Citation
The Picture history of England

Material Information

Title:
The Picture history of England in forty beautiful engravings ; accompanied by an historical summary, suited to the capacities of youth
Series Title:
Cassell's family picture books
Cover title:
Pictures in English history
Creator:
Pearson, G. ( George ) ( Engraver )
Cassell, Petter & Galpin ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Cassell, Petter, and Galpin
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1869
Language:
English
Physical Description:
96 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
History -- Juvenile literature -- Great Britain ( lcsh )
Printed boards (Binding) -- 1869 ( rbbin )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1869 ( local )
Bldn -- 1869
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
Printed boards ( rbbin )
Hand-colored illustrations ( local )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Baldwin Library copy: some illustrations are hand-colored, probably by young owner.
General Note:
Some illustrations engraved by Pearson.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AAA8751 ( ltqf )
ALG4826 ( notis )
50034728 ( oclc )
026649270 ( alephbibnum )

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THE EARLY BRITONS AND THEIR SAXON
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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

THE DRUIDS INCITING THE BRITONS TO OPPOSE THE LANDING OF TIIE ROMANS

Tux LANDING oF Junius Omsar . : : . .
BoaDIcEA’s BATTLE WITH THE ROMANS . . . .
Saxon LEADERS AND ENGLISH KING : : : .
ALFRED THE GREAT. .

Kina ALFRED IN THE COTTAGE . . . . .
EDGAR TIE PACIFIC ROWED DOWN THE DEE BY EIGHT PRINCES

ASSASSINATION OF EDWARD THE MARTYR. :

CANUTE REPROVING HIS COURTIERS . , . .
THE NORMAN THANKSGIVING AFTER THE BATTLE OF HASTINGS.
WILLIAM I. AND HIS SON ROBERT . . . . ;
RUFUS AND THE SOLDIER . : - : . .
DEATH OF WILLIAM RUFUS. . - :
SHIPWRECK OF PRINCE WILLIAM, Son oF HEnRy I. . ;
FLIGHT OF MATILDA FROM OXFORD . ; LO .
PASSAGE OF A BECKET THROUGH FRANCE. . . .
JOHN BEGGING FORGIVENESS OF RICHARD. ; . .

Henry III. ann THE BARONS . . . .

FRENCH AND ENGLISH CAVALRY IN THE PASSAGE OF THE SOMME

QUEEN PHILIPPA INTERCEDING FOR THE BURGESSES OF CALAIS.
SURRENDER OF KING JOHN OF FRANCE . . .
EXECUTION OF THE ARCHBISHOP OF YORK. : . :
HENRY V. AND DE HELLY AT AGINCOURT . . ;
RECEPTION OF SIGISMUND . , ; . .
FUNERAL PROCESSION OF HENRY Y. ° . ;
DeATH OF THE EARL OF SUREWSBURY . . ;
QUEEN MARGARET AND THE ROBBER OF HEXIAM : :

TYRRELL VIEWING THE MURDERED PRINCES ° °

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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

Viil
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BATTLE OF SPURS. : : " : . " ‘ . : : , Oo
SURRENDER oF Francis I. AT PAVIA ° . . . 4 . . 69
ARREST OF ANNE BOLEYN . :, . ye . . ; . 71
EpwAaRp VI. ENTERING LONDON . . . ; ‘ : . ‘ . 73
QUEEN ELIZABETH ACKNOWLEDGED BY THE BISHOPS . ‘ : . . : . 7d
SURRENDER OF MARY, QUEEN OF Scors, AT CARBERRY HILL . . : : . » 17
QUEEN ELIZABETH KNIGHTING DRAKE . . , : : . ; ‘ . 79
CROMWELL REFUSING TO ACCEPT THE CROWN . : . : : : ; . 883
LANpING oF WituiaM III. . . : ‘ ; : : . . . . 87
ERECTING THE STANDARD OF THE YOUNG PRETENDER . : : . , . . 89
DEATH OF NELSON . . ; , , . : . ; , ; . 983
95

CHARGE OF FrHE LirE-GUARDS AT WATEELLOO . . : . . . .



THE EARLY BRITONS AND THEIR
SAXON KINGS.

AVEFORE its invasion by the Romans, Britain was very





little known to the rest of Europe. Merchants from
-France—then called Gaul—sometimes crossed the
Channel for trading purposes; and it is said that
the pearls which they procured on our coasts first
Â¥ tempted Julius Cesar to come over and take possession of
>} it for his own Romans, who were a very mighty people
indeed. |

Ceesar expected an easy conquest, for the Britons, in his days,
were little better than savages. They lived in miserable huts,
feeding on the milk of their flocks, and on beasts taken by hunting,
_ whose shaggy skins served for such slender covering of their bodies as
they cared to have. It was very little, for their sinewy arms and legs
were left. bare, and painted blue, by way of ornament. ‘They wore
their hair long, hanging down upon the back, but cut off their beards,
with the exception of that which grew upon the upper lip. In fight,
they were terribly fierce fellows, not only spearing their enemies with

great dexterity, but driving in among them with war chariots, whose

[1]
1



_THE EARLY BRITONS AND THEIR SAXON KINGS.

axles being armed with short, stout scythes, cut right and left
in the most dreadful manner. They were, of course, heathens ;
and one of their religious ceremonies consisted in the sacrifice of
human beings. : |

Their priests were called Druids, and notwithstanding the
. dreadful sacrifices they offered, they were acquainted with a vast
amount. of knowledge, and acted both as the instructors and judges
of the people. They formed a distinct community, living in the
remote depths of the forests, where they celebrated their gloomy rites,
and instructed the young men who were to become priests. Their
temples were not like our churches, but were constructed of huge
stones, set up in the recesses of the mountains or in the open plains.
The most remarkable of the Druid temples in England are those of
Stonehenge and of Abury, the former consisting of no less than one
hundred and thirty-nine enormous stones.

The cities of the ancient Britons were formed by enclosing a
number of their rude huts within a deep ditch, as a means of defence.
They also constructed fortified camps of stones, without mortar or
cement, yet so strongly built that their remains exist to this day
But though they were strong and brave, they were not a united
people. They consisted of a great number of tribes, who were nearly
always quarrelling and fighting amongst themselves. The people, in.
short, were as savage as the wilds in which they dwelt.

Such were our British ancestors, and such were the rude people
against whom the highly-disciplined legions of Rome were now to
turn their arms. |

This invasion by the Romans took place fifty-five years before the
birth of Christ. Cesar assembled a fleet of eighty vessels on the
French coast, and filling them with his soldiers, crossed the Channel in

the night-time. The landing took place next day near Dover, where
{2] |



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THE DRUIDS AND THEIR TEMPLES.







THE DRUIDS INCITING THE BRITONS TO OPPOSE THE LANDING OF THE ROMANS.
| | ‘



THE EARLY BRITONS AND THEIR SAXON KINGS.

the water was too shallow to admit of his war-galleys discharging
their freight upon the beach itself ; but a standard-bearer, seizing the
Roman eagle, sprang with it into the sea, bidding his comrades
follow him. These heavily-armed men dashed in after their leader,
and, plunging and scrambling through the surf, flung themselves
furiously upon the Britons, who, with clubs and spears, and such rude
weapons, clustered upon the cliffs to oppose their landing. Both fought
well, but the Britons were at last driven back ; and thus the Romans
first planted their mailed feet upon our shores, centuries elapsing
before they, too, in their turn, were forced to give way to others.

They had not quiet possession, however. The Britons, though
broken, were not subdued ; and they had some brave, patriotic spirits
among them, who, from time to time, struggled to throw off this
foreign yoke. One of their most eminent leaders against the world-
conquering Romans was a woman !

Boadicea, our ancient British heroine, was the widow of one
of the many chiefs, or kings, who divided the island of Britain among
them. Her husband was called King of the Iceni; and when he
died, by way of preserving some portion of his little kingdom to his
daughters, he divided it between them and the Roman emperor,
Nero. The Roman governor, however, not content with a joint
heirship, seized the whole; and, when the widowed Boadicea pro-
tested against this injustice, he ordered her to be brutally whipped
like a slave, and inflicted other indignities upon the daughters for
whom she pleaded.

Such outrages were not to be borne. ‘The whole nation flew to
arms, making common cause against their oppressors ; and Boadicea, a
beautiful woman, with all the daring of a man, was soon at the head of
two hundred and eighty thousand savage warriors. The Romans

went down in all directions before the headlong onslaught of this
[4] |



THE INVASION BY JULIUS CAISAR.











































































































































































































































































































































































































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THE LANDING OF JULIUS CéiSAn.



THE EARLY BRITONS AND THEIR SAXON KINGS.

determined band. At length they summoned fresh forces, and a
decisive combat took place between the two. On this occasion,
Boadicea, appearing among her troops in her war chariot, exhorted
them to avenge her wrongs and their own, assuring them that that
day she herself would either die or be free. |

The Britons were brave and infuriate; but they could not
stand before the trained veterans now opposed to them. They were
defeated with dreadful slaughter; and Boadicea, poor -wretched
woman, put an end to her life by taking poison. That was wrong ;
but, as she was a heathen, she did not know this.

The Romans were now masters of Britain. But they, too, in
time, were compelled to yield their places to others; and the last of
them departed, after they had been on British soil rather more than
four hundred years. This was about the year 448.

The Britons were not particularly pleased to lose them, for their
neighbours in the extreme north of the island, Scotland, with whom
they had never had any intercourse, were becoming very trouble-
some to them, by frequently making fierce incursions into the south.
They used to sail over the Frith of Forth in small boats of basket-
work, covered with leather, to make them float; and were, to the —
full, as wild and uncivilised as the Britons were before their four
centuries spent side by side with the Romans. Kindly feelings had
sprung up between the Britons and their conquerors ; and, in taking
their last leave of the island, the latter had done what they could to
assist in its defence against that northern horde. But it was not
enough ; and, in their distress, the Britons made overtures to a very
warlike German people, called Saxons, to come and help them against.
those murderous Picts and Scots who were pouring into their
country. a

There were two valiant Saxon brothers, named Hengist and
| [6]



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THE EARLY BRITONS AND THEIR SAXON KINGS.

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Horsa, to whom this appeal of the harassed Britons was made.
Nothing loth, they accepted the invitation, bringing over with them
fifteen hundred of their followers. The strangers uniting with ‘the
Britons soon drove the Picts and Scots back again to their own
savage country. ‘But it is rather dangerous to ask very powerful
neighbours to take up your quarrels. The Saxons liked what they
saw of our island so well, that they began to come over by tribes and —
Swarms, and formed settlements of their own; until, before long,
they got almost the whole of Britain into their power ; expelling and
murdering its native population with great ferocity. Wales was the
place of retreat of such as were left, and there the Britons held
their own. ,

About the year 560 these Saxons, who were savage idolaters,
were made Christiane by the teaching of St. Augustine. The Pope—
that is, the Bishop of Rome—sent him on this good errand; and
that which moved him to do so was, it is said, his being struck with
the beauty of some Saxon children whom he saw in the slave-market
at Rome, and touched with pity when he was told that such lovely
creatures had never heard of the God who had made them.

The various little Saxon states were formed into one kingdom
under Egbert, in the year 827. He was the first King of England.

The most distinguished of this line of Saxon kings was he whom.
we call Alfred the Great. Before he came to the throne, in the year
871, the kingdom had been dreadfully harassed by the Danes, a
fierce, piratical people, from Denmark and Norway ; and Alfred, as
his brother’s general, had fought some very successful battles against
them. When he became king himself, he was ‘so hardly pressed by
them, that there was nothing but fighting for him ; he fought eight
pitched battles in the course of one year. Numbers. however, over-

powered valour; and at length the young king was so thoroughly
| [8 ]



LANDING OF THE SAXONS.























































































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THE EARLY BRITONS AND THEIR SAXON KINGS.

beaten, that, with his people dispersed and flying in all directions,
there was nothing for him but flight and concealment also. He
wandered about: in various places, and in various disguises. On one
occasion he took shelter with a farm servant of his own, who tended
cattle, remaining in his hut several days. fearful for the safety of



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ALFRED THE GREAT,

his royal guest, the man would not tell even his wife who that.
meanly-clad fellow was, that lounged about so strangely. So, one
day the good wife, tired, no doubt, of seeing him idling, as she
thought it (for he was only shaping a bow and some arrows), rather

sharply bade him look to the baking of some bread, which, according
[ 30 J



OF ALFRED THE GREAT.

REIGN

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KING AL

Oppressed by the cares of a ruined kingdom, poor Alfred, as may be

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so that, when the woman returned, she found them burned to a

[11]



THE EARLY BRITONS AND THEIR SAXON KINGS.

cinder. And a pretty scolding the monarch got, for not attending
better to that herdman’s bake-stove ! |

Alfred was one of the most wonderful men either of that time or
any other. He succeeded in ridding his kingdom of the Danes, in so
far as they were enemies. Some of them he permitted to settle in
his dominions on condition of their becoming Christians; for he
thought that, if such daring fellows could be tamed down, they might
become useful and brave subjects; and these he treated with great
kindness and favour. |

The ravages made by long warfare in England were repaired
with great zeal and address by this good king. Having built a large
fleet to protect his shores from fresh incursions, he gave himself up to
the instruction and improved government of his people ; and when
he came to his grave—too early, for he was only fifty-two—there was
no sovereign throughout Europe more admired, respected, and
beloved than he. In an old English chronicle, the epithet affixed to
the name of Alfred is that of “The Truth-teller.”

Alfred was succeeded in the throne which he had filled so
worthily by his second son, Edward. Other princes of the Saxon
line followed him, and were all, Jike the illustrious Alfred, sadly
tormented by the barbarous Danes. There needs not to make out a
catalogue of their names: fighting and quarreling make up the
history of that period. So much so was this the case, that one of
these kings is distinguished from the rest by the name of “ Edgar the
Peaceable.” He was the younger brother of the preceding king, who
from his complexion, was called « Kdwy the Fair.”

It has been said that the best Peace Society is a large standing
army ; and here lies the secret of Edgar’s quiet reign. He kept up
50 ereat an army and so powerful a fleet, that the Danes dared not

attack him.
[ 12]



SUBJUGATION OF THE WELSH PRINCES.

The freedom from foreign enemies which he enjoyed enabled him
the more successfully to contend with enemies at home. The Welsh
had been rather troublesome neighbours, and the sovereign of the
little Isle of Man, also an independent state, was disposed to make
common cause with them, for the purpose of teasing the powerful

































































































EDGAR THE PACIFIC ROWED DOWN THE DEE BY BIGHT PRINCES.

Saxon. But the Danes being kept at bay by Edgar's vast pre-
parations to meet them if they came, left him at leisure to menace
these Welsh and Manxmen so effectually that, without fighting a
single battle, he forced them to acknowledge him as their superior
lord. It was in token of this superiority, as we suppose, that he once

compelled eight of these Welsh princes to take each an oar, and row
[ 13}



THE EARLY BRITONS AND THEIR SAXON KINGS.

him in his boat down the river Dee, when he was minded to pay a
visit to the abbey of St. John the Baptist, at Chester. Not par-
ticularly pleasant, one thinks, for those eight fiery Welshmen ; but,
when people are thoroughly subdued, they are sometimes obliged to
do very unpleasant things; and it was far better that these eight
crowned heads should each pull an oar for King Edgar, than that they
should have been tearing each other and him to pieces—spilling the
blood of their own subjects and his.

This prince was fond of hunting, and he turned his liking for the
chase to good account. The uninhabited, uncultivated state of great
parts of England caused it to be infested by wild beasts, as the desert
places of some European countries are still. Edgar himself gave these
creatures no peace. Many condemned criminals, also, were liberated
on condition of their bringing in, within a fixed time, a certain
number of wolves’ heads ; and the tribute which his brother Athelstan
had compelled the Welsh to pay, he ordered should in future be
brought him in wolves’ heads—three hundred of them yearly. Such
hunting and chasing of wolves as these two wise regulations pro-
duced speedily put an end to the whole race in England.

Edgar was considered a good king. But he, unfortunately, died
early, leaving the kingdom to his son Edward, a boy of fourteen.
This Edward is called the Martyr, though, from the manner of his
death, the Murdered would have been the proper title. There were
quarrels about the succession: his step-mother, Elfrida, thought that
her son was the right heir to the throne. But, as his father had
named Edward for his successor, and a large number of the nobles,
together with Dunstan, the archbishop, were determined that Edgar’s
will should be complied with, Elfrida was obliged to withdraw her
claim ; and the young Kdward was duly crowned. He wags an

amiable, good youth ; but, though he treated his nepal -mother with all
[ 14 ]



MARTYR. ~

KING EDWARD THE

tenderness and affection, horrible feelings towards him rankled in her

mind.

Hunting one day in Dorsetshire, near Corfe Castle, where Elfrida



TYR.

N OF EDWARD THE MAR

ASSASSINATIO

lived, the king, having outridden his attendants, took the opportunity

When he mounted his horse again, ho

of making her a friendly call.

Wine was brought him, and while the

asked for something to drink.

(15 ]



THE EARLY BRITONS AND THEIR SAXON KINGS.

cup was at his lips, by command of the vile Elfrida, one of her
servants struck his dagger into the king from behind. Feeling the
thrust, Edward put spurs to his horse, but, speedily fainting with the
loss of blood, fell; one foot stuck fast in the stirrup, and, being
dragged along in this sad condition, life was soon extinct. Blood-
marks along the path which the horse had taken ouided his servants
to the lifeless body of their unfortunate master, who was already
beyond their help. |
| His people mourned for him very sincerely ; and, according to the
superstition of those days, imagined that miracles were wrought at
the tomb of one so innocent and so injured. |
The detestable Elfrida escaped the punishment that she deserved.
But she had remorse instead, and died in a convent, where her
tormented conscience led her to inflict upon herself many severities,
in the vain hope that they would make amends to God for the great
crime of which she had been guilty. :

[16 ]



OUR DANISH AND NORMAN
| KINGS.

was a conqueror ; but he was wise enough to try to
make himself agreeable to his new subjects. He
was a great king, and such, at times, receive out-
rageous flattery from those about him. Some of



ui Canute’s silly courtiers sought on one occasion to
recommend themselves to their sovereign, by representing to
him that his power was without limit, and that all things must
submit to him. To reprove their folly, the king ordered his chair to
be placed on the sea-shore, and then authoritatively commanded the
rising tide to approach no nearer, nor wet the foot of its lord and
master. On splashed the waves in response to this address, till one,
spreading further than the rest, drenched the royal feet. Turning to
his courtiers, who stood wondering what all this meant, Canute bade
them understand that there was one God and Ruler of all, and that
to Him alone men and things were entirely subject.
There were two more Saxon kings—Edward the Confessor and
Harold—before the Saxon rule was for ever extinguished in England.
Harold’s right to the throne was violently disputed by William, Duke

9 [17 ]



OUR DANISH AND NORMAN KINGS.

of Normandy, afterwards called the Conqueror, who, finding that
the English nation clung to their own native sovereign, prepared to
enforce by arms what he considered his claims to the crown. He
| raised a very large army for this purpose, with which he landed at
’ Pevensey, near Hastings, in the autumn of 1066. Stepping on shore,
the Duke. tripped and fell—an accident that rather alarmed his
superstitious followers. He re-assured them, however, by a joke;
remarking, as he picked himself up again, that he had already taken
possession of the soil.

On hearing of his landing, Harold sent messengers to Wilham
with proposals of peace. These were rejected; and as Harold did
not submit to the terms offered by the Duke, the two armies
prepared to engage.

This important battle took place on the 14th of October, 1066.
The previous night was spent by the English in drunken rioting ; by
the Normans, in prayers to God for success. The battle was fierce
and protracted, but ended in the entire defeat of the English.
Harold was slain, and there was no one to dispute the crown with
Duke William. |

As the Normans had prayed for success in their enterprise, they
now, on the field, offered up a devout thanksgiving to God for their
signal victory.

William had now his heart’s desire. He was king of England,
and was solemnly crowned in Westminster Abbey.

At first, he seemed disposed to treat his new subjects kindly ;
but, before long, gave way to excessive severity in his government.
The English were oppressed and discountenanced ; even their lands
were taken from them, and given to his Norman followers.

But though William made himself so great abroad, he had hot

much comfort at home. His three sons took to quarrelling among
[ 18 J



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CANUTE, THE DANE.





































































































































































































































































CANUTE REPROVING HIS COURTIERs.

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OUR DANISH AND NORMAN KINGS.

_ themselves ; and Robert, the eldest, being offended by the other two
(the foolish lads threw water upon him as he passed), broke out into
the most violent anger against them. ‘Their father in vain endea-
voured to appease him: Robert quarrelled with them all, and, leaving
the castle, got up an insurrection against his father’s authority.
Robert was not, in the main, a bad fellow; but it was a dreadful
thing to make war against his father. In order to put down Robert
and his friends, William was obliged to draw forces from his newly-
conquered England. ‘The young prince shut himself up in the castle
of Gerberay, and William laid siege to it with as much zeal as though
it had not been his own son with whom he was contending ; Robert,
on his part, fought with equal insensibility. In one of the many
encounters that took place before the walls of this castle, father and
‘son met in deadly conflict. The faces of both being concealed by
their helmets, neither knew the other, until one of them, being
wounded and unhorsed, called out for assistance. To his horror,
Robert recognised his father’s voice, and, filled with remorse, threw
himself on his knees before him to ask forgiveness. His petition was
answered by a curse from his incensed parent, who rode away on
Robert’s horse, which the prince had helped him to mount.

They were afterwards reconciled, and Robert fought the Scots in
his father’s army. -

William died on the 9th of September, 1087, pens the crown
of England to his second son, William Rufus.

- Robert and William were soon quarrelling again, after thair
father’s death. Robert, as the elder, thought that he had the best
claim to the English crown, and many of his Norman barons thought
go too: If father and son could fight against each other, of course
brothers could ; and both of them took up arms to settle the point.

They made both England and Normandy into’ their battle-field ; and
[ 20 J



ie

LLIAM THE CONQUERO

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THE NORMAN THANKSGIVING AFTER THE BATTLE OF HASTINGS.

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OUR DANISH AND NORMAN KINGS.

when the king of France made peace between them, Robert and
William cemented their newly patched-up friendship by carrying on
a skirmishing contest with their brother Henry.

Henry shut himself up in a strong castle on the Nerman coast :
and his brothers blockaded him there so strictly, that the garrison
were in the utmost distress for want of water. Robert, like a good
natured fellow, as (with all his faults) he was, allowed some of them
to slip through in order to fetch water, while he himself sent wine
to his brother. William was very angry at this; but Robert, with
much feeling, replied to him; “Where. shall we get another brother
when this is dead ?” .

The king’s own life was in danger during this siege, though not
in the same way as that of his brother, whom his hard heart: would
have left to die of thirst. Riding out alone one day to reconnoitre,
two soldiers, who were prowling about, set’ upon him. Two to one
was more than even a king could withstand, and William -was
presently unhorsed. Before he could recover himself, a rough, strong
hand was laid upon his shoulder, and the dagger of one of the men
gleamed over his head. Another moment, and the question. about
the English crown would have been closed for ever between Robert
and William ; but, seeing his danger, Rufus cried out, “Hold, knave !
I'am the King of England!” Down dropped the blade;. the
frightened soldier, with all reverence, raised the prostrate monarch,
and it is said that Rufus showed his gratitude to him by liberal
presents, and giving the man a place in his own service.

The reign of William Rufus was marked by the beginning
of a series of most extraordinary warlike expeditions to Palestine.
They were called the Crusades, and were undertaken for the
purpose of re-taking the city of Jerusalem from the Turks, who

then possessed the country, and who exceedingly ill treated such
| [ 22]



WILLIAM I. AT THE SIEGE OF GERBERAY.







































































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WILLIAM I, AND HIS SON ROBERT,

[ 23 |]



OUR DANISH AND NORMAN KINGS,

Christian people as travelled thither to see the tomb of our |
Lord. | .

But though thus fiercely disposed towards the cruel and in-
sulting Turks, the zeal of these Crusaders for one of the relics of
their Lord—the place where He was laid when His sacred ‘body had
yielded up its very life for mankind—caused them to be more
merciful towards each other. Europe had been full of wars and
bloodshed,. but now a universal peace was proclaimed among
Christians; and the “Truce of God” (so it was named) was pre-
served unbroken for a considerable time, while preparations were
being made for this vast enterprise in the East.

Kings, princes, with nobles and knights innumerable, took the
cross on this occasion, and among them was Robert of N ormandy,
who, in order to obtain money enough to carry him and his followers
on that long and difficult journey, sold his Norman inheritance to
Rutus, that king being glad to get it on any terms. Another French
prince did the same with his dominions, and William was just pre-—
paring to sail over and take possession, when an accident put an end
to his worthless life. |

He was hunting one day in the New Forest, a forest which his
father had created with so much cruelty to the inhabitants of the
district, driving them with violence from their homes, in order to
make a home for beasts of chase, whom, as an old writer tells us, the
Conqueror loved, “as though he had been their father.’ And in this
lonely wilderness, a fleet stag came within bow-shot of him. William
let fly his arrows one after another in vain, and then, with his own
quiver empty, he called out impatiently to Sir Walter Tyrrel, one
of his companions, to shoot the creature for him. Sir Walter drew
his bow-string smartly ; swift flew his arrow towards its mark, but,

alas! it glanced aside, and, instead of, slaying a deer, pierced the
[ 24 ]



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OUR DANISH AND NORMAN KINGS. —

very heart of the unfortunate king, who instantly sank lifeless to the
ground.

Clapping spurs to his horse, Sir Walter fled in terror, leaving
the dead body of his master lying sadly there in the forest. It was
afterwards found by some poor charcoal-burners, who came thither
to ply their trade, put into a cart, and carried to Winchester, where
it was buried with little ceremony.

The poor oppressed people of England thought that the fate of
William Rufus was God’s judgment upon the son, for the crimes
committed by the father in that place. William, however, had sins
enough of his own to answer for. |

Robert and William had made an engagement that the one who
outlived the other should succeed to the English throne. But when
William died, Robert was far away in the Holy Land. So their
younger brother Henry, who happened to be in England at the time,
immediately seized the kingdom for himself. He was called Beau-
clerc, or the Good Scholar ; because he had more learning than was
common among great people in those days. The clergy were almost
the only learned men; lords and knights could rarely even write
_ their own names. |

The people of England were quite content to have Henry for
their king; so that when Robert returned from Palestine, after the
city of Jerusalem had been taken by the Crusaders, theré was no
chance of his recovering the kingdom. Perhaps if Robert had not en-
joyed himself so excessively in Italy on his way home, he might have
arrived a little earlier, and so have had a better chance of securing
what was his own. Asit was, he was content to receive a yearly sum
of money in place of a kingdom; and being an easy, pleasure-loving
man, that, most likely, made him much happier than all the state of

royalty, accompanied by its cares, would have done.
[ 26 J



DEFEAT OF ROBERT.

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usual reckless bravery, was suddenly desertedvy one of his best

knights, who galloped off with his whole dision in the very

midst of the battle.

This ruined Robert, whoafter a desperate

struggle, was made prisoner, together with manpf his bravest fol-
Tt was not in Henry’s nature to be generou The unfortunate

lowers.

[ 27 J



OUR DANISH AND NORMAN KINGS.

Robert was brought to England, carried across the country to the
wild hill-country of Wales, and there shut up in Cardiff Castle.

His imprisonment was not at first very severe: he had liberty to
go about in the neighbourhood. But, attempting one day to make
his escape, he was retaken, dragged back again, and cooped up closely
in that dismal castle, where he spent the remainder of his life—
twenty-eight long, long years—in captyyity. What a change for poor
pleasure-loving Robert !

Some say that Henry was cruel ehough to destroy his brother’s
sight, in order to prevent his escaping a second time. That was a fine
return for Robert’s generosity in sending him wine, when he and his
garrison were near perishing of thirst in that castle of his.

The hard-hearted king, however, had his own troubles, He
dearly loved his only son, Prince William ; and, as he was heir to the
crown, he took him, when he was eighteen years old, to Normandy, that
the Norman barons might acknowledge him as Henry’s successor.
All this was done satisfactorily, and then the royal party prepared to
return to England. .

The king and prince had a large retinue, al the fleet that was
to convey them was moored at Barfleur. Just as the king was on the
point of embarking, Fitz- -Stephen, the captain -of one of the vessels,
approached him, saying, “My father, Stephen, served thy father by
sea all his life. He steered the vessel that carried Duke William to
the conquest of England ; I pray thee to let me have the same office.
I have a good ship here, called ‘La Blanche Nef’” (that is “The
White Ship "); and he would fain have had the king sail in it with
him. But the king told him he could not do go, as the vessel in
which he was to sail was already fixed upon. His son, the prince,
and his daughter, together with their attendants, amounting to a

hundred and forty persons, he would, however, intrust to the “White
[ 28 ]



DEATH OF PRINCE WILLIAM.

Ship,” and the care of him whose father had so faithfully served their

orandtfather.
With this Fitz-Stephen was well pleased, and the young prince
ordered three casks of wine to be distributed among the crew. But,

















































































































































































































































































































































































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SHIPWRECK OF PRINCE WILLIAM, SON OF HENRY I.

alas! they got drunk upon it ; so that, when they set sail, fine, and
calm, and moonlight though it was, they ran among some rocks upon
the coast. The vessel struck, filled, and was at once on the point of
sinking. Fitz-Stephen immediately lowered a boat, in which he
placed the prince, and then bade the sailors row for their lives to the
shore, which was not far off. Their strong, willing arms would soon

have landed him in safety ; but, hearing the cries of his sister, who
| [ 29 |



a



OUR DANISH AND NORMAN KINGS.

had been left in the sinking vessel, the prince commanded them to
row back again and rescue her. The boat reached the ship’s side, but
then such numbers sprang in, that it was instantly upset, sending the
prince and every one of them to the bottom. The “ White Ship”
itself went down directly afterwards, and nothing of her was left
save a floating spar, to which two men still clung.

Fitz-Stephen rose again to the surface after that fearful plunge,
and, struggling with the waters, eagerly asked these men what had
become of the prince. They answered, that he and all with him were
lost ; upon which, groaning out “Woe is me!” the unfortunate
captain, reckless of his own life, sank again to rise no more. One
only out of near two hundred persons in that ill-fated vessel was
saved, and he was a poor butcher of Rouen.

The king, meanwhile, sailed on pleasantly, in utter ignorance of
this dreadful shipwreck. The cry, indeed, of those drowning wretches
had been heard on board his vessel, distant as they were ; but none
knew what it was, and no one heeded it.

_ It was soon known in England that the poor young prince and
his companions were all lost, but none dared tell the king of it. At
length, those about him ventured to send a little boy into the royal
presence, who, kneeling before the monarch, simply informed him
that the “White Ship” had gone down, and that all on board were
drowned.

The miserable Henry fainted away when the child had ended his
brief but dreadful tale, and, though he lived fifteen years longer, was
never again, as historians tell us, seen to smile. He died in 1135, at
the age of sixty-six, and was buried at Reading Abbey, which he had
himself founded. |

After the death of his son, Henry caused his daughter Matilda,

who had married the Emperor of Germany, to be acknowledged as
| [ 80 J



EMPRESS MATILDA.

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[ 31 ]



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OUR DANISH AND NORMAN KINGS.

his heir. But, at the time of the king’s death, she was in France ; SO
Stephen, Henry’s nephew, took advantage of her absence, and seized
the crown for himself. The English people willingly received him as
their sovereign, and King Stephen was rather popular than otherwise.

Matilda, however, was not going tamely to yield up. her rights to
ausurper. In 1139 she landed, with a small company of knights, on
the Sussex coast ; and numbers flocking to her standard, enabled her
to overthrow Stephen and recover her own kingdom. But she did
not retain it long, for she had no abilities for government, and her
people, discontented with her, replaced Stephen on the throne.

This. was not accomplished without an obstinate | struggle.
Matilda had all the spirit of a king’s daughter, and she fought it out
with Stephen as long as possible. She threw herself with her
followers into Oxford ; but the city surrendered almost immediately
to Stephen, and the Empress was obliged to withdraw into the castle,
which, as it was of great strength, she hoped to hold against him. A
_ three months’ blockade, however, exhausted all their provisions ; and
then, to save herself, one snowy, winter's night, Matilda, with four
_ knights—all, like herself, wrapped in white mantles, to escape
observation—stole out of the castle, crossed the frozen Thames, and,
now on foot, now on horseback, reached Wallingford, where her son
and the Earl of Gloucester had assembled an army for her relief. But
their efforts were fruitless ; and at length, to put an end to the civil
war (between the partizans of Stephen and Prince Henry, Matilda’s |
son) which from time to time afflicted England, it was agreed upon
by the'two that Stephen should retain the crown for the rest of his
lite, and that, upon his death, Henry should succeed him.

Stephen died very soon afterwards, and then Henry quietly took
possession of the kingdom, of which his family had been unjustly
deprived for a period of nineteen years.

£32]



THE PLANTAGENET KINGS OF
ENGLAND.

Z ATILDA, daughter of, Henry I., was twice married




—first to the Emperor of Germany, and, after
his death, to Geoffrey Plantagenet, Earl of
Anjou. Henry II, who now came to the
throne, was the son of this Geoffrey, who
received his name of Plantagenet from his custom of
wearing a sprig of broom (called planta-genista) in
his helmet, in place of the long, waving feather with which
some surmounted their steel head-pieces. He was joyfully ©
welcomed by his people when he came to take possession
of his dominions; for the English remembered that, through his
mother, he had Saxon blood in his veins, while the Normans prided
themselves on his father’s pure Norman descent ; and so every one
was satisfied. |
Henry at first showed himself a good, vigorous king. He ruled

his people wisely and kindly, and he was very powerful abroad also.

33
3 { 33 ]



THE PLANTAGENET KINGS OF ENGLAND.

A whole third of the kingdom of France belonged to him; for, besides
his Norman dominions, a large portion of the south of France was
now attached to the English crown, in consequence of Henry’s
marriage with Eleanor of Guienne.

During this reign lived the great Chancellor and Archbishop of
Canterbury, Thomas 3 Becket.

The reign of Henry was a long and successful one. During its
course the Welsh were repulsed, and the Irish thoroughly subdued—
Ireland being made a part of the dominions of the kings of England.
Scotland was also rendered a tributary kingdom.

But it was not a very happy reign to the king himself. His
three sons, Henry, Geoffrey, and Richard, broke out into open revolt
against their father, and their mother actually encouraged them in
doing so. Henry’s grief of mind at the disobedience of his sons threw
him into aslow fever, of which he died in the castle of Chinon, in
Normandy, at the age of fifty-seven. He was succeeded by his son
Richard, surnamed, on account of his bravery, Coeur de Lion, or Lion
Heart. Richard was handsome, athletic, an undaunted warrior, of a
genial disposition, and great abilities ; and his people both loved and
were proud of their famous king. ,

When he first came to the throne, in 1189, he seemed desirous of
making amends for his past misconduct.

But the Crusades immediately tempted Richard from his own
home and people. His fiery valour soon distinguished him in the
Kast. The city of Acre, which had withstood a two years’ siege,
surrendered within one month to the united forces of Richard and
Philip of France. Other conquests followed; and at length he
fought his way to within a few days’ march of Jerusalem. But there
quarrels among his brother Crusaders compelled the Christian

armies to retreat. During this retreat, the indignant Richard
| [ 84]



REIGN OF HENRY THE SECOND.





















































































































































































































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PASSAGE OF A BECKET THROUGH FRANCE.

. [ 35 ]



THE PLANTAGENET KINGS OF ENGLAND.

learned that the city of Jaffa had been re-taken by the Turks; he
hastened thither, and, with his formidable battle-axe in hand, led a
successful attack upon the enemy.

Disappointed in the hope of taking Jerusalem, whose ‘capture
was the object of the Crusades, a truce was agreed upon with
Saladin, the celebrated sovereign of the Turks, and then Richard
returned home. But as he passed through Germany, the Duke of
Austria, who had been one of his brother Crusaders, and to whom
Richard had given deadly offence before Acre, laid hold of him, and
diseracefully threw him into prison. It is said that a wandering
minstrel at last found him out, and then joyfully sped to England
with the good news.

The Emperor refused to let Richard go, unless a very large sum
of money was given to him. But so eager were the English people
to get their king back again, that they not only brought money for
his ransom, but gladly melted down their gold and silver plate, to
swell the amount. |

Prince John had behaved very badly during Richard’s captivity,
and usurped his sovereignty. After Richard’s return, John was
anxious to make submission to him, and, at the intercession of their
mother, Richard frankly forgave the kneeling traitor. “I forgive
him,” said he, “and hope I shall as easily forget his offences as he
will my pardon.” | |

After his release from that German dungeon, Richard went to
war with Philip of France, who had acted towards him in a very
dishonourable manner. Laying siege to the castle of one of his own
refractory vassals, he was wounded in the shoulder by an arrow from .
the walls. Bad surgery made the injury fatal ; and, after pardoning
the man who had slain him, Richard died in Normandy, in 1199, in

the forty-second year of his age.
[ 36 ]



RICHARD CQZUR-DE-LION.









































































JOHN BEGGING FORGIVENESS OF RICHARD.

[ 87]



THE PLANTAGENET KINGS OF ENGLAND.

John, who succeeded him, was a poor exchange for the generous,
though violent Richard. He had been a bad son and a bad brother,
and he was now going to be a bad king.

His nephew Arthur disputed with him the succession to the
crown of England ; and, it is said, was murdered by him.

This was a horrible beginning of John’s reign.

John at last proved so violent and tyrannical a sovereign, that
his people would no longer endure it. The great lords of the kingdom
met together and forced him, at Runnymead, to sign the renewal of
an important charter (or written engagement) given by Henry L,
and a confirmation of the good laws of Edward the Confessor. The
promises which he thus solemnly made are called Magna Charta, or
the Great Charter ; because they contain so many things essential to
the just liberties of Englishmen.

John sealed this readily; but he broke his promises quite
as readily! And then, once more, there was that wretched
thing, a civil war, in England. It was carried on with excessive
violence; the king, marching from Dover to Berwick, laid waste
everything before him ; and the northern barons fled in dismay, to
seek refuge in Scotland.

John’s misdoings, however, were nearly at an end. He died at
Newark on the’ 18th of October, 1216, after a miserable reign of
seventeen years.

It is to be doubted whether apes cood can be said of J ohn:
he was both a bad man and a bad king.

His son, called Henry of Winchester, because he was born there,
succeeded him. He was only ten years old when he was crowned
King of England. | |

_ But, though he grew up a good a amiable man, he was not at

all fit for the difficult past of a monarch in those old, old times.
[ 38 J



KING HENRY THE THIRD.

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HENRY III. AND THE BARONS.

39 |



THE PLANTAGENET KINGS OF ENGLAND.

"There had been dissensions between Henry and his barons for
some time, and at length the storm burst.

The king had called a parliament together ; and when he sat in
state to receive them, to his surprise, the barons presented them-
selves armed and in their coats of mail. In great alarm, he asked
them what they meant ‘—were they going to make him a prisoner ?
They answered, No; they were going to make him more completely
king, by compelling him to rule according to the laws. The barons,
however, soon became so intolerable to the people, that they at
length entreated the king’s son, Prince Edward, to assist them in
getting rid of such odious rulers. They were glad to have the king
back again ; having experienced what it was to be governed by those
barons. | | |
Edward was a fine fellow, of twenty-two ; brave, and of great
abilities ; altogether as different from his father as possible. But at.
first, he was unwilling to do what was required of him. He was
afraid of making bad worse.

But as Henry had now resumed his royal authority, the barons
made war upon him ; and then there was something for that valiant
Edward-to do. The Earl of Leicester headed the insurgent nobles,
and Prince Edward was unfortunately taken prisoner, nor could he ~
obtain his release until his father had promised to let these men have
as much power again as they already had abused. This was done;
but, after all, the barons broke faith with the king, and then both
parties again took up arms. Dreadful battles were fought between
the royalists and rebels: in one of them, at Lewes, in Sussex, the |
poor old king was made prisoner by Leicester, and Prince Edward
was obliged to give himself up, to rescue his father. He managed,
however, one fine morning, to make his escape, by outriding his

guards. On rejoining his friends, he soon found himself at the head
[40] |



a ALS Ta A co Sa aR OF ET eS

































































































































































































































































































































































THE PLANTAGENET KINGS OF ENGLAND.

of a fine army, with which he gave battle to Leicester and such of the
barons as still adhered to him, at Evesham.

In this battle, the Earl of Leicester, together with a- hundred and
sixty knights, and many others of lower rank, lost their lives ; and it
put an end to the civil war that had so: long raged in the kingdom.

Now that peace was secured, EKdward’s soldierly spirit led him to
join the Crusades, and he and his wife Eleanor, of Castile, left
England with a large army for the Holy Land. The Prince was
wounded by a poisoned arrow, and would, it is said, have died, but
that his loving and heroic wife sucked the poison from the wound,
‘and so saved her husband !

The old king did not long survive this departure of his son to
the East. He drooped, and died, in November, 1272, after a reign of
fifty-five years.

The news of Henry’s death reached Edward when he was in
Italy, on his way home from the Holy Land. This brave prince was
a good son, and grieved sincerely for his father, as for a loss that
could never be replaced.

_ The chief events of this king’s reign were his entire subjugation
of the Welsh, and his long wars with Scotland.

Edward died at the age of sixty-nine. He was a very great
king, and, to his own subjects, a good one. He is celebrated, not
only for his warlike doings, but for having given his people many
wise laws.

His son, Edward of Caernarvon, who succeeded him, was a poor.
creature, who soon disgusted his people, by selecting for his favourites
persons quite unfit to be so distinguished, and upon whom he heaped
honours, and riches, and power, till they became eines imed pre-
suming and overbcaring.

A civil war between the king and his barons was the conse-
[ 42 ]



KING EDWARD’S FRENCH CAMPAIGN.

quence ; and this was renewed with various fortune, until at last the
king himself was taken prisoner, and the Parliament resolved that
Edward should no longer be allowed to reign, but that his son, a
, youth of fourteen, should be declared king.

Poor Edward was, after undergoing much ill-usage, cruelly put
to death, at Berkeley Castle, on the 22nd of September, 1327.

Edward III. was, like his grandfather, Edward I., a warlike
prince ; and his son, the Black Prince, was.almost more celebrated as
a warrior than he. Very soon after he came to the throne, he began
those famous wars of the English in France which ‘ended in the
almost total subjugation of that kingdom—a wonderful success, which
was, however, very short-lived, for, before his death, Edward lost
again almost all that he had gained.

King Edward landed in safety on the coast of N ormandy, in the
year 1346, and marched within a few miles of Paris itself, whose
suburbs he insulted; but as King Philip had raised an énormous
army to oppose him, Edward found it needful to retire towards the
north again. In attempting this, he found himself stopped in. all
directions, by the bridges over rivers being broken down, until, on
approaching the banks of the Somme, he found not only the bridges
destroyed, but a large French force, under Sir Gondemar de Faye,
awaiting him at the other side. As the King of France, with more
than three times his own number of men, was now close behind him,
Edward was in a dreadful difficulty. At this juncture, however, a
French peasant was bribed to show him a safe ford over the river.
It was reached while the tide was low ; and, dashing into the water,
horse and foot splashed through, cutting down the Frenchmen, who
rode into the stream to oppose them, and afterwards chased them to
some distance. The English got over only just in time, for Philip

came upon their rear, but was prevented following them by the rising
[ 43 J



THE PLANTAGENET KINGS OF ENGLAND.

tide. Philip and his army had to go round by the bridge of Abbe-
ville, and this gave Edward a little breathing time. The two armies,
however, soon came again in sight of each other, and, greatly dispro-

portioned as they were, a battle was unavoidable.

Edward chose his eround with great judgment, near Crecy, in
Ponthieu ; and, drawing up his little army in three lines, the first
of which was commanded by the Black Prince (then a boy of
sixteen), assisted by two experienced generals, aIIERTy, awaited the
attack.

The victory was complete, and this huge French army was
utterly defeated, with dreadful loss. |

From the glorious field of Crecy, Edward passed on to lay siege
to the town of Calais. This was sad work, for it took nearly a
twelvemonth’s close blockade before sheer famine compelled its
surrender. Edward was induced to spare its inhabitants only on
condition of six of the most important ones giving themselves up,
bareheaded, and with ropes round their necks, for him to do with as
he pleased. |

Six citizens were found willing to sacrifice themselves; and,
spite of the entreaties of his son and other officers, Edward ordered
them to instant execution. But the good queen Philippa, his wife,
fell on her knees before him, and pleaded so earnestly with him to
spare their lives, that he could not refuse her; for he loved his wife
very much. And so these brave fellows were kindly entertained by |
the queen, and sent on their way in safety.

Ten years afterwards the Black Prince led a very small but
victorious army, from the English possessions in the south, right
into the heart of France; and ravaged the country frightfully. On
his return to Bordeaux, however, he found that John, who succeeded

his father Philip as King of France, was close at his met with a °
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QUEEN PHILIPPA INTERCEDING FOR THE BURGESSES



THE PLANTAGENET KINGS OF ENGLAND.

force seven or eight times as large as his own ; and, considering that
he had no chance of success if he risked a battle with him, he was
willing to accept any reasonable terms of peace between them. But
John’s demands were so extravagant — among other things, he
required that the prince should give himself up as a prisoner—that
the young hero, vowing that England should never have to pay his
ransom, broke off all further negotiations, and began to make the best

preparations that he could for a battle near Poictiers, where he was
encamped.

Wonderful to relate, this mere handful of English and Gascons
routed the French host, consisting of all the great nobles and knights
of the kingdom ; and King John himself fighting desperately, with
his youngest son Philip by his side, was taken prisoner on the field.
He was led away to the tent where the young prince was resting
after that dreadful day, and who, on perceiving the captive king’s
approach, came out to meet him, with the utmost courtesy and
kindness, carried him to his tent, gave him drink with his own hands,
and at supper waited upon the king, who sat at table, while his
conqueror stood before him. |

The prince afterwards conducted his royal prisoner to England,
where. John was received with equal consideration by King Edward
himself. |

The Black Prince died in 137 6, lamented and honoured, not in
England only, but in France also. His sorrowing old father only
survived him one year; and Richard of Bordeaux, son of the prince,
succeeded to the crown when he-was eleven years old.

_ It was in the reign of Edward III. that the first beginning of
what is called the Reformation in England took place. John
Wycliffe first translated the Bible in this reign.

The early part of Richard’s reign was marked by a violent insur-
[ 46 ]



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SURRENDER OF KING JOHN OF FRANCE



THE PLANTAGENET KINGS OF ENGLAND.

rection of the lower orders of the people, under a man called Wat
Tyler. The insurrection was, however, speedily quelled.

Richard, although very promising as a youth, proved a pleasure-
loving, luxurious monarch, and lost the respect of his people, who
had been at first disposed to love him, no doubt for his father’s sake
as well as his own. | |

As a king, Richard was guilty of many faults, but his treat-
~ ment of his uncle, the Duke of Gloucester, must be looked upon as a

--erime, not a fault. The duke had been a turbulent subject; and

- Richard, weary of being plagued with him, determined to put an end
to his annoyance. So, pretending to be friendly, he paid the duke a
visit at his house in Essex, where Gloucester, suspecting no wrong,
came out, with his wife and daughter, to meet the king. At that
moment the treacherous Richard commanded the duke to be seized,
had him hurried to the beach, where a boat was waiting for him, and
put him on board a vessel, which sailed directly for Calais. There
the duke was thrown into prison, and presently murdered, it was
believed, by the king’s order.

‘Richard, however, was to suffer bitterly for his faults. The
discontent against him grew so general, that at length his cousin, the
Duke of Lancaster, dethroned him, and had himself crowned as Henry
IV., in his room.

Richard was imprisoned, first in the Tower of London, and then
in Pontefract Castle, where he came to a violent end—people did not
‘know how; but no one doubts that Henry IV. was the author of
this bad deed. : )

Richard II. was the last of the Plantagenet kings.



THE HOUSES OF LANCASTER
AND YORK.

NRY OF LANCASTER, who deposed his unhappy
cousin, soon found that it was no easy matter to
be aking. He had got the crown by foul means
and he must take the consequences. An insur- .
rection at home, in which the king was victorious,
was followed by another in Wales, headed by the

celebrated Owen Glendower ; while the Scots, taking advantage of



these disturbances, poured over the borders, and did all sorts of
damage in the northern counties.

One body of these Scots was so signally defeated by Percy, Earl
of Northumberland, that. the spot was afterwards known by the
melancholy name of Slaughter Hill. Hager to avenge this defeat,
Archibald, Earl of Douglas, one of the greatest of the Scottish lords,
assembled a large body of knights, archers, and spearmen, and made
an impetuous rush into Northumberland, devastating all before him.

The plunder that he and his followers secured, consisting of droves of

49
4 [ 49 J



THE HOUSES OF LANCASTER AND YORK.

cattle and flocks of sheep, was so immense, that they were obliged to
turn back again to their own country in order to get it safely home.
Accordingly, the marauders wheeled round, and, fearing nothing,
drove their spoils leisurely along the road. At a place called
Homildon Hill, however, they were unexpectedly met by a strong
force of English, under the Earl of Northumberland and his son
Henry Percy—known, on account of his fiery valour, as Harry
Hotspur. An engagement took place here, with fatal results to the
Scots, many of whose greatest chiefs were killed or taken prisoners.
A usurper must not expect peace. Two years afterwards there

was: another insurrection in the North, supported by Hotspur’s
father, Scroop, Archbishop of York, and other great people. The
general who commanded Henry’s forces on this occasion went to
work cunningly. He sought an interview with the rebel leaders,
and talked fairly and softly to them, until they, trusting to his
sincerity, caused their followers to disperse. When this was done,
he seized the archbishop, and hurried him off to his palace at
Bishopsthorpe, where the lord chief-justice, Gascoigne, was required
to pronounce sentence of instant death upon him. The upright
judge refused to do this ; prisoners, he said, were entitled by law
to a proper trial. A more accommodating judge was soon found,
who at once did what was required of him, and the archbishop was
| immediately beheaded. |

~The last days of the king were very sad ones. He suffered from
oppressive illness; his mind was tormented by remorse for his
crimes ; and he was jealous of his son ; fearing that, as he had stolen
the kingdom from his cousin, so his son would be tempted to steal it
from him. He died at Westminster, on the 20th of March, 1413, in
the for ty-seventh year of his age.

‘Within a year of his accession Henry V. led an army into
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THE HOUSES OF LANCASTER AND YORK.

France, with the old object of securing, by arms, that which the
kings of England believed to be theirs by inheritance—that 1s, the
crown of that kingdom. ‘The strong town of Harfleur surrendered
to him in six weeks; but his army was at the time so reduced by
sickness, that he was obliged to make the best of his way home
again, immediately. He accordingly marched on towards Calais ;
but, on approaching that town, found his passage barred by a great
French army, which was drawn up on the plains of Agincourt.
_ Advance or retreat were alike impossible; so the king drew up his
forces in the best possible manner, and then with a cheerful con-
fidence, that put heart into those hunger-bitten and enfeebled men,
calmly awaited the result. The French also prepared for action ;
and the two armies sat down on the ground, face to face, with their
weapons by their side. |

At this juncture three French knights came within Henry's
entrenchments, to offer him a free passage to Calais, on condition of
his giving up Harfleur, and resigning for ever all claim to the French
throne. These terms were indignantly refused ; and the knights ©
were about to be hastily dismissed, when one of them, the Sieur de
Helly, who, having formerly been a prisoner in England, had dis-
eraced himself by breaking his parole, had the impertinence to
propose a duel between himself and any knight who might dare to
charge him with that mean crime. |

«Sir knight,” said the king, shortly, “‘ this is no time for single
combats. Go, bid your comrades prepare for battle ; and doubt not,
that, for the breaking of your word, you wvl a second time lose your
liberty, if not your life.” |

- To this stinging speech De Helly answered, passionately—“ That

he should receive no orders from Henry ; Charles was their sovereign ;

and his Frenchmen would fight for him, whenever he thought fit.”
[ 52]



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THE HOUSES OF LANCASTER AND YORK.

Henry bid him begone ; and then, aeCp DUS forward, gave the
order—“ Banners, advance !”

Brave old Sir Thomas Erpingham, in answer to this, spun his
baton into the air, as he repeated the kine’s command; and the
English archers. then poured in on the enemy their customary fatal
flight of arrows. The battle was long and bloody ; but ended in the

total overthrow of the French. Those Frenchmen could not stand
before us English in the olden time! Ten thousand of them were
‘slain; fourteen thousand taken prisoners ; while not more than
sixteen hundred fell on the side of the English.

Md Passing over the field of battle, accompanied by the heralds of
both countries, Henry inquired what castle that was—pointing to
one in the distance. “The castle of Agincourt,” was the reply of the
principal French herald. “ Then,” rejoined the king, “let. this battle

os henceforth be called the battle of Agincourt.” :
Soon after Henry’s arrival in England, where his neowle received |
him with great joy, the Emperor Sigismund, of Germany, paid. him
a visit. On this occasion a singular scene was exhibited. When the
Emperor’s vessel cast anchor at Dover, the Duke of Gloucester and
a other nobles, mounted, armed, and with drawn swords, splashed into
_ the water, and demanded to know whether the Emperor came simply
as a guest, or as one claiming any authority in the realm. On its—
- being answered that he came only as their master’s guest, the
swords were sheathed, and he was welcomed with all the respect and
a cordiality due to so distinguished a, visitor. | |

In about two years after Agincourt, Henry again invaded
France. The result of his prowess during this second attempt was, |
that he married the Princess Catherine, daughter of the imbecile old

~ French king, and was himself declared next heir to the throne, |

He did not live long to enjoy his new honours. He brought his

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THE HOUSES OF LANCASTER AND YORK.

- queen home to England, where she was crowned with great state in
Westminster Abbey. Some more fighting in France followed ; and ‘
then, just when he seemed to have reached the height of ne
- grandeur, came the time for him to leave it all.
At Paris, where he had celebrated the birth of his son (after-
_ wards Henry VI.) with stately rejoicings, he was seized with illness.
| Physicians four hundred years ago were not much, to be trusted, and
it soon became apparent that the king must die. All the pride of
his youth, and beauty, and str ength, and valour could not save him.
He bore his doom with manly fortitude; settled the affairs of his
kingdom, appointed his brother John, Duke of Bedford, to be regent
of France during the young Henry’s childhood ; and then, being told
that he had not more than two hours to live, gave himself up to
devout prayers. He died on the 31st of August, 1422, deeply
lamented by his own subjects, and respected for his humanity and
- justice by those whom he had conquered.
--His dead body was conveyed with extraordinary pomp to Calais, |
attended by a vast concourse of mourning nobles. From Calais the
long procession crossed over to Dover, and thence followed all that
was left of the hero of Agincourt, to his last resting-place in|
Westminster Abbey. |
He had only lived thirty-five years, and reigned nine. |
Henry VI. was only nine years old when he became King of
_. England ; in two months after, he became King of France also, being
~ erowned in Paris on the 17th of December, 1431. |
The whole of France must have fallen before the English but for
the interference of a poor country girl, known as Joan of Are, who
- gave the French fresh courage to resist their conquerors; herself
° sleading them on from victory to victory, until the fruitless siege of
-Ofleans gave something like a finishing blow to English dominion in
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_ ‘THE HOUSES OF LANCASTER AND YORK.

: ‘France. Poor Joan was at length taken prisoner, and most cruelly
_ put to death in the market-place of Rouen. | |
| The English, however, did not gain anything by the destruction

of Joan. Bad as their affairs had become, after she had so heroically

_ roused the spirit of her countrymen, they became still worse and |

worse after her death ; until, at length, the only spot in all France
remaining to them was Edward ITT.’s conquest of Calais. Even their
king’s hereditary possessions in the south were lost; and, though
some of the inhabitants of Guienne, desirous of returning to their old
. allegiance, offered aid to Henry, it was all of no use. The Earl of -
Shrewsbury, a brave old knight, more than eighty years old, joined
_ these Gascon lords, with a force of eicht thousand men, and at first —
they obtained some successes ; but, hastening to the relief of one of
the towns taken by him, and which was DOW besieged by the French, |

he had to attack their strong camp, which was defended by several

hundred pieces of artillery. Charging gallantly, his rear was set |
upon by a body of French troops ; the fight grew hot, and, his horse _



being killed under hin, fell upon his rider, whose leg was broken in
_ consequence. Crippled and helpless, he was brutally speared as he ~
lay on the ground; his son was slain in a vain attempt to rescue
him; and his army was entirely routed. The close of that year,
1453, saw the end of English rule in France ; save in Calais, and the
marshes about it. e | |
Henry had grown up an amiable, but weak-minded man—much
governed by those about him, whomsoever they might chance to be ;
and this want of self-reliance led to serious dissensions at home.

_ There was an insurrection of the lower orders, under Jack Cade, who,

at the head of a rough sort of army, numbering twenty thousand —
~ Kentish men, encamped on Blackheath, near London ; and marching

thence, took possession of the city, where, committing some violence,

[ 58 ]



THE WARS OF THE TWO ROSES.

the inhabitants rose up against them, and repulsed them with great
slaughter. Then there were more alarming contests about the
throne ; for the descendants of the Duke of York, elder brother of

















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DEATH OF THE BARL OF SHREWSBURY.



the Duke of Lancaster, whose family had seized the crown, asserted,
and in arms too, their superior claim to it. This was the beginning

of the Wars of the Two Roses, which ravaged England for thirty
[ 59 J



THE HOUSES OF LANCASTER AND YORK.

years. — Those who supported the House of York adopted a white

rose as their badge, the Lancastrians a red one; and so their

contests are known as the Wars of the T'wo Roses.

Poor, weak old Henry lost and regained his throne several times
in the course of these sad and sanguinary doings. His wife, Margaret
of Anjou, had far more spirit than he, and struggled desperately to
retrieve her husband’s fallen fortunes—but in vain. At Hexham, in

Northumberland, a great battle was fought on the 15th of May, 1462,

between the rival factions, and it ended in the total rout of Henry’s

army. The old king was hotly chased from the field, and managed to

elude his bloodthirsty pursuers. Margaret, with her young son and
a few followers, fled for safety into the forest at hand, hoping to
make her escape into Scotland ; for there was small mercy dealt out
on either side. In her flight she was set upon by a band of robbers

(there were plenty of them in that wild district), who dragged her

and her son from their horses, and speedily dispossessed them of the
gold and jewels which they had concealed about them. While the
thieves were quarrelling over the division of their spoil, the queen

and her son stole away, unobserved, and wandered aimlessly on, until,
as the light of the moon broke forth, to their terror, they saw before

them an armed figure, whom they took to be one of the gang from
which they had just escaped! In her agony, expecting nothing less
than death, Margaret bade the man observe, that even the outer
garments of herself and her child had been stripped off by the heart-—

less set they had just encountered ; and, fancying that she perceived

on his countenance some signs of compassion for them, she boldly —
threw herself on his mercy. Drawing her boy towards hin,

“Friend,” said she to the robber, “save the son of your king! [I

| charge you to protect his innocent life. Take him, and eve him. a
hiding-place from those who seek his blood !”

[ 60]



THE ROBBER OF HEXHAM.

Touched by her confidence in him, and by the helplessness of the
young prince, that rough outcast kneeled before them, and vowed to
protect their lives with his own. Then, taking the child in his arms

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QUEEN MARGARET AND THE ROBBER OF HEXHAM.
he led the way to his cave, where he sheltered them for ten days, in
which time he succeeded in finding one of the queen’s friends, better

able to afford her protection than was the robber of Hexham.
[ 61 J



THE HOUSES OF LANCASTER AND YORK.

“Poor Henry skulked about for some time in the North, was
imprisoned in the Tower, and then regained his crown for awhile.
The fatal battle of Tewkesbury again consigned him to the Tower ;
and there, as it is believed, he was murdered. Queen Margaret, whose
spirit remained undaunted to the last, did her utmost to retrieve the
fallen fortunes of her house, but in vain. After some desperate
adventures, she crossed the Channel, and spent the remainder of her
days in obscurity in France. | .

The death of Henry rendered the House of York tthcmphiant
in the person of Edward IV. He had, indeed, been proclaimed king
ten years before ; but, as we have seen, his throne was not secure
until the king was out of his way. Edward died the 9th of PDE
1483, in the twenty-third year of his reign.

Edward V. was only thirteen years old when he was ei tained
king. On account of his youth, he was committed to the care of his
uncle Richard, Duke of Gloucester, who was also appointed Protector
of the kingdom. Richard was a wicked man, and had no sooner got
his nephew into his power, than he determined on seizing the poor
boy’s inheritance for himself. | i

Having the young king secure in the Tower, it was necessary, for
his plans, to lay hold of the younger brother also. The queen, Elizabeth
Woodville, had, after the death of her husband, taken sanctuary
in Westminster, with the young Duke of York ; but was persuaded
to give up the young duke quietly, on the pretence that he was only —
wanted as a playmate for the young king. His mother gave him up,
clasping him tenderly in her arms, as she kissed and bade him farewell.

When Gloucester got hold of the young duke, he made believe
to be delighted to see him, caressing him, and saying, “Now wel-
come, my lord, with all my very heart!” And then he was placed
with his brother in the Tower. |

[ 62 J



THE MURDERED PRINCES.

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TYRREL VIEWING THE MURDERED PRINCES,

[ 88 J



THE HOUSES OF LANCASTER AND YORK.

Having the king and prince quite safe, the next thing that
Cioucester did was to persuade people that the two youths were not
the right heirs to the throne; and he contrived his wicked plans
$0 cleverly, that he very soon got the crown bestowed upon himself. ©
And the newt thing he did was to have the two princes most bar-
barously assassinated. |

Richard did not long enjoy his ill-gotten greatness ; the Duke of
Buckingham, who had helped him to it, soon picked a quarrel with
the king, and, by way of revenge, conspired with others to dethrone
him, and raise Henry, Earl of Richmond (grandson of Catherine,
Henry V/s widow) in his place. The next year Henry left France,
where he had found refuge, with an army of about two thousand’
men, and landed at Milford Haven, in Wales, on the 7th of August,
1485. Richard had taken his post at Nottingham, with a force far
outnumbering that of his rival ; and the two armies came in sight of
each other at Bosworth, in Leicestershire, on the 22nd of August.

The attack was begun by the archers of both armies; and a
fierce one it was. Richard three times brought up his cavalry to the
charge. The third time he had nearly reached his rival, when ©
Stanley, pressing forward with his troops, pressed him so closely, |
that he was borne down, and perished on the field. |

His dead body was speedily stripped of its armour and regal |
ornaments ; and the crown being placed on Richmond’s head, he was
saluted on the field by loud cries of « Long live King Henry Ra |

Henry afterwards went in state to St. Paul’s, where a “Te
Deum” of thanksgiving was sung ; and the three standards captured
on Bosworth Field were solemnly deposited on the altar. _

With Richard ended the brief rule of the House of York.

[ 64 ]



THE TUDOR MONARCHS OF
GREAT BRITAIN.





0 MP®ENRY VII. was the grandson of Owen Tudor, a , Welsh-
THe? man, who married the widow of Henry V. This king
WZ Wa\ was descended from the Duke of Lancaster; and as
| | ays \ | Elizabeth, daughter of Edward IV., became his wife,
WtsN\// the two Houses of York and Lancaster were united
in them. He was an able and sagacious prince, but
df) not particularly popular.

4 In the second year of his reign a youth, named
Lambert Simnel, the son of a baker at Oxford, was trained to
represent the son of that Duke of Clarence who was murdered in
the Tower, and, as such, to lay claim to the crown. Simnel, who was
a fine, clever lad, played his part so well, that many believed that he
really was Edward. The Earl of Warwick warmly supported his
cause.

Some years afterwards a second attempt was made to dethrone
Henry, by bringing forward Perkin Warbeck to represent the young
Duke of York, who, with his brother, had perished in the Tower.
But this insurrection also was finally crushed; and though

Warbeck’s life was spared, a second attempt that he made led not

65
P [ 65 J



THE TUDOR MONARCHS OF GREAT BRITAIN.

only to his own execution, but to that of the unhappy Earl of
Warwick also. |

Henry loved money ; he loved it so much that he oppressed his
people in order to get it. When he came to die he repented of this ;
and, in his will, ordered recompense to be made to those whom he
had injured. He died at Richmond, in 1509, after reigning nearly
twenty-four years. —

His son, Henry VIII., was welcomed very sincerely by his
subjects, who were tired of their old, harsh, money-loving king. The
new sovereign was young, handsome, sprightly, and well-educated ;
and his conduct, on coming to the throne, was such as to win the
affections of his people.

He soon found himself engaged in a war with France, in which —
the English had the best of it. One defeat that the French
sustained from them was a very droll one. Henry had ordered up
some troops to check the advance of a large body of French cavalry;
and when the two came in sight, the Frenchmen rode at the English
with great spirit, but, being seized by a panic, rode away again quite
as rapidly. They were chased; but pursuit only added wings to
their flight : faster and faster fled those redoubtable cavaliers, spur-
ring away as if they were mad, and leaving a handful of their
astonished and confounded leaders to the mercy of the enemy.
Henry could not help laughing when these were brought before him :
he praised the fleetness of their steeds, and the Frenchmen thought
it best to laugh too, saying it was a “ Battle of Spurs,’ for they
were the only weapons that had that day been used. — |

Henry’s French war ended by his making old King Louis
marry his young sister Mary. Poor girl ! she did not like it; but
princes and princesses are often obliged to do what they do not like. |

Henry had a taste for magnificence as well as for fighting; and
[ 66 ]



HENRY VIII. AT WAR WITH FRANCE.

a meeting between himself and Francis, the new king of France, gave

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BATTLE OF SPURS.

He left England in May, 1520, attended by a splendid retinue of
nobles, and by Cardinal Wolsey also, whose train almast rivalled

that of his sovereign. The place of meeting was near Calais, where
[ 67 ]



THE TUDOR MONARCHS OF GREAT BRITAIN.

an imitation stone palace, made of wood, had been put together
for Henry’s reception, and adorned within and without in the most

sumptuous manner. [Francis was of course not outdone in magnifi-
cence by his brother sovereign. |

When the two Kings met on the Field of Cloth of Gold, —_
embraced each other in the most cordial manner ; then dismounting,
they entered, arm-in-arm, a tent prepared for their reception. Hach
day they paid each other stately visits; till at length Francis, who
was of a frank, open disposition, put an end to ceremony. Leaving |
Ardres, where he had taken up his abode, with only a few attendants,
he rode right into Henry’s quarters at Guisnes ; and, saying merrily
to the guards—* You are all my prisoners, carry me to your master,”
was at once conducted to the astonished and pleased Henr , who,
taking a valuable jewel from his own neck, placed it-on that of
Francis, assuring him that he had played him the most agreeable
trick in the world, Francis, in return, presented Henry with a
bracelet ; then he helped him to dress, and finally rode off, in the
briskest spirits possible, after his pleasantry. | One of his courtiers
scolded him well, for being so foolish as thus to trust himself to the
English ; but the good-humoured monarch only laughed it off.

Feasts and tournaments followed: and then the two pa
parted, apparently well satisfied with each other.

All this friendliness, however, did not mean much. Thi about a

-twelvemonth after, Henry joined the Emperor, Charles V., in making
“war upon his former “brother” Francis. This war was carried on in
| Italy, and with various fortunes to the combatants, until 1524, when
things went ill with the French. Their best knight, the Chevalier
Bayard, was slain on the field of battle; and,. on laying siege to.
Pavia, they were not only routed, but had their king taken prisoner.
Francis had his horse killed under him ; and, himself wounded
[ 68 ]



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SURRENDER OF FRANCIS I. AT PAVIA.



THE TUDOR MONARCHS OF GREAT BRITAIN.

in the face and hand, was compelled to surrender to the enemy. The
_ Viceroy of Naples, kneeling, received the king’s sword, which Francis
gave him in token of surrender ; and, respectfully kissing the gaunt-
“Jeted hand that held it, presented his own in return, saying, that it
did not become a monarch to appear unarmed in the one of
a subject. |

Henry was so exceedingly delighted when he heard that his old
friend Francis was taken prisoner, that he ordered public thanks-
givings at St. Paul’s for the happy event. He would very much
have liked to have Francis committed to his keeping; but the

4 _ Emperor knew better than to part with his prize. So Henry, in a

pet, changed sides ; and, through Wolsey, did all he could to procure
the liberation of the French king, which was accomplished in about —
six months. ; | | |

: Henry now began to show all his bad qualities. He married, and
got rid of his wives, one after another, as fast as he got tired of them.
Two of them he brutally beheaded. The first of these was Anne
- Boleyn, one of the attendants of his former wife, Queen Catherine.
- The king appeared much attached to her, but, speedily finding out
that he liked Jane Seymour better, had little difficulty in getting
| Anne out of his way.

One day, when the poor queen was at dinner, in the palace of
Greenwich, a number of officials, among whom was the lieutenant of
the Tower, entered her apartment. Trembling with apprehension of
_ the king’s anger, she inquired their errand ; and was answered that
they came, by his command, to conduct her to the Tower. She-
quietly submitted herself to them; then, rising up, was instantly,
without even changing her dress, placed in the barge awaiting her,
and swiftly rowed to the Tower ; _ exclaiming, as she entered it—“O

Lord, help me! as I am guiltless of that laid to my charge.”
[ 70 ]



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THE TUDOR MONARCHS OF GREAT BRITAIN.

pee was scebant to trial for crimes of which she was Innocent,
of course found guilty, and was beheaded within the Tower walls, on
the 19th of May, 1536. | |
There was much blood shed on the scaffold in this reign ; and
Henry rendered himself particularly infamous by putting to death
Fisher, Bishop of Rochester, and the excellent Sir Thomas More,
who succeeded Wolsey as chancellor. — |
- Towards the close of his life he became more disagreeable and
| tyrannical than ever, and breathed his last on the 28th otf J ay ;
1547.
- He was succeeded by his son, ‘Baward VL. the saly child of hice |
J ane Seymour. Edward was but ten years old when his father. died, |
but had always shown himself so good and studious a little fellow, |
that his people were at once prepared to love him.
His reign was short. But in that short time he gave proofs of
eoodness that made his people only the more regret his untimely
death. He founded Christ’s Hospital, in. London ; a school for the —
maintenance and education of boys. You may see the lads belonging
to it. playing about in the grounds, dressed in their long blue coats, —
with yellow breeches and stockings. He also founded St. Bartholo- |
mews ‘Hospital, where the sick poor are received. Those are two
| good establishments, for which we have to thank the boy-king. |
Five years after coming to the throne Edward’s health failed -
seriously ; ; and, being put under the care of a pretentious old ;
woman, his illness soon proved fatal. After having, in his feebleness,
been induced to set aside his sisters Mary and Elizabeth, and leave |
the crown to his cousin, Lady Jane Grey, the young king afterwards ~
expired at Greenwich, in the sixteenth year of his age. es
The Duke of Northumberland, who persuaded Edward to Leave :

the crown to Lady J ane Grey, little thought he was destroying his
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EDWARD VI. ENTERING LONDON.

[73]



THE TUDOR MONARCHS OF GREAT BRITAIN.

own son and daughter-in law. Jane was proclaimed queen, but few
heeded it. The Princess Mary, eldest daughter of Henry, was almost
universally acknowledged as queen ; and a few days saw the unfor-
tunate Jane a prisoner in the Tower, whence she only came to be
beheaded, together with her equally young husband, Guildford
Dudley.

Mary, who had been harshly treated, both by her father and ©
brother, seemed at first disposed to be a just ruler of her people.
But, after marrying Philip of Spain, she became a dreadful per-
secutor ; and, horrible to relate, both men and women, in great
numbers, were burned alive, because they did not believe as those
did who belonged to the Church of Rome.

Archbishop Cranmer was laid hold of, and committed to prison,
because he would not change his faith at the bidding of those cruel
persecutors. They threatened to put him to death ; and in the
dreadful prospect of death by fire, his courage failed him, and he
promised to believe anything they liked. But, after all, his enemies
were ‘malicious enough to take his life; and then the archbishop,
bitterly repenting the wrong to which alone the fear of such a death
had tempted him, boldly avowed the truth He was hurried off to
the stake ; and, as the flames rose around him, he thrust his right
hand into them, exclaiming—“ This hand hath offended !”—for, to
save his life, he had written that which he did not believe to be true.
He soon perished in those awful flames, raising his eyes to heaven,

and saying—* Lord Jesus, receive my spirit.”
| | Mary's chief fault was her bigotry, and in suffering others, who
were far more bigoted than herself, to lead her to those cruel deeds
of which she bears the blame. | |

She died on the 17th of November, 1558, in. the forty- second —

year of her age, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.
| [ 74 ]



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QUEEN ELIZABETH ACKNOWLEDGED BY THE BISHOPS.



THE TUDOR MONARCHS OF GREAT BRITAIN. ~

The Princess Elizabeth, who was seventeen years younger than
her sister, succeeded Queen Mary.

_ She was living at Hatfield when Mary died ; and, two days after
that event, the lords of the council went thither, and with much state
proclaimed her queen, at the gates of Hatfield House. |

On the 23rd of November, the new queen, attended by a magni-
ficent train of nobles, and vast. numbers of the common people, set.
out for London. When she reached Highgate, the bishops came
forth to meet her, and, on their knees, tendered their allegiance. She
received them very graciously, and all were permitted to kiss the
royal hand, save Bonner, Bishop of London, who had been foremost
in the late persecutions; from him she turned away, with marked
disfavour ; and that cruel man had to bear this public and deserved
slight as he best could. On entering the Tower, she knelt down, and
_ gave God thanks for having delivered her from so many dangers ; for
she had once been a prisoner within its walls.

She was crowned at Westminster, on Sunday, the 15th of
December; and very gracious was she to the thronging multitudes
who witnessed her procession from the Tower. She suffered any of
them, however humble, to speak to their sovereign; and a poor
woman having presented her with a sprig of rosemary at the Fleet
Bridge, the queen carried it in her hand all the way to Westminster.

Elizabeth, however, did not feel her throne quite secure ;
because some people thought that Mary of Scotland had a better
right to it than she had. Mary, at an early age, was married to
Francis, afterwards King of France; and, being widowed at eighteen,
returned to her own kingdom, where the turbulent nobles and people
involved her in continual troubles, which Elizabeth delighted to |
ageravate. At length, open war broke out between Mary and one |
portion of her subjects, who, having got possession of her son, a mere

[ 76 ]



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SURRENDER OF MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTS



THE TUDOR MONARCHS OF GREAT BRITAIN.

baby, set him up as king, in opposition to his mother. The royal
forces, and those of the insurgents, met at Carberry Hull, near Edin-
burgh, and a battle was about to take place, when Mary, perceiving
that her troops were rapidly deserting her, was prevailed upon to
give herself up to her rebel subjects. She was received with
apparent respect ; one of their leaders kissing her hand, and then
leading her horse to their camp. She soon, however, found that she
was only a prisoner; and, being placed in close captivity in Lochleven
Castle—a fortress in the middle of a lake—was compelled to resign
her crown to her son. She. made her escape a few months after-
wards, and her people rallying round her, she made one more effort
for freedom. But at Langside, near Glasgow, her army was utterly
routed; and then she ventured to throw herself on the compassion of
Elizabeth, hoping to find shelter in her dominions.

Never did any one make a greater mistake than did Mary —
- Stuart, in trusting herself to Elizabeth of England. Beginning with
professions of friendliness, she kept Mary a captive for nineteen
years, and then completed her baseness by having the Scottish queen
beheaded in Fotheringay Castle.

The reign of Elizabeth was distinguished for naval adventure
and prowess. Hawkins, Drake, and Frobisher were the most cele-
brated English heroes on the seas at this time. Drake was the first
Englishman who ever sailed round the world. He accomplished this
in safety ; and having, by the way, done a great deal of mischief to
the Spaniards, with whom the English were on bad terms, Elizabeth
was so delighted, that she did him the honour of dining with him on
board his ship, the “Golden Hind ;” and afterwards—by one gentle
touch of a sword on his shoulder—of converting him from plain
Captain Drake into Sir Francis.

The new knight did his country good service ; for elght years

[ 78 ] |



QUEEN ELIZABETH ON BOARD THE “ GOLDEN HIND.”



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[ 79 ]



THE TUDOR MONARCHS OF GREAT BRITAIN,

Cadiz, destroyed such quantities of their shipping, as delayed the
sailing of the “ Armada” for a twelvemonth.

_ The “ Armada” consisted of a hundred and thirty vessels, carry-
ing between three and four thousand brass guns, and having twenty
thousand troops on board ; while such was the zeal of the Spaniards
on this occasion, that among the numerous crew that manned the
fleet were to be found two thousand gentlemen, who gave their
services in the humble capacity of common seamen. |

| On, at last, came the “ Invincible Armada,” as the Spaniards
proudly named it. But, between tempest and our valiant seamen,
it was speedily knocked to pieces; only a few vessels out of that vast
multitude escaping, miserably, to Spain again. Not content with the
| destruction. of the “ Armada,” the English must needs send an expedi-
_ tion to Spain, for the purpose of still further punishing the Spaniards.
This expedition was under the command of Essex, the queen’s new
favourite, who not only behaved very gallantly in his attack upon
the enemy, but so humanely also, that even the Spaniards themselves
gratefully acknowledged his noble conduct. se

_ Essex, though brave, was a vain and foolish man ; sometimes he

was very impertinent to his sovereign ; and Elizabeth, in her old age,
getting tired of his wilfulness, at last suffered him to be put to death,
_ for a conspiracy into which he had entered against her. |

But the regret which she afterwards felt hastened her end. She
died at Richmond, on the 24th of March, 1603, in the seventieth year
of her age, and the forty-fourth of her reign. . oS :

Elizabeth had many faults ; but she was a great queen.

{ 80 1



OUR SOVEREIGNS
FROM JAMES I. TO VICTORIA.



»( LIZABETH’S successor was James Stuart, the sixth
‘S king of that name in Scotland, and the first in >
England. He was the son of Mary Stuart, whom
PUCENI—) — Elizabeth beheaded ; and under him the two king-
x S ile Z get doms were first united.



ee you James had not been long on the English
v2 throne when the horrible conspiracy known as the Gunpowder
7} Plot was entered into, for destroying the king and the mem-
: bers of both Houses of Parliament.
James’s eldest son, Henry, a youth of great promise, died
in 1612, and his brother Charles then became heir to the throne.
Charles married the Princess Henrietta Maria, daughter of
Henry IV. of France. Before this took place, however, King James
died, in the fifty-ninth year of his age, and the twenty-third of his
English reign.
Very soon after the accession of Charles I. to the throne, he
found himself involved in disputes with the House of Commons.

At length the Royalists and Parliamentarians took up arms

( 81 ]
G



OUR SOVEREIGNS FROM JAMES I. TO VICTORIA

against each other. The king’s party were at first victorious ; but
_ they were afterwards defeated at Margton Moor by Oliver Cromwell,
and were so completely routed at Naseby, in Northamptonshire, on
the 14th of June, 1645, that the king had to fly for safety, —— |
“all his military stores behind him.
Poor Charles vainly sought ‘etasé int ‘Wales; and, after more |
unsuccessful fighting, shut himself up in Oxford, where Sir Thomas ~
Fairfax, one of the Parliamentary generals, laid siege.to him.
Charles, having no means of defending the city, resolved to make
his way quietly out, and throw himself upon the people of Scotland,
who, though they had been rebellious enough, still seemed milder in

their demands than the English had become. The Scots did not, -

however, merit Charles’s confidence ; for they eventually delivered
him to the English army, Py whom he was a in custody | ab
Holmby Castle. | |

Oliver Cromwell had by this time become a man of ereat im-
portance. He acted with an independence and energy which con-
vinced all men of his talents to govern, and was soon made supreme.
The king was removed from prison to prison ; sometimes very
harshly treated ; and having the dreadful fear of assassination before
his eyes. Although Charles would not. acknowledge the power of
his subjects to try him, his enemies paid no heed to his opposition,
_ but brought the king to trial in Westminster Hall, and he was
/ sentenced to be beheaded. a a

Charles was led out to execution i in ‘the str eet before Whitehall;
on the 30th of January, 1649, EEN ES

An attempt was now made, first by the Ivish, and then by the
~ Seoteh, to place Charles IL, the son of Charles I, upon their
respective thrones ; but both projects were utterly defeated by the |

energy of Cromwell. Charles then threw himself upon his English
[ 82 ]









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OUR SOV EREIONS FROM JAMES I. TO VICTORIA.

friend, and with: an army of fourteen thousand men hazarded a
battle at Worcester. ‘The royalists were routed, and Charles I. was
competed to fly for his life.
‘Having dismissed the Parliament, the Protector of the Common- |
wealth (for that was the title Cromwell bore) called together a new

Parliament, and for a while governed the kingdom in conjunction

with them. In time they proposed to him to accept the crown, and

| call himself King of England, but this he declined. Already he had

= as. much power as any sovereign, and he soon proved this by the

| dismissal of the new Parliament, when he found them unwilling to

= - devote themselves to the public business for which they were called

. together. After this he ruled without a Parliament, and his power

- was as much dreaded abroad as at home.

Oliver Cromwell died on the 3rd of Senienibok: 1658, at
: this age” of. fifty- -eight, and in the ninth year of his Protectorate.
Richard, his son, was nominated to succeed him as Protector.
Richard, however, was an amiable man, who loved a quiet life, and
finding his high position not a very comfortable one, he soon gave it
oe up, and Prince Charles IL, who had taken refuge in Holland, was
| implored to return. He embarked at Scheveling on the 24th of May,
1660, and a two days’ sail brought him to Dover, where he was
received by an enthusiastic crowd of the nobility and gentry, who, —
dissatisfied with a Commonwealth and | a Protector, were glee to have
a king once more. . |
The new king pleased his subjects very much at first. “His
manners were aftable and. winning; he chose his ministers discreetly ;
and all seemed to go well. | on
But Charles Il. proved anything rather than a wise and
good monarch, He was mean enough to receive a yearly —
pension from Louis XIV. of France; and some of his subjects,
| [ 84 ] |



FALL OF JAMES II.

who pretended to call themselves patriots, were content to do
the same.

In this reign the Plague broke out in London, and destroyed in
one year ninety thousand people. The next year was almost more
terribly signalised by the Great Fire of London, by which no less
than eighty-nine churches and more than thirteen thousand houses
were totally destroyed.

Charles died, after a fit of apoplexy, on the 6th of February,
1685, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, and the twenty-fifth of his
actual reign, and was succeeded by his brother James.

James was a brave man, but being of a harsh, severe temper, he
was not much liked. The Duke of Monmouth’s insurrection was the
first important event in the short reign of King James. It was
subdued and punished with great cruelty: the Duke himself, though
he was the king’s nephew, lost his head for it.

James was a Romanist, and showed his favour to those of his
own church in ways forbidden by the law. He tried to coerce the
bishops, and make them break the law, in order to gratify him.
They were firm in their resistance ; and he sent seven of them to the
Tower for trial. This threw the nation into a ferment, and the
bishops were acquitted. To get out of their difficulties, the people
determined, at last, on inviting over William, Prince of Orange (who
had married James’s eldest daughter, Mary), to help them to send
away James, and place Mary upon the throne instead.

The Prince at once fitted out a small fleet and army, with which
he landed in Torbay, on the 5th of November, 1685. He was, on the
whole, well received ; and James found himself deserted by almost
all his friends, including his daughter Anne, and her husband Prince
George.. James now fled with his young queen, and her infant, the

Prince of Wales, safely out of the country.
[ 85 |



OUR SOVEREIGNS FROM JAMES I. TO VICTORIA.

The people of England were content to have William and Mary
for their sovereigns, the Irish were not, and there was some hard

fighting in Ireland before James was driven out of that country also,

and reduced to live, for the rest of his days, a melancholy exile ,

in France. William was not a popular monarch, and towards the
close of his reign he was frequently at variance with his Parliament.

~ Queen Mary, unfortunately, died early, in 1694; and as she died
childless, her sister, the Princess Anne, became heir to the throne after
William. ‘To prevent the succession of James’s son, the Parliament
made a fresh arrangement, according to which the crown, after Anne’s
death, was to go to the Electress Sophia of Hanover, and her family.

William’s end was now fast approaching. He became feverish
and ill, and gradually sank till the 7th of March, when he expired.
This was in 1702, after a reign of about thirteen years.

James II. died a short time before his son-in-law. His severe
reverses had softened the harshness of his character; and he gave the
best proofs of a truly religious spirit by the kindness and amiability
of his home-life.

Anne was exceedingly popular when she came to the throne ;
‘she was a good-hearted sort of woman, and she was a Stuart, for
whom the people had yet much affection.

One of her first acts was to go to war with France. In 1706
Marlborough gained the celebrated battle of Ramillies, in which the
enemy lost thirteen thousand men, and all their artillery; a loss that
compelled them to evacuate Spanish Flanders. The English at
last got tired of fighting for mere glory, and peace was made at
Utrecht on the 11th of April, 1713.

One of the most important events of Queen Anne’s reign was
the union between England and Scotland, which took place on the
6th of March, 1707. Anne died on the Ist of August, 1714.

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(87 J



OUR SOVEREIGNS FROM JAMES I. TO VICTORIA.

When ‘ 7 zood C Queen Anne” had breathed her last, there was a
short but agitating uncertainty. as to who should succeed her. But
there was no opposition to King George, who came over, and quietly
took possession of his rich prize on the 28th of September, 1714. His
accession Was according to the Act of Settlement passed, in the reign |
of William III., which limited the crown to Sophia, who was the
~ grand-daughter of J ames I., and the mother of George. '

The friends of James Edward Stuart thought that now was the
time for them to be up and doing; and they acted accordingly.
Scotland was the most favourable field of action for them ; and the |
standard of the “ Pretender,’ as he was called, was set up by the
Earl of Mar, at Kirk-Michael, in Braemar, on the 6th of September,

1715, while the Jacobite noblemen in the north of England prepared
_ to Co- -operate with their friends in Scotland. But the insurrection —
was soon over. The decisive battle of Preston, on November 11th,
ruined the Pretender’s cause. He escaped to France, and his unfor-
tunate adherents had to bear the full vengeance of King George,
who, in the hour of success, was too forgettul of mercy,

King George died suddenly, while on the way to his beloved
Hanover, on the 11th of June, 1727, in the sixty- eighth year of his
age, and the thirteenth of his reign. He was succeeded by his eldest
son, who became George II. |

George II. continued those wars on the Continent which had
been begun by William III. in order to preserve the “balance of
power ”—that is, to prevent any one kingdom having more power
than the other kingdoms might think suitable. At Dettingen, in
1743, he gained a great victory over the French. Fontenoy, which
was fought two years later, proved. a change for us; there, we
English, under the young Duke of Cumberland, were beaten with

considerable loss.
[ 88 ]



























































































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OUR SOVEREIGNS FROM JAMES I. TO VICTORIA.

The year 1745 was marked by another Jacobite insurrection.
Prince Charles Stuart, son of the first Pretender, left France on the
14th of July in that year, with a couple of small vessels, and landed
on a wild part of the Highland coast, with only seven followers.
Numbers hastened to support him, and then the prince’s standard
was solemnly set up in the quiet little valley of Glenfinnan. After
various adventures, and enduring much hardship, a final battle took
place on Culloden Moor, between the Pretender’s half-starved army
and a much larger force of the king’s, under the Duke of Cumberland.
It ended in the total defeat of the prince’s aIOHES'; and the hopes of
the Stuarts were crushed for ever.

King George died suddenly on the 25th of October, 1760, and
was succeeded by his grandson, George III., who, being the first real
Englishman that had ascended the throne since the days of James II.,
was liked all the better on that account. te ae

The events of his long reign were varied and striking. The
American colonies constituted themselves into an Independent
government, entitled the United States of America. The Declaration
of Independence was signed on the 4th of July, 1776, and acknow-
ledged by the British Government by a treaty signed at Paris,
September 3rd, 1783. General Washington was elected the first
president in 1789. | |

At the very time that America was lost to the British crown,
events were occurring in a-distant part of the world which led to the
acquisition of our Indian empire—the most extensive and magnificent
conquest in the annals of nations. In 1757 the famous victory of
Plassey was gained by Colonel Clive, who, with only 3,000 men,
defeated an army of 50,000. Hyder Ali was defeated by Sir Eyre
Coote in 1781, and died after his final overthrow in 1782. The native
forces were then mustered against us by Hyder. Ali’s son (Tippoo

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THE EARLY BRITONS AND THEIR SAXON
KINGS.

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OUR DANISH AND NORMAN KINGS.

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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

THE DRUIDS INCITING THE BRITONS TO OPPOSE THE LANDING OF TIIE ROMANS

Tux LANDING oF Junius Omsar . : : . .
BoaDIcEA’s BATTLE WITH THE ROMANS . . . .
Saxon LEADERS AND ENGLISH KING : : : .
ALFRED THE GREAT. .

Kina ALFRED IN THE COTTAGE . . . . .
EDGAR TIE PACIFIC ROWED DOWN THE DEE BY EIGHT PRINCES

ASSASSINATION OF EDWARD THE MARTYR. :

CANUTE REPROVING HIS COURTIERS . , . .
THE NORMAN THANKSGIVING AFTER THE BATTLE OF HASTINGS.
WILLIAM I. AND HIS SON ROBERT . . . . ;
RUFUS AND THE SOLDIER . : - : . .
DEATH OF WILLIAM RUFUS. . - :
SHIPWRECK OF PRINCE WILLIAM, Son oF HEnRy I. . ;
FLIGHT OF MATILDA FROM OXFORD . ; LO .
PASSAGE OF A BECKET THROUGH FRANCE. . . .
JOHN BEGGING FORGIVENESS OF RICHARD. ; . .

Henry III. ann THE BARONS . . . .

FRENCH AND ENGLISH CAVALRY IN THE PASSAGE OF THE SOMME

QUEEN PHILIPPA INTERCEDING FOR THE BURGESSES OF CALAIS.
SURRENDER OF KING JOHN OF FRANCE . . .
EXECUTION OF THE ARCHBISHOP OF YORK. : . :
HENRY V. AND DE HELLY AT AGINCOURT . . ;
RECEPTION OF SIGISMUND . , ; . .
FUNERAL PROCESSION OF HENRY Y. ° . ;
DeATH OF THE EARL OF SUREWSBURY . . ;
QUEEN MARGARET AND THE ROBBER OF HEXIAM : :

TYRRELL VIEWING THE MURDERED PRINCES ° °

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61
63
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

Viil
TAGE
BATTLE OF SPURS. : : " : . " ‘ . : : , Oo
SURRENDER oF Francis I. AT PAVIA ° . . . 4 . . 69
ARREST OF ANNE BOLEYN . :, . ye . . ; . 71
EpwAaRp VI. ENTERING LONDON . . . ; ‘ : . ‘ . 73
QUEEN ELIZABETH ACKNOWLEDGED BY THE BISHOPS . ‘ : . . : . 7d
SURRENDER OF MARY, QUEEN OF Scors, AT CARBERRY HILL . . : : . » 17
QUEEN ELIZABETH KNIGHTING DRAKE . . , : : . ; ‘ . 79
CROMWELL REFUSING TO ACCEPT THE CROWN . : . : : : ; . 883
LANpING oF WituiaM III. . . : ‘ ; : : . . . . 87
ERECTING THE STANDARD OF THE YOUNG PRETENDER . : : . , . . 89
DEATH OF NELSON . . ; , , . : . ; , ; . 983
95

CHARGE OF FrHE LirE-GUARDS AT WATEELLOO . . : . . . .
THE EARLY BRITONS AND THEIR
SAXON KINGS.

AVEFORE its invasion by the Romans, Britain was very





little known to the rest of Europe. Merchants from
-France—then called Gaul—sometimes crossed the
Channel for trading purposes; and it is said that
the pearls which they procured on our coasts first
Â¥ tempted Julius Cesar to come over and take possession of
>} it for his own Romans, who were a very mighty people
indeed. |

Ceesar expected an easy conquest, for the Britons, in his days,
were little better than savages. They lived in miserable huts,
feeding on the milk of their flocks, and on beasts taken by hunting,
_ whose shaggy skins served for such slender covering of their bodies as
they cared to have. It was very little, for their sinewy arms and legs
were left. bare, and painted blue, by way of ornament. ‘They wore
their hair long, hanging down upon the back, but cut off their beards,
with the exception of that which grew upon the upper lip. In fight,
they were terribly fierce fellows, not only spearing their enemies with

great dexterity, but driving in among them with war chariots, whose

[1]
1
_THE EARLY BRITONS AND THEIR SAXON KINGS.

axles being armed with short, stout scythes, cut right and left
in the most dreadful manner. They were, of course, heathens ;
and one of their religious ceremonies consisted in the sacrifice of
human beings. : |

Their priests were called Druids, and notwithstanding the
. dreadful sacrifices they offered, they were acquainted with a vast
amount. of knowledge, and acted both as the instructors and judges
of the people. They formed a distinct community, living in the
remote depths of the forests, where they celebrated their gloomy rites,
and instructed the young men who were to become priests. Their
temples were not like our churches, but were constructed of huge
stones, set up in the recesses of the mountains or in the open plains.
The most remarkable of the Druid temples in England are those of
Stonehenge and of Abury, the former consisting of no less than one
hundred and thirty-nine enormous stones.

The cities of the ancient Britons were formed by enclosing a
number of their rude huts within a deep ditch, as a means of defence.
They also constructed fortified camps of stones, without mortar or
cement, yet so strongly built that their remains exist to this day
But though they were strong and brave, they were not a united
people. They consisted of a great number of tribes, who were nearly
always quarrelling and fighting amongst themselves. The people, in.
short, were as savage as the wilds in which they dwelt.

Such were our British ancestors, and such were the rude people
against whom the highly-disciplined legions of Rome were now to
turn their arms. |

This invasion by the Romans took place fifty-five years before the
birth of Christ. Cesar assembled a fleet of eighty vessels on the
French coast, and filling them with his soldiers, crossed the Channel in

the night-time. The landing took place next day near Dover, where
{2] |
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THE DRUIDS AND THEIR TEMPLES.







THE DRUIDS INCITING THE BRITONS TO OPPOSE THE LANDING OF THE ROMANS.
| | ‘
THE EARLY BRITONS AND THEIR SAXON KINGS.

the water was too shallow to admit of his war-galleys discharging
their freight upon the beach itself ; but a standard-bearer, seizing the
Roman eagle, sprang with it into the sea, bidding his comrades
follow him. These heavily-armed men dashed in after their leader,
and, plunging and scrambling through the surf, flung themselves
furiously upon the Britons, who, with clubs and spears, and such rude
weapons, clustered upon the cliffs to oppose their landing. Both fought
well, but the Britons were at last driven back ; and thus the Romans
first planted their mailed feet upon our shores, centuries elapsing
before they, too, in their turn, were forced to give way to others.

They had not quiet possession, however. The Britons, though
broken, were not subdued ; and they had some brave, patriotic spirits
among them, who, from time to time, struggled to throw off this
foreign yoke. One of their most eminent leaders against the world-
conquering Romans was a woman !

Boadicea, our ancient British heroine, was the widow of one
of the many chiefs, or kings, who divided the island of Britain among
them. Her husband was called King of the Iceni; and when he
died, by way of preserving some portion of his little kingdom to his
daughters, he divided it between them and the Roman emperor,
Nero. The Roman governor, however, not content with a joint
heirship, seized the whole; and, when the widowed Boadicea pro-
tested against this injustice, he ordered her to be brutally whipped
like a slave, and inflicted other indignities upon the daughters for
whom she pleaded.

Such outrages were not to be borne. ‘The whole nation flew to
arms, making common cause against their oppressors ; and Boadicea, a
beautiful woman, with all the daring of a man, was soon at the head of
two hundred and eighty thousand savage warriors. The Romans

went down in all directions before the headlong onslaught of this
[4] |
THE INVASION BY JULIUS CAISAR.











































































































































































































































































































































































































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THE LANDING OF JULIUS CéiSAn.
THE EARLY BRITONS AND THEIR SAXON KINGS.

determined band. At length they summoned fresh forces, and a
decisive combat took place between the two. On this occasion,
Boadicea, appearing among her troops in her war chariot, exhorted
them to avenge her wrongs and their own, assuring them that that
day she herself would either die or be free. |

The Britons were brave and infuriate; but they could not
stand before the trained veterans now opposed to them. They were
defeated with dreadful slaughter; and Boadicea, poor -wretched
woman, put an end to her life by taking poison. That was wrong ;
but, as she was a heathen, she did not know this.

The Romans were now masters of Britain. But they, too, in
time, were compelled to yield their places to others; and the last of
them departed, after they had been on British soil rather more than
four hundred years. This was about the year 448.

The Britons were not particularly pleased to lose them, for their
neighbours in the extreme north of the island, Scotland, with whom
they had never had any intercourse, were becoming very trouble-
some to them, by frequently making fierce incursions into the south.
They used to sail over the Frith of Forth in small boats of basket-
work, covered with leather, to make them float; and were, to the —
full, as wild and uncivilised as the Britons were before their four
centuries spent side by side with the Romans. Kindly feelings had
sprung up between the Britons and their conquerors ; and, in taking
their last leave of the island, the latter had done what they could to
assist in its defence against that northern horde. But it was not
enough ; and, in their distress, the Britons made overtures to a very
warlike German people, called Saxons, to come and help them against.
those murderous Picts and Scots who were pouring into their
country. a

There were two valiant Saxon brothers, named Hengist and
| [6]
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THE EARLY BRITONS AND THEIR SAXON KINGS.

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Horsa, to whom this appeal of the harassed Britons was made.
Nothing loth, they accepted the invitation, bringing over with them
fifteen hundred of their followers. The strangers uniting with ‘the
Britons soon drove the Picts and Scots back again to their own
savage country. ‘But it is rather dangerous to ask very powerful
neighbours to take up your quarrels. The Saxons liked what they
saw of our island so well, that they began to come over by tribes and —
Swarms, and formed settlements of their own; until, before long,
they got almost the whole of Britain into their power ; expelling and
murdering its native population with great ferocity. Wales was the
place of retreat of such as were left, and there the Britons held
their own. ,

About the year 560 these Saxons, who were savage idolaters,
were made Christiane by the teaching of St. Augustine. The Pope—
that is, the Bishop of Rome—sent him on this good errand; and
that which moved him to do so was, it is said, his being struck with
the beauty of some Saxon children whom he saw in the slave-market
at Rome, and touched with pity when he was told that such lovely
creatures had never heard of the God who had made them.

The various little Saxon states were formed into one kingdom
under Egbert, in the year 827. He was the first King of England.

The most distinguished of this line of Saxon kings was he whom.
we call Alfred the Great. Before he came to the throne, in the year
871, the kingdom had been dreadfully harassed by the Danes, a
fierce, piratical people, from Denmark and Norway ; and Alfred, as
his brother’s general, had fought some very successful battles against
them. When he became king himself, he was ‘so hardly pressed by
them, that there was nothing but fighting for him ; he fought eight
pitched battles in the course of one year. Numbers. however, over-

powered valour; and at length the young king was so thoroughly
| [8 ]
LANDING OF THE SAXONS.























































































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THE EARLY BRITONS AND THEIR SAXON KINGS.

beaten, that, with his people dispersed and flying in all directions,
there was nothing for him but flight and concealment also. He
wandered about: in various places, and in various disguises. On one
occasion he took shelter with a farm servant of his own, who tended
cattle, remaining in his hut several days. fearful for the safety of



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ALFRED THE GREAT,

his royal guest, the man would not tell even his wife who that.
meanly-clad fellow was, that lounged about so strangely. So, one
day the good wife, tired, no doubt, of seeing him idling, as she
thought it (for he was only shaping a bow and some arrows), rather

sharply bade him look to the baking of some bread, which, according
[ 30 J
OF ALFRED THE GREAT.

REIGN

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FRED IN THE COTTAGE.

KING AL

Oppressed by the cares of a ruined kingdom, poor Alfred, as may be

is care ;

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so that, when the woman returned, she found them burned to a

[11]
THE EARLY BRITONS AND THEIR SAXON KINGS.

cinder. And a pretty scolding the monarch got, for not attending
better to that herdman’s bake-stove ! |

Alfred was one of the most wonderful men either of that time or
any other. He succeeded in ridding his kingdom of the Danes, in so
far as they were enemies. Some of them he permitted to settle in
his dominions on condition of their becoming Christians; for he
thought that, if such daring fellows could be tamed down, they might
become useful and brave subjects; and these he treated with great
kindness and favour. |

The ravages made by long warfare in England were repaired
with great zeal and address by this good king. Having built a large
fleet to protect his shores from fresh incursions, he gave himself up to
the instruction and improved government of his people ; and when
he came to his grave—too early, for he was only fifty-two—there was
no sovereign throughout Europe more admired, respected, and
beloved than he. In an old English chronicle, the epithet affixed to
the name of Alfred is that of “The Truth-teller.”

Alfred was succeeded in the throne which he had filled so
worthily by his second son, Edward. Other princes of the Saxon
line followed him, and were all, Jike the illustrious Alfred, sadly
tormented by the barbarous Danes. There needs not to make out a
catalogue of their names: fighting and quarreling make up the
history of that period. So much so was this the case, that one of
these kings is distinguished from the rest by the name of “ Edgar the
Peaceable.” He was the younger brother of the preceding king, who
from his complexion, was called « Kdwy the Fair.”

It has been said that the best Peace Society is a large standing
army ; and here lies the secret of Edgar’s quiet reign. He kept up
50 ereat an army and so powerful a fleet, that the Danes dared not

attack him.
[ 12]
SUBJUGATION OF THE WELSH PRINCES.

The freedom from foreign enemies which he enjoyed enabled him
the more successfully to contend with enemies at home. The Welsh
had been rather troublesome neighbours, and the sovereign of the
little Isle of Man, also an independent state, was disposed to make
common cause with them, for the purpose of teasing the powerful

































































































EDGAR THE PACIFIC ROWED DOWN THE DEE BY BIGHT PRINCES.

Saxon. But the Danes being kept at bay by Edgar's vast pre-
parations to meet them if they came, left him at leisure to menace
these Welsh and Manxmen so effectually that, without fighting a
single battle, he forced them to acknowledge him as their superior
lord. It was in token of this superiority, as we suppose, that he once

compelled eight of these Welsh princes to take each an oar, and row
[ 13}
THE EARLY BRITONS AND THEIR SAXON KINGS.

him in his boat down the river Dee, when he was minded to pay a
visit to the abbey of St. John the Baptist, at Chester. Not par-
ticularly pleasant, one thinks, for those eight fiery Welshmen ; but,
when people are thoroughly subdued, they are sometimes obliged to
do very unpleasant things; and it was far better that these eight
crowned heads should each pull an oar for King Edgar, than that they
should have been tearing each other and him to pieces—spilling the
blood of their own subjects and his.

This prince was fond of hunting, and he turned his liking for the
chase to good account. The uninhabited, uncultivated state of great
parts of England caused it to be infested by wild beasts, as the desert
places of some European countries are still. Edgar himself gave these
creatures no peace. Many condemned criminals, also, were liberated
on condition of their bringing in, within a fixed time, a certain
number of wolves’ heads ; and the tribute which his brother Athelstan
had compelled the Welsh to pay, he ordered should in future be
brought him in wolves’ heads—three hundred of them yearly. Such
hunting and chasing of wolves as these two wise regulations pro-
duced speedily put an end to the whole race in England.

Edgar was considered a good king. But he, unfortunately, died
early, leaving the kingdom to his son Edward, a boy of fourteen.
This Edward is called the Martyr, though, from the manner of his
death, the Murdered would have been the proper title. There were
quarrels about the succession: his step-mother, Elfrida, thought that
her son was the right heir to the throne. But, as his father had
named Edward for his successor, and a large number of the nobles,
together with Dunstan, the archbishop, were determined that Edgar’s
will should be complied with, Elfrida was obliged to withdraw her
claim ; and the young Kdward was duly crowned. He wags an

amiable, good youth ; but, though he treated his nepal -mother with all
[ 14 ]
MARTYR. ~

KING EDWARD THE

tenderness and affection, horrible feelings towards him rankled in her

mind.

Hunting one day in Dorsetshire, near Corfe Castle, where Elfrida



TYR.

N OF EDWARD THE MAR

ASSASSINATIO

lived, the king, having outridden his attendants, took the opportunity

When he mounted his horse again, ho

of making her a friendly call.

Wine was brought him, and while the

asked for something to drink.

(15 ]
THE EARLY BRITONS AND THEIR SAXON KINGS.

cup was at his lips, by command of the vile Elfrida, one of her
servants struck his dagger into the king from behind. Feeling the
thrust, Edward put spurs to his horse, but, speedily fainting with the
loss of blood, fell; one foot stuck fast in the stirrup, and, being
dragged along in this sad condition, life was soon extinct. Blood-
marks along the path which the horse had taken ouided his servants
to the lifeless body of their unfortunate master, who was already
beyond their help. |
| His people mourned for him very sincerely ; and, according to the
superstition of those days, imagined that miracles were wrought at
the tomb of one so innocent and so injured. |
The detestable Elfrida escaped the punishment that she deserved.
But she had remorse instead, and died in a convent, where her
tormented conscience led her to inflict upon herself many severities,
in the vain hope that they would make amends to God for the great
crime of which she had been guilty. :

[16 ]
OUR DANISH AND NORMAN
| KINGS.

was a conqueror ; but he was wise enough to try to
make himself agreeable to his new subjects. He
was a great king, and such, at times, receive out-
rageous flattery from those about him. Some of



ui Canute’s silly courtiers sought on one occasion to
recommend themselves to their sovereign, by representing to
him that his power was without limit, and that all things must
submit to him. To reprove their folly, the king ordered his chair to
be placed on the sea-shore, and then authoritatively commanded the
rising tide to approach no nearer, nor wet the foot of its lord and
master. On splashed the waves in response to this address, till one,
spreading further than the rest, drenched the royal feet. Turning to
his courtiers, who stood wondering what all this meant, Canute bade
them understand that there was one God and Ruler of all, and that
to Him alone men and things were entirely subject.
There were two more Saxon kings—Edward the Confessor and
Harold—before the Saxon rule was for ever extinguished in England.
Harold’s right to the throne was violently disputed by William, Duke

9 [17 ]
OUR DANISH AND NORMAN KINGS.

of Normandy, afterwards called the Conqueror, who, finding that
the English nation clung to their own native sovereign, prepared to
enforce by arms what he considered his claims to the crown. He
| raised a very large army for this purpose, with which he landed at
’ Pevensey, near Hastings, in the autumn of 1066. Stepping on shore,
the Duke. tripped and fell—an accident that rather alarmed his
superstitious followers. He re-assured them, however, by a joke;
remarking, as he picked himself up again, that he had already taken
possession of the soil.

On hearing of his landing, Harold sent messengers to Wilham
with proposals of peace. These were rejected; and as Harold did
not submit to the terms offered by the Duke, the two armies
prepared to engage.

This important battle took place on the 14th of October, 1066.
The previous night was spent by the English in drunken rioting ; by
the Normans, in prayers to God for success. The battle was fierce
and protracted, but ended in the entire defeat of the English.
Harold was slain, and there was no one to dispute the crown with
Duke William. |

As the Normans had prayed for success in their enterprise, they
now, on the field, offered up a devout thanksgiving to God for their
signal victory.

William had now his heart’s desire. He was king of England,
and was solemnly crowned in Westminster Abbey.

At first, he seemed disposed to treat his new subjects kindly ;
but, before long, gave way to excessive severity in his government.
The English were oppressed and discountenanced ; even their lands
were taken from them, and given to his Norman followers.

But though William made himself so great abroad, he had hot

much comfort at home. His three sons took to quarrelling among
[ 18 J
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CANUTE, THE DANE.





































































































































































































































































CANUTE REPROVING HIS COURTIERs.

119) :
OUR DANISH AND NORMAN KINGS.

_ themselves ; and Robert, the eldest, being offended by the other two
(the foolish lads threw water upon him as he passed), broke out into
the most violent anger against them. ‘Their father in vain endea-
voured to appease him: Robert quarrelled with them all, and, leaving
the castle, got up an insurrection against his father’s authority.
Robert was not, in the main, a bad fellow; but it was a dreadful
thing to make war against his father. In order to put down Robert
and his friends, William was obliged to draw forces from his newly-
conquered England. ‘The young prince shut himself up in the castle
of Gerberay, and William laid siege to it with as much zeal as though
it had not been his own son with whom he was contending ; Robert,
on his part, fought with equal insensibility. In one of the many
encounters that took place before the walls of this castle, father and
‘son met in deadly conflict. The faces of both being concealed by
their helmets, neither knew the other, until one of them, being
wounded and unhorsed, called out for assistance. To his horror,
Robert recognised his father’s voice, and, filled with remorse, threw
himself on his knees before him to ask forgiveness. His petition was
answered by a curse from his incensed parent, who rode away on
Robert’s horse, which the prince had helped him to mount.

They were afterwards reconciled, and Robert fought the Scots in
his father’s army. -

William died on the 9th of September, 1087, pens the crown
of England to his second son, William Rufus.

- Robert and William were soon quarrelling again, after thair
father’s death. Robert, as the elder, thought that he had the best
claim to the English crown, and many of his Norman barons thought
go too: If father and son could fight against each other, of course
brothers could ; and both of them took up arms to settle the point.

They made both England and Normandy into’ their battle-field ; and
[ 20 J
ie

LLIAM THE CONQUERO

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THE NORMAN THANKSGIVING AFTER THE BATTLE OF HASTINGS.

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OUR DANISH AND NORMAN KINGS.

when the king of France made peace between them, Robert and
William cemented their newly patched-up friendship by carrying on
a skirmishing contest with their brother Henry.

Henry shut himself up in a strong castle on the Nerman coast :
and his brothers blockaded him there so strictly, that the garrison
were in the utmost distress for want of water. Robert, like a good
natured fellow, as (with all his faults) he was, allowed some of them
to slip through in order to fetch water, while he himself sent wine
to his brother. William was very angry at this; but Robert, with
much feeling, replied to him; “Where. shall we get another brother
when this is dead ?” .

The king’s own life was in danger during this siege, though not
in the same way as that of his brother, whom his hard heart: would
have left to die of thirst. Riding out alone one day to reconnoitre,
two soldiers, who were prowling about, set’ upon him. Two to one
was more than even a king could withstand, and William -was
presently unhorsed. Before he could recover himself, a rough, strong
hand was laid upon his shoulder, and the dagger of one of the men
gleamed over his head. Another moment, and the question. about
the English crown would have been closed for ever between Robert
and William ; but, seeing his danger, Rufus cried out, “Hold, knave !
I'am the King of England!” Down dropped the blade;. the
frightened soldier, with all reverence, raised the prostrate monarch,
and it is said that Rufus showed his gratitude to him by liberal
presents, and giving the man a place in his own service.

The reign of William Rufus was marked by the beginning
of a series of most extraordinary warlike expeditions to Palestine.
They were called the Crusades, and were undertaken for the
purpose of re-taking the city of Jerusalem from the Turks, who

then possessed the country, and who exceedingly ill treated such
| [ 22]
WILLIAM I. AT THE SIEGE OF GERBERAY.







































































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WILLIAM I, AND HIS SON ROBERT,

[ 23 |]
OUR DANISH AND NORMAN KINGS,

Christian people as travelled thither to see the tomb of our |
Lord. | .

But though thus fiercely disposed towards the cruel and in-
sulting Turks, the zeal of these Crusaders for one of the relics of
their Lord—the place where He was laid when His sacred ‘body had
yielded up its very life for mankind—caused them to be more
merciful towards each other. Europe had been full of wars and
bloodshed,. but now a universal peace was proclaimed among
Christians; and the “Truce of God” (so it was named) was pre-
served unbroken for a considerable time, while preparations were
being made for this vast enterprise in the East.

Kings, princes, with nobles and knights innumerable, took the
cross on this occasion, and among them was Robert of N ormandy,
who, in order to obtain money enough to carry him and his followers
on that long and difficult journey, sold his Norman inheritance to
Rutus, that king being glad to get it on any terms. Another French
prince did the same with his dominions, and William was just pre-—
paring to sail over and take possession, when an accident put an end
to his worthless life. |

He was hunting one day in the New Forest, a forest which his
father had created with so much cruelty to the inhabitants of the
district, driving them with violence from their homes, in order to
make a home for beasts of chase, whom, as an old writer tells us, the
Conqueror loved, “as though he had been their father.’ And in this
lonely wilderness, a fleet stag came within bow-shot of him. William
let fly his arrows one after another in vain, and then, with his own
quiver empty, he called out impatiently to Sir Walter Tyrrel, one
of his companions, to shoot the creature for him. Sir Walter drew
his bow-string smartly ; swift flew his arrow towards its mark, but,

alas! it glanced aside, and, instead of, slaying a deer, pierced the
[ 24 ]
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OUR DANISH AND NORMAN KINGS. —

very heart of the unfortunate king, who instantly sank lifeless to the
ground.

Clapping spurs to his horse, Sir Walter fled in terror, leaving
the dead body of his master lying sadly there in the forest. It was
afterwards found by some poor charcoal-burners, who came thither
to ply their trade, put into a cart, and carried to Winchester, where
it was buried with little ceremony.

The poor oppressed people of England thought that the fate of
William Rufus was God’s judgment upon the son, for the crimes
committed by the father in that place. William, however, had sins
enough of his own to answer for. |

Robert and William had made an engagement that the one who
outlived the other should succeed to the English throne. But when
William died, Robert was far away in the Holy Land. So their
younger brother Henry, who happened to be in England at the time,
immediately seized the kingdom for himself. He was called Beau-
clerc, or the Good Scholar ; because he had more learning than was
common among great people in those days. The clergy were almost
the only learned men; lords and knights could rarely even write
_ their own names. |

The people of England were quite content to have Henry for
their king; so that when Robert returned from Palestine, after the
city of Jerusalem had been taken by the Crusaders, theré was no
chance of his recovering the kingdom. Perhaps if Robert had not en-
joyed himself so excessively in Italy on his way home, he might have
arrived a little earlier, and so have had a better chance of securing
what was his own. Asit was, he was content to receive a yearly sum
of money in place of a kingdom; and being an easy, pleasure-loving
man, that, most likely, made him much happier than all the state of

royalty, accompanied by its cares, would have done.
[ 26 J
DEFEAT OF ROBERT.

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usual reckless bravery, was suddenly desertedvy one of his best

knights, who galloped off with his whole dision in the very

midst of the battle.

This ruined Robert, whoafter a desperate

struggle, was made prisoner, together with manpf his bravest fol-
Tt was not in Henry’s nature to be generou The unfortunate

lowers.

[ 27 J
OUR DANISH AND NORMAN KINGS.

Robert was brought to England, carried across the country to the
wild hill-country of Wales, and there shut up in Cardiff Castle.

His imprisonment was not at first very severe: he had liberty to
go about in the neighbourhood. But, attempting one day to make
his escape, he was retaken, dragged back again, and cooped up closely
in that dismal castle, where he spent the remainder of his life—
twenty-eight long, long years—in captyyity. What a change for poor
pleasure-loving Robert !

Some say that Henry was cruel ehough to destroy his brother’s
sight, in order to prevent his escaping a second time. That was a fine
return for Robert’s generosity in sending him wine, when he and his
garrison were near perishing of thirst in that castle of his.

The hard-hearted king, however, had his own troubles, He
dearly loved his only son, Prince William ; and, as he was heir to the
crown, he took him, when he was eighteen years old, to Normandy, that
the Norman barons might acknowledge him as Henry’s successor.
All this was done satisfactorily, and then the royal party prepared to
return to England. .

The king and prince had a large retinue, al the fleet that was
to convey them was moored at Barfleur. Just as the king was on the
point of embarking, Fitz- -Stephen, the captain -of one of the vessels,
approached him, saying, “My father, Stephen, served thy father by
sea all his life. He steered the vessel that carried Duke William to
the conquest of England ; I pray thee to let me have the same office.
I have a good ship here, called ‘La Blanche Nef’” (that is “The
White Ship "); and he would fain have had the king sail in it with
him. But the king told him he could not do go, as the vessel in
which he was to sail was already fixed upon. His son, the prince,
and his daughter, together with their attendants, amounting to a

hundred and forty persons, he would, however, intrust to the “White
[ 28 ]
DEATH OF PRINCE WILLIAM.

Ship,” and the care of him whose father had so faithfully served their

orandtfather.
With this Fitz-Stephen was well pleased, and the young prince
ordered three casks of wine to be distributed among the crew. But,

















































































































































































































































































































































































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SHIPWRECK OF PRINCE WILLIAM, SON OF HENRY I.

alas! they got drunk upon it ; so that, when they set sail, fine, and
calm, and moonlight though it was, they ran among some rocks upon
the coast. The vessel struck, filled, and was at once on the point of
sinking. Fitz-Stephen immediately lowered a boat, in which he
placed the prince, and then bade the sailors row for their lives to the
shore, which was not far off. Their strong, willing arms would soon

have landed him in safety ; but, hearing the cries of his sister, who
| [ 29 |



a
OUR DANISH AND NORMAN KINGS.

had been left in the sinking vessel, the prince commanded them to
row back again and rescue her. The boat reached the ship’s side, but
then such numbers sprang in, that it was instantly upset, sending the
prince and every one of them to the bottom. The “ White Ship”
itself went down directly afterwards, and nothing of her was left
save a floating spar, to which two men still clung.

Fitz-Stephen rose again to the surface after that fearful plunge,
and, struggling with the waters, eagerly asked these men what had
become of the prince. They answered, that he and all with him were
lost ; upon which, groaning out “Woe is me!” the unfortunate
captain, reckless of his own life, sank again to rise no more. One
only out of near two hundred persons in that ill-fated vessel was
saved, and he was a poor butcher of Rouen.

The king, meanwhile, sailed on pleasantly, in utter ignorance of
this dreadful shipwreck. The cry, indeed, of those drowning wretches
had been heard on board his vessel, distant as they were ; but none
knew what it was, and no one heeded it.

_ It was soon known in England that the poor young prince and
his companions were all lost, but none dared tell the king of it. At
length, those about him ventured to send a little boy into the royal
presence, who, kneeling before the monarch, simply informed him
that the “White Ship” had gone down, and that all on board were
drowned.

The miserable Henry fainted away when the child had ended his
brief but dreadful tale, and, though he lived fifteen years longer, was
never again, as historians tell us, seen to smile. He died in 1135, at
the age of sixty-six, and was buried at Reading Abbey, which he had
himself founded. |

After the death of his son, Henry caused his daughter Matilda,

who had married the Emperor of Germany, to be acknowledged as
| [ 80 J
EMPRESS MATILDA.

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[ 31 ]
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OUR DANISH AND NORMAN KINGS.

his heir. But, at the time of the king’s death, she was in France ; SO
Stephen, Henry’s nephew, took advantage of her absence, and seized
the crown for himself. The English people willingly received him as
their sovereign, and King Stephen was rather popular than otherwise.

Matilda, however, was not going tamely to yield up. her rights to
ausurper. In 1139 she landed, with a small company of knights, on
the Sussex coast ; and numbers flocking to her standard, enabled her
to overthrow Stephen and recover her own kingdom. But she did
not retain it long, for she had no abilities for government, and her
people, discontented with her, replaced Stephen on the throne.

This. was not accomplished without an obstinate | struggle.
Matilda had all the spirit of a king’s daughter, and she fought it out
with Stephen as long as possible. She threw herself with her
followers into Oxford ; but the city surrendered almost immediately
to Stephen, and the Empress was obliged to withdraw into the castle,
which, as it was of great strength, she hoped to hold against him. A
_ three months’ blockade, however, exhausted all their provisions ; and
then, to save herself, one snowy, winter's night, Matilda, with four
_ knights—all, like herself, wrapped in white mantles, to escape
observation—stole out of the castle, crossed the frozen Thames, and,
now on foot, now on horseback, reached Wallingford, where her son
and the Earl of Gloucester had assembled an army for her relief. But
their efforts were fruitless ; and at length, to put an end to the civil
war (between the partizans of Stephen and Prince Henry, Matilda’s |
son) which from time to time afflicted England, it was agreed upon
by the'two that Stephen should retain the crown for the rest of his
lite, and that, upon his death, Henry should succeed him.

Stephen died very soon afterwards, and then Henry quietly took
possession of the kingdom, of which his family had been unjustly
deprived for a period of nineteen years.

£32]
THE PLANTAGENET KINGS OF
ENGLAND.

Z ATILDA, daughter of, Henry I., was twice married




—first to the Emperor of Germany, and, after
his death, to Geoffrey Plantagenet, Earl of
Anjou. Henry II, who now came to the
throne, was the son of this Geoffrey, who
received his name of Plantagenet from his custom of
wearing a sprig of broom (called planta-genista) in
his helmet, in place of the long, waving feather with which
some surmounted their steel head-pieces. He was joyfully ©
welcomed by his people when he came to take possession
of his dominions; for the English remembered that, through his
mother, he had Saxon blood in his veins, while the Normans prided
themselves on his father’s pure Norman descent ; and so every one
was satisfied. |
Henry at first showed himself a good, vigorous king. He ruled

his people wisely and kindly, and he was very powerful abroad also.

33
3 { 33 ]
THE PLANTAGENET KINGS OF ENGLAND.

A whole third of the kingdom of France belonged to him; for, besides
his Norman dominions, a large portion of the south of France was
now attached to the English crown, in consequence of Henry’s
marriage with Eleanor of Guienne.

During this reign lived the great Chancellor and Archbishop of
Canterbury, Thomas 3 Becket.

The reign of Henry was a long and successful one. During its
course the Welsh were repulsed, and the Irish thoroughly subdued—
Ireland being made a part of the dominions of the kings of England.
Scotland was also rendered a tributary kingdom.

But it was not a very happy reign to the king himself. His
three sons, Henry, Geoffrey, and Richard, broke out into open revolt
against their father, and their mother actually encouraged them in
doing so. Henry’s grief of mind at the disobedience of his sons threw
him into aslow fever, of which he died in the castle of Chinon, in
Normandy, at the age of fifty-seven. He was succeeded by his son
Richard, surnamed, on account of his bravery, Coeur de Lion, or Lion
Heart. Richard was handsome, athletic, an undaunted warrior, of a
genial disposition, and great abilities ; and his people both loved and
were proud of their famous king. ,

When he first came to the throne, in 1189, he seemed desirous of
making amends for his past misconduct.

But the Crusades immediately tempted Richard from his own
home and people. His fiery valour soon distinguished him in the
Kast. The city of Acre, which had withstood a two years’ siege,
surrendered within one month to the united forces of Richard and
Philip of France. Other conquests followed; and at length he
fought his way to within a few days’ march of Jerusalem. But there
quarrels among his brother Crusaders compelled the Christian

armies to retreat. During this retreat, the indignant Richard
| [ 84]
REIGN OF HENRY THE SECOND.





















































































































































































































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. [ 35 ]
THE PLANTAGENET KINGS OF ENGLAND.

learned that the city of Jaffa had been re-taken by the Turks; he
hastened thither, and, with his formidable battle-axe in hand, led a
successful attack upon the enemy.

Disappointed in the hope of taking Jerusalem, whose ‘capture
was the object of the Crusades, a truce was agreed upon with
Saladin, the celebrated sovereign of the Turks, and then Richard
returned home. But as he passed through Germany, the Duke of
Austria, who had been one of his brother Crusaders, and to whom
Richard had given deadly offence before Acre, laid hold of him, and
diseracefully threw him into prison. It is said that a wandering
minstrel at last found him out, and then joyfully sped to England
with the good news.

The Emperor refused to let Richard go, unless a very large sum
of money was given to him. But so eager were the English people
to get their king back again, that they not only brought money for
his ransom, but gladly melted down their gold and silver plate, to
swell the amount. |

Prince John had behaved very badly during Richard’s captivity,
and usurped his sovereignty. After Richard’s return, John was
anxious to make submission to him, and, at the intercession of their
mother, Richard frankly forgave the kneeling traitor. “I forgive
him,” said he, “and hope I shall as easily forget his offences as he
will my pardon.” | |

After his release from that German dungeon, Richard went to
war with Philip of France, who had acted towards him in a very
dishonourable manner. Laying siege to the castle of one of his own
refractory vassals, he was wounded in the shoulder by an arrow from .
the walls. Bad surgery made the injury fatal ; and, after pardoning
the man who had slain him, Richard died in Normandy, in 1199, in

the forty-second year of his age.
[ 36 ]
RICHARD CQZUR-DE-LION.









































































JOHN BEGGING FORGIVENESS OF RICHARD.

[ 87]
THE PLANTAGENET KINGS OF ENGLAND.

John, who succeeded him, was a poor exchange for the generous,
though violent Richard. He had been a bad son and a bad brother,
and he was now going to be a bad king.

His nephew Arthur disputed with him the succession to the
crown of England ; and, it is said, was murdered by him.

This was a horrible beginning of John’s reign.

John at last proved so violent and tyrannical a sovereign, that
his people would no longer endure it. The great lords of the kingdom
met together and forced him, at Runnymead, to sign the renewal of
an important charter (or written engagement) given by Henry L,
and a confirmation of the good laws of Edward the Confessor. The
promises which he thus solemnly made are called Magna Charta, or
the Great Charter ; because they contain so many things essential to
the just liberties of Englishmen.

John sealed this readily; but he broke his promises quite
as readily! And then, once more, there was that wretched
thing, a civil war, in England. It was carried on with excessive
violence; the king, marching from Dover to Berwick, laid waste
everything before him ; and the northern barons fled in dismay, to
seek refuge in Scotland.

John’s misdoings, however, were nearly at an end. He died at
Newark on the’ 18th of October, 1216, after a miserable reign of
seventeen years.

It is to be doubted whether apes cood can be said of J ohn:
he was both a bad man and a bad king.

His son, called Henry of Winchester, because he was born there,
succeeded him. He was only ten years old when he was crowned
King of England. | |

_ But, though he grew up a good a amiable man, he was not at

all fit for the difficult past of a monarch in those old, old times.
[ 38 J
KING HENRY THE THIRD.

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HENRY III. AND THE BARONS.

39 |
THE PLANTAGENET KINGS OF ENGLAND.

"There had been dissensions between Henry and his barons for
some time, and at length the storm burst.

The king had called a parliament together ; and when he sat in
state to receive them, to his surprise, the barons presented them-
selves armed and in their coats of mail. In great alarm, he asked
them what they meant ‘—were they going to make him a prisoner ?
They answered, No; they were going to make him more completely
king, by compelling him to rule according to the laws. The barons,
however, soon became so intolerable to the people, that they at
length entreated the king’s son, Prince Edward, to assist them in
getting rid of such odious rulers. They were glad to have the king
back again ; having experienced what it was to be governed by those
barons. | | |
Edward was a fine fellow, of twenty-two ; brave, and of great
abilities ; altogether as different from his father as possible. But at.
first, he was unwilling to do what was required of him. He was
afraid of making bad worse.

But as Henry had now resumed his royal authority, the barons
made war upon him ; and then there was something for that valiant
Edward-to do. The Earl of Leicester headed the insurgent nobles,
and Prince Edward was unfortunately taken prisoner, nor could he ~
obtain his release until his father had promised to let these men have
as much power again as they already had abused. This was done;
but, after all, the barons broke faith with the king, and then both
parties again took up arms. Dreadful battles were fought between
the royalists and rebels: in one of them, at Lewes, in Sussex, the |
poor old king was made prisoner by Leicester, and Prince Edward
was obliged to give himself up, to rescue his father. He managed,
however, one fine morning, to make his escape, by outriding his

guards. On rejoining his friends, he soon found himself at the head
[40] |
a ALS Ta A co Sa aR OF ET eS






























































































































































































































































































































































THE PLANTAGENET KINGS OF ENGLAND.

of a fine army, with which he gave battle to Leicester and such of the
barons as still adhered to him, at Evesham.

In this battle, the Earl of Leicester, together with a- hundred and
sixty knights, and many others of lower rank, lost their lives ; and it
put an end to the civil war that had so: long raged in the kingdom.

Now that peace was secured, EKdward’s soldierly spirit led him to
join the Crusades, and he and his wife Eleanor, of Castile, left
England with a large army for the Holy Land. The Prince was
wounded by a poisoned arrow, and would, it is said, have died, but
that his loving and heroic wife sucked the poison from the wound,
‘and so saved her husband !

The old king did not long survive this departure of his son to
the East. He drooped, and died, in November, 1272, after a reign of
fifty-five years.

The news of Henry’s death reached Edward when he was in
Italy, on his way home from the Holy Land. This brave prince was
a good son, and grieved sincerely for his father, as for a loss that
could never be replaced.

_ The chief events of this king’s reign were his entire subjugation
of the Welsh, and his long wars with Scotland.

Edward died at the age of sixty-nine. He was a very great
king, and, to his own subjects, a good one. He is celebrated, not
only for his warlike doings, but for having given his people many
wise laws.

His son, Edward of Caernarvon, who succeeded him, was a poor.
creature, who soon disgusted his people, by selecting for his favourites
persons quite unfit to be so distinguished, and upon whom he heaped
honours, and riches, and power, till they became eines imed pre-
suming and overbcaring.

A civil war between the king and his barons was the conse-
[ 42 ]
KING EDWARD’S FRENCH CAMPAIGN.

quence ; and this was renewed with various fortune, until at last the
king himself was taken prisoner, and the Parliament resolved that
Edward should no longer be allowed to reign, but that his son, a
, youth of fourteen, should be declared king.

Poor Edward was, after undergoing much ill-usage, cruelly put
to death, at Berkeley Castle, on the 22nd of September, 1327.

Edward III. was, like his grandfather, Edward I., a warlike
prince ; and his son, the Black Prince, was.almost more celebrated as
a warrior than he. Very soon after he came to the throne, he began
those famous wars of the English in France which ‘ended in the
almost total subjugation of that kingdom—a wonderful success, which
was, however, very short-lived, for, before his death, Edward lost
again almost all that he had gained.

King Edward landed in safety on the coast of N ormandy, in the
year 1346, and marched within a few miles of Paris itself, whose
suburbs he insulted; but as King Philip had raised an énormous
army to oppose him, Edward found it needful to retire towards the
north again. In attempting this, he found himself stopped in. all
directions, by the bridges over rivers being broken down, until, on
approaching the banks of the Somme, he found not only the bridges
destroyed, but a large French force, under Sir Gondemar de Faye,
awaiting him at the other side. As the King of France, with more
than three times his own number of men, was now close behind him,
Edward was in a dreadful difficulty. At this juncture, however, a
French peasant was bribed to show him a safe ford over the river.
It was reached while the tide was low ; and, dashing into the water,
horse and foot splashed through, cutting down the Frenchmen, who
rode into the stream to oppose them, and afterwards chased them to
some distance. The English got over only just in time, for Philip

came upon their rear, but was prevented following them by the rising
[ 43 J
THE PLANTAGENET KINGS OF ENGLAND.

tide. Philip and his army had to go round by the bridge of Abbe-
ville, and this gave Edward a little breathing time. The two armies,
however, soon came again in sight of each other, and, greatly dispro-

portioned as they were, a battle was unavoidable.

Edward chose his eround with great judgment, near Crecy, in
Ponthieu ; and, drawing up his little army in three lines, the first
of which was commanded by the Black Prince (then a boy of
sixteen), assisted by two experienced generals, aIIERTy, awaited the
attack.

The victory was complete, and this huge French army was
utterly defeated, with dreadful loss. |

From the glorious field of Crecy, Edward passed on to lay siege
to the town of Calais. This was sad work, for it took nearly a
twelvemonth’s close blockade before sheer famine compelled its
surrender. Edward was induced to spare its inhabitants only on
condition of six of the most important ones giving themselves up,
bareheaded, and with ropes round their necks, for him to do with as
he pleased. |

Six citizens were found willing to sacrifice themselves; and,
spite of the entreaties of his son and other officers, Edward ordered
them to instant execution. But the good queen Philippa, his wife,
fell on her knees before him, and pleaded so earnestly with him to
spare their lives, that he could not refuse her; for he loved his wife
very much. And so these brave fellows were kindly entertained by |
the queen, and sent on their way in safety.

Ten years afterwards the Black Prince led a very small but
victorious army, from the English possessions in the south, right
into the heart of France; and ravaged the country frightfully. On
his return to Bordeaux, however, he found that John, who succeeded

his father Philip as King of France, was close at his met with a °
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QUEEN PHILIPPA INTERCEDING FOR THE BURGESSES
THE PLANTAGENET KINGS OF ENGLAND.

force seven or eight times as large as his own ; and, considering that
he had no chance of success if he risked a battle with him, he was
willing to accept any reasonable terms of peace between them. But
John’s demands were so extravagant — among other things, he
required that the prince should give himself up as a prisoner—that
the young hero, vowing that England should never have to pay his
ransom, broke off all further negotiations, and began to make the best

preparations that he could for a battle near Poictiers, where he was
encamped.

Wonderful to relate, this mere handful of English and Gascons
routed the French host, consisting of all the great nobles and knights
of the kingdom ; and King John himself fighting desperately, with
his youngest son Philip by his side, was taken prisoner on the field.
He was led away to the tent where the young prince was resting
after that dreadful day, and who, on perceiving the captive king’s
approach, came out to meet him, with the utmost courtesy and
kindness, carried him to his tent, gave him drink with his own hands,
and at supper waited upon the king, who sat at table, while his
conqueror stood before him. |

The prince afterwards conducted his royal prisoner to England,
where. John was received with equal consideration by King Edward
himself. |

The Black Prince died in 137 6, lamented and honoured, not in
England only, but in France also. His sorrowing old father only
survived him one year; and Richard of Bordeaux, son of the prince,
succeeded to the crown when he-was eleven years old.

_ It was in the reign of Edward III. that the first beginning of
what is called the Reformation in England took place. John
Wycliffe first translated the Bible in this reign.

The early part of Richard’s reign was marked by a violent insur-
[ 46 ]
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SURRENDER OF KING JOHN OF FRANCE
THE PLANTAGENET KINGS OF ENGLAND.

rection of the lower orders of the people, under a man called Wat
Tyler. The insurrection was, however, speedily quelled.

Richard, although very promising as a youth, proved a pleasure-
loving, luxurious monarch, and lost the respect of his people, who
had been at first disposed to love him, no doubt for his father’s sake
as well as his own. | |

As a king, Richard was guilty of many faults, but his treat-
~ ment of his uncle, the Duke of Gloucester, must be looked upon as a

--erime, not a fault. The duke had been a turbulent subject; and

- Richard, weary of being plagued with him, determined to put an end
to his annoyance. So, pretending to be friendly, he paid the duke a
visit at his house in Essex, where Gloucester, suspecting no wrong,
came out, with his wife and daughter, to meet the king. At that
moment the treacherous Richard commanded the duke to be seized,
had him hurried to the beach, where a boat was waiting for him, and
put him on board a vessel, which sailed directly for Calais. There
the duke was thrown into prison, and presently murdered, it was
believed, by the king’s order.

‘Richard, however, was to suffer bitterly for his faults. The
discontent against him grew so general, that at length his cousin, the
Duke of Lancaster, dethroned him, and had himself crowned as Henry
IV., in his room.

Richard was imprisoned, first in the Tower of London, and then
in Pontefract Castle, where he came to a violent end—people did not
‘know how; but no one doubts that Henry IV. was the author of
this bad deed. : )

Richard II. was the last of the Plantagenet kings.
THE HOUSES OF LANCASTER
AND YORK.

NRY OF LANCASTER, who deposed his unhappy
cousin, soon found that it was no easy matter to
be aking. He had got the crown by foul means
and he must take the consequences. An insur- .
rection at home, in which the king was victorious,
was followed by another in Wales, headed by the

celebrated Owen Glendower ; while the Scots, taking advantage of



these disturbances, poured over the borders, and did all sorts of
damage in the northern counties.

One body of these Scots was so signally defeated by Percy, Earl
of Northumberland, that. the spot was afterwards known by the
melancholy name of Slaughter Hill. Hager to avenge this defeat,
Archibald, Earl of Douglas, one of the greatest of the Scottish lords,
assembled a large body of knights, archers, and spearmen, and made
an impetuous rush into Northumberland, devastating all before him.

The plunder that he and his followers secured, consisting of droves of

49
4 [ 49 J
THE HOUSES OF LANCASTER AND YORK.

cattle and flocks of sheep, was so immense, that they were obliged to
turn back again to their own country in order to get it safely home.
Accordingly, the marauders wheeled round, and, fearing nothing,
drove their spoils leisurely along the road. At a place called
Homildon Hill, however, they were unexpectedly met by a strong
force of English, under the Earl of Northumberland and his son
Henry Percy—known, on account of his fiery valour, as Harry
Hotspur. An engagement took place here, with fatal results to the
Scots, many of whose greatest chiefs were killed or taken prisoners.
A usurper must not expect peace. Two years afterwards there

was: another insurrection in the North, supported by Hotspur’s
father, Scroop, Archbishop of York, and other great people. The
general who commanded Henry’s forces on this occasion went to
work cunningly. He sought an interview with the rebel leaders,
and talked fairly and softly to them, until they, trusting to his
sincerity, caused their followers to disperse. When this was done,
he seized the archbishop, and hurried him off to his palace at
Bishopsthorpe, where the lord chief-justice, Gascoigne, was required
to pronounce sentence of instant death upon him. The upright
judge refused to do this ; prisoners, he said, were entitled by law
to a proper trial. A more accommodating judge was soon found,
who at once did what was required of him, and the archbishop was
| immediately beheaded. |

~The last days of the king were very sad ones. He suffered from
oppressive illness; his mind was tormented by remorse for his
crimes ; and he was jealous of his son ; fearing that, as he had stolen
the kingdom from his cousin, so his son would be tempted to steal it
from him. He died at Westminster, on the 20th of March, 1413, in
the for ty-seventh year of his age.

‘Within a year of his accession Henry V. led an army into
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THE HOUSES OF LANCASTER AND YORK.

France, with the old object of securing, by arms, that which the
kings of England believed to be theirs by inheritance—that 1s, the
crown of that kingdom. ‘The strong town of Harfleur surrendered
to him in six weeks; but his army was at the time so reduced by
sickness, that he was obliged to make the best of his way home
again, immediately. He accordingly marched on towards Calais ;
but, on approaching that town, found his passage barred by a great
French army, which was drawn up on the plains of Agincourt.
_ Advance or retreat were alike impossible; so the king drew up his
forces in the best possible manner, and then with a cheerful con-
fidence, that put heart into those hunger-bitten and enfeebled men,
calmly awaited the result. The French also prepared for action ;
and the two armies sat down on the ground, face to face, with their
weapons by their side. |

At this juncture three French knights came within Henry's
entrenchments, to offer him a free passage to Calais, on condition of
his giving up Harfleur, and resigning for ever all claim to the French
throne. These terms were indignantly refused ; and the knights ©
were about to be hastily dismissed, when one of them, the Sieur de
Helly, who, having formerly been a prisoner in England, had dis-
eraced himself by breaking his parole, had the impertinence to
propose a duel between himself and any knight who might dare to
charge him with that mean crime. |

«Sir knight,” said the king, shortly, “‘ this is no time for single
combats. Go, bid your comrades prepare for battle ; and doubt not,
that, for the breaking of your word, you wvl a second time lose your
liberty, if not your life.” |

- To this stinging speech De Helly answered, passionately—“ That

he should receive no orders from Henry ; Charles was their sovereign ;

and his Frenchmen would fight for him, whenever he thought fit.”
[ 52]
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THE HOUSES OF LANCASTER AND YORK.

Henry bid him begone ; and then, aeCp DUS forward, gave the
order—“ Banners, advance !”

Brave old Sir Thomas Erpingham, in answer to this, spun his
baton into the air, as he repeated the kine’s command; and the
English archers. then poured in on the enemy their customary fatal
flight of arrows. The battle was long and bloody ; but ended in the

total overthrow of the French. Those Frenchmen could not stand
before us English in the olden time! Ten thousand of them were
‘slain; fourteen thousand taken prisoners ; while not more than
sixteen hundred fell on the side of the English.

Md Passing over the field of battle, accompanied by the heralds of
both countries, Henry inquired what castle that was—pointing to
one in the distance. “The castle of Agincourt,” was the reply of the
principal French herald. “ Then,” rejoined the king, “let. this battle

os henceforth be called the battle of Agincourt.” :
Soon after Henry’s arrival in England, where his neowle received |
him with great joy, the Emperor Sigismund, of Germany, paid. him
a visit. On this occasion a singular scene was exhibited. When the
Emperor’s vessel cast anchor at Dover, the Duke of Gloucester and
a other nobles, mounted, armed, and with drawn swords, splashed into
_ the water, and demanded to know whether the Emperor came simply
as a guest, or as one claiming any authority in the realm. On its—
- being answered that he came only as their master’s guest, the
swords were sheathed, and he was welcomed with all the respect and
a cordiality due to so distinguished a, visitor. | |

In about two years after Agincourt, Henry again invaded
France. The result of his prowess during this second attempt was, |
that he married the Princess Catherine, daughter of the imbecile old

~ French king, and was himself declared next heir to the throne, |

He did not live long to enjoy his new honours. He brought his

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THE HOUSES OF LANCASTER AND YORK.

- queen home to England, where she was crowned with great state in
Westminster Abbey. Some more fighting in France followed ; and ‘
then, just when he seemed to have reached the height of ne
- grandeur, came the time for him to leave it all.
At Paris, where he had celebrated the birth of his son (after-
_ wards Henry VI.) with stately rejoicings, he was seized with illness.
| Physicians four hundred years ago were not much, to be trusted, and
it soon became apparent that the king must die. All the pride of
his youth, and beauty, and str ength, and valour could not save him.
He bore his doom with manly fortitude; settled the affairs of his
kingdom, appointed his brother John, Duke of Bedford, to be regent
of France during the young Henry’s childhood ; and then, being told
that he had not more than two hours to live, gave himself up to
devout prayers. He died on the 31st of August, 1422, deeply
lamented by his own subjects, and respected for his humanity and
- justice by those whom he had conquered.
--His dead body was conveyed with extraordinary pomp to Calais, |
attended by a vast concourse of mourning nobles. From Calais the
long procession crossed over to Dover, and thence followed all that
was left of the hero of Agincourt, to his last resting-place in|
Westminster Abbey. |
He had only lived thirty-five years, and reigned nine. |
Henry VI. was only nine years old when he became King of
_. England ; in two months after, he became King of France also, being
~ erowned in Paris on the 17th of December, 1431. |
The whole of France must have fallen before the English but for
the interference of a poor country girl, known as Joan of Are, who
- gave the French fresh courage to resist their conquerors; herself
° sleading them on from victory to victory, until the fruitless siege of
-Ofleans gave something like a finishing blow to English dominion in
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_ ‘THE HOUSES OF LANCASTER AND YORK.

: ‘France. Poor Joan was at length taken prisoner, and most cruelly
_ put to death in the market-place of Rouen. | |
| The English, however, did not gain anything by the destruction

of Joan. Bad as their affairs had become, after she had so heroically

_ roused the spirit of her countrymen, they became still worse and |

worse after her death ; until, at length, the only spot in all France
remaining to them was Edward ITT.’s conquest of Calais. Even their
king’s hereditary possessions in the south were lost; and, though
some of the inhabitants of Guienne, desirous of returning to their old
. allegiance, offered aid to Henry, it was all of no use. The Earl of -
Shrewsbury, a brave old knight, more than eighty years old, joined
_ these Gascon lords, with a force of eicht thousand men, and at first —
they obtained some successes ; but, hastening to the relief of one of
the towns taken by him, and which was DOW besieged by the French, |

he had to attack their strong camp, which was defended by several

hundred pieces of artillery. Charging gallantly, his rear was set |
upon by a body of French troops ; the fight grew hot, and, his horse _



being killed under hin, fell upon his rider, whose leg was broken in
_ consequence. Crippled and helpless, he was brutally speared as he ~
lay on the ground; his son was slain in a vain attempt to rescue
him; and his army was entirely routed. The close of that year,
1453, saw the end of English rule in France ; save in Calais, and the
marshes about it. e | |
Henry had grown up an amiable, but weak-minded man—much
governed by those about him, whomsoever they might chance to be ;
and this want of self-reliance led to serious dissensions at home.

_ There was an insurrection of the lower orders, under Jack Cade, who,

at the head of a rough sort of army, numbering twenty thousand —
~ Kentish men, encamped on Blackheath, near London ; and marching

thence, took possession of the city, where, committing some violence,

[ 58 ]
THE WARS OF THE TWO ROSES.

the inhabitants rose up against them, and repulsed them with great
slaughter. Then there were more alarming contests about the
throne ; for the descendants of the Duke of York, elder brother of

















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the Duke of Lancaster, whose family had seized the crown, asserted,
and in arms too, their superior claim to it. This was the beginning

of the Wars of the Two Roses, which ravaged England for thirty
[ 59 J
THE HOUSES OF LANCASTER AND YORK.

years. — Those who supported the House of York adopted a white

rose as their badge, the Lancastrians a red one; and so their

contests are known as the Wars of the T'wo Roses.

Poor, weak old Henry lost and regained his throne several times
in the course of these sad and sanguinary doings. His wife, Margaret
of Anjou, had far more spirit than he, and struggled desperately to
retrieve her husband’s fallen fortunes—but in vain. At Hexham, in

Northumberland, a great battle was fought on the 15th of May, 1462,

between the rival factions, and it ended in the total rout of Henry’s

army. The old king was hotly chased from the field, and managed to

elude his bloodthirsty pursuers. Margaret, with her young son and
a few followers, fled for safety into the forest at hand, hoping to
make her escape into Scotland ; for there was small mercy dealt out
on either side. In her flight she was set upon by a band of robbers

(there were plenty of them in that wild district), who dragged her

and her son from their horses, and speedily dispossessed them of the
gold and jewels which they had concealed about them. While the
thieves were quarrelling over the division of their spoil, the queen

and her son stole away, unobserved, and wandered aimlessly on, until,
as the light of the moon broke forth, to their terror, they saw before

them an armed figure, whom they took to be one of the gang from
which they had just escaped! In her agony, expecting nothing less
than death, Margaret bade the man observe, that even the outer
garments of herself and her child had been stripped off by the heart-—

less set they had just encountered ; and, fancying that she perceived

on his countenance some signs of compassion for them, she boldly —
threw herself on his mercy. Drawing her boy towards hin,

“Friend,” said she to the robber, “save the son of your king! [I

| charge you to protect his innocent life. Take him, and eve him. a
hiding-place from those who seek his blood !”

[ 60]
THE ROBBER OF HEXHAM.

Touched by her confidence in him, and by the helplessness of the
young prince, that rough outcast kneeled before them, and vowed to
protect their lives with his own. Then, taking the child in his arms

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QUEEN MARGARET AND THE ROBBER OF HEXHAM.
he led the way to his cave, where he sheltered them for ten days, in
which time he succeeded in finding one of the queen’s friends, better

able to afford her protection than was the robber of Hexham.
[ 61 J
THE HOUSES OF LANCASTER AND YORK.

“Poor Henry skulked about for some time in the North, was
imprisoned in the Tower, and then regained his crown for awhile.
The fatal battle of Tewkesbury again consigned him to the Tower ;
and there, as it is believed, he was murdered. Queen Margaret, whose
spirit remained undaunted to the last, did her utmost to retrieve the
fallen fortunes of her house, but in vain. After some desperate
adventures, she crossed the Channel, and spent the remainder of her
days in obscurity in France. | .

The death of Henry rendered the House of York tthcmphiant
in the person of Edward IV. He had, indeed, been proclaimed king
ten years before ; but, as we have seen, his throne was not secure
until the king was out of his way. Edward died the 9th of PDE
1483, in the twenty-third year of his reign.

Edward V. was only thirteen years old when he was ei tained
king. On account of his youth, he was committed to the care of his
uncle Richard, Duke of Gloucester, who was also appointed Protector
of the kingdom. Richard was a wicked man, and had no sooner got
his nephew into his power, than he determined on seizing the poor
boy’s inheritance for himself. | i

Having the young king secure in the Tower, it was necessary, for
his plans, to lay hold of the younger brother also. The queen, Elizabeth
Woodville, had, after the death of her husband, taken sanctuary
in Westminster, with the young Duke of York ; but was persuaded
to give up the young duke quietly, on the pretence that he was only —
wanted as a playmate for the young king. His mother gave him up,
clasping him tenderly in her arms, as she kissed and bade him farewell.

When Gloucester got hold of the young duke, he made believe
to be delighted to see him, caressing him, and saying, “Now wel-
come, my lord, with all my very heart!” And then he was placed
with his brother in the Tower. |

[ 62 J
THE MURDERED PRINCES.

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TYRREL VIEWING THE MURDERED PRINCES,

[ 88 J
THE HOUSES OF LANCASTER AND YORK.

Having the king and prince quite safe, the next thing that
Cioucester did was to persuade people that the two youths were not
the right heirs to the throne; and he contrived his wicked plans
$0 cleverly, that he very soon got the crown bestowed upon himself. ©
And the newt thing he did was to have the two princes most bar-
barously assassinated. |

Richard did not long enjoy his ill-gotten greatness ; the Duke of
Buckingham, who had helped him to it, soon picked a quarrel with
the king, and, by way of revenge, conspired with others to dethrone
him, and raise Henry, Earl of Richmond (grandson of Catherine,
Henry V/s widow) in his place. The next year Henry left France,
where he had found refuge, with an army of about two thousand’
men, and landed at Milford Haven, in Wales, on the 7th of August,
1485. Richard had taken his post at Nottingham, with a force far
outnumbering that of his rival ; and the two armies came in sight of
each other at Bosworth, in Leicestershire, on the 22nd of August.

The attack was begun by the archers of both armies; and a
fierce one it was. Richard three times brought up his cavalry to the
charge. The third time he had nearly reached his rival, when ©
Stanley, pressing forward with his troops, pressed him so closely, |
that he was borne down, and perished on the field. |

His dead body was speedily stripped of its armour and regal |
ornaments ; and the crown being placed on Richmond’s head, he was
saluted on the field by loud cries of « Long live King Henry Ra |

Henry afterwards went in state to St. Paul’s, where a “Te
Deum” of thanksgiving was sung ; and the three standards captured
on Bosworth Field were solemnly deposited on the altar. _

With Richard ended the brief rule of the House of York.

[ 64 ]
THE TUDOR MONARCHS OF
GREAT BRITAIN.





0 MP®ENRY VII. was the grandson of Owen Tudor, a , Welsh-
THe? man, who married the widow of Henry V. This king
WZ Wa\ was descended from the Duke of Lancaster; and as
| | ays \ | Elizabeth, daughter of Edward IV., became his wife,
WtsN\// the two Houses of York and Lancaster were united
in them. He was an able and sagacious prince, but
df) not particularly popular.

4 In the second year of his reign a youth, named
Lambert Simnel, the son of a baker at Oxford, was trained to
represent the son of that Duke of Clarence who was murdered in
the Tower, and, as such, to lay claim to the crown. Simnel, who was
a fine, clever lad, played his part so well, that many believed that he
really was Edward. The Earl of Warwick warmly supported his
cause.

Some years afterwards a second attempt was made to dethrone
Henry, by bringing forward Perkin Warbeck to represent the young
Duke of York, who, with his brother, had perished in the Tower.
But this insurrection also was finally crushed; and though

Warbeck’s life was spared, a second attempt that he made led not

65
P [ 65 J
THE TUDOR MONARCHS OF GREAT BRITAIN.

only to his own execution, but to that of the unhappy Earl of
Warwick also. |

Henry loved money ; he loved it so much that he oppressed his
people in order to get it. When he came to die he repented of this ;
and, in his will, ordered recompense to be made to those whom he
had injured. He died at Richmond, in 1509, after reigning nearly
twenty-four years. —

His son, Henry VIII., was welcomed very sincerely by his
subjects, who were tired of their old, harsh, money-loving king. The
new sovereign was young, handsome, sprightly, and well-educated ;
and his conduct, on coming to the throne, was such as to win the
affections of his people.

He soon found himself engaged in a war with France, in which —
the English had the best of it. One defeat that the French
sustained from them was a very droll one. Henry had ordered up
some troops to check the advance of a large body of French cavalry;
and when the two came in sight, the Frenchmen rode at the English
with great spirit, but, being seized by a panic, rode away again quite
as rapidly. They were chased; but pursuit only added wings to
their flight : faster and faster fled those redoubtable cavaliers, spur-
ring away as if they were mad, and leaving a handful of their
astonished and confounded leaders to the mercy of the enemy.
Henry could not help laughing when these were brought before him :
he praised the fleetness of their steeds, and the Frenchmen thought
it best to laugh too, saying it was a “ Battle of Spurs,’ for they
were the only weapons that had that day been used. — |

Henry’s French war ended by his making old King Louis
marry his young sister Mary. Poor girl ! she did not like it; but
princes and princesses are often obliged to do what they do not like. |

Henry had a taste for magnificence as well as for fighting; and
[ 66 ]
HENRY VIII. AT WAR WITH FRANCE.

a meeting between himself and Francis, the new king of France, gave

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BATTLE OF SPURS.

He left England in May, 1520, attended by a splendid retinue of
nobles, and by Cardinal Wolsey also, whose train almast rivalled

that of his sovereign. The place of meeting was near Calais, where
[ 67 ]
THE TUDOR MONARCHS OF GREAT BRITAIN.

an imitation stone palace, made of wood, had been put together
for Henry’s reception, and adorned within and without in the most

sumptuous manner. [Francis was of course not outdone in magnifi-
cence by his brother sovereign. |

When the two Kings met on the Field of Cloth of Gold, —_
embraced each other in the most cordial manner ; then dismounting,
they entered, arm-in-arm, a tent prepared for their reception. Hach
day they paid each other stately visits; till at length Francis, who
was of a frank, open disposition, put an end to ceremony. Leaving |
Ardres, where he had taken up his abode, with only a few attendants,
he rode right into Henry’s quarters at Guisnes ; and, saying merrily
to the guards—* You are all my prisoners, carry me to your master,”
was at once conducted to the astonished and pleased Henr , who,
taking a valuable jewel from his own neck, placed it-on that of
Francis, assuring him that he had played him the most agreeable
trick in the world, Francis, in return, presented Henry with a
bracelet ; then he helped him to dress, and finally rode off, in the
briskest spirits possible, after his pleasantry. | One of his courtiers
scolded him well, for being so foolish as thus to trust himself to the
English ; but the good-humoured monarch only laughed it off.

Feasts and tournaments followed: and then the two pa
parted, apparently well satisfied with each other.

All this friendliness, however, did not mean much. Thi about a

-twelvemonth after, Henry joined the Emperor, Charles V., in making
“war upon his former “brother” Francis. This war was carried on in
| Italy, and with various fortunes to the combatants, until 1524, when
things went ill with the French. Their best knight, the Chevalier
Bayard, was slain on the field of battle; and,. on laying siege to.
Pavia, they were not only routed, but had their king taken prisoner.
Francis had his horse killed under him ; and, himself wounded
[ 68 ]
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THE TUDOR MONARCHS OF GREAT BRITAIN.

in the face and hand, was compelled to surrender to the enemy. The
_ Viceroy of Naples, kneeling, received the king’s sword, which Francis
gave him in token of surrender ; and, respectfully kissing the gaunt-
“Jeted hand that held it, presented his own in return, saying, that it
did not become a monarch to appear unarmed in the one of
a subject. |

Henry was so exceedingly delighted when he heard that his old
friend Francis was taken prisoner, that he ordered public thanks-
givings at St. Paul’s for the happy event. He would very much
have liked to have Francis committed to his keeping; but the

4 _ Emperor knew better than to part with his prize. So Henry, in a

pet, changed sides ; and, through Wolsey, did all he could to procure
the liberation of the French king, which was accomplished in about —
six months. ; | | |

: Henry now began to show all his bad qualities. He married, and
got rid of his wives, one after another, as fast as he got tired of them.
Two of them he brutally beheaded. The first of these was Anne
- Boleyn, one of the attendants of his former wife, Queen Catherine.
- The king appeared much attached to her, but, speedily finding out
that he liked Jane Seymour better, had little difficulty in getting
| Anne out of his way.

One day, when the poor queen was at dinner, in the palace of
Greenwich, a number of officials, among whom was the lieutenant of
the Tower, entered her apartment. Trembling with apprehension of
_ the king’s anger, she inquired their errand ; and was answered that
they came, by his command, to conduct her to the Tower. She-
quietly submitted herself to them; then, rising up, was instantly,
without even changing her dress, placed in the barge awaiting her,
and swiftly rowed to the Tower ; _ exclaiming, as she entered it—“O

Lord, help me! as I am guiltless of that laid to my charge.”
[ 70 ]
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THE TUDOR MONARCHS OF GREAT BRITAIN.

pee was scebant to trial for crimes of which she was Innocent,
of course found guilty, and was beheaded within the Tower walls, on
the 19th of May, 1536. | |
There was much blood shed on the scaffold in this reign ; and
Henry rendered himself particularly infamous by putting to death
Fisher, Bishop of Rochester, and the excellent Sir Thomas More,
who succeeded Wolsey as chancellor. — |
- Towards the close of his life he became more disagreeable and
| tyrannical than ever, and breathed his last on the 28th otf J ay ;
1547.
- He was succeeded by his son, ‘Baward VL. the saly child of hice |
J ane Seymour. Edward was but ten years old when his father. died, |
but had always shown himself so good and studious a little fellow, |
that his people were at once prepared to love him.
His reign was short. But in that short time he gave proofs of
eoodness that made his people only the more regret his untimely
death. He founded Christ’s Hospital, in. London ; a school for the —
maintenance and education of boys. You may see the lads belonging
to it. playing about in the grounds, dressed in their long blue coats, —
with yellow breeches and stockings. He also founded St. Bartholo- |
mews ‘Hospital, where the sick poor are received. Those are two
| good establishments, for which we have to thank the boy-king. |
Five years after coming to the throne Edward’s health failed -
seriously ; ; and, being put under the care of a pretentious old ;
woman, his illness soon proved fatal. After having, in his feebleness,
been induced to set aside his sisters Mary and Elizabeth, and leave |
the crown to his cousin, Lady Jane Grey, the young king afterwards ~
expired at Greenwich, in the sixteenth year of his age. es
The Duke of Northumberland, who persuaded Edward to Leave :

the crown to Lady J ane Grey, little thought he was destroying his
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EDWARD VI. ENTERING LONDON.

[73]
THE TUDOR MONARCHS OF GREAT BRITAIN.

own son and daughter-in law. Jane was proclaimed queen, but few
heeded it. The Princess Mary, eldest daughter of Henry, was almost
universally acknowledged as queen ; and a few days saw the unfor-
tunate Jane a prisoner in the Tower, whence she only came to be
beheaded, together with her equally young husband, Guildford
Dudley.

Mary, who had been harshly treated, both by her father and ©
brother, seemed at first disposed to be a just ruler of her people.
But, after marrying Philip of Spain, she became a dreadful per-
secutor ; and, horrible to relate, both men and women, in great
numbers, were burned alive, because they did not believe as those
did who belonged to the Church of Rome.

Archbishop Cranmer was laid hold of, and committed to prison,
because he would not change his faith at the bidding of those cruel
persecutors. They threatened to put him to death ; and in the
dreadful prospect of death by fire, his courage failed him, and he
promised to believe anything they liked. But, after all, his enemies
were ‘malicious enough to take his life; and then the archbishop,
bitterly repenting the wrong to which alone the fear of such a death
had tempted him, boldly avowed the truth He was hurried off to
the stake ; and, as the flames rose around him, he thrust his right
hand into them, exclaiming—“ This hand hath offended !”—for, to
save his life, he had written that which he did not believe to be true.
He soon perished in those awful flames, raising his eyes to heaven,

and saying—* Lord Jesus, receive my spirit.”
| | Mary's chief fault was her bigotry, and in suffering others, who
were far more bigoted than herself, to lead her to those cruel deeds
of which she bears the blame. | |

She died on the 17th of November, 1558, in. the forty- second —

year of her age, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.
| [ 74 ]
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QUEEN ELIZABETH ACKNOWLEDGED BY THE BISHOPS.
THE TUDOR MONARCHS OF GREAT BRITAIN. ~

The Princess Elizabeth, who was seventeen years younger than
her sister, succeeded Queen Mary.

_ She was living at Hatfield when Mary died ; and, two days after
that event, the lords of the council went thither, and with much state
proclaimed her queen, at the gates of Hatfield House. |

On the 23rd of November, the new queen, attended by a magni-
ficent train of nobles, and vast. numbers of the common people, set.
out for London. When she reached Highgate, the bishops came
forth to meet her, and, on their knees, tendered their allegiance. She
received them very graciously, and all were permitted to kiss the
royal hand, save Bonner, Bishop of London, who had been foremost
in the late persecutions; from him she turned away, with marked
disfavour ; and that cruel man had to bear this public and deserved
slight as he best could. On entering the Tower, she knelt down, and
_ gave God thanks for having delivered her from so many dangers ; for
she had once been a prisoner within its walls.

She was crowned at Westminster, on Sunday, the 15th of
December; and very gracious was she to the thronging multitudes
who witnessed her procession from the Tower. She suffered any of
them, however humble, to speak to their sovereign; and a poor
woman having presented her with a sprig of rosemary at the Fleet
Bridge, the queen carried it in her hand all the way to Westminster.

Elizabeth, however, did not feel her throne quite secure ;
because some people thought that Mary of Scotland had a better
right to it than she had. Mary, at an early age, was married to
Francis, afterwards King of France; and, being widowed at eighteen,
returned to her own kingdom, where the turbulent nobles and people
involved her in continual troubles, which Elizabeth delighted to |
ageravate. At length, open war broke out between Mary and one |
portion of her subjects, who, having got possession of her son, a mere

[ 76 ]
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SURRENDER OF MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTS
THE TUDOR MONARCHS OF GREAT BRITAIN.

baby, set him up as king, in opposition to his mother. The royal
forces, and those of the insurgents, met at Carberry Hull, near Edin-
burgh, and a battle was about to take place, when Mary, perceiving
that her troops were rapidly deserting her, was prevailed upon to
give herself up to her rebel subjects. She was received with
apparent respect ; one of their leaders kissing her hand, and then
leading her horse to their camp. She soon, however, found that she
was only a prisoner; and, being placed in close captivity in Lochleven
Castle—a fortress in the middle of a lake—was compelled to resign
her crown to her son. She. made her escape a few months after-
wards, and her people rallying round her, she made one more effort
for freedom. But at Langside, near Glasgow, her army was utterly
routed; and then she ventured to throw herself on the compassion of
Elizabeth, hoping to find shelter in her dominions.

Never did any one make a greater mistake than did Mary —
- Stuart, in trusting herself to Elizabeth of England. Beginning with
professions of friendliness, she kept Mary a captive for nineteen
years, and then completed her baseness by having the Scottish queen
beheaded in Fotheringay Castle.

The reign of Elizabeth was distinguished for naval adventure
and prowess. Hawkins, Drake, and Frobisher were the most cele-
brated English heroes on the seas at this time. Drake was the first
Englishman who ever sailed round the world. He accomplished this
in safety ; and having, by the way, done a great deal of mischief to
the Spaniards, with whom the English were on bad terms, Elizabeth
was so delighted, that she did him the honour of dining with him on
board his ship, the “Golden Hind ;” and afterwards—by one gentle
touch of a sword on his shoulder—of converting him from plain
Captain Drake into Sir Francis.

The new knight did his country good service ; for elght years

[ 78 ] |
QUEEN ELIZABETH ON BOARD THE “ GOLDEN HIND.”



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[ 79 ]
THE TUDOR MONARCHS OF GREAT BRITAIN,

Cadiz, destroyed such quantities of their shipping, as delayed the
sailing of the “ Armada” for a twelvemonth.

_ The “ Armada” consisted of a hundred and thirty vessels, carry-
ing between three and four thousand brass guns, and having twenty
thousand troops on board ; while such was the zeal of the Spaniards
on this occasion, that among the numerous crew that manned the
fleet were to be found two thousand gentlemen, who gave their
services in the humble capacity of common seamen. |

| On, at last, came the “ Invincible Armada,” as the Spaniards
proudly named it. But, between tempest and our valiant seamen,
it was speedily knocked to pieces; only a few vessels out of that vast
multitude escaping, miserably, to Spain again. Not content with the
| destruction. of the “ Armada,” the English must needs send an expedi-
_ tion to Spain, for the purpose of still further punishing the Spaniards.
This expedition was under the command of Essex, the queen’s new
favourite, who not only behaved very gallantly in his attack upon
the enemy, but so humanely also, that even the Spaniards themselves
gratefully acknowledged his noble conduct. se

_ Essex, though brave, was a vain and foolish man ; sometimes he

was very impertinent to his sovereign ; and Elizabeth, in her old age,
getting tired of his wilfulness, at last suffered him to be put to death,
_ for a conspiracy into which he had entered against her. |

But the regret which she afterwards felt hastened her end. She
died at Richmond, on the 24th of March, 1603, in the seventieth year
of her age, and the forty-fourth of her reign. . oS :

Elizabeth had many faults ; but she was a great queen.

{ 80 1
OUR SOVEREIGNS
FROM JAMES I. TO VICTORIA.



»( LIZABETH’S successor was James Stuart, the sixth
‘S king of that name in Scotland, and the first in >
England. He was the son of Mary Stuart, whom
PUCENI—) — Elizabeth beheaded ; and under him the two king-
x S ile Z get doms were first united.



ee you James had not been long on the English
v2 throne when the horrible conspiracy known as the Gunpowder
7} Plot was entered into, for destroying the king and the mem-
: bers of both Houses of Parliament.
James’s eldest son, Henry, a youth of great promise, died
in 1612, and his brother Charles then became heir to the throne.
Charles married the Princess Henrietta Maria, daughter of
Henry IV. of France. Before this took place, however, King James
died, in the fifty-ninth year of his age, and the twenty-third of his
English reign.
Very soon after the accession of Charles I. to the throne, he
found himself involved in disputes with the House of Commons.

At length the Royalists and Parliamentarians took up arms

( 81 ]
G
OUR SOVEREIGNS FROM JAMES I. TO VICTORIA

against each other. The king’s party were at first victorious ; but
_ they were afterwards defeated at Margton Moor by Oliver Cromwell,
and were so completely routed at Naseby, in Northamptonshire, on
the 14th of June, 1645, that the king had to fly for safety, —— |
“all his military stores behind him.
Poor Charles vainly sought ‘etasé int ‘Wales; and, after more |
unsuccessful fighting, shut himself up in Oxford, where Sir Thomas ~
Fairfax, one of the Parliamentary generals, laid siege.to him.
Charles, having no means of defending the city, resolved to make
his way quietly out, and throw himself upon the people of Scotland,
who, though they had been rebellious enough, still seemed milder in

their demands than the English had become. The Scots did not, -

however, merit Charles’s confidence ; for they eventually delivered
him to the English army, Py whom he was a in custody | ab
Holmby Castle. | |

Oliver Cromwell had by this time become a man of ereat im-
portance. He acted with an independence and energy which con-
vinced all men of his talents to govern, and was soon made supreme.
The king was removed from prison to prison ; sometimes very
harshly treated ; and having the dreadful fear of assassination before
his eyes. Although Charles would not. acknowledge the power of
his subjects to try him, his enemies paid no heed to his opposition,
_ but brought the king to trial in Westminster Hall, and he was
/ sentenced to be beheaded. a a

Charles was led out to execution i in ‘the str eet before Whitehall;
on the 30th of January, 1649, EEN ES

An attempt was now made, first by the Ivish, and then by the
~ Seoteh, to place Charles IL, the son of Charles I, upon their
respective thrones ; but both projects were utterly defeated by the |

energy of Cromwell. Charles then threw himself upon his English
[ 82 ]






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OUR SOV EREIONS FROM JAMES I. TO VICTORIA.

friend, and with: an army of fourteen thousand men hazarded a
battle at Worcester. ‘The royalists were routed, and Charles I. was
competed to fly for his life.
‘Having dismissed the Parliament, the Protector of the Common- |
wealth (for that was the title Cromwell bore) called together a new

Parliament, and for a while governed the kingdom in conjunction

with them. In time they proposed to him to accept the crown, and

| call himself King of England, but this he declined. Already he had

= as. much power as any sovereign, and he soon proved this by the

| dismissal of the new Parliament, when he found them unwilling to

= - devote themselves to the public business for which they were called

. together. After this he ruled without a Parliament, and his power

- was as much dreaded abroad as at home.

Oliver Cromwell died on the 3rd of Senienibok: 1658, at
: this age” of. fifty- -eight, and in the ninth year of his Protectorate.
Richard, his son, was nominated to succeed him as Protector.
Richard, however, was an amiable man, who loved a quiet life, and
finding his high position not a very comfortable one, he soon gave it
oe up, and Prince Charles IL, who had taken refuge in Holland, was
| implored to return. He embarked at Scheveling on the 24th of May,
1660, and a two days’ sail brought him to Dover, where he was
received by an enthusiastic crowd of the nobility and gentry, who, —
dissatisfied with a Commonwealth and | a Protector, were glee to have
a king once more. . |
The new king pleased his subjects very much at first. “His
manners were aftable and. winning; he chose his ministers discreetly ;
and all seemed to go well. | on
But Charles Il. proved anything rather than a wise and
good monarch, He was mean enough to receive a yearly —
pension from Louis XIV. of France; and some of his subjects,
| [ 84 ] |
FALL OF JAMES II.

who pretended to call themselves patriots, were content to do
the same.

In this reign the Plague broke out in London, and destroyed in
one year ninety thousand people. The next year was almost more
terribly signalised by the Great Fire of London, by which no less
than eighty-nine churches and more than thirteen thousand houses
were totally destroyed.

Charles died, after a fit of apoplexy, on the 6th of February,
1685, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, and the twenty-fifth of his
actual reign, and was succeeded by his brother James.

James was a brave man, but being of a harsh, severe temper, he
was not much liked. The Duke of Monmouth’s insurrection was the
first important event in the short reign of King James. It was
subdued and punished with great cruelty: the Duke himself, though
he was the king’s nephew, lost his head for it.

James was a Romanist, and showed his favour to those of his
own church in ways forbidden by the law. He tried to coerce the
bishops, and make them break the law, in order to gratify him.
They were firm in their resistance ; and he sent seven of them to the
Tower for trial. This threw the nation into a ferment, and the
bishops were acquitted. To get out of their difficulties, the people
determined, at last, on inviting over William, Prince of Orange (who
had married James’s eldest daughter, Mary), to help them to send
away James, and place Mary upon the throne instead.

The Prince at once fitted out a small fleet and army, with which
he landed in Torbay, on the 5th of November, 1685. He was, on the
whole, well received ; and James found himself deserted by almost
all his friends, including his daughter Anne, and her husband Prince
George.. James now fled with his young queen, and her infant, the

Prince of Wales, safely out of the country.
[ 85 |
OUR SOVEREIGNS FROM JAMES I. TO VICTORIA.

The people of England were content to have William and Mary
for their sovereigns, the Irish were not, and there was some hard

fighting in Ireland before James was driven out of that country also,

and reduced to live, for the rest of his days, a melancholy exile ,

in France. William was not a popular monarch, and towards the
close of his reign he was frequently at variance with his Parliament.

~ Queen Mary, unfortunately, died early, in 1694; and as she died
childless, her sister, the Princess Anne, became heir to the throne after
William. ‘To prevent the succession of James’s son, the Parliament
made a fresh arrangement, according to which the crown, after Anne’s
death, was to go to the Electress Sophia of Hanover, and her family.

William’s end was now fast approaching. He became feverish
and ill, and gradually sank till the 7th of March, when he expired.
This was in 1702, after a reign of about thirteen years.

James II. died a short time before his son-in-law. His severe
reverses had softened the harshness of his character; and he gave the
best proofs of a truly religious spirit by the kindness and amiability
of his home-life.

Anne was exceedingly popular when she came to the throne ;
‘she was a good-hearted sort of woman, and she was a Stuart, for
whom the people had yet much affection.

One of her first acts was to go to war with France. In 1706
Marlborough gained the celebrated battle of Ramillies, in which the
enemy lost thirteen thousand men, and all their artillery; a loss that
compelled them to evacuate Spanish Flanders. The English at
last got tired of fighting for mere glory, and peace was made at
Utrecht on the 11th of April, 1713.

One of the most important events of Queen Anne’s reign was
the union between England and Scotland, which took place on the
6th of March, 1707. Anne died on the Ist of August, 1714.

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(87 J
OUR SOVEREIGNS FROM JAMES I. TO VICTORIA.

When ‘ 7 zood C Queen Anne” had breathed her last, there was a
short but agitating uncertainty. as to who should succeed her. But
there was no opposition to King George, who came over, and quietly
took possession of his rich prize on the 28th of September, 1714. His
accession Was according to the Act of Settlement passed, in the reign |
of William III., which limited the crown to Sophia, who was the
~ grand-daughter of J ames I., and the mother of George. '

The friends of James Edward Stuart thought that now was the
time for them to be up and doing; and they acted accordingly.
Scotland was the most favourable field of action for them ; and the |
standard of the “ Pretender,’ as he was called, was set up by the
Earl of Mar, at Kirk-Michael, in Braemar, on the 6th of September,

1715, while the Jacobite noblemen in the north of England prepared
_ to Co- -operate with their friends in Scotland. But the insurrection —
was soon over. The decisive battle of Preston, on November 11th,
ruined the Pretender’s cause. He escaped to France, and his unfor-
tunate adherents had to bear the full vengeance of King George,
who, in the hour of success, was too forgettul of mercy,

King George died suddenly, while on the way to his beloved
Hanover, on the 11th of June, 1727, in the sixty- eighth year of his
age, and the thirteenth of his reign. He was succeeded by his eldest
son, who became George II. |

George II. continued those wars on the Continent which had
been begun by William III. in order to preserve the “balance of
power ”—that is, to prevent any one kingdom having more power
than the other kingdoms might think suitable. At Dettingen, in
1743, he gained a great victory over the French. Fontenoy, which
was fought two years later, proved. a change for us; there, we
English, under the young Duke of Cumberland, were beaten with

considerable loss.
[ 88 ]
























































































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OUR SOVEREIGNS FROM JAMES I. TO VICTORIA.

The year 1745 was marked by another Jacobite insurrection.
Prince Charles Stuart, son of the first Pretender, left France on the
14th of July in that year, with a couple of small vessels, and landed
on a wild part of the Highland coast, with only seven followers.
Numbers hastened to support him, and then the prince’s standard
was solemnly set up in the quiet little valley of Glenfinnan. After
various adventures, and enduring much hardship, a final battle took
place on Culloden Moor, between the Pretender’s half-starved army
and a much larger force of the king’s, under the Duke of Cumberland.
It ended in the total defeat of the prince’s aIOHES'; and the hopes of
the Stuarts were crushed for ever.

King George died suddenly on the 25th of October, 1760, and
was succeeded by his grandson, George III., who, being the first real
Englishman that had ascended the throne since the days of James II.,
was liked all the better on that account. te ae

The events of his long reign were varied and striking. The
American colonies constituted themselves into an Independent
government, entitled the United States of America. The Declaration
of Independence was signed on the 4th of July, 1776, and acknow-
ledged by the British Government by a treaty signed at Paris,
September 3rd, 1783. General Washington was elected the first
president in 1789. | |

At the very time that America was lost to the British crown,
events were occurring in a-distant part of the world which led to the
acquisition of our Indian empire—the most extensive and magnificent
conquest in the annals of nations. In 1757 the famous victory of
Plassey was gained by Colonel Clive, who, with only 3,000 men,
defeated an army of 50,000. Hyder Ali was defeated by Sir Eyre
Coote in 1781, and died after his final overthrow in 1782. The native
forces were then mustered against us by Hyder. Ali’s son (Tippoo

L 90 ]
LORD NEL SON’ S VICTORIES.

“Saib), but he was coupled: 4 to submit, and his two sons were de-

livered as hostages to the British on the 19th of March, 1792. After
two years the war broke out again, and Tippoo Saib was killed at
the capture of his strong fortress of Seringapatam, in 1799.

The French Revolution took place in 1789, and the king was

beheaded in 17 93, by which event the other great Powers were

provoked to make threatening demonstrations against the French
Republic. In the general war which ensued a career-was opened for
Napoleon Buonaparte, then a young officer in the French army, who

obtained great victories over the Austrians in Italy, and was placed

at the head of affairs in 1799, with the title of First Consul,

and, in 1804, was crowned Emperor of the French.

Previous to this, in the war with the French and Spaniards, the
English had obtained great victories at sea; Lord Howe, in 1794,
with a fleet of inferior size, not only beat the enemy, but towed six of
his largest ships, as prizes, into Portsmouth. St. Vincent, in 1797,
brought the Spaniards to their senses, in equally admirable style ;
and the year after that, as the Dutch, under French influence, had
been making themselves disagreeable, it fell to the lot of Admiral
Duncan to give them their lesson, which was a pretty severe one,.
seeing he captured twelve of their fleet. But the destruction of the
naval power of France was reserved for Lord Nelson, one of the
ereatest naval commanders the world ever saw. |

Nelson having defeated the French at the Battle of the

Nile, totally crushed the united French and Spanish fleets at

Trafalgar, in March, 1805, though his own force was a much smaller

one than theirs. Nineteen of the enemy’s ships were captured, while

the French commander-in-chief and two Spanish admirals were made

prisoners. This great victory gave us peace for awhile, but it was bit-

terly dashed by the loss of our brave Nelson, who, as he stood on his
| | C91 J
OUR SOVEREIGNS FROM JAMES I. TO VICTORIA.

own quarter-deck, was hit by a rifleman stationed in the yards of one
' of the enemy’s ships. He was instantly carried below, when it was
found that he was mortally wounded. He only lived long enough to ”
know that the enemy was vanquished, and then exclaiming—“ Thank
God, I have done my duty ! !” he died in the arms of his friend,

Captain Hardy.

But, though driven from the seas, the French continued their
course of aggression by land, and so that great struggle was entered
upon which is generally spoken of as the Peninsular War. The
battle of Vimiera (August 21st, 1808) resulted in a great victory to
the British. In Ji anuary, 1809, the famous action at Corunna was
fought, and here we lost our gallant commander, Sir John Moore, who
was struck by a cannon ball in the hour of his success. Other victo-
ries were obtained over the French at Talavera, July 27th and 28th,
1809; at Busaco, September 27th, 1810; at Barossa, March 5th,
1811; at Albuera, May 16th, 1811; and at Salamanca, July 22nd,
1812. The great sieges, during the same war, were those of Ciudad
Rodrigo and of Badajoz, both in 1812. ‘In fine, Sir Arthur Wellesley,
who commanded the British forces during this war, succeeded in
driving the French out of Spain and Portugal, and was hailed as
their deliverer by the inhabitants of those countries.

After the failure of his Russian campaign in 1812, Napoleon was
forced by England, Prussia, Russia, and Austria to abdicate in 1814.
Louis X VIII., brother of the king who had been beheaded, was then
elevated to the throne, and Buonaparte was allowed to retire quietly
to the island of Elba. But his ambition was not to be satisfied with the
sovereignty of a little island, and he suddenly quitted Elba, having
been there less than a year, and landed in France, at Cannes, with
the intention of regaining his lost power. This was on the 15th of

March, 1815. In less than three weeks. the whole army of France
[ 92 ]
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OUR SOVEREIGNS FROM: JAMES I. TO VICTORIA.

had again joined his. standard ; and the allied Powers, on .their side,
had entered into a solemn treaty to subdue him. The command of
the allied forces was entrusted to the Duke of Wellington, who gained
the greatest victory of modern times, This was the famous battle of
Waterloo, fought on the 18th June, 1815.
battle, Napoleon surrendered himself a prisoner of war to the British.
He was conveyed to the distant island of St. Helena, and strictly
guarded till his death, which occurred on the 5th of May, 1821.
During the progress of these events, George III. had been in a
declining state of health, and many troubles had occurred in
England, partly arising from bad government, and partly from the
distress of the people. The death of the King took pee on the
29th of January, 1820. |
George III. was srecepaede by his son, the Prince of Wales,
who had, during his father’s illness, governed for him, under the
title of Prince Regent. The reign of George IV. was short, and
unmarked by any circumstances of great importance. He died in
1830, and was succeeded by his brother, the Duke of Clarence,
as William IV. The principal events in this king’s reign were the
. passing of the Reform Bill, and the extinction of slavery in our
‘English colonies. He died in 1837, and, as he had no children,
his niece, our present Queen, came to the throne after him. |
— Queen Victoria was the only child of the Duke of Kent,
George III’s fourth son. She was born in 1819, so that she was
only eighteen when she became sovereign. She was crowned in
Westminster Abbey on the 28th of June, 1838. : |
Her reign has been a very eventful one. In a few months
after her accession a very violent rebellion broke out in Canada,
which was not subdued until many lives had been lost. In 1842

the Afghans, in the north-west of India, rebelled, overpowered our
[ 94 J


































































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CHARGE OF THE LIFE-GUARDS AT WATERLOO,
OUR SOVEREIGNS FROM JAMES I. TO VICTORIA.

troops, and then: after engaging to let the poor remains of the British
army retire unmolested, treacherously slew nearly the whole of them.
Fresh troops were, however, speedily sent to avenge them ; and the
signal victories gained by Generals Pollock, Nott, and Sale amply
punished the treachery of the fierce Afehans, whose fortresses and
strongholds were then destroyed.

In 1853 we became involved in war with Russia 5 and in the
Crimea our soldiers fought side by side with the French. “ Balac-

93

lava” and “Inkermann” will long be words to stir the hearts of
Englishmen, as they recall the valour shown there by our countrymen,
and their patient suffering of the horrors of a Crimean winter. The
fall of the strong fortress of Sebastopol caused the Russians to make
peace with us and our French allies. | :

We were scarcely clear of the Russian war when we found ©
ourselves plunged into the far deeper distresses of the Indian
mutiny, which at one time threatened us with the loss of all 7
India. The heroic deeds of Sir Henry Havelock and other noble.
soldiers at length checked the insurrection; and, under Sir Colin
Campbell, perfect obedience was restored. |

But the reign of Queen Victoria has also been more pleasingly
distinguished by great improvements in the manners, morals, and
social condition of her people ; while abundant efforts on the part
of the higher classes to promote the comfort and well-being of those
in a lower position, manifest a striking increase of that kindly feeling
which ought to exist among those who, whether bse or low, are © yet
children of one Father, ‘“ who is in heaven.”

It is to be hoped we shall go on improving as a nation ; and, to
ensure that, the best plan is, that each one should mend one—that is, :
himself | bes

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DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20091121_AAAAZU' PACKAGE 'UF00016220_00001' INGEST_TIME '2009-11-21T18:29:14-05:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T18:07:34-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 300247; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-11T05:12:31-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
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'SHA-1' cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
EVENT '2012-05-01T12:09:11-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2012-05-01T11:56:26-04:00'
redup
'3655176' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYGP' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
b2bc17198e17b7a7dd3324c499a3eb18
9eb54ef739d659444024a5b3009ca85d9fe3c02e
'2012-05-01T12:12:13-04:00'
describe
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d26ffb30782d3b4d74d756811a42a268
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'2012-05-01T12:10:06-04:00'
describe
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33d1fd1894c4803c0fb22a1fd3c123e5
cb483fd152e34a1eadcfd8cff9a3e3c912b15707
'2012-05-01T11:58:53-04:00'
describe
'62375' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYGS' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
e735c012ebce0cc1d553a32626828e5c
42f369c3d52313549025915ee3ac6b91d7fa2ffc
'2012-05-01T12:08:31-04:00'
describe
'87743368' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYGT' 'sip-files00001.tif'
80cbb51339ec081411789c762c084fb8
a5fe4bcfac9ca2ff1b873574c73d9c9c95686616
'2012-05-01T12:05:35-04:00'
describe
'6769' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYGU' 'sip-files00001.txt'
1872f53dfec1cd97089d881dfddbbc23
779194342b6f9f2aa800c0750dcaf1af7ca9bf57
'2012-05-01T11:59:03-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'32030' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYGV' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
90aa3a538dbfd7db7f0272848729d280
e7bd1af546d49ad1a6d99fb7d11de5feea9986eb
'2012-05-01T12:06:31-04:00'
describe
'3622839' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYGW' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
12d6070fb4ae0ddf4fdd1eec8acc6971
9cf6e65c95de4d90c918325c9217471c77449688
'2012-05-01T12:11:01-04:00'
describe
'47547' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYGX' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
2e682e84617bd4fc67faf2df078f3637
40c6c83984866b4625b60a7ca7d426c35e039801
'2012-05-01T11:58:22-04:00'
describe
'2872' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYGY' 'sip-files00002.pro'
216bac2d9df086e15c5dd51354ada757
15464f6f79e9f371ba2c139701726b7ef02f47b1
'2012-05-01T11:56:47-04:00'
describe
'20723' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYGZ' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
26dd8170804a781c0f7be56dab714f0a
8fa5f4268e704ea3167944034e35f84659769e6c
'2012-05-01T12:07:00-04:00'
describe
'86955968' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHA' 'sip-files00002.tif'
44a82b7d7ea872416da9b322d3671eac
e2a7703b90de92ea187ce6a8f4299d11da1fe5ba
'2012-05-01T11:58:50-04:00'
describe
'174' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHB' 'sip-files00002.txt'
21d9fba722da25e93f8c41fa5c303fbd
857bfd637fa882afbabbac849ed633987691709b
'2012-05-01T12:00:16-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'13365' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHC' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
edd2fce4dd55615030f469d3dc2099b5
5f78080144d9bc3506f47cdfaba2206cad00efd8
'2012-05-01T12:02:54-04:00'
describe
'3358905' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHD' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
7075b46fd85d60c28558d31650990984
72cd4cb136bfcbc14a273a9ac07e63e4b488b2c2
'2012-05-01T12:02:23-04:00'
describe
'45111' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHE' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
1251b4fb2fe5839832798c71c7df3ba8
bafc010f994a728ddb24e820af1665b11268fe46
'2012-05-01T12:06:02-04:00'
describe
'3127' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHF' 'sip-files00003.pro'
5ab410b991f1be79f4d56e47ad3d5061
aeca62977a38139d18441470b131caa4d516a2ac
'2012-05-01T11:58:33-04:00'
describe
'20294' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHG' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
3564f58d9f5b09b3a972719b767a751d
920e84211a45a569af6397c3507b7645e9b18209
'2012-05-01T12:03:33-04:00'
describe
'80621384' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHH' 'sip-files00003.tif'
05a726d44e0cc8362f027afc561a29dc
5c94ffaff40b1240c4791c2ed9037d7ae88009c1
'2012-05-01T12:01:23-04:00'
describe
'195' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHI' 'sip-files00003.txt'
3cee4f63e66f211f9d728c60f43180e4
190b30b6189c3fb99328f0e50fefea3fa8d03886
'2012-05-01T12:06:29-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'13001' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHJ' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
89d5cacd2e319e88c3a9077f56f6cf0c
25c9da526f08f5ca7a59685e8855e2bec893e90d
'2012-05-01T11:58:37-04:00'
describe
'3336106' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHK' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
d9cd72eb87e712fde5b406d71a81b9e3
226d7a8588eef7c4339c3823b5d66475b7f5bc80
'2012-05-01T12:01:36-04:00'
describe
'142699' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHL' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
43cd16cac8bea52cf72e8f31be8fca1a
361f5aa2ef88127d8ac1f92cac5ab9747a7dd90c
'2012-05-01T12:12:11-04:00'
describe
'1580' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHM' 'sip-files00004.pro'
9e41dcd92193a15be204438e8b46cae9
a1dde933b4e558f455b9bc9e7eba22b32ddbec0c
'2012-05-01T11:58:23-04:00'
describe
'47707' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHN' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
85b0c03d5df47fe14eab109cfd55b05c
4d54f31ff5532db8a78a1ee72ce7e2ac26aa79de
'2012-05-01T11:56:50-04:00'
describe
'80081556' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHO' 'sip-files00004.tif'
127fd83710ed2aa0311f64bd8704ed75
7ace443e35baafb585d68786bf28df696dff201d
'2012-05-01T11:57:09-04:00'
describe
'68' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHP' 'sip-files00004.txt'
379e8c34db942ff701bc552b7eda7408
387d531752be94807ccb00050aaf8fec30c397b3
'2012-05-01T12:07:07-04:00'
describe
'25115' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHQ' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
f62608806d0412d80b7feceb785c13d9
d1a557f28bc5190bbf2d469b2223974b4525876b
'2012-05-01T11:59:57-04:00'
describe
'3324990' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHR' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
66d74c414c7d6c8f4819ac7eac2f300c
2b30db5055217dc6df8e8cc3797b9ac68baae3c1
'2012-05-01T12:08:19-04:00'
describe
'84738' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHS' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
6e5cb7fd04b01dac7e4a096baf861620
c57ed6fee9ac5546412f3020dae0a79ea7eb03cd
'2012-05-01T12:02:55-04:00'
describe
'7218' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHT' 'sip-files00005.pro'
0b8ffebbde4ec69e704e9418a6b898b7
d44e772c7aa12dd89184960fe59fd62cf31473fa
'2012-05-01T11:57:16-04:00'
describe
'39015' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHU' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
dfdc289895abb8f4326dc61d7ee6a44b
47cb1526dfee61ae8afca380715ca8c41146151b
'2012-05-01T12:02:28-04:00'
describe
'79818076' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHV' 'sip-files00005.tif'
95903df992ab3379867659d639fa8955
15107754d1313d3d29bb9691260ef0b48f066efe
'2012-05-01T12:09:55-04:00'
describe
'341' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHW' 'sip-files00005.txt'
6b2da9680cd88d6817a5642d34f6073b
408fe1292fec6b02a0a9ca660b01e605322ee2fd
'2012-05-01T12:06:49-04:00'
describe
'26072' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHX' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
39f8295f514a1ef4f9d2e821eda2c65b
14b0a711f56b5cc1f993ace5a26d6aee7fdde7fc
'2012-05-01T12:03:57-04:00'
describe
'1385564' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHY' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
8546a4e3f16a6b60e906030a99e950a8
06b4603a7a97ff609e9e6fe3ea09002333e04783
'2012-05-01T12:09:44-04:00'
describe
'42430' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYHZ' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
91fc80e179eaf3f1d553ba15887a9fb6
fa4e20f732a7ac050bbfddc191eb87a9ea418a34
'2012-05-01T12:06:45-04:00'
describe
'987' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIA' 'sip-files00006.pro'
f06a4f7e01c71fa12204494f57f40ca3
54f5fba3205f3abbbdd40e3cf4cccacaafbae555
'2012-05-01T12:02:35-04:00'
describe
'24894' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIB' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
e0ec020bfc97de13da4303c2aa603b46
f3ba5817838e6ce4eca7d2f91ffc60ee5c7d01c9
'2012-05-01T12:10:57-04:00'
describe
'25876508' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIC' 'sip-files00006.tif'
c4e2dec1e29f008d2e054a461591c20c
30f9d9b4e6ff522d747ccf8edc8189560b694313
'2012-05-01T12:07:26-04:00'
describe
'142' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYID' 'sip-files00006.txt'
f30c7b5f1312c104beab92164261b191
f81a8faec0d9c8b19d7cbd383c7a7aaac7f58550
'2012-05-01T12:08:15-04:00'
describe
'20269' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIE' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
3f3e4173ec7b516389eeb8a8023fe841
cdbbd4a53e831e3e4af5e1a3abe06d21484be8a4
'2012-05-01T12:10:10-04:00'
describe
'3294342' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIF' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
1d7abbc1b14b820d68f44a40951571a9
b021130e342660e143389762a48a183013b3b603
'2012-05-01T12:08:10-04:00'
describe
'188761' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIG' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
19932786a573d9580b6e1c68630b2851
e87a5cfd0d06ceae7ed681853c997bdc025e94fd
'2012-05-01T11:56:53-04:00'
describe
'6288' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIH' 'sip-files00007.pro'
8910154c29cc05efa6ce8bbafc0b1d78
9440423ffdcd29aa529644fc639d5f227599590b
'2012-05-01T12:08:17-04:00'
describe
'67641' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYII' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
2b568e9913f3a92c21d520debe11d30b
885be48ca289e3bc026108e37e9a4595f2e9bcec
'2012-05-01T12:03:05-04:00'
describe
'79086620' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIJ' 'sip-files00007.tif'
547ea30f24e4c0d66e13c1b8b2c94b6b
9286603cb0beac03cce4c6c7d6de908707354984
'2012-05-01T12:04:14-04:00'
describe
'469' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIK' 'sip-files00007.txt'
d875990f6fadd229f76ecac23b629991
15d373349daac45fb869573bd4c09aca04ef0f85
'2012-05-01T12:03:29-04:00'
describe
'36019' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIL' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
d680f03919be842bf37852df69cfa119
b8240a21cadcc6b8e4dbfaaa845a9e26be78c6af
'2012-05-01T11:57:22-04:00'
describe
'903128' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIM' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
cbdf27f04b95a1c0206cd5afa05bf11c
19e0fc7d39e8b381fee7583bd43d1f47d36dec7a
'2012-05-01T12:11:30-04:00'
describe
'28138' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIN' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
82713803a9f7312413e5b379aee8aace
4128374a8527a7dc44ad77c1df131215994ae199
'2012-05-01T12:03:09-04:00'
describe
'314' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIO' 'sip-files00008.pro'
2935229a86c35dd51535c94782eb1ef7
06e2f4b2d42c58c83a3c08fa10523a0dbd7ec691
'2012-05-01T12:07:49-04:00'
describe
'20979' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIP' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
4838c6f85e24591a0c1699e1317dee03
38ce23faa3ad68badfb350e53053f7523bbacb3c
'2012-05-01T12:00:46-04:00'
describe
'25852124' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIQ' 'sip-files00008.tif'
a420f66fab06f693725489a4475cc503
6fe0ec735f839cfd7c3a8a717f96072a9c6704f5
'2012-05-01T12:05:07-04:00'
describe
'225' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIR' 'sip-files00008.txt'
c30e2d077ac9674789927e6afc8fae97
75dccf16c6349e74d93e99e9c4bd5d7b6c04620c
'2012-05-01T12:02:05-04:00'
describe
'19027' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIS' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
562168ae990acd4bcec5cf114ce63fb6
e1085ba382cef1ff3bc57d88404dc577833ac0e6
'2012-05-01T11:59:33-04:00'
describe
'2017217' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIT' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
0f9a819ca7e3d98d8e7d0fbe69cb60a7
528ed853af96779d9400073c78b5a390b98880b5
'2012-05-01T12:07:59-04:00'
describe
'88576' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIU' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
5abfd3eee8be1008aa6cfe1965ab6eb4
27a4bee41212237efbf3385c336db8738739f801
'2012-05-01T12:11:40-04:00'
describe
'52017' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIV' 'sip-files00009.pro'
1c09be3882145b42643d647b12988188
0ef5095a72e4d4594c638036c4424ab08dc033c9
'2012-05-01T11:56:48-04:00'
describe
'42553' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIW' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
74eb2a2fd3b5a16af24e56e8bcf27906
c67c4984bcbb070cb90ff131f775d4b55a6e0743
'2012-05-01T12:08:43-04:00'
describe
'26078428' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIX' 'sip-files00009.tif'
723c96d2f0801663249785baf293ba61
9933c950c08fb6c271fd874506bf0c3403cdcb86
'2012-05-01T12:06:12-04:00'
describe
'2545' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIY' 'sip-files00009.txt'
1325e8e9d845f7da1236045a71f8ab73
9899a7059fac334dc25a576493c0a0586f88d013
'2012-05-01T12:03:46-04:00'
describe
'25815' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYIZ' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
03ac20ff6297324866927e45075e7906
74b177b8619ecef25b4bfc74a5cfb438b7c61c26
'2012-05-01T11:56:36-04:00'
describe
'943120' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJA' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
58e742d8f933f7b28ac26aeed06f7b84
7e7c42bc4a3a2a703988406760b2d3aff0e46a8b
'2012-05-01T12:03:18-04:00'
describe
'52743' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJB' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
bc3b0e91e3e747a0756b9df1f79f18f1
13b0249dc5966652fb08cf72d006eaa8f57fb34b
'2012-05-01T12:03:10-04:00'
describe
'23024' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJC' 'sip-files00010.pro'
7e0211a4ea91d616cc0e5d5766092249
76cd5d8a1a3d9b4feaf96ffd8f82886c8da8c6b0
'2012-05-01T12:08:22-04:00'
describe
'30328' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJD' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
4b3942e69c6d2f30e8fe740a006d178c
0a09dcbb52276a061926b5be9bc34ad0608b012b
'2012-05-01T11:58:04-04:00'
describe
'25366264' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJE' 'sip-files00010.tif'
0b186a808807788344aac44233122784
c561eed39764d0d2837bca5bb50b7f51de3860c3
'2012-05-01T11:59:07-04:00'
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJF' 'sip-files00010.txt'
e15f1ffc18ba1b57f1c46e14c21be722
467f281b69436124da6b0074a6e36c9e195803fc
'2012-05-01T11:58:44-04:00'
describe
'21904' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJG' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
632a4f1c561855e40ae84a68129fd549
382bf6784a52d3aaf06bd14998ffb2284ab4c9b7
'2012-05-01T12:03:50-04:00'
describe
'2813010' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJH' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
643fec3b09ec34c20ac87810f4301696
ab06c13bce2b6609bfc39b63e4b12d16e2c7af02
'2012-05-01T12:12:16-04:00'
describe
'118858' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJI' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
80f2987c407766be68b3285c5f81c5dd
cbd2197ac9b29f257387679547e98c9d8e829ae6
'2012-05-01T11:59:19-04:00'
describe
'29414' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJJ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
23e7a3f6f00eb37a31430b80708766d3
997e3659774c3c57043e2d8c9697eaaa22969de3
'2012-05-01T12:02:08-04:00'
describe
'52946' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJK' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
a751991862a3956d0c987911fecad0e5
c8573757943e1b8469b7de43e34c64cb972d7e38
'2012-05-01T12:03:17-04:00'
describe
'25856112' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJL' 'sip-files00011.tif'
38d283ba73b9486f89743ae0d803bd27
7a68603124ccc6ad33117fa9a268e50570e532d1
'2012-05-01T12:04:22-04:00'
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJM' 'sip-files00011.txt'
cb4d8c10e23cc164734609e3fbfb147c
57abb701058da6c03c3295f54c595336f28f04f7
describe
'29220' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJN' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
4d1a550847944771f354ae70a73ead8e
b28d67d02fcdbe5cdfda4fdd752dccfbdd77049f
'2012-05-01T12:11:35-04:00'
describe
'3198789' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJO' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
bddc5628053461e1eec8e04321247c96
8acd29fd7763fb097d1e3402620995825a6b21f0
'2012-05-01T12:09:25-04:00'
describe
'157977' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJP' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
35316d4ff874d8359d31023455ad0c4d
1be3ceaaffed5c54fd522fcfb1313fd2402bae56
'2012-05-01T12:12:30-04:00'
describe
'50288' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJQ' 'sip-files00012.pro'
ac6319b0845a99d5113de50d04db47f6
5700b118e41566db858078a38da09452d68b686c
'2012-05-01T11:59:05-04:00'
describe
'67752' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJR' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
078c15b08972f4b153fd7736319dcfb2
59549d2ead672aa25efcd13e96007f791f1a315b
'2012-05-01T11:57:55-04:00'
describe
'25613544' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJS' 'sip-files00012.tif'
2df362e05ea4aa2edf3009719d87ba80
608b90a4c01f8a164a9f87a083700a64f83ddde2
'2012-05-01T12:06:52-04:00'
describe
'1990' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJT' 'sip-files00012.txt'
07f233b3fe40921981e41330b02fc122
d3d32a3bcc6e0e9719ade15913d156e9dc0c8e00
'2012-05-01T11:58:43-04:00'
describe
'33259' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJU' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
8a1ff1e084ced1e3f280e71c034d40af
4a81fbc0df6152d0d2a0385c3c7b0300b0052e7a
'2012-05-01T11:57:35-04:00'
describe
'3229279' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJV' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
1f6e1767d4ff5c8635cd73d66b189374
73d268f7e59bcdbd4623cefb5bf298d20a2709da
'2012-05-01T12:11:09-04:00'
describe
'161162' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJW' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
1fed61509ae2448aaa28b090f60d0083
2d22dee9ec114dc4125af47cb85de00524e272f5
'2012-05-01T12:08:09-04:00'
describe
'4390' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJX' 'sip-files00013.pro'
33c5f436deffb0d44edc5b1af69afd47
69ec8ebe121abf8a2ffa97f6c1dd7ae0b780722b
'2012-05-01T12:11:28-04:00'
describe
'54585' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJY' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
2b66df2d04d4329c88cc13537f329956
471accc62769bb5e1d0842f2d385835eabbda4e1
'2012-05-01T12:07:35-04:00'
describe
'25855860' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYJZ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
578b222848abf19b392f2776f5694b3b
43813739157a70339e2136dd76f9f27ac65a60fc
'2012-05-01T12:00:59-04:00'
describe
'202' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKA' 'sip-files00013.txt'
c46f89b3089b55b0d080e52f015a862e
b9c40d5d92022f09b6f20759445a670ad549a562
'2012-05-01T12:09:30-04:00'
describe
'29553' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKB' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
b08a9533378f26edcb6307637638902c
9fc9f87ed54addfe245d11b4b4adccf67261eb92
'2012-05-01T12:10:37-04:00'
describe
'3198778' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKC' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
fa105986bc98397e302edcda0b479bbe
ccb3c75024339565282eadf9f9fad5cfa071e07e
'2012-05-01T12:04:54-04:00'
describe
'165345' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKD' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
e3864e5ad2ddfdd7e31f0fe5d2eddc38
510f7139c8ea47b6810adf68db5e8782b92893e9
'2012-05-01T11:59:29-04:00'
describe
'51567' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKE' 'sip-files00014.pro'
602f2b411919e604cc292b1acc48894c
aae927e8259757633e031e42a201e1bd80ff2fd0
'2012-05-01T11:57:58-04:00'
describe
'68977' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKF' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
7f6812117f136ecd8abc7604bfc039e0
6b269cf3e3e922752175c38af833c1fc4e7310ca
'2012-05-01T11:59:37-04:00'
describe
'25613568' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKG' 'sip-files00014.tif'
e5ea11d7358b11210d31c3f7edd0be14
4b9818d153e3f0782f9a7bb8484d2ec8a531a601
'2012-05-01T12:10:20-04:00'
describe
'2058' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKH' 'sip-files00014.txt'
31df492df76635dc5ab0c718d03f3ae2
a290d33dd1da040d3515399fefe918b79705ea6a
'2012-05-01T12:12:03-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'33472' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKI' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
08161c73d7312638b418775fadb21111
9e2236dd9a0eb4b2635d83b68692cf59eaed896a
'2012-05-01T11:58:38-04:00'
describe
'3229295' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKJ' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
b3ea10919196f25ff62134240c5d44bd
88cc53547f656a6ed3a49ffdb6c6f1cc8139102e
'2012-05-01T11:58:32-04:00'
describe
'180205' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKK' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
a560fe095a0a7f7b85ebc8a4e3d98d93
865a8f21fb48d4075e9120d94f3efbae68f5124d
'2012-05-01T12:04:17-04:00'
describe
'3322' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKL' 'sip-files00015.pro'
3587aef990b79aa8440282f41c2af6ac
17b5eea649d47f189ae59e15eb9675d3201c4223
'2012-05-01T12:03:04-04:00'
describe
'60346' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKM' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
37b3a55060ee6850562f386bd605df8b
acbb26a1dad8557ee6e0734f9e20a1fce1e12e71
'2012-05-01T12:04:59-04:00'
describe
'25857024' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKN' 'sip-files00015.tif'
9c69964c87f670cc1061d3050e056833
745a69e3034a80c722a45409918728e50e0934c6
'2012-05-01T12:04:24-04:00'
describe
'255' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKO' 'sip-files00015.txt'
79ca98fa33b0a89a8d90f09b2e6f1c74
a89e9a026cd1f134b0cd6964f279b58155468e6d
'2012-05-01T12:11:26-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'31977' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKP' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
f59ebd3e650fd21726405cc17970d180
9eb570c33f11ccde79ffae589b7702abda813309
'2012-05-01T12:05:11-04:00'
describe
'3198790' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKQ' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
5a026a4d52cc62df87d11e6e1a6b85ee
5949563288be404275f74ba321fc609b530bc33d
'2012-05-01T12:06:48-04:00'
describe
'158489' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKR' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
1cc3ba28a39af5717e8581142269fe6b
24f259b4f10447a400132209d498c43b1ead8aad
'2012-05-01T12:01:49-04:00'
describe
'50247' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKS' 'sip-files00016.pro'
21222dc73cf1ebb37c274fc4fab699cc
7db3f73039339dec690efad0f881f34c646a962c
'2012-05-01T12:08:39-04:00'
describe
'65374' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKT' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
a2561c000833387c2d40f6870594f354
38b37b3fdee00e10ebf848c98ba3016d4df3f0ff
describe
'25613116' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKU' 'sip-files00016.tif'
1229c37a706fb6a0092c47ebb79c6ef3
30c49b41ea84263de584675fdcd112cbe67aabf0
'2012-05-01T11:56:45-04:00'
describe
'1994' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKV' 'sip-files00016.txt'
6b05a89be3b97c915b110f2cfce390b6
d01e8792e145bdc2d5f20e20c97001eb3c5dc522
'2012-05-01T11:59:59-04:00'
describe
'32147' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKW' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
fdf8b1d9d600ef5f91c89457d46f764b
2254f05705715e27e8a36f54944bea86329f80c2
'2012-05-01T11:57:30-04:00'
describe
'3229305' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKX' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
b4778fcb55dcecb97908ff9e2ba0a08c
5aadd93aa0dcb9b6732b6929fc0f725425adf30e
'2012-05-01T12:01:52-04:00'
describe
'180762' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKY' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
af78132736b832a5b7a5eca1606a6936
6f35da49e86b5a90cb48b8ee49752cdb8049beac
'2012-05-01T12:02:56-04:00'
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYKZ' 'sip-files00017.pro'
21ab58e5099ba6f83583c213ec23597b
4ae54020b848584333f4ca58790fbc8fb9df250a
'2012-05-01T12:11:51-04:00'
describe
'59283' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLA' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
d05ef20f4861bc0c20c226387ed47f42
08596acca0df2a88964a1ca9ed21c78ca6b50781
'2012-05-01T11:57:29-04:00'
describe
'25856740' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLB' 'sip-files00017.tif'
6cfa5f1129eadf7fea115bf2e7601c28
f11d3ca7c3092490a7c764bed026b2c068081bb4
'2012-05-01T12:09:16-04:00'
describe
'198' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLC' 'sip-files00017.txt'
2faa6e19cc7457185a47a787cf6d1505
a311858dc5582cd33f73f3d5830272dfb77151f8
'2012-05-01T11:56:43-04:00'
describe
'31494' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLD' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
554c2ceb4a791cb47b7d5e707e258ff5
906da88b02b216962ad88ee514baeaf5abd3acfc
'2012-05-01T12:08:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLE' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
daf37406e8378583575bf2eb8218939c
ea1d7681622669136b8a91c6e9f395782edc4e0a
'2012-05-01T11:56:29-04:00'
describe
'164851' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLF' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
35cefc94acf0435760f051ef897b2d97
004ff0e86468407bc0978d9d48b9568f1994abe0
'2012-05-01T12:07:18-04:00'
describe
'51394' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLG' 'sip-files00018.pro'
5f364a2a2369eb3a2b2af6a16624ef46
85a983b2374c5e88feacadaa26f085633333cf3d
'2012-05-01T12:03:08-04:00'
describe
'66943' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLH' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
4c27b6ae208c275de2f18dbb34785048
600ffd7b85a0a7f67b81708008359be37c49d90a
'2012-05-01T12:06:05-04:00'
describe
'25613236' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLI' 'sip-files00018.tif'
3a98b1b31fae7430b5b8db8770921363
f407206cf241e809b3470ab839919a6fc23fd743
describe
'2062' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLJ' 'sip-files00018.txt'
9e586f340eea08d5254f4925b9de2b95
15ae1e7669ea0178b52982ce4d7b97a5f3f56e32
'2012-05-01T12:03:21-04:00'
describe
'32847' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLK' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
d90b5bbc81633a99e199924f17c01108
559c2f41b83e7406b3b90277dff3951a72b182a6
'2012-05-01T12:06:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLL' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
2bcaa808820f7d853cd22aac63b42393
3be9aa2a8655e39c4acc8a443421c7d4afb8fd97
'2012-05-01T12:04:03-04:00'
describe
'180490' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLM' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
091b57e227d4bb1b641b7dca95956ccb
18ae10199c1605df1bccd5f37dc4bcb37b162eaa
'2012-05-01T12:00:45-04:00'
describe
'14602' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLN' 'sip-files00019.pro'
5d6b71c4eb3fddf8d26bfbb2b614b8a1
1ebd419448d278362204f6b76714d6a8a570d899
'2012-05-01T12:07:11-04:00'
describe
'61010' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLO' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
13b3ad417d6354354231fc5989708507
288b7eaba3cbc4b2050ef247c2925215f2d793ea
'2012-05-01T12:03:12-04:00'
describe
'25857152' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLP' 'sip-files00019.tif'
4074876af268b227639e9f8be0f1b07e
5c567d169637240c7427f5fd2f0efa22317a6ac7
'2012-05-01T12:02:01-04:00'
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLQ' 'sip-files00019.txt'
380f8d1b4f9b05ce187eb5fafd69a76e
83159cb77140270781e231682201eec7c378c674
describe
Invalid character
'32169' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLR' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
2716356e5e6097f6ba2d049d5a3ded48
747b8fca16fbeb825c7e577d3aceca0650da1ea6
'2012-05-01T12:06:44-04:00'
describe
'3198777' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLS' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
5f573a92aff6e8de9b4941a1998bac38
7a40804f0873f0199bcf477876b78a310a53cd09
'2012-05-01T11:57:23-04:00'
describe
'133162' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLT' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
3505e23289d45345fd31911b424e0b75
adcf070e03287d7f0185eea0dc31ff46e352595a
'2012-05-01T12:11:54-04:00'
describe
'20366' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLU' 'sip-files00020.pro'
9139795c9433a6516c062a60e254d688
a26bf7c6b569f3ca90cd4c3ece9ba9dc6fb7804b
'2012-05-01T12:03:56-04:00'
describe
'51892' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLV' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
4a78a1cac0794b0e30977efe9da04929
072404d3521239969b0ea6db7398bc900271747e
'2012-05-01T12:02:17-04:00'
describe
'25611376' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLW' 'sip-files00020.tif'
7a2a5e026df63a3966055e2edf4eafdf
e44b0ba156ce578d201fe0b58cb3731dbefa637f
'2012-05-01T11:57:43-04:00'
describe
'820' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLX' 'sip-files00020.txt'
dc6ae365b8302a800c4e35aa5fdf1803
70b95b407f7c6e534411398ad66c91987476cabe
'2012-05-01T11:58:51-04:00'
describe
'28473' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLY' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
7fd5e30cfafd54761e6397addcf41f80
cd9a5a390f1b9ad1fdd51e1a658ce8098ef2c145
'2012-05-01T12:10:05-04:00'
describe
'3206372' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYLZ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
c6af02505c619ec93bf6c32703fde1fc
b0409d0f5412fc007034155dc6a063e46a9b6f14
'2012-05-01T12:05:09-04:00'
describe
'162671' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMA' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
a07c59ba8b45c5f3c0151d60a6688805
066b17a4ee24e10915d0010062be2a649e998eb8
'2012-05-01T12:07:55-04:00'
describe
'11091' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMB' 'sip-files00021.pro'
c58273dd36079a2f79344d8b28058805
2ad596fbd1f8ebeacfcd4b1753d00d7793d28fc2
'2012-05-01T11:59:31-04:00'
describe
'57385' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMC' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
995d59d9b37362ef475f7d7ec2a0bdcc
1924ce77719df7e334d3e18da358aadda33f061b
'2012-05-01T12:02:24-04:00'
describe
'25672860' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMD' 'sip-files00021.tif'
1411633e80b27a96501a8236e9f2cf91
a976a0665d56b884a35dec41374ee5ab2486adb5
'2012-05-01T12:10:52-04:00'
describe
'455' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYME' 'sip-files00021.txt'
ddbdc74faa85e2d6ec416776f17afdf3
cce2327d97630e515b291a6ccadca39165157898
'2012-05-01T12:04:28-04:00'
describe
'30757' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMF' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
3e8876f624e6e80440a46f78a2985d00
081c848a0e64499252ad5863d9b38e214dc9fec4
'2012-05-01T12:06:27-04:00'
describe
'3198784' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMG' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
ead196341cf11aafb5882ae5730eeeb3
9ed5e53e630634ba63fd3b291e5ea2baf89859cf
'2012-05-01T11:59:54-04:00'
describe
'154955' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMH' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
e5594d2686eeebe86ada76ad54216a46
6a57d162655abdf9c7fe8fc28e6c1078aa7e35f7
'2012-05-01T12:08:23-04:00'
describe
'49008' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMI' 'sip-files00022.pro'
64aee2c8b642f8f64e90228e15e1c2da
83c375265cb74adb5bc0876afe36be87aef66567
'2012-05-01T12:11:46-04:00'
describe
'65338' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMJ' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
9072188ddde872601afcbb5438571885
bd6cd209ce90173645c1516ab3bb978a3073d2a8
'2012-05-01T12:07:22-04:00'
describe
'25612832' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMK' 'sip-files00022.tif'
bb507e6faf68d444dfa076bdd8774d81
a4b452bffd75105bfdaa1533f7fca8259acdf4a7
'2012-05-01T12:08:46-04:00'
describe
'1945' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYML' 'sip-files00022.txt'
db08d576135e029dd6ed10e8bb757b48
236684c3ab642dd592fb661fc121debf562c917c
'2012-05-01T12:02:53-04:00'
describe
'32148' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMM' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
c7570b7f89ae89da5127a17490040734
03d4367f03fead94007a713c6e685f0f832c10f0
'2012-05-01T12:06:57-04:00'
describe
'3229312' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMN' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
220ce871b0b760e07f9f569ecf48fbf2
0f62ccfb328bef0bed275b1864563bb0bc680171
'2012-05-01T11:59:38-04:00'
describe
'176956' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMO' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
2bff0e771dc1ec1a5f8cc2144c452c0b
b2a04fb0b3933b681040683abd22c85dfa717368
'2012-05-01T12:11:45-04:00'
describe
'22162' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMP' 'sip-files00023.pro'
d195037d208967dd7dd10eab7ee6882d
e5cfaabfd3ed1d26d959780f343d939d86c086dc
'2012-05-01T12:09:36-04:00'
describe
'63629' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMQ' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
4f5652aa59efa3aa47ad726498a35b76
780c71a0e79458c8f62fab45bbb169fc4b220993
'2012-05-01T11:59:35-04:00'
describe
'25857092' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMR' 'sip-files00023.tif'
8814fa137aa1cf1afbf9f5e64e92c4aa
09121eadc1facd98a96741b36b4d34783d3fa9fd
'2012-05-01T12:09:33-04:00'
describe
'890' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMS' 'sip-files00023.txt'
631bbd4a37d95b96ed1395096c9deba7
85665828fead6c2ab650ed892a0af8212561a634
'2012-05-01T12:03:55-04:00'
describe
'32476' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMT' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
852786199a5c2b9a8a543cc54d5da3e9
f80743ffb53205ac7b86a7e908316d7049a50339
'2012-05-01T11:59:42-04:00'
describe
'3198788' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMU' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
59028bb6b3495938b5403b8c189136ef
eaba6a01af59a9d332fc6aecfa958f7228d5a085
'2012-05-01T11:59:04-04:00'
describe
'167028' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMV' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
4f98b67d7d34e907dff9aff850157279
ee938fefde0caa9b1a771f0f865743168aa62fc3
describe
'53012' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMW' 'sip-files00024.pro'
5d79fdce1f907d43b7a41a0e6abaa9ef
bd7dc5bb8f48a8b6ccce2f3d45eefc3eae892a95
'2012-05-01T12:04:16-04:00'
describe
'68007' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMX' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
f610777d3c1f3b8cd662efeb73d650fd
dda87fa6554648b8038548fcb39dea96d5c92679
'2012-05-01T12:10:08-04:00'
describe
'25613380' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMY' 'sip-files00024.tif'
372669ee97bb56746bdc395cc8c62fc6
af6f5d368f165d2624c8353fd873f1d221ccb761
'2012-05-01T12:08:26-04:00'
describe
'2092' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYMZ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
9a788238eb16cb5b329edc7e1d56b488
b6416af0b6a229f797ef1d21d3f1a2159f06dc35
'2012-05-01T11:59:39-04:00'
describe
'32894' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNA' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
bebd70e4ef77f55fb66fd6fef83d7740
5ef3870098eec265d684e799420411f3517f5eb7
'2012-05-01T12:09:43-04:00'
describe
'3229313' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNB' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
7e809484fcff0371069340e073852d42
4997acef595a70f15b70b8c9b6aabb3643d5c414
'2012-05-01T11:57:54-04:00'
describe
'148303' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNC' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
4cedf6835959368e6817792f0ff6ea63
a38aa3fb79fda98e782c1e124f8e18a62691249e
'2012-05-01T12:03:03-04:00'
describe
'19732' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYND' 'sip-files00025.pro'
c01e5e6924c35e7ce72e9d903e490cd5
ba84ebb5e8b906cd669f00aa5894fe96aff51998
describe
'53443' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNE' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
66fed74b9c985c83a08c1b57a2ebe8e7
24bc6cc4bcada38310ac3e7bfcbeef88c1f1ced1
'2012-05-01T12:05:52-04:00'
describe
'25855816' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNF' 'sip-files00025.tif'
89f173ed82a133abfa1bc2be80138835
f5fe36d4032dbdacec51c95b20c62d9b289ccbca
'2012-05-01T12:05:21-04:00'
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNG' 'sip-files00025.txt'
1aa6509bdf47d39d15f91363a8298970
541ff69f66b6324e97d73de9708ba2a1cebffea1
'2012-05-01T11:58:54-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'29477' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNH' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
1d08520be46d63f89a959ef1f4ea56fe
912fc8c49ca36b747485e10aa617a35fd4d4b27d
describe
'2095574' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNI' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
898396d94d85cc46a4b95531ceaf018d
165c767c4f9e593ed566872c076ef079b806d44f
'2012-05-01T12:05:49-04:00'
describe
'98148' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNJ' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
6439ce632a158e3adbaacbb0d7c689a5
5ae1a514e0f56c5d0d5c2a513ef908ad1b2f9d53
'2012-05-01T12:06:39-04:00'
describe
'26846' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNK' 'sip-files00026.pro'
fb635375ed83a3acfe459ea20fd7194c
53caffb77be20fe40f25c3f70a9a5ba943b4b806
'2012-05-01T12:06:16-04:00'
describe
'44970' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNL' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
cc91dac7b3cceafeed31142d87f6ed76
3dcac7583951aba06fda3690d272ca43105e833d
'2012-05-01T11:58:55-04:00'
describe
'25610640' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNM' 'sip-files00026.tif'
02227710ea83b4ee69e6f43232b8b434
3c9259f26c1da32da17d8c007593c429e5e76236
'2012-05-01T11:56:33-04:00'
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNN' 'sip-files00026.txt'
7ee36089f39ec6a9be6361d7370b1c83
bb5380d5895455a1c0dd3a76b4e949af737bde85
'2012-05-01T12:02:50-04:00'
describe
'26308' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNO' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
b8492989c619497f29b682c575b97139
2c0f3a721d9b7165b023c1160c0d81acf9aa7a4b
'2012-05-01T11:58:35-04:00'
describe
'3229307' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNP' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
dee744acc44d9b72a3e89a0b3888a5b3
da3bee1ac6d356ac31e413bb71b918888c5ba071
'2012-05-01T12:09:09-04:00'
describe
'126964' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNQ' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
b989a31429724f99a0bd1e1c0f8243f1
527a48faefee21f821153f7e16ab655b6c32566c
'2012-05-01T12:12:22-04:00'
describe
'31385' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNR' 'sip-files00027.pro'
e09230fc15905e0608e59d592d43f678
2e6dfd8855ef40275def220253dbb78babd6b208
'2012-05-01T12:03:44-04:00'
describe
'54748' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNS' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
e8107cd5055f08d453eb400cdb7256e7
c08d9d2787584fc7e69e6bbd19712bb4341f677d
'2012-05-01T12:09:41-04:00'
describe
'25856596' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNT' 'sip-files00027.tif'
378c1768c96d328a7df28d5a9a38ec74
43df32fc065bb7aff69ba21e6b9e0e8a1ab6a810
'2012-05-01T11:59:10-04:00'
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNU' 'sip-files00027.txt'
3e4c7254e1ae3878d0f418bf94b84fec
6d45461fa29e08d9633ad98b3159d17cf7985a97
'2012-05-01T12:06:13-04:00'
describe
'29910' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNV' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
dc91fd660e443181f974aa9609f15fe5
3e75b397898fd531bdb8bce6dceb9a706af8af7a
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNW' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
e453aead95b4676186e7b47265c9f6a1
1c67e1d09b8a102d5a9238e2a2ad9b04caf34957
'2012-05-01T11:58:13-04:00'
describe
'155158' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNX' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
a3fb2d3ed568a1e755beb4b08b0dd8b0
aa814506f7f5267432e408ce56341dd26fb3c37e
'2012-05-01T12:02:47-04:00'
describe
'46735' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNY' 'sip-files00028.pro'
34b7d7b995a882245faf35721701c027
7b83555de203b57f935ce49952dd93423f725721
'2012-05-01T12:08:03-04:00'
describe
'65119' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYNZ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
144b22491f2653edcf9811828d3760ab
421ad8bb62b78b19d5539e8ac6582313b6be71ed
'2012-05-01T12:01:13-04:00'
describe
'25613284' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOA' 'sip-files00028.tif'
a28bfc422c8d830d348d9bffabba1b47
b59e18228824572ce79a285de598a17eca16f65e
'2012-05-01T12:05:17-04:00'
describe
'1911' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOB' 'sip-files00028.txt'
742c5672ecebf6de3dbe3b5dd930bd5a
f5ed99c63ee68c935eb38c860b5810f19e4b8012
describe
'32876' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOC' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
98c7d3d68582a4b2e69639209b29a34e
543315eab45579aae77f48e63045dd7570333a0d
'2012-05-01T11:58:05-04:00'
describe
'3229300' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOD' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
39dd35d3b101728e7cd0229ebe2c0f9a
a3bf83d391776633ad60a14858e2b9986c892d49
'2012-05-01T12:04:09-04:00'
describe
'193802' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOE' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
7bd5dac9a2c47308fd53657c8b1ae8a2
3a475e173bf77b525c4622f44dd90d18388339c4
'2012-05-01T12:09:50-04:00'
describe
'2049' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOF' 'sip-files00029.pro'
dc9b11c847e1552ae7ae207295beaa2a
0f5de715f6bc899297d5f2e5e1b762baf1eb45bf
'2012-05-01T12:07:40-04:00'
describe
'63703' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOG' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
df1aec4550ddd65b995092b0a16d3eac
582e2134bd0371bdcf381383aef17bf0cdd3778d
'2012-05-01T12:09:56-04:00'
describe
'25857440' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOH' 'sip-files00029.tif'
96235edc6286068a397a32097ff3e0fc
a95e1e1e870d2eed60726edf4bf454a4a569670a
'2012-05-01T12:10:45-04:00'
describe
'93' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOI' 'sip-files00029.txt'
e619ff525adbcc4f8eabaddff3330404
1f3338e8807e8dcf2f18e941ca25d461b868a35c
'2012-05-01T12:01:35-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'32988' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOJ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
3ebf712a1df18499812eabb106464a9b
9d5aafe2ce1911dd774c95870f08f88fe2c97755
'2012-05-01T12:05:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOK' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
00e87ff1f4f0f68bdec2d574997f533b
c7af40fb82393d3824520078fb2ca742fbe7988e
'2012-05-01T12:11:18-04:00'
describe
'171009' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOL' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
6272adc5e91daa1f54512754e987823f
38c50ad30531a9696d22cfc901802f7d41f554df
'2012-05-01T12:08:40-04:00'
describe
'51634' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOM' 'sip-files00030.pro'
52336ebcd12a4f2b14b35540aa4aad6b
fba0533cc48078567b18c004d48dba1d43b1f28e
'2012-05-01T12:06:35-04:00'
describe
'70326' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYON' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
6031c4c3a0e7334cf98a3228df96d544
d39c8a948e3d0fc45118acc8eed01aec656568c6
'2012-05-01T12:06:40-04:00'
describe
'25613592' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOO' 'sip-files00030.tif'
9734a654b405cd3ac5ed6a5447d1f655
390a6c203b319afd7a9661d2b355514f042eca76
'2012-05-01T12:10:50-04:00'
describe
'2039' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOP' 'sip-files00030.txt'
c29c0188bc9e257de5015d5f5b540b5b
37d69c440fbd602d11b800db4f8599f507f6e22e
'2012-05-01T11:58:16-04:00'
describe
'33642' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOQ' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
e71dcfdbdb94ce4ad10c5cf6eb632bb3
e06f8193fc8bdee3809cf71667eab1bc43ea271a
describe
'3228879' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOR' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
7d9c0e36e8fde19f62c829dab356a64a
2869286f9c88ab3e53dde038bb25cc4403d61789
describe
'180045' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOS' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
a35829fa7d867f5b3137aeb29e85d4e4
0b88f3d1f1d7cf84cb86dbea59967d075f0d4ab7
'2012-05-01T12:01:57-04:00'
describe
'24056' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOT' 'sip-files00031.pro'
a7de9c741aee27924530362c3bad0bdc
3dc233f32e94b8bb04b87c6ef5c842d92f5f6910
describe
'58552' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOU' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
e70b15175147951e40e53f462c71fa21
cbe3266094a0f700714bac74cd2dbfe097ecee9e
describe
'25856252' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOV' 'sip-files00031.tif'
829ce2a5a90a01c75bc5cde17af1d45d
0f2cda5e21d5ad6ac6955d3ab9e6ed0eb91210f8
'2012-05-01T12:09:07-04:00'
describe
'2023' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOW' 'sip-files00031.txt'
518afbe3814709169c49cb93d033fe3f
5beec484d89f9ced0f188430a8864d612178a5e4
describe
Invalid character
'30549' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOX' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
c70d4304deeec7471a4abc37b1b952d5
cdfbdbf9020c05af64451627353607fc8e2fd83f
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOY' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
159ae431fb0010eb289fdc7a157422b4
5e401af842c83833dd6c8c6c255eebdb8a7139b9
'2012-05-01T12:09:24-04:00'
describe
'174939' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYOZ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
28c40f58febe07c46c510ea9bb07441b
9548cf265a61c253a92df5a1994fe830577843ba
'2012-05-01T12:01:59-04:00'
describe
'50830' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPA' 'sip-files00032.pro'
721e80331beb5417143b3ec54203f42f
74b15ee460295a8f1db3b55da53d0366f72a5c9d
'2012-05-01T12:02:45-04:00'
describe
'71311' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPB' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
f086130b818f79b999253696c9892128
974a626138ad1820fd3e1645257eb35b1fa47838
describe
'25614044' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPC' 'sip-files00032.tif'
a0d63b9f640e1e73d036fa39a7263ab2
e11f2c37c6896610a2ae06ea0c672b2207acd469
'2012-05-01T12:04:52-04:00'
describe
'2011' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPD' 'sip-files00032.txt'
57b381f325bb0ea16e3e858a60c9217e
7d6511fbfd3fabed0a8fe4027f16c6c6c08adc57
'2012-05-01T12:02:48-04:00'
describe
'34128' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPE' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
cc22459cf5727daa854da5f2b03431e9
587c9cbe50cb23e0002052b0cb1fc7fbadfe1243
describe
'3229268' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPF' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
4ab116380ae247f0913d711467fd9f7b
549c9a15024501b012a033e30f47094b7c1d23cc
'2012-05-01T12:02:09-04:00'
describe
'172439' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPG' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
9c6fd955dc3b7b3222a636bc03960415
d3a3eee686f30b3846daaae194f7be17fd15c1ee
'2012-05-01T12:05:40-04:00'
describe
'8216' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPH' 'sip-files00033.pro'
364074e759a10adf6394eca7f006864e
52627110690acf37498109c124184a579caf96ae
'2012-05-01T12:10:38-04:00'
describe
'57710' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPI' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
83f8ac15aa60f57e9aab916cc587aba9
0c209eb163e5aeaca135238eacc78bd1d5070f88
'2012-05-01T12:03:07-04:00'
describe
'25856344' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPJ' 'sip-files00033.tif'
d7ebe34948128df06851cae5f3e42641
10de1a16b4b4459637f56b4fddecd63d4497d873
describe
'626' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPK' 'sip-files00033.txt'
bc91d7d96d9fdc68a9a45d488eacb976
775bf2b622f319023f9bcae65fc939926e9e08f1
'2012-05-01T12:03:11-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'30581' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPL' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
c3f133d58c814640fca179e91e66bebc
c99ef49e812ecd8cbcd664e8812501b3417f07ae
'2012-05-01T11:58:26-04:00'
describe
'3198786' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPM' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
e197e15f3e39984a05ae8821f47e2553
600cf01e0c5e08bed2fb49515840eb9a8b658e45
'2012-05-01T12:11:20-04:00'
describe
'165142' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPN' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
ee1a4798c815e1d0e7e56f80de1fefb1
8e57126095ac8227937d680bd8970b9a6b13943f
'2012-05-01T12:11:02-04:00'
describe
'49930' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPO' 'sip-files00034.pro'
0e55a5bb71bb6c43212d565c1a96ff8c
054748e16aaa30c13d0edcbe42efe7b998a43346
'2012-05-01T12:10:13-04:00'
describe
'68252' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPP' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
75fa48164582db5c2640403957262353
d84fbe76bca1dd3c9457dc32df99ee0af4822719
'2012-05-01T11:59:11-04:00'
describe
'25613648' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPQ' 'sip-files00034.tif'
73493089b87950c392d28cb75496078d
9cac9000133695c71364a1fd099b6e983e3ed4b9
'2012-05-01T12:04:33-04:00'
describe
'1983' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPR' 'sip-files00034.txt'
845e082bb19fb2e339f3871db9fffb2c
2eaa6fe8664fbbf8eda72b27566fbaee06eb66bd
'2012-05-01T12:02:18-04:00'
describe
'33531' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPS' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
f0a8bb9050312fe6d2dc0329c871306e
6359eb3429c428dcba59d3d2cd9017f36254ea27
'2012-05-01T11:59:52-04:00'
describe
'3229311' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPT' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
647eb699ffe6daca70699aefed634fbd
574a9c1b15854c6de0275258be6cc92ed7f6338b
describe
'160695' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPU' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
b569c7ef2c9a061f61086b5916317c21
38423b9eb300e3e692afe11d8746c0962486465a
'2012-05-01T11:59:51-04:00'
describe
'7000' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPV' 'sip-files00035.pro'
c7348281dafc4648515ff2cf615daf99
6b8d4cfdc2a74cb6077c8c1cbe0b666142c0e95e
'2012-05-01T11:57:44-04:00'
describe
'56496' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPW' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
837ff9ba3ac4bd3d364466fa79833efa
21e09380945e32c737e5be1f8d0ad36763c8f955
'2012-05-01T12:00:53-04:00'
describe
'77523688' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPX' 'sip-files00035.tif'
22f8b6ed49f2747c42bb928341e4c0ef
51b481ca994fcd4eec6e11278d17cbbf5bc0c37d
'2012-05-01T12:07:46-04:00'
describe
'378' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPY' 'sip-files00035.txt'
431473d168a0bf6623b05a5c10f849da
9a8a15527164801927c5022791820f5e93cab047
'2012-05-01T11:57:31-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'31013' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYPZ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
6b201c15214fb4c53fbd004ebb8d3d4c
b29216a3ad5ec602ad5fd2375ee0e9735924c0df
'2012-05-01T12:11:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQA' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
de19156987838fd5cbc43a08e4ee8b23
41a7d2a46df24a5f00e258694ede741be98aa7c3
'2012-05-01T12:04:35-04:00'
describe
'165280' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQB' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
0ca0f7cfbde2b459b7757f373cb4086c
9894d8d1637ca4b543d044eb8255c9a41634e732
describe
'48419' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQC' 'sip-files00036.pro'
7edb51f54894334319e4c0da8e0ac7c5
63a06336bb967dea7c70a6e121de3a99038306f1
'2012-05-01T12:12:34-04:00'
describe
'67818' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQD' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
06f3f8c7217e77fe2631f881a6a6f857
5fb0e505bd8116bbab4a74d40679f3fe915454e0
'2012-05-01T12:11:44-04:00'
describe
'25613700' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQE' 'sip-files00036.tif'
cd35faa3519935aa33e3b0c063d6d89b
b4a6903684b67365e6048686e8afc40d9b273432
'2012-05-01T12:10:26-04:00'
describe
'1915' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQF' 'sip-files00036.txt'
bee8dc49275d990cba460397e03df8a3
9ba0c1dfc96af993e4f49e93b8094731423bad98
'2012-05-01T12:11:25-04:00'
describe
'33769' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQG' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
4803584a9f7c21d8d59b3cabb54cf0e2
14f26dc80fb8abb4e8842e4dee927f3a5abd59f5
describe
'3167179' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQH' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
e0c7171c4607dd5a2c8dff04d1ed5ead
2a004d04f0769e7e04d0371f18014bf7128228ea
'2012-05-01T11:58:14-04:00'
describe
'177209' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQI' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
fb67282dbcff1782ab5c12a821f8434e
47c029530fe6b432b2c5dc88a9a1372047f83dc4
'2012-05-01T12:07:19-04:00'
describe
'18633' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQJ' 'sip-files00037.pro'
1b0afd7f5e441b76852714b8cf44e77c
8ab58f08518e0c52607c0874aa2492f927c8dcaa
'2012-05-01T12:12:01-04:00'
describe
'63329' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQK' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
fdd39dfe3d71fe73ec33dc0f7e90540f
124819dc2bd9d612f74a866664e4e16417a32205
describe
'76032964' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQL' 'sip-files00037.tif'
c235c4523596cf49e7cbe27be51c3bf8
12c630e9ea166e77f5479f3c23aeec33f9753ea1
'2012-05-01T11:57:49-04:00'
describe
'758' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQM' 'sip-files00037.txt'
ff92c615aeb0739c970f9107ce6b2af4
8b30766e5baa27526c717d0ec4993907f5b0d239
'2012-05-01T12:11:15-04:00'
describe
'32217' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQN' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
03fa73cda4dd7f902174d5088446d093
07f07a05379c29a49d150a29a9659cbfffbc0772
'2012-05-01T12:03:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQO' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
5353c4608889ff568a3922f4e5363d83
6789d3cedd36aa9776c69f1e9eb501d3b5007786
'2012-05-01T12:00:31-04:00'
describe
'166500' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQP' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
6140498351b6ea848b0a04d95cec02b1
758a41b282eb2af4c4caf69740ee0ef4b8cd9e14
describe
'51415' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQQ' 'sip-files00038.pro'
fd1a8654d1f923309572fda129689d62
b352e495908a2cf7c3c4281abcefe4070e71bfc0
describe
'67942' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQR' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
fb8f9a362761ce2f37cb3a9ecdf8fa90
f54bfb1e80fbcdc40c62a2e1ad584b6855072161
'2012-05-01T12:10:12-04:00'
describe
'25613456' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQS' 'sip-files00038.tif'
3de345aca660203cf57f213bdfdb8d73
a8d7de4afd8646f1f3379cfc261ff3ed45e7d693
'2012-05-01T12:06:24-04:00'
describe
'2046' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQT' 'sip-files00038.txt'
391f40271b26f78dfbca56d216f9bdd7
aef447ca3bc8b7f1c5c697d61dc6db7e6b3725e2
'2012-05-01T12:05:42-04:00'
describe
'33244' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQU' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
84907edcb291d9d256d0575a91d53f21
6ff9d4e409a7921d05c08de697eef5a8f7d090ed
'2012-05-01T12:10:22-04:00'
describe
'3229292' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQV' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
addd73fd2cfdb43511b647e697a5a6d4
0a1b721c73c393043331cd182accdf7a4525994b
'2012-05-01T12:08:35-04:00'
describe
'169616' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQW' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
06cfd32b4222ab535ca13ed663783393
238f7ef2fcfde5c7e800414fb28969a614aa9131
'2012-05-01T11:56:37-04:00'
describe
'20772' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQX' 'sip-files00039.pro'
b2808fcc3a36b417d158c6bafe52d474
132eb44ddff3771d1a182459a4c1e1d395bf55b3
'2012-05-01T11:58:56-04:00'
describe
'61538' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQY' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
81322a2af28912c9f5f7b2e4f04771ee
655ad67449ac8c80f5d94a3b6a0d28c41bf85ba2
'2012-05-01T12:00:02-04:00'
describe
'25856852' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYQZ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
e7e3b9951ebc977f98cfdd4cf30338ae
2217c0e2d0e28c2716e723ef24edcb6153bbd33b
'2012-05-01T12:04:00-04:00'
describe
'837' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRA' 'sip-files00039.txt'
9897e90fce5331f771875818f965e8b1
3fe38bef971a1c8e65daeffd39266de7284df561
describe
'31875' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRB' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
576166573be83de6f84a996322efc959
f787c86a20ba1aaafa873543132420b18c4fffa7
'2012-05-01T12:05:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRC' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
0e63ed76a0dc2a7567b5b7a044b7da0e
c91dd024f5c8101fed7ebaa463df4a9d365ba5f1
'2012-05-01T11:57:52-04:00'
describe
'160148' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRD' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
1a97e9dc003d970f55177d359936c541
cca67aea968fbb133b8944b10cb84a7896742003
'2012-05-01T12:07:58-04:00'
describe
'49207' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRE' 'sip-files00040.pro'
6b9adc3d29fed2822dde894710ab4a30
a6731532a34304c9821eac959a1e3fd3151a2f19
'2012-05-01T12:08:50-04:00'
describe
'67648' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRF' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
c18fd24ac0c20f48fedf93edaaeb3c3a
09e8ccc96182457575f5f902fb74798fc1913451
'2012-05-01T12:12:26-04:00'
describe
'25613520' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRG' 'sip-files00040.tif'
51bf328a6d536b984d85c081ccb4ff96
d7aceecda808ae4068b8cce74ec3dd0e81acfdfb
'2012-05-01T12:08:57-04:00'
describe
'2098' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRH' 'sip-files00040.txt'
1fec8b29b70f37c970fc44c8cfbbef7f
22ad772d64cd662aa4df6856e091a7481731f825
'2012-05-01T12:07:33-04:00'
describe
'33301' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRI' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
94c7cdec3ddef411c34079337473b34d
58917f877219254d83b9874e3154501f8dc72ed1
'2012-05-01T11:56:31-04:00'
describe
'3229252' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRJ' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
ad9fe74f5ba593077eff709b4da88ed3
ebfaeaa8b095e5bf7c9880f662881f18d32b8e43
'2012-05-01T12:03:14-04:00'
describe
'151460' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRK' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
2087177da18f3cf680390ec137902155
bd12277922a9b7cf64b314aa697d834237299c5a
describe
'4923' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRL' 'sip-files00041.pro'
f2fde0c9656b2802627d9e34d4c91b9a
16a9a211c5df3d5bfa8c9cec43f68951a8fad4e2
describe
'53158' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRM' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
15305be033b3149eb7b9125ce4ac4179
86534a7201533d19a3422aed0f2c0317da2b6e5e
'2012-05-01T12:11:36-04:00'
describe
'25856104' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRN' 'sip-files00041.tif'
22f69af47beb0db83fd01672b0582ad4
275d4904921e3b0d10a87b5c0485a09b8a94cacf
'2012-05-01T12:07:10-04:00'
describe
'315' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRO' 'sip-files00041.txt'
45a59247eef5ae90ca56e3c156d3757b
6a7e8fb1228639e4d8e15fae1516f1ba822f8661
'2012-05-01T11:56:30-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRP' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
1bcdfd8fdb1d2933febbafe4bf98cea2
48854c85c7218ad2272fe47cbc9a0ee011a39f8a
'2012-05-01T12:11:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRQ' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
a7682e22069f201cea5ec83e63ba7597
93258ac7c04f7c8f70d3c187fe4a9e2e41895588
'2012-05-01T11:59:00-04:00'
describe
'172839' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRR' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
cb18d6779964987ec7f6479e1e5d4709
1c668f898812de3b2a2fe7d0843f16b170d26f70
'2012-05-01T12:10:21-04:00'
describe
'53266' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRS' 'sip-files00042.pro'
2ccf80b904dd450701304a75fedea57e
557b1ee4017da6e6e7c95e04590c71b42ecfb132
'2012-05-01T12:12:04-04:00'
describe
'70099' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRT' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
f327264a89d8510d9a0eedc8c4f769ca
2ae25b9a5a1138c38e411e349d5ca66518adc06a
'2012-05-01T12:12:25-04:00'
describe
'25613480' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRU' 'sip-files00042.tif'
c824f5aaeb558ba64a79cb715f246ced
61f1f953465f7d067f589d414b9f84c4f9e60a73
'2012-05-01T12:03:15-04:00'
describe
'2104' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRV' 'sip-files00042.txt'
b258e5592becf1af23b88612911fc033
5c686944aeeaab8879c77dac403d4dc767785d9f
'2012-05-01T12:06:33-04:00'
describe
'33897' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRW' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
9bf8efa23e2c162aa7ce0170a90be1eb
4d9e0751b5b5cf8874c9e718cf36e1130f86af5b
'2012-05-01T12:11:31-04:00'
describe
'3111703' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRX' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
7197dfb501bb929af2d55ee1693deedb
b50e58f6c18466b2667e10ed98dd579ba83ecf4d
describe
'118525' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRY' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
d53b4ec57082ab557a8c6c84b16867db
92af409c7ad0de6285baa838b44a3265338351d9
'2012-05-01T11:57:24-04:00'
describe
'24049' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYRZ' 'sip-files00043.pro'
5c93f81f0ee9b570cf75a55ea4b98308
2cddcd136e109d499c86d0acc983c329c2cdebea
'2012-05-01T11:58:45-04:00'
describe
'52954' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSA' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
ba31790d00c09aa9a6bc523956c658b6
aaac82e78c13d6f73edc57aceab1e44cc4605975
'2012-05-01T12:12:02-04:00'
describe
'24915460' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSB' 'sip-files00043.tif'
503261661565dacd7bc5c730a276de7a
4040d5c4b59a54fb1fa83e6c6b991edd30e18a45
'2012-05-01T12:09:20-04:00'
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSC' 'sip-files00043.txt'
b753b6ab12c112556cbccc8a186f2f9c
b2d9bb57909491096af8c87b8a9c52104a791cad
describe
'30019' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSD' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
ba35479f88725806469aabe50164bac6
527bab4492fea7904b949395a321abc328e9adda
describe
'3198742' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSE' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
0016dbb83740f4ac61da2589c6d897dd
005366d149da776ee76a4fe3e80c94190848c9b1
'2012-05-01T11:58:17-04:00'
describe
'159976' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSF' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
bb90360d8685c13208ce31249c2c3f9a
34c93648ad99dd69a8459d094c4b321c85040778
'2012-05-01T11:59:55-04:00'
describe
'49123' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSG' 'sip-files00044.pro'
4b7e529bb84aa8c4e03d7c488f835c48
dfd2725418f2d2e862cf40dbe9cb8fc9c15c5d69
describe
'66014' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSH' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
0ba643534641ac37c5c08ed051d51fca
f6a5e7a5d233dec5bde3fab3d2c7b977a9cae49a
'2012-05-01T12:05:38-04:00'
describe
'25613180' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSI' 'sip-files00044.tif'
c0c69a1db1adffde2dc0d1953eef5f6f
ac275d1adc99eb2403a26863cc60e21b49e6f67d
'2012-05-01T12:07:04-04:00'
describe
'1965' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSJ' 'sip-files00044.txt'
f7fbcd30c585dca5deeeee70e12f93b8
357bf90d64d6e5ae152df687b5860ebcd59cc900
'2012-05-01T11:56:28-04:00'
describe
'32871' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSK' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
e381066806238d2220bb26218d29fde8
6f77994f4d5b2da84211612922fd0a926f436b3e
'2012-05-01T12:02:20-04:00'
describe
'3290881' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSL' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
fbaaa485bb37d842c2b529a79d06bb7b
f3920872d0635cd9fa150e07889305ec14eae8ce
describe
'174272' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSM' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
18f86d9e6bd675f15eacaf27082bdb52
a2f539e755d1209b1ee0e843915f0bfa0aa2ad98
'2012-05-01T12:05:03-04:00'
describe
'2129' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSN' 'sip-files00045.pro'
f74e504541ab44e132d64c7254896659
55e61131aebd9a69cd33177047b5d30100467f41
describe
'58603' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSO' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
41d659051b3a716aa78ed3f47804960e
71dc89602f67df4d7c329f09d68a3c6c8eae8091
'2012-05-01T12:11:27-04:00'
describe
'26349332' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSP' 'sip-files00045.tif'
b42833c68280667aa56c5e926673a4f0
14c262009f264f733b057e46b93d65a579b4ce18
'2012-05-01T12:05:25-04:00'
describe
'107' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSQ' 'sip-files00045.txt'
d8c6b5714dd681538203e0e3bda9567c
1eb68c064b8a10cd5e4ffa347043cf9a8f821078
'2012-05-01T12:04:39-04:00'
describe
'31033' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSR' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
4ee81032900927ddf65369e25ecef798
1c2228bfd8f349322dc51eb96aaa4098835e513e
'2012-05-01T12:02:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSS' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
3c3454e9a88e2be36949dc09b2134bd0
ef7d0ff238876457e56e6a783598747d7fdca603
describe
'159601' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYST' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
92963a756d22eb3a6326f912bf9b9056
6a6c306102b07b6f21d63a05d96befeee35f63d8
describe
'47463' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSU' 'sip-files00046.pro'
0466b366f8ee6b5afdffa2b7e6230325
d934bcc42920c7c971f554dbaaf0762d48720e43
describe
'66553' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSV' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
495999c35aee8e14d9b53fe08c89a3ad
63cf13c20ae625c1dbb94159c678abf6b29904ce
'2012-05-01T12:04:31-04:00'
describe
'25613704' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSW' 'sip-files00046.tif'
01ffbb84b0afc058ca06b7a0f48a2581
3f4dab9e6f7166366be0766b0dbef60900fad40d
'2012-05-01T12:08:06-04:00'
describe
'1898' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSX' 'sip-files00046.txt'
9da7fec4d30dbaaa3981e42bf61aee8f
3ac406cf734a28db1156d06e120ea4c256f9dbf1
'2012-05-01T12:08:59-04:00'
describe
'33536' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSY' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
e4815cb566a38ab66516d21d8c36416f
7a1dcc175a7f16ab16a680da3580fb7fcfd548f3
describe
'3267873' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYSZ' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
00681e0ae9f2a56c4b53f69356064b8c
c4809cdd7485405572eea5b9cd99f830d59914f4
describe
'157443' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTA' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
67cc0349a6f67fb8c10762e89e79122a
f946fad11163d5e843ad934ce0e127c9d02d6c9d
describe
'7383' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTB' 'sip-files00047.pro'
2e7a0af77acfe7b7706f70ef3a153ec1
f8c87e10e75be9147ad6db96cc1e2baa25b1c682
'2012-05-01T12:00:54-04:00'
describe
'54909' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTC' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
539dbc67f62641cb96cf50e9dcf6f5b3
275098506347598e02eb581e5a9dd30396fe7a7e
'2012-05-01T12:06:43-04:00'
describe
'26164796' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTD' 'sip-files00047.tif'
3bae623fb327a12c23f88f0687dc49df
30fc4f7170f50ada13ea2e8ea91906deeea4a83f
describe
'338' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTE' 'sip-files00047.txt'
901852a54f15782a4158cf983a5be0f7
dc71600ddf0b18d00ce62768f34deb61d0479402
describe
Invalid character
'30189' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTF' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
eee7d0ef500ffe8da5b6e3a268884990
5827231df6428c353491c31009e6b418783b5985
'2012-05-01T12:05:46-04:00'
describe
'3048533' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTG' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
108f4e332e8848979d6a9d2b8621cd92
e683786e7e16e57607084642b426934c5e40a562
'2012-05-01T12:02:19-04:00'
describe
'158351' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTH' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
1c240eba834cd06f72e3797feab5021e
c69db711cfd7e0d4e803510c37451a825a925637
'2012-05-01T12:05:59-04:00'
describe
'45578' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTI' 'sip-files00048.pro'
4544717565d4727c725fde72df4ed827
75e18e7d60aecbd171e2c458f8c9b9a269be3241
'2012-05-01T12:10:02-04:00'
describe
'68566' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTJ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
41655616efd73aa58af2c9a1798c24a8
faa30e26824acf13cd5cda25c024652101cc2714
'2012-05-01T12:06:30-04:00'
describe
'24411836' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTK' 'sip-files00048.tif'
5927a459152b776b20eaf566244ff5f9
99c05d6be7b00373e556b50634ba8fcce0d1a43a
describe
'1828' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTL' 'sip-files00048.txt'
c1019c57e9b8cd652715e7b7be4ca15f
e355a7388e527f49ca57cd5dfd858c9740a882dc
'2012-05-01T12:09:58-04:00'
describe
'33952' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTM' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
6e0bad9fbc2fac951f0a57fdf21e279d
c87919198dc74fd69bc8a157f071151582d23ef1
describe
'3256341' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTN' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
6671ab97c7c3dea9044df836eb901ba8
ae25d61f7acdb5c18e69ee90f4eea491f4223764
describe
'174449' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTO' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
2473df635fe915b17019dfcbee21790f
6151c2ef38d0a1f60c5c74cc26bb5cce9694913b
describe
'1823' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTP' 'sip-files00049.pro'
853e8909876c0cbcd0f5dfc35e451c59
4633198cd278574228b8107d93699b48d7a5f2ff
'2012-05-01T12:11:50-04:00'
describe
'59394' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTQ' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
ed946c682dd91ebe983c203cff839c19
347b80883979885a26d7aeff0a2ae1226f46ab73
'2012-05-01T12:06:19-04:00'
describe
'26073424' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTR' 'sip-files00049.tif'
859f780a2c8da23f5f235beff912cea7
ecbe774e7ae57e8ca6fdc6b7f8dd0ee127f9b6a4
'2012-05-01T12:00:04-04:00'
describe
'80' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTS' 'sip-files00049.txt'
ac47cd33db3ebe44727f8759a8da1ba4
acd78f76d4559a16475f0e76608de0283c73258f
'2012-05-01T12:10:54-04:00'
describe
'31800' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTT' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
5a39cf9ec4f416c7e8a3a3e5c06c3878
b99a6d5a7313fb6a62e68f3afea5dee47503c5b3
'2012-05-01T12:02:32-04:00'
describe
'3198775' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTU' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
25fc500ed080b2ea1765836202a4ddd2
81af858a054fb8e4bfb20dcc28e1ed3de4852c62
'2012-05-01T12:02:31-04:00'
describe
'172187' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTV' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
fef31602e5fd08128fb77ece872f3fa5
b9054fc702e5500cc827d5975f6c225c9f503ae7
'2012-05-01T11:59:16-04:00'
describe
'49957' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTW' 'sip-files00050.pro'
0064b1210fdeec6888903648e9119b2c
f513d510f7735172303fc393b9ababe4143cfc1a
describe
'69236' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTX' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
568678f292807d38cb646e5e8e2a3009
f0be8dded1acc7c3a678fb2a7a1f1702f7aaec7d
'2012-05-01T12:08:41-04:00'
describe
'25613820' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTY' 'sip-files00050.tif'
047d1c633fb730d871a60b4b8200dbf5
8e40e55aaf4dbc344638cf19d8e52cd983ce5632
'2012-05-01T11:59:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYTZ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
c97ce27cf9efb4767d017c5b49550c3a
5e487edfafeabad8f304727f690d3a8a0506e4cf
describe
'34436' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUA' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
e58ec2c0a31a40204aec3e93b0907cfe
a5ee3f367a148f2a6a18cae905e93e215fa4c06f
'2012-05-01T12:01:56-04:00'
describe
'3233851' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUB' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
a98e4a7c3b25efbed08550ac9a06acd4
128e1e895a8e43d982254b033b608a28400e65a7
describe
'186044' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUC' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
97f71768333e6c020363cd702e9047b7
085698db4af9963bfe82696f4a1463acd0e8c3f0
'2012-05-01T12:02:36-04:00'
describe
'24030' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUD' 'sip-files00051.pro'
9e50ea8773b3f590827d6123485570d3
fc8e62b6572916b9cd253459caed53d33c002a3a
'2012-05-01T12:02:49-04:00'
describe
'61702' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUE' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
4da5fb25f65bd8f8bb9978d056792eae
9e8c2e47e6bfc1dc60929b0386dffdf5205ff720
'2012-05-01T12:04:58-04:00'
describe
'25893732' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUF' 'sip-files00051.tif'
d209a0b59231201d61c2941b45b2b7fa
ed0c3749344558906542d94d70e79eadba5033a7
'2012-05-01T12:11:12-04:00'
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUG' 'sip-files00051.txt'
db0afdf9408fc99de283a21d0107d11c
46e83674aab162046b4412b9a09d98070f24cf1c
'2012-05-01T12:07:34-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'32403' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUH' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
393adfd5c66a8c745fc712f02d3b0bcd
2f090174712a7be46607e43e02bafc3d8d1094d5
describe
'3007388' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUI' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
c91d339affcd30cb0316f9e9a9988b22
a9ece07757c45db12c0c46f537686a7ad9ff3ecb
'2012-05-01T12:04:27-04:00'
describe
'154806' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUJ' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
98057c766209d1e0775eb8d868827529
deb152a280c9fc41265e9ca04388974ccbc160c8
'2012-05-01T11:57:14-04:00'
describe
'46078' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUK' 'sip-files00052.pro'
0c7828be8dc7b04144c8b7a0611b996f
3181885d617af50ace88493ec3f151e1cca74963
describe
'66687' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUL' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
4aa5b8584398fe7934315d2585cf9f9b
bab462103d4234eab76e59df60f3ec58efcbc61b
'2012-05-01T12:04:40-04:00'
describe
'24082316' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUM' 'sip-files00052.tif'
582fac00d421122ab2a0c0a7188dd592
2f7532efe1b089d38484a12ba635199727e0c172
'2012-05-01T12:00:44-04:00'
describe
'1855' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUN' 'sip-files00052.txt'
77c2225bd19920a5b663f72dd9e6f208
70bdb0f0006e18cbc8c44c10622ea97118f0a101
'2012-05-01T12:03:42-04:00'
describe
'33400' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUO' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
f8b8d073be2740f3bf660a3ed17e7a84
68f83c6ac646dad55a09377cd818c2312c343095
describe
'3084074' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUP' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
d213ad4d298b370a977fd28216f1e9cb
0edbf7aafa7352fac1e22b9bc72f264062f0b7c9
'2012-05-01T11:56:40-04:00'
describe
'174264' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUQ' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
4a232153388ea1e11dbe0d9adf197f04
25bf188d99c3c88f196016409c100b309f9861c9
'2012-05-01T12:11:06-04:00'
describe
'51944' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUR' 'sip-files00053.pro'
932c793b393b125c079b795c2b4fec81
c5dcacefacf91174611562882b8c4cf28216ad69
'2012-05-01T11:57:17-04:00'
describe
'71073' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUS' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
89753ade5079e95370cb64bd1dacb482
7a9f8ad5e127d1ee23c3093ae6001490374cd3db
'2012-05-01T12:09:38-04:00'
describe
'24696544' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUT' 'sip-files00053.tif'
abb310383f1247689cb862f070e5db1a
dc6c3b12af896e1ea68b01abacbaeb5848e545f4
'2012-05-01T12:09:04-04:00'
describe
'2075' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUU' 'sip-files00053.txt'
b38597859e78fbeb7dd9a7bceee32971
05e05e5baa72de7867bbdb125d17889af96ed0de
'2012-05-01T12:05:26-04:00'
describe
'34227' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUV' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
65de3264d7a519a4197f92c35663695d
d160e10fe7e5f364dfb95be888852293d802e8ab
'2012-05-01T11:58:41-04:00'
describe
'3153385' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUW' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
17f726b6ff073e373d32d7136b81efb2
dd86bf0fd60f32bc2999adf82320665f9ad79ce4
'2012-05-01T12:01:12-04:00'
describe
'155912' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUX' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
fcaa1b9732e92a2aa080e16bcd09cc67
3db40d81b3437a7ef6ae27248b9e3d621c137bc4
describe
'48615' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUY' 'sip-files00054.pro'
67ab69073898e161cfd915886d6fa0c1
2d555344bac2284e7fce96c1cb6fd28bb4e8ff24
describe
'66149' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYUZ' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
c830d73f8a094cfba9c4d6ede01758bd
745ebfca23d659a2020da298cf202d23e4b63133
describe
'25250320' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVA' 'sip-files00054.tif'
eb8ce501243efdede5e7105255e0a7fb
b91e1b88a73c0085d51ac65832ad839172aaacea
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVB' 'sip-files00054.txt'
1c284fd7fd71357a78112696d219fc21
13023667cb9a10ef9bc9cf951a2ec73accfe7cf6
'2012-05-01T12:05:51-04:00'
describe
'32755' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVC' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
c997546f071168e72b724bfba1a0bd9f
2d2647f8dfe0c772f8f3af62e2e16e254aad14a7
describe
'3233866' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVD' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
35d02af18981a01ac251299141aaf7d7
b87fe4afcdb31335b62fcc5d4598ef13f2533da3
'2012-05-01T12:04:50-04:00'
describe
'168622' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVE' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
c623060a8adb44c610375b00afb1f567
ab3462ab72f312ef9acec38af8303e4d66bb130e
'2012-05-01T11:57:18-04:00'
describe
'5160' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVF' 'sip-files00055.pro'
099aae08f2e4adfbf1477b65a2fa8e25
37a0e1e542db3548251e3c22a7b096290b0e0905
describe
'58009' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVG' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
97ca62dd39b2ff20d16ac5a9d4c2d500
4bf33b0bc6395ccd3e1d2669f9499aa14814f4a4
'2012-05-01T11:57:32-04:00'
describe
'25893188' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVH' 'sip-files00055.tif'
b781b91c9c27ee55a5a93ff119ffad27
6af0a730172d2c91d30f7a35094e4c333e2f54ca
'2012-05-01T12:02:39-04:00'
describe
'295' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVI' 'sip-files00055.txt'
9fce0b480cf40faab4f7d558e5ab8115
16661d87e3cef03d53b449a84e549f30e679ea4e
'2012-05-01T11:57:25-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'31373' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVJ' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
5b2024629193fe8e30c0092e7ee19d0a
929036d82e59c11f9a1d62fb7f871b6b5be1ab93
describe
'3153387' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVK' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
869f40656779130dc8c878f31cf21665
ca10e3ee01d33942e88bb480b4d8dcdbd434d0be
describe
'162494' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVL' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
e4c378eee87e0d8dd0c95c9501c1637f
be61877811721c2de3b4efdbfb524b9f4f4b2531
describe
'48383' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVM' 'sip-files00056.pro'
f449ffd82f2ae8f312edfe44e31beaac
8a2557ff6203d44d761a2f6ebef07c02cd3cb4ea
describe
'67800' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVN' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
bfe432487122b81fb650a4074f9ebda8
164e64404b56ef050c3de7c1bd5938e8db115558
'2012-05-01T12:11:19-04:00'
describe
'25250780' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVO' 'sip-files00056.tif'
a68df6e2f4da0b7727be6b72926caacb
8fe9189a92fa55db8731d2564ba64afe226fe72e
describe
'1937' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVP' 'sip-files00056.txt'
f4a32133b04488f9232b3f72b7cb6c9f
b3455df8df3bbd55ba1ec9fe65cd05f9542981f9
describe
'34295' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVQ' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
7ef960d2741dde7527d9b199815cd3e7
dc7b05ea93c6d9e0e5a93ffeac492e1d32a846e9
'2012-05-01T12:00:47-04:00'
describe
'3233872' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVR' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
3dd04f144b58f25179f74e19bc4808ce
0f5a1770e2c08fb8370b4efa4699224b0756811e
'2012-05-01T11:56:35-04:00'
describe
'196524' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVS' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
50d2348d2ae1f3b873a88d36d28b28f4
09692cff82e68985710259028ebff4b96313fdee
'2012-05-01T12:03:30-04:00'
describe
'4856' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVT' 'sip-files00057.pro'
f94823e053bcb47b77e80bf295ca8c2a
b6a1c0747568e1f2aacf6a57768fa9a7d93cb959
'2012-05-01T11:58:01-04:00'
describe
'64576' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVU' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
f56193e6af6747b79a6ab4c6be9e257b
f33b266d0e2e4a5e50505b083cb5eef92dffe56b
'2012-05-01T12:11:10-04:00'
describe
'25894372' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVV' 'sip-files00057.tif'
78a4ed83b4089647319ac058c702a946
9397e66ba6a6c0f90d5ec46ac29f144a85570d42
'2012-05-01T11:57:27-04:00'
describe
'293' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVW' 'sip-files00057.txt'
650515cb1a26af8075b40a8fb8236f16
c06bd4bca7384ca94baa0aac07b277c2ed36f04c
describe
'33763' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVX' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
72dee741eafab0dd49937251c39c9122
201d6687486746c0db44009da2f869c6641c7821
describe
'3153356' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVY' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
0acbc1f09ba26bec72811c15e8678c6f
cb2de10a5554b169da26fd1745913ba76df66647
'2012-05-01T12:01:34-04:00'
describe
'151618' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYVZ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
60b3aff6e234e43b4c7ec242f926eaf7
907ea7ea4e78fbebeb124a85b535027c9b372dd6
describe
'42660' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWA' 'sip-files00058.pro'
f1d61a86554bcae52ec4b9d8578d7d87
c2d21c99dc9ff979e085f470d966436f9ff4838d
describe
'62632' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWB' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
85bca82c7e773a9dc884e0647a860454
313e4a702a3c112108a6cc5c8792f82ec51dd441
'2012-05-01T11:58:00-04:00'
describe
'25250020' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWC' 'sip-files00058.tif'
092a134baf149a68459b5e0af90e8622
06add3e2b3cfef18548596041cbf7eb297416205
'2012-05-01T11:57:40-04:00'
describe
'1680' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWD' 'sip-files00058.txt'
f559f6a7ce1c9c69ce976b5fbed08f3d
762ab98c218d41a939cd3837f76bb5203151cf5b
'2012-05-01T12:05:13-04:00'
describe
'32302' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWE' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
2a84ad20cfadeac1ae39a1a86aa375b1
5a908ac0d335e5433a57282288786e1e81d4a8df
'2012-05-01T12:07:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWF' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
2b6dd2b85254bc7006cc502e44022aa5
5a7ba93306311f2ef1c8b6a617bdafe601abe26e
'2012-05-01T12:10:28-04:00'
describe
'116772' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWG' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
2cf06b523bfae76aed0ce238d7a801a4
ca797eb867ca6a90cbb170c09b5f83fcdd901575
describe
'26363' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWH' 'sip-files00059.pro'
c954ea4a8e0e347998c9df2bd56837d9
9e56737c2561fda0dcc0542c1b777c1c0adcda73
'2012-05-01T12:05:39-04:00'
describe
'52408' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWI' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
e865b0c042ae819bbd8d9f5ea7b10e69
2d4c10b0a7ab694ce5da3adb0ca15cd99df73a10
describe
'25892924' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWJ' 'sip-files00059.tif'
32834a4590611f455d7310aa85b856ad
2c1bdc11dff6624ce43706ac5eb52636db355661
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWK' 'sip-files00059.txt'
fa7a8fe1b669419c0b087c7c3b785b38
2f0bdf9b97f3bce42532b3b4ea059f91d28f97f5
'2012-05-01T12:09:08-04:00'
describe
'29577' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWL' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
f77eb34b120d39384b8b3d77495f8a7e
4be4e9f0f7921240f8670c37a6ea64d47c7f6a78
describe
'3153388' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWM' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
fe74965f41735cbcac6296891f612734
18703a085726d2121648caafde1e2ba6c64a9773
describe
'163328' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWN' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
91d89db80afcc8c3e4805782c1db2621
3dabbc6ef45424918c6efc5e017a8c6959d07d9d
'2012-05-01T12:05:37-04:00'
describe
'50485' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWO' 'sip-files00060.pro'
eae5da33d8d73ecc2955d42aecd096d1
45c68824b337bf7db90e8861795cdc11545886be
'2012-05-01T12:09:42-04:00'
describe
'67726' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWP' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
cff45388f14526b5beb26c86778b7d74
fd7bdf966cfa9d7eb4f0bdd13e1f99e81955abd0
describe
'25250152' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWQ' 'sip-files00060.tif'
45875d7479e0b7e209869892b0f7ed45
03825c2f70c5385627092b576c9d456cb96294f4
'2012-05-01T12:06:37-04:00'
describe
'2000' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWR' 'sip-files00060.txt'
7b5879622c092d64ed4b13cd82c66d4c
98cd23b7b11daf4f6efbb8f4804fced27327f16d
describe
'33430' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWS' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
addccb9c43ca9ba94a464b268586c609
c8f7b7da2bc4238c19ef45ccbde364978b0a1d88
'2012-05-01T12:06:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWT' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
e58a070c24df77a244f3ead634f42b23
45c7b5f554a89083b3d21dadffb8fb3c523bb2e3
describe
'190177' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWU' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
8500278380d5d2f08e2e302117e8e175
8ba52e5a758d8e42ca1cb607f18219e96f12b19f
'2012-05-01T11:58:07-04:00'
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWV' 'sip-files00061.pro'
f5034e8fe3e38749b77a48e758108fff
402f6e4d65c21d118360f77940dad903e5367f78
describe
'62813' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWW' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
f40487a879edc7c3af41b92797c5db02
db53aedc9e5163bdc81a9aee25fa029b6ce1dc5e
'2012-05-01T12:01:50-04:00'
describe
'25893900' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWX' 'sip-files00061.tif'
5cd9d09786666dbcb1a2b928751d21bf
a7988ded4b97546f4c03170bebcc675b788b5760
'2012-05-01T11:57:02-04:00'
describe
'185' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWY' 'sip-files00061.txt'
47aaef780cd5dfd93681198a4cf927de
46d389660f7441dcee85036a36173f71f85161e9
'2012-05-01T12:08:18-04:00'
describe
'32827' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYWZ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
f392103a164590c2ba45bfe162d3fe39
1d3b6577c209b0ffb53a626998647de9bee816e6
'2012-05-01T12:09:10-04:00'
describe
'3199328' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXA' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
67f867465f18c01ae52aeb7a5c952e4d
5d1d3440affb5f52f52e834ae1c5eae4e770bb9f
describe
'160941' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXB' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
496acd24713eb94287fd42692958ca7d
a6efcde5c4ebb1adc2e60061202df4cb22bcab11
'2012-05-01T12:02:12-04:00'
describe
'50129' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXC' 'sip-files00062.pro'
4662aa59520d16eddaa6d2ab859cc6f9
96ae2546f8297dc66d1697722ef2675a25f97beb
'2012-05-01T12:10:09-04:00'
describe
'66637' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXD' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
1c0765c522c394ffd97947e14cba8664
af6f8a367e4e110b49e93856b7213f8e284517f6
'2012-05-01T12:06:14-04:00'
describe
'25617796' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXE' 'sip-files00062.tif'
39aa72cc16207ef5431d5719ad93a963
d106014963fe60613be3de739546228d02fbb952
describe
'1979' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXF' 'sip-files00062.txt'
2a8da70df133918a437f0d6998a97bfb
600a3db68cbee9dc1bec218d5259251889e16e19
'2012-05-01T12:07:31-04:00'
describe
'32974' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXG' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
b6180463142cea4bf054ca24ab793396
c4e8c66cdf7e7ceedfac993305e29bae99a386c7
'2012-05-01T11:59:46-04:00'
describe
'3195458' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXH' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
5238fcb5cb0c0f4a46f87da247bdb7a9
a403fc5a0adc14a1bdf3a1e9b36d2142924377c8
'2012-05-01T11:58:18-04:00'
describe
'184706' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXI' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
def24fe2dad37d4433502a46d1a5d816
18840d84d8259875232829a1af47c7f18852a77c
describe
'11079' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXJ' 'sip-files00063.pro'
3b5d178c8b668319dccc09fdcaf34422
c14f0e4a196b9e91111d2030b6eebf887303bbf3
describe
'61312' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXK' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
4a6d245b2d02bf8ce37a96ab3283d394
fe26a2382abd24baa881b8b7c051f7adddf7ee28
'2012-05-01T12:03:51-04:00'
describe
'25586488' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXL' 'sip-files00063.tif'
86133144fb573e132eb4920ec13bada8
fcb31d9fdae937ec4ffce31a2153b754068a1768
'2012-05-01T12:05:05-04:00'
describe
'914' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXM' 'sip-files00063.txt'
b30302cdbd2e2f6b0444909573cc0bed
8f7a560b33d8e6455b14c371e6f4754693cf7645
'2012-05-01T12:11:03-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXN' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
e1dbb6b8ba3828d4ccb0830f3c0283f6
085251b73f6cd42bdb7311bc3e7dab445bf2cdf7
describe
'3195472' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXO' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
f2439e409cec4dae8f3cc63849c653ae
cd761002e00cc0c00efb55a737f8cd6885abe68e
'2012-05-01T12:02:30-04:00'
describe
'165128' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXP' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
59d984894b7fe4e47fe8f8713fdf9e53
d3f049b4d186be8c3264b97e177e61c8cb3ddf88
'2012-05-01T12:07:20-04:00'
describe
'50138' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXQ' 'sip-files00064.pro'
0fc25d72037b494032abf230a192c031
4dc28cc01ff99713c76bbee7ed8e56c5392b31b6
describe
'65990' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXR' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
fe6ba50102e8776ef663a88309428d94
93907c9a61cda5ebe180b60e93e5d4254ab7cac4
'2012-05-01T12:05:58-04:00'
describe
'25586772' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXS' 'sip-files00064.tif'
811c04311a22be8e0e5a117bc4601735
38368f8f241f9c00745842cab21c14c43a86798b
'2012-05-01T12:00:23-04:00'
describe
'1992' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXT' 'sip-files00064.txt'
b0e177ebc70da570bdcc24eac951505c
ef34bba14985c42ac390fd886e0b1f548aff6eca
'2012-05-01T12:07:21-04:00'
describe
'32761' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXU' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
4b76a753257fef13404228f4eb689ba5
694980508816c80ea10b6ed5ec566aba892408d6
describe
'3225397' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXV' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
5f28b06729b82622f9b7bf39b5078e58
b711d28e8ac632195d833a9c916ec999b99a0f8e
describe
'178113' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXW' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
55097a9931791d06444427eea18f3b48
46c2d3b5bec302ff1be7fb11019f85ae4ae49728
describe
'7696' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXX' 'sip-files00065.pro'
52f559b9bf99404496f9490b30720fcb
1ad8b712eeeb5cf15835fc3d2fca39ee756ff67e
'2012-05-01T12:04:53-04:00'
describe
'59237' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXY' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
d1228eeb92079783fb3b73047d90f1f2
c724f7a713986208a18cc539e28fd1958174c2c9
'2012-05-01T12:06:03-04:00'
describe
'25826160' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYXZ' 'sip-files00065.tif'
74d9bf1e5842963db7b79e6d0c4636e0
7d39f740e350a992de9e79e0e741e4526d9d0f08
'2012-05-01T12:11:22-04:00'
describe
'435' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYA' 'sip-files00065.txt'
5be4741f442ebc6128acb98b7bd390f6
3f9371a3a89e910b98cf405ae75aa37f1e41f6ec
describe
Invalid character
'31426' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYB' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
3ac15d1bcd3bf7d9ee7c38141020a15b
0d78a36a20f6b77a5f5f3441b81c65a4309a097a
'2012-05-01T12:11:42-04:00'
describe
'3195477' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYC' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
c155182dbb4003d63be32fa582f3152f
0d69f88a5a05e2ce6754a7dd249b409c8ad4999a
'2012-05-01T12:09:59-04:00'
describe
'165338' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYD' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
dfbb724b1cdf9c9f112a5dea647cce00
7d926a6e942bdb098fab5b44a8d719e64fc61dec
'2012-05-01T11:58:06-04:00'
describe
'50696' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYE' 'sip-files00066.pro'
1ce005c9bb3ca4defacd9d5e1880ca35
67d430028a18ef7654c0ffdb1c5da5c0ad173cae
'2012-05-01T12:04:30-04:00'
describe
'67700' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYF' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
4fc252c0a424a85d9d6248cdb975d75f
2258fb42b400586a09a9b63dce315cd95d0963e9
describe
'25586864' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYG' 'sip-files00066.tif'
727a3fc7b2a89f3022f48ecc2ff6c468
6de3dbac42763545cdd285ca802737fd8691acc4
'2012-05-01T12:10:47-04:00'
describe
'2028' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYH' 'sip-files00066.txt'
b4c63ab7147ed5cbd8a49220f50f1f87
bd9e25fa81fc496b98d03afb0a181402877926c2
'2012-05-01T12:06:26-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'33161' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYI' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
922c544cd5265dbef1cbcb501676f3dd
bc44487704aed8ff9b69ad79257a885a8c5e4fc7
'2012-05-01T11:59:28-04:00'
describe
'3187888' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYJ' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
56a97353204e576835d2215a8675c003
23025bd67f2ece8ff3c4ff8ee880e4b54f7c58f6
'2012-05-01T11:58:34-04:00'
describe
'197497' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYK' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
489e464f637098bc21f6725a308369d7
28fc890da7c2ed9bb33dbd228eb9ef886892b097
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYL' 'sip-files00067.pro'
74eaf2ea2f204920c07ead09b050658d
390145034ce84099b4aa2d8ac9684cb590d1e300
'2012-05-01T11:57:10-04:00'
describe
'63909' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYM' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
9b249003139c94cde31642330e5d3e7f
d9a9358d379ef9d7a898571ed45d03c73c682093
'2012-05-01T12:08:12-04:00'
describe
'25528320' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYN' 'sip-files00067.tif'
c6773bc125b8d661cd8f5d8a09dcaa13
3e886bf647a7300fcff3e19ad1fd8035f74767af
'2012-05-01T11:59:23-04:00'
describe
'183' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYO' 'sip-files00067.txt'
96f6332e416f9c2f131cfb6230802a2e
849fd489b9f650305dcc8540c7b1849ab302c558
describe
'33178' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYP' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
a7aca0a5729e398d2160a5a6b4b27546
58dd39a253b7c2766d1c83aa4c2af90f75b339f1
describe
'3195473' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYQ' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
1f3c086c3bd0e5c7e89e2fce54fc8122
1a501ec3fb413be1a8b0298cb11f43bd5d53db14
'2012-05-01T12:12:10-04:00'
describe
'168251' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYR' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
731b4ab311646f391263439f538e99a3
5e07d93e5ed13cf3b7ba3690c9e24cdeae76d79a
'2012-05-01T12:04:32-04:00'
describe
'52210' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYS' 'sip-files00068.pro'
a7c0e7dff92457286ef98efac2fa17df
f6adee8e08d88fc1f58ab65bb96c7eeeddf7e61a
'2012-05-01T12:04:18-04:00'
describe
'67164' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYT' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
ba250635872e7126363f0cd1bff51514
96f1d989d39c3718491c60241099142b1cb3213f
describe
'25586872' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYU' 'sip-files00068.tif'
88b22baba8f4a7c1b79518b6616c6a3e
d7006adf6960db9128e4d12d0b498327ede1a346
describe
'2074' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYV' 'sip-files00068.txt'
b623e1c5cf0c3713388a068f6a9a7eb5
62a6f977aa780ede6c219cf4c97accaaa5924e89
describe
'32861' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYW' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
015ad1b34d55c2b20442beb267b0d9a2
e1ded60de4c9d9f327eaaabc24268af2eb0832d0
'2012-05-01T12:08:49-04:00'
describe
'3225470' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYX' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
ac9bd2ba171d2f46419fdae271694a50
2b7e82c35d7e0f9f2fafc8eaae658c31f45e5006
'2012-05-01T12:11:49-04:00'
describe
'176367' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYY' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
8d510b207d160640a287eb8524d54c80
1b059e35221afeaeb0494a578a8402a7d3e96a4f
'2012-05-01T12:12:33-04:00'
describe
'15098' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYYZ' 'sip-files00069.pro'
4bb9e3cb3e7247d7590bb1a9f9f015d9
37aabbb7cc54e643d8a79250b560e078185ca7ac
describe
'62688' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZA' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
17752e9614902abebe14f45a60649556
50b3f0f7e7fe7a1b07542d527e4e399b3f8604b2
'2012-05-01T12:00:00-04:00'
describe
'25826884' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZB' 'sip-files00069.tif'
16d2632df15ede552d53c99c1252b32c
30140698f73f65cfd9d794317255e8466fa17a05
'2012-05-01T12:06:55-04:00'
describe
'677' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZC' 'sip-files00069.txt'
15f42858c214f4d45eaed536e82d64cb
7a9732ca4023bb10f443fc7c1d8742fd497276c9
describe
'33092' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZD' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
9177b29fd4728a9412b403f37ab21b9c
187a8dea43bcec17a429a3b28b93bb4895c9b397
'2012-05-01T12:04:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZE' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
4a82b55e78c8b96e50c44c960f04aa57
2478fe1c498823bad32652b96d212a02febf5647
'2012-05-01T12:00:09-04:00'
describe
'167832' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZF' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
5efeb795319c02c149c3c46a249afd02
b4ea9647e0a88d1d43dc8c52e91d4747e563eadf
describe
'52870' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZG' 'sip-files00070.pro'
bf58d486f1d1d465cc4d228366abc5a7
55fd291426af0bbad5747354cd94ad35333a391c
'2012-05-01T11:57:38-04:00'
describe
'67484' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZH' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
b44cfa24483617300d66edb3bdd667c9
fbf5b163ebb17697d76528a2ebcde4c7d8f5928d
describe
'25586928' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZI' 'sip-files00070.tif'
001487088e4f3e6025ec7af3bab8d6af
9e41db112ff4834b3d00a32394eab5ba645a4ac7
describe
'2082' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZJ' 'sip-files00070.txt'
4d147978030bb5fb49116672e2f12bc6
95758a09c19f101cb19d6a66fbd4c97bf48bdd96
'2012-05-01T12:08:36-04:00'
describe
'32785' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZK' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
a6e47b7eb49b4c7aa03cb55325ef411d
5dbb3cf38ed190a1fa154ab9d2300de9b2a23268
'2012-05-01T12:07:13-04:00'
describe
'3172785' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZL' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
bf24134f0e9b64934f3c4405879d024c
9814f214c986cd1f9b35c064d698612d6e08b65b
'2012-05-01T12:06:58-04:00'
describe
'173940' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZM' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
1d2e232b8aaf30fc7bc4c803e7101d28
4108e93fa35041b236a73522443054ac2e165498
'2012-05-01T11:56:52-04:00'
describe
'12958' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZN' 'sip-files00071.pro'
95faaadd1c0ab03a736bfc21fe05a407
c0b709c9179cf9e7a57ebaf0f6d59cf2cc74395c
describe
'60162' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZO' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
905042b9911a8bc065030d5bbecca6c0
3a2a959de2555da882d3641b1dafc2eae4939c65
'2012-05-01T12:10:00-04:00'
describe
'25404388' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZP' 'sip-files00071.tif'
d82929a0135cfd1c86bce2b01a0b6ace
af53ae42e81b39c815923e41273193733247a8d7
'2012-05-01T11:58:28-04:00'
describe
'615' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZQ' 'sip-files00071.txt'
bff2660562726a3d3a88be627309b49a
25fd2281ded915ad5921d55b5d76f8381ff3a329
'2012-05-01T12:06:04-04:00'
describe
'31352' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZR' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
0ff4c0eb5276e0fa5d91d26b43586d98
364cf6bd53e453f31a60dffd9c1a5f47cc9595f5
'2012-05-01T12:12:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZS' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
506fc1448ff3c4a856fbd4f5f2da1ddb
ae59d4753fc71e37ad6f990620a89fe11e8753a1
'2012-05-01T12:06:20-04:00'
describe
'158687' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZT' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
928444bb2dbcf76de1257304e2b6ccf4
edfd4f24833f5b1c8d7e8f50e9330c57f60c2eda
'2012-05-01T12:09:47-04:00'
describe
'49609' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZU' 'sip-files00072.pro'
7e260a2f58b7e199cf4130635f7b9b95
ca7e1d044ef737e85a471bf5561ccbb85fc4aa03
'2012-05-01T12:06:32-04:00'
describe
'63793' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZV' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
e3232a8d9889e68a21923e9f669a72c0
623a2978a48e251b925784e4b62b62d338570c46
'2012-05-01T12:03:35-04:00'
describe
'25586312' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZW' 'sip-files00072.tif'
f39fb7d5c9a58daf49330f8c6eefb654
a33a9df6f4b4ffdf21bc464feae03860ab10141b
'2012-05-01T12:08:55-04:00'
describe
'1971' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZX' 'sip-files00072.txt'
987322708d98f1e24d08207e1416394e
ee12c9232dfed334a540d3e5f40201db020c5b9d
'2012-05-01T12:01:43-04:00'
describe
'31951' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZY' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
e9119d5fb37088df3ba7a654535b6c7c
6810a04093c8583c9528c81085cbfbc583926378
'2012-05-01T12:00:57-04:00'
describe
'3157341' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACYZZ' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
f5a0d1cf38aabeddabf62924ec6a073a
3e312f73c6798daca57479ac24db2e5e09ad623a
'2012-05-01T12:02:07-04:00'
describe
'184832' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAA' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
0ceaf167aae9153783a81a0228e6c8a4
55f5e9bf6289b38d83fbcca0edd1eee2f764effd
'2012-05-01T12:08:44-04:00'
describe
'5106' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAB' 'sip-files00073.pro'
304e72e94448c9ae496bc42df1626028
c9ea0d92f6fd1c74bcf4d0097e7039d7b4373735
'2012-05-01T12:05:43-04:00'
describe
'61015' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAC' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
e7a296ef934cda0fc47445bc49715f1b
bdbd39c614b20df2473542dbef279994af20f965
describe
'25281888' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAD' 'sip-files00073.tif'
a30f2f198d5548d7a8c3e537f41fe1d4
54290fb6420d7e0f90d4e06315b080173291cf1a
'2012-05-01T12:07:30-04:00'
describe
'265' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAE' 'sip-files00073.txt'
687c8ae8b3f3dfa2faeb9d9ef61f7f9e
3112e4b4bae7f2e8c66cc60a7515b9cba394f94e
describe
Invalid character
'32204' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAF' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
b6b958ba841af98bbdc5cc823dc6ef65
f076e868f8cfad307f0b5570e54c2f88522a7265
'2012-05-01T12:08:29-04:00'
describe
'3080818' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAG' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
a817e6b558e349482499c604a1e54902
67621e76c146fe3d75d5f90f707b6c49bf0852e0
'2012-05-01T12:10:34-04:00'
describe
'160984' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAH' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
9832b715123540a88ae73f7349b46ea5
c716c66e01bad17366405e55b7f33955638698d8
'2012-05-01T12:01:58-04:00'
describe
'46697' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAI' 'sip-files00074.pro'
2e4a2286e9ce61e2da4baa9c53d5bc2b
1cff9af14e4331ce208d732038233b3f5ed4fc41
'2012-05-01T11:58:27-04:00'
describe
'67118' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAJ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
a405dc5630503c80133172c06eec21ce
1f9538e45c977c3d7b135b8eb46cc9f03c1d9d8e
describe
'24669932' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAK' 'sip-files00074.tif'
1f895f6c15f69c6860b4bcfab7de2955
75c418d59a4466abafce2a5fdd97ad563c2e23ef
'2012-05-01T11:56:42-04:00'
describe
'1872' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAL' 'sip-files00074.txt'
9c2a782bb35ac789302240a9a4b8317d
b81049a2729c72a69472b4463267134096f49dec
describe
'32800' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAM' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
28515980e117f6cee0b485c7a001ea53
264a766de88c7d7906cd99dcc38785f8523d4914
describe
'2732071' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAN' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
56a976af9e24102a1b929abd75adcb96
9be05ce554b22fd359f381e749e44648fe0c1fbc
'2012-05-01T12:06:53-04:00'
describe
'118201' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAO' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
eb385ac4aa93098e174fcb78fada7bda
462611dceaeacc8fd29e04d7f437524e5eab0ec8
describe
'28632' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAP' 'sip-files00075.pro'
228bcca325fc134db72271b604408c66
ccc04b08fd5125ec88f7ec9883bfae1bb380bc74
'2012-05-01T11:59:48-04:00'
describe
'53087' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAQ' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
d0672d2dd510a5a368ddafb5c9d071c1
e814a07a7c223e247ecb85e4f306deca080c89d8
'2012-05-01T12:04:38-04:00'
describe
'25825884' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAR' 'sip-files00075.tif'
0fae02f098d111e5c259a1c93771d6aa
6c0447c431122a10c6098ee472f6297c99c0aad6
'2012-05-01T12:10:41-04:00'
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAS' 'sip-files00075.txt'
ad741235ce1cd2db94e97ec74a6c1af8
fc5d915cd152b8a1eb54e35dd0d560d42fbf476a
'2012-05-01T12:09:12-04:00'
describe
'29876' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAT' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
8cafd9ace5ea429ba51115fa12fee2ad
1cd6502796245a9ff34d1e449f01a66e28b18c8a
'2012-05-01T11:59:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAU' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
fe4d36cc53dbfb9167782ceae220945f
c144913262729d40b9d1a511dde6f80cbaf0e42a
'2012-05-01T12:11:58-04:00'
describe
'155327' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAV' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
545e2616a54a1ff6fdf915750c04cc0f
8fee64068a0d304dfed2a875e051de48274682ac
describe
'48598' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAW' 'sip-files00076.pro'
e8420b9c41b7b88ef54f05b9e4bfcfe7
ad61cf6189440a8b58fcb4b4bb490d42765b232a
'2012-05-01T12:03:41-04:00'
describe
'64044' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAX' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
61842047304a5f1ab255666ad40e94dc
25612c39f0f5c3730be90de2cf678dbfadab48bd
'2012-05-01T11:58:25-04:00'
describe
'25586668' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAY' 'sip-files00076.tif'
c2899f0f0268d91774ee556711844a8a
b02db4144ade9d3fae3d23a86e10a79c37e4f860
'2012-05-01T11:57:13-04:00'
describe
'1929' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZAZ' 'sip-files00076.txt'
d4f6b619a2b3e2704e1becc553ed7274
8fbccfbbe2eb612668f8bf03540e5a124e25fc43
describe
'32534' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBA' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
9ea1a34c4977ee6c535c851602564468
6776fb5035f87b3a0e58fc34350980a2d41fc7a2
describe
'3225453' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBB' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
c0607d1ba52d403b6591af1f333897e0
658422b87f89326ebebdd3a4768105c478ad6cb5
'2012-05-01T12:09:40-04:00'
describe
'153268' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBC' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
60c25db338d62c3861ffda4a18ee327d
9d8b165193799883c007f5c57e86158b2699eb79
'2012-05-01T12:05:00-04:00'
describe
'10319' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBD' 'sip-files00077.pro'
0953982263c5251d9f76dc59215d592c
b6d238727f7c8eec7116e0651278362acfa1048a
describe
'55906' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBE' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
c3b8273cc57101b01e9ca5a87cd60524
9d25631bda61c6a90526e8dc062a4254213d2799
describe
'25825852' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBF' 'sip-files00077.tif'
16a3905ad2de467846804a4f315c0ff7
4e5d4f99735b0b9601b07037fc233ea779a84411
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBG' 'sip-files00077.txt'
eaefcee493721376e4f1af07e438bd53
58f2a0b116ce27a3bf1c3b76f7512ab4c06644ca
describe
'30491' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBH' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
72aa208b1d7179803f43e956f1002184
8267326aa1cfa6d1fbc2198d352bff2f8c8d7829
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBI' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
bc75432c3710fb15ec5b74ee00e9d30b
658204be5b14bc8a460f439f3e0f0caacd717c90
'2012-05-01T12:03:02-04:00'
describe
'160034' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBJ' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
66fc1f6aa4ef1957c7fdd06ff5fb2211
f9d59794de1a24e705179f74dcac6eb65dc269f2
'2012-05-01T12:09:26-04:00'
describe
'52173' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBK' 'sip-files00078.pro'
1a5da3a212b8e5d71ff97d5c33f66655
b4b506842a2e09b9be40dcbde80dd8dae26df93b
describe
'65891' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBL' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
389d88be3d1f750a991274b9c85197f0
1eed9169e3a68f43189a5724e7c67d67c20aede4
describe
'25586484' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBM' 'sip-files00078.tif'
b2e0a0772efa758eacae010ebfe83b05
62c85be9e848643c1b4d4c2fd663f31d90c79de2
'2012-05-01T12:02:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBN' 'sip-files00078.txt'
72b35f97ba3aace16e47c9629ccd9a97
cd58f3064263168dc06af02a026ddeec3f6418b4
'2012-05-01T12:08:00-04:00'
describe
'32018' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBO' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
965b2c88473636862cb89faa54086c3b
6ad444e231c7410ddd682890e499a908250a1959
'2012-05-01T12:09:00-04:00'
describe
'3225465' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBP' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
efc26c90c20bc6c316aaa88e2d25ef19
9910aa5ed87691dcc916722e1bb4f1f3313fdda8
'2012-05-01T12:08:04-04:00'
describe
'189252' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBQ' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
135bd4c8b21de27434738ed471e1e1fd
47db1813048f7cc6398eb25e9e7cedea102c0252
'2012-05-01T12:00:51-04:00'
describe
'12933' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBR' 'sip-files00079.pro'
eaeb0e899517b342f08aeace95fa99b5
21aa49ca1691394ced0ded14c1de45b64e3854d3
describe
'62569' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBS' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
48aba002b6281de6c6d9c0c19fa78630
0e3c173ca4d166715bac27fa63a459172b96de58
describe
'25826812' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBT' 'sip-files00079.tif'
1ff3eef771930588caa56696f7a9e7ed
0f75761731a7d566f6e77826422562760d87bbb9
'2012-05-01T11:56:56-04:00'
describe
'968' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBU' 'sip-files00079.txt'
98b46de4fb1a379e64867a96738ebced
db50bb434029917869f85dfb6dde723e4bb00d15
describe
Invalid character
'32699' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBV' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
90e7580bb4082439bf651db97c023cea
d619d2fa2ed1d39c920135a708b427e35bbea82c
describe
'3195470' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBW' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
b9bd7d1400abe9a45c8b098d8b1c9c3e
88cae768f52503e6043e91173e1b68ce151d3947
describe
'158349' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBX' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
42e819bd8967a2c7deb37d13829939aa
8e3b11e049449f70906ccd80546dd1268d8fb472
'2012-05-01T12:09:39-04:00'
describe
'49430' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBY' 'sip-files00080.pro'
9e6c51219b915b94068583c5c0633627
74966f388e45e040820dbb78779381f73af6e40a
describe
'66041' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZBZ' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
bd75b6628cb2440ff60d01505c8857c5
93ff837373092e2ccf194efb4515be069092cfca
describe
'25586728' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCA' 'sip-files00080.tif'
f9b00b4d27e84db3998f2f5a0f8c2db2
840c320db0c9b90dcc9cdcb132cb43ab217d1210
'2012-05-01T12:12:20-04:00'
describe
'1954' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCB' 'sip-files00080.txt'
ef13e1b501afc86648519ce2ca141134
8bd63c448b878333cf4d525591881451334fcc90
'2012-05-01T12:10:31-04:00'
describe
'32777' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCC' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
bdb54f339ed14329035ad42823e35eee
245fdf198f212552932d7e01d3993043142bbea5
'2012-05-01T12:08:34-04:00'
describe
'3225462' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCD' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
4039c6303393126545e7a459efee3936
615bf20123b6cc8d179ae3465ced3973341b93ff
'2012-05-01T12:00:01-04:00'
describe
'195251' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCE' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
ccc385dfabda541595367f014b635cd9
e206bda2e5ade1c8eee2a3083a9f1e85f5fc5e13
describe
'1738' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCF' 'sip-files00081.pro'
f278c4fc5e5f132d81b987a46eecff12
21c730fd93802148d940e610f18588ca9751062d
describe
'64816' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCG' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
4e1da65d160491e8b56dd23e4907456a
61aac33b3adaaaa9cd8511e4980d2916f04c7a13
describe
'25827248' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCH' 'sip-files00081.tif'
2cee36793bc008da88c7f6f5aa9878f8
bf013524fb4e9f44e6c8691b09226a4b42831836
'2012-05-01T12:01:55-04:00'
describe
'89' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCI' 'sip-files00081.txt'
7cd561445c3f4d68635a2339599b087f
a7764934a6d3d646c544478ffcbb892b6de5141e
'2012-05-01T12:07:57-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'33640' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCJ' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
885b29aba24f0df4f102e164de58e99c
40ab40ef4454354476775b7c92641ec859ceaf6b
describe
'3195445' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCK' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
2608c68c4b8c0f8ab7ce52f9d952a308
7bb905535f259d78b5d4b6b08963ca69abaaa31a
describe
'163993' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCL' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
502d135c9a5824e24362551be505f707
ecdbfe2e904a4def81c3d57bc6e85a5d86494f7d
describe
'48687' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCM' 'sip-files00082.pro'
8b30bf37832a78b56a5b441a9e5c46f5
db550d04c4082419217faf1bdd221ce4d7d0598b
'2012-05-01T12:05:41-04:00'
describe
'65031' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCN' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
9d03d3ca2765c72bfaa91443024339d2
9a5479b125eb2b98a569b5d3486e9a713d7ee133
'2012-05-01T12:04:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCO' 'sip-files00082.tif'
3777f961decc29271e6d9bafb900911c
cacd8a447418d8360e9c93018cadea69057f3da7
'2012-05-01T12:04:42-04:00'
describe
'1942' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCP' 'sip-files00082.txt'
6bbad44022d1d5f81b47c517c07f2f5f
bf0f1e84ff31505260f4d0cf7d83eda3d093c311
'2012-05-01T12:02:06-04:00'
describe
'32767' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCQ' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
8beeb853e5559bb0a9e3f5805177ea11
ae34e89a78af4bf6b6d2a4c86f8471fdb592f071
describe
'3225478' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCR' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
08f363b7e6ad81891144b0c55bec3f08
1d39af1f99b197f4d7296db6412764f30d6f3d52
'2012-05-01T11:57:36-04:00'
describe
'181280' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCS' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
2b590a7628693302a593cdb83232ec15
1c540d780c4a0b830bad6cd316a96a149f058659
'2012-05-01T12:07:16-04:00'
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCT' 'sip-files00083.pro'
07bd412b3b6a3e5b0e45e57d41cdb229
df7bf6455b138fd25503ebe07c959c996f6b0a8d
'2012-05-01T12:08:16-04:00'
describe
'61487' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCU' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
16971d02ff951a523632921a9cb97b2a
6f44a976648642ed1cbfebc56f3be1e075ef728a
describe
'25826600' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCV' 'sip-files00083.tif'
a2e282f9288d22398f12f959f462c93c
748a2b3549c10ede3ab93783b5e4420b81ac5a5a
'2012-05-01T12:04:06-04:00'
describe
'179' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCW' 'sip-files00083.txt'
65d9ea3e145fe7f42c8204d964b5e779
d71cd4f20c7b1f40e5ac1fe9cc9b0cd10a62e2e8
describe
'32256' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCX' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
88df03fdb4765a46019000ed889b57f3
4fea62b8b182c85e145660d0de044280f5b01c70
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCY' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
5e45cfe6de67189f434247a5a6d56c3c
ed521c11595886408008bf1862056928bebede7c
'2012-05-01T12:06:15-04:00'
describe
'157300' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZCZ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
7d98a0d712ac1788e1e6bacf3120ede6
6d9c3b67e93d48b429250f8fa8ab40a26558ad68
'2012-05-01T12:03:25-04:00'
describe
'49155' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDA' 'sip-files00084.pro'
4521d0af3c8f787cd2199f17c747b215
627920ec96697320fa578b48d4e488bb25218a69
describe
'64713' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDB' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
0068c27fb69424a6948015bb57e8ffb2
1f52b868ed90e3e14391bb61880be2920a9d5014
'2012-05-01T12:12:31-04:00'
describe
'25586644' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDC' 'sip-files00084.tif'
daa28f1306d1dc7394119531fe79a5b9
065f00016515f1ac91588f76c2cca6a7f6dd7624
'2012-05-01T12:03:20-04:00'
describe
'1950' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDD' 'sip-files00084.txt'
d5b0fa7e5147704022598184d4cc5597
189b74e9caacd0a859f9af1f879cee0b9104e445
describe
'32119' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDE' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
c76b133ebfe279655036c466a4136d3e
8d62c61c33938aed2da7e6f694222c6646979b97
'2012-05-01T12:08:42-04:00'
describe
'3225483' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDF' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
0c52fd6eecf26a5dc0599c15ed173c34
0c9638c34eb1d9953f80fa4e651a25b86fb36839
'2012-05-01T12:12:15-04:00'
describe
'184705' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDG' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
f5dfa4db4cc142640daddef40466437b
ca4519b76e1a4646cbc00e046e1016a6118e510f
describe
'11947' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDH' 'sip-files00085.pro'
203b89ed63e03e4585217a1da796d9b2
9c0a48ebcf4326bef1f2e569fba7ad3e54ab4c8d
'2012-05-01T12:10:30-04:00'
describe
'62893' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDI' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
40dad6ca8d12c97e7962e5f269f9f32a
8c5391b7ea5bbd653a3dd011040729c44c489ad4
'2012-05-01T12:07:24-04:00'
describe
'25826800' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDJ' 'sip-files00085.tif'
95f9e5f434aa8f8b20cfc6acf9be9623
f82609f7e87de0135536942d07f86beacead0638
describe
'945' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDK' 'sip-files00085.txt'
d26f928c72052717693c60624d69c19d
011cd0e45d3665a2fc638e801a9c256ce00c8a6a
describe
Invalid character
'32873' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDL' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
bf1bbadccbb56301f05f8ebbdcff4ca2
ec17bccf268de458f610ce34bc9adc2161d155de
'2012-05-01T12:04:56-04:00'
describe
'3068839' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDM' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
536c165de993b9d3712bbdbefa18b4bd
40c311befd1d77b625ded63e3b635c2125c7becd
describe
'162219' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDN' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
09fa6f56b7d3e2e8618e1d67e2ff1428
cb457b52be529706cb17fb20498055b0bc680fb8
'2012-05-01T12:07:17-04:00'
describe
'50855' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDO' 'sip-files00086.pro'
415c4305a3250fe7b1bc3b0fc2a4088d
320e6e18f143c65215c6699ecdc36c10a18c2a4d
'2012-05-01T12:09:46-04:00'
describe
'65870' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDP' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
6a97ccceb65d1aa544df58ee2f79ada7
be3e5dcb8c14a9127d762d2b16c2a6c1311d45cc
describe
'24573260' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDQ' 'sip-files00086.tif'
0037d52a69683ef03f6650527b975131
b7ebff531f98488fb36997d74a5fb522dbde49c9
'2012-05-01T11:59:09-04:00'
describe
'2038' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDR' 'sip-files00086.txt'
52938fcf873bece64de163f47129eacb
fecc6a2f7b5e643abee381697a8c1e9150e34541
'2012-05-01T12:00:18-04:00'
describe
'32267' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDS' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
fb7f1fa57cee7d230b0d635ef8fe770d
aaaa28b11c8e696460f7dea9062321afba4575f0
describe
'3225458' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDT' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
1b971a267159b1829611d77af3f54760
51a997ac5a1a4f17b83b104c4f111f7ffbef5d4e
'2012-05-01T11:58:40-04:00'
describe
'175570' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDU' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
ec2fde3cb8ecba215b7726feb5453195
497e1e6920934c77d5f5955bfcaa5e3b9d738993
'2012-05-01T12:10:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDV' 'sip-files00087.pro'
62f3a2807c56b01fa461e910ea6d7975
1e23f0bc7b9efccc6e5196f66828afc36c5a6fbc
'2012-05-01T12:06:17-04:00'
describe
'60063' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDW' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
fd39538bed5699d0706b8faf6cdd56b3
a724f666081b10f16b0688cbac866f9fb98fc82c
'2012-05-01T11:57:15-04:00'
describe
'25826504' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDX' 'sip-files00087.tif'
e5aa56307da61a4efce18667f4f2e5e5
0faede63f79bdbed0c5877968e8889b237859c3a
'2012-05-01T12:02:34-04:00'
describe
'538' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDY' 'sip-files00087.txt'
160a32dea6269a310b0eac6080ac51a3
08ac32e1deb438395a6e0c4040721a737e74624b
'2012-05-01T11:59:30-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'31997' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZDZ' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
21058bbbe541a3781ec9aca166ad4933
14cc713e37b875985e9f2d4f19f10599cc2c7dcb
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEA' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
8642155da562d27fe78cc2518f104f1d
448f6c7f6592995f32c2a1102efb9f68737134ae
'2012-05-01T11:57:20-04:00'
describe
'158328' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEB' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
3e86a792ef6a77102c36535a58056639
d7800b2375db904f27100cb121b47ce6c679145d
'2012-05-01T12:07:52-04:00'
describe
'50917' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEC' 'sip-files00088.pro'
c1141b4ff966ea8a9946a37b9531462b
a02d6a99aa743644bb7b926226391394db4bf89b
describe
'64981' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZED' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
84865a446502a45c1094d796a90acb99
52a72a93a438a075543e0444e49a5f7835fbfbde
describe
'25586552' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEE' 'sip-files00088.tif'
aec755afae1fea26c16147eb4c67aae1
563e35fb9d9481660143014d1f9424a8f88ff2cc
'2012-05-01T12:10:15-04:00'
describe
'2015' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEF' 'sip-files00088.txt'
3a74dbfa3ec51f8f202c15d315466200
82645d42056d28e0a7369575b16f7640629dfdc3
'2012-05-01T11:59:36-04:00'
describe
'32372' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEG' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
e5e42529e345480feec8d847efa56897
f73d8e2dffdb4482ecfb9b0582974ff39cb5a6b3
describe
'3195460' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEH' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
e1d59b2a1be27b4bd732799f70731e11
1ead997ff257002e109d11b9efbc1271002c887b
'2012-05-01T12:07:12-04:00'
describe
'183208' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEI' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
b11dd7cfe6ff3cfe2baf04272a9bc61a
715ceb26385d5a6e61ac7036ec771478169f1f7b
'2012-05-01T12:11:48-04:00'
describe
'6206' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEJ' 'sip-files00089.pro'
5bb2905c9128f1756ef10a0fc954caf4
95a92f53fbfd2fdd968a9fd417040ce579977c8e
'2012-05-01T11:58:59-04:00'
describe
'61911' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEK' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
f68feb0cb3812af91b8ef511ecf05356
9670040ea787bc631b8603b5e0f41c3d73f020ab
'2012-05-01T12:00:56-04:00'
describe
'25586616' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEL' 'sip-files00089.tif'
7155ab5ce256670ac3366121dd4047e3
43e678d964b0deb35710da7987170261a71998ef
'2012-05-01T12:08:14-04:00'
describe
'272' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEM' 'sip-files00089.txt'
8d1b10366efe8cf84ddb193fdf36bf55
d82f52cb510d05b9304419a8a437f6496ee67750
describe
'32526' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEN' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
17ffea2b9c4337b5e5d2796fcc496dba
163fa9559709c5edc7f12c71ac51749d744cd96c
'2012-05-01T12:11:33-04:00'
describe
'3195476' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEO' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
e33c5571955ff4824ef988ba9d913ee6
39ae568fac7a3fef40ad590c9d9934d1a0231a51
'2012-05-01T11:56:39-04:00'
describe
'145712' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEP' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
7ab389556deab21789f891b378277f7a
1e60e11384a4c36be5eeffaaa1d0e3d942f73e58
'2012-05-01T12:05:08-04:00'
describe
'44002' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEQ' 'sip-files00090.pro'
0c21bfd464848ccbb703f3c3e8d1904d
8d8181e2b33b58023a5b4e4b81fcbe7e1bb91e21
'2012-05-01T12:03:16-04:00'
describe
'60055' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZER' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
1795395dbafede0c82afef6541d85c00
fb04df6a3dda22a1bd6eb3b2a64a0ae1b92f5dfa
describe
'25586100' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZES' 'sip-files00090.tif'
09b0e801869711c65dd2fb208ed95279
1e003a8aab52faa8529677100dcab79425828298
'2012-05-01T12:05:30-04:00'
describe
'1753' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZET' 'sip-files00090.txt'
2d12208566420a6482d964380d87df42
6b000a976e3b58560c7da50d1a8ed2f84cc1d524
'2012-05-01T12:11:57-04:00'
describe
'30899' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEU' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
f40964c9d5150cf102928eed1586caeb
f585ccb869749e3fd2d820970273cc99a9b028f6
describe
'2567595' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEV' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
58fc0fb991360a430279d85147752013
dc4737fa6e17fcac94af5d9eeb73c2abe2a5f9cd
describe
'112134' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEW' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
8e174de735444a705dcdce62c3c06125
45af7a7233983c624b25a2938d53e98b208648a7
'2012-05-01T12:02:52-04:00'
describe
'26222' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEX' 'sip-files00091.pro'
18e8e02164d8a5abf6040551fcc07765
a248465a7afed43f6e4c7049672a8770888e8162
'2012-05-01T12:10:51-04:00'
describe
'51841' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEY' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
0d4121007c502ca9f86abfa1d0994f1c
4dd18b21c464a6f25107e5403f96a5466baa8157
'2012-05-01T12:07:28-04:00'
describe
'25708844' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZEZ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
1b296c822082b4e51276aee73418433d
e6ae79542dbf08f85b3af9e424645fababdb97a0
'2012-05-01T11:57:57-04:00'
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFA' 'sip-files00091.txt'
70593e46d2ad2cd9ba195e2ae987dd39
98c666d73fef2243f516191f3dac2d99d5ce7227
describe
'29312' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFB' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
8ef45366860ae84a0576407a81ee4209
6d3e638a6ab3e80764bd16d15b5f493fc4bdd359
'2012-05-01T11:58:29-04:00'
describe
'3195467' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFC' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
3cbbe7307e2bc4dcef17b978d0633360
8f46e75cb5273cf73a2a4bec074441c956cb5305
describe
'160251' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFD' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
eb8e90599c9b62cffcf917d3d369d733
a55407f576e9d645da1f1f25b306564f090f60ba
describe
'48973' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFE' 'sip-files00092.pro'
baa710cba6c4fe93787c9e18d206e8bf
7f5c44a12e6df983ffc69e2a78a94d80740d4840
'2012-05-01T11:57:03-04:00'
describe
'65082' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFF' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
150949c73748c6033469bfdd08150e48
47b37ac6046cca8e5ddabaf215094017876f93e4
describe
'25586548' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFG' 'sip-files00092.tif'
a95aedb0359adae45c892ff310b17a0b
9b331e1a4a0f13729acbf64b005ac56d7a9c8a12
'2012-05-01T11:57:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFH' 'sip-files00092.txt'
c6e91e30a41b6a70893446e0e10a7741
592fa6db0c6ac8a29ec1b4cf8ddd644e17b51830
describe
'32338' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFI' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
00e2c0df979b3c80bb5f5e94f002e041
d03ee2b7dd5496b350da994219b37dcfc889b777
'2012-05-01T12:02:21-04:00'
describe
'3225466' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFJ' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
d95f605d47b40bbad075fe2f96c343cb
bbb2b8edbaa7ea5372233e4434fad9505b14223f
'2012-05-01T12:02:40-04:00'
describe
'180378' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFK' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
86bdb3974137028d86381f82c3b11731
bd43e4af13ca0ba15d352a6aa586c4bcb7cb51ba
'2012-05-01T12:00:30-04:00'
describe
'5013' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFL' 'sip-files00093.pro'
8ffc6832cd3839259fcb8566c2359f49
dee703c49da852eba3de56de2c1c2bae825bb3fe
describe
'58617' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFM' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
44e3ad4b27c7375eb9553c46a87f78aa
95262db9c15df214215829a2831b320a7fe363ec
'2012-05-01T12:03:28-04:00'
describe
'25826220' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFN' 'sip-files00093.tif'
d2587f82dd06765f9aeaaf14c4937669
e5c48ff015ccb147c77404d5a313fdbb77a35fdc
'2012-05-01T12:02:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFO' 'sip-files00093.txt'
0a6ebf5177402a6a74edc09c8b19028d
4bbc0df305bc2245c6f3be1ce1de7848f90cea2e
'2012-05-01T12:02:13-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFP' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
93cf572a3fad0333c4a2d9d18fb62082
1a3f1aef7c30f14ce5b34001c46c193a43123a25
'2012-05-01T12:03:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFQ' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
90273722e99c93450a07a81a39897de8
c5f5b11e40582b9a41d6dea0278ba5b29f5adf6d
describe
'159379' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFR' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
5f19a782d3cde7ab02f97e7d2943024e
a07c5dd0d652607f0785f81611052e0bad07162a
'2012-05-01T12:09:21-04:00'
describe
'48759' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFS' 'sip-files00094.pro'
eba7fcec8a161cdf6120950c7ead2db4
7ae50272feb6f828b9132e323f7a60deca638d90
describe
'64506' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFT' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
20c34df6c4ff86ed83f7f1e4ee710de4
dccf42c584f69193443093f2441d1755fc922e76
'2012-05-01T12:00:29-04:00'
describe
'25586700' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFU' 'sip-files00094.tif'
f2f27b7d6dbebacaef96f731ae1dd8bb
86452d485c3e114b763ac7807a94b025fa7d17a7
'2012-05-01T12:00:11-04:00'
describe
'1953' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFV' 'sip-files00094.txt'
dda3e2d1dbb45040d163aa4440bfbdf6
cfdb055e70f64f8c8ff4b28a2f45081671e884c0
describe
'32469' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFW' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
331d0a9442fb5b0be6921e103301efc8
5b7f0e9709ed89d5644a4529507320bb360f7fb0
describe
'3210837' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFX' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
542e8b2fc1ef13d62ccf442daca2bbb3
3bbc06866e182d52429213741c5632a41f91a33b
'2012-05-01T12:00:52-04:00'
describe
'156083' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFY' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
58da3cfcf23a6bbf7b4cc1c7b0df9468
7a4a3ca88b601be2ba39d4dede37fe5ffba63035
describe
'48227' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZFZ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
ef1c34ad9b1c159438d158ac218d65c5
ed0bf7a49d67ef8020ed806601670ca36d409348
describe
'62701' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGA' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
a71639080818c6d0e9bf9567f6a437dc
02534cd11644dee6d12648dad899275d108133ac
describe
'25709004' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGB' 'sip-files00095.tif'
016f9ca3837e8fc202746dfa36dde857
0928ff3f0ec862ac4833c0983eaea6b2d3fc6d73
'2012-05-01T12:04:45-04:00'
describe
'1912' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGC' 'sip-files00095.txt'
105ce771dbb8c69f4455b15add0adff7
a5a793ae2850c3ab296d212cac55745b6e71fa59
'2012-05-01T12:08:20-04:00'
describe
'31405' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGD' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
dabb70e23082a0ac9a382b7f73bfbbb2
8d9b0a36efe96d6497cc96cd3f691789a88f1aaa
'2012-05-01T12:11:07-04:00'
describe
'3288628' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGE' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
aefeb6e0996fee5b8c3091007679ef53
45e69c639879c5d8a933a160708306696e326390
'2012-05-01T12:11:05-04:00'
describe
'155546' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGF' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
f2f67ba78e2d34434001f67474389f37
446e2e38e8a4689ec803dd5dcd14677228afe25c
describe
'50206' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGG' 'sip-files00096.pro'
0d187ba77e227187e7545ec16282947a
a803eff572dfe3c878ffe4df752c005668dd633b
'2012-05-01T11:58:20-04:00'
describe
'64334' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGH' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
cff3fc2f23c9bd6162ca1e93c612267f
572de5c49ce9d4788be5fd0145bde11929af399b
describe
'26331920' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGI' 'sip-files00096.tif'
604328eea52cd375846aa513c60dcbde
a03c559e25142e7529211a7a0d157d68d4e592bd
'2012-05-01T12:05:55-04:00'
describe
'2001' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGJ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
17fdab8a668a2091ce14e218b0f2e689
17b81ba9edd8953a1282905f1426be582abbc432
'2012-05-01T12:12:14-04:00'
describe
'32383' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGK' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
aeb3cdbaf796eed262c6d10da58a398c
2642fc2bcca629e40f216f2223cb249272226249
'2012-05-01T11:57:21-04:00'
describe
'3294143' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGL' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
f8811a49b29c6558551deeb22d0c5a02
77b14c5fa4d73f83174afec0aa19a1a451c54f27
'2012-05-01T11:58:03-04:00'
describe
'190290' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGM' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
13bf3a3b82656b9391394c42e530d385
c694f01110a7d5b63627b8d6991833abfcd3b75c
describe
'1568' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGN' 'sip-files00097.pro'
5416ee9c539c3e8edff1ba86875a5cc7
52c44bb1243747e7b44eace7a583c4cd0919c0ed
describe
'63281' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGO' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
1478654d09f349f3eebe99d068202b4a
f45c0eb3e5e0554fba48cc65d8ed284daee49869
'2012-05-01T12:08:11-04:00'
describe
'26376108' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGP' 'sip-files00097.tif'
d3a69e849bb4e96d5c1dd6d83901b353
3692d34655e69478622d57cca4f619504a868883
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGQ' 'sip-files00097.txt'
d1f94d85123befd427cd489bb6d81a43
e9719588552c5a9c41abe85e1add403448ee8478
'2012-05-01T12:02:51-04:00'
describe
'32794' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGR' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
c11ce872e0e8e75cd9d6fcd2bda0b7e0
967b25b0c305d0dda1555782b51ce8333170cb54
describe
'3260374' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGS' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
a4da08e71771a052e778faa451e8c7d4
76f2299b68487465886a7d6d63d970975fdefbb7
'2012-05-01T12:02:15-04:00'
describe
'164603' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGT' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
81363a6761c236c328944c498bbda80b
d98bd3ae5f7764934f60953c604c294bb1cbce60
describe
'50020' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGU' 'sip-files00098.pro'
47a4c8b994b7469f67cca399b3b2e2d6
9b01a480cbb935d5308647b0fae1a257b68d519a
describe
'67348' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGV' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
1456786b57d8922287fe4d4a4b95932d
241fe3670f420c157e2b2700b61bbd342ed02d41
'2012-05-01T12:00:24-04:00'
describe
'26106396' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGW' 'sip-files00098.tif'
3643d67a14be02de46dcf72b17cc6b1d
3f14242d4a52e4abc236120cb95274b6d63b4583
'2012-05-01T12:02:59-04:00'
describe
'2021' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGX' 'sip-files00098.txt'
60934e6f2bc7c9d441dfa2728696c90d
f2e76fb02b163af5664b787fc0cff6bd54a6bcc5
describe
'33281' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGY' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
a43dfc3d5ca7cef95071b121e9cf9f36
a51c168dcc5737b6c71b58b33c8536329ac96665
'2012-05-01T12:11:00-04:00'
describe
'3283470' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZGZ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
076e0ea55370b25d5f2d517195952be7
964b4d1848f8b14590f6cc079504bb8d7810dc39
'2012-05-01T12:03:06-04:00'
describe
'191544' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHA' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
d855161ff8a7cb919e49600a57ad7624
8725e821eaa35c410868931d84e828bb7913617c
'2012-05-01T12:00:20-04:00'
describe
'6959' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHB' 'sip-files00099.pro'
95168f9f9cb041db5861ad83edd80c7e
f16ed0595feb3c2cf125397c0536338058640da1
'2012-05-01T12:00:28-04:00'
describe
'64894' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHC' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
74ec11a38b75e5998acfe20b60aa1ae5
b8e977a6d88ab80a3b1443736a9c40fd253f929e
describe
'26291564' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHD' 'sip-files00099.tif'
eebbcd7334e71954174796ac73cbd402
3da574aeec4722f96cb360f38845cd71bce72952
'2012-05-01T12:02:26-04:00'
describe
'472' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHE' 'sip-files00099.txt'
42fdfa166894213affd53f56833e8954
2ef0fd7c13e1ae498882531c1c2b7df127cba39d
'2012-05-01T12:07:05-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'33881' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHF' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
7dd16cb2f8a090f860bf2d96166ff75e
8304fc2dfe5a26a4e102d7579335c8e74faa9834
'2012-05-01T12:03:36-04:00'
describe
'3206916' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHG' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
2085e7a8f975aa900b58eb21d2af258f
297f2f1a325b903a4c5f693716299618e9069439
'2012-05-01T12:07:41-04:00'
describe
'169236' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHH' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
999bd974c33ff1220c04457a8ca69f09
1f73ce0fd407ac9edffb8d6b8ee345cc8d4c4b13
'2012-05-01T12:08:58-04:00'
describe
'50780' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHI' 'sip-files00100.pro'
fe83cccc0b4d81620be6177638ad1d5e
16e873afb9f5179add13a152bad141c747bcbde5
'2012-05-01T12:11:32-04:00'
describe
'67473' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHJ' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
cab9f70e6890464375f696caf69ba0a4
f537a0b6f4943c4e7bd0fdf3438b107f90381fdc
'2012-05-01T12:09:02-04:00'
describe
'25678816' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHK' 'sip-files00100.tif'
3723060bdcaa3b7768ccf693059e46ca
af6d115a1c3addb3041333798d2f863c47ad7684
'2012-05-01T11:58:31-04:00'
describe
'2034' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHL' 'sip-files00100.txt'
c67d5cef3b99eef2cc111bf65229df09
24856b0c0cc4d39e5c515bcf72846fcd293f06e7
describe
'33188' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHM' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
bbcc0b0323c410d5107a926ba8f8054f
e6a51d153430f03501501edbeca434dd7a806ce0
describe
'3283515' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHN' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
3e1e84ffb6781bd9076a03d0b4252559
a686666208ea3768aee2d6c6e6b2df20b255cc1e
describe
'164943' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHO' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
8ff66380b63334aa83530dc2b7d819c9
6723ac6b7bf1dcb5a4c2176b518687077b526b67
'2012-05-01T12:04:01-04:00'
describe
'52241' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHP' 'sip-files00101.pro'
df6978717464d831353f928d23bb3fe7
bdb097fdf2e274d985fca769c03b0dcf87d07924
describe
'67733' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHQ' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
2f4a5c7b0b8e7c8c062491df03f1ece0
a3e7dbd9e2227f93c1ff7f27f4c53b1050908ebb
describe
'26291084' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHR' 'sip-files00101.tif'
03ce2d72fe624752265e40ae84a97167
a672a033c779f4e7b1a24806f50e2e16614b2c93
describe
'2060' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHS' 'sip-files00101.txt'
17914b5ec38d9ded702c0e5239d8c20f
30979451e5c482ed503f7c3ee6f97da805fe3d5e
describe
'32862' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHT' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
4019e1bf38ef8be38e509beedc774ca0
6d5e0ab5fc2dc99660d33f97375c50a069bc1d43
'2012-05-01T12:08:52-04:00'
describe
'3206936' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHU' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
dc922a637116470ce7e815f042dbc3ef
247c9434b56b730b076802d36d4789359646031d
'2012-05-01T11:56:57-04:00'
describe
'166235' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHV' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
ad4ee8513b7111d0786a071ba76a2897
322cdb0575714c699bd3d6df0aa3a458c2b6216c
describe
'52236' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHW' 'sip-files00102.pro'
fbe873db025f2f5ccf1e287d3bd5e1b8
904b820e83aaa1b78937f4d5eb75d090da4cf74f
describe
'68602' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHX' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
2049fefe3232ba00f60e2059ef974054
fd52fa0b8adf24aaa3c0b0f61f48e1e0e875a5c1
'2012-05-01T12:11:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHY' 'sip-files00102.tif'
43bae0c8c49e18c823c79a503c13e2b0
6c10c3a871789fc8c796e04653f00bee70acfb32
describe
'2054' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZHZ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
30eddb62faa1a0fb16f5e2f60917e700
4cb86e3e38a8ae08f6c4c78ab1c94860e83517b3
describe
'33148' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIA' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
89792e2a28b6a71b5dbf04c00c49e56e
5f3a5e46cc05769ac18ee58d57363a33821f465b
describe
'3283222' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIB' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
3ece4dda2f59ba91fadb857c9af52926
5d69ce040c24352cf203cd6e17627c0f9f24f94b
'2012-05-01T12:00:14-04:00'
describe
'187145' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIC' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
7c19f7705c8ebb64ae816943d3c64a2a
28c00d4dc247a1823b6708e1b02da2c998ced0f9
'2012-05-01T12:05:50-04:00'
describe
'883' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZID' 'sip-files00103.pro'
90cd28ef4c144ac16d736568c1903664
a80e913a6a206edf12a5a275ea7736bfa77cfdf3
describe
'64584' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIE' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
7ed9adbd8e2b713f471779e372ebeec3
5f3fb6e590ba2b5ac67dbeb264aa389d233dcdb9
'2012-05-01T12:12:00-04:00'
describe
'26291568' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIF' 'sip-files00103.tif'
fa382a36ff5f2b7b8db3d4e24fe599ec
80dd2318563165af50e6bf110c8e2cc2fc4a30b6
describe
'167' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIG' 'sip-files00103.txt'
6aec4e7f701ddb98c3d1fa11fc3e118c
ea5bf7a0b4e0111d3a51d3756f43615d359047e7
'2012-05-01T12:10:33-04:00'
describe
'33921' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIH' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
f23c5b287f791b6dab51e2b96f47d88e
18d2817943380df742e2cd38196681c22159b0e4
'2012-05-01T12:07:01-04:00'
describe
'3206938' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZII' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
5818d5697b8ad965a44ac2fd94eaed9f
0a1438d3631e658b63274652c2ef184772a3365e
'2012-05-01T12:01:53-04:00'
describe
'174422' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIJ' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
927f591115eeca562423d0d1c720a082
2122bf26a5024962a41d5aebbaba8073e59413ba
'2012-05-01T12:09:35-04:00'
describe
'50961' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIK' 'sip-files00104.pro'
dc406a9fecba4abe8c38ba81375afb84
64ff64037d27d4533a9d183514681e0fc5b08777
describe
'69911' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIL' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
94655731ed2e45d659fd63b4d6c9df9a
8660907e9b34b8e75dfa2b2e2f6bb18a84c37219
describe
'25678844' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIM' 'sip-files00104.tif'
59ae47bde98ba2833542a11d05372d4b
a41e92b0e1fe4d46cdf54b494233cf6f8a182c30
'2012-05-01T11:58:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIN' 'sip-files00104.txt'
8f3a5c4a198c451d925e7246cc19d5d9
ec16e375305d256104a9c512c983184556ed8b2e
describe
'33674' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIO' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
9e270b733d9cba47a7c89a4211537a22
6ae28f1d25dcc888e9ca2e7c4b7b5e255e399023
'2012-05-01T12:03:13-04:00'
describe
'3250113' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIP' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
ac19e4b136ab05e02f804a1b665cf5e1
31f8fff3459ff82fb6f22d5a3f1e9481d2afbbf3
'2012-05-01T12:07:39-04:00'
describe
'106121' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIQ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
287fb81198e5ef4b020eb8e6656c50c5
6e191af88c83d429676bb67303ef6c27ee2b99c5
'2012-05-01T11:58:58-04:00'
describe
'1776' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIR' 'sip-files00105.pro'
60a47f58543e60df425246bfcddaae26
fba995041760c6687fe5bfab2070ec01d71c882d
describe
'42929' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIS' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
2f05ab1b2242682d30a3ad6656a3c629
02a47a8fa064a7a1e899ed19de8f4b5f7dc4f9b4
describe
'26024296' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIT' 'sip-files00105.tif'
e596ff657d3a15beea8d6a14ddb2ca5d
a1760b0555c29f1b45b6e4024952ca39db9b0867
'2012-05-01T12:10:43-04:00'
describe
'238' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIU' 'sip-files00105.txt'
79b9453131e758be97304ac55fd29156
9cc1c229ae757afab383f2e573c375a4b2682797
describe
'27984' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIV' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
b57ca0aaebcb8723cc6add763d25f988
1d1377b8d1f34083ce0e9badb5290f4d792b6430
'2012-05-01T12:08:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIW' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
def68382bb43a0284d710c20f68327c0
ec626125fd651678e4a9072f7167757d1f6be568
describe
'166804' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIX' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
b7e20e87002d95eaa08a430a3cd6e474
b71f771c763bb7c3143060ded834bfcdce785b57
describe
'47416' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIY' 'sip-files00106.pro'
61ee5b06ac301fcff4bc7b031dfaca33
264a1e7a7cc4d499cdf6df396e7bbd76ec359827
describe
'67087' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZIZ' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
42c38879da80e3f9c4f1084e485fa4e2
5b75ac252723cbb00ca16333356e86d7d1a62ef5
'2012-05-01T12:09:37-04:00'
describe
'25678576' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJA' 'sip-files00106.tif'
0fa6dd85574271f74b79a2ad2a45b8ec
46139dbc1b64c542c3d734c17d542f1da8c18331
'2012-05-01T12:06:10-04:00'
describe
'1910' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJB' 'sip-files00106.txt'
6fa46ff62c8976b1d860d4091dc79424
603868deccbd5aebb8f8f79559faabdd02cc4dc2
'2012-05-01T12:05:10-04:00'
describe
'33126' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJC' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
b8528094d09cf19004b40acf8f4de75c
5e737c21dca04ba5757de6d50430c4d200a9ea59
describe
'7891' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJD' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
fe3531ef6208bedc60cb0c11804da27b
eab603636319afc82f8de596ba34b7ea157714b5
describe
'20317' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJE' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
3f6d4a360b5d46c20801c66b484720f5
aa5956a1467c134ac7828c0689eaf864781ee469
'2012-05-01T12:04:46-04:00'
describe
'222' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJF' 'sip-files00107.pro'
b16230d2676bfa00ef7ae44276ef20fd
00a5cf858aa2858f3e7f3838bffa73463d8eaef4
'2012-05-01T12:11:53-04:00'
describe
'18744' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJG' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
2624da662a7e7f87f8956f7d41975aca
2e4d203ce1cbe58304a2e40c97f6e56bb437108e
'2012-05-01T12:08:32-04:00'
describe
'26378196' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJH' 'sip-files00107.tif'
d0e29f00789baca9260ca9cd6b59fa5a
312b1857a211f2406d7f7515312f623d83a424d0
'2012-05-01T12:07:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJI' 'sip-files00107.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2012-05-01T11:57:11-04:00'
describe
'18327' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJJ' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
d5721eeef6c335c68d8e8f4b9bd15bd9
38b4b2e102152db7429504f83b2943cd9ae23d48
'2012-05-01T11:58:08-04:00'
describe
'7893' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJK' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
0a6224f3207d2ca84ebfaa1bdf589a8e
eddcd6b00e4ccee286bd691aed9f1ea59c940801
'2012-05-01T11:59:13-04:00'
describe
'21076' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJL' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
720341051341c59d8e827c30c8d6d983
dd12910f2c01eddc4575a719f222c301a3e42a70
describe
'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJM' 'sip-files00108.pro'
20ab9c160611f1f428ca14ccc2fbee35
0c443a2a271961b712490f28ea81130730312c4c
'2012-05-01T12:11:29-04:00'
describe
'19493' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJN' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
b92fb00a82465068f08d9a85c478e407
36e468e4ffc2dbe939f67499721bcdd64ca9fba8
'2012-05-01T12:12:06-04:00'
describe
'26926956' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJO' 'sip-files00108.tif'
1d0cd8913f61ba1eeb8d37397cad0346
c89de779fa812fd311716906c7469b326ae808c2
'2012-05-01T12:08:02-04:00'
describe
'19086' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJP' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
e9b6d67ef528ffe14ba164f1957b5a01
f6e978cea57a3584c6b3e6b7b0b840d34dd42e19
'2012-05-01T12:10:03-04:00'
describe
'3574498' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJQ' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
165c9bb3e6b8f7d2fc438f834be3b01c
ccb7e81172ff15a979c5cb904ecc24498525d3c3
'2012-05-01T11:57:00-04:00'
describe
'51409' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJR' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
d5357b28c61fc62ef82167c04af892a8
be69c6d11f647db226a550d066094b17dc2951f7
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJS' 'sip-files00109.pro'
303671ab53c07f5a820eb5c074c9035c
86120710e5df894e2c6ad810ea4a47db3d8b99ca
describe
'21161' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJT' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
2da24cc21465b40af72f8fb63d28b8cd
710aa18d0e0b1b966d33cf94c1ffc04004a39738
'2012-05-01T12:03:23-04:00'
describe
'85795644' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJU' 'sip-files00109.tif'
8f0c8c755e036a403f34af9f1d3c0a49
874ecebbd6838cccdd7655e06424f8d6218eb76e
'2012-05-01T11:58:12-04:00'
describe
'137' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJV' 'sip-files00109.txt'
9c0c42f6ceb3b094a44b25b7368268b5
0c2f152b2fde65588777df5180cda2661140ae72
'2012-05-01T12:10:55-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'13175' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJW' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
9ea6d10762ef1dfeb454a250cad2f0b8
44a737f2403b8263495483681c8af1b2021fb16a
describe
'3451490' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJX' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
daaa11be6ba1a364b9f5b90b78b0f774
bfe5b8baafb25c1595bc1a2c64fb78ec7aac7141
describe
'189699' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJY' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
82a1ca674a9d2d648458bec5346d1ca0
a69f49c7726172c77585702b8239924243a86b9e
describe
'9726' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZJZ' 'sip-files00110.pro'
9553e7c585b1bbf6d59a60c6c7a950bd
e56fc967963f10fffd7d4d2fff31ebf9c2636792
describe
'67404' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZKA' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
2925aa2bba0747632dbf93f60850949b
6a31c5efa42556f56681766abb4a19aec297dbdc
describe
'82857020' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZKB' 'sip-files00110.tif'
2151873f921812aeff58850499e5570b
bba3f6e11367384846858a0225347fa2f9e74817
describe
'735' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZKC' 'sip-files00110.txt'
c5ddda546cec05c3acebe73c3a5c455e
53ccc883674836792b650104e3a5c3504c91228e
'2012-05-01T12:03:27-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'34614' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZKD' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
2980a55ab9654388f087d7c05932b309
3afea6dca75df6ede9a11ca3d1323b410aa9c24c
describe
'132790' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZKE' 'sip-filesUF00016220_00001.mets'
1fdd69486c693a83dec6bc950ec0ec67
b027045dab54e5bf19b9898f174c54541c9802fb
'2012-05-01T12:04:20-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T04:50:24-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'169594' 'info:fdaE20091121_AAAAZUfileF20091121_AACZKH' 'sip-filesUF00016220_00001.xml'
94edb88229257f60a9f9e101fab75b7f
e8053ae155fe24f036917879832bd6a9d64483ca
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T04:50:22-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.