-house
plants arranged about, Maria seated on a low SOB, repar=
ang a torn lace veil. :

Maria. Well, people may talk as they will abou
black slaves; but I know no slavery can be wor SC.
than that of a finished lady’s maid by profession... %
Slaves indeed! look at me, expected by my lady to —
do everything for her. Did ever anybody seesucha @ .
_ ragged, jagged rent as this? and she will expect to a

see the veil look as good as new before she goes out; |
and after all I shall be reproached. 3 her things are |,
not laid out, her lunch broughtup, the lap-dog *
washed, the flowers renewed, and the carriage prop-

16 S




DIALOGUE CHARADES, 17

erly heated. Well, mend I can’t, nor won’t. Then
all day long I have to sit and work in this dreadful
hot-house, and dare not open a window, just because
my lady never feels warm. How can she feel warm,

indeed, with such a cold heart? A pretty bargain

Mr. Seymour made when he married her for the
money; she is always telling himaboutit. But he
was right served: he is as bad as she is with his fine

talk, talk, talk—all gammon! and don’t I see that

while they are both as smooth as oil with their grand,
rich old uncle, they wish him in his coffin! I have
half a mind to open his eyes, for I am vexed to see
him cheated: he’s a real gentleman, and always has
a civil word for a respectable upper servant. And
here he comes. :

Linter COLONEL SEYMOUR.

Colonel Seymour. Where’s my niece—my pretty,
gentle Emily? I wish to-bid her good morning be-
fore Iget out on my ride.
Maria. My lad never rises so early as this, sir.
Col. S. Very bad plan; people should always rise

_ with the sun in this fine climate. Might as well be

in India if we indulge in bed so long. 'There—there
goes my glove. Sew it up, my good girl. I would»

not trouble you, but I am ina hurry to be out. I

vill sit down and watch your pretty, nimble fingers.

. But, whew! (whistles) how can you live in this atmo-

sphere? Wellseasoned as I am, I can’t stand this
heat; I must open the window, my little woman.
3 [Opens a window.]
18 PARLOR PASTIME.

Maria. Oh, sir, how refreshing the air is! but I
fear my lady will be displeased. She insists on.the
window being at all times shut.

Col S: Poor thing! poor thing ! ‘Quite a aistabe.
T must see her doctor; I must have him prescribe
to her early rising and fresh air. I must hint to my
worthy nephew, without alarming him, that such
habits may endanger her precious health.

(Maria sighs deeply.)

Col. S. Why do you sigh, my good creature”
Have you any fears about my dear niece’s health ?

Maria. Oh, no, sir; sheis in excellent health.
Iam sorry I sighed, sir—I was only thinking about
myself; and I couldn’t have anything more unhappy
to think about. I ask your pardon, sir; you are al-
ways considerate to poor servants ; I wish there were-
more like you; and sew your glove I will, that 1 am
determined, though I should be discharged, on the
spot for not having finished mending her veil.

Col. S. But surely, Maria, you need have no fear
of the reproofs of my gentle niecé.

Maria. I know very well what she will say, sir, if —
she orders a thing to be done, and it isn’t done. :

Col: S. Why, that-is certainly a vexation; but
you need not dread her words, child, they are so few
—so soft and sweet. .

Maria. No doubt,‘she can be sweet enough when
it pleases her; and you, sir, have little chance of
seeing her as I see her, as my fellow-servants see
her, and as poor folks see her, when they get a chance


DIALOGUE CHARADES, > 19

of it, which isn’t often. Bless you, sir, certainly
servants should see all and say nothing; but she és
a hard lady to’please.

Col. S. I am-sorry to hear this from you, young
woman; I would not have suspected it, and I would
gladly believe you are mistaken. If her words are
unkind to those beneath her, what pain it must give
to my virtuous and philanthropic nephew to hear
the feelings of a fellow-creature wounded in his
house; for his every thought, word, and act, are for
the good of his fellow-creatures.

Maria. To-speak the truth, sir, I think Mr. Sey-
mour is the worst of the two. My lady does not
mind for saying out down right that she cares for
nobody but herself: but he talks like an angel about
his feelings, and never does one good deed. He
feeds and clothes. the poor with fine words, and
blinds great folks with his preaching. I’m but a
_ poor, silly servant girl; but I can see through them
both, sir; I can see how they dupe you, and I made
up my mind to speak and tell you; for it’s a sin to
let such a kind-hearted gentleman be cheated.
There’s your glove, sir.

Col. S. You have shocked me very much, girl;
I must think over this; and I will certainly find out
the fact, Thank you for your work and your words;
both were meant in kindness. (Gives her money.)
Nay, don’t refuse. You have dofie me a favor, and
I can afford to do one to you. Now, good morning,
and go on with your tiresome work. (E7zit.)
90 3 PARLOR PASTIMES,

Maria. There, now! I have gone and done it!
See if I don’t lose my place for my prattling! Not
that I should call that any loss, if theyll only give
me a character ; and after all I feel as if I had done
right, though I haven’t finished mending the veil.
I must go and see what cook can send up for my la-
dy’s lunch. (Ezit.)

ACT IL—L-
The same dressing-room. Marta at work.
Enter Mrs. SEYMOUR.

Mrs. S. Wow wretched everything seems! Noth-
ing is as it ought to be: nothing as I ordered it.
My silk mantle laid out for this chilly day! And
bless me! who has taken the liberty to open my
windows ?

Maria. It was I that did it, madam. I was near
fainting with the heat, and I thought

Mrs. S. Ihave no wish to hear your thoughts.
If you chose to be faint, was that any reason why
my windows should be set open to endanger my life?
You know I never suffer the air to be admitted here ;
but my delicate constitution is perfectly shattered
in this comfortless house. Everybody here is oppos-
ed to me—all do their own way: I am nobody—no
one cares for me! I am miserable. Who was that
making so much noise, and trotting the horses be-
neath my windows? » |



Maria. Colonel Seymour, setting out for a ride.
- Mrs. S. Colonel Seymour! I hate to hear his


DIALOGUE CHARADES. ) 21

name. How selfish of Edward to bring that old bru-
tal, vulgar, East Indian uncle of his to my house!
He oontinually offends my eyes and ears and taste.
Did you inquire, as I ordered you, of Mrs. Norris,
what soup she intends to send to table to-day ?

Maria. I did, maa’m; it is to be mulligatawny.
Mr. Seymour ordered it himself, because, as he told
Mrs. Norris, it was the colonel’s favorite soup.

Mrs. S. And my feelings never consulted! Ed-
ward knows—Mrs. Norris knows—that mulligatawny
is poisén to me; but I am never considered. Go
down immediately, Maria, and tell Mrs. Norris that
I insist on it, that my soup, the white soup, be sub-
stituted for the mulligatawny. How can TL. possibly
dine. without soup? And, at the same time, tell
Brown to give out some. of the rich old Madeira, the
same as we had yesterday. I choose to have some
for my lunch. (zit Maria, with a curtsy.) The
mulled Madeira may perhaps restore the circulation
Which has been quite checked by the chill occasioned
by that selfish young woman opening the windows.
Servants think only of themselves. - What wretched
creatures we are, to be compelled to depend for every
comfort, on such heartless beings!

Enter Marta,

Have you ordered my soup?—and when am I to
have my lunch? .

Maria. Please, ma’am, Mrs. Norris says she has
no objection to send two soups, as you wish for the
22, | PARLOR PASTIMES.

white ; but Mr. Seymour was positive in his orders
for the mulligatawny.

Mrs. S. And they will enjoy it, though they see
I cannot touch it. Selfish and unfeeling men! But
when will my lunch be ready?

Maria. Please, ma’am, about the wine—Mr.
Brown

Mrs. S. What does the oirl mean? 2 has

- Brown to do with my lunch?
Maria. Were he comes, madam.



Enter Brown in a cotton Jacket.

Mrs. S. What is the meaning of this intrusion
into my apartments, unsummoned, and in that ex-
traordinary dress? Am I to be insulted by all my
servants ?

Brown. Please ma’am, Miss Maria was so prem-
tery, insisting on having the wine directly; and I
was quite out of my head, and never thought of my |
jacket, but came off all in a fluster, to say as how
Mr. Seymour ordered me, strict, to keep the Madeira
number thirtyeseven—only one dozen of it left—to
keep it all for the colonel, who is remarkable fond of
that Madeira; as well he may, after the four long
voyages it made before it came into our cellars. -

‘Mrs. S. Our cellars, man! the cellars are mine;
the contents of the cellars are mine; you are my
servant; and / order you to keep the wine for me.
I shall have some of the wine every day as long as it
lasts ; because.1 like the wine, and I choose to be
DIALOGUE CHARADES. 258

obeyed. Go immediately, and give out the wine.
(Exit Brown.) Come and arrange my hair again; it
is quite discomposed with the agitation I have under-
gone this morning, from the presumption, imperti-
nence and selfishness of my servant. . Exeunt.



ACT ITIT.— CANT
The dressing-room. Mrs. Szymour reclining on a couch.

Mrs.S. What unheard-of tyranny : with my fortune,
not to be allowed to choose my own dinner, or my own
lunch! Edward is abominably selfish. I’m glad I in-
sisted on having the Maderia, though I do think it is
rather heating, and injurious to the complexion [rising
and looking at herself in a mirror]; but I should be
crushed to the earth if I did not sometimes make a
struggle to obtain a small share of attention in a house
which it is supposed is mine. What does Edward.
want? I shall be wearied with long speeches now.

Enter Epwarp Srymoovr.

Mr. S. My sweet Emily! what is this that Brown
tells me, that my Emily wishes the bin of Maderia
thirty-seven to be reserved for her? My discrimin-
ating angel must surely have perceived the pure and
holy motive which induced me to set apart this fatal
_ liquor, ever a snare of the evil ihe for our worthy
and respected uncle.

Mrs. S. You know perfectly well, Edward, that I
have no respect for the vulgar, unfecling old fellow ;
and I see no reason why he should have the wine I
want for my own use. .
o4. PARLOR PASTIME.

Mr. S. But, my love, you are aware that my good
_ uncle, with his usual wisdom, has announced his de-
cided intention of bequeathing his vast wealth to us,
—in trust, of course,—in trust for the unfortunate !
for the poor! the widow and the orphan! A rich
Pool of Bethesda! from which I will lave the pre-
cious waters to a needy world.

Mrs. S. What absurdity, Edward! You will in-
vest it all in railway shares, I have no doubt; and
very probably make more widows and wheerNs than
you will relieve.

Mr. S. Alas! alas! it is the misfortune of the
benevolent never to be comprehended by the chil-

dren of this world! It is the ‘‘ crook in the lot” to .
which we, whose affections are devoted to our fellow-_

creatures, are exposed. I bow to my martyrdom.
[ glory in the contumely of the world.
Mrs. S. But Ihave no desire for the glory of
martyrdom; I do not wish to deny myself the nec-
essaries of life, and I do not see yet why I should
vive up any of my few comforts to please this ex-
acting old uncle of yours.
Mr. S. This trifle might offend him, my -love;
and I would not willingly cast away the means of

benefitting my fellow-creatures. I must have’ this

dangerous juice of the vine for the frail old man; it
is his foible to rejoice in the delusive draught of evil
and sorrow. My Emily knows I wish it not for my-
self.

Mrs. S. Certainly not ; | because you always drink
port.
DIALOGUE CHARADES. .

Mr.S. Tt is indeed my painful duty to do so;
left to myself, the simplest diet—the fruits, the roots
that the bounty of nature scatters round, the pure’
water from the spring—would supply all my wants;
but Dr. Wiseman, as you know, my dear, says im-
peratively, ‘‘ Do this, or die.” He commands me to
eat rich food, to drink generous wine, if I desire to
retain that life which is granted to.me solely to do
good to. all that surround me.

Mrs. S. You may fancy you are swallowing phys-
ic when you take your turtle and your port, Mr. Sey-
mour; but you seem to enjoy it more than any one
else at the table. |

Mr. 8S. I am resigned, my love ; I abhor the means,
but I sacrifice my inclinations to the duty of preserv-
ing my life. To the world it seems that I eat and

_ drink and live like a on vivant, but they know me



not; my heart is far from the festive board, in the
lowly hut of privation and sorrow. |
_ Mrs. S. I pray Edward, cease your preaching.
In all your sympathy for the unhappy, I am quite
sure lam never considered; and your plausible words
will not deceive me now. , I know that you did once

_ dupe me: now you want to dupe your uncle; you
_ fancy you can dupe the whole world; but one thing
is sure, you know what you are about—you do not |
dupe yourself. Now I shall go down to lunch, and
you can have bread and water if you desire it. (Ez-
it.) . )
Mr. 8. (holding up his hands).—Unfortunate wo-
man! (Ezit.)
26 “PARLOR PASTIMES,

SCENE THE LAST.— MENDICANT. |

The dressing-room. Marta arranging ‘the wig of Cou. Sry-
MOUR, disguised as an old Beggar.

Maria. That will do excellently. Now step into
this closet till I can introduce you, and you will preb-
ably hear your own character.

(Cox. Szymour enters the closet. Manta sits down to her
‘ work.)

; _ Enter Mr. and Mrs. Srymour.

_ Mrs. 8S. How painful to me is this miserable life!

I cannot comprehend, Edward, how you can be so
barbarous as to compel me to tolerate the provoking
eccentricities of that ill-bred, unfeeling, hideous old
man. When will he go away? —

Mr. 8S. Iventure to hope, my love, that he may
never leave us. I have carefully studied his consti-
tution; I have remarked in him a fulness of habit, |
a redness in the face, a short neck—all sad, sad symp-
toms. In short cate love, I caution you not to be.
alarmed if he should be tied carried off by apo- —
_plexy.
- Mrs. S. I should n6% be the least alarmed or —
troubled to hear that he was dead, but I cannot al- —
low him to die in my house; it would be a most un-
pleasant circumstance fer me. |

Mr. S. Emily, how can you be blind to the fact
that his death while staying with us would be of im- i
mense advantage to us! If he were to leave us he ~
might be induced to alter his will. He has left all to ©


DIALOGUE CHARADES. Zt

us—a beautiful arrangement of Providence! Al-
ready I feel in possession of his coffers, which might
then be truly inscribed ‘‘ Treasury of the Poor.”

Mrs. S. (Impatiently.) A treasury never to be
ppened for the poor, I dare to say. Maria, go and
wring me a shawl, to protect me from the draught
when I descend the cold staircase. (Maria goes.)
You may as well speak the truth before the servants,
Edward, for they must have long ago discovered that
you never give to the poor or the rich.

Mr. S. Mrs. Seymour, you are mistaken—you
do not comprehend my character. A thick veil con-
ceals my charities from the million, and I am ever
studious that my right hand should not know what
my left hand does. My tender heart—(sharply)—
What does that ragged old vagabond want here?

Enter Marta with the shawl, introducing Old Man.

Maria. (Putting on Mrs, Seymour’s shawl.) Please,
sir, Brown begged me to bring up the old man, who
has said he must see you immediately ,on a case of
life or death.

Mr. S. What can he want? Perhaps some acci-
dent has happened to the colonel, my dear. Speak,
old man, and at once declare the cause of this intru-
sion. : / ‘

Old Man. Your own words, nmaiie and exalted | |
man. I was waiting in the hall at the meeting of |
the magistrates yesterday, and shed tears to hear
you declare before that crowded assembly that all
your wealth belonged to the poor. Iam the poor-
28 PARLOR PASTIMES.

est of the poor: for I have been rich, and I feel more
keenly the cold and deadly pressure of poverty and
famine. )
Mr.8S. Do you belong to our parish? I know
nothing of you. |
Old Man. I am a stranger. When sudden and
total ruin fell upon me, I set out, accompanied by an

aged wife and a sick and helpless daughter, with the

hope of reaching the home of my early days, where
some might still be living who would remember and
befriend me.. When we arrrived at -your city our
strength and our scanty means were alike exhausted.
We took shelter in the humblest hut we could find,
hoping to be able to earn, by our labor, the small
pittance necessary to support life. f

Mr: S. Well, oldman, I suppose somebody would
give you work. |

Old Man. Alas! sir, my wife and child are pros-
trated by an attack of fever. I cannot even pay for
a shelter for their dying bed. Encouraged by your
noble sentiments, I come to ask of you, from your
abundance, the single piece of gold that may save
the lives of those dear to me, or at all events, render
their death-bed less miserable.

Mrs. 8. Send him away, Edward: he may have

brought infection: I may take this fever. I shall .

faint if he remains in my dressing-room.
Mr. S. Go away,}good man; I am myself very,
very poor; the demands of charity have completely

drained my purse. My ardent desire to bless the 4




DIALOGUE CHARADES. a.

needy with a share of my humble means, must be
reined néw by prudence. I subscribe largely to all
benevolent societies, those blessed fountains for the
support of the respectable poor ; what more can char-
ity require from me? Depart in peace; the union-
house is already crowded ; leave this poor and heavi-
ly-rated parish. Proceed.forward to another town,
where there are many men of larger means, though,
perhaps, with less feeling hearts than I possess.
There, old man, you will be received into a spacious
and commodious union-house: go, without delay.

Mrs. S. Why do you waste your words on sucha
wretch? Send him to prison if he will not leave.

Old Man. My wife and child cannot travel; I
will not be separated from them, Give me but a tri-
fle; they surely ought not to perish for want while
any of their fellow-creatures are revelling in luxury.

Mr. S. Strict principle forbids me to bestow
- money on unknown beggars. I give you my prayers.
Go. ) Ss sf

Maria. Please, sir, I think the cdlonel is riding
up the avenue; he is very rich, and perhaps he may.
be able to do something for the poor man.

Mr. S. However rich he may be, he gives noth-
ing, and has a great aversion to beggars. Go imme-
diately, man; for if Col. Seymour enters, I shall be

reluctantly compelled to commit you as vagrant.
Old Man. Will you not bestow a shilling on me? |
Mrs. S. Carry him off, girl, before the colonel
- comesup. I would not have such a miserable object
geen in my apartment.
30 PARLOR PASTIMES,

Mr. 8S. Be careful to take him out through the
back yard: not a moment longer, stubborn and im-
portunate offender; be grateful for my leniency, and
go quickly. ;

Old Man. Farewell, admirably-mated pair! And
in taking the liberty of removing my night-cap in
your ladyship’s luxurious abode (throwing off his dis-
guise) I will drop into the P. P. C. card of Colonel
Seymour. You may well be amazed; for much as I
abhor deception, I have stooped to practice it in or-
der to discover the truth. I have other nephews
and nieces, whom I shall now seek; and after reward-
ing this honest girl, I shall take leave of this house
forever ; hoping to be more successful in my next ex-
periment. I will search over half the world for a
worthy object, rather than bestow my wealth on sel-
fishness and falsehood.—Scene closes.
DIALOGUE CHARADES. 31

PATRIOT.

A Charade in Chree Acts,

Dramatis Persone.

Mr. James ARunDEL. Mrs. ARUNDEL. }
Caprain O’Brien. G=ERALDINE,
Parrick O’ BRALLAGAN. Mary.
Lucas. Coox.

ACT I.—PAT-

A Drawing-room. Mr. Arunpzt, Mrs. ArunpEt, GEratpine.

Mrs. Arundel. And now, my dear Geraldine, that
you are restored to me, I hope you will forget speed-
ily your Irish manners and customs.

Geraldine. Never, mamma; remember that the
seventeen years of my-life have been passed almost
entirely in dear Ireland.

Mr. A. And remember, too, my lady, the drop
of pure Milesian blood that runs in Geraldine’s veins.
My mother is proud of her country, and we can
‘scarcely expect her adopted child should have d‘u-
similar feelings.

Mrs. A. But I would not have the world believe
she cherishes such feelings; Mr. Dellington, whose
attentions to her last night were gratifying, has, I

know, a peculiar antipathy to Ireland.
. i
es
32 PARLOR PASTIMES.

Enter Lucas.

Lucas. A man, sir, about the footman’s place;
but I am afraid he is Irish.

Geraldine. Do let him come up, papa.

Mr. A. Well, we are really in immediate need of
a servant? we will see him at all events. Show him
up, Lucas.

Lucas ushers in O’BRALLAGAN, and retires.

O’Brallagan. Bless yer honors, and its a beauti-
ful parlor ye’re havin’ to yerselves. I’m the boy,
shure, that’s come to take the place, for want ofa
bettaer; and by the same token, it’s a capital servant
yer honors will Set, musha!

Mr. A. You are premature, my friend.

O’Brallagan. Will it be well-looking yer honor is
maning? arrah! and that’s thruly what all the girls
are saying.

Mr. A. I mean, young man, that I must hear
something more of you before I engage you. :

O’Brallagan. No offence in the world, yer honor,
and, if agraable to their lady-ships, Pll tell the his-
thory of all the root and stock of the O’Brallagans.

Mrs. A. No, no, it is quite unnecessary, O’Bral-
lagan, if that is your name.

O’Brallagan. Is it the name that’s on me, yer
ladyship? sure it’s Patrick O’Brallagan: Terence,
he’s the boy that comes next to me—and then there’s
Nora, our sisther, a sweet purty girl, she that died?’
the famine faver. Then——
ye

é

-

DIALOGUE CHARADES. 83

Mr. A. You wust not talk so much, O’Brallagan,
before the ladies. Be content to answer. my ques-
tions. Where did you last live?

O’Brailagan. Wt would be in the steerage, yer
honor, aboard of the stamer; and a very dacent
place it was to lie down in, saving yer ladyship’s
presence.

Mr. A. You misunderstand me; I wish to know
in whose service you have lived.

O’Brallagan. Och! sure wasn’t I at any gintle-
man’ 8 service that wanted a nate job done.

pe Mr. A. J am perfectly puzzled; I believe Ger-
aldine, I shall need your services to question the wit-
ness.

Geraldine.—(laughing.)—Tell me, Pat, what can
you do?

O’Brallagan. And is it yer honorable ladyship
asks me that with your own beautiful mouth? Sure
ye might ask the thing that Patrick O’Brallagan is
short of knowing, and if I don’t answer yer ladyship,
I have never seen the boy that will do that thing at
all, at all.

Mrs..A. I do hope, James, you will not think of
engaging this ignorant Irishman. Iam positively
alarmed, he appears so eccentric.

O’Brallagan. Not a bit of the same, yer ladyship.
It’s the quietest boy in the world ye’ll find me, and
that’s the thruth; barring any spalpeen blackens me
counthry, and thin me blood is riz, and no help for
that, at all, at all. es
84. . PARLOR PASTIMES.

Geraldine. Oblige me, dear papa, ly hiring Pat
O’Brallagan. He looks honest; Mary will teach him
his duty; and in truth, papa, my heart warms to the
brogue—it is home language to me.

' Mrs. A. Geraldine, I qujte shudder at your inel-
egant vehemence. I must entreat you to control this
Irish impetuosity before the refined Mr. Dellington.

Geraldine. Oh,mamma! I hate to hear of Mr.
Dellington..

Mr. A. That is an improper expression, my child.
Mr. Dellington is a good man in the world, a man of
fortune, of large estates, and above all, he admires
my little wild Irish girl.

Geraldine. But he is nearly as old as you are,
papa; and I should really like to choose a husband
myself.

Mrs. A. James, I am in despair; this is indeed
terrible.

Mr. A. We will discuss the matter afterwards ;
in the meantime we must endeavor to extract some
information of Patrick’s abilities. Can you perform
the duties of a house servant?

O’Brallagan. Musha! is it the work? Sure I'll
do all the work of the house beautiful! Will yer la-
dyship be kaping pigs, and won’t I engage to make
them so fat theyll bate the parson’s?

Geraldine. But we don’t keep pigs, Pat; we want
a footman. |

O’Brallagan. And that’s mighty lucky, my lady.
Where will yer two beautiful eyes see a nater foot-
PARLOR PASTIMES. 3D

man, if I was having but the fine coat? Would yer
ladyship be agreeable to me havin’ a green coat,
in regard of ould Ireland; may the sun never set
on her! But maybe yer ladyship would be wantin’
a choice about the coat: and faith! Pm aisy about
the color, barring it wouldn’t be orange, bad-luck to
it! And now, long life to yer ladyship, will I go
down to yer illigant kitchen and set to work?

Mr, A. Wowever unpromising our first acquaint-
ance is, I think I must oblige you, Geraldine, by giv-
ing this man a trial, as we really need a servant.
You may stay, O’Brallagan: Lucas and the maids
will teach you your duty. 13 galls

O’Brallagan. Sure and they will! and my blessin’
on yer honors, and the beautiful young cratur you
own, and she will be having the handsomest husband
in Ireland, and free of his money, long life to him,
and not an honester boy nor Pat O’Brallagan ever
darkened yer door, and quiet, barring the sup of
whiskey, when the heart’s heavy. And a good day
this has turned up for us all, by the powers! (Ezit.)

Mrs. A. I am by no means gatisfied with your
decision, James. We might surely have engaged a
more respectable servant than this extraordinary
savage. —

Geraldine. Do not think so harshly of him, mam-
ma—you are not accustomed to the Irish: but be-
lieve me, they are true and faithful. (Aside with a
sigh.) Dear, dear, O’Brien !
86 DIALOGUE CHARADES.

Mr. A. He is certainly a wild Irishman ; ‘but
with a little training, we may make a good servant
of Pat O’Brallagan. [Exeunt.

cero

ACT II.—RIOT-
A Kitchen. O’Bratuacan, Mary.

O’Brallagan, Faith and troth, it’s an illigant place,
and plenty to ate, and your purty face to comfort me,
and long may it last.. And didn’t I tell you before,
och! mavourneen, it would do yer bright éyes good
to look on the fine, grand captain, the thruest of lov-
ersg—when would an Irishman not be thrue?—one
of the ould race, a raal O’Brien; the blood runs right
down from the ould, ancient kings, thrue for him.
Isn’t it all to see on paper, and made out in Latin,
as ould Corney O’Neil can show, musna! musha!
So darling of me heart, the captain comes to me
and says,—Patrick O’Brallagan, you'll be the bach-
elor of purty Mary.

Mary. What assurance, indeed !—and what did
you say to that, Mr. O’Brallagan ?

O’Brallagan. Wouldn’t I tell the captain the
thruth? how we came togither, and how I was proud
to get a sight of yer face; and by the same token, it
was not your fault-that ye were not knowen me, in
regard that we had niyer met since we were born, at
all, at all. Then says the captain, wouldn’t your
purty Mary be the girl to put the bit of paper to
Miss Geraldine, and the mother that owned her niv-
- PARLOR PASTIMES. 37

er be the wiser. And didn’t I spakefor you, mavour-
neen, and give yer consint, and take the captin’s illi-
gant letther and the gold piece, for you entirely.
Few it is of them same gold pieces iver rests with
the O’Briens, in regard of their being remarkable free
in parting wid them, blessins on them for iver and
iver, itis them that are the raal thrue race. May
the heavens shower gold upon their heads.
Mary. And I must give Miss Geraldine the letter,
Patrick?
-O'Brallagan. In course ye will, my darlin’; and
A7ghen they are married, you are my choice to be Mrs.
Patrick O’Brallagan, and then we will apply for the
place of lady’s maid to the captain and his bride,
secing that same would shute us entirely.
Mary. Well, Patrick, I will do it, if you say itis
right; but I feel rather shy about it, for Mr. Lucas
has been watching us all along from his pantry win-
dow ; and Patrick, you know he is jealous about you.
Then Cook, she is jealous of him, and treats me like
a slave, and I cannot help being better looking than
she is. < P
O’Brallagan. Not a bit of it, you beauty o’ the
world, and if ye were wishiw’ the fairies to make you
ill-lookin’, they couldn’t find it in their hearts to do
it. Here comes Mrs. Cook, so lave me to discourse
her nately, and go in with the letther, ye good cratur.
Evit Mary.
Enter Cook with @ plucked fowl.
O’Brallagan. Shure I knowed that would-be your
purty foot makin’ the music on the flore. . Och, by
38 DIALOGUE CHARADES. |

8

the powers, it is a wonderful woman ye are, Mrs.
Cook. I’m thinking ye jewel, ye would aisily make
a roasted goose out of a_prater, musha. A raal clev-
er cratur ye are wi’ the pans and eridirons.

Cook. You say so, Mr: O’Brallagan, and you is
haltogether a gentleman, but there’s hothers that
hought to be the first to speak them words that ’old
their tongues and run after other girls as hought to
be hashamed o’ theirselves to be hinviggling hother
people’s sweetarts, and making their hinny henders
hagen them as is their betters.

O’Brallagan. And sure, it woldun’t be purty Mary
you. would mane, Mistress Cook. Bad luck to him
that would make her out to be a rogue, and me here
to let that word be said, and Mary my own counthry-
woman, and that’s the thruth intirely.

Cook. There hagan, Mr. O’Brallagan, you’re a
standin’ up for her, and the girl’s hinsensed you as
she’s a Hirisher. No such a thing! My lady never
’ires no Hirishers.

O’Brallagan. Och! only to see that same! But
be aisy, my jewel. Isn’t Mary my own lawful cous-
in? Leastways, her own born mother, which was
Biddy O’Neal, was second cousin to my Aunt Honor
Delaney, which same was born at Cilfinane, and ber-
red 7 the thrubbles, and it follows quite nat’ral that
Mary would be cousin tome. And sure Biddy O’
Neal was a Kilkenny woman, and anyhow her daugh-
ter would be a born Irishwoman.

Cook. Really, Mr. O’Brallagan, you talk a deal
a

PARLOR PASTIMES, . 39

of nonsense. I stand to itas Mary’s Hinglish, and
’old up ’er ’ed, and perk’erself about ’er beauty, sich
as it his, and him hencouraging ’er as hought to
know better, and telling ’er he hadmire black heyes—
more shame hon ’im, when, he knows my heyes is
surillen blue, hand that he swear with his hown
tongue, till she tice ’im hoff, a himperent ’ussy.

O’Brallayan. Be aisy now, my fine woman, arrah !
what would ye be havin’? It’s Patrick O’Brallagan
that’s her sworn bachelor, and will be thrue to her,
and be the friend of her and hers foriver and iver, and
~ pad luck to the spalpeen that lays his eyes on her at
all at all, without my lave from this day out.. (Sees
Lucas enter behind.) And you'd be hearing my words,
Mr. Lucas, long life to you for a.snake, stalen be-
hind to listen to our discourse. Maybe it’ll not be
plasin’ to you. :

Iucas. 1 hadvise you, O’Brallagan, not to forget
that you are speaking to a hupper servant, and to re-
spect your betters, and to keep a civil tongue in your
ed. IJ’ear what you say of me and Miss Mary, and
I hadvise you to mind your own affairs.

OBrallagan. Shure now! and a fine bit of advice
it is, and grand words; maybe it would be the Mas-
ther that said them words to you, and you being such
a mighty fine gentleman! (Enter Mary.) Och?
Mary, mayourneen, it wouldn’t be thrue that youd
be lettin’ him come round you with his grand dis-
coorse: ye wouldn’t be shaming them that come
afore you. Shure! it’s not for your mother’s daugh-
ter to demane herself to an Englishman.
40 DIALOGUE CHARADIES. ~

_ Lucas. What do you mean, you low Hirish feller?

I allays say you to be quite inferior to us; and I take
care that this ’ouse is too ’ot to’old ye. I say to
Mr. Arundel as how you hinsults the hupper servants,
and as you conways cladderintestine letters to our
Miss, which inference I’se make it my dooty to re-
port to my lady hin honor. ;

O’Brallagan. By the powers, and that’s what ye
mane to do, ye ould rogue o’ the world ; and it’s a hul-
labaloo ye’llriz, ye will! Arrah! then what'll Patrick
O’Brallagan be doing, musha! musha! To blazes
wi’ ye, ye schamer o’ life, ye slave of a Saxon, may
ye get yer desarvins, Sooner or later. Hoorah! for
the rights of Ireland !

Cook.—(Shrieks.)\—Poles! poles! ’elp! ’elp! Oh,
the willun will murder poor hinnocent Mr.-Lucas!

Cook and Mary hold O’ Brallagan back.

Lucas.—’Old ’im Cook, ’old ’im: get back to Hire-
land, you poor hignorant savage. Hall them Hirish
is rogues and beggars.

O’Brallagan. Wisha, girls, let me be. (Breaks
away.) Arrah, you spalpeen, wait till we git our
rights, and won’t we driv’ all ye venomous Saxons be-
fore us into the wide say, and clare you out of our
own counthry, outright. Wisha! wisha! ‘(Dances
about, waving his arms ; the women scream.)

Enter Mr. ARUNDEL.
Mr. A. What means all this noise? Are you all
drunk or mad? You have terrified the ladies into
hysterics.
* DIALOGUE CHARADES. 41



All together. Please, sir

Mr, A. Ymust understand the matter thoroughly ;
I command you all to follow me to the library, that
I may learn the truth. (Ezeunt.)

SCENE THE LAST.—PATRIOT.

The Library. Mr. Arunpet, Mrs. Arunpet, GrraLprve,
seated at a table; the Servants standing, the Wouun weep-
ing, Lucas and O’Bratiacan making gestures of anger.
Mr. A. Now, I must insist upon knowing the

cause of this strange uproar. You appeared to be a

quiet young man, O’Brallagan; what has thus pro-

voked you to lado violence?
O’Brallagan, It’s me counthry, yer honorable wor-
ship! That desaving thaifo’ the world, what does

She do but turn his black tongue to abuse me country !

Treland, yer honor, the finest ould counthry o’ the —
world. And by the same token, isn’t it every inch
of the ground is blessed, in regard of St. Patrick
himself that walked without a shoe to his foot from
‘one end to another, and left it to us for iver and iver,
that the boys would be the bravest, and the girls the
purtiest, of all the world, and that’s thrue of it, and
no lie, at.all at all, as Corney knows, and——

Mrs. A. Pray be silent, young man, your words
are perfectly distracting to me.

OBrallagan. Ochone! see that now! what will
{do at all, wisha? Sorra a bit would Patrick O’-.
Brallagauwbe the boy to give the -fear to her beauti-
\

42 ‘PARLOR PASTIMES.

ful honorable ladyship; and the illegant young miss
with the smile on her purty mouth, and one, too, that
knows the captain, him that’s the thruest of lovers,
and wanted to go off to fight the Rooshins, barring
he wouldn’t displease the jewel that owned his heart
altogether. Wisha! wisha! what will I be saying
now? That’s the way wid me iver, the truth always
comes out; and if it wer’ the killing o’ me, my heart
gets the betther o’ me.

Mrs. A. What does the man mean by these im-
pertinent allusions to lovers?

Lucas. Please, my lady, them were the very words
i say which aggravate O’Brallagan. I think it my
dooty, my lady, to infer, when I see O’Brallagan give
Miss Mary a cladderintestine letter to take to Miss
Geraldine.

O’Brallagan, Arrah, then, bad luck to yez, for a
maker of mischief! it’s the saints themselves that ye
would provoke, let alone a civil-spoken boy like me,
that cannot put up with yer ways. Musha! it’s thrue
for the master that yer all alike, and it’s divarshun
from morn till night, and nothing else in the world
ye think on, down below in the jintale kitchen, where
there’s plinty and no stint, and niver a pig durst
show his purty face at all.

Mr. A: Do not look alarmed, my dear Mrs. Ar-
undel. The cladderintestine letter enclosed one to
me, which Geraldine dutifully delivered, and told me
the tale which she has yet been too timid to commu-
nicate to her mother. It was my mother who sanc-
DIALOGUE CHARADES. 43

tioned and approved the addresses of Captain
O’Brien, a gallant soldier who has already earned
laurels—the nephew and heir of our old friend, Lord
O’Brien. The letter was from him, making such pro-
posals for our daughter as I think even you will not
reject, though the captain is Irish. I-expect the
gentleman to call himself this morning—and proba-
bly that may be his knock. Go, Lucas, and usher in
the visitor.

Lucas retires, and returns, announcing Captain O’BRIEN,
Mr. Arunpet goes forward, and shakes hands, and intro-
duces him to Mrs. ARUNDEL.

Capt. O’Brien. Truly, an introduction to your
gentle lady encourages me to hope. Who can be-
hold her and not see at once that she must be the .
mother of the lovely Geraldine! if they did not de-
cide that one so young and beautiful could only be
her sister.

Mrs. A. You gentlemen of Ireland certainly ex-
cel in the art of flattering the matrons, and winning
the maidens.

Capt. O’Brien. So the world say; but then, where
are there such sons and such husbands as the true-
hearted sons of Erin? Make me your devoted ser-
vant forever, dear lady, by granting me the hand of
your fair image, my lovely Geraldine.

Mrs, A. I had other views for my daughter, but
Tleave all inthe hands of her father: for though -
usually I have somewhat of prejudice against the
Irish, there is a nobility about your manner, worthy
‘44 PARLOR PASTIMES,

of the nephew of Lord O’Brien, whom I knew well
many years ago—in fact—I thought him too old.

Capt. O’Brien. How fortunate, dear Mrs. Arun-
del! for if you had not thought so, the world would
not have seen the flower of beauty, Geraldine Arun-
del, and I should not have been the heir of the
O’Briens. :

Mr. A. We will know you a little more, O’Brien,
and then I think you need not despair.

Capt. O’Brien. And blessed will be the day when
I shall carry my little pearl of the world back to the
land of love and beauty, dear Erin!

O’Brallagan. And would ye be wanting a lady’s
maid, Captain? . - 25

Capt. O’Brien. Arrah, Patrick, is that you?
‘What in the world have you been brought up for?—
you surely havn’t been breaking the peace here?

O’Brallagan. Wisha! wisha! what will Ido? It
was me blood was up! wasn’t it the innemies of our
counthry, Captain, ’ud provoke me?

Capt. O’Brien. And so you wished to go out as a
lady’s maid to Ireland?

O’Brallagan. Plase your -honor, that was in re-
gard to purty Mary and Miss Geraldine, and she :
willin’ to take me entirely, if Miss Geraldine will
want us for the lady’s maid, or the lodge at the grand
gate, when we would be having a praty all the year
round, and maybe a pig on the floor and not a penny
of rint to pay. And isn’t Mary the girl that’ll make
me come home straight, niver looking at the shebeen
at all at all.
DIALOGUE CHARADES. - 45

Capt. O’Brien. Well, O’Brallagan, I believe we
Trish boys are best at home: so, if Mr. Arundel will
allow it, and Mrs. Arundel will pardon your trespass-
es, you must return with me to the ould counthry,
good luck to i!

O’Brallagan. God bless your honor’s glory. You’re
araal patriot! Erin go bragh! [Scene closes.



RAINBOW.
A Charvare in Three Scenes,



Dramatis Persone.
Sire Witttam WALLACE,
Lomonr, Scottish officers.
Hawpen,
Dueatp, a Scottish soldier.
Fiona, the soldier’s sister. ;
Scunu, about the river Carron.—Time, towards sunset.
Sounz I.—The border of a wood.
Enter ‘Louon, Hawpen.
Lom. All, then, is lost!
Alas! long injured country\, Wallace down,
Who will redress thine evils!
Haw. Wallace,
Tho’ doubtless deeply grievetl, will not so sink
As to be lost to Scotland, but will rise
Heroic—like her thistle downward bent—
After a suiting space.
46 PARLOR PASTIMES,

Lom. Our troops dispers’d,
Dispirited ! severe is our late loss!
Oh, fatal Falkirk! .
Haw. Let us not despond ;
But seeking Wallace, plan re-union wise
With our dislodg’d array!
Lom. Wellurged! Eve glooms
As she advances, threatening us with rain 5
But storm of combat renders reckless.
Haw. Ay!
Nevertheless, we'll hail lone cot, to glean
News of our missing men!

SECOND.
Screnz Il.—Front of Recluse Cottage.
‘Enter Frora, Ducat. :

Flora. Oh, Dugald! Dugald!
Thouw’st brought us dreadful, dark intelligence!
Our country, then, is lost?

Dug. *Twould seem so now:

But our commander, coining ever good,
Will, while we speak, be active.

Flora. But, Dugald,

He will be shorn of every needful aid
In this sad juncture !

Dug. Itrust not, Flora!
But I must soon depart to join his fate—
My country calls!
DIALOGUE CHARADES. . 47

Flora. ow could our noble troops
Be beaten so?
Dug. Dissension—linked unto the Saxon bow—
Prov’d our dissolving bane.
Flora. Alas! ’tis oft
The fate of ardent soldiers, trusty, firm,
To fall thro’ leading envy.
Dug. Too true, indeed !
Now Flora, seek with me the edge of wood,
When I must quit thee. [Ezeunt.]

WHOLE.
Sonn II.—Side of Carron.
Enter W AuLace.

Wall. The sun is low!
So certainly, is Wallace’s fortune-star, :
That hath been erewhile bright! Yon swift rainbow,
Spanning ethereal spaces, in the east,

. ° ° 2
Reminds me of my lot; sunshine awhile,

To close in sudden sombrousness. Yet I,

The son of wild variety, will trust
Again, as heretofore, in heavenly aid ;
Nor, like a tyro in the freaks of war,
Yield my strong spirit, school’d in peril’s field,
To the deluding demon. of despair,

E’er on the watch, like an insidious foe

That settles in the bush. Here, by Carron,
Ranging so wildly to the quiet Forth,

_Are many meet retreats, wherein to plant
; “
_ Are thankful to enjoy their simple will.

48 PARLOR PASTIMES.

Our thistle-garnish’d standard. Lov’d Scotland.
Altho’ to-day thou’rt down, another hour,

I do invoke, with all a Patriot’s zeal,

Shall scan thee rais’d again; else Wallace will

Be borne from Hope to that depressing doom

That dark Despondence weaves, never to toil

Again for liberty! [ Scene. closes.

—_—___-<>-2-<—___—_—
WITCHCRAFT.

A Pastoral Charade in Three Scenes,



Dramatis Persone.
AtErto, a gentleman resident by Deeside.
Cxrop10, a sensible shepherd.
Urs1no, a skeptical shepherd.
Reais, a lady resident by Deeside.
Eros, daughter of Clodio.
Ovina, sister to Erica.

SCENE I.—THE HILL SIDE.
Scenes I.—Hizil.

Enter Erica, Ovina.

" Erica. How sweetly smiles the morning’s rising
ray, r
Piercing the mist upon the mountain gray.
The flock, Ovina, scents the fragrant air,
Grateful for Nature’s ever active care ;
The deer, delighting in the heathy hill,


DIALOGUE’ CHARADES. 49

Ovina. Ay! these, the creatures gifted less than
we,
Do yet appear to move more gratefully.
Man, lordling over all, is ever lax
In his discharge of gratitude’s just tax :
None other seems to meet with less regard,
From the bold biped of the terrene sward.
Erica. Nay, sister? sure thou gett’st alittle stern ;
I know we all have very much to learn.
Our ancestors old dame for witch would burn,
Then, for applause, to youthful damsel turn.
Ovina. Well, I do own I am a bit severe ;
Yet men do silly, certes, oft appear.
Erica. So do the maids—but see, the sheep do
stray,
Let us fast check them on their roving way.
[ Ezeunt.

Stunz II—A Meadow.
Enter Cxop10, Ursino. ~

‘Clodio. Now, sooth, Ursino, I must really say,
Thou talk’st like cynic of an early day.
I rather far o’erlook a little ill,
Than foster wenom, that would credit kill.
Ah! let us think, if Heaven resented so,
Where wickedness of Earth would after go!
Ursino. Thou think’st of Crathie! Iam a little
stirr’d )
By what doth move the common-minded herd.
50 PARLOR PASTIMES.

The churchyard stalker conning o’er a tomb,
May fill his heart with fear-arraying gloom;
Not so Ursino acts—hears he a tale
Unmoved, where craft can mightily prevail.
Clodio. So sceptics ever tall; but even these
Find fear disposed their hearts sometimes to freeze.
Ursino. So do discourse, oft seasons, old divines; .
But I take sermon by our open pines.
Clodio. Thoul’t rue this doctrine, bred by snaring
; strife,
Tf not before, at least by close of life.
Ursino. So says our clerk; but I will persevere,
At least till closure of this solar year.
Clodio. 'Then will I leave thee, never to return!
Ursino. I care not; for I such advices spurn! a
[ Exeunt.

Scene III.—A Lawn.
Enter Reatsa, ALerto,

Regisa. How lik’st thou faithful friend, to wander
forth, 3
While old Autumnus rules, amid the north?
Where the deer-stalker seeks soul-stirring sport,
*T would seem desirable to pleasure court®
Yet when I look upon the graceful train,
I hope the antler may escape o’er plain.
Alerto. Lady rever’d! there are more scenes to
please
Here, than such as one nigh the antlers sees ;
DIALOGUE CHARADES. 51

Tho’ I do own, a sportsman must enjoy
His skill, in such king-like sport, to employ.
There seems a sort of witchcraft in the spell
That leads the step to th’ antler-hunted dell.
ftegisa. It doth appear so! Well we subject
change.
How lik’st thou, then, thro’ birchen groves to range?
There, to the Muses meet, in Autumn day,
Is, sure, sage manner to wile time away !
Alerto. Ay, truly madam, so I do desire,
That I was favor’d with Parnassus fire.
Regisa. But are not poets, when they have but
zeal,
By deep devotion led to greately feel?
Alerto. It is so surmis’d, yet I dare to doubt,
Regisa. Well, let us try to draw some musers out?
Scene closes.
52 PARLOR PASTIMES.

MIS (S) CHIEF.
a Charave in Three Acts,



Dramatis Persone.

GLENALLIN. JESSY.
M’Lomonp. . Marraa WIttAns.
Jacos Hopazs.

ACT 1.—ROOM IN A HIGHLAND COTIGAE.

Enter Jacop Hopass.

Jacob. ‘ All the world’s a stage,” and I must say
my performances in this old highland castle have
been very successful. First, I succeeded in releasing
the young lady’s hawk unperceived and unsuspected ;
and then I recover it, of course, at the peril of my
life, and restore it to its fair mistress. How charm-
ingly she thanked me for my rash and dangerous ex-
ploit ; overcome by her matchless beauty, I revealed
my love. She blushed and trembled; and then re-
vealed to me, with a deep sigh, that she had the mis-
fortune to be the heiress of Glenallin; which dis-
closure naturally filled me with grief and despair.
In my distraction I threatened to terminate my
wretched life ; but at her urgent entreaties, I consent-
ed to live for her sake. By accident, we have met
again and again; and I have acted Romeo to the
DIALOGUE CHARADES. 53

life, and have I trust, captivated my admiring Juliet.
It has become necessary to take a bolder step, and
having opportunely to-day found the falcon’s silver
chain, I have ventured into the very den of the lion,
in order to restore the young lady’s property, but
above all to have a peep into the interior of the es-
tablishment, to rub down the governor, and then, if
the cards are in my favor, to present the happily-
worded letter 6f my Lord Glasgow.

Enter Jussy.

Jessy. Oh, Montague, rash and thoughtless man,
how could you disobey me ? how could you~-venture
to enter the castle uninvited ? Glenallin is fiery in
temper, and you have all the pride and bravery of an
English knight. I tremble to think on your meeting ;
should you quarrel, what would be my misery !
Promise me, Montague, not to resent any hasty words
my father may utter.

Jacob. Rest happy, gentle maiden, your soft wish-
es will form a shield to protect your parent. CouldI
by word or act create a pang in that valued heart?
He is safe though he insult me: but though le should
call out all his clan, he cannot stop me; for, Jessy,
* there lies more peril in thine eyes, than twenty of
their swords.”

Jessy. O, gentle Montag gue ! ! itis very strange! al-
mostmaryellous how all my ‘dreams of fancy have been
fulfilled. Would you believe it, that when my sweet
friend, Augusta Victoria Smith, and lused to speculate


54 PARLOR PASTIMES.

onour future prospects—for we shared the same dormi-
tory at Mount Ida House, at Hampstead, and used
to solace the long hours of our nocturnal watchfulness
by planning charming romances of love—would you
believe it, that I then vowed I would tolerate no lov-
er unless he was named Montague?

‘Jacob. Wappy, prophetic inspiration ! and did that
ideal Montague resemble—<- —

Jessy. I must confess that my fancied adorer.
spoke very much as you do, and except for the uni-
form, the personal resemblance is striking. But alas!
Glenallin wishes to betroth me to his constant ally
and fast friend ; and his name is unfortunately Alex-
ander. Besides, his accent is Scottish, and I am
persuaded he would be laughed at and ridiculed at
Mount Ida House. I allow that he is noble and
rich, tall and handsome; but he has no sentiment,
no romance in his character; he laughs so loudly
that I am convinced Miss Primley would faint to
hear him, and I fear many of his habits would be
thought low at Mount Ida House Academy.

Jacob. Then cast him from you, noble maiden,
*¢ Love is all gentle words, or sighs, or tears.”

Jessy. Whatwould Augusta Victoria Smith think
of such arude and unfashionable futur? She is already
betrothed ; but sad to say, her lover, though a captain
inthe Hampshire Militia, is named John Thompson.
This was ever a painful fact to her, till I suggested
that we should always name him Giovanni; she was
enchanted with the idea, and ever after addressed
DIALOGUE CHARADES. oo

him I mio caro Giovanni. Beloved, highly gifted,
Augusta Victoria !

Jacob. Oh, say to your charming friend that Mon-

tacue Fit-zAlan, throws himself at her feet, entreat-
ing her to intercede with the peerless Jessy to aceept
the devoted love of her slave. ‘*Turn not away,
light of my soul, from my bold words. O beauty!
till now Inever knew thee!”
* Jessy. Iam weak and blamable to listen to your
. wild vows; besides I cannot accept you—there is
one insuperable objection; the hero of my school
fancies was a soldier. Why, Montague, with your
noble nature, and distinguished figure, have you not
adopted the graceful and honorable uniform that
marks the defender of his country, in this her hour
of need ?

Jacob. Alas! fair maiden, family reasons have re-
strained my ardent desire to join the brave band.
But now, sweet Jessy, I am you slave; ‘‘ Call me
but love, I will forsake my name:’ Decide for me,
fair mistress of my fate; name your favorite regi-
ment ; and such is the influence of the name of Fitz-
Alan, that my.commission will be secured.

Jessy. Not on any account, Montague: in truth,
I fear I am wrong. I tremble at the thoughts of
your raeeting with Glenallin; that is, with papa.
You have no idea how absolute and imperious papa
can be, Montague; and probably he will insist on
knowing your business at the Castle.

Jacob. AndI am fully prepared to reply to him.

o
nO - PARLOR PASTIMES,

Glenallin is no more formidable to me than Derby,
Aberdeen, or any of my noble friends at the Court
of England.

Jessy. But Iam not sure that I should like to'ap-
pear at the Court of England, among your great
friends. I am but a simple Scottish lassie. And
then papa is so anxious that I should marry M’Lom- |
ond.

Jacob. M’Lomond! Is he in the Castle?

Jessy. No, he is gone off on a hunting party ; and
besides, he was so offended with my indifference, that
it will be long before he comes here again.

Jacob.—(Aside)—I trust it may.

Jessy. But why do youask? Do you know him?

Jacob. I have hunted with him at Lord Glasgow’s.

Jessy. Glasgow is papa’s great friend ; therefoze,
his name will be your introduction. We will go to
‘him in his study. [Ezeunt.



.



ACT II.—CHIEF.

Al room in the castle, with books, trophies of the chase, &c. QuEN- ‘

ALLIN seated, with papers before him.

What can have become of my bonnie spoilt lassie?
Ah! my lady Glenallin, it was a dark day for me
when you lay on your death-bed, and urged me to
promise to send my heartsome lassie to learn English
manners at a southron school. And what has come
of the deed ; it will be long before she bounds over
DIALOGUE CHARADES. 57

the heath again with the free step of the Gael. It
will be long before she forget the mincing, sickening
tongue of the south: nay, worse than all, I fear it
will be long before her wayward fancy will see the
worth of the gallant, faithful young M’Lomond.
My winsome Jessy! I would not have her to give
her hand till he has won her heart: but Ihave again —
urged him to come, unknown to her; and this day I
trust to see him at the head of: his brave clansmen ;
then I ken little of a young lassie’s fancy, if the bold
M Lomond, towering above his clan, clad in his gray
kilt and plaid, and wearing-his eagle plume above
his noble brow, does not win my Jesys. Ihear the
music of her foot; but who is this stranger?

Enter Jacop and Jussy.

Jessy. Dear papa—Glenallin, I mean—this gen-
tleman, an English traveller, was. so obliging as to
secure my fugitive falcon; and he has now kindly
come to restore to me the silver chain which he has
found. This is Mr. Montague Fitz-Alan, papa.

Glenallin. I thank Mr. Montague Fitz-Alan for
his exploit, and I make no doubt that you have also
thanked him, my daughter. The halls of Glenallin
are ever open to the stranger : he is welcome.

Jacob. My lord, I come to claim more from you
than your hospitality ; I would not be a stranger in
these honored halls. Ihave long, unknown to her,
admired and loved your fair daughter. Deem it not
presumption ; I am the heir of a noble house, and I


58 PARLOR PASTIMES.

come forward boldly to beseech you to accept me as
your son-in-law. I have set my life upon the cast,
yet dare not to urge my passion to the lovely maid
without your sanction. I rest all my hopes on your
generosity—I "ask but the maid; wealth I need not.
“My love, more noble than the world, prizes not
quantity of dirty lands.” She aloneis my attraction. |
That miracle !—that queen of gems!

Glenallin. But who, and what are you, young
Englishman? Your words are many and beyond the
comprehension of our northern simplicity. You are
welcome to the hospitality of my castle, as a stran-
ger; but, as the wooer of my daughter I would know
more of you.

Jacob. ‘I stand for judgment.” Know you not
the high-born Lord Glasgow?

Glenallin. Well1I know the heroic Glasgow; but he
is no longer in Scotland; ten days ago, at the head of
the bravest of his clan, he sailed to fight the battles
of his country in the East. Even if you knew him,
he cannot appear to certify who you are.

Jacob. ‘* Doubt not mine honor.” The noble
Glasgow has ever been my firm friend; we parted
on the strand, and at that anxious moment, I poured
into his friendly bosom my tale of silent love. He
heard and pitied me; nay, more, he urged me to seek
you, his noble friend, and declare my passion; he
even wrote a few brief words, before he left the shore,
to advocate my cause. Behold the letter! (Gives
letter.)


DIALOGUE CHARADES. 59

Glenallin. I am satisfied that you are honorable
by the sight of my friend’s writing; it is scarcely
needful to read his letter. (Opens and reads it.)

“ Will you, for my sake, dear Glenallin, grant the
bearer, if possible, the favor he asks from you; he
will peove all you can wish.

Ever yours,
ss _ GuLascow.”

Truly, Mr. Fitz-Alan, this is high testimony, and
had I not built my hopes on my little lassie becom-
ing the bride of the brave M’Lomond, I should have
proudly welcomed you .as my son. Now, I must
perforce disappoint you, for

Jacob. Yet, stay, Glenallin. ‘‘ Hear the lady !—
let the lady speak!” I will abide by her decision.



** Tf she love me not,
Let me be no assistant to a state,
But keep a farm and carters!’?

Glenallin. Young Englishman, it is not usual for
“Scottish maidens to dictate to their parents. I am
the head of a clan, of which my daughter forms an
individual. I require obedience, though I am’ no
despot. My clansmen give me their services; I do
not hold them in slavery. My daughter must yield
me her duty; but I do ‘not wish her to forfeit her hap-
piness. Speak, then, my Jessy : is it true that you
have so soon bestowed your heart on this stranger ;
and would you be his bride?

Jessy. Oh, Montague, I cannot leave Glenallin. I
60 PARLOR PASTIMES.

believe I never meant seriously to leavehome. But,
papa, Augusta Victoria wrote to assure me that you
would compel me to marry M’Lomond; and I thought
that would be terrible.

Glenallin. And you thought your silly English
correspondent knew your father better than you did
yourself. No, Jessy; I would not force you to mar-
ry my friend, though I shall expect that the daughter
of Glenallin wed only her equal. But you shall not
decide hastily, my child. We will descend to the
dining hall, and introduce the noble Saxon to High-
land Hospitality. [Lzeunt.

SCENE THE LAST.— MISCHIEF.

A hall in the Castle. Table covered with jugs, glasses, g-c.
GLENALLIN, Jacos, Jussy seated.

Glenallin. Leave us not yet, my Jessy. (Aside,)
I shall weary of this stranger’s fantastic words, if I
am left alone withhim. (Alouwd.) Ihave some hopes
of a visit from an old friend to-day; when he arrives,
you can seek your bower, and consider over the
grand question.

Jacob, (Aside.) I should like to know whom the
old fellow expects; it would be advisable to cut him
in time. (Alowd.) And I must tear myself awhile
from all I love. I expect important despatches from
Government, and must be at my inn to receive them.
DIALOGUE CHARADES. 61

Enter Sprvant.

Servant. There’s a puir sonsie English lassie,
clamoring for justice fra ye, Glenallin.

Glenallin. _ Take her to my study, Andrew.

Servant. But there’s no haulding her, Glenallin,
she is greetin’ just ahint me.

Jessy. Let the poor woman come here, papa, if
she be in sorrow. _ [Exit Servant.

Enter Marrua, who rushes up to Jacos.
: co

Martha. Oh; Jacob Hodges, shame on you!
you're at your play-actor tricks again; gettin’ into
grand folks’ houses wi’ your rigmarole speechifying.
' How dar’ ye lift up your head, man, after swearing

to marry a poor lass, and then Tne off an’ leav-
ing her altogether.

Jacob. Woman, avaunt! I know thee not. “This

is mere madness.” .

Martha. Not know me, Martha “Willans? Heay-

en forgi’ thee Jacob! (sobbing) and oh, miss! sic a
bonny, quiet lad he was down i’ Yorkshire, when we
“were bits of bairns together; but nought wad sarve
him, but gang off wi? V player folks; and it was
nobbit last Martinmas was a twelvemonth, that he
sattled down, and we cam’ together into yan house.

Glenallin. Young man, what means this woman’s

violence? Are not you a Fitz-Alan?

Jacob. ‘‘ You are abused, my lord.”

Glenallin. J fear indeed that Iam; and you must

certainly have greatly imposed on Lord Glasgow.
62 PARLOR PASTIMES,

Martha. That he never did, I'll stand to it. Ja-
cob there, wi’ all his bits of fine duds, and his silly
ways, is as good a groom as ever rubbed down a
horse, and that’s what my lord couldn’t but say on
him. See”

Jessy. A groom! can it be possible?

Martha. Yes, miss, we baith lived wi’ my lord,
till he sat off a soldering, and then Jacob, -he had no
mind for fighting, so my lord sits down and writes
him a charackter, to get him a good place. Then
Jacob he’ticed me on to ei warning, and he telled
me he would be sartain to meet me at Glasgow
town-end last Monday was a week, and he would
wed me. And I went, like a fule that I was, and
saw none on him, not I, and some folks we kenned
tuik me in, and there I fell bad wi’ crying and fret-
ting, till our folks heard on him seeking for a place
at Glenallin, and after him I cam’ and——

Jacob. Amazing! The woman labors under a
strong mental delusion. Believe her not.

Mine honor is my life; both grow in me3
Take honor from me, and my life is done.

Enter M’Lomonp.

MM’ Lomond—(Taking Jessy’s hand.) —How fares my
bonnie Jessy? What! in tears, my winsome lassie?
What means this? o

Jessy. Oh, do not ask me, M’Lomond! I am |
ashamed to look on you.

M’Lomond. I am in a mist. Speak Glenallin,
DIALOGUE CHARADES. 63

my good friend. You seem to be holding a court of
justice in your banqueting hall. Who is this weep-
ing woman and the gentleman? Why, Hodges!
what in the world has Eboneh you. in this gay attire
to Glenallin?

Jacob.. “A truant erosion, good my lord.”

M Lomond. Oh, I see, then the lass you left be-
hind you has followed to claim her property ; a com-
mon case. But yet I cannot understand how Lord
Glasgow’s groom happens to be seated at Glenallin’ 8
board.

Jessy. I will tell you all afterwards, iy uemana:
my romantic folly has produced this vexatious scene.
Entreat Glenallin to pardon his English school-girl,
who promises in fyture to act like Glenallin’s daugh-
ter. : C
Jacob. Oh, woman! woman! “Now could I drink

hot blood.” But no, I will not. “Would you please,
Glenallin, to return me my character, “ out of holy
pity?” I must needs resume the duties of my pro-
fession. See, girl what a pretty kettle of fish thou
‘hast made, but I forgive thee, and.





Mark but my fall and that which ruined me!
Martha, I charge thee, fling away ambition.’®
Let us leave the gorgeous palaces of the proud.
“ Not a frown more ;” ner’ my brief inconsistency,
and:



s¢ All my fortune at thy feet I lay, :
And follow thee, my love, through all the world.”’

[E£xeunt Jacop and Marrua.
64 PARLOR PASTIMES.

M’Lomond. (Laughing.) And now for explana-
tions of all this mischief. I am anxious to discover
the meaning of Martha’s “‘ Kettle of fish.”

Scene closes. .


FIRE-SIDE GAMES.

——_—_—_—-&-@ ©



WHAT IS MY THOUGHT LIKE.

The leader of the game, having thought of some
object, asks” her a ‘¢ What is my thought

like?” :
As all are ignorant of what she is thinking about,
their answers can of course be but random ones.
When she has questioned them all, they must give a
reason why the answers Sahota resemble the thought;
for instance:

“T have a thought aie what iv it like?”
1 ‘It is like the sea.”

2. ** Like a family.”

3. ‘Like a tree.” |

4, ‘Like a troop of soldiers.”

5. *‘ Like a dinner-bell.”

6. “Like General Williaina.” ,

7. ** Like this play.”

8. ‘Like a person of nobility.”

Then she gives her thought, which was @ book, and

proceeds to question each one as to the resemblance
65
66 PARLOR PASTIMES.

between that thought and the objects they selected—
as thus:
«‘ Why is a book like the sea?”
*¢Some are of great depth.”
“Why is it like a family?”
“Because it contains different characters.”
‘Why is it like a tree?”
“Oh, it is full of leaves.”
“Why is it like a.troop of soldiers?”
“‘Because both should be reviewed.”
‘cWhy is it like a dinner-bell?”
‘Tt calls us to a feast.”
“ Why is it like General Williams? ”
‘Because both have a title.”
¢ Why is it like this play?”
“They both must come to an end.”
‘““Why is it like a person of nobility?”
‘‘ Because both have titles.”

Then another player declares that she has 4
thought, and collects these answers.

. “It is like a garden.”
“It is like a ship.”

. ‘Like a rose.”

. “Like paper.”

‘¢ Like a coat.”

» ** Like mud.”

‘¢ Like a child.”

‘¢ Like cloth.”

Then she says her thought was a carpet.

SNS Rew
FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 67

“Why is a carpet like a garden?”
“Because some have borders.”

“Why is a carpet like a ship?”

“ Because both require tacking.”

““Why is a carpet like a rose?”

*¢ Both. are liable to fade.”

‘Why is it like paper?”

‘Some kinds are made of rags.”.

“ Why is it like a coat?”

‘Both need brushing.”

“Why is it like mud?”

‘Some are so soft that the feet sink into them.”
‘Why is it like a child?”

“When a child is naughty it is often shaken.”
“Why is it like cloth?

‘ Because both are sold by the yard.”

If the answers are given quickly it will enhance
the pleasure of the game. Many other questions of
this character will suggest themselves to our young
friends.

QUOTATIONS.

This game is instructive as well as pleasing, some-
times extending. one’s knowledge of literature, and
often refreshing the memory in cases where disuse
had produced a partial forgetfulness.

- A well-known quotation is repeated by one of the
party; and the one who can tell the author immedi-
68 PARLOR PASTIMES.

ately, gives another quotation to be guessed as be
fore. For instance, one commences with:

*¢ The quality of mercy is not strain’d;
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Upon the place beneath; it is twice blessed;
It blesseth him that gives, and him that takes:
Tis mightiest in the mightiest; it becomes
The throned monarch better than his crown.”’

The one who first says Shakspeare, might give a
passage from Moore:

*¢ QO! ever thus from childhood’s hour,
I’ve seen my fondest hopes decay 5
I never loved a tree or flower,
But ’twas the first to fade away.
I never nursed a dear gazelle,
To glad me with its soft black eye,
But when it came to know me well,
And love me, it was sure to die!’

The one who can name the author, might give this
selection from Burns :

*¢ 0, wad some power the-giftie gie us
To see ourselves as others see us!
It wad frae manie a blunder free us
And foolish notion.’?

The one who guesses the name of this last author,
might give a quotation from Lessing, the German
poet:

s¢ "Tig better to sit in Freedom’s hall,
With a cold, damp floor and.a mouldering wall,
Than to bow the neck or to bend the knee
In the proudest palace of slavery.’*
FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 69

THE TRAVELLER’S TOUR.

This game may be played by any number of per-
sons.
One of the party announces himself as a traveller,

“about to take a little tour. He calls upon any of

the party for information respecting the objects of
the greatest interest to be noticed in the different
cities and towns through which he intends to pass.
An empty bag is given to him, and to each of the
persons joining in the game are distributed sets of

counters with numbers on. Thus, if twelve persons

were playing, the counters required would be up to
the number twelve, and a set of ones would be given
to the first person, twos to the second, threes to the
third, and so on. é
When the traveller announces the name of the

place at which he intends to stop, the first person is

at liberty to give any information, or make any re-
marks respecting it; if he cannot: do’ so, the second
person has the chance, or the third, or it passes on
until some one is able to speak concerning it. If the
traveller considers it correct information, or worthy
of notice, he takes from the person one of his count-
ers, as a pledge of his obligation to him; the person
next in order is to proceed, so as not each time to
begin with No.1. If no one of the party speaks, the
traveller may consider there is nothing worthy of
notice at the plage he has announced, and he then
passes on to another.

CE ee ee ee a es
70 PARLOR PASTIMES.

After he has reached his destination, he turns out
his bag to see which of the party has given him the
greatest amount of information, and that person is
considered to have won the game, afd is entitled to
be the “‘ Traveller” in the next game.

If it should happen that two or more persons should
have given the same number of counters, those per-
sons are to be allowed in suceession to continue to
assist the traveller and deposit their pledges until
one alone remains.

EXAMPLE OF THE GAME.

Traveller. ‘¢T intend taking a little excursion this
summer, and shall shortly start from London for

Bridport; but as I wish to stop at several places, I

shall travel chiefly by post. As Windsor is only
twenty-two miles from London I shall first stop there.

No.1 ‘Then pray go and see the castle. It isa
noble building originally built by William the Con-
queror: but it has been so altered and added to by
‘other mogersl ants that little if any, of the original
building remains.’

Traveller. ‘Thank you for this information;
pray deposit a counter in _ bag, that I may re-
member to whom I owe it... I should like to know
who formed*the noble terraces.”

No. 2 and 3 not answering,

No. 4 said, “Queen Elizabeth,” and deposited a
counter.

4
No 7. “* Pray notice a long walk from Windsor Cas-










FIRE-SIDE GAMES, 71

tle to the top of Snow Hill; it isa perfectly straight
line, above three miles in length, and considered the
finest thing of the kind in Europe.” A counter of
No. 7 was put in the bag.

Lraveller. “I cannot stop longer at Windsor, but
Must proceed with my journey. Where shall I stop
next?” :

No. 9. ‘Do not pass Reading without seeing the
ruins of the abbey, which was built by Henry I., who
was interred there in 1185, as they are very beauti-
ful, especially the remains of one of the gates.” No.
9 deposits a, counter. .

No. 12. “* Will you pass Marlborough? for at that
place the royalists, in the time of Charles I., were
successful, and took the town, which was guarded by
the Parliamentarians.” No 12 puts a counter in the
traveller’s bag.

Traveller. “‘ Would you advise my stopping at-
Bath?”

No. 2. ‘By all means, as the natural hét springs in
that city are very curious and well worthy your no-
tice. These waters are of incalculable benefit in
many diseases, and have often cured the sufferer
when all other remedies have failed.” No. 2 depos-
its a counter. a

Traveller. “I think I shall now take the train for
Bridgewater.”

No. 3. “The inhabitants of Bridgewater supported
the claims to the throne of the Duke of Monmouth,
and he was proclaimed king by. the Mayor and cor-
72 PARLOR PASTIMES.

poration. There is a fine painting in the parish
church dedicated to St. Mary, representing the de-
seent.from the cross, which was found on board a
French privateer, which you had better go and see.”
No. 8 deposits a counter.

Traveller. ‘I think that I have heard that a cel-
ebrated admiral was born at Bridgewater. Who can
tell me his name?”

No. 7. ‘‘ Admiral Blake, in 1599.” No. 7 puts a
counter in the bag.

No. 8. ‘‘ As you approach Bridport, pray observe

the beautiful castle and park at Dunster; it hasbeen

in the Luthell family ever since the reign of Edward

Til. It was a military post of the royalists in the

civil war of Charles I.” No 8 deposits a counter.
No. 9. “* When you reach Bridgport, I beg, after

_ resting, you will walk over that lovely North Hill,
‘when I am sure you will thank me for giving you a

treat. Observe also, the fine statue of Queen Ann
in the church carved in white alabaster.” No. 9 de-
posits a counter.

The traveller having reached the place of his des-
tination, examines his bag, when he finds that 7 and
9 are equal as to the counters they have deposited,
so he asks those two to give him some further infor-
mation.

No. 7. ‘Pray go to Selworthy, near Bridport,
and observe the beautiful little cottages for the poor
which have been built there of late years by Sir J
Thomas Acland; you will, Iam sure, be delighted
with them.”
FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 73

This decided that No 7 had won the game.

' It must be perfectly evident that many - more
places might have been stopped at, and a great deal
more information collected respecting the places now
slightly touched upon; but as it was only to give an
example of the pastime, it was not necessary to go
into more particular details; but it may easily be
perceived that endless amusement and information
may be gained by varying not only the ultimate des-
tination of the traveller, but also the different routes
taken.

A SECRET THAT TRAVELS

This is a short game, but rather amusing ; it is to
be played with either a circle or line formed of the
players. When all are ready, one person begins by
whispering a secret to her left-hand neighbor, who
repeats it to the next, and so on until all have heard
it; then the last one to whom it is told, tells it aloud,
and the one who commenced must repeat what his
or her secret was exactly as she worded it, and then
all the party will know whether it returned as it was
given, or how much it gained, or lost, while travelling.

If the players are told to pass on the secret with-
out knowing that it will be exposed, they will not be
80 careful to repeat it exactly as when they know the
game, and by this means greater amusement will be
afforded. ;
74 PARLOR PASTIMES.

THE TEN BIRDS.

_ The company sit in a circle, and the leader of the
game says, ‘* A good fat hen,” then each in their turn (
repeat the words. The leader says, ‘ Two ducks and

a good fat hen,” which is also repeated by each of

the company separately ; then, ‘‘ Three squeaking wild

‘geese, two ducks and a good fat hen ;” then, ‘‘ Four

plump partridges, three squeaking wild geese, two

ducks and a good fat hen;” then, ‘ Five pouting

pigeons, four plump partridges, three squeaking wild

geese, two ducks and a good fat hen;” then, “Six

long-legged crows, five pouting pigeons, four plump

partridges, three squeaking wild geese, two ducks -
and a good fat hen;” then, ‘Seven green parrots,

six long-leeged crows, five pouting pigeons, four

plump partridges, three squeaking wild geese, two

ducks and a good fat hen ;” then, ‘¢ Hight screeching

owls, seven green parrots, six long-legged crows,

five pouting pigeons, four plump partridges, three

squeaking wild geese, two ducks and a good fat

hen ;” then, ‘‘ Nine ugly buzzards, eight screeching

owls, seven green parrots, six long-legged crows, five

pouting pigeons, four plump partridges, three squeak-

ing wild geese, two ducks and a good fat hen ;”

then, “Ten bald eagles, nine ugly buzzards, eight

screeching owls, seven green parrots, six long-legged

crows, five pouting pigeons four plump partridges,

three squeaking wild geese, two ducks and a good fat

hen.”
FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 75





The player must repeat all this separately after the
loader, and if any omissions or mistakes are made, a
forfeit must be paid.



HUNT THE RING.

All the company are seated in a circle, each one
holding a ribbon, which passes all round. A large,
brass or other ring is slipped along the ribbon; and
while all hands are in motion, the hunter in the cen-
tre must try and find out where itis. The person
with whom it is caught becomes the hunter.



HUNT THE SLIPPER.

the ground in a circle, and the slipper is passed from
hand to hand, the hunter trying all the time to find

This game is similar to the last, the players sit on
; who has it. It is a very amusing game.
|



. . ZOOLOGICAL RECREATIONS,

The names of each member of the party must be
written on slips of paper, and the whole placed to-
gether in a hat. Each person is then to choose a
beast, or bird, and write his name on a slip of paper,
its size and colors on another, and its habits on a
76 PARLOR PASTIMES.

third. The names, the sizes, and the habits are to
be placed each by themselves, in different lots. This
being arranged, one of the party draws out a name
from the first hat, and reads it aloud, and then
draws#out and reads a slip from each of the other
hats, and much merriment will be caused by the odd
associations ; as when Mr. Smith, for instance, is de-
scribed as Ten inches long, with a green head and
brilliant eyes, and prettily marked yellow and purple,
with a tail of beautiful blue feathers, and lives on
slugs and snails. The hat containing the names of
‘the animals should be placed aside until the conclu-
sion of the game, when some knowledge may be
gained by the attempts to arrange the descriptions
under their proper heads.



PARADOXES.

Each letter of the alphabet should be taken in turn,
and a paradoxical verse be made upon it, by the play-
ers. For instance; the first one commences with A.

A.

It is in the Apple, but not in the Seed,
It is in an Act, but not in a Deed.

B.

It is in a Bonnet, but not in a Hood,
It is in a Block, but not in Wood.
FIRE-SIDH GAMES,'

.;

It is in the Centre, but not in the Middle,
It is in a Conundrum, but not in the Riddle.

D.

It is in a Dress, but not in a Frock,
It is in a Door, but not in the Lock.

E.

It is in the Elbow, but not in the Arm,
It is in the Earth, though not in a Farm.

x.

It is in the Flour, but not in Bread,
It is in Fear, though not in Dread.

G.
It is in the Globe, but nof in the Land,
It is in Gravel, but not in Sand.

H.

It is in the Hour, but not in the Day,
It is found in the Happy, but not in the Gay.

I.

It is in an Instrument, but not in a Tool,

It is in the Ignorant, but not in a Fool.

°

7
73° ‘PARLOR PASTIMES, | |
ip “

"Tig found in June, but not in the Year, a
*Tis not in Taunt, but it is in a Jeer, |

Bop: |

It is in the Knee, but not in the Leg,
*Tis not in a Barrel, but ’tis in a Keg.

L.

- It is in a Laugh, but not in a Noise,
It is found in Lads, but not in Boys.

M.

"Tis found in Magnolia, but not in a Flower,
"Tis found in Might, but not in Power.

N.
"Tis in the beginning of Nephew and the end of Son.
“It is found in None, yet it is in every One.

Oo.

It is in the Ocean, but not in the Main,
It is found in Oats, though not in Grain.

Ps 5 |

Tis always in Pear, but not in Fruit,
"Tis found in a Plant, but not in the Root.

s
FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 79

e ©).
It is in Queerness, but not in Oddness,
It is in Quietness, but not in Stillness.

R.

"Tis always in a Road, but never in a Path,
It will be found in Water, but not in a Bath.



Ss.

- It is in a Speech, though not a in Word, “*
It is in a Sparrow, but not in a Bird.

a.

“
*

It is in a Tavern, but not in an Inn, ©
It is in a Tumult, but not in a Din.

Uv.

It is in an Uncle, but not in a Brother,
_ It’s not ina Niece, nor yet in a Mother.

V.

- *Tis in the Visage, though not in the Face,
- *Tis found in Vacuum, though not in Space.

W.

It is in a Window, but not in the Sash,
It is in a Whip but not in the Lash.
















80 PARLOR PASTIMES.
X.

*Tis seen in a Box, and in a Fix,
*Tis not in Number, yet ’tis in Six.

Y.

It’sin the beginning of Year, and the end of Day,
It’s never in Decline, but always in Decay.

Z.

It is never in Flame, but always in Blaze,
It is never in Mist, but always in Haze.

——

CUPID.

One of the players is seated at the end of the room,
as Head, or Leader—Venus, we would propose
as the title, ifa lady. The players range themselves
in a row, and each one represents a letter of the al-
phabet, and comes forward in turn before Venus to
personate Cupid, by the sentiment expressed in any
word they may choose that commences with the let-
ter they respond to—taking care that the countenance,
gesture, and manner, express the idea of the word
selected. :

For instance the first one in the row begins with
A, and says, Cupid comes Awkward, and at the same
time walks aéross the room towards the person seat-


FIRE-SIDE GAMES, 81

ed, ina very awkward manner, and takes her station
behind her; then the next one says Cupid comes
Begging, and acts accordingly while walking across
the room: the next one takes C, and so they proceed

‘until the alphabet is exhausted; and then if there

are more persons, they can begin the alphabet again,
or if but a few players, when the last one has played,
the one who commenced the game can take the next
letter, and so proceed again.

As all may not think of words as quickly as they
should, they will find here a variety from which they
can choose.

A. Cupid, comes sel cali gubatie.dion:
ished—A ffronted.
B. Cupid comes Boisterously—Bravely—Bending—

Blundering.
C. Cupid comes Carefully—Carelessly—Crossly—
_ Crooked.
D. Cupid comes Daringly—Disdainfully—Dancing
_ —Dejected.
E. Cupid comes Elegantly—Earnestly—Exhausted
—Egotistical. : ,
F. Cupid comes Fearfully—Foolishly—Furiously—
Fidgeting.
G. Cupid comes Gracefully—Grumbling—Gallant-
ly—Gaping.
H. Cupid comes Humbly—Hopping—Halting—Hum-
ming.
I. Cupid comes el pratcapeminty Te gaint ye
Inquisitively.

—- ..-
82

Hy oO WHO wo

1m)

U.

e

Ne

Ww.

X.

PARLOR PASTIMES.

. Cupid comes Joyously—J: ae umping—

Justly.

. Cupid comes Kindly—Kickine—Knocking—Kiss-

ing.

. Cupid comes ‘Lively—Listlessly—Laughing—

Leaping.

. Cupid comes Mischievously—Madly—Marching

—Musing.

- Cupid comes ee ee

ling.

. Cupid comes Officiously—Observant—Originally

—Obediently.

. Cupid comes Proudly—Patiently—Pleadingly—

Puffing.

. Cupid comes Quietly—Queerly—Quaking—

Quaintly.

. Cupid comes Reading—Rapidly—Rudely—Ri-

gid.

. Cupid comes Scornful—Steadily—Shivering—

Singing.

. Cupid comes Tediously—Talking—TAppine—

Tyrannical.

Cupid comes Eine aRi ier neenb=Enevenlie
Urbane.

Cupid comes Vainly—Vindietive—Vehemently—
- Victorious.

Cupid comes Wildly—Waltzing—Whispering—
Warbling.

Cupid comes Xhalting—or the letter may be.

omitted.


FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 83

Y. Cupid comes Yelling—Yielding—Youthful—
_ Yawning.
Z. Cupid comes Zealously—Zigzagging.

‘The one who fails to make the proper expression
or attitude, must do so at the command of Venus.

Cupid can be performed under these various as-
pects, and many more that are not given here, and
the alphabet can be gone over several times, by al-
ways using different words. It will be found to bea
very amusing game, especially if the players are
quick in thinking of their words, so as to avoid de-
lay.

UNIVERSAL BIOGRAPHY.

_ This game may be played by any number of per-
‘sons. One, by arrangement, is to leave the room.

—. the rest, with the knowledge of one an-
other, are each to fix on. some celebrated character.

The absent person is then admitted, and is to address

the following questions to each, beginning at the
right: ©

1. What countryman was he?
2. What was his calling?
3. For what is he chiefly remarkable? -

Suppose Robert Fulton be fixed upon, the answers
may be:—1. An American.” 2. An inventor and
84 PARLOR PASTIMES.

navigator. 3. For bringing steam to perfection in
propelling boats. Or suppose Edmund Burke, the
replies may be:—-1. An Englishman. 2. A states-
man. 8. For his Essay on the Sublime and Beauti-
ful. It must be borne in mind that the last ques-
tions will require some decided.and not general an-
swer, which must refer to some particular act, event,
or thing. i

If, from the answers to the queries, the questioner
is enabled to guess the character referred to, he or
she must pronounce it, and should it be correct, takes
the seat of the one questioned, who must then leave the.
room, the others each furnishing themselves with a
fresh character. The new questioner is then admit-
ted and puts the same three queries,,always commence
ing with the person sitting on the right hand of the
previous questioner, so that allmay thus be question-
ed in turn. :

Should the first person questioned baffie the in-
quiries, the questioner must address them to the
next on the right hand, and so on through the com-
pany, until a correct name is guessed, when the one
who had fixed upon it, must leave the room, and be-
come the questioner. If the queries have been put
to all without success, the same questioner leaves the
room and a new name is chosen as before. It may
be made a game of forfeits, where parties are guilty
of anachronism, or false answers (which should be
at once exposed by the rest of the company), and al-
so where the questioner addresses the queries to all
ussuccessfully.
FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 85

Among young people it may be made a@ game of
reward, some older person being present to decide
who among those questioned evinces the most cor-
rect biographical knowledge, and which among the
questioners is the cleverest at discovering the names
chosen.





POETICAL DOMINOES.

Provide some clean fine pasteboard and cut it up
in slips rather longer than they are ‘wide, about the
shape of dominoes, but they will need to be a little
larger. |

Then divide them in half, with a mark of ink, and
on one half of each piece write a quotation or verse
of poetry, and on the other half write the names of
one of the authors from whom you have made your
selections ; but be careful not to put a quotation and
its author’s name both on the same card ;—for in-
stance, if one of your selections be, “‘ If it were done,
when ’tis done, then ’twere well it were done quick-
ly: ” do not write Shakespeare on the other half of
that card, but Byron, Milton, or some other author
you have chosen from. Shakespeare must be writ-
ten on another card where there is a selected passage
from another author.

As many selections as you take from one author so
many times must his name be written on the cards.

Suppose you select three different passages from
86. PARLOR PASTIMES.

Moore, his name must be written an equal number
of times on separate cards.

When all is arranged, then shuffle and deal them .
to the players, and let one commence by laying one
of his cards in the centre of the table, reading the
quotation written upon it. His left hand neighbor
must then look over his cards, and if he has the name
of the author of the passage read, he will announce
it, and then read the selection that is on the other
half of his card, and put it down by the one on the
table, matching the author’s name to his production ;
but if the player has not the name of the author, he
must look for a passage that was written by the
author whose name is on the card first laid down,
read it, and also the name that is on the card, and
put it by the other, taking care to adjoin the quota.
tion with the author’s name to whom it belongs.

Then the first player’s left-hand neighbor must
look for the author’s name, and so the game pro-
ceeds. :

The one who first exhausts his cards, wins the
game.



THE INITIAL LETTERS.

Let one withdraw while a word is selected by the
remaining players, which being done, the absent
player is recalled, who, upon re-entering, walks up
to the person, to the right or left hand, as may be
agreed upon, and there stops until that person names
FIRE-SIDE GAMES. - eet

something that begins with = first letter of the
word that was chosen.

The guesser then stops before the next one, who
says a word that must commence with the second
letter of the selected word, and so proceeds until the
word is finished, and then by remembering what each
one said, and putting the first letter of each word
together, is enabled to find out the word determined
upon. _For instance, jire-side is fixed upon as the
word.

First one says Flower.
Second, ‘ Ink.
echird, ‘¢ River.
Fourth, “ Eagle.
ich, . .° Sunshine,
Sixth, “ India.
Seventh, ‘‘ Date.
Eighth, ‘“ Emery.

The player. then puts the initial letters of each
word together, and exclaims it is ‘‘ Fire-side.” The
next one in order then goes out, while another word
is proposed.

If most of the players are unacquainted with this
game, it would makeit more diverting, perhaps, if not
explained to them at once, the head one or leader
merely telling each one what word they must use
when the guesser comes to them in turn. They will
be quite surprised at the readiness with which the
word is detected, little dreaming how it isdone.
88 ; PARLOR PASTIMES,

CHARACTERS; OR, WHO AM I?

One of the party is sent out of the room; some
well-known hero, or equally well-known character
from a.book, like Dickens’s novels, or Shakspeare’s
plays, is selected, and when the absentee returns to
the assembly, he or she is greeted as the person fix-
ed upon, and he must reply in such a manner as to
elicit more information, as to the character he has
unconsciously assumed.

Suppose the game has commenced, and when the
player enters the room, he is thus accosted :

“Your military ardor must have been very great,
and you had a very adventurous spirit, when you left
your home in England, and set out with a determin-
ation of fighting the Turks.”

_“ Yes, I was always very fond of adventure.”
we Well, you had plenty of them: and when you
were taken prisoner and sold to the Bashaw, your
mistress to whom he presented you, felt so much
sympathy and affection for you that you were sent to
her brother, but he not being so well pleased with
you, treated you cruelly.”

“He did; and although I suffered much from his
treatment, I suffered more in the idea of being a.
slave.”

“The thought must have been terrible to you,”
remarks another of -the players, “‘ or you would not
have killed your master, hid his body, clothed your-




FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 89

self in his attire, mounted his horse and galloped to
the desert, where you wandered about for many days,

until at last yoy reached the Russian garrison, where

you were safe.”

“ And well pleased was I to aed there in safety ;
but was I then content with my travels?”

“¢ For a while, but the spirit of enterprise, so great
within you, caused you to set sail for the English
colony of Virgina, when you were taken a prisoner
again by the Indians, and your head placed upon a

large stone, in order to have your brains beaten out

with clubs.”

“What a dreadful situation I was in, with only en-
emies around me.”

“But there was one who proved a friend, the
young and beautiful princess, finding that her en-
treaties for your life were useless, rushed forward,
laid her head upon yours, and thus resolved to share
your fate, or save your life.”

“T am deeply grateful-to Pocahontas for her noble
act, and I am also glad to find myself so renowned
a person as Captain John Smith.”

Or suppose a lady has left the room and on re-
entering she is thus addressed :—

“Your Majesty’s many remarkable adventures
seem more like romance than reality. Accomplish-

ed, beautiful, spirited, and very courageous, you com-

mand our respect, especially for the vigorous and en-
ergetic action you displayed in trying to aid your
royal husband, who was preparing to maintain his


90 “PARLOR PASTIMES.

just rights to the crown of England. After purchas-
ing aid and military stores in Holland, you set sail
for England, when there arose a great storm which
increased in violence until at length the danger be-
come so imminent, that all the self-possession of the
passengers. was entirely gone, and you alone were
quiet and composed, rebuking their panic and telling
them not to fear, for ‘ Queens of England were Bas
drowned.’ ”

“That was a terrible storm, and we were all
thankful when we reached land in safety.”

* But you had to put back to the port from which
you sailed, which caused some delay, but the second
voyage was more prosperous, although you were
closely pursued by an English squadron, which came
into port the night after you landed, and the next
' morning the village was bombarded by your enemies’
ships. You and your attendants escaped into the _
open fields, stopped at a trench, and were obliged to
remain there for two hours, the balls passing over
your heads and covering you with dirt; but there
soon came an army to your relief;at the head of
which you marched. triumphantly on, stopping on
your way to take a town held by your husband’s en-
emies. Thus was added the glory of a conquest to
your other triumphs.”

‘¢ Well, was I enabled to reach my husband after
so many adventures?”

‘Yes, but in a short time you were obliged to
separate again, as you were accused of treason, for


FIRE-SIDE GAMES, 91

introducing munitions of war from foreign countries,
for the purpose of disturbing the public peace. Af
ter passing through many privations and dangers in
order to escape, you embarked and set sail for
France ; but while yet at sea some ships were seen
pursuing and firing-upon, you; then your courage
and resolution were displayed, while all the others
were in despair and terror; you took the command

of the ship — gave instructions to the pilot how to
steer — ordered every sail to be set that the ship
might be driven through the water as rapidly as pos-
sible — forbade the captain to fire back upon the pur-
suers, fearing that it would occasion delay—and
gave him positive orders, that so soon as all hope of
escape was gone, he must set fire to the magazine of
gunpowder, that by the explosion you might all be
destroyed. In the meantime the ships were all rap-
idly nearing the French coast, when some French
vessels hove in sight, who hastened to your aid,
and put the pursuers to flight.”

“What pleasure we all felt when we were safely
landed in France, feeling at last secure.”

“You were secure then, but well-nigh exhausted,
and were glad to find some straw in a corner of a
wretched cabin, where the Queen of England lay
down to rest and sleep. You Were soon, however,
escorted in state to Paris, and there lived in great
splendor.”

‘ And what became of my royal husband?”

“ His fate was asad one. After remaining a pris-
92 j PARLOR PASTIMES.

‘oner for some time, the members of Parliament
brought him to amock trial, treating him with every
indignity, and condemned him to death on the ground
of treason. He fell beneath the executioner’s hand,
and this blow completely prostrated your heroic na-
ture.”

“And well it might, for was not he, for whom I.
exerted my strength and energies, dead; there was
no more for Henrietta, Queen to Charles the First of
England, to do.”

CONSEQUENCES.

This game requires paper and pencils. And each
player is to write according to the directions given
by the leader. The first player is told to write one
or more terms descriptive of a gentleman. He does
so, and then folds down the paper so as to conceal what
is written, and hands it to the next player, who, after
receiving the order, writes, folds the paper down as
before, and passes it on to the next, and so on until
the directions are exhausted. The leader then reads
the contents of the sheet aloud, which from its in-
consistencies and absurdities will cause much amuse-
ment. » F

Let us suppose these to be the directions of the
leader: - “ :

“Begin by writing a term descriptive of a gentle-
man,”
FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 93



“A gentleman’s name; some one you know or
‘some distinguished person.”

“ An adjective descriptive of a lady.”

A lady’s name.”

* Mention a place and describe it.”

‘¢ Write down some date or period of time when an

- event might happen.” :

“¢ Put a speech into the gentleman’s mouth.”

* Make the lady reply.”

* Tell what the consequences were.”

*¢ And what the world said of it.”

The paper being opened, we.will suppose it to
read as follows:

‘The handsome and modest Napoleon, met the
graceful and accomplished Miss Norton, at Brighton,
that fashionable place of resort, on the 10th of No-
vember, 1890. He said, ‘ Dear lady, my respect for
you is unbounded, and she replied, ‘ Yes, I am very
fond of it.’ The consequences were, that they were
united in matrimony, and the world said, ‘It is so
very silly.’ ”

READY RHYMES.

_ This game should not be attempted bygery young
players, as it would most likely prove tedious to
many of them; but to those who are fond of exercis-
ing their ingenuity, it will prove very amusing.
Two, four, or more words are witten on paper and



agp
94 PARLOR PASTIMES.

given to each player ; the words must be such as would
rhyme together ; thus, suppose the party have chosen
‘near, clear, dell, bell,” all endeavor to make a com-
plete verse, of which the words given shall compose
the rhyme.

When all are ready, the papers must be thrown
into a heap, and read aloud, and those who have not
succeeded must be fined, the fine being the recital of
a piece of poetry. One of the papers might read
thus :

A gentle brook was murmuring near,
Afar “was heard the tinkling bell,
And peaceful zephyrs pure and clear,

Refreshed usin that shady dell.

Another would be quite different :

Fairies in the distant dell,
As they drink the waters clear,
From the yellow cowslip bell,
What have they to heed or fear?

Or a third might be:

Hark! to the solemn churchyard bell ae
Sounding o’er the waters clear,

Echoing over hill and dell,
Distant copse and village near.

&
FIRE-SIDE GAMES, 95

THE TRADE.

One of the party must be selected to open the
game, who does so by: saying,—‘I have apprenticed
my son to (naming some trade), and the first thing
he made (or used) was (mentioning the initial letters
of the article). }

Whoever first discovers the article alluded to takes
the next turn. We will suppose a number of per- |
sons are playing, and the one agreed upon begins
with: ‘ f apprenticed my son to a cabinet-maker,
and the first thing he made was an A. C.”

‘¢ Arm-chair,” exclaims a player, and this being
, correct, it becomes his turn, atid he says:

_ “TY apprenticed my son to a draper, and the first

thing he sold was a piece of P. M. .

‘¢ Paper Muslin.”
No, try again.”
‘¢ Was it printed muslin?” :
‘*¢ No, you are not right yet.”
“P.M. I can’t think of anything else beginning
with P. M.” |
Will all of you give it up? 0?”
‘Yes, is the general cry.”
“It was pink Merino. Now it is my turn again,
“as you did not guess it. I apprenticed my son to a

grocer, and the first thing he sold was a B. of C.”

‘¢ Box of candles some one says, who without de-
— lay continues : |
96 PARLOR PASTIMES,

“‘] apprenticed my son to an iron-monger, and the
first thing he sold was a F. I.”

« FlateIron.” ;

‘* Well I apprenticed my son to a pastry cook, and
the first he made was P. P.

* Paste Pate.”

“ No! guess again.”

“It must be pigeon-pie, then.”

“ Yes, that is right.”

“«T apprenticed my daughter to a dress-maker, and
the first thing she made was a B.S. C. é

“« Black silk cape,” says another, and so the game
goes on, the questions and answers passing rapidly
from one to another. It affords variety, sometimes,
to give out the initial letters of any article in the
room where the parties are playing.

THE GRACEFUL LADY.

Having procured a number of small twists of pa-
per, or pipe-lights, one of the players commences the
game by reciting a certain formula, which is to be
repeated with an additional remark by each of the
players in their respective turns.

If any omission or mistake is made, the one who*
makes it will have to receive a twist of paper in the
hair, and drop the title of Graceful Lady or Gentle-
man, and be called the One-horned Lady, or Gentle-
FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 97

man ; or if they have more than one horn, they must
be called according to the number. The player who
begins the game will politely bow to her neighbor,
and say, ‘‘ Good Morning, graceful lady, ever grace-
ful, I, a graceful lady, ever. graceful, come from
that graceful lady, ever graceful, to tell you that she
has a little bird with golden feathers.”

- The next. then takes up the play, addressing her
nearest companion: ‘‘ Good morning, graceful lady,
ever graceful, I, a graceful lady, ever graceful, come
from that graceful lady, ever graceful, to tell you
that she has a little bird with golden feathers and a
long red beak.”

The next one says in turn: ‘‘ Good evening grace-
ful lady, ever graceful, I, a graceful lady, ever grace-
ful, come from that -graceful lady, ever graceful» to
tell you that she has a gold bird with little feathers
and a long red beak tipped with green.”

You'll see there are two mistakes here, so the play-

er must have a couple of horns in her hair, and the
next proceeds with, ‘“‘ Good morning, graceful lady,
. ever graceful, I, a graceful lady, ever graceful, come
from that two-horned lady ever two-horned, to tell
you that she has a little bird with golden feathers,
a long red beak tipped with green, and brilliant dia-
-mond eyes.”
And so the game proceeds, producing more horns
“as it becomes more complicated. Nothing can be too
ridiculous for the graceful lady to possess, as it adds
to the enjoyment of the game.

©





98 PARLOR PASTIMES,

THE LAWYER.

The company must sit intwo rows opposite to, and
facing each other, leaving room for the Lawyer to
pass up and down between them.

“When all are seated, the player who personates
the Lawyer will ask a question or address a remark
to one of the persons present, either standing before
the person addressed, or calling out his name. The
one spoken to is not to answer, but the one sitting
opposite to him must reply to the question. The ob-
ject of the Lawyer is to make either the one he
speaks to answer him, or the one that should answer
to keep silent, therefore he should be quick in hurry-
ing from one to another with his questions, taking
them by surprise, and noticing those who are most
inattentive. No one must be allowed to remind an-
other of his turn to speak. When the Lawyer has
succeeded in eithermaking one speak that should not,
or finding any that did not answer when they should,
they must exchange places with each one and the
one caught becomes Lawyer.

This game will be found quite amusing if conduct-
ed with spirit.



THE ANTS AND THE GRASSHOPPERS.

Lots are drawn to decide which of the company”
shall first undertake the part of the grasshopper.
FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 99





















This important matter settled, the chosen individual

stands up, the other players (who represent the Ants)
seating themselves inacircle round him. The Grass-
hopper writes on a piece of paper the name of a
particular grain—or other article of food suitable to
his species—to which he has taken a fancy. The
memorandum he conceals for the present. He then
advances, with a profound salutation, to the Ants,
whom he addresses something in the following man-
ner :—

*‘ My dear and hospitable friends, I am very hun-
gry. Would any of you lend me a little provision of
some kind to be going on with?” Then, addressing
some particular Ant, ‘‘ You, my dear friend, I know
_ your goodness of heart ; Iam sure you will help me
with a trifle?”

The Ant addressed, replies, ‘‘ I have ouihien but
a grain of Barley” (or any other grain according to
fancy).

“Thank you, I don’t care for it. And you, neigh-
bor,” addressing another Ant, “is there nothing
better you can offer me?”

‘A grub.”

“ Thank you, I would rather not.”

He begs from all the players in turn, who propose
a fly, a grain of wheat, oats, hay-seed, &c.—always
an article which a Grasshopper might be expected to
eat, and which has not been mentioned before.
When he has gone all round, without the article he
- has written being named by any one, the Grasshop-
100 PARLOR PASTIMES.

per pays a forfeit, and proceeds with his second ques-
tion. If, however, one of the Ants should hit upon
the identical thing, “I will take it with pleasure,
neighbor,” cries the Grasshopper, ‘‘and may you be
rewarded.” He then produces his piece of paper,
proving that the article proposed was the one he had
thought of; the Ant pays a forfeit, and becomes
Grasshopper in his turn. Instead, however, of re-
commencing the game, he continues it in the follow-
ing manner :—‘‘ Neighbor,” (he says to an Ant), “I
have eaten abundantly, thanks to the kindness of
your companions. I should like a dance. What
dance would you recommend ?” (The name of the

dance is written down, secretly, as in the case of the

food).

The question goes round as before—the Ants pro-

posing various dances, such as the polka, the fandan-
go, the schottische, the minuet, the quadrille, &c. The
Grasshopper treats these suggestions (his own not
being among them) with the greatest. contempt.
Any player proposing a dance previously named,
pays a forfeit. The Grasshopper of course does the
same, should the round terminate without the dance
of his memorandum being mentioned, and proceeds
to write the third question. If, on the contrary, an
Ant should hit upon the right dance, they change
places, as in the first instance; and the new Grass-
hopper (having paid a forfeit) continues :—

‘‘ Well, I will dance my friends. But I see no fun

in dancing without music. What instrument would,.

you recommend?”










FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 101

The Ants recommend various instnneanninabiail as
the violin, the piano, the cornet, the harp, &c.—sub-
ject to the same conditions as the previous rounds.

The fourth Grasshopper (supposing an unlucky in-
sect to have hit on the identical instrument) takes up
the thread—

“T have had enough dancing; I feel rather tired :
I should like a nap. J always consult youmy friends ;
what sort of a couch would you advise me to sleep
on?”

The Ants reply, each in his turn—moss, stubble,
sand, clover, a rose-leaf, &c. &e.

At length the fifth and last Grasshopper puts the
question.

“My good friends, I should sleep very comforta-
bly, but for a slight misgiving. Iam afraid of be-
ing pounced upon by some hungry bird. What bird
do you think I have most reason to fear?”

Answer: The rook, the partridge, the pigeon, the
lark, &c., &e.

Should the bird whose name has been written down
be mentioned, the too-prophetic Ant pays a forfeit,
and the game is finished. If not, the Grasshopper
not only pays a forfeit, but has to put the question
round a second time, then a third, and more still
if necessary. Nor is that all—from the commence-
ment of the second round, he has to pay a forfeit for
every answer till the identical bird is named.. The
result is, generally, that the Grasshopper, despairing
of being able to redeem the number of forfeits exacted
102 PARLOR PASTIMES.

from him, eries for mercy; the pitch of mental.an-
guish to which he is wrought, keeping up the excite-
ment of the game to the very end.



QUESTIONS.

Prepare a set of cards with numbers written on
each in plain, large characters, and then have a du-
plicate set, which ‘are to be placed in the centre of
the table, and the other set must be shuffled and
dealt to all the players.

When ready, one will commence by drawing a
card from the table and asking-sny personal ques-
tion. The one who holds the duplicate in his hand,
must put it with the other saying, ‘It is I,” or “I
do,” or some such answer.

The more ridiculous or saucy the question is, the
greater merriment it creates; no time’ should be lost
in finding the duplicates, but look quick and reply
promptly ; here is an example :—

“‘ Who is the laziest person here?” says one draw-
ing from the pack a card marked 10.

“It is I,” says the one who has 10 in her hand,
throwing it on the table.

“Who has the darkest eyes?” says the last one,

drawing out a 5.

“I have,” says the one who can match the 5.
‘* Who has yellow hair?” says another, producing
al.

a
FIRE-SIDE GAMES,: 103

“JT myself,” is the answer from one who holds a 7.

““Who is the loveliest person present?” drawing a
12.

“JT am,” says the holder of 12.

‘¢ Who is very impertinent?” says another.

“Oh, I am,” exclaims the one matching the card
drawn.

In like manner the game proceeds until the cards
are all exhausted.

MAGIC MUSIC.

While one player is dismissed, those remaining fix
on something which he must do on his return, per-
haps to put out the lights, or select a partner and
dance round the room, or any difficult thing that will
take him a long time to find out. He is then called
in and another person is seated at the piano, who
plays loud or soft, as the movements of the person
may recede farther, or approach nearer the object he
is to touch, or the thing he is to do.

If he seems to have an idea of what is expected of
him, the player directly softens the music; but in-
creases its loudness as soon as he appears to have
lost it.

If unable to find out what his task was, he must
leave the room again, while the others will give him
something easier to do.
104 PARLOR PASTIMES.

THE SELECTED WORD.

The company arrange themselves in a circle, and
each player whispers to their right-hand neighbor any
word that they may select, provided it is not a small
word. It will render the game more troublesome,
and therefore more amusing, if the words that are -
chosen are difficult to place inasentence. When all
have their words, the first one who spoke to his right-
hand neighbor, asks a question of the person on his
left-hand, who is obliged to place the word that was
given him in his answer. The questioner must then
guess the given word; if unable to do so a forfeit
can be demanded. For example:

Suppose one of the selected words was Connois-
sieur, and this is the question asked, ‘“‘Have you
been to the opera lately?” The answer might be,
“Yes, frequently, and there may have been many
faults in it, but as Tam no Connoisseur, it pleased
me very much.” Suppose another of the words se-
lected was Pacify, and the following question given,
‘¢ What do you think of Mont Blanc?” the one in
terrogated might reply, ‘I see that you are anxious
ly waiting for my answer, so, in order to Pacify you _
I will say its grandeur is beyond my imagination.”

The replies should consist of more: than one long
word, so that they will be the more perplexing.

cs]
FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 105

COMPLIMENTS.

If there are both ladies and gentlemen present, a
- circle should be formed by seating them alternately.
When this is done, one of the party, a lady, says, I
should like to be such or such an animal, (insect or
piece of furniture), and then demands of the person
to the left hand what he can make of so strange a
choice. In reply, the person addressed must try to
find some resemblance between the thing named and
the lady, which would be complimentary to her.
After doing this, the gentleman in his turn says what
he should like to be, and the one on his left hand
must trace some complimentary resemblance between
them, and then the lady on his left hand proceeds
in the same manner, until the circle is complet-
ed. The more repulsive and unpleasant the animal
or object selected, the more difficult will it seem to
find a compliment. Suppose, for instance, a lady
should say, ‘I should like to be a snake, what do
you make of so strange a choice?”

The gentleman on her left might say, ‘‘ Because
you possess the art of charming.” He in turn could
say, ‘¢I should like to be a book-case, what do you
make of so strange a choice?” The lady on his left
may be supposed to reply; ‘¢ Because you are hand-

“somely made, and contain much valuable informa-
tion.”
106 : PARLOR PASTIMES,

I LOVE MY LOVE.

This game can be commenced with A, or any other
letter: each speaker in turn taking the same letter,
but they must be careful not to repeat the same
words. |
_ When one letter has been all around the players,
then take the next one following, and so on through
the alphabet. We give an example for each letter: _

A. I love my love with an A, because he is Affec-
tionate. I hate him because he is Awkward. He
came from Amsterdam ; lives on Apples. His name
‘is Alexander, and I will give him an Agate for a
keepsake.

B. L love my love with a B, because he is Benevo-
lent. I hate him because he is Blunt. He came
from Bedford; lives on Buttermilk.’ His name is
Basil, and I will give him a Bouquet for a keepsake.

C. I love my love with a C, because he is Confid-
ing. I hate him because he is Careless. He came
from Cumberland, lives on Chocolate. His name is
Clarence, and I will give him a Casket for a keep-
sake. ‘

D. Ilove my love with a D, because he is Daring.
I hate him because he is Deceitful. He came from
Dover ; lives on Dates. His name is Daniel, and I
will give him a bunch of Dandelions for a keepsake.

E. I love my love with an E, because he is Enter-
prising. I hate him because he is Eccentric. He
came from Egypt; lives on Eggs. His name is Eu-


/

e FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 107

gene, and I will give him an Evening primrose for a
keepsake.

Â¥. I love my love with an F, because he is so Frank.
I hate him because he is Fastidious. He came from
France; lives on Fish. His name is Franklin, and I
will give him a Flower for a keepsake.

G. I love my love with a G, because he is Gallant.
I hate him because he isa Grumbler, He came from
Greece; lives on Ginger-bread.. His name is Greg-
ory, and I will give him some Grass for a keepsake.

H. I love my love with an H, because he is Honora-
ble. I hate him because he is Hasty. He came
from Holland; he lives on Honey. His name is
Henry, and I will give him a Hyacinth for 2 keep-

. L love my love with an I, because he is Intelli-
gent. I hate him because he is Indolent. He came
from India; lives on Indian-meal. His name is
Isaac, and I will give him some Ice for a keepsake.

J. L love my love with a J, because he is Joyous.
I hate him because he isa Juggler. He came from
Jamaica: lives on Jellies. His name is Jonathan,
and I will give him a Jesmine for a keepsake.

K. I love my love with a K, because he is Kind-
hearted. I bate him because he is Keen. He cate
from Kingston; lives on Kernels. His name is Ke-
ria, and I will give him a Kiss for a keepsake.

L. Llove my love with an L, because he is Learned.
I hate him because he is a Loiterer. He came from
_ Liverpool; lives on Lemons. His name is Lorenza,
and I will give him a Lily for a a keepsake.
108 PARLOR PASTIMES.

M. I love my love with an M, because he is Mild.
I hate him because he is Malicious. He came from
Maqua; lives on Melons. His name is Maurice, .
and I will give him a Marigold for a keepsake.

N. I love my love with an N, because he is Nice.
Thate him because he is a Ninny. He came from
Nova Scotia; lives on Nutmegs. His name is Nich-
olas, and I will give him a Note for a keepsake.

O. I love my love with an O, because he is Ob-
serving. I hate him because he is Obstinate. He
came from Odessa; lives on Oatmeal. His name is
Oswald, and I will give him an Opal for a keepsake.

P. I love my love with a P, because he is Popu-
lar. I hate him because he is Perfidious. He came
from Plymouth; lives on Pheasants. His name is
Peter, and I will give him a Poppy for a keepsake.

Q. I love my love with a Q, because he is Quick-
witted. I hate him because he is Quarrelsome. He
came .from. Quebec; lives on Quails. His name is
Quigley, and I will give him a Quiver for a keep-
sake. he ee

R. I love my love with an R, because he is
Reasonable. I hate him because he is Reckless.
He came from Rome; lives on Rice. His name is
Roger, and I will give him a Rose for a keepsake.

S. Ilove my love with an S, because he is Socia-
ble. I hate him because he is a Spendthrift. He
came from Siberia; lives on Sugar. His name is
Solomon, and I will give him some Spice for a keep-
sake.
—_—





FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 109

T. I love my love with a T, because he is Truth-
fol. I hate him because he is Tedious. He came

from Tepperary; lives on Turkeys. His name is
- Thomas, and I will give him a Tea-pot for a keep-

sake. ~ 1
U. I love my love with a U, because he is Un-

affected. I hate him because he is Uncouth. He

came from the Ural Mountains, his “name is Uriah,
and I will give him an Urn for a keepsake.

V. I love my love with a V, because he is Vener-
able. Ihate him because heis Vindictive. He came
from Vienna; lives on Vegetables. His name is
Vincent, and I will give him a Valentine for a keep-

» gake.

W. I love my love with a W, because he is Wise.
I hate him because he is Wasteful. He came from
Worthing; lives on Wine, His-name is Walter,
and I will give him a Wall-flower for a keepsake.

X,Y, and Z are generally omitted, as theré are
but few words that commence with those letter s.



THE MOCK NEWSPAPER.

This game, when there is a large family party as-
sembled in one house for the Christmas holidays,
affords a rich fund of amusement. . An editor is
appointed’ who receives and copies on to a large, fo-
lio sheet of paper, all sorts of contributions; his
publication—which is produced and read aloud once
110 PARLOR PASTIMES.

a week to a laughing audience—being entitled, The
Saturday’s Delight, or any other appropriate name ;
and containing mock advertisements, daily news,

verses, leading articles, sporting intelligence, &c.,

&¢e., all of which may relate to the home doings of
the contributors, and be playfully sprinkled by their
proper names, disguised; good-natured jests upon
their employments, &c., and giving lively accounts,
under different headings, of the particular amuse-

ments, occupations, events, &c., which have distin- -

guished each week. As it is generally considered
pleasanter by the contributors to remain unknown,
it would be best to place a box in some convenient
part of the house, where all may deposit their con-
tributions, but the articles must not be taken from it
except by the editor.



LITTLE WORDS.

While one leaves the room, the others agree upon
a word, as the, you, yes, or, no, or any of the small
words that do not contain more than four letters.
‘When the person is re-admitted, she ‘asks a question
of each one, and the chosen word must be given by
all in their answers. Suppose the word ‘and’ is se-
lected, and the question should be this:

‘“* Do you think we shall have snow to-day?”

““T hope so, for I love to see it snow, ‘ and’ I am
very fond of snow-balls.”


FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 111

Then to the next one she might ask:

“You are fond of snow-balls also?”

«Yes, when there is a large party of us ‘ and’ they
are all very merry.”

The questioner will notice that there are three lit-
tle words in the last answer, ‘ and,’ ‘ of’ and ‘ very,’

# that are in the first; therefore, in the next answer,

she must remember which one of theSe three words is
repeated again; so in this manner she will soon be
able to find the right word; but if unable to guess
it, she must leave the room again while another word
is chosen.

The player by means of whose answer the word is
guessed must be the next to withdraw, while the
others fix upon a word to be guessed as before.



THE PUZZLE WORD.

One player goes out of the room; and the others
agree upon a word, which is to be found out by ask-
ing questions, such as, “‘ Does the thing you have
named fly?” “Does it walk?” ‘Does it sing?”
‘Does it speak?” ‘‘Does it grow?” &c. If the
questioner cannot find out from the answers given,
a forfeit must be paid.


112 PARLOR PASTIMES,

THE SPELLING GAME.

- Procure from the printer’s half a dozen print-
ed alphabets on cards. Cut out the letters singly,
and with them make the name of a person, object or
thing, keeping the letters in your hand, or out of
sight,—then shake them all together, and give them
to your friend to make out what word it was you
formed. Two persons may sit down, each giving a
puzzle, and amuse themselves by endeavoring to
find it out.

RHYMING CARDS.

Provide a hundred slips of thin card-board, about
two inches long, and one inch wide; upon these,
write in a clear legible hand all sorts of miscellaneous
words, provided they be substantives and adjectives.
Deal three cards to each person, without knowing
what words you give out; and when every one pres-
ent is supplied, they are each to make two or more
lines of doggerel rhyme, in which the three words
are to be brought in, however incongruous. Before
reading their verse or couplet, the three words must
be audibly announced. Suppose the following amongst

“the set of words: “* Wheelbarrow, gardener, mince:
pie, robin, chair, table, thunder, wind, rain, piano,
dancing, bridle, horse, cat, &c.,and suppose the

+
FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 113

first three words on the list to fall to one person, he
reads, for example (when every one else is prepared)
; * wheelborrow, gardener, mince-pie.”
Thus, a verse might run:

** Having put my wheelharrow away,
; I was glad to hear the gardener say,
ied : Your mother has on the table set,
A hot mince-pie for her darling pet.’*



CAPPING VERSES.

A pleasing and not unprofitable fire-side amuse-
ment, which requires, however, nothing more than a
good memory well stored with poetry. Inthis game,
one of the party recites a verse of a poem, on the
conclu sion of which, the next in sucgession must im-
mediately commence another, beginning with the same
letter as the last word of the verse just concluded be-
gan with; for instance, suppose the first reciter led
off with—

** Oh! what is friendship but a name,
A charm which lulls to sleep,
A shade which follows wealth and fame,
And leaves the wretch to weep.”?

The next verse might run thus:

* ¢ Why, then, o’er earthly friendships mourn,
As fleeting and as frail
As lovely flowers, by rude hands torn,
: And scattered on the gale! ??
114 PARLOR PASTIMES.

In this example, the sentiments of the verses have
a connection with each other: but this is not a rule
necessary to be observed, although the interest of
the game would be much heightened if it were so.



BLIND MAN’S BUFF.

Choose which shall be the Blind Man, and then
tie a handkerchief carefully over his eyes. Stand
him in the middle of the room. Then one says to
him—. 3

“ How many cows has your father got?”

He answers, “ three !”

‘“‘ What color are they?”

“Black, white, and gray !.”

Pibee turn around three times and eae you
may.”

The game then is to avoid being caught by the
Blind Man. ing him on the back, arms, legs, and so on. As soon
as one is caught, that one becomes the Blind Man.
This game ¢éan ‘also be played in the gardens or
fields.



HOW DO YOU LIKE IT?

Any number can play in this game. One must

leave the room, and the others select a word of.

double or treble meaning. When this is done the
FIRE-SIDE GAMES. 115

absent one must be recalled, whose duty it will be to
discover, by means of the following questions, the
word chosen by the rest of the players:

1. ‘‘ How do you like it?”
2. ‘* When do you like it?”
3. ‘Where would you put it?”

The first question must be put to all the circle in

succession before proceeding with the next one, and
descriptive answers should be given.
_ If the words are not spelt alike, or have different
meanings, yet if the pronunciation is the same, it
is considered right in this game. We will suppose
there are six persons playing, and flower (flour) is the
word chosen. Here is a specimen.

‘CHOW DO YOU LIKE IT?”

1. “Of very fine quality, and in great quantities.”
2. ‘*Of brilliant colors.”
3. ‘“* White and of sweet taste.”
_ 4. “Very fragrant and delicate.”
5. ** Well baked.”
6. *‘ Pure white in the centre of green leaves.”

WHEN DO YOU LIKE IT?

1. “When I am very hungry.”

2. “* When I am dressing for company.”
8. ‘¢ When I wish to prepare a feast.”

4, ‘When roaming through the woods.”
5. ‘“¢When made in nice small rolls.”

6. “‘ As early as possible in the spring.”
116 PARLOR PASTIMES.

‘6 WHERE WOULD YOU PUT IT?”

*¢ Put it down toa low price.”
“YT would put it in my hair.”
‘¢ Put some in a small tin box.”
4, ‘Put it in my sitting-room, where I could en-
joy it.”
5. ‘In the store-room.”
6. ‘In a book when dried.”

SOA tae

The person whose answer leads the questioner to
guess the word must leave the room, and the others
choose another word. One guess only is allowed to
each person, and if the word is not discovered, an-
other one can be selected, and the puzzled one make

~ another trial.

CENTO VERSES.

That is, verses made up of lines taken from vari-
ous quarters, as they occur to the memory ; the lines
must, however, contain the proper number of feet,
and terminate so as to rhyme with those which follow.
If I say, for instance—

S67 distance lends enchantment to the view,”?
You must be ready with—

‘* Tt was the sweetest flower that ever grew.’?


FIRE-SIDE GAMES, 117



Or it may be a four-line verse, where the rhymes
are in alternate lines, as thus—

** "Twas Greece, but living Greece no more;
Memorial frail of youthful years;
He sat beside the cottage door;
His was a grief too deep for tears.”?

In this way may be woven a cento or cloak made
of patches, which is the primary signification of the
word. Great and celebrated persons have thought
this game worthy of occupying their time and atten-
tion ; and although it is scarcely ever used now, ex-
cept as a pastime for young people, yet is theremuch
in it that is commendable as an agreeable and instruc-
tive mental recreation. It is pleasant in this way to
collect and string together the lines of poetry which
have grown into proverbs and ‘“‘ household words ”
amongst us, and muchingenuity may often be exhibit-
ed in placing these so that one line shallillustrate, or
enforce the sentiment expressed in the foregoing
line; or, perhaps, in some ludicrous way travestie,
or flatly contradict it; giving, thus, occasion for mer-
riment; and even where this is not attempted, the
‘jumble of familiar lines and phrases cannot fail to
excite a laugh in the circle of hearers.
118 PARLOR PASTIMES. -

THE UNIVERSAL TRAVELLER ; =
OR, A NEW WAY OF PLAYING AT JACK OF ALL TRADES.

_ The traveller quits the room; the rest of the com-

pany fix on thecountry they wish to represent, Some-
what in this fashion A Turkish lady twists a
handkerchief for her turban, and with a stick appears
_ to be smoking a pipe as she reclines on a cushion.
A German student may be represented with mock
knapsack, book, turned-down collar, and singing a
Rhine song ; a2 German lady should be knitting with
feet on the stove. A Laplander, warmly wrapped,
should be shown by appearing to drive reindeer,
which may be represented by chairs turned down,
and a hearth rug over his knees. A Gipsy’s tent
may be easily contrived, with a shawl and a couple
of chairs ; and other countries similarly personated ;
and when all are ready, the Traveller comes into the
room, and endeavors to guess what nation each per-
son eg by. his appearance, occupation, &e.



THE NOSEGAY OF FLOWERS.

One of the tallest boys present holds at arm’s
length a piece of wood or stiff card, about six inches
square, on which is placed a small bouquet of real or
artificial flowers, and the board is suspended by four _

e


FIRE-SIDE GAMES. - - ai

strings, one from each corner, to the end of the stick
which the boy holds at the other end. ‘Taking his
_ place. at the aoe of the room, he calls out:

** The blind man’s bride sits alone in hey bower,
As yet undecked by a ‘single flower, -

Upon iin, sia person soieed forward, and being
placed at eight feet distance from the challenger, and
cavefully blinded, takes a small. wand in his right
hand, and manfully steps forward, in hopes of -walk-
ing straight to the bouquet, which, if he succeeds in
hitting the board so as to shake it to the ground, be-
comes his to present to a young lady, previously se-
lected and seated on the sofa, or an easy chair. ©
Should he fail, the challenger takes off the covering
from his eyes, —

“Go, worthless knight, and banished be, —
From this noble company.’’

Others try to do better, and the game is closed by
tying as many bouquets as have been won, into a
wreath, which is then placed on the head of the same
young lady, the rest of the party singing or saying:
“‘ Gentle bride, we bind thy hair
With a wreath both sweet and fair;
May thy life-time, strewn with flowers,
: Be happy as these evening hours.’®



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describe
'614' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZDW' 'sip-files00009.txt'
8f99fd334ec4fc11b6ec3a81af9b9f64
12fe093b26b957f100fb16ba37f3a9ec3d131b40
'2012-05-15T20:04:55-04:00'
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZDX' 'sip-files00010.txt'
f6aef6db1951b2ff949d3fd39c4c44ba
67c5d3bdc19879fe41e5a3feb24294d6b038fb89
'2012-05-15T20:05:54-04:00'
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZDY' 'sip-files00011.txt'
7bb5a3372af3b2af33e79275aee85502
bf3b761f012bafbfd9442da22d47726e0e1261b5
'2012-05-15T20:05:32-04:00'
describe
'916' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZDZ' 'sip-files00012.txt'
4ca1757415babe0528ae230144cb47ed
e2048197f980487b9c9c65fe2e46f8c0b6232fb3
'2012-05-15T20:09:06-04:00'
describe
'1015' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEA' 'sip-files00013.txt'
9b08e33bb2caa3d19e572ac80a0f1ed0
8b7ff5fa061ae6ea8fd33392eda7b3c41ab97cda
'2012-05-15T20:11:06-04:00'
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEB' 'sip-files00014.txt'
0df6c00b938f486036149cccbd22ecff
fc71baacc42554d562c645f1440dbf2372b8acb8
'2012-05-15T20:09:27-04:00'
describe
'753' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEC' 'sip-files00015.txt'
6568e983ceeb8966fa7d938d9e7027a5
d075c9b1122f35c58033e8df9c9f94fd615a94e4
'2012-05-15T20:05:11-04:00'
describe
'925' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZED' 'sip-files00016.txt'
d080f8199ac480b4ea1fa4dd63c63ecc
db97a9b0b280246557701ba406bafb500ec61b94
'2012-05-15T20:04:18-04:00'
describe
'1433' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEE' 'sip-files00017.txt'
89163ab7c1926d169c8ac3c7ab4d80a7
75e24e93443ccde65a3aea4dd1ff100c8611d069
'2012-05-15T20:05:21-04:00'
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEF' 'sip-files00018.txt'
5f9af5a9b591c5e062ce4a94ced1ab89
8f74d229c939c2596fefee386e61263cdef3c22c
'2012-05-15T20:10:22-04:00'
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEG' 'sip-files00019.txt'
5a5be797c04ce7893786505cc5aa0b7d
0231caf2e4e955e75c79710a36c88550ed9f9d90
'2012-05-15T20:12:13-04:00'
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEH' 'sip-files00020.txt'
2d3957b2c9927e350556e301b8d7a55f
c4fd3b135fc89b793052c9b6ad5dd6bc7caa06e2
'2012-05-15T20:08:28-04:00'
describe
'1405' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEI' 'sip-files00021.txt'
f5b47b4b15f37318f2bfcdc4bfb39836
4e4abb12b7a31b66523d06db4ffae42a89862a0f
'2012-05-15T20:07:29-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1558' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEJ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
176d3636954fc772316abe3e49322885
809395130280156d1a8f2446575e13ddde3e9407
'2012-05-15T20:07:01-04:00'
describe
'1604' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEK' 'sip-files00023.txt'
6e38f1beed53a894a930d2d5b48c5bb3
34aefe44e651c95293b73b79a15e7fe0fd0de177
'2012-05-15T20:05:27-04:00'
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEL' 'sip-files00024.txt'
b4b6b806864e40d7d25038c19292ca9f
af4b0029ea3e286f126be665fb012329d5539460
'2012-05-15T20:04:35-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1532' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEM' 'sip-files00025.txt'
2e555a6bae55cae47bfb8ecf2e725cfb
0ebd0ce5908ef09bc1d6b2ed55c082d0b5fcd45c
'2012-05-15T20:07:15-04:00'
describe
'1517' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEN' 'sip-files00026.txt'
381e351a68bbf8fc5af8404c47929fa9
63d1e2fbfe4a4f90e4a6d6e0676948c7466f8e76
'2012-05-15T20:07:03-04:00'
describe
'1626' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEO' 'sip-files00027.txt'
6f5d7df0df484ae912eb3caaa065c416
ffaf9d643588efffa26e7ebf5cf45cb25e7cc60a
'2012-05-15T20:06:44-04:00'
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEP' 'sip-files00028.txt'
b11aa8dc6b819d7c89ebb4cf349ddfb9
1674922efb92b68dedca0625d9524874344028d2
'2012-05-15T20:08:00-04:00'
describe
'1470' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEQ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
f1d87a63a3173dde43adb6ac237e5996
d9c06e98d503b75d869d36d5c10d1a274cf8de21
'2012-05-15T20:11:59-04:00'
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZER' 'sip-files00030.txt'
3a591b5be917c298cfcc00529631df6b
8f362747db9ed02f0d847979b7c61f8ce6a22549
'2012-05-15T20:08:07-04:00'
describe
'1556' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZES' 'sip-files00031.txt'
fe54ed7bdf2d79a0684bb70ccddd5915
6b7ca645735156185906850c790e5bf3bad170c0
'2012-05-15T20:11:24-04:00'
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZET' 'sip-files00032.txt'
082bad7424ea3a778aca37fa989bdfab
1b8cb038da4f3cecc7c8b10a84238ded3887ef25
'2012-05-15T20:06:55-04:00'
describe
'1550' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEU' 'sip-files00033.txt'
2fa658068a8d8dc4c3b94f3720299934
1a8c9e0c080ab63d9f5146e69a333a3035382c47
'2012-05-15T20:09:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEV' 'sip-files00034.txt'
6484b68816e5450525eb7710de34de9a
ae608450fd95861d0208073062cfa413c8fa465c
'2012-05-15T20:11:10-04:00'
describe
'1524' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEW' 'sip-files00035.txt'
0dcfdadf010e0af1adf874993cdf03e0
f1517b911a0048651b518602ba240f11ea260179
'2012-05-15T20:11:05-04:00'
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEX' 'sip-files00036.txt'
4c5524f2c51611610fe41feedd141fe6
7eead1cf9fa7e828966ca9a11c25a8b49446bf3f
'2012-05-15T20:07:32-04:00'
describe
'1613' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEY' 'sip-files00037.txt'
863280bce859081c63a429b4349c4404
47659811b94c7867affa2c1450560c74f959d628
'2012-05-15T20:11:45-04:00'
describe
'882' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZEZ' 'sip-files00038.txt'
c5b34fcfdecf8dc1b1a69585dfea8a7e
2c5f69df0995656d8fae99a083950b6e41c50878
'2012-05-15T20:06:13-04:00'
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFA' 'sip-files00039.txt'
96188ac168fcaaef502b034b5b0fb673
f8ed7704e2a2baed19bcb6bbad835ab442c39c16
'2012-05-15T20:07:23-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1323' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFB' 'sip-files00040.txt'
49f935f199732b49e730ede2e1e5be1a
8f82eb1ff81d89739af947ad19fc3d755781345f
'2012-05-15T20:12:30-04:00'
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFC' 'sip-files00041.txt'
89f58bf41e1f97c97118622e26fbb27e
1970172ee71507fcd48327955498e11ffb13c61c
'2012-05-15T20:07:12-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1353' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFD' 'sip-files00042.txt'
1d7a2ea0abbfa1cec472fc0be6782146
ab2d4b36369201c5131929b1f1c7181a39723489
'2012-05-15T20:05:53-04:00'
describe
'1566' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFE' 'sip-files00043.txt'
1b0920fae860a04581b70be3b6680cc9
44b510d48650151e16c15b3ee68f77f4fc1a1716
'2012-05-15T20:07:49-04:00'
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFF' 'sip-files00044.txt'
6902c2c6b756fb59fc0bdca5c9db8a1c
a21796694c2c8b9e97b471090183d61c521ed2c8
'2012-05-15T20:12:41-04:00'
describe
'1620' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFG' 'sip-files00045.txt'
b063e453af262ce6a9393a053a6c9d4c
c7484a3190678479a44ba56fa9c1212deb24f49b
'2012-05-15T20:08:59-04:00'
describe
'1492' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFH' 'sip-files00046.txt'
a9af292a913b80a9bf0a69af67671702
8565173070a126090fbe3c1322cbba518a2197ea
'2012-05-15T20:07:18-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1794' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFI' 'sip-files00047.txt'
81f4b43120f11ec9cefb1d7c95d35844
11b13f2514c8ef938d9bfc44327eb99143f4132d
'2012-05-15T20:05:05-04:00'
describe
'1449' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFJ' 'sip-files00048.txt'
89909f3585ae8f49e6227602b8e18853
af758e26abce0434f79d163e9731a03cabe6f753
'2012-05-15T20:08:31-04:00'
describe
'1510' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFK' 'sip-files00049.txt'
43c132d47103f5ade41a9e453c47794a
f451791ab070dbfd19774aa4f9f85ec160f40acd
'2012-05-15T20:07:52-04:00'
describe
'1498' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFL' 'sip-files00050.txt'
0eb5cbde99900c3d0b02d99225c84c7a
d676c9eeb946c24e05111cf60e28fbce0f7c297d
'2012-05-15T20:08:36-04:00'
describe
'1545' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFM' 'sip-files00051.txt'
fbc7244d737e12a2377072b2a602d2ad
88320a82167eae3e8fd80bebea0243835aba50da
'2012-05-15T20:07:37-04:00'
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFN' 'sip-files00052.txt'
da3fffe21bb77d8f326c17a531aa531d
bb497b966a46bc68b269696bd8c79ddb364ab290
'2012-05-15T20:04:02-04:00'
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFO' 'sip-files00053.txt'
62f23d246b2aa439190cac4fbd1a6b98
03c7033f96065772a2220f4605f7492d1f0b5aa7
'2012-05-15T20:05:19-04:00'
describe
'924' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFP' 'sip-files00054.txt'
86b3eef4b2a357ab0bbcc00919a3939b
d93522d1db88c5f7b0d451f6c88f93894acfe0b3
'2012-05-15T20:12:28-04:00'
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFQ' 'sip-files00055.txt'
3c73701870c6e1a7dc27294588d7f4d3
46db41e57372cfbc3e68c7c5f341a8d58ae63577
'2012-05-15T20:12:46-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1128' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFR' 'sip-files00056.txt'
424272244c5750cceba6c5e037b54e8e
3f06c9d77fb41b711e775f591ccbb01ef257ec30
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFS' 'sip-files00057.txt'
7c36ca16cd92782435064064146414f4
fffbfb35b151c2ddafaac4ccddbd2b30bc701b88
'2012-05-15T20:05:52-04:00'
describe
'1256' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFT' 'sip-files00058.txt'
db7b5bb2a90d9cb50442df8cf73a70dd
f0e5f54322723c6fa4f8f82f57c42bdc79ab4272
'2012-05-15T20:10:20-04:00'
describe
'859' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFU' 'sip-files00059.txt'
ddd4351b26e037ef8e8ed181f1a8de80
458f3a283d6aac2b97af9f955c2b5be2aeab73b6
'2012-05-15T20:12:38-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1170' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFV' 'sip-files00060.txt'
77e906553d5f84e1c8990a988c442534
9c3ae736fd4b30816ce6925f327ab3b00291e2b6
'2012-05-15T20:07:00-04:00'
describe
'1632' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFW' 'sip-files00061.txt'
bf3246866aef301066de0d7b69bf641f
c990ac9df9a1ff4932f4ef9e87560591f8698e38
'2012-05-15T20:07:20-04:00'
describe
'1531' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFX' 'sip-files00062.txt'
71abb52447a84ebe50d0171fdf9c28d4
db2f4804f1cc399b4533e4a6e7c466639dec0e1c
'2012-05-15T20:08:18-04:00'
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFY' 'sip-files00063.txt'
bec9ab3c1b0134d88889273019dfbfb5
acdbc095d4cd7749e699f5f3f792f0b32895b47b
'2012-05-15T20:07:05-04:00'
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZFZ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
34fb7967d6af5eef7411744faf6d69fd
247dbfacad3757670b6fb8d928d88ff486f0e2a5
'2012-05-15T20:05:09-04:00'
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGA' 'sip-files00065.txt'
8a172d06877dc639d9685d7dcc106878
174dd3648885f4dc41289b4ceacb13ecc449109b
'2012-05-15T20:12:12-04:00'
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGB' 'sip-files00066.txt'
4f6888bcb46347c2cea4edc960e828c7
78bd87fa14901d12fdfbb9122e54abb9602dff5b
'2012-05-15T20:04:43-04:00'
describe
'1567' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGC' 'sip-files00067.txt'
254eeb86af12ec764078c15ca6fe6e7b
20bdfb95e9d153b63b81c830183176d22a1ea022
'2012-05-15T20:09:31-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1319' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGD' 'sip-files00068.txt'
0367373b5c0b4f87d89421373ebf54e2
6a3d8fc7a8291626a96b7c45b598010f46c306a8
'2012-05-15T20:06:17-04:00'
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGE' 'sip-files00069.txt'
ced0bfc0100d1ebf192871afe4a530d6
b1394e65b50944b90b983999c7352abb5fbeb9ac
'2012-05-15T20:04:28-04:00'
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGF' 'sip-files00070.txt'
dad584cd043d240d26efa380c5be6f2c
db0aac104580e808fdf42ce05e2ee7f94ded3424
'2012-05-15T20:07:39-04:00'
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGG' 'sip-files00071.txt'
2e1d6169391f21dfd1d053c947708840
b5c0f04ea0d979c2d1ed2422b6c6204801fd4700
'2012-05-15T20:08:45-04:00'
describe
'231' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGH' 'sip-files00072.txt'
1dd94f7887b8cc26be8e947e21a5afc2
8824e74fa518a30bf83d51ec4b29e36da6e65091
'2012-05-15T20:04:41-04:00'
describe
'827' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGI' 'sip-files00073.txt'
16ac082d284cb331bd755ee6da3eaec4
a6c2efd94ff52b2272c07ed693e9c64afde8f2c1
'2012-05-15T20:11:09-04:00'
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGJ' 'sip-files00074.txt'
023c929f0cbd8d6f5a3e8aa7ea9eba39
d0ae774c9a07cd58287ac57a54ec9cf49f7c55b9
'2012-05-15T20:10:54-04:00'
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGK' 'sip-files00075.txt'
ac6ecefaa5b60ff52f81d17d734191fe
15aedcf3bff7eaf207edc7f5ca98de18d1e5d8d8
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGL' 'sip-files00076.txt'
4c6e5a9658d32058802523d373cc853b
d0c2187178233347c6cbb15472a81582b3c80f2f
'2012-05-15T20:07:07-04:00'
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGM' 'sip-files00077.txt'
2a4af90ac565030cf11ccad0a7369552
1606e588cd2b3cc8db1eb76f0faac5c6ae57144f
'2012-05-15T20:11:07-04:00'
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGN' 'sip-files00078.txt'
8574999db3d3653b24f5b6c758ab6df6
44817840dfae2257a29d34e2e43cf7fc7509b83a
'2012-05-15T20:09:35-04:00'
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGO' 'sip-files00079.txt'
b54ab9258338a05f91b42f4fb8bd6057
c9a2a459fc67f5e5984cdb95ac464399bed4cdef
'2012-05-15T20:09:17-04:00'
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGP' 'sip-files00080.txt'
8bb0fa3715ac06a09dce3b4811519b74
9b36011c25d448991a67e004c39fbb50944baa7a
'2012-05-15T20:09:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGQ' 'sip-files00081.txt'
50b9888dc0e34994b03fd77f5ac99688
247a4f6f009e66aa6d7ca27d503dcbece86d350a
'2012-05-15T20:07:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGR' 'sip-files00082.txt'
ef1ca6f0cff5bd597794303d04503bb6
14bf62c6a41b04b033e267012f040700d2a2757b
'2012-05-15T20:06:20-04:00'
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGS' 'sip-files00083.txt'
02384bee67631866a267de92edd94af8
225ff95440db4eaf520f5e1b5de70c3ce017e249
'2012-05-15T20:04:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGT' 'sip-files00084.txt'
408953fa9613fd07ed69f8ac33d6c375
118e6252a4b71f6916610f9fdfbdbafb378c89b2
'2012-05-15T20:11:25-04:00'
describe
'809' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGU' 'sip-files00085.txt'
ca0b51ca5d7fb1de7029115f7e2c63be
a0413d0f9c36efa6ef14af79dc365fc00c9f2ebd
'2012-05-15T20:10:24-04:00'
describe
'822' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGV' 'sip-files00086.txt'
7ca3107126f5f39f2a3a0e686ad6751e
9b611cc564c53db7e2b9e4f18c3c5de1f062be93
'2012-05-15T20:09:30-04:00'
describe
'785' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGW' 'sip-files00087.txt'
fbe3a616849dd793c35fb3f0edb7945b
5ad63628ef360b5ffe5b63ed15d243ce98aac6e6
'2012-05-15T20:05:36-04:00'
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGX' 'sip-files00088.txt'
ca8c84e759c7c03a1f21ba0c5a3b594b
c43a2be74767e5de8f509ae41c304cb287f92ecd
'2012-05-15T20:04:20-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1292' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGY' 'sip-files00089.txt'
556416c20a4f85de1d3e133cf120fd7f
e2363504123ffe9c8c2747a3f43947d8c0e818c0
'2012-05-15T20:08:30-04:00'
describe
'968' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZGZ' 'sip-files00090.txt'
5259253dcf0f44c688275e572f5313ec
be788ecc848d850ac54e3b4cd834401cc0a3c0c8
'2012-05-15T20:09:57-04:00'
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHA' 'sip-files00091.txt'
8e11923a196ae755097bfbda66d059d4
dfed8ed9bd1878bfc16a8906e1f4369c8bdd0e6b
'2012-05-15T20:06:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHB' 'sip-files00092.txt'
bf84b37bfe4e00fc5f31ebdcf0a61d9c
c42541ed4ec2fb4c53fa657a04c76f4dcefdf51a
'2012-05-15T20:06:49-04:00'
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHC' 'sip-files00093.txt'
6691b5d21662cb7df872ca24e409305c
4e6020005f6d3020a2cdbda8c1236d4f9b209b8c
describe
'1366' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHD' 'sip-files00094.txt'
866fd8ec64d3bb51f5091e677d9820c0
172c94dc1ccf90a9758a3587b00d053e366e4b2e
'2012-05-15T20:09:10-04:00'
describe
'1321' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHE' 'sip-files00095.txt'
e1a77f145667102155033eeefa9b073b
df92bbbb117449cdecf3f068c69f2c801fe06bb6
'2012-05-15T20:06:29-04:00'
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHF' 'sip-files00096.txt'
8a8dde5c9f53ecf6952ea76c27b5520e
04610a0d6e4a6e56bf0545fef6fe5aeef7ac77b8
'2012-05-15T20:05:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHG' 'sip-files00097.txt'
f9496380b0bd1affa21c20fdc3f87556
0dbcb394ee0c2eab5600fcbc4031a1edc4ef5810
'2012-05-15T20:09:24-04:00'
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHH' 'sip-files00098.txt'
f6ceb684de1f24b29e2f364fc5574001
08b7eef5a34d61d40e07373de2f2a4250701497a
'2012-05-15T20:04:03-04:00'
describe
'1512' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHI' 'sip-files00099.txt'
cb8e10b1f705a21c7c80e74b13cd060d
f9e3d61990774f08df2674321dbc8cf99fc06b78
'2012-05-15T20:05:31-04:00'
describe
'1264' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHJ' 'sip-files00100.txt'
72f47a0471dac47ba76efcf90a4f1c39
8836993048f57f886d75bbd2fd4f59dfd798c580
'2012-05-15T20:11:53-04:00'
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHK' 'sip-files00101.txt'
95e7dbeb5d32ff8952624796e04e2976
8ca1a060f7f11d5c861d53b633fffa04a656ff9d
'2012-05-15T20:07:28-04:00'
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHL' 'sip-files00102.txt'
7f605dfe05f944614838db1621dab992
303142fa3bc697384fbdd5d641f8b22b3145cb43
'2012-05-15T20:05:04-04:00'
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHM' 'sip-files00103.txt'
102b6960effea6ea46ee68766cce3eee
d8bdf2f28ede1d2d806220a0ec0e356797019a3d
'2012-05-15T20:07:44-04:00'
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHN' 'sip-files00104.txt'
c9a57b48be4cea8c1579f71fd8c05bc3
22953f5881291068446ea195459ba324ad2292da
'2012-05-15T20:08:39-04:00'
describe
'1553' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHO' 'sip-files00105.txt'
b2dab4711eb058e82e5d9f23d3b3bb13
001ab856639dbce182af0fcc54429c0a608a4f7c
'2012-05-15T20:04:31-04:00'
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHP' 'sip-files00106.txt'
a8a26fbb5658028a53eae28ba9774042
752798eeef1f763884c07c579ce215d47d18fb76
'2012-05-15T20:04:33-04:00'
describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHQ' 'sip-files00107.txt'
42ceb088520ca13990f888f257ad1022
9035d50e407814916ff894aef0800f4f950a1a56
'2012-05-15T20:04:25-04:00'
describe
'1563' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHR' 'sip-files00108.txt'
2a5edf5dccfd9abaa8de9653330bda3f
b9767a7dd72ea4e51ca7f27a806d04a63fe5dcc6
'2012-05-15T20:09:19-04:00'
describe
'1654' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHS' 'sip-files00109.txt'
cf0457449b6e7eceb26227967beaa1a2
1114028a9f49d126d17277b8a5c46b4681632277
'2012-05-15T20:07:06-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1219' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHT' 'sip-files00110.txt'
3f2020b528a805447ff57bdc44eb7a00
a9d80cbf553895e3a71432baf4228974d92dc9d0
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHU' 'sip-files00111.txt'
041e1297182f244121a2ee3f7829a8a7
e6c52ab989e7adc487d0a79b62db8c913d982c9f
'2012-05-15T20:04:54-04:00'
describe
'1354' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHV' 'sip-files00112.txt'
52697e36e9278cc9cade2eea00aea60e
cf177a2f0e3f7d2da1869393d09f70962de2adde
describe
'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHW' 'sip-files00113.txt'
b3c4e1224db665d4fe4c1442197a544a
96e4a20dd555b619b950f7f9a537b1320633ec09
'2012-05-15T20:11:12-04:00'
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHX' 'sip-files00114.txt'
d4f5c5d73ab4bf296c0304e4a9bd1da9
a9e0d930d1943cb79f03dd03be8529efba8b4a5e
'2012-05-15T20:04:37-04:00'
describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHY' 'sip-files00115.txt'
1728de46e8452abad98aa13fc41dda72
a384e9172df8f0cf05b9720e4deb57b7b48b5a6c
'2012-05-15T20:04:01-04:00'
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZHZ' 'sip-files00116.txt'
d92863975926fc9bf2d9e58b2d52f060
61f14c526283238e44bc69e11d6c333635465ad7
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIA' 'sip-files00117.txt'
32d3276bd6ea59b5f53ccdafb7c1521a
ed04211ee4a6a35f42163f61cca6c4328dcbe14e
'2012-05-15T20:08:27-04:00'
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIB' 'sip-files00118.txt'
bf5534fb97a707b7d78bf6510120a862
4477cb60a85df134e6d93a6fa2f21266e4e26dc7
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIC' 'sip-files00119.txt'
df738db9f2d13f933e2741c284f99bb7
2f7d31bc2e0c3757c1a3bbea597d522eef089752
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZID' 'sip-files00120.txt'
efab372a3269c3f084051f3ace87ab58
66f936ef3a58fb5d8e232b447eac42a5330f7b64
'2012-05-15T20:07:38-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1300' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIE' 'sip-files00121.txt'
58768c941483fc815ade883ee0e64245
336d07d6082e159ffd37942b3e0ef38009afe34b
'2012-05-15T20:06:26-04:00'
describe
'1081' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIF' 'sip-files00122.txt'
f6448c8c489ac5bb5ed92c382ae1bb8b
ca8494826d81f2a2613d0a11e1c026c04a3a0731
'2012-05-15T20:12:35-04:00'
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIG' 'sip-files00123.txt'
a7da5d1fe59b82e67ad6ac6205015069
02f288af1910ccc36b7bdf813735704924b71d38
'2012-05-15T20:06:16-04:00'
describe
'1025' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIH' 'sip-files00124.txt'
772e5a362b1fa721c5947462d3bac4a9
bae83fe4d4ae8262f6223c0f39f0bdd1c7d028c0
'2012-05-15T20:08:57-04:00'
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZII' 'sip-files00125.txt'
dd8fc4137501a0d85237ef54511ac6a0
3824fdc8255d90bd581db2487dd22c9803d53eae
'2012-05-15T20:11:11-04:00'
describe
'1262' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIJ' 'sip-files00126.txt'
95c7ac5c996238f0c6c6df0c2487e7cd
8402a41e6c7bedc241236ba273816d55bb4b1211
'2012-05-15T20:12:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIK' 'sip-files00127.txt'
368ec850d8eca7df4786f1c49154b1bb
ec35b9cfb6867cd574ffdfc55b9bf39e3d91e219
'2012-05-15T20:07:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIL' 'sip-files00001.pro'
6f39486ecd13a69832fb8c32b297de4f
c96d1f98bd420329bd66f17f8e5e89ce26662387
describe
'1538' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIM' 'sip-files00002.pro'
4ec7e47133a64cfda8a932f91f11c0e9
2ab89db4b91e7194525072f1f44ed1e284426015
'2012-05-15T20:09:16-04:00'
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIN' 'sip-files00003.pro'
5580103ff4d6d8c0b92abdb4eb1aa9fe
8af340323946de22d9ab92a8411f6cc17b166707
'2012-05-15T20:11:04-04:00'
describe
'465' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIO' 'sip-files00004.pro'
1970cd6fd20f54c2a8fad58c6675d4d7
806b32e477ce4a55f30148cc87b65941c0e4941f
'2012-05-15T20:04:51-04:00'
describe
'285' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIP' 'sip-files00005.pro'
a6c5d014ae08a2b89bd1fb15101a622f
7b163a5d254196848973c75ab43f6331dea0b6fa
'2012-05-15T20:12:47-04:00'
describe
'462' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIQ' 'sip-files00006.pro'
37d45d25c976658b3e644326ca646540
9300730409cee9e4c87e3dfc66c64e9e955cf9bd
'2012-05-15T20:09:05-04:00'
describe
'615' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIR' 'sip-files00007.pro'
32d4685738fa92c653f4465a4f256302
27d1dfc3bce3a0624eeb6ff28b70511ac433a122
'2012-05-15T20:07:25-04:00'
describe
'815' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIS' 'sip-files00008.pro'
5967762d501ebf6a57c004717ecd6ae6
5e0d4e9a0b18b7d98b71ccf45e0fc8f10c494c5c
describe
'11228' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIT' 'sip-files00009.pro'
acc17fd42fe441ea52c92fb61344b0a8
e8d5563dd2b7b9e1248647ff5ef75df16af2d1e3
'2012-05-15T20:06:22-04:00'
describe
'3690' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIU' 'sip-files00010.pro'
dfddc1f2b212ca1c6df757d4c9e31a32
d44749ece84341796ac6d4e45004fe58c4a7589e
'2012-05-15T20:10:30-04:00'
describe
'24297' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIV' 'sip-files00011.pro'
d3c34c28f029c6479121c74c99c0da75
91f9b442956b60a2170e6f445d89f44f09089f6b
'2012-05-15T20:06:31-04:00'
describe
'22249' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIW' 'sip-files00012.pro'
97bb3b148a4e08fdb30fa9c9d0be4f1c
92b4586f7b783d2782feacc06f1cf7be8d08ee0b
'2012-05-15T20:05:39-04:00'
describe
'21056' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIX' 'sip-files00013.pro'
b08b72d47cf2392804bf2b313a3c4db3
7609a4cd1dad3a12e83152b23418b774dca0c376
'2012-05-15T20:06:45-04:00'
describe
'34433' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIY' 'sip-files00014.pro'
e888aff8d8e40662fefab4a3da7ffcf8
ef8a6e28c27b3c0a2e7359d37fc4ff1bdfde8c1b
'2012-05-15T20:05:29-04:00'
describe
'17579' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZIZ' 'sip-files00015.pro'
cc48a110b50e53a99594bb6ddb8d277b
826491fe962c912762433fe4ad2fdff57b2ce8e4
'2012-05-15T20:04:13-04:00'
describe
'19546' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJA' 'sip-files00016.pro'
3581fa0ac527168481e7d8404e7f995e
34644eecd5ebc64595a447d3880a4476a7d75d07
describe
'34717' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJB' 'sip-files00017.pro'
bc4018f90f92272c7881e16d2c704cb8
ee87431904db947e59562474fc3531e94df3bd71
'2012-05-15T20:04:42-04:00'
describe
'27663' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJC' 'sip-files00018.pro'
2dcd0046b8fbac20360b33cc6bbb6ea2
4350465d8c9b4afc60ba05ef3c445f2d54d2d82f
'2012-05-15T20:09:23-04:00'
describe
'26684' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJD' 'sip-files00019.pro'
399869b566f479e576099a1501240ba2
a6e674a01f029ab38bfdb7e5ba15686efb262c27
describe
'35617' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJE' 'sip-files00020.pro'
51d83fec510b3902d3a3ba67eb22c291
f3ea55ba9ad614ed5bbb98b238689f2d01247d7b
'2012-05-15T20:07:13-04:00'
describe
'33262' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJF' 'sip-files00021.pro'
28a61955f131abb5e502e54cb4fc7ece
acc531d9c91c9d18aad30b7d1e4a7d6c92c74f63
'2012-05-15T20:10:36-04:00'
describe
'33617' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJG' 'sip-files00022.pro'
bc3e5a7f8869f8cfea66e30f35a6288f
ad57932627e3aacb3e1e70bff125d2b8ee170a8c
'2012-05-15T20:09:08-04:00'
describe
'38971' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJH' 'sip-files00023.pro'
8b7f5dbcfab40245bbc60536a9370e26
b07749f04720ebb1f0b99bbe47b92434b98cfd7f
'2012-05-15T20:07:16-04:00'
describe
'22497' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJI' 'sip-files00024.pro'
64962789f4c35538c43817c874ba2bcc
a1af4374efb3a812272b27a006f11041c11e78ea
'2012-05-15T20:07:55-04:00'
describe
'35886' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJJ' 'sip-files00025.pro'
97cf36575456d90adb1532cc6c14b6f2
4d6e3c85d7b29278b93a1321593679b9c4bf96b8
'2012-05-15T20:07:04-04:00'
describe
'37366' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJK' 'sip-files00026.pro'
d90fb6f9ffe9f1f2c32d5c54ba6de11c
945f4270356298e9a852bfb6f2d6c49b80da44fe
'2012-05-15T20:12:42-04:00'
describe
'36442' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJL' 'sip-files00027.pro'
b6af1c33ea1ddc9a11b5dee6e8826f84
64f12eb326c6097c88f905c214783598501dc2e1
describe
'32056' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJM' 'sip-files00028.pro'
1542d1b0a20058f4feac2cb27f7263d3
ea8ecc10effc8e9899ccf6ed37c862978ecb5a78
'2012-05-15T20:07:53-04:00'
describe
'34669' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJN' 'sip-files00029.pro'
2660ac80b5e36e4b600a60f6cf96614e
dcb4afa1fba220ecc77705e0be98d64a2725d66e
describe
'32055' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJO' 'sip-files00030.pro'
78991ad293ff09469b4d13eb39eecb66
36ce4546eb36f7e18861bba62bc7d430652628ab
describe
'36084' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJP' 'sip-files00031.pro'
8b32f4cb1ee289c0f0724db0bcd9cc0f
7c82cd572cbc2775c70b13564a629ad8a51a3d2c
'2012-05-15T20:08:29-04:00'
describe
'37007' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJQ' 'sip-files00032.pro'
e0b94f6e78f19650c00970b632796255
6af777bd47d6096011395444f9f27e93030b0d55
'2012-05-15T20:05:20-04:00'
describe
'37227' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJR' 'sip-files00033.pro'
855a061d8a2d86856b6056c67bca991e
b8c336d427282c187e09b98d4c1a0df89fd0ed88
describe
'34061' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJS' 'sip-files00034.pro'
1099083a8c6e7c6d3d415c4fe9b32552
d59381c8b9e6a53a51b7e45b1c46ce939389c4d4
'2012-05-15T20:10:33-04:00'
describe
'36568' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJT' 'sip-files00035.pro'
345db7155909f14cc31df61319a2e365
bff9a247b538efbbb4f9d8c27eabfa8b001423f4
'2012-05-15T20:07:43-04:00'
describe
'35737' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJU' 'sip-files00036.pro'
a1b5147f32ea48463597ca5cd6e051ae
3064dbb0d8ca0ddf041ee9d40caa1a74ae2a124c
'2012-05-15T20:09:14-04:00'
describe
'38946' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJV' 'sip-files00037.pro'
429e59a9eb7c3f8f6be28f7267ac7d8a
aacf863d493941a209f4ba4d02d127f739e25175
describe
'21355' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJW' 'sip-files00038.pro'
bb5ed81694a8de61dcab564891611a12
0c162638f3ab9b6e1a672773bebdd29fa5af8b11
'2012-05-15T20:11:34-04:00'
describe
'24439' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJX' 'sip-files00039.pro'
0a301e2494c3da17df95c838d85701fd
d346043f31b7f4e93222cb09b1666bce6bc75260
'2012-05-15T20:08:42-04:00'
describe
'31332' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJY' 'sip-files00040.pro'
1f3c27881f3a0e5b730072dc9166e7f8
3e060e86c38b0c0179023d2f91ebc24df7c594aa
'2012-05-15T20:07:21-04:00'
describe
'32853' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZJZ' 'sip-files00041.pro'
3db641daefbe6e823ce810705a2f1fb7
7fb377b27fead5dc9225814ddd921518a4a60e9f
'2012-05-15T20:06:03-04:00'
describe
'32539' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKA' 'sip-files00042.pro'
a50dbbc4fa115d3df61f676ceb15fcaf
361d8c055f77f3a539475b73789b79797b3d5ab4
describe
'36068' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKB' 'sip-files00043.pro'
de01a0ddfc514114bd44ee0de1b01e3d
9c7aa4a21b6b60ddc93c90e1a06de1a000d05ada
'2012-05-15T20:12:26-04:00'
describe
'33404' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKC' 'sip-files00044.pro'
6761d5b86ef11989738467b669fd749d
7237160bdfacf03036b30199ba265e1050021908
'2012-05-15T20:07:40-04:00'
describe
'37252' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKD' 'sip-files00045.pro'
9c27ba284e70201141d209a1f31f2abe
8355a0c077322c7e428dac11c1163e18540405b9
'2012-05-15T20:09:54-04:00'
describe
'36303' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKE' 'sip-files00046.pro'
51ce49e5306e94ee248c0c6a70af0e93
8aaae08c5de0224090d6c659427dc76b02ea84f1
'2012-05-15T20:09:00-04:00'
describe
'39653' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKF' 'sip-files00047.pro'
94d318f69b441e862dcd53ce7be8a51d
affcdeb7955936249d2c93457abf1a386817d6ec
'2012-05-15T20:11:13-04:00'
describe
'34594' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKG' 'sip-files00048.pro'
071c7682b68a83c30a78fb1bbd27de70
2fd5026831778b181e3556f8ffd5dfffedf28f18
'2012-05-15T20:10:31-04:00'
describe
'34644' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKH' 'sip-files00049.pro'
075e7150378a7a6511af30b4b835eecf
5337dc14d31ed9f086fd612c9398299965d49645
'2012-05-15T20:04:07-04:00'
describe
'36725' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKI' 'sip-files00050.pro'
cd6feaf903bef22a8e85b63ce6a04b86
fd8609eab7193ee925106ea1145d52ce8656e004
describe
'34932' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKJ' 'sip-files00051.pro'
c0b5a2c69f7b57abde59971300a59bc1
b47430088a3e1916490938ae6da32a3a7b851430
'2012-05-15T20:05:58-04:00'
describe
'34971' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKK' 'sip-files00052.pro'
a3e9e7cfae6f18523f1366cd6274cf0f
9811a70505d2a4e727bb48bd5f06c2a40fc5b840
describe
'22977' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKL' 'sip-files00053.pro'
9fc612daac47ee3cda075c28da691dda
f7cd72c32034a0456ac0d3e1fbf5efc53b47c8ad
'2012-05-15T20:11:58-04:00'
describe
'20901' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKM' 'sip-files00054.pro'
22d1d781265c14c27e52ba9c6758a188
310d8d0366e13ce3caa23aab42ffb44d5c7f8d5d
'2012-05-15T20:11:29-04:00'
describe
'24941' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKN' 'sip-files00055.pro'
051c93aa043ac5531fa03ba12106f611
7bff411658ba56163a563686d0ae347136dc18bc
describe
'23060' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKO' 'sip-files00056.pro'
289725a912d8b1da4445972c71829d20
31a7f157ed798b151839b62c62a595d42becabed
describe
'24357' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKP' 'sip-files00057.pro'
afc5375da0886bb0ec44d9ba09560549
43284880b5761bc090fc8c3c82d235e0a5e8d85f
'2012-05-15T20:06:15-04:00'
describe
'27714' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKQ' 'sip-files00058.pro'
5b02903fd170576d0b212f98437cfdf9
6aa4b353faeaa7c7a714c0277cd8dd621042faf6
describe
'17864' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKR' 'sip-files00059.pro'
4e4ac65d3c57c82916164f165a16878b
9ff7a08bf66f1b1adc5b776e3477f3e20d3ef591
'2012-05-15T20:09:02-04:00'
describe
'26107' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKS' 'sip-files00060.pro'
135a928aa011303b3bad6f0b18702ca4
6b1fa4b5ba6d595313570e8c45568f257dd7db56
'2012-05-15T20:04:45-04:00'
describe
'32985' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKT' 'sip-files00061.pro'
651f4fc90ddd40f2ba97b5fb0921ced1
57848567f27e1cc0d8a09cbaecc44000406828fb
describe
'37350' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKU' 'sip-files00062.pro'
1778388584ec1b215c204b795cda8bc0
34bb895ad190f4714f2a155b5c9d56137e455030
'2012-05-15T20:11:03-04:00'
describe
'35508' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKV' 'sip-files00063.pro'
c1590d1fec25a81b1510a59451c7d32c
3710b60a510f1b09f37dbc98ba6929dcfec2cfdf
describe
'31053' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKW' 'sip-files00064.pro'
c0ab4d2e28c3d017140576a1ad993052
4c5cf5650128acead26561cfade5128f65cbc23d
'2012-05-15T20:08:49-04:00'
describe
'36417' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKX' 'sip-files00065.pro'
2a89493828a9885ca0b62e3939ba9ff9
184cedef0955aa91a67793aaeea7f642238777b7
'2012-05-15T20:05:10-04:00'
describe
'35545' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKY' 'sip-files00066.pro'
8e470030902e3fd997e5596368c1aa86
a2d3f33a04298a8c337da99931784a47d715d05f
'2012-05-15T20:07:45-04:00'
describe
'31831' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZKZ' 'sip-files00067.pro'
6d480cde530d98d8c88dad023507a754
06be3524b901d569a0d6bafc3086b5a35157b368
describe
'32201' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLA' 'sip-files00068.pro'
443c7cec5d8c3eb767ac8b748f13ef3b
2ba0f4771ac9884b7aa8ba9148bd49b3b2cb8769
'2012-05-15T20:06:25-04:00'
describe
'32298' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLB' 'sip-files00069.pro'
bc7b761a158e3beec0ec3b532704f8f3
6e8342ca3822a57cfd82022ed1030d3bf73637bf
'2012-05-15T20:11:28-04:00'
describe
'31990' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLC' 'sip-files00070.pro'
4e8fbed92cc4076fbcea1cc95be3880d
68cf7e631c6e165d40cf77263e7e2429fd768f5b
'2012-05-15T20:05:06-04:00'
describe
'33834' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLD' 'sip-files00071.pro'
a62c5b7a5dc81e2457f048404662ae32
320b756da1da80fe585c25b8755befa2e06cf8c0
'2012-05-15T20:09:42-04:00'
describe
'4792' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLE' 'sip-files00072.pro'
b1e98ca0c36719a4cc63d8244bb66619
6bca2c7847c3f2331f0ef4ebc92ebbc763b2e717
describe
'18662' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLF' 'sip-files00073.pro'
ff9aa03cc58838b1e4496a10601b16fc
9fc8ff2e0a6c832b5a624a6f4bd555d0557aecf9
describe
'22973' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLG' 'sip-files00074.pro'
ed4b48f7d52892b29ba79884d28029bc
7f53e996bcf71c1aa96ab5ace771804ddac2b695
'2012-05-15T20:05:12-04:00'
describe
'24670' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLH' 'sip-files00075.pro'
d2fba1203fd22317818e2ec195f77610
f5b0e5374f5bfe49399643364262bf7680f0938d
'2012-05-15T20:07:14-04:00'
describe
'30318' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLI' 'sip-files00076.pro'
dddd4329468f43a5c8388ae1935e162a
e3fcff9174ba715fd99a83382240a304fdff239a
'2012-05-15T20:10:10-04:00'
describe
'34702' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLJ' 'sip-files00077.pro'
1d720f653b0ecbc28253514dd5cc1081
48355580045e79679a67af0f512c74625523bd11
describe
'33182' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLK' 'sip-files00078.pro'
028d332ce41d7012db8969e175a777b0
41398fbd2becd849e9381a0144c346d30a58fadc
'2012-05-15T20:09:34-04:00'
describe
'32805' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLL' 'sip-files00079.pro'
d59271621f7a39a9b64f11615a287966
8334695279e2d7e227f43f490158fb69d2e0f9a9
describe
'35229' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLM' 'sip-files00080.pro'
f621c2d311fcf301ca58842ae8355e74
a3deadddb2a9a4da0a1e69514589a7c0bfcc629c
describe
'34091' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLN' 'sip-files00081.pro'
615b5232ecf1f1e2911ebd8f35c0db45
e0dc9487d23293a826eddde8700c45d9812c2a29
'2012-05-15T20:06:42-04:00'
describe
'37352' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLO' 'sip-files00082.pro'
5f6338903f380172317395595c19afb2
114e7bf6d6cf693bb2489ec51aedc8214eb7e8cf
'2012-05-15T20:05:18-04:00'
describe
'24313' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLP' 'sip-files00083.pro'
d06d44c91fe8767db129206db5d039c0
0d58b1c404beba6a9ce1d61fdff651cff1f31a5c
'2012-05-15T20:07:48-04:00'
describe
'27866' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLQ' 'sip-files00084.pro'
3f9c56194a71c24ed7b67ccbc90b5371
99980ec7dc9a36ff3ee7a7f8921955988994bff2
'2012-05-15T20:08:47-04:00'
describe
'15558' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLR' 'sip-files00085.pro'
445bb65d479fa0ae9631b70f79987dd3
ba45d37707f6e696243de625f296882d5734ff14
describe
'16108' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLS' 'sip-files00086.pro'
2ba32e14118451cc4ffe4861a385d896
cb9d4b4652f24f5ebf56d00056a75bee2401aaa8
'2012-05-15T20:04:09-04:00'
describe
'16413' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLT' 'sip-files00087.pro'
4f3a33f51f78b13cc436852e03db6124
a501dd0a785e86b7b8df048964a742aa6441bf88
describe
'23331' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLU' 'sip-files00088.pro'
679e6a6c94dcca2ab638bc4e0d43afa8
c19458aea0b655b598555ea4043278206244aab9
'2012-05-15T20:08:35-04:00'
describe
'27875' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLV' 'sip-files00089.pro'
1500e927704bbcf5c1ae99fb9afd4cb9
e74eff43d812e2321851e9ded4207fcdf25aca1f
'2012-05-15T20:03:56-04:00'
describe
'20934' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLW' 'sip-files00090.pro'
fb9b423af41b8acd31f0024ada4e2c92
600de6bb79e198b02c88678ecb72fce307b14b07
describe
'26442' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLX' 'sip-files00091.pro'
0181432f66777307c9b68220c080f4dc
2ae6ab7c163348bcdd19ff4d712786a892ec9147
'2012-05-15T20:06:34-04:00'
describe
'37700' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLY' 'sip-files00092.pro'
1d7a02fc53b776d06ceadae596cc13ff
8c563d8d02e147285a66de07eb17ca8daa273899
describe
'32691' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZLZ' 'sip-files00093.pro'
af3d63e6455d7a99a7be940f7841f490
334a92aad29c4ec255d28c936ec1863c09ddc13a
'2012-05-15T20:11:35-04:00'
describe
'32857' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMA' 'sip-files00094.pro'
d72df83b6008625f32a3346fb67a8df1
d4054b6706a6bad88dd8c26940862c4f56732997
describe
'28820' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMB' 'sip-files00095.pro'
e505b507963addf51ee39abbf74ce274
98296ecb5deeb1dd4e0c177bf312b067cf9f5bdc
'2012-05-15T20:06:14-04:00'
describe
'32025' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMC' 'sip-files00096.pro'
890e674ec713538e03f8071bddf179cb
e05152c7a327f19cb092bf640f4965bc93ec09d2
describe
'34986' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMD' 'sip-files00097.pro'
0f5f7d2abcf8ff26269c3c413d6a14c2
f012da840a2afd88c13ee97af8405ab481e0ee60
'2012-05-15T20:11:22-04:00'
describe
'36078' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZME' 'sip-files00098.pro'
5d12968ccffd94a72b4620a455c15c24
37504b7ce19b4dddbe98b26c18840e2de0360704
'2012-05-15T20:10:32-04:00'
describe
'36828' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMF' 'sip-files00099.pro'
f4a3b93ccce7c2389e0b1e36bf8d4c98
adb2e6415be603e92a75264e7b3e57335d2dd7ab
describe
'29559' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMG' 'sip-files00100.pro'
e089f7b7e20ece7c9b1fec77e196c546
f649cd48113c805e84cb0e54ca54f8c57d9507d7
'2012-05-15T20:10:05-04:00'
describe
'27276' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMH' 'sip-files00101.pro'
2148ce1065778f29786146f539ec73d2
17800a1d49a6096630b9e09d169cdc9457823afc
'2012-05-15T20:09:51-04:00'
describe
'22814' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMI' 'sip-files00102.pro'
867ea7fc69dceabc85176a7b81525447
7da1704c14bdf374bf4c3eb4daaa0552fbe52dbc
'2012-05-15T20:12:27-04:00'
describe
'28364' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMJ' 'sip-files00103.pro'
f410ae7fcbc5075e47659896b386f8fd
c83f0cf37911c1d0992167a3293e1209b07baa03
describe
'27658' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMK' 'sip-files00104.pro'
aeb820d18d22372a27f14eb8e30aca23
a04326b5dcfe070fc29483e8897c5aac48e844c1
'2012-05-15T20:07:41-04:00'
describe
'36982' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZML' 'sip-files00105.pro'
ccc1f5e6a997c6750cb6a71e1c2f5b52
0338f9a39db4edc5d253c04ef6cdb03d36e96522
'2012-05-15T20:09:45-04:00'
describe
'30264' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMM' 'sip-files00106.pro'
796045d79ee38480126d41023b841f73
e813b6c1b7e5645a3dfed0cc2a52bd3ece8767e0
'2012-05-15T20:11:01-04:00'
describe
'34135' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMN' 'sip-files00107.pro'
03cb6744c6f4205e2c18943660e4e654
bd1c9829cde35b60d79586d38722853bd1025ca4
describe
'37743' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMO' 'sip-files00108.pro'
b0313841282e303f25f10934d509bb22
ce7e4f2b1de27c97cf350bacc02ec6ef5f165f01
describe
'34916' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMP' 'sip-files00109.pro'
dacd930a81bb88259740f3995f26bca6
7d4bd7211cfe61ce78c943a8c9ea76c3cadf8492
describe
'28395' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMQ' 'sip-files00110.pro'
4a7ede30855d05f19162a29012799a27
a59ba2d6592cc66094c1684846b2c10f5676219b
'2012-05-15T20:04:59-04:00'
describe
'27201' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMR' 'sip-files00111.pro'
f8a914c5161e720e4e761673afc80dfe
e1ad8d9602091fd6a215541a2cafd7fc11c55ba4
'2012-05-15T20:12:14-04:00'
describe
'32527' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMS' 'sip-files00112.pro'
a96d239c3ef8345a759fdc52883d8c51
98b006a021622fd03ba3c37f42d0c1b3b352fb0e
'2012-05-15T20:07:19-04:00'
describe
'32515' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMT' 'sip-files00113.pro'
218a91af75542d59ab96db28c89689a6
71d18556ce354a169e9ab57fcef2bafd2fdf94b9
'2012-05-15T20:10:04-04:00'
describe
'32653' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMU' 'sip-files00114.pro'
b6ce84e0cdf918a738853d259a2f1d55
1c9745a85bf5c7c3072a1b849f38073f22ec80ed
'2012-05-15T20:08:20-04:00'
describe
'37036' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMV' 'sip-files00115.pro'
03c5e2b719027212d9917fb2ea316844
4d9449f700525d9b998e6aa03fc1f1283f4a73f9
'2012-05-15T20:10:57-04:00'
describe
'35230' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMW' 'sip-files00116.pro'
d4d0654bbd32d7e09e37cf845c4c06f8
f894a926219e2b477331ea2b5f30ae909fb962b6
'2012-05-15T20:08:32-04:00'
describe
'30953' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMX' 'sip-files00117.pro'
c64b6e3596b0762e4dfed90037bf362e
cb379df5462abf119aa74c8f7de8f48bb6de47c4
describe
'32736' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMY' 'sip-files00118.pro'
49e8a99fbcfb427561ef58410b610b54
655c073df4dcd016e9781df8812c45ca4237a956
'2012-05-15T20:04:39-04:00'
describe
'26123' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZMZ' 'sip-files00119.pro'
e944249aa80ee80709bb950572ef701b
64ac9a2732a91bf46be76fa126c367433a3394a1
'2012-05-15T20:08:33-04:00'
describe
'30160' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNA' 'sip-files00120.pro'
45643bdc521c7fcda09d193c6173ad21
1f01a31e45ef315743963058585da4ec1e76683c
describe
'27435' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNB' 'sip-files00121.pro'
2a63ad10a7fafb441c309617f4c84cad
77791b3c79cbf181027d8938edcf6ae8a967bb75
describe
'24832' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNC' 'sip-files00122.pro'
1d39c58ab27f5765d89a5328d7250f4d
c13a817804eba20cbfd71a1543dc5f673ce068a8
'2012-05-15T20:05:49-04:00'
describe
'27859' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZND' 'sip-files00123.pro'
bc604da7dc45ea4b0337eb068e83e3f1
dabc619927e3bbc65d0d2897f46890ae670f674c
describe
'22952' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNE' 'sip-files00124.pro'
4aa156f40d4bb4549d117a563e28190c
e6ade0ff7ea7843512ec4a28a70016ab8e2db756
describe
'29835' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNF' 'sip-files00125.pro'
67fdd2f657e6fd8e92dacc1420256da2
eead278f1bc2468b0d0c2905059c3f0396ce04f4
describe
'30596' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNG' 'sip-files00126.pro'
647cedc2f8ed6d9fc319198ba7eadeaa
c712debaa2c6cd055ff4a6c4362d77be88947794
describe
'29641' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNH' 'sip-files00127.pro'
b7a64e57d183a1476c89cb332f708428
320f04f21b08d70c4481c3d64a0c21e5012043c3
'2012-05-15T20:09:46-04:00'
describe
'1285391' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNI' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
5a0b3186a4abf28cba9036ac95325462
04f05b01d0336c222cdf345ff94b06463f701f80
'2012-05-15T20:10:48-04:00'
describe
'1408327' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNJ' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
b0798611d2f28670575c2dcc89a36962
a0cc4003c127cb9f7c091042535c86a1d7ea3944
'2012-05-15T20:07:36-04:00'
describe
'301532' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNK' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
64d163c5589784d2ea6bf5c1f026cf5e
c8e07f974ac1df1b13f8bf728bbf46b849225c0d
'2012-05-15T20:12:51-04:00'
describe
'300647' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNL' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
2c7de6b0125590a55f1d37e19ab40c0c
abf15b43ad93718e8661e174a4008e207a80a2a6
'2012-05-15T20:11:55-04:00'
describe
'312168' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNM' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
485a2ea40030ab48aec63355e5bfea7b
253f9672851a9f04fdbb1f4a71f3c4eb08686768
'2012-05-15T20:04:58-04:00'
describe
'302446' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNN' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
6a11682dfc8feaf996b22bcaf9753217
e63d5a81ddc73c43f88089388dda63077cd63f6c
'2012-05-15T20:10:23-04:00'
describe
'297989' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNO' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
81169cf4ea01c4951fe36eb18ae5a4f6
54e9d2cf4b533484ca905763dd08043bf7694d3f
'2012-05-15T20:07:51-04:00'
describe
'1123033' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNP' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
fe5db9487c23177c913ad0f9f7a1ab5f
c1905264a5a6d0a021cae4f8caccc69bb51fe078
'2012-05-15T20:04:57-04:00'
describe
'311569' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNQ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
00d4a5436b5ea88236ec2b10d405598e
4c96794320a6447c70c86c217f845456a695ab58
describe
'276557' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNR' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
5b8b53c46b18004015a3c53ac62546b8
7d1f46ccda9e3811e82d60961bb1b33598b0c558
'2012-05-15T20:09:55-04:00'
describe
'301508' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNS' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
90ea9d3c1eccbf5984f529954894ebc3
84c305a93680760d5ccb1d8bbd7c6afb1693e90c
'2012-05-15T20:10:16-04:00'
describe
'269800' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNT' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
c2f9a5275d932018f111a93072c319ef
af6c528aba109afa5ae1ad26e838b4dff5dd255f
describe
'309442' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNU' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
002635ac2d75e66277d96e04ee0f1b0c
2b70c6607d2b700b0d69a0ed56f17ef7dd48405a
'2012-05-15T20:08:23-04:00'
describe
'268450' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNV' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
a77926d20fcac7e0930885469a53367d
e8d6d2a03194d837a587b5dcbfa9106db6909fcc
'2012-05-15T20:04:52-04:00'
describe
'317202' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNW' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
5133812cfd4eee7d5374148719be90f9
7862d4074a1e34dcdd36ca39263c7acac098c146
describe
'287599' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNX' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
94aa6fa5efca9019236bb21cb1cfabad
21a8826ab1356ca44f14c49822784f092b7c0d45
'2012-05-15T20:04:19-04:00'
describe
'309878' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNY' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
35beed1a96f5fd22a7436b7542a2dd40
0efa7fb650bbc68bf43062f3096b7a441da91657
'2012-05-15T20:10:11-04:00'
describe
'281886' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZNZ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
e30338e843cf83d5cc1fa1dd2a3f5128
b19e8f01ce3093006ac4813563b9d2cb63076557
'2012-05-15T20:06:10-04:00'
describe
'314830' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOA' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
0a94688f71ea08f4a3af005406728cea
48af8f84ad6ef0125e6ac72fa8695259ca6c8ab4
'2012-05-15T20:06:37-04:00'
describe
'1237745' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOB' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
c9bff94fd6979cf1133952893ac9a3aa
34e138cc994a69a3abc3ac2924c07dc85a792f9b
'2012-05-15T20:08:01-04:00'
describe
'1207746' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOC' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
9c83d4dcd9d563272463002e5f6559ab
98060d0ee11fc3755fcbe18e7e4e8f723e50127e
'2012-05-15T20:09:53-04:00'
describe
'1106981' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOD' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
ec2bb289d581fbc5f450fa374a5699c1
ac08ea749300c09e730f2732ae71cda5e3a9c4b7
describe
'1170145' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOE' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
bfc0feba78b603543d797ec5f1621321
ea770436e60503d9a9dd8a3f88ed424defefff23
describe
'1207708' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOF' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
e47271f6482a456c8850b26d215cdfe0
ee2e3d84b501645a47069ebd065d247263dc0876
describe
'1148715' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOG' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
761d6f984e1f4ffb7f26308a45571ffe
df812ca2378671d5943f314d4e40f1cb81814faf
'2012-05-15T20:04:11-04:00'
describe
'1237750' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOH' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
2205a8594e70d4b4cf31113b05d4dca6
e1ea0d2a8212bedf3e4c073aec6b6144742d0323
'2012-05-15T20:11:43-04:00'
describe
'1140858' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOI' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
c13fa14b5c30d733b79449ca7d604a43
a30bd0eb520078c6636c4ecd672762e582da05d6
'2012-05-15T20:11:14-04:00'
describe
'1174236' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOJ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
685f08ec42f5ff8cec3053cc18e33e30
7ae51633930c19dc1e7adc0a7538e1b38b68039b
'2012-05-15T20:04:04-04:00'
describe
'1111566' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOK' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
acc909ca6a4af8e8ac7758d3f089de40
9911fd5dae934a2c96422aab83135f64066f53e2
'2012-05-15T20:11:48-04:00'
describe
'1203485' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOL' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
7a2b8f3f310e5d03e6532ea431198d6f
517213307000dc4cc960acb9268c17357bde8c08
'2012-05-15T20:08:17-04:00'
describe
'1084209' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOM' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
f86fb1929291f675ae668fad381fb5bc
2d4a00a32c31585e361c8e8aec61a6d103a022f9
'2012-05-15T20:05:26-04:00'
describe
'1160175' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZON' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
ddc8b9b292ccf3e8c4315a0283e05106
d932e7d91f281750299844e0adca39cee316b0db
describe
'1078215' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOO' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
1a800015190c28ef142ff10679cee14a
66b47c299f0a0612955c5a2f8d32c57d3ea49fe5
'2012-05-15T20:09:50-04:00'
describe
'1141728' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOP' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
470478aecb875c118954823358dc9814
c43d111ee6abdd7ba43074357f2b8e91f7264c82
describe
'1051252' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOQ' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
cba0c3d7d8d22923de778d0c23957a06
f504e775f9e7311d46c48dc06fa9fe737b21eb2c
'2012-05-15T20:05:03-04:00'
describe
'1123625' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOR' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
7ebe4f064dd18baef5280c2a6b440713
5a4b6b982688e75160487645e1ef44d6bb1679e0
describe
'1106510' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOS' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
e34ffd12e13a3c46747ccdbf7b5487cd
81247bd165bbe9cbcc2e39502829787a0c969b75
describe
'289181' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOT' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
9c74f382f0b6b0f19c8de03d0c1908b5
65b19aecf7cf8360fe4ecd5029c553a205de8db9
'2012-05-15T20:05:22-04:00'
describe
'306874' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOU' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
9d6c2674913fb9a522eda1e64acc6339
b729952915a53b6d728300e089fc6d9d38cb6e9a
'2012-05-15T20:08:53-04:00'
describe
'290511' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOV' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
7b20bed53be6bc6742c33b38c33f6c08
b07992ec26b5120e376de98d3c45a502ba615d5f
'2012-05-15T20:08:38-04:00'
describe
'301194' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOW' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
2f71e6c62e7b318690de6ea28ca1983f
9bb4478cd67a9676f8061d6d46075fff40a83b16
'2012-05-15T20:06:18-04:00'
describe
'293280' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOX' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
872c9b9af9ddea58fcc65d256e9ae79e
00d5fe352e8d9b7adb3d536b57d9e14c72eb0fc2
'2012-05-15T20:08:09-04:00'
describe
'299105' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOY' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
e70c3bea9dd758111e0aed577ed8e5ad
82861efa68afd44464431334169a92e3038f645c
describe
'296645' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZOZ' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
9b6ae4b8645d0208933b2803dff87fbc
12459105f655a4d0c03a633fc7bb2b64148719b4
'2012-05-15T20:04:05-04:00'
describe
'311352' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPA' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
e2a590299ff3d4baa640efabd5ed226c
0deb2d6c282aecb87df952a1c4f04f86f88ed0d6
'2012-05-15T20:08:56-04:00'
describe
'295375' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPB' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
33b60b13fb0c85a71d3f2dec04c60c69
a5b0d36eb65a9c90884eec70dc0f1492c03d1fb4
'2012-05-15T20:05:08-04:00'
describe
'304667' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPC' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
f9b916e3535a48be9b5cb83305bb1084
a61c4ddb3e891767f31f51a4c2f405ff7004f43a
'2012-05-15T20:08:34-04:00'
describe
'290581' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPD' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
00ed01d42b372118978d5bcf9d74f392
82ba585702cc7ce5857157cc7bcbcf6d679ad938
describe
'307503' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPE' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
8d703c69498880c57b4c92ef513ab59b
1bbdd815b45116b029e5501a41818418e0b7fca7
describe
'299657' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPF' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
5a7301229c9c80554d2cd8eef34409bc
1a9f3f012a55965aa1045c92a48a6722daf1257a
describe
'295424' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPG' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
968daeca49003495203203fbcaa4509a
6d7662ce2ad158978895c584c59caafef61e7822
'2012-05-15T20:09:18-04:00'
describe
'302235' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPH' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
116307c6072fb4ac531f0948eed927ec
31dc900c8d27aa022785bdd389c6c58bf3a28032
describe
'300301' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPI' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
1e3f4bb88482fe7d1a13a1d411126da4
675ecb5c16e90177df07dee9828520ec5457b2aa
'2012-05-15T20:04:48-04:00'
describe
'272765' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPJ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
d5ffa0ff33e566f03382c0d79998ae30
a1c3895c27540fae7fa73247e29f7d3a1f55ba50
describe
'307564' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPK' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
f8212e1877563917775747c5d7b664e4
bb8eb9a2f4b70ad8692dc887aece711985ea523b
describe
'285469' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPL' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
1f0bf906248e26eda4a7b90f53854fc5
0a2357491eb49f68fdd7df53265cb83d4201a7a3
describe
'280519' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPM' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
e1ef48ff9da3a31c22364b484cf83597
26fa6dacc70dcf60eb884dba018bd0689c7adaaf
'2012-05-15T20:05:41-04:00'
describe
'287201' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPN' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
e792781d1840c851c601d80d49080fa1
97f3d45ea7a28a17395546bbfa599b461fde4c36
'2012-05-15T20:10:44-04:00'
describe
'297614' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPO' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
0f9e3d5d05c97d47a70b7aa69a7b87a3
022b605e436faebcc4989551c5cc0cc7a32d691b
'2012-05-15T20:12:43-04:00'
describe
'286211' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPP' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
c637e85b3bfedc4e7d6fdd63107811a9
f717b7fd9e6a2635f519887be1d3170ce5b480c8
describe
'308309' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPQ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
e669524872cff668a1123f6d5d2ea6d8
69fc0ae9c05befe842c5432e0c6f28a1820a5e0f
describe
'286426' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPR' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
432f9d8987579e964cb78d6260f88fd3
915a06b6530f3e6c8938c9c2feb71436c7da3db9
describe
'299055' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPS' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
2827c00a5fd91609cb362a4dc893a801
692be0a5088e4cac7e9dad92223ded7f97bfaa33
describe
'286041' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPT' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
b49515db177a93c98bfac113b023818f
41c069bfe3f32d225a990f20f569500ed918d829
describe
'309934' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPU' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
f0316a0e54e7f979ce050f1812ee96ea
0e6b177e8b0f2dd42240ff53c135d4ecbdcebe48
'2012-05-15T20:11:37-04:00'
describe
'291627' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPV' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
67fd2365bb94d78adf4316be5aa12c88
bf178a6fae1b187d54fe8241bfcbb0a8f7834aaa
'2012-05-15T20:10:26-04:00'
describe
'305159' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPW' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
e3f3861a9ca3e369d1950f480ae82d12
0315684ffd6616306dd001db1b1d4f03bf8e4054
describe
'285985' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPX' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
c8bf969153bfee024bf2c9b4e7b29ae0
060d1eec8674eec083e9b93a7d38deb78e7391c8
'2012-05-15T20:08:04-04:00'
describe
'304774' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPY' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
dd8ce8ef0f7dd64f1b6d3f223be46f04
6462fba8220e0d6ddf1ca552343e1970c5fc918a
'2012-05-15T20:05:42-04:00'
describe
'293120' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZPZ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
511f3650a1eaa4e97344968b2f03f733
ed7e611b9ac552a628b0b5393d3160f3d8b9f051
'2012-05-15T20:11:52-04:00'
describe
'308054' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQA' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
6b26a733d1669293d199476ddc9d7491
9261843b939c3a4aa6548fb15aefd2d2a44cc10b
describe
'288626' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQB' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
a64b4802d61cbaa051cf5309f221c53d
0cf3611d6eae78d43c3ba9718a5633556350d383
describe
'1061457' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQC' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
b4fe304f462d2f29781da4fca16a4753
b25b967127f4bc99ea793ab01ff63b91a8b994f2
'2012-05-15T20:12:25-04:00'
describe
'287991' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQD' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
3a46f4e8a20bf6cd662c3308c85af2a4
8f00b1429d281167430112d447e7f926dfd63bbc
'2012-05-15T20:05:37-04:00'
describe
'295474' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQE' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
64d9cd5dbe77fd78d27550fc6c353fa7
5d4dfec81070b16f44e55c3c49281b445563d824
'2012-05-15T20:10:17-04:00'
describe
'292181' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQF' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
9e1b48cae2037f2e1e84a844e6576dbf
f7ca08a1986ae6418da435c4c0cb97cea4ae1756
'2012-05-15T20:06:38-04:00'
describe
'307316' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQG' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
b6df9eebd69dfb8dda54ce24890b0b2b
2f013193f6a07dfd3c38472ff39fa3ee230b26e1
describe
'296848' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQH' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
f038a14250fffc4c530fb3643f33d0ab
b507ace25d1ab6fc75b7f2d144223a52bee4b495
describe
'304077' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQI' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
a05da8c74d7ad290808be1c1f748fe79
bedd039cec65e49a751938fd95ca0606842cafd1
'2012-05-15T20:09:44-04:00'
describe
'295673' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQJ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
5b5b04803537d61bbedb79cf8954bf1e
dc2dcf6d5011b6d8d757d077c7a2a2a89029efc4
'2012-05-15T20:09:47-04:00'
describe
'307522' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQK' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
3bcf3ec1c209f891b0122f4625e491cc
c10e40ba445c01788345c18a7206664f619d8322
'2012-05-15T20:04:27-04:00'
describe
'297354' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQL' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
fb471890b5104aa28064f0f6fb0a04bb
0003366926d9eee3ee1d9ac44b2b32e747c477cc
'2012-05-15T20:05:17-04:00'
describe
'311604' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQM' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
d40dc832bffac68ec82cc7b73db7650c
10349702742cb4f5920c67d1b77b27fae753f023
'2012-05-15T20:11:20-04:00'
describe
'301104' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQN' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
ea79055eef99d7c0c8204bc703d627c4
1494f7baab97a65d7e6520860581c52c3a7c5735
describe
'301791' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQO' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
78471a4144ef05491bc368d14c4374c9
1b1f68c17147ca0857a77aab1d7617f1d656e022
describe
'301159' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQP' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
ced162adc4981bd39924f0cdbd93ba4a
a09063fc05389776d754e38815a49640cf034355
'2012-05-15T20:11:47-04:00'
describe
'320064' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQQ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
27c1e6d90d83cba1b71d3df5f3e8f32a
686992a840b51bed24d73b8784aa01d7c345eb55
describe
'301150' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQR' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
ab44bb688dc7a5ac15ad9595eb10948d
c0cf7f9958f2960407bbcf3e67fadb86fd67eba9
'2012-05-15T20:11:26-04:00'
describe
'312194' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQS' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
f7fc31fc8a296a268f341851b1bf3cfc
ad6373c6c1cd938b48e6866d560a20cb3e70a3f0
describe
'294143' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQT' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
7a5ae1eb197f6586a9bce0ac90cd4e6f
b35ecc70c1ea116ff405530c6b684564693aa9e0
'2012-05-15T20:06:59-04:00'
describe
'313150' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQU' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
37f898b289e5556a47ef0956cc3bc602
0374835cb6cc0ef9d2649baf17e029b69c8205cc
describe
'298904' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQV' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
57fc1b100a77d92848f78d38ea0a944a
0899397eb380089d4bdba63b7245241acfe9219e
'2012-05-15T20:12:39-04:00'
describe
'309553' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQW' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
f1a4a86c1e9a083c1100429a9378379a
a9417eed83019501a2b9f9fb82d6c2f05a1e39d0
'2012-05-15T20:09:33-04:00'
describe
'292160' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQX' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
c13e165a72094c124242e208cb81c069
2bc576bb309b8169e39c36f000410348d838df78
describe
'302639' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQY' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
ecb0bcd08316f8ded8d8e1a635357523
04114a9cf7fe3f02f4d8693e3806eb676cf29c41
'2012-05-15T20:04:47-04:00'
describe
'289279' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZQZ' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
f7b52cf8d546d1ac4fc5c605e05901c8
9454447bebe8647e9d9b8aa6043104d60049665c
'2012-05-15T20:08:43-04:00'
describe
'316436' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRA' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
9b40583ad7f30c8996052feb0f77f65f
013aa4031afd8ba31191ce3aabfd8e51f3b136c9
'2012-05-15T20:05:50-04:00'
describe
'290922' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRB' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
0621184e097de98e2d6fe615aadede36
e6c75cf9434ed8bd28fc709aef60cd5cb4854d27
describe
'307482' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRC' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
127a927da5a954799e3c52988672d460
aeb5cee8d5b47561d8761f3acedbbd3c62571bfd
'2012-05-15T20:07:46-04:00'
describe
'286029' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRD' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
9aa6fa387fe64895498c46c6ee6b8eb1
b7f2f649af124baa7fdb73f0c1f32e375c814174
'2012-05-15T20:06:54-04:00'
describe
'313796' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRE' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
52e3b562a12a8afb324b96ad2fcba085
ef692f2e49136b85c84bfa58d520b1cd1cdb0c3c
describe
'285777' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRF' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
feae8d9e6e75f60bfbd0d78871cc640d
dc804fdb41625963456a29eb2f0589e12b9c7f85
'2012-05-15T20:10:03-04:00'
describe
'1132487' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRG' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
9aee6dda56b547fa15b93e5c994ddf79
2c3e83de01e7ad83aaf8cbabf63dd2c598be8e69
describe
'301114' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRH' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
0a63cd052991d28407d40f3f6d89b23c
3e14580f480d90b23819ce9e21abcf54f52619c7
'2012-05-15T20:10:45-04:00'
describe
'316284' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRI' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
932a942eed99b4dca47a43dcfb2078c1
a747dc5dc677f7e46448c3b18d4b9d084322864d
'2012-05-15T20:07:58-04:00'
describe
'287162' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRJ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
66d283ac4524b069f4efb64f5d853e54
3efb17eab834d00e34513209c3403e023970cc19
'2012-05-15T20:11:39-04:00'
describe
'313079' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRK' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
ee7f298b3496702fe9877f89974b554a
f8a1584dcbf4a09b7111f63f4b0229cbc672f084
'2012-05-15T20:04:22-04:00'
describe
'298814' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRL' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
68100ba681e3d46b811b10bbd251ebab
6159a83394e5e4f8561b041e91566bdd76f4938c
describe
'316412' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRM' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
7312c8392cec5d0d960b566338f84846
91d71802a64068e546a102964c276d6ae92c8898
'2012-05-15T20:11:41-04:00'
describe
'301134' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRN' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
77dd26b2aaa559374f7b5d01f6d80305
7b7ed9080b677f471a21bd0390b753a739b4c652
describe
'309092' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRO' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
99f0ba5da5ea46150e408b863784e7f8
3d6d9a10e282aa957b08f294b02aa7d005fa7d96
'2012-05-15T20:08:40-04:00'
describe
'286133' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRP' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
204fd2df40a674fe26a77d9ea51e956a
f7f97cc1ed6e9debb7dffe3b6bde9cfdc9e256e3
'2012-05-15T20:11:50-04:00'
describe
'305459' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRQ' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
e92026c97cd2a99936b4ee01e30009fc
9cabf658d018769a9393c56f9a4092d8669e7777
'2012-05-15T20:04:40-04:00'
describe
'287267' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRR' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
113aa38fbfd2724a4d8916a52f2fe6d2
72a760b62251b8176511dccb88ea89c22cf4ff7b
describe
'313005' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRS' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
daac59eadc4a32ded74fcabb16419e45
af21b5e7a2127334ef124f9ebbe4851773150e86
describe
'295929' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRT' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
53060491d314a5ce84e5cef9183bf191
794219338f07ffa920ac3e8f6800f53769b7dfbb
'2012-05-15T20:04:29-04:00'
describe
'316281' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRU' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
6fbce03a5a4ef493fcec4f9f752e7a0d
0baecc66d0d30eea00341c47bbea6dc40c67a402
'2012-05-15T20:08:25-04:00'
describe
'298972' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRV' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
107a6474a046d92f6a8dddc5533d523e
db26271ffcc989e813a33583f816c43cf5bd7315
'2012-05-15T20:10:56-04:00'
describe
'314568' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRW' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
c6b06a5dfdfd88517e00ad0ad2216aa7
cde9dcec91099939eb2ca58e7320c6fc8b16690c
describe
'298900' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRX' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
1151d2346ee6b756a66171e23bdaecdf
d2e93298c5698c81c8de4c180cac22c587ebebed
describe
'304573' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRY' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
4f9ec45f7e7b45250f516c4d1347262a
bcb35e5be8030a85cd2a955b8290961d31397c5a
describe
'296914' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZRZ' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
a102d202b1e74e18b2e240e4dad5d4c6
25c3dda60357d28ba3eadbe993117bc5d1db9593
'2012-05-15T20:11:30-04:00'
describe
'307162' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSA' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
166fc92126611421f7388d6b121a21e5
be797c2577309736e0ac53eba4b89164ee34b9ca
describe
'301127' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSB' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
540622fa6ae5353307e8f8d78fc561a8
91ec98f18711d9e1c94ca31234bc9da91b779689
'2012-05-15T20:09:26-04:00'
describe
'314333' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSC' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
54594a896e1b6152708130e28c1837ac
aa2e92ea6208fce8a82c6fddc727dcd92240cd94
'2012-05-15T20:06:27-04:00'
describe
'1259622' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSD' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
d5ce98f3c25ff3f4498b634b51193b55
1dab390d4fc278aed438c5e0179a371a0cefe5f7
describe
'1238727' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSE' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
d246332d8d3de3125da1cd815ec16bba
92fb33f485093f57b77bb99445836492ee13c16e
describe
'30857200' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSF' 'sip-files00001.tif'
5ab00463888f7992d777369e4f317304
2fafed6a3e2e51bb083dbcae77d085431416b465
'2012-05-15T20:04:16-04:00'
describe
'33808072' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSG' 'sip-files00002.tif'
923003031cf9ff440d347b13443b7bc6
80f6582d8bbd917241953ce0c5a42af6dd7b769a
'2012-05-15T20:10:00-04:00'
describe
'2420136' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSH' 'sip-files00003.tif'
fcddf954c5ee5d7995d510f906b74f04
842091594b47259c3db23329033b1acaf855e2e1
'2012-05-15T20:08:37-04:00'
describe
'2412272' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSI' 'sip-files00004.tif'
a51152cc7dd90e14a2b4f84368c735bc
e6abd15bc52c1d326c96724fc3e138960a483c3a
'2012-05-15T20:07:24-04:00'
describe
'2505352' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSJ' 'sip-files00005.tif'
13cbe333eb9826818d1aa68db10fc8bc
f8fc156588b136b65365d65b5a12f0abdad15819
describe
'2429436' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSK' 'sip-files00006.tif'
24731f9bb9dcb9712860e8bdda2843be
80bb6633a6e6f5de58c0a84e63e574c33ffe3236
'2012-05-15T20:09:12-04:00'
describe
'2392772' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSL' 'sip-files00007.tif'
e999e5dc34e28f07ff6b8550ad526a73
640d6af463a0cc672f73f0a7412dcabc740f49c3
'2012-05-15T20:09:41-04:00'
describe
'26978928' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSM' 'sip-files00008.tif'
cb55bf123ac4697557f9d928581b272a
f6dba25e7a1d732712b13d6e6b8a968f8719ac3d
'2012-05-15T20:09:21-04:00'
describe
'2513676' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSN' 'sip-files00009.tif'
b230dd08cab8aaabadbf71f18662fa35
3093d4f3fa48739d5772520297ee83d945d288b0
'2012-05-15T20:04:24-04:00'
describe
'2221120' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSO' 'sip-files00010.tif'
c174aa9dad04d7fb5587f254f7905014
74542d1ccfb509a955389804b013a2960d2774c0
'2012-05-15T20:11:23-04:00'
describe
'2420792' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSP' 'sip-files00011.tif'
80b399b91d781d434366db8ce462352d
4f9951384fbcacdaa31c5fa1e6ef3651e2a3d669
'2012-05-15T20:09:13-04:00'
describe
'2166988' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSQ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
f5a402602fe03e428b2da317154bfb5b
baba04c8ed9be49d5b7469e567fb2d579419022f
'2012-05-15T20:08:06-04:00'
describe
'2483732' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSR' 'sip-files00013.tif'
d94c39dfc167281e34c8fba677706ece
f9968ef6ebd14e4a6005d92bef93aa5087d9f552
describe
'2156680' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSS' 'sip-files00014.tif'
e63700f67cb22b12a0b5158c147af47d
ec099deaa5c74a6ae5c8eed15900345c4870d91a
'2012-05-15T20:07:50-04:00'
describe
'2546172' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZST' 'sip-files00015.tif'
fd12d3f2c435d13a169d3d4eb460d4cc
851cdd989f6b66c6cbad487b964d253e83f206cf
'2012-05-15T20:12:50-04:00'
describe
'2308924' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSU' 'sip-files00016.tif'
692ef08db8af7c635e7eacf5b565e924
e9c40b770aa970a9cce9688bcb6ab74fd4d5de94
describe
'2488468' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSV' 'sip-files00017.tif'
ddc1db3b578b58c2137dac29c3e93d8f
75c6a8e0325319930f3802b72e3824de088612ca
describe
'2264260' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSW' 'sip-files00018.tif'
ee792e0208cd716ede2895902c1c2bba
b7f764bef8a5a7ea3b4f512c031c68a0b45866d8
'2012-05-15T20:12:45-04:00'
describe
'2527236' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSX' 'sip-files00019.tif'
3b3893ae1b230d14abf1450df95bfa9d
c8aa58b0b472be5672f528d2bc285dfe80f645c1
'2012-05-15T20:07:56-04:00'
describe
'9917848' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSY' 'sip-files00020.tif'
0164c47852a4232ec92adb41c3b222b6
bb0a1040d269fbd1e5e82268398cdc7fa1691840
'2012-05-15T20:05:47-04:00'
describe
'9677760' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZSZ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
718cc9f543e72b0bc23a9fe4843f0330
447d75415b00ede2f4229d7b3bb35bc48c283d4e
'2012-05-15T20:09:36-04:00'
describe
'8871260' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTA' 'sip-files00022.tif'
aaaf32c448d725e0ef6bf48f30606445
c87ad33c8489e4fada3c618a8162502449edb9c8
describe
'9378940' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTB' 'sip-files00023.tif'
e378f1b470cbd8f7c6a85ca31b6193b6
2101846297ba35ce8476631dc5e4c4b22b8dc63b
'2012-05-15T20:06:43-04:00'
describe
'9675432' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTC' 'sip-files00024.tif'
6e96fff2003da70b647116b704780201
659e7721293be0431445f09ac20b5cb3aee9caa8
'2012-05-15T20:03:55-04:00'
describe
'9206236' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTD' 'sip-files00025.tif'
c1b0d9613e2320f49d1a05bd6d974dbc
19fcc2d516a6c927caae72ed217a45fd8b31b4e1
'2012-05-15T20:05:33-04:00'
describe
'9918236' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTE' 'sip-files00026.tif'
2b169d8c76d2c0dff594543e4785cfdb
756a65f5ed8242a237e65c30bbab8805459844c0
'2012-05-15T20:03:58-04:00'
describe
'9143300' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTF' 'sip-files00027.tif'
952efaedf7f8e9b7d37c98a5ee29d26d
331233498080061368d862de7d152438cb8441b6
'2012-05-15T20:08:54-04:00'
describe
'9409380' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTG' 'sip-files00028.tif'
ccc6cb73ea5c90f5565f6237b992d759
7bf2d551c79b184096bee6f43c18c0e173248839
'2012-05-15T20:11:18-04:00'
describe
'8909516' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTH' 'sip-files00029.tif'
e1cf133ae483d61adee40c59a7007583
387a86c31692a2cd7b48b252b23c55d243d683e2
'2012-05-15T20:09:38-04:00'
describe
'9643616' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTI' 'sip-files00030.tif'
10cdc6373522f9df68a5c5054a91230f
a85a573e636d9ee92a3738609ec2bc252d2ad98c
'2012-05-15T20:11:40-04:00'
describe
'8690224' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTJ' 'sip-files00031.tif'
63980bea21d7fdbd511eb891f6068f7c
1d1d9c6905bbf052ea9d88534a4219ade15901b7
'2012-05-15T20:09:52-04:00'
describe
'9297580' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTK' 'sip-files00032.tif'
9315efbe1c83b243157a3d3a390fca50
8d13e68426297f73b5ca466dbb379ce32f020651
'2012-05-15T20:05:02-04:00'
describe
'8643384' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTL' 'sip-files00033.tif'
267db42422b07261e17d82895088947f
a9535e7db3777c6f4af1fef56276560b3c1922e8
'2012-05-15T20:07:08-04:00'
describe
'9149432' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTM' 'sip-files00034.tif'
496164ddb5b54156fdf894e610859c84
8bf1fcbdc6cd292d343f6bbf1583fe980c811915
'2012-05-15T20:05:24-04:00'
describe
'8427936' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTN' 'sip-files00035.tif'
5c5a5fcc992f926d35153fe93f8cb409
eb6fafde02169f4e3ff988c534aa4d07750282d7
'2012-05-15T20:04:44-04:00'
describe
'9005164' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTO' 'sip-files00036.tif'
4874312bf0ced6d0868716df70a33a2c
102b18b04e52a72a074fb30596b1edfd54530e0e
'2012-05-15T20:04:50-04:00'
describe
'8868468' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTP' 'sip-files00037.tif'
0b8dce9f4fc81fc801a6c5aab7e84dbe
e0c5c5bef2a57eabc5e1f5a5f36140c939d9985e
'2012-05-15T20:08:21-04:00'
describe
'2322492' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTQ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
5495233590801a9d6d67824fe7386b14
9254d43935153842659fd1ce3844ee7c5295d88d
describe
'2463728' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTR' 'sip-files00039.tif'
159e25c077c8d7a07af1d1201a8a2bed
7ab7e859ea1606598ee2d1c62096349da22ed520
describe
'2332596' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTS' 'sip-files00040.tif'
3d93b8c058622608d964aefb569697c0
8ed7be83391d26d7d3cb4934e9f75beb1a9a4bac
'2012-05-15T20:04:26-04:00'
describe
'2418244' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTT' 'sip-files00041.tif'
b795c15f0180dd99f38ebe8f27490afe
cb3b53e4a375c99015ff502094fefa2e092d6600
describe
'2354696' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTU' 'sip-files00042.tif'
d77c75de5c572e3056c6f9725102ac01
c719f0fbd79408085d2c5d917b4bcc985ab91dfe
'2012-05-15T20:11:42-04:00'
describe
'2401688' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTV' 'sip-files00043.tif'
24139dd18e3974e92999f97c98783469
ae74f7bf668019ae7bc6bb31a7211f92d68b956d
'2012-05-15T20:10:21-04:00'
describe
'2381660' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTW' 'sip-files00044.tif'
b4eb86eababe4e1d0dca7b3827aeaedb
8c7153b65ec6e499fae0c5565c79e6683595935e
'2012-05-15T20:06:46-04:00'
describe
'2499808' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTX' 'sip-files00045.tif'
56534ea26be393c13b17d9ffc39ef28c
1bba8bd4816a9bf979f7df1da8ddc33cf6c892d2
'2012-05-15T20:08:55-04:00'
describe
'2372392' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTY' 'sip-files00046.tif'
6182681da858480b1eabb11a9d661520
22b2f620ff9f7124b52726aa0f9f6c5a4d3d693c
'2012-05-15T20:07:11-04:00'
describe
'2446672' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZTZ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
a13b1da20a778688fa3370da9fb4f4aa
f7b341824710a6e4efcf766143848813e09f1679
'2012-05-15T20:08:02-04:00'
describe
'2332760' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUA' 'sip-files00048.tif'
c96a45b164e5a01579aa9cf036bf05ca
41330a4169be7b1dd281846a434b311eeea1de3d
'2012-05-15T20:06:52-04:00'
describe
'2468528' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUB' 'sip-files00049.tif'
18859ba4a61ed5536caba9b9253fdccd
0e04a25349d96df15a2963699e7b8875398c9dc6
'2012-05-15T20:05:23-04:00'
describe
'2405524' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUC' 'sip-files00050.tif'
6420b59d7b6956ddcc08efa280ee3910
b930c52e5b57116a1139d4e61aa0cecfc3194cb0
describe
'2372364' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUD' 'sip-files00051.tif'
70ffdcd42133ef5d4dcc1f093d2643be
fc76b2162098028baf7cbda74ac5237aa5c99241
'2012-05-15T20:05:15-04:00'
describe
'2426376' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUE' 'sip-files00052.tif'
82484c386978f38c2545a55b5f9d692f
cbc1469e7ba333296a023f34a631346ffac75019
'2012-05-15T20:07:02-04:00'
describe
'2410604' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUF' 'sip-files00053.tif'
ef31da76a122b13d6a6ecef14306fc6c
81c17c202da721e162bbb13b642ae0a69be07409
'2012-05-15T20:12:44-04:00'
describe
'2190352' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUG' 'sip-files00054.tif'
28d85705fdf3f0cc6c0dbd4accae45aa
6476b8850d3b3bd9b2ba4d3c110021c45efa2eef
'2012-05-15T20:08:16-04:00'
describe
'2468632' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUH' 'sip-files00055.tif'
b8a90402621fd1b5494c1635c837de83
c581b91efa97b50f7845c8540da90a34e9ee6d3c
describe
'2291800' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUI' 'sip-files00056.tif'
bf28d615584b923b02035c7a2b42606a
179a4386188a81b818f3b03d55dbb4a2fca5517c
describe
'2254128' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUJ' 'sip-files00057.tif'
92cf70978eb445d435fc75a72f5401f3
57ae31c8c568c76558468609aff6e51d64b23ece
describe
'2305788' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUK' 'sip-files00058.tif'
65e031c70d07c75aa139f323723712d8
6a5119171143bb834bd1ae03989b5375d34534f5
'2012-05-15T20:12:32-04:00'
describe
'2389512' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUL' 'sip-files00059.tif'
3a27c607f7e9d8967a8340b9238a2eef
7668e40e46a1b74a307407f472d463cb0f4b5129
'2012-05-15T20:04:56-04:00'
describe
'2298904' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUM' 'sip-files00060.tif'
2569ac5af510dff7da8afccc1c969b93
0c02b62729bd2ad10aa1c32a0a54e92961590839
describe
'2475064' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUN' 'sip-files00061.tif'
e175bec37691d655685959c46850e582
7ada184f2af5ee3a0e97caa264b814d6785d924d
'2012-05-15T20:06:11-04:00'
describe
'2299980' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUO' 'sip-files00062.tif'
59edf9164a89ebaed70c075daf79bf24
6d5dc2dd42d09d69fd1d9fdb416385aeede5167d
'2012-05-15T20:05:43-04:00'
describe
'2401096' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUP' 'sip-files00063.tif'
2984c21bf3105b4c45b313f8e5a2d6d4
46be32c90d795068269b24a8b82b427583f0fd12
'2012-05-15T20:04:06-04:00'
describe
'2296608' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUQ' 'sip-files00064.tif'
433a171a9006ca045fec3525e4803996
c32deb8b127a9dfad76a1cb68d06492b44247979
describe
'2488060' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUR' 'sip-files00065.tif'
eb4da5a9f0762f188bc9bfd22a8abda9
94ee7525324a4de3a58197c77fad46cf70aaffbf
describe
'2341844' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUS' 'sip-files00066.tif'
f1de293ed40dcf258ee323ef2d889203
2bbd501ff180142a0a21272a172cd6dd73f0fa0a
describe
'2450016' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUT' 'sip-files00067.tif'
f76b2b69c23a2ac1a6a6c6744548a215
7c453d9a07f18aebb79f753cd00683c6c9e1a942
describe
'2296584' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUU' 'sip-files00068.tif'
56fcc5bb4bf29cdc8aa9affc77f1cf17
5a9697424f1ff8ccb55b81d5c192ee8eb24ffe1f
'2012-05-15T20:08:15-04:00'
describe
'2447928' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUV' 'sip-files00069.tif'
4574c602e5aa377ada0b95e398902477
185180fc38acaaa3c5ac33c1489254efc9ea5fee
'2012-05-15T20:12:15-04:00'
describe
'2353736' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUW' 'sip-files00070.tif'
5baba0c42c988156f654aa8978e06ae7
a9abd354a6923462e3e904e83c49fc2693a1f5ac
describe
'2472916' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUX' 'sip-files00071.tif'
7b0fb95abf3c5ec65a1d5ac7717735a7
1736f64fd5c8b04e7dd252a249e9c84172f76286
'2012-05-15T20:10:08-04:00'
describe
'2316968' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUY' 'sip-files00072.tif'
dd043c1905b31fefeaface4b1eff9cd7
72eaeba875d0127af578090d7aeb83df962292b7
describe
'8505672' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZUZ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
2e5d299675d3abf598913b017b796a94
35c171bee8598ca9f0991ddddfd09762b57c0875
'2012-05-15T20:05:07-04:00'
describe
'2312092' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVA' 'sip-files00074.tif'
974c7d906d24d5d436c3f10d57837804
4c39f0180f38baec76ee53cdf66f8dfe4d0cf11c
'2012-05-15T20:04:38-04:00'
describe
'2372884' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVB' 'sip-files00075.tif'
6d4ac77130e7017de7ee1214ac1d4a86
facd919c99465601b8131827436a14df4e857a77
'2012-05-15T20:09:48-04:00'
describe
'2346388' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVC' 'sip-files00076.tif'
8cb66d9d8145b398a4541d22cd8058e0
1f31676f278fb8dc496ae4c02bd234c286f5caa3
'2012-05-15T20:06:50-04:00'
describe
'2467096' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVD' 'sip-files00077.tif'
1bfa1ec2609987f6df487641888207a1
17629f82641d93c8e5b79042ab304336a2d958c2
describe
'2383176' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVE' 'sip-files00078.tif'
8d0f97673daae13098e2825122495cb0
90bcb08c49935978eea2ee97f169b4c6c912e91a
'2012-05-15T20:05:13-04:00'
describe
'2441256' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVF' 'sip-files00079.tif'
e192fc46ebc371fef0dee30774120721
ec1b77fddcbc5ebd5e393633b7dacb59e30694b8
'2012-05-15T20:03:57-04:00'
describe
'2373752' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVG' 'sip-files00080.tif'
02f71d65fae351b637918e9cab99ded4
e6f4c9269fc01eb4c866efe54447422565b21f9b
'2012-05-15T20:11:19-04:00'
describe
'2468664' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVH' 'sip-files00081.tif'
e4a9b199ce3a91ed4cc63f1d65e2ff2c
756cad68fd58229c87ceb8c6beafcdd12ef3c135
describe
'2388528' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVI' 'sip-files00082.tif'
0440f84ec6696c2931cc436a9bf6edba
9908902a1312589df79aeed21f04946010690cf1
describe
'2500888' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVJ' 'sip-files00083.tif'
c11024b39f8db2e86797da12a1f8ddc6
9c2cbc286e58aca36c448dcb20684fbdf814e83a
'2012-05-15T20:09:11-04:00'
describe
'2417692' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVK' 'sip-files00084.tif'
b93f2243cc3089f879ecf8dc8052c251
59a8d7dc21ba97d94b2d17233f92c02498ecc50a
'2012-05-15T20:06:57-04:00'
describe
'2422284' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVL' 'sip-files00085.tif'
1914ed5f0eb38cb0f8a90705e51b6d3e
75a6f6dc51460133b82b6e1e07d9be0799339f88
'2012-05-15T20:10:14-04:00'
describe
'2417412' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVM' 'sip-files00086.tif'
049b151d54b9544ac455128572ef3ca9
250a0907ba6938b84c9e4f0b4868a511542fa0a9
describe
'2568648' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVN' 'sip-files00087.tif'
710038e78fce216c0da46bdab8b8a3d1
8affc0008b35aceabb89cea1782eba77b055e86d
'2012-05-15T20:12:36-04:00'
describe
'2417532' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVO' 'sip-files00088.tif'
7073c7924baaa5460031265326a642fb
6bf89ad4708d941f29dbd9e3b55ada84da5fbdfd
'2012-05-15T20:12:37-04:00'
describe
'2506104' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVP' 'sip-files00089.tif'
9ecf5bd3136beef593346508feb7b827
7f0294adef61bc005836ddbc10cfa7b5b3a660df
'2012-05-15T20:06:06-04:00'
describe
'2362280' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVQ' 'sip-files00090.tif'
bd635046bd06b119572346fa8be56f0a
47b9123d6efa77a6044af479732f2fb7346be80e
'2012-05-15T20:06:53-04:00'
describe
'2513820' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVR' 'sip-files00091.tif'
2a1971c70b8ccfa7d594ad633618804d
5bee800add507c117d2d41c1624ca35357955757
'2012-05-15T20:05:14-04:00'
describe
'2399908' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVS' 'sip-files00092.tif'
8e8ed12e08c37b0127cd2f99203fa1b3
2cd09f18e5f4b8c4e0421df1439526013b381184
'2012-05-15T20:11:32-04:00'
describe
'2484768' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVT' 'sip-files00093.tif'
0e95a7b02f63f40f2536a828b64b1e79
c8589ac365402d8aeb15433d066b1dd3e854f878
'2012-05-15T20:04:00-04:00'
describe
'2345976' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVU' 'sip-files00094.tif'
8c75699d46fc44bc51e1c7eb0eec0db4
d7ef6cb8ba6789c072c04b635c1dbc4b7f3c0f68
describe
'2429368' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVV' 'sip-files00095.tif'
68590f7b9733f424c09f22b092a2287b
04920c2e5e7682c396f0f231a4db63f216d7a22d
'2012-05-15T20:10:51-04:00'
describe
'2323432' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVW' 'sip-files00096.tif'
9c7e454c0b1a6dc0a86a6ef30f95ea09
86eacf06622d2e2343c10823265bdc75a536ff99
'2012-05-15T20:09:39-04:00'
describe
'2539908' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVX' 'sip-files00097.tif'
09c87fcbfcbe0d4c80e23e9fb01890e6
3e7182e6a952187b175776ef31d1244afcbb271a
describe
'2336576' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVY' 'sip-files00098.tif'
1dfee9bb5148be04444b9fafdaefa53e
2795736c92de56f56b99269dd0ee892449b0d10d
'2012-05-15T20:10:38-04:00'
describe
'2470452' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZVZ' 'sip-files00099.tif'
14e0d8ef11d7f24fa4f058825cfb5b44
5fb8ad878cdf586d9d18193df232414df9e6cac8
'2012-05-15T20:08:41-04:00'
describe
'2296720' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWA' 'sip-files00100.tif'
ea3822fbd47a56b7cd9020219864c18a
3a13b7b940b632c21f3178f98f5f6bd139735ad9
describe
'2518472' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWB' 'sip-files00101.tif'
9ad59b9a33840fb5f350f4f61f085c6a
423213419f373ba53356742c08d83b3de8e98952
'2012-05-15T20:11:08-04:00'
describe
'2294280' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWC' 'sip-files00102.tif'
97649e155f6d6c2af3e6ef321c352c79
f371220205bdd45e77fd6e1bd126a72b27b64200
'2012-05-15T20:07:34-04:00'
describe
'9075672' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWD' 'sip-files00103.tif'
40538659b630d99e9cfef96c1659d37b
3cfa119c3356b55467255a7867eb0b770e1ce034
'2012-05-15T20:10:28-04:00'
describe
'2417784' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWE' 'sip-files00104.tif'
a71a3a10930455bb5a3717aa23f2a62d
6b3659308003964e4ed80a0a683f32e6bcc4a19a
'2012-05-15T20:10:19-04:00'
describe
'2538980' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWF' 'sip-files00105.tif'
2336b6807cee9091f1c33751b5d72b48
7d67d62b0f7153b98669e7efed97efee2352a454
describe
'2306068' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWG' 'sip-files00106.tif'
77b643af46ba326b93de6656ad6965d9
988db98763ab59ad830964df64a8527e883912f2
'2012-05-15T20:04:53-04:00'
describe
'2512872' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWH' 'sip-files00107.tif'
2fcfb91f653177acb06564bbae76d20d
3d0b7aa5dbc259626d45c8000c1a5289a224929d
describe
'2399812' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWI' 'sip-files00108.tif'
c26918b6b17d779a057c026e6e10f537
2a3229fbcf8a25eef9f519f4d9a2b447a3020678
describe
'2539892' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWJ' 'sip-files00109.tif'
6cfa0a78f1ad3fb4594a38ff47652b86
0ce628fb7f627181a921dddd335f5731b1d4d5d6
'2012-05-15T20:11:33-04:00'
describe
'2417728' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWK' 'sip-files00110.tif'
55deefb4d16e8b8c18045dc1a57ed19a
d8787d76dd89dea6f45af3221859548c5ca36926
'2012-05-15T20:08:24-04:00'
describe
'2480880' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWL' 'sip-files00111.tif'
e100c6e047d0dbc4dee4f9727943f735
1c9e71d5c2870fcf2505187eb69d3ebc0a43c04c
'2012-05-15T20:11:54-04:00'
describe
'2297548' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWM' 'sip-files00112.tif'
44232bbee86093ce4fff17ea87fbfcbb
fbd600edf300408a43fe62b67c10dbd1bba95c02
describe
'2452252' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWN' 'sip-files00113.tif'
8ae13638f4e6d62b35396558e36fe707
d3ee65ec4c653c7e0fae606de3a42160c6be7082
'2012-05-15T20:04:32-04:00'
describe
'2306716' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWO' 'sip-files00114.tif'
db446bf0eb91b6a8d9a8dec6444d0d69
de9c8ad38473bfb7e470d3785944f8296b2f3f70
'2012-05-15T20:05:56-04:00'
describe
'2512812' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWP' 'sip-files00115.tif'
65845a24b4558a6d0824f3a5bc677fc9
cd3265200537e9425543947907cb009e9ef7f49b
describe
'2376828' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWQ' 'sip-files00116.tif'
3f5a9b3f6ed847b6c34f569326b2b950
6d58638c61cbad1f94020f5772e09251221a57cd
describe
'2538584' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWR' 'sip-files00117.tif'
7dc54304491ac6b7018170cf85e7c455
f0fef7e70ab545e07f7d889ed3eed2f3556afd87
describe
'2401328' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWS' 'sip-files00118.tif'
3c0eb5e37c929387a124fb6e9e7287a6
6f1ebf83e8f9dae2993d966f3c1884b7e506d8c4
'2012-05-15T20:11:17-04:00'
describe
'2525624' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWT' 'sip-files00119.tif'
03260047ab6e7c324dc307646aead5d5
0ab7855ffd41da3f98a8e3b6ad88c32c9aaca606
'2012-05-15T20:07:33-04:00'
describe
'2399688' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWU' 'sip-files00120.tif'
1056fc75dae4d228b399f2c092980c3c
77e72346115aa95272ac25e57b2995277db3ad49
'2012-05-15T20:05:01-04:00'
describe
'2444608' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWV' 'sip-files00121.tif'
e6f2c938592bf1b46bd93ca7305b8df2
da1e355a43d4c3d79952d71a97a7e6a05c71fdb8
describe
'2383724' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWW' 'sip-files00122.tif'
ae7d44fb6958a49a3f15876253da9930
fd7247b572e3a4e4f31678b81a2a4d3abd1e745b
'2012-05-15T20:06:04-04:00'
describe
'2466272' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWX' 'sip-files00123.tif'
b6fba552210d4b7bf49bddc76a29379e
ce8c54135c6e622f47d98380fb92bd197f599d1c
'2012-05-15T20:11:00-04:00'
describe
'2417424' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWY' 'sip-files00124.tif'
c46d243f2b9d4b2b064b3fc9db26bb41
5fac4770b33f7ab852baca140a2c0dbb2290bf11
'2012-05-15T20:07:10-04:00'
describe
'2523380' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZWZ' 'sip-files00125.tif'
d6ae89d8a8b47ae83c474cf5a9c5175e
c442a4c73175c9553f978a4a69892603d0b2f4c3
'2012-05-15T20:11:44-04:00'
describe
'10092040' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXA' 'sip-files00126.tif'
b9a6fa00ba0b55cd98aba3b2c55b4568
74c0057ecc89090139040606998e03ec08b89315
'2012-05-15T20:10:41-04:00'
describe
'9924040' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXB' 'sip-files00127.tif'
d335a70f596b94126cadb16cda76137c
202436542d9f04159e432e067bb8bc4a0c1ef647
'2012-05-15T20:09:37-04:00'
describe
'153042' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXC' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
9d1bd2024cae172d6816ef625e550901
fc42d00e3f7dbf95078797386a541d24f3ba1a23
'2012-05-15T20:06:39-04:00'
describe
'52376' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXD' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
e67498d35caf8a79818f544fd652dd62
69a04f2802d53f58303c70832dd766219f137a8d
describe
'38828' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXE' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
3290e8c45026a2865af5e20e382457a4
d320b3416d4a3162f7141b36fb9a3551dfc041a6
describe
'41741' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXF' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
c75619483c2a4d3e8241a0bb32c7dbf0
7f80210b81206c3176f8527ebef654cbce1d6c38
describe
'27208' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXG' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
bb564f7664e78f93216adb68a15924d7
8ebe4999122a0ec6ee52567156811ca94020cc8b
describe
'30859' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXH' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
e9c8f5e1ffbaff60735460d131f0612f
8fc5edd4d09dc0e2c1b64f99decbab418c51d849
'2012-05-15T20:10:12-04:00'
describe
'29598' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXI' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
8e9a3e83783af7d63b550f9f18435a50
e56358d192367b20bb2986e8693633bfe38e190e
'2012-05-15T20:08:58-04:00'
describe
'80953' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXJ' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
73979d2c5dbb44a78a5d39a6df999752
41fe55c058da022520c21084d22dc4b51c9fc921
describe
'73687' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXK' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
c219e20fff8be4dae3f75e268b9583f5
6338441feaccbc14937bde3693c42a3c709c19ee
'2012-05-15T20:10:59-04:00'
describe
'42720' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXL' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
8a6906e04f0aaebb5bf659a60ea3ce70
d3e228edd305c736f1108de2fc7bfa0c80bb7d50
describe
'84605' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXM' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
ebe7a0a1ef7302b422707ecec62eafe2
3ffaf8f3280f78ce329f2da46fb2212fd73d524d
'2012-05-15T20:07:54-04:00'
describe
'90203' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXN' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
6c09adcee8bbd46817a5db6d7110dca9
eb826755b482349a6b7bcf27e9285b458cac37e3
describe
'79590' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXO' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
d93a96d3a4648db54157f6106be12ba5
c4a062e81f55c2c5283c5f2ec978cfb303edde8f
describe
'122048' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXP' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
d4b99ecc489f274ae60bfc1119e52061
602c8d54252bf4c31a4bf9988e03ded2e672d221
'2012-05-15T20:08:26-04:00'
describe
'61955' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXQ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
b2c94702de8fe0b11a78f5a4c0d905f3
c163752b206e10fd44759362e1d4396b6e52e49a
'2012-05-15T20:10:29-04:00'
describe
'89086' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXR' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
9526a66f452b1e647f5e7ba1b1422846
ad7d2042ab53c2d7c568ac7ef66e5d7a4d1d890b
'2012-05-15T20:06:51-04:00'
describe
'103255' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXS' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
815fd4934ba9034396f5c1da02882b6d
1af8da11a6b9efec3c3d4716904cb5a3abdaccd6
describe
'103412' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXT' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
27d54c7c1cd349b1fb88c72be862f535
aaf1235b8ca4fe76348a302b7ece25af28cbe514
'2012-05-15T20:08:13-04:00'
describe
'86976' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXU' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
928bcc9f1905c829471f9c977e6617d7
f6b3fea1500fe9421d6e9719f892cfda9e2a6b32
'2012-05-15T20:10:25-04:00'
describe
'105412' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXV' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
ed498f87fe80b96e2ea261dabf02ae00
faf7035f5d20c183fe37d289e352045f8d908656
'2012-05-15T20:10:34-04:00'
describe
'99664' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXW' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
887fda7b5d8a4b75afde834ed4976003
9e6203873fba867884027473c0e02ca15658bb0e
describe
'96368' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXX' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
0abe1b85695fd198f7c5ee99248f1e0b
eda8c377073978e7c9cd39b0d9bf9f053a0e4841
'2012-05-15T20:09:22-04:00'
describe
'115965' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXY' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
4f77d6413dc1fccba6768ee3e60c7e54
b3e42bfd136c508d28eb402ef475430c605153ed
describe
'79587' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZXZ' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
c742b7435a6513dc9bf423002b5038c7
9d627b1a94777395458ed6c35f3000f61016310c
describe
'105508' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYA' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
5cf90abd643943a4dfd3640040e47dab
12d8219b6f79b59a1eda83f7f16f8a1ac28800ab
'2012-05-15T20:06:01-04:00'
describe
'105573' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYB' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
39e0b92739a76f5257f95cb1c61f8772
88454c28f9a29666088a99894204fa52851a6e4a
'2012-05-15T20:09:03-04:00'
describe
'104547' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYC' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
abaed14c69557bef030cd3a98b5d3b04
33b0dd29c851c34238d9909e12a9fe854fc93190
describe
'96436' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYD' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
9255774bec5e059544eae7a45c32655c
7901161a8690acb4d3da4fef106e553da1622460
describe
'106621' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYE' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
dccef8f5c79dd9739beb542b30b78f6e
3dfd7b508f092a8286482ca3e6259258ff906614
describe
'96689' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYF' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
6fcf1acd7bc9cdbc390af5bef2a83f7f
d98ce08fb610d85fb6d4bc6f63f4658f6ed81336
describe
'101135' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYG' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
826868fd842db5649813dfe2f6962bf0
65885418f6476159e6abb0747a88783b5c1baddf
'2012-05-15T20:10:07-04:00'
describe
'101491' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYH' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
fa1e7e452e7f17fb0aeb57c33b1d7f9c
26085912517c22a91f3a05bfb52268d7ab66c61a
describe
'104575' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYI' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
6f0695a88a32320329ca8f6dd5cc13a6
9e424a04090f4bfaba31f940f9db9c5bc89ba0d6
describe
'94445' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYJ' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
794d0c2ce18340f24f7339441cfe03a5
770d05b1fcb2f8d1609197b5f0a11fd1c698b8a8
describe
'95073' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYK' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
c3471456d1bea12af43463cf4591920d
43a09a83f018c6ccf60d3a16b06bff1f35109f95
'2012-05-15T20:10:06-04:00'
describe
'100389' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYL' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
cec186a8f07646e0fa7b90f83beb481e
c590e5318c5d1a4bffed1946df138607fa99a77b
'2012-05-15T20:09:29-04:00'
describe
'97937' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYM' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
4dccdc6363905c1f5a3450f1a3c501d2
dd16cf907b0f271c08979bde6aa33ad801a0ca0b
'2012-05-15T20:12:23-04:00'
describe
'64104' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYN' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
78ab05e944e7b7ac87d74cf9525c6926
838809871b246af34e4697c703205e7ff7664fa5
describe
'85974' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYO' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
681cfa25130ce58f9c365cc24ce194d0
8fe05e1fb329ba2392ee954d9b4158d1f85e7f5c
'2012-05-15T20:08:10-04:00'
describe
'81971' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYP' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
9fbce91a485777f357fbc36809f9d199
840e0cdf39aaa0cad7d9c706246bbaa8933ae206
'2012-05-15T20:05:35-04:00'
describe
'109934' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYQ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
3726e919b85353c85776dd5fff4c42bb
103630020690b68257dcf9968d29e19c9822a678
describe
'86205' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYR' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
15e7b87bde0a1fe2ae5fc494fc537710
c2f6624d6267d5ba0b04876e54983be30f4c6c01
describe
'115187' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYS' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
848d48b0cbfc83c1f1b2cf6b0a20453e
2325da09963cf24881f12a577910f1304d3e8e7c
'2012-05-15T20:10:15-04:00'
describe
'88442' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYT' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
828d2f454e2c19fcd36acc172729f26a
58f3c2c9626bff0a0b3100800fdfe03ec7325741
describe
'129024' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYU' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
23f8e7fec5f9c9b70d9f7abd0d9ec471
a9487293b9db9a43fef93281b11a10a600c0b5cc
describe
'92029' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYV' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
d53326fb982907b1c2b5bff4acdc9281
af4c42c37322fa6e0823743951e565a8cf153d4a
'2012-05-15T20:11:57-04:00'
describe
'126379' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYW' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
c9f340707e0ed7777559196469670315
e653125176af430d248f43d6c5fbee5421e8f208
describe
'88307' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYX' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
e1a1c950342f0c67ead47562fc009876
b0f00b829b1a716ec510e9ee72ed19b6b022f643
describe
'114195' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYY' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
d9dbbd22fe25662caedb27d9fab9f80e
d3d8e8c9d7c64ec207ade36e60436c5706b2d5c0
describe
'90277' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZYZ' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
3493c51785caaf48ca643b38b254f48a
1e6349d93d20175d9471e2fd96138ac94a655046
'2012-05-15T20:10:18-04:00'
describe
'118404' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZA' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
5f79b2314b615236aa186ae70b1ae7a8
004b2b76a792687b8bda9b395bddb755be4b9cac
describe
'93699' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZB' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
6d47e832278a4fe85e0c67b8185ebf05
f8ec729136529d22402617e2560c949edbfe87c6
describe
'86612' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZC' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
c72cf35fc6f74f0ee13c79ecfa16deb7
69c6f5776645e87d369c96784fb899b7fc4fd989
'2012-05-15T20:05:40-04:00'
describe
'63451' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZD' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
6099417609008805bccb20cbd5abdf05
87479ad32bfd9126a6de4d045fd6fdc6a54cb6fb
describe
'87305' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZE' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
e0971c56a249e3d9233a39ea7a310e11
d691df49bae1cba9e2921fe1d543bfb75b46673b
describe
'66635' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZF' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
89129bbc6d48b135dc98c10903c25e85
c88428866e4c69b4100efb280fe7e72f333fed36
describe
'88578' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZG' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
8347f205a4ab62ab40be9a1723d82df4
21f7b503c29eaa2df7447012a550a3e88d9f7e7a
describe
'75556' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZH' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
fb994f898b7079dd7f1c20fec12e7710
6d1cc5133a26f7077b240df8dc7bac24ebbafbc4
describe
'68845' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZI' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
ea301354e27f6da430e581edce19e042
4dfcb52f5fd761af07f12d127b56b9804bc679b3
describe
'71727' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZJ' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
428d40c616003c758ded779ac0929880
5dde6db38761529b96eec128d29de18952734824
describe
'112232' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZK' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
490af6472c54359976f6e163efd81cc1
652564ba2f656ad2b887b7930559e8b48298f4d8
'2012-05-15T20:11:38-04:00'
describe
'97335' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZL' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
5b1bae0dd6230ff9b9a2a7291501f9c5
4cac48af209a1d8b4f54a1b79b51e3136231a321
describe
'111939' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZM' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
12ae1c6573aab3599e8b8dd7b7ecf53b
46b7514196697c109b20057f588e64e714eb6db4
describe
'81197' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZN' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
550a79f3975861b3c0ea331ef8f2df53
3f8293b3e5b73d51a2d972696b4a77bbdc563326
describe
'114529' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZO' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
4cb006924cbf7dbe1890e4bd3d5e67ec
65ca731f925ec28a02d0445922e1938cb41c07c2
'2012-05-15T20:11:46-04:00'
describe
'90225' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZP' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
5eb16dd6ded22d0894d7a8760e257a7b
51a520d694eb1867f85ee4dcc5cdcc3ff2352d9b
describe
'96500' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZQ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
0b15533cc052c0803ca7b62c82b2bdea
7e3eafbf59f60bc520c0b53cb50660b1d9e49d14
'2012-05-15T20:10:49-04:00'
describe
'85202' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZR' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
08b288942a749f9cda5dbe01c5cae1db
cc0514a778e86f89ade5d6e193e567dadc4335e7
'2012-05-15T20:05:34-04:00'
describe
'101436' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZS' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
8f29b86b432614db3462a7b43937df96
3727c10ef175c1738fa66e3cc5a6aae075b0dddc
'2012-05-15T20:10:46-04:00'
describe
'85774' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZT' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
16543cf25ffe20457f1bc29e198a50ba
3ded0a9a4bcc8a8abf2cd175c492e3d4113c1819
'2012-05-15T20:07:47-04:00'
describe
'101568' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZU' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
394cf3c039f79a7b30f48b526a2d40f7
5483154b077a16d8e8ea5f09f86795916f8496bc
describe
'34911' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZV' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
b42cb7b8399569110cc9baa3d07da3a7
452ad5c28742a0b9358b6bf56e33fb1c92a34f3c
describe
'79360' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZW' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
99760fb86b81afaa6bad5f446d856e48
17914b211f76814fdfd0eb52a0c230d576d2b23a
'2012-05-15T20:08:03-04:00'
describe
'65783' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZX' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
71177dfec399d57e71fe0555add2566b
b791c0568534620fe4631220789b472c1d95d769
describe
'89249' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZY' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
649864a51da1e5529e596effb6a20e01
90af08f359b96160dfcfea686261fe67f37d573b
describe
'72128' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AACZZZ' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
e75c0c2bf0a82b9b6bf6c2b7b2f15551
2f098e01303b121a87bcba022a9dbe0d30b1bf7a
describe
'108995' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAA' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
b6d793395c32775903df0ecf70e5eb95
cc875e5cd575998adf2bf7840e48058547e23c01
'2012-05-15T20:05:48-04:00'
describe
'84925' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAB' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
b28d996bfabe65b597bf5a538d02e6d6
e681cff21d55bc414f8d5ee068de46a424648a02
describe
'106307' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAC' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
88188f5b17536f3b43f18f733a49f6ec
3baa1f675c4c2d831d353e367c3dd2d3e6691087
describe
'88653' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAD' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
c258f1ecbaa2bd14abdd9dc31e707d38
e9c3590d04659cd60527ef83006355097917fd6a
'2012-05-15T20:06:23-04:00'
describe
'110153' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAE' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
203a3c2e4ed984a53ed0d57eac1fd261
1eb5fd704ffb94a418fa849e38f16049473b86d3
describe
'125871' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAF' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
ca6d92ee92329c822e76da264ea042d1
4757a416230ed54513eb9434b83b1cac41352158
describe
'72476' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAG' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
4961865f200db5f2b542ea29070de16b
9893b5f8a2ad30821e888ede3b18f08795031ffe
describe
'98585' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAH' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
0b6081540d474a1df3da3e62d6264f28
09b8098cdd275765804e75ec320dce3a701a5c28
describe
'52460' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAI' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
ff50f905f7f22d4d16ec413d9732d42e
aa554bda60f8c0178402f4ff9be162e62bfd1089
describe
'67148' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAJ' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
5206722ed69b40837eb188491639759b
4319e5f1365607954387bb4170c3335d38ac4567
'2012-05-15T20:10:35-04:00'
describe
'54067' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAK' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
266289979712e505757c61daca97c734
fa7bb53f90c1a5e74a99d709e5e4d81e0fbfa860
'2012-05-15T20:10:02-04:00'
describe
'87464' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAL' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
7a43fed0f88bac0d8b6311b913d55958
2d685ff17e1acd00666187fd7e35c3e811b59105
describe
'82065' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAM' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
053bae7853ae238e7d251f9b782836d6
a7d54069fed68964331c7a8244c3dfa92b6206a4
describe
'89148' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAN' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
67c4521173737032a7403260066916da
1d1d37ca6c023bce6af65e4f920f0c9c076c36e6
'2012-05-15T20:05:59-04:00'
describe
'76933' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAO' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
f10236258a12f9bafad07eaeacf474ee
15553ab671fe13ab0fa8b573961e0721ea33ca6e
describe
'125339' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAP' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
7b4af07f668f6b7f54b2ac87385e89f9
94ee44b6c3c86bf5eba25bfe5357cd03b9ecfb33
describe
'82904' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAQ' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
78002f1bd4ee471e72e17a5a3567acd6
151ec455e0f7760aa76ccebdd62f72f64fec9cbb
describe
'112740' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAR' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
befd5e560103b03c1e24039f7fe60662
5f94334ac4e0073127f32b7205f761f4897a3c2a
describe
'79789' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAS' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
f77e06170136a3f04b885271fe39fe66
6e8d5bfe6728ec36a76c0191a61bcae811ddac3d
'2012-05-15T20:11:31-04:00'
describe
'114062' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAT' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
e55cd633d5e6b0071cee4938539935ab
00453bd5cf2c15474042bb54f591a97d5e478905
describe
'90304' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAU' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
808e7a57c9af500265298a8d1257e584
eac3db9de248c8dab47b94a37f7374865c85a96d
'2012-05-15T20:12:34-04:00'
describe
'122462' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAV' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
1cf54114ac4682c69402aec9c8df13f4
49b6625bdb908ff85653bb4f1bbb5fa008af1073
describe
'92738' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAW' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
f145a4ab31120a8da2e859a7f6dc137e
c1eca843decbf347125db251b346aabd926450c5
describe
'102946' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAX' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
07cc67265b2e518cb1e7792afe0552a2
146b5853f1f8b7647de1d4712773067935027454
'2012-05-15T20:06:24-04:00'
describe
'76114' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAY' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
a40cf80164561656f80f90ca351fdae9
fb90df5e0eb6bee1710c0d7ae37e84a1d2ca6fad
'2012-05-15T20:11:02-04:00'
describe
'81421' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAAZ' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
7fcbcbc03c04f0786aafd11aa64a8dce
54b6692f5b791865e9b11de9a6c665274e223d4b
describe
'101377' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABA' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
cef793f7e296966b611c4e633b5fc6aa
309dcca6f71cae7dc56fdbb661c3f90ec0cd4c11
'2012-05-15T20:11:56-04:00'
describe
'100838' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABB' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
d83d9fa33881140c1f6515e4671f5310
a9bb6808986f389a765801fca28cff949badffdd
'2012-05-15T20:11:27-04:00'
describe
'90259' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABC' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
c014446a2424386cfdc0f543693812ae
10b899873c09f2f8aa71370f9f49185dee8e54ae
describe
'106038' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABD' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
a2ce5e3210d557cf21f11eefd2564266
0ca6afd55fa624e45bb57aba43a109e4d8c1d523
'2012-05-15T20:10:01-04:00'
describe
'82673' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABE' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
e3c348ef9f7ad6ef13ca804e1d282a25
cf62c1091e4c2454ca0980e7431547a47f22cea7
'2012-05-15T20:10:52-04:00'
describe
'123561' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABF' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
3a79880337e8387a5fb94ac4f542c351
5e463d6600ef64e70307cb2e899d6a874f8cbca2
describe
'88373' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABG' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
f0c6703dcb752ea4c35902ae757465a7
c34019e5bdc25bb6d14f277653ad4cee4b7df296
describe
'100167' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABH' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
700ea17a8e2f7c7ead7ec98948de3597
207b79f0b9eedff970d3d522614af76d74796015
describe
'73656' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABI' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
61cd1707bdf15cff805a0938badb3a34
a9c9f49597681fa61b9b23205850ceeb6ae41b07
'2012-05-15T20:08:14-04:00'
describe
'110021' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABJ' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
4aefa06844db61cf20f4584c601a330d
5716d48c5c280f200a0731de9a4c862a3a787725
describe
'84479' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABK' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
ed3b41fcaadb91938f81d713ccc6a3f7
5a1dff5a8c9e357eb6e4b6d939a58c86ae822bf3
'2012-05-15T20:04:23-04:00'
describe
'109118' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABL' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
0e8298409cc26276014d48ae95947dd2
e5fdd4934a33bbd30acacefcc946803a53f97712
describe
'89854' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABM' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
320834dbf7ebb04f7a62c3c9c84cf559
075b96eb571b6e3499a03e5849c3385e4dc10610
'2012-05-15T20:10:39-04:00'
describe
'115637' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABN' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
f48abcde8a276f711d1351660c13a03e
a31da5f237af8c312dae6f048927351cbee2dec4
describe
'81931' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABO' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
4df32753340d2c1ed2a640ccb5758a70
34a93523c2fa9f2c8b7af8130d8e420e72dc6967
'2012-05-15T20:11:49-04:00'
describe
'107816' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABP' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
bfb7a4985ddd893c9adcf032d2cc2392
de165f58fb572796b03494298ec59953d0271541
describe
'73815' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABQ' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
49b1e7bb8a4021e551909b56817871ed
50283dad942632695de6e23aa49263037e216bb5
describe
'104337' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABR' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
6aa6f0482293c2e1c7bd313c50b6b4d1
27ca187cde59712025064b9448b7070af8adeb2b
describe
'69053' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABS' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
1f22135e7a91f6de30bd3d90b807959d
e008881e94311e7e49074ab2feb7083cc114179e
describe
'90717' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABT' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
878eb30fb4b9aed6d23818b9281d3eea
28ca57469e6f15accdbc8d17beb72073441eaee0
describe
'73928' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABU' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
3194245a434ea1d6cc70d3c4e4fdc7d4
18ba9bba925e39f3f5e88dc1becb80137604facc
'2012-05-15T20:09:04-04:00'
describe
'82812' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABV' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
73dceebb15d6692d1959de189c8644e5
4180667fb70b3c9b150e7cf5c543b76997129d5d
describe
'75101' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABW' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
1e67725af13b547299d3a577289d41cc
26010d2bc1937f01da036ec3400bcd1305e56d72
'2012-05-15T20:08:46-04:00'
describe
'89296' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABX' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
16343b848a9f99a5fdde4f9837b81e53
88e9eab0268b0461b5a2f1927e8e9aa90a6cb16d
'2012-05-15T20:06:12-04:00'
describe
'90019' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABY' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
43c410a9945b9db2b0fe5deaf285929a
d7a8916a88530d432b1a873d5460bce50d3b56b1
describe
'6931' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADABZ' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
62372080ce42f6e56479ce58a8ef4c6a
b40e2963657750583b4b08c400c872ee80695468
describe
'5723' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACA' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
50614fe3bd6361d26179bd530a2a99b4
c2ecb821c1e6ec6fc17199c9768e4225630f1c98
'2012-05-15T20:05:30-04:00'
describe
'29784' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACB' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
a8b268616c7979f58e9b569f4e9e412b
1a4d80ca4e00a1a12dc5bca00b79383851a2d6ef
'2012-05-15T20:10:27-04:00'
describe
'13693' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACC' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
8fc8eb5e9d57c3353026dee72bcc864f
7453225ad4790ec2daac995c7dc53b64540262b2
'2012-05-15T20:12:00-04:00'
describe
'3983' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACD' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
82777b284e18be52f4e9ad7655ece042
2d6f66c33664c828d7a59f576a3a86b507037c6d
describe
'8328' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACE' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
725c051386c473f925f41dd425f5bea1
01514d3135fd898fb828bfd36fa55070c7f365a0
describe
'2273' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACF' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
3df6e557018aded6348fe73348520b37
4369567c2e89227e2b782781419266f9f0e31f4b
describe
'8779' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACG' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
61678925811598f5ab5079ee7ebc4852
24906c226c53a11a9e9bab9115ec4c6e809e38b6
describe
'2117' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACH' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
973f632e5d4328bba29d4fdd49f29f5d
51b87f4a87c8681b4965bec18899e5a2ee5090e9
'2012-05-15T20:04:36-04:00'
describe
'6209' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACI' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
5a9fc49eee0fcacd222ac7ff436e2081
8991bcd7919f2c7c32d210877ebd053ea33fe6ad
describe
'1886' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACJ' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
d744e4d7eca710b8cd1a23c1495d1d0b
2dbb4de7740a0833720c58ad721a8a769b8cb23c
describe
'6538' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACK' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
1dfc12802acaebaf18c4ae40073357bf
d4d2f5a4959b9a7f0c4360ef428af592e77b06b6
'2012-05-15T20:12:29-04:00'
describe
'1859' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACL' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
1fd976553c565c8eee0f1ed54ec93b25
0f139c71b58f8fda5c2d816eecb2dafed2cd5c50
'2012-05-15T20:05:25-04:00'
describe
'7992' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACM' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
f8c5f0b88bfbeb0a98e427f37611e86d
ce6d71787c9c1adfd7a0d32b6e4040e07339a6ae
describe
'2502' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACN' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
6793bf4eeff2daf888c2e9009f8e8191
459b1afa5703ba4bb35f24d0a5ab1780afbb55fa
describe
'20862' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACO' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
8cab982ac933b848bb34f1a912d02371
a4b9ca877c036cb73a2f94f8bf4ecf80bb916fed
'2012-05-15T20:10:55-04:00'
describe
'24938' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACP' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
42104d1059619cc7bb603e91397cec73
0f33bda50ac025796449af6ab0a04618a17eeb8f
'2012-05-15T20:06:58-04:00'
describe
'7242' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACQ' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
509be83089b67bfec131868f74190a66
ceffe58b78de91de03fd96348cf2bca6c0d05417
'2012-05-15T20:08:44-04:00'
describe
'10332' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACR' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
02a33d4c38cd81aaa7b4a69add62bbb5
3497a1807c50c9dfbb24ff33aaa90dc39c7f44eb
describe
'3342' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACS' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
223d7aae7c0c394283361dbbd5bd6a92
4ea045a9748bb91fde59f45032c817ed4b61a8a6
'2012-05-15T20:06:32-04:00'
describe
'26470' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACT' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
6c47a423cdd99d4efaf434db0fef00fb
944dfce7c1c09512e16855a08fc431d676c1b428
'2012-05-15T20:10:09-04:00'
describe
'6947' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACU' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
f55086c45d697e33be403d1d2e8cdd97
ad817a6cf2f74c0a8a2a29ddf037e10569da7cca
describe
'25543' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACV' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
7721e77f8ea3ea84ecaa3d951a0dba21
dd17d97596da0dd0d255c2e758656dd39bc3e63b
'2012-05-15T20:06:41-04:00'
describe
'7537' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACW' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
8e3ebd8b350a62a0fcd704b5e996e769
a8956dc25e5e3da7faa4cff154248f23e2c0be3c
'2012-05-15T20:05:28-04:00'
describe
'24829' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACX' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
da74ac3a71174cdf9405cc0a55ca549c
00bdf82bc778935c80d0d9add43aa2c6f1e3e81f
'2012-05-15T20:08:22-04:00'
describe
'6142' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACY' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
10ecd4066beda48c0b8355cc43a33d6e
0e0849156d5364ce9c7df7817cfdb951cac37f89
'2012-05-15T20:08:51-04:00'
describe
'36201' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADACZ' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
c713080ac26937cd9c041de84dd46459
fe807ea13196421e0c421e43b7672ef19f150cfd
'2012-05-15T20:08:52-04:00'
describe
'10416' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADA' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
cd7882619591c11d384c51860bed55fa
0c10f9b64ac22a24cc95cd63b08a354be2903654
'2012-05-15T20:12:33-04:00'
describe
'18949' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADB' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
15b87d908a49be8833e4074a26a50e2a
1a1ce56259b92d8bedb220331966b457e3e8c6cf
describe
'5237' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADC' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
8da4cdba056fb35893e2d0a234aa781e
9d23904688c073c11503807b9de950864f9bd167
describe
'25751' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADD' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
da63053847c69f5664b784f0137a4361
7a43d45f8e3dd76f311ef00909501ce91925bf1f
'2012-05-15T20:04:10-04:00'
describe
'7307' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADE' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
7d2ceaa7a46b63b3a8fe723be275eee5
f69035a45209f17314e080465eb3d936c8d8ad0f
'2012-05-15T20:06:28-04:00'
describe
'33271' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADF' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
b41be233cbf084e1f4ea1959ac12f862
42b2169b218db08d132fae64e0100176ef46dea6
describe
'8315' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADG' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
b22e45e46b31cadace239cc807858f83
21cd4d57a67325d30d2c3e2f09434061ebaa7b13
describe
'30518' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADH' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
72e3ec7c467577f1b84081760b90a1dd
3be441a201c81fef6cac48ba1eed3b9d95d6b28c
'2012-05-15T20:07:42-04:00'
describe
'9502' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADI' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
9135a79e342bed0b6e3ec31e9e17c779
0fcacf88ace26e097afbe2c7f02c9f492e24ad71
describe
'27883' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADJ' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
03a9362b3500429d471d9961b7836078
85f36eb1299c623acc0ed22b36e9f628125694f8
describe
'7456' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADK' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
006d4a0c03a8b23408e41590dd8c38c4
ab526621da53cdb3f7f4fe0329e5d8065491a1e0
'2012-05-15T20:11:36-04:00'
describe
'32040' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADL' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
26506b872fec2d09e2fa70e80abb15c9
fe66aaf153333d2eac1b194abbe3a3f4d36573ab
'2012-05-15T20:04:08-04:00'
describe
'8149' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADM' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
7808f2dc840a5bf00f0a36d40074cfaf
8ecfedefa764c5468103024fd12d94dc17f6b819
'2012-05-15T20:06:36-04:00'
describe
'30211' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADN' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
480191a0bdde03288666363ff6e4c06c
86e7403af41d7788f5d6c85e716e647dd546f393
'2012-05-15T20:06:30-04:00'
describe
'7348' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADO' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
17a39fd6577c87a0385bd6c8506346e4
f81d91e41ad9b32f89243b13d99eafcc05fb6b3d
describe
'29333' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADP' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
0f084adc2843f1d3bde820a32aa14098
cb088a80cad7eb02a9a3a7117579f4c7d3b7a5cd
describe
'8115' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADQ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
69898479b5e2e5200dfcc4c7c9a8d59e
d4b318f61263816a8b4ae1d0f1cbad0cbca74ecf
describe
'35149' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADR' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
2e9def74f4a5b34813ec3d37d9588624
3e448637a4c6763ef1ef0d7c32b4a0a5f9a54056
describe
'8891' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADS' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
7985b3f32132cd1c5eae56bdb76cd9d7
e02199967b008e5f6074775894a1c0610a2cac3b
describe
'23706' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADT' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
6e8a569469c7b02a5d56d65efe0b4a7f
64c8cb07bb7602b84986d65b8b36d65b244784b9
describe
'6380' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADU' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
13eef2a342b14ad0ae0bfbdf2a40f84a
145cfd90a18c1af32fc47ee33843a0d2031b9367
describe
'31849' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADV' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
4de5bf99a1e9632293e2e0a1f5e7fe78
69be9c6013611a3d4aeda398e9195f9b39343d7c
'2012-05-15T20:07:35-04:00'
describe
'8310' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADW' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
cb0fb1dcfe4cf37563693b6ed795c7dd
649258c1708a924fec3a658b990a2b97c4fffac0
describe
'31758' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADX' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
6f620c1994aed1f6998465e942b76789
32c385b71f374d622776051249a6e8f30fa9a785
describe
'7982' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADY' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
77b401c47a28bb59bcf366df2d8cbc2d
4961c0eb51f8c2e64abf63ace9ed0cba5bf47109
describe
'31929' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADADZ' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
230623298027ccd8ccf356ae74d0dcd5
aa324e2ee595ad8b5021fcbf735baf0231f61443
'2012-05-15T20:09:56-04:00'
describe
'8293' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEA' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
af4392ba7119a674262c7f26a1af3195
e5a74b00860d0a4b23e668432bbdc42301493954
describe
'29165' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEB' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
3946739904d5cdb8e177c3434d333972
d125ad5762eaed87a60117cf0e9d785967a8dd54
describe
'7650' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEC' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
e49f4509499231de7e06e1078ab59480
4d768f4836ec0df3fc7a35b68eb6622f848e2c40
describe
'31801' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAED' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
50f6f2529bc3ae96ab691feedb88db75
599041e3b91e98f5987833b97a0611d120a37b9f
'2012-05-15T20:05:55-04:00'
describe
'8072' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEE' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
522a9319f6d9958a6195bbc957bb268a
15c627f04a7d68b5cfe06414e6d26d8864d25d96
describe
'29256' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEF' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
579d0f7c68d24061f33d14dee5a2d5c6
ea0025afc40847279066daac0fdde4b9f8d19d02
describe
'7712' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEG' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
052f1c550aa86400f69f450f16231dfa
152539c70613e310470ecc4c5d633643b4d2e7f2
'2012-05-15T20:04:12-04:00'
describe
'30656' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEH' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
fd3de591360058fbd547b9f8f4b52660
42fcd9f2fda6c4b608ae4f2c67a6956fe9019919
'2012-05-15T20:06:35-04:00'
describe
'8153' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEI' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
262523cb3250b1fd88c16721d35d21d4
af1b34922676f186c9fbb27d5935dc51b1a069a7
'2012-05-15T20:11:15-04:00'
describe
'30617' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEJ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
5471e77d1d31f903a566f26f768c3de1
d6f4078060c1836d09edc36124e26ac81daa4f5f
'2012-05-15T20:04:21-04:00'
describe
'8539' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEK' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
72383644e110d6bc50d38ce6d744e7f4
41761e1aacce54b62ce3a8c6400dcdfce44ece8f
describe
'33522' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEL' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
e62df134f0317b1bf0a5a4fb35e33b8e
0d6c80ac23f3032b6574cee9dccd3a3f1e6d2d81
'2012-05-15T20:09:43-04:00'
describe
'8561' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEM' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
a35918a97b9c1356ce93c55283da63f3
1a9d34fe26e7bb85fb3ead36770f73e8dfe4c532
describe
'29330' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEN' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
aa733b2dcc072e27f825fe25a98d7ae8
8b25756ccb2fb644efb33d80b4b79df597d08c97
describe
'8697' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEO' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
a6bb81efd9b4f27b0dafa5fab6884d42
d79d2a27ac6888614d920899fa795196e732ab21
describe
'31102' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEP' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
b13c9de5d49896caf1c80de85432939f
473c44f7876158baf9afd4d18da76c394a72fa8e
describe
'8951' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEQ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
0dc1c994724db8697b723d8e10a91c51
89c93008ca18d2eb163fd13b4605e61541ba0ae5
describe
'31252' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAER' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
717255aa086240c89583a85c80ccd9e1
8ef5f7e98a44679948152eb61860df8eb285efef
'2012-05-15T20:04:30-04:00'
describe
'8046' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAES' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
4edeacfbbf9619f62a3dacb8f514bbec
bb50fdb588e98dd8b60d10387c3dc5e8347369ba
'2012-05-15T20:12:11-04:00'
describe
'30778' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAET' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
9db926ba8c62ad138f51019e4bc32a13
0953f5185d502be22835b3908c34e7e3e26840f0
describe
'8234' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEU' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
6f52371f52febc95723b90975958f6bc
e5acbfe3146c36a876b2a6c488356dca8e63560e
'2012-05-15T20:08:50-04:00'
describe
'20296' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEV' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
2b3e500a84741e8b8d5c2a076f0ce723
303e573449fd7e38de22d7d881cdb55ead68dc9e
'2012-05-15T20:06:40-04:00'
describe
'5817' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEW' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
4ae125e9b79b818ac86ef28f80eff24e
38f4c8ab2a81df6aaf0dec146c9deb6eed185b39
'2012-05-15T20:12:40-04:00'
describe
'25483' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEX' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
39c5ae5e01d5bf8c4853e79f4da41bd5
ec410ee238629b6816f836130b433a3f835d2d39
describe
'6816' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEY' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
6132d336897dbb58e460dc4211a6686d
e764c735b17c9f94a150c4ad8b4a12f3dcb1095e
describe
'26550' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAEZ' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
430bf4734baba51590e5cba67f54b95d
2b318557c176101d613db3b5fd9af232cfaa7b82
describe
'8224' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFA' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
7883e2eb29885595efd99367a55838a2
f7f76a4ba5b7b2aff2a05ff8bdeb4d6c351ed414
describe
'32522' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFB' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
c6f118e3ebab834becbdcb2dba5bde69
4383043d24d01b21378b36c287d95dcf9e1ecc4f
describe
'8454' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFC' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
51a638489b7b23a6a6205a6f14cf1e0e
844d0416b2940252166fd610a238aae0c7ae829f
describe
'27754' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFD' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
fc4a27085118af31d7683546b4ca15fa
c99aeb29d58899e587a360d15fb9a28e6c4bf10f
'2012-05-15T20:06:08-04:00'
describe
'7515' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFE' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
5f04d235d62140352bae00584ec618d7
43468fd006e62d0263ecf1e255b064a2dd18ac98
describe
'34285' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFF' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
d80969f167acd31ba3ec3134310c8b01
c5d6fd13d57f14c66377dacbc6f22a205a11f06e
describe
'8336' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFG' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
fc244ab124746c89ebcd646ed8b15b74
925e274c17efba5c3032d729b8692f71f9aff7ae
describe
'28814' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFH' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
ee6d56fc119a265c5b237c794d990dfd
8a6cbc9eb055821bf87fe91b666e70579786d57a
describe
'7687' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFI' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
b6e885bbe3378ddceced1a04fcad70dd
4425526fcf9fe6f079178d574ef30a690cd16ebf
describe
'37333' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFJ' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
4dcf55ad6dcb287cea8a57b0aa193d28
2ec53983a001b7fd93a472eecb57a5ab2ef8ec6b
describe
'9204' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFK' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
b182943385da98a9389d66add42c0c48
05fa8755823e4462bc2bbd9571f35f3ac29c3e6c
describe
'30096' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFL' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
87e3d83f0dc914720793f6ccefc2c5b9
100045dfcd2fde1ca340e2bb1c5cc59f2ab26fba
describe
'7938' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFM' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
35a6cf7374a56113f5b474b53149b675
9b284dfaea8bbaae5a1decefaef79bb51d6e8781
'2012-05-15T20:05:45-04:00'
describe
'37133' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFN' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
4e021da6df70ab0be60f481b9d1e433d
6a2153596b728c4415494d481bd0ecc84c8afa2a
'2012-05-15T20:07:09-04:00'
describe
'9087' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFO' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
d84f3276a9c14f823ccd50ccdddf47a1
cfab3b7e4d1a10b3dcaa9ef99ce7ee214e4506b2
describe
'28505' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFP' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
2d3154cbdc431e92f268e973519b8c45
b5d255f3ddf7b14d2bef491d919d4dcd726ef022
describe
'7875' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFQ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
3f25293b7757b53f9e6605960b8934cd
f964b2bc035aecf96e4ea62c3655a4486db0a24e
'2012-05-15T20:06:47-04:00'
describe
'33605' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFR' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
ce5b0c8704c53b022e42cfc2de33101b
6fdf04dbc2799ed1ef0ebd80bd14e98587385683
'2012-05-15T20:06:19-04:00'
describe
'8496' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFS' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
59c2c4a3347ae0eb257a33062c338926
654042f000f13931b266e047d6a28fe088fd7521
describe
'29308' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFT' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
9248fb61a333dfd992fdcf4d299021d9
0d231582ff7e0814e483164c13b6b1cc756cfd73
describe
'7745' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFU' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
fcc3f5783566b6e54f0b2cf6fd4d1689
7e13b669523faa067891b8fdc0491104fcb193d7
describe
'34834' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFV' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
27f178efd16e7a33213f0cff4b137b83
bd342306668fb69c69ce67422accec6f6a64ba63
describe
'8669' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFW' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
097956dca4ed6b531e46f785c24b9419
63bdc877f1e4b62a136dfeb8a2c07167d8d3af62
describe
'29785' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFX' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
6c02b8a1f6ad375b04f26db996ca89bf
e7bf9963bd71c1c829f4398522708ecb7ebbc4cf
describe
'7918' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFY' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
0e19316996630ef67352b8a3a1f6bb37
3d5c8a15beb31126c347c99cb1edbee6e654447e
describe
'25933' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAFZ' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
0a5e0da0548b69e699332924511cb017
d6803d53e41b7d3334ca426394809d827118dba8
describe
'6919' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGA' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
1a0d0d01452471abf863ded4b9530ac2
f0a9b590503681f17c2dc5c1ea7f65fb3ff0393e
describe
'20561' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGB' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
db6168dcb78bad144596b0758a0e1171
485274d03249dd3117e8abd93931bd6ab58c0b9d
describe
'6198' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGC' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
b8ba4fb488d887ad3bc8d05645382827
0cb763ea5ed6ea9f95ebbb27854471249a081de3
'2012-05-15T20:08:19-04:00'
describe
'26185' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGD' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
d3843140073b32c29c7557378d9b9b1c
ab0bbd62c3fba45f752e5e85eff90006108e4bdb
describe
'7110' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGE' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
abb7b6843fc8fae0f8354926803512d4
c40160d258509f6baf0202a02dc12fa0ecc31b25
describe
'21331' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGF' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
37772bb37bb55ed26dd963ab476d74fa
3e5377804d248058e6bd220ba415eaa14372c11b
describe
'6586' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGG' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
8c1962fa407abf97e92c811cd690a5f3
66de2cc6affcb3b19413347e323122277e0bf0fa
describe
'27195' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGH' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
d6291adc2f59897b906b76b9003d9b8a
05a0b308798a4a680ea2400c3bc4f84a8549e533
describe
'8200' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGI' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
954ed26a4be41186dc043828298d14f4
c55820eb61a8f5ae57bd38bd687f22675376e074
'2012-05-15T20:08:11-04:00'
describe
'24218' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGJ' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
eb82514bfeef17d731da6a7d1afe740b
362981c7ee47a1e0cee334f6016f90e9fa907d9b
describe
'7232' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGK' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
cf272639e29914ca441501c43718ee5a
7d3e7590ce244fa4e18d1fab63d1266cb621c6a5
describe
'20197' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGL' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
5b52ab479a2b6d3369c8cb25a32e6fa8
d597fa75f32eab50a88b567cfa88401f2448bd6e
describe
'5533' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGM' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
3b1460d4853b2f8527b993c4b00d69c4
00314bbc49d07a17f9d1177d790dbb8d006285aa
'2012-05-15T20:11:51-04:00'
describe
'23171' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGN' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
37c24937633e3e4dbf2bd010e492b6c9
43fba8b996ef7b1dbce07f67c37467b415fc73f9
describe
'7051' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGO' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
a739828c22971a0f3c88ad1e9eafbdc8
6679741989de48a525ceda8ccef7e46bd4cdfa25
describe
'33734' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGP' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
bb757620580b87982cb403c0a48a3f26
6d0442e162a5432efdf95ed47ee5eee2c49d961c
'2012-05-15T20:09:28-04:00'
describe
'8654' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGQ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
3a08120d40142f25c1e570c173a78fce
e74880bbe86161e339725182af5dad15113f9ec8
describe
'31336' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGR' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
265b22b642705f096f964c46571781e1
59ac036798579cfbba217dad4c07f1a925e127ee
describe
'8700' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGS' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
c728e51c4d4329c89e4476e5b84f3e2d
f422f543b75aedbd08ea5ff228801d8b6d0a05cd
describe
'33390' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGT' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
a0f376eaddb8ef3098c16c31f769c70b
38e9d601a4c2aa468a3dd485d0692f01a9d42ce5
describe
'8340' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGU' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
edfa7b776f545a8006cd0b030da4a324
5830f9027cc617feddfbc7bd04097a5a23185ca6
describe
'26007' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGV' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
51eaf4451196e7f6325504da696138d9
fd89116e9255919741b77ed69e4b0c1ee039dd35
describe
'7697' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGW' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
0a0711f5f3be0fdf4e40b55aeef142bd
f563b47b89c8703533f1a41fdc69110ab5c6b045
describe
'34272' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGX' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
9d20f8154aa69a28b5044d1103a1de84
392640c3eb189823dc702ed21d75908ce13bbb73
describe
'8343' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGY' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
4eaebe983369d3b2f27e1a101fa3efe6
b76e9e5949b497323226c9d2fa3dd497c76da8ce
'2012-05-15T20:06:48-04:00'
describe
'30003' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAGZ' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
c8d6601fc4ff27d5adb30956c86dae13
438fb5a4d609214772677db00a170a7d3041419a
describe
'8359' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHA' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
d6228483d9162bf606f74a0ee3f528f7
41b4c1cf001542da50fe31b2e3d77e61132fb6d6
describe
'29867' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHB' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
b4085e86edc9aadf9373151bc5bba4f7
9aed04fbe98a362963127e37b5f3aa0fbf9f8b11
'2012-05-15T20:07:31-04:00'
describe
'7619' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHC' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
077f612c0eab29b238b527460e348006
f5ebd8be3fbc3533b27c6dee2b986e0b3932b076
describe
'27990' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHD' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
7cdc2c0387d5c0e0771451d6d8e85242
13736669f4efde1d8564b6a4d88b0513dfed3516
describe
'7931' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHE' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
2588b8af3086f4fa79cad1076986905c
e94c4792ff47adee9db53f1d52f858cd62e6e6cb
'2012-05-15T20:09:15-04:00'
describe
'30111' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHF' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
3f2fe6c85f3c218a93f370021a6e70b7
db6ae2e882cea404d7c19c96873bfe5501a29886
describe
'7668' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHG' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
c755874fb3c407db206a1cf6efdb2413
0578fea6d329cbef2f6c6ad970f00d825fb7595e
'2012-05-15T20:12:31-04:00'
describe
'29137' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHH' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
90033b012547dc4d54fa8a35c94d551f
abc85d6e2a681882edf9268d3de0b9502acef60a
describe
'7952' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHI' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
79dac5ae2d6ad9a8daabe07b06a2d5d0
25d0ee0da78936e00b0674a58322191c35626dd0
describe
'31153' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHJ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
bca5063df25e84aa06e477a30ac6416f
fe1e8135aef6f4c5c88b116e2d3c9939d596b82d
describe
'8151' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHK' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
eb5c320d74eb776faf9e5897543ac1d8
afdf1a0fefbfb713f7314429a0602e153a15ecc8
describe
'10062' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHL' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
d67ddbb2eeab40712a1ac5b8c80a129b
15f4b1a6e5e3d880eb6058e11cd8a71530b84a36
'2012-05-15T20:07:57-04:00'
describe
'3240' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHM' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
5f4f616d9bc0e40f28c9fe4f1bba7547
38946d02fd90a9d18f423d52fbeeae4a69f8e1fc
describe
'22856' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHN' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
fb4c94dd07958320fe398601c4194e87
da762e8326497fa042ffe62392e1016eff25b739
describe
'7086' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHO' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
03741b376811cca0494afd5ccc0ef6ef
218089bd1c5366aa1ce78da0131edd9e6a250246
'2012-05-15T20:10:58-04:00'
describe
'20630' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHP' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
6a70cb46be80e0d73ee44e5c3249f395
68328ef2b0f032f53cad964e1a13be61bd75be19
describe
'6332' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHQ' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
32f470fe1ee8aba7ec207a03025a6e1d
669ffcd80c63b9e79c6a2a661baa308915763315
describe
'26319' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHR' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
5cfdb3420555577d8deae91959378bf7
97402f5bda58d02f6f9053c951cbc8170e23a80c
'2012-05-15T20:08:12-04:00'
describe
'6637' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHS' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
ce0c4ea9733620d1d4f1f45ac5419023
3404a6fdd16ed254e9ef13b7a92ffa2b9d65f404
describe
'22785' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHT' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
f05934fe9d2f65fa4642c79c06741485
9ebbd01082e7ec6353289819ac11bb3ba5385882
describe
'6611' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHU' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
d46b06d68cd3e5682a721305dbcb2ebf
6ea78c8d95f1e3459efc79957fa07c4df74fa64e
describe
'32654' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHV' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
ec9dd7fa685d6b26eacb9249fe3bdfb9
4ffb603998e263908dc362d1e3adc37ec4574742
describe
'7967' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHW' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
221668401ab431ed1772ba8667ccac1e
916b7d46aa11b4db5b9e423e865e3b60f8217038
'2012-05-15T20:09:40-04:00'
describe
'27731' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHX' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
ffc15305788b0fa2050005803912fa88
20c9f9f922ccda088b23ab979b4657e2148813bc
'2012-05-15T20:10:42-04:00'
describe
'7669' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHY' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
64f2ac1eba9cb160caab9bdef6b43bd1
96bde2c31fe6ae8e5a298d183ad26bf5d7b17780
'2012-05-15T20:04:14-04:00'
describe
'31552' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAHZ' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
d58f135f13a111a48e61fcb09094f6f9
755d2218da40de8f935ff14ff803ed21faf24852
'2012-05-15T20:06:00-04:00'
describe
'8295' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIA' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
4f3ade9ef725bddd034851e740534272
6c6823f0013aee1dc82dfaf72dff5efe7f7dbc83
describe
'29086' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIB' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
5782c77572eb5c7a439a8e14792b0e56
d05a939051963cfed3a36dc63c46b7eb2b605127
'2012-05-15T20:12:01-04:00'
describe
'7898' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIC' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
fa9698fd351d4a94576aa55dc50bfa11
140d5e0d97435d63e4a7bc4bb898efb5def6400e
describe
'32351' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAID' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
e0e4cdfb0d6b0e2ff3535962164de05e
d63b8f276600901bd50d0d2201ccc4c08a270b8a
describe
'8023' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIE' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
9c2e3e8db9c9d4b152ff2050dc1a0e51
95da5a18c499cc89de4443aa54006bb1b4f94e05
'2012-05-15T20:06:09-04:00'
describe
'36777' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIF' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
92b1884bc21f376f1c482df4ae7ce7c6
d7f0789bc7b30f7eb29dcab7f6c1010fb4b1fd51
describe
'9218' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIG' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
d612a567c6ed63ba4d1017f11d763bf2
38ee25a3b21c58194255165931c96fc7f98b401c
describe
'23197' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIH' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
568f180c62685958682f3e372bf0a58e
c02c3551ae9fe02d81aa2d7c13c3864980159c9b
describe
'6150' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAII' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
18ddf3494c6db5fe2a35452179c2dcc2
9b9cf6e04c63ad482c24c7ad8bf00de8c26a80aa
describe
'29961' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIJ' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
129364f181ee4dfca3a1bc61791d3b19
504dd903d40303d4a0b4e350f62ebe549bc98048
describe
'8003' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIK' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
4365a00b2ecda0b1a2e7c177861f5a45
dc514eba261bbe845d03a85ccc267b8c674593bb
describe
'16785' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIL' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
192cf94f476742516cdd60c59a6ad3f2
77acd9eb4eab4c951ecd204df1054bc5035cc40e
describe
'5151' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIM' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
bb1306e93fb1db3c030f85865b362f6a
4f02a461ab01fbc5a1ff7ea373b1df35f828f973
'2012-05-15T20:04:34-04:00'
describe
'20210' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIN' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
e4407a00fa3d678ab0591c355a846f0f
1d518ccabe895e47daff5aca3ab468ed0b282317
describe
'6138' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIO' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
49534d1bc742f0530ffd268acf9a0ccf
44bdd2c0a89072300b6a11ac6dba4959f2a488bb
describe
'17858' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIP' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
b4dff8057cb1bc7fc33db420d62666bb
bf8006106afe41cf5e5f4d14d1b33103c5acc366
'2012-05-15T20:05:51-04:00'
describe
'5315' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIQ' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
3fe38200ba5387024eed4b2dda784185
8df0d38a6ec6e4424742d7681099cb683ad8fc62
describe
'25505' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIR' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
7c6a3bc6fe6f5ac5f3aa0b087e954fd3
d3250f2e8d0f7663d60d2ac436c4c1a2fd81a133
describe
'7031' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIS' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
8b1bde4cdb050beeecf4801f720f615b
5ccde67595a8d2909e25dc13115ab3e3542c9efc
'2012-05-15T20:08:08-04:00'
describe
'26356' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIT' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
6ad9b22ce810a6822bbb7b5c8dfe0bb9
9d5f1328e566083648a668ad2f971d61b5d409af
describe
'7144' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIU' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
057f7c3e912c022fd408827e077b2fc5
5be116747cf96f15f0cdc263e0ae7d97ec47efbf
describe
'26726' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIV' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
515937727783f4c10402794046593772
14db8b6bd3a2cc631ec39eb046b5da7aa3e1bc98
describe
'8217' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIW' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
f6b560468b297ba2ff821637c3e4d1e1
782534ba727eeb88d5e36f1725d4069d52bf5961
'2012-05-15T20:12:52-04:00'
describe
'25542' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIX' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
3dcce61e8d4c6db278cb75b1cd9a15b2
bd84c3af39e50532d3b260366c884ce1f0dd86ee
describe
'6704' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIY' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
2528a21796faec3ad2612c50b78cffc6
79650f0a15643ef452facc1558c217cd5d7c6ed9
describe
'37230' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAIZ' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
7ead4fd7960f35965ffe814d44c03109
d0dc06371c2220aae79bd4ff3d1471c8e90c1e29
'2012-05-15T20:11:21-04:00'
describe
'9302' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJA' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
fc6ab97da703154c5c77b1aeb4a83ff4
04f5710e3a6b87c954cbf91891c3aff692a9f2b6
'2012-05-15T20:12:24-04:00'
describe
'26930' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJB' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
bf23ccef8b392c7a847f1d4089cc73f4
47dca27abed0887d039bf9d988db64e44da74327
describe
'6774' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJC' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
ef6fc04c984115ed0c7795c6b00b6518
01cc6a045691f0034cb0465628697236aa0366e1
describe
'33210' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJD' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
541201333a65e0d177e32c5b447cfaca
1b62fddeceefcefa0e44fee114ec8b580bae537a
'2012-05-15T20:09:25-04:00'
describe
'8702' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJE' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
b7d22546e29e77cf83982189e4af9391
f90aba56011cee5bab2fb5bab246e6786aac0f71
describe
'26039' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJF' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
21d54553022935032af2951e61a16a36
fd54948a4edf1ef7a5d98ecd912a9eda04f7d401
describe
'6909' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJG' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
58bd1aba1773c19e3ef5ed21f2000b49
026d306a498e0b58e1e5e9bd6dcfdffc13d8b073
describe
'33759' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJH' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
6ad0b22d0bbd394d740c01ec02f21b41
dd78f42a0feeb31f1948a816720f71fdaa7c7b9a
describe
'9842' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJI' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
7fcf472845d1ec8815a6a65fa85726af
9bc5c000550702adf59a23e3ec09e0f2543b0b5b
describe
'29133' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJJ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
b7966a5e7f4b546c248f4bf7f9cc243d
d1e2149ea118c068c433004b4cef82f6fbe7cc09
describe
'7684' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJK' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
397231171603bd6f48b7c786829bc532
2a021d0177473076fb8932b3cf2175daf629c523
describe
'36996' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJL' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
e273c7a590a7539c0975d339438f2938
8afb7df90098ae94fdaa1fde3d53646a6d217b2d
describe
'9764' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJM' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
a5c876015cda2afa063e2fb71c8e4b8f
d908e2a33a02ec5a6238b42f251bcc5cfb864536
describe
'30671' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJN' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
8f3e682f6959bee9b1ef09aef2089d52
54b84c450683865ce3ff6dc3862e11aab0e5453f
'2012-05-15T20:07:17-04:00'
describe
'7848' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJO' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
e25418c45546d2398c496b9284b71e2c
7b4fc6765b74fad03b4a64078a649361e87d2beb
describe
'30364' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJP' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
5b8334f3511e87fcca24a67888bcd0cd
2aacc648c8f86c172a6aaf444618d20053184f2f
describe
'8133' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJQ' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
5653874db4df8a26a1ba53041b11c5fd
4e9e336d2cc81bb2523bab43b60a71d9c8e45633
describe
'24965' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJR' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
9dc6dff35031238a2d1789bfab89a9d0
1aee54d80153c5e3b657b1855bf9111544ccdd3e
describe
'6683' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJS' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
6a20e1745fd1f2048edd3babd49609e4
350eb32eb475f2b88e377b954ba23e57abf763fd
describe
'23156' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJT' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
f1f4db5f9588639ce034cc8e95a93167
74e8fb259781f111f48c330d925604c696581083
describe
'6692' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJU' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
91f0a517aed464b463da014a5cccbe6f
37fdd49e09fa7149846a325ba68d8b9f6f723f19
describe
'29374' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJV' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
79a59efa86c341b51c9585c2d711e688
7da0e8cd1a2e2eba1c4f63998193f4888546a152
describe
'7801' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJW' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
136483df8eb47c4a0049de28d7f59b5d
9bb56f38f5e7946ef0692759c4dc5dfdd43c93ce
describe
'29963' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJX' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
0397eb2b49cc3e16bc75ebb94be0775f
d38e3fcf927400693bc0c5655e86950f08b616a0
describe
'7968' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJY' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
9781640f4bb99b0f52d5d7866450e236
aab3346d46b4507e44f19314b4a660a0bf64fed2
describe
'28702' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAJZ' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
590c12c8c60209295922715ffb853f30
11c583f3da535e51bfcfcd5fb0e9b78a88ff06b7
'2012-05-15T20:08:05-04:00'
describe
'7154' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKA' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
463853260cd8e3f6d0d493c1c3f72b82
a37e82e77cd31ef4c467411e4348dc00f9a3e12b
describe
'31456' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKB' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
0e16c42b5a247cc1c31c7d95dac2da30
6065ecbf2c3c245fc5ad0531b82055435ab0e26b
'2012-05-15T20:09:09-04:00'
describe
'8703' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKC' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
e9bbbe6b3a57d0147160e7b39271d7e0
0856213d049dcc0c25e9453bfd5d6ba031c18163
describe
'27155' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKD' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
cfa72406d8cc199f86672c37364f521d
83bdc1f853148b0dce76c80018915d295a25eb5e
describe
'6916' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKE' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
53deaa3cd85d0f9f2558381e663c40d7
68c2a6f3addb08dec13285f464e983ae4aa4e4d3
describe
'36394' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKF' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
423730979596ab3b86d6561935f5a4c6
d86151b6ede5ea86f4d66501448811d0576d0bd4
describe
'9206' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKG' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
a1069f9768664616ade0b6622cb38694
6ef9aa562933c1d740ab7f4568695775d09f8c12
describe
'28945' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKH' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
3b99be29b981d7afd5c33848f0a94939
89bfd5ce96b32c398225cf3c2d456da1825340e0
describe
'7496' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKI' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
d0e2ccdbfd261ff0ece175188adaec01
4ea6baa0275af1a693da04d7040ed1dded29730d
describe
'29657' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKJ' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
5423664de0e82baec9a2c034adfe2040
5075a068d9cee63de0b5f0542b0ad663998ccb10
describe
'8236' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKK' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
83b211d3dc31f8d5d215ca37ab36d53c
d48d2b8ba9ee6c9218e780453fdfd8c4bdcdc6fb
'2012-05-15T20:10:13-04:00'
describe
'24597' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKL' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
c338845fd3255e8f588df34f015948d0
1aaa5012482cade998309f7d855a32252a57a25a
describe
'6318' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKM' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
1f2d86e9f79b4b3ccdba4aa4f9e6c74f
4fe6c368cf60613a5deb40e9c46b084199b98188
'2012-05-15T20:06:05-04:00'
describe
'32756' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKN' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
ca4be61dc08c87a68e1fb6b148aaf573
eb7676f28f708bb546a0a9440f51310300da2133
describe
'8714' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKO' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
25253f1ed8ec1572e41e0614d84134ab
9a2f5c2fd02711c1ac50b472ebd7eae54d607afe
describe
'27723' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKP' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
de4e72e1a318569ad882270dfb7ebc46
f04c2b621d793e27afbb38021676ee7ce66f8a5b
describe
'6627' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKQ' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
577e6f6afd882bc2a9312f232e088ee0
ba9b1d875a01f5c0dc4c81b9c24fd2cfc8b31fe2
describe
'33206' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKR' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
49e56519b5871f4f5cd99915d1b1111a
0d7a48dc43245463064fcdf2368a84ccc88b81a4
describe
'9112' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKS' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
55630a18f7dafe14273d96272678c823
a11d61073005053d474ade91ace0b136784e8f9e
describe
'29174' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKT' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
a956dcc364f9a9ca0a755620a4905bd5
74cea979605c7292425b3afaa7b5b3f238f7621e
describe
'7387' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKU' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
b316033b6ce2d8f29bc60ce21c574b0b
480025a9eb426bc394f5af6db1c7c95c31335702
describe
'34825' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKV' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
78934f5355da9853393a3ae99cc07b16
f67d0bb6c26801a2380d2419bc48ad197f6942a7
describe
'8942' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKW' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
e84ae8f2fe3796b5777facd3a71a0b31
1569fa2d17527408bfb6c7c6338649702ba1d8e9
describe
'27220' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKX' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
c6e68f027a0c60f34cc3aed2c46ce4b0
8d491d51306409f97334c673bc82fcbe992d85c1
'2012-05-15T20:08:48-04:00'
describe
'7092' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKY' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
813b51a9bf8d0f0b0b93bea1fe9822f6
c54c8eb0eeccad116ff072340968fbefede40cbc
describe
'32045' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADAKZ' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
63e80f0ab33fcd4499a210ad6019e4a3
b1a9a5b4aa5310cf20effbf105d4538833dec2e8
describe
'9268' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADALA' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
215c90d91643c4c574be29d04c1b8fcb
31c5ef5b784fafa5a8aa489145cd98ce582fac21
describe
'23995' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADALB' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
433a2e1bb2021f9d17bc12e2afebc9fa
ac2c62cac2fa797d8432ef6e0b314f731bf0407d
describe
'6190' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADALC' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
f28ffc616b2659e07e4a17a1fe67be55
0138b0193f26f859715272b3791d6d2361bc1884
describe
'30568' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADALD' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
8e6b3ef1522b6cd77796911ee2da5a53
1e59031209ccd72f15b8851369cc4fad13e19365
describe
'8026' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADALE' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
d2149d32faa7c0eddef44dc46edb7402
194bfd93125e577ab65761b4d85ce2c780eb9818
describe
'21998' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADALF' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
83f9898cd5008ec6d9253ae511931918
b9ad4e9696ab06ab9f9a7ad539ddd695fe376c0b
'2012-05-15T20:06:07-04:00'
describe
'5955' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADALG' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
d13cfd2afa7d258008c07ae40d777197
8f56cae17ebc1cf47967422ca9f95f6946160a28
describe
'27250' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADALH' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
d0053fd2e601b39ab76a7842124db514
ebbe9aedc4bef047a59ad5783084577c4f5885a7
describe
'8226' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADALI' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
221a7e88886e57369586cbfea478bb28
2b883f9ab2fda59a41413c14b024d26c16882df8
describe
'24080' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADALJ' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
1b6afc15a2469d6d302b082c07c09c1a
e5787e35542bb8c168ab9c629afc9b0a5b21bca8
'2012-05-15T20:06:56-04:00'
describe
'6419' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADALK' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
7bfc391d478209578b079ddf63a116a0
f343444ef19f419f959aec27db0705b6bf7fd740
describe
'24464' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADALL' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
f351e0cecda84ef5847356cd0918b893
a109c6676aaa8e0b486fb56af2ae64fa03fec60a
describe
'6886' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADALM' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
d9d2e57594607ed440b1d12fd5beda70
32aa907386325aed8f2d6df7f142cc28fda739ba
describe
'23868' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADALN' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
1b7fdf2edcf8660b5f6403425cda3eee
d1a080ca2465853b2dd195255ff085eb65ad2f47
describe
'6159' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADALO' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
ec582eb780e04f1c8a7473e59205d9a2
9af4dca06f6556886e9d51b9a1c5497d21d573b9
'2012-05-15T20:11:16-04:00'
describe
'27687' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADALP' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
ac01f600d3afdc2f784b2a05079aeca1
e49fca949a838f692e9421ce153c0da4e487fedc
describe
'6738' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADALQ' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
120fc0290540be715b9e84593e2479a8
a9bf3e72124f92fc695e7bb50e420317b268f56b
describe
'25974' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADALR' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
9e384cb43f57192b2e68db1ba49805f4
6fa402c37bfc3696d0e33be65546f166c989ee48
describe
'6621' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADALS' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
f9018e40055eec34977c9dc1d146b5bc
49ceb38d928207475415e9461448a251c2b236c8
describe
'217778' 'info:fdaE20100107_AAAALYfileF20100107_AADALT' 'sip-filesUF00016229_00001.mets'
248954262858ba3e98fccce270426c78
c181ae83893731a4f3d13db53d98c70d54295375
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T20:24:34-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.